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Sample records for coherent tunneling adiabatic

  1. Coherent tunneling by adiabatic passage in an optical waveguide system

    SciTech Connect

    Longhi, S.; Della Valle, G.; Ornigotti, M.; Laporta, P.

    2007-11-15

    We report on an experimental demonstration of light transfer in an engineered triple-well optical waveguide structure which provides a classic analog of coherent tunneling by adiabatic passage (CTAP) recently proposed for coherent transport in space of neutral atoms or electrons among tunneling-coupled optical traps or quantum wells [A. D. Greentree et al., Phys. Rev. B 70, 235317 (2004); K. Eckert et al., Phys. Rev. A 70, 023606 (2004)]. The direct visualization of CTAP wave-packet dynamics enabled by our simple optical system clearly shows that in the counterintuitive passage scheme light waves tunnel between the two outer wells without appreciable excitation of the middle well.

  2. Coherent tunnelling adiabatic passage in optical fibres using superimposed long-period fiber gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thyagarajan, K.; Gupta, Ruchi

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we present the optical analogue of stimulated Raman adiabatic passage (STIRAP) technique for three level atomic system in optical fibre geometry. Considering linearly polarized modes of an optical fibre, it is shown that using a pair of superimposed long-period gratings with peak refractive index perturbation varying spatially along the propagation axis, light can be transferred adiabatically from one core mode to another core mode via an intermediate cladding mode which itself does not get appreciably excited; thus acting like a dark mode. We compare the transmission spectrum of superimposed long-period gratings involved in adiabatic transfer with the transmission spectrum of conventional long-period grating. The analogue output is further analysed for its tolerance to the changes in the ambient refractive index, temperature and other fabrication parameters.

  3. Coherent revival of tunneling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Liang-Yan; Rabitz, Herschel

    2015-07-01

    We introduce a tunneling effect by a driving field, referred to as coherent revival of tunneling (CRT), corresponding to complete tunneling (transmission coefficient =1 ) that is revived from the circumstance of total reflection (transmission coefficient ≈0 ) through application of an appropriate perpendicular high-frequency ac field. To illustrate CRT, we simulate electron transport through fish-bone-like quantum-dot arrays by using single-particle Green's functions along with Floquet theory, and we explore the corresponding current-field amplitude characteristics as well as current-polarization characteristics. In regard to the two characteristics, we show that CRT exhibits entirely different features than coherent destruction of tunneling and photon-assisted tunneling. We also discuss two practical conditions for experimental realization of CRT.

  4. Creation and Transfer of Coherence via Technique of Stimulated Raman Adiabatic Passage in Triple Quantum Dots.

    PubMed

    Tian, Si-Cong; Wan, Ren-Gang; Wang, Chun-Liang; Shu, Shi-Li; Wang, Li-Jie; Tong, Chun-Zhu

    2016-12-01

    We propose a scheme for creation and transfer of coherence among ground state and indirect exciton states of triple quantum dots via the technique of stimulated Raman adiabatic passage. Compared with the traditional stimulated Raman adiabatic passage, the Stokes laser pulse is replaced by the tunneling pulse, which can be controlled by the externally applied voltages. By varying the amplitudes and sequences of the pump and tunneling pulses, a complete coherence transfer or an equal coherence distribution among multiple states can be obtained. The investigations can provide further insight for the experimental development of controllable coherence transfer in semiconductor structure and may have potential applications in quantum information processing.

  5. Quantum Adiabatic Algorithms and Large Spin Tunnelling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boulatov, A.; Smelyanskiy, V. N.

    2003-01-01

    We provide a theoretical study of the quantum adiabatic evolution algorithm with different evolution paths proposed in this paper. The algorithm is applied to a random binary optimization problem (a version of the 3-Satisfiability problem) where the n-bit cost function is symmetric with respect to the permutation of individual bits. The evolution paths are produced, using the generic control Hamiltonians H (r) that preserve the bit symmetry of the underlying optimization problem. In the case where the ground state of H(0) coincides with the totally-symmetric state of an n-qubit system the algorithm dynamics is completely described in terms of the motion of a spin-n/2. We show that different control Hamiltonians can be parameterized by a set of independent parameters that are expansion coefficients of H (r) in a certain universal set of operators. Only one of these operators can be responsible for avoiding the tunnelling in the spin-n/2 system during the quantum adiabatic algorithm. We show that it is possible to select a coefficient for this operator that guarantees a polynomial complexity of the algorithm for all problem instances. We show that a successful evolution path of the algorithm always corresponds to the trajectory of a classical spin-n/2 and provide a complete characterization of such paths.

  6. Nonlinear coherent destruction of tunneling

    SciTech Connect

    Luo Xiaobing; Xie Qiongtao; Wu Biao

    2007-11-15

    We study theoretically two coupled periodically curved optical waveguides with Kerr nonlinearity. We find that the tunneling between the waveguides can be suppressed in a wide range of parameters. This suppression of tunneling is found to be related to the coherent destruction of tunneling in a linear medium, which in contrast occurs only at isolated parameter points. Therefore, we call this suppression nonlinear coherent destruction of tunneling. This localization phenomenon can be observed readily with current experimental capability; it may also be observable in a different physical system, the Bose-Einstein condensate.

  7. Tunneling-assisted coherent population transfer and creation of coherent superposition states in triple quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Si-Cong; Wan, Ren-Gang; Wang, Li-Jie; Shu, Shi-Li; Tong, Cun-Zhu; Wang, Li-Jun

    2016-12-01

    A scheme is proposed for coherent population transfer and creation of coherent superposition states assisted by one time-dependent tunneling pulse and one time-independent tunneling pulse in triple quantum dots. Time-dependent tunneling, which is similar to the Stokes laser pulse used in traditional stimulated Raman adiabatic passage, can lead to complete population transfer from the ground state to the indirect exciton states. Time-independent tunneling can also create double dark states, resulting in the distribution of the population and arbitrary coherent superposition states. Such a scheme can also be extended to multiple quantum dots assisted by one time-dependent tunneling pulse and more time-independent tunneling pulses.

  8. Steady-state coherent transfer by adiabatic passage.

    PubMed

    Huneke, Jan; Platero, Gloria; Kohler, Sigmund

    2013-01-18

    We propose steady-state electron transport based on coherent transfer by adiabatic passage (CTAP) in a linearly arranged triple quantum dot with leads attached to the outer dots. Its main feature is repeated steering of single electrons from the first dot to the last dot without relevant occupation of the middle dot. The coupling to leads enables a steady-state current, whose shot noise is significantly suppressed provided that the CTAP protocol performs properly. This represents an indication for the direct transfer between spatially separated dots and, thus, may resolve the problem of finding experimental evidence for the nonoccupation of the middle dot.

  9. Atomistic simulations of adiabatic coherent electron transport in triple donor systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Rajib; Park, Seung H.; Cole, Jared H.; Greentree, Andrew D.; Muller, Richard P.; Klimeck, Gerhard; Hollenberg, Lloyd C. L.

    2009-07-01

    A solid-state analog of stimulated Raman adiabatic passage can be implemented in a triple-well solid-state system to coherently transport an electron across the wells with exponentially suppressed occupation in the central well at any point of time. Termed coherent-tunneling adiabatic passage (CTAP), this method provides a robust way to transfer quantum information encoded in the electronic spin across a chain of quantum dots or donors. Using large-scale atomistic tight-binding simulations involving over 3.5×106 atoms, we verify the existence of a CTAP pathway in a realistic solid-state system: gated triple donors in silicon. Realistic gate profiles from commercial tools were combined with tight-binding methods to simulate gate control of the donor to donor tunnel barriers in the presence of crosstalk. As CTAP is an adiabatic protocol, it can be analyzed by solving the time-independent problem at various stages of the pulse justifying the use of time-independent tight-binding methods to this problem. This work also involves the first atomistic treatment to translate the three-state-based quantum-optics type of modeling into a solid-state description beyond the ideal localization assumption. Our results show that a three-donor CTAP transfer, with interdonor spacing of 15 nm can occur on time scales greater than 23 ps, well within experimentally accessible regimes. The method not only provides a tool to guide future CTAP experiments but also illuminates the possibility of system engineering to enhance control and transfer times.

  10. Control of coherence transfer via tunneling in quadruple and multiple quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Si-Cong; Xing, En-Bo; Wan, Ren-Gang; Wang, Chun-Liang; Wang, Li-Jie; Shu, Shi-Li; Tong, Cun-Zhu; Wang, Li-Jun

    2016-12-01

    Transfer and manipulation of coherence among the ground state and indirect exciton states via tunneling in quadruple and multiple quantum dots is analyzed. By applying suitable amplitudes and sequences of the pump and tunneling pulses, a complete transfer of coherence or an arbitrary distribution of coherence of multiple states can be realized. The method, which is an adiabatic passage process, is different from previous works on quantum dot molecules in the way that the population can transfer from the ground state to the indirect exciton states without populating the direct exciton state, and thus no spontaneous emission occurs. This investigation can provide further insight to help the experimental development of coherence transfer in semiconductor structures, and may have potential applications in quantum information processing.

  11. Adiabatic generation of arbitrary coherent superpositions of two quantum states: Exact and approximate solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zlatanov, Kaloyan N.; Vitanov, Nikolay V.

    2017-07-01

    The common objective of the application of adiabatic techniques in the field of quantum control is to transfer a quantum system from one discrete energy state to another. These techniques feature both high efficiency and insensitivity to variations in the experimental parameters, e.g., variations in the driving field amplitude, duration, frequency, and shape, as well as fluctuations in the environment. Here we explore the potential of adiabatic techniques for creating arbitrary predefined coherent superpositions of two quantum states. We show that an equally weighted coherent superposition can be created by temporal variation of the ratio between the Rabi frequency Ω (t ) and the detuning Δ (t ) from 0 to ∞ (case 1) or vice versa (case 2), as it is readily deduced from the explicit adiabatic solution for the Bloch vector. We infer important differences between cases 1 and 2 in the composition of the created coherent superposition: The latter depends on the dynamical phase of the process in case 2, while it does not depend on this phase in case 1. Furthermore, an arbitrary coherent superposition of unequal weights can be created by using asymptotic ratios of Ω (t )/Δ (t ) different from 0 and ∞ . We supplement the general adiabatic solution with analytic solutions for three exactly soluble models: two trigonometric models and the hyperbolic Demkov-Kunike model. They allow us not only to demonstrate the general predictions in specific cases but also to derive the nonadiabatic corrections to the adiabatic solutions.

  12. Deep proton tunneling in the electronically adiabatic and non-adiabatic limits: comparison of the quantum and classical treatment of donor-acceptor motion in a protein environment.

    PubMed

    Benabbas, Abdelkrim; Salna, Bridget; Sage, J Timothy; Champion, Paul M

    2015-03-21

    Analytical models describing the temperature dependence of the deep tunneling rate, useful for proton, hydrogen, or hydride transfer in proteins, are developed and compared. Electronically adiabatic and non-adiabatic expressions are presented where the donor-acceptor (D-A) motion is treated either as a quantized vibration or as a classical "gating" distribution. We stress the importance of fitting experimental data on an absolute scale in the electronically adiabatic limit, which normally applies to these reactions, and find that vibrationally enhanced deep tunneling takes place on sub-ns timescales at room temperature for typical H-bonding distances. As noted previously, a small room temperature kinetic isotope effect (KIE) does not eliminate deep tunneling as a major transport channel. The quantum approach focuses on the vibrational sub-space composed of the D-A and hydrogen atom motions, where hydrogen bonding and protein restoring forces quantize the D-A vibration. A Duschinsky rotation is mandated between the normal modes of the reactant and product states and the rotation angle depends on the tunneling particle mass. This tunnel-mass dependent rotation contributes substantially to the KIE and its temperature dependence. The effect of the Duschinsky rotation is solved exactly to find the rate in the electronically non-adiabatic limit and compared to the Born-Oppenheimer (B-O) approximation approach. The B-O approximation is employed to find the rate in the electronically adiabatic limit, where we explore both harmonic and quartic double-well potentials for the hydrogen atom bound states. Both the electronically adiabatic and non-adiabatic rates are found to diverge at high temperature unless the proton coupling includes the often neglected quadratic term in the D-A displacement from equilibrium. A new expression is presented for the electronically adiabatic tunnel rate in the classical limit for D-A motion that should be useful to experimentalists working near

  13. Deep proton tunneling in the electronically adiabatic and non-adiabatic limits: Comparison of the quantum and classical treatment of donor-acceptor motion in a protein environment

    SciTech Connect

    Benabbas, Abdelkrim; Salna, Bridget; Sage, J. Timothy; Champion, Paul M.

    2015-03-21

    Analytical models describing the temperature dependence of the deep tunneling rate, useful for proton, hydrogen, or hydride transfer in proteins, are developed and compared. Electronically adiabatic and non-adiabatic expressions are presented where the donor-acceptor (D-A) motion is treated either as a quantized vibration or as a classical “gating” distribution. We stress the importance of fitting experimental data on an absolute scale in the electronically adiabatic limit, which normally applies to these reactions, and find that vibrationally enhanced deep tunneling takes place on sub-ns timescales at room temperature for typical H-bonding distances. As noted previously, a small room temperature kinetic isotope effect (KIE) does not eliminate deep tunneling as a major transport channel. The quantum approach focuses on the vibrational sub-space composed of the D-A and hydrogen atom motions, where hydrogen bonding and protein restoring forces quantize the D-A vibration. A Duschinsky rotation is mandated between the normal modes of the reactant and product states and the rotation angle depends on the tunneling particle mass. This tunnel-mass dependent rotation contributes substantially to the KIE and its temperature dependence. The effect of the Duschinsky rotation is solved exactly to find the rate in the electronically non-adiabatic limit and compared to the Born-Oppenheimer (B-O) approximation approach. The B-O approximation is employed to find the rate in the electronically adiabatic limit, where we explore both harmonic and quartic double-well potentials for the hydrogen atom bound states. Both the electronically adiabatic and non-adiabatic rates are found to diverge at high temperature unless the proton coupling includes the often neglected quadratic term in the D-A displacement from equilibrium. A new expression is presented for the electronically adiabatic tunnel rate in the classical limit for D-A motion that should be useful to experimentalists working

  14. Ab initio large-amplitude quantum-tunneling dynamics in vinyl radical: a vibrationally adiabatic approach.

    PubMed

    Nesbitt, David J; Dong, Feng

    2008-04-21

    Large-amplitude tunneling in vinyl radical over a C2v planar transition state involves CCH bending excitation coupled to all other internal coordinates, resulting in a significant dependence of barrier height and shape on vibrational degrees of freedom at the zero-point level. An ab initio potential surface for vinyl radical has been calculated at the CCSD(T) level (AVnZ; n=2, 3, 4, 5) for vibrationally adiabatic 1D motion along the planar CCH bending tunneling coordinate, extrapolated to the complete basis set (CBS) limit and corrected for anharmonic zero-point effects. The polyatomic reduced moment of inertia is calculated explicitly as a function of tunneling coordinate, with eigenvalues and tunneling splittings obtained from numerical solution of the resulting 1D Schrödinger equation. Linear scaling of the CBS potential to match predicted and observed tunneling splittings empirically yields an adiabatic barrier height of DeltaEadiab=1696(20) cm(-1) which, when corrected for zero-point energy contributions, translates into an effective barrier of DeltaEeff=1602(20) cm(-1) consistent with estimates (DeltaE=1580(100) cm(-1)) by Tanaka and coworkers [J. Chem. Phys., 2004, 120, 3604-3618]. These zero-point-corrected potential surfaces are used to predict tunneling dynamics in vibrationally excited states of vinyl radical, providing strong support for previous jet-cooled high-resolution infrared studies [Dong et al., J. Phys. Chem. A, 2006, 110, 3059-3070] in the symmetric CH2 stretch mode.

  15. Spectral-gap analysis for efficient tunneling in quantum adiabatic optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brady, Lucas T.; van Dam, Wim

    2016-09-01

    We investigate the efficiency of quantum adiabatic optimization when overcoming potential barriers to get from a local to a global minimum. Specifically we look at n qubit systems with symmetric cost functions f :{0,1 } n→R , where the ground state must tunnel through a potential barrier of width nα and height nβ. By the quantum adiabatic theorem the time delay sufficient to ensure tunneling grows quadratically with the inverse spectral gap during this tunneling process. We analyze barrier sizes with 1 /2 ≤α +β and α <1 /2 and show that the minimum gap scales polynomially as n1 /2 -α -β when 2 α +β ≤1 and exponentially as n-β /2exp(-C n(2 α +β -1 )/2) when 1 <2 α +β . Our proof uses elementary techniques and confirms and extends an unpublished folklore result by Goldstone from 2002, which used large spin and instanton methods. Parts of our result also refine recent results by Kong and Crosson [arXiv:1511.06991] and Jiang et al. [arXiv:1603.01293] about the exponential gap scaling.

  16. Understanding the reaction between muonium atoms and hydrogen molecules: zero point energy, tunnelling, and vibrational adiabaticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldegunde, J.; Jambrina, P. G.; García, E.; Herrero, V. J.; Sáez-Rábanos, V.; Aoiz, F. J.

    2013-11-01

    The advent of very precise measurements of rate coefficients in reactions of muonium (Mu), the lightest hydrogen isotope, with H2 in its ground and first vibrational state and of kinetic isotope effects with respect to heavier isotopes has triggered a renewed interests in the field of muonic chemistry. The aim of the present article is to review the most recent results about the dynamics and mechanism of the reaction Mu+H2 to shed light on the importance of quantum effects such as tunnelling, the preservation of the zero point energy, and the vibrational adiabaticity. In addition to accurate quantum mechanical (QM) calculations, quasiclassical trajectories (QCT) have been run in order to check the reliability of this method for this isotopic variant. It has been found that the reaction with H2(v=0) is dominated by the high zero point energy (ZPE) of the products and that tunnelling is largely irrelevant. Accordingly, both QCT calculations that preserve the products' ZPE as well as those based on the Ring Polymer Molecular Dynamics methodology can reproduce the QM rate coefficients. However, when the hydrogen molecule is vibrationally excited, QCT calculations fail completely in the prediction of the huge vibrational enhancement of the reactivity. This failure is attributed to tunnelling, which plays a decisive role breaking the vibrational adiabaticity when v=1. By means of the analysis of the results, it can be concluded that the tunnelling takes place through the ν1=1 collinear barrier. Somehow, the tunnelling that is missing in the Mu+H2(v=0) reaction is found in Mu+H2(v=1).

  17. Tunneling splittings in formic acid dimer: An adiabatic approximation to the Herring formula

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, Amber; Sibert, Edwin L.

    2015-02-28

    Small symmetric molecules and low-dimensional model Hamiltonians are excellent systems for benchmarking theories to compute tunneling splittings. In this work, we investigate a three dimensional model Hamiltonian coupled to a harmonic bath that describes concerted proton transfer in the formic acid dimer. The three modes include the symmetric proton stretch, the symmetric dimer rock, and the dimer stretch. These modes provide a paradigm for the symmetric and anti-symmetric coupled tunneling pathways, these being recognized in the literature as two of the more important classes of coupling. The effects of selective vibrational excitation and coupling to a bath on the tunneling splittings are presented. The splittings for highly excited states are computed using a novel method that makes an adiabatic approximation to the Herring estimate. Results, which are in excellent agreement with the exact splittings, are compared with those obtained using the Makri-Miller approach. This latter method has been shown to provide quality results for tunneling splittings including highly excited vibrational states.

  18. The theory of coherent resonance tunneling of interacting electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Elesin, V. F.

    2001-04-15

    Analytical solutions of the Schrödinger equation for a two-barrier structure (resonance-tunnel diode) with open boundary conditions are found within the model of coherent tunneling of interacting electrons. Simple expressions for resonance current are derived which enable one to analyze the current-voltage characteristics, the conditions of emergence of hysteresis, and singularities of the latter depending on the parameters of resonance-tunnel diode. It is demonstrated that the hysteresis is realized if the current exceeds some critical value proportional to the square of resonance level width.

  19. Zero-point energy, tunneling, and vibrational adiabaticity in the Mu + H2 reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Mielke, Steven L.; Garrett, Bruce C.; Fleming, Donald G.; Truhlar, Donald G.

    2015-01-09

    Abstract: Isotopic substitution of muonium for hydrogen provides an unparalleled opportunity to deepen our understanding of quantum mass effects on chemical reactions. A recent topical review [Aldegunde et al., Mol. Phys. 111, 3169 (2013)] of the thermal and vibrationally-stateselected reaction of Mu with H2 raises a number of issues that are addressed here. We show that some earlier quantum mechanical calculations of the Mu + H2 reaction, which are highlighted in this review and which have been used to benchmark approximate methods, are in error by as much as 19% in the low-temperature limit. We demonstrate that an approximate treatment of the Born–Oppenheimer diagonal correction that was used in some recent studies is not valid for treating the vibrationally-state-selected reaction. We also discuss why vibrationally adiabatic potentials that neglect bend zero-point energy are not a useful analytical tool for understanding reaction rates and why vibrationally nonadiabatic transitions cannot be understood by considering tunneling through vibrationally adiabatic potentials. Finally, we present calculations on a hierarchical family of potential energy surfaces to assess the sensitivity of rate constants to the quality of the potential surface.

  20. Vibrational coherences in charge-transfer dyes: A non-adiabatic picture

    SciTech Connect

    Sissa, Cristina; Delchiaro, Francesca; Di Maiolo, Francesco

    2014-10-28

    Essential-state models efficiently describe linear and nonlinear spectral properties of different families of charge-transfer chromophores. Here, the essential-state machinery is applied to the calculation of the early-stage dynamics after ultrafast (coherent) excitation of polar and quadrupolar chromophores. The fully non-adiabatic treatment of coupled electronic and vibrational motion allows for a reliable description of the dynamics of these intriguing systems. In particular, the proposed approach is reliable even when the adiabatic and harmonic approximations do not apply, such as for quadrupolar dyes that show a multistable, broken-symmetry excited state. Our approach quite naturally leads to a clear picture for a dynamical Jahn-Teller effect in these systems. The recovery of symmetry due to dynamical effects is however disrupted in polar solvents where a static symmetry lowering is observed. More generally, thermal disorder in polar solvents is responsible for dephasing phenomena, damping the coherent oscillations with particularly important effects in the case of polar dyes.

  1. Vibrational coherences in charge-transfer dyes: A non-adiabatic picture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sissa, Cristina; Delchiaro, Francesca; Di Maiolo, Francesco; Terenziani, Francesca; Painelli, Anna

    2014-10-01

    Essential-state models efficiently describe linear and nonlinear spectral properties of different families of charge-transfer chromophores. Here, the essential-state machinery is applied to the calculation of the early-stage dynamics after ultrafast (coherent) excitation of polar and quadrupolar chromophores. The fully non-adiabatic treatment of coupled electronic and vibrational motion allows for a reliable description of the dynamics of these intriguing systems. In particular, the proposed approach is reliable even when the adiabatic and harmonic approximations do not apply, such as for quadrupolar dyes that show a multistable, broken-symmetry excited state. Our approach quite naturally leads to a clear picture for a dynamical Jahn-Teller effect in these systems. The recovery of symmetry due to dynamical effects is however disrupted in polar solvents where a static symmetry lowering is observed. More generally, thermal disorder in polar solvents is responsible for dephasing phenomena, damping the coherent oscillations with particularly important effects in the case of polar dyes.

  2. Vibrational coherences in charge-transfer dyes: a non-adiabatic picture.

    PubMed

    Sissa, Cristina; Delchiaro, Francesca; Di Maiolo, Francesco; Terenziani, Francesca; Painelli, Anna

    2014-10-28

    Essential-state models efficiently describe linear and nonlinear spectral properties of different families of charge-transfer chromophores. Here, the essential-state machinery is applied to the calculation of the early-stage dynamics after ultrafast (coherent) excitation of polar and quadrupolar chromophores. The fully non-adiabatic treatment of coupled electronic and vibrational motion allows for a reliable description of the dynamics of these intriguing systems. In particular, the proposed approach is reliable even when the adiabatic and harmonic approximations do not apply, such as for quadrupolar dyes that show a multistable, broken-symmetry excited state. Our approach quite naturally leads to a clear picture for a dynamical Jahn-Teller effect in these systems. The recovery of symmetry due to dynamical effects is however disrupted in polar solvents where a static symmetry lowering is observed. More generally, thermal disorder in polar solvents is responsible for dephasing phenomena, damping the coherent oscillations with particularly important effects in the case of polar dyes.

  3. Coherent control of atomic tunneling in a driven triple well

    SciTech Connect

    Lu Gengbiao; Hai Wenhua; Xie Qiongtao

    2011-01-15

    Coherent control of quantum tunneling is investigated for a single atom held in a driven triple-well potential without tight-binding approximation. In the high-frequency regime within or without multiphoton resonance, we find the analytical solutions and their numerical correspondences, including the special Floquet states of invariant populations and the non-Floquet states of slowly varying populations. The Floquet quasienergy spectrum exhibits anticrossings and crossings for different values of the driving parameters, which are associated with different tunneling properties described by the non-Floquet states. Applying the presented results, we suggest a scheme for transporting a single atom between nonadjacent wells or between adjacent wells.

  4. Dynamics of the reactions of muonium and deuterium atoms with vibrationally excited hydrogen molecules: tunneling and vibrational adiabaticity.

    PubMed

    Jambrina, P G; García, E; Herrero, V J; Sáez-Rábanos, V; Aoiz, F J

    2012-11-14

    Quantum mechanical (QM) and quasiclassical trajectory (QCT) calculations have been carried out for the exchange reactions of D and Mu (Mu = muonium) with hydrogen molecules in their ground and first vibrational states. In all the cases considered, the QM rate coefficients, k(T), are in very good agreement with the available experimental results. In particular, QM calculations on the most accurate potential energy surfaces (PESs) predict a rate coefficient for the Mu + H(2) (ν = 1) reaction which is very close to the preliminary estimate of its experimental value at 300 K. In contrast to the D + H(2) (ν = 0,1) and the Mu + H(2) (ν = 0) reactions, the QCT calculations for Mu + H(2) (ν = 1) predict a much smaller k(T) than that obtained with the accurate QM method. This behaviour is indicative of tunneling. The QM reaction probabilities and total reactive cross sections show that the total energy thresholds for the reactions of Mu with H(2) in ν = 0 and ν = 1 are very similar, whereas for the corresponding reaction with D the ν = 0 total energy threshold is about 0.3 eV lower than that for ν = 1. The results just mentioned can be explained by considering the vibrational adiabatic potentials along the minimum energy path. The threshold for the reaction of Mu with H(2) in both ν = 0 and ν = 1 states is the same and is given by the height of the ground vibrational adiabatic collinear potential, whereas for the D + H(2) reaction the adiabaticity is preserved and the threshold for the reaction in ν = 1 is very close to the height of the ν = 1 adiabatic collinear barrier. For Mu + H(2) (ν = 1) the reaction takes place by crossing from the ν = 1 to the ν = 0 adiabat, since the exit channel leading to MuH (ν = 1) is not energetically accessible. At the lowest possible energies, the non-adiabatic vibrational crossing implies a strong tunneling effect through the ν = 1 adiabatic barrier. Absence of tunneling in the classical calculations results in a threshold

  5. Observation of pair tunneling and coherent destruction of tunneling in arrays of optical waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Sebabrata; Valiente, Manuel; Goldman, Nathan; Spracklen, Alexander; Andersson, Erika; Öhberg, Patrik; Thomson, Robert R.

    2016-11-01

    We report on the experimental realization of a photonic system that simulates the one-dimensional two-particle Hubbard model. This analogy is realized by means of two-dimensional arrays of coupled optical waveguides, fabricated using femtosecond laser inscription. By tuning the analogous "interaction strength," we reach the strongly interacting regime of the Hubbard Hamiltonian, and demonstrate the suppression of standard tunneling for individual "particles." In this regime the formation of bound states is identified through the direct observation of pair tunneling. We then demonstrate the coherent destruction of tunneling (CDT) for the paired particles in the presence of an engineered oscillating force of high frequency. The precise control over the analogous "interaction strength" and driving force offered by our experimental system opens an exciting route towards quantum simulation of few-body physics in photonics.

  6. Magnetic coherent tunnel junctions with periodic grating barrier

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Henan; Xiao, Mingwen; Rui, Wenbin; Du, Jun; Tao, Zhikuo

    2016-01-01

    A new spintronic theory has been developed for the magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) with single-crystal barrier. The barrier will be treated as a diffraction grating with intralayer periodicity, the diffracted waves of tunneling electrons thus contain strong coherence, both in charge and especially in spin. The theory can answer the two basic problems present in MgO-based MTJs: (1) Why does the tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) oscillate with the barrier thickness? (2) Why is the TMR still far away from infinity when the two electrodes are both half-metallic? Other principal features of TMR can also be explained and reproduced by the present work. It also provides possible ways to modulate the oscillation of TMR, and to enhance TMR so that it can tend to infinity. Within the theory, the barrier, as a periodic diffraction grating, can get rid of the confinement in width, it can vary from nanoscale to microscale. Based on those results, a future-generation MTJ is proposed where the three pieces can be fabricated separately and then assembled together, it is especially appropriate for the layered materials, e.g., MoS2 and graphite, and most feasible for industries. PMID:27063998

  7. Magnetic coherent tunnel junctions with periodic grating barrier.

    PubMed

    Fang, Henan; Xiao, Mingwen; Rui, Wenbin; Du, Jun; Tao, Zhikuo

    2016-04-11

    A new spintronic theory has been developed for the magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) with single-crystal barrier. The barrier will be treated as a diffraction grating with intralayer periodicity, the diffracted waves of tunneling electrons thus contain strong coherence, both in charge and especially in spin. The theory can answer the two basic problems present in MgO-based MTJs: (1) Why does the tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) oscillate with the barrier thickness? (2) Why is the TMR still far away from infinity when the two electrodes are both half-metallic? Other principal features of TMR can also be explained and reproduced by the present work. It also provides possible ways to modulate the oscillation of TMR, and to enhance TMR so that it can tend to infinity. Within the theory, the barrier, as a periodic diffraction grating, can get rid of the confinement in width, it can vary from nanoscale to microscale. Based on those results, a future-generation MTJ is proposed where the three pieces can be fabricated separately and then assembled together, it is especially appropriate for the layered materials, e.g., MoS2 and graphite, and most feasible for industries.

  8. Li-substituted MgAl2O4 barriers for spin-dependent coherent tunneling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheike, Thomas; Sukegawa, Hiroaki; Mitani, Seiji

    2016-11-01

    Epitaxial magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) with a Li-substituted spinel MgAl2O4 barrier were prepared by sputtering and plasma oxidation of an Mg/LiAl bilayer. The formed MTJ with Fe(001) electrodes showed a relatively large tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) ratio of 120% (174%) at room temperature (3 K) and two local minima in the tunneling conductance spectra (parallel magnetization), revealing the occurrence of the coherent tunneling effect through the Li-substituted spinel barrier. The results are likely to pave the way for a variety of quaternary spinel oxide barriers in which structural and transport properties of MTJs can be engineered in the coherent tunneling regime.

  9. Coherent diffraction of thermal currents in long Josephson tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guarcello, Claudio; Giazotto, Francesco; Solinas, Paolo

    2016-08-01

    We discuss heat transport in thermally-biased long Josephson tunnel junctions in the presence of an in-plane magnetic field. In full analogy with the Josephson critical current, the phase-dependent component of the heat current through the junction displays coherent diffraction. Thermal transport is analyzed as a function of both the length and the damping of the junction, highlighting deviations from the standard "Fraunhofer" pattern characteristic of short junctions. The heat current diffraction patterns show features strongly related to the formation and penetration of Josephson vortices, i.e., solitons. We show that a dynamical treatment of the system is crucial for the realistic description of the Josephson junction, and it leads to peculiar results. In fact, hysteretic behaviors in the diffraction patterns when the field is swept up and down are observed, corresponding to the trapping of vortices in the junction.

  10. A theoretical study of non-adiabatic surface effects for a model in the NTF cryogenic wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macha, J. M.; Pare, L. A.; Landrum, D. B.

    1985-01-01

    A theoretical analysis was made of the severity and effect of nonadiabatic surface conditions for a model in the NTF cryogenic wind tunnel. The nonadiabatic condition arises from heaters that are used to maintain a constant thermal environment for instrumentation internal to the model. The analysis was made for several axi-symmetric representations of a fuselage cavity, using a finite element heat conduction code. Potential flow and boundary layer codes were used to calculate the convection condition for the exterior surface of the model. The results of the steady state analysis show that it is possible to maintain the surface temperature very near the adiabatic value, with the judicious use of insulating material. Even for the most severe nonadiabatic condition studied, the effects on skin friction drag and displacement thickness were only marginally significant. The thermal analysis also provided an estimate of the power required to maintain a specified cavity temperature.

  11. Instanton paths and coherent quantum tunneling in antiferromagnetic spin clusters subject to a strong magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, B. A. Kireev, V. E.

    2008-09-15

    The coherent quantum tunneling effects in antiferromagnets in the presence of a strong external magnetic field parallel to the easy axis have been investigated using the instanton formalism. In a wide field range including the region of the phase spin-flop transition, the tunneling is described by 180{sup o} instantons for which the Euclidean action is real and destructive interference is absent. At the transition point, 90{sup o} instantons describing the tunneling between the collinear and spin-flop states appear. The Euclidean action decreases, whereas the tunneling probability and tunneling level splitting in both phases increase significantly in the immediate vicinity of the spin-flop transition point. The possibility of observing the coherent tunneling effects for artificial small particles (magnetic dots) made of antiferromagnets is discussed.

  12. Loss of adiabaticity with increasing tunneling gap in nonintegrable multistate Landau-Zener models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malla, Rajesh K.; Raikh, M. E.

    2017-09-01

    We consider the simplest nonintegrable model of the multistate Landau-Zener transition. In this model, two pairs of levels in two tunnel-coupled quantum dots are swept past each other by the gate voltage. Although this 2 ×2 model is nonintegrable, it can be solved analytically in the limit when the interlevel energy distance is much smaller than their tunnel splitting. The result is contrasted to the similar 2 ×1 model, in which one of the dots contains only one level. The latter model does not allow interference of the virtual transition amplitudes, and it is exactly solvable. In the 2 ×1 model, the probability for a particle, residing at time t →-∞ in one dot, to remain in the same dot at t →∞ , falls off exponentially with tunnel coupling. By contrast, in the 2 ×2 model, this probability grows rapidly with tunnel coupling. The physical origin of this growth is the formation of the tunneling-induced collective states in the system of two dots. This can be viewed as a manifestation of the Dicke effect.

  13. MgGa2O4 spinel barrier for magnetic tunnel junctions: Coherent tunneling and low barrier height

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukegawa, Hiroaki; Kato, Yushi; Belmoubarik, Mohamed; Cheng, P.-H.; Daibou, Tadaomi; Shimomura, Naoharu; Kamiguchi, Yuuzo; Ito, Junichi; Yoda, Hiroaki; Ohkubo, Tadakatsu; Mitani, Seiji; Hono, Kazuhiro

    2017-03-01

    Epitaxial Fe/magnesium gallium spinel oxide (MgGa2O4)/Fe(001) magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) were fabricated by magnetron sputtering. A tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) ratio up to 121% at room temperature (196% at 4 K) was observed, suggesting a TMR enhancement by the coherent tunneling effect in the MgGa2O4 barrier. The MgGa2O4 layer had a spinel structure and it showed good lattice matching with the Fe layers owing to slight tetragonal lattice distortion of MgGa2O4. Barrier thickness dependence of the tunneling resistance and current-voltage characteristics revealed that the height of the MgGa2O4 barrier is much lower than that of an MgAl2O4 barrier. This study demonstrates the potential of Ga-based spinel oxides for MTJ barriers having a large TMR ratio at a low resistance area product.

  14. Coherent destruction of tunneling in a six-dimensional model of NHD2: A computational study using the multi-configuration time-dependent Hartree method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sala, Matthieu; Gatti, Fabien; Guérin, Stéphane

    2014-10-01

    We investigate the phenomenon of coherent destruction of tunneling in a six-dimensional model of the NHD2 molecule. Two regimes are considered for the frequency of the laser field. A non-resonant regime where the frequency of the laser field is high with respect to the ground vibrational state tunneling splitting but smaller than the transition frequencies between the ground and excited vibrational states; and a quasi-resonant regime where the frequency of the laser field is close to the transition frequency between the ground and first excited vibrational states. In each case, we study the laser driven dynamics in the framework of the Floquet formalism and derive simple analytical formulas that explain the shape of the quasienergy curves associated with the two tunneling components of the ground vibrational state. This analysis allows us to obtain the parameters (frequency and amplitude) of the laser field that lead to the coherent destruction of tunneling. The multi-configuration time-dependent Hartree method is then used to solve the time-dependent Schrödinger equation for a six-dimensional model of the molecule in interaction with an adiabatically turned on monochromatic laser field, in order to confirm the results obtained from this analysis.

  15. Theory of coherent c-axis Josephson tunneling between layered superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, G. B.; Klemm, R. A.

    2000-07-01

    We calculate exactly the Josephson current for c-axis coherent tunneling between two layered superconductors, each with internal coherent tight-binding intra- and interlayer quasiparticle dispersions. Our results also apply when one or both of the superconductors is a bulk material, and include the usually neglected effects of surface states. For weak tunneling, our results reduce to our previous results derived using the tunneling Hamiltonian. Our results are also correct for strong tunneling. However, the c-axis tunneling expressions of Tanaka and Kashiwaya are shown to be incorrect in any limit. In addition, we consider the c-axis coherent critical current between two identical layered superconductors twisted an angle {phi}{sub 0} about the c axis with respect to each other. Regardless of the order-parameter symmetry, our coherent tunneling results using a tight-binding intralayer quasiparticle dispersion are inconsistent with the recent c-axis twist bicrystal Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8+{delta}} twist junction experiments of Li et al. [Li et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 83, 4160 (1999)]. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  16. Coherent tunneling of atoms from Bose-condensed gases at finite temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luxat, David L.; Griffin, Allan

    2002-04-01

    Tunneling of atoms between two trapped Bose-condensed gases at finite temperatures is explored using a many-body linear-response tunneling formalism similar to that used in superconductors. To lowest order, the tunneling currents can be expressed quite generally in terms of the single-particle Green's functions of isolated Bose gases. A coherent first-order tunneling Josephson current between two atomic Bose-Einstein condensates is found, in addition to coherent and dissipative contributions from second-order condensate-noncondensate and noncondensate-noncondensate tunneling. Our work is a generalization of Meier and Zwerger, who recently treated tunneling between uniform atomic Bose gases. We apply our formalism to the analysis of an out-coupling experiment induced by light wave fields, using a simple Bogoliubov-Popov quasiparticle approximation for the trapped Bose gas. For tunneling into the vacuum, we recover the results of Japha, Choi, Burnett, and Band, who recently pointed out the usefulness of studying the spectrum of out-coupled atoms. In particular, we show that the small tunneling current of noncondensate atoms from a trapped Bose gas has a broad spectrum of energies, with a characteristic structure associated with the Bogoliubov quasiparticle u2 and v2 amplitudes.

  17. Coherent control of quantum tunneling in different driving-frequency regions

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Gengbiao; Hai, Wenhua; Zhong, Honghua; Xie, Qiongtao

    2010-06-15

    We investigate the coherent control of quantum tunneling for a single particle held in a driven double-well potential. For a moderate-frequency region, we demonstrate that the irregular quantum tunneling is associated with classically chaotic dynamics. A set of lower resonance-like frequencies is found, for which the coherent destruction of tunneling in the sense of the time average is illustrated numerically. For a high-frequency region, it is shown that the particle is located at the bottom of each well alternately for a long time and the time located in one well can be modulated by adjusting the driving field. The results could be useful for the experiments of controlling single-particle tunneling [see, e.g., E. Kierig, U. Schnorrberger, A. Schietinger, J. Tomkovic, and M. K. Oberthaler, Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 190405 (2008).].

  18. Coherent destruction of tunneling in chaotic microcavities via three-state anti-crossings

    PubMed Central

    Song, Qinghai; Gu, Zhiyuan; Liu, Shuai; Xiao, Shumin

    2014-01-01

    Coherent destruction of tunneling (CDT) has been one seminal result of quantum dynamics control. Traditionally, CDT is understood as destructive interference between two intermediate transition paths near the level crossing. CDT near the level anti-crossings, especially the “locking”, has not been thoroughly explored so far. Taking chaotic microcavity as an example, here we study the inhibition of the tunneling via the strong couplings of three resonances. While the tunneling rate is only slightly affected by each strong coupling between two modes, the destructive interference between two strong couplings can dramatically improve the inhibition of the tunneling. A “locking” point, where dynamical tunneling is completely suppressed, has even been observed. We believe our finding will shed light on researches on micro- & nano-photonics. PMID:24781881

  19. Adiabatic and nonadiabatic perturbation theory for coherence vector description of neutrino oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollenberg, Sebastian; Päs, Heinrich

    2012-01-01

    The standard wave function approach for the treatment of neutrino oscillations fails in situations where quantum ensembles at a finite temperature with or without an interacting background plasma are encountered. As a first step to treat such phenomena in a novel way, we propose a unified approach to both adiabatic and nonadiabatic two-flavor oscillations in neutrino ensembles with finite temperature and generic (e.g., matter) potentials. Neglecting effects of ensemble decoherence for now, we study the evolution of a neutrino ensemble governed by the associated quantum kinetic equations, which apply to systems with finite temperature. The quantum kinetic equations are solved formally using the Magnus expansion and it is shown that a convenient choice of the quantum mechanical picture (e.g., the interaction picture) reveals suitable parameters to characterize the physics of the underlying system (e.g., an effective oscillation length). It is understood that this method also provides a promising starting point for the treatment of the more general case in which decoherence is taken into account.

  20. Coherent Destruction of Tunneling of Bosons with Effective Three-Body Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Zhen-Xia; Yu, Zi-Fa; Xue, Ju-Kui

    2015-06-01

    The tunneling dynamics of dilute boson gases with three-body interactions in a periodically driven double wells are investigated both theoretically and numerically. In our findings, when the system is with only repulsive two-body interactions or only three-body interactions, the tunneling will be suppressed; while in the case of the coupling between two- and three-body interactions, the tunneling can be either suppressed or enhanced. Particularly, when attractive three-body interactions are twice large as repulsive two-body interactions, CDT occurs at isolated points of driving force, which is similar to the linear case. Considering different interaction, the system can experience different transformation from coherent tunneling to coherent destruction of tunneling (CDT). The quasi-energy of the system as the function of the periodically driving force shows a triangular structure, which provides a deep insight into the tunneling dynamics of the system. Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant Nos. 11274255 and 11305132, Specialized Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China under Grant No. 20136203110001, the Natural Science Foundation of Gansu Province under Grant No. 2011GS04358, and Creation of Science and Technology of Northwest Normal University under Grant Nos. NWNU-KJCXGC-03-48, NWNU-LKQN-12-12

  1. Quantum Coherent Atomic Tunneling between Two Trapped Bose-Einstein Condensates

    SciTech Connect

    Smerzi, A.; Fantoni, S.; Giovanazzi, S.

    1997-12-01

    We study the coherent atomic tunneling between two zero-temperature Bose-Einstein condensates (BEC) confined in a double-well magnetic trap. Two Gross-Pitaevskii equations for the self-interacting BEC amplitudes, coupled by a transfer matrix element, describe the dynamics in terms of the interwell phase difference and population imbalance. In addition to the anharmonic generalization of the familiar ac Josephson effect and plasma oscillations occurring in superconductor junctions, the nonlinear BEC tunneling dynamics sustains a self-maintained population imbalance: a novel {open_quotes}macroscopic quantum self-trapping{close_quotes} effect. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  2. Concerted Electronic and Nuclear Fluxes During Coherent Tunnelling in Asymmetric Double-Well Potentials.

    PubMed

    Bredtmann, Timm; Manz, Jörn; Zhao, Jian-Ming

    2016-05-19

    The quantum theory of concerted electronic and nuclear fluxes (CENFs) during coherent periodic tunnelling from reactants (R) to products (P) and back to R in molecules with asymmetric double-well potentials is developed. The results are deduced from the solution of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation as a coherent superposition of two eigenstates; here, these are the two states of the lowest tunnelling doublet. This allows the periodic time evolutions of the resulting electronic and nuclear probability densities (EPDs and NPDs) as well as the CENFs to be expressed in terms of simple sinusodial functions. These analytical results reveal various phenomena during coherent tunnelling in asymmetric double-well potentials, e.g., all EPDs and NPDs as well as all CENFs are synchronous. Distortion of the symmetric reference to a system with an asymmetric double-well potential breaks the spatial symmetry of the EPDs and NPDs, but, surprisingly, the symmetry of the CENFs is conserved. Exemplary application to the Cope rearrangement of semibullvalene shows that tunnelling of the ideal symmetric system can be suppressed by asymmetries induced by rather small external electric fields. The amplitude for the half tunnelling, half nontunnelling border is as low as 0.218 × 10(-8) V/cm. At the same time, the delocalized eigenstates of the symmetric reference, which can be regarded as Schrödinger's cat-type states representing R and P with equal probabilities, get localized at one or the other minima of the asymmetric double-well potential, representing either R or P.

  3. Coherent tunnelling conductance in magnetic tunnel junctions of half-metallic full Heusler alloys with MgO barriers.

    PubMed

    Miura, Yoshio; Uchida, Hirohisa; Oba, Yoshihiro; Nagao, Kazutaka; Shirai, Masafumi

    2007-09-12

    We have carried out electronic structure and transport calculations for magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJ) composed of MgO and a half-metallic full Heusler alloy Co(2)MnSi on the basis of the density functional theory and the Landauer formula. We find that the density of states of Co atoms at the Co(2)MnSi/MgO(001) interface shifts toward the higher energy side due to the reduced symmetry, leading to a reduction of the spin polarization at the interface. Furthermore, we show that the majority-spin transmittance as a function of the in-plane wavevector [Formula: see text] has a broad peak centred at [Formula: see text] due to the tunnelling from the Δ(1) channel of Co(2)MnSi, while the transmittance from the Δ(5) channel is three orders of magnitude smaller than that of the Δ(1) channel. These results indicate that coherent tunnelling through the Δ(1) band is dominant also in an MTJ with Co(2)MnSi and an MgO barrier, like in Fe/MgO/Fe(001) MTJ and related systems.

  4. Effects of counter-rotating interaction on driven tunneling dynamics: Coherent destruction of tunneling and Bloch-Siegert shift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lü, Zhiguo; Zheng, Hang

    2012-08-01

    We investigate the dynamics of a driven two-level system (classical Rabi model) using the counter-rotating-hybridized rotating-wave method (CHRW), which is a simple method based on a unitary transformation with a parameter ξ. This approach is beyond the traditional rotating-wave approximation (Rabi-RWA) and more importantly, remains the RWA form with a renormalized tunneling strength and a modified driving strength. The reformulated rotating-wave method not only possesses the same mathematical simplicity as the Rabi-RWA but also allows us to explore the effects of counter-rotating (CR) components. We focus on the properties of off-resonance cases for which the Rabi-RWA method breaks down. After comparing the results of different RWA schemes and those of the numerically exact method in a wide range of parameter regime, we show that the CHRW method gives the accurate driven dynamics which is in good agreement with the numerical method. Moreover, the other RWA methods appear as various limiting cases of the CHRW method. The CHRW method reveals the effects of the CR terms clearly by means of coherent destruction of tunneling and Bloch-Siegert shift. Our main results are as follows: (i) the dynamics of the coherent destruction of tunneling is explicitly given and its dependence on Δ is clarified, which is quantitatively in good agreement with the exact results; (ii) the CR modulated Rabi frequency and the Bloch-Siegert shift are analytically calculated, which is the same as the exact results up to fourth order; (iii) the validity of parameter regions of different RWA methods are given and the comparison of dynamics of these methods are shown. Since the CHRW approach is mathematically simple as well as tractable and physically clear, it may be extended to some complicated problems where it is difficult to do a numerical study.

  5. Coherent Effects in Tiny Optics: Tunneling Through the Looking Glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, David D.

    2003-01-01

    I will discuss two types of one-dimensional photonic bandgap (PBG) effects that can arise in systems of coupled spherical resonators: (1) nearly-free-photon Fabry-Perot photonic bands that arise in quarter-wave concentrically stratified spheres and, (2) tight- binding photonic bands that arise in weakly-coupled mutually-resonant spheres as a result of whispering-gallery mode splitting. These effects can be derived directly from Mie theory, in a more straightforward manner, by exploiting an analogy with stratified planar systems. For odd numbers of mutually-resonant lossless coupled ring resonators, the circulating intensity can increase exponentially with the number of resonators, which can potentially be exploited for the development of advanced sensors. For even numbers of resonators, mode splitting and classical destructive interference lead to a cancellation of absorption and slow light on-resonance, reminiscent of electromagnetic induced transparency. The analogy between these coherent photon trapping effects and population trapping in an atomic system will be explored.

  6. Long-Range Phase Coherence in Double-Barrier Magnetic Tunnel Junctions with a Large Thick Metallic Quantum Well.

    PubMed

    Tao, B S; Yang, H X; Zuo, Y L; Devaux, X; Lengaigne, G; Hehn, M; Lacour, D; Andrieu, S; Chshiev, M; Hauet, T; Montaigne, F; Mangin, S; Han, X F; Lu, Y

    2015-10-09

    Double-barrier heterostructures are model systems for the study of electron tunneling and discrete energy levels in a quantum well (QW). Until now resonant tunneling phenomena in metallic QWs have been observed for limited thicknesses (1-2 nm) under which electron phase coherence is conserved. In the present study we show evidence of QW resonance states in Fe QWs up to 12 nm thick and at room temperature in fully epitaxial double MgAlO_{x} barrier magnetic tunnel junctions. The electron phase coherence displayed in this QW is of unprecedented quality because of a homogenous interface phase shift due to the small lattice mismatch at the Fe-MgAlO_{x} interface. The physical understanding of the critical role of interface strain on QW phase coherence will greatly promote the development of spin-dependent quantum resonant tunneling applications.

  7. Coherent destruction of tunneling in two-level system driven across avoided crossing via photon statistics

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Qiang; Zheng, Yujun

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, the nature of the multi-order resonance and coherent destruction of tunneling (CDT) for two-level system driven cross avoided crossing is investigated by employing the emitted photons 〈N〉 and the Mandel’s Q parameter based on the photon counting statistics. An asymmetric feature of CDT is shown in the spectrum of Mandel’s Q parameter. Also, the CDT can be employed to suppress the spontaneous decay and prolong waiting time noticeably. The photon emission pattern is of monotonicity in strong relaxation, and homogeneity in pure dephasing regime, respectively. PMID:27353375

  8. Coherent destruction of tunneling in two-level system driven across avoided crossing via photon statistics.

    PubMed

    Miao, Qiang; Zheng, Yujun

    2016-06-29

    In this paper, the nature of the multi-order resonance and coherent destruction of tunneling (CDT) for two-level system driven cross avoided crossing is investigated by employing the emitted photons 〈N〉 and the Mandel's Q parameter based on the photon counting statistics. An asymmetric feature of CDT is shown in the spectrum of Mandel's Q parameter. Also, the CDT can be employed to suppress the spontaneous decay and prolong waiting time noticeably. The photon emission pattern is of monotonicity in strong relaxation, and homogeneity in pure dephasing regime, respectively.

  9. Coherent destruction of tunneling in two-level system driven across avoided crossing via photon statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Qiang; Zheng, Yujun

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, the nature of the multi-order resonance and coherent destruction of tunneling (CDT) for two-level system driven cross avoided crossing is investigated by employing the emitted photons and the Mandel’s Q parameter based on the photon counting statistics. An asymmetric feature of CDT is shown in the spectrum of Mandel’s Q parameter. Also, the CDT can be employed to suppress the spontaneous decay and prolong waiting time noticeably. The photon emission pattern is of monotonicity in strong relaxation, and homogeneity in pure dephasing regime, respectively.

  10. Wireless adiabatic power transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Rangelov, A.A.; Suchowski, H.; Silberberg, Y.; Vitanov, N.V.

    2011-03-15

    Research Highlights: > Efficient and robust mid-range wireless energy transfer between two coils. > The adiabatic energy transfer is analogous to adiabatic passage in quantum optics. > Wireless energy transfer is insensitive to any resonant constraints. > Wireless energy transfer is insensitive to noise in the neighborhood of the coils. - Abstract: We propose a technique for efficient mid-range wireless power transfer between two coils, by adapting the process of adiabatic passage for a coherently driven two-state quantum system to the realm of wireless energy transfer. The proposed technique is shown to be robust to noise, resonant constraints, and other interferences that exist in the neighborhood of the coils.

  11. Quantum-Coherence-Assisted Tunable On- and Off-Resonance Tunneling through a Quantum-Dot-Molecule Dielectric Film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Jian Qi; Zeng, Rui Xi

    2017-02-01

    Quantum-dot-molecular phase coherence (and the relevant quantum-interference-switchable optical response) can be utilized to control electromagnetic wave propagation via a gate voltage, since quantum-dot molecules can exhibit an effect of quantum coherence (phase coherence) when quantum-dot-molecular discrete multilevel transitions are driven by an electromagnetic wave. Interdot tunneling of carriers (electrons and holes) controlled by the gate voltage can lead to destructive quantum interference in a quantum-dot molecule that is coupled to an incident electromagnetic wave, and gives rise to a quantum coherence effect (e.g., electromagnetically induced transparency, EIT) in a quantum-dot-molecule dielectric film. The tunable on- and off-resonance tunneling effect of an incident electromagnetic wave (probe field) through such a quantum-coherent quantum-dot-molecule dielectric film is investigated. It is found that a high gate voltage can lead to the EIT phenomenon of the quantum-dot-molecular systems. Under the condition of on-resonance light tunneling through the present quantum-dot-molecule dielectric film, the probe field should propagate without loss if the probe frequency detuning is zero. Such an effect caused by both EIT and resonant tunneling, which is sensitive to the gate voltage, can be utilized for designing devices such as photonic switching, transistors, and logic gates.

  12. Effects of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome on Force Coordination and Muscle Coherence during Precision Pinch.

    PubMed

    Lu, Szu-Ching; Xiu, Kaihua; Li, Ke; Marquardt, Tamara L; Evans, Peter J; Li, Zong-Ming

    2017-06-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS), caused by entrapment of the median nerve in the carpal tunnel, impairs hand function including dexterous manipulation. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of CTS on force coordination and muscle coherence during low-intensity sustained precision pinch while the wrist assumed different postures. Twenty subjects (10 CTS patients and 10 asymptomatic controls) participated in this study. An instrumented pinch device was used to measure the thumb and index finger forces while simultaneously collecting surface electromyographic activities of the abductor pollicis brevis (APB) and first dorsal interosseous (FDI) muscles. Subjects performed a sustained precision pinch at 10% maximum pinch force for 15 sec with the wrist stabilized at 30° extension, neutral, or 30° flexion using customized splints. The force discrepancy and the force coordination angle between the thumb and index finger forces were calculated, as well as the β-band (15-30 Hz) coherence between APB and FDI. The index finger applied greater force than the thumb (p < 0.05); this force discrepancy was increased with wrist flexion (p < 0.05), but was not affected by CTS (p > 0.05). The directional force coordination was not significantly affected by wrist posture or CTS (p > 0.05). In general, digit force coordination during precision pinch seems to be sensitive to wrist flexion, but is not affected by CTS. The β-band muscular coherence was increased by wrist flexion for CTS patients (p < 0.05), which could be a compensatory mechanism for the flexion-induced exacerbation of CTS symptoms. This study demonstrates that wrist flexion negatively influences muscle and force coordination in CTS patients supporting the avoidance of flexion posture for symptom exacerbation and functional performance.

  13. Semiconductor adiabatic qubits

    SciTech Connect

    Carroll, Malcolm S.; Witzel, Wayne; Jacobson, Noah Tobias; Ganti, Anand; Landahl, Andrew J.; Lilly, Michael; Nguyen, Khoi Thi; Bishop, Nathaniel; Carr, Stephen M.; Bussmann, Ezra; Nielsen, Erik; Levy, James Ewers; Blume-Kohout, Robin J.; Rahman, Rajib

    2016-12-27

    A quantum computing device that includes a plurality of semiconductor adiabatic qubits is described herein. The qubits are programmed with local biases and coupling terms between qubits that represent a problem of interest. The qubits are initialized by way of a tuneable parameter, a local tunnel coupling within each qubit, such that the qubits remain in a ground energy state, and that initial state is represented by the qubits being in a superposition of |0> and |1> states. The parameter is altered over time adiabatically or such that relaxation mechanisms maintain a large fraction of ground state occupation through decreasing the tunnel coupling barrier within each qubit with the appropriate schedule. The final state when tunnel coupling is effectively zero represents the solution state to the problem represented in the |0> and |1> basis, which can be accurately read at each qubit location.

  14. Real-space coherent manipulation of electrons in a single tunnel junction by single-cycle terahertz electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshioka, Katsumasa; Katayama, Ikufumi; Minami, Yasuo; Kitajima, Masahiro; Yoshida, Shoji; Shigekawa, Hidemi; Takeda, Jun

    2016-12-01

    The ultrafast coherent manipulation of electrons using waveform-controlled laser pulses is a key issue in the development of modern electronics. Developing such an approach for a tunnel junction will provide a new platform for governing ultrafast currents on an even smaller scale, which will be indispensable for the advancement of next-generation quantum nanocircuits and plasmonic devices. Here, we demonstrate that carrier-envelope-phase-controlled single-cycle terahertz electric fields can coherently drive electron tunnelling either from a nanotip to a sample or vice versa. Spatially confined electric fields of more than 10 V nm-1 strongly modulate the potential barrier at a nanogap in a scanning tunnelling microscope (STM) on the subpicosecond timescale and can steer a large number of electrons in an extremely nonlinear regime, which is not possible using a conventional STM. Our results are expected to pave the way for the future development of nanoscale science and technologies.

  15. Coherent tunneling through a double quantum dot coupled to Majorana bound states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, T. I.

    2017-07-01

    We consider a double quantum dot coupled to a one-dimensional superconducting quantum wire with Majorana bound states at the ends of the wire. We compute the conductance of the double dot in the coherent tunneling regime. When only one of the dots is coupled to one Majorana bound state the conductance is enhanced/diminished in the vicinity of zero voltage if it has minimum/maximum at this voltage with no Majorana bound state and has two local maximums/minimums at voltage equal plus or minus the Majorana bound states overlapping energy. When each dot is coupled to one Majorana bound state with zero overlapping energy it is possible by tuning the magnetic flux through the system to change the zero-voltage conductance from minimum to local maximum. We show that when both electron levels in the double quantum dot are below the right chemical potential the Fano resonance occurs only for the lower energy level.

  16. Coherent destruction of tunneling in graphene irradiated by elliptically polarized lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagnon, Denis; Fillion-Gourdeau, François; Dumont, Joey; Lefebvre, Catherine; MacLean, Steve

    2017-01-01

    Photo-induced transition probabilities in graphene are studied theoretically from the viewpoint of Floquet theory. Conduction band populations are computed for a strongly, periodically driven graphene sheet under linear, circular, and elliptic polarization. Features of the momentum spectrum of excited quasi-particles can be directly related to the avoided crossing of the Floquet quasi-energy levels. In particular, the impact of the ellipticity and the strength of the laser excitation on the avoided crossing structure—and on the resulting transition probabilities—is studied. It is shown that the ellipticity provides an additional control parameter over the phenomenon of coherent destruction of tunneling in graphene, allowing one to selectively suppress multiphoton resonances.

  17. Coherence generation and population transfer by stimulated Raman adiabatic passage and π pulse in a four-level ladder system.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bing; Wu, Jin-Hui; Yan, Xi-Zhang; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Xiao-Jun; Gao, Jin-Yue

    2011-06-20

    We propose a new scheme for achieving the complete population transfer and the optimal coherence generation between the ground state and the Rydberg state in a four-level ladder system by combining the STIRAP or fractional STIRAP technique and the π pulse technique. We consider, in particular, two different situations where spontaneous emission from the two highest states are neglected or not. Our numerical calculations show that the time width and the delay time of the π pulse are two critical parameters for attaining the maximal population transfer and coherence generation in this scheme.

  18. Coherent oscillations and incoherent tunneling in a one-dimensional asymmetric double-well potential.

    PubMed

    Benderskii, V A; Kats, E I

    2002-03-01

    For a model one-dimensional asymmetric double-well potential we calculated the so-called survival probability (i.e., the probability for a particle initially localized in one well to remain there). We use a semiclassical (WKB) solution of the Schrödinger equation. It is shown that behavior essentially depends on transition probability, and on a dimensionless parameter Lambda that is a ratio of characteristic frequencies for low-energy nonlinear in-well oscillations and interwell tunneling. For the potential describing a finite motion (double-well) one has always a regular behavior. For Lambda<1, there are well defined resonance pairs of levels and the survival probability has coherent oscillations related to resonance splitting. However, for Lambda>1 there are no oscillations at all for the survival probability, and there is almost an exponential decay with the characteristic time determined by Fermi golden rule. In this case, one may not restrict himself to only resonance pair levels. The number of levels perturbed by tunneling grows proportionally to square root of [Lambda] (in other words, instead of isolated pairs there appear the resonance regions containing the sets of strongly coupled levels). In the region of intermediate values of Lambda one has a crossover between both limiting cases, namely, the exponential decay with subsequent long period recurrent behavior.

  19. Impact of sub-volume excitation on improving overdrive delay product of sub-40 nm perpendicular magnetic tunnel junctions in adiabatic regime and its beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohuchida, Satoshi; Ito, Kenchi; Endoh, Tetsuo

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, we introduced a new figure of merit, overdrive delay product Pod which is defined as the product of overdrive factor (I/Ic0 - 1) and delay of transit time, to evaluate power consumption and switching delay from the viewpoint of perpendicular magnetic tunnel junctions (p-MTJs) switching. The impact of sub-volume excitation on the dependence of overdrive delay product on the junction size and material parameters of p-MTJs in adiabatic regime were clarified. Two strategies to decrease the Pod were proposed. The first strategy is scaling down the junction size free from sub-volume effect. A reduction more than 86% of Pod of p-MTJ with exchange stiffness Aij = 19 pJ/m was realized by scaling down the junction size from 70 to 10 nm when I/Ic0 - 1 = 0.5. The second strategy is to increase Aij to suppress the effect of sub-volume excitation. A 26% reduction of the overdrive delay product was realized by enlarging Aij from 10 to 31 pJ/m with annealing process in the p-MTJ with the diameter of 40 nm. These results indicate that p-MTJs of embedded magnetoresistive random access memory (MRAM) should be scaled down under 30 nm where no sub-volume effect occurs for high speed programing.

  20. Influence of Coherent Tunneling and Incoherent Hopping on the Charge Transfer Mechanism in Linear Donor-Bridge-Acceptor Systems.

    PubMed

    Li, Guangqi; Govind, Niranjan; Ratner, Mark A; Cramer, Christopher J; Gagliardi, Laura

    2015-12-17

    The mechanism of charge transfer has been observed to change from tunneling to hopping with increasing numbers of DNA base pairs in polynucleotides and with the length of molecular wires. The aim of this paper is to investigate this transition by examining the population dynamics using a tight-binding Hamiltonian with model parameters to describe a linear donor-bridge-acceptor (D-B-A) system. The model includes a primary vibration and an electron-vibration coupling at each site. A further coupling of the primary vibration with a secondary phonon bath allows the system to dissipate energy to the environment and reach a steady state. We apply the quantum master equation (QME) approach, based on second-order perturbation theory in a quantum dissipative system, to examine the dynamical processes involved in charge-transfer and follow the population transfer rate at the acceptor, ka, to shed light on the transition from tunneling to hopping. With a small tunneling parameter, V, the on-site population tends to localize and form polarons, and the hopping mechanism dominates the transfer process. With increasing V, the population tends to be delocalized and the tunneling mechanism dominates. The competition between incoherent hopping and coherent tunneling governs the mechanism of charge transfer. By varying V and the total number of sites, we also examine the onset of the transition from tunneling to hopping with increasing length.

  1. Stimulated Raman adiabatic passage preparation of a coherent superposition of ThO H3Δ1 states for an improved electron electric-dipole-moment measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panda, C. D.; O'Leary, B. R.; West, A. D.; Baron, J.; Hess, P. W.; Hoffman, C.; Kirilov, E.; Overstreet, C. B.; West, E. P.; DeMille, D.; Doyle, J. M.; Gabrielse, G.

    2016-05-01

    Experimental searches for the electron electric-dipole moment (EDM) probe new physics beyond the standard model. The current best EDM limit was set by the ACME Collaboration [Science 343, 269 (2014), 10.1126/science.1248213], constraining time-reversal symmetry (T ) violating physics at the TeV energy scale. ACME used optical pumping to prepare a coherent superposition of ThO H3Δ1 states that have aligned electron spins. Spin precession due to the molecule's internal electric field was measured to extract the EDM. We report here on an improved method for preparing this spin-aligned state of the electron by using stimulated Raman adiabatic passage (STIRAP). We demonstrate a transfer efficiency of 75 %±5 % , representing a significant gain in signal for a next-generation EDM experiment. We discuss the particularities of implementing STIRAP in systems such as ours, where molecular ensembles with large phase-space distributions are transferred via weak molecular transitions with limited laser power and limited optical access.

  2. Theory of charge transport in molecular junctions: From Coulomb blockade to coherent tunneling

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Yao-Wen; Jin, Bih-Yaw

    2014-08-14

    We study charge transport through molecular junctions in the presence of electron-electron interaction using the nonequilibrium Green's function techniques and the renormalized perturbation theory. In the perturbation treatment, the zeroth-order Hamiltonian of the molecular junction is composed of independent single-impurity Anderson's models, which act as the channels where charges come through or occupy, and the interactions between different channels are treated as the perturbation. Using this scheme, the effects of molecule-lead, electron-electron, and hopping interactions are included nonperturbatively, and the charge transport processes can thus be studied in the intermediate parameter range from the Coulomb blockade to the coherent tunneling regimes. The concept of quasi-particles is introduced to describe the kinetic process of charge transport, and then the electric current can be studied and calculated. As a test study, the Hubbard model is used as the molecular Hamiltonian to simulate dimeric and trimeric molecular junctions. Various nonlinear current-voltage characteristics, including Coulomb blockade, negative differential resistance, rectification, and current hysteresis, are shown in the calculations, and the mechanisms are elucidated.

  3. Parallelizable adiabatic gate teleportation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakago, Kosuke; Hajdušek, Michal; Nakayama, Shojun; Murao, Mio

    2015-12-01

    To investigate how a temporally ordered gate sequence can be parallelized in adiabatic implementations of quantum computation, we modify adiabatic gate teleportation, a model of quantum computation proposed by Bacon and Flammia [Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 120504 (2009), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.103.120504], to a form deterministically simulating parallelized gate teleportation, which is achievable only by postselection. We introduce a twisted Heisenberg-type interaction Hamiltonian, a Heisenberg-type spin interaction where the coordinates of the second qubit are twisted according to a unitary gate. We develop parallelizable adiabatic gate teleportation (PAGT) where a sequence of unitary gates is performed in a single step of the adiabatic process. In PAGT, numeric calculations suggest the necessary time for the adiabatic evolution implementing a sequence of L unitary gates increases at most as O (L5) . However, we show that it has the interesting property that it can map the temporal order of gates to the spatial order of interactions specified by the final Hamiltonian. Using this property, we present a controlled-PAGT scheme to manipulate the order of gates by a control qubit. In the controlled-PAGT scheme, two differently ordered sequential unitary gates F G and G F are coherently performed depending on the state of a control qubit by simultaneously applying the twisted Heisenberg-type interaction Hamiltonians implementing unitary gates F and G . We investigate why the twisted Heisenberg-type interaction Hamiltonian allows PAGT. We show that the twisted Heisenberg-type interaction Hamiltonian has an ability to perform a transposed unitary gate by just modifying the space ordering of the final Hamiltonian implementing a unitary gate in adiabatic gate teleportation. The dynamics generated by the time-reversed Hamiltonian represented by the transposed unitary gate enables deterministic simulation of a postselected event of parallelized gate teleportation in adiabatic

  4. Tunneling and speedup in quantum optimization for permutation-symmetric problems

    DOE PAGES

    Muthukrishnan, Siddharth; Albash, Tameem; Lidar, Daniel A.

    2016-07-21

    Tunneling is often claimed to be the key mechanism underlying possible speedups in quantum optimization via quantum annealing (QA), especially for problems featuring a cost function with tall and thin barriers. We present and analyze several counterexamples from the class of perturbed Hamming weight optimization problems with qubit permutation symmetry. We first show that, for these problems, the adiabatic dynamics that make tunneling possible should be understood not in terms of the cost function but rather the semiclassical potential arising from the spin-coherent path-integral formalism. We then provide an example where the shape of the barrier in the final costmore » function is short and wide, which might suggest no quantum advantage for QA, yet where tunneling renders QA superior to simulated annealing in the adiabatic regime. However, the adiabatic dynamics turn out not be optimal. Instead, an evolution involving a sequence of diabatic transitions through many avoided-level crossings, involving no tunneling, is optimal and outperforms adiabatic QA. We show that this phenomenon of speedup by diabatic transitions is not unique to this example, and we provide an example where it provides an exponential speedup over adiabatic QA. In yet another twist, we show that a classical algorithm, spin-vector dynamics, is at least as efficient as diabatic QA. Lastly, in a different example with a convex cost function, the diabatic transitions result in a speedup relative to both adiabatic QA with tunneling and classical spin-vector dynamics.« less

  5. Tunneling and Speedup in Quantum Optimization for Permutation-Symmetric Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muthukrishnan, Siddharth; Albash, Tameem; Lidar, Daniel A.

    2016-07-01

    Tunneling is often claimed to be the key mechanism underlying possible speedups in quantum optimization via quantum annealing (QA), especially for problems featuring a cost function with tall and thin barriers. We present and analyze several counterexamples from the class of perturbed Hamming weight optimization problems with qubit permutation symmetry. We first show that, for these problems, the adiabatic dynamics that make tunneling possible should be understood not in terms of the cost function but rather the semiclassical potential arising from the spin-coherent path-integral formalism. We then provide an example where the shape of the barrier in the final cost function is short and wide, which might suggest no quantum advantage for QA, yet where tunneling renders QA superior to simulated annealing in the adiabatic regime. However, the adiabatic dynamics turn out not be optimal. Instead, an evolution involving a sequence of diabatic transitions through many avoided-level crossings, involving no tunneling, is optimal and outperforms adiabatic QA. We show that this phenomenon of speedup by diabatic transitions is not unique to this example, and we provide an example where it provides an exponential speedup over adiabatic QA. In yet another twist, we show that a classical algorithm, spin-vector dynamics, is at least as efficient as diabatic QA. Finally, in a different example with a convex cost function, the diabatic transitions result in a speedup relative to both adiabatic QA with tunneling and classical spin-vector dynamics.

  6. Coherent electron transparent tunneling through a single barrier within a Fabry-Perot cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolle, Jason; Baum, Chaz; Amann, Ryan; Haman, Ryan; Call, Tanner; Li, Wei

    2016-07-01

    Electromagnetic wave and quantum DeBroglie wave have many parallels between each other. We investigate the quantum mechanical counterpart of electromagnetic resonant tunneling through a non-absorbing metal layer. It is confirmed that an electron also has transparent transmission through a single barrier within a Fabry-Perot like cavity. This tunneling structure is actually a distortion of the Fabry-Perot echelon. We find that for a specific resonant electron energy, the cavity length is related to the electron's DeBroglie wavelength; and the single barrier can be located at a series positions with an interval equal to a half of the DeBroglie wavelength, not just at the center of the cavity. This tunneling phenomenon will have novel applications in quantum devices such as the resonant tunneling diode and scanning tunneling microscope. The results of this paper should also have impact on related electromagnetic research and application.

  7. Contribution of coherent structures to momentum and concentration fluxes over a flat vegetation canopy modelled in a wind tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conan, Boris; Aubrun, Sandrine; Coudour, Bruno; Chetehouna, Khaled; Garo, Jean-Pierre

    2015-04-01

    Coherent structures dominate the shear flow in and above the vegetation canopy, affecting the transport of passive scalars. Their detailed understanding is therefore of great interest for a number of environmental studies such as organic gas exchange, pollution dispersion, or forest fire propagation. In the present study, a forest embedded in an atmospheric boundary layer was reproduced in a wind tunnel. An area source was installed to mimic the volatile organic compounds emission coming from the vegetation. A fast gas analyser combined to a triple hot-wire anemometer were used to measure simultaneously and at the same point the momentum and the concentration fluxes above the canopy. This particular set-up enabled the complex scalar exchange mechanism to be studied in the well defined and stationary boundary conditions of a laboratory experiment simulating neutral atmospheric conditions. Measurements showed that the contribution of coherent structures to the momentum and the concentration flux was 80% and 60% respectively. Contributions were found to be nearly constant with height. The combination of velocity and concentration measurements enabled the determination of the mean concentration of the coherent structures. Results highlights the preponderant role of ejections in releasing highly concentrated gas pockets above the forest canopy. These releases were measured to be, in average, 40% more concentrated than the average gas concentration at the same height. It is shown that 70% of the extreme events observed are linked to an ejection process.

  8. Coherence and phase techniques applied to noise diagnosis in the NASA Ames 7 times 10-foot wind tunnel no. 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilby, J. F.; Piersol, A. G.; Rentz, P. E.; Scharton, T. D.

    1977-01-01

    Measurements have been made of coherence and phase spectra for the acoustic field in a subsonic wind tunnel. The data are interpreted in terms of simple analytical models for propagating and diffuse noise fields, including the presence of uncorrelated noise signals. It is found that low frequency noise propagates upstream and downstream from the fan, with the noise in the test section arriving in the upstream direction. High frequency sound is generated in the test section and propagates upstream and downstream. In the low frequency range, the ratio of diffuse to propagating energy is about eight for all locations in the test section, diffuser, and settling chamber; the value of the ratio increases with frequency.

  9. Charge transfer and coherence dynamics of a tunnelling system coupled to an harmonic oscillator.

    PubMed

    Paganelli, S; Ciuchi, S

    2008-06-11

    We study the transition probability and coherence of a two-site system, interacting with an oscillator. Both properties depend on the initial preparation. The oscillator is prepared in a thermal state and, even though it cannot be considered as an extended bath, it produces decoherence because of the large number of states involved in the dynamics. In the case in which the oscillator is initially displaced, a coherent dynamics of charge entangled with oscillator modes takes place. Coherency is, however, degraded as far as the oscillator mass increases, producing an increasingly large recoherence time. Calculations are carried on by exact diagonalization and compared with two semiclassical approximations. The role of the quantum effects are highlighted in the long time dynamics, where semiclassical approaches give rise to a dissipative behaviour. Moreover, we find that the oscillator dynamics has to be taken into account, even in a semiclassical approximation, in order to reproduce a thermally activated enhancement of the transition probability.

  10. Detection and cloaking of molecular objects in coherent nanostructures using inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Fransson, J; Manoharan, H C; Balatsky, A V

    2010-05-12

    We address quantum invisibility in the context of electronics in nanoscale quantum structures. We make use of the freedom of design that quantum corrals provide and show that quantum mechanical objects can be hidden inside the corral, with respect to inelastic electron scattering spectroscopy in combination with scanning tunneling microscopy, and we propose a design strategy. A simple illustration of the invisibility is given in terms of an elliptic quantum corral containing a molecule, with a local vibrational mode, at one of the foci. Our work has implications to quantum information technology and presents new tools for nonlocal quantum detection and distinguishing between different molecules.

  11. Experimental demonstration of composite adiabatic passage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schraft, Daniel; Halfmann, Thomas; Genov, Genko T.; Vitanov, Nikolay V.

    2013-12-01

    We report an experimental demonstration of composite adiabatic passage (CAP) for robust and efficient manipulation of two-level systems. The technique represents a altered version of rapid adiabatic passage (RAP), driven by composite sequences of radiation pulses with appropriately chosen phases. We implement CAP with radio-frequency pulses to invert (i.e., to rephase) optically prepared spin coherences in a Pr3+:Y2SiO5 crystal. We perform systematic investigations of the efficiency of CAP and compare the results with conventional π pulses and RAP. The data clearly demonstrate the superior features of CAP with regard to robustness and efficiency, even under conditions of weakly fulfilled adiabaticity. The experimental demonstration of composite sequences to support adiabatic passage is of significant relevance whenever a high efficiency or robustness of coherent excitation processes need to be maintained, e.g., as required in quantum information technology.

  12. High-power coherent microwave emission from magnetic tunnel junction nano-oscillators with perpendicular anisotropy.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Zhongming; Amiri, Pedram Khalili; Krivorotov, Ilya N; Zhao, Hui; Finocchio, Giovanni; Wang, Jian-Ping; Katine, Jordan A; Huai, Yiming; Langer, Juergen; Galatsis, Kosmas; Wang, Kang L; Jiang, Hongwen

    2012-07-24

    The excitation of the steady-state precessions of magnetization opens a new way for nanoscale microwave oscillators by exploiting the transfer of spin angular momentum from a spin-polarized current to a ferromagnet, referred to as spin-transfer nano-oscillators (STNOs). For STNOs to be practical, however, their relatively low output power and their relatively large line width must be improved. Here we demonstrate that microwave signals with maximum measured power of 0.28 μW and simultaneously narrow line width of 25 MHz can be generated from CoFeB-MgO-based magnetic tunnel junctions having an in-plane magnetized reference layer and a free layer with strong perpendicular anisotropy. Moreover, the generation efficiency is substantially higher than previously reported STNOs. The results will be of importance for the design of nanoscale alternatives to traditional silicon oscillators used in radio frequency integrated circuits.

  13. Coexistence of coherent and incoherent tunneling in asymmetric double-well potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Carjan, N.; Grigorescu, M.; Strottman, D.

    1995-12-01

    Double-well potentials are widely used to model phenomena in physics and chemistry. The system is assumed to be formed in a metastable state, its dynamical evolution providing the clues for the interpretation of the experimental data. Quantum mechanics predicts coherent oscillations of probability between wells if the double-well potential is nearly symmetric and irreversible exponential decay if the final well has an infinite width. For very asymmetric double-well potentials, these two extreme behaviors are expected to coexist. The purpose of the present paper is to investigate this coexistence and its evolution as a function of the width of (or density of states in) the second well. In this sense, increasing the density of states can be regarded as a mechanism for coherence breakdown. The dynamical evolution of the metastable state can be simulated by solving numerically the time-dependent Schroedinger equation (TDSE). This approach is general, intuitive, and gives access to time scales and dynamical effects. It also allows the inclusion of phenomenological dissipation.

  14. Four-electron model for singlet and triplet excitation energy transfers with inclusion of coherence memory, inelastic tunneling and nuclear quantum effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Yosuke; Ebina, Kuniyoshi; Tanaka, Shigenori

    2016-08-01

    A computational scheme to describe the coherent dynamics of excitation energy transfer (EET) in molecular systems is proposed on the basis of generalized master equations with memory kernels. This formalism takes into account those physical effects in electron-bath coupling system such as the spin symmetry of excitons, the inelastic electron tunneling and the quantum features of nuclear motions, thus providing a theoretical framework to perform an ab initio description of EET through molecular simulations for evaluating the spectral density and the temporal correlation function of electronic coupling. Some test calculations have then been carried out to investigate the dependence of exciton population dynamics on coherence memory, inelastic tunneling correlation time, magnitude of electronic coupling, quantum correction to temporal correlation function, reorganization energy and energy gap.

  15. Twofold Andreev reflections and coherent transport in ferromagnetic semiconductor/d-wave superconductor/ferromagnetic semiconductor double tunneling junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Tao, Y. C. E-mail: taoyongchun@njnu.edu.cn; Li, Z. P.; Ji, T. T.; Liu, S. Y.; Di, Y. S.

    2014-04-21

    Coherent transport in a ferromagnetic semiconductor (FS)/d-wave superconductor (SC)/FS structure with (110) interfaces is studied by extending Bogoliubov-de Gennes equation into eight components, in which the interband coupling of heavy and light hole bands in the FS, the strengths of potential scattering at the interfaces, and the mismatches in the effective mass and Fermi vector between the FS and SC are taken into account. Twofold Andreev reflections exist due to the existence of two bands in the FS, in which the incident hole and the two Andreev-reflected electrons, belonging to the different spin subbands, form twofold spin-singlet pairing states near the FS/SC interface. It is shown that due to the interplay of the SC with unconventional d-wave pairing symmetry and FS, the differential conductance and tunneling magnetoresistance exhibit an abundant dependence on not only the interband coupling in the FS but also the strengths of potential scattering at the interfaces. More importantly, the properties are found to be quite different from those in the FS/s-wave SC/FS structure with conventional pairing symmetry for the SC.

  16. Optimizing Adiabaticity in NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandermause, Jonathan; Ramanathan, Chandrasekhar

    We demonstrate the utility of Berry's superadiabatic formalism for numerically finding control sequences that implement quasi-adiabatic unitary transformations. Using an iterative interaction picture, we design a shortcut to adiabaticity that reduces the time required to perform an adiabatic inversion pulse in liquid state NMR. We also show that it is possible to extend our scheme to two or more qubits to find adiabatic quantum transformations that are allowed by the control algebra, and demonstrate a two-qubit entangling operation in liquid state NMR. We examine the pulse lengths at which the fidelity of these adiabatic transitions break down and compare with the quantum speed limit.

  17. Improved treatment of the turning point in tunnel ionization of atoms in a low-frequency two color laser field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrović, V. M.; Miladinović, T. B.

    2016-12-01

    The tunneling photoionization rate for a two color (bichromatic) field consisting of coherent superposition of the fundamental laser field frequency ω and its second harmonic with frequency 2ω , was studied theoretically within the framework of the adiabatic Landau-Dykhne approach. Analytical expressions were derived for the case of fixed specified values of relative phase shift, \\varphi =0 between the harmonics of the incident bichromatic field.

  18. On black hole spectroscopy via adiabatic invariance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Qing-Quan; Han, Yan

    2012-12-01

    In this Letter, we obtain the black hole spectroscopy by combining the black hole property of adiabaticity and the oscillating velocity of the black hole horizon. This velocity is obtained in the tunneling framework. In particular, we declare, if requiring canonical invariance, the adiabatic invariant quantity should be of the covariant form Iadia = ∮pi dqi. Using it, the horizon area of a Schwarzschild black hole is quantized independently of the choice of coordinates, with an equally spaced spectroscopy always given by ΔA = 8 π lp2 in the Schwarzschild and Painlevé coordinates.

  19. Coherent Interlayer Tunneling and Negative Differential Resistance with High Current Density in Double Bilayer Graphene-WSe2 Heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Burg, G William; Prasad, Nitin; Fallahazad, Babak; Valsaraj, Amithraj; Kim, Kyounghwan; Taniguchi, Takashi; Watanabe, Kenji; Wang, Qingxiao; Kim, Moon J; Register, Leonard F; Tutuc, Emanuel

    2017-06-14

    We demonstrate gate-tunable resonant tunneling and negative differential resistance between two rotationally aligned bilayer graphene sheets separated by bilayer WSe2. We observe large interlayer current densities of 2 and 2.5 μA/μm(2) and peak-to-valley ratios approaching 4 and 6 at room temperature and 1.5 K, respectively, values that are comparable to epitaxially grown resonant tunneling heterostructures. An excellent agreement between theoretical calculations using a Lorentzian spectral function for the two-dimensional (2D) quasiparticle states, and the experimental data indicates that the interlayer current stems primarily from energy and in-plane momentum conserving 2D-2D tunneling, with minimal contributions from inelastic or non-momentum-conserving tunneling. We demonstrate narrow tunneling resonances with intrinsic half-widths of 4 and 6 meV at 1.5 and 300 K, respectively.

  20. Necessary adiabatic run times in quantum optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brady, Lucas T.; van Dam, Wim

    2017-03-01

    Quantum annealing is guaranteed to find the ground state of optimization problems provided it operates in the adiabatic limit. Recent work [S. Muthukrishnan et al., Phys. Rev. X 6, 031010 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevX.6.031010] has found that for some barrier tunneling problems, quantum annealing can be run much faster than is adiabatically required. Specifically, an n -qubit optimization problem was presented for which a nonadiabatic, or diabatic, annealing algorithm requires only a constant run time, while an adiabatic annealing algorithm requires a run-time polynomial in n . Here we show that this nonadiabatic speedup is the direct result of a specific symmetry in the studied problem. In the more general case, no such nonadiabatic speedup occurs and we show why the special case achieves this speedup compared to the general case. We also prove that the adiabatic annealing algorithm has a necessary and sufficient run time that is quadratically better than the standard quantum adiabatic condition suggests. We conclude with an observation about the required precision in timing for the diabatic algorithm.

  1. Adiabatically driven Brownian pumps.

    PubMed

    Rozenbaum, Viktor M; Makhnovskii, Yurii A; Shapochkina, Irina V; Sheu, Sheh-Yi; Yang, Dah-Yen; Lin, Sheng Hsien

    2013-07-01

    We investigate a Brownian pump which, being powered by a flashing ratchet mechanism, produces net particle transport through a membrane. The extension of the Parrondo's approach developed for reversible Brownian motors [Parrondo, Phys. Rev. E 57, 7297 (1998)] to adiabatically driven pumps is given. We demonstrate that the pumping mechanism becomes especially efficient when the time variation of the potential occurs adiabatically fast or adiabatically slow, in perfect analogy with adiabatically driven Brownian motors which exhibit high efficiency [Rozenbaum et al., Phys. Rev. E 85, 041116 (2012)]. At the same time, the efficiency of the pumping mechanism is shown to be less than that of Brownian motors due to fluctuations of the number of particles in the membrane.

  2. Tunnelling time in strong field ionisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landsman, Alexandra S.; Keller, Ursula

    2014-10-01

    We revisit the common approaches to tunnelling time in the context of attoclock experiments. These experiments measure tunnelling time using close-to-circularly polarised light of the infrared ultrashort laser pulse. We test the sensitivity of the attoclock measurements of tunnelling time to non-adiabatic effects, as described by a well-known theoretical model first developed by Perelomov, Popov, and Terent'ev. We find that in the case of ionisation of helium, both adiabatic and non-adiabatic theories give very similar predictions for ionisations times over a wide intensity range typical of ultrafast experiments.

  3. Symmetry-dependent electron-electron interaction in coherent tunnel junctions resolved by measurements of zero-bias anomaly

    DOE PAGES

    Liu, Liang; Niu, Jiasen; Xiang, Li; ...

    2014-11-18

    We provide experimental evidence that zero bias anomaly in the differential resistance of magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) is due to electron-electron interaction (EEI). Magnon effect is excluded by measuring at low temperatures down to 0.2 K and with reduced AC measurement voltages down to 0.06 mV. The normalized change of conductance is proportional to ln (eV /kB T ), consistent with the Altshuler-Aronov theory of tunneling with EEI but inconsistent with magnetic impurity scattering. The slope of the ln (eV /kBT ) dependence is symmetry dependent, i.e., MTJs with symmetry filtering show di erent slopes for P and AP states,more » while those without symmetry filtering (amorphous barriers) have nearly the same slopes for P and AP.« less

  4. Symmetry-dependent electron-electron interaction in coherent tunnel junctions resolved by measurements of zero-bias anomaly

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Liang; Niu, Jiasen; Xiang, Li; Wei, Jian; Li, D. -L.; Feng, J. -F.; Han, X. -F.; Zhang, X. -G.; Coey, J. M. D.

    2014-11-18

    We provide experimental evidence that zero bias anomaly in the differential resistance of magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) is due to electron-electron interaction (EEI). Magnon effect is excluded by measuring at low temperatures down to 0.2 K and with reduced AC measurement voltages down to 0.06 mV. The normalized change of conductance is proportional to ln (eV /kB T ), consistent with the Altshuler-Aronov theory of tunneling with EEI but inconsistent with magnetic impurity scattering. The slope of the ln (eV /kBT ) dependence is symmetry dependent, i.e., MTJs with symmetry filtering show di erent slopes for P and AP states, while those without symmetry filtering (amorphous barriers) have nearly the same slopes for P and AP.

  5. Direct Tunneling Delay Time Measurement in an Optical Lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortun, A.; Cabrera-Gutiérrez, C.; Condon, G.; Michon, E.; Billy, J.; Guéry-Odelin, D.

    2016-07-01

    We report on the measurement of the time required for a wave packet to tunnel through the potential barriers of an optical lattice. The experiment is carried out by loading adiabatically a Bose-Einstein condensate into a 1D optical lattice. A sudden displacement of the lattice by a few tens of nanometers excites the micromotion of the dipole mode. We then directly observe in momentum space the splitting of the wave packet at the turning points and measure the delay between the reflected and the tunneled packets for various initial displacements. Using this atomic beam splitter twice, we realize a chain of coherent micron-size Mach-Zehnder interferometers at the exit of which we get essentially a wave packet with a negative momentum, a result opposite to the prediction of classical physics.

  6. Dephasing effects on stimulated Raman adiabatic passage in tripod configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Lazarou, C.; Vitanov, N. V.

    2010-09-15

    We present an analytic description of the effects of dephasing processes on stimulated Raman adiabatic passage in a tripod quantum system. To this end, we develop an effective two-level model. Our analysis makes use of the adiabatic approximation in the weak dephasing regime. An effective master equation for a two-level system formed by two dark states is derived, where analytic solutions are obtained by utilizing the Demkov-Kunike model. From these, it is found that the fidelity for the final coherent superposition state decreases exponentially for increasing dephasing rates. Depending on the pulse ordering and for adiabatic evolution, the pulse delay can have an inverse effect.

  7. Mean-field dynamics of a Bose-Einstein condensate in a time-dependent triple-well trap: Nonlinear eigenstates, Landau-Zener models, and stimulated Raman adiabatic passage

    SciTech Connect

    Graefe, E. M.; Korsch, H. J.; Witthaut, D.

    2006-01-15

    We investigate the dynamics of a Bose-Einstein condensate in a triple-well trap in a three-level approximation. The interatomic interactions are taken into account in a mean-field approximation (Gross-Pitaevskii equation), leading to a nonlinear three-level model. Additional eigenstates emerge due to the nonlinearity, depending on the system parameters. Adiabaticity breaks down if such a nonlinear eigenstate disappears when the parameters are varied. The dynamical implications of this loss of adiabaticity are analyzed for two important special cases: A three-level Landau-Zener model and the stimulated Raman adiabatic passage (STIRAP) scheme. We discuss the emergence of looped levels for an equal-slope Landau-Zener model. The Zener tunneling probability does not tend to zero in the adiabatic limit and shows pronounced oscillations as a function of the velocity of the parameter variation. Furthermore we generalize the STIRAP scheme for adiabatic coherent population transfer between atomic states to the nonlinear case. It is shown that STIRAP breaks down if the nonlinearity exceeds the detuning.

  8. Adiabatic Soliton Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bednyakova, Anastasia; Turitsyn, Sergei K.

    2015-03-01

    The key to generating stable optical pulses is mastery of nonlinear light dynamics in laser resonators. Modern techniques to control the buildup of laser pulses are based on nonlinear science and include classical solitons, dissipative solitons, parabolic pulses (similaritons) and various modifications and blending of these methods. Fiber lasers offer remarkable opportunities to apply one-dimensional nonlinear science models for the design and optimization of very practical laser systems. Here, we propose a new concept of a laser based on the adiabatic amplification of a soliton pulse in the cavity—the adiabatic soliton laser. The adiabatic change of the soliton parameters during evolution in the resonator relaxes the restriction on the pulse energy inherent in traditional soliton lasers. Theoretical analysis is confirmed by extensive numerical modeling.

  9. Quantum adiabatic machine learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pudenz, Kristen L.; Lidar, Daniel A.

    2013-05-01

    We develop an approach to machine learning and anomaly detection via quantum adiabatic evolution. This approach consists of two quantum phases, with some amount of classical preprocessing to set up the quantum problems. In the training phase we identify an optimal set of weak classifiers, to form a single strong classifier. In the testing phase we adiabatically evolve one or more strong classifiers on a superposition of inputs in order to find certain anomalous elements in the classification space. Both the training and testing phases are executed via quantum adiabatic evolution. All quantum processing is strictly limited to two-qubit interactions so as to ensure physical feasibility. We apply and illustrate this approach in detail to the problem of software verification and validation, with a specific example of the learning phase applied to a problem of interest in flight control systems. Beyond this example, the algorithm can be used to attack a broad class of anomaly detection problems.

  10. Adiabatic capture and debunching

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, K.Y.; /Fermilab

    2012-03-01

    In the study of beam preparation for the g-2 experiment, adiabatic debunching and adiabatic capture are revisited. The voltage programs for these adiabbatic processes are derived and their properties discussed. Comparison is made with some other form of adiabatic capture program. The muon g-2 experiment at Fermilab calls for intense proton bunches for the creation of muons. A booster batch of 84 bunches is injected into the Recycler Ring, where it is debunched and captured into 4 intense bunches with the 2.5-MHz rf. The experiment requires short bunches with total width less than 100 ns. The transport line from the Recycler to the muon-production target has a low momentum aperture of {approx} {+-}22 MeV. Thus each of the 4 intense proton bunches required to have an emittance less than {approx} 3.46 eVs. The incoming booster bunches have total emittance {approx} 8.4 eVs, or each one with an emittance {approx} 0.1 eVs. However, there is always emittance increase when the 84 booster bunches are debunched. There will be even larger emittance increase during adiabatic capture into the buckets of the 2.5-MHz rf. In addition, the incoming booster bunches may have emittances larger than 0.1 eVs. In this article, we will concentrate on the analysis of the adiabatic capture process with the intention of preserving the beam emittance as much as possible. At this moment, beam preparation experiment is being performed at the Main Injector. Since the Main Injector and the Recycler Ring have roughly the same lattice properties, we are referring to adiabatic capture in the Main Injector instead in our discussions.

  11. Adiabatic quantum motors.

    PubMed

    Bustos-Marún, Raúl; Refael, Gil; von Oppen, Felix

    2013-08-09

    When parameters are varied periodically, charge can be pumped through a mesoscopic conductor without applied bias. Here, we consider the inverse effect in which a transport current drives a periodic variation of an adiabatic degree of freedom. This provides a general operating principle for adiabatic quantum motors which we discuss here in general terms. We relate the work performed per cycle on the motor degree of freedom to characteristics of the underlying quantum pump and discuss the motors' efficiency. Quantum motors based on chaotic quantum dots operate solely due to quantum interference, and motors based on Thouless pumps have ideal efficiency.

  12. Adiabatic gate teleportation.

    PubMed

    Bacon, Dave; Flammia, Steven T

    2009-09-18

    The difficulty in producing precisely timed and controlled quantum gates is a significant source of error in many physical implementations of quantum computers. Here we introduce a simple universal primitive, adiabatic gate teleportation, which is robust to timing errors and many control errors and maintains a constant energy gap throughout the computation above a degenerate ground state space. This construction allows for geometric robustness based upon the control of two independent qubit interactions. Further, our piecewise adiabatic evolution easily relates to the quantum circuit model, enabling the use of standard methods from fault-tolerance theory for establishing thresholds.

  13. Adiabatically implementing quantum gates

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Jie; Lu, Songfeng Liu, Fang

    2014-06-14

    We show that, through the approach of quantum adiabatic evolution, all of the usual quantum gates can be implemented efficiently, yielding running time of order O(1). This may be considered as a useful alternative to the standard quantum computing approach, which involves quantum gates transforming quantum states during the computing process.

  14. Photodissociation dynamics of phenol: multistate trajectory simulations including tunneling.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xuefei; Zheng, Jingjing; Yang, Ke R; Truhlar, Donald G

    2014-11-19

    We report multistate trajectory simulations, including coherence, decoherence, and multidimensional tunneling, of phenol photodissociation dynamics. The calculations are based on full-dimensional anchor-points reactive potential surfaces and state couplings fit to electronic structure calculations including dynamical correlation with an augmented correlation-consistent polarized valence double-ζ basis set. The calculations successfully reproduce the experimentally observed bimodal character of the total kinetic energy release spectra and confirm the interpretation of the most recent experiments that the photodissociation process is dominated by tunneling. Analysis of the trajectories uncovers an unexpected dissociation pathway for one quantum excitation of the O-H stretching mode of the S1 state, namely, tunneling in a coherent mixture of states starting in a smaller ROH (∼0.9-1.0 Å) region than has previously been invoked. The simulations also show that most trajectories do not pass close to the S1-S2 conical intersection (they have a minimum gap greater than 0.6 eV), they provide statistics on the out-of-plane angles at the locations of the minimum energy adiabatic gap, and they reveal information about which vibrational modes are most highly activated in the products.

  15. Picosecond electric field pulse induced coherent magnetic switching in MgO/FePt/Pt(001)-based tunnel junctions: a multiscale study

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Wanjiao; Xiao, Dun; Liu, Yaowen; Gong, S. J.; Duan, Chun-Gang

    2014-01-01

    Combined methods of first-principles calculations and Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert (LLG) macrospin simulations are performed to investigate the coherent magnetization switching in the MgO/FePt/Pt(001)-based magnetic tunnel junctions triggered by short pulses of electric field through the control of magnetic anisotropy energy (MAE) electrically. First-principles calculations indicate that the MAE of MgO/FePt/Pt(001) film varies linearly with the change of the electric field, whereas the LLG simulations show that the change in MAE by electric field pulses could induce the in-plane magnetization reversal of the free layer by tuning the pulse parameters. We find that there exist a critical pulse width τmin to switch the in-plane magnetization, and this τmin deceases with the increasing pulse amplitude E0. Besides, the magnetization orientation cannot be switched when the pulse width exceeds a critical value τmax, and τmax increases asymptotically with E0. In addition, there exist some irregular switching areas at short pulse width due to the high precessional frequency under small initial angle. Finally, a successive magnetization switching can be achieved by a series of electric field pulses. PMID:24844293

  16. Adiabatic topological quantum computing

    DOE PAGES

    Cesare, Chris; Landahl, Andrew J.; Bacon, Dave; ...

    2015-07-31

    Topological quantum computing promises error-resistant quantum computation without active error correction. However, there is a worry that during the process of executing quantum gates by braiding anyons around each other, extra anyonic excitations will be created that will disorder the encoded quantum information. Here, we explore this question in detail by studying adiabatic code deformations on Hamiltonians based on topological codes, notably Kitaev’s surface codes and the more recently discovered color codes. We develop protocols that enable universal quantum computing by adiabatic evolution in a way that keeps the energy gap of the system constant with respect to the computationmore » size and introduces only simple local Hamiltonian interactions. This allows one to perform holonomic quantum computing with these topological quantum computing systems. The tools we develop allow one to go beyond numerical simulations and understand these processes analytically.« less

  17. Cavity-state preparation using adiabatic transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, Jonas; Andersson, Erika

    2005-05-01

    We show how to prepare a variety of cavity field states for multiple cavities. The state preparation technique used is related to the method of stimulated adiabatic Raman passage. The cavity modes are coupled by atoms, making it possible to transfer an arbitrary cavity field state from one cavity to another and also to prepare nontrivial cavity field states. In particular, we show how to prepare entangled states of two or more cavities, such as an Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen state and a W state, as well as various entangled superpositions of coherent states in different cavities, including Schrödinger cat states. The theoretical considerations are supported by numerical simulations.

  18. Berry's phase for coherent states of Landau levels

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Wen-Long; Chen, Jing-Ling

    2007-02-15

    The Berry phases for coherent states and squeezed coherent states of Landau levels are calculated. Coherent states of Landau levels are interpreted as a result of a magnetic flux moved adiabatically from infinity to a finite place on the plane. The Abelian Berry phase for coherent states of Landau levels is an analog of the Aharonov-Bohm effect. Moreover, the non-Abelian Berry phase is calculated for the adiabatic evolution of the magnetic field B.

  19. On Adiabatic Pair Creation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pickl, Peter; Dürr, Detlef

    2008-08-01

    We give here a rigorous proof of the well known prediction of pair creation as it arises from the Dirac equation with an external time dependent potential. Pair creation happens with probability one if the potential changes adiabatically in time and becomes overcritical, which means that an eigenvalue curve (as a function of time) bridges the gap between the negative and positive spectral continuum. The potential can be thought of as being zero at large negative and large positive times. The rigorous treatment of this effect has been lacking since the pioneering work of Beck, Steinwedel and Süßmann [1] in 1963 and Gershtein and Zeldovich [8] in 1970.

  20. Dynamics with the effective adiabatic theory: The Bloch equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmeli, Benny; Chandler, David

    1988-07-01

    This paper extends our earlier work on the effective adiabatic theory [J. Chem. Phys. 82, 3400 (1985)] to study relaxation of a two-level system coupled to a Gaussian dissipative bath—the spin-boson problem. Bloch equations are derived which, under the limited circumstances described herein, treat the role of bath fluctuations omitted in the equilibrium effective adiabatic reference system. Applications to the Lorentzian dissipative bath show that the theory agrees closely with numerical simulation results. Application to an Ohmic bath shows that the theory is in agreement with currently accepted results concerned with the problem of macroscopic quantum coherence.

  1. Chirped Pulse Adiabatic Passage in CARS for Imaging of Biological Structure and Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Malinovskaya, Svetlana A.

    2007-12-26

    We propose the adiabatic passage control scheme implementing chirped femtosecond laser pulses to maximize coherence in a predetermined molecular vibrational mode using two-photon Raman transitions. We investigate vibrational energy relaxation and collisional dephasing as factors of coherence loss, and demonstrate the possibility for preventing decoherence by the chirped pulse train. The proposed method may be used to advance noninvasive biological imaging techniques.

  2. Geometry of the Adiabatic Theorem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lobo, Augusto Cesar; Ribeiro, Rafael Antunes; Ribeiro, Clyffe de Assis; Dieguez, Pedro Ruas

    2012-01-01

    We present a simple and pedagogical derivation of the quantum adiabatic theorem for two-level systems (a single qubit) based on geometrical structures of quantum mechanics developed by Anandan and Aharonov, among others. We have chosen to use only the minimum geometric structure needed for the understanding of the adiabatic theorem for this case.…

  3. Geometry of the Adiabatic Theorem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lobo, Augusto Cesar; Ribeiro, Rafael Antunes; Ribeiro, Clyffe de Assis; Dieguez, Pedro Ruas

    2012-01-01

    We present a simple and pedagogical derivation of the quantum adiabatic theorem for two-level systems (a single qubit) based on geometrical structures of quantum mechanics developed by Anandan and Aharonov, among others. We have chosen to use only the minimum geometric structure needed for the understanding of the adiabatic theorem for this case.…

  4. Experimental demonstration of population inversion driven by retroreflection-induced bichromatic adiabatic passage

    SciTech Connect

    Conde, Alvaro Peralta; Yatsenko, Leonid P.; Klein, Jens; Oberst, Martin; Halfmann, Thomas

    2005-11-15

    We present experimental data to demonstrate coherently driven population inversion by retroreflection-induced bichromatic adiabatic passage in metastable helium atoms. Complete and robust population transfer from an initial to a target state is induced by coherent interaction of the atoms in a supersonic beam with two counterpropagating and temporally delayed laser pulses of different intensities. The radiation fields intersect the atomic beam slightly tilted away from normal incidence, thereby inducing Doppler shifts of the atomic resonance between the initial and the target state. Thus the laser pulses produce a bichromatic field in the rest frame of each atom, which induces complete coherent population transfer by an adiabatic passage process.

  5. Applications of chirped Raman adiabatic rapid passage to atom interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotru, Krish; Butts, David L.; Kinast, Joseph M.; Johnson, David M. S.; Radojevic, Antonije M.; Timmons, Brian P.; Stoner, Richard E.

    2012-02-01

    We present robust atom optics, based on chirped Raman adiabatic rapid passage (ARP), in the context of atom interferometry. Such ARP light pulses drive coherent population transfer between two hyperfine ground states by sweeping the frequency difference of two fixed-intensity optical fields with large single photon detunings. Since adiabatic transfer is less sensitive to atom temperature and non-uniform Raman beam intensity than standard Raman pulses, this approach should improve the stability of atom interferometers operating in dynamic environments. In such applications, chirped Raman ARP may also provide advantages over the previously demonstrated stimulated Raman adiabatic passage (STIRAP) technique, which requires precise modulation of beam intensity and zeroing of the single photon detuning. We demonstrate a clock interferometer with chirped Raman ARP pulses, and compare its stability to that of a conventional Raman pulse interferometer. We also discuss potential improvements to inertially sensitive atom interferometers. Copyright 2011 by The Charles Stark Draper Laboratory, Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Orbital-resolved nonadiabatic tunneling ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qingbin; Basnayake, Gihan; Winney, Alexander; Lin, Yun Fei; Debrah, Duke; Lee, Suk Kyoung; Li, Wen

    2017-08-01

    In this theoretical work, we show that both the orbital helicity (p+ vs p-) and the adiabaticity of tunneling have a significant effect on the initial conditions of tunneling ionization. We developed a hybrid quantum (numerical solution of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation) and classical (back propagation of trajectories) approach to extract orbital-specific initial conditions of electrons at the tunneling exit. Clear physical insight connecting these initial conditions with the final momentum and deflection angles of electrons are presented. Moreover, the adiabaticity of tunneling ionization is characterized by comparing the initial conditions with those with a static field. Significant nonadiabatic tunneling is found to persist beyond a Keldysh parameter of less than 0.5.

  7. Stimulated Raman adiabatic control of a nuclear spin in diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coto, Raul; Jacques, Vincent; Hétet, Gabriel; Maze, Jerónimo R.

    2017-08-01

    Coherent manipulation of nuclear spins is a highly desirable tool for both quantum metrology and quantum computation. However, most of the current techniques to control nuclear spins lack fast speed, impairing their robustness against decoherence. Here, based on stimulated Raman adiabatic passage, and its modification including shortcuts to adiabaticity, we present a fast protocol for the coherent manipulation of nuclear spins. Our proposed Λ scheme is implemented in the microwave domain and its excited-state relaxation can be optically controlled through an external laser excitation. These features allow for the initialization of a nuclear spin starting from a thermal state. Moreover we show how to implement Raman control for performing Ramsey spectroscopy to measure the dynamical and geometric phases acquired by nuclear spins.

  8. Non-adiabatic effects in thermochemistry, spectroscopy and kinetics: the general importance of all three Born-Oppenheimer breakdown corrections.

    PubMed

    Reimers, Jeffrey R; McKemmish, Laura K; McKenzie, Ross H; Hush, Noel S

    2015-10-14

    Using a simple model Hamiltonian, the three correction terms for Born-Oppenheimer (BO) breakdown, the adiabatic diagonal correction (DC), the first-derivative momentum non-adiabatic correction (FD), and the second-derivative kinetic-energy non-adiabatic correction (SD), are shown to all contribute to thermodynamic and spectroscopic properties as well as to thermal non-diabatic chemical reaction rates. While DC often accounts for >80% of thermodynamic and spectroscopic property changes, the commonly used practice of including only the FD correction in kinetics calculations is rarely found to be adequate. For electron-transfer reactions not in the inverted region, the common physical picture that diabatic processes occur because of surface hopping at the transition state is proven inadequate as the DC acts first to block access, increasing the transition state energy by (ℏω)(2)λ/16J(2) (where λ is the reorganization energy, J the electronic coupling and ω the vibration frequency). However, the rate constant in the weakly-coupled Golden-Rule limit is identified as being only inversely proportional to this change rather than exponentially damped, owing to the effects of tunneling and surface hopping. Such weakly-coupled long-range electron-transfer processes should therefore not be described as "non-adiabatic" processes as they are easily described by Born-Huang ground-state adiabatic surfaces made by adding the DC to the BO surfaces; instead, they should be called just "non-Born-Oppenheimer" processes. The model system studied consists of two diabatic harmonic potential-energy surfaces coupled linearly through a single vibration, the "two-site Holstein model". Analytical expressions are derived for the BO breakdown terms, and the model is solved over a large parameter space focusing on both the lowest-energy spectroscopic transitions and the quantum dynamics of coherent-state wavepackets. BO breakdown is investigated pertinent to: ammonia inversion, aromaticity

  9. Majorization in quantum adiabatic algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Wei Zhaohui; Ji Zhengfeng; Ying Mingsheng

    2006-10-15

    The majorization theory has been applied to analyze the mathematical structure of quantum algorithms. An empirical conclusion by numerical simulations obtained in the previous literature indicates that step-by-step majorization seems to appear universally in quantum adiabatic algorithms. In this paper, a rigorous analysis of the majorization arrow in a special class of quantum adiabatic algorithms is carried out. In particular, we prove that for any adiabatic algorithm of this class, step-by-step majorization of the ground state holds exactly. For the actual state, we show that step-by-step majorization holds approximately, and furthermore that the longer the running time of the algorithm, the better the approximation.

  10. Perspective: Quantum or classical coherence?

    PubMed

    Miller, William H

    2012-06-07

    Some coherence effects in chemical dynamics are described correctly by classical mechanics, while others only appear in a quantum treatment--and when these are observed experimentally it is not always immediately obvious whether their origin is classical or quantum. Semiclassical theory provides a systematic way of adding quantum coherence to classical molecular dynamics and thus provides a useful way to distinguish between classical and quantum coherence. Several examples are discussed which illustrate both cases. Particularly interesting is the situation with electronically non-adiabatic processes, where sometimes whether the coherence effects are classical or quantum depends on what specific aspects of the process are observed.

  11. Adiabatic losses in Stirling refrigerators

    SciTech Connect

    Bauwens, L.

    1996-06-01

    The Stirling cycle has been used very effectively in cryocoolers; but efficiencies relative to the Carnot limit are typically observed to peak for absolute temperature ratios of about two, which makes it less suitable for low-life refrigeration. The adiabatic loss appears to be responsible for poor performance at small temperature differences. In this paper, adiabatic losses are evaluated, for a temperature ratio of 2/3, taking into account the effect of phase angle between pistons, of volume ratio, of the distribution of the dead volume necessary to reduce the volume ratio, and of the distribution of displacement between expansion and compression spaces. The study is carried out numerically, using an adiabatic Stirling engine model in which cylinder flow is assumed to be stratified. Results show that the best location for the cylinder dead volume is on the compression side. Otherwise, all strategies used to trade off refrigeration for coefficient of performance are found to be roughly equivalent.

  12. The Floquet Adiabatic Theorem revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinberg, Phillip; Bukov, Marin; D'Alessio, Luca; Kolodrubetz, Michael; Davidson, Shainen; Polkovnikov, Anatoli

    2015-03-01

    The existance of the adiabatic theorem for Floquet systems has been the subject of an active debate with different articles reaching opposite conclusions over the years. In this talk we clarify the situation by deriving a systematic expansion in the time-derivatives of a slow parameter for the occupation probabilities of the Floque states. Our analysis shows that the in a certain limit the transition between Floquet eigenstates are suppressed and it is possible to define an adiabatic theorem for Floquet systems. Crucially we observe however that the conditions for adiabaticity in ordinary and Floquet systems are different and that this difference can become important when the amplitude of the periodic driving is large. We illustrate our results with specific examples of a periodically driven harmonic oscillator and cold atoms in optical lattices which are relevant in current experiments.

  13. Adiabatic evolution of plasma equilibrium

    PubMed Central

    Grad, H.; Hu, P. N.; Stevens, D. C.

    1975-01-01

    A new theory of plasma equilibrium is introduced in which adiabatic constraints are specified. This leads to a mathematically nonstandard structure, as compared to the usual equilibrium theory, in which prescription of pressure and current profiles leads to an elliptic partial differential equation. Topologically complex configurations require further generalization of the concept of adiabaticity to allow irreversible mixing of plasma and magnetic flux among islands. Matching conditions across a boundary layer at the separatrix are obtained from appropriate conservation laws. Applications are made to configurations with planned islands (as in Doublet) and accidental islands (as in Tokamaks). Two-dimensional, axially symmetric, helically symmetric, and closed line equilibria are included. PMID:16578729

  14. Pressure Oscillations in Adiabatic Compression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stout, Roland

    2011-01-01

    After finding Moloney and McGarvey's modified adiabatic compression apparatus, I decided to insert this experiment into my physical chemistry laboratory at the last minute, replacing a problematic experiment. With insufficient time to build the apparatus, we placed a bottle between two thick textbooks and compressed it with a third textbook forced…

  15. Pressure Oscillations in Adiabatic Compression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stout, Roland

    2011-01-01

    After finding Moloney and McGarvey's modified adiabatic compression apparatus, I decided to insert this experiment into my physical chemistry laboratory at the last minute, replacing a problematic experiment. With insufficient time to build the apparatus, we placed a bottle between two thick textbooks and compressed it with a third textbook forced…

  16. Transitionless driving on adiabatic search algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, Sangchul; Kais, Sabre

    2014-12-14

    We study quantum dynamics of the adiabatic search algorithm with the equivalent two-level system. Its adiabatic and non-adiabatic evolution is studied and visualized as trajectories of Bloch vectors on a Bloch sphere. We find the change in the non-adiabatic transition probability from exponential decay for the short running time to inverse-square decay in asymptotic running time. The scaling of the critical running time is expressed in terms of the Lambert W function. We derive the transitionless driving Hamiltonian for the adiabatic search algorithm, which makes a quantum state follow the adiabatic path. We demonstrate that a uniform transitionless driving Hamiltonian, approximate to the exact time-dependent driving Hamiltonian, can alter the non-adiabatic transition probability from the inverse square decay to the inverse fourth power decay with the running time. This may open up a new but simple way of speeding up adiabatic quantum dynamics.

  17. Transitionless driving on adiabatic search algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Sangchul; Kais, Sabre

    2014-12-01

    We study quantum dynamics of the adiabatic search algorithm with the equivalent two-level system. Its adiabatic and non-adiabatic evolution is studied and visualized as trajectories of Bloch vectors on a Bloch sphere. We find the change in the non-adiabatic transition probability from exponential decay for the short running time to inverse-square decay in asymptotic running time. The scaling of the critical running time is expressed in terms of the Lambert W function. We derive the transitionless driving Hamiltonian for the adiabatic search algorithm, which makes a quantum state follow the adiabatic path. We demonstrate that a uniform transitionless driving Hamiltonian, approximate to the exact time-dependent driving Hamiltonian, can alter the non-adiabatic transition probability from the inverse square decay to the inverse fourth power decay with the running time. This may open up a new but simple way of speeding up adiabatic quantum dynamics.

  18. Transitionless driving on adiabatic search algorithm.

    PubMed

    Oh, Sangchul; Kais, Sabre

    2014-12-14

    We study quantum dynamics of the adiabatic search algorithm with the equivalent two-level system. Its adiabatic and non-adiabatic evolution is studied and visualized as trajectories of Bloch vectors on a Bloch sphere. We find the change in the non-adiabatic transition probability from exponential decay for the short running time to inverse-square decay in asymptotic running time. The scaling of the critical running time is expressed in terms of the Lambert W function. We derive the transitionless driving Hamiltonian for the adiabatic search algorithm, which makes a quantum state follow the adiabatic path. We demonstrate that a uniform transitionless driving Hamiltonian, approximate to the exact time-dependent driving Hamiltonian, can alter the non-adiabatic transition probability from the inverse square decay to the inverse fourth power decay with the running time. This may open up a new but simple way of speeding up adiabatic quantum dynamics.

  19. AWT aerodynamic design status. [Altitude Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Milt W.

    1984-01-01

    The aerodynamic design of the NASA Altitude Wind Tunnel is presented in viewgraph format. The main topics covered are: analysis of a plenum evacuation system; airline definition and pressure loss code development; contraction geometry and code analysis; and design of the two stage fan. Flow characteristics such as pressure ratio, mach number distribution, adiabatic efficiency, and losses are shown.

  20. Studies in Chaotic adiabatic dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Jarzynski, C.

    1994-01-01

    Chaotic adiabatic dynamics refers to the study of systems exhibiting chaotic evolution under slowly time-dependent equations of motion. In this dissertation the author restricts his attention to Hamiltonian chaotic adiabatic systems. The results presented are organized around a central theme, namely, that the energies of such systems evolve diffusively. He begins with a general analysis, in which he motivates and derives a Fokker-Planck equation governing this process of energy diffusion. He applies this equation to study the {open_quotes}goodness{close_quotes} of an adiabatic invariant associated with chaotic motion. This formalism is then applied to two specific examples. The first is that of a gas of noninteracting point particles inside a hard container that deforms slowly with time. Both the two- and three-dimensional cases are considered. The results are discussed in the context of the Wall Formula for one-body dissipation in nuclear physics, and it is shown that such a gas approaches, asymptotically with time, an exponential velocity distribution. The second example involves the Fermi mechanism for the acceleration of cosmic rays. Explicit evolution equations are obtained for the distribution of cosmic ray energies within this model, and the steady-state energy distribution that arises when this equation is modified to account for the injection and removal of cosmic rays is discussed. Finally, the author re-examines the multiple-time-scale approach as applied to the study of phase space evolution under a chaotic adiabatic Hamiltonian. This leads to a more rigorous derivation of the above-mentioned Fokker-Planck equation, and also to a new term which has relevance to the problem of chaotic adiabatic reaction forces (the forces acting on slow, heavy degrees of freedom due to their coupling to light, fast chaotic degrees).

  1. Digital waveguide adiabatic passage part 1: theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaitkus, Jesse A.; Steel, M. J.; Greentree, Andrew D.

    2017-03-01

    Spatial adiabatic passage represents a new way to design integrated photonic devices. In conventional adiabatic passage designs require smoothly varying waveguide separations. Here we show modelling of adiabatic passage devices where the waveguide separation is varied digitally. Despite digitisation, our designs show robustness against variations in the input wavelength and refractive index contrast of the waveguides relative to the cladding. This approach to spatial adiabatic passage opens new design strategies and hence the potential for new photonics devices.

  2. Adiabatic quantum state transfer in tight-binding chains using periodic driving fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longhi, S.

    2014-09-01

    A method for high-fidelity coherent adiabatic transport in a zig-zag tight-binding chain, based on application of two external periodic driving fields, is theoretically proposed. The method turns out to be robust against imperfections and disorder of the static lattice Hamiltonian, is tolerant to next-nearest neighborhood interactions, and enables coherent transport in long chains without the need for a local control and timing of the trapping potential.

  3. Epitaxial complex oxide tunnel barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, Junwoo; Moetakef, Pouya; Cagnon, Joël; Stemmer, Susanne

    2009-03-01

    Tunnel junctions with complex oxide thin film barriers are of interest for studies of the critical thickness of ferroelectricity, of phonon modes in ultrathin films and of traps by inelastic tunneling spectroscopy. We show that high-quality epitaxial SrTiO3 and BaTiO3 tunnel barriers can be grown on Pt bottom electrodes. Coherent, epitaxial Pt films with roughness of less than a unit cell were grown on (001) SrTiO3 to serve as bottom electrodes for epitaxial SrTiO3 and BaTiO3 tunnel barriers. All interfaces were atomically abrupt as confirmed by atomic resolution Z-contrast imaging. The IV characteristics were non-linear, demonstrating good insulating properties. For the SrTiO3 barriers and voltage sweeps up to ± 0.5 V, the measured tunnel current was independent of the sweep direction. At low biases, dynamic conductance curves showed a symmetrical parabolic shape around the origin in both resistance states. At high bias, deviation from the ideal tunnel behavior was observed. A large increase of the tunnel conductance occurred above a minimum positive bias. A dramatic decrease of tunnel conductance occurred for a large negative bias, indicating bipolar switching. We show the contributions to the resistive switching. Phonon modes and traps are determined using inelastic tunneling spectroscopy with both paraelectric and ferroelectric tunnel barriers.

  4. Coherent dynamics in long fluxonium qubits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rastelli, Gianluca; Vanević, Mihajlo; Belzig, Wolfgang

    2015-05-01

    We analyze the coherent dynamics of a fluxonium device (Manucharyan et al 2009 Science 326 113) formed by a superconducting ring of Josephson junctions in which strong quantum phase fluctuations are localized exclusively on a single weak element. In such a system, quantum phase tunnelling by 2π occurring at the weak element couples the states of the ring with supercurrents circulating in opposite directions, while the rest of the ring provides an intrinsic electromagnetic environment of the qubit. Taking into account the capacitive coupling between nearest neighbors and the capacitance to the ground, we show that the homogeneous part of the ring can sustain electrodynamic modes which couple to the two levels of the flux qubit. In particular, when the number of Josephson junctions is increased, several low-energy modes can have frequencies lower than the qubit frequency. This gives rise to a quasiperiodic dynamics, which manifests itself as a decay of oscillations between the two counterpropagating current states at short times, followed by oscillation-like revivals at later times. We analyze how the system approaches such a dynamics as the ring’s length is increased and discuss possible experimental implications of this non-adiabatic regime.

  5. Stimulated Raman adiabatic passage in Tm{sup 3+}:YAG

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, A. L.; Lauro, R.; Louchet, A.; Chaneliere, T.; Le Goueet, J. L.

    2008-10-01

    We report on the experimental demonstration of stimulated Raman adiabatic passage in a Tm{sup 3+}:YAG crystal. Tm{sup 3+}:YAG is a promising material for use in quantum information processing applications, but as yet there are few experimental investigations of coherent Raman processes in this material. We investigate the effect of inhomogeneous broadening and Rabi frequency on the transfer efficiency and the width of the two-photon spectrum. Simulations of the complete Tm{sup 3+}:YAG system are presented along with the corresponding experimental results.

  6. Nonadiabatic tunneling via conical intersections and the role of the geometric phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Changjian; Yarkony, David R.; Guo, Hua

    2017-02-01

    As a ubiquitous quantum effect, tunneling has attracted attention ever since the dawn of quantum mechanics. However, recent evidence suggests that nonadiabatic atomic tunneling near a conical intersection (CI) behaves differently from its adiabatic counterpart, producing lifetime differences of up to two orders of magnitude. Using two-dimensional models, we demonstrate here that the failure of the adiabatic model in describing tunneling near a CI can be attributed largely to the neglect of the geometric phase, which is associated with the adiabatic electronic wave function transported around a CI. The geometric phase-induced destructive interference among wave functions following different paths around the CI, manifested as a node in the adiabatic wave function, retards tunneling.

  7. Shot noise for resonant Cooper pair tunneling.

    PubMed

    Choi, M S; Plastina, F; Fazio, R

    2001-09-10

    We study intrinsic noise of current in a superconducting single-electron transistor, taking into account both coherence effects and Coulomb interaction near a Cooper pair resonance. Because of this interplay, the statistics of tunneling events deviates from the Poisson distribution and, more important, it shows even-odd asymmetry in the transmitted charge. The zero-frequency noise is suppressed significantly when the quasiparticle tunneling rates are comparable to the coherent oscillation frequency of Cooper pairs.

  8. Adiabatic Spin Pumping with Quantum Dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mucciolo, Eduardo R.

    Electronic transport in mesoscopic systems has been intensively studied for more the last three decades. While there is a substantial understanding of the stationary regime, much less is know about phase-coherent nonequilibrium transport when pulses or ac perturbations are used to drive electrons at low temperatures and at small length scales. However, about 20 years ago Thouless proposed to drive nondissipative currents in quantum systems by applying simultaneously two phase-locked external perturbations. The so-called adiabatic pumping mechanism has been revived in the last few years, both theoretically and experimentally, in part because of the development of lateral semiconductor quantum dots. Here we will explain how open dots can be used to create spin-polarized currents with little or no net charge transfer. The pure spin pump we propose is the analog of a charge battery in conventional electronics and may provide a needed circuit element for spin-based electronics. We will also discuss other relevant issues such as rectification and decoherence and point out possible extensions of the mechanism to closed dots.

  9. Semiclassical quantization of bound and quasistationary states beyond the adiabatic approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Benderskii, V.A.; Vetoshkin, E.V.; Kats, E.I.

    2004-06-01

    We examine one important (and previously overlooked) aspect of well-known crossing diabatic potentials or Landau-Zener (LZ) problem. We derive the semiclassical quantization rules for the crossing diabatic potentials with localized initial and localized or delocalized final states, in the intermediate energy region, when all four adiabatic states are coupled and should be taken into account. We found all needed connection matrices and present the following analytical results: (i) in the tunneling region, the splittings of vibrational levels are represented as a product of the splitting in the lower adiabatic potential and the nontrivial function depending on the Massey parameter; (ii) in the overbarrier region, we find specific resonances between the levels in the lower and in the upper adiabatic potentials and, in that condition, independent quantizations rules are not correct; (iii) for the delocalized final states (decay lower adiabatic potential), we describe quasistationary states and calculate the decay rate as a function of the adiabatic coupling; and (iv) for the intermediate energy regions, we calculate the energy level quantization, which can be brought into a compact form by using either adiabatic or diabatic basis set (in contrast to the previous results found in the Landau diabatic basis). Applications of the results may concern the various systems; e.g., molecules undergoing conversion of electronic states, radiationless transitions, or isomerization reactions.

  10. Invalidity of the quantitative adiabatic condition and general conditions for adiabatic approximations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dafa

    2016-05-01

    The adiabatic theorem was proposed about 90 years ago and has played an important role in quantum physics. The quantitative adiabatic condition constructed from eigenstates and eigenvalues of a Hamiltonian is a traditional tool to estimate adiabaticity and has proven to be the necessary and sufficient condition for adiabaticity. However, recently the condition has become a controversial subject. In this paper, we list some expressions to estimate the validity of the adiabatic approximation. We show that the quantitative adiabatic condition is invalid for the adiabatic approximation via the Euclidean distance between the adiabatic state and the evolution state. Furthermore, we deduce general necessary and sufficient conditions for the validity of the adiabatic approximation by different definitions.

  11. The performance of the quantum adiabatic algorithm on spike Hamiltonians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Linghang; Crosson, Elizabeth

    Spike Hamiltonians arise from optimization instances for which the adiabatic algorithm provably out performs classical simulated annealing. In this work, we study the efficiency of the adiabatic algorithm for solving the “the Hamming weight with a spike” problem by analyzing the scaling of the spectral gap at the critical point for various sizes of the barrier. Our main result is a rigorous lower bound on the minimum spectral gap for the adiabatic evolution when the bit-symmetric cost function has a thin but polynomially high barrier, which is based on a comparison argument and an improved variational ansatz for the ground state. We also adapt the discrete WKB method for the case of abruptly changing potentials and compare it with the predictions of the spin coherent instanton method which was previously used by Farhi, Goldstone and Gutmann. Finally, our improved ansatz for the ground state leads to a method for predicting the location of avoided crossings in the excited energy states of the thin spike Hamiltonian, and we use a recursion relation to understand the ordering of some of these avoided crossings as a step towards analyzing the previously observed diabatic cascade phenomenon.

  12. Theory of Adiabatic Fountain Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Gary A.

    2017-06-01

    The theory of "Adiabatic Fountain Resonance" with superfluid ^4{He} is clarified. In this geometry a film region between two silicon wafers bonded at their outer edge opens up to a central region with a free surface. We find that the resonance in this system is not a Helmholtz resonance as claimed by Gasparini et al., but in fact is a fourth sound resonance. We postulate that it occurs at relatively low frequency because the thin silicon wafers flex appreciably from the pressure oscillations of the sound wave.

  13. Theory of Adiabatic Fountain Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Gary A.

    2017-01-01

    The theory of "Adiabatic Fountain Resonance" with superfluid ^4{He} is clarified. In this geometry a film region between two silicon wafers bonded at their outer edge opens up to a central region with a free surface. We find that the resonance in this system is not a Helmholtz resonance as claimed by Gasparini et al., but in fact is a fourth sound resonance. We postulate that it occurs at relatively low frequency because the thin silicon wafers flex appreciably from the pressure oscillations of the sound wave.

  14. Adiabatic Wankel type rotary engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamo, R.; Badgley, P.; Doup, D.

    1988-01-01

    This SBIR Phase program accomplished the objective of advancing the technology of the Wankel type rotary engine for aircraft applications through the use of adiabatic engine technology. Based on the results of this program, technology is in place to provide a rotor and side and intermediate housings with thermal barrier coatings. A detailed cycle analysis of the NASA 1007R Direct Injection Stratified Charge (DISC) rotary engine was performed which concluded that applying thermal barrier coatings to the rotor should be successful and that it was unlikely that the rotor housing could be successfully run with thermal barrier coatings as the thermal stresses were extensive.

  15. Transport of ultracold atoms between concentric traps via spatial adiabatic passage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polo, J.; Benseny, A.; Busch, Th; Ahufinger, V.; Mompart, J.

    2016-01-01

    Spatial adiabatic passage processes for ultracold atoms trapped in tunnel-coupled cylindrically symmetric concentric potentials are investigated. Specifically, we discuss the matter-wave analog of the rapid adiabatic passage (RAP) technique for a high fidelity and robust loading of a single atom into a harmonic ring potential from a harmonic trap, and for its transport between two concentric rings. We also consider a system of three concentric rings and investigate the transport of a single atom between the innermost and the outermost rings making use of the matter-wave analog of the stimulated Raman adiabatic passage (STIRAP) technique. We describe the RAP-like and STIRAP-like dynamics by means of a two- and a three-state model, respectively, obtaining good agreement with the numerical simulations of the corresponding two-dimensional Schrödinger equation.

  16. Protecting and accelerating adiabatic passage with time-delayed pulse sequences.

    PubMed

    Sampedro, Pablo; Chang, Bo Y; Sola, Ignacio R

    2016-05-21

    Using numerical simulations of two-photon electronic absorption with femtosecond pulses in Na2 we show that: (i) it is possible to avoid the characteristic saturation or dumped Rabi oscillations in the yield of absorption by time-delaying the laser pulses; (ii) it is possible to accelerate the onset of adiabatic passage by using the vibrational coherence starting in a wave packet; and (iii) it is possible to prepare the initial wave packet in order to achieve full state-selective transitions with broadband pulses. The findings can be used, for instance, to achieve ultrafast adiabatic passage by light-induced potentials and understand its intrinsic robustness.

  17. Piecewise Adiabatic Population Transfer in a Molecule via a Wave Packet

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, Evgeny A.; Peer, Avi; Ye Jun; Shapiro, Moshe

    2008-07-11

    We propose a class of schemes for robust population transfer between quantum states that utilize trains of coherent pulses, thus forming a generalized adiabatic passage via a wave packet. We study piecewise stimulated Raman adiabatic passage with pulse-to-pulse amplitude variation, and piecewise chirped Raman passage with pulse-to-pulse phase variation, implemented with an optical frequency comb. In the context of production of ultracold ground-state molecules, we show that with almost no knowledge of the excited potential, robust high-efficiency transfer is possible.

  18. Adiabatic response and quantum thermoelectrics for ac-driven quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludovico, María Florencia; Battista, Francesca; von Oppen, Felix; Arrachea, Liliana

    2016-02-01

    We generalize the theory of thermoelectrics to include coherent electron systems under adiabatic ac driving, accounting for quantum pumping of charge and heat, as well as for the work exchanged between the electron system and driving potentials. We derive the relevant response coefficients in the adiabatic regime and show that they obey generalized Onsager reciprocity relations. We analyze the consequences of our generalized thermoelectric framework for quantum motors, generators, heat engines, and heat pumps, characterizing them in terms of efficiencies and figures of merit. We illustrate these concepts in a model for a quantum pump.

  19. Digitized adiabatic quantum computing with a superconducting circuit, part I: Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamata, L.; Barends, R.; Shabani, A.; Kelly, J.; Mezzacapo, A.; Las Heras, U.; Babbush, R.; Fowler, A. G.; Campbell, B.; Chen, Yu; Chen, Z.; Chiaro, B.; Dunsworth, A.; Jeffrey, E.; Lucero, E.; Megrant, A.; Mutus, J. Y.; Neeley, M.; Neill, C.; O'Malley, P. J. J.; Quintana, C.; Roushan, P.; Solano, E.; Neven, H.; Martinis, John M.

    Adiabatic quantum computing (AQC) is a general-purpose optimization algorithm that in contrast to circuit-model quantum algorithms can be applied to a large set of computational problems. An analog physical realization of AQC has certain limitations that we propose can be overcome by a gate-model equivalence of the AQC. In this talk we discuss the hardware advantages of digitized AQC in particular arbitrary interactions, precision, and coherence. We could experimentally realize the principles of digitized AQC on a chain of nine qubits, and highlight the physics of adiabatic evolutions as well as the Kibble-Zurek mechanism.

  20. Not all adiabatic vacua are physical states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindig, J.

    1999-03-01

    Adiabatic vacua are known to be Hadamard states. We show, however, that the energy-momentum tensor of a linear Klein-Gordon field on Robertson-Walker spaces develops a generic singularity on the initial hypersurface if the adiabatic vacuum is of order less than 4. Therefore, adiabatic vacua are physically reasonable only if their order is at least 4. A certain nonlocal large momentum expansion of the mode functions has recently been suggested to yield the subtraction terms needed to remove the ultraviolet divergences in the energy-momentum tensor. We find that this scheme fails to reproduce the trace anomaly and therefore is not equivalent to adiabatic regularization.

  1. Ultrafast adiabatic second harmonic generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahan, Asaf; Levanon, Assaf; Katz, Mordechai; Suchowski, Haim

    2017-03-01

    We introduce a generalization of the adiabatic frequency conversion method for an efficient conversion of ultrashort pulses in the full nonlinear regime. Our analysis takes into account dispersion as well as two-photon processes and Kerr effect, allowing complete analysis of any three waves with arbitrary phase mismatched design and any nonlinear optical process. We use this analysis to design an efficient and robust second harmonic generation, the most widely used nonlinear process for both fundamental and applied research. We experimentally show that such design not only allows for very efficient conversion of various of ultrashort pulses, but is also very robust to variations in the parameters of both the nonlinear crystal and the incoming light. These include variation of more than 100 °C in the crystal temperature, a wide bandwidth of up to 75 nm and a chirp variation of 300 fs to 3.5 ps of the incoming pulse. Also, we show the dependency of the adiabatic second harmonic generation design on the pump intensity and the crystal length. Our study shows that two photon absorption plays a critical role in such high influence nonlinear dynamics, and that it must be considered in order to achieve agreement with experimental results.

  2. Ultrafast adiabatic second harmonic generation.

    PubMed

    Dahan, Asaf; Levanon, Assaf; Katz, Mordechai; Suchowski, Haim

    2017-03-01

    We introduce a generalization of the adiabatic frequency conversion method for an efficient conversion of ultrashort pulses in the full nonlinear regime. Our analysis takes into account dispersion as well as two-photon processes and Kerr effect, allowing complete analysis of any three waves with arbitrary phase mismatched design and any nonlinear optical process. We use this analysis to design an efficient and robust second harmonic generation, the most widely used nonlinear process for both fundamental and applied research. We experimentally show that such design not only allows for very efficient conversion of various of ultrashort pulses, but is also very robust to variations in the parameters of both the nonlinear crystal and the incoming light. These include variation of more than 100 °C in the crystal temperature, a wide bandwidth of up to 75 nm and a chirp variation of 300 fs to 3.5 ps of the incoming pulse. Also, we show the dependency of the adiabatic second harmonic generation design on the pump intensity and the crystal length. Our study shows that two photon absorption plays a critical role in such high influence nonlinear dynamics, and that it must be considered in order to achieve agreement with experimental results.

  3. Quantum and classical dynamics in adiabatic computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowley, P. J. D.; Äńurić, T.; Vinci, W.; Warburton, P. A.; Green, A. G.

    2014-10-01

    Adiabatic transport provides a powerful way to manipulate quantum states. By preparing a system in a readily initialized state and then slowly changing its Hamiltonian, one may achieve quantum states that would otherwise be inaccessible. Moreover, a judicious choice of final Hamiltonian whose ground state encodes the solution to a problem allows adiabatic transport to be used for universal quantum computation. However, the dephasing effects of the environment limit the quantum correlations that an open system can support and degrade the power of such adiabatic computation. We quantify this effect by allowing the system to evolve over a restricted set of quantum states, providing a link between physically inspired classical optimization algorithms and quantum adiabatic optimization. This perspective allows us to develop benchmarks to bound the quantum correlations harnessed by an adiabatic computation. We apply these to the D-Wave Vesuvius machine with revealing—though inconclusive—results.

  4. PIPER Continuous Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimball, Mark O.; Shirron, Peter J.; Canavan, Edgar R.; James, Bryan L.; Sampson, Michael A.; Letmate, Richard V.

    2017-01-01

    We report upon the development and testing of a 4-stage adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR) capable of continuous cooling at 0.100 Kelvin. This cooler is being built to cool the detector array aboard NASA's Primordial Inflation Polarization Explorer (PIPER) observatory. The goal of this balloon mission is to measure the primordial gravitational waves that should exist if the theory of cosmological inflation is correct. At altitude, the ADR will hold the array of transition-edge sensors at 100 mK continuously while periodically rejecting heat to a 1.2 K pumped helium bath. During testing on ground, the array is held at the same temperature but heat is rejected to a 4.2 K helium bath indicating the flexibility in this coolers design.

  5. An interacting adiabatic quantum motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viola Kusminskiy, Silvia; Bruch, Anton; von Oppen, Felix

    We consider the effect of electron-electron interactions on the performance of an adiabatic quantum motor based on a Thouless pump operating in reverse. We model such a device by electrons in a 1d wire coupled to a slowly moving periodic potential associated with the classical mechanical degree of freedom of the motor. This periodic degree of freedom is set into motion by a bias voltage applied to the 1d electron channel. We investigate the Thouless motor with interacting leads modeled as Luttinger liquids. We show that interactions enhance the energy gap opened by the periodic potential and thus the robustness of the Thouless motor against variations in the chemical potential. We show that the motor degree of freedom can be described as a mobile impurity in a Luttinger liquid obeying Langevin dynamics with renormalized coefficients due to interactions, for which we give explicit expressions.

  6. Ultrafast adiabatic quantum algorithm for the NP-complete exact cover problem

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hefeng; Wu, Lian-Ao

    2016-01-01

    An adiabatic quantum algorithm may lose quantumness such as quantum coherence entirely in its long runtime, and consequently the expected quantum speedup of the algorithm does not show up. Here we present a general ultrafast adiabatic quantum algorithm. We show that by applying a sequence of fast random or regular signals during evolution, the runtime can be reduced substantially, whereas advantages of the adiabatic algorithm remain intact. We also propose a randomized Trotter formula and show that the driving Hamiltonian and the proposed sequence of fast signals can be implemented simultaneously. We illustrate the algorithm by solving the NP-complete 3-bit exact cover problem (EC3), where NP stands for nondeterministic polynomial time, and put forward an approach to implementing the problem with trapped ions. PMID:26923834

  7. Quantum state conversion in opto-electro-mechanical systems via shortcut to adiabaticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xiao; Liu, Bao-Jie; Shao, L.-B.; Zhang, Xin-Ding; Xue, Zheng-Yuan

    2017-09-01

    Adiabatic processes have found many important applications in modern physics, the distinct merit of which is that accurate control over process timing is not required. However, such processes are slow, which limits their application in quantum computation, due to the limited coherent times of typical quantum systems. Here, we propose a scheme to implement quantum state conversion in opto-electro-mechanical systems via a shortcut to adiabaticity, where the process can be greatly speeded up while precise timing control is still not necessary. In our scheme, by modifying only the coupling strength, we can achieve fast quantum state conversion with high fidelity, where the adiabatic condition does not need to be met. In addition, the population of the unwanted intermediate state can be further suppressed. Therefore, our protocol presents an important step towards practical state conversion between optical and microwave photons, and thus may find many important applications in hybrid quantum information processing.

  8. Temperature-Driven and Electrochemical-Potential-Driven Adiabatic Pumping via a Quantum Dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, Masahiro; Kato, Takeo

    2017-02-01

    We investigate adiabatic pumping via a single level quantum dot induced by periodic modulation of thermodynamic variables of reservoirs, i.e., temperatures and electrochemical potentials. We consider the impurity Anderson model and derive analytical formulas for coherent adiabatic charge pumping applicable to the strong dot-reservoir coupling within the first-order perturbation with respect to Coulomb interaction. We show that charge pumping is induced by rectification effect due to delayed response of the quantum dot to time-dependent reservoir parameters. The presence of interaction is necessary because this delayed response rectifies charge current via Coulomb interaction. For temperature-driven charge pumping, one-way pumping is realized regardless of reservoir temperatures when an energy level of the quantum dot locates near the Fermi level. We clarify that this new feature of adiabatic pumping is caused by level broadening effect of the quantum dot due to strong dot-reservoir coupling.

  9. Ultrafast adiabatic quantum algorithm for the NP-complete exact cover problem.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hefeng; Wu, Lian-Ao

    2016-02-29

    An adiabatic quantum algorithm may lose quantumness such as quantum coherence entirely in its long runtime, and consequently the expected quantum speedup of the algorithm does not show up. Here we present a general ultrafast adiabatic quantum algorithm. We show that by applying a sequence of fast random or regular signals during evolution, the runtime can be reduced substantially, whereas advantages of the adiabatic algorithm remain intact. We also propose a randomized Trotter formula and show that the driving Hamiltonian and the proposed sequence of fast signals can be implemented simultaneously. We illustrate the algorithm by solving the NP-complete 3-bit exact cover problem (EC3), where NP stands for nondeterministic polynomial time, and put forward an approach to implementing the problem with trapped ions.

  10. Vibrational coherent quantum computation

    SciTech Connect

    Paternostro, M.; Kim, M.S.; Knight, P.L.

    2005-02-01

    A long-lived coherent state and nonlinear interaction have been experimentally demonstrated for the vibrational mode of a trapped ion. We propose an implementation of quantum computation using coherent states of the vibrational modes of trapped ions. Differently from earlier experiments, we consider a far-off resonance for the interaction between external fields and the ion in a bidimensional trap. By appropriate choices of the detunings between the external fields, the adiabatic elimination of the ionic excited level from the Hamiltonian of the system allows for beam splitting between orthogonal vibrational modes, production of coherent states, and nonlinear interactions of various kinds. In particular, this model enables the generation of the four coherent Bell states. Furthermore, all the necessary operations for quantum computation, such as preparation of qubits and one-qubit and controlled two-qubit operations, are possible. The detection of the state of a vibrational mode in a Bell state is made possible by the combination of resonant and off-resonant interactions between the ion and some external fields. We show that our read-out scheme provides highly efficient discrimination between all the four Bell states. We extend this to a quantum register composed of many individually trapped ions. In this case, operations on two remote qubits are possible through a cavity mode. We emphasize that our remote-qubit operation scheme does not require a high-quality factor resonator: the cavity field acts as a catalyst for the gate operation.

  11. Quasi-adiabatic transport in Mercury's magnetotail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delcourt, Dominique; Malova, Helmi; Zelenyi, Lev

    2017-04-01

    MESSENGER observations have revealed that the magnetotail of Mercury is fairly dynamical, possibly subjected to series of magnetic field line dipolarization on time scales of a few seconds. Because of the sharp reversal of the magnetic field, ions may not travel adiabatically in this region of space, and their behavior can be organized according to different categories. Among these categories, quasi-adiabatic (Speiser) ions are such that they experience negligible net change of magnetic moment upon crossing of the field reversal and can thus travel back to low altitudes. We examine the robustness of this quasi-adiabatic behavior during magnetic field line dipolarization where ions are subjected to a large induced electric field. We demonstrate that, although this surging electric field possibly yields substantial nonadiabatic heating, quasi-adiabaticity is robust for ions with velocities larger than the peak ExB drift speed, a behavior that we refer to as "strong" quasi-adiabaticity (as opposed to "weak" quasi-adiabaticity that is violated during dipolarization). We show that the impulsive energization of such quasi-adiabatic ions during dipolarization events can lead to prominent energy-time dispersion structures at low altitudes.

  12. Adiabatic Compression of Oxygen: Real Fluid Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barragan, Michelle; Wilson, D. Bruce; Stoltzfus, Joel M.

    2000-01-01

    The adiabatic compression of oxygen has been identified as an ignition source for systems operating in enriched oxygen atmospheres. Current practice is to evaluate the temperature rise on compression by treating oxygen as an ideal gas with constant heat capacity. This paper establishes the appropriate thermodynamic analysis for the common occurrence of adiabatic compression of oxygen and in the process defines a satisfactory equation of state (EOS) for oxygen. It uses that EOS to model adiabatic compression as isentropic compression and calculates final temperatures for this system using current approaches for comparison.

  13. Energy consumption for shortcuts to adiabaticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torrontegui, E.; Lizuain, I.; González-Resines, S.; Tobalina, A.; Ruschhaupt, A.; Kosloff, R.; Muga, J. G.

    2017-08-01

    Shortcuts to adiabaticity let a system reach the results of a slow adiabatic process in a shorter time. We propose to quantify the "energy cost" of the shortcut by the energy consumption of the system enlarged by including the control device. A mechanical model where the dynamics of the system and control device can be explicitly described illustrates that a broad range of possible values for the consumption is possible, including zero (above the adiabatic energy increment) when friction is negligible and the energy given away as negative power is stored and reused by perfect regenerative braking.

  14. Adiabatic heating in impulsive solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maetzler, C.; Bai, T.; Crannell, C. J.; Frost, K. J.

    1977-01-01

    The dynamic X-ray spectra of two simple, impulsive solar flares are examined together with H alpha, microwave and meter wave radio observations. X-ray spectra of both events were characteristic of thermal bremsstrahlung from single temperature plasmas. The symmetry between rise and fall was found to hold for the temperature and emission measure. The relationship between temperature and emission measure was that of an adiabatic compression followed by adiabatic expansion; the adiabatic index of 5/3 indicated that the electron distribution remained isotropic. Observations in H alpha provided further evidence for compressive energy transfer.

  15. Resonant Tunneling and Resonant Excitation Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagelstein, Peter L.

    2005-12-01

    Issues involved in the tunneling of deuterons in metal deuterides are considered in relation to experimental claims of anomalies in metal deuterides. From earlier studies, screening is thought to be similar to the case of molecular D2. Resonant tunneling has been advocated in the literature as a possible mechanism to achieve tunneling enhancements. We develop a two-level system for a piecewise constant potential model for resonant tunneling that matches the energy levels in the vicinity of a level crossing, arguing that such models are applicable for more general potential models. Resonant tunneling effects and dynamics, including acceleration due to coherence, are accounted for in the model. The model is extended to include relaxation effects, and it is found that one would not expect to find coherent effects associated with tunneling in the case of two deuterons in a metal lattice. We present a simple model for the transfer of excitation from a collection of deuterons to a collection of helium nuclei, a model closely related to resonant tunneling and also to new phonon-coupled SU(N) models under development. The excitation transfer models show coherent enhancements as well as collective effects.

  16. Logic operations in a doped solid driven by stimulated Raman adiabatic passage

    SciTech Connect

    Beil, F.; Halfmann, T.; Remacle, F.; Levine, R. D.

    2011-03-15

    We experimentally demonstrate classical-optical logic operations in a solid-state memory, coherently driven by variants of stimulated Raman adiabatic passage (STIRAP). Cyclic transfer of atomic populations permits the implementation of a flip-flop or xor gate, with up to eight optical input operations. Observation of stimulated emission as an additional output channel enables the setup of a STIRAP-driven full adder for three optical input bits (or two input bits and a memory bit).

  17. Optical force on atoms with periodic adiabatic rapid passage sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Xiyue

    Adiabatic Rapid Passage (ARP) is a long-existing method to invert the population of a two-level nuclear spin system. Its extension to the optical domain necessitates a frequency chirped light pulse to interact with a two-level atom through dipole interaction. In this dissertation ARP processes for various pulse schemes and pulse parameters have been studied theoretically and experimentally. The non-adiabatic transition probability of ARP was quantified to characterize the efficiency of ARP for population transfer. Unanticipated regularities were found in the pulse parameter space. ARP sequences in periodic phase coherent counter-propagating light pulses can be used to produce large optical forces on atoms. The magnitude of the force is proportional to the pulse repetition rate. So the force can be much larger than the usual radiative force if the pulse repetition rate is much higher than the spontaneous emission rate. The behavior of the atoms in such periodic ARP fields without spontaneous emission is well described by a periodic Hamiltonian. By investigating the evolution of the Bloch vector on the Bloch sphere, we related the average optical force on atoms to the non-adiabatic transition probability of a single pulse. Syncopation time has to be introduced in the pulsing scheme to produce a directional force in the presence of spontaneous emission. Experimentally, we observed the force on He* atoms by the deflection of the atomic beam with periodic chirped pulses from counter-propagating pulse trains. The chirped pulse train was realized by synchronized phase and amplitude modulation of the light from a cw diode laser. The Fourier spectrum of the modulated light was monitored to guarantee the quality of the chirped pulses. The measured ARP forces are about half of the theoretical predictions. Not only have we shown that such forces are huge and robust, but we have also been able to map the forces in the two dimensional pulse parameter space. The force

  18. Including Tunneling in Non-Born-Oppenheimer Simulations.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jingjing; Meana-Pañeda, Rubén; Truhlar, Donald G

    2014-06-05

    For electronically nonadiabatic processes in all but the simplest systems, the most practical multidimensional simulation method is a semiclassical approximation in which a trajectory or the center of a wave packet follows a classical path governed by an effective potential energy function. Here, we show how such simulations can be made more realistic by including tunneling by the army ants tunneling method. We illustrate the theory by calculations with model potential energy surfaces; one model study is in the adiabatic limit, and the other one has nonadiabatic transitions between two electronic states during the tunneling event. The army ants tunneling algorithm is used to efficiently sample tunneling events in the trajectories in both cases. This work makes it possible to simulate complex nonadiabatic chemical processes by efficiently including the important quantum effect of tunneling.

  19. Adiabatic passage and dissociation controlled by interference of two laser-induced continuum structures

    SciTech Connect

    Popov, A. K.; Kimberg, V. V.; George, Thomas F.

    2003-09-01

    We have developed a theory of three-pulse coherent control of photochemical processes. It is based on adiabatic passage and quantum coherence and interference attributed to the lower-lying dissociation continuum and excited upper discrete states, which are otherwise not connected to the ground state by one-photon transitions. Opportunities offered by the proposed scheme are demonstrated through extensive numerical simulations with the aid of a model relevant to typical experiments. The opportunities for manipulating the distribution of the population among discrete and continuous states with any necessary ratio by the end of the pulses are demonstrated.

  20. General conditions for quantum adiabatic evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Comparat, Daniel

    2009-07-15

    Adiabaticity occurs when, during its evolution, a physical system remains in the instantaneous eigenstate of the Hamiltonian. Unfortunately, existing results, such as the quantum adiabatic theorem based on a slow down evolution [H({epsilon}t),{epsilon}{yields}0], are insufficient to describe an evolution driven by the Hamiltonian H(t) itself. Here we derive general criteria and exact bounds, for the state and its phase, ensuring an adiabatic evolution for any Hamiltonian H(t). As a corollary, we demonstrate that the commonly used condition of a slow Hamiltonian variation rate, compared to the spectral gap, is indeed sufficient to ensure adiabaticity but only when the Hamiltonian is real and nonoscillating (for instance, containing exponential or polynomial but no sinusoidal functions)

  1. Adiabatic limits on Riemannian Heisenberg manifolds

    SciTech Connect

    Yakovlev, A A

    2008-02-28

    An asymptotic formula is obtained for the distribution function of the spectrum of the Laplace operator, in the adiabatic limit for the foliation defined by the orbits of an invariant flow on a compact Riemannian Heisenberg manifold. Bibliography: 21 titles.

  2. Simulation of periodically focused, adiabatic thermal beams

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C.; Akylas, T. R.; Barton, T. J.; Field, D. M.; Lang, K. M.; Mok, R. V.

    2012-12-21

    Self-consistent particle-in-cell simulations are performed to verify earlier theoretical predictions of adiabatic thermal beams in a periodic solenoidal magnetic focusing field [K.R. Samokhvalova, J. Zhou and C. Chen, Phys. Plasma 14, 103102 (2007); J. Zhou, K.R. Samokhvalova and C. Chen, Phys. Plasma 15, 023102 (2008)]. In particular, results are obtained for adiabatic thermal beams that do not rotate in the Larmor frame. For such beams, the theoretical predictions of the rms beam envelope, the conservations of the rms thermal emittances, the adiabatic equation of state, and the Debye length are verified in the simulations. Furthermore, the adiabatic thermal beam is found be stable in the parameter regime where the simulations are performed.

  3. Adiabatic Quantum Search in Open Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wild, Dominik S.; Gopalakrishnan, Sarang; Knap, Michael; Yao, Norman Y.; Lukin, Mikhail D.

    2016-10-01

    Adiabatic quantum algorithms represent a promising approach to universal quantum computation. In isolated systems, a key limitation to such algorithms is the presence of avoided level crossings, where gaps become extremely small. In open quantum systems, the fundamental robustness of adiabatic algorithms remains unresolved. Here, we study the dynamics near an avoided level crossing associated with the adiabatic quantum search algorithm, when the system is coupled to a generic environment. At zero temperature, we find that the algorithm remains scalable provided the noise spectral density of the environment decays sufficiently fast at low frequencies. By contrast, higher order scattering processes render the algorithm inefficient at any finite temperature regardless of the spectral density, implying that no quantum speedup can be achieved. Extensions and implications for other adiabatic quantum algorithms will be discussed.

  4. Adiabatic Quantum Search in Open Systems.

    PubMed

    Wild, Dominik S; Gopalakrishnan, Sarang; Knap, Michael; Yao, Norman Y; Lukin, Mikhail D

    2016-10-07

    Adiabatic quantum algorithms represent a promising approach to universal quantum computation. In isolated systems, a key limitation to such algorithms is the presence of avoided level crossings, where gaps become extremely small. In open quantum systems, the fundamental robustness of adiabatic algorithms remains unresolved. Here, we study the dynamics near an avoided level crossing associated with the adiabatic quantum search algorithm, when the system is coupled to a generic environment. At zero temperature, we find that the algorithm remains scalable provided the noise spectral density of the environment decays sufficiently fast at low frequencies. By contrast, higher order scattering processes render the algorithm inefficient at any finite temperature regardless of the spectral density, implying that no quantum speedup can be achieved. Extensions and implications for other adiabatic quantum algorithms will be discussed.

  5. Damped Rabi oscillations produced by adiabatic pulses in atomic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandão, P. A.

    2017-08-01

    Propagation of optical pulses in adiabatic conditions in two-level systems was reported to induce Rabi oscillations if the initial state has atomic coherence. This is a surprising result since in ordinary conditions the population dynamics follows the temporal field profile. In this paper we construct a simple two-level atom model and examine the role of Rabi oscillations in the presence of a damping γ term (decoherence). We have found that, depending on the time scale between 1 / γ and the pulse, Rabi oscillations are still present. However, if the atom decays faster than when the interaction takes place, Rabi oscillations are suppressed. Analytical solutions are also provided for this general case.

  6. Adiabatic Demagnetization Cooler For Far Infrared Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Akio; Yazawa, Takashi; Yamamoto, Junya

    1988-11-01

    An small adiabatic demagnetization cooler for an astronomical far infrared detector has been built. Single crystals of manganese ammonium sulphate and chromium potassium alum, were prepared as magnetic substances. The superconducting magnet was indirectly cooled and operated by small current up to 13.3 A, the maximum field being 3.5 T. As a preliminary step, adiabatic demagnetization to zero field was implemented. The lowest temperature obtained was 0.5 K, for 5.0 K initial temperature.

  7. Influence of dimensionality on deep tunneling rates: A study based on the hydrogen-nickel system

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, R.; Zeiri, Y.; Kosloff, R.

    1996-08-01

    The tunneling of subsurface hydrogen into a surface site of a nickel crystal is used to investigate deep tunneling phenomena. A method to calculate tunneling lifetimes based on an energy and time filter is developed, enabling converged lifetimes differing by 14 orders of magnitude. It is found that the reduced dimensional approximation always overestimates the tunneling rate. The vibrational adiabatic correction improves dramatically the one-dimensional calculation but nevertheless overestimates the cases of deep tunneling. The isotope effect is studied, pointing to experimental implications. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  8. Symmetry of the Adiabatic Condition in the Piston Problem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anacleto, Joaquim; Ferreira, J. M.

    2011-01-01

    This study addresses a controversial issue in the adiabatic piston problem, namely that of the piston being adiabatic when it is fixed but no longer so when it can move freely. It is shown that this apparent contradiction arises from the usual definition of adiabatic condition. The issue is addressed here by requiring the adiabatic condition to be…

  9. Symmetry of the Adiabatic Condition in the Piston Problem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anacleto, Joaquim; Ferreira, J. M.

    2011-01-01

    This study addresses a controversial issue in the adiabatic piston problem, namely that of the piston being adiabatic when it is fixed but no longer so when it can move freely. It is shown that this apparent contradiction arises from the usual definition of adiabatic condition. The issue is addressed here by requiring the adiabatic condition to be…

  10. Laboratory Measurements of Adiabatic and Isothermal Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNairy, W. W.

    1997-04-01

    Adiabatic and isothermal measurements on various of gases are made possible by using the Adiabatic Gas Law apparatus made by PASCO Scientific(Much of this work was published by the author in "The Physics Teacher", vol. 34, March 1996, p. 178-80.). By using a computer interface, undergraduates are able to data for monatomic, diatomic and polyatomic gases for both compression and expansion processes. Designed principally to obtain adiabatic data, the apparatus may be easily modified for use in isothermal processes. The various sets of data are imported into a spreadsheet program where fits may be made to the ideal gas law and the adiabatic gas law. Excellent results are obtained for the natural logarithm of pressure versus the natural logarithm of volume for both the isothermal data (expected slope equal to -1 in all cases) and the adiabatic data (slope equal to -1 times the ratio of specific heats for the particular gas). An overview of the lab procedure used at VMI will be presented along with data obtained for several adiabatic and isothermal processes.

  11. Recognition Tunneling

    PubMed Central

    Lindsay, Stuart; He, Jin; Sankey, Otto; Hapala, Prokop; Jelinek, Pavel; Zhang, Peiming; Chang, Shuai; Huang, Shuo

    2010-01-01

    Single molecules in a tunnel junction can now be interrogated reliably using chemically-functionalized electrodes. Monitoring stochastic bonding fluctuations between a ligand bound to one electrode and its target bound to a second electrode (“tethered molecule-pair” configuration) gives insight into the nature of the intermolecular bonding at a single molecule-pair level, and defines the requirements for reproducible tunneling data. Simulations show that there is an instability in the tunnel gap at large currents, and this results in a multiplicity of contacts with a corresponding spread in the measured currents. At small currents (i.e. large gaps) the gap is stable, and functionalizing a pair of electrodes with recognition reagents (the “free analyte” configuration) can generate a distinct tunneling signal when an analyte molecule is trapped in the gap. This opens up a new interface between chemistry and electronics with immediate implications for rapid sequencing of single DNA molecules. PMID:20522930

  12. Assessment of total efficiency in adiabatic engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitianiec, W.

    2016-09-01

    The paper presents influence of ceramic coating in all surfaces of the combustion chamber of SI four-stroke engine on working parameters mainly on heat balance and total efficiency. Three cases of engine were considered: standard without ceramic coating, fully adiabatic combustion chamber and engine with different thickness of ceramic coating. Consideration of adiabatic or semi-adiabatic engine was connected with mathematical modelling of heat transfer from the cylinder gas to the cooling medium. This model takes into account changeable convection coefficient based on the experimental formulas of Woschni, heat conductivity of multi-layer walls and also small effect of radiation in SI engines. The simulation model was elaborated with full heat transfer to the cooling medium and unsteady gas flow in the engine intake and exhaust systems. The computer program taking into account 0D model of engine processes in the cylinder and 1D model of gas flow was elaborated for determination of many basic engine thermodynamic parameters for Suzuki DR-Z400S 400 cc SI engine. The paper presents calculation results of influence of the ceramic coating thickness on indicated pressure, specific fuel consumption, cooling and exhaust heat losses. Next it were presented comparisons of effective power, heat losses in the cooling and exhaust systems, total efficiency in function of engine rotational speed and also comparison of temperature inside the cylinder for standard, semi-adiabatic and full adiabatic engine. On the basis of the achieved results it was found higher total efficiency of adiabatic engines at 2500 rpm from 27% for standard engine to 37% for full adiabatic engine.

  13. Coupling quantum tunneling with cavity photons.

    PubMed

    Cristofolini, Peter; Christmann, Gabriel; Tsintzos, Simeon I; Deligeorgis, George; Konstantinidis, George; Hatzopoulos, Zacharias; Savvidis, Pavlos G; Baumberg, Jeremy J

    2012-05-11

    Tunneling of electrons through a potential barrier is fundamental to chemical reactions, electronic transport in semiconductors and superconductors, magnetism, and devices such as terahertz oscillators. Whereas tunneling is typically controlled by electric fields, a completely different approach is to bind electrons into bosonic quasiparticles with a photonic component. Quasiparticles made of such light-matter microcavity polaritons have recently been demonstrated to Bose-condense into superfluids, whereas spatially separated Coulomb-bound electrons and holes possess strong dipole interactions. We use tunneling polaritons to connect these two realms, producing bosonic quasiparticles with static dipole moments. Our resulting three-state system yields dark polaritons analogous to those in atomic systems or optical waveguides, thereby offering new possibilities for electromagnetically induced transparency, room-temperature condensation, and adiabatic photon-to-electron transfer.

  14. Mott-insulator state of cold atoms in tilted optical lattices: Doublon dynamics and multilevel Landau-Zener tunneling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolovsky, Andrey R.; Maksimov, Dmitrii N.

    2016-10-01

    We discuss the dynamical response of strongly interacting Bose atoms in an adiabatically tilted optical lattice. The analysis is performed in terms of the multilevel Landau-Zener tunneling. Different regimes of tunneling are identified and analytical expressions for the doublon number, which is the quantity measured in laboratory experiments, are derived.

  15. Nonadiabatic exchange dynamics during adiabatic frequency sweeps.

    PubMed

    Barbara, Thomas M

    2016-04-01

    A Bloch equation analysis that includes relaxation and exchange effects during an adiabatic frequency swept pulse is presented. For a large class of sweeps, relaxation can be incorporated using simple first order perturbation theory. For anisochronous exchange, new expressions are derived for exchange augmented rotating frame relaxation. For isochronous exchange between sites with distinct relaxation rate constants outside the extreme narrowing limit, simple criteria for adiabatic exchange are derived and demonstrate that frequency sweeps commonly in use may not be adiabatic with regard to exchange unless the exchange rates are much larger than the relaxation rates. Otherwise, accurate assessment of the sensitivity to exchange dynamics will require numerical integration of the rate equations. Examples of this situation are given for experimentally relevant parameters believed to hold for in-vivo tissue. These results are of significance in the study of exchange induced contrast in magnetic resonance imaging.

  16. On the adiabatic limit of Hadamard states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drago, Nicolò; Gérard, Christian

    2017-08-01

    We consider the adiabatic limit of Hadamard states for free quantum Klein-Gordon fields, when the background metric and the field mass are slowly varied from their initial to final values. If the Klein-Gordon field stays massive, we prove that the adiabatic limit of the initial vacuum state is the (final) vacuum state, by extending to the symplectic framework the adiabatic theorem of Avron-Seiler-Yaffe. In cases when only the field mass is varied, using an abstract version of the mode decomposition method we can also consider the case when the initial or final mass vanishes, and the initial state is either a thermal state or a more general Hadamard state.

  17. Adiabatic optimization versus diffusion Monte Carlo methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarret, Michael; Jordan, Stephen P.; Lackey, Brad

    2016-10-01

    Most experimental and theoretical studies of adiabatic optimization use stoquastic Hamiltonians, whose ground states are expressible using only real nonnegative amplitudes. This raises a question as to whether classical Monte Carlo methods can simulate stoquastic adiabatic algorithms with polynomial overhead. Here we analyze diffusion Monte Carlo algorithms. We argue that, based on differences between L1 and L2 normalized states, these algorithms suffer from certain obstructions preventing them from efficiently simulating stoquastic adiabatic evolution in generality. In practice however, we obtain good performance by introducing a method that we call Substochastic Monte Carlo. In fact, our simulations are good classical optimization algorithms in their own right, competitive with the best previously known heuristic solvers for MAX-k -SAT at k =2 ,3 ,4 .

  18. Long-Range Tunneling Processes across Ferritin-Based Junctions.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Karuppannan Senthil; Pasula, Rupali Reddy; Lim, Sierin; Nijhuis, Christian A

    2016-03-02

    The mechanism of long-range charge transport across tunneling junctions with monolayers of ferritin is investigated. It is shown that the mechanism can be switched between coherent tunneling, sequential tunneling, and hopping by changing the iron content inside the ferritin. This study shows that ferritins are an interesting class of biomolecules to control charge transport. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Josephson inplane and tunneling currents in bilayer quantum Hall system

    SciTech Connect

    Ezawa, Z. F.; Tsitsishvili, G.; Sawada, A.

    2013-12-04

    A Bose-Einstein condensation is formed by composite bosons in the quantum Hall state. A composite boson carries the fundamental charge (–e). We investigate Josephson tunneling of such charges in the bilayer quantum Hall system at the total filling ν = 1. We show the existence of the critical current for the tunneling current to be coherent and dissipationless in tunneling experiments with various geometries.

  20. Complexity of the Quantum Adiabatic Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hen, Itay

    2013-01-01

    The Quantum Adiabatic Algorithm (QAA) has been proposed as a mechanism for efficiently solving optimization problems on a quantum computer. Since adiabatic computation is analog in nature and does not require the design and use of quantum gates, it can be thought of as a simpler and perhaps more profound method for performing quantum computations that might also be easier to implement experimentally. While these features have generated substantial research in QAA, to date there is still a lack of solid evidence that the algorithm can outperform classical optimization algorithms.

  1. Local quasiequivalence and adiabatic vacuum states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lüders, Christian; Roberts, John E.

    1990-11-01

    The problem of determining the physically relevant states acquires a new dimension in curved spacetime where there is, in general, no natural definition of a vacuum state. It is argued that there is a unique local quasiequivalence class of physically relevant states and it is shown how this class can be specified for the free Klein-Gordon field on a Robertson-Walker spacetime by using the concept of an adiabatic vacuum state. Any two adiabatic vacuum states of order two are locally quasiequivalent.

  2. On adiabatic invariant in generalized Galileon theories

    SciTech Connect

    Ema, Yohei; Jinno, Ryusuke; Nakayama, Kazunori; Mukaida, Kyohei E-mail: jinno@hep-th.phys.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp E-mail: kazunori@hep-th.phys.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2015-10-01

    We consider background dynamics of generalized Galileon theories in the context of inflation, where gravity and inflaton are non-minimally coupled to each other. In the inflaton oscillation regime, the Hubble parameter and energy density oscillate violently in many cases, in contrast to the Einstein gravity with minimally coupled inflaton. However, we find that there is an adiabatic invariant in the inflaton oscillation regime in any generalized Galileon theory. This adiabatic invariant is useful in estimating the expansion law of the universe and also the particle production rate due to the oscillation of the Hubble parameter.

  3. Adiabatic Hyperspherical Analysis of Realistic Nuclear Potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daily, K. M.; Kievsky, Alejandro; Greene, Chris H.

    2015-12-01

    Using the hyperspherical adiabatic method with the realistic nuclear potentials Argonne V14, Argonne V18, and Argonne V18 with the Urbana IX three-body potential, we calculate the adiabatic potentials and the triton bound state energies. We find that a discrete variable representation with the slow variable discretization method along the hyperradial degree of freedom results in energies consistent with the literature. However, using a Laguerre basis results in missing energy, even when extrapolated to an infinite number of basis functions and channels. We do not include the isospin T = 3/2 contribution in our analysis.

  4. Spontaneous emission in stimulated Raman adiabatic passage

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, P. A.; Vitanov, N. V.; Bergmann, K.

    2005-11-15

    This work explores the effect of spontaneous emission on the population transfer efficiency in stimulated Raman adiabatic passage (STIRAP). The approach uses adiabatic elimination of weakly coupled density matrix elements in the Liouville equation, from which a very accurate analytic approximation is derived. The loss of population transfer efficiency is found to decrease exponentially with the factor {omega}{sub 0}{sup 2}/{gamma}, where {gamma} is the spontaneous emission rate and {omega}{sub 0} is the peak Rabi frequency. The transfer efficiency increases with the pulse delay and reaches a steady value. For large pulse delay and large spontaneous emission rate STIRAP degenerates into optical pumping.

  5. Markovian quantum master equation beyond adiabatic regime.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Makoto; Yuge, Tatsuro; Ogawa, Tetsuo

    2017-01-01

    By introducing a temporal change time scale τ_{A}(t) for the time-dependent system Hamiltonian, a general formulation of the Markovian quantum master equation is given to go well beyond the adiabatic regime. In appropriate situations, the framework is well justified even if τ_{A}(t) is faster than the decay time scale of the bath correlation function. An application to the dissipative Landau-Zener model demonstrates this general result. The findings are applicable to a wide range of fields, providing a basis for quantum control beyond the adiabatic regime.

  6. Markovian quantum master equation beyond adiabatic regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Makoto; Yuge, Tatsuro; Ogawa, Tetsuo

    2017-01-01

    By introducing a temporal change time scale τA(t ) for the time-dependent system Hamiltonian, a general formulation of the Markovian quantum master equation is given to go well beyond the adiabatic regime. In appropriate situations, the framework is well justified even if τA(t ) is faster than the decay time scale of the bath correlation function. An application to the dissipative Landau-Zener model demonstrates this general result. The findings are applicable to a wide range of fields, providing a basis for quantum control beyond the adiabatic regime.

  7. Adiabatic cluster-state quantum computing

    SciTech Connect

    Bacon, Dave; Flammia, Steven T.

    2010-09-15

    Models of quantum computation (QC) are important because they change the physical requirements for achieving universal QC. For example, one-way QC requires the preparation of an entangled ''cluster'' state, followed by adaptive measurement on this state, a set of requirements which is different from the standard quantum-circuit model. Here we introduce a model based on one-way QC but without measurements (except for the final readout), instead using adiabatic deformation of a Hamiltonian whose initial ground state is the cluster state. Our results could help increase the feasibility of adiabatic schemes by using tools from one-way QC.

  8. Coherent population transfer beyond rotating wave approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhee, Yongjoo; Kwon, Duck-Hee; Han, Jaemin; Park, Hyunmin; Kim, Sunkook

    2002-05-01

    The mechanism of coherent population transfer in a three-level system of lamda type interacting with strong and ultra-short laser pulses is investigated beyond the rotating wave approximation (RWA). The characteristics of population transfer arising from the consideration without RWA are numerically shown and interpreted in the point of view of dressed states both for the typical Stimulated Raman Adiabatic Passage(STIRAP) and for Optimal Detuning Method(ODM) which uses large wavelength-detuned lasers without time delay.

  9. Adiabatic Compression in a Fire Syringe.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayn, Carl H.; Baird, Scott C.

    1985-01-01

    Suggests using better materials in fire syringes to obtain more effective results during demonstrations which show the elevation in temperature upon a very rapid (adiabatic) compression of air. Also describes an experiment (using ignition temperatures) which introduces students to the use of thermocouples for high temperature measurements. (DH)

  10. Stopping power beyond the adiabatic approximation

    DOE PAGES

    Caro, M.; Correa, A. A.; Artacho, E.; ...

    2017-06-01

    Energetic ions traveling in solids deposit energy in a variety of ways, being nuclear and electronic stopping the two avenues in which dissipation is usually treated. This separation between electrons and ions relies on the adiabatic approximation in which ions interact via forces derived from the instantaneous electronic ground state. In a more detailed view, in which non-adiabatic effects are explicitly considered, electronic excitations alter the atomic bonding, which translates into changes in the interatomic forces. In this work, we use time dependent density functional theory and forces derived from the equations of Ehrenfest dynamics that depend instantaneously on themore » time-dependent electronic density. With them we analyze how the inter-ionic forces are affected by electronic excitations in a model of a Ni projectile interacting with a Ni target, a metallic system with strong electronic stopping and shallow core level states. We find that the electronic excitations induce substantial modifications to the inter-ionic forces, which translate into nuclear stopping power well above the adiabatic prediction. Particularly, we observe that most of the alteration of the adiabatic potential in early times comes from the ionization of the core levels of the target ions, not readily screened by the valence electrons.« less

  11. Apparatus to Measure Adiabatic and Isothermal Processes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamb, D. W.; White, G. M.

    1996-01-01

    Describes a simple manual apparatus designed to serve as an effective demonstration of the differences between isothermal and adiabatic processes for the general or elementary physics student. Enables students to verify Boyle's law for slow processes and identify the departure from this law for rapid processes and can also be used to give a clear…

  12. Adiabatic Compression in a Fire Syringe.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayn, Carl H.; Baird, Scott C.

    1985-01-01

    Suggests using better materials in fire syringes to obtain more effective results during demonstrations which show the elevation in temperature upon a very rapid (adiabatic) compression of air. Also describes an experiment (using ignition temperatures) which introduces students to the use of thermocouples for high temperature measurements. (DH)

  13. Scaling behavior of the adiabatic Dicke model

    SciTech Connect

    Liberti, Giuseppe; Plastina, Francesco; Piperno, Franco

    2006-08-15

    We analyze the quantum phase transition for a set of N two-level systems interacting with a bosonic mode in the adiabatic regime. Through the Born-Oppenheimer approximation, we obtain the finite-size scaling expansion for many physical observables and, in particular, for the entanglement content of the system.

  14. Semiclassical Monte-Carlo approach for modelling non-adiabatic dynamics in extended molecules

    PubMed Central

    Gorshkov, Vyacheslav N.; Tretiak, Sergei; Mozyrsky, Dmitry

    2013-01-01

    Modelling of non-adiabatic dynamics in extended molecular systems and solids is a next frontier of atomistic electronic structure theory. The underlying numerical algorithms should operate only with a few quantities (that can be efficiently obtained from quantum chemistry), provide a controlled approximation (which can be systematically improved) and capture important phenomena such as branching (multiple products), detailed balance and evolution of electronic coherences. Here we propose a new algorithm based on Monte-Carlo sampling of classical trajectories, which satisfies the above requirements and provides a general framework for existing surface hopping methods for non-adiabatic dynamics simulations. In particular, our algorithm can be viewed as a post-processing technique for analysing numerical results obtained from the conventional surface hopping approaches. Presented numerical tests for several model problems demonstrate efficiency and accuracy of the new method. PMID:23864100

  15. Ultrafast hydrogen migration in acetylene cation driven by non-adiabatic effects.

    PubMed

    Madjet, Mohamed El-Amine; Li, Zheng; Vendrell, Oriol

    2013-03-07

    Non-adiabatic dynamics of the acetylene cation is investigated using mixed quantum-classical dynamics based on trajectory surface hopping. To describe the non-adiabatic effects, two surface hopping methods are used, namely, Tully's fewest switches and Landau-Zener surface hopping. Similarities and differences between the results based on those two methods are discussed. We find that the photoionization of acetylene into the first excited state A(2)Σg(+) drives the molecule from the linear structure to a trans-bent structure. Through a conical intersection the acetylene cation can relax back to either the ground state of acetylene or vinylidene. We conclude that hydrogen migration always takes place after non-radiative electronic relaxation to the ground state of the monocation. Based on the analysis of correlation functions we identify coherent oscillations between acetylene and vinylidene with a period of about 70 fs after the electronic relaxation.

  16. High-fidelity adiabatic inversion of a {sup 31}P electron spin qubit in natural silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Laucht, Arne Kalra, Rachpon; Muhonen, Juha T.; Dehollain, Juan P.; Mohiyaddin, Fahd A.; Hudson, Fay; Dzurak, Andrew S.; Morello, Andrea; McCallum, Jeffrey C.; Jamieson, David N.

    2014-03-03

    The main limitation to the high-fidelity quantum control of spins in semiconductors is the presence of strongly fluctuating fields arising from the nuclear spin bath of the host material. We demonstrate here a substantial improvement in single-qubit inversion fidelities for an electron spin qubit bound to a {sup 31}P atom in natural silicon, by applying adiabatic sweeps instead of narrow-band pulses. We achieve an inversion fidelity of 97%, and we observe signatures in the spin resonance spectra and the spin coherence time that are consistent with the presence of an additional exchange-coupled donor. This work highlights the effectiveness of simple adiabatic inversion techniques for spin control in fluctuating environments.

  17. Adiabatic and Non-adiabatic quenches in a Spin-1 Bose Einstein Condensate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boguslawski, Matthew; Hebbe Madhusudhana, Bharath; Anquez, Martin; Robbins, Bryce; Barrios, Maryrose; Hoang, Thai; Chapman, Michael

    2016-05-01

    A quantum phase transition (QPT) is observed in a wide range of phenomena. We have studied the dynamics of a spin-1 ferromagnetic Bose-Einstein condensate for both adiabatic and non-adiabatic quenches through a QPT. At the quantum critical point (QCP), finite size effects lead to a non-zero gap, which makes an adiabatic quench possible through the QPT. We experimentally demonstrate such a quench, which is forbidden at the mean field level. For faster quenches through the QCP, the vanishing energy gap causes the reaction timescale of the system to diverge, preventing the system from adiabatically following the ground state. We measure the temporal evolution of the spin populations for different quench speeds and determine the exponents characterizing the scaling of the onset of excitations, which are in good agreement with the predictions of Kibble-Zurek mechanism.

  18. Communication: Adiabatic and non-adiabatic electron-nuclear motion: Quantum and classical dynamics.

    PubMed

    Albert, Julian; Kaiser, Dustin; Engel, Volker

    2016-05-07

    Using a model for coupled electronic-nuclear motion we investigate the range from negligible to strong non-adiabatic coupling. In the adiabatic case, the quantum dynamics proceeds in a single electronic state, whereas for strong coupling a complete transition between two adiabatic electronic states takes place. It is shown that in all coupling regimes the short-time wave-packet dynamics can be described using ensembles of classical trajectories in the phase space spanned by electronic and nuclear degrees of freedom. We thus provide an example which documents that the quantum concept of non-adiabatic transitions is not necessarily needed if electronic and nuclear motion is treated on the same footing.

  19. Adiabatic burst evaporation from bicontinuous nanoporous membranes.

    PubMed

    Ichilmann, Sachar; Rücker, Kerstin; Haase, Markus; Enke, Dirk; Steinhart, Martin; Xue, Longjian

    2015-05-28

    Evaporation of volatile liquids from nanoporous media with bicontinuous morphology and pore diameters of a few 10 nm is an ubiquitous process. For example, such drying processes occur during syntheses of nanoporous materials by sol-gel chemistry or by spinodal decomposition in the presence of solvents as well as during solution impregnation of nanoporous hosts with functional guests. It is commonly assumed that drying is endothermic and driven by non-equilibrium partial pressures of the evaporating species in the gas phase. We show that nearly half of the liquid evaporates in an adiabatic mode involving burst-like liquid-to-gas conversions. During single adiabatic burst evaporation events liquid volumes of up to 10(7) μm(3) are converted to gas. The adiabatic liquid-to-gas conversions occur if air invasion fronts get unstable because of the built-up of high capillary pressures. Adiabatic evaporation bursts propagate avalanche-like through the nanopore systems until the air invasion fronts have reached new stable configurations. Adiabatic cavitation bursts thus compete with Haines jumps involving air invasion front relaxation by local liquid flow without enhanced mass transport out of the nanoporous medium and prevail if the mean pore diameter is in the range of a few 10 nm. The results reported here may help optimize membrane preparation via solvent-based approaches, solution-loading of nanopore systems with guest materials as well as routine use of nanoporous membranes with bicontinuous morphology and may contribute to better understanding of adsorption/desorption processes in nanoporous media.

  20. Fixed-point adiabatic quantum search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalzell, Alexander M.; Yoder, Theodore J.; Chuang, Isaac L.

    2017-01-01

    Fixed-point quantum search algorithms succeed at finding one of M target items among N total items even when the run time of the algorithm is longer than necessary. While the famous Grover's algorithm can search quadratically faster than a classical computer, it lacks the fixed-point property—the fraction of target items must be known precisely to know when to terminate the algorithm. Recently, Yoder, Low, and Chuang [Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 210501 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.113.210501] gave an optimal gate-model search algorithm with the fixed-point property. Previously, it had been discovered by Roland and Cerf [Phys. Rev. A 65, 042308 (2002), 10.1103/PhysRevA.65.042308] that an adiabatic quantum algorithm, operating by continuously varying a Hamiltonian, can reproduce the quadratic speedup of gate-model Grover search. We ask, can an adiabatic algorithm also reproduce the fixed-point property? We show that the answer depends on what interpolation schedule is used, so as in the gate model, there are both fixed-point and non-fixed-point versions of adiabatic search, only some of which attain the quadratic quantum speedup. Guided by geometric intuition on the Bloch sphere, we rigorously justify our claims with an explicit upper bound on the error in the adiabatic approximation. We also show that the fixed-point adiabatic search algorithm can be simulated in the gate model with neither loss of the quadratic Grover speedup nor of the fixed-point property. Finally, we discuss natural uses of fixed-point algorithms such as preparation of a relatively prime state and oblivious amplitude amplification.

  1. The dynamic instability of adiabatic blast waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryu, Dongsu; Vishniac, Ethan T.

    1991-01-01

    Adiabatic blastwaves, which have a total energy injected from the center E varies as t(sup q) and propagate through a preshock medium with a density rho(sub E) varies as r(sup -omega) are described by a family of similarity solutions. Previous work has shown that adiabatic blastwaves with increasing or constant postshock entropy behind the shock front are susceptible to an oscillatory instability, caused by the difference between the nature of the forces on the two sides of the dense shell behind the shock front. This instability sets in if the dense postshock layer is sufficiently thin. The stability of adiabatic blastwaves with a decreasing postshock entropy is considered. Such blastwaves, if they are decelerating, always have a region behind the shock front which is subject to convection. Some accelerating blastwaves also have such region, depending on the values of q, omega, and gamma where gamma is the adiabatic index. However, since the shock interface stabilizes dynamically induced perturbations, blastwaves become convectively unstable only if the convective zone is localized around the origin or a contact discontinuity far from the shock front. On the other hand, the contact discontinuity of accelerating blastwaves is subject to a strong Rayleigh-Taylor instability. The frequency spectra of the nonradial, normal modes of adiabatic blastwaves have been calculated. The results have been applied to the shocks propagating through supernovae envelopes. It is shown that the metal/He and He/H interfaces are strongly unstable against the Rayleigh-Taylor instability. This instability will induce mixing in supernovae envelopes. In addition the implications of this work for the evolution of planetary nebulae is discussed.

  2. Adiabatic burst evaporation from bicontinuous nanoporous membranes

    PubMed Central

    Ichilmann, Sachar; Rücker, Kerstin; Haase, Markus; Enke, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Evaporation of volatile liquids from nanoporous media with bicontinuous morphology and pore diameters of a few 10 nm is an ubiquitous process. For example, such drying processes occur during syntheses of nanoporous materials by sol–gel chemistry or by spinodal decomposition in the presence of solvents as well as during solution impregnation of nanoporous hosts with functional guests. It is commonly assumed that drying is endothermic and driven by non-equilibrium partial pressures of the evaporating species in the gas phase. We show that nearly half of the liquid evaporates in an adiabatic mode involving burst-like liquid-to-gas conversions. During single adiabatic burst evaporation events liquid volumes of up to 107 μm3 are converted to gas. The adiabatic liquid-to-gas conversions occur if air invasion fronts get unstable because of the built-up of high capillary pressures. Adiabatic evaporation bursts propagate avalanche-like through the nanopore systems until the air invasion fronts have reached new stable configurations. Adiabatic cavitation bursts thus compete with Haines jumps involving air invasion front relaxation by local liquid flow without enhanced mass transport out of the nanoporous medium and prevail if the mean pore diameter is in the range of a few 10 nm. The results reported here may help optimize membrane preparation via solvent-based approaches, solution-loading of nanopore systems with guest materials as well as routine use of nanoporous membranes with bicontinuous morphology and may contribute to better understanding of adsorption/desorption processes in nanoporous media. PMID:25926406

  3. Adiabatic circuits: converter for static CMOS signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, J.; Amirante, E.; Bargagli-Stoffi, A.; Schmitt-Landsiedel, D.

    2003-05-01

    Ultra low power applications can take great advantages from adiabatic circuitry. In this technique a multiphase system is used which consists ideally of trapezoidal voltage signals. The input signals to be processed will often come from a function block realized in static CMOS. The static rectangular signals must be converted for the oscillating multiphase system of the adiabatic circuitry. This work shows how to convert the input signals to the proposed pulse form which is synchronized to the appropriate supply voltage. By means of adder structures designed for a 0.13µm technology in a 4-phase system there will be demonstrated, which additional circuits are necessary for the conversion. It must be taken into account whether the data arrive in parallel or serial form. Parallel data are all in one phase and therefore it is advantageous to use an adder structure with a proper input stage, e.g. a Carry Lookahead Adder (CLA). With a serial input stage it is possible to read and to process four signals during one cycle due to the adiabatic 4-phase system. Therefore input signals with a frequency four times higher than the adiabatic clock frequency can be used. This reduces the disadvantage of the slow clock period typical for adiabatic circuits. By means of an 8 bit Ripple Carry Adder (8 bit RCA) the serial reading will be introduced. If the word width is larger than 4 bits the word can be divided in 4 bit words which are processed in parallel. This is the most efficient way to minimize the number of input lines and pads. At the same time a high throughput is achieved.

  4. Filtering of matter-wave vibrational states via spatial adiabatic passage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loiko, Yu.; Ahufinger, V.; Corbalán, R.; Birkl, G.; Mompart, J.

    2011-03-01

    We discuss the filtering of the vibrational states of a cold atom in an optical trap by chaining this trap with two empty ones and adiabatically controlling the tunneling. Matter-wave filtering is performed by selectively transferring the population of the highest populated vibrational state to the most distant trap while the population of the rest of the states remains in the initial trap. Analytical conditions for two-state filtering are derived and then applied to an arbitrary number of populated bound states. Realistic numerical simulations close to state-of-the-art experimental arrangements are performed by modeling the triple well with time-dependent Pöschl-Teller potentials. In addition to filtering of vibrational states, we discuss applications for quantum tomography of the initial population distribution and engineering of atomic Fock states that, eventually, could be used for tunneling-assisted evaporative cooling.

  5. Fowler-Nordheim emission modified by laser pulses in the adiabatic regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rokhlenko, A.; Lebowitz, J. L.

    2016-06-01

    We investigate enhanced field emission due to a continuous or pulsed oscillating field added to a constant electric field E at the emitter surface. When the frequency of oscillation, field strength, and property of the emitter material satisfy the Keldysh condition γ<1 /2 , one can use the adiabatic approximation for treating the oscillating field, i.e., consider the tunneling through the instantaneous Fowler-Nordheim barrier created by both fields. Due to the great sensitivity of the emission to the field strength, the average tunneling current can be much larger than the current produced by only the constant field. We carry out the computations for arbitrary strong constant electric fields, beyond the commonly used Fowler-Nordheim approximation which exhibit, in particular, an important property of the wave function inside the potential barrier where it is found to be monotonically decreasing without oscillations.

  6. Tunnel magnetoresistance in epitaxially grown magnetic tunnel junctions using Heusler alloy electrode and MgO barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Tsunegi, S.; Sakuraba, Y.; Oogane, M.; Telling, N. D.; Shelford, L. R.; Arenholz, E.; van der Laan, G.; Hicken, R. J.; Takanashi, K.; Ando, Y.

    2009-07-01

    Epitaxially grown magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) with a stacking structure of Co{sub 2}MnSi/MgO/CoFe were fabricated. Their tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) effects were investigated. The TMR ratio and tunnelling conductance characteristics of MTJs were considerably different between those with an MgO barrier prepared using sputtering (SP-MTJ) and those prepared using EB evaporation (EB-MTJ). The EB-MTJ exhibited a very large TMR ratio of 217% at room temperature and 753% at 2 K. The bias voltage dependence of the tunnelling conductance in the parallel magnetic configuration for the EB-MTJ suggests that the observed large TMR ratio at RT results from the coherent tunnelling process through the crystalline MgO barrier. The tunnelling conductance in the anti-parallel magnetic configuration suggests that the large temperature dependence of the TMR ratio results from the inelastic spin-flip tunnelling process.

  7. Quantum-Classical Correspondence of Shortcuts to Adiabaticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okuyama, Manaka; Takahashi, Kazutaka

    2017-04-01

    We formulate the theory of shortcuts to adiabaticity in classical mechanics. For a reference Hamiltonian, the counterdiabatic term is constructed from the dispersionless Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) hierarchy. Then the adiabatic theorem holds exactly for an arbitrary choice of time-dependent parameters. We use the Hamilton-Jacobi theory to define the generalized action. The action is independent of the history of the parameters and is directly related to the adiabatic invariant. The dispersionless KdV hierarchy is obtained from the classical limit of the KdV hierarchy for the quantum shortcuts to adiabaticity. This correspondence suggests some relation between the quantum and classical adiabatic theorems.

  8. Non-adiabatic perturbations in multi-component perfect fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Koshelev, N.A.

    2011-04-01

    The evolution of non-adiabatic perturbations in models with multiple coupled perfect fluids with non-adiabatic sound speed is considered. Instead of splitting the entropy perturbation into relative and intrinsic parts, we introduce a set of symmetric quantities, which also govern the non-adiabatic pressure perturbation in models with energy transfer. We write the gauge invariant equations for the variables that determine on a large scale the non-adiabatic pressure perturbation and the rate of changes of the comoving curvature perturbation. The analysis of evolution of the non-adiabatic pressure perturbation has been made for several particular models.

  9. Kinetically constrained ring-polymer molecular dynamics for non-adiabatic chemical reactions.

    PubMed

    Menzeleev, Artur R; Bell, Franziska; Miller, Thomas F

    2014-02-14

    We extend ring-polymer molecular dynamics (RPMD) to allow for the direct simulation of general, electronically non-adiabatic chemical processes. The kinetically constrained (KC) RPMD method uses the imaginary-time path-integral representation in the set of nuclear coordinates and electronic states to provide continuous equations of motion that describe the quantized, electronically non-adiabatic dynamics of the system. KC-RPMD preserves the favorable properties of the usual RPMD formulation in the position representation, including rigorous detailed balance, time-reversal symmetry, and invariance of reaction rate calculations to the choice of dividing surface. However, the new method overcomes significant shortcomings of position-representation RPMD by enabling the description of non-adiabatic transitions between states associated with general, many-electron wavefunctions and by accurately describing deep-tunneling processes across asymmetric barriers. We demonstrate that KC-RPMD yields excellent numerical results for a range of model systems, including a simple avoided-crossing reaction and condensed-phase electron-transfer reactions across multiple regimes for the electronic coupling and thermodynamic driving force.

  10. Tunnel-to-tunnel correlation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinle, F. W., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Flow quality is discussed. Incremental comparisons of: (1) the angle of attack, (2) the axial force coefficient, and (3) the base cavity axial force coefficient against the normal force coefficient are presented. Relative blockage determination, relative buoyancy corrections, and boundary layer transition length are discussed. Blockage buoyancy caused by tunnel model wall dynamic interaction is discussed in terms of adaptive walls. The effect of 'transonic turbulence factor' is considered.

  11. Adiabatic elimination in nonlinear dynamical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lugiato, L. A.; Mandel, P.; Narducci, L. M.

    1984-03-01

    The problem of the adiabatic elimination of selected dynamical variables in the description of nonlinear systems is reconsidered, with emphasis on the identification of suitable criteria for the global validity of this procedure. The problem is analyzed in detail using as a guideline the one-mode homogeneously broadened laser model, with an injected signal and an arbitrary population difference for added flexibility. Five conditions for the global validity of the adiabatic limit are proposed, after consideration not only of the relative size of the time scales involved, but also of the magnitude of all parameters, of the physical variables, and of their fluctuations. From the analysis, it is considered evident that the main conclusions are model independent and not at all restricted to the specific features of the dynamical system selected as a test case.

  12. Shortcuts to adiabaticity from linear response theory

    DOE PAGES

    Acconcia, Thiago V.; Bonança, Marcus V. S.; Deffner, Sebastian

    2015-10-23

    A shortcut to adiabaticity is a finite-time process that produces the same final state as would result from infinitely slow driving. We show that such shortcuts can be found for weak perturbations from linear response theory. Moreover, with the help of phenomenological response functions, a simple expression for the excess work is found—quantifying the nonequilibrium excitations. For two specific examples, i.e., the quantum parametric oscillator and the spin 1/2 in a time-dependent magnetic field, we show that finite-time zeros of the excess work indicate the existence of shortcuts. We finally propose a degenerate family of protocols, which facilitates shortcuts tomore » adiabaticity for specific and very short driving times.« less

  13. Shortcuts to adiabaticity from linear response theory

    SciTech Connect

    Acconcia, Thiago V.; Bonança, Marcus V. S.; Deffner, Sebastian

    2015-10-23

    A shortcut to adiabaticity is a finite-time process that produces the same final state as would result from infinitely slow driving. We show that such shortcuts can be found for weak perturbations from linear response theory. Moreover, with the help of phenomenological response functions, a simple expression for the excess work is found—quantifying the nonequilibrium excitations. For two specific examples, i.e., the quantum parametric oscillator and the spin 1/2 in a time-dependent magnetic field, we show that finite-time zeros of the excess work indicate the existence of shortcuts. We finally propose a degenerate family of protocols, which facilitates shortcuts to adiabaticity for specific and very short driving times.

  14. Adiabatic Quantum Optimization for Associative Memory Recall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seddiqi, Hadayat; Humble, Travis

    2014-12-01

    Hopfield networks are a variant of associative memory that recall patterns stored in the couplings of an Ising model. Stored memories are conventionally accessed as fixed points in the network dynamics that correspond to energetic minima of the spin state. We show that memories stored in a Hopfield network may also be recalled by energy minimization using adiabatic quantum optimization (AQO). Numerical simulations of the underlying quantum dynamics allow us to quantify AQO recall accuracy with respect to the number of stored memories and noise in the input key. We investigate AQO performance with respect to how memories are stored in the Ising model according to different learning rules. Our results demonstrate that AQO recall accuracy varies strongly with learning rule, a behavior that is attributed to differences in energy landscapes. Consequently, learning rules offer a family of methods for programming adiabatic quantum optimization that we expect to be useful for characterizing AQO performance.

  15. Adiabatic quantum optimization for associative memory recall

    DOE PAGES

    Seddiqi, Hadayat; Humble, Travis S.

    2014-12-22

    Hopfield networks are a variant of associative memory that recall patterns stored in the couplings of an Ising model. Stored memories are conventionally accessed as fixed points in the network dynamics that correspond to energetic minima of the spin state. We show that memories stored in a Hopfield network may also be recalled by energy minimization using adiabatic quantum optimization (AQO). Numerical simulations of the underlying quantum dynamics allow us to quantify AQO recall accuracy with respect to the number of stored memories and noise in the input key. We investigate AQO performance with respect to how memories are storedmore » in the Ising model according to different learning rules. Our results demonstrate that AQO recall accuracy varies strongly with learning rule, a behavior that is attributed to differences in energy landscapes. Consequently, learning rules offer a family of methods for programming adiabatic quantum optimization that we expect to be useful for characterizing AQO performance.« less

  16. Adiabatic quantum simulation of quantum chemistry.

    PubMed

    Babbush, Ryan; Love, Peter J; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2014-10-13

    We show how to apply the quantum adiabatic algorithm directly to the quantum computation of molecular properties. We describe a procedure to map electronic structure Hamiltonians to 2-body qubit Hamiltonians with a small set of physically realizable couplings. By combining the Bravyi-Kitaev construction to map fermions to qubits with perturbative gadgets to reduce the Hamiltonian to 2-body, we obtain precision requirements on the coupling strengths and a number of ancilla qubits that scale polynomially in the problem size. Hence our mapping is efficient. The required set of controllable interactions includes only two types of interaction beyond the Ising interactions required to apply the quantum adiabatic algorithm to combinatorial optimization problems. Our mapping may also be of interest to chemists directly as it defines a dictionary from electronic structure to spin Hamiltonians with physical interactions.

  17. Multiphoton adiabatic passage for atom optics applications

    SciTech Connect

    Demeter, Gabor; Djotyan, Gagik P.

    2009-04-15

    We study the force exerted on two-level atoms by short, counterpropagating laser pulses. When the counterpropagating pulses overlap each other partially, multiphoton adiabatic processes are possible in several configurations, which amplify the force exerted on the atoms. We investigate the practical usefulness of such multiphoton adiabatic transitions for the manipulation of the atoms' mechanical state. In particular, we compare the efficiency of a pair of constant frequency, oppositely detuned laser pulses and that of a pair of frequency-chirped pulses. We also consider the case of prolonged exposure to a sequence of laser pulses for a duration that is comparable to or much larger than the spontaneous lifetime of the atoms. We use numerical methods to calculate the reduction of the force and the heating of the atomic ensemble when spontaneous emission cannot be neglected during the interaction. In addition, we derive simple approximate formulas for the force and the heating, and compare them to the numerical results.

  18. Adiabatic Quantum Simulation of Quantum Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babbush, Ryan; Love, Peter J.; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2014-10-01

    We show how to apply the quantum adiabatic algorithm directly to the quantum computation of molecular properties. We describe a procedure to map electronic structure Hamiltonians to 2-body qubit Hamiltonians with a small set of physically realizable couplings. By combining the Bravyi-Kitaev construction to map fermions to qubits with perturbative gadgets to reduce the Hamiltonian to 2-body, we obtain precision requirements on the coupling strengths and a number of ancilla qubits that scale polynomially in the problem size. Hence our mapping is efficient. The required set of controllable interactions includes only two types of interaction beyond the Ising interactions required to apply the quantum adiabatic algorithm to combinatorial optimization problems. Our mapping may also be of interest to chemists directly as it defines a dictionary from electronic structure to spin Hamiltonians with physical interactions.

  19. Adiabatic Theorem for Quantum Spin Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachmann, S.; De Roeck, W.; Fraas, M.

    2017-08-01

    The first proof of the quantum adiabatic theorem was given as early as 1928. Today, this theorem is increasingly applied in a many-body context, e.g., in quantum annealing and in studies of topological properties of matter. In this setup, the rate of variation ɛ of local terms is indeed small compared to the gap, but the rate of variation of the total, extensive Hamiltonian, is not. Therefore, applications to many-body systems are not covered by the proofs and arguments in the literature. In this Letter, we prove a version of the adiabatic theorem for gapped ground states of interacting quantum spin systems, under assumptions that remain valid in the thermodynamic limit. As an application, we give a mathematical proof of Kubo's linear response formula for a broad class of gapped interacting systems. We predict that the density of nonadiabatic excitations is exponentially small in the driving rate and the scaling of the exponent depends on the dimension.

  20. Adiabatic Theorem for Quantum Spin Systems.

    PubMed

    Bachmann, S; De Roeck, W; Fraas, M

    2017-08-11

    The first proof of the quantum adiabatic theorem was given as early as 1928. Today, this theorem is increasingly applied in a many-body context, e.g., in quantum annealing and in studies of topological properties of matter. In this setup, the rate of variation ϵ of local terms is indeed small compared to the gap, but the rate of variation of the total, extensive Hamiltonian, is not. Therefore, applications to many-body systems are not covered by the proofs and arguments in the literature. In this Letter, we prove a version of the adiabatic theorem for gapped ground states of interacting quantum spin systems, under assumptions that remain valid in the thermodynamic limit. As an application, we give a mathematical proof of Kubo's linear response formula for a broad class of gapped interacting systems. We predict that the density of nonadiabatic excitations is exponentially small in the driving rate and the scaling of the exponent depends on the dimension.

  1. Adiabatic quantum optimization for associative memory recall

    SciTech Connect

    Seddiqi, Hadayat; Humble, Travis S.

    2014-12-22

    Hopfield networks are a variant of associative memory that recall patterns stored in the couplings of an Ising model. Stored memories are conventionally accessed as fixed points in the network dynamics that correspond to energetic minima of the spin state. We show that memories stored in a Hopfield network may also be recalled by energy minimization using adiabatic quantum optimization (AQO). Numerical simulations of the underlying quantum dynamics allow us to quantify AQO recall accuracy with respect to the number of stored memories and noise in the input key. We investigate AQO performance with respect to how memories are stored in the Ising model according to different learning rules. Our results demonstrate that AQO recall accuracy varies strongly with learning rule, a behavior that is attributed to differences in energy landscapes. Consequently, learning rules offer a family of methods for programming adiabatic quantum optimization that we expect to be useful for characterizing AQO performance.

  2. Trapped Ion Quantum Computation by Adiabatic Passage

    SciTech Connect

    Feng Xuni; Wu Chunfeng; Lai, C. H.; Oh, C. H.

    2008-11-07

    We propose a new universal quantum computation scheme for trapped ions in thermal motion via the technique of adiabatic passage, which incorporates the advantages of both the adiabatic passage and the model of trapped ions in thermal motion. Our scheme is immune from the decoherence due to spontaneous emission from excited states as the system in our scheme evolves along a dark state. In our scheme the vibrational degrees of freedom are not required to be cooled to their ground states because they are only virtually excited. It is shown that the fidelity of the resultant gate operation is still high even when the magnitude of the effective Rabi frequency moderately deviates from the desired value.

  3. Adiabatic state preparation study of methylene

    SciTech Connect

    Veis, Libor Pittner, Jiří

    2014-06-07

    Quantum computers attract much attention as they promise to outperform their classical counterparts in solving certain type of problems. One of them with practical applications in quantum chemistry is simulation of complex quantum systems. An essential ingredient of efficient quantum simulation algorithms are initial guesses of the exact wave functions with high enough fidelity. As was proposed in Aspuru-Guzik et al. [Science 309, 1704 (2005)], the exact ground states can in principle be prepared by the adiabatic state preparation method. Here, we apply this approach to preparation of the lowest lying multireference singlet electronic state of methylene and numerically investigate preparation of this state at different molecular geometries. We then propose modifications that lead to speeding up the preparation process. Finally, we decompose the minimal adiabatic state preparation employing the direct mapping in terms of two-qubit interactions.

  4. Comment on ``Adiabatic theory for the bipolaron''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smondyrev, M. A.; Devreese, J. T.

    1996-05-01

    Comments are given on the application of the Bogoliubov-Tyablikov approach to the bipolaron problem in a recent paper by Lakhno [Phys. Rev. B 51, 3512 (1995)]. This author believes that his model (1) is the translation-invariant adiabatic theory of bipolarons and (2) gives asymptotically exact solutions in the adiabatic limit while the other approaches are considered as either phenomenological or variational in nature. Numerical results by Lakhno are in contradiction with all other papers published on the subject because his model leads to much lower energies. Thus, the author concludes that bipolarons ``are more stable than was considered before.'' We prove that both the analytical and the numerical results presented by Lakhno are wrong.

  5. Fast forward to the classical adiabatic invariant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarzynski, Christopher; Deffner, Sebastian; Patra, Ayoti; Subaşı, Yiǧit

    2017-03-01

    We show how the classical action, an adiabatic invariant, can be preserved under nonadiabatic conditions. Specifically, for a time-dependent Hamiltonian H =p2/2 m +U (q ,t ) in one degree of freedom, and for an arbitrary choice of action I0, we construct a so-called fast-forward potential energy function VFF(q ,t ) that, when added to H , guides all trajectories with initial action I0 to end with the same value of action. We use this result to construct a local dynamical invariant J (q ,p ,t ) whose value remains constant along these trajectories. We illustrate our results with numerical simulations. Finally, we sketch how our classical results may be used to design approximate quantum shortcuts to adiabaticity.

  6. Adiabatic invariance with first integrals of motion.

    PubMed

    Adib, Artur B

    2002-10-01

    The construction of a microthermodynamic formalism for isolated systems based on the concept of adiabatic invariance is an old but seldom appreciated effort in the literature, dating back at least to P. Hertz [Ann. Phys. (Leipzig) 33, 225 (1910)]. An apparently independent extension of such formalism for systems bearing additional first integrals of motion was recently proposed by Hans H. Rugh [Phys. Rev. E 64, 055101 (2001)], establishing the concept of adiabatic invariance even in such singular cases. After some remarks in connection with the formalism pioneered by Hertz, it will be suggested that such an extension can incidentally explain the success of a dynamical method for computing the entropy of classical interacting fluids, at least in some potential applications where the presence of additional first integrals cannot be ignored.

  7. Ramsey numbers and adiabatic quantum computing.

    PubMed

    Gaitan, Frank; Clark, Lane

    2012-01-06

    The graph-theoretic Ramsey numbers are notoriously difficult to calculate. In fact, for the two-color Ramsey numbers R(m,n) with m, n≥3, only nine are currently known. We present a quantum algorithm for the computation of the Ramsey numbers R(m,n). We show how the computation of R(m,n) can be mapped to a combinatorial optimization problem whose solution can be found using adiabatic quantum evolution. We numerically simulate this adiabatic quantum algorithm and show that it correctly determines the Ramsey numbers R(3,3) and R(2,s) for 5≤s≤7. We then discuss the algorithm's experimental implementation, and close by showing that Ramsey number computation belongs to the quantum complexity class quantum Merlin Arthur.

  8. Adiabatic Quantum Simulation of Quantum Chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Babbush, Ryan; Love, Peter J.; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2014-01-01

    We show how to apply the quantum adiabatic algorithm directly to the quantum computation of molecular properties. We describe a procedure to map electronic structure Hamiltonians to 2-body qubit Hamiltonians with a small set of physically realizable couplings. By combining the Bravyi-Kitaev construction to map fermions to qubits with perturbative gadgets to reduce the Hamiltonian to 2-body, we obtain precision requirements on the coupling strengths and a number of ancilla qubits that scale polynomially in the problem size. Hence our mapping is efficient. The required set of controllable interactions includes only two types of interaction beyond the Ising interactions required to apply the quantum adiabatic algorithm to combinatorial optimization problems. Our mapping may also be of interest to chemists directly as it defines a dictionary from electronic structure to spin Hamiltonians with physical interactions. PMID:25308187

  9. Siphon flows in isolated magnetic flux tubes. II - Adiabatic flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montesinos, Benjamin; Thomas, John H.

    1989-01-01

    This paper extends the study of steady siphon flows in isolated magnetic flux tubes surrounded by field-free gas to the case of adiabatic flows. The basic equations governing steady adiabatic siphon flows in a thin, isolated magnetic flux tube are summarized, and qualitative features of adiabatic flows in elevated, arched flux tubes are discussed. The equations are then cast in nondimensional form and the results of numerical computations of adiabatic siphon flows in arched flux tubes are presented along with comparisons between isothermal and adiabatic flows. The effects of making the interior of the flux tube hotter or colder than the surrounding atmosphere at the upstream footpoint of the arch is considered. In this case, is it found that the adiabatic flows are qualitatively similar to the isothermal flows, with adiabatic cooling producing quantitative differences. Critical flows can produce a bulge point in the rising part of the arch and a concentration of magnetic flux above the bulge point.

  10. Coherent detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawrence, C. R.; Church, S.; Gaier, T.; Lai, R.; Ruf, C.; Wollack, E.

    2009-03-01

    Coherent systems offer significant advantages in simplicity, testability, control of systematics, and cost. Although quantum noise sets the fundamental limit to their performance at high frequencies, recent breakthroughs suggest that near-quantum-limited noise up to 150 or even 200 GHz could be realized within a few years. If the demands of component separation can be met with frequencies below 200 GHz, coherent systems will be strong competitors for a space CMB polarization mission. The rapid development of digital correlator capability now makes space interferometers with many hundreds of elements possible. Given the advantages of coherent interferometers in suppressing systematic effects, such systems deserve serious study.

  11. Adiabatic charging of nickel-hydrogen batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lurie, Chuck; Foroozan, S.; Brewer, Jeff; Jackson, Lorna

    1995-01-01

    Battery management during prelaunch activities has always required special attention and careful planning. The transition from nickel-cadium to nickel-hydrogen batteries, with their high self discharge rate and lower charge efficiency, as well as longer prelaunch scenarios, has made this aspect of spacecraft battery management even more challenging. The AXAF-I Program requires high battery state of charge at launch. The use of active cooling, to ensure efficient charging, was considered and proved to be difficult and expensive. Alternative approaches were evaluated. Optimized charging, in the absence of cooling, appeared promising and was investigated. Initial testing was conducted to demonstrate the feasibility of the 'Adiabatic Charging' approach. Feasibility was demonstrated and additional testing performed to provide a quantitative, parametric data base. The assumption that the battery is in an adiabatic environment during prelaunch charging is a conservative approximation because the battery will transfer some heat to its surroundings by convective air cooling. The amount is small compared to the heat dissipated during battery overcharge. Because the battery has a large thermal mass, substantial overcharge can occur before the cells get too hot to charge efficiently. The testing presented here simulates a true adiabatic environment. Accordingly the data base may be slightly conservative. The adiabatic charge methodology used in this investigation begins with stabilizing the cell at a given starting temperature. The cell is then fully insulated on all sides. Battery temperature is carefully monitored and the charge terminated when the cell temperature reaches 85 F. Charging has been evaluated with starting temperatures from 55 to 75 F.

  12. Computer Code For Turbocompounded Adiabatic Diesel Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Assanis, D. N.; Heywood, J. B.

    1988-01-01

    Computer simulation developed to study advantages of increased exhaust enthalpy in adiabatic turbocompounded diesel engine. Subsytems of conceptual engine include compressor, reciprocator, turbocharger turbine, compounded turbine, ducting, and heat exchangers. Focus of simulation of total system is to define transfers of mass and energy, including release and transfer of heat and transfer of work in each subsystem, and relationship among subsystems. Written in FORTRAN IV.

  13. Computer Code For Turbocompounded Adiabatic Diesel Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Assanis, D. N.; Heywood, J. B.

    1988-01-01

    Computer simulation developed to study advantages of increased exhaust enthalpy in adiabatic turbocompounded diesel engine. Subsytems of conceptual engine include compressor, reciprocator, turbocharger turbine, compounded turbine, ducting, and heat exchangers. Focus of simulation of total system is to define transfers of mass and energy, including release and transfer of heat and transfer of work in each subsystem, and relationship among subsystems. Written in FORTRAN IV.

  14. Adiabatic charging of nickel-hydrogen batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lurie, Chuck; Foroozan, S.; Brewer, Jeff; Jackson, Lorna

    1995-02-01

    Battery management during prelaunch activities has always required special attention and careful planning. The transition from nickel-cadium to nickel-hydrogen batteries, with their high self discharge rate and lower charge efficiency, as well as longer prelaunch scenarios, has made this aspect of spacecraft battery management even more challenging. The AXAF-I Program requires high battery state of charge at launch. The use of active cooling, to ensure efficient charging, was considered and proved to be difficult and expensive. Alternative approaches were evaluated. Optimized charging, in the absence of cooling, appeared promising and was investigated. Initial testing was conducted to demonstrate the feasibility of the 'Adiabatic Charging' approach. Feasibility was demonstrated and additional testing performed to provide a quantitative, parametric data base. The assumption that the battery is in an adiabatic environment during prelaunch charging is a conservative approximation because the battery will transfer some heat to its surroundings by convective air cooling. The amount is small compared to the heat dissipated during battery overcharge. Because the battery has a large thermal mass, substantial overcharge can occur before the cells get too hot to charge efficiently. The testing presented here simulates a true adiabatic environment. Accordingly the data base may be slightly conservative. The adiabatic charge methodology used in this investigation begins with stabilizing the cell at a given starting temperature. The cell is then fully insulated on all sides. Battery temperature is carefully monitored and the charge terminated when the cell temperature reaches 85 F. Charging has been evaluated with starting temperatures from 55 to 75 F.

  15. Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Just a passing cramp? It could be carpal tunnel syndrome. The carpal tunnel is a narrow passageway of ligament and bones ... from irritated tendons or other swelling narrows the tunnel and causes the nerve to be compressed. Symptoms ...

  16. Looking into Tunnel Books.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinshaw, Craig

    1999-01-01

    Describes how to make tunnel books, which are viewed by looking into a "tunnel" created by accordion-folded expanding sides. Suggests possible themes. Describes how to create a walk-through tunnel book for first grade students. (CMK)

  17. Aspects of adiabatic population transfer and control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demirplak, Mustafa

    This thesis explores two different questions. The first question we answer is how to restore a given population transfer scenario given that it works efficiently in the adiabatic limit but fails because of lack of intensity and/or short duration. We derive a very simple algorithm to do this and apply it to both toy and realistic models. Two results emerge from this study. While the mathematical existence of the programme is certain it might not always be physically desirable. The restoration of adiabaticity is phase sensitive. The second question that is answered in this thesis is not how to invent new control paradigms, but rather what would happen to them in the presence of stochastic perturbers. We first use a phenomenological model to study the effect of stochastic dephasing on population transfer by stimulated Raman adiabatic passage. The results of this Monte Carlo calculation are qualitatively explained with a perturbation theoretical result in the dressed state basis. The reliability of our phenomenological model is questioned through a more rigorous hybrid quantal-classical simulation of controlled population transfer in HCl in Ar.

  18. Random matrix model of adiabatic quantum computing

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, David R.; Adami, Christoph; Lue, Waynn; Williams, Colin P.

    2005-05-15

    We present an analysis of the quantum adiabatic algorithm for solving hard instances of 3-SAT (an NP-complete problem) in terms of random matrix theory (RMT). We determine the global regularity of the spectral fluctuations of the instantaneous Hamiltonians encountered during the interpolation between the starting Hamiltonians and the ones whose ground states encode the solutions to the computational problems of interest. At each interpolation point, we quantify the degree of regularity of the average spectral distribution via its Brody parameter, a measure that distinguishes regular (i.e., Poissonian) from chaotic (i.e., Wigner-type) distributions of normalized nearest-neighbor spacings. We find that for hard problem instances - i.e., those having a critical ratio of clauses to variables - the spectral fluctuations typically become irregular across a contiguous region of the interpolation parameter, while the spectrum is regular for easy instances. Within the hard region, RMT may be applied to obtain a mathematical model of the probability of avoided level crossings and concomitant failure rate of the adiabatic algorithm due to nonadiabatic Landau-Zener-type transitions. Our model predicts that if the interpolation is performed at a uniform rate, the average failure rate of the quantum adiabatic algorithm, when averaged over hard problem instances, scales exponentially with increasing problem size.

  19. Adiabatic graph-state quantum computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonio, B.; Markham, D.; Anders, J.

    2014-11-01

    Measurement-based quantum computation (MBQC) and holonomic quantum computation (HQC) are two very different computational methods. The computation in MBQC is driven by adaptive measurements executed in a particular order on a large entangled state. In contrast in HQC the system starts in the ground subspace of a Hamiltonian which is slowly changed such that a transformation occurs within the subspace. Following the approach of Bacon and Flammia, we show that any MBQC on a graph state with generalized flow (gflow) can be converted into an adiabatically driven holonomic computation, which we call adiabatic graph-state quantum computation (AGQC). We then investigate how properties of AGQC relate to the properties of MBQC, such as computational depth. We identify a trade-off that can be made between the number of adiabatic steps in AGQC and the norm of \\dot{H} as well as the degree of H, in analogy to the trade-off between the number of measurements and classical post-processing seen in MBQC. Finally the effects of performing AGQC with orderings that differ from standard MBQC are investigated.

  20. Classical molecular dynamics simulation of electronically non-adiabatic processes.

    PubMed

    Miller, William H; Cotton, Stephen J

    2016-12-22

    Both classical and quantum mechanics (as well as hybrids thereof, i.e., semiclassical approaches) find widespread use in simulating dynamical processes in molecular systems. For large chemical systems, however, which involve potential energy surfaces (PES) of general/arbitrary form, it is usually the case that only classical molecular dynamics (MD) approaches are feasible, and their use is thus ubiquitous nowadays, at least for chemical processes involving dynamics on a single PES (i.e., within a single Born-Oppenheimer electronic state). This paper reviews recent developments in an approach which extends standard classical MD methods to the treatment of electronically non-adiabatic processes, i.e., those that involve transitions between different electronic states. The approach treats nuclear and electronic degrees of freedom (DOF) equivalently (i.e., by classical mechanics, thereby retaining the simplicity of standard MD), and provides "quantization" of the electronic states through a symmetrical quasi-classical (SQC) windowing model. The approach is seen to be capable of treating extreme regimes of strong and weak coupling between the electronic states, as well as accurately describing coherence effects in the electronic DOF (including the de-coherence of such effects caused by coupling to the nuclear DOF). A survey of recent applications is presented to illustrate the performance of the approach. Also described is a newly developed variation on the original SQC model (found universally superior to the original) and a general extension of the SQC model to obtain the full electronic density matrix (at no additional cost/complexity).

  1. Towards robust dynamical decoupling and high fidelity adiabatic quantum computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quiroz, Gregory

    Quantum computation (QC) relies on the ability to implement high-fidelity quantum gate operations and successfully preserve quantum state coherence. One of the most challenging obstacles for reliable QC is overcoming the inevitable interaction between a quantum system and its environment. Unwanted interactions result in decoherence processes that cause quantum states to deviate from a desired evolution, consequently leading to computational errors and loss of coherence. Dynamical decoupling (DD) is one such method, which seeks to attenuate the effects of decoherence by applying strong and expeditious control pulses solely to the system. Provided the pulses are applied over a time duration sufficiently shorter than the correlation time associated with the environment dynamics, DD effectively averages out undesirable interactions and preserves quantum states with a low probability of error, or fidelity loss. In this study various aspects of this approach are studied from sequence construction to applications of DD to protecting QC. First, a comprehensive examination of the error suppression properties of a near-optimal DD approach is given to understand the relationship between error suppression capabilities and the number of required DD control pulses in the case of ideal, instantaneous pulses. While such considerations are instructive for examining DD efficiency, i.e., performance vs the number of control pulses, high-fidelity DD in realizable systems is difficult to achieve due to intrinsic pulse imperfections which further contribute to decoherence. As a second consideration, it is shown how one can overcome this hurdle and achieve robustness and recover high-fidelity DD in the presence of faulty control pulses using Genetic Algorithm optimization and sequence symmetrization. Thirdly, to illustrate the implementation of DD in conjunction with QC, the utilization of DD and quantum error correction codes (QECCs) as a protection method for adiabatic quantum

  2. Freon-14 as a working medium in wind tunnels for modeling hypersonic air flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komarov, V. N.; Polianskii, O. Iu.; Chirikhin, A. V.

    The thermodynamic and kinetic properties of Freon-14, a gas characterized by a low adiabat and well suited to the modelling of real gas effects in wind tunnels, are examined. It is shown that flows that are free from condensation and closely resemble equilibrium flows can be obtained over a sufficiently wide range of wind tunnel regimes and model sizes. Viscosity coefficients of Freon-14 are presented.

  3. Cryogenic Wind Tunnels.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-07-01

    CRYOGENIC WIND TUNNEL by J.D.CadweD 18 A CRYOGENIC TRANSONIC INTERMITTENT TUNNEL PROJECT: THE INDUCED -FLOW CRYOGENIC WIND-TUNNEL T2 AT ONERA/CERT by...CRYOGENIC TUNNELS The types of tunnel drive and test gas currently exploited in cryogenic wind tunnels include: Drive Test Gas fan nitrogen induced flow...reduce other heat fluxes. Other sources can arise from thermally induced oscillations under both storage and transfer con- ditions. 1.3 (c) Reduction

  4. Nonlinear Landau-Zener tunneling in Majorana's stellar representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Qiuyi; Liu, Haodi; Zhou, Tianji; Chen, Xu-Zong; Wu, Biao

    2016-06-01

    By representing the evolution of a quantum state with the trajectories of the stars on a Bloch sphere, the Majorana's stellar representation provides an intuitive way to understand quantum motion in a high dimensional projective Hilbert space. In this work we show that the Majorana's representation offers a very interesting and intuitive way to understand the nonlinear Landau-Zener tunneling. In particular, the breakdown of adiabaticity in this tunneling phenomenon can be understood as some of the stars never reaching the south pole. We also establish a connection between the Majorana stars in the second quantized model and the single star in the mean field model by using the reduced density matrix.

  5. Experimental Progress Toward Multiple Adiabatic Rapid Passage Sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, X.; Wertz, E.; Cohen, M. G.; Metcalf, H.

    2006-05-01

    Multiple repetitions of adiabatic rapid passage (ARP) sweeps with counterpropagating light beams can enable huge optical forces on atoms. The repetition rate of the ARP sweeps φsγ results in a force k φs/πk γ/2 ≡Frad where 1/γ≡τ is the excited state lifetime and Frad is the ordinary radiative force. This is because each pair of ARP-induced inversions can coherently transfer momentum ±2 k between the light beams, and thus 2 k to the atoms. In developing instruments for such experiments on the 2^3S1-> 2^3P2 transition at λ = 1083 nm in He, we exploit recent developments in the optical communications industry. We use commercial phase and intensity modulators of the LiNbO3 waveguide type having Vπ as low as 6 V and thus requiring relatively low rf power for the modulation. Synchronized driving of the two modulators can produce the necessary multiple ARP sequences of 10 ns chirped pulses that span several GHz, as needed for the experiment^3. We are also developing optical methods for characterizing these pulses. T. Lu, X. Miao, and H. Metcalf, Phys., Rev. A 71 061405(R) (2005).

  6. Semiclassical methods of non-adiabatic dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonella, Sara

    A new method to study how the combined effect of electronic transitions and nuclear motion (non-adiabatic dynamics) influences the properties of molecular systems is presented in this dissertation. Building on previous ideas, a computer simulation technique that combines numerical efficiency with an accurate representation of the quantum aspects of the non-adiabatic evolution is developed. The new method, called Focusing, is tested against exact quantum calculations and standard approximate techniques currently in use in a series of calculations on benchmark problems of growing complexity. Focusing is consistently able to reproduce the exact result while reducing by two orders of magnitude the numerical effort necessary to achieve similar accuracy with the alternative methods. The improved efficiency is achieved by combining two well-controlled approximations. First, a theoretical analysis is performed to represent the quantum evolution, usually too complex to be calculated exactly, in terms of an ensemble of classical trajectories that can be obtained with well established algorithms. The resulting new semiclassical propagator, though closely related to known results, overcomes a serious limitation which prevented the application of this earlier work to realistic molecular systems. Secondly, the efficiency of the semiclassical simulation is optimized by taking advantage of the mathematical structure of the non-adiabatic propagator and through a steepest descent analysis identifying a priori the subset of trajectories that produce the most important contributions to the dynamics. A variation of the new method, called Refocusing, is shown to improve the situation even further for an interesting subset of non-adiabatic problems in which nuclear evolution takes place on different electronic surfaces which are very dissimilar from one another. The quality of the agreement and the gain in efficiency are maintained when studying the non-adiabatic dynamics of a

  7. Dissipation-induced mobility and coherence in frustrated lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owen, E. T.; Brown, O. T.; Hartmann, M. J.

    2017-06-01

    In quantum lattice systems with geometric frustration, particles cannot move coherently due to destructive interference between tunneling processes. Here we show that purely local, Markovian dissipation can induce mobility and long-range first-order coherence in frustrated lattice systems that is entirely generated by incoherent processes. Interactions reduce the coherences and mobility but do not destroy them. These effects are observable in experimental implementations of driven-dissipative lattices with a flat band and nonuniform dissipation.

  8. Non-adiabatic effects in near-adiabatic mixed-field orientation and alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maan, Anjali; Ahlawat, Dharamvir Singh; Prasad, Vinod

    2016-11-01

    We present a theoretical study of the impact of a pair of moderate electric fields tilted an angle with respect to one another on a molecule. As a prototype, we consider a molecule with large rotational constant (with corresponding small rotational period) and moderate dipole moment. Within rigid-rotor approximation, the time-dependent Schrodinger equation is solved using fourth-order Runge-Kutta method. We have analysed that lower rotational states are significantly influenced by variation in pulse durations, the tilt angle between the fields and also on the electric field strengths. We also suggest a control scheme of how the rotational dynamics, orientation and alignment of a molecule can be enhanced by a combination of near-adiabatic pulses in comparision to non-adiabatic or adiabatic pulses.

  9. Coherent Coupled Qubits for Quantum Annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Steven J.; Samach, Gabriel O.; Hover, David; Gustavsson, Simon; Kim, David K.; Melville, Alexander; Rosenberg, Danna; Sears, Adam P.; Yan, Fei; Yoder, Jonilyn L.; Oliver, William D.; Kerman, Andrew J.

    2017-07-01

    Quantum annealing is an optimization technique which potentially leverages quantum tunneling to enhance computational performance. Existing quantum annealers use superconducting flux qubits with short coherence times limited primarily by the use of large persistent currents Ip. Here, we examine an alternative approach using qubits with smaller Ip and longer coherence times. We demonstrate tunable coupling, a basic building block for quantum annealing, between two flux qubits with small (approximately 50-nA) persistent currents. Furthermore, we characterize qubit coherence as a function of coupler setting and investigate the effect of flux noise in the coupler loop on qubit coherence. Our results provide insight into the available design space for next-generation quantum annealers with improved coherence.

  10. Adiabatic Landau-Zener transitions at avoided level crossings with fast noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenmoe, M. B.; Fai, L. C.

    2015-11-01

    Effects of a fast classical noise on adiabatic Landau-Zener (LZ) transitions between the (2 S + 1) Zeeman multiplets (diabatic states) of an arbitrary spin S at an avoided level crossing are investigated. The spin system is simultaneously coupled to a slow regular magnetic field and a fast random field with Gaussian realizations. In the longitudinal direction, the magnetic field changes its sign at the degeneracy point (and is unbounded at large positive and negative times t = ± ∞ far from the degeneracy point) while in its single transverse direction, it remains of constant amplitude. The noise is considered in the limit where its characteristic correlation time (decay time) is small enough compared to the characteristic time of adiabatic LZ transitions. With these considerations, the condition for adiabatic evolution allows us to analytically evaluate the populations of diabatic levels and coherence factors. The study is first implemented for two- (S = 1 / 2) and three- (S = 1) state systems and finally extended to arbitrary S. A numerical study is implemented allowing us to check/confirm the range of validity of our analytical solutions. We found a satisfactory quantitative agreement between numerical and analytical data.

  11. Semiclassical Monte Carlo: a first principles approach to non-adiabatic molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    White, Alexander J; Gorshkov, Vyacheslav N; Wang, Ruixi; Tretiak, Sergei; Mozyrsky, Dmitry

    2014-11-14

    Modeling the dynamics of photophysical and (photo)chemical reactions in extended molecular systems is a new frontier for quantum chemistry. Many dynamical phenomena, such as intersystem crossing, non-radiative relaxation, and charge and energy transfer, require a non-adiabatic description which incorporate transitions between electronic states. Additionally, these dynamics are often highly sensitive to quantum coherences and interference effects. Several methods exist to simulate non-adiabatic dynamics; however, they are typically either too expensive to be applied to large molecular systems (10's-100's of atoms), or they are based on ad hoc schemes which may include severe approximations due to inconsistencies in classical and quantum mechanics. We present, in detail, an algorithm based on Monte Carlo sampling of the semiclassical time-dependent wavefunction that involves running simple surface hopping dynamics, followed by a post-processing step which adds little cost. The method requires only a few quantities from quantum chemistry calculations, can systematically be improved, and provides excellent agreement with exact quantum mechanical results. Here we show excellent agreement with exact solutions for scattering results of standard test problems. Additionally, we find that convergence of the wavefunction is controlled by complex valued phase factors, the size of the non-adiabatic coupling region, and the choice of sampling function. These results help in determining the range of applicability of the method, and provide a starting point for further improvement.

  12. Aeroacoustic noise measurements in wind tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alemdaroglu, H. N.

    1984-02-01

    The paper describes the general characteristics of the lowspeed Acoustic Research Wind Tunnel constructed in the Aerodynamics Laboratory of E.N.S.M.A (poitiers/France) and presents the results of the preliminary experiments conducted in this wind tunnel. The wind tunnel is of open test section, open circuit and blower type. It has a test section of 30x30 sq cm and a mean velocity of 42 m/s. Aerodynamic measurements revealed a maximum turbulence intensity of less than 1%. The open test section is completely enclosed within a acoustically lined semi-anechoic chamber of dimensions 3.3x4/2.8 sq cm. Acoustic calibration of the wind tunnel is done by using both white noise and pure tone noise sources and it was observed that the tunnel can be considered to be anechoic above 100 Hz for white noise tests. Preliminary measurements of aerodynamic noise are performed by using both smooth and artificially roughened circular cylinders placed in the open test section of the wind tunnel. An aeroacoustic coherence function is deviced in order to classify the subsonic flow at moderate Reynolds numbers 5.05x10 to the 4th power Re sub d around a circular cylinder in its different flow regimes; subcritical, transcritical and supercritical. The method uses simultaneous measurements of the power spectra of the far field acoustic pressure and of the turbulent longitudinal velocity fluctuations in the wake of the cylinder as well as their cross spectra density functions CSD and especially the coherence function between the two signals. The values of the coherent function corresponding to the critical Strouhal frequencies are intense in the subcritical regime, decrease sharply in the transcritical domain and then increase and stabilize in the supercritical regime.

  13. The effect of adiabatic focusing upon charged particle propagation in random magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Earl, J. A.

    1975-01-01

    Charged particles propagating along the diverging lines of force of a spatially inhomogeneous guiding field were considered as they are scattered by random fields. Their longitudinal transport is described in terms of the eigenfunctions of a Sturm-Liouville operator incorporating the effect of adiabatic focussing along with that of scattering. The relaxation times and characteristic velocities are graphed and tabulated. The particle density is evaluated as a function of space and time for two different regimes. In the first regime (relatively weak focussing), a diffusive mode of propagation is dominant but coherent modes are also dominant. In the second regime (strong focussing), diffusion does not occur and the propagation is purely coherent. This supercoherent mode corresponds exactly to the so-called scatter-free propagation of kilovolt solar flare electrons. On a larger scale, focussed transport provides an interpretation of many observed characteristics of extragalactic radio sources.

  14. Giant room-temperature magnetoresistance in single-crystal Fe/MgO/Fe magnetic tunnel junctions.

    PubMed

    Yuasa, Shinji; Nagahama, Taro; Fukushima, Akio; Suzuki, Yoshishige; Ando, Koji

    2004-12-01

    The tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) effect in magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) is the key to developing magnetoresistive random-access-memory (MRAM), magnetic sensors and novel programmable logic devices. Conventional MTJs with an amorphous aluminium oxide tunnel barrier, which have been extensively studied for device applications, exhibit a magnetoresistance ratio up to 70% at room temperature. This low magnetoresistance seriously limits the feasibility of spintronics devices. Here, we report a giant MR ratio up to 180% at room temperature in single-crystal Fe/MgO/Fe MTJs. The origin of this enormous TMR effect is coherent spin-polarized tunnelling, where the symmetry of electron wave functions plays an important role. Moreover, we observed that their tunnel magnetoresistance oscillates as a function of tunnel barrier thickness, indicating that coherency of wave functions is conserved across the tunnel barrier. The coherent TMR effect is a key to making spintronic devices with novel quantum-mechanical functions, and to developing gigabit-scale MRAM.

  15. Landau-Zener tunneling in a nonlinear three-level system

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Guanfang; Ye Difa; Fu Libin; Liu Jie; Chen Xuzong

    2006-09-15

    We present a comprehensive analysis of the Landau-Zener tunneling of a nonlinear three-level system in a linearly sweeping external field. We find the presence of nonzero tunneling probability in the adiabatic limit (i.e., very slowly sweeping field) even for the situation that the nonlinear term is very small and the energy levels keep the same topological structure as that of the linear case. In particular, the tunneling is irregular with showing an unresolved sensitivity on the sweeping rate. For the case of fast-sweeping fields, we derive an analytic expression for the tunneling probability with stationary phase approximation and show that the nonlinearity can dramatically influence the tunneling probability when the nonlinear 'internal field' resonate with the external field. We also discuss the asymmetry of the tunneling probability induced by the nonlinearity. Physics behind the above phenomena is revealed and possible application of our model to triple-well trapped Bose-Einstein condensate is discussed.

  16. Adiabatic regularization for gauge fields and the conformal anomaly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Chong-Sun; Koyama, Yoji

    2017-03-01

    Adiabatic regularization for quantum field theory in conformally flat spacetime is known for scalar and Dirac fermion fields. In this paper, we complete the construction by establishing the adiabatic regularization scheme for the gauge field. We show that the adiabatic expansion for the mode functions and the adiabatic vacuum can be defined in a similar way using Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin-type (WKB-type) solutions as the scalar fields. As an application of the adiabatic method, we compute the trace of the energy momentum tensor and reproduce the known result for the conformal anomaly obtained by the other regularization methods. The availability of the adiabatic expansion scheme for the gauge field allows one to study various renormalized physical quantities of theories coupled to (non-Abelian) gauge fields in conformally flat spacetime, such as conformal supersymmetric Yang Mills, inflation, and cosmology.

  17. Bond selective chemistry beyond the adiabatic approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, L.J.

    1993-12-01

    One of the most important challenges in chemistry is to develop predictive ability for the branching between energetically allowed chemical reaction pathways. Such predictive capability, coupled with a fundamental understanding of the important molecular interactions, is essential to the development and utilization of new fuels and the design of efficient combustion processes. Existing transition state and exact quantum theories successfully predict the branching between available product channels for systems in which each reaction coordinate can be adequately described by different paths along a single adiabatic potential energy surface. In particular, unimolecular dissociation following thermal, infrared multiphoton, or overtone excitation in the ground state yields a branching between energetically allowed product channels which can be successfully predicted by the application of statistical theories, i.e. the weakest bond breaks. (The predictions are particularly good for competing reactions in which when there is no saddle point along the reaction coordinates, as in simple bond fission reactions.) The predicted lack of bond selectivity results from the assumption of rapid internal vibrational energy redistribution and the implicit use of a single adiabatic Born-Oppenheimer potential energy surface for the reaction. However, the adiabatic approximation is not valid for the reaction of a wide variety of energetic materials and organic fuels; coupling between the electronic states of the reacting species play a a key role in determining the selectivity of the chemical reactions induced. The work described below investigated the central role played by coupling between electronic states in polyatomic molecules in determining the selective branching between energetically allowed fragmentation pathways in two key systems.

  18. Electron tunnel sensor technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waltman, S. B.; Kaiser, W. J.

    1989-01-01

    The recent development of Scanning Tunneling Microscopy technology allows the application of electron tunneling to position detectors for the first time. The vacuum tunnel junction is one of the most sensitive position detection mechanisms available. It is also compact, simple, and requires little power. A prototype accelerometer based on electron tunneling, and other sensor applications of this promising new technology are described.

  19. Local entanglement generation in the adiabatic regime

    SciTech Connect

    Cliche, M.; Veitia, Andrzej

    2010-09-15

    We study entanglement generation in a pair of qubits interacting with an initially correlated system. Using time-independent perturbation theory and the adiabatic theorem, we show conditions under which the qubits become entangled as the joint system evolves into the ground state of the interacting theory. We then apply these results to the case of qubits interacting with a scalar quantum field. We study three different variations of this setup; a quantum field subject to Dirichlet boundary conditions, a quantum field interacting with a classical potential, and a quantum field that starts in a thermal state.

  20. Quantized adiabatic transport in momentum space.

    PubMed

    Ho, Derek Y H; Gong, Jiangbin

    2012-07-06

    Though topological aspects of energy bands are known to play a key role in quantum transport in solid-state systems, the implications of Floquet band topology for transport in momentum space (i.e., acceleration) have not been explored so far. Using a ratchet accelerator model inspired by existing cold-atom experiments, here we characterize a class of extended Floquet bands of one-dimensional driven quantum systems by Chern numbers, reveal topological phase transitions therein, and theoretically predict the quantization of adiabatic transport in momentum space. Numerical results confirm our theory and indicate the feasibility of experimental studies.

  1. Adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator for space use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Serlemitsos, A. T.; Warner, B. A.; Castles, S.; Breon, S. R.; San Sebastian, M.; Hait, T.

    1990-01-01

    An Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerator (ADR) for space use is under development at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). The breadboard ADR operated at 100 mK for 400 minutes. Some significant changes to that ADR, designed to eliminate shortcomings revealed during tests, are reported. To increase thermal contact, the ferric ammonium sulfate crystals were grown directly on gold-plated copper wires which serve as the thermal bus. The thermal link to the X-ray sensors was also markedly improved. To speed up the testing required to determine the best design parameters for the gas gap heat switch, the new heat switch has a modular design and is easy to disassemble.

  2. Phase avalanches in near-adiabatic evolutions

    SciTech Connect

    Vertesi, T.; Englman, R.

    2006-02-15

    In the course of slow, nearly adiabatic motion of a system, relative changes in the slowness can cause abrupt and high magnitude phase changes, ''phase avalanches,'' superimposed on the ordinary geometric phases. The generality of this effect is examined for arbitrary Hamiltonians and multicomponent (>2) wave packets and is found to be connected (through the Blaschke term in the theory of analytic signals) to amplitude zeros in the lower half of the complex time plane. Motion on a nonmaximal circle on the Poincare-sphere suppresses the effect. A spectroscopic transition experiment can independently verify the phase-avalanche magnitudes.

  3. Hydrodynamic description of the adiabatic piston.

    PubMed

    Mansour, M Malek; Garcia, Alejandro L; Baras, F

    2006-01-01

    A closed macroscopic equation for the motion of the two-dimensional adiabatic piston is derived from standard hydrodynamics. It predicts a damped oscillatory motion of the piston towards a final rest position, which depends on the initial state. In the limit of large piston mass, the solution of this equation is in quantitative agreement with the results obtained from both hard disk molecular dynamics and hydrodynamics. The explicit forms of the basic characteristics of the piston's dynamics, such as the period of oscillations and the relaxation time, are derived. The limitations of the theory's validity, in terms of the main system parameters, are established.

  4. Shortcuts to adiabaticity for quantum annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Kazutaka

    2017-01-01

    We study the Ising Hamiltonian with a transverse field term to simulate the quantum annealing. Using shortcuts to adiabaticity, we design the time dependence of the Hamiltonian. The dynamical invariant is obtained by the mean-field ansatz, and the Hamiltonian is designed by the inverse engineering. We show that the time dependence of physical quantities such as the magnetization is independent of the speed of the Hamiltonian variation in the infinite-range model. We also show that rotating transverse magnetic fields are useful to achieve the ideal time evolution.

  5. Generalized Ramsey numbers through adiabatic quantum optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranjbar, Mani; Macready, William G.; Clark, Lane; Gaitan, Frank

    2016-09-01

    Ramsey theory is an active research area in combinatorics whose central theme is the emergence of order in large disordered structures, with Ramsey numbers marking the threshold at which this order first appears. For generalized Ramsey numbers r( G, H), the emergent order is characterized by graphs G and H. In this paper we: (i) present a quantum algorithm for computing generalized Ramsey numbers by reformulating the computation as a combinatorial optimization problem which is solved using adiabatic quantum optimization; and (ii) determine the Ramsey numbers r({{T}}m,{{T}}n) for trees of order m,n = 6,7,8, most of which were previously unknown.

  6. Decoherence in a scalable adiabatic quantum computer

    SciTech Connect

    Ashhab, S.; Johansson, J. R.; Nori, Franco

    2006-11-15

    We consider the effects of decoherence on Landau-Zener crossings encountered in a large-scale adiabatic-quantum-computing setup. We analyze the dependence of the success probability--i.e., the probability for the system to end up in its new ground state--on the noise amplitude and correlation time. We determine the optimal sweep rate that is required to maximize the success probability. We then discuss the scaling of decoherence effects with increasing system size. We find that those effects can be important for large systems, even if they are small for each of the small building blocks.

  7. Relaxation versus adiabatic quantum steady-state preparation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venuti, Lorenzo Campos; Albash, Tameem; Marvian, Milad; Lidar, Daniel; Zanardi, Paolo

    2017-04-01

    Adiabatic preparation of the ground states of many-body Hamiltonians in the closed-system limit is at the heart of adiabatic quantum computation, but in reality systems are always open. This motivates a natural comparison between, on the one hand, adiabatic preparation of steady states of Lindbladian generators and, on the other hand, relaxation towards the same steady states subject to the final Lindbladian of the adiabatic process. In this work we thus adopt the perspective that the goal is the most efficient possible preparation of such steady states, rather than ground states. Using known rigorous bounds for the open-system adiabatic theorem and for mixing times, we are then led to a disturbing conclusion that at first appears to doom efforts to build physical quantum annealers: relaxation seems to always converge faster than adiabatic preparation. However, by carefully estimating the adiabatic preparation time for Lindbladians describing thermalization in the low-temperature limit, we show that there is, after all, room for an adiabatic speedup over relaxation. To test the analytically derived bounds for the adiabatic preparation time and the relaxation time, we numerically study three models: a dissipative quasifree fermionic chain, a single qubit coupled to a thermal bath, and the "spike" problem of n qubits coupled to a thermal bath. Via these models we find that the answer to the "which wins" question depends for each model on the temperature and the system-bath coupling strength. In the case of the "spike" problem we find that relaxation during the adiabatic evolution plays an important role in ensuring a speedup over the final-time relaxation procedure. Thus, relaxation-assisted adiabatic preparation can be more efficient than both pure adiabatic evolution and pure relaxation.

  8. Numerical simulations of solar spicules: Adiabatic and non-adiabatic studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuźma, B.; Murawski, K.; Zaqarashvili, T. V.; Konkol, P.; Mignone, A.

    2017-01-01

    Aims: We aim to study the formation and evolution of solar spicules using numerical simulations of a vertical velocity pulse that is launched from the upper chromosphere. Methods: With the use of the PLUTO code, we numerically solved adiabatic and non-adiabatic magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations in 2D cylindrical geometry. We followed the evolution of spicules triggered by pulses that are launched in a vertical velocity component from the upper chromosphere. Then we compared the results obtained with and without non-adiabatic terms in the MHD equations. Results: Our numerical results reveal that the velocity pulse is steepened into a shock that propagates upward into the corona. The chromospheric cold and dense plasma follows the shock and rises into the corona with the mean speed of 20-25 km s-1. The nonlinear wake behind the pulse in the stratified atmosphere leads to quasi-periodic rebound shocks, which lead to quasi-periodic rising of chromospheric plasma into the corona with a period close to the acoustic cut-off period of the chromosphere. We found that the effect of non-adiabatic terms on spicule evolution is minor; the general properties of spicules such as their heights and rising-time remain slightly affected by these terms. Conclusions: In the framework of the axisymmetric model we devised, we show that the solar spicules can be triggered by the vertical velocity pulses, and thermal conduction and radiative cooling terms do not exert any significant influence on the dynamics of these spicules.

  9. Adiabatic approximation via hodograph translation and zero-curvature equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karasev, M. V.

    2014-04-01

    For quantum as well classical slow-fast systems, we develop a general method which allows one to compute the adiabatic invariant (approximate integral of motion), its symmetries, the adiabatic guiding center coordinates and the effective scalar Hamiltonian in all orders of a small parameter. The scheme does not exploit eigenvectors or diagonalization, but is based on the ideas of isospectral deformation and zero-curvature equations, where the role of "time" is played by the adiabatic (quantization) parameter. The algorithm includes the construction of the zero-curvature adiabatic connection and its splitting generated by averaging up to an arbitrary order in the small parameter.

  10. Adiabatic following for a three-state quantum system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wei; Shore, Bruce W.; Rangelov, Andon; Kyoseva, Elica

    2017-01-01

    Adiabatic time-evolution - found in various forms of adiabatic following and adiabatic passage - is often advantageous for controlled manipulation of quantum systems due to its insensitivity to deviations in the pulse shapes and timings. In this paper we discuss controlled adiabatic evolution of a three-state quantum system, a natural advance to the widespread use of two-state systems in numerous contemporary applications. We discuss, and illustrate, not only possibilities for population transfer but also for creating, with prescribed relative phase, 50:50 superpositions of two Zeeman sublevels in a letter-vee coupling linkage.

  11. On the Role of Prior Probability in Adiabatic Quantum Algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jie; Lu, Songfeng; Yang, Liping

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we study the role of prior probability on the efficiency of quantum local adiabatic search algorithm. The following aspects for prior probability are found here: firstly, only the probabilities of marked states affect the running time of the adiabatic evolution; secondly, the prior probability can be used for improving the efficiency of the adiabatic algorithm; thirdly, like the usual quantum adiabatic evolution, the running time for the case of multiple solution states where the number of marked elements are smaller enough than the size of the set assigned that contains them can be significantly bigger than that of the case where the assigned set only contains all the marked states.

  12. Tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance driven by magnetic phase transition.

    PubMed

    Chen, X Z; Feng, J F; Wang, Z C; Zhang, J; Zhong, X Y; Song, C; Jin, L; Zhang, B; Li, F; Jiang, M; Tan, Y Z; Zhou, X J; Shi, G Y; Zhou, X F; Han, X D; Mao, S C; Chen, Y H; Han, X F; Pan, F

    2017-09-06

    The independent control of two magnetic electrodes and spin-coherent transport in magnetic tunnel junctions are strictly required for tunneling magnetoresistance, while junctions with only one ferromagnetic electrode exhibit tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance dependent on the anisotropic density of states with no room temperature performance so far. Here, we report an alternative approach to obtaining tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance in α'-FeRh-based junctions driven by the magnetic phase transition of α'-FeRh and resultantly large variation of the density of states in the vicinity of MgO tunneling barrier, referred to as phase transition tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance. The junctions with only one α'-FeRh magnetic electrode show a magnetoresistance ratio up to 20% at room temperature. Both the polarity and magnitude of the phase transition tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance can be modulated by interfacial engineering at the α'-FeRh/MgO interface. Besides the fundamental significance, our finding might add a different dimension to magnetic random access memory and antiferromagnet spintronics.Tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance is promising for next generation memory devices but limited by the low efficiency and functioning temperature. Here the authors achieved 20% tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance at room temperature in magnetic tunnel junctions with one α'-FeRh magnetic electrode.

  13. Nonadiabatic Transitions in Adiabatic Rapid Passage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, T.; Miao, X.; Metcalf, H.

    2006-05-01

    Optical forces much larger than the ordinary radiative force can be achieved on a two-level atom by multiple repetitions of adiabatic rapid passage sweeps with counterpropagating light beams. Chirped light pulses drive the atom-laser system up a ladder of dressed state energy sheets on sequential trajectories, thereby decreasing the atomic kinetic energy. Nonadiabatic transitions between the energy sheets must be avoided for this process to be effective. We have calculated the nonadiabatic transition probability for various chirped light pulses numerically. These results were compared to the first Demkov-Kunike model and the well-known Landau-Zener model. In addition, an analytical form of the nonadiabatic transition probability has been found for linearly chirped pulses and an approximate form for generic symmetric finite-time pulses has been found for the entire parameter space using the technique of unitary integration. From this, the asymptotic transition probability in the adiabatic limit was derived. T. Lu, X. Miao, and H. Metcalf, Phys., Rev. A 71 061405(R) (2005). Yu. Demkov and M. Kunike, Vestn. Leningr. Univ. Fis. Khim., 16, 39 (1969); K.-A. Suominen and B. Garraway, Phys. Rev. A45, 374 (1992)

  14. The formation of multiple adiabatic shear bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, F.; Wright, T. W.; Ramesh, K. T.

    2006-07-01

    In a previous paper, Zhou et al. [2006. A numerical methodology for investigating adiabatic shear band formation. J. Mech. Phys. Solids, 54, 904-926] developed a numerical method for analyzing one-dimensional deformation of thermoviscoplastic materials. The method uses a second order algorithm for integration along characteristic lines, and computes the plastic flow after complete localization with high resolution and efficiency. We apply this numerical scheme to analyze localization in a thermoviscoplastic material where multiple shear bands are allowed to form at random locations in a large specimen. As a shear band develops, it unloads neighboring regions and interacts with other bands. Beginning with a random distribution of imperfections, which might be imagined as arising qualitatively from the microstructure, we obtain the average spacing of shear bands through calculations and compare our results with previously existing theoretical estimates. It is found that the spacing between nucleating shear bands follows the perturbation theory due to Wright and Ockendon [1996. A scaling law for the effect of inertia on the formation of adiabatic shear bands. Int. J. Plasticity 12, 927-934], whereas the spacing between mature shear bands is closer to that predicted by the momentum diffusion theory of Grady and Kipp [1987. The growth of unstable thermoplastic shear with application to steady-wave shock compression in solids. J. Mech. Phys. Solids 35, 95-119]. Scaling laws for the dependence of band spacing on material parameters differ in many respects from either theory.

  15. Accurate Variational Description of Adiabatic Quantum Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carleo, Giuseppe; Bauer, Bela; Troyer, Matthias

    Adiabatic quantum optimization (AQO) is a quantum computing protocol where a system is driven by a time-dependent Hamiltonian. The initial Hamiltonian has an easily prepared ground-state and the final Hamiltonian encodes some desired optimization problem. An adiabatic time evolution then yields a solution to the optimization problem. Several challenges emerge in the theoretical description of this protocol: on one hand, the exact simulation of quantum dynamics is exponentially complex in the size of the optimization problem. On the other hand, approximate approaches such as tensor network states (TNS) are limited to small instances by the amount of entanglement that can be encoded. I will present here an extension of the time-dependent Variational Monte Carlo approach to problems in AQO. This approach is based on a general class of (Jastrow-Feenberg) entangled states, whose parameters are evolved in time according to a stochastic variational principle. We demonstrate this approach for optimization problems of the Ising spin-glass type. A very good accuracy is achieved when compared to exact time-dependent TNS on small instances. We then apply this approach to larger problems, and discuss the efficiency of the quantum annealing scheme in comparison with its classical counterpart.

  16. The genesis of adiabatic shear bands

    PubMed Central

    Landau, P.; Osovski, S.; Venkert, A.; Gärtnerová, V.; Rittel, D.

    2016-01-01

    Adiabatic shear banding (ASB) is a unique dynamic failure mechanism that results in an unpredicted catastrophic failure due to a concentrated shear deformation mode. It is universally considered as a material or structural instability and as such, ASB is hardly controllable or predictable to some extent. ASB is modeled on the premise of stability analyses. The leading paradigm is that a competition between strain (rate) hardening and thermal softening determines the onset of the failure. It was recently shown that microstructural softening transformations, such as dynamic recrystallization, are responsible for adiabatic shear failure. These are dictated by the stored energy of cold work, so that energy considerations can be used to macroscopically model the failure mechanism. The initial mechanisms that lead to final failure are still unknown, as well as the ASB formation mechanism(s). Most of all - is ASB an abrupt instability or rather a gradual transition as would be dictated by microstructural evolutions? This paper reports thorough microstructural characterizations that clearly show the gradual character of the phenomenon, best described as a nucleation and growth failure mechanism, and not as an abrupt instability as previously thought. These observations are coupled to a simple numerical model that illustrates them. PMID:27849023

  17. Effect of the Heat Pipe Adiabatic Region.

    PubMed

    Brahim, Taoufik; Jemni, Abdelmajid

    2014-04-01

    The main motivation of conducting this work is to present a rigorous analysis and investigation of the potential effect of the heat pipe adiabatic region on the flow and heat transfer performance of a heat pipe under varying evaporator and condenser conditions. A two-dimensional steady-state model for a cylindrical heat pipe coupling, for both regions, is presented, where the flow of the fluid in the porous structure is described by Darcy-Brinkman-Forchheimer model which accounts for the boundary and inertial effects. The model is solved numerically by using the finite volumes method, and a fortran code was developed to solve the system of equations obtained. The results show that a phase change can occur in the adiabatic region due to temperature gradient created in the porous structure as the heat input increases and the heat pipe boundary conditions change. A recirculation zone may be created at the condenser end section. The effect of the heat transfer rate on the vapor radial velocities and the performance of the heat pipe are discussed.

  18. Non-adiabatic Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canfield, Jesse; Denissen, Nicholas; Reisner, Jon

    2016-11-01

    Onset of Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) in a non-adiabatic environment is investigated with the multi-physics numerical model, FLAG. This work was inspired by laboratory experiments of non-adiabatic RTI, where a glass vessel with a layer of tetrahyrdofuran (THF) below a layer of toluene was placed inside a microwave. THF, a polar solvent, readily absorbs electromagnetic energy from microwaves. Toluene, a non-polar solvent, is nearly transparent to microwave heating. The presence of a heat source in the THF layer produced convection and a time-dependent Atwood number (At). The system, initially in stable hydrostatic equilibrium At < 0 , was set into motion by microwave induced, volumetric heating of the THF. The point when At > 0 , indicates that the system is RTI unstable. The observed dominant mode at the onset of RTI was the horizontal length scale of the vessel. This scale is contrary to classical RTI, where the modes start small and increases in scale with time. It is shown that the dominant RTI mode observed in the experiments was determined by the THF length scale prior to RTI. The dominant length scale transitions from the THF to the toluene via the updrafts and downdrafts in the convective cells. This happens when At passes from negative to positive. This work was funded by the Advanced Simulation and Computing Program.

  19. Time-resolved measurement of Landau-Zener tunneling in periodic potentials.

    PubMed

    Zenesini, A; Lignier, H; Tayebirad, G; Radogostowicz, J; Ciampini, D; Mannella, R; Wimberger, S; Morsch, O; Arimondo, E

    2009-08-28

    We report time-resolved measurements of Landau-Zener tunneling of Bose-Einstein condensates in accelerated optical lattices, clearly resolving the steplike time dependence of the band populations. Using different experimental protocols we were able to measure the tunneling probability both in the adiabatic and in the diabatic bases of the system. We also experimentally determine the contribution of the momentum width of the Bose condensates to the temporal width of the tunneling steps and discuss the implications for measuring the jump time in the Landau-Zener problem.

  20. Time-Resolved Measurement of Landau-Zener Tunneling in Periodic Potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Zenesini, A.; Radogostowicz, J.; Ciampini, D.; Mannella, R.; Arimondo, E.; Lignier, H.; Morsch, O.; Tayebirad, G.; Wimberger, S.

    2009-08-28

    We report time-resolved measurements of Landau-Zener tunneling of Bose-Einstein condensates in accelerated optical lattices, clearly resolving the steplike time dependence of the band populations. Using different experimental protocols we were able to measure the tunneling probability both in the adiabatic and in the diabatic bases of the system. We also experimentally determine the contribution of the momentum width of the Bose condensates to the temporal width of the tunneling steps and discuss the implications for measuring the jump time in the Landau-Zener problem.

  1. Adiabatic effects of electrons and ions on electro-acoustic solitary waves in an adiabatic dusty plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanjia, Fatema; Mamun, A. A.

    2009-02-01

    A dusty plasma consisting of negatively charged cold dust, adiabatic hot ions, and inertia-less adiabatic hot electrons has been considered. The adiabatic effects of electrons and ions on the basic properties of electro-acoustic solitary waves associated with different types of electro-acoustic (viz. ion-acoustic (IA), dust ion-acoustic (DIA), and dust acoustic (DA)) waves are thoroughly investigated by the reductive perturbation method. It is found that the basic properties of the IA, DIA, and DA waves are significantly modified by the adiabatic effects of ions and inertia-less electrons. The implications of our results in space and laboratory dusty plasmas are briefly discussed.

  2. Stopping and storing light coherently

    SciTech Connect

    Yanik, Mehmet Fatih; Fan Shanhui

    2005-01-01

    We present a general analysis for the criteria to stop and store light coherently. We show that a light pulse can be stopped in any physical system, provided that (i) the system bandwidth can be compressed to zero; (ii) the system has sufficient degrees of freedom to accommodate the pulse, and the bandwidth compression occurs while the pulse is in the system; and (iii) the bandwidth compression is done reversibly in an adiabatic fashion that preserves the phase space and the information in the original photon pulse during the entire duration of the stopping process. Based upon this general criterion, we present a brief discussion of stopping-light schemes using atomic resonances, and a detailed analysis of the all-optical scheme that we recently proposed. We show that the all-optical scheme can achieve arbitrarily small group velocities for large bandwidth pulses, and opens up new opportunities in both fundamental sciences and technological applications.

  3. Coherent amplified optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jun; Rao, Bin; Chen, Zhongping

    2007-07-01

    A technique to improve the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of a high speed 1300 nm swept source optical coherence tomography (SSOCT) system was demonstrated. A semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) was employed in the sample arm to coherently amplify the weak light back-scattered from sample tissue without increasing laser power illuminated on the sample. The image quality improvement was visualized and quantified by imaging the anterior segment of a rabbit eye at imaging speed of 20,000 A-lines per second. The theory analysis of SNR gain is given followed by the discussion on the technologies that can further improve the SNR gain.

  4. Thermal radiation scanning tunnelling microscopy.

    PubMed

    De Wilde, Yannick; Formanek, Florian; Carminati, Rémi; Gralak, Boris; Lemoine, Paul-Arthur; Joulain, Karl; Mulet, Jean-Philippe; Chen, Yong; Greffet, Jean-Jacques

    2006-12-07

    In standard near-field scanning optical microscopy (NSOM), a subwavelength probe acts as an optical 'stethoscope' to map the near field produced at the sample surface by external illumination. This technique has been applied using visible, infrared, terahertz and gigahertz radiation to illuminate the sample, providing a resolution well beyond the diffraction limit. NSOM is well suited to study surface waves such as surface plasmons or surface-phonon polaritons. Using an aperture NSOM with visible laser illumination, a near-field interference pattern around a corral structure has been observed, whose features were similar to the scanning tunnelling microscope image of the electronic waves in a quantum corral. Here we describe an infrared NSOM that operates without any external illumination: it is a near-field analogue of a night-vision camera, making use of the thermal infrared evanescent fields emitted by the surface, and behaves as an optical scanning tunnelling microscope. We therefore term this instrument a 'thermal radiation scanning tunnelling microscope' (TRSTM). We show the first TRSTM images of thermally excited surface plasmons, and demonstrate spatial coherence effects in near-field thermal emission.

  5. Subgap conductivity of a superconductor--normal-metal tunnel interface

    SciTech Connect

    Hekking, F.W.J.; Nazarov, Y.V.

    1994-03-01

    At low temperatures, the transport through a superconductor--normal-metal tunnel interface is due to tunneling of electrons in pairs. We show that the rate for this process is often determined by the interference of the electron waves on a space scale determined by the coherence length. Therefore, the subgap current strongly depends on the layout of the electrodes within this space scale. The approach developed allows us to evaluate the subgap current for different layouts of interest.

  6. Coherence, Pseudo-Coherence, and Non-Coherence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Enkvist, Nils Erik

    Analysis of the factors that make a text coherent or non-coherent suggests that total coherence requires cohesion not only on the textual surface but on the semantic level as well. Syntactic evidence of non-coherence includes lack of formal agreement blocking a potential cross-reference, anaphoric and cataphoric references that do not follow their…

  7. A coherent quantum annealer with Rydberg atoms.

    PubMed

    Glaetzle, A W; van Bijnen, R M W; Zoller, P; Lechner, W

    2017-06-22

    There is a significant ongoing effort in realizing quantum annealing with different physical platforms. The challenge is to achieve a fully programmable quantum device featuring coherent adiabatic quantum dynamics. Here we show that combining the well-developed quantum simulation toolbox for Rydberg atoms with the recently proposed Lechner-Hauke-Zoller (LHZ) architecture allows one to build a prototype for a coherent adiabatic quantum computer with all-to-all Ising interactions and, therefore, a platform for quantum annealing. In LHZ an infinite-range spin-glass is mapped onto the low energy subspace of a spin-1/2 lattice gauge model with quasi-local four-body parity constraints. This spin model can be emulated in a natural way with Rubidium and Caesium atoms in a bipartite optical lattice involving laser-dressed Rydberg-Rydberg interactions, which are several orders of magnitude larger than the relevant decoherence rates. This makes the exploration of coherent quantum enhanced optimization protocols accessible with state-of-the-art atomic physics experiments.

  8. A coherent quantum annealer with Rydberg atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glaetzle, A. W.; van Bijnen, R. M. W.; Zoller, P.; Lechner, W.

    2017-06-01

    There is a significant ongoing effort in realizing quantum annealing with different physical platforms. The challenge is to achieve a fully programmable quantum device featuring coherent adiabatic quantum dynamics. Here we show that combining the well-developed quantum simulation toolbox for Rydberg atoms with the recently proposed Lechner-Hauke-Zoller (LHZ) architecture allows one to build a prototype for a coherent adiabatic quantum computer with all-to-all Ising interactions and, therefore, a platform for quantum annealing. In LHZ an infinite-range spin-glass is mapped onto the low energy subspace of a spin-1/2 lattice gauge model with quasi-local four-body parity constraints. This spin model can be emulated in a natural way with Rubidium and Caesium atoms in a bipartite optical lattice involving laser-dressed Rydberg-Rydberg interactions, which are several orders of magnitude larger than the relevant decoherence rates. This makes the exploration of coherent quantum enhanced optimization protocols accessible with state-of-the-art atomic physics experiments.

  9. Tunnel vision for US X-ray free-electron laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banks, Michael

    2017-03-01

    Construction can begin on a major upgrade to the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory in the US after the tunnel that will house the facility was cleared of equipment.

  10. Cryogenic wind tunnels. II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kilgore, Robert A.

    1987-01-01

    The application of the cryogenic concept to various types of tunnels including Ludwieg tube tunnel, Evans clean tunnel, blowdown, induced-flow, and continuous-flow fan-driven tunnels is discussed. Benefits related to construction and operating costs are covered, along with benefits related to new testing capabilities. It is noted that cooling the test gas to very low temperatures increases Reynolds number by more than a factor of seven. From the energy standpoint, ambient-temperature fan-driven closed-return tunnels are considered to be the most efficient type of tunnel, while a large reduction in the required tunnel stagnation pressure can be achieved through cryogenic operation. Operating envelopes for three modes of operation for a cryogenic transonic pressure tunnel with a 2.5 by 2.5 test section are outlined. A computer program for calculating flow parameters and power requirements for wind tunnels with operating temperatures from saturation to above ambient is highlighted.

  11. Time-resolved measurement of Landau-Zener tunneling in different bases

    SciTech Connect

    Tayebirad, G.; Loerch, N.; Wimberger, S.; Zenesini, A.; Ciampini, D.; Arimondo, E.; Mannella, R.; Morsch, O.

    2010-07-15

    A comprehensive study of the tunneling dynamics of a Bose-Einstein condensate in a tilted periodic potential is presented. We report numerical and experimental results on time-resolved measurements of the Landau-Zener tunneling of ultracold atoms introduced by the tilt, which experimentally is realized by accelerating the lattice. The use of different protocols enables us to access the tunneling probability, numerically as well as experimentally, in two different bases, namely, the adiabatic basis and the diabatic basis. The adiabatic basis corresponds to the eigenstates of the lattice, and the diabatic one to the free-particle momentum eigenstates. Our numerical and experimental results are compared with existing two-state Landau-Zener models.

  12. Quantum transport in multiple-barrier resonant-tunneling devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newaz, A. K. M.

    I have studied experimentally the quantum transport in multiple-barrier resonant-tunneling devices, namely double-barrier resonant-tunneling diodes (DBRTD) and triple-barrier resonant-tunneling diodes (TBRTD), to understand the tunneling processes in multiple-barrier resonant structures. We have performed various types of transport measurements, such as current, conductance, resonant magnetotunneling spectroscopy and shot noise measurements at low temperature (T=4.2K). To test the validity of the in-plane momentum conservation rule when electrons tunnel through a multiple-barrier resonant-tunneling device, I have studied in details the current and conductance with and without magnetic field perpendicular to the interfaces. We have found conclusive evidence that though this conservation rule governs the tunneling processes in DBRTD, the conservation rule breaks down in TBRTD. In addition, I have observed profound effect of nonparabolicity in the tunneling processes. By measuring the shot noise in TBRTDs at low temperature, I have found that the shot noise in a TBRTD is reduced over the Poissonian value, 2 eI, whenever the differential conductance is positive and is enhanced over 2eI when the differential conductance is negative. This behavior, although qualitatively similar to that found in DBRTD, differs from it in important details. In TBRTDs the noise reduction is considerably greater than that predicted by a semiclassical model, and the enhancement does not correlate with the strength of the negative differential conductance. Moreover, I have not observed any signature of the effect of the coherent tunneling on the shot noise suppression in coherently coupled TBRTDs. This suggests that the phase coherence does not have any effect on the shot noise suppression. On the other hand, the failure of a semiclassical model to explain shot noise suppression suggests an incomplete understanding of the noise properties of multiple-barrier heterostructures and a need for

  13. The Adiabatic Invariance of the Action Variable in Classical Dynamics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wells, Clive G.; Siklos, Stephen T. C.

    2007-01-01

    We consider one-dimensional classical time-dependent Hamiltonian systems with quasi-periodic orbits. It is well known that such systems possess an adiabatic invariant which coincides with the action variable of the Hamiltonian formalism. We present a new proof of the adiabatic invariance of this quantity and illustrate our arguments by means of…

  14. Kinetic Theory Derivation of the Adiabatic Law for Ideal Gases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sobel, Michael I.

    1980-01-01

    Discusses how the adiabatic law for ideal gases can be derived from the assumption of a Maxwell-Boltzmann (or any other) distribution of velocities--in contrast to the usual derivations from thermodynamics alone, and the higher-order effect that leads to one-body viscosity. An elementary derivation of the adiabatic law is given. (Author/DS)

  15. Adiabat-shaping in indirect drive inertial confinement fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, K. L.; Robey, H. F.; Milovich, J. L.; Jones, O. S.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Casey, D. T.; MacPhee, A. G.; Pak, A.; Celliers, P. M.; Clark, D. S.; Landen, O. L.; Peterson, J. L.; Berzak-Hopkins, L. F.; Weber, C. R.; Haan, S. W.; Döppner, T. D.; Dixit, S.; Hamza, A. V.; Jancaitis, K. S.; Kroll, J. J.; and others

    2015-05-15

    Adiabat-shaping techniques were investigated in indirect drive inertial confinement fusion experiments on the National Ignition Facility as a means to improve implosion stability, while still maintaining a low adiabat in the fuel. Adiabat-shaping was accomplished in these indirect drive experiments by altering the ratio of the picket and trough energies in the laser pulse shape, thus driving a decaying first shock in the ablator. This decaying first shock is designed to place the ablation front on a high adiabat while keeping the fuel on a low adiabat. These experiments were conducted using the keyhole experimental platform for both three and four shock laser pulses. This platform enabled direct measurement of the shock velocities driven in the glow-discharge polymer capsule and in the liquid deuterium, the surrogate fuel for a DT ignition target. The measured shock velocities and radiation drive histories are compared to previous three and four shock laser pulses. This comparison indicates that in the case of adiabat shaping the ablation front initially drives a high shock velocity, and therefore, a high shock pressure and adiabat. The shock then decays as it travels through the ablator to pressures similar to the original low-adiabat pulses when it reaches the fuel. This approach takes advantage of initial high ablation velocity, which favors stability, and high-compression, which favors high stagnation pressures.

  16. A Modified Adiabatic Quantum Algorithm for Evaluation of Boolean Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jie; Lu, Songfeng; Liu, Fang

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, we propose a modified construction of the quantum adiabatic algorithm for Boolean functions studied by M. Andrecut et al. [13, 14]. Our algorithm has the time complexity O(1) for the evaluation of Boolean functions, without additional computational cost of implementing the driving Hamiltonian, which is required by the adiabatic evolution described in [13, 14].

  17. Kinetic Theory Derivation of the Adiabatic Law for Ideal Gases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sobel, Michael I.

    1980-01-01

    Discusses how the adiabatic law for ideal gases can be derived from the assumption of a Maxwell-Boltzmann (or any other) distribution of velocities--in contrast to the usual derivations from thermodynamics alone, and the higher-order effect that leads to one-body viscosity. An elementary derivation of the adiabatic law is given. (Author/DS)

  18. Stark-induced adiabatic Raman passage for preparing polarized molecules.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Nandini; Zare, Richard N

    2011-07-14

    We propose a method based on Stark-induced adiabatic Raman passage (SARP) for preparing vibrationally excited molecules with known orientation and alignment for future dynamical stereochemistry studies. This method utilizes the (J, M)-state dependent dynamic Stark shifts of rovibrational levels induced by delayed but overlapping pump and Stokes pulses of unequal intensities. Under collision-free conditions, our calculations show that we can achieve complete population transfer to an excited vibrational level (v > 0) of the H(2) molecule in its ground electronic state. Specifically, the H(2) (v = 1, J = 2, M = 0) level can be prepared with complete population transfer from the (v = 0, J = 0, M = 0) level using the S(0) branch of the Raman transition with visible pump and Stoke laser pulses, each polarized parallel to the z axis (uniaxial π-π Raman pumping). Similarly, H(2) (v = 1, J = 2, M = ±2) can be prepared using SARP with a left circularly polarized pump and a right circularly (or vice versa) polarized Stokes wave propagating along the z axis (σ(±)-σ(∓) Raman pumping). This technique requires phase coherent nanosecond pulses with unequal intensity between the pump and the Stokes pulses, one being four or more times greater than the other. A peak intensity of ~16 GW/cm(2) for the stronger pulse is required to generate the desirable sweep of the Raman resonance frequency. These conditions may be fulfilled using red and green laser pulses with the duration of a few nanoseconds and optical energies of ~12 and 60 mJ within a focused beam of diameter ~0.25 mm. Additionally, complete population transfer to the v = 4 vibrational level is predicted to be possible using SARP with a 355-nm pump and a near infrared Stokes laser with accessible pulse energies.

  19. Constructive and Destructive Interference in Nonadiabatic Tunneling via Conical Intersections

    DOE PAGES

    Xie, Changjian; Kendrick, Brian K.; Yarkony, David R.; ...

    2017-03-31

    As a manifestation of the molecular Aharonov–Bohm effect, tunneling-facilitated dissociation under a conical intersection (CI) requires the inclusion of the geometric phase (GP) to ensure a single-valued adiabatic wave function encircling the CI. Here, we demonstrate using a simple two-dimensional model that the GP induces destructive interference for vibrational states with even quanta in the coupling mode, but it leads to constructive interference for those with odd quanta. The interference patterns are manifested in tunneling wave functions and clearly affect the tunneling lifetime. Furthermore, we show that the inclusion of the diagonal Born–Oppenheimer correction is necessary for agreement with exactmore » results.« less

  20. Interband coherence induced correction to Thouless pumping: possible observation in cold-atom systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raghava, Gudapati Naresh; Zhou, Longwen; Gong, Jiangbin

    2017-08-01

    In Thouless pump, the charge transport in a one-dimensional insulator over an adiabatic cycle is topologically quantized. For nonequilibrium initial states, however, interband coherence will induce a previously unknown contribution to Thouless pumping. Though not geometric in nature, this contribution is independent of the time scale of the pumping protocol. In this work, we perform a detailed analysis of our previous finding [H.L. Wang et al., Phys. Rev. B 91, 085420 (2015)] in an already available cold-atom setup. We show that initial states with interband coherence can be obtained via a quench of the system's Hamiltonian. Adiabatic pumping in the post-quench system are then examined both theoretically and numerically, in which the interband coherence is shown to play an important role and can hence be observed experimentally. By choosing adiabatic protocols with different switching-on rates, we also show that the contribution of interband coherence to adiabatic pumping can be tuned. It is further proposed that the interband coherence induced correction to Thouless pumping may be useful in capturing a topological phase transition point. All our results have direct experimental interests.

  1. An Integrated Development Environment for Adiabatic Quantum Programming

    SciTech Connect

    Humble, Travis S; McCaskey, Alex; Bennink, Ryan S; Billings, Jay Jay; D'Azevedo, Eduardo; Sullivan, Blair D; Klymko, Christine F; Seddiqi, Hadayat

    2014-01-01

    Adiabatic quantum computing is a promising route to the computational power afforded by quantum information processing. The recent availability of adiabatic hardware raises the question of how well quantum programs perform. Benchmarking behavior is challenging since the multiple steps to synthesize an adiabatic quantum program are highly tunable. We present an adiabatic quantum programming environment called JADE that provides control over all the steps taken during program development. JADE captures the workflow needed to rigorously benchmark performance while also allowing a variety of problem types, programming techniques, and processor configurations. We have also integrated JADE with a quantum simulation engine that enables program profiling using numerical calculation. The computational engine supports plug-ins for simulation methodologies tailored to various metrics and computing resources. We present the design, integration, and deployment of JADE and discuss its use for benchmarking adiabatic quantum programs.

  2. An integrated programming and development environment for adiabatic quantum optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humble, T. S.; McCaskey, A. J.; Bennink, R. S.; Billings, J. J.; DʼAzevedo, E. F.; Sullivan, B. D.; Klymko, C. F.; Seddiqi, H.

    2014-01-01

    Adiabatic quantum computing is a promising route to the computational power afforded by quantum information processing. The recent availability of adiabatic hardware has raised challenging questions about how to evaluate adiabatic quantum optimization (AQO) programs. Processor behavior depends on multiple steps to synthesize an adiabatic quantum program, which are each highly tunable. We present an integrated programming and development environment for AQO called Jade Adiabatic Development Environment (JADE) that provides control over all the steps taken during program synthesis. JADE captures the workflow needed to rigorously specify the AQO algorithm while allowing a variety of problem types, programming techniques, and processor configurations. We have also integrated JADE with a quantum simulation engine that enables program profiling using numerical calculation. The computational engine supports plug-ins for simulation methodologies tailored to various metrics and computing resources. We present the design, integration, and deployment of JADE and discuss its potential use for benchmarking AQO programs by the quantum computer science community.

  3. Thermodynamic Study of Energy Dissipation in Adiabatic Superconductor Logic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeuchi, Naoki; Yamanashi, Yuki; Yoshikawa, Nobuyuki

    2015-09-01

    Because of its extremely high energy efficiency, adiabatic superconductor logic is one of the most promising candidates for the realization of a practical reversible computer. In a previous study, we proposed a logically and physically reversible logic gate using adiabatic superconductor logic, and numerically demonstrated reversible computing. In the numerical calculation, we assumed that the average energy dissipation at finite temperature corresponds to that at zero temperature. However, how the phase difference of a Josephson junction in adiabatic superconductor logic behaves at finite temperature is not yet well understood, and whether thermal noise can induce a nonadiabatic state change remains unclear. In the present study, we investigate energy dissipation in adiabatic superconductor logic at finite temperature through numerical analyses using the Monte Carlo method. We investigate the average and standard deviation of the energy dissipation through both numerical calculation and analytical estimation. Finally, we discuss the minimum energy dissipation required for adiabatic switching operations.

  4. Adiabatic theory, Liapunov exponents, and rotation number for quadratic Hamiltonians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delyon, François; Foulon, Patrick

    1987-11-01

    We consider the adiabatic problem for general time-dependent quadratic Hamiltonians and develop a method quite different from WKB. In particular, we apply our results to the Schrödinger equation in a strip. We show that there exists a first regular step (avoiding resonance problems) providing one adiabatic invariant, bounds on the Liapunov exponents, and estimates on the rotation number at any order of the perturbation theory. The further step is shown to be equivalent to a quantum adiabatic problem, which, by the usual adiabatic techniques, provides the other possible adiabatic invariants. In the special case of the Schrödinger equation our method is simpler and more powerful than the WKB techniques.

  5. Adiabatic theory for anisotropic cold molecule collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Pawlak, Mariusz; Shagam, Yuval; Narevicius, Edvardas; Moiseyev, Nimrod

    2015-08-21

    We developed an adiabatic theory for cold anisotropic collisions between slow atoms and cold molecules. It enables us to investigate the importance of the couplings between the projection states of the rotational motion of the atom about the molecular axis of the diatom. We tested our theory using the recent results from the Penning ionization reaction experiment {sup 4}He(1s2s {sup 3}S) + HD(1s{sup 2}) → {sup 4}He(1s{sup 2}) + HD{sup +}(1s) + e{sup −} [Lavert-Ofir et al., Nat. Chem. 6, 332 (2014)] and demonstrated that the couplings have strong effect on positions of shape resonances. The theory we derived provides cross sections which are in a very good agreement with the experimental findings.

  6. The HAWC and SAFIRE adiabatic demagnetization refrigerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuttle, Jim; Shirron, Peter; DiPirro, Michael; Jackson, Michael; Behr, Jason; Kamiya, Koji; Warner, Brent; Kunes, Evan; Hait, Tom

    2001-11-01

    High-resolution airborne wide-band camera (HAWC) and sub-millimeter and far-infrared experiment (SAFIRE) are far-infrared experiments which will fly on the stratospheric observatory for infrared astronomy (SOFIA) aircraft. HAWC's detectors will operate at 0.2 K, while those of SAFIRE will be at 0.1 K. Each instrument will include an adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR) to cool its detector stage from the liquid helium bath temperature (HAWC's at 4.2 K and SAFIRE's pumped to about 1.3 K) to its operating temperature. Except for the magnets used to achieve the cooling, the magnetic shielding, and a slight difference in the heat switch design, the two ADRs are identical. We describe the ADR design and present the results of performance testing.

  7. The HAWC and SAFIRE Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tuttle, Jim; Shirron, Peter; DiPirro, Michael; Jackson, Michael; Behr, Jason; Kunes, Evan; Hait, Tom; Krebs, Carolyn (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The High-Resolution Airborne Wide-band Camera (HAWC) and Submillimeter and Far Infrared Experiment (SAFIRE) are far-infrared experiments which will fly on the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) aircraft. HAWC's detectors will operate at 0.2 Kelvin, while those of SAFIRE will be at 0.1 Kelvin. Each instrument will include an adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR) to cool its detector stage from the liquid helium bath temperature (HAWC's at 4.2 Kelvin and SAFIRE's pumped to about 1.3 Kelvin) to its operating temperature. Except for the magnets used to achieve the cooling and a slight difference in the heat switch design, the two ADRs are nearly identical. We describe the ADR design and present the results of performance testing.

  8. Reversible logic gate using adiabatic superconducting devices

    PubMed Central

    Takeuchi, N.; Yamanashi, Y.; Yoshikawa, N.

    2014-01-01

    Reversible computing has been studied since Rolf Landauer advanced the argument that has come to be known as Landauer's principle. This principle states that there is no minimum energy dissipation for logic operations in reversible computing, because it is not accompanied by reductions in information entropy. However, until now, no practical reversible logic gates have been demonstrated. One of the problems is that reversible logic gates must be built by using extremely energy-efficient logic devices. Another difficulty is that reversible logic gates must be both logically and physically reversible. Here we propose the first practical reversible logic gate using adiabatic superconducting devices and experimentally demonstrate the logical and physical reversibility of the gate. Additionally, we estimate the energy dissipation of the gate, and discuss the minimum energy dissipation required for reversible logic operations. It is expected that the results of this study will enable reversible computing to move from the theoretical stage into practical usage. PMID:25220698

  9. Quantum Adiabatic Optimization and Combinatorial Landscapes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smelyanskiy, V. N.; Knysh, S.; Morris, R. D.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we analyze the performance of the Quantum Adiabatic Evolution (QAE) algorithm on a variant of Satisfiability problem for an ensemble of random graphs parametrized by the ratio of clauses to variables, gamma = M / N. We introduce a set of macroscopic parameters (landscapes) and put forward an ansatz of universality for random bit flips. We then formulate the problem of finding the smallest eigenvalue and the excitation gap as a statistical mechanics problem. We use the so-called annealing approximation with a refinement that a finite set of macroscopic variables (verses only energy) is used, and are able to show the existence of a dynamic threshold gamma = gammad, beyond which QAE should take an exponentially long time to find a solution. We compare the results for extended and simplified sets of landscapes and provide numerical evidence in support of our universality ansatz.

  10. An adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator for SIRTF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timbie, P. T.; Bernstein, G. M.; Richards, P. L.

    1989-02-01

    An adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR) has been proposed to cool bolometric infrared detectors on the multiband imaging photometer of the Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF). One such refrigerator has been built which uses a ferric ammonium alum salt pill suspended by nylon threads in a 3-T solenoid. The resonant modes of this suspension are above 100 Hz. The heat leak to the salt pill is less than 0.5 microW. The system has a hold time at 0.1K of more than 12 h. The cold stage temperature is regulated with a feedback loop that controls the magnetic field. A second, similar refrigerator is being built at a SIRTF prototype to fly on a ballon-borne telescope. It will use a ferromagnetic shield. The possibility of using a high-Tc solenoid-actuated heat switch is also discussed.

  11. Design of a spaceworthy adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serlemitsos, A. T.; Kunes, E.; Sansebastian, M.

    A spaceworthy adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR) under development at NASA-Goddard is presented. A baseline model heat switch was tested extensively with an on/off ratio of about 10,000 and a parasitic heat leak of 10 micro-W. Data obtained from the breadboard models were used to design an ADR with improved structural integrity. The core of the ADR is the salt pill which consists of the paramagnetic salt crystal and the thermal bus. When a magnetic field is applied to the salt it forces the alignment of the magnetic moments, thereby decreasing the entropy of the salt. Preliminary tests results showed a net crystal mass of 680 g instead of the expected 740 g, which indicate that there are gaps in the salt pill. A partial fix was accomplished by sealing helium gas in the salt pill at a pressure of 2 bar, which improved the thermal contact during salt magnetization, at about 2 K.

  12. An adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator for SIRTF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Timbie, P. T.; Bernstein, G. M.; Richards, P. L.

    1989-01-01

    An adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR) has been proposed to cool bolometric infrared detectors on the multiband imaging photometer of the Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF). One such refrigerator has been built which uses a ferric ammonium alum salt pill suspended by nylon threads in a 3-T solenoid. The resonant modes of this suspension are above 100 Hz. The heat leak to the salt pill is less than 0.5 microW. The system has a hold time at 0.1K of more than 12 h. The cold stage temperature is regulated with a feedback loop that controls the magnetic field. A second, similar refrigerator is being built at a SIRTF prototype to fly on a ballon-borne telescope. It will use a ferromagnetic shield. The possibility of using a high-Tc solenoid-actuated heat switch is also discussed.

  13. Reversible logic gate using adiabatic superconducting devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeuchi, N.; Yamanashi, Y.; Yoshikawa, N.

    2014-09-01

    Reversible computing has been studied since Rolf Landauer advanced the argument that has come to be known as Landauer's principle. This principle states that there is no minimum energy dissipation for logic operations in reversible computing, because it is not accompanied by reductions in information entropy. However, until now, no practical reversible logic gates have been demonstrated. One of the problems is that reversible logic gates must be built by using extremely energy-efficient logic devices. Another difficulty is that reversible logic gates must be both logically and physically reversible. Here we propose the first practical reversible logic gate using adiabatic superconducting devices and experimentally demonstrate the logical and physical reversibility of the gate. Additionally, we estimate the energy dissipation of the gate, and discuss the minimum energy dissipation required for reversible logic operations. It is expected that the results of this study will enable reversible computing to move from the theoretical stage into practical usage.

  14. Reversible logic gate using adiabatic superconducting devices.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, N; Yamanashi, Y; Yoshikawa, N

    2014-09-15

    Reversible computing has been studied since Rolf Landauer advanced the argument that has come to be known as Landauer's principle. This principle states that there is no minimum energy dissipation for logic operations in reversible computing, because it is not accompanied by reductions in information entropy. However, until now, no practical reversible logic gates have been demonstrated. One of the problems is that reversible logic gates must be built by using extremely energy-efficient logic devices. Another difficulty is that reversible logic gates must be both logically and physically reversible. Here we propose the first practical reversible logic gate using adiabatic superconducting devices and experimentally demonstrate the logical and physical reversibility of the gate. Additionally, we estimate the energy dissipation of the gate, and discuss the minimum energy dissipation required for reversible logic operations. It is expected that the results of this study will enable reversible computing to move from the theoretical stage into practical usage.

  15. On stress collapse in adiabatic shear bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, T. W.; Walter, J. W.

    T HE DYNAMICS of adiabatic shear band formation is considered making use of a simplified thermo/visco/plastic flow law. A new numerical solution is used to follow the growth of a perturbation from initiation, through early growth and severe localization, to a slowly varying terminal configuration. Asymptotic analyses predict the early and late stage patterns, but the timing and structure of the abrupt transition to severe localization can only be studied numerically, to date. A characteristic feature of the process is that temperature and plastic strain rate begin to localize immediately, but only slowly, whereas the stress first evolves almost as if there were no perturbation, but then collapses rapidly when severe localization occurs.

  16. Index Theory and Adiabatic Limit in QFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wawrzycki, Jarosław

    2013-08-01

    The paper has the form of a proposal concerned with the relationship between the three mathematically rigorous approaches to quantum field theory: (1) local algebraic formulation of Haag, (2) Wightman formulation and (3) the perturbative formulation based on the microlocal renormalization method. In this project we investigate the relationship between (1) and (3) and utilize the known relationships between (1) and (2). The main goal of the proposal lies in obtaining obstructions for the existence of the adiabatic limit ( confinement problem in the phenomenological standard model approach). We extend the method of deformation of Dütsch and Fredenhagen (in the Bordeman-Waldmann sense) and apply Fedosov construction of the formal index—an analog of the index for deformed symplectic manifolds, generalizing the Atiyah-Singer index. We present some first steps in realization of the proposal.

  17. An adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator for SIRTF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Timbie, P. T.; Bernstein, G. M.; Richards, P. L.

    1989-01-01

    An adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR) has been proposed to cool bolometric infrared detectors on the multiband imaging photometer of the Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF). One such refrigerator has been built which uses a ferric ammonium alum salt pill suspended by nylon threads in a 3-T solenoid. The resonant modes of this suspension are above 100 Hz. The heat leak to the salt pill is less than 0.5 microW. The system has a hold time at 0.1K of more than 12 h. The cold stage temperature is regulated with a feedback loop that controls the magnetic field. A second, similar refrigerator is being built at a SIRTF prototype to fly on a ballon-borne telescope. It will use a ferromagnetic shield. The possibility of using a high-Tc solenoid-actuated heat switch is also discussed.

  18. Design of a spaceworthy adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Serlemitsos, A. T.; Kunes, E.; Sansebastian, M.

    1992-01-01

    A spaceworthy adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR) under development at NASA-Goddard is presented. A baseline model heat switch was tested extensively with an on/off ratio of about 10,000 and a parasitic heat leak of 10 micro-W. Data obtained from the breadboard models were used to design an ADR with improved structural integrity. The core of the ADR is the salt pill which consists of the paramagnetic salt crystal and the thermal bus. When a magnetic field is applied to the salt it forces the alignment of the magnetic moments, thereby decreasing the entropy of the salt. Preliminary tests results showed a net crystal mass of 680 g instead of the expected 740 g, which indicate that there are gaps in the salt pill. A partial fix was accomplished by sealing helium gas in the salt pill at a pressure of 2 bar, which improved the thermal contact during salt magnetization, at about 2 K.

  19. Sliding seal materials for adiabatic engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lankford, J.

    1985-01-01

    The sliding friction coefficients and wear rates of promising carbide, oxide, and nitride materials were measured under temperature, environmental, velocity, loading conditions that are representative of the adiabatic engine environment. In order to provide guidance needed to improve materials for this application, the program stressed fundamental understanding of the mechanisms involved in friction and wear. Microhardness tests were performed on the candidate materials at elevated temperatures, and in atmospheres relevant to the piston seal application, and optical and electron microscopy were used to elucidate the micromechanisms of wear following wear testing. X-ray spectroscopy was used to evaluate interface/environment interactions which seemed to be important in the friction and wear process. Electrical effects in the friction and wear processes were explored in order to evaluate the potential usefulness of such effects in modifying the friction and wear rates in service. However, this factor was found to be of negligible significance in controlling friction and wear.

  20. Number Partitioning via Quantum Adiabatic Computation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smelyanskiy, Vadim N.; Toussaint, Udo; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We study both analytically and numerically the complexity of the adiabatic quantum evolution algorithm applied to random instances of combinatorial optimization problems. We use as an example the NP-complete set partition problem and obtain an asymptotic expression for the minimal gap separating the ground and exited states of a system during the execution of the algorithm. We show that for computationally hard problem instances the size of the minimal gap scales exponentially with the problem size. This result is in qualitative agreement with the direct numerical simulation of the algorithm for small instances of the set partition problem. We describe the statistical properties of the optimization problem that are responsible for the exponential behavior of the algorithm.

  1. Adiabatic connection at negative coupling strengths

    SciTech Connect

    Seidl, Michael; Gori-Giorgi, Paola

    2010-01-15

    The adiabatic connection of density functional theory (DFT) for electronic systems is generalized here to negative values of the coupling strength alpha (with attractive electrons). In the extreme limit alpha->-infinity a simple physical solution is presented and its implications for DFT (as well as its limitations) are discussed. For two-electron systems (a case in which the present solution can be calculated exactly), we find that an interpolation between the limit alpha->-infinity and the opposite limit of infinitely strong repulsion (alpha->+infinity) yields a rather accurate estimate of the second-order correlation energy E{sub c}{sup GL2}[rho] for several different densities rho, without using virtual orbitals. The same procedure is also applied to the Be isoelectronic series, analyzing the effects of near degeneracy.

  2. Adiabatic/diabatic polarization beam splitter

    DOEpatents

    DeRose, Christopher; Cai, Hong

    2017-09-12

    The various presented herein relate to an on-chip polarization beam splitter (PBS), which is adiabatic for the transverse magnetic (TM) mode and diabatic for the transverse electric (TE) mode. The PBS comprises a through waveguide and a cross waveguide, wherein an electromagnetic beam comprising TE mode and TM mode components is applied to an input port of the through waveguide. The PBS can be utilized to separate the TE mode component from the TM mode component, wherein the TE mode component exits the PBS via an output port of the through waveguide, and the TM mode component exits the PBS via an output port of the cross waveguide. The PBS has a structure that is tolerant to manufacturing variations and exhibits high polarization extinction ratios over a wide bandwidth.

  3. Adiabatic vs. non-adiabatic determination of specific absorption rate of ferrofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natividad, Eva; Castro, Miguel; Mediano, Arturo

    2009-05-01

    The measurement of temperature variations in adiabatic conditions allows the determination of the specific absorption rate of magnetic nanoparticles and ferrofluids from the correct incremental expression, SAR=(1/ m MNP) C(Δ T/Δ t). However, when measurements take place in non-adiabatic conditions, one must approximate this expression by SAR≈ Cβ/ m MNP, where β is the initial slope of the temperature vs. time curve during alternating field application. The errors arising from the use of this approximation were estimated through several experiments with different isolating conditions, temperature sensors and sample-sensor contacts. It is concluded that small to appreciable errors can appear, which are difficult to infer or control.

  4. Non-adiabatic molecular dynamics with complex quantum trajectories. II. The adiabatic representation

    SciTech Connect

    Zamstein, Noa; Tannor, David J.

    2012-12-14

    We present a complex quantum trajectory method for treating non-adiabatic dynamics. Each trajectory evolves classically on a single electronic surface but with complex position and momentum. The equations of motion are derived directly from the time-dependent Schroedinger equation, and the population exchange arises naturally from amplitude-transfer terms. In this paper the equations of motion are derived in the adiabatic representation to complement our work in the diabatic representation [N. Zamstein and D. J. Tannor, J. Chem. Phys. 137, 22A517 (2012)]. We apply our method to two benchmark models introduced by John Tully [J. Chem. Phys. 93, 1061 (1990)], and get very good agreement with converged quantum-mechanical calculations. Specifically, we show that decoherence (spatial separation of wavepackets on different surfaces) is already contained in the equations of motion and does not require ad hoc augmentation.

  5. Energy decomposition analysis in an adiabatic picture.

    PubMed

    Mao, Yuezhi; Horn, Paul R; Head-Gordon, Martin

    2017-02-22

    Energy decomposition analysis (EDA) of electronic structure calculations has facilitated quantitative understanding of diverse intermolecular interactions. Nevertheless, such analyses are usually performed at a single geometry and thus decompose a "single-point" interaction energy. As a result, the influence of the physically meaningful EDA components on the molecular structure and other properties are not directly obtained. To address this gap, the absolutely localized molecular orbital (ALMO)-EDA is reformulated in an adiabatic picture, where the frozen, polarization, and charge transfer energy contributions are defined as energy differences between the stationary points on different potential energy surfaces (PESs), which are accessed by geometry optimizations at the frozen, polarized and fully relaxed levels of density functional theory (DFT). Other molecular properties such as vibrational frequencies can thus be obtained at the stationary points on each PES. We apply the adiabatic ALMO-EDA to different configurations of the water dimer, the water-Cl(-) and water-Mg(2+)/Ca(2+) complexes, metallocenes (Fe(2+), Ni(2+), Cu(2+), Zn(2+)), and the ammonia-borane complex. This method appears to be very useful for unraveling how physical effects such as polarization and charge transfer modulate changes in molecular properties induced by intermolecular interactions. As an example of the insight obtained, we find that a linear hydrogen bond geometry for the water dimer is preferred even without the presence of polarization and charge transfer, while the red shift in the OH stretch frequency is primarily a charge transfer effect; by contrast, a near-linear geometry for the water-chloride hydrogen bond is achieved only when charge transfer is allowed.

  6. 4. 'Ring Stones & Tunnel Sections, Tunnel #33,' Southern Pacific ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. 'Ring Stones & Tunnel Sections, Tunnel #33,' Southern Pacific Standard Double-Track Tunnel, ca. 1913. Compare to photos in documentation sets for Tunnel 18 (HAER No. CA-197), Tunnel 34 (HAER No. CA-206), and Tunnel 1 (HAER No. CA-207). - Central Pacific Transcontinental Railroad, Sacramento to Nevada state line, Sacramento, Sacramento County, CA

  7. A homonuclear spin-pair filter for solid-state NMR based on adiabatic-passage techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verel, René; Baldus, Marc; Ernst, Matthias; Meier, Beat H.

    1998-05-01

    A filtering scheme for the selection of spin pairs (and larger spin clusters) under fast magic-angle spinning is proposed. The scheme exploits the avoided level crossing in spin pairs during an adiabatic amplitude sweep through the so-called HORROR recoupling condition. The advantages over presently used double-quantum filters are twofold. (i) The maximum theoretical filter efficiency is, due to the adiabatic variation, 100% instead of 73% as for transient methods. (ii) Since the filter does not rely on the phase-cycling properties of the double-quantum coherence, there is no need to obtain the full double-quantum intensity for all spins in the sample at one single point in time. The only important requirement is that all coupled spins pass through a two-spin state during the amplitude sweep. This makes the pulse scheme robust with respect to rf-amplitude missetting, rf-field inhomogeneity and chemical-shift offset.

  8. Nonlinearity-induced destruction of resonant tunneling in the Wannier-Stark problem

    SciTech Connect

    Wimberger, S.; Mannella, R.; Morsch, O.; Arimondo, E.; Kolovsky, A. R.; Buchleitner, A.

    2005-12-15

    We present detailed numerical results on the dynamics of a Bose-Einstein condensate in a tilted periodic optical lattice over many Bloch periods. We show that an increasing atom-atom interaction systematically affects coherent tunneling, and eventually destroys the resonant tunneling peaks.

  9. The Channel Tunnel

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-08-11

    The Channel Tunnel is a 50.5 km-long rail tunnel beneath the English Channel at the Straits of Dover. It connects Dover, Kent in England with Calais, northern France. This image was acquired by NASA Terra spacecraft.

  10. Carpal tunnel repair - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100078.htm Carpal tunnel repair - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing ... in the wrist and the wrist bones (carpal tunnel). Review Date 5/9/2015 Updated by: C. ...

  11. Ionization Time and Exit Momentum in Strong-Field Tunnel Ionization.

    PubMed

    Teeny, Nicolas; Yakaboylu, Enderalp; Bauke, Heiko; Keitel, Christoph H

    2016-02-12

    Tunnel ionization belongs to the fundamental processes of atomic physics. The so-called two-step model, which describes the ionization as instantaneous tunneling at the electric field maximum and classical motion afterwards with zero exit momentum, is commonly employed to describe tunnel ionization in adiabatic regimes. In this contribution, we show by solving numerically the time-dependent Schrödinger equation in one dimension and employing a virtual detector at the tunnel exit that there is a nonvanishing positive time delay between the electric field maximum and the instant of ionization. Moreover, we find a nonzero exit momentum in the direction of the electric field. To extract proper tunneling times from asymptotic momentum distributions of ionized electrons, it is essential to incorporate the electron's initial momentum in the direction of the external electric field.

  12. How to control the coherent oscillations in Landau-Zener-Stueckelberg dynamics of three-level system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Xiao-Ke

    2016-02-01

    Coherent pulse is used to control and measure the quantum state of three-level system in double quantum dots. We analyze the coherent oscillations in Landau-Zener-Stueckelberg (LZS) dynamics by the adiabatic-impulse model, which simplifies the applied pulse as an optical interference device. Under the designed “hat-shape” pulse, the sweeping speed through each avoid crossing can be tuned independently. The coherent oscillations in LZS dynamics of three-level system are optimized by the control pulse. Moreover, we can filter out the coherent oscillations with the unexpected frequency and only keep the coherent oscillations with the frequency we are interested in.

  13. TOPICAL REVIEW: Optimization using quantum mechanics: quantum annealing through adiabatic evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santoro, Giuseppe E.; Tosatti, Erio

    2006-09-01

    We review here some recent work in the field of quantum annealing, alias adiabatic quantum computation. The idea of quantum annealing is to perform optimization by a quantum adiabatic evolution which tracks the ground state of a suitable time-dependent Hamiltonian, where 'planck' is slowly switched off. We illustrate several applications of quantum annealing strategies, starting from textbook toy-models—double-well potentials and other one-dimensional examples, with and without disorder. These examples display in a clear way the crucial differences between classical and quantum annealing. We then discuss applications of quantum annealing to challenging hard optimization problems, such as the random Ising model, the travelling salesman problem and Boolean satisfiability problems. The techniques used to implement quantum annealing are either deterministic Schrödinger's evolutions, for the toy models, or path-integral Monte Carlo and Green's function Monte Carlo approaches, for the hard optimization problems. The crucial role played by disorder and the associated non-trivial Landau-Zener tunnelling phenomena is discussed and emphasized.

  14. Robust Multiple-Range Coherent Quantum State Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bing; Peng, Yan-Dong; Li, Yong; Qian, Xiao-Feng

    2016-07-01

    We propose a multiple-range quantum communication channel to realize coherent two-way quantum state transport with high fidelity. In our scheme, an information carrier (a qubit) and its remote partner are both adiabatically coupled to the same data bus, i.e., an N-site tight-binding chain that has a single defect at the center. At the weak interaction regime, our system is effectively equivalent to a three level system of which a coherent superposition of the two carrier states constitutes a dark state. The adiabatic coupling allows a well controllable information exchange timing via the dark state between the two carriers. Numerical results show that our scheme is robust and efficient under practically inevitable perturbative defects of the data bus as well as environmental dephasing noise.

  15. Robust Multiple-Range Coherent Quantum State Transfer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bing; Peng, Yan-Dong; Li, Yong; Qian, Xiao-Feng

    2016-07-01

    We propose a multiple-range quantum communication channel to realize coherent two-way quantum state transport with high fidelity. In our scheme, an information carrier (a qubit) and its remote partner are both adiabatically coupled to the same data bus, i.e., an N-site tight-binding chain that has a single defect at the center. At the weak interaction regime, our system is effectively equivalent to a three level system of which a coherent superposition of the two carrier states constitutes a dark state. The adiabatic coupling allows a well controllable information exchange timing via the dark state between the two carriers. Numerical results show that our scheme is robust and efficient under practically inevitable perturbative defects of the data bus as well as environmental dephasing noise.

  16. Robust Multiple-Range Coherent Quantum State Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Bing; Peng, Yan-Dong; Li, Yong; Qian, Xiao-Feng

    2016-01-01

    We propose a multiple-range quantum communication channel to realize coherent two-way quantum state transport with high fidelity. In our scheme, an information carrier (a qubit) and its remote partner are both adiabatically coupled to the same data bus, i.e., an N-site tight-binding chain that has a single defect at the center. At the weak interaction regime, our system is effectively equivalent to a three level system of which a coherent superposition of the two carrier states constitutes a dark state. The adiabatic coupling allows a well controllable information exchange timing via the dark state between the two carriers. Numerical results show that our scheme is robust and efficient under practically inevitable perturbative defects of the data bus as well as environmental dephasing noise. PMID:27364891

  17. The Tunnels of Samos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Apostol, Tom M. (Editor)

    1995-01-01

    This 'Project Mathematics' series video from CalTech presents the tunnel of Samos, a famous underground aquaduct tunnel located near the capital of Pithagorion (named after the famed Greek mathematician, Pythagoras, who lived there), on one of the Greek islands. This tunnel was constructed around 600 BC by King Samos and was built under a nearby mountain. Through film footage and computer animation, the mathematical principles and concepts of why and how this aquaduct tunnel was built are explained.

  18. Signatures of discrete breathers in coherent state quantum dynamics.

    PubMed

    Igumenshchev, Kirill; Ovchinnikov, Misha; Maniadis, Panagiotis; Prezhdo, Oleg

    2013-02-07

    In classical mechanics, discrete breathers (DBs) - a spatial time-periodic localization of energy - are predicted in a large variety of nonlinear systems. Motivated by a conceptual bridging of the DB phenomena in classical and quantum mechanical representations, we study their signatures in the dynamics of a quantum equivalent of a classical mechanical point in phase space - a coherent state. In contrast to the classical point that exhibits either delocalized or localized motion, the coherent state shows signatures of both localized and delocalized behavior. The transition from normal to local modes have different characteristics in quantum and classical perspectives. Here, we get an insight into the connection between classical and quantum perspectives by analyzing the decomposition of the coherent state into system's eigenstates, and analyzing the spacial distribution of the wave-function density within these eigenstates. We find that the delocalized and localized eigenvalue components of the coherent state are separated by a mixed region, where both kinds of behavior can be observed. Further analysis leads to the following observations. Considered as a function of coupling, energy eigenstates go through avoided crossings between tunneling and non-tunneling modes. The dominance of tunneling modes in the high nonlinearity region is compromised by the appearance of new types of modes - high order tunneling modes - that are similar to the tunneling modes but have attributes of non-tunneling modes. Certain types of excitations preferentially excite higher order tunneling modes, allowing one to study their properties. Since auto-correlation functions decrease quickly in highly nonlinear systems, short-time dynamics are sufficient for modeling quantum DBs. This work provides a foundation for implementing modern semi-classical methods to model quantum DBs, bridging classical and quantum mechanical signatures of DBs, and understanding spectroscopic experiments that

  19. Coherent Raman spectroscopy for supersonic flow measurments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    She, C. Y.

    1986-01-01

    In collaboration with NASA/Langley Research Center, a truly nonintrusive and nonseeding method for measuring supersonic molecular flow parameters was proposed and developed at Colorado State University. The feasibility of this Raman Doppler Velocimetry (RDV), currently operated in a scanning mode, was demonstrated not only in a laboratory environment at Colorado State University, but also in a major wind tunnel at NASA/Langley Research Center. The research progress of the RDV development is summarized. In addition, methods of coherent Rayleigh-Brillouin spectroscopy and single-pulse coherent Raman spectroscopy are investigated, respectively, for measurements of high-pressure and turbulent flows.

  20. Variable Density Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1931-01-01

    Variable Density Tunnel in operation. Man at far right is probably Harold J. 'Cannonball' Tuner, longtime safety officer, who started with Curtiss in the teens. This view of the Variable Density Tunnel clearly shows the layout of the Tunnel's surroundings, as well as the plumbing and power needs of the this innovative research tool.

  1. Control of Population Flow in Coherently Driven Quantum Ladders

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Fernandez, Ruth; Bergmann, Klaas; Ekers, Aigars; Yatsenko, Leonid P.; Vitanov, Nikolay V.

    2005-07-22

    A technique for adiabatic control of the population flow through a preselected decaying excited level in a three-level quantum ladder is presented. The population flow through the intermediate or upper level is controlled efficiently and robustly by varying the pulse delay between a pair of partly overlapping coherent laser pulses. The technique is analyzed theoretically and demonstrated in an experiment with Na{sub 2} molecules.

  2. Effects of EOS adiabat on hot spot dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Baolian; Kwan, Thomas; Wang, Yi-Ming; Batha, Steven

    2013-10-01

    Equation of state (EOS) and adiabat of the pusher play significant roles in the dynamics and formation of the hot spot of an ignition capsule. For given imploding energy, they uniquely determine the partition of internal energy, mass, and volume between the pusher and the hot spot. In this work, we apply the new scaling laws recently derived by Cheng et al. to the National Ignition Campaign (NIC) ignition capsules and study the impacts of EOS and adiabat of the pusher on the hot spot dynamics by using the EOS adiabat index as an adjustable model parameter. We compare our analysis with the NIC data, specifically, for shots N120321 and N120205, and with the numerical simulations of these shots. The predictions from our theoretical model are in good agreements with the NIC data when a hot adiabat was used for the pusher, and with code simulations when a cold adiabat was used for the pusher. Our analysis indicates that the actual adiabat of the pusher in NIC experiments may well be higher than the adiabat assumed in the simulations. This analysis provides a physical and systematic explanation to the ongoing disagreements between the NIC experimental results and the multi-dimensional numerical simulations. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by the Los Alamos National Laboratory under contract number W-7405-ENG-36.

  3. On the General Class of Models of Adiabatic Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jie; Lu, Songfeng; Liu, Fang

    2016-10-01

    The general class of models of adiabatic evolution was proposed to speed up the usual adiabatic computation in the case of quantum search problem. It was shown [8] that, by temporarily increasing the ground state energy of a time-dependent Hamiltonian to a suitable quantity, the quantum computation can perform the calculation in time complexity O(1). But it is also known that if the overlap between the initial and final states of the system is zero, then the computation based on the generalized models of adiabatic evolution can break down completely. In this paper, we find another severe limitation for this class of adiabatic evolution-based algorithms, which should be taken into account in applications. That is, it is still possible that this kind of evolution designed to deal with the quantum search problem fails completely if the interpolating paths in the system Hamiltonian are chosen inappropriately, while the usual adiabatic evolutions can do the same job relatively effectively. This implies that it is not always recommendable to use nonlinear paths in adiabatic computation. On the contrary, the usual simple adiabatic evolution may be sufficient for effective use.

  4. Non-adiabatic perturbations in Ricci dark energy model

    SciTech Connect

    Karwan, Khamphee; Thitapura, Thiti E-mail: nanodsci2523@hotmail.com

    2012-01-01

    We show that the non-adiabatic perturbations between Ricci dark energy and matter can grow both on superhorizon and subhorizon scales, and these non-adiabatic perturbations on subhorizon scales can lead to instability in this dark energy model. The rapidly growing non-adiabatic modes on subhorizon scales always occur when the equation of state parameter of dark energy starts to drop towards -1 near the end of matter era, except that the parameter α of Ricci dark energy equals to 1/2. In the case where α = 1/2, the rapidly growing non-adiabatic modes disappear when the perturbations in dark energy and matter are adiabatic initially. However, an adiabaticity between dark energy and matter perturbations at early time implies a non-adiabaticity between matter and radiation, this can influence the ordinary Sachs-Wolfe (OSW) effect. Since the amount of Ricci dark energy is not small during matter domination, the integrated Sachs-Wolfe (ISW) effect is greatly modified by density perturbations of dark energy, leading to a wrong shape of CMB power spectrum. The instability in Ricci dark energy is difficult to be alleviated if the effects of coupling between baryon and photon on dark energy perturbations are included.

  5. Photodissociation of phenol via nonadiabatic tunneling: Comparison of two ab initio based potential energy surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Changjian; Guo, Hua

    2017-09-01

    The nonadiabatic tunneling-facilitated photodissociation of phenol is investigated using a reduced-dimensional quantum model on two ab initio-based coupled potential energy surfaces (PESs). Although dynamics occurs largely on the lower adiabat, the proximity to a conical intersection between the S1 and S2 states requires the inclusion of both the geometric phase (GP) and diagonal Born-Oppenheimer correction (DBOC). The lifetime of the lowest-lying vibronic state is computed using the diabatic and various adiabatic models. The GP and DBOC terms are found to be essential on one set of PESs, but have a small impact on the other.

  6. Achromatic multiple beam splitting by adiabatic passage in optical waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rangelov, Andon A.; Vitanov, Nikolay V.

    2012-05-01

    A variable achromatic optical beam splitter with one input and N output waveguide channels is introduced. The physical mechanism of this multiple beam splitter is adiabatic passage of light between neighboring optical waveguides in a fashion reminiscent of the technique of stimulated Raman adiabatic passage in quantum physics. The input and output waveguides are coupled via a mediator waveguide and the ratios of the light intensities in the output channels are controlled by the couplings of the respective waveguides to the mediator waveguide. Due to its adiabatic nature the beam splitting efficiency is robust to variations in the experimental parameters.

  7. Dynamics of Charged Particles in an Adiabatic Thermal Beam Equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chiping; Wei, Haofei

    2010-11-01

    Charged-particle motion is studied in the self-electric and self-magnetic fields of a well-matched, intense charged-particle beam and an applied periodic solenoidal magnetic focusing field. The beam is assumed to be in a state of adiabatic thermal equilibrium. The phase space is analyzed and compared with that of the well-known Kapchinskij-Vladimirskij (KV)-type beam equilibrium. It is found that the widths of nonlinear resonances in the adiabatic thermal beam equilibrium are narrower than those in the KV-type beam equilibrium. Numerical evidence is presented, indicating almost complete elimination of chaotic particle motion in the adiabatic thermal beam equilibrium.

  8. Creation of Arbitrary Coherent Superposition States in Four-Level Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Gong, S.; Niu, Y.

    2005-08-15

    Using the technique of stimulated Raman adiabatic passage, we propose schemes for creating arbitrary coherent superposition states of atoms in four-level systems: a {lambda}-type system with twofold final states and a four-level ladder system. With the use of a control field, arbitrary coherent superposition states are created without the condition of multiphoton resonance. Suitable manipulation of detunings and the control field can create either a single state or any superposition states desired.

  9. Coherent transport of armchair graphene constrictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, HuiQiong; Li, Wei; Hu, Xiao; Tao, Ruibao

    2010-05-01

    The coherent transport properties of armchair graphene nanoconstrictions (GNC) are studied using tight-binding approach and Green's function method. We find a nonbonding state at zero Fermi energy which results in a zero conductance valley, when a single vacancy locates at y =3n±1 of a perfect metallic armchair graphene nanoribbon (aGNR). However, the nonbonding state does not exist when a vacancy locates at y =3n, and the conductance behavior of lowest conducting channel will not be affected by the vacancy. For the square-shaped armchair GNC consisting of three metallic aGNR segments, resonant tunneling behavior is observed in the single channel energy region. We find that the presence of localized edge state locating at the zigzag boundary can affect the resonant tunneling severely. A simplified one dimensional model is put forward at last, which explains the resonant tunneling behavior of armchair GNC very well.

  10. Topological properties of adiabatically varied Floquet systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dana, Itzhack

    2017-08-01

    Energy or quasienergy (QE) band spectra depending on two parameters may have a nontrivial topological characterization by Chern integers. Band spectra of one-dimensional (1D) systems that are spanned by just one parameter, a Bloch phase, are topologically trivial. Recently, an ensemble of 1D Floquet (time-periodic) systems, double-kicked rotors (DKRs) that are classically nonintegrable and depend on an external parameter, has been studied. It was shown that a QE band spanned by both the Bloch phase and the external parameter is characterized by a Chern integer. The latter determines the change in the mean angular momentum of a state in the band when the external parameter is adiabatically varied by a natural period. We show here, under conditions much more general than in previous works, that the ensemble of DKRs for all values of the external parameter corresponds to a 1D double-kicked particle (DKP) having translational invariance in the position-momentum phase plane. This DKP can be characterized by a second Chern integer, which is shown to be connected with the integer above for the DKR ensemble. This connection is expressed by a Diophantine equation (DE), which we derive. The DE, involving the band degeneracies of the DKR ensemble and of the DKP system, determines the allowed values of the DKR-ensemble integer. In particular, this integer is generically nonzero, showing the general topological nontriviality of the DKR ensemble.

  11. Quantum adiabatic optimization and combinatorial landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smelyanskiy, V. N.; Knysh, S.; Morris, R. D.

    2004-09-01

    In this paper we analyze the performance of the Quantum Adiabatic Evolution algorithm on a variant of the satisfiability problem for an ensemble of random graphs parametrized by the ratio of clauses to variables, γ=M/N . We introduce a set of macroscopic parameters (landscapes) and put forward an ansatz of universality for random bit flips. We then formulate the problem of finding the smallest eigenvalue and the excitation gap as a statistical mechanics problem. We use the so-called annealing approximation with a refinement that a finite set of macroscopic variables (instead of only energy) is used, and are able to show the existence of a dynamic threshold γ=γd starting with some value of K —the number of variables in each clause. Beyond the dynamic threshold, the algorithm should take an exponentially long time to find a solution. We compare the results for extended and simplified sets of landscapes and provide numerical evidence in support of our universality ansatz. We have been able to map the ensemble of random graphs onto another ensemble with fluctuations significantly reduced. This enabled us to obtain tight upper bounds on the satisfiability transition and to recompute the dynamical transition using the extended set of landscapes.

  12. On the persistence of adiabatic shear bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boakye-Yiadom, S.; Bassim, M. N.; Al-Ameeri, S.

    2012-08-01

    It is generally agreed that the initiation and development of adiabatic shear bands (ASBs) are manifestations of damage in metallic materials subjected to high strain rates and large strains as those due to impact in a Hopkinson Bar system. Models for evolution of these bands have been described in the literature. One question that has not received attention is how persistent these bands are and whether their presence and effect can be reversed or eliminated by using a process of thermal (heat treatment) or thermo-mechanical treatment that would relieve the material from the high strain associated with ASBs and their role as precursors to crack initiation and subsequent failure. Since ASBs are more prevalent and more defined in BCC metals including steels, a study was conducted to investigate the best conditions of generating ASBs in a heat treatable steel, followed by determining the best conditions for heat treatment of specimens already damaged by the presence of ASBs in order to relieve the strains due to ASBs and restore the material to an apparent microstructure without the "scars" due to the previous presence of ASBs. It was found that heat treatment achieves the curing from ASBs. This presentation documents the process undertaken to achieve this objective.

  13. Non-adiabatic effects in photoelectron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuurman, Michael; Yarkony, David

    2007-03-01

    Recent developments in the construction of approximately diabatic second-order Hamiltonians in the vicinity of conical intersections have been employed to study photoelectron spectra of molecules in which nonadiabatic effects are preeminent. Our current approach explicitly includes all non-adiabatic coupling terms through second order, while requiring ab initio data at only (N[int] + 3) or (N[int] + 15) points for two and three-state intersections, respectively, where N[int] is the number of internal coordinates. This scaling allows very accurate wave functions to be used. Since the Hamiltonian is determined at a point of conical intersection, the method is ``self-policing'' in that the ability of the resultant surfaces to reproduce the vicinity of seams of intersection, as well as energy minima and the Franck-Condon region, is easily verified. We will report photoelectron spectra determined from these diabatic representations employing a harmonic oscillator basis and a Lanczos solver algorithm to diagonalize the resultant vibronic Hamiltonian matrices. The results of some initial applications will be discussed, with emphasis on the previously studied five membered heterogeneous ring systems, pyrazolyl (C3H3N2) and pyrrolyl (C4H4N) doublet radicals. These systems are of particular interest since they display low-lying conical intersections adjacent to both the neutral ground state geometries and the Franck-Condon region.

  14. Macroscopic equations for the adiabatic piston.

    PubMed

    Cencini, Massimo; Palatella, Luigi; Pigolotti, Simone; Vulpiani, Angelo

    2007-11-01

    A simplified version of a classical problem in thermodynamics--the adiabatic piston--is discussed in the framework of kinetic theory. We consider the limit of gases whose relaxation time is extremely fast so that the gases contained in the left and right chambers of the piston are always in equilibrium (that is, the molecules are uniformly distributed and their velocities obey the Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution) after any collision with the piston. Then by using kinetic theory we derive the collision statistics, from which we obtain a set of ordinary differential equations for the evolution of the macroscopic observables (namely, the piston average velocity and position, the velocity variance, and the temperatures of the two compartments). The dynamics of these equations is compared with simulations of an ideal gas and a microscopic model of a gas devised to verify the assumptions used in the derivation. We show that the equations predict an evolution for the macroscopic variables that catches the basic features of the problem. The results here presented recover those derived, using a different approach, by Gruber, Pache, and Lesne [J. Stat. Phys. 108, 669 (2002); Gruber, Pache, and Lesne,J. Stat. Phys.112, 1177 (2003)].

  15. Design of the PIXIE adiabatic demagnetization refrigerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirron, Peter J.; Kimball, Mark O.; Fixsen, Dale J.; Kogut, Alan J.; Li, Xiaoyi; DiPirro, Michael J.

    2012-04-01

    The Primordial Inflation Explorer (PIXIE) is a proposed mission to densely map the polarization of the cosmic microwave background. It will operate in a scanning mode from a sun-synchronous orbit, using low temperature detectors (at 0.1 K) and located inside a telescope that is cooled to approximately 2.73 K - to match the background temperature. A mechanical cryocooler operating at 4.5 K establishes a low base temperature from which two adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR) assemblies will cool the telescope and detectors. To achieve continuous scanning capability, the ADRs must operate continuously. Complicating the design are two factors: (1) the need to systematically vary the temperature of various telescope components in order to separate the small polarization signal variations from those that may arise from temperature drifts and changing gradients within the telescope, and (2) the orbital and monthly variations in lunar irradiance into the telescope barrels. These factors require the telescope ADR to reject quasi-continuous heat loads of 2-3 mW, while maintaining a peak heat reject rate of less than 12 mW. The detector heat load at 0.1 K is comparatively small at 1-2 μW. This paper will describe the 3-stage and 2-stage continuous ADRs that will be used to meet the cooling power and temperature stability requirements of the PIXIE detectors and telescope.

  16. Adiabatic Quantum Algorithm for Search Engine Ranking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garnerone, Silvano; Zanardi, Paolo; Lidar, Daniel A.

    2012-06-01

    We propose an adiabatic quantum algorithm for generating a quantum pure state encoding of the PageRank vector, the most widely used tool in ranking the relative importance of internet pages. We present extensive numerical simulations which provide evidence that this algorithm can prepare the quantum PageRank state in a time which, on average, scales polylogarithmically in the number of web pages. We argue that the main topological feature of the underlying web graph allowing for such a scaling is the out-degree distribution. The top-ranked log⁡(n) entries of the quantum PageRank state can then be estimated with a polynomial quantum speed-up. Moreover, the quantum PageRank state can be used in “q-sampling” protocols for testing properties of distributions, which require exponentially fewer measurements than all classical schemes designed for the same task. This can be used to decide whether to run a classical update of the PageRank.

  17. Adiabatic quantum algorithm for search engine ranking.

    PubMed

    Garnerone, Silvano; Zanardi, Paolo; Lidar, Daniel A

    2012-06-08

    We propose an adiabatic quantum algorithm for generating a quantum pure state encoding of the PageRank vector, the most widely used tool in ranking the relative importance of internet pages. We present extensive numerical simulations which provide evidence that this algorithm can prepare the quantum PageRank state in a time which, on average, scales polylogarithmically in the number of web pages. We argue that the main topological feature of the underlying web graph allowing for such a scaling is the out-degree distribution. The top-ranked log(n) entries of the quantum PageRank state can then be estimated with a polynomial quantum speed-up. Moreover, the quantum PageRank state can be used in "q-sampling" protocols for testing properties of distributions, which require exponentially fewer measurements than all classical schemes designed for the same task. This can be used to decide whether to run a classical update of the PageRank.

  18. Design of the PIXIE Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shirron, Peter J.; Kimball, Mark Oliver; Fixsen, Dale J.; Kogut, Alan J.; Li, Xiaoyi; DiPirro, Michael

    2012-01-01

    The Primordial Inflation Explorer (PIXIE) is a proposed mission to densely map the polarization of the cosmic microwave background. It will operate in a scanning mode from a sun-synchronous orbit, using low temperature detectors (at 0.1 K) and located inside a teslescope that is cooled to approximately 2.73 K - to match the background temperature. A mechanical cryocooler operating at 4.5 K establishes a low base temperature from which two adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR) assemblies will cool the telescope and detectors. To achieve continuous scanning capability, the ADRs must operate continuously. Complicating the design are two factors: 1) the need to systematically vary the temperature of various telescope components in order to separate the small polarization signal variations from those that may arise from temperature drifts and changing gradients within the telescope, and 2) the orbital and monthly variations in lunar irradiance into the telescope barrels. These factors require the telescope ADR to reject quasi-continuous heat loads of 2-3 millwatts, while maintaining a peak heat reject rate of less than 12 milliwatts. The detector heat load at 0.1 K is comparatively small at 1-2 microwatts. This paper will describe the 3-stage and 2-stage continuous ADRs that will be used to meet the cooling power and temperature stability requirements of the PIXIE detectors and telescope.

  19. Quantitative tunneling spectroscopy of nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    First, Phillip N; Whetten, Robert L; Schaaff, T Gregory

    2007-05-25

    The proposed goals of this collaborative work were to systematically characterize the electronic structure and dynamics of 3-dimensional metal and semiconducting nanocrystals using scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy (STM/STS) and ballistic electron emission spectroscopy (BEES). This report describes progress in the spectroscopic work and in the development of methods for creating and characterizing gold nanocrystals. During the grant period, substantial effort also was devoted to the development of epitaxial graphene (EG), a very promising materials system with outstanding potential for nanometer-scale ballistic and coherent devices ("graphene" refers to one atomic layer of graphitic, sp2 -bonded carbon atoms [or more loosely, few layers]). Funding from this DOE grant was critical for the initial development of epitaxial graphene for nanoelectronics

  20. Symmetrical windowing for quantum states in quasi-classical trajectory simulations: Application to electronically non-adiabatic processes

    SciTech Connect

    Cotton, Stephen J.; Miller, William H.

    2013-12-21

    A recently described symmetrical windowing methodology [S. J. Cotton and W. H. Miller, J. Phys. Chem. A 117, 7190 (2013)] for quasi-classical trajectory simulations is applied here to the Meyer-Miller [H.-D. Meyer and W. H. Miller, J. Chem. Phys. 70, 3214 (1979)] model for the electronic degrees of freedom in electronically non-adiabatic dynamics. Results generated using this classical approach are observed to be in very good agreement with accurate quantum mechanical results for a variety of test applications, including problems where coherence effects are significant such as the challenging asymmetric spin-boson system.

  1. On the adiabatic walking of plasma waves in a pulsar magnetosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Melikidze, George I.; Gil, Janusz; Mitra, Dipanjan E-mail: jag@astro.ia.uz.zgora.pl

    2014-10-20

    The pulsar radio emission is generated in the near magnetosphere of the neutron star, and it must propagate through the rest of it to emerge into the interstellar medium. An important issue is whether this propagation affects the planes of polarization of the generated radiation. Observationally, there is sufficient evidence that the emerging radiation is polarized parallel or perpendicular to the magnetic field line planes that should be associated with the ordinary (O) and extraordinary (X) plasma modes, respectively, excited by some radiative process. This strongly suggests that the excited X and O modes are not affected by the so-called adiabatic walking that causes a slow rotation of polarization vectors. In this paper, we demonstrate that the conditions for adiabatic walking are not fulfilled within the soliton model of pulsar radio emission, in which the coherent curvature radiation occurs at frequencies much lower than the characteristic plasma frequency, The X mode propagates freely and observationally represents the primary polarization mode. The O mode has difficulty escaping from the pulsar plasma; however, it is sporadically observed as a weaker secondary polarization mode. We discuss a possible scenario under which the O mode can also escape from the plasma and reach an observer.

  2. Strain-enhanced tunneling magnetoresistance in MgO magnetic tunnel junctions

    PubMed Central

    Loong, Li Ming; Qiu, Xuepeng; Neo, Zhi Peng; Deorani, Praveen; Wu, Yang; Bhatia, Charanjit S.; Saeys, Mark; Yang, Hyunsoo

    2014-01-01

    While the effects of lattice mismatch-induced strain, mechanical strain, as well as the intrinsic strain of thin films are sometimes detrimental, resulting in mechanical deformation and failure, strain can also be usefully harnessed for applications such as data storage, transistors, solar cells, and strain gauges, among other things. Here, we demonstrate that quantum transport across magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) can be significantly affected by the introduction of controllable mechanical strain, achieving an enhancement factor of ~2 in the experimental tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) ratio. We further correlate this strain-enhanced TMR with coherent spin tunneling through the MgO barrier. Moreover, the strain-enhanced TMR is analyzed using non-equilibrium Green's function (NEGF) quantum transport calculations. Our results help elucidate the TMR mechanism at the atomic level and can provide a new way to enhance, as well as tune, the quantum properties in nanoscale materials and devices. PMID:25266219

  3. Acceleration of adiabatic quantum dynamics in electromagnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Masuda, Shumpei; Nakamura, Katsuhiro

    2011-10-15

    We show a method to accelerate quantum adiabatic dynamics of wave functions under electromagnetic field (EMF) by developing the preceding theory [Masuda and Nakamura, Proc. R. Soc. London Ser. A 466, 1135 (2010)]. Treating the orbital dynamics of a charged particle in EMF, we derive the driving field which accelerates quantum adiabatic dynamics in order to obtain the final adiabatic states in any desired short time. The scheme is consolidated by describing a way to overcome possible singularities in both the additional phase and driving potential due to nodes proper to wave functions under EMF. As explicit examples, we exhibit the fast forward of adiabatic squeezing and transport of excited Landau states with nonzero angular momentum, obtaining the result consistent with the transitionless quantum driving applied to the orbital dynamics in EMF.

  4. Adiabatic shear bands localization in materials undergoing deformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryabov, P. N.; Kudryashov, N. A.; Muratov, R. V.

    2017-01-01

    We consider the adiabatic shear banding phenomenon in composite materials undergoing the high speed shear deformations. The mathematical model of adiabatic shear banding in thermo-visco-plastic material is given. New two step numerical algorithm which is based on the Courant-Isaacson-Rees scheme that allows one to simulate fully localized plastic flow from initial stage of localization is proposed. To test this numerical algorithm we use three benchmark problems. The testing results show the accuracy and efficiency of proposed algorithm. The features of adiabatic shear bands formation in composites are studied. The existence of characteristic depth of localization in composites is shown. Influence of initial temperature distribution on the processes of adiabatic shear bands formation in composites is considered.

  5. Adiabaticity and spectral splits in collective neutrino transformations

    SciTech Connect

    Raffelt, Georg G.; Smirnov, Alexei Yu.

    2007-12-15

    Neutrinos streaming off a supernova core transform collectively by neutrino-neutrino interactions, leading to 'spectral splits' where an energy E{sub split} divides the transformed spectrum sharply into parts of almost pure but different flavors. We present a detailed description of the spectral-split phenomenon which is conceptually and quantitatively understood in an adiabatic treatment of neutrino-neutrino effects. Central to this theory is a self-consistency condition in the form of two sum rules (integrals over the neutrino spectra that must equal certain conserved quantities). We provide explicit analytic and numerical solutions for various neutrino spectra. We introduce the concept of the adiabatic reference frame and elaborate on the relative adiabatic evolution. Violating adiabaticity leads to the spectral split being 'washed out'. The sharpness of the split appears to be represented by a surprisingly universal function.

  6. Adiabatic and isocurvature perturbation projections in multi-field inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, Chris; Saffin, Paul M. E-mail: Paul.Saffin@nottingham.ac.uk

    2013-08-01

    Current data are in good agreement with the predictions of single field inflation. However, the hemispherical asymmetry, seen in the cosmic microwave background data, may hint at a potential problem. Generalizing to multi-field models may provide one possible explanation. A useful way of modeling perturbations in multi-field inflation is to investigate the projection of the perturbation along and perpendicular to the background fields' trajectory. These correspond to the adiabatic and isocurvature perturbations. However, it is important to note that in general there are no corresponding adiabatic and isocurvature fields. The purpose of this article is to highlight the distinction between a field redefinition and a perturbation projection. We provide a detailed derivation of the evolution of the isocurvature perturbation to show that no assumption of an adiabatic or isocurvature field is needed. We also show how this evolution equation is consistent with the field covariant evolution equations for the adiabatic perturbation in the flat field space limit.

  7. Ultrafast stimulated Raman parallel adiabatic passage by shaped pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Dridi, G.; Guerin, S.; Hakobyan, V.; Jauslin, H. R.; Eleuch, H.

    2009-10-15

    We present a general and versatile technique of population transfer based on parallel adiabatic passage by femtosecond shaped pulses. Their amplitude and phase are specifically designed to optimize the adiabatic passage corresponding to parallel eigenvalues at all times. We show that this technique allows the robust adiabatic population transfer in a Raman system with the total pulse area as low as 3{pi}, corresponding to a fluence of one order of magnitude below the conventional stimulated Raman adiabatic passage process. This process of short duration, typically picosecond and subpicosecond, is easily implementable with the modern pulse shaper technology and opens the possibility of ultrafast robust population transfer with interesting applications in quantum information processing.

  8. Communication: Partial linearized density matrix dynamics for dissipative, non-adiabatic quantum evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huo, Pengfei; Coker, David F.

    2011-11-01

    An approach for treating dissipative, non-adiabatic quantum dynamics in general model systems at finite temperature based on linearizing the density matrix evolution in the forward-backward path difference for the environment degrees of freedom is presented. We demonstrate that the approach can capture both short time coherent quantum dynamics and long time thermal equilibration in an application to excitation energy transfer in a model photosynthetic light harvesting complex. Results are also presented for some nonadiabatic scattering models which indicate that, even though the method is based on a "mean trajectory" like scheme, it can accurately capture electronic population branching through multiple avoided crossing regions and that the approach offers a robust and reliable way to treat quantum dynamical phenomena in a wide range of condensed phase applications.

  9. Control of Diabatic versus Adiabatic Field Dissociation in a Heavy Rydberg System

    SciTech Connect

    Shiell, R.C.; Reinhold, E.; Ubachs, W.; Magnus, F.

    2005-11-18

    A novel phenomenon is observed in the dynamics of laser-prepared coherent wave packets, bound by the Coulombic 1/r potential of an ion-pair system. After exciting weakly bound ({approx_equal}3 meV) H{sup +}F{sup -} wave packets in a Stark field, and permitting them to evolve in time, control of field dissociation via adiabatic and diabatic routes is demonstrated by applying delayed pulsed-electric fields, involving a zero-field crossing. Control manifests itself through the production of ions from each pathway at a different instant in time. This phenomenon is applied to map the oscillatory behavior of an angular momentum wave packet in a heavy Rydberg system. The characteristic frequencies of the observed Stark oscillations verify predicted mass-scaling laws for heavy Rydberg systems.

  10. ENTROPY-VORTEX WAVES IN NON-ADIABATIC FLOWS

    SciTech Connect

    Ibáñez S, Miguel H.

    2016-02-20

    The Ertel theorem on the vorticity along the flow of adiabatic fluids is generalized for non-adiabatic flows. Several limiting cases are analyzed and the results are applied to flows behind different hydrodynamics fronts, particularly to thermal fronts (heat and cooling fronts). An important conclusion of the present analysis is that vorticity is inherent in the condensation’s (or hot spots) formation by thermal instabilities in plasma flows. Implications for several astrophysical plasmas are outlined.

  11. Nonadiabatic transitions in finite-time adiabatic rapid passage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, T.; Miao, X.; Metcalf, H.

    2007-06-01

    To apply the adiabatic rapid passage process repetitively [T. Lu, X. Miao, and H. Metcalf, Phys. Rev. A 71, 061405(R) (2005)], the nonadiabatic transition probability of a two-level atom subject to chirped light pulses over a finite period of time needs to be calculated. Using a unitary first-order perturbation method in the rotating adiabatic frame, an approximate formula has been derived for such transition probabilities in the entire parameter space of the pulses.

  12. Shortcuts to adiabaticity for non-Hermitian systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ibanez, S.; Martinez-Garaot, S.; Torrontegui, E.; Muga, J. G.; Chen Xi

    2011-08-15

    Adiabatic processes driven by non-Hermitian, time-dependent Hamiltonians may be sped up by generalizing inverse engineering techniques based on counter-diabatic (transitionless driving) algorithms or on dynamical invariants. We work out the basic theory and examples described by two-level Hamiltonians: the acceleration of rapid adiabatic passage with a decaying excited level and of the dynamics of a classical particle on an expanding harmonic oscillator.

  13. Vacuum vessel eddy current modeling for TFTR adiabatic compression experiments

    SciTech Connect

    DeLucia, J.; Bell, M.; Wong, K.L.

    1985-07-01

    A relatively simple current filament model of the TFTR vacuum vessel is described. It is used to estimate the three-dimensional structure of magnetic field perturbations in the vicinity of the plasma that arise from vacuum vessel eddy currents induced during adiabatic compression. Eddy currents are calculated self-consistently with the plasma motion. The Shafranov formula and adiabatic scaling laws are used to model the plasma. Although the specific application is to TFTR, the present model is of generation applicability.

  14. Adiabatic swimming in an ideal quantum gas.

    PubMed

    Avron, J E; Gutkin, B; Oaknin, D H

    2006-04-07

    Interference effects are important for swimming of mesoscopic systems that are small relative to the coherence length of the surrounding quantum medium. Swimming is geometric for slow swimmers and the distance covered in each stroke is determined, explicitly, in terms of the on-shell scattering matrix. Remarkably, for a one-dimensional Fermi gas at zero temperature we find that slow swimming is topological: the swimming distance covered in one stroke is quantized in half integer multiples of the Fermi wavelength. In addition, a careful choice of the swimming stroke can eliminate dissipation.

  15. Revealing Hidden Coherence in Partially Coherent Light.

    PubMed

    Svozilík, Jiří; Vallés, Adam; Peřina, Jan; Torres, Juan P

    2015-11-27

    Coherence and correlations represent two related properties of a compound system. The system can be, for instance, the polarization of a photon, which forms part of a polarization-entangled two-photon state, or the spatial shape of a coherent beam, where each spatial mode bears different polarizations. Whereas a local unitary transformation of the system does not affect its coherence, global unitary transformations modifying both the system and its surroundings can enhance its coherence, transforming mutual correlations into coherence. The question naturally arises of what is the best measure that quantifies the correlations that can be turned into coherence, and how much coherence can be extracted. We answer both questions, and illustrate its application for some typical simple systems, with the aim at illuminating the general concept of enhancing coherence by modifying correlations.

  16. Revealing Hidden Coherence in Partially Coherent Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svozilík, Jiří; Vallés, Adam; Peřina, Jan; Torres, Juan P.

    2015-11-01

    Coherence and correlations represent two related properties of a compound system. The system can be, for instance, the polarization of a photon, which forms part of a polarization-entangled two-photon state, or the spatial shape of a coherent beam, where each spatial mode bears different polarizations. Whereas a local unitary transformation of the system does not affect its coherence, global unitary transformations modifying both the system and its surroundings can enhance its coherence, transforming mutual correlations into coherence. The question naturally arises of what is the best measure that quantifies the correlations that can be turned into coherence, and how much coherence can be extracted. We answer both questions, and illustrate its application for some typical simple systems, with the aim at illuminating the general concept of enhancing coherence by modifying correlations.

  17. A connection between mix and adiabat in ICF capsules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Baolian; Kwan, Thomas; Wang, Yi-Ming; Yi, Sunghuan (Austin); Batha, Steven

    2016-10-01

    We study the relationship between instability induced mix, preheat and the adiabat of the deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel in fusion capsule experiments. Our studies show that hydrodynamic instability not only directly affects the implosion, hot spot shape and mix, but also affects the thermodynamics of the capsule, such as, the adiabat of the DT fuel, and, in turn, affects the energy partition between the pusher shell (cold DT) and the hot spot. It was found that the adiabat of the DT fuel is sensitive to the amount of mix caused by Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) and Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instabilities at the material interfaces due to its exponential dependence on the fuel entropy. An upper limit of mix allowed maintaining a low adiabat of DT fuel is derived. Additionally we demonstrated that the use of a high adiabat for the DT fuel in theoretical analysis and with the aid of 1D code simulations could explain some aspects of the 3D effects and mix in the capsule experiments. Furthermore, from the observed neutron images and our physics model, we could infer the adiabat of the DT fuel in the capsule and determine the possible amount of mix in the hot spot (LA-UR-16-24880). This work was conducted under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by the Los Alamos National Laboratory under Contract No. W-7405-ENG-36.

  18. Adiabatic and non-adiabatic charge pumping in a single-level molecular motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Napitu, B. D.; Thijssen, J. M.

    2015-07-01

    We propose a design for realizing quantum charge pump based on a recent proposal for a molecular motor (Seldenthuis J S et al 2010 ACS Nano 4 6681). Our design is based on the presence of a moiety with a permanent dipole moment which can rotate, thereby modulating the couplings to metallic contacts at both ends of the molecule. Using the non-equilibrium Keldysh Green’s function formalism (NEGF), we show that our design indeed generates a pump current. In the non-interacting pump, the variation of frequency from adiabatic to non-adiabatic regime, can be used to control the direction as well as the amplitude of the average current. The effect of Coulomb interaction is considered within the first- and the second- order perturbation. The numerical implementation of the scheme is quite demanding, and we develop an analytical approximation to obtain a speed-up giving results within a reasonable time. We find that the amplitude of the average pumped current can be controlled by both the driving frequency and the Coulomb interaction. The direction of of pumped current is shown to be determined by the phase difference between left and right anchoring groups.

  19. Adiabatic and non-adiabatic charge pumping in a single-level molecular motor.

    PubMed

    Napitu, B D; Thijssen, J M

    2015-07-15

    We propose a design for realizing quantum charge pump based on a recent proposal for a molecular motor (Seldenthuis J S et al 2010 ACS Nano 4 6681). Our design is based on the presence of a moiety with a permanent dipole moment which can rotate, thereby modulating the couplings to metallic contacts at both ends of the molecule. Using the non-equilibrium Keldysh Green's function formalism (NEGF), we show that our design indeed generates a pump current. In the non-interacting pump, the variation of frequency from adiabatic to non-adiabatic regime, can be used to control the direction as well as the amplitude of the average current. The effect of Coulomb interaction is considered within the first- and the second- order perturbation. The numerical implementation of the scheme is quite demanding, and we develop an analytical approximation to obtain a speed-up giving results within a reasonable time. We find that the amplitude of the average pumped current can be controlled by both the driving frequency and the Coulomb interaction. The direction of of pumped current is shown to be determined by the phase difference between left and right anchoring groups.

  20. Adiabatic fission barriers in superheavy nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jachimowicz, P.; Kowal, M.; Skalski, J.

    2017-01-01

    Using the microscopic-macroscopic model based on the deformed Woods-Saxon single-particle potential and the Yukawa-plus-exponential macroscopic energy, we calculated static fission barriers Bf for 1305 heavy and superheavy nuclei 98 ≤Z ≤126 , including even-even, odd-even, even-odd and odd-odd systems. For odd and odd-odd nuclei, adiabatic potential-energy surfaces were calculated by a minimization over configurations with one blocked neutron or/and proton on a level from the 10th below to the 10th above the Fermi level. The parameters of the model that have been fixed previously by a fit to masses of even-even heavy nuclei were kept unchanged. A search for saddle points has been performed by the "imaginary water flow" method on a basic five-dimensional deformation grid, including triaxiality. Two auxiliary grids were used for checking the effects of the mass asymmetry and hexadecapole nonaxiality. The ground states (g.s.) were found by energy minimization over configurations and deformations. We find that the nonaxiality significantly changes first and second fission saddle in many nuclei. The effect of the mass asymmetry, known to lower the second, very deformed saddles in actinides, in the heaviest nuclei appears at the less deformed saddles in more than 100 nuclei. It happens for those saddles in which the triaxiality does not play any role, which suggests a decoupling between effects of the mass asymmetry and triaxiality. We studied also the influence of the pairing interaction strength on the staggering of Bf for odd- and even-particle numbers. Finally, we provide a comparison of our results with other theoretical fission barrier evaluations and with available experimental estimates.

  1. Many-body Tunneling and Nonequilibrium Dynamics of Doublons in Strongly Correlated Quantum Dots.

    PubMed

    Hou, WenJie; Wang, YuanDong; Wei, JianHua; Zhu, ZhenGang; Yan, YiJing

    2017-05-30

    Quantum tunneling dominates coherent transport at low temperatures in many systems of great interest. In this work we report a many-body tunneling (MBT), by nonperturbatively solving the Anderson multi-impurity model, and identify it a fundamental tunneling process on top of the well-acknowledged sequential tunneling and cotunneling. We show that the MBT involves the dynamics of doublons in strongly correlated systems. Proportional to the numbers of dynamical doublons, the MBT can dominate the off-resonant transport in the strongly correlated regime. A T (3/2)-dependence of the MBT current on temperature is uncovered and can be identified as a fingerprint of the MBT in experiments. We also prove that the MBT can support the coherent long-range tunneling of doublons, which is well consistent with recent experiments on ultracold atoms. As a fundamental physical process, the MBT is expected to play important roles in general quantum systems.

  2. The cryogenic wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kilgore, R. A.

    1976-01-01

    Based on theoretical studies and experience with a low speed cryogenic tunnel and with a 1/3-meter transonic cryogenic tunnel, the cryogenic wind tunnel concept was shown to offer many advantages with respect to the attainment of full scale Reynolds number at reasonable levels of dynamic pressure in a ground based facility. The unique modes of operation available in a pressurized cryogenic tunnel make possible for the first time the separation of Mach number, Reynolds number, and aeroelastic effects. By reducing the drive-power requirements to a level where a conventional fan drive system may be used, the cryogenic concept makes possible a tunnel with high productivity and run times sufficiently long to allow for all types of tests at reduced capital costs and, for equal amounts of testing, reduced total energy consumption in comparison with other tunnel concepts.

  3. Simulator of Road Tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danišovič, Peter; Schlosser, František; Šrámek, Juraj; Rázga, Martin

    2015-05-01

    A Tunnel Traffic & Operation Simulator is a device of the Centre of Transport Research at the University of Žilina. The Simulator allows managing technological equipment of virtual two-tube highway tunnel, which is interconnected with simulation of vehicle traffic in tunnel. Changes of the traffic-operation states and other equipment are reflecting at the simulated traffic, as well as simulations of various emergency events in traffic initiate changes in tunnel detecting and measuring devices. It is thus possible to simulate emergency states, which can be affected by various faults of technology as well as by climatic conditions. The solutions can be found in irreplaceable experiences of Slovak road tunnel operators, changes of trafficoperation states, visualizations of operator technological display screens, technological devices labelling in order to increase operational safety of road tunnels.

  4. Temporal coherence of propagating surface plasmons.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Comtet, Geneviève; Le Moal, Eric; Dujardin, Gérald; Drezet, Aurélien; Huant, Serge; Boer-Duchemin, Elizabeth

    2014-12-01

    The temporal coherence of propagating surface plasmons is investigated using a local, broadband plasmon source consisting of a scanning tunneling microscope. A variant of Young's experiment is performed using a sample consisting of a 200-nm-thick gold film perforated by two 1-μm-diameter holes (separated by 4 or 6 μm). The resulting interference fringes are studied as a function of hole separation and source bandwidth. From these experiments, we conclude that apart from plasmon decay in the metal, there is no further loss of plasmon coherence from propagation, scattering at holes, or other dephasing processes. As a result, the plasmon coherence time may be estimated from its spectral bandwidth.

  5. Charge Islands Through Tunneling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Daryl C.

    2002-01-01

    It has been recently reported that the electrical charge in a semiconductive carbon nanotube is not evenly distributed, but rather it is divided into charge "islands." This paper links the aforementioned phenomenon to tunneling and provides further insight into the higher rate of tunneling processes, which makes tunneling devices attractive. This paper also provides a basis for calculating the charge profile over the length of the tube so that nanoscale devices' conductive properties may be fully exploited.

  6. Pipetron Tunnel Construction Issues

    SciTech Connect

    Friant, James E.; Bauer, Robert A.; Gross, David L.; May, Michael; Lach, Joseph

    1997-01-01

    This report examines issues involved in the civil construction aspects of the tunneling that could be done in the region of Fermilab to support the Pipetron along, moderately deep, tunnel loop. Cost, technical and political aspects of tunneling are addressed in this preliminary guide for further study. At Snowmass 96, in a series of informal, but comprehensive discussions, several guidelines were developed to frame this report.

  7. Measurement of recovery temperature on an airfoil in the Langley 0.3-m transonic cryogenic tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, C. B.; Adcock, J. B.

    1981-01-01

    Experimental measurements of recovery temperature were made on an airfoil in the Langley 0.3-m Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel at Mach numbers of 0.60 and 0.84 over a Reynolds number per meter range from about 15,000,000 to about 335,000,000. The measured recovery temperatures were considerably below those associated with ideal-gas ambient temperature wind tunnels. This difference was accentuated as the stagnation pressure increased and the total temperature decreased. A boundary-layer code modified for use with cryogenic nitrogen adequately predicted the measured adiabatic wall temperature at all conditions. A quantitative, on-line assessment of the nonadiabatic condition of a model can be made during the operation of a cryogenic wind tunnel by using a correlation for the adiabatic wall temperature which is only a function of total temperature, total pressure, and local Mach number on the model.

  8. Coherent catastrophism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asher, D. J.; Clube, S. V. M.; Napier, W. M.; Steel, D. I.

    We review the theoretical and observational evidence that, on timescales relevant to mankind, the prime collision hazard is posed by temporally correlated impacts (coherent catastrophism, Δt ˜ 10 2-10 4 yr) rather than random ones (stochastic catastrophism, Δt ˜ 10 5-10 8 yr). The mechanism whereby coherent incursions into and through the terrestrial atmosphere occur is described as being the result of giant cometary bodies arriving in orbits with perihelia in the inner solar system. Hierarchical fragmentation of such large (100 km-plus) bodies — due to thermal stresses near perihelion, collisions in the asteroid belt, or passages through the Jovian Roche radius — results in numerous ˜kilometre-sized objects being left in short-period orbits, and appearing in telescopic searches as Apollo-type asteroids. Many more smaller objects, in the 10-100 metre size range and only recently observed, by the Spacewatch team, are expected to be in replenished clusters in particular orbits as a result of continuing disintegrations of large, differentiated, cometary objects. Gravitational perturbations by Jupiter bring these clusters around to have a node at 1 AU in a cyclic fashion, leading to impacts at certain times of year every few years during active periods lasting a few centuries, such periods being separated by intervals of a few millennia. Furthermore, fragmentations within the hierarchy result in significant bombardment commensurabilities ( Δt ˜ 10-10 2 yr) during active periods occurring at random intervals ( Δt ˜ 10 2-10 3 yr). It appears that the Earth has been subject to such impacts since the break-up of such a comet ˜2×10 4 years ago; currently we are not passing through a high-risk epoch, although some phenomena originating in the products of this break-up have been observed in the 20th century. This most recent hierarchical disintegration, associated with four well-known meteor showers and termed the Taurid Complex, is now recognized as resulting

  9. Tunnel closure calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Moran, B.; Attia, A.

    1995-07-01

    When a deeply penetrating munition explodes above the roof of a tunnel, the amount of rubble that falls inside the tunnel is primarily a function of three parameters: first the cube-root scaled distance from the center of the explosive to the roof of the tunnel. Second the material properties of the rock around the tunnel, and in particular the shear strength of that rock, its RQD (Rock Quality Designator), and the extent and orientation of joints. And third the ratio of the tunnel diameter to the standoff distance (distance between the center of explosive and the tunnel roof). The authors have used CALE, a well-established 2-D hydrodynamic computer code, to calculate the amount of rubble that falls inside a tunnel as a function of standoff distance for two different tunnel diameters. In particular they calculated three of the tunnel collapse experiments conducted in an iron ore mine near Kirkeness, Norway in the summer of 1994. The failure model that they used in their calculations combines an equivalent plastic strain criterion with a maximum tensile strength criterion and can be calibrated for different rocks using cratering data as well as laboratory experiments. These calculations are intended to test and improve the understanding of both the Norway Experiments and the ACE (Array of conventional Explosive) phenomenology.

  10. Tunnelling in Dante's Inferno

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furuuchi, Kazuyuki; Sperling, Marcus

    2017-05-01

    We study quantum tunnelling in Dante's Inferno model of large field inflation. Such a tunnelling process, which will terminate inflation, becomes problematic if the tunnelling rate is rapid compared to the Hubble time scale at the time of inflation. Consequently, we constrain the parameter space of Dante's Inferno model by demanding a suppressed tunnelling rate during inflation. The constraints are derived and explicit numerical bounds are provided for representative examples. Our considerations are at the level of an effective field theory; hence, the presented constraints have to hold regardless of any UV completion.

  11. Qualitative Assessment of the Acoustic Disturbance Environment in the NASA LaRC 20-Inch MACH 6 Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horvath, Thomas J.; Berry, Scott A.; Hamilton, H. Harris

    2001-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted on a 5-degree-half-angle cone with a flare in a conventional Mach 6 wind tunnel to examine the effect of facility noise on boundary layer transition. The effect of tunnel noise was inferred by comparing transition onset locations determined from the present test to that previously obtained in a Mach 6 quiet tunnel. Together, the two sets of experiments are believed to represent the first direct comparison of transition onset between a conventional and a quiet hypersonic wind tunnel using a common test model. In the present conventional hypersonic tunnel experiment, adiabatic wall temperatures were measured and heat transfer distributions were inferred on the cone flare model at zero degree angle of attack over a range of length Reynolds numbers (2 x 10(exp 6) to 10 x 10(exp 6)) which resulted in laminar and turbulent flow. Wall-to-total temperature ratio for the transient heating measurements and the adiabatic wall temperature measurements were 0.69 and 0.86, respectively. The cone flare nosetip radius was varied from 0.0001 to 0.125-inch to examine the effects of bluntness on transition onset. At comparable freestream conditions the transition onset Reynolds number obtained on the cone flare model in the conventional "noisy" tunnel was approximately 25% lower than that measured in the low disturbance tunnel.

  12. Revealing the quantum regime in tunnelling plasmonics.

    PubMed

    Savage, Kevin J; Hawkeye, Matthew M; Esteban, Rubén; Borisov, Andrei G; Aizpurua, Javier; Baumberg, Jeremy J

    2012-11-22

    When two metal nanostructures are placed nanometres apart, their optically driven free electrons couple electrically across the gap. The resulting plasmons have enhanced optical fields of a specific colour tightly confined inside the gap. Many emerging nanophotonic technologies depend on the careful control of this plasmonic coupling, including optical nanoantennas for high-sensitivity chemical and biological sensors, nanoscale control of active devices, and improved photovoltaic devices. But for subnanometre gaps, coherent quantum tunnelling becomes possible and the system enters a regime of extreme non-locality in which previous classical treatments fail. Electron correlations across the gap that are driven by quantum tunnelling require a new description of non-local transport, which is crucial in nanoscale optoelectronics and single-molecule electronics. Here, by simultaneously measuring both the electrical and optical properties of two gold nanostructures with controllable subnanometre separation, we reveal the quantum regime of tunnelling plasmonics in unprecedented detail. All observed phenomena are in good agreement with recent quantum-based models of plasmonic systems, which eliminate the singularities predicted by classical theories. These findings imply that tunnelling establishes a quantum limit for plasmonic field confinement of about 10(-8)λ(3) for visible light (of wavelength λ). Our work thus prompts new theoretical and experimental investigations into quantum-domain plasmonic systems, and will affect the future of nanoplasmonic device engineering and nanoscale photochemistry.

  13. Subband current in resonant tunneling diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, H.; Sinkkonen, J.

    An accumulation layer is formed on the emitter side of a biased resonant tunneling diode (RTD) leading to a similar subband structure as in the ordinary MOS-system. Electrons occupying the subbands can tunnel through the RTD-structure and give rise to a significant contribution to the diode current. We calculate the subband current from our semiclassical transport model developed earlier for the ordinary tunneling current. The model includes quantum interference and bulk scattering by utilizing an optical approximation for the coherent part of the wave function. The subband current turns out to be of the same order of magnitude as the ordinary tunneling current component. It is shifted to higher voltages and therefore it increases the valley current. In order to reduce the subband current and improve the peak-to-valley current ratio (PVCR), we propose a novel RTD-structure with a grading in front of the emitter barrier. The purpose of the grading is to suppress the formation of the accumulation layer and thereby decrease the valley current. Calculations show that PVCR increases by a factor of two using a proper design of the grading.

  14. Coupled mode transport theory for sound transmission through an ocean with random sound speed perturbations: coherence in deep water environments.

    PubMed

    Colosi, John A; Chandrayadula, Tarun K; Voronovich, Alexander G; Ostashev, Vladimir E

    2013-10-01

    Second moments of mode amplitudes at fixed frequency as a function of separations in mode number, time, and horizontal distance are investigated using mode-based transport equations and Monte Carlo simulation. These second moments are used to study full-field acoustic coherence, including depth separations. Calculations for low-order modes between 50 and 250 Hz are presented using a deep-water Philippine Sea environment. Comparisons between Monte Carlo simulations and transport theory for time and depth coherence at frequencies of 75 and 250 Hz and for ranges up to 500 km show good agreement. The theory is used to examine the accuracy of the adiabatic and quadratic lag approximations, and the range and frequency scaling of coherence. It is found that while temporal coherence has a dominant adiabatic component, horizontal and vertical coherence have more equal contributions from coupling and adiabatic effects. In addition, the quadratic lag approximation is shown to be most accurate at higher frequencies and longer ranges. Last the range and frequency scalings are found to be sensitive to the functional form of the exponential decay of coherence with lag, but temporal and horizontal coherence show scalings that fall quite close to the well-known inverse frequency and inverse square root range laws.

  15. Charge and spin current oscillations in a tunnel junction induced by magnetic field pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dartora, C. A.; Nobrega, K. Z.; Cabrera, G. G.

    2016-08-01

    Usually, charge and spin transport properties in tunnel junctions are studied in the DC bias regime and/or in the adiabatic regime of time-varying magnetic fields. In this letter, the temporal dynamics of charge and spin currents in a tunnel junction induced by pulsed magnetic fields is considered. At low bias voltages, energy and momentum of the conduction electrons are nearly conserved in the tunneling process, leading to the description of the junction as a spin-1/2 fermionic system coupled to time-varying magnetic fields. Under the influence of pulsed magnetic fields, charge and spin current can flow across the tunnel junction, displaying oscillatory behavior, even in the absence of DC bias voltage. A type of spin capacitance function, in close analogy to electric capacitance, is predicted.

  16. Scanning Tunneling Microscopy Observation of Phonon Condensate

    DOE PAGES

    Altfeder, Igor; Balatsky, Alexander V.; Voevodin, Andrey A.; ...

    2017-02-22

    Using quantum tunneling of electrons into vibrating surface atoms, phonon oscillations can be observed on the atomic scale. Phonon interference patterns with unusually large signal amplitudes have been revealed by scanning tunneling microscopy in intercalated van der Waals heterostructures. Our results show that the effective radius of these phonon quasi-bound states, the real-space distribution of phonon standing wave amplitudes, the scattering phase shifts, and the nonlinear intermode coupling strongly depend on the presence of defect-induced scattering resonance. The observed coherence of these quasi-bound states most likely arises from phase- and frequency-synchronized dynamics of all phonon modes, and indicates the formationmore » of many-body condensate of optical phonons around resonant defects. We found that increasing the strength of the scattering resonance causes the increase of the condensate droplet radius without affecting the condensate fraction inside it. The condensate can be observed at room temperature.« less

  17. Scanning Tunneling Microscopy Observation of Phonon Condensate

    PubMed Central

    Altfeder, Igor; Voevodin, Andrey A.; Check, Michael H.; Eichfeld, Sarah M.; Robinson, Joshua A.; Balatsky, Alexander V.

    2017-01-01

    Using quantum tunneling of electrons into vibrating surface atoms, phonon oscillations can be observed on the atomic scale. Phonon interference patterns with unusually large signal amplitudes have been revealed by scanning tunneling microscopy in intercalated van der Waals heterostructures. Our results show that the effective radius of these phonon quasi-bound states, the real-space distribution of phonon standing wave amplitudes, the scattering phase shifts, and the nonlinear intermode coupling strongly depend on the presence of defect-induced scattering resonance. The observed coherence of these quasi-bound states most likely arises from phase- and frequency-synchronized dynamics of all phonon modes, and indicates the formation of many-body condensate of optical phonons around resonant defects. We found that increasing the strength of the scattering resonance causes the increase of the condensate droplet radius without affecting the condensate fraction inside it. The condensate can be observed at room temperature. PMID:28225066

  18. Scanning Tunneling Microscopy Observation of Phonon Condensate.

    PubMed

    Altfeder, Igor; Voevodin, Andrey A; Check, Michael H; Eichfeld, Sarah M; Robinson, Joshua A; Balatsky, Alexander V

    2017-02-22

    Using quantum tunneling of electrons into vibrating surface atoms, phonon oscillations can be observed on the atomic scale. Phonon interference patterns with unusually large signal amplitudes have been revealed by scanning tunneling microscopy in intercalated van der Waals heterostructures. Our results show that the effective radius of these phonon quasi-bound states, the real-space distribution of phonon standing wave amplitudes, the scattering phase shifts, and the nonlinear intermode coupling strongly depend on the presence of defect-induced scattering resonance. The observed coherence of these quasi-bound states most likely arises from phase- and frequency-synchronized dynamics of all phonon modes, and indicates the formation of many-body condensate of optical phonons around resonant defects. We found that increasing the strength of the scattering resonance causes the increase of the condensate droplet radius without affecting the condensate fraction inside it. The condensate can be observed at room temperature.

  19. Scanning Tunneling Microscopy Observation of Phonon Condensate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altfeder, Igor; Voevodin, Andrey A.; Check, Michael H.; Eichfeld, Sarah M.; Robinson, Joshua A.; Balatsky, Alexander V.

    2017-02-01

    Using quantum tunneling of electrons into vibrating surface atoms, phonon oscillations can be observed on the atomic scale. Phonon interference patterns with unusually large signal amplitudes have been revealed by scanning tunneling microscopy in intercalated van der Waals heterostructures. Our results show that the effective radius of these phonon quasi-bound states, the real-space distribution of phonon standing wave amplitudes, the scattering phase shifts, and the nonlinear intermode coupling strongly depend on the presence of defect-induced scattering resonance. The observed coherence of these quasi-bound states most likely arises from phase- and frequency-synchronized dynamics of all phonon modes, and indicates the formation of many-body condensate of optical phonons around resonant defects. We found that increasing the strength of the scattering resonance causes the increase of the condensate droplet radius without affecting the condensate fraction inside it. The condensate can be observed at room temperature.

  20. A novel technique to achieve atomic macro-coherence as a tool to determine the nature of neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyero García, R.; Carpentier, A. V.; Gómez-Cadenas, J. J.; Peralta Conde, A.

    2016-10-01

    The photon spectrum in macro-coherent atomic deexcitation via radiative emission of neutrino pairs has been proposed as a sensitive probe of the neutrino mass spectrum, capable of competing with conventional neutrino experiments. In this paper, we revisit this intriguing possibility, presenting an alternative method for inducing large coherence in a target based on adiabatic techniques. More concretely, we propose the use of a modified version of coherent population return (CPR), namely two-photon CPR, that turns out to be extremely robust with respect to the experimental parameters and capable of inducing a coherence close to 100 % in the target.

  1. Quantum and tunneling capacitance in charge and spin qubits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizuta, R.; Otxoa, R. M.; Betz, A. C.; Gonzalez-Zalba, M. F.

    2017-01-01

    We present a theoretical analysis of the capacitance of a double quantum dot in the charge and spin qubit configurations probed at high frequencies. We find that, in general, the total capacitance of the system consists of two state-dependent terms: the quantum capacitance arising from adiabatic charge motion and the tunneling capacitance that appears when repopulation occurs at a rate comparable or faster than the probing frequency. The analysis of the capacitance lineshape as a function of externally controllable variables offers a way to characterize the qubits' charge and spin state as well as relevant system parameters such as charge and spin relaxation rates, tunnel coupling, electron temperature, and electron g factor. Overall, our analysis provides a formalism to understand dispersive qubit-resonator interactions which can be applied to high-sensitivity and noninvasive quantum-state readout.

  2. LETTERS AND COMMENTS: Adiabatic process reversibility: microscopic and macroscopic views

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anacleto, Joaquim; Pereira, Mário G.

    2009-05-01

    The reversibility of adiabatic processes was recently addressed by two publications. In the first (Miranda 2008 Eur. J. Phys. 29 937-43), an equation was derived relating the initial and final volumes and temperatures for adiabatic expansions of an ideal gas, using a microscopic approach. In that relation the parameter r accounts for the process reversibility, ranging between 0 and 1, which corresponds to the free and reversible expansion, respectively. In the second (Anacleto and Pereira 2009 Eur. J. Phys. 30 177-83), the authors have shown that thermodynamics can effectively and efficiently be used to obtain the general law for adiabatic processes carried out by an ideal gas, including compressions, for which r \\ge 1. The present work integrates and extends the aforementioned studies, providing thus further insights into the analysis of the adiabatic process. It is shown that Miranda's work is wholly valid for compressions. In addition, it is demonstrated that the adiabatic reversibility coefficient given in terms of the piston velocity and the root mean square velocity of the gas particles is equivalent to the macroscopic description, given just by the quotient between surroundings and system pressure values.

  3. Atomically Thin Al2O3 Films for Tunnel Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilt, Jamie; Gong, Youpin; Gong, Ming; Su, Feifan; Xu, Huikai; Sakidja, Ridwan; Elliot, Alan; Lu, Rongtao; Zhao, Shiping; Han, Siyuan; Wu, Judy Z.

    2017-06-01

    Metal-insulator-metal tunnel junctions are common throughout the microelectronics industry. The industry standard AlOx tunnel barrier, formed through oxygen diffusion into an Al wetting layer, is plagued by internal defects and pinholes which prevent the realization of atomically thin barriers demanded for enhanced quantum coherence. In this work, we employ in situ scanning tunneling spectroscopy along with molecular-dynamics simulations to understand and control the growth of atomically thin Al2O3 tunnel barriers using atomic-layer deposition. We find that a carefully tuned initial H2O pulse hydroxylated the Al surface and enabled the creation of an atomically thin Al2O3 tunnel barrier with a high-quality M -I interface and a significantly enhanced barrier height compared to thermal AlOx . These properties, corroborated by fabricated Josephson junctions, show that atomic-layer deposition Al2O3 is a dense, leak-free tunnel barrier with a low defect density which can be a key component for the next generation of metal-insulator-metal tunnel junctions.

  4. Electron-Tunneling Magnetometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaiser, William J.; Kenny, Thomas W.; Waltman, Steven B.

    1993-01-01

    Electron-tunneling magnetometer is conceptual solid-state device operating at room temperature, yet offers sensitivity comparable to state-of-art magnetometers such as flux gates, search coils, and optically pumped magnetometers, with greatly reduced volume, power consumption, electronics requirements, and manufacturing cost. Micromachined from silicon wafer, and uses tunneling displacement transducer to detect magnetic forces on cantilever-supported current loop.

  5. Shotcrete in tunnel design

    SciTech Connect

    Golser, J.; Galler, R.; Schubert, P.; Rabensteiner, K.

    1995-12-31

    Shotcrete is an important structural element for tunnel support. Green shotcrete is exposed to compression strain rates and tunnel design requires a realistic material law for shotcrete. A modified rate of flow method simulates shotcrete behavior very well and can be incorporated in Finite Element calculations.

  6. The carpal tunnel.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Harold

    2009-12-01

    The carpal bones are deeply convex anteriorly. This bony gutter is converted by the flexor retinaculum into a tube - the carpal tunnel, which conveys the median nerve, together with the long flexor tendons of the fingers and thumb, into the hand. It is of special interest to the surgeon because it is the site of a common nerve entrapment, the carpal tunnel syndrome.

  7. LCLS XTOD Tunnel Vacuum System (XVTS)

    SciTech Connect

    Beale, R; Duffy, P; Kishiyama, K; Mckernan, M; McMahon, D; Lewis, S; Trent, J; Tung, L; Shen, S

    2005-11-04

    The vacuum system of the XVTS (X-Ray Vacuum Transport System) for the LCLS (Linac Coherent Light Source) XTOD (X-ray Transport, Optics and Diagnostics) system has been analyzed and configured by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's NTED (New Technologies Engineering Division) as requested by the SLAC/LCLS program. The system layout, detailed analyses and selection of the vacuum components for the XTOD tunnel section are presented in this preliminary design report. The vacuum system was analyzed and optimized using a coupled gas load balance model of sub-volumes of the components to be evacuated. Also included are the plans for procurement, mechanical integration, and the cost estimates.

  8. Stark-induced adiabatic Raman ladder for preparing highly vibrationally excited quantum states of molecular hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Nandini; Perreault, William E.; Zare, Richard N.

    2017-07-01

    We present a multi-color ladder excitation scheme that exploits Stark-induced adiabatic Raman passage to selectively populate a highly excited vibrational level of a molecule. We suggest that this multi-color coherent ladder excitation provides a practical way of accessing levels near the vibrational dissociation limit as well as the dissociative continuum, which would allow the generation of an entangled pair of fragments with near-zero relative kinetic energy. Specifically, we consider four- and six-photon coherent excitation of molecular hydrogen to high vibrational levels via intermediate vibrational levels, which are pairwise coupled by two-photon resonant interaction. Using a sequence of three partially overlapping, single-mode, nanosecond laser pulses we show that the sixth vibrational level of H2, which is too weakly coupled to be easily accessed by direct two-photon Raman excitation from the ground vibrational level, can be efficiently populated without leaving any population stranded in the intermediate level. Furthermore, we show that the fourteenth vibrational level of H2, which is the highest vibrational level in the ground electronic state with a binding energy of 22 meV, can be efficiently and selectively populated using a sequence of four pulses. The present technique offers the unique possibility of preparing entangled quantum states of H atoms without resorting to an ultracold system.

  9. The effect of adiabatic focusing upon charged-particle propagation in random magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Earl, J. A.

    1976-01-01

    The charged particles considered are scattered by random fields while they propagate along the diverging lines of force of a spatially inhomogeneous guiding field. Their longitudinal transport is described in terms of the eigenfunctions of a Sturm-Liouville operator which incorporates the effect of adiabatic focusing along with that of scattering. The relaxation times and characteristic velocities which appear in this matrix formulation of the transport problem are graphed and tabulated. Explicit formulas which describe the particle-density profile that results from a localized impulsive injection are derived for two different regimes. In the first regime, where focusing is relatively weak, a diffusive mode of propagation is dominant, but coherent modes are also present, and they become prominent as the intensity of focusing increases. In the second regime, where focusing is strong and where diffusion does not occur, the propagation is purely coherent. The existence of this supercoherent mode of particle transport opens up many possibilities for the interpretation of astrophysical phenomena.

  10. The Stability Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1943-01-01

    Engineers operate the controls of the Stability Tunnel: Plans for a new tunnel to study stability problems began in the late thirties. The Stability Tunnel was authorized in 1939 and began operations in June 1941. The installation was completed in December that year with the completion of a new 10,000 Horsepower Diesel-electric generating plant. It was a single return, closed jet tunnel with a 6-foot square test section. The tunnel was disassembled and shipped to Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University in 1958. The tunnel had two separate test sections: one for curved flow, the other for rolling flow. 'The facility...simulates the motion of the aircraft in curved or rolling flight. This is done by actually curving or rolling the airstream as it passes over the model and at the same time providing the proper velocity distribution.' (From AIAA-80-0309) >From Alan Pope, Wind-Tunnel Testing: 'The only tunnel directly designed for dynamic stability work is located at the Langley Field branch of the NACA. Its most vital feature is its ability to subject the models to curving air streams that simulate those actually encountered when an airplane rolls, pitches, or yaws. the rotating airstream for simulating roll is produced by a motor-driven paddle just ahead of the test section. Curved air of properly varying velocity for simulating pitch and yaw is produced by a combination of a curved test section and velocity screens. The proper use of this apparatus makes possible the determination of the stability derivatives.' Published in F.H. Lutze, 'Experimental Determination of Pure Rotary Stability Derivatives using a Curved and Rolling Flow Wind Tunnel,' AIAA-80-0309, AIAA 18th Aerospace Sciences Meeting, Pasadena, CA, January 14-16, 1980; Alan Pope, Wind-Tunnel Testing (New York: John Wiley & Sons, 1947).

  11. On a Consistent Quantum Adiabatic Theory of Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dugić, Miroljub; Jeknić-Dugić, Jasmina

    2009-10-01

    We point out certain inconsistency in the foundations of the standard adiabatic method in quantum theory of molecules. As an alternative, we develop a particular approach that overcomes the appointed inconsistency. Based on this new approach, some interesting physical results come to the scope. First, we point out that the adiabatic method is substantially state-of-the-molecule dependent. E.g., the method distinguishes the definite conformations as a kind of the preferred states of a molecule. Second, the existence of the local minima for the effective potential for the nuclei system appears as a kind of a necessary condition for the validity of the adiabatic method. However, our approach does not fully answer the fundamental problem of the origin and stability of the definite (semi-classically well-defined) conformations of the large molecules. To this end, a new approach/theory is needed—as recently proposed within the context of the decoherence theory.

  12. Pressure sensitivity of adiabatic shear banding in metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanina, E.; Rittel, D.; Rosenberg, Z.

    2007-01-01

    Adiabatic shear banding (ASB) is a dynamic failure mode characterized by large plastic strains in a narrow localized band. ASB occurs at high strain rates (ɛ˙⩾103s-1), under adiabatic conditions leading to a significant temperature rise inside the band [H. Tresca, Annales du Conservatoire des Arts et Métiers 4, (1879); Y. L. Bai and B. Dodd, Adiabatic Shear Localization-Occurrence, Theories, and Applications (Pergamon, Oxford, 1992); M. A. Meyers, Dynamic Behavior of Materials (Wiley, New York, 1994).; and J. J. Lewandowski and L. M. Greer, Nat. Mater. 5, 15 (2006)]. Large hydrostatic pressures are experienced in many dynamic applications involving ASB formation (e.g., ballistic penetration, impact, and machining). The relationship between hydrostatic pressure and ASB development remains an open question, although its importance has been often noted. This letter reports original experimental results indicating a linear relationship between the (normalized) dynamic deformation energy and the (normalized) hydrostatic pressure.

  13. Effect of dephasing on stimulated Raman adiabatic passage

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, P.A.; Vitanov, N.V.; Bergmann, K.

    2004-12-01

    This work explores the effect of phase relaxation on the population transfer efficiency in stimulated Raman adiabatic passage (STIRAP). The study is based on the Liouville equation, which is solved analytically in the adiabatic limit. The transfer efficiency of STIRAP is found to decrease exponentially with the dephasing rate; this effect is stronger for shorter pulse delays and weaker for larger delays, since the transition time is found to be inversely proportional to the pulse delay. Moreover, it is found that the transfer efficiency of STIRAP in the presence of dephasing does not depend on the peak Rabi frequencies at all, as long as they are sufficiently large to enforce adiabatic evolution; hence increasing the field intensity cannot reduce the dephasing losses. It is shown also that for any dephasing rate, the final populations of the initial state and the intermediate state are equal. For strong dephasing all three populations tend to (1/3)

  14. Adiabatic circular polarizer based on chiral fiber grating.

    PubMed

    Yang, Li; Xue, Lin-Lin; Li, Cheng; Su, Jue; Qian, Jing-Ren

    2011-01-31

    Based on the adiabatic coupling principle, a new scheme of a broadband circular polarizer formed by twisting a high-birefringence (Hi-Bi) fiber with a slowly varying twist rate is proposed. The conditions of adiabatic coupling for the adiabatic polarizer are first identified through analytical derivations. These conditions are easily realized by choosing a reasonable variation of the twist rate. Moreover, the bandwidth of the polarizer is able to be directly determined by the twist rates at the two ends. Finally, the broadband characteristics of the polarizer are demonstrated by simulations. It is also shown that the performance of the polarizer can be remarkably improved by accomplishing a multi-mode phase-matching along the grating or by using of the couplings of the core mode to lossy modes.

  15. Speeding up adiabatic passage by adding Lyapunov control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ran, Du; Shi, Zhi-Cheng; Song, Jie; Xia, Yan

    2017-09-01

    We propose a scheme to speed up adiabatic passage by using Lyapunov control theory. This is a good choice to solve the problem that may emerge in Berry's transitionless quantum driving [M. V. Berry, J. Phys. A 42, 365303 (2009), 10.1088/1751-8113/42/36/365303]. That is, the extra couplings in the counterdiabatic driving Hamiltonian can be avoided by choosing the available control Hamiltonian in an actual physical system. As examples, we shorten the evolution time of adiabatic population transfer in a three-level system and the entanglement generation in a cavity quantum electrodynamics system. Moreover, the occupation of an intermediate state can be sharply suppressed by properly choosing the control Hamiltonian in the three-level system. The scheme can also be generalized to a complex system where the exact expressions of adiabatic eigenstates are difficult to obtain.

  16. Adiabatic Pseudospectral Technique: Applications to Four Atom Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antikainen, Jyrki Tapio

    1995-01-01

    After the introduction, in chapter 2 we review some of the well established techniques used to solve the Schrodinger equation. The following methods are discussed: the Finite Basis Representation, the Discrete Variable Representation, the Basic Light basis set truncation, and the Lanczos tridiagonalization. After reviewing the previous techniques we present the main features of our Adiabatic Pseudospectral (APS) technique. The Adiabatic Pseudospectral technique is a synthesis of several powerful computational methods such as the sequential adiabatic basis set reduction, the iterative Lanczos diagonalization, the collocation techniques, and a careful implementation of the matrix -vector product for the Hamiltonian in the reduced adiabatic representation. In chapter 3 we use our adiabatic pseudospectral method (APS) to calculate energy levels of the H _2O_2 molecule up to 5000 cm ^{-1}. Reasonably high accuracy (a few wavenumbers) is achieved for a fully six dimensional calculation in a few hours of CPU time on an IBM 580 workstation. These results are a great improvement over previous calculations on the same system which required 50-100 times more computational effort for a similar level of accuracy. The method presented here is both general and robust. It will allow for routine studies of six dimensional potential surfaces and the associated spectroscopy, while making calculations on still larger systems feasible. In chapter 4 the adiabatic pseudospectral method is used to study the high energy vibrational levels of the H_2C_2 molecule. We calculate stimulated emission pumping spectra initialized by the excited electronic state vibrational trans-bent state ~ A_sp{u}{1 }3_{nu}_3 . The calculations show that with the APS-method we can easily investigate energy regions in the excess of 15,000 cm^{-1}; these high energy regions have been previously unattainable by computational techniques.

  17. The Instrument Set for Generating Fast Adiabatic Passage.

    PubMed

    Czechowski, T; Baranowski, M; Woźniak-Braszak, A; Jurga, K; Jurga, J; Kędzia, P

    2012-10-01

    The design and construction of a high-performance, low-cost, and easy to assemble adiabatic extension set for homebuilt and commercial spectrometers is described. Described apparatus set was designed for the fast adiabatic passage generation and is based on direct digital synthesizer DDS. This solution gives generator high signal to noise ratio, phase stability even during frequency change which is only possible in expansive commercial high-end hardware. Critical synchronization and timing issues are considered and solutions are discussed. Different experimental conditions and techniques for the measurements are briefly discussed. The proposed system is very flexible and might be used for the measurement of low-frequency nuclear magnetic resonance.

  18. New design of an adiabatic demagnetization cryostat for space application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Junya; Sato, Akio; Sahashi, Masashi

    A new adiabatic demagnetization cryostat for cooling (in the region of 0.1 K) spaceborne far-infrared detectors is described. The cryostat contains a superconducting magnetic coil indirectly cooled by liquid helium, with the liquid nitrogen and helium vessels being connected by gas-filled thermal switches; the adiabatic demagnetization cell of the cryostat is set in vacuum at the center of the coil. The magnetic field of 3 T was obtained by a current of 11.5 A. The magnetic salt (single crystals of manganese ammonium alum) was prepared by the falling temperature technique.

  19. Construction techniques for adiabatic demagnetization refrigerators using ferric ammonium alum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Grant W.; Timbie, Peter T.

    1999-07-01

    We describe techniques used to fabricate the cold stage of an adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator that uses the paramagnetic salt ferric ammonium alum. We discuss the design of a leak-tight housing for the salt as well as a technique for growing ferric ammonium alum crystals that results in a housing filled with >98% refrigerant. These techniques have proven to be reliable in creating robust single-stage refrigerators. Similar techniques can be used for the second stage of a dual-stage adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator.

  20. Adiabatic regularisation of power spectra in k-inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Alinea, Allan L.; Kubota, Takahiro; Nakanishi, Yukari; Naylor, Wade E-mail: kubota@celas.osaka-u.ac.jp E-mail: naylor@phys.sci.osaka-u.ac.jp

    2015-06-01

    We look at the question posed by Parker et al. about the effect of UV regularisation on the power spectrum for inflation. Focusing on the slow-roll k-inflation, we show that up to second order in the Hubble and sound flow parameters, the adiabatic regularisation of such model leads to no difference in the power spectrum apart from certain cases that violate near scale-invariant power spectra. Furthermore, extending to non-minimal k-inflation, we establish the equivalence of the subtraction terms in the adiabatic regularisation of the power spectrum in Jordan and Einstein frames.

  1. Gravitational Chern-Simons and the adiabatic limit

    SciTech Connect

    McLellan, Brendan

    2010-12-15

    We compute the gravitational Chern-Simons term explicitly for an adiabatic family of metrics using standard methods in general relativity. We use the fact that our base three-manifold is a quasiregular K-contact manifold heavily in this computation. Our key observation is that this geometric assumption corresponds exactly to a Kaluza-Klein Ansatz for the metric tensor on our three-manifold, which allows us to translate our problem into the language of general relativity. Similar computations have been performed by Guralnik et al.[Ann. Phys. 308, 222 (2008)], although not in the adiabatic context.

  2. Spatial adiabatic passage: a review of recent progress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menchon-Enrich, R.; Benseny, A.; Ahufinger, V.; Greentree, A. D.; Busch, Th; Mompart, J.

    2016-07-01

    Adiabatic techniques are known to allow for engineering quantum states with high fidelity. This requirement is currently of large interest, as applications in quantum information require the preparation and manipulation of quantum states with minimal errors. Here we review recent progress on developing techniques for the preparation of spatial states through adiabatic passage, particularly focusing on three state systems. These techniques can be applied to matter waves in external potentials, such as cold atoms or electrons, and to classical waves in waveguides, such as light or sound.

  3. Experimental Investigation of Adiabatic Shear Banding at Different Impact Velocities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-01-01

    relation of the power form, J. .%Iech. Working Technology 1j (1987), 143. (341 T.W. Wright and J.W. Walter . On stress collapse in adiabatic shear bands, 1...Mccl. Phys. Solids ], 11987). 701. [35) T.W. W-ight and J.W. Walter . Adiabatic shear bands in one dimension, in: Mechanical Pro- perties of Materials...metals. in Constinifive Relations and Their Physical Basis. RisO Natl. Laboratory, Roskilde. Daremnark (1987). 387. (381 J.R. Klepaczko. A general

  4. Quantum dynamics by the constrained adiabatic trajectory method

    SciTech Connect

    Leclerc, A.; Jolicard, G.; Guerin, S.; Killingbeck, J. P.

    2011-03-15

    We develop the constrained adiabatic trajectory method (CATM), which allows one to solve the time-dependent Schroedinger equation constraining the dynamics to a single Floquet eigenstate, as if it were adiabatic. This constrained Floquet state (CFS) is determined from the Hamiltonian modified by an artificial time-dependent absorbing potential whose forms are derived according to the initial conditions. The main advantage of this technique for practical implementation is that the CFS is easy to determine even for large systems since its corresponding eigenvalue is well isolated from the others through its imaginary part. The properties and limitations of the CATM are explored through simple examples.

  5. Tunneling properties of nonplanar molecules in a gas medium

    SciTech Connect

    Bahrami, Mohammad; Bassi, Angelo

    2011-12-15

    We propose a simple, general, and accurate formula for analyzing the tunneling between classical configurations of a nonplanar molecule in a gas medium, as a function of the thermodynamic parameters of the gas. We apply it to two interesting cases: (i) the shift to zero frequency of the inversion line of ammonia, upon an increase in the pressure of the gas; and (ii) the destruction of the coherent tunneling of D{sub 2}S{sub 2} molecules in a He gas. In both cases, we compare our analysis with previous theoretical and experimental results.

  6. Ultrafast scanning tunneling microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Botkin, D.A. |

    1995-09-01

    I have developed an ultrafast scanning tunneling microscope (USTM) based on uniting stroboscopic methods of ultrafast optics and scanned probe microscopy to obtain nanometer spatial resolution and sub-picosecond temporal resolution. USTM increases the achievable time resolution of a STM by more than 6 orders of magnitude; this should enable exploration of mesoscopic and nanometer size systems on time scales corresponding to the period or decay of fundamental excitations. USTM consists of a photoconductive switch with subpicosecond response time in series with the tip of a STM. An optical pulse from a modelocked laser activates the switch to create a gate for the tunneling current, while a second laser pulse on the sample initiates a dynamic process which affects the tunneling current. By sending a large sequence of identical pulse pairs and measuring the average tunnel current as a function of the relative time delay between the pulses in each pair, one can map the time evolution of the surface process. USTM was used to measure the broadband response of the STM`s atomic size tunnel barrier in frequencies from tens to hundreds of GHz. The USTM signal amplitude decays linearly with the tunnel junction conductance, so the spatial resolution of the time-resolved signal is comparable to that of a conventional STM. Geometrical capacitance of the junction does not appear to play an important role in the measurement, but a capacitive effect intimately related to tunneling contributes to the measured signals and may limit the ultimate resolution of the USTM.

  7. [Anterior tarsal tunnel syndrome].

    PubMed

    Miliam, Palle B; Basse, Peter N

    2009-03-30

    Anterior tarsal tunnel syndrome is a rare entrapment neuropathy of the deep peroneal nerve beneath the extensor retinaculum of the ankle. It may be rare because it is underrecognized clinically.We present a case regarding a 29-year-old man, drummer, who for one and a half year experienced clinical symptoms of anterior tarsal tunnel syndrome. A surgical decompression of the anterior tarsal tunnel was performed, and at the check three months later the symptoms where gone. One year after, there were still no symptoms.

  8. Consistent schemes for non-adiabatic dynamics derived from partial linearized density matrix propagation.

    PubMed

    Huo, Pengfei; Coker, David F

    2012-12-14

    Powerful approximate methods for propagating the density matrix of complex systems that are conveniently described in terms of electronic subsystem states and nuclear degrees of freedom have recently been developed that involve linearizing the density matrix propagator in the difference between the forward and backward paths of the nuclear degrees of freedom while keeping the interference effects between the different forward and backward paths of the electronic subsystem described in terms of the mapping Hamiltonian formalism and semi-classical mechanics. Here we demonstrate that different approaches to developing the linearized approximation to the density matrix propagator can yield a mean-field like approximate propagator in which the nuclear variables evolve classically subject to Ehrenfest-like forces that involve an average over quantum subsystem states, and by adopting an alternative approach to linearizing we obtain an algorithm that involves classical like nuclear dynamics influenced by a quantum subsystem state dependent force reminiscent of trajectory surface hopping methods. We show how these different short time approximations can be implemented iteratively to achieve accurate, stable long time propagation and explore their implementation in different representations. The merits of the different approximate quantum dynamics methods that are thus consistently derived from the density matrix propagator starting point and different partial linearization approximations are explored in various model system studies of multi-state scattering problems and dissipative non-adiabatic relaxation in condensed phase environments that demonstrate the capabilities of these different types of approximations for treating non-adiabatic electronic relaxation, bifurcation of nuclear distributions, and the passage from nonequilibrium coherent dynamics at short times to long time thermal equilibration in the presence of a model dissipative environment.

  9. Dark energy and dark matter from an additional adiabatic fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunsby, Peter K. S.; Luongo, Orlando; Reverberi, Lorenzo

    2016-10-01

    The dark sector is described by an additional barotropic fluid which evolves adiabatically during the Universe's history and whose adiabatic exponent γ is derived from the standard definitions of specific heats. Although in general γ is a function of the redshift, the Hubble parameter and its derivatives, we find that our assumptions lead necessarily to solutions with γ =constant in a Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker universe. The adiabatic fluid acts effectively as the sum of two distinct components, one evolving like nonrelativistic matter and the other depending on the value of the adiabatic index. This makes the model particularly interesting as a way of simultaneously explaining the nature of both dark energy and dark matter, at least at the level of the background cosmology. The Λ CDM model is included in this family of theories when γ =0 . We fit our model to supernovae Ia, H (z ) and baryonic acoustic oscillation data, discussing the model selection criteria. The implications for the early Universe and the growth of small perturbations in this model are also discussed.

  10. Non-adiabatic effects in F + CHD3 reactive scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palma, Juliana; Manthe, Uwe

    2017-06-01

    The effect of non-adiabatic transitions on the F(2P) + CHD3(ν1) → DF + CHD2 and F(2P) + CHD3(ν1) → HF + CD3 reactions is investigated. The dynamics of the nuclei was simulated using trajectory surface hopping and a vibronically and spin-orbit coupled diabatic potential energy matrix. To facilitate the calculations, the fewest switching algorithm of Tully was adapted to the use of a complex diabatic potential energy matrix. For reactions of CHD3 with ground state fluorine atoms, F(2P3/2), the ratio between the previously computed adiabatic cross sections and the non-adiabatic ones was found to range from 1.4 to 2.1. The actual ratio depends on the translational energy and the initial vibrational state of CHD3. The total reactivity of CHD3(ν1 = 1) was found to be always larger than that of CHD3(ν1=0) mainly because of the increase in the cross sections for the HF + CD3 channel. Thus, the inclusion of non-adiabatic transitions in the theoretical treatment cannot resolve the existing disagreement between theory and experiment. Cross sections for the reaction of CHD3 with spin-orbit excited fluorine atoms, F(2P1/2), were found to be significantly smaller than the ones for reaction with F(2P3/2).

  11. Fast Quasi-Adiabatic Gas Cooling: An Experiment Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oss, S.; Gratton, L. M.; Calza, G.; Lopez-Arias, T.

    2012-01-01

    The well-known experiment of the rapid expansion and cooling of the air contained in a bottle is performed with a rapidly responsive, yet very cheap thermometer. The adiabatic, low temperature limit is approached quite closely and measured with our apparatus. A straightforward theoretical model for this process is also presented and discussed.…

  12. Adiabatic frequency conversion with a sign flip in the coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hristova, H. S.; Rangelov, A. A.; Montemezzani, G.; Vitanov, N. V.

    2016-09-01

    Adiabatic frequency conversion is a method recently developed in nonlinear optics [H. Suchowski, D. Oron, A. Arie, and Y. Silberberg, Phys. Rev. A 78, 063821 (2008), 10.1103/PhysRevA.78.063821], using ideas from the technique of rapid adiabatic passage (RAP) via a level crossing in quantum physics. In this method, the coupling coefficients are constant and the phase mismatch is chirped adiabatically. In this work, we propose another method for adiabatic frequency conversion, in which the phase mismatch is constant and the coupling is a pulse-shaped function with a sign flip (i.e., a phase step of π ) at its maximum. Compared to the RAP method, our technique has comparable efficiency but it is simpler to implement for it only needs two bulk crystals with opposite χ(2 ) nonlinearity. Moreover, because our technique requires constant nonzero frequency mismatch and has zero conversion efficiency on exact frequency matching, it can be used as a frequency filter.

  13. When an Adiabatic Irreversible Expansion or Compression Becomes Reversible

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anacleto, Joaquim; Ferreira, J. M.; Soares, A. A.

    2009-01-01

    This paper aims to contribute to a better understanding of the concepts of a "reversible process" and "entropy". For this purpose, an adiabatic irreversible expansion or compression is analysed, by considering that an ideal gas is expanded (compressed), from an initial pressure P[subscript i] to a final pressure P[subscript f], by being placed in…

  14. Failure of geometric electromagnetism in the adiabatic vector Kepler problem

    SciTech Connect

    Anglin, J.R.; Schmiedmayer, J.

    2004-02-01

    The magnetic moment of a particle orbiting a straight current-carrying wire may precess rapidly enough in the wire's magnetic field to justify an adiabatic approximation, eliminating the rapid time dependence of the magnetic moment and leaving only the particle position as a slow degree of freedom. To zeroth order in the adiabatic expansion, the orbits of the particle in the plane perpendicular to the wire are Keplerian ellipses. Higher-order postadiabatic corrections make the orbits precess, but recent analysis of this 'vector Kepler problem' has shown that the effective Hamiltonian incorporating a postadiabatic scalar potential ('geometric electromagnetism') fails to predict the precession correctly, while a heuristic alternative succeeds. In this paper we resolve the apparent failure of the postadiabatic approximation, by pointing out that the correct second-order analysis produces a third Hamiltonian, in which geometric electromagnetism is supplemented by a tensor potential. The heuristic Hamiltonian of Schmiedmayer and Scrinzi is then shown to be a canonical transformation of the correct adiabatic Hamiltonian, to second order. The transformation has the important advantage of removing a 1/r{sup 3} singularity which is an artifact of the adiabatic approximation.

  15. Cosmological solutions in spatially curved universes with adiabatic particle production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aresté Saló, Llibert; de Haro, Jaume

    2017-03-01

    We perform a qualitative and thermodynamic study of two models when one takes into account adiabatic particle production. In the first one, there is a constant particle production rate, which leads to solutions depicting the current cosmic acceleration but without inflation. The other one has solutions that unify the early and late time acceleration. These solutions converge asymptotically to the thermal equilibrium.

  16. Reversibility and energy dissipation in adiabatic superconductor logic.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Naoki; Yamanashi, Yuki; Yoshikawa, Nobuyuki

    2017-03-06

    Reversible computing is considered to be a key technology to achieve an extremely high energy efficiency in future computers. In this study, we investigated the relationship between reversibility and energy dissipation in adiabatic superconductor logic. We analyzed the evolution of phase differences of Josephson junctions in the reversible quantum-flux-parametron (RQFP) gate and confirmed that the phase differences can change time reversibly, which indicates that the RQFP gate is physically, as well as logically, reversible. We calculated energy dissipation required for the RQFP gate to perform a logic operation and numerically demonstrated that the energy dissipation can fall below the thermal limit, or the Landauer bound, by lowering operation frequencies. We also investigated the 1-bit-erasure gate as a logically irreversible gate and the quasi-RQFP gate as a physically irreversible gate. We calculated the energy dissipation of these irreversible gates and showed that the energy dissipation of these gate is dominated by non-adiabatic state changes, which are induced by unwanted interactions between gates due to logical or physical irreversibility. Our results show that, in reversible computing using adiabatic superconductor logic, logical and physical reversibility are required to achieve energy dissipation smaller than the Landauer bound without non-adiabatic processes caused by gate interactions.

  17. Digitized adiabatic quantum computing with a superconducting circuit.

    PubMed

    Barends, R; Shabani, A; Lamata, L; Kelly, J; Mezzacapo, A; Las Heras, U; Babbush, R; Fowler, A G; Campbell, B; Chen, Yu; Chen, Z; Chiaro, B; Dunsworth, A; Jeffrey, E; Lucero, E; Megrant, A; Mutus, J Y; Neeley, M; Neill, C; O'Malley, P J J; Quintana, C; Roushan, P; Sank, D; Vainsencher, A; Wenner, J; White, T C; Solano, E; Neven, H; Martinis, John M

    2016-06-09

    Quantum mechanics can help to solve complex problems in physics and chemistry, provided they can be programmed in a physical device. In adiabatic quantum computing, a system is slowly evolved from the ground state of a simple initial Hamiltonian to a final Hamiltonian that encodes a computational problem. The appeal of this approach lies in the combination of simplicity and generality; in principle, any problem can be encoded. In practice, applications are restricted by limited connectivity, available interactions and noise. A complementary approach is digital quantum computing, which enables the construction of arbitrary interactions and is compatible with error correction, but uses quantum circuit algorithms that are problem-specific. Here we combine the advantages of both approaches by implementing digitized adiabatic quantum computing in a superconducting system. We tomographically probe the system during the digitized evolution and explore the scaling of errors with system size. We then let the full system find the solution to random instances of the one-dimensional Ising problem as well as problem Hamiltonians that involve more complex interactions. This digital quantum simulation of the adiabatic algorithm consists of up to nine qubits and up to 1,000 quantum logic gates. The demonstration of digitized adiabatic quantum computing in the solid state opens a path to synthesizing long-range correlations and solving complex computational problems. When combined with fault-tolerance, our approach becomes a general-purpose algorithm that is scalable.

  18. Fast Quasi-Adiabatic Gas Cooling: An Experiment Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oss, S.; Gratton, L. M.; Calza, G.; Lopez-Arias, T.

    2012-01-01

    The well-known experiment of the rapid expansion and cooling of the air contained in a bottle is performed with a rapidly responsive, yet very cheap thermometer. The adiabatic, low temperature limit is approached quite closely and measured with our apparatus. A straightforward theoretical model for this process is also presented and discussed.…

  19. On Models of Nonlinear Evolution Paths in Adiabatic Quantum Algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jie; Lu, Song-Feng; Samuel, L. Braunstein

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we study two different nonlinear interpolating paths in adiabatic evolution algorithms for solving a particular class of quantum search problems where both the initial and final Hamiltonian are one-dimensional projector Hamiltonians on the corresponding ground state. If the overlap between the initial state and final state of the quantum system is not equal to zero, both of these models can provide a constant time speedup over the usual adiabatic algorithms by increasing some another corresponding “complexity". But when the initial state has a zero overlap with the solution state in the problem, the second model leads to an infinite time complexity of the algorithm for whatever interpolating functions being applied while the first one can still provide a constant running time. However, inspired by a related reference, a variant of the first model can be constructed which also fails for the problem when the overlap is exactly equal to zero if we want to make up the “intrinsic" fault of the second model — an increase in energy. Two concrete theorems are given to serve as explanations why neither of these two models can improve the usual adiabatic evolution algorithms for the phenomenon above. These just tell us what should be noted when using certain nonlinear evolution paths in adiabatic quantum algorithms for some special kind of problems.

  20. A Kinetic Study of the Adiabatic Polymerization of Acrylamide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomson, R. A. M.

    1986-01-01

    Discusses theory, procedures, and results for an experiment which demonstrates the application of basic physics to chemical problems. The experiment involves the adiabatic process, in which polymerization carried out in a vacuum flask is compared to the theoretical prediction of the model with the temperature-time curve obtained in practice. (JN)

  1. Adiabatic perturbation theory and geometry of periodically-driven systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinberg, Phillip; Bukov, Marin; D'Alessio, Luca; Polkovnikov, Anatoli; Vajna, Szabolcs; Kolodrubetz, Michael

    2017-05-01

    We give a systematic review of the adiabatic theorem and the leading non-adiabatic corrections in periodically-driven (Floquet) systems. These corrections have a two-fold origin: (i) conventional ones originating from the gradually changing Floquet Hamiltonian and (ii) corrections originating from changing the micro-motion operator. These corrections conspire to give a Hall-type linear response for non-stroboscopic (time-averaged) observables allowing one to measure the Berry curvature and the Chern number related to the Floquet Hamiltonian, thus extending these concepts to periodically-driven many-body systems. The non-zero Floquet Chern number allows one to realize a Thouless energy pump, where one can adiabatically add energy to the system in discrete units of the driving frequency. We discuss the validity of Floquet Adiabatic Perturbation Theory (FAPT) using five different models covering linear and non-linear few and many-particle systems. We argue that in interacting systems, even in the stable high-frequency regimes, FAPT breaks down at ultra slow ramp rates due to avoided crossings of photon resonances, not captured by the inverse-frequency expansion, leading to a counter-intuitive stronger heating at slower ramp rates. Nevertheless, large windows in the ramp rate are shown to exist for which the physics of interacting driven systems is well captured by FAPT.

  2. A Kinetic Study of the Adiabatic Polymerization of Acrylamide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomson, R. A. M.

    1986-01-01

    Discusses theory, procedures, and results for an experiment which demonstrates the application of basic physics to chemical problems. The experiment involves the adiabatic process, in which polymerization carried out in a vacuum flask is compared to the theoretical prediction of the model with the temperature-time curve obtained in practice. (JN)

  3. Nonadiabatic quantum Liouville and master equations in the adiabatic basis.

    PubMed

    Jang, Seogjoo

    2012-12-14

    A compact form of nonadiabatic molecular Hamiltonian in the basis of adiabatic electronic states and nuclear position states is presented. The Hamiltonian, which includes both the first and the second derivative couplings, is hermitian and thus leads to a standard expression for the quantum Liouville equation for the density operator. With the application of a projection operator technique, a quantum master equation for the diagonal components of the density operator is derived. Under the assumption that nuclear states are much more short ranged compared to electronic states and assuming no singularity, a semi-adiabatic approximation is invoked, which results in expressions for the nonadiabatic molecular Hamiltonian and the quantum Liouville equation that are much more amenable to advanced quantum dynamics calculation. The semi-adiabatic approximation is also applied to a resonance energy transfer system consisting of a donor and an acceptor interacting via Coulomb terms, and explicit detailed expressions for exciton-bath Hamiltonian including all the non-adiabatic terms are derived.

  4. Nonadiabatic quantum Liouville and master equations in the adiabatic basis

    SciTech Connect

    Jang, Seogjoo

    2012-12-14

    A compact form of nonadiabatic molecular Hamiltonian in the basis of adiabatic electronic states and nuclear position states is presented. The Hamiltonian, which includes both the first and the second derivative couplings, is Hermitian and thus leads to a standard expression for the quantum Liouville equation for the density operator. With the application of a projection operator technique, a quantum master equation for the diagonal components of the density operator is derived. Under the assumption that nuclear states are much more short ranged compared to electronic states and assuming no singularity, a semi-adiabatic approximation is invoked, which results in expressions for the nonadiabatic molecular Hamiltonian and the quantum Liouville equation that are much more amenable to advanced quantum dynamics calculation. The semi-adiabatic approximation is also applied to a resonance energy transfer system consisting of a donor and an acceptor interacting via Coulomb terms, and explicit detailed expressions for exciton-bath Hamiltonian including all the non-adiabatic terms are derived.

  5. Adiabatic compression and radiative compression of magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Woods, C.H.

    1980-02-12

    Flux is conserved during mechanical compression of magnetic fields for both nonrelativistic and relativistic compressors. However, the relativistic compressor generates radiation, which can carry up to twice the energy content of the magnetic field compressed adiabatically. The radiation may be either confined or allowed to escape.

  6. Adiabatic quantum computing with phase modulated laser pulses

    PubMed Central

    Goswami, Debabrata

    2005-01-01

    Implementation of quantum logical gates for multilevel systems is demonstrated through decoherence control under the quantum adiabatic method using simple phase modulated laser pulses. We make use of selective population inversion and Hamiltonian evolution with time to achieve such goals robustly instead of the standard unitary transformation language. PMID:17195865

  7. Adiabatic inversion pulses for myocardial T1-mapping

    PubMed Central

    Kellman, Peter; Herzka, Daniel A.; Hansen, Michael Schacht

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the error in T1-estimates using inversion recovery based T1-mapping due to imperfect inversion, and perform a systematic study of adiabatic inversion pulse designs in order to maximize inversion efficiency for values of transverse relaxation (T2) in the myocardium subject to a peak power constraint. Methods The inversion factor for hyperbolic secant (HS) and tangent/hyperbolic tangent (tan/tanh) adiabatic full passage waveforms was calculated using Bloch equations. A brute force search was conducted of design parameters: pulse duration, frequency range, shape parameters, and peak amplitude. A design was selected that maximized the inversion factor over a specified range of amplitude and off-resonance and validated using phantom measurements. Empirical correction for imperfect inversion was performed. Results The tan/tanh adiabatic pulse was found to outperform HS designs, and achieve an inversion factor of 0.96 within ±150 Hz over 25% amplitude range with 14.7 μTesla peak amplitude. T1-mapping errors of the selected design due to imperfect inversion was approx. 4% and could be corrected to <1%. Conclusion Non-ideal inversion leads to significant errors in inversion recovery based T1-mapping. The inversion efficiency of adiabatic pulses is sensitive to transverse relaxation. The tan/tanh design achieved the best performance subject to the peak amplitude constraint. PMID:23722695

  8. When an Adiabatic Irreversible Expansion or Compression Becomes Reversible

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anacleto, Joaquim; Ferreira, J. M.; Soares, A. A.

    2009-01-01

    This paper aims to contribute to a better understanding of the concepts of a "reversible process" and "entropy". For this purpose, an adiabatic irreversible expansion or compression is analysed, by considering that an ideal gas is expanded (compressed), from an initial pressure P[subscript i] to a final pressure P[subscript f], by being placed in…

  9. Digitized adiabatic quantum computing with a superconducting circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barends, R.; Shabani, A.; Lamata, L.; Kelly, J.; Mezzacapo, A.; Heras, U. Las; Babbush, R.; Fowler, A. G.; Campbell, B.; Chen, Yu; Chen, Z.; Chiaro, B.; Dunsworth, A.; Jeffrey, E.; Lucero, E.; Megrant, A.; Mutus, J. Y.; Neeley, M.; Neill, C.; O'Malley, P. J. J.; Quintana, C.; Roushan, P.; Sank, D.; Vainsencher, A.; Wenner, J.; White, T. C.; Solano, E.; Neven, H.; Martinis, John M.

    2016-06-01

    Quantum mechanics can help to solve complex problems in physics and chemistry, provided they can be programmed in a physical device. In adiabatic quantum computing, a system is slowly evolved from the ground state of a simple initial Hamiltonian to a final Hamiltonian that encodes a computational problem. The appeal of this approach lies in the combination of simplicity and generality; in principle, any problem can be encoded. In practice, applications are restricted by limited connectivity, available interactions and noise. A complementary approach is digital quantum computing, which enables the construction of arbitrary interactions and is compatible with error correction, but uses quantum circuit algorithms that are problem-specific. Here we combine the advantages of both approaches by implementing digitized adiabatic quantum computing in a superconducting system. We tomographically probe the system during the digitized evolution and explore the scaling of errors with system size. We then let the full system find the solution to random instances of the one-dimensional Ising problem as well as problem Hamiltonians that involve more complex interactions. This digital quantum simulation of the adiabatic algorithm consists of up to nine qubits and up to 1,000 quantum logic gates. The demonstration of digitized adiabatic quantum computing in the solid state opens a path to synthesizing long-range correlations and solving complex computational problems. When combined with fault-tolerance, our approach becomes a general-purpose algorithm that is scalable.

  10. Non-adiabatic transition probability dependence on conical intersection topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malhado, João Pedro; Hynes, James T.

    2016-11-01

    We derive a closed form analytical expression for the non-adiabatic transition probability for a distribution of trajectories passing through a generic conical intersection (CI), based on the Landau-Zener equation for the non-adiabatic transition probability for a single straight-line trajectory in the CI's vicinity. We investigate the non-adiabatic transition probability's variation with topographical features and find, for the same crossing velocity, no intrinsic difference in efficiency at promoting non-adiabatic decay between peaked and sloped CIs, a result in contrast to the commonly held view. Any increased efficiency of peaked over sloped CIs is thus due to dynamical effects rather than to any increased transition probability of topographical origin. It is also shown that the transition probability depends in general on the direction of approach to the CI, and that the coordinates' reduced mass can affect the transition probability via its influence on the CI topography in mass-scaled coordinates. The resulting predictions compare well with surface hopping simulation results.

  11. Non-adiabatic transition probability dependence on conical intersection topography.

    PubMed

    Malhado, João Pedro; Hynes, James T

    2016-11-21

    We derive a closed form analytical expression for the non-adiabatic transition probability for a distribution of trajectories passing through a generic conical intersection (CI), based on the Landau-Zener equation for the non-adiabatic transition probability for a single straight-line trajectory in the CI's vicinity. We investigate the non-adiabatic transition probability's variation with topographical features and find, for the same crossing velocity, no intrinsic difference in efficiency at promoting non-adiabatic decay between peaked and sloped CIs, a result in contrast to the commonly held view. Any increased efficiency of peaked over sloped CIs is thus due to dynamical effects rather than to any increased transition probability of topographical origin. It is also shown that the transition probability depends in general on the direction of approach to the CI, and that the coordinates' reduced mass can affect the transition probability via its influence on the CI topography in mass-scaled coordinates. The resulting predictions compare well with surface hopping simulation results.

  12. Non-adiabatic effects in F + CHD3 reactive scattering.

    PubMed

    Palma, Juliana; Manthe, Uwe

    2017-06-07

    The effect of non-adiabatic transitions on the F((2)P) + CHD3(ν1) → DF + CHD2 and F((2)P) + CHD3(ν1) → HF + CD3 reactions is investigated. The dynamics of the nuclei was simulated using trajectory surface hopping and a vibronically and spin-orbit coupled diabatic potential energy matrix. To facilitate the calculations, the fewest switching algorithm of Tully was adapted to the use of a complex diabatic potential energy matrix. For reactions of CHD3 with ground state fluorine atoms, F((2)P3/2), the ratio between the previously computed adiabatic cross sections and the non-adiabatic ones was found to range from 1.4 to 2.1. The actual ratio depends on the translational energy and the initial vibrational state of CHD3. The total reactivity of CHD3(ν1 = 1) was found to be always larger than that of CHD3(ν1=0) mainly because of the increase in the cross sections for the HF + CD3 channel. Thus, the inclusion of non-adiabatic transitions in the theoretical treatment cannot resolve the existing disagreement between theory and experiment. Cross sections for the reaction of CHD3 with spin-orbit excited fluorine atoms, F((2)P1/2), were found to be significantly smaller than the ones for reaction with F((2)P3/2).

  13. Non-adiabatic response of relativistic radiation belt electrons to GEM magnetic storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAdams, K. L.; Reeves, G. D.

    The importance of fully adiabatic effects in the relativistic radiation belt electron response to magnetic storms is poorly characterized due to many difficulties in calculating adiabatic flux response. Using the adiabatic flux model of Kim and Chan [1997a] and Los Alamos National Laboratory geosynchronous satellite data, we examine the relative timing of the adiabatic and non-adiabatic flux responses. In the three storms identified by the GEM community for in depth study, the non-adiabatic energization occurs hours earlier than the adiabatic re-energization. The adiabatic energization can account for only 10-20% of the flux increases in the first recovery stages, and only 1% of the flux increase if there is continuing activity.

  14. Carpal tunnel syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... carpal tunnel is caused by typing on a computer, using a mouse, or repeating movements while working, ... special devices, such as keyboards, different types of computer mouse, cushioned mouse pads, and keyboard drawers Having ...

  15. Tarsal tunnel syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Tibial nerve dysfunction; Neuropathy - posterior tibial nerve; Peripheral neuropathy - tibial nerve; Tibial nerve entrapment ... tunnel syndrome is an unusual form of peripheral neuropathy . It occurs when there is damage to the ...

  16. Vacuum tunneling in gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Y. M.; Pak, D. G.

    2011-08-01

    Topologically non-trivial vacuum structures in gravity models with Cartan variables (vielbein and contortion) are considered. We study the possibility of vacuum spacetime tunneling in Einstein gravity assuming that the vielbein may play a fundamental role in quantum gravitational phenomena. It has been shown that in the case of RP3 space topology, the tunneling between non-trivial topological vacuums can be realized by means of Eguchi-Hanson gravitational instanton. In the Riemann-Cartan geometric approach to quantum gravity, the vacuum tunneling can be provided by means of contortion quantum fluctuations. We define a double self-duality condition for the contortion and give explicit self-dual configurations which can contribute to vacuum tunneling amplitude.

  17. Endoscopic cubital tunnel release.

    PubMed

    Cobb, Tyson K

    2010-10-01

    A minimally invasive endoscopic approach has been successfully applied to surgical treatment of cubital tunnel syndrome. This procedure allows for smaller incisions with faster recovery time. This article details relevant surgical anatomy, indications, contraindications, surgical technique, complications, and postoperative management.

  18. Inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khanna, S. K.; Lambe, J.

    1983-01-01

    Inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy is a useful technique for the study of vibrational modes of molecules adsorbed on the surface of oxide layers in a metal-insulator-metal tunnel junction. The technique involves studying the effects of adsorbed molecules on the tunneling spectrum of such junctions. The data give useful information about the structure, bonding, and orientation of adsorbed molecules. One of the major advantages of inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy is its sensitivity. It is capable of detecting on the order of 10 to the 10th molecules (a fraction of a monolayer) on a 1 sq mm junction. It has been successfully used in studies of catalysis, biology, trace impurity detection, and electronic excitations. Because of its high sensitivity, this technique shows great promise in the area of solid-state electronic chemical sensing.

  19. Quantum tunneling with friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokieda, M.; Hagino, K.

    2017-05-01

    Using the phenomenological quantum friction models introduced by P. Caldirola [Nuovo Cimento 18, 393 (1941), 10.1007/BF02960144] and E. Kanai [Prog. Theor. Phys. 3, 440 (1948), 10.1143/ptp/3.4.440], M. D. Kostin [J. Chem. Phys. 57, 3589 (1972), 10.1063/1.1678812], and K. Albrecht [Phys. Lett. B 56, 127 (1975), 10.1016/0370-2693(75)90283-X], we study quantum tunneling of a one-dimensional potential in the presence of energy dissipation. To this end, we calculate the tunneling probability using a time-dependent wave-packet method. The friction reduces the tunneling probability. We show that the three models provide similar penetrabilities to each other, among which the Caldirola-Kanai model requires the least numerical effort. We also discuss the effect of energy dissipation on quantum tunneling in terms of barrier distributions.

  20. Holographic tunneling wave function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conti, Gabriele; Hertog, Thomas; van der Woerd, Ellen

    2015-12-01

    The Hartle-Hawking wave function in cosmology can be viewed as a decaying wave function with anti-de Sitter (AdS) boundary conditions. We show that the growing wave function in AdS familiar from Euclidean AdS/CFT is equivalent, semiclassically and up to surface terms, to the tunneling wave function in cosmology. The cosmological measure in the tunneling state is given by the partition function of certain relevant deformations of CFTs on a locally AdS boundary. We compute the partition function of finite constant mass deformations of the O( N ) vector model on the round three sphere and show this qualitatively reproduces the behaviour of the tunneling wave function in Einstein gravity coupled to a positive cosmological constant and a massive scalar. We find the amplitudes of inhomogeneities are not damped in the holographic tunneling state.

  1. Coupled wave-packets for non-adiabatic molecular dynamics: a generalization of Gaussian wave-packet dynamics to multiple potential energy surfaces

    DOE PAGES

    White, Alexander James; Tretiak, Sergei; Mozyrsky, Dima V.

    2016-04-25

    Accurate simulation of the non-adiabatic dynamics of molecules in excited electronic states is key to understanding molecular photo-physical processes. Here we present a novel method, based on a semiclassical approximation, that is as efficient as the commonly used mean field Ehrenfest or ad hoc surface hopping methods and properly accounts for interference and decoherence effects. This novel method is an extension of Heller's thawed Gaussian wave-packet dynamics that includes coupling between potential energy surfaces. By studying several standard test problems we demonstrate that the accuracy of the method can be systematically improved while maintaining high efficiency. The method is suitablemore » for investigating the role of quantum coherence in the non-adiabatic dynamics of many-atom molecules.« less

  2. Coupled wave-packets for non-adiabatic molecular dynamics: a generalization of Gaussian wave-packet dynamics to multiple potential energy surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    White, Alexander James; Tretiak, Sergei; Mozyrsky, Dima V.

    2016-04-25

    Accurate simulation of the non-adiabatic dynamics of molecules in excited electronic states is key to understanding molecular photo-physical processes. Here we present a novel method, based on a semiclassical approximation, that is as efficient as the commonly used mean field Ehrenfest or ad hoc surface hopping methods and properly accounts for interference and decoherence effects. This novel method is an extension of Heller's thawed Gaussian wave-packet dynamics that includes coupling between potential energy surfaces. By studying several standard test problems we demonstrate that the accuracy of the method can be systematically improved while maintaining high efficiency. The method is suitable for investigating the role of quantum coherence in the non-adiabatic dynamics of many-atom molecules.

  3. Cavity QED implementation of non-adiabatic holonomies for universal quantum gates in decoherence-free subspaces with nitrogen-vacancy centers.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jian; Yu, Wei-Can; Gao, Yu-Mei; Xue, Zheng-Yuan

    2015-06-01

    A cavity QED implementation of the non-adiabatic holonomic quantum computation in decoherence-free subspaces is proposed with nitrogen-vacancy centers coupled commonly to the whispering-gallery mode of a microsphere cavity, where a universal set of quantum gates can be realized on the qubits. In our implementation, with the assistant of the appropriate driving fields, the quantum evolution is insensitive to the cavity field state, which is only virtually excited. The implemented non-adiabatic holonomies, utilizing optical transitions in the Λ type of three-level configuration of the nitrogen-vacancy centers, can be used to construct a universal set of quantum gates on the encoded logical qubits. Therefore, our scheme opens up the possibility of realizing universal holonomic quantum computation with cavity assisted interaction on solid-state spins characterized by long coherence times.

  4. Coherent states, quantum gravity, and the Born- Oppenheimer approximation. II. Compact Lie groups

    SciTech Connect

    Stottmeister, Alexander Thiemann, Thomas

    2016-07-15

    In this article, the second of three, we discuss and develop the basis of a Weyl quantisation for compact Lie groups aiming at loop quantum gravity-type models. This Weyl quantisation may serve as the main mathematical tool to implement the program of space adiabatic perturbation theory in such models. As we already argued in our first article, space adiabatic perturbation theory offers an ideal framework to overcome the obstacles that hinder the direct implementation of the conventional Born-Oppenheimer approach in the canonical formulation of loop quantum gravity. Additionally, we conjecture the existence of a new form of the Segal-Bargmann-Hall “coherent state” transform for compact Lie groups G, which we prove for G = U(1){sup n} and support by numerical evidence for G = SU(2). The reason for conjoining this conjecture with the main topic of this article originates in the observation that the coherent state transform can be used as a basic building block of a coherent state quantisation (Berezin quantisation) for compact Lie groups G. But, as Weyl and Berezin quantisation for ℝ{sup 2d} are intimately related by heat kernel evolution, it is natural to ask whether a similar connection exists for compact Lie groups as well. Moreover, since the formulation of space adiabatic perturbation theory requires a (deformation) quantisation as minimal input, we analyse the question to what extent the coherent state quantisation, defined by the Segal-Bargmann-Hall transform, can serve as basis of the former.

  5. Coherent states, quantum gravity, and the Born- Oppenheimer approximation. II. Compact Lie groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stottmeister, Alexander; Thiemann, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    In this article, the second of three, we discuss and develop the basis of a Weyl quantisation for compact Lie groups aiming at loop quantum gravity-type models. This Weyl quantisation may serve as the main mathematical tool to implement the program of space adiabatic perturbation theory in such models. As we already argued in our first article, space adiabatic perturbation theory offers an ideal framework to overcome the obstacles that hinder the direct implementation of the conventional Born-Oppenheimer approach in the canonical formulation of loop quantum gravity. Additionally, we conjecture the existence of a new form of the Segal-Bargmann-Hall "coherent state" transform for compact Lie groups G, which we prove for G = U(1)n and support by numerical evidence for G = SU(2). The reason for conjoining this conjecture with the main topic of this article originates in the observation that the coherent state transform can be used as a basic building block of a coherent state quantisation (Berezin quantisation) for compact Lie groups G. But, as Weyl and Berezin quantisation for ℝ2d are intimately related by heat kernel evolution, it is natural to ask whether a similar connection exists for compact Lie groups as well. Moreover, since the formulation of space adiabatic perturbation theory requires a (deformation) quantisation as minimal input, we analyse the question to what extent the coherent state quantisation, defined by the Segal-Bargmann-Hall transform, can serve as basis of the former.

  6. Band structure of topological insulators from noise measurements in tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cascales, Juan Pedro; Martínez, Isidoro; Katmis, Ferhat; Chang, Cui-Zu; Guerrero, Rubén; Moodera, Jagadeesh S.; Aliev, Farkhad G.

    2015-12-01

    The unique properties of spin-polarized surface or edge states in topological insulators (TIs) make these quantum coherent systems interesting from the point of view of both fundamental physics and their implementation in low power spintronic devices. Here we present such a study in TIs, through tunneling and noise spectroscopy utilizing TI/Al2O3/Co tunnel junctions with bottom TI electrodes of either Bi2Te3 or Bi2Se3. We demonstrate that features related to the band structure of the TI materials show up in the tunneling conductance and even more clearly through low frequency noise measurements. The bias dependence of 1/f noise reveals peaks at specific energies corresponding to band structure features of the TI. TI tunnel junctions could thus simplify the study of the properties of such quantum coherent systems that can further lead to the manipulation of their spin-polarized properties for technological purposes.

  7. Band structure of topological insulators from noise measurements in tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cascales Sandoval, Juan Pedro; Martinez, Isidoro; Guerrero, Ruben; Chang, Cui-Zu; Katmis, Ferhat; Moodera, Jagadeesh; Aliev, Farkhad

    The unique properties of spin-polarized surface or edge states in topological insulators (TIs) make these quantum coherent systems interesting from the point of view of both fundamental physics and their implementation in low power spintronic devices. Here we present such a study in TIs, through tunnelling and noise spectroscopy utilizing TI/Al2O3/Co tunnel junctions with bottom TI electrodes of either Bi2Te3 or Bi2Se3. We demonstrate that features related to the band structure of the TI materials show up in the tunnelling conductance and even more clearly through low frequency noise measurements. The bias dependence of 1/f noise reveals peaks at specific energies corresponding to band structure features of the TI. TI tunnel junctions could thus simplify the study of the properties of such quantum coherent systems that can further lead to the manipulation of their spin-polarized properties for technological purposes.

  8. Full Scale Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1931-01-01

    Construction of motor fairing for the fan motors of the Full-Scale Tunnel (FST). The motors and their supporting structures were enclosed in aerodynamically smooth fairings to minimize resistance to the air flow. Close examination of this photograph reveals the complicated nature of constructing a wind tunnel. This motor fairing, like almost every other structure in the FST, represents a one-of-a-kind installation.

  9. Electron tunnel sensor technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenny, T. W.; Waltman, S. B.; Reynolds, J. K.; Kaiser, W. J.

    1991-01-01

    Researchers designed and constructed a novel electron tunnel sensor which takes advantage of the mechanical properties of micro-machined silicon. For the first time, electrostatic forces are used to control the tunnel electrode separation, thereby avoiding the thermal drift and noise problems associated with piezoelectric actuators. The entire structure is composed of micro-machined silicon single crystals, including a folded cantilever spring and a tip. The application of this sensor to the development of a sensitive accelerometer is described.

  10. Dynamic mapping of conical intersection seams: A general method for incorporating the geometric phase in adiabatic dynamics in polyatomic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Changjian; Malbon, Christopher L.; Yarkony, David R.; Guo, Hua

    2017-07-01

    The incorporation of the geometric phase in single-state adiabatic dynamics near a conical intersection (CI) seam has so far been restricted to molecular systems with high symmetry or simple model Hamiltonians. This is due to the fact that the ab initio determined derivative coupling (DC) in a multi-dimensional space is not curl-free, thus making its line integral path dependent. In a recent work [C. L. Malbon et al., J. Chem. Phys. 145, 234111 (2016)], we proposed a new and general approach based on an ab initio determined diabatic representation consisting of only two electronic states, in which the DC is completely removable, so that its line integral is path independent in the simply connected domains that exclude the CI seam. Then with the CIs included, the line integral of the single-valued DC can be used to construct the complex geometry-dependent phase needed to exactly eliminate the double-valued character of the real-valued adiabatic electronic wavefunction. This geometry-dependent phase gives rise to a vector potential which, when included in the adiabatic representation, rigorously accounts for the geometric phase in a system with an arbitrary locus of the CI seam and an arbitrary number of internal coordinates. In this work, we demonstrate this approach in a three-dimensional treatment of the tunneling facilitated dissociation of the S1 state of phenol, which is affected by a Cs symmetry allowed but otherwise accidental seam of CI. Here, since the space is three-dimensional rather than two-dimensional, the seam is a curve rather than a point. The nodal structure of the ground state vibronic wavefunction is shown to map out the seam of CI.

  11. Sub-adiabatic perpendicular electron heating across high-Mach number collisionless shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundkvist, D. J.; Mozer, F.

    2012-12-01

    Spacecraft observations of a high Mach number quasi-perpendicular bow shock with high plasma beta have revealed electrons that were sub-adiabatic through the shock ramp because they were less heated than expected from conservation of the first adiabatic invariant. This stands out in contrast to existing theories of electron heating at collisionless shocks in which the electrons are adiabatically heated through compression or more-than-adiabatically heated due to additional effects such as anomalous resistivity induced by microinstabilites.

  12. The Beginner's Guide to Wind Tunnels with TunnelSim and TunnelSys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benson, Thomas J.; Galica, Carol A.; Vila, Anthony J.

    2010-01-01

    The Beginner's Guide to Wind Tunnels is a Web-based, on-line textbook that explains and demonstrates the history, physics, and mathematics involved with wind tunnels and wind tunnel testing. The Web site contains several interactive computer programs to demonstrate scientific principles. TunnelSim is an interactive, educational computer program that demonstrates basic wind tunnel design and operation. TunnelSim is a Java (Sun Microsystems Inc.) applet that solves the continuity and Bernoulli equations to determine the velocity and pressure throughout a tunnel design. TunnelSys is a group of Java applications that mimic wind tunnel testing techniques. Using TunnelSys, a team of students designs, tests, and post-processes the data for a virtual, low speed, and aircraft wing.

  13. Coherence versus interferometric resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Luis, Alfredo

    2010-06-15

    We examine the relation between second-order coherence and resolution in the interferometric detection of phase shifts. While for classical thermal light resolution and second-order coherence are synonymous, we show that for quantum light beams reaching optimum precision second-order coherence and resolution become antithetical.

  14. Coherence, the Rebel Angel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buchmann, Margret; Floden, Robert E.

    1992-01-01

    Among concepts that seem to be the guardian angels of school reform, coherence is a rebel angel, advancing human learning, but escaping control. Coherence must not be confused with consistency. It allows for change and imagination but remains true to concepts and experiences that construct coherence without fabricating consistency. (SLD)

  15. Novel tunnelling barriers for spin tunnelling junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Manish

    A tunnel junction consists of two metal electrodes separated by an insulating barrier thin enough for electrons to tunnel across. With ferromagnetic electrodes, a spin-dependent tunnelling (SDT) effect, electrons of one spin tunnelling preferentially over those of the other, is observed. When the electrodes are switched from a parallel to an anti-parallel alignment, the tunnelling current changes and gives rise to tunnelling magnetoresistance (TMR). Since 1995, interest in SDT junctions has increased as TMR in excess of 15% has been achieved, making viable their use in non-volatile memory and magnetic sensors applications. In this work, two key issues of SDT junctions are addressed: spin polarization of the electrode and the tunnel barrier. Spin polarization, a measure of electron states of up and down spins, is widely believed to be an intrinsic property of the electrode. In junctions with barriers formed by plasma oxidation of composite Ta/Al films, the surprising effect of the resistance being lower with the electrodes aligned antiparallel was observed. Junctions with Ta/Al barriers and those with Al/Ta barriers behave opposite to each other and exhibit an inversion only when the Ta side of the barrier is biased positive. This demonstrates the spin polarization is also influenced by the barrier material. Half-metallic materials such as magnetite (Fe3O4) have a gap in one of the spins' states at the fermi level, thus having a theoretical spin polarization of 100%. In this work, an ultrathin Fe3O 4 layer was added between the Al2O3 barrier and the NiFe electrode. The TMR increased sharply from 4% to 16% for thicknesses less than 0.5nm. As the tunnel barrier must be thinner than 2nm, choice of the barrier material becomes critical. Presently, Al2O3 is the best known barrier. In looking for alternative materials, AlN and AlON were formed by plasma nitridation and oxy-nitridation of deposited Al films. TMR results of up to 18% and resistance-area products down to 3

  16. COHERENCE PROPERTIES OF ELECTROMAGNETIC RADIATION,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    ELECTROMAGNETIC RADIATION , COHERENT SCATTERING), (*COHERENT SCATTERING, ELECTROMAGNETIC RADIATION ), LIGHT, INTERFERENCE, INTENSITY, STATISTICAL FUNCTIONS, QUANTUM THEORY, BOSONS, INTERFEROMETERS, CHINA

  17. Rabi noise spectroscopy of individual two-level tunneling defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matityahu, Shlomi; Lisenfeld, Jürgen; Bilmes, Alexander; Shnirman, Alexander; Weiss, Georg; Ustinov, Alexey V.; Schechter, Moshe

    2017-06-01

    Understanding the nature of two-level tunneling defects is important for minimizing their disruptive effects in various nanodevices. By exploiting the resonant coupling of these defects to a superconducting qubit, one can probe and coherently manipulate them individually. In this work, we utilize a phase qubit to induce Rabi oscillations of single tunneling defects and measure their dephasing rates as a function of the defect's asymmetry energy, which is tuned by an applied strain. The dephasing rates scale quadratically with the external strain and are inversely proportional to the Rabi frequency. These results are analyzed and explained within a model of interacting defects, in which pure dephasing of coherent high-frequency (gigahertz) defects is caused by interaction with incoherent low-frequency thermally excited defects. Our analysis sets an upper bound for the relaxation rates of thermally excited defects interacting strongly with strain fields.

  18. Quantum-like adiabatic light transfer in photo-induced waveguides with longitudinally varying detuning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oukraou, Hassan; Vittadello, Laura; Coda, Virginie; Ciret, Charles; Alonzo, Massimo; Rangelov, Andon A.; Vitanov, Nikolay V.; Montemezzani, Germano

    2017-06-01

    Besides longitudinally varying coupling constants, the longitudinal variation of the propagation constants leads to an additional parameter for the control of adiabatic light transfer in coupled waveguide systems. Examples are given using waveguides structures recorded with the help of the photorefractive effect and mimicking the quantum processes of Rapid Adiabatic Passage (RAP) and two-state STImulated Raman Adiabatic Passage (two-state STIRAP).

  19. Status of the Linac Coherent Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Galayda, John N.; /SLAC

    2011-11-04

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) is a free electron laser facility in construction at Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. It is designed to operate in the wavelength range 0.15-1.5 nanometers. At the time of this conference, civil construction of new tunnels and buildings is complete, the necessary modifications to the SLAC linac are complete, and the undulator system and x-ray optics/diagnostics are being installed. The electron gun, 135 MeV injector linac and 250 MeV bunch compressor were commissioned in 2007. Accelerator commissioning activities are presently devoted to the achievement of performance goals for the completed 14 GeV linac.

  20. Boundary Layer Transition on Slender Cones in Conventional and Low Disturbance Mach 6 Wind Tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horvath, Thomas J.; Berry, Scott A.; Hollis, Brian R.; Chang, Chau-Lyan; Singer, Bart A.

    2002-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted on a 5-degree half-angle cone and a 5-degree half-angle flared cone in a conventional Mach 6 wind tunnel to examine the effects of facility noise on boundary layer transition. The influence of tunnel noise was inferred by comparing transition onset locations determined from the present test to that previously obtained in a Mach 6 low disturbance quiet tunnel. Together, the two sets of experiments are believed to represent the first direct comparison of transition onset between a conventional and a low disturbance wind tunnel using a common test model and transition detection technique. In the present conventional hypersonic tunnel experiment, separate measurements of heat transfer and adiabatic wall temperatures were obtained on the conical models at small angles of attack over a range of Reynolds numbers, which resulted in laminar, transitional, and turbulent flow. Smooth model turbulent heating distributions are compared to that obtained with transition forced via discrete surface roughness. The model nosetip radius was varied to examine the effects of bluntness on transition onset. Despite wall to total temperature differences between the transient heating measurements and the adiabatic wall temperature measurement, the two methods for determining sharp cone transition onset generally yielded equivalent locations. In the 'noisy' mode of the hypersonic low disturbance tunnel, transition onset occurred earlier than that measured in the conventional hypersonic tunnel, suggesting higher levels of freestream acoustic radiation relative to the conventional tunnel. At comparable freestream conditions, the transition onset Reynolds number under low disturbance conditions was a factor of 1.3 greater than that measured on flared cone in the LaRC conventional hypersonic tunnel and a factor of 1.6 greater that the flared cone run in the low disturbance tunnel run 'noisy'. Navier-Stokes mean flow computations and linear stability

  1. Sequential mechanism of electron transport in the resonant tunneling diode with thick barriers

    SciTech Connect

    Alkeev, N. V. Averin, S. V.; Dorofeev, A. A.; Velling, P.; Khorenko, E.; Prost, W.; Tegude, F. J.

    2007-02-15

    A frequency-dependent impedance analysis (0.1-50 GHz) of an InGaAs/InAlAs-based resonant tunneling diode with a 5-nm-wide well and 5-nm-thick barriers showed that the transport mechanism in such a diode is mostly sequential, rather than coherent, which is consistent with estimates. The possibility of determining the coherent and sequential mechanism fractions in the electron transport through the resonant tunneling diode by its frequency dependence on the impedance is discussed.

  2. Dynamical Control of Matter-Wave Tunneling in Periodic Potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lignier, H.; Sias, C.; Ciampini, D.; Singh, Y.; Zenesini, A.; Morsch, O.; Arimondo, E.

    2007-11-01

    We report on measurements of dynamical suppression of interwell tunneling of a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) in a strongly driven optical lattice. The strong driving is a sinusoidal shaking of the lattice corresponding to a time-varying linear potential, and the tunneling is measured by letting the BEC freely expand in the lattice. The measured tunneling rate is reduced and, for certain values of the shaking parameter, completely suppressed. Our results are in excellent agreement with theoretical predictions. Furthermore, we have verified that, in general, the strong shaking does not destroy the phase coherence of the BEC, opening up the possibility of realizing quantum phase transitions by using the shaking strength as the control parameter.

  3. Resonant tunneling in high-T{sub c} superconductors.

    SciTech Connect

    Abrikosov, A. A.; Materials Science Division

    1998-01-01

    A review is presented of the author's work on resonance tunneling as an electron transport mechanism along the c axis in high-temperature layered cuprates. A formulation of the problem is given, qualitative aspects of the mechanism are described, and physical properties calculated. Comparisons are made with experimental data for the temperature dependence of normal conductivity, the frequency dependence of optical conductivity, and the stationary supercurrent along the c axis. For the latter, the resonance tunneling coherence of different centers is shown to be of crucial importance. Weakened interplane coupling and vortex fluctuations are invoked to explain the sharp drop in {Tc} and the rise in the 2{Delta}(0)/{Tc} ratio with decreasing oxygen content. Simple example models are given to demonstrate major aspects of resonance tunneling.

  4. Noise reduction in tunnels by hard rough surfaces.

    PubMed

    Law, Ming Kan; Li, Kai Ming; Leung, Chun Wah

    2008-08-01

    This paper examines the feasibility of using two-dimensional hard rough surfaces to reduce noise levels in traffic tunnels with perfectly reflecting boundaries. First, the Twersky boss model is used to estimate the acoustic impedance of a hard rough surface. Second, an image source model is then used to compute the propagation of sound in a long rectangular enclosure with finite impedance. The total sound fields are calculated by summing the contributions from all image sources coherently. Two model tunnels are built to validate the proposed model experimentally. Finally, a case study for a realistic geometrical configuration is presented to explore the use of hard rough surfaces for reducing traffic noise in a tunnel which is constructed with hard boundaries.

  5. Klein tunneling in driven-dissipative photonic graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozawa, Tomoki; Amo, Alberto; Bloch, Jacqueline; Carusotto, Iacopo

    2017-07-01

    We theoretically investigate Klein tunneling processes in photonic artificial graphene. Klein tunneling is a phenomenon in which a particle with Dirac dispersion going through a potential step shows a characteristic angle- and energy-dependent transmission. We consider a generic photonic system consisting of a honeycomb-shaped array of sites with losses, illuminated by coherent monochromatic light. We show how the transmission and reflection coefficients can be obtained from the steady-state field profile of the driven-dissipative system. Despite the presence of photonic losses, we recover the main scattering features predicted by the general theory of Klein tunneling. Signatures of negative refraction and the orientation dependence of the intervalley scattering are also highlighted. Our results will stimulate the experimental study of intricate transport phenomena using driven-dissipative photonic simulators.

  6. Hot Electrons Regain Coherence in Semiconducting Nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiner, Jonathan; Nayak, Abhay Kumar; Avraham, Nurit; Norris, Andrew; Yan, Binghai; Fulga, Ion Cosma; Kang, Jung-Hyun; Karzig, Toesten; Shtrikman, Hadas; Beidenkopf, Haim

    2017-04-01

    The higher the energy of a particle is above equilibrium, the faster it relaxes because of the growing phase space of available electronic states it can interact with. In the relaxation process, phase coherence is lost, thus limiting high-energy quantum control and manipulation. In one-dimensional systems, high relaxation rates are expected to destabilize electronic quasiparticles. Here, we show that the decoherence induced by relaxation of hot electrons in one-dimensional semiconducting nanowires evolves nonmonotonically with energy such that above a certain threshold hot electrons regain stability with increasing energy. We directly observe this phenomenon by visualizing, for the first time, the interference patterns of the quasi-one-dimensional electrons using scanning tunneling microscopy. We visualize the phase coherence length of the one-dimensional electrons, as well as their phase coherence time, captured by crystallographic Fabry-Pèrot resonators. A remarkable agreement with a theoretical model reveals that the nonmonotonic behavior is driven by the unique manner in which one-dimensional hot electrons interact with the cold electrons occupying the Fermi sea. This newly discovered relaxation profile suggests a high-energy regime for operating quantum applications that necessitate extended coherence or long thermalization times, and may stabilize electronic quasiparticles in one dimension.

  7. Suppression of tunneling rate fluctuations in tunnel field-effect transistors by enhancing tunneling probability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Takahiro; Migita, Shinji; Fukuda, Koichi; Asai, Hidehiro; Morita, Yukinori; Mizubayashi, Wataru; Liu, Yongxun; O'uchi, Shin-ichi; Fuketa, Hiroshi; Otsuka, Shintaro; Yasuda, Tetsuji; Masahara, Meishoku; Ota, Hiroyuki; Matsukawa, Takashi

    2017-04-01

    This paper discusses the impact of the tunneling probability on the variability of tunnel field-effect transistors (TFETs). Isoelectronic trap (IET) technology, which enhances the tunneling current in TFETs, is used to suppress the variability of the ON current and threshold voltage. The simulation results show that suppressing the tunneling rate fluctuations results in suppression of the variability. In addition, a formula describing the relationship between the tunneling rate fluctuations and the electric field strength is derived based on Kane’s band-to-band tunneling model. This formula indicates that the magnitude of the tunneling rate fluctuations is proportional to the magnitude of the fluctuations in the electric field strength and a higher tunneling probability results in a lower variability. The derived relationship is universally valid for any technologies that exploit enhancement of the tunneling probability, including IET technology, channel material engineering, heterojunctions, strain engineering, etc.

  8. Sideband excitation of trapped ions by rapid adiabatic passage for manipulation of motional states

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, T.; Nomura, S.; Toyoda, K.; Urabe, S.

    2011-09-15

    We describe an analysis and experimental results of the manipulation of motional states of a single trapped {sup 40}Ca{sup +} ion based on sideband excitation by rapid adiabatic passage. When the sideband transition is excited by rapid adiabatic passage, adiabaticity may be affected by ac Stark shifts. We investigate the influence of ac Stark shifts and compensate for these shifts with an additional laser field. This makes the population transfer by rapid adiabatic passage more robust with respect to experimental parameters. Finally, we manipulate the motional states and generate motional Fock states of a single {sup 40}Ca{sup +} ion by rapid adiabatic passage with ac Stark compensation.

  9. Single Electron Tunneling

    SciTech Connect

    Ruggiero, Steven T.

    2005-07-25

    Financial support for this project has led to advances in the science of single-electron phenomena. Our group reported the first observation of the so-called ''Coulomb Staircase'', which was produced by tunneling into ultra-small metal particles. This work showed well-defined tunneling voltage steps of width e/C and height e/RC, demonstrating tunneling quantized on the single-electron level. This work was published in a now well-cited Physical Review Letter. Single-electron physics is now a major sub-field of condensed-matter physics, and fundamental work in the area continues to be conducted by tunneling in ultra-small metal particles. In addition, there are now single-electron transistors that add a controlling gate to modulate the charge on ultra-small photolithographically defined capacitive elements. Single-electron transistors are now at the heart of at least one experimental quantum-computer element, and single-electron transistor pumps may soon be used to define fundamental quantities such as the farad (capacitance) and the ampere (current). Novel computer technology based on single-electron quantum dots is also being developed. In related work, our group played the leading role in the explanation of experimental results observed during the initial phases of tunneling experiments with the high-temperature superconductors. When so-called ''multiple-gap'' tunneling was reported, the phenomenon was correctly identified by our group as single-electron tunneling in small grains in the material. The main focus throughout this project has been to explore single electron phenomena both in traditional tunneling formats of the type metal/insulator/particles/insulator/metal and using scanning tunneling microscopy to probe few-particle systems. This has been done under varying conditions of temperature, applied magnetic field, and with different materials systems. These have included metals, semi-metals, and superconductors. Amongst a number of results, we have

  10. Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerman, Gregory R.

    1994-01-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome is a neuropathy resulting from compression of the median nerve as it passes through a narrow tunnel in the wrist on its way to the hand. The lack of precise objective and clinical tests, along with symptoms that are synonymous with other syndromes in the upper extremity, cause carpal tunnel syndrome to appear to be a rare entity in athletics. However, it should not be ruled out as a possible etiology of upper extremity paralysis in the athlete. More typically, carpal tunnel syndrome is the most common peripheral entrapment neuropathy encountered in industry. Treatment may include rest and/or splinting of the involved wrist, ice application, galvanic stimulation, or iontophoresis to reduce inflammation, and then transition to heat modalities and therapeutic exercises for developing flexibility, strength, and endurance. In addition, an ergonomic assessment should be conducted, resulting in modifications to accommodate the carpal tunnel syndrome patient. ImagesFig 3.Fig 4.Fig 5.Fig 6.Fig 7. PMID:16558255

  11. Condensate Mixtures and Tunneling

    SciTech Connect

    Timmermans, E.

    1998-09-14

    The experimental study of condensate mixtures is a particularly exciting application of the recently developed atomic-trap Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) technology: such multiple condensates represent the first laboratory systems of distinguishable boson superfluid mixtures. In addition, as the authors point out in this paper, the possibility of inter-condensate tunneling greatly enhances the richness of the condensate mixture physics. Not only does tunneling give rise to the oscillating particle currents between condensates of different chemical potentials, such as those studied extensively in the condensed matter Josephson junction experiments, it also affects the near-equilibrium dynamics and stability of the condensate mixtures. In particular, the stabilizing influence of tunneling with respect to spatial separation (phase separation) could be of considerable practical importance to the atomic trap systems. Furthermore, the creation of mixtures of atomic and molecular condensates could introduce a novel type of tunneling process, involving the conversion of a pair of atomic condensate bosons into a single molecular condensate boson. The static description of condensate mixtures with such type of pair tunneling suggests the possibility of observing dilute condensates with the liquid-like property of a self-determined density.

  12. The theory of electro-magnetic radiation of electron transiting through the resonance-tunnel structure

    SciTech Connect

    Tkach, M.; Seti, Ju.; Voitsekhivska, O.; Fartushynsky, R.

    2009-12-14

    The quasi-stationary electron states are studied in the three-barrier resonance-tunnel structure which is the basic element of coherent quantum cascade lasers. In the models of rectangular and delta-barrier potentials there is established theory of evolution and collapse of double resonance complexes in a symmetric resonance-tunnel structure. The induced conductivity of nano-system is calculated within the both models. It is shown that the negative induced conductivity of three-barrier resonance-tunnel structure in delta-barrier model is dozens times smaller than more realistic magnitudes obtained within the rectangular potentials model.

  13. Use of coherence and phase data between two receivers in evaluation of noise environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piersol, A. G.

    1978-01-01

    For certain types of noise control problems, where transducers cannot be mounted on suspected sources, valuable information can often be obtained by comparing the coherence and phase data measured between two closely spaced microphones with analytical models deduced from the physics of the problem. However, the application of such analysis techniques must be pursued with care, particularly when the measurements are made in a reverberant area. A simple illustration is presented where the acoustic field in the test section of a wind tunnel is evaluated by modelling the field as a combination of diffuse noise due to the boundary layer turbulence in the test section and propagating noise generated by the tunnel fan and possible flow disturbances outside the test section. The coherence and phase between two closely spaced microphones in the tunnel test section are predicted for various ratios of diffuse to propagating noise contributions and compared to actual measurements under several different tunnel operating conditions.

  14. Steam bottoming cycle for an adiabatic diesel engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poulin, E.; Demier, R.; Krepchin, I.; Walker, D.

    1984-01-01

    Steam bottoming cycles using adiabatic diesel engine exhaust heat which projected substantial performance and economic benefits for long haul trucks were studied. Steam cycle and system component variables, system cost, size and performance were analyzed. An 811 K/6.90 MPa state of the art reciprocating expander steam system with a monotube boiler and radiator core condenser was selected for preliminary design. The costs of the diesel with bottoming system (TC/B) and a NASA specified turbocompound adiabatic diesel with aftercooling with the same total output were compared, the annual fuel savings less the added maintenance cost was determined to cover the increase initial cost of the TC/B system in a payback period of 2.3 years. Steam bottoming system freeze protection strategies were developed, technological advances required for improved system reliability are considered and the cost and performance of advanced systes are evaluated.

  15. Adiabatic approximation and fluctuations in exciton-polariton condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobrovska, Nataliya; Matuszewski, Michał

    2015-07-01

    We study the relation between the models commonly used to describe the dynamics of nonresonantly pumped exciton-polariton condensates, namely the ones described by the complex Ginzburg-Landau equation, and by the open-dissipative Gross-Pitaevskii equation including a separate equation for the reservoir density. In particular, we focus on the validity of the adiabatic approximation and small density fluctuations approximation that allow one to reduce the coupled condensate-reservoir dynamics to a single partial differential equation. We find that the adiabatic approximation consists of three independent analytical conditions that have to be fulfilled simultaneously. By investigating stochastic versions of the two corresponding models, we verify that the breakdown of these approximations can lead to discrepancies in correlation lengths and distributions of fluctuations. Additionally, we consider the phase diffusion and number fluctuations of a condensate in a box, and show that self-consistent description requires treatment beyond the typical Bogoliubov approximation.

  16. Multi-excitation adiabatic quantum-flux-parametron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Kun; Takeuchi, Naoki; Ando, Takumi; Yamanashi, Yuki; Yoshikawa, Nobuyuki

    2017-04-01

    Adiabatic quantum-flux-parametron (AQFP) circuits are very low-power due to zero static power consumption and adiabatic switching operations. However, compared to other superconducting circuits, such as rapid single-flux-quantum logic, the operation frequency is relatively low and the latency is relatively large. In this work, we propose multi-excitation AQFP (ME-AQFP) circuits for high-speed and low-latency operations. In ME-AQFP, the intrinsic periodicity of the potential energy of a Josephson device with respect to applied magnetic fluxes is utilized to multiply operation frequencies and reduce latency. In a numerical simulation, we demonstrated an ME-AQFP AND gate, which operates at 10 GHz or 20 GHz with 5-GHz excitation currents. We also evaluated the energy efficiency of ME-AQFP circuits. In an experiment, we successfully demonstrated an ME-AQFP XOR gate and an ME-AQFP full adder.

  17. Adiabatic far-field sub-diffraction imaging

    PubMed Central

    Cang, Hu; Salandrino, Alessandro; Wang, Yuan; Zhang, Xiang

    2015-01-01

    The limited resolution of a conventional optical imaging system stems from the fact that the fine feature information of an object is carried by evanescent waves, which exponentially decays in space and thus cannot reach the imaging plane. We introduce here an adiabatic lens, which utilizes a geometrically conformal surface to mediate the interference of slowly decompressed electromagnetic waves at far field to form images. The decompression is satisfying an adiabatic condition, and by bridging the gap between far field and near field, it allows far-field optical systems to project an image of the near-field features directly. Using these designs, we demonstrated the magnification can be up to 20 times and it is possible to achieve sub-50 nm imaging resolution in visible. Our approach provides a means to extend the domain of geometrical optics to a deep sub-wavelength scale. PMID:26258769

  18. Engineering adiabaticity at an avoided crossing with optimal control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chasseur, T.; Theis, L. S.; Sanders, Y. R.; Egger, D. J.; Wilhelm, F. K.

    2015-04-01

    We investigate ways to optimize adiabaticity and diabaticity in the Landau-Zener model with nonuniform sweeps. We show how diabaticity can be engineered with a pulse consisting of a linear sweep augmented by an oscillating term. We show that the oscillation leads to jumps in populations whose value can be accurately modeled using a model of multiple, photon-assisted Landau-Zener transitions, which generalizes work by Wubs et al. [New J. Phys. 7, 218 (2005)], 10.1088/1367-2630/7/1/218. We extend the study on diabaticity using methods derived from optimal control. We also show how to preserve adiabaticity with optimal pulses at limited time, finding a nonuniform quantum speed limit.

  19. Confinement loss in adiabatic photonic crystal fiber tapers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhlmey, Boris T.; Nguyen, Hong C.; Steel, M. J.; Eggleton, Benjamin J.

    2006-09-01

    We numerically study confinement loss in photonic crystal fiber (PCF) tapers and compare our results with previously published experimental data. Agreement between theory and experiment requires taking into account hole shrinkage during the tapering process, which we measure by using a noninvasive technique. We show that losses are fully explained within the adiabatic approximation and that they are closely linked to the existence of a fundamental core-mode cutoff. This cutoff is equivalent to the core-mode cutoff in depressed-cladding fibers, so that losses in PCF tapers can be obtained semiquantitatively from an equivalent depressed-cladding fiber model. Finally, we discuss the definition of adiabaticity in this open boundary problem.

  20. Adiabatic molecular-dynamics-simulation-method studies of kinetic friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J.; Sokoloff, J. B.

    2005-06-01

    An adiabatic molecular-dynamics method is developed and used to study the Muser-Robbins model for dry friction (i.e., nonzero kinetic friction in the slow sliding speed limit). In this model, dry friction between two crystalline surfaces rotated with respect to each other is due to mobile molecules (i.e., dirt particles) adsorbed at the interface. Our adiabatic method allows us to quickly locate interface potential-well minima, which become unstable during sliding of the surfaces. Since dissipation due to friction in the slow sliding speed limit results from mobile molecules dropping out of such unstable wells, our method provides a way to calculate dry friction, which agrees extremely well with results found by conventional molecular dynamics for the same system, but our method is more than a factor of 10 faster.