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Sample records for coevolutionary competitive exclusion

  1. Competitive coevolutionary learning of fuzzy systems for job exchange in computational grids.

    PubMed

    Fölling, Alexander; Grimme, Christian; Lepping, Joachim; Papaspyrou, Alexander; Schwiegelshohn, Uwe

    2009-01-01

    In our work, we address the problem of workload distribution within a computational grid. In this scenario, users submit jobs to local high performance computing (HPC) systems which are, in turn, interconnected such that the exchange of jobs to other sites becomes possible. Providers are able to avoid local execution of jobs by offering them to other HPC sites. In our implementation, this distribution decision is made by a fuzzy system controller whose parameters can be adjusted to establish different exchange behaviors. In such a system, it is essential that HPC sites can only benefit if the workload is equitably (not necessarily equally) portioned among all participants. However, each site egoistically strives only for the minimization of its own jobs' response times regularly at the expense of other sites. This scenario is particularly suited for the application of a competitive coevolutionary algorithm: the fuzzy systems of the participating HPC sites are modeled as species that evolve in different populations while having to compete within the commonly shared ecosystem. Using real workload traces and grid setups, we show that opportunistic cooperation leads to significant improvements for each HPC site as well as for the overall system.

  2. 21 CFR 529.469 - Competitive exclusion culture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Competitive exclusion culture. 529.469 Section 529... Competitive exclusion culture. (a) Specifications. Each packet of lyophilized culture contains either 2,000 or... contents of one 2,000-dose packet of lyophilized culture. Mix thoroughly. (2) For 5,000-dose packet,...

  3. 21 CFR 529.469 - Competitive exclusion culture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Competitive exclusion culture. 529.469 Section 529... Competitive exclusion culture. (a) Specifications. Each packet of lyophilized culture contains either 2,000 or... contents of one 2,000-dose packet of lyophilized culture. Mix thoroughly. (2) For 5,000-dose packet,...

  4. 21 CFR 529.469 - Competitive exclusion culture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Competitive exclusion culture. 529.469 Section 529... Competitive exclusion culture. (a) Specifications. Each packet of lyophilized culture contains either 2,000 or... contents of one 2,000-dose packet of lyophilized culture. Mix thoroughly. (2) For 5,000-dose packet,...

  5. Quantifying Competitive Exclusion and Competitive Release in Ecological Communities: A Conceptual Framework and a Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Henkin, Zalmen; Kadmon, Ronen

    2016-01-01

    A fundamental notion in community ecology is that local species diversity reflects some balance between the contrasting forces of competitive exclusion and competitive release. Quantifying this balance is not trivial, and requires data on the magnitude of both processes in the same system, as well as appropriate methodology to integrate and interpret such data. Here we present a novel framework for empirical studies of the balance between competitive exclusion and competitive release and demonstrate its applicability using data from a Mediterranean annual grassland where grazing is a major mechanism of competitive release. Empirical data on the balance between competitive exclusion and competitive release are crucial for understanding observed patterns of variation in local species diversity and the proposed approach provides a simple framework for the collection, interpretation, and synthesis of such data. PMID:27536943

  6. Quantifying Competitive Exclusion and Competitive Release in Ecological Communities: A Conceptual Framework and a Case Study.

    PubMed

    Segre, Hila; DeMalach, Niv; Henkin, Zalmen; Kadmon, Ronen

    2016-01-01

    A fundamental notion in community ecology is that local species diversity reflects some balance between the contrasting forces of competitive exclusion and competitive release. Quantifying this balance is not trivial, and requires data on the magnitude of both processes in the same system, as well as appropriate methodology to integrate and interpret such data. Here we present a novel framework for empirical studies of the balance between competitive exclusion and competitive release and demonstrate its applicability using data from a Mediterranean annual grassland where grazing is a major mechanism of competitive release. Empirical data on the balance between competitive exclusion and competitive release are crucial for understanding observed patterns of variation in local species diversity and the proposed approach provides a simple framework for the collection, interpretation, and synthesis of such data.

  7. Coexistence and exclusion of stochastic competitive Lotka-Volterra models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Dang H.; Yin, George

    2017-02-01

    This work derives sufficient conditions for the coexistence and exclusion of a stochastic competitive Lotka-Volterra model. The conditions obtained are close to necessary. In addition, convergence in distribution of positive solutions of the model is also established. A number of numerical examples are given to illustrate our results.

  8. Stochastic competitive exclusion leads to a cascade of species extinctions.

    PubMed

    Capitán, José A; Cuenda, Sara; Alonso, David

    2017-04-21

    Community ecology has traditionally relied on the competitive exclusion principle, a piece of common wisdom in conceptual frameworks developed to describe species assemblages. Key concepts in community ecology, such as limiting similarity and niche partitioning, are based on competitive exclusion. However, this classical paradigm in ecology relies on implications derived from simple, deterministic models. Here we show how the predictions of a symmetric, deterministic model about the way extinctions proceed can be utterly different from the results derived from the same model when ecological drift (demographic stochasticity) is explicitly considered. Using analytical approximations to the steady-state conditional probabilities for assemblages with two and three species, we demonstrate that stochastic competitive exclusion leads to a cascade of extinctions, whereas the symmetric, deterministic model predicts a multiple collapse of species. To test the robustness of our results, we have studied the effect of environmental stochasticity and relaxed the species symmetry assumption. Our conclusions highlight the crucial role of stochasticity when deriving reliable theoretical predictions for species community assembly.

  9. Survival analysis of stochastic competitive models in a polluted environment and stochastic competitive exclusion principle.

    PubMed

    Liu, Meng; Wang, Ke; Wu, Qiong

    2011-09-01

    Stochastic competitive models with pollution and without pollution are proposed and studied. For the first system with pollution, sufficient criteria for extinction, nonpersistence in the mean, weak persistence in the mean, strong persistence in the mean, and stochastic permanence are established. The threshold between weak persistence in the mean and extinction for each population is obtained. It is found that stochastic disturbance is favorable for the survival of one species and is unfavorable for the survival of the other species. For the second system with pollution, sufficient conditions for extinction and weak persistence are obtained. For the model without pollution, a partial stochastic competitive exclusion principle is derived.

  10. Competitive coexistence and competitive exclusion for a nonlinear community with delay effect and impulsive birth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yanping; Zhang, Feng; Wei, Jianzhou

    2016-12-01

    By constructing a population model of multi-species competition, a community with nonlinear interaction relationship is investigated, in which the species' response delay and environmental fluctuation effects (i.e., seasonal fluctuation of resource supplies and species' reproductive activities) on population are considered. Firstly, the conditions about competitive coexistence (i.e., persistence of all species) and competitive exclusion (i.e., only partial of species, but not all, keep persistence) of the community are established, and the underlying ecological mechanism of these results are analyzed. Secondly, by some illustrative examples, the interactive effects of nonlinear competition, species' response delay and environmental fluctuation on the structure of community are explored. It is demonstrated that small response delay and slight deviation of nonlinear competition indexes from 1 have little impact on the coexistence of community, but acute changes have distinct negative influence on community coexistence. This reveals to us that parameter perturbations of natural communities should keep in an appropriate range, which is of great significance in conservation and restoration biology.

  11. 47 CFR 101.1317 - Competitive bidding procedures for mutually exclusive MAS EA applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Competitive bidding procedures for mutually exclusive MAS EA applications. 101.1317 Section 101.1317 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION... License Requirements § 101.1317 Competitive bidding procedures for mutually exclusive MAS EA...

  12. Competitive exclusion, beta diversity, and deterministic vs. stochastic drivers of community assembly.

    PubMed

    Segre, Hila; Ron, Ronen; De Malach, Niv; Henkin, Zalmen; Mandel, Micha; Kadmon, Ronen

    2014-11-01

    Species diversity has two components - number of species and spatial turnover in species composition (beta-diversity). Using a field experiment focusing on a system of Mediterranean grasslands, we show that interspecific competition may influence the two components in the same direction or in opposite directions, depending on whether competitive exclusions are deterministic or stochastic. Deterministic exclusions reduce both patch-scale richness and beta-diversity, thereby homogenising the community. Stochastic extinctions reduce richness at the patch scale, but increase the differences in species composition among patches. These results indicate that studies of competitive effects on beta diversity may help to distinguish between deterministic and stochastic components of competitive exclusion. Such distinction is crucial for understanding the causal relationship between competition and species diversity, one of the oldest and most fundamental questions in ecology.

  13. COEXISTENCE, EXCLUSION, OR NEUTRALITY? A META-ANALYSIS OF COMPETITION BETWEEN AEDES ALBOPICTUS AND RESIDENT MOSQUITOES.

    PubMed

    Juliano, Steven A

    2010-06-01

    Competition experiments estimating the relative effects of inter- and intraspecific competition can help to resolve whether interspecific competition results in coexistence or exclusion. For mosquitoes, most such experiments have focused on invasive Aedes albopictus and its interactions with resident Aedes. A meta-analysis of such experiments tested whether the effect of interspecific competition is greater than, less than, or equal to that of intraspecific competition, and whether competitive outcomes are dependent on food quality. For A. albopictus and A. aegypti, there was significant context dependence, with interspecific competitive advantage for A. albopictus with low food quality, and competitive equivalence with high food quality. Meta-analysis of survivorship yielded more significant effects than did estimated rate of increase. Competitive effects and competitive responses of each species yielded similar results. This meta-analysis suggests competitive exclusion of A. aegypti by A. albopictus, and is thus consistent with field sampling, qualitative reviews, and interpretations from individual publications. For A. albopictus and A. triseriatus, most results indicated competitive equivalence and no context dependence, and are thus contrary to previous qualitative reviews and to interpretations from individual publications. For both pairs of species, published results suitable for meta-analysis remain scarce, and better experimental designs and improved analysis and reporting of statistical results are needed. Greater emphasis needs to be placed on estimating species' inter- and intra-specific competitive effects, rather than the more common, but theoretically less interesting, competitive responses. Experiments without low-density controls (i.e., replacement series) are inadequate for comparing competitive effects and responses.

  14. COEXISTENCE, EXCLUSION, OR NEUTRALITY? A META-ANALYSIS OF COMPETITION BETWEEN AEDES ALBOPICTUS AND RESIDENT MOSQUITOES

    PubMed Central

    Juliano, Steven A.

    2012-01-01

    Competition experiments estimating the relative effects of inter- and intraspecific competition can help to resolve whether interspecific competition results in coexistence or exclusion. For mosquitoes, most such experiments have focused on invasive Aedes albopictus and its interactions with resident Aedes. A meta-analysis of such experiments tested whether the effect of interspecific competition is greater than, less than, or equal to that of intraspecific competition, and whether competitive outcomes are dependent on food quality. For A. albopictus and A. aegypti, there was significant context dependence, with interspecific competitive advantage for A. albopictus with low food quality, and competitive equivalence with high food quality. Meta-analysis of survivorship yielded more significant effects than did estimated rate of increase. Competitive effects and competitive responses of each species yielded similar results. This meta-analysis suggests competitive exclusion of A. aegypti by A. albopictus, and is thus consistent with field sampling, qualitative reviews, and interpretations from individual publications. For A. albopictus and A. triseriatus, most results indicated competitive equivalence and no context dependence, and are thus contrary to previous qualitative reviews and to interpretations from individual publications. For both pairs of species, published results suitable for meta-analysis remain scarce, and better experimental designs and improved analysis and reporting of statistical results are needed. Greater emphasis needs to be placed on estimating species’ inter- and intra-specific competitive effects, rather than the more common, but theoretically less interesting, competitive responses. Experiments without low-density controls (i.e., replacement series) are inadequate for comparing competitive effects and responses. PMID:23482823

  15. 'Excellence' and Exclusion: The Individual Costs of Institutional Competitiveness.

    PubMed

    Watermeyer, Richard; Olssen, Mark

    A performance-based funding system like the United Kingdom's 'Research Excellence Framework' (REF) symbolizes the re-rationalization of higher education according to neoliberal ideology and New Public Management technologies. The REF is also significant for disclosing the kinds of behaviour that characterize universities' response to government demands for research auditability. In this paper, we consider the casualties of what Henry Giroux (2014) calls "neoliberalism's war on higher education" or more precisely the deleterious consequences of non-participation in the REF. We also discuss the ways with which higher education's competition fetish, embodied within the REF, affects the instrumentalization of academic research and the diminution of academic freedom, autonomy and criticality.

  16. 47 CFR 101.1317 - Competitive bidding procedures for mutually exclusive MAS EA applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Competitive bidding procedures for mutually exclusive MAS EA applications. 101.1317 Section 101.1317 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES Multiple Address Systems...

  17. Exclusivity strategies and opportunities in view of the Biologics Price Competition and Innovation Act.

    PubMed

    Gaudry, Kate S

    2011-01-01

    Government-provided exclusivity periods provide pharmaceutical companies with incentives to invest in new drugs. Meanwhile, encouraging competition serves another worthy goal of improving the affordability of medications. Decades ago, the Hatch-Waxman Act set forth provisions attempting to balance these objectives in the context of small-molecule drugs. Recently, the Biologics Price Competition and Innovation Act was enacted to meet similar aims in the context of biologic drugs. This article presents a detailed comparison of these two Acts. While the Acts share many global similarities (e.g., providing exclusivity terms and abbreviated approval processes), many differences are also apparent when analyzing details of the provisions. One area of great departure between the Acts is the requirements of how a generic or follow-on applicant must address patents covering a reference product. After describing these differences, the article presents predictions of how reference product sponsors will adapt their patent-prosecution strategies in view of the new Biologics Act.

  18. Coevolutionary Free Lunches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolpert, David H.; Macready, William G.

    2005-01-01

    Recent work on the foundations of optimization has begun to uncover its underlying rich structure. In particular, the "No Free Lunch" (NFL) theorems [WM97] state that any two algorithms are equivalent when their performance is averaged across all possible problems. This highlights the need for exploiting problem-specific knowledge to achieve better than random performance. In this paper we present a general framework covering most search scenarios. In addition to the optimization scenarios addressed in the NFL results, this framework covers multi-armed bandit problems and evolution of multiple co-evolving agents. As a particular instance of the latter, it covers "self-play" problems. In these problems the agents work together to produce a champion, who then engages one or more antagonists in a subsequent multi-player game In contrast to the traditional optimization case where the NFL results hold, we show that in self-play there are free lunches: in coevolution some algorithms have better performance than other algorithms, averaged across all possible problems. However in the typical coevolutionary scenarios encountered in biology, where there is no champion, NFL still holds.

  19. Cost modeling of biocontrol strains Pseudomonas chlororaphis and P. flurorescens for competitive exclusion of Salmonella enterica on tomatoes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biological control of foodborne pathogens may complement postharvest intervention measures to enhance food safety of minimally processed produce. The purpose of this research was to develop cost model estimates for application of competitive exclusion process (CEM) using Pseudomonas chlororaphis and...

  20. In vitro selection of enteric microflora for potential use as a competitive exclusion culture against Campylobacter in poultry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The administration of nonpathogenic microflora in neonatal poultry has been employed to reduce or eliminate the colonization of enteric pathogens. This concept, also called competitive exclusion (CE), although effective against Salmonella, has not consistently worked against Campylobacter. Most CE...

  1. Competitive exclusion by autologous antibodies can prevent broad HIV-1 antibodies from arising

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Shishi; Perelson, Alan S.

    2015-08-31

    The past decade has seen the discovery of numerous broad and potent monoclonal antibodies against HIV type 1 (HIV-1). Eliciting these antibodies via vaccination appears to be remarkably difficult, not least because they arise late in infection and are highly mutated relative to germline antibody sequences. Here, using a computational model, we show that broad antibodies could in fact emerge earlier and be less mutated, but that they may be prevented from doing so as a result of competitive exclusion by the autologous antibody response. We further find that this competitive exclusion is weaker in infections founded by multiple distinct strains, with broadly neutralizing antibodies emerging earlier than in infections founded by a single strain. Our computational model simulates coevolving multitype virus and antibody populations. Broadly neutralizing antibodies may therefore be easier for the adaptive immune system to generate than previously thought. As a result, if less mutated broad antibodies exist, it may be possible to elicit them with a vaccine containing a mixture of diverse virus strains.

  2. Competitive exclusion by autologous antibodies can prevent broad HIV-1 antibodies from arising

    DOE PAGES

    Luo, Shishi; Perelson, Alan S.

    2015-08-31

    The past decade has seen the discovery of numerous broad and potent monoclonal antibodies against HIV type 1 (HIV-1). Eliciting these antibodies via vaccination appears to be remarkably difficult, not least because they arise late in infection and are highly mutated relative to germline antibody sequences. Here, using a computational model, we show that broad antibodies could in fact emerge earlier and be less mutated, but that they may be prevented from doing so as a result of competitive exclusion by the autologous antibody response. We further find that this competitive exclusion is weaker in infections founded by multiple distinctmore » strains, with broadly neutralizing antibodies emerging earlier than in infections founded by a single strain. Our computational model simulates coevolving multitype virus and antibody populations. Broadly neutralizing antibodies may therefore be easier for the adaptive immune system to generate than previously thought. As a result, if less mutated broad antibodies exist, it may be possible to elicit them with a vaccine containing a mixture of diverse virus strains.« less

  3. Species colonisation, not competitive exclusion, drives community overdispersion over long-term succession.

    PubMed

    Li, Shao-Peng; Cadotte, Marc W; Meiners, Scott J; Hua, Zheng-Shuang; Jiang, Lin; Shu, Wen-Sheng

    2015-09-01

    Ecological communities often transition from phylogenetic and functional clustering to overdispersion over succession as judged by space-for-time substitution studies. Such a pattern has been generally attributed to the increase in competitive exclusion of closely related species with similar traits through time, although colonisation and extinction have rarely been examined. Using 44 years of uninterrupted old-field succession in New Jersey, USA, we confirmed that phylogenetic and functional clustering decreased as succession unfolded, but the transition was largely driven by colonisation. Early colonists were closely related and functionally similar to residents, while later colonists became less similar to the species present. Extirpated species were generally more distantly related to residents than by chance, or exhibited random phylogenetic/functional patterns, and their relatedness to residents was not associated with time. These results provide direct evidence that the colonisation of distant relatives, rather than extinction of close relatives, drives phylogenetic and functional overdispersion over succession.

  4. Antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of competitive exclusion bacteria applied to newly hatched chickens.

    PubMed

    Wagner, R Doug; Cerniglia, Carl E

    2005-07-25

    Competitive exclusion (CE) products are mixtures of obligate and facultative anaerobic bacteria applied to poultry hatchlings for prevention of Salmonella colonization. These mixtures have the potential to introduce bacteria with undesirable antimicrobial drug resistance traits into the human food supply. Antimicrobial drug susceptibilities of 27 obligate and facultative anaerobes isolated from a commercial CE product were evaluated with a microdilution minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) assay. Bacteroides distasonis and Bacteroides fragilis isolates were resistant to tetracycline and other antimicrobial drugs. An Escherichia coli isolate was resistant to four antimicrobial drugs: erythromycin, penicillin, vancomycin, and tylosin. Erythromycin-resistant enterococci and vancomycin-resistant Lactococcus lactis isolates in the CE product were detected. These findings suggest that more work needs to be done to assess the potential effects of CE product use in poultry on the food supply.

  5. Herbivore exclusion drives the evolution of plant competitiveness via increased allelopathy.

    PubMed

    Uesugi, Akane; Kessler, André

    2013-05-01

    The 'Evolution of Increased Competitive Ability (EICA)' hypothesis predicts the evolution of plant invasiveness in introduced ranges when plants escape from their natural enemies. So far, the EICA hypothesis has been tested by comparing plant vigor from native and invasive populations, but these studies are confounded by among-population differences in additional environmental factors and/or founder effects. We tested the major prediction of EICA by comparing the competitive ability (CA) of Solidago altissima plants originating from artificial selection plots in which we manipulated directly the exposure to above-ground herbivores. In a common garden experiment, we found an increase in inter-specific, but not intra-specific, CA in clones from herbivore exclusion plots relative to control plots. The evolutionary increase in inter-specific CA coincided with the increased production of polyacetylenes, whose major constituent was allelopathic against a heterospecific competitor, Poa pratensis, but not against conspecifics. Our results provide direct evidence that release from herbivory alone can lead to an evolutionary increase in inter-specific CA, which is likely to be mediated by the increased production of allelopathic compounds in S. altissima.

  6. Competitive exclusion over broad spatial extents is a slow process: Evidence and implications for species distribution modeling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yackulic, Charles B.

    2016-01-01

    There is considerable debate about the role of competition in shaping species distributions over broad spatial extents. This debate has practical implications because predicting changes in species' geographic ranges in response to ongoing environmental change would be simpler if competition could be ignored. While this debate has been the subject of many reviews, recent literature has not addressed the rates of relevant processes. This omission is surprising in that ecologists hypothesized decades ago that regional competitive exclusion is a slow process. The goal of this review is to reassess the debate under the hypothesis that competitive exclusion over broad spatial extents is a slow process.Available evidence, including simulations presented for the first time here, suggests that competitive exclusion over broad spatial extents occurs slowly over temporal extents of many decades to millennia. Ecologists arguing against an important role for competition frequently study modern patterns and/or range dynamics over periods of decades, while much of the evidence for competition shaping geographic ranges at broad spatial extents comes from paleoecological studies over time scales of centuries or longer. If competition is slow, as evidence suggests, the geographic distributions of some, perhaps many species, would continue to change over time scales of decades to millennia, even if environmental conditions did not continue to change. If the distributions of competing species are at equilibrium it is possible to predict species distributions based on observed species–environment relationships. However, disequilibrium is widespread as a result of competition and many other processes. Studies whose goal is accurate predictions over intermediate time scales (decades to centuries) should focus on factors associated with range expansion (colonization) and loss (local extinction), as opposed to current patterns. In general, understanding of modern range dynamics would be

  7. Cost modeling of pseudomonoas fluorescens and pseudomonoas chlororphis biocontrol for competitive exclusion of salmonella enterica on tomatoes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biocontrol measures may enhance postharvest interventions, however; published research on process-based models for biocontrol of foodborne pathogens on produce is limited. The aim of this research was to develop cost model estimates for competitive exclusion process using Pseudomonas fluorescens and...

  8. Competitive exclusion within the predator community influences the distribution of a threatened prey species.

    PubMed

    Byholm, Patrik; Burgas, Daniel; Virtanen, Tarmo; Valkama, Jari

    2012-08-01

    While much effort has been made to quantify how landscape composition influences the distribution of species, the possibility that geographical differences in species interactions might affect species distributions has received less attention. Investigating a predator-prey setting in a boreal forest ecosystem, we empirically show that large-scale differences in the predator community structure and small-scale competitive exclusion among predators affect the local distribution of a threatened forest specialist more than does landscape composition. Consequently, even though the landscape parameters affecting Siberian flying squirrel (Pteromys volans) distribution (prey) did not differ between nest sites of the predators Northern Goshawks (Accipiter gentilis) and Ural Owls (Strix uralensis), flying squirrels were heterospecifically attracted by goshawks in a region where both predator species were present. No such effect was found in another region where Ural Owls were absent. These results provide evidence that differences in species interactions over large spatial scales may be a major force influencing the distribution and abundance patterns of species. On the basis of these findings, we suspect that subtle species interactions might be a central reason why landscape models constructed to predict species distributions often fail when applied to wider geographical scales.

  9. Detection of bacteria from a cecal anaerobic competitive exclusion culture with an immunoassay electrochemiluminescence sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beier, Ross C.; Young, Colin R.; Stanker, Larry H.

    1999-01-01

    A competitive exclusion (CE) culture of chicken cecal anaerobes has been developed and used in this laboratory for control of Salmonella typhimurium in chickens. The CE culture consists of 29 different species of micro-organisms, and is known as CF3. Detection of one of the CF3 bacteria, Eubacteria, and S. typhimurium were demonstrated using a commercial immunomagnetic (IM) electrochemiluminescence (ECL) sensor, the ORIGENR Analyzer. Analysis was achieved using a sandwich immunoassay. Bacteria were captured on antibody- conjugated 280 micron sized magnetic beads followed by binding of reporter antibodies labelled with ruthenium (II) tris(dipyridyl) chelate [Ru(bpy)32+]. The magnetic beads were then trapped on an electrode in the reaction cell of the ORIGENR Analyzer by a magnet, and the ECL was evoked from Ru(bpy)32+ on the tagged reporter antibodies by an electrical potential at the electrode. Preliminary IM-ECL assays with Eubacteria yielded a detection limit of 105 cfu/mL. Preliminary IM-ECL assays with S. typhimurium yielded a similar detection limit of 105 cfu/mL.

  10. Inhibition of Staphylococcus aureus by antimicrobial biofilms formed by competitive exclusion microorganisms on stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Son, Hyeri; Park, Sunhyung; Beuchat, Larry R; Kim, Hoikyung; Ryu, Jee-Hoon

    2016-12-05

    The goal of this study was to develop a desiccation resistant antimicrobial surface using biofilm of competitive exclusion (CE) microorganism inhibitory to Staphylococcus aureus. We isolated 161 microorganisms from soils, foods, and food-contact surfaces that are inhibitory to S. aureus. Among them, three CE microorganisms (Streptomyces spororaveus strain Gaeunsan-18, Bacillus safensis strain Chamnamu-sup 5-25, and Pseudomonas azotoformans strain Lettuce-9) exhibiting strong antibacterial activity and high growth rates were selected for evaluation. These isolates formed biofilms within 24h on stainless steel coupons (SSCs) immersed in Bennet's broth and tryptic soy broth at 25°C. Cells in these biofilms showed significantly (P≤0.05) enhanced resistance to a desiccation (43% relative humidity [RH]) compared to those attached to SSCs but not in biofilms. The antimicrobial activities of biofilms formed by these isolates on SSCs against S. aureus at 25°C and 43% RH were determined. Compared to SSCs lacking biofilms formed by CE microorganisms, populations of S. aureus on SSCs harboring CE biofilms were significantly lower (P≤0.05). Results indicate that persistent antimicrobial activity against S. aureus on stainless steel surfaces can be achieved by the presence of biofilms of CE microorganisms. This information will be useful when developing strategies to improve the microbiological safety of foods during storage, processing, and distribution by facilitating the development of effective antimicrobial food-contact surfaces.

  11. Dynamic use of wetlands by black ducks and mallards: evidence against competitive exclusion

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McAuley, D.G.; Clugston, D.A.; Longcore, J.R.

    2004-01-01

    The decline of the American black duck (Anas rubripes) has been attributed to competition from mallards (A. platyrhynchos) that led to exclusive use of fertile wetlands by mallards. Data from annual breeding waterfowl surveys provide instantaneous, single observations of breeding pairs, which are used to estimate breeding population size and evaluate the condition of habitat. Data from these surveys have been used to document habitat use by black ducks and mallards. We used quiet-observation surveys from elevated platforms to study sympatric black ducks and mallards in northern Maine during the breeding season. Our objectives were to document occupancy of wetlands by breeding black ducks and mallards throughout the day during prenesting and early nesting periods to determine whether 1) wetlands were occupied by only a single species, 2) pairs of the same species occupied wetlands throughout the period, and 3) single observations of short duration adequately determine numbers and species using a wetland. We observed ducks at 5-minute intervals from elevated platforms on wetland margins to determine numbers and species of indicated pairs using each wetland over time. We visited 80% of the wetlands >2 times, with mean total time per wetland averaging 267 minutes. For each wetland we determined the most frequently observed grouping of black ducks and mallards from all combinations recorded during all intervals (e.g., 1 black duck [BO] pair during 9 intervals; 2 mallard [MA] pairs and 1 BO pair during 22 intervals; 0 pairs during 3 intervals). A single pair, a lone male, or no ducks were recorded during 34% of the 5-minute intervals. For wetlands with >2 hours of observations (n=65), all but 2 were used by >2 different combinations of ducks. On most wetlands, the most frequent grouping was observed during 2 hours were used by both species, random visits detected both species on only 27 wetlands. Our data do not support assertions that the mallard has caused the decline

  12. Inhibition of Campylobacter jejuni colonization in chicks by defined competitive exclusion bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Schoeni, J L; Wong, A C

    1994-01-01

    Campylobacter enteritis in humans has been linked to consumption of chicken. Reducing Campylobacter jejuni colonization in chickens can potentially reduce Campylobacter infections in humans. In this study, the reduction of C. jejuni colonization in chicks by oral administration of defined competitive exclusion (CE) cultures, 2.5% dietary carbohydrates, or CE cultures and carbohydrates was examined. Prevention, elimination, or direct challenge of Campylobacter infection was simulated by administering treatments before, after, or at the same time as that of the Campylobacter inoculation. Additionally, the effect of maintaining high levels of protective bacteria was evaluated by administering CE cultures on days 1 and 4 (booster treatment). All treatments reduced C. jejuni colonization. Protection by aerobically grown CE cultures was not statistically different from that by anaerobically grown CE cultures. A combination of Citrobacter diversus 22, Klebsiella pneumoniae 23, and Escherichia coli 25 (CE 3) was the most effective CE treatment. Maintaining high numbers of CE isolates by administering CE boosters did not increase protection. The greatest reduction of Campylobacter colonization was observed in schemes to prevent or eliminate C. jejuni infection. C. jejuni was not detected in the ceca of birds receiving the prevention treatment, CE 3 with mannose, representing a 62% reduction in the colonization rate. The protection factor (PF), a value combining the colonization rate and the level of infection, for CE 3 with mannose was high (> 13.2). Fructo-oligosaccharides alone strongly prevented Campylobacter colonization. Only 8% of the chicks in this group were colonized, with a PF of > 14.3.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8017915

  13. Dynamic landscape models of coevolutionary games.

    PubMed

    Richter, Hendrik

    2017-02-24

    Players of coevolutionary games may update not only their strategies but also their networks of interaction. Based on interpreting the payoff of players as fitness, dynamic landscape models are proposed. The modeling procedure is carried out for Prisoner's Dilemma (PD) and Snowdrift (SD) games that both use either birth-death (BD) or death-birth (DB) strategy updating. The main focus is on using dynamic fitness landscapes as a mathematical model of coevolutionary game dynamics. Hence, an alternative tool for analyzing coevolutionary games becomes available, and landscape measures such as modality, ruggedness and information content can be computed and analyzed. In addition, fixation properties of the games and quantifiers characterizing the interaction networks are calculated numerically. Relations are established between landscape properties expressed by landscape measures and quantifiers of coevolutionary game dynamics such as fixation probabilities, fixation times and network properties.

  14. Effect of porcine-derived mucosal competitive exclusion culture on antimicrobial resistance in Escherichia coli from growing piglets.

    PubMed

    Kim, L M; Gray, Jeffery T; Bailey, J Stan; Jones, Richard D; Fedorka-Cray, Paula J

    2005-01-01

    While use of antimicrobial drugs in livestock production has made a significant impact on animal health, welfare, and productivity, interest in suitable alternatives such as pre/probiotics, organic acids, and cultures of normal flora or "competitive exclusion" cultures from young animals has increased significantly in the wake of the antimicrobial resistance issue. The present study was undertaken to determine the effect of porcine-derived mucosal competitive exclusion (PCE) culture on both the antimicrobial susceptibility of commensal E. coli and on growth performance in piglets. Two replicate trials were conducted using growing piglets fed standard antimicrobial-free production diets. Piglets in the treatment group were orally dosed with PCE (10(10) cfu/mL) twice within 24 h of birth, at weaning, and 18-24 h post-weaning; control group piglets were dosed with sterile broth as a placebo. Fecal samples from all piglets were cultured for commensal E. coli at dosing times and when feed type was changed. A significantly higher proportion of E. coli from PCE-treated piglets demonstrated resistance to tetracycline (p < 0.0001), and streptomycin (p < 0.0001) when compared to controls. Resistance to streptomycin resistance in E. coli from piglets treated with PCE culture was variable, returning to baseline levels by day 21 (weaning). Piglets treated with the PCE culture demonstrated improved feed efficiencies when compared to control piglets (p < 0.005) during feeding of the starter and first growth diets. The PCE culture used in the present study had previously been shown to effectively exclude Salmonella in pigs. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this is the first report characterizing the effect of a competitive exclusion culture on antimicrobial resistance of commensal E. coli.

  15. Follow-on biologics: data exclusivity and the balance between innovation and competition.

    PubMed

    Grabowski, Henry

    2008-06-01

    Legislation to create a regulatory pathway for follow-on biologics is currently being considered by the United States Congress. A critical issue in this respect is the period of data exclusivity for innovator companies before a follow-on competitor can rely in part on data obtained for an original biologic for an abbreviated approval. Given the nature of patents on biologics, the period of data exclusivity is anticipated to have a key role in determining how quickly follow-on competitors emerge, and consequently also on the time available for originator companies to recoup their investment. With this issue in mind, this article discusses factors influencing return on investment on biologic research and development. A break-even analysis for a representative portfolio of biologics provides support for a substantial data exclusivity period.

  16. The mechanism for exclusion of Pinus massoniana during the succession in subtropical forest ecosystems: light competition or stoichiometric homoeostasis?

    PubMed

    Yan, Junhua; Li, Kun; Peng, Xingju; Huang, Zhongliang; Liu, Shizhong; Zhang, Qianmei

    2015-06-05

    Competition for light has traditionally been considered as the main mechanism for exclusion of Pinus massoniana during succession in subtropical forest ecosystems. However, both long-term inventories and a seedling cultivation experiment showed that growth of mature individuals and young seedlings of P. massoniana was not limited by available light, but was strongly influenced by stoichiometric homoeostasis. This is supported by the results of homoeostatic regulation coefficients for nitrogen (HN) and phosphorus (HP) estimated using the measured data from six transitional forests across subtropical China. Among three dominant tree species in subtropical forests, P. massoniana and Castanopsis chinensis had the lowest values of HP and HN, respectively. Therefore P. massoniana cannot survive in the advanced stage due to soil phosphorus limitation and C. chinensis cannot successfully grow in the pioneer stage due to soil nitrogen limitation. Our results support that stoichiometric homeostasis is the main reason for gradual exclusion of P. massoniana from the transitional forest and the eventual elimination from the advanced forest during the subtropical forest succession. Therefore greater attention should be paid to stoichiometric homeostasis as one of the key mechanisms for species exclusion during forest succession.

  17. Seasonal sexual segregation in two Thalassarche albatross species: competitive exclusion, reproductive role specialization or foraging niche divergence?

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, R. A.; Silk, J. R. D.; Phalan, B.; Catry, P.; Croxall, J. P.

    2004-01-01

    Sexual segregation by micro- or macrohabitat is common in birds, and usually attributed to size-mediated dominance and exclusion of females by larger males, trophic niche divergence or reproductive role specialization. Our study of black-browed albatrosses, Thalassarche melanophrys, and grey-headed albatrosses, T. chrysostoma, revealed an exceptional degree of sexual segregation during incubation, with largely mutually exclusive core foraging ranges for each sex in both species. Spatial segregation was not apparent during brood-guard or post-guard chick rearing, when adults are constrained to feed close to colonies, providing no evidence for dominance-related competitive exclusion at the macrohabitat level. A comprehensive morphometric comparison indicated considerable species and sexual dimorphism in wing area and wing loading that corresponded, both within and between species, to broad-scale habitat preferences relating to wind strength. We suggest that seasonal sexual segregation in these two species is attributable to niche divergence mediated by differences in flight performance. Such sexual segregation may also have implications for conservation in relation to sex-specific overlap with commercial fisheries. PMID:15306353

  18. Exclusion and spatial segregation in the apparent competition between two hosts sharing macroparasites.

    PubMed

    Manica, Mattia; Rosà, Roberto; Pugliese, Andrea; Bolzoni, Luca

    2013-06-01

    In this paper we investigate the spatial dynamics of a deterministic model describing two host species that partially share a common spatial domain, experiencing apparent competition mediated by macroparasites. The aim of this work is to understand the mechanisms underlying apparent competition processes in a spatially structured environment, which have been generally overlooked up to now. First, we analyse the behaviour of a single-host macroparasite partial differential equation (PDE) model, both in the cases of uniform or spatially-dependent vital rates of the host, focusing on the role of spatial diffusion on parasite persistence and host abundance. We obtained the threshold condition for parasite persistence, and (in contrast to what occurs in reaction-diffusion models for an isolated population) we found that, in the case of spatially-dependent vital rates, increasing the host diffusion coefficient results in an increase of the overall host population. Then, a PDE model featuring spatial diffusion and apparent competition mediated via shared macroparasites between two species is analysed in order to understand the role of spatial heterogeneity in host coexistence. We assumed a partial overlap among the habitats of the two species and found that the shared parasites could cause, depending on the values of the diffusion coefficients and differences in induced mortality among host species, a decrease of the realized habitat and, eventually, the extinction of the species less tolerant to parasite infection. This shows that the presence of regulating parasites complicates the effect of dispersal on population dynamics and that the dynamics of apparent competition cannot be adequately understood from spatially-independent models.

  19. Competition between multiple totally asymmetric simple exclusion processes for a finite pool of resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, L. Jonathan; Zia, R. K. P.; Schmittmann, B.

    2009-09-01

    Using Monte Carlo simulations and a domain-wall theory, we discuss the effect of coupling several totally asymmetric simple exclusion processes (TASEPs) to a finite reservoir of particles. This simple model mimics directed biological transport processes in the presence of finite resources such as protein synthesis limited by a finite pool of ribosomes. If all TASEPs have equal length, we find behavior which is analogous to a single TASEP coupled to a finite pool. For the more generic case of chains with different lengths, several unanticipated regimes emerge. A generalized domain-wall theory captures our findings in good agreement with simulation results.

  20. The impact of predation on the coexistence and competitive exclusion of pathogens in prey.

    PubMed

    Lv, Yunfei; Yuan, Rong; Pei, Yongzhen

    2014-05-01

    A two-strain epidemic model with saturating contact rate under a generalist predator is proposed. For a generalist predator which feeds on many types of prey, we assume that the predator can discriminate among susceptible and infected with each strain prey. First, mathematical analysis of the model with regard to invariance of nonnegativity, boundedness of solutions, nature of equilibria, persistence and global stability are analyzed. Second, the two strains will competitively exclude each other in the absence of predation with the strain with the larger reproduction number persisting. If predation is discriminate, then depending on the predation level, a dominant strain may occur. Thus, for some predation levels, the strain one may persist while for other predation levels strain two may persist. Furthermore, coexistence line and coexistent asymptotic-periodic solution are obtained when coexistence occur while heteroclinic is obtained when the two strains competitively exclude each other. Finally, the impact of predation is mentioned along with numerical results to provide some support to the analytical findings.

  1. Comparing a Coevolutionary Genetic Algorithm for Multiobjective Optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lohn, Jason D.; Kraus, William F.; Haith, Gary L.; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We present results from a study comparing a recently developed coevolutionary genetic algorithm (CGA) against a set of evolutionary algorithms using a suite of multiobjective optimization benchmarks. The CGA embodies competitive coevolution and employs a simple, straightforward target population representation and fitness calculation based on developmental theory of learning. Because of these properties, setting up the additional population is trivial making implementation no more difficult than using a standard GA. Empirical results using a suite of two-objective test functions indicate that this CGA performs well at finding solutions on convex, nonconvex, discrete, and deceptive Pareto-optimal fronts, while giving respectable results on a nonuniform optimization. On a multimodal Pareto front, the CGA finds a solution that dominates solutions produced by eight other algorithms, yet the CGA has poor coverage across the Pareto front.

  2. Frequency-dependent assistance as a way out of competitive exclusion between two strains of an emerging virus

    PubMed Central

    Péréfarres, Frédéric; Thébaud, Gaël; Lefeuvre, Pierre; Chiroleu, Frédéric; Rimbaud, Loup; Hoareau, Murielle; Reynaud, Bernard; Lett, Jean-Michel

    2014-01-01

    Biological invasions are the main causes of emerging viral diseases and they favour the co-occurrence of multiple species or strains in the same environment. Depending on the nature of the interaction, co-occurrence can lead to competitive exclusion or coexistence. The successive fortuitous introductions of two strains of Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV-Mld and TYLCV-IL) in Réunion Island provided an ideal opportunity to study the invasion of, and competition between, these worldwide emerging pathogens. During a 7-year field survey, we observed a displacement of the resident TYLCV-Mld by the newcomer TYLCV-IL, with TYLCV-Mld remaining mostly in co-infected plants. To understand the factors associated with this partial displacement, biological traits related to fitness were measured. The better ecological aptitude of TYLCV-IL in single infections was demonstrated, which explains its rapid spread. However, we demonstrate that the relative fitness of virus strains can drastically change between single infections and co-infections. An epidemiological model parametrized with our experimental data predicts that the two strains will coexist in the long run through assistance by the fitter strain. This rare case of unilateral facilitation between two pathogens leads to frequency-dependent selection and maintenance of the less fit strain. PMID:24598426

  3. Frequency-dependent assistance as a way out of competitive exclusion between two strains of an emerging virus.

    PubMed

    Péréfarres, Frédéric; Thébaud, Gaël; Lefeuvre, Pierre; Chiroleu, Frédéric; Rimbaud, Loup; Hoareau, Murielle; Reynaud, Bernard; Lett, Jean-Michel

    2014-04-22

    Biological invasions are the main causes of emerging viral diseases and they favour the co-occurrence of multiple species or strains in the same environment. Depending on the nature of the interaction, co-occurrence can lead to competitive exclusion or coexistence. The successive fortuitous introductions of two strains of Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV-Mld and TYLCV-IL) in Réunion Island provided an ideal opportunity to study the invasion of, and competition between, these worldwide emerging pathogens. During a 7-year field survey, we observed a displacement of the resident TYLCV-Mld by the newcomer TYLCV-IL, with TYLCV-Mld remaining mostly in co-infected plants. To understand the factors associated with this partial displacement, biological traits related to fitness were measured. The better ecological aptitude of TYLCV-IL in single infections was demonstrated, which explains its rapid spread. However, we demonstrate that the relative fitness of virus strains can drastically change between single infections and co-infections. An epidemiological model parametrized with our experimental data predicts that the two strains will coexist in the long run through assistance by the fitter strain. This rare case of unilateral facilitation between two pathogens leads to frequency-dependent selection and maintenance of the less fit strain.

  4. Competitive exclusion among fig wasps achieved via entrainment of host plant flowering phenology.

    PubMed

    Liu, Min; Zhao, Rui; Chen, Yan; Zhang, Jian; Compton, Stephen G; Chen, Xiao-Yong

    2014-01-01

    Molecular techniques are revealing increasing numbers of morphologically similar but co-existing cryptic species, challenging the niche theory. To understand the co-existence mechanism, we studied phenologies of morphologically similar species of fig wasps that pollinate the creeping fig (F. pumila) in eastern China. We compared phenologies of fig wasp emergence and host flowering at sites where one or both pollinators were present. At the site where both pollinators were present, we used sticky traps to capture the emerged fig wasps and identified species identity using mitochondrial DNA COI gene. We also genotyped F. pumila individuals of the three sites using polymorphic microsatellites to detect whether the host populations were differentiated. Male F. pumila produced two major crops annually, with figs receptive in spring and summer. A small partial third crop of receptive figs occurred in the autumn, but few of the second crop figs matured at that time. Hence, few pollinators were available to enter third crop figs and they mostly aborted, resulting in two generations of pollinating wasps each year, plus a partial third generation. Receptive figs were produced on male plants in spring and summer, timed to coincide with the release of short-lived adult pollinators from the same individual plants. Most plants were pollinated by a single species. Plants pollinated by Wiebesia sp. 1 released wasps earlier than those pollinated by Wiebesia sp. 3, with little overlap. Plants occupied by different pollinators were not spatially separated, nor genetically distinct. Our findings show that these differences created mismatches with the flight periods of the other Wiebesia species, largely 'reserving' individual plants for the resident pollinator species. This pre-emptive competitive displacement may prevent long term co-existence of the two pollinators.

  5. Host Gut Motility Promotes Competitive Exclusion within a Model Intestinal Microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Ryan P; Schlomann, Brandon H; Ganz, Julia; Eisen, Judith S; Guillemin, Karen; Parthasarathy, Raghuveer

    2016-01-01

    The gut microbiota is a complex consortium of microorganisms with the ability to influence important aspects of host health and development. Harnessing this “microbial organ” for biomedical applications requires clarifying the degree to which host and bacterial factors act alone or in combination to govern the stability of specific lineages. To address this issue, we combined bacteriological manipulation and light sheet fluorescence microscopy to monitor the dynamics of a defined two-species microbiota within a vertebrate gut. We observed that the interplay between each population and the gut environment produces distinct spatiotemporal patterns. As a consequence, one species dominates while the other experiences sudden drops in abundance that are well fit by a stochastic mathematical model. Modeling revealed that direct bacterial competition could only partially explain the observed phenomena, suggesting that a host factor is also important in shaping the community. We hypothesized the host determinant to be gut motility, and tested this mechanism by measuring colonization in hosts with enteric nervous system dysfunction due to a mutation in the ret locus, which in humans is associated with the intestinal motility disorder known as Hirschsprung disease. In mutant hosts we found reduced gut motility and, confirming our hypothesis, robust coexistence of both bacterial species. This study provides evidence that host-mediated spatial structuring and stochastic perturbation of communities can drive bacterial population dynamics within the gut, and it reveals a new facet of the intestinal host–microbe interface by demonstrating the capacity of the enteric nervous system to influence the microbiota. Ultimately, these findings suggest that therapeutic strategies targeting the intestinal ecosystem should consider the dynamic physical nature of the gut environment. PMID:27458727

  6. The structure of a furin-antibody complex explains non-competitive inhibition by steric exclusion of substrate conformers

    PubMed Central

    Dahms, Sven O.; Creemers, John W. M.; Schaub, Yvonne; Bourenkov, Gleb P.; Zögg, Thomas; Brandstetter, Hans; Than, Manuel E.

    2016-01-01

    Proprotein Convertases (PCs) represent highly selective serine proteases that activate their substrates upon proteolytic cleavage. Their inhibition is a promising strategy for the treatment of cancer and infectious diseases. Inhibitory camelid antibodies were developed, targeting the prototypical PC furin. Kinetic analyses of them revealed an enigmatic non-competitive mechanism, affecting the inhibition of large proprotein-like but not small peptidic substrates. Here we present the crystal structures of furin in complex with the antibody Nb14 and of free Nb14 at resolutions of 2.0 Å and 2.3 Å, respectively. Nb14 binds at a site distant to the substrate binding pocket to the P-domain of furin. Interestingly, no major conformational changes were observed upon complex formation, neither for the protease nor for the antibody. Inhibition of furin by Nb14 is instead explained by steric exclusion of specific substrate conformers, explaining why Nb14 inhibits the processing of bulky protein substrates but not of small peptide substrates. This mode of action was further supported by modelling studies with the ternary factor X-furin-antibody complex and a mutation that disrupted the interaction interface between furin and the antibody. The observed binding mode of Nb14 suggests a novel approach for the development of highly specific antibody-based proprotein convertase inhibitors. PMID:27670069

  7. Competitive exclusion of a worldwide invasive pest by a native. Quantifying competition between two phytophagous insects on two host plant species.

    PubMed

    Paini, Dean R; Funderburk, Joe E; Reitz, Stuart R

    2008-01-01

    1. High competitive ability is believed to be an important characteristic of invasive species. Many animal studies have compared the competitive ability of invasive species with a native species that is being displaced, but few have looked at systems where an invasive species has failed to establish itself. These types of studies are important to determine if competition is relevant not only to invading species but also to the biotic resistance of a community. 2. The thrips species F. occidentalis is a highly invasive pest that has spread from its original range (the western states of the USA) to a worldwide distribution. Despite this, F. occidentalis is largely absent or occurs in low numbers in the eastern states of the USA, where the native F. tritici dominates. It is possible that F. tritici is competitively excluding F. occidentalis from this region. 3. Larval competition between these two thrips species was tested on two known plant hosts, Capsicum annuum (a crop plant), and Raphanus raphanistrum (an invasive weed), using a response surface design with number of larvae surviving as the response variable. The response surface design allowed competition models to be fit to data using maximum likelihood estimation, thus generating quantitative values for interspecific competition. 4. On both plant hosts, the native F. tritici did not experience significant interspecific competition from the invasive F. occidentalis. In contrast, F. occidentalis did experience significant interspecific competition from F. tritici. Competition from F. tritici larvae on F. occidentalis larvae was estimated to be 1.72 times (on C. annuum) and 1.76 times (on R. raphanistrum) the effect of intraspecific competition. The invasive F. occidentalis appears to be competitively excluded by the native F. tritici. 5. This study confirms the importance of competition in the biotic resistance of a community and is one of the few animal studies to not only test for competition in an apparently

  8. Coevolutionary dynamics with clustering behaviors on cyclic competition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Linrong; Yang, Guangcan

    2012-05-01

    We propose a dynamic model for describing clustering behaviors on a cyclic game, in which the same species form a cluster to compete. The rates of consuming the prey depend not only on the individual competing ability v, but also on the two interacting cluster’s sizes. The fragmentation and coagulation rates of the clusters are related to the cohesive strength among the individuals. A new parameter u is introduced to indicate the uniting degree. We find that the probability distribution of the clustering sizes is almost a power law in a large regime specified by the two parameters, which reflects the scale-free behavior in complex systems. In addition, the exponential magnitudes are mostly in the range of real social systems. Our simulation shows that clustering promotes biodiversity. At steady state, the amounts about the three species evolve tempestuously with asymmetric period; the aggregations about big size’s clusters to compete are obvious and on-off intermittence.

  9. A field test for competitive effects of Aedes albopictus on A. aegypti in South Florida: differences between sites of coexistence and exclusion?

    PubMed Central

    Juliano, Steven A.; Lounibos, L. Philip; O’Meara, George F.

    2007-01-01

    We tested whether interspecific competition from Aedes albopictus had measurable effects on A. aegypti at the typical numbers of larval mosquitoes found in cemetery vases in south Florida. We also tested whether the effect of interspecific competition from A. albopictus on A. aegypti differed between sites where A. aegypti either persists or went extinct following invasion by A. albopictus. Similar experiments manipulating numbers of A. albopictus in cemetery vases were conducted at three sites of A. aegypti persistence and three sites where A. aegypti was apparently extinct. The experiments were done using numbers of larvae that were determined by observed numbers of larvae for each site, and with resources (leaf detritus) that accumulated in experimental vases placed into each field site. In both the early rainy season (when number of mosquito larvae was low) and the late rainy season (when number of mosquito larvae was high), there was a significant effect of treatment on developmental progress of experimental A. aegypti. In the late rainy season, when numbers of larvae were high, there was also a significant effect of treatment on survivorship of A. aegypti. However, the competition treatment × site type (A. aegypti persists vs extinct) interaction was never significant, indicating that the competitive effect of A. albopictus on A. aegypti did not differ systematically between persistence versus extinction sites. Thus, although competition from A. albopictus is strong under field conditions at all sites, we find no evidence that variation in the impact of interspecific competition is associated with coexistence or exclusion. Interspecific competition among larvae is thus a viable explanation for exclusion or reduction of A. aegypti in south Florida, but variation in the persistence of A. aegypti following invasion does not seem to be primarily a product of variation in the conditions in the aquatic environments of cemetery vases. PMID:15024640

  10. Competition.

    PubMed

    Chambers, D W

    1997-01-01

    Our ambivalence toward competition can be traced to an unspoken preference for certain types of competition which give us an advantage over the types we value less. Four types are defined (a) pure (same rules, same objectives), (b) collaborative (same rules, shared objective), (c) market share (different rules, same objectives), and (d) market growth (different rules, value added orientation). The defining characteristics of the four types of competition are respectively: needing a referee, arguing over the spoils, differentiation and substitutability, and customer focus. Dentistry has features of all four types of competition, thus making it difficult to have a meaningful discussion or frame a coherent policy on this topic.

  11. Evolving Coevolutionary Classifiers Under Large Attribute Spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doucette, John; Lichodzijewski, Peter; Heywood, Malcolm

    Model-building under the supervised learning domain potentially face a dual learning problem of identifying both the parameters of the model and the subset of (domain) attributes necessary to support the model, thus using an embedded as opposed to wrapper or filter based design. Genetic Programming (GP) has always addressed this dual problem, however, further implicit assumptions are made which potentially increase the complexity of the resulting solutions. In this work we are specifically interested in the case of classification under very large attribute spaces. As such it might be expected that multiple independent/ overlapping attribute subspaces support the mapping to class labels; whereas GP approaches to classification generally assume a single binary classifier per class, forcing the model to provide a solution in terms of a single attribute subspace and single mapping to class labels. Supporting the more general goal is considered as a requirement for identifying a 'team' of classifiers with non-overlapping classifier behaviors, in which each classifier responds to different subsets of exemplars. Moreover, the subsets of attributes associated with each team member might utilize a unique 'subspace' of attributes. This work investigates the utility of coevolutionary model building for the case of classification problems with attribute vectors consisting of 650 to 100,000 dimensions. The resulting team based coevolutionary evolutionary method-Symbiotic Bid-based (SBB) GP-is compared to alternative embedded classifier approaches of C4.5 and Maximum Entropy Classification (MaxEnt). SSB solutions demonstrate up to an order of magnitude lower attribute count relative to C4.5 and up to two orders of magnitude lower attribute count than MaxEnt while retaining comparable or better classification performance. Moreover, relative to the attribute count of individual models participating within a team, no more than six attributes are ever utilized; adding a further

  12. Organizational coevolutionary classifiers with fuzzy logic used in intrusion detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhenguo

    2009-07-01

    Intrusion detection is an important technique in the defense-in-depth network security framework and a hot topic in computer security in recent years. To solve the intrusion detection question, we introduce the fuzzy logic into Organization CoEvolutionary algorithm [1] and present the algorithm of Organization CoEvolutionary Classification with Fuzzy Logic. In this paper, we give an intrusion detection models based on Organization CoEvolutionary Classification with Fuzzy Logic. After illustrating our model with a representative dataset and applying it to the real-world network datasets KDD Cup 1999. The experimental result shown that the intrusion detection based on Organizational Coevolutionary Classifiers with Fuzzy Logic can give higher recognition accuracy than the general method.

  13. Competitiveness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minihan, Charles E.

    1991-03-01

    Competition is defined as a spirited, sometimes ruthless, engagement of rivals such as in a race, a match, or an effort by one person to sell goods or services to customers in the marketplace of another. Sound familiar? If you will bear with me for a few minutes, I would like to examine competitiveness on a more global basis with emphasis on the rules of the game. You may be thinking that more often than not the competitive arena is relatively small and far from global, and its consequences are singularly influential on a trivial document called the P & L. However, with the newly established freedom of a major segment of the world population and with the industrial capability formerly known as Communist moving into what has heretofore been "our" limited arena, the competition could get very brisk. Brisk, and perhaps ruthless, unless we work together to try to establish an international industrial policy that is truly based on equality of competitive opportunity for all.

  14. Coevolutionary networks of reinforcement-learning agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kianercy, Ardeshir; Galstyan, Aram

    2013-07-01

    This paper presents a model of network formation in repeated games where the players adapt their strategies and network ties simultaneously using a simple reinforcement-learning scheme. It is demonstrated that the coevolutionary dynamics of such systems can be described via coupled replicator equations. We provide a comprehensive analysis for three-player two-action games, which is the minimum system size with nontrivial structural dynamics. In particular, we characterize the Nash equilibria (NE) in such games and examine the local stability of the rest points corresponding to those equilibria. We also study general n-player networks via both simulations and analytical methods and find that, in the absence of exploration, the stable equilibria consist of star motifs as the main building blocks of the network. Furthermore, in all stable equilibria the agents play pure strategies, even when the game allows mixed NE. Finally, we study the impact of exploration on learning outcomes and observe that there is a critical exploration rate above which the symmetric and uniformly connected network topology becomes stable.

  15. Coevolutionary networks of reinforcement-learning agents.

    PubMed

    Kianercy, Ardeshir; Galstyan, Aram

    2013-07-01

    This paper presents a model of network formation in repeated games where the players adapt their strategies and network ties simultaneously using a simple reinforcement-learning scheme. It is demonstrated that the coevolutionary dynamics of such systems can be described via coupled replicator equations. We provide a comprehensive analysis for three-player two-action games, which is the minimum system size with nontrivial structural dynamics. In particular, we characterize the Nash equilibria (NE) in such games and examine the local stability of the rest points corresponding to those equilibria. We also study general n-player networks via both simulations and analytical methods and find that, in the absence of exploration, the stable equilibria consist of star motifs as the main building blocks of the network. Furthermore, in all stable equilibria the agents play pure strategies, even when the game allows mixed NE. Finally, we study the impact of exploration on learning outcomes and observe that there is a critical exploration rate above which the symmetric and uniformly connected network topology becomes stable.

  16. A morphospace-based test for competitive exclusion among flying vertebrates: did birds, bats and pterosaurs get in each other's space?

    PubMed

    McGowan, A J; Dyke, G J

    2007-05-01

    Three vertebrate groups - birds, bats and pterosaurs - have evolved flapping flight over the past 200 million years. This innovation allowed each clade access to new ecological opportunities, but did the diversification of one of these groups inhibit the evolutionary radiation of any of the others? A related question is whether having the wing attached to the hindlimbs in bats and pterosaurs constrained their morphological diversity relative to birds. Fore- and hindlimb measurements from 894 specimens were used to construct a morphospace to assess morphological overlap and range, a possible indicator of competition, among the three clades. Neither birds nor bats entered pterosaur morphospace across the Cretaceous-Paleogene (Tertiary) extinction. Bats plot in a separate area from birds, and have a significantly smaller morphological range than either birds or pterosaurs. On the basis of these results, competitive exclusion among the three groups is not supported.

  17. Sympatric inhibition and niche differentiation suggest alternative coevolutionary trajectories among Streptomycetes.

    PubMed

    Kinkel, Linda L; Schlatter, Daniel C; Xiao, Kun; Baines, Anita D

    2014-02-01

    Soil bacteria produce a diverse array of antibiotics, yet our understanding of the specific roles of antibiotics in the ecological and evolutionary dynamics of microbial interactions in natural habitats remains limited. Here, we show a significant role for antibiotics in mediating antagonistic interactions and nutrient competition among locally coexisting Streptomycete populations from soil. We found that antibiotic inhibition is significantly more intense among sympatric than allopatric Streptomycete populations, indicating local selection for inhibitory phenotypes. For sympatric but not allopatric populations, antibiotic inhibition is significantly positively correlated with niche overlap, indicating that inhibition is targeted toward bacteria that pose the greatest competitive threat. Our results support the hypothesis that antibiotics serve as weapons in mediating local microbial interactions in soil and suggest that coevolutionary niche displacement may reduce the likelihood of an antibiotic arms race. Further insight into the diverse roles of antibiotics in microbial ecology and evolution has significant implications for understanding the persistence of antibiotic inhibitory and resistance phenotypes in environmental microbes, optimizing antibiotic drug discovery and developing strategies for managing microbial coevolutionary dynamics to enhance inhibitory phenotypes.

  18. Hybrid Co-Evolutionary Motion Planning via Visibility-Based Repair

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dozier, Gerry; McCullough, Shaun; Brown, Edward, Jr.; Homaifar, Abdollah; Bikdash, Mar-wan

    1997-01-01

    This paper introduces a hybrid co-evolutionary system for global motion planning within unstructured environments. This system combines the concept of co-evolutionary search along with a concept that we refer to as the visibility-based repair to form a hybrid which quickly transforms infeasible motions into feasible ones. Also, this system makes use of a novel representation scheme for the obstacles within an environment. Our hybrid evolutionary system differs from other evolutionary motion planners in that (1) more emphasis is placed on repairing infeasible motions to develop feasible motions rather than using simulated evolution exclusively as a means of discovering feasible motions, (2) a continuous map of the environment is used rather than a discretized map, and (3) it develops global motion plans for multiple mobile destinations by co-evolving populations of sub-global motion plans. In this paper, we demonstrate the effectiveness of this system by using it to solve two challenging motion planning problems where multiple targets try to move away from a point robot.

  19. The efficacy of a commercial competitive exclusion product on Campylobacter colonization in broiler chickens in a 5-week pilot-scale study

    PubMed Central

    Schneitz, C.; Hakkinen, M.

    2016-01-01

    The efficacy of the commercial competitive exclusion product Broilact against Campylobacter jejuni was evaluated in broiler chickens in a 5-week pilot-scale study. Newly-hatched broiler chicks were brought from a commercial hatchery. After arrival 50 seeder chicks were challenged orally with approximately 103 cfu of C. jejuni, wing marked, and placed back in a delivery box and moved to a separate room. The rest of the chicks (contact chicks) were placed in floor pens, 100 chicks per pen. Birds in two pens were treated orally on the day of hatch with the commercial competitive exclusion (CE) product Broilact, and three pens were left untreated. The following day 10 seeder chicks were introduced into the Broilact treated and untreated control pens. One pen was left both untreated and unchallenged (0-control). Each week the ceca of 10 contact chicks and one seeder chick were examined quantitatively for Campylobacter. The treatment prevented or significantly reduced the colonization of the challenge organism in the ceca during the two first weeks; the percentage of colonized birds being 0% after the first week and 30% after the second week in the Broilact treated groups but was 100% in the control groups the entire 5-week rearing period. During the third rearing week the proportion of Campylobacter positive birds started to increase in the treated pens, being 80% after the third week and 95 and 90% after the fourth and fifth rearing weeks, respectively. Similarly the average count of Campylobacter in the cecal contents of the Broilact treated chicks started to increase, the difference between the treated and control chicks being 1.4 logs at the end of the rearing period. Although the protective effect was temporary and occurred only during the first two weeks of the rearing period, the results of this study support the earlier observations that CE flora designed to protect chicks from Salmonella may also reduce Campylobacter colonization of broiler chickens. PMID

  20. The efficacy of a commercial competitive exclusion product on Campylobacter colonization in broiler chickens in a 5-week pilot-scale study.

    PubMed

    Schneitz, C; Hakkinen, M

    2016-05-01

    The efficacy of the commercial competitive exclusion product Broilact against Campylobacter jejuni was evaluated in broiler chickens in a 5-week pilot-scale study. Newly-hatched broiler chicks were brought from a commercial hatchery. After arrival 50 seeder chicks were challenged orally with approximately 10(3) cfu of C. jejuni, wing marked, and placed back in a delivery box and moved to a separate room. The rest of the chicks (contact chicks) were placed in floor pens, 100 chicks per pen. Birds in two pens were treated orally on the day of hatch with the commercial competitive exclusion (CE) product Broilact, and three pens were left untreated. The following day 10 seeder chicks were introduced into the Broilact treated and untreated control pens. One pen was left both untreated and unchallenged (0-control). Each week the ceca of 10 contact chicks and one seeder chick were examined quantitatively for Campylobacter The treatment prevented or significantly reduced the colonization of the challenge organism in the ceca during the two first weeks; the percentage of colonized birds being 0% after the first week and 30% after the second week in the Broilact treated groups but was 100% in the control groups the entire 5-week rearing period. During the third rearing week the proportion of Campylobacter positive birds started to increase in the treated pens, being 80% after the third week and 95 and 90% after the fourth and fifth rearing weeks, respectively. Similarly the average count of Campylobacter in the cecal contents of the Broilact treated chicks started to increase, the difference between the treated and control chicks being 1.4 logs at the end of the rearing period. Although the protective effect was temporary and occurred only during the first two weeks of the rearing period, the results of this study support the earlier observations that CE flora designed to protect chicks from Salmonella may also reduce Campylobacter colonization of broiler chickens.

  1. A restricted hybrid zone between native and introduced red fox (Vulpes vulpes) populations suggests reproductive barriers and competitive exclusion.

    PubMed

    Sacks, Benjamin N; Moore, Marcelle; Statham, Mark J; Wittmer, Heiko U

    2011-01-01

    Introduced species can threaten native taxa in multiple ways, including competition and hybridization, which can reduce fitness, alter ecological niches or swamp native genomes. Encroachment and hybridization by introduced species also provide opportunities to study the dynamics of invasiveness and hybridization during early stages following contact. We used 33 microsatellites, 51 single nucleotide polymorphisms and a mtDNA marker to characterize the extent and spatial pattern of encroachment and hybridization between a native, endemic subspecies of red fox (Vulpes vulpes patwin) and an introduced red fox population composed of highly admixed, phylogenetically divergent stock, resulting from a century of domestication. Both nuclear and mtDNA markers indicated that hybridization was primarily restricted to a narrow zone where the two populations came into contact. Although a few introgressed genotypes were detected in the interior of the native range, we found no immigrant foxes or F(1) or F(2) hybrids there, suggesting native foxes excluded introduced individuals. We speculate that the observed interbreeding at the periphery was facilitated by low densities. In total, 98% of mtDNA haplotypes in the native range were native and 96% of the nuclear ancestry was estimated to be native. Although the introduced range had expanded fivefold over the past four decades, native and non-native haplotypes from museum samples collected in and near the native range three decades earlier showed a similar geographic distribution as today, suggesting that the native range and hybrid zone were relatively stable. We hypothesize that the monogamous mating system of red foxes and other wild canids may enhance their resistance to hybridization because of greater fitness consequences associated with mate discrimination.

  2. Sorption of TCE by humic-preloaded activated carbon: Incorporating size-exclusion and pore blockage phenomenon in a competitive adsorption model

    SciTech Connect

    Kilduff, J.E.; Wigton, A.

    1999-01-15

    Naturally occurring, macromolecular dissolved organic matter (NOM) is known to foul activated carbon adsorbents, reducing the ability of fixed-bed adsorbers to efficiently remove targeted synthetic organic contaminants (SOCs). An accurate description of the effects of NOM competition on SOC adsorption equilibria is required to develop dynamic models, which have application to process design and analysis. A model was developed, using an approach based on the Ideal Adsorbed Solution Theory (IAST), to predict trichloroethylene (TCE) adsorption by activated carbon preloaded with humic acid. The IAST model was formulated for a bisolute system in which TCE and humic acid single-solute uptakes were described by the Langmuir-Freundlich and Freundlich isotherms, respectively. The humic mixture was modeled as a single component based on previous studies that identified the low-molecular-weight hydrophobic fraction as the most reactive with regard to preloading effects. Isotherms for this fraction, isolated from whole humic acid using ultrafiltration, were measured, and molar concentrations were computed based on an average molecular weight determined using size-exclusion chromatography. The IAST model was modified to reflect the hypothesis that TCE molecules can access adsorption sites which humic molecules cannot and that no competition can occur on these sites. The model was calibrated with data for TCE uptake by carbon preloaded with the low-molecular-weight humic acid fraction and was verified by predicting TCE uptake by carbon preloaded with whole humic acid. Further improvement to the model was possible by accounting for pore blockage as a mechanism which can reduce the effective surface area available in TCE.

  3. Unique coevolutionary dynamics in a predator-prey system.

    PubMed

    Mougi, Akihiko; Iwasa, Yoh

    2011-05-21

    In this paper, we study the predator-prey coevolutionary dynamics when a prey's defense and a predator's offense change in an adaptive manner, either by genetic evolution or phenotypic plasticity, or by behavioral choice. Results are: (1) The coevolutionary dynamics are more likely to be stable if the predator adapts faster than the prey. (2) The prey population size can be nearly constant but the predator population can show very large amplitude fluctuations. (3) Both populations may oscillate in antiphase. All of these are not observed when the handling time is short and the prey's density dependence is weak. (4) The population dynamics and the trait dynamics show resonance: the amplitude of the population fluctuation is the largest when the speed of adaptation is intermediate. These results may explain experimental studies with microorganisms.

  4. Partner switching stabilizes cooperation in coevolutionary prisoner's dilemma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Feng; Wu, Te; Wang, Long

    2009-03-01

    Previous studies suggest that cooperation prevails when individuals can switch their interaction partners quickly. However, it is still unclear how quickly individuals should switch adverse partners to maximize cooperation. To address this issue, we propose a simple model of coevolutionary prisoner’s dilemma in which individuals are allowed to either adjust their strategies or switch their defective partners. Interestingly, we find that, depending on the game parameter, there is an optimal tendency of switching adverse partnerships that maximizes the fraction of cooperators in the population. We confirm that the stabilization of cooperation by partner switching remains effective under some situations, where either normalized or accumulated payoff is used in strategy updating, and where either only cooperators or all individuals are privileged to sever disadvantageous partners. We also provide an extended pair approximation to study the coevolutionary dynamics. Our results may be helpful in understanding the role of partner switching in the stabilization of cooperation in the real world.

  5. Use of organic acids and competitive exclusion product as an alternative to antibiotic as a growth promoter in the raising of commercial turkeys.

    PubMed

    Milbradt, E L; Okamoto, A S; Rodrigues, J C Z; Garcia, E A; Sanfelice, C; Centenaro, L P; Andreatti Filho, R L

    2014-07-01

    A study was conducted to investigate the effects of organic acids (OA) and competitive exclusion product (CE) on growth performance, intestinal morphology, and concentration of volatile fatty acids in the cecal content. The experiment lasted for 10 wk. Four hundred twenty 1-d-old female commercial cross turkey poults (British United Turkeys, BUT Big 9) were distributed into 4 treatments with 5 replicates/pen of 21 birds each. The birds were fed a basal diet without growth promoter (control), diet with lincomycin (44 mg/kg), diet with organic acids (2 g/kg), and diet with product of CE (10(9) cfu/kg). Dietary levels of other nutrients, housing, and general management practices were similar for all treatments. On the first week (d 0-7), the BW and BW gain of the birds that fed diets with OA were lower than in the control group. In the fattening phase (d 28-70), the feed intake of the OA-treated group was lower than compared with the control. The birds that received diet with OA and CE product presented higher concentrations of propionic acid, at 14 d, and butyric acid in cecal content at 28, 56, and 70 d, compared with the control. Dietary inclusion of additives had no significant effects on intestinal villus height, crypt depth, and villus:crypt ratio. Organic acids had negative effects either on early gain or feed intake throughout the study. Because the test was conducted under controlled experimental conditions, the additives that showed results similar to those found by using antibiotics should be studied further in commercial farms to obtain results that can be incorporated into practice.

  6. Coevolutionary dynamics between tribe Cercopithecini tetherins and their lentiviruses

    PubMed Central

    Takeuchi, Junko S.; Ren, Fengrong; Yoshikawa, Rokusuke; Yamada, Eri; Nakano, Yusuke; Kobayashi, Tomoko; Matsuda, Kenta; Izumi, Taisuke; Misawa, Naoko; Shintaku, Yuta; Wetzel, Katherine S.; Collman, Ronald G.; Tanaka, Hiroshi; Hirsch, Vanessa M.; Koyanagi, Yoshio; Sato, Kei

    2015-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus, a primate lentivirus (PLV), causes AIDS in humans, whereas most PLVs are less or not pathogenic in monkeys. These notions suggest that the co-evolutionary process of PLVs and their hosts associates with viral pathogenicity, and therefore, that elucidating the history of virus-host co-evolution is one of the most intriguing topics in the field of virology. To address this, recent studies have focused on the interplay between intrinsic anti-viral proteins, such as tetherin, and viral antagonists. Through an experimental-phylogenetic approach, here we investigate the co-evolutionary interplay between tribe Cercopithecini tetherin and viral antagonists, Nef and Vpu. We reveal that tribe Cercopithecini tetherins are positively selected, possibly triggered by ancient Nef-like factor(s). We reconstruct the ancestral sequence of tribe Cercopithecini tetherin and demonstrate that all Nef proteins are capable of antagonizing ancestral Cercopithecini tetherin. Further, we consider the significance of evolutionary arms race between tribe Cercopithecini and their PLVs. PMID:26531727

  7. Cyber Security Research Frameworks For Coevolutionary Network Defense

    SciTech Connect

    Rush, George D.; Tauritz, Daniel Remy

    2015-12-03

    Several architectures have been created for developing and testing systems used in network security, but most are meant to provide a platform for running cyber security experiments as opposed to automating experiment processes. In the first paper, we propose a framework termed Distributed Cyber Security Automation Framework for Experiments (DCAFE) that enables experiment automation and control in a distributed environment. Predictive analysis of adversaries is another thorny issue in cyber security. Game theory can be used to mathematically analyze adversary models, but its scalability limitations restrict its use. Computational game theory allows us to scale classical game theory to larger, more complex systems. In the second paper, we propose a framework termed Coevolutionary Agent-based Network Defense Lightweight Event System (CANDLES) that can coevolve attacker and defender agent strategies and capabilities and evaluate potential solutions with a custom network defense simulation. The third paper is a continuation of the CANDLES project in which we rewrote key parts of the framework. Attackers and defenders have been redesigned to evolve pure strategy, and a new network security simulation is devised which specifies network architecture and adds a temporal aspect. We also add a hill climber algorithm to evaluate the search space and justify the use of a coevolutionary algorithm.

  8. Effect of competitive exclusion in reducing the occurrence of Escherichia coli producing extended-spectrum β-lactamases in the ceca of broiler chicks.

    PubMed

    Nuotio, L; Schneitz, C; Nilsson, O

    2013-01-01

    Extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBL) and class C serine β-lactamases (pAmpC) able to hydrolyze third-generation cephalosporins are a recognized threat to the efficacy of these drugs in treating serious infections. Broiler chicks are a known source of Escherichia coli harboring genes for these enzymes. Competitive exclusion (CE) has been used for decades in Finland to prevent the colonization of broiler ceca by Salmonella, but has not been widely used in Sweden. The markedly different prevalences of ESBL- or pAmpC-producing E. coli at slaughter in broilers produced in the 2 countries suggest a potential role for CE. The present study was undertaken to determine the efficacy of a commercial CE product in reducing the colonization of broiler ceca by ESBL- or pAmpC-producing E. coli. The challenge organisms were isolated from healthy broilers in Sweden. Each E. coli strain (1 ESBL and 2 pAmpC types) was subjected to 4 replicate trials. In each trial, a group of 20 newly hatched Ross breed chicks were treated by gavage with the CE product, whereas another group of 20 was left untreated. The next day, all 40 chicks were inoculated by gavage with the E. coli strain. The chicks were reared in cardboard boxes and received feed and water ad libitum. After a week the chicks were asphyxiated with CO(2), and their ceca removed and examined for the presence of the E. coli strains. The median and quartiles of the challenge E. coli estimates in the groups were determined, and the treated and control groups were compared with the Wilcoxon 2-sample test. In each trial, a substantial and statistically significant or highly significant reduction was observed in the colonization of the ceca of CE-treated chicks by E. coli strains, compared with that of untreated control. Referring to an arbitrary criterion for high shedders presented in the literature, it was concluded that at least for the ESBL E. coli, the results were also of epidemiological relevance.

  9. Nonlinear Dynamics of Complex Coevolutionary Systems in Historical Times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perdigão, Rui A. P.

    2016-04-01

    A new theoretical paradigm for statistical-dynamical modeling of complex coevolutionary systems is introduced, with the aim to provide historical geoscientists with a practical tool to analyse historical data and its underlying phenomenology. Historical data is assumed to represent the history of dynamical processes of physical and socio-economic nature. If processes and their governing laws are well understood, they are often treated with traditional dynamical equations: deterministic approach. If the governing laws are unknown or impracticable, the process is often treated as if being random (even if it is not): statistical approach. Although single eventful details - such as the exact spatiotemporal structure of a particular hydro-meteorological incident - may often be elusive to a detailed analysis, the overall dynamics exhibit group properties summarized by a simple set of categories or dynamical regimes at multiple scales - from local short-lived convection patterns to large-scale hydro-climatic regimes. The overwhelming microscale complexity is thus conveniently wrapped into a manageable group entity, such as a statistical distribution. In a stationary setting whereby the distribution is assumed to be invariant, alternating regimes are approachable as dynamical intermittence. For instance, in the context of bimodal climatic oscillations such as NAO and ENSO, each mode corresponds to a dynamical regime or phase. However, given external forcings or longer-term internal variability and multiscale coevolution, the structural properties of the system may change. These changes in the dynamical structure bring about a new distribution and associated regimes. The modes of yesteryear may no longer exist as such in the new structural order of the system. In this context, aside from regime intermittence, the system exhibits structural regime change. New oscillations may emerge whilst others fade into the annals of history, e.g. particular climate fluctuations during

  10. Direct coevolutionary couplings reflect biophysical residue interactions in proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coucke, Alice; Uguzzoni, Guido; Oteri, Francesco; Cocco, Simona; Monasson, Remi; Weigt, Martin

    2016-11-01

    Coevolution of residues in contact imposes strong statistical constraints on the sequence variability between homologous proteins. Direct-Coupling Analysis (DCA), a global statistical inference method, successfully models this variability across homologous protein families to infer structural information about proteins. For each residue pair, DCA infers 21 × 21 matrices describing the coevolutionary coupling for each pair of amino acids (or gaps). To achieve the residue-residue contact prediction, these matrices are mapped onto simple scalar parameters; the full information they contain gets lost. Here, we perform a detailed spectral analysis of the coupling matrices resulting from 70 protein families, to show that they contain quantitative information about the physico-chemical properties of amino-acid interactions. Results for protein families are corroborated by the analysis of synthetic data from lattice-protein models, which emphasizes the critical effect of sampling quality and regularization on the biochemical features of the statistical coupling matrices.

  11. Multiagent Flight Control in Dynamic Environments with Cooperative Coevolutionary Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knudson, Matthew D.; Colby, Mitchell; Tumer, Kagan

    2014-01-01

    Dynamic flight environments in which objectives and environmental features change with respect to time pose a difficult problem with regards to planning optimal flight paths. Path planning methods are typically computationally expensive, and are often difficult to implement in real time if system objectives are changed. This computational problem is compounded when multiple agents are present in the system, as the state and action space grows exponentially. In this work, we use cooperative coevolutionary algorithms in order to develop policies which control agent motion in a dynamic multiagent unmanned aerial system environment such that goals and perceptions change, while ensuring safety constraints are not violated. Rather than replanning new paths when the environment changes, we develop a policy which can map the new environmental features to a trajectory for the agent while ensuring safe and reliable operation, while providing 92% of the theoretically optimal performance

  12. Direct coevolutionary couplings reflect biophysical residue interactions in proteins.

    PubMed

    Coucke, Alice; Uguzzoni, Guido; Oteri, Francesco; Cocco, Simona; Monasson, Remi; Weigt, Martin

    2016-11-07

    Coevolution of residues in contact imposes strong statistical constraints on the sequence variability between homologous proteins. Direct-Coupling Analysis (DCA), a global statistical inference method, successfully models this variability across homologous protein families to infer structural information about proteins. For each residue pair, DCA infers 21 × 21 matrices describing the coevolutionary coupling for each pair of amino acids (or gaps). To achieve the residue-residue contact prediction, these matrices are mapped onto simple scalar parameters; the full information they contain gets lost. Here, we perform a detailed spectral analysis of the coupling matrices resulting from 70 protein families, to show that they contain quantitative information about the physico-chemical properties of amino-acid interactions. Results for protein families are corroborated by the analysis of synthetic data from lattice-protein models, which emphasizes the critical effect of sampling quality and regularization on the biochemical features of the statistical coupling matrices.

  13. Multiagent Flight Control in Dynamic Environments with Cooperative Coevolutionary Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colby, Mitchell; Knudson, Matthew D.; Tumer, Kagan

    2014-01-01

    Dynamic environments in which objectives and environmental features change with respect to time pose a difficult problem with regards to planning optimal paths through these environments. Path planning methods are typically computationally expensive, and are often difficult to implement in real time if system objectives are changed. This computational problem is compounded when multiple agents are present in the system, as the state and action space grows exponentially with the number of agents in the system. In this work, we use cooperative coevolutionary algorithms in order to develop policies which control agent motion in a dynamic multiagent unmanned aerial system environment such that goals and perceptions change, while ensuring safety constraints are not violated. Rather than replanning new paths when the environment changes, we develop a policy which can map the new environmental features to a trajectory for the agent while ensuring safe and reliable operation, while providing 92% of the theoretically optimal performance.

  14. Co-evolutionary dynamics between public good producers and cheats in the bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Kümmerli, R; Santorelli, L A; Granato, E T; Dumas, Z; Dobay, A; Griffin, A S; West, S A

    2015-12-01

    The production of beneficial public goods is common in the microbial world, and so is cheating--the exploitation of public goods by nonproducing mutants. Here, we examine co-evolutionary dynamics between cooperators and cheats and ask whether cooperators can evolve strategies to reduce the burden of exploitation, and whether cheats in turn can improve their exploitation abilities. We evolved cooperators of the bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa, producing the shareable iron-scavenging siderophore pyoverdine, together with cheats, defective in pyoverdine production but proficient in uptake. We found that cooperators managed to co-exist with cheats in 56% of all replicates over approximately 150 generations of experimental evolution. Growth and competition assays revealed that co-existence was fostered by a combination of general adaptions to the media and specific adaptions to the co-evolving opponent. Phenotypic screening and whole-genome resequencing of evolved clones confirmed this pattern, and suggest that cooperators became less exploitable by cheats because they significantly reduced their pyoverdine investment. Cheats, meanwhile, improved exploitation efficiency through mutations blocking the costly pyoverdine-signalling pathway. Moreover, cooperators and cheats evolved reduced motility, a pattern that likely represents adaptation to laboratory conditions, but at the same time also affects social interactions by reducing strain mixing and pyoverdine sharing. Overall, we observed parallel evolution, where co-existence of cooperators and cheats was enabled by a combination of adaptations to the abiotic and social environment and their interactions.

  15. Polymorphism in Multilocus Host–Parasite Coevolutionary Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Tellier, Aurélien; Brown, James K. M.

    2007-01-01

    Numerous loci in host organisms are involved in parasite recognition, such as major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes in vertebrates or genes involved in gene-for-gene (GFG) relationships in plants. Diversity is commonly observed at such loci and at corresponding loci encoding antigenic molecules in parasites. Multilocus theoretical models of host–parasite coevolution predict that polymorphism is more likely than in single-locus interactions because recurrent coevolutionary cycles are sustained by indirect frequency-dependent selection as rare genotypes have a selective advantage. These cycles are stabilized by direct frequency-dependent selection, resulting from repeated reinfection of the same host by a parasite, a feature of most diseases. Here, it is shown that for realistically small costs of resistance and virulence, polycyclic disease and high autoinfection rates, stable polymorphism of all possible genotypes is obtained in parasite populations. Two types of epistatic interactions between loci tend to increase the parameter space in which stable polymorphism can occur with all possible host and parasite genotypes. In the parasite, the marginal cost of each additional virulence allele should increase, while in the host, the marginal cost of each additional resistance allele should decrease. It is therefore predicted that GFG polymorphism will be stable (and hence detectable) when there is partial complementation of avirulence genes in the parasite and of resistance genes in the host. PMID:17947440

  16. Age structure and cooperation in coevolutionary games on dynamic network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Zilong; Hu, Zhenhua; Zhou, Xiaoping; Yi, Jingzhang

    2015-04-01

    Our proposed model imitates the growth of a population and describes the age structure and the level of cooperation in games on dynamic network with continuous changes of structure and topology. The removal of nodes and links caused by age-dependent attack, together with the nodes addition standing for the newborns of population, badly ruins Matthew effect in this coevolutionary process. Though the network is generated by growth and preferential attachment, it degenerates into random network and it is no longer heterogeneous. When the removal of nodes and links is equal to the addition of nodes and links, the size of dynamic network is maintained in steady-state, so is the low level of cooperation. Severe structure variation, homogeneous topology and continuous invasion of new defection jointly make dynamic network unsuitable for the survival of cooperator even when the probability with which the newborn players initially adopt the strategy cooperation is high, while things change slightly when the connections of newborn players are restricted. Fortunately, moderate interactions in a generation trigger an optimal recovering process to encourage cooperation. The model developed in this paper outlines an explanation of the cohesion changes in the development process of an organization. Some suggestions for cooperative behavior improvement are given in the end.

  17. Building toy models of proteins using coevolutionary information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Ryan; Raghunathan, Mohit; Onuchic, Jose

    2015-03-01

    Recent developments in global statistical methodologies have advanced the analysis of large collections of protein sequences for coevolutionary information. Coevolution between amino acids in a protein arises from compensatory mutations that are needed to maintain the stability or function of a protein over the course of evolution. This gives rise to quantifiable correlations between amino acid positions within the multiple sequence alignment of a protein family. Here, we use Direct Coupling Analysis (DCA) to infer a Potts model Hamiltonian governing the correlated mutations in a protein family to obtain the sequence-dependent interaction energies of a toy protein model. We demonstrate that this methodology predicts residue-residue interaction energies that are consistent with experimental mutational changes in protein stabilities as well as other computational methodologies. Furthermore, we demonstrate with several examples that DCA could be used to construct a structure-based model that quantitatively agrees with experimental data on folding mechanisms. This work serves as a potential framework for generating models of proteins that are enriched by evolutionary data that can potentially be used to engineer key functional motions and interactions in protein systems. This research has been supported by the NSF INSPIRE award MCB-1241332 and by the CTBP sponsored by the NSF (Grant PHY-1427654).

  18. Coevolutionary Feedbacks between Female Mating Interval and Male Allocation to Competing Sperm Traits Can Drive Evolution of Costly Polyandry.

    PubMed

    Bocedi, Greta; Reid, Jane M

    2016-03-01

    Complex coevolutionary feedbacks between female mating interval and male sperm traits have been hypothesized to explain the evolution and persistence of costly polyandry. Such feedbacks could potentially arise because polyandry creates sperm competition and consequent selection on male allocation to sperm traits, while the emerging sperm traits could create female sperm limitation and, hence, impose selection for increased polyandry. However, the hypothesis that costly polyandry could coevolve with male sperm dynamics has not been tested. We built a genetically explicit individual-based model to simulate simultaneous evolution of female mating interval and male allocation to sperm number versus longevity, where these two sperm traits trade off. We show that evolution of competing sperm traits under polyandry can indeed cause female sperm limitation and, hence, promote further evolution and persistence of costly polyandry, particularly when sperm are costly relative to the degree of female sperm limitation. These feedbacks were stronger, and greater polyandry evolved, when postcopulatory competition for paternity followed a loaded rather than fair raffle and when sperm traits had realistically low heritability. We therefore demonstrate that the evolution of allocation to sperm traits driven by sperm competition can prevent males from overcoming female sperm limitation, thereby driving ongoing evolution of costly polyandry.

  19. 47 CFR 73.5002 - Application and certification procedures; return of mutually exclusive applications not subject...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...; return of mutually exclusive applications not subject to competitive bidding procedures; prohibition of... RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES Procedures for Competitive Bidding and for Applications for... procedures; return of mutually exclusive applications not subject to competitive bidding...

  20. 47 CFR 73.5002 - Application and certification procedures; return of mutually exclusive applications not subject...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...; return of mutually exclusive applications not subject to competitive bidding procedures; prohibition of... RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES Procedures for Competitive Bidding and for Applications for... procedures; return of mutually exclusive applications not subject to competitive bidding...

  1. Predation and eukaryote cell origins: a coevolutionary perspective.

    PubMed

    Cavalier-Smith, T

    2009-02-01

    Cells are of only two kinds: bacteria, with DNA segregated by surface membrane motors, dating back approximately 3.5Gy; and eukaryotes, which evolved from bacteria, possibly as recently as 800-850My ago. The last common ancestor of eukaryotes was a sexual phagotrophic protozoan with mitochondria, one or two centrioles and cilia. Conversion of bacteria (=prokaryotes) into a eukaryote involved approximately 60 major innovations. Numerous contradictory ideas about eukaryogenesis fail to explain fundamental features of eukaryotic cell biology or conflict with phylogeny. Data are best explained by the intracellular coevolutionary theory, with three basic tenets: (1) the eukaryotic cytoskeleton and endomembrane system originated through cooperatively enabling the evolution of phagotrophy; (2) phagocytosis internalised DNA-membrane attachments, unavoidably disrupting bacterial division; recovery entailed the evolution of the nucleus and mitotic cycle; (3) the symbiogenetic origin of mitochondria immediately followed the perfection of phagotrophy and intracellular digestion, contributing greater energy efficiency and group II introns as precursors of spliceosomal introns. Eukaryotes plus their archaebacterial sisters form the clade neomura, which evolved from a radically modified derivative of an actinobacterial posibacterium that had replaced the ancestral eubacterial murein peptidoglycan by N-linked glycoproteins, radically modified its DNA-handling enzymes, and evolved cotranslational protein secretion, but not the isoprenoid-ether lipids of archaebacteria. I focus on this phylogenetic background and on explaining how in response to novel phagotrophic selective pressures and ensuing genome internalisation this prekaryote evolved efficient digestion of prey proteins by retrotranslocation and 26S proteasomes, then internal digestion by phagocytosis, lysosomes, and peroxisomes, and eukaryotic vesicle trafficking and intracellular compartmentation.

  2. Coevolutionary dynamics of phenotypic diversity and contingent cooperation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Long

    2017-01-01

    Phenotypic diversity is considered beneficial to the evolution of contingent cooperation, in which cooperators channel their help preferentially towards others of similar phenotypes. However, it remains largely unclear how phenotypic variation arises in the first place and thus leads to the construction of phenotypic complexity. Here we propose a mathematical model to study the coevolutionary dynamics of phenotypic diversity and contingent cooperation. Unlike previous models, our model does not assume any prescribed level of phenotypic diversity, but rather lets it be an evolvable trait. Each individual expresses one phenotype at a time and only the phenotypes expressed are visible to others. Moreover, individuals can differ in their potential of phenotypic variation, which is characterized by the number of distinct phenotypes they can randomly switch to. Each individual incurs a cost proportional to the number of potentially expressible phenotypes so as to retain phenotypic variation and expression. Our results show that phenotypic diversity coevolves with contingent cooperation under a wide range of conditions and that there exists an optimal level of phenotypic diversity best promoting contingent cooperation. It pays for contingent cooperators to elevate their potential of phenotypic variation, thereby increasing their opportunities of establishing cooperation via novel phenotypes, as these new phenotypes serve as secret tags that are difficult for defector to discover and chase after. We also find that evolved high levels of phenotypic diversity can occasionally collapse due to the invasion of defector mutants, suggesting that cooperation and phenotypic diversity can mutually reinforce each other. Thus, our results provide new insights into better understanding the coevolution of cooperation and phenotypic diversity. PMID:28141806

  3. Coevolutionary dynamics of phenotypic diversity and contingent cooperation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Te; Wang, Long; Fu, Feng

    2017-01-01

    Phenotypic diversity is considered beneficial to the evolution of contingent cooperation, in which cooperators channel their help preferentially towards others of similar phenotypes. However, it remains largely unclear how phenotypic variation arises in the first place and thus leads to the construction of phenotypic complexity. Here we propose a mathematical model to study the coevolutionary dynamics of phenotypic diversity and contingent cooperation. Unlike previous models, our model does not assume any prescribed level of phenotypic diversity, but rather lets it be an evolvable trait. Each individual expresses one phenotype at a time and only the phenotypes expressed are visible to others. Moreover, individuals can differ in their potential of phenotypic variation, which is characterized by the number of distinct phenotypes they can randomly switch to. Each individual incurs a cost proportional to the number of potentially expressible phenotypes so as to retain phenotypic variation and expression. Our results show that phenotypic diversity coevolves with contingent cooperation under a wide range of conditions and that there exists an optimal level of phenotypic diversity best promoting contingent cooperation. It pays for contingent cooperators to elevate their potential of phenotypic variation, thereby increasing their opportunities of establishing cooperation via novel phenotypes, as these new phenotypes serve as secret tags that are difficult for defector to discover and chase after. We also find that evolved high levels of phenotypic diversity can occasionally collapse due to the invasion of defector mutants, suggesting that cooperation and phenotypic diversity can mutually reinforce each other. Thus, our results provide new insights into better understanding the coevolution of cooperation and phenotypic diversity.

  4. Are the metabolomic responses to folivory of closely related plant species linked to macroevolutionary and plant-folivore coevolutionary processes?

    SciTech Connect

    Rivas-Ubach, Albert; Hódar, José A.; Sardans, Jordi; Kyle, Jennifer E.; Kim, Young-Mo; Oravec, Michal; Urban, Otmar; Guenther, Alex; Peñuelas, Josep

    2016-06-02

    The debate whether the coevolution of plants and insects or macroevolutionary processes (phylogeny) is the main driver determining the arsenal of molecular defensive compounds of plants remains unresolved. Attacks by herbivorous insects affect not only the composition of defensive compounds in plants but the entire metabolome (the set of molecular metabolites), including defensive compounds. Metabolomes are the final products of genotypes and are directly affected by macroevolutionary processes, so closely related species should have similar metabolomic compositions and may respond in similar ways to attacks by folivores. We analyzed the elemental compositions and metabolomes of needles from Pinus pinaster, P. nigra and P. sylvestris to determine if these closely related Pinus species with different coevolutionary histories with the caterpillars of the processionary moth respond similarly to attacks by this lepidopteran. All pines had different metabolomes and metabolic responses to herbivorous attack. The metabolomic variation among the pine species and the responses to folivory reflected their macroevolutionary relationships, with P. pinaster having the most divergent metabolome. The concentrations of phenolic metabolites were generally not higher in the attacked trees, which had lower concentrations of terpenes, suggesting that herbivores avoid individuals with high concentrations of terpenes. Our results suggest that macroevolutionary history plays important roles in the metabolomic responses of these pine species to folivory, but plant-insect coevolution probably constrains those responses. Combinations of different evolutionary factors and trade-offs are likely responsible for the different responses of each species to folivory, which is not necessarily exclusively linked to plant-insect coevolution.

  5. Parasitic castration promotes coevolutionary cycling but also imposes a cost on sex.

    PubMed

    Ashby, Ben; Gupta, Sunetra

    2014-08-01

    Antagonistic coevolution between hosts and parasites is thought to drive a range of biological phenomena including the maintenance of sexual reproduction. Of particular interest are conditions that produce persistent fluctuations in the frequencies of genes governing host-parasite specificity (coevolutionary cycling), as sex may be more beneficial than asexual reproduction in a constantly changing environment. Although many studies have shown that coevolutionary cycling can lead to the maintenance of sex, the effects of ecological feedbacks on the persistence of these fluctuations in gene frequencies are not well understood. Here, we use a simple deterministic model that incorporates ecological feedbacks to explore how parasitic reductions in host fecundity affect the maintenance of coevolutionary cycling. We demonstrate that parasitic castration is inherently destabilizing and may be necessary for coevolutionary cycling to persist indefinitely, but also reduces the likelihood that sexually reproducing individuals will find a fertile partner, which may select against sex. These findings suggest that castrators can play an important role in shaping host evolution and are likely to be good targets for observing fluctuations in gene frequencies that govern specificity in host-parasite interactions.

  6. Coevolutionary dynamics of polyandry and sex-linked meiotic drive.

    PubMed

    Holman, Luke; Price, Thomas A R; Wedell, Nina; Kokko, Hanna

    2015-03-01

    Segregation distorters located on sex chromosomes are predicted to sweep to fixation and cause extinction via a shortage of one sex, but in nature they are often found at low, stable frequencies. One potential resolution to this longstanding puzzle involves female multiple mating (polyandry). Because many meiotic drivers severely reduce the sperm competitive ability of their male carriers, females are predicted to evolve more frequent polyandry and thereby promote sperm competition when a meiotic driver invades. Consequently, the driving chromosome's relative fitness should decline, halting or reversing its spread. We used formal modeling to show that this initially appealing hypothesis cannot resolve the puzzle alone: other selective pressures (e.g., low fitness of drive homozygotes) are required to establish a stable meiotic drive polymorphism. However, polyandry and meiotic drive can strongly affect one another's frequency, and polyandrous populations may be resistant to the invasion of rare drive mutants.

  7. Optimal satellite formation reconfiguration using co-evolutionary particle swarm optimization in deep space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Haibin; Zhuang, Yufei

    2015-08-01

    This paper proposes a method that plans energy-optimal trajectories for multi-satellite formation reconfiguration in deep space environment. A novel co-evolutionary particle swarm optimization algorithm is stated to solve the nonlinear programming problem, so that the computational complexity of calculating the gradient information could be avoided. One swarm represents one satellite, and through communication with other swarms during the evolution, collisions between satellites can be avoided. In addition, a dynamic depth first search algorithm is proposed to solve the redundant search problem of a co-evolutionary particle swarm optimization method, with which the computation time can be shorten a lot. In order to make the actual trajectories optimal and collision-free with disturbance, a re-planning strategy is deduced for formation reconfiguration maneuver.

  8. Fine-tuned Bee-Flower Coevolutionary State Hidden within Multiple Pollination Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Akira; Dohzono, Ikumi; Nakaji, Masayoshi; Roff, Derek A.; Miller III, Donald G.; Osato, Sara; Yajima, Takuya; Niitsu, Shûhei; Utsugi, Nozomu; Sugawara, Takashi; Yoshimura, Jin

    2014-01-01

    Relationships between flowers and pollinators are generally considered cases of mutualism since both agents gain benefits. Fine-tuned adaptations are usually found in the form of strict one-to-one coevolution between species. Many insect pollinators are, however, considered generalists, visiting numerous kinds of flowers, and many flower species (angiosperms) are also considered generalists, visited by many insect pollinators. We here describe a fine-tuned coevolutionary state of a flower-visiting bee that collects both nectar and pollen from an early spring flower visited by multiple pollinators. Detailed morphology of the bee proboscis is shown to be finely adjusted to the floral morphology and nectar production of the flower. Behavioral observations also confirm the precision of this mutualism. Our results suggest that a fine-tuned one-to-one coevolutionary state between a flower species and a pollinator species might be common, but frequently overlooked, in multiple flower-pollinator interactions. PMID:24496444

  9. Network intrusion detection by the coevolutionary immune algorithm of artificial immune systems with clonal selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salamatova, T.; Zhukov, V.

    2017-02-01

    The paper presents the application of the artificial immune systems apparatus as a heuristic method of network intrusion detection for algorithmic provision of intrusion detection systems. The coevolutionary immune algorithm of artificial immune systems with clonal selection was elaborated. In testing different datasets the empirical results of evaluation of the algorithm effectiveness were achieved. To identify the degree of efficiency the algorithm was compared with analogs. The fundamental rules based of solutions generated by this algorithm are described in the article.

  10. Coevolutionary Analysis Identifies Protein–Protein Interaction Sites between HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase and Integrase

    PubMed Central

    Hetti Arachchilage, Madara; Piontkivska, Helen

    2016-01-01

    The replication of human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) requires reverse transcription of the viral RNA genome and integration of newly synthesized pro-viral DNA into the host genome. This is mediated by the viral proteins reverse transcriptase (RT) and integrase (IN). The formation and stabilization of the pre-integration complex (PIC), which is an essential step for reverse transcription, nuclear import, chromatin targeting, and subsequent integration, involves direct and indirect modes of interaction between RT and IN proteins. While epitope-based treatments targeting IN–viral DNA and IN–RT complexes appear to be a promising combination for an anti-HIV treatment, the mechanisms of IN-RT interactions within the PIC are not well understood due to the transient nature of the protein complex and the intrinsic flexibility of its components. Here, we identify potentially interacting regions between the IN and RT proteins within the PIC through the coevolutionary analysis of amino acid sequences of the two proteins. Our results show that specific regions in the two proteins have strong coevolutionary signatures, suggesting that these regions either experience direct and prolonged interactions between them that require high affinity and/or specificity or that the regions are involved in interactions mediated by dynamic conformational changes and, hence, may involve both direct and indirect interactions. Other regions were found to exhibit weak, but positive correlations, implying interactions that are likely transient and/or have low affinity. We identified a series of specific regions of potential interactions between the IN and RT proteins (e.g., specific peptide regions within the C-terminal domain of IN were identified as potentially interacting with the Connection domain of RT). Coevolutionary analysis can serve as an important step in predicting potential interactions, thus informing experimental studies. These studies can be integrated with structural data

  11. Natural Hazard Management from a Coevolutionary Perspective: Exposure and Policy Response in the European Alps

    PubMed Central

    Fuchs, Sven; Röthlisberger, Veronika; Thaler, Thomas; Zischg, Andreas; Keiler, Margreth

    2017-01-01

    A coevolutionary perspective is adopted to understand the dynamics of exposure to mountain hazards in the European Alps. A spatially explicit, object-based temporal assessment of elements at risk to mountain hazards (river floods, torrential floods, and debris flows) in Austria and Switzerland is presented for the period from 1919 to 2012. The assessment is based on two different data sets: (1) hazard information adhering to legally binding land use planning restrictions and (2) information on building types combined from different national-level spatial data. We discuss these transdisciplinary dynamics and focus on economic, social, and institutional interdependencies and interactions between human and physical systems. Exposure changes in response to multiple drivers, including population growth and land use conflicts. The results show that whereas some regional assets are associated with a strong increase in exposure to hazards, others are characterized by a below-average level of exposure. The spatiotemporal results indicate relatively stable hot spots in the European Alps. These results coincide with the topography of the countries and with the respective range of economic activities and political settings. Furthermore, the differences between management approaches as a result of multiple institutional settings are discussed. A coevolutionary framework widens the explanatory power of multiple drivers to changes in exposure and risk and supports a shift from structural, security-based policies toward an integrated, risk-based natural hazard management system. PMID:28267154

  12. Vulnerability from a co-evolutionary perspective: valuating natural hazards management in the Eastern Alps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thaler, Thomas; Fuchs, Sven

    2014-05-01

    In past decades, we observed a change in natural hazard management from a structural, security-based policy towards an integrated, risk-based management system. Therefore, the concept of vulnerability has become central in the policy debate. In order to assess vulnerability, we need a broader understanding of the term to manage natural hazards and to reduce damages and losses from future events. This paper adopts a co-evolutionary perspective to provide a critical assessment of vulnerability in natural hazard management, taking the Eastern Alps as an example. We discuss the structural, social and institutional vulnerability and governance from an integrated point of view to understand and to analyse the interdependences and interactions between human and physical systems. The aim is to consider the dynamic interactions between multiple conceptualised vulnerabilities in evaluating natural hazard management systems. A co-evolutionary framework widens the explanatory of multiple interactions in vulnerability to provide useful information and concepts to improve risk management. Keywords: vulnerability; co-evolution; natural hazards; Eastern Alps

  13. The bitterling-mussel coevolutionary relationship in areas of recent and ancient sympatry.

    PubMed

    Reichard, Martin; Polačik, Matej; Tarkan, Ali Serhan; Spence, Rowena; Gaygusuz, Ozcan; Ercan, Ertan; Ondračková, Markéta; Smith, Carl

    2010-10-01

    Host-parasite relationships are often characterized by the rapid evolution of parasite adaptations to exploit their host, and counteradaptations in the host to avoid the costs imposed by parasitism. Hence, the current coevolutionary state between a parasite and its hosts is predicted to vary according to the history of sympatry and local abundance of interacting species. We compared a unique reciprocal coevolutionary relationship of a fish, the European bitterling (Rhodeus amarus) and freshwater mussels (Unionidae) between areas of recent (Central Europe) and ancient (Turkey) sympatry. Bitterling parasitize freshwater mussels by laying their eggs in the gills of mussel and, in turn, mussel larvae (glochidia) parasitize the fish. We found that all bitterling from both regions avoided one mussel species. Preferences among other mussel species tended to be related to local mussel abundance rather than duration of sympatry. Individual fish were not consistent in their oviposition choices, precluding the evolution of host-specific lineages. Mussels were demonstrated to have evolved strong defenses to bitterling parasitism in the area of ancient sympatry, but have no such defenses in the large areas of Europe where bitterling are currently invasive. Bitterling avoided glochidia infection irrespective of the duration of sympatry.

  14. An Improved Co-evolutionary Particle Swarm Optimization for Wireless Sensor Networks with Dynamic Deployment

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xue; Wang, Sheng; Ma, Jun-Jie

    2007-01-01

    The effectiveness of wireless sensor networks (WSNs) depends on the coverage and target detection probability provided by dynamic deployment, which is usually supported by the virtual force (VF) algorithm. However, in the VF algorithm, the virtual force exerted by stationary sensor nodes will hinder the movement of mobile sensor nodes. Particle swarm optimization (PSO) is introduced as another dynamic deployment algorithm, but in this case the computation time required is the big bottleneck. This paper proposes a dynamic deployment algorithm which is named “virtual force directed co-evolutionary particle swarm optimization” (VFCPSO), since this algorithm combines the co-evolutionary particle swarm optimization (CPSO) with the VF algorithm, whereby the CPSO uses multiple swarms to optimize different components of the solution vectors for dynamic deployment cooperatively and the velocity of each particle is updated according to not only the historical local and global optimal solutions, but also the virtual forces of sensor nodes. Simulation results demonstrate that the proposed VFCPSO is competent for dynamic deployment in WSNs and has better performance with respect to computation time and effectiveness than the VF, PSO and VFPSO algorithms.

  15. Natural Hazard Management from a Coevolutionary Perspective: Exposure and Policy Response in the European Alps.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Sven; Röthlisberger, Veronika; Thaler, Thomas; Zischg, Andreas; Keiler, Margreth

    2017-03-04

    A coevolutionary perspective is adopted to understand the dynamics of exposure to mountain hazards in the European Alps. A spatially explicit, object-based temporal assessment of elements at risk to mountain hazards (river floods, torrential floods, and debris flows) in Austria and Switzerland is presented for the period from 1919 to 2012. The assessment is based on two different data sets: (1) hazard information adhering to legally binding land use planning restrictions and (2) information on building types combined from different national-level spatial data. We discuss these transdisciplinary dynamics and focus on economic, social, and institutional interdependencies and interactions between human and physical systems. Exposure changes in response to multiple drivers, including population growth and land use conflicts. The results show that whereas some regional assets are associated with a strong increase in exposure to hazards, others are characterized by a below-average level of exposure. The spatiotemporal results indicate relatively stable hot spots in the European Alps. These results coincide with the topography of the countries and with the respective range of economic activities and political settings. Furthermore, the differences between management approaches as a result of multiple institutional settings are discussed. A coevolutionary framework widens the explanatory power of multiple drivers to changes in exposure and risk and supports a shift from structural, security-based policies toward an integrated, risk-based natural hazard management system.

  16. A probabilistic coevolutionary biclustering algorithm for discovering coherent patterns in gene expression dataset

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Biclustering has been utilized to find functionally important patterns in biological problem. Here a bicluster is a submatrix that consists of a subset of rows and a subset of columns in a matrix, and contains homogeneous patterns. The problem of finding biclusters is still challengeable due to computational complex trying to capture patterns from two-dimensional features. Results We propose a Probabilistic COevolutionary Biclustering Algorithm (PCOBA) that can cluster the rows and columns in a matrix simultaneously by utilizing a dynamic adaptation of multiple species and adopting probabilistic learning. In biclustering problems, a coevolutionary search is suitable since it can optimize interdependent subcomponents formed of rows and columns. Furthermore, acquiring statistical information on two populations using probabilistic learning can improve the ability of search towards the optimum value. We evaluated the performance of PCOBA on synthetic dataset and yeast expression profiles. The results demonstrated that PCOBA outperformed previous evolutionary computation methods as well as other biclustering methods. Conclusions Our approach for searching particular biological patterns could be valuable for systematically understanding functional relationships between genes and other biological components at a genome-wide level. PMID:23282075

  17. The evolution of mutation rate in an antagonistic coevolutionary model with maternal transmission of parasites.

    PubMed

    Greenspoon, Philip B; M'Gonigle, Leithen K

    2013-06-22

    By constantly selecting for novel genotypes, coevolution between hosts and parasites can favour elevated mutation rates. Models of this process typically assume random encounters. However, offspring are often more likely to encounter their mother's parasites. Because parents and offspring are genetically similar, they may be susceptible to the same parasite strains and thus, in hosts, maternal transmission should select for mechanisms that decrease intergenerational genetic similarity. In parasites, however, maternal transmission should select for genetic similarity. We develop and analyse a model of host and parasite mutation rate evolution when parasites are maternally inherited. In hosts, we find that maternal transmission has two opposing effects. First, it eliminates coevolutionary cycles that previous work shows select for higher mutation. Second, it independently selects for higher mutation rates, because offspring that differ from their mothers are more likely to avoid infection. In parasites, however, the two effects of maternal transmission act in the same direction. As for hosts, maternal transmission eliminates coevolutionary cycles, thereby reducing selection for increased mutation. Unlike for hosts, however, maternal transmission additionally selects against higher mutation by favouring parasite offspring that are the same as their mothers.

  18. Coevolutionary diversification creates nested-modular structure in phage-bacteria interaction networks.

    PubMed

    Beckett, Stephen J; Williams, Hywel T P

    2013-12-06

    Phage and their bacterial hosts are the most diverse and abundant biological entities in the oceans, where their interactions have a major impact on marine ecology and ecosystem function. The structure of interaction networks for natural phage-bacteria communities offers insight into their coevolutionary origin. At small phylogenetic scales, observed communities typically show a nested structure, in which both hosts and phages can be ranked by their range of resistance and infectivity, respectively. A qualitatively different multi-scale structure is seen at larger phylogenetic scales; a natural assemblage sampled from the Atlantic Ocean displays large-scale modularity and local nestedness within each module. Here, we show that such 'nested-modular' interaction networks can be produced by a simple model of host-phage coevolution in which infection depends on genetic matching. Negative frequency-dependent selection causes diversification of hosts (to escape phages) and phages (to track their evolving hosts). This creates a diverse community of bacteria and phage, maintained by kill-the-winner ecological dynamics. When the resulting communities are visualized as bipartite networks of who infects whom, they show the nested-modular structure characteristic of the Atlantic sample. The statistical significance and strength of this observation varies depending on whether the interaction networks take into account the density of the interacting strains, with implications for interpretation of interaction networks constructed by different methods. Our results suggest that the apparently complex community structures associated with marine bacteria and phage may arise from relatively simple coevolutionary origins.

  19. The Conundrum of Modern Art : Prestige-Driven Coevolutionary Aesthetics Trumps Evolutionary Aesthetics among Art Experts.

    PubMed

    Verpooten, Jan; Dewitte, Siegfried

    2017-03-01

    Two major mechanisms of aesthetic evolution have been suggested. One focuses on naturally selected preferences (Evolutionary Aesthetics), while the other describes a process of evaluative coevolution whereby preferences coevolve with signals. Signaling theory suggests that expertise moderates these mechanisms. In this article we set out to verify this hypothesis in the domain of art and use it to elucidate Western modern art's deviation from naturally selected preferences. We argue that this deviation is consistent with a Coevolutionary Aesthetics mechanism driven by prestige-biased social learning among art experts. In order to test this hypothesis, we conducted two studies in which we assessed the effects on lay and expert appreciation of both the biological relevance of the given artwork's depicted content, viz., facial beauty, and the prestige specific to the artwork's associated context (MoMA). We found that laypeople appreciate artworks based on their depictions of facial beauty, mediated by aesthetic pleasure, which is consistent with previous studies. In contrast, experts appreciate the artworks based on the prestige of the associated context, mediated by admiration for the artist. Moreover, experts appreciate artworks depicting neutral faces to a greater degree than artworks depicting attractive faces. These findings thus corroborate our contention that expertise moderates the Evolutionary and Coevolutionary Aesthetics mechanisms in the art domain. Furthermore, our findings provide initial support for our proposal that prestige-driven coevolution with expert evaluations plays a decisive role in modern art's deviation from naturally selected preferences. After discussing the limitations of our research as well as the relation that our results bear on cultural evolution theory, we provide a number of suggestions for further research into the potential functions of expert appreciation that deviates from naturally selected preferences, on the one hand, and

  20. 37 CFR 404.7 - Exclusive, co-exclusive and partially exclusive licenses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Exclusive, co-exclusive and... Exclusive, co-exclusive and partially exclusive licenses. (a)(1) Exclusive, co-exclusive or partially... practical application or otherwise promote the invention's utilization by the public. (B) Exclusive,...

  1. 37 CFR 404.7 - Exclusive, co-exclusive and partially exclusive licenses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Exclusive, co-exclusive and..., co-exclusive and partially exclusive licenses. (a)(1) Exclusive, co-exclusive or partially exclusive... practical application or otherwise promote the invention's utilization by the public. (B) Exclusive,...

  2. 37 CFR 404.7 - Exclusive, co-exclusive and partially exclusive licenses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Exclusive, co-exclusive and... Exclusive, co-exclusive and partially exclusive licenses. (a)(1) Exclusive, co-exclusive or partially... practical application or otherwise promote the invention's utilization by the public. (B) Exclusive,...

  3. 37 CFR 404.7 - Exclusive, co-exclusive and partially exclusive licenses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Exclusive, co-exclusive and... Exclusive, co-exclusive and partially exclusive licenses. (a)(1) Exclusive, co-exclusive or partially... practical application or otherwise promote the invention's utilization by the public. (B) Exclusive,...

  4. 37 CFR 404.7 - Exclusive, co-exclusive and partially exclusive licenses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Exclusive, co-exclusive and..., co-exclusive and partially exclusive licenses. (a)(1) Exclusive, co-exclusive or partially exclusive... practical application or otherwise promote the invention's utilization by the public. (B) Exclusive,...

  5. Competition for finite resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, L. Jonathan; Zia, R. K. P.

    2012-05-01

    The resources in a cell are finite, which implies that the various components of the cell must compete for resources. One such resource is the ribosomes used during translation to create proteins. Motivated by this example, we explore this competition by connecting two totally asymmetric simple exclusion processes (TASEPs) to a finite pool of particles. Expanding on our previous work, we focus on the effects on the density and current of having different entry and exit rates.

  6. Molecular evolution of rbcL in three gymnosperm families: identifying adaptive and coevolutionary patterns

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The chloroplast-localized ribulose-1, 5-biphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco), the primary enzyme responsible for autotrophy, is instrumental in the continual adaptation of plants to variations in the concentrations of CO2. The large subunit (LSU) of Rubisco is encoded by the chloroplast rbcL gene. Although adaptive processes have been previously identified at this gene, characterizing the relationships between the mutational dynamics at the protein level may yield clues on the biological meaning of such adaptive processes. The role of such coevolutionary dynamics in the continual fine-tuning of RbcL remains obscure. Results We used the timescale and phylogenetic analyses to investigate and search for processes of adaptive evolution in rbcL gene in three gymnosperm families, namely Podocarpaceae, Taxaceae and Cephalotaxaceae. To understand the relationships between regions identified as having evolved under adaptive evolution, we performed coevolutionary analyses using the software CAPS. Importantly, adaptive processes were identified at amino acid sites located on the contact regions among the Rubisco subunits and on the interface between Rubisco and its activase. Adaptive amino acid replacements at these regions may have optimized the holoenzyme activity. This hypothesis was pinpointed by evidence originated from our analysis of coevolution that supported the correlated evolution between Rubisco and its activase. Interestingly, the correlated adaptive processes between both these proteins have paralleled the geological variation history of the concentration of atmospheric CO2. Conclusions The gene rbcL has experienced bursts of adaptations in response to the changing concentration of CO2 in the atmosphere. These adaptations have emerged as a result of a continuous dynamic of mutations, many of which may have involved innovation of functional Rubisco features. Analysis of the protein structure and the functional implications of such mutations put

  7. The evolution of sex and recombination in response to abiotic or coevolutionary fluctuations in epistasis.

    PubMed

    Gandon, Sylvain; Otto, Sarah P

    2007-04-01

    Evolutionary biologists have identified several factors that could explain the widespread phenomena of sex and recombination. One hypothesis is that host-parasite interactions favor sex and recombination because they favor the production of rare genotypes. A problem with many of the early models of this so-called Red Queen hypothesis is that several factors are acting together: directional selection, fluctuating epistasis, and drift. It is thus difficult to identify what exactly is selecting for sex in these models. Is one factor more important than the others or is it the synergistic action of these different factors that really matters? Here we focus on the analysis of a simple model with a single mechanism that might select for sex: fluctuating epistasis. We first analyze the evolution of sex and recombination when the temporal fluctuations are driven by the abiotic environment. We then analyze the evolution of sex and recombination in a two-species coevolutionary model, where directional selection is absent (allele frequencies remain fixed) and temporal variation in epistasis is induced by coevolution with the antagonist species. In both cases we contrast situations with weak and strong selection and derive the evolutionarily stable (ES) recombination rate. The ES recombination rate is most sensitive to the period of the cycles, which in turn depends on the strength of epistasis. In particular, more virulent parasites cause more rapid cycles and consequently increase the ES recombination rate of the host. Although the ES strategy is maximized at an intermediate period, some recombination is favored even when fluctuations are very slow. By contrast, the amplitude of the cycles has no effect on the ES level of sex and recombination, unless sex and recombination are costly, in which case higher-amplitude cycles allow the evolution of higher rates of sex and recombination. In the coevolutionary model, the amount of recombination in the interacting species also has

  8. 48 CFR 6.204 - Section 8(a) competition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Section 8(a) competition... ACQUISITION PLANNING COMPETITION REQUIREMENTS Full and Open Competition After Exclusion of Sources 6.204 Section 8(a) competition. (a) To fulfill statutory requirements relating to section 8(a) of the...

  9. 48 CFR 6.204 - Section 8(a) competition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Section 8(a) competition... ACQUISITION PLANNING COMPETITION REQUIREMENTS Full and Open Competition After Exclusion of Sources 6.204 Section 8(a) competition. (a) To fulfill statutory requirements relating to section 8(a) of the...

  10. 48 CFR 6.204 - Section 8(a) competition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Section 8(a) competition... ACQUISITION PLANNING COMPETITION REQUIREMENTS Full and Open Competition After Exclusion of Sources 6.204 Section 8(a) competition. (a) To fulfill statutory requirements relating to section 8(a) of the...

  11. 48 CFR 6.204 - Section 8(a) competition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Section 8(a) competition... ACQUISITION PLANNING COMPETITION REQUIREMENTS Full and Open Competition After Exclusion of Sources 6.204 Section 8(a) competition. (a) To fulfill statutory requirements relating to section 8(a) of the...

  12. 48 CFR 6.204 - Section 8(a) competition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Section 8(a) competition... ACQUISITION PLANNING COMPETITION REQUIREMENTS Full and Open Competition After Exclusion of Sources 6.204 Section 8(a) competition. (a) To fulfill statutory requirements relating to section 8(a) of the...

  13. 40 CFR 89.611 - Exemptions and exclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... sufficiently organized, EPA notifies the importer of any areas of inadequacy, and that the documentation does..., 89.609, or 89.611(c)(3). (e) Competition exclusion. A nonconforming engine may be imported by any... vehicle used solely for competition and obtains prior written approval from the Administrator....

  14. Quantitative genetic insights into the coevolutionary dynamics of male and female genitalia.

    PubMed

    Evans, Jonathan P; van Lieshout, Emile; Gasparini, Clelia

    2013-07-22

    The spectacular variability that typically characterizes male genital traits has largely been attributed to the role of sexual selection. Among the evolutionary mechanisms proposed to account for this diversity, two processes in particular have generated considerable interest. On the one hand, females may exploit postcopulatory mechanisms of selection to favour males with preferred genital traits (cryptic female choice; CFC), while on the other hand females may evolve structures or behaviours that mitigate the direct costs imposed by male genitalia (sexual conflict; SC). A critical but rarely explored assumption underlying both processes is that male and female reproductive traits coevolve, either via the classic Fisherian model of preference-trait coevolution (CFC) or through sexually antagonistic selection (SC). Here, we provide evidence for this prediction in the guppy (Poecilia reticulata), a polyandrous livebearing fish in which males transfer sperm internally to females via consensual and forced matings. Our results from a paternal half-sibling breeding design reveal substantial levels of additive genetic variation underlying male genital size and morphology-two traits known to predict mating success during non-consensual matings. Our subsequent finding that physically interacting female genital traits exhibit corresponding levels of genetic (co)variation reveals the potential intersexual coevolutionary dynamics of male and female genitalia, thereby fulfilling a fundamental assumption underlying CFC and SC theory.

  15. Coevolutionary analysis of resistance-evading peptidomimetic inhibitors of HIV-1 protease.

    PubMed

    Rosin, C D; Belew, R K; Morris, G M; Olson, A J; Goodsell, D S

    1999-02-16

    We have developed a coevolutionary method for the computational design of HIV-1 protease inhibitors selected for their ability to retain efficacy in the face of protease mutation. For HIV-1 protease, typical drug design techniques are shown to be ineffective for the design of resistance-evading inhibitors: An inhibitor that is a direct analogue of one of the natural substrates will be susceptible to resistance mutation, as will inhibitors designed to fill the active site of the wild-type or a mutant enzyme. Two design principles are demonstrated: (i) For enzymes with broad substrate specificity, such as HIV-1 protease, resistance-evading inhibitors are best designed against the immutable properties of the active site-the properties that must be conserved in any mutant protease to retain the ability to bind and cleave all of the native substrates. (ii) Robust resistance-evading inhibitors can be designed by optimizing activity simultaneously against a large set of mutant enzymes, incorporating as much of the mutational space as possible.

  16. Coevolutionary analysis of resistance-evading peptidomimetic inhibitors of HIV-1 protease

    PubMed Central

    Rosin, Christopher D.; Belew, Richard K.; Morris, Garrett M.; Olson, Arthur J.; Goodsell, David S.

    1999-01-01

    We have developed a coevolutionary method for the computational design of HIV-1 protease inhibitors selected for their ability to retain efficacy in the face of protease mutation. For HIV-1 protease, typical drug design techniques are shown to be ineffective for the design of resistance-evading inhibitors: An inhibitor that is a direct analogue of one of the natural substrates will be susceptible to resistance mutation, as will inhibitors designed to fill the active site of the wild-type or a mutant enzyme. Two design principles are demonstrated: (i) For enzymes with broad substrate specificity, such as HIV-1 protease, resistance-evading inhibitors are best designed against the immutable properties of the active site—the properties that must be conserved in any mutant protease to retain the ability to bind and cleave all of the native substrates. (ii) Robust resistance-evading inhibitors can be designed by optimizing activity simultaneously against a large set of mutant enzymes, incorporating as much of the mutational space as possible. PMID:9990030

  17. Quantitative genetic insights into the coevolutionary dynamics of male and female genitalia

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Jonathan P.; van Lieshout, Emile; Gasparini, Clelia

    2013-01-01

    The spectacular variability that typically characterizes male genital traits has largely been attributed to the role of sexual selection. Among the evolutionary mechanisms proposed to account for this diversity, two processes in particular have generated considerable interest. On the one hand, females may exploit postcopulatory mechanisms of selection to favour males with preferred genital traits (cryptic female choice; CFC), while on the other hand females may evolve structures or behaviours that mitigate the direct costs imposed by male genitalia (sexual conflict; SC). A critical but rarely explored assumption underlying both processes is that male and female reproductive traits coevolve, either via the classic Fisherian model of preference-trait coevolution (CFC) or through sexually antagonistic selection (SC). Here, we provide evidence for this prediction in the guppy (Poecilia reticulata), a polyandrous livebearing fish in which males transfer sperm internally to females via consensual and forced matings. Our results from a paternal half-sibling breeding design reveal substantial levels of additive genetic variation underlying male genital size and morphology—two traits known to predict mating success during non-consensual matings. Our subsequent finding that physically interacting female genital traits exhibit corresponding levels of genetic (co)variation reveals the potential intersexual coevolutionary dynamics of male and female genitalia, thereby fulfilling a fundamental assumption underlying CFC and SC theory. PMID:23720546

  18. Dispersal network structure and infection mechanism shape diversity in a coevolutionary bacteria-phage system.

    PubMed

    Sieber, Michael; Robb, Matthew; Forde, Samantha E; Gudelj, Ivana

    2014-03-01

    Resource availability, dispersal and infection genetics all have the potential to fundamentally alter the coevolutionary dynamics of bacteria-bacteriophage interactions. However, it remains unclear how these factors synergise to shape diversity within bacterial populations. We used a combination of laboratory experiments and mathematical modeling to test how the structure of a dispersal network affects host phenotypic diversity in a coevolving bacteria-phage system in communities of differential resource input. Unidirectional dispersal of bacteria and phage from high to low resources consistently increased host diversity compared with a no dispersal regime. Bidirectional dispersal, on the other hand, led to a marked decrease in host diversity. Our mathematical model predicted these opposing outcomes when we incorporated modified gene-for-gene infection genetics. To further test how host diversity depended on the genetic underpinnings of the bacteria-phage interaction, we expanded our mathematical model to include different infection mechanisms. We found that the direction of dispersal had very little impact on bacterial diversity when the bacteria-phage interaction was mediated by matching alleles, gene-for-gene or related infection mechanisms. Our experimental and theoretical results demonstrate that the effects of dispersal on diversity in coevolving host-parasite systems depend on an intricate interplay of the structure of the underlying dispersal network and the specifics of the host-parasite interaction.

  19. Cry-wolf signals emerging from coevolutionary feedbacks in a tritrophic system.

    PubMed

    Yamauchi, Atsushi; van Baalen, Minus; Kobayashi, Yutaka; Takabayashi, Junji; Shiojiri, Kaori; Sabelis, Maurice W

    2015-11-07

    For a communication system to be stable, senders should convey honest information. Providing dishonest information, however, can be advantageous to senders, which imposes a constraint on the evolution of communication systems. Beyond single populations and bitrophic systems, one may ask whether stable communication systems can evolve in multitrophic systems. Consider cross-species signalling where herbivore-induced plant volatiles (HIPVs) attract predators to reduce the damage from arthropod herbivores. Such plant signals may be honest and help predators to identify profitable prey/plant types via HIPV composition and to assess prey density via the amount of HIPVs. There could be selection for dishonest signals that attract predators for protection from possible future herbivory. Recently, we described a case in which plants release a fixed, high amount of HIPVs independent of herbivore load, adopting what we labelled a 'cry-wolf' strategy. To understand when such signals evolve, we model coevolutionary interactions between plants, herbivores and predators, and show that both 'honest' and 'cry-wolf' types can emerge, depending on the assumed plant-herbivore encounter rates and herbivore population density. It is suggested that the 'cry-wolf' strategy may have evolved to reduce the risk of heavy damage in the future. Our model suggests that eco-evolutionary feedback loops involving a third species may have important consequences for the stability of this outcome.

  20. Coevolutionary interactions between farmers and mafia induce host acceptance of avian brood parasites

    PubMed Central

    Hilbe, Christian; Traulsen, Arne

    2016-01-01

    Brood parasites exploit their host in order to increase their own fitness. Typically, this results in an arms race between parasite trickery and host defence. Thus, it is puzzling to observe hosts that accept parasitism without any resistance. The ‘mafia’ hypothesis suggests that these hosts accept parasitism to avoid retaliation. Retaliation has been shown to evolve when the hosts condition their response to mafia parasites, who use depredation as a targeted response to rejection. However, it is unclear if acceptance would also emerge when ‘farming’ parasites are present in the population. Farming parasites use depredation to synchronize the timing with the host, destroying mature clutches to force the host to re-nest. Herein, we develop an evolutionary model to analyse the interaction between depredatory parasites and their hosts. We show that coevolutionary cycles between farmers and mafia can still induce host acceptance of brood parasites. However, this equilibrium is unstable and in the long-run the dynamics of this host–parasite interaction exhibits strong oscillations: when farmers are the majority, accepters conditional to mafia (the host will reject first and only accept after retaliation by the parasite) have a higher fitness than unconditional accepters (the host always accepts parasitism). This leads to an increase in mafia parasites’ fitness and in turn induce an optimal environment for accepter hosts. PMID:27293783

  1. Cry-wolf signals emerging from coevolutionary feedbacks in a tritrophic system

    PubMed Central

    Yamauchi, Atsushi; van Baalen, Minus; Kobayashi, Yutaka; Takabayashi, Junji; Shiojiri, Kaori; Sabelis, Maurice W.

    2015-01-01

    For a communication system to be stable, senders should convey honest information. Providing dishonest information, however, can be advantageous to senders, which imposes a constraint on the evolution of communication systems. Beyond single populations and bitrophic systems, one may ask whether stable communication systems can evolve in multitrophic systems. Consider cross-species signalling where herbivore-induced plant volatiles (HIPVs) attract predators to reduce the damage from arthropod herbivores. Such plant signals may be honest and help predators to identify profitable prey/plant types via HIPV composition and to assess prey density via the amount of HIPVs. There could be selection for dishonest signals that attract predators for protection from possible future herbivory. Recently, we described a case in which plants release a fixed, high amount of HIPVs independent of herbivore load, adopting what we labelled a ‘cry-wolf’ strategy. To understand when such signals evolve, we model coevolutionary interactions between plants, herbivores and predators, and show that both ‘honest’ and ‘cry-wolf’ types can emerge, depending on the assumed plant–herbivore encounter rates and herbivore population density. It is suggested that the ‘cry-wolf’ strategy may have evolved to reduce the risk of heavy damage in the future. Our model suggests that eco-evolutionary feedback loops involving a third species may have important consequences for the stability of this outcome. PMID:26538597

  2. Effects of payoff-related velocity in the co-evolutionary snowdrift game

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhihu; Li, Zhi; Wu, Te; Wang, Long

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies concerning mobile populations seldom distinguish mobility on the individual level. In these models, all individuals have the identical moving speed and this moving speed has not been clearly defined in terms of its relevance to other features intrinsic to individual. Here we investigate the evolution of cooperation with a minimal co-evolutionary snowdrift game in which the payoff-dependent velocity as well as velocity diversity is taken into account. We find that the fate of evolution in such scenarios is precisely ruled both by population mobility and the inherent parameter of the snowdrift game. The outside-in and inside-out like attacks on cooperator clusters (C-clusters) are triggered in the Monte Carlo simulation. The results show that low mobility can lead to a plateau of full cooperation provided the challenge to cooperate is not too high, and also that high mobility always inhibits cooperation. Nevertheless, the phase transition diagram implies moderate population mobility most benefits the survival of cooperators when cooperation faces the greater challenge. Finally, the evolution of strategies seemingly rises superior to selection strength once the mobility intensity is fixed. Our findings may shed new light on the evolution of strategies in mobile systems.

  3. Environment Sensitivity-based Cooperative Co-evolutionary Algorithms for Dynamic Multi-objective Optimization.

    PubMed

    Xu, Biao; Zhang, Yong; Gong, Dunwei; Guo, Yinan; Rong, Miao

    2017-01-16

    Dynamic multi-objective optimization problems (DMOPs) not only involve multiple conflicting objectives, but these objectives may also vary with time, raising a challenge for researchers to solve them. This paper presents a cooperative co-evolutionary strategy based on environment sensitivities for solving DMOPs. In this strategy, a new method that groups decision variables is first proposed, in which all the decision variables are partitioned into two subcomponents according to their interrelation with environment. Adopting two populations to cooperatively optimize the two subcomponents, two prediction methods, i.e., differential prediction and Cauchy mutation, are then employed respectively to speed up their responses on the change of the environment. Furthermore, two improved dynamic multi-objective optimization algorithms, i.e., DNSGAII-CO and DMOPSO-CO, are proposed by incorporating the above strategy into NSGA-II and multi-objective particle swarm optimization, respectively. The proposed algorithms are compared with three state-of-the-art algorithms by applying to seven benchmark DMOPs. Experimental results reveal that the proposed algorithms significantly outperform the compared algorithms in terms of convergence and distribution on most DMOPs.

  4. Comparative dating of attine ant and lepiotaceous cultivar phylogenies reveals coevolutionary synchrony and discord.

    PubMed

    Mikheyev, Alexander S; Mueller, Ulrich G; Abbot, Patrick

    2010-06-01

    The mutualistic symbiosis between fungus-gardening ants and their cultivars has made fundamental contributions to our understanding of the coevolution of complex species interactions. Reciprocal specialization and vertical symbiont cotransmission are thought to promote a pattern of largely synchronous coevolutionary diversification in attines. Here we test this hypothesis by inferring the first time-calibrated multigene phylogeny of the lepiotaceous attine cultivars and comparing it with the recently published fossil-anchored phylogeny of the attine ants. While this comparison reveals some possible cases of synchronous origins of ant and fungal clades, there were a number of surprising asynchronies. For example, leaf-cutter cultivars appear to be significantly younger than the corresponding ant genera. Similarly, a clade of fungi interacting with primitive fungus-gardening ants--thought to be ancestral to the more derived leaf-cutter symbionts--appears instead to be a more recent acquisition from free-living stock. These macroevolutionary patterns are consistent with recent population-level studies suggesting occasional acquisition of novel cultivar types from environmental sources and horizontal transmission of cultivars between different ant species. Horizontal transmission events, even if rare, appear to form loose ecological connections between diffusely coevolving ant and fungus lineages that permit punctuated changes in the topology of the mutualistic ant-fungus interaction network.

  5. Testing co-evolutionary hypotheses over geological timescales: interactions between Mesozoic non-avian dinosaurs and cycads.

    PubMed

    Butler, Richard J; Barrett, Paul M; Kenrick, Paul; Penn, Malcolm G

    2009-02-01

    The significance of co-evolution over ecological timescales is well established, yet it remains unclear to what extent co-evolutionary processes contribute to driving large-scale evolutionary and ecological changes over geological timescales. Some of the most intriguing and pervasive long-term co-evolutionary hypotheses relate to proposed interactions between herbivorous non-avian dinosaurs and Mesozoic plants, including cycads. Dinosaurs have been proposed as key dispersers of cycad seeds during the Mesozoic, and temporal variation in cycad diversity and abundance has been linked to dinosaur faunal changes. Here we assess the evidence for proposed hypotheses of trophic and evolutionary interactions between these two groups using diversity analyses, a new database of Cretaceous dinosaur and plant co-occurrence data, and a geographical information system (GIS) as a visualisation tool. Phylogenetic evidence suggests that the origins of several key biological properties of cycads (e.g. toxins, bright-coloured seeds) likely predated the origin of dinosaurs. Direct evidence of dinosaur-cycad interactions is lacking, but evidence from extant ecosystems suggests that dinosaurs may plausibly have acted as seed dispersers for cycads, although it is likely that other vertebrate groups (e.g. birds, early mammals) also played a role. Although the Late Triassic radiations of dinosaurs and cycads appear to have been approximately contemporaneous, few significant changes in dinosaur faunas coincide with the late Early Cretaceous cycad decline. No significant spatiotemporal associations between particular dinosaur groups and cycads can be identified - GIS visualisation reveals disparities between the spatiotemporal distributions of some dinosaur groups (e.g. sauropodomorphs) and cycads that are inconsistent with co-evolutionary hypotheses. The available data provide no unequivocal support for any of the proposed co-evolutionary interactions between cycads and herbivorous dinosaurs

  6. Competitive Intelligence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergeron, Pierrette; Hiller, Christine A.

    2002-01-01

    Reviews the evolution of competitive intelligence since 1994, including terminology and definitions and analytical techniques. Addresses the issue of ethics; explores how information technology supports the competitive intelligence process; and discusses education and training opportunities for competitive intelligence, including core competencies…

  7. DISE: directed sphere exclusion.

    PubMed

    Gobbi, Alberto; Lee, Man-Ling

    2003-01-01

    The Sphere Exclusion algorithm is a well-known algorithm used to select diverse subsets from chemical-compound libraries or collections. It can be applied with any given distance measure between two structures. It is popular because of the intuitive geometrical interpretation of the method and its good performance on large data sets. This paper describes Directed Sphere Exclusion (DISE), a modification of the Sphere Exclusion algorithm, which retains all positive properties of the Sphere Exclusion algorithm but generates a more even distribution of the selected compounds in the chemical space. In addition, the computational requirement is significantly reduced, thus it can be applied to very large data sets.

  8. Sperm competition risk generates phenotypic plasticity in ovum fertilizability

    PubMed Central

    Firman, Renée C.; Simmons, Leigh W.

    2013-01-01

    Theory predicts that sperm competition will generate sexual conflict that favours increased ovum defences against polyspermy. A recent study on house mice has shown that ovum resistance to fertilization coevolves in response to increased sperm fertilizing capacity. However, the capacity for the female gamete to adjust its fertilizability as a strategic response to sperm competition risk has never, to our knowledge, been studied. We sourced house mice (Mus domesticus) from natural populations that differ in the level of sperm competition and sperm fertilizing capacity, and manipulated the social experience of females during their sexual development to simulate conditions of either a future ‘risk’ or ‘no risk’ of sperm competition. Consistent with coevolutionary predictions, we found lower fertilization rates in ova produced by females from a high sperm competition population compared with ova from a low sperm competition population, indicating that these populations are divergent in the fertilizability of their ova. More importantly, females exposed to a ‘risk’ of sperm competition produced ova that had greater resistance to fertilization than ova produced by females reared in an environment with ‘no risk’. Consequently, we show that variation in sperm competition risk during development generates phenotypic plasticity in ova fertilizability, which allows females to prepare for prevailing conditions during their reproductive life. PMID:24132308

  9. Sperm competition risk generates phenotypic plasticity in ovum fertilizability.

    PubMed

    Firman, Renée C; Simmons, Leigh W

    2013-12-07

    Theory predicts that sperm competition will generate sexual conflict that favours increased ovum defences against polyspermy. A recent study on house mice has shown that ovum resistance to fertilization coevolves in response to increased sperm fertilizing capacity. However, the capacity for the female gamete to adjust its fertilizability as a strategic response to sperm competition risk has never, to our knowledge, been studied. We sourced house mice (Mus domesticus) from natural populations that differ in the level of sperm competition and sperm fertilizing capacity, and manipulated the social experience of females during their sexual development to simulate conditions of either a future 'risk' or 'no risk' of sperm competition. Consistent with coevolutionary predictions, we found lower fertilization rates in ova produced by females from a high sperm competition population compared with ova from a low sperm competition population, indicating that these populations are divergent in the fertilizability of their ova. More importantly, females exposed to a 'risk' of sperm competition produced ova that had greater resistance to fertilization than ova produced by females reared in an environment with 'no risk'. Consequently, we show that variation in sperm competition risk during development generates phenotypic plasticity in ova fertilizability, which allows females to prepare for prevailing conditions during their reproductive life.

  10. Why is entry exclusion an essential feature of conjugative plasmids?

    PubMed

    Garcillán-Barcia, M Pilar; de la Cruz, Fernando

    2008-07-01

    Entry exclusion is a property of plasmids by which the cells that contain them become bad recipients in additional conjugation rounds. This work reviews entry exclusion essential features and analyzes the mechanisms of action of the best studied systems. We searched for homologs of the proteins responsible for experimentally known exclusion systems. Results were used to classify exclusion systems in families of related elements. We arrive to the conclusion that all conjugative plasmids contain at least one entry exclusion gene. Although entry exclusion genes seem to be part of the plasmid conjugative machinery, they are systematically absent in phylogenetically related type IV protein exporting machines involved in virulence for plants and animals. We infer from this fact that entry exclusion is an essential feature of conjugative plasmid biology. Mathematical models suggest that plasmids expressing entry exclusion selectively eliminate plasmids lacking it, reinforcing its essential character and suggesting that entry exclusion plays a direct role in plasmid survival. Other experimental results confirm that entry exclusion is essential for the stability of a conjugative plasmid. We suggest that entry exclusion limits the damage of lethal zygosis (bacterial death produced by excessive rounds of conjugation). Additionally, it avoids competition in a host among identical plasmid backbones. Conversely, the lack of entry exclusion in conjugative transposons can be understood as a means of generating rapid evolutionary change.

  11. A Molecular and Co-Evolutionary Context for Grazer Induced Toxin Production in Alexandrium tamarense

    PubMed Central

    Wohlrab, Sylke; Iversen, Morten H.; John, Uwe

    2010-01-01

    Marine dinoflagellates of the genus Alexandrium are the proximal source of neurotoxins associated with Paralytic Shellfish Poisoning. The production of these toxins, the toxin biosynthesis and, thus, the cellular toxicity can be influenced by abiotic and biotic factors. There is, however, a lack of substantial evidence concerning the toxins' ecological function such as grazing defense. Waterborne cues from copepods have been previously found to induce a species-specific increase in toxin content in Alexandrium minutum. However, it remains speculative in which context these species-specific responses evolved and if it occurs in other Alexandrium species as well. In this study we exposed Alexandrium tamarense to three copepod species (Calanus helgolandicus, Acartia clausii, and Oithona similis) and their corresponding cues. We show that the species-specific response towards copepod-cues is not restricted to one Alexandrium species and that co-evolutionary processes might be involved in these responses, thus giving additional evidence for the defensive role of phycotoxins. Through a functional genomic approach we gained insights into the underlying molecular processes which could trigger the different outcomes of these species-specific responses and consequently lead to increased toxin content in Alexandrium tamarense. We propose that the regulation of serine/threonine kinase signaling pathways has a major influence in directing the external stimuli i.e. copepod-cues, into different intracellular cascades and networks in A. tamarense. Our results show that A. tamarense can sense potential predating copepods and respond to the received information by increasing its toxin production. Furthermore, we demonstrate how a functional genomic approach can be used to investigate species interactions within the plankton community. PMID:21124775

  12. A molecular and co-evolutionary context for grazer induced toxin production in Alexandrium tamarense.

    PubMed

    Wohlrab, Sylke; Iversen, Morten H; John, Uwe

    2010-11-29

    Marine dinoflagellates of the genus Alexandrium are the proximal source of neurotoxins associated with Paralytic Shellfish Poisoning. The production of these toxins, the toxin biosynthesis and, thus, the cellular toxicity can be influenced by abiotic and biotic factors. There is, however, a lack of substantial evidence concerning the toxins' ecological function such as grazing defense. Waterborne cues from copepods have been previously found to induce a species-specific increase in toxin content in Alexandrium minutum. However, it remains speculative in which context these species-specific responses evolved and if it occurs in other Alexandrium species as well. In this study we exposed Alexandrium tamarense to three copepod species (Calanus helgolandicus, Acartia clausii, and Oithona similis) and their corresponding cues. We show that the species-specific response towards copepod-cues is not restricted to one Alexandrium species and that co-evolutionary processes might be involved in these responses, thus giving additional evidence for the defensive role of phycotoxins. Through a functional genomic approach we gained insights into the underlying molecular processes which could trigger the different outcomes of these species-specific responses and consequently lead to increased toxin content in Alexandrium tamarense. We propose that the regulation of serine/threonine kinase signaling pathways has a major influence in directing the external stimuli i.e. copepod-cues, into different intracellular cascades and networks in A. tamarense. Our results show that A. tamarense can sense potential predating copepods and respond to the received information by increasing its toxin production. Furthermore, we demonstrate how a functional genomic approach can be used to investigate species interactions within the plankton community.

  13. Community interactions govern host-switching with implications for host–parasite coevolutionary history

    PubMed Central

    Harbison, Christopher W.; Clayton, Dale H.

    2011-01-01

    Reciprocal selective effects between coevolving species are often influenced by interactions with the broader ecological community. Community-level interactions may also influence macroevolutionary patterns of coevolution, such as cospeciation, but this hypothesis has received little attention. We studied two groups of ecologically similar feather lice (Phthiraptera: Ischnocera) that differ in their patterns of association with a single group of hosts. The two groups, “body lice” and “wing lice,” are both parasites of pigeons and doves (Columbiformes). Body lice are more host-specific and show greater population genetic structure than wing lice. The macroevolutionary history of body lice also parallels that of their columbiform hosts more closely than does the evolutionary history of wing lice. The closer association of body lice with hosts, compared with wing lice, can be explained if body lice are less capable of switching hosts than wing lice. Wing lice sometimes disperse phoretically on parasitic flies (Diptera: Hippoboscidae), but body lice seldom engage in this behavior. We tested the hypothesis that wing lice switch host species more often than body lice, and that the difference is governed by phoresis. Our results show that, where flies are present, wing lice switch to novel host species in sufficient numbers to establish viable populations on the new host. Body lice do not switch hosts, even where flies are present. Thus, differences in the coevolutionary history of wing and body lice can be explained by differences in host-switching, mediated by a member of the broader parasite community. PMID:21606369

  14. Biological invasions and host-parasite coevolution: different coevolutionary trajectories along separate parasite invasion fronts.

    PubMed

    Feis, Marieke E; Goedknegt, M Anouk; Thieltges, David W; Buschbaum, Christian; Wegner, K Mathias

    2016-08-01

    Host-parasite coevolution has rarely been observed in natural systems. Its study often relies on microparasitic infections introducing a potential bias in the estimation of the evolutionary change of host and parasite traits. Using biological invasions as a tool to study host-parasite coevolution in nature can overcome these biases. We demonstrate this with a cross-infection experiment in the invasive macroparasite Mytilicola intestinalis and its bivalve host, the blue mussel Mytilus edulis. The invasion history of the parasite is well known for the southeastern North Sea and is characterised by two separate invasion fronts that reached opposite ends of the Wadden Sea (i.e. Texel, The Netherlands and Sylt, Germany) in a similar time frame. The species' natural history thus makes this invasion an ideal natural experiment to study host-parasite coevolution in nature. We infected hosts from Texel, Sylt and Kiel (Baltic Sea, where the parasite is absent) with parasites from Texel and Sylt, to form sympatric, allopatric and naïve infestation combinations, respectively. We measured infection rate, host condition and parasite growth to show that sympatric host-parasite combinations diverged in terms of pre- and post-infection traits within <100 generations since their introduction. Texel parasites were more infective and more efficient at exploiting the host's resources. Hosts on Texel, on the other hand, evolved resistance to infection, whereas hosts on Sylt may have evolved tolerance. This illustrates that different coevolutionary trajectories can evolve along separate invasion fronts of the parasite, highlighting the use of biological invasions in studies of host-parasite coevolution in nature.

  15. A Coevolutionary Residue Network at the Site of a Functionally Important Conformational Change in a Phosphohexomutase Enzyme Family

    PubMed Central

    Furdui, Cristina; Beamer, Lesa J.

    2012-01-01

    Coevolution analyses identify residues that co-vary with each other during evolution, revealing sequence relationships unobservable from traditional multiple sequence alignments. Here we describe a coevolutionary analysis of phosphomannomutase/phosphoglucomutase (PMM/PGM), a widespread and diverse enzyme family involved in carbohydrate biosynthesis. Mutual information and graph theory were utilized to identify a network of highly connected residues with high significance. An examination of the most tightly connected regions of the coevolutionary network reveals that most of the involved residues are localized near an interdomain interface of this enzyme, known to be the site of a functionally important conformational change. The roles of four interface residues found in this network were examined via site-directed mutagenesis and kinetic characterization. For three of these residues, mutation to alanine reduces enzyme specificity to ∼10% or less of wild-type, while the other has ∼45% activity of wild-type enzyme. An additional mutant of an interface residue that is not densely connected in the coevolutionary network was also characterized, and shows no change in activity relative to wild-type enzyme. The results of these studies are interpreted in the context of structural and functional data on PMM/PGM. Together, they demonstrate that a network of coevolving residues links the highly conserved active site with the interdomain conformational change necessary for the multi-step catalytic reaction. This work adds to our understanding of the functional roles of coevolving residue networks, and has implications for the definition of catalytically important residues. PMID:22685552

  16. Mutually Exclusive Uncertainty Relations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Yunlong; Jing, Naihuan

    2016-11-01

    The uncertainty principle is one of the characteristic properties of quantum theory based on incompatibility. Apart from the incompatible relation of quantum states, mutually exclusiveness is another remarkable phenomenon in the information- theoretic foundation of quantum theory. We investigate the role of mutual exclusive physical states in the recent work of stronger uncertainty relations for all incompatible observables by Mccone and Pati and generalize the weighted uncertainty relation to the product form as well as their multi-observable analogues. The new bounds capture both incompatibility and mutually exclusiveness, and are tighter compared with the existing bounds.

  17. Mutually Exclusive Uncertainty Relations.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yunlong; Jing, Naihuan

    2016-11-08

    The uncertainty principle is one of the characteristic properties of quantum theory based on incompatibility. Apart from the incompatible relation of quantum states, mutually exclusiveness is another remarkable phenomenon in the information- theoretic foundation of quantum theory. We investigate the role of mutual exclusive physical states in the recent work of stronger uncertainty relations for all incompatible observables by Mccone and Pati and generalize the weighted uncertainty relation to the product form as well as their multi-observable analogues. The new bounds capture both incompatibility and mutually exclusiveness, and are tighter compared with the existing bounds.

  18. Mutually Exclusive Uncertainty Relations

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Yunlong; Jing, Naihuan

    2016-01-01

    The uncertainty principle is one of the characteristic properties of quantum theory based on incompatibility. Apart from the incompatible relation of quantum states, mutually exclusiveness is another remarkable phenomenon in the information- theoretic foundation of quantum theory. We investigate the role of mutual exclusive physical states in the recent work of stronger uncertainty relations for all incompatible observables by Mccone and Pati and generalize the weighted uncertainty relation to the product form as well as their multi-observable analogues. The new bounds capture both incompatibility and mutually exclusiveness, and are tighter compared with the existing bounds. PMID:27824161

  19. Information use and resource competition: an integrative framework

    PubMed Central

    Ounsley, James P.

    2016-01-01

    Organisms may reduce uncertainty regarding how best to exploit their environment by collecting information about resource distribution. We develop a model to demonstrate how competition can facilitate or constrain an individual's ability to use information when acquiring resources. As resource distribution underpins both selection on information use and the strength and nature of competition between individuals, we demonstrate interdependencies between the two that should be common in nature. Individuals in our model can search for resources either personally or by using social information. We explore selection on social information use across a comprehensive range of ecological conditions, generalizing the producer–scrounger framework to a wide diversity of taxa and resources. We show that resource ecology—defined by scarcity, depletion rate and monopolizability—determines patterns of individual differences in social information use. These differences suggest coevolutionary processes linking dominance systems and social information use, with implications for the evolutionary demography of populations. PMID:26888031

  20. Phylogenetic diversity and co-evolutionary signals among trophic levels change across a habitat edge.

    PubMed

    Peralta, Guadalupe; Frost, Carol M; Didham, Raphael K; Varsani, Arvind; Tylianakis, Jason M

    2015-03-01

    Incorporating the evolutionary history of species into community ecology enhances understanding of community composition, ecosystem functioning and responses to environmental changes. Phylogenetic history might partly explain the impact of fragmentation and land-use change on assemblages of interacting organisms and even determine potential cascading effects across trophic levels. However, it remains unclear whether phylogenetic diversity of basal resources is reflected at higher trophic levels in the food web. In particular, phylogenetic determinants of community structure have never been incorporated into habitat edge studies, even though edges are recognized as key factors affecting communities in fragmented landscapes. Here, we test whether phylogenetic diversity at different trophic levels (plants, herbivores and parasitoids) and signals of co-evolution (i.e. phylogenetic congruence) among interacting trophic levels change across an edge gradient between native and plantation forests. To ascertain whether there is a signal of co-evolution across trophic levels, we test whether related consumer species generally feed on related resource species. We found differences across trophic levels in how their phylogenetic diversity responded to the habitat edge gradient. Plant and native parasitoid phylogenetic diversity changed markedly across habitats, while phylogenetic variability of herbivores (which were predominantly native) did not change across habitats, though phylogenetic evenness declined in plantation interiors. Related herbivore species did not appear to feed disproportionately on related plant species (i.e. there was no signal of co-evolution) even when considering only native species, potentially due to the high trophic generality of herbivores. However, related native parasitoid species tended to feed on related herbivore species, suggesting the presence of a co-evolutionary signal at higher trophic levels. Moreover, this signal was stronger in

  1. Coevolutionary modeling of protein sequences: Predicting structure, function, and mutational landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weigt, Martin

    Over the last years, biological research has been revolutionized by experimental high-throughput techniques, in particular by next-generation sequencing technology. Unprecedented amounts of data are accumulating, and there is a growing request for computational methods unveiling the information hidden in raw data, thereby increasing our understanding of complex biological systems. Statistical-physics models based on the maximum-entropy principle have, in the last few years, played an important role in this context. To give a specific example, proteins and many non-coding RNA show a remarkable degree of structural and functional conservation in the course of evolution, despite a large variability in amino acid sequences. We have developed a statistical-mechanics inspired inference approach - called Direct-Coupling Analysis - to link this sequence variability (easy to observe in sequence alignments, which are available in public sequence databases) to bio-molecular structure and function. In my presentation I will show, how this methodology can be used (i) to infer contacts between residues and thus to guide tertiary and quaternary protein structure prediction and RNA structure prediction, (ii) to discriminate interacting from non-interacting protein families, and thus to infer conserved protein-protein interaction networks, and (iii) to reconstruct mutational landscapes and thus to predict the phenotypic effect of mutations. References [1] M. Figliuzzi, H. Jacquier, A. Schug, O. Tenaillon and M. Weigt ''Coevolutionary landscape inference and the context-dependence of mutations in beta-lactamase TEM-1'', Mol. Biol. Evol. (2015), doi: 10.1093/molbev/msv211 [2] E. De Leonardis, B. Lutz, S. Ratz, S. Cocco, R. Monasson, A. Schug, M. Weigt ''Direct-Coupling Analysis of nucleotide coevolution facilitates RNA secondary and tertiary structure prediction'', Nucleic Acids Research (2015), doi: 10.1093/nar/gkv932 [3] F. Morcos, A. Pagnani, B. Lunt, A. Bertolino, D. Marks, C

  2. Friendly competition.

    PubMed

    Chambers, David W

    2006-01-01

    Competition that is characterized by rules, often informal, agreed among mutually accepted participants, and that gives the competitors a special, advantageous status with others is called friendly competition. Dentists have engaged in it deeply and it is good for the profession. Friendly competition offers the advantages of spillover of commonly useful information and technologies, stimulation of innovation, a united and convenient face to customers and suppliers, and standards that promote growth. Friendly competition increases the size of the pie, regardless of market share. Paradoxically, this is even true for the little guy in the shadow of the giant. If carried to extremes, unfriendly competition leads to destroying competitors, the confusion of multiple rules, and encouragement of disruptive change.

  3. UK Higher Education: Competitive Forces in the 21st Century.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webber, G. C.

    2000-01-01

    Considers United Kingdom higher education in the context of Michael Porter's book, "Competitive Strategy," which discusses five forces governing competition. Focusing mainly, but not exclusively, on teaching, the monograph identifies critical factors that have influenced the balance of competitive forces in higher education and…

  4. Exclusive production at CMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khakzad, Mohsen

    2017-03-01

    A search for exclusive or quasi-exclusive γγ → W+W- production, pp → p(∗)W+W-p(∗) → p(∗)μ±e∓p(∗), at √{s }=8 TeV (7 TeV) is reported using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb-1 (5.5fb-1), respectively. In this study, we look for any deviations that there might be from the Standard Model, and the results are used to set limits on the Anomalous Quartic Gauge Couplings. We also report a measurement of the exclusive production of pairs of charged pions in proton-proton collisions. The differential cross sections for π+π- pairs as a function of the pion pair invariant mass is measured and compared to several phenomenological predictions.

  5. Reproductive interference determines persistence and exclusion in species interactions.

    PubMed

    Kishi, Shigeki; Nishida, Takayoshi; Tsubaki, Yoshitaka

    2009-09-01

    1. Reproductive interference is a negative interspecific sexual interaction that adversely affects the fitness of males and females during reproductive process. Theoretical studies suggest that because reproductive interference is characterized by positive frequency dependence it is far more likely to cause species exclusion than the density dependence of resource competition. However, the respective contributions of resource competition and reproductive interference to species exclusion, which have been frequently observed in many competition studies, remain unclear. 2. We show that reproductive interference is a far more critical cause of species exclusion than resource competition in the competition between Callosobruchus bean weevil species. In competition experiments over several generations, we manipulated the initial relative abundance of the adzuki bean beetle, Callosobruchus chinensis, and the southern cowpea beetle, Callosobruchus maculatus. When the initial adult ratio of C. chinensis : C. maculatus were 6 : 2 and 4 : 4, C. chinensis excluded C. maculatus. However, when C. maculatus was four times more abundant than C. chinensis at the start, we observed the opposite outcome. 3. A behavioural experiment using adults of the two species revealed asymmetric reproductive interference. The fecundity and longevity of C. maculatus females, but not those of C. chinensis females, decreased when the females were kept with heterospecific males. Fecundities of females of both species decreased as the number of heterospecific males increased. In contrast, resource competition at the larval stage resulted in higher survival of C. maculatus than of C. chinensis. 4. These results suggest that the positive frequency-dependent effect of reproductive interference resulted in species exclusion, depending on the initial population ratio of the two species, and the asymmetry of the interference resulted in C. chinensis being dominant in this study, as in previous studies

  6. Mutually Exclusive, Complementary, or . . .

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schloemer, Cathy G.

    2016-01-01

    Whether students are beginning their study of probability or are well into it, distinctions between complementary sets and mutually exclusive sets can be confusing. Cathy Schloemer writes in this article that for years she used typical classroom examples but was not happy with the student engagement or the level of understanding they produced.…

  7. 47 CFR 22.969 - Cellular RSA licenses subject to competitive bidding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... CARRIER SERVICES PUBLIC MOBILE SERVICES Cellular Radiotelephone Service § 22.969 Cellular RSA licenses subject to competitive bidding. Mutually exclusive applications for initial authorization for...

  8. 47 CFR 22.201 - Paging geographic area authorizations are subject to competitive bidding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES PUBLIC MOBILE SERVICES Licensing Requirements and Procedures Competitive.... Mutually exclusive initial applications for paging geographic area licenses are subject to...

  9. 47 CFR 22.201 - Paging geographic area authorizations are subject to competitive bidding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES PUBLIC MOBILE SERVICES Licensing Requirements and Procedures Competitive.... Mutually exclusive initial applications for paging geographic area licenses are subject to...

  10. 47 CFR 22.969 - Cellular RSA licenses subject to competitive bidding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... CARRIER SERVICES PUBLIC MOBILE SERVICES Cellular Radiotelephone Service § 22.969 Cellular RSA licenses subject to competitive bidding. Mutually exclusive applications for initial authorization for...

  11. "Excellence" and Exclusion: The Individual Costs of Institutional Competitiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watermeyer, Richard; Olssen, Mark

    2016-01-01

    A performance-based funding system like the United Kingdom's "Research Excellence Framework" (REF) symbolizes the re-rationalization of higher education according to neoliberal ideology and New Public Management technologies. The REF is also significant for disclosing the kinds of behaviour that characterize universities' response to…

  12. Type III effector diversification via both pathoadaptation and horizontal transfer in response to a coevolutionary arms race.

    PubMed

    Ma, Wenbo; Dong, Frederick F T; Stavrinides, John; Guttman, David S

    2006-12-01

    The concept of the coevolutionary arms race holds a central position in our understanding of pathogen-host interactions. Here we identify the molecular mechanisms and follow the stepwise progression of an arms race in a natural system. We show how the evolution and function of the HopZ family of type III secreted effector proteins carried by the plant pathogen Pseudomonas syringae are influenced by a coevolutionary arms race between pathogen and host. We surveyed 96 isolates of P. syringae and identified three homologs (HopZ1, HopZ2, and HopZ3) distributed among approximately 45% of the strains. All alleles were sequenced and their expression was confirmed. Evolutionary analyses determined that the diverse HopZ1 homologs are ancestral to P. syringae, and have diverged via pathoadaptive mutational changes into three functional and two degenerate forms, while HopZ2 and HopZ3 have been brought into P. syringae via horizontal transfer from other ecologically similar bacteria. A PAML selection analysis revealed that the C terminus of HopZ1 is under strong positive selection. Despite the extensive genetic variation observed in this family, all three homologs have cysteine-protease activity, although their substrate specificity may vary. The introduction of the ancestral hopZ1 allele into strains harboring alternate alleles results in a resistance protein-mediated defense response in their respective hosts, which is not observed with the endogenous allele. These data indicate that the P. syringae HopZ family has undergone allelic diversification via both pathoadaptive mutational changes and horizontal transfer in response to selection imposed by the host defense system. This genetic diversity permits the pathogen to avoid host defenses while still maintaining a virulence-associated protease, thereby allowing it to thrive on its current host, while simultaneously impacting its host range.

  13. Tough Competition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Roland

    1994-01-01

    College and university public relations specialists find that, to get competitive coverage for their institutions, they must provide the media with instant access to information and understand the way the media operate. Although the computer is useful in expanding contacts, responsiveness and information of real interest are foremost…

  14. EDITORIAL: Physics competitions Physics competitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordens, H.; Mathelitsch, L.

    2009-11-01

    1. Physics competitions: aims and realizations One aim of physics competitions is to increase the interest of young students, primarily at upper secondary level, to physics and natural sciences in general. A competition has motivational aspects known usually from sports events or games—comparing one's own ability with others, of course with the desire to be better and to win. If competitions reach nationwide and even international levels, additional stimulation is created. Competitions provide greatest attraction to possible winners, to the group of gifted people in a particular field. This implies that science contests are excellent tools for the promotion of talented students. Traditional teaching has been shown to have problems in supporting this group of students. Very often teachers are overstretched with the demands of teaching both low- and high-level students. Extracurricular activities are therefore a good chance to relieve the teacher, and to give talented students the opportunity for appropriate training and challenge. The competitions, however, have a broader impact and address more young people than one might guess from the statements above. Training courses and selection at school level give a larger group of students extra and, to some extent, complimentary education in physics. The degree of complexity of the tasks corresponds very often to the standards of the next level of education in the school system. Interestingly, many physics competitions have their origin in countries beyond the former Iron Curtain. They started as regional and national tournaments, were joined by neighbouring countries and have grown, in some cases, to events with participants from more than 80 countries. Although the features mentioned above are common to the different competitions, there are distinct differences between them [1]. The International Physics Olympiad (IPhO) is the oldest international physics competition for students at upper secondary level [2]. It dates

  15. EDITORIAL: Physics competitions Physics competitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordens, H.; Mathelitsch, L.

    2010-07-01

    This editorial opens the second special section on physics competitions in European Journal of Physics. In the first section last year, we asked for feedback on the idea of such a section and on the content of the articles. We received no answer whatsoever, which can be interpreted in two ways: the section is not interesting enough to raise motivation for feedback, or the reader is satisfied. Having no indication which scenario is the correct one, we are optimistic and favour the second. The section at hand contains three articles. Again, as last year, the organizer of the annual Olympiad reports on tasks and outcomes of this competition. The Olympiad took place in Merida, Mexico, and was by far the largest event with 316 contestants from 68 countries. Again, the predominance of Asian/Chinese students was manifest, showing how serious the training is taken by both their authorities and students. Unfortunately, the winners of the last International Young Physicists' Tournament (IYPT), the team from Korea, did not accept the offer to report on their prize-winning contribution. We are thankful that two students from Austria, who achieved second place with their team, took over and reported on the task which they presented in the finals of the competition. It connects the fields of sport and physics and explains a special move in skateboarding. The third contribution introduces a different competition, 'International Conference of Young Scientists'. On one hand, as in the Olympiad, it addresses individuals, not teams. On the other, as in the IYPT, students have several months to prepare and also the quality of the presentation is an important element of the judgment. In fact, this competition comes closer to real scientific research compared to the other events. Finally and again, we hope that this section will serve several purposes: To show the competitions as a very important tool in the support of gifted students. To raise awareness amongst university teachers, and

  16. Coevolutionary dynamics of networks and games under birth-death and birth mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Z.-G.; Wu, Z.-X.; Xu, X.-J.; Guan, J.-Y.; Wang, Y.-H.

    2007-08-01

    There is much interest in studying evolutionary games in structured populations, in order to understand how cooperation emerges in communities of egoistic agents. In this paper, we consider a new mechanism for cooperation to survive on networks. Agents are designed to reproduce offspring in proportion to their fitness, i.e., the aggregate payoffs they collected in the previous Prisoner's Dilemma game with neighbours. The population then evolves either by an individual giving birth to an offspring that takes over a random neighbour (birth-death process dynamics as the competition for resources already occupied by others) or by an individual constructing one new site from unexploited resources for its offspring (birth process dynamics as the competition for the unexploited resources which induces the extension of system). The underlying interaction network thus evolves and expands simultaneously with the population dynamics. The birth process dynamics is proved to be one new route that favours cooperators, under which cooperators can successfully resist the invasion of defectors in spite of large cost. Furthermore, under this “birth-death & birth” mechanism, the resulting network has a scale-free degree distribution, a small-world property, and hierarchical topology.

  17. Social exclusion in finite populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Kun; Cong, Rui; Wu, Te; Wang, Long

    2015-04-01

    Social exclusion, keeping free riders from benefit sharing, plays an important role in sustaining cooperation in our world. Here we propose two different exclusion regimes, namely, peer exclusion and pool exclusion, to investigate the evolution of social exclusion in finite populations. In the peer exclusion regime, each excluder expels all the defectors independently, and thus bears the total cost on his own, while in the pool exclusion regime, excluders spontaneously form an institution to carry out rejection of the free riders, and each excluder shares the cost equally. In a public goods game containing only excluders and defectors, it is found that peer excluders outperform pool excluders if the exclusion costs are small, and the situation is converse once the exclusion costs exceed some critical points, which holds true for all the selection intensities and different update rules. Moreover, excluders can dominate the whole population under a suitable parameters range in the presence of second-order free riders (cooperators), showing that exclusion has prominent advantages over common costly punishment. More importantly, our finding indicates that the group exclusion mechanism helps the cooperative union to survive under unfavorable conditions. Our results may give some insights into better understanding the prevalence of such a strategy in the real world and its significance in sustaining cooperation.

  18. Sustainability and collapse in a coevolutionary model of local resource stocks and behavioral patterns on a social network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiedermann, Marc; Donges, Jonathan F.; Heitzig, Jobst; Kurths, Jürgen

    2014-05-01

    When investigating the causes and consequences of global change, the collective behavior of human beings is considered as having a considerable impact on natural systems. In our work, we propose a conceptual coevolutionary model simulating the dynamics of local renewable resources in interaction with simplistic societal agents exploiting those resources. The society is represented by a social network on which social traits may be transmitted between agents. These traits themselves induce a certain rate of exploitation of the resource, leading either to its depletion or sustainable existence. Traits are exchanged probabilistically according to their instantaneous individual payoff, and hence this process depends on the status of the natural resource. At the same time agents may adaptively restructure their set of acquaintances. Connections with agents having a different trait may be broken while new connections with agents of the same trait are established. We investigate which choices of social parameters, like the frequency of social interaction, rationality and rate of social network adaptation, cause the system to end in a sustainable state and, hence, what can be done to avoid a collapse of the entire system. The importance and influence of the social network structure is analyzed by the variation of link-densities in the underlying network topology and shows significant influence on the expected outcome of the model. For a static network with no adaptation we find a robust phase transition between the two different regimes, sustainable and non-sustainable, which co-exist in parameter space. High connectivity within the social network, e.g., high link-densities, in combination with a fast rate of social learning lead to a likely collapse of the entire co-evolutionary system, whereas slow learning and small network connectivity very likely result in the sustainable existence of the natural resources. Collapse may be avoided by an intelligent rewiring, e

  19. EDITORIAL: Physics competitions Physics competitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordens, H.; Mathelitsch, L.

    2011-07-01

    International tests on competences, such as TIMSS or PISA, and knowledge of young students have revealed low average scores in many countries, often unexpectedly. One effective measure to increase the average standard of a population is to bring the last third of the group to a higher level. Therefore, many nations put some effort into this activity. This brings the danger that not enough attention is paid to students at the other end, those who are talented. Indeed, it is a very difficult task for a teacher to support the less able and at the same time challenge the gifted students, to lead them to the limits of their abilities and provide for a smooth transition to university study. Physics competitions have been proven to fulfil these last demands to a large degree, and therefore are an important additional and, to some extent, complementary tool for the promotion of talented students. This third special section on physics competitions in European Journal of Physics contains three papers, each dealing with a different form of science contest. The first continues the series of presentations of tasks performed at the International Young Physicists' Tournament, which was held in Vienna in 2011. First place went to the team from Singapore, and they have put their investigation on vertical oscillations of coupled magnets into written form (not required by the tournament, where an oral presentation and a defence and discussion are the central aspects). Their paper shows how rich in physics this problem is, and what level of solutions high-school students can already achieve. Sadly, those responsible for the organization of last year's International Physics Olympiad did not provide us with a report on this competition. This is unfortunate, since the Olympiad in Zagreb was very successful and, in particular, the experimental tasks were creative and demanding. Very similar to the aims and the execution of the Physics Olympiad is the International Olympiad on Astronomy

  20. Exclusion processes with avalanches.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Uttam; Krapivsky, P L

    2014-07-01

    In an exclusion process with avalanches, when a particle hops to a neighboring empty site which is adjacent to an island the particle on the other end of the island immediately hops, and if it joins another island this triggers another hop. There are no restrictions on the length of the islands and the duration of the avalanche. This process is well defined in the low-density region ρ < 1/2. We describe the nature of steady states (on a ring) and determine all correlation functions. For the asymmetric version of the process, we compute the steady state current, and we describe shock and rarefaction waves which arise in the evolution of the step-function initial profile. For the symmetric version, we determine the diffusion coefficient and examine the evolution of a tagged particle.

  1. Exclusion performance and learning by exclusion in dogs.

    PubMed

    Zaine, Isabela; Domeniconi, Camila; de Rose, Julio C

    2016-05-01

    Responding by exclusion is a type of emergent repertoire in which an individual chooses an alternative by the apparent exclusion of other available alternatives. In this case it is possible to respond appropriately to an undefined stimulus (one that has not previously acquired discriminative functions) by excluding the defined alternatives. There is evidence of exclusion in humans and nonhuman animals, although learning as an outcome of exclusion does not always occur. This study aimed to investigate exclusion in visual simple discriminations and learning of new simple discriminations resulting from exclusion in four border collies. Subjects were trained to perform simple simultaneous discriminations between pairs of tridimensional objects, and were then tested for exclusion, novelty control and learning of new simple discriminations. All dogs successfully responded by exclusion, choosing an undefined stimulus displayed with an S-. For three dogs, it was possible to conclude that these previously undefined stimuli acquired S+ functions, documenting learning of new simple discriminations. However, this required up to four exposures to exclusion trials with each pair of stimuli.

  2. Habitat area and structure affect the impact of seed predators and the potential for coevolutionary arms races.

    PubMed

    Mezquida, Eduardo T; Benkman, Craig W

    2010-03-01

    Both habitat patch size and structure affect the abundance and occurrence of species and thereby can affect the ecology and evolution of species interactions. Here we contrast the level of seed predation and selection exerted by Common Crossbills (Loxia curvirostra complex) and red squirrels (Sciurus vulgaris) in the extensive mountain pine (Pinus uncinata) forests in the Pyrenees with their level of seed predation in two small, isolated forests. Crossbills consumed 5.1 times more seeds in the Pyrenees than in the isolated forests, and six of seven cone traits under selection by crossbills were enhanced in the Pyrenees. In contrast, red squirrels tend to be uncommon in the open mountain pine forests, consuming relatively few seeds in both regions and having limited impact on both mountain pine and the interaction between crossbills and mountain pine. Resident crossbills in mountain pine forests in the Pyrenees have larger bills than in nearby forests, consistent with local adaptation by crossbills and a coevolutionary arms race between crossbills and mountain pine. The mechanisms leading to variation in the interaction between crossbills and mountain pine should be general to many systems because habitat patch size and structure often vary across the range of a species.

  3. Frontier mutualism: coevolutionary patterns at the northern range limit of the leaf-cutter ant-fungus symbiosis.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Ulrich G; Mikheyev, Alexander S; Solomon, Scott E; Cooper, Michael

    2011-10-22

    Tropical leaf-cutter ants cultivate the fungus Attamyces bromatificus in a many-to-one, diffuse coevolutionary relationship where ant and fungal partners re-associate frequently over time. To evaluate whether ant-Attamyces coevolution is more specific (tighter) in peripheral populations, we characterized the host-specificities of Attamyces genotypes at their northern, subtropical range limits (southern USA, Mexico and Cuba). Population-genetic patterns of northern Attamyces reveal features that have so far not been observed in the diffusely coevolving, tropical ant-Attamyces associations. These unique features include (i) cases of one-to-one ant-Attamyces specialization that tighten coevolution at the northern frontier; (ii) distributions of genetically identical Attamyces clones over large areas (up to 81 000 km(2), approx. the area of Ireland, Austria or Panama); (iii) admixture rates between Attamyces lineages that appear lower in northern than in tropical populations; and (iv) long-distance gene flow of Attamyces across a dispersal barrier for leaf-cutter ants (ocean between mainland North America and Cuba). The latter suggests that Attamyces fungi may occasionally disperse independently of the ants, contrary to the traditional assumption that Attamyces fungi depend entirely on leaf-cutter queens for dispersal. Peripheral populations in Argentina or at mid-elevation sites in the Andes may reveal additional regional variants in ant-Attamyces coevolution. Studies of such populations are most likely to inform models of coextinctions of obligate mutualistic partners that are doubly stressed by habitat marginality and by environmental change.

  4. Competition promotes the persistence of populations in ecosystems

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tao; Duan, Jinqiao; Liu, Tong

    2016-01-01

    Competition is one of the most common form in ecological systems, which plays important roles in population dynamics. However, the influences of competition on persistence of populations remain unclear when space effect is included. In this paper, we investigated a predator-prey model with competition and spatial diffusion. Based on pattern formations and time series of populations, we found that competitions induce the persistence of populations, which denies competitive exclusion principle. Moreover, we testify the robustness of these effects. Our results also suggest that space may lead to the emergence of new phenomenon in ecosystems. PMID:27460143

  5. Competition promotes the persistence of populations in ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tao; Duan, Jinqiao; Liu, Tong

    2016-07-01

    Competition is one of the most common form in ecological systems, which plays important roles in population dynamics. However, the influences of competition on persistence of populations remain unclear when space effect is included. In this paper, we investigated a predator-prey model with competition and spatial diffusion. Based on pattern formations and time series of populations, we found that competitions induce the persistence of populations, which denies competitive exclusion principle. Moreover, we testify the robustness of these effects. Our results also suggest that space may lead to the emergence of new phenomenon in ecosystems.

  6. Exclusive Processes in Quantum Chromodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; Peter Lepage, G.

    The following sections are included: * INTRODUCTION * NONRELATIVISTIC FORM FACTORS FOR HEAVY-QUARK MESONS * HADRONIC WAVEFUNCTIONS * DEFINITIONS * LIGHT-CONE BOUND-STATE EQUATIONS * GENERAL PROPERTIES OF LIGHT-CONE WAVEFUNCTIONS * RENORMALIZATION * CALCULATING * A PERTURBATIVE ANALYSIS * FACTORIZATION—LEADING ORDER ANALYSIS * THE QUARK DISTRIBUTION AMPLITUDE * DETERMINATION OF DISTRIBUTION AMPLITUDES * HIGHER ORDER ANALYSIS * COMPLICATIONS * How LARGE IS ASYMPTOTIC Q? * APPLICATIONS OF QCD TO THE PHENOMENOLOGY OF EXCLUSIVE REACTIONS * GENERAL FEATURES OF EXCLUSIVE PROCESSES IN QCD * ELECTROMAGNETIC FORM FACTORS * COMPARISON OF QCD SCALING WITH EXPERIMENT * EXCLUSIVE ANTI-PROTON PROTON ANNIHILATION PROCESSES * ADDITIONAL TESTS OF GLUON SPIN IN EXCLUSIVE PROCESSES * HADRONIC WAVEFUNCTION PHENOMENOLOGY * CALCULATING TH * THE PRE-QCD DEVELOPMENT OF EXCLUSIVE REACTIONS * EXCLUSIVE e+ e- ANNIHILATION PROCESSES * J/ψ DECAY TO HADRON PAIRS * THE π-ρ PUZZLE * FORM FACTOR ZEROS IN QCD * EXCLUSIVE γγ REACTIONS * QCD PROCESSES IN NUCLEI * EXCLUSIVE NUCLEAR REACTIONS - REDUCED AMPLITUDES * COLOR TRANSPARENCY * SPIN CORRELATIONS IN PROTON-PROTON SCATTERING * CONCLUSIONS * APPENDIX I BARYON FORM FACTORS AND EVOLUTION EQUATIONS * APPENDIX II LIGHT CONE QUANTIZATION AND PERTURBATION THEORY * APPENDIX III A NONPERTURBATIVE ANALYSIS OF EXCLUSIVE REACTIONS-DISCRETIZED LIGHT-CONE QUANTIZATION * ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS * REFERENCES

  7. Competitive Science: Is Competition Ruining Science?

    PubMed Central

    Casadevall, Arturo

    2015-01-01

    Science has always been a competitive undertaking. Despite recognition of the benefits of cooperation and team science, reduced availability of funding and jobs has made science more competitive than ever. Here we consider the benefits of competition in providing incentives to scientists and the adverse effects of competition on resource sharing, research integrity, and creativity. The history of science shows that transformative discoveries often occur in the absence of competition, which only emerges once fields are established and goals are defined. Measures to encourage collaboration and ameliorate competition in the scientific enterprise are discussed. PMID:25605760

  8. Frontier mutualism: coevolutionary patterns at the northern range limit of the leaf-cutter ant–fungus symbiosis

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, Ulrich G.; Mikheyev, Alexander S.; Solomon, Scott E.; Cooper, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Tropical leaf-cutter ants cultivate the fungus Attamyces bromatificus in a many-to-one, diffuse coevolutionary relationship where ant and fungal partners re-associate frequently over time. To evaluate whether ant–Attamyces coevolution is more specific (tighter) in peripheral populations, we characterized the host-specificities of Attamyces genotypes at their northern, subtropical range limits (southern USA, Mexico and Cuba). Population-genetic patterns of northern Attamyces reveal features that have so far not been observed in the diffusely coevolving, tropical ant–Attamyces associations. These unique features include (i) cases of one-to-one ant–Attamyces specialization that tighten coevolution at the northern frontier; (ii) distributions of genetically identical Attamyces clones over large areas (up to 81 000 km2, approx. the area of Ireland, Austria or Panama); (iii) admixture rates between Attamyces lineages that appear lower in northern than in tropical populations; and (iv) long-distance gene flow of Attamyces across a dispersal barrier for leaf-cutter ants (ocean between mainland North America and Cuba). The latter suggests that Attamyces fungi may occasionally disperse independently of the ants, contrary to the traditional assumption that Attamyces fungi depend entirely on leaf-cutter queens for dispersal. Peripheral populations in Argentina or at mid-elevation sites in the Andes may reveal additional regional variants in ant–Attamyces coevolution. Studies of such populations are most likely to inform models of coextinctions of obligate mutualistic partners that are doubly stressed by habitat marginality and by environmental change. PMID:21389026

  9. Amino acid positions subject to multiple co-evolutionary constraints can be robustly identified by their eigenvector network centrality scores

    PubMed Central

    Parente, Daniel J.; Ray, J. Christian J.; Swint-Kruse, Liskin

    2015-01-01

    As proteins evolve, amino acid positions key to protein structure or function are subject to mutational constraints. These positions can be detected by analyzing sequence families for amino acid conservation or for co-evolution between pairs of positions. Co-evolutionary scores are usually rank-ordered and thresholded to reveal the top pairwise scores, but they also can be treated as weighted networks. Here, we used network analyses to bypass a major complication of co-evolution studies: For a given sequence alignment, alternative algorithms usually identify different, top pairwise scores. We reconciled results from five commonly-used, mathematically divergent algorithms (ELSC, McBASC, OMES, SCA, and ZNMI), using the LacI/GalR and 1,6-bisphosphate aldolase protein families as models. Calculations used unthresholded co-evolution scores from which column-specific properties such as sequence entropy and random noise were subtracted; “central” positions were identified by calculating various network centrality scores. When compared among algorithms, network centrality methods, particularly eigenvector centrality, showed markedly better agreement than comparisons of the top pairwise scores. Positions with large centrality scores occurred at key structural locations and/or were functionally sensitive to mutations. Further, the top central positions often differed from those with top pairwise co-evolution scores: Instead of a few strong scores, central positions often had multiple, moderate scores. We conclude that eigenvector centrality calculations reveal a robust evolutionary pattern of constraints – detectable by divergent algorithms – that occur at key protein locations. Finally, we discuss the fact that multiple patterns co-exist in evolutionary data that, together, give rise to emergent protein functions. PMID:26503808

  10. Lunabotics Mining Competition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, Rob; Murphy, Gloria

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation describes a competition to design a lunar robot (lunabot) that can be controlled either remotely or autonomously, isolated from the operator, and is designed to mine a lunar aggregate simulant. The competition is part of a systems engineering curriculum. The 2010 competition winners in five areas of the competition were acknowledged, and the 2011 competition was announced.

  11. Long-range RNA pairings contribute to mutually exclusive splicing.

    PubMed

    Yue, Yuan; Yang, Yun; Dai, Lanzhi; Cao, Guozheng; Chen, Ran; Hong, Weiling; Liu, Baoping; Shi, Yang; Meng, Yijun; Shi, Feng; Xiao, Mu; Jin, Yongfeng

    2016-01-01

    Mutually exclusive splicing is an important means of increasing the protein repertoire, by which the Down's syndrome cell adhesion molecule (Dscam) gene potentially generates 38,016 different isoforms in Drosophila melanogaster. However, the regulatory mechanisms remain obscure due to the complexity of the Dscam exon cluster. Here, we reveal a molecular model for the regulation of the mutually exclusive splicing of the serpent pre-mRNA based on competition between upstream and downstream RNA pairings. Such dual RNA pairings confer fine tuning of the inclusion of alternative exons. Moreover, we demonstrate that the splicing outcome of alternative exons is mediated in relative pairing strength-correlated mode. Combined comparative genomics analysis and experimental evidence revealed similar bidirectional structural architectures in exon clusters 4 and 9 of the Dscam gene. Our findings provide a novel mechanistic framework for the regulation of mutually exclusive splicing and may offer potentially applicable insights into long-range RNA-RNA interactions in gene regulatory networks.

  12. Competitive spirit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-01-01

    Leicester University will host the 65 international teams of students who will assemble in July for this year's International Physics Olympiad . The last time the Olympiad came to the UK was in 1986 in London, and it was the notable enthusiasm of the Leicester Physics and Astronomy department which persuaded the Olympiad Committee to give them the chance of organizing the prestigious event. The students taking part from all over the world are studying physics at A-level or an equivalent standard and they will take part in an intellectual marathon of theoretical and practical examinations. Each national team comprises five students selected from three rounds of competition and the teams will receive an official welcome from the city, as well as opportunities to visit some of the important educational and cultural centres of the surrounding region. The finalists will also be able to test their skills and initiative at the Challenger Learning Centre, which forms part of Leicester's new National Space Science Centre. Specific information on the event can be found on the Olympiad-2000 website at www.star.le.ac.uk/IphO-2000 . The Rudolf Ortvay problem solving contest in physics, which takes place in November, is a tradition of Eötvös University in Budapest, Hungary. The competition was first opened to international participants in 1998, enabling students from universities around the world to show their knowledge, ingenuity, problem-solving skills and physical insight into problems that are far beyond routine level. The problems (30 - 35 each year) are chosen from different branches of theoretical as well as applied physics. They have varying levels of difficulty, and every contestant can send solutions for ten problems. The focus is not on school-level problem-solving routines but rather on the `physical' way of thinking, recognition of the heart of the problem and an appropriate choice of mathematics. The majority of the assigned problems are original, few having

  13. Computational Analysis of Residue Interaction Networks and Coevolutionary Relationships in the Hsp70 Chaperones: A Community-Hopping Model of Allosteric Regulation and Communication

    PubMed Central

    Stetz, Gabrielle; Verkhivker, Gennady M.

    2017-01-01

    Allosteric interactions in the Hsp70 proteins are linked with their regulatory mechanisms and cellular functions. Despite significant progress in structural and functional characterization of the Hsp70 proteins fundamental questions concerning modularity of the allosteric interaction networks and hierarchy of signaling pathways in the Hsp70 chaperones remained largely unexplored and poorly understood. In this work, we proposed an integrated computational strategy that combined atomistic and coarse-grained simulations with coevolutionary analysis and network modeling of the residue interactions. A novel aspect of this work is the incorporation of dynamic residue correlations and coevolutionary residue dependencies in the construction of allosteric interaction networks and signaling pathways. We found that functional sites involved in allosteric regulation of Hsp70 may be characterized by structural stability, proximity to global hinge centers and local structural environment that is enriched by highly coevolving flexible residues. These specific characteristics may be necessary for regulation of allosteric structural transitions and could distinguish regulatory sites from nonfunctional conserved residues. The observed confluence of dynamics correlations and coevolutionary residue couplings with global networking features may determine modular organization of allosteric interactions and dictate localization of key mediating sites. Community analysis of the residue interaction networks revealed that concerted rearrangements of local interacting modules at the inter-domain interface may be responsible for global structural changes and a population shift in the DnaK chaperone. The inter-domain communities in the Hsp70 structures harbor the majority of regulatory residues involved in allosteric signaling, suggesting that these sites could be integral to the network organization and coordination of structural changes. Using a network-based formalism of allostery, we

  14. Coevolution between invasive and native plants driven by chemical competition and soil biota.

    PubMed

    Lankau, Richard A

    2012-07-10

    Although reciprocal evolutionary responses between interacting species are a driving force behind the diversity of life, pairwise coevolution between plant competitors has received less attention than other species interactions and has been considered relatively less important in explaining ecological patterns. However, the success of species transported across biogeographic boundaries suggests a stronger role for evolutionary relationships in shaping plant interactions. Alliaria petiolata is a Eurasian species that has invaded North American forest understories, where it competes with native understory species in part by producing compounds that directly and indirectly slow the growth of competing species. Here I show that populations of A. petiolata from areas with a greater density of interspecific competitors invest more in a toxic allelochemical under common conditions. Furthermore, populations of a native competitor from areas with highly toxic invaders are more tolerant to competition from the invader, suggesting coevolutionary dynamics between the species. Field reciprocal transplants confirmed that native populations more tolerant to the invader had higher fitness when the invader was common, but these traits came at a cost when the invader was rare. Exotic species are often detrimentally dominant in their new range due to their evolutionary novelty; however, the development of new coevolutionary relationships may act to integrate exotic species into native communities.

  15. Female competition: causes, constraints, content, and contexts.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Anne

    2004-02-01

    Monogamy tends to equalise mate competition between the sexes. However, women show greater restraint in their use of direct intrasexual aggression, which, I argue, is a result of their higher parental investment and the consequently greater reproductive cost of injury or death. Women usually compete for mates by advertising qualities valued by men (beauty and sexual exclusiveness) and by using indirect means of denigrating rivals (through gossip and stigmatisation). However, where well-resourced men are in short supply, women must find alternative sources of support or escalate their competition for male partners to physical levels. Data from criminology, psychology, evolutionary biology, and anthropology are used to support these proposals.

  16. Evolution of angiosperm seed disperser mutualisms: the timing of origins and their consequences for coevolutionary interactions between angiosperms and frugivores.

    PubMed

    Eriksson, Ove

    2016-02-01

    , and many of the originations of fleshy fruits occurred well after the peak in the early Eocene. (vi) During periods associated with environmental change altering coevolutionary networks and opening of niche space, reciprocal coevolution may result in strong directional selection formative for both fruit and frugivore evolution. Further evidence is needed to test this hypothesis. Based on the abundance of plant lineages with various forms of fleshy fruits, and the diversity of frugivores, it is suggested that periods of rapid coevolution in angiosperms and frugivores occurred numerous times during the 80 million years of angiosperm-frugivore evolution.

  17. Classification as clustering: a Pareto cooperative-competitive GP approach.

    PubMed

    McIntyre, Andrew R; Heywood, Malcolm I

    2011-01-01

    Intuitively population based algorithms such as genetic programming provide a natural environment for supporting solutions that learn to decompose the overall task between multiple individuals, or a team. This work presents a framework for evolving teams without recourse to prespecifying the number of cooperating individuals. To do so, each individual evolves a mapping to a distribution of outcomes that, following clustering, establishes the parameterization of a (Gaussian) local membership function. This gives individuals the opportunity to represent subsets of tasks, where the overall task is that of classification under the supervised learning domain. Thus, rather than each team member representing an entire class, individuals are free to identify unique subsets of the overall classification task. The framework is supported by techniques from evolutionary multiobjective optimization (EMO) and Pareto competitive coevolution. EMO establishes the basis for encouraging individuals to provide accurate yet nonoverlaping behaviors; whereas competitive coevolution provides the mechanism for scaling to potentially large unbalanced datasets. Benchmarking is performed against recent examples of nonlinear SVM classifiers over 12 UCI datasets with between 150 and 200,000 training instances. Solutions from the proposed coevolutionary multiobjective GP framework appear to provide a good balance between classification performance and model complexity, especially as the dataset instance count increases.

  18. Competition in Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rich, John Martin; DeVitis, Joseph L.

    This book discusses various major aspects of competition in education. It identifies competition within educational policies, programs, and practices, as well as the problems that certain forms of competition create. It also traces the influences of American competitive values on education. Chapter 1 provides an introductory overview of the…

  19. Coevolutionary Free Lunches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolpert, David H.; Macready, William G.

    2005-01-01

    Recent work on the mathematical foundations of optimization has begun to uncover its rich structure. In particular, the "No Free Lunch" (NFL) theorems state that any two algorithms are equivalent when their performance is averaged across all possible problems. This highlights the need for exploiting problem-specific knowledge to achieve better than random performance. In this paper we present a general framework covering more search scenarios. In addition to the optimization scenarios addressed in the NFL results, this framework covers multi-armed bandit problems and evolution of multiple co-evolving players. As a particular instance of the latter, it covers "self-play" problems. In these problems the set of players work together to produce a champion, who then engages one or more antagonists in a subsequent multi-player game. In contrast to the traditional optimization case where the NFL results hold, we show that in self-play there are free lunches: in coevolution some algorithms have better performance than other algorithms, averaged across all possible problems. We consider the implications of these results to biology where there is no champion.

  20. The relative importance of seed competition, resource competition and perturbations on community structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohn, K.; Dyke, J. G.; Pavlick, R.; Reineking, B.; Reu, B.; Kleidon, A.

    2011-05-01

    While the regional climate is the primary selection pressure for whether a plant strategy can survive, however, competitive interactions strongly affect the relative abundances of plant strategies within communities. Here, we investigate the relative importance of competition and perturbations on the development of vegetation community structure. To do so, we develop DIVE (Dynamics and Interactions of VEgetation), a simple general model that links plant strategies to their competitive dynamics, using growth and reproduction characteristics that emerge from climatic constraints. The model calculates population dynamics based on establishment, mortality, invasion and exclusion in the presence of different strengths of perturbations, seed and resource competition. The highest levels of diversity were found in simulations without competition as long as mortality is not too high. However, reasonable successional dynamics were only achieved when resource competition is considered. Under high levels of competition, intermediate levels of perturbations were required to obtain coexistence. Since succession and coexistence are observed in plant communities, we conclude that the DIVE model with competition and intermediate levels of perturbation represents an adequate way to model population dynamics. Because of the simplicity and generality of DIVE, it could be used to understand vegetation structure and functioning at the global scale and the response of vegetation to global change.

  1. 47 CFR 76.107 - Exclusivity contracts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Exclusivity contracts. 76.107 Section 76.107... § 76.107 Exclusivity contracts. A distributor or television station exercising exclusivity pursuant to... exclusivity contracts, such portions to be signed by both the distributor and the television station,...

  2. Physics Competitions in Hungary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lugosi, ErzséBet SzéP, Jenö

    The following sections are included: * Description of Physics Competitions in Hungary * Training of the Hungarian Team before the International Physics Olympiad * Few Problems for the Hungarian National Physics Competition for 15 - 16 Year Old students * Problems for the Hungarian National Physics Competition in 1989 for 17 - 18 Year Old Students * Experimental Problems for the Competition of KöMAL for 15 - 18 Year Old Students * Problems for the Hungarian National Physics Competition in 1989 for 17 - 18 Year Old Students * solving this equation we obtain m = 18kg * The work done is 427 joule - 80 joule 347 joule * Experimental Problems for the Competition of KöMAL for 15 - 18 Pear Old Students

  3. Exclusive processes in quantum chromodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, S.J.; Lepage, G.P.

    1981-06-01

    Large momentum transfer exclusive processes and the short distance structure of hadronic wave functions can be systematically analyzed within the context of perturbative QCD. Predictions for meson form factors, two-photon processes ..gamma gamma.. ..-->.. M anti M, hadronic decays of heavy quark systems, and a number of other related QCD phenomena are reviewed.

  4. University Ranking as Social Exclusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amsler, Sarah S.; Bolsmann, Chris

    2012-01-01

    In this article we explore the dual role of global university rankings in the creation of a new, knowledge-identified, transnational capitalist class and in facilitating new forms of social exclusion. We examine how and why the practice of ranking universities has become widely defined by national and international organisations as an important…

  5. Lunar Regolith Excavation Competition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liles, Cassandra

    2009-01-01

    The Lunar Regolith Excavation Competition is a new competition that needs graphics, logos, rules, as well as an arena. Although this is the first year of the competition, the competition is modeled after an existing competition, the Centennial Lunar Excavator Challenge. This competition however is aimed at college students. This makes the challenge identifying key aspects of the original competition and modeling them to fit into an easier task, and creating exciting advertisement that helps encourage participation. By using a youth focus group, young insight, as well as guiding advice from experts in the field, hopefully an arena can be designed and built, rules can be molded and created to fit, and alluring graphics can be printed to bring about a successful first year of the Lunar Regolith Excavation Competition.

  6. Competition and Intrinsic Motivation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tripathi, Kailas Nath

    1992-01-01

    Reports on a study of competition, motivation, and performance among 60 adolescents in India. Finds that direct competition with another person led to higher levels of immediate performance. Also finds that indirect competition against a pre-set standard resulted in greater intrinsic motivation. (CFR)

  7. Strategizing for Intense Competition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hahn, William; Bourgeois, Ernest J., Jr.

    1999-01-01

    Examines trend toward more aggressive student recruiting strategies by colleges and universities, applying a model that assesses five competitive forces-cause and effect of competition, the expanding marketplace, substitute products, buyer power, and supplier power, and examines various strategies for dealing with these competitive forces, such as…

  8. In Defence of Competition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prvulovich, Zika Rad

    1982-01-01

    Examines objections to competition as presented by educational philosopher Michael Fielding and others. The two major types of criticism of competition are that it is unfair and divisive and that it is selfish and immoral. The author advocates educational experiences which combine self-competition with cooperation. (AM)

  9. Competition in benthic marine invertebrates: the unrecognized role of exploitative competition for oxygen.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Nick; White, Craig R; Marshall, Dustin J

    2013-01-01

    Competition is a ubiquitous structuring force across systems, but different fields emphasize the role of different types of competition. In benthic marine environments, where some of the classic examples of competition were described, there is a strong emphasis on interference competition: marine invertebrates are assumed to compete fiercely for the limiting resource of space. Much of our understanding of the dynamics of this system is based on this assumption, yet empirical studies often find that increases in density can reduce performance despite free space being available. Furthermore, the assumption that space is the exclusively limiting resource raises paradoxes regarding species coexistence in this system. Here, we measure the availability of oxygen in the field and in the laboratory, as well as the tolerance of resident species to low-oxygen conditions. We show that oxygen can be the primary limiting resource in some instances, and that exploitative competition for this resource is very likely among benthic marine invertebrates. Furthermore, growth form (and the associated risk of oxygen limitation) covaries with the ability to withstand oxygen-poor conditions across a wide range of taxa. Oxygen availability at very small scales may influence the distribution and abundance of sessile marine invertebrates more than is currently appreciated. Furthermore, competition for multiple resources (space and oxygen) and trade-offs in competitive ability for each may promote coexistence in this system.

  10. Intrapersonal and interpersonal processes of social exclusion

    PubMed Central

    Kawamoto, Taishi; Ura, Mitsuhiro; Nittono, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    People have a fundamental need to belong with others. Social exclusion impairs this need and has various effects on cognition, affect, and the behavior of excluded individuals. We have previously reported that activity in the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) and right ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (rVLPFC) could be a neurocognitive index of social exclusion (Kawamoto et al., 2012). In this article, we provide an integrative framework for understanding occurrences during and after social exclusion, by reviewing neuroimaging, electrophysiological, and behavioral studies of dACC and rVLPFC, within the framework of intrapersonal and interpersonal processes of social exclusion. As a result, we have indicated directions for future studies to further clarify the phenomenon of social exclusion from the following perspectives: (1) constructional elements of social exclusion, (2) detection sensitivity and interpretation bias in social exclusion, (3) development of new methods to assess the reactivity to social exclusion, and (4) sources of social exclusion. PMID:25798081

  11. Competition among hospitals.

    PubMed

    Noether, M

    1988-09-01

    The traditional view of hospital competition has posited that hospitals compete primarily along 'quality' dimensions, in the form of fancy equipment to attract admitting physicians and pleasant surroundings to entice patients. Price competition among hospitals is thought to be non-existent. This paper estimates the effects of various hospital market characteristics on hospital prices and expenses in an attempt to determine the form of hospital competition. The results suggest that both price and quality competition are greater in markets that are less concentrated, although the net effect of the two on prices is insignificant. It appears, therefore, that, despite important distortions, hospital markets are not immune to standard competitive forces.

  12. Supplementing managed competition.

    PubMed

    Higgins, W

    President Clinton's proposal for health care reform calls for managed competition within global expenditure targets. However, it is unlikely that health plans will have sufficient leverage with providers to negotiate arrangements consistent with expenditure targets in nonurban areas. This paper describes a reimbursement system based on competitive prospective payment and capitation (CPPC) which can supplement managed competition in less populous areas or replace managed competition should that strategy prove unsuccessful. The CPPC system is capable of enforcing an expenditure target while encouraging the formation of capitated networks and creating strong incentives for efficiency. It is generally compatible with the Clinton administration's version of managed competition.

  13. Nanofluidic Size-Exclusion Chromatograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldman, Sabrina; Svehla, Danielle; Grunthaner, Frank; Feldman, Jason; Shakkottai, P.

    2004-01-01

    Efforts are under way to develop a nanofluidic size-exclusion chromatograph (SEC), which would be a compact, robust, lightweight instrument for separating molecules of interest according to their sizes and measuring their relative abundances in small samples. About as large as a deck of playing cards, the nanofluidic SEC would serve, in effect, as a laboratory on a chip that would perform the functions of a much larger, conventional, bench-top SEC and ancillary equipment, while consuming much less power and much smaller quantities of reagent and sample materials. Its compactness and low power demand would render it attractive for field applications in which, typically, it would be used to identify and quantitate a broad range of polar and nonpolar organic compounds in soil, ice, and water samples. Size-exclusion chromatography is a special case of high-performance liquid chromatography. In a conventional SEC, a sample plug is driven by pressure along a column packed with silica or polymer beads that contain uniform nanopores. The interstices between, and the pores in, the beads collectively constitute a size-exclusion network. Molecules follow different paths through the size-exclusion network, such that characteristic elution times can be related to sizes of molecules: basically, smaller molecules reach the downstream end of the column after the larger ones do because the smaller ones enter minor pores and stay there for a while, whereas the larger ones do not enter the pores. The volume accessible to molecules gradually diminishes as their size increases. All molecules bigger than a pore size elute together. For most substances, the elution times and sizes of molecules can be correlated directly with molecular weights. Hence, by measuring the flux of molecules arriving at the downstream end as a function of time, one can obtain a liquid mass spectrum for the molecules present in a sample over a broad range of molecular weights.

  14. Children's Group Nous: Understanding and Applying Peer Exclusion Within and Between Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abrams, Dominic; Rutland, Adam; Pelletier, Joseph; Ferrell, Jennifer M.

    2009-01-01

    In Study 1, 167 English children aged 6-8 or 9-11 evaluated peer English or French soccer fans that were loyal or partially disloyal. In Study 2, 149 children aged 5-11 made judgments about generic inclusion norms between and within competitive groups. In both studies, children's understanding of intergroup inclusion/exclusion norms (group nous)…

  15. Specialization and competition in dental health services.

    PubMed

    Grytten, Jostein; Skau, Irene

    2009-04-01

    The number of specialists within dental health services has increased over the last few years. This raises the issue of how the services should be organized and funded. We describe the effect of one way of organizing the services, which is by relying on competition. In Norway, some oral specialists face real competition with general dental practitioners for the same patients (prosthetists, periodontists and endodontists), while other specialists do not (orthodontists and oral surgeons). The latter specialists have skills that give them exclusive possibilities to practice their profession. We find that competition can be effective for the specialists who experience real competition with general dental practitioners for patients. In situations where real competition does not exist, specialists can obtain market power and raise their fees. Our results are based on an analysis of a representative set of data from general dental practitioners and specialists in Norway. The specialities in which practitioners can exercise market power raise challenges related to the type of public policy that can reduce this market power in an appropriate way, and without involving too large costs for the authorities.

  16. 77 FR 2278 - Notice of Availability for Exclusive, Non-Exclusive, or Partially-Exclusive Licensing of an...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-17

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Department of the Army Notice of Availability for Exclusive, Non-Exclusive, or Partially-Exclusive Licensing of an Invention Concerning a Method and Device for Detection of Bioavailable Drug Concentration in...

  17. 47 CFR 90.901 - 800 MHz SMR spectrum subject to competitive bidding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false 800 MHz SMR spectrum subject to competitive... Specialized Mobile Radio Service § 90.901 800 MHz SMR spectrum subject to competitive bidding. Mutually exclusive initial applications for 800 MHz band licenses in Spectrum Blocks A through V are subject...

  18. 47 CFR 90.901 - 800 MHz SMR spectrum subject to competitive bidding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false 800 MHz SMR spectrum subject to competitive... Specialized Mobile Radio Service § 90.901 800 MHz SMR spectrum subject to competitive bidding. Mutually exclusive initial applications for 800 MHz band licenses in Spectrum Blocks A through V are subject...

  19. 47 CFR 90.901 - 800 MHz SMR spectrum subject to competitive bidding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false 800 MHz SMR spectrum subject to competitive... Specialized Mobile Radio Service § 90.901 800 MHz SMR spectrum subject to competitive bidding. Mutually exclusive initial applications for 800 MHz band licenses in Spectrum Blocks A through V are subject...

  20. 47 CFR 90.901 - 800 MHz SMR spectrum subject to competitive bidding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false 800 MHz SMR spectrum subject to competitive... Specialized Mobile Radio Service § 90.901 800 MHz SMR spectrum subject to competitive bidding. Mutually exclusive initial applications for 800 MHz band licenses in Spectrum Blocks A through V are subject...

  1. 47 CFR 90.901 - 800 MHz SMR spectrum subject to competitive bidding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false 800 MHz SMR spectrum subject to competitive... Specialized Mobile Radio Service § 90.901 800 MHz SMR spectrum subject to competitive bidding. Mutually exclusive initial applications for 800 MHz band licenses in Spectrum Blocks A through V are subject...

  2. 47 CFR 1.2102 - Eligibility of applications for competitive bidding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... bidding. 1.2102 Section 1.2102 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE Grants by Random Selection Competitive Bidding Proceedings General Procedures § 1.2102 Eligibility of applications for competitive bidding. (a) Mutually exclusive initial applications are subject...

  3. 47 CFR 25.401 - Satellite DARS applications subject to competitive bidding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Satellite DARS applications subject to...) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES SATELLITE COMMUNICATIONS Competitive Bidding Procedures for DARS § 25.401 Satellite DARS applications subject to competitive bidding. Mutually exclusive initial applications for...

  4. 47 CFR 25.401 - Satellite DARS applications subject to competitive bidding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Satellite DARS applications subject to...) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES SATELLITE COMMUNICATIONS Competitive Bidding Procedures for DARS § 25.401 Satellite DARS applications subject to competitive bidding. Mutually exclusive initial applications for...

  5. 47 CFR 25.401 - Satellite DARS applications subject to competitive bidding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Satellite DARS applications subject to...) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES SATELLITE COMMUNICATIONS Competitive Bidding Procedures for DARS § 25.401 Satellite DARS applications subject to competitive bidding. Mutually exclusive initial applications for...

  6. 47 CFR 25.401 - Satellite DARS applications subject to competitive bidding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Satellite DARS applications subject to...) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES SATELLITE COMMUNICATIONS Competitive Bidding Procedures for DARS § 25.401 Satellite DARS applications subject to competitive bidding. Mutually exclusive initial applications for...

  7. 47 CFR 25.401 - Satellite DARS applications subject to competitive bidding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Satellite DARS applications subject to...) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES SATELLITE COMMUNICATIONS Competitive Bidding Procedures for DARS § 25.401 Satellite DARS applications subject to competitive bidding. Mutually exclusive initial applications for...

  8. A perturbative approach to central exclusive production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harland-Lang, L. A.; Khoze, V. A.; Ryskin, M. G.

    2015-02-01

    We review some selected results within the Durham model of central exclusive production. We present a detailed discussion of this theoretical approach for modeling exclusive processes and we briefly review some of its phenomenological applications.

  9. Approximate kernel competitive learning.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jian-Sheng; Zheng, Wei-Shi; Lai, Jian-Huang

    2015-03-01

    Kernel competitive learning has been successfully used to achieve robust clustering. However, kernel competitive learning (KCL) is not scalable for large scale data processing, because (1) it has to calculate and store the full kernel matrix that is too large to be calculated and kept in the memory and (2) it cannot be computed in parallel. In this paper we develop a framework of approximate kernel competitive learning for processing large scale dataset. The proposed framework consists of two parts. First, it derives an approximate kernel competitive learning (AKCL), which learns kernel competitive learning in a subspace via sampling. We provide solid theoretical analysis on why the proposed approximation modelling would work for kernel competitive learning, and furthermore, we show that the computational complexity of AKCL is largely reduced. Second, we propose a pseudo-parallelled approximate kernel competitive learning (PAKCL) based on a set-based kernel competitive learning strategy, which overcomes the obstacle of using parallel programming in kernel competitive learning and significantly accelerates the approximate kernel competitive learning for large scale clustering. The empirical evaluation on publicly available datasets shows that the proposed AKCL and PAKCL can perform comparably as KCL, with a large reduction on computational cost. Also, the proposed methods achieve more effective clustering performance in terms of clustering precision against related approximate clustering approaches.

  10. 40 CFR 1508.4 - Categorical exclusion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Categorical exclusion. 1508.4 Section 1508.4 Protection of Environment COUNCIL ON ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY TERMINOLOGY AND INDEX § 1508.4 Categorical exclusion. Categorical exclusion means a category of actions which do not individually...

  11. Approximating spatially exclusive invasion processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, Joshua V.; Binder, Benjamin J.

    2014-05-01

    A number of biological processes, such as invasive plant species and cell migration, are composed of two key mechanisms: motility and reproduction. Due to the spatially exclusive interacting behavior of these processes a cellular automata (CA) model is specified to simulate a one-dimensional invasion process. Three (independence, Poisson, and 2D-Markov chain) approximations are considered that attempt to capture the average behavior of the CA. We show that our 2D-Markov chain approximation accurately predicts the state of the CA for a wide range of motility and reproduction rates.

  12. Intramural Gymnastics Competition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cornelius, William L.

    1981-01-01

    An intramural gymnastic competition, if properly organized, can foster student and community interest in gymnastics. Aspects of organization and essential preplanning include: directing, judging, scoring, and managing. (JN)

  13. Exclusive Dijet production from CDF2LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Gallinaro, Michele; /Rockefeller U.

    2005-04-01

    Exclusive dijet production at the Tevatron can be used as a benchmark to establish predictions on exclusive diffractive Higgs production, a process with a much smaller cross section. Exclusive dijet production in Double Pomeron Exchange processes, including diffractive Higgs production with measurements at the Tevatron and predictions for the Large Hadron Collider are presented. Using new data from the Tevatron and dedicated diffractive triggers, no excess over a smooth falling distribution for exclusive dijet events could be found. Upper limits on the exclusive dijet production cross section are presented and compared to current theoretical predictions.

  14. Choreography of Ig allelic exclusion.

    PubMed

    Cedar, Howard; Bergman, Yehudit

    2008-06-01

    Allelic exclusion guarantees that each B or T cell only produces a single antigen receptor, and in this way contributes to immune diversity. This process is actually initiated in the early embryo when the immune receptor loci become asynchronously replicating in a stochastic manner with one early and one late allele in each cell. This distinct differential replication timing feature then serves an instructive mark that directs a series of allele-specific epigenetic events in the immune system, including programmed histone modification, nuclear localization and DNA demethylation that ultimately bring about preferred rearrangement on a single allele, and this decision is temporally stabilized by feedback mechanisms that inhibit recombination on the second allele. In principle, these same molecular components are also used for controlling monoallelic expression at other genomic loci, such as those carrying interleukins and olfactory receptor genes that require the choice of one gene out of a large array. Thus, allelic exclusion appears to represent a general epigenetic phenomenon that is modeled on the same basis as X chromosome inactivation.

  15. The quick and the dead? Sperm competition and sexual conflict in sea.

    PubMed

    Bode, Michael; Marshall, Dustin J

    2007-11-01

    Our view of sperm competition is largely shaped by game-theoretic models based on external fertilizers. External fertilization is of particular interest as it is the ancestral mode of reproduction and as such, relevant to the evolution and maintenance of anisogamy (i.e., large eggs and tiny, numerous sperm). Current game-theoretic models have been invaluable in generating predictions of male responses to sperm competition in a range of internal fertilizers but these models are less relevant to marine broadcast spawners, the most common and archetypal external fertilizers. Broadcast spawners typically have incomplete fertilization due to sperm limitation and/or polyspermy (too many sperm), but the effects of incomplete (<100% fertilization rates) fertilization on game-theoretic predictions are unclear particular with regards to polyspermy. We show that incorporating the effects of sperm concentration on fertilization success changes the predictions of a classic game-theoretic model, dramatically reversing the relationship between sperm competition and the evolutionarily stable sperm release strategy. Furthermore, our results suggest that male and female broadcast spawners are likely to be in conflict at both ends of the sperm environment continuum rather than only in conditions of excess sperm as previously thought. Across the majority of the parameter space we explored, males release either too little to too much sperm for females to achieve complete fertilization. This conflict could result in a coevolutionary race that may have led to the evolution of internal fertilization in marine organisms.

  16. Incorporating cultural beliefs in promoting exclusive breastfeeding

    PubMed Central

    Reinsma, Kathryn; Bolima, Nancy; Fonteh, Florence; Okwen, Patrick; Yota, Daniel; Montgomery, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Since 2003, the World Health Organization has recommended exclusive breastfeeding for the first 6 months of life. In the Northwest region of Cameroon approximately 90% of women initiate breastfeeding, yet only 34% of these women exclusively breastfeed for the recommended six months. Aim To determine influences on women’s exclusive breastfeeding practices. Methods Semi-structured interviews were conducted with six women and six men followed by focus group discussions with three groups of women and three groups of men in the Kumbo West Health District, Northwest region, Cameroon. All participants were selected using theoretical sampling to assure triangulation. Results Three themes emerged that influence exclusive breastfeeding practices: woman’s readiness to exclusively breastfeed; cultural influences towards exclusive breastfeeding; and perceived constraints to exclusive breastfeeding. Conclusion These emergent themes were used to create a theoretical framework that is useful for developing a breastfeeding health education intervention in non-Western settings. PMID:26973717

  17. Maternal Competition in Women.

    PubMed

    Linney, Catherine; Korologou-Linden, Laurel; Campbell, Anne

    2017-03-01

    We examined maternal competition, an unexplored form of competition between women. Given women's high investment in offspring and mothers' key role in shaping their reproductive, social, and cultural success as adults, we might expect to see maternal competition between women as well as mate competition. Predictions about the effect of maternal characteristics (age, relationship status, educational background, number of children, investment in the mothering role) and child variables (age, sex) were drawn from evolutionary theory and sociological research. Mothers of primary school children (in two samples: N = 210 and 169) completed a series of questionnaires. A novel nine-item measure of maternal competitive behavior (MCQ) and two subscales assessing Covert (MCQ-C) and Face-to-Face (MCQ-FF) forms of competition were developed using confirmatory factor analysis. Competitiveness (MCQ score) was predicted by maternal investment, single motherhood, fewer children, and (marginally) child's older age. The effect of single motherhood (but not other predictors) was partially mediated by greater maternal investment. In response to a scenario of their child underperforming relative to their peers, a mother's competitive distress was a positive function of the importance she ascribed to their success and her estimation of her child's ability. Her competitive distress was highly correlated with the distress she attributed to a female friend, hinting at bidirectional dyadic effects. Qualitative responses indicated that nonspecific bragging and boasting about academic achievements were the most common irritants. Although 40% of women were angered or annoyed by such comments, less than 5% endorsed a direct hostile response. Instead, competitive mothers were conversationally shunned and rejected as friends. We suggest that the interdependence of mothers based on reciprocal childcare has supported a culture of egalitarianism that is violated by explicit competitiveness.

  18. Seed Removal Increased by Scramble Competition with an Invasive Species.

    PubMed

    Minor, Rebecca L; Koprowski, John L

    2015-01-01

    Competition for seeds has a major influence on the evolution of granivores and the plants on which they rely. The complexity of interactions and coevolutionary relationships vary across forest types. The introduction of non-native granivores has considerable potential to alter seed dispersal dynamics. Non-native species are a major cause of endangerment for native species, but the mechanisms are often unclear. As biological invasions continue to rise, it is important to understand mechanisms to build up strategies to mitigate the threat. Our field experiment quantified the impact of introduced Abert's squirrels (Sciurus aberti) on rates of seed removal within the range of critically endangered Mount Graham red squirrels (Tamiasciurus hudsonicus grahamensis), which consumes similar foods. In the presence of invasive Abert's squirrels, the time cones were removed was faster than when the invasive was excluded, accounting for a median removal time of cones available to red and Abert's squirrels that is 32.8% less than that of cones available only to the rare native red squirrels. Moreover, in the presence of Abert's squirrels, removal rates are higher at great distance from a territorial red squirrel larderhoard and in more open portions of the forest, which suggests differential patterns of seed dispersal. The impact on food availability as a result of cone removal by Abert's squirrels suggests the potential of food competition as a mechanism of endangerment for the Mount Graham red squirrel. Furthermore, the magnitude and differential spatial patterns of seed removal suggest that non-native granivores may have impacts on forest regeneration and structure.

  19. Seed Removal Increased by Scramble Competition with an Invasive Species

    PubMed Central

    Minor, Rebecca L.; Koprowski, John L.

    2015-01-01

    Competition for seeds has a major influence on the evolution of granivores and the plants on which they rely. The complexity of interactions and coevolutionary relationships vary across forest types. The introduction of non-native granivores has considerable potential to alter seed dispersal dynamics. Non-native species are a major cause of endangerment for native species, but the mechanisms are often unclear. As biological invasions continue to rise, it is important to understand mechanisms to build up strategies to mitigate the threat. Our field experiment quantified the impact of introduced Abert’s squirrels (Sciurus aberti) on rates of seed removal within the range of critically endangered Mount Graham red squirrels (Tamiasciurus hudsonicus grahamensis), which consumes similar foods. In the presence of invasive Abert’s squirrels, the time cones were removed was faster than when the invasive was excluded, accounting for a median removal time of cones available to red and Abert’s squirrels that is 32.8% less than that of cones available only to the rare native red squirrels. Moreover, in the presence of Abert’s squirrels, removal rates are higher at great distance from a territorial red squirrel larderhoard and in more open portions of the forest, which suggests differential patterns of seed dispersal. The impact on food availability as a result of cone removal by Abert’s squirrels suggests the potential of food competition as a mechanism of endangerment for the Mount Graham red squirrel. Furthermore, the magnitude and differential spatial patterns of seed removal suggest that non-native granivores may have impacts on forest regeneration and structure. PMID:26650073

  20. The coevolutionary period of Wolbachia pipientis infecting Drosophila ananassae and its impact on the evolution of the host germline stem cell regulating genes.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jae Young; Aquadro, Charles F

    2014-09-01

    The endosymbiotic bacteria Wolbachia pipientis is known to infect a wide range of arthropod species yet less is known about the coevolutionary history it has with its hosts. Evidence of highly identical W. pipientis strains in evolutionary divergent hosts suggests horizontal transfer between hosts. For example, Drosophila ananassae is infected with a W. pipientis strain that is nearly identical in sequence to a strain that infects both D. simulans and D. suzukii, suggesting recent horizontal transfer among these three species. However, it is unknown whether the W. pipientis strain had recently invaded all three species or a more complex infectious dynamic underlies the horizontal transfers. Here, we have examined the coevolutionary history of D. ananassae and its resident W. pipientis to infer its period of infection. Phylogenetic analysis of D. ananassae mitochondrial DNA and W. pipientis DNA sequence diversity revealed the current W. pipientis infection is not recent. In addition, we examined the population genetics and molecular evolution of several germline stem cell (GSC) regulating genes of D. ananassae. These studies reveal significant evidence of recent and long-term positive selection at stonewall in D. ananassae, whereas pumillio showed patterns of variation consistent with only recent positive selection. Previous studies had found evidence for adaptive evolution of two key germline differentiation genes, bag of marbles (bam) and benign gonial cell neoplasm (bgcn), in D. melanogaster and D. simulans and proposed that the adaptive evolution at these two genes was driven by arms race between the host GSC and W. pipientis. However, we did not find any statistical departures from a neutral model of evolution for bam and bgcn in D. ananassae despite our new evidence that this species has been infected with W. pipientis for a period longer than the most recent infection in D. melanogaster. In the end, analyzing the GSC regulating genes individually showed two

  1. The Coevolutionary Period of Wolbachia pipientis Infecting Drosophila ananassae and Its Impact on the Evolution of the Host Germline Stem Cell Regulating Genes

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jae Young; Aquadro, Charles F.

    2014-01-01

    The endosymbiotic bacteria Wolbachia pipientis is known to infect a wide range of arthropod species yet less is known about the coevolutionary history it has with its hosts. Evidence of highly identical W. pipientis strains in evolutionary divergent hosts suggests horizontal transfer between hosts. For example, Drosophila ananassae is infected with a W. pipientis strain that is nearly identical in sequence to a strain that infects both D. simulans and D. suzukii, suggesting recent horizontal transfer among these three species. However, it is unknown whether the W. pipientis strain had recently invaded all three species or a more complex infectious dynamic underlies the horizontal transfers. Here, we have examined the coevolutionary history of D. ananassae and its resident W. pipientis to infer its period of infection. Phylogenetic analysis of D. ananassae mitochondrial DNA and W. pipientis DNA sequence diversity revealed the current W. pipientis infection is not recent. In addition, we examined the population genetics and molecular evolution of several germline stem cell (GSC) regulating genes of D. ananassae. These studies reveal significant evidence of recent and long-term positive selection at stonewall in D. ananassae, whereas pumillio showed patterns of variation consistent with only recent positive selection. Previous studies had found evidence for adaptive evolution of two key germline differentiation genes, bag of marbles (bam) and benign gonial cell neoplasm (bgcn), in D. melanogaster and D. simulans and proposed that the adaptive evolution at these two genes was driven by arms race between the host GSC and W. pipientis. However, we did not find any statistical departures from a neutral model of evolution for bam and bgcn in D. ananassae despite our new evidence that this species has been infected with W. pipientis for a period longer than the most recent infection in D. melanogaster. In the end, analyzing the GSC regulating genes individually showed two

  2. Competition: Was Kohn Right?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shields, David Light; Bredemeier, Brenda Light

    2010-01-01

    Alfie Kohn made the case for competition being destructive to education. The truth may be that there are two separate ways to contest: true competition, which is a healthy desire to excel, and decompetition, which is the unhealthy desire merely to beat the opponent. Decompetition leads to the ills that Kohn enumerated. Educators should teach their…

  3. Competitiveness, Technology and Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lall, Sanjaya

    This document examines competitiveness in the developing world. Chapters 1 through 3, which are largely conceptual, examine the following topics: the concept of competitiveness and why it is important; market-stimulating technology policies in developing countries, and the relationship between import liberalization and industrial performance.…

  4. Central exclusive production at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Adamczyk, Leszek; Guryn, Włodek; Turnau, Jacek

    2014-11-10

    The present status and future plans of the physics program of Central Exclusive Production (CEP) at RHIC are described. The measurements are based on the detection of the forward protons from the Double Pomeron Exchange (DPE) process in the Roman Pot system and of the recoil system of charged particles from the DPE process measured in the STAR experiment’s Time Projection Chamber (TPC). The data described here were taken using polarized proton-proton collisions at ps = 200 GeV. The preliminary spectra of two pion and four pion invariant mass reconstructed by STAR TPC in central region of pseudo-rapidity | | < 1, are presented. Near future plans to take data with the current system at center-of-mass energy ps = 200 GeV and plans to upgrade the forward proton tagging sys- tem are presented. Also a possible addition of the Roman Pots to the sPHENIX detector is discussed.

  5. Co-evolutionary patterns and diversification of ant-fungus associations in the asexual fungus-farming ant Mycocepurus smithii in Panama.

    PubMed

    Kellner, K; Fernández-Marín, H; Ishak, H D; Sen, R; Linksvayer, T A; Mueller, U G

    2013-06-01

    Partner fidelity through vertical symbiont transmission is thought to be the primary mechanism stabilizing cooperation in the mutualism between fungus-farming (attine) ants and their cultivated fungal symbionts. An alternate or additional mechanism could be adaptive partner or symbiont choice mediating horizontal cultivar transmission or de novo domestication of free-living fungi. Using microsatellite genotyping for the attine ant Mycocepurus smithii and ITS rDNA sequencing for fungal cultivars, we provide the first detailed population genetic analysis of local ant-fungus associations to test for the relative importance of vertical vs. horizontal transmission in a single attine species. M. smithii is the only known asexual attine ant, and it is furthermore exceptional because it cultivates a far greater cultivar diversity than any other attine ant. Cultivar switching could permit the ants to re-acquire cultivars after garden loss, to purge inferior cultivars that are locally mal-adapted or that accumulated deleterious mutations under long-term asexuality. Compared to other attine ants, symbiont choice and local adaptation of ant-fungus combinations may play a more important role than partner-fidelity feedback in the co-evolutionary process of M. smithii and its fungal symbionts.

  6. Nano-fabricated size exclusion chromatograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Svehla, D.; Feldman, S.; Feldman, J.; Grunthaner, F.; Shakkottai, P.; Castillo, L. del; White, V.

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a nano-fabricated size exclusion chromatograph (nSEC) based on the principle that molecules traveling through amicrocolumn containing nano-fabricated features will have characteristic elution times that directly correlate to molecular weight. Compared to conventional size exclusion chromatography, the nSEC offers greater control over the size exclusion process; mass fabrication; integration of the separation column with associated valves, pumps, and detectors; and dramatic reductions in instrument mass and power requirements.

  7. An ecocultural model predicts Neanderthal extinction through competition with modern humans

    PubMed Central

    Gilpin, William; Feldman, Marcus W.; Aoki, Kenichi

    2016-01-01

    Archaeologists argue that the replacement of Neanderthals by modern humans was driven by interspecific competition due to a difference in culture level. To assess the cogency of this argument, we construct and analyze an interspecific cultural competition model based on the Lotka−Volterra model, which is widely used in ecology, but which incorporates the culture level of a species as a variable interacting with population size. We investigate the conditions under which a difference in culture level between cognitively equivalent species, or alternatively a difference in underlying learning ability, may produce competitive exclusion of a comparatively (although not absolutely) large local Neanderthal population by an initially smaller modern human population. We find, in particular, that this competitive exclusion is more likely to occur when population growth occurs on a shorter timescale than cultural change, or when the competition coefficients of the Lotka−Volterra model depend on the difference in the culture levels of the interacting species. PMID:26831111

  8. An ecocultural model predicts Neanderthal extinction through competition with modern humans.

    PubMed

    Gilpin, William; Feldman, Marcus W; Aoki, Kenichi

    2016-02-23

    Archaeologists argue that the replacement of Neanderthals by modern humans was driven by interspecific competition due to a difference in culture level. To assess the cogency of this argument, we construct and analyze an interspecific cultural competition model based on the Lotka-Volterra model, which is widely used in ecology, but which incorporates the culture level of a species as a variable interacting with population size. We investigate the conditions under which a difference in culture level between cognitively equivalent species, or alternatively a difference in underlying learning ability, may produce competitive exclusion of a comparatively (although not absolutely) large local Neanderthal population by an initially smaller modern human population. We find, in particular, that this competitive exclusion is more likely to occur when population growth occurs on a shorter timescale than cultural change, or when the competition coefficients of the Lotka-Volterra model depend on the difference in the culture levels of the interacting species.

  9. A Study in Competition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Payne, Therese Anne

    1973-01-01

    Describes a microbiological experiment designed to study the competition between two species of bacteria. Experimental procedures and data obtained in conducting this experiment are provided, together with a discussion of the results. (JR)

  10. Central exclusive production at RHIC

    DOE PAGES

    Adamczyk, Leszek; Guryn, Włodek; Turnau, Jacek

    2014-11-10

    The present status and future plans of the physics program of Central Exclusive Production (CEP) at RHIC are described. The measurements are based on the detection of the forward protons from the Double Pomeron Exchange (DPE) process in the Roman Pot system and of the recoil system of charged particles from the DPE process measured in the STAR experiment’s Time Projection Chamber (TPC). The data described here were taken using polarized proton-proton collisions at ps = 200 GeV. The preliminary spectra of two pion and four pion invariant mass reconstructed by STAR TPC in central region of pseudo-rapidity | |more » < 1, are presented. Near future plans to take data with the current system at center-of-mass energy ps = 200 GeV and plans to upgrade the forward proton tagging sys- tem are presented. Also a possible addition of the Roman Pots to the sPHENIX detector is discussed.« less

  11. 2000 FIRST Robotics Competition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Purman, Richard

    2000-01-01

    The New Horizons Regional Education Center (NHREC) in Hampton, VA sought and received NASA funding to support its participation in the 2000 FIRST Robotics competition. FIRST, Inc. (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology) is an organization which encourages the application of creative science, math, and computer science principles to solve real-world engineering problems. The FIRST competition is an international engineering contest featuring high school, government, and business partnerships.

  12. Competition for land

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Pete; Gregory, Peter J.; van Vuuren, Detlef; Obersteiner, Michael; Havlík, Petr; Rounsevell, Mark; Woods, Jeremy; Stehfest, Elke; Bellarby, Jessica

    2010-01-01

    A key challenge for humanity is how a future global population of 9 billion can all be fed healthily and sustainably. Here, we review how competition for land is influenced by other drivers and pressures, examine land-use change over the past 20 years and consider future changes over the next 40 years. Competition for land, in itself, is not a driver affecting food and farming in the future, but is an emergent property of other drivers and pressures. Modelling studies suggest that future policy decisions in the agriculture, forestry, energy and conservation sectors could have profound effects, with different demands for land to supply multiple ecosystem services usually intensifying competition for land in the future. In addition to policies addressing agriculture and food production, further policies addressing the primary drivers of competition for land (population growth, dietary preference, protected areas, forest policy) could have significant impacts in reducing competition for land. Technologies for increasing per-area productivity of agricultural land will also be necessary. Key uncertainties in our projections of competition for land in the future relate predominantly to uncertainties in the drivers and pressures within the scenarios, in the models and data used in the projections and in the policy interventions assumed to affect the drivers and pressures in the future. PMID:20713395

  13. Plant Community Richness Mediates Inhibitory Interactions and Resource Competition between Streptomyces and Fusarium Populations in the Rhizosphere.

    PubMed

    Essarioui, Adil; LeBlanc, Nicholas; Kistler, Harold C; Kinkel, Linda L

    2017-01-05

    Plant community characteristics impact rhizosphere Streptomyces nutrient competition and antagonistic capacities. However, the effects of Streptomyces on, and their responses to, coexisting microorganisms as a function of plant host or plant species richness have received little attention. In this work, we characterized antagonistic activities and nutrient use among Streptomyces and Fusarium from the rhizosphere of Andropogon gerardii (Ag) and Lespedeza capitata (Lc) plants growing in communities of 1 (monoculture) or 16 (polyculture) plant species. Streptomyces from monoculture were more antagonistic against Fusarium than those from polyculture. In contrast, Fusarium isolates from polyculture had greater inhibitory capacities against Streptomyces than isolates from monoculture. Although Fusarium isolates had on average greater niche widths, the collection of Streptomyces isolates in total used a greater diversity of nutrients for growth. Plant richness, but not plant host, influenced the potential for resource competition between the two taxa. Fusarium isolates had greater niche overlap with Streptomyces in monoculture than polyculture, suggesting greater potential for Fusarium to competitively challenge Streptomyces in monoculture plant communities. In contrast, Streptomyces had greater niche overlap with Fusarium in polyculture than monoculture, suggesting that Fusarium experiences greater resource competition with Streptomyces in polyculture than monoculture. These patterns of competitive and inhibitory phenotypes among Streptomyces and Fusarium populations are consistent with selection for Fusarium-antagonistic Streptomyces populations in the presence of strong Fusarium resource competition in plant monocultures. Similarly, these results suggest selection for Streptomyces-inhibitory Fusarium populations in the presence of strong Streptomyces resource competition in more diverse plant communities. Thus, landscape-scale variation in plant species richness may be

  14. Marketing energy services in a competitive environment

    SciTech Connect

    Mykytyn, R.B.

    1996-05-01

    For nearly six decades electrical utilities have operated in a regulated environment established by the Public Utilities Holding Company Act (PUHCA) of 1935. This legislation granted generators exclusive franchise to market electrical power in a given geographical area in return for the company`s commitment to provide safe, reliable and fairly-priced electrical power to all customers within the region. For close to 40 years, this system of regulated monopoly functioned reasonably well to maintain a balance among the varied, and at times competing, interests in the industry. During the 1970s, however, the public argument in favor of competition within the electrical services industry gained momentum. Spiraling energy costs focused the consumer`s attention on the need for conservation and inspired a variety of technological developments as well as experiments in cogeneration. Today, the electrical utility industry is poised for great change. Soon, this industry will follow the natural gas, telecommunications, and transportation industries into the uncharted waters of deregulation. The most pressing consequence of moving from a regulated environment to one that is deregulated - in other words, a competitive environment - is the need to design and implement a completely new form of marketing program. The response among industry marketing managers ranges from confusion and concern to excitement and eager anticipation. Where you fall along this continuum depends on how well you understand competitive marketing practices and the degree to which your company`s management group is willing to initiate competitive strategies and tactics now in preparation for the coming competitive marketplace.

  15. CMS results on exclusive and diffractive production

    SciTech Connect

    Alves, Gilvan A.

    2015-04-10

    We present recent CMS measurements of diffractive and exclusive processes, using data collected at 7 TeV at the LHC. Measurements of soft single- and double-diffractive cross sections are presented, as well as measurements of photon-induced processes including studies of exclusive WW production via photon-photon exchange.

  16. 10 CFR 830.2 - Exclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Exclusions. 830.2 Section 830.2 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY NUCLEAR SAFETY MANAGEMENT § 830.2 Exclusions. This part does not apply to: (a) Activities that are... 1974, as amended; and (e) Activities related to the launch approval and actual launch of nuclear...

  17. 47 CFR 76.107 - Exclusivity contracts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Exclusivity contracts. 76.107 Section 76.107 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES MULTICHANNEL VIDEO AND CABLE TELEVISION SERVICE Network Non-duplication Protection, Syndicated Exclusivity and Sports...

  18. 47 CFR 1.6005 - Exclusive defenses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Exclusive defenses. 1.6005 Section 1.6005... Against Satellite Carriers for Retransmission Without Consent § 1.6005 Exclusive defenses. (a) The defenses listed in paragraphs (a)(1) through (a)(4) of this section, are the only defenses available to...

  19. 47 CFR 1.6005 - Exclusive defenses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Exclusive defenses. 1.6005 Section 1.6005... Against Satellite Carriers for Retransmission Without Consent § 1.6005 Exclusive defenses. (a) The defenses listed in paragraphs (a)(1) through (a)(4) of this section, are the only defenses available to...

  20. 32 CFR 536.46 - Other exclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Other exclusions. 536.46 Section 536.46 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY CLAIMS AND ACCOUNTS CLAIMS AGAINST THE UNITED STATES Investigation and Processing of Claims § 536.46 Other exclusions. (a) Statutory employer....

  1. 10 CFR 830.2 - Exclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Exclusions. 830.2 Section 830.2 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY NUCLEAR SAFETY MANAGEMENT § 830.2 Exclusions. This part does not apply to: (a) Activities that are... 1974, as amended; and (e) Activities related to the launch approval and actual launch of nuclear...

  2. 10 CFR 830.2 - Exclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Exclusions. 830.2 Section 830.2 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY NUCLEAR SAFETY MANAGEMENT § 830.2 Exclusions. This part does not apply to: (a) Activities that are... 1974, as amended; and (e) Activities related to the launch approval and actual launch of nuclear...

  3. 10 CFR 830.2 - Exclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Exclusions. 830.2 Section 830.2 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY NUCLEAR SAFETY MANAGEMENT § 830.2 Exclusions. This part does not apply to: (a) Activities that are... 1974, as amended; and (e) Activities related to the launch approval and actual launch of nuclear...

  4. 10 CFR 830.2 - Exclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Exclusions. 830.2 Section 830.2 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY NUCLEAR SAFETY MANAGEMENT § 830.2 Exclusions. This part does not apply to: (a) Activities that are... 1974, as amended; and (e) Activities related to the launch approval and actual launch of nuclear...

  5. 47 CFR 73.232 - Territorial exclusivity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Territorial exclusivity. 73.232 Section 73.232 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES FM Broadcast Stations § 73.232 Territorial exclusivity. No licensee of an FM broadcast station shall have...

  6. 47 CFR 73.232 - Territorial exclusivity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Territorial exclusivity. 73.232 Section 73.232 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES FM Broadcast Stations § 73.232 Territorial exclusivity. No licensee of an FM broadcast station shall have...

  7. 47 CFR 76.107 - Exclusivity contracts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Exclusivity contracts. 76.107 Section 76.107 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES MULTICHANNEL VIDEO AND CABLE TELEVISION SERVICE Network Non-duplication Protection, Syndicated Exclusivity and Sports...

  8. 48 CFR 19.1504 - Exclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Exclusions. 19.1504 Section 19.1504 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAMS Women-Owned Small Business (WOSB) Program 19.1504 Exclusions. This...

  9. 12 CFR 229.42 - Exclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Exclusions. 229.42 Section 229.42 Banks and Banking FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) BOARD OF GOVERNORS OF THE FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM AVAILABILITY OF FUNDS AND COLLECTION OF CHECKS (REGULATION CC) Collection of Checks § 229.42 Exclusions....

  10. 47 CFR 76.107 - Exclusivity contracts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Exclusivity contracts. 76.107 Section 76.107 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES MULTICHANNEL VIDEO AND CABLE TELEVISION SERVICE Network Non-duplication Protection, Syndicated Exclusivity and Sports...

  11. 47 CFR 76.107 - Exclusivity contracts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Exclusivity contracts. 76.107 Section 76.107 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES MULTICHANNEL VIDEO AND CABLE TELEVISION SERVICE Network Non-duplication Protection, Syndicated Exclusivity and Sports...

  12. Exclusion from School and Recognition of Difference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCluskey, Gillean; Riddell, Sheila; Weedon, Elisabet; Fordyce, Mariela

    2016-01-01

    There has been an overall decrease in exclusion rates and numbers in recent years across the UK. This change has often been heralded as evidence that national inclusion policies are "working" and that schools themselves are becoming increasingly inclusive. This article examines findings from a recent study on school exclusion in Wales,…

  13. 24 CFR 58.35 - Categorical exclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Environmental Review Process: Documentation, Range of Activities, Project Aggregation and Classification § 58.35 Categorical exclusions. Categorical exclusion refers to a category of activities for which no environmental... needed with respect to environmental requirements, except where paragraph (c) of this section...

  14. 12 CFR 367.5 - Exclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... EXCLUSION OF CONTRACTOR AND TERMINATION OF CONTRACTS § 367.5 Exclusions. (a) The Ethics Counselor may... also prohibited from conducting business with FDIC as agents or representatives of other contractors... Ethics Counselor's decision to exclude the contractor pursuant to § 367.16. Provided further, that...

  15. Healthy Competition and Unsound Comparison: Reforming Educational Competition in Singapore

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christensen, Søren

    2015-01-01

    It is frequently claimed that the "competition state" responds to external competition by making competition increasingly central to its internal processes as well. This article discusses education reform in Singapore as departing from the opposite position. In Singapore "excessive" competition in education is now targeted by…

  16. Exclusion and Education in South Africa: An Education Law Perspective of Emerging Alternative Understandings of Exclusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beckmann, Johan

    2016-01-01

    The new democratic dispensation in South Africa (1994) was accompanied by law and policy aimed at preventing unfair exclusion from educational opportunities and promoting equal access to educational opportunities. However, feelings of unfair exclusion remain and new understandings of exclusion are emerging. This paper examines the new policy and…

  17. Maternal androgens in avian brood parasites and their hosts: responses to parasitism and competition?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hahn, Caldwell; Wingfield, John C.; Fox, David M.; Walker, Brian G.; Thomley, Jill E

    2017-01-01

    In the coevolutionary dynamic of avian brood parasites and their hosts, maternal (or transgenerational) effects have rarely been investigated. We examined the potential role of elevated yolk testosterone in eggs of the principal brood parasite in North America, the brown-headed cowbird, and three of its frequent host species. Elevated maternal androgens in eggs are a common maternal effect observed in many avian species when breeding conditions are unfavorable. These steroids accelerate embryo development, shorten incubation period, increase nestling growth rate, and enhance begging vigor, all traits that can increase the survival of offspring. We hypothesized that elevated maternal androgens in host eggs are a defense against brood parasitism. Our second hypothesis was that elevated maternal androgens in cowbird eggs are a defense against intra-specific competition. For host species, we found that elevated yolk testosterone was correlated with parasitized nests of small species, those whose nest success is most reduced by cowbird parasitism. For cowbirds, we found that elevated yolk testosterone was correlated with eggs in multiply-parasitized nests, which indicate intra-specific competition for nests due to high cowbird density. We propose experimental work to further examine the use of maternal effects by cowbirds and their hosts.

  18. Co-evolutionary Analysis of Domains in Interacting Proteins Reveals Insights into Domain–Domain Interactions Mediating Protein–Protein Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Jothi, Raja; Cherukuri, Praveen F.; Tasneem, Asba; Przytycka, Teresa M.

    2006-01-01

    Recent advances in functional genomics have helped generate large-scale high-throughput protein interaction data. Such networks, though extremely valuable towards molecular level understanding of cells, do not provide any direct information about the regions (domains) in the proteins that mediate the interaction. Here, we performed co-evolutionary analysis of domains in interacting proteins in order to understand the degree of co-evolution of interacting and non-interacting domains. Using a combination of sequence and structural analysis, we analyzed protein–protein interactions in F1-ATPase, Sec23p/Sec24p, DNA-directed RNA polymerase and nuclear pore complexes, and found that interacting domain pair(s) for a given interaction exhibits higher level of co-evolution than the noninteracting domain pairs. Motivated by this finding, we developed a computational method to test the generality of the observed trend, and to predict large-scale domain–domain interactions. Given a protein–protein interaction, the proposed method predicts the domain pair(s) that is most likely to mediate the protein interaction. We applied this method on the yeast interactome to predict domain–domain interactions, and used known domain–domain interactions found in PDB crystal structures to validate our predictions. Our results show that the prediction accuracy of the proposed method is statistically significant. Comparison of our prediction results with those from two other methods reveals that only a fraction of predictions are shared by all the three methods, indicating that the proposed method can detect known interactions missed by other methods. We believe that the proposed method can be used with other methods to help identify previously unrecognized domain–domain interactions on a genome scale, and could potentially help reduce the search space for identifying interaction sites. PMID:16949097

  19. Aboveground insect herbivory increases plant competitive asymmetry, while belowground herbivory mitigates the effect.

    PubMed

    Borgström, Pernilla; Strengbom, Joachim; Viketoft, Maria; Bommarco, Riccardo

    2016-01-01

    Insect herbivores can shift the composition of a plant community, but the mechanism underlying such shifts remains largely unexplored. A possibility is that insects alter the competitive symmetry between plant species. The effect of herbivory on competition likely depends on whether the plants are subjected to aboveground or belowground herbivory or both, and also depends on soil nitrogen levels. It is unclear how these biotic and abiotic factors interactively affect competition. In a greenhouse experiment, we measured competition between two coexisting grass species that respond differently to nitrogen deposition: Dactylis glomerata L., which is competitively favoured by nitrogen addition, and Festuca rubra L., which is competitively favoured on nitrogen-poor soils. We predicted: (1) that aboveground herbivory would reduce competitive asymmetry at high soil nitrogen by reducing the competitive advantage of D. glomerata; and (2), that belowground herbivory would relax competition at low soil nitrogen, by reducing the competitive advantage of F. rubra. Aboveground herbivory caused a 46% decrease in the competitive ability of F. rubra, and a 23% increase in that of D. glomerata, thus increasing competitive asymmetry, independently of soil nitrogen level. Belowground herbivory did not affect competitive symmetry, but the combined influence of above- and belowground herbivory was weaker than predicted from their individual effects. Belowground herbivory thus mitigated the increased competitive asymmetry caused by aboveground herbivory. D. glomerata remained competitively dominant after the cessation of aboveground herbivory, showing that the influence of herbivory continued beyond the feeding period. We showed that insect herbivory can strongly influence plant competitive interactions. In our experimental plant community, aboveground insect herbivory increased the risk of competitive exclusion of F. rubra. Belowground herbivory appeared to mitigate the influence of

  20. Aboveground insect herbivory increases plant competitive asymmetry, while belowground herbivory mitigates the effect

    PubMed Central

    Strengbom, Joachim; Viketoft, Maria; Bommarco, Riccardo

    2016-01-01

    Insect herbivores can shift the composition of a plant community, but the mechanism underlying such shifts remains largely unexplored. A possibility is that insects alter the competitive symmetry between plant species. The effect of herbivory on competition likely depends on whether the plants are subjected to aboveground or belowground herbivory or both, and also depends on soil nitrogen levels. It is unclear how these biotic and abiotic factors interactively affect competition. In a greenhouse experiment, we measured competition between two coexisting grass species that respond differently to nitrogen deposition: Dactylis glomerata L., which is competitively favoured by nitrogen addition, and Festuca rubra L., which is competitively favoured on nitrogen-poor soils. We predicted: (1) that aboveground herbivory would reduce competitive asymmetry at high soil nitrogen by reducing the competitive advantage of D. glomerata; and (2), that belowground herbivory would relax competition at low soil nitrogen, by reducing the competitive advantage of F. rubra. Aboveground herbivory caused a 46% decrease in the competitive ability of F. rubra, and a 23% increase in that of D. glomerata, thus increasing competitive asymmetry, independently of soil nitrogen level. Belowground herbivory did not affect competitive symmetry, but the combined influence of above- and belowground herbivory was weaker than predicted from their individual effects. Belowground herbivory thus mitigated the increased competitive asymmetry caused by aboveground herbivory. D. glomerata remained competitively dominant after the cessation of aboveground herbivory, showing that the influence of herbivory continued beyond the feeding period. We showed that insect herbivory can strongly influence plant competitive interactions. In our experimental plant community, aboveground insect herbivory increased the risk of competitive exclusion of F. rubra. Belowground herbivory appeared to mitigate the influence of

  1. Factors associated with latent fingerprint exclusion determinations.

    PubMed

    Ulery, Bradford T; Hicklin, R Austin; Roberts, Maria Antonia; Buscaglia, JoAnn

    2017-02-22

    Exclusion is the determination by a latent print examiner that two friction ridge impressions did not originate from the same source. The concept and terminology of exclusion vary among agencies. Much of the literature on latent print examination focuses on individualization, and much less attention has been paid to exclusion. This experimental study assesses the associations between a variety of factors and exclusion determinations. Although erroneous exclusions are more likely to occur on some images and for some examiners, they were widely distributed among images and examiners. Measurable factors found to be associated with exclusion rates include the quality of the latent, value determinations, analysis minutia count, comparison difficulty, and the presence of cores or deltas. An understanding of these associations will help explain the circumstances under which errors are more likely to occur and when determinations are less likely to be reproduced by other examiners; the results should also lead to improved effectiveness and efficiency of training and casework quality assurance. This research is intended to assist examiners in improving the examination process and provide information to the broader community regarding the accuracy, reliability, and implications of exclusion decisions.

  2. Advancing Manufacturing Research Through Competitions

    SciTech Connect

    Balakirsky, Stephen; Madhavan, Raj

    2009-01-01

    Competitions provide a technique for building interest and collaboration in targeted research areas. This paper will present a new competition that aims to increase collaboration amongst Universities, automation end-users, and automation manufacturers through a virtual competition. The virtual nature of the competition allows for reduced infrastructure requirements while maintaining realism in both the robotic equipment deployed and the scenarios. Details of the virtual environment as well as the competitions objectives, rules, and scoring metrics will be presented.

  3. Measuring hospital competition.

    PubMed

    White, S L; Chirikos, T N

    1988-03-01

    This paper appraises the use of the Herfindahl market share index as an exogenous competition variable in empirical studies of the hospital sector. An analysis of cross-sectional Florida data shows that this index itself is significantly influenced by the demand and supply factors commonly included in econometric models of hospital performance. The analysis then illustrates that biased inferences about the effects of market competition on the costs of hospital care may result unless the values of the Herfindahl Index are treated endogenously in hospital cost models.

  4. Hard Exclusive Vector Meson Leptoproduction At HERMES

    SciTech Connect

    Golembiovskaya, M.

    2011-07-15

    The HERMES experiment at DESY, Hamburg collected a set of data on hard exclusive vector meson ({rho}{sup 0}{phi},{omega}) leptoproduction using the 27.6 GeV longitudinally polarized lepton beam of HERA accelerator and longitudinally or transversely polarized or unpolarized gas targets. Measurements of exclusive vector meson production provide access to the structure of the nucleon since the process can be described in terms of Generalized Parton Distributions (GPDs). An overview of the HERMES results on exclusive vector mesons production is presented.

  5. Competition and allelopathy with resource storage: two resources.

    PubMed

    Grover, James P; Wang, Feng-Bin

    2014-06-21

    Allelopathy is added to a familiar mathematical model of competition between two species for two essential resources in a chemostat environment. Both species store the resources, and each produces a toxin that induces mortality in the other species. The corresponding model without toxins displays outcomes of competitive exclusion independent of initial conditions, competitive exclusion that depends on initial conditions (bistability), and globally stable coexistence, depending on tradeoffs between competitors in growth requirements and consumption of the resources. Introducing toxins that act only between, and not within species, can destabilize coexistence leading to bistability or other multiple attractors. Invasibility of the missing species into a resident׳s semitrivial equilibrium is related to competitive outcomes. Mutual invasibility is necessary and sufficient for a globally stable coexistence equilibrium, but is not necessary for coexistence at a locally stable equilibrium. Invasibility of one semitrivial equilibrium but not the other is necessary but not sufficient for competitive exclusion independent of initial conditions. Mutual non-invasibility is necessary but not sufficient for bistability. Numerical analysis suggests that when competitors display bistability in the absence of toxin production, increases in the overall magnitude of resource supply cause bistability to arise over a larger range of supply ratios between the two resources. When competitors display coexistence in the absence of toxin production, increases in overall resource supply destabilize coexistence and produce bistability or other configurations of multiple attractors over large ranges of supply ratios. The emergence of multiple attractors at high resource supplies suggests that blooms of harmful algae producing allelopathic toxins could be difficult to predict under such rich conditions.

  6. 42 CFR 1001.1901 - Scope and effect of exclusion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Scope and effect of exclusion. 1001.1901 Section... SERVICES OIG AUTHORITIES PROGRAM INTEGRITY-MEDICARE AND STATE HEALTH CARE PROGRAMS Waivers and Effect of Exclusion § 1001.1901 Scope and effect of exclusion. (a) Scope of exclusion. Exclusions of individuals...

  7. A Winning Competition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geddes, Kim; Franchini, Elease

    2012-01-01

    As a high school physics teacher, Kim Geddes is constantly searching for new experiences to challenge, motivate, and engage students. Last year, she incorporated ExploraVision into the energy unit of her school's physics curriculum with the help of their media specialist (Elease Franchini). ExploraVision is a competition offered through a…

  8. Competition in Individualized CAI.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hativa, Nira; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Examines the effects of competition and cooperation on learning through computer-assisted instruction (CAI). A questionnaire was administered to 457 Israeli fourth graders who used two CAI arithmetic systems. The characteristics of the systems are discussed, and the results of the survey are correlated to students' gender and achievement levels.…

  9. Competition in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jameson, Daphne

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author shares the strategy she adopted to even out the participation among her multicultural students during their classroom discussions. The author realized that her students had different concepts about the classroom and different philosophies about competition. For the Americans and Indians, the classroom was a site of…

  10. Growing Competition for Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibbons, Susan

    2001-01-01

    Describes the Questia subscription-based online academic digital books library. Highlights include weaknesses of the collection; what college students want from a library; importance of marketing; competition for traditional academic libraries that may help improve library services; and the ability of Questia to overcome barriers and…

  11. Building Camaraderie from Competition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marino, Gordon

    2007-01-01

    Educational institutions have adopted athletics programs to promote character building. Sports help people feel comfortable in their skins and provide unique opportunities to develop qualities such as cooperation, perseverance, and the ability to cope with fear. But the arena can be a hothouse for more primal feelings that emerge in competition.…

  12. Competitiveness Index 1990.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council on Competitiveness, Washington, DC.

    The United States' economic performance in the world economy is compared with that of Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, and the United Kingdom (the Summit 7 countries). Competitiveness is assessed by four economic indicators: standard of living, trade, manufacturing productivity, and investment. The United States continues to outinvest the…

  13. Competition in Advertising.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avery, Jim

    1991-01-01

    Discusses five ways (high school newspaper and yearbook advertising, summer jobs, internships, contests, and student-run advertising agencies) students can start to prepare for a career in the competitive field of advertising while still in high school and college. (SR)

  14. Positioning for Competition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lapovsky, Lucie; Hubbell, Loren Loomis

    2000-01-01

    Analyzes results of the 1999 National Association of College and Business Officers tuition discounting survey and identifies trends. Finds colleges and universities are reactively responding to market pressures and proactively trying to analyze and position themselves ahead of the competition, often regional rather than national, for the…

  15. Reed Hundt's Friendly Competition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Educom Review, 1996

    1996-01-01

    Presents an interview with Reed Hundt, Chairman of the Federal Communications Commission (FCC), who implemented the Education Task Force to coordinate the FCC's role in educational provisions of the Telecommunications Act of 1996. He asserts that writing clear rules for the communications sector will promote competition and ensure educational…

  16. Television and Competition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noll, Roger G.

    The television industry is characterized by numerous imperfections in market competition. The spectrum allocation policy of the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) assures that there will be only three national television networks; consequently in nearly all markets these stations account for 75% to 100% of revenues. These networks in turn…

  17. Human Resources Competitiveness Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council on Competitiveness, Washington, DC.

    This report distills hundreds of indicators from both domestic and international sources to determine how the United States compares to other countries and to its own past performance in competitiveness. It attempts to establish a baseline of some key education and training indicators that, taken together, show where the nation stands and where it…

  18. Competitiveness and Campaign '88.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kernan-Schloss, Adam, Ed.; And Others

    This report profiles the positions of the six Democratic and six Republican 1988 presidential candidates on policy issues affecting U.S. competitiveness in the global economy. Candidate profiles are provided for: Bruce Babbitt, Michael Dukakis, Richard Gephardt, Albert Gore, Jr., Jesse Jackson, and Paul Simon (Democrats); and George Bush, Robert…

  19. Central exclusive production and the Durham model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harland-Lang, L. A.; Khoze, V. A.; Ryskin, M. G.

    2014-11-01

    We review some selected results within the Durham model of central exclusive production. We discuss the theoretical aspects of this approach and consider the phenomenological implications for a selection of processes.

  20. Teaching With Documents: Chinese Exclusion Forms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simmons, Linda, Ed.

    1986-01-01

    Reviews the history of Chinese immigration to the United States and provides a facsimilie of a form used to document immigrants under the Chinese Exclusion Act. Teaching suggestions are included. (JDH)

  1. Exclusion of pneumothorax by radionuclide lung scan

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, P.E.

    1986-05-01

    A case is reported in which ventilation lung imaging was useful in excluding a large pneumothorax. This technique may be helpful in patients with emphysema in whom exclusion of pneumothorax by radiographic criteria might be difficult.

  2. 48 CFR 37.202 - Exclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... CONTRACTING SERVICE CONTRACTING Advisory and Assistance Services 37.202 Exclusions. The following activities...) Routine information technology services unless they are an integral part of a contract for the acquisition... research involving medical, biological, physical, social, psychological, or other phenomena....

  3. 40 CFR 113.5 - Exclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... SMALL ONSHORE STORAGE FACILITIES Oil Storage Facilities § 113.5 Exclusions. This subpart does not apply to: (a) Those facilities whose average daily oil throughout is more than their fixed oil...

  4. 40 CFR 113.5 - Exclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... SMALL ONSHORE STORAGE FACILITIES Oil Storage Facilities § 113.5 Exclusions. This subpart does not apply to: (a) Those facilities whose average daily oil throughout is more than their fixed oil...

  5. 40 CFR 113.5 - Exclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... SMALL ONSHORE STORAGE FACILITIES Oil Storage Facilities § 113.5 Exclusions. This subpart does not apply to: (a) Those facilities whose average daily oil throughout is more than their fixed oil...

  6. 40 CFR 113.5 - Exclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... SMALL ONSHORE STORAGE FACILITIES Oil Storage Facilities § 113.5 Exclusions. This subpart does not apply to: (a) Those facilities whose average daily oil throughout is more than their fixed oil...

  7. 40 CFR 113.5 - Exclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... SMALL ONSHORE STORAGE FACILITIES Oil Storage Facilities § 113.5 Exclusions. This subpart does not apply to: (a) Those facilities whose average daily oil throughout is more than their fixed oil...

  8. 32 CFR 989.13 - Categorical exclusion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ANALYSIS PROCESS (EIAP) § 989.13 Categorical exclusion. (a) CATEXs define those categories... environment and do not, therefore, require further environmental analysis in an EA or an EIS. The list of...

  9. Exclusive Reactions Involving Pions and Nucleons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norbury, John W.; Blattnig, Steve R.; Tripathi, R. K.

    2002-01-01

    The HZETRN code requires inclusive cross sections as input. One of the methods used to calculate these cross sections requires knowledge of all exclusive processes contributing to the inclusive reaction. Conservation laws are used to determine all possible exclusive reactions involving strong interactions between pions and nucleons. Inclusive particle masses are subsequently determined and are needed in cross-section calculations for inclusive pion production.

  10. Rescinding the Ground Combat Exclusion Policy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-04-07

    memorandum, he then issued DoD’s current policy regarding the assignment of women : Rule. Service members are eligible to be assigned to all positioi). S ...Miller, " Feminism and the Exclusion of Army Women from Combat," in Women in the Military, ed. Rita James Simon (New Brunswick, NJ: Transaction...index.php/issuepapers (accessed November 23, 2010). Miller, Laura L. " Feminism and the Exclusion of Army Women from Combat." In Women in the Military

  11. Model of reversible vesicular transport with exclusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bressloff, Paul C.; Karamched, Bhargav R.

    2016-08-01

    A major question in neurobiology concerns the mechanics behind the motor-driven transport and delivery of vesicles to synaptic targets along the axon of a neuron. Experimental evidence suggests that the distribution of vesicles along the axon is relatively uniform and that vesicular delivery to synapses is reversible. A recent modeling study has made explicit the crucial role that reversibility in vesicular delivery to synapses plays in achieving uniformity in vesicle distribution, so called synaptic democracy (Bressloff et al 2015 Phys. Rev. Lett. 114 168101). In this paper we generalize the previous model by accounting for exclusion effects (hard-core repulsion) that may occur between molecular motor-cargo complexes (particles) moving along the same microtubule track. The resulting model takes the form of an exclusion process with four internal states, which distinguish between motile and stationary particles, and whether or not a particle is carrying vesicles. By applying a mean field approximation and an adiabatic approximation we reduce the system of ODEs describing the evolution of occupation numbers of the sites on a 1D lattice to a system of hydrodynamic equations in the continuum limit. We find that reversibility in vesicular delivery allows for synaptic democracy even in the presence of exclusion effects, although exclusion does exacerbate nonuniform distributions of vesicles in an axon when compared with a model without exclusion. We also uncover the relationship between our model and other models of exclusion processes with internal states.

  12. Environmental structure and competitive scoring advantages in team competitions.

    PubMed

    Merritt, Sears; Clauset, Aaron

    2013-10-29

    In most professional sports, playing field structure is kept neutral so that scoring imbalances may be attributed to differences in team skill. It thus remains unknown what impact environmental heterogeneities can have on scoring dynamics or competitive advantages. Applying a novel generative model of scoring dynamics to roughly 10 million team competitions drawn from an online game, we quantify the relationship between the structure within a competition and its scoring dynamics, while controlling the impact of chance. Despite wide structural variations, we observe a common three-phase pattern in the tempo of events. Tempo and balance are highly predictable from a competition's structural features alone and teams exploit environmental heterogeneities for sustained competitive advantage. Surprisingly, the most balanced competitions are associated with specific environmental heterogeneities, not from equally skilled teams. These results shed new light on the design principles of balanced competition, and illustrate the potential of online game data for investigating social dynamics and competition.

  13. Environmental structure and competitive scoring advantages in team competitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merritt, Sears; Clauset, Aaron

    2013-10-01

    In most professional sports, playing field structure is kept neutral so that scoring imbalances may be attributed to differences in team skill. It thus remains unknown what impact environmental heterogeneities can have on scoring dynamics or competitive advantages. Applying a novel generative model of scoring dynamics to roughly 10 million team competitions drawn from an online game, we quantify the relationship between the structure within a competition and its scoring dynamics, while controlling the impact of chance. Despite wide structural variations, we observe a common three-phase pattern in the tempo of events. Tempo and balance are highly predictable from a competition's structural features alone and teams exploit environmental heterogeneities for sustained competitive advantage. Surprisingly, the most balanced competitions are associated with specific environmental heterogeneities, not from equally skilled teams. These results shed new light on the design principles of balanced competition, and illustrate the potential of online game data for investigating social dynamics and competition.

  14. 5 CFR 919.1020 - Voluntary exclusion or voluntarily excluded.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) GOVERNMENTWIDE DEBARMENT AND SUSPENSION (NONPROCUREMENT) Definitions § 919.1020 Voluntary exclusion or voluntarily excluded. (a) Voluntary exclusion means a person's.... Voluntary exclusion must have governmentwide effect. (b) Voluntarily excluded means the status of a...

  15. Details on Exclusive Use Data Protection for Minor Use Registrations

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This document provides information about issues related to exclusive use data protection for minor use registrations, including extension of the exclusive use period and establishing a new exclusive use period.

  16. 78 FR 27181 - Notice of Intent To Grant Exclusive Licenses

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-09

    ..., an exclusive license to the blackberry variety named ``Columbia Star,'' an exclusive license to the... Agriculture. The ] prospective exclusive licenses will be royalty-bearing and will comply with the terms...

  17. The evolution of increased competitive ability, innate competitive advantages, and novel biochemical weapons act in concert for a tropical invader.

    PubMed

    Qin, Rui-Min; Zheng, Yu-Long; Valiente-Banuet, Alfonso; Callaway, Ragan M; Barclay, Gregor F; Pereyra, Carlos Silva; Feng, Yu-Long

    2013-02-01

    There are many non-mutually exclusive mechanisms for exotic invasions but few studies have concurrently tested more than one hypothesis for the same species. Here, we tested the evolution of increased competitive ability (EICA) hypothesis in two common garden experiments in which Chromolaena odorata plants originating from native and nonnative ranges were grown in competition with natives from each range, and the novel weapons hypothesis in laboratory experiments with leachates from C. odorata. Compared with conspecifics originating from the native range, C. odorata plants from the nonnative range were stronger competitors at high nutrient concentrations in the nonnative range in China and experienced far more herbivore damage in the native range in Mexico. In both China and Mexico, C. odorata was more suppressed by species native to Mexico than by species native to China. Species native to China were much more inhibited by leaf extracts from C. odorata than species from Mexico, and this difference in allelopathic effects may provide a possible explanation for the biogeographic differences in competitive ability. Our results indicate that EICA, innate competitive advantages, and novel biochemical weapons may act in concert to promote invasion by C. odorata, and emphasize the importance of exploring multiple, non-mutually exclusive mechanisms for invasions.

  18. Socio-technical transition as a co-evolutionary process: Innovation and the role of niche markets in the transition to motor vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birky, Alicia K.

    2008-10-01

    Significant reductions in greenhouse emissions from personal transportation will require a transition to an alternative technology regime based on renewable energy sources. Two bodies of research, the quasi-evolutionary (QE) model and the multi-level perspective (MLP) assert that processes within niches play a fundamental role in such transitions. This research asks whether the description of transitions based on this niche hypothesis and its underlying assumptions is consistent with the historical U.S. transition to motor vehicles at the beginning of the 20th century. Unique to this dissertation is the combination of the perspective of the entrepreneur with co-evolutionary approaches to socio-technical transitions. This approach is augmented with concepts from the industry life-cycle model and with a taxonomy of mechanisms of learning. Using this analytic framework, I examine specifically the role of entrepreneurial behavior and processes within and among firms in the co-evolution of technologies and institutions during the transition to motor vehicles. I find that niche markets played an important role in the development of the technology, institutions, and the industry. However, I also find that the diffusion of the automobile is not consistent with the niche hypothesis in the following ways: (1) product improvements and cost reductions were not realized in niche markets, but were achieved simultaneously with diffusion into mass markets; (2) in addition to learning-by-doing and learning-by-interacting with users, knowledge spillovers and interacting with suppliers were critical in this process; (3) cost reductions were not automatic results of expanding markets, but rather arose from the strategies of entrepreneurs based on personal perspectives and values. This finding supports the use of a behavioral approach with a micro-focus in the analysis of socio-technical change. I also find that the emergence and diffusion of the motor vehicle can only be understood by

  19. Demolishing the competition: the longitudinal link between competitive video games, competitive gambling, and aggression.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Paul J C; Willoughby, Teena

    2013-07-01

    The majority of research on the link between video games and aggression has focused on the violent content in games. In contrast, recent experimental research suggests that it is video game competition, not violence, that has the greatest effect on aggression in the short-term. However, no researchers have examined the long-term relationship between video game competition and aggression. In addition, if competition in video games is a significant reason for the link between video game play and aggression, then other competitive activities, such as competitive gambling, also may predict aggression over time. In the current study, we directly assessed the socialization (competitive video game play and competitive gambling predicts aggression over time) versus selection hypotheses (aggression predicts competitive video game play and competitive gambling over time). Adolescents (N = 1,492, 50.8 % female) were surveyed annually from Grade 9 to Grade 12 about their video game play, gambling, and aggressive behaviors. Greater competitive video game play and competitive gambling predicted higher levels of aggression over time, after controlling for previous levels of aggression, supporting the socialization hypothesis. The selection hypothesis also was supported, as aggression predicted greater competitive video game play and competitive gambling over time, after controlling for previous competitive video game play and competitive gambling. Our findings, taken together with the fact that millions of adolescents play competitive video games every day and that competitive gambling may increase as adolescents transition into adulthood, highlight the need for a greater understanding of the relationship between competition and aggression.

  20. Improved self-exclusion program: preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Tremblay, Nicole; Boutin, Claude; Ladouceur, Robert

    2008-12-01

    The gambling industry has offered self-exclusion programs for quite a long time. Such measures are designed to limit access to gaming opportunities and provide problem gamblers with the help they need to cease or limit their gambling behaviour. However, few studies have empirically evaluated these programs. This study has three objectives: (1) to observe the participation in an improved self-exclusion program that includes an initial voluntary evaluation, phone support, and a mandatory meeting, (2) to evaluate satisfaction and usefulness of this service as perceived by self-excluders, (3) to measure the preliminary impact of this improved program. One hundred sixteen self-excluders completed a questionnaire about their satisfaction and their perception of the usefulness during the mandatory meeting. Among those participants, 39 attended an initial meeting. Comparisons between data collected at the initial meeting and data taken at the final meeting were made for those 39 participants. Data showed that gamblers chose the improved self-exclusion program 75% of the time; 25% preferred to sign a regular self-exclusion contract. Among those who chose the improved service, 40% wanted an initial voluntary evaluation and 37% of these individuals actually attended that meeting. Seventy percent of gamblers came to the mandatory meeting, which was a required condition to end their self-exclusion. The majority of participants were satisfied with the improved self-exclusion service and perceived it as useful. Major improvements were observed between the final and the initial evaluation on time and money spent, consequences of gambling, DSM-IV score, and psychological distress. The applicability of an improved self-exclusion program is discussed and, as shown in our study, the inclusion of a final mandatory meeting might not be so repulsive for self-excluders. Future research directives are also proposed.

  1. The Literature of Competitive Intelligence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Thomas D.

    1994-01-01

    Describes competitive intelligence (CI) literature in terms of its location, quantity, authorship, length, and problems of bibliographic access. Highlights include subject access; competitive intelligence research; espionage and security; monographs; and journals. (21 references) (LRW)

  2. Competitive exclusion: an ecological model demonstrates how research metrics can drive women out of science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, K.; Hapgood, K.

    2012-12-01

    While universities are often perceived within the wider population as a flexible family-friendly work environment, continuous full-time employment remains the norm in tenure track roles. This traditional career path is strongly re-inforced by research metrics, which typically measure accumulated historical performance. There is a strong feedback between historical and future research output, and there is a minimum threshold of research output below which it becomes very difficult to attract funding, high quality students and collaborators. The competing timescales of female fertility and establishment of a research career mean that many women do not exceed this threshold before having children. Using a mathematical model taken from an ecological analogy, we demonstrate how these mechanisms create substantial barriers to pursuing a research career while working part-time or returning from extended parental leave. The model highlights a conundrum for research managers: metrics can promote research productivity and excellence within an organisation, but can classify highly capable scientists as poor performers simply because they have not followed the traditional career path of continuous full-time employment. Based on this analysis, we make concrete recommendations for researchers and managers seeking to retain the skills and training invested in female scientists. We also provide survival tactics for women and men who wish to pursue a career in science while also spending substantial time and energy raising their family.

  3. Welfare of competition horses.

    PubMed

    Atock, M A; Williams, R B

    1994-03-01

    In the large majority of cases and circumstances, horses benefit from their association with man. However, abuse of horses can occur, due to neglect or through the pressures of competition. The welfare of all animals, including competition horses, has become increasingly topical over the past ten years. Equestrian sport is coming under closer public scrutiny due to reports of apparent abuse. The bodies responsible for regulating these sports strenuously endeavour to protect the welfare of horses which compete under their rules and regulations. The Fédération Equestre Internationale (FEI: International Equestrian Federation) is the sole authority for all international events in dressage, show-jumping, three-day event, driving, endurance riding and vaulting. The FEI rules illustrate the ways in which the welfare of competing horses is safeguarded.

  4. Designing Competitive Service Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, Veronica; Turner, Trevor

    The explosives developed in Europe in the late nineteenth and early twentieth ­century by the famous Swede and patron of the world peace prize, Alfred Nobel, were extremely durable and, apart from the introduction of the electric detonator, have remained in use with minor modifications for almost a century (Fig. 5.1a). In the 1970s a new invention started a process of change that has transformed the explosives business from being a supplier of products to a provider of a service. Survival very much depended on the agility of ICI Explosives UK, hereinafter referred to as "ICI Explosives," in adapting to the new competitive environment. Manufacturing excellence was not a solution. Innovative thinking was required to sustain the ­business as changes in technology reduced the complexity that had ­protected the business from serious competition for over a century.

  5. Competitive Intelligence and Social Advantage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davenport, Elisabeth; Cronin, Blaise

    1994-01-01

    Presents an overview of issues concerning civilian competitive intelligence (CI). Topics discussed include competitive advantage in academic and research environments; public domain information and libraries; covert and overt competitive intelligence; data diversity; use of the Internet; cooperative intelligence; and implications for library and…

  6. ''Follow that quarkexclamation'' (and other exclusive stories)

    SciTech Connect

    Carroll, A.S.

    1987-06-17

    Quarks are considered to be the basic constituents of matter. In a series of recent experiments, Carroll studied exclusive reactions as a means of determining the interactions between quarks. Quantum Chromo-dynamics (QCD) is the modern theory of the interaction of quarks. This theory explains how quarks are held together via the strong interaction in particles known as hadrons. Hadrons consisting of three quarks are called baryons. Hadrons made up of a quark and an antiquark are called mesons. In his lecture, Carroll describes what happens when two hadrons collide and scatter to large angles. The violence of the collision causes the gluons that bind the quarks in a particular hadron to temporarily lose their grip on particular quarks. Quarks scramble toward renewed unity with other quarks, and they undergo rearrangement, which generally results in additional new particles. A two-body exclusive reaction has occurred when the same number of particles exist before and after the collisions. At large angles these exclusive reactions are very rare. The labels on the quarks known as flavor enable the experimenter to follow the history of individual quarks in detail during these exclusive reactions. Carroll describes the equipment used in the experiment to measure short distance, hard collisions at large angles. The collisions he discusses occur when a known beam of mesons or protons collide with a stationary proton target. Finally, Carroll summarizes what the experiments have shown from the study of exclusive reactions and what light some of their results shed on the theory of QCD.

  7. Cooperation induced by random sequential exclusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Kun; Cong, Rui; Wang, Long

    2016-06-01

    Social exclusion is a common and powerful tool to penalize deviators in human societies, and thus to effectively elevate collaborative efforts. Current models on the evolution of exclusion behaviors mostly assume that each peer excluder independently makes the decision to expel the defectors, but has no idea what others in the group would do or how the actual punishment effect will be. Thus, a more realistic model, random sequential exclusion, is proposed. In this mechanism, each excluder has to pay an extra scheduling cost and then all the excluders are arranged in a random order to implement the exclusion actions. If one free rider has already been excluded by an excluder, the remaining excluders will not participate in expelling this defector. We find that this mechanism can help stabilize cooperation under more unfavorable conditions than the normal peer exclusion can do, either in well-mixed population or on social networks. However, too large a scheduling cost may undermine the advantage of this mechanism. Our work validates the fact that collaborative practice among punishers plays an important role in further boosting cooperation.

  8. Autonomic and Coevolutionary Sensor Networking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boonma, Pruet; Suzuki, Junichi

    (WSNs) applications are often required to balance the tradeoffs among conflicting operational objectives (e.g., latency and power consumption) and operate at an optimal tradeoff. This chapter proposes and evaluates a architecture, called BiSNET/e, which allows WSN applications to overcome this issue. BiSNET/e is designed to support three major types of WSN applications: , and hybrid applications. Each application is implemented as a decentralized group of, which is analogous to a bee colony (application) consisting of bees (agents). Agents collect sensor data or detect an event (a significant change in sensor reading) on individual nodes, and carry sensor data to base stations. They perform these data collection and event detection functionalities by sensing their surrounding network conditions and adaptively invoking behaviors such as pheromone emission, reproduction, migration, swarming and death. Each agent has its own behavior policy, as a set of genes, which defines how to invoke its behaviors. BiSNET/e allows agents to evolve their behavior policies (genes) across generations and autonomously adapt their performance to given objectives. Simulation results demonstrate that, in all three types of applications, agents evolve to find optimal tradeoffs among conflicting objectives and adapt to dynamic network conditions such as traffic fluctuations and node failures/additions. Simulation results also illustrate that, in hybrid applications, data collection agents and event detection agents coevolve to augment their adaptability and performance.

  9. Gene-Culture Coevolutionary Games

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blute, Marion

    2006-01-01

    Gene-culture interactions have largely been modelled employing population genetic-type models. Moreover, in the most notable application to date, the "interactive" modes have been one way rather than bidirectional. This paper suggests using game theoretic, fully interactive models. Employing the logic utilized in population ecology for coevolution…

  10. 42 CFR 402.13 - Penalty, assessment, and exclusion not exclusive.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Penalty, assessment, and exclusion not exclusive. 402.13 Section 402.13 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... imposed under this part are in addition to any other penalties prescribed by law....

  11. 42 CFR 1003.108 - Penalty, assessment, and exclusion not exclusive.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Penalty, assessment, and exclusion not exclusive. 1003.108 Section 1003.108 Public Health OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL-HEALTH CARE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH... this part are in addition to any other penalties prescribed by law....

  12. 42 CFR 1003.108 - Penalty, assessment, and exclusion not exclusive.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Penalty, assessment, and exclusion not exclusive. 1003.108 Section 1003.108 Public Health OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL-HEALTH CARE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH... this part are in addition to any other penalties prescribed by law....

  13. 42 CFR 402.13 - Penalty, assessment, and exclusion not exclusive.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Penalty, assessment, and exclusion not exclusive. 402.13 Section 402.13 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... imposed under this part are in addition to any other penalties prescribed by law....

  14. Ion exclusion chromatography of aromatic acids.

    PubMed

    Mansour, Fotouh R; Kirkpatrick, Christine L; Danielson, Neil D

    2013-08-01

    The determination of aromatic acids by ion exclusion chromatography is challenging due to peak tailing and the long retention time of hydrophobic solutes. This review discusses the retention mechanisms and the factors affecting retention, eluents and detection methods used in ion exclusion chromatography of aromatic acids such as mono-, di-, tri- and tetra-carboxylic acids, amino acids, sulfonates and phenol. In addition, the different approaches used to improve the chromatographic separation of these compounds are also discussed. These approaches include introducing an internal gradient of the ionic strength, using vacancy ion exclusion chromatography, employing a hydrophilic cation exchange resin or adding a modifier such as heptanol to the dilute sulfuric acid mobile phase. The applications of these methods in the analysis of aromatic acids are provided with a table summarizing the stationary phases, the mobile phases and the detection methods.

  15. Asymmetric and frequency-dependent pollinator-mediated interactions may influence competitive displacement in two vernal pool plants.

    PubMed

    Runquist, Ryan Briscoe; Stanton, Maureen L

    2013-02-01

    A plant species immigrating into a community may experience a rarity disadvantage due to competition for the services of pollinators. These negative reproductive interactions have the potential to lead to competitive displacement or exclusion of a species from a site. In this study, we used one- and two-species arrays of potted plants to test for density and frequency dependence in pollinator-mediated and above-ground intraspecific and interspecific competition between two species of Limnanthes that have overlapping ranges, but rarely occur in close sympatry. There were asymmetric competitive effects; the species responded differently to their frequency within 16-plant replacement series arrays. Limnanthes douglasii rosea experienced stronger reductions in lifetime and per-flower fertility, likely due to pollinator-mediated competition with Limnanthes alba. This effect may be linked to asymmetrical competition through heterospecific pollen transfer. This study demonstrates that pollinator-mediated competition may discourage establishment of L. d. rosea in sites already occupied by its congener.

  16. 42 CFR 402.209 - Scope and effect of exclusion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Scope and effect of exclusion. 402.209 Section 402.209 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PROVISIONS CIVIL MONEY PENALTIES, ASSESSMENTS, AND EXCLUSIONS Exclusions § 402.209 Scope and effect of exclusion. (a) Scope of...

  17. 42 CFR 402.214 - Appeal of exclusion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PROVISIONS CIVIL MONEY PENALTIES, ASSESSMENTS, AND EXCLUSIONS Exclusions § 402.214 Appeal of exclusion. (a... defenses that the person intends to assert. (4) Reasons why the proposed length of exclusion should...

  18. 42 CFR 402.214 - Appeal of exclusion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PROVISIONS CIVIL MONEY PENALTIES, ASSESSMENTS, AND EXCLUSIONS Exclusions § 402.214 Appeal of exclusion. (a... defenses that the person intends to assert. (4) Reasons why the proposed length of exclusion should...

  19. 42 CFR 402.209 - Scope and effect of exclusion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Scope and effect of exclusion. 402.209 Section 402... effect of exclusion. (a) Scope of exclusion. Under this title, persons may be excluded from the Medicare, Medicaid, and, where applicable, any other Federal health care programs. (b) Effect of exclusion on...

  20. Attention competition with advertisement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cetin, Uzay; Bingol, Haluk O.

    2014-09-01

    In the new digital age, information is available in large quantities. Since information consumes primarily the attention of its recipients, the scarcity of attention is becoming the main limiting factor. In this study, we investigate the impact of advertisement pressure on a cultural market where consumers have a limited attention capacity. A model of competition for attention is developed and investigated analytically and by simulation. Advertisement is found to be much more effective when the attention capacity of agents is extremely scarce. We have observed that the market share of the advertised item improves if dummy items are introduced to the market while the strength of the advertisement is kept constant.

  1. Attention competition with advertisement.

    PubMed

    Cetin, Uzay; Bingol, Haluk O

    2014-09-01

    In the new digital age, information is available in large quantities. Since information consumes primarily the attention of its recipients, the scarcity of attention is becoming the main limiting factor. In this study, we investigate the impact of advertisement pressure on a cultural market where consumers have a limited attention capacity. A model of competition for attention is developed and investigated analytically and by simulation. Advertisement is found to be much more effective when the attention capacity of agents is extremely scarce. We have observed that the market share of the advertised item improves if dummy items are introduced to the market while the strength of the advertisement is kept constant.

  2. Rowing competitions and perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores, Alfinio; Bernhardt, Stephen A.; Shipman, Henry L.

    2015-02-01

    This paper is about integrating the use of graphing technology (specifically, GeoGebra) with principles of motion, principles of perspective, and the concept of vanishing points to model a dynamic event. Students were asked to analyse video images of a rowing competition filmed with a single camera positioned perpendicular to the race. The fixed position of the camera in such races makes it difficult to determine whether a scull closer to the camera is actually overtaking another, more distant scull. The paper illustrates how students in their first year at the university can integrate the use of technology, science, mathematics, and writing to solve a real world problem involving motion.

  3. The role of drought- and disturbance-mediated competition in shaping community responses to varied environments.

    PubMed

    Napier, Joseph D; Mordecai, Erin A; Heckman, Robert W

    2016-06-01

    By altering the strength of intra- and interspecific competition, droughts may reshape plant communities. Furthermore, species may respond differently to drought when other influences, such as herbivory, are considered. To explore this relationship, we conducted a greenhouse experiment measuring responses to inter- and intraspecific competition for two grasses, Schedonorus arundinaceus and Paspalum dilatatum, while varying water availability and simulating herbivory via clipping. We then parameterized population growth models to examine the long-term outcome of competition under these conditions. Under drought, S. arundinaceus was less water stressed than P. dilatatum, which exhibited severe water stress; clipping alleviated this stress, increasing the competitive ability of P. dilatatum relative to S. arundinaceus. Although P. dilatatum competed weakly under drought, clipping reduced water stress in P. dilatatum, thereby enhancing its ability to compete with S. arundinaceus under drought. Supporting these observations, population growth models predicted that P. dilatatum would exclude S. arundinaceus when clipped under drought, while S. arundinaceus would exclude P. dilatatum when unclipped under drought. When the modeled environment varied temporally, environmental variation promoted niche differences that, though insufficient to maintain stable coexistence, prevented unconditional competitive exclusion by promoting priority effects. Our results suggest that it is important to consider how species respond not just to stable, but also to variable, environments. When species differ in their responses to drought, competition, and simulated herbivory, stable environments may promote competitive exclusion, while fluctuating environments may promote coexistence. These interactions are critical to understanding how species will respond to global change.

  4. 40 CFR 503.6 - Exclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... treatment of domestic sewage in a treatment works. (i) Drinking water treatment sludge. This part does not... DISPOSAL OF SEWAGE SLUDGE General Provisions § 503.6 Exclusions. (a) Treatment processes. This part does... requirements for the use or disposal of sludge generated at an industrial facility during the treatment...

  5. 40 CFR 503.6 - Exclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... treatment of domestic sewage in a treatment works. (i) Drinking water treatment sludge. This part does not... DISPOSAL OF SEWAGE SLUDGE General Provisions § 503.6 Exclusions. (a) Treatment processes. This part does... requirements for the use or disposal of sludge generated at an industrial facility during the treatment...

  6. 40 CFR 503.6 - Exclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... treatment of domestic sewage in a treatment works. (i) Drinking water treatment sludge. This part does not... DISPOSAL OF SEWAGE SLUDGE General Provisions § 503.6 Exclusions. (a) Treatment processes. This part does... requirements for the use or disposal of sludge generated at an industrial facility during the treatment...

  7. 40 CFR 503.6 - Exclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... treatment of domestic sewage in a treatment works. (i) Drinking water treatment sludge. This part does not... DISPOSAL OF SEWAGE SLUDGE General Provisions § 503.6 Exclusions. (a) Treatment processes. This part does... requirements for the use or disposal of sludge generated at an industrial facility during the treatment...

  8. 40 CFR 503.6 - Exclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... treatment of domestic sewage in a treatment works. (i) Drinking water treatment sludge. This part does not... DISPOSAL OF SEWAGE SLUDGE General Provisions § 503.6 Exclusions. (a) Treatment processes. This part does... requirements for the use or disposal of sludge generated at an industrial facility during the treatment...

  9. 21 CFR 110.19 - Exclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Exclusions. 110.19 Section 110.19 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE IN MANUFACTURING, PACKING, OR HOLDING HUMAN FOOD...

  10. 21 CFR 110.19 - Exclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Exclusions. 110.19 Section 110.19 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE IN MANUFACTURING, PACKING, OR HOLDING HUMAN FOOD...

  11. 21 CFR 110.19 - Exclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Exclusions. 110.19 Section 110.19 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE IN MANUFACTURING, PACKING, OR HOLDING HUMAN FOOD...

  12. 40 CFR 763.99 - Exclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT ASBESTOS Asbestos-Containing Materials in Schools § 763.99 Exclusions. (a) A local education agency shall not be... that school. (4) The lead agency responsible for asbestos inspection in a State that has been granted...

  13. 40 CFR 763.99 - Exclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT ASBESTOS Asbestos-Containing Materials in Schools § 763.99 Exclusions. (a) A local education agency shall not be... that school. (4) The lead agency responsible for asbestos inspection in a State that has been granted...

  14. 40 CFR 763.99 - Exclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT ASBESTOS Asbestos-Containing Materials in Schools § 763.99 Exclusions. (a) A local education agency shall not be... that school. (4) The lead agency responsible for asbestos inspection in a State that has been granted...

  15. 40 CFR 763.99 - Exclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT ASBESTOS Asbestos-Containing Materials in Schools § 763.99 Exclusions. (a) A local education agency shall not be... that school. (4) The lead agency responsible for asbestos inspection in a State that has been granted...

  16. 40 CFR 763.99 - Exclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT ASBESTOS Asbestos-Containing Materials in Schools § 763.99 Exclusions. (a) A local education agency shall not be... that school. (4) The lead agency responsible for asbestos inspection in a State that has been granted...

  17. 24 CFR 58.35 - Categorical exclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ..., except in extraordinary circumstances (see § 58.2(a)(3)) in which a normally excluded activity may have a... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Categorical exclusions. 58.35 Section 58.35 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department of Housing and...

  18. 24 CFR 58.35 - Categorical exclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ..., except in extraordinary circumstances (see § 58.2(a)(3)) in which a normally excluded activity may have a... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Categorical exclusions. 58.35 Section 58.35 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department of Housing and...

  19. 24 CFR 58.35 - Categorical exclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ..., except in extraordinary circumstances (see § 58.2(a)(3)) in which a normally excluded activity may have a... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Categorical exclusions. 58.35 Section 58.35 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department of Housing and...

  20. 21 CFR 110.19 - Exclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Exclusions. 110.19 Section 110.19 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE IN MANUFACTURING, PACKING, OR HOLDING HUMAN FOOD...

  1. 32 CFR 220.3 - Exclusions impermissible.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Exclusions impermissible. 220.3 Section 220.3 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS COLLECTION FROM THIRD PARTY PAYERS OF REASONABLE CHARGES FOR HEALTHCARE SERVICES §...

  2. 32 CFR 220.3 - Exclusions impermissible.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Exclusions impermissible. 220.3 Section 220.3 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS COLLECTION FROM THIRD PARTY PAYERS OF REASONABLE CHARGES FOR HEALTHCARE SERVICES §...

  3. 32 CFR 220.3 - Exclusions impermissible.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Exclusions impermissible. 220.3 Section 220.3 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS COLLECTION FROM THIRD PARTY PAYERS OF REASONABLE CHARGES FOR HEALTHCARE SERVICES §...

  4. 49 CFR 236.911 - Exclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Exclusions. 236.911 Section 236.911 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RULES, STANDARDS, AND INSTRUCTIONS GOVERNING THE INSTALLATION, INSPECTION, MAINTENANCE, AND...

  5. 49 CFR 236.911 - Exclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Exclusions. 236.911 Section 236.911 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RULES, STANDARDS, AND INSTRUCTIONS GOVERNING THE INSTALLATION, INSPECTION, MAINTENANCE, AND...

  6. 49 CFR 236.911 - Exclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Exclusions. 236.911 Section 236.911 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RULES, STANDARDS, AND INSTRUCTIONS GOVERNING THE INSTALLATION, INSPECTION, MAINTENANCE, AND...

  7. 49 CFR 236.911 - Exclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Exclusions. 236.911 Section 236.911 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RULES, STANDARDS, AND INSTRUCTIONS GOVERNING THE INSTALLATION, INSPECTION, MAINTENANCE, AND...

  8. A Phenomenographical Study of Voluntary Digital Exclusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Derrick L.

    2012-01-01

    Traditionally scholars have used the digital divide and technology acceptance model definitions when examining why some people elect not to use certain information and communications technologies. When examining the phenomenon referred to as voluntary digital exclusion, the use of these classic definitions is woefully inadequate. They do not…

  9. 40 CFR 1508.4 - Categorical exclusion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... cumulatively have a significant effect on the human environment and which have been found to have no such... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Categorical exclusion. 1508.4 Section 1508.4 Protection of Environment COUNCIL ON ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY TERMINOLOGY AND INDEX §...

  10. 40 CFR 1508.4 - Categorical exclusion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... cumulatively have a significant effect on the human environment and which have been found to have no such... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Categorical exclusion. 1508.4 Section 1508.4 Protection of Environment COUNCIL ON ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY TERMINOLOGY AND INDEX §...

  11. 40 CFR 1508.4 - Categorical exclusion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... cumulatively have a significant effect on the human environment and which have been found to have no such... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Categorical exclusion. 1508.4 Section 1508.4 Protection of Environment COUNCIL ON ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY TERMINOLOGY AND INDEX §...

  12. 32 CFR 220.3 - Exclusions impermissible.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Exclusions impermissible. 220.3 Section 220.3 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS COLLECTION FROM THIRD PARTY PAYERS OF REASONABLE CHARGES FOR HEALTHCARE SERVICES §...

  13. 32 CFR 220.3 - Exclusions impermissible.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Exclusions impermissible. 220.3 Section 220.3 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS COLLECTION FROM THIRD PARTY PAYERS OF REASONABLE CHARGES FOR HEALTHCARE SERVICES §...

  14. 5 CFR 870.302 - Exclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Exclusions. 870.302 Section 870.302 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL... Pretrial Services, Parole, Adult Probation and Offender Supervision Trustee and employees of these...

  15. 5 CFR 846.712 - Statutory exclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Statutory exclusions. 846.712 Section 846.712 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS... District of Columbia Pretrial Services, Defense Services, Parole, Adult Probation and Offender...

  16. 10 CFR 851.2 - Exclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ..., as set forth in Public Law 98-525, 42 U.S.C. 7158 note. (b) This part does not apply to radiological... ENERGY WORKER SAFETY AND HEALTH PROGRAM General Provisions § 851.2 Exclusions. (a) This part does not apply to work at a DOE site: (1) Regulated by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration; or...

  17. 10 CFR 851.2 - Exclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ..., as set forth in Public Law 98-525, 42 U.S.C. 7158 note. (b) This part does not apply to radiological... ENERGY WORKER SAFETY AND HEALTH PROGRAM General Provisions § 851.2 Exclusions. (a) This part does not apply to work at a DOE site: (1) Regulated by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration; or...

  18. Case Study of Chinese Exclusion Act Enforcement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dufour, Joanne, Comp.

    2012-01-01

    While nearly 85 percent of the U.S. population is currently made up of immigrants and their descendants, some groups were specifically targeted for exclusion and deliberately expelled. The Chinese were the first to experience this. In the 1850s, many Chinese who came to this land to search for gold or to help build the transcontinental railroad,…

  19. 48 CFR 832.404 - Exclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Section 832.404 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS GENERAL CONTRACTING REQUIREMENTS CONTRACT FINANCING Advance Payments for Non-Commercial Items 832.404 Exclusions. (a) Under 31 U.S... payment for services and supplies obtained from another Government agency. (c) Under 5 U.S.C. 4109,...

  20. Citizenship Education in Turkey: Inclusive or Exclusive

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ince, Basak

    2012-01-01

    This paper scrutinises citizenship education in Turkey from the foundation of the Turkish Republic (1923) to the present and explores the extent to which it encourages inclusive or exclusive concepts of national identity and citizenship. In Turkey, where there are citizens belonging to ethnic and religious minorities, civic education plays a…

  1. 41 CFR 109-28.5102 - Exclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Exclusions. 109-28.5102 Section 109-28.5102 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY PROPERTY MANAGEMENT REGULATIONS SUPPLY AND PROCUREMENT...

  2. 28 CFR 91.55 - Categorical exclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., a proposed or listed endangered or threatened species, a proposed or listed critical habitat, a... that caused the loss of the exclusion. (a) Minor renovations. Projects for minor renovations within an...) Will affect a federally proposed or listed endangered or threatened species or its habitat; (5)...

  3. 21 CFR 110.19 - Exclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Exclusions. 110.19 Section 110.19 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE IN MANUFACTURING, PACKING, OR HOLDING HUMAN FOOD...

  4. New College Diversity Laws: Banning Racial Exclusion?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adam, Michelle

    2006-01-01

    Race-exclusive programs of American universities and colleges, created initially to level the playing fields for under-represented students in higher education, are now considered discriminatory and illegal. The concerns levied against higher education institutions have been in response to two 2003 U.S. Supreme Court cases on race and admission at…

  5. 43 CFR 20.302 - Exclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... and Payment of Travel and Related Expenses § 20.302 Exclusions. (a) Where employee travel is for... employee and/or the employee's spouse's travel from a non-Federal source when proper consideration is given... is issued in advance of the travel. (1) Conditions. Such travel expenses paid for by a...

  6. 43 CFR 20.302 - Exclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... and Payment of Travel and Related Expenses § 20.302 Exclusions. (a) Where employee travel is for... employee and/or the employee's spouse's travel from a non-Federal source when proper consideration is given... is issued in advance of the travel. (1) Conditions. Such travel expenses paid for by a...

  7. 43 CFR 20.302 - Exclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... and Payment of Travel and Related Expenses § 20.302 Exclusions. (a) Where employee travel is for... employee and/or the employee's spouse's travel from a non-Federal source when proper consideration is given... is issued in advance of the travel. (1) Conditions. Such travel expenses paid for by a...

  8. 29 CFR 9.4 - Exclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... amended. (2) Application to subcontracts. While the § 9.4(a)(1) exclusion applies to subcontracts that are...) of this section. (c) Federal service work constituting only part of employee's job. This part does... nonfederal service contracts as part of a single job, provided that the employees were not deployed in...

  9. 29 CFR 9.4 - Exclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Procurement Policy Act, as amended. (2) Application to subcontracts. While the § 9.4(a)(1) exclusion applies... paragraphs (b)(1)-(3) of this section. (c) Federal service work constituting only part of employee's job... or more nonfederal service contracts as part of a single job, provided that the employees were...

  10. 29 CFR 9.4 - Exclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) Application to subcontracts. While the § 9.4(a)(1) exclusion applies to subcontracts that are less than the... section. (c) Federal service work constituting only part of employee's job. This part does not apply to... contracts as part of a single job, provided that the employees were not deployed in a manner that...

  11. 41 CFR 101-26.802 - Exclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...-Discrepancies or Deficiencies in GSA or DOD Shipments, Material, or Billings § 101-26.802 Exclusions. The provisions of this regulation are not applicable to shipments and billings related to the stockpile of strategic and critical materials or excess or surplus property; or to billings for services,...

  12. 41 CFR 101-26.802 - Exclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...-Discrepancies or Deficiencies in GSA or DOD Shipments, Material, or Billings § 101-26.802 Exclusions. The provisions of this regulation are not applicable to shipments and billings related to the stockpile of strategic and critical materials or excess or surplus property; or to billings for services,...

  13. 41 CFR 101-26.802 - Exclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Exclusions. 101-26.802 Section 101-26.802 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System FEDERAL PROPERTY MANAGEMENT REGULATIONS SUPPLY AND PROCUREMENT 26-PROCUREMENT SOURCES AND PROGRAM...

  14. 41 CFR 101-26.802 - Exclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2014-07-01 2012-07-01 true Exclusions. 101-26.802 Section 101-26.802 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System FEDERAL PROPERTY MANAGEMENT REGULATIONS SUPPLY AND PROCUREMENT 26-PROCUREMENT SOURCES AND PROGRAM...

  15. 41 CFR 101-26.802 - Exclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Exclusions. 101-26.802 Section 101-26.802 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System FEDERAL PROPERTY MANAGEMENT REGULATIONS SUPPLY AND PROCUREMENT 26-PROCUREMENT SOURCES AND PROGRAM...

  16. Nano-fabricated size exclusion chromatograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Svehla, D.; Feldman, S.; Feldman, J.; Grunthaner, F.; Shakkottai, P.; dle Castillo, L.; White, V.

    2002-01-01

    This poster describes the development of a nano-fabricated size exclusion chromatograph (nSEC) based on the principle that molecules traveling through a microcolumn containing nano-fabricated features will have characteristics elution times that directly correlate to molecular weight.

  17. 22 CFR 513.210 - Voluntary exclusion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2011-04-01 2009-04-01 true Voluntary exclusion. 513.210 Section 513.210 Foreign Relations BROADCASTING BOARD OF GOVERNORS GOVERNMENT DEBARMENT AND SUSPENSION (NONPROCUREMENT) AND GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (GRANTS) Effect of Action § 513.210 Voluntary...

  18. 22 CFR 513.210 - Voluntary exclusion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Voluntary exclusion. 513.210 Section 513.210 Foreign Relations BROADCASTING BOARD OF GOVERNORS GOVERNMENT DEBARMENT AND SUSPENSION (NONPROCUREMENT) AND GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (GRANTS) Effect of Action § 513.210 Voluntary...

  19. 22 CFR 513.210 - Voluntary exclusion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2012-04-01 2009-04-01 true Voluntary exclusion. 513.210 Section 513.210 Foreign Relations BROADCASTING BOARD OF GOVERNORS GOVERNMENT DEBARMENT AND SUSPENSION (NONPROCUREMENT) AND GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (GRANTS) Effect of Action § 513.210 Voluntary...

  20. 22 CFR 513.210 - Voluntary exclusion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2013-04-01 2009-04-01 true Voluntary exclusion. 513.210 Section 513.210 Foreign Relations BROADCASTING BOARD OF GOVERNORS GOVERNMENT DEBARMENT AND SUSPENSION (NONPROCUREMENT) AND GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (GRANTS) Effect of Action § 513.210 Voluntary...

  1. 22 CFR 513.210 - Voluntary exclusion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Voluntary exclusion. 513.210 Section 513.210 Foreign Relations BROADCASTING BOARD OF GOVERNORS GOVERNMENT DEBARMENT AND SUSPENSION (NONPROCUREMENT) AND GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (GRANTS) Effect of Action § 513.210 Voluntary...

  2. 32 CFR 651.55 - Categorical exclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Categorical exclusions. 651.55 Section 651.55 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS OF ARMY ACTIONS (AR 200-2) Environmental Effects of Major Army Action Abroad §...

  3. 32 CFR 651.55 - Categorical exclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Categorical exclusions. 651.55 Section 651.55 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS OF ARMY ACTIONS (AR 200-2) Environmental Effects of Major Army Action Abroad §...

  4. 32 CFR 651.55 - Categorical exclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Categorical exclusions. 651.55 Section 651.55 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS OF ARMY ACTIONS (AR 200-2) Environmental Effects of Major Army Action Abroad §...

  5. 32 CFR 651.55 - Categorical exclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Categorical exclusions. 651.55 Section 651.55 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS OF ARMY ACTIONS (AR 200-2) Environmental Effects of Major Army Action Abroad §...

  6. 32 CFR 651.55 - Categorical exclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Categorical exclusions. 651.55 Section 651.55 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS OF ARMY ACTIONS (AR 200-2) Environmental Effects of Major Army Action Abroad §...

  7. 5 CFR 551.214 - Statutory exclusion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Statutory exclusion. 551.214 Section 551.214 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS PAY... customs officer who receives overtime pay under subsection (a) or premium pay under subsection (b) of 19...

  8. 46 CFR 504.4 - Categorical exclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... FEDERAL MARITIME COMMISSION GENERAL AND ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS PROCEDURES FOR ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ANALYSIS § 504.4 Categorical exclusions. (a) No environmental analyses need be undertaken or environmental... effect on the quality of the human environment because they are purely ministerial actions or...

  9. 46 CFR 504.4 - Categorical exclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... FEDERAL MARITIME COMMISSION GENERAL AND ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS PROCEDURES FOR ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ANALYSIS § 504.4 Categorical exclusions. (a) No environmental analyses need be undertaken or environmental... effect on the quality of the human environment because they are purely ministerial actions or...

  10. 12 CFR 1815.110 - Categorical exclusion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY § 1815.110 Categorical exclusion. The CEQ regulations provide for the categorical..., equipment, supplies and services; space acquisition; property management; and security); (b) Actions... replacement after rehabilitation; and (4) The Project does not involve the demolition of one or more...

  11. 12 CFR 1815.110 - Categorical exclusion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY § 1815.110 Categorical exclusion. The CEQ regulations provide for the categorical..., equipment, supplies and services; space acquisition; property management; and security); (b) Actions... replacement after rehabilitation; and (4) The Project does not involve the demolition of one or more...

  12. Diffraction and central exclusive production at ATLAS

    SciTech Connect

    Tasevsky, Marek

    2011-07-15

    The diffractive physics program for the ATLAS experiment with an emphasis on the central exclusive production is discussed. The key point in this discussion is the need for an unambiguous experimental definition of diffractive signature which would be acceptable and reproducible by theorists. Recent ATLAS results from samples enhanced in diffraction contribution underline this need.

  13. Teaching the Exclusion Principle with Philosophical Flavor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shadmi, Y.

    1978-01-01

    Outlines an approach to the teaching of a chapter in a quantum mechanics course. The exclusion principle is confronted with the principle of the "identity of the indiscernible" of Leibnitz. Concludes that philosophy can never replace scientific research, thus predicting directions of advances of physical theories. (GA)

  14. 12 CFR 1815.110 - Categorical exclusion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Categorical exclusion. 1815.110 Section 1815.110 Banks and Banking COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS FUND, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY... assessment and EIS have been prepared; (c) Actions directly related to the granting or receipt of...

  15. Sexism and Permanent Exclusion from School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlile, Anna

    2009-01-01

    Focussing on narratives collected during a two year participant observation research project in the children's services department of an urban local authority, this article addresses the intersection between incidents of permanent exclusion from school and assumptions made on the basis of a young person's gender. The article considers gendered…

  16. 47 CFR 2.1202 - Exclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL FREQUENCY ALLOCATIONS AND RADIO TREATY MATTERS; GENERAL RULES AND REGULATIONS Importation of Devices Capable of Causing Harmful Interference § 2.1202 Exclusions...) Radio frequency devices manufactured and assembled in the U.S.A. that meet applicable FCC...

  17. 47 CFR 2.1202 - Exclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL FREQUENCY ALLOCATIONS AND RADIO TREATY MATTERS; GENERAL RULES AND REGULATIONS Importation of Devices Capable of Causing Harmful Interference § 2.1202 Exclusions...) Radio frequency devices manufactured and assembled in the U.S.A. that meet applicable FCC...

  18. Exclusive breakup measurements for {sup 9}Be

    SciTech Connect

    Fulton, B.R.; Cowin, R.L.; Woolliscroft, R.J.; Clarke, N.M.; Donadille, L.; Freer, M.; Leask, P.J.; Singer, S.M.; Nicoli, M.P.; Benoit, B.; Hanappe, F.; Ninane, A.; Orr, N.A.; Tillier, J.; Stuttge, L.

    2004-10-01

    The first exclusive breakup measurements for the nucleus {sup 9}Be are presented. Breakup via several discrete states is observed following scattering off {sup 12}C and {sup 208}Pb. The results support the prediction of a recent microscopic cluster calculation for a strong n+{sup 8}Be(2{sup +}) state component in the second excited state.

  19. 19 CFR 10.452 - Exclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Exclusions. 10.452 Section 10.452 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ARTICLES CONDITIONALLY FREE, SUBJECT TO A REDUCED RATE, ETC. United States-Chile Free Trade Agreement...

  20. 5 CFR 359.401 - General exclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false General exclusions. 359.401 Section 359.401 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS REMOVAL FROM THE SENIOR EXECUTIVE SERVICE; GUARANTEED PLACEMENT IN OTHER PERSONNEL SYSTEMS Removal of Career...

  1. 5 CFR 359.401 - General exclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false General exclusions. 359.401 Section 359.401 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS REMOVAL FROM THE SENIOR EXECUTIVE SERVICE; GUARANTEED PLACEMENT IN OTHER PERSONNEL SYSTEMS Removal of Career...

  2. Canoe slalom competition analysis.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Adam; Cochrane, Jodie; Sachlikidis, Alexi

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to quantify the differences between groups of elite canoe slalom athletes based on the class they paddle in and the strategies they use in competition. Canoe and kayak footage was recorded using three cameras and analysed using lapsed-time time-motion analysis. Analysis was undertaken on the ten fastest competition runs for men's kayak and canoes and women's kayak for the 22-gate semi-final/final course at the 2005 canoe slalom world championships. Comparison between the categories of paddlers revealed that despite canoe paddlers taking significantly (P < or = 0.05) fewer strokes than kayak paddlers, they were not significantly slower than men's single kayak paddlers with respect to their run times and only significantly slower between 4 of 22 gates. Results revealed also that paddlers using different turn strategies (spin vs. pivot) had significantly (P < or = 0.05) different split times for the gates before and after the execution of the manoeuvre. For a paddler this means that their individual strategy could be analysed and compared with those of others to determine if alternate strategies would be beneficial to their performance.

  3. Unnecessary Child Care Exclusions in a State That Endorses National Exclusion Guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Hashikawa, Andrew N.; Juhn, Young J.; Nimmer, Mark; Copeland, Kristen; Shun-Hwa, Li; Simpson, Pippa; Stevens, Martha W.; Brousseau, David C.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE No study has evaluated the association between state endorsement of American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) and American Public Health Association (APHA) national guidelines and unnecessary exclusion decisions. We sought to determine the rate of unnecessary exclusion decisions by child care directors in a state that endorses AAP/APHA guidelines and to identify factors that are associated with higher unnecessary exclusion decisions. METHODS A telephone survey was administered to directors in metropolitan Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Directors were randomly sampled from a list of 971 registered centers. Director, center, and neighborhood characteristics were obtained. Directors reported whether immediate exclusion was indicated for 5 vignettes that featured children with mild illness that do not require exclusion by AAP/APHA guidelines. Weighted data were summarized by using descriptive statistics. Regression analysis was used to identify factors that were associated with directors’ exclusion decisions. RESULTS A total of 305 directors completed the survey. Overall, directors would unnecessarily exclude 57% of children. More than 62% had never heard of the AAP/APHA guidelines. Regression analysis showed fewer exclusions among more experienced compared with less experienced directors, among larger centers compared with smaller centers, and among centers that were located in areas with a higher percentage of female heads of household. Centers with ≤10% children on state-assisted tuition excluded more. CONCLUSIONS High rates of inappropriate exclusion persist despite state endorsement of AAP/APHA guidelines. Focused initial and ongoing training of directors regarding AAP/APHA guidelines may help to reduce high rates of unnecessary exclusions. PMID:20403929

  4. Competition among hospitals.

    PubMed

    Gaynor, Martin; Vogt, William B

    2003-01-01

    We examine competition in the hospital industry, in particular the effect of ownership type (for-profit, not-for-profit, government). We estimate a structural model of demand and pricing in the hospital industry in California, then use the estimates to simulate the effect of a merger. California hospitals in 1995 face an average price elasticity of demand of -4.85. Not-for-profit hospitals face less elastic demand and act as if they have lower marginal costs. Their prices are lower than those of for-profits, but markups are higher. We simulate the effects of the 1997 merger of two hospital chains. In San Luis Obispo County, where the merger creates a near monopoly, prices rise by up to 53%, and the predicted price increase would not be substantially smaller were the chains not-for-profit.

  5. Spatial Aspects of Interspecific Competition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durrett, Rick; Levin, Simon

    1998-01-01

    Using several variants of a stochastic spatial model introduced by Silvertown et al., we investigate the effect of spatial distribution of individuals on the outcome of competition. First, we prove rigorously that if one species has a competitive advantage over each of the others, then eventually it takes over all the sites in the system. Second, we examine tradeoffs between competition and dispersal distance in a two-species system. Third, we consider a cyclic competitive relationship between three types. In this case, a nonspatial treatment leads to densities that follow neutrally stable cycles or even unstable spiral solutions, while a spatial model yields a stationary distribution with an interesting spatial structure.

  6. Immunological impact of Taekwondo competitions.

    PubMed

    Lee, Y W; Shin, K W; Paik, I-Y; Jung, W M; Cho, S-Y; Choi, S T; Kim, H D; Kim, J Y

    2012-01-01

    Immunological changes in elite adolescent female athletes during Taekwondo competitions were investigated on-field. 6 female athletes (16.7 ± 0.8 year-old) volunteered and performed 5 bouts of demonstration Taekwondo competitions simulating real tournaments in intensity, duration, and break-time intervals on the same day. Blood samples were taken before, after the competitions and during the recovery, respectively. Immunological changes and oxidative stress in peripheral blood mononuclear cells were evaluated by flow-cytometry. During the competitions, exercise intensity was 92.2 ± 3.8% (86.1~95.7) of the maximal heart rate. Blood lactate increased immediately after the competitions (p=0.0165) and decreased to baseline during recovery. Intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the peripheral blood increased continuously during recovery (p<0.05, respectively). Natural killer cells increased immediately after the competitions (p=0.0006), and decreased during recovery. B and T cells increased immediately after the competitions and remained elevated throughout recovery (p<0.05, respectively). CD4/CD8 ratio after the competitions was decreased (p=0.0091) and returned to baseline during recovery. These results suggest that the immunological function of the elite female adolescent athletes could be attenuated after Taekwondo competitions. Further large-scaled Taekwondo studies on immunologic and apoptotic changes related to oxidative stress should be performed for improving and protecting the health of adolescent athletes.

  7. Mapping your competitive position.

    PubMed

    D'Aveni, Richard A

    2007-11-01

    A price-benefit positioning map helps you see, through your customers' eyes, how your product compares with all its competitors in a market. You can draw such a map quickly and objectively, without having to resort to costly, time-consuming consumer surveys or subjective estimates of the excellence of your product and the shortcomings of all the others. Creating a positioning map involves three steps: First, define your market to include everything your customers might consider to be your product's competitors or substitutes. Second, track the price your customers actually pay (wholesale or retail? bundled or unbundled?) and identify what your customers see as your offering's primary benefit. This is done through regression analysis, determining which of the product's attributes (as described objectively by rating services, government agencies, R&D departments, and the like) explains most of the variance in its price. Third, draw the map by plotting on a graph the position of every product in the market you've selected according to its price and its level of primary benefit, and draw a line that runs through the middle of the points. What you get is a picture of the competitive landscape of your market, where all the products above the line command a price premium owing to some secondary benefit customers value, and all those below the line are positioned to earn market share through lower prices and reduced secondary benefits. Using examples as varied as Harley-Davidson motorcycles, Motorola cell phones, and the New York restaurant market, Tuck professor D'Aveni demonstrates some of the many ways the maps can be used: to locate unoccupied or less-crowded spaces in highly competitive markets, for instance, or to identify opportunities created through changes in the relationship between the primary benefit and prices. The maps even allow companies to anticipate--and counter-- rivals' strategies. R eprint RO711G

  8. Mutually Exclusive CBC-Containing Complexes Contribute to RNA Fate.

    PubMed

    Giacometti, Simone; Benbahouche, Nour El Houda; Domanski, Michal; Robert, Marie-Cécile; Meola, Nicola; Lubas, Michal; Bukenborg, Jakob; Andersen, Jens S; Schulze, Wiebke M; Verheggen, Celine; Kudla, Grzegorz; Jensen, Torben Heick; Bertrand, Edouard

    2017-03-14

    The nuclear cap-binding complex (CBC) stimulates processing reactions of capped RNAs, including their splicing, 3'-end formation, degradation, and transport. CBC effects are particular for individual RNA families, but how such selectivity is achieved remains elusive. Here, we analyze three main CBC partners known to impact different RNA species. ARS2 stimulates 3'-end formation/transcription termination of several transcript types, ZC3H18 stimulates degradation of a diverse set of RNAs, and PHAX functions in pre-small nuclear RNA/small nucleolar RNA (pre-snRNA/snoRNA) transport. Surprisingly, these proteins all bind capped RNAs without strong preferences for given transcripts, and their steady-state binding correlates poorly with their function. Despite this, PHAX and ZC3H18 compete for CBC binding and we demonstrate that this competitive binding is functionally relevant. We further show that CBC-containing complexes are short lived in vivo, and we therefore suggest that RNA fate involves the transient formation of mutually exclusive CBC complexes, which may only be consequential at particular checkpoints during RNA biogenesis.

  9. A study of Central Exclusive Production

    SciTech Connect

    Monk, James

    2006-01-01

    Central exclusive production of a system X in a collision between two hadrons h is defined as hh → h + X + h with no other activity apart from the decay products of X. This thesis presents predictions for the production cross section of a CP violating supersymmetric Higgs boson and the radion of the Randall-Sundrum model. The ExHuME Monte Carlo generator was written to simulate central exclusive processes and is described and explored. A comparison to di-jet observations made by the D0 detector at the Tevatron, Fermilab between January and June 2004 is made and the distributions found support the predictions of ExHuME.

  10. Exclusive hadronic decays of B mesons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hölscher, Andreas

    1991-06-01

    The recent experimental results on exclusive hadronic decays of B mesons obtained by the ARGUS collaboration are presented in the talk. The results include exclusive hadronic decays involving a b → c transition, namely B decays with a D, D ∗ plus several pions and B decays to J/ψ or ψ' mesons plus Kaons have been studied. The measurements of branching ratios for two-body B decays involving a J/ψ or ψ' meson are of wide interest in the light of proposals for the study of CP violation in future experiments. The branching ratios are compared with the predictions of the model of Bauer, Stech and Wirbel and with a model of A.V. Dobrovolskaya. Using the cleanest decay channels, the masses and mass difference of the charged and neutral B meson are obtained. This mass difference is then compared with the mass splitting in other isospinmultipletts and with theoretical models.

  11. Gendered racial exclusion among White internet daters.

    PubMed

    Feliciano, Cynthia; Robnett, Belinda; Komaie, Golnaz

    2009-03-01

    Acceptance by the dominant group reveals the current standing of racial groups in the U.S. hierarchy, as well as the possibility for assimilation. However, few researchers have addressed the gendered nature of racial preferences by whites. We examine whites' exclusion of blacks, Latinos, Asians, Middle Easterners, East Indians and Native Americans as possible dates, using a sample of profiles collected from an internet dating website. We find that white men are more willing than white women to date non-whites in general, yet, with the exception of their top two preferences for dates, whites and Latinos, the racial hierarchies of males and females differ. Among daters with stated racial preferences, white men are more likely to exclude blacks as possible dates, while white women are more likely to exclude Asians. We argue that exclusion relates to racialized images of masculinity and femininity, and shapes dating and marriage outcomes, and thus minority groups' possibilities for full social incorporation.

  12. Mesoscopic full counting statistics and exclusion models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roche, P.-E.; Derrida, B.; Douçot, B.

    2005-02-01

    We calculate the distribution of current fluctuations in two simple exclusion models. Although these models are classical, we recover even for small systems such as a simple or a double barrier, the same distibution of current as given by traditional formalisms for quantum mesoscopic conductors. Due to their simplicity, the full counting statistics in exclusion models can be reduced to the calculation of the largest eigenvalue of a matrix, the size of which is the number of internal configurations of the system. As examples, we derive the shot noise power and higher order statistics of current fluctuations (skewness, full counting statistics, ....) of various conductors, including multiple barriers, diffusive islands between tunnel barriers and diffusive media. A special attention is dedicated to the third cumulant, which experimental measurability has been demonstrated lately.

  13. Exclusive nonleptonic B→VV decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barik, N.; Naimuddin, Sk.; Dash, P. C.; Kar, Susmita

    2009-07-01

    The exclusive two-body nonleptonic B→VV decays are investigated, within the factorization approximation, in the relativistic independent quark model based on a confining potential in the scalar-vector harmonic form. The branching ratios and the logitudinal polarization fraction (RL) are calculated yielding the model predictions in agreement with experiment. Our predicted CP-odd fraction (R⊥) for B→D*D(s)* decays are in general agreement with other model predictions and within the existing experimental limit.

  14. Haldane exclusion statistics and second virial coefficient

    SciTech Connect

    Murthy, M.V.N.; Shankar, R. )

    1994-06-06

    We show that Haldane's new definition of statistics, when generalized to infinite dimensional Hilbert spaces, is determined by the high temperature limit of the second virial coefficient. We thus show that this exclusion statistics parameter [ital g] of anyone is nontrivial and is completely determined by its exchange statistics parameter [alpha]. We also compute [ital g] for quasiparticles in the Luttinger model and show that it is equal to [alpha].

  15. Combat Exclusion: An Equal Protection Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-04-01

    uniforms, they served without the benefits of rank, officer status, equal pay , or veteran’s benefits. The Army also contracted women to serve in the Signal...accomplish the elimination of hearings on the merits, is to make the very kind of arbitrary legislative choice forbidden by the Equal Protection...wUGmm’" LOAN DOCUMENT * COMBAT EXCLUSION: AN EQUAL PROTECTION ANALYSIS A Thesis Presented to The Judge Advocate General’s School United States Army The

  16. The Asymmetric Exclusion Process and Brownian Excursions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derrida, B.; Enaud, C.; Lebowitz, J. L.

    2004-04-01

    We consider the totally asymmetric exclusion process (TASEP) in one dimension in its maximal current phase. We show, by an exact calculation, that the non-Gaussian part of the fluctuations of density can be described in terms of the statistical properties of a Brownian excursion. Numerical simulations indicate that the description in terms of a Brownian excursion remains valid for more general one dimensional driven systems in their maximal current phase.

  17. The evolution of cooperation by social exclusion

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, Tatsuya; Uchida, Satoshi

    2013-01-01

    The exclusion of freeriders from common privileges or public acceptance is widely found in the real world. Current models on the evolution of cooperation with incentives mostly assume peer sanctioning, whereby a punisher imposes penalties on freeriders at a cost to itself. It is well known that such costly punishment has two substantial difficulties. First, a rare punishing cooperator barely subverts the asocial society of freeriders, and second, natural selection often eliminates punishing cooperators in the presence of non-punishing cooperators (namely, ‘second-order’ freeriders). We present a game-theoretical model of social exclusion in which a punishing cooperator can exclude freeriders from benefit sharing. We show that such social exclusion can overcome the above-mentioned difficulties even if it is costly and stochastic. The results do not require a genetic relationship, repeated interaction, reputation or group selection. Instead, only a limited number of freeriders are required to prevent the second-order freeriders from eroding the social immune system. PMID:23222449

  18. Exclusion testing in pregnancy for Huntington's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Tyler, A; Quarrell, O W; Lazarou, L P; Meredith, A L; Harper, P S

    1990-01-01

    The results of DNA analysis are presented for a series of 90 couples, with one partner at 50% risk for Huntington's disease (HD), who were referred for exclusion testing in pregnancy over a three year period. Thirty-seven couples were studied in detail. The aims of the study were to evaluate attitudes towards prenatal testing, before pregnancy and afterwards, and the effectiveness of our counseling and methods of organising the service. Problems which could arise in relation to presymptomatic testing are documented. It is concluded that exclusion testing is a valuable form of prediction for some couples, particularly where family structure does not permit prediction for the person at risk. The need for intensive counselling was highlighted by the difficulties experienced by many couples in understanding how the test worked. Particular ethical and organisational problems may arise which require careful consideration beforehand and some recommendations are made. The proportion of couples who will continue to request exclusion testing as pre-symptomatic testing becomes more widely applicable remains unknown. PMID:2145437

  19. Density profiles of the exclusive queuing process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arita, Chikashi; Schadschneider, Andreas

    2012-12-01

    The exclusive queuing process (EQP) incorporates the exclusion principle into classic queuing models. It is characterized by, in addition to the entrance probability α and exit probability β, a third parameter: the hopping probability p. The EQP can be interpreted as an exclusion process of variable system length. Its phase diagram in the parameter space (α,β) is divided into a convergent phase and a divergent phase by a critical line which consists of a curved part and a straight part. Here we extend previous studies of this phase diagram. We identify subphases in the divergent phase, which can be distinguished by means of the shape of the density profile, and determine the velocity of the system length growth. This is done for EQPs with different update rules (parallel, backward sequential and continuous time). We also investigate the dynamics of the system length and the number of customers on the critical line. They are diffusive or subdiffusive with non-universal exponents that also depend on the update rules.

  20. Virginia DECA Competitive Events Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henrico County Public Schools, Glen Allen, VA. Virginia Vocational Curriculum Center.

    This handbook combines in a single publication several sets of guidelines for separate competitive events sponsored by the Virginia Association of the Distributive Education Clubs of America (VA DECA). The handbook is organized to promote understanding of the relationships between the competitive events held on the national level and those…

  1. Neurocognitive Performance: Returning to Competition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDaniel, Larry W.; McIntire, Kyle

    2010-01-01

    Athletes who suffer from concussions under report their symptoms in order to expedite their return to competition. Athletic trainers and coaches must be aware of what is going on with athletes, even if it means requiring them to refrain from competition. Ninety percent of concussions are minor and can be difficult to diagnosis. There is a lack of…

  2. Fresno County Mock Trial Competition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fresno City Unified School District, CA.

    THE FOLLOWING IS THE FULL TEXT OF THIS DOCUMENT: The Fresno County Office of Education and the Fresno Unified School District hosted the Mock Trial Competition. The state competition is sponsored by the Constitutional Rights Foundation, with cosponsorship from the California State Bar Association and the California Young Lawyer's Association. This…

  3. Competitive Skills Project. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    El Camino Coll., Torrance, CA.

    Almost 180 (22.5 percent) of BP Chemicals/HITCO, Inc. (BPCHI) employees have participated in the basic skills courses offered through the Competitive Skills Project (CSP) at El Camino College (Torrance, California). Workplace basics provide a solid foundation for Total Quality Management (TQM), enabling workers to be globally competitive. Two main…

  4. DOE Collegiate Wind Competition (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, J.

    2014-02-01

    This presentation for the January Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach webinar outlines the expanded need for workers in the wind industry and provides an overview of the DOE Wind Competition (to be held in May 2014) and the guiding principles of the competition.

  5. The 2005 Australian Informatics Competition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, David

    2006-01-01

    This article describes the Australian Informatics Competition (AIC), a non-programming competition aimed at identifying students with potential in programming and algorithmic design. It is the first step in identifying students to represent Australia at the International Olympiad in Informatics. The main aim of the AIC is to increase awareness of…

  6. Prediction of Competitive Microbial Growth.

    PubMed

    Fujikawa, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

     Prediction of competitive microbial growth is becoming important for microbial food safety. There would be two approaches to predict competitive microbial growth with mathematical models. The first approach is the development of a growth model for competitive microbes. Among several candidates for the competition model considered, the combination of the primary growth model of the new logistic (NL) model and the competition model of the Lotka-Vorttera (LV) model showed the best performance in predicting microbial competitive growth in the mixed culture of two species. This system further successfully predicted the growth of three competitive species in mixed culture. The second approach is the application of the secondary model especially for the parameter of the maximum cell population in the primary growth model. The combination of the NL model and a polynomial model for the maximum population successfully predicted Salmonella growth in raw ground beef. This system further successfully predicted Salmonella growth in beef at various initial concentrations and temperatures. The first approach requires microbial growth data in monoculture for analysis. The second approach to the prediction of competitive growth from the viewpoint of microbial food safety would be more suitable for practical application.

  7. Mathematics + Competitions = A Winning Formula!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riley, Tracy L.; Karnes, Frances A.

    1998-01-01

    Describes how teachers of the gifted can make the study of mathematics dynamic, innovative, and creative through the exploration of problem-solving skills and real-life applications. Math competitions and general academic competitions that include mathematics for elementary schools, middle schools, and high schools are highlighted. (CR)

  8. Feature Discovery by Competitive Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rumelhart, David E.; Zipser, David

    1985-01-01

    Reports results of studies with an unsupervised learning paradigm called competitive learning which is examined using computer simulation and formal analysis. When competitive learning is applied to parallel networks of neuron-like elements, many potentially useful learning tasks can be accomplished. (Author)

  9. Competitive strategy a new era.

    PubMed

    Zuckerman, Alan M

    2007-11-01

    By adopting five basic practices, your organization will be ready to advance to the next level of competitive fitness: Develop a reliable financial baseline. Insist on development of a competitive intelligence database system. Employ rigorous business planning. Advocate for focus and discipline. Really commit to competing.

  10. The need for competitive intelligence.

    PubMed

    MacStravic, R S

    1989-01-01

    Often associated with marketing warfare, competitive intelligence has become an essential part of health-care organizations' strategic planning efforts. Without overstepping ethical boundaries, providers can gather a vast array of "intelligence" about their competition from public sources, from the marketplace and from competitors themselves.

  11. How to use competitive intelligence.

    PubMed

    MacStravic, R S

    1989-02-01

    Keeping tabs on the competition is a necessity, not a luxury, for organizations operating in today's health-care marketplace. This article, the second of two, explores various strategies for using competitive intelligence and suggests ways to ensure organization-wide commitment to gathering and using this information as part of an overall strategic plan.

  12. Competitive Electricity Prices: An Update

    EIA Publications

    1998-01-01

    Illustrates a third impact of the move to competitive generation pricing -- the narrowing of the range of prices across regions of the country. This feature article updates information in Electricity Prices in a Competitive Environment: Marginal Cost Pricing of Generation Services and Financial Status of Electric Utilities.

  13. Competitive hybridization models.

    PubMed

    Cherepinsky, Vera; Hashmi, Ghazala; Mishra, Bud

    2010-11-01

    Microarray technology, in its simplest form, allows one to gather abundance data for target DNA molecules, associated with genomes or gene-expressions, and relies on hybridizing the target to many short probe oligonucleotides arrayed on a surface. While for such multiplexed reactions conditions are optimized to make the most of each individual probe-target interaction, subsequent analysis of these experiments is based on the implicit assumption that a given experiment yields the same result regardless of whether it was conducted in isolation or in parallel with many others. It has been discussed in the literature that this assumption is frequently false, and its validity depends on the types of probes and their interactions with each other. We present a detailed physical model of hybridization as a means of understanding probe interactions in a multiplexed reaction. Ultimately, the model can be derived from a system of ordinary differential equations (ODE's) describing kinetic mass action with conservation-of-mass equations completing the system. We examine pairwise probe interactions in detail and present a model of "competition" between the probes for the target--especially, when the target is effectively in short supply. These effects are shown to be predictable from the affinity constants for each of the four probe sequences involved, namely, the match and mismatch sequences for both probes. These affinity constants are calculated from the thermodynamic parameters such as the free energy of hybridization, which are in turn computed according to the nearest neighbor (NN) model for each probe and target sequence. Simulations based on the competitive hybridization model explain the observed variability in the signal of a given probe when measured in parallel with different groupings of other probes or individually. The results of the simulations can be used for experiment design and pooling strategies, based on which probes have been shown to have a strong effect

  14. Apparent competition with an exotic plant reduces native plant establishment.

    PubMed

    Orrock, John L; Witter, Martha S; Reichman, O J

    2008-04-01

    Biological invasions can change ecosystem function, have tremendous economic costs, and impact human health; understanding the forces that cause and maintain biological invasions is thus of immediate importance. A mechanism by which exotic plants might displace native plants is by increasing the pressure of native consumers on native plants, a form of indirect interaction termed "apparent competition." Using experimental exclosures, seed addition, and monitoring of small mammals in a California grassland, we examined whether exotic Brassica nigra increases the pressure of native consumers on a native bunchgrass, Nassella pulchra. Experimental plots were weeded to focus entirely on indirect effects via consumers. We demonstrate that B. nigra alters the activity of native small-mammal consumers, creating a gradient of consumption that dramatically reduces N. pulchra establishment. Previous work has shown that N. pulchra is a strong competitor, but that it is heavily seed limited. By demonstrating that consumer pressure is sufficient to curtail establishment, our work provides a mechanism for this seed limitation and suggests that, despite being a good competitor, N. pulchra cannot reestablish close to B. nigra within its old habitats because exotic-mediated consumption preempts direct competitive exclusion. Moreover, we find that apparent competition has a spatial extent, suggesting that consumers may dictate the rate of invasion and the area available for restoration, and that nonspatial studies of apparent competition may miss important dynamics.

  15. 76 FR 67763 - Notice of Intent To Grant Exclusive License

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-02

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION Notice of Intent To Grant Exclusive License AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space... of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The prospective exclusive license will...

  16. Exclusive-or logic circuit has useful properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batte, W. G.

    1966-01-01

    Single, simple exclusive-or logic connective eliminates excessive hardware and the number of interconnections between logic modules. This circuit performs the necessary switching for the exclusive-or operation and amplifies, restores, and inverts the signal.

  17. 47 CFR 90.165 - Procedures for mutually exclusive applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PRIVATE LAND MOBILE RADIO SERVICES Applications and Authorizations Special Rules Governing Facilities Used to Provide Commercial Mobile Radio Services § 90.165 Procedures for mutually exclusive applications. Mutually exclusive commercial mobile radio service applications are processed...

  18. 5 CFR 351.402 - Competitive area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Competition § 351.402 Competitive area. (a) Each agency shall establish competitive areas in which employees compete for retention under this part. (b) A competitive area must be defined solely in terms of the... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Competitive area. 351.402 Section...

  19. 27 CFR 6.151 - Exclusion, in general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Exclusion, in general. 6.151 Section 6.151 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS âTIED-HOUSEâ Exclusion § 6.151 Exclusion, in general. (a) Exclusion, in whole or in part occurs: (1) When a...

  20. 21 CFR 1404.945 - Excluded or exclusion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Excluded or exclusion. 1404.945 Section 1404.945 Food and Drugs OFFICE OF NATIONAL DRUG CONTROL POLICY GOVERNMENTWIDE DEBARMENT AND SUSPENSION (NONPROCUREMENT) Definitions § 1404.945 Excluded or exclusion. Excluded or exclusion means— (a) That a person...

  1. 78 FR 23886 - Notice of Intent To Grant Exclusive License

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-23

    ... Agricultural Research Service Notice of Intent To Grant Exclusive License AGENCY: Agricultural Research Service..., Agricultural Research Service, intends to grant to Biosortia Pharmaceuticals of Dublin, Ohio, an exclusive... prospective exclusive license may be granted unless, within thirty (30) days from the date of this...

  2. 20 CFR 416.1218 - Exclusion of the automobile.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ..., BLIND, AND DISABLED Resources and Exclusions § 416.1218 Exclusion of the automobile. (a) Automobile; defined. As used in this section, the term automobile includes, in addition to passenger cars, other... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Exclusion of the automobile. 416.1218...

  3. 46 CFR 16.109 - Public Interest Exclusion (PIE).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Public Interest Exclusion (PIE). 16.109 Section 16.109... General § 16.109 Public Interest Exclusion (PIE). Service agents are subject to Public Interest Exclusion (PIE) actions in accordance with 49 CFR Part 40, subpart R. The PIE is an action which excludes...

  4. 40 CFR 152.83 - Definition of exclusive use study.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Definition of exclusive use study. 152... Protection of Data Submitters' Rights § 152.83 Definition of exclusive use study. A study is an exclusive use study if it meets the conditions of either paragraph (a) or paragraph (b) of this section. (a)...

  5. 47 CFR 90.165 - Procedures for mutually exclusive applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PRIVATE LAND MOBILE RADIO SERVICES Applications and Authorizations Special Rules... exclusive applications. Mutually exclusive commercial mobile radio service applications are processed in... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Procedures for mutually exclusive...

  6. 20 CFR 416.1230 - Exclusion of life insurance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Exclusion of life insurance. 416.1230 Section..., BLIND, AND DISABLED Resources and Exclusions § 416.1230 Exclusion of life insurance. (a) General. In determining the resources of an individual (and spouse, if any), life insurance owned by the individual...

  7. 29 CFR 794.121 - Exclusion of excise taxes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Exclusion of excise taxes. 794.121 Section 794.121 Labor... Exclusion of excise taxes. The computation of the annual gross volume of sales of the enterprise for purposes of section 7(b)(3) is made “exclusive of excise taxes.” It will be noted that the excise...

  8. 20 CFR 416.1230 - Exclusion of life insurance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Exclusion of life insurance. 416.1230 Section..., BLIND, AND DISABLED Resources and Exclusions § 416.1230 Exclusion of life insurance. (a) General. In determining the resources of an individual (and spouse, if any), life insurance owned by the individual...

  9. 20 CFR 416.1230 - Exclusion of life insurance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Exclusion of life insurance. 416.1230 Section..., BLIND, AND DISABLED Resources and Exclusions § 416.1230 Exclusion of life insurance. (a) General. In determining the resources of an individual (and spouse, if any), life insurance owned by the individual...

  10. Social Exclusion and Career Development: A United Kingdom Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watts, A. G.

    2010-01-01

    Social exclusion can be defined in different ways, but a prominent definition--in relation to young people in particular--is exclusion from formal learning and paid employment. This ignores the role of informal learning and the informal economies. In England, career guidance services were remodelled to deal with the issue of social exclusion by…

  11. 77 FR 31399 - Notice of Intent To Grant Exclusive License

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-25

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION Notice of Intent To Grant Exclusive License AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration. ACTION: Notice of Intent To Grant Exclusive Research Only License. SUMMARY: This notice is issued... to grant an exclusive, research only license in the United States to practice the invention...

  12. 42 CFR 402.308 - Waivers of exclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... authorization to obtain information from private health insurers, peer review organizations (including, but not... of exclusion request. An excluded person must submit a request for waiver of exclusion in writing to... the submitter that the waiver of exclusion request has been received. (2) Reviews and validates...

  13. 78 FR 27181 - Notice of Intent To Grant Exclusive License

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-09

    ... Agricultural Research Service Notice of Intent To Grant Exclusive License AGENCY: Agricultural Research Service..., Agricultural Research Service, intends To grant to AIC Partners Group, LLC of Sylvester, Georgia, an exclusive... conditions of 35 U.S.C. 209 and 37 CFR 404.7. The prospective exclusive license may be granted unless,...

  14. 76 FR 14417 - Prospective Grant of Exclusive License

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-16

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Prospective Grant of Exclusive License AGENCY: National Institutes of Health, Public Health Service, HHS. ACTION: Notice of intent to grant exclusive license... grant of an exclusive patent license to intellectual property broker ICAP Ocean Tomo to promote...

  15. Social Judgments and Emotion Attributions about Exclusion in Switzerland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malti, Tina; Killen, Melanie; Gasser, Luciano

    2012-01-01

    Adolescents' social judgments and emotion attributions about exclusion in three contexts, nationality, gender, and personality, were measured in a sample of 12- and 15-year-old Swiss and non-Swiss adolescents (N = 247). Overall, adolescents judged exclusion based on nationality as less acceptable than exclusion based on gender or personality.…

  16. 20 CFR 416.1210 - Exclusions from resources; general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Exclusions from resources; general. 416.1210... AGED, BLIND, AND DISABLED Resources and Exclusions § 416.1210 Exclusions from resources; general. In determining the resources of an individual (and spouse, if any), the following items shall be excluded:...

  17. 20 CFR 416.1210 - Exclusions from resources; general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Exclusions from resources; general. 416.1210... AGED, BLIND, AND DISABLED Resources and Exclusions § 416.1210 Exclusions from resources; general. In determining the resources of an individual (and spouse, if any), the following items shall be excluded:...

  18. 20 CFR 416.1210 - Exclusions from resources; general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Exclusions from resources; general. 416.1210... AGED, BLIND, AND DISABLED Resources and Exclusions § 416.1210 Exclusions from resources; general. In determining the resources of an individual (and spouse, if any), the following items shall be excluded:...

  19. 20 CFR 416.1210 - Exclusions from resources; general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Exclusions from resources; general. 416.1210... AGED, BLIND, AND DISABLED Resources and Exclusions § 416.1210 Exclusions from resources; general. In determining the resources of an individual (and spouse, if any), the following items shall be excluded:...

  20. 20 CFR 416.1210 - Exclusions from resources; general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Exclusions from resources; general. 416.1210... AGED, BLIND, AND DISABLED Resources and Exclusions § 416.1210 Exclusions from resources; general. In determining the resources of an individual (and spouse, if any), the following items shall be excluded:...

  1. 33 CFR 2.30 - Exclusive Economic Zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Exclusive Economic Zone. 2.30... JURISDICTION Jurisdictional Terms § 2.30 Exclusive Economic Zone. (a) With respect to the United States... States exercises sovereignty, exclusive economic zone means the zone seaward of and adjacent to...

  2. 33 CFR 2.30 - Exclusive Economic Zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Exclusive Economic Zone. 2.30... JURISDICTION Jurisdictional Terms § 2.30 Exclusive Economic Zone. (a) With respect to the United States... States exercises sovereignty, exclusive economic zone means the zone seaward of and adjacent to...

  3. 33 CFR 2.30 - Exclusive Economic Zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Exclusive Economic Zone. 2.30... JURISDICTION Jurisdictional Terms § 2.30 Exclusive Economic Zone. (a) With respect to the United States... States exercises sovereignty, exclusive economic zone means the zone seaward of and adjacent to...

  4. 33 CFR 2.30 - Exclusive Economic Zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Exclusive Economic Zone. 2.30... JURISDICTION Jurisdictional Terms § 2.30 Exclusive Economic Zone. (a) With respect to the United States... States exercises sovereignty, exclusive economic zone means the zone seaward of and adjacent to...

  5. 42 CFR 1003.134 - Effect of exclusion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Effect of exclusion. 1003.134 Section 1003.134 Public Health OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL-HEALTH CARE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES OIG AUTHORITIES CIVIL MONEY PENALTIES, ASSESSMENTS AND EXCLUSIONS § 1003.134 Effect of exclusion. The effect of...

  6. 42 CFR 1002.211 - Effect of exclusion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Effect of exclusion. 1002.211 Section 1002.211 Public Health OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL-HEALTH CARE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES OIG AUTHORITIES PROGRAM INTEGRITY-STATE-INITIATED EXCLUSIONS FROM MEDICAID Permissive Exclusions § 1002.211...

  7. 21 CFR 1404.945 - Excluded or exclusion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Excluded or exclusion. 1404.945 Section 1404.945 Food and Drugs OFFICE OF NATIONAL DRUG CONTROL POLICY GOVERNMENTWIDE DEBARMENT AND SUSPENSION (NONPROCUREMENT) Definitions § 1404.945 Excluded or exclusion. Excluded or exclusion means— (a) That a person...

  8. 20 CFR 416.1234 - Exclusion of Indian lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Exclusion of Indian lands. 416.1234 Section..., BLIND, AND DISABLED Resources and Exclusions § 416.1234 Exclusion of Indian lands. In determining the... tribe, we will exclude any interest of the individual (or spouse, if any) in land which is held in...

  9. 20 CFR 416.1234 - Exclusion of Indian lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Exclusion of Indian lands. 416.1234 Section..., BLIND, AND DISABLED Resources and Exclusions § 416.1234 Exclusion of Indian lands. In determining the... tribe, we will exclude any interest of the individual (or spouse, if any) in land which is held in...

  10. 20 CFR 416.1234 - Exclusion of Indian lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Exclusion of Indian lands. 416.1234 Section..., BLIND, AND DISABLED Resources and Exclusions § 416.1234 Exclusion of Indian lands. In determining the... tribe, we will exclude any interest of the individual (or spouse, if any) in land which is held in...

  11. 47 CFR 76.123 - Satellite syndicated program exclusivity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Satellite syndicated program exclusivity. 76... Exclusivity and Sports Blackout § 76.123 Satellite syndicated program exclusivity. (a) Upon receiving notification pursuant to paragraph (d) of this section, a satellite carrier shall not deliver, to...

  12. 47 CFR 76.123 - Satellite syndicated program exclusivity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Satellite syndicated program exclusivity. 76... Exclusivity and Sports Blackout § 76.123 Satellite syndicated program exclusivity. (a) Upon receiving notification pursuant to paragraph (d) of this section, a satellite carrier shall not deliver, to...

  13. 20 CFR 416.1218 - Exclusion of the automobile.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Exclusion of the automobile. 416.1218 Section..., BLIND, AND DISABLED Resources and Exclusions § 416.1218 Exclusion of the automobile. (a) Automobile; defined. As used in this section, the term automobile includes, in addition to passenger cars,...

  14. 20 CFR 416.1218 - Exclusion of the automobile.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Exclusion of the automobile. 416.1218 Section..., BLIND, AND DISABLED Resources and Exclusions § 416.1218 Exclusion of the automobile. (a) Automobile; defined. As used in this section, the term automobile includes, in addition to passenger cars,...

  15. 20 CFR 416.1218 - Exclusion of the automobile.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Exclusion of the automobile. 416.1218 Section..., BLIND, AND DISABLED Resources and Exclusions § 416.1218 Exclusion of the automobile. (a) Automobile; defined. As used in this section, the term automobile includes, in addition to passenger cars,...

  16. 20 CFR 416.1218 - Exclusion of the automobile.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Exclusion of the automobile. 416.1218 Section..., BLIND, AND DISABLED Resources and Exclusions § 416.1218 Exclusion of the automobile. (a) Automobile; defined. As used in this section, the term automobile includes, in addition to passenger cars,...

  17. 20 CFR 416.1230 - Exclusion of life insurance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Exclusion of life insurance. 416.1230 Section..., BLIND, AND DISABLED Resources and Exclusions § 416.1230 Exclusion of life insurance. (a) General. In determining the resources of an individual (and spouse, if any), life insurance owned by the individual...

  18. 26 CFR 1.72-4 - Exclusion ratio.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Exclusion ratio. 1.72-4 Section 1.72-4 Internal... TAXES (CONTINUED) Items Specifically Included in Gross Income § 1.72-4 Exclusion ratio. (a) General rule... annuities described in section 72(o) and § 1.122-1), an exclusion ratio is to be determined for...

  19. 26 CFR 1.72-4 - Exclusion ratio.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Exclusion ratio. 1.72-4 Section 1.72-4 Internal... TAXES (CONTINUED) Items Specifically Included in Gross Income § 1.72-4 Exclusion ratio. (a) General rule... annuities described in section 72(o) and § 1.122-1), an exclusion ratio is to be determined for...

  20. 26 CFR 1.72-4 - Exclusion ratio.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Exclusion ratio. 1.72-4 Section 1.72-4 Internal... TAXES (CONTINUED) Items Specifically Included in Gross Income § 1.72-4 Exclusion ratio. (a) General rule... annuities described in section 72(o) and § 1.122-1), an exclusion ratio is to be determined for...

  1. 26 CFR 1.72-4 - Exclusion ratio.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Exclusion ratio. 1.72-4 Section 1.72-4 Internal... TAXES (CONTINUED) Items Specifically Included in Gross Income § 1.72-4 Exclusion ratio. (a) General rule... annuities described in section 72(o) and § 1.122-1), an exclusion ratio is to be determined for...

  2. 26 CFR 1.72-4 - Exclusion ratio.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Exclusion ratio. 1.72-4 Section 1.72-4 Internal... TAXES (CONTINUED) Items Specifically Included in Gross Income § 1.72-4 Exclusion ratio. (a) General rule... annuities described in section 72(o) and § 1.122-1), an exclusion ratio is to be determined for...

  3. 21 CFR 316.34 - FDA recognition of exclusive approval.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false FDA recognition of exclusive approval. 316.34... (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE ORPHAN DRUGS Orphan-drug Exclusive Approval § 316.34 FDA recognition of exclusive approval. (a) FDA will send the sponsor (or, the permanent-resident agent, if applicable)...

  4. Testosterone, cortisol, and human competition.

    PubMed

    Casto, Kathleen V; Edwards, David A

    2016-06-01

    Testosterone and cortisol figure prominently in the research literature having to do with human competition. In this review, we track the history of this literature, concentrating particularly on major theoretical and empirical contributions, and provide commentary on what we see as important unresolved issues. In men and women, athletic competition is typically associated with an increase in testosterone (T) and cortisol (C). Hormone changes in response to non-athletic competition are less predictable. Person (e.g., power motivation, mood, aggressiveness, social anxiety, sex, and baseline levels of T and C) and context (e.g., whether a competition is won or lost, the closeness of the competition, whether the outcome is perceived as being influenced by ability vs. chance, provocations) factors can influence hormone responses to competition. From early on, studies pointed to a positive relationship between T and dominance motivation/status striving. Recent research, however, suggests that this relationship only holds for individuals with low levels of C - this is the core idea of the dual-hormone hypothesis, and it is certain that the broadest applications of the hypothesis have not yet been realized. Individuals differ with respect to the extent to which they embrace competition, but the hormonal correlates of competitiveness remain largely unexplored. Although rapid increases in both T and C associated with competition are likely adaptive, we still know very little about the psychological benefits of these hormonal changes. Administration studies have and will continue to contribute to this inquiry. We close with a discussion of what, we think, are important methodological and mechanistic issues for future research.

  5. Softening the Blow of Social Exclusion: The Responsive Theory of Social Exclusion.

    PubMed

    Freedman, Gili; Williams, Kipling D; Beer, Jennifer S

    2016-01-01

    Social exclusion is an interactive process between multiple people, yet previous research has focused almost solely on the negative impacts on targets. What advice is there for people on the other side (i.e., sources) who want to minimize its negative impact and preserve their own reputation? To provide an impetus for research on the interactive nature of exclusion, we propose the Responsive Theory of Social Exclusion. Our theory postulates that targets and sources' needs are better maintained if sources use clear, explicit verbal communication. We propose that sources have three options: explicit rejection (clearly stating no), ostracism (ignoring), and ambiguous rejection (being unclear). Drawing on psychology, sociology, communications, and business research, we propose that when sources use explicit rejection, targets' feelings will be less hurt, their needs will be better protected, and sources will experience less backlash and emotional toil than if sources use ambiguous rejection or ostracism. Finally, we propose how the language of rejections may impact both parties.

  6. Death to perturbative QCD in exclusive processes?

    SciTech Connect

    Eckardt, R.; Hansper, J.; Gari, M.F.

    1994-04-01

    The authors discuss the question of whether perturbative QCD is applicable in calculations of exclusive processes at available momentum transfers. They show that the currently used method of determining hadronic quark distribution amplitudes from QCD sum rules yields wave functions which are completely undetermined because the polynomial expansion diverges. Because of the indeterminacy of the wave functions no statement can be made at present as to whether perturbative QCD is valid. The authors emphasize the necessity of a rigorous discussion of the subject and the importance of experimental data in the range of interest.

  7. Central exclusive production at the Tevatron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albrow, Michael

    2014-11-01

    The Collider Detector at Fermilab, CDF, observed for the first time in hadron-hadron collisions photon-photon (γ + γ → e+e-, μ+μ-) and photon-pomeron (γ + ℙ → J/ψ, ψ(2S)) interactions, as well as p+\\bar {p}-> p+χc+\\bar {p} by double pomeron exchange, ℙ + ℙ or DPE. Exclusive π+π- production was also measured at √ {s} = 900 GeV and 1960 GeV; resonance structures are discussed.

  8. Exclusive lower extremity mirror movements and diastematomyelia.

    PubMed

    Tubbs, R Shane; Smyth, Matthew D; Dure, Leon S; Oakes, W Jerry

    2004-01-01

    Mirror movements usually seen in the Klippel-Feil syndrome are most commonly appreciated in the upper extremities. Lower extremity involvement is seen rarely and when observed, is found in conjunction with upper extremity mirror movements. We report what we believe to be the first case of mirror movements found exclusively in the lower extremities in a female patient presenting with tethered cord syndrome. Our hopes are that this report will help elucidate mechanisms involved with these anomalous movements, as currently there is no commonly accepted etiology.

  9. FIRST 2002, 2003, 2004 Robotics Competition(s)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Purman, Richard

    2004-01-01

    The New Horizons Regional Education Center (NHREC) in Hampton, VA sought and received NASA funding to support its participation in the 2002, 2003, and 2004 FIRST Robotics Competitions. FIRST, Inc. (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology) is an organization which encourages the application of creative science, math, and computer science principles to solve real-world engineering problems. The FIRST competition is an international engineering contest featuring high school, government, and business partnerships.

  10. Distributed Wind Competitiveness Improvement Project

    SciTech Connect

    2016-05-01

    The Competitiveness Improvement Project (CIP) is a periodic solicitation through the U.S. Department of Energy and its National Renewable Energy Laboratory. Manufacturers of small and medium wind turbines are awarded cost-shared grants via a competitive process to optimize their designs, develop advanced manufacturing processes, and perform turbine testing. The goals of the CIP are to make wind energy cost competitive with other distributed generation technology and increase the number of wind turbine designs certified to national testing standards. This fact sheet describes the CIP and funding awarded as part of the project.

  11. Social Exclusion/Inclusion: Foucault's Analytics of Exclusion, the Political Ecology of Social Inclusion and the Legitimation of Inclusive Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peters, Michael A.; Besley, Tina A. C.

    2014-01-01

    This article offers a broad philosophical and historical background to the dyad of social exclusion/inclusion by examining the analytics and politics of exclusion first by reference to Michel Foucault who studies the modern history of exclusion and makes it central to his approach in understanding the development of modern institutions of emerging…

  12. Action co-representation and social exclusion.

    PubMed

    Costantini, Marcello; Ferri, Francesca

    2013-05-01

    Humans are thought to be able to form shared representations, considered a keystone of social cognition. However, whether and to what extent such representations are social in nature is still open for debate. In the present study, we address the question of whether action co-representation can be modulated by social attitudes, such as judgments about one's own social status. Two groups of participants performed an Interactive Simon task after the experimental induction of a feeling of social inclusion or exclusion (ostracism) by means of a virtual ball tossing game. Results showed a compatibility effect in included, but not in excluded participants. This indicates that judgments about one's own social status modulate action co-representation. We suggest that this modulation may occur by way of a redirection of one's attentional focus away from others when one experiences social exclusion. This is a far-reaching issue given the increasing need for integration in modern society. Indeed, if integration fails, modern society fails also.

  13. Hoarding Symptoms Are Not Exclusive to Hoarders

    PubMed Central

    Novara, Caterina; Bottesi, Gioia; Dorz, Stella; Sanavio, Ezio

    2016-01-01

    Hoarding disorder (HD) was originally conceptualized as a subcategory of obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD), and numerous studies have in fact focused exclusively on investigating the comorbidity between OCD and HD. Hoarding behavior can nevertheless also be found in other clinical populations and in particular in patients with eating disorders (ED), anxiety disorders (AD), major depression (MD), and psychotic disorders (PD). The current study was carried out with the aim of investigating, using a validated instrument such as the Saving Inventory-Revised (SI-R), the presence of HD symptoms in patients diagnosed with ED, AD, MD, and PD. Hoarding symptomatology was also assessed in groups of self-identified hoarders and healthy controls. The results revealed that 22.5% of the ED patients exceeded the cut-off for the diagnosis of HD, followed by 7.7% of the patients with MD, 7.4% of the patients with AD, and 5.9% of the patients with PD. The patients with ED had significantly higher SI-R scores than the other groups in the Acquisition and Difficulty Discarding scales while the AD, MD, and PD patients were characterized exclusively by Difficulty Discarding. These data suggest to clinicians that hoarding symptoms should be assessed in other types of patients and especially in those affected by Bulimia and Binge eating. PMID:27891104

  14. Deeply Virtual Exclusive Reactions with CLAS

    SciTech Connect

    Kubarovsky, Valery

    2011-03-01

    Deeply virtual exclusive reactions offer an unique opportunity to study the structure of the nucleon at the parton level as one has access to Bjorken xB and momentum transfer to the nucleon t at the same time. Such processes can reveal much more information about the structure of the nucleon than either inclusive electroproduction or elastic form factors alone. Dedicated experiments to study Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering (DVCS) and Deeply VirtualMeson Production (DVMP) have been carried out in Hall B at Jefferson Lab. DVCS helicity–dependent and helicity–independent cross sections and beam spin asymmetries have been measured with CLAS, as well as cross sections and asymmetries for the p 0, h, r 0, r+, w and f for exclusive electroproduction. The data were taken in a wide kinematic range in Q2=1–4.5 GeV2, xB=0.1–0.5, and |t| up to 2 GeV2. We will discuss the interpretation of these data in terms of traditional Regge and Generalized Parton Distributions models. We view the work presented in this report as leading into the program of the Jefferson Lab 12 GeV upgrade. The increased energy and luminosity will allow us to acquire data at much higher Q2 and xB, and perform Rosenbluth L/T separations of the cross sections.

  15. Exclusion of Nitrate from Frozen Aqueous Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrocco, H. A.; Michelsen, R. R.

    2013-12-01

    Reactions occurring at the surface of ice, sea ice, and snow in Earth's cryosphere have an impact on the composition of the overlying atmosphere. In order to elucidate reaction mechanisms and model their contributions to atmospheric processes, the morphology of frozen aqueous surfaces and amounts of reactants contained therein must be determined. To this end, the exclusion of nitrate ions to the surface of frozen aqueous solutions has been studied by attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy (ATR-IR). In this technique the near-surface region of the frozen films are interrogated to a depth of a few hundred nanometers from the film-crystal interface. Aqueous solutions (0.001 to 0.01 M) of sodium nitrate (NaNO3), magnesium nitrate (Mg(NO3)2), and nitric acid (HNO3) were quickly frozen on the germanium ATR crystal and observed at a constant temperature of about -18°C. In addition to ice and the solutes, liquid water in varying amounts was observed in the spectra. The amount of nitrate in the surface liquid is three to four orders of magnitude higher than in the unfrozen solution. While all the nitrate salts exhibit exclusion to the unfrozen surface, the dynamics are different for different counter-ions. Results are compared to freezing point depression data and the predictions of equilibrium thermodynamics.

  16. Hard Exclusive Meson Production at COMPASS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ter Wolbeek, Johannes

    2016-02-01

    The concept of Generalized Parton Distributions (GPDs) combines two-dimensional spatial information given by form factors, with longitudinal momentum information from Parton Distribution Functions. GPDs provide comprehensive description of the nucleon structure involving a wealth of new information. For instance, according to Ji’s sum rule, the GPDs H and E enable access to the total angular momenta of quarks, antiquarks and gluons. While H can be approached using measurements of electroproduction cross sections, asymmetry measurements in hard exclusive meson production off transversely polarized targets can help to constrain the GPD E and chiral-odd GPDs. In 2007 and 2010 the COMPASS experiment at CERN collected data by scattering a 160GeV/c muon beam off a transversely polarized NH3 target. Exclusive vector-meson production μ + p → μ‧ + p + V with a ρ0 or ω meson in the final state is studied and five single-spin and three double-spin azimuthal asymmetries are measured.

  17. Competitive hybridization models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherepinsky, Vera; Hashmi, Ghazala; Mishra, Bud

    2010-11-01

    Microarray technology, in its simplest form, allows one to gather abundance data for target DNA molecules, associated with genomes or gene-expressions, and relies on hybridizing the target to many short probe oligonucleotides arrayed on a surface. While for such multiplexed reactions conditions are optimized to make the most of each individual probe-target interaction, subsequent analysis of these experiments is based on the implicit assumption that a given experiment yields the same result regardless of whether it was conducted in isolation or in parallel with many others. It has been discussed in the literature that this assumption is frequently false, and its validity depends on the types of probes and their interactions with each other. We present a detailed physical model of hybridization as a means of understanding probe interactions in a multiplexed reaction. Ultimately, the model can be derived from a system of ordinary differential equations (ODE’s) describing kinetic mass action with conservation-of-mass equations completing the system. We examine pairwise probe interactions in detail and present a model of “competition” between the probes for the target—especially, when the target is effectively in short supply. These effects are shown to be predictable from the affinity constants for each of the four probe sequences involved, namely, the match and mismatch sequences for both probes. These affinity constants are calculated from the thermodynamic parameters such as the free energy of hybridization, which are in turn computed according to the nearest neighbor (NN) model for each probe and target sequence. Simulations based on the competitive hybridization model explain the observed variability in the signal of a given probe when measured in parallel with different groupings of other probes or individually. The results of the simulations can be used for experiment design and pooling strategies, based on which probes have been shown to have a strong

  18. Multifaceted Interfaces of Bacterial Competition

    PubMed Central

    Stubbendieck, Reed M.

    2016-01-01

    Microbial communities span many orders of magnitude, ranging in scale from hundreds of cells on a single particle of soil to billions of cells within the lumen of the gastrointestinal tract. Bacterial cells in all habitats are members of densely populated local environments that facilitate competition between neighboring cells. Accordingly, bacteria require dynamic systems to respond to the competitive challenges and the fluctuations in environmental circumstances that tax their fitness. The assemblage of bacteria into communities provides an environment where competitive mechanisms are developed into new strategies for survival. In this minireview, we highlight a number of mechanisms used by bacteria to compete between species. We focus on recent discoveries that illustrate the dynamic and multifaceted functions used in bacterial competition and discuss how specific mechanisms provide a foundation for understanding bacterial community development and function. PMID:27246570

  19. Does Walking Mitigate Affective and Cognitive Responses to Social Exclusion?

    PubMed

    Paoli, Anthony G Delli; Smith, Alan L; Pontifex, Matthew B

    2017-03-02

    Social exclusion can produce harmful affective and cognitive responses that undermine healthy functioning. Physical activity is known to have acute affective and cognitive effects that are adaptive, and therefore may mitigate these responses. The purpose of this study was to assess walking as a strategy to reduce the effects of social exclusion on affect and working memory performance. Healthy female college students (N = 96, M(age) = 19.2 ± 0.8 years) were randomly assigned to one of four experimental conditions: (a) sedentary plus neutral feedback, (b) sedentary plus exclusion feedback, (c) walking plus neutral feedback, or (d) walking plus exclusion feedback. Pre and post activity and pre and post feedback measures of affect and working memory performance were recorded. Excluded participants had a significant negative shift in affect following feedback, p < .05. Those who were sedentary prior to exclusion had lower affect scores following exclusion than the walking plus exclusion and the neutral feedback groups, p < .05. There were no direct effects of walking or social exclusion on working memory. However, perceptions of being ignored predicted smaller improvements in working memory performance for participants who were sedentary prior to exclusion, p < .05. The findings suggest that walking prior to social exclusion may mitigate the affective response to social exclusion as well as social perceptions that can undermine working memory. More broadly, this work supports continued examination of physical activity as a potential strategy for helping individuals cope with negative social experiences.

  20. Orthopedic aspects of competitive swimming.

    PubMed

    Richardson, A B

    1987-07-01

    Orthopedic problems related to competitive swimming are rarely disabling, but can be problematic in preventing training and competition. Most problems are related to the shoulder and knee. Treatment is primarily nonsurgical and directed at relieving symptoms and allowing the athlete to continue with swimming practice. Treatment aids such as ice packing, anti-inflammatory medications, muscle stimulation and electrogalvanic stimulation, strengthening exercises, and static stretching are encouraged; upper arm bands and patellar-stabilizing supports can be adapted to training routines.