Science.gov

Sample records for coenzyme q10 supplementation

  1. Coenzyme Q10 Supplementation in Aging and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Camacho, Juan D.; Bernier, Michel; López-Lluch, Guillermo; Navas, Plácido

    2018-01-01

    Coenzyme Q (CoQ) is an essential component of the mitochondrial electron transport chain and an antioxidant in plasma membranes and lipoproteins. It is endogenously produced in all cells by a highly regulated pathway that involves a mitochondrial multiprotein complex. Defects in either the structural and/or regulatory components of CoQ complex or in non-CoQ biosynthetic mitochondrial proteins can result in a decrease in CoQ concentration and/or an increase in oxidative stress. Besides CoQ10 deficiency syndrome and aging, there are chronic diseases in which lower levels of CoQ10 are detected in tissues and organs providing the hypothesis that CoQ10 supplementation could alleviate aging symptoms and/or retard the onset of these diseases. Here, we review the current knowledge of CoQ10 biosynthesis and primary CoQ10 deficiency syndrome, and have collected published results from clinical trials based on CoQ10 supplementation. There is evidence that supplementation positively affects mitochondrial deficiency syndrome and the symptoms of aging based mainly on improvements in bioenergetics. Cardiovascular disease and inflammation are alleviated by the antioxidant effect of CoQ10. There is a need for further studies and clinical trials involving a greater number of participants undergoing longer treatments in order to assess the benefits of CoQ10 treatment in metabolic syndrome and diabetes, neurodegenerative disorders, kidney diseases, and human fertility. PMID:29459830

  2. Coenzyme Q10 Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Garrido-Maraver, Juan; Cordero, Mario D.; Oropesa-Ávila, Manuel; Fernández Vega, Alejandro; de la Mata, Mario; Delgado Pavón, Ana; de Miguel, Manuel; Pérez Calero, Carmen; Villanueva Paz, Marina; Cotán, David; Sánchez-Alcázar, José A.

    2014-01-01

    For a number of years, coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) was known for its key role in mitochondrial bioenergetics; later studies demonstrated its presence in other subcellular fractions and in blood plasma, and extensively investigated its antioxidant role. These 2 functions constitute the basis for supporting the clinical use of CoQ10. Also, at the inner mitochondrial membrane level, CoQ10 is recognized as an obligatory cofactor for the function of uncoupling proteins and a modulator of the mitochondrial transition pore. Furthermore, recent data indicate that CoQ10 affects the expression of genes involved in human cell signaling, metabolism and transport, and some of the effects of CoQ10 supplementation may be due to this property. CoQ10 deficiencies are due to autosomal recessive mutations, mitochondrial diseases, aging-related oxidative stress and carcinogenesis processes, and also statin treatment. Many neurodegenerative disorders, diabetes, cancer, and muscular and cardiovascular diseases have been associated with low CoQ10 levels as well as different ataxias and encephalomyopathies. CoQ10 treatment does not cause serious adverse effects in humans and new formulations have been developed that increase CoQ10 absorption and tissue distribution. Oral administration of CoQ10 is a frequent antioxidant strategy in many diseases that may provide a significant symptomatic benefit. PMID:25126052

  3. Does Coenzyme Q10 Supplementation Mitigate Statin-Associated Muscle Symptoms? Pharmacological and Methodological Considerations.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Beth A

    2018-04-01

    Statin drugs markedly reduce low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and consequently the incidence of cardiac events. In approximately 5-10% of adults, these drugs are associated with a range of muscle side effects such as muscle pain, cramping and weakness. Reduction in mitochondrial coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10), or ubiquinone, has been proposed as a mechanism for these statin-associated muscle symptoms (SAMS), and thus various formulations of CoQ10 are marketed and consumed for the prevention and treatment of SAMS. However, data supporting the efficacy of CoQ10 are equivocal, with some studies showing that CoQ10 supplementation reduces the incidence and severity of SAMS and others finding no beneficial effects of supplementation. Methodological and pharmacological issues may confound interpretation of data on this topic. For example, many patients who report SAMS, such as those who have been enrolled in previous CoQ10 studies, may be experiencing non-specific (non-statin-associated) muscle pain. In addition, the effectiveness of oral CoQ10 supplementation to increase mitochondrial CoQ10 in human skeletal muscle is not well established. This manuscript will critically evaluate the published data on the efficacy of CoQ10 supplements in the prevention and treatment of SAMS.

  4. Reducing exercise-induced muscular injury in kendo athletes with supplementation of coenzyme Q10.

    PubMed

    Kon, Michihiro; Tanabe, Kai; Akimoto, Takayuki; Kimura, Fuminori; Tanimura, Yuko; Shimizu, Kazuhiro; Okamoto, Tadashi; Kono, Ichiro

    2008-10-01

    Intensive physical exercise may cause muscular injury and increase oxidative stress. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of an antioxidant, coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10), on muscular injury and oxidative stress during exercise training. Eighteen male students, all elite Japanese kendo athletes, were randomly assigned to either a CoQ10 group (n 10) or a placebo group (n 8) in a double-blind manner. Subjects in the CoQ10 group took 300 mg CoQ10 per d for 20 d, while subjects in the placebo group took the same dosage of a placebo. All subjects practised kendo 5.5 h per d for 6 d during the experimental period. Blood samples were taken 2 weeks before, during (1 d, 3 d, 5 d) and 1 week after the training. Serum creatine kinase (CK) activity and myoglobin (Mb) concentration significantly increased in both groups (at 3 d and 5 d). Serum CK (at 3 d), Mb (at 3 d) and lipid peroxide (at 3 d and 5 d) of the CoQ10 group were lower than those of the placebo group. The leucocyte counts in the placebo group significantly increased (at 3 d) and neutrophils significantly increased in both groups (at 3 d and 5 d). Serum scavenging activity against superoxide anion did not change in either group. These results indicate that CoQ10 supplementation reduced exercise-induced muscular injury in athletes.

  5. Effect of coenzyme Q10 supplementation on heart failure: a meta-analysis123

    PubMed Central

    Thompson-Paul, Angela M; Bazzano, Lydia A

    2013-01-01

    Background: Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10; also called ubiquinone) is an antioxidant that has been postulated to improve functional status in congestive heart failure (CHF). Several randomized controlled trials have examined the effects of CoQ10 on CHF with inconclusive results. Objective: The objective of this meta-analysis was to evaluate the impact of CoQ10 supplementation on the ejection fraction (EF) and New York Heart Association (NYHA) functional classification in patients with CHF. Design: A systematic review of the literature was conducted by using databases including MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and manual examination of references from selected studies. Studies included were randomized controlled trials of CoQ10 supplementation that reported the EF or NYHA functional class as a primary outcome. Information on participant characteristics, trial design and duration, treatment, dose, control, EF, and NYHA classification were extracted by using a standardized protocol. Results: Supplementation with CoQ10 resulted in a pooled mean net change of 3.67% (95% CI: 1.60%, 5.74%) in the EF and −0.30 (95% CI: −0.66, 0.06) in the NYHA functional class. Subgroup analyses showed significant improvement in EF for crossover trials, trials with treatment duration ≤12 wk in length, studies published before 1994, and studies with a dose ≤100 mg CoQ10/d and in patients with less severe CHF. These subgroup analyses should be interpreted cautiously because of the small number of studies and patients included in each subgroup. Conclusions: Pooled analyses of available randomized controlled trials suggest that CoQ10 may improve the EF in patients with CHF. Additional well-designed studies that include more diverse populations are needed. PMID:23221577

  6. Coenzyme Q10 Supplementation Decreases Statin-Related Mild-to-Moderate Muscle Symptoms: A Randomized Clinical Study

    PubMed Central

    Skarlovnik, Ajda; Janić, Miodrag; Lunder, Mojca; Turk, Martina; Šabovič, Mišo

    2014-01-01

    Background Statin use is frequently associated with muscle-related symptoms. Coenzyme Q10 supplementation has yielded conflicting results in decreasing statin myopathy. Herein, we tested whether coenzyme Q10 supplementation could decrease statin-associated muscular pain in a specific group of patients with mild-to-moderate muscle symptoms. Material/Methods Fifty patients treated with statins and reporting muscle pain were recruited. The Q10 group (n=25) received coenzyme Q10 supplementation over a period of 30 days (50 mg twice daily), and the control group (n=25) received placebo. The Brief Pain Inventory (BPI) questionnaire was used and blood testing was performed at inclusion in the study and after 30 days of supplementation. Results The intensity of muscle pain, measured as the Pain Severity Score (PSS), in the Q10 group was reduced from 3.9±0.4 to 2.9±0.4 (P<0.001). The Pain Interference Score (PIS) after Q10 supplementation was reduced from 4.0±0.4 to 2.6±0.4 (P<0.001). In the placebo group, PSS and PIS did not change. Coenzyme Q10 supplementation decreased statin-related muscle symptoms in 75% of patients. The relative values of PSS and PIS significantly decreased (−33.1% and −40.3%, respectively) in the Q10 group compared to placebo group (both P<0.05). From baseline, no differences in liver and muscle enzymes or cholesterol values were found. Conclusions The present results show that coenzyme Q10 supplementation (50 mg twice daily) effectively reduced statin-related mild-to-moderate muscular symptoms, causing lower interference of statin-related muscular symptoms with daily activities. PMID:25375075

  7. Coenzyme Q10 supplementation decreases statin-related mild-to-moderate muscle symptoms: a randomized clinical study.

    PubMed

    Skarlovnik, Ajda; Janić, Miodrag; Lunder, Mojca; Turk, Martina; Šabovič, Mišo

    2014-11-06

    Statin use is frequently associated with muscle-related symptoms. Coenzyme Q10 supplementation has yielded conflicting results in decreasing statin myopathy. Herein, we tested whether coenzyme Q10 supplementation could decrease statin-associated muscular pain in a specific group of patients with mild-to-moderate muscle symptoms. Fifty patients treated with statins and reporting muscle pain were recruited. The Q10 group (n=25) received coenzyme Q10 supplementation over a period of 30 days (50 mg twice daily), and the control group (n=25) received placebo. The Brief Pain Inventory (BPI) questionnaire was used and blood testing was performed at inclusion in the study and after 30 days of supplementation. The intensity of muscle pain, measured as the Pain Severity Score (PSS), in the Q10 group was reduced from 3.9±0.4 to 2.9±0.4 (P<0.001). The Pain Interference Score (PIS) after Q10 supplementation was reduced from 4.0±0.4 to 2.6±0.4 (P<0.001). In the placebo group, PSS and PIS did not change. Coenzyme Q10 supplementation decreased statin-related muscle symptoms in 75% of patients. The relative values of PSS and PIS significantly decreased (-33.1% and -40.3%, respectively) in the Q10 group compared to placebo group (both P<0.05). From baseline, no differences in liver and muscle enzymes or cholesterol values were found. The present results show that coenzyme Q10 supplementation (50 mg twice daily) effectively reduced statin-related mild-to-moderate muscular symptoms, causing lower interference of statin-related muscular symptoms with daily activities.

  8. The role of coenzyme Q-10 in aging: a follow-up study on life-long oral supplementation Q-10 in rats.

    PubMed

    Lönnrot, K; Metsä-Ketelä, T; Alho, H

    1995-01-01

    The essential role of coenzyme Q--ubiquinone--in biological energy transduction is well established. Reduced Q--ubiquinol--has also been shown to act as an antioxidant and to decrease the action of free radicals, which in turn could cause damage to structural lipids or proteins. The accumulation of lipopigments during aging in several peripheral organs and in the nervous system is considered to be related to the peroxidation of unsaturated fatty acids. An age-related decline of Q-10 has been suggested to occur in man and rats. In this study we followed the effects of life-long oral supplementation of coenzyme Q-10 on the development and life-span and pigment accumulation in peripheral tissues and the nervous system of laboratory rats. The Q-10 supplemented group showed a significant increase in Q-10 in plasma and liver, while it was unchanged in other tissues. There was no significant difference between the two groups in the development and mortality of the animals. No differences were observed in lipopigment accumulation. Our results indicate that in rats, life-long supplementation of Q-10 has no beneficial effects on life-span or pigment accumulation.

  9. Olive oil supplemented with Coenzyme Q(10): effect on plasma and lipoprotein oxidative status.

    PubMed

    Brugè, Francesca; Bacchetti, Tiziana; Principi, Federica; Scarpa, Emanuele-Salvatore; Littarru, Gian Paolo; Tiano, Luca

    2012-01-01

    Olive oil consumption is associated with protective cardiovascular properties, including some beneficial modifications in lipoprotein profile and composition. Coenzyme Q(10) (CoQ(10)) exerts a protective effect on plasma lipoproteins. Aim of the study was to investigate whether extra virgin (EV) olive oil enriched with CoQ(10) affects CoQ(10) levels and oxidative status in plasma and in isolated lipoproteins. Twelve subjects were administered 20 mL olive oil per day for 2 weeks, followed by 2 weeks of olive oil enriched with 20 mg and 2 more weeks with 40 mg of CoQ(10). Plasma and isolated lipoproteins were collected in each phase of the study and subsequently analyzed to assess lipid profile, CoQ10 levels, ORAC assay, resistance of lipoproteins to peroxidation and paroxonase 1 activity. Plasma CoQ(10) levels significantly increased with the 20 mg (+73%) and 40 mg dose (+170%), while the percentage of oxidized CoQ(10) decreased. A significant inverse correlation was found in plasma between percentage of oxidized CoQ(10) and total antioxidant capacity. A lower susceptibility of LDL to peroxidation was also found. Finally, a positive correlation was observed between concentration of CoQ(10) in HDL and paraoxonase-1 activity. EV olive oil enriched with both doses of CoQ(10) significantly affects its bioavailability and plasma redox status. These changes are associated with a decreased susceptibility of plasma lipoproteins to peroxidation associated with a chain-breaking antioxidant activity of the formulation. Copyright © 2012 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  10. Effects of dietary L-carnitine and coenzyme Q10 supplementation on performance and ascites mortality of broilers.

    PubMed

    Geng, Ailian; Guo, Yuming; Yuan, Jianmin

    2004-12-01

    The study was conducted to determine the effects of dietary L-carnitine and coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) supplementation on growth performance and ascites mortality of broilers. A 3 x 3 factorial arrangement was employed with three levels (0, 75 and 150 mg/kg) of L-carnitine and three levels of CoQ10 (0, 20 and 40 mg/kg) supplementation during the experiment. Five hundred and forty one-day-old Arbor Acre male broiler chicks were randomly allocated into nine groups with six replicates each. All birds were fed with the basal diets from day 1 to 7 and changed to the experimental diets from day 8. During day 15 to 21 all the birds were exposed to low ambient temperature (15-18 degrees C) to induce ascites. The results showed that under this condition, growth performance of broilers were not significantly affected by CoQ10 or L-carnitine + CoQ10 supplementation during week 0-3 and 0-6, but body weight gain (BWG) of broilers was significantly reduced by 150 mg/ kg L-carnitine during week 0-6. Packed cell volume (PCV) of broilers was significantly decreased by L-carnitine and L-carnitine + CoQ10 supplementation (P < 0.05). Erythrocyte osmotic fragility (EOF), ascites heart index (AHI) and ascites mortality of broilers were significantly decreased by L-carnitine, CoQ10 and L-carnitine + CoQ10 supplementation. Though no significant changes were observed in total antioxidative capability (T-AOC), total superoxide dismutase (T-SOD) was increased by L-carnitine, CoQ10 and L-carnitine + CoQ10 supplementation (P < 0.05). Malonaldehyde (MDA) content was significantly decreased by CoQ10 and L-carnitine + CoQ10 supplementation. The results indicate that dietary L-carnitine and CoQ10 supplementation reduce ascites mortality of broilers; the reason may be partially associated with their antioxidative effects.

  11. Coenzyme Q10 for heart failure.

    PubMed

    Madmani, Mohammed E; Yusuf Solaiman, Ahmad; Tamr Agha, Khalil; Madmani, Yasser; Shahrour, Yasser; Essali, Adib; Kadro, Waleed

    2014-06-02

    Coenzyme Q10, or ubiquinone, is a non-prescription nutritional supplement. It is a fat-soluble molecule that acts as an electron carrier in mitochondria and as a coenzyme for mitochondrial enzymes. Coenzyme Q10 deficiency may be associated with a multitude of diseases including heart failure. The severity of heart failure correlates with the severity of coenzyme Q10 deficiency. Emerging data suggest that the harmful effects of reactive oxygen species are increased in patients with heart failure and coenzyme Q10 may help to reduce these toxic effects because of its antioxidant activity. Coenzyme Q10 may also have a role in stabilising myocardial calcium-dependent ion channels and preventing the consumption of metabolites essential for adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP) synthesis. Coenzyme Q10, although not a primary recommended treatment, could be beneficial to patients with heart failure. Several randomised controlled trials have compared coenzyme Q10 to other therapeutic modalities, but no systematic review of existing randomised trials has been conducted. To review the safety and efficacy of coenzyme Q10 in heart failure. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (2012, Issue 12); MEDLINE OVID (1950 to January Week 3 2013) and EMBASE OVID (1980 to 2013 Week 03) on 24 January 2013; Web of Science with Conference Proceedings (1970 to January 2013) and CINAHL Plus (1981 to January 2013) on 25 January 2013; and AMED (Allied and Complementary Medicine) (1985 to January 2013) on 28 January 2013. We applied no language restrictions. We included randomised controlled trials of either parallel or cross-over design that assessed the beneficial and harmful effects of coenzyme Q10 in patients with heart failure. When cross-over studies were identified, we considered data only from the first phase. Two authors independently extracted data from the included studies onto a pre-designed data extraction form. We then entered the data into Review

  12. Coenzyme Q10 (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Cancer.gov

    Coenzyme Q10 is a dietary supplement, and use of it as a treatment for cancer in humans has been investigated in only a limited manner. Get detailed information about Coenzyme Q10 use in cancer in this summary for clinicians.

  13. Supplementing Rhodobacter sphaeroides in the diet of lactating Holstein cows may naturally produce coenzyme Q10-enriched milk

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Gui-Seck; Choi, Ahreum; Yeo, Joon Mo; Kim, Jong Nam; Song, Jaeyong; Kim, Eun Joong; Chang, Moon Baek

    2018-01-01

    Objective To examine the effects of Rhodobacter sphaeroides (R. sphaeroides) supplementation as a direct-fed microbial (DFM) on rumen fermentation in dairy cows and on coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) transition into milk, an in vitro rumen simulation batch culture and an in vivo dairy cow experiment were conducted. Methods The characteristics of in vitro ruminal fermentation were investigated using rumen fluids from six cannulated Holstein dairy cows at 2 h post-afternoon feeding. A control treatment was included in the experiments based on a typified total mixed ration (TMR) for lactating dairy cows, which was identical to the one used in the in vivo study, plus R. sphaeroides at 0.1%, 0.3%, and 0.5% TMR dry matter. The in vivo study employed six ruminally cannulated lactating Holstein cows randomly allotted to either the control TMR (C-TMR) treatment or to a diet supplemented with a 0.5% R. sphaeroides culture (S-TMR, dry matter basis) ad libitum. The presence of R. sphaeroides was verified using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) applied to the bacterial samples obtained from the in vivo study. The concentration of CoQ10 in milk and in the supernatant from the in vitro study was determined using high performance liquid chromatography. Results The results of the in vitro batch culture and DGGE showed that the concentration of CoQ10 significantly increased after 2 h of R. sphaeroides supplementation above 0.1%. When supplemented to the diet of lactating cows at the level of 0.5%, R. sphaeroides did not present any adverse effect on dry matter intake and milk yield. However, the concentration of CoQ10 in milk dramatically increased, with treated cows producing 70.9% more CoQ10 than control cows. Conclusion The CoQ10 concentration in milk increased via the use of a novel DFM, and R. sphaeroides might be used for producing value-added milk and dairy products in the future. PMID:28427254

  14. Coenzyme Q10 reverses pathological phenotype and reduces apoptosis in familial CoQ10 deficiency.

    PubMed

    Di Giovanni, S; Mirabella, M; Spinazzola, A; Crociani, P; Silvestri, G; Broccolini, A; Tonali, P; Di Mauro, S; Servidei, S

    2001-08-14

    Two brothers with myopathic coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) deficiency responded dramatically to CoQ10 supplementation. Muscle biopsies before therapy showed ragged-red fibers, lipid storage, and complex I + III and II + III deficiency. Approximately 30% of myofibers had multiple features of apoptosis. After 8 months of treatment, excessive lipid storage resolved, CoQ10 level normalized, mitochondrial enzymes increased, and proportion of fibers with TUNEL-positive nuclei decreased to 10%. The authors conclude that muscle CoQ10 deficiency can be corrected by supplementation of CoQ10, which appears to stimulate mitochondrial proliferation and to prevent apoptosis.

  15. Current state of coenzyme Q(10) production and its applications.

    PubMed

    Jeya, Marimuthu; Moon, Hee-Jung; Lee, Jeong-Lim; Kim, In-Won; Lee, Jung-Kul

    2010-02-01

    Coenzyme Q(10) (CoQ(10)), an obligatory cofactor in the aerobic respiratory electron transfer for energy generation, is formed from the conjugation of a benzoquinone ring with a hydrophobic isoprenoid chain. CoQ(10) is now used as a nutritional supplement because of its antioxidant properties and is beneficial in the treatment of several human diseases when administered orally. Bioprocesses have been developed for the commercial production of CoQ(10) because of its increased demand, and these bioprocesses depend on microbes that produce high levels of CoQ(10) naturally. However, as knowledge of the biosynthetic enzymes and the regulatory mechanisms modulating CoQ(10) production increases, approaches arise for the genetic engineering of CoQ(10) production in Escherichia coli and Agrobacterium tumefaciens. This review focused on approaches for CoQ(10) production, strategies used to engineer CoQ(10) production in microbes, and potential applications of CoQ(10).

  16. The Effect of Coenzyme Q10 Supplementation on Circulating Levels of Novel Adipokine Adipolin/CTRP12 in Overweight and Obese Patients with Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Mehrdadi, P; Kolahdouz Mohammadi, R; Alipoor, E; Eshraghian, M R; Esteghamati, A; Hosseinzadeh-Attar, M J

    2017-03-01

    Background: Adipolin, the novel adipokine that is proposed to be reduced in diabetes, obesity and inflammation, may improve glycemic control. It is known that coenzyme Q10 could improve insulin sensitivity. The aim of the current study was to investigate the effect of Q10 supplementation on adipolin concentration and glucose metabolism in overweight and obese diabetic patients. Material & Methods: Sixty four patients with type 2 diabetes and 25Q10 or placebo daily for 12 weeks. Fasting serum levels of adipolin, glucose, insulin, HbA1c and HOMA-IR were measured before and after supplementation. Results: Following supplementation, adipolin levels decreased significantly in Q10 group (38.19±32.02 to 29.03±34.23 ng/ml;P=0.001). HbA1c decreased dramatically following supplementation only in Q10 group (8.6±2.2% to 7.9±2.1%, P<0.001). It was also marginally lower in Q10 compared to placebo group at the end of study (P=0.056). Moreover, weight (P=0.003), BMI (P=0.003) and waist circumference (P=0.016) decreased significantly in Q10 group. No significant alterations were observed in FBS, fasting insulin and HOMA-IR within or between Q10 and placebo groups. Conclusions: Coenzyme Q10 reduced HbA1c considerably in overweight and obese patients with diabetes, although interestingly adipolin levels declined simultaneously. In this study, Q10 modulated glucose homeostasis, which was expected to be mediated by increasing adipolin. The similar mechanisms of action of Q10 and adipolin may justify lowering effect of Q10 on adipolin. In addition, the possible anti-adipogenic effect of Q10 might explain the significant reduction in weight and waist circumference and hence the adipolin decrease. Further studies are required to evaluate the precise role of adipolin in glucose metabolism as well as the probable effects of coenzyme Q10 on adipose tissue and adipokines. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  17. Determination of Coenzyme Q10 Content in Raw Materials and Dietary Supplements by High-Performance Liquid Chromatography-UV: Collaborative Study

    PubMed Central

    Lunetta, Steven; Roman, Mark

    2008-01-01

    An international collaborative study was conducted of a high-performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC)-UV method for the determination of coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10, ubidecarenone) in raw materials and dietary supplements. Ten collaborating laboratories determined the total CoQ10 content in 8 blind duplicate samples. Sample materials included CoQ10 raw material and 4 finished product dietary supplements representing softgels, hardshell gelatin capsules, and chewable wafers. In addition, collaborating laboratories received a negative control and negative control spiked with CoQ10 at low and high levels to determine recovery. Materials were extracted with an acetonitrile–tetrahydrofuran–water mixture. Ferric chloride was added to the test solutions to ensure all CoQ10 was in the oxidized form. The HPLC analyses were performed on a C18 column using UV detection at 275 nm. Repeatability relative standard deviations (RSDr) ranged from 0.94 to 5.05%. Reproducibility relative standard deviations (RSDR) ranged from 3.08 to 17.1%, with HorRat values ranging from 1.26 to 5.17. Recoveries ranged from 74.0 to 115%. Based on these results, the method is recommended for Official First Action for determination of CoQ10 in raw materials and dietary supplement finished products containing CoQ10 at a concentration of >100 mg CoQ10/g test material. PMID:18727527

  18. Determination of coenzyme Q10 content in raw materials and dietary supplements by high-performance liquid chromatography-UV: collaborative study.

    PubMed

    Lunetta, Steven; Roman, Mark

    2008-01-01

    An international collaborative study was conducted of a high-performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC)-UV method for the determination of coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10, ubidecarenone) in raw materials and dietary supplements. Ten collaborating laboratories determined the total CoQ10 content in 8 blind duplicate samples. Sample materials included CoQ10 raw material and 4 finished product dietary supplements representing softgels, hardshell gelatin capsules, and chewable wafers. In addition, collaborating laboratories received a negative control and negative control spiked with CoQ10 at low and high levels to determine recovery. Materials were extracted with an acetonitrile-tetrahydrofuran-water mixture. Ferric chloride was added to the test solutions to ensure all CoQ10 was in the oxidized form. The HPLC analyses were performed on a C18 column using UV detection at 275 nm. Repeatability relative standard deviations (RSDr) ranged from 0.94 to 5.05%. Reproducibility relative standard deviations (RSDR) ranged from 3.08 to 17.1%, with HorRat values ranging from 1.26 to 5.17. Recoveries ranged from 74.0 to 115%. Based on these results, the method is recommended for Official First Action for determination of CoQ10 in raw materials and dietary supplement finished products containing CoQ10 at a concentration of >100 mg CoQ10/g test material.

  19. Postprandial antioxidant gene expression is modified by Mediterranean diet supplemented with coenzyme Q(10) in elderly men and women.

    PubMed

    Yubero-Serrano, Elena M; Gonzalez-Guardia, Lorena; Rangel-Zuñiga, Oriol; Delgado-Casado, Nieves; Delgado-Lista, Javier; Perez-Martinez, Pablo; Garcia-Rios, Antonio; Caballero, Javier; Marin, Carmen; Gutierrez-Mariscal, Francisco M; Tinahones, Francisco J; Villalba, Jose M; Tunez, Isaac; Perez-Jimenez, Francisco; Lopez-Miranda, Jose

    2013-02-01

    Postprandial oxidative stress is characterized by an increased susceptibility of the organism towards oxidative damage after consumption of a meal rich in lipids and/or carbohydrates. We have investigated whether the quality of dietary fat alters postprandial gene expression and protein levels involved in oxidative stress and whether the supplementation with coenzyme Q(10) (CoQ) improves this situation in an elderly population. Twenty participants were randomized to receive three isocaloric diets each for 4 weeks: Mediterranean diet supplemented with CoQ (Med + CoQ diet), Mediterranean diet (Med diet), saturated fatty acid-rich diet (SFA diet). After 12-h fast, volunteers consumed a breakfast with a fat composition similar to that consumed in each of the diets. Nrf2, p22(phox) and p47(phox), superoxide dismutase 1 and 2 (SOD1 and SOD2), glutathione peroxidase 1 (GPx1), thiorredoxin reductase (TrxR) gene expression and Kelch-like ECH associating protein 1 (Keap-1) and citoplasmic and nuclear Nrf2 protein levels were determined. Med and Med + CoQ diets induced lower Nrf2, p22(phox), p47(phox), SOD1, SOD2 and TrxR gene expression and higher cytoplasmic Nrf2 and Keap-1 protein levels compared to the SFA diet. Moreover, Med + CoQ diet produced lower postprandial Nrf2 gene expression and lower nuclear Nrf2 protein levels compared to the other diets and lower GPx1 gene expression than the SFA diet. Our results support the antioxidant effect of a Med diet and that exogenous CoQ supplementation has a protective effects against free radical overgeneration through the lowering of postprandial oxidative stress modifying the postprandial antioxidant protein levels and reducing the postprandial expression of antioxidant genes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

  20. Postprandial antioxidant effect of the Mediterranean diet supplemented with coenzyme Q10 in elderly men and women.

    PubMed

    Yubero-Serrano, Elena M; Delgado-Casado, Nieves; Delgado-Lista, Javier; Perez-Martinez, Pablo; Tasset-Cuevas, Inmaculada; Santos-Gonzalez, Monica; Caballero, Javier; Garcia-Rios, Antonio; Marin, Carmen; Gutierrez-Mariscal, Francisco M; Fuentes, Francisco; Villalba, Jose M; Tunez, Isaac; Perez-Jimenez, Francisco; Lopez-Miranda, Jose

    2011-12-01

    Postprandial oxidative stress is characterized by an increased susceptibility of the organism towards oxidative damage after consumption of a meal rich in lipids and/or carbohydrates. We have investigated whether the quality of dietary fat alters postprandial cellular oxidative stress and whether the supplementation with coenzyme Q(10) (CoQ) lowers postprandial oxidative stress in an elderly population. In this randomized crossover study, 20 participants were assigned to receive three isocaloric diets for periods of 4 week each: (1) Mediterranean diet supplemented with CoQ (Med+CoQ diet), (2) Mediterranean diet (Med diet), and (3) saturated fatty acid-rich diet (SFA diet). After a 12-h fast, the volunteers consumed a breakfast with a fat composition similar to that consumed in each of the diets. CoQ, lipid peroxides (LPO), oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL), protein carbonyl (PC), total nitrite, nitrotyrosine plasma levels, catalase, superoxide dismutase (SOD), and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activities and ischemic reactive hyperaemia (IRH) were determined. Med diet produced a lower postprandial GPx activity and a lower decrease in total nitrite level compared to the SFA diet. Med and Med+CoQ diets induced a higher postprandial increase in IRH and a lower postprandial LPO, oxLDL, and nitrotyrosine plasma levels than the SFA diet. Moreover, the Med+CoQ diet produced a lower postprandial decrease in total nitrite and a greater decrease in PC levels compared to the other two diets and lower SOD, CAT, and GPx activities than the SFA diet.In conclusion, Med diet reduces postprandial oxidative stress by reducing processes of cellular oxidation and increases the action of the antioxidant system in elderly persons and the administration of CoQ further improves this redox balance.

  1. Effects of dietary L-carnitine and coenzyme Q10 at different supplemental ages on growth performance and some immune response in ascites-susceptible broilers.

    PubMed

    Geng, Ailian; Li, Baoming; Guo, Yuming

    2007-02-01

    Effects of dietary L-carnitine and coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) at different supplemental ages on performance and some immune response were investigated in ascites-susceptible broilers. A 3 x 2 x 2 factorial design was used consisting of L-carnitine supplementation (0, 75, and 100 mg/kg), CoQ10 supplementation (0 and 40 mg/kg) and different supplemental ages (from day 1 on and from day 10 on). A total of 480 one-day-old Arbor Acre male broiler chicks were randomly allocated to 12 groups, every group had five replicates, each with eight birds. The birds were fed a corn-soybean based diet for six weeks. From day 10-21, all the birds were exposed to a low ambient temperature (12-15 degrees C) to increase the susceptibility to ascites. No significant effects were observed on growth performance by L-carnitine, CoQ10 supplementation, and different supplemental ages. Packed cell volume was significantly decreased by L-carnitine supplementation alone, and ascites heart index and ascites mortality were decreased by L-carnitine, CoQ10 supplementation alone, and L-carnitine + CoQ10 supplementation together (p < 0.05). Heart index of broilers was significantly improved by L-carnitine, CoQ10 supplementation alone during 0-3 week. Serum IgG content was improved by L-carnitine supplementation alone (p < 0.05), but lysozyme activity was increased by L-carnitine + CoQ10 supplementation together (p < 0.05). A significant L-carnitine by supplemental age interaction was observed in lysozyme activity. L-carnitine supplementation alone had no effects on the peripheral blood lymphocyte (PBL) proliferation in response to concanavalin A (ConA) and lipopolysaccharide, but supplemental CoQ10 alone and L-carnitine+ CoQ10 together decreased the PBL proliferation in response to ConA (p < 0.05). The present study suggested that L-carnitine + CoQ10 supplementation together had positive effects on some immune response of ascites-susceptible broilers, which might benefit for the reduction of broilers

  2. The effect of short-term coenzyme Q10 supplementation and pre-cooling strategy on cardiac damage markers in elite swimmers.

    PubMed

    Emami, Ali; Tofighi, Asghar; Asri-Rezaei, Siamak; Bazargani-Gilani, Behnaz

    2018-02-01

    Strenuous physical exercise and hyperthermia may paradoxically induce oxidative stress and adverse effects on myocardial function. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of 14-d coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) supplementation and pre-cooling on serum creatine kinase-MB (CK-MB), cardiac Troponin I (cTnI), myoglobin (Mb), lactate dehydrogenase (LD), total antioxidant capacity (TAC), lipid peroxidation (LPO) and CoQ10 concentration in elite swimmers. In total, thirty-six healthy males (mean age 17 (sd 1) years) were randomly selected and divided into four groups of supplementation, supplementation with pre-cooling, pre-cooling and control. During an eighteen-session protocol in the morning and evening, subjects attended speed and endurance swimming training sessions for 5 km in each session. Blood sampling was done before (two stages) and after (two stages) administration of CoQ10 and pre-cooling. ANCOVA and repeated measurement tests with Bonferroni post hoc test were used for the statistical analysis of the data. There was no significant statistical difference among groups for the levels of CK-MB, cTnI, Mb, LD, TAC, LPO and CoQ10 at the presampling (stages 1 and 2) (P>0·05). However, pre-cooling and control groups show a significant increase in the levels of CK-MB, cTnI, Mb, LD and LPO compared with the supplementation and supplementation with pre-cooling groups in the post-sampling (stages 1 and 2) (P<0·05), except for the TAC and CoQ10. Consequently, CoQ10 supplementation prevents adverse changes of myocardial damage and oxidative stress during swimming competition phase. Meanwhile, the pre-cooling strategy individually has no desired effect on the levels of CK-MB, cTnI, Mb, LD, LPO, TAC and CoQ10.

  3. Haploinsufficiency of COQ4 causes coenzyme Q10 deficiency.

    PubMed

    Salviati, Leonardo; Trevisson, Eva; Rodriguez Hernandez, Maria Angeles; Casarin, Alberto; Pertegato, Vanessa; Doimo, Mara; Cassina, Matteo; Agosto, Caterina; Desbats, Maria Andrea; Sartori, Geppo; Sacconi, Sabrina; Memo, Luigi; Zuffardi, Orsetta; Artuch, Rafael; Quinzii, Catarina; Dimauro, Salvatore; Hirano, Michio; Santos-Ocaña, Carlos; Navas, Plácido

    2012-03-01

    COQ4 encodes a protein that organises the multienzyme complex for the synthesis of coenzyme Q(10) (CoQ(10)). A 3.9 Mb deletion of chromosome 9q34.13 was identified in a 3-year-old boy with mental retardation, encephalomyopathy and dysmorphic features. Because the deletion encompassed COQ4, the patient was screened for CoQ(10) deficiency. A complete molecular and biochemical characterisation of the patient's fibroblasts and of a yeast model were performed. The study found reduced COQ4 expression (48% of controls), CoQ(10) content and biosynthetic rate (44% and 43% of controls), and activities of respiratory chain complex II+III. Cells displayed a growth defect that was corrected by the addition of CoQ(10) to the culture medium. Knockdown of COQ4 in HeLa cells also resulted in a reduction of CoQ(10.) Diploid yeast haploinsufficient for COQ4 displayed similar CoQ deficiency. Haploinsufficency of other genes involved in CoQ(10) biosynthesis does not cause CoQ deficiency, underscoring the critical role of COQ4. Oral CoQ(10) supplementation resulted in a significant improvement of neuromuscular symptoms, which reappeared after supplementation was temporarily discontinued. Mutations of COQ4 should be searched for in patients with CoQ(10) deficiency and encephalomyopathy; patients with genomic rearrangements involving COQ4 should be screened for CoQ(10) deficiency, as they could benefit from supplementation.

  4. Effects of coenzyme Q10 supplementation on activities of selected antioxidative enzymes and lipid peroxidation in hypertensive patients treated with indapamide. A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Kędziora-Kornatowska, Kornelia; Czuczejko, Jolanta; Motyl, Jadwiga; Szewczyk-Golec, Karolina; Kozakiewicz, Mariusz; Pawluk, Hanna; Kędziora, Józef; Błaszczak, Robert; Banach, Maciej; Rysz, Jacek

    2010-08-30

    An increase in oxidative stress is strongly documented in hypertensive patients. In blood vessels, oxidative stress increases the production of superoxide anion (O(2) (•-)) that reacts with nitric oxide (NO) and impairs the ability of endothelium to relax. Many reports indicate a beneficial effect of coenzyme Q10 (CoQ) in hypertension. Coenzyme Q10 therapy may lower O(2) (•-) and thus decrease the complications associated with hypertension. The aim of our study was to evaluate the effects of CoQ supplementation on antioxidative enzyme activities and lipid peroxidation in elderly hypertensive patients. We determined the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD-1) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) and the concentration of malondialdehyde (MDA) in erythrocytes of 27 elderly (mean age 72.5 ±6.1 year) hypertensive patients treated with indapamide at baseline and after 12 weeks of CoQ supplementation (60 mg twice a day) in comparison with 30 healthy elderly volunteers (mean age 76.8 ±8.5 year). Decrease of SOD-1 (p < 0.001) and insignificant reduction of GSH-Px activities and increase of MDA (p < 0.001) level were observed in hypertensive patients in comparison to healthy volunteers before supplementation. Coenzyme Q10 administration resulted in a significant increase only in SOD-1 activity (p < 0.001). The present study indicates that CoQ improves the most important component of the antioxidant defence system - SOD-1, which is responsible for O(2) (•-) scavenging. Coenzyme Q10 may be used as an additional therapeutic agent for prophylaxis and treatment of hypertension in elderly patients.

  5. Novel HPLC-UV Method for Simultaneous Determination of Fat-soluble Vitamins and Coenzyme Q10 in Medicines and Supplements.

    PubMed

    Temova-Rakuša, Žane; Srečnik, Eva; Roškar, Robert

    2017-09-01

    A precise, accurate and rapid HPLC-UV method for simultaneous determination of fat-soluble vitamins (vitamin D3, E-acetate, K1, β-carotene, A-palmitate) and coenzyme Q10 was developed and validated according to ICH guidelines. Optimal chromatographic separation of the analytes in minimal analysis time (8 min) was achieved on a Luna C18 150 × 4.6 mm column using a mixture of acetonitrile, tetrahydrofuran and water (50:45:5, v/v/v). The described reversed phase HPLC method is the first published for quantification of these five fat-soluble vitamins and coenzyme Q10 within a single chromatographic run. The method was further applied for quantification of the analytes in selected liquid and solid dosage forms, registered as nutritional supplements and prescription medicines, which confirmed its suitability for routine analysis.

  6. Does Oral Coenzyme Q10 Plus NADH Supplementation Improve Fatigue and Biochemical Parameters in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome?

    PubMed Central

    Cordero, Mario D.; Segundo, María José; Sáez-Francàs, Naia; Calvo, Natalia; Román-Malo, Lourdes; Aliste, Luisa; Fernández de Sevilla, Tomás; Alegre, José

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is a chronic and extremely debilitating illness characterized by prolonged fatigue and multiple symptoms with unknown cause, diagnostic test, or universally effective treatment. Inflammation, oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, and CoQ10 deficiency have been well documented in CFS. We conducted an 8-week, randomized, double-blind placebo-controlled trial to evaluate the benefits of oral CoQ10 (200 mg/day) plus NADH (20 mg/day) supplementation on fatigue and biochemical parameters in 73 Spanish CFS patients. This study was registered in ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT02063126). A significant improvement of fatigue showing a reduction in fatigue impact scale total score (p<0.05) was reported in treated group versus placebo. In addition, a recovery of the biochemical parameters was also reported. NAD+/NADH (p<0.001), CoQ10 (p<0.05), ATP (p<0.05), and citrate synthase (p<0.05) were significantly higher, and lipoperoxides (p<0.05) were significantly lower in blood mononuclear cells of the treated group. These observations lead to the hypothesis that the oral CoQ10 plus NADH supplementation could confer potential therapeutic benefits on fatigue and biochemical parameters in CFS. Larger sample trials are warranted to confirm these findings. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 22, 679–685. PMID:25386668

  7. Coenzyme Q10 supplementation downregulates the increase of monocytes expressing toll-like receptor 4 in response to 6-day intensive training in kendo athletes.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Kazuhiro; Kon, Michihiro; Tanimura, Yuko; Hanaoka, Yukichi; Kimura, Fuminori; Akama, Takao; Kono, Ichiro

    2015-06-01

    This study examined changes in toll-like receptor 4 (TLR-4)-expressing monocytes and lymphocyte subpopulations in response to continuous intensive exercise training in athletes, as well as the effect of coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) supplementation on these changes. Eighteen male elite kendo athletes in Japan were randomly assigned to a CoQ10-supplementation group (n = 9) or a placebo-supplementation group (n = 9) using a double-blind method. Subjects in the CoQ10 group took 300 mg CoQ10 per day for 20 days. Subjects in the placebo group took the same dosage of placebo. All subjects practiced kendo 5.5 h per day for 6 consecutive days during the study period. Blood samples were collected 2 weeks before training, on the first day (day 1), third day (day 3), and fifth day of training (day 5), and 1 week after the training period (post-training) to ascertain TLR-4(+)/CD14(+) monocyte and lymphocyte subpopulations (CD3(+), CD4(+), CD8(+), CD28(+)/CD4(+), CD28(+)/CD8(+), and CD56(+)/CD3(-) cells) using flow cytometry analysis. The group × time interaction for TLR-4(+)/CD14(+) cells did not reach significance (p = 0.08). Within the CoQ10 group, the absolute number of TLR-4(+)/CD14(+) cells was significantly higher only at day 5. The placebo group showed a significant increase in the absolute number of TLR-4(+)/CD14(+) cells at day 3, day 5, and post-training (p < 0.05). There was no significant group × time interaction for any lymphocyte subpopulation. CD3(+), CD8(+), and CD56(+)/CD3(-) cells were significantly reduced at day 3 in both groups (p < 0.05). In conclusion, CoQ10 supplementation might downregulate the increase of TLR-4-expressing monocytes in response to continuous strenuous exercise training in kendo athletes.

  8. Coenzyme Q(10) , endothelial function, and cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Littarru, Gian Paolo; Tiano, Luca; Belardinelli, Romualdo; Watts, Gerald F

    2011-01-01

    Since the time a precise role of coenzyme Q(10) (CoQ(10) ) in myocardial bioenergetics was established, the involvement of CoQ in the pathophysiology of heart failure was hypothesized. This provided the rationale for numerous clinical trials of CoQ(10) as adjunctive treatment for heart failure. A mild hypotensive effect of CoQ was reported in the early years of clinical use of this compound. We review early human and animal studies on the vascular effects of CoQ. We then focus on endothelial dysfunction in type 2 diabetes and the possible impact on this condition of antioxidants and nutritional supplements, and in particular the therapeutic effects of CoQ. The effect of CoQ(10) on endothelial dysfunction in ischemic heart disease is also reviewed together with recent data highlighting that treatment with CoQ(10) increases extracellular SOD activity. Copyright © 2011 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  9. Co-Enzyme Q10 and n-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid Supplementation Reverse Intermittent Hypoxia-Induced Growth Restriction and Improved Antioxidant Profiles in Neonatal Rats

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Charles L.; Henry, Michael M.; Chowdhury, Sara; Valencia, Gloria B.; Aranda, Jacob V.

    2017-01-01

    Neonatal intermittent hypoxia (IH) increases the risk for many morbidities in extremely low birth weight/gestational age (ELBW/ELGA) neonates with compromised antioxidant systems and poor growth. We hypothesized that supplementation with coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10, ubiquinol) or n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) during neonatal IH improves antioxidant profiles and somatic growth in neonatal rats. Newborn rats were exposed to two IH paradigms at birth (P0): (1) 50% O2 with brief hypoxic episodes (12% O2); or (2) room air (RA) with brief hypoxia, until P14 during which they received daily oral CoQ10 in olive oil, n-3 PUFAs in fish oil, or olive oil only from P0 to P14. Pups were studied at P14 or placed in RA until P21 for recovery from IH (IHR). Body weight and length; organ weights; and serum antioxidants and growth factors were determined at P14 and P21. Neonatal IH resulted in sustained reductions in somatic growth, an effect that was reversed with n-3 PUFAs. Improved growth was associated with higher serum growth factors. CoQ10 decreased superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione, but increased catalase, suggesting reduced oxidative stress. Further studies are needed to determine the synergistic effects of CoQ10 and n-3 PUFA co-administration for the prevention of IH-induced oxidative stress and postnatal growth deficits. PMID:29258174

  10. Co-Enzyme Q10 and n-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid Supplementation Reverse Intermittent Hypoxia-Induced Growth Restriction and Improved Antioxidant Profiles in Neonatal Rats.

    PubMed

    Beharry, Kay D; Cai, Charles L; Henry, Michael M; Chowdhury, Sara; Valencia, Gloria B; Aranda, Jacob V

    2017-12-16

    Neonatal intermittent hypoxia (IH) increases the risk for many morbidities in extremely low birth weight/gestational age (ELBW/ELGA) neonates with compromised antioxidant systems and poor growth. We hypothesized that supplementation with coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10, ubiquinol) or n -3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) during neonatal IH improves antioxidant profiles and somatic growth in neonatal rats. Newborn rats were exposed to two IH paradigms at birth (P0): (1) 50% O₂ with brief hypoxic episodes (12% O₂); or (2) room air (RA) with brief hypoxia, until P14 during which they received daily oral CoQ10 in olive oil, n -3 PUFAs in fish oil, or olive oil only from P0 to P14. Pups were studied at P14 or placed in RA until P21 for recovery from IH (IHR). Body weight and length; organ weights; and serum antioxidants and growth factors were determined at P14 and P21. Neonatal IH resulted in sustained reductions in somatic growth, an effect that was reversed with n -3 PUFAs. Improved growth was associated with higher serum growth factors. CoQ10 decreased superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione, but increased catalase, suggesting reduced oxidative stress. Further studies are needed to determine the synergistic effects of CoQ10 and n -3 PUFA co-administration for the prevention of IH-induced oxidative stress and postnatal growth deficits.

  11. Primary coenzyme Q10 (CoQ 10) deficiencies and related nephropathies.

    PubMed

    Ozaltin, Fatih

    2014-06-01

    Oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) is a metabolic pathway that uses energy released by the oxidation of nutrients to generate adenosine triphosphate (ATP). Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10), also known as ubiquinone, plays an essential role in the human body not only by generating ATP in the mitochondrial respiratory chain but also by providing protection from reactive oxygen species (ROS) and functioning in the activation of many mitochondrial dehydrogenases and enzymes required in pyrimidine nucleoside biosynthesis. The presentations of primary CoQ10 deficiencies caused by genetic mutations are very heterogeneous. The phenotypes related to energy depletion or ROS production may depend on the content of CoQ10 in the cell, which is determined by the severity of the mutation. Primary CoQ10 deficiency is unique among mitochondrial disorders because early supplementation with CoQ10 can prevent the onset of neurological and renal manifestations. In this review I summarize primary CoQ10 deficiencies caused by various genetic abnormalities, emphasizing its nephropathic form.

  12. Reduction of ascites mortality in broilers by coenzyme Q10.

    PubMed

    Geng, A L; Guo, Y M; Yang, Y

    2004-09-01

    Effects of coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) supplementation on growth performance and ascites were studied in broilers. One hundred eighty 1-d-old Arbor Acre male broiler chicks were randomly allocated into 3 groups with 6 replicates each. From d 8, the diets were supplemented with CoQ10 at levels of 0, 20, and 40 mg/kg, respectively. From d 15 to 21, all the chicks were exposed to low ambient temperature (15 to 18 degrees C) to induce ascites. Average feed intake, BW gain, and feed conversion ratio of the broilers during 0 to 3 wk, 3 to 6 wk, and 0 to 6 wk were measured. The results showed that there were no influences observed on broilers' growth performance, but the mortality due to ascites was reduced by CoQ10 supplementation (P < or = 0.05). Erythrocyte osmotic fragility (EOF) was significantly decreased by 40 mg/kg CoQ10 compared with the control, but no significant changes were observed on blood packed cell volume (PCV) among the treatments. Pulmonary arterial diastolic pressure was significantly decreased on d 36, but no significant changes were observed on right ventricular pressure (RVP), pulmonary arterial systolic pressure, and the maximum change ratio of right intraventricular pressure (+/- dp/ dtmax). Ascites heart index (AHI) was significantly decreased by 40 mg/kg CoQ10 supplementation (P < or = 0.05). The results of this study suggested that CoQ10 has a beneficial effect in reducing ascites mortality in broilers, and 40 mg/kg CoQ10 seems to be more effective than 20 mg/ kg CoQ10.

  13. Obesity-induced oocyte mitochondrial defects are partially prevented and rescued by supplementation with co-enzyme Q10 in a mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Boots, C.E.; Boudoures, A.; Zhang, W.; Drury, A.; Moley, K.H.

    2016-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION Does supplementation with co-enzyme Q10 (CoQ10) improve the oocyte mitochondrial abnormalities associated with obesity in mice? SUMMARY ANSWER In an obese mouse model, CoQ10 improves the mitochondrial function of oocytes. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY Obesity impairs oocyte quality. Oocytes from mice fed a high-fat/high-sugar (HF/HS) diet have abnormalities in mitochondrial distribution and function and in meiotic progression. STUDY DESIGN, SIZE, DURATION Mice were randomly assigned to a normal, chow diet or an isocaloric HF/HS diet for 12 weeks. After 6 weeks on the diet, half of the mice receiving a normal diet and half of the mice receiving a HF/HS diet were randomly assigned to receive CoQ10 supplementation injections for the remaining 6 weeks. PARTICIPANTS/MATERIALS, SETTING, METHODS Dietary intervention was initiated on C57Bl6 female mice at 4 weeks of age, CoQ10 versus vehicle injections were assigned at 10 weeks, and assays were conducted at 16 weeks of age. Mice were super-ovulated, and oocytes were collected and stained to assess mitochondrial distribution, quantify reactive oxygen species (ROS), assess meiotic spindle formation, and measure metabolites. In vitro fertilization was performed, and blastocyst embryos were transferred into control mice. Oocyte number, fertilization rate, blastulation rate and implantation rate were compared between the four cohorts. Bivariate statistics were performed appropriately. MAIN RESULTS AND THE ROLE OF CHANCE HF/HS mice weighed significantly more than normal diet mice (29 versus 22 g, P< 0.001). CoQ10 supplementation did not influence weight. Levels of ATP, citrate, and phosphocreatine were lower and ROS levels were higher in HF/HS mice than in controls (P< 0.001). CoQ10 supplementation significantly increased the levels of metabolites and decreased ROS levels in oocytes from normal diet mice but not in oocytes from HF/HS mice. However, CoQ10 completely prevented the mitochondrial distribution abnormalities

  14. The production of coenzyme Q10 in microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Cluis, Corinne P; Pinel, Dominic; Martin, Vincent J

    2012-01-01

    Coenzyme Q10 has emerged as a valuable molecule for pharmaceutical and cosmetic applications. Therefore, research into producing and optimizing coenzyme Q10 via microbial fermentation is ongoing. There are two major paths being explored for maximizing production of this molecule to commercially advantageous levels. The first entails using microbes that naturally produce coenzyme Q10 as fermentation biocatalysts and optimizing the fermentation parameters in order to reach industrial levels of production. However, the natural coenzyme Q10-producing microbes tend to be intractable for industrial fermentation settings. The second path to coenzyme Q10 production being explored is to engineer Escherichia coli with the ability to biosynthesize this molecule in order to take advantage of its more favourable fermentation characteristics and the well-understood array of genetic tools available for this bacteria. Although many studies have attempted to over-produce coenzyme Q10 in E. coli through genetic engineering, production titres still remain below those of the natural coenzyme Q10-producing microorganisms. Current research is providing the knowledge needed to alleviate the bottlenecks involved in producing coenzyme Q10 from an E. coli strain platform and the fermentation parameters that could dramatically increase production titres from natural microbial producers. Synthesizing the lessons learned from both approaches may be the key towards a more cost-effective coenzyme Q10 industry.

  15. Coenzyme Q10 (PDQ®)—Patient Version

    Cancer.gov

    Coenzyme Q10 is naturally made by the body and can be taken as a pill or injection. Studies have shown it to help protect the heart from damaging side effects of doxorubicin and to stimulate the immune system in cancer patients. Read about the results of clinical trials in cancer patients using coenzyme Q10 in this expert-reviewed summary.

  16. Reversal of mitochondrial dysfunction by coenzyme Q10 supplement improves endothelial function in patients with ischaemic left ventricular systolic dysfunction: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Dai, Yuk-Ling; Luk, Ting-Hin; Yiu, Kai-Hang; Wang, Mei; Yip, Pandora M C; Lee, Stephen W L; Li, Sheung-Wai; Tam, Sidney; Fong, Bonnie; Lau, Chu-Pak; Siu, Chung-Wah; Tse, Hung-Fat

    2011-06-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is associated with endothelial dysfunction and mitochondrial dysfunction (MD). The aim of this study was to investigate whether co-enzyme Q10 (CoQ) supplementation, which is an obligatory coenzyme in the mitochondrial respiratory transport chain, can reverse MD and improve endothelial function in patients with ischaemic left ventricular systolic dysfunction (LVSD). We performed a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial to determine the effects of CoQ supplement (300 mg/day, n=28) vs. placebo (controls, n=28) for 8 weeks on brachial flow-mediated dilation (FMD) in patients with ischaemic LVSD(left ventricular ejection fraction <45%). Mitochondrial function was determined by plasma lactate/pyruvate ratio (LP ratio). After 8 weeks, CoQ-treated patients had significant increases in plasma CoQ concentration (treatment effect 2.20 μg/mL, P<0.001) and FMD (treatment effect 1.51%, P=0.03); and decrease in LP ratio (treatment effect -2.46, P=0.03) compared with controls. However, CoQ treatment did not alter nitroglycerin-mediated dilation, blood pressure, blood levels of fasting glucose, haemoglobin A1c, lipid profile, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein and oxidative stress as determined by serum superoxide dismutase and 8-isoprostane (all P>0.05). Furthermore, the reduction in LP ratio significantly correlated with improvement in FMD (r=-0.29, P=0.047). In patients with ischaemic LVSD, 8 weeks supplement of CoQ improved mitochondrial function and FMD; and the improvement of FMD correlated with the change in mitochondrial function, suggesting that CoQ improved endothelial function via reversal of mitochondrial dysfunction in patients with ischaemic LVSD. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Invertebrate Models for Coenzyme Q10 Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Ayala, Daniel J.M.; Jiménez-Gancedo, Sandra; Guerra, Ignacio; Navas, Plácido

    2014-01-01

    The human syndrome of coenzyme Q (CoQ) deficiency is a heterogeneous mitochondrial disease characterized by a diminution of CoQ content in cells and tissues that affects all the electron transport processes CoQ is responsible for, like the electron transference in mitochondria for respiration and ATP production and the antioxidant capacity that it exerts in membranes and lipoproteins. Supplementation with external CoQ is the main attempt to address these pathologies, but quite variable results have been obtained ranging from little response to a dramatic recovery. Here, we present the importance of modeling human CoQ deficiencies in animal models to understand the genetics and the pathology of this disease, although the election of an organism is crucial and can sometimes be controversial. Bacteria and yeast harboring mutations that lead to CoQ deficiency are unable to grow if they have to respire but develop without any problems on media with fermentable carbon sources. The complete lack of CoQ in mammals causes embryonic lethality, whereas other mutations produce tissue-specific diseases as in humans. However, working with transgenic mammals is time and cost intensive, with no assurance of obtaining results. Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila melanogaster have been used for years as organisms to study embryonic development, biogenesis, degenerative pathologies, and aging because of the genetic facilities and the speed of working with these animal models. In this review, we summarize several attempts to model reliable human CoQ deficiencies in invertebrates, focusing on mutant phenotypes pretty similar to those observed in human patients. PMID:25126050

  18. Effect of coenzyme q10 on myopathic symptoms in patients treated with statins.

    PubMed

    Caso, Giuseppe; Kelly, Patricia; McNurlan, Margaret A; Lawson, William E

    2007-05-15

    Treatment of hypercholesterolemia with statins (3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors) is effective in the primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease. However, statin use is often associated with a variety of muscle-related symptoms or myopathies. Myopathy may be related in part to statin inhibition of the endogenous synthesis of coenzyme Q10, an essential cofactor for mitochondrial energy production. The aim of this study is to determine whether coenzyme Q10 supplementation would reduce the degree of muscle pain associated with statin treatment. Patients with myopathic symptoms were randomly assigned in a double-blinded protocol to treatment with coenzyme Q10 (100 mg/day, n = 18) or vitamin E (400 IU/day, n = 14) for 30 days. Muscle pain and pain interference with daily activities were assessed before and after treatment. After a 30-day intervention, pain severity decreased by 40% (p <0.001) and pain interference with daily activities decreased by 38% (p <0.02) in the group treated with coenzyme Q10. In contrast, no changes in pain severity (+9%, p = NS) or pain interference with daily activities (-11%, p = NS) was observed in the group treated with vitamin E. In conclusion, results suggest that coenzyme Q10 supplementation may decrease muscle pain associated with statin treatment. Thus, coenzyme Q10 supplementation may offer an alternative to stopping treatment with these vital drugs.

  19. Effects of coenzyme Q10 supplementation on plasma C-reactive protein concentrations: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Mazidi, Mohsen; Kengne, Andre Pascal; Banach, Maciej

    2018-02-01

    The aim of this systematic review and meta-analysis of prospective interventional studies was to investigate the effects of coenzyme Q10 (CQ10) on plasma C-reactive protein (CRP) levels. PubMed/Medline, Web of Science (WoS), Cochrane Database and Google Scholar databases were searched (up to December 2016) to identify prospective studies evaluating the impact of CQ10 supplementation on CRP. Random effects models meta-analysis was used for quantitative data synthesis. Sensitivity analysis used the leave-one-out method, and heterogeneity was quantitatively assessed using the I 2 index. Systematic review PROSPERO database registration: CRD42016038155. From a total of 119 entries identified via searches, 7 studies were finally included to the analysis. The results of the meta-analysis indicated a non-significant reduction in CRP concentrations following supplementation with CQ10 with a weighted mean difference [WMD] of -0.25mg/l (95% confidence intervals [CI] -0.56 to 0.06, I 2 =42.0%). The WMD for the effects on interleukin 6 (IL6) was -0.72pg/dl, (95% CI -1.24 to -0.24, I 2 =51.8%). These findings were robust in sensitivity analyses. Random-effects meta-regression revealed that changes in plasma CRP levels were independent of the dosage of CQ10 (slope: -0.0005; 95% CI: -0.005, 0.004; p=0.832) while duration of supplementation was the dependent mediator (slope: slope: -0.111; 95% CI: -0.21, -0.004; p=0.042). In conclusion, CQ10 supplementation has a borderline favourable effect on CRP levels, and a significant effect on IL-6 level. This suggests that CQ10 supplementation likely attenuates subclinical inflammation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Dietary supplementation of coenzyme Q10 plus multivitamins to hamper the ROS mediated cisplatin ototoxicity in humans: A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Scasso, Felice; Sprio, Andrea Elio; Canobbio, Luciano; Scanarotti, Chiara; Manini, Giorgio; Berta, Giovanni Nicolao; Bassi, Anna Maria

    2017-02-01

    Oxidative stress exerts major role in the pathogenesis of side effects of many antineoplastic drugs, including ototoxicity of cisplatin. In particular, increased levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) represent one of the molecular mechanisms underlying the apoptosis of different types of hearing cells. Antioxidants and ROS scavengers may thus represent potential therapeutic options to prevent platinum-associated ototoxicity. The aim of this preliminary case-control study was to explore the efficacy of a dietary antioxidant supplement, in order to hamper the occurrences of ototoxicity in patients undergoing cisplatin chemotherapy. As results, a significant protection against cochlear toxic damage was demonstrated in patients who took the antioxidant supplement, which furthermore prevented the occurrence of hearing disorders and tinnitus. These clinical evidences were corroborated by the oxidative status of patients. After cisplatin chemotherapy, the plasma derivatives of reactive oxygen metabolites (d-ROMs) content rapidly increased in control patients, but it was maintained in those under dietary supplementation, likely because of a higher anti-ROMs potential. Indeed, an increment in rapid anti-ROMs was detected in supplemented patients, though no differences were highlighted in terms of slow anti-ROMs. In conclusion, in this preliminary report we demonstrated the feasibility of a dietary antioxidant supplementation in order to prevent the cisplatin induced hearing damage.

  1. Supplementation with Selenium and Coenzyme Q10 Reduces Cardiovascular Mortality in Elderly with Low Selenium Status. A Secondary Analysis of a Randomised Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Jan; Aaseth, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Background Selenium is needed by all living cells in order to ensure the optimal function of several enzyme systems. However, the selenium content in the soil in Europe is generally low. Previous reports indicate that a dietary supplement of selenium could reduce cardiovascular disease but mainly in populations in low selenium areas. The objective of this secondary analysis of a previous randomised double-blind placebo-controlled trial from our group was to determine whether the effects on cardiovascular mortality of supplementation with a fixed dose of selenium and coenzyme Q10 combined during a four-year intervention were dependent on the basal level of selenium. Methods In 668 healthy elderly individuals from a municipality in Sweden, serum selenium concentration was measured. Of these, 219 individuals received daily supplementation with selenium (200 μg Se as selenized yeast) and coenzyme Q10 (200 mg) combined for four years. The remaining participants (n = 449) received either placebo (n = 222) or no treatment (n = 227). All cardiovascular mortality was registered. No participant was lost during a median follow-up of 5.2 years. Based on death certificates and autopsy results, all mortality was registered. Findings The mean serum selenium concentration among participants at baseline was low, 67.1 μg/L. Based on the distribution of selenium concentration at baseline, the supplemented group was divided into three groups; <65 μg/L, 65–85 μg/L, and >85 μg/L (45 and 90 percentiles) and the remaining participants were distributed accordingly. Among the non-treated participants, lower cardiovascular mortality was found in the high selenium group as compared with the low selenium group (13.0% vs. 24.1%; P = 0.04). In the group with the lowest selenium basal concentration, those receiving placebo or no supplementation had a mortality of 24.1%, while mortality was 12.1% in the group receiving the active substance, which was an absolute risk reduction of 12%. In

  2. Plasma levels of coenzyme Q10 in children with hyperthyroidism.

    PubMed

    Menke, Thomas; Niklowitz, Petra; Reinehr, Thomas; de Sousa, Gideon John; Andler, Werner

    2004-01-01

    In hyperthyroidism, increased oxygen consumption and free radical production in the stimulated respiratory chain leads to oxidative stress. Apart from its antioxidative function, coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) is involved in electron transport in the respiratory chain. The aim of this study was to determine whether there is a correlation between an increased respiratory chain activity and the state of CoQ10 in children with hyperthyroidism. The CoQ10 plasma concentration was measured by high-performance liquid chromatography in 12 children with hyperthyroidism before and after treatment. In the hyperthyroid state, the plasma level of CoQ10 was significantly decreased in comparison with the level in the euthyroid state. The correction of the hyperthyroid state resulted in a normalization of the CoQ10 level. Plasma CoQ10 deficiency appears to be related to the stimulated respiratory chain activity in children with hyperthyroidism. Copyright 2004 S. Karger AG, Basel

  3. Coenzyme Q10 deficiencies in neuromuscular diseases.

    PubMed

    Artuch, Rafael; Salviati, Leonardo; Jackson, Sandra; Hirano, Michio; Navas, Plácido

    2009-01-01

    Coenzyme Q (CoQ) is an essential component of the respiratory chain but also participates in other mitochondrial functions such as regulation of the transition pore and uncoupling proteins. Furthermore, this compound is a specific substrate for enzymes of the fatty acids beta-oxidation pathway and pyrimidine nucleotide biosynthesis. Furthermore, CoQ is an antioxidant that acts in all cellular membranes and lipoproteins. A complex of at least ten nuclear (COQ) genes encoded proteins synthesizes CoQ but its regulation is unknown. Since 1989, a growing number of patients with multisystemic mitochondrial disorders and neuromuscular disorders showing deficiencies of CoQ have been identified. CoQ deficiency caused by mutation(s) in any of the COQ genes is designated primary deficiency. Other patients have displayed other genetic defects independent on the CoQ biosynthesis pathway, and are considered to have secondary deficiencies. This review updates the clinical and molecular aspects of both types of CoQ deficiencies and proposes new approaches to understanding their molecular bases.

  4. Effects of dietary coenzyme Q10 supplementation on hepatic mitochondrial function and the activities of respiratory chain-related enzymes in ascitic broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Geng, A L; Guo, Y M

    2005-10-01

    1. One hundred and sixty 1-d-old Arbor Acre male broiler chicks were fed with maize-soybean based diets for 6 weeks in a 2 x 2 factorial experiment. The factors were CoQ10 supplementation (0 or 40 mg/kg) and Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge (LPS or saline). 2. CoQ10 was supplemented from d 1. From d 18, the chickens received three weekly i.p. injections of LPS (1.0 mg/kg BW) or an equivalent amount of sterile saline as control. From d 10 on, all chickens were exposed to low ambient temperature (12 to 15 degrees C) to induce ascites. 3. The blood packed cell volume and ascites heart index of broiler chickens were reduced by dietary CoQ10 supplementation. Mitochondrial State 3 and State 4 respiration, respiratory control ratio and phosphate oxygen ratio were not changed, but H+/site stoichiometry of complex II + III was elevated by dietary CoQ10 supplementation. 4. Cytochrome c oxidase and H+-ATPase activity were increased by CoQ10 supplementation, whereas NADH cytochrome c reductase and succinate cytochrome c reductase were not influenced. Mitochondrial anti-ROS capability was increased and malondialdehyde content was decreased by CoQ10 supplementation. 5. The work suggested that dietary CoQ10 supplementation could reduce broiler chickens' susceptibility to ascites, which might be the result of improving hepatic mitochondrial function, some respiratory chain-related enzymes activities and mitochondrial antioxidative capability.

  5. Myocardial dysfunction in mitochondrial diabetes treated with Coenzyme Q10.

    PubMed

    Salles, João Eduardo; Moisés, Valdir A; Almeida, Dirceu R; Chacra, Antonio R; Moisés, Regina S

    2006-04-01

    Maternally-inherited diabetes and deafness (MIDD) has been related to an A to G transition in the mitochondrial tRNA Leu (UUR) gene at the base pair 3243. Although some previous articles have reported that this mutation may be a cause of cardiomyopathy in diabetes, the degree of cardiac involvement and a specific treatment has not been established. Here, we reported a case of a patient with MIDD who developed congestive heart failure and the therapeutic usefulness of Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10). In our patient, after the introduction of Coenzyme Q10 150 mg/day, there was a gradual improvement on left ventricular function evaluated by echocardiography. The fractional shortening (FS) and ejection fraction (EF) increased from 26 to 34% and from 49 to 64%, respectively. No side effects were noted. Three months after CoQ10 discontinuation, the parameters of systolic function evaluated by echocardiography decreased, suggesting that CoQ10 had a beneficial effect. Identification of diabetes and cardiomyopathy due to mitochondrial gene mutation may have therapeutic implications and Coenzyme Q10 is a possible adjunctive treatment in such patients.

  6. Coenzyme Q10 protects hair cells against aminoglycoside.

    PubMed

    Sugahara, Kazuma; Hirose, Yoshinobu; Mikuriya, Takefumi; Hashimoto, Makoto; Kanagawa, Eiju; Hara, Hirotaka; Shimogori, Hiroaki; Yamashita, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    It is well known that the production of free radicals is associated with sensory cell death induced by an aminoglycoside. Many researchers have reported that antioxidant reagents protect sensory cells in the inner ear, and coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) is an antioxidant that is consumed as a health food in many countries. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of CoQ10 in mammalian vestibular hair cell death induced by aminoglycoside. Cultured utricles of CBA/CaN mice were divided into three groups (control group, neomycin group, and neomycin + CoQ10 group). In the neomycin group, utricles were cultured with neomycin (1 mM) to induce hair cell death. In the neomycin + CoQ10 group, utricles were cultured with neomycin and water-soluble CoQ10 (30-0.3 µM). Twenty-four hours after exposure to neomycin, the cultured tissues were fixed, and vestibular hair cells were labeled using an anti-calmodulin antibody. Significantly more hair cells survived in the neomycin + CoQ10 group than in the neomycin group. These data indicate that CoQ10 protects sensory hair cells against neomycin-induced death in the mammalian vestibular epithelium; therefore, CoQ10 may be useful as a protective drug in the inner ear.

  7. Topical treatment with coenzyme Q10-containing formulas improves skin's Q10 level and provides antioxidative effects.

    PubMed

    Knott, Anja; Achterberg, Volker; Smuda, Christoph; Mielke, Heiko; Sperling, Gabi; Dunckelmann, Katja; Vogelsang, Alexandra; Krüger, Andrea; Schwengler, Helge; Behtash, Mojgan; Kristof, Sonja; Diekmann, Heike; Eisenberg, Tanya; Berroth, Andreas; Hildebrand, Janosch; Siegner, Ralf; Winnefeld, Marc; Teuber, Frank; Fey, Sven; Möbius, Janne; Retzer, Dana; Burkhardt, Thorsten; Lüttke, Juliane; Blatt, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Ubiquinone (coenzyme Q10, Q10) represents an endogenously synthesized lipid-soluble antioxidant which is crucial for cellular energy production but is diminished with age and under the influence of external stress factors in human skin. Here, it is shown that topical Q10 treatment is beneficial with regard to effective Q10 replenishment, augmentation of cellular energy metabolism, and antioxidant effects. Application of Q10-containing formulas significantly increased the levels of this quinone on the skin surface. In the deeper layers of the epidermis the ubiquinone level was significantly augmented indicating effective supplementation. Concurrent elevation of ubiquinol levels suggested metabolic transformation of ubiquinone resulting from increased energy metabolism. Incubation of cultured human keratinocytes with Q10 concentrations equivalent to treated skin showed a significant augmentation of energy metabolism. Moreover, the results demonstrated that stressed skin benefits from the topical Q10 treatment by reduction of free radicals and an increase in antioxidant capacity. © 2015 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  8. Coenzyme Q10 and statins: biochemical and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Littarru, Gian Paolo; Langsjoen, Peter

    2007-06-01

    Statins are drugs of known and undisputed efficacy in the treatment of hypercholesterolemia, usually well tolerated by most patients. In some cases treatment with statins produces skeletal muscle complaints, and/or mild serum CK elevation; the incidence of rhabdomyolysis is very low. As a result of the common biosynthetic pathway Coenzyme Q (ubiquinone) and dolichol levels are also affected, to a certain degree, by the treatment with these HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors. Plasma levels of CoQ10 are lowered in the course of statin treatment. This could be related to the fact that statins lower plasma LDL levels, and CoQ10 is mainly transported by LDL, but a decrease is also found in platelets and in lymphocytes of statin treated patients, therefore it could truly depend on inhibition of CoQ10 synthesis. There are also some indications that statin treatment affects muscle ubiquinone levels, although it is not yet clear to which extent this depends on some effect on mitochondrial biogenesis. Some papers indicate that CoQ10 depletion during statin therapy might be associated with subclinical cardiomyopathy and this situation is reversed upon CoQ10 treatment. We can reasonably hypothesize that in some conditions where other CoQ10 depleting situations exist treatment with statins may seriously impair plasma and possible tissue levels of coenzyme Q10. While waiting for a large scale clinical trial where patients treated with statins are also monitored for their CoQ10 status, with a group also being given CoQ10, physicians should be aware of this drug-nutrient interaction and be vigilant to the possibility that statin drugs may, in some cases, impair skeletal muscle and myocardial bioenergetics.

  9. Significant changes in circulating microRNA by dietary supplementation of selenium and coenzyme Q10 in healthy elderly males. A subgroup analysis of a prospective randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial among elderly Swedish citizens.

    PubMed

    Alehagen, Urban; Johansson, Peter; Aaseth, Jan; Alexander, Jan; Wågsäter, Dick

    2017-01-01

    Selenium and coenzyme Q10 is essential for important cellular functions. A low selenium intake is reported from many European countries, and the endogenous coenzyme Q10 production is decreasing in the body with increasing age. Supplementation with selenium and coenzyme Q10 in elderly have shown reduced cardiovascular mortality and reduced levels of markers of inflammation. However, microRNA analyses could give important information on the mechanisms behind the clinical effects of supplementation. Out of the 443 healthy elderly participants that were given supplementation with 200 μg Se/day as organic selenium yeast tablets, and 200 mg/day of coenzyme Q10 capsules, or placebo for 4 years, 25 participants from each group were randomized and evaluated regarding levels of microRNA. Isolation of RNA from plasma samples and quantitative PCR analysis were performed. Volcano- and principal component analyses (PCA)-plots were used to illustrate the differences in microRNA expression between the intervention, and the placebo groups. Serum selenium concentrations were measured before intervention. On average 145 different microRNAs out of 172 were detected per sample. In the PCA plots two clusters could be identified indicating significant difference in microRNA expression between the two groups. The pre-treatment expression of the microRNAs did not differ between active treatment and the placebo groups. When comparing the post-treatment microRNAs in the active and the placebo groups, 70 microRNAs exhibited significant differences in expression, also after adjustment for multiple measurements. For the 20 microRNAs with the greatest difference in expression the difference was up to more than 4 fold and with a P-value that were less than 4.4e-8. Significant differences were found in expression of more than 100 different microRNAs with up to 4 fold differences as a result of the intervention of selenium and coenzyme Q10 combined. The changes in microRNA could be a part of

  10. Significant changes in circulating microRNA by dietary supplementation of selenium and coenzyme Q10 in healthy elderly males. A subgroup analysis of a prospective randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial among elderly Swedish citizens

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, Peter; Aaseth, Jan; Alexander, Jan; Wågsäter, Dick

    2017-01-01

    Background Selenium and coenzyme Q10 is essential for important cellular functions. A low selenium intake is reported from many European countries, and the endogenous coenzyme Q10 production is decreasing in the body with increasing age. Supplementation with selenium and coenzyme Q10 in elderly have shown reduced cardiovascular mortality and reduced levels of markers of inflammation. However, microRNA analyses could give important information on the mechanisms behind the clinical effects of supplementation. Methods Out of the 443 healthy elderly participants that were given supplementation with 200 μg Se/day as organic selenium yeast tablets, and 200 mg/day of coenzyme Q10 capsules, or placebo for 4 years, 25 participants from each group were randomized and evaluated regarding levels of microRNA. Isolation of RNA from plasma samples and quantitative PCR analysis were performed. Volcano- and principal component analyses (PCA)–plots were used to illustrate the differences in microRNA expression between the intervention, and the placebo groups. Serum selenium concentrations were measured before intervention. Findings On average 145 different microRNAs out of 172 were detected per sample. In the PCA plots two clusters could be identified indicating significant difference in microRNA expression between the two groups. The pre-treatment expression of the microRNAs did not differ between active treatment and the placebo groups. When comparing the post-treatment microRNAs in the active and the placebo groups, 70 microRNAs exhibited significant differences in expression, also after adjustment for multiple measurements. For the 20 microRNAs with the greatest difference in expression the difference was up to more than 4 fold and with a P-value that were less than 4.4e-8. Conclusions Significant differences were found in expression of more than 100 different microRNAs with up to 4 fold differences as a result of the intervention of selenium and coenzyme Q10 combined. The

  11. Coenzyme Q10 protects ischemic myocardium in an open-chest swine model.

    PubMed

    Atar, D; Mortensen, S A; Flachs, H; Herzog, W R

    1993-01-01

    Myocardial stunning, defined as a reversible decrease in contractility after ischemia and reperfusion, may be a manifestation of reperfusion injury caused by free oxygen radical damage. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that pretreatment with coenzyme Q10 (ubiquinone), believed to act as a free radical scavenger, reduces myocardial stunning in a porcine model. Twelve swine were randomized to receive either oral supplementation with coenzyme Q10 or placebo for 20 days. A normothermic open-chest model was used with short occlusion (8 min) of the distal left descending coronary artery followed by reperfusion. Regional contractile function was measured with epicardial Doppler crystals in ischemic and nonischemic segments by measuring thickening fraction of the left ventricular wall during systole. Stunning time was defined as the elapsed time of reduced contractility until return to baseline. Coenzyme Q10 concentrations were measured in blood and homogenized myocardial tissue by high performance liquid chromatography. Plasma levels of reduced coenzyme Q10 (ubiquinol) were higher in swine pretreated with the experimental medication as compared to placebo (mean 0.45 mg/l versus 0.11 mg/l, respectively). Myocardial tissue concentrations, however, did not show any changes (mean 0.79 micrograms/mg dry weight versus 0.74 micrograms/mg). Stunning time was significantly reduced in coenzyme Q10 pretreated animals (13.7 +/- 7.7 min versus 32.8 +/- 3.1 min, P < 0.01). In conclusion, chronic pretreatment with coenzyme Q10 protects ischemic myocardium in an open-chest swine model. The beneficial effect of coenzyme Q10 on myocardial stunning may be due to protection from free radical mediated reperfusion injury. This protective effect seems to be generated by a humoral rather than intracellular mechanism.

  12. Still reduced cardiovascular mortality 12 years after supplementation with selenium and coenzyme Q10 for four years: A validation of previous 10-year follow-up results of a prospective randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial in elderly.

    PubMed

    Alehagen, Urban; Aaseth, Jan; Alexander, Jan; Johansson, Peter

    2018-01-01

    Selenium and coenzyme Q10 are both necessary for optimal cell function in the body. The intake of selenium is low in Europe, and the endogenous production of coenzyme Q10 decreases as age increases. Therefore, an intervention trial using selenium and coenzyme Q10 for four years as a dietary supplement was performed. The main publication reported reduced cardiovascular mortality as a result of the intervention. In the present sub-study the objective was to determine whether reduced cardiovascular (CV) mortality persisted after 12 years, in the supplemented population or in subgroups with diabetes, hypertension, ischemic heart disease or reduced functional capacity due to impaired cardiac function. From a rural municipality in Sweden, four hundred forty-three healthy elderly individuals were included. All cardiovascular mortality was registered, and no participant was lost to the follow-up. Based on death certificates and autopsy results, mortality was registered. After 12 years a significantly reduced CV mortality could be seen in those supplemented with selenium and coenzyme Q10, with a CV mortality of 28.1% in the active treatment group, and 38.7% in the placebo group. A multivariate Cox regression analysis demonstrated a reduced CV mortality risk in the active treatment group (HR: 0.59; 95%CI 0.42-0.81; P = 0.001). In those with ischemic heart disease, diabetes, hypertension and impaired functional capacity we demonstrated a significantly reduced CV mortality risk. This is a 12-year follow-up of a group of healthy elderly participants that were supplemented with selenium and coenzyme Q10 for four years. Even after twelve years we observed a significantly reduced risk for CV mortality in this group, as well as in subgroups of patients with diabetes, hypertension, ischemic heart disease or impaired functional capacity. The results thus validate the results obtained in the 10-year evaluation. The protective action was not confined to the intervention period, but

  13. Relative bioavailability and antioxidant potential of two coenzyme q10 preparations.

    PubMed

    Kurowska, Elzbieta M; Dresser, George; Deutsch, Luisa; Bassoo, Errol; Freeman, David J

    2003-01-01

    Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) is synthesized by the human body and found in certain foods. Daily supplementation of CoQ10 could protect against heart disease but the bioavailability of CoQ10 supplements depends on the formulation taken. We compared the bioavailability and antioxidant properties of two commercial CoQ10 formulations, a commercial grade CoQ10 powder (commercial grade CoQ) and a new BT-CoQ10 BIO-TRANSFORMED (BT-CoQ10) obtained by fermentation of a soy-based, CoQ10-rich media with baker's yeast. Eleven healthy individuals participated in a randomized two-way crossover trial, with a 3-week washout period. Capsules containing 300 mg of either BT-CoQ10 or commercial grade CoQ10 were given daily for 1 week and multiple blood samples were taken for CoQ10, glutathione and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) determination. In 3 subjects, baseline plasma CoQ10 levels were lower prior to BT than prior to commercial grade CoQ treatment. In the remaining participants, ingestion of BT vs. commercial grade CoQ significantly increased maximum plasma CoQ10 concentration (+126%, p = 0.04) and tended to increase CoQ10 area under the curve from 0 to 24 h (+160%, p = 0.07). One week of treatment with each formulation increased plasma CoQ10 but did not alter plasma glutathione or GPx activity. The enhanced bioavailability of the BT product might be due to its predominantly reduced, hydrophilic membrane-complex form. Copyright 2003 S. Karger AG, Basel

  14. Coenzyme Q10: A New Treatment for Hemorrhagic Shock

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-29

    SUBJECT TERMS hemorrhagic shock, ubiquinol, Coenzyme Q10, patient outcome 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18...o leo& to tboOigllll failure. The < Iota fur AlM •1 ha"’ boon ._...runym.,..,; •• ted in p=en~atlons and publiobed tn Expu""’""" P/u<llology. Tho

  15. Therapeutic Potential of Co-enzyme Q10 in Retinal Diseases.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xun; Tohari, Ali Mohammad; Marcheggiani, Fabio; Zhou, Xinzhi; Reilly, James; Tiano, Luca; Shu, Xinhua

    2017-01-01

    Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) plays a critical role in mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation by serving as an electron carrier in the respiratory electron transport chain. CoQ10 also functions as a lipid-soluble antioxidant by protecting lipids, proteins and DNA damaged by oxidative stress. CoQ10 deficiency has been associated with a number of human diseases in which CoQ10 supplementation therapy has been effective in slowing or reversing pathological changes. Oxidative stress is a major contributory factor in the process of retinal degeneration. The related literature was reviewed through searching PubMed using keywords: CoQ10, CoQ10 and oxidative stress, CoQ10 and retinal degeneration. The functions of CoQ10 were summarized and its use in the treatment of age-related macular degeneration and glaucoma highlighted. The therapeutic potential of CoQ10 for other retinal diseases was also discussed. CoQ10 has been applied in different types of neurodegeneration. CoQ10 is detectable in retina and declines with ageing. Early studies showed treatment of CoQ10 improved visual function in patients with age-related macular degeneration. In glaucomatous models, CoQ10 exposure protected ganglion cell death from environmental stress; in glaucoma patients, CoQ10 treatment demonstrated beneficial effects on function of inner retina and enhancement of visual cortical response. Since oxidative stress also plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy and retinitis pigmentosa, CoQ10 is a therapeutic target for both conditions. A wide range of evidence supports a role of CoQ10 in retinal diseases through inhibiting production of reactive oxygen species and protecting neuroretinal cells from oxidative damage. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  16. Balneotherapy and coenzyme Q10 in clinical and experimental medicine.

    PubMed

    Gvozdjakova, Anna; Kucharska, Jarmila; Sykora, L'ubomir; Singh, Ram B

    2014-01-01

    Balneotherapy or Spa therapy is used in neurological, cardiovascular, musculoskeletal, dermatological and gynecological diseases, in infertility as well as in metabolic disturbances. Beneficial effects of balneotherapy at the metabolic level is not fully understood. Authors have documented enhancement of antioxidants concentrations (coenzyme Q10- CoQ(10-OX) and alpha-tocopherol) of women with gynecological diseases by treatment with natural mineral water (Spa Lucky balneotherapy, Slovakia). In an experiment with rats, drinking of Spa Lucky mineral water decreased oxidative stress and enhanced concentrations of antioxidants CoQ(9-OX), CoQ(10-OX) in the myocardium, and alpha-tocopherol in uterus, ovaries and myocardium. Drinking of Spa Lucky water by rats stimulated myocardial mitochondrial respiration and energy production, and diminished skeletal muscle mitochondrial function. Simultaneous ingestion of coenzyme Q10 with drinking spa water returned mitochondrial parameters to the values of the control group. This pilot study helps explain the role of antioxidants, oxidative stress and mitochondrial energy production in beneficial effects of Spa Lucky balneotherapy.

  17. Potency of pre-post treatment of coenzyme Q10 and melatonin supplement in ameliorating the impaired fatty acid profile in rodent model of autism.

    PubMed

    El-Ansary, Afaf; Al-Ghamdi, Mashael; Bhat, Ramesa Shafi; Al-Daihan, Sooad; Al-Ayadhi, Laila

    2016-01-01

    Abnormalities in fatty acid metabolism and membrane fatty acid composition play a part in a wide range of neurodevelopmental and psychiatric disorders. Altered fatty acid homeostasis as a result of insufficient dietary supplementation, genetic defects, the function of enzymes involved in their metabolism, or mitochondrial dysfunction contributes to the development of autism. This study evaluates the association of altered brain lipid composition and neurotoxicity related to autism spectrum disorders in propionic acid (PA)-treated rats. Forty-eight young male western albino rats were used in this study. They were grouped into six equal groups with eight rats in each. The first group received only phosphate buffered saline (control group). The second group received a neurotoxic dose of buffered PA (250 mg/kg body weight/day for 3 consecutive days). The third and fourth groups were intoxicated with PA as described above followed by treatment with either coenzyme Q (4.5 mg/kg body weight) or melatonin (10 mg/kg body weight) for 1 week (therapeutically treated groups). The fifth and sixth groups were administered both compounds for 1 week prior to PA (protected groups). Methyl esters of fatty acid were extracted with hexane, and the fatty acid composition of the extract was analyzed on a gas chromatography. The obtained data proved that fatty acids are altered in brain tissue of PA-treated rats. All saturated fatty acids were increased while all unsaturated fatty acids were significantly decreased in the PA-treated group and relatively ameliorated in the pre-post melatonin and coenzyme Q groups. Melatonin and coenzyme Q were effective in restoring normal level of most of the impaired fatty acids in PA-intoxicated rats which could help suggest both as supplements to ameliorate the autistic features induced in rat pups.

  18. The effect of coenzyme Q10 in statin myopathy.

    PubMed

    Zlatohlavek, Lukas; Vrablik, Michal; Grauova, Barbora; Motykova, Eva; Ceska, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Statins significantly reduce CV morbidity and mortality. Unfortunately, one of the side effects of statins is myopathy, for which statins cannot be administered in sufficient doses or administered at all. The aim of this study was to demonstrate the effect of coenzyme Q10 in patients with statin myopathy. Twenty eight patients aged 60.6±10.7 years were monitored (18 women and 10 men) and treated with different types and doses of statin. Muscle weakness and pain was monitored using a scale of one to ten, on which patients expressed the degree of their inconvenience. Examination of muscle problems was performed prior to administration of CQ10 and after 3 and 6 months of dosing. Statistical analysis was performed using Friedman test, Annova and Students t-test. Pain decreased on average by 53.8% (p<0.0001), muscle weakness by 44.4% (p<0.0001). The CQ10 levels were increased by more than 194% (from 0,903 μg/ml to 2.66 μg/ml; p<0.0001). After a six-month administration of coenzyme Q10, muscle pain and sensitivity statistically significantly decreased.

  19. A randomized trial of coenzyme Q10 in patients with confirmed statin myopathy.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Beth A; Lorson, Lindsay; White, C Michael; Thompson, Paul D

    2015-02-01

    Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) supplementation is the most popular therapy for statin myalgia among both physicians and patients despite limited and conflicting evidence of its efficacy. This study examined the effect of coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) supplementation on simvastatin-associated muscle pain, muscle strength and aerobic performance in patients with confirmed statin myalgia. Statin myalgia was confirmed in 120 patients with prior symptoms of statin myalgia using an 8-week randomized, double-blind crossover trial of simvastatin 20 mg/d and placebo. Forty-one subjects developed muscle pain with simvastatin but not with placebo and were randomized to simvastatin 20 mg/d combined with CoQ10 (600 mg/d ubiquinol) or placebo for 8 weeks. Muscle pain (Brief Pain Inventory [BPI]), time to pain onset, arm and leg muscle strength, and maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) were measured before and after each treatment. Serum CoQ10 increased from 1.3 ± 0.4 to 5.2 ± 2.3 mcg/mL with simvastatin and CoQ10, but did not increase with simvastatin and placebo (1.3 ± 0.3 to 0.8 ± 0.2) (p < 0.05). BPI pain severity and interference scores increased with simvastatin therapy (both p < 0.01), irrespective of CoQ10 assignment (p = 0.53 and 0.56). There were no changes in muscle strength or VO2max with simvastatin with or without CoQ10 (all p > 0.10). Marginally more subjects reported pain with CoQ10 (14 of 20 vs 7 of 18; p = 0.05). There was no difference in time to pain onset in the CoQ10 (3.0 ± 2.0 weeks) vs. placebo (2.4 ± 2.1 wks) groups (p = 0.55). A similar lack of CoQ10 effect was observed in 24 subjects who were then crossed over to the alternative treatment. Only 36% of patients complaining of statin myalgia develop symptoms during a randomized, double-blind crossover of statin vs placebo. CoQ10 supplementation does not reduce muscle pain in patients with statin myalgia. Trial RegistrationNCT01140308; www.clinicaltrials.gov. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd

  20. Coenzyme Q10 in Cardiovascular and Metabolic Diseases: Current State of the Problem.

    PubMed

    Zozina, Vladlena I; Covantev, Serghei; Goroshko, Olga A; Krasnykh, Liudmila M; Kukes, Vladimir G

    2018-04-15

    The burden of cardiovascular and metabolic diseases is increasing with every year. Although the management of these conditions has improved greatly over the years it is still far from perfect. With all of this in mind, there is a need for new methods of prophylaxis and treatment. Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) is an essential compound of the human body. There is growing evidence that CoQ10 is tightly linked to cardiometabolic disorders. Its supplementation can be useful in a variety of chronic and acute disorders. This review analyses the role of CoQ10 in hypertension, ischemic heart disease, myocardial infarction, heart failure, viral myocarditis, cardiomyopathies, cardiac toxicity, dyslipidemia, obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus, metabolic syndrome, cardiac procedures and resuscitation. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  1. The Value of Coenzyme Q10 Determination in Mitochondrial Patients

    PubMed Central

    Yubero, Delia; Allen, George; Artuch, Rafael; Montero, Raquel

    2017-01-01

    Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ) is a lipid that is ubiquitously synthesized in tissues and has a key role in mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. Its biochemical determination provides insight into the CoQ status of tissues and may detect CoQ deficiency that can result from either an inherited primary deficiency of CoQ metabolism or may be secondary to different genetic and environmental conditions. Rapid identification of CoQ deficiency can also allow potentially beneficial treatment to be initiated as early as possible. CoQ may be measured in different specimens, including plasma, blood mononuclear cells, platelets, urine, muscle, and cultured skin fibroblasts. Blood and urinary CoQ also have good utility for CoQ treatment monitoring. PMID:28338638

  2. Coenzyme Q10 for the treatment of heart failure: a review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    DiNicolantonio, James J; Bhutani, Jaikrit; McCarty, Mark F; O'Keefe, James H

    2015-01-01

    Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) is an endogenously synthesised and diet-supplied lipid-soluble cofactor that functions in the mitochondrial inner membrane to transfer electrons from complexes I and II to complex III. In addition, its redox activity enables CoQ10 to act as a membrane antioxidant. In patients with congestive heart failure, myocardial CoQ10 content tends to decline as the degree of heart failure worsens. A number of controlled pilot trials with supplemental CoQ10 in heart failure found improvements in functional parameters such as ejection fraction, stroke volume and cardiac output, without side effects. Subsequent meta-analyses have confirmed these findings, although the magnitude of benefit tends to be less notable in patients with severe heart failure, or within the context of ACE inhibitor therapy. The multicentre randomised placebo-controlled Q-SYMBIO trial has assessed the impact of supplemental CoQ10 on hard endpoints in heart failure. A total of 420 patients received either CoQ10 (100 mg three times daily) or placebo and were followed for 2 years. Although short-term functional endpoints were not statistically different in the two groups, CoQ10 significantly reduced the primary long-term endpoint—a major adverse cardiovascular event—which was observed in 15% of the treated participants compared to 26% of those receiving placebo (HR=0.50, CI 0.32 to 0.80, p=0.003). Particularly in light of the excellent tolerance and affordability of this natural physiological compound, supplemental CoQ10 has emerged as an attractive option in the management of heart failure, and merits evaluation in additional large studies. PMID:26512330

  3. [Combination treatment with coenzyme Q10 and simvastatin in patients with coronary atherosclerosis].

    PubMed

    Chapidze G E; Kapanadze, S D; Dolidze, N K; Latsabidze, N E; Bakhutashvili, Z V

    2006-01-01

    In order to assess efficacy of one of natural antioxidants--coenzyme Q10 (90 mg daily) and its combination with simvastatin (10 mg daily) 44 outpatients with coronary atherosclerosis were examined. Twenty four patients had undergone coronary artery bypass surgery, 12--coronary angioplasty and in 8 coronary heart disease was confirmed by angiography. Duration of treatment was 12 weeks. Positive effects of coenzyme Q10 was particularly expressed in relation to antiatherogenic fraction of cholesterol which increased by 23%. Index of atherogenicity decreased by 27%. At the background of coenzyme Q10 treatment 30% reduction in plasma lipoperoxide levels occurred demonstrating potentially independent role of coenzyme Q10 in positive modification of oxidative stress. Coenzyme Q10 revealed antiaggregatory ability. It was not related to the improvement of endothelial function. Normalization of plasma nitric oxide concentrations was achieved only with combination of coenzyme Q10 and simvastatin. This fact may be explained by positive action of statins on endothelial function.

  4. Potential role of coenzyme Q10 in facilitating recovery from statin-induced rhabdomyolysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, L W; Jabbour, A; Hayward, C S; Furlong, T J; Girgis, L; Macdonald, P S; Keogh, A M

    2015-04-01

    Rhabdomyolysis is a rare, but serious complication of statin therapy, and represents the most severe end of the spectrum of statin-induced myotoxicity. We report a case where coenzyme Q10 facilitated recovery from statin-induced rhabdomyolysis and acute renal failure, which had initially persisted despite statin cessation and haemodialysis. This observation is biologically plausible due to the recognised importance of coenzyme Q10 in mitochondrial bioenergetics within myocytes, and the fact that statins inhibit farnesyl pyrophosphate production, a biochemical step crucial for coenzyme Q10 synthesis. Coenzyme Q10 is generally well tolerated, and may potentially benefit patients with statin-induced rhabdomyolysis. © 2015 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  5. Oxidative Stress Correlates with Headache Symptoms in Fibromyalgia: Coenzyme Q10 Effect on Clinical Improvement

    PubMed Central

    Cordero, Mario D.; Cano-García, Francisco Javier; Alcocer-Gómez, Elísabet; De Miguel, Manuel; Sánchez-Alcázar, José Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Background Fibromyalgia (FM) is a chronic pain syndrome with unknown etiology and a wide spectrum of symptoms such as allodynia, debilitating fatigue, joint stiffness and migraine. Recent studies have shown some evidences demonstrating that oxidative stress is associated to clinical symptoms in FM of fibromyalgia. We examined oxidative stress and bioenergetic status in blood mononuclear cells (BMCs) and its association to headache symptoms in FM patients. The effects of oral coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) supplementation on biochemical markers and clinical improvement were also evaluated. Methods We studied 20 FM patients and 15 healthy controls. Clinical parameters were evaluated using the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ), visual analogues scales (VAS), and the Headache Impact Test (HIT-6). Oxidative stress was determined by measuring CoQ10, catalase and lipid peroxidation (LPO) levels in BMCs. Bioenergetic status was assessed by measuring ATP levels in BMCs. Results We found decreased CoQ10, catalase and ATP levels in BMCs from FM patients as compared to normal control (P<0.05 and P<0.001, respectively) We also found increased level of LPO in BMCs from FM patients as compared to normal control (P<0.001). Significant negative correlations between CoQ10 or catalase levels in BMCs and headache parameters were observed (r = −0.59, P<0.05; r = −0.68, P<0.05, respectively). Furthermore, LPO levels showed a significant positive correlation with HIT-6 (r = 0.33, P<0.05). Oral CoQ10 supplementation restored biochemical parameters and induced a significant improvement in clinical and headache symptoms (P<0.001). Discussion The results of this study suggest a role for mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress in the headache symptoms associated with FM. CoQ10 supplementation should be examined in a larger placebo controlled trial as a possible treatment in FM. PMID:22532869

  6. [Effect of phlebodium decumanum and coenzyme Q10 on sports performance in professional volleyball players].

    PubMed

    García Verazaluce, Juan José; Vargas Corzo, María Del Carmen; Aguilar Cordero, María José; Ocaña Peinado, Francisco; Sarmiento Ramírez, Álvaro; Guisado Barrilao, Rafael

    2014-10-03

    Physical training programmes are based on provoking transitory states of fatigue in order to induce super compensation by the biological systems involved in the activity, in order to improve the athlete's medium-long term performance. The administration of nutritional supplements with antioxidant and immunomodulatory properties, such as Phlebodium decumanum and coenzyme Q10, can be a very advantageous means of achieving recovery from the inflammation and tissue damage caused by the stress of prolonged, intense exercise. An experimental, longitudinal, double- blind experiment was conducted, with three randomised groups obtained from a sample of 30 male volleyball players (aged 22-32 years) at the University of Granada, with a high level of training (17 hours a week during the 6 months preceding the study). The effects were then evaluated of a month-long physical training programme, common to all the study groups, associated with the simultaneous administration of the following nutritional supplements: Phlebodium decumanum (4 capsules of 400 mg/capsule, daily), Experimental Group 1; Phlebodium decumanum (same dose and schedule as Group 1) plus coenzyme Q10 (4 capsules of 30 mg/ capsule, daily), Experimental Group 2; a placebo substance, Control Group. The following dependent blood variables were examined to assess the effects of the intervention on the basal immune and endocrine-metabolic profile: cortisol and interleukin-6, both related to the axis of exercise-induced stress; and lactic acid and ammonium, related essentially to the anaerobic metabolism of energy. All the study groups presented favourable adaptive changes with respect to the endocrine-metabolic and immune profile, as reflected by a significant decrease in the post-test concentrations of cortisol, interleukin 6, lactic acid and ammonium, compared to the values recorded before the physical activity with/without nutritional supplement, per protocol. The groups that achieved the most favourable profile

  7. Nano-encapsulation of coenzyme Q10 using octenyl succinic anhydride modified starch

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Octenyl succinic anhydride modified starch (OSA-ST) was used to encapsulate Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10). CoQ10 was dissolved in rice bran oil (RBO), and incorporated into an aqueous OSA-ST solution. High pressure homogenization (HPH) of the mixture was conducted at 170 MPa for 5-6 cycles. The resulting ...

  8. Combination Therapy with Glucan and Coenzyme Q10 in Murine Experimental Autoimmune Disease and Cancer.

    PubMed

    Vetvicka, Vaclav; Vetvickova, Jana

    2018-06-01

    Coenzyme Q 10 is a well-accepted anti-oxidant agent known to play a protective role in various physiological and disease processes. Recently, Coenzyme Q 10 is gaining attention as a substance with significant anti-inflammatory properties. β-Glucan is the most studied immunomodulator with significant synergetic effects with numerous bioactive molecules. We aimed to evaluate the possible synergistic effects of simultaneous use of coenzyme Q 10 with the well-established immune modulator, β-glucan, on immune reactions and cancer development. Coenzyme Q 10 and β-glucan were used, both in vivo and in vitro, and their effects were evaluated using phagocytosis and cytokine secretion. Our study confirmed the strong anti-inflammatory effects of coenzyme Q 10 and showed that these effects were further potentiated with the addition of β-glucan. The anticancer effects of coenzyme Q 10 were less pronounced, but stronger, with the addition of β-glucan. There is significant synergy between coenzyme Q 10 and β-glucan. Copyright© 2018, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  9. A combination of coenzyme Q10, feverfew and magnesium for migraine prophylaxis: a prospective observational study.

    PubMed

    Guilbot, Angèle; Bangratz, Marie; Ait Abdellah, Samira; Lucas, Christian

    2017-08-30

    Feverfew (Tanacetum parthenium L.), magnesium and coenzyme Q10 are frequently used for migraine prophylaxis. Supplementation with a fixed combination of these three agents (Antemig®, PiLeJe) was investigated in an observational study. Adult patients suffering from migraine according to the criteria of the International Headache Society were enrolled by general practitioners (≥2 migraine attacks during previous month; exclusion of chronic migraine and medication overuse) and after a one-month baseline phase, supplemented with one tablet of 100 mg feverfew, 100 mg coenzyme Q10 and 112.5 mg magnesium per day for 3 months. Supplementation significantly reduced the number of days with migraine headache during third month of supplementation compared to baseline phase (1.3 days ±1.5 versus 4.9 days ±2.6, p < 0.0001; n = 68 intention to treat; primary criterion). The decrease was progressive over the period of supplementation and significant from first month (1st month: -2.5 days ±3.1, p < 0.0001; 2nd month: -3 days ±2.8, p < 0.0001). The proportion of patients with a reduction of at least 50% in the number of days with migraine headache was 75% (51/68) after 3 months, with a progressive increase over the period of supplementation (63.2% [43/68] after 1 month and 70.6% [48/68] after 2 months). The proportion of patients with anxiety and depressive symptoms (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale) decreased between baseline phase and third month of supplementation from 61.9% (39/63 patients with information available) to 35% (21/60) for depression and from 52.4% (33/63) to 30% (18/60) for anxiety. An improvement of quality of life (Qualité de Vie et Migraine questionnaire) was also observed. The combination was well tolerated. Results suggest that the proprietary supplement containing feverfew, coenzyme Q10 and magnesium assessed could be beneficial and safe for the prevention of migraine in adult patients and merits further study. Clinical

  10. A randomized controlled trial of coenzyme Q10 for fatigue in the late-onset sequelae of poliomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Peel, Margaret M; Cooke, Marie; Lewis-Peel, Helen J; Lea, Rodney A; Moyle, Wendy

    2015-12-01

    To determine if coenzyme Q(10) alleviates fatigue in the late-onset sequelae of poliomyelitis. Parallel-group, randomized, placebo-controlled trial. Coenzyme Q(10) has been shown to boost muscle energy metabolism in post-polio subjects but it does not promote muscle strength, endurance or function in polio survivors with post-poliomyelitis syndrome. However, the collective increased energy metabolism might contribute to a reduction in post-polio fatigue. Polio survivors from the Australian post-polio networks in Queensland and New South Wales who attribute a moderate to high level of fatigue to their diagnosed late-onset sequelae of poliomyelitis. Those with fatigue-associated comorbidities of diabetes, anaemia, hypothyroidism and fibromyalgia were excluded. Participants were assigned (1:1), with stratification of those who use energy-saving mobility aids, to receive 100 mg coenzyme Q(10) or matching placebo daily for 60 days. Participants and investigators were blinded to group allocation. Fatigue was assessed by the Multidimensional Assessment of Fatigue as the primary outcome and the Fatigue Severity Scale as secondary outcome. Of 103 participants, 54 were assigned to receive coenzyme Q(10) and 49 to receive the placebo. The difference in the mean score reductions between the two groups was not statistically significant for either fatigue measure. Oral supplementation with coenzyme Q(10) was safe and well-tolerated. A daily dose of 100 mg coenzyme Q(10) for 60 days does not alleviate the fatigue of the late-onset sequelae of poliomyelitis. The registration number for the clinical trial is ACTRN 12612000552886. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. 76 FR 42729 - Certain Coenzyme Q10 Products and Methods of Making Same; Notice of Institution of Investigation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-19

    ... INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION [Inv. No. 337-TA-790] Certain Coenzyme Q10 Products and Methods of... United States after importation of certain coenzyme Q10 products and methods of making same by reason of... after importation of certain coenzyme Q10 products and methods of making same that infringe one or more...

  12. Preparation of coenzyme Q10 liposomes using supercritical anti-solvent technique.

    PubMed

    Xia, Fei; Jin, Heyang; Zhao, Yaping; Guo, Xinqiu

    2012-01-01

    Coenzyme Q(10) (CoQ(10)) proliposomes were prepared using the supercritical anti-solvent (SAS) technique to encapsulate CoQ(10). The mixture of cholesterol and soya bean phosphatidylcholine (PC) was chosen as wall materials. The effects of operation conditions (temperature, pressure and components) on the recovery of CoQ(10) and the CoQ(10) loading in CoQ(10) proliposomes were studied. At the optimum conditions of pressure of 8.0 MPa, temperature of 35°C, the weight ratio of 1/10 between CoQ(10) and PC, and the weight ratio of 1/3 between cholesterol and PC, the CoQ(10) loading reached 8.92%. CoQ(10) liposomes were obtained by hydrating CoQ(10) proliposomes and the entrapment efficiency of CoQ(10) reached 82.28%. The morphologies of CoQ(10) proliposomes were characterized by scanning electron microscope, and their solid states were characterized by X-ray diffractometer. The structures of CoQ(10) liposomes were characterized by transmission electron microscope. The particle size distribution of CoQ(10) liposomes was determined by dynamic light scattering instrument. The results indicate that CoQ(10) liposomes with particle sizes about 50 nm can be easily obtained from hydrating CoQ(10) proliposomes prepared by SAS technique.

  13. Coenzyme Q10 and vitamin E deficiency in Friedreich's ataxia: predictor of efficacy of vitamin E and coenzyme Q10 therapy.

    PubMed

    Cooper, J M; Korlipara, L V P; Hart, P E; Bradley, J L; Schapira, A H V

    2008-12-01

    A pilot study of high dose coenzyme Q(10) (CoQ(10))/vitamin E therapy in Friedreich's ataxia (FRDA) patients resulted in significant clinical improvements in most patients. This study investigated the potential for this treatment to modify clinical progression in FRDA in a randomized double blind trial. Fifty FRDA patients were randomly divided into high or low dose CoQ(10)/ vitamin E groups. The change in International Co-operative Ataxia Ratings Scale (ICARS) was assessed over 2 years as the primary end-point. A post hoc analysis was made using cross-sectional data. At baseline serum CoQ(10) and vitamin E levels were significantly decreased in the FRDA patients (P < 0.001). During the trial CoQ(10) and vitamin E levels significantly increased in both groups (P < 0.01). The primary and secondary end-points were not significantly different between the therapy groups. When compared to cross-sectional data 49% of all patients demonstrated improved ICARS scores. This responder group had significantly lower baseline serum CoQ(10) levels. A high proportion of FRDA patients have a decreased serum CoQ(10) level which was the best predictor of a positive clinical response to CoQ(10)/vitamin E therapy. Low and high dose CoQ(10)/vitamin E therapies were equally effective in improving ICARS scores.

  14. Genetics Home Reference: primary coenzyme Q10 deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... q10 deficiency. Mol Syndromol. 2014 Jul;5(3-4):156-62. doi: 10.1159/000362826. Citation on PubMed or Free article on PubMed Central Emmanuele V, López LC, Berardo A, Naini A, Tadesse S, Wen B, D'Agostino E, Solomon M, DiMauro S, Quinzii C, Hirano M. Heterogeneity of ...

  15. Coenzyme Q10 and pro-inflammatory markers in children with Down syndrome: clinical and biochemical aspects.

    PubMed

    Zaki, Moushira E; El-Bassyouni, Hala T; Tosson, Angie M S; Youness, Eman; Hussein, Jihan

    Evidence of oxidative stress was reported in individuals with Down syndrome. There is a growing interest in the contribution of the immune system in Down syndrome. The aim of this study is to evaluate the coenzyme Q10 and selected pro-inflammatory markers such as interleukin 6 and tumor necrosis factor α in children with Down syndrome. Eighty-six children (5-8 years of age) were enrolled in this case-control study from two public institutions. At the time of sampling, the patients and controls suffered from no acute or chronic illnesses and received no therapies or supplements. The levels of interleukin 6, tumor necrosis factor α, coenzyme Q10, fasting blood glucose, and intelligence quotient were measured. Forty-three young Down syndrome children and forty-three controls were included over a period of eight months (January-August 2014). Compared with the control group, the Down syndrome patients showed significant increase in interleukin 6 and tumor necrosis factor α (p=0.002), while coenzyme Q10 was significantly decreased (p=0.002). Also, body mass index and fasting blood glucose were significantly increased in patients. There was a significantly positive correlation between coenzyme Q10 and intelligence quotient levels, as well as between interleukin 6 and tumor necrosis factor α. Interleukin 6 and tumor necrosis factor α levels in young children with Down syndrome may be used as biomarkers reflecting the neurodegenerative process in them. Coenzyme Q10 might have a role as a good supplement in young children with Down syndrome to ameliorate the neurological symptoms. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  16. A case of mitochondrial encephalomyopathy associated with a muscle coenzyme Q10 deficiency.

    PubMed

    Boitier, E; Degoul, F; Desguerre, I; Charpentier, C; François, D; Ponsot, G; Diry, M; Rustin, P; Marsac, C

    1998-01-01

    We report severe coenzyme Q10 deficiency of muscle in a 4-year-old boy presenting with progressive muscle weakness, seizures, cerebellar syndrome, and a raised cerebro-spinal fluid lactate concentration. State-3 respiratory rates of muscle mitochondria with glutamate, pyruvate, palmitoylcarnitine, and succinate as respiratory substrates were markedly reduced, whereas ascorbate/N,N,N',N'-tetramethyl-p-phenylenediamine were oxidized normally. The activities of complexes I, II, III and IV of the electron transport chain were normal, but the activities of complexes I+III and II+III, both systems requiring coenzyme Q10 as an electron carrier, were dramatically decreased. These results suggested a defect in the mitochondrial coenzyme Q10 content. This was confirmed by the direct assessment of coenzyme Q10 level by high-performance liquid chromatography in patient's muscle homogenate and isolated mitochondria, revealing levels of 16% and 6% of the control values, respectively. We did not find any impairment of the respiratory chain either in a lymphoblastoid cell line or in skin cultured fibroblasts from the patient, suggesting that the coenzyme Q10 depletion was tissue-specific. This is a new case of a muscle deficiency of mitochondrial coenzyme Q in a patient suffering from an encephalomyopathy.

  17. The antioxidant status of coenzyme Q10 and vitamin E in children with type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Alkholy, Usama M; Abdalmonem, Nermin; Zaki, Ahmed; Elkoumi, Mohamed A; Hashim, Mustafa I Abu; Basset, Maha A A; Salah, Hossam E

    2018-02-07

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the antioxidant status of plasma vitamin E and plasma and intracellular coenzyme Q10 in children with type 1 diabetes. This case-control study was conducted on 72 children with type 1 diabetes and compared to 48 healthy children, who were age, sex, and ethnicity-matched. The diabetic children were divided according to their glycosylated hemoglobin (A1c %) into two groups: poor and good glycemic control groups. All children underwent full history taking, clinical examination, and laboratory measurement of complete blood count, A1c %, plasma cholesterol, triglycerides, and vitamin E levels and coenzyme Q10 levels in plasma, erythrocytes, and platelets. Children with poor glycemic control showed significantly higher plasma vitamin E, coenzyme Q10, triglycerides, low-density lipoproteins, waist circumference/height ratio, cholesterol levels, and lower high-density lipoproteins and platelet coenzyme Q10 redox status in comparison to those with good glycemic control and the control group (p<0.05). Plasma coenzyme Q10 showed a positive correlation with the duration of type 1 diabetes, triglycerides, cholesterol, vitamin E, and A1c %, and negative correlation with the age of the diabetic group (p<0.05). The platelet redox status showed a negative correlation with the A1c % levels (r=-0.31; p=0.022) and the duration of type 1 diabetes (r=-0.35, p=0.012). Patients with type 1 diabetes, especially poorly controlled, had elevation of plasma vitamin E and coenzyme Q10 levels and decreased platelet redox status of coenzyme Q10, which may be an indicator of increased oxidative stress. Copyright © 2018 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  18. Increase in insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) and insulin-like growth factor binding protein 1 after supplementation with selenium and coenzyme Q10. A prospective randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial among elderly Swedish citizens

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, Peter; Aaseth, Jan; Alexander, Jan; Brismar, Kerstin

    2017-01-01

    Background Insulin-like growth factor-1(IGF-1) has a multitude of effects besides cell growth and metabolism. Reports also indicate anti-inflammatory and antioxidative effects. The concentrations of IGF-1 decrease with age and during inflammation. As selenium and coenzyme Q10 are involved in both the antioxidative defense and the inflammatory response, the present study aimed to examine the effects of supplementation with selenium and coenzyme Q10 on concentrations of IGF-1 and its binding protein IGFBP-1 in a population showing reduced cardiovascular mortality following such supplementation. Methods 215 elderly individuals were included and given the intervention for four years. A clinical examination was performed and blood samples were taken at the start and after 48 months. Evaluations of IGF-1, the age adjusted IGF-1 SD score and IGFBP-1 were performed using group mean values, and repeated measures of variance. Findings After supplementation with selenium and coenzyme Q10, applying group mean evaluations, significantly higher IGF-1 and IGF-1 SD scores could be seen in the active treatment group, whereas a decrease in concentration could be seen of the same biomarkers in the placebo group. Applying the repeated measures of variance evaluations, the same significant increase in concentrations of IGF-1 (F = 68; P>0.0001), IGF-1 SD score (F = 29; P<0.0001) and of IGFBP-1 (F = 6.88; P = 0.009) could be seen, indicating the effect of selenium and coenzyme Q10 also on the expression of IGF-1 as one of the mechanistic effects of the intervention. Conclusion Supplementation with selenium and coenzyme Q10 over four years resulted in increased levels of IGF-1 and the postprandial IGFBP-1, and an increase in the age-corrected IGF-1 SD score, compared with placebo. The effects could be part of the mechanistic explanation behind the surprisingly positive clinical effects on cardiovascular morbidity and mortality reported earlier. However, as the effects of IGF-1 are complex

  19. Increase in insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) and insulin-like growth factor binding protein 1 after supplementation with selenium and coenzyme Q10. A prospective randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial among elderly Swedish citizens.

    PubMed

    Alehagen, Urban; Johansson, Peter; Aaseth, Jan; Alexander, Jan; Brismar, Kerstin

    2017-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-1(IGF-1) has a multitude of effects besides cell growth and metabolism. Reports also indicate anti-inflammatory and antioxidative effects. The concentrations of IGF-1 decrease with age and during inflammation. As selenium and coenzyme Q10 are involved in both the antioxidative defense and the inflammatory response, the present study aimed to examine the effects of supplementation with selenium and coenzyme Q10 on concentrations of IGF-1 and its binding protein IGFBP-1 in a population showing reduced cardiovascular mortality following such supplementation. 215 elderly individuals were included and given the intervention for four years. A clinical examination was performed and blood samples were taken at the start and after 48 months. Evaluations of IGF-1, the age adjusted IGF-1 SD score and IGFBP-1 were performed using group mean values, and repeated measures of variance. After supplementation with selenium and coenzyme Q10, applying group mean evaluations, significantly higher IGF-1 and IGF-1 SD scores could be seen in the active treatment group, whereas a decrease in concentration could be seen of the same biomarkers in the placebo group. Applying the repeated measures of variance evaluations, the same significant increase in concentrations of IGF-1 (F = 68; P>0.0001), IGF-1 SD score (F = 29; P<0.0001) and of IGFBP-1 (F = 6.88; P = 0.009) could be seen, indicating the effect of selenium and coenzyme Q10 also on the expression of IGF-1 as one of the mechanistic effects of the intervention. Supplementation with selenium and coenzyme Q10 over four years resulted in increased levels of IGF-1 and the postprandial IGFBP-1, and an increase in the age-corrected IGF-1 SD score, compared with placebo. The effects could be part of the mechanistic explanation behind the surprisingly positive clinical effects on cardiovascular morbidity and mortality reported earlier. However, as the effects of IGF-1 are complex, more research on the result of

  20. Concentrations in beef and lamb of taurine, carnosine, coenzyme Q(10), and creatine.

    PubMed

    Purchas, R W; Rutherfurd, S M; Pearce, P D; Vather, R; Wilkinson, B H P

    2004-03-01

    Levels of taurine, carnosine, coenzyme Q(10), and creatine were measured in beef liver and several muscles of beef and lamb and in cooked and uncooked meat. The amino acid taurine has numerous biological functions, the dipeptide carnosine is a buffer as well as an antioxidant, coenzyme Q(10) is also an antioxidant present within mitochondria, and creatine along with creatine phosphate is involved with energy metabolism in muscle. Large differences were shown for all compounds between beef cheek muscle (predominantly red fibres) and beef semitendinosus muscle (mainly white fibres), with cheek muscle containing 9.9 times as much taurine, and 3.2 times as much coenzyme Q(10), but only 65% as much creatine and 9% as much carnosine. Levels in lamb relative to beef semitendinosus muscles were higher for taurine but slightly lower for carnosine, coenzyme Q(10) and creatine. Values for all the compounds varied significantly between eight lamb muscles, possibly due in part to differences in the proportion of muscle fibre types. Slow cooking (90 min at 70 °C) of lamb longissimus and semimembranosus muscles led to significant reductions in the content of taurine, carnosine, and creatine (P<0.001), but a slight increase in coenzyme Q(10). There was also a four-fold increase in creatinine, presumably due to its formation from creatine. It is concluded that biologically, and possibly nutritionally, significant levels of taurine, carnosine, coenzyme Q(10), and creatine are present in beef and lamb, but that these levels vary between muscles, between animals, and with cooking.

  1. Novel Lipid-Free Nanoformulation for Improving Oral Bioavailability of Coenzyme Q10

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Huafeng; Liu, Guoqing; Zhang, Jing; Sun, Ning; Duan, Mingxing; Yan, Zemin; Xia, Qiang

    2014-01-01

    To improve the bioavailability of orally administered lipophilic coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10), we formulated a novel lipid-free nano-CoQ10 system stabilized by various surfactants. Nano-CoQ10s, composed of 2.5% (w/w) CoQ10, 1.67% (w/w) surfactant, and 41.67% (w/w) glycerol, were prepared by hot high-pressure homogenization. The resulting formulations were characterized by particle size, zeta potential, differential scanning calorimetry, and cryogenic transmission electron microscopy. We found that the mean particle size of all nano-CoQ10s ranged from 66.3 ± 1.5 nm to 92.7 ± 1.5 nm and the zeta potential ranged from −12.8 ± 1.4 mV to −41.6 ± 1.4 mV. The CoQ10 in nano-CoQ10s likely existed in a supercooled state, and nano-CoQ10s stored in a brown sealed bottle were stable for 180 days at 25°C. The bioavailability of CoQ10 was evaluated following oral administration of CoQ10 formulations in Sprague-Dawley rats. Compared to the values observed following administration of CoQ10-Suspension, nano-CoQ10 modified with various surfactants significantly increased the maximum plasma concentration and the area under the plasma concentration-time curve. Thus, the lipid-free system of a nano-CoQ10 stabilized with a surfactant may be an effective vehicle for improving oral bioavailability of CoQ10. PMID:24995328

  2. Characterisation and Skin Distribution of Lecithin-Based Coenzyme Q10-Loaded Lipid Nanocapsules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Huafeng; Yue, Yang; Liu, Guanlan; Li, Yan; Zhang, Jing; Yan, Zemin; Duan, Mingxing

    2010-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of the inner lipid ratio on the physicochemical properties and skin targeting of surfactant-free lecithin-based coenzyme Q10-loaded lipid nanocapsules (CoQ10-LNCs). The smaller particle size of CoQ10-LNCs was achieved by high pressure and a lower ratio of CoQ10/GTCC (Caprylic/capric triglyceride); however, the zeta potential of CoQ10-LNCs was above /- 60 mV/ with no distinct difference among them at different ratios of CoQ10/GTCC. Both the crystallisation point and the index decreased with the decreasing ratio of CoQ10/GTCC and smaller particle size; interestingly, the supercooled state of CoQ10-LNCs was observed at particle size below about 200 nm, as verified by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) in one heating-cooling cycle. The lecithin monolayer sphere structure of CoQ10-LNCs was investigated by cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (Cryo-TEM). The skin penetration results revealed that the distribution of Nile red-loaded CoQ10-LNCs depended on the ratio of inner CoQ10/GTCC; moreover, epidermal targeting and superficial dermal targeting were achieved by the CoQ10-LNCs application. The highest fluorescence response was observed at a ratio of inner CoQ10/GTCC of 1:1. These observations suggest that lecithin-based LNCs could be used as a promising topical delivery vehicle for lipophilic compounds.

  3. Physical activity affects plasma coenzyme Q10 levels differently in young and old humans.

    PubMed

    Del Pozo-Cruz, Jesús; Rodríguez-Bies, Elisabet; Ballesteros-Simarro, Manuel; Navas-Enamorado, Ignacio; Tung, Bui Thanh; Navas, Plácido; López-Lluch, Guillermo

    2014-04-01

    Coenzyme Q (Q) is a key lipidic compound for cell bioenergetics and membrane antioxidant activities. It has been shown that also has a central role in the prevention of oxidation of plasma lipoproteins. Q has been associated with the prevention of cholesterol oxidation and several aging-related diseases. However, to date no clear data on the levels of plasma Q during aging are available. We have measured the levels of plasmatic Q10 and cholesterol in young and old individuals showing different degrees of physical activity. Our results indicate that plasma Q10 levels in old people are higher that the levels found in young people. Our analysis also indicates that there is no a relationship between the degree of physical activity and Q10 levels when the general population is studied. However, very interestingly, we have found a different tendency between Q10 levels and physical activity depending on the age of individuals. In young people, higher activity correlates with lower Q10 levels in plasma whereas in older adults this ratio changes and higher activity is related to higher plasma Q10 levels and higher Q10/Chol ratios. Higher Q10 levels in plasma are related to lower lipoperoxidation and oxidized LDL levels in elderly people. Our results highlight the importance of life habits in the analysis of Q10 in plasma and indicate that the practice of physical activity at old age can improve antioxidant capacity in plasma and help to prevent cardiovascular diseases.

  4. Enhancement of solubility and dissolution of coenzyme Q10 using solid dispersion formulation.

    PubMed

    Nepal, Pushp R; Han, Hyo-Kyung; Choi, Hoo-Kyun

    2010-01-04

    This study aimed to develop a stable solid dispersion of Coenzyme Q(10) (CoQ(10)) with high aqueous solubility and dissolution rate. Among various carriers screened, poloxamer 407 was most effective to form a superior solid dispersion of CoQ(10) having significantly enhanced solubility. Particularly, solid dispersion of CoQ(10) with poloxamer 407 in the weight ratio of 1:5 prepared by melting method enhanced the solubility of CoQ(10) to the greatest extent. However, it exhibited poor stability and hence Aerosil 200 (colloidal silicon dioxide) was incorporated into the solid dispersion as an adsorbent to inhibit the recrystallization process. The solid dispersion of CoQ(10), poloxamer 407 and Aerosil 200 in the weight ratio of 1:5:6 exhibited improved stability with no significant change in solubility during the 1-month stability test. Moreover, the solid dispersion formulation containing Aerosil 200 significantly enhanced the extent of drug release (approx. 75% release) as well as the dissolution rate of CoQ(10). In conclusion, the present study has developed the stable solid dispersion formulation of CoQ(10) with poloxamer 407 and Aerosil 200 for the enhanced solubility and dissolution of CoQ(10), which could also offer some additional advantages including ease of preparation, good flowability and cost-effectiveness.

  5. Clinical, biochemical and molecular aspects of cerebellar ataxia and Coenzyme Q10 deficiency.

    PubMed

    Montero, Raquel; Pineda, Mercé; Aracil, Asun; Vilaseca, Maria-Antonia; Briones, Paz; Sánchez-Alcázar, José-Antonio; Navas, Plácido; Artuch, Rafael

    2007-01-01

    Coenzyme Q(10) (CoQ) deficiency is an autosomal recessive disorder presenting five phenotypes: a myopathic form, a severe infantile neurological syndrome associated with nephritic syndrome, an ataxic variant, Leigh syndrome and a pure myopathic form. The third is the most common phenotype related with CoQ deficiency and it will be the focus of this review. This new syndrome presents muscle CoQ deficiency associated with cerebellar ataxia and cerebellar atrophy as the main neurological signs. Biochemically, the hallmark of CoQ deficiency syndrome is a decreased CoQ concentration in muscle and/or fibroblasts. There is no molecular evidence of the enzyme or gene involved in primary CoQ deficiencies associated with cerebellar ataxia, although recently a family has been reported with mutations at COQ2 gene who present a distinct phenotype. Patients with primary CoQ deficiency may benefit from CoQ supplementation, although the clinical response to this therapy varies even among patients with similar phenotypes. Some present an excellent response to CoQ while others show only a partial improvement of some symptoms and signs. CoQ deficiency is the mitochondrial encephalomyopathy with the best clinical response to CoQ supplementation, highlighting the importance of an early identification of this disorder.

  6. Effects of coenzyme Q10 on statin-induced myopathy: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Banach, Maciej; Serban, Corina; Sahebkar, Amirhossein; Ursoniu, Sorin; Rysz, Jacek; Muntner, Paul; Toth, Peter P; Jones, Steven R; Rizzo, Manfredi; Glasser, Stephen P; Lip, Gregory Y H; Dragan, Simona; Mikhailidis, Dimitri P

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) supplementation on statin-induced myopathy. We searched the MEDLINE, Cochrane Library, Scopus, and EMBASE databases (November 1, 1987, to May 1, 2014) to identify randomized controlled trials investigating the impact of CoQ10 on muscle pain and plasma creatine kinase (CK) activity as 2 measures of statin-induced myalgia. Two independent reviewers extracted data on study characteristics, methods, and outcomes. We included 6 studies with 302 patients receiving statin therapy: 5 studies with 226 participants evaluated the effect of CoQ10 supplementation on plasma CK activity, and 5 studies (4 used in the CK analysis and 1 other study) with 253 participants were included to assess the effect of CoQ10 supplementation on muscle pain. Compared with the control group, plasma CK activity was increased after CoQ10 supplementation, but this change was not significant (mean difference, 11.69 U/L [to convert to μkat/L, multiply by 0.0167]; 95% CI, -14.25 to 37.63 U/L; P=.38). Likewise, CoQ10 supplementation had no significant effect on muscle pain despite a trend toward a decrease (standardized mean difference, -0.53; 95% CI, -1.33 to 0.28; P=.20). No dose-effect association between changes in plasma CK activity (slope, -0.001; 95% CI, -0.004 to 0.001; P=.33) or in the indices of muscle pain (slope, 0.002; 95% CI, -0.005 to 0.010; P=.67) and administered doses of CoQ10 were observed. The results of this meta-analysis of available randomized controlled trials do not suggest any significant benefit of CoQ10 supplementation in improving statin-induced myopathy. Larger, well-designed trials are necessary to confirm the findings from this meta-analysis. Copyright © 2015 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Can coenzyme Q10 supplementation effectively reduce human tumour necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6 levels in chronic diseases? Protocol for a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Farsi, Farnaz; Heshmati, Javad; Janani, Leila; Irandoost, Pardis; Mesri Alamdari, Naeimeh; Keshtkar, Abbasali; Akbari, Abolfazl; Vafa, Mohammadreza

    2017-10-08

    Inflammation, as a critical factor, can cause numerous chronic diseases by creating various proinflammatory cytokines. Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) can potentially exert an anti-inflammatory agent; in turn, this agent can reduce the systemic inflammatory response. The aims of this study are to conduct a comprehensive systematic review and a meta-analysis for the determination of the CoQ10 efficacy on the changes in serum interleukin-6 (IL-6) and the tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) levels in unhealthy subjects. We will conduct an electronic search for articles published between January 1990 and January 2017 using a prespecified search strategy in MEDLINE, SCOPUS, EMBASE, CENTRAL and Web of Science.Our search will focus only on randomised controlled clinical trials in unhealthy subjects that employ either a parallel or a crossover design; this search will involve concurrent control groups. The primary outcomes of the literature are to determine the CoQ10 efficacy on the changes in the serum IL-6 and the TNF-α levels in unhealthy subjects. Secondary outcomes such as body mass index, serum adiponectin and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein levels, lipid profile and the heterogeneity assessment of the primary studies will be evaluated. The stages of screen articles, the extracts of relevant data and the assessment of study quality using the Cochrane risk of bias tool will be conducted independently by the two reviewers. Any disagreement will be resolved by discussion with a third person. If the number of eligible studies is sufficient, we will carry out a meta-analysis according to both outcomes. This study is the protocol for a systematic review and no ethics approval is needed. The findings from the full systematic review will be published in a peer-reviewed journal, and they will also be exhibited at national/international academic and clinical conferences. CRD42016052200. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article

  8. Biosynthesis and bioproduction of coenzyme Q10 by yeasts and other organisms.

    PubMed

    Kawamukai, Makoto

    2009-06-22

    CoQ (coenzyme Q), an isoprenylated benzoquinone, is a well-known component of the electron-transfer system in eukaryotes. The main role of CoQ is to transfer electrons from NADH dehydrogenase and succinate dehydrogenase to CoQ:cytochrome c reductase in the respiratory chain. However, recent evidence indicates that an involvement in respiration is not the only role of CoQ. The second apparent role of CoQ is its anti-oxidation property, and other novel roles for CoQ, such as in disulfide-bond formation, sulfide oxidation and pyrimidine metabolism, have been reported. CoQ10, having ten isoprene units in the isoprenoid side chain, has been used as a medicine and is now commercially popular as a food supplement. Two yeast species, namely the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which produces CoQ6, and the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, which produces CoQ10, are the main subjects of the present minireview because they have greatly contributed to our basic knowledge of CoQ biosynthesis among eukaryotes. The biosynthetic pathway that converts p-hydroxybenzoate into CoQ consists of eight steps in yeasts. The five enzymes involved in the biosynthetic pathway have been identified in both yeasts, yet the functions of three proteins were still not known. Analyses of the biosynthetic pathway in yeasts also contribute to the understanding of human genetic diseases related to CoQ deficiency. In the present minireview I focus on the biochemical and commercial aspects of CoQ in yeasts and in other organisms for comparison.

  9. Coenzyme Q10 plus Multivitamin Treatment Prevents Cisplatin Ototoxicity in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Astolfi, Laura; Simoni, Edi; Valente, Filippo; Ghiselli, Sara; Hatzopoulos, Stavros; Chicca, Milvia; Martini, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Cisplatin (Cpt) is known to induce a high level of oxidative stress, resulting in an increase of reactive oxygen species damaging the inner ear and causing hearing loss at high frequencies. Studies on animal models show that antioxidants may lower Cpt-induced ototoxicity. The aim of this study is to evaluate the ototoxic effects of two different protocols of Cpt administration in a Sprague-Dawley rat model, and to test in the same model the synergic protective effects of a solution of coenzyme Q10 terclatrate and Acuval 400®, a multivitamin supplement containing antioxidant agents and minerals (Acu-Qter). The Cpt was administered intraperitoneally in a single dose (14 mg/kg) or in three daily doses (4.6 mg/kg/day) to rats orally treated or untreated with Acu-Qter for 5 days. The auditory function was assessed by measuring auditory brainstem responses from 2 to 32 kHz at day 0 and 5 days after treatment. Similar hearing threshold and body weight alterations were observed in both Cpt administration protocols, but mortality reduced to zero when Cpt was administered in three daily doses. The Acu-Qter treatment was able to prevent and completely neutralize ototoxicity in rats treated with three daily Cpt doses, supporting the synergic protective effects of coenzyme Q terclatrate and Acuval 400® against Cpt-induced oxidative stress. The administration protocol involving three Cpt doses is more similar to common human chemotherapy protocols, therefore it appears more useful for long-term preclinical studies on ototoxicity prevention. PMID:27632426

  10. CINRG pilot trial of coenzyme Q10 in steroid-treated Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Spurney, Christopher F; Rocha, Carolina Tesi; Henricson, Erik; Florence, Julaine; Mayhew, Jill; Gorni, Ksenija; Pasquali, Livia; Pestronk, Alan; Martin, Gerard R; Hu, Fengming; Nie, Lei; Connolly, Anne M; Escolar, Diana M

    2011-08-01

    Corticosteroid treatment slows disease progression and is the standard of care for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) is a potent antioxidant that may improve function in dystrophin-deficient muscle. We performed an open-label, "add-on" pilot study of CoQ10 in thirteen 5-10-year-old DMD patients on steroids. The primary outcome measure was the total quantitative muscle testing (QMT) score. Twelve of 16 children (mean age 8.03 ± 1.64 years) completed the trial. Target serum levels of CoQ10 (≥2.5 μg/ml) were shown to be subject- and administration-dependent. Nine of 12 subjects showed an increase in total QMT score. Overall, CoQ10 treatment resulted in an 8.5% increase in muscle strength (P = 0.03). Addition of CoQ10 to prednisone therapy in DMD patients resulted in an increase in muscle strength. These results warrant a larger, controlled trial of CoQ10 in DMD. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Design, optimization and characterization of coenzyme Q10- and D-panthenyl triacetate-loaded liposomes

    PubMed Central

    Çelik, Burak; Sağıroğlu, Ali Asram; Özdemir, Samet

    2017-01-01

    Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) is a lipid-soluble molecule found naturally in many eukaryotic cells and is essential for electron transport chain and energy generation in mitochondria. D-Panthenyl triacetate (PTA) is an oil-soluble derivative of D-panthenol, which is essential for coenzyme A synthesis in the epithelium. Liposomal formulations that encapsulate both ingredients were prepared and optimized by applying response surface methodology for increased stability and skin penetration. The optimum formulation comprised 4.17 mg CoQ10, 4.22 mg PTA and 13.95 mg cholesterol per 100 mg of soy phosphatidylcholine. The encapsulation efficiency of the optimized formulation for CoQ10 and PTA was found to be 90.89%±3.61% and 87.84%±4.61%, respectively. Narrow size distribution was achieved with an average size of 161.6±3.6 nm, while a spherical and uniform shape was confirmed via scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy images. Cumulative release of 90.93% for PTA and 24.41% for CoQ10 was achieved after 24 hours of in vitro release study in sink conditions. Physical stability tests indicated that the optimized liposomes were suitable for storage at 4°C for at least 60 days. The results suggest that the optimized liposomal formulation would be a promising delivery system for both ingredients in various topical applications. PMID:28744121

  12. Coenzyme Q10 as a treatment for fatigue and depression in multiple sclerosis patients: A double blind randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Sanoobar, Meisam; Dehghan, Parvin; Khalili, Mohammad; Azimi, Amirreza; Seifar, Fatemeh

    2016-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is the chronic inflammatory and demyelinating disorder of central nervous system which is accompanied with disability and negative life style changes such as fatigue and depression. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) supplementation on fatigue and depression in patients with MS. We performed a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial to determine the effect of CoQ10 supplement (500 mg/day) vs. placebo for 12 weeks. Fatigue symptoms were quantified by means of fatigue severity scale (FSS) and the Beck depression inventory (BDI) was used to assess depressive symptoms. A significant decrease of FSS was observed in CoQ10 group during the intervention (P = 0.001) and significant increase of FSS change was observed within placebo group (P = 0.001). Repeated measure analysis of variance showed a significant time-by-treatment interaction for FSS (baseline 41.5 ± 15.6 vs. endpoint 45 ± 13.6; F1,45 = 55.23, P < 0.001, η(2) = 0.56) and BDI (baseline 17.8 ± 12.2 vs. endpoint 20.4 ± 11.4; F1,45 = 40.3, P < 0.001, η(2) = 0.48), indicating significant decrease of FSS and BDI in CoQ10 group compared to placebo group. Our study suggests that CoQ10 supplementation (500 mg/day) can improve fatigue and depression in patients with multiple sclerosis.

  13. Comparative bioavailability of two novel coenzyme Q10 preparations in humans.

    PubMed

    Joshi, S S; Sawant, S V; Shedge, A; Halpner, A D

    2003-01-01

    To determine the absorptive properties of 2 novel coenzyme Q10 preparations, a fast-melting tablet and an effervescent tablet, compared with currently available formulations. In the first trial, the absorptive properties of 4 different coenzyme Q10 preparations (fast-melting, effervescent, soft gelatin, and powder-filled hard shell) were studied in a randomized, single-dose, crossover study. Twenty-four male subjects were given a 60 mg dose of coenzyme Q10 and plasma coenzyme Q10 was measured over the next 12 hours. Pharmacokinetic properties including area under the curve (AUC), maximum plasma concentration (Cmax), time to maximum plasma concentration (Tmax) and elimination half-life (t 1/2) were measured. In a separate single-dose study, the absorptive characteristics of a different coenzyme Q10 soft gel (Q-Gel) were studied in 6 male subjects. Area under the curve (microg/ml x h) for the fast-melting and effervescent formulations, while marginally greater, was not significantly different when compared to the soft gelatin and powder-filled preparations, 5.4 +/- 1.04 (110%) and 5.5 +/- 0.589 (112%) versus 5.0 +/- 0.859 (102%) and 4.9 +/- 0.812 (100%), respectively. Cmax for the 2 novel formulations was also not statistically different from the soft gelatin or powder-filled preparations, 0.87 +/- 0.14 and 0.86 +/- 0.074 versus 0.70 +/- 0.010 and 0.81 +/- 0.159 (microg/ml). Tmax however, was significantly shorter for the fast-melting and effervescent formulations compared with the soft gel and powder-filled forms, 1.3 +/- 0.348 and 2.0 +/- 0.552 versus 3.7 +/- 0.702 and 4.1 +/- 0.993 (h), respectively. The results of the second trial were similar to those of the powder-filled and soft gel formulations from the first study. The novel fast-melting and effervescent formulations provide a more rapid delivery of CoQ10 to the blood while exhibiting a similar AUC compared with current formulations. The potential clinical significance of this finding should be further

  14. Modeling of process parameters for enhanced production of coenzyme Q10 from Rhodotorula glutinis.

    PubMed

    Balakumaran, Palanisamy Athiyaman; Meenakshisundaram, Sankaranarayanan

    2015-01-01

    Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) plays an indispensable role in ATP generation through oxidative phosphorylation and helps in scavenging superoxides generated during electron transfer reactions. It finds extensive applications specifically related to oxidative damage and metabolic dysfunctions. This article reports the use of a statistical approach to optimize the concentration of key variables for the enhanced production of CoQ10 by Rhodotorula glutinis in a lab-scale fermenter. The culture conditions that promote optimum growth and CoQ10 production were optimized and the interaction of significant variables para-hydroxybenzoic acid (PHB, 819.34 mg/L) and soybean oil (7.78% [v/v]) was studied using response surface methodology (RSM). CoQ10 production increased considerably from 10 mg/L (in control) to 39.2 mg/L in batch mode with RSM-optimized precursor concentration. In the fed-batch mode, PHB and soybean oil feeding strategy enhanced CoQ10 production to 78.2 mg/L.

  15. Topical Coenzyme Q10 demonstrates mitochondrial-mediated neuroprotection in a rodent model of ocular hypertension.

    PubMed

    Davis, Benjamin Michael; Tian, Kailin; Pahlitzsch, Milena; Brenton, Jonathan; Ravindran, Nivedita; Butt, Gibran; Malaguarnera, Giulia; Normando, Eduardo M; Guo, Li; Cordeiro, M Francesca

    2017-09-01

    Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) is a mitochondrial-targeted antioxidant with known neuroprotective activity. Its ocular effects when co-solubilised with α-tocopherol polyethylene glycol succinate (TPGS) were evaluated. In vitro studies confirmed that CoQ10 was significantly protective in different retinal ganglion cell (RGC) models. In vivo studies in Adult Dark Agouti (DA) rats with unilateral surgically-induced ocular hypertension (OHT) treated with either CoQ10/TPGS micelles or TPGS vehicle twice daily for three weeks were performed, following which retinal cell health was assessed in vivo using DARC (Detection of Apoptotic Retinal Cells) and post-mortem with Brn3a histological assessment on whole retinal mounts. CoQ10/TPGS showed a significant neuroprotective effect compared to control with DARC (p<0.05) and Brn3 (p<0.01). Topical CoQ10 appears an effective therapy preventing RGC apoptosis and loss in glaucoma-related models. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Coenzyme Q10 protects neural stem cells against hypoxia by enhancing survival signals.

    PubMed

    Park, Jinse; Park, Hyun-Hee; Choi, Hojin; Kim, Young Seo; Yu, Hyun-Jeung; Lee, Kyu-Yong; Lee, Young Joo; Kim, Seung Hyun; Koh, Seong-Ho

    2012-10-10

    Recanalization and secondary prevention are the main therapeutic strategies for acute ischemic stroke. Neuroprotective therapies have also been investigated despite unsuccessful clinical results. Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10), which is an essential cofactor for electron transport in mitochondria, is known to have an antioxidant effect. We investigated the protective effects of CoQ10 against hypoxia in neural stem cells (NSCs). We measured cell viability and levels of intracellular signaling proteins after treatment with several concentrations of CoQ10 under hypoxia-reperfusion. CoQ10 protected NSCs against hypoxia-reperfusion in a concentration-dependent manner by reducing growth inhibition and inhibiting free radical formation. It increased the expression of a number of survival-related proteins such as phosphorylated Akt (pAkt), phosphorylated glycogen synthase kinase 3-β (pGSK3-β), and B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) in NSCs injured by hypoxia-reperfusion and reduced the expression of death-related proteins such as cleaved caspase-3. We conclude that CoQ10 has effects against hypoxia-reperfusion induced damage to NSCs by enhancing survival signals and decreasing death signals. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Plasma coenzyme Q10 levels in type 2 diabetic patients with retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Ates, Orhan; Bilen, Habip; Keles, Sadullah; Alp, H. Hakan; Keleş, Mevlüt Sait; Yıldırım, Kenan; Öndaş, Osman; Pınar, L. Can; Civelekler, Mustafa; Baykal, Orhan

    2013-01-01

    AIM To determine the relationship between proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDRP) and plasma coenzyme Q10(CoQ10) concentration. METHODS Patients with type 2 diabetes and PDRP were determined to be the case group (n=50). The control group was consist of healthy individuals (n=50). Plasma CoQ10 and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels were measured in both groups. RESULTS Ubiquinone-10 (Coenzyme Q10) levels in PDRP and control subjects are 3.81±1.19µmol/L and 1.91±0.62µmol/L, respectively. Plasma MDA levels in PDRP and control subjects were 8.16±2µmol/L and 3.44±2.08µmol/L, respectively. Ratio of Ubiquinol-10/ubiquinone-10 in PDRP and control subjects were 0.26±0.16 and 1.41±0.68, respectively. CONCLUSION The ratio of ubiquinol-10/ubiquinone-10 is found lower in patients with PDRP. High levels of plasma ubiquinol-10/ubiquinone-10 ratio indicate the protective effect on diabetic retinopathy. PMID:24195048

  18. Bioavailability enhancement of coenzyme Q10: an extensive review of patents.

    PubMed

    Beg, Sarwar; Javed, Shamama; Kohli, Kanchan

    2010-11-01

    Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) is a major antioxidant principle found in human body which plays a vital role in maintaining several biochemical pathways of body. It acts as a potential mediator in transferring electrons in oxidoreductive reactions of electron transport chain. Chemically, it is a basic quinone containing moiety having a large and high molecular weight structure. Deficiency of this in body leads to several potential disorders like dysfunctions in cellular energetics, neurological degeneration, higher oxidative stress induced damage, breast cancer etc. The high molecular weight and lipophilicity of CoQ10 makes it poorly water soluble and consequently leads to low systemic availability. Several advancements have been made to enhance the bioavailability of CoQ10 using various approaches like size reduction, solubility enhancement (by solid dispersion, prodrug, complexation, ionization) and use of novel drug carriers such as liposomes, microspheres, nanoparticles, nanoemulsions and self-emulsifying system. The primary objective of the present review is to assemble patents representing the various approaches used for enhancement of CoQ10 bioavailability.

  19. A mechanistic approach for modulation of chlorpyrifos-induced toxicity in human lymphocytes by melatonin, coenzyme Q10, and vinpocetine.

    PubMed

    Ghayomi, F; Navaei-Nigjeh, M; Baeeri, M; Rezvanfar, M A; Abdollahi, M

    2016-08-01

    Chlorpyrifos (CP) is an organophosphorus pesticide that induces oxidative stress through the production of free radicals and depletes intracellular antioxidant reserves. In this study, the efficacy of three antioxidants (melatonin, coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10), and vinpocetine) on alleviation of toxic effects of CP was evaluated. Cytotoxicity of CP, in the presence or absence of effective doses of melatonin, CoQ10, and vinpocetine, was determined in human peripheral blood lymphocytes after 72-h exposure. The levels of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity along with tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), as inflammatory index, were measured. Further, the viability and oxidative stress markers including cellular mitochondrial activity, cell death modes (apoptosis vs. necrosis), total antioxidant power (TAP), total thiol molecules (TTM), lipid peroxidation (LPO), and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity were measured. CoQ10 and also the combination of the three antioxidants were the most notable in opposing toxicity of CP and led to increasing TAP and TTM; improvement of AChE activity; and lowering LPO, MPO, TNF-α, and apoptosis compared to CP alone. CP toxicity overwhelms the intracellular antioxidant defense mechanisms. Exogenous supplementation with antioxidants, such as the ones we have investigated, seems to be effective in the prevention of cytotoxicity of CP. © The Author(s) 2015.

  20. A randomized clinical trial of high-dosage coenzyme Q10 in early Parkinson disease: no evidence of benefit.

    PubMed

    Beal, M Flint; Oakes, David; Shoulson, Ira; Henchcliffe, Claire; Galpern, Wendy R; Haas, Richard; Juncos, Jorge L; Nutt, John G; Voss, Tiffini Smith; Ravina, Bernard; Shults, Clifford M; Helles, Karen; Snively, Victoria; Lew, Mark F; Griebner, Brian; Watts, Arthur; Gao, Shan; Pourcher, Emmanuelle; Bond, Louisette; Kompoliti, Katie; Agarwal, Pinky; Sia, Cherissa; Jog, Mandar; Cole, Linda; Sultana, Munira; Kurlan, Roger; Richard, Irene; Deeley, Cheryl; Waters, Cheryl H; Figueroa, Angel; Arkun, Ani; Brodsky, Matthew; Ondo, William G; Hunter, Christine B; Jimenez-Shahed, Joohi; Palao, Alicia; Miyasaki, Janis M; So, Julie; Tetrud, James; Reys, Liza; Smith, Katharine; Singer, Carlos; Blenke, Anita; Russell, David S; Cotto, Candace; Friedman, Joseph H; Lannon, Margaret; Zhang, Lin; Drasby, Edward; Kumar, Rajeev; Subramanian, Thyagarajan; Ford, Donna Stuppy; Grimes, David A; Cote, Diane; Conway, Jennifer; Siderowf, Andrew D; Evatt, Marian Leslie; Sommerfeld, Barbara; Lieberman, Abraham N; Okun, Michael S; Rodriguez, Ramon L; Merritt, Stacy; Swartz, Camille Louise; Martin, W R Wayne; King, Pamela; Stover, Natividad; Guthrie, Stephanie; Watts, Ray L; Ahmed, Anwar; Fernandez, Hubert H; Winters, Adrienna; Mari, Zoltan; Dawson, Ted M; Dunlop, Becky; Feigin, Andrew S; Shannon, Barbara; Nirenberg, Melissa Jill; Ogg, Mattson; Ellias, Samuel A; Thomas, Cathi-Ann; Frei, Karen; Bodis-Wollner, Ivan; Glazman, Sofya; Mayer, Thomas; Hauser, Robert A; Pahwa, Rajesh; Langhammer, April; Ranawaya, Ranjit; Derwent, Lorelei; Sethi, Kapil D; Farrow, Buff; Prakash, Rajan; Litvan, Irene; Robinson, Annette; Sahay, Alok; Gartner, Maureen; Hinson, Vanessa K; Markind, Samuel; Pelikan, Melisa; Perlmutter, Joel S; Hartlein, Johanna; Molho, Eric; Evans, Sharon; Adler, Charles H; Duffy, Amy; Lind, Marlene; Elmer, Lawrence; Davis, Kathy; Spears, Julia; Wilson, Stephanie; Leehey, Maureen A; Hermanowicz, Neal; Niswonger, Shari; Shill, Holly A; Obradov, Sanja; Rajput, Alex; Cowper, Marilyn; Lessig, Stephanie; Song, David; Fontaine, Deborah; Zadikoff, Cindy; Williams, Karen; Blindauer, Karen A; Bergholte, Jo; Propsom, Clara Schindler; Stacy, Mark A; Field, Joanne; Mihaila, Dragos; Chilton, Mark; Uc, Ergun Y; Sieren, Jeri; Simon, David K; Kraics, Lauren; Silver, Althea; Boyd, James T; Hamill, Robert W; Ingvoldstad, Christopher; Young, Jennifer; Thomas, Karen; Kostyk, Sandra K; Wojcieszek, Joanne; Pfeiffer, Ronald F; Panisset, Michel; Beland, Monica; Reich, Stephen G; Cines, Michelle; Zappala, Nancy; Rivest, Jean; Zweig, Richard; Lumina, L Pepper; Hilliard, Colette Lynn; Grill, Stephen; Kellermann, Marye; Tuite, Paul; Rolandelli, Susan; Kang, Un Jung; Young, Joan; Rao, Jayaraman; Cook, Maureen M; Severt, Lawrence; Boyar, Karyn

    2014-05-01

    Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10), an antioxidant that supports mitochondrial function, has been shown in preclinical Parkinson disease (PD) models to reduce the loss of dopamine neurons, and was safe and well tolerated in early-phase human studies. A previous phase II study suggested possible clinical benefit. To examine whether CoQ10 could slow disease progression in early PD. A phase III randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind clinical trial at 67 North American sites consisting of participants 30 years of age or older who received a diagnosis of PD within 5 years and who had the following inclusion criteria: the presence of a rest tremor, bradykinesia, and rigidity; a modified Hoehn and Yahr stage of 2.5 or less; and no anticipated need for dopaminergic therapy within 3 months. Exclusion criteria included the use of any PD medication within 60 days, the use of any symptomatic PD medication for more than 90 days, atypical or drug-induced parkinsonism, a Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) rest tremor score of 3 or greater for any limb, a Mini-Mental State Examination score of 25 or less, a history of stroke, the use of certain supplements, and substantial recent exposure to CoQ10. Of 696 participants screened, 78 were found to be ineligible, and 18 declined participation. The remaining 600 participants were randomly assigned to receive placebo, 1200 mg/d of CoQ10, or 2400 mg/d of CoQ10; all participants received 1200 IU/d of vitamin E. Participants were observed for 16 months or until a disability requiring dopaminergic treatment. The prospectively defined primary outcome measure was the change in total UPDRS score (Parts I-III) from baseline to final visit. The study was powered to detect a 3-point difference between an active treatment and placebo. The baseline characteristics of the participants were well balanced, the mean age was 62.5 years, 66% of participants were male, and the mean baseline total UPDRS score was 22.7. A total of 267 participants

  1. Coenzyme Q10, carotenoid, tocopherol, and retinol levels in cord plasma from multiethnic subjects in Hawaii

    PubMed Central

    Franke, AA; Lai, J.F.; Morrison, C.M.; Pagano, I.; Li, X; Halm, B.M.; Soon, R.; Custer, L.J.

    2015-01-01

    Coenzyme Q10 (Q10), carotenoids, tocopherols, and retinol are the major circulating lipid-phase micronutrients (LPM) known to help mitigate oxidative damage and prevent chronic diseases. However, the functions of these compounds in newborns are little understood. This is due, in part, to the paucity of studies reporting their concentrations in this population. We measured Q10, carotenoids, tocopherols, and retinol in cord plasma from 100 multiethnic subjects living in Hawaii using HPLC with diode array and electrochemical detection. Appropriate internal standards were used including, for the first time, custom designed oxidized (UN10) and reduced (UL10) Q10 analogues. These compounds reflected the oxidation of UL10 to UN10 that occurred during sample processing and analysis and thus permitted accurate adjustments of natively circulating Q10 levels. All LPM measured were much lower in cord than in peripheral plasma. Cord plasma levels of total carotenoids, tocopherols, and retinol were approximately 10-fold, 3- to 5-fold and 1.5- to 3-fold lower than those in children or women. Cord plasma levels of total Q10 (TQ10; median, 113 ng/mL) were approximately 2-fold or 7- to 9-fold lower than peripheral plasma levels of neonates or children and adults, respectively. In contrast, the UN10/TQ10 ratio was substantially higher in cord (24%) than in peripheral plasma of children (3 – 4%) or adults (9%). Among the 5 ethnic groups in our cohort, no differences were observed in the levels of UN10, UL10, or TQ10. However, significant differences in many of the LPM were observed between ethnicities. More research is needed to explain these phenomena. PMID:23829202

  2. Protective effects of coenzyme q(10) on decreased oxidative stress resistance induced by simvastatin.

    PubMed

    Kettawan, Aikkarach; Takahashi, Takayuki; Kongkachuichai, Ratchanee; Charoenkiatkul, Somsri; Kishi, Takeo; Okamoto, Tadashi

    2007-05-01

    The effects of simvastatin, an inhibitor of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase (HMG-CoA reductase), on oxidative stress resistance and the protective effects of coenzyme Q (CoQ) were investigated. When simvastatin was administered orally to mice, the levels of oxidized and reduced CoQ(9) and CoQ(10) in serum, liver, and heart, decreased significantly when compared to those of control. The levels of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances induced by Fe(2+)-ascorbate in liver and heart mitochondria also increased significantly with simvastatin. Furthermore, cultured cardiac myocytes treated with simvastatin exhibited less resistance to oxidative stress, decreased time to the cessation of spontaneous beating in response to H(2)O(2) addition, and decreased responsiveness to electrical field stimulation. These results suggested that oral administration of simvastatin suppresses the biosynthesis of CoQ, which shares the same biosynthesis pathway as cholesterol up to farnesyl pyrophosphate, thus compromising the physiological function of reduced CoQ, which possesses antioxidant activity. However, these undesirable effects induced by simvastatin were alleviated by coadministering CoQ(10) with simvastatin to mice. Simvastatin also reduced the activity of NADPH-CoQ reductase, a biological enzyme that converts oxidized CoQ to the corresponding reduced CoQ, while CoQ(10) administration improved it. These findings may also support the efficacy of coadministering CoQ(10) with statins.

  3. Coenzyme Q10 as a potent compound that inhibits Cdt1-geminin interaction.

    PubMed

    Mizushina, Yoshiyuki; Takeuchi, Toshifumi; Takakusagi, Yoichi; Yonezawa, Yuko; Mizuno, Takeshi; Yanagi, Ken-Ichiro; Imamoto, Naoko; Sugawara, Fumio; Sakaguchi, Kengo; Yoshida, Hiromi; Fujita, Masatoshi

    2008-02-01

    A human replication initiation protein Cdt1 is a very central player in the cell cycle regulation of DNA replication, and geminin down-regulates Cdt1 function by directly binding to it. It has been demonstrated that Cdt1 hyperfunction resulting from Cdt1-geminin imbalance, for example by geminin silencing with siRNA, induces DNA re-replication and eventual cell death in some cancer-derived cell lines. In the present study, we first established a high throughput screening system based on modified ELISA (enzyme linked immunosorbent assay) to identify compounds that interfere with human Cdt1-geminin binding. Using this system, we found that coenzyme Q(10) (CoQ(10)) can inhibit Cdt1-geminin interaction in vitro. CoQ compound is an isoprenoid quinine that functions as an electron carrier in the mitochondrial respiratory chain in eukaryotes. CoQ(10), having a longer isoprenoid chain, was the strongest inhibitor of Cdt1-geminin binding in the tested CoQs, with 50% inhibition observed at concentrations of 16.2 muM. Surface plasmon resonance analysis demonstrated that CoQ(10) bound selectively to Cdt1, but did not interact with geminin. Moreover, CoQ(10) had no influence on the interaction between Cdt1 and mini-chromosome maintenance (MCM)4/6/7 complexes. These results suggested that CoQ(10) inhibits Cdt1-geminin complex formation by binding to Cdt1 and thereby could liberate Cdt1 from inhibition by geminin. Using three-dimensional computer modeling analysis, CoQ(10) was considered to interact with the geminin interaction interface on Cdt1, and was assumed to make hydrogen bonds with the residue of Arg243 of Cdt1. CoQ(10) could prevent the growth of human cancer cells, although only at high concentrations, and it remains unclear whether such an inhibitory effect is associated with the interference with Cdt1-geminin binding. The application of inhibitors for the formation of Cdt1-geminin complex is discussed.

  4. Effects of L-carnitine and coenzyme q10 on impaired spermatogenesis caused by isoproterenol in male rats.

    PubMed

    Ghanbarzadeh, S; Garjani, A; Ziaee, M; Khorrami, A

    2014-09-01

    Nowadays, cardiovascular diseases and male infertility are two big health problems in industrial countries.The aim of the present study was to investigate the protective role of coenzyme Q10 and L-Carnitine pretreatment in the impaired spermatogenesis caused by isoproterenol (ISO) in male rats.Thirty-two male Wistar rats were allocated in 4 groups. ISO was injected for 2 consecutive days (100 mg/kg) in ISO treated groups. Before ISO administration, pretreatment with Coenzyme Q10 (10 mg/kg/day) and L-Carnitine (350 mg/kg/day) were conducted for 20 consecutive days. Sex hormones level, malondialdehyde (MDA) and total antioxidant concentration as well as testis, epididymis and seminal vesicle weight were investigated.Increase in the concentration of MDA and decrease in total antioxidant level was observed following ISO administration. Accordingly, the sperm viability as well as testis, epididymis and seminal vesicle weights were decreased. In the case of sex hormones, the testosterone and LH levels were decreased and the concentration of FSH was increased. Pretreatment with L-carnitine and Coenzyme Q10 significantly decreased the MDA level and increased total antioxidant, LH and testosterone levels. Pretreatment with L-carnitine and Coenzyme Q10 also improved semen parameters and organs weight which were impaired by ISO administration.L-carnitine and Coenzyme Q10 pretreatment could protect spermatogenesis in male rats with ISO administration. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  5. Prevention of coronary atherosclerosis by the use of combination therapy with antioxidant coenzyme Q10 and statins.

    PubMed

    Chapidze, G; Kapanadze, S; Dolidze, N; Bachutashvili, Z; Latsabidze, N

    2005-01-01

    The goal of the present research was to assess the efficacy of combination treatment with antioxidant coenzyme Q10 and simvastatin as well as coenzyme Q10 without statin therapy in order to prevent coronary atherosclerosis. 42 outpatients were divided into 2 groups: receiving coenzyme Q10 (Hasco-Lek, Poland) 60mg daily and its combination with simvastatin (zocor, vasilip) 10mg daily for an 8-week period. The treatment with coenzyme Q10 demonstrated its potential independent role in positive modification of oxidative stress, antiatherogenic fraction of lipid profile, atherogenic ratio, platelet aggregability. Taking into consideration the obtained results the study supports the use of coenzyme Q10 in combination with statins. Suggested attractive approach may result in complete correction of dislipidemia, reverse of endothelial dysfunction, reduce degree of oxidative stress and platelet aggregability. Consequently such a combination may be beneficial in preventing of further development of atherosclerosis in native coronary arteries as well as in bypass grafts in all coronary heart disease patients with or without myocardial revascularization.

  6. Coenzyme Q10 quantification in muscle, fibroblasts and cerebrospinal fluid by liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry using a novel deuterated internal standard.

    PubMed

    Duberley, Kate E C; Hargreaves, Iain P; Chaiwatanasirikul, Korn-Anong; Heales, Simon J R; Land, John M; Rahman, Shamima; Mills, Kevin; Eaton, Simon

    2013-05-15

    Neurological dysfunction is common in primary coenzyme Q10 (2,3-dimethoxy, 5-methyl, 6-polyisoprene parabenzoquinone; CoQ10 ; ubiquinone) deficiencies, the most readily treatable subgroup of mitochondrial disorders. Therapeutic benefit from CoQ10 supplementation has also been noted in other neurodegenerative diseases. CoQ10 can be measured by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) in plasma, muscle or leucocytes; however, there is no reliable method to quantify CoQ10 in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Additionally, many methods use CoQ9 , an endogenous ubiquinone in humans, as an internal standard. Deuterated CoQ10 (d6 -CoQ10 ) was synthesised by a novel, simple, method. Total CoQ10 was measured by liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) using d6 -CoQ10 as internal standard and 5 mM methylamine as an ion-pairing reagent. Chromatography was performed using a Hypsersil GOLD C4 column (150 × 3 mm, 3 µm). CoQ10 levels were linear over a concentration range of 0-200 nM (R(2) = 0.9995). The lower limit of detection was 2 nM. The inter-assay coefficient of variation (CV) was 3.6% (10 nM) and 4.3% (20 nM), and intra-assay CV 3.4% (10 nM) and 3.6% (20 nM). Reference ranges were established for CoQ10 in CSF (5.7-8.7 nM; n = 17), fibroblasts (57.0-121.6 pmol/mg; n = 50) and muscle (187.3-430.1 pmol/mg; n = 15). Use of d6 -CoQ10 internal standard has enabled the development of a sensitive LC/MS/MS method to accurately determine total CoQ10 levels. Clinical applications of CSF CoQ10 determination include identification of patients with cerebral CoQ10 deficiency, and monitoring CSF CoQ10 levels following supplementation. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Effect of Simvastatin, Coenzyme Q10, Resveratrol, Acetylcysteine and Acetylcarnitine on Mitochondrial Respiration.

    PubMed

    Fišar, Z; Hroudová, J; Singh, N; Kopřivová, A; Macečková, D

    2016-01-01

    Some therapeutic and/or adverse effects of drugs may be related to their effects on mitochondrial function. The effects of simvastatin, resveratrol, coenzyme Q10, acetylcysteine, and acetylcarnitine on Complex I-, Complex II-, or Complex IV-linked respiratory rate were determined in isolated brain mitochondria. The protective effects of these biologically active compounds on the calcium-induced decrease of the respiratory rate were also studied. We observed a significant inhibitory effect of simvastatin on mitochondrial respiration (IC50 = 24.0 μM for Complex I-linked respiration, IC50 = 31.3 μM for Complex II-linked respiration, and IC50 = 42.9 μM for Complex IV-linked respiration); the inhibitory effect of resveratrol was found at very high concentrations (IC50 = 162 μM for Complex I-linked respiration, IC50 = 564 μM for Complex II-linked respiration, and IC50 = 1454 μM for Complex IV-linked respiration). Concentrations required for effective simvastatin- or resveratrol-induced inhibition of mitochondrial respiration were found much higher than concentrations achieved under standard dosing of these drugs. Acetylcysteine and acetylcarnitine did not affect the oxygen consumption rate of mitochondria. Coenzyme Q10 induced an increase of Complex I-linked respiration. The increase of free calcium ions induced partial inhibition of the Complex I+II-linked mitochondrial respiration, and all tested drugs counteracted this inhibition. None of the tested drugs showed mitochondrial toxicity (characterized by respiratory rate inhibition) at drug concentrations achieved at therapeutic drug intake. Resveratrol, simvastatin, and acetylcarnitine had the greatest neuroprotective potential (characterized by protective effects against calcium-induced reduction of the respiratory rate).

  8. Cardioprotective Effect of Coenzyme Q10 on Apoptotic Myocardial Cell Death by Regulation of Bcl-2 Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Najam Ali; Abid, M.; Ahmad, Aftab; Abuzinadah, Mohammed F.; Basheikh, Mohammed; Kishore, Kamal

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the effect of coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) on apoptotic myocardial cell death in rat model of heart ischemia and reperfusion I/R injury. Materials and Methods: Eighteen rats (200–250 g) were divided into three groups of 6 rats in each. Group I (sham-operated control group): this is the control group. The animals received the surgical procedure without IR injury or any drug treatment. Group II (I/R group): ischemia was accomplished by the occlusion of coronary artery for 30 min followed by reperfusion for 45 min and Group-III (Coenzyme Q10 treated group): Treated with CoQ10 at a dose of 1 mg/kg, postoperative for 7 days before induction of IR injury. Results: The study revealed that pretreatment with CoQ10 has shown protective effect on apoptotic rat heart and agreed with earlier reports that CoQ10 significantly protects from oxidative stress and cytopathological changes caused by cardiac ischemia followed by reperfusion and attenuated decrease of antioxidant enzymes. Nitric oxide production in the heart of ischemic rats was significantly increased by the pretreatment with CoQ10 in comparison with IR group. Conclusions: CoQ10 protects against cardiac apoptosis induced by IR injury by significantly decreasing the apoptotic DNA and regulating the expression of Bcl-2 gene. PMID:29081620

  9. The use of coenzyme Q10 and DHEA during IUI and IVF cycles in patients with decreased ovarian reserve.

    PubMed

    Gat, Itai; Blanco Mejia, Sonia; Balakier, Hanna; Librach, Clifford L; Claessens, Anne; Ryan, Edward A J

    2016-07-01

    The objective of this study is to compare the combination of dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) (D + C) with DHEA alone (D) in intrauterine insemination (IUI) and in vitro fertilization (IVF) cycles among patients with decreased ovarian reserve. We retrospectively extracted data from patients charts treated by DHEA with/without CoQ10 during IUI or IVF between February 2006 and June 2014. Prestimulation parameters included age, BMI, day 3 FSH and antral follicular count (AFC). Ovarian response parameters included total gonadotropins dosage, peak serum estradiol, number of follicles > 16 mm and fertilization rate. Clinical outcomes included clinical and ongoing pregnancy rates. Three hundred and thirty IUI cycles involved D + C compared with 467 cycles of D; 78 IVF cycles involved D + C and 175 D. In both IUI and IVF, AFC was higher with D + C compared with D (7.4 ± 5.7 versus 5.9 ± 4.7, 8.2 ± 6.3 versus 5.2 ± 5, respectively, p < 0.05). D + C resulted in a more follicles > 16 mm during IUI cycles (3.3 ± 2.3 versus 2.9 ± 2.2, respectively, p = 0.01), while lower mean total gonadotropin dosage was administered after D + C supplementation compared with D (3414 ± 1141 IUs versus 3877 ± 1143 IUs respectively, p = 0.032) in IVF cycles. Pregnancy and delivery rates were similar for both IUI and IVF. D + C significantly increases AFC and improves ovarian responsiveness during IUI and IVF without a difference in clinical outcome.

  10. A comparative evaluation of coenzyme Q10-loaded liposomes and solid lipid nanoparticles as dermal antioxidant carriers

    PubMed Central

    Gokce, Evren H; Korkmaz, Emrah; Tuncay-Tanrıverdi, Sakine; Dellera, Eleonora; Sandri, Giuseppina; Bonferoni, M Cristina; Ozer, Ozgen

    2012-01-01

    Background The effective delivery of coenzyme Q10 (Q10) to the skin has several benefits in therapy for different skin pathologies. However, the delivery of Q10 to deeper layers of skin is challenging due to low aqueous solubility of Q10. Liposomes and solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN) have many advantages to accomplish the requirements in topical drug delivery. This study aims to evaluate the influence of these nanosystems on the effective delivery of Q10 into the skin. Methods Q10-loaded liposomes (LIPO-Q10) and SLNs (SLN-Q10) were prepared by thin film hydration and high shear homogenization methods, respectively. Particle size (PS), polydispersity index (PI), zeta potential (ZP), and drug entrapment efficiency were determined. Differential scanning calorimetry analysis and morphological transmission electron microscopy (TEM) examination were conducted. Biocompatibility/cytotoxicity studies of Q10-loaded nanosystems were performed by means of cell culture (human fibroblasts) under oxidative conditions. The protective effect of formulations against production of reactive oxygen species were comparatively evaluated by cytofluorometry studies. Results PS of uniform SLN-Q10 and LIPO-Q10 were determined as 152.4 ± 7.9 nm and 301.1 ± 8.2 nm, respectively. ZPs were −13.67 ± 1.32 mV and −36.6 ± 0.85 mV in the same order. The drug entrapment efficiency was 15% higher in SLN systems. TEM studies confirmed the colloidal size. SLN-Q10 and LIPO-Q10 showed biocompatibility towards fibroblasts up to 50 μM of Q10, which was determined as suitable for cell proliferation. The mean fluorescence intensity % depending on ROS production determined in cytofluorometric studies could be listed as Q10 ≥ SLN-Q10 > LIPO-Q10. Conclusion The LIPO-Q10 system was able to enhance cell proliferation. On the contrary, SLN-Q10 did not show protective effects against ROS accumulation. As a conclusion, liposomes seem to have advantages over SLN in terms of effective delivery of Q10 to skin

  11. Effect of the additives on clouding behavior and thermodynamics of coenzyme Q10-Kolliphor HS15 micelle aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Li; Zhang, Jing; Zhu, Chao; Pan, Hong-chun; Liu, Hong

    2017-11-01

    Herein we investigate the effect of different additives (electrolytes, amino acids, PEG, and sugars) on the cloud points (CP) of coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) - Kolliphor HS15 (HS15) micelle aqueous solutions. The CP values were decreased with the increase of electrolytes and sugars, following: CPAl3+ < CPMg2+ < CPCa2+ < CPNa+ < CPK+ < CPNH4+; CPdisaccharide < CPmonosaccharide. The presences of Arginine and Tryptophan significantly increased the CP; while the other amino acids reduced the CP. A depression of CP for CoQ10-HS15 micelle solution with PEG was molecular weight of PEG dependent. The significant thermodynamic parameters were also evaluated and discussed.

  12. Orally delivered water soluble Coenzyme Q10 (Ubisol-Q10) blocks on-going neurodegeneration in rats exposed to paraquat: potential for therapeutic application in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Muthukumaran, Krithika; Leahy, Samantha; Harrison, Kate; Sikorska, Marianna; Sandhu, Jagdeep K; Cohen, Jerome; Keshan, Corrine; Lopatin, Daniel; Miller, Harvey; Borowy-Borowski, Henryk; Lanthier, Patricia; Weinstock, Shelly; Pandey, Siyaram

    2014-01-31

    Paraquat, still used as an herbicide in some parts of the world, is now regarded as a dangerous environmental neurotoxin and is linked to the development Parkinson's disease (PD). Paraquat interacts with cellular redox systems and causes mitochondrial dysfunction and the formation of reactive oxygen species, which in turn, plays a crucial role in the pathophysiology of PD. Various antioxidant therapies have been explored with the expectations that they deliver health benefits to the PD patients, however, no such therapies were effective. Here we have tested the neuroprotective efficacy of a novel water-soluble CoQ10 (Ubisol-Q10), in a rat model of paraquat-induced neurodegeneration in order to evaluate its potential application in the management of PD. We have developed a rat model of progressive nigrostriatal degeneration by giving rats five intraperitoneal injections of paraquat (10 mg/kg/injection), once every five days. Neuronal death occurred over a period of 8 weeks with close to 50% reduction in the number of tyrosine hydroxylase-positive cells. Ubisol-Q10, at 6 mg CoQ10/kg body weight/day, was delivered as a supplement in drinking water. The intervention begun after the completion of paraquat injections when the neurodegenerative process had already began and about 20% of TH-positive neurons were lost. Ubisol-Q10 treatment halted the progression of neurodegeneration and remaining neurons were protected. The outcomes were evaluated based on the number of surviving tyrosine hydroxylase-positive neurons in the substantia nigra region and improved motor skills in response to the Ubisol-Q10 intervention. To maintain this neuroprotection, however, continuous Ubisol- Q10 supplementation was required, if withdrawn, the neuronal death pathway resumed, suggesting that the presence of CoQ10 was essential for blocking the pathway. The CoQ10, given orally as Ubisol-Q10 in drinking solution, was effective in blocking the progression of neurodegeneration when administered

  13. Coenzyme Q(10) enhances dermal elastin expression, inhibits IL-1α production and melanin synthesis in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zhang, M; Dang, L; Guo, F; Wang, X; Zhao, W; Zhao, R

    2012-06-01

    Coenzyme Q(10) (CoQ(10) ) is a well-known antioxidant and has been used in many skincare products for anti-ageing purpose. However, the molecular mechanisms of CoQ(10) function in skin cells are not fully understood. In this paper, we compared the effects of CoQ(10) on primary human dermal fibroblasts from three individuals, including adult. We demonstrated that CoQ(10) treatment promoted proliferation of fibroblasts, increased type IV collagen expression and reduced UVR-induced matrix metalloproteinases-1 (MMP-1) level in embryonic and adult cells. In addition, CoQ(10) treatment increased elastin gene expression in cultured fibroblasts and significantly decreased UVR-induced IL-1α production in HaCat cells. Taken together, CoQ(10) presented anti-ageing benefits against intrinsic ageing as well as photo damage. Interestingly, CoQ(10) was able to inhibit tyrosinase activity, resulting in reduced melanin content in B16 cells. Thus, CoQ(10) may have potential depigmentation effects for skincare. © 2012 Space Biology Research & Technology Center, CASC. ICS © 2012 Society of Cosmetic Scientists and the Société Française de Cosmétologie.

  14. Prophylactic role of coenzyme Q10 and Cynara scolymus L on doxorubicin-induced toxicity in rats: Biochemical and immunohistochemical study.

    PubMed

    Mustafa, Hesham N; El Awdan, Sally A; Hegazy, Gehan A; Abdel Jaleel, Gehad A

    2015-01-01

    The study aims to evaluate the protective effects of coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) and Cynara scolymus L (CS) on doxorubicin (dox)-induced toxicity. Sixty male rats were divided into six groups. Group 1 as a control. Group 2 received dox (10 mg/kg) intraperitoneally. Group 3 received CoQ10 (200 mg/kg). Group 4 received CS (500 mg/kg). Group 5 received CoQ10 (200 mg/kg) and dox (10 mg/kg). Group 6 received CS (500 mg/kg) and dox (10 mg/kg). The rats were then evaluated biochemically and immunohistochemically. Dox produced a significant deterioration of hepatic and renal functional parameters. Moreover, an upsurge of oxidative stress and nitrosative stress markers. The expression of alpha-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) was increased and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) expression was decreased. Administration of CoQ10 and CS resulted in a significant improvement of hepatic and renal functional parameters, and an improvement of both α-SMA and PCNA. It is concluded that pretreatment with CoQ10 and CS is associated with up-regulation of favorable protective enzymes and down-regulation of oxidative stress. That can be advised as a supplement to dox-treated patients.

  15. Prophylactic role of coenzyme Q10 and Cynara scolymus L on doxorubicin-induced toxicity in rats: Biochemical and immunohistochemical study

    PubMed Central

    Mustafa, Hesham N.; El Awdan, Sally A.; Hegazy, Gehan A.; Abdel Jaleel, Gehad A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The study aims to evaluate the protective effects of coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) and Cynara scolymus L (CS) on doxorubicin (dox)-induced toxicity. Materials and Methods: Sixty male rats were divided into six groups. Group 1 as a control. Group 2 received dox (10 mg/kg) intraperitoneally. Group 3 received CoQ10 (200 mg/kg). Group 4 received CS (500 mg/kg). Group 5 received CoQ10 (200 mg/kg) and dox (10 mg/kg). Group 6 received CS (500 mg/kg) and dox (10 mg/kg). The rats were then evaluated biochemically and immunohistochemically. Results: Dox produced a significant deterioration of hepatic and renal functional parameters. Moreover, an upsurge of oxidative stress and nitrosative stress markers. The expression of alpha-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) was increased and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) expression was decreased. Administration of CoQ10 and CS resulted in a significant improvement of hepatic and renal functional parameters, and an improvement of both α-SMA and PCNA. Conclusion: It is concluded that pretreatment with CoQ10 and CS is associated with up-regulation of favorable protective enzymes and down-regulation of oxidative stress. That can be advised as a supplement to dox-treated patients. PMID:26729958

  16. Coenzyme Q10 Ameliorates Trimethyltin Chloride Neurotoxicity in Experimental Model of Injury in Dentate Gyrus of Hippocampus: A Histopathological and Behavioral Study

    PubMed Central

    Sakhaie, Mohammad Hassan; Soleimani, Mansoureh; Pirhajati, Vahid; Soleimani Asl, Sara; Madjd, Zahra; Mehdizadeh, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Background Coenzyme Q10 has antioxidative and free radical scavenging effects. CoQ10 supplementation is known to have neuroprotective effects in some neurodegenerative diseases, such as Parkinson’s disease and Huntington’s disease. Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate both histopathologic and behavioral whether Coenzyme Q10 is protective against trimethyltin chloride (TMT) induced hippocampal damage. Materials and Methods This was an experimental study. Thirty-six Balb/c mice were divided into four groups, as follows: 1) control group; 2) sham group of mice that received a 100 µL intraperitoneal injection (IP) of sesame oil; 3) TMT group of mice that received a single 2.5 mg/kg/day IP injection of TMT; and 4) TMT + CoQ10 group of mice that received a 10 mg/kg IP injection of CoQ10. Body weight and Morris water maze (MWM) responses were investigated. In addition, the dentate gyrus neurons of the hippocampus were evaluated histopathologically by light and electron microscopes. Results This study revealed that the body weight scale was found to be significantly higher in the CoQ10 group (21.39 ± 2.70), compared to the TMT group (19.39 ± 2.74) (P < 0.05). In the TMT group, the animals showed body a weight loss that was significantly lower than that of the control group (22.33 ± 3.06) (P < 0.05). Our results showed that CoQ10 provided protection against MWM deficits. Furthermore, TMT impaired the ability of mice to locate the hidden platform, compared to the control group (P < 0.05). Microscopic studies showed that TMT caused histopathological changes in the dentate gyrus and increased the number of necrotic neurons (476 ± 78.51), compared to the control group (208 ± 40.84) (P < 0.001). But, CoQ10 significantly attenuated (31 9 ± 60.08) the density of necrotic neurons compared to TMT (P < 0.05). Conclusions The results of the present study indicate that Coenzyme Q10 diminished neuronal necrosis and improved learning memory. Part of its beneficial

  17. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of coenzyme Q10 in Huntington disease.

    PubMed

    McGarry, Andrew; McDermott, Michael; Kieburtz, Karl; de Blieck, Elisabeth A; Beal, Flint; Marder, Karen; Ross, Christopher; Shoulson, Ira; Gilbert, Peter; Mallonee, William M; Guttman, Mark; Wojcieszek, Joanne; Kumar, Rajeev; LeDoux, Mark S; Jenkins, Mary; Rosas, H Diana; Nance, Martha; Biglan, Kevin; Como, Peter; Dubinsky, Richard M; Shannon, Kathleen M; O'Suilleabhain, Padraig; Chou, Kelvin; Walker, Francis; Martin, Wayne; Wheelock, Vicki L; McCusker, Elizabeth; Jankovic, Joseph; Singer, Carlos; Sanchez-Ramos, Juan; Scott, Burton; Suchowersky, Oksana; Factor, Stewart A; Higgins, Donald S; Molho, Eric; Revilla, Fredy; Caviness, John N; Friedman, Joseph H; Perlmutter, Joel S; Feigin, Andrew; Anderson, Karen; Rodriguez, Ramon; McFarland, Nikolaus R; Margolis, Russell L; Farbman, Eric S; Raymond, Lynn A; Suski, Valerie; Kostyk, Sandra; Colcher, Amy; Seeberger, Lauren; Epping, Eric; Esmail, Sherali; Diaz, Nancy; Fung, Wai Lun Alan; Diamond, Alan; Frank, Samuel; Hanna, Philip; Hermanowicz, Neal; Dure, Leon S; Cudkowicz, Merit

    2017-01-10

    To test the hypothesis that chronic treatment of early-stage Huntington disease (HD) with high-dose coenzyme Q10 (CoQ) will slow the progressive functional decline of HD. We performed a multicenter randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Patients with early-stage HD (n = 609) were enrolled at 48 sites in the United States, Canada, and Australia from 2008 to 2012. Patients were randomized to receive either CoQ 2,400 mg/d or matching placebo, then followed for 60 months. The primary outcome variable was the change from baseline to month 60 in Total Functional Capacity score (for patients who survived) combined with time to death (for patients who died) analyzed using a joint-rank analysis approach. An interim analysis for futility revealed a conditional power of <5% for the primary analysis, prompting premature conclusion in July 2014. No statistically significant differences were seen between treatment groups for the primary or secondary outcome measures. CoQ was generally safe and well-tolerated throughout the study. These data do not justify use of CoQ as a treatment to slow functional decline in HD. NCT00608881. This article provides Class I evidence that CoQ does not slow the progressive functional decline of patients with HD. © 2016 American Academy of Neurology.

  18. Amitriptyline down-regulates coenzyme Q10 biosynthesis in lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, Tamara; Villanueva-Paz, Marina; Díaz-Parrado, Eduardo; Illanes, Matilde; Fernández-Rodríguez, Ana; Sánchez-Alcázar, José A; de Miguel, Manuel

    2017-02-15

    Amitriptyline, a tricyclic antidepressant, has been proposed as an antitumoral drug in oxidative therapy. Its pro-apoptotic effects, mediated by high reactive oxygen species generation, have been already described. In this study we analysed the effect of amitriptyline on the biosynthesis of coenzyme Q 10 (CoQ), an essential component for electron transport and a potent membrane antioxidant involved in redox signaling. We treated H460 cells, a non-small-cell lung cancer cell line, with amitriptyline and we analysed CoQ levels by HPLC and CoQ biosynthesis rate, as well as the enzymes involved in CoQ biosynthesis by real-time PCR and Western blot. Amitriptyline treatment induced a dose-dependent decrease in CoQ levels in tumor cells. CoQ decreased levels were associated with down-regulation of the expression of COQ4 gene, as well as decreased Coq4 and Coq6 protein levels. Our findings suggest that the effect of amitriptyline on CoQ biosynthesis highlights the potential of this drug for antitumoral oxidative therapy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Protective effects of coenzyme Q10 nanoparticles on dichlorvos-induced hepatotoxicity and mitochondrial/lysosomal injury.

    PubMed

    Eftekhari, Aziz; Ahmadian, Elham; Azami, Aida; Johari-Ahar, Mohammad; Eghbal, Mohammad Ali

    2018-02-01

    Development of biocompatible antioxidant nanoparticles for xenobiotic-induced liver disease treatment by oral or parenteral administration is of great interest in medicine. In the current study, we demonstrate the protective effects of coenzyme Q10 nanoparticles (CoQ10-NPs) on hepatotoxicity induced by dichlorvos (DDVP) as an organophosphate. Although CoQ10 is an efficient antioxidant, its poor bioavailability has limited the applications of this useful agent. First, CoQ10-NPs were prepared then characterized using dynamic light scattering (DLS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). In DDVP-treated and non-treated hepatocytes in the presence of CoQ10-NPs, cell viability, the level of reactive oxygen species (ROS), lipid peroxidation (LPO), mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), lysosome membrane integrity, and cellular glutathione (GSH) content were measured. The prepared CoQ10-NPs were mono-dispersed and had narrow size distribution with average diameter of 54 nm. In the in vivo study, we evaluated the enzymes, which are involved in the antioxidant system for maintenance of normal liver function. In comparison to nonparticulate CoQ10, the CoQ10-NPs efficiently decreased the ROS formation, lipid peroxidation and cell death. Also, particulate form of CoQ10 improved MMP, GSH level and lysosome membrane integrity. In the in vivo, study, we revealed that CoQ10-NPs were better hepatoprotective than its nonparticulate form (P < .05). Altogether, we propose that the CoQ10-NPs have potential capability to be used as a therapeutic and prophylactic agent for poisoning that is induced by organophosphate agents, especially in the case of DDVP. Furthermore, these positive remarks make this nanoparticle amenable for the treatment of xenobiotic-induced liver diseases. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Reduced mitochondrial coenzyme Q10 levels in HepG2 cells treated with high-dose simvastatin: A possible role in statin-induced hepatotoxicity?

    SciTech Connect

    Tavintharan, S.; Ong, C.N.; Jeyaseelan, K.

    2007-09-01

    Lowering of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol is well achieved by 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors (statins). Statins inhibit the conversion of HMG-CoA to mevalonate, a precursor for cholesterol and coenzyme Q10 (CoQ{sub 10}). In HepG2 cells, simvastatin decreased mitochondrial CoQ{sub 10} levels, and at higher concentrations was associated with a moderately higher degree of cell death, increased DNA oxidative damage and a reduction in ATP synthesis. Supplementation of CoQ{sub 10}, reduced cell death and DNA oxidative stress, and increased ATP synthesis. It is suggested that CoQ{sub 10} deficiency plays an important role in statin-induced hepatopathy, and that CoQ{sub 10} supplementation protectsmore » HepG2 cells from this complication.« less

  1. Coenzyme Q10 and oxidative stress, the association with peripheral sensory neuropathy and cardiovascular disease in type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Forsberg, Elisabete; Xu, Cheng; Grünler, Jacob; Frostegård, Johan; Tekle, Michael; Brismar, Kerstin; Kärvestedt, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Our study aimed to explore associations between metabolic control, oxidative stress and coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) in relation to diabetes complications in a representative population of type 2 diabetes. A geographic cohort of 156 subjects was recruited. Serum concentrations of CoQ10 and vitamin E were measured by HPLC. ROS was determined by free oxygen radicals testing (FORT). Glutaredoxin (Grx) activity, oxidized LDL cholesterol (oxLDLc), high sensitive CRP (hsCRP), HbA1c, urine albumin, serum creatinine, serum cystatin C, and plasma lipids were assayed with routine laboratory protocols. Serum CoQ10 was higher than in nondiabetics. HbA1c, fP-glucose, hyperlipidemia, inflammation (hsCRP), and increased BMI were associated with signs of oxidative stress as increased levels of FORT, Grx activity and/or increased levels of oxLDLc Oxidative stress was found to be strongly correlated with prevalence of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and peripheral sensory neuropathy (PSN). In both gender groups there were positive correlations between CoQ10 and oxLDLc, and between BMI and the ratio CoQ10/chol. Grx activity was inversely correlated to oxLDLc and CoQ10. Women with CVD and PSN had higher waist index, oxLDLc, and FORT levels compared to men but lower CoQ10 levels. Men had worse kidney function and lower vitamin E. Multiple regression analysis showed increased levels of CoQ10 to be significantly correlated with increased levels of cholesterol, triglycerides, vitamin E, fB-glucose and BMI. Hyperlipidemia, hyperglycemia and inflammation were associated with oxidative stress, which was correlated to the prevalence of diabetes complications. CoQ10 was increased in response to oxidative stress. There were gender differences in the risk factors associated with diabetes complications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Coenzyme Q10 and Pyridoxal Phosphate Deficiency Is a Common Feature in Mucopolysaccharidosis Type III.

    PubMed

    Yubero, Dèlia; Montero, Raquel; O'Callaghan, Mar; Pineda, Mercè; Meavilla, Silvia; Delgadillo, Veronica; Sierra, Cristina; Altimira, Laura; Navas, Plácido; Pope, Simon; Oppenheim, Marcus; Neergheen, Viruna; Ghosh, Arunabha; Mills, Phillipa; Clayton, Peter; Footitt, Emma; Cleary, Maureen; Hargreaves, Iain; Jones, Simon A; Heales, Simon; Artuch, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharidoses (MPS) are a group of lysosomal storage disorders caused by deficiencies of lysosomal enzymes catalyzing degradation of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). Previously, we reported a secondary plasma coenzyme Q 10 (CoQ) deficiency in MPS patients. For this study, nine MPS patients were recruited in the Hospital Sant Joan de Déu (HSJD, Barcelona) and two patients in the Neurometabolic Unit, National Hospital (NMU, London), to explore the nutritional status of MPS type III patients by analyzing several vitamins and micronutrients in blood and in cerebrospinal fluid. Plasma CoQ and plasma and cerebrospinal fluid pyridoxal phosphate (PLP) content were analyzed by high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) with electrochemical and fluorescence detection, respectively. We found that most MPS-III patients disclosed low plasma pyridoxal phosphate (PLP) values (seven out of nine) and also low plasma CoQ concentrations (eight out of nine). We observed significantly lower median values of PLP, tocopherol, and CoQ (Mann-Whitney U test, p = 0.006, p = 0.004, and p = 0.001, respectively) in MPS patients when compared with age-matched controls. Chi-square test showed a significant association between the fact of having low plasma PLP and CoQ values in the whole cohort of patients. Cerebrospinal fluid PLP values were clearly deficient in the two patients studied. In conclusion, we report a combined CoQ and PLP deficiency in MPS-III patients. These observations could be related to the complexity of the physiopathology of the disease. If our results are confirmed in larger series of patients, CoQ and PLP therapy could be trialed as coadjuvant therapy with the current MPS treatments.

  3. Design and Evaluation of Multi-functional Nanocarriers for Selective Delivery of Coenzyme Q10 to Mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Anjali; Soliman, Ghareb M.; Al-Hajaj, Noura; Sharma, Rishi; Maysinger, Dusica; Kakkar, Ashok

    2016-01-01

    Impairments of mitochondrial functions have been associated with failure of cellular functions in different tissues leading to various pathologies. We report here a mitochondria–targeted nanodelivery system for coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) which can reach mitochondria, and deliver CoQ10 in adequate quantities. Multifunctional nanocarriers based on ABC miktoarm polymers (A= PEG, B = polycaprolactone (PCL) and C = triphenylphosphonium bromide (TPPBr)) were synthesized using a combination of click chemistry with ring opening polymerization, self-assembled into nano-sized micelles, and were employed for CoQ10-loading. Drug loading capacity (60 weight%), micelle size (25–60 nm) and stability were determined using a variety of techniques. The micelles had a small critical association concentration, and were colloidally stable in solution for more than 3 months. The extraordinarily high CoQ10 loading capacity in the micelles is attributed to good compatibility between CoQ10 and PCL, as indicated by low Flory-Huggins interaction parameter. Confocal microscopy studies of fluorescently labeled polymer analog together with the mitochondria-specific vital dye label, indicated that the carrier did indeed reach mitochondria. The high CoQ10 loading efficiency allowed testing of micelles within a broad concentration range, and provided evidence for CoQ10 effectiveness in two different experimental paradigms: oxidative stress and inflammation. Combined results from chemical, analytical and biological experiments suggest that the new miktoarm-based carrier provides a suitable means of CoQ10 delivery to mitochondria without loss of drug effectiveness. The versatility of the click chemistry used to prepare this new mitochondria-targeting nanocarrier offers a widely applicable, simple and easily reproducible procedure to deliver drugs to mitochondria or other intracellular organelles. PMID:22148549

  4. Effect of particle size on solubility, dissolution rate, and oral bioavailability: evaluation using coenzyme Q10 as naked nanocrystals

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jiao; Wang, Fan; Sui, Yue; She, Zhennan; Zhai, Wenjun; Wang, Chunling; Deng, Yihui

    2012-01-01

    In this paper work, four naked nanocrystals (size range 80–700 nm) were prepared without any surfactant or polymer using the solvent/nonsolvent method. The effects of particle size on their solubility, dissolution, and oral bioavailability were investigated. Solubility and dissolution testing were performed in three types of dissolution medium, and the studies demonstrated that the equilibrium solubilities of coenzyme Q10 nanocrystals and bulk drugs were not affected by the dissolution media but the kinetic solubilities were. Kinetic solubility curves and changes in particle size distribution were determined and well explained by the proposed solubilization model for the nanocrystals and bulk drugs. The particle size effect on dissolution was clearly influenced by the diffusion coefficients of the various dissolution media, and the dissolution velocity of coenzyme Q10 increased as particle size decreased. The bioavailability of coenzyme Q10 after oral administration in beagle dogs was improved by reducing the particle size. For 700 nm nanocrystals, the AUC0–48 was 4.4-fold greater than that for the coarse suspensions, but a further decrease in particle size from 700 nm to 120 nm did not contribute to improvement in bioavailability until the particle size was reduced to 80 nm, when bioavailability was increased by 7.3-fold. PMID:23166438

  5. Nanoencapsulation of coenzyme Q10 and vitamin E acetate protects against UVB radiation-induced skin injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Pegoraro, Natháli S; Barbieri, Allanna V; Camponogara, Camila; Mattiazzi, Juliane; Brum, Evelyne S; Marchiori, Marila C L; Oliveira, Sara M; Cruz, Letícia

    2017-02-01

    This study aimed to investigate the feasibility of producing semisolid formulations based on nanocapsule suspensions containing the association of the coenzyme Q10 and vitamin E acetate by adding gellan gum (2%) to the suspensions. Furthermore, we studied their application as an alternative for the treatment of inflammation induced by ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation. For this, an animal model of injury induced by UVB-radiation was employed. All semisolids presented pH close to 5.5, drug content above 95% and mean diameter on the nanometric range, after redispersion in water. Besides, the semisolids presented non-Newtonian flow with pseudoplastic behavior and suitable spreadability factor values. The results also showed that the semisolid containing coenzyme Q10-loaded nanocapsules with higher vitamin E acetate concentration reduced in 73±8% the UVB radiation-induced ear edema. Moreover, all formulations tested were able to reduce inflammation parameters evaluated through MPO activity and histological procedure on injured tissue and the semisolids containing the nanoencapsulated coenzyme Q10 reduced oxidative parameters assessment through the non-protein thiols levels and lipid peroxidation. This way, the semisolids based on nanocapsules may be considered a promising approach for the treatment and prevention of skin inflammation diseases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Combined coenzyme Q10 and clomiphene citrate for ovulation induction in clomiphene-citrate-resistant polycystic ovary syndrome.

    PubMed

    El Refaeey, Abdelaziz; Selem, Amal; Badawy, Ahmed

    2014-07-01

    This prospective randomized controlled trial evaluated the effect of combined oral coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) and clomiphene citrate for ovulation induction in clomiphene-citrate-resistant polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). A total of 101 infertile women with PCOS resistant to clomiphene citrate were randomized either to combined CoQ10 and clomiphene citrate (51 patients, 82 cycles) or to clomiphene citrate alone (50 patients, 71 cycles). The outcome measures were number of follicles, serum oestradiol, serum progesterone, endometrial thickness and ovulation, clinical pregnancy and miscarriage rates. Numbers of follicles >14 mm and ≥18 mm were significantly higher in the CoQ10 group. Endometrial thickness on the day of human chorionic gonadotrophin was significantly greater in the CoQ10 group (8.82 ± 0.27 mm versus 7.03 ± 0.74 mm). Ovulation occurred in 54/82 cycles (65.9%) in the CoQ10 group and 11/71 cycles (15.5%) in the control group. Clinical pregnancy rate was significantly higher in the CoQ10 group (19/51, 37.3%) versus the control group (3/50, 6.0%). Combination of CoQ10 and clomiphene citrate in the treatment of clomiphene-citrate-resistant PCOS patients improves ovulation and clinical pregnancy rates. It is an effective and safe option and can be considered before gonadotrophin therapy or laparoscopic ovarian drilling. Copyright © 2014 Reproductive Healthcare Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Genetic Rescue of Mitochondrial and Skeletal Muscle Impairment in an Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Model of Coenzyme Q10 Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Romero-Moya, Damià; Santos-Ocaña, Carlos; Castaño, Julio; Garrabou, Gloria; Rodríguez-Gómez, José A; Ruiz-Bonilla, Vanesa; Bueno, Clara; González-Rodríguez, Patricia; Giorgetti, Alessandra; Perdiguero, Eusebio; Prieto, Cristina; Moren-Nuñez, Constanza; Fernández-Ayala, Daniel J; Victoria Cascajo, Maria; Velasco, Iván; Canals, Josep Maria; Montero, Raquel; Yubero, Delia; Jou, Cristina; López-Barneo, José; Cardellach, Francesc; Muñoz-Cánoves, Pura; Artuch, Rafael; Navas, Plácido; Menendez, Pablo

    2017-07-01

    Coenzyme Q 10 (CoQ 10 ) plays a crucial role in mitochondria as an electron carrier within the mitochondrial respiratory chain (MRC) and is an essential antioxidant. Mutations in genes responsible for CoQ 10 biosynthesis (COQ genes) cause primary CoQ 10 deficiency, a rare and heterogeneous mitochondrial disorder with no clear genotype-phenotype association, mainly affecting tissues with high-energy demand including brain and skeletal muscle (SkM). Here, we report a four-year-old girl diagnosed with minor mental retardation and lethal rhabdomyolysis harboring a heterozygous mutation (c.483G > C (E161D)) in COQ4. The patient's fibroblasts showed a decrease in [CoQ 10 ], CoQ 10 biosynthesis, MRC activity affecting complexes I/II + III, and respiration defects. Bona fide induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSCs) lines carrying the COQ4 mutation (CQ4-iPSCs) were generated, characterized and genetically edited using the CRISPR-Cas9 system (CQ4 ed -iPSCs). Extensive differentiation and metabolic assays of control-iPSCs, CQ4-iPSCs and CQ4 ed -iPSCs demonstrated a genotype association, reproducing the disease phenotype. The COQ4 mutation in iPSC was associated with CoQ 10 deficiency, metabolic dysfunction, and respiration defects. iPSC differentiation into SkM was compromised, and the resulting SkM also displayed respiration defects. Remarkably, iPSC differentiation in dopaminergic or motor neurons was unaffected. This study offers an unprecedented iPSC model recapitulating CoQ 10 deficiency-associated functional and metabolic phenotypes caused by COQ4 mutation. Stem Cells 2017;35:1687-1703. © 2017 AlphaMed Press.

  8. Coenzyme Q10 Attenuates High Glucose-Induced Endothelial Progenitor Cell Dysfunction through AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Hsiao-Ya; Lin, Chih-Pei; Huang, Po-Hsun; Li, Szu-Yuan; Chen, Jia-Shiong; Lin, Feng-Yen; Chen, Jaw-Wen; Lin, Shing-Jong

    2016-01-01

    Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10), an antiapoptosis enzyme, is stored in the mitochondria of cells. We investigated whether CoQ10 can attenuate high glucose-induced endothelial progenitor cell (EPC) apoptosis and clarified its mechanism. EPCs were incubated with normal glucose (5 mM) or high glucose (25 mM) enviroment for 3 days, followed by treatment with CoQ10 (10 μM) for 24 hr. Cell proliferation, nitric oxide (NO) production, and JC-1 assay were examined. The specific signal pathways of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), eNOS/Akt, and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) were also assessed. High glucose reduced EPC functional activities, including proliferation and migration. Additionally, Akt/eNOS activity and NO production were downregulated in high glucose-stimulated EPCs. Administration of CoQ10 ameliorated high glucose-induced EPC apoptosis, including downregulation of caspase 3, upregulation of Bcl-2, and increase in mitochondrial membrane potential. Furthermore, treatment with CoQ10 reduced reactive oxygen species, enhanced eNOS/Akt activity, and increased HO-1 expression in high glucose-treated EPCs. These effects were negated by administration of AMPK inhibitor. Transplantation of CoQ10-treated EPCs under high glucose conditions into ischemic hindlimbs improved blood flow recovery. CoQ10 reduced high glucose-induced EPC apoptosis and dysfunction through upregulation of eNOS, HO-1 through the AMPK pathway. Our findings provide a potential treatment strategy targeting dysfunctional EPC in diabetic patients. PMID:26682233

  9. Combined atorvastatin and coenzyme Q10 improve the left ventricular function in isoproterenol-induced heart failure in rat.

    PubMed

    Garjani, Alireza; Andalib, Sina; Biabani, Sajjad; Soraya, Hamid; Doustar, Yousef; Garjani, Afagh; Maleki-Dizaji, Nasrin

    2011-09-01

    The effect of atorvastatin on cardiac remodeling, function, and homodynamic parameters in isoproterenol-induced heart failure was evaluated in the present study. A subcutaneous injection of isoproterenol (5mg/kg/day) for 10 days was used for the induction of heart failure. Isoproterenol administration produced intensive myocardial necrosis and fibrosis with a significant decrease in the arterial pressure indices, heart rate, contractility (LVdP/dt(max)) and relaxation (LVdP/dt(min)), but an increase in the left ventricular end-diastolic pressure. Rats were randomly assigned to control, treatment with only atorvastatin, and treatment with atorvastatin plus coenzyme Q10. Histopathological analysis showed a marked attenuation of myocyte necrosis and interstitial fibrosis in all atorvastatin treated groups (P<0.001). A low dose of atorvastatin (5mg/kg/day) significantly improved the left ventricular systolic pressure, contractility and relaxation (P<0.01). On the contrary, a high dose of atorvastatin (20mg/kg/day) worsened the isoproterenol-induced left ventricular dysfunction by a further reduction of LVdP/dt(max) from +2780 ± 94 to +1588 ± 248 (mmHg/s; P<0.01) and LVdP/dt(min) from -2007 ± 190 to -2939 ± 291 (mmHg/s; P<0.05). Co-administration of coenzyme Q10 with atorvastatin reversed the hemodynamic depression and the left ventricular dysfunction to a high level (P<0.001). There was a lower level of LVEDPs in the atorvastatin+coenzyme Q10 treated groups (3 ± 1 and 4 ± 1.4 versus 8 ± 3.5 and 14 ± 3.6 mmHg, respectively), thereby suggesting improvement in the myocardial stiffness by the combined coenzyme Q10 and atorvastatin treatment. The atorvastatin therapy attenuated myocardial necrosis and fibrosis in isoproterenol-induced heart failure. However, a high dose of the drug considerably worsened the left ventricular dysfunction and hemodynamic depression, which was reversed by coenzyme Q10 co-administration. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights

  10. Coenzyme Q10 Prevents Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Facilitates Pharmacological Activity of Atorvastatin in 6-OHDA Induced Dopaminergic Toxicity in Rats.

    PubMed

    Prajapati, Santosh Kumar; Garabadu, Debapriya; Krishnamurthy, Sairam

    2017-05-01

    Atorvastatin (ATV) generally used to treat dyslipidemia is also reported to have effect against 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) induced neurotoxicity. Additionally, atorvastatin can interfere with mitochondrial function by reducing the level of Q10. Therefore, the therapeutic effect of atorvastatin (20 mg/kg) could be compromised. In this context, the present study evaluated the effect of ATV supplemented with Q10. 6-OHDA was unilaterally injected into the right striatum of male rats. On day 8 of 6-OHDA infusion, ATV (20 mg/kg), Q10 (200 mg/kg), and their combination were administered per oral for 14 days. On day 21, there was significant loss of striatal dopamine indicating neurotoxicity. The combination of ATV+Q10 showed significant amelioration of dopamine (DA) toxicity compared to individual treatments. Similarly, ATV+Q10 compared to individual treatment significantly decreased the motor deficits induced by 6-OHDA. Further, 6-OHDA induced mitochondrial dysfunction in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc). There was significant decrease in mitochondrial complex enzyme activities and mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP). Treatment with ATV and ATV+Q10 ameliorated mitochondrial dysfunction by increasing complex enzyme activities; however, only ATV+Q10 were able to stabilize MMP and maintained mitochondrial integrity. Moreover, there was significant induction of oxidative stress as observed from increase in lipid peroxidases (LPO) and nitrite (NO), and decrease in super oxide dismutase (SOD). Treatment with ATV+Q10 significantly altered the above effects indicating antioxidant activity. Furthermore, only combination of ATV and Q10 decreased the 6-OHDA induced expression of cytochrome-C, caspase-9 and caspase-3. Therefore, current results provide evidence that supplementation of Q10 with ATV shows synergistic effect in reducing dopamine toxicity.

  11. Effects of coenzyme Q10 on semen cryopreservation of stallions classified as having good or bad semen freezing ability.

    PubMed

    Carneiro, Joao A M; Canisso, Igor F; Bandeira, R S; Scheeren, V F C; Freitas-Dell'Aqua, Camila P; Alvarenga, Marco A; Papa, Frederico O; Dell'Aqua, Jose A

    2018-05-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the antioxidant properties of coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) during cryopreservation of semen obtained from stallions having good and bad semen freezing ability (GFA vs. BFA, respectively). Forty ejaculates (n = 20 stallions) were split into five centrifugation and five freezing extenders containing different concentrations of CoQ10 (0, 25, 50, 75 and 100 μmols/L). If CoQ10 was added to the centrifugation extender, the freezing extender had no CoQ10 added; similarly, if CoQ10 was added to the freezing extender, the centrifugation extender had no CoQ10. Semen cryopreserved on extenders containing no CoQ10 served as the control. After post-thaw total sperm motility (TM) assessments, the stallions were classified as GFA (i.e., decrease of ≤25% in TM, n = 7) or BFA (i.e., decrease of ≥40% in TM, n = 5). Stallions not fitting (n = 8) this enrollment criteria had samples discarded. After that, two straws for each extender were thawed at 37 °C for 30 s; one straw was immediately used for evaluation of sperm kinetics, plasma membrane integrity, non-capacitated spermatozoa, reactive oxygen species production, mitochondrial activity and lipid peroxidation. The second straw was kept at 37 °C for 30 min and subjected to the same assessments. Expectedly, sperm motility parameters were significantly lower for stallions with BFA. There were no effects of CoQ10 concentration or time for all parameters evaluated in the group with GFA when compared with the control extender (p > 0.05), except lipid peroxidation (p < 0.05). However, stallions with BFA had improved sperm parameters for samples processed with extenders containing CoQ10 (particularly 75 μmols/L) (p < 0.05), except for the reactive oxygen species production and mitochondrial potential (T0) in which there were no differences between the groups (p > 0.05). In summary, 75 μmols/L appears to be the optimal dose of Co-Q10, particularly, when added to

  12. Genome-wide association study of serum coenzyme Q10 levels identifies susceptibility loci linked to neuronal diseases.

    PubMed

    Degenhardt, Frauke; Niklowitz, Petra; Szymczak, Silke; Jacobs, Gunnar; Lieb, Wolfgang; Menke, Thomas; Laudes, Matthias; Esko, Tõnu; Weidinger, Stephan; Franke, Andre; Döring, Frank; Onur, Simone

    2016-07-01

    Coenzyme Q 10 (CoQ 10 ) is a lipophilic redox molecule that is present in membranes of almost all cells in human tissues. CoQ 10 is, amongst other functions, essential for the respiratory transport chain and is a modulator of inflammatory processes and gene expression. Rare monogenetic CoQ 10 deficiencies show noticeable symptoms in tissues (e.g. kidney) and cell types (e.g. neurons) with a high energy demand. To identify common genetic variants influencing serum CoQ 10 levels, we performed a fixed effects meta-analysis in two independent cross-sectional Northern German cohorts comprising 1300 individuals in total. We identified two genome-wide significant susceptibility loci. The best associated single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) was rs9952641 (P value = 1.31 × 10 - 8 , β = 0.063, CI 0.95 [0.041, 0.085]) within the COLEC12 gene on chromosome 18. The SNP rs933585 within the NRXN-1 gene on chromosome 2 also showed genome wide significance (P value = 3.64 × 10 - 8 , β = -0.034, CI 0.95 [-0.046, -0.022]). Both genes have been previously linked to neuronal diseases like Alzheimer's disease, autism and schizophrenia. Among our 'top-10' associated variants, four additional loci with known neuronal connections showed suggestive associations with CoQ 10 levels. In summary, this study demonstrates that serum CoQ 10 levels are associated with common genetic loci that are linked to neuronal diseases. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Antioxidant vitamins C, E and coenzyme Q10 vs Dexamethasone: comparisons of their effects in pulmonary contusion model

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The goal of our study is to evaluate the effects of antioxidant vitamins (vitamin C and E), Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) and dexamethasone (Dxm) in experimental rat models with pulmonary contusion (PC). Methods Rats were randomly divided into six groups. Except for the control, all subgroups had a moderate pulmonary contusion. Animals in the group I and group II received intraperitoneal saline, group III received 10mg.kg-1 CoQ10 group IV received 100mg.kg-1 vitamin C, group V received 150mg.kg-1 vitamin E, and group VI received 10mg.kg-1 Dxm. Blood gas analysis, serum nitric oxide (NO) and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels as well as superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity assays, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid and histopathological examination were performed. Results Administration of CoQ10 resulted in a significant increase in PaO2 values compared with the group I (p = 0.004). Levels of plasma MDA in group II were significantly higher than those in the group I (p = 0.01). Early administration of vitamin C, CoQ10, and Dxm significantly decreased the levels of MDA (p = 0.01). Lung contusion due to blunt trauma significantly decreased SOD activities in rat lung tissue compared with group I (p = 0.01). SOD levels were significantly elevated in animals treated with CoQ10, Vitamin E, or Dxm compared with group II (p = 0.01). Conclusions In our study, CoQ10, vitamin C, vitamin E and Dxm had a protective effect on the biochemical and histopathological outcome of PC after experimental blunt thorax trauma. PMID:23013526

  14. Addition of omega-3 fatty acid and coenzyme Q10 to statin therapy in patients with combined dyslipidemia.

    PubMed

    Tóth, Štefan; Šajty, Matej; Pekárová, Tímea; Mughees, Adil; Štefanič, Peter; Katz, Matan; Spišáková, Katarína; Pella, Jozef; Pella, Daniel

    2017-07-26

    Statins represent a group of drugs that are currently indicated in the primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular events. Their administration can be associated with side effects and the insufficient reduction of triacylglyceride (TAG) levels. This study aimed to assess the effect of the triple combination of statins with omega-3 fatty acids and coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) on parameters associated with atherogenesis and statin side effects. In this pilot randomized double-blind trial, 105 subjects who met the criteria of combined dislipidemia and elevated TAG levels were randomly divided into three groups. In the control group, unaltered statin therapy was indicated. In the second and third groups, omega-3 PUFA 2.52 g/day (Zennix fa Pleuran) and omega-3 PUFA 2.52 g+CoQ10 200 mg/day (Pharma Nord ApS) were added, res//. At the end of the 3-month period (±1 week), all patients were evaluated. Significant reduction of hepatic enzymes activity, systolic blood preasure, inflammatory markers and TAG levels were detected in both groups in comparison to the control group. Activity of SOD and GPx increased significantly after additive therapy. Coenzyme Q10 addition significantly reduced most of the abovementioned parameters (systolic blood preasure, total cholesterol, LDL, hsCRP, IL-6, SOD) in comparison with the statin+omega-3 PUFA group. The intensity of statin adverse effects were significantly reduced in the group with the addition of CoQ10. The results of this pilot study suggest the possible beneficial effects of triple combination on the lipid and non-lipid parameters related to atherogenesis and side effects of statin treatment.

  15. The use of coenzyme Q0 as a template in the development of a molecularly imprinted polymer for the selective recognition of coenzyme Q10.

    PubMed

    Contin, Mario; Flor, Sabrina; Martinefski, Manuela; Lucangioli, Silvia; Tripodi, Valeria

    2014-01-07

    In this work, a novel molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) for use as a solid phase extraction sorbent was developed for the determination of coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) in liver extract. CoQ10 is an essential cofactor in mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation and a powerful antioxidant agent found in low concentrations in biological samples. This fact and its high hydrophobicity make the analysis of CoQ10 technically challenging. Accordingly, a MIP was synthesised using coenzyme Q0 as the template, methacrylic acid as the functional monomer, acetonitrile as the porogen, ethylene glycol dimethacrylate as the crosslinker and benzoyl peroxide as the initiator. Various parameters affecting the polymer preparation and extraction efficiency were evaluated. Morphological characterisation of the MIP and its proper comparison with C18 as a sorbent in solid phase extraction were performed. The optimal conditions for the molecularly imprinted solid phase extraction (MISPE) consisted of 400 μL of sample mixed with 30 mg of MIP and 600 μL of water to reach the optimum solution loading. The loading was followed by a washing step consisting of 1 mL of a 1-propanol solution (1-propanol:water, 30:70,v/v) and elution with 1 mL of 1-propanol. After clean-up, the CoQ10 in the samples was analysed by high performance liquid chromatography. The extraction recoveries were higher than 73.7% with good precision (3.6-8.3%). The limits of detection and quantification were 2.4 and 7.5 μg g(-1), respectively, and a linear range between 7.5 and 150 μg g(-1) of tissue was achieved. The new MISPE procedure provided a successful clean-up for the determination of CoQ10 in a complex matrix. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Compound Heterozygous Inheritance of Mutations in Coenzyme Q8A Results in Autosomal Recessive Cerebellar Ataxia and Coenzyme Q10 Deficiency in a Female Sib-Pair.

    PubMed

    Jacobsen, Jessie C; Whitford, Whitney; Swan, Brendan; Taylor, Juliet; Love, Donald R; Hill, Rosamund; Molyneux, Sarah; George, Peter M; Mackay, Richard; Robertson, Stephen P; Snell, Russell G; Lehnert, Klaus

    2017-11-21

    Autosomal recessive ataxias are characterised by a fundamental loss in coordination of gait with associated atrophy of the cerebellum. There is significant clinical and genetic heterogeneity amongst inherited ataxias; however, an early molecular diagnosis is essential with low-risk treatments available for some of these conditions. We describe two female siblings who presented early in life with unsteady gait and cerebellar atrophy. Whole exome sequencing revealed compound heterozygous inheritance of two pathogenic mutations (p.Leu277Pro, c.1506+1G>A) in the coenzyme Q8A gene (COQ8A), a gene central to biosynthesis of coenzyme Q (CoQ). The paternally derived p.Leu277Pro mutation is predicted to disrupt a conserved motif in the substrate-binding pocket of the protein, resulting in inhibition of CoQ 10 production. The maternal c.1506+1G>A mutation destroys a canonical splice donor site in exon 12 affecting transcript processing and subsequent protein translation. Mutations in this gene can result in primary coenzyme Q 10 deficiency type 4, which is characterized by childhood onset of cerebellar ataxia and exercise intolerance, both of which were observed in this sib-pair. Muscle biopsies revealed unequivocally low levels of CoQ 10, and the siblings were subsequently established on a therapeutic dose of CoQ 10 with distinct clinical evidence of improvement after 1 year of treatment. This case emphasises the importance of an early and accurate molecular diagnosis for suspected inherited ataxias, particularly given the availability of approved treatments for some subtypes.

  17. Reduction of coenzyme q10 content: a possible effect of isoproterenol on heart failure and myocardial infarction in rat.

    PubMed

    Khorrami, A; Garjani, A; Ghanbarzadeh, S; Andalib, S

    2014-04-01

    Myocardial infarction (MI) was induced by subcutaneous injection of isoproterenol (ISO) to investigate the effect of ISO on Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) content of myocardium and subsequent effects on lipid peroxidation, electrocardiogram pattern and hemodynamic parameters of the rat's heart.36 male Wistar rats were divided randomly into 6 groups. To induce heart failure (HF) and MI, 10 and 100 mg/kg of ISO was administered subcutaneously for 10 and 2 consecutive days, respectively. The effects of ISO on myocardium CoQ10 content, concentration of malondialdehyde, ECG pattern and hemodynamic parameters of heart were analyzed.ISO-treated rats showed significant alteration in heart hemodynamic parameters such as reduction of left-ventricular systolic pressure, maximum and minimum rate of developed left ventricular pressure, besides increase of left ventricular end-diastolic pressure. Significant depletion of heart CoQ10 content (from 4.57 and 4.55 µg/100 mg tissue in control groups to 2.85 and 2.89 µg/100 mg tissue in ISO-induced HF and MI groups respectively) and increase in tissue levels of malondialdehyde (47.1 and 53.8 nmol/100 mg tissue in ISO-induced HF and MI groups, respectively) were also observed in ISO-treated animals compared with the normal animals (17.4 and 18.8 nmol/100 mg tissue in control groups, respectively). Additionally CoQ10 improved ISO effects on hemodynamic parameters and ECG pattern in ISO-induced HF and myocardial injury.The present findings have demonstrated that the cardiotoxic effects of ISO such as oxidative damage and hemodynamic declination might be related to depletion of CoQ10 concentration. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  18. The Protective Effects of Alpha-Lipoic Acid and Coenzyme Q10 Combination on Ovarian Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury: An Experimental Study.

    PubMed

    Tuncer, Ahmet Ali; Bozkurt, Mehmet Fatih; Koken, Tulay; Dogan, Nurhan; Pektaş, Mine Kanat; Baskin Embleton, Didem

    2016-01-01

    Objective. This study aims to evaluate whether alpha-lipoic acid and/or coenzyme Q10 can protect the prepubertal ovarian tissue from ischemia-reperfusion injury in an experimental rat model of ovarian torsion. Materials and Methods. Forty-two female preadolescent Wistar-Albino rats were divided into 6 equal groups randomly. The sham group had laparotomy without torsion; the other groups had torsion/detorsion procedure. After undergoing torsion, group 2 received saline, group 3 received olive oil, group 4 received alpha-lipoic acid, group 5 received coenzyme Q10, and group 6 received both alpha-lipoic acid and coenzyme Q10 orally. The oxidant-antioxidant statuses of these groups were compared using biochemical measurement of oxidized/reduced glutathione, glutathione peroxidase and malondialdehyde, pathological evaluation of damage and apoptosis within the ovarian tissue, and immunohistochemical assessment of nitric oxide synthase. Results. The left ovaries of the alpha-lipoic acid + coenzyme Q10 group had significantly lower apoptosis scores and significantly higher nitric oxide synthase content than the left ovaries of the control groups. The alpha-lipoic acid + coenzyme Q10 group had significantly higher glutathione peroxidase levels and serum malondialdehyde concentrations than the sham group. Conclusions. The combination of alpha-lipoic acid and coenzyme Q10 has beneficial effects on oxidative stress induced by ischemia-reperfusion injury related to ovarian torsion.

  19. Coenzyme Q10 prevents hepatic fibrosis, inflammation, and oxidative stress in a male rat model of poor maternal nutrition and accelerated postnatal growth1

    PubMed Central

    Tarry-Adkins, Jane L; Fernandez-Twinn, Denise S; Hargreaves, Iain P; Neergheen, Viruna; Aiken, Catherine E; Martin-Gronert, Malgorzata S; McConnell, Josie M; Ozanne, Susan E

    2016-01-01

    Background: It is well established that low birth weight and accelerated postnatal growth increase the risk of liver dysfunction in later life. However, molecular mechanisms underlying such developmental programming are not well characterized, and potential intervention strategies are poorly defined. Objectives: We tested the hypotheses that poor maternal nutrition and accelerated postnatal growth would lead to increased hepatic fibrosis (a pathological marker of liver dysfunction) and that postnatal supplementation with the antioxidant coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) would prevent this programmed phenotype. Design: A rat model of maternal protein restriction was used to generate low-birth-weight offspring that underwent accelerated postnatal growth (termed “recuperated”). These were compared with control rats. Offspring were weaned onto standard feed pellets with or without dietary CoQ10 (1 mg/kg body weight per day) supplementation. At 12 mo, hepatic fibrosis, indexes of inflammation, oxidative stress, and insulin signaling were measured by histology, Western blot, ELISA, and reverse transcriptase–polymerase chain reaction. Results: Hepatic collagen deposition (diameter of deposit) was greater in recuperated offspring (mean ± SEM: 12 ± 2 μm) than in controls (5 ± 0.5 μm) (P < 0.001). This was associated with greater inflammation (interleukin 6: 38% ± 24% increase; P < 0.05; tumor necrosis factor α: 64% ± 24% increase; P < 0.05), lipid peroxidation (4-hydroxynonenal, measured by ELISA: 0.30 ± 0.02 compared with 0.19 ± 0.05 μg/mL per μg protein; P < 0.05), and hyperinsulinemia (P < 0.05). CoQ10 supplementation increased (P < 0.01) hepatic CoQ10 concentrations and ameliorated liver fibrosis (P < 0.001), inflammation (P < 0.001), some measures of oxidative stress (P < 0.001), and hyperinsulinemia (P < 0.01). Conclusions: Suboptimal in utero nutrition combined with accelerated postnatal catch-up growth caused more hepatic fibrosis in adulthood, which was

  20. Effect of Coenzyme Q10 on ischemia and neuronal damage in an experimental traumatic brain-injury model in rats

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Head trauma is one of the most important clinical issues that not only can be fatal and disabling, requiring long-term treatment and care, but also can cause heavy financial burden. Formation or distribution of free oxygen radicals should be decreased to enable fixing of poor neurological outcomes and to prevent neuronal damage secondary to ischemia after trauma. Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10), a component of the mitochondrial electron transport chain, is a strong antioxidant that plays a role in membrane stabilization. In this study, the role of CoQ10 in the treatment of head trauma is researched by analyzing the histopathological and biochemical effects of CoQ10 administered after experimental traumatic brain injury in rats. A traumatic brain-injury model was created in all rats. Trauma was inflicted on rats by the free fall of an object of 450 g weight from a height of 70 cm on the frontoparietal midline onto a metal disc fixed between the coronal and the lambdoid sutures after a midline incision was carried out. Results In the biochemical tests, tissue malondialdehyde (MDA) levels were significantly higher in the traumatic brain-injury group compared to the sham group (p < 0.05). Administration of CoQ10 after trauma was shown to be protective because it significantly lowered the increased MDA levels (p < 0.05). Comparing the superoxide dismutase (SOD) levels of the four groups, trauma + CoQ10 group had SOD levels ranging between those of sham group and traumatic brain-injury group, and no statistically significant increase was detected. Histopathological results showed a statistically significant difference between the CoQ10 and the other trauma-subjected groups with reference to vascular congestion, neuronal loss, nuclear pyknosis, nuclear hyperchromasia, cytoplasmic eosinophilia, and axonal edema (p < 0.05). Conclusion Neuronal degenerative findings and the secondary brain damage and ischemia caused by oxidative stress are decreased by CoQ10 use in rats with

  1. LC/MS/MS analysis of α-tocopherol and coenzyme Q10 content in lyophilized royal jelly, beebread and drone homogenate.

    PubMed

    Hryniewicka, Marta; Karpinska, Agnieszka; Kijewska, Marta; Turkowicz, Monika Joanna; Karpinska, Joanna

    2016-11-01

    This study shows the results of application liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) for assay of the content of α-tocopherol and coenzyme Q 10 in bee products of animal origin, i.e. royal jelly, beebread and drone homogenate. The biological matrix was removed using extraction with n-hexane. It was found that drone homogenate is a rich source of coenzyme Q 10 . It contains only 8 ± 1 µg/g of α-tocopherol and 20 ± 2 µg/g of coenzyme Q 10 . The contents of assayed compounds in royal jelly were 16 ± 3 and 8 ± 0.2 µg/g of α-tocopherol and coenzyme Q 10 , respectively. Beebread appeared to be the richest of α-tocopherol. Its level was 80 ± 30 µg/g, while the level of coenzyme Q 10 was only 11.5 ± 0.3 µg/g. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. In vitro effects of zinc, D-aspartic acid, and coenzyme-Q10 on sperm function.

    PubMed

    Giacone, Filippo; Condorelli, Rosita A; Mongioì, Laura M; Bullara, Valentina; La Vignera, Sandro; Calogero, Aldo E

    2017-05-01

    Reactive oxygen species favor reproductive processes at low concentrations, but damage spermatozoa and decrease their fertilizing capacity at high concentrations. During infection and/or inflammation of the accessory sex glands reactive oxygen species overproduction may occur which, in turn, may negatively impact on sperm motility, sperm DNA fragmentation, and lipid peroxidation. A number of nutraceutical formulations containing antioxidant molecules have been developed to counteract the deleterious effects of the oxidative stress. A recent formulation containing zinc, D-aspartic acid, and coenzyme-Q10 is present in the pharmaceutical market. Based on these premises, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of this combination on spermatozoa in vitro. The study was conducted on 24 men (32.2 ± 5.5 years): 12 normozoospermic men and 12 asthenozoospermic patients. Spermatozoa from each sample were divided into two control aliquots (aliquot A and B) and an aliquot incubated with zinc, D-aspartic acid, and coenzyme-Q10 (aliquot C). After 3 h of incubation, the following parameters were evaluated: progressive motility, number of spermatozoa with progressive motility recovered after swim-up, lipid peroxidation, and DNA fragmentation. Incubation with zinc, D-aspartic acid, and coenzyme-Q10 maintained sperm motility in normozoospermic men (37.7 ± 1.2 % vs. 35.8 ± 2.3 % at time zero) and improved it significantly in asthenozoospermic patients (26.5 ± 1.9 % vs. 18.8 ± 2.0 % at time zero) (p < 0.01). This resulted in a significantly higher (p < 0.01) number of spermatozoa with progressive motility recovered after swim-up in both normozospermic men (4.1 ± 0.9 vs. 3.3 ± 1.0 millions) and asthenozooseprmic patients (3.2 ± 0.8 vs. 1.6 ± 0.5 millions). Finally, a statistically significant lower sperm lipid peroxidation was found after incubation with zinc, D-aspartic acid, and coenzyme-Q10 (p < 0

  3. The clinical heterogeneity of coenzyme Q10 deficiency results from genotypic differences in the Coq9 gene

    PubMed Central

    Luna-Sánchez, Marta; Díaz-Casado, Elena; Barca, Emanuele; Tejada, Miguel Ángel; Montilla-García, Ángeles; Cobos, Enrique Javier; Escames, Germaine; Acuña-Castroviejo, Dario; Quinzii, Catarina M; López, Luis Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Primary coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) deficiency is due to mutations in genes involved in CoQ biosynthesis. The disease has been associated with five major phenotypes, but a genotype–phenotype correlation is unclear. Here, we compare two mouse models with a genetic modification in Coq9 gene (Coq9Q95X and Coq9R239X), and their responses to 2,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid (2,4-diHB). Coq9R239X mice manifest severe widespread CoQ deficiency associated with fatal encephalomyopathy and respond to 2,4-diHB increasing CoQ levels. In contrast, Coq9Q95X mice exhibit mild CoQ deficiency manifesting with reduction in CI+III activity and mitochondrial respiration in skeletal muscle, and late-onset mild mitochondrial myopathy, which does not respond to 2,4-diHB. We show that these differences are due to the levels of COQ biosynthetic proteins, suggesting that the presence of a truncated version of COQ9 protein in Coq9R239X mice destabilizes the CoQ multiprotein complex. Our study points out the importance of the multiprotein complex for CoQ biosynthesis in mammals, which may provide new insights to understand the genotype–phenotype heterogeneity associated with human CoQ deficiency and may have a potential impact on the treatment of this mitochondrial disorder. PMID:25802402

  4. Coenzyme Q10 protects renal proximal tubule cells against nicotine-induced apoptosis through induction of p66shc-dependent antioxidant responses.

    PubMed

    Arany, Istvan; Carter, Anthony; Hall, Samuel; Fulop, Tibor; Dixit, Mehul

    2017-02-01

    Chronic nicotine exposure (via smoking, E-cigarettes) increases oxidative stress in the kidney that sensitizes it to additional injury in experimental models and in the renal patient. The pro-apoptotic p66 shc protein-via serine36 phosphorylation that facilitates its mitochondrial translocation and therein cytochrome c binding-generates oxidative stress that leads to injury of renal proximal tubule cells during chronic nicotine exposure. Coenzyme Q10-a clinically safe antioxidant-has been used against nicotine/smoke extract-associated oxidative stress in various non-renal cells. This study explored the anti-oxidant/anti-apoptotic effect of Coenzyme Q10 on nicotine-induced oxidative stress and its impact on p66shc in cultured rat renal proximal tubule cells (NRK52E). We studied the anti-oxidant effect of 10 µM Coenzyme Q10 using various mutants of the p66shc gene and also determined the induction of selected anti-oxidant entities (antioxidant response element, promoter of the manganese superoxide dismutase gene) in reporter luciferase assay during oxidative stress induced by 200 µM nicotine. Our studies revealed that Coenzyme Q10 strongly inhibits nicotine-mediated production of reactive oxygen species and consequent apoptosis that requires serine36 phosphorylation but not mitochondrial translocation/cytochrome c binding of p66 shc . While both nicotine and Coenzyme Q10 stimulates the p66shc promoter, only nicotine exposure results in mitochondrial translocation of p66 shc . In contrast, the Coenzyme Q10-stimulated and non-mitochondrial p66 shc activates the anti-oxidant manganese superoxide dismutase promoter via the antioxidant response elements and hence, rescues cells from nicotine-induced oxidative stress and consequent apoptosis.

  5. Effect of pretreatment with coenzyme Q10 on isoproterenol-induced cardiotoxicity and cardiac hypertrophy in rats.

    PubMed

    Ghule, Arvindkumar E; Kulkarni, Chetan P; Bodhankar, Subhash L; Pandit, Vijaya A

    2009-12-01

    Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) is a lipid-soluble, vitamin-like substance found in the hydrophobic interior of the phospholipid bilayer of most cellular membranes. It appears to be involved in the coordinated regulation between oxidative stress and antioxidant capacity of heart tissue when the heart is subjected to oxidative stress in various pathogenic conditions. The objective of the present study was to investigate the effect of pretreatment with CoQ10 (100 mg/kg) on isoproterenol (ISO)-induced cardiotoxicity and cardiac hypertrophy in rats. Albino male Wistar rats (250-300 g) were evenly divided by lottery method into 1 of the following 3 groups: the ISO group (olive oil 2 mL/kg orally for 18 days and ISO 1 mg/kg IP from days 9-18); the CoQ10 + ISO group (CoQ10 100 mg/kg orally for 18 days and ISO 1 mg/kg IP from days 9-18); and the control group (olive oil 2 mL/kg orally for 18 days and water IP from days 9-18). Twenty-four hours after the last dose of water or ISO, the rats were anesthetized and an ECG was recorded. Blood was withdrawn by retro-orbital puncture for estimation of serum creatine kinase-MB (CK-MB) isoenzyme levels, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) levels, and aspartate aminotransferase activities. The animals were euthanized using an overdose of ether. The hearts of 6 animals from each group were used for estimation of superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, reduced glutathione (GSH) concentration, lipid peroxidation (LPO), malondialdehyde (MDA), and total protein concentration. Histopathology of the 2 remaining hearts in each group was carried out by a blinded technician. A total of 24 rats (8 in each group) were used in this study; all rats survived to study end. Compared with the control group, the ISO-treated rats had a significant change in heart to body weight ratio (P < 0.001); significant changes in the endogenous antioxidants (ie, significantly higher myocardial MDA concentration [P < 0.001]; significantly lower myocardial GSH concentration [P < 0

  6. Relationship between functional capacity and body mass index with plasma coenzyme Q10 and oxidative damage in community-dwelling elderly-people.

    PubMed

    Del Pozo-Cruz, Jesús; Rodríguez-Bies, Elizabeth; Navas-Enamorado, Ignacio; Del Pozo-Cruz, Borja; Navas, Plácido; López-Lluch, Guillermo

    2014-04-01

    The impact of aging and physical capacity on coenzyme Q10 (Q10) levels in human blood is unknown. Plasma Q10 is an important factor in cardiovascular diseases. To understand how physical activity in the elderly affects endogenous Q10 levels in blood plasma, we studied a cohort of healthy community-dwelling people. Volunteers were subjected to different tests of the Functional Fitness Test Battery including handgrip strength, six-minute walk, 30 s chair to stand, and time up and go tests. Anthropometric characteristics, plasma Q10 and lipid peroxidation (MDA) levels were determined. Population was divided according to gender and fitness. We found that people showing higher levels of functional capacity presented lower levels of cholesterol and lipid peroxidation accompanied by higher levels of Q10 in plasma. The ratio Q10/cholesterol and Q10/LDL increased in these people. No relationship was found when correlated to muscle strength or agility. On the other hand, obesity was related to lower Q10 and higher MDA levels in plasma affecting women more significantly. Our data demonstrate for the first time that physical activity at advanced age can increase the levels of Q10 and lower the levels of lipid peroxidation in plasma, probably reducing the progression of cardiovascular diseases. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Secondary coenzyme Q10 deficiency and oxidative stress in cultured fibroblasts from patients with riboflavin responsive multiple Acyl-CoA dehydrogenation deficiency.

    PubMed

    Cornelius, Nanna; Byron, Colleen; Hargreaves, Iain; Guerra, Paula Fernandez; Furdek, Andrea K; Land, John; Radford, Weston W; Frerman, Frank; Corydon, Thomas J; Gregersen, Niels; Olsen, Rikke K J

    2013-10-01

    Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) is essential for the energy production of the cells and as an electron transporter in the mitochondrial respiratory chain. CoQ10 links the mitochondrial fatty acid β-oxidation to the respiratory chain by accepting electrons from electron transfer flavoprotein-ubiquinone oxidoreductase (ETF-QO). Recently, it was shown that a group of patients with the riboflavin responsive form of multiple acyl-CoA dehydrogenation deficiency (RR-MADD) carrying inherited amino acid variations in ETF-QO also had secondary CoQ10 deficiency with beneficial effects of CoQ10 treatment, thus adding RR-MADD to an increasing number of diseases involving secondary CoQ10 deficiency. In this study, we show that moderately decreased CoQ10 levels in fibroblasts from six unrelated RR-MADD patients were associated with increased levels of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS). Treatment with CoQ10, but not with riboflavin, could normalize the CoQ10 level and decrease the level of ROS in the patient cells. Additionally, riboflavin-depleted control fibroblasts showed moderate CoQ10 deficiency, but not increased mitochondrial ROS, indicating that variant ETF-QO proteins and not CoQ10 deficiency are the causes of mitochondrial ROS production in the patient cells. Accordingly, the corresponding variant Rhodobacter sphaeroides ETF-QO proteins, when overexpressed in vitro, bind a CoQ10 pseudosubstrate, Q10Br, less tightly than the wild-type ETF-QO protein, suggesting that molecular oxygen can get access to the electrons in the misfolded ETF-QO protein, thereby generating superoxide and oxidative stress, which can be reversed by CoQ10 treatment.

  8. Coenzyme Q10-Loaded Fish Oil-Based Bigel System: Probing the Delivery Across Porcine Skin and Possible Interaction with Fish Oil Fatty Acids.

    PubMed

    Zulfakar, Mohd Hanif; Chan, Lee Mei; Rehman, Khurram; Wai, Lam Kok; Heard, Charles M

    2018-04-01

    Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) is a vitamin-like oil-soluble molecule that has anti-oxidant and anti-ageing effects. To determine the most optimal CoQ10 delivery vehicle, CoQ10 was solubilised in both water and fish oil, and formulated into hydrogel, oleogel and bigel. Permeability of CoQ10 from each formulation across porcine ear skin was then evaluated. Furthermore, the effects of the omega-3 fatty eicosapentaenoic (EPA) and docosahexaenoic (DHA) acids from fish oil on skin permeation were investigated by means of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and computerised molecular modelling docking experiments. The highest drug permeation was achieved with the bigel formulation that proved to be the most effective vehicle in delivering CoQ10 across the skin membrane due to a combination of its adhesive, viscous and lipophilic properties. Furthermore, the interactions between CoQ10 and fatty acids revealed by NMR and molecular modelling experiments likely accounted for skin permeability of CoQ10. NMR data showed dose-dependent changes in proton chemical shifts in EPA and DHA. Molecular modelling revealed complex formation and large binding energies between fatty acids and CoQ10. This study advances the knowledge about bigels as drug delivery vehicles and highlights the use of NMR and molecular docking studies for the prediction of the influence of drug-excipient relationships at the molecular level.

  9. Coenzyme Q 10 improves lactic acidosis, strokelike episodes, and epilepsy in a patient with MELAS (mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, and strokelike episodes).

    PubMed

    Berbel-Garcia, Angel; Barbera-Farre, Jose Ramon; Etessam, Jesús Porta; Salio, Antonio Martínez; Cabello, Ana; Gutierrez-Rivas, Eduardo; Campos, Yolanda

    2004-01-01

    Mitochondrial encephalomyopathies encompass a group of disorders that have impaired oxidative metabolism in skeletal muscles and central nervous system. Many compounds have been used in clinical trials on mitochondrial diseases, but the outcomes have been variable. It remains controversial whether treatment of mitochondrial diseases with coenzyme Q 10 is effective. This paper describes a case of mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, strokelike episodes, and exercise intolerance successfully treated with coenzyme Q 10. Efficacy of this therapy in this patient is correlated to control of lactic acidosis and serum creatine kinase levels. Disappointingly, larger studies with coenzyme Q 10 failed to demonstrate a clear beneficial effect on the entire study population with regard to clinical improvement or several parameters of the oxidative metabolism. They suggest that the use of coenzyme Q in treatment of mitochondrial diseases should be confined to protocols. There is a confounding variation in phenotype and genotype, and the natural history of the disorders in individual patients is not accurately predictable. The unpredictable a priori efficacy of therapy suggests that a long-term trial of oral coenzyme Q may be warranted.

  10. The effect of coenzyme Q10 included by γ-cyclodextrin on the growth of fission yeast studied by microscope Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishida, Tatsuro; Kaino, Tomohiro; Ikarashi, Ryo; Nakata, Daisuke; Terao, Keiji; Ando, Masahiro; Hamaguchi, Hiro-o.; Kawamukai, Makoto; Yamamoto, Tatsuyuki

    2013-09-01

    The inclusion complex of coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) by γ-cyclodextrin (γ-CD), CoQ10-CD complex, was recently developed. The addition of the CoQ10-CD complex recovered the growth of a fission yeast mutant strain, Δdps1, which otherwise cannot grow well due to the lack of coenzyme Q producing ability. However, the oxygen consumption rate of this strain was not restored by the addition of the CoQ10-CD complex. The addition of two other anti-oxidative reagents, glutathione and ascorbic acid, also recovered the growth of the Δdps1 strain as well. These results indicated that the recovery of the growth of Δdps1 was brought about by the anti-oxidative property of CoQ10. The intensity of Raman spectra of Δdps1 at 1602 cm-1, which is prominently observed for the wild type of the fission yeast, was compared between before and after addition of the CoQ10-CD complex. The signal was very weakly observed for Δdps1 and did not increase in intensity by the addition of the CoQ10-CD complex. These results suggested the recovery of the growth of Δdps1 was brought about not by the restoration of respiration function of Δdps1 but by the anti-oxidative property of CoQ10 to result in the decrease in the oxidative stress.

  11. Water-soluble Coenzyme Q10 formulation (Q-ter) promotes outer hair cell survival in a guinea pig model of noise induced hearing loss (NIHL).

    PubMed

    Fetoni, Anna Rita; Piacentini, Roberto; Fiorita, Antonella; Paludetti, Gaetano; Troiani, Diana

    2009-02-27

    The mitochondrial respiratory chain is a powerful source of reactive oxygen species (ROS) also in noise induced hearing loss (NIHL) and anti-oxidants and free-radicals scavengers have been shown to attenuate the damage. Coenzyme Q(10) (CoQ(10)) or ubiquinone has a bioenergetic role as a component of the mithocondrial respiratory chain, it inhibits mitochondrial lipid peroxidation, inducing ATP production and it is involved in ROS removal and prevention of oxidative stress-induced apoptosis. However the therapeutic application of CoQ(10) is limited by the lack of solubility and poor bio- availability, therefore it is a challenge to improve its water solubility in order to ameliorate the efficacy in tissues and fluids. This study was conducted in a model of acoustic trauma in the guinea pig where the effectiveness of CoQ(10) was compared with a soluble formulation of CoQ(10) (multicomposite CoQ(10) Terclatrate, Q-ter) given intraperitoneally 1 h before and once daily for 3 days after pure tone noise exposure (6 kHz for 1 h at 120 dB SPL). Functional and morphological studies were carried out by measuring auditory brainstem responses, scanning electron microscopy for hair cell loss count, active caspase 3 staining and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP labelling assay in order to identify initial signs of apoptosis. Treatments decreased active caspase 3 expression and the number of apoptotic cells, but animals injected with Q-ter showed a greater degree of activity in preventing apoptosis and thus in improving hearing. These data confirm that solubility of Coenzyme Q(10) improves the ability of CoQ(10) in preventing oxidative injuries that result from mitochondrial dysfunction.

  12. Coenzyme Q10 ameliorates pain and cartilage degradation in a rat model of osteoarthritis by regulating nitric oxide and inflammatory cytokines.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jennifer; Hong, Yeon Sik; Jeong, Jeong Hee; Yang, Eun Ji; Jhun, Joo Yeon; Park, Mi Kyoung; Jung, Young Ok; Min, Jun Ki; Kim, Ho Youn; Park, Sung Hwan; Cho, Mi-La

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the effect of CoenzymeQ10 (CoQ10) on pain severity and cartilage degeneration in an experimental model of rat osteoarthritis (OA). OA was induced in rats by intra-articular injection of monosodium iodoacetate (MIA) to the knee. Oral administration of CoQ10 was initiated on day 4 after MIA injection. Pain severity was assessed by measuring secondary tactile allodynia using the von Frey assessment test. The degree of cartilage degradation was determined by measuring cartilage thickness and the amount of proteoglycan. The mankin scoring system was also used. Expressions of matrix metalloproteinase-13 (MMP-13), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), IL-6, IL-15, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), nitrotyrosine and receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) were analyzed using immunohistochemistry. Treatment with CoQ10 demonstrated an antinociceptive effect in the OA animal model. The reduction in secondary tactile allodynia was shown by an increased pain withdrawal latency and pain withdrawal threshold. CoQ10 also attenuated cartilage degeneration in the osteoarthritic joints. MMP-13, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-15, iNOS, nitrotyrosine and RAGE expressions were upregulated in OA joints and significantly reduced with CoQ10 treatment. CoQ10 exerts a therapeutic effect on OA via pain suppression and cartilage degeneration by inhibiting inflammatory mediators, which play a vital role in OA pathogenesis.

  13. Regulation of the oxidative balance with coenzyme Q10 sensitizes human glioblastoma cells to radiation and temozolomide.

    PubMed

    Frontiñán-Rubio, Javier; Santiago-Mora, Raquel María; Nieva-Velasco, Consuelo María; Ferrín, Gustavo; Martínez-González, Alicia; Gómez, María Victoria; Moreno, María; Ariza, Julia; Lozano, Eva; Arjona-Gutiérrez, Jacinto; Gil-Agudo, Antonio; De la Mata, Manuel; Pesic, Milica; Peinado, Juan Ramón; Villalba, José M; Pérez-Romasanta, Luis; Pérez-García, Víctor M; Alcaín, Francisco J; Durán-Prado, Mario

    2018-05-18

    To investigate how the modulation of the oxidative balance affects cytotoxic therapies in glioblastoma, in vitro. Human glioblastoma U251 and T98 cells and normal astrocytes C8D1A were loaded with coenzyme Q10 (CoQ). Mitochondrial superoxide ion (O 2 - ) and H 2 O 2 were measured by fluorescence microscopy. OXPHOS performance was assessed in U251 cells with an oxytherm Clark-type electrode. Radio- and chemotherapy cytotoxicity was assessed by immunostaining of γH2AX (24 h), annexin V and nuclei morphology, at short (72 h) and long (15 d) time. Hif-1α, SOD1, SOD2 and NQO1 were determined by immunolabeling. Catalase activity was measured by classic enzymatic assay. Glutathione levels and total antioxidant capacity were quantified using commercial kits. CoQ did not affect oxygen consumption but reduced the level of O 2 - and H 2 O 2 while shifted to a pro-oxidant cell status mainly due to a decrease in catalase activity and SOD2 level. Hif-1α was dampened, echoed by a decrease lactate and several key metabolites involved in glutathione synthesis. CoQ-treated cells were twofold more sensitive than control to radiation-induced DNA damage and apoptosis in short and long-term clonogenic assays, potentiating TMZ-induced cytotoxicity, without affecting non-transformed astrocytes. CoQ acts as sensitizer for cytotoxic therapies, disarming GBM cells, but not normal astrocytes, against further pro-oxidant injuries, being potentially useful in clinical practice for this fatal pathology. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Potential Cardiovascular and Renal Protective Effects of Vitamin D and Coenzyme Q10 in l-NAME-Induced Hypertensive Rats.

    PubMed

    Shamardl, Hanan A; El-Ashmony, Sahar M; Kamel, Hala F; Fatani, Sameer H

    2017-08-01

    Hypertension is one of the primary modifiable risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Adequate vitamin D (vit D) levels have been shown to reduce vascular smooth muscle contraction and to increase arterial compliance, which may be beneficial in hypertension. Further, coenzyme Q10 (COQ10) through its action to lower oxidative stress has been reported to have beneficial effects on hypertension and heart failure. This study examined the possible cardiac and renal protective effects of vit D and COQ10 both separately and in combination with an angiotensin II receptor blocker, valsartan (vals) in l-NAME hypertensive rats. Hypertension was induced in rats by l-NAME administration. Following induction of hypertension, the rats were assigned into the following 6 subgroups: an l-NAME alone group and treated groups receiving the following drugs intraperitoneally for 6 weeks; vals, vit D, COQ10 and combination of vals with either vit D or COQ10. A group of normotensive rats were used as negative controls. At the end of the treatment period, blood pressure, serum creatinine, blood urea nitrogen, lipids and serum, cardiac and renal parameters of oxidative stress were measured. Compared to the l-NAME only group, all treatments lowered systolic, diastolic, mean arterial pressure, total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and creatinine levels as well as TNF-α and malondialdehyde. Further, the agents increased serum, cardiac and renal total antioxidant capacity. Interestingly, the combination of agents had further effects on all the parameters compared to treatment with each single agent. The study suggests that the additive protective effects of vit D and COQ10 when used alone or concurrent with vals treatment in hypertensive rats may be due to their effects as antioxidants, anticytokines and blood pressure conservers. Copyright © 2017 Southern Society for Clinical Investigation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Therapeutic targeting of oxidative stress with coenzyme Q10 counteracts exaggerated diabetic cardiomyopathy in a mouse model of diabetes with diminished PI3K(p110α) signaling.

    PubMed

    De Blasio, Miles J; Huynh, Karina; Qin, Chengxue; Rosli, Sarah; Kiriazis, Helen; Ayer, Anita; Cemerlang, Nelly; Stocker, Roland; Du, Xiao-Jun; McMullen, Julie R; Ritchie, Rebecca H

    2015-10-01

    Diabetes-induced cardiac complications include left ventricular (LV) dysfunction and heart failure. We previously demonstrated that LV phosphoinositide 3-kinase p110α (PI3K) protects the heart against diabetic cardiomyopathy, associated with reduced NADPH oxidase expression and activity. Conversely, in dominant negative PI3K(p110α) transgenic mice (dnPI3K), reduced cardiac PI3K signaling exaggerated diabetes-induced cardiomyopathy, associated with upregulated NADPH oxidase. The goal was to examine whether chronic supplementation with the antioxidant coenzyme Q(10) (CoQ(10)) could attenuate LV superoxide and diabetic cardiomyopathy in a setting of impaired PI3K signaling. Diabetes was induced in 6-week-old nontransgenic and dnPI3K male mice via streptozotocin. After 4 weeks of diabetes, CoQ(10) supplementation commenced (10 mg/kg ip, 3 times/week, 8 weeks). At study end (12 weeks of diabetes), markers of LV function, cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, collagen deposition, NADPH oxidase, oxidative stress (3-nitrotyrosine), and concentrations of CoQ(9) and CoQ(10) were determined. LV NADPH oxidase (Nox2 gene expression and activity, and lucigenin-enhanced chemiluminescence), as well as oxidative stress, were increased by diabetes, exaggerated in diabetic dnPI3K mice, and attenuated by CoQ(10). Diabetes-induced LV diastolic dysfunction (prolonged deceleration time, elevated end-diastolic pressure, impaired E/A ratio), cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and fibrosis, expression of atrial natriuretic peptide, connective tissue growth factor, and β-myosin heavy chain were all attenuated by CoQ(10). Chronic CoQ(10) supplementation attenuates aspects of diabetic cardiomyopathy, even in a setting of reduced cardiac PI3K protective signaling. Given that CoQ(10) supplementation has been suggested to have positive outcomes in heart failure patients, chronic CoQ(10) supplementation may be an attractive adjunct therapy for diabetic heart failure. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights

  16. Microemulsions based on a sunflower lecithin-Tween 20 blend have high capacity for dissolving peppermint oil and stabilizing coenzyme Q10.

    PubMed

    Chen, Huaiqiong; Guan, Yongguang; Zhong, Qixin

    2015-01-28

    The objectives of the present study were to improve the capability of microemulsions to dissolve peppermint oil by blending sunflower lecithin with Tween 20 and to study the possibility of codelivering lipophilic bioactive compounds. The oil loading in microemulsions with 20% (w/w) Tween 20 increased from 3% (w/w) to 20% (w/w) upon gradual supplementation of 6% (w/w) lecithin. All microemulsions had particles of <12 nm that did not change over 70 d of storage at 21 °C. They had relatively low Newtonian viscosities and were physically and chemically stable after 50-200-fold dilution in water, resulting from similar hydrophile-lipophile-balance values of the surfactant mixture and peppermint oil. Furthermore, the microemulsions were capable of dissolving coenzyme Q10 and preventing its degradation at UV 302 nm, more significant for the microemulsion with lecithin. Therefore, natural surfactant lecithin can reduce the use of synthetic Tween 20 to dissolve peppermint oil and protect the degradation of dissolved lipophilic bioactive components in transparent products.

  17. Pharmacological Chaperones and Coenzyme Q10 Treatment Improves Mutant β-Glucocerebrosidase Activity and Mitochondrial Function in Neuronopathic Forms of Gaucher Disease

    PubMed Central

    de la Mata, Mario; Cotán, David; Oropesa-Ávila, Manuel; Garrido-Maraver, Juan; Cordero, Mario D.; Villanueva Paz, Marina; Delgado Pavón, Ana; Alcocer-Gómez, Elizabet; de Lavera, Isabel; Ybot-González, Patricia; Paula Zaderenko, Ana; Ortiz Mellet, Carmen; Fernández, José M. García; Sánchez-Alcázar, José A.

    2015-01-01

    Gaucher disease (GD) is caused by mutations in the GBA1 gene, which encodes lysosomal β-glucocerebrosidase. Homozygosity for the L444P mutation in GBA1 is associated with high risk of neurological manifestations which are not improved by enzyme replacement therapy. Alternatively, pharmacological chaperones (PCs) capable of restoring the correct folding and trafficking of the mutant enzyme represent promising alternative therapies.Here, we report on how the L444P mutation affects mitochondrial function in primary fibroblast derived from GD patients. Mitochondrial dysfunction was associated with reduced mitochondrial membrane potential, increased reactive oxygen species (ROS), mitophagy activation and impaired autophagic flux.Both abnormalities, mitochondrial dysfunction and deficient β-glucocerebrosidase activity, were partially restored by supplementation with coenzyme Q10 (CoQ) or a L-idonojirimycin derivative, N-[N’-(4-adamantan-1-ylcarboxamidobutyl)thiocarbamoyl]-1,6-anhydro-L-idonojirimycin (NAdBT-AIJ), and more markedly by the combination of both treatments. These data suggest that targeting both mitochondria function by CoQ and protein misfolding by PCs can be promising therapies in neurological forms of GD. PMID:26045184

  18. Orally delivered water soluble Coenzyme Q10 (Ubisol-Q10) blocks on-going neurodegeneration in rats exposed to paraquat: potential for therapeutic application in Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Paraquat, still used as an herbicide in some parts of the world, is now regarded as a dangerous environmental neurotoxin and is linked to the development Parkinson’s disease (PD). Paraquat interacts with cellular redox systems and causes mitochondrial dysfunction and the formation of reactive oxygen species, which in turn, plays a crucial role in the pathophysiology of PD. Various antioxidant therapies have been explored with the expectations that they deliver health benefits to the PD patients, however, no such therapies were effective. Here we have tested the neuroprotective efficacy of a novel water-soluble CoQ10 (Ubisol-Q10), in a rat model of paraquat-induced neurodegeneration in order to evaluate its potential application in the management of PD. Results We have developed a rat model of progressive nigrostriatal degeneration by giving rats five intraperitoneal injections of paraquat (10 mg/kg/injection), once every five days. Neuronal death occurred over a period of 8 weeks with close to 50% reduction in the number of tyrosine hydroxylase-positive cells. Ubisol-Q10, at 6 mg CoQ10/kg body weight/day, was delivered as a supplement in drinking water. The intervention begun after the completion of paraquat injections when the neurodegenerative process had already began and about 20% of TH-positive neurons were lost. Ubisol-Q10 treatment halted the progression of neurodegeneration and remaining neurons were protected. The outcomes were evaluated based on the number of surviving tyrosine hydroxylase-positive neurons in the substantia nigra region and improved motor skills in response to the Ubisol-Q10 intervention. To maintain this neuroprotection, however, continuous Ubisol- Q10 supplementation was required, if withdrawn, the neuronal death pathway resumed, suggesting that the presence of CoQ10 was essential for blocking the pathway. Conclusion The CoQ10, given orally as Ubisol-Q10 in drinking solution, was effective in blocking the progression of

  19. Inhibition of liver fibrosis by solubilized coenzyme Q10: Role of Nrf2 activation in inhibiting transforming growth factor-beta1 expression

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Hoo-Kyun; Pokharel, Yuba Raj; Lim, Sung Chul

    2009-11-01

    Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10), an endogenous antioxidant, is important in oxidative phosphorylation in mitochondria. It has anti-diabetic and anti-cardiovascular disease effects, but its ability to protect against liver fibrosis has not been studied. Here, we assessed the ability of solubilized CoQ10 to improve dimethylnitrosamine (DMN)-induced liver fibrogenesis in mice. DMN treatments for 3 weeks produced a marked liver fibrosis as assessed by histopathological examination and tissue 4-hydroxyproline content. Solubilized CoQ10 (10 and 30 mg/kg) significantly inhibited both the increases in fibrosis score and 4-hydroxyproline content induced by DMN. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analyses revealed that solubilized CoQ10 inhibitedmore » increases in the transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1) mRNA and alpha-smooth muscle actin (alpha-SMA) protein by DMN. Interestingly, hepatic glutamate-cysteine ligase (GCL) and glutathione S-transferase A2 (GSTA2) were up-regulated in mice treated with CoQ10. Solubilized CoQ10 also up-regulated antioxidant enzymes such as catalytic subunits of GCL and GSTA2 via activating NF-E2 related factor2 (Nrf2)/antioxidant response element (ARE) in H4IIE hepatoma cells. Moreover, CoQ10's inhibition of alpha-SMA and TGF-beta1 expressions disappeared in Nrf2-null MEF cells. In contrast, Nrf2 overexpression significantly decreased the basal expression levels of alpha-SMA and TGF-beta1 in Nrf2-null MEF cells. These results demonstrated that solubilized CoQ10 inhibited DMN-induced liver fibrosis through suppression of TGF-beta1 expression via Nrf2/ARE activation.« less

  20. The effects of coenzyme Q10 treatment on maternally inherited diabetes mellitus and deafness, and mitochondrial DNA 3243 (A to G) mutation.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, S; Hinokio, Y; Ohtomo, M; Hirai, M; Hirai, A; Chiba, M; Kasuga, S; Satoh, Y; Akai, H; Toyota, T

    1998-05-01

    The characteristic clinical features of diabetes mellitus with mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) 3243(A-G) mutation are progressive insulin secretory defect, neurosensory deafness and maternal inheritance, referred to as maternally inherited diabetes mellitus and deafness (MIDD). A treatment for MIDD to improve insulin secretory defects and reduce deafness has not been established. The effects of coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) treatment on insulin secretory response, hearing capacity and clinical symptoms of MIDD were investigated. 28 MIDD patients (CoQ10-DM), 7 mutant subjects with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), and 15 mutant subjects with normal glucose tolerance (NGT) were treated daily with oral administration of 150 mg of CoQ10 for 3 years. Insulin secretory response, blood lactate after exercise, hearing capacity and other laboratory examinations were investigated every year. In the same way we evaluated 16 MIDD patients (control-DM), 5 mutant IGT and 5 mutant NGT subjects in yearly examinations. The insulin secretory response assessed by glucagon-induced C-peptide secretion and 24 h urinary C-peptide excretion after 3 years in the CoQ10-DM group was significantly higher than that in the control-DM group. CoQ10 therapy prevented progressive hearing loss and improved blood lactate after exercise in the MIDD patients. CoQ10 treatment did not affect the diabetic complications or other clinical symptoms of MIDD patients. CoQ10 treatment did not affect the insulin secretory capacity of the mutant IGT and NGT subjects. There were no side effects during therapy. This is the first report demonstrating the therapeutic usefulness of CoQ10 on MIDD.

  1. Low-cost and disposable sensors for the simultaneous determination of coenzyme Q10 and α-lipoic acid using manganese (IV) oxide-modified screen-printed graphene electrodes.

    PubMed

    Charoenkitamorn, Kanokwan; Chaiyo, Sudkate; Chailapakul, Orawon; Siangproh, Weena

    2018-04-03

    In this work, for the first time, manganese (IV) oxide-modified screen-printed graphene electrodes (MnO 2 /SPGEs) were developed for the simultaneous electrochemical detection of coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) and α-lipoic acid (ALA). This sensor exhibits attractive benefits such as simplicity, low production costs, and disposability. Cyclic voltammetry (CV) was used to characterize the electrochemical behavior of the analyte and investigate the capacitance and electroactive surface area of the unmodified and modified electrode surfaces. The electrochemical behavior of CoQ10 and ALA on MnO 2 /SPGEs was also discussed. Additionally, square wave anodic stripping voltammetry (SWASV) was used for the quantitative determination of CoQ10 and ALA. Under optimal conditions, the obtained signals are linear in the concentration range from 2.0 to 75.0 μg mL -1 for CoQ10 and 0.3-25.0 μg mL -1 for ALA. The low limits of detection (LODs) were found to be 0.56 μg mL -1 and 0.088 μg mL -1 for CoQ10 and ALA, respectively. Moreover, we demonstrated the utility and applicability of the MnO 2 /SPGE sensor through simultaneous measurements of CoQ10 and ALA in dietary supplements. The sensor provides high accuracy measurements, exhibiting its high potential for practical applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Effect of mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress on endogenous levels of coenzyme Q(10) in human cells.

    PubMed

    Yen, Hsiu-Chuan; Chen, Feng-Yuan; Chen, Shih-Wei; Huang, Yu-Hsiang; Chen, Yun-Ru; Chen, Chih-Wei

    2011-01-01

    Little is known about the regulation of endogenous CoQ(10) levels in response to mitochondrial dysfunction or oxidative stress although exogenous CoQ(10) has been extensively used in humans. In this study, we first demonstrated that acute treatment of antimycin A, an inhibitor of mitochondrial complex III, and the absence of mitochondrial DNA suppressed CoQ(10) levels in human 143B cells. Because these two conditions also enhanced formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), we further investigated whether oxidative stress or mitochondrial dysfunction primarily contributed to the decrease of CoQ(10) levels. Results showed that H(2)O(2) augmented CoQ(10) levels, but carbonyl cyanide-p-trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone (FCCP), a chemical uncoupler, decreased CoQ(10) levels in 143B cells. However, H(2)O(2) and FCCP both increased mRNA levels of multiple COQ genes for biosynthesis of CoQ(10) . Our findings suggest that ROS induced CoQ(10) biosynthesis, whereas mitochondrial energy deficiency caused secondary suppression of CoQ(10) levels possibly due to impaired import of COQ proteins into mitochondria. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Effects of Combined Treatment with Branched-Chain Amino Acids, Citric Acid, L-Carnitine, Coenzyme Q10, Zinc, and Various Vitamins in Tumor-Bearing Mice.

    PubMed

    Awa, Hiroko; Futamura, Akihiko; Higashiguchi, Takashi; Ito, Akihiro; Mori, Naoharu; Murai, Miyo; Ohara, Hiroshi; Chihara, Takeshi; Kaneko, Takaaki

    2017-03-01

    A functional dietary supplement (FDS) containing Coenzyme Q10, branched-chain amino acids and L-carnitine was administered to tumor-bearing mice, investigating its effects on tumor and muscle tissues. Experiment (A): B16 melanoma cells were implanted subcutaneously into the right side of the abdomen of 8- to 9-week-old C57BL/6J mice. The mice were divided into two groups: a FDS group that received oral administration of FDS (n=10), and a control group that received oral administration of glucose (n=10). The moribund condition was used as the endpoint, and median survival time was determined. Experiment (B): On day 21 after tumor implantation, tumors, soleus muscle, gastrocnemius muscle, and suprahyoid muscles were collected. Tumor and muscle weight and other aspects were evaluated in each group: FDS group (n=15) and control group (n=15). The median survival time was comparable (21 d in the FDS group vs. 18 d in the control group, p=0.30). However, cumulative food intake was significantly higher in the FDS group than the control group (p=0.011). Metastasis of melanoma to the lung was observed in the control group but not in the FDS group (p=0.043). The weight of the suprahyoid muscles was significantly higher in the FDS group than in the control group (p=0.0045). The weight of the tumor was significantly lower in the FDS group than in the control group (p=0.013). The results possibly suggest oral administration of FDS in tumor-bearing mice enhances the maintenance of suprahyoid muscles, resulting in an extended feeding period and suppression of tumor growth and metastasis.

  4. Pretreatment with coenzyme Q10 improves ovarian response and embryo quality in low-prognosis young women with decreased ovarian reserve: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yangying; Nisenblat, Victoria; Lu, Cuiling; Li, Rong; Qiao, Jie; Zhen, Xiumei; Wang, Shuyu

    2018-03-27

    Management of women with reduced ovarian reserve or poor ovarian response (POR) to stimulation is one of the major challenges in reproductive medicine. The primary causes of POR remain elusive and oxidative stress was proposed as one of the important contributors. It has been suggested that focus on the specific subpopulations within heterogeneous group of poor responders could assist in evaluating optimal management strategies for these patients. This study investigated the effect of anti-oxidant treatment with coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) on ovarian response and embryo quality in young low-prognosis patients with POR. This prospective, randomized controlled study included 186 consecutive patients with POR stratified according to the POSEIDON classification group 3 (age < 35, poor ovarian reserve parameters). The participants were randomized to the CoQ10 pre-treatment for 60 days preceding IVF-ICSI cycle or no pre-treatment. The number of high quality embryos was a primary outcome measure. A total of 169 participants were evaluated (76 treated with CoQ10 and 93 controls); 17 women were excluded due to low compliance with CoQ10 administration. The baseline demographic and clinical characteristics were comparable between the groups. CoQ10 pretreatment resulted in significantly lower gonadotrophin requirements and higher peak E2 levels. Women in CoQ10 group had increased number of retrieved oocytes (4, IQR 2-5), higher fertilization rate (67.49%) and more high-quality embryos (1, IQR 0-2); p < 0.05. Significantly less women treated with CoQ10 had cancelled embryo transfer because of poor embryo development than controls (8.33% vs. 22.89%, p = 0.04) and more women from treatment group had available cryopreserved embryos (18.42% vs. 4.3%, p = 0.012). The clinical pregnancy and live birth rates per embryo transfer and per one complete stimulation cycle tended to be higher in CoQ10 group but did not achieve statistical significance. Pretreatment with CoQ10

  5. Beneficial effects of aged garlic extract and coenzyme Q10 on vascular elasticity and endothelial function: The FAITH randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Larijani, Vahid Nabavi; Ahmadi, Naser; Zeb, Irfan; Khan, Faraz; Flores, Ferdinand; Budoff, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    Objective Aged garlic extract (AGE) is associated with a significant decrease in atherosclerotic plaque progression and endothelial function improvement. Similarly, coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) has significant beneficial effects on endothelial function. A stressful lifestyle is a well-known risk factor for the presence and progression of atherosclerosis. This study investigated the effect of AGE plus CoQ10 on vascular elasticity measured by pulse-wave velocity (PWV) and endothelial function measured by digital thermal monitoring (DTM) in firefighters. Methods Sixty-five Los-Angeles County firefighters who met the eligibility criteria were enrolled in this placebo-controlled, double-blinded randomized trial. The firefighters were randomized to four tablets of AGE (300 mg/tablet) plus CoQ10 (30 mg/tablet) or placebo. The participants underwent quarterly visits and 1-year follow-up. PWV and DTM were measured at baseline and at the 1-year follow-up. Results There were no significant differences in age, cardiovascular risk factors, PWV, and DTM between the AGE/CoQ10 and placebo groups at baseline (P > 0.5). At 1-y, PWV and DTM significantly improved in the AGE/CoQ10 compared with the placebo group (P < 0.05). After an adjustment for cardiovascular risk factors and statin therapy, the mean decrease in vascular stiffness (PWV) was 1.21 m/s in the AGE/CoQ10 compared with the placebo group (P = 0.005). Similarly, the mean increase in the area under the temperature curve, the DTM index of endothelial function, was 31.3 in the AGE/CoQ10 compared with the placebo group (P = 0.01). Conclusion The combination of AGE and CoQ10 was independently associated with significant beneficial effects on vascular elasticity and endothelial function in firefighters with high occupational stress, highlighting the important role of AGE and CoQ10 in atherosclerotic prevention of such individuals. PMID:22858191

  6. Targeting Oxidative Stress, Cytokines and Serotonin Interactions Via Indoleamine 2, 3 Dioxygenase by Coenzyme Q10: Role in Suppressing Depressive Like Behavior in Rats.

    PubMed

    Abuelezz, Sally A; Hendawy, Nevien; Magdy, Yosra

    2017-06-01

    Depression is a major health problem in which oxidative stress and inflammation are inextricably connected in its pathophysiology. Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) is an important anti-oxidant compound with anti-inflammatory and neuro-protective properties. This study was designed to investigate the hypothesis that CoQ10 by its anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory potentials can alleviate depressive- like behavior by restoring the balance of the tryptophan catabolites kynurenine/serotonin toward the serotonin pathway by down-regulation of hippocampal indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase 1 (IDO-1). Depressive-like behavior was induced by chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS) protocol including food or water deprivation, cage tilting, reversed light cycle etc. Male Wistar rats were randomly divided into five groups; Control, CUMS, CUMS and CoQ10 (50,100 and 200 mg/kg/day i.p. respectively) groups. CoQ10 effects on different behavioral and biochemical tests were analyzed. CoQ10 showed significant antidepressant efficacy, as evidenced by significantly decreased stress induced changes to forced swimming challenge and open field test, as well as attenuating raised corticosterone level and adrenal glands weight. The anti-oxidant effect of CoQ10 was exhibited by its ability to significantly reduce hippocampal elevated malondialdehyde and 4-hydroxynonenal levels and elevate the reduced glutathione and catalase levels. CoQ10 significantly reduced different pro-inflammatory cytokines levels including interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-2, IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α. It suppressed hippocampal IDO-1 and subsequent production of kynurenine and enhanced the hippocampal contents of tryptophan and serotonin. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that CoQ10 was able to attenuate the elevated microglial CD68 and elevate the astrocyte glial fibrillary acidic protein compared to CUMS group. CoQ10 exhibited antidepressant-like effects on rats exposed to CUMS. This could be attributed to its ability to reduce

  7. Effect of cooking and in vitro digestion on the stability of co-enzyme Q10 in processed meat products.

    PubMed

    Tobin, Brian D; O'Sullivan, Maurice G; Hamill, Ruth; Kerry, Joseph P

    2014-05-01

    The use of CoQ10 fortification in the production of a functional food has been demonstrated in the past but primarily for dairy products. This study aimed to determine the bio-accessibility of CoQ10 in processed meat products, beef patties and pork breakfast sausages, fortified with CoQ10. Both the patties and sausages were fortified with a micellarized form of CoQ10 to enhance solubility to a concentration of 1mg/g of sample (NovaSolQ®). An assay was developed combining in vitro digestion and HPLC analysis to quantify the CoQ10 present in fortified products (100mg/g). The cooking retention level of CoQ10 in the products was found to be 74±1.42% for patties and 79.69±0.75% for sausages. The digestibility for both products ranged between 93% and 95%, sausages did have a higher digestibility level than patties but this was not found to be significant (P<0.01). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Coenzyme Q10 Protects Human Endothelial Cells from β-Amyloid Uptake and Oxidative Stress-Induced Injury

    PubMed Central

    Durán-Prado, Mario; Frontiñán, Javier; Santiago-Mora, Raquel; Peinado, Juan Ramón; Parrado-Fernández, Cristina; Gómez-Almagro, María Victoria; Moreno, María; López-Domínguez, José Alberto; Villalba, José Manuel; Alcaín, Francisco J.

    2014-01-01

    Neuropathological symptoms of Alzheimer's disease appear in advances stages, once neuronal damage arises. Nevertheless, recent studies demonstrate that in early asymptomatic stages, ß-amyloid peptide damages the cerebral microvasculature through mechanisms that involve an increase in reactive oxygen species and calcium, which induces necrosis and apoptosis of endothelial cells, leading to cerebrovascular dysfunction. The goal of our work is to study the potential preventive effect of the lipophilic antioxidant coenzyme Q (CoQ) against ß-amyloid-induced damage on human endothelial cells. We analyzed the protective effect of CoQ against Aβ-induced injury in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) using fluorescence and confocal microscopy, biochemical techniques and RMN-based metabolomics. Our results show that CoQ pretreatment of HUVECs delayed Aβ incorporation into the plasma membrane and mitochondria. Moreover, CoQ reduced the influx of extracellular Ca2+, and Ca2+ release from mitochondria due to opening the mitochondrial transition pore after β-amyloid administration, in addition to decreasing O2 .− and H2O2 levels. Pretreatment with CoQ also prevented ß-amyloid-induced HUVECs necrosis and apoptosis, restored their ability to proliferate, migrate and form tube-like structures in vitro, which is mirrored by a restoration of the cell metabolic profile to control levels. CoQ protected endothelial cells from Aβ-induced injury at physiological concentrations in human plasma after oral CoQ supplementation and thus could be a promising molecule to protect endothelial cells against amyloid angiopathy. PMID:25272163

  9. Self-Nanoemulsifying Drug Delivery System of Coenzyme (Q10) with Improved Dissolution, Bioavailability, and Protective Efficiency on Liver Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Khattab, Abeer; Hassanin, Lobna; Zaki, Nashwah

    2017-07-01

    The aim of our investigation is to develop and characterize self-nanoemulsifying drug delivery systems (SNEDDS) of CoQ 10 to improve its water solubility, dissolution rate, and bioavailability, and then evaluate its biochemical and physiological effect on liver cirrhosis in rats compared with CoQ 10 powder. SNEDDS are isotropic and thermodynamically stable mixture of oil, surfactant, co-surfactant, and drug that form an oil/water nanoemulsion when added to aqueous phases with soft agitation. Upon administration, self-nanoemulsifying system becomes in contact with gastrointestinal fluid and forms o/w nanoemulsion by the aid of gastrointestinal motility. When the nanoemulsion is formed in the gastrointestinal tract, it presents the drug in a solubilized form inside small nano-sized droplets that provide a large surface area for enhancing the drug release and absorption. Solubility of CoQ 10 in various oils, surfactants, and co-surfactants were studied to identify the components of SNEDDS; pseudo-ternary phase diagrams were plotted to identify the efficient self-emulsifying regions. CoQ 10 -loaded SNEDDS were prepared using isopropyl myristate as oil; Cremophor El, Labrasol, or Tween80 as surfactant; and Transcutol as co-surfactant. The amount of CoQ 10 in each vehicle was 3%. The formulations that passed thermostability evaluation test were assessed for particle size analysis, morphological characterization, refractive index, zeta potential, viscosity, electroconductivity, drug release profile, as well as ex vivo permeability. Pharmacokinetics and hepatoprotective efficiency of the optimized SNEDDS of CoQ 10 compared with CoQ 10 suspension were performed. Results showed that all optimized formulae have the ability to form a good and stable nanoemulsion when diluted with water; the mean droplet size of all formulae was in the nanometric range (11.7-13.5 nm) with optimum polydispersity index values (0.2-0.21). All formulae showed negative zeta potential (-11.3 to -17

  10. High degree of efficacy in the treatment of cyclic vomiting syndrome with combined co-enzyme Q10, L-carnitine and amitriptyline, a case series

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Cyclic vomiting syndrome (CVS), defined by recurrent stereotypical episodes of nausea and vomiting, is a relatively-common disabling and historically difficult-to-treat condition associated with migraine headache and mitochondrial dysfunction. Limited data suggests that the anti-migraine therapies amitriptyline and cyproheptadine, and the mitochondrial-targeted cofactors co-enzyme Q10 and L-carnitine, have efficacy in episode prophylaxis. Methods A retrospective chart review of 42 patients seen by one clinician that met established CVS diagnostic criteria revealed 30 cases with available outcome data. Participants were treated on a loose protocol consisting of fasting avoidance, co-enzyme Q10 and L-carnitine, with the addition of amitriptyline (or cyproheptadine in those < 5 years) in refractory cases. Blood level monitoring of the therapeutic agents featured prominently in management. Results Vomiting episodes resolved in 23 cases, and improved by > 75% and > 50% in three and one additional case respectively. Among the three treatment failures, two could not tolerate amitriptyline (as was also the case in the child with only > 50% efficacy) and one had multiple congenital gastrointestinal anomalies. Excluding the latter case, substantial efficacy (> 75% response) was 26/29 at the start of treatment, and 26/26 in those able to tolerate the regiment, including high dosages of amitriptyline. Conclusion Our data suggest that a protocol consisting of mitochondrial-targeted cofactors (co-enzyme Q10 and L-carnitine) plus amitriptyline (or possibly cyproheptadine in preschoolers) coupled with blood level monitoring is highly effective in the prevention of vomiting episodes. PMID:21846334

  11. Protection of rat skeletal muscle fibers by either L-carnitine or coenzyme Q10 against statins toxicity mediated by mitochondrial reactive oxygen generation

    PubMed Central

    La Guardia, P. G.; Alberici, L. C.; Ravagnani, F. G.; Catharino, R. R.; Vercesi, A. E.

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial redox imbalance has been implicated in mechanisms of aging, various degenerative diseases and drug-induced toxicity. Statins are safe and well-tolerated therapeutic drugs that occasionally induce myotoxicity such as myopathy and rhabdomyolysis. Previous studies indicate that myotoxicity caused by statins may be linked to impairment of mitochondrial functions. Here, we report that 1-h incubation of permeabilized rat soleus muscle fiber biopsies with increasing concentrations of simvastatin (1–40 μM) slowed the rates of ADP-or FCCP-stimulated respiration supported by glutamate/malate in a dose-dependent manner, but caused no changes in resting respiration rates. Simvastatin (1 μM) also inhibited the ADP-stimulated mitochondrial respiration supported by succinate by 24% but not by TMPD/ascorbate. Compatible with inhibition of respiration, 1 μM simvastatin stimulated lactate release from soleus muscle samples by 26%. Co-incubation of muscle samples with 1 mM L-carnitine, 100 μM mevalonate or 10 μM coenzyme Q10 (Co-Q10) abolished simvastatin effects on both mitochondrial glutamate/malate-supported respiration and lactate release. Simvastatin (1 μM) also caused a 2-fold increase in the rate of hydrogen peroxide generation and a decrease in Co-Q10 content by 44%. Mevalonate, Co-Q10 or L-carnitine protected against stimulation of hydrogen peroxide generation but only mevalonate prevented the decrease in Co-Q10 content. Thus, independently of Co-Q10 levels, L-carnitine prevented the toxic effects of simvastatin. This suggests that mitochondrial respiratory dysfunction induced by simvastatin, is associated with increased generation of superoxide, at the levels of complexes-I and II of the respiratory chain. In all cases the damage to these complexes, presumably at the level of 4Fe-4S clusters, is prevented by L-carnitine. PMID:23720630

  12. Efficacy of eyedrops containing cross-linked hyaluronic acid and coenzyme Q10 in treating patients with mild to moderate dry eye.

    PubMed

    Postorino, Elisa I; Rania, Laura; Aragona, Emanuela; Mannucci, Carmen; Alibrandi, Angela; Calapai, Gioacchino; Puzzolo, Domenico; Aragona, Pasquale

    2018-01-01

    Dry eye disease (DED) is a common condition causing substantial burden. A randomized, controlled, single-masked study was performed in 40 patients with mild to moderate DED to evaluate the efficacy and safety of a collyrium based on crosslinked hyaluronic acid (XLHA) with coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10). Enrolled subjects were divided into 2 groups: group A, treated with XLHA + CoQ10; and group B, treated with hyaluronic acid (HA). Eyedrops were administered 4 times daily for 3 months. The Ocular Surface Disease Index (OSDI) questionnaire, tear break-up time (TBUT), corneal and conjunctival staining, and meibomian gland assessment (MGD) were evaluated; furthermore, corneal aesthesiometry, in vivo corneal confocal microscopy, visual acuity, intraocular pressure (IOP), and fundus examination were performed. At the end of treatment, OSDI score significantly decreased in groups A and B (p<0.01 and p<0.05, respectively); the decrease was significantly higher in group A. Corneal staining decreased in both groups, with lower scores in group A. The MGD was significantly ameliorated in group A patients. No differences were found for corneal aesthesiometry or TBUT. Epithelial cell reflectivity was significantly reduced only in group A. For keratocytes and stromal matrix parameters, there was a significant improvement in group A. No changes were found for visual acuity, IOP, or fundus examination. The XLHA + CoQ10 treatment showed greater effectiveness in DED compared to HA alone, probably due to the longer permanency on ocular surface and the antioxidant activity of CoQ10. Therefore, XLHA + CoQ10 eyedrops could represent a new possibility in dry eye treatment.

  13. Up-regulation of antioxidant enzymes and coenzyme Q(10) in a human oral cancer cell line with acquired bleomycin resistance.

    PubMed

    Yen, Hsiu-Chuan; Li, Sin-Hua; Majima, Hideyuki J; Huang, Yu-Hsiang; Chen, Chiu-Ping; Liu, Chia-Chi; Tu, Ya-Chi; Chen, Chih-Wei

    2011-06-01

    Bleomycin (BLM) is an anti-cancer drug that can induce formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). To investigate the association between up-regulation of antioxidant enzymes and coenzyme Q(10) (CoQ(10)) in acquired BLM resistance, one BLM-resistant clone, SBLM24 clone, was selected from a human oral cancer cell line, SCC61 clone. The BLM resistance of SBLM24 clone relative to a sub-clone of SCC61b cells was confirmed by analysis of clonogenic ability and cell cycle arrest. CoQ(10) levels and levels of Mn superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase 1, catalase and thioredoxin reductase 1 were augmented in SBLM24 clone although there was also a mild increase in the expression of BLM hydrolase. Suppression of CoQ(10) levels by 4-aminobenzoate sensitized BLM-induced cytotoxicity. The results of suppression on enhanced ROS production by BLM and the cross-resistance to hydrogen peroxide in SBLM24 clone further demonstrated the development of adaptation to oxidative stress during the formation of acquired BLM resistance.

  14. Modulatory role of Co-enzyme Q10 on methionine and choline deficient diet-induced non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) in albino rats.

    PubMed

    Saleh, Dalia O; Ahmed, Rania F; Amin, Mohamed M

    2017-03-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the hepato-protective and neuro-protective activity of Co-enzyme Q10 (CoQ10) on non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) in albino rats induced by methionine and choline-deficient (MCD) diet. Rats were fed an MCD diet for 8 weeks to induce non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. CoQ10 (10 mg/(kg·day) -1 ) was orally administered for 2 consecutive weeks. Twenty-four hours after the last dose of the drug, the behavioral test, namely the activity cage test, was performed and the activity counts were recorded. Serum alanine transaminase, aspartate aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase, gamma-glutamyl transferase, total/direct bilirubin, and albumin were valued to assess liver function. Moreover, hepatic cytokines interleukin-6 as well as its modulator nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells were determined. In addition, brain biomarkers, viz ammonia, nitric oxide, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), were measured as they are reliable indices to assess brain damage. Histopathological and immunohistochemical examination of brain proliferating cell nuclear antigen in brain and liver tissues were also evaluated. Results revealed that MCD-induced NASH showed impairment in the liver functions with an increase in the liver inflammatory markers. Moreover, NASH resulted in pronounced brain dysfunction as evidenced by hyper-locomotor activity, a decrease in the BDNF level, as well as an increase in the brain nitric oxide and ammonia contents. Oral treatment of MCD-diet-fed rats with CoQ10 for 14 days showed a marked improvement in all the assigned parameters. Finally, it can be concluded that CoQ10 has a hepatoprotective and neuroprotective role in MCD-diet-induced NASH in rats.

  15. Pilot study of safety and efficacy of polyprenols in combination with coenzyme Q10 in patients with statin-induced myopathy.

    PubMed

    Latkovskis, Gustavs; Saripo, Vita; Sokolova, Emma; Upite, Dana; Vanaga, Ilona; Kletnieks, Ugis; Erglis, Andrejs

    2016-01-01

    Statin-induced myopathy (SIM) has been partially attributed to deficiency of dolichol and coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10). We aimed to test the safety and efficacy of plant polyprenols in combination with CoQ10 for alleviation of SIM. In an open-label, one-center prospective pilot study patients with SIM received conifer-tree needle polyprenols (4mg/day) and CoQ10 (100mg/day) for 8 weeks. Symptoms and safety were evaluated according to symptom severity score (0-10), creatine kinase (CK) levels, exercise test, dynamometry, complete blood count, clinical biochemistry and electrocardiography. Of the 14 patients, 11 completed the study per protocol. Two patients withdrew consent due to travels abroad, and it was discontinued for one patient with stage 3 chronic kidney disease due to asymptomatic elevations of liver enzymes at week 4. No safety parameters changed significantly in per protocol group. Non-significant increase of CK levels was observed (P=0.231). Muscle pain (n=10) and weakness (n=7) scores improved significantly (P<0.001 and P=0.018, respectively). Muscle pain completely disappeared in 2 patients, weakness resolved in 3 patients and cramps disappeared in two patients. Four patients assessed improvement strong enough to consider increase of statin dose. No changes were observed in exercise test or dynamometry. Conifer-tree polyprenols in combination with CoQ10 may be generally safe in patients with SIM, but caution should be exercised in patients with glomerular filtration rate <60mL/min and routine monitoring of the liver enzymes and CK is advocated in all patients. The observed efficacy provides the rationale for a larger, double-blind controlled study with polyprenols. Copyright © 2016 The Lithuanian University of Health Sciences. Production and hosting by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  16. Critical assessment of various techniques for the extraction of carotenoids and co-enzyme Q10 from the Thraustochytrid strain ONC-T18.

    PubMed

    Armenta, Roberto E; Burja, Adam; Radianingtyas, Helia; Barrow, Colin J

    2006-12-27

    A variety of techniques for extracting carotenoids from the marine Thraustochytrium sp. ONC-T18 was compared. Specifically, the organic solvents acetone, ethyl acetate, and petroleum ether were tested, along with direct and indirect ultrasonic assisted extraction (probe vs bath) methods. Techniques that used petroleum ether/acetone/water (15:75:10, v/v/v) with 3 h of agitation, or 5 min in an ultrasonic bath, produced the highest extraction yields of total carotenoids (29-30.5 microg g-1). Concentrations up to 11.5 microg g-1 of canthaxanthin and 17.5 microg g-1 of beta;-carotene were detected in extracts stored for 6 weeks. Astaxanthin and echinenone were also detected as minor compounds. Extracts with and without antioxidants showed similar carotenoid concentration profiles. However, total carotenoid concentrations were approximately 8% higher when antioxidants were used. Finally, an easy-to-perform and inexpensive method to detect co-enzymes in ONC-T18 was also developed using silica gel TLC plates. Five percent methanol in toluene as a mobile phase consistently eluted co-enzyme Q10 standards and could separate the co-enzyme fractions present in ONC-T18.

  17. Statin therapy and plasma coenzyme Q10 concentrations--A systematic review and meta-analysis of placebo-controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Banach, Maciej; Serban, Corina; Ursoniu, Sorin; Rysz, Jacek; Muntner, Paul; Toth, Peter P; Jones, Steven R; Rizzo, Manfredi; Glasser, Stephen P; Watts, Gerald F; Blumenthal, Roger S; Lip, Gregory Y H; Mikhailidis, Dimitri P; Sahebkar, Amirhossein

    2015-09-01

    Statin therapy may lower plasma coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) concentrations, but the evidence as to the significance of this effect is unclear. We assessed the impact of statin therapy on plasma CoQ10 concentrations through the meta-analysis of available RCTs. The literature search included selected databases up to April 30, 2015. The meta-analysis was performed using either a fixed-effects or random-effect model according to I(2) statistic. Effect sizes were expressed as weighted mean difference (WMD) and 95% confidence interval (CI). The data from 8 placebo-controlled treatment arms suggested a significant reduction in plasma CoQ10 concentrations following treatment with statins (WMD: -0.44 μmol/L, 95%CI: -0.52, -0.37, p<0.001). The pooled effect size was robust and remained significant in the leave-one-out sensitivity analysis. Subgroup analysis suggested that the impact of statins on plasma CoQ10 concentrations is significant for all 4 types of statins studied i.e. atorvastatin (WMD: -0.41 μmol/L, 95%CI: -0.53, -0.29, p<0.001), simvastatin (WMD: -0.47 μmol/L, 95% CI: -0.61, -0.33, p<0.001), rosuvastatin (WMD: -0.49 μmol/L, 95%CI: -0.67, -0.31, p<0.001) and pravastatin (WMD: -0.43 μmol/L, 95%CI: -0.69, -0.16, p=0.001). Likewise, there was no differential effect of lipophilic (WMD: -0.43 μmol/L, 95%CI: -0.53, -0.34, p<0.001) and hydrophilic statins (WMD: -0.47 μmol/L, 95%CI: -0.62, -0.32, p<0.001). With respect to treatment duration, a significant effect was observed in both subsets of trials lasting <12 weeks (WMD: -0.51 μmol/L, 95%CI: -0.64, -0.39, p<0.001) and ≥12 weeks (WMD: -0.40 μmol/L, 95%CI: -0.50, -0.30, p<0.001). The meta-analysis showed a significant reduction in plasma CoQ10 concentrations following treatment with statins. Further well-designed trials are required to confirm our findings and elucidate their clinical relevance. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Supplementation with α-Lipoic Acid, CoQ10, and Vitamin E Augments Running Performance and Mitochondrial Function in Female Mice

    PubMed Central

    Abadi, Arkan; Crane, Justin D.; Ogborn, Daniel; Hettinga, Bart; Akhtar, Mahmood; Stokl, Andrew; MacNeil, Lauren; Safdar, Adeel; Tarnopolsky, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Antioxidant supplements are widely consumed by the general public; however, their effects of on exercise performance are controversial. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of an antioxidant cocktail (α-lipoic acid, vitamin E and coenzyme Q10) on exercise performance, muscle function and training adaptations in mice. C57Bl/J6 mice were placed on antioxidant supplement or placebo-control diets (n = 36/group) and divided into trained (8 wks treadmill running) (n = 12/group) and untrained groups (n = 24/group). Antioxidant supplementation had no effect on the running performance of trained mice nor did it affect training adaptations; however, untrained female mice that received antioxidants performed significantly better than placebo-control mice (p ≤ 0.05). Furthermore, antioxidant-supplemented females (untrained) showed elevated respiratory capacity in freshly excised muscle fibers (quadriceps femoris) (p ≤ 0.05), reduced oxidative damage to muscle proteins (p ≤ 0.05), and increased expression of mitochondrial proteins (p ≤ 0.05) compared to placebo-controls. These changes were attributed to increased expression of proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1α (PGC-1α) (p ≤ 0.05) via activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) (p ≤ 0.05) by antioxidant supplementation. Overall, these results indicate that this antioxidant supplement exerts gender specific effects; augmenting performance and mitochondrial function in untrained females, but does not attenuate training adaptations. PMID:23565271

  19. [Coenzyme Q10 enhances the expression of Bcl-2 and inhibits the expressions of Bax and GSK-3β in the hippocampus of rats exposed to ischemia/reperfusion injury].

    PubMed

    Tian, Shuang; Wang, Di; Li, Xiaodong; Tang, Jianjie; Han, Guang; Dai, Yongyi

    2013-07-01

    To investigate the effects of coenzyme Q10 pretreatment on the expressions of Bcl-2, Bax and glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) in rats suffering from ischemia/reperfusion injury. Thirty-six adult male SD rats were randomly assigned into 3 groups: sham-operated group (sham), ischemia/reperfusion group (I/R) and coenzyme Q10 preconditioning group (Q10). Focal cerebral ischemia/reperfusion models were established in experimental rats by blocking middle cerebral artery with suture. Histological changes of hippocampal neurons were observed by HE staining. The expressions of Bcl-2, Bax and GSK-3β were detected by immunohistochemistry and Western blotting. Immunohistochemistry showed that the percentage of Bcl-2 positive cells increased in the hippocampus, while the percentages of Bax and GSK-3β positive cells decreased in Q10 group compared with I/R group. Western blotting revealed that the expression level of Bcl-2 was higher and the expression levels of Bax and GSK-3β were lower in Q10 group than in I/R group. There were significant differences between the two groups (P<0.05). Coenzyme Q10 promoted the expression of Bcl-2 and suppressed the expressions of Bax and GSK-3β in the hippocampus of rats exposed to cerebral ischemia/reperfusion.

  20. Human neuronal coenzyme Q10 deficiency results in global loss of mitochondrial respiratory chain activity, increased mitochondrial oxidative stress and reversal of ATP synthase activity: implications for pathogenesis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Duberley, Kate E C; Abramov, Andrey Y; Chalasani, Annapurna; Heales, Simon J; Rahman, Shamima; Hargreaves, Iain P

    2013-01-01

    Disorders of coenzyme Q(10) (CoQ(10)) biosynthesis represent the most treatable subgroup of mitochondrial diseases. Neurological involvement is frequently observed in CoQ(10) deficiency, typically presenting as cerebellar ataxia and/or seizures. The aetiology of the neurological presentation of CoQ(10) deficiency has yet to be fully elucidated and therefore in order to investigate these phenomena we have established a neuronal cell model of CoQ(10) deficiency by treatment of neuronal SH-SY5Y cell line with para-aminobenzoic acid (PABA). PABA is a competitive inhibitor of the CoQ(10) biosynthetic pathway enzyme, COQ2. PABA treatment (1 mM) resulted in a 54 % decrease (46 % residual CoQ(10)) decrease in neuronal CoQ(10) status (p < 0.01). Reduction of neuronal CoQ(10) status was accompanied by a progressive decrease in mitochondrial respiratory chain enzyme activities, with a 67.5 % decrease in cellular ATP production at 46 % residual CoQ(10). Mitochondrial oxidative stress increased four-fold at 77 % and 46 % residual CoQ(10). A 40 % increase in mitochondrial membrane potential was detected at 46 % residual CoQ(10) with depolarisation following oligomycin treatment suggesting a reversal of complex V activity. This neuronal cell model provides insights into the effects of CoQ(10) deficiency on neuronal mitochondrial function and oxidative stress, and will be an important tool to evaluate candidate therapies for neurological conditions associated with CoQ(10) deficiency.

  1. Coenzyme Q supplementation in pulmonary arterial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Sharp, Jacqueline; Farha, Samar; Park, Margaret M.; Comhair, Suzy A.; Lundgrin, Erika L.; Tang, W.H. Wilson; Bongard, Robert D.; Merker, Marilyn P.; Erzurum, Serpil C.

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is a fundamental abnormality in the vascular endothelium and smooth muscle of patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Because coenzyme Q (CoQ) is essential for mitochondrial function and efficient oxygen utilization as the electron carrier in the inner mitochondrial membrane, we hypothesized that CoQ would improve mitochondrial function and benefit PAH patients. To test this, oxidized and reduced levels of CoQ, cardiac function by echocardiogram, mitochondrial functions of heme synthesis and cellular metabolism were evaluated in PAH patients (N=8) in comparison to healthy controls (N=7), at baseline and after 12 weeks oral CoQ supplementation. CoQ levels were similar among PAH and control individuals, and increased in all subjects with CoQ supplementation. PAH patients had higher CoQ levels than controls with supplementation, and a tendency to a higher reduced-to-oxidized CoQ ratio. Cardiac parameters improved with CoQ supplementation, although 6-minute walk distances and BNP levels did not significantly change. Consistent with improved mitochondrial synthetic function, hemoglobin increased and red cell distribution width (RDW) decreased in PAH patients with CoQ, while hemoglobin declined slightly and RDW did not change in healthy controls. In contrast, metabolic and redox parameters, including lactate, pyruvate and reduced or oxidized gluthathione, did not change in PAH patients with CoQ. In summary, CoQ improved hemoglobin and red cell maturation in PAH, but longer studies and/or higher doses with a randomized placebo-controlled controlled design are necessary to evaluate the clinical benefit of this simple nutritional supplement. PMID:25180165

  2. The Combination of Physical Exercise with Muscle-Directed Antioxidants to Counteract Sarcopenia: A Biomedical Rationale for Pleiotropic Treatment with Creatine and Coenzyme Q10

    PubMed Central

    Tiano, Luca; Silvestri, Sonia; Orlando, Patrik; Calcabrini, Cinzia; Stocchi, Vilberto

    2017-01-01

    Sarcopenia represents an increasing public health risk due to the rapid aging of the world's population. It is characterized by both low muscle mass and function and is associated with mobility disorders, increased risk of falls and fractures, loss of independence, disabilities, and increased risk of death. Despite the urgency of the problem, the development of treatments for sarcopenia has lagged. Increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and decreased antioxidant (AO) defences seem to be important factors contributing to muscle impairment. Studies have been conducted to verify whether physical exercise and/or AOs could prevent and/or delay sarcopenia through a normalization of the etiologically relevant ROS imbalance. Despite the strong rationale, the results obtained were contradictory, particularly with regard to the effects of the tested AOs. A possible explanation might be that not all the agents included in the general heading of “AOs” could fulfill the requisites to counteract the complex series of events causing/accelerating sarcopenia: the combination of the muscle-directed antioxidants creatine and coenzyme Q10 with physical exercise as a biomedical rationale for pleiotropic prevention and/or treatment of sarcopenia is discussed. PMID:29123615

  3. Automated statistical experimental design approach for rapid separation of coenzyme Q10 and identification of its biotechnological process related impurities using UHPLC and UHPLC-APCI-MS.

    PubMed

    Talluri, Murali V N Kumar; Kalariya, Pradipbhai D; Dharavath, Shireesha; Shaikh, Naeem; Garg, Prabha; Ramisetti, Nageswara Rao; Ragampeta, Srinivas

    2016-09-01

    A novel ultra high performance liquid chromatography method development strategy was ameliorated by applying quality by design approach. The developed systematic approach was divided into five steps (i) Analytical Target Profile, (ii) Critical Quality Attributes, (iii) Risk Assessments of Critical parameters using design of experiments (screening and optimization phases), (iv) Generation of design space, and (v) Process Capability Analysis (Cp) for robustness study using Monte Carlo simulation. The complete quality-by-design-based method development was made automated and expedited by employing sub-2 μm particles column with an ultra high performance liquid chromatography system. Successful chromatographic separation of the Coenzyme Q10 from its biotechnological process related impurities was achieved on a Waters Acquity phenyl hexyl (100 mm × 2.1 mm, 1.7 μm) column with gradient elution of 10 mM ammonium acetate buffer (pH 4.0) and a mixture of acetonitrile/2-propanol (1:1) as the mobile phase. Through this study, fast and organized method development workflow was developed and robustness of the method was also demonstrated. The method was validated for specificity, linearity, accuracy, precision, and robustness in compliance to the International Conference on Harmonization, Q2 (R1) guidelines. The impurities were identified by atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-mass spectrometry technique. Further, the in silico toxicity of impurities was analyzed using TOPKAT and DEREK software. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Unusual occurrence of intestinal pseudo obstruction in a patient with maternally inherited diabetes and deafness (MIDD) and favorable outcome with coenzyme Q10.

    PubMed

    Bergamin, Carla S; Rolim, Luiz Clemente; Dib, Sergio A; Moisés, Regina S

    2008-11-01

    Maternally inherited diabetes and deafness (MIDD) has been related to an A to G transition in the mitochondrial tRNA Leu (UUR) gene at the base pair 3243. This subtype of diabetes is characterized by maternal transmission, young age at onset and bilateral hearing impairment. Besides diabetes and deafness, the main diagnostic features, a wide range of multisystemic symptoms may be associated with the A3243G mutation. Organs that are most metabolically active, such as muscles, myocardium, retina, cochlea, kidney and brain are frequently affected. Gastrointestinal tract symptoms are also common in patients with mitochondrial disease and constipation and diarrhea are the most frequent manifestations. However, there are few prior reports of intestinal pseudo obstruction in MIDD patients. Here we report the case of a patient with MIDD associated with the mtDNA A3243G mutation who developed chronic intestinal pseudo obstruction, and the introduction of Coenzyme Q10 as adjunctive therapy led to a solution of the pseudo obstruction.

  5. Coenzyme Q10 inhibits the release of glutamate in rat cerebrocortical nerve terminals by suppression of voltage-dependent calcium influx and mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yi; Huang, Shu-Kuei; Wang, Su-Jane

    2012-12-05

    This study investigates the effects and possible mechanism of coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) on endogenous glutamate release in the cerebral cortex nerve terminals of rats. CoQ10 inhibited the release of glutamate evoked by the K+ channel blocker 4-aminopyridine (4-AP). CoQ10 reduced the depolarization-induced increase in cytosolic [Ca2+]c but did not alter the 4-AP-mediated depolarization. The effect of CoQ10 on evoked glutamate release was abolished by blocking the Cav2.2 (N-type) and Cav2.1 (P/Q-type) Ca2+ channels and mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK). In addition, CoQ10 decreased the 4-AP-induced phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) and synaptic vesicle-associated protein synapsin I, a major presynaptic substrate for ERK. Moreover, the inhibition of glutamate release by CoQ10 was strongly attenuated in mice without synapsin I. These results suggest that CoQ10 inhibits glutamate release from cortical synaptosomes in rats through the suppression of the presynaptic voltage-dependent Ca2+ entry and ERK/synapsin I signaling pathway.

  6. Highly sensitive and selective determination of redox states of coenzymes Q9 and Q10 in mice tissues: Application of orbitrap mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Renu; Riley, Christopher L; Mills, Edward M; Tiziani, Stefano

    2018-06-29

    Coenzyme Q (CoQ) is a redox active molecule that plays a fundamental role in mitochondrial energy generation and functions as a potent endogenous antioxidant. Redox ratio of CoQ has been suggested as a good marker of mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress. Nevertheless, simultaneous measurement of redox states of CoQ is challenging owing to its hydrophobicity and instability of the reduced form. In order to improve the analytical methodology, paying special attention to this instability, we developed a highly sensitive and selective high-resolution/accurate-mass (HR/AM) UHPLC-MS/MS method for the rapid determination of redox states of CoQ 9 and CoQ 10 by ultra-performance liquid chromatography-hybrid quadrupole-Orbitrap mass spectrometry. CoQs were extracted using hexane with the addition of butylated hydroxytoluene to limit oxidation during sample preparation. Chromatographic separation of the analytes was achieved on a Kinetex C 18 column with the isocratic elution of 5 mM ammonium formate in 2-propanol/methanol (60:40) within 4 min. A full MS/all ion fragmentation (AIF) acquisition mode with mass accuracy < 5 ppm was used for detection and determination of redox states of CoQ 9 and CoQ 10 in healthy mice tissues using reduced and oxidized CoQ 4 as internal standards. The validated method showed good linearity (r 2  ≥ 0.9991), intraday, inter-day precision (CVs ≤ 11.9%) and accuracy (RE ≤±15.2%). In contrast to existing methods, the current method offers enhanced sensitivity (up to 52 fold) with LOD and LOQ ranged from 0.01 to 0.49 ng mL -1 and 0.04-1.48 ng mL -1 , respectively. Moreover, we evaluated various diluents to investigate bench top stability (at 4 °C) of targeted analytes in tissue samples during LC-MS assay up to 24 h. Ethanol was determined to be an optimum diluent without any significant oxidation of reduced CoQ up to 24 h. The developed method offers a rapid, highly sensitive and selective strategy

  7. Efficiency of emulsifier-free emulsions and emulsions containing rapeseed lecithin as delivery systems for vectorization and release of coenzyme Q10: physico-chemical properties and in vitro evaluation.

    PubMed

    Kaci, M; Arab-Tehrany, E; Dostert, G; Desjardins, I; Velot, E; Desobry, S

    2016-11-01

    To improve the encapsulation and release of coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10), emulsifier-free-emulsions were developed with a new emulsification process using high-frequency ultrasound (HFU) at 1.7MHz. Nano-emulsions containing CoQ10 were prepared with or without rapeseed lecithin as an emulsifier. The emulsions prepared with HFU were compared with an emulsion of CoQ10 containing emulsifier prepared with the same emulsification technique as well as with emulsions prepared with low-frequency ultrasound coupled with high-pressure homogenization (LFU+HPH). The physico-chemical properties of the emulsions were determined by average droplet size measurement with nano-droplet tracking analysis, droplet surface charge with ζ potential measurement, surface tension and rheological behaviour. Emulsions made by LFU+HPH with an emulsifier showed lower droplet sizes due to cavitation generated by the HFU process. Surface tension results showed that there was no significant difference between emulsions containing lecithin emulsifier regardless of the preparation process or the inclusion of CoQ10. In vitro biocompatibility tests were performed on human mesenchymal stem cells in order to show the cytotoxicity of various formulations and the efficiency of CoQ10-loaded emulsions. In vitro tests proved that the vectors were not toxic. Furthermore, CoQ10 facilitated a high rate of cell proliferation and metabolic activity especially when in an emulsifier-free formulation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Coenzyme Q10 instilled as eye drops on the cornea reaches the retina and protects retinal layers from apoptosis in a mouse model of kainate-induced retinal damage.

    PubMed

    Lulli, Matteo; Witort, Ewa; Papucci, Laura; Torre, Eugenio; Schipani, Christian; Bergamini, Christian; Dal Monte, Massimo; Capaccioli, Sergio

    2012-12-17

    To evaluate if coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) can protect retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) from apoptosis and, when instilled as eye drops on the cornea, if it can reach the retina and exert its antiapoptotic activity in this area in a mouse model of kainate (KA)-induced retinal damage. Rat primary or cultured RGCs were subjected to glutamate (50 μM) or chemical hypoxia (Antimycin A, 200 μM) or serum withdrawal (FBS, 0.5%) in the presence or absence of CoQ10 (10 μM). Cell viability was evaluated by light microscopy and fluorescence-activated cell sorting analyses. Apoptosis was evaluated by caspase 3/7 activity and mitochondrion depolarization tetramethylrhodamine ethyl ester analysis. CoQ10 transfer to the retina following its instillation as eye drops on the cornea was quantified by HPLC. Retinal protection by CoQ10 (10 μM) eye drops instilled on the cornea was then evaluated in a mouse model of KA-induced excitotoxic retinal cell apoptosis by cleaved caspase 3 immunohistofluorescence, caspase 3/7 activity assays, and quantification of inhibition of RGC loss. CoQ10 significantly increased viable cells by preventing RGC apoptosis. Furthermore, when topically applied as eye drops to the cornea, it reached the retina, thus substantially increasing local CoQ10 concentration and protecting retinal layers from apoptosis. The ability of CoQ10 eye drops to protect retinal cells from apoptosis in the mouse model of KA-induced retinal damage suggests that topical CoQ10 may be evaluated in designing therapies for treating apoptosis-driven retinopathies.

  9. Paraquat induces oxidative stress, neuronal loss in substantia nigra region and parkinsonism in adult rats: neuroprotection and amelioration of symptoms by water-soluble formulation of coenzyme Q10.

    PubMed

    Somayajulu-Niţu, Mallika; Sandhu, Jagdeep K; Cohen, Jerome; Sikorska, Marianna; Sridhar, T S; Matei, Anca; Borowy-Borowski, Henryk; Pandey, Siyaram

    2009-07-27

    Parkinson's disease, for which currently there is no cure, develops as a result of progressive loss of dopamine neurons in the brain; thus, identification of any potential therapeutic intervention for disease management is of a great importance. Here we report that prophylactic application of water-soluble formulation of coenzyme Q10 could effectively offset the effects of environmental neurotoxin paraquat, believed to be a contributing factor in the development of familial PD. In this study we utilized a model of paraquat-induced dopaminergic neurodegeneration in adult rats that received three weekly intra-peritoneal injections of the herbicide paraquat. Histological and biochemical analyses of rat brains revealed increased levels of oxidative stress markers and a loss of approximately 65% of dopamine neurons in the substantia nigra region. The paraquat-exposed rats also displayed impaired balancing skills on a slowly rotating drum (rotorod) evidenced by their reduced spontaneity in gait performance. In contrast, paraquat exposed rats receiving a water-soluble formulation of coenzyme Q10 in their drinking water prior to and during the paraquat treatment neither developed neurodegeneration nor reduced rotorod performance and were indistinguishable from the control paraquat-untreated rats. Our data confirmed that paraquat-induced neurotoxicity represents a convenient rat model of parkinsonian neurodegeneration suitable for mechanistic and neuroprotective studies. This is the first preclinical evaluation of a water-soluble coenzyme Q10 formulation showing the evidence of prophylactic neuroprotection at clinically relevant doses.

  10. Paraquat induces oxidative stress, neuronal loss in substantia nigra region and Parkinsonism in adult rats: Neuroprotection and amelioration of symptoms by water-soluble formulation of Coenzyme Q10

    PubMed Central

    Somayajulu-Niţu, Mallika; Sandhu, Jagdeep K; Cohen, Jerome; Sikorska, Marianna; Sridhar, TS; Matei, Anca; Borowy-Borowski, Henryk; Pandey, Siyaram

    2009-01-01

    Background Parkinson's disease, for which currently there is no cure, develops as a result of progressive loss of dopamine neurons in the brain; thus, identification of any potential therapeutic intervention for disease management is of a great importance. Results Here we report that prophylactic application of water-soluble formulation of coenzyme Q10 could effectively offset the effects of environmental neurotoxin paraquat, believed to be a contributing factor in the development of familial PD. In this study we utilized a model of paraquat-induced dopaminergic neurodegeneration in adult rats that received three weekly intra-peritoneal injections of the herbicide paraquat. Histological and biochemical analyses of rat brains revealed increased levels of oxidative stress markers and a loss of approximately 65% of dopamine neurons in the substantia nigra region. The paraquat-exposed rats also displayed impaired balancing skills on a slowly rotating drum (rotorod) evidenced by their reduced spontaneity in gait performance. In contrast, paraquat exposed rats receiving a water-soluble formulation of coenzyme Q10 in their drinking water prior to and during the paraquat treatment neither developed neurodegeneration nor reduced rotorod performance and were indistinguishable from the control paraquat-untreated rats. Conclusion Our data confirmed that paraquat-induced neurotoxicity represents a convenient rat model of Parkinsonian neurodegeneration suitable for mechanistic and neuroprotective studies. This is the first preclinical evaluation of a water-soluble coenzyme Q10 formulation showing the evidence of prophylactic neuroprotection at clinically relevant doses. PMID:19635141

  11. Effects of metabolic modifiers such as carnitines, coenzyme Q10, and PUFAs against different forms of neurotoxic insults: metabolic inhibitors, MPTP, and methamphetamine.

    PubMed

    Virmani, Ashraf; Gaetani, Franco; Binienda, Zbigniew

    2005-08-01

    A number of strategies using the nutritional approach are emerging for the protection of the brain from damage caused by metabolic toxins, age, or disease. Neural dysfunction and metabolic imbalances underlie many diseases, and the inclusion of metabolic modifiers may provide an alternative and early intervention approach that may prevent further damage. Various models have been developed to study the impact of metabolism on brain function. These have also proven useful in expanding our understanding of neurodegeneration processes. For example, the metabolic compromise induced by inhibitors such as 3-nitropropionic acid (3-NPA), rotenone, and 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+) can cause neurodegeneration in animal models and these models are thought to simulate the processes that may lead to diseases such as Huntington's and Parkinson's diseases. These inhibitors of metabolism are thought to selectively kill neurons by inhibiting various mitochondrial enzymes. However, the eventual cell death is attributed to oxidative stress damage of selectively vulnerable cells, especially highly differentiated neurons. Various studies indicate that the neurotoxicity resulting from these types of metabolic compromise is related to mitochondrial dysfunction and may be ameliorated by metabolic modifiers such as L-carnitine (L-C), creatine, and coenzyme Q10, as well as by antioxidants such as lipoic acid, vitamin E, and resveratrol. Mitochondrial function and cellular metabolism are also affected by the dietary intake of essential polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), which may regulate membrane composition and influence cellular processes, especially the inflammatory pathways. Cellular metabolic function may also be ameliorated by caloric restriction diets. L-C is a naturally occurring quaternary ammonium compound that is a vital cofactor for the mitochondrial entry and oxidation of fatty acids. Any factors affecting L-C levels may also affect ATP levels. This endogenous compound

  12. Impact of Chemical Analogs of 4-Hydroxybenzoic Acid on Coenzyme Q Biosynthesis: From Inhibition to Bypass of Coenzyme Q Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Pierrel, Fabien

    2017-01-01

    Coenzyme Q is a lipid that participates to important physiological functions. Coenzyme Q is synthesized in multiple steps from the precursor 4-hydroxybenzoic acid. Mutations in enzymes that participate to coenzyme Q biosynthesis result in primary coenzyme Q deficiency, a type of mitochondrial disease. Coenzyme Q 10 supplementation of patients is the classical treatment but it shows limited efficacy in some cases. The molecular understanding of the coenzyme Q biosynthetic pathway allowed the design of experiments to bypass deficient biosynthetic steps with analogs of 4-hydroxybenzoic acid. These molecules provide the defective chemical group and can reactivate endogenous coenzyme Q biosynthesis as demonstrated recently in yeast, mammalian cell cultures, and mouse models of primary coenzyme Q deficiency. This mini review presents how the chemical properties of various analogs of 4-hydroxybenzoic acid dictate the effect of the molecules on CoQ biosynthesis and how the reactivation of endogenous coenzyme Q biosynthesis may achieve better results than exogenous CoQ 10 supplementation.

  13. Loss of Bone Mineral Density Associated with Age in Male Rats Fed on Sunflower Oil Is Avoided by Virgin Olive Oil Intake or Coenzyme Q Supplementation

    PubMed Central

    Ochoa, Julio J.; Llamas-Elvira, José M.; López-Frías, Magdalena

    2017-01-01

    The role of dietary fat unsaturation and the supplementation of coenzyme Q have been evaluated in relation to bone health. Male Wistar rats were maintained for 6 or 24 months on two diets varying in the fat source, namely virgin olive oil, rich in monounsaturated fatty acids, or sunflower oil, rich in n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids. Both dietary fats were supplemented or not with coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10). Bone mineral density (BMD) was evaluated in the femur. Serum levels of osteocalcin, osteopontin, receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand (RANKL), osteoprotegerin (OPG), adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) and parathyroid hormone (PTH), as well as urinary F2-isoprostanes were measured. Aged animals fed on virgin olive oil showed higher BMD than those fed on sunflower oil. In addition, CoQ10 prevented the age-related decline in BMD in animals fed on sunflower oil. Urinary F2-isoprostanes analysis showed that sunflower oil led to the highest oxidative status in old animals, which was avoided by supplementation with CoQ10. In conclusion, lifelong feeding on virgin olive oil or the supplementation of sunflower oil on CoQ10 prevented, at least in part mediated by a low oxidative stress status, the age-related decrease in BMD found in sunflower oil fed animals. PMID:28661441

  14. Effects of nutraceutical diet integration, with coenzyme Q10 (Q-Ter multicomposite) and creatine, on dyspnea, exercise tolerance, and quality of life in COPD patients with chronic respiratory failure

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The protein-calorie malnutrition, resulting in muscle mass loss, frequently occurs in severe COPD patients with chronic respiratory failure (CRF), causing dyspnea, reduced exercise tolerance and impaired quality of life. The cause of this occurrence is an intake-output energy imbalance. A documented deficit of phosphocreatine and reduced mithocondrial energy production can contribute to this imbalance. Aim of this study is to verify whether a dietary supplementation with creatine and coenzyme Q10, important mitochondrial function factors, is able to influence this mechanism leading to a dyspnea reduction and improving exercise tolerance and quality of life. Methods 55 COPD patients with chronic respiratory failure (in long term O2 therapy), in stable phase of the disease and without severe comorbidities were assigned (double-blind, randomized) to: group A (30 patients) with daily dietary supplementation with Creatine 340 mg + 320 mg Coenzyme Q-Ter (Eufortyn®, Scharper Therapeutics Srl) for 2 months whereas Group B (25 patients) received placebo. All patients continued the same diet, rehabilitation and therapy during the study. At recruitment (T0) and after 2 months (T1), patients were submitted to medical history, anthropometry (BMI), bioelectrical impedance, arterial blood gas analysis, evaluation of dyspnea (VAS, Borg, BDI, MRC) and functional independence (ADL), 6-minute walk test (6MWT) and quality of life questionnaire (SGRQ). At 6 months and 1 year, a telephone follow up was conducted on exacerbations number. Results No significant difference was detected at baseline (T0) in the 2 groups. After 2 months of therapy (T1) the FFMI increased in the daily dietary supplementation group (+ 3.7 %) and decreased in the placebo group (- 0.6 %), resulting in a statistically significant (p < 0.001) treatment difference. Statistically significant treatment differences, favouring daily dietary supplementation group, were also seen for the 6MWT comparison. Group

  15. The relationships between clinical outcome and the levels of total antioxidant capacity (TAC) and coenzyme Q (CoQ 10) in children with pandemic influenza (H 1 N1) and seasonal flu.

    PubMed

    Kelekçi, S; Evliyaoğlu, O; Sen, V; Yolbaş, I; Uluca, U; Tan, I; Gürkan, M F

    2012-08-01

    This study was planned to evaluate the relationships between the levels of total antioxidant capacity (TAC) and Coenzyme Q (CoQ10) and clinical outcome in hospitalized children with pandemic influenza (H1N1). Serum copper (Cu) and zinc (Zn) levels were also determined to evaluate the changings of oxidative stress's enzyme activities depending on their cofactor concentrations. Children with suspected H1N1 virus infection were hospitalized and nasal swabs were sent to laboratory for confirmation of H1N1 by rRT-PCR assay. Age and sex matched 31 healthy children were included as Control Group. Total antioxidant capacity and CoQ10 were determined by spectrophotometry and HPLC, respectively, and Cu and Zn were determined using atomic absorption spectrometer. Totally 28 children had H1N1 and 37 children had seasonal influenza (SI). TAC, CoQ10 and Zn levels were found to be significantly decreased in H1N1 patients (1.01 +/- 0.19, 752.2 +/- 163, 69 +/- 27, respectively) compared to Control Group (1.64 +/- 0.36, 934 +/- 21, 92 +/- 4, respectively). Seasonal Influenza group had significantly decreased TAC and Zn levels (1.31 +/- 0.27, 78 +/- 34 respectively) compared with control group (1.64 +/- 0.36, 92 +/-41, respectively). CoQ10 levels were also found as decreased in H1N1 compared to seasonal influenza (752.2 +/- 163 vs 1022 +/- 199, p = 0.003). There was a significant correlation between CoQ10 levels of sera and chest radiographic findings of patients with H1N1 pneumonia. No significant differences were found in serum Cu levels between patients with H1N1 and SI or control group (150 +/- 45 vs 127 +/- 37, p = 0.215). CONCLUSIONS, Pandemic influenza infection had increased oxidative stress compared to the seasonal influenza.

  16. High-fat diet-induced met-hemoglobin formation in rats prone (WOKW) or resistant (DA) to the metabolic syndrome: effect of CoQ10 supplementation.

    PubMed

    Orlando, Patrick; Silvestri, Sonia; Brugè, Francesca; Tiano, Luca; Kloting, Ingrid; Falcioni, Giancarlo; Polidori, Carlo

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of a high-fat diet (HFD) on oxidative indexes in WistarOttawaKarlsburg W (WOKW) rats used as a model of metabolic syndrome in comparison with Dark Agouti (DA) rats used as a control strain. This syndrome is defined by the occurrence of two or more risk factors including obesity, hypertension, dyslipidemia, and insulin resistance. Forty rats were used in the study and the effect of HFD was evaluated in terms of body weight and both hemoglobin and CoQ oxidative status. Moreover, 16 rats (8 of each strain) were supplemented with 3 mg/100 g b.w. of CoQ10 for 1 month in view of its beneficial properties in cardiovascular disease due to its antioxidant activity in the lipid environment. HFD promoted an increase in body weight, in particular in WOKW males, and in the methemoglobin (met-Hb) index in both strains. Moreover, HFD promoted endogenous CoQ10 oxidation. CoQ10 supplementation was able to efficiently counteract the HFD pro-oxidant effects, preventing met-Hb formation and CoQ oxidation. © 2014 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  17. CoQ(10) deficiencies and MNGIE: two treatable mitochondrial disorders.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Michio; Garone, Caterina; Quinzii, Catarina M

    2012-05-01

    Although causative mutations have been identified for numerous mitochondrial disorders, few disease-modifying treatments are available. Two examples of treatable mitochondrial disorders are coenzyme Q(10) (CoQ(10) or ubiquinone) deficiency and mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy (MNGIE). Here, we describe clinical and molecular features of CoQ(10) deficiencies and MNGIE and explain how understanding their pathomechanisms have led to rationale therapies. Primary CoQ(10) deficiencies, due to mutations in genes required for ubiquinone biosynthesis, and secondary deficiencies, caused by genetic defects not directly related to CoQ(10) biosynthesis, often improve with CoQ(10) supplementation. In vitro and in vivo studies of CoQ(10) deficiencies have revealed biochemical alterations that may account for phenotypic differences among patients and variable responses to therapy. In contrast to the heterogeneous CoQ(10) deficiencies, MNGIE is a single autosomal recessive disease due to mutations in the TYMP gene encoding thymidine phosphorylase (TP). In MNGIE, loss of TP activity causes toxic accumulations of the nucleosides thymidine and deoxyuridine that are incorporated by the mitochondrial pyrimidine salvage pathway and cause deoxynucleoside triphosphate pool imbalances, which, in turn cause mtDNA instability. Allogeneic hematopoetic stem cell transplantation to restore TP activity and eliminate toxic metabolites is a promising therapy for MNGIE. CoQ(10) deficiencies and MNGIE demonstrate the feasibility of treating specific mitochondrial disorders through replacement of deficient metabolites or via elimination of excessive toxic molecules. Studies of CoQ(10) deficiencies and MNGIE illustrate how understanding the pathogenic mechanisms of mitochondrial diseases can lead to meaningful therapies. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Biochemistry of Mitochondria, Life and Intervention 2010. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Impact of Chemical Analogs of 4-Hydroxybenzoic Acid on Coenzyme Q Biosynthesis: From Inhibition to Bypass of Coenzyme Q Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Pierrel, Fabien

    2017-01-01

    Coenzyme Q is a lipid that participates to important physiological functions. Coenzyme Q is synthesized in multiple steps from the precursor 4-hydroxybenzoic acid. Mutations in enzymes that participate to coenzyme Q biosynthesis result in primary coenzyme Q deficiency, a type of mitochondrial disease. Coenzyme Q10 supplementation of patients is the classical treatment but it shows limited efficacy in some cases. The molecular understanding of the coenzyme Q biosynthetic pathway allowed the design of experiments to bypass deficient biosynthetic steps with analogs of 4-hydroxybenzoic acid. These molecules provide the defective chemical group and can reactivate endogenous coenzyme Q biosynthesis as demonstrated recently in yeast, mammalian cell cultures, and mouse models of primary coenzyme Q deficiency. This mini review presents how the chemical properties of various analogs of 4-hydroxybenzoic acid dictate the effect of the molecules on CoQ biosynthesis and how the reactivation of endogenous coenzyme Q biosynthesis may achieve better results than exogenous CoQ10 supplementation. PMID:28690551

  19. Restoring de novo Coenzyme Q biosynthesis in Caenorhabditis elegans coq-3 mutants yields profound rescue compared to exogenous Coenzyme Q supplementation

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, Fernando; Saiki, Ryoichi; Chin, Randall; Srinivasan, Chandra; Clarke, Catherine F.

    2012-01-01

    Coenzyme Q (ubiquinone or Q) is an essential lipid component of the mitochondrial electron transport chain. In Caenorhabditis elegans Q biosynthesis involves at least nine steps, including the hydroxylation of the hydroquinone ring by CLK-1 and two O-methylation steps mediated by COQ-3. We characterize two C. elegans coq-3 deletion mutants, and show that while each has defects in Q synthesis, their phenotypes are distinct. First generation homozygous coq-3(ok506) mutants are fertile when fed the standard lab diet of Q-replete OP50 E. coli, but their second generation homozygous progeny do not reproduce. In contrast, the coq-3(qm188) deletion mutant remains sterile when fed Q-replete OP50. Quantitative PCR analyses suggest that the longer qm188 deletion may alter expression of the flanking nuo-3 and gdi-1 genes, located 5′ and 3′, respectively of coq-3 within an operon. We surmise that variable expression of nuo-3, a subunit of complex I, or of gdi-1, a guanine nucleotide dissociation inhibitor, may act in combination with defects in Q biosynthesis to produce a more severe phenotype. The phenotypes of both coq-3 mutants are more drastic as compared to the C. elegans clk-1 mutants. When fed OP50, clk-1 mutants reproduce for many generations, but show reduced fertility, slow behaviors, and enhanced life span. The coq-3 and clk-1 mutants all show arrested development and are sterile when fed the Q-deficient E. coli strain GD1 (harboring a mutation in the ubiG gene). However, unlike clk-1 mutant worms, neither coq-3 mutant strain responded to dietary supplementation with purified exogenous Q10. Here we show that the Q9 content can be determined in lipid extracts from just 200 individual worms, enabling the determination of Q content in the coq-3 mutants unable to reproduce. An extra-chromosomal array expressing wild-type C. elegans coq-3 rescued fertility of both coq-3 mutants and partially restored steady-state levels of COQ-3 polypeptide and Q9 content, indicating

  20. Restoring de novo coenzyme Q biosynthesis in Caenorhabditis elegans coq-3 mutants yields profound rescue compared to exogenous coenzyme Q supplementation.

    PubMed

    Gomez, Fernando; Saiki, Ryoichi; Chin, Randall; Srinivasan, Chandra; Clarke, Catherine F

    2012-09-10

    Coenzyme Q (ubiquinone or Q) is an essential lipid component of the mitochondrial electron transport chain. In Caenorhabditis elegans Q biosynthesis involves at least nine steps, including the hydroxylation of the hydroquinone ring by CLK-1 and two O-methylation steps mediated by COQ-3. We characterize two C. elegans coq-3 deletion mutants, and show that while each has defects in Q synthesis, their phenotypes are distinct. First generation homozygous coq-3(ok506) mutants are fertile when fed the standard lab diet of Q-replete OP50 Escherichia coli, but their second generation homozygous progeny does not reproduce. In contrast, the coq-3(qm188) deletion mutant remains sterile when fed Q-replete OP50. Quantitative PCR analyses suggest that the longer qm188 deletion may alter expression of the flanking nuo-3 and gdi-1 genes, located 5' and 3', respectively of coq-3 within an operon. We surmise that variable expression of nuo-3, a subunit of complex I, or of gdi-1, a guanine nucleotide dissociation inhibitor, may act in combination with defects in Q biosynthesis to produce a more severe phenotype. The phenotypes of both coq-3 mutants are more drastic as compared to the C. elegans clk-1 mutants. When fed OP50, clk-1 mutants reproduce for many generations, but show reduced fertility, slow behaviors, and enhanced life span. The coq-3 and clk-1 mutants all show arrested development and are sterile when fed the Q-deficient E. coli strain GD1 (harboring a mutation in the ubiG gene). However, unlike clk-1 mutant worms, neither coq-3 mutant strain responded to dietary supplementation with purified exogenous Q(10). Here we show that the Q(9) content can be determined in lipid extracts from just 200 individual worms, enabling the determination of Q content in the coq-3 mutants unable to reproduce. An extra-chromosomal array expressing wild-type C. elegans coq-3 rescued fertility of both coq-3 mutants and partially restored steady-state levels of COQ-3 polypeptide and Q(9

  1. Q10 supplementation effects on cardiac enzyme CK-MB and troponin in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft: a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Moludi, Jalal; Keshavarz, Seyedali; Tabaee, Ali Sadeghpour; Safiri, Saeid; Pakzad, Reza

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Coronary artery bypass surgery (CABG) is associated with ischemia-reperfusion injury and tissue damage. CoQ10 as an antioxidant has an important role and may have cardio-protective effects after myocardial dysfunction and CABG. We aimed to evaluate whether CoQ10 has a myocardial cardio protective impact on cardiac biomarkers after CABG. Methods: In this double-blind study, 80 patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) who underwent CABG surgery were divided into intervention and control groups and received Q10 supplement or placebo, respectively. The surgical characteristics of the patients in the two groups were similar. The intervention group received 150 mg of Q10 supplement per day for 7 days before the surgery. The control group received placebo capsule. After operation the inter- and intra-group blood levels of CK-MB and troponin, before and after supplementation and 12 hours after the CABG, and postoperative outcomes such as intensive care unit (ICU) stay and hospital stay were compared. Results: In this study, 40 subjects were located in each group. The participation rate was 97.5% and men and women accounted for 52.5% and 47.5% respectively. The mean age of the subjects was 58.17 ± 8.55. The two groups were not significantly different in terms of basic variables. Within-group comparison showed a significant increase in the level of troponin enzymes over time (P < 0.001) and CK-MB (P < 0.001). However, between-group comparison showed no significant difference between the two groups in terms of CK-MB (P = 0.384) and troponin (P = 0.115). In the end, no interaction was observed between the intervention and time on CK-MB (P = 0.095) and troponin (P = 0.198) variables. Conclusion: Q10 supplementation 7 days before surgery was not effective in reducing CK-MB and troponin after CABG. PMID:27069560

  2. Detection of 6-demethoxyubiquinone in CoQ10 deficiency disorders: Insights into enzyme interactions and identification of potential therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Herebian, Diran; Seibt, Annette; Smits, Sander H J; Bünning, Gisela; Freyer, Christoph; Prokisch, Holger; Karall, Daniela; Wredenberg, Anna; Wedell, Anna; López, Luis C; Mayatepek, Ertan; Distelmaier, Felix

    2017-07-01

    Coenzyme Q 10 (CoQ 10 ) is an essential cofactor of the mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) system and its deficiency has important implications for several inherited metabolic disorders of childhood. The biosynthesis of CoQ 10 is a complicated process, which involves at least 12 different enzymes. One of the metabolic intermediates that are formed during CoQ 10 biosynthesis is the molecule 6-demethoxyubiquinone (6-DMQ). This CoQ precursor is processed at the level of COQ7 and COQ9. We selected this metabolite as a marker substance for metabolic analysis of cell lines with inherited genetic defects (COQ2, COQ4, COQ7 and COQ9) or siRNA knockdown in CoQ biosynthesis enzymes using ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS). In COQ4, COQ7 and COQ9 deficient cell lines, we detected significantly elevated levels of 6-DMQ. This suggests a functional interplay of these proteins. However, additional siRNA studies demonstrated that elevated 6-DMQ levels are not an exclusive marker of the COQ7/COQ9 enzymatic step of CoQ 10 biosynthesis but constitute a more general phenomenon that occurs in disorders impairing the function or stability of the CoQ-synthome. To further investigate the interdependence of CoQ 10 biosynthesis enzyme expression, we performed immunoblotting in various cell lines with CoQ 10 deficiency, indicating that COQ4, COQ7 and COQ9 protein expression levels are highly regulated depending on the underlying defect. Supplementation of cell lines with synthetic CoQ precursor compounds demonstrated beneficial effects of 2,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid in COQ7 and COQ9 deficiency. Moreover, vanillic acid selectively stimulated CoQ 10 biosynthesis and improved cell viability in COQ9 deficiency. However, compounds tested in this study failed to rescue COQ4 deficiency. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Update on clinical aspects and treatment of selected vitamin-responsive disorders II (riboflavin and CoQ 10).

    PubMed

    Horvath, Rita

    2012-07-01

    Riboflavin and ubiquinone (Coenzyme Q(10), CoQ(10)) deficiencies are heterogeneous groups of autosomal recessive conditions affecting both children and adults. Riboflavin (vitamin B(2))-derived cofactors are essential for the function of numerous dehydrogenases. Genetic defects of the riboflavin transport have been detected in Brown-Vialetto-Van Laere and Fazio-Londe syndromes (C20orf54), and haploinsufficiency of GPR172B has been proposed in one patient to cause persistent riboflavin deficiency. Mutations in the electron tranferring fravoprotein genes (ETFA/ETFB) and its dehydrogenase (ETFDH) are causative for multiple acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency. Mutations in ACAD9, encoding the acyl-CoA dehydrogenase 9 protein were recently reported in mitochondrial disease with respiratory chain complex I deficiency. All these conditions may respond to riboflavin therapy. CoQ(10) is a lipid-soluble component of the cell membranes, where it functions as a mobile electron and proton carrier, but also participates in other cellular processes as a potent antioxidant, and by influencing pyrimidine metabolism. The increasing number of molecular defects in enzymes of the CoQ(10) biosynthetic pathways (PDSS1, PDSS2, COQ2, COQ6, COQ9, CABC1/ADCK3) underlies the importance of these conditions. The clinical heterogeneity may reflect blocks at different levels in the complex biosynthetic pathway. Despite the identification of several primary CoQ(10) deficiency genes, the number of reported patients is still low, and no true genotype-phenotype correlations are known which makes the genetic diagnosis still difficult. Additionally to primary CoQ(10) deficiencies, where the mutation impairs a protein directly involved in CoQ(10) biosynthesis, we can differentiate secondary deficiencies. CoQ(10) supplementation may be beneficial in both primary and secondary deficiencies and therefore the early recognition of these diseases is of utmost importance.

  4. The Impact of Coenzyme Q[subscript10] Supplement on the Indicators of Muscle Damage in Young Male Skiing Athletes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Demirci, Nevzat

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted in order to know the impact of coenzyme Q[subscript 10] (CoQ[subscript 10]) supplement on the muscle damage and total oxidant (TOS) enzyme levels of young skiing athletes during exercise. 15 male athletes were used for two weeks in the study. The athletes were divided into three groups: the control group and two subject…

  5. Coenzyme Q10: Can It Prevent Statin Side Effects?

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Privacy Practices Notice of Nondiscrimination Manage Cookies Advertising Mayo Clinic is a not-for-profit organization and proceeds from Web advertising help support our mission. Mayo Clinic does not ...

  6. MitoQ10 induces adipogenesis and oxidative metabolism in myotube cultures.

    PubMed

    Nierobisz, Lidia S; McFarland, Douglas C; Mozdziak, Paul E

    2011-02-01

    Coenzyme Q(10) (CoQ(10)) plays an essential role in determination of mitochondrial membrane potential and substrate utilization in all metabolically important tissues. The objective of the present study was to investigate the effect of Coenzyme Q analog (MitoQ(10)) on oxidative phenotype and adipogenesis in myotubes derived from fast-glycolytic Pectoralis major (PM) and slow-oxidative Anterior latissimus dorsi (ALD) muscles of the turkey (Meleagris gallopavo). The myotubes were subjected to the following treatments: fusion media alone, fusion media+125 nM MitoQ(10), and 500 nM MitoQ(10). Lipid accumulation was visualized by Oil Red O staining and quantified by measuring optical density of extracted lipid at 500 nm. Quantitative Real-Time PCR was utilized to quantify the expression levels of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPARγ) and PPARγ co-activator-1α (PGC-1α). MitoQ(10) treatment resulted in the highest (P<0.05) lipid accumulation in PM myotubes. MitoQ(10) up-regulated genes controlling oxidative mitochondrial biogenesis and adipogenesis in PM myotube cultures. In contrast, MitoQ(10) had a limited effect on adipogenesis and down-regulated oxidative metabolism in ALD myotube cultures. Differential response to MitoQ(10) treatment may be dependent on the cellular redox state. MitoQ(10) likely controls a range of metabolic pathways through its differential regulation of gene expression levels in myotubes derived from fast-glycolytic and slow-oxidative muscles. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Coenzyme Q biosynthesis in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Acosta, Manuel Jesús; Vazquez Fonseca, Luis; Desbats, Maria Andrea; Cerqua, Cristina; Zordan, Roberta; Trevisson, Eva; Salviati, Leonardo

    2016-08-01

    Coenzyme Q (CoQ, or ubiquinone) is a remarkable lipid that plays an essential role in mitochondria as an electron shuttle between complexes I and II of the respiratory chain, and complex III. It is also a cofactor of other dehydrogenases, a modulator of the permeability transition pore and an essential antioxidant. CoQ is synthesized in mitochondria by a set of at least 12 proteins that form a multiprotein complex. The exact composition of this complex is still unclear. Most of the genes involved in CoQ biosynthesis (COQ genes) have been studied in yeast and have mammalian orthologues. Some of them encode enzymes involved in the modification of the quinone ring of CoQ, but for others the precise function is unknown. Two genes appear to have a regulatory role: COQ8 (and its human counterparts ADCK3 and ADCK4) encodes a putative kinase, while PTC7 encodes a phosphatase required for the activation of Coq7. Mutations in human COQ genes cause primary CoQ(10) deficiency, a clinically heterogeneous mitochondrial disorder with onset from birth to the seventh decade, and with clinical manifestation ranging from fatal multisystem disorders, to isolated encephalopathy or nephropathy. The pathogenesis of CoQ(10) deficiency involves deficient ATP production and excessive ROS formation, but possibly other aspects of CoQ(10) function are implicated. CoQ(10) deficiency is unique among mitochondrial disorders since an effective treatment is available. Many patients respond to oral CoQ(10) supplementation. Nevertheless, treatment is still problematic because of the low bioavailability of the compound, and novel pharmacological approaches are currently being investigated. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'EBEC 2016: 19th European Bioenergetics Conference, Riva del Garda, Italy, July 2-6, 2016', edited by Prof. Paolo Bernardi. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. ADCK4 mutations promote steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome through CoQ10 biosynthesis disruption

    PubMed Central

    Ashraf, Shazia; Gee, Heon Yung; Woerner, Stephanie; Xie, Letian X.; Vega-Warner, Virginia; Lovric, Svjetlana; Fang, Humphrey; Song, Xuewen; Cattran, Daniel C.; Avila-Casado, Carmen; Paterson, Andrew D.; Nitschké, Patrick; Bole-Feysot, Christine; Cochat, Pierre; Esteve-Rudd, Julian; Haberberger, Birgit; Allen, Susan J.; Zhou, Weibin; Airik, Rannar; Otto, Edgar A.; Barua, Moumita; Al-Hamed, Mohamed H.; Kari, Jameela A.; Evans, Jonathan; Bierzynska, Agnieszka; Saleem, Moin A.; Böckenhauer, Detlef; Kleta, Robert; El Desoky, Sherif; Hacihamdioglu, Duygu O.; Gok, Faysal; Washburn, Joseph; Wiggins, Roger C.; Choi, Murim; Lifton, Richard P.; Levy, Shawn; Han, Zhe; Salviati, Leonardo; Prokisch, Holger; Williams, David S.; Pollak, Martin; Clarke, Catherine F.; Pei, York; Antignac, Corinne; Hildebrandt, Friedhelm

    2013-01-01

    Identification of single-gene causes of steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome (SRNS) has furthered the understanding of the pathogenesis of this disease. Here, using a combination of homozygosity mapping and whole human exome resequencing, we identified mutations in the aarF domain containing kinase 4 (ADCK4) gene in 15 individuals with SRNS from 8 unrelated families. ADCK4 was highly similar to ADCK3, which has been shown to participate in coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) biosynthesis. Mutations in ADCK4 resulted in reduced CoQ10 levels and reduced mitochondrial respiratory enzyme activity in cells isolated from individuals with SRNS and transformed lymphoblasts. Knockdown of adck4 in zebrafish and Drosophila recapitulated nephrotic syndrome-associated phenotypes. Furthermore, ADCK4 was expressed in glomerular podocytes and partially localized to podocyte mitochondria and foot processes in rat kidneys and cultured human podocytes. In human podocytes, ADCK4 interacted with members of the CoQ10 biosynthesis pathway, including COQ6, which has been linked with SRNS and COQ7. Knockdown of ADCK4 in podocytes resulted in decreased migration, which was reversed by CoQ10 addition. Interestingly, a patient with SRNS with a homozygous ADCK4 frameshift mutation had partial remission following CoQ10 treatment. These data indicate that individuals with SRNS with mutations in ADCK4 or other genes that participate in CoQ10 biosynthesis may be treatable with CoQ10. PMID:24270420

  9. CoQ10 plasmatic levels in breast-fed infants compared to formula-fed infants.

    PubMed

    Compagnoni, G; Giuffrè, B; Lista, G; Mosca, F; Marini, A

    2004-01-01

    Coenzyme Q10 has been recognized as an important antioxidant factor besides its main role in bioenergetic metabolism. CoQ10 tissue levels depend both on exogenous dietetic intake and on endogenous biosynthesis, as this compound can be partly synthesized in human cells. Q10 plasma levels reflect the tissue content of the coenzyme and can be used to evaluate the presence of this compound in the human organism. Aim of the study was to measure CoQ10 plasmatic levels in a newborn breast-fed population and to compare them to CoQ10 levels in a newborn formula-fed population in order to verify whether changes in CoQ10 plasmatic contents could be related to a different dietetic intakes. We measured CoQ10 plasmatic levels in 25 healthy term neonates with different dietetic intakes: 15 breast-fed and 10 bottle-fed with a common infant formula. These infants were evaluated prospectively during the first month of life. The analyses were performed on the mothers' blood samples and cord blood samples at the time of delivery, then on infants at 4 and 28 days of age. Our results showed markedly reduced Q10 levels in cord blood samples compared to maternal Q10 plasmatic levels at the time of delivery, suggesting placental impermeability towards this molecule or increased fetal utilization during labor and delivery. At 4 days of age Q10 levels had increased in both groups of neonates, but significantly more in breast-fed infants compared to formula-fed babies (p <0.05). At 4 weeks of age no significant changes occurred in breast-fed infants, while values increased significantly in formula-fed infants (p <0.05). The content of Q10 in breast milk samples was lower than in infant formula. The results of this study show that CoQ10 plasmatic levels are at least partly influenced by the exogenous dietetic supply.

  10. The evidence basis for coenzyme Q therapy in oxidative phosphorylation disease.

    PubMed

    Haas, Richard H

    2007-06-01

    The evidence supporting a treatment benefit for coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) in primary mitochondrial disease (mitochondrial disease) whilst positive is limited. Mitochondrial disease in this context is defined as genetic disease causing an impairment in mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS). There are no treatment trials achieving the highest Level I evidence designation. Reasons for this include the relative rarity of mitochondrial disease, the heterogeneity of mitochondrial disease, the natural cofactor status and easy 'over the counter availability' of CoQ10 all of which make funding for the necessary large blinded clinical trials unlikely. At this time the best evidence for efficacy comes from controlled trials in common cardiovascular and neurodegenerative diseases with mitochondrial and OXPHOS dysfunction the etiology of which is most likely multifactorial with environmental factors playing on a background of genetic predisposition. There remain questions about dosing, bioavailability, tissue penetration and intracellular distribution of orally administered CoQ10, a compound which is endogenously produced within the mitochondria of all cells. In some mitochondrial diseases and other commoner disorders such as cardiac disease and Parkinson's disease low mitochondrial or tissue levels of CoQ10 have been demonstrated providing an obvious rationale for supplementation. This paper discusses the current state of the evidence supporting the use of CoQ10 in mitochondrial disease.

  11. Oxidative stress correlates with headache symptoms in fibromyalgia: coenzyme Q₁₀ effect on clinical improvement.

    PubMed

    Cordero, Mario D; Cano-García, Francisco Javier; Alcocer-Gómez, Elísabet; De Miguel, Manuel; Sánchez-Alcázar, José Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Fibromyalgia (FM) is a chronic pain syndrome with unknown etiology and a wide spectrum of symptoms such as allodynia, debilitating fatigue, joint stiffness and migraine. Recent studies have shown some evidences demonstrating that oxidative stress is associated to clinical symptoms in FM of fibromyalgia. We examined oxidative stress and bioenergetic status in blood mononuclear cells (BMCs) and its association to headache symptoms in FM patients. The effects of oral coenzyme Q(10) (CoQ(10)) supplementation on biochemical markers and clinical improvement were also evaluated. We studied 20 FM patients and 15 healthy controls. Clinical parameters were evaluated using the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ), visual analogues scales (VAS), and the Headache Impact Test (HIT-6). Oxidative stress was determined by measuring CoQ(10), catalase and lipid peroxidation (LPO) levels in BMCs. Bioenergetic status was assessed by measuring ATP levels in BMCs. We found decreased CoQ(10), catalase and ATP levels in BMCs from FM patients as compared to normal control (P < 0.05 and P < 0.001, respectively) We also found increased level of LPO in BMCs from FM patients as compared to normal control (P < 0.001). Significant negative correlations between CoQ(10) or catalase levels in BMCs and headache parameters were observed (r  = -0.59, P < 0.05; r  =  -0.68, P < 0.05, respectively). Furthermore, LPO levels showed a significant positive correlation with HIT-6 (r = 0.33, P<0.05). Oral CoQ(10) supplementation restored biochemical parameters and induced a significant improvement in clinical and headache symptoms (P < 0.001). The results of this study suggest a role for mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress in the headache symptoms associated with FM. CoQ10 supplementation should be examined in a larger placebo controlled trial as a possible treatment in FM.

  12. Requirement for Coenzyme Q in Plasma Membrane Electron Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, I. L.; Sun, E. E.; Crane, F. L.; Morre, D. J.; Lindgren, A.; Low, H.

    1992-12-01

    Coenzyme Q is required in the electron transport system of rat hepatocyte and human erythrocyte plasma membranes. Extraction of coenzyme Q from the membrane decreases NADH dehydrogenase and NADH:oxygen oxidoreductase activity. Addition of coenzyme Q to the extracted membrane restores the activity. Partial restoration of activity is also found with α-tocopherylquinone, but not with vitamin K_1. Analogs of coenzyme Q inhibit NADH dehydrogenase and oxidase activity and the inhibition is reversed by added coenzyme Q. Ferricyanide reduction by transmembrane electron transport from HeLa cells is inhibited by coenzyme Q analogs and restored with added coenzyme Q10. Reduction of external ferricyanide and diferric transferrin by HeLa cells is accompanied by proton release from the cells. Inhibition of the reduction by coenzyme Q analogs also inhibits the proton release, and coenzyme Q10 restores the proton release activity. Trans-plasma membrane electron transport stimulates growth of serum-deficient cells, and added coenzyme Q10 increases growth of HeLa (human adenocarcinoma) and BALB/3T3 (mouse fibroblast) cells. The evidence is consistent with a function for coenzyme Q in a trans-plasma membrane electron transport system which influences cell growth.

  13. Novel recessive mutations in COQ4 cause severe infantile cardiomyopathy and encephalopathy associated with CoQ10 deficiency.

    PubMed

    Sondheimer, Neal; Hewson, Stacy; Cameron, Jessie M; Somers, Gino R; Broadbent, Jane Dunning; Ziosi, Marcello; Quinzii, Catarina Maria; Naini, Ali B

    2017-09-01

    Coenzyme Q 10 (CoQ 10 ) or ubiquinone is one of the two electron carriers in the mitochondrial respiratory chain which has an essential role in the process of oxidative phosphorylation. Defects in CoQ 10 synthesis are usually associated with the impaired function of CoQ 10 -dependent complexes I, II and III. The recessively transmitted CoQ 10 deficiency has been associated with a number of phenotypically and genetically heterogeneous groups of disorders manifesting at variable age of onset. The infantile, multisystemic presentation is usually caused by mutations in genes directly involved in CoQ 10 biosynthesis. To date, mutations in COQ1 ( PDSS1 and PDSS2 ), COQ2 , COQ4 , COQ6 , COQ7 , COQ8A / ADCK3 , COQ8B/ADCK4 , and COQ9 genes have been identified in patients with primary form of CoQ 10 deficiency. Here we report novel mutations in the COQ4 gene, which were identified in an infant with profound mitochondrial disease presenting with perinatal seizures, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and severe muscle CoQ 10 deficiency.

  14. Identification of bottlenecks in Escherichia coli engineered for the production of CoQ(10).

    PubMed

    Cluis, Corinne P; Ekins, Andrew; Narcross, Lauren; Jiang, Heng; Gold, Nicholas D; Burja, Adam M; Martin, Vincent J J

    2011-11-01

    In this work, Escherichia coli was engineered to produce a medically valuable cofactor, coenzyme Q(10) (CoQ(10)), by removing the endogenous octaprenyl diphosphate synthase gene and functionally replacing it with a decaprenyl diphosphate synthase gene from Sphingomonas baekryungensis. In addition, by over-expressing genes coding for rate-limiting enzymes of the aromatic pathway, biosynthesis of the CoQ(10) precursor para-hydroxybenzoate (PHB) was increased. The production of isoprenoid precursors of CoQ(10) was also improved by the heterologous expression of a synthetic mevalonate operon, which permits the conversion of exogenously supplied mevalonate to farnesyl diphosphate. The over-expression of these precursors in the CoQ(10)-producing E. coli strain resulted in an increase in CoQ(10) content, as well as in the accumulation of an intermediate of the ubiquinone pathway, decaprenylphenol (10P-Ph). In addition, the over-expression of a PHB decaprenyl transferase (UbiA) encoded by a gene from Erythrobacter sp. NAP1 was introduced to direct the flux of DPP and PHB towards the ubiquinone pathway. This further increased CoQ(10) content in engineered E. coli, but decreased the accumulation of 10P-Ph. Finally, we report that the combined over-production of isoprenoid precursors and over-expression of UbiA results in the decaprenylation of para-aminobenzoate, a biosynthetic precursor of folate, which is structurally similar to PHB. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Examining intentions to use CoQ10 amongst breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Hill, Gina Jarman; Shriver, Brent J; Arnett, Dennis B

    2006-01-01

    To determine factors that influence breast cancer patients' intentions to supplement with CoQ10. A survey based upon the expanded rational expectations intentions model was completed by breast cancer outpatients (N=160). A significantly positive relationship existed between referent other (the influence specific people have in terms of an individual's behavior) and subjective norm (subject's perception of how people view a behavior). Beliefs, referent other, attitude, and subjective norm did have a significant effect on intention to use CoQ10. Health practitioners may address supplementation with breast cancer patients with a better understanding of what factors impact supplement use.

  16. Coenzyme Q plays opposing roles on bacteria/fungi and viruses in Drosophila innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Cheng, W; Song, C; Anjum, K M; Chen, M; Li, D; Zhou, H; Wang, W; Chen, J

    2011-08-01

    Coenzyme Q (CoQ or ubiquinone) is a lipid-soluble component of virtually all types of cell membranes and has been shown to play multiple metabolic functions. Several clinical diseases including encephalomyopathy, cerebellar ataxia and isolated myopathy were shown to be associated with CoQ deficiency. However, the role of CoQ in immunity has not been defined. In the present study, we showed that flies defective in CoQ biosynthetic gene coq2 were more susceptible to bacterial and fungal infections, while were more resistant to viruses. We found that Drosophila contained both CoQ9 and CoQ10, and food supplement of CoQ10 could partially rescue the impaired immune functions of coq2 mutants. Surprisingly, wild-type flies fed CoQ10 became more susceptible to viral infection, which suggested that extra caution should be taken when using CoQ10 as a food supplement. We further showed that CoQ was essential for normal induction of anti-microbial peptides and amplification of viruses. Our work determined CoQ content in Drosophila and described its function in immunity for the first time. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  17. Primary and secondary CoQ(10) deficiencies in humans.

    PubMed

    Quinzii, Catarina M; Hirano, Michio

    2011-01-01

    CoQ(10) deficiencies are clinically and genetically heterogeneous. This syndrome has been associated with five major clinical phenotypes: (1) encephalomyopathy, (2) severe infantile multisystemic disease, (3) cerebellar ataxia, (4) isolated myopathy, and (5) nephrotic syndrome. In a few patients, pathogenic mutations have been identified in genes involved in the biosynthesis of CoQ(10) (primary CoQ(10) deficiencies) or in genes not directly related to CoQ(10) biosynthesis (secondary CoQ(10) deficiencies). Respiratory chain defects, ROS production, and apoptosis variably contribute to the pathogenesis of primary CoQ(10) deficiencies. Copyright © 2011 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  18. Additive enhancement of wound healing in diabetic mice by low level light and topical CoQ10

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Zhigang; Wu, Jeffrey H.; Dong, Tingting; Wu, Mei X.

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes, a highly prevalent disease that affects 9.3% of Americans, often leads to severe complications and slow wound healing. Preclinical studies have suggested that low level light therapy (LLLT) can accelerate wound healing in diabetic subjects, but significant improvements must be made to overcome the absence of persuasive evidence for its clinical use. We demonstrate here that LLLT can be combined with topical Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) to heal wounds in diabetic mice significantly faster than LLLT alone, CoQ10 alone, or controls. LLLT followed by topical CoQ10 enhanced wound healing by 68~103% in diabetic mice in the first week and more than 24% in the second week compared with untreated controls. All wounds were fully healed in two weeks following the dual treatment, in contrast to only 50% wounds or a fewer being fully healed for single or sham treatment. The accelerated healing was corroborated by at least 50% higher hydroxyproline levels, and tripling cell proliferation rates in LLLT and CoQ10 treated wounds over controls. The beneficial effects on wound healing were probably attributed to additive enhancement of ATP production by LLLT and CoQ10 treatment. The combination of LLLT and topical CoQ10 is safe and convenient, and merits further clinical study. PMID:26830658

  19. Leigh Syndrome with Nephropathy and CoQ10 Deficiency Due to decaprenyl diphosphate synthase subunit 2 (PDSS2) Mutations

    PubMed Central

    López, Luis Carlos ; Schuelke, Markus ; Quinzii, Catarina M. ; Kanki, Tomotake ; Rodenburg, Richard J. T. ; Naini, Ali ; DiMauro, Salvatore ; Hirano, Michio 

    2006-01-01

    Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) is a vital lipophilic molecule that transfers electrons from mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes I and II to complex III. Deficiency of CoQ10 has been associated with diverse clinical phenotypes, but, in most patients, the molecular cause is unknown. The first defect in a CoQ10 biosynthetic gene, COQ2, was identified in a child with encephalomyopathy and nephrotic syndrome and in a younger sibling with only nephropathy. Here, we describe an infant with severe Leigh syndrome, nephrotic syndrome, and CoQ10 deficiency in muscle and fibroblasts and compound heterozygous mutations in the PDSS2 gene, which encodes a subunit of decaprenyl diphosphate synthase, the first enzyme of the CoQ10 biosynthetic pathway. Biochemical assays with radiolabeled substrates indicated a severe defect in decaprenyl diphosphate synthase in the patient’s fibroblasts. This is the first description of pathogenic mutations in PDSS2 and confirms the molecular and clinical heterogeneity of primary CoQ10 deficiency. PMID:17186472

  20. Additive enhancement of wound healing in diabetic mice by low level light and topical CoQ10.

    PubMed

    Mao, Zhigang; Wu, Jeffrey H; Dong, Tingting; Wu, Mei X

    2016-02-02

    Diabetes, a highly prevalent disease that affects 9.3% of Americans, often leads to severe complications and slow wound healing. Preclinical studies have suggested that low level light therapy (LLLT) can accelerate wound healing in diabetic subjects, but significant improvements must be made to overcome the absence of persuasive evidence for its clinical use. We demonstrate here that LLLT can be combined with topical Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) to heal wounds in diabetic mice significantly faster than LLLT alone, CoQ10 alone, or controls. LLLT followed by topical CoQ10 enhanced wound healing by 68~103% in diabetic mice in the first week and more than 24% in the second week compared with untreated controls. All wounds were fully healed in two weeks following the dual treatment, in contrast to only 50% wounds or a fewer being fully healed for single or sham treatment. The accelerated healing was corroborated by at least 50% higher hydroxyproline levels, and tripling cell proliferation rates in LLLT and CoQ10 treated wounds over controls. The beneficial effects on wound healing were probably attributed to additive enhancement of ATP production by LLLT and CoQ10 treatment. The combination of LLLT and topical CoQ10 is safe and convenient, and merits further clinical study.

  1. Additive enhancement of wound healing in diabetic mice by low level light and topical CoQ10

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Zhigang; Wu, Jeffrey H.; Dong, Tingting; Wu, Mei X.

    2016-02-01

    Diabetes, a highly prevalent disease that affects 9.3% of Americans, often leads to severe complications and slow wound healing. Preclinical studies have suggested that low level light therapy (LLLT) can accelerate wound healing in diabetic subjects, but significant improvements must be made to overcome the absence of persuasive evidence for its clinical use. We demonstrate here that LLLT can be combined with topical Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) to heal wounds in diabetic mice significantly faster than LLLT alone, CoQ10 alone, or controls. LLLT followed by topical CoQ10 enhanced wound healing by 68~103% in diabetic mice in the first week and more than 24% in the second week compared with untreated controls. All wounds were fully healed in two weeks following the dual treatment, in contrast to only 50% wounds or a fewer being fully healed for single or sham treatment. The accelerated healing was corroborated by at least 50% higher hydroxyproline levels, and tripling cell proliferation rates in LLLT and CoQ10 treated wounds over controls. The beneficial effects on wound healing were probably attributed to additive enhancement of ATP production by LLLT and CoQ10 treatment. The combination of LLLT and topical CoQ10 is safe and convenient, and merits further clinical study.

  2. CoQ10 and L-carnitine for statin myalgia?

    PubMed

    DiNicolantonio, James J

    2012-10-01

    Statins are a standard of care in many clinical settings such as acute myocardial infarction and for patients having or at risk of cardiovascular (CV) disease. This is based on a plethora of data showing reductions in CV events and mortality. The CV benefit of statins can be partly explained by their ability to inhibit of HMG-CoA reductase, which subsequently lowers cholesterol and decreases the formation of mevalonate. However, the inhibition of the mevalonate pathway decreases the formation of coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) within the body. It has been a long-standing theory that statin-associated muscle pain (myalgia) is caused, or at least partly contributed by, a reduction in CoQ10 levels in muscle mitochondria. One of the main side effects of statins is myalgia, which causes the patient to either stop their statin or significantly reduce the dose of their statin. The question of whether CoQ10 can help treat statin myopathy is a common one encountered by clinicians in current day practice.

  3. Coenzyme Q supplementation or over-expression of the yeast Coq8 putative kinase stabilizes multi-subunit Coq polypeptide complexes in yeast coq null mutants.

    PubMed

    He, Cuiwen H; Xie, Letian X; Allan, Christopher M; Tran, Uyenphuong C; Clarke, Catherine F

    2014-04-04

    Coenzyme Q biosynthesis in yeast requires a multi-subunit Coq polypeptide complex. Deletion of any one of the COQ genes leads to respiratory deficiency and decreased levels of the Coq4, Coq6, Coq7, and Coq9 polypeptides, suggesting that their association in a high molecular mass complex is required for stability. Over-expression of the putative Coq8 kinase in certain coq null mutants restores steady-state levels of the sensitive Coq polypeptides and promotes the synthesis of late-stage Q-intermediates. Here we show that over-expression of Coq8 in yeast coq null mutants profoundly affects the association of several of the Coq polypeptides in high molecular mass complexes, as assayed by separation of digitonin extracts of mitochondria by two-dimensional blue-native/SDS PAGE. The Coq4 polypeptide persists at high molecular mass with over-expression of Coq8 in coq3, coq5, coq6, coq7, coq9, and coq10 mutants, indicating that Coq4 is a central organizer of the Coq complex. Supplementation with exogenous Q6 increased the steady-state levels of Coq4, Coq7, and Coq9, and several other mitochondrial polypeptides in select coq null mutants, and also promoted the formation of late-stage Q-intermediates. Q supplementation may stabilize this complex by interacting with one or more of the Coq polypeptides. The stabilizing effects of exogenously added Q6 or over-expression of Coq8 depend on Coq1 and Coq2 production of a polyisoprenyl intermediate. Based on the observed interdependence of the Coq polypeptides, the effect of exogenous Q6, and the requirement for an endogenously produced polyisoprenyl intermediate, we propose a new model for the Q-biosynthetic complex, termed the CoQ-synthome. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Coenzyme Q supplementation or over-expression of the yeast Coq8 putative kinase stabilizes multi-subunit Coq polypeptide complexes in yeast coq null mutants*

    PubMed Central

    He, Cuiwen H.; Xie, Letian X.; Allan, Christopher M.; Tran, UyenPhuong C.; Clarke, Catherine F.

    2014-01-01

    Coenzyme Q biosynthesis in yeast requires a multi-subunit Coq polypeptide complex. Deletion of any one of the COQ genes leads to respiratory deficiency and decreased levels of the Coq4, Coq6, Coq7, and Coq9 polypeptides, suggesting that their association in a high molecular mass complex is required for stability. Over-expression of the putative Coq8 kinase in certain coq null mutants restores steady-state levels of the sensitive Coq polypeptides and promotes the synthesis of late-stage Q-intermediates. Here we show that over-expression of Coq8 in yeast coq null mutants profoundly affects the association of several of the Coq polypeptides in high molecular mass complexes, as assayed by separation of digitonin extracts of mitochondria by two-dimensional blue-native/SDS PAGE. The Coq4 polypeptide persists at high molecular mass with over-expression of Coq8 in coq3, coq5, coq6, coq7, coq9, and coq10 mutants, indicating that Coq4 is a central organizer of the Coq complex. Supplementation with exogenous Q6 increased the steady-state levels of Coq4, Coq7, Coq9, and several other mitochondrial polypeptides in select coq null mutants, and also promoted the formation of late-stage Q-intermediates. Q supplementation may stabilize this complex by interacting with one or more of the Coq polypeptides. The stabilizing effects of exogenously added Q6 or over-expression of Coq8 depend on Coq1 and Coq2 production of a polyisoprenyl intermediate. Based on the observed interdependence of the Coq polypeptides, the effect of exogenous Q6, and the requirement for an endogenously produced polyisoprenyl intermediate, we propose a new model for the Q-biosynthetic complex, termed the CoQ-synthome. PMID:24406904

  5. Phase II trial of CoQ10 for ALS finds insufficient evidence to justify Phase III

    PubMed Central

    Kaufmann, Petra; Thompson, John L.P.; Levy, Gilberto; Buchsbaum, Richard; Shefner, Jeremy; Krivickas, Lisa S.; Katz, Jonathan; Rollins, Yvonne; Barohn, Richard J.; Jackson, Carlayne E.; Tiryaki, Ezgi; Lomen-Hoerth, Catherine; Armon, Carmel; Tandan, Rup; Rudnicki, Stacy A.; Rezania, Kourosh; Sufit, Robert; Pestronk, Alan; Novella, Steven P.; Heiman-Patterson, Terry; Kasarskis, Edward J.; Pioro, Erik P.; Montes, Jacqueline; Arbing, Rachel; Vecchio, Darleen; Barsdorf, Alexandra; Mitsumoto, Hiroshi; Levin, Bruce

    2010-01-01

    Objective Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a devastating, and currently incurable, neuromuscular disease in which oxidative stress and mitochondrial impairment are contributing to neuronal loss. Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10), an antioxidant and mitochondrial cofactor, has shown promise in ALS transgenic mice, and in clinical trials for neurodegenerative diseases other than ALS. Our aims were to choose between two high doses of CoQ10 for ALS, and to determine if it merits testing in a Phase III clinical trial. Methods We designed and implemented a multi-center trial with an adaptive, two-stage, bias-adjusted, randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, Phase II design (n=185). The primary outcome in both stages was decline in the ALS Functional Rating Scale-revised (ALSFRSr) score over 9 months. Stage 1 (dose selection, 35 participants per group) compared CoQ10 doses of 1,800 and 2,700 mg/day. Stage 2 (futility test, 75 patients per group) compared the dose selected in Stage 1 against placebo. Results Stage 1 selected the 2,700 mg dose. In Stage 2, the pre-specified primary null hypothesis that this dose is superior to placebo was not rejected. It was rejected, however, in an accompanying pre-specified sensitivity test, and further supplementary analyses. Pre-specified secondary analyses showed no significant differences between CoQ10 at 2,700 mg/day and placebo. There were no safety concerns. Interpretation CoQ10 at 2,700 mg daily for 9 months shows insufficient promise to warrant Phase III testing. Given this outcome, the adaptive Phase II design incorporating a dose selection and a futility test avoided the need for a much larger conventional Phase III trial. PMID:19743457

  6. [Nutrition and dietary supplements in neurological diseases].

    PubMed

    Erbguth, F; Himmerich, H

    2014-12-01

    "Healthy" diets and supplements are widely used for prevention and disease modification in vascular, inflammatory and degenerative neurological diseases. Apart from a large number of cross-sectional and prospective cohort studies, there are only few interventional studies on individual dietary measures. A recent study confirmed the stroke preventive effect of a Mediterranean diet rich in olive oil and nuts; a ketogenic diet reduces seizure frequency in epilepsy. Supplementation of riboflavin, magnesium and coenzyme Q10 are probably effective in migraine prophylaxis. Creatine can improve muscle strength in muscular dystrophy and myositis. There is insufficient evidence to recommend any of the many dietary supplements, such as vitamins, omega-3 fatty acids and other substances for the prevention or improvement of all other neurological diseases. This review critically evaluates the present data on the role of nutrition and dietary supplements in neurological diseases.

  7. Orthomolecular medicine: the therapeutic use of dietary supplements for anti-aging

    PubMed Central

    Janson, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Dietary supplements at high doses as part of medical therapy have been controversial, but the evidence suggests that they play a significant role in prevention and treatment of diseases as well as protection from accelerated aging that results from oxygen free-radical damage, inflammation, and glycation. This literature review examines several supplements that have documented roles in medical therapy, including vitamins C and E, coenzyme Q10, alpha-lipoic acid, chromium, L-carnitine, and quercetin. The evidence shows benefits in diabetes, cardiovascular disease, hypertension, congestive heart failure, age-related deterioration of brain function and vision, and immune function, as well as other age-related health problems. PMID:18046879

  8. Orthomolecular medicine: the therapeutic use of dietary supplements for anti-aging.

    PubMed

    Janson, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Dietary supplements at high doses as part of medical therapy have been controversial, but the evidence suggests that they play a significant role in prevention and treatment of diseases as well as protection from accelerated aging that results from oxygen free-radical damage, inflammation, and glycation. This literature review examines several supplements that have documented roles in medical therapy, including vitamins C and E, coenzyme Q10, alpha-lipoic acid, chromium, L-carnitine, and quercetin. The evidence shows benefits in diabetes, cardiovascular disease, hypertension, congestive heart failure, age-related deterioration of brain function and vision, and immune function, as well as other age-related health problems.

  9. Pro-oxidant mitochondrial matrix-targeted ubiquinone MitoQ10 acts as anti-oxidant at retarded electron transport or proton pumping within Complex I.

    PubMed

    Plecitá-Hlavatá, Lydie; Jezek, Jan; Jezek, Petr

    2009-01-01

    Oxidative stress of mitochondrial origin, i.e. elevated mitochondrial superoxide production, belongs to major factors determining aging and oxidative-stress-related diseases. Antioxidants, such as the mitochondria-targeted coenzyme Q, MitoQ(10), may prevent or cure these pathological conditions. To elucidate pro- and anti-oxidant action of MitoQ(10), we studied its effects on HepG2 cell respiration, mitochondrial network morphology, and rates of superoxide release (above that neutralized by superoxide dismutase) to the mitochondrial matrix (J(m)). MitoSOX Red fluorescence confocal microscopy monitoring of J(m) rates showed pro-oxidant effects of 3.5-fold increased J(m) with MitoQ(10). MitoQ(10) induced fission of the mitochondrial network which was recovered after 24h. In rotenone-inhibited HepG2 cells (i.e., already under oxidative stress) MitoQ(10) sharply decreased rotenone-induced J(m), but not together with the Complex II inhibitor thenoyltrifluoroacetone. Respiration of HepG2 cells and isolated rat liver mitochondria with MitoQ(10) increased independently of rotenone. The increase was prevented by thenoyltrifluoroacetone. These results suggest that MitoQ(10) accepts electrons prior to the rotenone-bound Q-site, and the Complex II reverse mode oxidizes MitoQ(10)H(2) to regenerate MitoQ(10). Consequently, MitoQ(10) has a pro-oxidant role in intact cells, whereas it serves as an antioxidant when Complex I-derived superoxide generation is already elevated due to electron flow retardation. Moreover, unlike mitochondrial uncoupling, MitoQ(10) exerted its antioxidant role when Complex I proton pumping was retarded by a hydrophobic amiloride, 5-(N-ethyl-N-isopropyl) amiloride. Consequently, MitoQ(10) may be useful in the treatment of diseases originating from impairment of respiratory chain Complex I due to oxidatively damaged mitochondrial DNA, when its targeted delivery to pathogenic tissues is ensured.

  10. Kaempferol increases levels of coenzyme Q in kidney cells and serves as a biosynthetic ring precursor.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Del-Río, Lucía; Nag, Anish; Gutiérrez Casado, Elena; Ariza, Julia; Awad, Agape M; Joseph, Akil I; Kwon, Ohyun; Verdin, Eric; de Cabo, Rafael; Schneider, Claus; Torres, Jorge Z; Burón, María I; Clarke, Catherine F; Villalba, José M

    2017-09-01

    Coenzyme Q (Q) is a lipid-soluble antioxidant essential in cellular physiology. Patients with Q deficiencies, with few exceptions, seldom respond to treatment. Current therapies rely on dietary supplementation with Q 10 , but due to its highly lipophilic nature, Q 10 is difficult to absorb by tissues and cells. Plant polyphenols, present in the human diet, are redox active and modulate numerous cellular pathways. In the present study, we tested whether treatment with polyphenols affected the content or biosynthesis of Q. Mouse kidney proximal tubule epithelial (Tkpts) cells and human embryonic kidney cells 293 (HEK 293) were treated with several types of polyphenols, and kaempferol produced the largest increase in Q levels. Experiments with stable isotope 13 C-labeled kaempferol demonstrated a previously unrecognized role of kaempferol as an aromatic ring precursor in Q biosynthesis. Investigations of the structure-function relationship of related flavonols showed the importance of two hydroxyl groups, located at C3 of the C ring and C4' of the B ring, both present in kaempferol, as important determinants of kaempferol as a Q biosynthetic precursor. Concurrently, through a mechanism not related to the enhancement of Q biosynthesis, kaempferol also augmented mitochondrial localization of Sirt3. The role of kaempferol as a precursor that increases Q levels, combined with its ability to upregulate Sirt3, identify kaempferol as a potential candidate in the design of interventions aimed on increasing endogenous Q biosynthesis, particularly in kidney. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Calcium binding and transport by coenzyme Q.

    PubMed

    Bogeski, Ivan; Gulaboski, Rubin; Kappl, Reinhard; Mirceski, Valentin; Stefova, Marina; Petreska, Jasmina; Hoth, Markus

    2011-06-22

    Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) is one of the essential components of the mitochondrial electron-transport chain (ETC) with the primary function to transfer electrons along and protons across the inner mitochondrial membrane (IMM). The concomitant proton gradient across the IMM is essential for the process of oxidative phosphorylation and consequently ATP production. Cytochrome P450 (CYP450) monoxygenase enzymes are known to induce structural changes in a variety of compounds and are expressed in the IMM. However, it is unknown if CYP450 interacts with CoQ10 and how such an interaction would affect mitochondrial function. Using voltammetry, UV-vis spectrometry, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), fluorescence microscopy and high performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS), we show that both CoQ10 and its analogue CoQ1, when exposed to CYP450 or alkaline media, undergo structural changes through a complex reaction pathway and form quinone structures with distinct properties. Hereby, one or both methoxy groups at positions 2 and 3 on the quinone ring are replaced by hydroxyl groups in a time-dependent manner. In comparison with the native forms, the electrochemically reduced forms of the new hydroxylated CoQs have higher antioxidative potential and are also now able to bind and transport Ca(2+) across artificial biomimetic membranes. Our results open new perspectives on the physiological importance of CoQ10 and its analogues, not only as electron and proton transporters, but also as potential regulators of mitochondrial Ca(2+) and redox homeostasis.

  12. Self-Incorporation of Coenzymes by Ribozymes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breaker, Ronald R.; Joyce, Gerald F.

    1995-01-01

    RNA molecules that are assembled from the four standard nucleotides contain a limited number of chemical functional groups, a characteristic that is generally thought to restrict the potential for catalysis by ribozymes. Although polypeptides carry a wider range of functional groups, many contemporary protein-based enzymes employ coenzymes to augment their capabilities. The coenzymes possess additional chemical moieties that can participate directly in catalysis and thereby enhance catalytic function. In this work, we demonstrate a mechanism by which ribozymes can supplement their limited repertoire of functional groups through RNAcatalyzed incorporation of various coenzymes and coenzyme analogues. The group I ribozyme of Tetrahymena thermophila normally mediates a phosphoester transfer reaction that results in the covalent attachment of guanosine to the ribozyme. Here, a shortened version of the ribozyme is shown to catalyze the self-incorporation of coenzymes and coenzyme analogues, such as NAD+ and dephosphorylated CoA-SH. Similar ribozyme activities may have played an important role in the "RNA world," when RNA enzymes are thought to have maintained a complex metabolism in the absence of proteins and would have benefited from the inclusion of additional functional groups.

  13. 76 FR 57746 - Conference on the International Conference on Harmonisation Q10 Pharmaceutical Quality System: A...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-16

    ... ``Pharmaceutical Quality System (ICH Q10) Conference: A Practical Approach to Effective Life- Cycle Implementation... Pharmaceutical Quality System across the product life cycle according to the ICH Q10 model. These companies are...] Conference on the International Conference on Harmonisation Q10 Pharmaceutical Quality System: A Practical...

  14. Antioxidant Effect of CoQ(10) on N-nitrosodiethylamine-induced Oxidative Stress in Mice.

    PubMed

    Song, Ho Sun; Kim, Hee Rae; Park, Tae Wook; Cho, Bong Jae; Choi, Mi Young; Kim, Chang Jong; Sohn, Uy Dong; Sim, Sang Soo

    2009-08-01

    The antioxidant effect of CoQ(10) on N-nitrosodiethylamine (NDEA)-induced oxidative stress was investigated in mice. Food intake and body weight were similar in both CoQ(10) and control groups during the 3-week experimental period. NDEA significantly increased the activities of typical marker enzymes of liver function (AST, ALT and ALP) both in control and CoQ(10) groups. However, the increase of plasma aminotransferase activity was significantly reduced in the CoQ(10) group. Lipid peroxidation in various tissues, such as heart, lung, liver, kidney, spleen and plasma, was significantly increased by NDEA, but this increase was significantly reduced by 100 mg/kg of CoQ(10). Superoxide dismutase activity increased significantly upon NDEA-induced oxidative stress in both the control and CoQ(10) groups with the effect being less in the CoQ(10) group. Catalase activity decreased significantly in both the control and CoQ(10) groups treated with NDEA, again with the effect being less in the CoQ(10) group. The lesser effect on superoxide dismutase and catalase in the NDEA-treated CoQ(10) group is indicative of the protective effect CoQ(10). Thus, CoQ(10) can offer useful protection against NDEA-induced oxidative stress.

  15. 77 FR 60722 - Certain Coenzyme Q10 Products and Methods of Making Same; Notice of Request for Statements on the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-04

    ... respondents Zhejiang Medicine Co., Ltd., ZMC-USA, L.L.C., Xiamen Kingdomway Group Company, Pacific Rainbow... and Technology Co., Ltd. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Lisa R. Barton, Acting Secretary to the...

  16. 77 FR 72385 - Certain Coenzyme Q10 Products and Methods of Making Same; Commission Determination (1) To Review...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-05

    ... Gas Chemical Co., Inc. (``MGC'') does not satisfy the 70 mole % limitation, and (b) the claim construction of ``inert gas atmosphere'' with respect to the asserted claims of U.S. Patent No. 7,910,340... does not satisfy the 70 mole % limitation, and (b) the claim construction of ``inert gas atmosphere...

  17. Consumption of nutritional supplements among adolescents: usage and perceived benefits.

    PubMed

    O'Dea, Jennifer A

    2003-02-01

    The aim of the study was to obtain rich qualitative data about the type of nutritional supplements and drinks consumed by adolescents, and the reasons for their consumption, with particular emphasis on the perceived benefits of nutritional supplementation. Semi-structured focus group interviews (n = 16) were conducted among 78 adolescents aged 11-18 years from a co-educational government high school. Participants reported consuming sports drinks, vitamin and mineral supplements, energy drinks, herbal supplements, guarana, creatine, high protein milk supplements, and coenzyme Q10. Reasons for supplement use included perceived short-term health benefits, prevention of illness, improved immunity, parental supply of supplements, taste, energy boost, better sports performance and to rectify a poor diet. Results suggest that some adolescents consume nutritional supplements, sports drinks and energy drinks for their perceived physiological benefits, and that they may not be aware of any potential risks. Health educators should be aware that adolescents seek specific health benefits from nutritional supplements and drinks, which may be better achieved through appropriate consumption of a nutritious diet. Health education programmes should incorporate the perceptions, aspirations and motivations of young people into the planning of interventions and activities in order to make them most relevant and effective.

  18. Reduced G tolerance associated with supplement use.

    PubMed

    Barker, Patrick D

    2011-02-01

    High G forces encountered in tactical military aviation and aerobatic flight produce a host of physiologic responses aimed at preserving cerebral perfusion. The military has instituted measures to augment the physiologic response in order to avoid G-induced loss of consciousness (G-LOC) because of its potential to cause a catastrophic mishap. The case presented here details a Naval Aviator who experienced reduced G tolerance over two successive flights with a temporal relationship of starting a new supplement. Two components of the supplement, coenzyme Q10 and niacin, are highlighted here for their hemodynamic effects. After stopping the supplement the aviator regained his normal G tolerance and had no further issues in flight. There are several factors that can reduce G tolerance and supplement use has to be considered here because of the potential for altering the normal physiological response to increased G force. Our discussion reviews the physiological effects of increased G force, the spectrum of signs of decompensation under the stress of G force, and the potential effects this supplement had on the normal physiological response to increased G force, thus reducing the aviator's G tolerance.

  19. Inhibition of Coenzyme Qs Accumulation in Engineered Escherichia coli by High Concentration of Farnesyl Diphosphate.

    PubMed

    Samoudi, Mojtaba; Omid Yeganeh, Negar; Shahbani Zahiri, Hossein; Shariati, Parvin; Hajhosseini, Reza

    2015-01-01

    Coenzyme Q 10 (CoQ 10 ) is an isoprenoid component used widely in nutraceutical industries. Farnesyl diphosphate synthase (FPPS) is a responsible enzyme for biosynthesis of farnesyl diphosphate (FPP), a key precursor for CoQs production. This research involved investigating the effect of FPPS over-expression on CoQs production in engineered CoQ 10 -producing Escherichia coli (E. coli). Two CoQ 10 -producing strains, as referred to E. coli Ba and E. coli Br, were transformed by the encoding gene for FPPS (ispA) under the control of either the trc or P BAD promoters. Over-expression of ispA under the control of P BAD promoter led to a relative increase in CoQ 10 production only in recombinant E. coli Br although induction by arabinose resulted in partial reduction of CoQ 10 production in both recombinant E. coli Ba and E. coli Br strains. Over-expression of ispA under the control of stronger trc promoter, however, led to a severe decrease in CoQ 10 production in both recombinant E. coli Ba and E. coli Br strains, as reflected by reductions from 629±40 to 30±13 and 564±28 to 80±14 μg/g Dried Cell Weight (DCW), respectively. The results showed high level of FPP reduces endogenous CoQ 8 production as well and that CoQs are produced in a complimentary manner, as the increase in production of one decreases the production of the other. The reduction in CoQ 10 production can be a result of Dds inhibition by high FPP concentration. Therefore, more effort is needed to verify the role of intermediate metabolite concentration and to optimize production of CoQ 10 .

  20. Inhibition of Coenzyme Qs Accumulation in Engineered Escherichia coli by High Concentration of Farnesyl Diphosphate

    PubMed Central

    Samoudi, Mojtaba; Omid Yeganeh, Negar; Shahbani Zahiri, Hossein; Shariati, Parvin; Hajhosseini, Reza

    2015-01-01

    Background: Coenzyme Q 10 (CoQ 10 ) is an isoprenoid component used widely in nutraceutical industries. Farnesyl diphosphate synthase (FPPS) is a responsible enzyme for biosynthesis of farnesyl diphosphate (FPP), a key precursor for CoQs production. This research involved investigating the effect of FPPS over-expression on CoQs production in engineered CoQ 10 -producing Escherichia coli (E. coli). Methods: Two CoQ 10 -producing strains, as referred to E. coli Ba and E. coli Br, were transformed by the encoding gene for FPPS (ispA) under the control of either the trc or P BAD promoters. Results: Over-expression of ispA under the control of P BAD promoter led to a relative increase in CoQ 10 production only in recombinant E. coli Br although induction by arabinose resulted in partial reduction of CoQ 10 production in both recombinant E. coli Ba and E. coli Br strains. Over-expression of ispA under the control of stronger trc promoter, however, led to a severe decrease in CoQ 10 production in both recombinant E. coli Ba and E. coli Br strains, as reflected by reductions from 629±40 to 30±13 and 564±28 to 80±14 μg/g Dried Cell Weight (DCW), respectively. The results showed high level of FPP reduces endogenous CoQ 8 production as well and that CoQs are produced in a complimentary manner, as the increase in production of one decreases the production of the other. Conclusion: The reduction in CoQ 10 production can be a result of Dds inhibition by high FPP concentration. Therefore, more effort is needed to verify the role of intermediate metabolite concentration and to optimize production of CoQ 10 . PMID:26306151

  1. Sperm FISH analysis of a 44,X,der(Y),t(Y;15)(q12;q10)pat,rob(13;14)(q10;q10)mat complex chromosome rearrangement.

    PubMed

    Ferfouri, F; Boitrelle, F; Clement, P; Molina Gomes, D; Selva, J; Vialard, F

    2014-06-01

    Complex chromosome rearrangements (CCR) with two independent chromosome rearrangements are rare. Although CCRs lead to high unbalanced gamete rates, data on meiotic segregation in this context are scarce. A male patient was referred to our clinic as part of a family screening programme prompted by the observation of a 44,X,der(Y),t(Y;15)(q12;q10)pat,rob(13;14)(q10;q10)mat karyotype in his brother. Karyotyping identified the same CCR. Sperm FISH (with locus-specific probes for the segments involved in the translocations and nine chromosomes not involved in both rearrangements) was used to investigate the rearrangements meiotic segregation products and establish whether or not an inter-chromosomal effect was present. Sperm nuclear DNA fragmentation was also evaluated. For rob(13;14) and der(Y), the proportions of unbalanced products were, respectively, 26.4% and 60.6%. Overall, 70.3% of the meiotic segregation products were unbalanced. No evidence of an inter-chromosomal effect was found, and the sperm nuclear DNA fragmentation rate was similar to our laboratory's normal cut-off value. In view of previously published sperm FISH analyses of Robertsonian translocations (and even though the mechanism is still unknown), we hypothesise that cosegregation of der(Y) and rob(13;14) could modify rob(13;14) meiotic segregation. © 2013 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  2. Mitochondria-targeted antioxidant MitoQ10 improves endothelial function and attenuates cardiac hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Graham, Delyth; Huynh, Ngan N; Hamilton, Carlene A; Beattie, Elisabeth; Smith, Robin A J; Cochemé, Helena M; Murphy, Michael P; Dominiczak, Anna F

    2009-08-01

    Mitochondria are a major site of reactive oxygen species production, which may contribute to the development of cardiovascular disease. Protecting mitochondria from oxidative damage should be an effective therapeutic strategy; however, conventional antioxidants are ineffective, because they cannot penetrate the mitochondria. This study investigated the role of mitochondrial oxidative stress during development of hypertension in the stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rat, using the mitochondria-targeted antioxidant, MitoQ(10). Eight-week-old male stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats were treated with MitoQ(10) (500 mumol/L; n=16), control compound decyltriphenylphosphonium (decylTPP; 500 mumol/L; n=8), or vehicle (n=9) in drinking water for 8 weeks. Systolic blood pressure was significantly reduced by approximately 25 mm Hg over the 8-week MitoQ(10) treatment period compared with decylTPP (F=5.94; P=0.029) or untreated controls (F=65.6; P=0.0001). MitoQ(10) treatment significantly improved thoracic aorta NO bioavailability (1.16+/-0.03 g/g; P=0.002, area under the curve) compared with both untreated controls (0.68+/-0.02 g/g) and decylTPP-treated rats (0.60+/-0.06 g/g). Cardiac hypertrophy was significantly reduced by MitoQ(10) treatment compared with untreated control and decylTPP treatment (MitoQ(10): 4.01+/-0.05 mg/g; control: 4.42+/-0.11 mg/g; and decylTPP: 4.40+/-0.09 mg/g; ANOVA P=0.002). Total MitoQ(10) content was measured in liver, heart, carotid artery, and kidney harvested from MitoQ(10)-treated rats by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. All of the organs analyzed demonstrated detectable levels of MitoQ(10), with comparable accumulation in vascular and cardiac tissues. Administration of the mitochondria-targeted antioxidant MitoQ(10) protects against the development of hypertension, improves endothelial function, and reduces cardiac hypertrophy in young stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats. MitoQ(10) provides a novel

  3. The mitochondrial antioxidants MitoE(2) and MitoQ(10) increase mitochondrial Ca(2+) load upon cell stimulation by inhibiting Ca(2+) efflux from the organelle.

    PubMed

    Leo, Sara; Szabadkai, György; Rizzuto, Rosario

    2008-12-01

    Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) production is recognized as a major pathogenic event in a number of human diseases, and mitochondrial scavenging of ROS appears a promising therapeutic approach. Recently, two mitochondrial antioxidants have been developed; conjugating alpha-tocopherol and the ubiquinol moiety of coenzyme Q to the lipophilic triphenylphosphonium cation (TPP+), denominated MitoE(2) and MitoQ(10), respectively. We have investigated the effect of these compounds on mitochondrial Ca(2+) homeostasis, which controls processes as diverse as activation of mitochondrial dehydrogenases and pro-apoptotic morphological changes of the organelle. We demonstrate that treatment of HeLa cells with both MitoE(2) and MitoQ(10) induces (albeit with different efficacy) a major enhancement of the increase in matrix Ca(2+) concentration triggered by cell stimulation with the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate-generating agonist histamine. The effect is a result of the inhibition of Ca(2+) efflux from the organelle and depends on the TPP+ moiety of these compounds. Overall, the data identify an effect independent of their antioxidant activity, that on the one hand may be useful in addressing disorders in which mitochondrial Ca(2+) handling is impaired (e.g., mitochondrial diseases) and on the other may favor mitochondrial Ca(2+) overload and thus increase cell sensitivity to apoptosis (thus possibly counteracting the benefits of the antioxidant activity).

  4. Skin Antiageing and Systemic Redox Effects of Supplementation with Marine Collagen Peptides and Plant-Derived Antioxidants: A Single-Blind Case-Control Clinical Study

    PubMed Central

    De Luca, Chiara; Mikhal'chik, Elena V.; Suprun, Maxim V.; Papacharalambous, Michael; Truhanov, Arseniy I.; Korkina, Liudmila G.

    2016-01-01

    Recently, development and research of nutraceuticals based on marine collagen peptides (MCPs) have been growing due to their high homology with human collagens, safety, bioavailability through gut, and numerous bioactivities. The major concern regarding safety of MCPs intake relates to increased risk of oxidative stress connected with collagen synthesis (likewise in fibrosis) and to ROS production by MCPs-stimulated phagocytes. In this clinical-laboratory study, fish skin MCPs combined with plant-derived skin-targeting antioxidants (AO) (coenzyme Q10 + grape-skin extract + luteolin + selenium) were administered to volunteers (n = 41). Skin properties (moisture, elasticity, sebum production, and biological age) and ultrasonic markers (epidermal/dermal thickness and acoustic density) were measured thrice (2 months before treatment and before and after cessation of 2-month oral intake). The supplementation remarkably improved skin elasticity, sebum production, and dermal ultrasonic markers. Metabolic data showed significant increase of plasma hydroxyproline and ATP storage in erythrocytes. Redox parameters, GSH/coenzyme Q10 content, and GPx/GST activities were unchanged, while NO and MDA were moderately increased within, however, normal range of values. Conclusions. A combination of MCPs with skin-targeting AOs could be effective and safe supplement to improve skin properties without risk of oxidative damage. PMID:26904164

  5. Commonly Used Dietary Supplements on Coagulation Function during Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chong-Zhi; Moss, Jonathan; Yuan, Chun-Su

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background Patients who undergo surgery appear to use dietary supplements significantly more frequently than the general population. Because they contain pharmacologically active compounds, dietary supplements may affect coagulation and platelet function during the perioperative period through direct effects, pharmacodynamic interactions, and pharmacokinetic interactions. However, in this regard, limited studies have been conducted that address the pharmacological interactions of dietary supplements. To avoid possible bleeding risks during surgery, information about the potential complications of dietary supplements during perioperative management is important for physicians. Methods Through a systematic database search of all available years, articles were identified in this review if they included dietary supplements and coagulation/platelet function, while special attention was paid to studies published after 1990. Results Safety concerns are reported in commercially available dietary supplements. Effects of the most commonly used natural products on blood coagulation and platelet function are systematically reviewed, including 11 herbal medicines (echinacea, ephedra, garlic, ginger, ginkgo, ginseng, green tea, kava, saw palmetto, St John’s wort, and valerian) and four other dietary supplements (coenzyme Q10, glucosamine and chondroitin sulfate, fish oil, and vitamins). Bleeding risks of garlic, ginkgo, ginseng, green tea, saw palmetto, St John’s wort, and fish oil are reported. Cardiovascular instability was observed with ephedra, ginseng, and kava. Pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic interactions between dietary supplements and drugs used in the perioperative period are discussed. Conclusions To prevent potential problems associated with the use of dietary supplements, physicians should be familiar with the perioperative effects of commonly used dietary supplements. Since the effects of dietary supplements on coagulation and platelet function are

  6. Commonly Used Dietary Supplements on Coagulation Function during Surgery.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chong-Zhi; Moss, Jonathan; Yuan, Chun-Su

    2015-09-01

    Patients who undergo surgery appear to use dietary supplements significantly more frequently than the general population. Because they contain pharmacologically active compounds, dietary supplements may affect coagulation and platelet function during the perioperative period through direct effects, pharmacodynamic interactions, and pharmacokinetic interactions. However, in this regard, limited studies have been conducted that address the pharmacological interactions of dietary supplements. To avoid possible bleeding risks during surgery, information of potential complications of dietary supplements during perioperative management is important for physicians. Through a systematic database search of all available years, articles were identified in this review if they included dietary supplements and coagulation/platelet function, while special attention was paid to studies published after 1990. Safety concerns are reported in commercially available dietary supplements. Effects of the most commonly used natural products on blood coagulation and platelet function are systematically reviewed, including 11 herbal medicines (echinacea, ephedra, garlic, ginger, ginkgo, ginseng, green tea, kava, saw palmetto, St John's wort, and valerian) and 4 other dietary supplements (coenzyme Q 10 , glucosamine and chondroitin sulfate, fish oil, and vitamins). Bleeding risks of garlic, ginkgo, ginseng, green tea, saw palmetto, St John's wort, and fish oil are reported. Cardiovascular instability was observed with ephedra, ginseng, and kava. Pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic interactions between dietary supplements and drugs used in the perioperative period are discussed. To prevent potential problems associated with the use of dietary supplements, physicians should be familiar with the perioperative effects of commonly used dietary supplements. Since the effects of dietary supplements on coagulation and platelet function are difficult to predict, it is prudent to advise their

  7. Synergistic cosolubilization of omega-3 fatty acid esters and CoQ10 in dilutable microemulsions.

    PubMed

    Deutch-Kolevzon, Rivka; Aserin, Abraham; Garti, Nissim

    2011-10-01

    Water-dilutable microemulsions were prepared and loaded with two types of omega-3 fatty acid esters (omega-3 ethyl esters, OEE; and omega-3 triacylglycerides, OTG), each separately and together with ubiquinone (CoQ(10)). The microemulsions showed high and synergistic loading capabilities. The linear fatty acid ester (OEE) solubilization capacity was greater than that of the bulky and robust OTG. The location of the guest molecules within the microemulsions at any dilution point were determined by electrical conductivity, viscosity, DSC, SAXS, cryo-TEM, SD-NMR, and DLS. We found that OEE molecules pack well within the surfactant tails to form reverse micelles that gradually, upon water dilution, invert into bicontinuous phase and finally into O/W droplets. The CoQ(10) increases the stabilization and solubilization of the omega-3 fatty acid esters because it functions as a kosmotropic agent in the micellar system. The hydrophobic and bulky OTG molecule strongly interferes with the tail packing and spaces them significantly - mainly in the low and medium range water dilutions. When added to the micellar system, CoQ(10) forms some reverse hexagonal mesophases. The inversion into direct micelles is more difficult in comparison to the OEE system and requires additional water dilution. The OTG with or without CoQ(10) destabilizes the structures and decreases the solubilization capacity since it acts as a chaotropic agent to the micellar system and as a kosmotropic agent to hexagonal packing. These results explain the differences in the behavior of these molecules with vehicles that solubilize them in aqueous phases. Temperature disorders the bicontinuous structures and reduces the supersaturation of the system containing OEE with CoQ(10); as a result CoQ(10) crystallization is retarded. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  8. How Effective Are Antioxidant Supplements in Obesity and Diabetes?

    PubMed Central

    Abdali, Daniyal; Samson, Sue E.; Grover, Ashok Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is a central health issue due to its epidemic prevalence and its association with type 2 diabetes and other comorbidities. Obesity is not just being overweight. It is a metabolic disorder due to the accumulation of excess dietary calories into visceral fat and the release of high concentrations of free fatty acids into various organs. It represents a state of chronic oxidative stress and low-grade inflammation whose intermediary molecules may include leptin, adiponectin and cytokines. It may progress to hyperglycemia, leading to type 2 diabetes. Whether or not dietary antioxidant supplements are useful in the management of obesity and type 2 diabetes is discussed in this review. Only the benefits for obesity and diabetes are examined here. Other health benefits of antioxidants are not considered. There are difficulties in comparing studies in this field because they differ in the time frame, participants' ethnicity, administration of antioxidant supplements, and even in how obesity was measured. However, the literature presents reasonable evidence for marginal benefits of supplementation with zinc, lipoic acid, carnitine, cinnamon, green tea, and possibly vitamin C plus E, although the evidence is much weaker for omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, coenzyme Q10, green coffee, resveratrol, or lycopene. Overall, antioxidant supplements are not a panacea to compensate for a fast-food and video-game way of living, but antioxidant-rich foods are recommended as part of the lifestyle. Such antioxidant foods are commonly available. PMID:25791371

  9. Short-term ubiquinol supplementation reduces oxidative stress associated with strenuous exercise in healthy adults: A randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Sarmiento, Alvaro; Diaz-Castro, Javier; Pulido-Moran, Mario; Moreno-Fernandez, Jorge; Kajarabille, Naroa; Chirosa, Ignacio; Guisado, Isabel M; Javier Chirosa, Luis; Guisado, Rafael; Ochoa, Julio J

    2016-11-12

    Studies about Coenzyme Q 10 (CoQ 10 ) supplementation on strenuous exercise are scarce, especially those related with oxidative stress associated with physical activity and virtually nonexistent with the reduced form, Ubiquinol. The objective of this study was to determine, for the first time, whether a short-term supplementation with Ubiquinol can prevent oxidative stress associated to strenuous exercise. The participants (n = 100 healthy and well trained, but not on an elite level) were classified in two groups: Ubiquinol (experimental group), and placebo group (control). The protocol consisted of conducting two identical strenuous exercise tests with a rest period between tests of 24 h. Blood and urine samples were collected from the participants before supplementation (basal value) (T1), after supplementation (2 weeks) (T2), after first physical exercise test (T3), after 24 h of rest (T4), and after second physical exercise test (T5).The increase observed in the lactate, isoprostanes, DNA damage, and hydroperoxide levels reveals the severity of the oxidative damage induced by the exercise. There was a reduction in the isoprostanes, 8-OHdG, oxidized LDL, and hydroperoxydes in the supplemented Ubiquinol group, an increase in total antioxidant status, fat soluble antioxidant (both plasma and membrane), and CAT activity. Also, NO in the Ubiquinol-supplemented group was maintained within a narrow range. Oxidative stress induced by strenuous exercise is accumulative and increases transiently in subsequent sessions of physical activity. A short-term supplementation (2 weeks) with Ubiquinol (200 mg/day) before strenuous exercise, decreases oxidative stress and increases plasma NO, fact that could improve endothelial function, energetic substrate supply, and muscle recovery after strenuous exercise. © 2016 BioFactors, 42(6):612-622, 2016. © 2016 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  10. Photoionization of oxidized coenzyme Q in microemulsion: laser flash photolysis study in biomembrane-like system.

    PubMed

    Li, Kun; Wang, Mei; Wang, Jin; Zhu, Rongrong; Sun, Dongmei; Sun, Xiaoyu; Wang, Shi-Long

    2013-01-01

    Photoexcitation to generate triplet state has been proved to be the main photoreaction in homogeneous system for many benzoquinone derivatives, including oxidized coenzyme Q (CoQ) and its analogs. In the present study, microemulsion of CoQ, a heterogeneous system, is employed to mimic the distribution of CoQ in biomembrane. The photochemistry of CoQ(10) in microemulsion and cyclohexane is investigated and compared using laser flash photolysis and results show that CoQ(10) undergoes photoionization via a monophotonic process to generate radical cation of CoQ(10) in microemulsion and photoexcitation to generate excited triplet state in cyclohexane. Meanwhile, photoreactions of duroquinone (DQ) and CoQ(0) in microemulsion are also investigated to analyze the influence of molecular structure on the photochemistry of benzoquinone derivatives in microemulsion. Results suggest that photoexcitation, which is followed by excited state-involved hydrogen-abstraction reaction, is the main photoreaction for DQ and CoQ(0) in microemulsion. However, photoexcited CoQ(0) also leads to the formation of hydrated electrons. The isoprenoid side chain-involved high resonance stabilization is proposed to explain the difference in photoreactions of CoQ(0) and CoQ(10) in microemulsion. Considering that microemulsion is close to biomembrane system, its photoionization in microemulsion may be helpful to understand the real photochemistry of biological quinones in biomembrane system. © 2012 Tongji University. Photochemistry and Photobiology © 2012 The American Society of Photobiology.

  11. Coenzyme Q and Mitochondrial Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quinzii, Catarina M.; Hirano, Michio

    2010-01-01

    Coenzyme Q[subscript 10] (CoQ[subscript 10]) is an essential electron carrier in the mitochondrial respiratory chain and an important antioxidant. Deficiency of CoQ[subscript 10] is a clinically and molecularly heterogeneous syndrome, which, to date, has been found to be autosomal recessive in inheritance and generally responsive to CoQ[subscript…

  12. European consumer attitudes on the associated health benefits of neutraceutical-containing processed meats using Co-enzyme Q10 as a sample functional ingredient.

    PubMed

    Tobin, Brian D; O'Sullivan, Maurice G; Hamill, Ruth; Kerry, Joseph P

    2014-06-01

    This study accumulated European consumer attitudes towards processed meats and their use as a functional food. A survey was set up using an online web-application to gather information on consumer perception of processed meats as well as neutraceutical-containing processed meats. 548 responses were obtained and statistical analysis was carried out using a statistical software package. Data was summarized as frequencies for each question and statistical differences analyzed using the Chi-Square statistical test with a significance level of 5% (P<0.05). The majority of consumer attitudes towards processed meat indicate that they are unhealthy products. Most believe that processed meats contain large quantities of harmful chemicals, fat and salt. Consumers were found to be very pro-bioactive compounds in yogurt style products but unsure of their feelings in meat based products, which is likely due to the lack of familiarity to these products. Many of the respondents were willing to consume meat based functional foods but were not willing to pay more for them. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Suppression of coenzyme Q₁₀ levels and the induction of multiple PDSS and COQ genes in human cells following oligomycin treatment.

    PubMed

    Yen, H-C; Liu, C-C; Kan, C-C; Chen, C-S; Wei, H-R

    2014-09-01

    Endogenous coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) is a lipid-soluble antioxidant and essential for the electron transport chain. We previously demonstrated that hydrogen peroxide enhanced CoQ10 levels, whereas disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential by a chemical uncoupler suppressed CoQ10 levels, in human 143B cells. In this study, we investigated how CoQ10 levels and expression of two PDSS and eight COQ genes were affected by oligomycin, which inhibited ATP synthesis at Complex V without uncoupling the mitochondria. We confirmed that oligomycin increased the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and decreased mitochondria-dependent ATP production in 143B cells. We also demonstrated that CoQ10 levels were decreased by oligomycin after 42 or 48 h of treatment, but not at earlier time points. Expression of PDSS2 and COQ2-COQ9 were up-regulated after 18-hour oligomycin treatment, and the expression of PPARGC1A (PGC1-1α) elevated concurrently. Knockdown of PPARGC1A down-regulated the basal mRNA levels of PDSS2 and five COQ genes and suppressed the induction of COQ8 and COQ9 genes by oligomycin, but did not affect CoQ10 levels under these conditions. N-acetylcysteine suppressed the augmentation of ROS levels and the enhanced expression of COQ2, COQ4, COQ7, and COQ9 induced by oligomycin, but did not modulate the changes in CoQ10 levels. These results suggested that the condition of mitochondrial dysfunction induced by oligomycin decreased CoQ10 levels independent of oxidative stress. Up-regulation of PDSS2 and several COQ genes by oligomycin might be regulated by multiple mechanisms, including the signaling pathways mediated by PGC-1α and ROS, but it would not restore CoQ10 levels.

  14. International Conference on Harmonisation; guidance on Q10 Pharmaceutical Quality System; availability. Notice.

    PubMed

    2009-04-08

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing the availability of a guidance entitled "Q10 Pharmaceutical Quality System." The guidance was prepared under the auspices of the International Conference on Harmonisation of Technical Requirements for Registration of Pharmaceuticals for Human Use (ICH). The guidance describes a model for an effective quality management system for the pharmaceutical industry, referred to as the Pharmaceutical Quality System. The guidance is intended to provide a comprehensive approach to an effective pharmaceutical quality system that is based on International Organization for Standardization (ISO) concepts, includes applicable good manufacturing practice (GMP) regulations and complements ICH guidances on "Q8 Pharmaceutical Development" and "Q9 Quality Risk Management."

  15. Specialty Supplements and Prostate Cancer Risk in the VITamins And Lifestyle (VITAL) Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Brasky, Theodore M.; Kristal, Alan R.; Navarro, Sandi L.; Lampe, Johanna W.; Patterson, Ruth E.; Peters, Ulrike; White, Emily

    2011-01-01

    Although there is evidence from studies of prostate cancer cell lines and rodent models that several supplements may have anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant, or other anti-cancer properties, few epidemiologic studies have examined the association between non-vitamin, non-mineral, “specialty” supplement use and prostate cancer risk. Participants, 50–76 years, were 35,239 male members of the VITamins And Lifestyle (VITAL) cohort who were residents of western Washington State, and who completed an extensive baseline questionnaire in 2000–2002. Participants responded about their frequency (days/week) and duration (years) of specialty supplement uses. 1,602 incident invasive prostate cancers were obtained from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results registry. Multivariate-adjusted hazards ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were estimated by Cox proportional hazards models. Any use of grapeseed supplements was associated with a 41% (HR 0.59, 95% CI: 0.40–0.86) reduced risk of total prostate cancer. There were no associations for use of chondroitin, co-enzyme Q10, fish oil, garlic, ginkgo biloba, ginseng, glucosamine, or saw palmetto. Grapeseed may be a potential chemopreventive agent, however as current evidence is limited, it should not yet be promoted for prevention of prostate cancer. PMID:21598177

  16. Role of Diet and Nutritional Supplements in Parkinson's Disease Progression

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Richard C.; Bennett, Rachel D.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives The goal of this study is to describe modifiable lifestyle variables associated with reduced rate of Parkinson's disease (PD) progression. Methods The patient-reported outcomes in PD (PRO-PD) were used as the primary outcome measure, and a food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) was used to assess dietary intake. In this cross-sectional analysis, regression analysis was performed on baseline data to identify the nutritional and pharmacological interventions associated with the rate of PD progression. All analyses were adjusted for age, gender, and years since diagnosis. Results 1053 individuals with self-reported idiopathic PD were available for analysis. Foods associated with the reduced rate of PD progression included fresh vegetables, fresh fruit, nuts and seeds, nonfried fish, olive oil, wine, coconut oil, fresh herbs, and spices (P < 0.05). Foods associated with more rapid PD progression include canned fruits and vegetables, diet and nondiet soda, fried foods, beef, ice cream, yogurt, and cheese (P < 0.05). Nutritional supplements coenzyme Q10 and fish oil were associated with reduced PD progression (P = 0.026 and P = 0.019, resp.), and iron supplementation was associated with faster progression (P = 0.022). Discussion These are the first data to provide evidence that targeted nutrition is associated with the rate of PD progression. PMID:29081890

  17. Transport and metabolism of MitoQ10, a mitochondria-targeted antioxidant, in Caco-2 cell monolayers.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Fawcett, J Paul; Zhang, Hu; Tucker, Ian G

    2007-04-01

    Mitoquinone (MitoQ(10) mesylate) is a mitochondria-targeted antioxidant formulated for oral administration in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. We have investigated the absorption and metabolism of MitoQ(10) in Caco-2 cell monolayers. The intracellular accumulation of MitoQ(10) was 18-41% of the total amount of MitoQ(10) added. Some of the intracellular MitoQ(10) was reduced to mitoquinol and subsequently metabolized to glucuronide and sulfate conjugates. Transport of MitoQ(10) was polarized with the apparent permeability (P(app)) from basolateral (BL) to apical (AP) (P(appBL-->AP)) being >2.5-fold the P(app) from apical to basolateral (P(appAP-->BL)). In the presence of 4% bovine serum albumin on the basolateral side, the P(appAP-->BL) value increased 7-fold compared with control. The P(appBL-->AP) value decreased by 26, 31 and 61% in the presence of verapamil 100 microM, ciclosporin 10 and 30 microM, respectively, whereas the P(appAP-->BL) value increased 71% in the presence of ciclosporin 30 microM. Apical efflux of mitoquinol sulfate and mitoquinol glucuronide conjugates was significantly decreased by ciclosporin 30 microM and the breast cancer receptor protein (BCRP) inhibitor, reserpine 25 microM, respectively. These results suggested that the bioavailability of MitoQ(10) may be limited by intracellular metabolism and the action of P-glycoprotein and BCRP. However, the dramatic increase in absorptive P(app) in the presence of bovine serum albumin on the receiver side suggests these barrier functions may be less significant in-vivo.

  18. LDL-cholesterol lowering effect of a new dietary supplement: an open label, controlled, randomized, cross-over clinical trial in patients with mild-to-moderate hypercholesterolemia.

    PubMed

    Magno, S; Ceccarini, G; Pelosini, C; Jaccheri, R; Vitti, J; Fierabracci, P; Salvetti, G; Airoldi, G; Minale, M; Saponati, G; Santini, F

    2018-05-24

    Hypercholesterolemia is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disorders and requires specific intervention through an adequate lifestyle (diet and physical exercise) and, if necessary, an appropriate drug treatment. Lipid-lowering drugs, although generally efficacious, may sometimes cause adverse events. A growing attention has been devoted to the correction of dyslipidemias through the use of dietary supplements. The aim of this study was to assess the lipid-lowering activity and safety of a dietary supplement containing monacolin K, L-arginine, coenzyme Q10 and ascorbic acid, named Argicolina (A), compared to a commercially available product containing monacolin K and coenzyme Q10, Normolip 5 (N). This was a single center, controlled, randomized, open-label, cross-over clinical study enrolling 20 Caucasian outpatients aged 18-75 years with serum LDL-C between 130 and 180 mg/dL. Patients assumed two different dietary supplements (A and N) both containing monacolin K 10 mg for 8 weeks each, separated by a 4-week wash-out period. Evaluated parameters were: Total cholesterol (Tot-C), low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), triglycerides (TG), fasting blood glucose, aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, creatinekinase, gamma-glutamyl-transpeptidase, brachial arterial pressure and heart rate, measured at the start and at the end of each treatment period. Safety was monitored through the study. LDL-C decreased by 23.3% during treatment with N (p < 0.0001) and by 25.6% during treatment with A (p < 0.0001); the LDL-C mean reduction was 36.4 (95% CI: 45,6-27,1) mg/dL during N treatment and 40.1 (95% CI: 49.2-30,9) mg/dL during A treatment. Tot-C decreased significantly (p < 0.0001) within each treatment period. HDL-C increase was negligible during A whereas it was significant during N. TG diminished markedly during A and not significantly during N. The difference between treatments was not

  19. The 7Q10 in South Carolina water-quality regulation: Nearly fifty years later

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Feaster, Toby D.; Cantrell, Wade M.

    2010-01-01

    The annual minimum 7-day average streamflow with a 10-year recurrence interval, often referred to as the 7Q10, has a long history of being an important low-flow statistic used in water-quality management in South Carolina as evidenced by its adoption into South Carolina law in 1967. State agencies, such as the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control and the South Carolina Department of Natural Resources, use such lowflow statistics to determine Wasteload Allocations for National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System discharges, develop Total Maximum Daily Loads for streams, prepare the State Water Plan, and restrict the quantity of water that can be transferred out of basin. The U.S. Geological Survey, working cooperatively with the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control, is updating low-flow statistics at continuous-record streamflow gages in South Carolina on a basin-by-basin approach. Such statistics are influenced by length of record and hydrologic conditions under which the record was collected. Statewide low-flow statistics in South Carolina were last updated in 1987. Since that time several droughts have occurred with the most severe occurring from 1998-2002 and the most recent occurring from 2006-2009. The low-flow statistics for the Pee Dee River basin were the first to be completed in this ongoing investigation.

  20. Effect of ubiquinone Q(10) and antioxidant vitamins on free radical oxidation of phospholipids in biological membranes of rat liver.

    PubMed

    Tikhaze, A K; Konovalova, G G; Lankin, V Z; Kaminnyi, A I; Kaminnaja, V I; Ruuge, E K; Kukharchuk, V V

    2005-08-01

    We studied the effects of 30-day peroral treatment with beta-carotene, a complex of antioxidant vitamins (vitamins C and E and provitamin A) and selenium, and solubilized ubiquinone Q(10) on the antioxidant potential in rat liver (ascorbate-dependent free radical oxidation of unsaturated membrane phospholipids). beta-Carotene irrespective of the administration route increased antioxidant potential of the liver by 2-3.5 times. The complex of antioxidant vitamins and selenium increased this parameter by more than 15 times. Antiradical activity in rat liver was extremely high after administration of solubilized ubiquinone Q(10) (increase by more than by 36 times). It can be expected that reduced ubiquinone Q(10) in vivo should produce a more pronounced protective effect due to activity of the system for bioregeneration of this natural antioxidant.

  1. Ubiad1 Is an Antioxidant Enzyme that Regulates eNOS Activity by CoQ10 Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Mugoni, Vera; Postel, Ruben; Catanzaro, Valeria; De Luca, Elisa; Turco, Emilia; Digilio, Giuseppe; Silengo, Lorenzo; Murphy, Michael P.; Medana, Claudio; Stainier, Didier Y.R.; Bakkers, Jeroen; Santoro, Massimo M.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Protection against oxidative damage caused by excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS) by an antioxidant network is essential for the health of tissues, especially in the cardiovascular system. Here, we identified a gene with important antioxidant features by analyzing a null allele of zebrafish ubiad1, called barolo (bar). bar mutants show specific cardiovascular failure due to oxidative stress and ROS-mediated cellular damage. Human UBIAD1 is a nonmitochondrial prenyltransferase that synthesizes CoQ10 in the Golgi membrane compartment. Loss of UBIAD1 reduces the cytosolic pool of the antioxidant CoQ10 and leads to ROS-mediated lipid peroxidation in vascular cells. Surprisingly, inhibition of eNOS prevents Ubiad1-dependent cardiovascular oxidative damage, suggesting a crucial role for this enzyme and nonmitochondrial CoQ10 in NO signaling. These findings identify UBIAD1 as a nonmitochondrial CoQ10-forming enzyme with specific cardiovascular protective function via the modulation of eNOS activity. PMID:23374346

  2. Coenzymes, Viruses and the RNA World

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyes-Prieto, F.; Hernández-Morales, R.; Jácome, R.; Becerra, A.; Lazcano, A.

    2017-07-01

    Bioinformatic search for homologous sequences involved in ribonucleotidyl-coenzyme biosynthesis has shown that they are absent in RNA viral genomes, indicating that RNA viruses may not be direct holdovers from an ancient RNA/protein world.

  3. Usage patterns, health, and nutritional status of long-term multiple dietary supplement users: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Block, Gladys; Jensen, Christopher D; Norkus, Edward P; Dalvi, Tapashi B; Wong, Les G; McManus, Jamie F; Hudes, Mark L

    2007-01-01

    Background Dietary supplement use in the United States is prevalent and represents an important source of nutrition. However, little is known about individuals who routinely consume multiple dietary supplements. This study describes the dietary supplement usage patterns, health, and nutritional status of long-term multiple dietary supplement users, and where possible makes comparisons to non-users and multivitamin/mineral supplement users. Methods Using a cross-sectional study design, information was obtained by online questionnaires and physical examination (fasting blood, blood pressure, body weight) from a convenience sample of long-term users of multiple dietary supplements manufactured by Shaklee Corporation (Multiple Supp users, n = 278). Data for non-users (No Supp users, n = 602) and multivitamin/mineral supplement users (Single Supp users, n = 176) were obtained from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2001–2002 and NHANES III 1988–1994. Logistic regression methods were used to estimate odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals. Results Dietary supplements consumed on a daily basis by more than 50% of Multiple Supp users included a multivitamin/mineral, B-complex, vitamin C, carotenoids, vitamin E, calcium with vitamin D, omega-3 fatty acids, flavonoids, lecithin, alfalfa, coenzyme Q10 with resveratrol, glucosamine, and a herbal immune supplement. The majority of women also consumed gamma linolenic acid and a probiotic supplement, whereas men also consumed zinc, garlic, saw palmetto, and a soy protein supplement. Serum nutrient concentrations generally increased with increasing dietary supplement use. After adjustment for age, gender, income, education and body mass index, greater degree of supplement use was associated with more favorable concentrations of serum homocysteine, C-reactive protein, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and triglycerides, as well as lower risk of prevalent elevated blood pressure and diabetes

  4. Antioxidant nutrient intake and supplements as potential moderators of cognitive decline and cardiovascular disease in obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, Carol M; Bootzin, Richard R; Schwenke, Dawn C; Quan, Stuart F

    2005-12-01

    Cognitive deficits and cardiovascular disease (CVD) are comorbid conditions frequently associated with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Oxygen free radical release and its differential regulation of cytokine synthesis and immune modulation resulting from OSA-related hypoxic events have been hypothesized as the underlying mechanism(s) for the cognitive deficits and CVD in OSA. A number of studies have suggested that increased levels of oxidative stress and/or antioxidant deficiencies may also be risk factors in cognitive decline and CVD. The influence of antioxidant nutrients and supplements, such as Vitamins B6, B12, C, E, folic acid, alpha-lipoic acid and Coenzyme Q(10) on cognitive decline and CVD have been investigated. The influence of antioxidant nutrients or supplements on OSA remains to be investigated. Even if dietary or supplemental antioxidants do not prove to be effective therapies for OSA, dietary assessment and prescription to increase dietary intake of neuro- and cardio-protective nutrients may make it possible to reduce some of the cognitive and cardiovascular sequelae associated with OSA.

  5. Antioxidant status (CoQ10 and Vit. E levels) and immunohistochemical analysis of soft tissues in periodontal diseases.

    PubMed

    Battino, Maurizio; Bompadre, Stefano; Politi, Alessia; Fioroni, Massimiliano; Rubini, Corrado; Bullon, Pedro

    2005-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species and antioxidant status in periodontal diseases and periodontal-related pathologies is an item of growing interest. Immunohistochemical approach may be usefully employed in the study of soft tissues affected by periodontal disease, giving valuable information on tissue morphology and vascular proliferation that depends directly on the inflammatory state. In order to study CoQ(10) and vitamin E content in healthy gingiva and in gingivitis a new adaptation to previously published methods for their determination was adopted. During gingivitis tissue displayed a large inflammatory infiltration in the lamina propria and a VEGF positive squamous epithelium. The inflammatory infiltration consisted mainly of lymphocytes, plasma cells and neutrophils. Vitamin E dramatically decreased and CoQ(10) remained unchanged despite the increased amount of cells present in the periodontally affected tissues, indicating that continuous oxidative stress which occurred in these structure affected the antioxidant pattern of the tissue.

  6. Mild clinical manifestation and unusual recovery upon coenzyme Q₁₀ treatment in the first Chinese Leigh syndrome pedigree with mutation m.10197 G>A.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhiting; Zhao, Zhenhua; Ye, Qinyong; Chen, Ying; Pan, Xiaodong; Sun, Bin; Huang, Huapin; Zheng, An

    2015-03-01

    The Leigh syndrome (LS), characterized by psychomotor retardation, seizures, nystagmus, ophthalmoparesis, optic atrophy, ataxia, dystonia, or respiratory failure, is one of the most severe mitochondrial diseases. In the majority of cases, the disease is fatal and patients die before age 5. Mutation m.10197 G>A was found to relate to the severe phenotype of the Leigh syndrome. Here, we describe the first Chinese Leigh syndrome pedigree with this mutation. The proband had the characteristic brain lesions of the Leigh syndrome and presented a decrease in exercise tolerance and mild face paralysis. Sequencing the NADH dehydrogenase, subunit 3 (ND3) gene in the pedigree, revealed that the proband, as well as her unaffected brother, have a high mutant load in the ND3 gene, compared to their mother. Following one‑year treatment with the coenzyme Q10, an obvious improvement in clinical features was observed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the proband. Our study and previous reports highlight the variability of phenotypic expression of the m.10197 G>A mutation, and suggest that pathogenesis of the syndrome may be affected by a number of factors. This is the first report on successful treatment of an LS patient carrying the mutation m.10197 G>A with the coenzyme Q10, indicating that Q10 may attenuate the mitochondrial dysfunctions caused by the m.10197 G>A mutation.

  7. The Temperature Sensitivity (Q10) of Soil Respiration: Controlling Factors and Spatial Prediction at Regional Scale Based on Environmental Soil Classes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, N.; Welp, G.; Amelung, W.

    2018-02-01

    The temperature sensitivity of heterotrophic soil respiration is crucial for modeling carbon dynamics but it is variable. Presently, however, most models employ a fixed value of 1.5 or 2.0 for the increase of soil respiration per 10°C increase in temperature (Q10). Here we identified the variability of Q10 at a regional scale (Rur catchment, Germany/Belgium/Netherlands). We divided the study catchment into environmental soil classes (ESCs), which we define as unique combinations of land use, aggregated soil groups, and texture. We took nine soil samples from each ESC (108 samples) and incubated them at four soil moisture levels and five temperatures (5-25°C). We hypothesized that Q10 variability is controlled by soil organic carbon (SOC) degradability and soil moisture and that ESC can be used as a widely available proxy for Q10, owing to differences in SOC degradability. Measured Q10 values ranged from 1.2 to 2.8 and were correlated with indicators of SOC degradability (e.g., pH, r = -0.52). The effect of soil moisture on Q10 was variable: Q10 increased with moisture in croplands but decreased in forests. The ESC captured significant parts of Q10 variability under dry (R2 = 0.44) and intermediate (R2 = 0.36) moisture conditions, where Q10 increased in the order croplandQ10 values were used instead of 1.5, suggesting that scaling Q10 on the basis of both ESC and moisture might be a promising concept for spatially continuous assessments of carbon turnover at regional scales.

  8. Effect of ubiquinol supplementation on biochemical and oxidative stress indexes after intense exercise in young athletes.

    PubMed

    Orlando, Patrick; Silvestri, Sonia; Galeazzi, Roberta; Antonicelli, Roberto; Marcheggiani, Fabio; Cirilli, Ilenia; Bacchetti, Tiziana; Tiano, Luca

    2018-12-01

    Physical exercise significantly impacts the biochemistry of the organism. Ubiquinone is a key component of the mitochondrial respiratory chain and ubiquinol, its reduced and active form, is an emerging molecule in sport nutrition. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of ubiquinol supplementation on biochemical and oxidative stress indexes after an intense bout of exercise. 21 male young athletes (26 + 5 years of age) were randomized in two groups according to a double blind cross-over study, either supplemented with ubiquinol (200 mg/day) or placebo for 1 month. Blood was withdrawn before and after a single bout of intense exercise (40 min run at 85% maxHR). Physical performance, hematochemical parameters, ubiquinone/ubiquinol plasma content, intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) level, mitochondrial membrane depolarization, paraoxonase activity and oxidative DNA damage were analyzed. A single bout of intense exercise produced a significant increase in most hematochemical indexes, in particular CK and Mb while, on the contrary, normalized coenzyme Q 10 plasma content decreased significantly in all subjects. Ubiquinol supplementation prevented exercise-induced CoQ deprivation and decrease in paraoxonase activity. Moreover at a cellular level, in peripheral blood mononuclear cells, ubiquinol supplementation was associated with a significant decrease in cytosolic ROS while mitochondrial membrane potential and oxidative DNA damage remained unchanged. Data highlights a very rapid dynamic of CoQ depletion following intense exercise underlying an increased demand by the organism. Ubiquinol supplementation minimized exercise-induced depletion and enhanced plasma and cellular antioxidant levels but it was not able to improve physical performance indexes or markers of muscular damage.

  9. 31 CFR 30.10 - Q-10: What actions are necessary for a TARP recipient to comply with section 111(b)(3)(D) of EESA...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Q-10: What actions are necessary for....10 Section 30.10 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the Treasury TARP STANDARDS FOR COMPENSATION AND CORPORATE GOVERNANCE § 30.10 Q-10: What actions are necessary for a TARP...

  10. 31 CFR 30.10 - Q-10: What actions are necessary for a TARP recipient to comply with section 111(b)(3)(D) of EESA...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Q-10: What actions are necessary for... FOR COMPENSATION AND CORPORATE GOVERNANCE § 30.10 Q-10: What actions are necessary for a TARP... the fiscal year including June 15, 2009, see § 30.17 (Q-17). (2) Payments or accruals after the...

  11. 31 CFR 30.10 - Q-10: What actions are necessary for a TARP recipient to comply with section 111(b)(3)(D) of EESA...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Q-10: What actions are necessary for... FOR COMPENSATION AND CORPORATE GOVERNANCE § 30.10 Q-10: What actions are necessary for a TARP... the fiscal year including June 15, 2009, see § 30.17 (Q-17). (2) Payments or accruals after the...

  12. 31 CFR 30.10 - Q-10: What actions are necessary for a TARP recipient to comply with section 111(b)(3)(D) of EESA...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Q-10: What actions are necessary for... FOR COMPENSATION AND CORPORATE GOVERNANCE § 30.10 Q-10: What actions are necessary for a TARP... the fiscal year including June 15, 2009, see § 30.17 (Q-17). (2) Payments or accruals after the...

  13. Artificial Enzymes with Thiazolium and Imidazolium Coenzyme Mimics

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Huanyu; Foss, Frank W.; Breslow, Ronald

    2009-01-01

    Hydrophobic thiazolium and imidazolium coenzyme mimics in the presence of modified-polyethylenimine enzyme mimics catalyze the benzoin condensation 2300–3300 times faster than the coenzyme mimics alone. Polycationic enzyme mimics provide not only a hydrophobic binding domain for coenzyme and substrate, but also electrostatic stabilization of anionic species that arise along the reaction pathway of the benzoin condensation. PMID:18763766

  14. NADPH-dependent coenzyme Q reductase is the main enzyme responsible for the reduction of non-mitochondrial CoQ in cells.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Takayuki; Okuno, Masaaki; Okamoto, Tadashi; Kishi, Takeo

    2008-01-01

    We purified an NADPH-dependent coenzyme Q reductase (NADPH-CoQ reductase) in rat liver cytosol and compared its enzymatic properties with those of the other CoQ10 reductases such as NADPH: quinone acceptor oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1), lipoamide dehydrogenase, thioredoxine reductase and glutathione reductase. NADPH-CoQ reductase was the only enzyme that preferred NADPH to NADH as an electron donor and was also different from the other CoQ10 reductases in the sensitivities to its inhibitors and stimulators. Especially, Zn2+ was the most powerful inhibitor for NADPH-CoQ reductase, but CoQ10 reduction by the other CoQ10 reductases could not be inhibited by Zn2+. Furthermore, the reduction of the CoQ9 incorporated into HeLa cells was also inhibited by Zn2+ in the presence of pyrithione, a zinc ionophore. Moreover, NQO1 gene silencing in HeLa cells by transfection of a small interfering RNA resulted in lowering of both the NQO1 protein level and the NQO1 activity by about 75%. However, this transfection did not affect the NADPH-CoQ reductase activity and the reduction of CoQ9 incorporated into the cells. These results suggest that the NADPH-CoQ reductase located in cytosol may be the main enzyme responsible for the reduction of non-mitochondrial CoQ in cells.

  15. Gene encoding acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase

    DOEpatents

    Roessler, P.G.; Ohlrogge, J.B.

    1996-09-24

    A DNA encoding an acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase (ACCase) from a photosynthetic organism and functional derivatives are disclosed which are resistant to inhibition from certain herbicides. This gene can be placed in organisms to increase their fatty acid content or to render them resistant to certain herbicides. 5 figs.

  16. Gene encoding acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase

    DOEpatents

    Roessler, Paul G.; Ohlrogge, John B.

    1996-01-01

    A DNA encoding an acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase (ACCase) from a photosynthetic organism and functional derivatives thereof which are resistant to inhibition from certain herbicides. This gene can be placed in organisms to increase their fatty acid content or to render them resistant to certain herbicides.

  17. Antioxidant and Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Selected Natural Compounds Contained in a Dietary Supplement on Two Human Immortalized Keratinocyte Lines

    PubMed Central

    Serini, Simona; Mondella, Nadia; Celleno, Leonardo; Lanza, Paola; Calviello, Gabriella

    2014-01-01

    Several advantages may derive from the use of dietary supplements containing multiple natural antioxidants and/or anti-inflammatory agents. At present, however, there is scarce information on the properties and potential of combined supplements. To fill the gap, the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities exerted by a combination of seven natural components (coenzyme Q10, krill oil, lipoic acid, resveratrol, grape seed oil, α-tocopherol, and selenium) contained in a dietary supplement used for the prevention of skin disorders were investigated in vitro. Each component was administered, alone or in combination, to human keratinocytes, and the inhibition of Reactive Oxygen Species production and lipid peroxidation as well as the ability to reduce inflammatory cytokine secretion and to modulate Nuclear Factor-κB pathway was evaluated. The combination exhibited high antioxidant activity and in specific conditions the combination's efficiency was higher than that of the most powerful components administered individually. Moreover, the combination showed remarkable anti-inflammatory properties. It reduced more efficiently than each component the secretion of Monocyte Chemoattractant Protein-1, a crucial cytokine for the development of chronic inflammation in skin, and inhibited Nuclear Factor-κB molecular pathway. Overall, our findings suggest that the combined formulation may have the potential to powerfully inhibit oxidative stress and inflammation at skin level. PMID:25197638

  18. Influence of nanostructured lipid carriers (NLC) on the physical properties of the Cutanova Nanorepair Q10 cream and the in vivo skin hydration effect.

    PubMed

    Pardeike, Jana; Schwabe, Kay; Müller, Rainer H

    2010-08-30

    Cutanvoa Nanorepair Q10 cream, the first NLC containing cosmetical product introduced to the market in October 2005, was compared to an identical o/w cream without NLC with regards to particle size, melting behaviour, rheological properties and the in vivo effect on skin hydration. The consistency, the spreadability on the skin and the subjective feeling of increase in skin hydration were evaluated using a standardized questionnaire, and compared to hydration data measured. Furthermore, it was shown by epicutaneous patch test that Cutanova Nanorepair Q10 cream has no irritating effects on the skin. By laser diffraction (LD) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) measurements it could be shown that NLC are physically stable in Cutanova Nanorepair Q10 cream. After 7 days application of Cutanova Nanorepair Q10 cream and NLC negative control cream an increase in skin hydration could be objectively confirmed by measurements in vivo. From day 28 on the skin hydration measured in the test areas of Cutanova Nanorepair Q10 cream was significantly higher than the skin hydration in the test areas of the NLC negative control cream (p=0.05). The subjective feeling of increase in skin hydration was also rated from the volunteers as superior for Cutanova Nanorepair Q10 cream. The rheological properties of Cutanova Nanorepair Q10 cream contributed to a better subjective impression of consistency and spreadability on the skin than found for NLC negative control cream. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Enabling ICH Q10 Implementation--Part 1. Striving for Excellence by Embracing ICH Q8 and ICH Q9.

    PubMed

    Calnan, Nuala; O'Donnell, Kevin; Greene, Anne

    2013-01-01

    This article is the first in a series of articles that will focus on understanding the implementation essentials necessary to deliver operational excellence through a International Conference on Harmonisation of Technical Requirements for Registration of Pharmaceuticals for Human Use (ICH) Q10-based pharmaceutical quality system (PQS). The authors examine why, despite the fact that the ICH Q10 guideline has been with us since 2008, the transformation of the traditional Quality Management Systems QMS in use within the pharmaceutical industry is a work in progress for only a few forward-thinking organisations. Unfortunately, this transformation remains a mere aspiration for the majority of organisations. We explore the apparent lack of progress by the pharmaceutical sector in adopting six sigma and related quality management techniques to ensure the availability of high-quality medicines worldwide. The authors propose that the desired progress can be delivered through two key shifts in our current practices; by embodying the principles of operational excellence in every aspect of our business and by learning how to unlock the scientific and tacit knowledge within our organisations. It has been ten years since The Wall Street Journal revealed the pharmaceutical industry's "little secret" comparing the perceived level of manufacturing expertise in the industry as lagging far behind those of potato-chip and laundry-soap makers. Would you consider the quality and manufacturing strategies in place today in your organisation to be more efficient and scientifically based than those of 2003? If so, what evidence exists for you to draw any conclusion regarding enhanced performance? Do your current practices drive innovation and facilitate continual improvement and if so, how? Ultimately, can you confidently affirm that patient-related risks associated with the product(s) manufactured by your organisation have been reduced due to the quality assurance program now applied

  20. Better than Nature: Nicotinamide Biomimetics That Outperform Natural Coenzymes.

    PubMed

    Knaus, Tanja; Paul, Caroline E; Levy, Colin W; de Vries, Simon; Mutti, Francesco G; Hollmann, Frank; Scrutton, Nigel S

    2016-01-27

    The search for affordable, green biocatalytic processes is a challenge for chemicals manufacture. Redox biotransformations are potentially attractive, but they rely on unstable and expensive nicotinamide coenzymes that have prevented their widespread exploitation. Stoichiometric use of natural coenzymes is not viable economically, and the instability of these molecules hinders catalytic processes that employ coenzyme recycling. Here, we investigate the efficiency of man-made synthetic biomimetics of the natural coenzymes NAD(P)H in redox biocatalysis. Extensive studies with a range of oxidoreductases belonging to the "ene" reductase family show that these biomimetics are excellent analogues of the natural coenzymes, revealed also in crystal structures of the ene reductase XenA with selected biomimetics. In selected cases, these biomimetics outperform the natural coenzymes. "Better-than-Nature" biomimetics should find widespread application in fine and specialty chemicals production by harnessing the power of high stereo-, regio-, and chemoselective redox biocatalysts and enabling reactions under mild conditions at low cost.

  1. Prebiotic syntheses of vitamin coenzymes: I. Cysteamine and 2-mercaptoethanesulfonic acid (coenzyme M)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, S. L.; Schlesinger, G.

    1993-01-01

    The reaction of NH3 and SO3(2-) with ethylene sulfide is shown to be a prebiotic synthesis of cysteamine and 2-mercaptoethanesulfonic acid (coenzyme M). A similar reaction with ethylene imine would give cysteamine and taurine. Ethylene oxide would react with NH3 and N(CH3)3 to give the phospholipid components ethanolamine and choline. The prebiotic sources of ethylene sulfide, ethylene imine and ethylene oxide are discussed. Cysteamine itself is not a suitable thioester for metabolic processes because of acyl transfer to the amino group, but this can be prevented by using an amide of cysteamine. The use of cysteamine in coenzyme A may have been due to its prebiotic abundance. The facile prebiotic synthesis of both cysteamine and coenzyme M suggests that they were involved in very early metabolic pathways.

  2. Coenzyme Q{sub 10} and alpha-tocopherol protect against amitriptyline toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Cordero, Mario D.; Dpto. Citologia e Histologia Normal y Patologica, Facultad de Medicina. Universidad de Sevilla. 41009 Sevilla; Moreno-Fernandez, Ana Maria

    Since amitriptyline is a very frequently prescribed antidepressant drug, it is not surprising that amitriptyline toxicity is relatively common. Amitriptyline toxic systemic effects include cardiovascular, autonomous nervous, and central nervous systems. To understand the mechanisms of amitriptyline toxicity we studied the cytotoxic effects of amitriptyline treatment on cultured primary human fibroblasts and zebrafish embryos, and the protective role of coenzyme Q{sub 10} and alpha-tocopherol, two membrane antioxidants. We found that amitriptyline treatment induced oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction in primary human fibroblasts. Mitochondrial dysfunction in amitriptyline treatment was characterized by reduced expression levels of mitochondrial proteins and coenzyme Q{sub 10},more » decreased NADH:cytochrome c reductase activity, and a drop in mitochondrial membrane potential. Moreover, and as a consequence of these toxic effects, amitriptyline treatment induced a significant increase in apoptotic cell death activating mitochondrial permeability transition. Coenzyme Q{sub 10} and alpha-tocopherol supplementation attenuated ROS production, lipid peroxidation, mitochondrial dysfunction, and cell death, suggesting that oxidative stress affecting cell membrane components is involved in amitriptyline cytotoxicity. Furthermore, amitriptyline-dependent toxicity and antioxidant protection were also evaluated in zebrafish embryos, a well established vertebrate model to study developmental toxicity. Amitriptyline significantly increased embryonic cell death and apoptosis rate, and both antioxidants provided a significant protection against amitriptyline embryotoxicity.« less

  3. Functional Conservation of Coenzyme Q Biosynthetic Genes among Yeasts, Plants, and Humans

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Kazuhiro; Ogiyama, Yuki; Yokomi, Kazumasa; Nakagawa, Tsuyoshi; Kaino, Tomohiro; Kawamukai, Makoto

    2014-01-01

    Coenzyme Q (CoQ) is an essential factor for aerobic growth and oxidative phosphorylation in the electron transport system. The biosynthetic pathway for CoQ has been proposed mainly from biochemical and genetic analyses of Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae; however, the biosynthetic pathway in higher eukaryotes has been explored in only a limited number of studies. We previously reported the roles of several genes involved in CoQ synthesis in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Here, we expand these findings by identifying ten genes (dps1, dlp1, ppt1, and coq3–9) that are required for CoQ synthesis. CoQ10-deficient S. pombe coq deletion strains were generated and characterized. All mutant fission yeast strains were sensitive to oxidative stress, produced a large amount of sulfide, required an antioxidant to grow on minimal medium, and did not survive at the stationary phase. To compare the biosynthetic pathway of CoQ in fission yeast with that in higher eukaryotes, the ability of CoQ biosynthetic genes from humans and plants (Arabidopsis thaliana) to functionally complement the S. pombe coq deletion strains was determined. With the exception of COQ9, expression of all other human and plant COQ genes recovered CoQ10 production by the fission yeast coq deletion strains, although the addition of a mitochondrial targeting sequence was required for human COQ3 and COQ7, as well as A. thaliana COQ6. In summary, this study describes the functional conservation of CoQ biosynthetic genes between yeasts, humans, and plants. PMID:24911838

  4. POTENTIAL ADMINISTRATION OF LIPOIC ACID AND COENZYME Q AGAINST ADIPOGENSIS: TARGET FOR WEIGHT REDUCTION.

    PubMed

    Al-Ghamdi, Maryam A; Choudhry, Hani; Al-Doghather, Huda A; Huwait, Etimad H; Kumosani, Taha A; Moselhy, Said S

    2017-01-01

    Body overweight and obesity were considered as a risk factor for many systemic diseases as diabetic hypertension, cardiovascular diseases, and some cancers. The lipoic acid and Co Q are considered as coenzymes needed for enhancement metabolic rate. The goal of this study is to evaluate the anti-obese effect of lipoic acid alone or combined with Co-Q in rats. Ninety male albino rats (100-150g) were used in this study, divided into six groups (15 each). Group I: Normal rats fed normal diet. Group II: Rats fed high fat diet (HFD). Group III: Rats fed HFD were given lipoic acid (10 μg/kg b w/day) intra-gastric by stomach tube. Group IV: Rats fed HFD were given Co-Q (10 μg/kg b.w/day) intra-gastric. Group V: Rats fed HFD were given lipoic acid (50 mg/kg b w/day) and Co-Q (10 μg/kg b. w/day). Group VI: Rats were given orlistat intra-gastric (10 mg/kg b w/day) as positive control for 6 weeks. Serum was subjected for determination of lipid profile, liver function tests atherogenic factor and lipoprotein lipase. It was found that treatment with lipoic acid or Co-Q or combined showed increase in the activity of lipoprotein lipase ( P < 0.001) and reduction of atherogenic effect and obesity index ( P <0.001). The effect of combined gives good results than orlistat or individual treatment. lipoic acid combined with Co-Q increase fat oxidation and prevent fat accumulation. The consumption of lipoic acid daily promotes fat oxidation and prevents its accumulation in visceral tissues. Further studies should be carried out to examine the mechanistic signals of these nutrients that helps in weight management.

  5. POTENTIAL ADMINISTRATION OF LIPOIC ACID AND COENZYME Q AGAINST ADIPOGENSIS: TARGET FOR WEIGHT REDUCTION

    PubMed Central

    AL-Ghamdi, Maryam A.; Choudhry, Hani; AL-Doghather, Huda A.; Huwait, Etimad H.; Kumosani, Taha A; Moselhy, Said S

    2017-01-01

    Background: Body overweight and obesity were considered as a risk factor for many systemic diseases as diabetic hypertension, cardiovascular diseases, and some cancers. The lipoic acid and Co Q are considered as coenzymes needed for enhancement metabolic rate. The goal of this study is to evaluate the anti-obese effect of lipoic acid alone or combined with Co-Q in rats. Materials and Methods: Ninety male albino rats (100-150g) were used in this study, divided into six groups (15 each). Group I: Normal rats fed normal diet. Group II: Rats fed high fat diet (HFD). Group III: Rats fed HFD were given lipoic acid (10 μg/kg b w/day) intra-gastric by stomach tube. Group IV: Rats fed HFD were given Co-Q (10 μg/kg b.w/day) intra-gastric. Group V: Rats fed HFD were given lipoic acid (50 mg/kg b w/day) and Co-Q (10 μg/kg b. w/day). Group VI: Rats were given orlistat intra-gastric (10 mg/kg b w/day) as positive control for 6 weeks. Serum was subjected for determination of lipid profile, liver function tests atherogenic factor and lipoprotein lipase. Results: It was found that treatment with lipoic acid or Co-Q or combined showed increase in the activity of lipoprotein lipase (P < 0.001) and reduction of atherogenic effect and obesity index (P <0.001). The effect of combined gives good results than orlistat or individual treatment. Conclusion: lipoic acid combined with Co-Q increase fat oxidation and prevent fat accumulation. The consumption of lipoic acid daily promotes fat oxidation and prevents its accumulation in visceral tissues. Further studies should be carried out to examine the mechanistic signals of these nutrients that helps in weight management. PMID:28480405

  6. Prebiotic syntheses of vitamin coenzymes: II. Pantoic acid, pantothenic acid, and the composition of coenzyme A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, S. L.; Schlesinger, G.

    1993-01-01

    Pantoic acid can by synthesized in good prebiotic yield from isobutyraldehyde or alpha-ketoisovaleric acid + H2CO + HCN. Isobutyraldehyde is the Strecker precursor to valine and alpha-ketoisovaleric acid is the valine transamination product. Mg2+ and Ca2+ as well as several transition metals are catalysts for the alpha-ketoisovaleric acid reaction. Pantothenic acid is produced from pantoyl lactone (easily formed from pantoic acid) and the relatively high concentrations of beta-alanine that would be formed on drying prebiotic amino acid mixtures. There is no selectivity for this reaction over glycine, alanine, or gamma-amino butyric acid. The components of coenzyme A are discussed in terms of ease of prebiotic formation and stability and are shown to be plausible choices, but many other compounds are possible. The gamma-OH of pantoic acid needs to be capped to prevent decomposition of pantothenic acid. These results suggest that coenzyme A function was important in the earliest metabolic pathways and that the coenzyme A precursor contained most of the components of the present coenzyme.

  7. Coenzyme Q deficiency causes impairment of the sulfide oxidation pathway.

    PubMed

    Ziosi, Marcello; Di Meo, Ivano; Kleiner, Giulio; Gao, Xing-Huang; Barca, Emanuele; Sanchez-Quintero, Maria J; Tadesse, Saba; Jiang, Hongfeng; Qiao, Changhong; Rodenburg, Richard J; Scalais, Emmanuel; Schuelke, Markus; Willard, Belinda; Hatzoglou, Maria; Tiranti, Valeria; Quinzii, Catarina M

    2017-01-01

    Coenzyme Q (CoQ) is an electron acceptor for sulfide-quinone reductase (SQR), the first enzyme of the hydrogen sulfide oxidation pathway. Here, we show that lack of CoQ in human skin fibroblasts causes impairment of hydrogen sulfide oxidation, proportional to the residual levels of CoQ. Biochemical and molecular abnormalities are rescued by CoQ supplementation in vitro and recapitulated by pharmacological inhibition of CoQ biosynthesis in skin fibroblasts and ADCK3 depletion in HeLa cells. Kidneys of Pdss2 kd/kd mice, which only have ~15% residual CoQ concentrations and are clinically affected, showed (i) reduced protein levels of SQR and downstream enzymes, (ii) accumulation of hydrogen sulfides, and (iii) glutathione depletion. These abnormalities were not present in brain, which maintains ~30% residual CoQ and is clinically unaffected. In Pdss2 kd/kd mice, we also observed low levels of plasma and urine thiosulfate and increased blood C4-C6 acylcarnitines. We propose that impairment of the sulfide oxidation pathway induced by decreased levels of CoQ causes accumulation of sulfides and consequent inhibition of short-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase and glutathione depletion, which contributes to increased oxidative stress and kidney failure. © 2016 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY 4.0 license.

  8. Nanosized self-emulsifying lipid vesicles of diacylglycerol-PEG lipid conjugates: Biophysical characterization and inclusion of lipophilic dietary supplements

    SciTech Connect

    Koynova, Rumiana; Tihova, Mariana; Biopharma)

    Hydrated diacylglycerol-PEG lipid conjugates, glyceryl dioleate-PEG12 (GDO-PEG12) and glyceryl dipalmitate-PEG23 (GDP-PEG23), spontaneously form uni- or oligolamellar liposomes in their liquid crystalline phase, in distinct difference from the PEGylated phospholipids which form micelles. GDP-PEG23 exhibits peculiar hysteretic phase behavior and can arrange into a long-living hexagonal phase at ambient and physiological temperatures. Liposomes of GDO-PEG12 and its mixture with soy lecithin exchange lipids with the membranes much more actively than common lecithin liposomes; such an active lipid exchange might facilitate the discharging of the liposome cargo upon uptake and internalization, and can thus be important in drug delivery applications. Diacylglycerol-PEG lipidmore » liposome formulations can encapsulate up to 20-30 wt.% lipophilic dietary supplements such as fish oil, coenzyme Q10, and vitamins D and E. The encapsulation is feasible by way of dry mixing, avoiding the use of organic solvent.« less

  9. Nutritional programming of coenzyme Q: potential for prevention and intervention?

    PubMed

    Tarry-Adkins, Jane L; Fernandez-Twinn, Denise S; Chen, Jian-Hua; Hargreaves, Iain P; Martin-Gronert, Malgorzata S; McConnell, Josie M; Ozanne, Susan E

    2014-12-01

    Low birth weight and rapid postnatal growth increases risk of cardiovascular-disease (CVD); however, underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Previously, we demonstrated that rats exposed to a low-protein diet in utero that underwent postnatal catch-up growth (recuperated) have a programmed deficit in cardiac coenzyme Q (CoQ) that was associated with accelerated cardiac aging. It is unknown whether this deficit occurs in all tissues, including those that are clinically accessible. We investigated whether aortic and white blood cell (WBC) CoQ is programmed by suboptimal early nutrition and whether postweaning dietary supplementation with CoQ could prevent programmed accelerated aging. Recuperated male rats had reduced aortic CoQ [22 d (35±8.4%; P<0.05); 12 m (53±8.8%; P<0.05)], accelerated aortic telomere shortening (P<0.01), increased DNA damage (79±13% increase in nei-endonucleaseVIII-like-1), increased oxidative stress (458±67% increase in NAPDH-oxidase-4; P<0.001), and decreased mitochondrial complex II-III activity (P<0.05). Postweaning dietary supplementation with CoQ prevented these detrimental programming effects. Recuperated WBCs also had reduced CoQ (74±5.8%; P<0.05). Notably, WBC CoQ levels correlated with aortic telomere-length (P<0.0001) suggesting its potential as a diagnostic marker of vascular aging. We conclude that early intervention with CoQ in at-risk individuals may be a cost-effective and safe way of reducing the global burden of CVDs. © FASEB.

  10. Nutraceuticals and Dietary Supplements to Improve Quality of Life and Outcomes in Heart Failure Patients.

    PubMed

    Cicero, Arrigo F G; Colletti, Alessandro

    2017-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a complex clinical syndrome that can result from any structural or functional cardiac disorder that impairs the ability of the ventricle to fill or eject blood. It represents a major public health issue, with a prevalence of over 23 million worldwide. The lifetime risk of developing HF is one in five and the most important risk factors identified are ischemic heart disease, hypertension, smoking, obesity and diabetes. Preventive approaches are based on improvements of lifestyle, associated with pharmacological therapy. Several nutraceuticals have shown interesting clinical results in prevention of HF as well as in the treatment of the early stages of the disease, alone or in association with pharmacological therapy. The aim of this review is to resume the available clinical evidence on phytochemicals effect on HF prevention and/or treatment. A systematic search strategy was developed to identify trials in PubMed (January 1980 to April 2016). The terms 'nutraceuticals', 'dietary supplements', 'herbal drug' and 'heart failure' were incorporated into an electronic search strategy. Clinical trials reported that the intake of some nutraceuticals (hawthorn, coenzyme Q10, L-carnitine, Dribose, Carnosine, Vitamin D, Some probiotics, Omega-3 PUFAs, Beet nitrates) is associated with improvements in functional parameters such as ejection fraction, stroke volume and cardiac output in HF patients, with minimal side effects. These findings were sometimes reinforced by subsequent meta-analyses, which further concluded that benefits tended to be greater in earlier stage HF. The main mechanisms involved are antioxidant, antinflammatory, anti-ischemic and antiaggregant effects. Evidence suggests that the supplementation with nutraceuticals may be a useful option for effective management of HF, with the advantage of excellent clinical tolerance. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  11. A Pediatric Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia With a Rare Karyotype of ider(17)(q10)t(15;17) and Favorable Outcome: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    He, Yanli; Wang, Ping; Liang, Kaiwei; Chen, Xiangjun; Du, Wen; Li, Juan; Hu, Yanjie; Bai, Yan; Liu, Wei; Li, Xiaoqing; Jin, Runming; Zhang, Min; Zheng, Jine

    2015-10-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) is a specific malignant hematological disorder with a diagnostic hallmark of chromosome translocation t(15;17)(q22;q21). As a very rare secondary cytogenetic aberration in pediatric APL, ider(17q) (q10)t(15;17) was suggested to be a poor prognostic factor based on previous case reports.Here, we report a pediatric APL case with a rare karyotype of ider(17)(q10)t(15;17). Bone marrow aspiration, immunophenotyping, molecular biology, cytogenetic, and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analyses were performed at initial diagnosis and during the treatment.A 6-year-old boy was brought to our hospital with the chief complaint of bleeding gums twice and intermittent fever for 3 days in January 2013. He was diagnosed as low-risk APL according to the 2012 NCCN guideline on APL, with the expression of PML-RARA (bcr3 subtype) and the karyotype of 46,XY, der(15)t(15;17)(q22;q21),ider(17)(q10)t(15;17), which was further verified by FISH. The patient was treated through combination all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) and arsenic with daunorubicin according to the 2012 NCCN guideline for APL. Continuous hematological completed remission (HCR) and major molecular remission (MMR) were achieved with normal karyotype for >28 months after induction chemotherapy.Different from previously reported cases, this pediatric APL patient with ider(17)(q10)t(15;17) displays favorable clinical outcomes, which might be related to the low-risk classification and arsenic treatment during the treatment. It suggests that ider(17)(q10)t(15;17) may not be the sole determinant for worse outcomes in pediatric APL and implies that more contributed factors should be considered for pediatric APL prognosis.

  12. Diet supplementation during early lactation with non-alcoholic beer increases the antioxidant properties of breastmilk and decreases the oxidative damage in breastfeeding mothers.

    PubMed

    Codoñer-Franch, Pilar; Hernández-Aguilar, María T; Navarro-Ruiz, Almudena; López-Jaén, Ana B; Borja-Herrero, Cintia; Valls-Bellés, Victoria

    2013-04-01

    After delivery and birth, mothers and neonates are exposed to oxidative stress. We tested whether supplementing the diet of breastfeeding mothers with non-alcoholic beer, a product rich in antioxidants, could improve their oxidative status and the antioxidant content of their milk. A prospective trial begun on Day 2 postpartum was conducted in mother-infant dyads. Sixty breastfeeding mothers and their infants were allocated to either a control group (n=30) on a free diet or a study group (n=30) on a free diet supplemented with 660 mL of non-alcoholic beer/day. The oxidative status of the mothers' breastmilk, plasma, and urine and the infant's urine was analyzed on Days 2 and 30 postpartum. The before-after difference was compared within and between the groups. The increase in antioxidant capacity and coenzyme Q10 content in the breastmilk of the study group at Day 30 was higher than in that of the control group (p<0.001). There was also a change in the oxidative status of the mothers' plasma in the supplemented group regarding the control group; higher values of total antioxidant capacity (p<0.05) and lower levels of 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (p<0.05), indicative of DNA oxidative damage, were found. These results indicate a positive effect of non-alcoholic beer supplementation on oxidative stress in mothers. However, no difference in oxidant markers was found in the infant's urine. The consumption of non-alcoholic beer appears to enhance the antioxidant capacity of breastmilk and decrease oxidative damage in breastfeeding mothers.

  13. Biochemistry of Mitochondrial Coenzyme Q Biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Stefely, Jonathan A; Pagliarini, David J

    2017-10-01

    Coenzyme Q (CoQ, ubiquinone) is a redox-active lipid produced across all domains of life that functions in electron transport and oxidative phosphorylation and whose deficiency causes human diseases. Yet, CoQ biosynthesis has not been fully defined in any organism. Several proteins with unclear molecular functions facilitate CoQ biosynthesis through unknown means, and multiple steps in the pathway are catalyzed by currently unidentified enzymes. Here we highlight recent progress toward filling these knowledge gaps through both traditional biochemistry and cutting-edge 'omics' approaches. To help fill the remaining gaps, we present questions framed by the recently discovered CoQ biosynthetic complex and by putative biophysical barriers. Mapping CoQ biosynthesis, metabolism, and transport pathways has great potential to enhance treatment of numerous human diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Neutron study of B 12 coenzyme at 15 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouquiere, J. P.

    1992-06-01

    This high resolution and low temperature study, at 15 K, of the vitamin B 12 coenzyme ( C72H100N18O17PCo) was undertaken to confirm and clarify the water networks identified at 279 K by Savage [1]. Details of the data collection and refinement of the low temperature structure are described, a comparison of the coenzyme molecule structures at 15 and 279 K is made, and that of solvent structures outlined.

  15. Better than Nature: Nicotinamide Biomimetics That Outperform Natural Coenzymes

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The search for affordable, green biocatalytic processes is a challenge for chemicals manufacture. Redox biotransformations are potentially attractive, but they rely on unstable and expensive nicotinamide coenzymes that have prevented their widespread exploitation. Stoichiometric use of natural coenzymes is not viable economically, and the instability of these molecules hinders catalytic processes that employ coenzyme recycling. Here, we investigate the efficiency of man-made synthetic biomimetics of the natural coenzymes NAD(P)H in redox biocatalysis. Extensive studies with a range of oxidoreductases belonging to the “ene” reductase family show that these biomimetics are excellent analogues of the natural coenzymes, revealed also in crystal structures of the ene reductase XenA with selected biomimetics. In selected cases, these biomimetics outperform the natural coenzymes. “Better-than-Nature” biomimetics should find widespread application in fine and specialty chemicals production by harnessing the power of high stereo-, regio-, and chemoselective redox biocatalysts and enabling reactions under mild conditions at low cost. PMID:26727612

  16. [Effect of procaine and procaine metabolites on coenzyme A and acetyl coenzyme A concentration in various tissues of the rat].

    PubMed

    Kietzmann, M; Kaemmerer, K

    1989-01-01

    In rats treated with procaine hydrochloride, diethylaminoethanol, monoethylaminoethanol, ethanolamine, as well as a combination of procaine hydrochloride and haematoporphyrine the ratio of acetyl coenzyme A and coenzyme A clearly was enhanced in the liver and to a minor extent in the cerebellum. In the tissue of cerebral cortex, heart, muscle and duodenum no corresponding effects were demonstrated. These findings, showing a further intermediary effect of orally administered procaine, can be interpreted as an influence in intermediary energy utilisation.

  17. Biosynthesis of coenzyme Q in eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Kawamukai, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    Coenzyme Q (CoQ) is a component of the electron transport chain that participates in aerobic cellular respiration to produce ATP. In addition, CoQ acts as an electron acceptor in several enzymatic reactions involving oxidation-reduction. Biosynthesis of CoQ has been investigated mainly in Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and the findings have been extended to various higher organisms, including plants and humans. Analyses in yeast have contributed greatly to current understanding of human diseases related to CoQ biosynthesis. To date, human genetic disorders related to mutations in eight COQ biosynthetic genes have been reported. In addition, the crystal structures of a number of proteins involved in CoQ synthesis have been solved, including those of IspB, UbiA, UbiD, UbiX, UbiI, Alr8543 (Coq4 homolog), Coq5, ADCK3, and COQ9. Over the last decade, knowledge of CoQ biosynthesis has accumulated, and striking advances in related human genetic disorders and the crystal structure of proteins required for CoQ synthesis have been made. This review focuses on the biosynthesis of CoQ in eukaryotes, with some comparisons to the process in prokaryotes.

  18. Coenzyme Q as an antiadipogenic factor.

    PubMed

    Bour, Sandy; Carmona, Maria-Carmen; Galinier, Anne; Caspar-Bauguil, Sylvie; Van Gaal, Luc; Staels, Bart; Pénicaud, Luc; Casteilla, Louis

    2011-02-01

    Coenzyme Q (CoQ) is not only the single antioxidant synthesized in humans but also an obligatory element of mitochondrial functions. We have previously reported CoQ deficiency in white adipose tissue of ob/ob mice. We sought to determine (i) whether this deficit exists in all species and its relevance in human obesity and (ii) to what extent CoQ could be involved in adipocyte differentiation. Here we identified in rodents as well as in humans a specific very strong nonlinear negative correlation between CoQ content in subcutaneous adipose tissue and obesity indexes. This striking correlation reveals a threshold value similar in both species. This relative deficit in CoQ content in adipose tissue rapidly took place during the time course of high-fat-diet-induced obesity in mice. Adipocyte differentiation was assessed in vitro using the preadipocyte 3T3-F442A cell line. When CoQ synthesis was inhibited by a pharmacological approach using chlorobenzoic acid, this strongly triggered adipose differentiation. In contrast, adipogenesis was strongly inhibited when a long-term increase in CoQ content was obtained by overexpressing human 4-hydroxy benzoate acid polyprenyltransferase gene. Altogether, these data suggest that a strict level of CoQ remains essential for adipocyte differentiation, and its impairment is associated with obesity.

  19. The DIRT on Q10: In situ depletion of labile-inputs does not increase temperature sensitivity in a laboratory incubation (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, L. L.; Lajtha, K.; Bowden, R.; Johnson, B. R.; Bridgham, S. D.

    2013-12-01

    The decomposition of soil organic matter is expected to increase with global warming and has been commonly described by kinetic models with at least two pools with differing turnover times. Pools characterized by rapid turnover are thought to consist of labile substrates. Meanwhile, slower turnover is attributed, in part, to greater chemical complexity and a necessarily higher activation energy which should in turn lead to a higher sensitivity (Q10) to temperature and a proportionally larger response to warming. Experimental tests of the relative Q10 of these pools have been inconclusive and contradictory in part due the fact that all pools are decomposing simultaneously and soils kept under differing conditions over long periods of time diverge in more than the Q10 response making them less comparable over time. We present here a test of the temperature response on soils from a 20 yr litter manipulation experiment incubated under an experimental regime that minimizes divergence among the soils. We hypothesize that 1) if exclusion of inputs has depleted labile substrates and 2) the remaining carbon is more chemically complex, then the input exclusion treatments should show a higher Q10 compared to the ambient or increased input treatments. The soils are taken from the Detritus Input and Removal Treatment (DIRT) plots in the Bousson Forest, Pennsylvania, US. The DIRT treatments consist of litter and root exclusion (no inputs = NI), no roots (NR), no litter (NL), double litter (DL), and ambient conditions (C). Soils were incubated at 25oC for 525 days. Periodically, replicate sets were rotated into 15oC, 35oC or remained at 25oC for 24 hr. The headspace CO2 concentration was measured before and after the 24 hr temperature treatments, and then all replicate sets were returned to 25oC. Twenty years of input exclusion decreased respiration rate, with NI < NR = NL < C = DL, and total carbon content, and thus, we conclude, labile substrates. The respiration rate at 25o

  20. The Regulation of Coenzyme Q Biosynthesis in Eukaryotic Cells: All That Yeast Can Tell Us

    PubMed Central

    González-Mariscal, Isabel; García-Testón, Elena; Padilla, Sergio; Martín-Montalvo, Alejandro; Pomares Viciana, Teresa; Vazquez-Fonseca, Luis; Gandolfo Domínguez, Pablo; Santos-Ocaña, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    rate of CoQ6. This critical model is needed for a better understanding of CoQ biosynthesis. Taking into account that patients with CoQ10 deficiency maintain to some extent the machinery to synthesize CoQ, new promising strategies for the treatment of CoQ10 deficiency will require a better understanding of the regulation of CoQ biosynthesis in the future. PMID:25126044

  1. RNA-binding proteins regulate cell respiration and coenzyme Q biosynthesis by post-transcriptional regulation of COQ7.

    PubMed

    Cascajo, María V; Abdelmohsen, Kotb; Noh, Ji Heon; Fernández-Ayala, Daniel J M; Willers, Imke M; Brea, Gloria; López-Lluch, Guillermo; Valenzuela-Villatoro, Marina; Cuezva, José M; Gorospe, Myriam; Siendones, Emilio; Navas, Plácido

    2016-07-02

    Coenzyme Q (CoQ) is a key component of the mitochondrial respiratory chain carrying electrons from complexes I and II to complex III and it is an intrinsic component of the respirasome. CoQ concentration is highly regulated in cells in order to adapt the metabolism of the cell to challenges of nutrient availability and stress stimuli. At least 10 proteins have been shown to be required for CoQ biosynthesis in a multi-peptide complex and COQ7 is a central regulatory factor of this pathway. We found that the first 765 bp of the 3'-untranslated region (UTR) of COQ7 mRNA contains cis-acting elements of interaction with RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) HuR and hnRNP C1/C2. Binding of hnRNP C1/C2 to COQ7 mRNA was found to require the presence of HuR, and hnRNP C1/C2 silencing appeared to stabilize COQ7 mRNA modestly. By contrast, lowering HuR levels by silencing or depriving cells of serum destabilized and reduced the half-life of COQ7 mRNA, thereby reducing COQ7 protein and CoQ biosynthesis rate. Accordingly, HuR knockdown decreased oxygen consumption rate and mitochondrial production of ATP, and increased lactate levels. Taken together, our results indicate that a reduction in COQ7 mRNA levels by HuR depletion causes mitochondrial dysfunction and a switch toward an enhanced aerobic glycolysis, the characteristic phenotype exhibited by primary deficiency of CoQ10. Thus HuR contributes to efficient oxidative phosphorylation by regulating of CoQ10 biosynthesis.

  2. Primary Coenzyme Q Deficiency in Pdss2 Mutant Mice Causes Isolated Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Haase, Volker H.; King, Rhonda; Polyak, Erzsebet; Selak, Mary; Yudkoff, Marc; Hancock, Wayne W.; Meade, Ray; Saiki, Ryoichi; Lunceford, Adam L.; Clarke, Catherine F.; Gasser, David L.

    2008-01-01

    Coenzyme Q (CoQ) is an essential electron carrier in the respiratory chain whose deficiency has been implicated in a wide variety of human mitochondrial disease manifestations. Its multi-step biosynthesis involves production of polyisoprenoid diphosphate in a reaction that requires the enzymes be encoded by PDSS1 and PDSS2. Homozygous mutations in either of these genes, in humans, lead to severe neuromuscular disease, with nephrotic syndrome seen in PDSS2 deficiency. We now show that a presumed autoimmune kidney disease in mice with the missense Pdss2kd/kd genotype can be attributed to a mitochondrial CoQ biosynthetic defect. Levels of CoQ9 and CoQ10 in kidney homogenates from B6.Pdss2kd/kd mutants were significantly lower than those in B6 control mice. Disease manifestations originate specifically in glomerular podocytes, as renal disease is seen in Podocin/cre,Pdss2loxP/loxP knockout mice but not in conditional knockouts targeted to renal tubular epithelium, monocytes, or hepatocytes. Liver-conditional B6.Alb/cre,Pdss2loxP/loxP knockout mice have no overt disease despite demonstration that their livers have undetectable CoQ9 levels, impaired respiratory capacity, and significantly altered intermediary metabolism as evidenced by transcriptional profiling and amino acid quantitation. These data suggest that disease manifestations of CoQ deficiency relate to tissue-specific respiratory capacity thresholds, with glomerular podocytes displaying the greatest sensitivity to Pdss2 impairment. PMID:18437205

  3. Premature ovarian failure, short stature, and Hashimoto's disease in an 18-year-old adolescent girl with 46, X, i(X)(q10).

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiang; Zhang, Qiao; Gao, Feng; Chen, Lu-Lu

    2018-04-22

    Premature ovarian failure (POF) is a heterogeneous condition affecting girls and women. We detected a previously healthy 18-year-old adolescent girl, presented with amenorrhea over six months, as well as circulating levels of estradiol lower decreased and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) increased. She was 138 cm tall. Results of laboratory tests and/or ultrasound investigations showed 46, X, i(X)(q10) karyotype and Hashimoto's disease. This case suggests that pubertal onset and progression, as well as karyotype analysis, should be evaluated in girls with Hashimoto's disease and short stature.

  4. Structural Insight into Methyl-Coenzyme M Reductase Chemistry using Coenzyme B Analogues†,‡

    PubMed Central

    Cedervall, Peder E.; Dey, Mishtu; Pearson, Arwen R.; Ragsdale, Stephen W.; Wilmot, Carrie M.

    2011-01-01

    Methyl-coenzyme M reductase (MCR) catalyzes the final and rate-limiting step in methane biogenesis; the reduction of methyl-coenzyme M (methyl-SCoM) by coenzyme B (CoBSH) to methane and a heterodisulfide (CoBS-SCoM). Crystallographic studies show that the active site is deeply buried within the enzyme, and contains a highly reduced nickel-tetrapyrrole, coenzyme F430. Methyl-SCoM must enter the active site prior to CoBSH, as species derived from analogues of methyl-SCoM are always observed bound to the F430 nickel in the deepest part of the 30 Å long substrate channel that leads from the protein surface to the active site. The seven-carbon mercaptoalkanoyl chain of CoBSH binds within a 16 Å predominantly hydrophobic part of the channel close to F430, with the CoBSH thiolate lying closest to the nickel at a distance of 8.8 Å. It has previously been suggested that binding of CoBSH initiates catalysis by inducing a conformational change that moves methyl-SCoM closer to the nickel promoting cleavage of the C-S bond of methyl-SCoM. In order to better understand the structural role of CoBSH early in the MCR mechanism, we have determined crystal structures of MCR in complex with four different CoBSH analogues; pentanoyl-, hexanoyl-, octanoyl- and nonanoyl- derivatives of CoBSH (CoB5SH, CoB6SH, CoB8SH and CoB9SH respectively). The data presented here reveal that the shorter CoB5SH mercaptoalkanoyl chain overlays with that of CoBSH, but terminates two units short of the CoBSH thiolate position. In contrast, the mercaptoalkanoyl chain of CoB6SH adopts a different conformation, such that its thiolate is coincident with the position of the CoBSH thiolate. This is consistent with the observation that CoB6SH is a slow substrate. A labile water in the substrate channel was found to be a sensitive indicator for the presence of CoBSH and HSCoM. The longer CoB8SH and CoB9SH analogues can be accommodated in the active site through exclusion of this water. These analogues react with

  5. Improving coenzyme Q8 production in Escherichia coli employing multiple strategies.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wen; Yang, Shuiyun; Zhao, Junchao; Su, Tingting; Zhao, Liangrui; Liu, Jiankang

    2014-08-01

    Coenzyme Q (CoQ) is a medically valuable compound and a high yielding strain for CoQ will have several benefits for the industrial production of CoQ. To increase the CoQ(8) content of E. coli, we blocked the pathway for the synthesis of menaquinone by deleting the menA gene. The blocking of menaquinone pathway increased the CoQ(8) content by 81 % in E. coli (ΔmenA). To study the CoQ producing potential of E. coli, we employed previous known increasing strategies for systematic metabolic engineering. These include the supplementation with substrate precursors and the co-expression of rate-limiting genes. The co-expression of dxs-ubiA and the supplementation with substrate precursors such as pyruvate (PYR) and parahydroxybenzoic acid (pHBA) increased the content of CoQ(8) in E. coli (ΔmenA) by 125 and 59 %, respectively. Moreover, a 180 % increase in the CoQ(8) content in E. coli (ΔmenA) was realized by the combination of the co-expression of dxs-ubiA and the supplementation with PYR and pHBA. All in all, CoQ(8) content in E. coli increased 4.06 times by blocking the menaquinone pathway, dxs-ubiA co-expression and the addition of sodium pyruvate and parahydroxybenzoic acid to the medium. Results suggested a synergistic effect among different metabolic engineering strategies.

  6. Fermentation of 1,2-Propanediol and 1,2-Ethanediol by Some Genera of Enterobacteriaceae, Involving Coenzyme B12-Dependent Diol Dehydratase

    PubMed Central

    Toraya, Tetsuo; Honda, Susumu; Fukui, Saburo

    1979-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae (Aerobacter aerogenes) ATCC 8724 was able to grow anaerobically on 1,2-propanediol and 1,2-ethanediol as carbon and energy sources. Whole cells of the bacterium grown anaerobically on 1,2-propanediol or on glycerol catalyzed conversion of 1,2-diols and aldehydes to the corresponding acids and alcohols. Glucose-grown cells also converted aldehydes, but not 1,2-diols, to acids and alcohols. The presence of activities of coenzyme B12-dependent diol dehydratase, alcohol dehydrogenase, coenzyme-A-dependent aldehyde dehydrogenase, phosphotransacetylase, and acetate kinase was demonstrated with crude extracts of 1,2-propanediol-grown cells. The dependence of the levels of these enzymes on growth substrates, together with cofactor requirements in in vitro conversion of these substrates, indicates that 1,2-diols are fermented to the corresponding acids and alcohols via aldehydes, acyl-coenzyme A, and acyl phosphates. This metabolic pathway for 1,2-diol fermentation was also suggested in some other genera of Enterobacteriaceae which were able to grow anaerobically on 1,2-propanediol. When the bacteria were cultivated in a 1,2-propanediol medium not supplemented with cobalt ion, the coenzyme B12-dependent conversion of 1,2-diols to aldehydes was the rate-limiting step in this fermentation. This was because the intracellular concentration of coenzyme B12 was very low in the cells grown in cobalt-deficient medium, since the apoprotein of diol dehydratase was markedly induced in the cells grown in the 1,2-propanediol medium. Better cell yields were obtained when the bacteria were grown anaerobically on 1,2-propanediol. Evidence is presented that aerobically grown cells have a different metabolic pathway for utilizing 1,2-propanediol. PMID:378959

  7. Longevity of major coenzymes allows minimal de novo synthesis in microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Hartl, Johannes; Kiefer, Patrick; Meyer, Fabian; Vorholt, Julia A

    2017-05-15

    Coenzymes are vital for cellular metabolism and act on the full spectrum of enzymatic reactions. Intrinsic chemical reactivity, enzyme promiscuity and high flux through their catalytic cycles make coenzymes prone to damage. To counteract such compromising factors and ensure stable levels of functional coenzymes, cells use a complex interplay between de novo synthesis, salvage, repair and degradation. However, the relative contribution of these factors is currently unknown, as is the overall stability of coenzymes in the cell. Here, we use dynamic 13 C-labelling experiments to determine the half-life of major coenzymes of Escherichia coli. We find that coenzymes such as pyridoxal 5-phosphate, flavins, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (phosphate) and coenzyme A are remarkably stable in vivo and allow biosynthesis close to the minimal necessary rate. In consequence, they are essentially produced to compensate for dilution by growth and passed on over generations of cells. Exceptions are antioxidants, which are short-lived, suggesting an inherent requirement for increased renewal. Although the growth-driven turnover of stable coenzymes is apparently subject to highly efficient end-product homeostasis, we exemplify that coenzyme pools are propagated in excess in relation to actual growth requirements. Additional testing of Bacillus subtilis and Saccharomyces cerevisiae suggests that coenzyme longevity is a conserved feature in biology.

  8. ANTAGONISTIC EFFECTS OF 6-MERCAPTOPURINE AND COENZYME A ON MITOCHONDRIA AND MITOSIS IN TISSUE CULTURE

    PubMed Central

    Biesele, John J.

    1955-01-01

    The partial mitotic inhibition caused by 6-mercaptopurine in tissue cultures of Crocker mouse sarcoma 180 and embryonic mouse skin is blocked by co-enzyme A. 6-Mercaptopurine and coenzyme A also have opposite effects on mitochondrial morphology. Mitochondria in cells treated with 6-mercaptopurine become thin and fragmented. Coenzyme A blocks this effect, and alone coenzyme A makes for longer and thicker mitochondria. 6-Mercaptopurine inhibits lipogenesis in embryo skin fibroblasts, and this inhibition is partly counteracted by coenzyme A, which by itself makes for a greater accumulation of lipid droplets in the cytoplasm. It is suggested that at least one part of the action by which 6-mercaptopurine decreases mitotic incidence in tissue cultures may be an interference on the part of 6-mercaptopurine, acting as an antimetabolite of coenzyme A, in mitochondrial function related to cell division. PMID:14381434

  9. Profiling Redox and Energy Coenzymes in Whole Blood, Tissue and Cells Using NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Gowda, G A Nagana

    2018-05-14

    Coenzymes of cellular redox reactions and cellular energy, as well as antioxidants mediate biochemical reactions fundamental to the functioning of all living cells. Conventional analysis methods lack the opportunity to evaluate these important redox and energy coenzymes and antioxidants in a single step. Major coenzymes include redox coenzymes: NAD⁺ (oxidized nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide), NADH (reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide), NADP⁺ (oxidized nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate) and NADPH (reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate); energy coenzymes: ATP (adenosine triphosphate), ADP (adenosine diphosphate) and AMP (adenosine monophosphate); and antioxidants: GSSG (oxidized glutathione) and GSH (reduced glutathione). We show here that a simple ¹H NMR experiment can measure these coenzymes and antioxidants in tissue and whole blood apart from a vast pool of other metabolites. In addition, focused on the goal of identification of coenzymes in subcellular fractions, we demonstrate analysis of coenzymes in the cytoplasm using breast cancer cells. Owing to their unstable nature, or low concentrations, most of the coenzymes either evade detection or lose their integrity when established sample preparation and analysis methods are used. To overcome this challenge, here we describe the development of new methods to detect these molecules without affecting the integrity of other metabolites. We used an array of 1D and 2D NMR methods, chemical shift databases, pH measurements and spiking with authentic compounds to establish the identity of peaks for the coenzymes and antioxidants in NMR spectra. Interestingly, while none of the coenzymes and antioxidants were detected in plasma, they were abundant in whole blood. Considering that the coenzymes and antioxidants represent a sensitive measure of human health and risk for numerous diseases, the presented NMR methods to measure them in one step potentially open new opportunities in the

  10. Cataract induction by protons and HZE particles is suppressed by dietary supplements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ware, Jeffrey; Kennedy, Ann; Davis, James

    The present study was undertaken to investigate the ability of dietary supplements to reduce the formation and severity of cataracts in mice irradiated with protons or iron ions, which are important components of the radiation encountered by astronauts during spaceflight. The mice were exposed to proton or iron ion radiation and fed with control diet or diets supplemented with an antioxidant formulation or with Bowman-Birk Inhibitor Concentrate (BBIC) both before and after the radiation exposure. The antioxidant formulation contained L-selenomethionine, N-acetyl cysteine, ascorbic acid, co-enzyme Q10, alpha-lipoic acid and vitamin E succinate. This mixture is highly effective at reducing space radiation induced oxidative stress in both in vivo and in vitro systems, space radiation induced cytotoxicity and malignant transformation in vitro. BBIC is a soybean extract with high levels of the Bowman-Birk Inhibitor, an 8-KD soybean-derived protease inhibitor with anticarcinogenic, anti-inflammatory and radioprotection properties. At approximately two years after the radiation exposure, the animals were killed and lenses were harvested post-mortem and characterized using an established classifi- cation system that assigns discrete scores based on the severity of the lens opacifications. The results showed that exposure to 1-GeV/n proton (300 cGy) or iron ion (50 cGy) radiation significantly increased the cataract prevalence and severity in CBA/J mice to levels above the baseline levels of age-induced cataract formation in this mouse strain. Treatment with BBIC or the antioxidant formulation significantly reduced the prevalence and severity of the lens opaci- fications in the mice exposed to iron ion radiation. Treatment with BBIC or the antioxidant formulation also decreased the severity of the lens opacifications in the mice exposed to proton radiation; however, the decrease did not reach statistical significance. These results indicate that BBIC and the antioxidant

  11. Pheochromocytoma as a rare cause of hypertension in a 46 X, i(X)(q10) turner syndrome: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Shin, Ji Yeon; Kim, Bo Hyun; Kim, Young Keum; Kim, Tae Hwa; Kim, Eun Heui; Lee, Min Jin; Kim, Jong Ho; Jeon, Yun Kyung; Kim, Sang Soo; Kim, In Joo

    2018-05-10

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) presents the most serious health problems and contributes to the increased mortality in young women with Turner syndrome. Arterial hypertension in Turner syndrome patients is significantly more prevalent than that in a general age-matched control group. The aetiology of hypertension in Turner syndrome varies, even in the absence of cardiac anomalies and obvious structural renal abnormalities. Pheochromocytoma is an extremely rare cause among various etiologies for hypertension in patients with Turner syndrome. Here, we reported a pheochromocytoma as a rare cause of hypertension in Turner syndrome patient. A 21-year-old woman who has diagnosed with Turner syndrome with a karyotype of 46,X,i(X)(q10) visited for hypertension and mild headache. Transthoracic echography (TTE) showed no definite persistent ductus arteriosus shunt flow and cardiac valve abnormalities. Considering other important secondary causes like pheochromocytoma, hormonal studies were performed and the results showed increased serum norepinephrine, serum normetanephrine, and 24 h urine norepinephrine. We performed an abdominal computed tomography (CT) to confirm the location of pheochromocytoma. Abdominal CT showed a 1.9 cm right adrenal mass. I-131 meta-iodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) scintigraphy showed a right adrenal uptake. Laparoscopic adrenalectomy was performed and confirmed a pheochromocytoma. After surgery, blood pressure was within normal ranges and postoperative course was uneventful, and no recurrence developed via biochemical tests and abdominal CT until 24 months. Our case and previous literatures suggest that hypertension caused by pheochromocytoma which is a rare but important and potentially lethal cause of hypertension in Turner syndrome. This case underlines the importance of early detection of pheochromocytoma in Turner syndrome. Clinicians should keep in mind that pheochromocytoma can be a cause of hypertension in patients with Turner syndrome.

  12. Dietary Supplements

    MedlinePlus

    ... For Consumers Consumer Information by Audience For Women Dietary Supplements: Tips for Women Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it ... or 10877-382-4357. To Learn More about Dietary Supplements Information for Consumers on Using Dietary Supplements NIH ...

  13. Protein Engineering for Nicotinamide Coenzyme Specificity in Oxidoreductases: Attempts and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Chánique, Andrea M.; Parra, Loreto P.

    2018-01-01

    Oxidoreductases are ubiquitous enzymes that catalyze an extensive range of chemical reactions with great specificity, efficiency, and selectivity. Most oxidoreductases are nicotinamide cofactor-dependent enzymes with a strong preference for NADP or NAD. Because these coenzymes differ in stability, bioavailability and costs, the enzyme preference for a specific coenzyme is an important issue for practical applications. Different approaches for the manipulation of coenzyme specificity have been reported, with different degrees of success. Here we present various attempts for the switching of nicotinamide coenzyme preference in oxidoreductases by protein engineering. This review covers 103 enzyme engineering studies from 82 articles and evaluates the accomplishments in terms of coenzyme specificity and catalytic efficiency compared to wild type enzymes of different classes. We analyzed different protein engineering strategies and related them with the degree of success in inverting the cofactor specificity. In general, catalytic activity is compromised when coenzyme specificity is reversed, however when switching from NAD to NADP, better results are obtained. In most of the cases, rational strategies were used, predominantly with loop exchange generating the best results. In general, the tendency of removing acidic residues and incorporating basic residues is the strategy of choice when trying to change specificity from NAD to NADP, and vice versa. Computational strategies and algorithms are also covered as helpful tools to guide protein engineering strategies. This mini review aims to give a general introduction to the topic, giving an overview of tools and information to work in protein engineering for the reversal of coenzyme specificity. PMID:29491854

  14. Protein Engineering for Nicotinamide Coenzyme Specificity in Oxidoreductases: Attempts and Challenges.

    PubMed

    Chánique, Andrea M; Parra, Loreto P

    2018-01-01

    Oxidoreductases are ubiquitous enzymes that catalyze an extensive range of chemical reactions with great specificity, efficiency, and selectivity. Most oxidoreductases are nicotinamide cofactor-dependent enzymes with a strong preference for NADP or NAD. Because these coenzymes differ in stability, bioavailability and costs, the enzyme preference for a specific coenzyme is an important issue for practical applications. Different approaches for the manipulation of coenzyme specificity have been reported, with different degrees of success. Here we present various attempts for the switching of nicotinamide coenzyme preference in oxidoreductases by protein engineering. This review covers 103 enzyme engineering studies from 82 articles and evaluates the accomplishments in terms of coenzyme specificity and catalytic efficiency compared to wild type enzymes of different classes. We analyzed different protein engineering strategies and related them with the degree of success in inverting the cofactor specificity. In general, catalytic activity is compromised when coenzyme specificity is reversed, however when switching from NAD to NADP, better results are obtained. In most of the cases, rational strategies were used, predominantly with loop exchange generating the best results. In general, the tendency of removing acidic residues and incorporating basic residues is the strategy of choice when trying to change specificity from NAD to NADP, and vice versa . Computational strategies and algorithms are also covered as helpful tools to guide protein engineering strategies. This mini review aims to give a general introduction to the topic, giving an overview of tools and information to work in protein engineering for the reversal of coenzyme specificity.

  15. Sunflower Oil but Not Fish Oil Resembles Positive Effects of Virgin Olive Oil on Aged Pancreas after Life-Long Coenzyme Q Addition

    PubMed Central

    González-Alonso, Adrián; Ramírez-Tortosa, César L.; Varela-López, Alfonso; Roche, Enrique; Arribas, María I.; Ramírez-Tortosa, M. Carmen; Giampieri, Francesca; Ochoa, Julio J.; Quiles, José L.

    2015-01-01

    An adequate pancreatic structure is necessary for optimal organ function. Structural changes are critical in the development of age-related pancreatic disorders. In this context, it has been reported that different pancreatic compartments from rats were affected according to the fat composition consumed. Since there is a close relationship between mitochondria, oxidative stress and aging, an experimental approach has been developed to gain more insight into this process in the pancreas. A low dosage of coenzyme Q was administered life-long in rats in order to try to prevent pancreatic aging-related alterations associated to some dietary fat sources. According to that, three groups of rats were fed normocaloric diets containing Coenzyme Q (CoQ) for two years, where virgin olive, sunflower, or fish oil was included as unique fat source. Pancreatic samples for microscopy and blood samples were collected at the moment of euthanasia. The main finding is that CoQ supplementation gives different results according to fat used in diet. When sunflower oil was the main fat in the diet, CoQ supplementation seems to improve endocrine pancreas structure and in particular β-cell mass resembling positive effects of virgin olive oil. Conversely, CoQ intake does not seem to improve the structural alterations of exocrine compartment previously observed in fish oil fed rats. Therefore CoQ may improve pancreatic alterations associated to the chronic intake of some dietary fat sources. PMID:26426013

  16. Elucidation of the biosynthesis of the methane catalyst coenzyme F430

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Simon J.; Sowa, Sven T.; Schuchardt, Christopher; Deery, Evelyne; Lawrence, Andrew D.; Ramos, José Vazquez; Billig, Susan; Birkemeyer, Claudia; Chivers, Peter T.; Howard, Mark J.; Rigby, Stephen E. J.; Layer, Gunhild; Warren, Martin J.

    2017-01-01

    Summary Methane biogenesis in methanogens is mediated by methyl-coenzyme M reductase, an enzyme that is also responsible for the utilisation of methane through anaerobic methane oxidation. The enzyme employs an ancillary factor called coenzyme F430, a nickel-containing modified tetrapyrrole that promotes catalysis through a novel methyl radical/Ni(II)-thiolate intermediate. However, the biosynthesis of coenzyme F430 from the common primogenitor uroporphyrinoge III, incorporating 11 steric centres into the macrocycle, has remained poorly understood although the pathway must involve chelation, amidation, macrocyclic ring reduction, lactamisation and carbocyclic ring formation. We have now identified the proteins that catalyse coenzyme F430 biosynthesis from sirohydrochlorin, termed CfbA-E, and shown their activity. The research completes our understanding of how nature is able to construct its repertoire of tetrapyrrole-based life pigments, permitting the development of recombinant systems to utilise these metalloprosthetic groups more widely. PMID:28225763

  17. Dietary Supplements

    MedlinePlus

    Dietary supplements are vitamins, minerals, herbs, and many other products. They can come as pills, capsules, powders, drinks, ... possible Tell your health care provider about any dietary supplements you use Do not take a bigger dose ...

  18. Vitamin B supplementation for diabetic peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Jayabalan, Bhavani; Low, Lian Leng

    2016-02-01

    Vitamin B12 deficiency has been associated with significant neurological pathology, especially peripheral neuropathy. This review aims to examine the existing evidence on the effectiveness of vitamin B12 supplementation for the treatment of diabetic peripheral neuropathy. A search of PubMed and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials for all relevant randomised controlled trials was conducted in December 2014. Any type of therapy using vitamin B12 or its coenzyme forms was assessed for efficacy and safety in diabetics with peripheral neuropathy. Changes in vibration perception thresholds, neuropathic symptoms and nerve conduction velocities, as well as the adverse effects of vitamin B12 therapy, were assessed. Four studies comprising 363 patients met the inclusion criteria. This review found no evidence that the use of oral vitamin B12 supplements is associated with improvement in the clinical symptoms of diabetic neuropathy. Furthermore, the majority of studies reported no improvement in the electrophysiological markers of nerve conduction. Copyright © Singapore Medical Association.

  19. Vitamin B supplementation for diabetic peripheral neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Jayabalan, Bhavani; Low, Lian Leng

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin B12 deficiency has been associated with significant neurological pathology, especially peripheral neuropathy. This review aims to examine the existing evidence on the effectiveness of vitamin B12 supplementation for the treatment of diabetic peripheral neuropathy. A search of PubMed and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials for all relevant randomised controlled trials was conducted in December 2014. Any type of therapy using vitamin B12 or its coenzyme forms was assessed for efficacy and safety in diabetics with peripheral neuropathy. Changes in vibration perception thresholds, neuropathic symptoms and nerve conduction velocities, as well as the adverse effects of vitamin B12 therapy, were assessed. Four studies comprising 363 patients met the inclusion criteria. This review found no evidence that the use of oral vitamin B12 supplements is associated with improvement in the clinical symptoms of diabetic neuropathy. Furthermore, the majority of studies reported no improvement in the electrophysiological markers of nerve conduction. PMID:26892473

  20. MeaA, a Putative Coenzyme B12-Dependent Mutase, Provides Methylmalonyl Coenzyme A for Monensin Biosynthesis in Streptomyces cinnamonensis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Weiwen; Reynolds, Kevin A.

    2001-01-01

    The ratio of the major monensin analogs produced by Streptomyces cinnamonensis is dependent upon the relative levels of the biosynthetic precursors methylmalonyl-coenzyme A (CoA) (monensin A and monensin B) and ethylmalonyl-CoA (monensin A). The meaA gene of this organism was cloned and sequenced and was shown to encode a putative 74-kDa protein with significant amino acid sequence identity to methylmalonyl-CoA mutase (MCM) (40%) and isobutyryl-CoA mutase (ICM) large subunit (36%) and small subunit (52%) from the same organism. The predicted C terminus of MeaA contains structural features highly conserved in all coenzyme B12-dependent mutases. Plasmid-based expression of meaA from the ermE∗ promoter in the S. cinnamonensis C730.1 strain resulted in a decreased ratio of monensin A to monensin B, from 1:1 to 1:3. Conversely, this ratio increased to 4:1 in a meaA mutant, S. cinnamonensis WM2 (generated from the C730.1 strain by insertional inactivation of meaA by using the erythromycin resistance gene). In both of these experiments, the overall monensin titers were not significantly affected. Monensin titers, however, did decrease over 90% in an S. cinnamonensis WD2 strain (an icm meaA mutant). Monensin titers in the WD2 strain were restored to at least wild-type levels by plasmid-based expression of the meaA gene or the Amycolatopsis mediterranei mutAB genes (encoding MCM). In contrast, growth of the WD2 strain in the presence of 0.8 M valine led only to a partial restoration (<25%) of monensin titers. These results demonstrate that the meaA gene product is significantly involved in methylmalonyl-CoA production in S. cinnamonensis and that under the tested conditions the presence of both MeaA and ICM is crucial for monensin production in the WD2 strain. These results also indicate that valine degradation, implicated in providing methylmalonyl-CoA precursors for many polyketide biosynthetic processes, does not do so to a significant degree for monensin biosynthesis

  1. Role of mitochondrial electron transport complex I in coenzyme Q1 reduction by intact pulmonary arterial endothelial cells and the effect of hyperoxia.

    PubMed

    Merker, Marilyn P; Audi, Said H; Lindemer, Brian J; Krenz, Gary S; Bongard, Robert D

    2007-09-01

    The objective was to determine the impact of intact normoxic and hyperoxia-exposed (95% O(2) for 48 h) bovine pulmonary arterial endothelial cells in culture on the redox status of the coenzyme Q(10) homolog coenzyme Q(1) (CoQ(1)). When CoQ(1) (50 microM) was incubated with the cells for 30 min, its concentration in the medium decreased over time, reaching a lower level for normoxic than hyperoxia-exposed cells. The decreases in CoQ(1) concentration were associated with generation of CoQ(1) hydroquinone (CoQ(1)H(2)), wherein 3.4 times more CoQ(1)H(2) was produced in the normoxic than hyperoxia-exposed cell medium (8.2 +/- 0.3 and 2.4 +/- 0.4 microM, means +/- SE, respectively) after 30 min. The maximum CoQ(1) reduction rate for the hyperoxia-exposed cells, measured using the cell membrane-impermeant redox indicator potassium ferricyanide, was about one-half that of normoxic cells (11.4 and 24.1 nmol x min(-1) x mg(-1) cell protein, respectively). The mitochondrial electron transport complex I inhibitor rotenone decreased the CoQ(1) reduction rate by 85% in the normoxic cells and 44% in the hyperoxia-exposed cells. There was little or no inhibitory effect of NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) inhibitors on CoQ(1) reduction. Intact cell oxygen consumption rates and complex I activities in mitochondria-enriched fractions were also lower for hyperoxia-exposed than normoxic cells. The implication is that intact pulmonary endothelial cells influence the redox status of CoQ(1) via complex I-mediated reduction to CoQ(1)H(2), which appears in the extracellular medium, and that the hyperoxic exposure decreases the overall CoQ(1) reduction capacity via a depression in complex I activity.

  2. Synthesis of fruity ethyl esters by acyl coenzyme A: alcohol acyltransferase and reverse esterase activities in Oenococcus oeni and Lactobacillus plantarum.

    PubMed

    Costello, P J; Siebert, T E; Solomon, M R; Bartowsky, E J

    2013-03-01

    To assess the abilities of commercial wine lactic acid bacteria (LAB) to synthesize potentially flavour active fatty acid ethyl esters and determine mechanisms involved in their production. Oenococcus oeni AWRI B551 produced significant levels of ethyl hexanoate and ethyl octanoate following growth in an ethanolic test medium, and ester formation generally increased with increasing pH (4.5 > 3.5), anaerobiosis and precursor supplementation. Cell-free extracts of commercial O. oeni strains and Lactobacillus plantarum AWRI B740 were also tested for ester-synthesizing capabilities in a phosphate buffer via: (i) acyl coenzyme A: alcohol acyltransferase (AcoAAAT) activity and (ii) reverse esterase activity. For both ester-synthesizing activities, strain-dependent variation was observed, with AcoAAAT activity generally greater than reverse esterase. Reverse esterase in O. oeni AWRI B551 also esterified 1-propanol to produce propyl octanoate, and deuterated substrates ([(2)H(6)]ethanol and [(2)H(15)]octanoic acid) to produce the fully deuterated ester, [(2)H(5)]ethyl [(2)H(15)]octanoate. Wine LAB exhibit ethyl ester-synthesizing capability and possess two different ester-synthesizing activities, one of which is associated with an acyl coenzyme A: alcohol acyltransferase. This study demonstrates that wine LAB exhibit enzyme activities that can augment the ethyl ester content of wine. This knowledge will facilitate greater control over the impacts of malolactic fermentation on the fruity sensory properties and quality of wine. © 2012 Australian Wine Research Institute © 2012 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  3. Functional role of coenzyme Q in the energy coupling of NADH-CoQ oxidoreductase (Complex I): stabilization of the semiquinone state with the application of inside-positive membrane potential to proteoliposomes.

    PubMed

    Ohnishi, Tomoko; Ohnishi, S Tsuyoshi; Shinzawa-Ito, Kyoko; Yoshikawa, Shinya

    2008-01-01

    Coenzyme Q10 (which is also designated as CoQ10, ubiquinone-10, UQ10, CoQ, UQ or simply as Q) plays an important role in energy metabolism. For NADH-Q oxidoreductase (complex I), Ohnishi and Salerno proposed a hypothesis that the proton pump is operated by the redox-driven conformational change of a Q-binding protein, and that the bound form of semiquinone (SQ) serves as its gate [FEBS Letters 579 (2005) 45-55]. This was based on the following experimental results: (i) EPR signals of the fast-relaxing SQ anion (designated as QNf(.-)) are observable only in the presence of the proton electrochemical potential (DeltamuH+); (ii) iron-sulfur cluster N2 and QNf(.-) are directly spin-coupled; and (iii) their center-to-center distance was calculated as 12angstroms, but QNf(.-) is only 5angstroms deeper than N2 perpendicularly to the membrane. After the priming reduction of Q to QNf(.-), the proton pump operates only in the steps between the semiquinone anion (QNf(.-)) and fully reduced quinone (QH2). Thus, by cycling twice for one NADH molecule, the pump transports 4H+ per 2e(-). This hypothesis predicts the following phenomena: (a) Coupled with the piericidin A sensitive NADH-DBQ or Q1 reductase reaction, DeltamuH+ would be established; (b) DeltamuH+ would enhance the SQ EPR signals; and (c) the dissipation of DeltamuH+ with the addition of an uncoupler would increase the rate of NADH oxidation and decrease the SQ signals. We reconstituted bovine heart complex I, which was prepared at Yoshikawa's laboratory, into proteoliposomes. Using this system, we succeeded in demonstrating that all of these phenomena actually took place. We believe that these results strongly support our hypothesis.

  4. Dietary supplements.

    PubMed

    Maughan, Ron J; King, Doug S; Lea, Trevor

    2004-01-01

    For the athlete training hard, nutritional supplements are often seen as promoting adaptations to training, allowing more consistent and intensive training by promoting recovery between training sessions, reducing interruptions to training because of illness or injury, and enhancing competitive performance. Surveys show that the prevalence of supplement use is widespread among sportsmen and women, but the use of few of these products is supported by a sound research base and some may even be harmful to the athlete. Special sports foods, including energy bars and sports drinks, have a real role to play, and some protein supplements and meal replacements may also be useful in some circumstances. Where there is a demonstrated deficiency of an essential nutrient, an increased intake from food or from supplementation may help, but many athletes ignore the need for caution in supplement use and take supplements in doses that are not necessary or may even be harmful. Some supplements do offer the prospect of improved performance; these include creatine, caffeine, bicarbonate and, perhaps, a very few others. There is no evidence that prohormones such as androstenedione are effective in enhancing muscle mass or strength, and these prohormones may result in negative health consequences, as well as positive drug tests. Contamination of supplements that may cause an athlete to fail a doping test is widespread.

  5. A conserved START domain coenzyme Q-binding polypeptide is required for efficient Q biosynthesis, respiratory electron transport, and antioxidant function in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Allan, Christopher M; Hill, Shauna; Morvaridi, Susan; Saiki, Ryoichi; Johnson, Jarrett S; Liau, Wei-Siang; Hirano, Kathleen; Kawashima, Tadashi; Ji, Ziming; Loo, Joseph A; Shepherd, Jennifer N; Clarke, Catherine F

    2013-04-01

    Coenzyme Qn (ubiquinone or Qn) is a redox active lipid composed of a fully substituted benzoquinone ring and a polyisoprenoid tail of n isoprene units. Saccharomyces cerevisiae coq1-coq9 mutants have defects in Q biosynthesis, lack Q6, are respiratory defective, and sensitive to stress imposed by polyunsaturated fatty acids. The hallmark phenotype of the Q-less yeast coq mutants is that respiration in isolated mitochondria can be rescued by the addition of Q2, a soluble Q analog. Yeast coq10 mutants share each of these phenotypes, with the surprising exception that they continue to produce Q6. Structure determination of the Caulobacter crescentus Coq10 homolog (CC1736) revealed a steroidogenic acute regulatory protein-related lipid transfer (START) domain, a hydrophobic tunnel known to bind specific lipids in other START domain family members. Here we show that purified CC1736 binds Q2, Q3, Q10, or demethoxy-Q3 in an equimolar ratio, but fails to bind 3-farnesyl-4-hydroxybenzoic acid, a farnesylated analog of an early Q-intermediate. Over-expression of C. crescentus CC1736 or COQ8 restores respiratory electron transport and antioxidant function of Q6 in the yeast coq10 null mutant. Studies with stable isotope ring precursors of Q reveal that early Q-biosynthetic intermediates accumulate in the coq10 mutant and de novo Q-biosynthesis is less efficient than in the wild-type yeast or rescued coq10 mutant. The results suggest that the Coq10 polypeptide:Q (protein:ligand) complex may serve essential functions in facilitating de novo Q biosynthesis and in delivering newly synthesized Q to one or more complexes of the respiratory electron transport chain. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. A Conserved START Domain Coenzyme Q-binding Polypeptide is Required for Efficient Q Biosynthesis, Respiratory Electron Transport, and Antioxidant Function in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Morvaridi, Susan; Saiki, Ryoichi; Johnson, Jarrett S.; Liau, Wei-Siang; Hirano, Kathleen; Kawashima, Tadashi; Ji, Ziming; Loo, Joseph A.; Shepherd, Jennifer N.; Clarke, Catherine F.

    2014-01-01

    Coenzyme Qn (ubiquinone or Qn) is a redox active lipid composed of a fully substituted benzoquinone ring and a polyisoprenoid tail of n isoprene units. Saccharomyces cerevisiae coq1-coq9 mutants have defects in Q biosynthesis, lack Q6, are respiratory defective, and sensitive to stress imposed by polyunsaturated fatty acids. The hallmark phenotype of the Q-less yeast coq mutants is that respiration in isolated mitochondria can be rescued by the addition of Q2, a soluble Q analog. Yeast coq10 mutants share each of these phenotypes, with the surprising exception that they continue to produce Q6. Structure determination of the Caulobacter crescentus Coq10 homolog (CC1736) revealed a steroidogenic acute regulatory protein-related lipid transfer (START) domain, a hydrophobic tunnel known to bind specific lipids in other START domain family members. Here we show that purified CC1736 binds Q2, Q3, Q10, or demethoxy-Q3 in an equimolar ratio, but fails to bind 3-farnesyl-4-hydroxybenzoic acid, a farnesylated analog of an early Q-intermediate. Over-expression of C. crescentus CC1736 or COQ8 restores respiratory electron transport and antioxidant function of Q6 in the yeast coq10 null mutant. Studies with stable isotope ring precursors of Q reveal that early Q-biosynthetic intermediates accumulate in the coq10 mutant and de novo Q-biosynthesis is less efficient than in the wild-type yeast or rescued coq10 mutant. The results suggest that the Coq10 polypeptide:Q (protein:ligand) complex may serve essential functions in facilitating de novo Q biosynthesis and in delivering newly synthesized Q to one or more complexes of the respiratory electron transport chain. PMID:23270816

  7. Effects of various vitamins and coenzymes Q on reactions involving alpha-hydroxyl-containing radicals.

    PubMed

    Shadyro, Oleg I; Sosnovskaya, Anna A; Edimecheva, Irina P; Grintsevich, Ivan B; Lagutin, Petr Yu; Alekseev, Aleksei V; Kazem, Kamel

    2005-07-01

    Effects of vitamins B, C, E, K and P, as well as coenzymes Q, on formation of final products of radiation-induced free-radical transformations of ethanol, ethylene glycol, alpha-methylglycoside and glucose in aqueous solutions were studied. Based on the obtained results, it can be concluded that there are substances among vitamins and coenzymes that effectively interact with alpha-hydroxyl-containing radicals. In the presence of these substances, recombination reactions of alpha-hydroxyalkyl radicals and fragmentation of alpha-hydroxy-beta-substituted organic radicals are suppressed. It has been established that the observed effects are due to the ability of the vitamins and coenzymes under study to either oxidize alpha-hydroxyl-containing radicals yielding the respective carbonyl compounds or reduce them into the initial molecules.

  8. Stable isotope labeling by essential nutrients in cell culture for preparation of labeled coenzyme A and its thioesters.

    PubMed

    Basu, Sankha S; Mesaros, Clementina; Gelhaus, Stacy L; Blair, Ian A

    2011-02-15

    Stable isotope dilution mass spectrometry (MS) represents the gold standard for quantification of endogenously formed cellular metabolites. Although coenzyme A (CoA) and acyl-CoA thioester derivatives are central players in numerous metabolic pathways, the lack of a commercially available isotopically labeled CoA limits the development of rigorous MS-based methods. In this study, we adapted stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) methodology to biosynthetically generate stable isotope labeled CoA and thioester analogues for use as internal standards in liquid chromatography/multiple reaction monitoring mass spectrometry (LC/MRM-MS) assays. This was accomplished by incubating murine hepatocytes (Hepa 1c1c7) in media in which pantothenate (a precursor of CoA) was replaced with [(13)C(3)(15)N(1)]-pantothenate. Efficient incorporation into various CoA species was optimized to >99% [(13)C(3)(15)N(1)]-pantothenate after three passages of the murine cells in culture. Charcoal-dextran-stripped fetal bovine serum (FBS) was found to be more efficient for serum supplementation than dialyzed or undialyzed FBS, due to lower contaminating unlabeled pantothenate content. Stable isotope labeled CoA species were extracted and utilized as internal standards for CoA thioester analysis in cell culture models. This methodology of stable isotope labeling by essential nutrients in cell culture (SILEC) can serve as a paradigm for using vitamins and other essential nutrients to generate stable isotope standards that cannot be readily synthesized.

  9. Knockdown of the coenzyme Q synthesis gene Smed-dlp1 affects planarian regeneration and tissue homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Shiobara, Yumiko; Harada, Chiaki; Shiota, Takeshi; Sakamoto, Kimitoshi; Kita, Kiyoshi; Tanaka, Saeko; Tabata, Kenta; Sekie, Kiyoteru; Yamamoto, Yorihiro; Sugiyama, Tomoyasu

    2015-01-01

    The freshwater planarian is a model organism used to study tissue regeneration that occupies an important position among multicellular organisms. Planarian genomic databases have led to the identification of genes that are required for regeneration, with implications for their roles in its underlying mechanism. Coenzyme Q (CoQ) is a fundamental lipophilic molecule that is synthesized and expressed in every cell of every organism. Furthermore, CoQ levels affect development, life span, disease and aging in nematodes and mice. Because CoQ can be ingested in food, it has been used in preventive nutrition. In this study, we investigated the role of CoQ in planarian regeneration. Planarians synthesize both CoQ9 and rhodoquinone 9 (RQ9). Knockdown of Smed-dlp1, a trans-prenyltransferase gene that encodes an enzyme that synthesizes the CoQ side chain, led to a decrease in CoQ9 and RQ9 levels. However, ATP levels did not consistently decrease in these animals. Knockdown animals exhibited tissue regression and curling. The number of mitotic cells decreased in Smed-dlp1 (RNAi) animals. These results suggested a failure in physiological cell turnover and stem cell function. Accordingly, regenerating planarians died from lysis or exhibited delayed regeneration. Interestingly, the observed phenotypes were partially rescued by ingesting food supplemented with α-tocopherol. Taken together, our results suggest that oxidative stress induced by reduced CoQ9 levels affects planarian regeneration and tissue homeostasis. PMID:26516985

  10. Modeling the reactions catalyzed by coenzyme B12-dependent enzymes.

    PubMed

    Sandala, Gregory M; Smith, David M; Radom, Leo

    2010-05-18

    Enzymes accelerate chemical reactions with an exceptional selectivity that makes life itself possible. Understanding the factors responsible for this efficient catalysis is of utmost importance in our quest to harness the tremendous power of enzymes. Computational chemistry has emerged as an important adjunct to experimental chemistry and biochemistry in this regard, because it provides detailed insights into the relationship between structure and function in a systematic and straightforward manner. In this Account, we highlight our recent high-level theoretical investigations toward this end in studying the radical-based reactions catalyzed by enzymes dependent on coenzyme B(12) (or adenosylcobalamin, AdoCbl). In addition to their fundamental position in biology, the AdoCbl-dependent enzymes represent a valuable framework within which to understand Nature's method of efficiently handling high-energy species to execute very specific reactions. The AdoCbl-mediated reactions are characterized by the interchange of a hydrogen atom and a functional group on adjacent carbon atoms. Our calculations are consistent with the conclusion that the main role of AdoCbl is to provide a source of radicals, thus moving the 1,2-rearrangements onto the radical potential energy surface. Our studies also show that the radical rearrangement step is facilitated by partial proton transfer involving the substrate. Specifically, we observe that the energy requirements for radical rearrangement are reduced dramatically with appropriate partial protonation or partial deprotonation or sometimes (synergistically) both. Such interactions are particularly relevant to enzyme catalysis, because it is likely that the local amino acid environment in the active site of an enzyme can function in this capacity through hydrogen bonding. Finally, our calculations indicate that the intervention of a very stable radical along the reaction pathway may inactivate the enzyme, demonstrating that sustained

  11. Estimation of methanogen biomass via quantitation of coenzyme M

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elias, Dwayne A.; Krumholz, Lee R.; Tanner, Ralph S.; Suflita, Joseph M.

    1999-01-01

    Determination of the role of methanogenic bacteria in an anaerobic ecosystem often requires quantitation of the organisms. Because of the extreme oxygen sensitivity of these organisms and the inherent limitations of cultural techniques, an accurate biomass value is very difficult to obtain. We standardized a simple method for estimating methanogen biomass in a variety of environmental matrices. In this procedure we used the thiol biomarker coenzyme M (CoM) (2-mercaptoethanesulfonic acid), which is known to be present in all methanogenic bacteria. A high-performance liquid chromatography-based method for detecting thiols in pore water (A. Vairavamurthy and M. Mopper, Anal. Chim. Acta 78:363–370, 1990) was modified in order to quantify CoM in pure cultures, sediments, and sewage water samples. The identity of the CoM derivative was verified by using liquid chromatography-mass spectroscopy. The assay was linear for CoM amounts ranging from 2 to 2,000 pmol, and the detection limit was 2 pmol of CoM/ml of sample. CoM was not adsorbed to sediments. The methanogens tested contained an average of 19.5 nmol of CoM/mg of protein and 0.39 ± 0.07 fmol of CoM/cell. Environmental samples contained an average of 0.41 ± 0.17 fmol/cell based on most-probable-number estimates. CoM was extracted by using 1% tri-(N)-butylphosphine in isopropanol. More than 90% of the CoM was recovered from pure cultures and environmental samples. We observed no interference from sediments in the CoM recovery process, and the method could be completed aerobically within 3 h. Freezing sediment samples resulted in 46 to 83% decreases in the amounts of detectable CoM, whereas freezing had no effect on the amounts of CoM determined in pure cultures. The method described here provides a quick and relatively simple way to estimate methanogenic biomass.

  12. Heterologous Expression of Bacterial Epoxyalkane:Coenzyme M Transferase and Inducible Coenzyme M Biosynthesis in Xanthobacter Strain Py2 and Rhodococcus rhodochrous B276

    PubMed Central

    Krum, Jonathan G.; Ensign, Scott A.

    2000-01-01

    Coenzyme M (CoM) (2-mercaptoethanesulfonic acid) biosynthesis is shown to be coordinately regulated with the expression of the enzymes of alkene and epoxide metabolism in the propylene-oxidizing bacteria Xanthobacter strain Py2 and Rhodococcus rhodochrous strain B276. These results provide the first evidence for the involvement of CoM in propylene metabolism by R. rhodochrous and demonstrate for the first time the inducible nature of eubacterial CoM biosynthesis. PMID:10762269

  13. Sports Supplements

    MedlinePlus

    ... supplements. Instead, try these tips for getting better game: Make downtime a priority. Studies show that teens ... Meditating or visualizing your success during the next game may improve your performance; sitting quietly and focusing ...

  14. Engineering acetyl coenzyme A supply: functional expression of a bacterial pyruvate dehydrogenase complex in the cytosol of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Kozak, Barbara U; van Rossum, Harmen M; Luttik, Marijke A H; Akeroyd, Michiel; Benjamin, Kirsten R; Wu, Liang; de Vries, Simon; Daran, Jean-Marc; Pronk, Jack T; van Maris, Antonius J A

    2014-10-21

    The energetic (ATP) cost of biochemical pathways critically determines the maximum yield of metabolites of vital or commercial relevance. Cytosolic acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) is a key precursor for biosynthesis in eukaryotes and for many industrially relevant product pathways that have been introduced into Saccharomyces cerevisiae, such as isoprenoids or lipids. In this yeast, synthesis of cytosolic acetyl-CoA via acetyl-CoA synthetase (ACS) involves hydrolysis of ATP to AMP and pyrophosphate. Here, we demonstrate that expression and assembly in the yeast cytosol of an ATP-independent pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDH) from Enterococcus faecalis can fully replace the ACS-dependent pathway for cytosolic acetyl-CoA synthesis. In vivo activity of E. faecalis PDH required simultaneous expression of E. faecalis genes encoding its E1α, E1β, E2, and E3 subunits, as well as genes involved in lipoylation of E2, and addition of lipoate to growth media. A strain lacking ACS that expressed these E. faecalis genes grew at near-wild-type rates on glucose synthetic medium supplemented with lipoate, under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. A physiological comparison of the engineered strain and an isogenic Acs(+) reference strain showed small differences in biomass yields and metabolic fluxes. Cellular fractionation and gel filtration studies revealed that the E. faecalis PDH subunits were assembled in the yeast cytosol, with a subunit ratio and enzyme activity similar to values reported for PDH purified from E. faecalis. This study indicates that cytosolic expression and assembly of PDH in eukaryotic industrial microorganisms is a promising option for minimizing the energy costs of precursor supply in acetyl-CoA-dependent product pathways. Importance: Genetically engineered microorganisms are intensively investigated and applied for production of biofuels and chemicals from renewable sugars. To make such processes economically and environmentally sustainable, the energy

  15. Effect of Antioxidants Supplementation on Aging and Longevity

    PubMed Central

    Bartosz, Grzegorz

    2014-01-01

    If aging is due to or contributed by free radical reactions, as postulated by the free radical theory of aging, lifespan of organisms should be extended by administration of exogenous antioxidants. This paper reviews data on model organisms concerning the effects of exogenous antioxidants (antioxidant vitamins, lipoic acid, coenzyme Q, melatonin, resveratrol, curcumin, other polyphenols, and synthetic antioxidants including antioxidant nanoparticles) on the lifespan of model organisms. Mechanisms of effects of antioxidants, often due to indirect antioxidant action or to action not related to the antioxidant properties of the compounds administered, are discussed. The legitimacy of antioxidant supplementation in human is considered. PMID:24783202

  16. A possible prebiotic synthesis of pantetheine, a precursor to coenzyme A.

    PubMed

    Keefe, A D; Newton, G L; Miller, S L

    1995-02-23

    The involvement of coenzyme A in many enzyme reactions suggests that it acted in this capacity very early in the development of life on Earth. Particularly relevant in this regard is its role in the activation of amino acids and hydroxy acids in the biosynthesis of some peptide antibiotics--a mechanism of peptide synthesis that forms the basis for the proposal that a thioester world could have preceded the RNA world. The components of coenzyme A have been shown to be probable prebiotic compounds: beta-alanine, pantoyl lactone and cysteamine and possibly adenosine. We show here that the pantetheine moiety of coenzyme A (which also occurs in a number of enzymes) can be synthesized in yields of several per cent by heating pantoyl lactone, beta-alanine and cysteamine at temperatures as low as 40 degrees C. These components are extremely soluble and so would have been preferentially concentrated in evaporating bodies of water, for example on beaches and at lagoon margins. Our results show that amide bonds can be formed at temperatures as low as 40 degrees C, and provide circumstantial support for the suggestion that pantetheine and coenzyme A were important in the earliest metabolic systems.

  17. A possible prebiotic synthesis of pantetheine, a precursor to coenzyme A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keefe, A. D.; Newton, G. L.; Miller, S. L.

    1995-01-01

    The involvement of coenzyme A in many enzyme reactions suggests that it acted in this capacity very early in the development of life on Earth. Particularly relevant in this regard is its role in the activation of amino acids and hydroxy acids in the biosynthesis of some peptide antibiotics--a mechanism of peptide synthesis that forms the basis for the proposal that a thioester world could have preceded the RNA world. The components of coenzyme A have been shown to be probable prebiotic compounds: beta-alanine, pantoyl lactone and cysteamine and possibly adenosine. We show here that the pantetheine moiety of coenzyme A (which also occurs in a number of enzymes) can be synthesized in yields of several per cent by heating pantoyl lactone, beta-alanine and cysteamine at temperatures as low as 40 degrees C. These components are extremely soluble and so would have been preferentially concentrated in evaporating bodies of water, for example on beaches and at lagoon margins. Our results show that amide bonds can be formed at temperatures as low as 40 degrees C, and provide circumstantial support for the suggestion that pantetheine and coenzyme A were important in the earliest metabolic systems.

  18. Knockdown of the coenzyme Q synthesis gene Smed-dlp1 affects planarian regeneration and tissue homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Shiobara, Yumiko; Harada, Chiaki; Shiota, Takeshi; Sakamoto, Kimitoshi; Kita, Kiyoshi; Tanaka, Saeko; Tabata, Kenta; Sekie, Kiyoteru; Yamamoto, Yorihiro; Sugiyama, Tomoyasu

    2015-12-01

    The freshwater planarian is a model organism used to study tissue regeneration that occupies an important position among multicellular organisms. Planarian genomic databases have led to the identification of genes that are required for regeneration, with implications for their roles in its underlying mechanism. Coenzyme Q (CoQ) is a fundamental lipophilic molecule that is synthesized and expressed in every cell of every organism. Furthermore, CoQ levels affect development, life span, disease and aging in nematodes and mice. Because CoQ can be ingested in food, it has been used in preventive nutrition. In this study, we investigated the role of CoQ in planarian regeneration. Planarians synthesize both CoQ9 and rhodoquinone 9 (RQ9). Knockdown of Smed-dlp1, a trans-prenyltransferase gene that encodes an enzyme that synthesizes the CoQ side chain, led to a decrease in CoQ9 and RQ9 levels. However, ATP levels did not consistently decrease in these animals. Knockdown animals exhibited tissue regression and curling. The number of mitotic cells decreased in Smed-dlp1 (RNAi) animals. These results suggested a failure in physiological cell turnover and stem cell function. Accordingly, regenerating planarians died from lysis or exhibited delayed regeneration. Interestingly, the observed phenotypes were partially rescued by ingesting food supplemented with α-tocopherol. Taken together, our results suggest that oxidative stress induced by reduced CoQ9 levels affects planarian regeneration and tissue homeostasis. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Engineering Acetyl Coenzyme A Supply: Functional Expression of a Bacterial Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex in the Cytosol of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Kozak, Barbara U.; van Rossum, Harmen M.; Luttik, Marijke A. H.; Akeroyd, Michiel; Benjamin, Kirsten R.; Wu, Liang; de Vries, Simon; Daran, Jean-Marc; Pronk, Jack T.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The energetic (ATP) cost of biochemical pathways critically determines the maximum yield of metabolites of vital or commercial relevance. Cytosolic acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) is a key precursor for biosynthesis in eukaryotes and for many industrially relevant product pathways that have been introduced into Saccharomyces cerevisiae, such as isoprenoids or lipids. In this yeast, synthesis of cytosolic acetyl-CoA via acetyl-CoA synthetase (ACS) involves hydrolysis of ATP to AMP and pyrophosphate. Here, we demonstrate that expression and assembly in the yeast cytosol of an ATP-independent pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDH) from Enterococcus faecalis can fully replace the ACS-dependent pathway for cytosolic acetyl-CoA synthesis. In vivo activity of E. faecalis PDH required simultaneous expression of E. faecalis genes encoding its E1α, E1β, E2, and E3 subunits, as well as genes involved in lipoylation of E2, and addition of lipoate to growth media. A strain lacking ACS that expressed these E. faecalis genes grew at near-wild-type rates on glucose synthetic medium supplemented with lipoate, under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. A physiological comparison of the engineered strain and an isogenic Acs+ reference strain showed small differences in biomass yields and metabolic fluxes. Cellular fractionation and gel filtration studies revealed that the E. faecalis PDH subunits were assembled in the yeast cytosol, with a subunit ratio and enzyme activity similar to values reported for PDH purified from E. faecalis. This study indicates that cytosolic expression and assembly of PDH in eukaryotic industrial microorganisms is a promising option for minimizing the energy costs of precursor supply in acetyl-CoA-dependent product pathways. PMID:25336454

  20. Coenzyme engineering of a hyperthermophilic 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase from NADP + to NAD + with its application to biobatteries

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Hui; Zhu, Zhiguang; Huang, Rui

    Engineering the coenzyme specificity of redox enzymes plays an important role in metabolic engineering, synthetic biology, and biocatalysis, but it has rarely been applied to bioelectrochemistry. Here we develop a rational design strategy to change the coenzyme specificity of 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6PGDH) from a hyperthermophilic bacterium Thermotoga maritima from its natural coenzyme NADP + to NAD +. Through amino acid-sequence alignment of NADP +- and NAD +-preferred 6PGDH enzymes and computer-aided substrate-coenzyme docking, the key amino acid residues responsible for binding the phosphate group of NADP + were identified. Four mutants were obtained via site-directed mutagenesis. The best mutant N32E/R33I/T34Imore » exhibited a ~6.4 × 10 4-fold reversal of the coenzyme selectivity from NADP + to NAD +. The maximum power density and current density of the biobattery catalyzed by the mutant were 0.135 mW cm -2 and 0.255 mA cm -2, ~25% higher than those obtained from the wide-type 6PGDH-based biobattery at the room temperature. By using this 6PGDH mutant, the optimal temperature of running the biobattery was as high as 65 °C, leading to a high power density of 1.75 mW cm -2. As a result, this study demonstrates coenzyme engineering of a hyperthermophilic 6PGDH and its application to high-temperature biobatteries.« less

  1. Coenzyme engineering of a hyperthermophilic 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase from NADP + to NAD + with its application to biobatteries

    DOE PAGES

    Chen, Hui; Zhu, Zhiguang; Huang, Rui; ...

    2016-11-02

    Engineering the coenzyme specificity of redox enzymes plays an important role in metabolic engineering, synthetic biology, and biocatalysis, but it has rarely been applied to bioelectrochemistry. Here we develop a rational design strategy to change the coenzyme specificity of 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6PGDH) from a hyperthermophilic bacterium Thermotoga maritima from its natural coenzyme NADP + to NAD +. Through amino acid-sequence alignment of NADP +- and NAD +-preferred 6PGDH enzymes and computer-aided substrate-coenzyme docking, the key amino acid residues responsible for binding the phosphate group of NADP + were identified. Four mutants were obtained via site-directed mutagenesis. The best mutant N32E/R33I/T34Imore » exhibited a ~6.4 × 10 4-fold reversal of the coenzyme selectivity from NADP + to NAD +. The maximum power density and current density of the biobattery catalyzed by the mutant were 0.135 mW cm -2 and 0.255 mA cm -2, ~25% higher than those obtained from the wide-type 6PGDH-based biobattery at the room temperature. By using this 6PGDH mutant, the optimal temperature of running the biobattery was as high as 65 °C, leading to a high power density of 1.75 mW cm -2. As a result, this study demonstrates coenzyme engineering of a hyperthermophilic 6PGDH and its application to high-temperature biobatteries.« less

  2. Coenzyme Engineering of a Hyperthermophilic 6-Phosphogluconate Dehydrogenase from NADP+ to NAD+ with Its Application to Biobatteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hui; Zhu, Zhiguang; Huang, Rui; Zhang, Yi-Heng Percival

    2016-11-01

    Engineering the coenzyme specificity of redox enzymes plays an important role in metabolic engineering, synthetic biology, and biocatalysis, but it has rarely been applied to bioelectrochemistry. Here we develop a rational design strategy to change the coenzyme specificity of 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6PGDH) from a hyperthermophilic bacterium Thermotoga maritima from its natural coenzyme NADP+ to NAD+. Through amino acid-sequence alignment of NADP+- and NAD+-preferred 6PGDH enzymes and computer-aided substrate-coenzyme docking, the key amino acid residues responsible for binding the phosphate group of NADP+ were identified. Four mutants were obtained via site-directed mutagenesis. The best mutant N32E/R33I/T34I exhibited a ~6.4 × 104-fold reversal of the coenzyme selectivity from NADP+ to NAD+. The maximum power density and current density of the biobattery catalyzed by the mutant were 0.135 mW cm-2 and 0.255 mA cm-2, ~25% higher than those obtained from the wide-type 6PGDH-based biobattery at the room temperature. By using this 6PGDH mutant, the optimal temperature of running the biobattery was as high as 65 °C, leading to a high power density of 1.75 mW cm-2. This study demonstrates coenzyme engineering of a hyperthermophilic 6PGDH and its application to high-temperature biobatteries.

  3. Donor-Acceptor Distance Sampling Enhances the Performance of "Better than Nature" Nicotinamide Coenzyme Biomimetics.

    PubMed

    Geddes, Alexander; Paul, Caroline E; Hay, Sam; Hollmann, Frank; Scrutton, Nigel S

    2016-09-07

    Understanding the mechanisms of enzymatic hydride transfer with nicotinamide coenzyme biomimetics (NCBs) is critical to enhancing the performance of nicotinamide coenzyme-dependent biocatalysts. Here the temperature dependence of kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) for hydride transfer between "better than nature" NCBs and several ene reductase biocatalysts is used to indicate transfer by quantum mechanical tunneling. A strong correlation between rate constants and temperature dependence of the KIE (ΔΔH(⧧)) for H/D transfer implies that faster reactions with NCBs are associated with enhanced donor-acceptor distance sampling. Our analysis provides the first mechanistic insight into how NCBs can outperform their natural counterparts and emphasizes the need to optimize donor-acceptor distance sampling to obtain high catalytic performance from H-transfer enzymes.

  4. Enzymic Dehalogenation of 4-Chlorobenzoyl Coenzyme A in Acinetobacter sp. Strain 4-CB1

    PubMed Central

    Copley, Shelley D.; Crooks, Gwen P.

    1992-01-01

    4-Chlorobenzoate degradation in cell extracts of Acinetobacter sp. strain 4-CB1 occurs by initial synthesis of 4-chlorobenzoyl coenzyme A (4-chlorobenzoyl CoA) from 4-chlorobenzoate, CoA, and ATP. 4-Chlorobenzoyl CoA is dehalogenated to 4-hydroxybenzoyl CoA. Following the dehalogenation reaction, 4-hydroxybenzoyl CoA is hydrolyzed to 4-hydroxybenzoate and CoA. Possible roles for the CoA moiety in the dehalogenation reaction are discussed. PMID:16348702

  5. Metal plasmon-coupled fluorescence imaging and label free coenzyme detection in cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jian, E-mail: jian@cfs.bioment.umaryland.edu; Fu, Yi; Li, Ge

    2012-08-31

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Metal nanoparticle for fluorescence cell imaging. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Non-invasive emission detection of coenzyme in cell on time-resolved confocal microscope. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Near-field interaction of flavin adenine dinucleotide with silver substrate. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Isolation of emissions by coenzymes from cellular autofluorescence on fluorescence cell imaging. -- Abstract: Flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) is a key metabolite in cellular energy conversion. Flavin can also bind with some enzymes in the metabolic pathway and the binding sites may be changed due to the disease progression. Thus, there is interest on studying its expression level, distribution, and redox state within the cells. FAD is naturally fluorescent,more » but it has a modest extinction coefficient and quantum yield. Hence the intrinsic emission from FAD is generally too weak to be isolated distinctly from the cellular backgrounds in fluorescence cell imaging. In this article, the metal nanostructures on the glass coverslips were used as substrates to measure FAD in cells. Particulate silver films were fabricated with an optical resonance near the absorption and the emission wavelengths of FAD which can lead to efficient coupling interactions. As a result, the emission intensity and quantum yield by FAD were greatly increased and the lifetime was dramatically shortened resulting in less interference from the longer lived cellular background. This feature may overcome the technical limits that hinder the direct observation of intrinsically fluorescent coenzymes in the cells by fluorescence microscopy. Fluorescence cell imaging on the metallic particle substrates may provide a non-invasive strategy for collecting the information of coenzymes in cells.« less

  6. Mechanism of α-Glycerophosphate Regulation of Acetyl-Coenzyme A Carboxylase of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Rasmussen, Roberta K.; Klein, Harold P.

    1968-01-01

    The mechanism proposed for the activation of animal acetyl-coenzyme A (CoA) carboxylase by α-glycerophosphate, namely, the removal of inhibitory palmityl-CoA via glyceride synthesis, is not the only possible one in the yeast system because extracts exhibiting marked stimulation of acetyl-CoA carboxylase activity by α-glyerophosphate show a lack of acyl-CoA compounds. PMID:5643049

  7. 76 FR 36936 - Notice of Receipt of Complaint; Solicitation of Comments Relating to the Public Interest

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-23

    ... Certain Coenzyme Q10 Products and Methods of Making Same, DN 2822; the Commission is soliciting comments... importation of certain coenzyme Q10 products and method of making same. The complaint names as respondents...

  8. Missense mutation of the COQ2 gene causes defects of bioenergetics and de novo pyrimidine synthesis.

    PubMed

    López-Martín, José M; Salviati, Leonardo; Trevisson, Eva; Montini, Giovanni; DiMauro, Salvatore; Quinzii, Catarina; Hirano, Michio; Rodriguez-Hernandez, Angeles; Cordero, Mario D; Sánchez-Alcázar, José A; Santos-Ocaña, Carlos; Navas, Plácido

    2007-05-01

    Coenzyme Q(10) (CoQ(10)) deficiency has been associated with an increasing number of clinical phenotypes that respond to CoQ(10) supplementation. In two siblings with encephalomyopathy, nephropathy and severe CoQ(10) deficiency, a homozygous mutation was identified in the CoQ(10) biosynthesis gene COQ2, encoding polyprenyl-pHB transferase. To confirm the pathogenicity of this mutation, we have demonstrated that human wild-type, but not mutant COQ2, functionally complements COQ2 defective yeast. In addition, an equivalent mutation introduced in the yeast COQ2 gene also decreases both CoQ(6) concentration and growth in respiratory-chain dependent medium. Polyprenyl-pHB transferase activity was 33-45% of controls in COQ2 mutant fibroblasts. CoQ-dependent mitochondrial complexes activities were restored in deficient fibroblasts by CoQ(10) supplementation, and growth rate was restored in these cells by either CoQ(10) or uridine supplementation. This work is the first direct demonstration of the pathogenicity of a COQ2 mutation involved in human disease, and establishes yeast as a useful model to study human CoQ(10) deficiency. Moreover, we demonstrate that CoQ(10) deficiency in addition to the bioenergetics defect also impairs de novo pyrimidine synthesis, which may contribute to the pathogenesis of the disease.

  9. Uptake of exogenous coenzyme Q and transport to mitochondria is required for bc1 complex stability in yeast coq mutants.

    PubMed

    Santos-Ocaña, Carlos; Do, Thai Q; Padilla, Sergio; Navas, Placido; Clarke, Catherine F

    2002-03-29

    Coenzyme Q (Q) is an essential component of the mitochondrial respiratory chain in eukaryotic cells but also is present in other cellular membranes where it acts as an antioxidant. Because Q synthesis machinery in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is located in the mitochondria, the intracellular distribution of Q indicates the existence of intracellular Q transport. In this study, the uptake of exogenous Q(6) by yeast and its transport from the plasma membrane to mitochondria was assessed in both wild-type and in Q-less coq7 mutants derived from four distinct laboratory yeast strains. Q(6) supplementation of medium containing ethanol, a non-fermentable carbon source, rescued growth in only two of the four coq7 mutant strains. Following culture in medium containing dextrose, the added Q(6) was detected in the plasma membrane of each of four coq7 mutants tested. This detection of Q(6) in the plasma membrane was corroborated by measuring ascorbate stabilization activity, as catalyzed by NADH-ascorbate free radical reductase, a transmembrane redox activity that provides a functional assay of plasma membrane Q(6). These assays indicate that each of the four coq7 mutant strains assimilate exogenous Q(6) into the plasma membrane. The two coq7 mutant strains rescued by Q(6) supplementation for growth on ethanol contained mitochondrial Q(6) levels similar to wild type. However, the content of Q(6) in mitochondria from the non-rescued strains was only 35 and 8%, respectively, of that present in the corresponding wild-type parental strains. In yeast strains rescued by exogenous Q(6), succinate-cytochrome c reductase activity was partially restored, whereas non-rescued strains contained very low levels of activity. There was a strong correlation between mitochondrial Q(6) content, succinate-cytochrome c reductase activity, and steady state levels of the cytochrome c(1) polypeptide. These studies show that transport of extracellular Q(6) to the mitochondria operates in yeast but is

  10. [Regulation of the expression of coenzyme Q-synthesis complex during ageing].

    PubMed

    Campos-Silva, Carmen; Reyes-Torres, Iván; Rivera, Maximiliano; Meza-Torres, Catherine; Hernández-Camacho, Juan Diego; Rodríguez-Bies, Elisabet; Navas, Plácido; López-Lluch, Guillermo

    Coenzyme Q is an essential component in the activity of the mitochondrial electron transport chain. Its synthesis involves, at least, a complex of ten different proteins. In this study, an attempt is made to determine the evolution of the expression of the genes involved in coenzyme Q synthesis during mouse ageing. The messenger RNA (mRNA) of different organs, such as brain, liver, kidney and skeletal muscle from young (8 months), mature (18 months), and old (24 months) mice was extracted by using Trizol and was then analysed by real time PCR (qPCR) using specific primers for all the known components of the coenzyme Q-synthesis complex (COQ genes). Liver showed the highest age-dependent changes in mRNA levels of the different components of Q-synthesis complex, affecting the extent of the variation as well as the significance of the change. In most of the cases, mRNA levels of the different components were higher in mature animals compared to young and old animals. When mRNAs of young and old animals were compared, only minor reductions of mRNA levels were found. Kidney showed a pattern similar to that found in liver as regards the changes in expression, although with lower increases in mature animals than those observed in the liver. Brain and skeletal muscle showed low variations, with muscle being the tissue with less changes, although a pattern similar to that found in liver and kidney was found, with slight increases in mature animals. The results of this study indicate that ageing is an important factor affecting COQ gene expression, but its effect depends on the organ, and that mature animals show higher levels of mRNA than young and old animals. Taken into consideration the importance of coenzyme Q in cell metabolism and ageing, a more detailed study is needed to understand the gene regulation of the coenzyme Q-synthesis mechanisms during ageing. Copyright © 2017 SEGG. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Thermodynamics of various F420 coenzyme models as sources of electrons, hydride ions, hydrogen atoms and protons in acetonitrile.

    PubMed

    Xia, Ke; Shen, Guang-Bin; Zhu, Xiao-Qing

    2015-06-14

    32 F420 coenzyme models with alkylation of the three different N atoms (N1, N3 and N10) in the core structure (XFH(-)) were designed and synthesized and the thermodynamic driving forces (defined in terms of the molar enthalpy changes or the standard redox potentials in this work) of the 32 XFH(-) releasing hydride ions, hydrogen atoms and electrons, the thermodynamic driving forces of the 32 XFH˙ releasing protons and hydrogen atoms and the thermodynamic driving forces of XF(-)˙ releasing electrons in acetonitrile were determined using titration calorimetry and electrochemical methods. The effects of the methyl group at N1, N3 and N10 and a negative charge on N1 and N10 atoms on the six thermodynamic driving forces of the F420 coenzyme models and their related reaction intermediates were examined; the results show that seating arrangements of the methyl group and the negative charge have remarkably different effects on the thermodynamic properties of the F420 coenzyme models and their related reaction intermediates. The effects of the substituents at C7 and C8 on the six thermodynamic driving forces of the F420 coenzyme models and their related reaction intermediates were also examined; the results show that the substituents at C7 and C8 have good Hammett linear free energy relationships with the six thermodynamic parameters. Meanwhile, a reasonable determination of possible reactions between members of the F420 family and NADH family in vivo was given according to a thermodynamic analysis platform constructed using the elementary step thermodynamic parameter of F420 coenzyme model 2FH(-) and NADH model MNAH releasing hydride ions in acetonitrile. The information disclosed in this work can not only fill a gap in the chemical thermodynamics of F420 coenzyme models as a class of very important organic sources of electrons, hydride ions, hydrogen atoms and protons, but also strongly promote the fast development of the chemistry and applications of F420 coenzyme.

  12. Methyl-coenzyme M reductase from methanogenic archaea: isotope effects on label exchange and ethane formation with the homologous substrate ethyl-coenzyme M.

    PubMed

    Scheller, Silvan; Goenrich, Meike; Thauer, Rudolf K; Jaun, Bernhard

    2013-10-09

    Ethyl-coenzyme M (CH3CH2-S-CH2CH2-SO3(-), Et-S-CoM) serves as a homologous substrate for the enzyme methyl-coenzyme M reductase (MCR) resulting in the product ethane instead of methane. The catalytic reaction proceeds via an intermediate that already contains all six C-H bonds of the product. Because product release occurs after a second, rate-limiting step, many cycles of intermediate formation and reconversion to substrate occur before a substantial amount of ethane is released. In deuterated buffer, the intermediate becomes labeled, and C-H activation in the back reaction rapidly leads to labeled Et-S-CoM, which enables intermediate formation to be detected. Here, we present a comprehensive analysis of this pre-equilibrium. (2)H- and (13)C-labeled isotopologues of Et-S-CoM were used as the substrates, and the time course of each isotopologue was followed by NMR spectroscopy. A kinetic simulation including kinetic isotope effects allowed determination of the primary and α- and β-secondary isotope effects for intermediate formation and for the C-H/C-D bond activation in the ethane-containing intermediate. The values obtained are in accordance with those found for the native substrate Me-S-CoM (see preceding publication, Scheller, S.; Goenrich, M.; Thauer, R. K.; Jaun, B. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2013, 135, DOI: 10.1021/ja406485z) and thus imply the same catalytic mechanism for both substrates. The experiment by Floss and co-workers, demonstrating a net inversion of configuration to chiral ethane with CH3CDT-S-CoM as the substrate, is compatible with the observed rapid isotope exchange if the isotope effects measured here are taken into account.

  13. Supplements and Men's Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... Supplements and Men's Health Print Email Supplements and Men's Health Reviewed by Taylor Wolfram, MS, RDN, LDN ... an individualized nutrition plan. There are several reasons men may need supplements. They include: Bone Health: Calcium ...

  14. Using Dietary Supplements Wisely

    MedlinePlus

    ... T U V W X Y Z Using Dietary Supplements Wisely Share: On This Page Key Points About ... will help ensure coordinated and safe care. About Dietary Supplements Dietary supplements were defined in a law passed ...

  15. Nuclear-cytoplasmic localization of acetyl coenzyme A synthetase-1 in the rat brain

    PubMed Central

    Ariyannur, Prasanth S.; Moffett, John R.; Madhavarao, Chikkathur N; Arun, Peethambaran; Vishnu, Nisha; Jacobowitz, David M.; Hallows, William C.; Denu, John M.; Namboodiri, Aryan M.A.

    2011-01-01

    Acetyl coenzyme A synthetase 1 (AceCS1) catalyzes the synthesis of acetyl coenzyme A from acetate and coenzyme A, and is thought to play diverse roles ranging from fatty acid synthesis to gene regulation. Using an affinity purified antibody generated against an 18-mer peptide sequence of AceCS1, and a polyclonal antibody directed against recombinant AceCS1 protein, we examined the expression of AceCS1 in the rat brain. AceCS1 immunoreactivity in the adult rat brain was present predominantly in cell nuclei, with only light to moderate cytoplasmic staining in some neurons, axons and oligodendrocytes. Some non-neuronal cell nuclei were very strongly immunoreactive, including those of some oligodendrocytes, whereas neuronal nuclei ranged from unstained to moderately stained. Both antibodies stained some neuronal cell bodies and axons, especially in the hindbrain. AceCS1 immunoreactivity was stronger and more widespread in the brains of 18 day old rats than in adults, with increased expression in oligodendrocytes and neurons, including cortical pyramidal cells. Expression of AceCS1 was substantially upregulated in neurons throughout the brain after controlled cortical impact injury. The strong AceCS1 expression observed in the nuclei of CNS cells during brain development and after injury is consistent with a role in nuclear histone acetylation and therefore the regulation of chromatin structure and gene expression. The cytoplasmic staining observed in some oligodendrocytes, especially during postnatal brain development, suggests an additional role in CNS lipid synthesis and myelination. Neuronal and axonal localization implicates AceCS1 in cytoplasmic acetylation reactions in some neurons. PMID:20533355

  16. A new role for coenzyme F420 in aflatoxin reduction by soil mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Graham, David E

    2010-11-01

    Hepatotoxic aflatoxins have found a worthy adversary in two new families of bacterial oxidoreductases. These enzymes use the reduced coenzyme F420 to initiate the degradation of furanocoumarin compounds, including the major mycotoxin products of Aspergillus flavus. Along with pyridoxal 5'-phosphate synthases and aryl nitroreductases, these proteins form a large and versatile superfamily of flavin and deazaflavin-dependent oxidoreductases. F420-dependent members of this family appear to share a common mechanism of hydride transfer from the reduced, low-potential deazaflavin to the electron-deficient ring systems of their substrates. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  17. Regeneration of Nicotinamide Coenzymes: Principles and Applications for the Synthesis of Chiral Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weckbecker, Andrea; Gröger, Harald; Hummel, Werner

    Dehydrogenases which depend on nicotinamide coenzymes are of increasing interest for the preparation of chiral compounds, either by reduction of a prochiral precursor or by oxidative resolution of their racemate. The regeneration of oxidized and reduced nicotinamide cofactors is a very crucial step because the use of these cofactors in stoichiometric amounts is too expensive for application. There are several possibilities to regenerate nicotinamide cofactors: established methods such as formate/formate dehydrogenase (FDH) for the regeneration of NADH, recently developed electrochemical methods based on new mediator structures, or the application of gene cloning methods for the construction of "designed" cells by heterologous expression of appropriate genes.

  18. MicroCommentary: A New Role for Coenzyme F420 in Aflatoxin Reduction by Soil Mycobacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, David E

    Hepatotoxic aflatoxins have found a worthy adversary in two new families of bacterial oxidoreductases. These enzymes use the reduced coenzyme F420 to initiate the degradation of furanocoumarin compounds, including the major mycotoxin products of Aspergillus flavus. Along with pyridoxalamine 5 -phosphate oxidases and aryl nitroreductases, these proteins form a large and versatile superfamily of flavin and deazaflavin-dependent oxidoreductases. F420-dependent members of this family appear to share a common mechanism of hydride transfer from the reduced deazaflavin to the electron-deficient ring systems of their substrates.

  19. Effect of a 5-mo nutritional intervention on nutritional status and quality of life for patient with 3-hydroxyisobutyryl-coenzyme A hydrolase deficiency: A case report.

    PubMed

    Li, Chun-Wei; Yu, Kang; Xu, Yan; Sun, Xia-Yuan; Li, Rong-Rong; Wang, Fang

    2015-01-01

    3-Hydroxy-isobutyryl-coenzyme A (CoA) hydrolase (HBICH) deficiency is a rare cerebral organic aciduria caused by disturbance of valine catabolism that leads to the accumulation of toxic metabolites, methacrylyl-CoA. The major feature exhibited by a patient with HBICH deficiency includes multiple congenital malformations and abnormal neurologic findings. However, the pathophysiology of this disease remains unknown. The major treatment for HBICH deficiency involves a low-protein diet, especially restricting valine, supplemented with micronutrients and carnitine. To our knowledge, only four patients with HBICH deficiency have been reported. These patients were boys and presented with different clinical, biochemical, and genetic features than our patient. In this report, we described what was to our knowledge the first genetically confirmed girl with HBICH deficiency in China. A 5-mo nutritional intervention was given to the patient by a nutritional support team. On this regimen, the patient's symptoms were alleviated and her quality of life was improved. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Coenzyme Q0 Enhances Ultraviolet B-Induced Apoptosis in Human Estrogen Receptor-Positive Breast (MCF-7) Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui-Min; Yang, Hsin-Ling; Thiyagarajan, Varadharajan; Huang, Tzu-Hsiang; Huang, Pei-Jane; Chen, Ssu-Ching; Liu, Jer-Yuh; Hsu, Li-Sung; Chang, Hsueh-Wei; Hseu, You-Cheng

    2017-09-01

    Coenzyme Q 0 (CoQ 0 ; 2,3-dimethoxy-5-methyl-1,4-benzoquinone), a major active constituent of Antrodia camphorata, has been shown to inhibit human triple-negative breast cancer (MDA-MB-231) cells through induction of apoptosis and cell-cycle arrest. Ecological studies have suggested a possible association between ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation and reduction in the risk of breast cancer. However, the underlying mechanism of the combination of CoQ 0 and UVB in human estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer (MCF-7) remains unclear. In this study, the possible effect of CoQ 0 on inducing apoptosis in MCF-7 cells under exposure to low-dose UVB (0.05 J/cm 2 ) has been investigated. CoQ 0 treatment (0-35 µM, for 24-72 hours) inhibits moderately the growth of breast cancer MCF-7 cells, and the cell viability was significantly decreased when the cells were pretreated with UVB irradiation. It was noted that there was a remarkable accumulation of subploid cells, the so-called sub-G1 peak, in CoQ 0 -treated cells by using flow cytometric analysis, which suggests that the viability reduction observed after treatment may result from apoptosis induction in MCF-7 cells. CoQ 0 caused an elevation of reactive oxygen species, as indicated by dichlorofluorescein fluorescence, and UVB pretreatment significantly increased CoQ 0 -induced reactive oxygen species generation in MCF-7 cells. In addition, cells were exposed to CoQ 0 , and the induction of DNA damage was evaluated by single-cell gel electrophoresis (comet assay). CoQ 0 -induced DNA damage was remarkably enhanced by UVB pretreatment. Furthermore, CoQ 0 induced apoptosis in MCF-7 cells, which was associated with PARP degradation, Bcl-2/Bax dysregulation, and p53 expression as shown by western blot. Collectively, these findings suggest that CoQ 0 might be an important supplemental agent for treating patients with breast cancer.

  1. Characterization of acyl-coenzyme A:diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGAT) enzyme of human small intestine.

    PubMed

    Hiramine, Yasushi; Tanabe, Toshizumi

    2011-06-01

    Acyl-coenzyme A:diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGAT) enzyme plays a significant role in dietary triacylglycerol (TAG) absorption in the small intestine. However, the characteristics of human intestinal DGAT enzyme have not been examined in detail. The aim of our study was to characterize the human intestinal DGAT enzyme by examining acyl-CoA specificity, temperature dependency, and selectivity for 1,2-diacylglycerol (DAG) or 1,3-DAG. We detected DGAT activity of human intestinal microsome and found that the acyl-CoA specificity and temperature dependency of intestinal DGAT coincided with those of recombinant human DGAT1. To elucidate the selectivity of human intestinal DGAT to 1,2-DAG or 1,3-DAG, we conducted acyl-coenzyme A:monoacylglycerol acyltransferase assays using 1- or 2-monoacylglycerol (MAG) as substrates. When 2-MAG was used as acyl acceptor, both 1,2-DAG and TAG were generated; however, when 1-MAG was used, 1,3-DAG was predominantly observed and little TAG was detected. These findings suggest that human small intestinal DGAT, which is mainly encoded by DGAT1, utilizes 1,2-DAG as the substrate to form TAG. This study will contribute to understand the lipid absorption profile in the small intestine.

  2. Mitochondrial ADCK3 employs an atypical protein kinase-like fold to enable coenzyme Q biosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Stefely, Jonathan A.; Reidenbach, Andrew G.; Ulbrich, Arne

    The ancient UbiB protein kinase-like family is involved in isoprenoid lipid biosynthesis and is implicated in human diseases, but demonstration of UbiB kinase activity has remained elusive for unknown reasons. In this paper, we quantitatively define UbiB-specific sequence motifs and reveal their positions within the crystal structure of a UbiB protein, ADCK3. We find that multiple UbiB-specific features are poised to inhibit protein kinase activity, including an N-terminal domain that occupies the typical substrate binding pocket and a unique A-rich loop that limits ATP binding by establishing an unusual selectivity for ADP. A single alanine-to-glycine mutation of this loop flipsmore » this coenzyme selectivity and enables autophosphorylation but inhibits coenzyme Q biosynthesis in vivo, demonstrating functional relevance for this unique feature. Finally, our work provides mechanistic insight into UbiB enzyme activity and establishes a molecular foundation for further investigation of how UbiB family proteins affect diseases and diverse biological pathways.« less

  3. Probing Reversible Chemistry in Coenzyme B12-Dependent Ethanolamine Ammonia Lyase with Kinetic Isotope Effects

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Alex R; Rentergent, Julius; Scrutton, Nigel S; Hay, Sam

    2015-01-01

    Coenzyme B12-dependent enzymes such as ethanolamine ammonia lyase have remarkable catalytic power and some unique properties that enable detailed analysis of the reaction chemistry and associated dynamics. By selectively deuterating the substrate (ethanolamine) and/or the β-carbon of the 5′-deoxyadenosyl moiety of the intrinsic coenzyme B12, it was possible to experimentally probe both the forward and reverse hydrogen atom transfers between the 5′-deoxyadenosyl radical and substrate during single-turnover stopped-flow measurements. These data are interpreted within the context of a kinetic model where the 5′-deoxyadenosyl radical intermediate may be quasi-stable and rearrangement of the substrate radical is essentially irreversible. Global fitting of these data allows estimation of the intrinsic rate constants associated with CoC homolysis and initial H-abstraction steps. In contrast to previous stopped-flow studies, the apparent kinetic isotope effects are found to be relatively small. PMID:25950663

  4. Mitochondrial ADCK3 employs an atypical protein kinase-like fold to enable coenzyme Q biosynthesis

    DOE PAGES

    Stefely, Jonathan A.; Reidenbach, Andrew G.; Ulbrich, Arne; ...

    2014-12-11

    The ancient UbiB protein kinase-like family is involved in isoprenoid lipid biosynthesis and is implicated in human diseases, but demonstration of UbiB kinase activity has remained elusive for unknown reasons. In this paper, we quantitatively define UbiB-specific sequence motifs and reveal their positions within the crystal structure of a UbiB protein, ADCK3. We find that multiple UbiB-specific features are poised to inhibit protein kinase activity, including an N-terminal domain that occupies the typical substrate binding pocket and a unique A-rich loop that limits ATP binding by establishing an unusual selectivity for ADP. A single alanine-to-glycine mutation of this loop flipsmore » this coenzyme selectivity and enables autophosphorylation but inhibits coenzyme Q biosynthesis in vivo, demonstrating functional relevance for this unique feature. Finally, our work provides mechanistic insight into UbiB enzyme activity and establishes a molecular foundation for further investigation of how UbiB family proteins affect diseases and diverse biological pathways.« less

  5. Production of a Brassica napus low-molecular mass acyl-coenzyme A-binding protein in Arabidopsis alters the acyl-coenzyme A pool and acyl composition of oil in seeds

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Low-molecular mass (10 kD) cytosolic acyl-coenzyme A-binding protein (ACBP) has a substantial influence over fatty acid (FA) composition in oilseeds, possibly via an effect on the partitioning of acyl groups between elongation and desaturation pathways. Previously, we demonstrated that the expressio...

  6. Coq6 Is Responsible for the C4-deamination Reaction in Coenzyme Q Biosynthesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae*

    PubMed Central

    Ozeir, Mohammad; Pelosi, Ludovic; Ismail, Alexandre; Mellot-Draznieks, Caroline; Fontecave, Marc; Pierrel, Fabien

    2015-01-01

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is able to use para-aminobenzoic acid (pABA) in addition to 4-hydroxybenzoic acid as a precursor of coenzyme Q, a redox lipid essential to the function of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. The biosynthesis of coenzyme Q from pABA requires a deamination reaction at position C4 of the benzene ring to substitute the amino group with an hydroxyl group. We show here that the FAD-dependent monooxygenase Coq6, which is known to hydroxylate position C5, also deaminates position C4 in a reaction implicating molecular oxygen, as demonstrated with labeling experiments. We identify mutations in Coq6 that abrogate the C4-deamination activity, whereas preserving the C5-hydroxylation activity. Several results support that the deletion of Coq9 impacts Coq6, thus explaining the C4-deamination defect observed in Δcoq9 cells. The vast majority of flavin monooxygenases catalyze hydroxylation reactions on a single position of their substrate. Coq6 is thus a rare example of a flavin monooxygenase that is able to act on two different carbon atoms of its C4-aminated substrate, allowing its deamination and ultimately its conversion into coenzyme Q by the other proteins constituting the coenzyme Q biosynthetic pathway. PMID:26260787

  7. Validation of CoaBC as a Bactericidal Target in the Coenzyme A Pathway of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Evans, Joanna C; Trujillo, Carolina; Wang, Zhe; Eoh, Hyungjin; Ehrt, Sabine; Schnappinger, Dirk; Boshoff, Helena I M; Rhee, Kyu Y; Barry, Clifton E; Mizrahi, Valerie

    2016-12-09

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis relies on its own ability to biosynthesize coenzyme A to meet the needs of the myriad enzymatic reactions that depend on this cofactor for activity. As such, the essential pantothenate and coenzyme A biosynthesis pathways have attracted attention as targets for tuberculosis drug development. To identify the optimal step for coenzyme A pathway disruption in M. tuberculosis, we constructed and characterized a panel of conditional knockdown mutants in coenzyme A pathway genes. Here, we report that silencing of coaBC was bactericidal in vitro, whereas silencing of panB, panC, or coaE was bacteriostatic over the same time course. Silencing of coaBC was likewise bactericidal in vivo, whether initiated at infection or during either the acute or chronic stages of infection, confirming that CoaBC is required for M. tuberculosis to grow and persist in mice and arguing against significant CoaBC bypass via transport and assimilation of host-derived pantetheine in this animal model. These results provide convincing genetic validation of CoaBC as a new bactericidal drug target.

  8. In vitro methanol production from methyl coenzyme M using the Methanosarcina barkeri MtaABC protein complex.

    PubMed

    Dong, Ming; Gonzalez, Tara D; Klems, Meghan M; Steinberg, Lisa M; Chen, Wilfred; Papoutsakis, Eleftherios T; Bahnson, Brian J

    2017-09-01

    Methanol:coenzyme M methyltransferase is an enzyme complex composed of three subunits, MtaA, MtaB, and MtaC, found in methanogenic archaea and is needed for their growth on methanol ultimately producing methane. MtaABC catalyzes the energetically favorable methyl transfer from methanol to coenzyme M to form methyl coenzyme M. Here we demonstrate that this important reaction for possible production of methanol from the anaerobic oxidation of methane can be reversed in vitro. To this effect, we have expressed and purified the Methanosarcina barkeri MtaABC enzyme, and developed an in vitro functional assay that demonstrates MtaABC can catalyze the energetically unfavorable (ΔG° = 27 kJ/mol) reverse reaction starting from methyl coenzyme M and generating methanol as a product. Demonstration of an in vitro ability of MtaABC to produce methanol may ultimately enable the anaerobic oxidation of methane to produce methanol and from methanol alternative fuel or fuel-precursor molecules. © 2017 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 33:1243-1249, 2017. © 2017 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  9. Regulation of 4CL, encoding 4-coumarate: coenzyme A ligase, expression in kenaf under diverse stress conditions

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    We cloned the full length 4CL ortholog encoding 4-coumarate: coenzymeA ligase from kenaf (Hibiscus cannabiuns) using degenerate primers and RACE (rapid amplification of cDNA ends) systems. The 4CL is a key regulatory enzyme of the phenylpropanoid pathway that regulates the activation of cinnamic ac...

  10. Reductive, Coenzyme A-Mediated Pathway for 3-Chlorobenzoate Degradation in the Phototrophic Bacterium Rhodopseudomonas palustris

    PubMed Central

    Egland, Paul G.; Gibson, Jane; Harwood, Caroline S.

    2001-01-01

    We isolated a strain of Rhodopseudomonas palustris (RCB100) by selective enrichment in light on 3-chlorobenzoate to investigate the steps that it uses to accomplish anaerobic dechlorination. Analyses of metabolite pools as well as enzyme assays suggest that R. palustris grows on 3-chlorobenzoate by (i) converting it to 3-chlorobenzoyl coenzyme A (3-chlorobenzoyl–CoA), (ii) reductively dehalogenating 3-chlorobenzoyl–CoA to benzoyl-CoA, and (iii) degrading benzoyl-CoA to acetyl-CoA and carbon dioxide. R. palustris uses 3-chlorobenzoate only as a carbon source and thus incorporates the acetyl-CoA that is produced into cell material. The reductive dechlorination route used by R. palustris for 3-chlorobenzoate degradation differs from those previously described in that a CoA thioester, rather than an unmodified aromatic acid, is the substrate for complete dehalogenation. PMID:11229940

  11. Acyl coenzyme A thioesterase 7 regulates neuronal fatty acid metabolism to prevent neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Jessica M; Wong, G William; Wolfgang, Michael J

    2013-05-01

    Numerous neurological diseases are associated with dysregulated lipid metabolism; however, the basic metabolic control of fatty acid metabolism in neurons remains enigmatic. Here we have shown that neurons have abundant expression and activity of the long-chain cytoplasmic acyl coenzyme A (acyl-CoA) thioesterase 7 (ACOT7) to regulate lipid retention and metabolism. Unbiased and targeted metabolomic analysis of fasted mice with a conditional knockout of ACOT7 in the nervous system, Acot7(N-/-), revealed increased fatty acid flux into multiple long-chain acyl-CoA-dependent pathways. The alterations in brain fatty acid metabolism were concomitant with a loss of lean mass, hypermetabolism, hepatic steatosis, dyslipidemia, and behavioral hyperexcitability in Acot7(N-/-) mice. These failures in adaptive energy metabolism are common in neurodegenerative diseases. In agreement, Acot7(N-/-) mice exhibit neurological dysfunction and neurodegeneration. These data show that ACOT7 counterregulates fatty acid metabolism in neurons and protects against neurotoxicity.

  12. Factors affecting the palmitoyl-coenzyme A desaturase of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, H. P.; Volkmann, C. M.

    1975-01-01

    The activity and stability of the palmitoyl-coenzyme A (CoA) desaturase complex of Saccharomyces cerevisiae was influenced by several factors. Cells, grown nonaerobically and then incubated with glucose, either in air or under N2, showed a marked increase in desaturase activity. Cycloheximide, added during such incubations, prevented the increase in activity, suggesting de novo synthesis. The stability of the desaturase from cells grown nonaerobically was affected by subsequent treatment of the cells; enzyme from freshly harvested cells, or from cells that were then shaken under nitrogen, readily lost activity upon washing or during density gradient analysis, whereas aerated cells, in the presence or absence of glucose, yielded stable enzyme preparations. The loss of activity in nonaerobic preparations could be reversed by adding soluble supernatant from these homogenates and could be prevented by growing the cells in the presence of palmitoleic acid and ergosterol, but not with several other lipids tested.

  13. Effects of aeration on formation and localization of the acetyl coenzyme A synthetases of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, H. P.; Jahnke, L.

    1979-01-01

    Previous studies on the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae have shown that two different forms of the enzyme acetyl coenzyme A synthetase (ACS) are present, depending on the conditions under which the cells are grown. The paper evaluates the usefulness of a method designed to assay both synthetases simultaneously in yeast homogenates. The data presented confirm the possibility of simultaneous detection and estimation of the amount of both ACSs of S. cerevisiae in crude homogenates of this strain, making possible the study of physiological factors involved in the formation of these isoenzymes. One important factor for specifying which of the two enzymes is found in these yeast cells is the presence or absence of oxygen in their environment. Aeration not only affects the ratio of the two ACSs but also appears to affect the cellular distribution of these enzymes. Most of the data presented suggest the possibility that the nonaerobic ACS may serve as a precursor to the aerobic form.

  14. Isolation and characterization of cDNAs encoding wheat 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase.

    PubMed Central

    Aoyagi, K; Beyou, A; Moon, K; Fang, L; Ulrich, T

    1993-01-01

    The enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGR, EC 1.1.1.34) is a key enzyme in the isoprenoid biosynthetic pathway. We have isolated partial cDNAs from wheat (Triticum aestivum) using the polymerase chain reaction. Comparison of deduced amino acid sequences of these cDNAs shows that they represent a small family of genes that share a high degree of sequence homology among themselves as well as among genes from other organisms including tomato, Arabidopsis, hamster, human, Drosophila, and yeast. Southern blot analysis reveals the presence of at least four genes. Our results concerning the tissue-specific expression as well as developmental regulation of these HMGR cDNAs highlight the important role of this enzyme in the growth and development of wheat. PMID:8108513

  15. Transcriptomic and proteomic landscape of mitochondrial dysfunction reveals secondary coenzyme Q deficiency in mammals

    PubMed Central

    Atanassov, Ilian; Kuznetsova, Irina; Hinze, Yvonne; Mourier, Arnaud; Filipovska, Aleksandra

    2017-01-01

    Dysfunction of the oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) system is a major cause of human disease and the cellular consequences are highly complex. Here, we present comparative analyses of mitochondrial proteomes, cellular transcriptomes and targeted metabolomics of five knockout mouse strains deficient in essential factors required for mitochondrial DNA gene expression, leading to OXPHOS dysfunction. Moreover, we describe sequential protein changes during post-natal development and progressive OXPHOS dysfunction in time course analyses in control mice and a middle lifespan knockout, respectively. Very unexpectedly, we identify a new response pathway to OXPHOS dysfunction in which the intra-mitochondrial synthesis of coenzyme Q (ubiquinone, Q) and Q levels are profoundly decreased, pointing towards novel possibilities for therapy. Our extensive omics analyses provide a high-quality resource of altered gene expression patterns under severe OXPHOS deficiency comparing several mouse models, that will deepen our understanding, open avenues for research and provide an important reference for diagnosis and treatment. PMID:29132502

  16. Antiplasmodial dihetarylthioethers target the coenzyme A synthesis pathway in Plasmodium falciparum erythrocytic stages.

    PubMed

    Weidner, Thomas; Lucantoni, Leonardo; Nasereddin, Abed; Preu, Lutz; Jones, Peter G; Dzikowski, Ron; Avery, Vicky M; Kunick, Conrad

    2017-05-15

    Malaria is a widespread infectious disease that threatens a large proportion of the population in tropical and subtropical areas. Given the emerging resistance against the current standard anti-malaria chemotherapeutics, the development of alternative drugs is urgently needed. New anti-malarials representing chemotypes unrelated to currently used drugs have an increased potential for displaying novel mechanisms of action and thus exhibit low risk of cross-resistance against established drugs. Phenotypic screening of a small library (32 kinase-inhibitor analogs) against Plasmodium falciparum NF54-luc asexual erythrocytic stage parasites identified a diarylthioether structurally unrelated to registered drugs. Hit expansion led to a series in which the most potent congener displayed nanomolar antiparasitic activity (IC 50  = 39 nM, 3D7 strain). Structure-activity relationship analysis revealed a thieno[2,3-d]pyrimidine on one side of the thioether linkage as a prerequisite for antiplasmodial activity. Within the series, the oxazole derivative KuWei173 showed high potency (IC 50  = 75 nM; 3D7 strain), good solubility in aqueous solvents (1.33 mM), and >100-fold selectivity toward human cell lines. Rescue experiments identified inhibition of the plasmodial coenzyme A synthesis as a possible mode of action for this compound class. The class of antiplasmodial bishetarylthioethers reported here has been shown to interfere with plasmodial coenzyme A synthesis, a mechanism of action not yet exploited for registered anti-malarial drugs. The oxazole congener KuWei173 displays double-digit nanomolar antiplasmodial activity, selectivity against human cell lines, high drug likeness, and thus represents a promising chemical starting point for further drug development.

  17. Methyl-coenzyme M reductase A as an indicator to estimate methane production from dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Aguinaga Casañas, M A; Rangkasenee, N; Krattenmacher, N; Thaller, G; Metges, C C; Kuhla, B

    2015-06-01

    The evaluation of greenhouse gas mitigation strategies requires the quantitative assessment of individual methane production. Because methane measurement in respiration chambers is highly accurate, but also comprises various disadvantages such as limited capacity and high costs, the establishment of an indicator for estimating methane production of individual ruminants would provide an alternative to direct methane measurement. Methyl-coenzyme M reductase is involved in methanogenesis and the subunit α of methyl-coenzyme M reductase is encoded by the mcrA gene of rumen archaea. We therefore examined the relationship between methane emissions of Holstein dairy cows measured in respiration chambers with 2 different diets (high- and medium-concentrate diet) and the mcrA DNA and mcrA cDNA abundance determined from corresponding rumen fluid samples. Whole-body methane production per kilogram of dry matter intake and mcrA DNA normalized to the abundance of the rrs gene coding for 16S rRNA correlated significantly when using qmcrA primers. Use of qmcrA primers also revealed linear correlation between mcrA DNA copy number and methane yield. Regression analyses based on normalized mcrA cDNA abundances revealed no significant linear correlation with methane production per kilogram of dry matter intake. Furthermore, the correlations between normalized mcrA DNA abundance and the rumen fluid concentration of acetic and isobutyric acid were positive, whereas the correlations with propionic and lactic acid were negative. These data suggest that the mcrA DNA approach based on qmcrA primers could potentially be a molecular proxy for methane yield after further refinement. Copyright © 2015 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. TD-DFT Insight into Photodissociation of Co-C Bond in Coenzyme B12

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlowski, Pawel; Liu, Hui; Kornobis, Karina; Lodowski, Piotr; Jaworska, Maria

    2013-12-01

    Coenzyme B12 (AdoCbl) is one of the most biologically active forms of vitamin B12, and continues to be a topic of active research interest. The mechanism of Co-C bond cleavage in AdoCbl, and the corresponding enzymatic reactions are however, not well understood at the molecular level. In this work, time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) has been applied to investigate the photodissociation of coenzyme B12. To reduce computational cost, while retaining the major spectroscopic features of AdoCbl, a truncated model based on ribosylcobalamin (RibCbl) was used to simulate Co-C photodissociation. Equilibrium geometries of RibCbl were obtained by optimization at the DFT/BP86/TZVP level of theory, and low-lying excited states were calculated by TD-DFT using the same functional and basis set. The calculated singlet states, and absorption spectra were simulated in both the gas phase, and water, using the polarizable continuum model (PCM). Both spectra were in reasonable agreement with experimental data, and potential energy curves based on vertical excitations were plotted to explore the nature of Co-C bond dissociation. It was found that a repulsive 3(σCo-C → σ*Co-C) triplet state became dissociative at large Co-C bond distance, similar to a previous observation for methylcobalamin (MeCbl). Furthermore, potential energy surfaces (PESs) obtained as a function of both Co-CRib and Co-NIm distances, identify the S1 state as a key intermediate generated during photoexcitation of RibCbl, attributed to a mixture of a MLCT (metal-to-ligand charge transfer) and a σ bonding-ligand charge transfer (SBLCT) states.

  19. The reaction mechanism of methyl-coenzyme M reductase: How an enzyme enforces strict binding order

    DOE PAGES

    Wongnate, Thanyaporn; Ragsdale, Stephen W.

    2015-02-17

    Methyl-coenzyme M reductase (MCR) is a nickel tetrahydrocorphinoid (coenzyme F430) containing enzyme involved in the biological synthesis and anaerobic oxidation of methane. MCR catalyzes the conversion of methyl-2-mercaptoethanesulfonate (methyl-SCoM) and N-7-mercaptoheptanoylthreonine phosphate (CoB 7SH) to CH 4 and the mixed disulfide CoBS-SCoM. In this study, the reaction of MCR from Methanothermobacter marburgensis, with its native substrates was investigated using static binding, chemical quench, and stopped-flow techniques. Rate constants were measured for each step in this strictly ordered ternary complex catalytic mechanism. Surprisingly, in the absence of the other substrate, MCR can bind either substrate; however, only one binary complex (MCR·methyl-SCoM)more » is productive whereas the other (MCR·CoB 7SH) is inhibitory. Moreover, the kinetic data demonstrate that binding of methyl-SCoM to the inhibitory MCR·CoB 7SH complex is highly disfavored ( Kd = 56 mM). However, binding of CoB 7SH to the productive MCR·methyl-SCoM complex to form the active ternary complex (CoB 7SH·MCR(Ni I)·CH 3SCoM) is highly favored ( Kd = 79 μM). Only then can the chemical reaction occur ( kobs = 20 s -1 at 25 °C), leading to rapid formation and dissociation of CH 4 leaving the binary product complex (MCR(Ni II)·CoB 7S -·SCoM), which undergoes electron transfer to regenerate Ni(I) and the final product CoBS-SCoM. In conclusion, this first rapid kinetics study of MCR with its natural substrates describes how an enzyme can enforce a strictly ordered ternary complex mechanism and serves as a template for identification of the reaction intermediates.« less

  20. Mitochondrial Targeted Coenzyme Q, Superoxide, and Fuel Selectivity in Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Fink, Brian D.; O'Malley, Yunxia; Dake, Brian L.; Ross, Nicolette C.; Prisinzano, Thomas E.; Sivitz, William I.

    2009-01-01

    Background Previously, we reported that the “antioxidant” compound “mitoQ” (mitochondrial-targeted ubiquinol/ubiquinone) actually increased superoxide production by bovine aortic endothelial (BAE) cell mitochondria incubated with complex I but not complex II substrates. Methods and Results To further define the site of action of the targeted coenzyme Q compound, we extended these studies to include different substrate and inhibitor conditions. In addition, we assessed the effects of mitoquinone on mitochondrial respiration, measured respiration and mitochondrial membrane potential in intact cells, and tested the intriguing hypothesis that mitoquinone might impart fuel selectivity in intact BAE cells. In mitochondria respiring on differing concentrations of complex I substrates, mitoquinone and rotenone had interactive effects on ROS consistent with redox cycling at multiple sites within complex I. Mitoquinone increased respiration in isolated mitochondria respiring on complex I but not complex II substrates. Mitoquinone also increased oxygen consumption by intact BAE cells. Moreover, when added to intact cells at 50 to 1000 nM, mitoquinone increased glucose oxidation and reduced fat oxidation, at doses that did not alter membrane potential or induce cell toxicity. Although high dose mitoquinone reduced mitochondrial membrane potential, the positively charged mitochondrial-targeted cation, decyltriphenylphosphonium (mitoquinone without the coenzyme Q moiety), decreased membrane potential more than mitoquinone, but did not alter fuel selectivity. Therefore, non-specific effects of the positive charge were not responsible and the quinone moiety is required for altered nutrient selectivity. Conclusions In summary, the interactive effects of mitoquinone and rotenone are consistent with redox cycling at more than one site within complex I. In addition, mitoquinone has substrate dependent effects on mitochondrial respiration, increases repiration by intact cells

  1. Mitochondrial targeted coenzyme Q, superoxide, and fuel selectivity in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Fink, Brian D; O'Malley, Yunxia; Dake, Brian L; Ross, Nicolette C; Prisinzano, Thomas E; Sivitz, William I

    2009-01-01

    Previously, we reported that the "antioxidant" compound "mitoQ" (mitochondrial-targeted ubiquinol/ubiquinone) actually increased superoxide production by bovine aortic endothelial (BAE) cell mitochondria incubated with complex I but not complex II substrates. To further define the site of action of the targeted coenzyme Q compound, we extended these studies to include different substrate and inhibitor conditions. In addition, we assessed the effects of mitoquinone on mitochondrial respiration, measured respiration and mitochondrial membrane potential in intact cells, and tested the intriguing hypothesis that mitoquinone might impart fuel selectivity in intact BAE cells. In mitochondria respiring on differing concentrations of complex I substrates, mitoquinone and rotenone had interactive effects on ROS consistent with redox cycling at multiple sites within complex I. Mitoquinone increased respiration in isolated mitochondria respiring on complex I but not complex II substrates. Mitoquinone also increased oxygen consumption by intact BAE cells. Moreover, when added to intact cells at 50 to 1000 nM, mitoquinone increased glucose oxidation and reduced fat oxidation, at doses that did not alter membrane potential or induce cell toxicity. Although high dose mitoquinone reduced mitochondrial membrane potential, the positively charged mitochondrial-targeted cation, decyltriphenylphosphonium (mitoquinone without the coenzyme Q moiety), decreased membrane potential more than mitoquinone, but did not alter fuel selectivity. Therefore, non-specific effects of the positive charge were not responsible and the quinone moiety is required for altered nutrient selectivity. In summary, the interactive effects of mitoquinone and rotenone are consistent with redox cycling at more than one site within complex I. In addition, mitoquinone has substrate dependent effects on mitochondrial respiration, increases repiration by intact cells, and alters fuel selectivity favoring glucose over

  2. Cloning and expression of clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 acetoacetyl-coenzyme A:acetate/butyrate:coenzyme A-transferase in Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Cary, J.W.; Petersen, D.J.; Bennett, G.N.

    1990-06-01

    Coenzyme A (CoA)-transferase (acetoacetyl-CoA:acetate/butyrate:CoA-transferase (butyrate-acetoacetate CoA-transferase) (EC 2.8.3.9)) of Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 is an important enzyme in the metabolic shift between the acid-producing and solvent-forming states of this organism. The genes encoding the two subunits of this enzyme have been cloned and subsequent subcloning experiments established the position of the structural genes for CoA-transferase. Complementation of Escherichia coli ato mutants with the recombinant plasmid pCoAT4 (pUC19 carrying a 1.8-kilobase insert of C. acetobutylicum DNA encoding CoA-transferase activity) enabled the transformants to grow on butyrate as a sole carbon source. Despite the ability of CoA-transferase to complement the ato defectmore » in E. coli mutants, Southern blot and Western blot (immunoblot) analyses showed showed that neither the C. acetobutylicum genes encoding CoA-transferase nor the enzyme itself shared any apparent homology with its E. coli counterpart. Polypeptides of M{sub r} of the purified CoA-transferase subunits were observed by Western blot and maxicell analysis of whole-cell extracts of E.coli harboring pCoAT4. The proximity and orientation of the genes suggest that the genes encoding the two subunits of CoA-transferase may form an operon similar to that found in E. coli. In the plasmid, however, transcription appears to be primarily from the lac promoter of the vector.« less

  3. Herbal Products and Supplements

    MedlinePlus

    ... called a botanical product) is a type of dietary supplement that contains one or more herbs. Herbal health ... effective by the FDA. But the FDA defines dietary supplements as a category of food, not as drugs. ...

  4. [β-hydroxy-β-methylbutyrate as a dietary supplement (I): metabolism and toxicity].

    PubMed

    Manjarrez-Montes-de-Oca, Rafael; Torres-Vaca, Mateo; González-Gallego, Javier; Alvear-Ordenes, Ildefonso

    2014-11-27

    -hydroxy--methylbutyrate (HMB) is a leucine metabolite produced from -ketoisocaproic acid. HMB supplementation has been used as a dietary supplement in sports since 1997, with the aim of decreasing muscle proteolysis. In recent years, positive effects have been reported in different pathologies, which suggests potential health benefits. The objectives of this review are: to know both HMB metabolism and toxicity, and to identify HMB cellular and molecular mechanisms of action when used as a dietary supplement. A search was performed in the Web of Science, Pubmed and SportDiscus data bases. RESULTS were divided into two parts; this article presents the results about both HMB metabolism and possible toxicity. Studies show that HMB is related to cholesterol metabolism in skeletal muscle, which could reduce proteolysis, through hydroxy-methyl-glutaryl-coenzyme A and mevalonate as a precursor in the synthesis of cholesterol. However, HMB could also be transformed from acetoacetate to beta-hydroxybutyrate by beta-hydrozybutyrate dehydrogenase. The calcium salt of HMB is the most used chemical form in dietary supplements, being the most common dose 3 g of HMB/day. Studies in humans and animals provide evidence that there are no adverse effects associated with HMB supplementation. Metabolic effects and lack of toxicity of HMB make it an adequate compound to be used as a dietary supplement. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  5. Hepatic Concentration and Distribution of Coenzyme A and Carnitine during a Streptococcus pneumoniae Infection in the Rat: Possible Implications on Fatty Acid Metabolism and Ketogenesis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-01-09

    subcellular distribution of carnitine and coenzyme A (CoA). Compared to fasted control ILJ rats, fasted-infected rats have a decreased ketogenic capacity...decreased ketogenic capacity that is associated with an accumulation of total hepatic carnitine and a decrease in total hepatic coenzyme A. The...cholesterol. IiA .Ii INTRODUCTION Rats infected with Streptococcus pneumoniae have a decreased hep-tic ketogenic capacity which is associated with an

  6. Functional contribution of coenzyme specificity-determining sites of 7α-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase from Clostridium absonum.

    PubMed

    Lou, Deshuai; Wang, Yue; Tan, Jun; Zhu, Liancai; Ji, Shunlin; Wang, Bochu

    2017-10-01

    Studies of the molecular determinants of coenzyme specificity help to reveal the structure-function relationship of enzymes, especially with regards to coenzyme specificity-determining sites (CSDSs) that usually mediate complex interactions. NADP(H)-dependent 7α-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase from Clostridium absonum (CA 7α-HSDH), a member of the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase superfamily (SDRs), possesses positively charged CSDSs that mainly contain T15, R16, R38, and R194, forming complicated polar interactions with the adenosine ribose C2 phosphate group of NADP(H). The R38 residue is crucial for coenzyme anchoring, but the influence of the other residues on coenzyme utilization is still not clear. Hence, we performed alanine scanning mutagenesis and molecular dynamic (MD) simulations. The results suggest that the natural CSDSs have the greatest NADP(H)-binding affinity, but not the best activity (k cat ) toward NADP + . Compared with the wild type and other mutants, the mutant R194A showed the highest catalytic efficiency (k cat /K m ), which was more than three-times that of the wild type. MD simulation and kinetics analysis suggested that the importance of the CSDSs of CA 7α-HSDH should be in accordance with the following order R38>T15>R16>R194, and S39 may have a supporting role in NADP(H) anchoring for mutants R16A/T194A and T15A/R16A/T194A. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. High-throughput screening of coenzyme preference change of thermophilic 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase from NADP + to NAD +

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Rui; Chen, Hui; Zhong, Chao

    Coenzyme engineering that changes NAD(P) selectivity of redox enzymes is an important tool in metabolic engineering, synthetic biology, and biocatalysis. Here we developed a high throughput screening method to identify mutants of 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6PGDH) from a thermophilic bacterium Moorella thermoacetica with reversed coenzyme selectivity from NADP + to NAD +. Colonies of a 6PGDH mutant library growing on the agar plates were treated by heat to minimize the background noise, that is, the deactivation of intracellular dehydrogenases, degradation of inherent NAD(P)H, and disruption of cell membrane. The melted agarose solution containing a redox dye tetranitroblue tetrazolium (TNBT), phenazine methosulfatemore » (PMS), NAD +, and 6-phosphogluconate was carefully poured on colonies, forming a second semi-solid layer. More active 6PGDH mutants were examined via an enzyme-linked TNBT-PMS colorimetric assay. Positive mutants were recovered by direct extraction of plasmid from dead cell colonies followed by plasmid transformation into E. coli TOP10. By utilizing this double-layer screening method, six positive mutants were obtained from two-round saturation mutagenesis. The best mutant 6PGDH A30D/R31I/T32I exhibited a 4,278-fold reversal of coenzyme selectivity from NADP + to NAD +. Furthermore, this screening method could be widely used to detect numerous redox enzymes, particularly for thermophilic ones, which can generate NAD(P)H reacted with the redox dye TNBT.« less

  8. Molecular mechanisms of the non-coenzyme action of thiamin in brain: biochemical, structural and pathway analysis

    PubMed Central

    Mkrtchyan, Garik; Aleshin, Vasily; Parkhomenko, Yulia; Kaehne, Thilo; Luigi Di Salvo, Martino; Parroni, Alessia; Contestabile, Roberto; Vovk, Andrey; Bettendorff, Lucien; Bunik, Victoria

    2015-01-01

    Thiamin (vitamin B1) is a pharmacological agent boosting central metabolism through the action of the coenzyme thiamin diphosphate (ThDP). However, positive effects, including improved cognition, of high thiamin doses in neurodegeneration may be observed without increased ThDP or ThDP-dependent enzymes in brain. Here, we determine protein partners and metabolic pathways where thiamin acts beyond its coenzyme role. Malate dehydrogenase, glutamate dehydrogenase and pyridoxal kinase were identified as abundant proteins binding to thiamin- or thiazolium-modified sorbents. Kinetic studies, supported by structural analysis, revealed allosteric regulation of these proteins by thiamin and/or its derivatives. Thiamin triphosphate and adenylated thiamin triphosphate activate glutamate dehydrogenase. Thiamin and ThDP regulate malate dehydrogenase isoforms and pyridoxal kinase. Thiamin regulation of enzymes related to malate-aspartate shuttle may impact on malate/citrate exchange, responsible for exporting acetyl residues from mitochondria. Indeed, bioinformatic analyses found an association between thiamin- and thiazolium-binding proteins and the term acetylation. Our interdisciplinary study shows that thiamin is not only a coenzyme for acetyl-CoA production, but also an allosteric regulator of acetyl-CoA metabolism including regulatory acetylation of proteins and acetylcholine biosynthesis. Moreover, thiamin action in neurodegeneration may also involve neurodegeneration-related 14-3-3, DJ-1 and β-amyloid precursor proteins identified among the thiamin- and/or thiazolium-binding proteins. PMID:26212886

  9. High-throughput screening of coenzyme preference change of thermophilic 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase from NADP + to NAD +

    DOE PAGES

    Huang, Rui; Chen, Hui; Zhong, Chao; ...

    2016-09-02

    Coenzyme engineering that changes NAD(P) selectivity of redox enzymes is an important tool in metabolic engineering, synthetic biology, and biocatalysis. Here we developed a high throughput screening method to identify mutants of 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6PGDH) from a thermophilic bacterium Moorella thermoacetica with reversed coenzyme selectivity from NADP + to NAD +. Colonies of a 6PGDH mutant library growing on the agar plates were treated by heat to minimize the background noise, that is, the deactivation of intracellular dehydrogenases, degradation of inherent NAD(P)H, and disruption of cell membrane. The melted agarose solution containing a redox dye tetranitroblue tetrazolium (TNBT), phenazine methosulfatemore » (PMS), NAD +, and 6-phosphogluconate was carefully poured on colonies, forming a second semi-solid layer. More active 6PGDH mutants were examined via an enzyme-linked TNBT-PMS colorimetric assay. Positive mutants were recovered by direct extraction of plasmid from dead cell colonies followed by plasmid transformation into E. coli TOP10. By utilizing this double-layer screening method, six positive mutants were obtained from two-round saturation mutagenesis. The best mutant 6PGDH A30D/R31I/T32I exhibited a 4,278-fold reversal of coenzyme selectivity from NADP + to NAD +. Furthermore, this screening method could be widely used to detect numerous redox enzymes, particularly for thermophilic ones, which can generate NAD(P)H reacted with the redox dye TNBT.« less

  10. High-Throughput Screening of Coenzyme Preference Change of Thermophilic 6-Phosphogluconate Dehydrogenase from NADP(+) to NAD(.).

    PubMed

    Huang, Rui; Chen, Hui; Zhong, Chao; Kim, Jae Eung; Zhang, Yi-Heng Percival

    2016-09-02

    Coenzyme engineering that changes NAD(P) selectivity of redox enzymes is an important tool in metabolic engineering, synthetic biology, and biocatalysis. Here we developed a high throughput screening method to identify mutants of 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6PGDH) from a thermophilic bacterium Moorella thermoacetica with reversed coenzyme selectivity from NADP(+) to NAD(+). Colonies of a 6PGDH mutant library growing on the agar plates were treated by heat to minimize the background noise, that is, the deactivation of intracellular dehydrogenases, degradation of inherent NAD(P)H, and disruption of cell membrane. The melted agarose solution containing a redox dye tetranitroblue tetrazolium (TNBT), phenazine methosulfate (PMS), NAD(+), and 6-phosphogluconate was carefully poured on colonies, forming a second semi-solid layer. More active 6PGDH mutants were examined via an enzyme-linked TNBT-PMS colorimetric assay. Positive mutants were recovered by direct extraction of plasmid from dead cell colonies followed by plasmid transformation into E. coli TOP10. By utilizing this double-layer screening method, six positive mutants were obtained from two-round saturation mutagenesis. The best mutant 6PGDH A30D/R31I/T32I exhibited a 4,278-fold reversal of coenzyme selectivity from NADP(+) to NAD(+). This screening method could be widely used to detect numerous redox enzymes, particularly for thermophilic ones, which can generate NAD(P)H reacted with the redox dye TNBT.

  11. Effects of α-Glycerophosphate and of Palmityl-Coenzyme A on Lipid Synthesis in Yeast Extracts

    PubMed Central

    White, David; Klein, Harold P.

    1966-01-01

    White, David (Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, Calif.), and Harold P. Klein. Effects of α-glycerophosphate and of palmityl-coenzyme A on lipid synthesis in yeast extracts. J. Bacteriol. 91:1218–1223. 1966.—The incorporation of acetate into fatty acids, but not into nonsaponifiable lipids, was stimulated by α-glycerophosphate in a supernatant fraction of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, obtained after centrifugation at 86,000 × g for 60 min. There was a pronounced effect at concentrations below 2 mm, but at concentrations above 5 mm α-glycerophosphate was relatively less stimulatory. α-Glycerophosphate markedly increased the percentage of esterified fatty acids among the products, and the formation of both saturated and unsaturated fatty acids was stimulated. Palmityl-coenzyme A inhibited fatty acid synthesis, affecting the formation of unsaturated acids more severely than saturated acids. In the presence of sufficient α-glycerophosphate to alleviate these inhibitions, palmityl-coenzyme A still reduced the formation of certain unsaturated fatty acids. PMID:5929752

  12. A dietary supplement improves facial photoaging and skin sebum, hydration and tonicity modulating serum fibronectin, neutrophil elastase 2, hyaluronic acid and carbonylated proteins.

    PubMed

    Di Cerbo, Alessandro; Laurino, Carmen; Palmieri, Beniamino; Iannitti, Tommaso

    2015-03-01

    Excessive exposure to the sun can cause severe photoaging as early as the second decade of life resulting in a loss of physiological elastic fiber functions. We designed a first study to assess differences in facial skin pH, sebum, elasticity, hydration and tonicity and serum levels of fibronectin, elastin, neutrophil elastase 2, hyaluronic acid and carbonylated proteins between patients affected by facial photoaging and healthy controls. In a second study we tested the hypothesis that a dietary supplement would improve facial photoaging, also promoting changes in the above mentioned skin and serum parameters. In the first study we enrolled 30 women [age: 47.5 ± 1.6 years (mean ± standard error of the mean)] affected by moderate facial photoaging (4 cm ≤ Visual Analogue Scale (VAS)<7 cm) and 30 healthy women [age: 45.9 ± 1.6 years (mean ± standard error of the mean)]. In the second study we enrolled a cohort of 30 women [age: 43.6 ± 1.2 years (mean ± standard error of the mean)], affected by moderate (n = 22) and severe (VAS ≥ 7 cm; n = 8) facial photoaging, who were randomized to receive a pharmaceutical formulation (VISCODERM Pearls; IBSA FARMACEUTICI ITALIA Srl, Lodi, Italy) containing Pycnogenol, collagen, coenzyme Q10, low-molecular-weight hyaluronic acid, chondroitin sulfate and glucosamine sulfate (n = 15) or placebo (n = 15). Dietary supplement and placebo were administered 2 times a day for 4 weeks. Facial photoaging was assessed by VAS in the first cohort of patients affected by facial photoaging and healthy controls and, at baseline and 2 weeks after the end of treatment, in the second cohort of patients who underwent treatment with VISCODERM Pearls and placebo. Skin Tester was used to analyze differences in facial skin parameters between patients affected by facial photoaging and healthy controls. Skin Tester was also used to assess the effect of VISCODERM Pearls on facial skin parameters and compared with placebo 2 weeks after the end of

  13. Depletion of mitochondrial coenzyme A and glutathione by 4-dimethylaminophenol and formation of mixed thioethers.

    PubMed

    Eckert, K G; Elbers, F R; Eyer, P

    1989-10-01

    4-Dimethylaminophenol (DMAP), an antidote in cyanide poisoning, has been shown to produce kidney lesions in rats, to damage isolated rat kidney tubules and to impair mitochondrial functions as already described for 4-aminophenol. Since DMAP upon oxidation forms bis- and tris-substituted thioethers with GSH, it was anticipated that mitochondrial toxicity of DMAP might result from CoA depletion. In a model reaction DMAP was oxidized by oxyhemoglobin in the presence of CoA and GSH resulting in formation of tris-(CoA-S-yl)-DMAP, tris-(GSH-S-yl)-DMAP and two mixed thioethers, namely, (CoA-S-yl)-bis-(GSH-S-yl)-DMAP and (GSH-S-yl)-bis-(CoA-S-yl)-DMAP. The compounds were isolated by HPLC and identified spectroscopically, by amino acid analysis and Raney-Nickel desulfuration. Rat liver mitochondria (5 mg protein/ml) incubated under state IV conditions with 20 and 50 microM DMAP were depleted of GSH and total coenzyme A with formation of GSSG and the above-mentioned thioethers which were quantified by isotope dilution techniques using [14C]-labelled DMAP and the isolated, inactive thioethers. The results confirm earlier suggestions that part of the cytotoxicity of DMAP may result from depletion of vital mitochondrial thiols, particularly CoA. Since 4-aminophenol reacts analogously, similar cytotoxic effects can be expected from compounds which on (aut)oxidation form quinoid systems capable of 1.4-addition reactions with nucleophilic thiols.

  14. Coenzyme B12 synthesis as a baseline to study metabolite contribution of animal microbiota.

    PubMed

    Danchin, Antoine; Braham, Sherazade

    2017-07-01

    Microbial communities thrive in a number of environments. Exploration of their microbiomes - their global genome - may reveal metabolic features that contribute to the development and welfare of their hosts, or chemical cleansing of environments. Yet we often lack final demonstration of their causal role in features of interest. The reason is that we do not have proper baselines that we could use to monitor how microbiota cope with key metabolites in the hosting environment. Here, focusing on animal gut microbiota, we describe the fate of cobalamins - metabolites of the B12 coenzyme family - that are essential for animals but synthesized only by prokaryotes. Microbiota produce the vitamin used in a variety of animals (and in algae). Coprophagy plays a role in its management. For coprophobic man, preliminary observations suggest that the gut microbial production of vitamin B12 plays only a limited role. By contrast, the vitamin is key for structuring microbiota. This implies that it is freely available in the environment. This can only result from lysis of the microbes that make it. A consequence for biotechnology applications is that, if valuable for their host, B12-producing microbes should be sensitive to bacteriophages and colicins, or make spores. © 2017 The Authors. Microbial Biotechnology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Society for Applied Microbiology.

  15. Conversion of NO2 to NO by reduced coenzyme F420 protects mycobacteria from nitrosative damage

    PubMed Central

    Purwantini, Endang; Mukhopadhyay, Biswarup

    2009-01-01

    In mycobacteria, F420, a deazaflavin derivative, acts as a hydride transfer coenzyme for an F420-specific glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (Fgd). Physiologically relevant reactions in the mycobacteria that use Fgd-generated reduced F420 (F420H2) are unknown. In this work, F420H2 was found to be oxidized by NO only in the presence of oxygen. Further analysis demonstrated that NO2, produced from NO and O2, was the oxidant. UV-visible spectroscopic and NO-sensor-based analyses proved that F420H2 reduced NO2 to NO. This reaction could serve as a defense system for Mycobacterium tuberculosis, which is more sensitive to NO2 than NO under aerobic conditions. Activated macrophages produce NO, which in acidified phagosomes is converted to NO2. Hence, by converting NO2 back to NO with F420H2, M. tuberculosis could decrease the effectiveness of antibacterial action of macrophages; such defense would correspond to active tuberculosis conditions where the bacterium grows aerobically. This hypothesis was consistent with the observation that a mutant strain of Mycobacterium smegmatis, a nonpathogenic relative of M. tuberculosis, which either did not produce or could not reduce F420, was ≈4-fold more sensitive to NO2 than the wild-type strain. The phenomenon is reminiscent of the anticancer activity of γ-tocopherol, which reduces NO2 to NO and protects human cells from NO2-induced carcinogenesis. PMID:19325122

  16. Preformed {beta}-amyloid fibrils are destabilized by coenzyme Q{sub 10} in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Ono, Kenjiro; Hasegawa, Kazuhiro; Naiki, Hironobu

    2005-04-29

    Inhibition of the formation of {beta}-amyloid fibrils (fA{beta}), as well as the destabilization of preformed fA{beta} in the CNS, would be attractive therapeutic targets for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease (AD). We reported previously that nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA) and wine-related polyphenol, myricetin (Myr), inhibit fA{beta} formation from A{beta} and destabilize preformed fA{beta} in vitro. Using fluorescence spectroscopic analysis with thioflavin T and electron microscopic studies, we examined the effects of coenzyme Q{sub 10} (CoQ{sub 10}) on the formation, extension, and destabilization of fA{beta} at pH 7.5 at 37 deg C in vitro. We next compared the anti-amyloidogenic activities of CoQ{submore » 10} with NDGA and Myr. CoQ{sub 10} dose-dependently inhibited fA{beta} formation from amyloid {beta}-peptide (A{beta}), as well as their extension. Moreover, it destabilized preformed fA{beta}s. The anti-amyloidogenic effects of CoQ{sub 10} were slightly weaker than those of NDGA and Myr. CoQ{sub 10} could be a key molecule for the development of therapeutics for AD.« less

  17. Excess Coenzyme A Reduces Skeletal Muscle Performance and Strength in Mice Overexpressing Human PANK2

    PubMed Central

    Corbin, Deborah R.; Rehg, Jerold E.; Shepherd, Danielle L.; Stoilov, Peter; Percifield, Ryan J.; Horner, Linda; Frase, Sharon; Zhang, Yong-Mei; Rock, Charles O.; Hollander, John M.; Jackowski, Suzanne; Leonardi, Roberta

    2017-01-01

    Coenzyme A (CoA) is a cofactor that is central to energy metabolism and CoA synthesis is controlled by the enzyme pantothenate kinase (PanK). A transgenic mouse strain expressing human PANK2 was derived to determine the physiological impact of PANK overexpression and elevated CoA levels. The Tg(PANK2) mice expressed high levels of the transgene in skeletal muscle and heart; however, CoA was substantially elevated only in skeletal muscle, possibly associated with the comparatively low endogenous levels of acetyl-CoA, a potent feedback inhibitor of PANK2. Tg(PANK2) mice were smaller, had less skeletal muscle mass and displayed significantly impaired exercise tolerance and grip strength. Skeletal myofibers were characterized by centralized nuclei and aberrant mitochondria. Both the content of fully assembled complex I of the electron transport chain and ATP levels were reduced, while markers of oxidative stress were elevated in Tg(PANK2) skeletal muscle. These abnormalities were not detected in the Tg(PANK2) heart muscle, with the exception of spotty loss of cristae organization in the mitochondria. The data demonstrate that excessively high CoA may be detrimental to skeletal muscle function. PMID:28189602

  18. Investigation of Pyridine Carboxylic Acids in CM2 Carbonaceous Chondrites: Potential Precursor Molecules for Ancient Coenzymes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Karen E.; Callahan, Michael P.; Gerakines, Perry A.; Dworkin, Jason P.; House, Christopher H.

    2014-01-01

    The distribution and abundances of pyridine carboxylic acids (including nicotinic acid) in eight CM2 carbonaceous chondrites (ALH 85013, DOM 03183, DOM 08003, EET 96016, LAP 02333, LAP 02336, LEW 85311, and WIS 91600) were investigated by liquid chromatography coupled to UV detection and high resolution Orbitrap mass spectrometry. We find that pyridine monocarboxylic acids are prevalent in CM2-type chondrites and their abundance negatively correlates with the degree of pre-terrestrial aqueous alteration that the meteorite parent body experienced. We lso report the first detection of pyridine dicarboxylic acids in carbonaceous chondrites. Additionally, we carried out laboratory studies of proton-irradiated pyridine in carbon dioxide-rich ices (a 1:1 mixture) to serve as a model of the interstellar ice chemistry that may have led to the synthesis of pyridine carboxylic acids. Analysis of the irradiated ice residue shows that a comparable suite of pyridine mono- and dicarboxylic acids was produced, although aqueous alteration may still play a role in the synthesis (and ultimate yield) of these compounds in carbonaceous meteorites. Nicotinic acid is a precursor to nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, a likely ancient molecule used in cellular metabolism in all of life, and its common occurrence in CM2 chondrites may indicate that meteorites may have been a source of molecules for the emergence of more complex coenzymes on the early Earth.

  19. Investigation of Pyridine Carboxylic Acids in CM2 Carbonaceous Chondrites: Potential Precursor Molecules for Ancient Coenzymes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Karen E.; Callahan, Michael P.; Gerakines, Perry A.; Dworkin, Jason P.; House, Christopher H.

    2014-01-01

    The distribution and abundances of pyridine carboxylic acids (including nicotinic acid) in eight CM2 carbonaceous chondrites (ALH 85013, DOM 03183, DOM 08003, EET 96016, LAP 02333, LAP 02336, LEW 85311, and WIS 91600) were investigated by liquid chromatography coupled to UV detection and high resolution Orbitrap mass spectrometry. We find that pyridine monocarboxylic acids are prevalent in CM2-type chondrites and their abundance negatively correlates with the degree of pre-terrestrial aqueous alteration that the meteorite parent body experienced. We also report the first detection of pyridine dicarboxylic acids in carbonaceous chondrites. Additionally, we carried out laboratory studies of proton-irradiated pyridine in carbon dioxide-rich ices (a 1:1 mixture) to serve as a model of the interstellar ice chemistry that may have led to the synthesis of pyridine carboxylic acids. Analysis of the irradiated ice residue shows that a comparable suite of pyridine mono- and dicarboxylic acids was produced, although aqueous alteration may still play a role in the synthesis (and ultimate yield) of these compounds in carbonaceous meteorites. Nicotinic acid is a precursor to nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, a likely ancient molecule used in cellular metabolism in all of life, and its common occurrence in CM2 chondrites may indicate that meteorites may have been a source of molecules for the emergence of more complex coenzymes on the early Earth.

  20. Protein CoAlation: a redox-regulated protein modification by coenzyme A in mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Tsuchiya, Yugo; Peak-Chew, Sew Yeu; Newell, Clare; Miller-Aidoo, Sheritta; Mangal, Sriyash; Zhyvoloup, Alexander; Bakovic´, Jovana; Malanchuk, Oksana; Pereira, Gonçalo C.; Kotiadis, Vassilios; Szabadkai, Gyorgy; Duchen, Michael R.; Campbell, Mark; Cuenca, Sergio Rodriguez; Vidal-Puig, Antonio; James, Andrew M.; Murphy, Michael P.; Filonenko, Valeriy; Skehel, Mark

    2017-01-01

    Coenzyme A (CoA) is an obligatory cofactor in all branches of life. CoA and its derivatives are involved in major metabolic pathways, allosteric interactions and the regulation of gene expression. Abnormal biosynthesis and homeostasis of CoA and its derivatives have been associated with various human pathologies, including cancer, diabetes and neurodegeneration. Using an anti-CoA monoclonal antibody and mass spectrometry, we identified a wide range of cellular proteins which are modified by covalent attachment of CoA to cysteine thiols (CoAlation). We show that protein CoAlation is a reversible post-translational modification that is induced in mammalian cells and tissues by oxidising agents and metabolic stress. Many key cellular enzymes were found to be CoAlated in vitro and in vivo in ways that modified their activities. Our study reveals that protein CoAlation is a widespread post-translational modification which may play an important role in redox regulation under physiological and pathophysiological conditions. PMID:28341808

  1. The radical mechanism of biological methane synthesis by methyl-coenzyme M reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Wongnate, T.; Sliwa, D.; Ginovska, B.

    2016-05-19

    Methyl-coenzyme M reductase (MCR), the rate-limiting enzyme in methanogenesis and anaerobic methane oxidation, is responsible for the production of over one billion tons of methane per year. The mechanism of methane synthesis is unknown, with the two leading proposals involving either a methyl-nickel(III) (Mechanism I) or methyl radical/Ni(II)-thiolate (Mechanism II) intermediate(s). When the reaction between the active Ni(I) enzyme with substrates was studied by transient kinetic, spectroscopic and computational methods, formation of an EPR-silent Ni(II)-thiolate intermediate was positively identified by magnetic circular dichroism spectroscopy. There was no evidence for an EPR-active methyl-Ni(III) species. Temperature-dependent transient kinetic studies revealed that themore » activation energy for the initial catalytic step closely matched the value computed by density functional theory for Mechanism II. Thus, our results demonstrate that biological methane synthesis occurs by generation of a methyl radical.« less

  2. Acyl Coenzyme A Thioesterase 7 Regulates Neuronal Fatty Acid Metabolism To Prevent Neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Jessica M.; Wong, G. William

    2013-01-01

    Numerous neurological diseases are associated with dysregulated lipid metabolism; however, the basic metabolic control of fatty acid metabolism in neurons remains enigmatic. Here we have shown that neurons have abundant expression and activity of the long-chain cytoplasmic acyl coenzyme A (acyl-CoA) thioesterase 7 (ACOT7) to regulate lipid retention and metabolism. Unbiased and targeted metabolomic analysis of fasted mice with a conditional knockout of ACOT7 in the nervous system, Acot7N−/−, revealed increased fatty acid flux into multiple long-chain acyl-CoA-dependent pathways. The alterations in brain fatty acid metabolism were concomitant with a loss of lean mass, hypermetabolism, hepatic steatosis, dyslipidemia, and behavioral hyperexcitability in Acot7N−/− mice. These failures in adaptive energy metabolism are common in neurodegenerative diseases. In agreement, Acot7N−/− mice exhibit neurological dysfunction and neurodegeneration. These data show that ACOT7 counterregulates fatty acid metabolism in neurons and protects against neurotoxicity. PMID:23459938

  3. Coenzyme Q biosynthesis and its role in the respiratory chain structure.

    PubMed

    Alcázar-Fabra, María; Navas, Plácido; Brea-Calvo, Gloria

    2016-08-01

    Coenzyme Q (CoQ) is a unique electron carrier in the mitochondrial respiratory chain, which is synthesized on-site by a nuclear encoded multiprotein complex. CoQ receives electrons from different redox pathways, mainly NADH and FADH2 from tricarboxylic acid pathway, dihydroorotate dehydrogenase, electron transfer flavoprotein dehydrogenase and glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase that support key aspects of the metabolism. Here we explore some lines of evidence supporting the idea of the interaction of CoQ with the respiratory chain complexes, contributing to their superassembly, including respirasome, and its role in reactive oxygen species production in the mitochondrial inner membrane. We also review the current knowledge about the involvement of mitochondrial genome defects and electron transfer flavoprotein dehydrogenase mutations in the induction of secondary CoQ deficiency. This mechanism would imply specific interactions coupling CoQ itself or the CoQ-biosynthetic apparatus with the respiratory chain components. These interactions would regulate mitochondrial CoQ steady-state levels and function. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'EBEC 2016: 19th European Bioenergetics Conference, Riva del Garda, Italy, July 2-6, 2016', edited by Prof. Paolo Bernardi. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Multi-omic Mitoprotease Profiling Defines a Role for Oct1p in Coenzyme Q Production.

    PubMed

    Veling, Mike T; Reidenbach, Andrew G; Freiberger, Elyse C; Kwiecien, Nicholas W; Hutchins, Paul D; Drahnak, Michael J; Jochem, Adam; Ulbrich, Arne; Rush, Matthew J P; Russell, Jason D; Coon, Joshua J; Pagliarini, David J

    2017-12-07

    Mitoproteases are becoming recognized as key regulators of diverse mitochondrial functions, although their direct substrates are often difficult to discern. Through multi-omic profiling of diverse Saccharomyces cerevisiae mitoprotease deletion strains, we predicted numerous associations between mitoproteases and distinct mitochondrial processes. These include a strong association between the mitochondrial matrix octapeptidase Oct1p and coenzyme Q (CoQ) biosynthesis-a pathway essential for mitochondrial respiration. Through Edman sequencing and in vitro and in vivo biochemistry, we demonstrated that Oct1p directly processes the N terminus of the CoQ-related methyltransferase, Coq5p, which markedly improves its stability. A single mutation to the Oct1p recognition motif in Coq5p disrupted its processing in vivo, leading to CoQ deficiency and respiratory incompetence. This work defines the Oct1p processing of Coq5p as an essential post-translational event for proper CoQ production. Additionally, our data visualization tool enables efficient exploration of mitoprotease profiles that can serve as the basis for future mechanistic investigations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Defective remethylation of homocysteine is related to decreased synthesis of coenzymes B2 in thyroidectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Ayav, A; Alberto, J M; Barbe, F; Brunaud, L; Gerard, P; Merten, M; Gueant, J L

    2005-02-01

    We investigated the influence of hypothyroidism on homocysteine metabolism in rats, focusing on a hypothetical deficient synthesis of FAD by riboflavin kinases. Animals were allocated in control group (n = 7), thyroidectomized rats (n = 6), rats with diet deficient in vitamin B2, B9, B12, choline and methionine (n = 7), thyroidectomized rats with deficient diet (n = 9). Homocysteine was decreased in operated rats (2.6 +/- 1.01 vs. 4.05 +/- 1.0 mumol/L, P = 0.02) and increased in deficient diet rats (29.56 +/- 4.52 vs. 4.05 +/- 1.0 micromol/L, P = 0.001), when compared to control group. Erythrocyte-Glutathione-Reductase-Activation-Coefficient (index of FAD deficiency) was increased in thyroidectomized or deficient diet rats (P = 0.004 for both). Methylenetetrahydrofolate-reductase and methionine-synthase activities were decreased in thyroidectomized rats but not in those subjected to deficient diet. Cystathionine-beta-synthase was increased only in operated rats. Taken together, these results showed a defective re-methylation in surgical hypothyroidism, which was due in part to a defective synthesis of vitamin B2 coenzymes. This defective pathway was overcompensated by the increased Cystathionine-beta-synthase activity.

  6. Protein CoAlation and antioxidant function of Coenzyme A in prokaryotic cells.

    PubMed

    Tsuchiya, Yugo; Zhyvoloup, Alexander; Bakovic, Jovana; Thomas, Naam; Yi Kun Yu, Bess; Das, Sayoni; Orengo, Christine; Newell, Clare; Ward, John; Saladino, Giorgio; Comitani, Federico; Gervasio, Francesco L; Malanchuk, Oksana M; Khoruzhenko, Antonina I; Filonenko, Valeriy; Peak-Chew, Sew Yeu; Skehel, Mark; Gout, Ivan

    2018-04-06

    In all living organisms, Coenzyme A (CoA) is an essential cofactor with a unique design allowing it to function as an acyl group carrier and a carbonyl-activating group in diverse biochemical reactions. It is synthesized in a highly conserved process in prokaryotes and eukaryotes that requires pantothenic acid (vitamin B5), cysteine and ATP. CoA and its thioester derivatives are involved in major metabolic pathways, allosteric interactions and the regulation of gene expression. A novel unconventional function of CoA in redox regulation has been recently discovered in mammalian cells and termed protein CoAlation. Here, we report for the first time that protein CoAlation occurs at a background level in exponentially growing bacteria and is strongly induced in response to oxidizing agents and metabolic stress. Over 12% of S. aureus gene products were shown to be CoAlated in response to diamide-induced stress . In vitro CoAlation of S. aureus glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (SaGAPDH) was found to inhibit its enzymatic activity and to protect the catalytic cysteine 151 from overoxidation by hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ). These findings suggest that in exponentially growing bacteria CoA functions to generate metabolically active thioesters, while it also has the potential to act as a low molecular weight antioxidant in response to oxidative and metabolic stress. ©2018 The Author(s).

  7. Polyunsaturated fatty acyl-coenzyme As are inhibitors of cholesterol biosynthesis in zebrafish and mice

    PubMed Central

    Karanth, Santhosh; Tran, Vy My; Kuberan, Balagurunathan; Schlegel, Amnon

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Lipid disorders pose therapeutic challenges. Previously we discovered that mutation of the hepatocyte β-hydroxybutyrate transporter Slc16a6a in zebrafish causes hepatic steatosis during fasting, marked by increased hepatic triacylglycerol, but not cholesterol. This selective diversion of trapped ketogenic carbon atoms is surprising because acetate and acetoacetate can exit mitochondria and can be incorporated into both fatty acids and cholesterol in normal hepatocytes. To elucidate the mechanism of this selective diversion of carbon atoms to fatty acids, we fed wild-type and slc16a6a mutant animals high-protein ketogenic diets. We find that slc16a6a mutants have decreased activity of the rate-limiting enzyme of cholesterol biosynthesis, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase (Hmgcr), despite increased Hmgcr protein abundance and relative incorporation of mevalonate into cholesterol. These observations suggest the presence of an endogenous Hmgcr inhibitor. We took a candidate approach to identify such inhibitors. First, we found that mutant livers accumulate multiple polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) and PUFA-CoAs, and we showed that human HMGCR is inhibited by PUFA-CoAs in vitro. Second, we injected mice with an ethyl ester of the PUFA eicosapentaenoic acid and observed an acute decrease in hepatic Hmgcr activity, without alteration in Hmgcr protein abundance. These results elucidate a mechanism for PUFA-mediated cholesterol lowering through direct inhibition of Hmgcr. PMID:24057001

  8. Alteration of the coenzyme A biosynthetic pathway in neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation syndromes.

    PubMed

    Venco, Paola; Dusi, Sabrina; Valletta, Lorella; Tiranti, Valeria

    2014-08-01

    NBIA (neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation) comprises a heterogeneous group of neurodegenerative diseases having as a common denominator, iron overload in specific brain areas, mainly basal ganglia and globus pallidus. In the past decade a bunch of disease genes have been identified, but NBIA pathomechanisms are still not completely clear. PKAN (pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration), an autosomal recessive disorder with progressive impairment of movement, vision and cognition, is the most common form of NBIA. It is caused by mutations in the PANK2 (pantothenate kinase 2) gene, coding for a mitochondrial enzyme that phosphorylates vitamin B5 in the first reaction of the CoA (coenzyme A) biosynthetic pathway. A distinct form of NBIA, denominated CoPAN (CoA synthase protein-associated neurodegeneration), is caused by mutations in the CoASY (CoA synthase) gene coding for a bifunctional mitochondrial enzyme, which catalyses the final steps of CoA biosynthesis. These two inborn errors of CoA metabolism further support the concept that dysfunctions in CoA synthesis may play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of NBIA.

  9. The 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme-A (HMG-CoA) reductases

    PubMed Central

    Friesen, Jon A; Rodwell, Victor W

    2004-01-01

    The enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase catalyzes the conversion of HMG-CoA to mevalonate, a four-electron oxidoreduction that is the rate-limiting step in the synthesis of cholesterol and other isoprenoids. The enzyme is found in eukaryotes and prokaryotes; and phylogenetic analysis has revealed two classes of HMG-CoA reductase, the Class I enzymes of eukaryotes and some archaea and the Class II enzymes of eubacteria and certain other archaea. Three-dimensional structures of the catalytic domain of HMG-CoA reductases from humans and from the bacterium Pseudomonas mevalonii, in conjunction with site-directed mutagenesis studies, have revealed details of the mechanism of catalysis. The reaction catalyzed by human HMG-CoA reductase is a target for anti-hypercholesterolemic drugs (statins), which are intended to lower cholesterol levels in serum. Eukaryotic forms of the enzyme are anchored to the endoplasmic reticulum, whereas the prokaryotic enzymes are soluble. Probably because of its critical role in cellular cholesterol homeostasis, mammalian HMG-CoA reductase is extensively regulated at the transcriptional, translational, and post-translational levels. PMID:15535874

  10. Recurrent Ventricular Tachycardia in Medium-Chain Acyl-Coenzyme A Dehydrogenase Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Bala, P; Ferdinandusse, S; Olpin, S E; Chetcuti, P; Morris, A A M

    2016-01-01

    We report a baby with medium-chain acyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase (MCAD) deficiency who presented on day 2 with poor feeding and lethargy. She was floppy with hypoglycaemia (1.8 mmol/l) and hyperammonaemia (182 μmol/l). Despite correction of these and a continuous intravenous infusion of glucose at 4.5-6.2 mg/kg/min, she developed generalised tonic clonic seizures on day 3. She also suffered two episodes of pulseless ventricular tachycardia, from which she was resuscitated successfully. Unfortunately, she died on day 5, following a third episode of pulseless ventricular tachycardia. Arrhythmias are generally thought to be rarer in MCAD deficiency than in disorders of long-chain fatty acid oxidation. This is, however, the sixth report of ventricular tachyarrhythmias in MCAD deficiency. Five of these involved neonates and it may be that patients with MCAD deficiency are particularly prone to ventricular arrhythmias in the newborn period. Three of the patients (including ours) had normal blood glucose concentrations at the time of the arrhythmias and had been receiving intravenous glucose for many hours. These cases suggest that arrhythmias can be induced by medium-chain acylcarnitines or other metabolites accumulating in MCAD deficiency. Ventricular tachyarrhythmias can occur in MCAD deficiency, especially in neonates.

  11. Getting a Handle on the Role of Coenzyme M in Alkene Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Krishnakumar, Arathi M.; Sliwa, Darius; Endrizzi, James A.; Boyd, Eric S.; Ensign, Scott A.; Peters, John W.

    2008-01-01

    Summary: Coenzyme M (2-mercaptoethanesulfonate; CoM) is one of several atypical cofactors discovered in methanogenic archaea which participate in the biological reduction of CO2 to methane. Elegantly simple, CoM, so named for its role as a methyl carrier in all methanogenic archaea, is the smallest known organic cofactor. It was thought that this cofactor was used exclusively in methanogenesis until it was recently discovered that CoM is a key cofactor in the pathway of propylene metabolism in the gram-negative soil microorganism Xanthobacter autotrophicus Py2. A four-step pathway requiring CoM converts propylene and CO2 to acetoacetate, which feeds into central metabolism. In this process, CoM is used to activate and convert highly electrophilic epoxypropane, formed from propylene epoxidation, into a nucleophilic species that undergoes carboxylation. The unique properties of CoM provide a chemical handle for orienting compounds for site-specific redox chemistry and stereospecific catalysis. The three-dimensional structures of several of the enzymes in the pathway of propylene metabolism in defined states have been determined, providing significant insights into both the enzyme mechanisms and the role of CoM in this pathway. These studies provide the structural basis for understanding the efficacy of CoM as a handle to direct organic substrate transformations at the active sites of enzymes. PMID:18772284

  12. Evaluation of Chemotherapeutic Agents Against Malaria, Drugs, Diet, and Biological Response Modifiers.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-10-29

    The oils, MCT and Miglyol , were found to be suitable placebos for fish oil. A normal chow diet (with adequate vitamin E levels) supplemented with 20...year. Co-enzyme Q10 did not act as an antioxidant like vitamin E during a malarial infection. Two oils, MCT and Miglyol , were found to be suitable...manipulation. In experiment 84 miglyol was added to a standard rodent chow diet with normal levels of vitamin E to see whether it whould interfere with the

  13. Family Living Supplement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Truitt, Debbie

    This family living supplement contains 125 supplemental ideas and strategies designed to help vocational home economics teachers increase student motivation and enrich the teaching process. Ideas and strategies are organized into seven sections. These are career planning, securing a job, and career success; managing financial resources, buying…

  14. Antioxidant supplements and mortality.

    PubMed

    Bjelakovic, Goran; Nikolova, Dimitrinka; Gluud, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative damage to cells and tissues is considered involved in the aging process and in the development of chronic diseases in humans, including cancer and cardiovascular diseases, the leading causes of death in high-income countries. This has stimulated interest in the preventive potential of antioxidant supplements. Today, more than one half of adults in high-income countries ingest antioxidant supplements hoping to improve their health, oppose unhealthy behaviors, and counteract the ravages of aging. Older observational studies and some randomized clinical trials with high risks of systematic errors ('bias') have suggested that antioxidant supplements may improve health and prolong life. A number of randomized clinical trials with adequate methodologies observed neutral or negative results of antioxidant supplements. Recently completed large randomized clinical trials with low risks of bias and systematic reviews of randomized clinical trials taking systematic errors ('bias') and risks of random errors ('play of chance') into account have shown that antioxidant supplements do not seem to prevent cancer, cardiovascular diseases, or death. Even more, beta-carotene, vitamin A, and vitamin E may increase mortality. Some recent large observational studies now support these findings. According to recent dietary guidelines, there is no evidence to support the use of antioxidant supplements in the primary prevention of chronic diseases or mortality. Antioxidant supplements do not possess preventive effects and may be harmful with unwanted consequences to our health, especially in well-nourished populations. The optimal source of antioxidants seems to come from our diet, not from antioxidant supplements in pills or tablets.

  15. Multivitamin/Mineral Supplements

    MedlinePlus

    ... of folic acid from fortified foods and/or dietary supplements to reduce the risk of birth defects of the brain and spine ... of vitamin B12 from fortified foods and/or dietary supplements because they ... MVM is unlikely to pose any risks to health. But if you consume fortified foods ...

  16. Supplemental instruction in chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundeberg, Mary A.

    This study was designed to measure some effects of supplemental instruction in chemistry. Supplemental instruction is a peer-led cooperative learning program that encourages students to develop conceptual understanding by articulating both understandings and misconceptions in a think-aloud fashion. Supplemental instruction was offered three hours weekly outside of class and lab time for students in four classes of General Organic and Biological Chemistry. Over a two-year period 108 students volunteered to participate in this program; 45 students did not participate. As measured by final grades in chemistry and responses to a questionnaire, supplemental instruction was effective in increasing students' achievement in chemistry. Further research is needed to determine the in-depth effects of supplemental instruction on students' learning, problem solving, and self-esteem.

  17. Should You Take Dietary Supplements?

    MedlinePlus

    ... August 2013 Print this issue Should You Take Dietary Supplements? A Look at Vitamins, Minerals, Botanicals and More ... half of all Americans take one or more dietary supplements daily or on occasion. Supplements are available without ...

  18. Beware of Fraudulent 'Dietary Supplements'

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home For Consumers Consumer Updates Beware of Fraudulent Dietary Supplements Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... phone at 1-800-FDA-1088 or online . Dietary Supplements and FDA Dietary supplements, in general, are not ...

  19. Resveratrol and para-coumarate serve as ring precursors for coenzyme Q biosynthesis[S

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Letian X.; Williams, Kevin J.; He, Cuiwen H.; Weng, Emily; Khong, San; Rose, Tristan E.; Kwon, Ohyun; Bensinger, Steven J.; Marbois, Beth N.; Clarke, Catherine F.

    2015-01-01

    Coenzyme Q (Q or ubiquinone) is a redox-active polyisoprenylated benzoquinone lipid essential for electron and proton transport in the mitochondrial respiratory chain. The aromatic ring 4-hydroxybenzoic acid (4HB) is commonly depicted as the sole aromatic ring precursor in Q biosynthesis despite the recent finding that para-aminobenzoic acid (pABA) also serves as a ring precursor in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Q biosynthesis. In this study, we employed aromatic 13C6-ring-labeled compounds including 13C6-4HB, 13C6-pABA, 13C6-resveratrol, and 13C6-coumarate to investigate the role of these small molecules as aromatic ring precursors in Q biosynthesis in Escherichia coli, S. cerevisiae, and human and mouse