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Sample records for coexisting nuclear shapes

  1. Nuclear shapes: from earliest ideas to multiple shape coexisting structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heyde, K.; Wood, J. L.

    2016-08-01

    The concept of the atomic nucleus being characterized by an intrinsic property such as shape came as a result of high precision hyperfine studies in the field of atomic physics, which indicated a non-spherical nuclear charge distribution. Herein, we describe the various steps taken through ingenious experimentation and bold theoretical suggestions that mapped the way for later work in the early 50s by Aage Bohr, Ben Mottelson and James Rainwater. We lay out a long and winding road that marked, in the period of 50s to 70s, the way shell-model and collective-model concepts were reconciled. A rapid increase in both accelerator and detection methods (70s towards the early 2000s) opened new vistas into nuclear shapes, and their coexistence, in various regions of the nuclear mass table. Next, we outline a possible unified view of nuclear shapes: emphasizing decisive steps taken as well as questions remaining, next to the theoretical efforts that could result in an emerging understanding of nuclear shapes, building on the nucleus considered as a strongly interacting system of nucleons as the microscopic starting point.

  2. Nuclear shape coexistence in Po isotopes: An interacting boson model study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Ramos, J. E.; Heyde, K.

    2015-09-01

    Background: The lead region, Po, Pb, Hg, and Pt, shows up the presence of coexisting structures having different deformation and corresponding to different particle-hole configurations in the shell-model language. Purpose: We intend to study the importance of configuration mixing in the understanding of the nuclear structure of even-even Po isotopes, where the shape coexistence phenomena are not clear enough. Method: We study in detail a long chain of polonium isotopes, Po-208190, using the interacting boson model with configuration mixing (IBM-CM). We fix the parameters of the Hamiltonians through a least-squares fit to the known energies and absolute B (E 2 ) transition rates of states up to 3 MeV. Results: We obtained the IBM-CM Hamiltonians and we calculate excitation energies, B (E 2 ) 's, electric quadrupole moments, nuclear radii and isotopic shifts, quadrupole shape invariants, wave functions, and deformations. Conclusions: We obtain a good agreement with the experimental data for all the studied observables and we conclude that shape coexistence phenomenon is hidden in Po isotopes, very much as in the case of the Pt isotopes.

  3. Nuclear shape coexistence and shape evolution in the A = 155 transitional region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Timothy Bannon

    High-spin states of the rare-earth nuclei 153Gd, 155Dy, and 157Tm were populated using heavy-ion reactions at the Florida State University (FSU) tandem-linac, the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) 88' cyclotron and the Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The de- exciting γ rays were detected with the Pittsburgh- Florida State Universities array (FSU), the Gammasphere spectrometer (LBNL) or the Oak Ridge Compton-Suppressed γ array. Over 500 new transitions and 300 new levels were identified in the three odd-A nuclei. In each of these nuclei, DCO measurements, rotational alignment behavior, and B(M1)/B(E2) transition strength ratios were analyzed. Cranked Shell Model calculations were performed and compared to the observed behavior in all the nuclei. At high spin in 155Dy and 157Tm, shape evolution via band termination is studied and the experimental data is compared with various high spin cranking calculations. In 155Dy, evidence for shape coexistence at high spin (I > 30/hbar) is discussed. In addition, superdeformed structures have been observed for the first time in the doubly-odd nucleus 130Pr (Z = 59). These latter bands were produced in a heavy-ion reaction at the LBNL 88' cyclotron facility and detected with the Gamma-sphere spectrometer and the Microball charged particle array. Possible quasiparticle assignments are given and extracted B(M1)/B(E2) ratios are consistent with large deformation.

  4. Shape coexistence in 153Ho

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pramanik, Dibyadyuti; Sarkar, S.; Saha Sarkar, M.; Bisoi, Abhijit; Ray, Sudatta; Dasgupta, Shinjinee; Chakraborty, A.; Krishichayan, Kshetri, Ritesh; Ray, Indrani; Ganguly, S.; Pradhan, M. K.; Ray Basu, M.; Raut, R.; Ganguly, G.; Ghugre, S. S.; Sinha, A. K.; Basu, S. K.; Bhattacharya, S.; Mukherjee, A.; Banerjee, P.; Goswami, A.

    2016-08-01

    The high-spin states in 153Ho have been studied by the La57(20Ne139,6 n ) reaction at a projectile energy of 139 MeV at the Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre (VECC), Kolkata, India, utilizing an earlier campaign of the Indian National Gamma Array (INGA) setup. Data from γ -γ coincidence, directional correlation, and polarization measurements have been analyzed to assign and confirm the spins and parities of the levels. We have suggested a few additions and revisions of the reported level scheme of 153Ho. The RF-γ time difference spectra have been useful to confirm the half-life of an isomer in this nucleus. From the comparison of experimental and theoretical results, it is found that there are definite indications of shape coexistence in this nucleus. The experimental and calculated lifetimes of several isomers have been compared to follow the coexistence and evolution of shape with increasing spin.

  5. Shape coexistence in and near 68Ni

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suchyta, Scott

    2015-10-01

    The nuclei in the vicinity of 68Ni have been the subject of considerable experimental and theoretical work focused on studying the evolution of nuclear structure. Situated at the Z = 28 proton shell closure and the fragile N = 40 subshell closure, 68Ni is an important nucleus to understand as a progression is made from stable to increasingly exotic nuclei. The nature and decay of the first excited state in 68Ni has been thoroughly investigated in recent years. The first excited state has a spin and parity of 0+, can be described by the excitation of neutrons across the N = 40 gap, and has been interpreted as a moderately oblate-deformed state that coexists with the spherical ground state. A second low-energy excited 0+ state is also known to exist in 68Ni. Based on comparisons with theoretical calculations, the second excited 0+ state has been proposed to be strongly prolate deformed and based primarily on the excitation of protons across the Z = 28 gap, leading to the inference that three different 0+ states with three distinct shapes coexist below 3 MeV in 68Ni. Additional studies suggest that shape coexistence is not unique to 68Ni in this neutron-rich region near Z = 28. For instance, in the neighboring even-even isotope 70Ni, theory predicts that a prolate-deformed minimum in the potential energy surface occurs at even lower energy than in 68Ni, and experimental evidence is consistent with the theoretical prediction. The results of recent experiments studying shape coexistence in the region, particularly investigations of 68,70Ni, will be presented and theoretical interpretations will be discussed.

  6. Shape Coexistence in Transitional Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulp, W. D.; Schmelzenbach, P.; Wood, J. L.; Allmond, J. M.; Krane, K. S.; Loats, J.; Stapels, C. J.; Norman, E. B.

    2007-10-01

    The ``transitional'' nuclei near N=90 have long been a focus of experimental and theoretical investigations. We report on a program of study of the N=90 and N=88 nuclei with a focus on the structure of ^150Sm elucidated through new high-statistics, precision γ-ray coincidence spectroscopy and γ-γ angular correlation data from the radioactive decay of ^150Pm (T1/2= 2.68 h, Q^- = 3454 keV, J^π= 1^-) and ^150m,gEu (T1/2= 12.8 h, J^π= 0^- and T1/2= 36.9 y, J^π= 5^(-), respectively, Q^+(g.s.)= 2261 keV). In particular, very weak key collective transitions (e.g., the 2^+2(1046) ->4^+1(773) 272 keV γ ray) are observed and precision δ(E2/M1) mixing ratios are extracted (determining δJ = 0 transitions). This data, when combined with published results from conversion electron measurements, two-neutron transfer studies, and Coulomb excitation supports the results from detailed multiple-spectroscopy studies of ^152Sm [1] indicating that shape coexistence underlies the structure at N=88, 90. [1] W. D. Kulp, et al., arXiv:0706.4129 [nucl-ex].

  7. A focus on shape coexistence in nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, J. L.; Heyde, K.

    2016-02-01

    The present collection of articles focuses on new directions and developments under the title of shape coexistence in nuclei, following our 2011 Reviews of Modern Physics article (K Heyde and J L Wood).

  8. Shape Coexistence in Neutron Deficient Po Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Helariutta, K.; Cocks, J.F.C.; Enqvist, T.; Greenlees, P.T.; Jones, P.; Julin, R.; Juutinen, S.; Jamsen, P.; Kankaanpaa, H.; Kettunen, H.; Kuiusiniemi, P.; Leino, M.; Muikkui, M.; Piiparinen, M.; Rahkila, P.; Savelius, A.; Trzaska, W.H.; Tormanen, S.; Uusitalo, J.; Allatt, R.G.; Butler, P.A.; Page, R.D.; Kapusta, M.

    1999-12-31

    The excited levels in {sup 192-195}Po have been studied using the recoil-decay tagging method. New levels have been identified. The data are in accordance with the scheme of the coexisting spherical and deformed intruder structures crossing each other with N<112.

  9. Shape coexistence in neutron deficient Po nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Helariutta, K.; Cocks, J. F. C.; Enqvist, T.; Greenlees, P. T.; Jones, P.; Julin, R.; Juutinen, S.; Jaemsen, P.; Kankaanpaeae, H.; Kettunen, H.; Kuusiniemi, P.; Leino, M.; Muikku, M.; Piiparinen, M.; Rahkila, P.; Savelius, A.; Trzaska, W. H.; Toermaenen, S.; Uusitalo, J.; Allatt, R. G.

    1999-11-16

    The excited levels in {sup 192-195}Po have been studied using the recoil-decay tagging method. New levels have been identified. The data are in accordance with the scheme of the coexisting spherical and deformed intruder structures crossing each other with N<112.

  10. Shape coexistence and triaxiality in nuclei near 80Zr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, S. J.; Xu, F. R.; Shen, S. F.; Liu, H. L.; Wyss, R.; Yan, Y. P.

    2014-12-01

    Total-Routhian-surface calculations have been performed to investigate the shape evolutions of A ˜80 nuclei: Zr-8480,Sr-8076 , and Mo,8684 . Shape coexistences of spherical, prolate, and oblate deformations have been found in these nuclei. Particularly for the nuclei 80Sr and 82Zr , the energy differences between two shape-coexisting states are less than 220 keV. At high spins, the g9 /2 shell plays an important role in shape evolutions. It has been found that the alignment of the g9 /2 quasiparticles drives nuclei to be triaxial.

  11. Shape coexistence and phase transitions in the platinum isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Morales, Irving O.; Frank, Alejandro; Vargas, Carlos E.; Isacker, P. Van

    2008-08-15

    The matrix coherent-state approach of the interacting boson model with configuration mixing is used to study the geometry of the platinum isotopes. With a parameter set determined in previous studies, it is found that the absolute minimum of the potential for the Pt isotopes evolves from spherical to oblate and finally to prolate shapes when the neutron number decreases from N=126 (semi-magic) to N=104 (mid-shell). Shape coexistence is found in the isotopes {sup 182,184,186,188}Pt. A phase diagram is constructed that shows the coexistence region as a function of the number of bosons and the strength of the mixing parameter.

  12. Shape coexistence with strong mixing in ^152Sm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulp, W. D.; Wood, J. L.; Garrett, P. E.

    2009-10-01

    The transitional nucleus ^152Sm has been described as a ``soft'' nucleus with low-lying β- and γ-vibrational states and with candidate multiple-phonon excitations. However, detailed experimental studies using multiple spectroscopic techniques reveal two extensive families of rotational bands that are remarkably similar. This result suggests that there are coexisting shapes which strongly mix. A prescription of two-state mixing calculations are presented which describe the experimental level energies of the ground-state and first excited (0^+ state) rotational bands, electric monopole transition rates, electric quadrupole matrix elements, and the isomer shift of the first excited 2^+ state.

  13. Shape Coexistence in Neutron-Rich Nickel Isotopes around N = 40

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prokop, C. J.; e14039 Collaboration; e14057 Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    Shape coexistence is a fascinating phenomenon in atomic nuclei characterized by multiple states with different intrinsic shapes coexisting at similar excitation energies. In even-even nuclei, a hallmark of shape coexistence is low-energy 0+ states. In 68Ni, the Monte-Carlo Shell Model (MCSM) employing the A3DA interaction, utilizing the fpg9/2d5 / 2 model space for protons and neutrons, predicts triple shape coexistence with three 0+ states below 3 MeV. Transitioning to 70Ni, the energy of the prolate-deformed 0+ state is predicted to drop precipitously from 2511 to 1525 keV. This is due to strengthening of the attractive νg9 / 2 - πf5 / 2 and repulsive νg9 / 2 - πf7 / 2 monopole interactions of the tensor force altering the effective single-particle energies of the πf7 / 2 and πf5 / 2 single-particle states, thereby reducing the spherical Z = 28 shell gap. Recent beta-decay spectroscopy experiments at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL) have discovered a new excited 0+ state at 1567 keV in 70Ni. This result supports MCSM predictions extending the picture of shape coexistence to 70Ni and demonstrates the importance of the tensor force for describing the nuclear structure of neutron-rich nuclei. Results of the latest NSCL experiments will be presented. Supported by NSF Contract No. PHY-1102511, by the DOE NNSA Award Nos. DE-NA0000979 and DE-FG52-08NA28552, the U.S DOE SC NP Contract No. DE-AC-06CH11357 and Grant Nos. DE-FG02-94ER40834 and DE-FG02-96ER40983, and U.S. ARL Coop. Agreement W911NF-12-2-0019.

  14. New Features of Shape Coexistence in Sm152

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrett, P. E.; Kulp, W. D.; Wood, J. L.; Bandyopadhyay, D.; Choudry, S.; Dashdorj, D.; Lesher, S. R.; McEllistrem, M. T.; Mynk, M.; Orce, J. N.; Yates, S. W.

    2009-08-01

    Excited states in Sm152 have been investigated with the Sm152(n,n'γ) reaction. The lowest four negative-parity band structures have been characterized in detail with respect to their absolute decay properties. Specifically, a new Kπ=0- band has been assigned with its 1- band head at 1681 keV. This newly observed band has a remarkable similarity in its E1 transition rates for decay to the first excited Kπ=0+ band at 684 keV to the lowest Kπ=0- band and its decay to the ground-state band. Based on these decay properties, as well as energy considerations, this new band is assigned as a Kπ=0- octupole excitation based on the Kπ=02+ state. An emerging pattern of repeating excitations built on the 02+ level similar to those built on the ground state may indicate that Sm152 is a complex example of shape coexistence rather than a critical point nucleus.

  15. New Features of Shape Coexistence in {sup 152}Sm

    SciTech Connect

    Garrett, P. E.; Kulp, W. D.; Wood, J. L.; Bandyopadhyay, D.; Choudry, S.; Lesher, S. R.; McEllistrem, M. T.; Mynk, M.; Orce, J. N.; Yates, S. W.; Dashdorj, D.

    2009-08-07

    Excited states in {sup 152}Sm have been investigated with the {sup 152}Sm(n,n{sup '}gamma) reaction. The lowest four negative-parity band structures have been characterized in detail with respect to their absolute decay properties. Specifically, a new K{sup p}i=0{sup -} band has been assigned with its 1{sup -} band head at 1681 keV. This newly observed band has a remarkable similarity in its E1 transition rates for decay to the first excited K{sup p}i=0{sup +} band at 684 keV to the lowest K{sup p}i=0{sup -} band and its decay to the ground-state band. Based on these decay properties, as well as energy considerations, this new band is assigned as a K{sup p}i=0{sup -} octupole excitation based on the K{sup p}i=0{sub 2}{sup +} state. An emerging pattern of repeating excitations built on the 0{sub 2}{sup +} level similar to those built on the ground state may indicate that {sup 152}Sm is a complex example of shape coexistence rather than a critical point nucleus.

  16. The coexistence curve of finite charged nuclear matter

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, J.B.; Moretto, L.G.; Phair, L.; Wozniak, G.J.; Beaulieu, L.; Breuer, H.; Korteling, R.G.; Kwiatkowski, K.; Lefort, T.; Pienkowski, L.; Ruangma, A.; Viola, V.E.; Yennello, S.J.; Albergo, S.; Bieser, F.; Brady, F.P.; Caccia, Z.; Cebra, D.A.; Chacon, A.D.; Chance, J.L.; Choi, Y.; Costa, S.; Gilkes, M.L.; Hauger, J.A.; Hirsch, A.S.; Hjort, E.L.; Insolia, A.; Justice, M.; Keane, D.; Kintner, J.C.; Lindenstruth, V.; Lisa, M.A.; Matis, H.S.; McMahan, M.; McParland, C.; Muller, W.F.J.; Olson, D.L.; Partlan, M.D.; Porile, N.T.; Potenza, R.; Rai, G.; Rasmussen, J.; Ritter, H.G.; Romanski, J.; Romero, J.L.; Russo, G.V.; Sann, H.; Scharenberg, R.P.; Scott, A.; Shao, Y.; Srivastava, B.K.; Symons, T.J.M.; Tincknell, M.; Tuve, C.; Wang , S.; Warren, P.; Wieman, H.H.; Wienold, T.; Wolf, K.

    2001-01-01

    The multifragmentation data of the ISiS Collaboration and the EOS Collaboration are examined. Fisher's droplet formalism, modified to account for Coulomb energy, is used to determine the critical exponents {tau} and {sigma}, the surface energy coefficient c{sub 0}, the pressure-temperature-density coexistence curve of finite nuclear matter and the location of the critical point.

  17. Shape coexistence at low spin in the Z = 50 region and its spectroscopic signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrett, P. E.

    2016-08-01

    Nuclei in the Z = 50 region provide excellent examples of shape coexistence, the establishment of which occurred through the use of detailed spectroscopy, based not only on γ-ray spectroscopy but also conversion electron, particle transfer, Coulomb excitation, and lifetime measurements. The evidence to date strongly suggests that the presence of coexisting shapes arises from the promotion of protons across the Z = 50 closed shell and the strong correlations arising from interplay of the pairing and quadrupole interactions. The evidence for the presence of shape coexistence in the Z = 50 region, at low spin and low excitation energies, will be presented and clues for the microscopic origin explored.

  18. A microscopic study on shape transition and shape coexistence in superdeformed nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Kanthimathi, G.; Boomadevi, N.; Rajasekaran, T. R.

    2012-08-15

    Superdeformed nuclei at high-spin states in several mass regions are investigated within a microscopic approach using cranked Nilsson-Strutinsky formalism to explore the equilibrium deformations in the ground state and their evolution with spin. Shape transition from normal deformed to superdeformed states with increasing spin is studied and a clear picture of shape coexistence is provided. Detailed information on spin, rotational energy, dynamical moment of inertia, and rotational frequency of superdeformed rotational bands is presented and the general features of superdeformed bands in certain mass regions are outlined. Rotational energy and dynamical moment of inertia are compared with available experimental data and the impact of temperature and pairing on superdeformed configuration are discussed.

  19. Unique and complementary information on shape coexistence in the neutron-deficient Pb region derived from Coulomb excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wrzosek-Lipska, K.; Gaffney, L. P.

    2016-02-01

    Neutron-deficient isotopes of Pt-Hg-Pb-Po-Rn are the classic region in the investigation of shape coexistence in atomic nuclei. A large programme of Coulomb-excitation experiments has been undertaken at the REX-ISOLDE facility in CERN with a number of even-even isotopes in this region. These experiments have been used to probe the electromagnetic properties of yrast and non-yrast states of even-even exotic nuclei, above and below Z = 82. Amongst a large amount of different complementary techniques used to study nuclear structure, Coulomb excitation brings substantial and unique information detailing shape coexistence. In this paper we review the Coulomb-excitation campaign at REX-ISOLDE in the light-lead region together with most recently obtained results. Furthermore, we present some new interpretations that arise from this data and show testing comparisons to state-of-the-art nuclear models.

  20. Description of the shape coexistence in neutron-deficient 74,76Kr with IBM2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, DaLi; Mu, ChengFu

    2016-08-01

    The shape deformation and shape coexistence in 74,76Kr isotopes are investigated within the framework of the proton-neutron interacting boson model (IBM2). By considering the relative energy of the d proton boson to be different from that of the neutron boson, the low-lying energy spectrum is in good agreement with experimental results both qualitatively and quantitatively. In particular, the low-lying 0 2 + states associated with the shape-coexistence phenomenon are reproduced quite well. The calculated key sensitive quantities of B(E2) transition branch ratios are fairly consistent with the experimental data except for R 4. The predicated deformation parameter is very similar for the ground states in 74Kr and 76Kr, showing good agreement with the experimental result, and the calculated deformation parameter for the second 0+ state in 74Kr is close to the experimental data. The calculated results of the triaxiality parameter indicated an almost purely prolate shape for the ground state of 76Kr and a mostly prolate shape with a little triaxiality for the ground state of 74Kr. The calculations also show an oblate triaxial shape for the second 0+ state in 76Kr and maximum triaxiality for the second 0+ state in 74Kr. These results confirm the importance of the triaxial deformation for the description of such shape coexistence.

  1. Energy density functional analysis of shape coexistence in {sup 44}S

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Z. P.; Yao, J. M.; Vretenar, D.; Niksic, T.; Meng, J.

    2012-10-20

    The structure of low-energy collective states in the neutron-rich nucleus {sup 44}S is analyzed using a microscopic collective Hamiltonian model based on energy density functionals (EDFs). The calculated triaxial energy map, low-energy spectrum and corresponding probability distributions indicate a coexistence of prolate and oblate shapes in this nucleus.

  2. Shape coexistence in the neutron-deficient Pt isotopes in a configuration mixing IBM

    SciTech Connect

    Morales, Irving O.; Vargas, Carlos E.; Frank, Alejandro

    2004-09-13

    The recently proposed matrix-coherent state approach for configuration mixing IBM is used to describe the evolving geometry of the neutron deficient Pt isotopes. It is found that the Potential Energy Surface (PES) of the Platinum isotopes evolves, when the number of neutrons decreases, from spherical to oblate and then to prolate shapes, in agreement with experimental measurements. Oblate-Prolate shape coexistence is observed in 194,192Pt isotopes.

  3. Multi-quasiparticle excitation: Extending shape coexistence in A~190 neutron-deficient nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Yue; Xu, F. R.; Liu, H. L.; Walker, P. M.

    2010-10-01

    Multi-quasiparticle high-K states in neutron-deficient mercury, lead, and polonium isotopes have been investigated systematically by means of configuration-constrained potential-energy-surface calculations. An abundance of high-K states is predicted with both prolate and oblate shapes, which extends the shape coexistence of the mass region. Well-deformed shapes provide good conditions for the formation of isomers, as exemplified in Pb188. Of particular interest is the prediction of low-lying 10- states in polonium isotopes, which indicate long-lived isomers.

  4. Multi-quasiparticle excitation: Extending shape coexistence in A{approx}190 neutron-deficient nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Shi Yue; Liu, H. L.; Xu, F. R.; Walker, P. M.

    2010-10-15

    Multi-quasiparticle high-K states in neutron-deficient mercury, lead, and polonium isotopes have been investigated systematically by means of configuration-constrained potential-energy-surface calculations. An abundance of high-K states is predicted with both prolate and oblate shapes, which extends the shape coexistence of the mass region. Well-deformed shapes provide good conditions for the formation of isomers, as exemplified in {sup 188}Pb. Of particular interest is the prediction of low-lying 10{sup -} states in polonium isotopes, which indicate long-lived isomers.

  5. Coexistence of specialist and generalist species is shaped by dispersal and environmental factors.

    PubMed

    Büchi, Lucie; Vuilleumier, Séverine

    2014-05-01

    Disentangling the mechanisms mediating the coexistence of habitat specialists and generalists has been a long-standing subject of investigation. However, the roles of species traits and environmental and spatial factors have not been assessed in a unifying theoretical framework. Theory suggests that specialist species are more competitive in natural communities. However, empirical work has shown that specialist species are declining worldwide due to habitat loss and fragmentation. We addressed the question of the coexistence of specialist and generalist species with a spatially explicit metacommunity model in continuous and heterogeneous environments. We characterized how species' dispersal abilities, the number of interacting species, environmental spatial autocorrelation, and disturbance impact community composition. Our results demonstrated that species' dispersal ability and the number of interacting species had a drastic influence on the composition of metacommunities. More specialized species coexisted when species had large dispersal abilities and when the number of interacting species was high. Disturbance selected against highly specialized species, whereas environmental spatial autocorrelation had a marginal impact. Interestingly, species richness and niche breadth were mainly positively correlated at the community scale but were negatively correlated at the metacommunity scale. Numerous diversely specialized species can thus coexist, but both species' intrinsic traits and environmental factors interact to shape the specialization signatures of communities at both the local and global scales.

  6. New low-energy 0+ state and shape coexistence in 70Ni

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prokop, C. J.; Crider, B. P.; Liddick, S. N.; Ayangeakaa, A. D.; Carpenter, M. P.; Carroll, J. J.; Chen, J.; Chiara, C. J.; David, H. M.; Dombos, A. C.; Go, S.; Harker, J.; Janssens, R. V. F.; Larson, N.; Lauritsen, T.; Lewis, R.; Quinn, S. J.; Recchia, F.; Seweryniak, D.; Spyrou, A.; Suchyta, S.; Walters, W. B.; Zhu, S.

    2015-12-01

    In recent models, the neutron-rich Ni isotopes around N =40 are predicted to exhibit multiple low-energy excited 0+ states attributed to neutron and proton excitations across both the N =40 and Z =28 shell gaps. In 68Ni, the three observed 0+ states have been interpreted in terms of triple shape coexistence between spherical, oblate, and prolate deformed shapes. In the present work a new (02+) state at an energy of 1567 keV has been discovered in 70Ni by using β -delayed, γ -ray spectroscopy following the decay of 70Co. The precipitous drop in the energy of the prolate-deformed 0+ level between 68Ni and 70Ni with the addition of two neutrons compares favorably with results of Monte Carlo shell-model calculations carried out in the large f p g9 /2d5 /2 model space, which predict a 02+ state at 1525 keV in 70Ni. The result extends the shape-coexistence picture in the region to 70Ni and confirms the importance of the role of the tensor component of the monopole interaction in describing the structure of neutron-rich nuclei.

  7. Discovery of the Shape Coexisting 0+ State in Mg32 by a Two Neutron Transfer Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wimmer, K.; Kröll, T.; Krücken, R.; Bildstein, V.; Gernhäuser, R.; Bastin, B.; Bree, N.; Diriken, J.; van Duppen, P.; Huyse, M.; Patronis, N.; Vermaelen, P.; Voulot, D.; van de Walle, J.; Wenander, F.; Fraile, L. M.; Chapman, R.; Hadinia, B.; Orlandi, R.; Smith, J. F.; Lutter, R.; Thirolf, P. G.; Labiche, M.; Blazhev, A.; Kalkühler, M.; Reiter, P.; Seidlitz, M.; Warr, N.; Macchiavelli, A. O.; Jeppesen, H. B.; Fiori, E.; Georgiev, G.; Schrieder, G.; Das Gupta, S.; Lo Bianco, G.; Nardelli, S.; Butterworth, J.; Johansen, J.; Riisager, K.

    2010-12-01

    The “island of inversion” nucleus Mg32 has been studied by a (t, p) two neutron transfer reaction in inverse kinematics at REX-ISOLDE. The shape coexistent excited 0+ state in Mg32 has been identified by the characteristic angular distribution of the protons of the ΔL=0 transfer. The excitation energy of 1058 keV is much lower than predicted by any theoretical model. The low γ-ray intensity observed for the decay of this 0+ state indicates a lifetime of more than 10 ns. Deduced spectroscopic amplitudes are compared with occupation numbers from shell-model calculations.

  8. Discovery of the shape coexisting 0+ state in 32 Mg by a two neutron transfer reaction.

    PubMed

    Wimmer, K; Kröll, T; Krücken, R; Bildstein, V; Gernhäuser, R; Bastin, B; Bree, N; Diriken, J; Van Duppen, P; Huyse, M; Patronis, N; Vermaelen, P; Voulot, D; Van de Walle, J; Wenander, F; Fraile, L M; Chapman, R; Hadinia, B; Orlandi, R; Smith, J F; Lutter, R; Thirolf, P G; Labiche, M; Blazhev, A; Kalkühler, M; Reiter, P; Seidlitz, M; Warr, N; Macchiavelli, A O; Jeppesen, H B; Fiori, E; Georgiev, G; Schrieder, G; Das Gupta, S; Lo Bianco, G; Nardelli, S; Butterworth, J; Johansen, J; Riisager, K

    2010-12-17

    The "island of inversion" nucleus 32 Mg has been studied by a (t, p) two neutron transfer reaction in inverse kinematics at REX-ISOLDE. The shape coexistent excited 0+ state in 32 Mg has been identified by the characteristic angular distribution of the protons of the Δ L=0 transfer. The excitation energy of 1058 keV is much lower than predicted by any theoretical model. The low γ-ray intensity observed for the decay of this 0+ state indicates a lifetime of more than 10 ns. Deduced spectroscopic amplitudes are compared with occupation numbers from shell-model calculations.

  9. First Evidence of Shape Coexistence in the 78Ni Region: Intruder 02+ State in 80Ge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gottardo, A.; Verney, D.; Delafosse, C.; Ibrahim, F.; Roussière, B.; Sotty, C.; Roccia, S.; Andreoiu, C.; Costache, C.; Delattre, M.-C.; Deloncle, I.; Etilé, A.; Franchoo, S.; Gaulard, C.; Guillot, J.; Lebois, M.; MacCormick, M.; Marginean, N.; Marginean, R.; Matea, I.; Mihai, C.; Mitu, I.; Olivier, L.; Portail, C.; Qi, L.; Stan, L.; Testov, D.; Wilson, J.; Yordanov, D. T.

    2016-05-01

    The N =48 80Ge nucleus is studied by means of β -delayed electron-conversion spectroscopy at ALTO. The radioactive 80Ga beam is produced through the isotope separation on line photofission technique and collected on a movable tape for the measurement of γ and e- emission following β decay. An electric monopole E 0 transition, which points to a 639(1) keV intruder 02+ state, is observed for the first time. This new state is lower than the 21+ level in 80Ge, and provides evidence of shape coexistence close to one of the most neutron-rich doubly magic nuclei discovered so far, 78Ni. This result is compared with theoretical estimates, helping to explain the role of monopole and quadrupole forces in the weakening of the N =50 gap at Z =32 . The evolution of intruder 02+ states towards 78Ni is discussed.

  10. Shape coexistence at N=20 and N=28: Study of 02+ states in 34Si and 44S

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grévy, S.; Rotaru, F.; Negoita, F.; Borcea, C.; Borcea, R.; Buta, A.; Calinescu, S.; Petrone, C.; Stanoiu, M.; Mrazek, J.; Lukyanov, S.; Penionzhkevich, Y.; Cáceres, L.; De Oliveira, F.; Force, C.; Lebhertz, D.; Sorlin, O.; Stodel, C.; Thomas, J. C.; Chevrier, R.; Daugas, J. M.; Gaudefroy, L.; Dombrádi, Zs.; Sohler, D.; Nowacki, F.; Poves, A.; Azaiez, F.; Stefan, I.; Achouri, N. L.; Angélique, J. C.; Bastin, B.

    2014-08-01

    It is well known that the nuclear shell structure changes for the most exotic nuclei. One of the consequences of this phenomenon is the modification of the "classical" magic numbers, as experimentally observed at N = 20 and N = 28. Nevertheless, the mechanisms responsible for such changes are still under discussion and more experimental information is needed to better constrain the theoretical models. In these proceedings, we report on the discovery and the experimental study by precise spectroscopy experiments of the 02+ state in 34Si and 44S. The 34Si is located between the magic spherical 36S and the deformed 32Mg, member of the so-called island of inversion, whereas 44S is located between the magic spherical 48Ca and the deformed 42Si. Therefore, the structure of these nuclei, and in particular the phenomenon of shape coexistence, is of crucial importance to understand how the intruder configurations progressively dominate the ground state structure of the most exotic nuclei at both N = 20 and N = 28.

  11. Possible shape coexistence and magnetic dipole transitions in {sup 17}C and {sup 21}Ne

    SciTech Connect

    Sagawa, H.; Zhou, X. R.; Suzuki, Toshio; Yoshida, N.

    2008-10-15

    Magnetic dipole (M1) transitions of N=11 nuclei {sup 17}C and {sup 21}Ne are investigated by using shell model and deformed Skyrme Hartree-Fock + blocked BCS wave functions. Shell model calculations predict well observed energy spectra and magnetic dipole transitions in {sup 21}Ne, while the results are rather poor to predict these observables in {sup 17}C. In the deformed HF calculations, the ground states of the two nuclei are shown to have large prolate deformations close to {beta}{sub 2}=0.4. It is also pointed out that the first K{sup {pi}}=1/2{sup +} state in {sup 21}Ne is prolately deformed, while the first K{sup {pi}}=1/2{sup +} state in {sup 17}C is predicted to have a large oblate deformation close to the ground state in energy, We point out that the experimentally observed large hindrance of the M1 transition between I{sup {pi}}=1/2{sup +} and 3/2{sup +} in {sup 17}C can be attributed to a shape coexistence near the ground state of {sup 17}C.

  12. Spectroscopic Quadrupole Moments in Sr,9896 : Evidence for Shape Coexistence in Neutron-Rich Strontium Isotopes at N =60

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clément, E.; Zielińska, M.; Görgen, A.; Korten, W.; Péru, S.; Libert, J.; Goutte, H.; Hilaire, S.; Bastin, B.; Bauer, C.; Blazhev, A.; Bree, N.; Bruyneel, B.; Butler, P. A.; Butterworth, J.; Delahaye, P.; Dijon, A.; Doherty, D. T.; Ekström, A.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fransen, C.; Georgiev, G.; Gernhäuser, R.; Hess, H.; Iwanicki, J.; Jenkins, D. G.; Larsen, A. C.; Ljungvall, J.; Lutter, R.; Marley, P.; Moschner, K.; Napiorkowski, P. J.; Pakarinen, J.; Petts, A.; Reiter, P.; Renstrøm, T.; Seidlitz, M.; Siebeck, B.; Siem, S.; Sotty, C.; Srebrny, J.; Stefanescu, I.; Tveten, G. M.; Van de Walle, J.; Vermeulen, M.; Voulot, D.; Warr, N.; Wenander, F.; Wiens, A.; De Witte, H.; Wrzosek-Lipska, K.

    2016-01-01

    Neutron-rich Sr,9896 isotopes have been investigated by safe Coulomb excitation of radioactive beams at the REX-ISOLDE facility. Reduced transition probabilities and spectroscopic quadrupole moments have been extracted from the differential Coulomb excitation cross sections. These results allow, for the first time, the drawing of definite conclusions about the shape coexistence of highly deformed prolate and spherical configurations. In particular, a very small mixing between the coexisting states is observed, contrary to other mass regions where strong mixing is present. Experimental results have been compared to beyond-mean-field calculations using the Gogny D1S interaction in a five-dimensional collective Hamiltonian formalism, which reproduce the shape change at N =60 .

  13. Acquired phototrophy stabilises coexistence and shapes intrinsic dynamics of an intraguild predator and its prey.

    PubMed

    Moeller, Holly V; Peltomaa, Elina; Johnson, Matthew D; Neubert, Michael G

    2016-04-01

    In marine ecosystems, acquired phototrophs - organisms that obtain their photosynthetic ability by hosting endosymbionts or stealing plastids from their prey - are omnipresent. Such taxa function as intraguild predators yet depend on their prey to periodically obtain chloroplasts. We present a new theory for the effects of acquired phototrophy on community dynamics by analysing a mathematical model of this predator-prey interaction and experimentally verifying its predictions with a laboratory model system. We show that acquired phototrophy stabilises coexistence, but that the nature of this coexistence exhibits a 'paradox of enrichment': as light increases, the coexistence between the acquired phototroph and its prey transitions from a stable equilibrium to boom-bust cycles whose amplitude increases with light availability. In contrast, heterotrophs and mixotrophic acquired phototrophs (that obtain < 30% of their carbon from photosynthesis) do not exhibit such cycles. This prediction matches field observations, in which only strict ( > 95% of carbon from photosynthesis) acquired phototrophs form blooms.

  14. Acquired phototrophy stabilises coexistence and shapes intrinsic dynamics of an intraguild predator and its prey.

    PubMed

    Moeller, Holly V; Peltomaa, Elina; Johnson, Matthew D; Neubert, Michael G

    2016-04-01

    In marine ecosystems, acquired phototrophs - organisms that obtain their photosynthetic ability by hosting endosymbionts or stealing plastids from their prey - are omnipresent. Such taxa function as intraguild predators yet depend on their prey to periodically obtain chloroplasts. We present a new theory for the effects of acquired phototrophy on community dynamics by analysing a mathematical model of this predator-prey interaction and experimentally verifying its predictions with a laboratory model system. We show that acquired phototrophy stabilises coexistence, but that the nature of this coexistence exhibits a 'paradox of enrichment': as light increases, the coexistence between the acquired phototroph and its prey transitions from a stable equilibrium to boom-bust cycles whose amplitude increases with light availability. In contrast, heterotrophs and mixotrophic acquired phototrophs (that obtain < 30% of their carbon from photosynthesis) do not exhibit such cycles. This prediction matches field observations, in which only strict ( > 95% of carbon from photosynthesis) acquired phototrophs form blooms. PMID:26833622

  15. Shapes and stability of algebraic nuclear models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lopez-Moreno, Enrique; Castanos, Octavio

    1995-01-01

    A generalization of the procedure to study shapes and stability of algebraic nuclear models introduced by Gilmore is presented. One calculates the expectation value of the Hamiltonian with respect to the coherent states of the algebraic structure of the system. Then equilibrium configurations of the resulting energy surface, which depends in general on state variables and a set of parameters, are classified through the Catastrophe theory. For one- and two-body interactions in the Hamiltonian of the interacting Boson model-1, the critical points are organized through the Cusp catastrophe. As an example, we apply this Separatrix to describe the energy surfaces associated to the Rutenium and Samarium isotopes.

  16. How direct competition shapes coexistence and vaccine effects in multi-strain pathogen systems.

    PubMed

    Gjini, Erida; Valente, Carina; Sá-Leão, Raquel; Gomes, M Gabriela M

    2016-01-01

    We describe an integrated modeling framework for understanding strain coexistence in polymorphic pathogen systems. Previous studies have debated the utility of neutral formulations and focused on cross-immunity between strains as a major stabilizing mechanism. Here we convey that direct competition for colonization mediates stable coexistence only when competitive abilities amongst pathogen clones satisfy certain pairwise asymmetries. We illustrate our ideas with nested SIS models of single and dual colonization, applied to polymorphic pneumococcal bacteria. By fitting the models to cross-sectional prevalence data from Portugal (before and after the introduction of a seven-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine), we are able to not only statistically compare neutral and non-neutral epidemiological formulations, but also estimate vaccine efficacy, transmission and competition parameters simultaneously. Our study highlights that the response of polymorphic pathogen populations to interventions holds crucial information about strain interactions, which can be extracted by suitable nested modeling.

  17. How direct competition shapes coexistence and vaccine effects in multi-strain pathogen systems.

    PubMed

    Gjini, Erida; Valente, Carina; Sá-Leão, Raquel; Gomes, M Gabriela M

    2016-01-01

    We describe an integrated modeling framework for understanding strain coexistence in polymorphic pathogen systems. Previous studies have debated the utility of neutral formulations and focused on cross-immunity between strains as a major stabilizing mechanism. Here we convey that direct competition for colonization mediates stable coexistence only when competitive abilities amongst pathogen clones satisfy certain pairwise asymmetries. We illustrate our ideas with nested SIS models of single and dual colonization, applied to polymorphic pneumococcal bacteria. By fitting the models to cross-sectional prevalence data from Portugal (before and after the introduction of a seven-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine), we are able to not only statistically compare neutral and non-neutral epidemiological formulations, but also estimate vaccine efficacy, transmission and competition parameters simultaneously. Our study highlights that the response of polymorphic pathogen populations to interventions holds crucial information about strain interactions, which can be extracted by suitable nested modeling. PMID:26471070

  18. Discovery of the Shape Coexisting 0{sup +} State in {sup 32}Mg by a Two Neutron Transfer Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Wimmer, K.; Kroell, T.; Kruecken, R.; Bildstein, V.; Gernhaeuser, R.; Bastin, B.; Bree, N.; Diriken, J.; Van Duppen, P.; Huyse, M.; Patronis, N.; Vermaelen, P.; Voulot, D.; Van de Walle, J.; Wenander, F.; Fraile, L. M.; Chapman, R.; Hadinia, B.; Orlandi, R.; Smith, J. F.

    2010-12-17

    The ''island of inversion'' nucleus {sup 32}Mg has been studied by a (t, p) two neutron transfer reaction in inverse kinematics at REX-ISOLDE. The shape coexistent excited 0{sup +} state in {sup 32}Mg has been identified by the characteristic angular distribution of the protons of the {Delta}L=0 transfer. The excitation energy of 1058 keV is much lower than predicted by any theoretical model. The low {gamma}-ray intensity observed for the decay of this 0{sup +} state indicates a lifetime of more than 10 ns. Deduced spectroscopic amplitudes are compared with occupation numbers from shell-model calculations.

  19. Recent advances in understanding nuclear size and shape.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Richik N; Chen, Pan; Levy, Daniel L

    2016-04-25

    Size and shape are important aspects of nuclear structure. While normal cells maintain nuclear size within a defined range, altered nuclear size and shape are associated with a variety of diseases. It is unknown if altered nuclear morphology contributes to pathology, and answering this question requires a better understanding of the mechanisms that control nuclear size and shape. In this review, we discuss recent advances in our understanding of the mechanisms that regulate nuclear morphology, focusing on nucleocytoplasmic transport, nuclear lamins, the endoplasmic reticulum, the cell cycle, and potential links between nuclear size and size regulation of other organelles. We then discuss the functional significance of nuclear morphology in the context of early embryonic development. Looking toward the future, we review new experimental approaches that promise to provide new insights into mechanisms of nuclear size control, in particular microfluidic-based technologies, and discuss how altered nuclear morphology might impact chromatin organization and physiology of diseased cells.

  20. Recent advances in understanding nuclear size and shape.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Richik N; Chen, Pan; Levy, Daniel L

    2016-04-25

    Size and shape are important aspects of nuclear structure. While normal cells maintain nuclear size within a defined range, altered nuclear size and shape are associated with a variety of diseases. It is unknown if altered nuclear morphology contributes to pathology, and answering this question requires a better understanding of the mechanisms that control nuclear size and shape. In this review, we discuss recent advances in our understanding of the mechanisms that regulate nuclear morphology, focusing on nucleocytoplasmic transport, nuclear lamins, the endoplasmic reticulum, the cell cycle, and potential links between nuclear size and size regulation of other organelles. We then discuss the functional significance of nuclear morphology in the context of early embryonic development. Looking toward the future, we review new experimental approaches that promise to provide new insights into mechanisms of nuclear size control, in particular microfluidic-based technologies, and discuss how altered nuclear morphology might impact chromatin organization and physiology of diseased cells. PMID:26963026

  1. Joint modeling of cell and nuclear shape variation.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Gregory R; Buck, Taraz E; Sullivan, Devin P; Rohde, Gustavo K; Murphy, Robert F

    2015-11-01

    Modeling cell shape variation is critical to our understanding of cell biology. Previous work has demonstrated the utility of nonrigid image registration methods for the construction of nonparametric nuclear shape models in which pairwise deformation distances are measured between all shapes and are embedded into a low-dimensional shape space. Using these methods, we explore the relationship between cell shape and nuclear shape. We find that these are frequently dependent on each other and use this as the motivation for the development of combined cell and nuclear shape space models, extending nonparametric cell representations to multiple-component three-dimensional cellular shapes and identifying modes of joint shape variation. We learn a first-order dynamics model to predict cell and nuclear shapes, given shapes at a previous time point. We use this to determine the effects of endogenous protein tags or drugs on the shape dynamics of cell lines and show that tagged C1QBP reduces the correlation between cell and nuclear shape. To reduce the computational cost of learning these models, we demonstrate the ability to reconstruct shape spaces using a fraction of computed pairwise distances. The open-source tools provide a powerful basis for future studies of the molecular basis of cell organization. PMID:26354424

  2. Shape coexistence in the neutron-deficient Pt isotopes in the configuration-mixed IBM

    SciTech Connect

    Vargas, Carlos E.; Campuzano, Cuauhtemoc; Morales, Irving O.; Frank, Alejandro; Van Isacker, Piet

    2008-05-12

    The matrix-coherent state approach in the IBM with configuration mixing is used to describe the geometry of neutron-deficient Pt isotopes. Employing a parameter set for all isotopes determined previously, it is found that the lowest minimum goes from spherical to oblate and finally acquires a prolate shape when approaching the mid-shell Pt isotopes.

  3. First Evidence of Shape Coexistence in the ^{78}Ni Region: Intruder 0_{2}^{+} State in ^{80}Ge.

    PubMed

    Gottardo, A; Verney, D; Delafosse, C; Ibrahim, F; Roussière, B; Sotty, C; Roccia, S; Andreoiu, C; Costache, C; Delattre, M-C; Deloncle, I; Etilé, A; Franchoo, S; Gaulard, C; Guillot, J; Lebois, M; MacCormick, M; Marginean, N; Marginean, R; Matea, I; Mihai, C; Mitu, I; Olivier, L; Portail, C; Qi, L; Stan, L; Testov, D; Wilson, J; Yordanov, D T

    2016-05-01

    The N=48 ^{80}Ge nucleus is studied by means of β-delayed electron-conversion spectroscopy at ALTO. The radioactive ^{80}Ga beam is produced through the isotope separation on line photofission technique and collected on a movable tape for the measurement of γ and e^{-} emission following β decay. An electric monopole E0 transition, which points to a 639(1) keV intruder 0_{2}^{+} state, is observed for the first time. This new state is lower than the 2_{1}^{+} level in ^{80}Ge, and provides evidence of shape coexistence close to one of the most neutron-rich doubly magic nuclei discovered so far, ^{78}Ni. This result is compared with theoretical estimates, helping to explain the role of monopole and quadrupole forces in the weakening of the N=50 gap at Z=32. The evolution of intruder 0_{2}^{+} states towards ^{78}Ni is discussed. PMID:27203316

  4. The Fisher Droplet Model and Physical Clusters at Liquid-Vapor Phase Coexistence with Implications for the Nuclear Phase Diagram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lake, Peter Theodore, Jr.

    The nuclear strong force, which binds the nucleons within an atomic nucleus, is a van der Waals force. A consequence of this is that the phenomenon of liquid-vapor phase coexistence occurs in the nuclear system. The experimental means of constructing the nuclear phase diagrams rely heavily on the thermodynamics of cluster theories, theories that historically have not served in many practical applications. In this thesis I explore the validity of the ideal cluster law and the Fisher droplet model in systems where the phase diagrams are known from traditional means. For molecular fluids, I show that the phase coexistence of a wide variety of systems can be described using the Fisher theory. This study is closely related to the study of an extended principle of corresponding states. These considerations demonstrates the utility of the Fisher droplet model in describing liquid-vapor phase coexistence of van der Waals fluids. For model systems, I show that the physical clusters of the Lennard-Jones model at coexistence can be used to construct the phase diagrams of the fluid. The connection between the physical clusters and the thermodynamic properties of the vapor are established using the ideal cluster law. Furthermore, the cluster concentrations are well described by the Fisher droplet model. These considerations lead to an alternative construction of the phase diagrams for the Lennard-Jones system. The success of cluster theories to describe properties of liquid-vapor coexistence that are already well established demonstrates the validity of applying these concepts to construct the nuclear phase diagrams.

  5. Study of extreme nuclear shapes in extreme conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, Sudhee Ranjan

    2014-08-14

    Studies of extreme nuclear shapes have always fascinated scientists and are being pursued quite strongly over the years. Nuclei present themselves with interesting shapes and structures at different conditions of spin, excitation and also with the number of neutrons and/or protons in them. Gamma decays from the Giant dipole Resonances in nuclei can probe directly their shapes at different extreme conditions by looking at their resonant line-shapes, e.g., Jacobi shapes and shape-transitions, super/hyper-deformation etc. Similar such studies, done for the first time, using the LAMBDA high energy gamma spectrometer developed at VECC, is discussed here.

  6. Moving Cell Boundaries Drive Nuclear Shaping during Cell Spreading

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yuan; Lovett, David; Zhang, Qiao; Neelam, Srujana; Kuchibhotla, Ram Anirudh; Zhu, Ruijun; Gundersen, Gregg G.; Lele, Tanmay P.; Dickinson, Richard B.

    2015-01-01

    The nucleus has a smooth, regular appearance in normal cells, and its shape is greatly altered in human pathologies. Yet, how the cell establishes nuclear shape is not well understood. We imaged the dynamics of nuclear shaping in NIH3T3 fibroblasts. Nuclei translated toward the substratum and began flattening during the early stages of cell spreading. Initially, nuclear height and width correlated with the degree of cell spreading, but over time, reached steady-state values even as the cell continued to spread. Actomyosin activity, actomyosin bundles, microtubules, and intermediate filaments, as well as the LINC complex, were all dispensable for nuclear flattening as long as the cell could spread. Inhibition of actin polymerization as well as myosin light chain kinase with the drug ML7 limited both the initial spreading of cells and flattening of nuclei, and for well-spread cells, inhibition of myosin-II ATPase with the drug blebbistatin decreased cell spreading with associated nuclear rounding. Together, these results show that cell spreading is necessary and sufficient to drive nuclear flattening under a wide range of conditions, including in the presence or absence of myosin activity. To explain this observation, we propose a computational model for nuclear and cell mechanics that shows how frictional transmission of stress from the moving cell boundaries to the nuclear surface shapes the nucleus during early cell spreading. Our results point to a surprisingly simple mechanical system in cells for establishing nuclear shapes. PMID:26287620

  7. Low-density homogeneous symmetric nuclear matter: Disclosing dinucleons in coexisting phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arellano, Hugo F.; Delaroche, Jean-Paul

    2015-01-01

    The effect of in-medium dinucleon bound states on self-consistent single-particle fields in Brueckner, Bethe and Goldstone theory is investigated in symmetric nuclear matter at zero temperature. To this end, dinucleon bound state occurences in the 1 S 0 and 3 SD 1 channels are explicitly accounted for --within the continuous choice for the auxiliary fields-- while imposing self-consistency in Brueckner-Hartree-Fock approximation calculations. Searches are carried out at Fermi momenta in the range fm-1, using the Argonne bare nucleon-nucleon potential without resorting to the effective-mass approximation. As a result, two distinct solutions meeting the self-consistency requirement are found with overlapping domains in the interval 0.130 fm-1 0.285 fm-1, corresponding to mass densities between and g cm-3. Effective masses as high as three times the nucleon mass are found in the coexistence domain. The emergence of superfluidity in relationship with BCS pairing gap solutions is discussed.

  8. Superdeformation in the a Approximately 190 Mass Region and Shape Coexistence in LEAD-194

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brinkman, Matthew James

    Near-yrast states in ^{194 }Pb have been identified up to a spin of {~}35hbar following the ^{176}Yb(^ {24}Mg,6n)^{194} Pb^{*} reaction at a beam energy of 134 MeV, measured with the High Energy -Resolution Array located at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory 88-Inch Cyclotron facility. Eighteen new transitions were placed. Examples of non-collective prolate and oblate and collective oblate excitations are seen. In addition a rotational band consisting of twelve transitions, with energy spacings characteristic of superdeformed shapes, were also seen. These results have been interpreted using both Nilsson model calculations and previously published potential energy surface calculations. The superdeformed bands in the A ~ 190 mass region are discussed with primary emphasis on ten superdeformed bands in ^{192,193,194 }Hg and ^{192,194,196,198 }Pb discovered or codiscovered by our collaboration. The discussion of superdeformation in these nuclei have been broken into three portions, focusing on the population of, the physics associated with, and the depopulation of these bands, respectively. The population behavior of the superdeformed structures is presented, and discussed with respect to theoretical predictions for nuclei near A ~ 190 expected to support superdeformation. A detailed analysis of the population of the ^{193} Hg^{rm 1a} band is provided, and the results are compared with statistical model calculations predictions. Significant differences were found between the population of the superdeformed bands in the A ~ 150 and 190 mass regions. The systematics of the intraband region are presented. Nilsson model calculations are carried out, with nucleon configurations for the primary superdeformed bands proposed. A discussion of possible mechanisms for reproducing the smooth increase in dynamic moments of inertia observed in all superdeformed bands in this mass region is provided. A number of superdeformed bands in the A ~ 190 mass region have transition energies

  9. Isomer Shift and Magnetic Moment of the Long-Lived 1/2^{+} Isomer in _{30}^{79}Zn_{49}: Signature of Shape Coexistence near ^{78}Ni.

    PubMed

    Yang, X F; Wraith, C; Xie, L; Babcock, C; Billowes, J; Bissell, M L; Blaum, K; Cheal, B; Flanagan, K T; Garcia Ruiz, R F; Gins, W; Gorges, C; Grob, L K; Heylen, H; Kaufmann, S; Kowalska, M; Kraemer, J; Malbrunot-Ettenauer, S; Neugart, R; Neyens, G; Nörtershäuser, W; Papuga, J; Sánchez, R; Yordanov, D T

    2016-05-01

    Collinear laser spectroscopy is performed on the _{30}^{79}Zn_{49} isotope at ISOLDE-CERN. The existence of a long-lived isomer with a few hundred milliseconds half-life is confirmed, and the nuclear spins and moments of the ground and isomeric states in ^{79}Zn as well as the isomer shift are measured. From the observed hyperfine structures, spins I=9/2 and I=1/2 are firmly assigned to the ground and isomeric states. The magnetic moment μ (^{79}Zn)=-1.1866(10)μ_{N}, confirms the spin-parity 9/2^{+} with a νg_{9/2}^{-1} shell-model configuration, in excellent agreement with the prediction from large scale shell-model theories. The magnetic moment μ (^{79m}Zn)=-1.0180(12)μ_{N} supports a positive parity for the isomer, with a wave function dominated by a 2h-1p neutron excitation across the N=50 shell gap. The large isomer shift reveals an increase of the intruder isomer mean square charge radius with respect to that of the ground state, δ⟨r_{c}^{2}⟩^{79,79m}=+0.204(6)  fm^{2}, providing first evidence of shape coexistence.

  10. Isomer Shift and Magnetic Moment of the Long-Lived 1/2^{+} Isomer in _{30}^{79}Zn_{49}: Signature of Shape Coexistence near ^{78}Ni.

    PubMed

    Yang, X F; Wraith, C; Xie, L; Babcock, C; Billowes, J; Bissell, M L; Blaum, K; Cheal, B; Flanagan, K T; Garcia Ruiz, R F; Gins, W; Gorges, C; Grob, L K; Heylen, H; Kaufmann, S; Kowalska, M; Kraemer, J; Malbrunot-Ettenauer, S; Neugart, R; Neyens, G; Nörtershäuser, W; Papuga, J; Sánchez, R; Yordanov, D T

    2016-05-01

    Collinear laser spectroscopy is performed on the _{30}^{79}Zn_{49} isotope at ISOLDE-CERN. The existence of a long-lived isomer with a few hundred milliseconds half-life is confirmed, and the nuclear spins and moments of the ground and isomeric states in ^{79}Zn as well as the isomer shift are measured. From the observed hyperfine structures, spins I=9/2 and I=1/2 are firmly assigned to the ground and isomeric states. The magnetic moment μ (^{79}Zn)=-1.1866(10)μ_{N}, confirms the spin-parity 9/2^{+} with a νg_{9/2}^{-1} shell-model configuration, in excellent agreement with the prediction from large scale shell-model theories. The magnetic moment μ (^{79m}Zn)=-1.0180(12)μ_{N} supports a positive parity for the isomer, with a wave function dominated by a 2h-1p neutron excitation across the N=50 shell gap. The large isomer shift reveals an increase of the intruder isomer mean square charge radius with respect to that of the ground state, δ⟨r_{c}^{2}⟩^{79,79m}=+0.204(6)  fm^{2}, providing first evidence of shape coexistence. PMID:27203317

  11. Shape coexistence at N=20 and N=28: Study of 0{sub 2}{sup +} states in {sup 34}Si and {sup 44}S

    SciTech Connect

    Grévy, S.; Rotaru, F.; Negoita, F.; Borcea, C.; Borcea, R.; Buta, A.; Calinescu, S.; Petrone, C.; Mrazek, J.; Lukyanov, S.; Penionzhkevich, Y.; Cáceres, L.; De Oliveira, F.; Force, C.; Lebhertz, D.; Sorlin, O.; Stodel, C.; Thomas, J. C.; Chevrier, R. [Grand Accélérateur National d'Ions Lourds , CEA and others

    2014-08-14

    It is well known that the nuclear shell structure changes for the most exotic nuclei. One of the consequences of this phenomenon is the modification of the 'classical' magic numbers, as experimentally observed at N = 20 and N = 28. Nevertheless, the mechanisms responsible for such changes are still under discussion and more experimental information is needed to better constrain the theoretical models. In these proceedings, we report on the discovery and the experimental study by precise spectroscopy experiments of the 0{sub 2}{sup +} state in {sup 34}Si and {sup 44}S. The {sup 34}Si is located between the magic spherical {sup 36}S and the deformed {sup 32}Mg, member of the so-called island of inversion, whereas {sup 44}S is located between the magic spherical {sup 48}Ca and the deformed {sup 42}Si. Therefore, the structure of these nuclei, and in particular the phenomenon of shape coexistence, is of crucial importance to understand how the intruder configurations progressively dominate the ground state structure of the most exotic nuclei at both N = 20 and N = 28.

  12. Isomer Shift and Magnetic Moment of the Long-Lived 1 /2+ Isomer in 30,79Zn49: Signature of Shape Coexistence near 78Ni

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, X. F.; Wraith, C.; Xie, L.; Babcock, C.; Billowes, J.; Bissell, M. L.; Blaum, K.; Cheal, B.; Flanagan, K. T.; Garcia Ruiz, R. F.; Gins, W.; Gorges, C.; Grob, L. K.; Heylen, H.; Kaufmann, S.; Kowalska, M.; Kraemer, J.; Malbrunot-Ettenauer, S.; Neugart, R.; Neyens, G.; Nörtershäuser, W.; Papuga, J.; Sánchez, R.; Yordanov, D. T.

    2016-05-01

    Collinear laser spectroscopy is performed on the 30,79Zn49 isotope at ISOLDE-CERN. The existence of a long-lived isomer with a few hundred milliseconds half-life is confirmed, and the nuclear spins and moments of the ground and isomeric states in 79Zn as well as the isomer shift are measured. From the observed hyperfine structures, spins I =9 /2 and I =1 /2 are firmly assigned to the ground and isomeric states. The magnetic moment μ (79Zn)=-1.1866 (10 )μN , confirms the spin-parity 9 /2+ with a ν g9/2 -1 shell-model configuration, in excellent agreement with the prediction from large scale shell-model theories. The magnetic moment μ (Znm79)=-1.0180 (12 )μN supports a positive parity for the isomer, with a wave function dominated by a 2 h -1 p neutron excitation across the N =50 shell gap. The large isomer shift reveals an increase of the intruder isomer mean square charge radius with respect to that of the ground state, δ ⟨rc2⟩79 ,79 m=+0.204 (6 ) fm2 , providing first evidence of shape coexistence.

  13. Search for shape coexistence in {sup 188,190}Pb via fine structure in the alpha decay of {sup 192,194}Po

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, I.; Davids, C.; Janssens, R.V.F.

    1995-08-01

    The interaction between coexisting shapes in nuclei near closed shells was of great interest in the past decade. Excited 0{sup +} states at low energy can often be identified as the bandheads of structures with differing shapes built on those states, These structures were identified in {sup 190-198}Pb via beta decay and alpha decay {open_quotes}fine structure{close_quotes} studies. Coexistence of different shapes in Pb nuclei was predicted by Nilsson-Strutinsky calculations, in which both the oblate and prolate minima were predicted to have excitation energies near 1 MeV. It was our intention to continue the systematic study of the Pb nuclides by searching for excited O{sup +} states in {sup 188}Pb by observing the fine structure in the alpha decay of {sup 192}Po.

  14. The relationship of bull fertility to sperm nuclear shape

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ostermeier, G.C.; Sargeant, G.A.; Yandell, B.S.; Parrish, J.J.

    2001-01-01

    group had a linear relationship (r .89, P .05) with fertility. To construct a plot of mean sperm shapes, a novel technique to automatically orient and identify the anterior tip of the sperm head was developed. The mean nuclear shape of high-fertility sperm was more elongated and tapered than those of lower fertility. A discriminant function (P .05) was also constructed that separated the 6 bulls into 2 groups based only on the harmonic amplitudes or sperm nuclear shape. The bulls were correctly classified into the 2 fertility groups. A comparison of sperm chromatin structure analysis (SCSA) and harmonic amplitudes found that overall size variance, anterior roundness, and posterior taperedness of sperm nuclei were related to chromatin stability (P .05). Some of the differences observed in sperm nuclear shape between the high- and lower-fertility bulls may be explained by varying levels of chromatin stability. However, sperm nuclear shape appears to contain additional information from chromatin stability alone. In this particular study, with 6 bulls, all with good chromatin quality, sperm nuclear shape was a better predictor of bull fertility.

  15. Nuclear Calcium Buffering Capacity Shapes Neuronal Architecture.

    PubMed

    Mauceri, Daniela; Hagenston, Anna M; Schramm, Kathrin; Weiss, Ursula; Bading, Hilmar

    2015-09-18

    Calcium-binding proteins (CaBPs) such as parvalbumin are part of the cellular calcium buffering system that determines intracellular calcium diffusion and influences the spatiotemporal dynamics of calcium signals. In neurons, CaBPs are primarily localized to the cytosol and function, for example, in nerve terminals in short-term synaptic plasticity. However, CaBPs are also expressed in the cell nucleus, suggesting that they modulate nuclear calcium signals, which are key regulators of neuronal gene expression. Here we show that the calcium buffering capacity of the cell nucleus in mouse hippocampal neurons regulates neuronal architecture by modulating the expression levels of VEGFD and the complement factor C1q-c, two nuclear calcium-regulated genes that control dendrite geometry and spine density, respectively. Increasing the levels of nuclear calcium buffers by means of expression of a nuclearly targeted form of parvalbumin fused to mCherry (PV.NLS-mC) led to a reduction in VEGFD expression and, as a result, to a decrease in total dendritic length and complexity. In contrast, mRNA levels of the synapse pruning factor C1q-c were increased in neurons expressing PV.NLS-mC, causing a reduction in the density and size of dendritic spines. Our results establish a close link between nuclear calcium buffering capacity and the transcription of genes that determine neuronal structure. They suggest that the development of cognitive deficits observed in neurological conditions associated with CaBP deregulation may reflect the loss of necessary structural features of dendrites and spines.

  16. Nuclear hyperdeformation and the Jacobi shape transition

    SciTech Connect

    Schunck, N.; Dudek, J.

    2007-05-15

    The possibility that atomic nuclei possess stable, extremely elongated (hyperdeformed) shapes at very high angular momentum is investigated in the light of the most recent experimental results. The crucial role of the Jacobi shape transitions for the population of hyperdeformed states is discussed and emphasized. State-of-the-art mean-field calculations including the most recent parametrization of the liquid-drop energy together with thermal effects and minimization algorithms allowing the spanning of a large deformation space predict the existence of a region of hyperdeformed nuclei in the mass A{approx}120-130: Te, Cs, Xe, I, and Ba isotopes. In agreement with predictions presented in reviews by J. Dudek, K. Pomorski, N. Schunck, and N. Dubray [Eur. Phys. J. A 20, 15 (2003)] and J. Dudek, N. Schunck, and N. Dubray [Acta Phys Pol. B 36, 975 (2005)], our extended calculations predict that only very short hyperdeformed bands composed of a dozen discrete transitions at the most are to be expected-in contrast to the results known for the superdeformed bands. We stress the importance of the experimental research in terms of multiple-{gamma} correlation analysis that proved to be very efficient for the superdeformation studies and seems very helpful in the even more difficult search for the discrete transitions in hyperdeformed nuclei.

  17. Spectroscopic Quadrupole Moments in {96,98}Sr: Evidence for Shape Coexistence in Neutron-Rich Strontium Isotopes at N=60.

    PubMed

    Clément, E; Zielińska, M; Görgen, A; Korten, W; Péru, S; Libert, J; Goutte, H; Hilaire, S; Bastin, B; Bauer, C; Blazhev, A; Bree, N; Bruyneel, B; Butler, P A; Butterworth, J; Delahaye, P; Dijon, A; Doherty, D T; Ekström, A; Fitzpatrick, C; Fransen, C; Georgiev, G; Gernhäuser, R; Hess, H; Iwanicki, J; Jenkins, D G; Larsen, A C; Ljungvall, J; Lutter, R; Marley, P; Moschner, K; Napiorkowski, P J; Pakarinen, J; Petts, A; Reiter, P; Renstrøm, T; Seidlitz, M; Siebeck, B; Siem, S; Sotty, C; Srebrny, J; Stefanescu, I; Tveten, G M; Van de Walle, J; Vermeulen, M; Voulot, D; Warr, N; Wenander, F; Wiens, A; De Witte, H; Wrzosek-Lipska, K

    2016-01-15

    Neutron-rich {96,98}Sr isotopes have been investigated by safe Coulomb excitation of radioactive beams at the REX-ISOLDE facility. Reduced transition probabilities and spectroscopic quadrupole moments have been extracted from the differential Coulomb excitation cross sections. These results allow, for the first time, the drawing of definite conclusions about the shape coexistence of highly deformed prolate and spherical configurations. In particular, a very small mixing between the coexisting states is observed, contrary to other mass regions where strong mixing is present. Experimental results have been compared to beyond-mean-field calculations using the Gogny D1S interaction in a five-dimensional collective Hamiltonian formalism, which reproduce the shape change at N=60.

  18. Spectroscopic Quadrupole Moments in {96,98}Sr: Evidence for Shape Coexistence in Neutron-Rich Strontium Isotopes at N=60.

    PubMed

    Clément, E; Zielińska, M; Görgen, A; Korten, W; Péru, S; Libert, J; Goutte, H; Hilaire, S; Bastin, B; Bauer, C; Blazhev, A; Bree, N; Bruyneel, B; Butler, P A; Butterworth, J; Delahaye, P; Dijon, A; Doherty, D T; Ekström, A; Fitzpatrick, C; Fransen, C; Georgiev, G; Gernhäuser, R; Hess, H; Iwanicki, J; Jenkins, D G; Larsen, A C; Ljungvall, J; Lutter, R; Marley, P; Moschner, K; Napiorkowski, P J; Pakarinen, J; Petts, A; Reiter, P; Renstrøm, T; Seidlitz, M; Siebeck, B; Siem, S; Sotty, C; Srebrny, J; Stefanescu, I; Tveten, G M; Van de Walle, J; Vermeulen, M; Voulot, D; Warr, N; Wenander, F; Wiens, A; De Witte, H; Wrzosek-Lipska, K

    2016-01-15

    Neutron-rich {96,98}Sr isotopes have been investigated by safe Coulomb excitation of radioactive beams at the REX-ISOLDE facility. Reduced transition probabilities and spectroscopic quadrupole moments have been extracted from the differential Coulomb excitation cross sections. These results allow, for the first time, the drawing of definite conclusions about the shape coexistence of highly deformed prolate and spherical configurations. In particular, a very small mixing between the coexisting states is observed, contrary to other mass regions where strong mixing is present. Experimental results have been compared to beyond-mean-field calculations using the Gogny D1S interaction in a five-dimensional collective Hamiltonian formalism, which reproduce the shape change at N=60. PMID:26824536

  19. SUN2 Overexpression Deforms Nuclear Shape and Inhibits HIV

    PubMed Central

    Amraoui, Sonia; di Nunzio, Francesca; Kieffer, Camille; Porrot, Françoise; Opp, Silvana; Diaz-Griffero, Felipe; Casartelli, Nicoletta

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In a previous screen of putative interferon-stimulated genes, SUN2 was shown to inhibit HIV-1 infection in an uncharacterized manner. SUN2 is an inner nuclear membrane protein belonging to the linker of nucleoskeleton and cytoskeleton complex. We have analyzed here the role of SUN2 in HIV infection. We report that in contrast to what was initially thought, SUN2 is not induced by type I interferon, and that SUN2 silencing does not modulate HIV infection. However, SUN2 overexpression in cell lines and in primary monocyte-derived dendritic cells inhibits the replication of HIV but not murine leukemia virus or chikungunya virus. We identified HIV-1 and HIV-2 strains that are unaffected by SUN2, suggesting that the effect is specific to particular viral components or cofactors. Intriguingly, SUN2 overexpression induces a multilobular flower-like nuclear shape that does not impact cell viability and is similar to that of cells isolated from patients with HTLV-I-associated adult T-cell leukemia or with progeria. Nuclear shape changes and HIV inhibition both mapped to the nucleoplasmic domain of SUN2 that interacts with the nuclear lamina. This block to HIV replication occurs between reverse transcription and nuclear entry, and passaging experiments selected for a single-amino-acid change in capsid (CA) that leads to resistance to overexpressed SUN2. Furthermore, using chemical inhibition or silencing of cyclophilin A (CypA), as well as CA mutant viruses, we implicated CypA in the SUN2-imposed block to HIV infection. Our results demonstrate that SUN2 overexpression perturbs both nuclear shape and early events of HIV infection. IMPORTANCE Cells encode proteins that interfere with viral replication, a number of which have been identified in overexpression screens. SUN2 is a nuclear membrane protein that was shown to inhibit HIV infection in such a screen, but how it blocked HIV infection was not known. We show that SUN2 overexpression blocks the infection of certain

  20. Role of shape dependence of dissipation on nuclear fission

    SciTech Connect

    Sadhukhan, Jhilam; Pal, Santanu

    2010-03-15

    We examine the validity of extending Kramers' expression for fission width to systems with shape-dependent dissipations. For a system with a shape-dependent dissipation, Kramers' width obtained with the presaddle dissipation strength is found to be different from the stationary width obtained from the corresponding Langevin equations. It is demonstrated that the probability of a hot compound nucleus undergoing fission depends on both the presaddle and the postsaddle dynamics of collective nuclear motion. The predictions for prescission neutron multiplicity and evaporation residue cross section from statistical model calculations are also found to be different from those obtained from Langevin dynamical calculations when a shape-dependent dissipation is considered. For systems with shape-dependent dissipations, we conclude that the strength of 'presaddle dissipation' determined by fitting experimental data in statistical model calculations does not represent the true strength of presaddle dissipation.

  1. Allometric and Non-Allometric Patterns in Sexual Dimorphism Discrimination of Wing Shape in Ophion intricatus: Might Two Male Morphotypes Coexist?

    PubMed Central

    Benítez, Hugo A.; Bravi, Raffaella; Parra, Luis E.; Sanzana, Maria-Jose; Sepúlveda-Zúñiga, Einer

    2013-01-01

    Bees and wasps could exhibit shape and size sexual dimorphism, and most of their morphological variation could depend on phenotypic responses due to environmental pressure during ontogenetic development. More complex measurement techniques related to size and shape rather than simply to mass and length should be required to analyze such a complex sexual dimorphism. In this study, differences related to wing shape and size of males and females of Ophion intricatus Brullé (Hymenoptera: Ichneumonidae) were evaluated using geometric morphometrics. Right and left wings of specimens were used, and a photographic matrix was constructed in which 18 morphological landmarks based on shape and vein patterns of the wings were digitalized. A multivariate analysis of wing shape showed significant differences between sexes and sites. The geometric variation demonstrated that the points at the intersection of radial and cubital-anal veins might be key characters to differentiate between sexes. This study also showed the presence of two clearly different male morphotypes coexisting in the same study site. However, it should be noted that the results of this study showed that the variation in wing shape is an analytical character in the determination of sexual differences in the family Ichneumonidae. These differences raise the question of whether sexual dimorphism of wing shape may be modulated by natural selection. PMID:24766555

  2. Probes of shape transitions from mass and charge radii of nuclear ground states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, B. H.; Liu, C. Y.

    2016-09-01

    The masses and sizes of nuclear ground states constitute two of the most precise and extensive arrays of experimental information. These data make a model-independent view of microscopic nuclear structure possible. Relevant differential observables of nuclear mass and charge radius can be highly sensitive to nuclear shape transitions. In this contribution, we examine the correlation of these two bulk properties to nuclear shape transitions. By combining different observables, it is even possible to isolate shape transitions from nuclear shell closures.

  3. Cytoskeletal prestress regulates nuclear shape and stiffness in cardiac myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyungsuk; Adams, William J; Alford, Patrick W; McCain, Megan L; Feinberg, Adam W; Sheeny, Sean P; Goss, Josue A

    2015-01-01

    Mechanical stresses on the myocyte nucleus have been associated with several diseases and potentially transduce mechanical stimuli into cellular responses. Although a number of physical links between the nuclear envelope and cytoplasmic filaments have been identified, previous studies have focused on the mechanical properties of individual components of the nucleus, such as the nuclear envelope and lamin network. The mechanical interaction between the cytoskeleton and chromatin on nuclear deformability remains elusive. Here, we investigated how cytoskeletal and chromatin structures influence nuclear mechanics in cardiac myocytes. Rapid decondensation of chromatin and rupture of the nuclear membrane caused a sudden expansion of DNA, a consequence of prestress exerted on the nucleus. To characterize the prestress exerted on the nucleus, we measured the shape and the stiffness of isolated nuclei and nuclei in living myocytes during disruption of cytoskeletal, myofibrillar, and chromatin structure. We found that the nucleus in myocytes is subject to both tensional and compressional prestress and its deformability is determined by a balance of those opposing forces. By developing a computational model of the prestressed nucleus, we showed that cytoskeletal and chromatin prestresses create vulnerability in the nuclear envelope. Our studies suggest the cytoskeletal–nuclear–chromatin interconnectivity may play an important role in mechanics of myocyte contraction and in the development of laminopathies by lamin mutations. PMID:25908635

  4. Shape and topography corrections for planetary nuclear spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prettyman, Thomas H.; Hendricks, John S.

    2015-11-01

    The elemental composition of planetary surfaces can be determined using gamma ray and neutron spectroscopy. Most planetary bodies for which nuclear spectroscopy data have been acquired are round, and simple, analytic corrections for measurement geometry can be applied; however, recent measurements of the irregular asteroid 4 Vesta by Dawn required more detailed corrections using a shape model (Prettyman et al., Science 2012). In addition, subtle artifacts of topography have been observed in low altitude measurements of lunar craters, with potential implications for polar hydrogen content (Eke et al., JGR 2015). To explore shape and topography effects, we have updated the general-purpose Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNPX to include a polygonal shape model (Prettyman and Hendricks, LPSC 2015). The shape model is fully integrated with the code’s 3D combinatorial geometry modules. A voxel-based acceleration algorithm enables fast ray-intersection calculations needed for Monte Carlo. As modified, MCNPX can model neutron and gamma ray transport within natural surfaces using global and/or regional shape/topography data (e.g. from photogrammetry and laser altimetry). We are using MCNPX to explore the effect of small-scale roughness, regional-, and global-topography for asteroids, comets and close-up measurements of high-relief features on larger bodies, such as the lunar surface. MCNPX can characterize basic effects on measurements by an orbiting spectrometer such as 1) the angular distribution of emitted particles, 2) shielding of galactic cosmic rays by surrounding terrain and 3) re-entrant scattering. In some cases, re-entrant scattering can be ignored, leading to a fast ray-tracing model that treats effects 1 and 2. The algorithm is applied to forward modeling and spatial deconvolution of epithermal neutron data acquired at Vesta. Analyses of shape/topography effects and correction strategies are presented for Vesta, selected small bodies and cratered

  5. Monopole strength as a probe of nuclear shape mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, R.A.

    1987-08-17

    The monopole strength, MS, within a single set of nuclear shape excitations is compared with the MS between different shapes. After misconceptions are pointed out concerning the spin dependence of B(E2) values, MS properties are juxtaposed with gamma-ray and beta-decay properties of /sup 70/Se, /sup 96/Zr, /sup 102/Pd, and the N = 60 isotones to illustrate the utility of combined investigations and evidence is given for the observation of a two-phonon octupole multiplet. Finally, consideration is given to the dominance of the /sup 3/S/sub 1/ force in producing deformation in the N > 50 1g nuclei. 23 refs., 4 figs.

  6. Shape coexistence in the neutron-deficient even-even (182-188)Hg isotopes studied via coulomb excitation.

    PubMed

    Bree, N; Wrzosek-Lipska, K; Petts, A; Andreyev, A; Bastin, B; Bender, M; Blazhev, A; Bruyneel, B; Butler, P A; Butterworth, J; Carpenter, M P; Cederkäll, J; Clément, E; Cocolios, T E; Deacon, A; Diriken, J; Ekström, A; Fitzpatrick, C; Fraile, L M; Fransen, Ch; Freeman, S J; Gaffney, L P; García-Ramos, J E; Geibel, K; Gernhäuser, R; Grahn, T; Guttormsen, M; Hadinia, B; Hadyńska-Kle K, K; Hass, M; Heenen, P-H; Herzberg, R-D; Hess, H; Heyde, K; Huyse, M; Ivanov, O; Jenkins, D G; Julin, R; Kesteloot, N; Kröll, Th; Krücken, R; Larsen, A C; Lutter, R; Marley, P; Napiorkowski, P J; Orlandi, R; Page, R D; Pakarinen, J; Patronis, N; Peura, P J; Piselli, E; Rahkila, P; Rapisarda, E; Reiter, P; Robinson, A P; Scheck, M; Siem, S; Singh Chakkal, K; Smith, J F; Srebrny, J; Stefanescu, I; Tveten, G M; Van Duppen, P; Van de Walle, J; Voulot, D; Warr, N; Wenander, F; Wiens, A; Wood, J L; Zielińska, M

    2014-04-25

    Coulomb-excitation experiments to study electromagnetic properties of radioactive even-even Hg isotopes were performed with 2.85  MeV/nucleon mercury beams from REX-ISOLDE. Magnitudes and relative signs of the reduced E2 matrix elements that couple the ground state and low-lying excited states in Hg182-188 were extracted. Information on the deformation of the ground and the first excited 0+ states was deduced using the quadrupole sum rules approach. Results show that the ground state is slightly deformed and of oblate nature, while a larger deformation for the excited 0+ state was noted in Hg182,184. The results are compared to beyond mean field and interacting-boson based models and interpreted within a two-state mixing model. Partial agreement with the model calculations was obtained. The presence of two different structures in the light even-mass mercury isotopes that coexist at low excitation energy is firmly established.

  7. Shape Coexistence in the Neutron-Deficient Even-Even Hg182-188 Isotopes Studied via Coulomb Excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bree, N.; Wrzosek-Lipska, K.; Petts, A.; Andreyev, A.; Bastin, B.; Bender, M.; Blazhev, A.; Bruyneel, B.; Butler, P. A.; Butterworth, J.; Carpenter, M. P.; Cederkäll, J.; Clément, E.; Cocolios, T. E.; Deacon, A.; Diriken, J.; Ekström, A.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fraile, L. M.; Fransen, Ch.; Freeman, S. J.; Gaffney, L. P.; García-Ramos, J. E.; Geibel, K.; Gernhäuser, R.; Grahn, T.; Guttormsen, M.; Hadinia, B.; Hadyńska-KleÂķ, K.; Hass, M.; Heenen, P.-H.; Herzberg, R.-D.; Hess, H.; Heyde, K.; Huyse, M.; Ivanov, O.; Jenkins, D. G.; Julin, R.; Kesteloot, N.; Kröll, Th.; Krücken, R.; Larsen, A. C.; Lutter, R.; Marley, P.; Napiorkowski, P. J.; Orlandi, R.; Page, R. D.; Pakarinen, J.; Patronis, N.; Peura, P. J.; Piselli, E.; Rahkila, P.; Rapisarda, E.; Reiter, P.; Robinson, A. P.; Scheck, M.; Siem, S.; Singh Chakkal, K.; Smith, J. F.; Srebrny, J.; Stefanescu, I.; Tveten, G. M.; Van Duppen, P.; Van de Walle, J.; Voulot, D.; Warr, N.; Wenander, F.; Wiens, A.; Wood, J. L.; Zielińska, M.

    2014-04-01

    Coulomb-excitation experiments to study electromagnetic properties of radioactive even-even Hg isotopes were performed with 2.85 MeV/nucleon mercury beams from REX-ISOLDE. Magnitudes and relative signs of the reduced E2 matrix elements that couple the ground state and low-lying excited states in Hg182-188 were extracted. Information on the deformation of the ground and the first excited 0+ states was deduced using the quadrupole sum rules approach. Results show that the ground state is slightly deformed and of oblate nature, while a larger deformation for the excited 0+ state was noted in Hg182,184. The results are compared to beyond mean field and interacting-boson based models and interpreted within a two-state mixing model. Partial agreement with the model calculations was obtained. The presence of two different structures in the light even-mass mercury isotopes that coexist at low excitation energy is firmly established.

  8. Shape coexistence in the neutron-deficient even-even (182-188)Hg isotopes studied via coulomb excitation.

    PubMed

    Bree, N; Wrzosek-Lipska, K; Petts, A; Andreyev, A; Bastin, B; Bender, M; Blazhev, A; Bruyneel, B; Butler, P A; Butterworth, J; Carpenter, M P; Cederkäll, J; Clément, E; Cocolios, T E; Deacon, A; Diriken, J; Ekström, A; Fitzpatrick, C; Fraile, L M; Fransen, Ch; Freeman, S J; Gaffney, L P; García-Ramos, J E; Geibel, K; Gernhäuser, R; Grahn, T; Guttormsen, M; Hadinia, B; Hadyńska-Kle K, K; Hass, M; Heenen, P-H; Herzberg, R-D; Hess, H; Heyde, K; Huyse, M; Ivanov, O; Jenkins, D G; Julin, R; Kesteloot, N; Kröll, Th; Krücken, R; Larsen, A C; Lutter, R; Marley, P; Napiorkowski, P J; Orlandi, R; Page, R D; Pakarinen, J; Patronis, N; Peura, P J; Piselli, E; Rahkila, P; Rapisarda, E; Reiter, P; Robinson, A P; Scheck, M; Siem, S; Singh Chakkal, K; Smith, J F; Srebrny, J; Stefanescu, I; Tveten, G M; Van Duppen, P; Van de Walle, J; Voulot, D; Warr, N; Wenander, F; Wiens, A; Wood, J L; Zielińska, M

    2014-04-25

    Coulomb-excitation experiments to study electromagnetic properties of radioactive even-even Hg isotopes were performed with 2.85  MeV/nucleon mercury beams from REX-ISOLDE. Magnitudes and relative signs of the reduced E2 matrix elements that couple the ground state and low-lying excited states in Hg182-188 were extracted. Information on the deformation of the ground and the first excited 0+ states was deduced using the quadrupole sum rules approach. Results show that the ground state is slightly deformed and of oblate nature, while a larger deformation for the excited 0+ state was noted in Hg182,184. The results are compared to beyond mean field and interacting-boson based models and interpreted within a two-state mixing model. Partial agreement with the model calculations was obtained. The presence of two different structures in the light even-mass mercury isotopes that coexist at low excitation energy is firmly established. PMID:24815644

  9. Sizing up the nucleus: nuclear shape, size and nuclear-envelope assembly

    PubMed Central

    Webster, Micah; Witkin, Keren L.; Cohen-Fix, Orna

    2009-01-01

    Summary The nucleus is one of the most prominent cellular organelles, yet surprisingly little is known about how it is formed, what determines its shape and what defines its size. As the nuclear envelope (NE) disassembles in each and every cell cycle in metazoans, the process of rebuilding the nucleus is crucial for proper development and cell proliferation. In this Commentary, we summarize what is known about the regulation of nuclear shape and size, and highlight recent findings that shed light on the process of building a nucleus, including new discoveries related to NE assembly and the relationship between the NE and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Throughout our discussion, we note interesting aspects of nuclear structure that have yet to be resolved. Finally, we present an idea – which we refer to as `the limited flat membrane hypothesis' – to explain the formation of a single nucleus that encompasses of all of the cell's chromosomes following mitosis. PMID:19420234

  10. Multidimensionally constrained covariant density functional theories—nuclear shapes and potential energy surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Shan-Gui

    2016-06-01

    The intrinsic nuclear shapes deviating from a sphere not only manifest themselves in nuclear collective states but also play important roles in determining nuclear potential energy surfaces (PES’s) and fission barriers. In order to describe microscopically and self-consistently nuclear shapes and PES’s with as many shape degrees of freedom as possible included, we developed multidimensionally constrained covariant density functional theories (MDC-CDFTs). In MDC-CDFTs, the axial symmetry and the reflection symmetry are both broken and all deformations characterized by {β }λ μ with even μ are considered. We have used the MDC-CDFTs to study PES’s and fission barriers of actinides, the non-axial octupole Y 32 correlations in N = 150 isotones and shapes of hypernuclei. In this Review we will give briefly the formalism of MDC-CDFTs and present the applications to normal nuclei.

  11. Expectation values for low resolution flow slit scan prescreening: influence of nuclear shape and DNA density

    SciTech Connect

    Mullaney, P.F.; Mann, R.; Seger, G.; Achatz, M.

    1981-01-01

    High resolution fluorescent image analysis has been conducted with mithramycin stained cells from clinical gynecological specimens. Features characteristic of the usual, low resolution, one dimensional slit-scan flow cytometric measurements were extracted from 250 high resolution nuclear images. In addition to the measurement of the usual parameters, nuclear ellipticity and DNA density (DNA per unit nuclear size) were also determined. Preliminary results indicate both these features offer increased discrimination. When nuclear shape is included as a global feature, at least 77% of the diagnostic cells can be distinguished from normals, with no overlap. Both features hold promise for improving the discrimination possible with flow cytometry.

  12. Mitochondrial and nuclear DNA matching shapes metabolism and healthy ageing.

    PubMed

    Latorre-Pellicer, Ana; Moreno-Loshuertos, Raquel; Lechuga-Vieco, Ana Victoria; Sánchez-Cabo, Fátima; Torroja, Carlos; Acín-Pérez, Rebeca; Calvo, Enrique; Aix, Esther; González-Guerra, Andrés; Logan, Angela; Bernad-Miana, María Luisa; Romanos, Eduardo; Cruz, Raquel; Cogliati, Sara; Sobrino, Beatriz; Carracedo, Ángel; Pérez-Martos, Acisclo; Fernández-Silva, Patricio; Ruíz-Cabello, Jesús; Murphy, Michael P; Flores, Ignacio; Vázquez, Jesús; Enríquez, José Antonio

    2016-07-28

    Human mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) shows extensive within population sequence variability. Many studies suggest that mtDNA variants may be associated with ageing or diseases, although mechanistic evidence at the molecular level is lacking. Mitochondrial replacement has the potential to prevent transmission of disease-causing oocyte mtDNA. However, extension of this technology requires a comprehensive understanding of the physiological relevance of mtDNA sequence variability and its match with the nuclear-encoded mitochondrial genes. Studies in conplastic animals allow comparison of individuals with the same nuclear genome but different mtDNA variants, and have provided both supporting and refuting evidence that mtDNA variation influences organismal physiology. However, most of these studies did not confirm the conplastic status, focused on younger animals, and did not investigate the full range of physiological and phenotypic variability likely to be influenced by mitochondria. Here we systematically characterized conplastic mice throughout their lifespan using transcriptomic, proteomic,metabolomic, biochemical, physiological and phenotyping studies. We show that mtDNA haplotype profoundly influences mitochondrial proteostasis and reactive oxygen species generation,insulin signalling, obesity, and ageing parameters including telomere shortening and mitochondrial dysfunction, resulting in profound differences in health longevity between conplastic strains. PMID:27383793

  13. Nuclear structure and shapes from prompt gamma ray spectroscopy of fission products

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, I.; Morss, L.R.; Durell, J.L.

    1996-10-01

    Many nuclear shape phenomena are predicted to occur in neutron-rich nuclei. The best source for the production of these nuclides is the spontaneous fission which produces practically hundreds of nuclides with yields of greater than 0.1 % per decay. Measurements of coincident gamma rays with large Ge arrays have recently been made to obtain information on nuclear structures and shapes of these neutron- rich nuclei. Among the important results that have been obtained from such measurements are octupole correlations in Ba isotopes, triaxial shapes in Ru nuclei, two-phonon vibrations in {sup 106}Mo and level lifetimes and quadrupole moments in Nd isotopes and A=100 nuclei. These data have been used to test theoretical models.

  14. Masses and scaling relations for nuclear star clusters, and their co-existence with central black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgiev, Iskren Y.; Böker, Torsten; Leigh, Nathan; Lützgendorf, Nora; Neumayer, Nadine

    2016-04-01

    Galactic nuclei typically host either a nuclear star cluster (NSC, prevalent in galaxies with masses ≲1010 M⊙) or a massive black hole (MBH, common in galaxies with masses ≳1012 M⊙). In the intermediate-mass range, some nuclei host both an NSC and an MBH. In this paper, we explore scaling relations between NSC mass (M_NSC) and host-galaxy total stellar mass (M_{star ,gal}) using a large sample of NSCs in late- and early-type galaxies, including a number of NSCs harbouring an MBH. Such scaling relations reflect the underlying physical mechanisms driving the formation and (co)evolution of these central massive objects. We find ˜1.5σ significant differences between NSCs in late- and early-type galaxies in the slopes and offsets of the relations reff,NSC-M_NSC, reff,NSC-M_{star ,gal} and M_NSC-M_{star ,gal}, in the sense that (i) NSCs in late types are more compact at fixed M_NSC and M_{star ,gal}; and (ii) the M_NSC-M_{star ,gal} relation is shallower for NSCs in late types than in early types, similar to the M_BH-M_{star ,bulge} relation. We discuss these results in the context of the (possibly ongoing) evolution of NSCs, depending on host-galaxy type. For NSCs with an MBH, we illustrate the possible influence of an MBH on its host NSC, by considering the ratio between the radius of the MBH sphere of influence and reff,NSC. NSCs harbouring a sufficiently massive black hole are likely to exhibit surface brightness profile deviating from a typical King profile.

  15. System for determining the type of nuclear radiation from detector output pulse shape

    DOEpatents

    Miller, W.H.; Berliner, R.R.

    1994-09-13

    A radiation detection system determines the type of nuclear radiation received in a detector by producing a correlation value representative of the statistical cross correlation between the shape of the detector signal and pulse shape data previously stored in memory and characteristic of respective types of radiation. The correlation value is indicative of the type of radiation. The energy of the radiation is determined from the detector signal and is used to produce a spectrum of radiation energies according to radiation type for indicating the nature of the material producing the radiation. 2 figs.

  16. System for determining the type of nuclear radiation from detector output pulse shape

    DOEpatents

    Miller, William H.; Berliner, Ronald R.

    1994-01-01

    A radiation detection system determines the type of nuclear radiation received in a detector by producing a correlation value representative of the statistical cross correlation between the shape of the detector signal and pulse shape data previously stored in memory and characteristic of respective types of radiation. The correlation value is indicative of the type of radiation. The energy of the radiation is determined from the detector signal and is used to produce a spectrum of radiation energies according to radiation type for indicating the nature of the material producing the radiation.

  17. {alpha} transitions to coexisting 0{sup +} states in Pb and Po isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Chang; Ren Zhongzhou

    2007-04-15

    The {alpha}-transitions ({delta}l=0) to ground and first excited 0{sup +} states in neutron deficient Pb and Po isotopes are systematically analyzed by the density-dependent cluster model. The magnitude of nuclear deformation of the coexisting 0{sub 1}{sup +} and 0{sub 2}{sup +} states is extracted directly from the experimental {alpha}-decay energies and half-lives. The phenomenon of shape coexistence around the Z=82 shell closure is clearly demonstrated in our present analysis. The obtained deformation values from Rn {yields} Po {yields} Pb decay chains are generally consistent with both the available experimental and theoretical studies.

  18. Universally Conserved Relationships between Nuclear Shape and Cytoplasmic Mechanical Properties in Human Stem Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozoya, Oswaldo A.; Gilchrist, Christopher L.; Guilak, Farshid

    2016-03-01

    The ability of cells to proliferate, differentiate, transduce extracellular signals and assemble tissues involves structural connections between nucleus and cytoskeleton. Yet, how the mechanics of these connections vary inside stem cells is not fully understood. To address those questions, we combined two-dimensional particle-tracking microrheology and morphological measures using variable reduction techniques to measure whether cytoplasmic mechanics allow for discrimination between different human adherent stem cell types and across different culture conditions. Here we show that nuclear shape is a quantifiable discriminant of mechanical properties in the perinuclear cytoskeleton (pnCSK) of various stem cell types. Also, we find the pnCSK is a region with different mechanical properties than elsewhere in the cytoskeleton, with heterogeneously distributed locations exhibiting subdiffusive features, and which obeys physical relations conserved among various stem cell types. Finally, we offer a prospective basis to discriminate between stem cell types by coupling perinuclear mechanical properties to nuclear shape.

  19. Nuclear shape transitions in neutron-rich medium-mass nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Sarriguren, P.; Rodriguez-Guzman, R.; Robledo, L. M.

    2012-10-20

    We study the isotopic evolution of the ground-state nuclear shapes in neutron-rich Kr, Rb, Sr, Y, Zr, Nb, and Mo isotopic chains. Both even-even and odd-A nuclei are included in the analysis. For the latter we also study the systematics of their one-quasiparticle low-lying configurations. The theoretical approach is based on a selfconsistent Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov formalism with finite range Gogny energy density functionals. Neutron separation energies, charge radii, and the spin-parity of the ground states are calculated and compared with available data. Shape-transition signatures are identified around N= 60 isotones as discontinuities in both charge radii isotopic shifts and spin-parities of the ground states. The nuclear deformation including triaxiality is shown to play a relevant role in the understanding of the bulk and spectroscopic features of the ground and low-lying one-quasiparticle states.

  20. Universally Conserved Relationships between Nuclear Shape and Cytoplasmic Mechanical Properties in Human Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lozoya, Oswaldo A.; Gilchrist, Christopher L.; Guilak, Farshid

    2016-01-01

    The ability of cells to proliferate, differentiate, transduce extracellular signals and assemble tissues involves structural connections between nucleus and cytoskeleton. Yet, how the mechanics of these connections vary inside stem cells is not fully understood. To address those questions, we combined two-dimensional particle-tracking microrheology and morphological measures using variable reduction techniques to measure whether cytoplasmic mechanics allow for discrimination between different human adherent stem cell types and across different culture conditions. Here we show that nuclear shape is a quantifiable discriminant of mechanical properties in the perinuclear cytoskeleton (pnCSK) of various stem cell types. Also, we find the pnCSK is a region with different mechanical properties than elsewhere in the cytoskeleton, with heterogeneously distributed locations exhibiting subdiffusive features, and which obeys physical relations conserved among various stem cell types. Finally, we offer a prospective basis to discriminate between stem cell types by coupling perinuclear mechanical properties to nuclear shape. PMID:26976044

  1. Mito-nuclear genetic comparison in a Wolbachia infected weevil: insights on reproductive mode, infection age and evolutionary forces shaping genetic variation

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Maternally inherited endosymbionts like Wolbachia pipientis are in linkage disequilibrium with the mtDNA of their hosts. Therefore, they can induce selective sweeps, decreasing genetic diversity over many generations. This sex ratio distorter, that is involved in the origin of parthenogenesis and other reproductive alterations, infects the parthenogenetic weevil Naupactus cervinus, a serious pest of ornamental and fruit plants. Results Molecular evolution analyses of mitochondrial (COI) and nuclear (ITS1) sequences from 309 individuals of Naupactus cervinus sampled over a broad range of its geographical distribution were carried out. Our results demonstrate lack of recombination in the nuclear fragment, non-random association between nuclear and mitochondrial genomes and the consequent coevolution of both genomes, being an indirect evidence of apomixis. This weevil is infected by a single Wolbachia strain, which could have caused a moderate bottleneck in the invaded population which survived the initial infection. Conclusions Clonal reproduction and Wolbachia infection induce the coevolution of bacterial, mitochondrial and nuclear genomes. The time elapsed since the Wolbachia invasion would have erased the traces of the demographic crash in the mtDNA, being the nuclear genome the only one that retained the signal of the bottleneck. The amount of genetic change accumulated in the mtDNA and the high prevalence of Wolbachia in all populations of N. cervinus agree with the hypothesis of an ancient infection. Wolbachia probably had great influence in shaping the genetic diversity of N. cervinus. However, it would have not caused the extinction of males, since sexual and asexual infected lineages coexisted until recent times. PMID:21050430

  2. Self-consistent description of coexistence phenomena in medium mass nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Petrovici, A.; Schmid, K. W.; Faessler, Amand; Andrei, O.

    2010-11-24

    Shape coexistence and mixing, isospin mixing, the competition between neutron-proton and like-nucleon pairing correlations have been identified as the main characteristic features of nuclei near the N = Z line in the A{approx_equal}70 mass region. The self-consistent treatment of exotic phenomena dominated by their interplay represents a challenge for the nuclear many-body models. The realistic description of tiny effects in this mass region aiming to test the fundamental interactions and symmetries as well as the required theoretical predictions concerning the nuclear properties relevant for astrophysical scenarios are still open problems of the low-energy nuclear physics today.

  3. Spermatid Head Elongation with Normal Nuclear Shaping Requires ADP-Ribosyltransferase PARP11 (ARTD11) in Mice1

    PubMed Central

    Meyer-Ficca, Mirella L.; Ihara, Motomasa; Bader, Jessica J.; Leu, N. Adrian; Beneke, Sascha; Meyer, Ralph G.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Sperm are highly differentiated cells characterized by their species-specific nuclear shapes and extremely condensed chromatin. Abnormal head shapes represent a form of teratozoospermia that can impair fertilization capacity. This study shows that poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-11 (ARTD11/PARP11), a member of the ADP-ribosyltransferase (ARTD) family, is expressed preferentially in spermatids undergoing nuclear condensation and differentiation. Deletion of the Parp11 gene results in teratozoospermia and male infertility in mice due to the formation of abnormally shaped fertilization-incompetent sperm, despite normal testis weights and sperm counts. At the subcellular level, PARP11-deficient elongating spermatids reveal structural defects in the nuclear envelope and chromatin detachment associated with abnormal nuclear shaping, suggesting functional relevance of PARP11 for nuclear envelope stability and nuclear reorganization during spermiogenesis. In vitro, PARP11 exhibits mono(ADP-ribosyl)ation activity with the ability to ADP-ribosylate itself. In transfected somatic cells, PARP11 colocalizes with nuclear pore components, such as NUP153. Amino acids Y77, Q86, and R95 in the N-terminal WWE domain, as well as presence of the catalytic domain, are essential for colocalization of PARP11 with the nuclear envelope, but catalytic activity of the protein is not required for colocalization with NUP153. This study demonstrates that PARP11 is a novel enzyme important for proper sperm head shaping and identifies it as a potential factor involved in idiopathic mammalian teratozoospermia. PMID:25673562

  4. Implementation of a real-time adaptive digital shaping for nuclear spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regadío, Alberto; Sánchez-Prieto, Sebastián; Prieto, Manuel; Tabero, Jesús

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the structure, design and implementation of a new adaptive digital shaper for processing the pulses generated in nuclear particle detectors. The proposed adaptive algorithm has the capacity to automatically adjust the coefficients for shaping an input signal with a desired profile in real-time. Typical shapers such as triangular, trapezoidal or cusp-like ones can be generated, but more exotic unipolar shaping could also be performed. A practical prototype was designed, implemented and tested in a Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA). Particular attention was paid to the amount of internal FPGA resources required and to the sampling rate, making the design as simple as possible in order to minimize power consumption. Lastly, its performance and capabilities were measured using simulations and a real benchmark.

  5. Extreme nuclear shapes examined via giant dipole resonance lineshapes in hot light-mass systems

    SciTech Connect

    Pandit, Deepak; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Pal, Surajit; Bhattacharya, S.; Bhattacharya, C.; Banerjee, K.; Kundu, S.; Rana, T. K.; Dey, A.; Mukherjee, G.; Ghosh, T.; Banerjee, S. R.; De, A.; Gupta, D.

    2010-06-15

    The influence of alpha clustering on nuclear reaction dynamics is investigated using the giant dipole resonance (GDR) lineshape studies in the reactions {sup 20}Ne (E{sub lab}=145,160 MeV) + {sup 12}C and {sup 20}Ne (E{sub lab}=160 MeV) + {sup 27}Al, populating {sup 32}S and {sup 47}V, respectively. The GDR lineshapes from the two systems are remarkably different from each other. Whereas, the non-alpha-like {sup 47}V undergoes Jacobi shape transition and matches exceptionally well with the theoretical GDR lineshape estimated under the framework rotating liquid drop model (RLDM) and thermal shape fluctuation model (TSFM) signifying shape equilibration, for the alpha cluster {sup 32}S an extended prolate kind of shape is observed. This unusual deformation, seen directly via gamma decay for the first time, is predicted to be due to the formation of orbiting dinuclear configuration or molecular structure of {sup 16}O + {sup 16}O in the {sup 32}S superdeformed band.

  6. Stimulated echoes and two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance spectra for solids with simple line shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geil, Burkhard; Diezemann, Gregor; Böhmer, Roland

    2008-03-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments on ion conductors often yield rather unstructured spectra, which are hard to interpret if the relation between the actual translational motion of the mobile species and the changes of the NMR frequencies is not known. In order to facilitate a general analysis of experiments on solids with such spectra, different models for the stochastic evolution of the NMR frequencies are considered. The treated models involve random frequency jumps, diffusive evolutions, or approximately fixed frequency jumps. Two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance spectra as well as stimulated-echo functions for the study of slow and ultraslow translational dynamics are calculated for Gaussian equilibrium line shapes. The results are compared with corresponding ones from rotational models and with experimental data.

  7. Altering the cellular mechanical force balance results in integrated changes in cell, cytoskeletal and nuclear shape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sims, J. R.; Karp, S.; Ingber, D. E.

    1992-01-01

    Studies were carried out with capillary endothelial cells cultured on fibronectin (FN)-coated dishes in order to analyze the mechanism of cell and nuclear shape control by extracellular matrix (ECM). To examine the role of the cytoskeleton in shape determination independent of changes in transmembrane osmotic pressure, membranes of adherent cells were permeabilized with saponin (25 micrograms/ml) using a buffer that maintains the functional integrity of contractile microfilaments. Real-time videomicroscopic studies revealed that addition of 250 microM ATP resulted in time-dependent retraction and rounding of permeabilized cells and nuclei in a manner similar to that observed in intact living cells following detachment using trypsin-EDTA. Computerized image analysis confirmed that permeabilized cells remained essentially rigid in the absence of ATP and that retraction was stimulated in a dose-dependent manner as the concentration of ATP was raised from 10 to 250 microM. Maximal rounding occurred by 30 min with projected cell and nuclear areas being reduced by 69 and 41%, respectively. ATP-induced rounding was also accompanied by a redistribution of microfilaments resulting in formation of a dense net of F-actin surrounding retracted nuclei. Importantly, ATP-stimulated changes in cell, cytoskeletal, and nuclear form were prevented in permeabilized cells using a synthetic myosin peptide (IRICRKG) that has been previously shown to inhibit actomyosin filament sliding in muscle. In contrast, both the rate and extent of cell and nuclear rounding were increased in permeabilized cells exposed to ATP when the soluble FN peptide, GRGDSP, was used to dislodge immobilized FN from cell surface integrin receptors.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

  8. Shape Coexistence in Odd-Mass Nuclei Near Z = 82 Closed Shell; a Study of the Excited States of Gold -185 in the BETA(+)/EC Decay of MERCURY-185.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papanicolopoulos, Chrysanthos Dionisios

    1987-11-01

    The excited states of ^{185 }{rm Au} have been studied by the radioactive decay of {^ {185m,g}Hg.} Sources of {^{185m,g}Hg} were produced by the reaction ^{176 }Hf (^{16}O, 7n) ^{185}Hg using 140 MeV ^{16}O beams from the 25 MV folded tandem of the Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility. Sources of ^{185}Hg were mass-separated on-line using the University Isotope Separator Oak Ridge (UNISOR) facility. Multiscaled spectra of rays, x rays and conversion electrons were obtained together with gamma- gamma - t, gamma- x - t, e ^{-} - gamma - t, and e^{-}- x - t coincidence data. A decay scheme consisting of 82 excited states and 182 transitions was constructed. Bands of states associated with the s_{1over 2}, d_{3over 2} , d_{5over 2}, h_{11over 2} proton -hole configurations and the h_{9over 2} and i_{13over 2} proton-particle (intruder) configurations were constructed. In addition, a number of EO transitions were located: these de-excite levels which are interpreted as resulting from shape coexistence in the ^ {184}Pt and ^{186 }Hg "particle" and "hole" cores. The h _{9over 2} band is compared with calculations made with the Lund model of Larsson et al.

  9. Theory of damped quantum rotation in nuclear magnetic resonance spectra. III. Nuclear permutation symmetry of the line shape equation.

    PubMed

    Szymański, S

    2009-12-28

    The damped quantum rotation (DQR) theory describes manifestations in nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of the coherent and stochastic dynamics of N-fold molecular rotors composed of indistinguishable particles. The standard jump model is only a limiting case of the DQR approach; outside this limit, the stochastic motions of such rotors have no kinematic description. In this paper, completing the previous two of this series, consequences of nuclear permutation symmetry for the properties of the DQR line shape equation are considered. The systems addressed are planar rotors, such as aromatic hydrocarbons' rings, occurring inside of molecular crystals oriented in the magnetic field. Under such conditions, oddfold rotors can have nontrivial permutation symmetries only for peculiar orientations while evenfold ones always retain their intrinsic symmetry element, which is rotation by 180 degrees about the N-fold axis; in specific orientations the latter can gain two additional symmetry elements. It is shown that the symmetry selection rules applicable to the classical rate processes in fluids, once recognized as having two diverse aspects, macroscopic and microscopic, are also rigorously valid for the DQR processes in the solid state. However, formal justification of these rules is different because the DQR equation is based on the Pauli principle, which is ignored in the jump model. For objects like the benzene ring, exploitation of these rules in simulations of spectra using the DQR equation can be of critical significance for the feasibility of the calculations. Examples of such calculations for the proton system of the benzene ring in a general orientation are provided. It is also shown that, because of the intrinsic symmetries of the evenfold rotors, many of the DQR processes, which such rotors can undergo, are unobservable in NMR spectra.

  10. Software emulator of nuclear pulse generation with different pulse shapes and pile-up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pechousek, Jiri; Konecny, Daniel; Novak, Petr; Kouril, Lukas; Kohout, Pavel; Celiktas, Cuneyt; Vujtek, Milan

    2016-08-01

    The optimal detection of output signals from nuclear counting devices represents one of the key physical factors that govern accuracy and experimental reproducibility. In this context, the fine calibration of the detector under diverse experimental scenarios, although time costly, is necessary. However this process can be rendered easier with the use of systems that work in lieu of emulators. In this report we describe an innovative programmable pulse generator device capable to emulate the scintillation detector signals, in a way to mimic the detector performances under a variety of experimental conditions. The emulator generates a defined number of pulses, with a given shape and amplitude in the form of a sampled detector signal. The emulator output is then used off-line by a spectrometric system in order to set up its optimal performance. Three types of pulse shapes are produced by our device, with the possibility to add noise and pulse pile-up effects into the signal. The efficiency of the pulse detection, pile-up rejection and/or correction, together with the dead-time of the system, are therein analyzed through the use of some specific algorithms for pulse processing, and the results obtained validate the beneficial use of emulators for the accurate calibration process of spectrometric systems.

  11. Brownian shape motion on five-dimensional potential-energy surfaces:nuclear fission-fragment mass distributions.

    PubMed

    Randrup, Jørgen; Möller, Peter

    2011-04-01

    Although nuclear fission can be understood qualitatively as an evolution of the nuclear shape, a quantitative description has proven to be very elusive. In particular, until now, there existed no model with demonstrated predictive power for the fission-fragment mass yields. Exploiting the expected strongly damped character of nuclear dynamics, we treat the nuclear shape evolution in analogy with Brownian motion and perform random walks on five-dimensional fission potential-energy surfaces which were calculated previously and are the most comprehensive available. Test applications give good reproduction of highly variable experimental mass yields. This novel general approach requires only a single new global parameter, namely, the critical neck size at which the mass split is frozen in, and the results are remarkably insensitive to its specific value.

  12. Brownian Shape Motion on Five-Dimensional Potential-Energy Surfaces:Nuclear Fission-Fragment Mass Distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Randrup, Joergen; Moeller, Peter

    2011-04-01

    Although nuclear fission can be understood qualitatively as an evolution of the nuclear shape, a quantitative description has proven to be very elusive. In particular, until now, there existed no model with demonstrated predictive power for the fission-fragment mass yields. Exploiting the expected strongly damped character of nuclear dynamics, we treat the nuclear shape evolution in analogy with Brownian motion and perform random walks on five-dimensional fission potential-energy surfaces which were calculated previously and are the most comprehensive available. Test applications give good reproduction of highly variable experimental mass yields. This novel general approach requires only a single new global parameter, namely, the critical neck size at which the mass split is frozen in, and the results are remarkably insensitive to its specific value.

  13. Geometry of coexistence in the interacting boson model

    SciTech Connect

    Van Isacker, P.; Frank, A.; Vargas, C.E.

    2004-09-13

    The Interacting Boson Model (IBM) with configuration mixing is applied to describe the phenomenon of coexistence in nuclei. The analysis suggests that the IBM with configuration mixing, used in conjunction with a (matrix) coherent-state method, may be a reliable tool for the study of geometric aspects of shape coexistence in nuclei.

  14. Critical nuclear charge and shape resonances for the two-electron Hamiltonian

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Z.-C.; Ho, Y. K.

    2015-09-01

    The hydrogen negative ion H$^-$ is the simplest two-electron system that exists in nature. This system is not only important in astrophysics but it also serves as an ideal ground to study electron-electron correlations. The peculiar balance of the correlations between the two electrons with the interaction of electron-nucleus in H$^-$ makes this system to have only two bound states, one being the ground state $1s^2\\,^{1}\\!S^e$ and the other the doubly-excited metastable state $2p^2\\,^{3}\\!P^e$ embedded below the hydrogen $n=2$ threshold. Here we report a calculation for the $2p^2\\,^{3}\\!P^e$ state of H$^-$ that yields the energy eigenvalue $E=-0.125\\,355\\,451\\,242\\,864\\,058\\,376\\,012\\,313\\,25(2)$, in atomic units. Our result substantially improves the best available result by 16 orders of magnitude. We further study the critical nuclear charge $Z_{\\rm cr}$, the minimum value of nuclear charge $Z$ that is required to bind a nucleus and two electrons. Our determination of $Z_{\\rm cr}$ for the $2p^2\\,^{3}\\!P^e$ state of two-electron systems is $Z_{\\rm cr}=0.994\\,781\\,292\\,240\\,366\\,246\\,3(1)$, corresponding to $1/Z_{\\rm cr}= 1.005\\,246\\,085\\,546\\,985\\,509\\,4(1)$, which improves the best published value of $Z_{\\rm cr}$ by about 10 orders of magnitude. We further investigate in a definitive way the unexplored regime of $Z < Z_{\\rm cr}$ using the method of complex scaling and establish precise shape resonance poles for the state of $2p^2\\,^{3}\\!P^e$ in the complex energy plane.

  15. Nuclear Data Library Effects on Fast to Thermal Flux Shapes Around PWR Control Rod Tips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasiliev, A.; Ferroukhi, H.; Zhu, T.; Pautz, A.

    2014-04-01

    The development of a high-fidelity computational scheme to estimate the accumulated fluence at the tips of PWR control rods (CR) has been initiated at the Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI). Both the fluence from high-energy (E>1 MeV) neutrons as well as for the thermal range (E<0.625 eV) are required as these affect the CR integrity through stresses/strains induced by coupled clad embrittlement / absorber swelling phenomena. The concept of the PSI scheme under development is to provide from validated core analysis models, the volumetric neutron source to a full core MCNPX model that is then used to compute the neutron fluxes. A particular aspect that needs scrutiny is the ability of the MCNPX-based calculation methodology to accurately predict the flux shapes along the control rod surfaces, especially for fully withdrawn CRs. In that case, the tip is located a short distance above the core/reflector interface and since this situation corresponds to a large part of reactor operation, the accumulated fluence will highly depend on the achieved calculation accuracy and precision in this non-fueled zone. The objective of the work presented in this paper is to quantify the influence of nuclear data on the calculated fluxes at the CR tips by (1) conducting a systematic comparison of modern neutron cross-section libraries, including JENDL-4.0, JEFF-3.1.1 and ENDF/B-VII.0, and (2) by quantifying the uncertainties in the neutron flux calculations with the help of available neutron cross-section variances/covariances data. For completeness, the magnitude of these nuclear data-based uncertainties is also assessed in relation to the influence from other typical sources of modeling uncertainties/biases.

  16. Three-Dimensional Analysis of Nuclear Size, Shape and Displacement in Clover Root Cap Statocytes from Space and a Clinostat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, J.D.; Todd, P. W.; Staehelin, L. A.; Holton, Emily (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Under normal (l-g) conditions the statocytes of root caps have a characteristic polarity with the nucleus in tight association with the proximal cell wall; but, in altered gravity environments including microgravity (mu-g) and the clinostat (c-g) movement of the nucleus away from the proximal cell wall is not uncommon. To further understand the cause of gravity-dependent nuclear displacement in statocytes, three-dimensional cell reconstruction techniques were used to precisely measure the volumes, shapes, and positions of nuclei in white clover (Trifolium repens) flown in space and rotated on a clinostat. Seeds were germinated and grown for 72 hours aboard the Space Shuttle (STS-63) in the Fluid Processing Apparatus (BioServe Space Technologies, Univ. of Colorado, Boulder). Clinorotation experiments were performed on a two-axis clinostat (BioServe). Computer reconstruction of selected groups of statocytes were made from serial sections (0.5 microns thick) using the ROSS (Reconstruction Of Serial Sections) software package (Biocomputation Center, NASA Ames Research Center). Nuclei were significantly displaced from the tops of cells in mu-g (4.2 +/- 1.0 microns) and c-g (4.9 +/- 1.4 microns) when compared to l-g controls (3.4 +/- 0.8 gm); but, nuclear volume (113 +/- 36 cu microns, 127 +/- 32 cu microns and 125 +/- 28 cu microns for l-g, mu-g and c-g respectively) and the ratio of nuclear volume to cell volume (4.310.7%, 4.211.0% and 4.911.4% respectively) were not significantly dependent on gravity treatment (ANOVA; alpha = 0.05). Three-dimensional analysis of nuclear shape and proximity to the cell wall, however, showed that nuclei from l-g controls appeared ellipsoidal while those from space and the clinostat were more spherically shaped. This change in nuclear shape may be responsible for its displacement under altered gravity conditions. Since the cytoskeleton is known to affect nuclear polarity in root cap statocytes, those same cytoskeletal elements could also

  17. A Confrontation for Coexistence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Jen

    2003-01-01

    A month-long summer camp in Maine combines recreation, sports, and arts activities with daily conflict resolution sessions to help adolescents from regions of conflict (primarily the Middle East) learn the art of coexistence and peace. From its center in East Jerusalem, Seeds of Peace provides regular activities to reinforce the lessons that…

  18. Nuclear shape and structure in neutron-rich {sup 110,111}Tc

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Y. X.; Hamilton, J. H.; Ramayya, A. V.; Hwang, J. K.; Gore, P. M.; Jones, E. F.; Fong, D.; Rasmussen, J. O.; Lee, I. Y.; Stefanescu, I.; Che, X. L.; Zhu, S. J.; Wu, S. C.; Ginter, T. N.; Ma, W. C.; Ter-Akopian, G. M.; Daniel, A. V.; Stoyer, M. A.; Donangelo, R.; Gelberg, A.

    2006-08-15

    The high-spin nuclear structure of Tc isotopes is extended to more neutron-rich regions based on the measurements of prompt {gamma} rays from the spontaneous fission of {sup 252}Cf at the Gammasphere. The high-spin level scheme of N=67 neutron-rich {sup 110}Tc (Z=43) is established for the first time, and that of {sup 111}Tc is extended and expanded. The ground band of {sup 111}Tc reaches the band-crossing region, and the new observation of the weakly populated {alpha}=-1/2 member of the band provides important information on signature splitting. The systematics of band crossings in the isotopic and isotonic chains and a CSM calculation suggest that the band crossing of the ground band of {sup 111}Tc is due to alignment of a pair of h{sub 11/2} neutrons. The best fit to signature splitting, branching ratios, and excitations of the ground band of {sup 111}Tc by the rigid triaxial rotor plus particle model calculations result in a shape of {epsilon}{sub 2}=0.32 and {gamma}=-26 deg. for this nucleus. Its triaxiality is larger than that of {sup 107,109}Tc, which indicates increasing triaxiality in Tc isotopes with increasing neutron number. The identification of the weakly populated K+2 satellite band provides strong evidence for the large triaxiality of {sup 111}Tc. In {sup 110}Tc, the four lowest-lying levels observed are very similar to those in {sup 108}Tc. At an excitation of 478.9 keV above the lowest state observed, ten states of a {delta}I=1 band are observed. This band of {sup 110}Tc is very analogous to the {delta}I=1 bands in {sup 106,108}Tc, but it has greater and reversal signature splitting at higher spins.

  19. Cell shape and the microenvironment regulate nuclear translocation of NF-κB in breast epithelial and tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Sero, Julia E; Sailem, Heba Zuhair; Ardy, Rico Chandra; Almuttaqi, Hannah; Zhang, Tongli; Bakal, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Although a great deal is known about the signaling events that promote nuclear translocation of NF-κB, how cellular biophysics and the microenvironment might regulate the dynamics of this pathway is poorly understood. In this study, we used high-content image analysis and Bayesian network modeling to ask whether cell shape and context features influence NF-κB activation using the inherent variability present in unperturbed populations of breast tumor and non-tumor cell lines. Cell–cell contact, cell and nuclear area, and protrusiveness all contributed to variability in NF-κB localization in the absence and presence of TNFα. Higher levels of nuclear NF-κB were associated with mesenchymal-like versus epithelial-like morphologies, and RhoA-ROCK-myosin II signaling was critical for mediating shape-based differences in NF-κB localization and oscillations. Thus, mechanical factors such as cell shape and the microenvironment can influence NF-κB signaling and may in part explain how different phenotypic outcomes can arise from the same chemical cues. PMID:25735303

  20. Role of Actin Filaments in Correlating Nuclear Shape and Cell Spreading

    PubMed Central

    Vishavkarma, Renu; Raghavan, Swetavalli; Kuyyamudi, Chandrashekar; Majumder, Abhijit; Dhawan, Jyotsna; Pullarkat, Pramod A.

    2014-01-01

    It is well known that substrate properties like stiffness and adhesivity influence stem cell morphology and differentiation. Recent experiments show that cell morphology influences nuclear geometry and hence gene expression profile. The mechanism by which surface properties regulate cell and nuclear properties is only beginning to be understood. Direct transmission of forces as well as chemical signalling are involved in this process. Here, we investigate the formal aspect by studying the correlation between cell spreading and nuclear deformation using Mesenchymal stem cells under a wide variety of conditions. It is observed that a robust quantitative relation holds between the cell and nuclear projected areas, irrespective of how the cell area is modified or when various cytoskeletal or nuclear components are perturbed. By studying the role of actin stress fibers in compressing the nucleus we propose that nuclear compression by stress fibers can lead to enhanced cell spreading due to an interplay between elastic and adhesion factors. The significance of myosin-II in regulating this process is also explored. We demonstrate this effect using a simple technique to apply external compressive loads on the nucleus. PMID:25251154

  1. Effective pairing interaction in semi-infinite nuclear matter in the Brueckner approach: Model {delta}-shaped NN interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Baldo, M.; Lombardo, U.; Saperstein, E.E.; Zverev, M.V.

    1995-09-01

    The problem of pairing in semi-infinite nuclear matter is considered in the Brueckner approach. Equations for effective pairing interaction in semi-infinite matter are derived for the case of the separable representation of realistic NN interaction. The propagator of two noninteracting particles in a semi-infinite potential well is calculated numerically. The equation for effective interaction is solved for a model 8-shaped NN interaction, which correctly reproduces NN scattering in the low-energy limit. 15 refs., 10 figs.

  2. Construction of Nuclear Envelope Shape by a High-Genus Vesicle with Pore-Size Constraint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noguchi, Hiroshi

    2016-08-01

    Nuclear pores have an approximately uniform distribution in the nuclear envelope of most living cells. Hence, the morphology of the nuclear envelope is a spherical stomatocyte with a high genus. We have investigated the morphology of high-genus vesicles under pore-size constraint using dynamically triangulated membrane simulations. Bending-energy minimization without volume or other constraints produces a circular-cage stomatocyte, where the pores are aligned in a circular line on an oblate bud. As the pore radius is reduced, the circular-pore alignment is more stabilized than a random pore distribution on a spherical bud. However, we have clarified the conditions for the formation of a spherical stomatocyte: a small perinuclear volume, osmotic pressure within nucleoplasm, and repulsion between the pores. When area-difference elasticity is taken into account, the formation of cylindrical or budded tubules from the stomatocyte and discoidal stomatocyte is found.

  3. Construction of Nuclear Envelope Shape by a High-Genus Vesicle with Pore-Size Constraint.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, Hiroshi

    2016-08-23

    Nuclear pores have an approximately uniform distribution in the nuclear envelope of most living cells. Hence, the morphology of the nuclear envelope is a spherical stomatocyte with a high genus. We have investigated the morphology of high-genus vesicles under pore-size constraint using dynamically triangulated membrane simulations. Bending-energy minimization without volume or other constraints produces a circular-cage stomatocyte, where the pores are aligned in a circular line on an oblate bud. As the pore radius is reduced, the circular-pore alignment is more stabilized than a random pore distribution on a spherical bud. However, we have clarified the conditions for the formation of a spherical stomatocyte: a small perinuclear volume, osmotic pressure within nucleoplasm, and repulsion between the pores. When area-difference elasticity is taken into account, the formation of cylindrical or budded tubules from the stomatocyte and discoidal stomatocyte is found. PMID:27558725

  4. Effects of pore-size and shape distributions on diffusion pore imaging by nuclear magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuder, Tristan Anselm; Laun, Frederik Bernd

    2015-08-01

    In medical imaging and porous media research, NMR diffusion measurements are extensively used to investigate the structure of diffusion restrictions such as cell membranes. Recently, several methods have been proposed to unambiguously determine the shape of arbitrary closed pores or cells filled with an NMR-visible medium by diffusion experiments. The first approach uses a combination of a long and a short diffusion-weighting gradient pulse, while the other techniques employ short gradient pulses only. While the eventual aim of these methods is to determine pore-size and shape distributions, the focus has been so far on identical pores. Thus, the aim of this work is to investigate the ability of these different methods to resolve pore-size and orientation distributions. Simulations were performed comparing the various pore imaging techniques employing different distributions of pore size and orientation and varying timing parameters. The long-narrow gradient profile is most advantageous to investigate pore distributions, because average pore images can be directly obtained. The short-gradient methods suppress larger pores or induce a considerable blurring. Moreover, pore-shape-specific artifacts occur; for example, the central part of a distribution of cylinders may be largely underestimated. Depending on the actual pore distribution, short-gradient methods may nonetheless yield good approximations of the average pore shape. Furthermore, the application of short-gradient methods can be advantageous to differentiate whether pore-size distributions or intensity distributions, e.g., due to surface relaxation, are predominant.

  5. Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome alters nuclear shape and reduces cell motility in three dimensional model substrates.

    PubMed

    Booth-Gauthier, Elizabeth A; Du, Vicard; Ghibaudo, Marion; Rape, Andrew D; Dahl, Kris Noel; Ladoux, Benoit

    2013-03-01

    Cell migration through tight interstitial spaces in three dimensional (3D) environments impacts development, wound healing and cancer metastasis and is altered by the aging process. The stiffness of the extracellular matrix (ECM) increases with aging and affects the cells and cytoskeletal processes involved in cell migration. However, the nucleus, which is the largest and densest organelle, has not been widely studied during cell migration through the ECM. Additionally, the nucleus is stiffened during the aging process through the accumulation of a mutant nucleoskeleton protein lamin A, progerin. By using microfabricated substrates to mimic the confined environment of surrounding tissues, we characterized nuclear movements and deformation during cell migration into micropillars where interspacing can be tuned to vary nuclear confinement. Cell motility decreased with decreased micropillar (μP) spacing and correlated with increased dysmorphic shapes of nuclei. We examined the effects of increased nuclear stiffness which correlates with cellular aging by studying Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome cells which are known to accumulate progerin. With the expression of progerin, cells showed a threshold response to decreased μP spacing. Cells became trapped in the close spacing, possibly from visible micro-defects in the nucleoskeleton induced by cell crawling through the μP and from reduced force generation, measured independently. We suggest that ECM changes during aging could be compounded by the increasing stiffness of the nucleus and thus changes in cell migration through 3D tissues.

  6. Measurement of Scintillation and Ionization Yield and Scintillation Pulse Shape from Nuclear Recoils in Liquid Argon

    DOE PAGES

    Cao, H.

    2015-05-26

    We have measured the scintillation and ionization yield of recoiling nuclei in liquid argon as a function of applied electric field by exposing a dual-phase liquid argon time projection chamber (LAr-TPC) to a low energy pulsed narrow band neutron beam produced at the Notre Dame Institute for Structure and Nuclear Astrophysics. Liquid scintillation counters were arranged to detect and identify neutrons scattered in the TPC and to select the energy of the recoiling nuclei. We also report measurements of the scintillation yields for nuclear recoils with energies from 10.3 to 57.3 keV and for median applied electric fields from 0more » to 970 V/cm. For the ionization yields, we report measurements from 16.9 to 57.3 keV and for electric fields from 96.4 to 486 V/cm. Furthermore, we report the observation of an anticorrelation between scintillation and ionization from nuclear recoils, which is similar to the anticorrelation between scintillation and ionization from electron recoils. Assuming that the energy loss partitions into excitons and ion pairs from 83mKr internal conversion electrons is comparable to that from 207Bi conversion electrons, we obtained the numbers of excitons (Nex) and ion pairs (Ni) and their ratio (Nex/Ni) produced by nuclear recoils from 16.9 to 57.3 keV. Motivated by arguments suggesting direction sensitivity in LAr-TPC signals due to columnar recombination, a comparison of the light and charge yield of recoils parallel and perpendicular to the applied electric field is presented for the first time.« less

  7. Measurement of scintillation and ionization yield and scintillation pulse shape from nuclear recoils in liquid argon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, H.; Alexander, T.; Aprahamian, A.; Avetisyan, R.; Back, H. O.; Cocco, A. G.; Dejongh, F.; Fiorillo, G.; Galbiati, C.; Grandi, L.; Guardincerri, Y.; Kendziora, C.; Lippincott, W. H.; Love, C.; Lyons, S.; Manenti, L.; Martoff, C. J.; Meng, Y.; Montanari, D.; Mosteiro, P.; Olvitt, D.; Pordes, S.; Qian, H.; Rossi, B.; Saldanha, R.; Sangiorgio, S.; Siegl, K.; Strauss, S. Y.; Tan, W.; Tatarowicz, J.; Walker, S.; Wang, H.; Watson, A. W.; Westerdale, S.; Yoo, J.; Scene Collaboration

    2015-05-01

    We have measured the scintillation and ionization yield of recoiling nuclei in liquid argon as a function of applied electric field by exposing a dual-phase liquid argon time projection chamber (LAr-TPC) to a low energy pulsed narrow band neutron beam produced at the Notre Dame Institute for Structure and Nuclear Astrophysics. Liquid scintillation counters were arranged to detect and identify neutrons scattered in the TPC and to select the energy of the recoiling nuclei. We report measurements of the scintillation yields for nuclear recoils with energies from 10.3 to 57.3 keV and for median applied electric fields from 0 to 970 V /cm . For the ionization yields, we report measurements from 16.9 to 57.3 keV and for electric fields from 96.4 to 486 V /cm . We also report the observation of an anticorrelation between scintillation and ionization from nuclear recoils, which is similar to the anticorrelation between scintillation and ionization from electron recoils. Assuming that the energy loss partitions into excitons and ion pairs from Krm83 internal conversion electrons is comparable to that from 207Bi conversion electrons, we obtained the numbers of excitons (Nex) and ion pairs (Ni) and their ratio (Nex/Ni ) produced by nuclear recoils from 16.9 to 57.3 keV. Motivated by arguments suggesting direction sensitivity in LAr-TPC signals due to columnar recombination, a comparison of the light and charge yield of recoils parallel and perpendicular to the applied electric field is presented for the first time.

  8. Measurement of Scintillation and Ionization Yield and Scintillation Pulse Shape from Nuclear Recoils in Liquid Argon

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, H.

    2015-05-26

    We have measured the scintillation and ionization yield of recoiling nuclei in liquid argon as a function of applied electric field by exposing a dual-phase liquid argon time projection chamber (LAr-TPC) to a low energy pulsed narrow band neutron beam produced at the Notre Dame Institute for Structure and Nuclear Astrophysics. Liquid scintillation counters were arranged to detect and identify neutrons scattered in the TPC and to select the energy of the recoiling nuclei. We also report measurements of the scintillation yields for nuclear recoils with energies from 10.3 to 57.3 keV and for median applied electric fields from 0 to 970 V/cm. For the ionization yields, we report measurements from 16.9 to 57.3 keV and for electric fields from 96.4 to 486 V/cm. Furthermore, we report the observation of an anticorrelation between scintillation and ionization from nuclear recoils, which is similar to the anticorrelation between scintillation and ionization from electron recoils. Assuming that the energy loss partitions into excitons and ion pairs from 83mKr internal conversion electrons is comparable to that from 207Bi conversion electrons, we obtained the numbers of excitons (Nex) and ion pairs (Ni) and their ratio (Nex/Ni) produced by nuclear recoils from 16.9 to 57.3 keV. Motivated by arguments suggesting direction sensitivity in LAr-TPC signals due to columnar recombination, a comparison of the light and charge yield of recoils parallel and perpendicular to the applied electric field is presented for the first time.

  9. Shape and pairing fluctuation effects on neutrinoless double beta decay nuclear matrix elements.

    PubMed

    López Vaquero, Nuria; Rodríguez, Tomás R; Egido, J Luis

    2013-10-01

    Nuclear matrix elements (NME) for the most promising candidates to detect neutrinoless double beta decay have been computed with energy density functional methods including deformation and pairing fluctuations explicitly on the same footing. The method preserves particle number and angular momentum symmetries and can be applied to any decay without additional fine tunings. The finite range density dependent Gogny force is used in the calculations. An increase of 10%-40% in the NME with respect to the ones found without the inclusion of pairing fluctuations is obtained, reducing the predicted half-lives of these isotopes.

  10. Nuclear shape dependence of Gamow-Teller distributions in neutron-deficient Pb isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Sarriguren, P.; Moreno, O.; Alvarez-Rodriguez, R.; Moya de Guerra, E.

    2005-11-01

    We study Gamow-Teller strength distributions in the neutron-deficient even isotopes {sup 184-194}Pb in a search for signatures of deformation. The microscopic formalism used is based on a deformed quasiparticle random-phase approximation (QRPA) approach, which involves a self-consistent quasiparticle deformed Skyrme Hartree-Fock (HF) basis and residual spin-isospin forces in both the particle-hole and particle-particle channels. By analyzing the sensitivity of the Gamow-Teller strength distributions to the various ingredients in the formalism, we conclude that the {beta} decay of these isotopes could be a useful tool to look for fingerprints of nuclear deformation.

  11. Phase coexistence far from equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickman, Ronald

    2016-04-01

    Investigation of simple far-from-equilibrium systems exhibiting phase separation leads to the conclusion that phase coexistence is not well defined in this context. This is because the properties of the coexisting nonequilibrium systems depend on how they are placed in contact, as verified in the driven lattice gas with attractive interactions, and in the two-temperature lattice gas, under (a) weak global exchange between uniform systems, and (b) phase-separated (nonuniform) systems. Thus, far from equilibrium, the notions of universality of phase coexistence (i.e., independence of how systems exchange particles and/or energy), and of phases with intrinsic properties (independent of their environment) are lost.

  12. Probing nuclear shapes close to the fission limit with the giant dipole resonance in {sup 216}Rn

    SciTech Connect

    Kmiecik, M.; Maj, A.; Brekiesz, M.; Krolas, W.; Meczynski, W.; Styczen, J.; Zieblinski, M.; Million, B.; Bracco, A.; Camera, F.; Benzoni, G.; Leoni, S.; Wieland, O.; Brambilla, S.; Herskind, B.; Kicinska-Habior, M.; Dubray, N.; Dudek, J.; Schunck, N.

    2004-12-01

    The gamma-ray decay of the giant dipole resonance (GDR) in the compound nucleus {sup 216}Rn formed with the reaction {sup 18}O+{sup 198}Pt at the bombarding energy of 96 MeV was investigated. High-energy gamma-ray spectra in coincidence with both prompt and delayed low-energy transitions were measured. The obtained GDR width at the average temperature {approx_equal}1 MeV was found to be larger than that at T=0 MeV and to be approximately constant as a function of spin. The measured width value of 7 MeV is found to be consistent with the predictions based on calculations of the nuclear shape distribution using the newest approach for the treatment of the fission barrier within the liquid drop model. The present study is the first investigation of the giant dipole resonance width from the fusion-evaporation decay channel in this nuclear mass range.

  13. Evolution of ground state nuclear shapes in tungsten nuclei in terms of interacting boson model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalaf, A. M.; El-Shal, A. O.; Taha, M. M.; El-Sayed, M. A.

    2016-03-01

    The tungsten nuclei 180-190W are investigated within the framework of the interacting boson model using an intrinsic coherent state formalism. The Hamiltonian operator contains only multipole operators of the subalgebra associated with the dynamical symmetries SU(3) and O(6). The study includes the behavior of potential energy surfaces (BES's) and critical points in the space of the model parameters to declare the geometric character of the tungsten isotopic chain. Some selected energy levels and reduced E2 transition probabilities B(E2) for each nucleus are calculated to adjust the model parameters by using a computer code PH INT and simulated computer fitting programme to fit the experimental data with the IBM calculation by minimizing the root mean square deviations. The 180-190W isotopes lies in shape transition SU(3)-O(6) region of the IBM such that the lighter isotopes comes very clare to the SU(3) limit, while the behavior ones tend to be near the γ-unstable O(6) limit.

  14. U(5)-SU(3) nuclear shape transition within the interacting boson model applied to dysprosium isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotb, M.

    2016-07-01

    In the framework of the interacting boson model (IBM) with intrinsic coherent state, the shape Hamiltonian from spherical vibrator U(5) to axially symmetric prolate deformed rotator SU(3) are examined. The Hamiltonian used is composed of a single boson energy term and quadrupole term. The potential energy surfaces (PES' s) corresponding to the U(5)-SU(3) transition are calculated with variation of a scaling and control parameters. The model is applied to 150-162Dy chain of isotopes. In this chain a change from spherical to well deformed nuclei is observed when moving from the lighter to heavier isotopes. 156Dy is a good candidate for the critical point symmetry X(5). The parameters of the model are determined by using a computer simulated search program in order to minimize the deviation between our calculated and some selected experimental energy levels, B(E2) transition rates and the two neutron separation energies S2n. We have also studied the energy ratios and the B(E2) values for the yrast state of the critical nucleus. The nucleon pair transfer intensities between ground-ground and ground-beta states are examined within IBM and boson intrinsic coherent framework.

  15. Dynamic phase coexistence in glass-forming liquids.

    PubMed

    Pastore, Raffaele; Coniglio, Antonio; Ciamarra, Massimo Pica

    2015-07-09

    One of the most controversial hypotheses for explaining the heterogeneous dynamics of glasses postulates the temporary coexistence of two phases characterized by a high and by a low diffusivity. In this scenario, two phases with different diffusivities coexist for a time of the order of the relaxation time and mix afterwards. Unfortunately, it is difficult to measure the single-particle diffusivities to test this hypothesis. Indeed, although the non-Gaussian shape of the van-Hove distribution suggests the transient existence of a diffusivity distribution, it is not possible to infer from this quantity whether two or more dynamical phases coexist. Here we provide the first direct observation of the dynamical coexistence of two phases with different diffusivities, by showing that in the deeply supercooled regime the distribution of the single-particle diffusivities acquires a transient bimodal shape. We relate this distribution to the heterogeneity of the dynamics and to the breakdown of the Stokes-Einstein relation, and we show that the coexistence of two dynamical phases occurs up to a timescale growing faster than the relaxation time on cooling, for some of the considered models. Our work offers a basis for rationalizing the dynamics of supercooled liquids and for relating their structural and dynamical properties.

  16. Coexistence of Phases in a Protein Heterodimer

    PubMed Central

    Krokhotin, Andrey; Liwo, Adam; Niemi, Antti J.; Scheraga, Harold A.

    2012-01-01

    A heterodimer consisting of two or more different kinds of proteins can display an enormous number of distinct molecular architectures. The conformational entropy is an essential ingredient in the Helmholtz free energy and, consequently, these heterodimers can have a very complex phase structure. Here, it is proposed that there is a state of proteins, in which the different components of a heterodimer exist in different phases. For this purpose, the structures in the protein data bank (PDB) have been analyzed, with radius of gyration as the order parameter. Two major classes of heterodimers with their protein components coexisting in different phases have been identified. An example is the PDB structure 3DXC. This is a transcriptionally active dimer. One of the components is an isoform of the intra-cellular domain of the Alzheimer-disease related amyloid precursor protein (AICD), and the other is a nuclear multidomain adaptor protein in the Fe65 family. It is concluded from the radius of gyration that neither of the two components in this dimer is in its own collapsed phase, corresponding to a biologically active protein. The UNRES energy function has been utilized to confirm that, if the two components are separated from each other, each of them collapses. The results presented in this work show that heterodimers whose protein components coexist in different phases, can have intriguing physical properties with potentially important biological consequences. PMID:22830730

  17. Competitive exclusion and coexistence of universal grammars.

    PubMed

    Mitchener, W Garrett; Nowak, Martin A

    2003-01-01

    Universal grammar (UG) is a list of innate constraints that specify the set of grammars that can be learned by the child during primary language acquisition. UG of the human brain has been shaped by evolution. Evolution requires variation. Hence, we have to postulate and study variation of UG. We investigate evolutionary dynamics and language acquisition in the context of multiple UGs. We provide examples for competitive exclusion and stable coexistence of different UGs. More specific UGs admit fewer candidate grammars, and less specific UGs admit more candidate grammars. We will analyze conditions for more specific UGs to outcompete less specific UGs and vice versa. An interesting finding is that less specific UGs can resist invasion by more specific UGs if learning is more accurate. In other words, accurate learning stabilizes UGs that admit large numbers of candidate grammars.

  18. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic investigations of phase biaxiality in the nematic glass of a shape-persistent V-shaped mesogen.

    PubMed

    Figueirinhas, João L; Feio, Gabriel; Cruz, Carlos; Lehmann, Matthias; Köhn, Christiane; Dong, Ronald Y

    2010-11-01

    Deuterium and carbon-13 NMR spectroscopy were used to study both the high temperature uniaxial nematic and the low temperature biaxial nematic glass of a shape-persistent V-shaped mesogen. It was found that biaxial ordering determined in the domains of the latter has symmetry lower than D(2h) and is compatible with C(2h) symmetry or lower. In particular, elements of the ordering matrix including biaxial phase order parameters were determined from (2)H NMR at two temperatures, one just below the glass transition, and the other deep inside the biaxial glass, which allowed for the characterization of the dominant molecular motions at these temperatures. (13)C NMR magic angle spinning sideband patterns, collected both in the high temperature nematic phase and in the nematic glass, clearly show the difference between them in terms of the phase symmetry.

  19. Interplay of order and chaos across a first-order quantum shape-phase transition in nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Leviatan, A.; Macek, M.

    2012-10-20

    We study the nature of the dynamics in a first-order quantum phase transition between spherical and prolate-deformed nuclear shapes. Classical and quantum analyses reveal a change in the system from a chaotic Henon-Heiles behavior on the spherical side into a pronounced regular dynamics on the deformed side. Both order and chaos persist in the coexistence region and their interplay reflects the Landau potential landscape and the impact of collective rotations.

  20. Interplay of order and chaos across a first-order quantum shape-phase transition in nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leviatan, A.; Macek, M.

    2012-10-01

    We study the nature of the dynamics in a first-order quantum phase transition between spherical and prolate-deformed nuclear shapes. Classical and quantum analyses reveal a change in the system from a chaotic Hénon-Heiles behavior on the spherical side into a pronounced regular dynamics on the deformed side. Both order and chaos persist in the coexistence region and their interplay reflects the Landau potential landscape and the impact of collective rotations.

  1. Probe of Triple Shape Coexistence In Neutron Deficient Polonium Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Wiseman, D. R.; Page, R. D.; Darby, I. G.; Andreyev, A. N.; Eeckhaudt, S.; Grahn, T.; Greenlees, P. T.; Jones, P.; Julin, R.; Juutinen, S.; Kettunen, H.; Leino, M.; Leppaenen, A.-P.; Nyman, M.; Pakarinen, J.; Rahkila, P.; Saren, J.; Scholey, C.; Uusitalo, J.; Sandzelius, M.

    2006-04-26

    {gamma}-ray transitions in the neutron deficient 190,197Po nuclei have been identified. The yrast band of 190Po has been extended up to a spin and parity of 14+ and is found to display similar systematic behaviour to isotones 186Hg and 188Pb above the 4+ level, thus confirming its prolate nature. In 197Po the band built upon the 13/2+ isomer has been extended up to a spin and parity of 33/2+, while the non-yrast side-band has been observed for the first time. The behaviour of 197Po is found to be similar to that of the nearby even-mass isotopes, which is consistent with the model in which the i13/2 neutron is weakly coupled to the states in the even-even core.

  2. Concealed configuration mixing and shape coexistence in the platinum nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Ramos, J. E.; Hellemans, V.; Heyde, K.

    2012-10-20

    The role of configuration mixing in the Pt region is investigated. The nature of the ground state changes smoothly, being spherical around mass A{approx} 174 and A{approx} 192 and deformed around the mid-shell N= 104 region. Interacting Boson Model with configuration mixing calculations are presented for deformations and isotope shifts. The assumption of the existence of two configurations with very different deformation provides a simple framework to explain the observed isotope shifts systematics.

  3. Species coexistence: macroevolutionary relationships and the contingency of historical interactions.

    PubMed

    Germain, Rachel M; Weir, Jason T; Gilbert, Benjamin

    2016-03-30

    Evolutionary biologists since Darwin have hypothesized that closely related species compete more intensely and are therefore less likely to coexist. However, recent theory posits that species diverge in two ways: either through the evolution of 'stabilizing differences' that promote coexistence by causing individuals to compete more strongly with conspecifics than individuals of other species, or through the evolution of 'fitness differences' that cause species to differ in competitive ability and lead to exclusion of the weaker competitor. We tested macroevolutionary patterns of divergence by competing pairs of annual plant species that differ in their phylogenetic relationships, and in whether they have historically occurred in the same region or different regions (sympatric versus allopatric occurrence). For sympatrically occurring species pairs, stabilizing differences rapidly increased with phylogenetic distance. However, fitness differences also increased with phylogenetic distance, resulting in coexistence outcomes that were unpredictable based on phylogenetic relationships. For allopatric species, stabilizing differences showed no trend with phylogenetic distance, whereas fitness differences increased, causing coexistence to become less likely among distant relatives. Our results illustrate the role of species' historical interactions in shaping how phylogenetic relationships structure competitive dynamics, and offer an explanation for the evolution of invasion potential of non-native species. PMID:27009226

  4. Interference competition and species coexistence.

    PubMed Central

    Amarasekare, Priyanga

    2002-01-01

    Interference competition is ubiquitous in nature. Yet its effects on resource exploitation remain largely unexplored for species that compete for dynamic resources. Here, I present a model of exploitative and interference competition with explicit resource dynamics. The model incorporates both biotic and abiotic resources. It considers interference competition both in the classical sense (i.e. each species suffers a net reduction in per capita growth rate via interference from, and interference on, the other species) and in the broad sense (i.e. each species suffers a net reduction in per capita growth rate via interference from, but can experience an increase in growth rate via interference on, the other species). Coexistence cannot occur under classical interference competition even when the species inferior at resource exploitation is superior at interference. Such a trade-off can, however, change the mechanism of competitive exclusion from dominance by the superior resource exploiter to a priority effect. Now the inferior resource exploiter can exclude the superior resource exploiter provided it has a higher initial abundance. By contrast, when interference is beneficial to the interacting species, coexistence is possible via a trade-off between exploitation and interference. These results hold regardless of whether the resource is biotic or abiotic, indicating that the outcome of exploitative and interference competition does not depend on the exact nature of resource dynamics. The model makes two key predictions. First, species that engage in costly interference mechanisms (e.g. territoriality, overgrowth or undercutting, allelopathy and other forms of chemical competition) should not be able to coexist unless they also engage in beneficial interference mechanisms (e.g. predation or parasitism). Second, exotic invasive species that displace native biota should be superior resource exploiters that have strong interference effects on native species with little

  5. Learning to coexist with wildfire.

    PubMed

    Moritz, Max A; Batllori, Enric; Bradstock, Ross A; Gill, A Malcolm; Handmer, John; Hessburg, Paul F; Leonard, Justin; McCaffrey, Sarah; Odion, Dennis C; Schoennagel, Tania; Syphard, Alexandra D

    2014-11-01

    The impacts of escalating wildfire in many regions - the lives and homes lost, the expense of suppression and the damage to ecosystem services - necessitate a more sustainable coexistence with wildfire. Climate change and continued development on fire-prone landscapes will only compound current problems. Emerging strategies for managing ecosystems and mitigating risks to human communities provide some hope, although greater recognition of their inherent variation and links is crucial. Without a more integrated framework, fire will never operate as a natural ecosystem process, and the impact on society will continue to grow. A more coordinated approach to risk management and land-use planning in these coupled systems is needed. PMID:25373675

  6. Coexistence: Exploration and the environment

    SciTech Connect

    Cunningham, P.S.; Winston, J.G.; Watt, G.L.

    1995-12-31

    One of the major challenges in our industry today is successfully meeting two needs of the planet that often appear to be conflicting: Meeting the economic needs of the people through sustainable development of natural resources while preserving the integrity and diversity of our environment. Nowhere is this more critical than in the world`s wetlands and rain forests. This presentation demonstrates the principles and practices that have fostered coexistence of environmental protection and sustainable development projects in wetlands and tropical forests in the Americas. Excerpts from two projects are shown. one in a national wildlife refuge in Louisiana, and one in the rain forests of Bolivia.

  7. Learning to coexist with wildfire.

    PubMed

    Moritz, Max A; Batllori, Enric; Bradstock, Ross A; Gill, A Malcolm; Handmer, John; Hessburg, Paul F; Leonard, Justin; McCaffrey, Sarah; Odion, Dennis C; Schoennagel, Tania; Syphard, Alexandra D

    2014-11-01

    The impacts of escalating wildfire in many regions - the lives and homes lost, the expense of suppression and the damage to ecosystem services - necessitate a more sustainable coexistence with wildfire. Climate change and continued development on fire-prone landscapes will only compound current problems. Emerging strategies for managing ecosystems and mitigating risks to human communities provide some hope, although greater recognition of their inherent variation and links is crucial. Without a more integrated framework, fire will never operate as a natural ecosystem process, and the impact on society will continue to grow. A more coordinated approach to risk management and land-use planning in these coupled systems is needed.

  8. Nuclear Aerosols: Direct Simulation and Elucidation of the Role of Multiple Components, Radioactivity, Charge, Shape and Spatial Inhomogeneity

    SciTech Connect

    Sudarshan K. Loyalka

    2008-10-12

    Nuclear aerosols can originate from severe core damae in light water reactors, core disruptive accidents in fast reactors, nuclear accidents during nuclear material transport, at waste disposal sites, or explosions. These aerosols evolve under natural transport processes as well as under the influence of engineered safety features. Such aerosols can be hazardous for the equipment inside the reactor, and when leaked into the environment, pose potential risks to the public. Hence, the origin, movement and distribution of these aerosols need to be studied and controlled.

  9. [Malignant melanoma coexisting with pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Krasomski, G; Broniarczyk, D; Gładysiak, A

    1992-09-01

    An extremely rare case of melanoma amelanoticum coexisting with pregnancy has been discussed. Pregnant A. Ch., age 42, was admitted to the Polish Mother's Health Centre Memorial Hospital on the 22nd of August, 1990 with a diagnosis of the 5th pregnancy, the 2nd delivery, the 30th week of gestation, state after cesarean section. Suspected malignant melanoma. Stomach ulceration. Thrombophlebitis of left lower extremity. General condition--medium hard. For the last three days she did not report fetal movements, fetal heartbeat was not detected either. Us examination confirmed fetal death. On the 24th of August, 1990, spontaneous vaginal delivery terminated the pregnancy, giving a dead, macerated female fetus, body weight of 1500 g. On the 3rd day after delivery the patient died with growing circulation-respiratory insufficiency. Autopsy revealed melanoma malignum amelanoticum disseminatum. Neither an autopsy of the fetus nor histopathological examinations of the secundines were performed for the advanced maceration. The coexistence of pregnancy with malignant melanoma in this case brought a tragic end both for the mother and the fetus. PMID:1305602

  10. Microfilaria Coexistent with Fibroadenoma - An Unusual Association.

    PubMed

    Sane, Kavita Chandrahas; Bholay, Sandhya Unmesh; Bari, Vaibhav Bhika; Kulkarni, Manoj Narayan

    2015-10-01

    Filariasis is an endemic problem in India. Involvement of breast by filariasis is uncommon, but known to occur in endemic areas. However, microfilaria co-existing with neoplastic lesions is very rare. Here we report an unusual finding of microfilaria co-existing with fibroadenoma in a 20-year-old female patient. PMID:26557533

  11. Voice Deviations and Coexisting Communication Disorders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    St. Louis, Kenneth O.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    This study examined the coexistence of other communicative disorders with voice disorders in about 3,400 children in grades 1-12 at 100 sites throughout the United States. The majority of voice-disordered children had coexisting articulation deviations and also differed from controls on two language measures and mean pure-tone hearing thresholds.…

  12. Spatial complementarity and the coexistence of species.

    PubMed

    Velázquez, Jorge; Garrahan, Juan P; Eichhorn, Markus P

    2014-01-01

    Coexistence of apparently similar species remains an enduring paradox in ecology. Spatial structure has been predicted to enable coexistence even when population-level models predict competitive exclusion if it causes each species to limit its own population more than that of its competitor. Nevertheless, existing hypotheses conflict with regard to whether clustering favours or precludes coexistence. The spatial segregation hypothesis predicts that in clustered populations the frequency of intra-specific interactions will be increased, causing each species to be self-limiting. Alternatively, individuals of the same species might compete over greater distances, known as heteromyopia, breaking down clusters and opening space for a second species to invade. In this study we create an individual-based model in homogeneous two-dimensional space for two putative sessile species differing only in their demographic rates and the range and strength of their competitive interactions. We fully characterise the parameter space within which coexistence occurs beyond population-level predictions, thereby revealing a region of coexistence generated by a previously-unrecognised process which we term the triadic mechanism. Here coexistence occurs due to the ability of a second generation of offspring of the rarer species to escape competition from their ancestors. We diagnose the conditions under which each of three spatial coexistence mechanisms operates and their characteristic spatial signatures. Deriving insights from a novel metric - ecological pressure - we demonstrate that coexistence is not solely determined by features of the numerically-dominant species. This results in a common framework for predicting, given any pair of species and knowledge of the relevant parameters, whether they will coexist, the mechanism by which they will do so, and the resultant spatial pattern of the community. Spatial coexistence arises from complementary combinations of traits in each species

  13. Spatial Complementarity and the Coexistence of Species

    PubMed Central

    Velázquez, Jorge; Garrahan, Juan P.; Eichhorn, Markus P.

    2014-01-01

    Coexistence of apparently similar species remains an enduring paradox in ecology. Spatial structure has been predicted to enable coexistence even when population-level models predict competitive exclusion if it causes each species to limit its own population more than that of its competitor. Nevertheless, existing hypotheses conflict with regard to whether clustering favours or precludes coexistence. The spatial segregation hypothesis predicts that in clustered populations the frequency of intra-specific interactions will be increased, causing each species to be self-limiting. Alternatively, individuals of the same species might compete over greater distances, known as heteromyopia, breaking down clusters and opening space for a second species to invade. In this study we create an individual-based model in homogeneous two-dimensional space for two putative sessile species differing only in their demographic rates and the range and strength of their competitive interactions. We fully characterise the parameter space within which coexistence occurs beyond population-level predictions, thereby revealing a region of coexistence generated by a previously-unrecognised process which we term the triadic mechanism. Here coexistence occurs due to the ability of a second generation of offspring of the rarer species to escape competition from their ancestors. We diagnose the conditions under which each of three spatial coexistence mechanisms operates and their characteristic spatial signatures. Deriving insights from a novel metric — ecological pressure — we demonstrate that coexistence is not solely determined by features of the numerically-dominant species. This results in a common framework for predicting, given any pair of species and knowledge of the relevant parameters, whether they will coexist, the mechanism by which they will do so, and the resultant spatial pattern of the community. Spatial coexistence arises from complementary combinations of traits in each

  14. Intermittent control of coexisting attractors.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Wiercigroch, Marian; Ing, James; Pavlovskaia, Ekaterina

    2013-06-28

    This paper proposes a new control method applicable for a class of non-autonomous dynamical systems that naturally exhibit coexisting attractors. The central idea is based on knowledge of a system's basins of attraction, with control actions being applied intermittently in the time domain when the actual trajectory satisfies a proximity constraint with regards to the desired trajectory. This intermittent control uses an impulsive force to perturb one of the system attractors in order to switch the system response onto another attractor. This is carried out by bringing the perturbed state into the desired basin of attraction. The method has been applied to control both smooth and non-smooth systems, with the Duffing and impact oscillators used as examples. The strength of the intermittent control force is also considered, and a constrained intermittent control law is introduced to investigate the effect of limited control force on the efficiency of the controller. It is shown that increasing the duration of the control action and/or the number of control actuations allows one to successfully switch between the stable attractors using a lower control force. Numerical and experimental results are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method. PMID:23690639

  15. Competitive coexistence in stoichiometric chaos.

    PubMed

    Deng, Bo; Loladze, Irakli

    2007-09-01

    Classical predator-prey models, such as Lotka-Volterra, track the abundance of prey, but ignore its quality. Yet, in the past decade, some new and occasionally counterintuitive effects of prey quality on food web dynamics emerged from both experiments and mathematical modeling. The underpinning of this work is the theory of ecological stoichiometry that is centered on the fact that each organism is a mixture of multiple chemical elements such as carbon (C), nitrogen (N), and phosphorus (P). The ratios of these elements can vary within and among species, providing simple ways to represent prey quality as its C:N or C:P ratios. When these ratios modeled to vary, as they frequently do in nature, seemingly paradoxical results can arise such as the extinction of a predator that has an abundant and accessible prey. Here, for the first time, we show analytically that the reduction in prey quality can give rise to chaotic oscillations. In particular, when competing predators differ in their sensitivity to prey quality then all species can coexist via chaotic fluctuations. The chaos generating mechanism is based on the existence of a junction-fold point on the nullcline surfaces of the species. Conditions on parameters are found for such a point, and the singular perturbation method and the kneading sequence analysis are used to demonstrate the existence of a period-doubling cascade to chaos as a result of the point.

  16. Competitive coexistence in stoichiometric chaos.

    PubMed

    Deng, Bo; Loladze, Irakli

    2007-09-01

    Classical predator-prey models, such as Lotka-Volterra, track the abundance of prey, but ignore its quality. Yet, in the past decade, some new and occasionally counterintuitive effects of prey quality on food web dynamics emerged from both experiments and mathematical modeling. The underpinning of this work is the theory of ecological stoichiometry that is centered on the fact that each organism is a mixture of multiple chemical elements such as carbon (C), nitrogen (N), and phosphorus (P). The ratios of these elements can vary within and among species, providing simple ways to represent prey quality as its C:N or C:P ratios. When these ratios modeled to vary, as they frequently do in nature, seemingly paradoxical results can arise such as the extinction of a predator that has an abundant and accessible prey. Here, for the first time, we show analytically that the reduction in prey quality can give rise to chaotic oscillations. In particular, when competing predators differ in their sensitivity to prey quality then all species can coexist via chaotic fluctuations. The chaos generating mechanism is based on the existence of a junction-fold point on the nullcline surfaces of the species. Conditions on parameters are found for such a point, and the singular perturbation method and the kneading sequence analysis are used to demonstrate the existence of a period-doubling cascade to chaos as a result of the point. PMID:17902990

  17. Competitive coexistence in stoichiometric chaos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Bo; Loladze, Irakli

    2007-09-01

    Classical predator-prey models, such as Lotka-Volterra, track the abundance of prey, but ignore its quality. Yet, in the past decade, some new and occasionally counterintuitive effects of prey quality on food web dynamics emerged from both experiments and mathematical modeling. The underpinning of this work is the theory of ecological stoichiometry that is centered on the fact that each organism is a mixture of multiple chemical elements such as carbon (C), nitrogen (N), and phosphorus (P). The ratios of these elements can vary within and among species, providing simple ways to represent prey quality as its C:N or C:P ratios. When these ratios modeled to vary, as they frequently do in nature, seemingly paradoxical results can arise such as the extinction of a predator that has an abundant and accessible prey. Here, for the first time, we show analytically that the reduction in prey quality can give rise to chaotic oscillations. In particular, when competing predators differ in their sensitivity to prey quality then all species can coexist via chaotic fluctuations. The chaos generating mechanism is based on the existence of a junction-fold point on the nullcline surfaces of the species. Conditions on parameters are found for such a point, and the singular perturbation method and the kneading sequence analysis are used to demonstrate the existence of a period-doubling cascade to chaos as a result of the point.

  18. Membrane Elasticity in Giant Vesicles with Fluid Phase Coexistence

    PubMed Central

    Baumgart, T.; Das, S.; Webb, W. W.; Jenkins, J. T.

    2005-01-01

    Biological membranes are known to contain compositional heterogeneities, often termed rafts, with distinguishable composition and function, and these heterogeneities participate in vigorous transport processes. Membrane lipid phase coexistence is expected to modulate these processes through the differing mechanical properties of the bulk domains and line tension at phase boundaries. In this contribution, we compare the predictions from a shape theory derived for vesicles with fluid phase coexistence to the geometry of giant unilamellar vesicles with coexisting liquid-disordered (Ld) and liquid-ordered (Lo) phases. We find a bending modulus for the Lo phase higher than that of the Ld phase and a saddle-splay (Gauss) modulus difference with the Gauss modulus of the Lo phase being more negative than the Ld phase. The Gauss modulus critically influences membrane processes that change topology, such as vesicle fission or fusion, and could therefore be of significant biological relevance in heterogeneous membranes. Our observations of experimental vesicle geometries being modulated by Gaussian curvature moduli differences confirm the prediction by the theory of Juelicher and Lipowsky. PMID:15894634

  19. Investigations of Shape Conundra Using Reorientation-Effect Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orce, J. N.

    2015-11-01

    A recent Coulomb-excitation reorientation-effect measurement at TRIUMF has enabled information on diagonal matrix elements for the 3.368 MeV high-lying first excited state in 10Be from γ-ray data. The result allows for a comparison with state-of-the-art no-core-shell-model calculations and questions our knowledge of the spin-orbit interaction. Similar experiments using 12C beams at TRIUMF are aimed at measuring the diagonal matrix element for the first 2+ state at 4.439 MeV, which is currently determined as oblate, but presents an uncertainty of over 50%. Nuclear clustering effects are also being investigated using 20Ne beams at iThemba LABS--the first `safe' reorientation-effect measurement with 20Ne beams. In addition, the occurrence of oblate shapes and shape coexistence will also be studied using 70Se beams at 5.5 MeV/u at HIE-ISOLDE. These studies will shed light on nuclear shapes and resolved some of the timely shape conundra found in nuclei.

  20. Syringe shape and positioning relative to efficiency volume inside dose calibrators and its role in nuclear medicine quality assurance programs.

    PubMed

    Santos, J A M; Carrasco, M F; Lencart, J; Bastos, A L

    2009-06-01

    A careful analysis of geometry and source positioning influence in the activity measurement outcome of a nuclear medicine dose calibrator is presented for (99m)Tc. The implementation of a quasi-point source apparent activity curve measurement is proposed for an accurate correction of the activity inside several syringes, and compared with a theoretical geometric efficiency model. Additionally, new geometrical parameters are proposed to test and verify the correct positioning of the syringes as part of acceptance testing and quality control procedures.

  1. Alpha-particle emission as a probe of nuclear shapes and structure effects in proton evaporation spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Nicolis, N.G.; Sarantites, D.G.; Abenante, V.; Adler, L.A.; Dilmanian, F.A.; Majka, Z.; Semkow, T.M.; Stracener, D.W. . Dept. of Chemistry); Baktash, C.; Beene, J.R.; Garcia-Bermudez, G.; Halbert, M.L.; Hensley, D.C.; Johnson, N.R.; Lee, I.Y.; McGowan, F.K.; Riley, M.A.; Virtanen, A. ); Griffin, H.C. . Dep

    1990-01-01

    Emission barriers and subbarrier anisotropies from {alpha} decay of Sn* and Yb* compound nuclei are examined in the light of calculations incorporating deformation effects in the decay process. For the Yb* systems deformation which increases with spin is necessary to explain the data. For the Sn* systems the spectral shapes and anisotropies can be explained without deformation. For systems lighter than Sn this probe is not sensitive to the deformation. Energy spectra and angular correlations of evaporated protons from the {sup 52}Cr({sup 34}S, 2n2p){sup 82}Sr reaction were measured in coincidence with discrete transitions. Large shifts in proton spectra were observed when high spin states in different rotational bands are populated. They are interpreted as due to near-yrast stretched proton emission preferentially populating the yrast band by subbarrier protons. Simulations show that channel selected proton spectra cannot be used as probes of deformation.

  2. Competition between fusion and quasifission in a heavy fusing system: Diffusion of nuclear shapes through a dynamical collective potential energy landscape

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz-Torres, Alexis

    2006-12-15

    A theory of the competition between fusion and quasifission in a heavy fusing system is proposed, which is based on a master equation and the two-center shell model. Fusion and quasifission arise from a diffusion process in an ensemble of nuclear shapes, each of which evolves toward the thermal equilibrium. The fusing system moves on a dynamical (time-dependent) collective potential energy surface that is initially diabatic and gradually becomes adiabatic. Calculations for several reactions leading to {sup 256}No are performed within a simplified two-dimensional model. Among other important conclusions, the results indicate that (i) the diabatic effects play a very important role in the onset of fusion hindrance for heavy systems and (ii) very asymmetric reactions induced by closed-shell nuclei seem to be the best suited to synthesize the heaviest compound nuclei.

  3. Deuteron NMR study of dynamics and of coexistence of paraelectric and ferroelectric phases in Rb0.90(ND4)0.10D2AsO4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinto, Nicholas J.; Howell, Francis L.; Schmidt, V. Hugo

    1993-09-01

    The deuteron glass Rb1-x(ND4)xD2AsO4 (DRADA) is a mixed crystal of RbD2AsO4 (DRDA) and ND4D2AsO4 (DADA). Deuteron nuclear magnetic resonance has been performed on the acid and ammonium deuterons. The crystal studied has an ammonium concentration (x=0.10) that puts it in the coexistence region of the phase diagram. Line-shape measurements of the ammonium deuterons show the coexistence of the ferroelectric (FE) and paraelectric (PE) phases as the temperature is lowered below the ferroelectric-phase-transition temperature Tc. The acid deuteron line shape on the other hand is found to broaden as the temperature is reduced but is unaffected by the ferroelectric transition. Spin-lattice-relaxation measurements have been performed and the activation energies for the relaxation processes have been computed. The relaxation-rate anomaly for acid deuterons in the ferroelectric-transition range indicates a short correlation length for the FE phase in the coexistence region of the phase diagram.

  4. Stereological studies on rat spinal neurons during postnatal development: estimates of mean perikaryal and nuclear volumes free from assumptions about shape.

    PubMed Central

    Mayhew, T M

    1989-01-01

    A stereological method for estimating the mean volumes of particles independent of assumptions about their shapes is illustrated using neurons in the ventral horn of rat cervical spinal cord. Male rats of 20 and 120 days post partum age were killed by intracardiac perfusion with formaldehyde/glutaraldehyde solutions. Cervical enlargements were removed, trimmed and embedded in resin. Randomised sections of ventral horn were photographed in a systematic pattern and used to estimate the volume-weighted mean volumes of neuronal perikarya and their nuclei. Volumes were estimated from point-sampled intercepts using rulers to classify intercept lengths. Classifying motoneuron perikarya was extremely reproducible, group means (coefficients of variation) at 120 days post partum being 25,190 microns3 (23%) and 24,250 microns3 (25%) in two separate trials. Classifying all neurons at the same age gave values of 20,520 microns3 (22%) and 22,490 microns3 (28%) in two trials. The mean perikaryal volumes of motoneurons at 20 and 120 days of age were not significantly different but nuclear volumes increased from 1,580 microns3 (16%) at 20 days to 2,660 microns3 (28%) at 120 days. These results illustrate the value of the method for obtaining unbiased and efficient estimates of the sizes of irregular perikarya and their nuclei. The benefit is that sizes can be estimated without biases due to simplifying assumptions about perikaryal/nuclear shape or nucleolar location. The influence of section thickness (even of thick paraffin sections) on the estimates is also negligible. Images Fig. 1 PMID:2808127

  5. Dipole strength distributions in the stable Ba isotopes 134 138 Ba : A study in the mass region of a nuclear shape transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheck, M.; von Garrel, H.; Tsoneva, N.; Belic, D.; von Brentano, P.; Fransen, C.; Gade, A.; Jolie, J.; Kneissl, U.; Kohstall, C.; Linnemann, A.; Nord, A.; Pietralla, N.; Pitz, H. H.; Stedile, F.; Stoyanov, C.; Werner, V.

    2004-10-01

    The low-lying dipole strength distributions in the odd-mass isotopes 135,137 Ba were studied in nuclear resonance fluorescence experiments (NRF) performed at the Stuttgart Dynamitron facility using bremsstrahlung beams with end point energies of 4.1, 3.1, and 2.5 MeV . Numerous excited states, most of them unknown so far, were observed in the excitation energy range up to 4 MeV . Detailed spectroscopic information has been obtained on excitation energies, decay widths, decay branching ratios, and transition probabilities. The results for 137Ba are compared with calculations in the framework of the Quasiparticle-Phonon Model. The new data for 135,137 Ba complete the systematics of low-lying dipole excitations as observed for the even Ba isotopes 134,136,138 Ba in previous NRF experiments in Stuttgart. The complete systematics within the Ba isotopic chain, exhibiting a nuclear shape transition, is discussed with respect to E1 two-phonon excitations, M1 scissors mode excitations, and in regard to the new critical point symmetries.

  6. Phase Coexistence in a Dynamic Phase Diagram.

    PubMed

    Gentile, Luigi; Coppola, Luigi; Balog, Sandor; Mortensen, Kell; Ranieri, Giuseppe A; Olsson, Ulf

    2015-08-01

    Metastability and phase coexistence are important concepts in colloidal science. Typically, the phase diagram of colloidal systems is considered at the equilibrium without the presence of an external field. However, several studies have reported phase transition under mechanical deformation. The reason behind phase coexistence under shear flow is not fully understood. Here, multilamellar vesicle (MLV)-to-sponge (L3 ) and MLV-to-Lα transitions upon increasing temperature are detected using flow small-angle neutron scattering techniques. Coexistence of Lα and MLV phases at 40 °C under shear flow is detected by using flow NMR spectroscopy. The unusual rheological behavior observed by studying the lamellar phase of a non-ionic surfactant is explained using (2) H NMR and diffusion flow NMR spectroscopy with the coexistence of planar lamellar-multilamellar vesicles. Moreover, a dynamic phase diagram over a wide range of temperatures is proposed.

  7. Equilibrium coexistence of three amphiboles

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robinson, P.; Jaffe, H.W.; Klein, C.; Ross, M.

    1969-01-01

    Electron probe and wet chemical analyses of amphibole pairs from the sillimanite zone of central Massachusetts and adjacent New Hampshire indicated that for a particular metamorphic grade there should be a restricted composition range in which three amphiboles can coexist stably. An unequivocal example of such an equilibrium three amphibole rock has been found in the sillimanite-orthoclase zone. It contains a colorless primitive clinoamphibole, space group P21/m, optically and chemically like cummingtonite with blue-green hornblende exsolution lamellae on (100) and (-101) of the host; blue-green hornblende, space group C2/m, with primitive cummingtonite exsolution lamellae on (100) and (-101) of the host; and pale pinkish tan anthophyllite, space group Pnma, that is free of visible exsolution lamellae but is a submicroscopic intergrowth of two orthorhombic amphiboles. Mutual contacts and coarse, oriented intergrowths of two and three host amphiboles indicate the three grew as an equilibrium assemblage prior to exsolution. Electron probe analyses at mutual three-amphibole contacts showed little variation in the composition of each amphibole. Analyses believed to represent most closely the primary amphibole compositions gave atomic proportions on the basis of 23 oxygens per formula unit as follows: for primitive cummingtonite (Na0.02Ca0.21- Mn0.06Fe2+2.28Mg4.12Al0.28) (Al0.17Si7.83), for hornblende (Na0.35Ca1.56Mn0.02Fe1.71Mg2.85Al0.92) (Al1.37Si6.63), and for anthophyllite (Na0.10Ca0.06Mn0.06Fe2.25Mg4.11Al0.47) (Al0.47Si7.53). The reflections violating C-symmetry, on X-ray single crystal photographs of the primitive cummingtonite, are weak and diffuse, and suggest a partial inversion from a C-centered to a primitive clinoamphibole. Single crystal photographs of the anthophyllite show split reflections indicating it is an intergrowth of about 80% anthophyllite and about 20% gedrite which differ in their b crystallographic dimensions. Split reflections are

  8. Quantitative analysis of nuclear shape in oral squamous cell carcinoma is useful for predicting the chemotherapeutic response.

    PubMed

    Ogura, Maki; Yamamoto, Yoichiro; Miyashita, Hitoshi; Kumamoto, Hiroyuki; Fukumoto, Manabu

    2016-06-01

    The number of people afflicted with oral carcinoma in Japan has increased in recent years. Although preoperative neoadjuvant therapy with cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil are performed, chemotherapeutic response varies widely among the patients. With the aim of establishing novel indices to predict the therapeutic response to chemotherapy, we investigated the relationship between morphological features of pre-treatment oral carcinoma nuclei and the chemotherapeutic response using quantifying morphology of cell nuclei in pathological specimen images. We measured 4 morphological features of the nucleus of oral squamous cell carcinoma cases classified by the response to chemotherapy: No Change (NC) group, Partial Response (PR) group and Complete Response (CR) group. Furthermore, we performed immunohistochemical staining for p53 and Ki67 and calculated their positive rates in cancer tissues. Compactness and symmetry of the nucleus were significantly higher and nuclear edge response was significantly lower in cancer cells with lower chemotherapeutic responses compared high chemotherapeutic responders. As for positive rates of p53 and Ki67, there were no significant differences between any of the response groups. Morphological features of cancer cell nuclei in pathological specimens are sensitive predictive factors for the chemotherapeutic response to oral squamous cell carcinoma.

  9. Collagen Substrate Stiffness Anisotropy Affects Cellular Elongation, Nuclear Shape, and Stem Cell Fate toward Anisotropic Tissue Lineage.

    PubMed

    Islam, Anowarul; Younesi, Mousa; Mbimba, Thomas; Akkus, Ozan

    2016-09-01

    Rigidity of substrates plays an important role in stem cell fate. Studies are commonly carried out on isotropically stiff substrate or substrates with unidirectional stiffness gradients. However, many native tissues are anisotropically stiff and it is unknown whether controlled presentation of stiff and compliant material axes on the same substrate governs cytoskeletal and nuclear morphology, as well as stem cell differentiation. In this study, electrocompacted collagen sheets are stretched to varying degrees to tune the stiffness anisotropy (SA) in the range of 1 to 8, resulting in stiff and compliant material axes orthogonal to each other. The cytoskeletal aspect ratio increased with increasing SA by about fourfold. Such elongation was absent on cellulose acetate replicas of aligned collagen surfaces indicating that the elongation was not driven by surface topography. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) seeded on varying anisotropy sheets displayed a dose-dependent upregulation of tendon-related markers such as Mohawk and Scleraxis. After 21 d of culture, highly anisotropic sheets induced greater levels of production of type-I, type-III collagen, and thrombospondin-4. Therefore, SA has direct effects on MSC differentiation. These findings may also have ramifications of stem cell fate on other anisotropically stiff tissues, such as skeletal/cardiac muscles, ligaments, and bone.

  10. Collagen Substrate Stiffness Anisotropy Affects Cellular Elongation, Nuclear Shape, and Stem Cell Fate toward Anisotropic Tissue Lineage.

    PubMed

    Islam, Anowarul; Younesi, Mousa; Mbimba, Thomas; Akkus, Ozan

    2016-09-01

    Rigidity of substrates plays an important role in stem cell fate. Studies are commonly carried out on isotropically stiff substrate or substrates with unidirectional stiffness gradients. However, many native tissues are anisotropically stiff and it is unknown whether controlled presentation of stiff and compliant material axes on the same substrate governs cytoskeletal and nuclear morphology, as well as stem cell differentiation. In this study, electrocompacted collagen sheets are stretched to varying degrees to tune the stiffness anisotropy (SA) in the range of 1 to 8, resulting in stiff and compliant material axes orthogonal to each other. The cytoskeletal aspect ratio increased with increasing SA by about fourfold. Such elongation was absent on cellulose acetate replicas of aligned collagen surfaces indicating that the elongation was not driven by surface topography. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) seeded on varying anisotropy sheets displayed a dose-dependent upregulation of tendon-related markers such as Mohawk and Scleraxis. After 21 d of culture, highly anisotropic sheets induced greater levels of production of type-I, type-III collagen, and thrombospondin-4. Therefore, SA has direct effects on MSC differentiation. These findings may also have ramifications of stem cell fate on other anisotropically stiff tissues, such as skeletal/cardiac muscles, ligaments, and bone. PMID:27377355

  11. Energetic Constraints on Species Coexistence in Birds.

    PubMed

    Pigot, Alexander L; Tobias, Joseph A; Jetz, Walter

    2016-03-01

    The association between species richness and ecosystem energy availability is one of the major geographic trends in biodiversity. It is often explained in terms of energetic constraints, such that coexistence among competing species is limited in low productivity environments. However, it has proven challenging to reject alternative views, including the null hypothesis that species richness has simply had more time to accumulate in productive regions, and thus the role of energetic constraints in limiting coexistence remains largely unknown. We use the phylogenetic relationships and geographic ranges of sister species (pairs of lineages who are each other's closest extant relatives) to examine the association between energy availability and coexistence across an entire vertebrate class (Aves). We show that the incidence of coexistence among sister species increases with overall species richness and is elevated in more productive ecosystems, even when accounting for differences in the evolutionary time available for coexistence to occur. Our results indicate that energy availability promotes species coexistence in closely related lineages, providing a key step toward a more mechanistic understanding of the productivity-richness relationship underlying global gradients in biodiversity.

  12. Energetic Constraints on Species Coexistence in Birds

    PubMed Central

    Pigot, Alexander L.

    2016-01-01

    The association between species richness and ecosystem energy availability is one of the major geographic trends in biodiversity. It is often explained in terms of energetic constraints, such that coexistence among competing species is limited in low productivity environments. However, it has proven challenging to reject alternative views, including the null hypothesis that species richness has simply had more time to accumulate in productive regions, and thus the role of energetic constraints in limiting coexistence remains largely unknown. We use the phylogenetic relationships and geographic ranges of sister species (pairs of lineages who are each other’s closest extant relatives) to examine the association between energy availability and coexistence across an entire vertebrate class (Aves). We show that the incidence of coexistence among sister species increases with overall species richness and is elevated in more productive ecosystems, even when accounting for differences in the evolutionary time available for coexistence to occur. Our results indicate that energy availability promotes species coexistence in closely related lineages, providing a key step toward a more mechanistic understanding of the productivity–richness relationship underlying global gradients in biodiversity. PMID:26974194

  13. Physical layer simulation study for the coexistence of WLAN standards

    SciTech Connect

    Howlader, M. K.; Keiger, C.; Ewing, P. D.; Govan, T. V.

    2006-07-01

    This paper presents the results of a study on the performance of wireless local area network (WLAN) devices in the presence of interference from other wireless devices. To understand the coexistence of these wireless protocols, simplified physical-layer-system models were developed for the Bluetooth, Wireless Fidelity (WiFi), and Zigbee devices, all of which operate within the 2.4-GHz frequency band. The performances of these protocols were evaluated using Monte-Carlo simulations under various interference and channel conditions. The channel models considered were basic additive white Gaussian noise (AWGN), Rayleigh fading, and site-specific fading. The study also incorporated the basic modulation schemes, multiple access techniques, and channel allocations of the three protocols. This research is helping the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) understand the coexistence issues associated with deploying wireless devices and could prove useful in the development of a technical basis for guidance to address safety-related issues with the implementation of wireless systems in nuclear facilities. (authors)

  14. Cloning and Functional Analysis of Histones H3 and H4 in Nuclear Shaping during Spermatogenesis of the Chinese Mitten Crab, Eriocheir sinensis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jiang-Li; Kang, Xian-Jiang; Guo, Ming-Shen; Mu, Shu-Mei; Zhang, Zhao-Hui

    2015-01-01

    During spermatogenesis in most animals, the basic proteins associated with DNA are continuously changing and somatic-typed histones are partly replaced by sperm-specific histones, which are then successively replaced by transition proteins and protamines. With the replacement of sperm nuclear basic proteins, nuclei progressively undergo chromatin condensation. The Chinese Mitten Crab (Eriocheir sinensis) is also known as the hairy crab or river crab (phylum Arthropoda, subphylum Crustacea, order Decapoda, and family Grapsidae). The spermatozoa of this species are aflagellate, and each has a spherical acrosome surrounded by a cup-shaped nucleus, peculiar to brachyurans. An interesting characteristic of the E. sinensis sperm nucleus is its lack of electron-dense chromatin. However, its formation is not clear. In this study, sequences encoding histones H3 and H4 were cloned by polymerase chain reaction amplification. Western blotting indicated that H3 and H4 existed in the sperm nuclei. Immunofluorescence and ultrastructural immunocytochemistry demonstrated that histones H3 and H4 were both present in the nuclei of spermatogonia, spermatocytes, spermatids and mature spermatozoa. The nuclear labeling density of histone H4 decreased in sperm nuclei, while histone H3 labeling was not changed significantly. Quantitative real-time PCR showed that the mRNA expression levels of histones H3 and H4 were higher at mitotic and meiotic stages than in later spermiogenesis. Our study demonstrates that the mature sperm nuclei of E. sinensis contain histones H3 and H4. This is the first report that the mature sperm nucleus of E. sinensis contains histones H3 and H4. This finding extends the study of sperm histones of E. sinensis and provides some basic data for exploring how decapod crustaceans form uncondensed sperm chromatin. PMID:25993499

  15. Solvable model for template coexistence in protocells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontanari, J. F.; Serva, M.

    2013-02-01

    Compartmentalization of self-replicating molecules (templates) in protocells is a necessary step towards the evolution of modern cells. However, coexistence between distinct template types inside a protocell can be achieved only if there is a selective pressure favoring protocells with a mixed template composition. Here we study analytically a group selection model for the coexistence between two template types using the diffusion approximation of population genetics. The model combines competition at the template and protocell levels as well as genetic drift inside protocells. At the steady state, we find a continuous phase transition separating the coexistence and segregation regimes, with the order parameter vanishing linearly with the distance to the critical point. In addition, we derive explicit analytical expressions for the critical steady-state probability density of protocell compositions.

  16. Species coexistence in temperate, mixed deciduous forests.

    PubMed

    Nakashizuka, T

    2001-04-01

    The response of tree life-history traits to community profiles (horizontal and vertical heterogeneity, disturbances and biotic interactions) determines community assembly rules, which are currently a hot issue in community ecology. Important mechanisms of coexistence differ throughout the developing stages of tree life history. Many processes of niche partitioning and tradeoffs that potentially enable tree coexistence have been reported to be present in temperate forests, although some of these life-history traits are either correlated with each other or are not independent. Not all of the proposed mechanisms explain coexistence equally well; some could predominate in determining the community organization of forest communities. Population studies need to concentrate more on the component species of a target community to detect the ecological assembly rule. These approaches can also address how chance factors contribute to the composition of temperate tree communities, which might be less dependent on chance than are tropical ones.

  17. Coexistence curve of a near-critical, eight-arm star polystyrene in methylcyclohexane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wellons, Mark; Lightfoot, Mark; Jacobs, D. T.

    2006-03-01

    The coexistence curve of eight-arm star polystyrene in methylcyclohexane has been measured and used to determine the coexistence curve amplitude B. An automated measurement of the minimum deviated angle in each phase provides the refractive index and thus the composition in each phase. By exploring temperatures from a few milliKelvins to two Kelvin below the critical temperature, the shape of the coexistence curve is determined and compared to a simple power law of amplitude B and exponent β. The exponent should be independent of molecular weight while the amplitude should vary as a power-law in molecular weight. We report the results of one molecular weight (228,000) and compare them to published values for a smaller molecular weight (74,000) and to the results for a linear polystyrene in the same solvent. We acknowledge the support from the donors of the American Chemical Society Petroleum Research Fund.

  18. Coexistence curve of a near-critical, eight-arm star polystyrene in methylcyclohexane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lightfoot, Mark

    2005-03-01

    The coexistence curve of eight-arm star polystyrene in methylcyclohexane has been measured and used to determine the coexistence curve amplitude B. An automated measurement of the minimum deviated angle in each phase provides the refractive index and thus the composition in each phase. By exploring temperatures from a few milliKelvins to ten Kelvin below the critical temperature, the shape of the coexistence curve is determined and compared to a simple power law of amplitude B and exponent β. The exponent should be independent of molecular weight while the amplitude should vary as a power-law in molecular weight. We report the results of one molecular weight (228,000) and compare them to published values for a smaller molecular weight (74,000) and to the results for a linear polystyrene in the same solvent. We acknowledge the support from the donors of the American Chemical Society Petroleum Research Fund.

  19. On the evidence for species coexistence: a critique of the coexistence program.

    PubMed

    Siepielski, Adam M; McPeek, Mark A

    2010-11-01

    A major challenge in ecology is to understand how the millions of species on Earth are organized into biological communities. Mechanisms promoting coexistence are one such class of organizing processes, which allow multiple species to persist in the same trophic level of a given web of species interactions. If some mechanism promotes the coexistence of two or more species, each species must be able to increase when it is rare and the others are at their typical abundances; this invasibility criterion is fundamental evidence for species coexistence regardless of the mechanism. In an attempt to evaluate the level of empirical support for coexistence mechanisms in nature, we surveyed the literature for empirical studies of coexistence at a local scale (i.e., species found living together in one place) to determine whether these studies satisfied the invasibility criterion. In our survey, only seven of 323 studies that drew conclusions about species coexistence evaluated invasibility in some way in either observational or experimental studies. In addition, only three other studies evaluated necessary but not sufficient conditions for invasibility (i.e., negative density dependence and a trade-off in performance that influences population regulation). These results indicate that, while species coexistence is a prevalent assumption for why species are able to live together in one place, critical empirical tests of this fundamental assumption of community structure are rarely performed. These tests are central to developing a more robust understanding of the relative contributions of both deterministic and stochastic processes structuring biological communities.

  20. Microscopic description of nuclear shapes

    SciTech Connect

    Egido, J.L.; Robledo, L.M.; Valor, A.; Villafranca, A.

    1996-12-31

    The approximate particle number theory for density dependent forces is sketched, the theory is applied to discuss properties of the superdeformed ground state and excited bands of {sup 192}Hg. The force used in the calculations is the finite range density dependent Gogny force. The agreement with the available experimental results is very satisfactory.

  1. How variation between individuals affects species coexistence.

    PubMed

    Hart, Simon P; Schreiber, Sebastian J; Levine, Jonathan M

    2016-08-01

    Although the effects of variation between individuals within species are traditionally ignored in studies of species coexistence, the magnitude of intraspecific variation in nature is forcing ecologists to reconsider. Compelling intuitive arguments suggest that individual variation may provide a previously unrecognised route to diversity maintenance by blurring species-level competitive differences or substituting for species-level niche differences. These arguments, which are motivating a large body of empirical work, have rarely been evaluated with quantitative theory. Here we incorporate intraspecific variation into a common model of competition and identify three pathways by which this variation affects coexistence: (1) changes in competitive dynamics because of nonlinear averaging, (2) changes in species' mean interaction strengths because of variation in underlying traits (also via nonlinear averaging) and (3) effects on stochastic demography. As a consequence of the first two mechanisms, we find that intraspecific variation in competitive ability increases the dominance of superior competitors, and intraspecific niche variation reduces species-level niche differentiation, both of which make coexistence more difficult. In addition, individual variation can exacerbate the effects of demographic stochasticity, and this further destabilises coexistence. Our work provides a theoretical foundation for emerging empirical interests in the effects of intraspecific variation on species diversity.

  2. 2H nuclear magnetic resonance order parameter profiles suggest a change of molecular shape for phosphatidylcholines containing a polyunsaturated acyl chain.

    PubMed Central

    Holte, L. L.; Peter, S. A.; Sinnwell, T. M.; Gawrisch, K.

    1995-01-01

    Solid-state 2H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to determine the orientational order parameter profiles for a series of phosphatidylcholines with perdeuterated stearic acid, 18:0d35, in position sn-1 and 18:1 omega 9, 18:2 omega 6, 18:3 omega 3, 20:4 omega 6, 20:5 omega 3, or 22:6 omega 3 in position sn-2. The main phase transition temperatures were derived from a first moment analysis, and order parameter profiles of sn-1 chains were calculated from dePaked nuclear magnetic resonance powder patterns. Comparison of the profiles at 37 degrees C showed that unsaturation causes an inhomogenous disordering along the sn-1 chain. Increasing sn-2 chain unsaturation from one to six double bonds resulted in a 1.6-kHz decrease in quadrupolar splittings of the sn-1 chain in the upper half of the chain (or plateau region) and maximum splitting difference of 4.4 kHz at methylene carbon 14. The change in chain order corresponds to a decrease in the 18:0 chain length of 0.4 +/- 0.2 A with 18:2 omega 6 versus 18:1 omega 9 in position sn-2. Fatty acids containing three or more double bonds in sn-2 showed a decrease in sn-1 chain length of 0.7 +/- 0.2 A compared with 18:1 omega 9. The chain length of all lipids decreased with increasing temperature. Highly unsaturated phosphatidylcholines (three or more double bonds in sn-2) had shorter sn-1 chains, but the chain length was somewhat less sensitive to temperature. The profiles reveal that the sn-1 chain exhibits a selective increase in motional freedom in a region located toward the bottom half of the chain as sn-2 unsaturation is increased. This corresponds to an area increase around carbon atom number 14 that is three to four times greater than the increase for the top part of the chain. A similar asymmetric decrease in order, largest toward the methyl end of the chain, was observed when 1 -palmitoyl-2-oleoylphosphatidylethanolamine goes from a lamellar to an inverse hexagonal (H,,) phase. This is consistent with a

  3. Ultrasonic features of papillary thyroid microcarcinoma coexisting with a thyroid abnormality

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bo; Zhang, Yaqiong; Yin, Ping; Zhou, Jian; Jiang, Tian'an

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the value of ultrasonography in the diagnosis of papillary thyroid microcarcinoma (PTMC) coexisting with a thyroid abnormality, and to improve the accuracy of PTMC diagnosis. The ultrasonic features of 38 PTMC nodules coexisting with a thyroid abnormality and 56 thyroid benign nodules, obtained by surgical resection and confirmed by pathological analysis, were retrospectively analyzed. All masses were ≤ 1.0 cm in diameter. Ultrasonic features that were analyzed included the shape, aspect ratio, boundary, margin, echo, uniformity, presence or absence of microcalcification and enlargement of the lymph nodes, as well as the blood flow of the nodules. Furthermore, the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of ultrasonography for the diagnosis of PTMC were obtained. The following ultrasonic features of thyroid nodules were significantly (P<0.05) associated with PTMC coexisting with a thyroid abnormality: An irregular shape; an aspect ratio of ≥ 1; an unclear boundary; blurred margins; internal heterogeneous hypoechogenicity; and microcalcification. Therefore, thyroid nodules with these ultrasonic characteristics coexisting with a thyroid abnormality may be suspected as malignant PTMC. The present study demonstrated that ultrasound-guided biopsies are necessary to prevent misdiagnosis of PTMC. The sensitivities of enlarged neck lymph nodes and abundant blood flow are so low that they may be considered as references for the differentiation of PTMC from benign nodules.

  4. Co-existence of agricultural production systems.

    PubMed

    Jank, Bernhard; Rath, Johannes; Gaugitsch, Helmut

    2006-05-01

    Strategies and best practices for the co-existence of GM and non-GM crops need to be developed and implemented with the participation of farmers and other stakeholders. According to the principle of 'subsidiarity', decisions should be made by the lowest authority possible. When applying this concept to the case of GM crops, the affected society should determine their use and management in a regional decision-making process. Public participation is better accomplished at a lower level, and democratic deficits in decision-making on GMOs are better resolved, enabling farmers to manage or avoid GM crops. Ultimately, voluntary GMO-free zones might be a tool for sustainable co-existence and GM-free production and GMO-free zones might create a specific image for marketing regional products and services, such as tourism. PMID:16545877

  5. Coexistence of different serotypes of dengue virus.

    PubMed

    Esteva, Lourdes; Vargas, Cristobal

    2003-01-01

    We formulate a non-linear system of differential equations that models the dynamics of dengue fever. This disease is produced by any of the four serotypes of dengue arbovirus. Each serotype produces permanent immunity to it, but only a certain degree of cross-immunity to heterologous serotypes. In our model we consider the relation between two serotypes. Our interest is to analyze the factors that allow the invasion and persistence of different serotypes in the human population. Analysis of the model reveals the existence of four equilibrium points, which belong to the region of biological interest. One of the equilibrium points corresponds to the disease-free state, the other three equilibria correspond to the two states where just one serotype is present, and the state where both serotypes coexist, respectively. We discuss conditions for the asymptotic stability of equilibria, supported by analytical and numerical methods. We find that coexistence of both serotypes is possible for a large range of parameters.

  6. Co-existence of agricultural production systems.

    PubMed

    Jank, Bernhard; Rath, Johannes; Gaugitsch, Helmut

    2006-05-01

    Strategies and best practices for the co-existence of GM and non-GM crops need to be developed and implemented with the participation of farmers and other stakeholders. According to the principle of 'subsidiarity', decisions should be made by the lowest authority possible. When applying this concept to the case of GM crops, the affected society should determine their use and management in a regional decision-making process. Public participation is better accomplished at a lower level, and democratic deficits in decision-making on GMOs are better resolved, enabling farmers to manage or avoid GM crops. Ultimately, voluntary GMO-free zones might be a tool for sustainable co-existence and GM-free production and GMO-free zones might create a specific image for marketing regional products and services, such as tourism.

  7. Nuclear structure research. Annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, J.L.

    1995-07-31

    The most significant development this year has been the realization of a method for estimating EO transition strength in nuclei and the prediction that the de-excitation (draining) of superdeformed bands must take place, at least in some cases, by strong EO transitions. A considerable effort has been devoted to planning the nuclear structure physics that will be pursued using the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) at Oak Ridge. A significant effort has been devoted to HRIBF target development. This is a critical component of the HRIBF project. Exhaustive literature searches have been made for a variety of target materials with emphasis on thermodynamic properties. Vapor pressure measurements have been carried out. Experimental data sets for radioactive decays in the very neutron-deficient Pr-Eu and Ir-Tl regions have been under analysis. These decay schemes constitute parts of student Ph.D. theses. These studies are aimed at elucidating the onset of deformation in the Pr-Sm region and the characteristics of shape coexistence in the Ir-Bi region. Further experiments on shape coexistence in the neutron-deficient Ir-Bi region are planned using {alpha} decay studies at the FMA at ATLAS. The first experiment is scheduled for later this year.

  8. Emergent neutrality drives phytoplankton species coexistence

    PubMed Central

    Segura, Angel M.; Calliari, Danilo; Kruk, Carla; Conde, Daniel; Bonilla, Sylvia; Fort, Hugo

    2011-01-01

    The mechanisms that drive species coexistence and community dynamics have long puzzled ecologists. Here, we explain species coexistence, size structure and diversity patterns in a phytoplankton community using a combination of four fundamental factors: organism traits, size-based constraints, hydrology and species competition. Using a ‘microscopic’ Lotka–Volterra competition (MLVC) model (i.e. with explicit recipes to compute its parameters), we provide a mechanistic explanation of species coexistence along a niche axis (i.e. organismic volume). We based our model on empirically measured quantities, minimal ecological assumptions and stochastic processes. In nature, we found aggregated patterns of species biovolume (i.e. clumps) along the volume axis and a peak in species richness. Both patterns were reproduced by the MLVC model. Observed clumps corresponded to niche zones (volumes) where species fitness was highest, or where fitness was equal among competing species. The latter implies the action of equalizing processes, which would suggest emergent neutrality as a plausible mechanism to explain community patterns. PMID:21177680

  9. Species coexistence in a changing world.

    PubMed

    Valladares, Fernando; Bastias, Cristina C; Godoy, Oscar; Granda, Elena; Escudero, Adrián

    2015-01-01

    The consequences of global change for the maintenance of species diversity will depend on the sum of each species responses to the environment and on the interactions among them. A wide ecological literature supports that these species-specific responses can arise from factors related to life strategies, evolutionary history and intraspecific variation, and also from environmental variation in space and time. In the light of recent advances from coexistence theory combined with mechanistic explanations of diversity maintenance, we discuss how global change drivers can influence species coexistence. We revise the importance of both competition and facilitation for understanding coexistence in different ecosystems, address the influence of phylogenetic relatedness, functional traits, phenotypic plasticity and intraspecific variability, and discuss lessons learnt from invasion ecology. While most previous studies have focused their efforts on disentangling the mechanisms that maintain the biological diversity in species-rich ecosystems such as tropical forests, grasslands and coral reefs, we argue that much can be learnt from pauci-specific communities where functional variability within each species, together with demographic and stochastic processes becomes key to understand species interactions and eventually community responses to global change.

  10. Increased competition may promote species coexistence.

    PubMed

    Vandermeer, J; Evans, M A; Foster, P; Höök, T; Reiskind, M; Wund, M

    2002-06-25

    It is a mainstay of community ecology that local exclusion of species will result if competitive pressures become too large. The pattern of exclusion may be complicated, but the qualitative orthodoxy has changed little since the pioneering work of Lotka, Volterra, and Gause--no two species can occupy the same niche. Stated in a more precise form, the higher the intensity of interspecific competition in an assemblage of species, the fewer the number of species that can coexist in perpetuity. We suggest that this orthodoxy results from "linear" thinking, and that if the classical equations are formulated more realistically with attendant nonlinearities, the orthodoxy breaks down and higher levels of competition may actually increase the likelihood that species will avoid competitive exclusion. Furthermore, this increased probability of coexistence at higher levels of competition is accompanied by characteristic dynamic patterns: (i) at lower levels of competition, after all extinction events have occurred, remaining species follow irregular chaotic patterns; (ii) at higher levels of competition, when most species coexist, all species are entrained in a single large limit cycle; (iii) the transient behavior appears to correspond to a special case of chaos, uniform phase chaotic amplitude.

  11. Species coexistence in a changing world

    PubMed Central

    Valladares, Fernando; Bastias, Cristina C.; Godoy, Oscar; Granda, Elena; Escudero, Adrián

    2015-01-01

    The consequences of global change for the maintenance of species diversity will depend on the sum of each species responses to the environment and on the interactions among them. A wide ecological literature supports that these species-specific responses can arise from factors related to life strategies, evolutionary history and intraspecific variation, and also from environmental variation in space and time. In the light of recent advances from coexistence theory combined with mechanistic explanations of diversity maintenance, we discuss how global change drivers can influence species coexistence. We revise the importance of both competition and facilitation for understanding coexistence in different ecosystems, address the influence of phylogenetic relatedness, functional traits, phenotypic plasticity and intraspecific variability, and discuss lessons learnt from invasion ecology. While most previous studies have focused their efforts on disentangling the mechanisms that maintain the biological diversity in species-rich ecosystems such as tropical forests, grasslands and coral reefs, we argue that much can be learnt from pauci-specific communities where functional variability within each species, together with demographic and stochastic processes becomes key to understand species interactions and eventually community responses to global change. PMID:26528323

  12. Body Size Mediated Coexistence in Swans

    PubMed Central

    Engelhardt, Katharina A. M.; Ritchie, Mark E.; Powell, James A.

    2014-01-01

    Differences in body sizes may create a trade-off between foraging efficiency (foraging gains/costs) and access to resources. Such a trade-off provides a potential mechanism for ecologically similar species to coexist on one resource. We explored this hypothesis for tundra (Cygnus columbianus) and trumpeter swans (Cygnus buccinator), a federally protected species, feeding solely on sago pondweed (Stuckenia pectinata) tubers during fall staging and wintering in northern Utah. Foraging efficiency was higher for tundra swans because this species experienced lower foraging and metabolic costs relative to foraging gains; however, trumpeter swans (a) had longer necks and therefore had access to exclusive resources buried deep in wetland sediments and (b) were more aggressive and could therefore displace tundra swans from lucrative foraging locations. We conclude that body size differentiation is an important feature of coexistence among ecologically similar species feeding on one resource. In situations where resources are limiting and competition for resources is strong, conservation managers will need to consider the trade-off between foraging efficiency and access to resources to ensure ecologically similar species can coexist on a shared resource. PMID:24672347

  13. Body size mediated coexistence in swans.

    PubMed

    Engelhardt, Katharina A M; Ritchie, Mark E; Powell, James A

    2014-01-01

    Differences in body sizes may create a trade-off between foraging efficiency (foraging gains/costs) and access to resources. Such a trade-off provides a potential mechanism for ecologically similar species to coexist on one resource. We explored this hypothesis for tundra (Cygnus columbianus) and trumpeter swans (Cygnus buccinator), a federally protected species, feeding solely on sago pondweed (Stuckenia pectinata) tubers during fall staging and wintering in northern Utah. Foraging efficiency was higher for tundra swans because this species experienced lower foraging and metabolic costs relative to foraging gains; however, trumpeter swans (a) had longer necks and therefore had access to exclusive resources buried deep in wetland sediments and (b) were more aggressive and could therefore displace tundra swans from lucrative foraging locations. We conclude that body size differentiation is an important feature of coexistence among ecologically similar species feeding on one resource. In situations where resources are limiting and competition for resources is strong, conservation managers will need to consider the trade-off between foraging efficiency and access to resources to ensure ecologically similar species can coexist on a shared resource.

  14. Competitive coexistence of two Pneumocystis species.

    PubMed

    Icenhour, Crystal R; Arnold, Jonathan; Medvedovic, Mario; Cushion, Melanie T

    2006-05-01

    Pneumocystis are fungal pathogens of mammalian lungs that can cause lethal pneumonia in immunocompromised hosts. In some mammals, coinfections of genetically distinct Pneumocystis populations have been identified, but the nature of their interaction and its significance are unknown. Two species that infect rats, Pneumocystis carinii and Pneumocystis wakefieldiae, were studied over a 6-year period, representing approximately 700 generations of Pneumocystis. Population densities of each species were analyzed within the framework of the Lotka-Volterra competition model, which revealed the two species were in competition and predicted competitive exclusion of one species. However, stable coexistence was observed in 460 replicate populations. Selected extrinsic factors that might mitigate the extinction were evaluated. Logistic-regression analyses showed that higher relative humidity and higher organism lung burdens were associated with infections comprised of P. carinii alone, while lower temperatures and an increased rat census were associated with the presence of P. wakefieldiae. PCR and immunofluorescent analysis of rat lung tissue showed that both species were present within the same alveoli, excluding habitat heterogeneity as a mechanism of coexistence. These data suggest that P. carinii and P. wakefieldiae were in competitive coexistence, which was influenced in part by extrinsic factors. To our knowledge, this is the first report to evaluate interactions of pathogenic fungal species within a mammalian host using ecological models. PMID:15949973

  15. Revisiting the Two-Layer Hypothesis: Coexistence of Alternative Functional Rooting Strategies in Savannas

    PubMed Central

    Holdo, Ricardo M.

    2013-01-01

    The two-layer hypothesis of tree-grass coexistence posits that trees and grasses differ in rooting depth, with grasses exploiting soil moisture in shallow layers while trees have exclusive access to deep water. The lack of clear differences in maximum rooting depth between these two functional groups, however, has caused this model to fall out of favor. The alternative model, the demographic bottleneck hypothesis, suggests that trees and grasses occupy overlapping rooting niches, and that stochastic events such as fires and droughts result in episodic tree mortality at various life stages, thus preventing trees from otherwise displacing grasses, at least in mesic savannas. Two potential problems with this view are: 1) we lack data on functional rooting profiles in trees and grasses, and these profiles are not necessarily reflected by differences in maximum or physical rooting depth, and 2) subtle, difficult-to-detect differences in rooting profiles between the two functional groups may be sufficient to result in coexistence in many situations. To tackle this question, I coupled a plant uptake model with a soil moisture dynamics model to explore the environmental conditions under which functional rooting profiles with equal rooting depth but different depth distributions (i.e., shapes) can coexist when competing for water. I show that, as long as rainfall inputs are stochastic, coexistence based on rooting differences is viable under a wide range of conditions, even when these differences are subtle. The results also indicate that coexistence mechanisms based on rooting niche differentiation are more viable under some climatic and edaphic conditions than others. This suggests that the two-layer model is both viable and stochastic in nature, and that a full understanding of tree-grass coexistence and dynamics may require incorporating fine-scale rooting differences between these functional groups and realistic stochastic climate drivers into future models. PMID

  16. A theoretical study of rotational diffusion models for rod-shaped viruses. The influence of motion on 31P nuclear magnetic resonance lineshapes and transversal relaxation.

    PubMed Central

    Magusin, P C; Hemminga, M A

    1993-01-01

    Information about the interaction between nucleic acids and coat proteins in intact virus particles may be obtained by studying the restricted backbone dynamics of the incapsulated nucleic acids using 31P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. In this article, simulations are carried out to investigate how reorientation of a rod-shaped virus particle as a whole and isolated nucleic acid motions within the virion influence the 31P NMR lineshape and transversal relaxation dominated by the phosphorus chemical shift anisotropy. Two opposite cases are considered on a theoretical level. First, isotropic rotational diffusion is used as a model for mobile nucleic acids that are loosely or partially bound to the protein coat. The effect of this type of diffusion on lineshape and transversal relaxation is calculated by solving the stochastic Liouville equation by an expansion in spherical functions. Next, uniaxial rotational diffusion is assumed to represent the mobility of phosphorus in a virion that rotates as a rigid rod about its length axis. This type of diffusion is approximated by an exchange process among discrete sites. As turns out from these simulations, the amplitude and the frequency of the motion can only be unequivocally determined from experimental data by a combined analysis of the lineshape and the transversal relaxation. In the fast motional region both the isotropic and the uniaxial diffusion model predict the same transversal relaxation as the Redfield theory. For very slow motion, transversal relaxation resembles the nonexponential relaxation as observed for water molecules undergoing translational diffusion in a magnetic field gradient. In this frequency region T2e is inversely proportional to the cube root of the diffusion coefficient. In addition to the isotropic and uniaxial diffusion models, a third model is presented, in which fast restricted nucleic acid backbone motions dominating the lineshape are superimposed on a slow rotation of the

  17. Shaping the nucleus: factors and forces.

    PubMed

    Walters, Alison D; Bommakanti, Ananth; Cohen-Fix, Orna

    2012-09-01

    Take a look at a textbook illustration of a cell and you will immediately be able to locate the nucleus, which is often drawn as a spherical or ovoid shaped structure. But not all cells have such nuclei. In fact, some disease states are diagnosed by the presence of nuclei that have an abnormal shape or size. What defines nuclear shape and nuclear size, and how does nuclear geometry affect nuclear function? While the answer to the latter question remains largely unknown, significant progress has been made towards understanding the former. In this review, we provide an overview of the factors and forces that affect nuclear shape and size, discuss the relationship between ER structure and nuclear morphology, and speculate on the possible connection between nuclear size and its shape. We also note the many interesting questions that remain to be explored. PMID:22566057

  18. Unusual coexistence of extramedullary plasmacytoma and nasopharyngeal carcinoma in nasopharynx.

    PubMed

    Du, Ri-Chang; Li, Hai-Nan; Huang, Wei; Tian, Xiao-Ying; Li, Zhi

    2015-09-17

    Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is an EBV-associated malignant tumor of nasopharynx. As extremely rare condition, the second primary cancer of nasopharynx can occur in NPC patients synchronously or subsequently. Extramedullary plasmacytoma (EMP) is a rare tumor and commonly originates in the head and neck region. However, there is no report to describe a collision tumor of NPC and EMP occurring in the same nasopharyngeal mass. We report here an unusual case of synchronous coexistence of NPC and EMP occurring in the nasopharynx of an old male patient. A 63-year-old male patient presented with a 3-month history of right-sided nasal obstruction and recently intermittent epistaxis without enlargement of cervical lymph nodes. The solitary mass of nasopharynx was found by radiological and nasopharyngeal examination. Histologically, the mass contained two separated portions and displayed typically histological features of NPC and EMP, respectively. In EMP portion, the tumor was composed of monomorphic plasmacytoid-appearing cells with immuno-positive to CD79a, CD138, CD38, MUM-1 and CD56, but lack immunoreactivity to pan-CK (AE1/AE3), CD20, CD21 and EBERs. In NPC portion, the tumor cells formed irregular-shaped islands with diffusely immuno-positive to pan-CK (AE1/AE3), EMA and EBERs, but lack expressions of lymphoplasmacytic markers. A diagnosis of simultaneous occurrence of EMP and NPC in nasopharynx was made. There was no evidence of tumor recurrence or metastasis 18-month follow-up after radiotherapy. To our knowledge, it may be the first case of coexistence of EMP and NPC synchronously. In addition, the histological differential diagnosis and relevant potential mechanism of this unusual collision tumor were also discussed.

  19. Two Types of Coexistence in Cross-Feeding Microbial Consortia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakaoka, Shinji; Takeuchi, Yasuhiro

    2008-07-01

    Exploitative competition of two cross-feeding strains is studied. We found that two types of coexistence of two cross-feeding strains, type-I coexistence (cultivated type) and type-II coexistence (self-sufficiency type) are possible for microbial cross-feeding strains. In all cases of coexistence, trade-off in nutrient availability is required. However, trade-off is necessary but is not sufficient for the coexistence of two strains. Over-production of metabolite can induce competitive exclusion on one hand (cultivated regime) whereas do support the coexistence of two strain on the other hand (self-sufficiency regime). Coexistence of two strains is evaluated by invasibility and permanence criteria and numerical simulations.

  20. Measurements of the Coexistence Curve near the Liquid-Gas Critical Point

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hahn, Inseob

    2003-01-01

    The shape of the liquid-gas coexistence curve of He-3 very near the critical point (-2x10(exp -6) < t < -5x10(exp -3) was measured using the quasi-static thermogram method. The study was performed in Earth s gravitational field using two different height calorimetry cells, both originally designed for simultaneous measurements of the isochoric heat capacity, isothermal compressibility, and PVT. The heights of two cells were 0.5 mm and 4.8 cm. The uncertainty in measuring the phase transition temperature was typically +/-2 micro-K. The measured coexistence curve near the critical point was strongly affected by the gravitational field. Away from the critical point, the coexistence curve obtained using this technique was also consistent with the earlier work using the local density measurements of Pittman et al. The recent crossover parametric model of the equation-of-state are used to analyze the height-dependent measured coexistence curves. Data analyses have indicated that microgravity will permit measurements within two additional decades in reduced temperatures beyond the best gravity-free data obtained in Earth-bound experiments.

  1. Coexistent Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia with Extrapulmonary Sequestration

    PubMed Central

    Kawamura, Nao; Bhandal, Samarjeet

    2016-01-01

    Bronchopulmonary foregut malformations are a heterogeneous but interrelated group of abnormalities that may contain more than one histologic feature. It is helpful to be familiar with the presentation and imaging features of bronchopulmonary foregut malformations presenting as a congenital mass or mass-like lesion, as imaging plays a central role in the evaluation of these lesions since, when symptomatic, clinical features are usually nonspecific. With imaging, the presence of other associated lesions can be determined, facilitating appropriate management to prevent the potential complications. We report a case of coexisting extralobar pulmonary sequestration and ipsilateral diaphragmatic hernia in a term neonate. PMID:27445516

  2. Full jet evolution in quark-gluon plasma and nuclear modification of jet production and jet shape in Pb+Pb collisions at 2.76 A TeV at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Ning-Bo; Qin, Guang-You

    2016-08-01

    We study the evolution of the full jet shower in quark-gluon plasma by solving a set of coupled differential transport equations for the three-dimensional momentum distributions of quarks and gluons contained in full jets. In our jet evolution equations, we include all partonic splitting processes as well as the collisional energy loss and transverse momentum broadening for both the leading and radiated partons of the full jets. Combining with a realistic (2 +1 )-dimensional viscous hydrodynamic simulation for the spacetime profiles of the hot and dense nuclear medium produced in heavy-ion collisions, we apply our formalism to calculate the nuclear modification of single inclusive full jet spectra, the momentum imbalance of photon-jet and dijet pairs, and the jet shape function (at partonic level) in Pb+Pb collisions at 2.76 A TeV. The roles of various jet-medium interaction mechanisms on the full jet modification are studied. We find that the nuclear modification of jet shape is sensitive to the interplay of different interaction mechanisms as well as the energies of the full jets.

  3. Asexuality and the coexistence of cytotypes.

    PubMed

    Kao, Rebecca Hufft

    2007-01-01

    Reproductive isolation via apomixis is one way for newly created cytotypes to persist and coexist with other cytotypes. Arnica cordifolia (Asteraceae) has both triploid and tetraploid cytotypes co-occurring in many locations. The rate of apomixis in each cytotype was explored as a mechanism for the maintenance of sympatric cytotypes. Flow cytometry was used on both adults and seeds from mixed cytotype populations to estimate reproductive mode and to evaluate the relationship between cytotype frequency and reproductive success. Flowering time was surveyed to look for temporal reproductive isolation between cytotypes. Both triploids and tetraploids can be asexual. Apomixis in A. cordifolia is usually autonomous, not pseudogamous as previously thought. Sexual reproduction appears to be uncommon. The minority cytotype in each population does not produce fewer seeds, confirming that minority cytotype exclusion is unlikely to occur via reproductive disadvantage. Triploids flowered earlier than tetraploids, but with much overlap. Asexual reproduction is an important factor promoting the coexistence of cytotypes in this system. Other mechanisms maintaining populations of sympatric cytotypes are not well studied or understood and warrant further investigation.

  4. Coexistence Curve of Perfluoromethylcyclohexane-Isopropyl Alcohol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobs, D. T.; Kuhl, D. E.; Selby, C. E.

    1996-01-01

    The coexistence curve of the binary fluid mixture perfluoromethylcyclohexane-isopropyl alcohol was determined by precisely measuring the refractive index both above and below its upper critical consolute point. Sixty-seven two-phase data points were obtained over a wide range of reduced temperatures, 10(exp -5) less than t less than 2.5 x 10(exp -1), to determine the location of the critical point: critical temperature=89.901 C, and critical composition = 62.2% by volume perfluoromethylcyclohexane. These data were analyzed to determine the critical exponent 8 close to the critical point, the amplitude B, and the anomaly in the diameter. The volume-fraction coexistence curve is found to be as symmetric as any composition like variable. Correction to scaling is investigated as well as the need for a crossover theory. A model is proposed that describes the asymptotic approach to zero of the effective exponent Beta, which allows an estimation of the temperature regime free of crossover effects.

  5. Neurotransmitters co-existing with VIP or PACAP.

    PubMed

    Fahrenkrug, Jan; Hannibal, Jens

    2004-03-01

    It is now recognized that a neuron can produce, store and release more than one transmitter substance, and a number of examples of co-existing transmitters, particularly a neuropeptide together with a classical transmitter, have been reported. The present paper deals with transmitter substances, peptides or classical transmitters, co-existing with the two structurally related peptides VIP and PACAP and the possible functional implications of this co-existence.

  6. How can flexibility be integrated into coexistence regulations? A review.

    PubMed

    Devos, Yann; Dillen, Koen; Demont, Matty

    2014-02-01

    Member states in the European Union (EU) implemented both ex ante coexistence regulations and ex post liability schemes to ensure that genetically modified (GM) and non-GM crops can be cultivated side by side without excluding any agricultural option. Although proportionate coexistence is best achieved if regulated in a flexible manner, most implemented coexistence regulations merely rely on rigid measures. Flexible coexistence regulations, however, would reduce the regulatory burden on certain agricultural options and avoid jeopardizing economic incentives for coexistence. Flexibility can be integrated at: (i) the regulatory level by relaxing the rigidity of coexistence measures in ex ante regulations, yet without offsetting incentives to implement coexistence measures; (ii) the farm level by recommending the use of pollen barriers instead of large and fixed isolation distances; and (iii) the national/regional level by allowing diversified coexistence measures, which are adapted to the heterogeneity of farming in the EU. Owing to difficulties of implementation, the adoption of flexible and proportionate coexistence regulations will inevitably entail challenges.

  7. Blocking protein farnesylation improves nuclear shape abnormalities in keratinocytes of mice expressing the prelamin A variant in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuexia; Östlund, Cecilia

    2010-01-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is an accelerated aging disorder caused by mutations in LMNA leading to expression of a truncated prelamin A variant termed progerin. Whereas a farnesylated polypeptide is normally removed from the carboxyl-terminus of prelamin A during endoproteolytic processing to lamin A, progerin lacks the cleavage site and remains farnesylated. Cultured cells from human subjects with HGPS and genetically modified mice expressing progerin have nuclear morphological abnormalities, which are reversed by inhibitors of protein farnesylation. In addition, treatment with protein farnesyltransferase inhibitors improves whole animal phenotypes in mouse models of HGPS. However, improvement in nuclear morphology in tissues after treatment of animals has not been demonstrated. We therefore treated transgenic mice that express progerin in epidermis with the protein farnesyltransferase inhibitor FTI-276 or a combination of pravastatin and zoledronate to determine if they reversed nuclear morphological abnormalities in tissue. Immunofluorescence microscopy and “blinded” electron microscopic analysis demonstrated that systemic administration of FTI-276 or pravastatin plus zoledronate significantly improved nuclear morphological abnormalities in keratinocytes of transgenic mice. These results show that pharmacological blockade of protein prenylation reverses nuclear morphological abnormalities that occur in HGPS in vivo. They further suggest that skin biopsy may be useful to determine if protein farnesylation inhibitors are exerting effects in subjects with HGPS in clinical trials. PMID:21326826

  8. Blocking protein farnesylation improves nuclear shape abnormalities in keratinocytes of mice expressing the prelamin A variant in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuexia; Ostlund, Cecilia; Worman, Howard J

    2010-01-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is an accelerated aging disorder caused by mutations in LMNA leading to expression of a truncated prelamin A variant termed progerin. Whereas a farnesylated polypeptide is normally removed from the carboxyl-terminus of prelamin A during endoproteolytic processing to lamin A, progerin lacks the cleavage site and remains farnesylated. Cultured cells from human subjects with HGPS and genetically modified mice expressing progerin have nuclear morphological abnormalities, which are reversed by inhibitors of protein farnesylation. In addition, treatment with protein farnesyltransferase inhibitors improves whole animal phenotypes in mouse models of HGPS. However, improvement in nuclear morphology in tissues after treatment of animals has not been demonstrated. We therefore treated transgenic mice that express progerin in epidermis with the protein farnesyltransferase inhibitor FTI-276 or a combination of pravastatin and zoledronate to determine if they reversed nuclear morphological abnormalities in tissue. Immunofluorescence microscopy and "blinded" electron microscopic analysis demonstrated that systemic administration of FTI-276 or pravastatin plus zoledronate significantly improved nuclear morphological abnormalities in keratinocytes of transgenic mice. These results show that pharmacological blockade of protein prenylation reverses nuclear morphological abnormalities that occur in HGPS in vivo. They further suggest that skin biopsy may be useful to determine if protein farnesylation inhibitors are exerting effects in subjects with HGPS in clinical trials.

  9. Coexistence of competitors in marine metacommunities: environmental variability, edge effects, and the dispersal niche.

    PubMed

    Aiken, Christopher M; Navarrete, Sergio A

    2014-08-01

    Theoretical studies have shown that coexistence between competitors can be favored in a spatially heterogeneous environment by a number of mechanisms, which ultimately allow the expression of persistent or transitory variation in species competitive abilities, colonization, or reproduction. Four distinctive paradigms to model metacommunities have been identified according to assumptions about the biology of the species and essential aspects of the environment. Missing from these are mechanisms of coexistence that can arise from the dispersal process itself without explicit spatial heterogeneity or biological trade-offs. These mechanisms have only recently received attention, but they may be common in marine communities and other systems in which dispersal is obligatory and modulated by the physical environment. We investigate coexistence in spatially homogeneous metacommunities where there is no partitioning of resources, no competition-colonization trade-off, and no possibility of source-sink dynamics. Coexistence is shown to be possible through three distinct mechanisms related to the dispersal process itself. Firstly, in a neutral scenario, inclusion of temporal variability in the connectivity matrix, emulating an intrinsic attribute of ocean character and other turbulent environments, can promote the invasion of an equally matched competitor and, in a hierarchical competition scenario, the persistence of an otherwise unviable, inferior competitor (the dispersal variability mechanism). Secondly, a sufficiently large difference in the shape of the time-independent dispersal kernels of the two species, which may result from differences in larval-release timing, buoyancy, or behavior, can produce stable coexistence in the center of their shared range (the dispersal-shape mechanism). Thirdly, asymmetry in the dispersal process due to biased advection renders the metapopulation model reactive, such that small variations in the upstream abundances can be sufficient

  10. Genes and processed paralogs co-exist in plant mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Cuenca, Argelia; Petersen, Gitte; Seberg, Ole; Jahren, Anne Hoppe

    2012-04-01

    RNA-mediated gene duplication has been proposed to create processed paralogs in the plant mitochondrial genome. A processed paralog may retain signatures left by the maturation process of its RNA precursor, such as intron removal and no need of RNA editing. Whereas it is well documented that an RNA intermediary is involved in the transfer of mitochondrial genes to the nucleus, no direct evidence exists for insertion of processed paralogs in the mitochondria (i.e., processed and un-processed genes have never been found simultaneously in the mitochondrial genome). In this study, we sequenced a region of the mitochondrial gene nad1, and identified a number of taxa were two different copies of the region co-occur in the mitochondria. The two nad1 paralogs differed in their (a) presence or absence of a group II intron, and (b) number of edited sites. Thus, this work provides the first evidence of co-existence of processed paralogs and their precursors within the plant mitochondrial genome. In addition, mapping the presence/absence of the paralogs provides indirect evidence of RNA-mediated gene duplication as an essential process shaping the mitochondrial genome in plants.

  11. Novel trophic cascades: apex predators enable coexistence.

    PubMed

    Wallach, Arian D; Ripple, William J; Carroll, Scott P

    2015-03-01

    Novel assemblages of native and introduced species characterize a growing proportion of ecosystems worldwide. Some introduced species have contributed to extinctions, even extinction waves, spurring widespread efforts to eradicate or control them. We propose that trophic cascade theory offers insights into why introduced species sometimes become harmful, but in other cases stably coexist with natives and offer net benefits. Large predators commonly limit populations of potentially irruptive prey and mesopredators, both native and introduced. This top-down force influences a wide range of ecosystem processes that often enhance biodiversity. We argue that many species, regardless of their origin or priors, are allies for the retention and restoration of biodiversity in top-down regulated ecosystems. PMID:25687158

  12. Emergence of coexisting percolating clusters in networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faqeeh, Ali; Melnik, Sergey; Colomer-de-Simón, Pol; Gleeson, James P.

    2016-06-01

    It is commonly assumed in percolation theories that at most one percolating cluster can exist in a network. We show that several coexisting percolating clusters (CPCs) can emerge in networks due to limited mixing, i.e., a finite and sufficiently small number of interlinks between network modules. We develop an approach called modular message passing (MMP) to describe and verify these observations. We demonstrate that the appearance of CPCs is an important source of inaccuracy in previously introduced percolation theories, such as the message passing (MP) approach, which is a state-of-the-art theory based on the belief propagation method. Moreover, we show that the MMP theory improves significantly over the predictions of MP for percolation on synthetic networks with limited mixing and also on several real-world networks. These findings have important implications for understanding the robustness of networks and in quantifying epidemic outbreaks in the susceptible-infected-recovered (SIR) model of disease spread.

  13. Thermophysical properties of coexistent phases of plutonium

    SciTech Connect

    Freibert, Franz J; Mitchell, Jeremy N; Saleh, Tarik A; Schwartz, Dan S

    2009-01-01

    Plutonium is the element with the greatest number of allotropic phases. Thermally induced transformations between these phases are typically characterized by thermal hysteresis and incomplete phase reversion. With Ga substitutal in the lattice, low symmetry phases are replaced by a higher symmetry phase. However, the low temperature Martensitic phase transformation ({delta} {yields} {alpha}{prime}) in Ga stabilized {delta}-phase Pu is characterized by a region of thermal hysteresis which can reach 200 C in extent. These regions of thermal hysteresis offer a unique opportunity to study thermodynamics in inhomogeneous systems of coexistent phases. The results of thermophysical properties measured for samples of inhomogeneous unalloyed and Ga alloyed Pu will be discussed and compared with similar measurements of their single phase constituents.

  14. Fixation-coexistence transition in spatial populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dall'Asta, Luca; Caccioli, Fabio; Beghè, Deborah

    2013-01-01

    Balancing selection is a special case of frequency-dependent selection that is known to be the major force for the maintenance of biodiversity and polymorphism in natural populations. In finite populations, genetic drift eventually drives the population to fixation to the detriment of biodiversity. The interplay between selection and genetic drift is much richer in spatially extended populations, where the local density of individuals can be low even in the limit of infinitely large systems. We consider the limit of low local density of individuals (strong genetic drift) that is well represented by a modified voter model. We show analytically the existence of a non-equilibrium phase transition between a region in which fixation always occurs and a coexistence phase for a one-dimensional system. We also provide a characterization of the dynamical properties of the system, in particular for what concerns the coarsening behavior and the speed of propagation of heterozygosity above the threshold.

  15. Novel trophic cascades: apex predators enable coexistence.

    PubMed

    Wallach, Arian D; Ripple, William J; Carroll, Scott P

    2015-03-01

    Novel assemblages of native and introduced species characterize a growing proportion of ecosystems worldwide. Some introduced species have contributed to extinctions, even extinction waves, spurring widespread efforts to eradicate or control them. We propose that trophic cascade theory offers insights into why introduced species sometimes become harmful, but in other cases stably coexist with natives and offer net benefits. Large predators commonly limit populations of potentially irruptive prey and mesopredators, both native and introduced. This top-down force influences a wide range of ecosystem processes that often enhance biodiversity. We argue that many species, regardless of their origin or priors, are allies for the retention and restoration of biodiversity in top-down regulated ecosystems.

  16. Coexistent digital gouty and infective flexor tenosynovitis.

    PubMed

    Akram, Qasim; Hughes, Michael; Muir, Lindsay

    2016-01-01

    Flexor tenosynovitis of the hand is often caused by trauma or infection. Gouty tenosynovitis is an uncommon presentation of the condition and is usually misdiagnosed as infection with the patient undergoing surgery. The coexistence of infection and gout causing flexor tenosynovitis has never been described before in the literature; we report the first ever case and emphasise the importance of its awareness for optimal treatment. A 54-year-old man was initially diagnosed and treated as having infective flexor tenosynovitis and, later, due to a lack of improvement in his symptoms, was discovered to also have gout. We review the literature and suggest management strategy for use in daily clinical practice, including an algorithm, for this presentation. PMID:27358092

  17. Erythema elevatum diutinum coexisting with ankylosing spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Yıldız, Fatih; Karakaş, Tuğba; Açıkalın, Arbil; Taş, Didem Arslan; Erken, Eren

    2015-01-01

    A 43-year-old woman presented to our hospital with the complaint of a reddish-purple rash on the extensor sides of her forearms. She had been diagnosed with ankylosing spondylitis 7 years ago. On physical examination, reddish-purple nodules were detected on the pretibial areas of both legs and extensor sides of both hands and forearms. Neutrophil, eosinophil, lymphocyte, and mixed-type leukocyte infiltration and erythrocyte extravasation were observed in skin biopsy. Erythema elevatum diutinum (EED) was diagnosed. For treatment, sulphasalazine, colchicine, and diclofenac were started. After 3 months of treatment, the lesions were healed. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of EED coexisting with ankylosing spondylitis.

  18. Coexistence of peptides with classical neurotransmitters.

    PubMed

    Hökfelt, T; Millhorn, D; Seroogy, K; Tsuruo, Y; Ceccatelli, S; Lindh, B; Meister, B; Melander, T; Schalling, M; Bartfai, T

    1987-07-15

    In the present article the fact is emphasized that neuropeptides often are located in the same neurons as classical transmitters such as acetylcholine, 5-hydroxy-tryptamine, catecholamines, gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) etc. This raises the possibility that neurons produce, store and release more than one messenger molecule. The exact functional role of such coexisting peptides is often difficult to evaluate, especially in the central nervous system. In the periphery some studies indicate apparently meaningful interactions of different types with the classical transmitter, but other types of actions including trophic effects have been observed. More recently it has been shown that some neurons contain more than one classical transmitter, e.g. 5-HT plus GABA, further underlining the view that transfer of information across synapses may be more complex than perhaps hitherto assumed. PMID:2885215

  19. Coexistence of multiple omphalomesenteric duct anomalies.

    PubMed

    Ioannidis, Orestis; Paraskevas, George; Kakoutis, Emmanouil; Kotronis, Anastasios; Papadimitriou, Nikos; Chatzopoulos, Stavros; Makrantonakis, Apostolos

    2012-08-01

    The omphalomesenteric duct is an embryonic structure which connects the yolk sac to the midgut. The omphalomesenteric duct attenuates between the 5th and 9th week of gestation. Failure of the omphalomesenteric duct involution, either partial or complete, results in various omphalomesenteric duct remnants including Meckel's diverticulum, patent vitelline duct, fibrous band, sinus tract, umbilical polyp and cyst. Omphalomesenteric duct remnants are present in 2% of the population but related diseases have seldom been reported in adults. The simultaneous presence of sinus tract, omphalomesenteric cyst, fibrous ligament and Meckel's diverticulum has, according to authors' knowledge, never been reported. We present a case of a 23 years old male with persisting umbilical discharge for 2 years in whom there was coexistence of the above mentioned anomalies of the omphalomesenteric duct.

  20. Emergence of coexisting percolating clusters in networks.

    PubMed

    Faqeeh, Ali; Melnik, Sergey; Colomer-de-Simón, Pol; Gleeson, James P

    2016-06-01

    It is commonly assumed in percolation theories that at most one percolating cluster can exist in a network. We show that several coexisting percolating clusters (CPCs) can emerge in networks due to limited mixing, i.e., a finite and sufficiently small number of interlinks between network modules. We develop an approach called modular message passing (MMP) to describe and verify these observations. We demonstrate that the appearance of CPCs is an important source of inaccuracy in previously introduced percolation theories, such as the message passing (MP) approach, which is a state-of-the-art theory based on the belief propagation method. Moreover, we show that the MMP theory improves significantly over the predictions of MP for percolation on synthetic networks with limited mixing and also on several real-world networks. These findings have important implications for understanding the robustness of networks and in quantifying epidemic outbreaks in the susceptible-infected-recovered (SIR) model of disease spread. PMID:27415281

  1. Early mesozoic coexistence of amniotes and hepadnaviridae.

    PubMed

    Suh, Alexander; Weber, Claudia C; Kehlmaier, Christian; Braun, Edward L; Green, Richard E; Fritz, Uwe; Ray, David A; Ellegren, Hans

    2014-12-01

    Hepadnaviridae are double-stranded DNA viruses that infect some species of birds and mammals. This includes humans, where hepatitis B viruses (HBVs) are prevalent pathogens in considerable parts of the global population. Recently, endogenized sequences of HBVs (eHBVs) have been discovered in bird genomes where they constitute direct evidence for the coexistence of these viruses and their hosts from the late Mesozoic until present. Nevertheless, virtually nothing is known about the ancient host range of this virus family in other animals. Here we report the first eHBVs from crocodilian, snake, and turtle genomes, including a turtle eHBV that endogenized >207 million years ago. This genomic "fossil" is >125 million years older than the oldest avian eHBV and provides the first direct evidence that Hepadnaviridae already existed during the Early Mesozoic. This implies that the Mesozoic fossil record of HBV infection spans three of the five major groups of land vertebrates, namely birds, crocodilians, and turtles. We show that the deep phylogenetic relationships of HBVs are largely congruent with the deep phylogeny of their amniote hosts, which suggests an ancient amniote-HBV coexistence and codivergence, at least since the Early Mesozoic. Notably, the organization of overlapping genes as well as the structure of elements involved in viral replication has remained highly conserved among HBVs along that time span, except for the presence of the X gene. We provide multiple lines of evidence that the tumor-promoting X protein of mammalian HBVs lacks a homolog in all other hepadnaviruses and propose a novel scenario for the emergence of X via segmental duplication and overprinting of pre-existing reading frames in the ancestor of mammalian HBVs. Our study reveals an unforeseen host range of prehistoric HBVs and provides novel insights into the genome evolution of hepadnaviruses throughout their long-lasting association with amniote hosts. PMID:25501991

  2. Early Mesozoic Coexistence of Amniotes and Hepadnaviridae

    PubMed Central

    Suh, Alexander; Weber, Claudia C.; Kehlmaier, Christian; Braun, Edward L.; Green, Richard E.; Fritz, Uwe; Ray, David A.; Ellegren, Hans

    2014-01-01

    Hepadnaviridae are double-stranded DNA viruses that infect some species of birds and mammals. This includes humans, where hepatitis B viruses (HBVs) are prevalent pathogens in considerable parts of the global population. Recently, endogenized sequences of HBVs (eHBVs) have been discovered in bird genomes where they constitute direct evidence for the coexistence of these viruses and their hosts from the late Mesozoic until present. Nevertheless, virtually nothing is known about the ancient host range of this virus family in other animals. Here we report the first eHBVs from crocodilian, snake, and turtle genomes, including a turtle eHBV that endogenized >207 million years ago. This genomic “fossil” is >125 million years older than the oldest avian eHBV and provides the first direct evidence that Hepadnaviridae already existed during the Early Mesozoic. This implies that the Mesozoic fossil record of HBV infection spans three of the five major groups of land vertebrates, namely birds, crocodilians, and turtles. We show that the deep phylogenetic relationships of HBVs are largely congruent with the deep phylogeny of their amniote hosts, which suggests an ancient amniote–HBV coexistence and codivergence, at least since the Early Mesozoic. Notably, the organization of overlapping genes as well as the structure of elements involved in viral replication has remained highly conserved among HBVs along that time span, except for the presence of the X gene. We provide multiple lines of evidence that the tumor-promoting X protein of mammalian HBVs lacks a homolog in all other hepadnaviruses and propose a novel scenario for the emergence of X via segmental duplication and overprinting of pre-existing reading frames in the ancestor of mammalian HBVs. Our study reveals an unforeseen host range of prehistoric HBVs and provides novel insights into the genome evolution of hepadnaviruses throughout their long-lasting association with amniote hosts. PMID:25501991

  3. China and the global uranium market: prospects for peaceful coexistence.

    PubMed

    Massot, Pascale; Chen, Zhan-Ming

    2013-01-01

    China's recent reemergence has resulted in a significant increase in the global demand of commodities and is already having major impacts on the dynamics of global commodity markets. In the case of the global uranium market, we stand at the very beginning of a period of change. However, interesting trends are already emerging. Whereas China has had many policy reversals, and some difficulties in taking control of its procurement strategy in other commodity markets, it is seemingly more successful in managing its uranium procurement strategy. Why? The argument presented here is that a mixture of domestic and international level variables has allowed China more room for maneuver in fulfilling its uranium procurement strategy. On the domestic level, a centralized industry, and, on the international level, a geographically dispersed and uncoordinated market have allowed China to forge ahead with an ambitious civilian nuclear power plan and triple its total uranium imports, all within the span of a few years. Many challenges remain, not the least that of negative public opinion, which has surged since the Fukushima disaster in 2011. Nevertheless, should uranium demand continue to grow, this paper will consider the potential for continued peaceful coexistence among uranium market participants worldwide.

  4. China and the Global Uranium Market: Prospects for Peaceful Coexistence

    PubMed Central

    Massot, Pascale

    2013-01-01

    China's recent reemergence has resulted in a significant increase in the global demand of commodities and is already having major impacts on the dynamics of global commodity markets. In the case of the global uranium market, we stand at the very beginning of a period of change. However, interesting trends are already emerging. Whereas China has had many policy reversals, and some difficulties in taking control of its procurement strategy in other commodity markets, it is seemingly more successful in managing its uranium procurement strategy. Why? The argument presented here is that a mixture of domestic and international level variables has allowed China more room for maneuver in fulfilling its uranium procurement strategy. On the domestic level, a centralized industry, and, on the international level, a geographically dispersed and uncoordinated market have allowed China to forge ahead with an ambitious civilian nuclear power plan and triple its total uranium imports, all within the span of a few years. Many challenges remain, not the least that of negative public opinion, which has surged since the Fukushima disaster in 2011. Nevertheless, should uranium demand continue to grow, this paper will consider the potential for continued peaceful coexistence among uranium market participants worldwide. PMID:23606818

  5. Octocoral Species Assembly and Coexistence in Caribbean Coral Reefs

    PubMed Central

    Velásquez, Johanna; Sánchez, Juan A.

    2015-01-01

    Background What are the determinant factors of community assemblies in the most diverse ecosystem in the ocean? Coral reefs can be divided in continental (i.e., reefs that develop on the continental shelf, including siliciclastic reefs) and oceanic (i.e., far off the continental shelf, usually on volcanic substratum); whether or not these habitat differences impose community-wide ecological divergence or species exclusion/coexistence with evolutionary consequences, is unknown. Methods Studying Caribbean octocorals as model system, we determined the phylogenetic community structure in a coral reef community, making emphasis on species coexistence evidenced on trait evolution and environmental feedbacks. Forty-nine species represented in five families constituted the species pool from which a phylogenetic tree was reconstructed using mtDNA. We included data from 11 localities in the Western Caribbean (Colombia) including most reef types. To test diversity-environment and phenotype-environment relationships, phylogenetic community structure and trait evolution we carried out comparative analyses implementing ecological and evolutionary approaches. Results Phylogenetic inferences suggest clustering of oceanic reefs (e.g., atolls) contrasting with phylogenetic overdispersion of continental reefs (e.g., reefs banks). Additionally, atolls and barrier reefs had the highest species diversity (Shannon index) whereas phylogenetic diversity was higher in reef banks. The discriminant component analysis supported this differentiation between oceanic and continental reefs, where continental octocoral species tend to have greater calyx apertures, thicker branches, prominent calyces and azooxanthellate species. This analysis also indicated a clear separation between the slope and the remaining habitats, caused by the presence or absence of Symbiodinium. K statistic analysis showed that this trait is conserved as well as the branch shape. Discussion There was strong octocoral

  6. Composite bulges: the coexistence of classical bulges and discy pseudo-bulges in S0 and spiral galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erwin, Peter; Saglia, Roberto P.; Fabricius, Maximilian; Thomas, Jens; Nowak, Nina; Rusli, Stephanie; Bender, Ralf; Vega Beltrán, Juan Carlos; Beckman, John E.

    2015-02-01

    We present an analysis of nine S0-Sb galaxies which have (photometric) bulges consisting of two distinct components. The outer component is a flattened, kinematically cool, disc-like structure: a `discy pseudo-bulge'. Embedded inside is a rounder, kinematically hot spheroidal structure: a `classical bulge'. This indicates that pseudo-bulges and classical bulges are not mutually exclusive phenomena: some galaxies have both. The discy pseudo-bulges almost always consist of an exponential disc (scalelengths = 125-870 pc, mean size ˜440 pc) with one or more disc-related subcomponents: nuclear rings, nuclear bars, and/or spiral arms. They constitute 11-59 per cent of the galaxy stellar mass (mean PB/T = 0.33), with stellar masses ˜7 × 109-9 × 1010 M⊙. The classical-bulge components have Sérsic indices of 0.9-2.2, effective radii of 25-430 pc and stellar masses of 5 × 108-3 × 1010 M⊙; they are usually <10 per cent of the galaxy's stellar mass (mean B/T = 0.06). The classical bulges do show rotation, but are clearly kinematically hotter than the discy pseudo-bulges. Dynamical modelling of three systems indicates that velocity dispersions are isotropic in the classical bulges and equatorially biased in the discy pseudo-bulges. In the mass-radius and mass-stellar mass density planes, classical-bulge components follow sequences defined by ellipticals and (larger) classical bulges. Discy pseudo-bulges also fall on this sequence; they are more compact than large-scale discs of similar mass. Although some classical bulges are quite compact, they are as a class clearly distinct from nuclear star clusters in both size and mass; in at least two galaxies they coexist with nuclear clusters. Since almost all the galaxies in this study are barred, they probably also host boxy/peanut-shaped bulges (vertically thickened inner parts of bars). NGC 3368 shows isophotal evidence for such a zone just outside its discy pseudo-bulge, making it a clear case of a galaxy with all three

  7. Microscopic Approach to Species Coexistence Based on Evolutionary Game Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grebogi, Celso; Lai, Ying-Cheng; Wang, Wen-Xu

    2014-12-01

    An outstanding problem in complex systems and mathematical biology is to explore and understand the fundamental mechanisms of species coexistence. Existing approaches are based on niche partitioning, dispersal, chaotic evolutionary dynamics, and more recently, evolutionary games. Here we briefly review a number of fundamental issues associated with the coexistence of mobile species under cyclic competitions in the framework of evolutionary games.

  8. Co-Adaptation Is Key to Coexisting with Large Carnivores.

    PubMed

    Carter, Neil H; Linnell, John D C

    2016-08-01

    There is a pressing need to integrate large carnivore species into multi-use landscapes outside protected areas. However, an unclear understanding of coexistence hinders the realization of this goal. Here, we provide a comprehensive conceptualization of coexistence in which mutual adaptations by both large carnivores and humans have a central role. PMID:27377600

  9. 38 CFR 4.113 - Coexisting abdominal conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... SCHEDULE FOR RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Digestive System § 4.113 Coexisting abdominal conditions. There are diseases of the digestive system, particularly within the abdomen, which, while... coexisting diseases in this area, as indicated in the instruction under the title “Diseases of the...

  10. 38 CFR 4.113 - Coexisting abdominal conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... SCHEDULE FOR RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Digestive System § 4.113 Coexisting abdominal conditions. There are diseases of the digestive system, particularly within the abdomen, which, while... coexisting diseases in this area, as indicated in the instruction under the title “Diseases of the...

  11. Double Jeopardy for Children Who Stutter: Race and Coexisting Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blood, Gordon W.; Blood, Ingrid; Kreiger, Jennifer; O'Connor, Shelah; Qualls, Constance Dean

    2009-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to examine the influence of racial and ethnic backgrounds in children who stutter (CWS) with 18 specific coexisting disorders. A sample of 1,184 speech-language pathologists responded to a detailed questionnaire designed to answer questions about the type and prevalence of coexisting disorders in 2,535 CWS.…

  12. Evolution of life-history traits collapses competitive coexistence.

    PubMed

    Mougi, Akihiko; Nishimura, Kinya

    2007-10-01

    Trade-offs between competitive ability and the other life-history traits are considered to be a major mechanism of competitive coexistence. Many theoretical studies have demonstrated the robustness of such a coexistence mechanism ecologically; however, it is unknown whether the coexistence is robust evolutionarily. Here, we report that evolution of life-history traits not directly related to competition, such as longevity, and predator avoidance, easily collapses competitive coexistence in several competition systems: spatially structured, and predator-mediated two-species competition systems. In addition, we found that a superior competitor can be excluded by an inferior one by common mechanisms among the models. Our results suggest that ecological competitive coexistence due to a life-history trait trade-off balance may not be balanced on an evolutionary timescale, that is, it may be evolutionarily fragile.

  13. Glioma coexisting with angiographically occult cerebrovascular malformation: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Junhui; Chen, Lei; Zhang, Chunlei; He, Jianqing; Li, Peipei; Zhou, Jingxu; Zhu, Jun; Wang, Yuhai

    2016-01-01

    Angiographically occult cerebrovascular malformation (AOVM) is a type of complex cerebrovascular malformation that is not visible on digital subtraction angiography (DSA). Vascular malformation coexisting with glioma is clinically rare, and glioma coexisting with AOVM is even more rare. To the best of our knowledge, the present study is the first to report glioma coexisting with AOVM in the literature. The present study reports a rare case of glioma coexisting with AOVM in a 30-year-old male patient. Computed tomography (CT) scan revealed calcification, hemorrhage and edema in the right frontal lobe. CT angiography revealed a vascular malformation in the right frontal lobe, which was not observed on DSA. Finally, glioma coexisting with AOVM was confirmed by 2.0T magnetic resonance imaging and postoperative pathological examination. The present patient had a positive outcome and no neurological dysfunctions during the 6-month follow-up subsequent to surgery. PMID:27698825

  14. Glioma coexisting with angiographically occult cerebrovascular malformation: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Junhui; Chen, Lei; Zhang, Chunlei; He, Jianqing; Li, Peipei; Zhou, Jingxu; Zhu, Jun; Wang, Yuhai

    2016-01-01

    Angiographically occult cerebrovascular malformation (AOVM) is a type of complex cerebrovascular malformation that is not visible on digital subtraction angiography (DSA). Vascular malformation coexisting with glioma is clinically rare, and glioma coexisting with AOVM is even more rare. To the best of our knowledge, the present study is the first to report glioma coexisting with AOVM in the literature. The present study reports a rare case of glioma coexisting with AOVM in a 30-year-old male patient. Computed tomography (CT) scan revealed calcification, hemorrhage and edema in the right frontal lobe. CT angiography revealed a vascular malformation in the right frontal lobe, which was not observed on DSA. Finally, glioma coexisting with AOVM was confirmed by 2.0T magnetic resonance imaging and postoperative pathological examination. The present patient had a positive outcome and no neurological dysfunctions during the 6-month follow-up subsequent to surgery.

  15. Estimating the probability of coexistence in cross-feeding communities.

    PubMed

    Vessman, Björn; Gerlee, Philip; Lundh, Torbjörn

    2016-11-01

    The dynamics of many microbial ecosystems are driven by cross-feeding interactions, in which metabolites excreted by some species are metabolised further by others. The population dynamics of such ecosystems are governed by frequency-dependent selection, which allows for stable coexistence of two or more species. We have analysed a model of cross-feeding based on the replicator equation, with the aim of establishing criteria for coexistence in ecosystems containing three species, given the information of the three species' ability to coexist in their three separate pairs, i.e. the long term dynamics in the three two-species component systems. The triple-system is studied statistically and the probability of coexistence in the species triplet is computed for two models of species interactions. The interaction parameters are modelled either as stochastically independent or organised in a hierarchy where any derived metabolite carries less energy than previous nutrients in the metabolic chain. We differentiate between different modes of coexistence with respect to the pair-wise dynamics of the species, and find that the probability of coexistence is close to 12 for triplet systems with three pair-wise coexistent pairs and for the so-called intransitive systems. Systems with two and one pair-wise coexistent pairs are more likely to exist for random interaction parameters, but are on the other hand much less likely to exhibit triplet coexistence. Hence we conclude that certain species triplets are, from a statistical point of view, rare, but if allowed to interact are likely to coexist. This knowledge might be helpful when constructing synthetic microbial communities for industrial purposes. PMID:27484301

  16. Environmental stress, facilitation, competition, and coexistence.

    PubMed

    Hart, Simon P; Marshall, Dustin J

    2013-12-01

    The major theories regarding the combined influence of the environment and species interactions on population and community dynamics appear to conflict. Stress/ disturbance gradient models of community organization, such as the stress gradient hypothesis, emphasize a diminished role for competition in harsh environments whereas modern coexistence theory does not. Confusion about the role of species interactions in harsh environments is perpetuated by a disconnect between population dynamics theory and data. We linked theory and data using response surface experiments done in the field to parameterize mathematical, population-dynamic competition models. We replicated our experiment across two environments that spanned a common and important environmental stress gradient for determining community structure in benthic marine systems. We generated quantitative estimates of the effects of environmental stress on population growth rates and the direction and strength of intra- and interspecific interactions within each environment. Our approach directly addressed a perpetual blind spot in this field by showing how the effects of competition can be intensified in stressful environments even though the apparent strength of competition remains unchanged. Furthermore, we showed how simultaneous, reciprocal competitive and facilitative effects can stabilize population dynamics in multispecies communities in stressful environments.

  17. Coexisting living stromatolites and infaunal metazoans.

    PubMed

    Rishworth, Gavin M; Perissinotto, Renzo; Bird, Matthew S

    2016-10-01

    Microbialites, bioaccretionary structures formed during the growth and metabolism of microorganisms (principally cyanobacteria) were the dominant lifeform in shallow late-Archean and Proterozoic oceans. During the Cambrian radiation of metazoan life, which began ~540 Mya, microbialite abundance and diversity further declined following a peak in the Mesoproterozoic. Notwithstanding contention, grazing and bioturbation effects of metazoans have been hypothesized as the dominant driver of modern microbialite scarcity. However, this metazoan-microbialite exclusion has not been fully explored in the few extant microbialites. Here we provide further evidence showing that living marine layered microbialites (stromatolites) coexist with a persistent assemblage of benthic macro-invertebrates, as has previously been demonstrated in some thrombolitic (clotted) microbialites. Surprisingly, these metazoans have active habits, such as burrowing, which should be expected to disrupt the layered matrix. As other studies have shown, through a network of burrows, metazoans can exploit local diurnal oxygen refugia within microbialites as well as escape predation. Our results, therefore, add novel evidence in support of the hypotheses that geologically, metazoans are not always incompatible with stromatolites, while ecologically, microbialites may act as micro-refugia for modern metazoans and historically have performed a similar inferred role in past ecosystems. PMID:27334871

  18. Aggression and coexistence in female caribou

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weckerly, Floyd W.; Ricca, Mark A.

    2014-01-01

    Female caribou (Rangifer tarandus) are highly gregarious, yet there has been little study of the behavioral mechanisms that foster coexistence. Quantifying patterns of aggression between male and female, particularly in the only cervid taxa where both sexes grow antlers, should provide insight into these mechanisms. We asked if patterns of aggression by male and female caribou followed the pattern typically noted in other polygynous cervids, in which males display higher frequencies and intensity of aggression. From June to August in 2011 and 2012, we measured the frequency and intensity of aggression across a range of group sizes through focal animal sampling of 170 caribou (64 males and 106 females) on Adak Island in the Aleutian Archipelago, Alaska. Males in same-sex and mixed-sex groups and females in mixed-sex groups had higher frequencies of aggression than females in same-sex groups. Group size did not influence frequency of aggression. Males displayed more intense aggression than females. Frequent aggression in mixed-sex groups probably reflects lower tolerance of males for animals in close proximity. Female caribou were less aggressive and more gregarious than males, as in other polygynous cervid species.

  19. Environmental stress, facilitation, competition, and coexistence.

    PubMed

    Hart, Simon P; Marshall, Dustin J

    2013-12-01

    The major theories regarding the combined influence of the environment and species interactions on population and community dynamics appear to conflict. Stress/ disturbance gradient models of community organization, such as the stress gradient hypothesis, emphasize a diminished role for competition in harsh environments whereas modern coexistence theory does not. Confusion about the role of species interactions in harsh environments is perpetuated by a disconnect between population dynamics theory and data. We linked theory and data using response surface experiments done in the field to parameterize mathematical, population-dynamic competition models. We replicated our experiment across two environments that spanned a common and important environmental stress gradient for determining community structure in benthic marine systems. We generated quantitative estimates of the effects of environmental stress on population growth rates and the direction and strength of intra- and interspecific interactions within each environment. Our approach directly addressed a perpetual blind spot in this field by showing how the effects of competition can be intensified in stressful environments even though the apparent strength of competition remains unchanged. Furthermore, we showed how simultaneous, reciprocal competitive and facilitative effects can stabilize population dynamics in multispecies communities in stressful environments. PMID:24597219

  20. Dipole Strength Distributions in 124,126,128,130,132,134,136Xe:. a Systematic Study in the Mass Region of a Nuclear Shape Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kneissl, U.

    2005-03-01

    Systematic nuclear resonance fluorescence experiments (NRF) on all 7 stable even-even Xe isotopes have been performed at the bremsstrahlung facility of the 4.3 MV Stuttgart Dynamitron accelerator. For the first time thin-walled, high-pressure gas targets (about 70 bar) were used in NRF experiments. Precise excitation energies, transition strengths, spins, and decay branching ratios were obtained for numerous states, most of them unknown so far. The systematics of the observed E1 two-phonon excitations (2+ ⊗ 3-) and M1 excitations to 1+ mixed symmetry states are discussed with respect to the new critical point symmetry E(5).

  1. Long-Term Coexistence of Rotifer Cryptic Species

    PubMed Central

    Serra, Manuel; Gómez, Africa

    2011-01-01

    Despite their high morphological similarity, cryptic species often coexist in aquatic habitats presenting a challenge in the framework of niche differentiation theory and coexistence mechanisms. Here we use a rotifer species complex inhabiting highly unpredictable and fluctuating salt lakes to gain insights into the mechanisms involved in stable coexistence in cryptic species. We combined molecular barcoding surveys of planktonic populations and paleogenetic analysis of diapausing eggs to reconstruct the current and historical coexistence dynamics of two highly morphologically similar rotifer species, B. plicatilis and B. manjavacas. In addition, we carried out laboratory experiments using clones isolated from eight lakes where both species coexist to explore their clonal growth responses to salinity, a challenging, highly variable and unpredictable condition in Mediterranean salt lakes. We show that both species have co-occurred in a stable way in one lake, with population fluctuations in which no species was permanently excluded. The seasonal occurrence patterns of the plankton in two lakes agree with laboratory experiments showing that both species differ in their optimal salinity. These results suggest that stable species coexistence is mediated by differential responses to salinity and its fluctuating regime. We discuss the role of fluctuating salinity and a persistent diapausing egg banks as a mechanism for species coexistence in accordance with the ‘storage effect’. PMID:21738691

  2. Pollinator Foraging Adaptation and Coexistence of Competing Plants

    PubMed Central

    Revilla, Tomás A.; Křivan, Vlastimil

    2016-01-01

    We use the optimal foraging theory to study coexistence between two plant species and a generalist pollinator. We compare conditions for plant coexistence for non-adaptive vs. adaptive pollinators that adjust their foraging strategy to maximize fitness. When pollinators have fixed preferences, we show that plant coexistence typically requires both weak competition between plants for resources (e.g., space or nutrients) and pollinator preferences that are not too biased in favour of either plant. We also show how plant coexistence is promoted by indirect facilitation via the pollinator. When pollinators are adaptive foragers, pollinator’s diet maximizes pollinator’s fitness measured as the per capita population growth rate. Simulations show that this has two conflicting consequences for plant coexistence. On the one hand, when competition between pollinators is weak, adaptation favours pollinator specialization on the more profitable plant which increases asymmetries in plant competition and makes their coexistence less likely. On the other hand, when competition between pollinators is strong, adaptation promotes generalism, which facilitates plant coexistence. In addition, adaptive foraging allows pollinators to survive sudden loss of the preferred plant host, thus preventing further collapse of the entire community. PMID:27505254

  3. Pollinator Foraging Adaptation and Coexistence of Competing Plants.

    PubMed

    Revilla, Tomás A; Křivan, Vlastimil

    2016-01-01

    We use the optimal foraging theory to study coexistence between two plant species and a generalist pollinator. We compare conditions for plant coexistence for non-adaptive vs. adaptive pollinators that adjust their foraging strategy to maximize fitness. When pollinators have fixed preferences, we show that plant coexistence typically requires both weak competition between plants for resources (e.g., space or nutrients) and pollinator preferences that are not too biased in favour of either plant. We also show how plant coexistence is promoted by indirect facilitation via the pollinator. When pollinators are adaptive foragers, pollinator's diet maximizes pollinator's fitness measured as the per capita population growth rate. Simulations show that this has two conflicting consequences for plant coexistence. On the one hand, when competition between pollinators is weak, adaptation favours pollinator specialization on the more profitable plant which increases asymmetries in plant competition and makes their coexistence less likely. On the other hand, when competition between pollinators is strong, adaptation promotes generalism, which facilitates plant coexistence. In addition, adaptive foraging allows pollinators to survive sudden loss of the preferred plant host, thus preventing further collapse of the entire community. PMID:27505254

  4. Influence of the nuclear membrane, active transport, and cell shape on the Hes1 and p53-Mdm2 pathways: insights from spatio-temporal modelling.

    PubMed

    Sturrock, Marc; Terry, Alan J; Xirodimas, Dimitris P; Thompson, Alastair M; Chaplain, Mark A J

    2012-07-01

    There are many intracellular signalling pathways where the spatial distribution of the molecular species cannot be neglected. These pathways often contain negative feedback loops and can exhibit oscillatory dynamics in space and time. Two such pathways are those involving Hes1 and p53-Mdm2, both of which are implicated in cancer. In this paper we further develop the partial differential equation (PDE) models of Sturrock et al. (J. Theor. Biol., 273:15-31, 2011) which were used to study these dynamics. We extend these PDE models by including a nuclear membrane and active transport, assuming that proteins are convected in the cytoplasm towards the nucleus in order to model transport along microtubules. We also account for Mdm2 inhibition of p53 transcriptional activity. Through numerical simulations we find ranges of values for the model parameters such that sustained oscillatory dynamics occur, consistent with available experimental measurements. We also find that our model extensions act to broaden the parameter ranges that yield oscillations. Hence oscillatory behaviour is made more robust by the inclusion of both the nuclear membrane and active transport. In order to bridge the gap between in vivo and in silico experiments, we investigate more realistic cell geometries by using an imported image of a real cell as our computational domain. For the extended p53-Mdm2 model, we consider the effect of microtubule-disrupting drugs and proteasome inhibitor drugs, obtaining results that are in agreement with experimental studies.

  5. Spatial analysis of nuclear and cytoplasmic DNA diversity in wild sea beet (Beta vulgaris ssp. maritima) populations: do marine currents shape the genetic structure?

    PubMed

    Fievet, Virgil; Touzet, Pascal; Arnaud, Jean-François; Cuguen, Joël

    2007-05-01

    Patterns of seed dispersal in the wild sea beet (Beta vulgaris ssp. maritima) are predicted to be influenced by marine currents because populations are widely distributed along the European Atlantic coast. We investigated the potential influence of marine currents on the pattern of spatial genetic structuring in natural populations of sea beet. Populations were located along the French coasts of the Anglo-Norman gulf that features peculiar marine currents in the Channel. Thirty-three populations were sampled, among which 23 were continental and 10 were insular populations located in Jersey, Guernsey and Chausey, for a total of 1224 plants genotyped. To validate the coastal topography influence and the possibility of marine current orientated gene flow on the genetic features of sea beet populations, we assessed patterns of genetic structuring of cytoplasmic and nuclear diversity by: (i) searching for an isolation-by-distance (IBD) pattern using spatial autocorrelation tools; (ii) using the Monmonier algorithm to identify genetic boundaries in the area studied; and (iii) performing assignment tests that are based on multilocus genotype information to ascertain population membership of individuals. Our results showed a highly contrasted cytoplasmic and nuclear genetic differentiation and highlighted the peculiar situation of island populations. Beyond a classical isolation-by-distance due to short-range dispersal, genetic barriers fitting the orientation of marine currents were clearly identified. This suggests the occurrence of long-distance seed dispersal events and an asymmetrical gene flow separating the eastern and western part of the Anglo-Norman gulf.

  6. Multiple coexisting states of liquid rope coiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribe, N. M.; Huppert, H. E.; Hallworth, M. A.; Habibi, M.; Bonn, Daniel

    2006-05-01

    A thin ‘rope’ of viscous fluid falling from a sufficient height onto a surface forms a series of regular coils. Here we investigate theoretically and experimentally a curious feature of this instability: the existence of multiple states with different frequencies at a fixed value of the fall height. Using a numerical model based on asymptotic ‘thin rope’ theory, we determine curves of coiling frequency Omega vs. fall height H as functions of the fluid viscosity nu, the diameter d of the injection hole, the volumetric injection rate Q, and the acceleration due to gravity g. In addition to the three coiling modes previously identified (viscous, gravitational and inertial), we find a new multivalued ‘inertio-gravitational’ mode that occurs at heights intermediate between gravitational and inertial coiling. In the limit when the rope is strongly stretched by gravity and Pi_1 {equiv} (nu(5/g) Q(3)(1/5} {≫)) 1, inertio-gravititational coiling occurs in the height range O(Pi_1(-1/6}) {≤) H(g/nu(2)(1/3} {≤)) O(Pi_1(-5/48) ). The frequencies of the individual branches are proportional to (g/H)(1/2) , and agree closely with the eigenfrequencies of a whirling liquid string with negligible resistance to bending and twisting. The number of coexisting branches scales as Pi_1(5/32) . The predictions of the numerical model are in excellent agreement with laboratory experiments performed by two independent groups using different apparatus and working fluids. The experiments further show that interbranch transitions in the inertio-gravitational regime occur via an intermediate state with a ‘figure of eight’ geometry that changes the sense of rotation of the coiling.

  7. Coexistence of fisheries with river dolphin conservation.

    PubMed

    Kelkar, Nachiket; Krishnaswamy, Jagdish; Choudhary, Sunil; Sutaria, Dipani

    2010-08-01

    Freshwater biodiversity conservation is generally perceived to conflict with human use and extraction (e.g., fisheries). Overexploited fisheries upset the balance between local economic needs and endangered species' conservation. We investigated resource competition between fisheries and Ganges river dolphins (Platanista gangetica gangetica) in a human-dominated river system in India to assess the potential for their coexistence. We surveyed a 65-km stretch of the lower Ganga River to assess habitat use by dolphins (encounter rates) and fishing activity (habitat preferences of fishers, intensity of net and boat use). Dolphin abundance in the main channel increased from 179 (SE 7) (mid dry season) to 270 (SE 8) (peak dry season), probably as a result of immigration from upstream tributaries. Dolphins preferred river channels with muddy, rocky substrates, and deep midchannel waters. These areas overlapped considerably with fishing areas. Sites with 2-6 boats/km (moderately fished) were more preferred by dolphins than sites with 8-55 boats/km (heavily fished). Estimated spatial (85%) and prey-resource overlap (75%) between fisheries and dolphins (chiefly predators of small fish) suggests a high level of competition between the two groups. A decrease in abundance of larger fish, indicated by the fact that small fish comprised 74% of the total caught, may have intensified the present competition. Dolphins seem resilient to changes in fish community structure and may persist in overfished rivers. Regulated fishing in dolphin hotspots and maintenance of adequate dry season flows can sustain dolphins in tributaries and reduce competition in the main river. Fish-stock restoration and management, effective monitoring, curbing destructive fishing practices, secure tenure rights, and provision of alternative livelihoods for fishers may help reconcile conservation and local needs in overexploited river systems.

  8. Coexistence of fisheries with river dolphin conservation.

    PubMed

    Kelkar, Nachiket; Krishnaswamy, Jagdish; Choudhary, Sunil; Sutaria, Dipani

    2010-08-01

    Freshwater biodiversity conservation is generally perceived to conflict with human use and extraction (e.g., fisheries). Overexploited fisheries upset the balance between local economic needs and endangered species' conservation. We investigated resource competition between fisheries and Ganges river dolphins (Platanista gangetica gangetica) in a human-dominated river system in India to assess the potential for their coexistence. We surveyed a 65-km stretch of the lower Ganga River to assess habitat use by dolphins (encounter rates) and fishing activity (habitat preferences of fishers, intensity of net and boat use). Dolphin abundance in the main channel increased from 179 (SE 7) (mid dry season) to 270 (SE 8) (peak dry season), probably as a result of immigration from upstream tributaries. Dolphins preferred river channels with muddy, rocky substrates, and deep midchannel waters. These areas overlapped considerably with fishing areas. Sites with 2-6 boats/km (moderately fished) were more preferred by dolphins than sites with 8-55 boats/km (heavily fished). Estimated spatial (85%) and prey-resource overlap (75%) between fisheries and dolphins (chiefly predators of small fish) suggests a high level of competition between the two groups. A decrease in abundance of larger fish, indicated by the fact that small fish comprised 74% of the total caught, may have intensified the present competition. Dolphins seem resilient to changes in fish community structure and may persist in overfished rivers. Regulated fishing in dolphin hotspots and maintenance of adequate dry season flows can sustain dolphins in tributaries and reduce competition in the main river. Fish-stock restoration and management, effective monitoring, curbing destructive fishing practices, secure tenure rights, and provision of alternative livelihoods for fishers may help reconcile conservation and local needs in overexploited river systems. PMID:20337677

  9. Conjunction of γ-rigid and γ-stable collective motions in the critical point of the phase transition from spherical to deformed nuclear shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budaca, R.; Budaca, A. I.

    2015-08-01

    Based on the competition between γ-stable and γ-rigid collective motions mediated by a rigidity parameter, a two-parameter exactly separable version of the Bohr Hamiltonian is proposed. The γ-stable part of the Hamiltonian is restricted to stiff oscillations around the γ value of the rigid motion. The separated potential for β and γ shape variables is chosen such that in the lower limit of this parameter, the model recovers exactly the ES-X(5) model, while in the upper limit it tends to the prolate γ-rigid solution X(3). The combined effect of the rigidity and stiffness parameters on the energy spectrum and wave function is duly investigated. Numerical results are given for few nuclei showing such ambiguous behaviour.

  10. Nuclear Speckles

    PubMed Central

    Spector, David L.; Lamond, Angus I.

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear speckles, also known as interchromatin granule clusters, are nuclear domains enriched in pre-mRNA splicing factors, located in the interchromatin regions of the nucleoplasm of mammalian cells. When observed by immunofluorescence microscopy, they usually appear as 20–50 irregularly shaped structures that vary in size. Speckles are dynamic structures, and their constituents can exchange continuously with the nucleoplasm and other nuclear locations, including active transcription sites. Studies on the composition, structure, and dynamics of speckles have provided an important paradigm for understanding the functional organization of the nucleus and the dynamics of the gene expression machinery. PMID:20926517

  11. Physical properties, structure, and shape of radioactive Cs from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident derived from soil, bamboo and shiitake mushroom measurements.

    PubMed

    Niimura, Nobuo; Kikuchi, Kenji; Tuyen, Ninh Duc; Komatsuzaki, Masakazu; Motohashi, Yoshinobu

    2015-01-01

    We conducted an elution experiment with contaminated soils using various aqueous reagent solutions and autoradiography measurements of contaminated bamboo shoots and shiitake mushrooms to determine the physical and chemical characteristics of radioactive Cs from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident. Based on our study results and data in the literature, we conclude that the active Cs emitted by the accident fell to the ground as granular non-ionic materials. Therefore, they were not adsorbed or trapped by minerals in the soil, but instead physically adhere to the rough surfaces of the soil mineral particles. Granular Cs* can be transferred among media, such as soils and plants. The physical properties and dynamic behavior of the granular Cs* is expected to be helpful in considering methods for decontamination of soil, litter, and other media. PMID:24445055

  12. Coexistence of reef organisms in the Abrolhos Archipelago, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Lins de Barros, M M; Castro, C B; Pires, D O; Segal, B

    2000-12-01

    The first study on coexistence of reef benthic organisms in Brazilian coral reefs was done in three localities of the Abrolhos Archipelago. Organisms were recorded in concentric circle samples (10 and 20 cm in diameter) randomly laid on transects. Type and frequency of "coexistence events" between pairs of organisms were determined. Most frequent organisms (massive and branched coralline algae, Favia gravida, and Agaricia agaricites) also had many significant positive coexistence events. These results might be related to the abundances of these organisms. The most frequent coral (Siderastrea stellata), however, exhibited only a few significant coexistence events (9% of 32 tests). Since the great majority of events were positive, and since there was high variation in the species/groups involved in significant events in different localities, benthic communities of Abrolhos Archipelago may well be structured primarily by abiotic rather than biotic factors.

  13. Opting out against defection leads to stable coexistence with cooperation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Bo-Yu; Fan, Song-Jia; Li, Cong; Zheng, Xiu-Deng; Bao, Jian-Zhang; Cressman, Ross; Tao, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Cooperation coexisting with defection is a common phenomenon in nature and human society. Previous studies for promoting cooperation based on kin selection, direct and indirect reciprocity, graph selection and group selection have provided conditions that cooperators outcompete defectors. However, a simple mechanism of the long-term stable coexistence of cooperation and defection is still lacking. To reveal the effect of direct reciprocity on the coexistence of cooperation and defection, we conducted a simple experiment based on the Prisoner’s Dilemma (PD) game, where the basic idea behind our experiment is that all players in a PD game should prefer a cooperator as an opponent. Our experimental and theoretical results show clearly that the strategies allowing opting out against defection are able to maintain this stable coexistence. PMID:27775099

  14. Infantile Perianal Pyramidal Protrusion with Coexisting Perineal and Perianal Hemangiomas: A Fortuitous Association or Incomplete PELVIS Syndrome?

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Shyam B; Wollina, Uwe

    2014-01-01

    Two cases of infantile perianal pyramidal protrusions (IPPP), one pyramidal in shape and one leaf shaped, are being described by us. Both were notable for coexisting hemangiomas in the close vicinity. To the best of our knowledge we are reporting these two variants of IPPP with the associated neighboring hemangiomas for the first time in Indian dermatologic literature. We suggest that this presentation may be a part of one of the syndromes that comprise anorectal malformations with hemangiomas like PELVIS syndrome and others mentioned in the table. PMID:24470664

  15. Coexistence of structured populations with size-based prey selection.

    PubMed

    Hartvig, Martin; Andersen, Ken Haste

    2013-11-01

    Species with a large adult-offspring size ratio and a preferred predator-prey mass ratio undergo ontogenetic trophic niche shift(s) throughout life. Trophic interactions between such species vary throughout life, resulting in different species-level interaction motifs depending on the maximum adult sizes and population size distributions. We explore the assembly and potential for coexistence of small communities where all species experience ontogenetic trophic niche shifts. The life-history of each species is described by a physiologically structured model and species identity is characterised by the trait: size at maturation. We show that a single species can exist in two different states: a 'resource driven state' and a 'cannibalistic state' with a large scope for emergent Allee effects and bistable states. Two species can coexist in two different configurations: in a 'competitive coexistence' state when the ratio between sizes at maturation of the two species is less than a predator-prey mass ratio and the resource level is low to intermediate, or in a 'trophic ladder' state if the ratio of sizes at maturation is larger than the predator-prey mass ratio at all resource levels. While there is a large scope for coexistence of two species, the scope for coexistence of three species is limited and we conclude that further trait differentiation is required for coexistence of more species-rich size-structured communities. PMID:23927897

  16. Tradeoffs, competition, and coexistence in eastern deciduous forest ant communities.

    PubMed

    Stuble, Katharine L; Rodriguez-Cabal, Mariano A; McCormick, Gail L; Jurić, Ivan; Dunn, Robert R; Sanders, Nathan J

    2013-04-01

    Ecologists have long sought to explain the coexistence of multiple potentially competing species in local assemblages. This is especially challenging in species-rich assemblages in which interspecific competition is intense, as it often is in ant assemblages. As a result, a suite of mechanisms has been proposed to explain coexistence among potentially competing ant species: the dominance-discovery tradeoff, the dominance-thermal tolerance tradeoff, spatial segregation, temperature-based niche partitioning, and temporal niche partitioning. Through a series of observations and experiments, we examined a deciduous forest ant assemblage in eastern North America for the signature of each of these coexistence mechanisms. We failed to detect evidence for any of the commonly suggested mechanisms of coexistence, with one notable exception: ant species appear to temporally partition foraging times such that behaviourally dominant species foraged more intensely at night, while foraging by subdominant species peaked during the day. Our work, though focused on a single assemblage, indicates that many of the commonly cited mechanisms of coexistence may not be general to all ant assemblages. However, temporal segregation may play a role in promoting coexistence among ant species in at least some ecosystems, as it does in many other organisms.

  17. The role of Pleistocene glaciations in shaping the evolution of polar and brown bears. Evidence from a critical review of mitochondrial and nuclear genome analyses.

    PubMed

    Hassanin, Alexandre

    2015-07-01

    In this report, I review recent molecular studies dealing with the origin and evolution of polar bears (Ursus maritimus), with special emphasis on their relationships with brown bears (U. arctos). On the basis of mitochondrial and nuclear data, different hypotheses have been proposed, including rapid morphological differentiation of U. maritimus, genetic introgression from U. arctos into U. maritimus, or inversely from U. maritimus into U. arctos, involving either male- or female-mediated gene flow. In the light of available molecular and eco-ethological data, I suggest, firstly, that all divergences among major clades of large bears can be linked to glacial periods, secondly, that polar bears diverged from brown bears before 530 thousand years ago (ka), during one of the three glacial marine isotope stages (MIS) 14, 15.2 or 16, and, thirdly, that genetic introgression had occurred from female polar bears into brown bear populations during at least two glacial periods, at 340 ± 10 ka (MIS 10) in western Europe, and at 155 ± 5 ka (MIS 6) on the ABC islands of southeastern Alaska, and probably also in Beringia and Ireland based on ancient DNA sequences.

  18. The role of Pleistocene glaciations in shaping the evolution of polar and brown bears. Evidence from a critical review of mitochondrial and nuclear genome analyses.

    PubMed

    Hassanin, Alexandre

    2015-07-01

    In this report, I review recent molecular studies dealing with the origin and evolution of polar bears (Ursus maritimus), with special emphasis on their relationships with brown bears (U. arctos). On the basis of mitochondrial and nuclear data, different hypotheses have been proposed, including rapid morphological differentiation of U. maritimus, genetic introgression from U. arctos into U. maritimus, or inversely from U. maritimus into U. arctos, involving either male- or female-mediated gene flow. In the light of available molecular and eco-ethological data, I suggest, firstly, that all divergences among major clades of large bears can be linked to glacial periods, secondly, that polar bears diverged from brown bears before 530 thousand years ago (ka), during one of the three glacial marine isotope stages (MIS) 14, 15.2 or 16, and, thirdly, that genetic introgression had occurred from female polar bears into brown bear populations during at least two glacial periods, at 340 ± 10 ka (MIS 10) in western Europe, and at 155 ± 5 ka (MIS 6) on the ABC islands of southeastern Alaska, and probably also in Beringia and Ireland based on ancient DNA sequences. PMID:26026577

  19. Deformation and mixing of coexisting shapes in neutron-deficient polonium isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kesteloot, N.; Bastin, B.; Gaffney, L. P.; Wrzosek-Lipska, K.; Auranen, K.; Bauer, C.; Bender, M.; Bildstein, V.; Blazhev, A.; Bönig, S.; Bree, N.; Clément, E.; Cocolios, T. E.; Damyanova, A.; Darby, I.; De Witte, H.; Di Julio, D.; Diriken, J.; Fransen, C.; García-Ramos, J. E.; Gernhäuser, R.; Grahn, T.; Heenen, P.-H.; Hess, H.; Heyde, K.; Huyse, M.; Iwanicki, J.; Jakobsson, U.; Konki, J.; Kröll, T.; Laurent, B.; Lecesne, N.; Lutter, R.; Pakarinen, J.; Peura, P.; Piselli, E.; Próchniak, L.; Rahkila, P.; Rapisarda, E.; Reiter, P.; Scheck, M.; Seidlitz, M.; Sferrazza, M.; Siebeck, B.; Sjodin, M.; Tornqvist, H.; Traykov, E.; Van De Walle, J.; Van Duppen, P.; Vermeulen, M.; Voulot, D.; Warr, N.; Wenander, F.; Wimmer, K.; Zielińska, M.

    2015-11-01

    Coulomb-excitation experiments are performed with postaccelerated beams of neutron-deficient Po 196 ,198 ,200 ,202 isotopes at the REX-ISOLDE facility. A set of matrix elements, coupling the low-lying states in these isotopes, is extracted. In the two heaviest isotopes, Po,202200, the transitional and diagonal matrix elements of the 21+ state are determined. In Po,198196 multistep Coulomb excitation is observed, populating the 41+,02+ , and 22+ states. The experimental results are compared to the results from the measurement of mean-square charge radii in polonium isotopes, confirming the onset of deformation from 196Po onwards. Three model descriptions are used to compare to the data. Calculations with the beyond-mean-field model, the interacting boson model, and the general Bohr Hamiltonian model show partial agreement with the experimental data. Finally, calculations with a phenomenological two-level mixing model hint at the mixing of a spherical structure with a weakly deformed rotational structure.

  20. Shape Coexistence in Pb-Rn Nuclei Studied by Particle Decay Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Andreyev, A. N.

    2006-08-14

    This contribution reviews the results of recent experiments at the velocity filter SHIP (GSI, Darmstadt) in which a number of very neutron-deficient nuclei with Z=83-88 and N< 126 were studied in detail and new nuclides 186,187Po, 192At and 193,194Rn were identified. Complete fusion reactions at beam energies close to the Coulomb barrier were used, followed by particle detection with various detection systems. Peculiarities in {alpha}-decay characteristics of the 186-191Po isotopes are discussed in detail. Very recent results for the neutron-deficient At-Ra nuclei from the gas-filled separator RITU (JYFL, Jyvaeskylae) are also highlighted.The application of a new method to reach nuclei in this region - spallation-evaporation reactions of 238U ions at 1 AGeV on a Be target, followed by the separation with the FRS at GSI is discussed as well.

  1. Decay-out of 151Tb Yrast Superdeformed Band and Shape Coexistence

    SciTech Connect

    Duchene, G.; Robin, J.; Odahara, A.; Byrski, Th.; Beck, F.A.; Bednarczyk, P.; Curien, D.; Courtin, S.; Dorvaux, O.; Gall, B.; Joshi, P.; Nourreddine, A.; Pachoud, E.; Piqueras, I.; Vivien, J.P.; Twin, P.J.; Cullen, D.M.; Ertueck, S.; King, S.L.; Paul, E.S.

    2004-02-27

    Linking transitions between the superdeformed (SD) and the normal deformed (ND) wells have been searched in 151Tb nucleus. Two experiments of 5 and 17 days have been performed with EUROBALL IV. Transitions of 2818 keV and 3748 keV with intensities of about 1 % relative to the yrast SD band have been observed. Their decay-out properties are discussed in the text. In addition the eight known SD bands have been extended towards higher rotational frequencies where orbital crossings are observed. For the first time, weakly populated collective ND structures, likely triaxial, similar to the ones recently identified in 152Dy, 153Ho and 155Er nuclei have been observed in 151Tb. The SD and ND structures are interpreted in the frame of Woods-Saxon theoretical calculations.

  2. Shape Coexistence in Pb-Rn Nuclei Studied by Particle Decay Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreyev, A. N.

    2006-08-01

    This contribution reviews the results of recent experiments at the velocity filter SHIP (GSI, Darmstadt) in which a number of very neutron-deficient nuclei with Z=83-88 and N< 126 were studied in detail and new nuclides 186,187Po, 192At and 193,194Rn were identified. Complete fusion reactions at beam energies close to the Coulomb barrier were used, followed by particle detection with various detection systems. Peculiarities in α-decay characteristics of the 186-191Po isotopes are discussed in detail. Very recent results for the neutron-deficient At-Ra nuclei from the gas-filled separator RITU (JYFL, Jyväskylä) are also highlighted. The application of a new method to reach nuclei in this region — spallation-evaporation reactions of 238U ions at 1 AGeV on a Be target, followed by the separation with the FRS at GSI is discussed as well.

  3. Exotic shapes and exotic clusterization

    SciTech Connect

    Cseh, J.; Darai, J.; Algora, A.

    2011-10-28

    The interrelation of the largely elongated nuclear shapes and clusterization is discussed by applying semimicroscopic methods. {sup 36}Ar is considered as a specific example, where recent experimental heavy-ion scattering data seem to justify the theoretical predictions on the hyperdeformed states. Alpha-emitting reactions are also suggested for its population.

  4. Equilibrium Shaping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izzo, Dario; Petazzi, Lorenzo

    2006-08-01

    We present a satellite path planning technique able to make identical spacecraft aquire a given configuration. The technique exploits a behaviour-based approach to achieve an autonomous and distributed control over the relative geometry making use of limited sensorial information. A desired velocity is defined for each satellite as a sum of different contributions coming from generic high level behaviours: forcing the final desired configuration the behaviours are further defined by an inverse dynamic calculation dubbed Equilibrium Shaping. We show how considering only three different kind of behaviours it is possible to acquire a number of interesting formations and we set down the theoretical framework to find the entire set. We find that allowing a limited amount of communication the technique may be used also to form complex lattice structures. Several control feedbacks able to track the desired velocities are introduced and discussed. Our results suggest that sliding mode control is particularly appropriate in connection with the developed technique.

  5. Environmental transmission scrambles coexistence patterns of avian influenza viruses.

    PubMed

    Roche, Benjamin; Rohani, Pejman

    2010-06-01

    Despite the recent accumulation of theoretical and empirical studies on avian influenza viruses (AIVs), the interactions among the diverse pool of strains remain poorly understood. One potential reason is multiple transmission routes. In this paper, we explore the behavior of a two-strain mathematical model of AIV dynamics with lifelong immunity to understand how the combination of direct and environmental transmission (via a persistent viral reservoir) determines strains coexistence and dominance. We find that coexistence requires the magnitude of basic reproductive ratios of the strains to be identical for each transmission route (R(0)(dir) and R(0)(env)) when cross-immunity is assumed to be perfect. Coexistence may be also possible when one strain is only directly transmitted and the contribution by environmental transmission is high. When we relax this assumption, the level of cross-protection does not modify coexistence criteria when strains are mainly environmentally transmitted, in contrast to the case where direct transmission dominates. Finally, when competitive exclusion is observed, the strain with the largest contribution from direct transmission outcompetes the other through competition for viral particle acquisition. Overall, we conclude that environmental transmission can affect the patterns of coexistence predicted by direct transmission models in complex ways. PMID:21352779

  6. Coexistence of competing metabolic pathways in well-mixed populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández, Lenin; Amado, André; Campos, Paulo R. A.; Ferreira, Fernando Fagundes

    2016-05-01

    Understanding why strains with different metabolic pathways that compete for a single limiting resource coexist is a challenging issue within a theoretical perspective. Previous investigations rely on mechanisms such as group or spatial structuring to achieve a stable coexistence between competing metabolic strategies. Nevertheless, coexistence has been experimentally reported even in situations where it cannot be attributed to spatial effects [Heredity 100, 471 (2008), 10.1038/sj.hdy.6801073]. According to that study a toxin expelled by one of the strains can be responsible for the stable maintenance of the two strain types. We propose a resource-based model in which an efficient strain with a slow metabolic rate competes with a second strain type which presents a fast but inefficient metabolism. Moreover, the model assumes that the inefficient strain produces a toxin as a by-product. This toxin affects the growth rate of both strains with different strength. Through an extensive exploration of the parameter space we determine the situations at which the coexistence of the two strains is possible. Interestingly, we observe that the resource influx rate plays a key role in the maintenance of the two strain types. In a scenario of resource scarcity the inefficient is favored, though as the resource influx rate is augmented the coexistence becomes possible and its domain is enlarged.

  7. Competitive intransitivity, population interaction structure, and strategy coexistence.

    PubMed

    Laird, Robert A; Schamp, Brandon S

    2015-01-21

    Intransitive competition occurs when competing strategies cannot be listed in a hierarchy, but rather form loops-as in the game rock-paper-scissors. Due to its cyclic competitive replacement, competitive intransitivity promotes strategy coexistence, both in rock-paper-scissors and in higher-richness communities. Previous work has shown that this intransitivity-mediated coexistence is strongly influenced by spatially explicit interactions, compared to when populations are well mixed. Here, we extend and broaden this line of research and examine the impact on coexistence of intransitive competition taking place on a continuum of small-world networks linking spatial lattices and regular random graphs. We use simulations to show that the positive effect of competitive intransitivity on strategy coexistence holds when competition occurs on networks toward the spatial end of the continuum. However, in networks that are sufficiently disordered, increasingly violent fluctuations in strategy frequencies can lead to extinctions and the prevalence of monocultures. We further show that the degree of disorder that leads to the transition between these two regimes is positively dependent on population size; indeed for very large populations, intransitivity-mediated strategy coexistence may even be possible in regular graphs with completely random connections. Our results emphasize the importance of interaction structure in determining strategy dynamics and diversity.

  8. Coexistence of competing metabolic pathways in well-mixed populations.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Lenin; Amado, André; Campos, Paulo R A; Ferreira, Fernando Fagundes

    2016-05-01

    Understanding why strains with different metabolic pathways that compete for a single limiting resource coexist is a challenging issue within a theoretical perspective. Previous investigations rely on mechanisms such as group or spatial structuring to achieve a stable coexistence between competing metabolic strategies. Nevertheless, coexistence has been experimentally reported even in situations where it cannot be attributed to spatial effects [Heredity 100, 471 (2008)HDTYAT0018-067X10.1038/sj.hdy.6801073]. According to that study a toxin expelled by one of the strains can be responsible for the stable maintenance of the two strain types. We propose a resource-based model in which an efficient strain with a slow metabolic rate competes with a second strain type which presents a fast but inefficient metabolism. Moreover, the model assumes that the inefficient strain produces a toxin as a by-product. This toxin affects the growth rate of both strains with different strength. Through an extensive exploration of the parameter space we determine the situations at which the coexistence of the two strains is possible. Interestingly, we observe that the resource influx rate plays a key role in the maintenance of the two strain types. In a scenario of resource scarcity the inefficient is favored, though as the resource influx rate is augmented the coexistence becomes possible and its domain is enlarged. PMID:27300918

  9. SAFSTOR and License Renewal: Making Them Coexist

    SciTech Connect

    Henries, William PE

    2008-01-15

    The Indian Point Energy Center is located on the eastern shore of the Hudson River in the town of Buchanan, New York. It lies approximately thirty miles north of New York City, and thus, holds the distinction of being the closest nuclear facility to a major metropolitan area. Units 1 and 2 were constructed and operated by Consolidated Edison and Unit 3 was owned and operated by the New York State Power Authority. All three units are now owned and operated by Entergy Nuclear- Northeast. Indian Point Unit 1 was powered by a pressurized water reactor which operated with an authorized maximum steady state power level of 615 thermal megawatts until October 31, 1974. On June 19, 1980, the Commission issued an order revoking authority to operate the facility. Although 244 spent fuel assemblies were successfully shipped offsite to a spent fuel reprocessing facility, 160 assemblies remain in the Unit 1 spent fuel pool awaiting relocation to dry cask storage. Units 2 and 3 are also pressurized water reactors which each produce slightly in excess of 1,000 MWe. Since 1974, Unit 1 has been maintained in a Safe Store Mode (SAFSTOR). For the purposes of this document, the term 'SAFSTOR' is intended to mean 'Custodial SAFSTOR' as described in section 2.4.3 of NUREG 0586 (Final Generic Environmental Impact Statement on Decommissioning of Nuclear Facilities (GEIS) as follows: 'Custodial SAFSTOR requires a minimum cleanup and decontamination effort initially, followed by a period of continuing care with the active protection systems (principally the ventilation system) kept in service throughout the storage period. Full-time onsite surveillance by operating and security forces is required to carry out radiation monitoring, to maintain the equipment, and to prevent accidental or deliberate intrusion into the facility and the subsequent exposure to radiation or the disposal of radioactivity beyond the confines of the facility'. The decision to enter SAFSTOR was based upon the immediate

  10. The Coexistence of Rathke Cleft Cyst and Pituitary Adenoma.

    PubMed

    Gao, Mingtong; An, Yanyan; Huang, Zhihong; Niu, Jianyi; Yuan, Xunhui; Bai, Yun'an; Guo, Liemei

    2016-03-01

    Both of Pituitary adenoma (PA) and Rathke cleft cyst (RCC) are the most common and benign sellar lesions. Generally, the origin of RCC is considered to be derived from remnants of Rathke punch, while PA is formed by proliferation of the anterior wall of Rathke pouch. Although they have a possibility to share a common embryological origin, the coexistence of PA and RCC is extremely rare. Here, the authors report a 50-year-old male patient who was found to have a large cystic sellar lesion, and surgical resection revealed components of a RCC coexisting with a PA. This collision reminded us of the possibility of RCC coexisting with PA. Furthermore, a clinicopathologic relation of them were reviewed and investigated.

  11. Coexistence of nematic order and superconductivity in the Hubbard model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaczmarczyk, Jan; Schickling, Tobias; Bünemann, Jörg

    2016-08-01

    We study the interplay of nematic and superconducting order in the two-dimensional Hubbard model and show that they can coexist, especially when superconductivity is not the energetically dominant phase. Due to a breaking of the C4 symmetry, the coexisting phase inherently contains admixture of the s -wave pairing components. As a result, the superconducting gap exhibits nonstandard features including changed nodal directions. Our results also show that in the optimally doped regime the pure superconducting phase is typically unstable towards developing nematicity (breaking of the C4 symmetry). This has implications for the cuprate high-Tc superconductors, for which in this regime the so-called intertwined orders have recently been observed. Namely, the coexisting phase may be viewed as a precursor to such more involved patterns of symmetry breaking.

  12. Sexual selection enables long-term coexistence despite ecological equivalence.

    PubMed

    M'Gonigle, Leithen K; Mazzucco, Rupert; Otto, Sarah P; Dieckmann, Ulf

    2012-04-26

    Empirical data indicate that sexual preferences are critical for maintaining species boundaries, yet theoretical work has suggested that, on their own, they can have only a minimal role in maintaining biodiversity. This is because long-term coexistence within overlapping ranges is thought to be unlikely in the absence of ecological differentiation. Here we challenge this widely held view by generalizing a standard model of sexual selection to include two ubiquitous features of populations with sexual selection: spatial variation in local carrying capacity, and mate-search costs in females. We show that, when these two features are combined, sexual preferences can single-handedly maintain coexistence, even when spatial variation in local carrying capacity is so slight that it might go unnoticed empirically. This theoretical study demonstrates that sexual selection alone can promote the long-term coexistence of ecologically equivalent species with overlapping ranges, and it thus provides a novel explanation for the maintenance of species diversity. PMID:22466286

  13. Interdisciplinary and Cross-Cultural Perspectives on Explanatory Coexistence.

    PubMed

    Watson-Jones, Rachel E; Busch, Justin T A; Legare, Cristine H

    2015-10-01

    Natural and supernatural explanations are used to interpret the same events in a number of predictable and universal ways. Yet little is known about how variation in diverse cultural ecologies influences how people integrate natural and supernatural explanations. Here, we examine explanatory coexistence in three existentially arousing domains of human thought: illness, death, and human origins using qualitative data from interviews conducted in Tanna, Vanuatu. Vanuatu, a Melanesian archipelago, provides a cultural context ideal for examining variation in explanatory coexistence due to the lack of industrialization and the relatively recent introduction of Christianity and Western education. We argue for the integration of interdisciplinary methodologies from cognitive science and anthropology to inform research on explanatory coexistence. PMID:26350158

  14. Interdisciplinary and Cross-Cultural Perspectives on Explanatory Coexistence.

    PubMed

    Watson-Jones, Rachel E; Busch, Justin T A; Legare, Cristine H

    2015-10-01

    Natural and supernatural explanations are used to interpret the same events in a number of predictable and universal ways. Yet little is known about how variation in diverse cultural ecologies influences how people integrate natural and supernatural explanations. Here, we examine explanatory coexistence in three existentially arousing domains of human thought: illness, death, and human origins using qualitative data from interviews conducted in Tanna, Vanuatu. Vanuatu, a Melanesian archipelago, provides a cultural context ideal for examining variation in explanatory coexistence due to the lack of industrialization and the relatively recent introduction of Christianity and Western education. We argue for the integration of interdisciplinary methodologies from cognitive science and anthropology to inform research on explanatory coexistence.

  15. [Coexistence of coeliac disease and inflammatory bowel disease in children].

    PubMed

    Krawiec, Paulina; Pawłowska-Kamieniak, Agnieszka; Pac-Kożuchowska, Elżbieta; Mroczkowska-Juchkiewcz, Agnieszka; Kominek, Katarzyna

    2016-01-01

    Coeliac disease and inflammatory bowel disease are chronic inflammatory conditions of gastrointestinal tract with complex aetiology with genetic, environmental and immunological factors contributing to its pathogenesis. It was noted that immune-mediated disorders often coexist. There is well-known association between coeliac disease and type 1 diabetes and ulcerative colitis and primary sclerosing cholangitis. However, growing body of literature suggests the association between coeliac disease and inflammatory bowel disease, particularly ulcerative colitis. This is an extremely rare problem in paediatric gastroenterology. To date there have been reported several cases of children with coexisting coeliac disease and inflammatory bowel disease. Herewith we present review of current literature on coexistence of coeliac disease and inflammatory bowel disease in children.

  16. Two-dimensional shape memory graphene oxide

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Zhenyue; Deng, Junkai; Chandrakumara, Ganaka G.; Yan, Wenyi; Liu, Jefferson Zhe

    2016-01-01

    Driven by the increasing demand for micro-/nano-technologies, stimuli-responsive shape memory materials at nanoscale have recently attracted great research interests. However, by reducing the size of conventional shape memory materials down to approximately nanometre range, the shape memory effect diminishes. Here, using density functional theory calculations, we report the discovery of a shape memory effect in a two-dimensional atomically thin graphene oxide crystal with ordered epoxy groups, namely C8O. A maximum recoverable strain of 14.5% is achieved as a result of reversible phase transition between two intrinsically stable phases. Our calculations conclude co-existence of the two stable phases in a coherent crystal lattice, giving rise to the possibility of constructing multiple temporary shapes in a single material, thus, enabling highly desirable programmability. With an atomic thickness, excellent shape memory mechanical properties and electric field stimulus, the discovery of a two-dimensional shape memory graphene oxide opens a path for the development of exceptional micro-/nano-electromechanical devices. PMID:27325441

  17. Two-dimensional shape memory graphene oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Zhenyue; Deng, Junkai; Chandrakumara, Ganaka G.; Yan, Wenyi; Liu, Jefferson Zhe

    2016-06-01

    Driven by the increasing demand for micro-/nano-technologies, stimuli-responsive shape memory materials at nanoscale have recently attracted great research interests. However, by reducing the size of conventional shape memory materials down to approximately nanometre range, the shape memory effect diminishes. Here, using density functional theory calculations, we report the discovery of a shape memory effect in a two-dimensional atomically thin graphene oxide crystal with ordered epoxy groups, namely C8O. A maximum recoverable strain of 14.5% is achieved as a result of reversible phase transition between two intrinsically stable phases. Our calculations conclude co-existence of the two stable phases in a coherent crystal lattice, giving rise to the possibility of constructing multiple temporary shapes in a single material, thus, enabling highly desirable programmability. With an atomic thickness, excellent shape memory mechanical properties and electric field stimulus, the discovery of a two-dimensional shape memory graphene oxide opens a path for the development of exceptional micro-/nano-electromechanical devices.

  18. Two-dimensional shape memory graphene oxide.

    PubMed

    Chang, Zhenyue; Deng, Junkai; Chandrakumara, Ganaka G; Yan, Wenyi; Liu, Jefferson Zhe

    2016-01-01

    Driven by the increasing demand for micro-/nano-technologies, stimuli-responsive shape memory materials at nanoscale have recently attracted great research interests. However, by reducing the size of conventional shape memory materials down to approximately nanometre range, the shape memory effect diminishes. Here, using density functional theory calculations, we report the discovery of a shape memory effect in a two-dimensional atomically thin graphene oxide crystal with ordered epoxy groups, namely C8O. A maximum recoverable strain of 14.5% is achieved as a result of reversible phase transition between two intrinsically stable phases. Our calculations conclude co-existence of the two stable phases in a coherent crystal lattice, giving rise to the possibility of constructing multiple temporary shapes in a single material, thus, enabling highly desirable programmability. With an atomic thickness, excellent shape memory mechanical properties and electric field stimulus, the discovery of a two-dimensional shape memory graphene oxide opens a path for the development of exceptional micro-/nano-electromechanical devices.

  19. Biodefense research: can secrecy and safety coexist?

    PubMed

    Kahn, Laura H

    2004-01-01

    Over the next 10 years, the United States will spend 6 billion US dollars to develop countermeasures against biological and chemical weapons. Much of this research on highly virulent pathogens will be done in academic settings around the country. This article explores the challenges in ensuring secrecy to protect national security while accommodating the right of local communities to have access to safety information regarding select agents and laboratory-acquired infections. Secrecy has been defended as being vital for protecting national security. Problems with secrecy can include the misinterpretation of intentions, particularly in laboratories located in nuclear weapons design facilities, and the restricted access to information relevant to public health and safety. While federal select agent legislation requires laboratories to have emergency plans in place with first responders, these plans do not necessarily include public health professionals, who will be responsible for any future public health action, such as quarantine, surveillance, or mass vaccinations, in the unlikely event that a laboratory-acquired infection spreads into a community. Laboratory-acquired infections do occur, even with the best safety mechanisms in place; however, the epidemiology of the incidence and severity of these infections are not known since there is no national surveillance reporting system. Evidence suggests that many of these infections occur in the absence of an actual laboratory accident. The best emergency plans and surveillance systems are only as good as the participation and vigilance of the laboratory workers themselves. Thus, laboratory workers have a responsibility to themselves and others to report all laboratory accidents and spills, regardless how minor. In addition, they should have a lower threshold than normal in seeking medical attention when feeling ill, and their physicians should be aware of what pathogens they work with to reduce the risk of a delay in

  20. Biodefense research: can secrecy and safety coexist?

    PubMed

    Kahn, Laura H

    2004-01-01

    Over the next 10 years, the United States will spend 6 billion US dollars to develop countermeasures against biological and chemical weapons. Much of this research on highly virulent pathogens will be done in academic settings around the country. This article explores the challenges in ensuring secrecy to protect national security while accommodating the right of local communities to have access to safety information regarding select agents and laboratory-acquired infections. Secrecy has been defended as being vital for protecting national security. Problems with secrecy can include the misinterpretation of intentions, particularly in laboratories located in nuclear weapons design facilities, and the restricted access to information relevant to public health and safety. While federal select agent legislation requires laboratories to have emergency plans in place with first responders, these plans do not necessarily include public health professionals, who will be responsible for any future public health action, such as quarantine, surveillance, or mass vaccinations, in the unlikely event that a laboratory-acquired infection spreads into a community. Laboratory-acquired infections do occur, even with the best safety mechanisms in place; however, the epidemiology of the incidence and severity of these infections are not known since there is no national surveillance reporting system. Evidence suggests that many of these infections occur in the absence of an actual laboratory accident. The best emergency plans and surveillance systems are only as good as the participation and vigilance of the laboratory workers themselves. Thus, laboratory workers have a responsibility to themselves and others to report all laboratory accidents and spills, regardless how minor. In addition, they should have a lower threshold than normal in seeking medical attention when feeling ill, and their physicians should be aware of what pathogens they work with to reduce the risk of a delay in

  1. Coexistence and survival in conservative Lotka-Volterra networks.

    PubMed

    Knebel, Johannes; Krüger, Torben; Weber, Markus F; Frey, Erwin

    2013-04-19

    Analyzing coexistence and survival scenarios of Lotka-Volterra (LV) networks in which the total biomass is conserved is of vital importance for the characterization of long-term dynamics of ecological communities. Here, we introduce a classification scheme for coexistence scenarios in these conservative LV models and quantify the extinction process by employing the Pfaffian of the network's interaction matrix. We illustrate our findings on global stability properties for general systems of four and five species and find a generalized scaling law for the extinction time.

  2. Evolution of Dispersal with Starvation Measure and Coexistence.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong-Jung; Kwon, Ohsang

    2016-02-01

    Many biological species increase their dispersal rate if starvation starts. To model such a behavior, we need to understand how organisms measure starvation and response to it. In this paper, we compare three different ways of measuring starvation by applying them to starvation-driven diffusion. The evolutional selection and coexistence of such starvation measures are studied within the context of Lotka-Volterra-type competition model of two species. We will see that, if species have different starvation measures and different motility functions, both the coexistence and selection are possible. PMID:26817757

  3. Superordinate Shape Classification Using Natural Shape Statistics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilder, John; Feldman, Jacob; Singh, Manish

    2011-01-01

    This paper investigates the classification of shapes into broad natural categories such as "animal" or "leaf". We asked whether such coarse classifications can be achieved by a simple statistical classification of the shape skeleton. We surveyed databases of natural shapes, extracting shape skeletons and tabulating their parameters within each…

  4. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, C.R.

    1962-07-24

    A fluidized bed nuclear reactor and a method of operating such a reactor are described. In the design means are provided for flowing a liquid moderator upwardly through the center of a bed of pellets of a nentron-fissionable material at such a rate as to obtain particulate fluidization while constraining the lower pontion of the bed into a conical shape. A smooth circulation of particles rising in the center and falling at the outside of the bed is thereby established. (AEC)

  5. Field-theoretic studies of phase coexistence and supramolecular assembly in block copolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mester, Zoltan

    Field-theoretic methods for studying supramolecular self-assembly in multiblock copolymer melts are developed. The reversibility of noncovalent bonds in supramolecular assemblies allows for environmental control (temperature, pH, etc.) over reaction equilibrium. When chemically distinct polymers are linked, environmental and stoichiometric control over the bonding is used to select from a variety of phase behaviors including macrophase separation into homogeneous phases, microphase separation into ordered mesophases, coexistence of homogeneous phases and ordered mesophases, and coexistence of ordered mesophases that differ in composition and possibly structure. The formalism for describing the gelation and macro- and microphase separation behavior of binary melts of A and B star-shaped polymers that reversibly bond to form copolymer networks is obtained by incorporating a graphical representation of polymers as trees into a grand canonical ensemble field-theoretic model of continuous Gaussian chains. The enumeration of clusters of different isomeric forms and compositions takes place via generating functions that are a system of nonlinear, transcendental, integral equations. The integral equations are turned into purely algebraic equations by making use of the random phase approximation (RPA). The macro- and microphase separation separation and gelation behavior is first investigated for heterogeneously bonded networks, and, later, the methodology is applied to calculate the melt phase behavior of polyester elastomers. A new computational technique is developed to investigate the phase behavior of melts of multiple polymer species based on an intensive formulation of the Gibbs ensemble SCFT method. The intensive formulation allows constituent mesophases of macrophase separated systems to be represented by single representative unit cells. The compositions of coexisting phases in equilibrium are found by minimizing the intensive free energy of the overall system

  6. Coexisting Situs Inversus Totalis and Immune Thrombocytopenic Purpura

    PubMed Central

    Gundogdu, Kemal; Altintoprak, Fatih; Uzunoğlu, Mustafa Yener; Dikicier, Enis; Zengin, İsmail; Yağmurkaya, Orhan

    2016-01-01

    Situs inversus totalis is a rare congenital abnormality with mirror symmetry of mediastinal and abdominal organs. Immune thrombocytopenic purpura is an autoimmune disease with destruction of thrombocytes. This paper is presentation of surgical approach to a case with coexistence of these two conditions. PMID:26981307

  7. Synchronized reproduction promotes species coexistence through reproductive facilitation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-Yun; Hsu, Sze-Bi

    2011-04-01

    Theories for species coexistence often emphasize niche differentiation and temporal segregation of recruitment to avoid competition. Recent work on mutualism suggested that plant species sharing pollinators provide mutual facilitation when exhibit synchronized reproduction. The facilitation on reproduction may enhance species persistence and coexistence. Theoretical ecologists paid little attention to such indirect mutualistic systems by far. We propose a new model for a two-species system using difference equations. The model focuses on adult plants and assumes no resource competition between these well-established individuals. Our formulas include demographic parameters, such as mortality and recruitment rates, and functions of reproductive facilitation. Both recruitment and facilitation effects reach saturation levels when flower production is at high levels. We conduct mathematical analyses to assess conditions of coexistence. We establish demographical conditions permitting species coexistence. Our analyses suggest a "rescue" effect from a "superior" species to a "weaker" species under strong recruitment enhancement effect when the later is not self-sustainable. The facilitation on rare species may help to overcome Allee effect.

  8. [School coexistence and learning in adolescence from a gender perspective].

    PubMed

    Díaz-Aguado Jalón, María José; Martín Seoane, Gema

    2011-04-01

    This article reviews recent research about academic learning and school coexistence in adolescence from a gender perspective. It focuses on the research developed by the Preventive Psychology research group (UCM), specially the results from the Spanish National Study of School Coexistence using a sample of 22,247 secondary school students. Research shows that girls are overrepresented in positive indicators whereas boys are in negative indicators, not only in academic adjustment but also in school coexistence. Girls' better academic achievement can be explained by their higher tendency to overcome sexism: they identify with traditional masculinity values (such as success orientation) without giving up traditional femininity values (such as empathy). Based on this, the following conclusions are reached: 1) to extend the advantages of equality also to men; 2) to emphasize that sharing academic contexts and activities is necessary but sufficient to construct equality; and lastly, 3) to improve school coexistence, it is necessary to adopt a integrative gender approach to prevent any kind of violence, including violence against women.

  9. Beyond Coexistence: Toward a More Reflective Religious Pluralism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenblith, Suzanne

    2008-01-01

    If a pluralistic democratic state such as the United States wishes to move beyond coexistence and toward a more reflective religious pluralism, then public schools must take epistemic issues seriously. Taking a cue from multicultural education, many have called for including the study of religion from a cultural perspective. I argue instead that,…

  10. Climate Change Threatens Coexistence within Communities of Mediterranean Forested Wetlands

    PubMed Central

    Di Paola, Arianna; Valentini, Riccardo; Paparella, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    The Mediterranean region is one of the hot spots of climate change. This study aims at understanding what are the conditions sustaining tree diversity in Mediterranean wet forests under future scenarios of altered hydrological regimes. The core of the work is a quantitative, dynamic model describing the coexistence of different Mediterranean tree species, typical of arid or semi-arid wetlands. Two kind of species, i.e. Hygrophilous (drought sensitive, flood resistant) and Non-hygrophilous (drought resistant, flood sensitive), are broadly defined according to the distinct adaptive strategies of trees against water stress of summer drought and winter flooding. We argue that at intermediate levels of water supply the dual role of water (resource and stress) results in the coexistence of the two kind of species. A bifurcation analysis allows us to assess the effects of climate change on the coexistence of the two species in order to highlight the impacts of predicted climate scenarios on tree diversity. Specifically, the model has been applied to Mediterranean coastal swamp forests of Central Italy located at Castelporziano Estate and Circeo National Park. Our results show that there are distinct rainfall thresholds beyond which stable coexistence becomes impossible. Regional climatic projections show that the lower rainfall threshold may be approached or crossed during the XXI century, calling for an urgent adaptation and mitigation response to prevent biodiversity losses. PMID:23077484

  11. Coexistence of continuous variable QKD with intense DWDM classical channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Rupesh; Qin, Hao; Alléaume, Romain

    2015-04-01

    We demonstrate experimentally the feasibility of continuous variable quantum key distribution (CV-QKD) in dense-wavelength-division multiplexing networks (DWDM), where QKD will typically have to coexist with several co-propagating (forward or backward) C-band classical channels whose launch power is around 0 dBm. We have conducted experimental tests of the coexistence of CV-QKD multiplexed with an intense classical channel, for different input powers and different DWDM wavelengths. Over a 25 km fiber, a CV-QKD operated over the 1530.12 nm channel can tolerate the noise arising from up to 11.5 dBm classical channel at 1550.12 nm in the forward direction (9.7 dBm in backward). A positive key rate (0.49 kbits s-1) can be obtained at 75 km with classical channel power of respectively -3 and -9 dBm in forward and backward. Based on these measurements, we have also simulated the excess noise and optimized channel allocation for the integration of CV-QKD in some access networks. We have, for example, shown that CV-QKD could coexist with five pairs of channels (with nominal input powers: 2 dBm forward and 1 dBm backward) over a 25 km WDM-PON network. The obtained results demonstrate the outstanding capacity of CV-QKD to coexist with classical signals of realistic intensity in optical networks.

  12. Coexistence of coeliac disease and type 1 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    There is a selective review of the literature concerning the coexistence of coeliac disease and type 1 diabetes mellitus. This review focuses on the principles of serological tests towards coeliac disease in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus and metabolic control measures as a result of a gluten-free diet. PMID:24868293

  13. Tracking the Roundup Ready® gene: implications for coexistence

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The USDA has been conducting research to address concerns voiced by the alfalfa industry regarding the coexistence of genetically engineered and non-GE alfalfa seed production. In 2011 a survey was conducted to get a baseline estimate of the presence of transgenic roadside alfalfa plants. We surveye...

  14. Tracking neighbours promotes the coexistence of large carnivores

    PubMed Central

    López-Bao, José Vicente; Mattisson, Jenny; Persson, Jens; Aronsson, Malin; Andrén, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    The study of competition and coexistence among similar interacting species has long been considered a cornerstone in evolutionary and community ecology. However, understanding coexistence remains a challenge. Using two similar and sympatric competing large carnivores, Eurasian lynx and wolverines, we tested the hypotheses that tracking among heterospecifics and reactive responses to potential risk decreases the probability of an agonistic encounter when predators access shared food resources, thus facilitating coexistence. Lynx and wolverines actively avoided each other, with the degree of avoidance being greater for simultaneous than time-delayed predator locations. Wolverines reacted to the presence of lynx at relatively short distances (mean: 383 m). In general, lynx stayed longer, and were more stationary, around reindeer carcasses than wolverines. However, when both predators were present at the same time around a carcass, lynx shortened their visits, while wolverine behavior did not change. Our results support the idea that risk avoidance is a reactive, rather than a predictive, process. Since wolverines have adapted to coexist with lynx, exploiting lynx-killed reindeer carcasses while avoiding potential encounters, the combined presence of both predators may reduce wolverine kill rate and thus the total impact of these predators on semi-domestic reindeer in Scandinavia. Consequently, population management directed at lynx may affect wolverine populations and human-wolverine conflicts. PMID:26979573

  15. Climate change threatens coexistence within communities of Mediterranean forested wetlands.

    PubMed

    Di Paola, Arianna; Valentini, Riccardo; Paparella, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    The Mediterranean region is one of the hot spots of climate change. This study aims at understanding what are the conditions sustaining tree diversity in Mediterranean wet forests under future scenarios of altered hydrological regimes. The core of the work is a quantitative, dynamic model describing the coexistence of different Mediterranean tree species, typical of arid or semi-arid wetlands. Two kind of species, i.e. Hygrophilous (drought sensitive, flood resistant) and Non-hygrophilous (drought resistant, flood sensitive), are broadly defined according to the distinct adaptive strategies of trees against water stress of summer drought and winter flooding. We argue that at intermediate levels of water supply the dual role of water (resource and stress) results in the coexistence of the two kind of species. A bifurcation analysis allows us to assess the effects of climate change on the coexistence of the two species in order to highlight the impacts of predicted climate scenarios on tree diversity. Specifically, the model has been applied to Mediterranean coastal swamp forests of Central Italy located at Castelporziano Estate and Circeo National Park. Our results show that there are distinct rainfall thresholds beyond which stable coexistence becomes impossible. Regional climatic projections show that the lower rainfall threshold may be approached or crossed during the XXI century, calling for an urgent adaptation and mitigation response to prevent biodiversity losses. PMID:23077484

  16. Tracking neighbours promotes the coexistence of large carnivores.

    PubMed

    López-Bao, José Vicente; Mattisson, Jenny; Persson, Jens; Aronsson, Malin; Andrén, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    The study of competition and coexistence among similar interacting species has long been considered a cornerstone in evolutionary and community ecology. However, understanding coexistence remains a challenge. Using two similar and sympatric competing large carnivores, Eurasian lynx and wolverines, we tested the hypotheses that tracking among heterospecifics and reactive responses to potential risk decreases the probability of an agonistic encounter when predators access shared food resources, thus facilitating coexistence. Lynx and wolverines actively avoided each other, with the degree of avoidance being greater for simultaneous than time-delayed predator locations. Wolverines reacted to the presence of lynx at relatively short distances (mean: 383 m). In general, lynx stayed longer, and were more stationary, around reindeer carcasses than wolverines. However, when both predators were present at the same time around a carcass, lynx shortened their visits, while wolverine behavior did not change. Our results support the idea that risk avoidance is a reactive, rather than a predictive, process. Since wolverines have adapted to coexist with lynx, exploiting lynx-killed reindeer carcasses while avoiding potential encounters, the combined presence of both predators may reduce wolverine kill rate and thus the total impact of these predators on semi-domestic reindeer in Scandinavia. Consequently, population management directed at lynx may affect wolverine populations and human-wolverine conflicts. PMID:26979573

  17. Coexistence of two stage-structured intraguild predators.

    PubMed

    Schellekens, Tim; van Kooten, Tobias

    2012-09-01

    An organism can be defined as omnivorous if it feeds on more than one trophic level. Omnivory is present in many ecosystems and multiple omnivorous species can coexist in the same ecosystem. How coexisting omnivores are able to avoid competitive exclusion is very much an open question. In this paper we analyze a model of a community consisting of two omnivorous predators and a basal resource. The population of both predators is explicitly structured into juveniles and adults, of which juveniles only feed on basal resource and adults feed on a varied proportion of basal resource and juveniles of the other population. We thereby separate the omnivorous roles (competitor for basal resource and predator of competitors) over life history. We show in this study that persistence of multiple omnivorous predators is possible when predators differ in adult diets. In this case, coexistence occurs because community dynamics force one of the model species to act as a predator and the other to act as a consumer. We conclude that separation of omnivorous roles over life history not only offers an explanation on why systems with omnivory can persist, but also how multiple omnivores can coexist at the same trophic levels of those systems.

  18. Coexistence in a multispecies assemblage of eagles in central Asia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Katzner, Todd; Bragin, E.; Knick, Steven T.; Smith, Andrew T.

    2003-01-01

    We evaluated factors that permit species coexistence in an exceptional assemblage of similar raptor species at the Naurzum Zapovednik (a national nature reserve) in north-central Kazakhstan. White-tailed Sea-Eagle (Haliaeetus albicilla), Imperial Eagle (Aquila heliaca), Golden Eagle (A. chrysaetos), and Steppe Eagle (A. nipalensis) all breed at the Zapovednik. Steppe Eagle use of nesting resources was distinct from that of tree-nesting species. We evaluated differences in nest tree and nest habitat characteristics, nest dimensions and positions, and nest spacing among the three forest-dwelling eagle species to distinguish between the effects of inter- and intraspecific resource limitations on species coexistence. Although the different species bred in similar habitat and sometimes reused other species' nests, the dimensions, positions and locations of their nests often differed. These differences did not appear to result from interspecific competition. Nest spacing trends were also species specific; Imperial Eagles generally nested farther from other eagle nests than did Golden Eagles and White-tailed Sea-Eagles. Intraspecific variation in habitat, physical characteristics, and spacing patterns of Imperial Eagle nests was extensive throughout the nature reserve. Although interspecific partitioning of nesting habitat may allow coexistence of ground-nesting Steppe Eagles, interspecific competition did not appear to be a primary determinant of the use of nest habitat, space, or nests by tree-nesting species. Rather, interspecific effects appeared secondary to intraspecific effects in determining coexistence of tree-nesting eagles at this site.

  19. Endometriosis coexisting with mature cystic teratoma in the same ovary and ectopic pregnancy of left fallopian tube: a rare coexistence.

    PubMed

    Chae, Heesuk; Rheu, Chulhee

    2015-05-01

    A coexistence of endometriosis and mature cystic teratoma in the same ovary is a rare occurrence although such tumors of ovaries are said to be common in the reproductive age group. We report a case of fimbrial ectopic pregnancy combined with simultaneous ipsilateral ovarian presentation of endometriosis and mature teratoma.

  20. Coexisting static magnetic ordering and superconductivity in CeCu2.1Si2 found by muon spin relaxation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uemura, Y. J.; Kossler, W. J.; Yu, X. H.; Schone, H. E.; Kempton, J. R.; Stronach, C. E.; Barth, S.; Gygax, F. N.; Hitti, B.; Schenck, A.

    1988-01-01

    Zero- and longitudinal-field muon spin relaxation measurements on a heavy fermion system CeCu2.1 Si2 have revealed an onset of static magnetic ordering below T(M) approximately 0.8 K, which coexists with superconductivity below T(c) = 0.7 K. The line shapes of the observed muon spin depolarization functions suggest an ordering in either spin glass or incommensurate spin-density-wave state, with a small averaged static moment of the order of 0.1 micro-B per formula unit at T approaches 0.

  1. Triple shape memory effect of star-shaped polyurethane.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xifeng; Wang, Lin; Wang, Wenxi; Chen, Hongmei; Yang, Guang; Zhou, Shaobing

    2014-05-14

    In this study, we synthesized one type of star-shaped polyurethane (SPU) with star-shaped poly(ε-caprolactone) (SPCL) containing different arm numbers as soft segment and 4,4'-diphenyl methane diisocyanate (MDI) as well as chain extender 1,4-butylene glycol (BDO) as hard segment. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR) confirmed the chemical structure of the material. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) results indicated that both the melting temperature (Tm) and transition temperature (Ttrans) of SPU decreased with the hard segment composition increase. X-ray diffraction (XRD) results demonstrated that the increase of the crystallinity of SPU following the raised arm numbers endowed a high shape fixity of six-arm star-shaped polyurethane (6S-PU) and a wide melting temperature range, which resulted in an excellent triple-shape memory effect of 6S-PU. The in vitro cytotoxicity assay evaluated with osteoblasts through Alamar blue assay demonstrates that this copolymer possessed good cytocompatibility. This material can be potentially used as a new smart material in the field of biomaterials.

  2. Thermodynamics and phase coexistence in nonequilibrium steady states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickman, Ronald

    2016-09-01

    I review recent work focussing on whether thermodynamics can be extended to nonequilibrium steady states (NESS), in particular, the possibility of consistent definitions of temperature T and chemical potential μ for NESS. The testing-grounds are simple lattice models with stochastic dynamics. Each model includes a drive that maintains the system far from equilibrium, provoking particle and/or energy flows; for zero drive the system relaxes to equilibrium. Analysis and numerical simulation show that for spatially uniform NESS, consistent definitions of T and μ are possible via coexistence with an appropriate reservoir, if (and in general only if) a particular kind of rate (that proposed by Sasa and Tasaki) is used for exchanges of particles and energy between systems. The program fails, however, for nonuniform systems. The functions T and μ describing isolated phases cannot be used to predict the properties of coexisting phases in a single, phase-separated system.

  3. Positive interactions, discontinuous transitions and species coexistence in plant communities.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Sierra, R; Zavala, M A; Rietkerk, M

    2010-03-01

    The population and community level consequences of positive interactions between plants remain poorly explored. In this study we incorporate positive resource-mediated interactions in classic resource competition theory and investigate the main consequences for plant population dynamics and species coexistence. We focus on plant communities for which water infiltration rates exhibit positive dependency on plant biomass and where plant responses can be improved by shading, particularly under water limiting conditions. We show that the effects of these two resource-mediated positive interactions are similar and additive. We predict that positive interactions shift the transition points between different species compositions along environmental gradients and that realized niche widths will expand or shrink. Furthermore, continuous transitions between different community compositions can become discontinuous and bistability or tristability can occur. Moreover, increased infiltration rates may give rise to a new potential coexistence mechanism that we call controlled facilitation. PMID:20005884

  4. Community assembly and coexistence in communities of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi

    PubMed Central

    Vályi, Kriszta; Mardhiah, Ulfah; Rillig, Matthias C; Hempel, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi are asexual, obligately symbiotic fungi with unique morphology and genomic structure, which occupy a dual niche, that is, the soil and the host root. Consequently, the direct adoption of models for community assembly developed for other organism groups is not evident. In this paper we adapted modern coexistence and assembly theory to arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi. We review research on the elements of community assembly and coexistence of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi, highlighting recent studies using molecular methods. By addressing several points from the individual to the community level where the application of modern community ecology terms runs into problems when arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi are concerned, we aim to account for these special circumstances from a mycocentric point of view. We suggest that hierarchical spatial structure of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal communities should be explicitly taken into account in future studies. The conceptual framework we develop here for arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi is also adaptable for other host-associated microbial communities. PMID:27093046

  5. Community assembly and coexistence in communities of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi.

    PubMed

    Vályi, Kriszta; Mardhiah, Ulfah; Rillig, Matthias C; Hempel, Stefan

    2016-10-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi are asexual, obligately symbiotic fungi with unique morphology and genomic structure, which occupy a dual niche, that is, the soil and the host root. Consequently, the direct adoption of models for community assembly developed for other organism groups is not evident. In this paper we adapted modern coexistence and assembly theory to arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi. We review research on the elements of community assembly and coexistence of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi, highlighting recent studies using molecular methods. By addressing several points from the individual to the community level where the application of modern community ecology terms runs into problems when arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi are concerned, we aim to account for these special circumstances from a mycocentric point of view. We suggest that hierarchical spatial structure of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal communities should be explicitly taken into account in future studies. The conceptual framework we develop here for arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi is also adaptable for other host-associated microbial communities.

  6. Coexistence of multiple metastable polytypes in rhombohedral bismuth

    PubMed Central

    Shu, Yu; Hu, Wentao; Liu, Zhongyuan; Shen, Guoyin; Xu, Bo; Zhao, Zhisheng; He, Julong; Wang, Yanbin; Tian, Yongjun; Yu, Dongli

    2016-01-01

    Derivative structural polytypes coexisting with the rhombohedral A7 structure of elemental bismuth (Bi) have been discovered at ambient condition, based on microstructure analyses of pure Bi samples treated under high pressure and high temperature conditions. Three structures with atomic positions close to those of the A7 structure have been identified through first-principles calculations, showing these polytypes energetically comparable to the A7 structure under ambient condition. Simulated diffraction data are in excellent agreement with the experimental observations. We argue that previously reported some variations of physical properties (e.g., density, electrical conductivity, and magnetism) in bismuth could be due to the formation of these polytypes. The coexistence of metastable derivative structural polytypes may be a widely occurring phenomenon in other elemental materials. PMID:26883895

  7. Phase coexistence and line tension in ternary lipid systems.

    PubMed

    Idema, T; van Leeuwen, J M J; Storm, C

    2009-10-01

    The ternary system consisting of cholesterol, a saturated lipid, and an unsaturated one exhibits a rich phase behavior with multiple phase coexistence regimes. Remarkably, phase separation even occurs when each of the three binary systems consisting of two of these components is a uniform mixture. We use a Flory-Huggins like model in which the phase separation of the ternary system is a consequence of an interaction between all three components to describe the system. From the associated Gibbs free energy we calculate phase diagrams, spinodals, and critical points. Moreover, we use a Van der Waals/Cahn-Hilliard like construction to derive an expression for the line tension between coexisting phases. We show how the line tension depends on the position in the phase diagram, and give an explicit expression for the concentration profile at the phase boundary. PMID:19905359

  8. Coexistence of pneumothorax and chilaiditi sign: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Nitin, Tangri; Sameer, Singhal; Priyanka, Sharma; Dinesh, Mehta; Sachin, Bansal; Neeraj, Bhushan; Sulbha, Singla; Puneet, Singh

    2014-01-01

    We present a case of 50 year old male patient with coexistence of Pneumothorax and Chilaiditi sign. Chilaiditi sign is an incidental radiographic finding of a usually asymptomatic condition in which a part of intestine is located between the liver and diaphragm; however, the term “Chilaiditi syndrome” is used for symptomatic hepatodiaphragmatic interposition. The patient had no symptoms of abdominal pain, constipation, diarrhea, or emesis. Incidentally, Chilaiditi sign was diagnosed on chest radiography. Pneumothorax is defined as air in the pleural space. Pneumothoraces are classified as spontaneous or traumatic. Spontaneous pneumothorax is labelled as primary when no underlying lung disease is present, or secondary, when it is associated with pre-existing lung disease. Our case is the rare in the literature indicating the coexistence of Chilaiditi sign and pneumothorax. PMID:24144135

  9. Positive interactions, discontinuous transitions and species coexistence in plant communities.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Sierra, R; Zavala, M A; Rietkerk, M

    2010-03-01

    The population and community level consequences of positive interactions between plants remain poorly explored. In this study we incorporate positive resource-mediated interactions in classic resource competition theory and investigate the main consequences for plant population dynamics and species coexistence. We focus on plant communities for which water infiltration rates exhibit positive dependency on plant biomass and where plant responses can be improved by shading, particularly under water limiting conditions. We show that the effects of these two resource-mediated positive interactions are similar and additive. We predict that positive interactions shift the transition points between different species compositions along environmental gradients and that realized niche widths will expand or shrink. Furthermore, continuous transitions between different community compositions can become discontinuous and bistability or tristability can occur. Moreover, increased infiltration rates may give rise to a new potential coexistence mechanism that we call controlled facilitation.

  10. What Coexists with the Ferromagnetic Metallic Phase in Manganites?

    SciTech Connect

    Burkhardt, Mark H.; Hossain, M.A.; Sarkar, S.; Achkar, A.J.; Hawthorn, D.G.; Sutarto, R.; Chuang, 5 Y.-D.; Gonzalez, A.G.Cruz; Choi, Y.J.; Cheong, S.-W.; Durr, H.A.; Stohr, J.

    2012-07-25

    Colossal magnetoresistance, whereby the application of a magnetic field reduces the resistivity of a manganite by orders of magnitude, is generally believed to occur because of coexisting phases. Development of a complete theory to explain the phenomenon requires that the exact nature of these phases be known. We used resonant elastic soft x-ray scattering to examine the superlattice order that exists in La{sub 0.35}Pr{sub 0.275}Ca{sub 0.375}MnO{sub 3} above and below the Curie temperature. By measuring the resonance profile of the scattered x-rays at different values of q, we disentangle the contributions of orbital order and antiferromagnetism to the scattering signal above the Curie temperature. Below the Curie temperature, we see no signal from orbital order, and only antiferromagnetism coexists with the dominant ferromagnetic metallic phase.

  11. Shape-Shifting Plastic

    SciTech Connect

    2015-05-20

    A new plastic developed by ORNL and Washington State University transforms from its original shape through a series of temporary shapes and returns to its initial form. The shape-shifting process is controlled through changes in temperature

  12. Phase coexistence in partially symmetric q-state models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laanait, Lahoussine; Masaif, Noureddine; Ruiz, Jean

    1993-08-01

    We consider a lattice model whose spins may assume a finite number q of values. The interaction energy between two nearest-neighbor spins takes on the value J 1 + J 2 or J 2, depending on whether the two spins coincide or are different but coincide modulo q1, and it is zero otherwise. This model is a generalization of the Ashkin-Teller model and exhibits the multilayer wetting phenomenon, that is, wetting by one or two or three interfacial layers, depending on the number of phases in coexistence. While we plan to consider interface properties in such a case, here we study the phase diagram of the model. We show that for large values of q 1 and q/q 1, it exhibits, according the value of J 2/ J 1, either a unique first-order temperature-driven phase transition at some point β t where q ordered phases coexist with the disordered one, or two transition temperatures β{t/(1)} and β{t/(2)}, where q1 partially ordered phases coexist with the ordered ones (β{t/(1)}) or with the disordered one (β{t/(2)}), or for a particular value of J 2/ J 1 there is a unique transition temperature where all the previous phases coexist. Proofs are based on the Pirogov-Sinai theory: we perform a random cluster representation of the model (allowing us to consider noninteger values of q 1 and q/q 1) to which we adapt this theory.

  13. Coexistence between wildlife and humans at fine spatial scales.

    PubMed

    Carter, Neil H; Shrestha, Binoj K; Karki, Jhamak B; Pradhan, Narendra Man Babu; Liu, Jianguo

    2012-09-18

    Many wildlife species face imminent extinction because of human impacts, and therefore, a prevailing belief is that some wildlife species, particularly large carnivores and ungulates, cannot coexist with people at fine spatial scales (i.e., cannot regularly use the exact same point locations). This belief provides rationale for various conservation programs, such as resettling human communities outside protected areas. However, quantitative information on the capacity and mechanisms for wildlife to coexist with humans at fine spatial scales is scarce. Such information is vital, because the world is becoming increasingly crowded. Here, we provide empirical information about the capacity and mechanisms for tigers (a globally endangered species) to coexist with humans at fine spatial scales inside and outside Nepal's Chitwan National Park, a flagship protected area for imperiled wildlife. Information obtained from field cameras in 2010 and 2011 indicated that human presence (i.e., people on foot and vehicles) was ubiquitous and abundant throughout the study site; however, tiger density was also high. Surprisingly, even at a fine spatial scale (i.e., camera locations), tigers spatially overlapped with people on foot and vehicles in both years. However, in both years, tigers offset their temporal activity patterns to be much less active during the day when human activity peaked. In addition to temporal displacement, tiger-human coexistence was likely enhanced by abundant tiger prey and low levels of tiger poaching. Incorporating fine-scale spatial and temporal activity patterns into conservation plans can help address a major global challenge-meeting human needs while sustaining wildlife.

  14. Coexistence analysis of diploid and triploid hybrid water frogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apri, M.; Suandi, D.; Soewono, E.

    2014-02-01

    A dynamical model for genotype distributions of all hybrid populations of Pelophylax esculentus in the absence of differential survival is studied here. Assuming that under natural condition the parental genotypes LL and RR do not survive into adult stage, the dynamic is then reduced into three-dimensional dynamical system of classes LR, LLR, LRR genotypes. Coexistence of diploid (LR) and triploid (LLR and LRR) genotypes is analyzed here.

  15. Auditory-olfactory synesthesia coexisting with auditory-visual synesthesia.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Thomas E; Sandramouli, Soupramanien

    2012-09-01

    Synesthesia is an unusual condition in which stimulation of one sensory modality causes an experience in another sensory modality or when a sensation in one sensory modality causes another sensation within the same modality. We describe a previously unreported association of auditory-olfactory synesthesia coexisting with auditory-visual synesthesia. Given that many types of synesthesias involve vision, it is important that the clinician provide these patients with the necessary information and support that is available.

  16. Network reciprocity by coexisting learning and teaching strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanimoto, Jun; Brede, Markus; Yamauchi, Atsuo

    2012-03-01

    We propose a network reciprocity model in which an agent probabilistically adopts learning or teaching strategies. In the learning adaptation mechanism, an agent may copy a neighbor's strategy through Fermi pairwise comparison. The teaching adaptation mechanism involves an agent imposing its strategy on a neighbor. Our simulations reveal that the reciprocity is significantly affected by the frequency with which learning and teaching agents coexist in a network and by the structure of the network itself.

  17. Parental harsh discipline in mainland China: prevalence, frequency, and coexistence.

    PubMed

    Wang, Meifang; Liu, Li

    2014-06-01

    The study examined the prevalence, frequency, and coexistence of psychological aggression (PA), corporal punishment (CP), and severe physical abuse (SPA) in mainland China. Using a sample of 2,518 father-mother dyads of 3-15-year-old children, the findings revealed that parental harsh discipline was prevalent in mainland China. The rates of harsh discipline in the current study fell in the middle of the ranges of rates found in other studies. Harsh discipline was most likely directed at boys or children aged 7 years and committed by mothers, young fathers, or high and low socioeconomic status (SES) parents. The prevalence of maternal and paternal PA and CP declined with the children's age. Maternal and paternal SPA first increased and then decreased with child age. The frequency of the three types of maternal and paternal harsh discipline fluctuated depending on the age of the children. In addition, approximately 50% of the mothers and fathers who reported using severe forms of disciplinary practices also engaged in less severe forms of harsh disciplinary practices against their children. SPA generally coexisted with CP and PA, and CP was usually accompanied by PA; however, PA was more likely to occur independently compared with CP and SPA. Moreover, maternal harsh discipline coexisted with paternal harsh discipline to some extent. The coexistence decreased with increasing severity of parental harsh discipline and differed according to child gender. These findings highlight the importance of studying these three types of parental harsh discipline simultaneously and intervening in harsh discipline by mothers and fathers within the same family.

  18. Spatial coexistence of synchronized oscillation and death: A chimeralike state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, Partha Sharathi; Banerjee, Tanmoy

    2015-10-01

    We report an interesting spatiotemporal state, namely the chimeralike incongruous coexistence of synchronized oscillation and stable steady state (CSOD) in a network of nonlocally coupled oscillators. Unlike the chimera and chimera death state, in the CSOD state identical oscillators are self-organized into two coexisting spatially separated domains: In one domain neighboring oscillators show synchronized oscillation and in another domain the neighboring oscillators randomly populate either a synchronized oscillating state or a stable steady state (we call it a death state). We consider a realistic ecological network and show that the interplay of nonlocality and coupling strength results in two routes to the CSOD state: One is from a coexisting mixed state of amplitude chimera and death, and another one is from a globally synchronized state. We provide a qualitative explanation of the origin of this state. We further explore the importance of this study in ecology that gives insight into the relationship between spatial synchrony and global extinction of species. We believe this study will improve our understanding of chimera and chimeralike states.

  19. Coexistence in a competitive parasitoid-host system.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Derik; Velasco-Hernández, Jorge X

    2003-03-01

    The main objective of this work is to determine the conditions for coexistence and competitive exclusion in a discrete model for a community of three species: a stage-structured host and two competing parasitoids sharing the same host developmental stage. Coexistence of the community of the species is found to depend on the host life history parameters in the first place, and on competitive ability and parasitoid efficiency in the second place. In particular, parasitoids equilibrium densities are defined by the size of the refuge. Extinction is expected with low growth rate and with low adult survival. Host life histories are also associated with oscillations in population density, and depending on the combination of host adult survival from one generation to the next and host growth rate, the minimum of fluctuations approaches zero, implying a higher potential risk of extinction because of stochastic factors. Our results suggest that equally reduced survival of parasitoids in hosts parasitized by both species determines extinction of the parasitoid with lower population density, in contrast to the case when both parasitoids benefit with 50% of all doubly parasitized hosts, leading to the hypothesis that a community where competitors in multiparasitized hosts die, easily becomes extinct. Competitive exclusion is expected for highly asymmetric competitive interactions, independent of population densities, allowing us to hypothesize that coexistence of competitors in systems with limited resources and refuges is associated with a clearly defined competitive hierarchy.

  20. The importance of niche differentiation for coexistence on large scales.

    PubMed

    Tang, Junfeng; Zhou, Shurong

    2011-03-21

    It is widely accepted that niche differentiation plays a key role in coexistence on relatively small scales. With regard to a large community scale, the recently propounded neutral theory suggests that species abundances are more influenced by history and chance than they are by interspecies competition. This inference is mainly based on the probability that competitive exclusion is largely slowed by recruitment limitation, which may be common in species rich communities. In this respect, a theoretical study conducted by Hurtt and Pacala (1995) for a niche differentiated community has been frequently cited to support neutral coexistence. In this paper, we focused on the effect of symmetric recruitment limitation on delaying species competitive exclusion caused by both symmetric and asymmetric competition in a large homogeneous habitat. By removing niche differentiation in space, we found that recruitment limitation could delay competitive exclusion to some extent, but the effect was rather limited compared to that predicted by Hurtt and Pacala's model for a niche differentiated community. Our results imply that niche differentiation may be important for species coexistence even on large scales and this has already been confirmed in some species rich communities.

  1. Coexisting generalist herbivores occupy unique nutritional feeding niches

    PubMed Central

    Behmer, Spencer T.; Joern, Anthony

    2008-01-01

    A mainstay of ecological theory and practice is that coexisting species use different resources, leading to the local development of biodiversity. However, a problem arises for understanding coexistence of multiple species if they share critical resources too generally. Here, we employ an experimental framework grounded in nutritional physiology to show that closely related, cooccurring and generalist-feeding herbivores (seven grasshopper species in the genus Melanoplus; Orthoptera: Acrididae) eat protein and carbohydrate in different absolute amounts and ratios even if they eat the same plant taxa. The existence of species-specific nutritional niches provides a cryptic mechanism that helps explain how generalist herbivores with broadly overlapping diets might coexist. We also show that performance by grasshoppers allowed to mix their diets and thus regulate their protein–carbohydrate intake matched optimal performance peaks generated from no-choice treatments. These results indicate the active nature of diet selection to achieve balanced diets and provide buffering capacity in the face of variable food quality. Our empirical findings and experimental approach can be extended to generate and test predictions concerning the intensity of biotic interactions between species, the relative abundance of species, yearly fluctuations in population size, and the nature of interactions with natural enemies in tritrophic niche space. PMID:18238894

  2. Coexistence of charge and ferromagnetic order in fcc Fe

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Pin-Jui; Kügel, Jens; Kemmer, Jeannette; Parisen Toldin, Francesco; Mauerer, Tobias; Vogt, Matthias; Assaad, Fakher; Bode, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Phase coexistence phenomena have been intensively studied in strongly correlated materials where several ordered states simultaneously occur or compete. Material properties critically depend on external parameters and boundary conditions, where tiny changes result in qualitatively different ground states. However, up to date, phase coexistence phenomena have exclusively been reported for complex compounds composed of multiple elements. Here we show that charge- and magnetically ordered states coexist in double-layer Fe/Rh(001). Scanning tunnelling microscopy and spectroscopy measurements reveal periodic charge-order stripes below a temperature of 130 K. Close to liquid helium temperature, they are superimposed by ferromagnetic domains as observed by spin-polarized scanning tunnelling microscopy. Temperature-dependent measurements reveal a pronounced cross-talk between charge and spin order at the ferromagnetic ordering temperature about 70 K, which is successfully modelled within an effective Ginzburg–Landau ansatz including sixth-order terms. Our results show that subtle balance between structural modifications can lead to competing ordering phenomena. PMID:26971713

  3. Phase coexistence and competing interactions in complex oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Soon Yong

    A significant progress in the materials physics research of the past decades, has been associated with the emerging paradigm of naturally or artificially fabricated heterogeneous structures/phases of complex materials with distinct physical phases, in which various physical degrees of freedoms are intricately coupled and charge carriers are strongly interacting. The heterogeneous structures/phases can be associated with various architectures and length-scales. For example, in the intrinsic multiferroics, magnetism and ferroelectricity are intricately mixed in atomic length-scales, but they coexist with much larger length scales such as micro-meters in the composite multiferroics. The recent investigation has revealed that the interplay between magnetism and ferroelectricity can be significant in magnetically-driven multiferroics where magnetic orders with broken inversion symmetry induce ferroelectric lattice distortions through exchange-striction. Herein, we focus on three systems with the coexistence of distinct physical phases: (1) an intrinsic multiferroic of a S = 1/2 chain cuprate, (2) a composite multiferroic fabricated by utilizing chemical/structural phase separation, and (3) a heterogeneous mixture where antiferromagnetic-insulating and high TC superconducting phases coexist. These novel systems reveal unprecedented physical properties and phenomena due to the presence of physical distinct phases in spatial proximity.

  4. Coexistence of charge and ferromagnetic order in fcc Fe.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Pin-Jui; Kügel, Jens; Kemmer, Jeannette; Parisen Toldin, Francesco; Mauerer, Tobias; Vogt, Matthias; Assaad, Fakher; Bode, Matthias

    2016-03-14

    Phase coexistence phenomena have been intensively studied in strongly correlated materials where several ordered states simultaneously occur or compete. Material properties critically depend on external parameters and boundary conditions, where tiny changes result in qualitatively different ground states. However, up to date, phase coexistence phenomena have exclusively been reported for complex compounds composed of multiple elements. Here we show that charge- and magnetically ordered states coexist in double-layer Fe/Rh(001). Scanning tunnelling microscopy and spectroscopy measurements reveal periodic charge-order stripes below a temperature of 130 K. Close to liquid helium temperature, they are superimposed by ferromagnetic domains as observed by spin-polarized scanning tunnelling microscopy. Temperature-dependent measurements reveal a pronounced cross-talk between charge and spin order at the ferromagnetic ordering temperature about 70 K, which is successfully modelled within an effective Ginzburg-Landau ansatz including sixth-order terms. Our results show that subtle balance between structural modifications can lead to competing ordering phenomena.

  5. Coexistence of superconductivity, ferromagnetism and antiferromagnetism in iron pnictides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gill, Raminder

    2016-05-01

    Coexistence of Superconductivity and magnetism have always been the fascinating area of interest for condensed-matter physicists. A variety of systems, such as cuprates, heavy fermions, and iron pnictides showed superconductivity in a narrow region near the border to antiferromagnetism (AFM)as a function of pressure or doping. However, the coexistence of superconductivity and ferromagnetism (FM) has seen in URhGe, UGe2, ErRh4B4 and many compounds. Here, we present a third situation where superconductivity coexists with FM and AFM. The recent experimental finding of interplay of ferromagnetism,antiferromagnetism and superconductivity in EuFe2(As1-xPx)2 impressed us to discuss this problem in detail. Ironpnictides are high Tc magnetic superconductors and could be very useful in finding many new superconductorswith high Tc probably near to room temperature. In this paper, we have theoretically calculated the superconducting order parameter of EuFe2(As1-xPx)2 where magnetic ordering is due to Eu+ moments and superconductivity is due to Fe3+ moments. The Eu ions order antiferromagnetically for x≤0.13, while a crossover is observed for x≥0.22 whereupon the Eu ions order ferromagnetically.

  6. Acyl chain composition and coexisting fluid phases in lipid bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Yongwen; Bradley, Miranda; Mitchell, Drake

    2011-10-01

    At room temperature phospholipid bilayers enriched in sphingolipids and cholesterol may form a solid phase as well as two coexisting fluid phases. These are the standard fluid phase, or the liquid-disordered phase, ld, and the liquid-ordered phase, lo, which is commonly associated with lipid rafts. Ternary mixtures of palmitoyl-oleoyl-phosphocholine (POPC; 16:0,18:1 PC), sphingomyelin (SPM), and cholesterol (Chol) form coexisting lo, ld and solid phases over a wide range of molar ratios. We are examining the ability of two fluorescent probes to detect these 2 phases: NBD linked to di-16:0 PE which partitions strongly into the lo phase and NBD linked to di-18:1 PE which partitions strongly into the ld phase. We are also examining the effect of the highly polyunsaturated phospholipid stearoyl-docosahexanoyl-phosphocholine (SDPC; 18:0, 22:6 PC) on the ternary phase diagram of POPC/SPM/Chol with particular focus on the functionally important lo/ld coexistence region. We report on the fluorescence lifetime and anisotropy decay dynamics of these two fluorescent probes.

  7. Digital Ecology: Coexistence and Domination among Interacting Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleineberg, Kaj-Kolja; Boguñá, Marián

    2015-05-01

    The overwhelming success of Web 2.0, within which online social networks are key actors, has induced a paradigm shift in the nature of human interactions. The user-driven character of Web 2.0 services has allowed researchers to quantify large-scale social patterns for the first time. However, the mechanisms that determine the fate of networks at the system level are still poorly understood. For instance, the simultaneous existence of multiple digital services naturally raises questions concerning which conditions these services can coexist under. Analogously to the case of population dynamics, the digital world forms a complex ecosystem of interacting networks. The fitness of each network depends on its capacity to attract and maintain users’ attention, which constitutes a limited resource. In this paper, we introduce an ecological theory of the digital world which exhibits stable coexistence of several networks as well as the dominance of an individual one, in contrast to the competitive exclusion principle. Interestingly, our theory also predicts that the most probable outcome is the coexistence of a moderate number of services, in agreement with empirical observations.

  8. Niche partitioning and species coexistence in a Neotropical felid assemblage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Bitetti, Mario S.; De Angelo, Carlos D.; Di Blanco, Yamil E.; Paviolo, Agustín

    2010-07-01

    Carnivores have been used as a model to understand the effects of competition in community structure. Behavioral mechanisms that facilitate species coexistence have been poorly explored and may explain the lack of community-wide morphological character displacement in some carnivore assemblages. We use the results of large-scale and intensive camera-trap surveys conducted in the Atlantic Forest of NE Argentina between 2003 and 2008 to describe the spatial patterns of detection and the daily pattern of records of the six wild cat species present in the region (jaguar Panthera onca, puma Puma concolor, ocelot Leopardus pardalis, jaguarundi Puma yagouaroundi, margay Leopardus wiedii, and oncilla Leopardus tigrinus). We use these patterns to generate hypotheses about behavioral differences that may facilitate species coexistence. The larger species were more frequently recorded in the better-protected areas, probably as a result of anthropogenic effects (poaching of cats and their prey). Competitive release from ocelots and jaguarundis may explain why the oncilla and the margay showed the opposite pattern. Morphologically similar species had the most contrasting activity patterns: the margay was exclusively nocturnal and the jaguarundi diurnal. The other species were cathemeral, but alternated their peaks of activity in relation to the relative order of their body weights. The contrasting temporal patterns observed and the ability of pumas and oncillas to adjust their activity patterns to local conditions may facilitate the coexistence of these cat species and explain the lack of character displacement in this assemblage.

  9. Tooth - abnormal shape

    MedlinePlus

    Hutchinson incisors; Abnormal tooth shape; Peg teeth; Mulberry teeth; Conical teeth ... The appearance of normal teeth varies, especially the molars. ... conditions. Specific diseases can affect tooth shape, tooth ...

  10. Nuclear physics

    SciTech Connect

    Garg, U.; Reviol, W.; Kaczarowski, R.

    1995-08-01

    Several groups from the University of Notre Dame are playing an important role in developing the research program at ATLAS. One of their main interests is the study, in collaboration with ANL staff members, of the behavior of nuclei at high spin in the transitional region near A=180 (i.e. the Hg-Pt-Os nuclei), and A=100 (i.e. the Ru-Tc nuclei) with emphasis on shape coexistence and configuration mixing. This group has also participated in many other experiments performed with the BGO gamma-ray facility, especially in the investigation of superdeformation. The {gamma}-ray groups at ANL and Notre Dame have also had collaborative experiments at Gammasphere. The Notre Dame group has built, tested and extensively used a state-of-the-art plunger device for lifetime measurements in conjunction with the ATLAS {gamma}-ray facility. An adapted version of this device is now under construction at Notre Dame, under contract with ANL, for use at the Gammasphere facility.

  11. Imaging coexisting fluid domains in biomembrane models coupling curvature and line tension.

    PubMed

    Baumgart, Tobias; Hess, Samuel T; Webb, Watt W

    2003-10-23

    Lipid bilayer membranes--ubiquitous in biological systems and closely associated with cell function--exhibit rich shape-transition behaviour, including bud formation and vesicle fission. Membranes formed from multiple lipid components can laterally separate into coexisting liquid phases, or domains, with distinct compositions. This process, which may resemble raft formation in cell membranes, has been directly observed in giant unilamellar vesicles. Detailed theoretical frameworks link the elasticity of domains and their boundary properties to the shape adopted by membranes and the formation of particular domain patterns, but it has been difficult to experimentally probe and validate these theories. Here we show that high-resolution fluorescence imaging using two dyes preferentially labelling different fluid phases directly provides a correlation between domain composition and local membrane curvature. Using freely suspended membranes of giant unilamellar vesicles, we are able to optically resolve curvature and line tension interactions of circular, stripe and ring domains. We observe long-range domain ordering in the form of locally parallel stripes and hexagonal arrays of circular domains, curvature-dependent domain sorting, and membrane fission into separate vesicles at domain boundaries. By analysing our observations using available membrane theory, we are able to provide experimental estimates of boundary tension between fluid bilayer domains. PMID:14574408

  12. Finite-size effects on liquid-solid phase coexistence and the estimation of crystal nucleation barriers.

    PubMed

    Statt, Antonia; Virnau, Peter; Binder, Kurt

    2015-01-16

    A fluid in equilibrium in a finite volume V with particle number N at a density ρ=N/V exceeding the onset density ρ_{f} of freezing may exhibit phase coexistence between a crystalline nucleus and surrounding fluid. Using a method suitable for the estimation of the chemical potential of dense fluids, we obtain the excess free energy due to the surface of the crystalline nucleus. There is neither a need to precisely locate the interface nor to compute the (anisotropic) interfacial tension. As a test case, a soft version of the Asakura-Oosawa model for colloid-polymer mixtures is treated. While our analysis is appropriate for crystal nuclei of arbitrary shape, we find the nucleation barrier to be compatible with a spherical shape and consistent with classical nucleation theory.

  13. Finite-Size Effects on Liquid-Solid Phase Coexistence and the Estimation of Crystal Nucleation Barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Statt, Antonia; Virnau, Peter; Binder, Kurt

    2015-01-01

    A fluid in equilibrium in a finite volume V with particle number N at a density ρ =N /V exceeding the onset density ρf of freezing may exhibit phase coexistence between a crystalline nucleus and surrounding fluid. Using a method suitable for the estimation of the chemical potential of dense fluids, we obtain the excess free energy due to the surface of the crystalline nucleus. There is neither a need to precisely locate the interface nor to compute the (anisotropic) interfacial tension. As a test case, a soft version of the Asakura-Oosawa model for colloid-polymer mixtures is treated. While our analysis is appropriate for crystal nuclei of arbitrary shape, we find the nucleation barrier to be compatible with a spherical shape and consistent with classical nucleation theory.

  14. Networks with dispersed degrees save stable coexistence of species in cyclic competition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuda, Naoki; Konno, Norio

    2006-12-01

    Coexistence of individuals with different species or phenotypes is often found in nature in spite of competition between them. Stable coexistence of multiple types of individuals have implications for maintenance of ecological biodiversity and emergence of altruism in society, to name a few. Various mechanisms of coexistence including spatial structure of populations, heterogeneous individuals, and heterogeneous environments, have been proposed. In reality, individuals disperse and interact on complex networks. We examine how heterogeneous degree distributions of networks influence coexistence, focusing on models of cyclically competing species. We show analytically and numerically that heterogeneity in degree distributions promotes stable coexistence.

  15. Regulating coexistence of GM and non-GM crops without jeopardizing economic incentives.

    PubMed

    Demont, Matty; Devos, Yann

    2008-07-01

    The ongoing debate about the coexistence of genetically modified (GM) and non-GM crops in the European Union (EU) mainly focuses on preventive measures needed to keep the adventitious presence of GM material in non-GM products below established tolerance thresholds, as well as on issues covering questions of liability and the duty to redress the incurred economic harm once adventitious mixing in non-GM products has occurred. By contrast, the interplay between the economic incentives and costs of coexistence has attracted little attention. The current overemphasis on the technical aspects and cost of coexistence over its economic incentives might lead EU policy-makers to adopt too stringent and rigid regulations on coexistence. Therefore, we argue for flexible coexistence regulations that explicitly take into account the economic incentives for coexistence. Our arguments provide a timely and important framework for EU policy-makers, who are currently struggling to implement coherent coexistence regulations in all member states.

  16. Analysis of potential factors allowing coexistence in a sexual/asexual minnow complex.

    PubMed

    Barron, James N; Lawson, Troy J; Jensen, Philip A

    2016-03-01

    The northern redbelly dace (Chrosomus eos) and the finescale dace (C. neogaeus) have hybridized to produce an all-female, asexual hybrid (C. eos-neogaeus) that reproduces by sperm-limited parthenogenesis (gynogenesis). However, in this system, gynogenesis is not 100 % efficient; triploid females are occasionally formed which reproduce as sexuals, producing nuclear males and females of the paternal species (generally C. eos). Thus, the asexual lineage continually produces occasional males that can serve as a sperm source. Because (almost) all hybrid offspring are females, the hybrid population has the potential to grow more quickly and even outcompete the sexuals, thus eliminating their own sperm source. The current research uses behavioral testing, ovarian analyses, and modeling to examine three hypotheses for the maintenance of the sexual/asexual complex: male discrimination against hybrid females, fecundity differences between sexual and asexual females, and production of nuclear male sexuals from the asexual lineage. Results suggest that males do not discriminate against asexual females, and that both sexual and asexual females have similar fecundities, eliminating these hypotheses as potential coexistence mechanisms. However, computer simulations of population growth support the hypothesis that occasional triploidy within the hybrid population supplies enough breeding males to maintain the sexual/asexual complex. PMID:26650583

  17. Analysis of potential factors allowing coexistence in a sexual/asexual minnow complex.

    PubMed

    Barron, James N; Lawson, Troy J; Jensen, Philip A

    2016-03-01

    The northern redbelly dace (Chrosomus eos) and the finescale dace (C. neogaeus) have hybridized to produce an all-female, asexual hybrid (C. eos-neogaeus) that reproduces by sperm-limited parthenogenesis (gynogenesis). However, in this system, gynogenesis is not 100 % efficient; triploid females are occasionally formed which reproduce as sexuals, producing nuclear males and females of the paternal species (generally C. eos). Thus, the asexual lineage continually produces occasional males that can serve as a sperm source. Because (almost) all hybrid offspring are females, the hybrid population has the potential to grow more quickly and even outcompete the sexuals, thus eliminating their own sperm source. The current research uses behavioral testing, ovarian analyses, and modeling to examine three hypotheses for the maintenance of the sexual/asexual complex: male discrimination against hybrid females, fecundity differences between sexual and asexual females, and production of nuclear male sexuals from the asexual lineage. Results suggest that males do not discriminate against asexual females, and that both sexual and asexual females have similar fecundities, eliminating these hypotheses as potential coexistence mechanisms. However, computer simulations of population growth support the hypothesis that occasional triploidy within the hybrid population supplies enough breeding males to maintain the sexual/asexual complex.

  18. Shape memory polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, Thomas S.; Bearinger, Jane P.

    2015-06-09

    New shape memory polymer compositions, methods for synthesizing new shape memory polymers, and apparatus comprising an actuator and a shape memory polymer wherein the shape memory polymer comprises at least a portion of the actuator. A shape memory polymer comprising a polymer composition which physically forms a network structure wherein the polymer composition has shape-memory behavior and can be formed into a permanent primary shape, re-formed into a stable secondary shape, and controllably actuated to recover the permanent primary shape. Polymers have optimal aliphatic network structures due to minimization of dangling chains by using monomers that are symmetrical and that have matching amine and hydroxyl groups providing polymers and polymer foams with clarity, tight (narrow temperature range) single transitions, and high shape recovery and recovery force that are especially useful for implanting in the human body.

  19. Liquid disordered-liquid ordered phase coexistence in bicelles containing unsaturated lipids and cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Miranda L; Davis, James H

    2016-04-01

    Magnetically orienting bicelles are often made by combining the long chain phospholipid 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC) with the short chain phospholipid 1,2-dicaproyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DCPC) in buffer. These bicelles orient with their bilayer normals perpendicular to the external magnetic field. We have examined the phase behaviour of DMPC/DCPC bicelles and the effects of cholesterol and the unsaturated phospholipid 1,2-dipalmitoleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPoPC) as a function of temperature using static solid state (2)H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. As expected, cholesterol has an ordering effect on the long phospholipid chains and this is reflected in the phase behaviour of the bicelle mixtures. Liquid disordered-liquid ordered, fluid-fluid phase coexistence is observed in DMPC/cholesterol/DCPC bicelles with cholesterol mole fractions of 0.13 and higher. DPoPC/DMPC/cholesterol/DCPC bicelles also exhibit two fluid phase coexistence over a broad range of temperatures and compositions. Bicelles can provide a useful medium in which to study membrane bound peptides and proteins. The orientation parallel to the magnetic field is favourable for studying membrane peptides/proteins because information about the orientation of relevant molecular bonds or internuclear vectors can be obtained directly from the resulting (2)H spectra. Lanthanide ions can be used to flip the bicelles to have their bilayer normals parallel to the external magnetic field. Yb(3+) was used to flip the DPoPC/DMPC/cholesterol/DCPC bicelles while Eu(3+) was found to be ineffective at flipping bicelles containing cholesterol in the present work.

  20. Co-existence of Functionally Different Vesicular Neurotransmitter Transporters

    PubMed Central

    Münster-Wandowski, Agnieszka; Zander, Johannes-Friedrich; Richter, Karin; Ahnert-Hilger, Gudrun

    2016-01-01

    The vesicular transmitter transporters VGLUT, VGAT, VMAT2 and VAChT, define phenotype and physiological properties of neuronal subtypes. VGLUTs concentrate the excitatory amino acid glutamate, VGAT the inhibitory amino acid GABA, VMAT2 monoamines, and VAChT acetylcholine (ACh) into synaptic vesicle (SV). Following membrane depolarization SV release their content into the synaptic cleft. A strict segregation of vesicular transporters is mandatory for the precise functioning of synaptic communication and of neuronal circuits. In the last years, evidence accumulates that subsets of neurons express more than one of these transporters leading to synaptic co-release of different and functionally opposing transmitters and modulation of synaptic plasticity. Synaptic co-existence of transporters may change during pathological scenarios in order to ameliorate misbalances in neuronal activity. In addition, evidence increases that transporters also co-exist on the same vesicle providing another layer of regulation. Generally, vesicular transmitter loading relies on an electrochemical gradient ΔμH+ driven by the proton ATPase rendering the lumen of the vesicle with respect to the cytosol positive (Δψ) and acidic (ΔpH). While the activity of VGLUT mainly depends on the Δψ component, VMAT, VGAT and VAChT work best at a high ΔpH. Thus, a vesicular synergy of transporters depending on the combination may increase or decrease the filling of SV with the principal transmitter. We provide an overview on synaptic co-existence of vesicular transmitter transporters including changes in the excitatory/inhibitory balance under pathological conditions. Additionally, we discuss functional aspects of vesicular synergy of transmitter transporters. PMID:26909036

  1. Thermophysical properties of hydrogen along the liquid-vapor coexistence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osman, S. M.; Sulaiman, N.; Bahaa Khedr, M.

    2016-05-01

    We present Theoretical Calculations for the Liquid-Vapor Coexistence (LVC) curve of fluid Hydrogen within the first order perturbation theory with a suitable first order quantum correction to the free energy. In the present equation of state, we incorporate the dimerization of H2 molecule by treating the fluid as a hard convex body fluid. The thermophysical properties of fluid H2 along the LVC curve, including the pressure-temperature dependence, density-temperature asymmetry, volume expansivity, entropy and enthalpy, are calculated and compared with computer simulation and empirical results.

  2. Electrical signaling and photosynthesis: can they co-exist together?

    PubMed

    Pavlovič, Andrej; Mancuso, Stefano

    2011-06-01

    Mechanical irritation of trigger hairs and subsequent generation of action potentials have significant impact on photosynthesis and respiration in carnivorous Venus flytrap (Dionaea muscipula). Action potential-mediated inhibition of photosynthesis and stimulation of respiration is confined only to the trap and was not recorded in adjacent photosynthetic lamina. We showed that the main primary target of electrical signals on assimilation is in the dark enzymatic reaction of photosynthesis. Without doubt, the electrical signaling is costly, and the possible co-existence of such type of signals and photosynthesis in plant cell is discussed.

  3. Competition between phytoplankton and bacteria: exclusion and coexistence.

    PubMed

    Grognard, Frédéric; Masci, Pierre; Benoît, Eric; Bernard, Olivier

    2015-04-01

    Resource-based competition between microorganisms species in continuous culture has been studied extensively both experimentally and theoretically, mostly for bacteria through Monod and Contois "constant yield" models, or for phytoplankton through the Droop "variable yield" models. For homogeneous populations of N bacterial species (Monod) or N phytoplanktonic species (Droop), with one limiting substrate and under constant controls, the theoretical studies indicated that competitive exclusion occurs: only one species wins the competition and displaces all the others (Armstrong and McGehee in Am Nat 115:151, 1980; Hsu and Hsu in SIAM J Appl Math 68:1600-1617, 2008). The winning species expected from theory is the one with the lowest "substrate subsistence concentration" s([star]), such that its corresponding equilibrium growth rate is equal to the dilution rate D. This theoretical result was validated experimentally with phytoplankton (Tilman and Sterner in Oecologia 61(2):197-200, 1984) and bacteria (Hansen and Hubell in Science 207(4438):1491-1493, 1980), and observed in a lake with microalgae (Tilman in Ecology 58(22):338-348, 1977). On the contrary for aggregating bacterial species described by a Contois model, theory predicts coexistence between several species (Grognard et al. in Discrete Contin Dyn Syst Ser B 8(1):73-93, 2007). In this paper we present a generalization of these results by studying a competition between three different types of microorganisms: planktonic (or free) bacteria (represented by a generalized Monod model), aggregating bacteria (represented by a Contois model) and free phytoplankton (represented by a Droop model). We prove that the outcome of the competition is a coexistence between several aggregating bacterial species with a free species of bacteria or phytoplankton, all the other free species being washed out. This demonstration is based mainly on the study of the substrate concentration's evolution caused by competition; it

  4. Coal and climate regulations can co-exist

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, J.

    2006-07-15

    Jim Rogers, president and chief executive officer of Duke Energy Corporation, examines how coal and climate change regulations can co-exist. He addresses the need for economically sound choices for future energy needs, which is complicated by what he refers to as 'the elephant in the room'climate change. He observes that new CO{sub 2} regulations would increase the USA's cost of generating electricity over time and result in higher prices for customers, and he advocates that a gradual, economy-wide, market-based U.S. climate policy is the best option. 1 ref., 1 fig.

  5. Dural arteriovenous fistula coexisting with a lumbar lipomeningocele. Case report.

    PubMed

    Rajeev, Kariyattil; Panikar, Dilip

    2005-11-01

    The authors describe the case of a 44-year-old woman who presented with recent onset of progressive paraparesis and bladder involvement; she had an asymptomatic lumbosacral lipomatous swelling that was present since birth. Magnetic resonance imaging confirmed the diagnosis of a lipomeningocele. It also revealed intramedullary hyperintensity on T2-weighted images and serpiginous flow voids suggestive of a dural arteriovenous fistula (DAVF) at the same level; the lesion was confirmed by spinal angiography. Both lesions were surgically managed, and the patient subsequently experienced neurological improvement. The coexistence of a DAVF and a lipomeningocele at the same level is unusual and can lead to treatment failure if missed.

  6. Treatment considerations in carpal tunnel syndrome with coexistent Dupuytren's disease.

    PubMed

    Nissenbaum, M; Kleinert, H E

    1980-11-01

    Twenty-nine patients with involvement of 31 hands presented with coexisting carpal tunnel syndrome and ipsilateral Dupuytren's disease. Analysis of the patient population showed a high proportion of women, dominant hand involvement, and repetitive manual trauma. Various treatment combinations were used and the results evaluated. Simultaneous surgical excision of Dupuytren's contracture and carpal tunnel release gave compromised long-term results, particularly among the women. To minimize complications, it is advised that carpal tunnel release not be performed at the same time as excision of Dupuytren's contracture.

  7. Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy Coexisting with Acute Pericarditis and Myocardial Bridge

    PubMed Central

    Sezavar, Seyed Hashem; Riahi Beni, Hassan; Ghanavati, Reza; Hajahmadi, Marjan

    2016-01-01

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TCM) is a stress-induced cardiomyopathy that occurs primarily in postmenopausal women. It mimics clinical picture of acute coronary syndrome with nonobstructive coronary arteries and a characteristic transient left (or bi-) ventricular apical ballooning at angiography. The exact pathogenesis of TCM is not well recognized. Hereby we present an unusual case of TCM that presents with signs and symptoms of acute pericarditis and was also found to have a coexisting coronary muscle bridge on coronary angiography. We discuss the impact of these associations in better understanding of the pathogenesis of TCM. PMID:27437150

  8. Combined hybridization and mitochondrial capture shape complex phylogeographic patterns in hybridogenetic Cataglyphis desert ants.

    PubMed

    Eyer, P A; Leniaud, L; Tinaut, A; Aron, S

    2016-12-01

    Some species of Cataglyphis desert ants have evolved a hybridogenetic mode of reproduction at the social scale. In hybridogenetic populations, two distinct genetic lineages coexist. Non-reproductive offspring (workers) are hybrids of the two lineages, whereas sexual offspring (males and new queens) are produced by parthenogenesis and belong to the mother queen lineage. How this unusual reproductive system affects phylogeographic patterns and speciation processes remains completely unknown to date. Using one mitochondrial and four nuclear genes, we examined the phylogenetic relationships between three species of Cataglyphis (C. hispanica, C. humeya and C. velox) where complex DNA inheritance through social hybridogenesis may challenge phylogenetic inference. Our results bring two important insights. First, our data confirm a hybridogenetic mode of reproduction across the whole distribution range of the species C. hispanica. In contrast, they do not provide support for hybridogenesis in the populations sampled of C. humeya and C. velox. This suggests that these populations are not hybridogenetic, or that hybridogenesis is too recent to result in reciprocally monophyletic lineages on nuclear genes. Second, due to mitochondrial introgression between lineages (Darras and Aron, 2015), the faster-evolving COI marker is not lineage specific, hence, unsuitable to further investigate the segregation of lineages in the species studied. Different mitochondrial haplotypes occur in each locality sampled, resulting in strongly structured populations. This micro-allopatric structure leads to over-splitting species delimitation on mitochondrial gene, as every locality could potentially be considered a putative species; haploweb analyses of nuclear markers, however, yield species delimitations that are consistent with morphology. Overall, this study highlights how social hybridogenesis varies across species and shapes complex phylogeographic patterns. PMID:27591172

  9. Combined hybridization and mitochondrial capture shape complex phylogeographic patterns in hybridogenetic Cataglyphis desert ants.

    PubMed

    Eyer, P A; Leniaud, L; Tinaut, A; Aron, S

    2016-12-01

    Some species of Cataglyphis desert ants have evolved a hybridogenetic mode of reproduction at the social scale. In hybridogenetic populations, two distinct genetic lineages coexist. Non-reproductive offspring (workers) are hybrids of the two lineages, whereas sexual offspring (males and new queens) are produced by parthenogenesis and belong to the mother queen lineage. How this unusual reproductive system affects phylogeographic patterns and speciation processes remains completely unknown to date. Using one mitochondrial and four nuclear genes, we examined the phylogenetic relationships between three species of Cataglyphis (C. hispanica, C. humeya and C. velox) where complex DNA inheritance through social hybridogenesis may challenge phylogenetic inference. Our results bring two important insights. First, our data confirm a hybridogenetic mode of reproduction across the whole distribution range of the species C. hispanica. In contrast, they do not provide support for hybridogenesis in the populations sampled of C. humeya and C. velox. This suggests that these populations are not hybridogenetic, or that hybridogenesis is too recent to result in reciprocally monophyletic lineages on nuclear genes. Second, due to mitochondrial introgression between lineages (Darras and Aron, 2015), the faster-evolving COI marker is not lineage specific, hence, unsuitable to further investigate the segregation of lineages in the species studied. Different mitochondrial haplotypes occur in each locality sampled, resulting in strongly structured populations. This micro-allopatric structure leads to over-splitting species delimitation on mitochondrial gene, as every locality could potentially be considered a putative species; haploweb analyses of nuclear markers, however, yield species delimitations that are consistent with morphology. Overall, this study highlights how social hybridogenesis varies across species and shapes complex phylogeographic patterns.

  10. Saddle point shapes of nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Poenaru, D. N.; Plonski, I. H.; Greiner, W.

    2007-04-23

    Very general reflection asymmetrical saddle point nuclear shapes are obtained by solving an integro-differential equation without being necessary to specify a certain parametrization. This equation is derived as an Euler-Lagrange relationship associated to the variational problem of minimizing the potential energy with constraints (constant volume and given deformation parameter). The mass asymmetry in binary cold fission of Th and U isotopes is explained as the result of adding a phenomenological shell correction to the liquid drop model deformation energy. Applications to ternary fission are outlined.

  11. Nuclear Structure in China 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Hong-Bo; Meng, Jie; Zhao, En-Guang; Zhou, Shan-Gui

    2011-08-01

    Personal view on nuclear physics research / Jie Meng -- High-spin level structures in [symbol]Zr / X. P. Cao ... [et al.] -- Constraining the symmetry energy from the neutron skin thickness of tin isotopes / Lie-Wen Chen ... [et al.] -- Wobbling rotation in atomic nuclei / Y. S. Chen and Zao-Chun Gao -- The mixing of scalar mesons and the possible nonstrange dibaryons / L. R. Dai ... [et al.] -- Net baryon productions and gluon saturation in the SPS, RHIC and LHC energy regions / Sheng-Qin Feng -- Production of heavy isotopes with collisions between two actinide nuclides / Z. Q. Feng ... [et al.] -- The projected configuration interaction method / Zao-Chun Gao and Yong-Shou Chen -- Applications of Nilsson mean-field plus extended pairing model to rare-earth nuclei / Xin Guan ... [et al.] -- Complex scaling method and the resonant states / Jian-You Guo ... [et al.] -- Probing the equation of state by deep sub-barrier fusion reactions / Hong-Jun Hao and Jun-Long Tian -- Doublet structure study in A[symbol]105 mass region / C. Y. He ... [et al.] -- Rotational bands in transfermium nuclei / X. T. He -- Shape coexistence and shape evolution [symbol]Yb / H. Hua ... [et al.] -- Multistep shell model method in the complex energy plane / R. J. Liotta -- The evolution of protoneutron stars with kaon condensate / Ang Li -- High spin structures in the [symbol]Lu nucleus / Li Cong-Bo ... [et al.] -- Nuclear stopping and equation of state / QingFeng Li and Ying Yuan -- Covariant description of the low-lying states in neutron-deficient Kr isotopes / Z. X. Li ... [et al.] -- Isospin corrections for superallowed [symbol] transitions / HaoZhao Liang ... [et al.] -- The positive-parity band structures in [symbol]Ag / C. Liu ... [et al.] -- New band structures in odd-odd [symbol]I and [symbol]I / Liu GongYe ... [et al.] -- The sd-pair shell model and interacting boson model / Yan-An Luo ... [et al.] -- Cross-section distributions of fragments in the calcium isotopes projectile

  12. Nuclear Structure in China 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Hong-Bo; Meng, Jie; Zhao, En-Guang; Zhou, Shan-Gui

    2011-08-01

    Personal view on nuclear physics research / Jie Meng -- High-spin level structures in [symbol]Zr / X. P. Cao ... [et al.] -- Constraining the symmetry energy from the neutron skin thickness of tin isotopes / Lie-Wen Chen ... [et al.] -- Wobbling rotation in atomic nuclei / Y. S. Chen and Zao-Chun Gao -- The mixing of scalar mesons and the possible nonstrange dibaryons / L. R. Dai ... [et al.] -- Net baryon productions and gluon saturation in the SPS, RHIC and LHC energy regions / Sheng-Qin Feng -- Production of heavy isotopes with collisions between two actinide nuclides / Z. Q. Feng ... [et al.] -- The projected configuration interaction method / Zao-Chun Gao and Yong-Shou Chen -- Applications of Nilsson mean-field plus extended pairing model to rare-earth nuclei / Xin Guan ... [et al.] -- Complex scaling method and the resonant states / Jian-You Guo ... [et al.] -- Probing the equation of state by deep sub-barrier fusion reactions / Hong-Jun Hao and Jun-Long Tian -- Doublet structure study in A[symbol]105 mass region / C. Y. He ... [et al.] -- Rotational bands in transfermium nuclei / X. T. He -- Shape coexistence and shape evolution [symbol]Yb / H. Hua ... [et al.] -- Multistep shell model method in the complex energy plane / R. J. Liotta -- The evolution of protoneutron stars with kaon condensate / Ang Li -- High spin structures in the [symbol]Lu nucleus / Li Cong-Bo ... [et al.] -- Nuclear stopping and equation of state / QingFeng Li and Ying Yuan -- Covariant description of the low-lying states in neutron-deficient Kr isotopes / Z. X. Li ... [et al.] -- Isospin corrections for superallowed [symbol] transitions / HaoZhao Liang ... [et al.] -- The positive-parity band structures in [symbol]Ag / C. Liu ... [et al.] -- New band structures in odd-odd [symbol]I and [symbol]I / Liu GongYe ... [et al.] -- The sd-pair shell model and interacting boson model / Yan-An Luo ... [et al.] -- Cross-section distributions of fragments in the calcium isotopes projectile

  13. The Ecohydrologic Role of Coexistence and Competition in Semiarid Hillslopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soltanjalili, M. J.; Saco, P. M.; Willgoose, G. R.

    2015-12-01

    Through its influence on runoff and erosion-deposition processes, vegetation remarkably regulates different aspects of landscape dynamics. Here, the influence of different plant functional traits on the coexistence of different species in arid and semi-arid regions with patchy vegetation is investigated using an ecohydrology model. The model simulates coevolving changes in biomass patterns for two species, as well as overland flow and soil moisture dynamics. Vegetation patterns emerge as a result of facilitation (shading and infiltration) and competition mechanisms as well as varying seed dispersal strategies. The results show that the survival of only one species or the coexistence of both species not only strongly depends on environmental stresses, but also on differences in hillslope micro and macro topography. These vegetation patterns have very different hydrologic signatures and the potential to trigger remarkably different geomorphic responses. Based on these results we establish new hypothesis that will be used to further investigate the role of plant interspecific and intraspecific feedbacks on landscape coevolution processes.

  14. Explosive synchronization coexists with classical synchronization in the Kuramoto model.

    PubMed

    Danziger, Michael M; Moskalenko, Olga I; Kurkin, Semen A; Zhang, Xiyun; Havlin, Shlomo; Boccaletti, Stefano

    2016-06-01

    Explosive synchronization has recently been reported in a system of adaptively coupled Kuramoto oscillators, without any conditions on the frequency or degree of the nodes. Here, we find that, in fact, the explosive phase coexists with the standard phase of the Kuramoto oscillators. We determine this by extending the mean-field theory of adaptively coupled oscillators with full coupling to the case with partial coupling of a fraction f. This analysis shows that a metastable region exists for all finite values of f > 0, and therefore explosive synchronization is expected for any perturbation of adaptively coupling added to the standard Kuramoto model. We verify this theory with GPU-accelerated simulations on very large networks (N ∼ 10(6)) and find that, in fact, an explosive transition with hysteresis is observed for all finite couplings. By demonstrating that explosive transitions coexist with standard transitions in the limit of f → 0, we show that this behavior is far more likely to occur naturally than was previously believed. PMID:27369869

  15. Explosive synchronization coexists with classical synchronization in the Kuramoto model.

    PubMed

    Danziger, Michael M; Moskalenko, Olga I; Kurkin, Semen A; Zhang, Xiyun; Havlin, Shlomo; Boccaletti, Stefano

    2016-06-01

    Explosive synchronization has recently been reported in a system of adaptively coupled Kuramoto oscillators, without any conditions on the frequency or degree of the nodes. Here, we find that, in fact, the explosive phase coexists with the standard phase of the Kuramoto oscillators. We determine this by extending the mean-field theory of adaptively coupled oscillators with full coupling to the case with partial coupling of a fraction f. This analysis shows that a metastable region exists for all finite values of f > 0, and therefore explosive synchronization is expected for any perturbation of adaptively coupling added to the standard Kuramoto model. We verify this theory with GPU-accelerated simulations on very large networks (N ∼ 10(6)) and find that, in fact, an explosive transition with hysteresis is observed for all finite couplings. By demonstrating that explosive transitions coexist with standard transitions in the limit of f → 0, we show that this behavior is far more likely to occur naturally than was previously believed.

  16. Gynaecological cancers coexisting with pregnancy – a literature review

    PubMed Central

    Rubach, Maryna

    2016-01-01

    The coexistence of malignant tumour and pregnancy is a state of simultaneous occurrence of two completely contradictory philosophical and biological phenomena – the development of a new life and a life-threatening terminal illness. Finally, a physician – in fact the whole team of doctors – is facing the fight for two lives: of the mother and her unborn child. The incidence of malignant disease in pregnancy is 0.05 to 0.1%. This condition is a major challenge for physicians because there are no randomised studies that could be the basis to choose the therapeutic methods – the medical knowledge merely comes from case reports, registries, and observational studies. The following cancers most often coexist with pregnancy: gynaecological neoplasm (especially cervical and ovarian cancer), breast cancer, lymphatic system neoplasm, and melanoma. Formerly, the diagnosis was clearly the necessity of abortion. Today – although unskilled doctors still propose the only therapeutic option – termination of pregnancy is not the only solution. The past few years have seen the updating of reports and guidelines for the management of pregnant women with cancer. This paper is a review and summary of the information from these publications. PMID:27647981

  17. Soil Nematode Diversity: Species Coexistence and Ecosystem Function

    PubMed Central

    Ettema, Christien H.

    1998-01-01

    Soil nematode species diversity is often high, both at ecosystem and single soil-core scales. First, how can so many species coexist? There is evidence of niche partitioning, notably of physical space, but vast interspecific overlaps and trait plasticity seem equally common. It appears that coexistence of species with similar resource needs is made possible by small-scale disturbance and predation, which likely reduce local population sizes and interspecific competition. Regional processes such as dispersal, large-scale disturbance, and aggregation, which govern ecosystem level diversity, may also affect local species interactions and soil-core scale diversity. Second, what is the significance of having so many species, with so few trophic functions, for ecosystem processes? Focusing on bacterivore diversity, it is clear that species contributions to decomposition, likely to differ as a function of individual biologies, are concealed by the trophic group approach. However, considerable functional redundancy probably exists, which may explain why decomposition processes are maintained in highly disturbed soils despite the extinction of many species. Thus, soil nematode diversity is important for the long-term stability of soil functioning, and merits protection and further study. PMID:19274206

  18. Coexistence of osteopoikilosis with seronegative spondyloarthritis and spinal stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Demir, Saliha Eroglu; Özaras, Nihal; Poyraz, Emine; Toprak, Hüseyin; Güler, Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] Osteopoikilosis is a rare hereditary bone disease that is usually asymptomatic. It is generally diagnosed incidentally on plain radiography. The coexistence of osteopoikilosis with seronegative spondyloarthritis or spinal stenosis is rarely reported. Here, we report the case of a 27-year-old male patient with osteopoikilosis, seronegative spondyloarthritis, and spinal stenosis. [Subject] A 27-year-old male patient with buttock pain and back pain radiating to the legs. [Methods] A plain anteroposterior radiograph of the pelvis revealed numerous round and oval sclerotic bone areas of varying size. Investigation of the knee joints showed similar findings, and the patient was diagnosed with osteopoikilosis. Lumbar magnetic resonance images showed spinal stenosis and degenerative changes in his lumbar facet joints. Magnetic resonance images of the sacroiliac joints showed bilateral involvement with narrowing of both sacroiliac joints, nodular multiple sclerotic foci, and contrast enhancement in both joint spaces and periarticular areas. HLA B-27 test was negative. [Results] The patient was diagnosed with osteopoikilosis, seronegative spondyloarthritis, and spinal stenosis. Treatment included asemetasin twice daily and exercise therapy. [Conclusion] Symptomatic patients with osteopoikilosis should be investigated for other possible coexisting medical conditions; this will shorten the times to diagnosis and treatment. PMID:26157277

  19. Plant functional traits and the multidimensional nature of species coexistence

    PubMed Central

    Kraft, Nathan J. B.; Godoy, Oscar; Levine, Jonathan M.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the processes maintaining species diversity is a central problem in ecology, with implications for the conservation and management of ecosystems. Although biologists often assume that trait differences between competitors promote diversity, empirical evidence connecting functional traits to the niche differences that stabilize species coexistence is rare. Obtaining such evidence is critical because traits also underlie the average fitness differences driving competitive exclusion, and this complicates efforts to infer community dynamics from phenotypic patterns. We coupled field-parameterized mathematical models of competition between 102 pairs of annual plants with detailed sampling of leaf, seed, root, and whole-plant functional traits to relate phenotypic differences to stabilizing niche and average fitness differences. Single functional traits were often well correlated with average fitness differences between species, indicating that competitive dominance was associated with late phenology, deep rooting, and several other traits. In contrast, single functional traits were poorly correlated with the stabilizing niche differences that promote coexistence. Niche differences could only be described by combinations of traits, corresponding to differentiation between species in multiple ecological dimensions. In addition, several traits were associated with both fitness differences and stabilizing niche differences. These complex relationships between phenotypic differences and the dynamics of competing species argue against the simple use of single functional traits to infer community assembly processes but lay the groundwork for a theoretically justified trait-based community ecology. PMID:25561561

  20. Temperature and kairomone induced life history plasticity in coexisting Daphnia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bernot, R.J.; Dodds, W.K.; Quist, M.C.; Guy, C.S.

    2006-01-01

    We investigated the life history alterations of coexisting Daphnia species responding to environmental temperature and predator cues. In a laboratory experiment, we measured Daphnia life history plasticity under different predation risk and temperature treatments that simulate changing environmental conditions. Daphnia pulicaria abundance and size at first reproduction (SFR) declined, while ephippia (resting egg) formation increased at high temperatures. Daphnia mendotae abundance and clutch size increased with predation risk at high temperatures, but produced few ephippia. Thus, each species exhibited phenotypic plasticity, but responded in sharply different ways to the same environmental cues. In Glen Elder reservoir, Kansas USA, D. pulicaria dominance shifted to D. mendotae dominance as temperature and predation risk increased from March to June in both 1999 and 2000. Field estimates of life history shifts mirrored the laboratory experiment results, suggesting that similar phenotypic responses to seasonal cues contribute to seasonal Daphnia population trends. These results illustrate species-specific differences in life history plasticity among coexisting zooplankton taxa. ?? Springer-Verlag 2006.

  1. Explosive synchronization coexists with classical synchronization in the Kuramoto model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danziger, Michael M.; Moskalenko, Olga I.; Kurkin, Semen A.; Zhang, Xiyun; Havlin, Shlomo; Boccaletti, Stefano

    2016-06-01

    Explosive synchronization has recently been reported in a system of adaptively coupled Kuramoto oscillators, without any conditions on the frequency or degree of the nodes. Here, we find that, in fact, the explosive phase coexists with the standard phase of the Kuramoto oscillators. We determine this by extending the mean-field theory of adaptively coupled oscillators with full coupling to the case with partial coupling of a fraction f. This analysis shows that a metastable region exists for all finite values of f > 0, and therefore explosive synchronization is expected for any perturbation of adaptively coupling added to the standard Kuramoto model. We verify this theory with GPU-accelerated simulations on very large networks (N ˜ 106) and find that, in fact, an explosive transition with hysteresis is observed for all finite couplings. By demonstrating that explosive transitions coexist with standard transitions in the limit of f → 0, we show that this behavior is far more likely to occur naturally than was previously believed.

  2. Gynaecological cancers coexisting with pregnancy – a literature review

    PubMed Central

    Rubach, Maryna

    2016-01-01

    The coexistence of malignant tumour and pregnancy is a state of simultaneous occurrence of two completely contradictory philosophical and biological phenomena – the development of a new life and a life-threatening terminal illness. Finally, a physician – in fact the whole team of doctors – is facing the fight for two lives: of the mother and her unborn child. The incidence of malignant disease in pregnancy is 0.05 to 0.1%. This condition is a major challenge for physicians because there are no randomised studies that could be the basis to choose the therapeutic methods – the medical knowledge merely comes from case reports, registries, and observational studies. The following cancers most often coexist with pregnancy: gynaecological neoplasm (especially cervical and ovarian cancer), breast cancer, lymphatic system neoplasm, and melanoma. Formerly, the diagnosis was clearly the necessity of abortion. Today – although unskilled doctors still propose the only therapeutic option – termination of pregnancy is not the only solution. The past few years have seen the updating of reports and guidelines for the management of pregnant women with cancer. This paper is a review and summary of the information from these publications.

  3. Requirements for plant coexistence through pollination niche partitioning.

    PubMed

    Benadi, Gita

    2015-07-01

    Plant-pollinator interactions are often thought to have been a decisive factor in the diversification of flowering plants, but to be of little or no importance for the maintenance of existing plant diversity. In a recent opinion paper, Pauw (2013 Trends Ecol. Evol. 28, 30-37. (doi:10.1016/j.tree.2012.07.019)) challenged this view by proposing a mechanism of diversity maintenance based on pollination niche partitioning. In this article, I investigate under which conditions the mechanism suggested by Pauw can promote plant coexistence, using a mathematical model of plant and pollinator population dynamics. Numerical simulations show that this mechanism is most effective when the costs of searching for flowers are low, pollinator populations are strongly limited by resources other than pollen and nectar, and plant-pollinator interactions are sufficiently specialized. I review the empirical literature on these three requirements, discuss additional factors that may be important for diversity maintenance through pollination niche partitioning, and provide recommendations on how to detect this coexistence mechanism in natural plant communities.

  4. Coexistence of Gait Disturbances and Chorea in Experimental Huntington's Disease.

    PubMed

    Casaca-Carreira, João; Temel, Yasin; van Zelst, Marloes; Jahanshahi, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disease caused by an expanded CAG repeat. The clinical features are progressive motor dysfunction, cognitive deterioration, and psychiatric disturbances. Unpredictable choreic movements, among the most characteristic hallmarks, may contribute to gait disturbances and loss of balance in HD individuals. In this study, we aimed to investigate and characterize the gait abnormalities and choreic movements in a transgenic rat model of HD (tgHD). TgHD presents typical neuropathological, neurophysiological, and behavioral aspects mimicking some of the key features of human HD and is the only described experimental model for HD that exhibits choreiform movements. We used the Catwalk, with emphasis on static and dynamic gait parameters, to test the hypothesis that at symptomatic age (9 months) the dynamic measures of gait in HD are altered and coexist with choreiform movements. Our results showed that the dynamic parameters seem to be more affected than static parameters at this age in tgHD rats. The number of steps and step cycles and swing speed of the paws were increased in tgHD rat in comparison to wild-type controls. Our study demonstrates that gait abnormalities coexist with chorea rather than being caused by it. These symptoms may originate from distinct networks in the basal ganglia and downstream connections. PMID:26063966

  5. Plant functional traits and the multidimensional nature of species coexistence.

    PubMed

    Kraft, Nathan J B; Godoy, Oscar; Levine, Jonathan M

    2015-01-20

    Understanding the processes maintaining species diversity is a central problem in ecology, with implications for the conservation and management of ecosystems. Although biologists often assume that trait differences between competitors promote diversity, empirical evidence connecting functional traits to the niche differences that stabilize species coexistence is rare. Obtaining such evidence is critical because traits also underlie the average fitness differences driving competitive exclusion, and this complicates efforts to infer community dynamics from phenotypic patterns. We coupled field-parameterized mathematical models of competition between 102 pairs of annual plants with detailed sampling of leaf, seed, root, and whole-plant functional traits to relate phenotypic differences to stabilizing niche and average fitness differences. Single functional traits were often well correlated with average fitness differences between species, indicating that competitive dominance was associated with late phenology, deep rooting, and several other traits. In contrast, single functional traits were poorly correlated with the stabilizing niche differences that promote coexistence. Niche differences could only be described by combinations of traits, corresponding to differentiation between species in multiple ecological dimensions. In addition, several traits were associated with both fitness differences and stabilizing niche differences. These complex relationships between phenotypic differences and the dynamics of competing species argue against the simple use of single functional traits to infer community assembly processes but lay the groundwork for a theoretically justified trait-based community ecology.

  6. Predicting future coexistence in a North American ant community

    PubMed Central

    Bewick, Sharon; Stuble, Katharine L; Lessard, Jean-Phillipe; Dunn, Robert R; Adler, Frederick R; Sanders, Nathan J

    2014-01-01

    Global climate change will remodel ecological communities worldwide. However, as a consequence of biotic interactions, communities may respond to climate change in idiosyncratic ways. This makes predictive models that incorporate biotic interactions necessary. We show how such models can be constructed based on empirical studies in combination with predictions or assumptions regarding the abiotic consequences of climate change. Specifically, we consider a well-studied ant community in North America. First, we use historical data to parameterize a basic model for species coexistence. Using this model, we determine the importance of various factors, including thermal niches, food discovery rates, and food removal rates, to historical species coexistence. We then extend the model to predict how the community will restructure in response to several climate-related changes, such as increased temperature, shifts in species phenology, and altered resource availability. Interestingly, our mechanistic model suggests that increased temperature and shifts in species phenology can have contrasting effects. Nevertheless, for almost all scenarios considered, we find that the most subordinate ant species suffers most as a result of climate change. More generally, our analysis shows that community composition can respond to climate warming in nonintuitive ways. For example, in the context of a community, it is not necessarily the most heat-sensitive species that are most at risk. Our results demonstrate how models that account for niche partitioning and interspecific trade-offs among species can be used to predict the likely idiosyncratic responses of local communities to climate change. PMID:24963378

  7. Coexistence of interacting opinions in a generalized Sznajd model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timpanaro, André M.; Prado, Carmen P. C.

    2011-08-01

    The Sznajd model is a sociophysics model that mimics the propagation of opinions in a closed society, where the interactions favor groups of agreeing people. It is based in the Ising and Potts ferromagnetic models and, although the original model used only linear chains, it has since been adapted to general networks. This model has a very rich transient, which has been used to model several aspects of elections, but its stationary states are always consensus states. In order to model more complex behaviors, we have, in a recent work, introduced the idea of biases and prejudices to the Sznajd model by generalizing the bounded confidence rule, which is common to many continuous opinion models, to what we called confidence rules. In that work we have found that the mean field version of this model (corresponding to a complete network) allows for stationary states where noninteracting opinions survive, but never for the coexistence of interacting opinions. In the present work, we provide networks that allow for the coexistence of interacting opinions for certain confidence rules. Moreover, we show that the model does not become inactive; that is, the opinions keep changing, even in the stationary regime. This is an important result in the context of understanding how a rule that breeds local conformity is still able to sustain global diversity while avoiding a frozen stationary state. We also provide results that give some insights on how this behavior approaches the mean field behavior as the networks are changed.

  8. Gynaecological cancers coexisting with pregnancy - a literature review.

    PubMed

    Skrzypczyk-Ostaszewicz, Anna; Rubach, Maryna

    2016-01-01

    The coexistence of malignant tumour and pregnancy is a state of simultaneous occurrence of two completely contradictory philosophical and biological phenomena - the development of a new life and a life-threatening terminal illness. Finally, a physician - in fact the whole team of doctors - is facing the fight for two lives: of the mother and her unborn child. The incidence of malignant disease in pregnancy is 0.05 to 0.1%. This condition is a major challenge for physicians because there are no randomised studies that could be the basis to choose the therapeutic methods - the medical knowledge merely comes from case reports, registries, and observational studies. The following cancers most often coexist with pregnancy: gynaecological neoplasm (especially cervical and ovarian cancer), breast cancer, lymphatic system neoplasm, and melanoma. Formerly, the diagnosis was clearly the necessity of abortion. Today - although unskilled doctors still propose the only therapeutic option - termination of pregnancy is not the only solution. The past few years have seen the updating of reports and guidelines for the management of pregnant women with cancer. This paper is a review and summary of the information from these publications. PMID:27647981

  9. Requirements for plant coexistence through pollination niche partitioning

    PubMed Central

    Benadi, Gita

    2015-01-01

    Plant–pollinator interactions are often thought to have been a decisive factor in the diversification of flowering plants, but to be of little or no importance for the maintenance of existing plant diversity. In a recent opinion paper, Pauw (2013 Trends Ecol. Evol. 28, 30–37. (doi:10.1016/j.tree.2012.07.019)) challenged this view by proposing a mechanism of diversity maintenance based on pollination niche partitioning. In this article, I investigate under which conditions the mechanism suggested by Pauw can promote plant coexistence, using a mathematical model of plant and pollinator population dynamics. Numerical simulations show that this mechanism is most effective when the costs of searching for flowers are low, pollinator populations are strongly limited by resources other than pollen and nectar, and plant–pollinator interactions are sufficiently specialized. I review the empirical literature on these three requirements, discuss additional factors that may be important for diversity maintenance through pollination niche partitioning, and provide recommendations on how to detect this coexistence mechanism in natural plant communities. PMID:26108627

  10. Role of intraspecific competition in the coexistence of mobile populations in spatially extended ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Yang, Rui; Wang, Wen-Xu; Lai, Ying-Cheng; Grebogi, Celso

    2010-06-01

    Evolutionary-game based models of nonhierarchical, cyclically competing populations have become paradigmatic for addressing the fundamental problem of species coexistence in spatially extended ecosystems. We study the role of intraspecific competition in the coexistence and find that the competition can strongly promote the coexistence for high individual mobility in the sense that stable coexistence can arise in parameter regime where extinction would occur without the competition. The critical value of the competition rate beyond which the coexistence is induced is found to be independent of the mobility. We derive a theoretical model based on nonlinear partial differential equations to predict the critical competition rate and the boundaries between the coexistence and extinction regions in a relevant parameter space. We also investigate pattern formation and well-mixed spatiotemporal population dynamics to gain further insights into our findings.

  11. Thin-thick coexistence behavior of 8CB liquid crystalline films on silicon.

    PubMed

    Garcia, R; Subashi, E; Fukuto, M

    2008-05-16

    The wetting behavior of thin films of 4-n-octyl-4'-cyanobiphenyl (8CB) on Si is investigated via optical and x-ray reflectivity measurement. An experimental phase diagram is obtained showing a broad thick-thin coexistence region spanning the bulk isotropic-to-nematic (T(IN)) and the nematic-to-smectic-A (T(NA)) temperatures. For Si surfaces with coverages between 47 and 72 +/- 3 nm, reentrant wetting behavior is observed twice as we increase the temperature, with separate coexistence behaviors near T(IN) and T(NA). For coverages less than 47 nm, however, the two coexistence behaviors merge into a single coexistence region. The observed thin-thick coexistence near the second-order NA transition is not anticipated by any previous theory or experiment. Nevertheless, the behavior of the thin and thick phases within the coexistence regions is consistent with this being an equilibrium phenomenon.

  12. Fragment oriented molecular shapes.

    PubMed

    Hain, Ethan; Camacho, Carlos J; Koes, David Ryan

    2016-05-01

    Molecular shape is an important concept in drug design and virtual screening. Shape similarity typically uses either alignment methods, which dynamically optimize molecular poses with respect to the query molecular shape, or feature vector methods, which are computationally less demanding but less accurate. The computational cost of alignment can be reduced by pre-aligning shapes, as is done with the Volumetric-Aligned Molecular Shapes (VAMS) method. Here, we introduce and evaluate fragment oriented molecular shapes (FOMS), where shapes are aligned based on molecular fragments. FOMS enables the use of shape constraints, a novel method for precisely specifying molecular shape queries that provides the ability to perform partial shape matching and supports search algorithms that function on an interactive time scale. When evaluated using the challenging Maximum Unbiased Validation dataset, shape constraints were able to extract significantly enriched subsets of compounds for the majority of targets, and FOMS matched or exceeded the performance of both VAMS and an optimizing alignment method of shape similarity search. PMID:27085751

  13. The Shape of Thought

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markson, Lori; Diesendruck, Gil; Bloom, Paul

    2008-01-01

    When children learn the name of a novel object, they tend to extend that name to other objects similar in shape--a phenomenon referred to as the shape bias. Does the shape bias stem from learned associations between names and categories of objects, or does it derive from more general properties of children's understanding of language and the…

  14. The Hue of Shapes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albertazzi, Liliana; Da Pos, Osvaldo; Canal, Luisa; Micciolo, Rocco; Malfatti, Michela; Vescovi, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    This article presents an experimental study on the naturally biased association between shape and color. For each basic geometric shape studied, participants were asked to indicate the color perceived as most closely related to it, choosing from the Natural Color System Hue Circle. Results show that the choices of color for each shape were not…

  15. Assessing the coexistence of Mediterranean oak species having different hygrophilia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Paola, Arianna; Trabucco, Antonio; Paquette, Alain; Valentini, Riccardo; Paparella, Francesco

    2014-05-01

    In a previous work (Di Paola et al., 2011) we defined a mathematical model to explain the observed copresence of trees having different responses to water stress (i.e. drought sensitive but flood resistant (hygrophilous species) and vice versa (non-hygrophilous species)). The model admits different equilibria, the most interesting of which is that of coexistence for which we found out the necessary condition for its stability and biological meaningful. Such model predicts that a stable forest with coexistence of both the species must have an evapotranspiration (ET) that ranges between the ETs that occur in the cases of stable forests with single species. With the present work we want to test the validity of the model on the copresence of typical endemism of deciduous and evergreen oaks species of the Mediterranean. Justifications are: oak trees represent the vegetation climax stage in the Mediterranean climate type. There are many observed and cited cases of such copresence in literature and most of them are explained by the different responses to water stress between deciduous and evergreen leaf habit. Lastly, the Mediterranean climate, characterized by hot dry summers and rainy winters, subject these species to the double stress of summer drought and flood winter (dynamics on which the model focuses on). To do that we mainly use 3 open source dataset: 1) the Modis actual evapotranspiration global maps, from which we derived the mean annual evapotranspiration of the period 2000-2011; 2) The mean actual evapotranspiration global map (period 1950-2000, supposing a land cover of green grass) provided by the CGIAR-CSI; 3) the European tree species distribution provided by the Joint Research Center from which we extracted the distribution of the main endemic oaks species of the Mediterranean area. The results show that i) the choice of leaf habit (Deciduous vs. Evergreen) as a proxy for hygrophilous and non-hygrophilous distinction is reasonable for this case study; ii

  16. Theoretical description of phase coexistence in model C60.

    PubMed

    Costa, D; Pellicane, G; Caccamo, C; Schöll-Paschinger, E; Kahl, G

    2003-08-01

    We have investigated the phase diagram of a pair interaction model of C60 fullerene [L. A. Girifalco, J. Phys. Chem. 96, 858 (1992)], in the framework provided by two integral equation theories of the liquid state, namely, the modified hypernetted chain (MHNC) implemented under a global thermodynamic consistency constraint, and the self-consistent Ornstein-Zernike approximation (SCOZA), and by a perturbation theory (PT) with various degrees of refinement, for the free energy of the solid phase. We present an extended assessment of such theories as set against a recent Monte Carlo study of the same model [D. Costa, G. Pellicane, C. Caccamo, and M. C. Abramo, J. Chem. Phys. 118, 304 (2003)]. We have compared the theoretical predictions with the corresponding simulation results for several thermodynamic properties such as the free energy, the pressure, and the internal energy. Then we have determined the phase diagram of the model, by using either the SCOZA, the MHNC, or the PT predictions for one of the coexisting phases, and the simulation data for the other phase, in order to separately ascertain the accuracy of each theory. It turns out that the overall appearance of the phase portrait is reproduced fairly well by all theories, with remarkable accuracy as for the melting line and the solid-vapor equilibrium. All theories show a more or less pronounced discrepancy with the simulated fluid-solid coexistence pressure, above the triple point. The MHNC and SCOZA results for the liquid-vapor coexistence, as well as for the corresponding critical points, are quite accurate; the SCOZA tends to underestimate the density corresponding to the freezing line. All results are discussed in terms of the basic assumptions underlying each theory. We have then selected the MHNC for the fluid and the first-order PT for the solid phase, as the most accurate tools to investigate the phase behavior of the model in terms of purely theoretical approaches. It emerges that the use of

  17. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Grebe, J.J.

    1959-07-14

    High temperature reactors which are uniquely adapted to serve as the heat source for nuclear pcwered rockets are described. The reactor is comprised essentially of an outer tubular heat resistant casing which provides the main coolant passageway to and away from the reactor core within the casing and in which the working fluid is preferably hydrogen or helium gas which is permitted to vaporize from a liquid storage tank. The reactor core has a generally spherical shape formed entirely of an active material comprised of fissile material and a moderator material which serves as a diluent. The active material is fabricated as a gas permeable porous material and is interlaced in a random manner with very small inter-connecting bores or capillary tubes through which the coolant gas may flow. The entire reactor is divided into successive sections along the direction of the temperature gradient or coolant flow, each section utilizing materials of construction which are most advantageous from a nuclear standpoint and which at the same time can withstand the operating temperature of that particular zone. This design results in a nuclear reactor characterized simultaneously by a minimum critiral size and mass and by the ability to heat a working fluid to an extremely high temperature.

  18. Nuclear Medicine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Parents/Teachers Resource Links for Students Glossary Nuclear Medicine What is nuclear medicine? What are radioactive tracers? ... funded researchers advancing nuclear medicine? What is nuclear medicine? Nuclear medicine is a medical specialty that uses ...

  19. Local Solid Shape

    PubMed Central

    Koenderink, Jan; van Doorn, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Local solid shape applies to the surface curvature of small surface patches—essentially regions of approximately constant curvatures—of volumetric objects that are smooth volumetric regions in Euclidean 3-space. This should be distinguished from local shape in pictorial space. The difference is categorical. Although local solid shape has naturally been explored in haptics, results in vision are not forthcoming. We describe a simple experiment in which observers judge shape quality and magnitude of cinematographic presentations. Without prior training, observers readily use continuous shape index and Casorati curvature scales with reasonable resolution. PMID:27648217

  20. Local Solid Shape

    PubMed Central

    Koenderink, Jan; van Doorn, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Local solid shape applies to the surface curvature of small surface patches—essentially regions of approximately constant curvatures—of volumetric objects that are smooth volumetric regions in Euclidean 3-space. This should be distinguished from local shape in pictorial space. The difference is categorical. Although local solid shape has naturally been explored in haptics, results in vision are not forthcoming. We describe a simple experiment in which observers judge shape quality and magnitude of cinematographic presentations. Without prior training, observers readily use continuous shape index and Casorati curvature scales with reasonable resolution.

  1. Local Solid Shape.

    PubMed

    Koenderink, Jan; van Doorn, Andrea; Wagemans, Johan

    2015-10-01

    Local solid shape applies to the surface curvature of small surface patches-essentially regions of approximately constant curvatures-of volumetric objects that are smooth volumetric regions in Euclidean 3-space. This should be distinguished from local shape in pictorial space. The difference is categorical. Although local solid shape has naturally been explored in haptics, results in vision are not forthcoming. We describe a simple experiment in which observers judge shape quality and magnitude of cinematographic presentations. Without prior training, observers readily use continuous shape index and Casorati curvature scales with reasonable resolution. PMID:27648217

  2. Relatedness among arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi drives plant growth and intraspecific fungal coexistence.

    PubMed

    Roger, Aurélien; Colard, Alexandre; Angelard, Caroline; Sanders, Ian R

    2013-11-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) form symbioses with most plant species. They are ecologically important determinants of plant growth and diversity. Considerable genetic variation occurs in AMF populations. Thus, plants are exposed to AMF of varying relatedness to each other. Very little is known about either the effects of coexisting AMF on plant growth or which factors influence intraspecific AMF coexistence within roots. No studies have addressed whether the genetics of coexisting AMF, and more specifically their relatedness, influences plant growth and AMF coexistence. Relatedness is expected to influence coexistence between individuals, and it has been suggested that decreasing ability of symbionts to coexist can have negative effects on the growth of the host. We tested the effect of a gradient of AMF genetic relatedness on the growth of two plant species. Increasing relatedness between AMFs lead to markedly greater plant growth (27% biomass increase with closely related compared to distantly related AMF). In one plant species, closely related AMF coexisted in fairly equal proportions but decreasing relatedness lead to a very strong disequilibrium between AMF in roots, indicating much stronger competition. Given the strength of the effects with such a shallow relatedness gradient and the fact that in the field plants are exposed to a steeper gradient, we consider that AMF relatedness can have a strong role in plant growth and the ability of AMF to coexist. We conclude that AMF relatedness is a driver of plant growth and that relatedness is also a strong driver of intraspecific coexistence of these ecologically important symbionts. PMID:23823490

  3. Diffuse-interface modeling of liquid-vapor coexistence in equilibrium drops using smoothed particle hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigalotti, Leonardo Di G.; Troconis, Jorge; Sira, Eloy; Peña-Polo, Franklin; Klapp, Jaime

    2014-07-01

    We study numerically liquid-vapor phase separation in two-dimensional, nonisothermal, van der Waals (vdW) liquid drops using the method of smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH). In contrast to previous SPH simulations of drop formation, our approach is fully adaptive and follows the diffuse-interface model for a single-component fluid, where a reversible, capillary (Korteweg) force is added to the equations of motion to model the rapid but smooth transition of physical quantities through the interface separating the bulk phases. Surface tension arises naturally from the cohesive part of the vdW equation of state and the capillary forces. The drop models all start from a square-shaped liquid and spinodal decomposition is investigated for a range of initial densities and temperatures. The simulations predict the formation of stable, subcritical liquid drops with a vapor atmosphere, with the densities and temperatures of coexisting liquid and vapor in the vdW phase diagram closely matching the binodal curve. We find that the values of surface tension, as determined from the Young-Laplace equation, are in good agreement with the results of independent numerical simulations and experimental data. The models also predict the increase of the vapor pressure with temperature and the fitting to the numerical data reproduces very well the Clausius-Clapeyron relation, thus allowing for the calculation of the vaporization pressure for this vdW fluid.

  4. Diffuse-interface modeling of liquid-vapor coexistence in equilibrium drops using smoothed particle hydrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Sigalotti, Leonardo Di G; Troconis, Jorge; Sira, Eloy; Peña-Polo, Franklin; Klapp, Jaime

    2014-07-01

    We study numerically liquid-vapor phase separation in two-dimensional, nonisothermal, van der Waals (vdW) liquid drops using the method of smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH). In contrast to previous SPH simulations of drop formation, our approach is fully adaptive and follows the diffuse-interface model for a single-component fluid, where a reversible, capillary (Korteweg) force is added to the equations of motion to model the rapid but smooth transition of physical quantities through the interface separating the bulk phases. Surface tension arises naturally from the cohesive part of the vdW equation of state and the capillary forces. The drop models all start from a square-shaped liquid and spinodal decomposition is investigated for a range of initial densities and temperatures. The simulations predict the formation of stable, subcritical liquid drops with a vapor atmosphere, with the densities and temperatures of coexisting liquid and vapor in the vdW phase diagram closely matching the binodal curve. We find that the values of surface tension, as determined from the Young-Laplace equation, are in good agreement with the results of independent numerical simulations and experimental data. The models also predict the increase of the vapor pressure with temperature and the fitting to the numerical data reproduces very well the Clausius-Clapeyron relation, thus allowing for the calculation of the vaporization pressure for this vdW fluid. PMID:25122383

  5. Diffuse-interface modeling of liquid-vapor coexistence in equilibrium drops using smoothed particle hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klapp, Jaime; di G Sigalotti, Leonardo; Troconis, Jorge; Sira, Eloy; Pena, Franklin; ININ-IVIC Team; Cinvestav-UAM-A Team

    2014-11-01

    We study numerically liquid-vapor phase separation in two-dimensional, nonisothermal, van der Waals (vdW) liquid drops using the method of Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH). In contrast to previous SPH simulations of drop formation, our approach is fully adaptive and follows the diffuse interface model for a single-component fluid, where a reversible, capillary (Korteweg) force is added to the equations of motion to model the rapid but smooth transition of physical quantities through the interface separating the bulk phases. Surface tension arises naturally from the cohesive part of the vdW equation of state and the capillary forces. The drop models all start from a square-shaped liquid and spinodal decomposition is investigated for a range of initial densities and temperatures. The simulations predict the formation of stable, subcritical liquid drops with a vapor atmosphere, with the densities and temperatures of coexisting liquid and vapor in the vdW phase diagram closely matching the binodal curve. We find that the values of surface tension, as determined from the Young-Laplace equation, are in good agreement with the results of independent numerical simulations and experimental data. The models also predict the increase of the vapor pressure with temperature and the fitting to the numerical data reproduces very well the Clausius-Clapeyron relation, thus allowing for the calculation of the vaporization pressure for this vdW fluid. Cinvestav-Abacus.

  6. Diffuse-interface modeling of liquid-vapor coexistence in equilibrium drops using smoothed particle hydrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Sigalotti, Leonardo Di G; Troconis, Jorge; Sira, Eloy; Peña-Polo, Franklin; Klapp, Jaime

    2014-07-01

    We study numerically liquid-vapor phase separation in two-dimensional, nonisothermal, van der Waals (vdW) liquid drops using the method of smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH). In contrast to previous SPH simulations of drop formation, our approach is fully adaptive and follows the diffuse-interface model for a single-component fluid, where a reversible, capillary (Korteweg) force is added to the equations of motion to model the rapid but smooth transition of physical quantities through the interface separating the bulk phases. Surface tension arises naturally from the cohesive part of the vdW equation of state and the capillary forces. The drop models all start from a square-shaped liquid and spinodal decomposition is investigated for a range of initial densities and temperatures. The simulations predict the formation of stable, subcritical liquid drops with a vapor atmosphere, with the densities and temperatures of coexisting liquid and vapor in the vdW phase diagram closely matching the binodal curve. We find that the values of surface tension, as determined from the Young-Laplace equation, are in good agreement with the results of independent numerical simulations and experimental data. The models also predict the increase of the vapor pressure with temperature and the fitting to the numerical data reproduces very well the Clausius-Clapeyron relation, thus allowing for the calculation of the vaporization pressure for this vdW fluid.

  7. General shape optimization capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chargin, Mladen K.; Raasch, Ingo; Bruns, Rudolf; Deuermeyer, Dawson

    1991-01-01

    A method is described for calculating shape sensitivities, within MSC/NASTRAN, in a simple manner without resort to external programs. The method uses natural design variables to define the shape changes in a given structure. Once the shape sensitivities are obtained, the shape optimization process is carried out in a manner similar to property optimization processes. The capability of this method is illustrated by two examples: the shape optimization of a cantilever beam with holes, loaded by a point load at the free end (with the shape of the holes and the thickness of the beam selected as the design variables), and the shape optimization of a connecting rod subjected to several different loading and boundary conditions.

  8. Entanglement swapping between photons that have never coexisted.

    PubMed

    Megidish, E; Halevy, A; Shacham, T; Dvir, T; Dovrat, L; Eisenberg, H S

    2013-05-24

    The role of the timing and order of quantum measurements is not just a fundamental question of quantum mechanics, but also a puzzling one. Any part of a quantum system that has finished evolving can be measured immediately or saved for later, without affecting the final results, regardless of the continued evolution of the rest of the system. In addition, the nonlocality of quantum mechanics, as manifested by entanglement, does not apply only to particles with spacelike separation, but also to particles with timelike separation. In order to demonstrate these principles, we generated and fully characterized an entangled pair of photons that have never coexisted. Using entanglement swapping between two temporally separated photon pairs, we entangle one photon from the first pair with another photon from the second pair. The first photon was detected even before the other was created. The observed two-photon state demonstrates that entanglement can be shared between timelike separated quantum systems.

  9. Coexisting coherent and incoherent domains near saddle-node bifurcation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandrasekar, V. K.; Suresh, R.; Senthilkumar, D. V.; Lakshmanan, M.

    2015-09-01

    A common external forcing can cause a saddle-node bifurcation in an ensemble of identical Duffing oscillators by breaking the symmetry of the individual bistable (double-well) unit. The strength of the forcing determines the separation between the saddle and the node, which in turn dictates different dynamical transitions depending on the distribution of the initial states of the oscillators. In particular, chimera-like states appear in the vicinity of the saddle-node bifurcation for which theoretical explanation is provided from the stability of the steady state of the slow-scale dynamics of the original system of equations. Further, we have also established similar states by replacing the external forcing with an appropriate coupling between the oscillators in the same parameter space. Additionally, we have also designed an appropriate coupling that can lead to saddle-node bifurcation due to symmetry breaking of the bistable systems in the vicinity of which the synchronized and desynchronized domains coexist.

  10. Coexistence of amorphous and crystalline calcium carbonate in skeletal tissues.

    PubMed

    Aizenberg, J; Weiner, S; Addadi, L

    2003-01-01

    We describe a new type of composite skeletal tissues in which calcite and stabilized amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) coexist in well-defined domains. The organisms that form such structures are widely separated in the animal kingdom phylogenetic tree: calcareous sponges and ascidians. This paper compares the microstructures of their composite skeletal elements: The triradiate spicules from the sponge Clathrina are composed of a core of calcite embedded in a thick layer of ACC and covered by a thin calcitic envelope; the tunic spicules from the ascidian Pyura pachydermatina are composed of a core of ACC enveloped by an insoluble organic sheath and covered by a thick calcitic layer. We compare and contrast the macromolecules associated with different amorphous and crystalline phases and their ability to induce the formation of stabilized ACC in vitro.

  11. Coexistence of metallic and insulating-like states in graphene.

    PubMed

    Wu, Fang; Huang, Jing; Li, Qunxiang; Deng, Kaiming; Kan, Erjun

    2015-03-10

    Since graphene has been taken as the potential host material for next-generation electric devices, coexistence of high carrier mobility and an energy gap has the determining role in its real applications. However, in conventional methods of band-gap engineering, the energy gap and carrier mobility in graphene are seemed to be the two terminals of a seesaw, which limit its rapid development in electronic devices. Here we demonstrated the realization of insulating-like state in graphene without breaking Dirac cone. Using first-principles calculations, we found that ferroelectric substrate not only well reserves the Dirac fermions, but also induces pseudo-gap states in graphene. Calculated transport results clearly revealed that electrons cannot move along the ferroelectric direction. Thus, our work established a new concept of opening an energy gap in graphene without reducing the high mobility of carriers, which is a step towards manufacturing graphene-based devices.

  12. Coexistence of Spinal Intramedullary Tuberculoma and Multiple Intracranial Tuberculomas.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong-Yoon; Kim, Sang-Pyo; Kim, In-Soo

    2015-06-01

    Spinal intramedullary tuberculoma remains a very rare entity of central nervous system tuberculosis. This is the same with the coexistence of spinal intramedullary and intracranial tuberculomas that remains extremely rare with less than 20 cases reported at present. Authors describe this uncommon case by analyzing a 65-year-old female patient who had past history of kidney transplantation due to stage 5 chronic kidney disease and pulmonary tuberculosis on medication. The patient experiences progressive paraplegia and numbness on both lower extremities. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated an intramedullary mass at T9-10 level and multiple intracranial enhancing nodules. Microsurgical resection of spinal intramedullary mass was performed and the lesion was histopathologically confirmed as Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Efficient diagnosis and management of this rare disease are reviewed along with previously reported cases.

  13. Coexisting chaotic and periodic dynamics in clock escapements.

    PubMed

    Moon, Francis C; Stiefel, Preston D

    2006-09-15

    This paper addresses the nature of noise in machines. As a concrete example, we examine the dynamics of clock escapements from experimental, historical and analytical points of view. Experiments on two escapement mechanisms from the Reuleaux kinematic collection at Cornell University are used to illustrate chaotic-like noise in clocks. These vibrations coexist with the periodic dynamics of the balance wheel or pendulum. A mathematical model is presented that shows how self-generated chaos in clocks can break the dry friction in the gear train. This model is shown to exhibit a strange attractor in the structural vibration of the clock. The internal feedback between the oscillator and the escapement structure is similar to anti-control of chaos models.

  14. Fair and unfair punishers coexist in the Ultimatum Game

    PubMed Central

    Brañas-Garza, Pablo; Espín, Antonio M.; Exadaktylos, Filippos; Herrmann, Benedikt

    2014-01-01

    In the Ultimatum Game, a proposer suggests how to split a sum of money with a responder. If the responder rejects the proposal, both players get nothing. Rejection of unfair offers is regarded as a form of punishment implemented by fair-minded individuals, who are willing to impose the cooperation norm at a personal cost. However, recent research using other experimental frameworks has observed non-negligible levels of antisocial punishment by competitive, spiteful individuals, which can eventually undermine cooperation. Using two large-scale experiments, this note explores the nature of Ultimatum Game punishers by analyzing their behavior in a Dictator Game. In both studies, the coexistence of two entirely different sub-populations is confirmed: prosocial punishers on the one hand, who behave fairly as dictators, and spiteful (antisocial) punishers on the other, who are totally unfair. The finding has important implications regarding the evolution of cooperation and the behavioral underpinnings of stable social systems. PMID:25113502

  15. Fair and unfair punishers coexist in the Ultimatum Game.

    PubMed

    Brañas-Garza, Pablo; Espín, Antonio M; Exadaktylos, Filippos; Herrmann, Benedikt

    2014-08-12

    In the Ultimatum Game, a proposer suggests how to split a sum of money with a responder. If the responder rejects the proposal, both players get nothing. Rejection of unfair offers is regarded as a form of punishment implemented by fair-minded individuals, who are willing to impose the cooperation norm at a personal cost. However, recent research using other experimental frameworks has observed non-negligible levels of antisocial punishment by competitive, spiteful individuals, which can eventually undermine cooperation. Using two large-scale experiments, this note explores the nature of Ultimatum Game punishers by analyzing their behavior in a Dictator Game. In both studies, the coexistence of two entirely different sub-populations is confirmed: prosocial punishers on the one hand, who behave fairly as dictators, and spiteful (antisocial) punishers on the other, who are totally unfair. The finding has important implications regarding the evolution of cooperation and the behavioral underpinnings of stable social systems.

  16. Coexistence of negative photoconductivity and hysteresis in semiconducting graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuang, Shendong; Chen, Yan; Xia, Yidong; Tang, Nujiang; Xu, Xiaoyong; Hu, Jingguo; Chen, Zhuo

    2016-04-01

    Solution-processed graphene quantum dots (GQDs) possess a moderate bandgap, which make them a promising candidate for optoelectronics devices. However, negative photoconductivity (NPC) and hysteresis that happen in the photoelectric conversion process could be harmful to performance of the GQDs-based devices. So far, their origins and relations have remained elusive. Here, we investigate experimentally the origins of the NPC and hysteresis in GQDs. By comparing the hysteresis and photoconductance of GQDs under different relative humidity conditions, we are able to demonstrate that NPC and hysteresis coexist in GQDs and both are attributed to the carrier trapping effect of surface adsorbed moisture. We also demonstrate that GQDs could exhibit positive photoconductivity with three-order-of-magnitude reduction of hysteresis after a drying process and a subsequent encapsulation. Considering the pervasive moisture adsorption, our results may pave the way for a commercialization of semiconducting graphene-based and diverse solution-based optoelectronic devices.

  17. Coexistent mesenteric and ovarian mature cystic teratomas: a case report.

    PubMed

    Lee, D H

    2016-01-01

    This report describes the first documented case of coexistent mesenteric and gonadal teratomas in an adult female patient. Physical examination of a 51-year-old Korean woman referred for treatment of abdominal distension and pain revealed two masses in both the right upper abdomen and in the right pelvic region. Computed tomography (CT) of the abdomen and pelvis showed the presence of well-defined, complex, fat-dense mass lesions in the upper abdomen and pelvic cavity. A large cystic mass located in the retroperitoneal space extending from the mesenteric border at the level of the transverse colon, and a goose-egg sized right ovarian mass were founded on exploratory laparotomy. The entire abdominal tumor was excised and total hysterectomy with bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy was performed. Examination of the macroscopic and microscopic findings led to diagnosis of mature cystic teratomas of the ovary and the mesentery. The patient's postoperative course was uneventful. PMID:27352571

  18. The electrocardiographic diagnosis of intraventricular blocks coexisting with ventricular preexcitation.

    PubMed

    Chiale, Pablo A; Elizari, Marcelo V

    2012-09-01

    The electrocardiographic diagnosis of intraventricular conduction disturbances may be hindered by the coexistence of ventricular preexcitation. In fact, the premature depolarization of ventricular myocardium through an accessory pathway tends to conceal any electrocardiographic manifestation of a bundle-branch block. However, there are several conditions favoring the diagnosis of bundle-branch block associated with ventricular preexcitation: intermittency of ventricular preexcitation and/or bundle-branch block, fast atrioventricular (AV) nodal impulse propagation, slow conduction over the accessory pathway or between its ventricular insertion site and the remaining myocardium, and presence of atrioventricular junctional ectopic beats exposing the intraventricular conduction disturbance. This article reexamines the available data on preexcitation in patients with intraventricular blocks and presents clinical examples to emphasize the importance of a thorough examination of the electrocardiogram to attain the correct diagnosis of this association.

  19. Phase coexistence and spatial correlations in reconstituting k -mer models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Amit Kumar; Daga, Bijoy; Mohanty, P. K.

    2016-07-01

    In reconstituting k -mer models, extended objects that occupy several sites on a one-dimensional lattice undergo directed or undirected diffusion, and reconstitute—when in contact—by transferring a single monomer unit from one k -mer to the other; the rates depend on the size of participating k -mers. This polydispersed system has two conserved quantities, the number of k -mers and the packing fraction. We provide a matrix product method to write the steady state of this model and to calculate the spatial correlation functions analytically. We show that for a constant reconstitution rate, the spatial correlation exhibits damped oscillations in some density regions separated, from other regions with exponential decay, by a disorder surface. In a specific limit, this constant-rate reconstitution model is equivalent to a single dimer model and exhibits a phase coexistence similar to the one observed earlier in totally asymmetric simple exclusion process on a ring with a defect.

  20. Do Electrons and Ions Coexist in an EBIT?

    SciTech Connect

    Lapierre, A.; Crespo Lopez-Urrutia, J.R.; Braun, J.; Brenner, G.; Bruhns, H.; Fischer, D.; Gonzalez Martinez, A.J.; Mironov, V.; Osborne, C. J.; Sikler, G.; Soria Orts, R.; Tawara, H.; Ullrich, J.; Yamazaki, Y.

    2005-10-19

    Detailed analysis of an extended exponential tail observed in the decay curve of the 2P3/2-2P1/2 magnetic dipole (M1) transition in boron-like Ar13+ provides evidence that electrons and ions might coexist in the same spatial region in the Heidelberg Electron Beam Ion Trap (HD-EBIT). On this basis, new trapping-cooling-recombination schemes for positron-antiproton plasmas are envisioned, integrated in a magnetic bottle configuration that should be able to trap the subsequently formed recombined cold antihydrogen. Moreover, the EBIT configuration, providing excellent spectroscopic access to the trapping region via seven view ports is shown to be well suited for performing precision spectroscopy of antiprotonic ions. Those might be generated either by recombination of antiprotons with neutral gas atoms or through radiative recombination and state-selective dielectronic-recombination-like processes with highly charged ions produced and stored in the EBIT simultaneously in a nested trap configuration.

  1. Coexistence of exponentially many chaotic spin-glass attractors.

    PubMed

    Peleg, Y; Zigzag, M; Kinzel, W; Kanter, I

    2011-12-01

    A chaotic network of size N with delayed interactions which resembles a pseudoinverse associative memory neural network is investigated. For a load α = P/N < 1, where P stands for the number of stored patterns, the chaotic network functions as an associative memory of 2P attractors with macroscopic basin of attractions which decrease with α. At finite α, a chaotic spin-glass phase exists, where the number of distinct chaotic attractors scales exponentially with N. Each attractor is characterized by a coexistence of chaotic behavior and freezing of each one of the N chaotic units or freezing with respect to the P patterns. Results are supported by large scale simulations of networks composed of Bernoulli map units and Mackey-Glass time delay differential equations.

  2. Supercooling and phase coexistence in cosmological phase transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Megevand, Ariel; Sanchez, Alejandro D.

    2008-03-15

    Cosmological phase transitions are predicted by particle physics models, and have a variety of important cosmological consequences, which depend strongly on the dynamics of the transition. In this work we investigate in detail the general features of the development of a first-order phase transition. We find thermodynamical constraints on some quantities that determine the dynamics, namely, the latent heat, the radiation energy density, and the false-vacuum energy density. Using a simple model with a Higgs field, we study numerically the amount and duration of supercooling and the subsequent reheating and phase coexistence. We analyze the dependence of the dynamics on the different parameters of the model, namely, the energy scale, the number of degrees of freedom, and the couplings of the scalar field with bosons and fermions. We also inspect the implications for the cosmological outcomes of the phase transition.

  3. Coexistence of metallic and insulating-like states in graphene.

    PubMed

    Wu, Fang; Huang, Jing; Li, Qunxiang; Deng, Kaiming; Kan, Erjun

    2015-01-01

    Since graphene has been taken as the potential host material for next-generation electric devices, coexistence of high carrier mobility and an energy gap has the determining role in its real applications. However, in conventional methods of band-gap engineering, the energy gap and carrier mobility in graphene are seemed to be the two terminals of a seesaw, which limit its rapid development in electronic devices. Here we demonstrated the realization of insulating-like state in graphene without breaking Dirac cone. Using first-principles calculations, we found that ferroelectric substrate not only well reserves the Dirac fermions, but also induces pseudo-gap states in graphene. Calculated transport results clearly revealed that electrons cannot move along the ferroelectric direction. Thus, our work established a new concept of opening an energy gap in graphene without reducing the high mobility of carriers, which is a step towards manufacturing graphene-based devices. PMID:25754862

  4. Fair and unfair punishers coexist in the Ultimatum Game.

    PubMed

    Brañas-Garza, Pablo; Espín, Antonio M; Exadaktylos, Filippos; Herrmann, Benedikt

    2014-01-01

    In the Ultimatum Game, a proposer suggests how to split a sum of money with a responder. If the responder rejects the proposal, both players get nothing. Rejection of unfair offers is regarded as a form of punishment implemented by fair-minded individuals, who are willing to impose the cooperation norm at a personal cost. However, recent research using other experimental frameworks has observed non-negligible levels of antisocial punishment by competitive, spiteful individuals, which can eventually undermine cooperation. Using two large-scale experiments, this note explores the nature of Ultimatum Game punishers by analyzing their behavior in a Dictator Game. In both studies, the coexistence of two entirely different sub-populations is confirmed: prosocial punishers on the one hand, who behave fairly as dictators, and spiteful (antisocial) punishers on the other, who are totally unfair. The finding has important implications regarding the evolution of cooperation and the behavioral underpinnings of stable social systems. PMID:25113502

  5. [Coexistence of autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 3 with diabetes insipidus].

    PubMed

    Krysiak, Robert; Okopień, Bogusław

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune polyglandular syndromes are conditions characterized by the combination of two or more organ-specific disorders. The underestimation oftheir real frequency probable results from physicians' inadequate knowledge of these clinical entities and sometimes their atypical clinical presentation. Because they comprise a wide spectrum of autoimmune disorders, autoimmune polyglandular syndromes are divided into four types, among which type-3 is the most common one. In this article, we report the case of a young female, initially diagnosed with diabetes mellitus who several years later developed full-blown autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 3 consisting of autoimmune thyroid disorder and latent autoimmune diabetes in adults.The discussed case suggests that in selected patients diabetes insipidus may coexist with autoimmune endocrinopathies and nonendocrine autoimmunopathies, as well as that in some patients idiopathic diabetes insipidus may be secondary to lymphocytic infiltration and destruction of the hypothalamic supraoptic and paraventricular nuclei and/or the supraoptic-hypophyseal tract

  6. Spatial heterogeneity promotes coexistence of rock-paper-scissors metacommunities.

    PubMed

    Schreiber, Sebastian J; Killingback, Timothy P

    2013-06-01

    The rock-paper-scissors game-which is characterized by three strategies R,P,S, satisfying the non-transitive relations S excludes P, P excludes R, and R excludes S-serves as a simple prototype for studying more complex non-transitive systems. For well-mixed systems where interactions result in fitness reductions of the losers exceeding fitness gains of the winners, classical theory predicts that two strategies go extinct. The effects of spatial heterogeneity and dispersal rates on this outcome are analyzed using a general framework for evolutionary games in patchy landscapes. The analysis reveals that coexistence is determined by the rates at which dominant strategies invade a landscape occupied by the subordinate strategy (e.g. rock invades a landscape occupied by scissors) and the rates at which subordinate strategies get excluded in a landscape occupied by the dominant strategy (e.g. scissors gets excluded in a landscape occupied by rock). These invasion and exclusion rates correspond to eigenvalues of the linearized dynamics near single strategy equilibria. Coexistence occurs when the product of the invasion rates exceeds the product of the exclusion rates. Provided there is sufficient spatial variation in payoffs, the analysis identifies a critical dispersal rate d(∗) required for regional persistence. For dispersal rates below d(∗), the product of the invasion rates exceeds the product of the exclusion rates and the rock-paper-scissors metacommunities persist regionally despite being extinction prone locally. For dispersal rates above d(∗), the product of the exclusion rates exceeds the product of the invasion rates and the strategies are extinction prone. These results highlight the delicate interplay between spatial heterogeneity and dispersal in mediating long-term outcomes for evolutionary games. PMID:23474219

  7. Pathogens, density dependence and the coexistence of tropical trees

    PubMed Central

    Freckleton, Robert P; Lewis, Owen T

    2006-01-01

    There is increasing interest in the role played by density-dependent mortality from natural enemies, particularly plant pathogens, in promoting the coexistence and diversity of tropical trees. Here, we review four issues in the analysis of pathogen-induced density dependence that have been overlooked or inadequately addressed. First, the methodology for detecting density dependence must be robust to potential biases. Observational studies, in particular, require a careful analysis to avoid biases generated by measurement error, and existing studies could be criticized on these grounds. Experimental studies manipulating plant density and pathogen incidence will often be preferable, or should be run in parallel. Second, the form of density dependence is not well understood and, in particular, there are no data indicating whether pathogens cause compensating or overcompensating density responses. Owing to this, we argue that the potential for pathogen-induced density dependence to generate diversity-enhancing outcomes, such as the Janzen–Connell effect, remains uncertain, as coexistence is far more probable if density dependence is overcompensating. Third, there have been few studies examining the relative importance of intra- or interspecific density dependence resulting from pathogens (or, more widely, natural enemies). This is essentially equivalent to asking to what extent pathogens are host-specific. If pathogens are generalists, then mortality rates will respond to overall plant density, irrespective of plant species identity. This will weaken the intraspecific density dependence and reduce the diversity-promoting effects of pathogens. Finally, we highlight the need for studies that integrate observations and experiments on pathogens and density dependence into the whole life cycle of trees, because as yet it is not possible to be certain of the degree to which pathogens contribute to observed dynamics. PMID:17015362

  8. Habitat heterogeneity promotes the coexistence of exotic seaweeds.

    PubMed

    Tamburello, L; Benedetti-Cecchi, L; Masini, L; Bulleri, F

    2013-06-01

    Despite the progressive accumulation of exotic species in natural communities, little effort has been devoted to elucidating the mechanisms underpinning the coexistence of invaders in environmentally and biologically heterogeneous systems. The exotic seaweeds, Asparagopsis taxiformis and Caulerpa racemosa, exhibit a segregated distribution on Mediterranean rocky reefs. A. taxiformis dominates assemblages in topographically complex habitats, but is virtually absent on homogenous platforms. In contrast, C. racemosa achieves extensive cover in both types of habitat. We assessed whether differences in their distribution were generated by biotic interactions (between invaders and/or between invaders and natives) or by environmental constraints. Three models were proposed to explain seaweed distribution patterns: (1) invaders inhibit one another; (2) native assemblages, differing between complex and simple habitats, prevent the establishment/spread of one invader, but not that of the other; and (3) environmental conditions regulate the establishment/persistence of the seaweeds in different habitats. We removed the dominant invader and resident assemblages in each type of habitat. Moreover, A. taxiformis thalli were transplanted into the habitat dominated by C. racemosa to establish whether its failure to colonize the simple habitat was due to the lack of propagules or post-recruitment mortality. C. racemosa spread in the complex habitat was not influenced by the removal of resident assemblages, but it was slightly enhanced by A. taxiformis removal. Neither C. racemosa removal nor that of resident assemblages promoted A. taxiformis colonization and survival in simple habitats. Our results suggest that heterogeneity in environmental conditions can promote invader coexistence by mitigating the effects of negative biotic interactions. Therefore, the accumulation of introduced species in native communities does not necessarily imply established invaders fostering further

  9. Interactions between coexisting intracellular genomes: mitochondrial density and Wolbachia infection.

    PubMed

    Mouton, L; Henri, H; Fleury, F

    2009-04-01

    Many arthropods are infected with maternally transmitted microorganisms, leading to the coexistence of several intracellular genomes within the host cells, including their own mitochondria. As these genomes are cotransmitted, their patterns of evolution have been intimately linked, with possible consequences for the diversity and evolution of the host mitochondrial DNA. The evolutionary aspects of the situation have been thoroughly investigated, especially the selective sweep on the mitochondria as a result of Wolbachia invasion, whereas direct interactions between mitochondria and intracellular symbionts within the host cells or body have received little attention. Since endosymbionts exploit host resources but mitochondria supply energy to meet the bioenergetic demands of organisms, an unanswered question concerns the correlation between their densities. Here, we investigated the influence of Wolbachia symbiosis on mitochondrial density in two parasitic wasps of Drosophila species, both of which are naturally infected by three Wolbachia strains, but they differ in their degree of dependency on these bacteria. In Leptopilina heterotoma, all Wolbachia strains are facultative, whereas Asobara tabida requires a strain of Wolbachia for oogenesis to occur. In both species, Wolbachia infections are stable and well regulated, since the density of each strain does not depend on the presence or absence of other strains. Using lines that harbor various Wolbachia infection statuses, we found that mitochondrial density was not affected by the infection regardless of the sex and age of the host, which is strongly reminiscent of the independent regulation of specific Wolbachia strains and suggest that the protagonists coexist independently of each other as the result of a long-term coevolutionary interaction. PMID:19181828

  10. Hutchinson revisited: patterns of density regulation and the coexistence of strong competitors.

    PubMed

    Münkemüller, Tamara; Bugmann, Harald; Johst, Karin

    2009-07-01

    Ecologists have long been searching for mechanisms of species coexistence, particularly since G.E. Hutchinson raised the 'paradox of the plankton'. A promising approach to solve this paradox and to explain the coexistence of many species with strong niche overlap is to consider over-compensatory density regulation with its ability to generate endogenous population fluctuations. Previous work has analysed the role of over-compensation in coexistence based on analytical approaches. Using a spatially explicit time-discrete simulation model, we systematically explore the dynamics and conditions for coexistence of two species. We go beyond the analytically accessible range of models by studying the whole range of density regulation from under- to very strong over-compensation and consider the impact of spatial structure and temporal disturbances. In particular, we investigate how coexistence can emerge in different types of population growth models. We show that two strong competitors are able to coexist if at least one species exhibits over-compensation. Analysing the time series of population dynamics reveals how the differential responses to density fluctuations of the two competitors lead to coexistence: The over-compensator generates density fluctuations but is the inferior competitor at strong amplitudes of those fluctuations; the competitor, therefore, becomes frequent and dampens the over-compensator's amplitudes, but it becomes inferior under dampened fluctuations. These species interactions cause a dynamic alternation of community states with long-term persistence of both species. We show that a variety of population growth models is able to reproduce this coexistence although the particular parameter ranges differ among the models. Spatial structure influences the probability of coexistence but coexistence is maintained for a broad range of dispersal parameters. The flexibility and robustness of coexistence through over-compensation emphasize the importance

  11. Compressibility, the measurement of surface tension, and particle size in molecular or nuclear matter.

    PubMed

    Dixmier, Marc

    2006-02-15

    It is shown that the interface shrinkage resulting from the capillary pressure difference between both sides of a curved interface is the product of a "standard shrinkage"kappagamma (kappa is the isothermal compressibility, gamma the interfacial tension) by a dimensionless factor that depends only on the shape of the sample of matter under study. The behaviour of the standard shrinkage in the critical domain shows that it cannot be a measure of the thickness of the liquid-vapour interface in that domain. The standard shrinkage of classical liquids somewhat above triple point is usually near to 0.048 v(c)(1/3) (v(c) is the critical molecular volume); exceptions to this rule are discussed. The variation of the standard shrinkage along the liquid-vapour coexistence curves of water and argon is presented; the effect of the interface shrinkage on the measured surface tension of liquids can become important within about 15% of the critical temperature. The standard shrinkage of solids is less than that of the corresponding liquids, and is of no consequence when measuring the surface tension of solids. The standard shrinkage of the nuclear fluid is 0.23 fm=0.09 v(c)(1/3). The saturation density of infinite nuclear matter is about 9% less than its value in atomic nuclei, and a term proportional to A(1/3) (A is the mass number) must be added to the nuclear binding energy formula. PMID:16266717

  12. Pessimal shapes for packing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kallus, Yoav

    2014-03-01

    The question of which convex shapes leave the most empty space in their densest packing is the subject of Reinhardt's conjecture in two dimensions and Ulam's conjecture in three dimensions. Such conjectures about pessimal packing shapes have proven notoriously difficult to make progress on. I show that the regular heptagon is a local pessimum among all convex shapes, and that the 3D ball is a local pessimum among origin-symmetric shapes. Any shape sufficiently close in the space of shapes to these local pessima can be packed at a greater efficiency than they. In two dimensions and in dimensions above three, the ball is not a local pessimum, so the situation in 3D is unusual and intriguing. I will discuss what conditions conspire to make the 3D ball a local pessimum and whether we can prove that it is also a global pessimum.

  13. The shape of Tethys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, P. C.; Dermott, S. F.

    1991-01-01

    After considering the most important relationships between density, rotation rate, shape, and internal structure on the basis of equilibrium figures, the shape of the Saturn satellite Tethys is established from limb-coordinate data. Attention is given to the shape's significance for Tethys' internal structure. It is alternatively concluded that Tethys is either differentiated, and possesses a small rocky core, or has been interpreted as possessing a mass that is too low by about 15 percent.

  14. Moral Education and Improvement of Coexistence in Secondary Education (12-16 Years) in Spain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodriguez-Conde, M. J.; Olmos Miguelanez, S.; Perochena Gonzalez, P.; Herrera Garcia, E.

    2011-01-01

    Coexistence and moral education are areas of great interest in Spanish compulsory education, especially in the period that comprises between 12 and 16 years of age, named "compulsory secondary education" in Spain. With the aim to improve the processes of coexistence within this level, this research team on education from the University of…

  15. An NMR study of the coexistence of nematic and "induced" smectic phases in mixtures of nematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diehl, P.; Wasser, H. R.; Gowda, G. A. Nagana; Suryaprakash, N.; Khetrapal, C. L.

    1989-07-01

    Deuteron NMR studies of mixtures of nematic liquid crystals such as N-( p-ethoxybenzylidene)- p-n-butylaniline and trans-4-pentyl-4-(4-cyanophenyl)cyclohexane and the molecules dissolved therein show the coexistence of up to three different spectra at certain concentrations and temperatures. This is attributed to the coexistence of nematic and "induced" smectic phases.

  16. Coexistence between conventional, organic and GM crops production: the Portuguese system.

    PubMed

    Chiarabolli, Alessandro

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to analyze the way of Portugal is addressing the issue of the coexistence between conventional, organic and Genetically Modified (GM) crops production. In the EU, no form of agriculture, be it conventional, organic or transgenic, should be excluded. Farmers are free to choose the production type they prefer, without being forced to change patterns already established in the area and without spending more resources. Farmers' choice of growing GM or non-GM crops depends not only on technical aspects related to the productivity gains and agronomic benefits to be gained from adopting this technology, but also on consumers' preferences. Today only few Member States have adopted specific legislation on coexistence. Portugal was one of the first European Country that, in 2005, adopted a coexistence law and it has implemented one of the most complete systems of coexistence regulation. Today Portugal has a well-balanced regime based on free choice for consumers and growers. It has a coexistence system complete regulation and farmers who wish to cultivate GM maize must fulfill with national coexistence legislation that includes the following compulsory rules: participate in specific coexistence training courses, register the cultivation area, inform by written notification about their intent to cultivate GM, apply measures of coexistence, among others.

  17. Coexistence of Communication Disorders in SchoolChildren. ASHA Monographs No. 27.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    St. Louis, Kenneth O.; And Others

    This monograph describes the National Speech and Hearing Survey (NSHS) database and examines the prevalence of articulation deviations, voice deviations, stuttering, dialects, hearing impairments, and multiple deviations. Literature on the coexistence of communication disorders is then reviewed, focusing on coexistence in articulation and language…

  18. Gause's Principle and the Effect of Resource Partitioning on the Dynamical Coexistence of Replicating Templates

    PubMed Central

    Szilágyi, András; Zachar, István; Szathmáry, Eörs

    2013-01-01

    Models of competitive template replication, although basic for replicator dynamics and primordial evolution, have not yet taken different sequences explicitly into account, neither have they analyzed the effect of resource partitioning (feeding on different resources) on coexistence. Here we show by analytical and numerical calculations that Gause's principle of competitive exclusion holds for template replicators if resources (nucleotides) affect growth linearly and coexistence is at fixed point attractors. Cases of complementary or homologous pairing between building blocks with parallel or antiparallel strands show no deviation from the rule that the nucleotide compositions of stably coexisting species must be different and there cannot be more coexisting replicator species than nucleotide types. Besides this overlooked mechanism of template coexistence we show also that interesting sequence effects prevail as parts of sequences that are copied earlier affect coexistence more strongly due to the higher concentration of the corresponding replication intermediates. Template and copy always count as one species due their constraint of strict stoichiometric coupling. Stability of fixed-point coexistence tends to decrease with the length of sequences, although this effect is unlikely to be detrimental for sequences below 100 nucleotides. In sum, resource partitioning (niche differentiation) is the default form of competitive coexistence for replicating templates feeding on a cocktail of different nucleotides, as it may have been the case in the RNA world. Our analysis of different pairing and strand orientation schemes is relevant for artificial and potentially astrobiological genetics. PMID:23990769

  19. Conditions for coexistence of freshwater mussel species via partitioning of fish host resources

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rashleigh, B.; DeAngelis, D.L.

    2007-01-01

    Riverine freshwater mussel species can be found in highly diverse communities where many similar species coexist. Mussel species potentially compete for food and space as adults, and for fish host resources during the larval (glochidial) stage. Resource partitioning at the larval stage may promote coexistence. A model of resource utilization was developed for two mussel species and analyzed to determine conditions for coexistence. Mussel species were predicted to coexist when they differed in terms of their success in contacting different fish host species; very similar strategies offered limited possibilities for coexistence. Differences in the mussel species' maximum infestation loads on the fish hosts that coincided with differences in their fish host contact success promoted coexistence. Mussel species with a given set of trade-offs in fish host use were predicted to coexist only for a subset of relative fish host abundances, so a shift in relative fish host abundances could result in the loss of a mussel species. An understanding of the conditions for freshwater mussel species coexistence can help explain high mussel diversity in rivers and guide ongoing conservation activities. ?? 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Coexistence of macro-zoobenthic species on the Antarctic shelf: An attempt to link ecological theory and results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutt, Julian

    2006-04-01

    The coexistence of species within a community generally can be explained by niche differentiation, mechanisms that control competitive displacement, and by chance. This review is an attempt to link ecological conceptual models with results from field research. A verification of different theoretically developed mechanisms shows that niche differentiation plays a major role in the Antarctic. This is particularly true if a broad niche definition is applied that includes alternating phases of competitive strength and weakness that allow populations to persist in a community. Such specific adaptation to the environment also seems to be an important mechanism among animals, which, to date, have been assumed to have broadly overlapping ecological demands. Nevertheless, disturbances due to glaciation history, ice impact, and predation, as well as a high dispersal capacity and low resource limitation contribute to the coexistence or, locally, to the reduction of potential competitors. Chance, reflecting extremely complex or otherwise indecipherable processes, also shapes diversity, e.g., during recolonization after habitat devastation due to iceberg scouring. The slow rates of ecological processes in the Antarctic benthos are shown not necessarily to reduce, but perhaps, to increase the potential for evolutionary radiation in some systematic groups. The fundamental question of how ecosystems continue to develop in the presence or absence of anthropogenic impacts can only be answered if such system-specific ecological and evolutionary mechanisms can be better identified and verified. Studies of the Antarctic benthos can contribute to a corresponding global approach if more comparable information on the life histories of representative species becomes available and if ecological models are developed to decipher complex processes, that shape biodiversity patterns.

  1. The Shape of Eros

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Looking at a few pictures of Eros under the right lighting conditions gives a reasonable idea of the shape of the asteroid, but analysis of NEAR Shoemaker data requires a very accurate digital model of Eros' shape. This 'shape model' helps the NEAR team analyze images and other types of data. For example, comparing the brightness of imaged regions with the orientation of the corresponding parts of the surface, taken from the shape model, allows scientists to determine whether bright areas are due to just surface orientation or also to surface properties. By 'filling

  2. Shape optimization for DSA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouaknin, Gaddiel; Laachi, Nabil; Delaney, Kris; Fredrickson, Glenn; Gibou, Frederic

    2016-03-01

    Directed self-assembly using block copolymers for positioning vertical interconnect access in integrated circuits relies on the proper shape of a confined domain in which polymers will self-assemble into the targeted design. Finding that shape, i.e., solving the inverse problem, is currently mainly based on trial and error approaches. We introduce a level-set based algorithm that makes use of a shape optimization strategy coupled with self-consistent field theory to solve the inverse problem in an automated way. It is shown that optimal shapes are found for different targeted topologies with accurate placement and distances between the different components.

  3. DISJUNCTIVE NORMAL SHAPE MODELS

    PubMed Central

    Ramesh, Nisha; Mesadi, Fitsum; Cetin, Mujdat; Tasdizen, Tolga

    2016-01-01

    A novel implicit parametric shape model is proposed for segmentation and analysis of medical images. Functions representing the shape of an object can be approximated as a union of N polytopes. Each polytope is obtained by the intersection of M half-spaces. The shape function can be approximated as a disjunction of conjunctions, using the disjunctive normal form. The shape model is initialized using seed points defined by the user. We define a cost function based on the Chan-Vese energy functional. The model is differentiable, hence, gradient based optimization algorithms are used to find the model parameters. PMID:27403233

  4. Species coexistence in a lattice-structured habitat: effects of species dispersal and interactions.

    PubMed

    Ying, Zhixia; Liao, Jinbao; Wang, Shichang; Lu, Hui; Liu, Yongjie; Ma, Liang; Li, Zhenqing

    2014-10-21

    Opinions differ on how the spatial distribution of species over space affects species coexistence. Here, we constructed both mean-field and pair approximation (PA) models to explore the effects of interspecific and intraspecific interactions and dispersal modes on species coexistence. We found that spatial structure resulting from species dispersal traits and neighboring interactions in PA model did not promote coexistence if two species had the same traits, though it might intensify the contact frequency of intraspecific competition. If two species adopt different dispersal modes, the spatial structure in PA would make the coexistence or founder control less likely since it alters the species effective birth rate. This suggests that the spatial distribution caused by neighboring interactions and local dispersal does not affect species coexistence unless it adequately alters the effective birth rate for two species. Besides, we modeled how the initial densities and patterns affected population dynamics and revealed how the final spatial pattern was generated.

  5. The coexistence of alternative and scientific conceptions in physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozdemir, Omer F.

    The purpose of this study was to inquire about the simultaneous coexistence of alternative and scientific conceptions in the domain of physics. This study was particularly motivated by several arguments put forward in opposition to the Conceptual Change Model. In the simplest form, these arguments state that people construct different domains of knowledge and different modes of perception in different situations. Therefore, holding different conceptualizations is unavoidable and expecting a replacement in an individual's conceptual structure is not plausible in terms of instructional practices. The following research questions were generated to inquire about this argument: (1) Do individuals keep their alternative conceptions after they have acquired scientific conceptions? (2) Assuming that individuals who acquired scientific conceptions also have alternative conceptions, how are these different conceptions nested in their conceptual structure? (3) What kind of knowledge, skills, and reasoning are necessary to transfer scientific principles instead of alternative ones in the construction of a valid model? Analysis of the data collected from the non-physics group indicated that the nature of alternative conceptions is framed by two types of reasoning: reasoning by mental simulation and semiformal reasoning. Analysis of the data collected from the physics group revealed that mental images or scenes feeding reasoning by mental simulation had not disappeared after the acquisition of scientific conceptions. The analysis of data also provided enough evidence to conclude that alternative principles feeding semiformal reasoning have not necessarily disappeared after the acquisition of scientific conceptions. However, in regard to semiformal reasoning, compartmentalization was not as clear as the case demonstrated in reasoning by mental simulation; instead semiformal and scientific reasoning are intertwined in a way that the components of semiformal reasoning can easily

  6. Nuclear physics: Macroscopic aspects

    SciTech Connect

    Swiatecki, W.J.

    1993-12-01

    A systematic macroscopic, leptodermous approach to nuclear statics and dynamics is described, based formally on the assumptions {h_bar} {yields} 0 and b/R << 1, where b is the surface diffuseness and R the nuclear radius. The resulting static model of shell-corrected nuclear binding energies and deformabilities is accurate to better than 1 part in a thousand and yields a firm determination of the principal properties of the nuclear fluid. As regards dynamics, the above approach suggests that nuclear shape evolutions will often be dominated by dissipation, but quantitative comparisons with experimental data are more difficult than in the case of statics. In its simplest liquid drop version the model exhibits interesting formal connections to the classic astronomical problem of rotating gravitating masses.

  7. Coexistence of minicircular and a highly rearranged mtDNA molecule suggests that recombination shapes mitochondrial genome organization.

    PubMed

    Mao, Meng; Austin, Andrew D; Johnson, Norman F; Dowton, Mark

    2014-03-01

    Recombination has been proposed as a possible mechanism to explain mitochondrial (mt) gene rearrangements, although the issue of whether mtDNA recombination occurs in animals has been controversial. In this study, we sequenced the entire mt genome of the megaspilid wasp Conostigmus sp., which possessed a highly rearranged mt genome. The sequence of the A+T-rich region contained a number of different types of repeats, similar to those reported previously in the nematode Meloidogyne javanica, in which recombination was discovered. In Conostigmus, we detected the end products of recombination: a range of minicircles. However, using isolated (cloned) fragments of the A+T-rich region, we established that some of these minicircles were found to be polymerase chain reaction (PCR) artifacts. It appears that regions with repeats are prone to PCR template switching or PCR jumping. Nevertheless, there is strong evidence that one minicircle is real, as amplification primers that straddle the putative breakpoint junction produce a single strong amplicon from genomic DNA but not from the cloned A+T-rich region. The results provide support for the direct link between recombination and mt gene rearrangement. Furthermore, we developed a model of recombination which is important for our understanding of mtDNA evolution.

  8. Rollercoaster loop shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pendrill, Ann-Marie

    2005-11-01

    Many modern rollercoasters feature loops. Although textbook loops are often circular, real rollercoaster loops are not. In this paper, we look into the mathematical description of various possible loop shapes, as well as their riding properties. We also discuss how a study of loop shapes can be used in physics education.

  9. Crystal Shape Bingo.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rule, Audrey C.

    This document describes a game that provides students with practice in recognizing three dimensional crystal shapes and planar geometric shapes of crystal faces. It contains information on the objective of the game, game preparation, and rules for playing. Play cards are included (four to a page). (ASK)

  10. Quadrupole shape dynamics from the viewpoint of a theory of large-amplitude collective motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuo, M.; Hinohara, N.; Sato, K.; Matsuyanagi, K.; Nakatsukasa, T.; Yoshida, K.

    2014-05-01

    Low-lying quadrupole shape dynamics is a typical manifestation of large-amplitude collective motion in finite nuclei. To describe the dynamics on a microscopic foundation, we have formulated a consistent scheme in which the Bohr collective Hamiltonian for the five-dimensional quadrupole shape variables is derived on the basis of the time-dependent Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov theory. It enables us to incorporate the Thouless-Valatin effect on the shape inertial functions, which has been neglected in previous microscopic Bohr Hamiltonian approaches. Quantitative successes are illustrated for the low-lying spectra in 68Se, 30-34Mg and 58-64Cr, which display shape-coexistence, shape-mixing and shape-transitional behavior.

  11. Defence and Security Research Coexistence, Coherence, and Convergence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breant, Christian; Karock, Ulrich

    Defence and security research have coexisted at the European Union level since the inception of the European Defence Agency (EDA). The agency was established under a Joint Action of the Council of Ministers on 12 July 2004, "to support the Member States and the Council in their effort to improve European defence capabilities in the field of crisis management and to sustain the European Security and Defence Policy as it stands now and develops in the future".1 The political decision to create the EDA was taken at the Thessaloniki European Council on 19 and 20 June 2003. Heads of State or Government tasked the Council bodies to undertake the requisite actions, in the course of 2004, to create an intergovernmental agency in the field of defence capabilities development, research, acquisition and armaments. The EDA has been located in Brussels right from the start. It is an intergovernmental EU agency under the Council's authority within the single institutional framework of the Union. It performs its mission in close cooperation with its participating Member States (pMS) and the European institutional actors.

  12. Hierarchical ferroelectric and ferrotoroidic polarizations coexistent in nano-metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Takahiro; Lich, Le Van; Nagano, Koyo; Wang, Jie; Kitamura, Takayuki

    2015-10-01

    Tailoring materials to obtain unique, or significantly enhanced material properties through rationally designed structures rather than chemical constituents is principle of metamaterial concept, which leads to the realization of remarkable optical and mechanical properties. Inspired by the recent progress in electromagnetic and mechanical metamaterials, here we introduce the concept of ferroelectric nano-metamaterials, and demonstrate through an experiment in silico with hierarchical nanostructures of ferroelectrics using sophisticated real-space phase-field techniques. This new concept enables variety of unusual and complex yet controllable domain patterns to be achieved, where the coexistence between hierarchical ferroelectric and ferrotoroidic polarizations establishes a new benchmark for exploration of complexity in spontaneous polarization ordering. The concept opens a novel route to effectively tailor domain configurations through the control of internal structure, facilitating access to stabilization and control of complex domain patterns that provide high potential for novel functionalities. A key design parameter to achieve such complex patterns is explored based on the parity of junctions that connect constituent nanostructures. We further highlight the variety of additional functionalities that are potentially obtained from ferroelectric nano-metamaterials, and provide promising perspectives for novel multifunctional devices. This study proposes an entirely new discipline of ferroelectric nano-metamaterials, further driving advances in metamaterials research.

  13. Beyond Peaceful Coexistence: The Emergence of Space, Time and Quantum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Licata, Ignazio

    A physical theory consists of a formal structure and one or more interpretations. The latter can come out from cultural and cognitive tension going far beyond any sound operational pact between theoretical constructs and empirical data. We have no reason to doubt about the consistency and efficacy of syntaxes if properly used in the right range. The formal side of Physics has grown in a strongly connected and stratified way through an almost autopoietic, self-dual procedure (let's think of the extraordinary success of the gauge theories), whereas the foundational debate is still blustering about the two pillars of such monumental construction. The general relativity (GR) and the quantum mechanics (QM), which still appear to be greatly incompatible and stopped in a limited peaceful coexistence between local causality in space-time and quantum non-locality [1]. The formidable challenges waiting for us beyond the Standard Model seem to require a new semantic consistency [2] within the two theories, so as to build a new way to look at them, to work and to relate them...

  14. Coexistence of epileptic nocturnal wanderings and an arachnoid cyst.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Genchi, Alejandro; Díaz-Galviz, John L; García-Reyna, Juan Carlos; Avila-Ordoñez, Mario U

    2007-06-15

    Episodic nocturnal wanderings (ENWs) have rarely been associated with gross abnormalities of brain structures. We describe the case of a patient with ENWs in coexistence with an arachnoid cyst (AC). The patient was a 15-year-old boy who presented with nocturnal attacks characterized by complex motor behaviors. An MRI revealed a left temporal cyst and a SPECT Tc99 scan showed left temporal hypoperfusion and bilateral frontal hyperperfusion, more evident on the right side. During an all-night polysomnographic recording with audiovisual monitoring, dystonic posture followed by sleepwalking-like behavior was documented. The sleepwalking-like behavior was preceded by a spike discharge over the left frontocentral region with contralateral projection and secondary generalization during stage 2 sleep. Treatment with levetiracetam produced a striking remission of seizures. This supports a conservative management of an AC, considering that it may be an incidental finding. In epileptic patients, an AC may not necessarily be related to the location of the seizure focus. PMID:17694730

  15. Ultrafast studies of coexisting electronic order in cuprate superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinton, James; Thewalt, Eric; Alpichshev, Zhanybek; Sternbach, Aaron; McLeod, Alex; Ji, L.; Veit, Mike; Dorrow, Chelsey; Koralek, Jake; Xhao, Xudong; Barisic, Neven; Kemper, Alexander; Gedik, Nuh; Greven, Martin; Basov, Dimitri; Orenstein, Joe

    The cuprate family of high temperature superconductors displays a variety of electronic phases which emerge when charge carriers are added to the antiferromagnetic parent compound. These electronic phases are characterized by subtle differences in the low energy electronic excitations. Ultrafast time-resolved reflectivity (TRR) provides an ideal tool for investigating the cuprate phase diagram, as small changes in the electronic structure can produce significant contrast in the non-equilibrium reflectivity. Here we present TRR measurements of cuprate superconductors, focusing on the model single-layer cuprate HgBa2CuO4+δ. We observe a cusp-like feature in the quasiparticle lifetime near the superconducting transition temperature Tc. This feature can be understood using a model of coherently-mixed charge-density wave and superconducting pairing. We propose extending this technique to the nanoscale using ultrafast scattering scanning near-field microscopy (u-SNOM). This will allow us to explore how these electronic phases coexist and compete in real-space.

  16. Hierarchical ferroelectric and ferrotoroidic polarizations coexistent in nano-metamaterials

    PubMed Central

    Shimada, Takahiro; Lich, Le Van; Nagano, Koyo; Wang, Jie; Kitamura, Takayuki

    2015-01-01

    Tailoring materials to obtain unique, or significantly enhanced material properties through rationally designed structures rather than chemical constituents is principle of metamaterial concept, which leads to the realization of remarkable optical and mechanical properties. Inspired by the recent progress in electromagnetic and mechanical metamaterials, here we introduce the concept of ferroelectric nano-metamaterials, and demonstrate through an experiment in silico with hierarchical nanostructures of ferroelectrics using sophisticated real-space phase-field techniques. This new concept enables variety of unusual and complex yet controllable domain patterns to be achieved, where the coexistence between hierarchical ferroelectric and ferrotoroidic polarizations establishes a new benchmark for exploration of complexity in spontaneous polarization ordering. The concept opens a novel route to effectively tailor domain configurations through the control of internal structure, facilitating access to stabilization and control of complex domain patterns that provide high potential for novel functionalities. A key design parameter to achieve such complex patterns is explored based on the parity of junctions that connect constituent nanostructures. We further highlight the variety of additional functionalities that are potentially obtained from ferroelectric nano-metamaterials, and provide promising perspectives for novel multifunctional devices. This study proposes an entirely new discipline of ferroelectric nano-metamaterials, further driving advances in metamaterials research. PMID:26424484

  17. Coexistent trichilemmoma and trichoblastoma without associated nevus sebaceus.

    PubMed

    Stowman, A M; Griffin, M M; Kanner, W A; Tchernev, G; Chokoeva, A A; Wollina, U; Lotti, T; Fioranelli, M; Roccia, M G; Maximov, G K; Patterson, J W

    2016-01-01

    Trichilemmoma and trichoblastoma are benign adnexal neoplasms derived from the hair follicle unit. While trichilemmomas are closely associated with the epidermis, trichoblastomas are found within the dermis and subcutaneous tissue. Both tumors have been reported to arise within nevus sebaceus of Jadassohn (NSJ). We present a 42-year-old white male with a 5 mm crusted, erythematous papule on the right occipital scalp that had been present for years. A shave biopsy was performed and read as trichilemmoma involving the biopsy base. The patient returned for follow-up 2 months later with recurrence of a crusted papule, measuring 9 mm in greatest diameter at the site of the previous biopsy. The lesion was excised for complete histologic evaluation, diagnosed as trichilemmoma with verrucoid features and associated basaloid proliferation with adnexal differentiation, again involving the biopsy base. The lesion recurred 2 months later in the form of an 8 mm multilobulated pink nodule. It was again excised and diagnosed as trichoblastoma with overlying trichilemmoma. The significance of this finding is that coexistent lesions do not necessarily necessitate a preexisting nevus sebaceous. Rather, this finding supports the notion of a common stem cell capable of differentiating toward the various portions of the hair follicle unit and adnexal structures. The idea is that any portion of the skin adnexal structure may develop out of a pluripotential germ cell and develop into a tumor. PMID:27373129

  18. Spatial–Numerical and Ordinal Positional Associations Coexist in Parallel

    PubMed Central

    Huber, Stefan; Klein, Elise; Moeller, Korbinian; Willmes, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    There is evidence for a systematic association of numbers and space. A prominent finding supporting this notion is the spatial-numerical association of response codes (SNARC) effect describing relatively faster responses to smaller numbers using a left-hand key and to larger numbers using a right-hand key. However, the assumption of the SNARC effect reflecting spatial-numerical associations was challenged recently. A working memory account was proposed suggesting that not numbers per se but their position in a memorized sequence is associated with space. Yet, there is also first evidence suggesting that this ordinal position and the SNARC effect may not be mutually exclusive. In the present study, we further examined the relationship between the ordinal position and the SNARC effect. We manipulated the number of items in the memorized ordered sequence and the number range employed. Results revealed both a significant ordinal position effect, but also a significant SNARC effect, substantiating the view that both effects are not mutually exclusive but may co-exist. Furthermore, we found that the SNARC effect was reduced when numbers ranging from 1 to 10 versus numbers ranging from 1 to 9 were employed. Thus, our results question a pure working memory account for the SNARC effect. Additionally, they highlight the critical role of the number range employed in research about the SNARC effect. PMID:27064216

  19. Shell and Shapes in the N = 28 Isotones

    SciTech Connect

    Caceres, L.; Force, C.; Grevy, S.; Sorlin, O.; Gaudefroy, L.; Nowacki, F.

    2010-06-01

    New experimental results on {sup 43}S and {sup 44}S reveal that these nuclei are located in a transitional region of shape coexistence between the spherical {sup 48}Ca and the oblate {sup 42}Si. The origin of the deformation is discussed in terms of the evolution of the single particle energy levels leading to the compression of the energy difference of the orbitals in the sd and pf shells for protons and neutrons, respectively. Therefore, due to quadrupole excitations across the Z = 14 and N = 28 gaps, the intruder configuration in the neutron rich S isotopes became the ground state.

  20. Pulse shaping system

    DOEpatents

    Skeldon, Mark D.; Letzring, Samuel A.

    1999-03-23

    Temporally shaped electrical waveform generation provides electrical waveforms suitable for driving an electro-optic modulator (EOM) which produces temporally shaped optical laser pulses for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) research. The temporally shaped electrical waveform generation is carried out with aperture coupled transmission lines having an input transmission line and an aperture coupled output transmission line, along which input and output pulses propagate in opposite directions. The output electrical waveforms are shaped principally due to the selection of coupling aperture width, in a direction transverse to the lines, which varies along the length of the line. Specific electrical waveforms, which may be high voltage (up to kilovolt range), are produced and applied to the EOM to produce specifically shaped optical laser pulses.

  1. Pulse shaping system

    DOEpatents

    Skeldon, M.D.; Letzring, S.A.

    1999-03-23

    Temporally shaped electrical waveform generation provides electrical waveforms suitable for driving an electro-optic modulator (EOM) which produces temporally shaped optical laser pulses for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) research. The temporally shaped electrical waveform generation is carried out with aperture coupled transmission lines having an input transmission line and an aperture coupled output transmission line, along which input and output pulses propagate in opposite directions. The output electrical waveforms are shaped principally due to the selection of coupling aperture width, in a direction transverse to the lines, which varies along the length of the line. Specific electrical waveforms, which may be high voltage (up to kilovolt range), are produced and applied to the EOM to produce specifically shaped optical laser pulses. 8 figs.

  2. Studies of the shapes of heavy pear-shaped nuclei at ISOLDE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, P. A.

    2016-07-01

    For certain combinations of protons and neutrons there is a theoretical expectation that the shape of nuclei can assume octupole deformation, which would give rise to reflection asymmetry or a "pear-shape" in the intrinsic frame, either dynamically (octupole vibrations) or statically (permanent octupole deformation). I will briefly review the historic evidence for reflection asymmetry in nuclei and describe how recent experiments carried out at REX-ISOLDE have constrained nuclear theory and how they contribute to tests of extensions of the Standard Model. I will also discuss future prospects for measuring nuclear shapes from Coulomb Excitation: experiments are being planned that will exploit beams from HIE-ISOLDE that are cooled in the TSR storage ring and injected into a solenoidal spectrometer similar to the HELIOS device developed at the Argonne National Laboratory.

  3. Wing shape variation associated with mimicry in butterflies.

    PubMed

    Jones, Robert T; Le Poul, Yann; Whibley, Annabel C; Mérot, Claire; ffrench-Constant, Richard H; Joron, Mathieu

    2013-08-01

    Mimetic resemblance in unpalatable butterflies has been studied by evolutionary biologists for over a century, but has largely focused on the convergence in wing color patterns. In Heliconius numata, discrete color-pattern morphs closely resemble comimics in the distantly related genus Melinaea. We examine the possibility that the shape of the butterfly wing also shows adaptive convergence. First, simple measures of forewing dimensions were taken of individuals in a cross between H. numata morphs, and showed quantitative differences between two of the segregating morphs, f. elegans and f. silvana. Second, landmark-based geometric morphometric and elliptical Fourier outline analyses were used to more fully characterize these shape differences. Extension of these techniques to specimens from natural populations suggested that, although many of the coexisting morphs could not be discriminated by shape, the differences we identified between f. elegans and f. silvana hold in the wild. Interestingly, despite extensive overlap, the shape variation between these two morphs is paralleled in their respective Melinaea comimics. Our study therefore suggests that wing-shape variation is associated with mimetic resemblance, and raises the intriguing possibility that the supergene responsible for controlling the major switch in color pattern between morphs also contributes to wing shape differences in H. numata.

  4. The exchangeability of shape

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Landmark based geometric morphometrics (GM) allows the quantitative comparison of organismal shapes. When applied to systematics, it is able to score shape changes which often are undetectable by traditional morphological studies and even by classical morphometric approaches. It has thus become a fast and low cost candidate to identify cryptic species. Due to inherent mathematical properties, shape variables derived from one set of coordinates cannot be compared with shape variables derived from another set. Raw coordinates which produce these shape variables could be used for data exchange, however they contain measurement error. The latter may represent a significant obstacle when the objective is to distinguish very similar species. Results We show here that a single user derived dataset produces much less classification error than a multiple one. The question then becomes how to circumvent the lack of exchangeability of shape variables while preserving a single user dataset. A solution to this question could lead to the creation of a relatively fast and inexpensive systematic tool adapted for the recognition of cryptic species. Conclusions To preserve both exchangeability of shape and a single user derived dataset, our suggestion is to create a free access bank of reference images from which one can produce raw coordinates and use them for comparison with external specimens. Thus, we propose an alternative geometric descriptive system that separates 2-D data gathering and analyzes. PMID:20964872

  5. Active shape models unleashed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirschner, Matthias; Wesarg, Stefan

    2011-03-01

    Active Shape Models (ASMs) are a popular family of segmentation algorithms which combine local appearance models for boundary detection with a statistical shape model (SSM). They are especially popular in medical imaging due to their ability for fast and accurate segmentation of anatomical structures even in large and noisy 3D images. A well-known limitation of ASMs is that the shape constraints are over-restrictive, because the segmentations are bounded by the Principal Component Analysis (PCA) subspace learned from the training data. To overcome this limitation, we propose a new energy minimization approach which combines an external image energy with an internal shape model energy. Our shape energy uses the Distance From Feature Space (DFFS) concept to allow deviations from the PCA subspace in a theoretically sound and computationally fast way. In contrast to previous approaches, our model does not rely on post-processing with constrained free-form deformation or additional complex local energy models. In addition to the energy minimization approach, we propose a new method for liver detection, a new method for initializing an SSM and an improved k-Nearest Neighbour (kNN)-classifier for boundary detection. Our ASM is evaluated with leave-one-out tests on a data set with 34 tomographic CT scans of the liver and is compared to an ASM with standard shape constraints. The quantitative results of our experiments show that we achieve higher segmentation accuracy with our energy minimization approach than with standard shape constraints.nym

  6. Basins of coexistence and extinction in spatially extended ecosystems of cyclically competing species.

    PubMed

    Ni, Xuan; Yang, Rui; Wang, Wen-Xu; Lai, Ying-Cheng; Grebogi, Celso

    2010-12-01

    Microscopic models based on evolutionary games on spatially extended scales have recently been developed to address the fundamental issue of species coexistence. In this pursuit almost all existing works focus on the relevant dynamical behaviors originated from a single but physically reasonable initial condition. To gain comprehensive and global insights into the dynamics of coexistence, here we explore the basins of coexistence and extinction and investigate how they evolve as a basic parameter of the system is varied. Our model is cyclic competitions among three species as described by the classical rock-paper-scissors game, and we consider both discrete lattice and continuous space, incorporating species mobility and intraspecific competitions. Our results reveal that, for all cases considered, a basin of coexistence always emerges and persists in a substantial part of the parameter space, indicating that coexistence is a robust phenomenon. Factors such as intraspecific competition can, in fact, promote coexistence by facilitating the emergence of the coexistence basin. In addition, we find that the extinction basins can exhibit quite complex structures in terms of the convergence time toward the final state for different initial conditions. We have also developed models based on partial differential equations, which yield basin structures that are in good agreement with those from microscopic stochastic simulations. To understand the origin and emergence of the observed complicated basin structures is challenging at the present due to the extremely high dimensional nature of the underlying dynamical system.

  7. Lottery coexistence on rocky shores: weak niche differentiation or equal competitors engaged in neutral dynamics?

    PubMed

    Shinen, Jennifer L; Navarrete, Sergio A

    2014-03-01

    Reconciling how niche and neutral processes may be important in species coexistence has revealed two important weaknesses in our collective understanding of species diversity: few empirical studies have determined whether species are truly coexisting, and fewer still have properly evaluated whether coexistence is achieved through niche differentiation or ecological equivalence. Here, we ask whether two common barnacles, Jehlius cirratus and Notochthamalus scabrosus, coexist locally and whether the slight but persistent differences in their distribution provide sufficient fitness trade-offs to overcome differences in competition. Both species recovered after experimental reduction; that is, they coexist, with no indication of hierarchical exclusion. No fitness inequalities affected species performance or interference effects on vital rates at any shore level, indicating no trade-offs in intra-interspecific effects across the ecological gradient. Additionally, no relationship was found between per capita population growth rates of either species with its own relative abundance; that is, neither species has a demographic advantage when rare. Instead, a lottery for space during settlement largely determines species' distributions, evidenced by the positive correlation across sites and tidal elevations between the relative abundances of adults and the recruits of the prior season. We conclude that Jehlius and Notochthamalus coexist neutrally, or nearly so, but discuss whether small, nonsignificant, and probably ephemeral fitness differences, which are inconsistent across the tidal gradient, could provide enough niche differentiation to promote coexistence.

  8. Basins of coexistence and extinction in spatially extended ecosystems of cyclically competing species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Xuan; Yang, Rui; Wang, Wen-Xu; Lai, Ying-Cheng; Grebogi, Celso

    2010-12-01

    Microscopic models based on evolutionary games on spatially extended scales have recently been developed to address the fundamental issue of species coexistence. In this pursuit almost all existing works focus on the relevant dynamical behaviors originated from a single but physically reasonable initial condition. To gain comprehensive and global insights into the dynamics of coexistence, here we explore the basins of coexistence and extinction and investigate how they evolve as a basic parameter of the system is varied. Our model is cyclic competitions among three species as described by the classical rock-paper-scissors game, and we consider both discrete lattice and continuous space, incorporating species mobility and intraspecific competitions. Our results reveal that, for all cases considered, a basin of coexistence always emerges and persists in a substantial part of the parameter space, indicating that coexistence is a robust phenomenon. Factors such as intraspecific competition can, in fact, promote coexistence by facilitating the emergence of the coexistence basin. In addition, we find that the extinction basins can exhibit quite complex structures in terms of the convergence time toward the final state for different initial conditions. We have also developed models based on partial differential equations, which yield basin structures that are in good agreement with those from microscopic stochastic simulations. To understand the origin and emergence of the observed complicated basin structures is challenging at the present due to the extremely high dimensional nature of the underlying dynamical system.

  9. Selected Highlights in Nuclear Research in the Southeast by Vanderbilt and ORNL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, Joseph

    2011-10-01

    On the one hundredth anniversary of the discovery of the nucleus, selected highlights in nuclear research by Vanderbilt scientists and by Oak Ridge National Laboratory scientists as well as their joint research are described. These will include the earliest work involving the first confirmation of neutron induced fission and classic papers on the fission process. This was followed by the development of the barrier for the gaseous diffusion separation of ^235U from ^238U. In the 1940's the first working nuclear reactor became operational at ORNL, to make ^239Pu followed by the first radioisotopes for nuclear medicine, neutron scattering to probe materials leading to a Nobel Prize and the first observation of the β decay of the free neutron. In 1953 Hill and Wheeler published their classic nuclear theory paper that has over 2000 citations. In the 1960's large E0 transitions were observed in decays of β but not γ vibrational bands to confirm the predictions of Bohr and Mottelson that β vibrations change the nuclear deformation. Then the first failures of the B-M model were observed. In the 1970's the paradigm that each nucleus had one fixed shape was changed when the discovery of the coexistence of overlapping bands built on different deformations were observed. This was made possible, in part, by universities building the first isotope separator on-line to the Oak Ridge cyclotron. This was followed by the discovery of the reinforcement of proton and neutron shell gaps at the same deformation to give superdeformed double magic nuclei. Other highlights will be presented, including the recent discovery of the new element 117 and confirmation of new elements 113 and 115.

  10. Shape memory polymer foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santo, Loredana

    2016-02-01

    Recent advances in shape memory polymer (SMP) foam research are reviewed. The SMPs belong to a new class of smart polymers which can have interesting applications in microelectromechanical systems, actuators and biomedical devices. They can respond to specific external stimulus changing their configuration and then remember the original shape. In the form of foams, the shape memory behaviour can be enhanced because they generally have higher compressibility. Considering also the low weight, and recovery force, the SMP foams are expected to have great potential applications primarily in aerospace. This review highlights the recent progress in characterization, evaluation, and proposed applications of SMP foams mainly for aerospace applications.

  11. Shaped Crystal Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatartchenko, Vitali A.

    Crystals of specified shape and size (shaped crystals) with controlled crystal growth (SCG) defect and impurity structure have to be grown for the successful development of modern engineering. Since the 1950s many hundreds of papers and patents concerned with shaped growth have been published. In this chapter, we do not try to enumerate the successful applications of shaped growth to different materials but rather to carry out a fundamental physical and mathematical analysis of shaping as well as the peculiarities of shaped crystal structures. Four main techniques, based on which the lateral surface can be shaped without contact with the container walls, are analyzed: the Czochralski technique (CZT), the Verneuil technique (VT), the floating zone technique (FZT), and technique of pulling from shaper (TPS). Modifications of these techniques are analyzed as well. In all these techniques the shape of the melt meniscus is controlled by surface tension forces, i.e., capillary forces, and here they are classified as capillary shaping techniques (CST). We look for conditions under which the crystal growth process in each CST is dynamically stable. Only in this case are all perturbations attenuated and a crystal of constant cross section shaping technique (CST) grown without any special regulation. The dynamic stability theory of the crystal growth process for all CST is developed on the basis of Lyapunov's dynamic stability theory. Lyapunov's equations for the crystal growth processes follow from fundamental laws. The results of the theory allow the choice of stable regimes for crystal growth by all CST as well as special designs of shapers in TPS. SCG experiments by CZT, VT, and FZT are discussed but the main consideration is given to TPS. Shapers not only allow crystal of very complicated cross section to be grown but provide a special distribution of impurities. A history of TPS is provided later in the chapter, because it can only be described after explanation of the

  12. Temperature fluctuation facilitates coexistence of competing species in experimental microbial communities.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Lin; Morin, Peter J

    2007-07-01

    1. Temperature fluctuation is a general phenomenon affecting many, if not all, species in nature. While a few studies have shown that temperature fluctuation can promote species coexistence, little is known about the effects of different regimes of temperature fluctuation on coexistence. 2. We experimentally investigated how temperature fluctuation and different regimes of temperature fluctuation ('red' environments in which temperature series exhibited positive temporal autocorrelation vs. 'white' environments in which temperature series showed little autocorrelation) affected the coexistence of two ciliated protists, Colpidium striatum Stein and Paramecium tetraurelia Sonneborn, which competed for bacterial resources. 3. We have previously shown that the two species differed in their growth responses to changes in temperature and in their resource utilization patterns. The two species were not always able to coexist at constant temperatures (22, 24, 26, 28 and 30 degrees C), with Paramecium being competitively excluded at 26 and 28 degrees C. This indicated that resource partitioning was insufficient to maintain coexistence at these temperatures. 4. Here we show that in both red and white environments in which temperature varied between 22 and 32 degrees C, Paramecium coexisted with Colpidium. Consistent with the differential effects of temperature on their intrinsic growth rates, Paramecium population dynamics were largely unaffected by temperature regimes, and Colpidium showed more variable population dynamics in the red environments. 5. Temperature-dependent competitive effects of Colpidium on Paramecium, together with resource partitioning, appeared to be responsible for the coexistence in the white environments; resource partitioning and the storage effect appeared to account for the coexistence in the red environments. 6. These results suggest that temperature fluctuation may play important roles in regulating species coexistence and diversity in ecological

  13. Metastable liquid-liquid coexistence and density anomalies in a core-softened fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, H. M.; Wilding, N. B.

    2006-06-01

    Linearly sloped or “ramp” potentials belong to a class of core-softened models which possess a liquid-liquid critical point (LLCP) in addition to the usual liquid-gas critical point. Furthermore, they exhibit thermodynamic anomalies in their density and compressibility, the nature of which may be akin to those occurring in water. Previous simulation studies of ramp potentials have focused on just one functional form, for which the LLCP is thermodynamically stable. In this work we construct a series of ramp potentials, which interpolate between this previously studied form and a ramp-based approximation to the Lennard-Jones (LJ) potential. By means of Monte Carlo simulation, we locate the LLCP, the first order high density liquid (HDL)-low density liquid (LDL) coexistence line, and the line of density maxima for a selection of potentials in the series. We observe that as the LJ limit is approached, the LLCP becomes metastable with respect to freezing into a hexagonal close packed crystalline solid. The qualitative nature of the phase behavior in this regime shows a remarkable resemblance to that seen in simulation studies of accurate water models. Specifically, the density of the liquid phase exceeds that of the solid; the gradient of the metastable LDL-HDL line is negative in the pressure (p) -temperature (T) plane; while the line of density maxima in the p-T plane has a shape similar to that seen in water and extends into the stable liquid region of the phase diagram. As such, our results lend weight to the “second critical point” hypothesis as an explanation for the anomalous behavior of water.

  14. Metastable liquid-liquid coexistence and density anomalies in a core-softened fluid.

    PubMed

    Gibson, H M; Wilding, N B

    2006-06-01

    Linearly sloped or "ramp" potentials belong to a class of core-softened models which possess a liquid-liquid critical point (LLCP) in addition to the usual liquid-gas critical point. Furthermore, they exhibit thermodynamic anomalies in their density and compressibility, the nature of which may be akin to those occurring in water. Previous simulation studies of ramp potentials have focused on just one functional form, for which the LLCP is thermodynamically stable. In this work we construct a series of ramp potentials, which interpolate between this previously studied form and a ramp-based approximation to the Lennard-Jones (LJ) potential. By means of Monte Carlo simulation, we locate the LLCP, the first order high density liquid (HDL)-low density liquid (LDL) coexistence line, and the line of density maxima for a selection of potentials in the series. We observe that as the LJ limit is approached, the LLCP becomes metastable with respect to freezing into a hexagonal close packed crystalline solid. The qualitative nature of the phase behavior in this regime shows a remarkable resemblance to that seen in simulation studies of accurate water models. Specifically, the density of the liquid phase exceeds that of the solid; the gradient of the metastable LDL-HDL line is negative in the pressure (p)-temperature (T) plane; while the line of density maxima in the p-T plane has a shape similar to that seen in water and extends into the stable liquid region of the phase diagram. As such, our results lend weight to the "second critical point" hypothesis as an explanation for the anomalous behavior of water.

  15. Line tension between coexisting phases in monolayers and bilayers of amphiphilic molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sriram, Indira; Schwartz, Daniel K.

    2012-06-01

    Phase coexistence is frequently observed in molecular monolayers and bilayers. The free energy per unit length of phase boundaries in these quasi-two-dimensional (2D) systems is known as line tension, and is directly analogous to surface tension in three dimensions. The existence of line tension implies the possibility of 2D capillary phenomena, a fundamentally intriguing possibility. Moreover, line tension has important implications with respect to the formation and stability of nm-scale features in thin films, ranging from lithographically-prepared molecular features in devices (e.g. sensor nanoarrays or molecular electronics) to signaling domains in biological membranes (i.e. lipid rafts). It has been proposed that such nm-scale domains may have important ramifications for budding and/or fusion in bilayer membranes. Various methods have been developed to measure line tension, including observations of domain boundary fluctuations, relaxation dynamics, nucleation rates, and others. The competition between line tension and long-range forces (e.g. electrostatic repulsion or curvature elasticity) can lead to a preferred equilibrium domain size, domain shape instabilities, or even unusual domain morphologies (e.g. stripe phases) near critical points. Since liquid crystalline mesophases are ubiquitous in 2D, it is not unusual for the line tension to be anisotropic; this can lead to non-circular domains exhibiting kinks and/or chirality. Recent efforts have been aimed at controlling line tension by the addition of line-active compounds that are analogous to surfactants potentially leading to the observation of new 2D “capillary” phenomena.

  16. Line tension between coexisting phases in monolayers and bilayers of amphiphilic molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sriram, Indira; Schwartz, Daniel K.

    Phase coexistence is frequently observed in molecular monolayers and bilayers. The free energy per unit length of phase boundaries in these quasi-two-dimensional (2D) systems is known as line tension, and is directly analogous to surface tension in three dimensions. The existence of line tension implies the possibility of 2D capillary phenomena, a fundamentally intriguing possibility. Moreover, line tension has important implications with respect to the formation and stability of nm-scale features in thin films, ranging from lithographically-prepared molecular features in devices (e.g. sensor nanoarrays or molecular electronics) to signaling domains in biological membranes (i.e. lipid rafts). It has been proposed that such nm-scale domains may have important ramifications for budding and/or fusion in bilayer membranes. Various methods have been developed to measure line tension, including observations of domain boundary fluctuations, relaxation dynamics, nucleation rates, and others. The competition between line tension and long-range forces (e.g. electrostatic repulsion or curvature elasticity) can lead to a preferred equilibrium domain size, domain shape instabilities, or even unusual domain morphologies (e.g. stripe phases) near critical points. Since liquid crystalline mesophases are ubiquitous in 2D, it is not unusual for the line tension to be anisotropic; this can lead to non-circular domains exhibiting kinks and/or chirality. Recent efforts have been aimed at controlling line tension by the addition of line-active compounds that are analogous to surfactants potentially leading to the observation of new 2D "capillary" phenomena.

  17. Good Fences: The Importance of Setting Boundaries for Peaceful Coexistence

    PubMed Central

    Rutherford, Alex; Harmon, Dion; Werfel, Justin; Gard-Murray, Alexander S.; Bar-Yam, Shlomiya; Gros, Andreas; Xulvi-Brunet, Ramon; Bar-Yam, Yaneer

    2014-01-01

    We consider the conditions of peace and violence among ethnic groups, testing a theory designed to predict the locations of violence and interventions that can promote peace. Characterizing the model's success in predicting peace requires examples where peace prevails despite diversity. Switzerland is recognized as a country of peace, stability and prosperity. This is surprising because of its linguistic and religious diversity that in other parts of the world lead to conflict and violence. Here we analyze how peaceful stability is maintained. Our analysis shows that peace does not depend on integrated coexistence, but rather on well defined topographical and political boundaries separating groups, allowing for partial autonomy within a single country. In Switzerland, mountains and lakes are an important part of the boundaries between sharply defined linguistic areas. Political canton and circle (sub-canton) boundaries often separate religious groups. Where such boundaries do not appear to be sufficient, we find that specific aspects of the population distribution guarantee either sufficient separation or sufficient mixing to inhibit intergroup violence according to the quantitative theory of conflict. In exactly one region, a porous mountain range does not adequately separate linguistic groups and that region has experienced significant violent conflict, leading to the recent creation of the canton of Jura. Our analysis supports the hypothesis that violence between groups can be inhibited by physical and political boundaries. A similar analysis of the area of the former Yugoslavia shows that during widespread ethnic violence existing political boundaries did not coincide with the boundaries of distinct groups, but peace prevailed in specific areas where they did coincide. The success of peace in Switzerland may serve as a model to resolve conflict in other ethnically diverse countries and regions of the world. PMID:24847861

  18. Good fences: the importance of setting boundaries for peaceful coexistence.

    PubMed

    Rutherford, Alex; Harmon, Dion; Werfel, Justin; Gard-Murray, Alexander S; Bar-Yam, Shlomiya; Gros, Andreas; Xulvi-Brunet, Ramon; Bar-Yam, Yaneer

    2014-01-01

    We consider the conditions of peace and violence among ethnic groups, testing a theory designed to predict the locations of violence and interventions that can promote peace. Characterizing the model's success in predicting peace requires examples where peace prevails despite diversity. Switzerland is recognized as a country of peace, stability and prosperity. This is surprising because of its linguistic and religious diversity that in other parts of the world lead to conflict and violence. Here we analyze how peaceful stability is maintained. Our analysis shows that peace does not depend on integrated coexistence, but rather on well defined topographical and political boundaries separating groups, allowing for partial autonomy within a single country. In Switzerland, mountains and lakes are an important part of the boundaries between sharply defined linguistic areas. Political canton and circle (sub-canton) boundaries often separate religious groups. Where such boundaries do not appear to be sufficient, we find that specific aspects of the population distribution guarantee either sufficient separation or sufficient mixing to inhibit intergroup violence according to the quantitative theory of conflict. In exactly one region, a porous mountain range does not adequately separate linguistic groups and that region has experienced significant violent conflict, leading to the recent creation of the canton of Jura. Our analysis supports the hypothesis that violence between groups can be inhibited by physical and political boundaries. A similar analysis of the area of the former Yugoslavia shows that during widespread ethnic violence existing political boundaries did not coincide with the boundaries of distinct groups, but peace prevailed in specific areas where they did coincide. The success of peace in Switzerland may serve as a model to resolve conflict in other ethnically diverse countries and regions of the world. PMID:24847861

  19. Distribution of cooperative unit size of amphiphilic molecules in the phase coexistence region in Langmuir monolayers.

    PubMed

    Hatta, E; Nishimura, T

    2013-02-01

    The dependence of the size of the cooperative unit (C.U.) of amphiphilic molecules on surface pressure (π) in the liquid expanded (LE)-liquid condensed (LC) phase coexistence region of Langmuir monolayers has been formulated and calculated using measured isotherm data. The C.U. size changes largely depending on the surface pressure in the coexistence region: these submicroscopic molecular aggregates are not static objects, but dynamic ones characterized by large fluctuations in size. It has been found that the C.U. size distribution can be a natural consequence of the significant change of monolayer compressibility, which reflects large molecular area density fluctuations, in the coexistence region.

  20. Temperature-driven volume transition in hydrogels: Phase-coexistence and interface localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cirillo, E. N. M.; Nardinocchi, P.; Sciarra, G.

    2016-05-01

    We study volume transition phenomenon in hydrogels within the framework of Flory-Rehner thermodynamic modelling; we show that starting from different models for the Flory parameter different conclusions can be achieved, in terms of admissible coexisting equilibria of the system. In particular, with explicit reference to a one-dimensional problem we establish the ranges of both temperature and traction which allow for the coexistence of a swollen and a shrunk phase. Through consideration of an augmented Flory-Rehner free-energy, which also accounts for the gradient of volume changes, we determine the position of the interface between the coexisting phases, and capture the connection profile between them.

  1. Nuclear rights - nuclear wrongs

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, E.F.; Miller, F.D.; Paul, J.; Ahrens, J.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains 11 selections. The titles are: Three Ways to Kill Innocent Bystanders: Some Conundrums Concerning the Morality of War; The International Defense of Liberty; Two Concepts of Deterrence; Nuclear Deterrence and Arms Control; Ethical Issues for the 1980s; The Moral Status of Nuclear Deterrent Threats; Optimal Deterrence; Morality and Paradoxical Deterrence; Immoral Risks: A Deontological Critique of Nuclear Deterrence; No War Without Dictatorship, No Peace Without Democracy: Foreign Policy as Domestic Politics; Marxism-Leninism and its Strategic Implications for the United States; Tocqueveille War.

  2. Electrostatically shaped membranes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silverberg, Larry M. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    Disclosed is a method and apparatus for electrostatically shaping a membrane suitable for use in antennas or the like, comprising an electrically conductive thin membrane where the periphery of said membrane is free to move in at least one direction, a first charge on the electrically conductive thin membrane to electrostatically stiffen the membrane, a second charge which shapes the electrostatically stiffened thin membrane and a restraint for limiting the movement of at least one point of the thin membrane relative to the second charge. Also disclosed is a method and apparatus for adaptively controlling the shape of the thin membrane by sensing the shape of the membrane and selectively controlling the first and second charge to achieve a desired performance characteristic of the membrane.

  3. Shape of Taylor bubbles in vertical tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Nigmatulin, T.R.; Bonetto, F.J.

    1997-12-01

    The shape of a Taylor bubble in a vertical downward slug flow in a pipe is studied. The phase distribution in the Taylor bubble region is investigated by still pictures and video film. The shape of the Taylor bubble is reported for different condition. These experimental results consists of the position of the interface x(r) obtained using image processing and represents the new view to the shape of the Taylor Bubble and gives some light on the basic phenomena for the hydrodynamics of the two-phase slug flow. Slug flow is one of the most common and complex flow patterns in two-phase flow. Slug flow exists over a broad range of gas and liquid flow rates and is encountered in a wide variety of industrial applications like gas wells and process vaporizers. It also occurs during certain stages of emergency core cooling of a nuclear reactor.

  4. Volume regulation and shape bifurcation in the cell nucleus.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong-Hwee; Li, Bo; Si, Fangwei; Phillip, Jude M; Wirtz, Denis; Sun, Sean X

    2015-09-15

    Alterations in nuclear morphology are closely associated with essential cell functions, such as cell motility and polarization, and correlate with a wide range of human diseases, including cancer, muscular dystrophy, dilated cardiomyopathy and progeria. However, the mechanics and forces that shape the nucleus are not well understood. Here, we demonstrate that when an adherent cell is detached from its substratum, the nucleus undergoes a large volumetric reduction accompanied by a morphological transition from an almost smooth to a heavily folded surface. We develop a mathematical model that systematically analyzes the evolution of nuclear shape and volume. The analysis suggests that the pressure difference across the nuclear envelope, which is influenced by changes in cell volume and regulated by microtubules and actin filaments, is a major factor determining nuclear morphology. Our results show that physical and chemical properties of the extracellular microenvironment directly influence nuclear morphology and suggest that there is a direct link between the environment and gene regulation.

  5. Universality of fragment shapes

    PubMed Central

    Domokos, Gábor; Kun, Ferenc; Sipos, András Árpád; Szabó, Tímea

    2015-01-01

    The shape of fragments generated by the breakup of solids is central to a wide variety of problems ranging from the geomorphic evolution of boulders to the accumulation of space debris orbiting Earth. Although the statistics of the mass of fragments has been found to show a universal scaling behavior, the comprehensive characterization of fragment shapes still remained a fundamental challenge. We performed a thorough experimental study of the problem fragmenting various types of materials by slowly proceeding weathering and by rapid breakup due to explosion and hammering. We demonstrate that the shape of fragments obeys an astonishing universality having the same generic evolution with the fragment size irrespective of materials details and loading conditions. There exists a cutoff size below which fragments have an isotropic shape, however, as the size increases an exponential convergence is obtained to a unique elongated form. We show that a discrete stochastic model of fragmentation reproduces both the size and shape of fragments tuning only a single parameter which strengthens the general validity of the scaling laws. The dependence of the probability of the crack plan orientation on the linear extension of fragments proved to be essential for the shape selection mechanism. PMID:25772300

  6. On Characterizing Particle Shape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ennis, Bryan J.; Rickman, Douglas; Rollins, A. Brent; Ennis, Brandon

    2014-01-01

    It is well known that particle shape affects flow characteristics of granular materials, as well as a variety of other solids processing issues such as compaction, rheology, filtration and other two-phase flow problems. The impact of shape crosses many diverse and commercially important applications, including pharmaceuticals, civil engineering, metallurgy, health, and food processing. Two applications studied here include the dry solids flow of lunar simulants (e.g. JSC-1, NU-LHT-2M, OB-1), and the flow properties of wet concrete, including final compressive strength. A multi-dimensional generalized, engineering method to quantitatively characterize particle shapes has been developed, applicable to both single particle orientation and multi-particle assemblies. The two-dimension, three dimension inversion problem is also treated, and the application of these methods to DEM model particles will be discussed. In the case of lunar simulants, flow properties of six lunar simulants have been measured, and the impact of particle shape on flowability - as characterized by the shape method developed here -- is discussed, especially in the context of three simulants of similar size range. In the context of concrete processing, concrete construction is a major contributor to greenhouse gas production, of which the major contributor is cement binding loading. Any optimization in concrete rheology and packing that can reduce cement loading and improve strength loading can also reduce currently required construction safety factors. The characterization approach here is also demonstrated for the impact of rock aggregate shape on concrete slump rheology and dry compressive strength.

  7. Shape-memory polymers.

    PubMed

    Lendlein, Andreas; Kelch, Steffen

    2002-06-17

    Material scientists predict a prominent role in the future for self-repairing and intelligent materials. Throughout the last few years, this concept has found growing interest as a result of the rise of a new class of polymers. These so-called shape-memory polymers by far surpass well-known metallic shape-memory alloys in their shape-memory properties. As a consequence of the relatively easy manufacture and programming of shape-memory polymers, these materials represent a cheap and efficient alternative to well-established shape-memory alloys. In shape-memory polymers, the consequences of an intended or accidental deformation caused by an external force can be ironed out by heating the material above a defined transition temperature. This effect can be achieved because of the given flexibility of the polymer chains. When the importance of polymeric materials in our daily life is taken into consideration, we find a very broad, additional spectrum of possible applications for intelligent polymers that covers an area from minimally invasive surgery, through high-performance textiles, up to self-repairing plastic components in every kind of transportation vehicles.

  8. Universality of fragment shapes.

    PubMed

    Domokos, Gábor; Kun, Ferenc; Sipos, András Árpád; Szabó, Tímea

    2015-01-01

    The shape of fragments generated by the breakup of solids is central to a wide variety of problems ranging from the geomorphic evolution of boulders to the accumulation of space debris orbiting Earth. Although the statistics of the mass of fragments has been found to show a universal scaling behavior, the comprehensive characterization of fragment shapes still remained a fundamental challenge. We performed a thorough experimental study of the problem fragmenting various types of materials by slowly proceeding weathering and by rapid breakup due to explosion and hammering. We demonstrate that the shape of fragments obeys an astonishing universality having the same generic evolution with the fragment size irrespective of materials details and loading conditions. There exists a cutoff size below which fragments have an isotropic shape, however, as the size increases an exponential convergence is obtained to a unique elongated form. We show that a discrete stochastic model of fragmentation reproduces both the size and shape of fragments tuning only a single parameter which strengthens the general validity of the scaling laws. The dependence of the probability of the crack plan orientation on the linear extension of fragments proved to be essential for the shape selection mechanism. PMID:25772300

  9. Impacts of Nuclear Symmetry Energy on Neutron Star Crusts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, S. S.; Shen, H.

    2015-11-01

    Using the relativistic mean-field theory, we adopt two different methods, namely, the coexisting phase method and the self-consistent Thomas-Fermi approximation, to study the impacts of nuclear symmetry energy on the properties of neutron star crusts within a wide range of densities. It is found that the nuclear symmetry energy and its density slope play an important role in determining the pasta phases and the crust-core transition.

  10. Shapes of Interacting RNA Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Benjamin M.M.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Shapes of interacting RNA complexes are studied using a filtration via their topological genus. A shape of an RNA complex is obtained by (iteratively) collapsing stacks and eliminating hairpin loops. This shape projection preserves the topological core of the RNA complex, and for fixed topological genus there are only finitely many such shapes. Our main result is a new bijection that relates the shapes of RNA complexes with shapes of RNA structures. This allows for computing the shape polynomial of RNA complexes via the shape polynomial of RNA structures. We furthermore present a linear time uniform sampling algorithm for shapes of RNA complexes of fixed topological genus. PMID:25075750

  11. Low-lying E1,M1, and E2 strength distributions in Xe124,126,128,129,130,131,132,134,136: Systematic photon scattering experiments in the mass region of a nuclear shape or phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Garrel, H.; Brentano, P. Von; Fransen, C.; Friessner, G.; Hollmann, N.; Jolie, J.; Käppeler, F.; Käubler, L.; Kneissl, U.; Kohstall, C.; Kostov, L.; Linnemann, A.; Mücher, D.; Pietralla, N.; Pitz, H. H.; Rusev, G.; Scheck, M.; Schilling, K. D.; Scholl, C.; Schwengner, R.; Stedile, F.; Walter, S.; Werner, V.; Wisshak, K.

    2006-05-01

    Systematic nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF) experiments on all nine stable (seven even-even and two odd-mass) Xe isotopes have been performed at the bremsstrahlung facility of the 4.3-MV Stuttgart Dynamitron accelerator. For the first time thin-walled, high-pressure gas targets (about 70 bar) with highly enriched target material were used in NRF experiments. Precise excitation energies, transition strengths, spins, and decay branching ratios were obtained for numerous states, most of them previously unknown. The systematics of the observed E1 two-phonon excitations (2+⊗3-) and M1 excitations to 1+ mixed-symmetry states in the even-even isotopes are discussed with respect to the new critical point symmetry E(5). The fragmentation of these fundamental dipole excitation modes in the odd-mass isotopes Xe129,131 is shown and discussed. In the even-even nuclei several low-lying E2 excitations were observed.

  12. A necessary condition for coexistence of autocatalytic replicators in a prebiotic environment.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, Andres F; Grover, Martha A

    2013-07-24

    A necessary, but not sufficient, mathematical condition for the coexistence of short replicating species is presented here. The mathematical condition is obtained for a prebiotic environment, simulated as a fed-batch reactor, which combines monomer recycling, variable reaction order and a fixed monomer inlet flow with two replicator types and two monomer types. An extensive exploration of the parameter space in the model validates the robustness and efficiency of the mathematical condition, with nearly 1.7% of parameter sets meeting the condition and half of those exhibiting sustained coexistence. The results show that it is possible to generate a condition of coexistence, where two replicators sustain a linear growth simultaneously for a wide variety of chemistries, under an appropriate environment. The presence of multiple monomer types is critical to sustaining the coexistence of multiple replicator types.

  13. Theoretical study on phase coexistence in ferroelectric solid solutions near the tricritical point

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Xiaoyan E-mail: dzk@psu.edu; Li, Hui; Zheng, Limei; Cao, Wenwu

    2015-04-07

    Phase coexistence in ferroelectric solid solutions near the tricritical point has been theoretically analyzed by using the Landau-Devonshire theory. Results revealed that different phases having similar potential wells could coexist in a narrow composition range near the tricritical point in the classical Pb(Zr{sub 1−x}Ti{sub x})O{sub 3} system. The potential barrier between potential wells increases with the decrease of temperature. Coexisting phases or different domains of the same phase can produce adaptive strains to maintain atomic coherency at the interfaces or domain walls. Such compatibility strains have influence on the energy potential as well as the stability of relative phases, leading to the appearance of energetically unfavorable monoclinic phases. Those competing and coexisting phases also construct an easy phase transition path with small energy barrier in between, so that very small stimuli can produce large response in compositions near the morphotropic phase boundary, especially near the tricritical point.

  14. Coexistence of resistance to thyroid hormone and papillary thyroid carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Igata, Motoyuki; Tsuruzoe, Kaku; Kawashima, Junji; Kukidome, Daisuke; Kondo, Tatsuya; Motoshima, Hiroyuki; Shimoda, Seiya; Furukawa, Noboru; Nishikawa, Takeshi; Miyamura, Nobuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Summary Resistance to thyroid hormone (RTH) is a syndrome of reduced tissue responsiveness to thyroid hormones. RTH is majorly caused by mutations in the thyroid hormone receptor beta (THRB) gene. Recent studies indicated a close association of THRB mutations with human cancers, but the role of THRB mutation in carcinogenesis is still unclear. Here, we report a rare case of RTH with a papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC). A 26-year-old woman was referred to our hospital due to a thyroid tumor and hormonal abnormality. She had elevated serum thyroid hormones and non-suppressed TSH levels. Genetic analysis of THRB identified a missense mutation, P452L, leading to a diagnosis of RTH. Ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration biopsy of the tumor and lymph nodes enabled the cytological diagnosis of PTC with lymph node metastases. Total thyroidectomy and neck lymph nodes dissection were performed. Following surgery, thyroxine replacement (≥500 μg) was necessary to avoid the symptoms of hypothyroidism and to maintain her TSH levels within the same range as before the operation. During the follow-up, basal thyroglobulin (Tg) levels were around 6 ng/ml and TSH-stimulated Tg levels were between 12 and 20 ng/ml. Up to present, the patient has had no recurrence of PTC. This indicates that these Tg values are consistent with a biochemical incomplete response or an indeterminate response. There is no consensus regarding the management of thyroid carcinoma in patients with RTH, but aggressive treatments such as total thyroidectomy followed by radioiodine (RAI) and TSH suppression therapy are recommended. Learning points There are only a few cases reporting the coexistence of RTH and thyroid carcinoma. Moreover, our case would be the first case presenting one with lymph node metastases. Recent studies indicated a close association of THRB mutations with human cancers, but the role of THRB mutation in carcinogenesis is still unclear. When total thyroidectomy is performed in

  15. The phenotype of gastric mucosa coexisting with Barrett's oesophagus

    PubMed Central

    Rugge, M; Russo, V; Busatto, G; Genta, R; Di, M; Farinati, F; Graham, D

    2001-01-01

    Background/Aims—Barrett's oesophagus complicates the gastro-oesophageal acid reflux. Helicobacter pylori infection, particularly with cagA positive strains, induces inflammatory/atrophic lesions of the gastric mucosa, which may impair acid output. No systematic study has investigated the phenotype of the gastric mucosa coexisting with Barrett's oesophagus. This study was designed to identify the phenotype of gastric mucosa associated with Barrett's oesophagus. Methods—In this retrospective case control study, the phenotype of the gastric mucosa was histologically characterised in 53 consecutive patients with Barrett's oesophagus and in 53 (sex and age matched) non-ulcer dyspeptic controls. Both patients and controls underwent extensive sampling of the gastric mucosa (two antral, one incisural, and two oxyntic biopsies). Intestinal metaplasia (IM) was categorised (type I, complete IM; types II and III, incomplete IM) by the high iron diamine stain; cagA status was ascertained by genotyping. Results—Helicobacter pylori was present in 19 of the 53 patients with Barrett's oesophagus and in 30 of the 53 controls (p < 0.02); eight of the 19 patients with Barrett's oesophagus and 28 of the 35 controls harboured cagA positive H pylori (p < 0.03). The histological severity of non-atrophic gastritis detected in the controls was significantly higher than that detected in the patients with Barrett's oesophagus (p < 0.0001). Multifocal atrophic gastritis was present in 4% of the patients with Barrett's oesophagus and in 23% of controls (p < 0.01). The odds ratio for the association between multifocal atrophic gastritis and Barrett's oesophagus was 0.20 (95% confidence interval, 0.006 to 0.60). Gastric IM was detected in 13.2% of the patients with Barrett's oesophagus and in 30.1% of the controls (p < 0.03). Type III IM at the gastric mucosa was only detected among controls. Conclusions—Barrett's oesophagus is associated with a low prevalence of H pylori cagA positive

  16. Coexistence of Incommensurate Magnetism and Superconductivity in the Two-Dimensional Hubbard Model.

    PubMed

    Yamase, Hiroyuki; Eberlein, Andreas; Metzner, Walter

    2016-03-01

    We analyze the competition of magnetism and superconductivity in the two-dimensional Hubbard model with a moderate interaction strength, including the possibility of incommensurate spiral magnetic order. Using an unbiased renormalization group approach, we compute magnetic and superconducting order parameters in the ground state. In addition to previously established regions of Néel order coexisting with d-wave superconductivity, the calculations reveal further coexistence regions where superconductivity is accompanied by incommensurate magnetic order.

  17. Trait adaptation promotes species coexistence in diverse predator and prey communities.

    PubMed

    Klauschies, Toni; Vasseur, David A; Gaedke, Ursula

    2016-06-01

    Species can adjust their traits in response to selection which may strongly influence species coexistence. Nevertheless, current theory mainly assumes distinct and time-invariant trait values. We examined the combined effects of the range and the speed of trait adaptation on species coexistence using an innovative multispecies predator-prey model. It allows for temporal trait changes of all predator and prey species and thus simultaneous coadaptation within and among trophic levels. We show that very small or slow trait adaptation did not facilitate coexistence because the stabilizing niche differences were not sufficient to offset the fitness differences. In contrast, sufficiently large and fast trait adaptation jointly promoted stable or neutrally stable species coexistence. Continuous trait adjustments in response to selection enabled a temporally variable convergence and divergence of species traits; that is, species became temporally more similar (neutral theory) or dissimilar (niche theory) depending on the selection pressure, resulting over time in a balance between niche differences stabilizing coexistence and fitness differences promoting competitive exclusion. Furthermore, coadaptation allowed prey and predator species to cluster into different functional groups. This equalized the fitness of similar species while maintaining sufficient niche differences among functionally different species delaying or preventing competitive exclusion. In contrast to previous studies, the emergent feedback between biomass and trait dynamics enabled supersaturated coexistence for a broad range of potential trait adaptation and parameters. We conclude that accounting for trait adaptation may explain stable and supersaturated species coexistence for a broad range of environmental conditions in natural systems when the absence of such adaptive changes would preclude it. Small trait changes, coincident with those that may occur within many natural populations, greatly enlarged

  18. Trait adaptation promotes species coexistence in diverse predator and prey communities.

    PubMed

    Klauschies, Toni; Vasseur, David A; Gaedke, Ursula

    2016-06-01

    Species can adjust their traits in response to selection which may strongly influence species coexistence. Nevertheless, current theory mainly assumes distinct and time-invariant trait values. We examined the combined effects of the range and the speed of trait adaptation on species coexistence using an innovative multispecies predator-prey model. It allows for temporal trait changes of all predator and prey species and thus simultaneous coadaptation within and among trophic levels. We show that very small or slow trait adaptation did not facilitate coexistence because the stabilizing niche differences were not sufficient to offset the fitness differences. In contrast, sufficiently large and fast trait adaptation jointly promoted stable or neutrally stable species coexistence. Continuous trait adjustments in response to selection enabled a temporally variable convergence and divergence of species traits; that is, species became temporally more similar (neutral theory) or dissimilar (niche theory) depending on the selection pressure, resulting over time in a balance between niche differences stabilizing coexistence and fitness differences promoting competitive exclusion. Furthermore, coadaptation allowed prey and predator species to cluster into different functional groups. This equalized the fitness of similar species while maintaining sufficient niche differences among functionally different species delaying or preventing competitive exclusion. In contrast to previous studies, the emergent feedback between biomass and trait dynamics enabled supersaturated coexistence for a broad range of potential trait adaptation and parameters. We conclude that accounting for trait adaptation may explain stable and supersaturated species coexistence for a broad range of environmental conditions in natural systems when the absence of such adaptive changes would preclude it. Small trait changes, coincident with those that may occur within many natural populations, greatly enlarged

  19. Spatial instabilities untie the exclusion-principle constraint on species coexistence.

    PubMed

    Nathan, Jonathan; von Hardenberg, Jost; Meron, Ehud

    2013-10-21

    Using a spatially explicit mathematical model for water-limited vegetation we show that spatial instabilities of uniform states can lead to species coexistence under conditions where uniformly distributed species competitively exclude one another. Coexistence is made possible when water-rich patches formed by a pattern forming species provide habitats for a highly dispersive species that is a better competitor in uniform settings. PMID:23820039

  20. Experimental examination of EFL and MATX eukaryotic horizontal gene transfers: coexistence of mutually exclusive transcripts predates functional rescue.

    PubMed

    Szabová, Jana; Ruzicka, Petr; Verner, Zdenek; Hampl, Vladimír; Lukes, Julius

    2011-08-01

    Many eukaryotic genes do not follow simple vertical inheritance. Elongation factor 1α (EF-1α) and methionine adenosyl transferase (MAT) are enzymes with complicated evolutionary histories and, interestingly, the two cases have several features in common. These essential enzymes occur as two relatively divergent paralogs (EF-1α/EFL, MAT/MATX) that have patchy distributions in eukaryotic lineages that are nearly mutually exclusive. To explain such distributions, we must invoke either multiple eukaryote-to-eukaryote horizontal gene transfers (HGTs) followed by functional replacement or presence of both paralogs in the common ancestor followed by long-term coexistence and differential losses in various eukaryotic lineages. To understand the evolution of these paralogs, we have performed in vivo experiments in Trypanosoma brucei addressing the consequences of long-term coexpression and functional replacement. In the first experiment of its kind, we have demonstrated that EF-1α and MAT can be simultaneously expressed with EFL and MATX, respectively, without affecting the growth of the flagellates. After the endogenous MAT or EF-1α was downregulated by RNA interference, MATX immediately substituted for its paralog, whereas EFL was not able to substitute for EF-1α, leading to mortality. We conclude that MATX is naturally capable of evolving patchy paralog distribution via HGTs and/or long- term coexpression and differential losses. The capability of EFL to spread by HGT is lower and so the patchy distribution of EF-1α/EFL paralogs was probably shaped mainly by deep paralogy followed by long-term coexistence and differential losses.

  1. Solar Radiation Determines Site Occupancy of Coexisting Tropical and Temperate Deer Species Introduced to New Zealand Forests.

    PubMed

    Allen, Robert B; Forsyth, David M; Allen, Roy K J; Affeld, Kathrin; MacKenzie, Darryl I

    2015-01-01

    Assemblages of introduced taxa provide an opportunity to understand how abiotic and biotic factors shape habitat use by coexisting species. We tested hypotheses about habitat selection by two deer species recently introduced to New Zealand's temperate rainforests. We hypothesised that, due to different thermoregulatory abilities, rusa deer (Cervus timorensis; a tropical species) would prefer warmer locations in winter than red deer (Cervus elaphus scoticus; a temperate species). Since adult male rusa deer are aggressive in winter (the rut), we also hypothesised that rusa deer and red deer would not use the same winter locations. Finally, we hypothesised that in summer both species would prefer locations with fertile soils that supported more plant species preferred as food. We used a 250 × 250 m grid of 25 remote cameras to collect images in a 100-ha montane study area over two winters and summers. Plant composition, solar radiation, and soil fertility were also determined for each camera location. Multiseason occupancy models revealed that direct solar radiation was the best predictor of occupancy and detection probabilities for rusa deer in winter. Multistate, multiseason occupancy models provided strong evidence that the detection probability of adult male rusa deer was greater in winter and when other rusa deer were present at a location. Red deer mostly vacated the study area in winter. For the one season that had sufficient camera images of both species (summer 2011) to allow two-species occupancy models to be fitted, the detection probability of rusa deer also increased with solar radiation. Detection probability also varied with plant composition for both deer species. We conclude that habitat use by coexisting tropical and temperate deer species in New Zealand likely depends on the interplay between the thermoregulatory and behavioural traits of the deer and the abiotic and biotic features of the habitat.

  2. Coexistence of Insect Species Competing for a Pulsed Resource: Toward a Unified Theory of Biodiversity in Fluctuating Environments

    PubMed Central

    Venner, Samuel; Pélisson, Pierre-François; Bel-Venner, Marie-Claude; Débias, François; Rajon, Etienne; Menu, Frédéric

    2011-01-01

    Background One major challenge in understanding how biodiversity is organized is finding out whether communities of competing species are shaped exclusively by species-level differences in ecological traits (niche theory), exclusively by random processes (neutral theory of biodiversity), or by both processes simultaneously. Communities of species competing for a pulsed resource are a suitable system for testing these theories: due to marked fluctuations in resource availability, the theories yield very different predictions about the timing of resource use and the synchronization of the population dynamics between the competing species. Accordingly, we explored mechanisms that might promote the local coexistence of phytophagous insects (four sister species of the genus Curculio) competing for oak acorns, a pulsed resource. Methodology/Principal Findings We analyzed the time partitioning of the exploitation of oak acorns by the four weevil species in two independent communities, and we assessed the level of synchronization in their population dynamics. In accordance with the niche theory, overall these species exhibited marked time partitioning of resource use, both within a given year and between different years owing to different dormancy strategies between species, as well as distinct demographic patterns. Two of the four weevil species, however, consistently exploited the resource during the same period of the year, exhibited a similar dormancy pattern, and did not show any significant difference in their population dynamics. Conclusions/Significance The marked time partitioning of the resource use appears as a keystone of the coexistence of these competing insect species, except for two of them which are demographically nearly equivalent. Communities of consumers of pulsed resources thus seem to offer a promising avenue for developing a unifying theory of biodiversity in fluctuating environments which might predict the co-occurrence, within the same community

  3. Nuclear isomers: structures and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Sun Yang; Wiescher, Michael; Aprahamian, Ani; Fisker, Jacob

    2006-03-13

    Isomeric states in the nuclei along the rapid proton capture process path are studied by the projected shell model. Emphasis is given to two waiting point nuclei 68Se and 72Kr that are characterized by shape coexistence. Energy surface calculations indicate that the ground state of these nuclei corresponds to an oblate-deformed minimum, while the lowest state at the prolate-deformed minimum can be considered as a shape isomer. Due to occupation of the orbitals with large K-components, states built upon two-quasiparticle excitations at the oblate-deformed minimum may form high K-isomers. The impact of the isomer states on isotopic abundance in X-ray bursts is studied in a multi-mass-zone X-ray burst model by assuming an upper-lower limit approach.

  4. Trade-offs and coexistence: a lottery model applied to fig wasp communities.

    PubMed

    Duthie, A Bradley; Abbott, Karen C; Nason, John D

    2014-06-01

    Ecological communities in which organisms complete their life cycles on discrete ephemeral patches are common and often support an unusually large number of species. Explaining this diversity is challenging for communities of ecologically similar species undergoing preemptive competition, where classic coexistence mechanisms may not readily apply. We use nonpollinating fig wasps as a model community characterized by high diversity and preemptive competition to show how subadditive population growth and a trade-off between competitor fecundity and dispersal ability can lead to coexistence. Because nonpollinator species are often closely related, have similar life histories, and compete for the same discrete resources, understanding their coexistence is challenging given competitive exclusion is expected. Empirical observations suggest that nonpollinating fig wasp species may face a trade-off between egg loads and dispersal abilities. We model a lottery in which a species' competitive ability is determined by a trade-off between fecundity and dispersal ability. Variation in interpatch distance between figs generates temporal variability in the relative benefit of fecundity versus dispersal. We show that the temporal storage effect leads to coexistence for a range of biologically realistic parameter values. We further use individual-based modeling to show that when species' traits evolve, coexistence is less likely but trait divergence can result. We discuss the implications of this coexistence mechanism for ephemeral patch systems wherein competition is strongly preemptive.

  5. Zealotry promotes coexistence in the rock-paper-scissors model of cyclic dominance.

    PubMed

    Verma, Gunjan; Chan, Kevin; Swami, Ananthram

    2015-11-01

    Cyclic dominance models, such as the classic rock-paper-scissors (RPS) game, have found real-world applications in biology, ecology, and sociology. A key quantity of interest in such models is the coexistence time, i.e., the time until at least one population type goes extinct. Much recent research has considered conditions that lengthen coexistence times in an RPS model. A general finding is that coexistence is promoted by localized spatial interactions (low mobility), while extinction is fostered by global interactions (high mobility). That is, there exists a mobility threshold which separates a regime of long coexistence from a regime of rapid collapse of coexistence. The key finding of our paper is that if zealots (i.e., nodes able to defeat others while themselves being immune to defeat) of even a single type exist, then system coexistence time can be significantly prolonged, even in the presence of global interactions. This work thus highlights a crucial determinant of system survival time in cyclic dominance models.

  6. Zealotry promotes coexistence in the rock-paper-scissors model of cyclic dominance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Gunjan; Chan, Kevin; Swami, Ananthram

    2015-11-01

    Cyclic dominance models, such as the classic rock-paper-scissors (RPS) game, have found real-world applications in biology, ecology, and sociology. A key quantity of interest in such models is the coexistence time, i.e., the time until at least one population type goes extinct. Much recent research has considered conditions that lengthen coexistence times in an RPS model. A general finding is that coexistence is promoted by localized spatial interactions (low mobility), while extinction is fostered by global interactions (high mobility). That is, there exists a mobility threshold which separates a regime of long coexistence from a regime of rapid collapse of coexistence. The key finding of our paper is that if zealots (i.e., nodes able to defeat others while themselves being immune to defeat) of even a single type exist, then system coexistence time can be significantly prolonged, even in the presence of global interactions. This work thus highlights a crucial determinant of system survival time in cyclic dominance models.

  7. Microhabitat locality allows multi-species coexistence in terrestrial plant communities.

    PubMed

    Tubay, Jerrold M; Suzuki, Keisuke; Uehara, Takashi; Kakishima, Satoshi; Ito, Hiromu; Ishida, Atsushi; Yoshida, Katsuhiko; Mori, Shigeta; Rabajante, Jomar F; Morita, Satoru; Yokozawa, Masayuki; Yoshimura, Jin

    2015-10-20

    Most terrestrial plant communities exhibit relatively high species diversity and many competitive species are ubiquitous. Many theoretical studies have been carried out to investigate the coexistence of a few competitive species and in most cases they suggest competitive exclusion. Theoretical studies have revealed that coexistence of even three or four species can be extremely difficult. It has been suggested that the coexistence of many species has been achieved by the fine differences in suitable microhabitats for each species, attributing to niche-separation. So far there is no explicit demonstration of such a coexistence in mathematical and simulation studies. Here we built a simple lattice Lotka-Volterra model of competition by incorporating the minute differences of suitable microhabitats for many species. By applying the site variations in species-specific settlement rates of a seedling, we achieved the coexistence of more than 10 species. This result indicates that competition between many species is avoided by the spatial variations in species-specific microhabitats. Our results demonstrate that coexistence of many species becomes possible by the minute differences in microhabitats. This mechanism should be applicable to many vegetation types, such as temperate forests and grasslands.

  8. Free energy landscapes and volumes of coexisting phases for a colloidal dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Trinh Hoa; Wang, G. F.; Lai, S. K.

    2010-01-01

    Treating the repulsive part of a pairwise potential by the hard-sphere form and its attractive part by the effective depletion potential form, we calculate using this model potential the colloidal domains of phase separation. Differing from the usual recipe of applying the thermodynamic conditions of equal pressure and equal chemical potential where the branches of coexisting phases are the ultimate target, we employ the free energy density minimization approach [G. F. Wang and S. K. Lai, Phys. Rev. E 70, 051402 (2004)] to crosshatch the domains of equilibrium phases, which consist of the gas, liquid, and solid homogeneous phases as well as the coexistence of these phases. This numerical procedure is attractive since it yields naturally the colloidal volume of space occupied by each of the coexisting phases. In this work, we first examine the change in structures of the fluid and solid free energy density landscapes with the effective polymer concentration. We show by explicit illustration the link between the free energy density landscapes and the development of both the metastable and stable coexisting phases. Then, attention is paid to the spatial volumes predicted at the triple point. It is found here that the volumes of spaces of the three coexisting phases at the triple point vary one dimensionally, whereas for the two coexisting phases, they are uniquely determined.

  9. Microhabitat locality allows multi-species coexistence in terrestrial plant communities

    PubMed Central

    Tubay, Jerrold M.; Suzuki, Keisuke; Uehara, Takashi; Kakishima, Satoshi; Ito, Hiromu; Ishida, Atsushi; Yoshida, Katsuhiko; Mori, Shigeta; Rabajante, Jomar F.; Morita, Satoru; Yokozawa, Masayuki; Yoshimura, Jin

    2015-01-01

    Most terrestrial plant communities exhibit relatively high species diversity and many competitive species are ubiquitous. Many theoretical studies have been carried out to investigate the coexistence of a few competitive species and in most cases they suggest competitive exclusion. Theoretical studies have revealed that coexistence of even three or four species can be extremely difficult. It has been suggested that the coexistence of many species has been achieved by the fine differences in suitable microhabitats for each species, attributing to niche-separation. So far there is no explicit demonstration of such a coexistence in mathematical and simulation studies. Here we built a simple lattice Lotka-Volterra model of competition by incorporating the minute differences of suitable microhabitats for many species. By applying the site variations in species-specific settlement rates of a seedling, we achieved the coexistence of more than 10 species. This result indicates that competition between many species is avoided by the spatial variations in species-specific microhabitats. Our results demonstrate that coexistence of many species becomes possible by the minute differences in microhabitats. This mechanism should be applicable to many vegetation types, such as temperate forests and grasslands. PMID:26483077

  10. Coexistence via resource partitioning fails to generate an increase in community function.

    PubMed

    DeLong, John P; Vasseur, David A

    2012-01-01

    Classic ecological theory suggests that resource partitioning facilitates the coexistence of species by reducing inter-specific competition. A byproduct of this process is an increase in overall community function, because a greater spectrum of resources can be used. In contrast, coexistence facilitated by neutral mechanisms is not expected to increase function. We studied coexistence in laboratory microcosms of the bactivorous ciliates Paramecium aurelia and Colpidium striatum to understand the relationship between function and coexistence mechanism. We quantified population and community-level function (biomass and oxygen consumption), competitive interactions, and resource partitioning. The two ciliates partitioned their bacterial resource along a size axis, with the larger ciliate consuming larger bacteria than the smaller ciliate. Despite this, there was no gain in function at the community level for either biomass or oxygen consumption, and competitive effects were symmetrical within and between species. Because other potential coexistence mechanisms can be ruled out, it is likely that inter-specific interference competition diminished the expected gain in function generated by resource partitioning, leading to a system that appeared competitively neutral even when structured by niche partitioning. We also analyzed several previous studies where two species of protists coexisted and found that the two-species communities showed a broad range of biomass levels relative to the single-species states.

  11. Coexistence via Resource Partitioning Fails to Generate an Increase in Community Function

    PubMed Central

    DeLong, John P.; Vasseur, David A.

    2012-01-01

    Classic ecological theory suggests that resource partitioning facilitates the coexistence of species by reducing inter-specific competition. A byproduct of this process is an increase in overall community function, because a greater spectrum of resources can be used. In contrast, coexistence facilitated by neutral mechanisms is not expected to increase function. We studied coexistence in laboratory microcosms of the bactivorous ciliates Paramecium aurelia and Colpidium striatum to understand the relationship between function and coexistence mechanism. We quantified population and community-level function (biomass and oxygen consumption), competitive interactions, and resource partitioning. The two ciliates partitioned their bacterial resource along a size axis, with the larger ciliate consuming larger bacteria than the smaller ciliate. Despite this, there was no gain in function at the community level for either biomass or oxygen consumption, and competitive effects were symmetrical within and between species. Because other potential coexistence mechanisms can be ruled out, it is likely that inter-specific interference competition diminished the expected gain in function generated by resource partitioning, leading to a system that appeared competitively neutral even when structured by niche partitioning. We also analyzed several previous studies where two species of protists coexisted and found that the two-species communities showed a broad range of biomass levels relative to the single-species states. PMID:22253888

  12. Microhabitat locality allows multi-species coexistence in terrestrial plant communities.

    PubMed

    Tubay, Jerrold M; Suzuki, Keisuke; Uehara, Takashi; Kakishima, Satoshi; Ito, Hiromu; Ishida, Atsushi; Yoshida, Katsuhiko; Mori, Shigeta; Rabajante, Jomar F; Morita, Satoru; Yokozawa, Masayuki; Yoshimura, Jin

    2015-01-01

    Most terrestrial plant communities exhibit relatively high species diversity and many competitive species are ubiquitous. Many theoretical studies have been carried out to investigate the coexistence of a few competitive species and in most cases they suggest competitive exclusion. Theoretical studies have revealed that coexistence of even three or four species can be extremely difficult. It has been suggested that the coexistence of many species has been achieved by the fine differences in suitable microhabitats for each species, attributing to niche-separation. So far there is no explicit demonstration of such a coexistence in mathematical and simulation studies. Here we built a simple lattice Lotka-Volterra model of competition by incorporating the minute differences of suitable microhabitats for many species. By applying the site variations in species-specific settlement rates of a seedling, we achieved the coexistence of more than 10 species. This result indicates that competition between many species is avoided by the spatial variations in species-specific microhabitats. Our results demonstrate that coexistence of many species becomes possible by the minute differences in microhabitats. This mechanism should be applicable to many vegetation types, such as temperate forests and grasslands. PMID:26483077

  13. Technical Seminar "Shape Memory Alloys"

    NASA Video Gallery

    Shape memory alloys are a unique group of materials that remember their original shape and return to that shape after being strained. How could the aerospace, automotive, and energy exploration ind...

  14. A distributed scheme to manage the dynamic coexistence of IEEE 802.15.4-based health-monitoring WBANs.

    PubMed

    Deylami, Mohammad N; Jovanov, Emil

    2014-01-01

    The overlap of transmission ranges between wireless networks as a result of mobility is referred to as dynamic coexistence. The interference caused by coexistence may significantly affect the performance of wireless body area networks (WBANs) where reliability is particularly critical for health monitoring applications. In this paper, we analytically study the effects of dynamic coexistence on the operation of IEEE 802.15.4-based health monitoring WBANs. The current IEEE 802.15.4 standard lacks mechanisms for effectively managing the coexistence of mobile WBANs. Considering the specific characteristics and requirements of health monitoring WBANs, we propose the dynamic coexistence management (DCM) mechanism to make IEEE 802.15.4-based WBANs able to detect and mitigate the harmful effects of coexistence. We assess the effectiveness of this scheme using extensive OPNET simulations. Our results indicate that DCM improves the successful transmission rates of dynamically coexisting WBANs by 20%-25% for typical medical monitoring applications.

  15. Microscopic description of large-amplitude shape-mixing dynamics with local QRPA inertial functions

    SciTech Connect

    Hinohara, Nobuo; Yoshida, Kenichi; Nakatsukasa, Takashi; Sato, Koichi; Matsuo, Masayuki

    2011-05-06

    We introduce a microscopic approach to derive all the inertial functions in the five-dimensional quadrupole collective Hamiltonian. Local normal modes are evaluated on the constrained mean field in the quasiparticle random-phase approximation in order to derive the inertial functions. The collective Hamiltonians for neutron-rich Mg isotopes are determined with use of this approach, and the shape coexistence/mixing around the N = 20 region is analyzed.

  16. Shape memory polymer medical device

    DOEpatents

    Maitland, Duncan; Benett, William J.; Bearinger, Jane P.; Wilson, Thomas S.; Small, IV, Ward; Schumann, Daniel L.; Jensen, Wayne A.; Ortega, Jason M.; Marion, III, John E.; Loge, Jeffrey M.

    2010-06-29

    A system for removing matter from a conduit. The system includes the steps of passing a transport vehicle and a shape memory polymer material through the conduit, transmitting energy to the shape memory polymer material for moving the shape memory polymer material from a first shape to a second and different shape, and withdrawing the transport vehicle and the shape memory polymer material through the conduit carrying the matter.

  17. Nuclear ventriculography

    MedlinePlus

    ... ventriculography (RNV); Multiple gate acquisition scan (MUGA); Nuclear cardiology; Cardiomyopathy - nuclear ventriculography ... 56. Udelson JE, Dilsizian V, Bonow RO. Nuclear cardiology. In: Bonow RO, Mann DL, Zipes DP, Libby ...

  18. Nuclear Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Badawi, Ramsey D.

    2001-01-01

    Describes the use of nuclear medicine techniques in diagnosis and therapy. Describes instrumentation in diagnostic nuclear medicine and predicts future trends in nuclear medicine imaging technology. (Author/MM)

  19. Majorana approach to the stochastic theory of line shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komijani, Yashar; Coleman, Piers

    2016-08-01

    Motivated by recent Mössbauer experiments on strongly correlated mixed-valence systems, we revisit the Kubo-Anderson stochastic theory of spectral line shapes. Using a Majorana representation for the nuclear spin we demonstrate how to recast the classic line-shape theory in a field-theoretic and diagrammatic language. We show that the leading contribution to the self-energy can reproduce most of the observed line-shape features including splitting and line-shape narrowing, while the vertex and the self-consistency corrections can be systematically included in the calculation. This approach permits us to predict the line shape produced by an arbitrary bulk charge fluctuation spectrum providing a model-independent way to extract the local charge fluctuation spectrum of the surrounding medium. We also derive an inverse formula to extract the charge fluctuation from the measured line shape.

  20. Nuclear ``pasta'' formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, A. S.; Horowitz, C. J.; Hughto, J.; Berry, D. K.

    2013-12-01

    The formation of complex nonuniform phases of nuclear matter, known as nuclear pasta, is studied with molecular dynamics (MD) simulations containing 51200 nucleons. A phenomenological nuclear interaction is used that reproduces the saturation binding energy and density of nuclear matter. Systems are prepared at an initial density of 0.10fm-3 and then the density is decreased by expanding the simulation volume at different rates to densities of 0.01fm-3 or less. An originally uniform system of nuclear matter is observed to form spherical bubbles (“swiss cheese”), hollow tubes, flat plates (“lasagna”), thin rods (“spaghetti”) and, finally, nearly spherical nuclei with decreasing density. We explicitly observe nucleation mechanisms, with decreasing density, for these different pasta phase transitions. Topological quantities known as Minkowski functionals are obtained to characterize the pasta shapes. Different pasta shapes are observed depending on the expansion rate. This indicates nonequilibrium effects. We use this to determine the best ways to obtain lower energy states of the pasta system from MD simulations and to place constraints on the equilibration time of the system.

  1. Nuclear deterrence and disarmament after the Cold War

    SciTech Connect

    Lehman, R.F. II

    1995-03-01

    During the Cold War, nuclear arms control measures were shaped significantly by nuclear doctrine. Consequently, the negotiation of arms control agreements often became a battleground for different nuclear strategies. The Cold War between the United States and the Soviet Union has been declared over. Today, both nuclear weapons policies and arms control objectives are again being reviewed. This document discusses points of this review.

  2. Comments on comet shapes and aggregation processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartmann, William K.

    1989-01-01

    An important question for a comet mission is whether comet nuclei preserve information clarifying aggregation processes of planetary matter. New observational evidence shows that Trojan asteroids, as a group, display a higher fraction of highly-elongated objects than the belt. More recently evidence has accumulated that comet nuclei, as a group, also display highly-elongated shapes at macro-scale. This evidence comes from the several comets whose nuclear lightcurves or shapes have been well studied. Trojans and comet nuclei share other properties. Both groups have extremely low albedos and reddish-to neutral-black colors typical of asteroids of spectral class D, P, and C. Both groups may have had relatively low collision frequencies. An important problem to resolve with spacecraft imaging is whether these elongated shapes are primordial, or due to evolution of the objects. Two hypotheses that might be tested by a combination of global-scale and close-up imaging from various directions are: (1) The irregular shapes are primordial and related to the fact that these bodies have had lower collision frequencies than belt asteroids; or (2) The irregular shapes may be due to volatile loss.

  3. The shape of Eros

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ostro, S. J.; Rosema, K. D.; Jurgens, R. F.

    1990-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulations are presently used to optimize estimation, ascertain associated errors, and guide bias-correction procedures, for the Eros polar silhouette convex hull that has been estimated from radar echo spectra. This hull is trapezoidal; this nonaxisymmetric shape may account for odd harmonics in Eros' echo spectral signature as a function of rotation phase. Additional constraints have been obtained for the figure of Eros through the inversion of the optical lightcurve to estimate the asteroid's two-dimensional average of the three-dimensional shape. This 'mean cross-section' and the polar silhouette exhibit similar elongations.

  4. Intramolecular Nuclear Flux Densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barth, I.; Daniel, C.; Gindensperger, E.; Manz, J.; PéRez-Torres, J. F.; Schild, A.; Stemmle, C.; Sulzer, D.; Yang, Y.

    The topic of this survey article has seen a renaissance during the past couple of years. Here we present and extend the results for various phenomena which we have published from 2012-2014, with gratitude to our coauthors. The new phenomena include (a) the first reduced nuclear flux densities in vibrating diatomic molecules or ions which have been deduced from experimental pump-probe spectra; these "experimental" nuclear flux densities reveal several quantum effects including (b) the "quantum accordion", i.e., during the turn from bond stretch to bond compression, the diatomic system never stands still — instead, various parts of it with different bond lengths flow into opposite directions. (c) Wavepacket interferometry has been extended from nuclear densities to flux densities, again revealing new phenomena: For example, (d) a vibrating nuclear wave function with compact initial shape may split into two partial waves which run into opposite directions, thus causing interfering flux densities. (e) Tunneling in symmetric 1-dimensional double-well systems yields maximum values of the associated nuclear flux density just below the potential barrier; this is in marked contrast with negligible values of the nuclear density just below the barrier. (f) Nuclear flux densities of pseudorotating nuclei may induce huge magnetic fields. A common methodologic theme of all topics is the continuity equation which connects the time derivative of the nuclear density to the divergence of the flux density, subject to the proper boundary conditions. (g) Nearly identical nuclear densities with different boundary conditions may be related to entirely different flux densities, e.g., during tunneling in cyclic versus non-cyclic systems. The original continuity equation, density and flux density of all nuclei, or of all nuclear degrees of freedom, may be reduced to the corresponding quantities for just a single nucleus, or just a single degree of freedom.

  5. Nuclear "waffles"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, A. S.; Berry, D. K.; Briggs, C. M.; Caplan, M. E.; Horowitz, C. J.

    2014-11-01

    Background: The dense neutron-rich matter found in supernovae and inside neutron stars is expected to form complex nonuniform phases, often referred to as nuclear pasta. The pasta shapes depend on density, temperature and proton fraction and determine many transport properties in supernovae and neutron star crusts. Purpose: To characterize the topology and compute two observables, the radial distribution function (RDF) g (r ) and the structure factor S (q ) , for systems with proton fractions Yp=0.10 ,0.20 ,0.30 , and 0.40 at about one-third of nuclear saturation density, n =0.050 fm-3 , and temperatures near k T =1 MeV . Methods: We use two recently developed hybrid CPU/GPU codes to perform large scale molecular dynamics (MD) simulations with 51 200 and 409 600 nucleons. From the output of the MD simulations we obtain the two desired observables. Results: We compute and discuss the differences in topology and observables for each simulation. We observe that the two lowest proton fraction systems simulated, Yp=0.10 and 0.20 , equilibrate quickly and form liquidlike structures. Meanwhile, the two higher proton fraction systems, Yp=0.30 and 0.40 , take a longer time to equilibrate and organize themselves in solidlike periodic structures. Furthermore, the Yp=0.40 system is made up of slabs, lasagna phase, interconnected by defects while the Yp=0.30 systems consist of a stack of perforated plates, the nuclear waffle phase. Conclusions: The periodic configurations observed in our MD simulations for proton fractions Yp≥0.30 have important consequences for the structure factors S (q ) of protons and neutrons, which relate to many transport properties of supernovae and neutron star crust. A detailed study of the waffle phase and how its structure depends on temperature, size of the simulation, and the screening length showed that finite-size effects appear to be under control and, also, that the plates in the waffle phase merge at temperatures slightly above 1.0 MeV and

  6. Shape Aftereffects Reflect Shape Constancy Operations: Appearance Matters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Storrs, Katherine R.; Arnold, Derek H.

    2013-01-01

    One of the oldest known visual aftereffects is the shape aftereffect, wherein looking at a particular shape can make subsequent shapes seem distorted in the opposite direction. After viewing a narrow ellipse, for example, a perfect circle can look like a broad ellipse. It is thought that shape aftereffects are determined by the dimensions of…

  7. Nuclear reactor

    DOEpatents

    Thomson, Wallace B.

    2004-03-16

    A nuclear reactor comprising a cylindrical pressure vessel, an elongated annular core centrally disposed within and spaced from the pressure vessel, and a plurality of ducts disposed longitudinally of the pressure vessel about the periphery thereof, said core comprising an annular active portion, an annular reflector just inside the active portion, and an annular reflector just outside the active a portion, said annular active portion comprising rectangular slab, porous fuel elements radially disposed around the inner reflector and extending the length of the active portion, wedge-shaped, porous moderator elements disposed adjacent one face of each fuel element and extending the length of the fuel element, the fuel and moderator elements being oriented so that the fuel elements face each other and the moderator elements do likewise, adjacent moderator elements being spaced to provide air inlet channels, and adjacent fuel elements being spaced to provide air outlet channels which communicate with the interior of the peripheral ducts, and means for introducing air into the air inlet channels which passes through the porous moderator elements and porous fuel elements to the outlet channel.

  8. Interactive shape metamorphosis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, David T.; State, Andrei; Banks, David

    1994-01-01

    A technique for controlled metamorphosis between surfaces in 3-space is described. Well-understood techniques to produce shape metamorphosis between models in a 2D parametric space is applied. The user selects morphable features interactively, and the morphing process executes in real time on a high-performance graphics multicomputer.

  9. Shape Memory Alloy Actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumbick, Robert J. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    The present invention discloses and teaches a unique, remote optically controlled micro actuator particularly suitable for aerospace vehicle applications wherein hot gas, or in the alternative optical energy, is employed as the medium by which shape memory alloy elements are activated. In gas turbine powered aircraft the source of the hot gas may be the turbine engine compressor or turbine sections.

  10. Coordination of hand shape.

    PubMed

    Pesyna, Colin; Pundi, Krishna; Flanders, Martha

    2011-03-01

    The neural control of hand movement involves coordination of the sensory, motor, and memory systems. Recent studies have documented the motor coordinates for hand shape, but less is known about the corresponding patterns of somatosensory activity. To initiate this line of investigation, the present study characterized the sense of hand shape by evaluating the influence of differences in the amount of grasping or twisting force, and differences in forearm orientation. Human subjects were asked to use the left hand to report the perceived shape of the right hand. In the first experiment, six commonly grasped items were arranged on the table in front of the subject: bottle, doorknob, egg, notebook, carton, and pan. With eyes closed, subjects used the right hand to lightly touch, forcefully support, or imagine holding each object, while 15 joint angles were measured in each hand with a pair of wired gloves. The forces introduced by supporting or twisting did not influence the perceptual report of hand shape, but for most objects, the report was distorted in a consistent manner by differences in forearm orientation. Subjects appeared to adjust the intrinsic joint angles of the left hand, as well as the left wrist posture, so as to maintain the imagined object in its proper spatial orientation. In a second experiment, this result was largely replicated with unfamiliar objects. Thus, somatosensory and motor information appear to be coordinated in an object-based, spatial-coordinate system, sensitive to orientation relative to gravitational forces, but invariant to grasp forcefulness. PMID:21389230

  11. Trends Shaping Education 2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    OECD Publishing (NJ3), 2010

    2010-01-01

    "Trends Shaping Education 2010" brings together evidence showing the effects on education of globalisation, social challenges, changes in the workplace, the transformation of childhood, and ICT. To make the content accessible, each trend is presented on a double page, containing an introduction, two charts with brief descriptive text and a set of…

  12. Coordination of Hand Shape

    PubMed Central

    Pesyna, Colin; Pundi, Krishna; Flanders, Martha

    2011-01-01

    The neural control of hand movement involves coordination of the sensory, motor and memory systems. Recent studies have documented the motor coordinates for hand shape, but less is known about the corresponding patterns of somatosensory activity. To initiate this line of investigation, the present study characterized the sense of hand shape by evaluating the influence of differences in the amount of grasping or twisting force, and differences in forearm orientation. Human subjects were asked to use the left hand to report the perceived shape of the right hand. In Experiment 1, six commonly grasped items were arranged on the table in front of the subject: bottle, doorknob, egg, notebook, carton, pan. With eyes closed, subjects used the right hand to lightly touch, forcefully support or imagine holding each object, while 15 joint angles were measured in each hand with a pair of wired gloves. The forces introduced by supporting or twisting did not influence the perceptual report of hand shape, but for most objects, the report was distorted in a consistent manner by differences in forearm orientation. Subjects appeared to adjust the intrinsic joint angles of the left hand, as well as the left wrist posture, so as to maintain the imagined object in its proper spatial orientation. In a second experiment, this result was largely replicated with unfamiliar objects. Thus somatosensory and motor information appear to be coordinated in an object-based, spatial coordinate system, sensitive to orientation relative to gravitational forces, but invariant to grasp forcefulness. PMID:21389230

  13. How life shaped Earth.

    PubMed

    Gross, Michael

    2015-10-01

    Earth is much more complex than all the other solar system objects that we know. Thanks to its rich and diverse geology, our planet can offer habitats to a wide range of living species. Emerging insights suggest that this is not just a happy coincidence, but that life itself has in many ways helped to shape the planet.

  14. The Shapes of Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenslade, Thomas B., Jr.

    2013-01-01

    I have used many ploys to start a course in introductory physics, but one of the more interesting ones was to spend 20 minutes describing some of the curves and shapes that we would encounter in our year together. The students saw parabolas, catenaries, hyperbolas, cycloids, circles, ellipses, and helices, and were shown examples, either live or…

  15. How life shaped Earth.

    PubMed

    Gross, Michael

    2015-10-01

    Earth is much more complex than all the other solar system objects that we know. Thanks to its rich and diverse geology, our planet can offer habitats to a wide range of living species. Emerging insights suggest that this is not just a happy coincidence, but that life itself has in many ways helped to shape the planet. PMID:26726334

  16. Shaping Adolescent Gambling Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arcuri, Alan F.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Surveyed the incidence of casino gambling by adolescents. Results indicated that 64 percent of the students at one Atlantic City high school had gambled at the casinos. The dangers of shaping compulsive gambling behavior through societal acceptance of legalized gambling are discussed. (Author/BL)

  17. Sounds Exaggerate Visual Shape

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweeny, Timothy D.; Guzman-Martinez, Emmanuel; Ortega, Laura; Grabowecky, Marcia; Suzuki, Satoru

    2012-01-01

    While perceiving speech, people see mouth shapes that are systematically associated with sounds. In particular, a vertically stretched mouth produces a /woo/ sound, whereas a horizontally stretched mouth produces a /wee/ sound. We demonstrate that hearing these speech sounds alters how we see aspect ratio, a basic visual feature that contributes…

  18. Orbital Shape Representations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kikuchi, Osamu; Suzuki, Keizo

    1985-01-01

    Discusses the use of orbital shapes for instructional purposes, emphasizing that differences between polar, contour, and three-dimensional plots must be made clear to students or misconceptions will occur. Also presents three-dimensional contour surfaces for the seven 4f atomic orbitals of hydrogen and discusses their computer generation. (JN)

  19. Nuclear weapons and nuclear war

    SciTech Connect

    Cassel, C.; McCally, M.; Abraham, H.

    1984-01-01

    This book examines the potential radiation hazards and environmental impacts of nuclear weapons. Topics considered include medical responsibility and thermonuclear war, the threat of nuclear war, nuclear weaponry, biological effects, radiation injury, decontamination, long-term effects, ecological effects, psychological aspects, the economic implications of nuclear weapons and war, ethics, civil defense, arms control, nuclear winter, and long-term biological consequences of nuclear war.

  20. Nuclear Theory - Nuclear Power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svenne, J. P.; Canton, L.; Kozier, K. S.

    2008-01-01

    The results from modern nuclear theory are accurate and reliable enough to be used for practical applications, in particular for scattering that involves few-nucleon systems of importance to nuclear power. Using well-established nucleon-nucleon (NN) interactions that fit well the NN scattering data, and the AGS form of the three-body theory, we have performed precise calculations of low-energy neutron-deuteron (n+d) scattering. We show that three-nucleon force effects that have impact on the low-energy vector analyzing powers have no practical effects on the angular distribution of the n+d cross-section. There appear to be problems for this scattering in the evaluated nuclear data file (ENDF) libraries, at the incident neutron energies less than 3.2 MeV. Supporting experimental data in this energy region are rather old (>25 years), sparse and often inconsistent. Our three-body results at low energies, 50 keV to 10.0 MeV, are compared to the ENDF/B-VII.0 and JENDL (Japanese Evaluated Nuclear Data Library) -3.3 evaluated angular distributions. The impact of these results on the calculated reactivity for various critical systems involving heavy water is shown.