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Sample records for coherent differential absorption

  1. A Two Micron Coherent Differential Absorption Lidar Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Jirong; Petros, Mulugeta; Chen, Songsheng; Bai, Yingxin; Petzar, Paul J.; Trieu, Bo C.; Koch, Grady J.; Beyon, Jeffrey Y.; VanValkenburg, Randal L.; Kavaya, Michael J.; Singh, Upendra N.

    2010-01-01

    A pulsed, 2-micron coherent Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL)/Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) transceiver, developed under the Laser Risk Reduction Program (LRRP) at NASA, is integrated into a fully functional lidar instrument. This instrument measures atmospheric CO2 profiles (by DIAL) from a ground platform. It allows the investigators to pursue subsequent in science-driven deployments, and provides a unique tool for Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Night, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) validation that was strongly advocated in the recent ASCENDS Workshop. Keywords: Differential Absorption Lidar, Near Infrared Laser,

  2. Air monitoring with a coherent infrared differential absorption lidar

    SciTech Connect

    Richter, P.I.; Peczeli, I.; Boeroecz, S.; Herndon, R.C.

    1995-12-31

    A coherent infrared differential absorption lidar was developed that is capable of fast remote detection of several atmospheric molecular pollutants. Typical detectable components are ammonia, phosgene, acetone, toluene, hydrogen cyanide, benzene etc. Enhanced operation of the lidar system was demonstrated using autodyne detection scheme with appropriate selection of the laser sources. This allowed keeping mass (250 kg) and power consumption (1,5 kW) of the system low. At the same time by signal fluctuation optimization sensitivities in the column content rage of 3{center_dot}10{sup 1}--10{sup 3} ppm{center_dot}m for ranges up to 2,5 km could be achieved.

  3. Differential Absorption Measurements of Atmospheric Water Vapor with a Coherent Lidar at 2050.532 nm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koch, Grady J.; Dharamsi, Amin; Davis, Richard E.; Petros, Mulugeta; McCarthy, John C.

    1999-01-01

    Wind and water vapor are two major factors driving the Earth's atmospheric circulation, and direct measurement of these factors is needed for better understanding of basic atmospheric science, weather forecasting, and climate studies. Coherent lidar has proved to be a valuable tool for Doppler profiling of wind fields, and differential absorption lidar (DIAL) has shown its effectiveness in profiling water vapor. These two lidar techniques are generally considered distinctly different, but this paper explores an experimental combination of the Doppler and DIAL techniques for measuring both wind and water vapor with an eye-safe wavelength based on a solid-state laser material. Researchers have analyzed and demonstrated coherent DIAL water vapor measurements at 10 micrometers wavelength based on CO2 lasers. The hope of the research presented here is that the 2 gm wavelength in a holmium or thulium-based laser may offer smaller packaging and more rugged operation that the CO2-based approach. Researchers have extensively modeled 2 um coherent lasers for water vapor profiling, but no published demonstration is known. Studies have also been made, and results published on the Doppler portion, of a Nd:YAG-based coherent DIAL operating at 1.12 micrometers. Eye-safety of the 1.12 micrometer wavelength may be a concern, whereas the longer 2 micrometer and 10 micrometer systems allow a high level of eyesafety.

  4. Differential Absorption Measurements of Atmospheric Water Vapor with a Coherent Lidar at 2050.532 nm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koch, Grady J.; Dharamsi, Amin; Davis, Richard E.; Petros, Mulugeta; McCarthy, John C.

    1999-01-01

    Wind and water vapor are two major factors driving the Earth's atmospheric circulation, and direct measurement of these factors is needed for better understanding of basic atmospheric science, weather forecasting, and climate studies. Coherent lidar has proved to be a valuable tool for Doppler profiling of wind fields, and differential absorption lidar (DIAL) has shown its effectiveness in profiling water vapor. These two lidar techniques are generally considered distinctly different, but this paper explores an experimental combination of the Doppler and DIAL techniques for measuring both wind and water vapor with an eye-safe wavelength based on a solid-state laser material. Researchers have analyzed and demonstrated coherent DIAL water vapor measurements at 10 micrometers wavelength based on CO2 lasers. The hope of the research presented here is that the 2 gm wavelength in a holmium or thulium-based laser may offer smaller packaging and more rugged operation that the CO2-based approach. Researchers have extensively modeled 2 um coherent lasers for water vapor profiling, but no published demonstration is known. Studies have also been made, and results published on the Doppler portion, of a Nd:YAG-based coherent DIAL operating at 1.12 micrometers. Eye-safety of the 1.12 micrometer wavelength may be a concern, whereas the longer 2 micrometer and 10 micrometer systems allow a high level of eyesafety.

  5. Improved speckle statistics in coherent differential absorption lidar with in-fiber wavelength multiplexing.

    PubMed

    Ridley, K D; Pearson, G N; Harris, M

    2001-04-20

    Remote detection of gaseous pollutants and other atmospheric constituents can be achieved with differential absorption lidar (DIAL) methods. The technique relies on the transmission of two or more laser wavelengths and exploits absorption features in the target gas by measuring the ratio of their detected powers to determine gas concentration. A common mode of operation is when the transmitter and receiver are collocated, and the absorption is measured over a return trip by a randomly scattering topographic target. Hence, in coherent DIAL, speckle fluctuation leads to a large uncertainty in the detected powers unless the signal is averaged over multiple correlation times, i.e., over many independent speckles. We examine a continuous-wave coherent DIAL system in which the laser wavelengths are transmitted and received by the same single-mode optical fibers. This ensures that the two wavelengths share a common spatial mode, which, for certain transmitter and target parameters, enables highly correlated speckle fluctuations to be readily achieved in practice. For a DIAL system, this gives the potential for improved accuracy in a given observation time. A theoretical analysis quantifies this benefit as a function of the degree of correlation between the two time series (which depends on wavelength separation and target depth). The results are compared with both a numerical simulation and a laboratory-based experiment.

  6. Coherent differential absorption lidar for combined measurement of wind and trace atmospheric gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, Grady James

    A lidar system was developed for making combined range-resolved measurements of wind speed and direction, water vapor concentration, and carbon dioxide concentration in the atmosphere. This lidar combines the coherent Doppler technique for wind detection and the differential absorption lidar (DIAL) technique to provide a multifunctional capability. DIAL and coherent lidars have traditionally been thought of and implemented as separate instruments, but the research reported here has shown a demonstration of combining the coherent and DIAL techniques into a single instrument using solid-state lasers. The lasers used are of Ho:Tm:YLF, which operates at a wavelength of 2 mum. This wavelength is a further advantage to the lidar, as this wavelength offers a much higher level of eyesafety than shorter wavelengths conventionally used for DIAL. Two generations are lidars are described, with the first design making combined measurement of wind and water vapor. Wind speed measurements are shown of a precision better than 1 m/s, making it useful for many meteorological applications. Water vapor concentration measurements were of 86% accuracy, requiring improvement for scientific applications. This preliminary experiment revealed the largest source of error in concentration measurement to be a lack of stability in the wavelength of the laser. This problem was solved by implementing a means to precisely control the continuous-wave laser that injection seeds a pulsed laser. The finely tunable Ho:Tm:YLF laser was stabilized to absorption lines of both carbon dioxide and water vapor using a wavelength modulation technique. Long-term stabilization to within 13.5 MHz of absorption line center is shown, representing the first frequency-stabilized laser at or within 500 run of 2mum wavelength. Results are presented on injection seeding a pulsed Ho:Tm:YLF laser to impart the tunability and stabilization to the pulsed laser output. The stabilized laser system was incorporated into a

  7. Ground-based integrated path coherent differential absorption lidar measurement of CO2: foothill target return

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishii, S.; Koyama, M.; Baron, P.; Iwai, H.; Mizutani, K.; Itabe, T.; Sato, A.; Asai, K.

    2013-05-01

    The National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT) has made a great deal of effort to develop a coherent 2 μm differential absorption and wind lidar (Co2DiaWiL) for measuring CO2 and wind speed. First, coherent Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) lidar experiments were conducted using the Co2DiaWiL and a foothill target (tree and ground surface) located about 7.12 km south of NICT on 11, 27, and 28 December 2010. The detection sensitivity of a 2 μm IPDA lidar was examined in detail using the CO2 concentration measured by the foothill reflection. The precisions of CO2 measurements for the foothill target and 900, 4500 and 27 000 shot pairs were 6.5, 2.8, and 1.2%, respectively. The results indicated that a coherent IPDA lidar with a laser operating at a high pulse repetition frequency of a few tens of KHz is necessary for XCO2 (column-averaged dry air mixing ratio of CO2) measurement with a precision of 1-2 ppm in order to observe temporal and spatial variations in the CO2. Statistical comparisons indicated that, although a small amount of in situ data and the fact that they were not co-located with the foothill target made comparison difficult, the CO2 volume mixing ratio obtained by the Co2DiaWiL measurements for the foothill target and atmospheric returns was about -5 ppm lower than the 5 min running averages of the in situ sensor. Not only actual difference of sensing volume or the natural variability of CO2 but also the fluctuations of temperature could cause this difference. The statistical results indicated that there were no biases between the foothill target and atmospheric return measurements. The 2 μm coherent IPDA lidar can detect the CO2 volume mixing ratio change of 3% in the 5 min signal integration. In order to detect the position of the foothill target, to measure a range with a high SNR (signal-to-noise ratio), and to reduce uncertainty due to the presence of aerosols and clouds, it is important to make a

  8. Development of a Coherent Differential Absorption Lidar for Range Resolved Atmospheric CO2 Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Jirong; Petros, Mulgueta; Chen, Songsheng; Bai, Yingxin; Petzar, Paul J.; Trieu, Bo. C.; Koch, Grady J.; Beyon, Jeffery J.; Singh, Upendra N.

    2010-01-01

    A pulsed, 2-m coherent Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) / Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) transceiver, developed under the Laser Risk Reduction Program (LRRP) at NASA, is integrated into a fully functional lidar instrument. This instrument will measure atmospheric CO2 profiles (by DIAL) initially from a ground platform, and then be prepared for aircraft installation to measure the atmospheric CO2 column densities in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) and lower troposphere. The airborne prototype CO2 lidar can measure atmospheric CO2 column density in a range bin of 1km with better than 1.5% precision at horizontal resolution of less than 50km. It can provide the image of the pooling of CO2 in lowlying areas and performs nighttime mass balance measurements at landscape scale. This sensor is unique in its capability to study the vertical ABL-free troposphere exchange of CO2 directly. It will allow the investigators to pursue subsequent in science-driven deployments, and provides a unique tool for Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Night, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) validation that was strongly advocated in the recent ASCENDS Workshop.

  9. Data Analysis of a Pulsed 2-micron Coherent Differential Absorption Lidar For Atmospheric CO2 Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, J.; Yu, J.

    2013-12-01

    The study of climate change requires precise measurement of the production, migration, and sinking of greenhouse gases. Carbon Dioxide (CO2) is one of the principal greenhouse gases. NASA Langley Research Center (LARC) has developed a pulsed 2-micron coherent differential absorption lidar (DiAL) for CO2 measurement, operating on the R30 absorption line. On April 5, 2010, the lidar instrument transmitted alternating On-line and Off-line pulses from LARC into a residential area in Poquoson, Virginia; while a passive in-situ sensor measured the local CO2 concentration. This paper outlines a procedure to estimate CO2 concentration from atmospheric lidar return signal using the DiAL method; our calculation produced results in line with the in-situ measurement and matched the current state of DiAL instrument accuracy. Data from April 5 is part of a series of experiments validating the measurement accuracy and precision of this lidar. After a summative verification, a packaged lidar may be installed on research aircraft to perform CO2 studies at a great range of latitudes throughout the year, and to discover sources, sinks, and migration trends for this key greenhouse gas. The following procedure is used to estimate CO2 concentration from atmospheric lidar return using the DiAL method. First, MATLAB software developed at LARC sorts the lidar return into On-only and Off-only files containing pulses of only that type. The sorted pulses are reexamined for quality based on the center frequency, energy, and power - unsatisfactory pulses are removed. A 512-point Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) with 256-point shift is performed on each pulse to discretize the atmospheric return signal according to 63 distance 'bins'. Next, comparing decay rates of the On-line and Off-line atmospheric return intensity with distance yields the Differential Absorption Optical Slope (DAOD), which is proportional to the concentration of the desired gas. Then, in-situ meteorological data - pressure

  10. Iris as a reflector for differential absorption low-coherence interferometry to measure glucose level in the anterior chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yong; Zeng, Nan; Ji, Yanhong; Li, Yao; Dai, Xiangsong; Li, Peng; Duan, Lian; Ma, Hui; He, Yonghong

    2011-01-01

    We present a method of glucose concentration detection in the anterior chamber with a differential absorption optical low-coherent interferometry (LCI) technique. Back-reflected light from the iris, passing through the anterior chamber twice, was selectively obtained with the LCI technique. Two light sources, one centered within (1625 nm) and the other centered outside (1310 nm) of a glucose absorption band were used for differential absorption measurement. In the eye model and pig eye experiments, we obtained a resolution glucose level of 26.8 mg/dL and 69.6 mg/dL, respectively. This method has a potential application for noninvasive detection of glucose concentration in aqueous humor, which is related to the glucose concentration in blood.

  11. 315mJ, 2-micrometers Double-Pulsed Coherent Differential Absorption Lidar Transmitter for Atmospheric CO2 Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Jirong; Trieu, Bo; Bai, Yingxin; Koch, Grady; Chen, Songsheng; Petzar, Paul; Singh, Upendra N.; Kavaya, Michael J.; Beyon, Jeffrey

    2010-01-01

    The design of a double pulsed, injection seeded, 2-micrometer compact coherent Differential absorption Lidar (DIAL) transmitter for CO2 sensing is presented. This system is hardened for ground and airborne applications. The design architecture includes three continuous wave lasers which provide controlled on and off line seeding, injection seeded power oscillator and a single amplifier operating in double pass configuration. As the derivative a coherent Doppler wind lidar, this instrument has the added benefit of providing wind information. The active laser material used for this application is a Ho: Tm:YLF crystal operates at the eye-safe wavelength. The 3-meter long folded ring resonator produces energy of 130-mJ (90/40) with a temporal pulse length around 220 nanoseconds and 530 nanosecond pulses for on and off lines respectively. The separation between the two pulses is on the order of 200 microseconds. The line width is in the order of 2.5MHz and the beam quality has an M(sup 2) of 1.1 times diffraction limited beam. A final output energy for a pair of both on and off pulses as high as 315 mJ (190/125) at a repetition rate of 10 Hz is achieved. The operating temperature is set around 20 C for the pump diode lasers and 10 C for the rod. Since the laser design has to meet high-energy as well as high beam quality requirements, close attention is paid to the laser head design to avoid thermal distortion in the rod. A side-pumped configuration is used and heat is removed uniformly by passing coolant through a tube slightly larger than the rod to reduce thermal gradient. This paper also discusses the advantage of using a long upper laser level life time laser crystal for DIAL application. In addition issues related to injection seeding with two different frequencies to achieve a transform limited line width will be presented.

  12. Differential absorption lidar measurements of H2O and O2 using a coherent white light continuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somekawa, T.; Manago, N.; Kuze, H.; Fujita, M.

    2016-10-01

    We applied a broadband and coherent white light continuum to differential absorption lidar (DIAL) detection of H2O and O2 profiles in the troposphere. The white light continuum can be generated by focusing high intensity femtosecond laser pulses at 800 nm into a Kr gas cell covering a broad spectral range from UV to mid-IR. Thus, the use of white light continuum potentially enables the DIAL measurement of several greenhouse and/or pollutant gases simultaneously while minimizing the lead time for developing a tunable light source. In order to demonstrate such capability, here we report the lidar measurements of H2O and O2. These molecular species exhibit absorption lines in the near IR region where relatively high intensity of the white light continuum is available. The white light continuum was transmitted through the atmosphere collinearly to the axis of a receiver telescope. Backscattered light was passed through bandpass filters (H2O On: 725 and 730 nm, H2O Off: 750 nm, O2 On: 760 nm, O2 Off: 780 nm), and was detected by a photomultiplier tube. The detection wavelengths were selected consecutively by rotating the filter wheels that contain five bandpass filters with an interval of 1 minute. In addition, we propose a method for retrieving vertical profiles of H2O by considering wavelength dependence of the aerosol extinction coefficient α and backscatter coefficient β. These results show that for achieving precise retrieval of H2O distribution, one needs to reduce the effect of aerosol temporal variations by means of long-time accumulation or simultaneous detection of the On- and Off-wavelength signals.

  13. Aqueous glucose measurement using differential absorption-based frequency domain optical coherence tomography at wavelengths of 1310 nm and 1625 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    John, Pauline; Manoj, Murali; Sujatha, N.; Vasa, Nilesh J.; Rao, Suresh R.

    2015-07-01

    This work presents a combination of differential absorption technique and frequency domain optical coherence tomography for detection of glucose, which is an important analyte in medical diagnosis of diabetes. Differential absorption technique is used to detect glucose selectively in the presence of interfering species especially water and frequency domain optical coherence tomography (FDOCT) helps to obtain faster acquisition of depth information. Two broadband super-luminescent diode (SLED) sources with centre wavelengths 1586 nm (wavelength range of 1540 to 1640 nm) and 1312 nm (wavelength range of 1240 to 1380 nm) and a spectral width of ≍ 60 nm (FWHM) are used. Preliminary studies on absorption spectroscopy using various concentrations of aqueous glucose solution gave promising results to distinguish the absorption characteristics of glucose at two wavelengths 1310 nm (outside the absorption band of glucose) and 1625 nm (within the absorption band of glucose). In order to mimic the optical properties of biological skin tissue, 2% and 10% of 20% intralipid with various concentrations of glucose (0 to 4000 mg/dL) was prepared and used as sample. Using OCT technique, interference spectra were obtained using an optical spectrum analyzer with a resolution of 0.5 nm. Further processing of the interference spectra provided information on reflections from the surfaces of the cuvette containing the aqueous glucose sample. Due to the absorption of glucose in the wavelength range of 1540 nm to 1640 nm, a trend of reduction in the intensity of the back reflected light was observed with increase in the concentration of glucose.

  14. Selective coherent perfect absorption in metamaterials

    SciTech Connect

    Nie, Guangyu; Shi, Quanchao; Zhu, Zheng; Shi, Jinhui

    2014-11-17

    We show multi-band coherent perfect absorption (CPA) in simple bilayered asymmetrically split ring metamaterials. The selectivity of absorption can be accomplished by separately excited electric and magnetic modes in a standing wave formed by two coherent counterpropagating beams. In particular, each CPA can be completely switched on/off by the phase of a second coherent wave. We propose a practical scheme for realizing multi-band coherent perfect absorption of 100% that is allowed to work from microwave to optical frequency.

  15. Differential optoacoustic absorption detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shumate, M. S. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A differential optoacoustic absorption detector employed two tapered cells in tandem or in parallel. When operated in tandem, two mirrors were used at one end remote from the source of the beam of light directed into one cell back through the other, and a lens to focus the light beam into the one cell at a principal focus half way between the reflecting mirror. Each cell was tapered to conform to the shape of the beam so that the volume of one was the same as for the other, and the volume of each received maximum illumination. The axes of the cells were placed as close to each other as possible in order to connect a differential pressure detector to the cells with connecting passages of minimum length. An alternative arrangement employed a beam splitter and two lenses to operate the cells in parallel.

  16. Super-Resonant Intracavity Coherent Absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malara, P.; Campanella, C. E.; Giorgini, A.; Avino, S.; de Natale, P.; Gagliardi, G.

    2016-07-01

    The capability of optical resonators to extend the effective radiation-matter interaction length originates from a multipass effect, hence is intrinsically limited by the resonator’s quality factor. Here, we show that this constraint can be overcome by combining the concepts of resonant interaction and coherent perfect absorption (CPA). We demonstrate and investigate super-resonant coherent absorption in a coupled Fabry-Perot (FP)/ring cavity structure. At the FP resonant wavelengths, the described phenomenon gives rise to split modes with a nearly-transparent peak and a peak whose transmission is exceptionally sensitive to the intracavity loss. For small losses, the effective interaction pathlength of these modes is proportional respectively to the ratio and the product of the individual finesse coefficients of the two resonators. The results presented extend the conventional definition of resonant absorption and point to a way of circumventing the technological limitations of ultrahigh-quality resonators in spectroscopy and optical sensing schemes.

  17. Differential-absorption photoacoustic imaging.

    PubMed

    Huang, Sheng-Wen; Eary, Janet F; Jia, Congxian; Huang, Lingyun; Ashkenazi, Shai; O'Donnell, Matthew

    2009-08-15

    We present differential-absorption photoacoustic imaging, which detects the difference between transient and ground-state absorption, for contrast enhancement based on suppressing undesired objects. Two tubes were imaged. One contains a Pt(II) octaethylporphine (PtOEP) dye solution and serves as an object of interest, while the other contains an IR-783 (from Sigma-Aldrich) dye solution and serves as an object to suppress. Although the IR-783 tube dominates the conventional photoacoustic image, it is suppressed by 43 dB and consequently significantly overwhelmed by the PtOEP tube in the differential-absorption photoacoustic image. Imaging depth in this mode is also discussed.

  18. Scheme for achieving coherent perfect absorption by anisotropic metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiujuan; Wu, Ying

    2017-03-06

    We propose a unified scheme to achieve coherent perfect absorption of electromagnetic waves by anisotropic metamaterials. The scheme describes the condition on perfect absorption and offers an inverse design route based on effective medium theory in conjunction with retrieval method to determine practical metamaterial absorbers. The scheme is scalable to frequencies and applicable to various incident angles. Numerical simulations show that perfect absorption is achieved in the designed absorbers over a wide range of incident angles, verifying the scheme. By integrating these absorbers, we further propose an absorber to absorb energy from two coherent point sources.

  19. "Stirred, Not Shaken": Vibrational Coherence Can Speed Up Electronic Absorption.

    PubMed

    Chang, Bo Y; Shin, Seokmin; Sola, Ignacio R

    2015-08-27

    We have recently proposed a laser control scheme for ultrafast absorption in multilevel systems by parallel transfer (J. Phys. Chem. Lett. 2015, 6, 1724). In this work we develop an analytical model that better takes into account the main features of electronic absorption in molecules. We show that the initial vibrational coherence in the ground electronic state can be used to greatly enhance the rate and yield of absorption when ultrashort pulses are used, provided that the phases of the coherences are taken into account. On the contrary, the initial coherence plays no role in the opposite limit, when a single long pulse drives the optical transition. The theory is tested by numerical simulations in the first absorption band of Na2.

  20. Coherent perfect absorption and reflection in slow-light waveguides.

    PubMed

    Gutman, Nadav; Sukhorukov, Andrey A; Chong, Y D; de Sterke, C Martijn

    2013-12-01

    We identify a family of unusual slow-light modes occurring in lossy multimode grating waveguides, for which either the forward or backward mode components, or both, are degenerate. In the fully degenerate case, the response can be modulated between coherent perfect absorption (zero reflection) and perfect reflection by varying the wave amplitudes in a uniform input waveguide. The perfectly absorbed wave has anomalously short absorption length, scaling as the inverse one-third power of the absorptivity.

  1. Coherent perfect absorption mediated anomalous reflection and refraction.

    PubMed

    Dutta-Gupta, Shourya; Deshmukh, Rahul; Venu Gopal, Achanta; Martin, Olivier J F; Dutta Gupta, S

    2012-11-01

    We show bending of light on the same side of the normal in a free-standing corrugated metal film under bidirectional illumination. Coherent perfect absorption (CPA) is exploited to suppress the specular zeroth order leading to effective back-bending of light into the "-1" order, while the "+1" order is resonant with the surface mode. The effect is shown to be phase sensitive, yielding CPA and superscattering in the same geometry.

  2. Infrared differential absorption for atmospheric pollutant detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byer, R. L.

    1974-01-01

    Progress made in the generation of tunable infrared radiation and its application to remote pollutant detection by the differential absorption method are summarized. It is recognized that future remote pollutant measurements depended critically on the availability of high energy tunable transmitters. Futhermore, due to eye safety requirements, the transmitted frequency must lie in the 1.4 micron to 13 micron infrared spectral range.

  3. Coherent perfect absorption in one-sided reflectionless media

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jin-Hui; Artoni, M.; La Rocca, G. C.

    2016-01-01

    In optical experiments one-sided reflectionless (ORL) and coherent perfect absorption (CPA) are unusual scattering properties yet fascinating for their fundamental aspects and for their practical interest. Although these two concepts have so far remained separated from each other, we prove that the two phenomena are indeed strictly connected. We show that a CPA–ORL connection exists between pairs of points lying along lines close to each other in the 3D space-parameters of a realistic lossy atomic photonic crystal. The connection is expected to be a generic feature of wave scattering in non-Hermitian optical media encompassing, as a particular case, wave scattering in parity-time (PT) symmetric media. PMID:27759020

  4. Symmetrical and anti-symmetrical coherent perfect absorption for acoustic waves

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Pengjiang; Croënne, Charles; Tak Chu, Sai; Li, Jensen

    2014-03-24

    We investigate tunable acoustic absorption enabled by the coherent control of input waves. It relies on coherent perfect absorption originally proposed in optics. By designing appropriate acoustic metamaterial structures with resonating effective bulk modulus or density, we show that complete absorption of incident waves impinging on the metamaterial can be achieved for either symmetrical or anti-symmetrical inputs in the forward and backward directions. By adjusting the relative phase between the two incident beams, absorption can be tuned effectively from unity to zero, making coherent control useful in applications like acoustic modulators, noise controllers, transducers, and switches.

  5. Coherent perfect absorption in deeply subwavelength films in the single-photon regime

    PubMed Central

    Roger, Thomas; Vezzoli, Stefano; Bolduc, Eliot; Valente, Joao; Heitz, Julius J. F.; Jeffers, John; Soci, Cesare; Leach, Jonathan; Couteau, Christophe; Zheludev, Nikolay I.; Faccio, Daniele

    2015-01-01

    The technologies of heating, photovoltaics, water photocatalysis and artificial photosynthesis depend on the absorption of light and novel approaches such as coherent absorption from a standing wave promise total dissipation of energy. Extending the control of absorption down to very low light levels and eventually to the single-photon regime is of great interest and yet remains largely unexplored. Here we demonstrate the coherent absorption of single photons in a deeply subwavelength 50% absorber. We show that while the absorption of photons from a travelling wave is probabilistic, standing wave absorption can be observed deterministically, with nearly unitary probability of coupling a photon into a mode of the material, for example, a localized plasmon when this is a metamaterial excited at the plasmon resonance. These results bring a better understanding of the coherent absorption process, which is of central importance for light harvesting, detection, sensing and photonic data processing applications. PMID:25991584

  6. Octave-spanning coherent perfect absorption in a thin silicon film.

    PubMed

    Pye, Lorelle N; Villinger, Massimo L; Shabahang, Soroush; Larson, Walker D; Martin, Lane; Abouraddy, Ayman F

    2017-01-01

    Although optical absorption is an intrinsic materials property, it can be manipulated through structural modification. Coherent perfect absorption increases absorption to 100% interferometrically but is typically realized only over narrow bandwidths using two laser beams with fixed phase relationship. We show that engineering a thin film's photonic environment severs the link between the effective absorption of the film and its intrinsic absorption while eliminating, in principle, bandwidth restrictions. Employing thin aperiodic dielectric mirrors, we demonstrate coherent perfect absorption in a 2 μm thick film of polycrystalline silicon using a single incoherent beam of light at all the resonances across a spectrally flat, octave-spanning near-infrared spectrum, ≈800-1600  nm. Critically, these mirrors have wavelength-dependent reflectivity devised to counterbalance the decline in silicon's intrinsic absorption at long wavelengths.

  7. Surface ozone measurements using differential absorption lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Sohan L.; Arya, B. C.; Ghude, Sachin D.; Arora, Arun K.; Sinha, Randhir K.

    2005-01-01

    Human activities have been influencing the global atmosphere since the beginning of the industrial era, causing shifts from its natural state. The measurements have shown that tropospheric ozone is increasing gradually due to anthropogenic activities. Surface ozone is a secondary pollutant, its concentration in lower troposphere depends upon its precursors (CO, CH4, non methane hydrocarbons, NOx) as well as weather and transport phenomenon. The surface ozone exceeding the ambient air quality standard is health hazard to human being, animal and vegetation. The regular information of its concentrations on ground levels is needed for setting ambient air quality objectives and understanding photo chemical air pollution in urban areas. A Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) using a tunable CO2 laser has been designed and developed at National Physical Laboratory, New Delhi, to monitor water vapour, surface ozone, ammonia, ethylene etc. Some times ethylene and surface ozone was found to be more than 40 ppb and 140 ppb respectively which is a health hazard. Seasonal variation in ozone concentrations shows maximum in the months of summer and autumn and minimum in monsoon and winter months. In present communication salient features of experimental set up and results obtained will be presented in detail.

  8. First attempt to monitor atmospheric glyoxal using differential absorption lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, Liang; Lundin, Patrik; Somesfalean, Gabriel; Hu, Jiandong; Zhao, Guangyu; Svanberg, Sune; Bood, Joakim; Vrekoussis, Mihalis; Papayannis, Alexandros

    2012-11-01

    Glyoxal (CHOCHO), as an indicator of photochemical "hot spots", was for the first time the subject of a differential absorption lidar (DIAL) campaign. The strongest absorption line of glyoxal in the blue wavelength region - 455.1 nm - was chosen as the experimental absorption wavelength. In order to handle the effects of absorption cross-section variation of the interfering gas - nitrogen dioxide (NO2) - three-wavelength DIAL measurements simultaneously detecting glyoxal and NO2, were performed. The differential absorption curves, recorded in July 2012, indicate an extremely low glyoxal concentration in Lund, Sweden, although it is expected to be peaking at this time of the year.

  9. Effect of coherence loss in differential phase contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Weixing; Ning, Ruola; Liu, Jiangkun

    2014-03-01

    Coherence property of x-rays is critical in the grating-based differential phase contrast (DPC) imaging because it is the physical foundation that makes any form of phase contrast imaging possible. Loss of coherence is an important experimental issue, which results in increased image noise and reduced object contrast in DPC images and DPC cone beam CT (DPC-CBCT) reconstructions. In this study, experimental results are investigated to characterize the visibility loss (a measurement of coherence loss) in several different applications, including different-sized phantom imaging, specimen imaging and small animal imaging. Key measurements include coherence loss (relative intensity changes in the area of interest in phase-stepping images), contrast and noise level in retrieved DPC images, and contrast and noise level in reconstructed DPC-CBCT images. The influence of size and composition of imaged object (uniform object, bones, skin hairs, tissues, and etc) will be quantified. The same investigation is also applied for moiré pattern-based DPC-CBCT imaging with the same exposure dose. A theoretical model is established to relate coherence loss, noise level in phase stepping images (or moiré images), and the contrast and noise in the retrieved DPC images. Experiment results show that uniform objects lead to a small coherence loss even when the attenuation is higher, while objects with large amount of small structures result in huge coherence loss even when the attenuation is small. The theoretical model predicts the noise level in retrieved DPC images, and it also suggests a minimum dose required for DPC imaging to compensate for coherence loss.

  10. Reconsidering harmonic and anharmonic coherent states: Partial differential equations approach

    SciTech Connect

    Toutounji, Mohamad

    2015-02-15

    This article presents a new approach to dealing with time dependent quantities such as autocorrelation function of harmonic and anharmonic systems using coherent states and partial differential equations. The approach that is normally used to evaluate dynamical quantities involves formidable operator algebra. That operator algebra becomes insurmountable when employing Morse oscillator coherent states. This problem becomes even more complicated in case of Morse oscillator as it tends to exhibit divergent dynamics. This approach employs linear partial differential equations, some of which may be solved exactly and analytically, thereby avoiding the cumbersome noncommutative algebra required to manipulate coherent states of Morse oscillator. Additionally, the arising integrals while using the herein presented method feature stability and high numerical efficiency. The correctness, applicability, and utility of the above approach are tested by reproducing the partition and optical autocorrelation function of the harmonic oscillator. A closed-form expression for the equilibrium canonical partition function of the Morse oscillator is derived using its coherent states and partial differential equations. Also, a nonequilibrium autocorrelation function expression for weak electron–phonon coupling in condensed systems is derived for displaced Morse oscillator in electronic state. Finally, the utility of the method is demonstrated through further simplifying the Morse oscillator partition function or autocorrelation function expressions reported by other researchers in unevaluated form of second-order derivative exponential. Comparison with exact dynamics shows identical results.

  11. Experimental demonstration of coherent perfect absorption in a silicon photonic racetrack resonator.

    PubMed

    Rothenberg, Jacob M; Chen, Christine P; Ackert, Jason J; Dadap, Jerry I; Knights, Andrew P; Bergman, Keren; Osgood, Richard M; Grote, Richard R

    2016-06-01

    We present the first experimental demonstration of coherent perfect absorption (CPA) in an integrated device using a silicon racetrack resonator at telecommunication wavelengths. Absorption in the racetrack is achieved by Si+-ion-implantation, allowing for phase controllable amplitude modulation at the resonant wavelength. The device is measured to have an extinction of 24.5 dB and a quality-factor exceeding 3000. Our results will enable integrated CPA devices for data modulation and detection.

  12. An equivalent realization of coherent perfect absorption under single beam illumination.

    PubMed

    Li, Sucheng; Luo, Jie; Anwar, Shahzad; Li, Shuo; Lu, Weixin; Hang, Zhi Hong; Lai, Yun; Hou, Bo; Shen, Mingrong; Wang, Chinhua

    2014-12-08

    We have experimentally and numerically demonstrated that the coherent perfect absorption (CPA) can equivalently be accomplished under single beam illumination. Instead of using the counter-propagating coherent dual beams, we introduce a perfect magnetic conductor (PMC) surface as a mirror boundary to the CPA configuration. Such a PMC surface can practically be embodied, utilizing high impedance surfaces, i.e., mushroom structures. By covering them with an ultrathin conductive film of sheet resistance 377 Ω, the perfect (100%) microwave absorption is achieved when the film is illuminated by a single beam from one side. Employing the PMC boundary reduces the coherence requirement in the original CPA setup, though the present implementation is limited to the single frequency or narrow band operation. Our work proposes an equivalent way to realize the CPA under the single beam illumination, and might have applications in engineering absorbent materials.

  13. An equivalent realization of coherent perfect absorption under single beam illumination

    PubMed Central

    Li, Sucheng; Luo, Jie; Anwar, Shahzad; Li, Shuo; Lu, Weixin; Hang, Zhi Hong; Lai, Yun; Hou, Bo; Shen, Mingrong; Wang, Chinhua

    2014-01-01

    We have experimentally and numerically demonstrated that the coherent perfect absorption (CPA) can equivalently be accomplished under single beam illumination. Instead of using the counter-propagating coherent dual beams, we introduce a perfect magnetic conductor (PMC) surface as a mirror boundary to the CPA configuration. Such a PMC surface can practically be embodied, utilizing high impedance surfaces, i.e., mushroom structures. By covering them with an ultrathin conductive film of sheet resistance 377 Ω, the perfect (100%) microwave absorption is achieved when the film is illuminated by a single beam from one side. Employing the PMC boundary reduces the coherence requirement in the original CPA setup, though the present implementation is limited to the single frequency or narrow band operation. Our work proposes an equivalent way to realize the CPA under the single beam illumination, and might have applications in engineering absorbent materials. PMID:25482592

  14. Coherent perfect absorption induced by the nonlinearity of a Helmholtz resonator.

    PubMed

    Achilleos, V; Richoux, O; Theocharis, G

    2016-07-01

    In this work, coherent perfect absorption of sound waves induced by the nonlinear response of a Helmholtz Resonator side loaded to a waveguide, is reported. It is shown that this two-port system can perfectly absorb two high amplitude symmetric incident waves under a certain condition. For the one-sided incidence configuration, this condition leads to an absorption equal to 0.5. Experiments verify these results and are in agreement with an analytical nonlinear impedance model for the resonator. The nonlinear control of perfect absorption opens new possibilities in the design of high amplitude sound attenuators for aero-engine applications.

  15. Gate-tunable coherent perfect absorption of terahertz radiation in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fangli; Chong, Y. D.; Adam, Shaffique; Polini, Marco

    2014-12-01

    Perfect absorption of radiation in a graphene sheet may play a pivotal role in the realization of technologically relevant optoelectronic devices. In particular, perfect absorption of radiation in the terahertz (THz) spectral range would tremendously boost the utility of graphene in this difficult range of photon energies, which still lacks cheap and robust devices operating at room temperature. In this work we show that unpatterned graphene flakes deposited on appropriate substrates can display gate-tunable coherent perfect absorption (CPA) in the THz spectral range. We present theoretical estimates for the CPA operating frequency as a function of doping, which take into account the presence of common sources of disorder in graphene samples.

  16. [Using Fourier transform to analyse differential optical absorption spectrum].

    PubMed

    Liu, Qian-Lin; Wang, Li-Shi; Huang, Xin-Jian

    2008-05-01

    According to the theory of differential optical absorption spectral technique, the differential optical absorption spectral monitoring equipment was designed. Aiming at two kinds of main pollutants, SO2 and NO2, in the atmosphere, this technique was used to monitor them. The present article puts forward the signal analysis method of Fourier transformation to process the above-mentioned two kinds of absorption spectra. The two approaches contain the removeal of noise and the fitting of the slow variety. On the frequency chart after the spectrum was transformed, the low frequency corresponded to the slow variety part and the high frequency corresponded to the noise part of the original spectrum, so through intercepting a certain frequency segment and using inverse Fourier transformation the slow variety part of the low frequency and the noise part of the high frequency of the absorption spectrum could be subtracted. After farther processing we can get a higher resolution differential absorption spectrum of the gas. According to the strength of the spectrum, we can calculate the concentration of the gas. After analysis and comparison with the conventional method, it is considered a new processing method of differential optical absorption spectral technique, and the method can fit the slow variety much better.

  17. Characterization of power absorption response of periodic three-dimensional structures to partially coherent fields.

    PubMed

    Tihon, Denis; Withington, Stafford; Thomas, Christopher N; Craeye, Christophe

    2016-12-01

    In many applications of absorbing structures it is important to understand their spatial response to incident fields, for example in thermal solar panels, bolometric imaging, and controlling radiative heat transfer. In practice, the illuminating field often originates from thermal sources and is only partially spatially coherent when it reaches the absorbing device. In this paper, we present a method to fully characterize the way a structure can absorb such partially coherent fields. The method is presented for any three-dimensional material and accounts for the partial coherence and partial polarization of the incident light. This characterization can be achieved numerically using simulation results or experimentally using the energy absorption interferometry that has been described previously in the literature. The absorbing structure is characterized through a set of absorbing functions onto which any partially coherent field can be projected. This set is compact for any structure of finite extent, and the absorbing function is discrete for periodic structures.

  18. Low coherence fiber differentiating interferometer and its passive demodulation schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Wentan; Jia, Qiumin; Zhen, Shenglai; Chen, Jian; Cheng, Xiaoyan; Yu, Benli

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a low coherence fiber differentiating interferometer and its passive demodulation schemes are presented and experimentally demonstrated. The interferometer which adopts a broadband light resource and balanced detection is a hybrid configuration of Mach-Zehnder and Sagnac interferometer. The two passive demodulation schemes employ an approximate method and a differential-and-cross-multiply (DCM) method to obtain the vibration signal. The phase measurement resolution (PMR) of both methods can reach 6 × 10-5 rad. Comparing with the approximate method which is usually adopted to restore weak signal, the experiment results demonstrated the dynamic range of the DCM demodulation method has increased 30 dB, which extends the measurement range and can be used widely in various physical fields.

  19. Direct Observation of the Coherent Nuclear Response after the Absorption of a Photon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebel, M.; Schnedermann, C.; Bassolino, G.; Taylor, G.; Watts, A.; Kukura, P.

    2014-06-01

    How molecules convert light energy to perform a specific transformation is a fundamental question in photophysics. Ultrafast spectroscopy reveals the kinetics associated with electronic energy flow, but little is known about how absorbed photon energy drives nuclear motion. Here we used ultrabroadband transient absorption spectroscopy to monitor coherent vibrational energy flow after photoexcitation of the retinal chromophore. In the proton pump bacteriorhodopsin, we observed coherent activation of hydrogen-out-of-plane wagging and backbone torsional modes that were replaced by unreactive coordinates in the solution environment, concomitant with a deactivation of the reactive relaxation pathway.

  20. Direct observation of the coherent nuclear response after the absorption of a photon.

    PubMed

    Liebel, M; Schnedermann, C; Bassolino, G; Taylor, G; Watts, A; Kukura, P

    2014-06-13

    How molecules convert light energy to perform a specific transformation is a fundamental question in photophysics. Ultrafast spectroscopy reveals the kinetics associated with electronic energy flow, but little is known about how absorbed photon energy drives nuclear motion. Here we used ultrabroadband transient absorption spectroscopy to monitor coherent vibrational energy flow after photoexcitation of the retinal chromophore. In the proton pump bacteriorhodopsin, we observed coherent activation of hydrogen-out-of-plane wagging and backbone torsional modes that were replaced by unreactive coordinates in the solution environment, concomitant with a deactivation of the reactive relaxation pathway.

  1. Coherent absorption of light by graphene and other optically conducting surfaces in realistic on-substrate configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanotto, S.; Bianco, F.; Miseikis, V.; Convertino, D.; Coletti, C.; Tredicucci, A.

    2017-01-01

    Analytical formulas are derived describing the coherent absorption of light from a realistic multilayer structure composed by an optically conducting surface on a supporting substrate. The model predicts two fundamental results. First, the absorption regime named coherent perfect transparency theoretically can always be reached. Second, the optical conductance of the surface can be extrapolated from absorption experimental data even when the substrate thickness is unknown. The theoretical predictions are experimentally verified by analyzing a multilayer graphene structure grown on a silicon carbide substrate. The graphene thickness estimated through the coherent absorption technique resulted in good agreement with the values obtained by two other spectroscopic techniques. Thanks to the high spatial resolution that can be reached and high sensitivity to the probed structure thickness, coherent absorption spectroscopy represents an accurate and non-destructive diagnostic method for the spatial mapping of the optical properties of two-dimensional materials and of metasurfaces on a wafer scale.

  2. Atmospheric Water Vapour Differential Absorption Measurements with an Infrared Sounder.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-03-01

    such as amonia . As the differential absorption was only of the order of 2 dB for the above measurements (at 450 m range), the measurements were repeated...frequent(ref.7), and most seriously affect surface based radio frequency sensors and communications systems. Further development and refinement of the

  3. Coherent manipulation of absorption by intense fields in four level ladder system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Pardeep; Dasgupta, Shubhrangshu

    2016-05-01

    Nonlinear optical processes attributed to the dependence of the susceptibility of the medium on the input fluence can be remarkably manipulated by the quantum interference and coherence. One of these processes, the optical bistability (OB), that refers to the possibilities of two stable outputs for the same input fields, can also be modified by quantum coherence. Further, the nonlinear dependence of the absorption on the power of the input light gives rise to interesting processes like saturable absorption (SA) and reverse saturable absorption (RSA). While the SA corresponds to the decrease in the absorption coefficient with the increase of intensity of input light, the RSA corresponds to otherwise, that finds applications in optical limiting. We show, using a four-level Ladder system, how a control field manipulates these processes for an intense probe field applied in the excited state transition. The nonlinear absorption increases whereas the threshold of OB decreases in presence of a control field. We further delineates how the control field and the decay rates modifies SA and RSA. The control of these processes find applications in optical switching, optical limiting and optical communications.

  4. Coherence in the presence of absorption and heating in a molecule interferometer.

    PubMed

    Cotter, J P; Eibenberger, S; Mairhofer, L; Cheng, X; Asenbaum, P; Arndt, M; Walter, K; Nimmrichter, S; Hornberger, K

    2015-06-11

    Matter-wave interferometry can be used to probe the foundations of physics and to enable precise measurements of particle properties and fundamental constants. It relies on beam splitters that coherently divide the wave function. In atom interferometers, such elements are often realised using lasers by exploiting the dipole interaction or through photon absorption. It is intriguing to extend these ideas to complex molecules where the energy of an absorbed photon can rapidly be redistributed across many internal degrees of freedom. Here, we provide evidence that center-of-mass coherence can be maintained even when the internal energy and entropy of the interfering particle are substantially increased by absorption of photons from a standing light wave. Each photon correlates the molecular center-of-mass wave function with its internal temperature and splits it into a superposition with opposite momenta in addition to the beam-splitting action of the optical dipole potential.

  5. Coherence in the presence of absorption and heating in a molecule interferometer

    PubMed Central

    Cotter, J. P.; Eibenberger, S.; Mairhofer, L.; Cheng, X.; Asenbaum, P.; Arndt, M.; Walter, K.; Nimmrichter, S.; Hornberger, K.

    2015-01-01

    Matter-wave interferometry can be used to probe the foundations of physics and to enable precise measurements of particle properties and fundamental constants. It relies on beam splitters that coherently divide the wave function. In atom interferometers, such elements are often realised using lasers by exploiting the dipole interaction or through photon absorption. It is intriguing to extend these ideas to complex molecules where the energy of an absorbed photon can rapidly be redistributed across many internal degrees of freedom. Here, we provide evidence that center-of-mass coherence can be maintained even when the internal energy and entropy of the interfering particle are substantially increased by absorption of photons from a standing light wave. Each photon correlates the molecular center-of-mass wave function with its internal temperature and splits it into a superposition with opposite momenta in addition to the beam-splitting action of the optical dipole potential. PMID:26066053

  6. In vivo low-coherence spectroscopic measurements of local hemoglobin absorption spectra in human skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosschaart, Nienke; Faber, Dirk J.; van Leeuwen, Ton G.; Aalders, Maurice C. G.

    2011-10-01

    Localized spectroscopic measurements of optical properties are invaluable for diagnostic applications that involve layered tissue structures, but conventional spectroscopic techniques lack exact control over the size and depth of the probed tissue volume. We show that low-coherence spectroscopy (LCS) overcomes these limitations by measuring local attenuation and absorption coefficient spectra in layered phantoms. In addition, we demonstrate the first in vivo LCS measurements of the human epidermis and dermis only. From the measured absorption in two distinct regions of the dermal microcirculation, we determine total hemoglobin concentration (3.0+/-0.5 g/l and 7.8+/-1.2 g/l) and oxygen saturation.

  7. In vivo low-coherence spectroscopic measurements of local hemoglobin absorption spectra in human skin.

    PubMed

    Bosschaart, Nienke; Faber, Dirk J; van Leeuwen, Ton G; Aalders, Maurice C G

    2011-10-01

    Localized spectroscopic measurements of optical properties are invaluable for diagnostic applications that involve layered tissue structures, but conventional spectroscopic techniques lack exact control over the size and depth of the probed tissue volume. We show that low-coherence spectroscopy (LCS) overcomes these limitations by measuring local attenuation and absorption coefficient spectra in layered phantoms. In addition, we demonstrate the first in vivo LCS measurements of the human epidermis and dermis only. From the measured absorption in two distinct regions of the dermal microcirculation, we determine total hemoglobin concentration (3.0±0.5 g∕l and 7.8±1.2 g∕l) and oxygen saturation.

  8. Differential absorption lidar measurements of atmospheric temperature and pressure profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korb, C. L.

    1981-01-01

    The theory and methodology of using differential absorption lidar techniques for the remote measurement of atmospheric pressure profiles, surface pressure, and temperature profiles from ground, air, and space-based platforms are presented. Pressure measurements are effected by means of high resolution measurement of absorption at the edges of the oxygen A band lines where absorption is pressure dependent due to collisional line broadening. Temperature is assessed using measurements of the absorption at the center of the oxygen A band line originating from a quantum state with high ground state energy. The population of the state is temperature dependent, allowing determination of the temperature through the Boltzmann term. The results of simulations of the techniques using Voigt profile and variational analysis are reported for ground-based, airborne, and Shuttle-based systems. Accuracies in the 0.5-1.0 K and 0.1-0.3% range are projected.

  9. [Optical coherence tomography for differentiation of parathyroid gland tissue].

    PubMed

    Ladurner, R; Hallfeldt, K; Al Arabi, N; Gallwas, J; Mortensen, U; Sommerey, S

    2016-05-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a high-resolution imaging technique that allows the identification of microarchitectural features in real-time. Can OCT be used to differentiate parathyroid tissue from other cervical tissue entities? All investigations were carried out during cervical operations. Initially, ex vivo images were analyzed to define morphological imaging criteria for each tissue entity. These criteria were used to evaluate a first series of ex vivo images. In a second phase the practicability of the technique was investigated in vivo and in the third phase backscattering intensity measurements were analyzed employing linear discriminant analysis (LDA). In the ex vivo series parathyroid tissue could be differentiated from other tissue entities with a sensitivity and specificity of 84  % and 94  %, respectively. Parathyroid tissue was correctly identified in the in vivo series in only 69.2 %. The analysis of backscattering intensity profiles employing LDA reliably distinguished between the different tissue types. The OCT images displayed typical characteristics for each tissue entity. Due to technical problems in handling the probe the in vivo OCT images were of much poorer quality. Backscattering intensity measurements illustrated that OCT images provide an individual profile for each tissue entity independent of the defined morphological assessment criteria. The results show that OCT is fundamentally suitable for intraoperative differentiation of tissues.

  10. Simulation of X-ray transient absorption for following vibrations in coherently ionized F2 molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutoi, Anthony D.; Leone, Stephen R.

    2017-01-01

    Femtosecond and attosecond X-ray transient absorption experiments are becoming increasingly sophisticated tools for probing nuclear dynamics. In this work, we explore and develop theoretical tools needed for interpretation of such spectra,in order to characterize the vibrational coherences that result from ionizing a molecule in a strong IR field. Ab initio data for F2 is combined with simulations of nuclear dynamics, in order to simulate time-resolved X-ray absorption spectra for vibrational wavepackets after coherent ionization at 0 K and at finite temperature. Dihalogens pose rather difficult electronic structure problems, and the issues encountered in this work will be reflective of those encountered with any core-valence excitation simulation when a bond is breaking. The simulations reveal a strong dependence of the X-ray absorption maximum on the locations of the vibrational wave packets. A Fourier transform of the simulated signal shows features at the overtone frequencies of both the neutral and the cation, which reflect spatial interferences of the vibrational eigenstates. This provides a direct path for implementing ultrafast X-ray spectroscopic methods to visualize coherent nuclear dynamics.

  11. Towards quantitative atmospheric water vapor profiling with differential absorption lidar.

    PubMed

    Dinovitser, Alex; Gunn, Lachlan J; Abbott, Derek

    2015-08-24

    Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) is a powerful laser-based technique for trace gas profiling of the atmosphere. However, this technique is still under active development requiring precise and accurate wavelength stabilization, as well as accurate spectroscopic parameters of the specific resonance line and the effective absorption cross-section of the system. In this paper we describe a novel master laser system that extends our previous work for robust stabilization to virtually any number of multiple side-line laser wavelengths for the future probing to greater altitudes. In this paper, we also highlight the significance of laser spectral purity on DIAL accuracy, and illustrate a simple re-arrangement of a system for measuring effective absorption cross-section. We present a calibration technique where the laser light is guided to an absorption cell with 33 m path length, and a quantitative number density measurement is then used to obtain the effective absorption cross-section. The same absorption cell is then used for on-line laser stabilization, while microwave beat-frequencies are used to stabilize any number of off-line lasers. We present preliminary results using ∼300 nJ, 1 μs pulses at 3 kHz, with the seed laser operating as a nanojoule transmitter at 822.922 nm, and a receiver consisting of a photomultiplier tube (PMT) coupled to a 356 mm mirror.

  12. Optical coherence tomography in differential diagnosis of skin pathology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladkova, Natalia D.; Petrova, Galina P.; Derpaluk, Elena; Nikulin, Nikolai K.; Snopova, Ludmila; Chumakov, Yuri; Feldchtein, Felix I.; Gelikonov, Valentin M.; Gelikonov, Grigory V.; Kuranov, Roman V.

    2000-05-01

    The capabilities of optical coherence tomography (OCT) for imaging in vivo of optical patterns of pathomorphological processes in the skin and use of their optical patterns in clinical practice for differential diagnosis of dermatoses are presented. Images of skin tissue 0.8 - 1.5 mm deep were acquired with a resolution of 5, 12 and 20 micrometer using three compact fiber OCT devices developed at the Institute of Applied Physics RAS. The acquisition time of images of skin regions 2 - 6 mm in length was 2 - 4 s. The OCT capabilities were analyzed based on the study of 50 patients with different dermatoses. OCT images were interpreted by comparing with parallel histology. It is shown that OCT can detect in vivo optical patterns of morphological alterations in such general papulous dermatoses as lichen ruber planus and psoriasis, a capability that can be used in differential diagnosis of these diseases. Most informative are OCT images obtained with a resolution of 5 micrometer. The results of our study demonstrate the practical importance of OCT imaging for diagnosis of different dermatoses. OCT is noninvasive and, therefore, makes it possible to perform frequent multifocal examination of skin without any adverse effects.

  13. High-resolution absorptive intermolecular multiple-quantum coherence NMR spectroscopy under inhomogeneous fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Meijin; Lin, Yanqin; Chen, Xi; Cai, Shuhui; Chen, Zhong

    2012-01-01

    Intermolecular multiple-quantum coherence (iMQC) is capable of improving NMR spectral resolution using a 2D shearing manipulation method. A pulse sequence termed CT-iDH, which combines intermolecular double-quantum filter (iDQF) with a modified constant-time (CT) scheme, is designed to achieve fast acquisition of high-resolution intermolecular zero-quantum coherences (iZQCs) and intermolecular double-quantum coherences (iDQCs) spectra without strong coupling artifacts. Furthermore, double-absorption lineshapes are first realized in 2D intermolecular multi-quantum coherences (iMQCs) spectra under inhomogeneous fields through a combination of iZQC and iDQC signals to double the resolution without loss of sensitivity. Theoretically the spectral linewidth can be further reduced by half compared to original iMQC high-resolution spectra. Several experiments were performed to test the feasibility of the new method and the improvements are evaluated quantitatively. The study suggests potential applications for in vivo spectroscopy.

  14. Selective coherent perfect absorption of subradiant mode in ultrathin bi-layer metamaterials via antisymmetric excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Wei; Zhang, Caihong; Li, Chun; Zhou, Xiaoying; Jia, Xiaoqing; Feng, Zheng; Su, Juan; Jin, Biaobing

    2017-05-01

    We demonstrate that the subradiant mode in ultrathin bi-layer metamaterials can be exclusively excited under two-antisymmetric-beam illumination (or equivalently, at a node of the standing wave field), while the superradiant mode is fully suppressed due to their different mode symmetry. Coherent perfect absorption (CPA) with the Lorentzian lineshape can be achieved corresponding to the subradiant mode. A theoretical model is established to distinguish the different behaviors of these two modes and to elucidate the CPA condition. Terahertz ultrathin bi-layer metamaterials on flexible polyimide substrates are fabricated and tested, exhibiting excellent agreement with theoretical predictions. This work provides physical insight into how to selectively excite the antisymmetric subradiant mode via coherence incidence.

  15. Differential length measurement using low coherence coupled tandem interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Martin D.; MacPherson, William N.; Maier, Robert R. J.

    2013-05-01

    This paper presents the use of low coherence coupled tandem interferometry to measure the differential length of two independent Fabry-Perot (F-P) type microcavities. The two discrete F-P type microcavities are formed between the cleaved end of a fibre and a reflective surface, which could for example, be a pressure sensing membrane or any other component of a transducing element. The technique is an all-optical fibre based sensing configuration in which the sensing cavities are at widely separated locations in an environment where strong temperature gradients may exist. The sensing system is based on two sequential cavities arranged in tandem. The lengths of the cavities are probed by a temperature stabilised fibre based Michelson interferometer operating with a broadband light source. One arm of the probing Michelson interferometer is scanned using a piezo fibre stretcher resulting in an optical path length difference (OPD) between the two arms. The optical interconnecting leads from the probing Michelson interferometer to the two F-P locations are not an active part of the sensor configuration and therefore this configuration is largely insensitive to temperature and strain effects on these interconnecting leads. It is only the probing Michelson interferometer which has to be temperature stabilised. This arrangement allows the F-P measurement cavities to be separated by distances in the range of tens of meters.

  16. Non-reciprocal transmission in photonic lattices based on unidirectional coherent perfect absorption.

    PubMed

    Longhi, Stefano

    2015-04-01

    A method for realizing asymmetric (one-way) transmission of discretized light in modulated, linear, and purely passive optical lattices is suggested, which exploits the idea of unidirectional coherent perfect absorption. The system consists of a linear photonic lattice of coupled resonators or waveguides, side coupled to a chain of lossy elements, in which light can avoid the occupation of the dissipative sites when propagating in one way, but not in the opposite one. Non-reciprocity requires modulation of the resonator/waveguide parameters, realizing a dissipative optical Aharonov-Bohm diode with non-reciprocal behavior.

  17. Electromagnetically induced absorption due to transfer of coherence and coherence population oscillation for the Fg = 3 →Fe = 4 transition in 85Rb atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehman, Hafeez Ur; Mohsin, Muhammad Qureshi; Noh, Heung-Ryoul; Kim, Jin-Tae

    2016-12-01

    Lineshapes for the electromagnetically induced absorption (EIA) of thermal 85Rb atoms in a degenerate two-level system have been investigated using matching (σ∥σ , π∥π) and orthogonal (σ ⊥ σ , π ⊥ π) polarization configurations of coupling and probe beams. EIA signals, which result from coherence population oscillation and transfer of coherence of the excited state, are obtained in detail theoretically and experimentally. The observed EIA linewidths, which are limited due to the decoherence rate between the magnetic sublevels in the ground state from transit-time relaxation, match well with the calculated ones. Decompositions of the absorption signals analyzed with respect to magnetic sublevels of the ground state show that enhanced or decreased absorption signals for each component of magnetic sublevels in the ground state depend on several factors. These factors include the decay rates and transition strengths, which determine the overall absorption spectral profile.

  18. Analytical model for coherent perfect absorption in one-dimensional photonic structures.

    PubMed

    Villinger, Massimo L; Bayat, Mina; Pye, Lorelle N; Abouraddy, Ayman F

    2015-12-01

    Coherent perfect absorption (CPA) is the phenomenon where a linear system with low intrinsic loss strongly absorbs two incident beams but only weakly absorbs either beam when incident separately. We present an analytical model that captures the relevant physics of CPA in one-dimensional photonic structures. This model elucidates an absorption-mediated interference effect that underlies CPA-an effect that is normally forbidden in Hermitian systems but is allowed when conservation of energy is violated due to the inclusion of loss. By studying a planar cavity model, we identify the optimal mirror reflectivity to guarantee CPA in the cavity at resonances extending in principle over any desired bandwidth. As a concrete example, we design a resonator that produces CPA in a 1-μm-thick layer of silicon over a 200-nm bandwidth in the near-infrared.

  19. Analyzing absorption and scattering spectra of micro-scale structures with spectroscopic optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Yi, Ji; Gong, Jianmin; Li, Xu

    2009-07-20

    We demonstrate the feasibility of characterizing the absorption and scattering spectra of micron-scale structures in a turbid medium using a spectroscopic optical coherence tomography (SOCT) system with a bandwidth of 430-650 nm. SOCT measurements are taken from phantoms composed of fluorescent microspheres. The absorption and scattering spectra are recovered with proper selections of spatial window width in the post processing step. Furthermore, we present an analysis using numerical OCT simulation based on full-wave solutions of the Maxwell's Equation to elucidate the origination of the multiple peaks in the OCT image for a single microsphere. Finally, we demonstrate the possibility of identifying contrast agents concentrated in micron-sized scale in an SOCT image. Two different types of microspheres in gel phantom are discriminated based on their distinguished absorbent feature.

  20. Tunable mid-infrared coherent perfect absorption in a graphene meta-surface

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Yuancheng; Liu, Zhe; Zhang, Fuli; Zhao, Qian; Wei, Zeyong; Fu, Quanhong; Li, Junjie; Gu, Changzhi; Li, Hongqiang

    2015-01-01

    Graphene has drawn considerable attention due to its intriguing properties in photonics and optoelectronics. However, its interaction with light is normally rather weak. Meta-surfaces, artificial structures with single planar function-layers, have demonstrated exotic performances in boosting light-matter interactions, e.g., for absorption enhancement. Graphene based high efficiency absorber is desirable for its potential applications in optical detections and signal modulations. Here we exploit graphene nanoribbons based meta-surface to realize coherent perfect absorption (CPA) in the mid-infrared regime. It was shown that quasi-CPA frequencies, at which CPA can be demonstrated with proper phase modulations, exist for the grapheme meta-surface with strong resonant behaviors. The CPA can be tuned substantially by merging the geometric design of the meta-surface and the electrical tunability of graphene. Furthermore, we found that the graphene nanoribbon meta-surface based CPA is realizable with experimentally achievable graphene sample. PMID:26400371

  1. Coherent phase control of resonance-mediated two-photon absorption in rare-earth ions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Shian Lu, Chenhui; Jia, Tianqing; Sun, Zhenrong; Qiu, Jianrong

    2013-11-04

    We theoretically and experimentally demonstrate the quantum coherent control of the resonance-mediated two-photon absorption in rare-earth ions by the phase-shaped femtosecond laser pulse. Our theoretical results show that the resonance-mediated two-photon absorption can be effectively controlled, but the control efficiency depends on the laser repetition rate in real experiment due to the long lifetime and the short decoherence time of the excited state, and the larger laser repetition rate yields the lower control efficiency. These theoretical results are experimentally confirmed in glass sample doped with Er{sup 3+} by utilizing the femtosecond lasers with low repetition rate of 1 kHz and high repetition rate of 80 MHz.

  2. Analytical description of partially coherent propagation and absorption losses in x-ray planar waveguides.

    PubMed

    Tsanaktsidis, K J; Paganin, D M; Pelliccia, D

    2013-06-01

    We present an analytical approach to describe field propagation along a planar x-ray waveguide (WG) in the presence of absorption losses. The method utilizes the complete expression for the complex index of refraction in solving the Helmholtz equation describing the guided modes. In this way, the propagation modes for the WG are no longer imposed to be standing waves and the energy flow from the core to the cladding, a consequence of the absorption in the cladding, can be calculated. In addition, the method accurately describes the field coupling between a plane wave and the WG, reproducing the self-imaging phenomenon. The case of partially coherent illumination has also been calculated for a realistic laboratory x-ray source.

  3. Stabilized master laser system for differential absorption lidar.

    PubMed

    Dinovitser, Alex; Hamilton, Murray W; Vincent, Robert A

    2010-06-10

    Wavelength accuracy and stability are key requirements for differential absorption lidar (DIAL). We present a control and timing design for the dual-stabilized cw master lasers in a pulsed master-oscillator power-amplifier configuration, which forms a robust low-cost water-vapor DIAL transmitter system. This design operates at 823 nm for water-vapor spectroscopy using Fabry-Perot-type laser diodes. However, the techniques described could be applied to other laser technologies at other wavelengths. The system can be extended with additional off-line or side-line wavelengths. The on-line master laser is locked to the center of a water absorption line, while the beat frequency between the on-line and the off-line is locked to 16 GHz using only a bandpass microwave filter and low-frequency electronics. Optical frequency stabilities of the order of 1 MHz are achieved.

  4. In vivo photothermal optical coherence tomography for non-invasive imaging of endogenous absorption agents.

    PubMed

    Makita, Shuichi; Yasuno, Yoshiaki

    2015-05-01

    In vivo photothermal optical coherence tomography (OCT) is demonstrated for cross-sectional imaging of endogenous absorption agents. In order to compromise the sensitivity, imaging speed, and sample motion immunity, a new photothermal detection scheme and phase processing method are developed. Phase-resolved swept-source OCT and fiber-pigtailed laser diode (providing excitation at 406 nm) are combined to construct a high-sensitivity photothermal OCT system. OCT probe and excitation beam coaxially illuminate and are focused on tissues. The photothermal excitation and detection procedure is designed to obtain high efficiency of photothermal effect measurement. The principle and method of depth-resolved cross-sectional imaging of absorption agents with photothermal OCT has been derived. The phase-resolved thermal expansion detection algorithm without motion artifact enables in vivo detection of photothermal effect. Phantom imaging with a blood phantom and in vivo human skin imaging are conducted. A phantom with guinea-pig blood as absorber has been scanned by the photothermal OCT system to prove the concept of cross-sectional absorption agent imaging. An in vivo human skin measurement is also performed with endogenous absorption agents.

  5. In vivo photothermal optical coherence tomography for non-invasive imaging of endogenous absorption agents

    PubMed Central

    Makita, Shuichi; Yasuno, Yoshiaki

    2015-01-01

    In vivo photothermal optical coherence tomography (OCT) is demonstrated for cross-sectional imaging of endogenous absorption agents. In order to compromise the sensitivity, imaging speed, and sample motion immunity, a new photothermal detection scheme and phase processing method are developed. Phase-resolved swept-source OCT and fiber-pigtailed laser diode (providing excitation at 406 nm) are combined to construct a high-sensitivity photothermal OCT system. OCT probe and excitation beam coaxially illuminate and are focused on tissues. The photothermal excitation and detection procedure is designed to obtain high efficiency of photothermal effect measurement. The principle and method of depth-resolved cross-sectional imaging of absorption agents with photothermal OCT has been derived. The phase-resolved thermal expansion detection algorithm without motion artifact enables in vivo detection of photothermal effect. Phantom imaging with a blood phantom and in vivo human skin imaging are conducted. A phantom with guinea-pig blood as absorber has been scanned by the photothermal OCT system to prove the concept of cross-sectional absorption agent imaging. An in vivo human skin measurement is also performed with endogenous absorption agents. PMID:26137374

  6. Coherent perfect absorption, transmission, and synthesis in a double-cavity optomechanical system.

    PubMed

    Yan, Xiao-Bo; Cui, Cui-Li; Gu, Kai-Hui; Tian, Xue-Dong; Fu, Chang-Bao; Wu, Jin-Hui

    2014-03-10

    We study a double-cavity optomechanical system in which a movable mirror with perfect reflection is inserted between two fixed mirrors with partial transmission. This optomechanical system is driven from both fixed end mirrors in a symmetric scheme by two strong coupling fields and two weak probe fields. We find that three interesting phenomena: coherent perfect absorption (CPA), coherent perfect transmission (CPT), and coherent perfect synthesis (CPS) can be attained within different parameter regimes. That is, we can make two input probe fields totally absorbed by the movable mirror without yielding any energy output from either end mirror (CPA); make an input probe field transmitted from one end mirror to the other end mirror without suffering any energy loss in the two cavities (CPT); make two input probe fields synthesized into one output probe field after undergoing either a perfect transmission or a perfect reflection (CPS). These interesting phenomena originate from the efficient hybrid coupling of optical and mechanical modes and may be all-optically controlled to realize novel photonic devices in quantum information networks.

  7. NASA three-laser airborne differential absorption lidar system electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, R. J.; Copeland, G. D.

    1984-01-01

    The system control and signal conditioning electronics of the NASA three laser airborne differential absorption lidar (DIAL) system are described. The multipurpose DIAL system was developed for the remote measurement of gas and aerosol profiles in the troposphere and lower stratosphere. A brief description and photographs of the majority of electronics units developed under this contract are presented. The precision control system; which includes a master control unit, three combined NASA laser control interface/quantel control units, and three noise pulse discriminator/pockels cell pulser units; is described in detail. The need and design considerations for precision timing and control are discussed. Calibration procedures are included.

  8. Tunable IR differential absorption lidar for remote sensing of chemicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, Coorg R.; Kabro, Pierre; Mathur, Savyasachee L.

    1999-10-01

    Standoff sensors for rapid remote detection of chemical emissions from either clandestine chemical production sites, chemical and biological warfare agents, concealed internal combustion engine emissions or rocket propellants from missiles are required for several DoD applications. The differential absorption lidar (DIAL) operating in the infrared wavelengths has established itself as a very effective tool for rapidly detecting many of the chemicals, with sufficient sensitivity with a range of several kilometers. The wavelengths required for this task lie within the atmospheric window regions 3 to 5 micrometers and 8 to 12 micrometers . We are currently developing a differential absorption lidar (DIAL) tunable in the 3 to 5 micrometers range for detecting low concentrations of chemical species with high sensitivity (5 ppb) and accuracy (error < 10%) measurements for greater than 5 km range. We have successfully established the feasibility of an innovative frequency agile laser source which is the crucial component of the infrared DIAL. A diode-pumped ytterbium YAG laser was built for pumping and rapidly tuning an optical parametric oscillator (OPO) over the mid-infra red region. Good performance (5 mJ/pulse) of the laser and low threshold wide infra red tuning of OPO (2.2 - 3.1 micrometers ) were demonstrated. The simulated performance of the topographical IR-DIAL showed that 5 ppb concentration can be measured at 5 km range with a 35 cm telescope.

  9. Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) Measurements from Air and Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Browell, E. V.; Ismail, S.; Grant, W. B.

    1998-01-01

    Differential absorption lidar (DIAL) systems have been used for the measurement of ozone, water vapor, and aerosols from aircraft platforms for over 18 years, yielding new insights into atmospheric chemistry, composition, and dynamics in large-scale field experiments conducted all over the world. The successful deployment of the lidar in-space technology experiment (LITE) in September 1994 demonstrated that space-based lidars can also collect valuable information on the global atmosphere. This paper reviews some of the contributions of the NASA Langley Research Center's airborne ozone and water vapor DIAL systems and space-based LITE system to the understanding of the atmosphere and discusses the feasibility and advantages of putting DIAL systems in space for routine atmospheric measurements of ozone and/or water vapor and aerosols and clouds. The technology and applications of the differential absorption lidar (DIAL) technique have progressed significantly since the first DIAL measurements of Schotland, and airborne DIAL measurements of ozone and water vapor are frequently being made in a wide range of field experiments. In addition, plans are underway to develop DIAL systems for use on satellites for continuous global measurements. This paper will highlight the history of airborne lidar and DIAL systems, summarize the major accomplishments of the NASA Langley DIAL program, and discuss specifications and goals for DIAL systems in space.

  10. Toward absorption contrast imaging of biological tissues in vivo by using photothermal optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makita, Shuichi; Hong, Young-Joo; Yasuno, Yoshiaki

    2014-03-01

    Optical coherence tomography has been proven in the last two decades its clinical value by providing 3D non-invasive in vivo biopsy of the biological samples. In addition to structural information given by the backscattered intensity, the optical absorption will also provide another powerful contrast. Optical absorbers in biological tissues exhibits important role such as hemoglobin and melanin. However, current methods of absorption contrast take long time and not suitable for in vivo imaging. Toward in vivo absorption contrast imaging, we developed photothermal OCT system by combining swept-source OCT system and excitation laser. A swept-source OCT system is used with a wavelength swept laser at 1310 nm with a scanning rate and range of 47 kHz and of 100 nm, respectively. Photocurrents from balanced photoreceivers are sampled by a high-speed digitizer by using k-clock from the source to sample optical spectrum in k-linear domain. The sensitivity of 107 dB for two polarization channels is achieved. At the sample arm, the OCT probe beam and an excitation laser are combined by a dielectric mirror. The fiber-coupled laser diode of 406 nm wavelength is used for excitation since the absorption of hemoglobin has peak around this wavelength. In order to evaluate the ability of this system, phase stability of the system was measured. The standard deviation of the phase shift is measured as 0.0028 radians, where the signal-to-noise-limited value is approximately 0.001. Several issues for in vivo case, motion, blood flow, thermal damage, and etc. will be addressed here.

  11. Estimation of background gas concentration from differential absorption lidar measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Peter; Smith, Nadia; Livina, Valerie; Gardiner, Tom; Robinson, Rod; Innocenti, Fabrizio

    2016-10-01

    Approaches are considered to estimate the background concentration level of a target species in the atmosphere from an analysis of the measured data provided by the National Physical Laboratory's differential absorption lidar (DIAL) system. The estimation of the background concentration level is necessary for an accurate quantification of the concentration level of the target species within a plume, which is the quantity of interest. The focus of the paper is on methodologies for estimating the background concentration level and, in particular, contrasting the assumptions about the functional and statistical models that underpin those methodologies. An approach is described to characterise the noise in the recorded signals, which is necessary for a reliable estimate of the background concentration level. Results for measured data provided by a field measurement are presented, and ideas for future work are discussed.

  12. Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) Measurements of Landfill Methane Emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Innocenti, Fabrizio; Robinson, Rod; Gardiner, Tom; Finlayson, Andrew; Connor, Andy

    2017-04-01

    DIFFERENTIAL ABSORPTION LIDAR (DIAL) MEASURMENTS OF LANDFILL METHANE EMISSIONS F. INNOCENTI *, R.A. ROBINSON *, T.D. GARDINER, A. FINLAYSON *, A. CONNOR* * National Physical Laboratory (NPL), Hampton Road, Teddington, Middlesex, TW11 0LW, United Kingdom Methane is one of the most important gaseous hydrocarbon species for both industrial and environmental reasons. Understanding and quantifying methane emissions to atmosphere is an important element of climate change research. Range-resolved infrared Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) measurements provide the means to map and quantify a wide range of different methane sources. DIAL is a powerful technique that can be used to track and quantify plumes emitted from area emission sources such as landfill sites, waste water treatment plants and petrochemical plants. By using lidar (light detection and ranging), the DIAL technique is able to make remote range-resolved single-ended measurements of the actual distribution of target gases in the atmosphere, with no disruption to normal site operational activities. DIAL provides 3D mapping of emission concentrations and quantification of emission rates for a wide range of target gases such as methane. The NPL DIAL laser source is operated alternately at two similar wavelengths. One of these, termed the "on-resonant wavelength", is chosen to be at a wavelength which is absorbed by the target species. The other, the "off-resonant wavelength", is chosen to be at a nearby wavelength which is not absorbed significantly by the target species. The two wavelengths are chosen to be close, so that the atmospheric scattering properties are the same for both wavelengths. They are also chosen so that any differential absorption due to other atmospheric species are minimised. Any measured difference in the returned signals is therefore due to absorption by the target gas. In the typical DIAL measurement configuration the mobile DIAL facility is positioned downwind of the area being

  13. Experimental and theoretical fully differential study of coherence effects in ionization of He by proton impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, Michael; Arthanayaka, Thusitha; Lamichhane, Basu; Hasan, Ahmad; Gurung, Sudip; Remolina, Juan; Borbely, Sandor; Jarai-Szabo, Ferenc; Nagy, Ladislau

    2016-09-01

    We have measured and calculated fully differential cross sections (FDCS) for ionization of He by 75 keV proton impact. Results were obtained for transverse projectile coherence lengths of 3.3 and 1.0 a.u. The coherence length is related to the maximum dimension of a diffracting object that can be coherently illuminated by the projectiles. In the calculation impact parameter dependent amplitudes a(b) are computed and multiplied by a wave packet of varying width, reflecting the coherence length, which describes the projectile. The scattering angle dependent transition amplitude is then obtained from a Fourier transform. Pronounced coherence effects observed in the data are qualitatively well reproduced by the calculation. Along with extensive data published already the present work therefore confirms the presence of such effects beyond reasonable doubt. Work supported by NSF Grant No. PHY-1401586.

  14. Active Sensing Air Pressure Using Differential Absorption Barometric Radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, B.

    2016-12-01

    Tropical storms and other severe weathers cause huge life losses and property damages and have major impacts on public safety and national security. Their observations and predictions need to be significantly improved. This effort tries to develop a feasible active microwave approach that measures surface air pressure, especially over open seas, from space using a Differential-absorption BArometric Radar (DiBAR) operating at 50-55 GHz O2 absorption band in order to constrain assimilated dynamic fields of numerical weather Prediction (NWP) models close to actual conditions. Air pressure is the most important variable that drives atmospheric dynamics, and currently can only be measured by limited in-situ observations over oceans. Even over land there is no uniform coverage of surface air pressure measurements. Analyses show that with the proposed space radar the errors in instantaneous (averaged) pressure estimates can be as low as 4mb ( 1mb) under all weather conditions. NASA Langley research team has made substantial progresses in advancing the DiBAR concept. The feasibility assessment clearly shows the potential of surface barometry using existing radar technologies. The team has also developed a DiBAR system design, fabricated a Prototype-DiBAR (P-DiBAR) for proof-of-concept, conducted laboratory, ground and airborne P-DiBAR tests. The flight test results are consistent with the instrumentation goals. The precision and accuracy of radar surface pressure measurements are within the range of the theoretical analysis of the DiBAR concept. Observational system simulation experiments for space DiBAR performance based on the existing DiBAR technology and capability show substantial improvements in tropical storm predictions, not only for the hurricane track and position but also for the hurricane intensity. DiBAR measurements will provide us an unprecedented level of the prediction and knowledge on global extreme weather and climate conditions.

  15. Differentiating oral lesions in different carcinogenesis stages with optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Meng-Tsan; Lee, Cheng-Kuang; Lee, Hsiang-Chieh; Chen, Hsin-Ming; Chiang, Chun-Pin; Wang, Yih-Ming; Yang, Chih-Chung

    2009-07-01

    A swept-source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT) system is used to clinically scan oral lesions in different oral carcinogenesis stages, including normal oral mucosa control, mild dysplasia (MiD), moderate dysplasia (MoD), early-stage squamous cell carcinoma (ES-SCC), and well-developed SCC (WD-SCC), for diagnosis purpose. On the basis of the analyses of the SS-OCT images, the stages of dysplasia (MiD and MoD), and SCC (ES-SCC and WD-SCC) can be differentiated from normal control by evaluating the depth-dependent standard deviation (SD) values of lateral variations. In the dysplasia stage, the boundary between the epithelium (EP) and lamina propria (LP) layers can still be identified and the EP layer becomes significantly thicker than that of normal control. Also, in a certain range of the EP layer above the EP/LP boundary, the SD value becomes larger than a certain percentage of the maximum level, which is observed around the EP/LP boundary. On the other hand, in the ES-SCC and WD-SCC stages, the EP/LP boundary disappears. Because of the higher density of connective tissue papillae in the ES-SCC stage, the SD values of the slowly varying lateral scan profiles in the ES-SCC samples are significantly larger than those in the WD-SCC sample. Also, ES-SCC can be differentiated from WD-SCC by comparing the exponential decay constants of averaged A-mode scan profiles. Because of the higher tissue absorption in the WD-SCC lesion, the decay constants in the WD-SCC samples are significantly higher than those in the ES-SCC samples.

  16. Speckle suppression and companion detection using coherent differential imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bottom, M.; Wallace, J. K.; Bartos, R. D.; Shelton, J. C.; Serabyn, E.

    2017-01-01

    Residual speckles due to aberrations arising from optical errors after the split between the wavefront sensor and the science camera path are the most significant barriers to imaging extrasolar planets. While speckles can be suppressed using the science camera in conjunction with the deformable mirror, this requires knowledge of the phase of the electric field in the focal plane. We describe a method which combines a coronagraph with a simple phase-shifting interferometer to measure and correct speckles in the full focal plane. We demonstrate its initial use on the Stellar Double Coronagraph at the Palomar Observatory. We also describe how the same hardware can be used to distinguish speckles from true companions by measuring the coherence of the optical field in the focal plane. We present results observing the brown dwarf HD49197b with this technique, demonstrating the ability to detect the presence of a companion even when it is buried in the speckle noise, without the use of any standard `calibration' techniques. We believe this is the first detection of a substellar companion using the coherence properties of light.

  17. Progress Report on Frequency - Modulated Differential Absorption Lidar

    SciTech Connect

    Cannon, Bret D.; Harper, Warren W.; Myers, Tanya L.; Taubman, Matthew S.; Williams, Richard M.; Schultz, John F.

    2001-12-15

    Modeling done at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in FY2000 predicted improved sensitivity for remote chemical detection by differential absorption lidar (DIAL) if frequency-modulated (FM) lasers were used. This improved sensitivity results from faster averaging away of speckle noise and the recently developed quantum cascade (QC) lasers offer the first practical method for implementing this approach in the molecular fingerprint region of the infrared. To validate this model prediction, a simple laboratory bench FM-DIAL system was designed, assembled, tested, and laboratory-scale experiments were carried out during FY2001. Preliminary results of the FM DIAL experiments confirm the speckle averaging advantages predicted by the models. In addition, experiments were performed to explore the use of hybrid QC - CO2 lasers for achieving sufficient frequency-modulated laser power to enable field experiments at longer ranges (up to one kilometer or so). This approach will allow model validation at realistic ranges much sooner than would be possible if one had to first develop master oscillator - power amplifier systems utilizing only QC devices. Amplification of a QC laser with a CO2 laser was observed in the first hybrid laser experiments, but the low gain and narrow linewidth of the CO2 laser available for these experiments prevented production of a high-power FM laser beam.

  18. Rayleigh-backscattering doppler broadening correction for differential absorption lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Lanlan; Zhang, Yinchao; Chen, Siying; Guo, Pan; Chen, He

    2015-11-01

    The spectral broadening by Rayleigh backscattering can cause large changes in water vapor echo signals, causing errors when the water vapor concentration is inversed by differential absorption lidar (DIAL). A correction algorithm is proposed to revise the errors due to the effect of laser spectral broadening. The relative errors of water vapor are calculated in cases of different aerosol distribution and temperature changes before and after correction. The results show that measurement errors due to the Doppler broadening are more than 5% before correction and a 2% measurement error after corrected for the case of a smooth, background aerosol distribution. However, due to the high aerosol gradients and strong temperature inversion, errors can be up to 40% and 10% with no corrections for this effect, respectively. The relative errors can reduce to less than 2% after correction. Hence, the correction algorithm for Rayleigh Doppler broadening can improve detection accuracy in H2O DIAL measurements especially when it is applied to high aerosol concentration or strong temperature inversion.

  19. Laser speckle effects on hard target differential absorption lidar

    SciTech Connect

    MacKerrow, E.P.; Tiee, J.J.; Fite, C.B.

    1996-04-01

    Reflection of laser light from a diffuse surface exhibits a complex interference pattern known as laser speckle. Measurement of the reflected intensity from remote targets, common to ``hard-target`` differential absorption lidar (DIAL) requires consideration of the statistical properties of the reflected light. The authors have explored the effects of laser speckle on the noise statistics for CO{sub 2} DIAL. For an ensemble of independent speckle patterns it is predicted that the variance for the measured intensity is inversely proportional to the number of speckle measured. They have used a rotating drum target to obtain a large number of independent speckle and have measured the predicted decrease in the variance after correlations due to system drifts were accounted for. Measurements have been made using both circular and linear polarized light. These measurements show a slight improvement in return signal statistics when circular polarization is used. The authors have conducted experiments at close range to isolate speckle phenomena from other phenomena, such as atmospheric turbulence and platform motion thus allowing them to gain a full understanding of speckle. They have also studied how to remove correlation in the data due to albedo inhomogeneities producing a more statistically independent ensemble of speckle patterns. They find that some types of correlation are difficult to remove from the data.

  20. Urban ozone measurements using differential optical absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Morales, J A; Treacy, J; Coffey, S

    2004-05-01

    In order to improve the air quality in Europe the European Commission has issued a number of directives with regard to acceptable levels of a range of gaseous pollutants, which includes ozone. Therefore, monitoring of this compound is necessary to comply with EU legislation, to provide improved pollution warnings for those who are sensitive to air pollutants as well as providing valuable data for environmental planning. Open-path spectroscopic techniques, such as differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS), are ideal for monitoring pollutants because of the advantages they offer over classical methods and point-source analysers. A DOAS system has been installed in Dublin city centre to monitor a range of criteria pollutants including ozone. Observations of urban background ozone concentrations are presented. The measurements are compared with those obtained using a UV point-source analyser and are presented in the context of the current EU directive. The influence of trans-boundary pollution from mainland Europe leading to ozone episodes is also discussed. Observations of high ozone during this measurement campaign coincided with the influx of photochemically polluted air masses which originated over continental Europe. For the analysed time interval, the data suggest that the ground ozone level in Dublin might be significantly influenced by long-range transport from the United Kingdom and continental Europe.

  1. Atmospheric NO2 concentration measurements using differential absorption lidar technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devara, P. C. S.; Raj, P. Ernest

    1992-02-01

    Using the Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) technique, two types of approaches, namely, reflection from retroreflector / topographic target and backscatter from atmosphere, are available for studying remotely the atmospheric NO2 concentration. The Argon ion lidar system at the Indian Institute of Tropical Meteorology (IITM), Pune, India has been used for the measurements by following both the path-averaged and range-resolved approaches. For the former, a topographic target (hill) is used for determining path-averaged surface concentration. In the latter, spectral properties of atmospheric attenuation is used for making range-resolved measurements in the surface layer. The results of the observations collected by following both approaches are presented. The average surface NO2 concentration was found to vary between 0.01 and 0.105 ppm and the range-resolved measurements exhibited higher values suggesting treatment of the lidar data for scattering and extinction effects due to atmospheric aerosols and air molecules, and atmospheric turbulence. Certain modifications that are suggested to the experimental set-up, data acquisition and analysis to improve the measurements are briefly described.

  2. Micropulse water vapor differential absorption lidar: transmitter design and performance.

    PubMed

    Nehrir, Amin R; Repasky, Kevin S; Carlsten, John L

    2012-10-22

    An all diode-laser-based micropulse differential absorption lidar (DIAL) laser transmitter for tropospheric water vapor and aerosol profiling is presented. The micropulse DIAL (MPD) transmitter utilizes two continuous wave (cw) external cavity diode lasers (ECDL) to seed an actively pulsed, overdriven tapered semiconductor optical amplifier (TSOA). The MPD laser produces up to 7 watts of peak power over a 1 µs pulse duration (7 µJ) and a 10 kHz pulse repetition frequency. Spectral switching between the online and offline seed lasers is achieved on a 1Hz basis using a fiber optic switch to allow for more accurate sampling of the atmospheric volume between the online and offline laser shots. The high laser spectral purity of greater than 0.9996 coupled with the broad tunability of the laser transmitter will allow for accurate measurements of tropospheric water vapor in a wide range of geographic locations under varying atmospheric conditions. This paper describes the design and performance characteristics of a third generation MPD laser transmitter with enhanced laser performance over the previous generation DIAL system.

  3. Deep imaging of absorption and scattering features by multispectral multiple scattering low coherence interferometry

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yang; Maher, Jason R.; Ibrahim, Mohamed M.; Chien, Jennifer S.; Levinson, Howard; Wax, Adam

    2016-01-01

    We have developed frequency domain multispectral multiple scattering low coherence interferometry (ms2/LCI) for deep imaging of absorption and scattering contrast. Using tissue-mimicking phantoms that match the full scattering phase function of human dermal tissue, we demonstrate that ms2/LCI can provide a signal/noise ratio (SNR) improvement of 15.4 dB over conventional OCT at an imaging depth of 1 mm. The enhanced SNR and penetration depth provided by ms2/LCI could be leveraged for a variety of clinical applications including the assessment of burn injuries where current clinical classification of severity only provides limited accuracy. The utility of the approach was demonstrated by imaging a tissue phantom simulating a partial-thickness burn revealing good spectroscopic contrast between healthy and injured tissue regions deep below the sample surface. Finally, healthy rat skin was imaged in vivo with both a commercial OCT instrument and our custom ms2/LCI system. The results demonstrate that ms2/LCI is capable of obtaining spectroscopic information far beyond the penetration depth provided by conventional OCT. PMID:27867703

  4. Phase-sensitive optical coherence reflectometer with differential phase-shift keying of probe pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Alekseev, A E; Vdovenko, V S; Sergachev, I A; Simikin, D E; Gorshkov, B G; Potapov, V T

    2014-10-31

    We report a new method for reconstructing the signal shape of the external dynamic perturbations along the entire length of the fibre of an optical coherence reflectometer. The method proposed is based on differential phase-shift keying of a probe pulse and demodulation of scattered light by the phase diversity technique. Possibilities of the method are demonstrated experimentally. (fibre-optic sensors)

  5. Differential backscatter from the atmospheric aerosol: the implications for IR differential absorption lidar.

    PubMed

    Petheram, J C

    1981-11-15

    To avoid systematic errors in differential absorption lidar experiments, which use the atmospheric aerosol as a distributed reflector, the assumption has to be made that the volume backscattering coefficient is approximately the same at the two wavelengths. A model of the aerosol has been used to show that in the 9-11-microm region this assumption may be invalid since absorption by the aerosol makes the backscattering term a sensitive function of frequency and relative humidity. To illustrate the problem we examine five pairs of laser frequencies recommended in the literature for monitoring ammonia, ozone, ethylene, and Freon-11 and show that peak-to-peak differential backscatter of >10% is common across the whole humidity range. We also show that the sensitivity of backscattering to humidity changes is such that the volume backscattering coefficient at the on-line wavelength can become larger than the off-line value as the relative humidity increases, an effect that may nullify any rise in trace gas concentration that happens to take place.

  6. Differentiating functional brain regions using optical coherence tomography (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gil, Daniel A.; Bow, Hansen C.; Shen, Jin-H.; Joos, Karen M.; Skala, Melissa C.

    2017-02-01

    The human brain is made up of functional regions governing movement, sensation, language, and cognition. Unintentional injury during neurosurgery can result in significant neurological deficits and morbidity. The current standard for localizing function to brain tissue during surgery, intraoperative electrical stimulation or recording, significantly increases the risk, time, and cost of the procedure. There is a need for a fast, cost-effective, and high-resolution intraoperative technique that can avoid damage to functional brain regions. We propose that optical coherence tomography (OCT) can fill this niche by imaging differences in the cellular composition and organization of functional brain areas. We hypothesized this would manifest as differences in the attenuation coefficient measured using OCT. Five functional regions (prefrontal, somatosensory, auditory, visual, and cerebellum) were imaged in ex vivo porcine brains (n=3), a model chosen due to a similar white/gray matter ratio as human brains. The attenuation coefficient was calculated using a depth-resolved model and quantitatively validated with Intralipid phantoms across a physiological range of attenuation coefficients (absolute difference < 0.1cm-1). Image analysis was performed on the attenuation coefficient images to derive quantitative endpoints. We observed a statistically significant difference among the median attenuation coefficients of these five regions (one-way ANOVA, p<0.05). Nissl-stained histology will be used to validate our results and correlate OCT-measured attenuation coefficients to neuronal density. Additional development and validation of OCT algorithms to discriminate brain regions are planned to improve the safety and efficacy of neurosurgical procedures such as biopsy, electrode placement, and tissue resection.

  7. Differential Absorption Lidar Measurements of Fugitive Benzene Emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, R. A.; Innocenti, F.; Helmore, J.; Gardiner, T.; Finlayson, A.; Connor, A.

    2016-12-01

    The Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) technique is based on the optical analogue of radar; lidar (light detection and ranging). It provides the capability to remotely measure the concentration and spatial distribution of compounds in the atmosphere. The ability to scan the optical measurement beam throughout the atmosphere enables pollutant concentrations to be mapped, and emission fluxes to be determined when combined with wind data. The NPL DIAL systems can operate in the UV and infrared spectral, enabling the measurement of a range of air pollutants and GHGs including hazardous air pollutants such as benzene. The mobile ground based DIAL systems developed at NPL for pollution monitoring have been used for over 25 years. They have been deployed for routine monitoring, emission factor studies, research investigations and targeted monitoring campaigns. More recently the NPL DIAL has been used in studies to validate other monitoring techniques. In support of this capability, NPL have developed a portable, configurable controlled release system (CRF) able to simulate emissions from typical sources. This has been developed to enable the validation and assessment of fugitive emission monitoring techniques. Following a brief summary of the technique, we outline recent developments in the use of DIAL for monitoring fugitive and diffuse emissions, including the development of a European Standard Method for fugitive emission monitoring. We will present the results of a number of validation exercises using the CRF presenting an update on the performance of DIAL for emission quantification and discuss the wider validation of novel technologies. We will report on recent measurements of the emissions of benzene from industrial sites including a large scale emissions monitoring study carried out by the South Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD) and will report on the measurement of emissions from petrochemical facilities and examine an example of the identification

  8. Attosecond transient absorption of argon atoms in the vacuum ultraviolet region: line energy shifts versus coherent population transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Wei; Warrick, Erika R.; Neumark, Daniel M.; Leone, Stephen R.

    2016-01-01

    Using attosecond transient absorption, the dipole response of an argon atom in the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) region is studied when an external electromagnetic field is present. An isolated attosecond VUV pulse populates Rydberg states lying 15 eV above the argon ground state. A synchronized few-cycle near infrared (NIR) pulse modifies the oscillating dipoles of argon impulsively, leading to alterations in the VUV absorption spectra. As the NIR pulse is delayed with respect to the VUV pulse, multiple features in the absorption profile emerge simultaneously including line broadening, sideband structure, sub-cycle fast modulations, and 5-10 fs slow modulations. These features indicate the coexistence of two general processes of the light-matter interaction: the energy shift of individual atomic levels and coherent population transfer between atomic eigenstates, revealing coherent superpositions. An intuitive formula is derived to treat both effects in a unifying framework, allowing one to identify and quantify the two processes in a single absorption spectrogram.

  9. Differentiating retroperitoneal liposarcoma tumors with optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lev, Dina; Baranov, Stepan A.; Carbajal, Esteban F.; Young, Eric D.; Pollock, Raphael E.; Larin, Kirill V.

    2011-03-01

    Liposarcoma (LS) is a rare and heterogeneous group of malignant mesenchymal neoplasms exhibiting characteristics of adipocytic differentiation. Currently, radical surgical resection represents the most effective and widely used therapy for patients with abdominal/retroperitoneal LS, but the presence of contiguous essential organs, such as the kidney, pancreas, spleen, adrenal glands, esophagus or colon, as well as often reoccurrence of LS in A/RP calls for the enhancement of surgical techniques to minimize resection and avoid LS reoccurrences. Difficulty in detecting the margins of neoplasms due to their affinity to healthy fat tissue accounts for the high reoccurrence of LS within A/RP. Nowadays, the microscopic detection of margins is possible only by use of biopsy, and the minimization of surgical resection of healthy tissues is challenging. In this presentation we'll demonstrate the initial OCT results for the imaging and distinction of LS and normal human fat tissues and clear detection of tumor boundaries.

  10. Nature of quantum states created by one photon absorption: pulsed coherent vs pulsed incoherent light.

    PubMed

    Han, Alex C; Shapiro, Moshe; Brumer, Paul

    2013-08-29

    We analyze electronically excited nuclear wave functions and their coherence when subjecting a molecule to the action of natural, pulsed incoherent solar-like light and to that of ultrashort coherent light assumed to have the same center frequencies and spectral bandwidths. Specifically, we compute the spatiotemporal dependence of the excited wave packets and their electronic coherence for these two types of light sources, on different electronic potential energy surfaces. The resultant excited state wave functions are shown to be dramatically different, reflecting the light source from which they originated. In addition, electronic coherence is found to decay significantly faster for incoherent light than for coherent ultrafast excitation, for both continuum and bound wave packets. These results confirm that the dynamics observed from ultrashort coherent excitation does not reflect what happens in processes induced by solar-like radiation, and conclusions drawn from one do not, in general, apply to the other. These results provide further support to the view that the dynamics observed in studies using ultrashort coherent pulses can be significantly different than those that would result from excitation with natural incoherent light.

  11. Assessment of the differential linear coherent scattering coefficient of biological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conceição, A. L. C.; Antoniassi, M.; Poletti, M. E.

    2010-07-01

    New differential linear coherent scattering coefficient, μ CS, data for four biological tissue types (fat pork, tendon chicken, adipose and fibroglandular human breast tissues) covering a large momentum transfer interval (0.07≤ q≤70.5 nm -1), resulted from combining WAXS and SAXS data, are presented in order to emphasize the need to update the default data-base by including the molecular interference and the large-scale arrangements effect. The results showed that the differential linear coherent scattering coefficient demonstrates influence of the large-scale arrangement, mainly due to collagen fibrils for tendon chicken and fibroglandular breast samples, and triacylglycerides for fat pork and adipose breast samples at low momentum transfer region. While, at high momentum transfer, the μ CS reflects effects of molecular interference related to water for tendon chicken and fibroglandular samples and, fatty acids for fat pork and adipose samples.

  12. A scheme for lensless X-ray microscopy combining coherent diffraction imaging and differential corner holography.

    PubMed

    Capotondi, F; Pedersoli, E; Kiskinova, M; Martin, A V; Barthelmess, M; Chapman, H N

    2012-10-22

    We successfully use the corners of a common silicon nitride supporting window in lensless X-ray microscopy as extended references in differential holography to obtain a real space hologram of the illuminated object. Moreover, we combine this method with the iterative phasing techniques of coherent diffraction imaging to enhance the spatial resolution on the reconstructed object, and overcome the problem of missing areas in the collected data due to the presence of a beam stop, achieving a resolution close to 85 nm.

  13. Coherent-backscatter effect - A vector formulation accounting for polarization and absorption effects and small or large scatterers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, Kenneth J.

    1992-01-01

    Previous theoretical work on the coherent-backscatter effect in the context of speckle time autocorrelation has gone beyond the diffusion approximation and the assumption of isotropic (point) scatterers. This paper extends the theory to include the effects of polarization and absorption, and to give the angular line shape. The results are expressions for angular variations valid for small and large scatterers and linear and circular polarizations, in lossless or lossy media. Calculations show that multiple anisotropic scattering results in the preservation of incident polarization. Application to a problem in radar astronomy is considered. It is shown that the unusual radar measurements (high reflectivity and polarization ratios) of Jupiter's icy Galilean satellites can be explained by coherent backscatter from anisotropic (forward) scatterers.

  14. Differential carrier phase recovery for QPSK optical coherent systems with integrated tunable lasers.

    PubMed

    Fatadin, Irshaad; Ives, David; Savory, Seb J

    2013-04-22

    The performance of a differential carrier phase recovery algorithm is investigated for the quadrature phase shift keying (QPSK) modulation format with an integrated tunable laser. The phase noise of the widely-tunable laser measured using a digital coherent receiver is shown to exhibit significant drift compared to a standard distributed feedback (DFB) laser due to enhanced low frequency noise component. The simulated performance of the differential algorithm is compared to the Viterbi-Viterbi phase estimation at different baud rates using the measured phase noise for the integrated tunable laser.

  15. Atmospheric pressure and temperature profiling using near IR differential absorption lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korb, C. L.; Schwemmer, G. K.; Dombrowski, M.; Weng, C. Y.

    1983-01-01

    The present investigation is concerned with differential absorption lidar techniques for remotely measuring the atmospheric temperature and pressure profile, surface pressure, and cloud top pressure-height. The procedure used in determining the pressure is based on the conduction of high-resolution measurements of absorption in the wings of lines in the oxygen A band. Absorption with respect to these areas is highly pressure sensitive in connection with the mechanism of collisional line broadening. The method of temperature measurement utilizes a determination of the absorption at the center of a selected line in the oxygen A band which originates from a quantum state with high ground state energy.

  16. Microscopic description of intraband absorption in graphene: the occurrence of transient negative differential transmission.

    PubMed

    Kadi, Faris; Winzer, Torben; Malic, Ermin; Knorr, Andreas; Göttfert, F; Mittendorff, M; Winnerl, S; Helm, M

    2014-07-18

    We present a microscopic explanation of the controversially discussed transient negative differential transmission observed in degenerate optical pump-probe measurements in graphene. Our approach is based on the density matrix formalism allowing a time- and momentum-resolved study of carrier-light, carrier-carrier, and carrier-phonon interaction on microscopic footing. We show that phonon-assisted optical intraband transitions give rise to transient absorption in the optically excited hot carrier system counteracting pure absorption bleaching of interband transitions. While interband transition bleaching is relevant in the first hundreds of fs after the excitation, intraband absorption sets in at later times. In particular, in the low excitation regime, these intraband absorption processes prevail over the absorption bleaching resulting in a zero crossing of the differential transmission. Our findings are in good qualitative agreement with recent experimental pump-probe studies.

  17. Low-coherence terahertz tomography based on spatially separated counterpropagating beams with allowance for probe radiation absorption in the medium

    SciTech Connect

    Mandrosov, V I

    2015-10-31

    This paper analyses low-coherence tomography of absorbing media with the use of spatially separated counterpropagating object and reference beams. A probe radiation source based on a broadband terahertz (THz) generator that emits sufficiently intense THz waves in the spectral range 90 – 350 μm and a prism spectroscope that separates out eight narrow intervals from this range are proposed for implementing this method. This allows media of interest to be examined by low-coherence tomography with counterpropagating beams in each interval. It is shown that, according to the Rayleigh criterion, the method is capable of resolving inhomogeneities with a size near one quarter of the coherence length of the probe radiation. In addition, the proposed tomograph configuration allows one to determine the average surface asperity slope and the refractive index and absorption coefficient of inhomogeneities 180 to 700 mm in size, and obtain spectra of such inhomogeneities in order to determine their chemical composition. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  18. Coherent optical feedback for the analog solution of partial differential and integral equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cederquist, J. N.

    1980-12-01

    To extend and improve the capabilities of optical information processing systems, the use of coherent optical feedback was investigated. A confocal feedback system based on the confocal Fabry-Perot interferometer was developed and shown to have a very flexible, complex-valued coherent transfer function unattainable without feedback. This system was used to solve the three types of second order linear partial differential equations in two dimensions-elliptic, hyperbolic, and parabolic- for a variety of inhomogeneous terms and boundary and initial conditions. Space-variant image plane filters were used to allow the solution of partial differential equations with variable coefficients. An optical flat with a small wedge angle was added to perform time sampling of the feedback signal. The resulting system can then solve partial differential equations in three dimensions. A second confocal Fabry-Perot interferometer was placed inside the first to produce multiple feedback. Time sampling was also combined with multiple feedback to create a system capable of solving four dimensional problems. Methods for the solution of Fredholm and Voltera integral equations are also discussed.

  19. Optical Path Switching Based Differential Absorption Radiometry for Substance Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sachse, Glen W. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A system and method are provided for detecting one or more substances. An optical path switch divides sample path radiation into a time series of alternating first polarized components and second polarized components. The first polarized components are transmitted along a first optical path and the second polarized components along a second optical path. A first gasless optical filter train filters the first polarized components to isolate at least a first wavelength band thereby generating first filtered radiation. A second gasless optical filter train filters the second polarized components to isolate at least a second wavelength band thereby generating second filtered radiation. The first wavelength band and second wavelength band are unique. Further, spectral absorption of a substance of interest is different at the first wavelength band as compared to the second wavelength band. A beam combiner combines the first and second filtered radiation to form a combined beam of radiation. A detector is disposed to monitor magnitude of at least a portion of the combined beam alternately at the first wavelength band and the second wavelength band as an indication of the concentration of the substance in the sample path.

  20. Error Reduction Methods for Integrated-path Differential-absorption Lidar Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Jeffrey R.; Numata, Kenji; Wu, Stewart T.

    2012-01-01

    We report new modeling and error reduction methods for differential-absorption optical-depth (DAOD) measurements of atmospheric constituents using direct-detection integrated-path differential-absorption lidars. Errors from laser frequency noise are quantified in terms of the line center fluctuation and spectral line shape of the laser pulses, revealing relationships verified experimentally. A significant DAOD bias is removed by introducing a correction factor. Errors from surface height and reflectance variations can be reduced to tolerable levels by incorporating altimetry knowledge and "log after averaging", or by pointing the laser and receiver to a fixed surface spot during each wavelength cycle to shorten the time of "averaging before log".

  1. Measurement of atmospheric coherence length with differential movement of the image sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Yu-gang; Tong, Shou-feng

    2013-08-01

    This paper gives the introduction about a new measuring device which is to measure th e atmospheric coherence length by using the differential movement principle.The system can observe the edge of the sun in the day time, and also observe planets at night. This system can measure the atmospheric coherence length in both horizontal and slant directions. The measurement in the day time requests the assistance of the attenuator and beacon beam of the atmospheric coherence length in the direction of the slant path.The working principle is the laser beam scattered by atmospheric turbulence through into the receiving optical system. Because the receiving system which is consists of two completely symmetrical telephoto optical system. Therefore,two optical channels in turbulence device are completely identical. After passing through the optical channels, the beam focusing is finished. By adjusting the optical system manually or automatically, two light point images can be formed on the photosensitive element of the CCD. Atmospheric turbulence can cause phase fluctuation of wave front. After aggregation by the receiving lens, The photosensitive element of CCD can collect the relative jitter of the two imaging optical centroid positions we require, and researchers can obtain relative changes from the two centroid positions by the calculations of computer software, as the result, the atmospheric coherence length is obtained. By means of the simulation of the optical system and the imaging quality optimization by Code V, researchers can rather achieve transfer function diagram, the circle of confusion value in different views and energy distribution. From above, researchers can examine whether the optical system is being qualified, or the method is leading to a better observation effect. At end of this dissertation, the limitations of this system will be analyzed, and the improvement methods and suggestions will be provided.

  2. The differential influences of parenting and child narrative coherence on the development of emotion recognition.

    PubMed

    Berzenski, Sara R; Yates, Tuppett M

    2017-10-01

    The ability to recognize and label emotions serves as a building block by which children make sense of the world and learn how to interact with social partners. However, the timing and salience of influences on emotion recognition development are not fully understood. Path analyses evaluated the contributions of parenting and child narrative coherence to the development of emotion recognition across ages 4 through 8 in a diverse (50% female; 46% Hispanic, 18.4% Black, 11.2% White, .4% Asian, 24.0% multiracial) longitudinally followed sample of 250 caregiver-child dyads. Parenting behaviors during interactions (i.e., support, instructional quality, intrusiveness, and hostility) and children's narrative coherence during the MacArthur Story Stem Battery were observed at ages 4 and 6. Emotion recognition increased from age 4 to 8. Parents' supportive presence at age 4 and instructional quality at age 6 predicted increased emotion recognition at 8, beyond initial levels of emotion recognition and child cognitive ability. There were no significant effects of negative parenting (i.e., intrusiveness or hostility) at 4 or 6 on emotion recognition. Child narrative coherence at ages 4 and 6 predicted increased emotion recognition at 8. Emotion recognition at age 4 predicted increased parent instructional quality and decreased intrusiveness at 6. These findings clarify whether and when familial and child factors influence emotion recognition development. Influences on emotion recognition development emerged as differentially salient across time periods, such that there is a need to develop and implement targeted interventions to promote positive parenting skills and children's narrative coherence at specific ages. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  3. Differential diagnosis of human bladder mucosa pathologies in vivo with cross-polarization optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Kiseleva, Elena; Kirillin, Mikhail; Feldchtein, Felix; Vitkin, Alex; Sergeeva, Ekaterina; Zagaynova, Elena; Streltzova, Olga; Shakhov, Boris; Gubarkova, Ekaterina; Gladkova, Natalia

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative image analysis and parameter extraction using a specific implementation of polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography (OCT) provides differential diagnosis of mucosal pathologies in in-vivo human bladders. We introduce a cross-polarization (CP) OCT image metric called Integral Depolarization Factor (IDF) to enable automatic diagnosis of bladder conditions (assessment the functional state of collagen fibers). IDF-based diagnostic accuracy of identification of the severe fibrosis of normal bladder mucosa is 79%; recurrence of carcinoma on the post-operative scar is 97%; and differentiation between neoplasia and acute inflammation is 75%. The promising potential of CP OCT combined with image analysis in human urology is thus demonstrated in vivo. PMID:25909028

  4. Airborne Measurements of CO2 Column Absorption and Range Using a Pulsed Direct-Detection Integrated Path Differential Absorption Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abshire, James B.; Riris, Haris; Weaver, Clark J.; Mao, Jianping; Allan, Graham R.; Hasselbrack, William E.; Browell, Edward V.

    2013-01-01

    We report on airborne CO2 column absorption measurements made in 2009 with a pulsed direct-detection lidar operating at 1572.33 nm and utilizing the integrated path differential absorption technique. We demonstrated these at different altitudes from an aircraft in July and August in flights over four locations in the central and eastern United States. The results show clear CO2 line shape and absorption signals, which follow the expected changes with aircraft altitude from 3 to 13 km. The lidar measurement statistics were also calculated for each flight as a function of altitude. The optical depth varied nearly linearly with altitude, consistent with calculations based on atmospheric models. The scatter in the optical depth measurements varied with aircraft altitude as expected, and the median measurement precisions for the column varied from 0.9 to 1.2 ppm. The altitude range with the lowest scatter was 810 km, and the majority of measurements for the column within it had precisions between 0.2 and 0.9 ppm.

  5. Attosecond transient absorption spectroscopy of molecular nitrogen: Vibrational coherences in the b‧ 1Σ+u state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warrick, Erika R.; Bækhøj, Jens E.; Cao, Wei; Fidler, Ashley P.; Jensen, Frank; Madsen, Lars Bojer; Leone, Stephen R.; Neumark, Daniel M.

    2017-09-01

    Nuclear and electronic dynamics in a wavepacket comprising bound Rydberg and valence electronic states of nitrogen from 12 to 15 eV are investigated using attosecond transient absorption. Vibrational quantum beats with a fundamental period of 50 femtoseconds persist for a picosecond in the b‧ 1Σ+u valence state. Multi-state calculations show that these coherences result primarily from near infrared-induced coupling between the inner and outer regions of the b‧ 1Σ+u state potential and the dark a″ 1Σ+g state. The excellent spectral and temporal resolution of this technique allows measurement of the anharmonicity of the b‧ 1Σ+u potential directly from the observed quantum beats.

  6. The effect of absorption and coherent interference in the photoluminescence and electroluminescence spectra of SRO/SRN MIS capacitors.

    PubMed

    Juvert, Joan; González-Fernández, Alfredo Abelardo; Llobera, Andreu; Domínguez, Carlos

    2013-04-22

    In this paper we present a technique that can be used to study the effect of absorption and coherent interference in the luminescence of multilayer structures. We apply the technique to the measured photoluminescence and electroluminescence spectra of MIS capacitors where the insulator is composed of a silicon rich oxide (SRO)/silicon rich nitride (SRN) bilayer structure. We remove the effect of the multilayer stack on the measured photoluminescence spectrum of the samples without the metal contact to find the intrinsic spectrum. Then we apply the effect of the MIS structure on the intrinsic spectrum in order to calculate the electroluminescence spectrum. Good agreement with the experimentally measured EL spectrum is found. We discuss which parameters affect the spectra most significantly.

  7. [Concentration retrieving method of SO2 using differential optical absorption spectroscopy based on statistics].

    PubMed

    Liu, Bin; Sun, Chang-Ku; Zhang, Chi; Zhao, Yu-Mei; Liu, Jun-Ping

    2011-01-01

    A concentration retrieving method using statistics is presented, which is applied in differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) for measuring the concentration of SO2. The method uses the standard deviation of the differential absorption to represents the gas concentration. Principle component analysis (PCA) method is used to process the differential absorption spectrum. In the method, the basis data for the concentration retrieval of SO2 is the combination of the PCA processing result, the correlation coefficient, and the standard deviation of the differential absorption. The method is applied to a continuous emission monitoring system (CEMS) with optical path length of 0.3 m. Its measuring range for SO2 concentration is 0-5 800 mg x m(-3). The nonlinear calibration and the temperature compensation for the system were executed. The full scale error of the retrieving concentration is less than 0.7% FS. And the measuring result is -4.54 mg x m(-3) when the concentration of SO2 is zero.

  8. The concentration-estimation problem for multiple-wavelength differential absorption lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payne, A. N.

    1994-07-01

    We are seeking to develop a reliable methodology for multi-chemical detection and discrimination based upon multi-wavelength differential absorption lidar measurements. In this paper, we summarize some preliminary results of our efforts to devise suitable concentration-estimation algorithms for use in detection and discrimination schemes.

  9. Invited Article: All-optical multichannel logic based on coherent perfect absorption in a plasmonic metamaterial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papaioannou, Maria; Plum, Eric; Valente, João; Rogers, Edward T. F.; Zheludev, Nikolay I.

    2016-12-01

    The exponential growth of telecommunications bandwidth will require next generation optical networks, where multiple spatial information channels will be transmitted in parallel. To realise the full potential of parallel optical data channels, fast and scalable multichannel solutions for processing of optical data are of paramount importance. Established solutions based on the nonlinear wave interaction in photorefractive materials are slow. Here we experimentally demonstrate all-optical logical operations between pairs of simulated spatially multiplexed information channels using the coherent interaction of light with light on a plasmonic metamaterial. The approach is suitable for fiber implementation and—in principle—operates with diffraction-limited spatial resolution, 100 THz bandwidth, and arbitrarily low intensities, thus promising ultrafast, low-power solutions for all-optical parallel data processing.

  10. Wavelength-locking-free 1.57µm differential absorption lidar for CO₂ sensing.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hao; Chen, Tao; Shu, Rong; Hong, Guanglie; Zheng, Long; Ge, Ye; Hu, Yihua

    2014-11-03

    We propose a novel wavelength-locking-free differential absorption lidar system for CO₂ sensing. The ON-line wavelength laser was wavelength modulated around a specific CO₂ absorption line to ensure that the emission from the ON-line laser hit the atmospheric CO₂ absorption line peak twice a cycle. In the meantime, the intensity of the ON-line and OFF-line wavelength lasers were sinusoidally intensity modulated to enhance the SNR of the back-scattered signal. As a consequence, the system configuration was simplified and the measurement error caused by the deviation of CO₂ absorption coefficient from the long-time ON-line wavelength drifting was completely eliminated. Furthermore, a more precise calibration method was developed which could simultaneously calibrate the offset and precision of the lidar detector. This method could be applied to other differential-absorption-based lidar systems. The result showed that a measurement precision of 0.525% for the column concentration was achieved in 1 s time interval through a path of 780m. We recorded the CO₂ concentration variation for 12 hours starting from mid-night, the result showed that the course of the concentration derived from the DIAL was in good agreement with that of the in situ CO₂ sensor only when the status of atmosphere was stable.

  11. Round-robin differential-phase-shift quantum key distribution with heralded pair-coherent sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Le; Zhao, Shengmei

    2017-04-01

    Round-robin differential-phase-shift (RRDPS) quantum key distribution (QKD) scheme provides an effective way to overcome the signal disturbance from the transmission process. However, most RRDPS-QKD schemes use weak coherent pulses (WCPs) as the replacement of the perfect single-photon source. Considering the heralded pair-coherent source (HPCS) can efficiently remove the shortcomings of WCPs, we propose a RRDPS-QKD scheme with HPCS in this paper. Both infinite-intensity decoy-state method and practical three-intensity decoy-state method are adopted to discuss the tight bound of the key rate of the proposed scheme. The results show that HPCS is a better candidate for the replacement of the perfect single-photon source, and both the key rate and the transmission distance are greatly increased in comparison with those results with WCPs when the length of the pulse trains is small. Simultaneously, the performance of the proposed scheme using three-intensity decoy states is close to that result using infinite-intensity decoy states when the length of pulse trains is small.

  12. Differentiating Mild Papilledema and Buried Optic Nerve Head Drusen Using Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Kaushal M.; Pasol, Joshua; Rosa, Potyra R.; Lam, Byron L.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the clinical utility of spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) in differentiating mild papilledema from buried optic nerve head drusen (ONHD). Design Comparative case series. Participants 16 eyes of 9 patients with ultrasound-proven buried ONHD, 12 eyes of 6 patients with less than or equal to Frisén grade 2 papilledema due to idiopathic intracranial hypertension. 2 normal fellow eyes of patients with buried ONHD were included. Methods A raster scan on the optic nerve and retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness analysis was performed on each eye using SD-OCT. Eight eyes underwent enhanced depth imaging SD-OCT. Images were assessed qualitatively and quantitatively to identify differentiating features between buried ONHD and papilledema. Five clinicians trained with a tutorial and masked to the underlying diagnosis reviewed the SD-OCT images of each eye independently to determine the diagnosis. Main outcome measures Differences in RNFL thickness in each quadrant between the two groups, and diagnostic accuracy of five independent clinicians based on the SD-OCT images alone. Results We found no statistically significant difference in RNFL thickness between buried ONHD and papilledema in any of the four quadrants. Diagnostic accuracy among the readers was low and ranged from 50–64%. The kappa coefficient of agreement among the readers was 0.35 (95% Confidence interval: 0.19, 0.54). Conclusions SD-OCT is not clinically reliable in differentiating buried ONHD and mild papilledema. PMID:24321144

  13. Pressure Measurements Using an Airborne Differential Absorption Lidar. Part 1; Analysis of the Systematic Error Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flamant, Cyrille N.; Schwemmer, Geary K.; Korb, C. Laurence; Evans, Keith D.; Palm, Stephen P.

    1999-01-01

    Remote airborne measurements of the vertical and horizontal structure of the atmospheric pressure field in the lower troposphere are made with an oxygen differential absorption lidar (DIAL). A detailed analysis of this measurement technique is provided which includes corrections for imprecise knowledge of the detector background level, the oxygen absorption fine parameters, and variations in the laser output energy. In addition, we analyze other possible sources of systematic errors including spectral effects related to aerosol and molecular scattering interference by rotational Raman scattering and interference by isotopic oxygen fines.

  14. Noise suppression in coherent population-trapping atomic clock by differential magneto-optic rotation detection.

    PubMed

    Tan, Bozhong; Tian, Yuan; Lin, Huifang; Chen, Jiehua; Gu, Sihong

    2015-08-15

    We propose and investigate a scheme for differential detection of the magneto-optic rotation (MOR) effect, where a linearly polarized bichromatic laser field is coherent population-trapping (CPT)-resonant with alkali atoms, and discuss the application of this effect to CPT-based atomic clocks. The results of our study indicate that laser noise in a vertical cavity surface-emitting laser-based CPT atomic clock can be effectively suppressed by the proposed scheme. The proposed scheme promises to realize a packaged MOR-CPT atomic clock that has significantly better frequency stability coupled with similar power consumption, volume, and cost when compared with currently available packaged CPT atomic clocks.

  15. Atmospheric CO2 measurements with a 2 μm airborne laser absorption spectrometer employing coherent detection.

    PubMed

    Spiers, Gary D; Menzies, Robert T; Jacob, Joseph; Christensen, Lance E; Phillips, Mark W; Choi, Yonghoon; Browell, Edward V

    2011-05-10

    We report airborne measurements of CO(2) column abundance conducted during two 2009 campaigns using a 2.05 μm laser absorption spectrometer. The two flight campaigns took place in the California Mojave desert and in Oklahoma. The integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) method is used for the CO(2) column mixing ratio retrievals. This instrument and the data analysis methodology provide insight into the capabilities of the IPDA method for both airborne measurements and future global-scale CO(2) measurements from low Earth orbit pertinent to the NASA Active Sensing of CO(2) Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons mission. The use of a favorable absorption line in the CO(2) 2 μm band allows the on-line frequency to be displaced two (surface pressure) half-widths from line center, providing high sensitivity to the lower tropospheric CO(2). The measurement repeatability and measurement precision are in good agreement with predicted estimates. We also report comparisons with airborne in situ measurements conducted during the Oklahoma campaign.

  16. Spectrum sensing of trace C(2)H(2) detection in differential optical absorption spectroscopy technique.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xi; Dong, Xiaopeng

    2014-09-10

    An improved algorithm for trace C(2)H(2) detection is presented in this paper. The trace concentration is accurately calculated by focusing on the absorption spectrum from the frequency domain perspective. The advantage of the absorption spectroscopy frequency domain algorithm is its anti-interference capability. First, the influence of the background noise on the minimum detectable concentration is greatly reduced. Second, the time-consuming preprocess of spectra calibration in the differential optical absorption spectroscopy technique is skipped. Experimental results showed the detection limit of 50 ppm is achieved at a lightpath length of 0.2 m. This algorithm can be used in real-time spectrum analysis with high accuracy.

  17. Experimental studies of a zeeman-tuned xenon laser differential absorption apparatus.

    PubMed

    Linford, G J

    1973-06-01

    A Zeeman-tuned cw xenon laser differential absorption device is described. The xenon laser was tuned by axial magnetic fields up to 5500 G generated by an unusually large water-cooled dc solenoid. Xenon laser lines at 3.37 micro, 3.51 micro, and 3.99 micro were tuned over ranges of 6 A, 6 A, and 11 A, respectively. To date, this apparatus has been used principally to study the details of formaldehyde absorption lines lying near the 3 .508-micro xenon laser transition. These experiments revealed that the observed absorption spectrum of formaldehyde exhibits a sufficiently unique spectral structure that the present technique may readily be used to measure relative concentrations of formaldehyde in samples of polluted air.

  18. Differential absorption lidar technique for measurement of the atmospheric pressure profile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korb, C. L.; Weng, C. Y.

    1983-01-01

    A new two-wavelength lidar technique for remotely measuring the pressure profile using the trough absorption region between two strong lines in the oxygen A band is described. The theory of integrated vertical path, differential ranging, and horizontal-path pressure measurements is given, with methods to desensitize and correct for temperature effects. The properties of absorption troughs are described and shown to reduce errors due to laser frequency jitter by up to two orders of magnitude. A general analysis, including laser bandwidth effects, demonstrates that pressure measurements with an integrated-vertical-path technique are typically fifty times more accurate than with a differential ranging technique. Simulations show 0.1-0.3 percent accuracy for ground and Shuttle-based pressure-profile and surface-pressure experiments.

  19. [A new retrieval method for ozone concentration at the troposphere based on differential absorption lidar].

    PubMed

    Fan, Guang-Qiang; Liu, Jian-Guo; Liu, Wen-Qing; Lu, Yi-Huai; Zhang, Tian-Shu; Dong, Yun-Sheng; Zhao, Xue-Song

    2012-12-01

    Aerosols interfere with differential absorption lidar ozone concentration measurement and can introduce significant errors. A new retrieval method was introduced, and ozone concentration and aerosol extinction coefficient were gained simultaneously based on the retrieval method. The variables were analyzed by experiment including aerosol lidar ratio, aerosol wavelength exponent, and aerosol-molecular ratio at the reference point. The results show that these parameters introduce error less than 8% below 1 km. The measurement error derives chiefly from signal noise and the parameters introduce error less than 3% above 1 km. Finally the vertical profile of tropospheric ozone concentration and aerosol extinction coefficient were derived by using this algorithm. The retrieval results of the algorithm and traditional dual-wavelength difference algorithm are compared and analyzed. Experimental results indicate that the algorithm is feasible, and the algorithm can reduce differential absorption lidar measurement error introduced by aerosol.

  20. The developmental psychometrics of big five self-reports: acquiescence, factor structure, coherence, and differentiation from ages 10 to 20.

    PubMed

    Soto, Christopher J; John, Oliver P; Gosling, Samuel D; Potter, Jeff

    2008-04-01

    How do youths' personality reports differ from those of adults? To identify the year-by-year timing of developmental trends from late childhood (age 10) to early adulthood (age 20), the authors examined Big Five self-report data from a large and diverse Internet sample. At younger ages within this range, there were large individual differences in acquiescent responding, and acquiescence variability had pronounced effects on psychometric characteristics. Beyond the effects of acquiescence, self-reports generally became more coherent within domains, and better differentiated across domains, at older ages. Importantly, however, different Big Five domains showed different developmental trends. Extraversion showed especially pronounced age gains in coherence but no gains in differentiation. In contrast, Agreeableness and Conscientiousness showed large age gains in differentiation but only trivial gains in coherence. Neuroticism and Openness showed moderate gains in both coherence and differentiation. Comparisons of items that were relatively easy versus difficult to comprehend indicated that these patterns were not simply due to verbal comprehension. These findings have important implications for the study of personality characteristics and other psychological attributes in childhood and adolescence. (c) 2008 APA, all rights reserved.

  1. The optical fiber monitoring system of environmental parameters using multiwavelength and differential absorption technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Kaihua; Yan, Kuang; Huang, Zuohua; Wang, Ruirong

    2005-02-01

    Air pollution monitoring is an important aspect of environmental protection. The pollutants to be detected are usually more than one in air or smoke monitoring. Researching new techniques that can meet the demand of detecting the pollutants at the same time is important and necessary. The paper researched the method of detecting multi-parameters in one optical fiber gas sensing system. The system used multi-wavelength and time division multiplex technique to detect the concentration of SO2 and NO2 simultaneously based on gas' spectra absorption principle. The light differential absorption formula was deduced. The two strong and weak absorbing wavelengths were chosen as signal and reference relatively. To every gas, optical coupler and narrow-band optical filters were used to generate signal and reference light from a high brightness LED. The central wavelength of filters is identical to the strong or weak absorption wavelength respectively. The multi-channel signals were switched to one light beam using a 4x1 optical switch controlled by computer in designed time sequence. The output light after absorbing by gas was coupled on a high sensitivity PIN detector. To achieve high detecting sensitivity, the light source was modulated by a pulse signal. The power and temperature control circuits were also used to stabilize the output power and wavelength of light source. After differential absorption process, the concentration of different gas can be deduced in one set of common optical and electrical sensing system.

  2. A 2-Micron Pulsed Integrated Path Differential Absorption Lidar Development For Atmospheric CO2 Concentration Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Jirong; Petros, Mulugeta; Reithmaier, Karl; Bai, Yingxin; Trieu, Bo C.; Refaat, Tamer F.; Kavaya, Michael J.; Singh, Upendra N.

    2012-01-01

    A 2-micron pulsed, Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) lidar instrument for ground and airborne atmospheric CO2 concentration measurements via direct detection method is being developed at NASA Langley Research Center. This instrument will provide an alternate approach to measure atmospheric CO2 concentrations with significant advantages. A high energy pulsed approach provides high-precision measurement capability by having high signal-to-noise level and unambiguously eliminates the contamination from aerosols and clouds that can bias the IPDA measurement.

  3. Differential absorption lidars for remote sensing of atmospheric pressure and temperature profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korb, C. Laurence; Schwemmer, Geary K.; Famiglietti, Joseph; Walden, Harvey; Prasad, Coorg

    1995-01-01

    A near infrared differential absorption lidar technique is developed using atmospheric oxygen as a tracer for high resolution vertical profiles of pressure and temperature with high accuracy. Solid-state tunable lasers and high-resolution spectrum analyzers are developed to carry out ground-based and airborne measurement demonstrations and results of the measurements presented. Numerical error analysis of high-altitude airborne and spaceborne experiments is carried out, and system concepts developed for their implementation.

  4. The capability of fluoroscopic systems to determine differential Roentgen-ray absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baily, N. A.; Crepeau, R. L.

    1975-01-01

    A clinical fluoroscopic unit used in conjunction with a TV image digitization system was investigated to determine its capability to evaluate differential absorption between two areas in the same field. Fractional contrasts and minimum detectability for air, several concentrations of Renografin-60, and aluminum were studied using phantoms of various thicknesses. Results showed that the videometric response, when treated as contrast, shows a linear response with absorber thickness up to considerable thicknesses.

  5. Studies of the differential absorption rocket experiment. [to measure atmospheric electron density

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ginther, J. C.; Smith, L. G.

    1975-01-01

    Investigations of the ionosphere, in the rocket program of the Aeronomy Laboratory, include a propagation experiment, the data from which may be analyzed in several modes. This report considers in detail the differential absorption experiment. The sources of error and limitations of sensitivity are discussed. Methods of enhancing the performance of the experiment are described. Some changes have been made in the system and the improvement demonstrated. Suggestions are made for further development of the experiment.

  6. Differentiation of morphotic elements in human blood using optical coherence tomography and a microfluidic setup.

    PubMed

    Ossowski, Paweł; Raiter-Smiljanic, Anna; Szkulmowska, Anna; Bukowska, Danuta; Wiese, Małgorzata; Derzsi, Ladislav; Eljaszewicz, Andrzej; Garstecki, Piotr; Wojtkowski, Maciej

    2015-10-19

    We demonstrate a novel optical method for the detection and differentiation between erythrocytes and leukocytes that uses amplitude and phase information provided by optical coherence tomography (OCT). Biological cells can introduce significant phase modulation with substantial scattering anisotropy and dominant forward-scattered light. Such physical properties may favor the use of a trans-illumination imaging technique. However, an epi-illumination mode may be more practical and robust in many applications. This study describes a new way of measuring the phase modulation introduced by flowing microobjects. The novel part of this invention is that it uses the backscattered signal from the substrate located below the flowing/moving objects. The identification of cells is based on phase-sensitive OCT signals. To differentiate single cells, a custom-designed microfluidic device with a highly scattering substrate is introduced. The microchannels are molded in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) mixed with titanium dioxide (TiO2) to ensure high scattering properties. The statistical parameters of the measured signal depend on the cells' features, such as their size, shape, and internal structure.

  7. Segmentation of optical coherence tomography images for differentiation of the cavernous nerves from the prostate gland.

    PubMed

    Chitchian, Shahab; Weldon, Thomas P; Fried, Nathaniel M

    2009-01-01

    The cavernous nerves course along the surface of the prostate and are responsible for erectile function. Improvements in identification, imaging, and visualization of the cavernous nerves during prostate cancer surgery may improve nerve preservation and postoperative sexual potency. Two-dimensional (2-D) optical coherence tomography (OCT) images of the rat prostate were segmented to differentiate the cavernous nerves from the prostate gland. To detect these nerves, three image features were employed: Gabor filter, Daubechies wavelet, and Laws filter. The Gabor feature was applied with different standard deviations in the x and y directions. In the Daubechies wavelet feature, an 8-tap Daubechies orthonormal wavelet was implemented, and the low-pass sub-band was chosen as the filtered image. Last, Laws feature extraction was applied to the images. The features were segmented using a nearest-neighbor classifier. N-ary morphological postprocessing was used to remove small voids. The cavernous nerves were differentiated from the prostate gland with a segmentation error rate of only 0.058+/-0.019. This algorithm may be useful for implementation in clinical endoscopic OCT systems currently being studied for potential intraoperative diagnostic use in laparoscopic and robotic nerve-sparing prostate cancer surgery.

  8. Differential shrinkage induced formation of yolk-shell carbon microspheres toward enhanced microwave absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Chunhua; Du, Yunchen; Xu, Haiyan; Xue, Jianlei; Chu, Wenlei; Qiang, Rong; Han, Xijiang; Xu, Ping

    2017-09-01

    Rational design of the microstructure paves new ways for microwave absorbing materials because it can create more facilities for the attenuation of incident electromagnetic waves. In this study, a simple method is proposed to prepare yolk-shell carbon microspheres through differential shrinkage in the internal cores and external shells of polypyrrole microspheres with the assistance of outermost SiO2 coating. This method simplifies the preparation procedures and avoids strictly controlled conditions. The electromagnetic parameters, such as relative complex permittivity and permeability, of the as-prepared yolk-shell carbon microspheres, are investigated in the frequency range of 2.0-18.0 GHz. Compared with solid carbon microspheres, yolk-shell carbon microspheres exhibit significantly enhanced microwave absorption properties in terms of both the reflection loss intensity and absorption bandwidth. The minimum reflection loss value can reach up to -27.5 dB at 8.32 GHz with an absorber thickness of 2.96 mm. The absorption bandwidth over -10.0 dB is in the range of 11.3-16.2 GHz at the typical thickness of 2.0 mm. The enhanced microwave absorption properties may be attributed to the good attenuation ability and well matched characteristic impedance. This work not only provides a promising candidate for microwave absorption, but also provides an attractive strategy to prepare various yolk-shell composites.

  9. [Study on removing the lamp spectrum structure in differential optical absorption spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Qu, Xiao-ying; Li, Yu-jin

    2010-11-01

    Differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) technique has been used to measure trace gases in the atmosphere by their strongly structured absorption of radiation in the UV and visible spectral range, and nowadays this technique has been widely utilized to measure trace polluted gases in the atmosphere e.g. SO2, NO2, O3, HCHO, etc. However, there exists lamp (xenon lamp or deuteriumlamp) spectrum structure in the measured band (300-700 nm) of the absorption spectra of atmosphere, which badly impacts on precision of retrieving the concentration of trace gases in the atmosphere. People home and abroad generally employ two ways to handle this problem, one is segmenting band retrieving method, another is remedial retrieving method. In the present paper, a new retrieving method to deal with this trouble is introduced. The authors used moving-window average smoothing method to obtain the slow part of the absorption spectra of atmosphere, then achieved the lamp (xenon lamp in the paper) spectrum structure in the measured band of the absorption spectra of atmosphere. The authors analyzed and retrieved the measured spectrum of the atmosphere, and the result is better than the forenamed ways. Chi-square of residuum is 2.995 x 10(-4), and this method was proved to be able to avoid shortcoming of choosing narrowband and disadvantage of discovering the new component of atmosphere in retrieving the concentration of air pollutants and measuring the air pollutants.

  10. Spatial transport of atomic coherence in electromagnetically induced absorption with a paraffin-coated Rb vapor cell.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yoon-Seok; Moon, Han Seb

    2014-06-30

    We report the spatial transport of spontaneously transferred atomic coherence (STAC) in electromagnetically induced absorption (EIA), which resulted from moving atoms with the STAC of the 5S(1/2) (F = 2)-5P(3/2) (F' = 3) transition of (87)Rb in a paraffin-coated vapor cell. In our experiment, two channels were spatially separate; the writing channel (WC) generated STAC in the EIA configuration, and the reading channel (RC) retrieved the optical field from the spatially transported STAC. Transported between the spatially separated positions, the fast light pulse of EIA in the WC and the delayed light pulse in the RC were observed. When the laser direction of the RC was counter-propagated in the direction of the WC, we observed direction reversal of the transported light pulse in the EIA medium. Furthermore, the delay time, the magnitude, and the width of the spatially transported light pulse were investigated with respect to the distance between the two channels.

  11. Side-line tunable laser transmitter for differential absorption lidar measurements of CO2: design and application to atmospheric measurements.

    PubMed

    Koch, Grady J; Beyon, Jeffrey Y; Gibert, Fabien; Barnes, Bruce W; Ismail, Syed; Petros, Mulugeta; Petzar, Paul J; Yu, Jirong; Modlin, Edward A; Davis, Kenneth J; Singh, Upendra N

    2008-03-01

    A 2 microm wavelength, 90 mJ, 5 Hz pulsed Ho laser is described with wavelength control to precisely tune and lock the wavelength at a desired offset up to 2.9 GHz from the center of a CO(2) absorption line. Once detuned from the line center the laser wavelength is actively locked to keep the wavelength within 1.9 MHz standard deviation about the setpoint. This wavelength control allows optimization of the optical depth for a differential absorption lidar (DIAL) measuring atmospheric CO(2) concentrations. The laser transmitter has been coupled with a coherent heterodyne receiver for measurements of CO(2) concentration using aerosol backscatter; wind and aerosols are also measured with the same lidar and provide useful additional information on atmospheric structure. Range-resolved CO(2) measurements were made with <2.4% standard deviation using 500 m range bins and 6.7 min? (1000 pulse pairs) integration time. Measurement of a horizontal column showed a precision of the CO(2) concentration to <0.7% standard deviation using a 30 min? (4500 pulse pairs) integration time, and comparison with a collocated in situ sensor showed the DIAL to measure the same trend of a diurnal variation and to detect shorter time scale CO(2) perturbations. For vertical column measurements the lidar was setup at the WLEF tall tower site in Wisconsin to provide meteorological profiles and to compare the DIAL measurements with the in situ sensors distributed on the tower up to 396 m height. Assuming the DIAL column measurement extending from 153 m altitude to 1353 m altitude should agree with the tower in situ sensor at 396 m altitude, there was a 7.9 ppm rms difference between the DIAL and the in situ sensor using a 30 min? rolling average on the DIAL measurement.

  12. Measurement of Range-Resolved Water Vapor Concentration by Coherent CO2 Differential Absorption Lidar.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-03-01

    behavior is similar to that predicted by Willets and Harris [112], who postulated that the initial chirp results from the presence of free electrons in the...measured chirp characteristics of a number of CO 2 TE systems, including the NOAA lidar with those predicted by the Willetts and Harris scaling parameters...the winter months, measurements between October and March were performed with the lidar pcinting roughly horizontally. Such measuremetIts poter .- tially

  13. Spectral control of an alexandrite laser for an airborne water-vapor differential absorption lidar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponsardin, Patrick; Grossmann, Benoist E.; Browell, Edward V.

    1994-01-01

    A narrow-linewidth pulsed alexandrite laser has been greatly modified for improved spectral stability in an aircraft environment, and its operation has been evaluated in the laboratory for making water-vapor differential absorption lidar measurements. An alignment technique is described to achieve the optimum free spectral range ratio for the two etalons inserted in the alexandrite laser cavity, and the sensitivity of this ratio is analyzed. This technique drastically decreases the occurrence of mode hopping, which is commonly observed in a tunable, two-intracavity-etalon laser system. High spectral purity (greater than 99.85%) at 730 nm is demonstrated by the use of a water-vapor absorption line as a notch filter. The effective cross sections of 760-nm oxygen and 730-nm water-vapor absorption lines are measured at different pressures by using this laser, which has a finite linewidth of 0.02 cm(exp -1) (FWHM). It is found that for water-vapor absorption linewidths greater than 0.04 cm(exp -1) (HWHM), or for altitudes below 10 km, the laser line can be considered monochromatic because the measured effective absorption cross section is within 1% of the calculated monochromatic cross section. An analysis of the environmental sensitivity of the two intracavity etalons is presented, and a closed-loop computer control for active stabilization of the two intracavity etalons in the alexandrite laser is described. Using a water-vapor absorption line as a wavelength reference, we measure a long-term frequency drift (approximately 1.5 h) of less than 0.7 pm in the laboratory.

  14. Spectral control of an alexandrite laser for an airborne water-vapor differential absorption lidar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponsardin, Patrick; Grossmann, Benoist E.; Browell, Edward V.

    1994-01-01

    A narrow-linewidth pulsed alexandrite laser has been greatly modified for improved spectral stability in an aircraft environment, and its operation has been evaluated in the laboratory for making water-vapor differential absorption lidar measurements. An alignment technique is described to achieve the optimum free spectral range ratio for the two etalons inserted in the alexandrite laser cavity, and the sensitivity of this ratio is analyzed. This technique drastically decreases the occurrence of mode hopping, which is commonly observed in a tunable, two-intracavity-etalon laser system. High spectral purity (greater than 99.85%) at 730 nm is demonstrated by the use of a water-vapor absorption line as a notch filter. The effective cross sections of 760-nm oxygen and 730-nm water-vapor absorption lines are measured at different pressures by using this laser, which has a finite linewidth of 0.02 cm(exp -1) (FWHM). It is found that for water-vapor absorption linewidths greater than 0.04 cm(exp -1) (HWHM), or for altitudes below 10 km, the laser line can be considered monochromatic because the measured effective absorption cross section is within 1% of the calculated monochromatic cross section. An analysis of the environmental sensitivity of the two intracavity etalons is presented, and a closed-loop computer control for active stabilization of the two intracavity etalons in the alexandrite laser is described. Using a water-vapor absorption line as a wavelength reference, we measure a long-term frequency drift (approximately 1.5 h) of less than 0.7 pm in the laboratory.

  15. Spectral control of an alexandrite laser for an airborne water-vapor differential absorption lidar system.

    PubMed

    Ponsardin, P; Higdon, N S; Grossmann, B E; Browell, E V

    1994-09-20

    A narrow-linewidth pulsed alexandrite laser has been greatly modified for improved spectral stability in an aircraft environment, and its operation has been evaluated in the laboratory for making water-vapor differential absorption lidar measurements. An alignment technique is described to achieve the optimum free spectral range ratio for the two étalons inserted in the alexandrite laser cavity, and the sensitivity of this ratio is analyzed. This technique drastically decreases the occurrence of mode hopping, which is commonly observed in a tunable, two-intracavity-étalon laser system. High spectral purity (> 99.85%) at 730 nm is demonstrated by the use of a water-vapor absorption line as a notch filter. The effective cross sections of 760-nm oxygen and 730-nm water-vapor absorption lines are measured at different pressures by usingthis laser, which has a finite linewidth of 0.02 cm(-1) (FWHM). It is found that for water-vapor absorption linewidths greater than 0.04 cm(-1) (HWHM), or for altitudes below 10 km, the laser line can be considered monochromatic because the measured effective absorption cross section is within 1% of the calculated monochromatic cross section. An analysis of the environmental sensitivity of the two intracavity étalons is presented, and a closed-loop computer control for active stabilization of the two intracavity étalons in the alexandrite laser is described. Using a water-vapor absorption line as a wavelength reference, we measure a long-term frequency drift (≈ 1.5 h) of less than 0.7 pm in the laboratory.

  16. The Influence of Trace Gases Absorption on Differential Ring Cross Sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Dong; Zhao, Keyi

    2017-04-01

    The Ring effect refers to the filling in of Fraunhofer lines, which is known as solar absorption lines, caused almost entirely by rotational Raman scattering. The rotational Raman scattering by N2 and O2 in the atmosphere is the main factor that leads to Ring effect. The Ring effect is one significant limitation to the accuracy of the retrieval of trace gas constituents in atmosphere, while using satellite data with Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy technique. In this study, firstly the solar spectrum is convolved with rotational Raman cross sections of atmosphere, which is calculated with rotational Raman cross sections of N2 and O2, divided by the original solar spectrum, with a cubic polynomial subtracted off, to create differential Ring spectrum Ring1. Secondly, the Ring effect for pure Raman scattering of the Fraunhofer spectrum plus the contribution from interference by terrestrial absorption which always comes from a kind of trace gas (e.g., O3) are derived. To allow for more generality, the optically thin term as well as the next term in the expansion for the Beer-Lambert law are calculated.Ring1, Ring2, and Ring3are the Fraunhofer only, 1st terrestrial correction, and 2nd terrestrial correction for DOAS fitting.

  17. On-Line Wavelength Calibration of Pulsed Laser for CO2 Differential Absorption LIDAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Chengzhi; Ma, Xin; Han, Ge; Liang, Ailin; Gong, Wei

    2016-06-01

    Differential absorption lidar (DIAL) remote sensing is a promising technology for atmospheric CO2 detection. However, stringent wavelength accuracy and stability are required in DIAL system. Accurate on-line wavelength calibration is a crucial procedure for retrieving atmospheric CO2 concentration using the DIAL, particularly when pulsed lasers are adopted in the system. Large fluctuations in the intensities of a pulsed laser pose a great challenge for accurate on-line wavelength calibration. In this paper, a wavelength calibration strategy based on multi-wavelength scanning (MWS) was proposed for accurate on-line wavelength calibration of a pulsed laser for CO2 detection. The MWS conducted segmented sampling across the CO2 absorption line with appropriate number of points and range of widths by using a tunable laser. Complete absorption line of CO2 can be obtained through a curve fitting. Then, the on-line wavelength can be easily found at the peak of the absorption line. Furthermore, another algorithm called the energy matching was introduced in the MWS to eliminate the backlash error of tunable lasers during the process of on-line wavelength calibration. Finally, a series of tests was conducted to elevate the calibration precision of MWS. Analysis of tests demonstrated that the MWS proposed in this paper could calibrate the on-line wavelength of pulsed laser accurately and steadily.

  18. Airborne differential absorption lidar system for measurements of atmospheric water vapor and aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Arlen F.; Allen, Robert J.; Mayo, M. Neale; Butler, Carolyn F.; Grossman, Benoist E.; Ismail, Syed; Grant, William B.; Browell, Edward V.; Higdon, Noah S.; Mayor, Shane D.; hide

    1994-01-01

    An airborne differential absorption lidar (DIAL) system has been developed at the NASA Langley Research Center for remote measurements of atmospheric water vapor (H2O) and aerosols. A solid-state alexandrite laser with a 1-pm linewidth and greater than 99.85% spectral purity was used as the on-line transmitter. Solid-state avalanche photodiode detector technology has replaced photomultiplier tubes in the receiver system, providing an average increase by a factor of 1.5-2.5 in the signal-to-noise ratio of the H2O measurement. By incorporating advanced diagnostic and data-acquisition instrumentation into other subsystems, we achieved additional improvements in system operational reliability and measurement accuracy. Laboratory spectroscopic measurements of H2O absorption-line parameters were performed to reduce the uncertainties in our knowledge of the absorption cross sections. Line-center H2O absorption cross sections were determined, with errors of 3-6%, for more than 120 lines in the 720-nm region. Flight tests of the system were conducted during 1989-1991 on the NASA Wallops Flight Facility Electra aircraft, and extensive intercomparison measurements were performed with dew-point hygrometers and H2O radiosondes. The H2O distributions measured with the DIAL system differed by less than 10% from the profiles determined with the in situ probes in a variety of atmospheric conditions.

  19. Airborne differential absorption lidar system for measurements of atmospheric water vapor and aerosols.

    PubMed

    Higdon, N S; Browell, E V; Ponsardin, P; Grossmann, B E; Butler, C F; Chyba, T H; Mayo, M N; Allen, R J; Heuser, A W; Grant, W B; Ismail, S; Mayor, S D; Carter, A F

    1994-09-20

    An airborne differential absorption lidar (DIAL) system has been developed at the NASA Langley Research Center for remote measurements of atmospheric water vapor (H(2)O) and aerosols. A solid-state alexandrite laser with a 1-pm linewidth and > 99.85% spectral purity was used as the on-line transmitter. Solid-state avalanche photodiode detector technology has replaced photomultiplier tubes in the receiver system, providing an average increase by a factor of 1.5-2.5 in the signal-to-noise ratio of the H(2)O measurement. By incorporating advanced diagnostic and data-acquisition instrumentation into other subsystems, we achieved additional improvements in system operational reliability and measurement accuracy. Laboratory spectroscopic measurements of H(2)O absorption-line parameters were perfo med to reduce the uncertainties in our knowledge of the absorption cross sections. Line-center H(2)O absorption cross sections were determined, with errors of 3-6%, for more than 120 lines in the 720-nm region. Flight tests of the system were conducted during 1989-1991 on the NASA Wallops Flight Facility Electra aircraft, and extensive intercomparison measurements were performed with dew-point hygrometers and H(2)O radiosondes. The H(2)O distributions measured with the DIAL system differed by ≤ 10% from the profiles determined with the in situ probes in a variety of atmospheric conditions.

  20. Sensitivity analysis of differential absorption lidar measurements in the mid-infrared region.

    PubMed

    Ambrico, P F; Amodeo, A; Di Girolamo, P; Spinelli, N

    2000-12-20

    The availability of new laser sources that are tunable in the IR spectral region opens new perspectives for differential absorption lidar (DIAL) measurements. A region of particular interest is located in the near IR, where some of the atmospheric pollutants have absorption lines that permit monitoring of emissions from industrial plants and in urban areas. In DIAL measurements, the absorption lines for the species to be measured must be carefully chosen to prevent interference from other molecules, to minimize the dependence of the absorption cross section on temperature, and to optimize the measurements with respect to the optical depth. We analyze the influence of these factors and discuss a set of criteria for selecting the best pairs of wavelengths (lambda(on) and lambda(off)) to be used in DIAL measurements of several molecular species (HCl, CO, CO(2), NO(2), CH(4), H(2)O, and O(2)). Moreover, a sensitivity study has been carried out for selected lines in three different regimes: clean air, urban polluted air, and emission from an incinerator stack.

  1. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) combined with videokeratography to differentiate mild keratoconus subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Rabinowitz, Yaron S.; Li, Xiaohui; Canedo, Ana Laura Caiado; Ambrosio, Renato; Bykhovskaya, Yelena

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aims To develop parameters using a combination of optical coherence tomography (OCT) and videokeratography to ‘early’ detect keratoconus. Methods We performed videokeratography, wavefront analysis and measured OCT indices on 180 normal, 46 moderate keratoconus, 54 early keratoconus, 7 ‘forme fruste’ keratoconus and 16 keratoconus ‘suspect” eyes, to determine the most sensitive parameters for separating these groups. Results A combination of videokeratography and OCT indices (I-S value and Minimum pachymetry) was statistically the most significant in separating the keratoconus groups from normals (P<.001). Using a newly derived index, the Minimum pachymetry divided by the I-S value (PA/I-S index) with a cut off of 100, we could identify 100% of “early” and ‘forme fruste’ keratoconus as being abnormal with 7 normals misclassified (misclassification rate of 2.7%). By adding keratoconus ‘suspects’ to the analysis and an I-S value of 1.2 as a cut of point, we classified 5 ‘suspects’ as normal and 11 normals as abnormal (misclassification rate 7.8%). The PA/I-S index, with a cut of point of 100, reduced this misclassification rate to 4.4%. Conclusion These results suggest that OCT combined with videokeratography may be more useful for differentiating mild forms of keratoconus, than videokeratography alone. PMID:24763472

  2. Atmospheric effects on CO{sub 2} differential absorption lidar sensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Petrin, R.R.; Nelson, D.H.; Schmitt, M.J.

    1996-03-01

    The ambient atmosphere between the laser transmitter and the target can affect CO{sub 2} differential absorption lidar (DIAL) measurement sensitivity through a number of different processes. In this work, we will address two of the sources of atmospheric interference with CO{sub 2} DIAL measurements: effects due to beam propagation through atmospheric turbulence and extinction due to absorption by atmospheric gases. Measurements of atmospheric extinction under different atmospheric conditions are presented and compared to a standard atmospheric transmission model (FASCODE). We have also investigated the effects of atmospheric turbulence on system performance. Measurements of the effective beam size after propagation are compared to model predictions using simultaneous measurements of atmospheric turbulence as input to the model. These results are also discussed in the context of the overall effect of beam propagation through atmospheric turbulence on the sensitivity of DIAL measurements.

  3. Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) using Targets: SO2 and NO2 Measurements in Montevideo City

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louban, Ilia; Píriz, Gustavo; Platt, Ulrich; Frins, Erna

    2008-04-01

    SO2 and NO2 were remotely measured in a main street of Montevideo city using Multiaxis-Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS) combined with on-field selected targets. Target-based measurements are the basis of a new experimental procedure called Topographic Target Light scattering-DOAS (TOTAL-DOAS) that provides a well define absorption path to measure the near surface distribution of trace gases in the boundary layer. It combines the measurement principles of the long-path DOAS and zenith-scattered sunlight DOAS, within the near UV and VIS spectral range. We give a general description of the procedure and present first results of the 2006 campaign at Montevideo.

  4. Atmospheric effects on CO{sub 2} differential absorption lidar performance

    SciTech Connect

    Petrin, R.R.; Quagliano, J.R.; Nelson, D.H.; Schmitt, M.J.; Quick, C.R.; Sander, R.K.; Tiee, J.J.; Whitehead, M.

    1996-05-01

    CO{sub 2} differential absorption lidar (DIAL) performance can be adversely affected by the ambient atmosphere between the laser transmitter and the target through a number of different processes. This work addresses two sources of atmospheric interference with multispectral CO{sub 2} DIAL measurements: effects due to beam propagation through atmospheric turbulence and extinction due to absorption by atmospheric gases. The authors compare measurements of the effective beam size after propagation to predictions from a beam propagation model that includes turbulence effects such as beam steering and beam spreading. They also compare the experimental measurements of atmospheric extinction to those predicted by both a standard atmospheric transmission model (FASCODE) and a chemometric analysis.

  5. Cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) system for measuring atmospheric mercury using differential absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierce, A.; Obrist, D.; Moosmuller, H.; Moore, C.

    2012-04-01

    Atmospheric elemental mercury (Hg0) is a globally pervasive element that can be transported and deposited to remote ecosystems where it poses — particularly in its methylated form — harm to many organisms including humans. Current techniques for measurement of atmospheric Hg0 require several liters of sample air and several minutes for each analysis. Fast-response (i.e., 1 second or faster) measurements would improve our ability to understand and track chemical cycling of mercury in the atmosphere, including high frequency Hg0 fluctuations, sources and sinks, and chemical transformation processes. We present theory, design, challenges, and current results of our new prototype sensor based on cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) for fast-response measurement of Hg0 mass concentrations. CRDS is a direct absorption technique that implements path-lengths of multiple kilometers in a compact absorption cell using high-reflectivity mirrors, thereby improving sensitivity and reducing sample volume compared to conventional absorption spectroscopy. Our sensor includes a frequency-doubled, dye-laser emitting laser pulses tunable from 215 to 280 nm, pumped by a Q-switched, frequency tripled Nd:YAG laser with a pulse repetition rate of 50 Hz. We present how we successfully perform automated wavelength locking and stabilization of the laser to the peak Hg0 absorption line at 253.65 nm using an external isotopically-enriched mercury (202Hg0) cell. An emphasis of this presentation will be on the implementation of differential absorption measurement whereby measurements are alternated between the peak Hg0 absorption wavelength and a nearby wavelength "off" the absorption line. This can be achieved using a piezo electric tuning element that allows for pulse-by-pulse tuning and detuning of the laser "online" and "offline" of the Hg absorption line, and thereby allows for continuous correction of baseline extinction losses. Unexpected challenges with this approach included

  6. Evaluation of the effects of Mount Pinatubo aerosol on differential absorption lidar measurements of stratospheric ozone

    SciTech Connect

    Steinbrecht, W.; Carswell, A.I.

    1995-01-01

    Substantially increased aerosol backscattering and extinction after a major volcanic eruption can lead to errors in differential absorption lidar (DIAL) measurements of stratospheric ozone. Mie calculations, performed for the wavelengths 308 and 353 nm and based on size distributions measured over Laramie, Wyoming (41 deg), were used to assess size and temporal evolution of these errors. In many situations, neglecting the different aerosol backscattering at the absorption and reference wavelengths can lead to relative errors in the ozone concentration larger than 100% for the 308-, 353-nm pair. The error due to neglecting the differential aerosol extinction, however, will rarely exceed 2%. A correction for this differential extinction should only be attempted when high concentrations (greater than 100/cu cm) of small aerosol particles with radii below 0.1 micrometers are present, e.g., shortly after an eruption. A correction for the differential backscatter can be made by using additional lidar measurements at a second reference wavelength or by having general size distribution information on the aerosol. Possible corrections were tested and will usually reduce the error in the ozone concentration considerably. For the 308-, 353-nm pair, both Mie calculations and a comparison with ozone profiles from electrochemical cell sondes show, however, that even after the correction the uncertainty in the ozone concentration within some regions of the strongly enhanced Mt. Pinatubo aerosol layer can still be substantial, of the order of 10-50%. Wavelength separation smaller than 40 nm or use of wavelengths shorter than 300 nm will reduce the error. The best solution seems to be the addition of Raman channels. It avoids the large error due to the differential backscatter term.

  7. A robust optical parametric oscillator and receiver telescope for differential absorption lidar of greenhouse gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Iain; Jack, James W.; Rae, Cameron F.; Moncrieff, John B.

    2015-10-01

    We report the development of a differential absorption lidar instrument (DIAL) designed and built specifically for the measurement of anthropogenic greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. The DIAL is integrated into a commercial astronomical telescope to provide high-quality receiver optics and enable automated scanning for three-dimensional lidar acquisition. The instrument is portable and can be set up within a few hours in the field. The laser source is a pulsed optical parametric oscillator (OPO) which outputs light at a wavelength tunable near 1.6 μm. This wavelength region, which is also used in telecommunications devices, provides access to absorption lines in both carbon dioxide at 1573 nm and methane at 1646 nm. To achieve the critical temperature stability required for a laserbased field instrument the four-mirror OPO cavity is machined from a single aluminium block. A piezoactuator adjusts the cavity length to achieve resonance and this is maintained over temperature changes through the use of a feedback loop. The laser output is continuously monitored with pyroelectric detectors and a custom-built wavemeter. The OPO is injection seeded by a temperature-stabilized distributed feedback laser diode (DFB-LD) with a wavelength locked to the absorption line centre (on-line) using a gas cell containing pure carbon dioxide. A second DFB-LD is tuned to a nearby wavelength (off-line) to provide the reference required for differential absorption measurements. A similar system has been designed and built to provide the injection seeding wavelengths for methane. The system integrates the DFB-LDs, drivers, locking electronics, gas cell and balanced photodetectors. The results of test measurements of carbon dioxide are presented and the development of the system is discussed, including the adaptation required for the measurement of methane.

  8. Investigation of potential of differential absorption Lidar techniques for remote sensing of atmospheric pollutants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, C. F.; Shipley, S. T.; Allen, R. J.

    1981-01-01

    The NASA multipurpose differential absorption lidar (DIAL) system uses two high conversion efficiency dye lasers which are optically pumped by two frequency-doubled Nd:YAG lasers mounted rigidly on a supporting structure that also contains the transmitter, receiver, and data system. The DIAL system hardware design and data acquisition system are described. Timing diagrams, logic diagrams, and schematics, and the theory of operation of the control electronics are presented. Success in obtaining remote measurements of ozone profiles with an airborne systems is reported and results are analyzed.

  9. Advances in Diode-Laser-Based Water Vapor Differential Absorption Lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spuler, Scott; Repasky, Kevin; Morley, Bruce; Moen, Drew; Weckwerth, Tammy; Hayman, Matt; Nehrir, Amin

    2016-06-01

    An advanced diode-laser-based water vapor differential absorption lidar (WV-DIAL) has been developed. The next generation design was built on the success of previous diode-laser-based prototypes and enables accurate measurement of water vapor closer to the ground surface, in rapidly changing atmospheric conditions, and in daytime cloudy conditions up to cloud base. The lidar provides up to 1 min resolution, 150 m range resolved measurements of water vapor in a broad range of atmospheric conditions. A description of the instrument and results from its initial field test in 2014 are discussed.

  10. Pressure Measurement in Supersonic Air Flow by Differential Absorptive Laser-Induced Thermal Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart, Roger C.; Herring, Gregory C.; Balla, Robert J.

    2007-01-01

    Nonintrusive, off-body flow barometry in Mach-2 airflow has been demonstrated in a large-scale supersonic wind tunnel using seedless laser-induced thermal acoustics (LITA). The static pressure of the gas flow is determined with a novel differential absorption measurement of the ultrasonic sound produced by the LITA pump process. Simultaneously, stream-wise velocity and static gas temperature of the same spatially-resolved sample volume were measured with this nonresonant time-averaged LITA technique. Mach number, temperature and pressure have 0.2%, 0.4%, and 4% rms agreement, respectively, in comparison with known free-stream conditions.

  11. Pressure measurement in supersonic air flow by differential absorptive laser-induced thermal acoustics.

    PubMed

    Hart, Roger C; Herring, G C; Balla, R Jeffrey

    2007-06-15

    Nonintrusive, off-body flow barometry in Mach 2 airflow has been demonstrated in a large-scale supersonic wind tunnel using seedless laser-induced thermal acoustics (LITA). The static pressure of the gas flow is determined with a novel differential absorption measurement of the ultrasonic sound produced by the LITA pump process. Simultaneously, the streamwise velocity and static gas temperature of the same spatially resolved sample volume were measured with this nonresonant time-averaged LITA technique. Mach number, temperature, and pressure have 0.2%, 0.4%, and 4% rms agreement, respectively, in comparison with known free-stream conditions.

  12. Differential absorption and Raman lidar for water vapor profile measurements - A review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, William B.

    1991-01-01

    Differential absorption lidar and Raman lidar have been applied to the range-resolved measurements of water vapor density for more than 20 years. Results have been obtained using both lidar techniques that have led to improved understanding of water vapor distributions in the atmosphere. This paper reviews the theory of the measurements, including the sources of systematic and random error; the progress in lidar technology and techniques during that period, including a brief look at some of the lidar systems in development or proposed; and the steps being taken to improve such lidar systems.

  13. Differential Absorption Lidar to Measure Sub-Hourly Variation of Tropospheric Ozone Profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuang, Shi; Burris, John F.; Newchurch, Michael J.; Johnson, Steve; Long, Stephanie

    2009-01-01

    A tropospheric ozone Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) system, developed jointly by the University of Alabama at Huntsville and NASA, is making regular observations of ozone vertical distributions between 1 and 8 km with two receivers under both daytime and nighttime conditions using lasers at 285 and 291 nm. This paper describes the lidar system and analysis technique with some measurement examples. An iterative aerosol correction procedure reduces the retrieval error arising from differential aerosol backscatter in the lower troposphere. Lidar observations with coincident ozonesonde flights demonstrate that the retrieval accuracy ranges from better than 10% below 4 km to better than 20% below 8 km with 750-m vertical resolution and 10-min temporal integration

  14. Differential Absorption Lidar to Measure Subhourly Variation of Tropospheric Ozone Profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuang, Shi; Burris, John F.; Newchurch, Michael J.; Johnson, Steve; Long, Stephania

    2011-01-01

    A tropospheric ozone Differential Absorption Lidar system, developed jointly by The University of Alabama in Huntsville and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, is making regular observations of ozone vertical distributions between 1 and 8 km with two receivers under both daytime and nighttime conditions using lasers at 285 and 291 nm. This paper describes the lidar system and analysis technique with some measurement examples. An iterative aerosol correction procedure reduces the retrieval error arising from differential aerosol backscatter in the lower troposphere. Lidar observations with coincident ozonesonde flights demonstrate that the retrieval accuracy ranges from better than 10% below 4 km to better than 20% below 8 km with 750-m vertical resolution and 10-min 17 temporal integration.

  15. Differentially coherent detection of QASK for frequency-hopping systems. II - Performance in the presence of jamming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, M. K.

    1982-01-01

    The performance of differentially coherent detection of frequency-hopped QASK in the presence of partial-band noise and partial-band multitone jamming is presented. In each case, the worst case jamming strategy is determined which consists of specifying the worst case partial-band fraction and the corresponding maximum average error probability. The results obtained are compared with those of M-ary FH-DPSK operating in the same jamming environment.

  16. DIFFERENTIAL MACULAR FEATURES ON OPTICAL COHERENCE TOMOGRAPHY ANGIOGRAPHY IN EYES WITH CHOROIDAL NEVUS AND MELANOMA.

    PubMed

    Valverde-Megías, Alicia; Say, Emil A T; Ferenczy, Sandor R; Shields, Carol L

    2017-04-01

    .0001). Compared with contralateral eye, eyes with choroidal nevus demonstrate similar CMT, FAZ, and CVD. In contrast, eyes with melanoma show increased CMT, enlarged FAZ, and reduced CVD, particularly related to increasing tumor thickness. Optical coherence tomography angiography could be a useful tool in differentiating choroidal nevus from melanoma.

  17. A Modified Differential Coherent Bit Synchronization Algorithm for BeiDou Weak Signals with Large Frequency Deviation.

    PubMed

    Han, Zhifeng; Liu, Jianye; Li, Rongbing; Zeng, Qinghua; Wang, Yi

    2017-07-04

    BeiDou system navigation messages are modulated with a secondary NH (Neumann-Hoffman) code of 1 kbps, where frequent bit transitions limit the coherent integration time to 1 millisecond. Therefore, a bit synchronization algorithm is necessary to obtain bit edges and NH code phases. In order to realize bit synchronization for BeiDou weak signals with large frequency deviation, a bit synchronization algorithm based on differential coherent and maximum likelihood is proposed. Firstly, a differential coherent approach is used to remove the effect of frequency deviation, and the differential delay time is set to be a multiple of bit cycle to remove the influence of NH code. Secondly, the maximum likelihood function detection is used to improve the detection probability of weak signals. Finally, Monte Carlo simulations are conducted to analyze the detection performance of the proposed algorithm compared with a traditional algorithm under the CN0s of 20~40 dB-Hz and different frequency deviations. The results show that the proposed algorithm outperforms the traditional method with a frequency deviation of 50 Hz. This algorithm can remove the effect of BeiDou NH code effectively and weaken the influence of frequency deviation. To confirm the feasibility of the proposed algorithm, real data tests are conducted. The proposed algorithm is suitable for BeiDou weak signal bit synchronization with large frequency deviation.

  18. Temperature sensitivity of differential absorption lidar measurements of water vapor in the 720-nm region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Browell, Edward V.; Ismail, Syed; Grossmann, Benoist E.

    1991-01-01

    Recently measured properties of water vapor (H2O) absorption lines have been used in calculations to evalute the temperature sensitivity of differential absorption lidar (Dial) H2O measurements. This paper estimates the temperature sensitivity of H2O lines in the 717-733-nm region for both H2O mixing ratio and number density measurements, and discusses the influence of the H2O line ground state energies E-double-prime, the H2O absorption linewidths, the linewidth temperature dependence parameter, and the atmospheric temperature and pressure variations with altitude and location on the temperature sensitivity calculations. Line parameters and temperature sensitivity calculations for 67 H2O lines in the 720-nm band are given which can be directly used in field experiments. Water vapor lines with E-double-prime values in the 100-300/cm range were found to be optimum for Dial measurements of H2O number densities, while E-double-prime values in the 250-500/cm range were found to be optimum for H2O mixing ratio measurements.

  19. Remote sensing of atmospheric SO2 using the differential absorption LIDAR technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoell, J. M., Jr.; Wade, W. R.; Thompson, R. T., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    The paper reports an investigation of the capabilities of a UV differential absorption lidar (DIAL) system for remote measurements of sulfur dioxide emissions. Two features of the present DIAL system are an absorption cell permitting the determination of the difference in SO2 absorption coefficients for the two transmitted wavelengths and a calibration cell permitting the linearity and performance of the system to be evaluated. The DIAL technique is described along with the transmitter, receiver, data-adquisition, and data-processing components of the investigated system. Quantitative measurements of the average SO2 concentration in a region surrounding the exhaust stack of a steam-generating plant are discussed which show that the present system has measurement sensitivities of 10 ppb at a range of 0.8 km and 20 ppb at 1.9 km. Based on performance characteristics obtained during a calibration of this system, it is predicted that a measurement sensitivity of less than 4 ppb over a 1-km path will be attained.

  20. Temperature sensitivity of differential absorption lidar measurements of water vapor in the 720-nm region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Browell, Edward V.; Ismail, Syed; Grossmann, Benoist E.

    1991-01-01

    Recently measured properties of water vapor (H2O) absorption lines have been used in calculations to evalute the temperature sensitivity of differential absorption lidar (Dial) H2O measurements. This paper estimates the temperature sensitivity of H2O lines in the 717-733-nm region for both H2O mixing ratio and number density measurements, and discusses the influence of the H2O line ground state energies E-double-prime, the H2O absorption linewidths, the linewidth temperature dependence parameter, and the atmospheric temperature and pressure variations with altitude and location on the temperature sensitivity calculations. Line parameters and temperature sensitivity calculations for 67 H2O lines in the 720-nm band are given which can be directly used in field experiments. Water vapor lines with E-double-prime values in the 100-300/cm range were found to be optimum for Dial measurements of H2O number densities, while E-double-prime values in the 250-500/cm range were found to be optimum for H2O mixing ratio measurements.

  1. Atmospheric Pre-Corrected Differential Absorption Techniques to Retrieve Columnar Water Vapor: Theory and Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borel, Christoph C.; Schlaepfer, Daniel

    1996-01-01

    Two different approaches exist to retrieve columnar water vapor from imaging spectrometer data: (1) Differential absorption techniques based on: (a) Narrow-Wide (N/W) ratio between overlapping spectrally wide and narrow channels; (b) Continuum Interpolated Band Ratio (CIBR) between a measurement channel and the weighted sum of two reference channels. (2) Non-linear fitting techniques which are based on spectral radiative transfer calculations. The advantage of the first approach is computational speed and of the second, improved retrieval accuracy. Our goal was to improve the accuracy of the first technique using physics based on radiative transfer. Using a modified version of the Duntley equation, we derived an "Atmospheric Pre-corrected Differential Absorption" (APDA) technique and described an iterative scheme to retrieve water vapor on a pixel-by-pixel basis. Next we compared both, the CIBR and the APDA using the Duntley equation for MODTRAN3 computed irradiances, transmissions and path radiance (using the DISORT option). This simulation showed that the CIBR is very sensitive to reflectance effects and that the APDA performs much better. An extensive data set was created with the radiative transfer code 6S over 379 different ground reflectance spectra. The calculated relative water vapor error was reduced significantly for the APDA. The APDA technique had about 8% (vs. over 35% for the CIBR) of the 379 spectra with a relative water vapor error of greater than +5%. The APDA has been applied to 1991 and 1995 AVIRIS scenes which visually demonstrate the improvement over the CIBR technique.

  2. Atmospheric Pre-Corrected Differential Absorption Techniques to Retrieve Columnar Water Vapor: Theory and Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borel, Christoph C.; Schlaepfer, Daniel

    1996-01-01

    Two different approaches exist to retrieve columnar water vapor from imaging spectrometer data: (1) Differential absorption techniques based on: (a) Narrow-Wide (N/W) ratio between overlapping spectrally wide and narrow channels; (b) Continuum Interpolated Band Ratio (CIBR) between a measurement channel and the weighted sum of two reference channels. (2) Non-linear fitting techniques which are based on spectral radiative transfer calculations. The advantage of the first approach is computational speed and of the second, improved retrieval accuracy. Our goal was to improve the accuracy of the first technique using physics based on radiative transfer. Using a modified version of the Duntley equation, we derived an "Atmospheric Pre-corrected Differential Absorption" (APDA) technique and described an iterative scheme to retrieve water vapor on a pixel-by-pixel basis. Next we compared both, the CIBR and the APDA using the Duntley equation for MODTRAN3 computed irradiances, transmissions and path radiance (using the DISORT option). This simulation showed that the CIBR is very sensitive to reflectance effects and that the APDA performs much better. An extensive data set was created with the radiative transfer code 6S over 379 different ground reflectance spectra. The calculated relative water vapor error was reduced significantly for the APDA. The APDA technique had about 8% (vs. over 35% for the CIBR) of the 379 spectra with a relative water vapor error of greater than +5%. The APDA has been applied to 1991 and 1995 AVIRIS scenes which visually demonstrate the improvement over the CIBR technique.

  3. Analytical BER performance in differential n-PSK coherent transmission system influenced by equalization enhanced phase noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Tianhua; Jacobsen, Gunnar; Popov, Sergei; Li, Jie; Sergeyev, Sergey; Friberg, Ari T.; Zhang, Yimo

    2015-01-01

    Long-haul high speed optical transmission systems are significantly distorted by the interplay between the electronic chromatic dispersion (CD) equalization and the local oscillator (LO) laser phase noise, which leads to an effect of equalization enhanced phase noise (EEPN). The EEPN degrades the performance of optical communication systems severely with the increment of fiber dispersion, LO laser linewidth, symbol rate, and modulation format. In this paper, we present an analytical model for evaluating the performance of bit-error-rate (BER) versus signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in the n-level phase shift keying (n-PSK) coherent transmission system employing differential carrier phase estimation (CPE), where the influence of EEPN is considered. Theoretical results based on this model have been investigated for the differential quadrature phase shift keying (DQPSK), the differential 8-PSK (D8PSK), and the differential 16-PSK (D16PSK) coherent transmission systems. The influence of EEPN on the BER performance in term of the fiber dispersion, the LO phase noise, the symbol rate, and the modulation format are analyzed in detail. The BER behaviors based on this analytical model achieve a good agreement with previously reported BER floors influenced by EEPN. Further simulations have also been carried out in the differential CPE considering EEPN. The results indicate that this analytical model can give an accurate prediction for the DQPSK system, and a leading-order approximation for the D8PSK and the D16PSK systems.

  4. Real time quantum propagation on a Monte Carlo trajectory guided grids of coupled coherent states: 26D simulation of pyrazine absorption spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shalashilin, Dmitrii V.; Child, Mark S.

    2004-08-01

    In this work we apply the coupled coherent states technique of quantum molecular dynamics to simulation of the absorption spectrum of pyrazine. All 24 vibrational modes are taken into account. The nonadiabatic coupling obetween the S1 and S2 electronic states is treated by a mapping approach that adds two extra degrees of freedom to the effective vibronic Hamiltonian. The results are in a good agreement with experiment and with previous calculations by quantum multiconfigurational time dependent Hartree and semiclassical Herman-Kluk methods.

  5. Real time quantum propagation on a Monte Carlo trajectory guided grids of coupled coherent states: 26D simulation of pyrazine absorption spectrum.

    PubMed

    Shalashilin, Dmitrii V; Child, Mark S

    2004-08-22

    In this work we apply the coupled coherent states technique of quantum molecular dynamics to simulation of the absorption spectrum of pyrazine. All 24 vibrational modes are taken into account. The nonadiabatic coupling obetween the S(1) and S(2) electronic states is treated by a mapping approach that adds two extra degrees of freedom to the effective vibronic Hamiltonian. The results are in a good agreement with experiment and with previous calculations by quantum multiconfigurational time dependent Hartree and semiclassical Herman-Kluk methods. (c) 2004 American Institute of Physics

  6. Distribution of zeros of the S-matrix of chaotic cavities with localized losses and coherent perfect absorption: non-perturbative results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fyodorov, Yan V.; Suwunnarat, Suwun; Kottos, Tsampikos

    2017-07-01

    We employ the random matrix theory framework to calculate the density of zeroes of an M-channel scattering matrix describing a chaotic cavity with a single localized absorber embedded in it. Our approach extends beyond the weak-coupling limit of the cavity with the channels and applies for any absorption strength. Importantly it provides an insight for the optimal amount of loss needed to realize a chaotic coherent perfect absorbing trap. Our predictions are tested against simulations for two types of traps: a complex network of resonators and quantum graphs.

  7. Ultraviolet DIAL measurements of O3 profiles in regions of spatially inhomogeneous aerosols. [differential absorption lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Browell, E. V.; Shipley, S. T.; Ismail, S.

    1985-01-01

    The differential absorption lidar (DIAL) technique generally assumes that atmospheric optical scattering is the same at the two laser wavelengths used in the DIAL measurement of a gas concentration profile. Erros can arise in this approach when the wavelengths are significantly separated, and there is a range dependence in the aerosol scattering distribution. This paper discusses the errors introduced by large DIAL wavelength separations and spatial inhomogeneity of aerosols in the atmosphere. A Bernoulli solution for determining the relative distribution of aerosol backscattering in the UV region is presented, and scattering ratio boundary values for these solutions are discussed. The results of this approach are used to derive a backscatter correction to the standard DIAL analysis method. It is shown that for the worst cases of severe range dependence in aerosol backscattering, the residual errors in the corrected DIAL O3 measurements were less than 10 ppbv for DIAL wavelengths at 286 and 300 nm.

  8. Development of a Pulsed 2-Micron Integrated Path Differential Absorption Lidar for CO2 Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Yu, Jirong; Petros, Mulugeta; Refaat, Tamer; Refaat, Tamer

    2013-01-01

    Atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) is an important greenhouse gas that significantly contributes to the carbon cycle and global radiation budget on Earth. Active remote sensing of CO2 is important to address several limitations that contend with passive sensors. A 2-micron double-pulsed, Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) lidar instrument for ground and airborne atmospheric CO2 concentration measurements via direct detection method is being developed at NASA Langley Research Center. This active remote sensing instrument will provide an alternate approach of measuring atmospheric CO2 concentrations with significant advantages. A high energy pulsed approach provides high-precision measurement capability by having high signal-to-noise ratio level and unambiguously eliminates the contamination from aerosols and clouds that can bias the IPDA measurement. Commercial, on the shelf, components are implemented for the detection system. Instrument integration will be presented in this paper as well as a background for CO2 measurement at NASA Langley research Center

  9. Development of a pulsed 2-micron integrated path differential absorption lidar for CO2 measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Yu, Jirong; Petros, Mulugeta; Refaat, Tamer; Reithmaier, Karl

    2013-09-01

    Atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) is an important greenhouse gas that significantly contributes to the carbon cycle and global radiation budget on Earth. Active remote sensing of CO2 is important to address several limitations that contend with passive sensors. A 2-micron double-pulsed, Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) lidar instrument for ground and airborne atmospheric CO2 concentration measurements via direct detection method is being developed at NASA Langley Research Center. This active remote sensing instrument will provide an alternate approach of measuring atmospheric CO2 concentrations with significant advantages. A high energy pulsed approach provides high-precision measurement capability by having high signal-to-noise ratio level and unambiguously eliminates the contamination from aerosols and clouds that can bias the IPDA measurement. Commercial, on the shelf, components are implemented for the detection system. Instrument integration will be presented in this paper as well as a background for CO2 measurement at NASA Langley research Center.

  10. Predictions of silicon avalanche photodiode detector performance in water vapor differential absorption lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenimer, R. L.

    1988-01-01

    Performance analyses are presented which establish that over most of the range of signals expected for a down-looking differential absorption lidar (DIAL) operated at 16 km the silicon avalanche photodiode (APD) is the preferred detector for DIAL measurements of atmospheric water vapor in the 730 nm spectral region. The higher quantum efficiency of the APD's, (0.8-0.9) compared to a photomultiplier's (0.04-0.18) more than offsets the higher noise of an APD receiver. In addition to offering lower noise and hence lower random error the APD's excellent linearity and impulse recovery minimize DIAL systematic errors attributable to the detector. Estimates of the effect of detector system parameters on overall random and systematic DIAL errors are presented, and performance predictions are supported by laboratory characterization data for an APD receiver system.

  11. Predictions of silicon avalanche photodiode detector performance in water vapor differential absorption lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenimer, R. L.

    1988-01-01

    Performance analyses are presented which establish that over most of the range of signals expected for a down-looking differential absorption lidar (DIAL) operated at 16 km the silicon avalanche photodiode (APD) is the preferred detector for DIAL measurements of atmospheric water vapor in the 730 nm spectral region. The higher quantum efficiency of the APD's, (0.8-0.9) compared to a photomultiplier's (0.04-0.18) more than offsets the higher noise of an APD receiver. In addition to offering lower noise and hence lower random error the APD's excellent linearity and impulse recovery minimize DIAL systematic errors attributable to the detector. Estimates of the effect of detector system parameters on overall random and systematic DIAL errors are presented, and performance predictions are supported by laboratory characterization data for an APD receiver system.

  12. [Studies on the remote measurement of the emission of formaldehyde by mobile differential optical absorption spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Wu, Feng-Cheng; Xie, Pin-Hua; Li, Ang; Si, Fu-Qi; Dou, Ke; Liu, Yu; Xu, Jin; Wang, Jie

    2011-11-01

    Formaldehyde (HCHO) is the most abundant carbonyl compounds that play an important role in atmospheric chemistry and photochemical reactions. Formaldehyde is an important indicator of atmospheric reactivity and urban atmospheric aerosol precursors. In the present paper, the emission of formaldehyde from chemical area was measured using the mobile differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS). This instrument uses the zenith scattered sunlight as the light source with successful sampling in the area loop. Vertical column density was retrieved by this system, combined with the meteorological wind field and car speed information, the emission of formaldehyde in the area was estimated. The authors carried out the measuring experiment in one chemical plant in Beijing using this technology. The result showed that the average value of the flux of formaldehyde in this area was 605 kg x h(-1) during the measuring period.

  13. Development and Testing of a Differential Absorption LIDAR system for Greenhouse Gas Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maxwell, S. E.; Douglass, K.; Plusquellic, D.; Whetstone, J. R.

    2013-12-01

    Our objective is to develop accurate and reliable methods for quantifying distributed carbon sources and sinks to support both mitigation efforts and climate change research. We will describe progress toward a field-deployable, eye-safe differential absorption LIDAR system. The current version of our system utilizes a high repetition rate (>200 kHz), 200 ns pulsed fiber amplifier driven by tunable DFB lasers around 1602 nm. Collection is performed using a small (3' diameter) telescope and an avalanche photodiode. We demonstrate a rapid hard target measurement of ambient levels of CO2 in our 100m test facility using low powers from the fiber laser and a highly-retro-reflecting target. We also discuss progress toward a range resolved measurement in the test facility, planned upgrades to the facility, and the development of a low-backscatter beam dump for range-limited applications.

  14. Concurrent multiaxis differential optical absorption spectroscopy system for the measurement of tropospheric nitrogen dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leigh, Roland J.; Corlett, Gary K.; Friess, Udo; Monks, Paul S.

    2006-10-01

    The development of a new concurrent multiaxis (CMAX) sky viewing spectrometer to monitor rapidly changing urban concentrations of nitrogen dioxide is detailed. The CMAX differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) technique involves simultaneous spectral imaging of the zenith and off-axis measurements of spatially resolved scattered sunlight. Trace-gas amounts are retrieved from the measured spectra using the established DOAS technique. The potential of the CMAX DOAS technique to derive information on rapidly changing concentrations and the spatial distribution of NO2 in an urban environment is demonstrated. Three example data sets are presented from measurements during 2004 of tropospheric NO2 over Leicester, UK (52.62°N, 1.12°W). The data demonstrate the current capabilities and future potential of the CMAX DOAS method in terms of the ability to measure real-time spatially disaggregated urban NO2.

  15. High-resolution atmospheric water vapor measurements with a scanning differential absorption lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Späth, F.; Behrendt, A.; Muppa, S. K.; Metzendorf, S.; Riede, A.; Wulfmeyer, V.

    2014-11-01

    The scanning differential absorption lidar (DIAL) of the University of Hohenheim (UHOH) is presented. The UHOH DIAL is equipped with an injection-seeded frequency-stabilized high-power Ti:sapphire laser operated at 818 nm with a repetition rate of 250 Hz. A scanning transceiver unit with a 80 cm primary mirror receives the atmospheric backscatter signals. The system is capable of water vapor measurements with temporal resolutions of a few seconds and a range resolution between 30 and 300 m at daytime. It allows to investigate surface-vegetation-atmosphere exchange processes with high resolution. In this paper, we present the design of the instrument and illustrate its performance with recent water vapor measurements taken in Stuttgart-Hohenheim and in the frame of the HD(CP)2 Observational Prototype Experiment (HOPE). HOPE was located near research center Jülich, in western Germany, in spring 2013 as part of the project "High Definition of Clouds and Precipitation for advancing Climate Prediction" (HD(CP)2). Scanning measurements reveal the 3-dimensional structures of the water vapor field. The influence of uncertainties within the calculation of the absorption cross-section at wavelengths around 818 nm for the WV retrieval is discussed. Radiosonde intercomparisons show a very small bias between the instruments of only (-0.04 ± 0.11) g m-3 or (-1.0 ± 2.3) % in the height range of 0.5 to 3 km.

  16. [Study on Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy Data Processing Based on Chirp-Z Transformation].

    PubMed

    Zheng, Hai-ming; Li, Guang-jie; Wu, Hao

    2015-06-01

    Differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) is a commonly used atmospheric pollution monitoring method. Denoising of monitoring spectral data will improve the inversion accuracy. Fourier transform filtering method is effectively capable of filtering out the noise in the spectral data. But the algorithm itself can introduce errors. In this paper, a chirp-z transform method is put forward. By means of the local thinning of Fourier transform spectrum, it can retain the denoising effect of Fourier transform and compensate the error of the algorithm, which will further improve the inversion accuracy. The paper study on the concentration retrieving of SO2 and NO2. The results show that simple division causes bigger error and is not very stable. Chirp-z transform is proved to be more accurate than Fourier transform. Results of the frequency spectrum analysis show that Fourier transform cannot solve the distortion and weakening problems of characteristic absorption spectrum. Chirp-z transform shows ability in fine refactoring of specific frequency spectrum.

  17. NO2 measurements in Hong Kong using LED based long path differential optical absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, K. L.; Pöhler, D.; Kuhlmann, G.; Hartl, A.; Platt, U.; Wenig, M. O.

    2012-05-01

    In this study we present the first long term measurements of atmospheric nitrogen dioxide (NO2) using a LED based Long Path Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (LP-DOAS) instrument. This instrument is measuring continuously in Hong Kong since December 2009, first in a setup with a 550 m absorption path and then with a 3820 m path at about 30 m to 50 m above street level. The instrument is using a high power blue light LED with peak intensity at 450 nm coupled into the telescope using a Y-fibre bundle. The LP-DOAS instrument measures NO2 levels in the Kowloon Tong and Mongkok district of Hong Kong and we compare the measurement results to mixing ratios reported by monitoring stations operated by the Hong Kong Environmental Protection Department in that area. Hourly averages of coinciding measurements are in reasonable agreement (R = 0.74). Furthermore, we used the long-term data set to validate the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) NO2 data product. Monthly averaged LP-DOAS and OMI measurements correlate well (R = 0.84) when comparing the data for the OMI overpass time. We analyzed weekly patterns in both data sets and found that the LP-DOAS detects a clear weekly cycle with a reduction on weekends during rush hour peaks, whereas OMI is not able to observe this weekly cycle due to its fix overpass time (13:30-14:30 LT - local time).

  18. Spaceborne estimate of atmospheric CO2 column by use of the differential absorption method: error analysis.

    PubMed

    Dufour, Emmanuel; Bréon, François-Marie

    2003-06-20

    For better knowledge of the carbon cycle, there is a need for spaceborne measurements of atmospheric CO2 concentration. Because the gradients are relatively small, the accuracy requirements are better than 1%. We analyze the feasibility of a CO2-weighted-column estimate, using the differential absorption technique, from high-resolution spectroscopic measurements in the 1.6- and 2-microm CO2 absorption bands. Several sources of uncertainty that can be neglected for other gases with less stringent accuracy requirements need to be assessed. We attempt a quantification of errors due to the radiometric noise, uncertainties in the temperature, humidity and surface pressure uncertainty, spectroscopic coefficients, and atmospheric scattering. Atmospheric scattering is the major source of error [5 parts per 10 (ppm) for a subvisual cirrus cloud with an assumed optical thickness of 0.03], and additional research is needed to properly assess the accuracy of correction methods. Spectroscopic data are currently a major source of uncertainty but can be improved with specific ground-based sunphotometry measurements. The other sources of error amount to several ppm, which is less than, but close to, the accuracy requirements. Fortunately, these errors are mostly random and will therefore be reduced by proper averaging.

  19. Development of a differential absorption lidar for identification of carbon sequestration site leakage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, William Eric

    This thesis describes the development and deployment of a near-infrared scanning micropulse differential absorption lidar (DIAL) system for monitoring carbon dioxide sequestration site integrity. The DIAL utilizes a custom-built lidar (light detection and ranging) transmitter system based on two commercial tunable diode lasers operating at 1.571 microm, an acousto-optic modulator, fiber optic switches, and an Erbium-doped fiber amplifier to generate 65 microJ 200 ns pulses at a 15 kHz repetition rate. Backscattered laser transmitter light is collected with an 11 inch Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope where it is optically filtered to reduce background noise. A fiber-coupled photomultiplier tube operating in the photon counting mode is then used to monitor the collected return signal. Averaging over periods typically of one hour permit range-resolved measurements of carbon dioxide from 1 to 2.5 km with a typical error of 40 ppm. For monitoring a field site, the system scans over a field area by pointing the transmitter and receiver with a computer controlled motorized commercial telescope base. The system has made autonomous field measurements in an agricultural field adjacent to Montana State University and at the Kevin Dome carbon sequestration site in rural northern Montana. Comparisons have been made with an in situ sensor showing agreement between the two measurements to within the 40 error of the DIAL. In addition to the work on the 1.57 micron DIAL, this thesis also presents work done at NASA Langley Research Center on the development and deployment of a 2 micron integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar. The 2 micron system utilizes a low repetition rate 140 mJ double pulsed Ho:Tm:YLF laser developed at NASA Langley.

  20. Atmospheric pre-corrected differential absorption techniques to retrieve columnar water vapor: Theory and simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Borel, C.C.; Schlaepfer, D.

    1996-03-01

    Two different approaches exist to retrieve columnar water vapor from imaging spectrometer data: (1) Differential absorption techniques based on: (a) Narrow-Wide (N/W) ratio between overlapping spectrally wide and narrow channels (b) Continuum Interpolated Band Ratio (CIBR) between a measurement channel and the weighted sum of two reference channels; and (2) Non-linear fitting techniques which are based on spectral radiative transfer calculations. The advantage of the first approach is computational speed and of the second, improved retrieval accuracy. Our goal was to improve the accuracy of the first technique using physics based on radiative transfer. Using a modified version of the Duntley equation, we derived an {open_quote}Atmospheric Pre-corrected Differential Absorption{close_quote} (APDA) technique and described an iterative scheme to retrieve water vapor on a pixel-by-pixel basis. Next we compared both, the CIBR and the APDA using the Duntley equation for MODTRAN3 computed irradiances, transmissions and path radiance (using the DISORT option). This simulation showed that the CIBR is very sensitive to reflectance effects and that the APDA performs much better. An extensive data set was created with the radiative transfer code 6S over 379 different ground reflectance spectra. The calculated relative water vapor error was reduced significantly for the APDA. The APDA technique had about 8% (vs. over 35% for the CIBR) of the 379 spectra with a relative water vapor error of greater than {+-}5%. The APDA has been applied to 1991 and 1995 AVIRIS scenes which visually demonstrate the improvement over the CIBR technique.

  1. Differential alpha coherence hemispheric patterns in men and women during pleasant and unpleasant musical emotions.

    PubMed

    Flores-Gutiérrez, Enrique O; Díaz, José-Luis; Barrios, Fernando A; Guevara, Miguel Angel; Del Río-Portilla, Yolanda; Corsi-Cabrera, María; Del Flores-Gutiérrez, Enrique O

    2009-01-01

    Potential sex differences in EEG coherent activity during pleasant and unpleasant musical emotions were investigated. Musical excerpts by Mahler, Bach, and Prodromidès were played to seven men and seven women and their subjective emotions were evaluated in relation to alpha band intracortical coherence. Different brain links in specific frequencies were associated to pleasant and unpleasant emotions. Pleasant emotions (Mahler, Bach) increased upper alpha couplings linking left anterior and posterior regions. Unpleasant emotions (Prodromidès) were sustained by posterior midline coherence exclusively in the right hemisphere in men and bilateral in women. Combined music induced bilateral oscillations among posterior sensory and predominantly left association areas in women. Consistent with their greater positive attributions to music, the coherent network is larger in women, both for musical emotion and for unspecific musical effects. Musical emotion entails specific coupling among cortical regions and involves coherent upper alpha activity between posterior association areas and frontal regions probably mediating emotional and perceptual integration. Linked regions by combined music suggest more working memory contribution in women and attention in men.

  2. Error analysis of Raman differential absorption lidar ozone measurements in ice clouds.

    PubMed

    Reichardt, J

    2000-11-20

    A formalism for the error treatment of lidar ozone measurements with the Raman differential absorption lidar technique is presented. In the presence of clouds wavelength-dependent multiple scattering and cloud-particle extinction are the main sources of systematic errors in ozone measurements and necessitate a correction of the measured ozone profiles. Model calculations are performed to describe the influence of cirrus and polar stratospheric clouds on the ozone. It is found that it is sufficient to account for cloud-particle scattering and Rayleigh scattering in and above the cloud; boundary-layer aerosols and the atmospheric column below the cloud can be neglected for the ozone correction. Furthermore, if the extinction coefficient of the cloud is ?0.1 km(-1), the effect in the cloud is proportional to the effective particle extinction and to a particle correction function determined in the limit of negligible molecular scattering. The particle correction function depends on the scattering behavior of the cloud particles, the cloud geometric structure, and the lidar system parameters. Because of the differential extinction of light that has undergone one or more small-angle scattering processes within the cloud, the cloud effect on ozone extends to altitudes above the cloud. The various influencing parameters imply that the particle-related ozone correction has to be calculated for each individual measurement. Examples of ozone measurements in cirrus clouds are discussed.

  3. Extending differential optical absorption spectroscopy for limb measurements in the UV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puä·Ä«Te, J.; Kühl, S.; Deutschmann, T.; Platt, U.; Wagner, T.

    2010-05-01

    Methods of UV/VIS absorption spectroscopy to determine the constituents in the Earth's atmosphere from measurements of scattered light are often based on the Beer-Lambert law, like e.g. Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS). While the Beer-Lambert law is strictly valid for a single light path only, the relation between the optical depth and the concentration of any absorber can be approximated as linear also for scattered light observations at a single wavelength if the absorption is weak. If the light path distribution is approximated not to vary with wavelength, also linearity between the optical depth and the product of the cross-section and the concentration of an absorber can be assumed. These assumptions are widely made for DOAS applications for scattered light observations. For medium and strong absorption of scattered light (e.g. along very long light-paths like in limb geometry) the relation between the optical depth and the concentration of an absorber is no longer linear. In addition, for broad wavelength intervals the differences in the travelled light-paths at different wavelengths become important, especially in the UV, where the probability for scattering increases strongly with decreasing wavelength. However, the DOAS method can be extended to cases with medium to strong absorptions and for broader wavelength intervals by the so called air mass factor modified (or extended) DOAS and the weighting function modified DOAS. These approaches take into account the wavelength dependency of the slant column densities (SCDs), but also require a priori knowledge for the air mass factor or the weighting function from radiative transfer modelling. We describe an approach that considers the fitting results obtained from DOAS, the SCDs, as a function of wavelength and vertical optical depth and expands this function into a Taylor series of both quantities. The Taylor coefficients are then applied as additional fitting parameters in the DOAS analysis

  4. Coherence in metal-metal-to-ligand-charge-transfer excited states of a dimetallic complex investigated by ultrafast transient absorption anisotropy.

    PubMed

    Cho, Sung; Mara, Michael W; Wang, Xianghuai; Lockard, Jenny V; Rachford, Aaron A; Castellano, Felix N; Chen, Lin X

    2011-04-28

    Coherence in the metal-metal-to-ligand-charge transfer (MMLCT) excited state of diplatinum molecule [Pt(ppy)(μ-(t)Bu(2)pz)](2) has been investigated through the observed oscillatory features and their corresponding frequencies as well as polarization dependence in the single-wavelength transient absorption (TA) anisotropy signals. Anticorrelated parallel and perpendicular TA signals with respect to the excitation polarization direction were captured, while minimal oscillatory features were observed in the magic angle TA signal. The combined analysis of the experimental results coupled with those previous calculated in the literature maps out a plausible excited state trajectory on the potential energy surface, suggesting that (1) the two energetically close MMLCT excited states due to the symmetry of the molecule may be electronically and coherently coupled with the charge density shifting back and forth between the two phenylpyridine (ppy) ligands, (2) the electronic coupling strength in the (1)MMLCT and (3)MMLCT states may be extracted from the oscillation frequencies of the TA signals to be 160 and 55 cm(-1), respectively, (3) a stepwise intersystem crossing cascades follows (1)MMLCT → (3)MMLCT (T(1b)) → (3)MMLCT (T(1a)), and (4) a possible electronic coherence can be modulated via the Pt-Pt σ-interactions over a picosecond and survive the first step of intersystem crossing. Future experiments are in progress to further investigate the origin of the oscillatory features. These experimental observations may have general implications in design of multimetal center complexes for photoactivated reactions where coherence in the excited states may facilitate directional charge or energy transfer along a certain direction between different parts of a molecule.

  5. Monitoring Changes of Tropical Extreme Rainfall Events Using Differential Absorption Barometric Radar (DiBAR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Bing; Harrah, Steven; Lawrence, R. Wes; Hu, Yongxiang; Min, Qilong

    2015-01-01

    This work studies the potential of monitoring changes in tropical extreme rainfall events such as tropical storms from space using a Differential-absorption BArometric Radar (DiBAR) operating at 50-55 gigahertz O2 absorption band to remotely measure sea surface air pressure. Air pressure is among the most important variables that affect atmospheric dynamics, and currently can only be measured by limited in-situ observations over oceans. Analyses show that with the proposed radar the errors in instantaneous (averaged) pressure estimates can be as low as approximately 5 millibars (approximately 1 millibar) under all weather conditions. With these sea level pressure measurements, the forecasts, analyses and understanding of these extreme events in both short and long time scales can be improved. Severe weathers, especially hurricanes, are listed as one of core areas that need improved observations and predictions in WCRP (World Climate Research Program) and NASA Decadal Survey (DS) and have major impacts on public safety and national security through disaster mitigation. Since the development of the DiBAR concept about a decade ago, our team has made substantial progress in advancing the concept. Our feasibility assessment clearly shows the potential of sea surface barometry using existing radar technologies. We have developed a DiBAR system design, fabricated a Prototype-DiBAR (P-DiBAR) for proof-of-concept, conducted lab, ground and airborne P-DiBAR tests. The flight test results are consistent with our instrumentation goals. Observational system simulation experiments for space DiBAR performance show substantial improvements in tropical storm predictions, not only for the hurricane track and position but also for the hurricane intensity. DiBAR measurements will lead us to an unprecedented level of the prediction and knowledge on tropical extreme rainfall weather and climate conditions.

  6. Retrieval of Aerosol Profiles using Multi Axis Differential Absorption Spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yilmaz, S.; Friess, U.; Apituley, A.; de Leeuw, G.; Platt, U.

    2009-04-01

    Multi Axis Differential Absorption Spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS) is a well established measurement technique to derive atmospheric trace gas profiles. Using MAX-DOAS measurements of trace gases with a known vertical profile, like the oxygen-dimer O4, it is possible to retrieve information on atmospheric aerosols. Based on the optimal estimation method, we have developed an algorithm which fits simultaneously measured O4 optical densities at several wavelengths and elevation angles to values simulated by a radiative transfer model. Retrieval parameters are aerosol extinction profile and optical properties like single scattering albedo, phase function and Angström exponent. In the scope of a joint research activity of the EU funded project EUSAAR (European Supersites for Atmospheric Aerosol Research) we have developed a new kind of DOAS instrument, which uses three miniature spectrometers to cover the near-ultraviolet to visible wavelength range (290-790nm), enabling to capture all absorption bands of the oxygen-dimer O4. Additionally, it is possible to point to any direction in the sky with a 2D telescope unit which is connected to the spectrometers via fiber optics. In May 2008, an intercomparison campaign with established aerosol measurement techniques took place in Cabauw/Netherlands, where simultaneous DOAS, LIDAR, Sun photometer and Nephelometer measurements were performed. We present first results of selected days from this period. The optical properties of aerosols retrieved by the DOAS measurement technique show very promising qualitative agreement with the established measurement techniques demonstrating the progress towards our goal of establishing the MAX-DOAS technique for retrieving optical properties of atmospheric aerosols. Quantitative comparison is ongoing.

  7. Remote Sensing Global Surface Air Pressure Using Differential Absorption BArometric Radar (DiBAR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Bing; Harrah, Steven; Lawrence, Wes; Hu, Yongxiang; Min, Qilong

    2016-01-01

    Tropical storms and severe weathers are listed as one of core events that need improved observations and predictions in World Meteorological Organization and NASA Decadal Survey (DS) documents and have major impacts on public safety and national security. This effort tries to observe surface air pressure, especially over open seas, from space using a Differential-absorption BArometric Radar (DiBAR) operating at the 50-55 gigahertz O2 absorption band. Air pressure is among the most important variables that affect atmospheric dynamics, and currently can only be measured by limited in-situ observations over oceans. Analyses show that with the proposed space radar the errors in instantaneous (averaged) pressure estimates can be as low as approximately 4 millibars (approximately 1 millibar under all weather conditions). With these sea level pressure measurements, the forecasts of severe weathers such as hurricanes will be significantly improved. Since the development of the DiBAR concept about a decade ago, NASA Langley DiBAR research team has made substantial progress in advancing the concept. The feasibility assessment clearly shows the potential of sea surface barometry using existing radar technologies. The team has developed a DiBAR system design, fabricated a Prototype-DiBAR (P-DiBAR) for proof-of-concept, conducted lab, ground and airborne P-DiBAR tests. The flight test results are consistent with the instrumentation goals. Observational system simulation experiments for space DiBAR performance based on the existing DiBAR technology and capability show substantial improvements in tropical storm predictions, not only for the hurricane track and position but also for the hurricane intensity. DiBAR measurements will lead us to an unprecedented level of the prediction and knowledge on global extreme weather and climate conditions.

  8. [Study on determination of plume velocity by passive differential optical absorption spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Li, Ang; Xie, Pin-hua; Liu, Wen-qing; Liu, Jian-guo; Dou, Ke; Lin, Yi-hui

    2008-10-01

    Differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) technique has been used to measure various trace gases in the atmosphere by their strongly structured absorption of radiation in the UV and visible spectral range. Passive DOAS using the zenith scattered sunlight as the light source can obtain the continuous column density distribution of air pollutants (such as SO2 and NO2) by scanning the plume emitted from sources on a mobile platform, then with the plume velocity information the total emission value can be ultimately estimated. In practice it is hard to calculate the total emission because there is no efficient way to accurately get the plume velocity which is the most important parameter. Usually the wind speed near ground is used as the actual plume speed, which constitutes the greatest source of uncertainty in the passive DOAS measurements for the total emission calculation. A passive DOAS method for the determination of plume velocity of pollution source was studied in the present paper. Two passive DOAS systems were placed under the plume along the plume transmission direction to observed the scattered sunlight at one fixed sepasation angle, and then the plume velocity was derived from the time delay resulting from the plume moving a certain distance, and also the plume height needed in the plume velocity calculation was measured by the same two passive DOAS systems. Measurement of the plume emitted from a certain power plant was carried out by the two passive DOAS systems and the plume velocities of 3.6 and 5.4 m x s(-1) at two separate moments were derived. The comparison with the wind speed measured at the same time by the single theodolite wind observation method indicates that this optical remote sensing method based on passive DOAS can be used to determine the plume velocity by monitoring the total emission from sources.

  9. Development and testing of a frequency-agile optical parametric oscillator system for differential absorption lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weibring, P.; Smith, J. N.; Edner, H.; Svanberg, S.

    2003-10-01

    An all-solid-state fast-tuning lidar transmitter for range- and temporally resolved atmospheric gas concentration measurements has been developed and thoroughly tested. The instrument is based on a commercial optical parametric oscillator (OPO) laser system, which has been redesigned with piezoelectric transducers mounted on the wavelength-tuning mirror and on the crystal angle tuning element in the OPO. Piezoelectric transducers similarly control a frequency-mixing stage and doubling stage, which have been incorporated to extend system capabilities to the mid-IR and UV regions. The construction allows the system to be tuned to any wavelength, in any order, in the range of the piezoelectric transducers on a shot-to-shot basis. This extends the measurement capabilities far beyond the two-wavelength differential absorption lidar method and enables simultaneous measurements of several gases. The system performance in terms of wavelength, linewidth, and power stability is monitored in real time by an étalon-based wave meter and gas cells. The tests showed that the system was able to produce radiation in the 220-4300-nm-wavelength region, with an average linewidth better than 0.2 cm-1 and a shot-to-shot tunability up to 160 cm-1 within 20 ms. The utility of real-time linewidth and wavelength measurements is demonstrated by the ability to identify occasional poor quality laser shots and disregard these measurements. Also, absorption cell measurements of methane and mercury demonstrate the performance in obtaining stable wavelength and linewidth during rapid scans in the mid-IR and UV regions.

  10. Tropospheric ozone differential-absorption lidar using stimulated Raman scattering in carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Nakazato, Masahisa; Nagai, Tomohiro; Sakai, Tetsu; Hirose, Yasuo

    2007-04-20

    A UV ozone differential-absorption lidar (DIAL) utilizing a Nd:YAG laser and a single Raman cell filled with carbon dioxide (CO(2)) is designed, developed, and evaluated. The generated wavelengths are 276, 287, and 299 nm, comprising the first to third Stokes lines of the stimulated Raman scattering technique. The correction terms originated from the aerosol extinction, the backscatter, and the absorption by other gases are estimated using a model atmosphere. The experimental results demonstrate that the emitted output energies were 13 mJ/pulse at 276 nm and 287 nm and 5 mJ/pulse at 299 nm, with pump energy of 91 mJ/pulse and a CO(2) pressure of 0.7 MPa. The three Stokes lines account for 44.0% of the available energy. The use of argon or helium as a buffer gas in the Raman cell was also investigated, but this leads to a dramatic decrease in the third Stokes line, which makes this wavelength practically unusable. Our observations confirmed that 30 min of integration were sufficient to observe ozone concentration profiles up to 10 km. Aerosol extinction and backscatter correction are estimated and applied. The aerosol backscatter correction profile using 287 and 299 nm as reference wavelengths is compared with that using 355 nm. The estimated statistical error is less than 5% at 1.5 km and 10% at 2.6 km. Comparisons with the operational carbon-iodine type chemical ozonesondes demonstrate 20% overestimation of the ozone profiles by the DIAL technique.

  11. Development of a widely tunable amplified diode laser differential absorption lidar for profiling atmospheric water vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obland, Michael D.; Repasky, Kevin S.; Nehrir, Amin R.; Carlsten, John L.; Shaw, Joseph A.

    2010-03-01

    This work describes the design and testing of a highly-tunable differential absorption lidar (DIAL) instrument utilizing an all-semiconductor transmitter. This new DIAL instrument transmitter has a highly-tunable external cavity diode laser (ECDL) as a seed laser source for two cascaded commercial tapered amplifiers. The transmitter has the capability of tuning over a range of ~ 17 nm centered at about 832 nm to selectively probe several water vapor absorption lines. This capability has been requested in other recent DIAL experiments for wavelengths near 830 nm. The transmitter produces pulse energies of approximately 0.25 μJ at a repetition rate of 20 kHz. The linewidth is exceptionally narrow at <0.3 MHz, with frequency stability that has been shown to be +/- 88 MHz and spectral purity of 0.995. Tests of the DIAL instrument to prove the validity of its measurements were undertaken. Preliminary water vapor profiles, taken in Bozeman, Montana, agree to within 5-60% with profiles derived from co-located radiosondes 800 meters above ground altitude. Below 800 meters, the measurements are biased low due to a number of systematic issues that are discussed. The long averaging times required by low-power systems have been shown to lead to biases in data, and indeed, our results showed strong disagreements on nights when the atmosphere was changing rapidly, such as on windy nights or when a storm system was entering the area. Improvements to the system to correct the major systematic biases are described.

  12. Receiver Performance Analysis of a Multi-wavelength Sampling Integrated Path Differential Absorption CO2 Lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, X.; Abshire, J. B.; Ramanathan, A. K.; Mao, J.; Kawa, S. R.

    2016-12-01

    A multi-wavelength sampling integrated path differential (IPDA) CO2 lidar is analyzed and modeled. The instrument transmits laser pulses at a series of wavelengths across the 1572.33 nm CO2 absorption line. The receiver measures the received laser pulse energy and time of flight at each wavelength. The measurements are then fit to a CO2 absorption line shape to determine the total column CO2 mixing ratio. The receiver model includes effects of solar background, photon detection shot noise, detector dark current, preamplifier noise and laser speckle noise. The least-square curve fit is a linear fit in the optical depth domain and the logarithm of the raw measurements. The column CO2 mixing ratio is proportional to the scaling factor resulted from the curve fit. There are several advantages to performing the curve fit in the optical depth domain: (a) the result is directly proportional to the CO2molecule number density of the column; (b) it is a standard linear least square error fit where the theory is well established; (c) there is no need to separately estimate the off-line optical transmission. The receiver model further gives insight about the effects of various instrument parameters and the difference between the atmosphere model used in the curve fit and the actual atmosphere. For example, we can use the model to estimate the biases in the retrieved CO2 mixing ratio from small errors in the meteorological data used to generate the line shape used in the curve fit. We have shown that the estimated instrument performance using this receiver model agrees with the results from our recent airborne measurements. The receiver model is also used in the simulation of the impact of the lidar measurements of the global greenhouse gas distribution and their projected impact on quantification of surface sources and sinks.

  13. Advanced Sine Wave Modulation of Continuous Wave Laser System for Atmospheric CO2 Differential Absorption Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Joel F.; Lin, Bing; Nehrir, Amin R.

    2014-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center in collaboration with ITT Exelis have been experimenting with Continuous Wave (CW) laser absorption spectrometer (LAS) as a means of performing atmospheric CO2 column measurements from space to support the Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) mission.Because range resolving Intensity Modulated (IM) CW lidar techniques presented here rely on matched filter correlations, autocorrelation properties without side lobes or other artifacts are highly desirable since the autocorrelation function is critical for the measurements of lidar return powers, laser path lengths, and CO2 column amounts. In this paper modulation techniques are investigated that improve autocorrelation properties. The modulation techniques investigated in this paper include sine waves modulated by maximum length (ML) sequences in various hardware configurations. A CW lidar system using sine waves modulated by ML pseudo random noise codes is described, which uses a time shifting approach to separate channels and make multiple, simultaneous online/offline differential absorption measurements. Unlike the pure ML sequence, this technique is useful in hardware that is band pass filtered as the IM sine wave carrier shifts the main power band. Both amplitude and Phase Shift Keying (PSK) modulated IM carriers are investigated that exibit perfect autocorrelation properties down to one cycle per code bit. In addition, a method is presented to bandwidth limit the ML sequence based on a Gaussian filter implemented in terms of Jacobi theta functions that does not seriously degrade the resolution or introduce side lobes as a means of reducing aliasing and IM carrier bandwidth.

  14. NONLINEAR-APPROXIMATION TECHNIQUE FOR DETERMINING VERTICAL OZONE-CONCENTRATION PROFILES WITH A DIFFERENTIAL-ABSORPTION LIDAR

    EPA Science Inventory

    A new technique is presented for the retrieval of ozone concentration profiles from backscattered signals obtained by a multi-wavelength differential-absorption lidar (DIAL). The technique makes it possible to reduce erroneous local fluctuations induced in the ozone-concentration...

  15. Halo mass dependence of H I and O VI absorption: evidence for differential kinematics

    SciTech Connect

    Mathes, Nigel L.; Churchill, Christopher W.; Nielsen, Nikole M.; Trujillo-Gomez, Sebastian; Kacprzak, Glenn G.; Charlton, Jane; Muzahid, Sowgat

    2014-09-10

    We studied a sample of 14 galaxies (0.1 < z < 0.7) using HST/WFPC2 imaging and high-resolution HST/COS or HST/STIS quasar spectroscopy of Lyα, Lyβ, and O VI λλ1031, 1037 absorption. The galaxies, having 10.8 ≤ log (M {sub h}/M {sub ☉}) ≤ 12.2, lie within D = 300 kpc of quasar sightlines, probing out to D/R {sub vir} = 3. When the full range of M {sub h} and D/R {sub vir} of the sample are examined, ∼40% of the H I absorbing clouds can be inferred to be escaping their host halo. The fraction of bound clouds decreases as D/R {sub vir} increases such that the escaping fraction is ∼15% for D/R {sub vir} < 1, ∼45% for 1 ≤ D/R {sub vir} < 2, and ∼90% for 2 ≤ D/R {sub vir} < 3. Adopting the median mass log M {sub h}/M {sub ☉} = 11.5 to divide the sample into 'higher' and 'lower' mass galaxies, we find a mass dependency for the hot circumgalactic medium kinematics. To our survey limits, O VI absorption is found in only ∼40% of the H I clouds in and around lower mass halos as compared to ∼85% around higher mass halos. For D/R {sub vir} < 1, lower mass halos have an escape fraction of ∼65%, whereas higher mass halos have an escape fraction of ∼5%. For 1 ≤ D/R {sub vir} < 2, the escape fractions are ∼55% and ∼35% for lower mass and higher mass halos, respectively. For 2 ≤ D/R {sub vir} < 3, the escape fraction for lower mass halos is ∼90%. We show that it is highly likely that the absorbing clouds reside within 4R {sub vir} of their host galaxies and that the kinematics are dominated by outflows. Our finding of 'differential kinematics' is consistent with the scenario of 'differential wind recycling' proposed by Oppenheimer et al. We discuss the implications for galaxy evolution, the stellar to halo mass function, and the mass-metallicity relationship of galaxies.

  16. Development of a 2-micron Pulsed Differential Absorption Lidar for Atmospheric CO2 Concentration Measurement by Direct Detection Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, J.; Singh, U. N.; Petros, M.; Bai, Y.

    2011-12-01

    Researchers at NASA Langley Research Center are developing a 2-micron Pulsed Differential Absorption Lidar instrument for ground and airborne measurements via direct detection method. This instrument will provide an alternate approach to measure atmospheric CO2 concentrations with significant advantages. A high energy pulsed approach provides high-precision measurement capbility by having high signal-to-noise level and unambiguously eliminates the contamination from aerosols and clouds that can bias the IPDA measurement. A key component of the CO2 DIAL system, transceiver, is an existing, airborne ready, robust hardware which can provide 250mJ at 10Hz with double pulse format specifically designed for DIAL instrument. The exact wavelengths of the transceiver are controlled by well defined CW seed laser source to provide the required injection source for generating on-and-off line wavelength pulses sequentially. The compact, rugged, highly reliable transceiver is based on the unique Ho:Tm:YLF high-energy 2-micron pulsed laser technology. All the optical mounts are custom designed and have space heritage. They are designed to be adjustable and lockable and hardened to withstand vibrations that can occur in airborne operation. For the direct detection lidar application, a large primary mirror size is preferred. A 14 inch diameter telescope will be developed for this program. The CO2 DIAL/IPDA system requires many electronic functions to operate. These include diode, RF, seed laser, and PZT drivers; injection seeding detection and control; detector power supplies; and analog inputs to sample various sensors. Under NASA Laser Risk Reduction Program (LRRP), a control unit Compact Laser Electronics (CLE), is developed for the controlling the coherent wind lidar transceiver. Significant modifications and additions are needed to update it for CO2 lidar controls. The data acquisition system was built for ground CO2 measurement demonstration. The software will be updated for

  17. Differential phase measurements in low-coherence interferometry without 2π ambiguity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hitzenberger, Christoph K.; Sticker, Markus; Leitgeb, Rainer; Fercher, Adolf F.

    2001-12-01

    Quantitative phase measurements by low-coherence interferometry and optical coherence tomography are restricted by the well-known 2π ambiguity to path-length differences smaller than λ/2. We present a method that overcomes this ambiguity. Introducing a slight dispersion imbalance between reference and sample arms of the interferometer causes the short and long wavelengths of the source spectrum to separate within the interferometric signal. This causes the phase slope to vary within the signal. The phase-difference function between two adjacent sample beam components is calculated by subtraction of their phase functions obtained from phase-sensitive interferometric signal recording. Because of the dispersive effect, the phase difference varies across the interferometric signal. The slope of that phase difference is proportional to the optical path difference, without 2π ambiguity.

  18. Differentiation of ex vivo human breast tissue using polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    South, Fredrick A.; Chaney, Eric J.; Marjanovic, Marina; Adie, Steven G.; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2014-01-01

    Successful treatment of breast cancer typically requires surgical removal of the tumor. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has been previously developed for real-time imaging of the surgical margin. However, it can be difficult to distinguish between normal stromal tissue and cancer tissue based on scattering intensity and structure alone. Polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT) is sensitive to form birefringence of biological tissue. We report on the development of a high-speed PS-OCT system and imaging of ex vivo human breast tissue, showing enhanced contrast between healthy and cancerous tissues based upon collagen content confirmed with corresponding histology. These results demonstrate the feasibility of using PS-OCT to supplement structural OCT as a possible method for intraoperative tumor margin evaluation. PMID:25360360

  19. Observation of phycoerythrin-containing cyanobacteria and other phytoplankton groups from space using Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy on SCIAMACHY data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bracher, Astrid; Dinter, Tilman; Burrows, John P.; Vountas, Marco; Röttgers, Rüdiger; Peeken, Ilka

    In order to understand the marine phytoplankton's role in the global marine ecosystem and biogeochemical cycles it is necessary to derive global information on the distribution of major functional phytoplankton types (PFT) in the world oceans. In our study we use instead of the common ocean color sensors such as CZCS, SeaWiFS, MODIS, MERIS, with rather low spectral resolution, the Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) to study the retrieval of phytoplankton distribution and absorption with the satellite sensor Scanning Imaging Absorption Spectrometer for Atmospheric Chartography (SCIAMACHY). SCIAMACHY measures back scattered solar radiation in the UV-Vis-NIR spectral region with a high spectral resolution (0.2 to 1.5 nm). We used in-situ measured phytoplankton absorption spectra from two different RV Polarstern expeditions where different phytoplankton groups were representing or dominating the phytoplankton composition in order to identify these characteristic absorption spectra in SCIAMACHY data in the range of 430 to 500 nm and also to identify absorption from cyanobacterial photosynthetic pigment phycoerythrin. Our results show clearly these absorptions in the SCIAMACHY data. The conversion of these differential absorptions by including the information of the light penetration depth (according to Vountas et al., Ocean Science, 2007) globally distributed pigment concentrations for these characteristic phytoplankton groups for two monthly periods (Feb-March 2004, Oct-Nov 2005 and Oct-Nov 2007) are derived. The satellite retrieved information on cyanobacteria (Synechococcus sp. and Prochlorococcus sp.) and diatoms distribution matches well with the concentration measured from collocated water samples with HPLC technique and also to global model analysis with the NASA Ocean Biogeochemical Model (NOBM from http://reason.gsfc.nasa.gov/OPS/Giovanni/) according to Gregg and Casey 2006 and Gregg 2006. Results are of great importance for global modelling of

  20. Retrieval of Aerosol Profiles using Multi-Axis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yilmaz, Selami; Frieß, Udo; Apituley, Arnoud; Henzing, Bas; Baars, Holger; Heese, Birgit; Althausen, Dietrich; Adam, Mariana; Putaud, Jean-Philippe; Zieger, Paul; Platt, Ulrich

    2010-05-01

    Multi Axis Differential Absorption Spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS) is a well established measurement technique to derive atmospheric trace gas profiles. Using MAX-DOAS measurements of trace gases with a known vertical profile, like the oxygen-dimer O4, it is possible to retrieve information on atmospheric aerosols. Based on the optimal estimation method, we have developed an algorithm which fits simultaneously measured O4 optical densities and relative intensities at several wavelengths and elevation angles to values simulated by a radiative transfer model. Retrieval parameters are aerosol extinction profile and optical properties such as single scattering albedo, phase function and Angström exponent. In 2008 and 2009 several intercomparison campaigns with established aerosol measurement techniques took place in Cabauw/Netherlands, Melpitz/Germany, Ispra/Italy and Leipzig/Germany, where simultaneous DOAS, lidar, Sun photometer and Nephelometer measurements were performed. Here we present results of the intercomparisons for cloud free conditions. The correlation of the aerosol optical thickness retrieved by the DOAS technique and the Sun photometer shows coefficients of determination from 0.96 to 0.98 and slopes from 0.94 to 1.07. The vertical structure of the DOAS retrieved aerosol extinction profiles compare favourably with the structures seen by the backscatter lidar. However, the vertical spatial development of the boundary layer is reproduced with a lower resolution by the DOAS technique. Strategies for the near real-time retrieval of trace gas profiles, aerosol profiles and optical properties will be discussed as well.

  1. Airborne 2-Micron Double-Pulsed Integrated Path Differential Absorption Lidar for Column CO2 Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Yu, Jirong; Petros, Mulugeta; Refaat, Tamer F.; Remus, Ruben G.; Fay, James J.; Reithmaier, Karl

    2014-01-01

    Double-pulse 2-micron lasers have been demonstrated with energy as high as 600 millijouls and up to 10 Hz repetition rate. The two laser pulses are separated by 200 microseconds and can be tuned and locked separately. Applying double-pulse laser in DIAL system enhances the CO2 measurement capability by increasing the overlap of the sampled volume between the on-line and off-line. To avoid detection complicity, integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar provides higher signal-to-noise ratio measurement compared to conventional range-resolved DIAL. Rather than weak atmospheric scattering returns, IPDA rely on the much stronger hard target returns that is best suited for airborne platforms. In addition, the IPDA technique measures the total integrated column content from the instrument to the hard target but with weighting that can be tuned by the transmitter. Therefore, the transmitter could be tuned to weight the column measurement to the surface for optimum CO2 interaction studies or up to the free troposphere for optimum transport studies. Currently, NASA LaRC is developing and integrating a double-Pulsed 2-micron direct detection IPDA lidar for CO2 column measurement from an airborne platform. The presentation will describe the development of the 2-micron IPDA lidar system and present the airborne measurement of column CO2 and will compare to in-situ measurement for various ground target of different reflectivity.

  2. Summertime measurements of benzene and toluene in Athens using a differential optical absorption spectroscopy system.

    PubMed

    Petrakis, Michael; Psiloglou, Basil; Kassomenos, Pavlos A; Cartalis, Costas

    2003-09-01

    In this paper, measurements of benzene, toluene, p,m-xylene, ozone (O3), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), and sulfur dioxide (SO2) made using the differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) technique during a 4-month period of summer 2000 (June-September) in Athens, Greece, are presented. An assessment of benzene mean value concentrations during this 4-month period exceeded 10 microg/m3, which is 2 times greater than the average yearly limit proposed by European authorities. Toluene measurements present mean values of approximately 33 microg/m3. Benzene and especially toluene measurements are highly correlated with NO2 and anticorrelated with O3. High values of benzene, NO2, and toluene are also correlated with winds from the southeast section, an area of industrial activity where emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) have been recorded in previous studies. O3 is correlated with winds from the south-southwest section affected by the sea breeze circulation. Diurnal variations of O3, NO2, and SO2 concentrations are compatible with measurements from the stations of the Ministry of Environment's network. Outliers are combined with weak winds from the south-southwest. As far as p,m-xylene measurements are concerned, there is a poor correlation between gas chromatography (GC) and DOAS Opsis measurements, also observed in previous relevant campaigns and eventually a criticism in the use of the DOAS Opsis model for the measurement of p,m-xylene.

  3. Airborne 2-micron double-pulsed integrated path differential absorption lidar for column CO2 measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Yu, Jirong; Petros, Mulugeta; Refaat, Tamer F.; Remus, Ruben G.; Fay, James J.; Reithmaier, Karl

    2014-10-01

    Double-pulse 2-micron lasers have been demonstrated with energy as high as 600 mJ and up to 10 Hz repetition rate. The two laser pulses are separated by 200 µs and can be tuned and locked separately. Applying double-pulse laser in DIAL system enhances the CO2 measurement capability by increasing the overlap of the sampled volume between the on-line and off-line. To avoid detection complicity, integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar provides higher signal-to-noise ratio measurement compared to conventional range-resolved DIAL. Rather than weak atmospheric scattering returns, IPDA rely on the much stronger hard target returns that is best suited for airborne platforms. In addition, the IPDA technique measures the total integrated column content from the instrument to the hard target but with weighting that can be tuned by the transmitter. Therefore, the transmitter could be tuned to weight the column measurement to the surface for optimum CO2 interaction studies or up to the free troposphere for optimum transport studies. Currently, NASA LaRC is developing and integrating a double-Pulsed 2-µm direct detection IPDA lidar for CO2 column measurement from an airborne platform. The presentation will describe the development of the 2-μm IPDA lidar system and present the airborne measurement of column CO2 and will compare to in-situ measurement for various ground target of different reflectivity.

  4. Performance characterization and ground testing of an airborne CO2 differential absorption LIDAR system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senft, Daniel C.; Fox, Marsha J.; Bousek, Ronald R.; Dowling, James A.; Richter, Dale A.; Kelly, Brian T.

    1998-01-01

    The Phillips Laboratory Remote Optical Sensors (ROS) program is developing the Laser Airborne Remote Sensing (LARS) system for chemical detection using the differential absorption lidar (DIAL) technique. The system is based upon a high-power CO(subscript 2) laser which can use either the standard (superscript 12)C(superscript 16)O(subscript 2) or the (superscript 13)C(superscript 16)O(subscript 2) carbon dioxide isotopes as the lasing medium, and has output energies in excess of 4 J on the stronger laser transitions. The laser, transmitter optics, receiver telescope and optics, and monitoring equipment are mounted on a flight-qualified optical breadboard designed to mount in the Argus C-135E optical testbed aircraft operated by Phillips Laboratory. The LARS system is being prepared for initial flight experiments at Kirtland AFB, NM, in August 1997, and for chemical detection flight experiments at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) in September 1997. This paper briefly describes the system characterization, and presents some results from the pre- flight ground testing.

  5. Ultra Narrowband Optical Filters for Water Vapor Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) Atmospheric Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stenholm, Ingrid; DeYoung, Russell J.

    2001-01-01

    Differential absorption lidar (DIAL) systems are being deployed to make vertical profile measurements of atmospheric water vapor from ground and airborne platforms. One goal of this work is to improve the technology of such DIAL systems that they could be deployed on space-based platforms. Since background radiation reduces system performance, it is important to reduce it. One way to reduce it is to narrow the bandwidth of the optical receiver system. However, since the DIAL technique uses two or more wavelengths, in this case separated by 0.1 nm, a fixed-wavelength narrowband filter that would encompass both wavelengths would be broader than required for each line, approximately 0.02 nm. The approach employed in this project is to use a pair of tunable narrowband reflective fiber Bragg gratings. The Bragg gratings are germanium-doped silica core fiber that is exposed to ultraviolet radiation to produce index-of-refraction changes along the length of the fiber. The gratings can be tuned by stretching. The backscattered laser radiation is transmitted through an optical circulator to the gratings, reflected back to the optical circulator by one of the gratings, and then sent to a photodiode. The filter reflectivities were >90 percent, and the overall system efficiency was 30 percent.

  6. A Water Vapor Differential Absorption LIDAR Design for Unpiloted Aerial Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeYoung, Russell J.; Mead, Patricia F.

    2004-01-01

    This system study proposes the deployment of a water vapor Differential Absorption LIDAR (DIAL) system on an Altair unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) platform. The Altair offers improved payload weight and volume performance, and longer total flight time as compared to other commercial UAV's. This study has generated a preliminary design for an Altair based water vapor DIAL system. The design includes a proposed DIAL schematic, a review of mechanical challenges such as temperature and humidity stresses on UAV deployed DIAL systems, an assessment of the available capacity for additional instrumentation (based on the proposed design), and an overview of possible weight and volume improvements associated with the use of customized electronic and computer hardware, and through the integration of advanced fiber-optic and laser products. The results of the study show that less than 17% of the available weight, less than 19% of the volume capacity, and approximately 11% of the electrical capacity is utilized by the proposed water vapor DIAL system on the Altair UAV.

  7. Differential absorption lidar probing of atmospheric ozone over a tropical urban station in India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devara, P. C. S.; Raj, P. Ernest; Pandithurai, G.; Dani, K. K.; Sonbawne, S. M.; Jaya Rao, Y.

    2007-03-01

    An ultra-violet (UV) rare-gas halide XeCl excimer-Raman laser-based ozone lidar system has been developed and installed at the Indian Institute of Tropical Meteorology (IITM), Pune (18°43'N, 73°51'E, 559 m above mean sea level), India. This system essentially operates in the differential-absorption-lidar (DIAL) mode with laser emission at 308 nm ('on') wavelength as well as reference ('off') wavelength of 353 nm generated by stimulated Raman shifting (SRS) the 308 nm radiation in hydrogen. The receiving system consists of a large diameter telescope tailored with a signal detection and data acquisition/processing system with 5 ns-10.5 ms multi-channel scaler/averager. This paper deals with a brief description of the lidar system developed and discusses the methodology followed for the retrieval of ozone vertical distributions from the lidar back-scattered signals obtained at 'on' and 'off' wavelengths. These initial results are compared with those obtained from a collocated ozonesonde and multi-filter solar radiometer and also with coincident observations from TOMS satellite. They are found to be in fair agreement within the experimental limitations.

  8. Performance characterization and ground testing of an airborne CO2 differential absorption lidar system (phase II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senft, Daniel C.; Fox, Marsha J.; Hamilton, Carla M.; Richter, Dale A.; Higdon, N. S.; Kelly, Brian T.

    1999-05-01

    The Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) Active Remote Sensing Branch has developed the Laser Airborne Remote Sensing (LARS) system for chemical detection using the differential absorption lidar (DIAL) technique. The system is based on a high-power CO2 laser which can use either the standard 12C16O2 or the 13C16O2 carbon dioxide isotopes as the lasing medium, and has output energies of up to 5 J on the stronger laser transitions. The lidar system is mounted on a flight-qualified optical breadboard designed for installation into the AFRL Argus C- 135E optical testbed aircraft. The Phase I ground tests were conducted at Kirtland AFB in 1997, prior to the LARS flight tests performed in September 1997 at Kirtland AFB and the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The Phase II ground tests were conducted in 1998 to determine the optimum performance of the LARS system, after the incorporation of modification and improvements suggested by the flight test results. This paper will present some of the chemical detection and radiometric results obtained during the Phase II ground tests.

  9. Applicability of light-emitting diodes as light sources for active differential optical absorption spectroscopy measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kern, Christoph; Trick, Sebastian; Rippel, Bernhard; Platt, Ulrich

    2006-03-01

    We present what is to our knowledge the first use of light-emitting diodes (LEDs) as light sources for long-path differential optical absorption spectroscopy (LP-DOAS) measurements of trace gases in the open atmosphere. Modern LEDs represent a potentially advantageous alternative to thermal light sources, in particular to xenon arc lamps, which are the most common active DOAS light sources. The radiative properties of a variety of LEDs were characterized, and parameters such as spectral shape, spectral range, spectral stability, and ways in which they can be influenced by environmental factors were analyzed. The spectra of several LEDs were found to contain Fabry-Perot etalon-induced spectral structures that interfered with the DOAS evaluation, in particular when a constant temperature was not maintained. It was shown that LEDs can be used successfully as light sources in active DOAS experiments that measure NO2 and NO3 near 450 and 630 nm, respectively. Average detection limits of 0.3 parts in 109 and 16 parts in 1012 respectively, were obtained by use of a 6 km light path in the open atmosphere.

  10. Effect of temperature on passive remote sensing of chemicals by differential absorption radiometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holland, Stephen K.; Krauss, Roland H.; Laufer, Gabriel

    2005-10-01

    Differential absorption radiometry (DAR), using uncooled detectors, is a simple, low-cost method for passive remote sensing of hazardous chemicals for domestic security applications. However, radiometric temperature differences (ΔTeffective) between a target gas species and its background affect detection sensitivity. Two DARs with sensitivities to methanol, diisopropyl methylphosphonate (DIMP), and dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP), all spectral or physical simulants of hazardous chemicals, were developed and used to experimentally determine the effect of |ΔTeffective| on detection sensitivity. An analytical model was also developed and compared with the experimental results. With a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR)>5, a |ΔTeffective|≥2 K is sufficient for rapid (≤1 s) detection of methanol at <0.03 atm cm and DMMP and DIMP at <0.001 atm cm. These measured sensitivities suggest that rapid detection of hazardous chemical vapor clouds below lethal dose concentrations can be achieved using room-temperature pyroelectric detectors. Measurements were within 3% of the analytical predictions.

  11. Evaluation of tropospheric water vapor profiling using eye-safe, infrared differential absorption lidar

    SciTech Connect

    Rye, B.J. |; Machol, J.L.; Grund, C.J.; Hardesty, R.M.

    1996-05-14

    Continuous, high quality profiles of water vapor, free of systematic bias, and of moderate temporal and spatial resolution are fundamental to the success of the ARM CART program. In addition, these should be acquired over long periods at low operational and maintenance cost. The development and verification of realistic climate model parameterizations for clouds and net radiation balance, and the correction of other CART site sensor observations for interferences due to the presence of water vapor are critically dependent on water vapor profile measurements. To date, application of profiles have been limited by vertical resolution and uniqueness and high operating cost, or diminished daytime performance, lack of eye-safety, and high maintenance cost. Recent developments in infrared laser and detector technology make possible compact IR differential absorption lidar (DIAL) systems at eye-safe wavelengths. In the studies reported here, we develop DIAL system performance models and examine the potential of solving some of the shortcomings of previous methods using parameters representative of current technologies. These simulations are also applied to determine the strengths and weaknesses unique to the DIAL method for this application.

  12. Mid-infrared carbon monoxide detection system using differential absorption spectroscopy technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Ming; Sui, Yue; Li, Guo-lin; Zheng, Chuan-tao; Chen, Mei-mei; Wang, Yi-ding

    2015-11-01

    A differential carbon monoxide (CO) concentration sensing device using a self-fabricated spherical mirror (e.g. light-collector) and a multi-pass gas-chamber is presented in this paper. Single-source dual-channel detection method is adopted to suppress the interferences from light source, optical path and environmental changes. Detection principle of the device is described, and both the optical part and the electrical part are developed. Experiments are carried out to evaluate the sensing performance on CO concentration. The results indicate that at 1.013×105 Pa and 298 K, the limit of detection (LoD) is about 11.5 mg/m3 with an absorption length of 40 cm. As the gas concentration gets larger than 115 mg/m3 (1.013×105 Pa, 298 K), the relative detection error falls into the range of -1.7%—+1.9%. Based on 12 h long-term measurement on the 115 mg/m3 and 1 150 mg/m3 CO samples, the maximum detection errors are about 0.9% and 5.5%, respectively. Due to the low cost and competitive characteristics, the proposed device shows potential applications in CO detection in the circumstances of coal-mine production and environmental protection.

  13. Design of differential optical absorption spectroscopy long-path telescopes based on fiber optics.

    PubMed

    Merten, André; Tschritter, Jens; Platt, Ulrich

    2011-02-10

    We present a new design principle of telescopes for use in the spectral investigation of the atmosphere and the detection of atmospheric trace gases with the long-path differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) technique. A combination of emitting and receiving fibers in a single bundle replaces the commonly used coaxial-Newton-type combination of receiving and transmitting telescope. This very simplified setup offers a higher light throughput and simpler adjustment and allows smaller instruments, which are easier to handle and more portable. The higher transmittance was verified by ray-tracing calculations, which result in a theoretical factor threefold improvement in signal intensity compared with the old setup. In practice, due to the easier alignment and higher stability, up to factor of 10 higher signal intensities were found. In addition, the use of a fiber optic light source provides a better spectral characterization of the light source, which results in a lower detection limit for trace gases studied with this instrument. This new design will greatly enhance the usability and the range of applications of active DOAS instruments.

  14. Comparison of atmospheric nitrous acid measurements by annular denuder and differential optical absorption systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appel, B. R.; Winer, A. M.; Tokiwa, Y.; Biermann, H. W.

    As part of the Southern California Air Quality Study (SCAQS), nitrous acid (HONO) measurements were made at Long Beach, CA during the period 11 November-12 December 1987, using two distinctly different techniqes. One of these, the annular denuder method (ADM), used two denuders in tandem, coated with an alkaline medium to obtain 4- or 6-h integrated measurements. A small FEP Tefloncoated glass cyclone preceded the denuders to exclude coarse particles while minimizing loss or artifactual formation of HONO. Nitrite recoveries from the rear denuder were used to correct for sampling artifacts. In the second method, 15 min average HONO concentrations were measured with a differential optical absorption spectrometer (DOAS) coupled to a 25 m basepath, open multiple reflection system operated at a total optical path of 800 m. Period-averaged HONO concentrations from the two techniques were highly correlated ( r = 0.94), with DOAS results averaging about 10% higher. However, ADM results were biased high at low HONO concentrations. HONO and NO concentrations showed a significant, positive correlation ( r = 0.8), consistent with a common emission source (e.g. auto exhaust) for the two pollutants.

  15. ELECTROMAGNETISM, OPTICS, ACOUSTICS, HEAT TRANSFER, CLASSICAL MECHANICS, AND FLUID DYNAMICS: Local Control of Two-Photon Absorption in a Six-Level Atomic System by Using a Coherent Perturbation Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Wen-Zhi; Wang, Shun-Jin

    2009-11-01

    If a coherent perturbation field is used to couple the excited level of the coupling transition in the five-level K-type atom with another higher excited level, the two-photon electromagnetically induced transparency can be locally modulated by altering the parameters of the additional perturbation field. With different detunings of the coherent perturbation field, the absorption peak or transparency window with sharp and high-contrast spectral feature can be generated in the two-photon absorption spectrum. The physical interpretation of these phenomena is given in terms of the dressed states.

  16. Laser Based Instruments Using Differential Absorption Detection for Above and Below Ground Monitoring of Carbon Dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humphries, S. D.; Barr, J. L.; Repasky, K. S.; Carlsten, J. L.; Spangler, L. H.; Dobeck, L. M.

    2008-12-01

    Carbon capture and sequestration in geologic formations provides a method to remove carbon dioxide (CO2) from entering the Earth's atmosphere. An important issue for the successful storage of CO2 is the ability to monitor geologic sequestration sites for leakage to verify site integrity. A field site for testing the performance of CO2 detection instruments and techniques has been developed by the Zero Emissions Research Technology (ZERT) group at Montana State University. A field experiment was conducted at the ZERT field site beginning July 9th, 2008 and ending August 7th, 2008 to test the performance of several CO2 detection instruments. The field site allows a controlled flow rate of CO2 to be released underground through a 100 m long horizontal pipe placed below the water table. A flow rate of 0.3 tons CO2/day was used for the entirety of this experiment. This paper describes the results from two laser based instruments that use differential absorption techniques to determine CO2 concentrations in real time both above and below the ground surface. Both instruments use a continuous wave (cw) temperature tunable distributed feedback (DFB) laser capable of tuning across several CO2 and water vapor absorption features between at 2003 nm and 2006 nm. The first instrument uses the DFB laser to measure path integrated atmospheric concentrations of CO2. The second instrument uses the temperature tunable DFB laser to monitor underground CO2 concentrations using a buried photonic bandgap optical fiber. The above ground instrument operated nearly continuously during the CO2 release experiment and an increase in atmospheric CO2 concentration above the release pipe of approximately 2.5 times higher than the background was observed. The underground instrument also operated continuously during the experiment and saw an increase in underground CO2 concentration of approximately 15 times higher than the background. These results from the 2008 ZERT field experiment demonstrate

  17. Optimization of A 2-Micron Laser Frequency Stabilization System for a Double-Pulse CO2 Differential Absorption Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Songsheng; Yu, Jirong; Bai, Yingsin; Koch, Grady; Petros, Mulugeta; Trieu, Bo; Petzar, Paul; Singh, Upendra N.; Kavaya, Michael J.; Beyon, Jeffrey

    2010-01-01

    A carbon dioxide (CO2) Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) for accurate CO2 concentration measurement requires a frequency locking system to achieve high frequency locking precision and stability. We describe the frequency locking system utilizing Frequency Modulation (FM), Phase Sensitive Detection (PSD), and Proportional Integration Derivative (PID) feedback servo loop, and report the optimization of the sensitivity of the system for the feed back loop based on the characteristics of a variable path-length CO2 gas cell. The CO2 gas cell is characterized with HITRAN database (2004). The method can be applied for any other frequency locking systems referring to gas absorption line.

  18. Differential-absorption lidar measurements in the oxygen A band using a ruby lidar and stimulated Raman scattering.

    PubMed

    Barton, I J; Marshall, J F

    1979-03-01

    Stimulated Raman scattering has been used to convert the output wavelength of a ruby-laser radar (lambda = 6943 A) into the oxygen A band near 7660 A. The system has been used to measure the energy backscattered from the lower atmosphere at both 6943 and 7658 A. Smith and Platt [NOAA Technical Memorandum, NESS 89 (1977)] have shown that such differential-absorption lidar measurements can be used to give both pressure height profiles and vertical temperature profiles. Some correlation between pressure height and oxygen absorption has been found, but greater transmitted energies and better frequency stability at the converted wavelength are required before an operational system can be implemented.

  19. Feasibility of tropospheric water vapor profiling using infrared heterodyne differential absorption lidar

    SciTech Connect

    Grund, C.J.; Hardesty, R.M.; Rye, B.J.

    1995-04-03

    Continuous, high quality profiles of water vapor, free of systematic bias, and of moderate temporal and spatial resolution, acquired over long periods at low operational and maintenance cost, are fundamental to the success of the ARM CART program. The development and verification of realistic climate model parameterizations for clouds and net radiation balance, and the correction of other CART site sensor observations for interferences due to the presence of water vapor are critically dependent on water vapor profile measurements. Application of profiles acquired with current techniques, have, to date, been limited by vertical resolution and uniqueness of solution [e.g. high resolution infrared (IR) Fourier transform radiometry], poor spatial and temporal coverage and high operating cost (e.g. radiosondes), or diminished daytime performance, lack of eye-safety, and high maintenance cost (e.g. Raman lidar). Recent developments in infrared laser and detector technology make possible compact IR differential absorption lidar (DIAL) systems at eye-safe wavelengths. In the study reported here, we develop DIAL system performance models and examine the potential of to solve some of the shortcomings of previous methods using parameterizations representative of current technologies. These models are also applied to diagnose and evaluate other strengths and weaknesses unique to the DIAL method for this application. This work is to continue in the direction of evaluating yet smaller and lower-cost laser diode-based systems for routine monitoring of the lower altitudes using photon counting detection methods. We regard the present report as interim in nature and will update and extend it as a final report at the end of the term of the contract.

  20. Feasibility of tropospheric water vapor profiling using infrared heterodyne differential absorption lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grund, Christian J.; Hardesty, R. Michael; Rye, Barry J.

    1995-04-01

    Continuous, high quality profiles of water vapor, free of systematic bias, and of moderate temporal and spatial resolution, acquired over long periods at low operational and maintenance cost, are fundamental to the success of the ARM CART program. The development and verification of realistic climate model parameterizations for clouds and net radiation balance, and the correction of other CART site sensor observations for interferences due to the presence of water vapor are critically dependent on water vapor profile measurements. Application of profiles acquired with current techniques, have, to date, been limited by vertical resolution and uniqueness of solution (e.g. high resolution infrared (IR) Fourier transform radiometry), poor spatial and temporal coverage and high operating cost (e.g. radiosondes), or diminished daytime performance, lack of eye-safety, and high maintenance cost (e.g. Raman lidar). Recent developments in infrared laser and detector technology make possible compact IR differential absorption lidar (DIAL) systems at eye-safe wavelengths. In the study reported here, we develop DIAL system performance models and examine the potential to solve some of the shortcomings of previous methods using parameterizations representative of current technologies. These models are also applied to diagnose and evaluate other strengths and weaknesses unique to the DIAL method for this application. This work is to continue in the direction of evaluating yet smaller and lower-cost laser diode-based systems for routine monitoring of the lower altitudes using photon counting detection methods. We regard the present report as interim in nature and will update and extend it as a final report at the end of the term of the contract.

  1. Diode-laser-based water vapor differential absorption lidar (DIAL) profiler evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spuler, S.; Weckwerth, T.; Repasky, K. S.; Nehrir, A. R.; Carbone, R.

    2012-12-01

    We are in the process of evaluating the performance of an eye-safe, low-cost, diode-laser-based, water vapor differential absorption lidar (DIAL) profiler. This class of instrument may be capable of providing continuous water vapor and aerosol backscatter profiles at high vertical resolution in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) for periods of months to years. The technology potentially fills a national long term observing facility gap and could greatly benefit micro- and meso-meteorology, water cycle, carbon cycle and, more generally, biosphere-hydrosphere-atmosphere interaction research at both weather and climate variability time scales. For the evaluation, the Montana State University 3rd generation water vapor DIAL was modified to enable unattended operation for a period of several weeks. The performance of this V3.5 version DIAL was tested at MSU and NCAR in June and July of 2012. Further tests are currently in progress with Howard University at Beltsville, Maryland; and with the National Weather Service and Oklahoma University at Dallas/Fort Worth, Texas. The presentation will include a comparison of DIAL profiles against meteorological "truth" at the aforementioned locations including: radiosondes, Raman lidars, microwave and IR radiometers, AERONET and SUOMINET systems. Instrument reliability, uncertainty, systematic biases, detection height statistics, and environmental complications will be evaluated. Performance will be judged in the context of diverse scientific applications that range from operational weather prediction and seasonal climate variability, to more demanding climate system process studies at the land-canopy-ABL interface. Estimating the extent to which such research and operational applications can be satisfied with a low cost autonomous network of similar instruments is our principal objective.

  2. Differentially coherent detection of QASK for frequency-hopping systems. I - Performance in the presence of a Gaussian noise environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, M. K.; Huth, G. K.; Polydoros, A.

    1982-01-01

    Bandwidth-conserving modulation techniques, which trade average power for bandwidth in a favorable exchange, have recently found widespread application in digital radio and satellite communication systems. Quadrature amplitude-shift-keying (QASK) is a particular type of the considered techniques. QASK makes use of multilevel signals to amplitude modulate the in-phase and quadrature components of a carrier. Frequency hopping (FH) is used to protect a conventional communication system from radio frequency interference (RFI) or jamming. Differentially coherent detection provides a possible solution to the effect of phase discontinuities introduced by FH. The application of such a detection technique to QASK signals is discussed. A receiver structure is proposed and its symbol error probability performance for an additive white Gaussian noise (AWGN) background is investigated.

  3. Textural analysis of optical coherence tomography skin images: quantitative differentiation between healthy and cancerous tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adabi, Saba; Conforto, Silvia; Hosseinzadeh, Matin; Noe, Shahryar; Daveluy, Steven; Mehregan, Darius; Nasiriavanaki, Mohammadreza

    2017-02-01

    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) offers real-time high-resolution three-dimensional images of tissue microstructures. In this study, we used OCT skin images acquired from ten volunteers, neither of whom had any skin conditions addressing the features of their anatomic location. OCT segmented images are analyzed based on their optical properties (attenuation coefficient) and textural image features e.g., contrast, correlation, homogeneity, energy, entropy, etc. Utilizing the information and referring to their clinical insight, we aim to make a comprehensive computational model for the healthy skin. The derived parameters represent the OCT microstructural morphology and might provide biological information for generating an atlas of normal skin from different anatomic sites of human skin and may allow for identification of cell microstructural changes in cancer patients. We then compared the parameters of healthy samples with those of abnormal skin and classified them using a linear Support Vector Machines (SVM) with 82% accuracy.

  4. Differential Absorption Measurements of Carbon Dioxide for Carbon Sequestration Site Monitoring Using a Temperature Tunable Diode Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humphries, S. D.; Nehrir, A. R.; Repasky, K. S.; Carlsten, J. L.; Spangler, L. H.; Dobeck, L. M.; Shaw, J. A.

    2007-12-01

    Carbon capture and sequestration in geologic formations provides a method to remove carbon dioxide (CO2) from entering the Earth's atmosphere. An important issue for the successful storage of CO2 is the ability to monitor geologic sequestration sites for leakage to verify site integrity. A differential absorption measurement instrument based on a continuous wave (cw) temperature tunable distributed feedback (DFB) laser has been developed for measuring atmospheric concentrations of CO2. The tunable DFB laser is capable of tuning across two CO2 absorption features at 2003.50 nm and 2004.02 nm. The measured normalized transmission through the atmosphere is then related to the atmospheric concentration of CO2 through the line strength and normalized line width associated with each absorption feature. A description of this instrument will be presented including the instrument design, operation, and performance characteristics. A field site for testing the performance of CO2 detection instruments and techniques has been developed by the Zero Emissions Research Technology (ZERT) group at Montana State University. The field site allows a controlled flow rate of CO2 to be released underground through a 100 m long horizontal pipe placed below the water table. Two release experiments were performed this past summer with flow rates of 0.1 and 0.3 tons CO2/day. The first release experiment lasted ten days while the second release lasted seven days. Measurements taken with the differential absorption instrument over the horizontal well during these release experiments showed an increase of greater than 300 parts per million (ppm) over the background CO2 concentration. These results indicate the capabilities of the above ground differential absorption instrument for carbon sequestration site monitoring.

  5. Orbital-differentiated coherence-incoherence crossover identified by photoemission spectroscopy in LiFeAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, H.; Yin, Z. P.; Wu, S. F.; Li, J. M.; Ma, J.; Lv, B.-Q.; Wang, X. P.; Qian, T.; Richard, P.; Xing, L.-Y.; Wang, X.-C.; Jin, C. Q.; Haule, K.; Kotliar, G.; Ding, H.

    2016-11-01

    In iron-based superconductors (FeSCs), orbital differentiation is an important phenomenon, whereby correlations stronger on the dx y orbital than on the dx z/dy z orbital yield quasiparticles with a dx y orbital character having larger mass renormalization and an abnormal temperature evolution. However, the physical origin of this orbital differentiation is debated between the Hund's coupling-induced unbinding of spin and orbital degrees of freedom and the Hubbard interaction instigated orbital-selective Mott transition. Here we use angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy to identify an orbital-dependent correlation-induced quasiparticle (QP) anomaly in LiFeAs. The excellent agreement between our photoemission measurements and first-principles many-body theory calculations shows that the orbital-differentiated QP lifetime anomalies in LiFeAs are controlled by the Hund's coupling.

  6. Coherent control of optical absorption and the energy transfer pathway of an infrared quantum dot hybridized with a VO2 nanoparticle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatef, Ali; Zamani, Naser; Johnston, William

    2017-04-01

    We systematically investigate the optical response of a semiconductor quantum dot (QD) hybridized with a vanadium dioxide nanoparticle (VO2NP) in the infrared (IR) region. The VO2NP features a semiconductor to metal phase change characteristic below and above a critical temperature that leads to an abrupt change in the particle’s optical properties. This feature means that the QD-VO2NP hybrid system can support the coherent coupling of exciton-polaritons and exciton-plasmon polaritons in the semiconductor and metal phases of the VO2NP, respectively. In our calculations, the VO2NP phase transition is modelled with a filling fraction (f), representing the fraction of the VO2NP in the metallic phase. The phase transition is driven by the hybrid system’s interaction with a continuous wave (CW) IR laser field. In this paper, we show how control over the filling fraction results in the enhancement or suppression of the QD’s linear absorption. These variations in the QD absorption is due to dramatic changes in the effective local field experienced by the QD and the non-radiative energy transfer from the QD to the VO2NP. The presented results have the potential to be applied to the design of thermal sensors at the nanoscale.

  7. Coherent control of optical absorption and the energy transfer pathway of an infrared quantum dot hybridized with a VO2 nanoparticle.

    PubMed

    Hatef, Ali; Zamani, Naser; Johnston, William

    2017-04-20

    We systematically investigate the optical response of a semiconductor quantum dot (QD) hybridized with a vanadium dioxide nanoparticle (VO2NP) in the infrared (IR) region. The VO2NP features a semiconductor to metal phase change characteristic below and above a critical temperature that leads to an abrupt change in the particle's optical properties. This feature means that the QD-VO2NP hybrid system can support the coherent coupling of exciton-polaritons and exciton-plasmon polaritons in the semiconductor and metal phases of the VO2NP, respectively. In our calculations, the VO2NP phase transition is modelled with a filling fraction (f), representing the fraction of the VO2NP in the metallic phase. The phase transition is driven by the hybrid system's interaction with a continuous wave (CW) IR laser field. In this paper, we show how control over the filling fraction results in the enhancement or suppression of the QD's linear absorption. These variations in the QD absorption is due to dramatic changes in the effective local field experienced by the QD and the non-radiative energy transfer from the QD to the VO2NP. The presented results have the potential to be applied to the design of thermal sensors at the nanoscale.

  8. Study of electron transition energies between anions and cations in spinel ferrites using differential UV-vis absorption spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, L. C.; Wu, L. Q.; Li, S. Q.; Li, Z. Z.; Tang, G. D.; Qi, W. H.; Ge, X. S.; Ding, L. L.

    2016-07-01

    It is very important to determine electron transition energies (Etr) between anions and different cations in order to understand the electrical transport and magnetic properties of a material. Many authors have analyzed UV-vis absorption spectra using the curve (αhν)2 vs E, where α is the absorption coefficient and E(=hν) is the photon energy. Such an approach can give only two band gap energies for spinel ferrites. In this paper, using differential UV-vis absorption spectra, dα/dE vs E, we have obtained electron transition energies (Etr) between the anions and cations, Fe2+ and Fe3+ at the (A) and [B] sites and Ni2+ at the [B] sites for the (A)[B]2O4 spinel ferrite samples CoxNi0.7-xFe2.3O4 (0.0≤x≤0.3), CrxNi0.7Fe2.3-xO4 (0.0≤x≤0.3) and Fe3O4. We suggest that the differential UV-vis absorption spectra should be accepted as a general analysis method for determining electron transition energies between anions and cations.

  9. Challenges and Solutions for Frequency and Energy References for Spaceborne and Airborne Integrated Path Differential Absorption Lidars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fix, Andreas; Quatrevalet, Mathieu; Witschas, Benjamin; Wirth, Martin; Büdenbender, Christian; Amediek, Axel; Ehret, Gerhard

    2016-06-01

    The stringent requirements for both the frequency stability and power reference represent a challenging task for Integrated Path Differential Absorption Lidars (IPDA) to measure greenhouse gas columns from satellite or aircraft. Currently, the German-French methane mission MERLIN (Methan Remote Lidar Mission) is prepared. At the same time CHARM-F, an aircraft installed system has been developed at DLR as an airborne demonstrator for a spaceborne greenhouse gas mission. The concepts and realization of these important sub-systems are discussed.

  10. Ground-based differential absorption lidar system for day or night measurements of ozone throughout the free troposphere.

    PubMed

    Proffitt, M H; Langford, A O

    1997-04-20

    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Aeronomy Laboratory's rapid tunable daylight differential absorption lidar system for monitoring ozone throughout the free troposphere is described. The system components are optimized to provide continuously and rapidly profiles of ozone, day or night, with a vertical resolution of 1 km and an absolute accuracy of +/-10% to the tropopause under clear sky conditions. Routine observations of ozone with frequent error assessments are made by scanning wavelengths between 286 and 292 nm.

  11. Development and Testing of a Scanning Differential Absorption Lidar For Carbon Sequestration Site Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soukup, B.; Johnson, W.; Repasky, K. S.; Carlsten, J. L.

    2013-12-01

    A scanning differential absorption lidar (DIAL) instrument for carbon sequestration site monitoring is under development and testing at Montana State University. The laser transmitter uses two tunable discrete mode laser diodes (DMLD) operating in the continuous wave (cw) mode with one locked to the on-line absorption wavelength at 1571.4067 nm and the second operating at the off-line wavelength at 1571.2585 nm. Two in-line fiber optic switches are used to switch between on-line and off-line operation. After the fiber optic switches, an acousto-optic modulator (AOM) is used to generate a pulse train used to injection seed an erbium doped fiber amplifier (EDFA) to produce eye-safe laser pulses with maximum pulse energies of 66 J and a pulse repetition frequency of 15 kHz. The DIAL receiver uses a 28 cm diameter Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope to collect that backscattered light, which is then monitored using a fiber coupled photo-multiplier tube (PMT) module operating in the photon counting mode. The PMT has a 3% quantum efficiency, a dark count rate of 90 kHz, and a maximum count rate of 1 MHz. Recently, a fiber coupled avalanche photodiode (APD) operating in the geiger mode has been incorporated into the DIAL receiver. The APD has a quantum efficiency of 10%, a dark count rate of 10 kHz, and a maximum count rate of 1 MHz and provides a much larger dynamic range than the PMT. Both the PMT and APD provide TTL logic pulses that are monitored using a multichannel scaler card used to count the return photons as a function of time of flight and are thus interchangeable. The DIAL instrument was developed at the 1.571 m wavelength to take advantage of commercial-off-the-shelf components. The instrument is operated using a custom Labview program that switches to the DMLD operating at the on-line wavelength, locks this laser to a user defined wavelength setting, and collects return signals for a user defined time. The control program switches to the DMLD operating at the off

  12. New Results from Frequency and Energy Reference Measurements during the first Test Flight with the Airborne Integrated Path Differential Absorption Lidar System CHARM-F

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehret, G.; Fix, A.; Amediek, A.; Quatrevalet, M.

    2015-12-01

    The Integrated Path Differential Absorption Lidar (IPDA) technique is regarded as a suitable means for the measurement of methane and carbon dioxide columns from satellite or aircraft platforms with unprecedented accuracy. Currently, the German-French methane mission MERLIN (Methan Remote Lidar Mission) is prepared. At the same time CHARM-F, an aircraft installed system has been developed at DLR as an airborne demonstrator for a spaceborne greenhouse gas mission. Both use e.g. optical parametric oscillators (OPOs) in a double-pulse mode as the transmitter. Of particular importance for both instruments are the sub-modules required for the frequency stabilization of the transmitter wavelength and, since the IPDA technique, in contrast to DIAL, requires the exact knowledge of the energy ratio of outgoing on-line. The coherence of the lidar transmitter gives rise to speckle effects which have to be considered for the monitoring of the energy ratio of outgoing on- and off-line pulses. For the frequency reference of CHARM-F, a very successful stabilization scheme has been developed which will also serve as the reference for MERLIN. In Spring 2015, CHARM-F was flown aboard the German HALO aircraft for the first time which enables a detailed view on the performance of both the energy calibration and frequency reference subsystems under real flight conditions. As an initial quality check we will compared the airborne results to previous lab measurements which have been performed under stable environmental conditions.

  13. Flavonoids have differential effects on glucose absorption in rats (Rattus norvegicus) and American robins (Turdis migratorius).

    PubMed

    Skopec, Michele M; Green, Adam K; Karasov, William H

    2010-02-01

    Mounting evidence suggests that small birds rely largely on non-mediated intestinal absorption of glucose through the paracellular pathway, while non-flying mammals rely on mediated absorption across the enterocyte membranes by using glucose transporters SGLT-1 and GLUT-2. Relying on non-mediated transport of glucose may decrease its absorption rate at low glucose concentrations but may release small birds from the effects of glucose transport inhibitors. We evaluated transport by using flavonoids known to inhibit glucose transport in vitro. Quercetin, isoquercetrin, and phloridzin were tested in rats (Rattus norvegicus) and robins (Turdis migratirius), and naringenin, naringenin-7-glucoside, genistein, epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), and phloretin were used only in rats. By using a pharmacokinetic approach that involves serial blood collection and area under the curve calculations, we determined the bioavailability of 3-0-methyl D-glucose, the non-metabolized analogue of D-glucose. Six of the eight flavonoids tested in rats significantly decreased the absorption of 3-0-methyl D-glucose, while none of the flavonoids tested in robins significantly decreased the bioavailability of 3-0-methyl D-glucose. We conclude that flavonoids effectively decrease glucose absorption in rats, which rely on mediated absorption of glucose, but that flavonoids do not have an effect in robins, which rely on non-mediated absorption of glucose.

  14. Diode-Laser-Based Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) for Long Term Autonomous Field Deployment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moen, D.; Repasky, K. S.; Spuler, S.; Nehrir, A. R.

    2015-12-01

    The rapidly changing spatial and temporal distribution of water vapor in the planetary boundary layer influences dynamical and physical processes that drive weather phenomena, general circulation patterns, radiative transfer, and the global water cycle. The ability to measure the water vapor distribution continuously within the lower troposphere has been identified as a high priority measurement capability needed by both the weather forecasting and climate science communities. This presentation provides an update on an economical and compact diode-laser-based differential absorption lidar (DIAL) which has demonstrated the capability of meeting these high priority measurement needs. The DIAL instrument utilizes two continuous wave distributed feedback diode lasers to injection seed a current modulated tapered semiconductor optical amplifier. An improved switching time between the on-line and off-line wavelength, on the order of 16.7 ms, allows the instrument to retrieve water vapor profiles in rapidly changing atmospheric conditions. A shared telescope design based on a 40.64 cm diameter Dobsonian telescope allows the outgoing beam to be eye-safe at the exit of the telescope. The DIAL receiver utilizes the Dobsonian telescope to collect the scattered light and direct it through an optical narrow bandpass filter (NBF) and a Fabry-Perot etalon with a free spectral range of 0.1 nm which is equal to the wavelength difference between the on-line and off-line DIAL wavelengths. A beam splitter directs 90% of the scattered light through a second NBF, and couples it onto a fiber coupled avalanche photodiode (APD), providing a far field measurement. The remaining 10% of the light passing through the beam splitter is incident on a free space coupled APD, providing a wider field of view for water vapor measurements at lower altitudes. The two channel receiver allows water vapor measurement between 500 m and 4 km/6km during daytime/nighttime operation, respectively. The DIAL

  15. 3-D water vapor field in the atmospheric boundary layer observed with scanning differential absorption lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Späth, Florian; Behrendt, Andreas; Muppa, Shravan Kumar; Metzendorf, Simon; Riede, Andrea; Wulfmeyer, Volker

    2016-04-01

    High-resolution three-dimensional (3-D) water vapor data of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) are required to improve our understanding of land-atmosphere exchange processes. For this purpose, the scanning differential absorption lidar (DIAL) of the University of Hohenheim (UHOH) was developed as well as new analysis tools and visualization methods. The instrument determines 3-D fields of the atmospheric water vapor number density with a temporal resolution of a few seconds and a spatial resolution of up to a few tens of meters. We present three case studies from two field campaigns. In spring 2013, the UHOH DIAL was operated within the scope of the HD(CP)2 Observational Prototype Experiment (HOPE) in western Germany. HD(CP)2 stands for High Definition of Clouds and Precipitation for advancing Climate Prediction and is a German research initiative. Range-height indicator (RHI) scans of the UHOH DIAL show the water vapor heterogeneity within a range of a few kilometers up to an altitude of 2 km and its impact on the formation of clouds at the top of the ABL. The uncertainty of the measured data was assessed for the first time by extending a technique to scanning data, which was formerly applied to vertical time series. Typically, the accuracy of the DIAL measurements is between 0.5 and 0.8 g m-3 (or < 6 %) within the ABL even during daytime. This allows for performing a RHI scan from the surface to an elevation angle of 90° within 10 min. In summer 2014, the UHOH DIAL participated in the Surface Atmosphere Boundary Layer Exchange (SABLE) campaign in southwestern Germany. Conical volume scans were made which reveal multiple water vapor layers in three dimensions. Differences in their heights in different directions can be attributed to different surface elevation. With low-elevation scans in the surface layer, the humidity profiles and gradients can be related to different land cover such as maize, grassland, and forest as well as different surface layer

  16. Autonomous long-term trace gas measurements using Long-Path Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasse, Jan-Marcus; Pöhler, Denis; Eger, Philipp; Schmitt, Stefan; Friess, Udo; Platt, Ulrich

    2017-04-01

    Long-Path DOAS (Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy) is a well-established, very specific and reliable remote sensing technique for the observation of a large variety of trace gases. So far DOAS has been mostly applied in the UV-Vis spectral region; detectable species are for example ClO, OClO, BrO, OBrO, IO, OIO, I2, OIO, O3, formaldehyde, glyoxal, NO2, H2O, O4, or SO2. In the Long Path DOAS setup, a dedicated light source and a measurement path of up to 10 km between a telescope and a reflector yield continuous path averaged concentrations independent of solar radiation and still on scales below the ground pixel sizes of satellite instruments. Here we present an advanced LP-DOAS instrument incorporating several technical improvements to a setup that allows for the first time autonomous and continuous long term measurements with very high measurement accuracy necessary for the measurement of low trace gas concentrations. The setup uses an optical fiber bundle in the telescope for transmission and reception of the measurement signal. The traditional Xe-arc lamp has been replaced by a Laser Driven Light Source with a long life time and very good optical stability. Using this light source also allows an improved wavelength selective coupling from light source into the fiber which reduces stray light. The coupling and configuration of the optical fiber was optimised compared to previous designs to maximise light throughput and reduce stray light. Additionally, the fibers were treated in order to reduce noise caused by irregular grating illumination. These changes drastically lower detection limits (e.g. to 1 pptv for BrO or 8 pptv for ClO) and improve the long-term reliability. To facilitate an autonomous operation, the measurement software incorporates features such as an automatic reflector search and intensity optimisation as well as a selection from the available measurement paths based on atmospheric visibility. Since January 2016, we are successfully

  17. Differentiation of oral precancerous stages with optical coherence tomography based on the evaluation of optical scattering properties of oral mucosae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, M. T.; Lee, J. D.; Lee, Y. J.; Lee, C. K.; Jin, H. L.; Chang, F. Y.; Hu, K. Y.; Wu, C. P.; Chiang, C. P.; Yang, C. C.

    2013-04-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has been demonstrated to be a powerful tool for noninvasive, real-time oral cancer diagnosis. However, in previous reports, OCT has still been found to be difficult to use in the diagnosis of oral precancerous stages, including mild dysplasia and moderate dysplasia. In clinical applications, early diagnosis and treatment of oral cancer can greatly improve the survival rate. Therefore, in this study, we propose a new approach to differentiate the oral precancerous stages based on the evaluation of the optical scattering properties of the epithelial layer, which is where the dysplastic cells start to develop in the precancerous stages. Instead of using exponential decay fitting to evaluate the scattering properties of mucosal tissues based on the Beer-Lambert law, linear fitting of the OCT depth intensity is used to evaluate the scattering properties of normal and dysplastic cells. From the statistical results of the linear fitting, the slope, a, can be an effective indicator to discriminate healthy mucosa and moderate dysplasia when an a value equal to zero is the threshold value, and the intercept, b, can be used to differentiate healthy and dysplastic mucosae, as well as mild and moderate dysplasia, when b values of 0.15 and 0.18 are used as the threshold values, respectively. Furthermore, this approach is also applied to the determination of the safe margin between normal and abnormal mucosae, making it possible to provide real-time, in vivo inspection during oral maxillofacial surgery.

  18. Orbital-differentiated coherence-incoherence crossover identified by photoemission spectroscopy in LiFeAs

    SciTech Connect

    Miao, H.; Yin, Z. P.; Wu, S. F.; Li, J. M.; Ma, J.; Lv, B. -Q.; Wang, X. P.; Qian, T.; Richard, P.; Xing, L. -Y.; Wang, X. -C.; Jin, C. Q.; Haule, K.; Kotliar, G.; Ding, H.

    2016-11-14

    In the iron-based superconductors (FeSCs), orbital differentiation is an important phenomenon, whereby correlations stronger on the dxy orbital than on the dxz/dyz orbital yield quasi-particles with dxy orbital character having larger mass renormalization and abnormal temperature evolution. However, the physical origin of this orbital di erentiation is debated between the Hund's coupling induced unbinding of spin and orbital degrees of freedom and the Hubbard interaction instigated orbital selective Mott transition. Here we use angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy to identify an orbital-dependent correlation-induced quasi-particle (QP) anomaly in LiFeAs. Lastly, the excellent agreement between our photoemission measurements and first-principles many-body theory calculations shows that the orbital-differentiated QP lifetime anomalies in LiFeAs are controlled by the Hund's coupling.

  19. Orbital-differentiated coherence-incoherence crossover identified by photoemission spectroscopy in LiFeAs

    DOE PAGES

    Miao, H.; Yin, Z. P.; Wu, S. F.; ...

    2016-11-14

    In the iron-based superconductors (FeSCs), orbital differentiation is an important phenomenon, whereby correlations stronger on the dxy orbital than on the dxz/dyz orbital yield quasi-particles with dxy orbital character having larger mass renormalization and abnormal temperature evolution. However, the physical origin of this orbital di erentiation is debated between the Hund's coupling induced unbinding of spin and orbital degrees of freedom and the Hubbard interaction instigated orbital selective Mott transition. Here we use angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy to identify an orbital-dependent correlation-induced quasi-particle (QP) anomaly in LiFeAs. Lastly, the excellent agreement between our photoemission measurements and first-principles many-body theory calculations showsmore » that the orbital-differentiated QP lifetime anomalies in LiFeAs are controlled by the Hund's coupling.« less

  20. Spatial and temporal coherence between Amazon River discharge, salinity, and light absorption by colored organic carbon in western tropical Atlantic surface waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salisbury, J.; Vandemark, D.; Campbell, J.; Hunt, C.; Wisser, D.; Reul, N.; Chapron, B.

    2011-07-01

    The temporal evolution and spatial distribution of surface salinity and colored detrital matter (cdm) were evaluated within and adjacent to the Amazon River Plume. Study objectives were as follows: first, to document the spatial coherence between Amazon discharge, salinity, cdm, and the nature of the salinity-cdm relationship; second, to document the temporal and spatial variability of cdm along the trajectory of the low-salinity Amazon Plume, and third, to explore the departure of cdm from conservative mixing behavior along the plume trajectory into the open ocean. Time series (2003-2007) of surface salinity estimated using the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer-Earth Observing System and corresponding satellite cdm absorption (acdm) data documented a plume of freshened, colored water emanating from the Amazon. Salinity and acdm were generally coherent, but there were regions in which spatial patterns of salinity and acdm did not coincide. Salinity was oppositely phased with discharge, whereas acdm was in phase but lagged discharge and typically remained high after maximum discharge. Along the river plume trajectory, acdm was inversely correlated with salinity, yet there was considerable deviation from conservative mixing behavior during all seasons. Positive anomalies in a linear relationship between salinity and acdm corresponded to areas of enhanced satellite-retrieved net primary productivity, suggesting the importance of phytoplankton biomass or its subsequent remineralization as a source of cdm. Negative anomalies tended to predominate at the distal sections of the plume trajectories, an observation consistent with the process of photo-oxidation of cdm over observed time scales of days to weeks.

  1. Underground Fiber-Optic Differential Absorption Instrument for Monitoring Carbon Dioxide Soil Gas Concentrations for Carbon Sequestration Site Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nehrir, A. R.; Humphries, S. D.; Repasky, K. S.; Carlsten, J. L.; Spangler, L. H.; Dobeck, L. M.

    2007-12-01

    The burning of fossil fuels has resulted in higher carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations in the atmosphere with potential impacts on the Earth's climate. The use of fossil fuels is predicted to grow over the next several decades with the potential for further increasing the atmospheric concentration of CO2. A proposed method of diminishing the impacts of increased CO2 on the Earth's climate is to capture and store the CO2 in geologic storage sites. One issue with underground sequestration of CO2 is the ability to monitor sequestration sites to verify the integrity of the storage of the CO2. An underground fiber optic differential absorption instrument based on a tunable distributed feedback (DFB) diode laser is being developed at Montana State University to detect small changes in CO2 soil gas concentration in an effort to monitor the overall integrity of the sequestration storage site. The fiber optic instrument exploits the 2003-2006 nm region of the spectrum which contains four CO2 absorption lines. Light from the DFB laser is delivered to an underground absorption cell one meter in length via a single mode optical fiber. The normalized transmission is measured by tuning the DFB diode laser across these four absorption lines and the results are used to determine the CO2 soil gas concentration. A description of this instrument will be presented including the instrument design, operation, and performance characteristics. A field site for testing the performance of CO2 detection instruments and techniques has been developed by the Zero Emissions Research Technology (ZERT) group at Montana State University. The field site allows a controlled flow rate of CO2 to be released underground through a 100 m long horizontal pipe placed below the water table. Two release experiments were performed this past summer with flow rates of 0.1 and 0.3 tons CO2/day. The first release experiment lasted ten days while the second release lasted seven days. Measurements taken with the

  2. Differential absorption lidar measurements of atmospheric water vapor using a pseudonoise code modulated AlGaAs laser. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rall, Jonathan A. R.

    1994-01-01

    Lidar measurements using pseudonoise code modulated AlGaAs lasers are reported. Horizontal path lidar measurements were made at night to terrestrial targets at ranges of 5 and 13 km with 35 mW of average power and integration times of one second. Cloud and aerosol lidar measurements were made to thin cirrus clouds at 13 km altitude with Rayleigh (molecular) backscatter evident up to 9 km. Average transmitter power was 35 mW and measurement integration time was 20 minutes. An AlGaAs laser was used to characterize spectral properties of water vapor absorption lines at 811.617, 816.024, and 815.769 nm in a multipass absorption cell using derivative spectroscopy techniques. Frequency locking of an AlGaAs laser to a water vapor absorption line was achieved with a laser center frequency stability measured to better than one-fifth of the water vapor Doppler linewidth over several minutes. Differential absorption lidar measurements of atmospheric water vapor were made in both integrated path and range-resolved modes using an externally modulated AlGaAs laser. Mean water vapor number density was estimated from both integrated path and range-resolved DIAL measurements and agreed with measured humidity values to within 6.5 percent and 20 percent, respectively. Error sources were identified and their effects on estimates of water vapor number density calculated.

  3. Triple detection fiber differentiating interferometer based on low-coherence interferometer and its passive demodulation scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhen, Shenglai; Chen, Jian; Li, Hui; Wang, Xiaoguang; Cao, Zhigang; Zhu, Jun; Xu, Feng; Yu, Benli

    2015-10-01

    This paper presents a triple detection fiber differential interferometer and its passive demodulation scheme. The interferometer is based on an all fiber Mach-Zehnder and Sagnac hybrid configuration, which is composed of a fiber ASE source, a section of delay fiber, a 3×3 fiber coupler and several other fiber components. In the interferometer, the signal beam and reference beam travel along the same path but in opposite directions. The received signal is demodulated by a triple detection passive demodulation scheme. The interferometer can measure the absolute amplitudes and frequencies of phase sensitive signals with large dynamic range, and the low frequency environmental disturbance is removed simultaneously due to the phase compression mechanism. The experimental results demonstrate that the phase demodulation resolution is 6×10-5 rad and the maximum measuring amplitude is up to 90 rad. This method can be used to measure many kinds of parameters such as vibration and refractive index.

  4. Atmospheric Pre-Corrected Differential Absorption Techniques to Retrieve Columnar Water Vapor: Application to AVIRIS 91/95 Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlaepfer, Daniel; Borel, Christoph C.; Keller, Johannes; Itten, Klaus I.

    1996-01-01

    Water vapor is one of the main forces for weather development as well as for mesoscale air transport processes. The monitoring of water vapor is therefore an important aim in remote sensing of the atmosphere. Current operational systems for water vapor detection use primarily the emission in the thermal infrared (AVHRR, GOES, ATSR, Meteosat) or in the microwave radiation bands (DMSP). The disadvantage of current satellite systems is either a coarse spatial (horizontal) resolution ranging from one to tens of kilometers or a limited insight into the lower atmosphere. Imaging spectrometry on the other hand measures total column water vapor contents at a high spatial horizontal resolution and has therefore the potential of filling these gaps. The sensors of the AVIRIS instrument are capable of acquiring hyperspectral data in 224 bands located in the visible and near infrared at 10 nm resolution. This data includes the information on constituents of the earth's surface as well as of the atmosphere. The optical measurement of water vapor can be performed using sensor channels located in bands or lines of the absorption spectrum. The AVIRIS sensor has been used to retrieve water vapor and with less accuracy carbon dioxide, oxygen and ozone. To retrieve the water vapor amount, the so called differential absorption technique has been applied. The goal of this technique is to eliminate background factors by taking a ratio between channels within the absorption band and others besides the band. Various ratioing methods on the basis of different channels and calculation techniques were developed. The influence of a trace gas of interest on the radiance at the sensor level is usually simulated by using radiative transfer codes. In this study, the spectral transmittance and radiance are calculated by MODTRAN3 simulations with the new DISORT option. The objective of this work is to test the best performing differential absorption techniques for imaging spectrometry of

  5. Atmospheric Pre-Corrected Differential Absorption Techniques to Retrieve Columnar Water Vapor: Application to AVIRIS 91/95 Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlaepfer, Daniel; Borel, Christoph C.; Keller, Johannes; Itten, Klaus I.

    1996-01-01

    Water vapor is one of the main forces for weather development as well as for mesoscale air transport processes. The monitoring of water vapor is therefore an important aim in remote sensing of the atmosphere. Current operational systems for water vapor detection use primarily the emission in the thermal infrared (AVHRR, GOES, ATSR, Meteosat) or in the microwave radiation bands (DMSP). The disadvantage of current satellite systems is either a coarse spatial (horizontal) resolution ranging from one to tens of kilometers or a limited insight into the lower atmosphere. Imaging spectrometry on the other hand measures total column water vapor contents at a high spatial horizontal resolution and has therefore the potential of filling these gaps. The sensors of the AVIRIS instrument are capable of acquiring hyperspectral data in 224 bands located in the visible and near infrared at 10 nm resolution. This data includes the information on constituents of the earth's surface as well as of the atmosphere. The optical measurement of water vapor can be performed using sensor channels located in bands or lines of the absorption spectrum. The AVIRIS sensor has been used to retrieve water vapor and with less accuracy carbon dioxide, oxygen and ozone. To retrieve the water vapor amount, the so called differential absorption technique has been applied. The goal of this technique is to eliminate background factors by taking a ratio between channels within the absorption band and others besides the band. Various ratioing methods on the basis of different channels and calculation techniques were developed. The influence of a trace gas of interest on the radiance at the sensor level is usually simulated by using radiative transfer codes. In this study, the spectral transmittance and radiance are calculated by MODTRAN3 simulations with the new DISORT option. The objective of this work is to test the best performing differential absorption techniques for imaging spectrometry of

  6. General Strategy for Broadband Coherent Perfect Absorption and Multi-wavelength All-optical Switching Based on Epsilon-Near-Zero Multilayer Films

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae Young; Badsha, Md. Alamgir; Yoon, Junho; Lee, Seon Young; Jun, Young Chul; Hwangbo, Chang Kwon

    2016-01-01

    We propose a general, easy-to-implement scheme for broadband coherent perfect absorption (CPA) using epsilon-near-zero (ENZ) multilayer films. Specifically, we employ indium tin oxide (ITO) as a tunable ENZ material, and theoretically investigate CPA in the near-infrared region. We first derive general CPA conditions using the scattering matrix and the admittance matching methods. Then, by combining these two methods, we extract analytic expressions for all relevant parameters for CPA. Based on this theoretical framework, we proceed to study ENZ CPA in a single layer ITO film and apply it to all-optical switching. Finally, using an ITO multilayer of different ENZ wavelengths, we implement broadband ENZ CPA structures and investigate multi-wavelength all-optical switching in the technologically important telecommunication window. In our design, the admittance matching diagram was employed to graphically extract not only the structural parameters (the film thicknesses and incident angles), but also the input beam parameters (the irradiance ratio and phase difference between two input beams). We find that the multi-wavelength all-optical switching in our broadband ENZ CPA system can be fully controlled by the phase difference between two input beams. The simple but general design principles and analyses in this work can be widely used in various thin-film devices. PMID:26965195

  7. General Strategy for Broadband Coherent Perfect Absorption and Multi-wavelength All-optical Switching Based on Epsilon-Near-Zero Multilayer Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Tae Young; Badsha, Md. Alamgir; Yoon, Junho; Lee, Seon Young; Jun, Young Chul; Hwangbo, Chang Kwon

    2016-03-01

    We propose a general, easy-to-implement scheme for broadband coherent perfect absorption (CPA) using epsilon-near-zero (ENZ) multilayer films. Specifically, we employ indium tin oxide (ITO) as a tunable ENZ material, and theoretically investigate CPA in the near-infrared region. We first derive general CPA conditions using the scattering matrix and the admittance matching methods. Then, by combining these two methods, we extract analytic expressions for all relevant parameters for CPA. Based on this theoretical framework, we proceed to study ENZ CPA in a single layer ITO film and apply it to all-optical switching. Finally, using an ITO multilayer of different ENZ wavelengths, we implement broadband ENZ CPA structures and investigate multi-wavelength all-optical switching in the technologically important telecommunication window. In our design, the admittance matching diagram was employed to graphically extract not only the structural parameters (the film thicknesses and incident angles), but also the input beam parameters (the irradiance ratio and phase difference between two input beams). We find that the multi-wavelength all-optical switching in our broadband ENZ CPA system can be fully controlled by the phase difference between two input beams. The simple but general design principles and analyses in this work can be widely used in various thin-film devices.

  8. Laser thermal therapy monitoring using complex differential variance in optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Lo, William C Y; Uribe-Patarroyo, Néstor; Nam, Ahhyun S; Villiger, Martin; Vakoc, Benjamin J; Bouma, Brett E

    2017-01-01

    Conventional thermal therapy monitoring techniques based on temperature are often invasive, limited by point sampling, and are indirect measures of tissue injury, while techniques such as magnetic resonance and ultrasound thermometry are limited by their spatial resolution.  The visualization of the thermal coagulation zone at high spatial resolution is particularly critical to the precise delivery of thermal energy to epithelial lesions. In this work, an integrated thulium laser thermal therapy monitoring system was developed based on complex differential variance (CDV), which enables the 2D visualization of the dynamics of the thermal coagulation process at high spatial and temporal resolution with an optical frequency domain imaging system. With proper calibration to correct for noise, the CDV-based technique was shown to accurately delineate the thermal coagulation zone, which is marked by the transition from high CDV upon heating to a significantly reduced CDV once the tissue is coagulated, in 3 different tissue types ex vivo: skin, retina, and esophagus. The ability to delineate thermal lesions in multiple tissue types at high resolution opens up the possibility of performing microscopic image-guided procedures in a vast array of epithelial applications ranging from dermatology, ophthalmology, to gastroenterology and beyond. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Laser thermal therapy monitoring using complex differential variance in optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Lo, William C. Y.; Uribe-Patarroyo, Néstor; Nam, Ahhyun S.; Villiger, Martin; Vakoc, Benjamin J.; Bouma, Brett E.

    2016-01-01

    Conventional thermal therapy monitoring techniques based on temperature are often invasive, limited by point sampling, and are indirect measures of tissue injury, while techniques such as magnetic resonance and ultrasound thermometry are limited by their spatial resolution. The visualization of the thermal coagulation zone at high spatial resolution is particularly critical to the precise delivery of thermal energy to epithelial lesions. In this work, an integrated thulium laser thermal therapy monitoring system was developed based on complex differential variance (CDV), which enables the 2D visualization of the dynamics of the thermal coagulation process at high spatial and temporal resolution with an optical frequency domain imaging system. With proper calibration to correct for noise, the CDV-based technique was shown to accurately delineate the thermal coagulation zone, which is marked by the transition from high CDV upon heating to a significantly reduced CDV once the tissue is coagulated, in 3 different tissue types ex vivo: skin, retina, and esophagus. The ability to delineate thermal lesions in multiple tissue types at high resolution opens up the possibility of performing microscopic image-guided procedures in a vast array of epithelial applications ranging from dermatology, ophthalmology, to gastroenterology and beyond. PMID:27623742

  10. An easy method to differentiate retinal arteries from veins by spectral domain optical coherence tomography: retrospective, observational case series

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Recently it was shown that retinal vessel diameters could be measured using spectral domain optical coherence tomography (OCT). It has also been suggested that retinal vessels manifest different features on spectral domain OCT (SD-OCT) depending on whether they are arteries or veins. Our study was aimed to present a reliable SD-OCT assisted method of differentiating retinal arteries from veins. Methods Patients who underwent circular OCT scans centred at the optic disc using a Spectralis OCT (Heidelberg Engineering, Heidelberg, Germany) were retrospectively reviewed. Individual retinal vessels were identified on infrared reflectance (IR) images and given unique labels for subsequent grading. Vessel types (artery, vein or uncertain) assessed by IR and/or fluorescein angiography (FA) were referenced as ground truth. From OCT, presence/absence of the hyperreflective lower border reflectivity feature was assessed. Presence of this feature was considered indicative for retinal arteries and compared with the ground truth. Results A total of 452 vessels from 26 eyes of 18 patients were labelled and 398 with documented vessel type (302 by IR and 96 by FA only) were included in the study. Using SD-OCT, 338 vessels were assigned a final grade, of which, 86.4% (292 vessels) were classified correctly. Forty three vessels (15 arteries and 28 veins) that IR failed to differentiate were correctly classified by SD-OCT. When using only IR based ground truth for vessel type the SD-OCT based classification approach reached a sensitivity of 0.8758/0.9297, and a specificity of 0.9297/0.8758 for arteries/veins, respectively. Conclusion Our method was able to classify retinal arteries and veins with a commercially available SD-OCT alone, and achieved high classification performance. Paired with OCT based vessel measurements, our study has expanded the potential clinical implication of SD-OCT in evaluation of a variety of retinal and systemic vascular diseases. PMID:24884611

  11. Differentiation of bacterial versus viral otitis media using a combined Raman scattering spectroscopy and low coherence interferometry probe (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Youbo; Shelton, Ryan L.; Tu, Haohua; Nolan, Ryan M.; Monroy, Guillermo L.; Chaney, Eric J.; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2016-02-01

    Otitis media (OM) is a highly prevalent disease that can be caused by either a bacterial or viral infection. Because antibiotics are only effective against bacterial infections, blind use of antibiotics without definitive knowledge of the infectious agent, though commonly practiced, can lead to the problems of potential harmful side effects, wasteful misuse of medical resources, and the development of antimicrobial resistance. In this work, we investigate the feasibility of using a combined Raman scattering spectroscopy and low coherence interferometry (LCI) device to differentiate OM infections caused by viruses and bacteria and improve our diagnostic ability of OM. Raman spectroscopy, an established tool for molecular analysis of biological tissue, has been shown capable of identifying different bacterial species, although mostly based on fixed or dried sample cultures. LCI has been demonstrated recently as a promising tool for determining tympanic membrane (TM) thickness and the presence and thickness of middle-ear biofilm located behind the TM. We have developed a fiber-based ear insert that incorporates spatially-aligned Raman and LCI probes for point-of-care diagnosis of OM. As shown in human studies, the Raman probe provides molecular signatures of bacterial- and viral-infected OM and normal middle-ear cavities, and LCI helps to identify depth-resolved structural information as well as guide and monitor positioning of the Raman spectroscopy beam for relatively longer signal acquisition time. Differentiation of OM infections is determined by correlating in vivo Raman data collected from human subjects with the Raman features of different bacterial and viral species obtained from cultured samples.

  12. Dual/differential coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering module for multiphoton microscopes with a femtosecond Ti:sapphire oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bei; Borri, Paola; Langbein, Wolfgang

    2013-06-01

    In the last decade, coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy has emerged as a powerful multiphoton imaging technique offering label-free chemical sensitivity and high three-dimensional resolution. However, its widespread application in the life sciences has been hampered by the use of costly pulsed lasers, the existence of a nonresonant background requiring involved technical solutions for its efficient suppression, and the limited acquisition speed of multiplex techniques addressing several vibrational resonances, if improved chemical specificity is needed. We have recently reported a differential CARS technique (D-CARS), which simultaneously measures two vibrational frequencies, enhancing the chemical selectivity and sensitivity without introducing costly hardware, while maintaining fast acquisition. In this study, we demonstrate a compact, fully automated, cost-effective module, which integrates on hardware and software level with a commercial multiphoton microscope based on a single 100 fs Ti:Sapphire oscillator and enables D-CARS microscopy in a user-friendly format for applications in the life sciences.

  13. Dual/differential coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering module for multiphoton microscopes with a femtosecond Ti:sapphire oscillator.

    PubMed

    Li, Bei; Borri, Paola; Langbein, Wolfgang

    2013-06-01

    In the last decade, coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy has emerged as a powerful multiphoton imaging technique offering label-free chemical sensitivity and high three-dimensional resolution. However, its widespread application in the life sciences has been hampered by the use of costly pulsed lasers, the existence of a nonresonant background requiring involved technical solutions for its efficient suppression, and the limited acquisition speed of multiplex techniques addressing several vibrational resonances, if improved chemical specificity is needed. We have recently reported a differential CARS technique (D-CARS), which simultaneously measures two vibrational frequencies, enhancing the chemical selectivity and sensitivity without introducing costly hardware, while maintaining fast acquisition. In this study, we demonstrate a compact, fully automated, cost-effective module, which integrates on hardware and software level with a commercial multiphoton microscope based on a single 100 fs Ti:Sapphire oscillator and enables D-CARS microscopy in a user-friendly format for applications in the life sciences.

  14. In vivo measurement of differential motion inside the organ of Corti using a low coherence interferometer system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Fangyi; Zha, Dingjun; Fridberger, Anders; Zheng, Jiefu; Choudhury, Niloy; Jacques, Steven L.; Wang, Ruikang K.; Nuttall, Alfred L.

    2012-02-01

    The differential motion of the organ of Corti has been expected as a result of the outer hair cell force, believed to be necessary for the cochlear amplifier. In vitro experiments have been performed to demonstrate this motion but the in vivo data was unavailable due to the technical difficulties. Using a specially-designed time-domain optical coherence tomography system, we performed in vivo imaging and vibration measurement at the sensitive base of the guinea pig cochlea. This technique, for the first time, provides in vivo information about the internal vibration of the organ of Corti. At low sound level, when the cochlea is more sensitive, top surface of the organ of Corti, the reticular lamina (RL) showed tuning at a higher frequency than of the bottom surface, basilar membrane (BM) and its vibration amplitude is 2-3 times of that of the BM. Corresponding to the frequency difference, the phase of RL vibration is lead to that of the BM. Both the amplitude gain and the phase lead on RL is level dependent. This suggests that they are related to the cochlear amplification. The amplitude gain at the RL is an enhancement of the BM motion for stimulating the stereocillia. The advance in time of RL vibration can prepare proper timing of stereocillia stimulation for the cochlear amplification.

  15. Carbonized blood deposited on fibres during 810, 940 and 1,470 nm endovenous laser ablation: thickness and absorption by optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Amzayyb, Mustafa; van den Bos, Renate R; Kodach, Vitali M; de Bruin, D Martijn; Nijsten, Tamar; Neumann, H A Martino; van Gemert, Martin J C

    2010-05-01

    Endovenous laser ablation (EVLA) is commonly used to treat saphenous varicosities. Very high temperatures at the laser fibre tip have been reported during EVLA. We hypothesized that the laser irradiation deposits a layer of strongly absorbing carbonized blood of very high temperature on the fibre tip. We sought to prove the existence of these layers and study their properties by optical transmission, optical coherence tomography (OCT) and microscopy. We analysed 23 EVLA fibres, 8 used at 810 nm, 7 at 940 nm and 8 at 1,470 nm. We measured the transmission of these fibres in two wavelength bands (450-950 nm; 950-1,650 nm). We used 1,310 nm OCT to assess the thickness of the layers and the attenuation as a function of depth to determine the absorption coefficient. Microscopy was used to view the tip surface. All fibres showed a slightly increasing transmission with wavelength in the 450-950 nm band, and a virtually wavelength-independent transmission in the 950-1,650 nm band. OCT scans showed a thin layer deposited on all 13 fibres investigated, 6 used at 810 nm, 4 at 940 nm and 3 at 1,470 nm, some with inhomogeneities over the tip area. The average absorption coefficient of the 13 layers was 72 +/- 16 mm(-1). The average layer thickness estimated from the transmission and absorption measurements was 8.0 +/- 2.7 microm. From the OCT data, the average maximal thickness was 26 +/- 6 microm. Microscopy of three fibre tips, one for each EVLA wavelength, showed rough, cracked and sometimes seriously damaged tip surfaces. There was no clear correlation between the properties of the layers and the EVLA parameters such as wavelength, except for a positive correlation between layer thickness and total delivered energy. In conclusion, we found strong evidence that all EVLA procedures in blood filled veins deposit a heavily absorbing hot layer of carbonized blood on the fibre tip, with concomitant tip damage. This major EVLA mechanism is unlikely to have much wavelength

  16. Field tests of the real-data acquisiton system for the NASA-LaRC differential absorption lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, C.

    1984-01-01

    A data acquisition system (DAS) for the NASA/LaRC Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) was documented. This DAS is a dual LSI 11/23 set up where one computer retrieves data from the digitizers and other peripheral units, stores that data on magnetic tape, generates aerosol grayscales on a Trilog printer and passes data to the second computer. The second computer is dedicated to real time displays of the data in a variety of modes from raw data to range resolved ozone profiles. The DIAL DAS also has several new features.

  17. Development and operation of a real-time data acquisition system for the NASA-LaRC differential absorption lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, C.

    1985-01-01

    Computer hardware and software of the NASA multipurpose differential absorption lidar (DIAL) sysatem were improved. The NASA DIAL system is undergoing development and experimental deployment for remote measurement of atmospheric trace gas concentration from ground and aircraft platforms. A viable DIAL system was developed with the capability of remotely measuring O3 and H2O concentrations from an aircraft platform. Test flights were successfully performed on board the NASA/Goddard Flight Center Electra aircraft from 1980 to 1984. Improvements on the DIAL data acquisition system (DAS) are described.

  18. [Application of the differential absorption UV-VIS spectrum to assay some of humic compounds in therapeutic peats].

    PubMed

    Drobnik, Michał; Latour, Teresa

    2009-01-01

    Delineated were differential 4th degree absorption spectrum UV-VIS range for standardized humid acids produced by "Fluka". These acids were separated through selective extraction (acid, alcoholic, alkaline). Determined was wavelength for which distinct, well separated, symmetrical peaks characteristic for particular compounds were found. The similar procedure were applied to separate the same sort of acids extracted from 4 Polish peat deposits. Certified are the presence of hymatomelanoic acid, fulvic acid, humic acid in examined peat of low type. These acids occurred in different quantity and proportions.

  19. Acousto-optically tuned isotopic CO{sub 2} lasers for long-range differential absorption LIDAR

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, D.C.; Busch, G.E.; Hewitt, C.J.; Remelius, D.K.; Shimada, Tsutomu; Strauss, C.E.M.; Wilson, C.W.

    1998-12-01

    The authors are developing 2--100 kHz repetition rate CO{sub 2} lasers with milliJoule pulse energies, rapid acousto-optic tuning and isotopic gas mixes, for Differential Absorption LIDAR (DIAL) applications. The authors explain the tuning method, which uses a pair of acousto-optic modulators and is capable of random access to CO{sub 2} laser lines at rates of 100 kHz or more. The laser system is also described, and they report on performance with both normal and isotopic gas mixes.

  20. Aerosol absorption measurement at SWIR with water vapor interference using a differential photoacoustic spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wenyue; Liu, Qiang; Wu, Yi

    2015-09-07

    Atmospheric aerosol plays an important role in atmospheric radiation balance through absorbing and scattering the solar radiation, which changes local weather and global climate. Accurate measurement is highly requested to estimate the radiative effects and climate effects of atmospheric aerosol. Photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) technique, which observes the aerosols on their natural suspended state and is insensitive to light scattering, is commonly recognized as one of the best candidates to measure the optical absorption coefficient (OAC) of aerosols. In the present work, a method of measuring aerosol OAC at the wavelength where could also be absorbed by water vapor was proposed and corresponding measurements of the absorption properties of the atmospheric aerosol at the short wave infrared (SWIR, 1342 nm) wavelength were carried out. The spectrometer was made up of two high performance homemade photoacoustic cells. To improve the sensitivity, several methods were presented to control the noise derived from gas flow and vibration from the sampling pump. Calibration of the OAC and properties of the system were also studied in detail. Using the established PAS instrument, measurement of the optical absorption properties of the atmospheric aerosol were carried out in laboratory and field environment.

  1. Differentiation and classification of beers with flame atomic spectrometry and molecular absorption spectrometry and sample preparation assisted by microwaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellido-Milla, Dolores; Moreno-Perez, Juana M.; Hernández-Artiga, María. P.

    2000-07-01

    The characterization of beer samples has a lot of interest because their composition can affect the taste and stability of beer and consumer health. Flame atomic absorption spectrometry was used to determine Fe, Mn, Zn, Cu, Mg, Ca and Al. Sodium and K were determined by flame atomic emission spectrometry. A sample preparation method was developed, based on treatment with HNO 3 and H 2O 2 in a microwave oven. This has many advantages over the methods found in the literature. The combination of the results of atomic spectrometry and the spectrum obtained by molecular absorption spectrometry provides information on the inorganic and organic components of the samples. The application of chemometric techniques to chemical composition data could be extremely useful for food quality control. The metal concentrations, the molecular absorption spectrum, the pH and conductivity of each sample were subject to analysis of variance and linear discriminant analysis. Twenty-five different beer samples were used to differentiate and classify different types of beers.

  2. A new ground-based differential absorption sunphotometer for measuring atmospheric columnar CO2 and preliminary applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Yisong; Li, Zhengqiang; Zhang, Xingying; Xu, Hua; Li, Donghui; Li, Kaitao

    2015-10-01

    Carbon dioxide is commonly considered as the most important greenhouse gas. Ground-based remote sensing technology of acquiring CO2 columnar concentration is needed to provide validation for spaceborne CO2 products. A new groundbased sunphotometer prototype for remotely measuring atmospheric CO2 is introduced in this paper, which is designed to be robust, portable, automatic and suitable for field observation. A simple quantity, Differential Absorption Index (DAI) related to CO2 optical depth, is proposed to derive the columnar CO2 information based on the differential absorption principle around 1.57 micron. Another sun/sky radiometer CE318, is used to provide correction parameters of aerosol extinction and water vapor absorption. A cloud screening method based on the measurement stability is developed. A systematic error assessment of the prototype and DAI is also performed. We collect two-year DAI observation from 2010 to 2012 in Beijing, analyze the DAI seasonal variation and find that the daily average DAI decreases in growing season and reaches to a minimum on August, while increases after that until January of the next year, when DAI reaches its highest peak, showing generally the seasonal cycle of CO2. We also investigate the seasonal differences of DAI variation and attribute the tendencies of high in the morning and evening while low in the noon to photosynthesis efficiency variation of vegetation and anthropogenic emissions. Preliminary comparison between DAI and model simulated XCO2 (Carbon Tracker 2011) is conducted, showing that DAI roughly reveals some temporal characteristics of CO2 when using the average of multiple measurements.

  3. Differential two-signal picosecond-pulse coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering imaging microscopy by using a dual-mode optical parametric oscillator.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Yong Shim; Lee, Dong-Hoon; Cho, Hyuck

    2007-11-15

    We propose and demonstrate a novel differential two-signal technique of coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) imaging microscopy using a picosecond (ps) optical parametric oscillator (OPO). By adjusting a Lyot filter inside the cavity, we operated the OPO oscillating in two stable modes separated by a few nanometers. The CARS images generated by the two modes are separated by a spectrograph behind the microscope setup, and their differential image is directly obtained by balanced lock-in detection. The feasibility of the technique is experimentally verified by imaging micrometer-sized polystyrene beads immersed in water.

  4. Epigallocatechin gallate and caffeine differentially inhibit the intestinal absorption of cholesterol and fat in ovariectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shu; Noh, Sang K; Koo, Sung I

    2006-11-01

    We conducted this study to determine whether green tea constituents, (-)-epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) and caffeine, affect the intestinal absorption of cholesterol (CH), fat, and other fat-soluble compounds. Ovariectomized rats with lymph cannula were infused intraduodenally with a lipid emulsion containing 14C-labeled CH (14C-CH), alpha-tocopherol (alpha TOH), triolein, and sodium taurocholate, without (control) or with EGCG, caffeine, or EGCG plus caffeine, in PBS, pH 6.5. The lymphatic total 14C-CH was significantly lowered by EGCG (21.1 +/- 2.1% dose), caffeine (27.9 +/- 1.7% dose), and EGCG plus caffeine (19.3 +/- 0.9% dose), compared with the control (32.4 +/- 1.6% dose). The lymphatic output of esterified CH also was significantly lower in rats infused with EGCG (7.9 +/- 0.7 micromol), caffeine (7.6 +/- 0.2 micromol), and EGCG plus caffeine (7.5 +/- 0.6 micromol) than rats in the control group (11.6 +/- 1.7 micromol). Also, EGCG and caffeine significantly lowered the absorption of alpha TOH, another highly hydrophobic lipid. However, the lymphatic outputs of oleic acid (exogenous fatty acid marker) and other fatty acids of endogenous origin were not affected by EGCG but were markedly lowered by caffeine and EGCG plus caffeine. Caffeine significantly lowered the amount of lymph flow, regardless of whether it was infused alone (14.2 +/- 3.9 mL) or with EGCG (18.6 +/- 2.0 mL), compared with EGCG (22.2 +/- 2.2 mL) alone and the control group (23.2 +/- 3.8 mL). The caffeine-induced decline in lymph flow was associated with the lowering of lipid absorption. The results indicate that both EGCG and caffeine inhibit lipid absorption and that the inhibitory effects of the 2 tea constituents are not synergistic but mediated by distinctly different mechanisms.

  5. Retinal vessel density from optical coherence tomography angiography to differentiate early glaucoma, pre-perimetric glaucoma and normal eyes.

    PubMed

    Akil, Handan; Huang, Alex S; Francis, Brian A; Sadda, Sirinivas R; Chopra, Vikas

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate optic nerve vascular density using swept source optical coherence tomography angiography (OCTA) in patients with early primary open angle glaucoma (POAG), pre-perimetric glaucoma and normal eyes. This is a prospective, observational study including 56 eyes in total and divided into 3 groups; 20 eyes with mild POAG, 20 pre-perimetric glaucoma eyes, and 16 age-matched normal eyes as controls. The optic disc region was imaged by a 1050-nm-wavelength swept-source OCT system (DRI OCT Triton, TOPCON). Vessel density was assessed as the ratio of the area occupied by the vessels in 3 distinct regions: 1) within the optic nerve head; 2) in the 3 mm papillary region around the optic disc; and 3) in the peripapillary region, defined as a 700-μm-wide elliptical annulus around the disc. The potential associations between vessel density and structural, functional measures were analyzed. There was a statistically significant difference for the peripapillary vessel density, optic nerve head vessel density, and papillary vessel density among all the groups (p<0.001). Control eyes showed a significant difference for all measured vessel densities compared to glaucomatous eyes (p values from 0.001 to 0.024). There was a statistically significant difference between control and pre-perimetric glaucoma eyes for peripapillary, optic nerve head and papillary vessel density values (p values from 0.001 to 0.007). The optic nerve head vessel density, superior and inferior papillary area vessel density (Pearson r = 0.512, 0.436, 0.523 respectively) were highly correlated with mean overall, superior and inferior RNFL thickness in POAG eyes (p = 0.04, p = 0.02 and p = 0.04 respectively). Multiple linear regression analysis of POAG group showed that optic nerve head vessel density in POAG group was more strongly linked to RNFL thickness than to any other variables. Eyes with mild POAG could be differentiated from pre-perimetric glaucoma eyes, which also could be differentiated from

  6. Retinal vessel density from optical coherence tomography angiography to differentiate early glaucoma, pre-perimetric glaucoma and normal eyes

    PubMed Central

    Akil, Handan; Huang, Alex S.; Francis, Brian A.; Sadda, Sirinivas R.; Chopra, Vikas

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate optic nerve vascular density using swept source optical coherence tomography angiography (OCTA) in patients with early primary open angle glaucoma (POAG), pre-perimetric glaucoma and normal eyes. Methods This is a prospective, observational study including 56 eyes in total and divided into 3 groups; 20 eyes with mild POAG, 20 pre-perimetric glaucoma eyes, and 16 age-matched normal eyes as controls. The optic disc region was imaged by a 1050-nm-wavelength swept-source OCT system (DRI OCT Triton, TOPCON). Vessel density was assessed as the ratio of the area occupied by the vessels in 3 distinct regions: 1) within the optic nerve head; 2) in the 3 mm papillary region around the optic disc; and 3) in the peripapillary region, defined as a 700-μm-wide elliptical annulus around the disc. The potential associations between vessel density and structural, functional measures were analyzed. Results There was a statistically significant difference for the peripapillary vessel density, optic nerve head vessel density, and papillary vessel density among all the groups (p<0.001). Control eyes showed a significant difference for all measured vessel densities compared to glaucomatous eyes (p values from 0.001 to 0.024). There was a statistically significant difference between control and pre-perimetric glaucoma eyes for peripapillary, optic nerve head and papillary vessel density values (p values from 0.001 to 0.007). The optic nerve head vessel density, superior and inferior papillary area vessel density (Pearson r = 0.512, 0.436, 0.523 respectively) were highly correlated with mean overall, superior and inferior RNFL thickness in POAG eyes (p = 0.04, p = 0.02 and p = 0.04 respectively). Multiple linear regression analysis of POAG group showed that optic nerve head vessel density in POAG group was more strongly linked to RNFL thickness than to any other variables. Conclusions Eyes with mild POAG could be differentiated from pre-perimetric glaucoma eyes, which

  7. Differential modulation of STN-cortical and cortico-muscular coherence by movement and levodopa in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Hirschmann, J; Özkurt, T E; Butz, M; Homburger, M; Elben, S; Hartmann, C J; Vesper, J; Wojtecki, L; Schnitzler, A

    2013-03-01

    Previous research suggests that oscillatory coupling between cortex, basal ganglia and muscles plays an important role in motor behavior. Furthermore, there is evidence that oscillatory coupling is altered in patients with movement disorders such as Parkinson's disease (PD). In this study, we performed simultaneous magnetoencephalography (MEG), local field potential (LFP) and electromyogram (EMG) recordings in PD patients selected for therapeutic subthalamic nucleus (STN) stimulation. Patients were recorded (i) after withdrawal of anti-parkinsonian medication (OFF) and (ii) after levodopa administration (ON). We analyzed STN-cortical and cortico-muscular coherence during static forearm contraction and repetitive hand movement in order to evaluate modulations of coherence by movement and medication. Based on previous results from studies investigating resting state coherence in PD patients, we selected primary motor cortex (M1) and superior temporal gyrus (STG) as regions of interest. We found beta coherence between M1 and STN to be suppressed by administration of levodopa. M1-muscular coherence was strongly reduced in the alpha and beta band during repetitive movement compared to static contraction, but was unaffected by administration of levodopa. Strong STG-STN but not STG-muscular coherence could be observed in the alpha band. Coherence with STG was modulated neither by movement nor by medication. Finally, we found both M1-STN and M1-muscular beta coherence to be negatively correlated with UPDRS akinesia and rigidity sub-scores in the OFF state. The present study provides new insights into the functional roles of STN-cortical and cortico-muscular coherence and their relationship to PD symptoms. The results indicate that STN-cortical and cortico-muscular coupling are correlated, but can be modulated independently. Moreover, they show differences in their frequency-specific topography. We conclude that they represent partly independent sub-loops within the motor

  8. Tropospheric O3 measurement by simultaneous differential absorption lidar and null profiling and comparison with sonde measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuchi, Tetsuo; Fujii, Takashi; Cao, Nianwen; Nemoto, Koshichi; Takeuchi, Nobuo

    2001-09-01

    A differential absorption lidar (DIAL) system consisting of two identical tunable laser systems and a single optical receiver is applied to measurement of O3 concentration profiles in the lower troposphere. Each laser is capable of emitting two wavelengths on alternate pulses, so the system is capable of simultaneous measurement of two species in the same wavelength region. We set the two lasers to emit at identical wavelength pairs consisting of on wavelength 285.0 nm and off wavelength 290.1 nm for simultaneous measurement of two null profiles, one at each wavelength, and two DIAL profiles, or O3 concentration profiles. Null profiles are useful in estimating instrumental error and checking the vertical range interval in which the DIAL profiles are accurate. Null and DIAL profiles are obtained for vertical range 1000 to 4000 m using neutral density filters of different transmissions to prevent the strong return signals from close range from saturating the photodetector. The obtained O3 concentration profiles agree with simultaneous O3 sonde measurements. An evaluation of the measurement error shows that the average O3 measurement error for vertical range 1000 to 4000 m was 3.4 ppb, or 8% relative to the average O3 concentration of 42.3 ppb, most of which is due to statistical error. The error due to differential Mie attenuation and differential backscatter gradient was found to be 0.5 ppb.

  9. Feasibility of tropospheric water vapor profiling using infrared heterodyne differential absorption lidar

    SciTech Connect

    Grund, C.J.; Hardesty, R.M.; Rye, B.J.

    1996-04-01

    The development and verification of realistic climate model parameterizations for clouds and net radiation balance and the correction of other site sensor observations for interferences due to the presence of water vapor are critically dependent on water vapor profile measurements. In this study, we develop system performance models and examine the potential of infrared differential absoroption lidar (DIAL) to determine the concentration of water vapor.

  10. Differential effect of dietary antioxidant classes (carotenoids, polyphenols, vitamins C and E) on lutein absorption.

    PubMed

    Reboul, Emmanuelle; Thap, Sinay; Tourniaire, Franck; André, Marc; Juhel, Christine; Morange, Sophie; Amiot, Marie-Josèphe; Lairon, Denis; Borel, Patrick

    2007-03-01

    Lutein is assumed to protect the human retina from blue light and oxidative stress and diminish the incidence of age-related macular degeneration. This antioxidant is commonly ingested with other dietary antioxidants. The aim of the present study was to assess whether the main dietary antioxidants, i.e. carotenoids, polyphenols and vitamins C and E, affect lutein absorption. We measured the effect of adding a mixture of antioxidants (500 mg vitamin C, 67 mg (100 IU) vitamin E and 1 g polyphenols) to a lutein-containing meal (18 mg) on the postprandial lutein response in the chylomicron-rich fraction in eight healthy men. Lutein response was weakest (-23 %; P=0 x 07) after ingestion of the meal containing antioxidants (21 x 9 (sem 4 x 6) v. 28 x 4 (sem 7 x 2) nmol x h/l). To assess the effect of each class of antioxidants and potential interactions, we subsequently evaluated the effect of various combinations of antioxidants on lutein uptake by human intestinal Caco-2 TC-7 cells. A full factorial design showed that both a mixture of polyphenols (gallic acid, caffeic acid, (+)-catechin and naringenin) and a mixture of carotenoids (lycopene plus beta-carotene) significantly (P<0 x 05) impaired lutein uptake by (-10 to-30 %), while vitamins C and E had no significant effect. Subsequent experiments showed that the aglycone flavanone naringenin was the only polyphenol responsible for the effect of the polyphenol mixture, and that the carotenoid effect was not carotenoid species-dependent. Taken together, the present results suggest that lutein absorption is not markedly affected by physiological concentrations of vitamins C and E but can be impaired by carotenoids and naringenin

  11. Effect of projectile coherence on multiple differential cross sections for 75 keV proton impact on H2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, S.; Egodapitiya, K.; Madison, D.; Schulz, M.; Hasan, A.; Laforge, A.; Moshammer, R.

    2011-10-01

    Recent results in ion-atom collision experiments suggest that discrepancies between theory and experiment are at least partly due to the representation of incoming projectile by a delocalized wave (coherent treatment). Recently we reported an experiment designed to investigate this. There, DDCS were measured for two different positions of the collimating slit. In one case the width of the proton wave packet was larger than the inter-nuclear separation of a H2 molecule (coherent case), while in the other it was much smaller than that (incoherent case). The two data sets were clearly different where in the coherent case a Young type interference structure was present and in the incoherent case it was not. Our next effort was to see the effects of projectile coherence on other processes such as single electron capture. Here we discuss the details of such an experiment and the observed results. Recent results in ion-atom collision experiments suggest that discrepancies between theory and experiment are at least partly due to the representation of incoming projectile by a delocalized wave (coherent treatment). Recently we reported an experiment designed to investigate this. There, DDCS were measured for two different positions of the collimating slit. In one case the width of the proton wave packet was larger than the inter-nuclear separation of a H2 molecule (coherent case), while in the other it was much smaller than that (incoherent case). The two data sets were clearly different where in the coherent case a Young type interference structure was present and in the incoherent case it was not. Our next effort was to see the effects of projectile coherence on other processes such as single electron capture. Here we discuss the details of such an experiment and the observed results. Funded by NSF.

  12. CHARM-F: An airborne integral path differential absorption lidar for simultaneous measurements of carbon dioxide and methane columns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amediek, A.; Büdenbender, H.-C.; Ehret, G.; Fix, A.; Kiemle, C.; Quatrevalet, M.; Wirth, M.; Hoffmann, D.; Löhring, J.; Klein, V.

    2012-04-01

    CHARM-F (CO2 and CH4 Atmospheric Remote Monitoring - Flugzeug) is DLR's airborne Integral Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) lidar for simultaneous measurements of the column-weighted average dry-air mixing ratios of atmospheric carbon dioxide and methane, designed to be flown on DLR's new High-Altitude, LOng-range research aircraft, HALO. It is meant to serve as a demonstrator of the use of spaceborne active optical instruments in inferring atmospheric CO2 and CH4 surface fluxes from total column measurements by inverse modeling. As it will be shown, this is enabled by HALO's high flight altitude and its range of 8000 km, which will make it possible to produce real-world data at truly regional scales with a viewing geometry and vertical weighting function similar to those enabled by a space platform. In addition, CHARM-F has the potential to be used as a validation tool not only for active but also passive spaceborne instruments utilizing scattered solar radiation for remote sensing of greenhouse gases. Building on the expertise from CHARM, a helicopter-borne methane IPDA lidar for pipeline monitoring developed in collaboration with E.ON, and WALES, DLR's water vapour differential absorption lidar, CHARM-F relies on a double-pulse transmitter architecture producing nanosecond pulses which allows for a precise ranging and a clean separation of atmospheric influences from the ground returns leading to an unambiguously defined column. One pulse is tuned to an absorption line of the trace gas under consideration, the other to a nearby wavelength with much less absorption. The close temporal separation of 250 μs within each pulse pair ensures that nearly the same spot on ground is illuminated. The ratio of both return signals is then a direct function of the column-weighted average dry-air mixing ratio. The two laser systems, one for each trace gas, use highly efficient and robust Nd:YAG lasers to pump an optical parametric oscillator (OPO) level which converts the

  13. Two-micrometer heterodyne differential absorption lidar measurements of the atmospheric CO2 mixing ratio in the boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibert, Fabien; Flamant, Pierre H.; Bruneau, Didier; Loth, Claude

    2006-06-01

    A 2 μm heterodyne differential absorption lidar (HDIAL) has been operated at the Instïtut Pierre Simon Laplace, Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique (Paris) to monitor the CO2 mixing ratio in absolute value at high accuracy in the atmospheric boundary layer. Horizontal measurements at increasing range are made to retrieve the optical depth. The experimental setup takes advantage of a heterodyne lidar developed for wind velocity measurements. A control unit based on a photoacoustic cell filled with CO2 is tested to correct afterward for ON-line frequency drift. The HDIAL results are validated using in situ routine measurements. The Doppler capability is used to follow the change in wind direction in the Paris suburbs.

  14. Two-micrometer heterodyne differential absorption lidar measurements of the atmospheric CO2 mixing ratio in the boundary layer.

    PubMed

    Gibert, Fabien; Flamant, Pierre H; Bruneau, Didier; Loth, Claude

    2006-06-20

    A 2 microm heterodyne differential absorption lidar (HDIAL) has been operated at the Instïtut Pierre Simon Laplace, Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique (Paris) to monitor the CO(2) mixing ratio in absolute value at high accuracy in the atmospheric boundary layer. Horizontal measurements at increasing range are made to retrieve the optical depth. The experimental setup takes advantage of a heterodyne lidar developed for wind velocity measurements. A control unit based on a photoacoustic cell filled with CO(2) is tested to correct afterward for ON-line frequency drift. The HDIAL results are validated using in situ routine measurements. The Doppler capability is used to follow the change in wind direction in the Paris suburbs.

  15. Computer simulation of an aircraft-based differential absorption and scattering system for retrieval of SO2 vertical profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoell, J. M., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    The feasibility of using the differential absorption and scattering technique from aircraft altitudes for remotely measuring the vertical distribution of SO2 was studied via a computer simulation. Particular care was taken in this simulation to use system parameters (i.e., laser energy, telescope size, etc.) which can be accommodated on an aircraft and can be realized with commercially available technology. The vertical molecular and aerosol profiles were chosen to simulate the types of profiles which might be experienced over a large city. Results are presented on the retrieval of the assumed SO2 profile which show the effects of systematic errors due to interfering gases and aerosols, as well as random errors due to shot noise in the return signal, detector and background noise, and instrument-generated noise.

  16. [Measurement of atmospheric NO3 radical with long path differential optical absorption spectroscopy based on red light emitting diodes].

    PubMed

    Li, Su-Wen; Liu, Wen-Qing; Wang, Jiang-Tao; Xie, Pin-Hua; Wang, Xu-De

    2013-02-01

    Nitrate radical (NO3) is the most important oxidant in the tropospheric nighttime chemistry. Due to its high reactivity and low atmospheric concentrations, modern red light emitting diodes (LEDs) was proposed as light source in long path differential optical absorption spectroscopy (LP-DOAS) to measure NO3 radical in the atmosphere. The spectral properties of Luxeon LXHL-MD1D LEDs were analyzed in the present paper. The principle of LEDs-DOAS system to measure nitrate radical was studied in this paper. The experimental setup and retrieval method of NO3 radical were discussed in this paper. The retrieved example of NO3 was given and the time series of NO3 concentrations was performed for a week. The results showed that the detection limits of LEDs-DOAS system were 12 ppt for atmospheric NO3 radical when the optical path of LEDs-DOAS system was 2.8 km.

  17. Spectral x-ray phase contrast imaging for single-shot retrieval of absorption, phase, and differential-phase imagery.

    PubMed

    Das, Mini; Liang, Zhihua

    2014-11-01

    In this Letter, we propose the first single-shot, noninterferometric x-ray imaging method for simultaneous retrieval of absorption, phase, and differential-phase imagery with quantitative accuracy. Our method utilizes a photon-counting spectral x-ray detector in conjunction with a simplified transport-of-intensity equation for coded-aperture phase-contrast imaging to efficiently solve the retrieval problem. This method can utilize an incoherent and polychromatic (clinical or laboratory) x-ray tube and can enable retrieval for a wide range and composition of material properties. The proposed method has been validated via computer simulations and is expected to significantly benefit applications that are sensitive to complexity of measurement, radiation dose and imaging time.

  18. Chiral-index resolved length mapping of carbon nanotubes in solution using electric-field induced differential absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wenshan; Hennrich, Frank; Flavel, Benjamin S.; Kappes, Manfred M.; Krupke, Ralph

    2016-09-01

    The length of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) is an important metric for the integration of SWCNTs into devices and for the performance of SWCNT-based electronic or optoelectronic applications. In this work we propose a rather simple method based on electric-field induced differential absorption spectroscopy to measure the chiral-index-resolved average length of SWCNTs in dispersions. The method takes advantage of the electric-field induced length-dependent dipole moment of nanotubes and has been verified and calibrated by atomic force microscopy. This method not only provides a low cost, in situ approach for length measurements of SWCNTs in dispersion, but due to the sensitivity of the method to the SWCNT chiral index, the chiral index dependent average length of fractions obtained by chromatographic sorting can also be derived. Also, the determination of the chiral-index resolved length distribution seems to be possible using this method.

  19. Spatially resolved measurements of nitrogen dioxide in an urban environment using concurrent multi-axis differential optical absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leigh, R. J.; Corlett, G. K.; Frieß, U.; Monks, P. S.

    2006-12-01

    A novel system using the technique of concurrent multi-axis differential optical absorption spectroscopy system has been developed and applied to the measurement of nitrogen dioxide in an urban environment. Using five fixed telescopes, slant columns of nitrogen dioxide, ozone, water vapour, and the oxygen dimer, O4, are simultaneously retrieved in five vertically separated viewing directions. The application of this remote sensing technique in the urban environment is explored. Through, the application of several simplifying assumptions a tropospheric concentration of NO2 is derived and compared with an urban background in-situ chemiluminescence detector. The remote sensing and in-situ techniques show good agreement. Owing to the high time resolution of the measurements, the ability to image and quantify plumes within the urban environment is demonstrated. The CMAX-DOAS measurements provide a useful measure of overall NO2 concentrations on a city-wide scale.

  20. Spatially resolved measurements of nitrogen dioxide in an urban environment using concurrent multi-axis differential optical absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leigh, R. J.; Corlett, G. K.; Frieß, U.; Monks, P. S.

    2007-09-01

    A novel system using the technique of concurrent multi-axis differential optical absorption spectroscopy system has been developed and applied to the measurement of nitrogen dioxide in an urban environment. Using five fixed telescopes, slant columns of nitrogen dioxide, ozone, water vapour, and the oxygen dimer, O4, are simultaneously retrieved in five vertically separated viewing directions. The application of this remote sensing technique in the urban environment is explored. Through the application of several simplifying assumptions a tropospheric concentration of NO2 is derived and compared with an urban background in-situ chemiluminescence detector. Trends derived from remote sensing and in-situ techniques show agreement to within 15 to 40% depending on conditions. Owing to the high time resolution of the measurements, the ability to image and quantify plumes within the urban environment is demonstrated. The CMAX-DOAS measurements provide a useful measure of overall NO2 concentrations on a city-wide scale.

  1. Multibeam long-path differential optical absorption spectroscopy instrument: a device for simultaneous measurements along multiple light paths.

    PubMed

    Pundt, Irene; Mettendorf, Kai Uwe

    2005-08-10

    A novel long-path differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) apparatus for measuring tropospheric trace gases and the first results from its use are presented: We call it the multibeam instrument. It is the first active DOAS device that emits several light beams simultaneously through only one telescope and with only one lamp as a light source, allowing simultaneous measurement along multiple light paths. In contrast to conventional DOAS instruments, several small mirrors are positioned near the lamp, creating multiple virtual light sources that emit one light beam each in one specific direction. The possibility of error due to scattering between the light beams is negligible. The trace-gas detection limits of NO2, SO2, O3, and H2CO are similar to those of the traditional long-path DOAS instrument.

  2. Identification and correction of analog-to-digital-converter nonlinearities and their implications for differential absorption lidar measurements.

    PubMed

    Langford, A O

    1995-12-20

    Differential absorption lidar (DIAL) is a powerful remote-sensing technique widely used to probe the spatial and temporal distribution of ozone and other gaseous atmospheric trace constituents. Although conceptually simple, the DIAL technique presents many challenging and often subtle technical difficulties that can limit its useful range and accuracy. One potentially serious source of error for many DIAL experiments is nonlinearity in the analog-to-digital converters used to capture lidar return signals. The impact of digitizer nonlinearity on DIAL measurements is examined, and a simple and inexpensive low-frequency dithering technique that significantly reduces the effects of ADC nonlinearity in DIAL and other applications in which the signal is repetitively averaged is described.

  3. Progress toward a water-vapor differential absorption lidar (DIAL) using a widely tunable amplified diode laser source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obland, Michael D.; Meng, Lei S.; Repasky, Kevin S.; Shaw, Joseph A.; Carlsten, John L.

    2005-08-01

    Water vapor is one of the most significant constituents of the atmosphere because of its role in cloud formation, precipitation, and interactions with electromagnetic radiation, especially its absorption of longwave infrared radiation. Some details of the role of water vapor and related feedback mechanisms in the Earth system need to be characterized better if local weather, global climate, and the water cycle are to be understood. A Differential Absorption LIDAR (DIAL) with a compact laser diode source may be able to provide boundary-layer water vapor profiles with improved vertical resolution relative to passive remote sensors. While the tradeoff with small DIAL systems is lower vertical resolution relative to large LIDARs, the advantage is that DIAL systems can be built much smaller and more robust at less cost, and consequently are the more ideal choice for creating a multi-point array or satellite-borne system. This paper highlights the progress made at Montana State University towards a water vapor DIAL using a widely tunable amplified external cavity diode laser (ECDL) transmitter. The ECDL is configured in a Littman-Metcalf configuration and was built at Montana State University. It has a continuous wave (cw) output power of 20 mW, a center wavelength of 832 nm, a coarse tuning range of 17 nm, and a continuous tuning range greater than 20 GHz. The ECDL is used to injection seed a tapered amplifier with a cw output power of 500 mW. The spectral characteristics of the ECDL are transferred to the output of the tapered amplifier. The rest of the LIDAR uses commercially available telescopes, filter optics, and detectors. Initial cw and pulsed absorption measurements are presented.

  4. Measurements of atmospheric NO3 radicals in Hefei using LED-based long path differential optical absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Lu; Min, Qin; Pin-Hua, Xie; Jun, Duan; Wu, Fang; Liu-Yi, Ling; Lan-Lan, Shen; Jian-Guo, Liu; Wen-Qing, Liu

    2016-02-01

    NO3 radicals accumulate during the night, thereby being the most critical night oxidant. Owing to the low concentration and dramatic variation, the detection of atmospheric NO3 radicals is still challenging. In this paper, an LED-based Long Path Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (LPDOAS) instrument is developed for measuring the atmospheric NO3 radicals. This instrument is composed of a Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope, a combined emitting and receiving fiber, and a red LED equipped with a thermostat, and has a center wavelength of 660 nm, covering the NO3 strongest absorption peak (662 nm). The influence of LED temperature fluctuations is discussed. The temperature of the LED lamp with a home-made thermostat is tested, showing a stability of ±0.1 °C. The principle and fitting analyses of LED-LPDOAS are presented. A retrieval example and a time series of NO3 radical concentrations with good continuity for one night are shown. The detection limit of NO3 for 2.6-km optical path is about 10 ppt. Project supported by the “Strategic Priority Research Program” of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (Grant Nos. XDB05040200 and XDB05010500).

  5. Integrated Path Differential Absorption Lidar Optimizations Based on Pre-Analyzed Atmospheric Data for ASCENDS Mission Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pliutau, Denis; Prasad, Narasimha S.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper a modeling method based on data reductions is investigated which includes pre analyzed MERRA atmospheric fields for quantitative estimates of uncertainties introduced in the integrated path differential absorption methods for the sensing of various molecules including CO2. This approach represents the extension of our existing lidar modeling framework previously developed and allows effective on- and offline wavelength optimizations and weighting function analysis to minimize the interference effects such as those due to temperature sensitivity and water vapor absorption. The new simulation methodology is different from the previous implementation in that it allows analysis of atmospheric effects over annual spans and the entire Earth coverage which was achieved due to the data reduction methods employed. The effectiveness of the proposed simulation approach is demonstrated with application to the mixing ratio retrievals for the future ASCENDS mission. Independent analysis of multiple accuracy limiting factors including the temperature, water vapor interferences, and selected system parameters is further used to identify favorable spectral regions as well as wavelength combinations facilitating the reduction in total errors in the retrieved XCO2 values.

  6. Differential effects of some natural compounds on the transdermal absorption and penetration of caffeine and salicylic acid.

    PubMed

    Muhammad, Faqir; Riviere, Jim E

    2015-04-10

    Many natural products have the potential to modulate the dermal penetration of topically applied drugs and chemicals. We studied the effect of five natural compounds (hydroxycitronellal, limonene 1,2-epoxide, terpinyl acetate, p-coumaric acid, transferrulic acid) and ethanol on the transdermal penetration of two marker drugs ((14)C-caffeine and (14)C-salicylic acid) in a flow through in vitro porcine skin diffusion system. The parameters of flux, permeability, diffusivity, and percent dose absorbed/retained were calculated and compared. The dermal absorption of (14)C-caffeine was significantly higher with terpinyl acetate and limonene 1,2-epoxide as compared to ethanol; while dermal absorption of (14)C-salicylic acid was significantly greater with hydroxycitronellal and limonene 1,2-epoxide as compared to ethanol. A 10-fold increase in flux and permeability of caffeine with terpinyl acetate was observed while limonene increased flux of caffeine by 4-fold and permeability by 3-fold. Hydroxycitronellal and limonene increased salicylic acid's flux and permeability over 2-fold. The other natural compounds tested did not produce statistically significant effects on dermal penetration parameters for both caffeine and salicylic acid (p≥0.05). These results emphasize the differential effects of natural substances on the transdermal penetration of hydrophilic (caffeine) and hydrophobic (salicylic acid) drugs.

  7. Determination of Spatial Distribution of Air Pollution by Dye Laser Measurement of Differential Absorption of Elastic Backscatter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahmed, S. A.; Gergely, J. S.

    1973-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an analytical study of a lidar system which uses tunable organic dye lasers to accurately determine spatial distribution of molecular air pollutants. Also described will be experimental work to date on simultaneous multiwavelength output dye laser sources for this system. Basically the scheme determines the concentration of air pollutants by measuring the differential absorption of an (at least) two wavelength lidar signal elastically backscattered by the atmosphere. Only relative measurements of the backscattered intensity at each of the two wavelengths, one on and one off the resonance absorption of the pollutant in question, are required. The various parameters of the scheme are examined and the component elements required for a system of this type discussed, with emphasis on the dye laser source. Potential advantages of simultaneous multiwavelength outputs are described. The use of correlation spectroscopy in this context is examined. Comparisons are also made for the use of infrared probing wavelengths and sources instead of dye lasers. Estimates of the sensitivity and accuracy of a practical dye laser system of this type, made for specific pollutants, snow it to have inherent advantages over other schemes for determining pollutant spatial distribution.

  8. Long term NO2 measurements in Hong Kong using LED based Long Path Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, K. L.; Pöhler, D.; Kuhlmann, G.; Hartl, A.; Platt, U.; Wenig, M. O.

    2011-11-01

    In this study we present the first long term measurements of atmospheric nitrogen dioxide (NO2) using a LED based Long Path Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (LP-DOAS) instrument. This instrument is measuring continuously in Hong Kong since December 2009, first in a setup with a 550 m absorption path and then with a 3820 m path at about 30 m to 50 m above street level. The instrument is using a high power blue light LED with peak intensity at 450 nm coupled into the telescope using a Y-fibre bundle. The LP-DOAS instrument measures NO2 concentrations in the Kowloon Tong and Mong Kok district of Hong Kong and we compare the measurement results to concentrations reported by monitoring stations operated by the Hong Kong Environmental Protection Department in that area. Hourly averages of coinciding measurements are in reasonable agreement (R = 0.74). Furthermore, we used the long-term data set to validate the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) NO2 data product. Monthly averaged LP-DOAS and OMI measurements correlate well (R = 0.84) when comparing the data for the OMI overpass time. We analyzed weekly patterns in both data sets and found that the LP-DOAS detects a clear weekly cycle with a reduction on weekends during rush hour peaks, whereas OMI is not able to observe this weekly cycle due to its fix overpass time.

  9. Water vapor differential absorption lidar measurements using a diode-pumped all-solid-state laser at 935 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fix, A.; Ehret, G.; Löhring, J.; Hoffmann, D.; Alpers, M.

    2011-03-01

    A diode-pumped, single-frequency laser system emitting at 935 nm has recently been developed to serve as the transmitter for water vapor differential absorption lidar (DIAL) measurements. This laser uses Nd:YGG (Y3Ga5O12) as the active medium and emits radiation directly at 935 nm without the need of additional frequency conversion processes. The system was diode-pumped at 806 nm and was built up in a master-oscillator-power-amplifier configuration. It generates more than 30 mJ of pulse energy at 100 Hz repetition rate with a beam quality ( M 2) of better than 1.4. Since water vapor DIAL demands for stringent requirements of the spectral properties those were carefully investigated in the scope of this paper. Single-frequency operation is achieved by injection seeding and active length control of the oscillator cavity. The range of continuously tunable single-frequency radiation extends to ˜0.4 nm centered around 935.31 nm. Values of the spectral purity of >99.996% were determined using long-pass absorption measurements in the atmosphere exceeding the requirements by a large margin. Finally, for the first time water vapor DIAL measurements were performed using a Nd:YGG laser. The reported results show much promise of these directly pumped lasers at 935 nm for future spaceborne but also airborne water vapor lidar systems.

  10. A Ground-Based Profiling Differential Absorption LIDAR System for Measuring CO2 in the Planetary Boundary Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, Arlyn E.; Burris, John F.; Abshire, James B.; Krainak, Michael A.; Riris, Haris; Sun, Xiao-Li; Collatz, G. James

    2002-01-01

    Ground-based LIDAR observations can potentially provide continuous profiles of CO2 through the planetary boundary layer and into the free troposphere. We will present initial atmospheric measurements from a prototype system that is based on components developed by the telecommunications industry. Preliminary measurements and instrument performance calculations indicate that an optimized differential absorption LIDAR (DIAL) system will be capable of providing continuous hourly averaged profiles with 250m vertical resolution and better than 1 ppm precision at 1 km. Precision increases (decreases) at lower (higher) altitudes and is directly proportional to altitude resolution and acquisition time. Thus, precision can be improved if temporal or vertical resolution is sacrificed. Our approach measures absorption by CO2 of pulsed laser light at 1.6 microns backscattered from atmospheric aerosols. Aerosol concentrations in the planetary boundary layer are relatively high and are expected to provide adequate signal returns for the desired resolution. The long-term goal of the project is to develop a rugged, autonomous system using only commercially available components that can be replicated inexpensively for deployment in a monitoring network.

  11. Pre-formulation studies on moisture absorption in microcrystalline cellulose using differential thermo-gravimetric analysis.

    PubMed

    Heng, Paul Wan Sia; Liew, Celine Valeria; Soh, Josephine Lay Peng

    2004-04-01

    A study on the differential thermo-gravimetric (DTG) measurements of microcrystalline cellulose (MCC) containing moisture indicated that particle size affected the amount of bound water and the flow indices. Thermal analysis of 6 commercial grades of MCC powders and MCC/water blends were performed using a thermo-gravimetric analyzer. These MCCs were differentiated by their particle size, bulk and tapped densities, crystallinity and micromeritic properties. From the DTG curves, it was observed that water loss from the MCC/water blends occurred in 3 phases which corresponded to the different states of water associated with the solid particles. Area under the third phase, or the falling rate phase, can be associated with the release of water that was physically shielded or bound to the solid. This water may be referred to as "structured" water. The large particle size grades of MCC-Avicel PH 102, PH 302 and Pharmacel 102 were found to possess smaller quantities of structured water. Water vapor sorption results revealed the monolayer capacities for the respective MCC grades. The amount of structured water appeared to correspond to the existence of bilayers on the surface of the small particle size MCC grades. Using the avalanche flow assessment method, flow properties of small particle size grades of MCC were found to be poorer as indicated by the significant correlation between their flow indices and size, in addition to the longer mean times to avalanche.

  12. Ozone monitoring using differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) and UV photometry instruments in Sohar, Oman.

    PubMed

    Nawahda, Amin

    2015-08-01

    Ground level ozone (O3) concentrations were measured across Sohar highway in Oman during a four-month period from September to December 2014 by using an open-path deferential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) instrument. The monthly average concentrations of O3 varied from 19.6 to 29.4 ppb. The measurements of O3 are compared with the measurements of a non-open-path UV photometry analyzer (UVP). The percent difference (PD) concept and linear regression methods were used to compare the readings of the two instruments. The findings show high correlation coefficients between the measurements of the DOAS and UVP instruments. The DOAS measurements of O3 are found to be less than those measured by the UVP instrument; the correlation coefficients between absolute PD values and meteorological parameters and PM2.5 were very low indicating a minor effect; therefore, titrations of O3 by traffic emissions and difference in elevation could be the reason for the difference in the measurements of the two instruments.

  13. Development of a Ground-Based Differential Absorption Lidar for High Accurate Measurements of Vertical CO2 Concentration Profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagasawa, Chikao; Abo, Makoto; Shibata, Yasukuni; Nagai, Tomohiro; Nakazato, Masahisa; Sakai, Tetsu; Tsukamoto, Makoto; Sakaizawa, Daisuku

    2010-05-01

    High-accurate vertical carbon dioxide (CO2) profiles are highly desirable in the inverse method to improve quantification and understanding of the global sink and source of CO2, and also global climate change. We have developed a ground based 1.6μm differential absorption lidar (DIAL) to achieve high accurate measurements of vertical CO2 profiles in the atmosphere. The DIAL system is constructed from the optical parametric oscillation(OPO) transmitter and the direct detection receiving system that included a near-infrared photomultiplier tube operating at photon counting mode. The primitive DIAL measurement was achieved successfully the vertical CO2 profile up to 7 km altitude with an error less than 1.0 % by integration time of 50 minutes and vertical resolution of 150m. We are developing the next generation 1.6 μm DIAL that can measure simultaneously the vertical CO2 concentration, temperature and pressure profiles in the atmosphere. The output laser of the OPO is 20mJ at a 500 Hz repetition rate and a 600mm diameter telescope is employed for this measurement. A very narrow interference filter (0.5nm FWHM) is used for daytime measurement. As the spectra of absorption lines of any molecules are influenced basically by the temperature and pressure in the atmosphere, it is important to measure them simultaneously so that the better accuracy of the DIAL measurement may be realized. Moreover, the value of the retrieved CO2 concentration will be improved remarkably by processing the iteration assignment of CO2 concentration, temperature and pressure, which measured by DIAL techniques. This work was financially supported by the Japan EOS Promotion Program by the MEXT Japan and System Development Program for Advanced Measurement and Analysis by the JST. Reference D. Sakaizawa, C. Nagasawa, T. Nagai, M. Abo, Y. Shibata, H. Nagai, M. Nakazato, and T. Sakai, Development of a 1.6μm differential absorption lidar with a quasi-phase-matching optical parametric oscillator and

  14. The feasibility of water vapor sounding of the cloudy boundary layer using a differential absorption radar technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebsock, M. D.; Suzuki, K.; Millan, L. F.; Kalmus, P. M.

    2015-06-01

    The feasibility of Differential Absorption Radar (DAR) for the spaceborne remote profiling of water vapor within the cloudy boundary layer is assessed by applying a radar instrument simulator to Large Eddy Simulations (LES). Frequencies near the 183 GHz water vapor absorption line attenuate too strongly to penetrate the large vapor concentrations that are ubiquitous in the boundary layer. However it is shown that lower frequencies between 140 and 170 GHz in the water vapor absorption continuum and on the wings of the absorption line, which are attenuated less efficiently than those near the line center, still have sufficient spectral variation of gaseous attenuation to perform sounding. The high resolution LES allow for assessment of the potential uncertainty in the method due to natural variability in thermodynamic and dynamic variables on scales smaller than the instrument field of view. The (160, 170) GHz frequency pair is suggested to best maximize signal for vapor profiling while minimizing noise due to undesired spectral variation in the target extinction properties. Precision in the derived water vapor is quantified as a function of the range resolution and the instrument precision. Assuming an observational spatial scale of 500 m vertical and 750 m Full Width at Half Maximum (FWHM) horizontal, measurement precision better that 1 g m-3 is achievable for stratocumulus scenes and 3 g m-3 for cumulus scenes given precision in radar reflectivity of 0.16 dBZ. Expected precision in the Column Water Vapor (CWV) is achievable between 0.5 and 2 kg m-2 on these same spatial scales. Sampling efficiency is quantified as a function of radar sensitivity. Mean biases in CWV due to natural variability in the target extinction properties do not exceed 0.25 kg m-2. Potential biases due to uncertainty in the temperature and pressure profile are negligible relative to those resulting from natural variability. Assuming a -35 dBZ minimum detectable signal, 40 % (21.9 %) of

  15. The feasibility of water vapor sounding of the cloudy boundary layer using a differential absorption radar technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebsock, M. D.; Suzuki, K.; Millán, L. F.; Kalmus, P. M.

    2015-09-01

    The feasibility of differential absorption radar (DAR) for the spaceborne remote profiling of water vapor within the cloudy boundary layer is assessed by applying a radar instrument simulator to large eddy simulations (LES). Frequencies near the 183 GHz water vapor absorption line attenuate too strongly to penetrate the large vapor concentrations that are ubiquitous in the boundary layer. However it is shown that lower frequencies between 140 and 170 GHz in the water vapor absorption continuum and on the wings of the absorption line, which are attenuated less efficiently than those near the line center, still have sufficient spectral variation of gaseous attenuation to perform sounding. The high resolution LES allow for assessment of the potential uncertainty in the method due to natural variability in thermodynamic and dynamic variables on scales smaller than the instrument field of view. The (160, 170) GHz frequency pair is suggested to best maximize signal for vapor profiling while minimizing noise due to undesired spectral variation in the target extinction properties. Precision in the derived water vapor is quantified as a function of the range resolution and the instrument precision. Assuming an observational spatial scale of 500 m vertical and 750 m full width at half maximum (FWHM) horizontal, measurement precision better that 1 g m-3 is achievable for stratocumulus scenes and 3 g m-3 for cumulus scenes given precision in radar reflectivity of 0.16 dBZ. Expected precision in the column water vapor (CWV) is achievable between 0.5 and 2 kg m-2 on these same spatial scales. Sampling efficiency is quantified as a function of radar sensitivity. Mean biases in CWV due to natural variability in the target extinction properties do not exceed 0.25 kg m-2. Potential biases due to uncertainty in the temperature and pressure profile are negligible relative to those resulting from natural variability. Assuming a -35 dBZ minimum detectable signal, 40 %(21.9 %) of

  16. Nonlinear-approximation technique for determining vertical ozone-concentration profiles with a differential-absorption lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalev, Vladimir A.; Bristow, Michael P.; McElroy, James L.

    1996-08-01

    A new technique is presented for the retrieval of ozone-concentration profiles (O 3 ) from backscattered signals obtained by a multiwavelength differential-absorption lidar (DIAL). The technique makes it possible to reduce erroneous local fluctuations induced in the ozone-concentration profiles by signal noise and other phenomena such as aerosol inhomogeneity. Before the O 3 profiles are derived, the dominant measurement errors are estimated and uncertainty boundaries for the measured profiles are established. The off- to on-line signal ratio is transformed into an intermediate function, and analytical approximations of the function are then determined. The separation of low- and high-frequency constituents of the measured ozone profile is made by the application of different approximation fits to appropriate intermediate functions. The low-frequency constituents are approximated with a low-order polynomial fit, whereas the high-frequency constituents are approximated with a trigonometric fit. The latter fit makes it possible to correct the measured O 3 profiles in zones of large ozone-concentration gradients where the low-order polynomial fit is found to be insufficient. Application of this technique to experimental data obtained in the lower troposphere shows that erroneous fluctuations induced in the ozone-concentration profile by signal noise and aerosol inhomogeneity undergo a significant reduction in comparison with the results from the conventional technique based on straightforward numerical differentiation.

  17. D-region electron densities obtained by differential absorption and phase measurements with a 3-MHz-Doppler radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singer, W.; Latteck, R.; Friedrich, M.; Dalin, P.; Kirkwood, S.; Engler, N.; Holdsworth, D.

    2005-08-01

    A Doppler radar at 3.17 MHz has been installed close to the Andøya Rocket Range as part of the ALOMAR observatory at Andenes, Norway (69.3°N, 16.0°E) in summer 2002 to improve the ground based capabilities for measurements of small scale features and electron number densities in the mesosphere. The main feature of the new radar is the transmitting/receiving antenna which is arranged as a Mills Cross of 29 crossed half-wave dipoles with a minimum beam width of about 7°. The modular transceiver system provides high flexibility in beam forming and pointing as well as in switching of the polarisation between ordinary and extraordinary mode on transmission and reception. Doppler winds and electron number densities can be measured between about 55 km and 90 km with a time resolution of 9 minutes. The electron number density profiles derived with differential absorption (DAE) and differential phase (DPE) measurements are in remarkable good agreement. We discuss the diurnal and seasonal variability of electron densities obtained at Andenes in 2004/2005, the response of D-region electron densities to geomagnetic disturbances and solar proton events. The results are compared with rocket measurements from Andenes and with observations from EISCAT VHF radar at Tromsø.

  18. Double-pulse 2-μm integrated path differential absorption lidar airborne validation for atmospheric carbon dioxide measurement.

    PubMed

    Refaat, Tamer F; Singh, Upendra N; Yu, Jirong; Petros, Mulugeta; Remus, Ruben; Ismail, Syed

    2016-05-20

    Field experiments were conducted to test and evaluate the initial atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement capability of airborne, high-energy, double-pulsed, 2-μm integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar. This IPDA was designed, integrated, and operated at the NASA Langley Research Center on-board the NASA B-200 aircraft. The IPDA was tuned to the CO2 strong absorption line at 2050.9670 nm, which is the optimum for lower tropospheric weighted column measurements. Flights were conducted over land and ocean under different conditions. The first validation experiments of the IPDA for atmospheric CO2 remote sensing, focusing on low surface reflectivity oceanic surface returns during full day background conditions, are presented. In these experiments, the IPDA measurements were validated by comparison to airborne flask air-sampling measurements conducted by the NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory. IPDA performance modeling was conducted to evaluate measurement sensitivity and bias errors. The IPDA signals and their variation with altitude compare well with predicted model results. In addition, off-off-line testing was conducted, with fixed instrument settings, to evaluate the IPDA systematic and random errors. Analysis shows an altitude-independent differential optical depth offset of 0.0769. Optical depth measurement uncertainty of 0.0918 compares well with the predicted value of 0.0761. IPDA CO2 column measurement compares well with model-driven, near-simultaneous air-sampling measurements from the NOAA aircraft at different altitudes. With a 10-s shot average, CO2 differential optical depth measurement of 1.0054±0.0103 was retrieved from a 6-km altitude and a 4-GHz on-line operation. As compared to CO2 weighted-average column dry-air volume mixing ratio of 404.08 ppm, derived from air sampling, IPDA measurement resulted in a value of 405.22±4.15  ppm with 1.02% uncertainty and

  19. Experimental realization of coherent perfect polarization rotation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Chuanhong; Andrews, James H; Crescimanno, Michael

    2016-05-15

    Coherent perfect processes enable high optical efficiencies in optical conversion phenomena such as coherent perfect absorption or coherent perfect polarization rotation. A linear optical coherent perfect process based on Faraday rotation has been evaluated experimentally, achieving contrast limited by other optical components of the system and demonstrating like-parity resonance doublets above threshold.

  20. Impacts of Uncertainties in Atmospheric State on Differential Absorption Spectroscopy Retrievals of Column XCO2 Mixing Ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaccheo, T.; Pernini, T.; Browell, E. V.; Dobler, J. T.; Harrison, F. W.; Henderson, J.; Ismail, S.; Obland, M. D.

    2013-12-01

    This work assesses the impact of uncertainties in atmospheric state knowledge on laser absorption spectroscopy (LAS) based retrievals of carbon dioxide column mixing ratios (XCO2). LAS estimates of column XCO2 are normally derived from a combination of observed CO2 differential optical depths (ΔOD) and measured, or estimated, values of temperature, moisture and pressure along the viewing path. The observed CO2 differential optical depth from space, associated with a given CO2 spectral feature, is given by ΔOD=∫psfcΔσ(λon, λoff,T,p) η(T,WV,p)dp where Δσ is the CO2 differential absorption cross section, η is the dry air CO2 number density, psfc is the surface pressure, and λon/λoff represent the on/off-line wavelengths. XCO2 is given by XCO2= ΔOD / ∫psfcΔσ(λon, λoff,T,p) dp Both Δσ and η vary as a function of pressure (P) and depend on temperature (T), and water vapor concentration (WV), which vary as a function of pressure. In addition, absorption due to other trace gas features (including water vapor), which are not considered in this simplified formulation, may also impact the observed ΔOD. As illustrated by these equations, the accuracy of retrieved XCO2 values depends not only on the error characteristics of the observed ΔOD, but also the ability to accurately characterize the ,P, T, and WV concentration along the observed path. In the case of global space-based monitoring systems it is often difficult, if not impossible, to provide collocated in situ measurements of the ancillary quantities for all observations. Therefore, retrievals often rely on collocated remotely sensed data or values derived from Numerical Weather Predictions (NWP) models to describe the atmospheric state. A radiative transfer (RT)-based simulation framework, combined with representative global upper-air observations and matched NWP profiles, was used to assess the impact of model differences in vertical temperature, vertical moisture and surface pressure on

  1. Coherent scatter implementation for SimSET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplan, M. S.; Harrison, R. L.; Vannoy, S. D.

    1998-12-01

    At 140 keV, 3% of photon scatter interactions in human tissues are coherent scatter; at Tl-201 emission energies, this fraction increases to approximately 7%. However, since coherent scatter at these energies is sharply forward-peaked, it is often the dominant scatter interaction at small angles. SimSET (Simulation System for Emission Tomography), which previously modeled only photoelectric absorption and Compton scatter, has been extended to include coherent scatter. The current implementation uses form factor and anomalous scattering amplitude data from the Livermore Evaluated Photon Data Library. Interaction probability and angular distribution tables for several human tissues and common detector materials were calculated using the independent atoms approximation and human-tissue composition data from the ICRP Reference Man. These data were also used to generate new tables for photoelectric absorption and Compton scatter, significantly improving the accuracy of SimSET and extending its photon tracking capability to lower photon energy (from 50 keV to 1 keV). The form, content, and structure of the tables were carefully designed for efficient data storage, access, and use by the software. The derived data tables and implementation of coherent scatter were validated by comparing simulation results to published differential cross-section data.

  2. Observation of the Spatial Distribution of BTEX Using a new Long-path Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy Instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stutz, J.; Hurlock, S. C.; Colosimo, S. F.; Tsai, J. Y.; Cheung, R.; Festa, J.; Pikelnaya, O.; Alvarez, S. L.; Flynn, J. H., III; Erickson, M.; Olaguer, E. P.

    2016-12-01

    Accidental releases and fugitive emissions of aromatic hydrocarbons, such as benzene, toluene, ethyl-benzene and xylenes (often summarized as BTEX), from petrochemical facilities have received considerable attention in recent years due their well-known detrimental impact on human health. Monitoring these compounds at facility fencelines or on a neighborhood scale remains a substantial challenge. New methods that allow automated long-term around-the-clock measurements of BTEX are thus needed. In addition, observations that allow identification and quantification of specific emission sources are highly desirable to reduce trace gas emissions from such sources. Long-path Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (LP-DOAS) of BTEX offers the unique capability to provide these measurements, but has only been used sporadically in research applications. Here we present a novel dual-LED LP-DOAS instrument specifically designed for the automated observation of BTEX. We discuss the performance of the system as an automated long-term fenceline monitor at a petrochemical facility, which is capable of detecting BTEX compounds at mixing ratios down to 0.5 - 1 part-per-billion. In winter 2015, two LP-DOAS instruments measured BTEX concentrations along multiple crossing absorption paths in a neighborhood adjacent to a refinery during the Benzene and other Toxics Exposure (BEE-TEX) Study in Houston, TX. The analysis of two emission events of toluene and xylenes using 4Dvar data assimilation and an adjoint of a micro-scale air quality model demonstrate how this setup can be used to derive the spatial distribution of aromatic hydrocarbons and identify point sources.

  3. Initial results from a water vapor differential absorption lidar (DIAL) using a widely tunable amplified diode laser source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obland, Michael D.; Nehrir, Amin R.; Repasky, Kevin S.; Shaw, Joseph A.; Carlsten, John L.

    2007-09-01

    It is widely agreed that water vapor is one of the most important gasses in the atmosphere with regards to its role in local weather, global climate, and the water cycle. Especially with the growing concern for understanding and predicting global climate change, detailed data of water vapor distribution and flux and related feedback mechanisms in the lowest 3 km of the troposphere, where most of the atmospheric water vapor resides, are required to aid in climate models. Improved capabilities to monitor range-resolved tropospheric water vapor profiles continuously in time at many locations are needed. One method of obtaining this data in the boundary layer with improved vertical resolution relative to passive remote sensors is with a Differential Absorption LIDAR (DIAL) utilizing a compact laser diode source. Montana State University, with the expertise of its laser source development group, has developed a compact water vapor DIAL system that utilizes a widely tunable amplified external cavity diode laser (ECDL) transmitter. This transmitter has the ability to tune across a 17 nm spectrum near 830 nm, allowing it access to multiple water vapor absorption lines of varying strengths. A novel tuning system tunes and holds the ECDL to within +/- 88 MHz (0.20 pm) of the selected wavelength. The ECDL acts as a seed source for two commercial cascaded tapered amplifiers. The receiver uses commercially available optics and a fiber-coupled Avalanche Photodiode (APD) detector. Initial nighttime measurements of water vapor profiles taken over Bozeman, Montana, with comparisons to radiosonde-derived profiles will be presented.

  4. MO-F-CAMPUS-I-04: Characterization of Fan Beam Coded Aperture Coherent Scatter Spectral Imaging Methods for Differentiation of Normal and Neoplastic Breast Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, R; Albanese, K; Lakshmanan, M; Greenberg, J; Kapadia, A

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: This study intends to characterize the spectral and spatial resolution limits of various fan beam geometries for differentiation of normal and neoplastic breast structures via coded aperture coherent scatter spectral imaging techniques. In previous studies, pencil beam raster scanning methods using coherent scatter computed tomography and selected volume tomography have yielded excellent results for tumor discrimination. However, these methods don’t readily conform to clinical constraints; primarily prolonged scan times and excessive dose to the patient. Here, we refine a fan beam coded aperture coherent scatter imaging system to characterize the tradeoffs between dose, scan time and image quality for breast tumor discrimination. Methods: An X-ray tube (125kVp, 400mAs) illuminated the sample with collimated fan beams of varying widths (3mm to 25mm). Scatter data was collected via two linear-array energy-sensitive detectors oriented parallel and perpendicular to the beam plane. An iterative reconstruction algorithm yields images of the sample’s spatial distribution and respective spectral data for each location. To model in-vivo tumor analysis, surgically resected breast tumor samples were used in conjunction with lard, which has a form factor comparable to adipose (fat). Results: Quantitative analysis with current setup geometry indicated optimal performance for beams up to 10mm wide, with wider beams producing poorer spatial resolution. Scan time for a fixed volume was reduced by a factor of 6 when scanned with a 10mm fan beam compared to a 1.5mm pencil beam. Conclusion: The study demonstrates the utility of fan beam coherent scatter spectral imaging for differentiation of normal and neoplastic breast tissues has successfully reduced dose and scan times whilst sufficiently preserving spectral and spatial resolution. Future work to alter the coded aperture and detector geometries could potentially allow the use of even wider fans, thereby making coded

  5. Differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) and air mass factor concept for a multiply scattering vertically inhomogeneous medium: theoretical consideration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozanov, V. V.; Rozanov, A. V.

    2010-06-01

    The Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) technique is widely used to retrieve amounts of atmospheric species from measurements of the direct solar light transmitted through the Earth's atmosphere as well as of the solar light scattered in the atmosphere or reflected from the Earth's surface. For the transmitted direct solar light the theoretical basis of the DOAS technique represented by the Beer-Lambert law is well studied. In contrast, scarcely investigated is the theoretical basis and validity range of the DOAS method for those cases where the contribution of the multiple scattering processes is not negligible. Our study is intended to fill this gap by means of a theoretical investigation of the applicability of the DOAS technique for the retrieval of amounts of atmospheric species from observations of the scattered solar light with a non-negligible contribution of the multiple scattering. Starting from the expansion of the intensity logarithm in the functional Taylor series we formulate the general form of the DOAS equation. The thereby introduced variational derivative of the intensity logarithm with respect to the variation of the gaseous absorption coefficient, which is often referred to as the weighting function, is demonstrated to be closely related to the air mass factor. Employing some approximations we show that the general DOAS equation can be rewritten in the form of the weighting function (WFDOAS), the modified (MDOAS), and the standard DOAS equations. For each of these forms a specific equation for the air mass factor follows which, in general, is not suitable for other forms of the DOAS equation. Furthermore, the validity range of the standard DOAS equation is quantitatively investigated using a suggested criterion of a weak absorption. The results presented in this study are intended to provide a basis for a better understanding of the applicability range of different forms of the DOAS equation as well as of the relationship between

  6. Differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) and air mass factor concept for a multiply scattering vertically inhomogeneous medium: theoretical consideration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozanov, V. V.; Rozanov, A. V.

    2010-02-01

    The Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) technique is widely used to retrieve amounts of atmospheric species from measurements of the direct solar light transmitted through the Earth's atmosphere as well as of the solar light scattered in the atmosphere or reflected from the Earth's surface. For the transmitted direct solar light the theoretical basis of the DOAS technique represented by the Beer-Lambert law is well studied. In contrast, scarcely investigated is the theoretical basis and validity range of the DOAS method for those cases where the contribution of the multiple scattering processes is not negligible. Our study is intended to fill this gap by means of a theoretical investigation of the applicability of the DOAS technique for the retrieval of amounts of atmospheric species from observations of the scattered solar light with a non-negligible contribution of the multiple scattering. Starting from the expansion of the intensity logarithm in the functional Taylor series we formulate the general form of the DOAS equation. The thereby introduced variational derivative of the intensity logarithm with respect to the variation of the gaseous absorption coefficient, which is often referred to as the weighting function, is demonstrated to be closely related to the air mass factor. Employing some approximations we show that the general DOAS equation can be rewritten in the form of the weighting function (WFDOAS), the modified (MDOAS), and the standard DOAS equations. For each of these forms a specific equation for the air mass factor follows which, in general, is not suitable for other forms of the DOAS equation. Furthermore, the validity range of the standard DOAS equation is quantitatively investigated using a suggested criterion of a weak absorption. The results presented in this study are intended to provide a basis for a better understanding of the applicability range of different forms of the DOAS equation as well as of the relationship between

  7. Altered nitrogen metabolism associated with de-differentiated suspension cultures derived from root cultures of Datura stramonium studied by heteronuclear multiple bond coherence (HMBC) NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Fliniaux, Ophélie; Mesnard, François; Raynaud-Le Grandic, Sophie; Baltora-Rosset, Sylvie; Bienaimé, Christophe; Robins, Richard J; Fliniaux, Marc-André

    2004-05-01

    De-differentiation of transformed root cultures of Datura stramonium has previously been shown to cause a loss of tropane alkaloid synthetic capacity. This indicates a marked shift in physiological status, notably in the flux of primary metabolites into tropane alkaloids. Nitrogen metabolism in transformed root cultures of D. stramonium (an alkaloid-producing system) and de-differentiated suspension cultures derived therefrom (a non-producing system) has been compared using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. (15)N-Labelled precursors [((15)NH(4))(2)SO(4) and K(15)NO(3)] were fed and their incorporation into nitrogenous metabolites studied using Heteronuclear Multiple Bond Coherence (HMBC) NMR spectroscopy. In both cultures, the same amino acids were resolved in the HMBC spectra. However, marked differences were found in the intensity of labelling of a range of nitrogenous compounds. In differentiated root cultures, cross-peaks corresponding to secondary metabolites, such as tropine, were observed, whereas these were absent in the de-differentiated cultures. By contrast, N- acetylputrescine and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) accumulated in the de-differentiated cultures to a much larger extent than in the root cultures. It can therefore be suggested that the loss of alkaloid biosynthesis was compensated by the diversion of putrescine metabolism away from the tropane pathway and toward the synthesis of GABA via N-acetylputrescine.

  8. The identification and differentiation of secondary colorectal cancer in human liver tissue using X-ray fluorescence, coherent scatter spectroscopy, and multivariate analysis.

    PubMed

    Darvish-Molla, Sahar; Al-Ebraheem, Alia; Farquharson, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    Secondary colorectal liver cancer is the most widespread malignancy in patients with colorectal cancer. The aim of this study is to identify and differentiate between normal liver tissue and malignant secondary colorectal liver cancer tissue using X-ray scattering and X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy to investigate the best combination of data that can be used to enable classification of these two tissue types. X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and coherent scatter data were collected for 24 normal and 24 tumor matched pair tissue samples. The levels of 12 elements (P, S, K, Ca, Cr, Fe, Cu, Zn, As, Se, Br, and Rb) were measured in all samples. When comparisons were made between normal and tumor tissues, statistically significant differences were determined for K (p = 0.046), Ca (p = 0.040), Cr (p = 0.011), Fe, Cu, Zn, Br, and Rb (p < 0.01). However, for P, S, As, and Se, no statistically significant differences were found (p > 0.05). For the coherent scatter spectra collected, three peaks due to adipose, fibrous content, and water content of tissue were observed. The amplitude, full width half-maximum, and area under both fibrous content and water content peaks were found to be significantly higher in secondary colorectal liver tumors compared with surrounding normal liver tissue (p < 0.05). However, no significant differences were found for the adipose peak parameters (p > 0.05). Soft independent modeling of class analogy was performed using the XRF, coherent scatter, and elemental ratio data separately, and the accuracy of the classification of 20 unknown samples was found to be 50, 30, and 80%, respectively. Further analysis has shown that using a combination of the XRF and coherent scatter data in a single combined model gave improved normal and tumor liver tissue classification, with an accuracy that was found to be 85%.

  9. Differential phase-contrast, swept-source optical coherence tomography at 1060 nm for in vivo human retinal and choroidal vasculature visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motaghiannezam, S. M. Reza; Koos, David; Fraser, Scott E.

    2012-02-01

    Human retinal and choroidal vasculature was visualized by a differential phase-contrast (DPC) method using high-speed, swept-source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT) at 1060 nm. The vasculature was recognized as regions of motion by creating differential phase-variance (DPV) tomograms: multiple B-scans of individual slices through the retina were collected and the variance of the phase differences was calculated. DPV captured the small vessels and the meshwork of capillaries associated with the inner retina in en-face images over 4 mm2. The swept-source laser at 1060 nm offered the needed phase sensitivity to perform DPV and generated en-face images that capture motion in the inner choroidal layer exceeding the capabilities of previous spectrometer-based instruments. In comparison with the power Doppler phase-shift method, DPV provided better visualization of the foveal avascular zone in en-face images.

  10. Differential Sound Absorption Technique and Effect of Ion-Pairing and Pressure on Sound Absorption in Seawater and Aqueous Mixtures of Magnesium Sulfate and sodium Chloride.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-11-01

    Ws Sound absorption, seawater, ion-pairing, pressure, ion-association models, MgSo4 solutions, MgS0 4 - MaC1 mixtures, Debye - Huckel theory . 20...solution upon the addition of NaCI can be accounted for theoretically by Debye - Huckel theory and by formation of MgCW and NaSO ion-pairs. The measured...M NaCl addition. For 0.6M NaCI addition to 0.02 M MgS04, the absorption results cannot be explained by either simple Debye - Huckel theory , the Johnson

  11. Investigation of PBL schemes combining the WRF model simulations with scanning water vapor differential absorption lidar measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milovac, Josipa; Warrach-Sagi, Kirsten; Behrendt, Andreas; Späth, Florian; Ingwersen, Joachim; Wulfmeyer, Volker

    2016-01-01

    Six simulations with the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model differing in planetary boundary layer (PBL) schemes and land surface models (LSMs) are investigated in a case study in western Germany during clear-sky weather conditions. The simulations were performed at 2 km resolution with two local and two nonlocal PBL schemes, combined with two LSMs (NOAH and NOAH-MP). Resulting convective boundary layer (CBL) features are investigated in combination with high-resolution water vapor differential absorption lidar measurements at an experimental area. Further, the simulated soil-vegetation-atmosphere feedback processes are quantified applying a mixing diagram approach. The investigation shows that the nonlocal PBL schemes simulate a deeper and drier CBL than the local schemes. Furthermore, the application of different LSMs reveals that the entrainment of dry air depends on the energy partitioning at the land surface. The study demonstrates that the impact of processes occurring at the land surface is not constrained to the lower CBL but extends up to the interfacial layer and the lower troposphere. With respect to the choice of the LSM, the discrepancies in simulating a diurnal change of the humidity profiles are even more significant at the interfacial layer than close to the land surface. This indicates that the representation of land surface processes has a significant impact on the simulation of mixing properties within the CBL.

  12. First measurements of a carbon dioxide plume from an industrial source using a ground based mobile differential absorption lidar.

    PubMed

    Robinson, R A; Gardiner, T D; Innocenti, F; Finlayson, A; Woods, P T; Few, J F M

    2014-08-01

    The emission of carbon dioxide (CO2) from industrial sources is one of the main anthropogenic contributors to the greenhouse effect. Direct remote sensing of CO2 emissions using optical methods offers the potential for the identification and quantification of CO2 emissions. We report the development and demonstration of a ground based mobile differential absorption lidar (DIAL) able to measure the mass emission rate of CO2 in the plume from a power station. To our knowledge DIAL has not previously been successfully applied to the measurement of emission plumes of CO2 from industrial sources. A significant challenge in observing industrial CO2 emission plumes is the ability to discriminate and observe localised concentrations of CO2 above the locally observed background level. The objectives of the study were to modify our existing mobile infrared DIAL system to enable CO2 measurements and to demonstrate the system at a power plant to assess the feasibility of the technique for the identification and quantification of CO2 emissions. The results of this preliminary study showed very good agreement with the expected emissions calculated by the site. The detection limit obtained from the measurements, however, requires further improvement to provide quantification of smaller emitters of CO2, for example for the detection of fugitive emissions. This study has shown that in principle, remote optical sensing technology will have the potential to provide useful direct data on CO2 mass emission rates.

  13. Monitoring of atmospheric nitrogen dioxide by long-path pulsed differential optical absorption spectroscopy using two different light paths.

    PubMed

    Kambe, Yasuaki; Yoshii, Yotsumi; Takahashi, Kenshi; Tonokura, Kenichi

    2012-03-01

    Measurements of the local distribution of atmospheric nitrogen dioxide (NO(2)) by long-path pulsed differential optical absorption spectroscopy (LP-PDOAS) in Tokyo during August 2008 are presented. Two LP-PDOAS systems simultaneously measured average NO(2) temporal mixing ratios along two different paths from a single observation point. Two flashing aviation obstruction lights, located 7.0 km north and 6.3 km east from the observation point, were used as light sources, allowing spatiotemporal variations of NO(2) in Tokyo to be inferred. The LP-PDOAS data were compared with ground-based data measured using chemiluminescence. Surface wind data indicated that large inhomogeneities were present in the spatial NO(2) distributions under southerly wind conditions, while northerly wind conditions displayed greater homogeneity between the two systems. The higher correlation in the NO(2) mixing ratio between the two LP-PDOAS systems was observed under northerly wind conditions with a correlation factor R(2) = 0.88. We demonstrated that the combined deployment of two LP-PDOAS systems oriented in different directions provides detailed information on the spatial distribution of NO(2).

  14. Observation of halogen species in the Amundsen Gulf, Arctic, by active long-path differential optical absorption spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Pöhler, Denis; Vogel, Leif; Frieß, Udo; Platt, Ulrich

    2010-01-01

    In the polar tropospheric boundary layer, reactive halogen species (RHS) are responsible for ozone depletion as well as the oxidation of elemental mercury and dimethyl sulphide. After polar sunrise, air masses enriched in reactive bromine cover areas of several million square kilometers. Still, the source and release mechanisms of halogens are not completely understood. We report measurements of halogen oxides performed in the Amundsen Gulf, Arctic, during spring 2008. Active long-path differential optical absorption spectroscopy (LP-DOAS) measurements were set up offshore, several kilometers from the coast, directly on the sea ice, which was never done before. High bromine oxide concentrations were detected frequently during sunlight hours with a characteristic daily cycle showing morning and evening maxima and a minimum at noon. The, so far, highest observed average mixing ratio in the polar boundary layer of 41 pmol/mol (equal to pptv) was detected. Only short sea ice contact is required to release high amounts of bromine. An observed linear decrease of maximum bromine oxide levels with ambient temperature during sunlight, between -24 °C and -15 °C, provides indications on the conditions required for the emission of RHS. In addition, the data indicate the presence of reactive chlorine in the Arctic boundary layer. In contrast to Antarctica, iodine oxide was not detected above a detection limit of 0.3 pmol/mol. PMID:20160121

  15. Wave optics simulation of atmospheric turbulence and reflective speckle effects in CO{sub 2} differential absorption LIDAR (DIAL)

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, D.H.; Petrin, R.R.; MacKerrow, E.P.; Schmitt, M.J.; Quick, C.R.; Zardecki, A.; Porch, W.M.; Whitehead, M.; Walters, D.L.

    1998-09-01

    The measurement sensitivity of CO{sub 2} differential absorption LIDAR (DIAL) can be affected by a number of different processes. The authors address the interaction of two of these processes: effects due to beam propagation through atmospheric turbulence and effects due to reflective speckle. Atmospheric turbulence affects the beam distribution of energy and phase on target. These effects include beam spreading, beam wander and scintillation which can result in increased shot-to-shot signal noise. In addition, reflective speckle alone has a major impact on the sensitivity of CO{sub 2} DIAL. The interaction of atmospheric turbulence and reflective speckle is of great importance in the performance of a DIAL system. A Huygens-Fresnel wave optics propagation code has previously been developed at the Naval Postgraduate School that models the effects of atmospheric turbulence as propagation through a series of phase screens with appropriate atmospheric statistical characteristics. This code has been modified to include the effects of reflective speckle. The performance of this modified code with respect to the combined effects of atmospheric turbulence and reflective speckle is examined. Results are compared with a combination of experimental data and analytical models.

  16. Quantification and parametrization of non-linearity effects by higher-order sensitivity terms in scattered light differential optical absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puķīte, Jānis; Wagner, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    We address the application of differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) of scattered light observations in the presence of strong absorbers (in particular ozone), for which the absorption optical depth is a non-linear function of the trace gas concentration. This is the case because Beer-Lambert law generally does not hold for scattered light measurements due to many light paths contributing to the measurement. While in many cases linear approximation can be made, for scenarios with strong absorptions non-linear effects cannot always be neglected. This is especially the case for observation geometries, for which the light contributing to the measurement is crossing the atmosphere under spatially well-separated paths differing strongly in length and location, like in limb geometry. In these cases, often full retrieval algorithms are applied to address the non-linearities, requiring iterative forward modelling of absorption spectra involving time-consuming wavelength-by-wavelength radiative transfer modelling. In this study, we propose to describe the non-linear effects by additional sensitivity parameters that can be used e.g. to build up a lookup table. Together with widely used box air mass factors (effective light paths) describing the linear response to the increase in the trace gas amount, the higher-order sensitivity parameters eliminate the need for repeating the radiative transfer modelling when modifying the absorption scenario even in the presence of a strong absorption background. While the higher-order absorption structures can be described as separate fit parameters in the spectral analysis (so-called DOAS fit), in practice their quantitative evaluation requires good measurement quality (typically better than that available from current measurements). Therefore, we introduce an iterative retrieval algorithm correcting for the higher-order absorption structures not yet considered in the DOAS fit as well as the absorption dependence on

  17. Coherent nuclear wavepacket motions in ultrafast excited-state intramolecular proton transfer: sub-30-fs resolved pump-probe absorption spectroscopy of 10-hydroxybenzo[h]quinoline in solution.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Satoshi; Tahara, Tahei

    2005-11-17

    The dynamics of the excited-state intramolecular proton transfer of 10-hydroxybenzo[h]quinoline (10-HBQ) and the associated coherent nuclear motion were investigated in solution by femtosecond absorption spectroscopy. Sub-picosecond transient absorption measurements revealed spectral features of the stimulated emission and absorption of the keto excited state (the product of the reaction). The stimulated emission band appeared in the 600-800-nm region, corresponding to the wavelength region of the steady-state keto fluorescence. It showed successive temporal changes with time constants of 350 fs and 8.3 ps and then disappeared with the lifetime of the keto excited state (260 ps). The spectral feature of the stimulated emission changed in the 350-fs dynamics, which was likely assignable to the intramolecular vibrational energy redistribution in the keto excited state. The 8.3-ps change caused a spectral blue shift and was attributed to the vibrational cooling process. The excited-state absorption was observed in the 400-600-nm region, and it also showed temporal changes characterized by the 350-fs and 8.3-ps components. To examine the coherent nuclear dynamics (nuclear wavepacket motion) in excited-state 10-HBQ, we carried out pump-probe measurements of the stimulated emission and absorption signals with time resolution as good as 27 fs. The obtained data showed substantially modulated signals due to the excited-state vibrational coherence up to a delay time of several picoseconds after photoexcitation. This means that the vibrational coherence created by photoexcitation in the enol excited state is transferred to the product. Fourier transform analysis indicated that four frequency components in the 200-700-cm(-1) region contribute to the oscillatory signal, corresponding to the coherent nuclear motions in excited-state 10-HBQ. Especially, the lowest-frequency mode at 242 cm(-1) is dephased significantly faster than the other three modes. This observation was

  18. A differential absorption lidar instrument for the measurment of carbon dioxide and methane in the lower troposphere (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budinov, Daniel; Clements, Robert; Rae, Cameron F.; Moncrieff, John B.; Jack, James W.

    2016-12-01

    Developments in the remote detection of trace gases in the atmosphere using Differential Absorption Lidar have been driven largely by improvements in two key technologies: lasers and detectors. We have designed and built a narrow linewidth pulsed laser source with a well-controlled output wavelength and sufficient pulse energy to measure the concentration profile of CO2 and CH4 to a range in excess of 4km. We describe here the initial measurements of concentration profiles recorded with this instrument. The system is built around a custom-designed Newtonian telescope with a 40cm diameter primary mirror. Laser sources and detectors attach directly to the side of the telescope allowing for flexible customization with a range of additional equipment. The instrument features an all-solid-state laser source based on an optical parametric oscillator (OPO) pumped by an YLF based diode-laser pumped solid-state laser and seeded by a tuned DFB seed. This provides a range of available wavelengths suitable for DIAL within the 1.5-1.6 μm spectral region. The output of the OPO is beam expanded and transmitted coaxially from the receiver telescope. A gas cell within the laser source controls the seed wavelength and allows the wavelength to be tuned to match a specific absorption feature of the selected gas species. The source can be rapidly tuned between the on-line and off-line wavelengths to make a DIAL measurement of either CO2 or CH4 The receiver is based on an InGaAs avalanche photodetector. Whilst photodiode detectors are a low-cost solution their limited sensitivity restricts the maximum range over which a signal can be detected. The receiver signal is digitised for subsequent processing to produce a sightline concentration profile. The instrument is mounted on a robust gimballed mount providing full directional movement within the upper hemisphere. Both static pointing and angular scan modes are available. Accurate angular position is available giving the sightline

  19. [Studies on the determination of the flux of gaseous pollutant from an area by passive differential optical absorption spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Li, Ang; Xie, Pin-Hua; Liu, Wen-Qing; Liu, Jian-Guo; Dou, Ke

    2009-01-01

    An optical remote sensing method based on passive differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) for the determination of the flux of SO2 or other gaseous pollutants from an area (such as industrial area, city) which includes many different atmospheric pollution sources was studied in the present paper. Passive DOAS using the zenith scattered sunlight as the light source provides the column density (the integrated concentration of atmospheric absorbers along the light path) and has been successfully applied to the determination of the flux of gaseous pollutants emitted from the volcano or point source. Passive DOAS instrument installed in a car scanned the plume emitted from an area by circling around the area in this paper. Column density of each selected gaseous pollutant was retrieved from zenith scattered sunlight spectra collected by the instrument by spectral analysis method of passive DOAS in their particular absorption spectral range respectively. Combined with the meteorological (wind field) information during the period of measurement, the net flux value of gaseous pollutant from this area during the measurement could be estimated. DOAS method used to obtain the column density of gaseous pollutant in the section plane of the plume emitted from source and the method of net flux calculation of gaseous pollutant from a certain area are described. Also a passive DOAS instrument was developed and installed in a car to scan the gaseous pollutants from the area surrounded by the 5th Ring Road in Beijing city during a field campaign in the summer of 2005. The SO2 net flux 1.13 x 10(4) kg x h(-1) and NO2 net flux 9.3 x 10(3) kg x h(-1) from this area were derived separately after the passive DOAS measured the entire ring road and the wind data were roughly estimated from wind profile radar. The results indicate that this optical remote sensing method based on passive DOAS can be used to rapidly determine the flux of gaseous pollutant (such as SO2, NO2

  20. A new calibration system for lightweight, compact and mobile Cavity-Enhanced Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zielcke, Johannes; Horbanski, Martin; Pöhler, Denis; Frieß, Udo; Platt, Ulrich

    2013-04-01

    Absorption Spectroscopy has been employed for several decades now to study the earth's atmosphere. While the focus has been on remote sensing for a long time, lately there has been a renewed interest in in-situ methods, as point measurements allow an easier interpretation for highly inhomogeneous distributions of gases of interest compared to the integration approach of most remote sensing methods. One comparatively new method offering both advantages of in-situ measurements as well as being contactless is open-path Cavity-Enhanced Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (CE-DOAS). Broadband open-path CE-DOAS instruments have been used for ten years now, and in the meantime allow the measurement of numerous atmospheric trace gases (e.g. NO2, NO3, IO, CHOCHO, HCHO). While those instruments were bulky and not very mobile at first, recent developments resulted in relatively lightweight (< 30 kg) instruments with a relatively low power consumption allowing mobile open-path measurements at remote field locations. An important operational issue has been the path length calibration in the field, necessary for the determination of the concentration of measured gases. Until now, often calibration gases were used with different scattering properties than air or known concentrations. However this methods has several major shortcomings, being rather inconvenient and cumbersome in the field with the need for compressed gas cylinders, as well as time consuming, preventing a quick check of the state of the instrument in the field after changing measurement locations. Here we present a new wavelength-resolved method for broadband CE-DOAS path length calibration. A small, custom made ring-down system is employed with a pulsed LED as light source. The wavelength is then resolved by tilting a narrow band interference filter. The system not only allows quick, automated path length calibrations without physical interaction on the instrument, but also saves weight, space and the

  1. Two instruments based on differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) to measure accurate ammonia concentrations in the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volten, H.; Bergwerff, J. B.; Haaima, M.; Lolkema, D. E.; Berkhout, A. J. C.; van der Hoff, G. R.; Potma, C. J. M.; Wichink Kruit, R. J.; van Pul, W. A. J.; Swart, D. P. J.

    2011-08-01

    We present two Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) instruments built at RIVM, the RIVM DOAS and the miniDOAS. Both instruments provide virtually interference free measurements of NH3 concentrations in the atmosphere, since they measure over an open path, without suffering from inlet problems or interference problems by ammonium aerosols dissociating on tubes or filters. They measure concentrations up to at least 200 μg m-3, have a fast response, low maintenance demands, and a high up-time. The RIVM DOAS has a high accuracy of typically 0.15 μg m-3 for ammonia over 5-min averages and over a total light path of 100 m. The miniDOAS has been developed for application in measurement networks such as the Dutch National Air Quality Monitoring Network (LML). Compared to the RIVM DOAS it has a similar accuracy, but is significantly reduced in size, costs, and handling complexity. The RIVM DOAS and miniDOAS results showed excellent agreement (R2 = 0.996) during a field measurement campaign in Vredepeel, the Netherlands. This measurement site is located in an agricultural area and is characterized by highly variable, but on average high ammonia concentrations in the air. The RIVM-DOAS and miniDOAS results were compared to the results of the AMOR instrument, a continuous-flow wet denuder system, which is currently used in the LML. Averaged over longer time spans of typically a day the (mini)DOAS and AMOR results agree reasonably well, although an offset of the AMOR values compared to the (mini)DOAS results exists. On short time scales the (mini)DOAS shows a faster response and does not show the memory effects due to inlet tubing and transport of absorption fluids encountered by the AMOR. Due to its high accuracy, high uptime, low maintenance and its open path, the (mini)DOAS shows a good potential for flux measurements by using two (or more) systems in a gradient set-up and applying the aerodynamic gradient technique.

  2. Two instruments based on differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) to measure accurate ammonia concentrations in the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volten, H.; Bergwerff, J. B.; Haaima, M.; Lolkema, D. E.; Berkhout, A. J. C.; van der Hoff, G. R.; Potma, C. J. M.; Wichink Kruit, R. J.; van Pul, W. A. J.; Swart, D. P. J.

    2012-02-01

    We present two Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) instruments built at RIVM: the RIVM DOAS and the miniDOAS. Both instruments provide virtually interference-free measurements of NH3 concentrations in the atmosphere, since they measure over an open path, without suffering from inlet problems or interference problems by ammonium aerosols dissociating on tubes or filters. They measure concentrations up to at least 200 μg m-3, have a fast response, low maintenance demands, and a high up-time. The RIVM DOAS has a high accuracy of typically 0.15 μg m-3 for ammonia for 5-min averages and over a total light path of 100 m. The miniDOAS has been developed for application in measurement networks such as the Dutch National Air Quality Monitoring Network (LML). Compared to the RIVM DOAS it has a similar accuracy, but is significantly reduced in size, costs, and handling complexity. The RIVM DOAS and miniDOAS results showed excellent agreement (R2 = 0.996) during a field measurement campaign in Vredepeel, the Netherlands. This measurement site is located in an agricultural area and is characterized by highly variable, but on average high ammonia concentrations in the air. The RIVM-DOAS and miniDOAS results were compared to the results of the AMOR instrument, a continuous-flow wet denuder system, which is currently used in the LML. Averaged over longer time spans of typically a day, the (mini)DOAS and AMOR results agree reasonably well, although an offset of the AMOR values compared to the (mini)DOAS results exists. On short time scales, the (mini)DOAS shows a faster response and does not show the memory effects due to inlet tubing and transport of absorption fluids encountered by the AMOR. Due to its high accuracy, high uptime, low maintenance and its open path, the (mini)DOAS shows a good potential for flux measurements by using two (or more) systems in a gradient set-up and applying the aerodynamic gradient technique.

  3. Apparatus and method for quantitative measurement of small differences in optical absorptivity between two samples using differential interferometry and the thermooptic effect

    DOEpatents

    Cremers, D.A.; Keller, R.A.

    1984-05-08

    An apparatus and method for the measurement of small differences in optical absorptivity of weakly absorbing solutions using differential interferometry and the thermooptic effect have been developed. Two sample cells are placed in each arm of an interferometer and are traversed by colinear probe and heating laser beams. The interrogation probe beams are recombined forming a fringe pattern, the intensity of which can be related to changes in optical path length of these laser beams through the cells. This in turn can be related to small differences in optical absorptivity which results in different amounts of sample heating when the heating laser beams are turned on, by the fact that the index of refraction of a liquid is temperature dependent. A critical feature of this invention is the stabilization of the optical path of the probe beams against drift. Background (solvent) absorption can then be suppressed by a factor of approximately 400. Solute absorptivities of about 10[sup [minus]5] cm[sup [minus]1] can then be determined in the presence of background absorptions in excess of 10[sup [minus]3] cm[sup [minus]1]. In addition, the smallest absorption measured with the instant apparatus and method is about 5 [times] 10[sup [minus]6] cm[sup [minus]1]. 6 figs.

  4. Apparatus and method for quantitative measurement of small differences in optical absorptivity between two samples using differential interferometry and the thermooptic effect

    DOEpatents

    Cremers, David A.; Keller, Richard A.

    1984-01-01

    An apparatus and method for the measurement of small differences in optical absorptivity of weakly absorbing solutions using differential interferometry and the thermooptic effect has been developed. Two sample cells are placed in each arm of an interferometer and are traversed by colinear probe and heating laser beams. The interrogation probe beams are recombined forming a fringe pattern, the intensity of which can be related to changes in optical pathlength of these laser beams through the cells. This in turn can be related to small differences in optical absorptivity which results in different amounts of sample heating when the heating laser beams are turned on, by the fact that the index of refraction of a liquid is temperature dependent. A critical feature of this invention is the stabilization of the optical path of the probe beams against drift. Background (solvent) absorption can then be suppressed by a factor of approximately 400. Solute absorptivities of about 10.sup.-5 cm.sup.-1 can then be determined in the presence of background absorptions in excess of 10.sup.-3 cm.sup.-1. In addition, the smallest absorption measured with the instant apparatus and method is about 5.times. 10.sup.-6 cm.sup.-1.

  5. Apparatus and method for quantitative measurement of small differences in optical absorptivity between two samples using differential interferometry and the thermooptic effect

    DOEpatents

    Cremers, D.A.; Keller, R.A.

    1982-06-08

    An apparatus and method for the measurement of small differences in optical absorptivity of weakly absorbing solutions using differential interferometry and the thermooptic effect has been developed. Two sample cells are placed in each arm of an interferometer and are traversed by colinear probe and heating laser beams. The interrogation probe beams are recombined forming a fringe pattern, the intensity of which can be related to changes in optical pathlength of these laser beams through the cells. This in turn can be related to small differences in optical absorptivity which results in different amounts of sample heating when the heating laser beams are turned on, by the fact that the index of refraction of a liquid is temperature dependent. A critical feature of this invention is the stabilization of the optical path of the probe beams against drift. Background (solvent) absorption can then be suppressed by a factor of approximately 400. Solute absorptivities of about 10/sup -5/ cm/sup -1/ can then be determined in the presence of background absorptions in excess of 10/sup -3/ cm/sup -1/. In addition, the smallest absorption measured with the instant apparatus and method is about 5 x 10/sup -6/ cm/sup -1/.

  6. Climatology and Dynamics of Water Vapor: Three Years of Sounding with the Differential Absorption Lidar on Mt. Zugspitze

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogelmann, Hannes; Trickl, Thomas

    2010-05-01

    Water vapor is the the most important greenhouse gas and its vertical distribution plays a major role for the radiative balance. In particular in the upper troposphere the radiative transfer is very sensitive to small changes of the water-vapor concentration. At the same time the water-vapor distribution strongly depends on atmospheric dynamics and, thus, can serve as a good tracer for airmass histories. In order to access water-vapor profiles with a high resolution in time (typically 15 min) and a high vertical resolution (50 m to 300 m) throughout the free troposphere (3 km to 12 km a.s.l.) a differential absorption lidar (DIAL) system with excellent daytime capability has been developed and installed at the Schneefernerhaus research station (UFS) on Mt. Zugspitze (Germany) at an altitude of 2675 m a.s.l. (Vogelmann and Trickl 2008). The DIAL system is in routine operation since January 2007 and recording water-vapor profiles on one or two days a week. We present results from the first three years of operation. A climatology is derived and different water-vapor profile-types are assigned to typical large-scale atmospheric circulation patterns as well as to local-scale circulation patterns for the lower altitudes, in particular in the summer season, when the orographic convection reaches altitudes higher than 3 km a.s.l.. Particular attention is spent on stratospheric air intrusion events, which exhibit a maximum at the Alpine summit levels during the winter season (Trickl et al., 2010). Based on daily intrusion forecast-model by ETH Zürich simultaneousmeasurements with the water-vapor DIAL and the ozone-lidar at Garmisch-Partenkirchen have been carried out. In combination also with the in-situ measurements at the Zugspitze summit several intrusions have been very well characterized. In one exciting case a large-scale stratospheric intrusion took place during a lidar intercomparison campaign (LUAMI 2008) with an airborne DIAL. The intrusion layer was mapped by

  7. A new Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy instrument to study atmospheric chemistry from a high-altitude unmanned aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stutz, Jochen; Werner, Bodo; Spolaor, Max; Scalone, Lisa; Festa, James; Tsai, Catalina; Cheung, Ross; Colosimo, Santo F.; Tricoli, Ugo; Raecke, Rasmus; Hossaini, Ryan; Chipperfield, Martyn P.; Feng, Wuhu; Gao, Ru-Shan; Hintsa, Eric J.; Elkins, James W.; Moore, Fred L.; Daube, Bruce; Pittman, Jasna; Wofsy, Steven; Pfeilsticker, Klaus

    2017-03-01

    Observations of atmospheric trace gases in the tropical upper troposphere (UT), tropical tropopause layer (TTL), and lower stratosphere (LS) require dedicated measurement platforms and instrumentation. Here we present a new limb-scanning Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) instrument developed for NASA's Global Hawk (GH) unmanned aerial system and deployed during the Airborne Tropical TRopopause EXperiment (ATTREX). The mini-DOAS system is designed for automatic operation under unpressurized and unheated conditions at 14-18 km altitude, collecting scattered sunlight in three wavelength windows: UV (301-387 nm), visible (410-525 nm), and near infrared (900-1700 nm). A telescope scanning unit allows selection of a viewing angle around the limb, as well as real-time correction of the aircraft pitch. Due to the high altitude, solar reference spectra are measured using diffusors and direct sunlight. The DOAS approach allows retrieval of slant column densities (SCDs) of O3, O4, NO2, and BrO with relative errors similar to other aircraft DOAS systems. Radiative transfer considerations show that the retrieval of trace gas mixing ratios from the observed SCD based on O4 observations, the most common approach for DOAS measurements, is inadequate for high-altitude observations. This is due to the frequent presence of low-altitude clouds, which shift the sensitivity of the O4 SCD into the lower atmosphere and make it highly dependent on cloud coverage. A newly developed technique that constrains the radiative transfer by comparing in situ and DOAS O3 observations overcomes this issue. Extensive sensitivity calculations show that the novel O3-scaling technique allows the retrieval of BrO and NO2 mixing ratios at high accuracies of 0.5 and 15 ppt, respectively. The BrO and NO2 mixing ratios and vertical profiles observed during ATTREX thus provide new insights into ozone and halogen chemistry in the UT, TTL, and LS.

  8. Development of a portable active long-path differential optical absorption spectroscopy system for volcanic gas measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vita, Fabio; Kern, Christoph; Inguaggiato, Salvatore

    2014-01-01

    Active long-path differential optical absorption spectroscopy (LP-DOAS) has been an effective tool for measuring atmospheric trace gases for several decades. However, instruments were large, heavy and power-inefficient, making their application to remote environments extremely challenging. Recent developments in fibre-coupling telescope technology and the availability of ultraviolet light emitting diodes (UV-LEDS) have now allowed us to design and construct a lightweight, portable, low-power LP-DOAS instrument for use at remote locations and specifically for measuring degassing from active volcanic systems. The LP-DOAS was used to measure sulfur dioxide (SO2) emissions from La Fossa crater, Vulcano, Italy, where column densities of up to 1.2 × 1018 molec cm−2 (~ 500 ppmm) were detected along open paths of up to 400 m in total length. The instrument's SO2 detection limit was determined to be 2 × 1016 molec cm−2 (~ 8 ppmm), thereby making quantitative detection of even trace amounts of SO2 possible. The instrument is capable of measuring other volcanic volatile species as well. Though the spectral evaluation of the recorded data showed that chlorine monoxide (ClO) and carbon disulfide (CS2) were both below the instrument's detection limits during the experiment, the upper limits for the X / SO2 ratio (X = ClO, CS2) could be derived, and yielded 2 × 10−3 and 0.1, respectively. The robust design and versatility of the instrument make it a promising tool for monitoring of volcanic degassing and understanding processes in a range of volcanic systems.

  9. An instrument for measurements of BrO with LED-based Cavity-Enhanced Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoch, D. J.; Buxmann, J.; Sihler, H.; Pöhler, D.; Zetzsch, C.; Platt, U.

    2014-01-01

    The chemistry of the troposphere and specifically the global tropospheric ozone budget is affected by reactive halogen species such as bromine monoxide (BrO) or chlorine monoxide (ClO). Especially BrO plays an important role in the processes of ozone destruction, disturbance of NOx and HOx chemistry, oxidation of dimethyl sulfide (DMS), and the deposition of elementary mercury. In the troposphere BrO has been detected in polar regions, at salt lakes, in volcanic plumes, and in the marine boundary layer. For a better understanding of these processes, field measurements as well as reaction chamber studies are performed. In both cases instruments with high spatial resolution and high sensitivity are necessary. A Cavity-Enhanced Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (CE-DOAS) instrument with an open path measurement cell was designed and applied. For the first time, a CE-DOAS instrument is presented using an UV LED in the 325-365 nm wavelength range. In laboratory studies, BrO as well as HONO, HCHO, O3, and O4 could be reliably determined at detection limits of 20 ppt for BrO, 9.1 ppb for HCHO, 970 ppt for HONO, and 91 ppb for O3, for five minutes integration time. The best detection limits were achieved for BrO (11 ppt), HCHO (5.1 ppb), HONO (490 ppt), and O3 (59 ppb) for integration times of 81 minutes or less. Comparison with established White system (WS) DOAS and O3 monitor measurements demonstrate the reliability of the instrument.

  10. Measurement of nitrogen dioxide in cigarette smoke using quantum cascade tunable infrared laser differential absorption spectroscopy (TILDAS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shorter, Joanne H.; Nelson, David D.; Zahniser, Mark S.; Parrish, Milton E.; Crawford, Danielle R.; Gee, Diane L.

    2006-04-01

    Although nitrogen dioxide (NO 2) has been previously reported to be present in cigarette smoke, the concentration estimates were derived from kinetic calculations or from measurements of aged smoke, where NO 2 was formed some time after the puff was taken. The objective of this work was to use tunable infrared laser differential absorption spectroscopy (TILDAS) equipped with a quantum cascade (QC) laser to determine if NO 2 could be detected and quantified in a fresh puff of cigarette smoke. A temporal resolution of ˜0.16 s allowed measurements to be taken directly as the NO 2 was formed during the puff. Sidestream cigarette smoke was sampled to determine if NO 2 could be detected using TILDAS. Experiments were conducted using 2R4F Kentucky Reference cigarettes with and without a Cambridge filter pad. NO 2 was detected only in the lighting puff of whole mainstream smoke (without a Cambridge filter pad), with no NO 2 detected in the subsequent puffs. The measurement precision was ˜1.0 ppbV Hz -1/2, which allows a detection limit of ˜0.2 ng in a 35 ml puff volume. More NO 2 was generated in the lighting puff using a match or blue flame lighter (29 ± 21 ng) than when using an electric lighter (9 ± 3 ng). In the presence of a Cambridge filter pad, NO 2 was observed in the gas phase mainstream smoke for every puff (total of 200 ± 30 ng/cigarette) and is most likely due to smoke chemistry taking place on the Cambridge filter pad during the smoke collection process. Nitrogen dioxide was observed continuously in the sidestream smoke starting with the lighting puff.

  11. Measurement of atmospheric ammonia at a dairy using differential optical absorption spectroscopy in the mid-ultraviolet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mount, George H.; Rumburg, Brian; Havig, Jeff; Lamb, Brian; Westberg, Hal; Yonge, David; Johnson, Kristen; Kincaid, Ronald

    Ammonia is the most abundant basic gas in the atmosphere, and after N 2 and N 2O is the most abundant nitrogen-containing specie (Seinfeld and Pandis, 1998. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics: from air pollution to climate changes. Wiley, New York). Typical concentrations of ammonia in the boundary layer range from <1 part per billion by volume (ppbv) in the free continental troposphere to parts per million (ppmv) levels over animal waste lagoons and near animal stalls. Agricultural activities are the dominant global source of ammonia emissions and a major environmental concern. In the US, ≈85% of ammonia emissions come from livestock operations (EPA Trends, 1998. www.epa.gov/ttn/chief/trends98/chapter2.pdf). Dairy farms constitute a large fraction of the livestock inventory. Current estimates of ammonia emissions to the atmosphere are characterized by a high degree of uncertainty, and so it is very important to obtain better estimates of ammonia emissions. We are working at the Washington State University research dairy to quantify ammonia emissions and investigate the effects of various mitigation strategies on those emissions. We describe here a new instrument utilizing the differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) technique to measure ammonia in the mid-ultraviolet with a detectability limit of about 1 ppb. DOAS avoids many of the problems that have thwarted past ammonia concentration measurements. Initial results show concentrations in the barn/concrete yard areas in the tens of parts per million range, over the slurry lagoons of hundreds of parts per billion to low parts per million, and low parts per million levels after initial slurry applications onto pastureland. Future papers will report on emission fluxes from the various parts of the dairy and the results of mitigation strategies; we show here initial data results. For a recent review of ammonia volatilization from dairy farms, see Bussink and Oenema (Nutrient Cycling in Agroecosystems 51

  12. Remote measurement of high preeruptive water vapor emissions at Sabancaya volcano by passive differential optical absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kern, Christoph; Masias, Pablo; Apaza, Fredy; Reath, Kevin A.; Platt, Ulrich

    2017-05-01

    Water (H2O) is by far the most abundant volcanic volatile species and plays a predominant role in driving volcanic eruptions. However, numerous difficulties associated with making accurate measurements of water vapor in volcanic plumes have limited their use as a diagnostic tool. Here we present the first detection of water vapor in a volcanic plume using passive visible-light differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS). Ultraviolet and visible-light DOAS measurements were made on 21 May 2016 at Sabancaya Volcano, Peru. We find that Sabancaya's plume contained an exceptionally high relative water vapor abundance 6 months prior to its November 2016 eruption. Our measurements yielded average sulfur dioxide (SO2) emission rates of 800-900 t/d, H2O emission rates of around 250,000 t/d, and an H2O/SO2 molecular ratio of 1000 which is about an order of magnitude larger than typically found in high-temperature volcanic gases. We attribute the high water vapor emissions to a boiling-off of Sabancaya's hydrothermal system caused by intrusion of magma to shallow depths. This hypothesis is supported by a significant increase in the thermal output of the volcanic edifice detected in infrared satellite imagery leading up to and after our measurements. Though the measurement conditions encountered at Sabancaya were very favorable for our experiment, we show that visible-light DOAS systems could be used to measure water vapor emissions at numerous other high-elevation volcanoes. Such measurements would provide observatories with additional information particularly useful for forecasting eruptions at volcanoes harboring significant hydrothermal systems.

  13. Remote measurement of high preeruptive water vapor emissions at Sabancaya volcano by passive differential optical absorption spectroscopy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kern, Christoph; Masias, Pablo; Apaza, Fredy; Reath, Kevin; Platt, Ulrich

    2017-01-01

    Water (H2O) is by far the most abundant volcanic volatile species and plays a predominant role in driving volcanic eruptions. However, numerous difficulties associated with making accurate measurements of water vapor in volcanic plumes have limited their use as a diagnostic tool. Here we present the first detection of water vapor in a volcanic plume using passive visible-light differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS). Ultraviolet and visible-light DOAS measurements were made on 21 May 2016 at Sabancaya Volcano, Peru. We find that Sabancaya's plume contained an exceptionally high relative water vapor abundance 6 months prior to its November 2016 eruption. Our measurements yielded average sulfur dioxide (SO2) emission rates of 800–900 t/d, H2O emission rates of around 250,000 t/d, and an H2O/SO2 molecular ratio of 1000 which is about an order of magnitude larger than typically found in high-temperature volcanic gases. We attribute the high water vapor emissions to a boiling-off of Sabancaya's hydrothermal system caused by intrusion of magma to shallow depths. This hypothesis is supported by a significant increase in the thermal output of the volcanic edifice detected in infrared satellite imagery leading up to and after our measurements. Though the measurement conditions encountered at Sabancaya were very favorable for our experiment, we show that visible-light DOAS systems could be used to measure water vapor emissions at numerous other high-elevation volcanoes. Such measurements would provide observatories with additional information particularly useful for forecasting eruptions at volcanoes harboring significant hydrothermal systems.

  14. Turbulent Humidity Fluctuations in the Convective Boundary Layer: Case Studies Using Water Vapour Differential Absorption Lidar Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muppa, Shravan Kumar; Behrendt, Andreas; Späth, Florian; Wulfmeyer, Volker; Metzendorf, Simon; Riede, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Turbulent humidity fluctuations in the convective boundary layer (CBL) under clear-sky conditions were investigated by deriving moments up to fourth-order. High-resolution humidity measurements were collected with a water vapour differential absorption lidar system during the HD(CP)}2 Observational Prototype Experiment (HOPE). Two cases, both representing a well-developed CBL around local noon, are discussed. While the first case (from the intensive observation period (IOP) 5 on 20 April 2013) compares well with what is considered typical CBL behaviour, the second case (from IOP 6 on 24 April 2013) shows a number of non-typical characteristics. Both cases show similar capping inversions and wind shear across the CBL top. However, a major difference between both cases is the advection of a humid layer above the CBL top during IOP 6. While the variance profile of IOP 5 shows a maximum at the interfacial layer, two variance peaks are observed near the CBL top for IOP 6. A marked difference can also be seen in the third-order moment and skewness profiles: while both are negative (positive) below (above) the CBL top for IOP 5, the structure is more complex for IOP 6. Kurtosis is about three for IOP 5, whereas for IOP 6, the distribution is slightly platykurtic. We believe that the entrainment of an elevated moist layer into the CBL is responsible for the unusual findings for IOP 6, which suggests that it is important to consider the structure of residual humidity layers entrained into the CBL.

  15. Sense of coherence (SOC) among psychotherapists in Austria, differentiated according to number of individually completed training therapy sessions.

    PubMed

    Binder, Heinz P; Mesenholl-Strehler, Elke; Pass, Paul; Endler, P Christian

    2006-10-02

    The sense of coherence (according Aaron Antonovsky, 1923-1994, when a person's sense that his/her own life and the world are sufficiently comprehensible, manageable, and meaningful) of Austrian psychotherapists was assessed and compared with a standard sample, as well as with the sense of coherence (SOC) of members of other professions. In addition, the question as to whether psychotherapists who had completed more extensive individual training therapy/self-awareness sessions had a higher SOC than do those with fewer, was addressed. Forty psychotherapists who worked in private practices and various psychosocial health care institutions in Styria, Austria took part in the study. The investigation was conducted in the form of a questionnaire assessment. The evaluation showed that the overall SOC value of the professional group in question was significantly higher than that of the standard sample (162.3 vs. 145.7), as well as other samples (physicians: SOC = 153.8; teachers: SOC = 156.1; physiotherapists SOC = 158.1). Concerning whether psychotherapists who had completed more individual training therapy/self-awareness sessions had higher SOC values than did those with fewer, we found no difference in regard to the overall SOC score or SOC scores for individual components. The SOC of psychotherapists did not seem to depend on the number of additional training therapy/self-awareness sessions.

  16. Differentiating Early Stage Cystic Keratoacanthoma, Nodular Basal Cell Carcinoma, and Excoriated Acne Vulgaris by Clinical Exam, Dermoscopy, and Optical Coherence Tomography: A Report of 3 Cases.

    PubMed

    Markowitz, Orit; Utz, Sarah

    2015-04-01

    Making accurate diagnoses when certain lesions are in a relatively young stage can prove challenging, as their "textbook descriptions" are often not fully apparent, and may in fact be markedly different. The authors present three interesting cases of early lesions that were clinically difficult to differentiate from one another: a cystic variation of a keratoacanthoma squamous cell carcinoma, a basal cell carcinoma, and an excoriated facial acne vulgaris. The subtle clinical nuances found in each of these cases demonstrated the importance of a careful clinical evaluation; however, this was not sufficient for adequate assessment of whether or not to biopsy. With early lesions such as these, the use of the noninvasive imaging modalities of dermoscopy and optical coherence tomography becomes critical in order to avoid unnecessary biopsy. The discussion of the clinically and dermoscopically challenging features is both instructive and enlightening. Oftentimes, "textbook descriptions" of lesions focus on the description of an already mature stage of growth, despite the fact that we continue to strive toward earlier detection of potential malignancies. With this in mind, the features found with optical coherence tomography proved essential to the elucidation of these difficult lesions. These three interesting cases illustrated the challenges encountered when dealing with early lesions specifically. The authors bring to light features in each of these cases that are often not thought of as being the "typical" presentation in each lesion category and demonstrate the clinical utility of noninvasive devices in difficult-to-diagnose cases such as these.

  17. Differentiating Early Stage Cystic Keratoacanthoma, Nodular Basal Cell Carcinoma, and Excoriated Acne Vulgaris by Clinical Exam, Dermoscopy, and Optical Coherence Tomography: A Report of 3 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Utz, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    Making accurate diagnoses when certain lesions are in a relatively young stage can prove challenging, as their “textbook descriptions” are often not fully apparent, and may in fact be markedly different. The authors present three interesting cases of early lesions that were clinically difficult to differentiate from one another: a cystic variation of a keratoacanthoma squamous cell carcinoma, a basal cell carcinoma, and an excoriated facial acne vulgaris. The subtle clinical nuances found in each of these cases demonstrated the importance of a careful clinical evaluation; however, this was not sufficient for adequate assessment of whether or not to biopsy. With early lesions such as these, the use of the noninvasive imaging modalities of dermoscopy and optical coherence tomography becomes critical in order to avoid unnecessary biopsy. The discussion of the clinically and dermoscopically challenging features is both instructive and enlightening. Oftentimes, “textbook descriptions” of lesions focus on the description of an already mature stage of growth, despite the fact that we continue to strive toward earlier detection of potential malignancies. With this in mind, the features found with optical coherence tomography proved essential to the elucidation of these difficult lesions. These three interesting cases illustrated the challenges encountered when dealing with early lesions specifically. The authors bring to light features in each of these cases that are often not thought of as being the “typical” presentation in each lesion category and demonstrate the clinical utility of noninvasive devices in difficult-to-diagnose cases such as these. PMID:26060518

  18. Triple-Pulse Integrated Path Differential Absorption Lidar for Carbon Dioxide Measurement - Novel Lidar Technologies and Techniques with Path to Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Refaat, Tamer F.; Petros, Mulugeta

    2017-01-01

    The societal benefits of understanding climate change through identification of global carbon dioxide sources and sinks led to the desired NASA's active sensing of carbon dioxide emissions over nights, days, and seasons (ASCENDS) space-based missions of global carbon dioxide measurements. For more than 15 years, NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) have developed several carbon dioxide active remote sensors using the differential absorption lidar (DIAL) technique operating at the two-micron wavelength. Currently, an airborne two-micron triple-pulse integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar is under development. This IPDA lidar measures carbon dioxide as well as water vapor, the dominant interfering molecule on carbon dioxide remote sensing. Advancement of this triple-pulse IPDA lidar development is presented.

  19. Wide-band coherent receiver development for enhanced surveillance

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, M.L.; Richards, R.K.; Hutchinson, D.P.

    1998-03-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been developing advanced coherent IR heterodyne receivers for plasma diagnostics in fusion reactors for over 20 years. Recent progress in wide band IR detectors and high speed electronics has significantly enhanced the measurement capabilities of coherent receivers. In addition, developments in new HgCdTe and quantum well IR photodetector (QWIP) focal plane arrays are providing the possibility of both active and passive coherent imaging. In this paper the authors discuss the implications of these new enabling technologies to the IR remote sensing community for enhanced surveillance. Coherent receivers, as opposed to direct or thermal detection, provide multiple dimensions of information about a scene or target in a single detector system. Combinations of range, velocity, temperature, and chemical species information are all available from a coherent heterodyne receiver. They present laboratory data showing measured noise equivalent power (NEP) of new QWIP detectors with heterodyne bandwidths greater than 7 GHz. For absorption measurements, a wide band coherent receiver provides the capability of looking between CO{sub 2} lines at off-resonance peaks and thus the measurement of lines normally inaccessible with conventional heterodyne or direct detection systems. Also described are differential absorption lidar (DIAL) and Doppler laboratory measurements using an 8 x 8 HgCdTe focal plane array demonstrating the snapshot capability of coherent receiver detector arrays for enhanced chemical plume and moving hardbody capture. Finally they discuss a variety of coherent receiver configurations that can suppress (or enhance) sensitivity of present active remote sensing systems to speckle, glint, and other measurement anomalies.

  20. Quantitative, Label-Free Characterization of Stem Cell Differentiation at the Single-Cell Level by Broadband Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Young Jong; Vega, Sebastián L.; Patel, Parth J.; Aamer, Khaled A.; Moghe, Prabhas V.

    2014-01-01

    We use broadband coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (BCARS) microscopy to characterize lineage commitment of individual human mesenchymal stem cells cultured in adipogenic, osteogenic, and basal culture media. We treat hyperspectral images obtained by BCARS in two independent ways, obtaining robust metrics for differentiation. In one approach, pixel counts corresponding to functional markers, lipids, and minerals, are used to classify individual cells as belonging to one of the three lineage groups: adipocytes, osteoblasts, and undifferentiated stem cells. In the second approach, we use multivariate analysis of Raman spectra averaged exclusively over cytosol regions of individual cells to classify the cells into the same three groups, with consistent results. The exceptionally high speed of spectral imaging with BCARS allows us to chemically map a large number of cells with high spatial resolution, revealing not only the phenotype of individual cells, but also population heterogeneity in the degree of phenotype commitment. PMID:24224876

  1. Graphics processing unit accelerated intensity-based optical coherence tomography angiography using differential frames with real-time motion correction.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Yuuki; Takahashi, Yuhei; Numazawa, Hiroshi

    2014-02-01

    We demonstrate intensity-based optical coherence tomography (OCT) angiography using the squared difference of two sequential frames with bulk-tissue-motion (BTM) correction. This motion correction was performed by minimization of the sum of the pixel values using axial- and lateral-pixel-shifted structural OCT images. We extract the BTM-corrected image from a total of 25 calculated OCT angiographic images. Image processing was accelerated by a graphics processing unit (GPU) with many stream processors to optimize the parallel processing procedure. The GPU processing rate was faster than that of a line scan camera (46.9 kHz). Our OCT system provides the means of displaying structural OCT images and BTM-corrected OCT angiographic images in real time.

  2. Analysis of signed chromatic dispersion monitoring by waveform asymmetry for differentially-coherent phase-modulated systems.

    PubMed

    Lau, Alan Pak Tao; Li, ZhaoHui; Khan, F N; Lu, Chao; Wai, P K A

    2011-02-28

    We analytically study received waveform asymmetries induced by chromatic dispersion (CD) for signed CD monitoring in differential quadrature phase-shift keying (DQPSK) systems and show that the asymmetries are results of differential detection and the ±π/4 phase shifters used in conventional DQPSK receivers. The theoretical insights developed help explain various published results on signed CD monitoring based on waveform asymmetries and allow us to further propose signed CD monitoring for differential eight phase-shift keying (D8PSK) systems without any modification to the receiver. Simulation results also show that the CD-induced waveform asymmetric features are preserved in presence of self-phase modulation (SPM) and polarization-mode dispersion (PMD).

  3. Global observations of atmospheric CH4 by Integrated Path Differential-Absorption Lidar: the French-German Climate Monitoring Initiative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehret, Gerhard; Flamant, Pierre; Ciais, Philippe; Fabien, Gibert; Amediek, Axel; Kiemle, Christoph; Fix, Andreas; Quatrevalet, Mathieu; Wirth, Martin

    Atmospheric methane (CH4) is a powerful greenhouse gas, which has a Greenhouse Warming Potential (GWP) of 25 relative to CO2 on a time scale of 100 years. Despite the fact that the imbalance between the sources and sinks has decreased in the early 1990's to an insignificant value, a significant renewal of the CH4 growth is reported in recent years. Questions arise whether an increase of atmospheric CH4 might be fostered through melting of permafrost soil in the Arctic region or arise from changes of the tropical wetlands which comprise the biggest natural methane source. Another reason could be the change in the agro-industrial era of predominant human influence or the very large deposits of CH4 as gas hydrates on ocean shelves that are vulnerable to ocean warming. The French-German Climate Monitoring Initiative, which has recently been selected to undergo Phase0/A studies in a joint project by the space agencies CNES (France)and DLR (Germany), targets on satellite observations of atmospheric CH4 for the improvement of our knowledge on regional to synoptic scale CH4 sources on a global basis. As a novel feature, the observational instrument of this mission will be an Integrated Path Differential-Absorption (IPDA) Lidar system embarked on board of the French Myriade platform for the measurement of the column-weighted dry-air mixing ratio of CH4 in a nadir viewing configuration. This data will be provided by the lidar technique with no bias due to particles scattering in the light path and can directly be used as input for flux inversion models. In our presentation we will discuss the observational principle and the sampling strategy of the envisaged mission in connection to the needs for CH4 flux inversion experiments. In addition, we report on supporting campaign activities on airborne measurements of Lidar reflectivity data in the respective spectral region. The airborne data is of prime interest for the generation of pseudo CH4 data examples using the satellite

  4. The moderating role of absorptive capacity and the differential effects of acquisitions and alliances on Big Pharma firms' innovation performance

    PubMed Central

    Fernald, K. D. S.; Pennings, H. P. G.; van den Bosch, J. F.; Commandeur, H. R.; Claassen, E.

    2017-01-01

    In the context of increased pharmaceutical innovation deficits and Big Pharma blockbusters’ patent expirations, this paper examines the moderating role of firms’ absorptive capacity in external innovation activities of Big Pharma firms. The study indicates a rising interest of Big Pharma in acquisitions of and alliances with biotechnology companies. Unfortunately, this increased interest is not reflected in the number of new drugs generated by Big Pharma. We find that acquisitions of biotech companies have negatively affected Big Pharma firms’ innovation performance on average but these acquisitions might have a positive effect at higher levels of acquiring firms’ absorptive capacity. Moreover, also acquisitions of pharma companies and alliances with biotech companies only have a positive effect on innovation performance at sufficiently high levels of absorptive capacity. The moderating role of absorptive capacity implicates that a tight integration of internal R&D efforts and (unrelated) external knowledge is crucial for harnessing complementarity effects. PMID:28231332

  5. Identification of Absorption, Distribution, Metabolism, and Excretion (ADME) Genes Relevant to Steatosis Using a Differential Gene Expression Approach

    EPA Science Inventory

    Absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion (ADME) parameters represent important connections between exposure to chemicals and the activation of molecular initiating events of Adverse Outcome Pathways (AOPs) in cellular, tissue, and organ level targets. ADME parameters u...

  6. The moderating role of absorptive capacity and the differential effects of acquisitions and alliances on Big Pharma firms' innovation performance.

    PubMed

    Fernald, K D S; Pennings, H P G; van den Bosch, J F; Commandeur, H R; Claassen, E

    2017-01-01

    In the context of increased pharmaceutical innovation deficits and Big Pharma blockbusters' patent expirations, this paper examines the moderating role of firms' absorptive capacity in external innovation activities of Big Pharma firms. The study indicates a rising interest of Big Pharma in acquisitions of and alliances with biotechnology companies. Unfortunately, this increased interest is not reflected in the number of new drugs generated by Big Pharma. We find that acquisitions of biotech companies have negatively affected Big Pharma firms' innovation performance on average but these acquisitions might have a positive effect at higher levels of acquiring firms' absorptive capacity. Moreover, also acquisitions of pharma companies and alliances with biotech companies only have a positive effect on innovation performance at sufficiently high levels of absorptive capacity. The moderating role of absorptive capacity implicates that a tight integration of internal R&D efforts and (unrelated) external knowledge is crucial for harnessing complementarity effects.

  7. Identification of Absorption, Distribution, Metabolism, and Excretion (ADME) Genes Relevant to Steatosis Using a Differential Gene Expression Approach

    EPA Science Inventory

    Absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion (ADME) parameters represent important connections between exposure to chemicals and the activation of molecular initiating events of Adverse Outcome Pathways (AOPs) in cellular, tissue, and organ level targets. ADME parameters u...

  8. A compact high repetition rate CO2 coherent Doppler lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alejandro, S.; Frelin, R.; Dix, B.; Mcnicholl, P.

    1992-01-01

    As part of its program to develop coherent heterodyne detection lidar technology for space, airborne, and ground based applications, the Optical Environment Division of the USAF's Phillips Laboratory developed a compact coherent CO2 TEA lidar system. Although originally conceived as a high altitude balloon borne system, the lidar is presently integrated into a trailer for ground based field measurements of aerosols and wind fields. In this role, it will also serve as a testbed for signal acquisition and processing development for planned future airborne and space based solid state lidar systems. The system has also found significance in new areas of interest to the Air Force such as cloud studies and coherent Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) systems.

  9. A compact high repetition rate CO2 coherent Doppler lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alejandro, S.; Frelin, R.; Dix, B.; Mcnicholl, P.

    1992-01-01

    As part of its program to develop coherent heterodyne detection lidar technology for space, airborne, and ground based applications, the Optical Environment Division of the USAF's Phillips Laboratory developed a compact coherent CO2 TEA lidar system. Although originally conceived as a high altitude balloon borne system, the lidar is presently integrated into a trailer for ground based field measurements of aerosols and wind fields. In this role, it will also serve as a testbed for signal acquisition and processing development for planned future airborne and space based solid state lidar systems. The system has also found significance in new areas of interest to the Air Force such as cloud studies and coherent Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) systems.

  10. Differentiating untreated and cross-linked porcine corneas of the same measured stiffness with optical coherence elastography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jiasong; Han, Zhaolong; Singh, Manmohan; Twa, Michael D.; Larin, Kirill V.

    2014-11-01

    Structurally degenerative diseases, such as keratoconus, can significantly alter the stiffness of the cornea, directly affecting the quality of vision. Ultraviolet-induced collagen cross-linking (CXL) effectively increases corneal stiffness and is applied clinically to treat keratoconus. However, measured corneal stiffness is also influenced by intraocular pressure (IOP). Therefore, experimentally measured changes in corneal stiffness may be attributable to the effects of CXL, changes in IOP, or both. We present a noninvasive measurement method using phase-stabilized swept-source optical coherence elastography to distinguish between CXL and IOP effects on measured corneal stiffness. This method compared the displacement amplitude attenuation of a focused air-pulse-induced elastic wave. The damping speed of the displacement amplitudes at each measurement position along the wave propagation were compared for different materials. This method was initially tested on gelatin and agar phantoms of the same stiffness for validation. Consequently, untreated and CXL-treated porcine corneas of the same measured stiffness, but at different IOPs, were also evaluated. The results suggest that this noninvasive method may have the potential to detect the early stages of ocular diseases such as keratoconus or may be applied during CLX procedures by factoring in the effects of IOP on the measured corneal stiffness.

  11. In vivo assessment of optical properties of basal cell carcinoma and differentiation of BCC subtypes by high-definition optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Boone, Marc; Suppa, Mariano; Miyamoto, Makiko; Marneffe, Alice; Jemec, Gregor; Del Marmol, Veronique

    2016-01-01

    High-definition optical coherence tomography (HD-OCT) features of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) have recently been defined. We assessed in vivo optical properties (IV-OP) of BCC, by HD-OCT. Moreover their critical values for BCC subtype differentiation were determined. The technique of semi-log plot whereby an exponential function becomes linear has been implemented on HD-OCT signals. The relative attenuation factor (µraf) at different skin layers could be assessed.. IV-OP of superficial BCC with high diagnostic accuracy (DA) and high negative predictive values (NPV) were (i) decreased µraf in lower part of epidermis and (ii) increased epidermal thickness (E-T). IV-OP of nodular BCC with good to high DA and NPV were (i) less negative µraf in papillary dermis compared to normal adjacent skin and (ii) significantly decreased E-T and papillary dermal thickness (PD-T). In infiltrative BCC (i) high µraf in reticular dermis compared to normal adjacent skin and (ii) presence of peaks and falls in reticular dermis had good DA and high NPV. HD-OCT seems to enable the combination of in vivo morphological analysis of cellular and 3-D micro-architectural structures with IV-OP analysis of BCC. This permits BCC sub-differentiation with higher accuracy than in vivo HD-OCT analysis of morphology alone. PMID:27375943

  12. Rapid diagnosis and differentiation of microbial pathogens in otitis media with a combined Raman spectroscopy and low-coherence interferometry probe: toward in vivo implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Youbo; Monroy, Guillermo L.; You, Sixian; Shelton, Ryan L.; Nolan, Ryan M.; Tu, Haohua; Chaney, Eric J.; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2016-10-01

    We investigate and demonstrate the feasibility of using a combined Raman scattering (RS) spectroscopy and low-coherence interferometry (LCI) probe to differentiate microbial pathogens and improve our diagnostic ability of ear infections [otitis media (OM)]. While the RS probe provides noninvasive molecular information to identify and differentiate infectious microorganisms, the LCI probe helps to identify depth-resolved structural information as well as to guide and monitor positioning of the Raman spectroscopy beam for relatively longer signal acquisition times. A series of phantom studies, including the use of human middle ear effusion samples, were performed to mimic the conditions of in vivo investigations. These were also conducted to validate the feasibility of using this combined RS/LCI probe for point-of-care diagnosis of the infectious pathogen(s) in OM patients. This work establishes important parameters for future in vivo investigations of fast and accurate determination and diagnosis of infectious microorganisms in OM patients, potentially improving the efficacy and outcome of OM treatments, and importantly reducing the misuse of antibiotics in the presence of viral infections.

  13. In vivo assessment of optical properties of basal cell carcinoma and differentiation of BCC subtypes by high-definition optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Boone, Marc; Suppa, Mariano; Miyamoto, Makiko; Marneffe, Alice; Jemec, Gregor; Del Marmol, Veronique

    2016-06-01

    High-definition optical coherence tomography (HD-OCT) features of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) have recently been defined. We assessed in vivo optical properties (IV-OP) of BCC, by HD-OCT. Moreover their critical values for BCC subtype differentiation were determined. The technique of semi-log plot whereby an exponential function becomes linear has been implemented on HD-OCT signals. The relative attenuation factor (µraf ) at different skin layers could be assessed.. IV-OP of superficial BCC with high diagnostic accuracy (DA) and high negative predictive values (NPV) were (i) decreased µraf in lower part of epidermis and (ii) increased epidermal thickness (E-T). IV-OP of nodular BCC with good to high DA and NPV were (i) less negative µraf in papillary dermis compared to normal adjacent skin and (ii) significantly decreased E-T and papillary dermal thickness (PD-T). In infiltrative BCC (i) high µraf in reticular dermis compared to normal adjacent skin and (ii) presence of peaks and falls in reticular dermis had good DA and high NPV. HD-OCT seems to enable the combination of in vivo morphological analysis of cellular and 3-D micro-architectural structures with IV-OP analysis of BCC. This permits BCC sub-differentiation with higher accuracy than in vivo HD-OCT analysis of morphology alone.

  14. Lgr5 positive stem cells sorted from small intestines of diabetic mice differentiate into higher proportion of absorptive cells and Paneth cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Xian-Yang; Yu, Tao; Zhong, Wa; Li, Jie-Yao; Xia, Zhong-Sheng; Yuan, Yu-Hong; Yu, Zhong; Chen, Qi-Kui

    2015-08-01

    Intestinal epithelial stem cells (IESCs) can differentiate into all types of intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) and Leucine-rich repeat-containing G protein-coupled receptor 5 (Lgr5) is a marker for IESC. Previous studies reported enhanced proliferation of IECs in diabetic mice. In this study, the in vitro differentiation of Lgr5 positive IESCs sorted from diabetic mice was further investigated. The diabetic mouse model was induced by streptozotocin (STZ), and crypt IECs were isolated from small intestines. Subsequently, Lgr5 positive IESCs were detected by flow cytometry (FCM) and sorted by magnetic activated cell sorting (MACS). Differentiation of the sorted IESCs was investigated by detecting the IEC markers in the diabetic mice using immunostaining, quantitative real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), and Western blot analysis, which was compared with normal mice. We found that the proportion of Lgr5 positive cells in the crypt IECs of diabetic mice was higher than that of control mice (P < 0.05). Lgr5 positive IESCs could be significantly enriched in Lgr5 positive cell fraction sorted by MACS. Furthermore, the absorptive cell marker sucrase-isomaltase (SI) and the Paneth cell marker lysozyme 1 (Lyz1) were more highly expressed in the differentiated cells derived from Lgr5 positive IESCs of diabetic mice in vitro (P < 0.05). We demonstrate that the number of Lgr5 positive IESCs is significantly increased in the small intestines of STZ-induced diabetic mice. Lgr5 positive IESCs sorted from the diabetic mice can differentiate into a higher proportion of absorptive cells and Paneth cells in vitro. We characterized the expression of Lgr5 in the small intestine of diabetic mice, and sorted Lgr5 positive intestinal epithelial stem cells (IESCs) for investigating their differentiation in vitro. We proved that the quantity of Lgr5 positive IESCs was significantly increased in the small intestines of diabetic mice. IESCs sorted from the

  15. Development of 3.0-3.45 μm OPO laser based range resolved and hard-target differential absorption lidar for sensing of atmospheric methane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veerabuthiran, S.; Razdan, A. K.; Jindal, M. K.; Sharma, R. K.; Sagar, Vikas

    2015-10-01

    We have developed a tripod mounted 3.0-3.45 μm OPO laser based differential absorption lidar (DIAL) system for sensing of atmospheric methane. The system operates with Nd: YAG laser pumped OPO laser, a 20 cm aperture telescope and a pan-tilt system to scan the atmosphere. Atmospheric transmission spectra over the entire spectral region are measured and indentified the absorption region of the various molecules in comparison with HITRAN. The backscattered signal for range resolved and hard target configuration up to a range of 400 m are measured with range resolution of 15 m. The stable daytime measurements of methane concentration varied from 1.9 ppm to 2.4 ppm with rms deviation of 0.2 ppm have been achieved. The measured concentration is in good agreement with reported values.

  16. Coherent hybrid electromagnetic field imaging

    DOEpatents

    Cooke, Bradly J.; Guenther, David C.

    2008-08-26

    An apparatus and corresponding method for coherent hybrid electromagnetic field imaging of a target, where an energy source is used to generate a propagating electromagnetic beam, an electromagnetic beam splitting means to split the beam into two or more coherently matched beams of about equal amplitude, and where the spatial and temporal self-coherence between each two or more coherently matched beams is preserved. Two or more differential modulation means are employed to modulate each two or more coherently matched beams with a time-varying polarization, frequency, phase, and amplitude signal. An electromagnetic beam combining means is used to coherently combine said two or more coherently matched beams into a coherent electromagnetic beam. One or more electromagnetic beam controlling means are used for collimating, guiding, or focusing the coherent electromagnetic beam. One or more apertures are used for transmitting and receiving the coherent electromagnetic beam to and from the target. A receiver is used that is capable of square-law detection of the coherent electromagnetic beam. A waveform generator is used that is capable of generation and control of time-varying polarization, frequency, phase, or amplitude modulation waveforms and sequences. A means of synchronizing time varying waveform is used between the energy source and the receiver. Finally, a means of displaying the images created by the interaction of the coherent electromagnetic beam with target is employed.

  17. Coherent Interlayer Tunneling and Negative Differential Resistance with High Current Density in Double Bilayer Graphene-WSe2 Heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Burg, G William; Prasad, Nitin; Fallahazad, Babak; Valsaraj, Amithraj; Kim, Kyounghwan; Taniguchi, Takashi; Watanabe, Kenji; Wang, Qingxiao; Kim, Moon J; Register, Leonard F; Tutuc, Emanuel

    2017-06-14

    We demonstrate gate-tunable resonant tunneling and negative differential resistance between two rotationally aligned bilayer graphene sheets separated by bilayer WSe2. We observe large interlayer current densities of 2 and 2.5 μA/μm(2) and peak-to-valley ratios approaching 4 and 6 at room temperature and 1.5 K, respectively, values that are comparable to epitaxially grown resonant tunneling heterostructures. An excellent agreement between theoretical calculations using a Lorentzian spectral function for the two-dimensional (2D) quasiparticle states, and the experimental data indicates that the interlayer current stems primarily from energy and in-plane momentum conserving 2D-2D tunneling, with minimal contributions from inelastic or non-momentum-conserving tunneling. We demonstrate narrow tunneling resonances with intrinsic half-widths of 4 and 6 meV at 1.5 and 300 K, respectively.

  18. Thiazide-sensitive Na+ -Cl- cotransporter (NCC) gene inactivation results in increased duodenal Ca2+ absorption, enhanced osteoblast differentiation and elevated bone mineral density.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Yu-Juei; Yang, Sung-Sen; Cheng, Chih-Jen; Liu, Shu-Ting; Huang, Shih-Ming; Chau, Tom; Chu, Pauling; Salter, Donald M; Lee, Herng-Sheng; Lin, Shih-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Inactivation of the thiazide-sensitive sodium chloride cotransporter (NCC) due to genetic mutations in Gitelman's syndrome (GS) or pharmacological inhibition with thiazide diuretics causes hypocalciuria and increased bone mineral density (BMD) with unclear extrarenal calcium (Ca(2+) ) regulation. We investigated intestinal Ca(2+) absorption and bone Ca(2+) metabolism in nonsense Ncc Ser707X (S707X) homozygous knockin mice (Ncc(S707X/S707X) mice). Compared to wild-type and heterozygous knockin littermates, Ncc(S707X/S707X) mice had increased intestinal absorption of (45) Ca(2+) and expression of the active Ca(2+) transport machinery (transient receptor potential vanilloid 6, calbindin-D9K , and plasma membrane Ca(2+) ATPase isoform 1b). Ncc(S707X/S707X) mice had also significantly increased Ca(2+) content accompanied by greater mineral apposition rate (MAR) in their femurs and higher trabecular bone volume, cortical bone thickness, and BMD determined by μCT. Their osteoblast differentiation markers, such as bone alkaline phosphatase, procollagen I, osteocalcin, and osterix, were also significantly increased while osteoclast activity was unaffected. Analysis of marrow-derived bone cells, either treated with thiazide or directly cultured from Ncc S707X knockin mice, showed that the differentiation of osteoblasts was associated with increased phosphorylation of mechanical stress-induced focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK). In conclusion, NCC inhibition stimulates duodenal Ca(2+) absorption as well as osteoblast differentiation and bone Ca(2+) storage, possibly through a FAK/ERK dependent mechanism. © 2014 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.

  19. 3D differential phase contrast microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Michael; Tian, Lei; Waller, Laura

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate 3D phase and absorption recovery from partially coherent intensity images captured with a programmable LED array source. Images are captured through-focus with four different illumination patterns. Using first Born and weak object approximations (WOA), a linear 3D differential phase contrast (DPC) model is derived. The partially coherent transfer functions relate the sample’s complex refractive index distribution to intensity measurements at varying defocus. Volumetric reconstruction is achieved by a global FFT-based method, without an intermediate 2D phase retrieval step. Because the illumination is spatially partially coherent, the transverse resolution of the reconstructed field achieves twice the NA of coherent systems and improved axial resolution. PMID:27867705

  20. Triple-Pulsed Two-Micron Integrated Path Differential Absorption Lidar: A New Active Remote Sensing Capability with Path to Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Refaat, Tamer F.; Petros, Mulugeta; Yu, Jirong

    2015-01-01

    The two-micron wavelength is suitable for monitoring atmospheric water vapor and carbon dioxide, the two most dominant greenhouse gases. Recent advances in 2-micron laser technology paved the way for constructing state-of-the-art lidar transmitters for active remote sensing applications. In this paper, a new triple-pulsed 2-micron integrated path differential absorption lidar is presented. This lidar is capable of measuring either two species or single specie with two different weighting functions, simultaneously and independently. Development of this instrument is conducted at NASA Langley Research Center. Instrument scaling for projected future space missions will be discussed.

  1. Theoretical study of differential enthalpy of absorption of CO2 with MEA and MDEA as a function of temperature.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Mayuri; da Silva, Eirik F; Hartono, Ardi; Svendsen, Hallvard F

    2013-08-15

    Temperature dependent correlations for enthalpy of deprotonation, carbamate formation, and heat of absorption of the overall reaction between aqueous MEA and MDEA and gaseous CO2 are calculated on the basis of computational chemistry based ln K values input to the Gibbs-Helmholtz equation. Temperature dependency of reaction equilibrium constants for deprotonation and carbamate formation reactions is calculated with the SM8T continuum solvation model coupled with density functional theoretical calculations at the B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) level of theory. Calculated reaction equilibrium constants and enthalpies of individual reactions and overall heat of absorption are compared against experimental data in the temperature range 273.15-373 K. Temperature dependent correlations for different reaction equilibrium constants and enthalpies of reactions are given. These correlated results can be used in thermodynamic models such as UNIQUAC and NRTL for better understanding of post-combustion CO2 capture solvent chemistry.

  2. Initial investigation of the wavelength dependence of optical properties measured with a new multi-pass Aerosol Extinction Differential Optical Absorption Spectrometer (AE-DOAS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chartier, R. T.; Greenslade, M. E.

    2012-04-01

    Atmospheric aerosols directly affect climate by scattering and absorbing radiation. The magnitude of the impact is dependent upon the wavelength of light, but is often estimated near 550 nm. When light scattering and absorption by aerosols is approximated, the wavelength dependence of the refractive index for specific components is lost. As a result, climate models would have inherent uncertainties for aerosol contributions to radiative forcing when considering the entire solar spectrum. An aerosol extinction differential optical absorption spectrometer has been developed to directly measure aerosol extinction at mid-ultraviolet to near infrared wavelengths. The instrument consists of a spectrometer coupled to a closed White-type multi-pass gas cell with an adjustable path length of up to approximately 20 m. Laboratory measurements of various gases are compared with known absorption cross sections. Additionally, the extinction of monodisperse samples of polystyrene latex spheres are measured and compared to Mie theory generated with refractive index values from the literature to validate the new instrument. The polystyrene experiments also emphasize the ability of the new instrument to retrieve the wavelength dependent refractive index, especially in the ultraviolet wavelength regions where variability is expected. The spectrometer will be a significant advancement for determining wavelength dependent complex refractive indices in future laboratory studies as well as provide the ability to monitor ambient aerosol light extinction.

  3. Initial investigation of the wavelength dependence of optical properties measured with a new multi-pass aerosol extinction differential optical absorption spectrometer (AE-DOAS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chartier, R. T.; Greenslade, M. E.

    2011-10-01

    Atmospheric aerosols directly affect climate by scattering and absorbing radiation. The magnitude of the impact is dependent upon the wavelength of light, but is often estimated near 550 nm. When light scattering and absorption by aerosols is approximated, the wavelength dependence of the refractive index for specific components is lost. As a result, climate models would have inherent uncertainties for aerosol contributions to radiative forcing when considering the entire solar spectrum. An aerosol extinction differential optical absorption spectrometer has been developed to directly measure aerosol extinction at mid-ultraviolet to near infrared wavelengths. The instrument consists of a spectrometer coupled to a closed White-type multi-pass gas cell with an adjustable path length of up to approximately 20 m. Laboratory measurements of various gases are compared with known absorption cross sections. Additionally, the extinction of monodisperse samples of polystyrene latex spheres are measured and compared to Mie theory generated with refractive index values from the literature to validate the new instrument. The polystyrene experiments also emphasize the ability of the new instrument to retrieve the wavelength dependent refractive index, especially in the ultraviolet wavelength regions where variability is expected. The spectrometer will be a significant advancement for determining wavelength dependent complex refractive indices in future laboratory studies as well as provide the ability to monitor ambient aerosol light extinction.

  4. Ultrafast modulation of electronic structure by coherent phonon excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weisshaupt, J.; Rouzée, A.; Woerner, M.; Vrakking, M. J. J.; Elsaesser, T.; Shirley, E. L.; Borgschulte, A.

    2017-02-01

    Femtosecond x-ray absorption spectroscopy with a laser-driven high-harmonic source is used to map ultrafast changes of x-ray absorption by femtometer-scale coherent phonon displacements. In LiBH4, displacements along an Ag phonon mode at 10 THz are induced by impulsive Raman excitation and give rise to oscillatory changes of x-ray absorption at the Li K edge. Electron density maps from femtosecond x-ray diffraction data show that the electric field of the pump pulse induces a charge transfer from the BH4- to neighboring Li+ ions, resulting in a differential Coulomb force that drives lattice vibrations in this virtual transition state.

  5. A New Differential Absorption Lidar to Measure Sub-Hourly Fluctuation of Tropospheric Ozone Profiles in the Baltimore - Washington D.C. Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, J. T.; McGee, T. J.; Sumnicht, G. K.; Twigg, L. W.; Hoff, R. M.

    2014-01-01

    Tropospheric ozone profiles have been retrieved from the new ground based National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Goddard Space Flight Center TROPospheric OZone DIfferential Absorption Lidar (GSFC TROPOZ DIAL) in Greenbelt, MD (38.99 N, 76.84 W, 57 meters ASL) from 400 m to 12 km AGL. Current atmospheric satellite instruments cannot peer through the optically thick stratospheric ozone layer to remotely sense boundary layer tropospheric ozone. In order to monitor this lower ozone more effectively, the Tropospheric Ozone Lidar Network (TOLNet) has been developed, which currently consists of five stations across the US. The GSFC TROPOZ DIAL is based on the Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) technique, which currently detects two wavelengths, 289 and 299 nm. Ozone is absorbed more strongly at 289 nm than at 299 nm. The DIAL technique exploits this difference between the returned backscatter signals to obtain the ozone number density as a function of altitude. The transmitted wavelengths are generated by focusing the output of a quadrupled Nd:YAG laser beam (266 nm) into a pair of Raman cells, filled with high pressure hydrogen and deuterium. Stimulated Raman Scattering (SRS) within the focus generates a significant fraction of the pump energy at the first Stokes shift. With the knowledge of the ozone absorption coefficient at these two wavelengths, the range resolved number density can be derived. An interesting atmospheric case study involving the Stratospheric-Tropospheric Exchange (STE) of ozone is shown to emphasize the regional importance of this instrument as well as assessing the validation and calibration of data. The retrieval yields an uncertainty of 16-19 percent from 0-1.5 km, 10-18 percent from 1.5-3 km, and 11-25 percent from 3 km to 12 km. There are currently surface ozone measurements hourly and ozonesonde launches occasionally, but this system will be the first to make routine tropospheric ozone profile measurements in the Baltimore

  6. A new differential absorption lidar to measure sub-hourly fluctuation of tropospheric ozone profiles in the Baltimore-Washington DC region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, J. T.; McGee, T. J.; Sumnicht, G. K.; Twigg, L. W.; Hoff, R. M.

    2014-04-01

    Tropospheric ozone profiles have been retrieved from the new ground based National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Goddard Space Flight Center TROPospheric OZone DIfferential Absorption Lidar (GSFC TROPOZ DIAL) in Greenbelt, MD (38.99° N, 76.84° W, 57 m a.s.l.) from 400 m to 12 km a.g.l. Current atmospheric satellite instruments cannot peer through the optically thick stratospheric ozone layer to remotely sense boundary layer tropospheric ozone. In order to monitor this lower ozone more effectively, the Tropospheric Ozone Lidar Network (TOLNet) has been developed, which currently consists of five stations across the US. The GSFC TROPOZ DIAL is based on the Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) technique, which currently detects two wavelengths, 289 and 299 nm. Ozone is absorbed more strongly at 289 nm than at 299 nm. The DIAL technique exploits this difference between the returned backscatter signals to obtain the ozone number density as a function of altitude. The transmitted wavelengths are generated by focusing the output of a quadrupled Nd:YAG laser beam (266 nm) into a pair of Raman cells, filled with high pressure hydrogen and deuterium. Stimulated Raman Scattering (SRS) within the focus generates a significant fraction of the pump energy at the first Stokes shift. With the knowledge of the ozone absorption coefficient at these two wavelengths, the range resolved number density can be derived. An interesting atmospheric case study involving the Stratospheric-Tropospheric Exchange (STE) of ozone is shown to emphasize the regional importance of this instrument as well as assessing the validation and calibration of data. The retrieval yields an uncertainty of 16-19% from 0-1.5 km, 10-18% from 1.5-3 km, and 11-25% from 3 km to 12 km. There are currently surface ozone measurements hourly and ozonesonde launches occasionally, but this system will be the first to make routine tropospheric ozone profile measurements in the Baltimore-Washington DC area.

  7. Human small intestinal epithelial cells differentiated from adult intestinal stem cells as a novel system for predicting oral drug absorption in humans.

    PubMed

    Takenaka, Toru; Harada, Naomoto; Kuze, Jiro; Chiba, Masato; Iwao, Takahiro; Matsunaga, Tamihide

    2014-11-01

    Adult intestinal stem cells (ISCs) possess both a long-term proliferation ability and differentiation capability into enterocytes. As a novel in vitro system for the evaluation of drug absorption, we characterized a human small intestinal epithelial cell (HIEC) monolayer that differentiated from adult ISCs. Continuous proliferation/differentiation from ISCs consistently conferred the capability of maturation of enterocytes to HIECs over 25 passages. The morphologically matured HIEC monolayer consisted of polarized columnar epithelia with dense microvilli, tight junctions, and desmosomes 8 days after seeding onto culture inserts. Transepithelial electrical resistance across the monolayer was 9-fold lower in HIECs (98.9 Ω × cm(2)) than in Caco-2 cells (900 Ω × cm(2)), which indicated that the looseness of the tight junctions in the HIEC monolayer was similar to that in the human small intestine (approximately 40 Ω × cm(2)). No significant differences were observed in the overall gene expression patterns of the major drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters between the HIEC and Caco-2 cell monolayers. Furthermore, the functions of P-glycoprotein and breast cancer resistance protein in the HIEC monolayer were confirmed by the vectorial transport of marker substrates and their disappearance in the presence of specific inhibitors. The apparent drug permeability values of paracellularly transported compounds (fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran 4000, atenolol, and terbutaline) and nucleoside transporter substrates (didanosine, ribavirin, and doxifluridine) in the HIEC monolayer were markedly higher than those of Caco-2 cells, whereas transcellularly transported drugs (pindolol and midazolam) were equally well permeated. In conclusion, the HIEC monolayer can serve as a novel and superior alternative to the conventional Caco-2 cell monolayer for predicting oral absorption in humans.

  8. Coherent catastrophism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asher, D. J.; Clube, S. V. M.; Napier, W. M.; Steel, D. I.

    We review the theoretical and observational evidence that, on timescales relevant to mankind, the prime collision hazard is posed by temporally correlated impacts (coherent catastrophism, Δt ˜ 10 2-10 4 yr) rather than random ones (stochastic catastrophism, Δt ˜ 10 5-10 8 yr). The mechanism whereby coherent incursions into and through the terrestrial atmosphere occur is described as being the result of giant cometary bodies arriving in orbits with perihelia in the inner solar system. Hierarchical fragmentation of such large (100 km-plus) bodies — due to thermal stresses near perihelion, collisions in the asteroid belt, or passages through the Jovian Roche radius — results in numerous ˜kilometre-sized objects being left in short-period orbits, and appearing in telescopic searches as Apollo-type asteroids. Many more smaller objects, in the 10-100 metre size range and only recently observed, by the Spacewatch team, are expected to be in replenished clusters in particular orbits as a result of continuing disintegrations of large, differentiated, cometary objects. Gravitational perturbations by Jupiter bring these clusters around to have a node at 1 AU in a cyclic fashion, leading to impacts at certain times of year every few years during active periods lasting a few centuries, such periods being separated by intervals of a few millennia. Furthermore, fragmentations within the hierarchy result in significant bombardment commensurabilities ( Δt ˜ 10-10 2 yr) during active periods occurring at random intervals ( Δt ˜ 10 2-10 3 yr). It appears that the Earth has been subject to such impacts since the break-up of such a comet ˜2×10 4 years ago; currently we are not passing through a high-risk epoch, although some phenomena originating in the products of this break-up have been observed in the 20th century. This most recent hierarchical disintegration, associated with four well-known meteor showers and termed the Taurid Complex, is now recognized as resulting

  9. 2-μm Coherent DIAL for CO2, H2O and Wind Field Profiling in the Lower Atmosphere: Instrumentation and Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibert, Fabien; Edouart, Dimitri; Cénac, Claire; Pellegrino, Jessica; Le Mounier, Florian; Dumas, Arnaud

    2016-06-01

    We report on 2-μm coherent differential absorption lidar (CDIAL) measurements of carbon dioxide (CO2), water vapour (H2O) absorption and wind field profiling in the atmospheric boundary layer. The CDIAL uses a Tm:fiber pumped, single longitudinal mode Q-switched seeded Ho:YLF laser and a fibercoupled coherent detection. The laser operates at a pulse repetition frequency of 2 kHz and emits an output energy of 10 mJ with a pulse width of 40 ns (FWHM). Experimental horizontal and vertical range-resolved measurements were made in the atmospheric boundary layer and compared to colocated in-situ sensor data.

  10. Pulsed Compression for Aerosol Ranging with Coherent Pulse-Doppler Lidar Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-12-01

    as well as conventional Doppler radar hard-target applications. Accord- ing to Menzies and Hardesty , the accuracy of Doppler lidar velocity...density expressed in Equation (80). As Hardesty and Menzies explain, if a lidar of a single carrier frequency f illuminates a volume of dense, randomly...ham, WA: SPIE, 1988. 14. Hardesty , Michael R. Measurement of Range-Resolved Water Vapor Concentra- tion by Coherent C0 2 Differential Absorption Lidar

  11. A rapid method to derive horizontal distributions of trace gases and aerosols near the surface using multi-axis differential optical absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Li, A.; Xie, P. H.; Wagner, T.; Chen, H.; Liu, W. Q.; Liu, J. G.

    2014-06-01

    We apply a novel experimental procedure for the rapid measurement of the average volume mixing ratios (VMRs) and horizontal distributions of trace gases such as NO2, SO2, and HCHO in the boundary layer, which was recently suggested by Sinreich et al. (2013). The method is based on two-dimensional scanning multi-axis differential optical absorption spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS). It makes use of two facts (Sinreich et al., 2013): first, the light path for observations at 1° elevation angle traverses mainly air masses located close to the ground (typically < 200 m); second, the light path length can be calculated using the simultaneous measured absorption of the oxygen dimer O4. Thus, the average value of the trace gas VMR in the atmospheric layer between the surface and the particular altitude, for which this observation was sensitive, can be calculated. Compared to the originally proposed method, we introduce several important modifications and improvements: We apply the method only to measurements at 1° elevation angle (besides zenith view), for which the uncertainties of the retrieved values of the VMRs and surface extinctions are especially small. Using only 1° elevation angle for off-axis observation also allows an increased temporal resolution. We determine (and apply) correction factors (and their uncertainties) directly as function of the measured O4 absorption. Finally, the method is extended to trace gases analysed at other wavelengths and also to the retrieval of aerosol extinction. Depending on atmospheric visibility, the typical uncertainty of the results ranges from about 20% to 30%. We apply the rapid method to observations of a newly-developed ground-based multifunctional passive differential optical absorption spectroscopy (GM-DOAS) instrument in the north-west outskirts near Hefei in China. We report NO2, SO2, and HCHO VMRs and aerosol extinction for four azimuth angles and compare these results with those from simultaneous long-path DOAS observations

  12. A rapid method to derive horizontal distributions of trace gases and aerosols near the surface using multi-axis differential optical absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Li, A.; Xie, P. H.; Wagner, T.; Chen, H.; Liu, W. Q.; Liu, J. G.

    2013-09-01

    We apply a novel experimental procedure for the rapid measurement of the average volume mixing ratios (VMRs) and horizontal distributions of trace gases such as NO2, SO2, and HCHO in the boundary layer, which was recently suggested by Sinreich et al. (2013). The method is based on two-dimensional scanning multi-axis differential optical absorption spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS). It makes use of two facts (Sinreich et al. 2013): First, the light path for observations at 1° elevation angle traverses mainly air masses located close to the ground (typically < 200 m). Second, the light path length can be calculated using the simultaneous measured absorption of the oxygen dimer O4. Thus, the average value of the trace gas VMR in the atmospheric layer between the surface and the altitude, for which this observation was sensitive, can be calculated. Compared to the originally proposed method, we introduce several important modifications and improvements: We apply the method only to measurements at 1° elevation angles, for which the uncertainties are especially small. Using only 1 elevation angle also allows an increased temporal resolution. We apply correction factors (and their uncertainties) as function of the simultaneously modelled O4 absorption. In this way the correction factors can be directly determined according to the measured O4 dAMF. Finally, the method is extended to trace gases analysed at other wavelengths and also to the retrieval of the aerosol extinction. Depending on the atmospheric visibility, the typical uncertainty of the results ranges from about 15 to 30%. We apply the rapid method to observations of a newly developed ground-based multifunctional passive differential optical absorption spectroscopy (GM-DOAS) instrument in the north-west outskirt near Hefei City in China. We report NO2, SO2, and HCHO VMRs and aerosol extinction for four azimuth angles and compare these results with those from simultaneous long-path DOAS observations. Good agreement is

  13. Quantitative characterization of x-ray differential interference contrast microscopy using modulation transfer function.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Takashi; Chang, Chang

    2011-08-01

    Performance of two types of differential interference contrast objectives, i.e., the XOR pattern and the zone-plate doublet, is quantitatively characterized and compared using modulation transfer function. Effects of partial coherence, finite absorption and phase in a complex object, as well as bias retardation are also examined.

  14. Fast tracking of wind speed with a differential absorption LiDAR system: first results of an experimental campaign at Stromboli volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parracino, Stefano; Santoro, Simone; Maio, Giovanni; Nuvoli, Marcello; Aiuppa, Alessandro; Fiorani, Luca

    2017-04-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) is considered a precursor gas of volcanic eruptions by volcanologists. Monitoring the anomalous release of this parameter, we can retrieve useful information for the mitigation of volcanic hazards, such as for air traffic security. From a dataset collected during the Stromboli volcano field campaign, an assessment of the wind speed, in both horizontal and vertical paths, performing a fast tracking of this parameter was retrieved. This was determined with a newly designed shot-per-shot differential absorption LiDAR system operated in the near-infrared spectral region due to the simultaneous reconstruction of CO2 concentrations and wind speeds, using the same sample of LiDAR returns. A correlation method was used for the wind speed retrieval in which the transport of the spatial inhomogeneities of the aerosol backscattering coefficient, along the optical path of the system, was analyzed.

  15. 2-Micron Triple-Pulse Integrated Path Differential Absorption Lidar Development for Simultaneous Airborne Column Measurements of Carbon Dioxide and Water Vapor in the Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Petros, Mulugeta; Refaat, Tamer F.; Yu, Jirong

    2016-01-01

    For more than 15 years, NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) has contributed in developing several 2-micron carbon dioxide active remote sensors using the DIAL technique. Currently, an airborne 2-micron triple-pulse integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar is under development at NASA LaRC. This paper focuses on the advancement of the 2-micron triple-pulse IPDA lidar development. Updates on the state-of-the-art triple-pulse laser transmitter will be presented including the status of wavelength control, packaging and lidar integration. In addition, receiver development updates will also be presented, including telescope integration, detection systems and data acquisition electronics. Future plan for IPDA lidar system for ground integration, testing and flight validation will be presented.

  16. 2-micron triple-pulse integrated path differential absorption lidar development for simultaneous airborne column measurements of carbon dioxide and water vapor in the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Petros, Mulugeta; Refaat, Tamer F.; Yu, Jirong

    2016-05-01

    For more than 15 years, NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) has contributed in developing several 2-micron carbon dioxide active remote sensors using the DIAL technique. Currently, an airborne 2-micron triple-pulse integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar is under development at NASA LaRC. This paper focuses on the advancement of the 2-micron triple-pulse IPDA lidar development. Updates on the state-of-the-art triple-pulse laser transmitter will be presented including the status of wavelength control, packaging and lidar integration. In addition, receiver development updates will also be presented, including telescope integration, detection systems and data acquisition electronics. Future plan for IPDA lidar system for ground integration, testing and flight validation will be presented.

  17. Spaceborne profiling of atmospheric temperature and particle extinction with pure rotational Raman lidar and of relative humidity in combination with differential absorption lidar: performance simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Di Girolamo, Paolo; Behrendt, Andreas; Wulfmeyer, Volker

    2006-04-10

    The performance of a spaceborne temperature lidar based on the pure rotational Raman (RR) technique in the UV has been simulated. Results show that such a system deployed onboard a low-Earth-orbit satellite would provide global-scale clear-sky temperature measurements in the troposphere and lower stratosphere with precisions that satisfy World Meteorological Organization (WMO) threshold observational requirements for numerical weather prediction and climate research applications. Furthermore, nighttime temperature measurements would still be within the WMO threshold observational requirements in the presence of several cloud structures. The performance of aerosol extinction measurements from space, which can be carried out simultaneously with temperature measurements by RR lidar, is also assessed. Furthermore, we discuss simulations of relative humidity measurements from space obtained from RR temperature measurements and water-vapor data measured with the differential absorption lidar (DIAL) technique.

  18. Theory and operation of the real-time data acquisition system for the NASA-LaRC differential absorption lidar (DIAL)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, Carolyn; Spencer, Randall

    1988-01-01

    The improvement of computer hardware and software of the NASA Multipurpose Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) system is documented. The NASA DIAL system has undergone development and experimental deployment at NASA/Langley Res. Center for the remote measurement of atmospheric trace gas concentrations from ground and aircraft platforms. A viable DIAL system was developed capable of remotely measuring O3 and H2O concentrations from an aircraft platform. The DIAL Data Acquisition System (DAS) has undergone a number of improvements also. Due to the participation of the DIAL in the Global Tropospheric Experiment, modifications and improvements of the system were tested and used both in the lab and in air. Therefore, this is an operational manual for the DIAL DAS.

  19. Spaceborne profiling of atmospheric temperature and particle extinction with pure rotational Raman lidar and of relative humidity in combination with differential absorption lidar: performance simulations.

    PubMed

    Di Girolamo, Paolo; Behrendt, Andreas; Wulfmeyer, Volker

    2006-04-10

    The performance of a spaceborne temperature lidar based on the pure rotational Raman (RR) technique in the UV has been simulated. Results show that such a system deployed onboard a low-Earth-orbit satellite would provide global-scale clear-sky temperature measurements in the troposphere and lower stratosphere with precisions that satisfy World Meteorological Organization (WMO) threshold observational requirements for numerical weather prediction and climate research applications. Furthermore, nighttime temperature measurements would still be within the WMO threshold observational requirements in the presence of several cloud structures. The performance of aerosol extinction measurements from space, which can be carried out simultaneously with temperature measurements by RR lidar, is also assessed. Furthermore, we discuss simulations of relative humidity measurements from space obtained from RR temperature measurements and water-vapor data measured with the differential absorption lidar (DIAL) technique.

  20. Design and testing of a compact diode-laser-based differential absorption lidar (DIAL) for water vapor profiling in the lower troposphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nehrir, Amin R.; Repasky, Kevin S.; Carlsten, John L.

    2009-08-01

    A compact, widely tunable semiconductor based water vapor differential absorption lidar (DIAL) has been built and tested at Montana State University (MSU). The laser transmitter uses a tunable external cavity diode laser (ECDL) with a center wavelength of 830 nm to injection seed two cascaded tapered semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA), producing 1.5 micro joule pulses at a pulse repetition rate and pulse width duration of 20 kHz and 1000 ns respectively, allowing for water vapor number density retrievals up to approximately 4 km. Water vapor number density profiles collected with the MSU water vapor DIAL will be compared with co-located radiosonde measurements, demonstrating the instruments ability to measure daytime and nighttime water vapor profiles in the lower troposphere.

  1. Open-path quantum cascade laser-based system for simultaneous remote sensing of methane, nitrous oxide, and water vapor using chirped-pulse differential optical absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castillo, Paulo; Diaz, Adrian; Thomas, Benjamin; Gross, Barry; Moshary, Fred

    2015-10-01

    Methane and Nitrous Oxide are long-lived greenhouse gases in the atmosphere with significant global warming effects. We report on application of chirped-pulsed quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) to simultaneous measurements of these trace gases in both open-path fence-line and backscatter systems. The intra-pulse thermal frequency chip in a QCL can be time resolved and calibrated to allow for high resolution differential optical absorption spectroscopy over the spectral window of the chip, which for a DFB-QCL can be reach ~2cm-1 for a 500 nsec pulse. The spectral line-shape of the output from these lasers are highly stable from pulse to pulse over long period of time (> 1 day), and the system does not require frequent calibrations.

  2. Theory and operation of the real-time data acquisition system for the NASA-LaRC differential absorption lidar (DIAL)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, C.

    1986-01-01

    The improvement of computer hardware and software of the NASA Multipurpose Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) system is documented. The NASA DIAL system is undergoing development and experimental deployment at NASA Langley Research Center for the remote measurement of atmospheric trace gas concentrations from ground and aircraft platforms. A viable DIAL system was developed capable of remotely measuring O3 and H2O concentrations from an aircraft platform. Test flights of the DIAL system were successfully performed onboard the NASA Goddard Flight Center Electra aircraft from 1980 to 1985. The DIAL Data Acquisition System has undergone a number of improvements over the past few years. These improvements have now been field tested. The theory behind a real time computer system as it applies to the needs of the DIAL system is discussed. This report is designed to be used as an operational manual for the DIAL DAS.

  3. Multiple Axis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS) Observations of Bromine Monoxide (BrO) at Barrow, Alaska: An Instrumental Inter-Comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, D. A.; Donohoue, D.; Simpson, W. R.; Friess, U.; Sihler, H.; Platt, U.

    2009-12-01

    Differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) measures atmospheric slant column densities of gases by fitting ambient skylight spectra, referenced to a zenith spectrum, to laboratory-measured molecular absorption cross sections. In the Multiple-Axis (MAX)-DOAS method, measurement spectra are recorded with a narrow-field telescope aimed at low elevation angles to enhance sensitivity to boundary-layer trace gases. MAX-DOAS instruments are particularly well suited for low-power measurements at remote sites because the calibration relies on well-established absorption cross sections and the sun is used as the light source (saving power). For example, MAX-DOAS has proven very useful for observing bromine monoxide (BrO) in the Arctic springtime troposphere, when unique chemistry leads to relatively high mixing ratios (tens of pptv) in the boundary layer. Although MAX-DOAS has been successful in many studies, there has seldom been a chance to intercompare multiple MAX-DOAS instruments to discern the overall data quality, in particular not for tropospheric BrO. This data quality can be affected by instrumental differences within the various spectrometers as well as radiative-transfer differences between the skylight in the various view directions of the different instruments. To evaluate the agreement and underlying causes for differences between different MAX-DOAS systems, concurrent observations of BrO slant column densities from multiple instruments were compared. Observations are from the spring of 2009 at Barrow, Alaska. The resulting correlation plots show good general agreement in BrO slant column densities (slopes within error of unity) and attest to the quality of each of the MAX-DOAS systems. The oxygen collisional dimer, O4, and the fit residual RMS were also examined to understand light path differences and spectral fitting issues, respectively.

  4. Expression Profile of Drug and Nutrient Absorption Related Genes in Madin-Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK) Cells Grown under Differentiation Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Quan, Yong; Jin, Yisheng; Faria, Teresa N.; Tilford, Charles A.; He, Aiqing; Wall, Doris A.; Smith, Ronald L.; Vig, Balvinder S.

    2012-01-01

    The expression levels of genes involved in drug and nutrient absorption were evaluated in the Madin-Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK) in vitro drug absorption model. MDCK cells were grown on plastic surfaces (for 3 days) or on Transwell® membranes (for 3, 5, 7, and 9 days). The expression profile of genes including ABC transporters, SLC transporters, and cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes was determined using the Affymetrix® Canine GeneChip®. Expression of genes whose probe sets passed a stringent confirmation process was examined. Expression of a few transporter (MDR1, PEPT1 and PEPT2) genes in MDCK cells was confirmed by RT-PCR. The overall gene expression profile was strongly influenced by the type of support the cells were grown on. After 3 days of growth, expression of 28% of the genes was statistically different (1.5-fold cutoff, p < 0.05) between the cells grown on plastic and Transwell® membranes. When cells were differentiated on Transwell® membranes, large changes in gene expression profile were observed during the early stages, which then stabilized after 5–7 days. Only a small number of genes encoding drug absorption related SLC, ABC, and CYP were detected in MDCK cells, and most of them exhibited low hybridization signals. Results from this study provide valuable reference information on endogenous gene expression in MDCK cells that could assist in design of drug-transporter and/or drug-enzyme interaction studies, and help interpret the contributions of various transporters and metabolic enzymes in studies with MDCK cells. PMID:24300234

  5. Inter-comparison of 2 microm Heterodyne Differential Absorption Lidar, Laser Diode Spectrometer, LICOR NDIR analyzer and flasks measurements of near-ground atmospheric CO2 mixing ratio.

    PubMed

    Gibert, Fabien; Joly, Lilian; Xuéref-Rémy, Irène; Schmidt, Martina; Royer, Adrien; Flamant, Pierre H; Ramonet, Michel; Parvitte, Bertrand; Durry, Georges; Zéninari, Virginie

    2009-01-01

    Remote sensing and in situ instruments are presented and compared in the same location for accurate CO(2) mixing ratio measurements in the atmosphere: (1) a 2.064 microm Heterodyne DIfferential Absorption Lidar (HDIAL), (2) a field deployable infrared Laser Diode Spectrometer (LDS) using new commercial diode laser technology at 2.68 microm, (3) LICOR NDIR analyzer and (4) flasks. LDS, LICOR and flasks measurements were made in the same location, LICOR and flasks being taken as reference. Horizontal HDIAL measurements of CO(2) absorption using aerosol backscatter signal are reported. Using new spectroscopic data in the 2 microm band and meteorological sensor measurements, a mean CO(2) mixing ratio is inferred by the HDIAL in a 1 km long path above the 15m height location of the CO(2) in situ sensors. We compare HDIAL and LDS measurements with the LICOR data for 30 min of time averaging. The mean standard deviation of the HDIAL and the LDS CO(2) mixing ratio results are 3.3 ppm and 0.89 ppm, respectively. The bias of the HDIAL and the LDS measurements are -0.54 ppm and -0.99 ppm, respectively.

  6. 2-D tomography of volcanic CO2 from scanning hard-target differential absorption lidar: the case of Solfatara, Campi Flegrei (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Queißer, Manuel; Granieri, Domenico; Burton, Mike

    2016-11-01

    Solfatara is part of the active volcanic zone of Campi Flegrei (Italy), a densely populated urban area where ground uplift and increasing ground temperature are observed, connected with rising rates of CO2 emission. A major pathway of CO2 release at Campi Flegrei is diffuse soil degassing, and therefore quantifying diffuse CO2 emission rates is of vital interest. Conventional in situ probing of soil gas emissions with accumulation chambers is accurate over a small footprint but requires significant time and effort to cover large areas. An alternative approach is differential absorption lidar, which allows for a fast and spatially integrated measurement. Here, a portable hard-target differential absorption lidar has been used to acquire horizontal 1-D profiles of column-integrated CO2 concentration at the Solfatara crater. To capture heterogenic features in the CO2 distribution, a 2-D tomographic map of the CO2 distribution has been inverted from the 1-D profiles. The scan was performed one-sided, which is unfavorable for the inverse problem. Nonetheless, the result is in agreement with independent measurements and furthermore confirms an area of anomalous CO2 degassing along the eastern edge as well as the center of the Solfatara crater. The method may have important implications for measurements of degassing features that can only be accessed from limited angles, such as airborne sensing of volcanic plumes. CO2 fluxes retrieved from the 2-D map are comparable, but modestly higher than emission rates from previous studies, perhaps reflecting an increase in CO2 flux or a more integrated measurement or both.

  7. Coherent detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawrence, C. R.; Church, S.; Gaier, T.; Lai, R.; Ruf, C.; Wollack, E.

    2009-03-01

    Coherent systems offer significant advantages in simplicity, testability, control of systematics, and cost. Although quantum noise sets the fundamental limit to their performance at high frequencies, recent breakthroughs suggest that near-quantum-limited noise up to 150 or even 200 GHz could be realized within a few years. If the demands of component separation can be met with frequencies below 200 GHz, coherent systems will be strong competitors for a space CMB polarization mission. The rapid development of digital correlator capability now makes space interferometers with many hundreds of elements possible. Given the advantages of coherent interferometers in suppressing systematic effects, such systems deserve serious study.

  8. Self-Calibration and Laser Energy Monitor Validations for a Double-Pulsed 2-Micron CO2 Integrated Path Differential Absorption Lidar Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Refaat, Tamer F.; Singh, Upendra N.; Petros, Mulugeta; Remus, Ruben; Yu, Jirong

    2015-01-01

    Double-pulsed 2-micron integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar is well suited for atmospheric CO2 remote sensing. The IPDA lidar technique relies on wavelength differentiation between strong and weak absorbing features of the gas normalized to the transmitted energy. In the double-pulse case, each shot of the transmitter produces two successive laser pulses separated by a short interval. Calibration of the transmitted pulse energies is required for accurate CO2 measurement. Design and calibration of a 2-micron double-pulse laser energy monitor is presented. The design is based on an InGaAs pin quantum detector. A high-speed photo-electromagnetic quantum detector was used for laser-pulse profile verification. Both quantum detectors were calibrated using a reference pyroelectric thermal detector. Calibration included comparing the three detection technologies in the single-pulsed mode, then comparing the quantum detectors in the double-pulsed mode. In addition, a self-calibration feature of the 2-micron IPDA lidar is presented. This feature allows one to monitor the transmitted laser energy, through residual scattering, with a single detection channel. This reduces the CO2 measurement uncertainty. IPDA lidar ground validation for CO2 measurement is presented for both calibrated energy monitor and self-calibration options. The calibrated energy monitor resulted in a lower CO2 measurement bias, while self-calibration resulted in a better CO2 temporal profiling when compared to the in situ sensor.

  9. Self-Calibration and Laser Energy Monitor Validations for a Double-Pulsed 2-Micron CO2 Integrated Path Differential Absorption Lidar Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Refaat, Tamer F.; Singh, Upendra N.; Petros, Mulugeta; Remus, Ruben; Yu, Jirong

    2015-01-01

    Double-pulsed 2-micron integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar is well suited for atmospheric CO2 remote sensing. The IPDA lidar technique relies on wavelength differentiation between strong and weak absorbing features of the gas normalized to the transmitted energy. In the double-pulse case, each shot of the transmitter produces two successive laser pulses separated by a short interval. Calibration of the transmitted pulse energies is required for accurate CO2 measurement. Design and calibration of a 2-micron double-pulse laser energy monitor is presented. The design is based on an InGaAs pin quantum detector. A high-speed photo-electromagnetic quantum detector was used for laser-pulse profile verification. Both quantum detectors were calibrated using a reference pyroelectric thermal detector. Calibration included comparing the three detection technologies in the single-pulsed mode, then comparing the quantum detectors in the double-pulsed mode. In addition, a self-calibration feature of the 2-micron IPDA lidar is presented. This feature allows one to monitor the transmitted laser energy, through residual scattering, with a single detection channel. This reduces the CO2 measurement uncertainty. IPDA lidar ground validation for CO2 measurement is presented for both calibrated energy monitor and self-calibration options. The calibrated energy monitor resulted in a lower CO2 measurement bias, while self-calibration resulted in a better CO2 temporal profiling when compared to the in situ sensor.

  10. Spectroscopic Low Coherence Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosschaart, Nienke; van Leeuwen, T. G.; Aalders, Maurice C.; Hermann, Boris; Drexler, Wolfgang; Faber, Dirk J.

    Low-coherence interferometry (LCI) allows high-resolution volumetric imaging of tissue morphology and provides localized optical properties that can be related to the physiological status of tissue. This chapter discusses the combination of spatial and spectroscopic information by means of spectroscopic OCT (sOCT) and low-coherence spectroscopy (LCS). We describe the theory behind these modalities for the assessment of spatially resolved optical absorption and (back)scattering coefficient spectra. These spectra can be used for the highly localized quantification of chromophore concentrations and assessment of tissue organization on (sub)cellular scales. This leads to a wealth of potential clinical applications, ranging from neonatology for the determination of billibrubin concentrations, to oncology for the optical assessment of the aggressiveness of a cancerous lesion.

  11. Differential Gene Expression in Rhododendron fortunei Roots Colonized by an Ericoid Mycorrhizal Fungus and Increased Nitrogen Absorption and Plant Growth

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Xiangying; Chen, Jianjun; Zhang, Chunying; Pan, Dongming

    2016-01-01

    Ericoid mycorrhizal (ERM) fungi are specifically symbiotic with plants in the family Ericaceae. Little is known thus far about their symbiotic establishment and subsequent nitrogen (N) uptake at the molecular level. The present study devised a system for establishing a symbiotic relationship between Rhododendron fortunei Lindl. and an ERM fungus (Oidiodendron maius var. maius strain Om19), quantified seedling growth and N uptake, and compared transcriptome profiling between colonized and uncolonized roots using RNA-Seq. The Om19 colonization induced 16,892 genes that were differentially expressed in plant roots, of which 14,364 were upregulated and 2,528 were downregulated. These genes included those homologous to ATP-binding cassette transporters, calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinases, and symbiosis receptor-like kinases. N metabolism was particularly active in Om19-colonized roots, and 51 genes were upregulated, such as nitrate transporters, nitrate reductase, nitrite reductase, ammonium transporters, glutamine synthetase, and glutamate synthase. Transcriptome analysis also identified a series of genes involving endocytosis, Fc-gamma R-mediated phagocytosis, glycerophospholipid metabolism, and Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) signal pathway that have not been reported previously. Their roles in the symbiosis require further investigation. The Om19 colonization significantly increased N uptake and seedling growth. Total N content and dry weight of colonized seedlings were 36.6 and 46.6% greater than control seedlings. This is the first transcriptome analysis of a species from the family Ericaceae colonized by an ERM fungus. The findings from this study will shed light on the mechanisms underlying symbiotic relationships of ericaceous species with ERM fungi and the symbiosis-resultant N uptake and plant growth. PMID:27826312

  12. A mobile differential absorption lidar to measure sub-hourly fluctuation of tropospheric ozone profiles in the Baltimore-Washington, D.C. region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, J. T.; McGee, T. J.; Sumnicht, G. K.; Twigg, L. W.; Hoff, R. M.

    2014-10-01

    Tropospheric ozone profiles have been retrieved from the new ground-based National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Goddard Space Flight Center TROPospheric OZone DIfferential Absorption Lidar (GSFC TROPOZ DIAL) in Greenbelt, MD (38.99° N, 76.84° W, 57 m a.s.l.), from 400 m to 12 km a.g.l. Current atmospheric satellite instruments cannot peer through the optically thick stratospheric ozone layer to remotely sense boundary layer tropospheric ozone. In order to monitor this lower ozone more effectively, the Tropospheric Ozone Lidar Network (TOLNet) has been developed, which currently consists of five stations across the US. The GSFC TROPOZ DIAL is based on the DIAL technique, which currently detects two wavelengths, 289 and 299 nm, with multiple receivers. The transmitted wavelengths are generated by focusing the output of a quadrupled Nd:YAG laser beam (266 nm) into a pair of Raman cells, filled with high-pressure hydrogen and deuterium, using helium as buffer gas. With the knowledge of the ozone absorption coefficient at these two wavelengths, the range-resolved number density can be derived. An interesting atmospheric case study involving the stratospheric-tropospheric exchange (STE) of ozone is shown, to emphasize the regional importance of this instrument as well as to assess the validation and calibration of data. There was a low amount of aerosol aloft, and an iterative aerosol correction has been performed on the retrieved data, which resulted in less than a 3 ppb correction to the final ozone concentration. The retrieval yields an uncertainty of 16-19% from 0 to 1.5 km, 10-18% from 1.5 to 3 km, and 11-25% from 3 to 12 km according to the relevant aerosol concentration aloft. There are currently surface ozone measurements hourly and ozonesonde launches occasionally, but this system will be the first to make routine tropospheric ozone profile measurements in the Baltimore-Washington, D.C. area.

  13. CHARM-F: An airborne Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) LIDAR for the simultaneous measurement of CO2 and CH4 Columns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wirth, M.; Amediek, A.; Büdenbender, C.; Ehret, G.; Fix, A.; Kiemle, C.; Quatrevalet, M.; Hoffmann, D.; Löhring, J.; Klein, V.; Schöggl, R.

    2011-12-01

    Currently, Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt (DLR) - in collaboration with Fraunhofer-Institut für Lasertechnik (ILT) and Kayser-Threde GmbH (KT) - is developing CHARM-F, an Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) LIDAR for simultaneous measurement of CO2 and CH4 columns. Design goal is a compact and rugged instrument optimized for airborne use on board of DLR's long range research aircraft HALO. The main scientific goal of the instrument is to provide precise column measurements of CO2 and CH4 to infer fluxes of these important greenhouse gases by means of inverse modeling. For this purpose, very stringent requirements concerning accuracy and precision have to be met since typical surface sources and sinks alter the total column only by a few percent. To achieve this, CHARM-F uses laser sources emitting pulse-pairs with nanosecond duration which allows for a precise ranging and a proper separation of atmospheric influences (i.e. aerosol and clouds) from the ground return leading to an unambiguously defined column (no airmass factors involved). Two laser systems - one for each trace gas - are employed using highly efficient and robust Nd:YAG lasers to pump optical parametric oscillators (OPO) which convert the pump radiation to the desired measurement wavelengths in the near infrared. Each laser system emits a pulse pair having different wavelengths. One is tuned to an absorption line of the trace gas under consideration and the other one to a nearby wavelength with much less absorption. The close temporal pulse separation of 250 μs together with a relatively large spot size of 30 m on ground ensures that nearly the same area is illuminated by both pulses. To achieve single-mode operation, both the pump and the OPO are injection seeded. The seed lasers are locked to a gas cell filled with a mixture of CO2 and CH4 to ensure an absolute wavelength calibration. Furthermore, deviations of the wavelength between outgoing laser pulse and the seed lasers

  14. Electromagnetic theory of optical coherence [Invited].

    PubMed

    Friberg, Ari T; Setälä, Tero

    2016-12-01

    The coherence theory of random, vector-valued optical fields has been of great research interest in recent years. In this work we formulate the foundations of electromagnetic coherence theory both in the space-time and space-frequency domains, with particular emphasis on various types of optical interferometry. Analyzing statistically stationary, two-component (paraxial) electric fields in the classical and quantum-optical contexts we show fundamental connections between the conventional (polarization) Stokes parameters and the associated two-point (coherence) Stokes parameters. Measurement of the coherence and polarization properties of random vector beams by nanoparticle scattering and two-photon absorption is also addressed.

  15. Coherent orthogonal polynomials

    SciTech Connect

    Celeghini, E.; Olmo, M.A. del

    2013-08-15

    We discuss a fundamental characteristic of orthogonal polynomials, like the existence of a Lie algebra behind them, which can be added to their other relevant aspects. At the basis of the complete framework for orthogonal polynomials we include thus–in addition to differential equations, recurrence relations, Hilbert spaces and square integrable functions–Lie algebra theory. We start here from the square integrable functions on the open connected subset of the real line whose bases are related to orthogonal polynomials. All these one-dimensional continuous spaces allow, besides the standard uncountable basis (|x〉), for an alternative countable basis (|n〉). The matrix elements that relate these two bases are essentially the orthogonal polynomials: Hermite polynomials for the line and Laguerre and Legendre polynomials for the half-line and the line interval, respectively. Differential recurrence relations of orthogonal polynomials allow us to realize that they determine an infinite-dimensional irreducible representation of a non-compact Lie algebra, whose second order Casimir C gives rise to the second order differential equation that defines the corresponding family of orthogonal polynomials. Thus, the Weyl–Heisenberg algebra h(1) with C=0 for Hermite polynomials and su(1,1) with C=−1/4 for Laguerre and Legendre polynomials are obtained. Starting from the orthogonal polynomials the Lie algebra is extended both to the whole space of the L{sup 2} functions and to the corresponding Universal Enveloping Algebra and transformation group. Generalized coherent states from each vector in the space L{sup 2} and, in particular, generalized coherent polynomials are thus obtained. -- Highlights: •Fundamental characteristic of orthogonal polynomials (OP): existence of a Lie algebra. •Differential recurrence relations of OP determine a unitary representation of a non-compact Lie group. •2nd order Casimir originates a 2nd order differential equation that defines

  16. Optical Coherence Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faber, Dirk J.; van Leeuwen, Ton G.

    Seventy percent of our body is made up of water. For that reason, radiation based medical imaging techniques operate in spectral regions where water absorption is low (Fig. 18.1, panel). Well known modalities are MRI that operates at radio frequencies, and PET/SPECT which work in the high frequency range. Water absorption is also low around the part of the spectrum that is visible to the human eye. In this spectral region, scattering of the light by tissue structures roughly decreases with wavelength. Therefore, most optical imaging techniques such as (confocal) microscopy, optical tomography and Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) use wavelengths between 650 and 1300 nm to allow reasonable imaging depths.

  17. Self-calibration and laser energy monitor validations for a double-pulsed 2-μm CO2 integrated path differential absorption lidar application.

    PubMed

    Refaat, Tamer F; Singh, Upendra N; Petros, Mulugeta; Remus, Ruben; Yu, Jirong

    2015-08-20

    Double-pulsed 2-μm integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar is well suited for atmospheric CO2 remote sensing. The IPDA lidar technique relies on wavelength differentiation between strong and weak absorbing features of the gas normalized to the transmitted energy. In the double-pulse case, each shot of the transmitter produces two successive laser pulses separated by a short interval. Calibration of the transmitted pulse energies is required for accurate CO2 measurement. Design and calibration of a 2-μm double-pulse laser energy monitor is presented. The design is based on an InGaAs pin quantum detector. A high-speed photoelectromagnetic quantum detector was used for laser-pulse profile verification. Both quantum detectors were calibrated using a reference pyroelectric thermal detector. Calibration included comparing the three detection technologies in the single-pulsed mode, then comparing the quantum detectors in the double-pulsed mode. In addition, a self-calibration feature of the 2-μm IPDA lidar is presented. This feature allows one to monitor the transmitted laser energy, through residual scattering, with a single detection channel. This reduces the CO2 measurement uncertainty. IPDA lidar ground validation for CO2 measurement is presented for both calibrated energy monitor and self-calibration options. The calibrated energy monitor resulted in a lower CO2 measurement bias, while self-calibration resulted in a better CO2 temporal profiling when compared to the in situ sensor.

  18. Optical modeling of sunlight by using partially coherent sources in organic solar cells.

    PubMed

    Alaibakhsh, Hamzeh; Darvish, Ghafar

    2016-03-01

    We investigate the effects of coherent and partially coherent sources in optical modeling of organic solar cells. Two different organic solar cells are investigated: one without substrate and the other with a millimeter-sized glass substrate. The coherent light absorption is calculated with rigorous coupled-wave analysis. The result of this method is convolved with a distribution function to calculate the partially coherent light absorption. We propose a new formulation to accurately model sunlight as a set of partially coherent sources. In the structure with glass substrate, the accurate sunlight modeling results in the elimination of coherent effects in the thick substrate, but the coherency in other layers is not affected. Using partially coherent sources instead of coherent sources for simulations with sunlight results in a smoother absorption spectrum, but the change in the absorption efficiency is negligible.

  19. 2-Micron Laser Transmitter for Coherent CO2 DIAL Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Bai, Yingxin; Yu, Jirong

    2009-01-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) has been recognized as one of the most important greenhouse gases. It is essential for the study of global warming to accurately measure the CO2 concentration in the atmosphere and continuously record its variation. A high repetition rate, highly efficient, Q-switched 2-micron laser system as the transmitter of a coherent differential absorption lidar for CO2 measurement has been developed in NASA Langley Research Center. This laser system is capable of making a vertical profiling of CO2 from ground and column measurement of CO2 from air and space-borne platform. The transmitter is a master-slave laser system. The master laser operates in a single frequency, either on-line or off-line of a selected CO2 absorption line. The slave laser is a Q-switched ring-cavity Ho:YLF laser which is pumped by a Tm:fiber laser. The repetition rate can be adjusted from a few hundred Hz to 10 kHz. The injection seeding success rate is from 99.4% to 99.95%. For 1 kHz operation, the output pulse energy is 5.5mJ with the pulse length of 50 ns. The optical-to-optical efficiency is 39% when the pump power is 14.5W. A Ho:YLF laser operating in the range of 2.05 micrometers can be tuned over several characteristic lines of CO2 absorption. Experimentally, a diode pumped Ho:Tm:YLF laser has been successfully used as the transmitter of coherent differential absorption lidar for the measurement of CO2 with a repetition rate of 5 Hz and pulse energy of 75 mJ. For coherent detection, high repetition rate is required for speckle averaging to obtain highly precise measurements. However, a diode pumped Ho:Tm:YLF laser can not operate in high repetition rate due to the large heat loading and up-conversion. A Tm:fiber laser pumped Ho:YLF laser with low heat loading can operate in high repetition rate. A theoretical model has been established to simulate the performance of Tm:fiber laser pumped Ho:YLF lasers. For continuous wave (CW) operation, high pump intensity with small beam

  20. 2-Micron Laser Transmitter for Coherent CO2 DIAL Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Bai, Yingxin; Yu, Jirong

    2009-01-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) has been recognized as one of the most important greenhouse gases. It is essential for the study of global warming to accurately measure the CO2 concentration in the atmosphere and continuously record its variation. A high repetition rate, highly efficient, Q-switched 2-micron laser system as the transmitter of a coherent differential absorption lidar for CO2 measurement has been developed in NASA Langley Research Center. This laser system is capable of making a vertical profiling of CO2 from ground and column measurement of CO2 from air and space-borne platform. The transmitter is a master-slave laser system. The master laser operates in a single frequency, either on-line or off-line of a selected CO2 absorption line. The slave laser is a Q-switched ring-cavity Ho:YLF laser which is pumped by a Tm:fiber laser. The repetition rate can be adjusted from a few hundred Hz to 10 kHz. The injection seeding success rate is from 99.4% to 99.95%. For 1 kHz operation, the output pulse energy is 5.5mJ with the pulse length of 50 ns. The optical-to-optical efficiency is 39% when the pump power is 14.5W. A Ho:YLF laser operating in the range of 2.05 micrometers can be tuned over several characteristic lines of CO2 absorption. Experimentally, a diode pumped Ho:Tm:YLF laser has been successfully used as the transmitter of coherent differential absorption lidar for the measurement of CO2 with a repetition rate of 5 Hz and pulse energy of 75 mJ. For coherent detection, high repetition rate is required for speckle averaging to obtain highly precise measurements. However, a diode pumped Ho:Tm:YLF laser can not operate in high repetition rate due to the large heat loading and up-conversion. A Tm:fiber laser pumped Ho:YLF laser with low heat loading can operate in high repetition rate. A theoretical model has been established to simulate the performance of Tm:fiber laser pumped Ho:YLF lasers. For continuous wave (CW) operation, high pump intensity with small beam

  1. Real-time monitoring of benzene, toluene, and p-xylene in a photoreaction chamber with a tunable mid-infrared laser and ultraviolet differential optical absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Parsons, Matthew T; Sydoryk, Ihor; Lim, Alan; McIntyre, Thomas J; Tulip, John; Jäger, Wolfgang; McDonald, Karen

    2011-02-01

    We describe the implementation of a mid-infrared laser-based trace gas sensor with a photoreaction chamber, used for reproducing chemical transformations of benzene, toluene, and p-xylene (BTX) gases that may occur in the atmosphere. The system performance was assessed in the presence of photoreaction products including aerosol particles. A mid-infrared external cavity quantum cascade laser (EC-QCL)-tunable from 9.41-9.88 μm (1012-1063 cm(-1))-was used to monitor gas phase concentrations of BTX simultaneously and in real time during chemical processing of these compounds with hydroxyl radicals in a photoreaction chamber. Results are compared to concurrent measurements using ultraviolet differential optical absorption spectroscopy (UV DOAS). The EC-QCL based system provides quantitation limits of approximately 200, 200, and 600 parts in 10(9) (ppb) for benzene, toluene, and p-xylene, respectively, which represents a significant improvement over our previous work with this laser system. Correspondingly, we observe the best agreement between the EC-QCL measurements and the UV DOAS measurements with benzene, followed by toluene, then p-xylene. Although BTX gas-detection limits are not as low for the EC-QCL system as for UV DOAS, an unidentified by-product of the photoreactions was observed with the EC-QCL, but not with the UV DOAS system.

  2. A Compact Ti:Sapphire Laser With its Third Harmonic Generation (THG) for an Airborne Ozone Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) Transmitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Songsheng; Storm, Mark E.; Marsh, Waverly D.; Petway, Larry B.; Edwards, William C.; Barnes, James C.

    2000-01-01

    A compact and high-pulse-energy Ti:Sapphire laser with its Third Harmonic Generation (THG) has been developed for an airborne ozone differential absorption lidar (DIAL) to study the distributions and concentrations of the ozone throughout the troposphere. The Ti:Sapphire laser, pumped by a frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser and seeded by a single mode diode laser, is operated either at 867 nm or at 900 nm with a pulse repetition frequency of 20 Hz. High energy laser pulses (more than 110 mJ/pulse) at 867 nm or 900 nm with a desired beam quality have been achieved and utilized to generate its third harmonic at 289nm or 300nm, which are on-line and off-line wavelengths of an airborne ozone DIAL. After being experimentally compared with Beta-Barium Borate (beta - BaB2O4 or BBO) nonlinear crystals, two Lithium Triborate (LBO) crystals (5 x 5 x 20 cu mm) are selected for the Third Harmonic Generation (THG). In this paper, we report the Ti:Sapphire laser at 900 nm and its third harmonic at 300 nm. The desired high ultraviolet (UV) output pulse energy is more than 30 mJ at 300 nm and the energy conversion efficiency from 900 nm to 300 nm is 30%.

  3. Joint application of Doppler Lidar and differential absorption lidar to estimate the atomic mercury flux from a chlor-alkali plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, M.; Edner, H.; Grönlund, R.; Sjöholm, M.; Svanberg, S.; Ferrara, R.

    We have combined differential absorption lidar (DIAL) measurements of mercury concentrations downwind of a chlor-alkali plant (Rosignano Solvay) with measurements of wind profiles made with a Doppler Lidar based on modern fibre-optic technology. Since the flux of pollutant is equal to the cross-wind integral of the product of concentration and wind speed, this should permit us to make a more precise estimate of the fugitive emission of mercury from the plant than could be obtained by using anemometer measurements of the wind. The flux was estimated to be 54 g Hg h -1 using an anemometer on the plant building; 49 g Hg h -1 using an anemometer on a nearby 10 m mast; and 48 g Hg h -1 using wind speed corrections estimated from the Doppler Lidar measurements. Because of difficulties with the range resolution of the Doppler Lidar, the precision of this estimate was not as good as it should have been, though the difference from the rooftop anemometer remains statistically significant. Corrections of this magnitude are irrelevant to the Rosignano plant, where the emission rate varies strongly with the meteorological conditions. Where a precise estimate of a steady flux is required, however, reliable measurements of the wind profile in the wake of the source are essential. Doppler Lidar provides a possible method for acquiring such measurements.

  4. Analysis of a random modulation single photon counting differential absorption lidar system for space-borne atmospheric CO2 sensing.

    PubMed

    Ai, X; Pérez-Serrano, A; Quatrevalet, M; Nock, R W; Dahnoun, N; Ehret, G; Esquivias, I; Rarity, J G

    2016-09-05

    The ability to observe the Earth's carbon cycles from space provides scientists an important tool to analyze climate change. Current proposed systems are mainly based on pulsed integrated path differential absorption lidar, in which two high energy pulses at different wavelengths interrogate the atmosphere sequentially for its transmission properties and are back-scattered by the ground. In this work an alternative approach based on random modulation single photon counting is proposed and analyzed; this system can take advantage of a less power demanding semiconductor laser in intensity modulated continuous wave operation, benefiting from a better efficiency, reliability and radiation hardness. Our approach is validated via numerical simulations considering current technological readiness, demonstrating its potential to obtain a 1.5 ppm retrieval precision for 50 km averaging with 2.5 W average power in a space-borne scenario. A major limiting factor is the ambient shot noise, if ultra-narrow band filtering technology could be applied, 0.5 ppm retrieval precision would be attainable.

  5. High-power Ti:sapphire laser at 820 nm for scanning ground-based water-vapor differential absorption lidar.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Gerd; Behrendt, Andreas; Wulfmeyer, Volker; Späth, Florian; Schiller, Max

    2013-04-10

    The Ti:sapphire (TISA) laser transmitter of the mobile, three-dimensional-scanning water-vapor differential absorption lidar (DIAL) of the University of Hohenheim is described in detail. The dynamically-stable, unidirectional ring resonator contains a single Brewster-cut TISA crystal, which is pumped from both sides with 250 Hz using a diode-pumped frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser. The resonator is injection seeded and actively frequency-stabilized using a phase-sensitive technique. The TISA laser is operating near 820 nm, which is optimum for ground-based water-vapor DIAL measurements. An average output power of up to 6.75 W with a beam quality factor of M2<2 is reached. The pointing stability is <13 μrad (rms), the depolarization <1%. The overall optical-optical conversion efficiency is up to 19%. The pulse length is 40 ns with a pulse linewidth of <157 MHz. The short- and long-term frequency stabilities are 10 MHz (rms). A spectral purity of 99.9% was determined by pointing to a stratus cloud in low-elevation scanning mode with a cloud bottom height of ≈2.4 km.

  6. Observation of tropospheric NO2 by airborne multi-axis differential optical absorption spectroscopy in the Pearl River Delta region, south China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jin; Xie, Pin-Hua; Si, Fu-Qi; Li, Ang; Wu, Feng-Cheng; Wang, Yang; Liu, Jian-Guo; Liu, Wen-Qing; Andreas, Hartl; Chan, Ka Lok

    2014-09-01

    An airborne multi-axis differential optical absorption spectroscopic (AMAX-DOAS) instrument was developed and applied to measure tropospheric NO2 in the Pearl River Delta region in the south of China. By combining the measurements in nadir and zenith directions and analyzing the UV and visible spectral region using the DOAS method, information about tropospheric NO2 vertical columns was obtained. Strong tropospheric NO2 signals were detected when flying over heavilly polluted regions and point sources like plants. The AMAX-DOAS results were compared with ground-based MAX-DOAS observations in the southwest of Zhuhai city using the same parameters for radiative transport calculations. The difference in vertical column data between the two instruments is about 8%. Our data were also compared with those from OMI and fair agreement was obtained with a correlation coefficient R of 0.61. The difference between the two instruments can be attributed to the different spatial resolution and the temporal mismatch during the measurements.

  7. Comparing different light-emitting diodes as light sources for long path differential optical absorption spectroscopy NO2 and SO2 measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Ka-Lok; Ling, Liu-Yi; Andreas, Hartl; Zheng, Ni-Na; Gerrit, Kuhlmann; Qin, Min; Sun, You-Wen; Xie, Pin-Hua; Liu, Wen-Qing; Mark, Wenig

    2012-11-01

    In this paper, we present a comparison of different light-emitting diodes (LEDs) as the light source for long path differential optical absorption spectroscopy (LP-DOAS) atmospheric trace gas measurements. In our study, we use a fiberoptic design, where high power LEDs used as the light source are coupled into the telescope using a Y shape fiber bundle. Two blue and one ultraviolet (UV) LEDs with different emission wavelength ranges are tested for NO2 and SO2 measurements. The detailed description of the instrumental setup, the NO2 and SO2 retrieval procedure, the error analysis, and the preliminary results from the measurements carried out in Science Island, Hefei, Anhui, China are presented. Our first measurement results show that atmospheric NO2 and SO2 have strong temporal variations in that area and that the measurement accuracy is strongly dependent on the visibility conditions. The measured NO2 and SO2 data are compared to the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) satellite observations. The results show that the OMI NO2 product underestimates the ground level NO2 by 45%, while the OMI SO2 data are highly influenced by clouds and aerosols, which can lead to large biases in the ground level concentrations. During the experiment, the mixing ratios of the atmospheric NO2 and SO2 vary from 8 ppbv to 36 ppbv and from 3 ppbv to 18 ppbv, respectively.

  8. A Compact Ti:Sapphire Laser With its Third Harmonic Generation (THG) for an Airborne Ozone Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) Transmitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Songsheng; Storm, Mark E.; Marsh, Waverly D.; Petway, Larry B.; Edwards, William C.; Barnes, James C.

    2000-01-01

    A compact and high-pulse-energy Ti:Sapphire laser with its Third Harmonic Generation (THG) has been developed for an airborne ozone differential absorption lidar (DIAL) to study the distributions and concentrations of the ozone throughout the troposphere. The Ti:Sapphire laser, pumped by a frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser and seeded by a single mode diode laser, is operated either at 867 nm or at 900 nm with a pulse repetition frequency of 20 Hz. High energy laser pulses (more than 110 mJ/pulse) at 867 nm or 900 nm with a desired beam quality have been achieved and utilized to generate its third harmonic at 289nm or 300nm, which are on-line and off-line wavelengths of an airborne ozone DIAL. After being experimentally compared with Beta-Barium Borate (beta - BaB2O4 or BBO) nonlinear crystals, two Lithium Triborate (LBO) crystals (5 x 5 x 20 cu mm) are selected for the Third Harmonic Generation (THG). In this paper, we report the Ti:Sapphire laser at 900 nm and its third harmonic at 300 nm. The desired high ultraviolet (UV) output pulse energy is more than 30 mJ at 300 nm and the energy conversion efficiency from 900 nm to 300 nm is 30%.

  9. Huygens-Fresnel Wave-Optics Simulation of Atmosphere Optical Turbulence and Reflective Speckle in CO{sub 2} Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL)

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, D.H.; Petrin, R.R.; MacKerrow, E.P.; Schmitt, M.J.; Foy, B.R.; Koskelo, A.C.; McVey, B.D.; Quick, C.R.; Porch, W.M.; Tiee, J.J.; Fite, C.B.; Archuleta, F.A.; Whitehead, M.C.; Walters, D.L.

    1999-03-23

    The measurement sensitivity of CO{sub 2} differential absorption lidar (DIAL) can be affected by a number of different processes. We have previously developed a Huygens-Fresnel wave optics propagation code to simulate the effects of two of these process: effects caused by beam propagation through atmospheric optical turbulence and effects caused by reflective speckle. Atmospheric optical turbulence affects the beam distribution of energy and phase on target. These effects include beam spreading, beam wander and scintillation which can result in increased shot-to-shot signal noise. In addition, reflective speckle alone has been shown to have a major impact on the sensitivity of CO{sub 2} DIAL. However, in real DIAL systems it is a combination of these phenomena, the interaction of atmospheric optical turbulence and reflective speckle, that influences the results. In this work, we briefly review a description of our model including the limitations along with previous simulation s of individual effects. The performance of our modified code with respect to experimental measurements affected by atmospheric optical turbulence and reflective speckle is examined. The results of computer simulations are directly compared with lidar measurements and show good agreement. In addition, advanced studies have been performed to demonstrate the utility of our model in assessing the effects for different lidar geometries on RMS noise and correlation ''size'' in the receiver plane.

  10. Huygens-Fresnel wave-optics simulation of atmospheric optical turbulence and reflective speckle in CO{sub 2} differential absorption lidar (DIAL)

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, D.; Petrin, R.; MacKerrow, E.; Schmitt, M.; Foy, B.; Koskelo, A.; McVey, B.; Quick, C.; Porch, W.; Fite, C.; Archuleta, F.; Whitehead, M.; Tiee, J.; Walters, D.

    1999-04-01

    The measurement sensitivity of CO{sub 2} differential absorption lidar (DIAL) can be affected by a number of different processes. The authors have previously developed a Huygens-Fresnel wave optics propagation code to simulate the effects of two of these processes: effects caused by beam propagation through atmospheric optical turbulence and effects caused by reflective speckle. Atmospheric optical turbulence affects the beam distribution of energy and phase on target. These effects include beam spreading, beam wander and scintillation which can result in increased shot-to-shot signal noise. In addition, reflective speckle alone has been shown to have a major impact on the sensitivity of CO{sub 2} DIAL. However, in real DIAL systems it is a combination of these phenomena, the interaction of atmospheric optical turbulence and reflective speckle, that influences the results. The performance of the modified code with respect to experimental measurements affected by atmospheric optical turbulence and reflective speckle is examined. The results of computer simulations are directly compared with lidar measurements. The limitations of the model are also discussed. In addition, studies have been performed to determine the importance of key parameters in the simulation. The results of these studies and their impact on the overall results will be presented.

  11. Direct measurements of HONO and NO2 by tunable infrared differential absorption spectroscopy; Results from two field campaigns sampling aircraft exhaust and ambient urban air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, B. H.; Santoni, G.; Herndon, S. C.; Wood, E. C.; Miake-Lye, R. C.; Munger, J. W.; Wofsy, S. C.; Zahniser, M. S.; McManus, J. B.; Nelson, D. D.

    2009-12-01

    Nitrous acid (HONO) is an important source of hydroxyl radicals (OH), the main oxidizing agent in the atmosphere. However, gaseous HONO has historically proven difficult to measure accurately and to date there is no standard technique. We describe a new instrument capable of high-frequency measurements of HONO and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) mixing ratios by tunable infrared differential absorption spectrometry. Mid-infrared light from two continuous-wave mode quantum cascade lasers traverse a 210 m path through a multi-pass astigmatic cell at reduced pressures for the direct detection of HONO (1660 cm-1) and NO2 (1604 cm-1). We achieve an absorbance precision less than 3×10-6 Hz-1 in one second, which translates to detection limits (S/N=3) of 300 and 30 ppt for HONO and NO2, respectively, in one second. Both lasers and the detector are thermoelectrically cooled, facilitating long-term unattended measurements. We also report preliminary results from two field campaigns; the Alternative Aviation Fuels Experiment (AAFEX) and the Study of Houston Air Radical Precursors (SHARP). At AAFEX, HONO emission ratios relative to CO2 and NOy observed in commercial aircraft exhaust are larger than in most other combustion sources and likely to play a significant role in regional HOx chemistry. Preliminary analysis from the SHARP campaign shows good agreement in HONO and NO2 levels between various measurement techniques.

  12. Coherent amplified optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jun; Rao, Bin; Chen, Zhongping

    2007-07-01

    A technique to improve the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of a high speed 1300 nm swept source optical coherence tomography (SSOCT) system was demonstrated. A semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) was employed in the sample arm to coherently amplify the weak light back-scattered from sample tissue without increasing laser power illuminated on the sample. The image quality improvement was visualized and quantified by imaging the anterior segment of a rabbit eye at imaging speed of 20,000 A-lines per second. The theory analysis of SNR gain is given followed by the discussion on the technologies that can further improve the SNR gain.

  13. Coherence, Pseudo-Coherence, and Non-Coherence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Enkvist, Nils Erik

    Analysis of the factors that make a text coherent or non-coherent suggests that total coherence requires cohesion not only on the textual surface but on the semantic level as well. Syntactic evidence of non-coherence includes lack of formal agreement blocking a potential cross-reference, anaphoric and cataphoric references that do not follow their…

  14. AR (Autoregressive) Modeling of Coherence in Time Delay and Doppler Estimation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-12-01

    Authoriy 3 Distribution Availabilhtv of Report 2b Declassifica’ion Downgrading Schedule Approved for public release: distribution is unlimited. 4 Performira...2 C. COHERENCE ESTIMATION ................................. 3 D. COHERENCE OF NARROW BAND SIGNALS WITH DIFFERENTIAL TIME DELAY AND DIFFERENTIAL...5 Figure 2. Coherence estimation block diagram (reinterpretation) ............. 5 Figure 3 . Coherence estimation block diagram using the FFT

  15. Induced Transparency and Absorption in Coupled Microresonators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, David D.; Chang, Hongrok

    2004-01-01

    We review the conditions for the occurrence of coherence phenomena in passive coupled optical microresonators. We derive the effective steady-state response and determine conditions for induced transparency and absorption in these systems.

  16. Induced Transparency and Absorption in Coupled Microresonators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, David D.; Chang, Hongrok

    2004-01-01

    We review the conditions for the occurrence of coherence phenomena in passive coupled optical microresonators. We derive the effective steady-state response and determine conditions for induced transparency and absorption in these systems.

  17. Femtosecond optical spectroscopy and microscopy with phase coherent pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chunqiang

    This dissertation focuses on femtosecond optical spectroscopy and microscopy by using ultrashort laser pulse shaping technology. Collinear phase coherent two-dimensional spectroscopy on the organic dye Coumarin 102 was performed. The collinear phase coherent three-pulse sequences in the near infrared wavelength (800 nm) were generated by an acousto-optic pulse shaper. Coumarin 102 has a broad absorption band of around 400 nm. Two-photon absorption of the 800 nm light in Coumarin 102 is essential to perform the experiment. For comparison another set of experiments with the light frequency doubled to 400 nm was also performed. The results obtained show similar features with different details. The energy level information, e.g. linewidth, can be retrieved from the two-dimensional spectral peaks. With pulse shaping technology the possibility to perform ultrafast laser microscopy aiming at potential biomedical application was also explored. The information utilized to differentiate chemicals is two-photon absorption and the structural information can also be retrieved from self-phase modulation. The nonlinear signal from these experiments is very small compared with input laser power. A heterodyne detection method was performed by creating a spectral hole in the laser spectrum with the pulse shaper. The signal generated is mixed with the local oscillator. The results from Rhodamine 6G, oxyHemoglobin and pheomelanin show the difference and imply promising further development with this method. The last part of this dissertation is a previous work on a novel structure wavelength tunable semiconductor laser based on asymmetric twin waveguide technology. To integrate several optoelectronic devices together, several schemes are available. Asymmetric twin waveguide technology is the only integration platform which does not require material regrowth and quantum well intermixing. The tunable laser based on this technology can be used as a local oscillator in a coherent optical

  18. Boundary Layer Observations of Water Vapor and Aerosol Profiles with an Eye-Safe Micro-Pulse Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nehrir, A. R.; Repasky, K. S.; Carlsten, J.; Ismail, S.

    2011-12-01

    Measurements of real-time high spatial and temporal resolution profiles of combined water vapor and aerosols in the boundary layer have been a long standing observational challenge to the meteorological, weather forecasting, and climate science communities. To overcome the high reoccurring costs associated with radiosondes as well as the lack of sufficient water vapor measurements over the continental united states, a compact and low cost eye-safe all semiconductor-based micro-pulse differential absorption lidar (DIAL) has been developed for water vapor and aerosol profiling in the lower troposphere. The laser transmitter utilizes two continuous wave external cavity diode lasers operating in the 830 nm absorption band as the online and offline seed laser sources. An optical switch is used to sequentially injection seed a tapered semiconductor optical amplifier (TSOA) with the two seed laser sources in a master oscillator power amplifier (MOPA) configuration. The TSOA is actively current pulsed to produce up to 7 μJ of output energy over a 1 μs pulse duration (150 m vertical resolution) at a 10 kHz pulse repetition frequency. The measured laser transmitter spectral linewidth is less than 500 kHz while the long term frequency stability of the stabilized on-line wavelength is ± 55 MHz. The laser transmitter spectral purity was measured to be greater than 0.9996, allowing for simultaneous measurements of water vapor in the lower and upper troposphere. The DIAL receiver utilizes a commercially available full sky-scanning capable 35 cm Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope to collect the scattered light from the laser transmitter. Light collected by the telescope is spectrally filtered to suppress background noise and is coupled into a fiber optic cable which acts as the system field stop and limits the full angle field of view to 140 μrad. The light is sampled by a fiber coupled APD operated in a Geiger mode. The DIAL instrument is operated autonomously where water vapor and

  19. Application of surface pressure measurements of O2-band differential absorption radar system in three-dimensional data assimilation on hurricane: Part II - A quasi-observational study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Qilong; Gong, Wei; Lin, Bing; Hu, Yongxiang

    2015-01-01

    This is the second part on assessing the impacts of assimilating various distributions of sea-level pressure (SLP) on hurricane simulations, using the Weather and Research Forecast (WRF) three dimensional variational data assimilation system (3DVAR). One key purpose of this series of study is to explore the potential of using remotely sensed sea surface barometric data from O2-band differential absorption radar system currently under development for server weather including hurricane forecasts. In this part II we further validate the conclusions of observational system simulation experiments (OSSEs) in the part I using observed SLP for three hurricanes that passed over the Florida peninsula. Three SLP patterns are tested again, including all available data near the Florida peninsula, and a band of observations either through the center or tangent to the hurricane position. Before the assimilation, a vortex SLP reconstruction technique is employed for the use of observed SLP as discussed in the part I. In agreement with the results from OSSEs, the performance of assimilating SLP is enhanced for the two hurricanes with stronger initial minimum SLP, leading to a significant improvement in the track and position relative to the control where no data are assimilated. On the other hand, however, the improvement in the hurricane intensity is generally limited to the first 24-48 h of integration, while a high resolution nested domain simulation, along with assimilation of SLP in the coarse domain, shows more profound improvement in the intensity. A diagnostic analysis of the potential vorticity suggests that the improved track forecasts are attributed to the combined effects of adjusting the steering wind fields in a consistent manner with having a deeper vortex, and the associated changes in the convective activity.

  20. Practical witness for electronic coherences.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Allan S; Yuen-Zhou, Joel; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán; Krich, Jacob J

    2014-12-28

    The origin of the coherences in two-dimensional spectroscopy of photosynthetic complexes remains disputed. Recently, it has been shown that in the ultrashort-pulse limit, oscillations in a frequency-integrated pump-probe signal correspond exclusively to electronic coherences, and thus such experiments can be used to form a test for electronic vs. vibrational oscillations in such systems. Here, we demonstrate a method for practically implementing such a test, whereby pump-probe signals are taken at several different pulse durations and used to extrapolate to the ultrashort-pulse limit. We present analytic and numerical results determining requirements for pulse durations and the optimal choice of pulse central frequency, which can be determined from an absorption spectrum. Our results suggest that for numerous systems, the required experiment could be implemented by many ultrafast spectroscopy laboratories using pulses of tens of femtoseconds in duration. Such experiments could resolve the standing debate over the nature of coherences in photosynthetic complexes.

  1. Practical witness for electronic coherences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Allan S.; Yuen-Zhou, Joel; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán; Krich, Jacob J.

    2014-12-01

    The origin of the coherences in two-dimensional spectroscopy of photosynthetic complexes remains disputed. Recently, it has been shown that in the ultrashort-pulse limit, oscillations in a frequency-integrated pump-probe signal correspond exclusively to electronic coherences, and thus such experiments can be used to form a test for electronic vs. vibrational oscillations in such systems. Here, we demonstrate a method for practically implementing such a test, whereby pump-probe signals are taken at several different pulse durations and used to extrapolate to the ultrashort-pulse limit. We present analytic and numerical results determining requirements for pulse durations and the optimal choice of pulse central frequency, which can be determined from an absorption spectrum. Our results suggest that for numerous systems, the required experiment could be implemented by many ultrafast spectroscopy laboratories using pulses of tens of femtoseconds in duration. Such experiments could resolve the standing debate over the nature of coherences in photosynthetic complexes.

  2. Practical witness for electronic coherences

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Allan S.; Yuen-Zhou, Joel; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán; Krich, Jacob J.

    2014-12-28

    The origin of the coherences in two-dimensional spectroscopy of photosynthetic complexes remains disputed. Recently, it has been shown that in the ultrashort-pulse limit, oscillations in a frequency-integrated pump-probe signal correspond exclusively to electronic coherences, and thus such experiments can be used to form a test for electronic vs. vibrational oscillations in such systems. Here, we demonstrate a method for practically implementing such a test, whereby pump-probe signals are taken at several different pulse durations and used to extrapolate to the ultrashort-pulse limit. We present analytic and numerical results determining requirements for pulse durations and the optimal choice of pulse central frequency, which can be determined from an absorption spectrum. Our results suggest that for numerous systems, the required experiment could be implemented by many ultrafast spectroscopy laboratories using pulses of tens of femtoseconds in duration. Such experiments could resolve the standing debate over the nature of coherences in photosynthetic complexes.

  3. Coherence, Cohesion, and Writing Quality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faigley, Lester; Witte, Stephen P.

    1981-01-01

    Differentiates the two concepts of cohesion and coherence. Points out the differences between highly-rated and lower-rated essays by the techniques the writers used to achieve cohesion. Offers references on text linguistics and on European writings about discourse. (RL)

  4. Coherence Phenomena in Coupled Optical Resonators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, D. D.; Chang, H.

    2004-01-01

    We predict a variety of photonic coherence phenomena in passive and active coupled ring resonators. Specifically, the effective dispersive and absorptive steady-state response of coupled resonators is derived, and used to determine the conditions for coupled-resonator-induced transparency and absorption, lasing without gain, and cooperative cavity emission. These effects rely on coherent photon trapping, in direct analogy with coherent population trapping phenomena in atomic systems. We also demonstrate that the coupled-mode equations are formally identical to the two-level atom Schrodinger equation in the rotating-wave approximation, and use this result for the analysis of coupled-resonator photon dynamics. Notably, because these effects are predicted directly from coupled-mode theory, they are not unique to atoms, but rather are fundamental to systems of coherently coupled resonators.

  5. Coherence Phenomena in Coupled Optical Resonators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, D. D.; Chang, H.

    2004-01-01

    We predict a variety of photonic coherence phenomena in passive and active coupled ring resonators. Specifically, the effective dispersive and absorptive steady-state response of coupled resonators is derived, and used to determine the conditions for coupled-resonator-induced transparency and absorption, lasing without gain, and cooperative cavity emission. These effects rely on coherent photon trapping, in direct analogy with coherent population trapping phenomena in atomic systems. We also demonstrate that the coupled-mode equations are formally identical to the two-level atom Schrodinger equation in the rotating-wave approximation, and use this result for the analysis of coupled-resonator photon dynamics. Notably, because these effects are predicted directly from coupled-mode theory, they are not unique to atoms, but rather are fundamental to systems of coherently coupled resonators.

  6. An iterative approach for modeling the interaction of a partial coherent light distribution with an absorbing photosensitive polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heyvaert, S.; Meuret, Y.; Meulebroeck, W.; Thienpont, H.

    2012-06-01

    The propagation of coherent light through a heterogeneous medium is an often-encountered problem in optics. Analytical solutions, found by solving the appropriate differential equations, usually only exist for simplified and idealized situations limiting their accuracy and applicability. A widely used approach is the Beam Propagation Method in which the electric field is determined by solving the wave equation numerically, making the method time-consuming, a drawback exacerbated by the heterogeneity of the medium. In this work we propose an alternative approach which combines, in an iterative way, optical ray-tracing simulation in the software ASAP™ with numerical simulations in Matlab in order to model the change in light distribution in a medium with anisotropic absorption, exposed to partially coherent light with high irradiance. The medium under study is a photosensitive polymer in which photochemical reactions cause the local absorption to change as a function of the local light fluence. Under continuous illumination, this results in time-varying light distributions throughout the irradiance process. In our model the fluence-absorption interaction is modelled by splitting up each iteration step into two parts. In the first part the optical ray-tracing software determines the new light distribution in the medium using the absorption from the previous iteration step. In the second part, using the new light distribution, the new absorption coefficients are calculated and expressed as a set of polynomials. The evolution of the light distribution and absorption is presented and the change in total transmission is compared with experiments.

  7. Comparison of IPDA lidar receiver sensitivity for coherent detection and for direct detection using sine-wave and pulsed modulation.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaoli; Abshire, James B

    2012-09-10

    We use theoretical models to compare the receiver signal to noise ratio (SNR) vs. average rate of detected signal photons for an integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar using coherent detection with continuous wave (CW) lasers and direct detection with sine-wave and pulse modulations. The results show the coherent IPDA lidar has high receiver gain and narrow bandwidth to overcome the effects of detector circuit noise and background light, but the actual receiver performance can be limited by the coherent mixing efficiency, speckle and other factors. For direct detection, using sine-wave modulation allows the use of a low peak power laser transmitter and synchronous detection. The pulse modulation technique requires higher laser peak powers but is more efficient than sine-wave modulation in terms of average detected signal photon rate required to achieve a given receiver SNR. We also conducted experiments for the direct detection cases and the results agreed well with theory.

  8. Fundamental relationship between the noise properties of grating-based differential phase contrast CT and absorption CT: Theoretical framework using a cascaded system model and experimental validation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ke; Bevins, Nicholas; Zambelli, Joseph; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Using a grating interferometer, a conventional x-ray cone beam computed tomography (CT) data acquisition system can be used to simultaneously generate both conventional absorption CT (ACT) and differential phase contrast CT (DPC-CT) images from a single data acquisition. Since the two CT images were extracted from the same set of x-ray projections, it is expected that intrinsic relationships exist between the noise properties of the two contrast mechanisms. The purpose of this paper is to investigate these relationships. Methods: First, a theoretical framework was developed using a cascaded system model analysis to investigate the relationship between the noise power spectra (NPS) of DPC-CT and ACT. Based on the derived analytical expressions of the NPS, the relationship between the spatial-frequency-dependent noise equivalent quanta (NEQ) of DPC-CT and ACT was derived. From these fundamental relationships, the NPS and NEQ of the DPC-CT system can be derived from the corresponding ACT system or vice versa. To validate these theoretical relationships, a benchtop cone beam DPC-CT/ACT system was used to experimentally measure the modulation transfer function (MTF) and NPS of both DPC-CT and ACT. The measured three-dimensional (3D) MTF and NPS were then combined to generate the corresponding 3D NEQ. Results: Two fundamental relationships have been theoretically derived and experimentally validated for the NPS and NEQ of DPC-CT and ACT: (1) the 3D NPS of DPC-CT is quantitatively related to the corresponding 3D NPS of ACT by an inplane-only spatial-frequency-dependent factor 1/f 2, the ratio of window functions applied to DPC-CT and ACT, and a numerical factor Cg determined by the geometry and efficiency of the grating interferometer. Note that the frequency-dependent factor is independent of the frequency component fz perpendicular to the axial plane. (2) The 3D NEQ of DPC-CT is related to the corresponding 3D NEQ of ACT by an f 2 scaling factor and

  9. Progress Toward an Autonomous Field Deployable Diode Laser Based Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) for Profiling Water Vapor in the Lower Troposphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Repasky, K. S.; Spuler, S.; Nehrir, A. R.; Moen, D.

    2013-12-01

    Water vapor is the most dominant greenhouse gas in the atmosphere and plays an important role in many key atmospheric processes associated with both weather and climate. Water vapor is highly variable in space and time due to large scale transport and biosphere-atmosphere interactions. Having long-term, high-resolution, vertical profiles of water vapor will help to better understand the water vapor structure and variability and its associated impact on weather and climate. A diode laser based differential absorption lidar (DIAL) for full-time water vapor and aerosol profiling in the lower troposphere has been demonstrated at Montana State University. This prototype instrument has the potential to form the basis of a ground based network of eye-safe autonomous instruments that can provide important information on the spatial and temporal variability of water vapor in the lower troposphere. To achieve this potential, major improvements to the prototype instrument need to be implemented and demonstrated including developing a laser transmitter capable of long term operation and modifying the optical receiver to make measurement below 0.5 km. During the past year, work on incorporating a new laser transmitter based on two distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) diode lasers, one operating at the on-line/side-line wavelength and the second operating at the off-line wavelength to injection seed a tapered semiconductor optical amplifier (TSOA) in a master oscillator power amplifier (MOPA) configuration has been completed. Recent work on the optical receiver is driven by the fact that the majority of the atmospheric water vapor resides below 2 km. The current single channel DIAL receiver has a narrow field of view and does not come in to full overlap until approximately 2 km. A two channel DIAL receiver has been designed that will allow the DIAL to achieve full overlap at ranges of less the 0.5 km providing significant improvement to the instrument performance. A discussion of

  10. Early in-flight detection of SO2 via Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy: a feasible aviation safety measure to prevent potential encounters with volcanic plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, L.; Galle, B.; Kern, C.; Delgado Granados, H.; Conde, V.; Norman, P.; Arellano, S.; Landgren, O.; Lübcke, P.; Alvarez Nieves, J. M.; Cárdenas Gonzáles, L.; Platt, U.

    2011-05-01

    Volcanic ash constitutes a risk to aviation, mainly due to its ability to cause jet engines to fail. Other risks include the possibility of abrasion of windshields and potentially serious damage to avionic systems. These hazards have been widely recognized since the early 1980s, when volcanic ash provoked several incidents of engine failure in commercial aircraft. In addition to volcanic ash, volcanic gases also pose a threat. Prolonged and/or cumulative exposure to sulphur dioxide (SO2) or sulphuric acid (H2SO4) aerosols potentially affects e.g. windows, air frame and may cause permanent damage to engines. SO2 receives most attention among the gas species commonly found in volcanic plumes because its presence above the lower troposphere is a clear proxy for a volcanic cloud and indicates that fine ash could also be present. Up to now, remote sensing of SO2 via Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) in the ultraviolet spectral region has been used to measure volcanic clouds from ground based, airborne and satellite platforms. Attention has been given to volcanic emission strength, chemistry inside volcanic clouds and measurement procedures were adapted accordingly. Here we present a set of experimental and model results, highlighting the feasibility of DOAS to be used as an airborne early detection system of SO2 in two spatial dimensions. In order to prove our new concept, simultaneous airborne and ground-based measurements of the plume of Popocatépetl volcano, Mexico, were conducted in April 2010. The plume extended at an altitude around 5250 m above sea level and was approached and traversed at the same altitude with several forward looking DOAS systems aboard an airplane. These DOAS systems measured SO2 in the flight direction and at ± 40 mrad (2.3°) angles relative to it in both, horizontal and vertical directions. The approaches started at up to 25 km distance to the plume and SO2 was measured at all times well above the detection limit. In

  11. Early in-flight detection of SO2 via Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy: a feasible aviation safety measure to prevent potential encounters with volcanic plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, L.; Galle, B.; Kern, C.; Delgado Granados, H.; Conde, V.; Norman, P.; Arellano, S.; Landgren, O.; Lübcke, P.; Alvarez Nieves, J. M.; Cárdenas Gonzáles, L.; Platt, U.

    2011-09-01

    Volcanic ash constitutes a risk to aviation, mainly due to its ability to cause jet engines to fail. Other risks include the possibility of abrasion of windshields and potentially serious damage to avionic systems. These hazards have been widely recognized since the early 1980s, when volcanic ash provoked several incidents of engine failure in commercial aircraft. In addition to volcanic ash, volcanic gases also pose a threat. Prolonged and/or cumulative exposure to sulphur dioxide (SO2) or sulphuric acid (H2SO4) aerosols potentially affects e.g. windows, air frame and may cause permanent damage to engines. SO2 receives most attention among the gas species commonly found in volcanic plumes because its presence above the lower troposphere is a clear proxy for a volcanic cloud and indicates that fine ash could also be present. Up to now, remote sensing of SO2 via Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) in the ultraviolet spectral region has been used to measure volcanic clouds from ground based, airborne and satellite platforms. Attention has been given to volcanic emission strength, chemistry inside volcanic clouds and measurement procedures were adapted accordingly. Here we present a set of experimental and model results, highlighting the feasibility of DOAS to be used as an airborne early detection system of SO2 in two spatial dimensions. In order to prove our new concept, simultaneous airborne and ground-based measurements of the plume of Popocatépetl volcano, Mexico, were conducted in April 2010. The plume extended at an altitude around 5250 m above sea level and was approached and traversed at the same altitude with several forward looking DOAS systems aboard an airplane. These DOAS systems measured SO2 in the flight direction and at ±40 mrad (2.3°) angles relative to it in both, horizontal and vertical directions. The approaches started at up to 25 km distance to the plume and SO2 was measured at all times well above the detection limit. In

  12. Advancements in the 2-μm Triple-Pulse Integrated Path Differential Absorption Airborne Lidar for Simultaneous CO2 and H2O measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Refaat, T. F.; Singh, U. N.; Petros, M.; Yu, J.; Antill, C.; Remus, R.; Lee, H.; Wong, T. H.; Reithmaier, K.; Lee, J.; Ismail, S.; Davis, K. J.

    2016-12-01

    Water vapor (H2O) and carbon dioxide (CO2) are the most dominant greenhouse gases directly contributing to the Earth's radiation budget and global warming. A new 2-mm triple-pulse Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) lidar for simultaneously measuring lower tropospheric weighted-column average dry-air volume-mixing ratios of H2O and CO2 is currently under development at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC). The IPDA transmitter generates three consecutive pulses at three different wavelengths separated by approximately 200 ms, for each pump pulse at 50 Hz pulse repetition rate. Wavelength tuning and locking for each of the generated pulses are optimized to achieve independent H2O and CO2 measurements with minimum interference from either of the two gases. The IPDA receiver includes two direct detection systems based on different detection technologies. The first detection system is based on InGaAs pin detector, previously demonstrated in the 2-mm double-pulse IPDA lidar. The second detection system is based on HgCdTe (MCT) electron initiated avalanche photodiode (e-APD) that was demonstrated in 1.6-mm lidar. Advancements of the triple-pulse IPDA lidar component development and testing and system integration will be presented. These components include laser transmitter and timing control electronics, wavelength center-line locking and side wavelength generation, MCT detection system and digitizers. Ground-based testing of these components is being conducted using the 2-mm double-pulse IPDA lidar instrument in a lidar mobile laboratory located at NASA LaRC. This setup allows evaluation of technology developments, system operation and testing of software and data retrieval algorithms. The facility at LaRC includes calibrated hard targets for horizontal ranging up to 1 km, ground-based meteorological observation site (CAPABLE) and a CO2 and H2O in-situ sensor (LiCor). The development and testing of the new lidar technologies are critical for aircraft

  13. Early in-flight detection of SO2 via Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy: A feasible aviation safety measure to prevent potential encounters with volcanic plumes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vogel, L.; Galle, B.; Kern, C.; Delgado, Granados H.; Conde, V.; Norman, P.; Arellano, S.; Landgren, O.; Lubcke, P.; Alvarez, Nieves J.M.; Cardenas, Gonzales L.; Platt, U.

    2011-01-01

    Volcanic ash constitutes a risk to aviation, mainly due to its ability to cause jet engines to fail. Other risks include the possibility of abrasion of windshields and potentially serious damage to avionic systems. These hazards have been widely recognized 5 since the early 1980s, when volcanic ash provoked several incidents of engine failure in commercial aircraft. In addition to volcanic ash, volcanic gases also pose a threat. Prolonged and/or cumulative exposure to sulphur dioxide (SO2) or sulphuric acid (H2SO4) aerosols potentially affects e.g. windows, air frame and may cause permanent damage to engines. SO2 receives most attention among the gas species commonly found in 10 volcanic plumes because its presence above the lower troposphere is a clear proxy for a volcanic cloud and indicates that fine ash could also be present. Up to now, remote sensing of SO2 via Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) in the ultraviolet spectral region has been used to measure volcanic clouds from ground based, airborne and satellite platforms. Attention has been given to vol- 15 canic emission strength, chemistry inside volcanic clouds and measurement procedures were adapted accordingly. Here we present a set of experimental and model results, highlighting the feasibility of DOAS to be used as an airborne early detection system of SO2 in two spatial dimensions. In order to prove our new concept, simultaneous airborne and ground-based measurements of the plume of Popocatepetl volcano, Mexico, were conducted in April 2010. The plume extended at an altitude around 5250 m above sea level and was approached and traversed at the same altitude with several forward looking DOAS systems aboard an airplane. These DOAS systems measured SO2 in the flight direction and at ±40 mrad (2.3◦) angles relative to it in both, horizontal and vertical directions. The approaches started at up to 25 km distance to 25 the plume and SO2 was measured at all times well above the detection

  14. How Quantum Coherence Assists Photosynthetic Light Harvesting

    PubMed Central

    Strümpfer, J; Şener, M; Schulten, K

    2012-01-01

    This perspective examines how hundreds of pigment molecules in purple bacteria cooperate through quantum coherence to achieve remarkable light harvesting efficiency. Quantum coherent sharing of excitation, which modifies excited state energy levels and combines transition dipole moments, enables rapid transfer of excitation over large distances. Purple bacteria exploit the resulting excitation transfer to engage many antenna proteins in light harvesting, thereby increasing the rate of photon absorption and energy conversion. We highlight here how quantum coherence comes about and plays a key role in the photosynthetic apparatus of purple bacteria. PMID:22844553

  15. Propagating of partially coherent laser beam in the near-resonant atomic gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Delong; Wang, Zhaoying; Fang, Feiyun; Shi, Congquan; Lin, Qiang

    2017-09-01

    The characteristics of the light with various degrees of spatial coherence traveling in near-resonant atomic gas are investigated both experimentally and theoretically. The experimental results show that the coherence of partially coherent beams can get better after interaction with atoms under some certain conditions compared with that before interaction. The experimental results are explained theoretically by the method of spectroscopy absorption. Furthermore, partially coherent light has a better environmental adaptability than fully coherent light.

  16. Absorption and fluorescence of single molecules.

    PubMed

    Butter, J Y P; Hecht, B; Crenshaw, B R; Weder, C

    2006-10-21

    Simultaneous detection of single molecules by absorption and fluorescence is demonstrated using confocal microscopy at cryogenic temperature. Dynamical processes such as blinking and spectral jumping of single emitters are observed in both detection channels. The relative magnitude of fluorescence and absorption varies between molecules. In particular, we observe molecules that do not emit detectable Stokes-shifted fluorescence but show a strong absorption signal. The fact that coherent resonant scattering underlies the absorption process is demonstrated by a correlation between small linewidth and large absorption amplitude.

  17. Revealing Hidden Coherence in Partially Coherent Light.

    PubMed

    Svozilík, Jiří; Vallés, Adam; Peřina, Jan; Torres, Juan P

    2015-11-27

    Coherence and correlations represent two related properties of a compound system. The system can be, for instance, the polarization of a photon, which forms part of a polarization-entangled two-photon state, or the spatial shape of a coherent beam, where each spatial mode bears different polarizations. Whereas a local unitary transformation of the system does not affect its coherence, global unitary transformations modifying both the system and its surroundings can enhance its coherence, transforming mutual correlations into coherence. The question naturally arises of what is the best measure that quantifies the correlations that can be turned into coherence, and how much coherence can be extracted. We answer both questions, and illustrate its application for some typical simple systems, with the aim at illuminating the general concept of enhancing coherence by modifying correlations.

  18. Revealing Hidden Coherence in Partially Coherent Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svozilík, Jiří; Vallés, Adam; Peřina, Jan; Torres, Juan P.

    2015-11-01

    Coherence and correlations represent two related properties of a compound system. The system can be, for instance, the polarization of a photon, which forms part of a polarization-entangled two-photon state, or the spatial shape of a coherent beam, where each spatial mode bears different polarizations. Whereas a local unitary transformation of the system does not affect its coherence, global unitary transformations modifying both the system and its surroundings can enhance its coherence, transforming mutual correlations into coherence. The question naturally arises of what is the best measure that quantifies the correlations that can be turned into coherence, and how much coherence can be extracted. We answer both questions, and illustrate its application for some typical simple systems, with the aim at illuminating the general concept of enhancing coherence by modifying correlations.

  19. Spectral triangulation molecular contrast optical coherence tomography with indocyanine green as the contrast agent

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Changhuei; McGuckin, Laura E. L.; Simon, John D.; Choma, Michael A.; Applegate, Brian E.; Izatt, Joseph A.

    2005-01-01

    We report a new molecular contrast optical coherence tomography (MCOCT) implementation that profiles the contrast agent distribution in a sample by measuring the agent’s spectral differential absorption. The method, spectra triangulation MCOCT, can effectively suppress contributions from spectrally dependent scatterings from the sample without a priori knowledge of the scattering properties. We demonstrate molecular imaging with this new MCOCT modality by mapping the distribution of indocyanine green, a FDA-approved infrared red dye, within a stage 54 Xenopus laevis. PMID:15455765

  20. Coherent control of plasmons in nanoparticles with nonlocal response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McArthur, D.; Hourahine, B.; Papoff, F.

    2017-01-01

    We discuss a scheme for the coherent control of light and plasmons in nanoparticles that have nonlocal dielectric permittivity and contain nonlinear impurities or color centers. We consider particles which have a response to light that is strongly influenced by plasmons over a broad range of frequencies. Our coherent control method enables the reduction of absorption and/or suppression of scattering.

  1. Discourse coherence and cognition after stroke: A dual task study

    PubMed Central

    Rogalski, Yvonne; Altmann, Lori J.P.; Plummer-D’Amato, Prudence; Behrman, Andrea L.; Marsiske, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Several researchers have suggested that the maintenance of global coherence (topic maintenance) and local coherence (maintenance between utterances) in discourse requires cognitive resources. This study directly tests this hypothesis by examining the relationship between cognitive variables and coherence in narrative discourse produced by mobility-impaired stroke survivors under single (talking) and dual (talking and walking) task conditions. Although there were no effects of the dual task on coherence, global coherence was significantly disrupted regardless of the single or dual task condition. Moreover, global coherence strongly correlated with cognitive function measures, whereas local coherence did not. Findings are consistent with two interpretations: (1) that global and local coherence may be subserved by different cognitive processes or (2) that maintaining global coherence is a more difficult task and thus will show effects of cognitive impairment before local coherence is impaired. These are both testable hypotheses for future research. Learning outcomes After reading the manuscript, the reader will be able to: (1) understand and differentiate between local and global measures of coherence; (2) discuss the effects of a dual task, walking and talking, on global coherence in a gait-impaired group of stroke survivors; (3) understand why the maintenance of global coherence in discourse might be more cognitively demanding than the maintenance of local coherence. PMID:20219209

  2. Intercomparing CO2 amounts from dispersion modeling, 1.6 μm differential absorption lidar and open path FTIR at a natural CO2 release at Caldara di Manziana, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Queißer, M.; Granieri, D.; Burton, M.; La Spina, A.; Salerno, G.; Avino, R.; Fiorani, L.

    2015-04-01

    We intercompare results of three independent approaches to quantify a vented CO2 release at a strongly non-uniform CO2 Earth degassing at Caldara di Manziana, central Italy. An integrated path differential absorption lidar prototype and a commercial open path FTIR system were measuring column averaged CO2 concentrations in parallel at two different paths. An Eulerian gas dispersion model simulated 3-D CO2 concentration maps in the same area, using in situ CO2 flux input data acquired at 152 different points. Local processes the model does not account for, such as small-scale and short-lived wind eddies, govern CO2 concentrations in the instrument measurement paths. The model, on the other hand, also considers atmospheric effects that are out of the field of view of the instruments. Despite this we find satisfactory agreement between modeled and measured CO2 concentrations under certain meteorological conditions. Under these conditions the results suggest that an Eulerian dispersion model and optical remote sensing can be used as an integrated, complementary monitoring approach for CO2 hazard or leakage assessment. Furthermore, the modeling may assist in evaluating CO2 sensing surveys in the future. CO2 column amounts from differential absorption lidar are in line with those from FTIR for both paths with a mean residual of the time series of 44 and 34 ppm, respectively. This experiment is a fundamental step forward in the deployment of the differential absorption lidar prototype as a highly portable active remote sensing instrument probing vented CO2 emissions, including volcanoes.

  3. Putting Differentials Back into Calculus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dray, Tevian; Manogue, Corrine A.

    2010-01-01

    We argue that the use of differentials in introductory calculus courses is useful and provides a unifying theme, leading to a coherent view of the calculus. Along the way, we meet several interpretations of differentials, some better than others.

  4. Putting Differentials Back into Calculus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dray, Tevian; Manogue, Corrine A.

    2010-01-01

    We argue that the use of differentials in introductory calculus courses is useful and provides a unifying theme, leading to a coherent view of the calculus. Along the way, we meet several interpretations of differentials, some better than others.

  5. Neutrino induced coherent pion production

    SciTech Connect

    Hernandez, E.; Nieves, J.; Valverde, M.; Vicente-Vacas, M. J.

    2010-03-30

    We discuss different parameterizations of the C{sub 5}{sup A}(q{sup 2}) NDELTA form factor, fitted to the old Argonne bubble chamber data for pion production by neutrinos, and we use coherent pion production to test their low q{sup 2} behavior. We find moderate effects that will be difficult to observe with the accuracy of present experiments. We also discuss the use of the Rein-Sehgal model for low energy coherent pion production. By comparison to a microscopic calculation, we show the weaknesses some of the approximations in that model that lead to very large cross sections as well as to the wrong shapes for differential ones. Finally we show that models based on the partial conservation of the axial current hypothesis are not fully reliable for differential cross sections that depend on the angle formed by the pion and the incident neutrino.

  6. In vivo assessment of optical properties of melanocytic skin lesions and differentiation of melanoma from non-malignant lesions by high-definition optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Boone, M A L M; Suppa, M; Dhaenens, F; Miyamoto, M; Marneffe, A; Jemec, G B E; Del Marmol, V; Nebosis, R

    2016-01-01

    One of the most challenging problems in clinical dermatology is the early detection of melanoma. Reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) is an added tool to dermoscopy improving considerably diagnostic accuracy. However, diagnosis strongly depends on the experience of physicians. High-definition optical coherence tomography (HD-OCT) appears to offer additional structural and cellular information on melanocytic lesions complementary to that of RCM. However, the diagnostic potential of HD-OCT seems to be not high enough for ruling out the diagnosis of melanoma if based on morphology analysis. The aim of this paper is first to quantify in vivo optical properties such as light attenuation in melanocytic lesions by HD-OCT. The second objective is to determine the best critical value of these optical properties for melanoma diagnosis. The technique of semi-log plot whereby an exponential function becomes a straight line has been implemented on HD-OCT signals coming from four successive skin layers (epidermis, upper papillary dermis, deeper papillary dermis and superficial reticular dermis). This permitted the HD-OCT in vivo measurement of skin entrance signal (SES), relative attenuation factor normalized for the skin entrance signal (µ raf1) and half value layer (z 1/2). The diagnostic accuracy of HD-OCT for melanoma detection based on the optical properties, µ raf1 , SES and z 1/2 was high (95.6, 82.2 and 88.9 %, respectively). High negative predictive values could be found for these optical properties (96.7, 89.3 and 96.3 %, respectively) compared to morphologic assessment alone (89.9 %), reducing the risk of mistreating a malignant lesion to a more acceptable level (3.3 % instead of 11.1 %). HD-OCT seems to enable the combination of in vivo morphological analysis of cellular and 3-D micro-architectural structures with in vivo analysis of optical properties of tissue scatterers in melanocytic lesions. In vivo HD-OCT analysis of optical properties permits melanoma

  7. Coherence Phenomena in Coupled Optical Resonators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, David D.

    2007-01-01

    Quantum coherence effects in atomic media such as electromagnetically-induced transparency and absorption, lasing without inversion, super-radiance and gain-assisted superluminality have become well-known in atomic physics. But these effects are not unique to atoms, nor are they uniquely quantum in nature, but rather are fundamental to systems of coherently coupled oscillators. In this talk I will review a variety of analogous photonic coherence phenomena that can occur in passive and active coupled optical resonators. Specifically, I will examine the evolution of the response that can occur upon the addition of a second resonator, to a single resonator that is side-coupled to a waveguide, as the coupling is increased, and discuss the conditions for slow and fast light propagation, coupled-resonator-induced transparency and absorption, lasing without gain, and gain-assisted superluminal pulse propagation. Finally, I will discuss the application of these systems to laser stabilization and gyroscopy.

  8. Tunable Coherent X-rays.

    PubMed

    Attwood, D; Halbach, K; Kim, K J

    1985-06-14

    A modern 1- to 2-billion-electron-volt synchrotron radiation facility (based on high-brightness electron beams and magnetic undulators) would generate coherent (laser-like) soft x-rays of wavelengths as short as 10 angstroms. The radiation would also be broadly tunable and subject to full polarization control. Radiation with these properties could be used for phase- and element-sensitive microprobing of biological assemblies and material interfaces as well as reserch on the production of electronic microstructures with features smaller than 1000 angstroms. These short wavelength capabilities, which extend to the K-absorption edges of carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen, are neither available nor projected for laboratory XUV lasers. Higher energy storage rings (5 to 6 billion electron volts) would generate significantly less coherent radiation and would be further compromised by additional x-ray thermal loading of optical components.

  9. Coherent Scatter Imaging Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ur Rehman, Mahboob

    In conventional radiography, anatomical information of the patients can be obtained, distinguishing different tissue types, e.g. bone and soft tissue. However, it is difficult to obtain appreciable contrast between two different types of soft tissues. Instead, coherent x-ray scattering can be utilized to obtain images which can differentiate between normal and cancerous cells of breast. An x-ray system using a conventional source and simple slot apertures was tested. Materials with scatter signatures that mimic breast cancer were buried in layers of fat of increasing thickness and imaged. The result showed that the contrast and signal to noise ratio (SNR) remained high even with added fat layers and short scan times.

  10. Coherent photoacoustic-ultrasound correlation and imaging.

    PubMed

    Gao, Fei; Feng, Xiaohua; Zheng, Yuanjin

    2014-09-01

    Both photoacoustics and ultrasound have been researched extensively but separately. In this letter, we report an initial study on the coherent correlation between pulsed photoacoustic wave and pulse-echo ultrasound wave. By illuminating an object with a pulsed laser and external ultrasound sequentially, both the endogenous photoacoustic wave and pulse-echo ultrasound wave are received and coherently correlated, demonstrating enhanced signal-to-noise ratio. Image contrast of the proposed coherent photoacoustic-ultrasound imaging is also demonstrated to be improved significantly on vessel-mimicking phantom, due to fusion of the optical absorption and ultrasound reflection contrasts by coherent correlation of either conventional laser-induced photoacoustic imaging or pulse-echo ultrasound imaging separately.

  11. Characterization of the physico-chemical properties of polymeric materials for aerospace flight. [differential thermal and atomic absorption spectroscopic analysis of nickel cadmium batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rock, M.

    1981-01-01

    Electrodes and electrolytes of nickel cadmium sealed batteries were analyzed. Different thermal analysis of negative and positive battery electrodes was conducted and the temperature ranges of occurrence of endotherms indicating decomposition of cadmium hydroxide and nickel hydroxide are identified. Atomic absorption spectroscopy was used to analyze electrodes and electrolytes for traces of nickel, cadmium, cobalt, and potassium. Calibration curves and data are given for each sample analyzed. Instrumentation and analytical procedures used for each method are described.

  12. Differential roles of AVP and VIP signaling in the postnatal changes of neural networks for coherent circadian rhythms in the SCN

    PubMed Central

    Ono, Daisuke; Honma, Sato; Honma, Ken-ichi

    2016-01-01

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) is the site of the master circadian clock in mammals. The SCN neural network plays a critical role in expressing the tissue-level circadian rhythm. Previously, we demonstrated postnatal changes in the SCN network in mice, in which the clock gene products CRYPTOCHROMES (CRYs) are involved. Here, we show that vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) signaling is essential for the tissue-level circadian PER2::LUC rhythm in the neonatal SCN of CRY double-deficient mice (Cry1,2−/−). VIP and arginine vasopressin (AVP) signaling showed redundancy in expressing the tissue-level circadian rhythm in the SCN. AVP synthesis was significantly attenuated in the Cry1,2−/− SCN, which contributes to aperiodicity in the adult mice together with an attenuation of VIP signaling as a natural process of ontogeny. The SCN network consists of multiple clusters of cellular circadian rhythms that are differentially integrated by AVP and VIP signaling, depending on the postnatal period. PMID:27626074

  13. Coherent acoustic phonons in YBa2Cu3O7/La1/3Ca2/3MnO3 superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wei; He, Bin; Zhang, Chunfeng; Liu, Shenghua; Liu, Xiaoran; Middey, S.; Chakhalian, J.; Wang, Xiaoyong; Xiao, Min

    2016-03-01

    We investigate photo-induced coherent acoustic phonons in complex oxide superlattices consisting of high-Tc superconductor YBa2Cu3O7-x and ferromagnetic manganite La1/3Ca2/3MnO3 epitaxial layers with broadband pump-probe spectroscopy. Two oscillatory components have been observed in time-resolved differential reflectivity spectra. Based on the analysis, the slow oscillation mode with a frequency sensitive to the probe wavelength is ascribed to the stimulated Brillouin scattering due to the photon reflection by propagating train of coherent phonons. The fast oscillation mode with a probe-wavelength-insensitive frequency is attributed to the Bragg oscillations caused by specular phonon reflections at oxide interfaces or the electron-coupling induced modulation due to free carrier absorption in the metallic superlattices. Our findings suggest that oxide superlattice is an ideal system to tailor the coherent behaviors of acoustic phonons and to manipulate the thermal and acoustic properties.

  14. Coherence in X-ray physics.

    PubMed

    Lengeler, B

    2001-06-01

    Highly brilliant synchrotron radiation sources have opened up the possibility of using coherent X-rays in spectroscopy and imaging. Coherent X-rays are characterized by a large lateral coherence length. Speckle spectroscopy is extended to hard X-rays, improving the resolution to the nm range. It has become possible to image opaque objects in phase contrast with a sensitivity far superior to imaging in absorption contrast. All the currently available X-ray sources are chaotic sources. Their characterization in terms of coherence functions of the first and second order is introduced. The concept of coherence volume, defined in quantum optics terms, is generalized for scattering experiments. When the illuminated sample volume is smaller than the coherence volume, the individuality of the defect arrangement in a sample shows up as speckle in the scattered intensity. Otherwise, a configurational average washes out the speckle and only diffuse scattering and possibly Bragg reflections will survive. The loss of interference due to the finite detection time, to the finite detector pixel size and to uncontrolled degrees of freedom in the sample is discussed at length. A comparison between X-ray scattering, neutron scattering and mesoscopic electron transport is given. A few examples illustrate the possibilities of coherent X-rays for imaging and intensity correlation spectroscopy.

  15. Triplet absorption spectroscopy and electromagnetically induced transparency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghafoor, F.; Nazmitdinov, R. G.

    2016-09-01

    Coherence phenomena in a four-level atomic system, cyclically driven by three coherent fields, are investigated thoroughly at zero and weak magnetic fields. Each strongly interacting atomic state is converted to a triplet due to a dynamical Stark effect. Two dark lines with a Fano-like profile arise in the triplet absorption spectrum with anomalous dispersions. We provide conditions to control the widths of the transparency windows by means of the relative phase of the driving fields and the intensity of the microwave field, which closes the optical system loop. The effect of Doppler broadening on the results of the triplet absorption spectroscopy is analysed in detail.

  16. Coherence versus interferometric resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Luis, Alfredo

    2010-06-15

    We examine the relation between second-order coherence and resolution in the interferometric detection of phase shifts. While for classical thermal light resolution and second-order coherence are synonymous, we show that for quantum light beams reaching optimum precision second-order coherence and resolution become antithetical.

  17. Coherence, the Rebel Angel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buchmann, Margret; Floden, Robert E.

    1992-01-01

    Among concepts that seem to be the guardian angels of school reform, coherence is a rebel angel, advancing human learning, but escaping control. Coherence must not be confused with consistency. It allows for change and imagination but remains true to concepts and experiences that construct coherence without fabricating consistency. (SLD)

  18. Spherical-complex-optical-potential (SCOP) model for electron-monosilane (SiH4) collisions at 30-400 eV: Total (elastic+absorption), momentum transfer, and differential cross sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Ashok

    1987-02-01

    We report nonempirical quantum mechanical calculations on the total (elastic+absorption), momentum transfer, and differential cross sections for e-SiH4 collisions at intermediate and high energies (30-400 eV). A parameter-free and energy-dependent spherical-complex-optical potential (SCOP) is evaluated for the e-SiH4 system. The real part of the SCOP consists of three local terms, namely static, exchange, and polarization. The static interaction is generated very accurately from near-Hartree-Fock one-center silane wave functions, while the exchange effects are accounted for in the free-electron-gas-exchange (FEGE) model. The polarization potential is evaluated ab initio in a parameter-free approximation of Jain and Thompson. The imaginary term of the total SCOP represents loss of flux due to inelastic channels via an energy-dependent absorption potential calculated from target electron density and short-range static-exchange force in the quasifree model with Pauli blocking [Staszewska et al.; J. Phys. B 16, L281 (1983)]. Two versions of this absorption potential are employed; one with an undistorted density and the other with a polarized density determined approximately from first order target wave functions. The later version is more successful when the final results are compared with experiment. The total SCOP is treated exactly in a partial-wave analysis using the variable-phase approach to yield complex phase shifts. Our final total cross sections compare very well with the only available measurements of Sueoka and Mori. However, below 50 eV, present total cross sections overestimate the experimental data within 10%. The effect of absorption potential is to reduce the elastic cross sections significantly; this reduction is more dramatic in case of the differential cross sections (DCS); for example, the reduced DCS are exposed to more pronounced structure. Interestingly, the e-SiH4 reduced DCS are very close in shape to the corresponding e-Ar cross sections

  19. Optical Coherence Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, David

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a new method for noninvasive cross-sectional imaging in biological systems. In OCT, the longitudinal locations of tissue structures are determined by measuring the time-of-flight delays of light backscattered from these structures. The optical delays are measured by low coherence interferometry. Information on lateral position is provided by transverse scanning of the probe beam. The two dimensional map of optical scattering from internal tissue microstructures is then represented in a false-color or grayscale image. OCT is the optical analog of ultrasonic pulse-echo imaging, but with greatly improved spatial resolutions (a few microns). This thesis describes the development of this new high resolution tomographic imaging technology and the demonstration of its use in a variety of tissues under both in vitro and in vivo conditions. In vitro OCT ranging and imaging studies were performed using human ocular and arterial tissues, two clinically relevant examples of transparent and turbid media, respectively. In the anterior eye, precise measurements of cornea and anterior chamber dimensions were made. In the arterial specimens, the differentiation between fatty -calcified and fibromuscular tissues was demonstrated. In vivo OCT imaging in the retina and optic nerve head in human subjects was also performed. The delineation of retinal layers, which has not been possible with other noninvasive imaging techniques, is demonstrated in these OCT images. OCT has high spatial resolution but limited penetration into turbid tissue. It has potential for diagnostic applications where high resolution is needed and optical access is available, such as in the eye, skin, surgically exposed tissues, and surfaces that can be reached by various catheters and endoscopic probes. In particular, the measurement of fine retinal structures promises improvements in the diagnosis and management of glaucoma, macular edema and other vitreo-retinal diseases

  20. Application of surface pressure measurements from O2-band differential absorption radar system in three-dimensional data assimilation on hurricane: Part I - An observing system simulation experiments study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Qilong; Gong, Wei; Lin, Bing; Hu, Yongxiang

    2015-01-01

    Sea level pressure (SLP) is an important variable in regulating hurricane motion. However, SLP generally cannot be measured in open oceans due to limited buoys. Because of the potential availability of an O2-band differential absorption radar for sea surface barometry, we investigate the value of assimilating various patterns of SLP from such a system on hurricane prediction using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) three-dimensional variational data assimilation system (3DVAR) based on Observing System Simulation Experiments (OSSEs). An important objective of this series of study is to explore the potential to use space and airborne sea surface air pressure measurements from an O2-band differential absorption radar currently under development for server weather including hurricane forecasts. The surface pressure patterns include an area of SLP, and a band of SLP either through the center or tangent to the hurricane position; the latter two distributions are similar to what could be obtained from the differential absorption radar system, which could be installed on spaceborne satellites and/or mounted on reconnaissance aircraft. In the banded pressure cases, we propose a vortex reconstruction technique based on surface pressure field. Assimilating observations from the reconstructed surface pressure leads to a better representation of initial SLP and vertical cross-section of wind, relative to the control where no data is assimilated and to the assimilation without vortex reconstruction. In eight of the nine OSSEs simulations on three hurricanes with three leading times of integration, which cover a wide range of initial minimum SLP from 951 to 1011 hPa, substantial improvements are found not only in the hurricane track and position, but also in the hurricane intensity, in terms of the SLP and maximum surface wind. The only case without significant improvement is resulted from the very weak initial condition (SLP 1011 hPa), which had no clear indication of

  1. COHERENCE PROPERTIES OF ELECTROMAGNETIC RADIATION,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    ELECTROMAGNETIC RADIATION , COHERENT SCATTERING), (*COHERENT SCATTERING, ELECTROMAGNETIC RADIATION ), LIGHT, INTERFERENCE, INTENSITY, STATISTICAL FUNCTIONS, QUANTUM THEORY, BOSONS, INTERFEROMETERS, CHINA

  2. Painlevé IV coherent states

    SciTech Connect

    Bermudez, David; Contreras-Astorga, Alonso; Fernández C, David J.

    2014-11-15

    A simple way to find solutions of the Painlevé IV equation is by identifying Hamiltonian systems with third-order differential ladder operators. Some of these systems can be obtained by applying supersymmetric quantum mechanics (SUSY QM) to the harmonic oscillator. In this work, we will construct families of coherent states for such subset of SUSY partner Hamiltonians which are connected with the Painlevé IV equation. First, these coherent states are built up as eigenstates of the annihilation operator, then as displaced versions of the extremal states, both involving the related third-order ladder operators, and finally as extremal states which are also displaced but now using the so called linearized ladder operators. To each SUSY partner Hamiltonian corresponds two families of coherent states: one inside the infinite subspace associated with the isospectral part of the spectrum and another one in the finite subspace generated by the states created through the SUSY technique. - Highlights: • We use SUSY QM to obtain Hamiltonians with third-order differential ladder operators. • We show that these systems are related with the Painlevé IV equation. • We apply different definitions of coherent states to these Hamiltonians using the third-order ladder operators and some linearized ones. • We construct families of coherent states for such systems, which we called Painlevé IV coherent states.

  3. Coherent Doppler Laser Radar: Technology Development and Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kavaya, Michael J.; Arnold, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center has been investigating, developing, and applying coherent Doppler laser radar technology for over 30 years. These efforts have included the first wind measurement in 1967, the first airborne flights in 1972, the first airborne wind field mapping in 1981, and the first measurement of hurricane eyewall winds in 1998. A parallel effort at MSFC since 1982 has been the study, modeling and technology development for a space-based global wind measurement system. These endeavors to date have resulted in compact, robust, eyesafe lidars at 2 micron wavelength based on solid-state laser technology; in a factor of 6 volume reduction in near diffraction limited, space-qualifiable telescopes; in sophisticated airborne scanners with full platform motion subtraction; in local oscillator lasers capable of rapid tuning of 25 GHz for removal of relative laser radar to target velocities over a 25 km/s range; in performance prediction theory and simulations that have been validated experimentally; and in extensive field campaign experience. We have also begun efforts to dramatically improve the fundamental photon efficiency of the laser radar, to demonstrate advanced lower mass laser radar telescopes and scanners; to develop laser and laser radar system alignment maintenance technologies; and to greatly improve the electrical efficiency, cooling technique, and robustness of the pulsed laser. This coherent Doppler laser radar technology is suitable for high resolution, high accuracy wind mapping; for aerosol and cloud measurement; for Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) measurements of atmospheric and trace gases; for hard target range and velocity measurement; and for hard target vibration spectra measurement. It is also suitable for a number of aircraft operations applications such as clear air turbulence (CAT) detection; dangerous wind shear (microburst) detection; airspeed, angle of attack, and sideslip measurement; and fuel savings through

  4. Coherent Doppler Laser Radar: Technology Development and Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kavaya, Michael J.; Arnold, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center has been investigating, developing, and applying coherent Doppler laser radar technology for over 30 years. These efforts have included the first wind measurement in 1967, the first airborne flights in 1972, the first airborne wind field mapping in 1981, and the first measurement of hurricane eyewall winds in 1998. A parallel effort at MSFC since 1982 has been the study, modeling and technology development for a space-based global wind measurement system. These endeavors to date have resulted in compact, robust, eyesafe lidars at 2 micron wavelength based on solid-state laser technology; in a factor of 6 volume reduction in near diffraction limited, space-qualifiable telescopes; in sophisticated airborne scanners with full platform motion subtraction; in local oscillator lasers capable of rapid tuning of 25 GHz for removal of relative laser radar to target velocities over a 25 km/s range; in performance prediction theory and simulations that have been validated experimentally; and in extensive field campaign experience. We have also begun efforts to dramatically improve the fundamental photon efficiency of the laser radar, to demonstrate advanced lower mass laser radar telescopes and scanners; to develop laser and laser radar system alignment maintenance technologies; and to greatly improve the electrical efficiency, cooling technique, and robustness of the pulsed laser. This coherent Doppler laser radar technology is suitable for high resolution, high accuracy wind mapping; for aerosol and cloud measurement; for Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) measurements of atmospheric and trace gases; for hard target range and velocity measurement; and for hard target vibration spectra measurement. It is also suitable for a number of aircraft operations applications such as clear air turbulence (CAT) detection; dangerous wind shear (microburst) detection; airspeed, angle of attack, and sideslip measurement; and fuel savings through

  5. Nutrient absorption.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Deborah C

    2004-03-01

    Our understanding of nutrient absorption continues to grow, from the development of unique animal models and from studies in which cutting-edge molecular and cellular biologic approaches have been used to analyze the structure and function of relevant molecules. Studies of the molecular genetics of inherited disorders have also provided many new insights into these processes. A major advance in lipid absorption has been the cloning and characterization of several intestinal acyl CoA:monoacylglycerol acyltransferases; these may provide new targets for antiobesity drug therapy. Studies of intestinal cholesterol absorption and reverse cholesterol transport have encouraged the development of novel potential treatments for hyperlipidemia. Observations in genetically modified mice and in humans with mutations in glucose transporter 2 suggest the importance of a separate microsomal membrane transport pathway for glucose transport. The study of iron metabolism has advanced greatly with the identification of the hemochromatosis gene and the continued examination of the genetic regulation of iron absorptive pathways. Several human thiamine transporters have been identified, and their specific roles in different tissues are being explored.

  6. PERITONEAL ABSORPTION

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, P. F.; Miller, L. L.; Robscheit-Robbins, F. S.; Bale, W. F.; Whipple, G. H.

    1944-01-01

    The absorption of red cells from the normal peritoneum of the dog can be demonstrated by means of red cells labeled with radio-iron incorporated in the hemoglobin of these red cells. Absorption in normal dogs runs from 20 to 100 per cent of the amount given within 24 hours. Dogs rendered anemic by bleeding absorb red cells a little less rapidly—ranging from 5 to 80 per cent of the injected red cells. Doubly depleted dogs (anemic and hypoproteinemic) absorb even less in the three experiments recorded. This peritoneal absorption varies widely in different dogs and even in the same dog at different times. We do not know the factors responsible for these variations but there is no question about active peritoneal absorption. The intact red cells pass readily from the peritoneal cavity into lymph spaces in diaphragm and other areas of the peritoneum. The red cells move along the lymphatics and through the lymph glands with little or no phagocytosis and eventually into the large veins through the thoracic ducts. PMID:19871404

  7. Microwave instability as a coherent light source

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.

    1998-07-01

    We suggest that the coherent radiation observed recently at SURF II and the National Snychrotron Light Source vacuum ultraviolet ring is due to coherent microwave instability or, equivalently, to {open_quotes}microbunching{close_quotes} of the electron beams in the storage rings. We formulate in this paper the problem of microwave instability in the time domain. A linear homogeneous integro-differential equation for the perturbed current distribution is derived to describe the microwave coherent motion inside the electron bunch. For a specific band-limited high-frequency impedance, the equation can be diagonalized analytically and the eigensolution manifests explicitly the characteristics of microbunching. Coherent radiation power is also calculated for this solvable model, assuming the instability to be initiated by the shot noise inherent in the electron beam. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  8. X-ray optics for phase differential contrast: Design, optimization, simulation, fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aristov, V.; Chukalina, M.; Firsov, A.; Ishikawa, T.; Kikuta, S.; Kohmura, Y.; Svintsov, A.; Zaitsev, S.

    2000-05-01

    With increasing of X-ray energy an interesting situation appears when due to different dependence of refraction and absorption on X-ray energy a sample becomes transparent but still produces refraction. So such samples become unvisible for usual absorption methods but could be analyzed with variouse phase contrast methodes. The situation becomes more actual for higher X-ray energy especially for range 20-100 keV. F. Polack and D. Joyeux described an extension of an interferential differential phase contrast to scanning X-ray microscopy. The principle is to illuminate two points of an object with coherent radiation and detect the fringe shift induced by small phase differences. Fresnel mirrors have been suggested to split a X-ray beam in two coherent ones. In this paper it is proposed instead to use bifocal (multi-focal) lenses. Design and fabrication process of the lenses are described.

  9. Development of an Airborne Triple-Pulse 2-Micron Integrated Path Differential Absorption Lidar (IPDA) for Simultaneous Airborne Column Measurements of Carbon Dioxide and Water Vapor in the Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Petros, Mulugeta; Refaat, Tamer F.; Yu, Jirong; Antill, Charles W.; Remus, Ruben

    2016-01-01

    This presentation will provide status and details of an airborne 2-micron triple-pulse integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar being developed at NASA Langley Research Center with support from NASA ESTO Instrument Incubator Program. The development of this active optical remote sensing IPDA instrument is targeted for measuring both atmospheric carbon dioxide and water vapor in the atmosphere from an airborne platform. This presentation will focus on the advancement of the 2-micron triple-pulse IPDA lidar development. Updates on the state-of-the-art triple-pulse laser transmitter will be presented including the status of seed laser locking, wavelength control, receiver and detector upgrades, laser packaging and lidar integration. Future plan for IPDA lidar system for ground integration, testing and flight validation will also be presented.

  10. Development and Deployment of a Compact Eye-Safe Scanning Differential absorption Lidar (DIAL) for Spatial Mapping of Carbon Dioxide for Monitoring/Verification/Accounting at Geologic Sequestration Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Repasky, Kevin

    2014-03-31

    A scanning differential absorption lidar (DIAL) instrument for monitoring carbon dioxide has been developed. The laser transmitter uses two tunable discrete mode laser diodes (DMLD) operating in the continuous wave (cw) mode with one locked to the online absorption wavelength and the other operating at the offline wavelength. Two in-line fiber optic switches are used to switch between online and offline operation. After the fiber optic switch, an acousto- optic modulator (AOM) is used to generate a pulse train used to injection seed an erbium doped fiber amplifier (EDFA) to produce eye-safe laser pulses with maximum pulse energies of 66 {micro}J, a pulse repetition frequency of 15 kHz, and an operating wavelength of 1.571 {micro}m. The DIAL receiver uses a 28 cm diameter Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope to collect that backscattered light, which is then monitored using a photo-multiplier tube (PMT) module operating in the photon counting mode. The DIAL instrument has been operated from a laboratory environment on the campus of Montana State University, at the Zero Emission Research Technology (ZERT) field site located in the agricultural research area on the western end of the Montana State University campus, and at the Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership site located in north-central Montana. DIAL data has been collected and profiles have been validated using a co-located Licor LI-820 Gas Analyzer point sensor.

  11. Comparison of ground-based Multi-Axis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS) and satellite DOAS measurements of NO2 distribution over Ulaanbaatar (Mongolia) during summer 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böhnke, Sebastian; Behrendt, Thomas; Bruse, Michael; Meixner, Franz X.; Mamtimin, Buhalqem

    2014-05-01

    Cities are immense sources of air pollutants; however, emission inventories in many of them still are highly uncertain, particularly in developing countries. Ulaanbaatar is the most populous and polluted area in Mongolia. Tropospheric NO2 is proved to be harmful to both, the atmospheric environment and human health. It might be meaningful and important to observe pollutant concentrations in an area-integrated form (satellite observations) to create a sound data basis for air quality control measures. In our study, we preliminary present the results of both satellite and ground-based Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) measurements of vertical column densities (VCDs) of NO2 in Ulaanbaatar (urban area). As a ground validation tool, the MAX-DOAS measurements carried out in Ulaanbaatar (Mongolia) summer 2013 and are applied at 3 different sites in the west of Ulaanbaatar (106.73° E / 47.83° N), the city center (106.92° E / 47.92° N) and in the east (107.12° E / 47.87° N). Additionally, Automatic Weather Stations (AWS) have been set up and ozone was measured by UV absorption technique also at the 3 sites. Preliminary results show that the NO2 column densities increase during sunset and decrease after sunrise, which is most likely caused by a longer light path resulting from high solar zenith angles (SZA). The maximum DSCDs (Differential Slant Column Densities) are observed around sunset and sunrise (up to 10^17 molec cm-², mainly a measurement effect as stated above). The daily minima of the vertical column densities (VCD) appear in the morning and in the afternoon (DSCD ~2×10^15 molec cm-²) while, around noon, a second maximum can be observed (DSCD ~4×10^16 molec cm-²). Satellite data show mean VCDs of about 3×10^15 molec cm-² in July and a varying agreement with MAX-DOAS measurements.

  12. Use of radiation sources with mercury isotopes for real-time highly sensitive and selective benzene determination in air and natural gas by differential absorption spectrometry with the direct Zeeman effect.

    PubMed

    Revalde, Gita; Sholupov, Sergey; Ganeev, Alexander; Pogarev, Sergey; Ryzhov, Vladimir; Skudra, Atis

    2015-08-05

    A new analytical portable system is proposed for the direct determination of benzene vapor in the ambient air and natural gas, using differential absorption spectrometry with the direct Zeeman effect and innovative radiation sources: capillary mercury lamps with different isotopic compositions ((196)Hg, (198)Hg, (202)Hg, (204)Hg, and natural isotopic mixture). Resonance emission of mercury at a wavelength of 254 nm is used as probing radiation. The differential cross section of benzene absorption in dependence on wavelength is determined by scanning of magnetic field. It is found that the sensitivity of benzene detection is enhanced three times using lamp with the mercury isotope (204)Hg in comparison with lamp, filled with the natural isotopic mixture. It is experimentally demonstrated that, when benzene content is measured at the Occupational Exposure Limit (3.2 mg/m(3) for benzene) level, the interference from SO2, NO2, O3, H2S and toluene can be neglected if concentration of these gases does not exceed corresponding Occupational Exposure Limits. To exclude the mercury effect, filters that absorb mercury and let benzene pass in the gas duct are proposed. Basing on the results of our study, a portable spectrometer is designed with a multipath cell of 960 cm total path length and detection limit 0.5 mg/m(3) at 1 s averaging and 0.1 mg/m(3) at 30 s averaging. The applications of the designed spectrometer to measuring the benzene concentration in the atmospheric air from a moving vehicle and in natural gas are exemplified. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Active Stand-off Detection of Gas Leaks Using a Short Range Hard-target Backscatter Differential Optical Absorption System Based on a Quantum Cascade Laser Transmitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz, Adrian; Thomas, Benjamin; Castillo, Paulo; Gross, Barry; Moshary, Fred

    2016-06-01

    Fugitive gas emissions from agricultural or industrial plants and gas pipelines are an important environmental concern as they can contribute to the global increase of greenhouse gas concentration. Moreover, they are also a security and safety concern because of possible risk of fire/explosion or toxicity. This study presents gas concentration measurements using a quantum cascade laser open path system (QCLOPS). The system retrieves the pathaveraged concentration of N2O and CH4 by collecting the backscattered light from a scattering target. The gas concentration measurements have a high temporal resolution (68 ms) and are achieved at sufficient range (up to 40 m, ~ 130 feet) with a detection limit of 2.6 ppm CH4 and 0.4 ppm for N2O. Given these characteristics, this system is promising for mobile/multidirectional remote detection and evaluation of gas leaks. The instrument is monostatic with a tunable QCL emitting at ~ 7.7 μm wavelength range. The backscattered radiation is collected by a Newtonian telescope and focused on an infrared light detector. Puffs of N2O and CH4 are released along the optical path to simulate a gas leak. The measured absorption spectrum is obtained using the thermal intra-pulse frequency chirped DFB QCL and is analyzed to obtain path averaged gas concentrations.

  14. Carbon Dioxide Laser Absorption Spectrometer (CO2LAS) Aircraft Measurements of CO2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christensen, Lance E.; Spiers, Gary D.; Menzies, Robert T.; Jacob, Joseph C.; Hyon, Jason

    2011-01-01

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory Carbon Dioxide Laser Absorption Spectrometer (CO2LAS) utilizes Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) at 2.05 microns to obtain CO2 column mixing ratios weighted heavily in the boundary layer. CO2LAS employs a coherent detection receiver and continuous-wave Th:Ho:YLF laser transmitters with output powers around 100 milliwatts. An offset frequency-locking scheme coupled to an absolute frequency reference enables the frequencies of the online and offline lasers to be held to within 200 kHz of desired values. We describe results from 2009 field campaigns when CO2LAS flew on the Twin Otter. We also describe spectroscopic studies aimed at uncovering potential biases in lidar CO2 retrievals at 2.05 microns.

  15. Coherently combining data between detectors for all-sky semi-coherent continuous gravitational wave searches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goetz, E.; Riles, K.

    2016-04-01

    We present a method for coherently combining short data segments from gravitational-wave detectors to improve the sensitivity of semi-coherent searches for continuous gravitational waves. All-sky searches for continuous gravitational waves from unknown sources are computationally limited. The semi-coherent approach reduces the computational cost by dividing the entire observation timespan into short segments to be analyzed coherently, then combined together incoherently. Semi-coherent analyses that attempt to improve sensitivity by coherently combining data from multiple detectors face a computational challenge in accounting for uncertainties in signal parameters. In this article, we lay out a technique to meet this challenge using summed Fourier transform coefficients. Applying this technique to one all-sky search algorithm called TwoSpect, we confirm that the sensitivity of all-sky, semi-coherent searches can be improved by coherently combining the short data segments, e.g., by up to 42% over a single detector for an all-sky search. For misaligned detectors, however, this improvement requires careful attention when marginalizing over unknown polarization parameters. In addition, care must be taken in correcting for differential detector velocity due to the Earth’s rotation for high signal frequencies and widely separated detectors.

  16. Signatures of Quantum Coherences in Rydberg Excitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grünwald, P.; Aßmann, M.; Heckötter, J.; Fröhlich, D.; Bayer, M.; Stolz, H.; Scheel, S.

    2016-09-01

    Coherent optical control of individual particles has been demonstrated both for atoms and semiconductor quantum dots. Here we demonstrate the emergence of quantum coherent effects in semiconductor Rydberg excitons in bulk Cu2O . Because of the spectral proximity between two adjacent Rydberg exciton states, a single-frequency laser may pump both resonances with little dissipation from the detuning. As a consequence, additional resonances appear in the absorption spectrum that correspond to dressed states consisting of two Rydberg exciton levels coupled to the excitonic vacuum, forming a V -type three-level system, but driven only by one laser light source. We show that the level of pure dephasing in this system is extremely low. These observations are a crucial step towards coherently controlled quantum technologies in a bulk semiconductor.

  17. Cu K-edge X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy Reveals Differential Copper Coordimation Within Amyloid-beta Oligomers Compared to Amyloid-beta Monomers

    SciTech Connect

    J Shearer; P Callan; T Tran; V Szalai

    2011-12-31

    The fatal neurodegenerative disorder Alzheimer's disease (AD) has been linked to the formation of soluble neurotoxic oligomers of amyloid-{beta} (A{beta}) peptides. These peptides have high affinities for copper cations. Despite their potential importance in AD neurodegeneration few studies have focused on probing the Cu{sup 2+/1+} coordination environment within A{beta} oligomers. Herein we present a Cu K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopic study probing the copper-coordination environment within oligomers of A{beta}(42) (sequence: DAEFRHDSGYEVHHQKLVFFAEDVGSNKGAIIGLMVGGVVIA). We find that the Cu{sup 2+} cation is contained within a square planar mixed N/O ligand environment within A{beta}(42) oligomers, which is similar to the copper coordination environment of the monomeric forms of {l_brace}Cu{sup II}A{beta}(40){r_brace} and {l_brace}Cu{sup II}A{beta}(16){r_brace}. Reduction of the Cu{sup 2+} cation within the A{beta}(42) oligomers to Cu{sup 1+} yields a highly dioxygen sensitive copper-species that contains Cu{sup 1+} in a tetrahedral coordination geometry. This can be contrasted with monomers of {l_brace}Cu{sup I}A{beta}(40){r_brace} and {l_brace}Cu{sup I}A{beta}(16){r_brace}, which contain copper in a dioxygen inert linear bis-histidine ligand environment [Shearer and Szalai, J. Am. Chem. Soc., 2008, 130, 17826]. The biological implications of these findings are discussed.

  18. Coherent signal processing in optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, Manish Dinkarrao

    1999-09-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a novel method for non-invasive sub-surface imaging of biological tissue micro-structures. OCT achieves high spatial resolution ( ~ 15 m m in three dimensions) using a fiber-optically integrated system which is suitable for application in minimally invasive diagnostics, including endoscopy. OCT uses an optical heterodyne detection technique based on white light interferometry. Therefore extremely faint reflections ( ~ 10 fW) are routinely detected with high spatial localization. The goal of this thesis is twofold. The first is to present a theoretical model for describing image formation in OCT, and attempt to enhance the current level of understanding of this new modality. The second objective is to present signal processing methods for improving OCT image quality. We present deconvolution algorithms to obtain improved longitudinal resolution in OCT. This technique may be implemented without increasing system complexity as compared to current clinical OCT systems. Since the spectrum of the light backscattered from bio-scatterers is closely associated with ultrastructural variations in tissue, we propose a new technique for measuring spectra as a function of depth. This advance may assist OCT in differentiating various tissue types and detecting abnormalities within a tissue. In addition to depth resolved spectroscopy, Doppler processing of OCT signals can also improve OCT image contrast. We present a new technique, termed color Doppler OCT (CDOCT). It is an innovative extension of OCT for performing spatially localized optical Doppler velocimetry. Micron-resolution imaging of blood flow in sub-surface vessels in living tissue using CDOCT is demonstrated. The fundamental issues regarding the trade- off between the velocity estimation precision and image acquisition rate are presented. We also present novel algorithms for high accuracy velocity estimation. In many blood vessels velocities tend to be on the order of a few cm

  19. Ellipsis and discourse coherence

    PubMed Central

    Frazier, Lyn; Clifton, Charles

    2006-01-01

    VP-ellipsis generally requires a syntactically matching antecedent. However, many documented examples exist where the antecedent is not appropriate. Kehler (2000, 2002) proposed an elegant theory which predicts a syntactic antecedent for an elided VP is required only for a certain discourse coherence relation (resemblance) not for cause-effect relations. Most of the data Kehler used to motivate his theory come from corpus studies and thus do not consist of true minimal pairs. We report five experiments testing predictions of the coherence theory, using standard minimal pair materials. The results raise questions about the empirical basis for coherence theory because parallelism is preferred for all coherence relations, not just resemblance relations. Further, strict identity readings, which should not be available when a syntactic antecedent is required, are influenced by parallelism per se, holding the discourse coherence relation constant. This draws into question the causal role of coherence relations in processing VP ellipsis. PMID:16896367

  20. Sleeve gastrectomy and Roux-en-Y gastric bypass exhibit differential effects on food preferences, nutrient absorption and energy expenditure in obese rats.

    PubMed

    Saeidi, N; Nestoridi, E; Kucharczyk, J; Uygun, M K; Yarmush, M L; Stylopoulos, N

    2012-11-01

    All available treatments directed towards obesity and obesity-related complications are associated with suboptimal effectiveness/invasiveness ratios. Pharmacological, behavioral and lifestyle modification treatments are the least invasive, but also the least effective options, leading to modest weight loss that is difficult to maintain long-term. Gastrointestinal weight loss surgery (GIWLS) is the most effective, leading to >60-70% of excess body weight loss, but also the most invasive treatment available. Sleeve gastrectomy (SGx) and Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) are the two most commonly performed GIWLS procedures. The fundamental anatomic difference between SGx and RYGB is that in the former procedure, only the anatomy of the stomach is altered, without surgical reconfiguration of the intestine. Therefore, comparing these two operations provides a unique opportunity to study the ways that different parts of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract contribute to the regulation of physiological processes, such as the regulation of body weight, food intake and metabolism. To explore the physiologic mechanisms of the two procedures, we used rodent models of SGx and RYGB to study the effects of these procedures on body weight, food intake and metabolic function. Both SGx and RYGB induced a significant weight loss that was sustained over the entire study period. SGx-induced weight loss was slightly lower compared with that observed after RYGB. SGx-induced weight loss primarily resulted from a substantial decrease in food intake and a small increase in locomotor activity. In contrast, rats that underwent RYGB exhibited a substantial increase in non-activity-related (resting) energy expenditure and a modest decrease in nutrient absorption. Additionally, while SGx-treated animals retained their preoperative food preferences, RYGB-treated rats experienced a significant alteration in their food preferences. These results indicate a fundamental difference in the mechanisms of

  1. Sleeve gastrectomy and Roux-en-Y gastric bypass exhibit differential effects on food preferences, nutrient absorption and energy expenditure in obese rats

    PubMed Central

    Saeidi, N; Nestoridi, E; Kucharczyk, J; Uygun, MK; Yarmush, ML; Stylopoulos, N

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE All available treatments directed towards obesity and obesity-related complications are associated with suboptimal effectiveness/invasiveness ratios. Pharmacological, behavioral and lifestyle modification treatments are the least invasive, but also the least effective options, leading to modest weight loss that is difficult to maintain long-term. Gastrointestinal weight loss surgery (GIWLS) is the most effective, leading to >60–70% of excess body weight loss, but also the most invasive treatment available. Sleeve gastrectomy (SGx) and Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) are the two most commonly performed GIWLS procedures. The fundamental anatomic difference between SGx and RYGB is that in the former procedure, only the anatomy of the stomach is altered, without surgical reconfiguration of the intestine. Therefore, comparing these two operations provides a unique opportunity to study the ways that different parts of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract contribute to the regulation of physiological processes, such as the regulation of body weight, food intake and metabolism. DESIGN To explore the physiologic mechanisms of the two procedures, we used rodent models of SGx and RYGB to study the effects of these procedures on body weight, food intake and metabolic function. RESULTS Both SGx and RYGB induced a significant weight loss that was sustained over the entire study period. SGx-induced weight loss was slightly lower compared with that observed after RYGB. SGx-induced weight loss primarily resulted from a substantial decrease in food intake and a small increase in locomotor activity. In contrast, rats that underwent RYGB exhibited a substantial increase in non-activity-related (resting) energy expenditure and a modest decrease in nutrient absorption. Additionally, while SGx-treated animals retained their preoperative food preferences, RYGB-treated rats experienced a significant alteration in their food preferences. CONCLUSIONS These results indicate a

  2. Coherent spectroscopy of semiconductors.

    PubMed

    Cundiff, Steven T

    2008-03-31

    The coherent optical response of semiconductors has been the subject of substantial research over the last couple of decades. The interest has been motivated by unique aspects of the interaction between light and semiconductors that are revealed by coherent techniques. The ability to probe the dynamics of charge carriers has been a significant driver. This paper presents a review of selected results in coherent optical spectroscopy of semiconductors.

  3. Water absorption of freeze-dried meat at different water activities: a multianalytical approach using sorption isotherm, differential scanning calorimetry, and nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Venturi, Luca; Rocculi, Pietro; Cavani, Claudio; Placucci, Giuseppe; Dalla Rosa, Marco; Cremonini, Mauro A

    2007-12-26

    Hydration of freeze-dried chicken breast meat was followed in the water activity range of aw=0.12-0.99 by a multianalytical approach comprising of sorption isotherm, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). The amount of frozen water and the shape of the T2-relaxogram were evaluated at each water content by DSC and NMR, respectively. Data revealed an agreement between sorption isotherm and DSC experiments about the onset of bulk water (aw=0.83-0.86), and NMR detected mobile water starting at aw=0.75. The origin of the short-transverse relaxation time part of the meat NMR signal was also reinvestigated through deuteration experiments and proposed to arise from protons belonging to plasticized matrix structures. It is proved both by D2O experiments and by gravimetry that the extra protons not contributing to the water content in the NMR experiments are about 6.4% of the total proton NMR CPMG signal of meat.

  4. Interaural Coherence and Localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pepin, Eric

    2006-10-01

    In a study of the relationship between interaural coherence and localization ability, two experiments were performed. Both made use of a 1/3 octave band of low frequency sound and a 1/3 octave band of high frequency sound. Stimuli with coherences ranging from 0.2 to 0.8 were created in three recording environments using a KEMAR and digitally altered to eliminate interaural level differences (ILD). The environments had short, medium, and long reverberation times. The coherences were measured and were accurate to one significant figure. Experiment 1 had two goals: to determine the relationship between interaural coherence and the ability to localize using interaural time differences (ITD) and to determine if localization ability was dependent only on coherence. The relationship between coherence and localization was tested in a headphone lateralization experiment in which psychometric functions were generated. The functions revealed a linear relationship, with the ability to localize high coherence sounds breaking down quickly at small ITD. Within standard error, ITD localization appeared to be dependent only on coherence. In Experiment 2, a 3-down 1-up staircase method was employed to determine how opposing ILDs affected ITD localization. When the task could be completed, the threshold values were linearly related, however, the ability broke down at large ILDs. Both experiments provide a linear description of interaural coherence and localization, with thresholds being sharp deviations from these trends.

  5. On the influence of affective states on intuitive coherence judgements.

    PubMed

    Balas, Robert; Sweklej, Joanna; Pochwatko, Grzegorz; Godlewska, Malgorzata

    2012-01-01

    Recent research has shown that coherence judgements of semantically related word triads are facilitated by a subtle positive response triggered by their increased fluency of processing. Such positive affective response serves as a cue indicating semantic coherence. However, we argue that the fluency of processing is not the only source of affective response that can influence intuitive judgements. The present study investigated differential influences of mood and affective valence of solution words on intuitive coherence judgements. We show that affective cues resulting from processing fluency can be strengthened or weakened by inducing positive or negative affective response through the activation of solutions to semantically coherent triads. Also, mood is shown to impact the breadth of activated associations therefore affecting not only judgements of semantic coherence but also solvability of word triads. We discuss the implications of our findings for how people might form intuitive judgements of semantic coherence.

  6. Fragments and Coherence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Anne

    2008-01-01

    Can teachers contact the inner coherence of mathematics while working in a context fragmented by always-new objectives, criteria, and initiatives? How, more importantly, can learners experience the inner coherence of mathematics while working in a context fragmented by testing, modular curricular, short-term learning objectives, and lessons that…