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Sample records for coiled-coil interactions contribute

  1. Computational analysis of residue contributions to coiled-coil topology.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Jorge; Lazaridis, Themis

    2011-11-01

    A variety of features are thought to contribute to the oligomeric and topological specificity of coiled coils. In previous work, we examined the determinants of oligomeric state. Here, we examine the energetic basis for the tendency of six coiled-coil peptides to align their α-helices in antiparallel orientation using molecular dynamics simulations with implicit solvation (EEF1.1). We also examine the effect of mutations known to disrupt the topology of these peptides. In agreement with experiment, ARG or LYS at a or d positions were found to stabilize the antiparallel configuration. The modeling suggests that this is not due to a-a' or d-d' repulsions but due to interactions with e' and g' residues. TRP at core positions also favors the antiparallel configuration. Residues that disfavor parallel dimers, such as ILE at d, are better tolerated in, and thus favor the antiparallel configuration. Salt bridge networks were found to be more stabilizing in the antiparallel configuration for geometric reasons: antiparallel helices point amino acid side chains in opposite directions. However, the structure with the largest number of salt bridges was not always the most stable, due to desolvation and configurational entropy contributions. In tetramers, the extent of stabilization of the antiparallel topology by core residues is influenced by the e' residue on a neighboring helix. Residues at b and c positions in some cases also contribute to stabilization of antiparallel tetramers. This work provides useful rules toward the goal of designing coiled coils with a well-defined and predictable three-dimensional structure.

  2. Statistical analysis of intrahelical ionic interactions in alpha-helices and coiled coils.

    PubMed

    Meier, Markus; Burkhard, Peter

    2006-08-01

    There are many controversies concerning whether ionic interactions in alpha-helices and coiled coils actually contribute to the stabilisation and formation of these structures. Here we used a statistical approach to probe this question. We extracted unique alpha-helical and coiled coil structures from the protein database and analysed the ionic interactions between positively and negatively charged residues. The ionic interactions were categorized according to the type, spacing and order of the residues involved. Separate datasets were produced depending on the number of alpha-helices in the coiled coils and the mutual orientation of the helices. We compared the frequency of residue configurations able to form ionic interactions with their probability to form the interaction. We found a correlation between the two variables in alpha-helices, antiparallel two-stranded coiled coils and parallel two-stranded coiled coils. This indicates that some ionic interactions are indeed important for the formation and stabilisation of alpha-helices and coiled coils. We concluded that the configurations, which have simultaneously a large probability to form the ionic interaction and a frequent occurrence, are those, which have the most stabilising effect. These are the 4RE, 3ER and 4ER interactions.

  3. Heterodimeric coiled-coil interactions of human GABAB receptor

    PubMed Central

    Burmakina, Svetlana; Geng, Yong; Chen, Yan; Fan, Qing R.

    2014-01-01

    Metabotropic GABAB receptor is a G protein-coupled receptor that mediates inhibitory neurotransmission in the CNS. It functions as an obligatory heterodimer of GABAB receptor 1 (GBR1) and GABAB receptor 2 (GBR2) subunits. The association between GBR1 and GBR2 masks an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) retention signal in the cytoplasmic region of GBR1 and facilitates cell surface expression of both subunits. Here, we present, to our knowledge, the first crystal structure of an intracellular coiled-coil heterodimer of human GABAB receptor. We found that polar interactions buried within the hydrophobic core determine the specificity of heterodimer pairing. Disruption of the hydrophobic coiled-coil interface with single mutations in either subunit impairs surface expression of GBR1, confirming that the coiled-coil interaction is required to inactivate the adjacent ER retention signal of GBR1. The coiled-coil assembly buries an internalization motif of GBR1 at the heterodimer interface. The ER retention signal of GBR1 is not part of the core coiled-coil structure, suggesting that it is sterically shielded by GBR2 upon heterodimer formation. PMID:24778228

  4. Investigation of electrostatic interactions in two-stranded coiled-coils through residue shuffling.

    PubMed

    Yu, Y; Monera, O D; Hodges, R S; Privalov, P L

    1996-04-16

    The effects of electrostatic interactions on the stability of coiled-coils were investigated using the strategy of shuffling the sequence without changing the overall content of amino acid residues in the peptides. Shuffling the sequence provides peptides with thermodynamically similar unfolded states. Therefore, the unfolded state can be used as a universal reference state in comparing the thermodynamic properties of the folded coiled-coil structure of the peptides, while varying the configuration of ionized groups, that is, changing the types and number of potential electrostatic interactions. The relative stabilities of these states were determined by monitoring the temperature-induced folding/unfolding of the peptides in solutions with different pH and ionic strength by circular dichroism spectroscopy and scanning microcalorimetry. It was found that, in solutions with low ionic strength, ionic pairs contribute significantly to the stability of the coiled-coil conformation. The stability increases with an increase in the number of ionized groups in the peptide upon changing pH from acidic to neutral. In contrast, in the solutions with high ionic strength, the coiled-coil becomes less stable at neutral pH than at acidic pH. Most surprisingly, the increase in Gibbs energy of stabilization of the coiled-coil state with increasing pH at low ionic strength proceeds with a decrease in the enthalpy and entropy of unfolding. This observation can be explained only by hydration of ionized groups upon unfolding of coiled-coils which is associated with significant negative enthalpy and entropy effects.

  5. A classic zinc finger from friend of GATA mediates an interaction with the coiled-coil of transforming acidic coiled-coil 3.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Raina J Y; Yi Lee, Stella Hoi; Bartle, Natalie; Sum, Eleanor Y; Visvader, Jane E; Matthews, Jacqueline M; Mackay, Joel P; Crossley, Merlin

    2004-09-17

    Classic zinc finger domains (cZFs) consist of a beta-hairpin followed by an alpha-helix. They are among the most abundant of all protein domains and are often found in tandem arrays in DNA-binding proteins, with each finger contributing an alpha-helix to effect sequence-specific DNA recognition. Lone cZFs, not found in tandem arrays, have been postulated to function in protein interactions. We have studied the transcriptional co-regulator Friend of GATA (FOG), which contains nine zinc fingers. We have discovered that the third cZF of FOG contacts a coiled-coil domain in the centrosomal protein transforming acidic coiled-coil 3 (TACC3). Although FOG-ZF3 exhibited low solubility, we have used a combination of mutational mapping and protein engineering to generate a derivative that was suitable for in vitro and structural analysis. We report that the alpha-helix of FOG-ZF3 recognizes a C-terminal portion of the TACC3 coiled-coil. Remarkably, the alpha-helical surface utilized by FOG-ZF3 is the same surface responsible for the well established sequence-specific DNA-binding properties of many other cZFs. Our data demonstrate the versatility of cZFs and have implications for the analysis of many as yet uncharacterized cZF proteins.

  6. The structure of the GemC1 coiled coil and its interaction with the Geminin family of coiled-coil proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Caillat, Christophe; Fish, Alexander; Pefani, Dafni-Eleftheria; Taraviras, Stavros; Lygerou, Zoi; Perrakis, Anastassis

    2015-10-31

    The GemC1 coiled-coil structure has subtle differences compared with its homologues Geminin and Idas. Co-expression experiments in cells and biophysical stability analysis of the Geminin-family coiled coils suggest that the GemC1 coiled coil alone is unstable. GemC1, together with Idas and Geminin, an important regulator of DNA-replication licensing and differentiation decisions, constitute a superfamily sharing a homologous central coiled-coil domain. To better understand this family of proteins, the crystal structure of a GemC1 coiled-coil domain variant engineered for better solubility was determined to 2.2 Å resolution. GemC1 shows a less typical coiled coil compared with the Geminin homodimer and the Geminin–Idas heterodimer structures. It is also shown that both in vitro and in cells GemC1 interacts with Geminin through its coiled-coil domain, forming a heterodimer that is more stable that the GemC1 homodimer. Comparative analysis of the thermal stability of all of the possible superfamily complexes, using circular dichroism to follow the unfolding of the entire helix of the coiled coil, or intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence of a unique conserved N-terminal tryptophan, shows that the unfolding of the coiled coil is likely to take place from the C-terminus towards the N-terminus. It is also shown that homodimers show a single-state unfolding, while heterodimers show a two-state unfolding, suggesting that the dimer first falls apart and the helices then unfold according to the stability of each protein. The findings argue that Geminin-family members form homodimers and heterodimers between them, and this ability is likely to be important for modulating their function in cycling and differentiating cells.

  7. Protein detection by Western blot via coiled-coil interactions.

    PubMed

    Boucher, Cyril; St-Laurent, Gilles; Jolicoeur, Mario; Crescenzo, Gregory De; Durocher, Yves

    2010-04-01

    We propose an approach for the detection of proteins by Western blot that takes advantage of the high-affinity interaction occurring between two de novo designed peptides, the E and K coils. As a model system, K coil-tagged epidermal growth factor (EGF) was revealed with secreted alkaline phosphatase (SeAP) tagged with E coil (SeAP-Ecoil) as well as with biotinylated E coil. In that respect, we first produced purified SeAP-Ecoil and verified its ability to interact with K coil peptides by surface plasmon resonance biosensing. We demonstrated that protein detection with Ecoil-biotin was more specific than with SeAP-Ecoil. We then showed that our approach is as sensitive as conventional detection strategies relying on nickel-nitrilotriacetic acid-horseradish peroxidase (Ni-NTA-HRP), anti-His-HRP, or anti-EGF. Altogether, our results indicate that the E/K coiled-coil system is a good alternative for protein detection by Western blot. Crown Copyright 2009. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Accommodation of structural rearrangements in the huntingtin-interacting protein 1 coiled-coil domain

    SciTech Connect

    Wilbur, Jeremy D.; Hwang, Peter K.; Brodsky, Frances M.; Fletterick, Robert J.

    2010-03-01

    Variable packing interaction related to the conformational flexibility within the huntingtin-interacting protein 1 coiled coil domain. Huntingtin-interacting protein 1 (HIP1) is an important link between the actin cytoskeleton and clathrin-mediated endocytosis machinery. HIP1 has also been implicated in the pathogenesis of Huntington’s disease. The binding of HIP1 to actin is regulated through an interaction with clathrin light chain. Clathrin light chain binds to a flexible coiled-coil domain in HIP1 and induces a compact state that is refractory to actin binding. To understand the mechanism of this conformational regulation, a high-resolution crystal structure of a stable fragment from the HIP1 coiled-coil domain was determined. The flexibility of the HIP1 coiled-coil region was evident from its variation from a previously determined structure of a similar region. A hydrogen-bond network and changes in coiled-coil monomer interaction suggest that the HIP1 coiled-coil domain is uniquely suited to allow conformational flexibility.

  9. Pharmacological interference with protein-protein interactions mediated by coiled-coil motifs.

    PubMed

    Strauss, H M; Keller, S

    2008-01-01

    Coiled coils are bundles of intertwined alpha-helices that provide protein-protein interaction sites for the dynamic assembly and disassembly of protein complexes. The coiled-coil motif combines structural versatility and adaptability with mechanical strength and specificity. Multimeric proteins that rely on coiled-coil interactions are structurally and functionally very diverse, ranging from simple homodimeric transcription factors to elaborate heteromultimeric scaffolding clusters. Several coiled-coil-bearing proteins are of outstanding pharmacological importance, most notably SNARE proteins involved in vesicular trafficking of neurotransmitters and viral fusion proteins. Together with their crucial roles in many physiological and pathological processes, the structural simplicity and reversible nature of coiled-coil associations render them a promising target for pharmacological interference, as successfully exemplified by botulinum toxins and viral fusion inhibitors. The alpha-helical coiled coil is a ubiquitous protein domain that mediates highly specific homo- and heteromeric protein-protein interactions among a wide range of proteins. The coiled-coil motif was first proposed by Crick on the basis of X-ray diffraction data on alpha-keratin more than 50 years ago (Crick 1952, 1953) and nowadays belongs to the best-characterized protein interaction modules. By definition, a coiled coil is an oligomeric protein assembly consisting of several right-handed amphipathic alpha-helices that wind around each other into a superhelix (or a supercoil) in which the hydrophobic surfaces of the constituent helices are in continuous contact, forming a hydrophobic core. Both homomeric and heteromeric coiled coils with different stoichiometries are possible, and the helices can be aligned in either a parallel or an antiparallel topology (Harbury et al. 1993, 1994). Stoichiometry and topology are governed by the primary structure, that is, the sequence of the polypeptide chains

  10. The structure of the GemC1 coiled coil and its interaction with the Geminin family of coiled-coil proteins.

    PubMed

    Caillat, Christophe; Fish, Alexander; Pefani, Dafni Eleftheria; Taraviras, Stavros; Lygerou, Zoi; Perrakis, Anastassis

    2015-11-01

    GemC1, together with Idas and Geminin, an important regulator of DNA-replication licensing and differentiation decisions, constitute a superfamily sharing a homologous central coiled-coil domain. To better understand this family of proteins, the crystal structure of a GemC1 coiled-coil domain variant engineered for better solubility was determined to 2.2 Å resolution. GemC1 shows a less typical coiled coil compared with the Geminin homodimer and the Geminin-Idas heterodimer structures. It is also shown that both in vitro and in cells GemC1 interacts with Geminin through its coiled-coil domain, forming a heterodimer that is more stable that the GemC1 homodimer. Comparative analysis of the thermal stability of all of the possible superfamily complexes, using circular dichroism to follow the unfolding of the entire helix of the coiled coil, or intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence of a unique conserved N-terminal tryptophan, shows that the unfolding of the coiled coil is likely to take place from the C-terminus towards the N-terminus. It is also shown that homodimers show a single-state unfolding, while heterodimers show a two-state unfolding, suggesting that the dimer first falls apart and the helices then unfold according to the stability of each protein. The findings argue that Geminin-family members form homodimers and heterodimers between them, and this ability is likely to be important for modulating their function in cycling and differentiating cells.

  11. Strong contributions from vertical triads to helix-partner preferences in parallel coiled coils.

    PubMed

    Steinkruger, Jay D; Bartlett, Gail J; Woolfson, Derek N; Gellman, Samuel H

    2012-09-26

    Pairing preferences in heterodimeric coiled coils are determined by complementarities among side chains that pack against one another at the helix-helix interface. However, relationships between dimer stability and interfacial residue identity are not fully understood. In the context of the "knobs-into-holes" (KIH) packing pattern, one can identify two classes of interactions between side chains from different helices: "lateral", in which a line connecting the adjacent side chains is perpendicular to the helix axes, and "vertical", in which the connecting line is parallel to the helix axes. We have previously analyzed vertical interactions in antiparallel coiled coils and found that one type of triad constellation (a'-a-a') exerts a strong effect on pairing preferences, while the other type of triad (d'-d-d') has relatively little impact on pairing tendencies. Here, we ask whether vertical interactions (d'-a-d') influence pairing in parallel coiled-coil dimers. Our results indicate that vertical interactions can exert a substantial impact on pairing specificity, and that the influence of the d'-a-d' triad depends on the lateral a' contact within the local KIH motif. Structure-informed bioinformatic analyses of protein sequences reveal trends consistent with the thermodynamic data derived from our experimental model system in suggesting that heterotriads involving Leu and Ile are preferred over homotriads involving Leu and Ile.

  12. Data-Driven Prediction and Design of bZIP Coiled-Coil Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Potapov, Vladimir; Kaplan, Jenifer B.; Keating, Amy E.

    2015-01-01

    Selective dimerization of the basic-region leucine-zipper (bZIP) transcription factors presents a vivid example of how a high degree of interaction specificity can be achieved within a family of structurally similar proteins. The coiled-coil motif that mediates homo- or hetero-dimerization of the bZIP proteins has been intensively studied, and a variety of methods have been proposed to predict these interactions from sequence data. In this work, we used a large quantitative set of 4,549 bZIP coiled-coil interactions to develop a predictive model that exploits knowledge of structurally conserved residue-residue interactions in the coiled-coil motif. Our model, which expresses interaction energies as a sum of interpretable residue-pair and triplet terms, achieves a correlation with experimental binding free energies of R = 0.68 and significantly out-performs other scoring functions. To use our model in protein design applications, we devised a strategy in which synthetic peptides are built by assembling 7-residue native-protein heptad modules into new combinations. An integer linear program was used to find the optimal combination of heptads to bind selectively to a target human bZIP coiled coil, but not to target paralogs. Using this approach, we designed peptides to interact with the bZIP domains from human JUN, XBP1, ATF4 and ATF5. Testing more than 132 candidate protein complexes using a fluorescence resonance energy transfer assay confirmed the formation of tight and selective heterodimers between the designed peptides and their targets. This approach can be used to make inhibitors of native proteins, or to develop novel peptides for applications in synthetic biology or nanotechnology. PMID:25695764

  13. Data-driven prediction and design of bZIP coiled-coil interactions.

    PubMed

    Potapov, Vladimir; Kaplan, Jenifer B; Keating, Amy E

    2015-02-01

    Selective dimerization of the basic-region leucine-zipper (bZIP) transcription factors presents a vivid example of how a high degree of interaction specificity can be achieved within a family of structurally similar proteins. The coiled-coil motif that mediates homo- or hetero-dimerization of the bZIP proteins has been intensively studied, and a variety of methods have been proposed to predict these interactions from sequence data. In this work, we used a large quantitative set of 4,549 bZIP coiled-coil interactions to develop a predictive model that exploits knowledge of structurally conserved residue-residue interactions in the coiled-coil motif. Our model, which expresses interaction energies as a sum of interpretable residue-pair and triplet terms, achieves a correlation with experimental binding free energies of R = 0.68 and significantly out-performs other scoring functions. To use our model in protein design applications, we devised a strategy in which synthetic peptides are built by assembling 7-residue native-protein heptad modules into new combinations. An integer linear program was used to find the optimal combination of heptads to bind selectively to a target human bZIP coiled coil, but not to target paralogs. Using this approach, we designed peptides to interact with the bZIP domains from human JUN, XBP1, ATF4 and ATF5. Testing more than 132 candidate protein complexes using a fluorescence resonance energy transfer assay confirmed the formation of tight and selective heterodimers between the designed peptides and their targets. This approach can be used to make inhibitors of native proteins, or to develop novel peptides for applications in synthetic biology or nanotechnology.

  14. Coiled coil interactions for the targeting of liposomes for nucleic acid delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oude Blenke, Erik E.; van den Dikkenberg, Joep; van Kolck, Bartjan; Kros, Alexander; Mastrobattista, Enrico

    2016-04-01

    Coiled coil interactions are strong protein-protein interactions that are involved in many biological processes, including intracellular trafficking and membrane fusion. A synthetic heterodimeric coiled-coil forming peptide pair, known as E3 (EIAALEK)3 and K3 (KIAALKE)3 was used to functionalize liposomes encapsulating a splice correcting oligonucleotide or siRNA. These peptide-functionalized vesicles are highly stable in solution but start to cluster when vesicles modified with complementary peptides are mixed together, demonstrating that the peptides quickly coil and crosslink the vesicles. When one of the peptides was anchored to the cell membrane using a hydrophobic cholesterol anchor, vesicles functionalized with the complementary peptide could be docked to these cells, whereas non-functionalized cells did not show any vesicle tethering. Although the anchored peptides do not have a downstream signaling pathway, microscopy pictures revealed that after four hours, the majority of the docked vesicles were internalized by endocytosis. Finally, for the first time, it was shown that the coiled coil assembly at the interface between the vesicles and the cell membrane induces active uptake and leads to cytosolic delivery of the nucleic acid cargo. Both the siRNA and the splice correcting oligonucleotide were functionally delivered, resulting respectively in the silencing or recovery of luciferase expression in the appropriate cell lines. These results demonstrate that the docking to the cell by coiled coil interaction can induce active uptake and achieve the successful intracellular delivery of otherwise membrane impermeable nucleic acids in a highly specific manner.Coiled coil interactions are strong protein-protein interactions that are involved in many biological processes, including intracellular trafficking and membrane fusion. A synthetic heterodimeric coiled-coil forming peptide pair, known as E3 (EIAALEK)3 and K3 (KIAALKE)3 was used to functionalize liposomes

  15. A coiled-coil interaction mediates cauliflower mosaic virus cell-to-cell movement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stavolone, Livia; Villani, Maria Elena; Leclerc, Denis; Hohn, Thomas

    2005-04-01

    The function of the virion-associated protein (VAP) of cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) has long been only poorly understood. VAP is associated with the virion but is dispensable for virus morphogenesis and replication. It mediates virus transmission by aphids through simultaneous interaction with both the aphid transmission factor and the virion. However, although insect transmission is not fundamental to CaMV survival, VAP is indispensable for spreading the virus infection within the host plant. We used a GST pull-down technique to demonstrate that VAP interacts with the viral movement protein through coiled-coil domains and surface plasmon resonance to measure the interaction kinetics. We mapped the movement protein coiled-coil to the C terminus of the protein and proved that it self-assembles as a trimer. Immunogold labeling/electron microscopy revealed that the VAP and viral movement protein colocalize on CaMV particles within plasmodesmata. These results highlight the multifunctional potential of the VAP protein conferred by its efficient coiled-coil interaction system and show a plant virus possessing a surface-exposed protein (VAP) mediating viral entry into host cells. movement protein | virion-associated protein | Biacore

  16. Coiled-coil coactivators play a structural role mediating interactions in hypoxia-inducible factor heterodimerization

    DOE PAGES

    Guo, Yirui; Scheuermann, Thomas H.; Partch, Carrie L.; ...

    2015-01-27

    The hypoxia-inducible factor complex (HIF-α·aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator (ARNT)) requires association with several transcription coactivators for a successful cellular response to hypoxic stress. In addition to the conventional global transcription coactivator CREB-binding protein/p300 (CBP/p300) that binds to the HIF-α transactivation domain, a new group of transcription coactivators called the coiled-coil coactivators (CCCs) interact directly with the second PER-ARNT-SIM (PAS) domain of ARNT (ARNT PAS-B). These less studied transcription coactivators play essential roles in the HIF-dependent hypoxia response, and CCC misregulation is associated with several forms of cancer. To better understand CCC protein recruitment by the heterodimeric HIF transcription factor,more » we used x-ray crystallography, NMR spectroscopy, and biochemical methods to investigate the structure of the ARNT PAS-B domain in complex with the C-terminal fragment of a coiled-coil coactivator protein, transforming acidic coiled-coil coactivator 3 (TACC3). We found that the HIF-2α PAS-B domain also directly interacts with TACC3, motivating an NMR data-derived model suggesting a means by which TACC3 could form a ternary complex with HIF-2α PAS-B and ARNT PAS-B via β-sheet/coiled-coil interactions. Furthermore, these findings suggest that TACC3 could be recruited as a bridge to cooperatively mediate between the HIF-2α PAS-B·ARNT PAS-B complex, thereby participating more directly in HIF-dependent gene transcription than previously anticipated.« less

  17. Coiled-coil coactivators play a structural role mediating interactions in hypoxia-inducible factor heterodimerization

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Yirui; Scheuermann, Thomas H.; Partch, Carrie L.; Tomchick, Diana R.; Gardner, Kevin H.

    2015-01-27

    The hypoxia-inducible factor complex (HIF-α·aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator (ARNT)) requires association with several transcription coactivators for a successful cellular response to hypoxic stress. In addition to the conventional global transcription coactivator CREB-binding protein/p300 (CBP/p300) that binds to the HIF-α transactivation domain, a new group of transcription coactivators called the coiled-coil coactivators (CCCs) interact directly with the second PER-ARNT-SIM (PAS) domain of ARNT (ARNT PAS-B). These less studied transcription coactivators play essential roles in the HIF-dependent hypoxia response, and CCC misregulation is associated with several forms of cancer. To better understand CCC protein recruitment by the heterodimeric HIF transcription factor, we used x-ray crystallography, NMR spectroscopy, and biochemical methods to investigate the structure of the ARNT PAS-B domain in complex with the C-terminal fragment of a coiled-coil coactivator protein, transforming acidic coiled-coil coactivator 3 (TACC3). We found that the HIF-2α PAS-B domain also directly interacts with TACC3, motivating an NMR data-derived model suggesting a means by which TACC3 could form a ternary complex with HIF-2α PAS-B and ARNT PAS-B via β-sheet/coiled-coil interactions. Furthermore, these findings suggest that TACC3 could be recruited as a bridge to cooperatively mediate between the HIF-2α PAS-B·ARNT PAS-B complex, thereby participating more directly in HIF-dependent gene transcription than previously anticipated.

  18. Coiled-coil coactivators play a structural role mediating interactions in hypoxia-inducible factor heterodimerization.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yirui; Scheuermann, Thomas H; Partch, Carrie L; Tomchick, Diana R; Gardner, Kevin H

    2015-03-20

    The hypoxia-inducible factor complex (HIF-α·aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator (ARNT)) requires association with several transcription coactivators for a successful cellular response to hypoxic stress. In addition to the conventional global transcription coactivator CREB-binding protein/p300 (CBP/p300) that binds to the HIF-α transactivation domain, a new group of transcription coactivators called the coiled-coil coactivators (CCCs) interact directly with the second PER-ARNT-SIM (PAS) domain of ARNT (ARNT PAS-B). These less studied transcription coactivators play essential roles in the HIF-dependent hypoxia response, and CCC misregulation is associated with several forms of cancer. To better understand CCC protein recruitment by the heterodimeric HIF transcription factor, we used x-ray crystallography, NMR spectroscopy, and biochemical methods to investigate the structure of the ARNT PAS-B domain in complex with the C-terminal fragment of a coiled-coil coactivator protein, transforming acidic coiled-coil coactivator 3 (TACC3). We found that the HIF-2α PAS-B domain also directly interacts with TACC3, motivating an NMR data-derived model suggesting a means by which TACC3 could form a ternary complex with HIF-2α PAS-B and ARNT PAS-B via β-sheet/coiled-coil interactions. These findings suggest that TACC3 could be recruited as a bridge to cooperatively mediate between the HIF-2α PAS-B·ARNT PAS-B complex, thereby participating more directly in HIF-dependent gene transcription than previously anticipated.

  19. Coiled-coil Coactivators Play a Structural Role Mediating Interactions in Hypoxia-inducible Factor Heterodimerization*

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yirui; Scheuermann, Thomas H.; Partch, Carrie L.; Tomchick, Diana R.; Gardner, Kevin H.

    2015-01-01

    The hypoxia-inducible factor complex (HIF-α·aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator (ARNT)) requires association with several transcription coactivators for a successful cellular response to hypoxic stress. In addition to the conventional global transcription coactivator CREB-binding protein/p300 (CBP/p300) that binds to the HIF-α transactivation domain, a new group of transcription coactivators called the coiled-coil coactivators (CCCs) interact directly with the second PER-ARNT-SIM (PAS) domain of ARNT (ARNT PAS-B). These less studied transcription coactivators play essential roles in the HIF-dependent hypoxia response, and CCC misregulation is associated with several forms of cancer. To better understand CCC protein recruitment by the heterodimeric HIF transcription factor, we used x-ray crystallography, NMR spectroscopy, and biochemical methods to investigate the structure of the ARNT PAS-B domain in complex with the C-terminal fragment of a coiled-coil coactivator protein, transforming acidic coiled-coil coactivator 3 (TACC3). We found that the HIF-2α PAS-B domain also directly interacts with TACC3, motivating an NMR data-derived model suggesting a means by which TACC3 could form a ternary complex with HIF-2α PAS-B and ARNT PAS-B via β-sheet/coiled-coil interactions. These findings suggest that TACC3 could be recruited as a bridge to cooperatively mediate between the HIF-2α PAS-B·ARNT PAS-B complex, thereby participating more directly in HIF-dependent gene transcription than previously anticipated. PMID:25627682

  20. The SH3 domain of UNC-89 (obscurin) interacts with paramyosin, a coiled-coil protein, in Caenorhabditis elegans muscle

    PubMed Central

    Qadota, Hiroshi; Mayans, Olga; Matsunaga, Yohei; McMurry, Jonathan L.; Wilson, Kristy J.; Kwon, Grace E.; Stanford, Rachel; Deehan, Kevin; Tinley, Tina L.; Ngwa, Verra M.; Benian, Guy M.

    2016-01-01

    UNC-89 is a giant polypeptide located at the sarcomeric M-line of Caenorhabditis elegans muscle. The human homologue is obscurin. To understand how UNC-89 is localized and functions, we have been identifying its binding partners. Screening a yeast two-hybrid library revealed that UNC-89 interacts with paramyosin. Paramyosin is an invertebrate-specific coiled-coil dimer protein that is homologous to the rod portion of myosin heavy chains and resides in thick filament cores. Minimally, this interaction requires UNC-89’s SH3 domain and residues 294–376 of paramyosin and has a KD of ∼1.1 μM. In unc-89 loss-of-function mutants that lack the SH3 domain, paramyosin is found in accumulations. When the SH3 domain is overexpressed, paramyosin is mislocalized. SH3 domains usually interact with a proline-rich consensus sequence, but the region of paramyosin that interacts with UNC-89’s SH3 is α-helical and lacks prolines. Homology modeling of UNC-89’s SH3 suggests structural features that might be responsible for this interaction. The SH3-binding region of paramyosin contains a “skip residue,” which is likely to locally unwind the coiled-coil and perhaps contributes to the binding specificity. PMID:27009202

  1. Intracellular coiled-coil domain engaged in subunit interaction and assembly of melastatin-related transient receptor potential channel 2

    PubMed Central

    Mei, Zhu-Zhong; Xia, Rong; Beech, David J; Jiang, Lin-Hua

    2006-01-01

    TRPM2 channels, activated by adenosine diphosphoribose (ADPR) and related molecules, are assembled as oligomers and most likely tetramers. However, the molecular determinants driving the subunit interaction and assembly of the TRPM2 channels are not well defined. Here we examined, using site-directed mutagenesis in conjunction with co-immunoprecipitation and patch clamp recording, the role of a coiled-coil domain in the intracellular C-terminus of TRPM2 subunit in the subunit interaction and the channel assembly. Deletion of the coiled-coil domain resulted in severe disruption of the subunit interaction and substantial loss of the ADPR-evoked channel currents. Individual or combined mutations to glutamine of the hydrophobic residues at positions a and d of the abcdef heptad repeat, key residues for protein-protein interaction, significantly reduced the subunit interaction and the channel currents; the mutational effects on the subunit interaction and the channel currents were clearly correlated. Furthermore, deletion of the coiled-coil domain in a pore mutant subunit abolished its dominant negative phenotypic functional suppression. These results provide strong evidence that the coiled-coil domain is critically engaged in the TRPM2 subunit interaction and such interaction is required for assembly of functional TRPM2 channel. The coiled-coil domain, which is highly conserved within the TRPM subfamily, may serve as a general structural element governing the assembly of TRPM channels. PMID:17060318

  2. Membrane interactions of fusogenic coiled-coil peptides: implications for lipopeptide mediated vesicle fusion.

    PubMed

    Rabe, Martin; Schwieger, Christian; Zope, Harshal R; Versluis, Frank; Kros, Alexander

    2014-07-08

    Fusion of lipid membranes is an important natural process for the intra- and intercellular exchange of molecules. However, little is known about the actual fusion mechanism at the molecular level. In this study we examine a system that models the key features of this process. For the molecular recognition between opposing membranes two membrane anchored heterodimer coiled-coil forming peptides called 'E' (EIAALEK)3 and 'K' (KIAALKE)3 were used. Lipid monolayers and IR reflection absorption spectroscopy (IRRAS) revealed the interactions of the peptides 'E', 'K', and their parallel coiled-coil complex 'E/K' with the phospholipid membranes and thereby mimicked the pre- and postfusion states, respectively. The peptides adopted α-helical structures and were incorporated into the monolayers with parallel orientation. The strength of binding to the monolayer differed for the peptides and tethering them to the membrane increased the interactions even further. Remarkably, these interactions played a role even in the postfusion state. These findings shed light on important mechanistic details of the membrane fusion process in this model system. Furthermore, their implications will help to improve the rational design of new artificial membrane fusion systems, which have a wide range of potential applications in supramolecular chemistry and biomedicine.

  3. The use of coiled-coil interactions for the analysis and micropreparative isolation of adenomatous polyposis coli protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Catimel, B; Faux, M C; Nerrie, M; Rothacker, J; Otvos, L J; Wade, J D; Nice, E C; Burgess, A W

    2001-12-01

    The coiled coil is a common structural motif found both as the dominant structure in fibrous proteins and as an oligomerization domain in a variety of cytoskeletal and extracellular matrix proteins. Coiled-coils typically consist of two to four helices that are supercoiled around one another in either parallel or antiparallel orientations. In the past few years our knowledge of the structure and specificity of coiled coil interactions has increased, allowing the de novo design and preparation of coiled-coils with well-defined structure and specificity. Indeed, the design and synthesis of a peptide that binds specifically to a single coiled-coil-containing protein, adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) has been reported. We have optimized solid-phase synthesis techniques to produce a modified form of the anti-APC peptide that contains a biotin moiety specifically placed so as to allow selective orientation onto the surface of a biosensor or affinity support. These peptide surfaces have been used to both monitor and purify APC and APC complexes from cellular extracts.

  4. Coiled-coil destabilizing residues in the group A Streptococcus M1 protein are required for functional interaction

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Chelsea M.; Buffalo, Cosmo Z.; Valderrama, J. Andrés; Henningham, Anna; Cole, Jason N.; Nizet, Victor; Ghosh, Partho

    2016-01-01

    The sequences of M proteins, the major surface-associated virulence factors of the widespread bacterial pathogen group A Streptococcus, are antigenically variable but have in common a strong propensity to form coiled coils. Paradoxically, these sequences are also replete with coiled-coil destabilizing residues. These features are evident in the irregular coiled-coil structure and thermal instability of M proteins. We present an explanation for this paradox through studies of the B repeats of the medically important M1 protein. The B repeats are required for interaction of M1 with fibrinogen (Fg) and consequent proinflammatory activation. The B repeats sample multiple conformations, including intrinsically disordered, dissociated, as well as two alternate coiled-coil conformations: a Fg-nonbinding register 1 and a Fg-binding register 2. Stabilization of M1 in the Fg-nonbinding register 1 resulted in attenuation of Fg binding as expected, but counterintuitively, so did stabilization in the Fg-binding register 2. Strikingly, these register-stabilized M1 proteins gained the ability to bind Fg when they were destabilized by a chaotrope. These results indicate that M1 stability is antithetical to Fg interaction and that M1 conformational dynamics, as specified by destabilizing residues, are essential for interaction. A “capture-and-collapse” model of association accounts for these observations, in which M1 captures Fg through a dynamic conformation and then collapses into a register 2-coiled coil as a result of stabilization provided by binding energy. Our results support the general conclusion that destabilizing residues are evolutionarily conserved in M proteins to enable functional interactions necessary for pathogenesis. PMID:27512043

  5. Tropomyosin is an interaction partner of the Drosophila coiled coil protein yuri gagarin.

    PubMed

    Texada, Michael J; Simonette, Rebecca A; Deery, William J; Beckingham, Kathleen M

    2011-02-15

    The Drosophila gene yuri gagarin is a complex locus encoding three protein isoform classes that are ubiquitously expressed in the organism. Mutations to the gene affect processes as diverse as gravitactic behavior and spermatogenesis. The larger Yuri isoforms contain extensive coiled-coil regions. Our previous studies indicate that one of the large isoform classes (Yuri-65) is required for formation of specialized F-actin-containing structures generated during spermatogenesis, including the so-called actin "cones" that mediate spermatid individualization. We used the tandem affinity purification of a tagged version of Yuri-65 (the TAP-tagging technique) to identify proteins associated with Yuri-65 in the intact organism. Tropomyosin, primarily as the 284-residue isoform derived from the ubiquitously expressed Tropomyosin 1 gene was thus identified as a major Yuri interaction partner. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments confirmed this interaction. We have established that the stable F-actin cones of spermatogenesis contain Tropomyosin 1 (Tm1) and that in mutant yuri(F64), failure of F-actin cone formation is associated with failure of Tm1 to accumulate at the cone initiation sites. In investigating possible interactions of Tm1 and Yuri in other tissues, we discovered that Tm1 and Yuri frequently colocalize with the endoplasmic reticulum. Tropomyosin has been implicated in actin-mediated membrane trafficking activity in other systems. Our findings suggest that Yuri-Tm1 complexes participate in related functions.

  6. TROPOMYOSIN IS AN INTERACTION PARTNER OF THE DROSOPHILA COILED COIL PROTEIN YURI GAGARIN

    PubMed Central

    Texada, Michael J.; Simonette, Rebecca A.; Deery, William J.; Beckingham, Kathleen M.

    2011-01-01

    The Drosophila gene yuri gagarin is a complex locus encoding three protein isoform classes that are ubiquitously expressed in the organism. Mutations to the gene affect processes as diverse as gravitactic behavior and spermatogenesis. The larger Yuri isoforms contain extensive coiled-coil regions. Our previous studies indicate that one of the large isoform classes (Yuri-65) is required for formation of specialized F-actin-containing structures generated during spermatogenesis, including the so-called actin “cones” that mediate spermatid individualization. We used tandem affinity purification of a tagged version of Yuri-65 (the TAP-tagging technique) to identify proteins associated with Yuri-65 in the intact organism. Tropomyosin, primarily as the 284-residue isoform derived from the ubiquitously expressed Tropomyosin 1 gene was thus identified as a major Yuri interaction partner. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments confirmed this interaction. We have established that the stable F-actin cones of spermatogenesis contain Tropomyosin 1 (Tm1) and that in mutant yuriF64, failure of F-actin cone formation is associated with failure of Tm1 to accumulate at the cone initiation sites. In investigating possible interactions of Tm1 and Yuri in other tissues, we discovered that Tm1 and Yuri frequently colocalize with the endoplasmic reticulum. Tropomyosin has been implicated in actin-mediated membrane trafficking activity in other systems. Our findings suggest that Yuri-Tm1 complexes participate in related functions. PMID:21126519

  7. Crystalline tubes of myosin subfragment-2 showing the coiled-coil and molecular interaction geometry

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    We have produced crystalline tubes of chicken breast myosin long subfragment-2 that show order to resolutions better than 2 nm. The tubes were formed from a thin sheet in which the myosin long subfragment-2 molecules were arranged on an approximately rectangular crystalline lattice with a = 14.1 +/- 0.2 nm and b = 3.9 +/- 0.1 nm in projection. Shadowing indicated that the tube wall was approximately 7 nm thick and that the sheets from which it was formed followed a right- handed helix. Superposition of the lattices from the top and bottom of the tube produced a moire pattern in negatively stained material, but images of single sheets were easily obtained by computer image processing. Although several molecules were superimposed perpendicular to the plane of the sheet, the modulation in density due to the coiled- coil envelope was clear, indicating that the coiled-coils in these molecules were in register (or staggered by an even number of quarter pitches). In projection the coiled-coil had an apparent pitch of 14.1 nm (the axial repeat of the unit cell), but the small number of molecules (probably four) superimposed perpendicular to the plane of the sheet meant that pitches within approximately 1 nm of this value could have shown a modulation. Therefore, a more precise determination of the coiled-coil pitch must await determination of the sheet's three- dimensional structure. The coiled-coils of adjacent molecules within the plane of the sheet were staggered by an odd number of quarter pitches. This arrangement was similar to that between paramyosin molecules in molluscan thick filaments and may have features in common with other coiled-coil protein assemblies, such as intermediate filaments. Each molecule in the crystal had two types of neighbor: one staggered by an odd number of quarter pitches and the other by an even number of quarter pitches, as has been proposed for the general packing of coiled-coils (Longley, W., 1975, J. Mol. Biol., 93:111-115). We propose

  8. Crystal structure of cytomegalovirus IE1 protein reveals targeting of TRIM family member PML via coiled-coil interactions.

    PubMed

    Scherer, Myriam; Klingl, Stefan; Sevvana, Madhumati; Otto, Victoria; Schilling, Eva-Maria; Stump, Joachim D; Müller, Regina; Reuter, Nina; Sticht, Heinrich; Muller, Yves A; Stamminger, Thomas

    2014-11-01

    PML nuclear bodies (PML-NBs) are enigmatic structures of the cell nucleus that act as key mediators of intrinsic immunity against viral pathogens. PML itself is a member of the E3-ligase TRIM family of proteins that regulates a variety of innate immune signaling pathways. Consequently, viruses have evolved effector proteins to modify PML-NBs; however, little is known concerning structure-function relationships of viral antagonists. The herpesvirus human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) expresses the abundant immediate-early protein IE1 that colocalizes with PML-NBs and induces their dispersal, which correlates with the antagonization of NB-mediated intrinsic immunity. Here, we delineate the molecular basis for this antagonization by presenting the first crystal structure for the evolutionary conserved primate cytomegalovirus IE1 proteins. We show that IE1 consists of a globular core (IE1CORE) flanked by intrinsically disordered regions. The 2.3 Å crystal structure of IE1CORE displays an all α-helical, femur-shaped fold, which lacks overall fold similarity with known protein structures, but shares secondary structure features recently observed in the coiled-coil domain of TRIM proteins. Yeast two-hybrid and coimmunoprecipitation experiments demonstrate that IE1CORE binds efficiently to the TRIM family member PML, and is able to induce PML deSUMOylation. Intriguingly, this results in the release of NB-associated proteins into the nucleoplasm, but not of PML itself. Importantly, we show that PML deSUMOylation by IE1CORE is sufficient to antagonize PML-NB-instituted intrinsic immunity. Moreover, co-immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrate that IE1CORE binds via the coiled-coil domain to PML and also interacts with TRIM5α We propose that IE1CORE sequesters PML and possibly other TRIM family members via structural mimicry using an extended binding surface formed by the coiled-coil region. This mode of interaction might render the antagonizing activity less susceptible to

  9. Electrostatic contribution to the thermodynamic and kinetic stability of the homotrimeric coiled coil Lpp-56: A computational study.

    PubMed

    Bjelić, Sasa; Wieninger, Silke; Jelesarov, Ilian; Karshikoff, Andrey

    2008-02-15

    The protein moiety of the Braun's E. coli outer membrane lipoprotein (Lpp-56) is an attractive object of biophysical investigation in several aspects. It is a homotrimeric, parallel coiled coil, a class of coiled coils whose stability and folding have been studied only occasionally. Lpp-56 possesses unique structural properties and exhibits extremely low rates of folding and unfolding. It is natural to ask how the specificity of the structure determines the extraordinary physical chemical properties of this protein. Recently, a seemingly controversial data on the stability and unfolding rate of Lpp-56 have been published (Dragan et al., Biochemistry 2004;43: 14891-14900; Bjelic et al., Biochemistry 2006;45:8931-8939). The unfolding rate constant measured using GdmCl as the denaturing agent, though extremely low, was substantially higher than that obtained on the basis of thermal unfolding. If this large difference arises from the effect of screening of electrostatic interactions induced by GdmCl, electrostatic interactions would appear to be an important factor determining the unusual properties of Lpp-56. We present here a computational analysis of the electrostatic properties of Lpp-56 combining molecular dynamics simulations and continuum pK calculations. The pH-dependence of the unfolding free energy is predicted in good agreement with the experimental data: the change in DeltaG between pH 3 and pH 7 is approximately 60 kJ mol(-1). The results suggest that the difference in the stability of the protein observed using different experimental methods is mainly because of the effect of the reduction of electrostatic interactions when the salt (GdmCl) concentration increases. We also find that the occupancy of the interhelical salt bridges is unusually high. We hypothesize that electrostatic interactions, and the interhelical salt bridges in particular, are an important factor determining the low unfolding rate of Lpp-56.

  10. SAS-6 coiled-coil structure and interaction with SAS-5 suggest a regulatory mechanism in C. elegans centriole assembly.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Renping; Cabral, Gabriela; Lettman, Molly M; Dammermann, Alexander; Dong, Gang

    2012-11-14

    The centriole is a conserved microtubule-based organelle essential for both centrosome formation and cilium biogenesis. Five conserved proteins for centriole duplication have been identified. Two of them, SAS-5 and SAS-6, physically interact with each other and are codependent for their targeting to procentrioles. However, it remains unclear how these two proteins interact at the molecular level. Here, we demonstrate that the short SAS-5 C-terminal domain (residues 390-404) specifically binds to a narrow central region (residues 275-288) of the SAS-6 coiled coil. This was supported by the crystal structure of the SAS-6 coiled-coil domain (CCD), which, together with mutagenesis studies, indicated that the association is mediated by synergistic hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions. The crystal structure also shows a periodic charge pattern along the SAS-6 CCD, which gives rise to an anti-parallel tetramer. Overall, our findings establish the molecular basis of the specific interaction between SAS-5 and SAS-6, and suggest that both proteins individually adopt an oligomeric conformation that is disrupted upon the formation of the hetero-complex to facilitate the correct assembly of the nine-fold symmetric centriole.

  11. Peptidyl Materials Formed Through Click Chemistry Enhanced Coiled-Coil Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koehler, Kenneth

    2014-03-01

    Biologically derived materials offer a level of sophistication synthetically fabricated materials have only attempted to mimic. This level of complexity may be found in materials such as peptides. Implementing new theory and modeling, peptides with the propensity to form coiled-coil (CC) bundles were designed and synthesized. Through the use of this de novo approach, modeling allowed prediction of the feasibility to include non-natural amino acids conducive to click chemistry into the peptide. Amino acids showcasing thiol or alkyne functionalities were considered owing to the ability of these moieties to participate in the thiol-ene and copper click reactions respectively. Once synthesized, the peptides decorated with these clickable motifs were placed in solution and allowed to self-assemble into CC's. CD spectroscopy and DLS experiments confirmed the formation and assembly of CC's. Click reactions were then incited to link the CC assemblies together and form a network with predictable dimensionality and pore size between CC bundles. To incite network formation, click reactions between CC side chain residues and suitably functionalized crosslinkers were implemented. The linking of coiled-coils and material formation were assessed using DLS and TEM.

  12. Coiled-Coil Design: Updated and Upgraded.

    PubMed

    Woolfson, Derek N

    2017-01-01

    α-Helical coiled coils are ubiquitous protein-folding and protein-interaction domains in which two or more α-helical chains come together to form bundles. Through a combination of bioinformatics analysis of many thousands of natural coiled-coil sequences and structures, plus empirical protein engineering and design studies, there is now a deep understanding of the sequence-to-structure relationships for this class of protein architecture. This has led to considerable success in rational design and what might be termed in biro de novo design of simple coiled coils, which include homo- and hetero-meric parallel dimers, trimers and tetramers. In turn, these provide a toolkit for directing the assembly of both natural proteins and more complex designs in protein engineering, materials science and synthetic biology. Moving on, the increased and improved use of computational design is allowing access to coiled-coil structures that are rare or even not observed in nature, for example α-helical barrels, which comprise five or more α-helices and have central channels into which different functions may be ported. This chapter reviews all of these advances, outlining improvements in our knowledge of the fundamentals of coiled-coil folding and assembly, and highlighting new coiled coil-based materials and applications that this new understanding is opening up. Despite considerable progress, however, challenges remain in coiled-coil design, and the next decade promises to be as productive and exciting as the last.

  13. A trimeric, alpha-helical, coiled coil peptide: association stoichiometry and interaction strength by analytical ultracentrifugation.

    PubMed

    Thomas, R M; Zampieri, A; Jumel, K; Harding, S E

    1997-01-01

    Alpha-helical coiled coils are proving to be almost ideal systems for the modelling of peptide and protein self-association processes. Stable oligomeric systems, in which the stoichiometry is well defined, can be produced by the careful selection of the appropriate amino acid sequence, although the principles behind this are still not fully understood. Here we report on a 35 residue peptide, FZ, synthesized by the solid phase method, which was originally designed to form a dimer, but which, in fact, associates to the trimeric state. A detailed characterization of the associative properties of the peptide has been performed by circular dichroism spectroscopy and, in particular, by sedimentation equilibrium in the analytical ultracentrifuge. The presence of the trimeric state, which is stable even at low peptide concentrations, has been confirmed by various independent methods of analysis for molar mass. The effects of both temperature and of guanidinium chloride on the peptide have been investigated and both found to be peptide-concentration dependent. The unfolding induced by the denaturant cannot be adequately described by a simple, two state monomer-trimer equilibrium.

  14. CCBuilder: an interactive web-based tool for building, designing and assessing coiled-coil protein assemblies

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Christopher W.; Bruning, Marc; Ibarra, Amaurys Á.; Bartlett, Gail J.; Thomson, Andrew R.; Sessions, Richard B.; Brady, R Leo; Woolfson, Derek N.

    2014-01-01

    Motivation: The ability to accurately model protein structures at the atomistic level underpins efforts to understand protein folding, to engineer natural proteins predictably and to design proteins de novo. Homology-based methods are well established and produce impressive results. However, these are limited to structures presented by and resolved for natural proteins. Addressing this problem more widely and deriving truly ab initio models requires mathematical descriptions for protein folds; the means to decorate these with natural, engineered or de novo sequences; and methods to score the resulting models. Results: We present CCBuilder, a web-based application that tackles the problem for a defined but large class of protein structure, the α-helical coiled coils. CCBuilder generates coiled-coil backbones, builds side chains onto these frameworks and provides a range of metrics to measure the quality of the models. Its straightforward graphical user interface provides broad functionality that allows users to build and assess models, in which helix geometry, coiled-coil architecture and topology and protein sequence can be varied rapidly. We demonstrate the utility of CCBuilder by assembling models for 653 coiled-coil structures from the PDB, which cover >96% of the known coiled-coil types, and by generating models for rarer and de novo coiled-coil structures. Availability and implementation: CCBuilder is freely available, without registration, at http://coiledcoils.chm.bris.ac.uk/app/cc_builder/ Contact: D.N.Woolfson@bristol.ac.uk or Chris.Wood@bristol.ac.uk PMID:25064570

  15. A Coiled-coil Clamp Controls Both Conformation and Clustering of Stromal Interaction Molecule 1 (STIM1)*

    PubMed Central

    Fahrner, Marc; Muik, Martin; Schindl, Rainer; Butorac, Carmen; Stathopulos, Peter; Zheng, Le; Jardin, Isaac; Ikura, Mitsuhiko; Romanin, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    Store-operated Ca2+ entry, essential for the adaptive immunity, is initiated by the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) Ca2+ sensor STIM1. Ca2+ entry occurs through the plasma membrane resident Ca2+ channel Orai1 that directly interacts with the C-terminal STIM1 domain, named SOAR/CAD. Depletion of the ER Ca2+ store controls this STIM1/Orai1 interaction via transition to an extended STIM1 C-terminal conformation, exposure of the SOAR/CAD domain, and STIM1/Orai1 co-clustering. Here we developed a novel approach termed FRET-derived Interaction in a Restricted Environment (FIRE) in an attempt to dissect the interplay of coiled-coil (CC) interactions in controlling STIM1 quiescent as well as active conformation and cluster formation. We present evidence of a sequential activation mechanism in the STIM1 cytosolic domains where the interaction between CC1 and CC3 segment regulates both SOAR/CAD exposure and CC3-mediated higher-order oligomerization as well as cluster formation. These dual levels of STIM1 auto-inhibition provide efficient control over the coupling to and activation of Orai1 channels. PMID:25342749

  16. Evolutionary Patterns in Coiled-Coils

    PubMed Central

    Surkont, Jaroslaw; Pereira-Leal, Jose B.

    2015-01-01

    Models of protein evolution are used to describe evolutionary processes, for phylogenetic analyses and homology detection. Widely used general models of protein evolution are biased toward globular domains and lack resolution to describe evolutionary processes for other protein types. As three-dimensional structure is a major constraint to protein evolution, specific models have been proposed for other types of proteins. Here, we consider evolutionary patterns in coiled-coil forming proteins. Coiled-coils are widespread structural domains, formed by a repeated motif of seven amino acids (heptad repeat). Coiled-coil forming proteins are frequently rods and spacers, structuring both the intracellular and the extracellular spaces that often form protein interaction interfaces. We tested the hypothesis that due to their specific structure the associated evolutionary constraints differ from those of globular proteins. We showed that substitution patterns in coiled-coil regions are different than those observed in globular regions, beyond the simple heptad repeat. Based on these substitution patterns we developed a coiled-coil specific (CC) model that in the context of phylogenetic reconstruction outperforms general models in tree likelihood, often leading to different topologies. For multidomain proteins containing both a coiled-coil region and a globular domain, we showed that a combination of the CC model and a general one gives higher likelihoods than a single model. Finally, we showed that the model can be used for homology detection to increase search sensitivity for coiled-coil proteins. The CC model, software, and other supplementary materials are available at http://www.evocell.org/cgl/resources (last accessed January 29, 2015). PMID:25577198

  17. Two interacting coiled-coil proteins, WEB1 and PMI2, maintain the chloroplast photorelocation movement velocity in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Kodama, Yutaka; Suetsugu, Noriyuki; Kong, Sam-Geun; Wada, Masamitsu

    2010-11-09

    Chloroplasts move toward weak light (accumulation response) and away from strong light (avoidance response). The fast and accurate movement of chloroplasts in response to ambient light conditions is essential for efficient photosynthesis and photodamage prevention in chloroplasts. Here, we report that two Arabidopsis mutants, weak chloroplast movement under blue light 1 (web1) and web2, are defective in both the avoidance and the accumulation responses. Map-based cloning revealed that both genes encode coiled-coil proteins and that WEB2 is identical to the plastid movement impaired 2 (PMI2) gene. The velocities of chloroplast movement in web1 and pmi2 were approximately threefold lower than that in the wild type. Defects in the avoidance response of web1 and pmi2 were suppressed by mutation of the J-domain protein required for chloroplast accumulation response 1 (JAC1) gene, which is essential for the accumulation response; these results indicate that WEB1 and PMI2 play a role in suppressing JAC1 under strong light conditions. A yeast two-hybrid analysis and a nuclear recruitment assay identified a physical interaction between WEB1 and PMI2, and transient expression analysis of CFP-WEB1 and YFP-PMI2 revealed that they colocalized in the cytosol. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation analysis confirmed the interaction of these proteins in the cytosol. Blue light-induced changes in short chloroplast actin filaments (cp-actin filaments) were impaired in both web1 and pmi2. Our findings suggest that a cytosolic WEB1-PMI2 complex maintains the velocity of chloroplast photorelocation movement via cp-actin filament regulation.

  18. Cross-linking reveals laminin coiled-coil architecture

    PubMed Central

    Armony, Gad; Jacob, Etai; Moran, Toot; Levin, Yishai; Mehlman, Tevie; Levy, Yaakov; Fass, Deborah

    2016-01-01

    Laminin, an ∼800-kDa heterotrimeric protein, is a major functional component of the extracellular matrix, contributing to tissue development and maintenance. The unique architecture of laminin is not currently amenable to determination at high resolution, as its flexible and narrow segments complicate both crystallization and single-particle reconstruction by electron microscopy. Therefore, we used cross-linking and MS, evaluated using computational methods, to address key questions regarding laminin quaternary structure. This approach was particularly well suited to the ∼750-Å coiled coil that mediates trimer assembly, and our results support revision of the subunit order typically presented in laminin schematics. Furthermore, information on the subunit register in the coiled coil and cross-links to downstream domains provide insights into the self-assembly required for interaction with other extracellular matrix and cell surface proteins. PMID:27815530

  19. The basic amino acids in the coiled-coil domain of CIN85 regulate its interaction with c-Cbl and phosphatidic acid during epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiudan; Zhang, Jing; Liao, Kan

    2014-07-08

    During EGFR internalization CIN85 bridges EGFR-Cbl complex, endocytic machinery and fusible membrane through the interactions of CIN85 with c-Cbl, endophilins and phosphatidic acid. These protein-protein and protein-lipid interactions are mediated or regulated by the positively charged C-terminal coiled-coil domain of CIN85. However, the details of CIN85-lipid interaction remain unknown. The present study suggested a possible electric interaction between the negative charge of phosphatidic acid and the positive charge of basic amino acids in coiled-coil domain. Mutations of the basic amino acids in the coiled-coil domain, especially K645, K646, R648 and R650, into neutral amino acid alanine completely blocked the interaction of CIN85 with c-Cbl or phosphatidic acid. However, they did not affect CIN85-endophilin interaction. In addition, CIN85 was found to associate with the internalized EGFR endosomes. It interacted with several ESCRT (Endosomal Sorting Complex Required for Transport) component proteins for ESCRT assembly on endosomal membrane. Mutations in the coiled-coil domain (deletion of the coiled-coil domain or point mutations of the basic amino acids) dissociated CIN85 from endosomes. These mutants bound the ESCRT components in cytoplasm to prevent them from assembly on endosomal membrane and inhibited EGFR sorting for degradation. As an adaptor protein, CIN85 interacts with variety of partners through several domains. The positive charges of basic amino acids in the coiled-coil domain are not only involved in the interaction with phosphatidic acid, but also regulate the interaction of CIN85 with c-Cbl. CIN85 also interacts with ESCRT components for protein sorting in endosomes. These CIN85-protein and CIN85-lipid interactions enable CIN85 to link EGFR-Cbl endocytic complex with fusible membrane during EGFR endocytosis and subsequently to facilitate ESCRT formation on endosomal membrane for EGFR sorting and degradation.

  20. The use of ion mobility mass spectrometry to assist protein design: a case study on zinc finger fold versus coiled coil interactions.

    PubMed

    Berezovskaya, Yana; Porrini, Massimiliano; Nortcliffe, Chris; Barran, Perdita E

    2015-04-21

    The dramatic conformational change in zinc fingers on binding metal ions for DNA recognition makes their structure-function behaviour an attractive target to mimic in de novo designed peptides. Mass spectrometry, with its high throughput and low sample consumption provides insight into how primary amino acid sequence can encode stable tertiary fold. We present here the use of ion mobility mass spectrometry (IM-MS) coupled with molecular dynamics (MD) simulations as a rapid analytical platform to inform de novo design efforts for peptide-metal and peptide-peptide interactions. A dual peptide-based synthetic system, ZiCop based on a zinc finger peptide motif, and a coiled coil partner peptide Pp, have been investigated. Titration mass spectrometry determines the relative binding affinities of different divalent metal ions as Zn(2+) > Co(2+) ≫ Ca(2+). With collision induced dissociation (CID), we probe complex stability, and establish that peptide-metal interactions are stronger and more 'specific' than those of peptide-peptide complexes, and the anticipated hetero-dimeric complex is more stable than the two homo-dimers. Collision cross-sections (CCS) measurements by IM-MS reveal increased stability with respect to unfolding of the metal-bound peptide over its apo-form, and further, larger collision cross sections for the hetero-dimeric forms suggest that dimeric species formed in the absence of metal are coiled coil like. MD supports these structural assignments, backed up by data from visible light absorbance measurements.

  1. Coiled-coil interaction of N-terminal 36 residues of cyclase-associated protein with adenylyl cyclase is sufficient for its function in Saccharomyces cerevisiae ras pathway.

    PubMed

    Nishida, Y; Shima, F; Sen, H; Tanaka, Y; Yanagihara, C; Yamawaki-Kataoka, Y; Kariya, K; Kataoka, T

    1998-10-23

    In the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, association with the 70-kDa cyclase-associated protein (CAP) is required for proper response of adenylyl cyclase to Ras proteins. We show here that a small segment comprising the N-terminal 36 amino acid residues of CAP is sufficient for association with adenylyl cyclase as well as for its function in the Ras-adenylyl cyclase pathway as assayed by the ability to confer RAS2(Val-19)-dependent heat shock sensitivity to yeast cells. The CAP-binding site of adenylyl cyclase was mapped to a segment of 119 amino acid residues near its C terminus. Both of these regions contained tandem repetitions of a heptad motif alphaXXalphaXXX (where alpha represents a hydrophobic amino acid and X represents any amino acid), suggesting a coiled-coil interaction. When mutants of CAP defective in associating with adenylyl cyclase were isolated by screening of a pool of randomly mutagenized CAP, they were found to carry substitution mutations in one of the key hydrophobic residues in the heptad repeats. Furthermore, mutations of the key hydrophobic residues in the heptad repeats of adenylyl cyclase also resulted in loss of association with CAP. These results indicate the coiled-coil mechanism as a basis of the CAP-adenylyl cyclase interaction.

  2. Structural and biochemical characterizations of an intramolecular tandem coiled coil protein.

    PubMed

    Shin, Donghyuk; Kim, Gwanho; Kim, Gyuhee; Zheng, Xu; Kim, Yang-Gyun; Lee, Sangho

    2014-12-12

    Coiled coil has served as an excellent model system for studying protein folding and developing protein-based biomaterials. Most designed coiled coils function as oligomers, namely intermolecular coiled coils. However, less is known about structural and biochemical behavior of intramolecular coiled coils where coiled coil domains are covalently linked in one polypeptide. Here we prepare a protein which harbors three coiled coil domains with two short linkers, termed intramolecular tandem coiled coil (ITCC) and characterize its structural and biochemical behavior in solution. ITCC consists of three coiled coil domains whose sequences are derived from Coil-Ser and its domain swapped dimer. Modifications include positioning E (Glu) residue at "e" and K (Lys) at "g" positions throughout heptad repeats to enhance ionic interaction among its constituent coiled coil domains. Molecular modeling of ITCC suggests a compact triple helical bundle structure with the second and the third coiled coil domains forming a canonical coiled coil. ITCC exists as a mixture of monomeric and dimeric species in solution. Small-angle X-ray scattering reveals ellipsoidal molecular envelopes for both dimeric and monomeric ITCC in solution. The theoretically modeled structures of ITCC dock well into the envelopes of both species. Higher ionic strength shifts the equilibrium into monomer with apparently more compact structure while secondary structure remains unchanged. Taken together, our results suggest that our designed ITCC is predominantly monomeric structure through the enhanced ionic interactions, and its conformation is affected by the concentration of ionic species in the buffer.

  3. The evolution and structure prediction of coiled coils across all genomes.

    PubMed

    Rackham, Owen J L; Madera, Martin; Armstrong, Craig T; Vincent, Thomas L; Woolfson, Derek N; Gough, Julian

    2010-10-29

    Coiled coils are α-helical interactions found in many natural proteins. Various sequence-based coiled-coil predictors are available, but key issues remain: oligomeric state and protein-protein interface prediction and extension to all genomes. We present SpiriCoil (http://supfam.org/SUPERFAMILY/spiricoil), which is based on a novel approach to the coiled-coil prediction problem for coiled coils that fall into known superfamilies: hundreds of hidden Markov models representing coiled-coil-containing domain families. Using whole domains gives the advantage that sequences flanking the coiled coils help. SpiriCoil performs at least as well as existing methods at detecting coiled coils and significantly advances the state of the art for oligomer state prediction. SpiriCoil has been run on over 16 million sequences, including all completely sequenced genomes (more than 1200), and a resulting Web interface supplies data downloads, alignments, scores, oligomeric state classifications, three-dimensional homology models and visualisation. This has allowed, for the first time, a genomewide analysis of coiled-coil evolution. We found that coiled coils have arisen independently de novo well over a hundred times, and these are observed in 16 different oligomeric states. Coiled coils in almost all oligomeric states were present in the last universal common ancestor of life. The vast majority of occasions that individual coiled coils have arisen de novo were before the last universal common ancestor of life; we do, however, observe scattered instances throughout subsequent evolutionary history, mostly in the formation of the eukaryote superkingdom. Coiled coils do not change their oligomeric state over evolution and did not evolve from the rearrangement of existing helices in proteins; coiled coils were forged in unison with the fold of the whole protein. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Complex Networks Govern Coiled-Coil Oligomerization – Predicting and Profiling by Means of a Machine Learning Approach*

    PubMed Central

    Mahrenholz, Carsten C.; Abfalter, Ingrid G.; Bodenhofer, Ulrich; Volkmer, Rudolf; Hochreiter, Sepp

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the relationship between protein sequence and structure is one of the great challenges in biology. In the case of the ubiquitous coiled-coil motif, structure and occurrence have been described in extensive detail, but there is a lack of insight into the rules that govern oligomerization, i.e. how many α-helices form a given coiled coil. To shed new light on the formation of two- and three-stranded coiled coils, we developed a machine learning approach to identify rules in the form of weighted amino acid patterns. These rules form the basis of our classification tool, PrOCoil, which also visualizes the contribution of each individual amino acid to the overall oligomeric tendency of a given coiled-coil sequence. We discovered that sequence positions previously thought irrelevant to direct coiled-coil interaction have an undeniable impact on stoichiometry. Our rules also demystify the oligomerization behavior of the yeast transcription factor GCN4, which can now be described as a hybrid—part dimer and part trimer—with both theoretical and experimental justification. PMID:21311038

  5. Structural analysis of intermolecular interactions in the kinesin adaptor complex fasciculation and elongation protein zeta 1/ short coiled-coil protein (FEZ1/SCOCO).

    PubMed

    Alborghetti, Marcos Rodrigo; Furlan, Ariane da Silva; da Silva, Júlio César; Sforça, Maurício Luís; Honorato, Rodrigo Vargas; Granato, Daniela Campos; dos Santos Migueleti, Deivid Lucas; Neves, Jorge L; de Oliveira, Paulo Sergio Lopes; Paes-Leme, Adriana Franco; Zeri, Ana Carolina de Mattos; de Torriani, Iris Concepcion Linares; Kobarg, Jörg

    2013-01-01

    Cytoskeleton and protein trafficking processes, including vesicle transport to synapses, are key processes in neuronal differentiation and axon outgrowth. The human protein FEZ1 (fasciculation and elongation protein zeta 1 / UNC-76, in C. elegans), SCOCO (short coiled-coil protein / UNC-69) and kinesins (e.g. kinesin heavy chain / UNC116) are involved in these processes. Exploiting the feature of FEZ1 protein as a bivalent adapter of transport mediated by kinesins and FEZ1 protein interaction with SCOCO (proteins involved in the same path of axonal growth), we investigated the structural aspects of intermolecular interactions involved in this complex formation by NMR (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance), cross-linking coupled with mass spectrometry (MS), SAXS (Small Angle X-ray Scattering) and molecular modelling. The topology of homodimerization was accessed through NMR (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance) studies of the region involved in this process, corresponding to FEZ1 (92-194). Through studies involving the protein in its monomeric configuration (reduced) and dimeric state, we propose that homodimerization occurs with FEZ1 chains oriented in an anti-parallel topology. We demonstrate that the interaction interface of FEZ1 and SCOCO defined by MS and computational modelling is in accordance with that previously demonstrated for UNC-76 and UNC-69. SAXS and literature data support a heterotetrameric complex model. These data provide details about the interaction interfaces probably involved in the transport machinery assembly and open perspectives to understand and interfere in this assembly and its involvement in neuronal differentiation and axon outgrowth.

  6. Structural Analysis of Intermolecular Interactions in the Kinesin Adaptor Complex Fasciculation and Elongation Protein Zeta 1/ Short Coiled-Coil Protein (FEZ1/SCOCO)

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Júlio César; Sforça, Maurício Luís; Honorato, Rodrigo Vargas; Granato, Daniela Campos; dos Santos Migueleti, Deivid Lucas; Neves, Jorge L.; de Oliveira, Paulo Sergio Lopes; Paes-Leme, Adriana Franco; Zeri, Ana Carolina de Mattos; de Torriani, Iris Concepcion Linares; Kobarg, Jörg

    2013-01-01

    Cytoskeleton and protein trafficking processes, including vesicle transport to synapses, are key processes in neuronal differentiation and axon outgrowth. The human protein FEZ1 (fasciculation and elongation protein zeta 1 / UNC-76, in C. elegans), SCOCO (short coiled-coil protein / UNC-69) and kinesins (e.g. kinesin heavy chain / UNC116) are involved in these processes. Exploiting the feature of FEZ1 protein as a bivalent adapter of transport mediated by kinesins and FEZ1 protein interaction with SCOCO (proteins involved in the same path of axonal growth), we investigated the structural aspects of intermolecular interactions involved in this complex formation by NMR (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance), cross-linking coupled with mass spectrometry (MS), SAXS (Small Angle X-ray Scattering) and molecular modelling. The topology of homodimerization was accessed through NMR (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance) studies of the region involved in this process, corresponding to FEZ1 (92-194). Through studies involving the protein in its monomeric configuration (reduced) and dimeric state, we propose that homodimerization occurs with FEZ1 chains oriented in an anti-parallel topology. We demonstrate that the interaction interface of FEZ1 and SCOCO defined by MS and computational modelling is in accordance with that previously demonstrated for UNC-76 and UNC-69. SAXS and literature data support a heterotetrameric complex model. These data provide details about the interaction interfaces probably involved in the transport machinery assembly and open perspectives to understand and interfere in this assembly and its involvement in neuronal differentiation and axon outgrowth. PMID:24116125

  7. The Chloroplastic Protein THF1 Interacts with the Coiled-Coil Domain of the Disease Resistance Protein N′ and Regulates Light-Dependent Cell Death1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Sekine, Ken-Taro; Wallon, Thérèse; Sugiwaka, Yuji; Kobayashi, Kappei

    2016-01-01

    One branch of plant immunity is mediated through nucleotide-binding/Leu-rich repeat (NB-LRR) family proteins that recognize specific effectors encoded by pathogens. Members of the I2-like family constitute a well-conserved subgroup of NB-LRRs from Solanaceae possessing a coiled-coil (CC) domain at their N termini. We show here that the CC domains of several I2-like proteins are able to induce a hypersensitive response (HR), a form of programmed cell death associated with disease resistance. Using yeast two-hybrid screens, we identified the chloroplastic protein Thylakoid Formation1 (THF1) as an interacting partner for several I2-like CC domains. Co-immunoprecipitations and bimolecular fluorescence complementation assays confirmed that THF1 and I2-like CC domains interact in planta and that these interactions take place in the cytosol. Several HR-inducing I2-like CC domains have a negative effect on the accumulation of THF1, suggesting that the latter is destabilized by active CC domains. To confirm this model, we investigated N′, which recognizes the coat protein of most Tobamoviruses, as a prototypical member of the I2-like family. Transient expression and gene silencing data indicated that THF1 functions as a negative regulator of cell death and that activation of full-length N′ results in the destabilization of THF1. Consistent with the known function of THF1 in maintaining chloroplast homeostasis, we show that the HR induced by N′ is light-dependent. Together, our results define, to our knowledge, novel molecular mechanisms linking light and chloroplasts to the induction of cell death by a subgroup of NB-LRR proteins. PMID:26951433

  8. Ion pairs significantly stabilize coiled-coils in the absence of electrolyte.

    PubMed

    Yu, Y; Monera, O D; Hodges, R S; Privalov, P L

    1996-01-26

    We have used a synthetic coiled-coil peptide model system to address the long perplexing issue as to why coiled-coils are in general more stable at acidic pH than at neutral pH. Contrary to the above expectation, our results show that at low ionic strength (10 mM) the coiled-coil was much more stable at neutral pH than at acidic pH against both thermal and urea unfolding, indicating that the Lys(+)-Glu- ions pairs present around the coiled-coil interface at neutral pH contribute significantly to the stability of the coiled-coil. However, while the addition of NaCl had no significant effect on the coiled-coil stability at neutral pH, its stability at acidic pH increased dramatically. The cross-over point between the stability at acidic pH and neutral pH occurred at around 100 mM salt, above which the coiled-coil became more stable at acidic pH, in agreement with published results. Therefore, salt effect, rather than intrinsic property, such as carboxyl-carboxyl hydrogen bonding, causes this coiled-coil to become more stable at acidic pH. The preferential stabilizing effect of salt on the coiled-coil at acidic pH can be best explained in terms of the condensation of anions to the positively charged groups on the coiled-coil, the net density of which increases as glutamic acid residues become protonated in acidic pH.

  9. A Parallel Coiled-Coil Tetramer with Offset Helices

    SciTech Connect

    Liu,J.; Deng, Y.; Zheng, Q.; Cheng, C.; Kallenbach, N.; Lu, M.

    2006-01-01

    Specific helix-helix interactions are fundamental in assembling the native state of proteins and in protein-protein interfaces. Coiled coils afford a unique model system for elucidating principles of molecular recognition between {alpha} helices. The coiled-coil fold is specified by a characteristic seven amino acid repeat containing hydrophobic residues at the first (a) and fourth (d) positions. Nonpolar side chains spaced three and four residues apart are referred to as the 3-4 hydrophobic repeat. The presence of apolar amino acids at the e or g positions (corresponding to a 3-3-1 hydrophobic repeat) can provide new possibilities for close-packing of {alpha}-helices that includes examples such as the lac repressor tetramerization domain. Here we demonstrate that an unprecedented coiled-coil interface results from replacement of three charged residues at the e positions in the dimeric GCN4 leucine zipper by nonpolar valine side chains. Equilibrium circular dichroism and analytical ultracentrifugation studies indicate that the valine-containing mutant forms a discrete {alpha}-helical tetramer with a significantly higher stability than the parent leucine-zipper molecule. The 1.35 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure of the tetramer reveals a parallel four-stranded coiled coil with a three-residue interhelical offset. The local packing geometry of the three hydrophobic positions in the tetramer conformation is completely different from that seen in classical tetrameric structures yet bears resemblance to that in three-stranded coiled coils. These studies demonstrate that distinct van der Waals interactions beyond the a and d side chains can generate a diverse set of helix-helix interfaces and three-dimensional supercoil structures.

  10. N@a and N@d: Oligomer and Partner Specification by Asparagine in Coiled-Coil Interfaces.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Jordan M; Bartlett, Gail J; Boyle, Aimee L; Danon, Jonathan J; Rush, Laura E; Lupas, Andrei N; Woolfson, Derek N

    2017-02-17

    The α-helical coiled coil is one of the best-studied protein-protein interaction motifs. As a result, sequence-to-structure relationships are available for the prediction of natural coiled-coil sequences and the de novo design of new ones. However, coiled coils adopt a wide range of oligomeric states and topologies, and our understanding of the specification of these and the discrimination between them remains incomplete. Gaps in our knowledge assume more importance as coiled coils are used increasingly to construct biomimetic systems of higher complexity; for this, coiled-coil components need to be robust, orthogonal, and transferable between contexts. Here, we explore how the polar side chain asparagine (Asn, N) is tolerated within otherwise hydrophobic helix-helix interfaces of coiled coils. The long-held view is that Asn placed at certain sites of the coiled-coil sequence repeat selects one oligomer state over others, which is rationalized by the ability of the side chain to make hydrogen bonds, or interactions with chelated ions within the coiled-coil interior of the favored state. We test this with experiments on de novo peptide sequences traditionally considered as directing parallel dimers and trimers, and more widely through bioinformatics analysis of natural coiled-coil sequences and structures. We find that when located centrally, rather than near the termini of such coiled-coil sequences, Asn does exert the anticipated oligomer-specifying influence. However, outside of these bounds, Asn is observed less frequently in the natural sequences, and the synthetic peptides are hyperthermostable and lose oligomer-state specificity. These findings highlight that not all regions of coiled-coil repeat sequences are equivalent, and that care is needed when designing coiled-coil interfaces.

  11. Structural implications of conserved aspartate residues located in tropomyosin’s coiled-coil core

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Jeffrey R.; Li, Xiaochuan; Nirody, Jasmine; Fischer, Stefan; Lehman, William

    2011-01-01

    Polar residues lying between adjacent α-helical chains of coiled-coils often contribute to coiled-coil curvature and flexibility, while more typical core hydrophobic residues anneal the chains together. In tropomyosins, ranging from smooth and skeletal muscle to cytoplasmic isoforms, a highly conserved Asp at residue 137 places negative charges within the tropomyosin coiled-coil core in a position which may affect the conformation needed for tropomyosin binding and regulatory movements on actin. Proteolytic susceptibility suggested that substituting a canonical Leu for the naturally occurring Asp at residue 137 increases inter-chain rigidity by stabilizing the tropomyosin coiled-coil. Using molecular dynamics, we now directly assess changes in coiled-coil curvature and flexibility caused by such mutants. Although the coiled-coil flexibility is modestly diminished near the residue 137 mutation site, as expected, a delocalized increase in flexibility along the overall coiled-coil is observed. Even though the average shape of the D137L tropomyosin is straighter than that of wild-type tropomyosin, it is still capable of binding actin due to this increase in flexibility. We conclude that the conserved, non-canonical Asp-137 destabilizes the local structure resulting in a local flexible region in the middle of tropomyosin that normally is important for tropomyosin steady-state equilibrium position on actin. PMID:22754618

  12. Two Complementary Approaches for the Controlled Release of Biomolecules Immobilized via Coiled-Coil Interactions: Peptide Core Mutations and Multivalent Presentation.

    PubMed

    Murschel, Frederic; Fortier, Charles; Jolicoeur, Mario; Hodges, Robert S; De Crescenzo, Gregory

    2017-03-13

    We have developed a heterodimeric coiled-coil system based on two complementary peptides, namely (EVSALEK)5 and (KVSALKE)5, or E and K, for the attachment of E-tagged biomolecules onto K-decorated biomaterials. We here explore two approaches to control the strength and the stability of the E/K coiled-coil complex, and thus its potential for the controlled release of biomolecules. Those are Leucine-to-Alanine mutations in the K peptide (4 peptides with 0 to 3 mutations) and multivalent presentation of the E peptide (6 bio-objects from monomeric to dimeric and n-meric). Using E-tagged growth factors and nanoparticles as models, SPR-based assays performed under continuous flow indicated that the release rate was strongly affected by both approaches independently, and that the strength of the capture could be finely tuned over a wide range (apparent dissociation constant from 0.12 pM to 270 nM). Further release assays carried out in well-plates showed that the multivalent presentation only had a significant influence in this setup since the wells were not rinsed under continuous flow.

  13. The C-terminal coiled-coil of the bacterial voltage-gated sodium channel NaChBac is not essential for tetramer formation, but stabilizes subunit-to-subunit interactions.

    PubMed

    Mio, Kazuhiro; Mio, Muneyo; Arisaka, Fumio; Sato, Masahiko; Sato, Chikara

    2010-09-01

    The NaChBac is a prokaryotic homologue of the voltage-gated sodium channel found in the genome of the alkalophilic bacterium Bacillus halodurans C-125. Like a repeating cassette of mammalian sodium channel, the NaChBac possesses hydrophobic domains corresponding to six putative transmembrane segments and a pore loop, and exerts channel function by forming a tetramer although detailed mechanisms of subunit assembly remain unclear. We generated truncated mutants from NaChBac, and investigated their ability to form tetramers in relation to their channel functions. A mutant that deletes almost all of the C-terminal coiled-coil structure lost its voltage-dependent ion permeability, although it was properly translocated to the cell surface. The mutant protein was purified as a tetramer using a reduced concentration of detergent, but the association between the subunits was shown to be much weaker than the wild type. The chemical cross-linking, blue native PAGE, sedimentation velocity experiments, size exclusion chromatography, immunoprecipitation, and electron microscopy all supported its tetrameric assembly. We further purified the C-terminal cytoplasmic domain alone and confirmed its self-oligomerization. These data suggest that the C-terminal coiled-coil structure stabilizes subunit-to-subunit interactions of NaChBac, but is not critical for their tetramer formation. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Contributed Review: Absolute spectral radiance calibration of fiber-optic shock-temperature pyrometers using a coiled-coil irradiance standard lamp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fat'yanov, O. V.; Asimow, P. D.

    2015-10-01

    We describe an accurate and precise calibration procedure for multichannel optical pyrometers such as the 6-channel, 3-ns temporal resolution instrument used in the Caltech experimental geophysics laboratory. We begin with a review of calibration sources for shock temperatures in the 3000-30 000 K range. High-power, coiled tungsten halogen standards of spectral irradiance appear to be the only practical alternative to NIST-traceable tungsten ribbon lamps, which are no longer available with large enough calibrated area. However, non-uniform radiance complicates the use of such coiled lamps for reliable and reproducible calibration of pyrometers that employ imaging or relay optics. Careful analysis of documented methods of shock pyrometer calibration to coiled irradiance standard lamps shows that only one technique, not directly applicable in our case, is free of major radiometric errors. We provide a detailed description of the modified Caltech pyrometer instrument and a procedure for its absolute spectral radiance calibration, accurate to ±5%. We employ a designated central area of a 0.7× demagnified image of a coiled-coil tungsten halogen lamp filament, cross-calibrated against a NIST-traceable tungsten ribbon lamp. We give the results of the cross-calibration along with descriptions of the optical arrangement, data acquisition, and processing. We describe a procedure to characterize the difference between the static and dynamic response of amplified photodetectors, allowing time-dependent photodiode correction factors for spectral radiance histories from shock experiments. We validate correct operation of the modified Caltech pyrometer with actual shock temperature experiments on single-crystal NaCl and MgO and obtain very good agreement with the literature data for these substances. We conclude with a summary of the most essential requirements for error-free calibration of a fiber-optic shock-temperature pyrometer using a high-power coiled tungsten halogen

  15. Contributed Review: Absolute spectral radiance calibration of fiber-optic shock-temperature pyrometers using a coiled-coil irradiance standard lamp

    SciTech Connect

    Fat’yanov, O. V. Asimow, P. D.

    2015-10-15

    We describe an accurate and precise calibration procedure for multichannel optical pyrometers such as the 6-channel, 3-ns temporal resolution instrument used in the Caltech experimental geophysics laboratory. We begin with a review of calibration sources for shock temperatures in the 3000-30 000 K range. High-power, coiled tungsten halogen standards of spectral irradiance appear to be the only practical alternative to NIST-traceable tungsten ribbon lamps, which are no longer available with large enough calibrated area. However, non-uniform radiance complicates the use of such coiled lamps for reliable and reproducible calibration of pyrometers that employ imaging or relay optics. Careful analysis of documented methods of shock pyrometer calibration to coiled irradiance standard lamps shows that only one technique, not directly applicable in our case, is free of major radiometric errors. We provide a detailed description of the modified Caltech pyrometer instrument and a procedure for its absolute spectral radiance calibration, accurate to ±5%. We employ a designated central area of a 0.7× demagnified image of a coiled-coil tungsten halogen lamp filament, cross-calibrated against a NIST-traceable tungsten ribbon lamp. We give the results of the cross-calibration along with descriptions of the optical arrangement, data acquisition, and processing. We describe a procedure to characterize the difference between the static and dynamic response of amplified photodetectors, allowing time-dependent photodiode correction factors for spectral radiance histories from shock experiments. We validate correct operation of the modified Caltech pyrometer with actual shock temperature experiments on single-crystal NaCl and MgO and obtain very good agreement with the literature data for these substances. We conclude with a summary of the most essential requirements for error-free calibration of a fiber-optic shock-temperature pyrometer using a high-power coiled tungsten halogen

  16. Hydrophobic core packing and backbone flexibility in coiled coils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plecs, Joseph John

    1999-11-01

    An understanding of the structure and function of protein molecules requires an understanding of how their hydrophobic cores are assembled, including how the peptide backbone can adjust to accommodate different packing arrangements. Using coiled-coil molecules as a model of protein structures, we studied several cases in which the arrangement of packing groups in the hydrophobic core controls the structure of a folded molecule. First, we consider an example of a prosthetic packing group, where the addition of a hydrophobic ligand permits a new packing arrangement that incorporates the ligand, leading to a new overall structure. Second, the crystal structures of two peptides designed to adopt a novel fold, the right-handed coiled coils, reveal how a small change in core packing can discriminate between two different folds. And last, the design of heterodimers based on core-packing complementarity establishes that core packing can convey specificity of association between different molecules, as well as determining the molecular structure. The heterodimer designs also demonstrate the importance of a combination of backbone freedom and restriction in predicting the energetics of folded molecules. In this case, a parametrized coiled- coil backbone with appropriate parameters and restrictions was required to predict stabilities. We conclude that core packing can exert a great deal of control over the structure of proteins, and that many of its effects can be accurately predicted by modeling the molecular interactions in the context of a flexible overall structure.

  17. Immune responses to coiled coil supramolecular biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Rudra, Jai S; Tripathi, Pulak K; Hildeman, David A; Jung, Jangwook P; Collier, Joel H

    2010-11-01

    Self-assembly has been increasingly utilized in recent years to create peptide-based biomaterials for 3D cell culture, tissue engineering, and regenerative medicine, but the molecular determinants of these materials' immunogenicity have remained largely unexplored. In this study, a set of molecules that self-assembled through coiled coil oligomerization was designed and synthesized, and immune responses against them were investigated in mice. Experimental groups spanned a range of oligomerization behaviors and included a peptide from the coiled coil region of mouse fibrin that did not form supramolecular structures, an engineered version of this peptide that formed coiled coil bundles, and a peptide-PEG-peptide triblock bioconjugate that formed coiled coil multimers and supramolecular aggregates. In mice, the native peptide and engineered peptide did not produce any detectable antibody response, and none of the materials elicited detectable peptide-specific T cell responses, as evidenced by the absence of IL-2 and interferon-gamma in cultures of peptide-challenged splenocytes or draining lymph node cells. However, specific antibody responses were elevated in mice injected with the multimerizing peptide-PEG-peptide. Minimal changes in secondary structure were observed between the engineered peptide and the triblock peptide-PEG-peptide, making it possible that the triblock's multimerization was responsible for this antibody response.

  18. Visualization of an unstable coiled coil from the scallop myosin rod.

    PubMed

    Li, Yu; Brown, Jerry H; Reshetnikova, Ludmilla; Blazsek, Antal; Farkas, László; Nyitray, László; Cohen, Carolyn

    2003-07-17

    Alpha-helical coiled coils in muscle exemplify simplicity and economy of protein design: small variations in sequence lead to remarkable diversity in cellular functions. Myosin II is the key protein in muscle contraction, and the molecule's two-chain alpha-helical coiled-coil rod region--towards the carboxy terminus of the heavy chain--has unusual structural and dynamic features. The amino-terminal subfragment-2 (S2) domains of the rods can swing out from the thick filament backbone at a hinge in the coiled coil, allowing the two myosin 'heads' and their motor domains to interact with actin and generate tension. Most of the S2 rod appears to be a flexible coiled coil, but studies suggest that the structure at the N-terminal region is unstable, and unwinding or bending of the alpha-helices near the head-rod junction seems necessary for many of myosin's functional properties. Here we show the physical basis of a particularly weak coiled-coil segment by determining the 2.5-A-resolution crystal structure of a leucine-zipper-stabilized fragment of the scallop striated-muscle myosin rod adjacent to the head-rod junction. The N-terminal 14 residues are poorly ordered; the rest of the S2 segment forms a flexible coiled coil with poorly packed core residues. The unusual absence of interhelical salt bridges here exposes apolar core atoms to solvent.

  19. The trimerization domain of NEMO is composed of the interacting C-terminal CC2 and LZ coiled-coil subdomains.

    PubMed

    Agou, Fabrice; Traincard, François; Vinolo, Emilie; Courtois, Gilles; Yamaoka, Shoji; Israël, Alain; Véron, Michel

    2004-07-02

    NEMO (NF-kappaB essential modulator) plays a key role in the canonical NF-kappaB pathway as the scaffold/regulatory component of the IkappaB kinase (IKK) complex. The self-association of NEMO involves the C-terminal halves of the polypeptide chains containing two putative coiled-coil motifs (a CC2 and a LZ leucine zipper), a proline-rich region, and a ZF zinc finger motif. Using purified truncation mutants, we showed that the minimal oligomerization domain of NEMO is the CC2-LZ segment and that both CC2 and LZ subdomains are necessary to restore the LPS-dependent activation of the NF-kappaB pathway in a NEMO-deficient cell line. We confirmed the association of the oligomerization domain in a trimer and investigated the specific role of CC2 and LZ subdomains in the building of the oligomer. Whereas a recombinant CC2-LZ polypeptide self-associated into a trimer with an association constant close to that of the wild-type protein, the isolated CC2 and LZ peptides, respectively, formed trimers and dimers with weaker association constants. Upon mixing, isolated CC2 and LZ peptides associated to form a stable hetero-hexamer as shown by gel filtration and fluorescence anisotropy experiments. We propose a structural model for the organization of the oligomerization domain of activated NEMO in which three C-terminal domains associate into a pseudo-hexamer forming a six-helix bundle. This model is discussed in relation to the mechanism of activation of the IKK complex by upstream activators.

  20. Engineered coiled-coil protein microfibers.

    PubMed

    Hume, Jasmin; Sun, Jennifer; Jacquet, Rudy; Renfrew, P Douglas; Martin, Jesse A; Bonneau, Richard; Gilchrist, M Lane; Montclare, Jin Kim

    2014-10-13

    The fabrication of de novo proteins able to self-assemble on the nano- to meso-length scales is critical in the development of protein-based biomaterials in nanotechnology and medicine. Here we report the design and characterization of a protein engineered coiled-coil that not only assembles into microfibers, but also can bind hydrophobic small molecules. Under ambient conditions, the protein forms fibers with nanoscale structure possessing large aspect ratios formed by bundles of α-helical homopentameric assemblies, which further assemble into mesoscale fibers in the presence of curcumin through aggregation. Surprisingly, these biosynthesized fibers are able to form in conditions of remarkably low concentrations. Unlike previously designed coiled-coil fibers, these engineered protein microfibers can bind the small molecule curcumin throughout the assembly, serving as a depot for encapsulation and delivery of other chemical agents within protein-based 3D microenvironments.

  1. A Set of Computationally Designed Orthogonal Antiparallel Homodimers that Expands the Synthetic Coiled-Coil Toolkit

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Molecular engineering of protein assemblies, including the fabrication of nanostructures and synthetic signaling pathways, relies on the availability of modular parts that can be combined to give different structures and functions. Currently, a limited number of well-characterized protein interaction components are available. Coiled-coil interaction modules have been demonstrated to be useful for biomolecular design, and many parallel homodimers and heterodimers are available in the coiled-coil toolkit. In this work, we sought to design a set of orthogonal antiparallel homodimeric coiled coils using a computational approach. There are very few antiparallel homodimers described in the literature, and none have been measured for cross-reactivity. We tested the ability of the distance-dependent statistical potential DFIRE to predict orientation preferences for coiled-coil dimers of known structure. The DFIRE model was then combined with the CLASSY multistate protein design framework to engineer sets of three orthogonal antiparallel homodimeric coiled coils. Experimental measurements confirmed the successful design of three peptides that preferentially formed antiparallel homodimers that, furthermore, did not interact with one additional previously reported antiparallel homodimer. Two designed peptides that formed higher-order structures suggest how future design protocols could be improved. The successful designs represent a significant expansion of the existing protein-interaction toolbox for molecular engineers. PMID:25337788

  2. Orientation and Oligomerization Specificity of the Bcr Coiled-Coil Oligomerization Domain†

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Christina M.; Keating, Amy E.

    2008-01-01

    The Bcr oligomerization domain, from the Bcr-Abl oncoprotein, is an attractive therapeutic target for treating leukemias because it is required for cellular transformation. The domain homodimerizes via an antiparallel coiled coil with an adjacent short, helical swap domain. Inspection of the coiled-coil sequence does not reveal obvious determinants of helix-orientation specificity, raising the possibility that the antiparallel orientation preference and/or the dimeric oligomerization state are due to interactions of the swap domains. To better understand how structural specificity is encoded in Bcr, coiled-coil constructs containing either an N- or C-terminal cysteine were synthesized without the swap domain. When crosslinked to adopt exclusively parallel or antiparallel orientations, these showed similar circular dichroism spectra. Both constructs formed coiled-coil dimers, but the antiparallel construct was ~16 °C more stable than the parallel to thermal denaturation. Equilibrium disulfide-exchange studies confirmed that the isolated coiled-coil homodimer shows a very strong preference for the antiparallel orientation. We conclude that the orientation and oligomerization preferences of Bcr are not caused by the presence of the swap domains, but rather are directly encoded in the coiled-coil sequence. We further explored possible determinants of structural specificity by mutating residues in the d position of the coiled-coil core. Some of the mutations caused a change in orientation specificity, and all of the mutations led to the formation of higher-order oligomers. In the absence of the swap domain, these residues play an important role in disfavoring alternate states and are especially important for encoding dimeric oligomerization specificity. PMID:16331985

  3. High-resolution structures of a heterochiral coiled coil

    DOE PAGES

    Mortenson, David E.; Steinkruger, Jay D.; Kreitler, Dale F.; ...

    2015-10-12

    Interactions between polypeptide chains containing amino acid residues with opposite absolute configurations have long been a source of interest and speculation, but there is very little structural information for such heterochiral associations. The need to address this lacuna has grown in recent years because of increasing interest in the use of peptides generated from D amino acids (D peptides) as specific ligands for natural proteins, e.g., to inhibit deleterious protein–protein interactions. Coiled–coil interactions, between or among α-helices, represent the most common tertiary and quaternary packing motif in proteins. Heterochiral coiled–coil interactions were predicted over 50 years ago by Crick, andmore » limited experimental data obtained in solution suggest that such interactions can indeed occur. To address the dearth of atomic-level structural characterization of heterochiral helix pairings, we report in this paper two independent crystal structures that elucidate coiled-coil packing between L- and D-peptide helices. Both structures resulted from racemic crystallization of a peptide corresponding to the transmembrane segment of the influenza M2 protein. Networks of canonical knobs-into-holes side-chain packing interactions are observed at each helical interface. Finally, however, the underlying patterns for these heterochiral coiled coils seem to deviate from the heptad sequence repeat that is characteristic of most homochiral analogs, with an apparent preference for a hendecad repeat pattern.« less

  4. Routine phasing of coiled-coil protein crystal structures with AMPLE

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Jens M. H.; Keegan, Ronan M.; Bibby, Jaclyn; Winn, Martyn D.; Mayans, Olga; Rigden, Daniel J.

    2015-01-01

    Coiled-coil protein folds are among the most abundant in nature. These folds consist of long wound α-helices and are architecturally simple, but paradoxically their crystallographic structures are notoriously difficult to solve with molecular-replacement techniques. The program AMPLE can solve crystal structures by molecular replacement using ab initio search models in the absence of an existent homologous protein structure. AMPLE has been benchmarked on a large and diverse test set of coiled-coil crystal structures and has been found to solve 80% of all cases. Successes included structures with chain lengths of up to 253 residues and resolutions down to 2.9 Å, considerably extending the limits on size and resolution that are typically tractable by ab initio methodologies. The structures of two macromolecular complexes, one including DNA, were also successfully solved using their coiled-coil components. It is demonstrated that both the ab initio modelling and the use of ensemble search models contribute to the success of AMPLE by comparison with phasing attempts using single structures or ideal polyalanine helices. These successes suggest that molecular replacement with AMPLE should be the method of choice for the crystallo­graphic elucidation of a coiled-coil structure. Furthermore, AMPLE may be able to exploit the presence of a coiled coil in a complex to provide a convenient route for phasing. PMID:25866657

  5. Crystal Structure of the Central Coiled-Coil Domain from Human Liprin-[beta]2

    SciTech Connect

    Stafford, Ryan L.; Tang, Ming-Yun; Sawaya, Michael R.; Phillips, Martin L.; Bowie, James U.

    2012-02-07

    Liprins are a conserved family of scaffolding proteins important for the proper regulation and development of neuronal synapses. Humans have four liprin-{alpha}s and two liprin-{beta}s which all contain long coiled-coil domains followed by three tandem SAM domains. Complex interactions between the coiled-coil and SAM domains are thought to create liprin scaffolds, but the structural and biochemical properties of these domains remain largely uncharacterized. In this study we find that the human liprin-{beta}2 coiled-coil forms an extended dimer. Several protease-resistant subdomains within the liprin-{beta}1 and liprin-{beta}2 coiled-coils were also identified. A 2.0 {angstrom} crystal structure of the central, protease-resistant core of the liprin-{beta}2 coiled-coil reveals a parallel helix orientation. These studies represent an initial step toward determining the overall architecture of liprin scaffolds and understanding the molecular basis for their synaptic functions.

  6. The vaccinia virus 14-kilodalton (A27L) fusion protein forms a triple coiled-coil structure and interacts with the 21-kilodalton (A17L) virus membrane protein through a C-terminal alpha-helix.

    PubMed

    Vázquez, M I; Rivas, G; Cregut, D; Serrano, L; Esteban, M

    1998-12-01

    The vaccinia virus 14-kDa protein (encoded by the A27L gene) plays an important role in the biology of the virus, acting in virus-to-cell and cell-to-cell fusions. The protein is located on the surface of the intracellular mature virus form and is essential for both the release of extracellular enveloped virus from the cells and virus spread. Sequence analysis predicts the existence of four regions in this protein: a structureless region from amino acids 1 to 28, a helical region from residues 29 to 37, a triple coiled-coil helical region from residues 44 to 72, and a Leu zipper motif at the C terminus. Circular dichroism spectroscopy, analytical ultracentrifugation, and chemical cross-linking studies of the purified wild-type protein and several mutant forms, lacking one or more of the above regions or with point mutations, support the above-described structural division of the 14-kDa protein. The two contiguous cysteine residues at positions 71 and 72 are not responsible for the formation of 14-kDa protein trimers. The location of hydrophobic residues at the a and d positions on a helical wheel and of charged amino acids in adjacent positions, e and g, suggests that the hydrophobic and ionic interactions in the triple coiled-coil helical region are involved in oligomer formation. This conjecture was supported by the construction of a three-helix bundle model and molecular dynamics. Binding assays with purified proteins expressed in Escherichia coli and cytoplasmic extracts from cells infected with a virus that does not produce the 14-kDa protein during infection (VVindA27L) show that the 21-kDa protein (encoded by the A17L gene) is the specific viral binding partner and identify the putative Leu zipper, the predicted third alpha-helix on the C terminus of the 14-kDa protein, as the region involved in protein binding. These findings were confirmed in vivo, following transfection of animal cells with plasmid vectors expressing mutant forms of the 14-kDa protein and

  7. Molecular basis of coiled-coil oligomerization-state specificity.

    PubMed

    Ciani, Barbara; Bjelic, Saša; Honnappa, Srinivas; Jawhari, Hatim; Jaussi, Rolf; Payapilly, Aishwarya; Jowitt, Thomas; Steinmetz, Michel O; Kammerer, Richard A

    2010-11-16

    Coiled coils are extensively and successfully used nowadays to rationally design multistranded structures for applications, including basic research, biotechnology, nanotechnology, materials science, and medicine. The wide range of applications as well as the important functions these structures play in almost all biological processes highlight the need for a detailed understanding of the factors that control coiled-coil folding and oligomerization. Here, we address the important and unresolved question why the presence of particular oligomerization-state determinants within a coiled coil does frequently not correlate with its topology. We found an unexpected, general link between coiled-coil oligomerization-state specificity and trigger sequences, elements that are indispensable for coiled-coil formation. By using the archetype coiled-coil domain of the yeast transcriptional activator GCN4 as a model system, we show that well-established trimer-specific oligomerization-state determinants switch the peptide's topology from a dimer to a trimer only when inserted into the trigger sequence. We successfully confirmed our results in two other, unrelated coiled-coil dimers, ATF1 and cortexillin-1. We furthermore show that multiple topology determinants can coexist in the same trigger sequence, revealing a delicate balance of the resulting oligomerization state by position-dependent forces. Our experimental results should significantly improve the prediction of the oligomerization state of coiled coils. They therefore should have major implications for the rational design of coiled coils and consequently many applications using these popular oligomerization domains.

  8. CC+: a relational database of coiled-coil structures

    PubMed Central

    Testa, Oliver D.; Moutevelis, Efrosini; Woolfson, Derek N.

    2009-01-01

    We introduce the CC+ Database, a detailed, searchable repository of coiled-coil assignments, which is freely available at http://coiledcoils.chm.bris.ac.uk/ccplus. Coiled coils were identified using the program SOCKET, which locates coiled coils based on knobs-into-holes packing of side chains between α-helices. A method for determining the overall sequence identity of coiled-coil sequences was introduced to reduce statistical bias inherent in coiled-coil data sets. There are two points of entry into the CC+ Database: the ‘Periodic Table of Coiled-coil Structures’, which presents a graphical path through coiled-coil space based on manually validated data, and the ‘Dynamic Interface’, which allows queries of the database at different levels of complexity and detail. The latter entry level, which is the focus of this article, enables the efficient and rapid compilation of subsets of coiled-coil structures. These can be created and interrogated with increasingly sophisticated pull-down, keyword and sequence-based searches to return detailed structural and sequence information. Also provided are means for outputting the retrieved coiled-coil data in various formats, including PyMOL and RasMol scripts, and Position-Specific Scoring Matrices (or amino-acid profiles), which may be used, for example, in protein-structure prediction. PMID:18842638

  9. Coiled-coil length: Size does matter.

    PubMed

    Surkont, Jaroslaw; Diekmann, Yoan; Ryder, Pearl V; Pereira-Leal, Jose B

    2015-12-01

    Protein evolution is governed by processes that alter primary sequence but also the length of proteins. Protein length may change in different ways, but insertions, deletions and duplications are the most common. An optimal protein size is a trade-off between sequence extension, which may change protein stability or lead to acquisition of a new function, and shrinkage that decreases metabolic cost of protein synthesis. Despite the general tendency for length conservation across orthologous proteins, the propensity to accept insertions and deletions is heterogeneous along the sequence. For example, protein regions rich in repetitive peptide motifs are well known to extensively vary their length across species. Here, we analyze length conservation of coiled-coils, domains formed by an ubiquitous, repetitive peptide motif present in all domains of life, that frequently plays a structural role in the cell. We observed that, despite the repetitive nature, the length of coiled-coil domains is generally highly conserved throughout the tree of life, even when the remaining parts of the protein change, including globular domains. Length conservation is independent of primary amino acid sequence variation, and represents a conservation of domain physical size. This suggests that the conservation of domain size is due to functional constraints. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Computational characterization of parallel dimeric and trimeric coiled-coils using effective amino acid indices.

    PubMed

    Li, Chen; Wang, Xiao-Feng; Chen, Zhen; Zhang, Ziding; Song, Jiangning

    2015-02-01

    The coiled-coil, which consists of two or more α-helices winding around each other, is a ubiquitous and the most frequently observed protein-protein interaction motif in nature. The coiled-coil is known for its straightforward heptad repeat pattern and can be readily recognized based on protein primary sequences, exhibiting a variety of oligomer states and topologies. Due to the stable interaction formed between their α-helices, coiled-coils have been under close scrutiny to design novel protein structures for potential applications in the fields of material science, synthetic biology and medicine. However, their broader application requires an in-depth and systematic analysis of the sequence-to-structure relationship of coiled-coil folding and oligomeric formation. In this article, we propose a new oligomerization state predictor, termed as RFCoil, which exploits the most useful and non-redundant amino acid indices combined with the machine learning algorithm - random forest (RF) - to predict the oligomeric states of coiled-coil regions. Benchmarking experiments show that RFCoil achieves an AUC (area under the ROC curve) of 0.849 on the 10-fold cross-validation test using the training dataset and 0.855 on the independent test using the validation dataset, respectively. Performance comparison results indicate that RFCoil outperforms the four existing predictors LOGICOIL, PrOCoil, SCORER 2.0 and Multicoil2. Furthermore, we extract a number of predominant rules from the trained RF model that underlie the oligomeric formation. We also present two case studies to illustrate the applicability of the extracted rules to the prediction of coiled-coil oligomerization state. The RFCoil web server, source codes and datasets are freely available for academic users at http://protein.cau.edu.cn/RFCoil/.

  11. Coiled-Coil Domain Containing Protein 124 Is a Novel Centrosome and Midbody Protein That Interacts with the Ras-Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factor 1B and Is Involved in Cytokinesis

    PubMed Central

    Telkoparan, Pelin; Erkek, Serap; Yaman, Elif; Alotaibi, Hani; Bayık, Defne; Tazebay, Uygar H.

    2013-01-01

    Cytokinetic abscission is the cellular process leading to physical separation of two postmitotic sister cells by severing the intercellular bridge. The most noticeable structural component of the intercellular bridge is a transient organelle termed as midbody, localized at a central region marking the site of abscission. Despite its major role in completion of cytokinesis, our understanding of spatiotemporal regulation of midbody assembly is limited. Here, we report the first characterization of coiled-coil domain-containing protein-124 (Ccdc124), a eukaryotic protein conserved from fungi-to-man, which we identified as a novel centrosomal and midbody protein. Knockdown of Ccdc124 in human HeLa cells leads to accumulation of enlarged and multinucleated cells; however, centrosome maturation was not affected. We found that Ccdc124 interacts with the Ras-guanine nucleotide exchange factor 1B (RasGEF1B), establishing a functional link between cytokinesis and activation of localized Rap2 signaling at the midbody. Our data indicate that Ccdc124 is a novel factor operating both for proper progression of late cytokinetic stages in eukaryotes, and for establishment of Rap2 signaling dependent cellular functions proximal to the abscission site. PMID:23894443

  12. Detection of alpha-helical coiled-coil dimer formation by spin-labeled synthetic peptides: a model parallel coiled-coil peptide and the antiparallel coiled coil formed by a replica of the ProP C-terminus.

    PubMed

    Hillar, Alexander; Tripet, Brian; Zoetewey, David; Wood, Janet M; Hodges, Robert S; Boggs, Joan M

    2003-12-30

    Electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to determine relative peptide orientation within homodimeric, alpha-helical coiled-coil structures. Introduction of cysteine (Cys) residues into peptides/proteins for spin labeling allows detection of their oligomerization from exchange broadening or dipolar interactions between residues within 25 A of each other. Two synthetic peptides containing Cys substitutions were used: a 35-residue model peptide and the 30-residue ProP peptide. The model peptide is known to form a stable, parallel homodimeric coiled coil, which is partially destabilized by Cys substitutions at heptad a and d positions (peptides C30a and C33d). The ProP peptide, a 30-residue synthetic peptide, corresponds to residues 468-497 of osmoregulatory transporter ProP from Escherichia coli. It forms a relatively unstable, homodimeric coiled coil that is predicted to be antiparallel in orientation. Cys was introduced in heptad g positions of the ProP peptide, near the N-terminus (K473C, creating peptide C473g) or closer to the center of the sequence (E480C, creating peptide C480g). In contrast to the destabilizing effect of Cys substitution at the core heptad a or d positions of model peptides C30a and C33d, circular dichroism spectroscopy showed that Cys substitutions at the heptad g positions of the ProP peptide had little or no effect on coiled-coil stability. Thermal denaturation analysis showed that spin labeling increased the stability of the coiled coil for all peptides. Strong exchange broadening was detected for both C30a and C33d, in agreement with a parallel structure. EPR spectra of C480g had a large hyperfine splitting of about 90 G, indicative of strong dipole-dipole interactions and a distance between spin-labeled residues of less than 9 A. Spin-spin interactions were much weaker for C473g. These results supported the hypothesis that the ProP peptide primarily formed an antiparallel coiled coil, since formation of a parallel dimer

  13. A periodic table of coiled-coil protein structures.

    PubMed

    Moutevelis, Efrosini; Woolfson, Derek N

    2009-01-23

    Coiled coils are protein structure domains with two or more alpha-helices packed together via interlacing of side chains known as knob-into-hole packing. We analysed and classified a large set of coiled-coil structures using a combination of automated and manual methods. This led to a systematic classification that we termed a "periodic table of coiled coils," which we have made available at http://coiledcoils.chm.bris.ac.uk/ccplus/search/periodic_table. In this table, coiled-coil assemblies are arranged in columns with increasing numbers of alpha-helices and in rows of increased complexity. The table provides a framework for understanding possibilities in and limits on coiled-coil structures and a basis for future prediction, engineering and design studies.

  14. Mitochondrial Proteins Containing Coiled-Coil-Helix-Coiled-Coil-Helix (CHCH) Domains in Health and Disease.

    PubMed

    Modjtahedi, Nazanine; Tokatlidis, Kostas; Dessen, Philippe; Kroemer, Guido

    2016-03-01

    Members of the coiled-coil-helix-coiled-coil-helix (CHCH) domain-containing protein family that carry (CX9C) type motifs are imported into the mitochondrion with the help of the disulfide relay-dependent MIA import pathway. These evolutionarily conserved proteins are emerging as new cellular factors that control mitochondrial respiration, redox regulation, lipid homeostasis, and membrane ultrastructure and dynamics. We discuss recent insights on the activity of known (CX9C) motif-carrying proteins in mammals and review current data implicating the Mia40/CHCHD4 import machinery in the regulation of their mitochondrial import. Recent findings and the identification of disease-associated mutations in specific (CX9C) motif-carrying proteins have highlighted members of this family of proteins as potential therapeutic targets in a variety of human disorders.

  15. Exploring the conserved water site and hydration of a coiled-coil trimerisation motif: a MD simulation study.

    PubMed

    Dolenc, Jozica; Baron, Riccardo; Missimer, John H; Steinmetz, Michel O; van Gunsteren, Wilfred F

    2008-07-21

    The solvent structure and dynamics around ccbeta-p, a 17-residue peptide that forms a parallel three-stranded alpha-helical coiled coil in solution, was analysed through 10 ns explicit solvent molecular dynamics (MD) simulations at 278 and 330 K. Comparison with two corresponding simulations of the monomeric form of ccbeta-p was used to investigate the changes of hydration upon coiled-coil formation. Pronounced peaks in the solvent density distribution between residues Arg8 and Glu13 of neighbouring helices show the presence of water bridges between the helices of the ccbeta-p trimer; this is in agreement with the water sites observed in X-ray crystallography experiments. Interestingly, this water site is structurally conserved in many three-stranded coiled coils and, together with the Arg and Glu residues, forms part of a motif that determines three-stranded coiled-coil formation. Our findings show that little direct correlation exists between the solvent density distribution and the temporal ordering of water around the trimeric coiled coil. The MD-calculated effective residence times of up to 40 ps show rapid exchange of surface water molecules with the bulk phase, and indicate that the solvent distribution around biomolecules requires interpretation in terms of continuous density distributions rather than in terms of discrete molecules of water. Together, our study contributes to understanding the principles of three-stranded coiled-coil formation.

  16. Antiparallel Four-Stranded Coiled Coil Specified by a 3-3-1 Hyrdrophobic Heptad Repeat

    SciTech Connect

    Deng,Y.; Liu, J.; Zheng, Q.; Eliezer, D.; Kallenbach, N.; Lu, M.

    2006-01-01

    Coiled-coil sequences in proteins commonly share a seven-amino acid repeat with nonpolar side chains at the first (a) and fourth (d) positions. We investigate here the role of a 3-3-1 hydrophobic repeat containing nonpolar amino acids at the a, d, and g positions in determining the structures of coiled coils using mutants of the GCN4 leucine zipper dimerization domain. When three charged residues at the g positions in the parental sequence are replaced by nonpolar alanine or valine side chains, stable four-helix structures result. The X-ray crystal structures of the tetramers reveal antiparallel, four-stranded coiled coils in which the a, d, and g side chains interlock in a combination of knobs-into-knobs and knobs-into-holes packing. Interfacial interactions in a coiled coil can therefore be prescribed by hydrophobic-polar patterns beyond the canonical 3-4 heptad repeat. The results suggest that the conserved, charged residues at the g positions in the GCN4 leucine zipper can impart a negative design element to disfavor thermodynamically more stable, antiparallel tetramers.

  17. Forced Unfolding of the Coiled-Coils of Fibrinogen by Single-Molecule AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Andre; Litvinov, Rustem; Discher, Dennis; Weisel, John

    2007-03-01

    A blood clot needs to have the right degree of stiffness and plasticity for hemostasis, but the origin of these mechanical properties is unknown. Here we report the first measurements using single molecule atomic force microscopy (AFM) to study the forced unfolding of fibrinogen to begin addressing this problem. To generate longer reproducible curves than are possible using monomer, factor XIIIa cross-linked, single chain fibrinogen oligomers were used. When extended under force, these oligomers showed sawtooth shaped force-extension patterns characteristic of unfolding proteins with a peak-to-peak separation of approximately 26 nm, consistent with the independent unfolding of the coiled-coils. These results were then reproduced using a Monte Carlo simulation with parameters in the same range as those previously used for unfolding globular domains. In particular, we found that the refolding time was negligible on experimental time and force scales in contrast to previous work on simpler coiled-coils. We suggest that this difference may be due to fibrinogen's structurally and topologically more complex coiled-coils and that an interaction between the alpha C and central domains may be involved. These results suggest a new functional property of fibrinogen and that the coiled-coil is more than a passive structural element of this molecule.

  18. Coiled coils and SAH domains in cytoskeletal molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Peckham, Michelle

    2011-10-01

    Cytoskeletal motors include myosins, kinesins and dyneins. Myosins move along tracks of actin filaments, whereas kinesins and dyneins move along microtubules. Many of these motors are involved in trafficking cargo in cells. However, myosins are mostly monomeric, whereas kinesins are mostly dimeric, owing to the presence of a coiled coil. Some myosins (myosins 6, 7 and 10) contain an SAH (single α-helical) domain, which was originally thought to be a coiled coil. These myosins are now known to be monomers, not dimers. The differences between SAH domains and coiled coils are described and the potential roles of SAH domains in molecular motors are discussed.

  19. Heterotrimeric Coiled Coils with Core Residue Urea Side Chains

    PubMed Central

    Diss, Maria L.; Kennan, Alan J.

    2009-01-01

    We report several coiled coil heterotrimers with varying core residue buried polar groups, all with Tm values > 43° C. Introduction of new synthetic side chain structures, including some terminating in mono-substituted ureas, diversifies the pool of viable core residue candidates. A study of core charge pairings demonstrates that, unlike dimeric systems, trimeric coiled coils do not tolerate guanidine-guanidine contacts, even in the presence of a compensating carboxylate. Overall, the roster of feasible coiled coil designs is significantly expanded. PMID:19032043

  20. Contribution of DEAF1 structural domains to the interaction with the breast cancer oncogene LMO4.

    PubMed

    Cubeddu, Liza; Joseph, Soumya; Richard, Derek J; Matthews, Jacqueline M

    2012-01-01

    The proteins LMO4 and DEAF1 contribute to the proliferation of mammary epithelial cells. During breast cancer LMO4 is upregulated, affecting its interaction with other protein partners. This may set cells on a path to tumour formation. LMO4 and DEAF1 interact, but it is unknown how they cooperate to regulate cell proliferation. In this study, we identify a specific LMO4-binding domain in DEAF1. This domain contains an unstructured region that directly contacts LMO4, and a coiled coil that contains the DEAF1 nuclear export signal (NES). The coiled coil region can form tetramers and has the typical properties of a coiled coil domain. Using a simple cell-based assay, we show that LMO4 modulates the activity of the DEAF NES, causing nuclear accumulation of a construct containing the LMO4-interaction region of DEAF1.

  1. Meiosis specific coiled-coil proteins in Shizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed

    Ohtaka, Ayami; Saito, Takamune T; Okuzaki, Daisuke; Nojima, Hiroshi

    2007-05-18

    Many meiosis-specific proteins in Schizosaccharomyces pombe contain coiled-coil motifs which play essential roles for meiotic progression. For example, the coiled-coil motifs present in Meu13 and Mcp7 are required for their function as a putative recombinase cofactor complex during meiotic recombination. Mcp6/Hrs1 and Mcp5/Num1 control horsetail chromosome movement by astral microtubule organization and anchoring dynein respectively. Dhc1 and Ssm4 are also required for horsetail chromosome movement. It is clear from these examples that the coiled-coil motif in these proteins plays an important role during the progression of cells through meiosis. However, there are still many unanswered questions on how these proteins operate. In this paper, we briefly review recent studies on the meiotic coiled-coil proteins in Sz. pombe.

  2. Meiosis specific coiled-coil proteins in Shizosaccharomyces pombe

    PubMed Central

    Ohtaka, Ayami; Saito, Takamune T; Okuzaki, Daisuke; Nojima, Hiroshi

    2007-01-01

    Many meiosis-specific proteins in Schizosaccharomyces pombe contain coiled-coil motifs which play essential roles for meiotic progression. For example, the coiled-coil motifs present in Meu13 and Mcp7 are required for their function as a putative recombinase cofactor complex during meiotic recombination. Mcp6/Hrs1 and Mcp5/Num1 control horsetail chromosome movement by astral microtubule organization and anchoring dynein respectively. Dhc1 and Ssm4 are also required for horsetail chromosome movement. It is clear from these examples that the coiled-coil motif in these proteins plays an important role during the progression of cells through meiosis. However, there are still many unanswered questions on how these proteins operate. In this paper, we briefly review recent studies on the meiotic coiled-coil proteins in Sz. pombe. PMID:17509158

  3. X-Ray Crystal Structure of a TRPM Assembly Domain Reveals An Antiparallel Four-Stranded Coiled-Coil

    SciTech Connect

    Fujiwara, Y.; Minor, D.L.; Jr.

    2009-05-18

    Transient receptor potential (TRP) channels comprise a large family of tetrameric cation-selective ion channels that respond to diverse forms of sensory input. Earlier studies showed that members of the TRPM subclass possess a self-assembling tetrameric C-terminal cytoplasmic coiled-coil domain that underlies channel assembly and trafficking. Here, we present the high-resolution crystal structure of the coiled-coil domain of the channel enzyme TRPM7. The crystal structure, together with biochemical experiments, reveals an unexpected four-stranded antiparallel coiled-coil architecture that bears unique features relative to other antiparallel coiled-coils. Structural analysis indicates that a limited set of interactions encode assembly specificity determinants and uncovers a previously unnoticed segregation of TRPM assembly domains into two families that correspond with the phylogenetic divisions seen for the complete subunits. Together, the data provide a framework for understanding the mechanism of TRPM channel assembly and highlight the diversity of forms found in the coiled-coil fold.

  4. Crystal Structure of the Central Coiled-Coil Domain from Human Liprin-β2†,‡

    PubMed Central

    Stafford, Ryan L.; Tang, Ming-Yun; Sawaya, Michael R.; Phillips, Martin L.; Bowie, James U.

    2011-01-01

    Liprins are a conserved family of scaffolding proteins important for the proper regulation and development of neuronal synapses. Humans have four liprin-αs and two liprin-βs which all contain long coiled-coil domains followed by three tandem SAM domains. Complex interactions between the coiled-coil and SAM domains are thought to create liprin scaffolds, but the structural and biochemical properties of these domains remain largely uncharacterized. In this study we find that the human liprin-β2 coiled-coil forms an extended dimer. Several protease-resistant sub-domains within the liprin-β1 and liprin-β2 coiled-coils were also identified. A 2.0 Å crystal structure of the central, protease-resistant core of the liprin-β2 coiled-coil reveals a parallel helix orientation. These studies represent an initial step towards determining the overall architecture of liprin scaffolds and understanding the molecular basis for their synaptic functions. PMID:21462929

  5. Characterization of mesoscale coiled-coil peptide-porphyrin complexes.

    PubMed

    Pepe-Mooney, Brian J; Kokona, Bashkim; Fairman, Robert

    2011-12-12

    Photoelectronically conductive self-assembling peptide-porphyrin assemblies have great potential in their use as biomaterials, owing largely to their environmentally responsive properties. We have successfully designed a coiled-coil peptide that can self-assemble to form mesoscale filaments and serve as a scaffold for porphyrin interaction. In our earlier work, peptide-porphyrin-based biomaterials were formed at neutral pH, but the structures were irregular at the nano- to microscale size range, as judged by atomic force microscopy. We identified a pH in which mesoscale fibrils were formed, taking advantage of the types of porphyrin interactions that are present in well-characterized J-aggregates. We used UV-visible spectroscopy, circular dichroism spectropolarimetry, fluorescence spectroscopy, and atomic force microscopy to characterize these self-assembling biomaterials. We propose a new assembly paradigm that arises from a set of unique porphyrin-porphyrin and porphyrin-peptide interactions whose structure may be readily modulated by changes in pH or peptide concentration.

  6. Crystal structure of a trimeric form of the KV7.1 (KCNQ1) A-domain tail coiled-coil reveals structural plasticity and context dependent changes in a putative coiled-coil trimerization motif

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Qiang; Minor, Daniel L

    2009-01-01

    Coiled-coils are widespread protein–protein interaction motifs typified by the heptad repeat (abcdefg)n in which “a” and “d” positions are hydrophobic residues. Although identification of likely coiled-coil sequences is robust, prediction of strand order remains elusive. We present the X-ray crystal structure of a short form (residues 583–611), “Q1-short,” of the coiled-coil assembly specificity domain from the voltage-gated potassium channel Kv7.1 (KCNQ1) determined at 1.7 Å resolution. Q1-short lacks one and half heptads present in a previously studied tetrameric coiled-coil construct, Kv7.1 585–621, “Q1-long.” Surprisingly, Q1-short crystallizes as a trimer. In solution, Q1-short self-assembles more poorly than Q1-long and depends on an R-h-x-x-h-E motif common to trimeric coiled-coils. Addition of native sequences that include “a” and “d” positions C-terminal to Q1-short overrides the R-h-x-x-h-E motif influence and changes assembly state from a weakly associated trimer to a strongly associated tetramer. These data provide a striking example of a naturally occurring amino sequence that exhibits context-dependent folding into different oligomerization states, a three-stranded versus a four-stranded coiled-coil. The results emphasize the degenerate nature of coiled-coil energy landscapes in which small changes can have drastic effects on oligomerization. Discovery of these properties in an ion channel assembly domain and prevalence of the R-h-x-x-h-E motif in coiled-coil assembly domains of a number of different channels that are thought to function as tetrameric assemblies raises the possibility that such sequence features may be important for facilitating the assembly of intermediates en route to the final native state. PMID:19693805

  7. GBNV encoded movement protein (NSm) remodels ER network via C-terminal coiled coil domain

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Pratibha; Savithri, H.S.

    2015-08-15

    Plant viruses exploit the host machinery for targeting the viral genome–movement protein complex to plasmodesmata (PD). The mechanism by which the non-structural protein m (NSm) of Groundnut bud necrosis virus (GBNV) is targeted to PD was investigated using Agrobacterium mediated transient expression of NSm and its fusion proteins in Nicotiana benthamiana. GFP:NSm formed punctuate structures that colocalized with mCherry:plasmodesmata localized protein 1a (PDLP 1a) confirming that GBNV NSm localizes to PD. Unlike in other movement proteins, the C-terminal coiled coil domain of GBNV NSm was shown to be involved in the localization of NSm to PD, as deletion of this domain resulted in the cytoplasmic localization of NSm. Treatment with Brefeldin A demonstrated the role of ER in targeting GFP NSm to PD. Furthermore, mCherry:NSm co-localized with ER–GFP (endoplasmic reticulum targeting peptide (HDEL peptide fused with GFP). Co-expression of NSm with ER–GFP showed that the ER-network was transformed into vesicles indicating that NSm interacts with ER and remodels it. Mutations in the conserved hydrophobic region of NSm (residues 130–138) did not abolish the formation of vesicles. Additionally, the conserved prolines at positions 140 and 142 were found to be essential for targeting the vesicles to the cell membrane. Further, systematic deletion of amino acid residues from N- and C-terminus demonstrated that N-terminal 203 amino acids are dispensable for the vesicle formation. On the other hand, the C-terminal coiled coil domain when expressed alone could also form vesicles. These results suggest that GBNV NSm remodels the ER network by forming vesicles via its interaction through the C-terminal coiled coil domain. Interestingly, NSm interacts with NP in vitro and coexpression of these two proteins in planta resulted in the relocalization of NP to PD and this relocalization was abolished when the N-terminal unfolded region of NSm was deleted. Thus, the NSm

  8. Coiled-Coil Proteins Facilitated the Functional Expansion of the Centrosome

    PubMed Central

    Kuhn, Michael; Hyman, Anthony A.; Beyer, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Repurposing existing proteins for new cellular functions is recognized as a main mechanism of evolutionary innovation, but its role in organelle evolution is unclear. Here, we explore the mechanisms that led to the evolution of the centrosome, an ancestral eukaryotic organelle that expanded its functional repertoire through the course of evolution. We developed a refined sequence alignment technique that is more sensitive to coiled coil proteins, which are abundant in the centrosome. For proteins with high coiled-coil content, our algorithm identified 17% more reciprocal best hits than BLAST. Analyzing 108 eukaryotic genomes, we traced the evolutionary history of centrosome proteins. In order to assess how these proteins formed the centrosome and adopted new functions, we computationally emulated evolution by iteratively removing the most recently evolved proteins from the centrosomal protein interaction network. Coiled-coil proteins that first appeared in the animal–fungi ancestor act as scaffolds and recruit ancestral eukaryotic proteins such as kinases and phosphatases to the centrosome. This process created a signaling hub that is crucial for multicellular development. Our results demonstrate how ancient proteins can be co-opted to different cellular localizations, thereby becoming involved in novel functions. PMID:24901223

  9. Structural mapping of the coiled-coil domain of a bacterial condensin and comparative analyses across all domains of life suggest conserved features of SMC proteins.

    PubMed

    Waldman, Vincent M; Stanage, Tyler H; Mims, Alexandra; Norden, Ian S; Oakley, Martha G

    2015-06-01

    The structural maintenance of chromosomes (SMC) proteins form the cores of multisubunit complexes that are required for the segregation and global organization of chromosomes in all domains of life. These proteins share a common domain structure in which N- and C- terminal regions pack against one another to form a globular ATPase domain. This "head" domain is connected to a central, globular, "hinge" or dimerization domain by a long, antiparallel coiled coil. To date, most efforts for structural characterization of SMC proteins have focused on the globular domains. Recently, however, we developed a method to map interstrand interactions in the 50-nm coiled-coil domain of MukB, the divergent SMC protein found in γ-proteobacteria. Here, we apply that technique to map the structure of the Bacillus subtilis SMC (BsSMC) coiled-coil domain. We find that, in contrast to the relatively complicated coiled-coil domain of MukB, the BsSMC domain is nearly continuous, with only two detectable coiled-coil interruptions. Near the middle of the domain is a break in coiled-coil structure in which there are three more residues on the C-terminal strand than on the N-terminal strand. Close to the head domain, there is a second break with a significantly longer insertion on the same strand. These results provide an experience base that allows an informed interpretation of the output of coiled-coil prediction algorithms for this family of proteins. A comparison of such predictions suggests that these coiled-coil deviations are highly conserved across SMC types in a wide variety of organisms, including humans.

  10. Competition between Coiled-Coil Structures and the Impact on Myosin-10 Bundle Selection.

    PubMed

    Vavra, Kevin C; Xia, Youlin; Rock, Ronald S

    2016-06-07

    Coiled-coil fusions are a useful approach to enforce dimerization in protein engineering. However, the final structures of coiled-coil fusion proteins have received relatively little attention. Here, we determine the structural outcome of adjacent parallel and antiparallel coiled coils. The targets are coiled coils that stabilize myosin-10 in single-molecule biophysical studies. We reveal the solution structure of a short, antiparallel, myosin-10 coiled-coil fused to the parallel GCN4-p1 coiled coil. Surprisingly, this structure is a continuous, antiparallel coiled coil where GCN4-p1 pairs with myosin-10 rather than itself. We also show that longer myosin-10 segments in these parallel/antiparallel fusions are dynamic and do not fold cooperatively. Our data resolve conflicting results on myosin-10 selection of actin filament bundles, demonstrating the importance of understanding coiled-coil orientation and stability. Copyright © 2016 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Coiled Coil Rich Proteins (Ccrp) Influence Molecular Pathogenicity of Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Schätzle, Sarah; Specht, Mara; Waidner, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Pathogenicity of the human pathogen Helicobacter pylori relies on its capacity to adapt to a hostile environment and to escape the host response. Although there have been great advances in our understanding of the bacterial cytoskeleton, major gaps remain in our knowledge of its contribution to virulence. In this study we have explored the influence of coiled coil rich proteins (Ccrp) cytoskeletal elements on pathogenicity factors of H. pylori. Deletion of any of the ccrp resulted in a strongly decreased activity of the main pathogenicity factor urease. We further investigated their role using in vitro co-culture experiments with the human gastric adenocarcinoma cell line AGS modeling H. pylori - host cell interactions. Intriguingly, host cell showed only a weak “scattering/hummingbird” phenotype, in which host cells are transformed from a uniform polygonal shape into a severely elongated state characterized by the formation of needle-like projections, after co-incubation with any ccrp deletion mutant. Furthermore, co-incubation with the ccrp59 mutant resulted in reduced type IV secretion system associated activities, e.g. IL-8 production and CagA translocation/phosphorylation. Thus, in addition to their role in maintaining the helical cell shape of H. pylori Ccrp proteins influence many cellular processes and are thereby crucial for the virulence of this human pathogen. PMID:25822999

  12. Crystal Structure of the Human Short Coiled Coil Protein and Insights into SCOC-FEZ1 Complex Formation

    PubMed Central

    Behrens, Caroline; Binotti, Beyenech; Schmidt, Carla; Robinson, Carol V.; Chua, John Jia En; Kühnel, Karin

    2013-01-01

    The short coiled coil protein (SCOC) forms a complex with fasciculation and elongation protein zeta 1 (FEZ1). This complex is involved in autophagy regulation. We determined the crystal structure of the coiled coil domain of human SCOC at 2.7 Å resolution. SCOC forms a parallel left handed coiled coil dimer. We observed two distinct dimers in the crystal structure, which shows that SCOC is conformationally flexible. This plasticity is due to the high incidence of polar and charged residues at the core a/d-heptad positions. We prepared two double mutants, where these core residues were mutated to either leucines or valines (E93V/K97L and N125L/N132V). These mutations led to a dramatic increase in stability and change of oligomerisation state. The oligomerisation state of the mutants was characterized by multi-angle laser light scattering and native mass spectrometry measurements. The E93V/K97 mutant forms a trimer and the N125L/N132V mutant is a tetramer. We further demonstrate that SCOC forms a stable homogeneous complex with the coiled coil domain of FEZ1. SCOC dimerization and the SCOC surface residue R117 are important for this interaction. PMID:24098481

  13. The d′--d--d′ Vertical Triad is Less Discriminating Than the a′--a--a′ Vertical Triad in the Antiparallel Coiled-coil Dimer Motif

    PubMed Central

    Steinkruger, Jay D.; Bartlett, Gail J.; Hadley, Erik B.; Fay, Lindsay; Woolfson, Derek N.; Gellman, Samuel H.

    2012-01-01

    Elucidating relationships between the amino-acid sequences of proteins and their three-dimensional structures, and uncovering non-covalent interactions that underlie polypeptide folding, are major goals in protein science. One approach toward these goals is to study interactions between selected residues, or among constellations of residues, in small folding motifs. The α-helical coiled coil has served as a platform for such studies because this folding unit is relatively simple in terms of both sequence and structure. Amino acid side chains at the helix-helix interface of a coiled coil participate in so-called ‘knobs-into-holes’ (KIH) packing whereby a side chain (the knob) on one helix inserts into a space (the hole) generated by four side chains on a partner helix. The vast majority of sequence-stability studies on coiled-coil dimers have focused on lateral interactions within these KIH arrangements, for example, between an a position on one helix and an a' position of the partner in a parallel coiled-coil dimer, or between a--d' pairs in an antiparallel dimer. More recently, it has been shown that vertical triads (specifically, a'--a--a' triads) in antiparallel dimers exhibit significant impact on pairing preferences. This observation provides impetus for analysis of other complex networks of side-chain interactions at the helix-helix interface. Here, we describe a combination of experimental and bioinformatics studies that show that d'--d--d' triads have much less impact on pairing preference than do a'--a--a' triads in a small, designed antiparallel coiled-coil dimer. However, the influence of the d'--d--d' triad depends on the lateral at a'--d interaction. Taken together, these results strengthen the emerging understanding that simple pair-wise interactions are not sufficient to describe side-chain interactions and overall stability in antiparallel coiled-coil dimers; higher-order interactions must be considered as well. PMID:22296518

  14. The d'--d--d' vertical triad is less discriminating than the a'--a--a' vertical triad in the antiparallel coiled-coil dimer motif.

    PubMed

    Steinkruger, Jay D; Bartlett, Gail J; Hadley, Erik B; Fay, Lindsay; Woolfson, Derek N; Gellman, Samuel H

    2012-02-08

    Elucidating relationships between the amino-acid sequences of proteins and their three-dimensional structures, and uncovering non-covalent interactions that underlie polypeptide folding, are major goals in protein science. One approach toward these goals is to study interactions between selected residues, or among constellations of residues, in small folding motifs. The α-helical coiled coil has served as a platform for such studies because this folding unit is relatively simple in terms of both sequence and structure. Amino acid side chains at the helix-helix interface of a coiled coil participate in so-called "knobs-into-holes" (KIH) packing whereby a side chain (the knob) on one helix inserts into a space (the hole) generated by four side chains on a partner helix. The vast majority of sequence-stability studies on coiled-coil dimers have focused on lateral interactions within these KIH arrangements, for example, between an a position on one helix and an a' position of the partner in a parallel coiled-coil dimer, or between a--d' pairs in an antiparallel dimer. More recently, it has been shown that vertical triads (specifically, a'--a--a' triads) in antiparallel dimers exert a significant impact on pairing preferences. This observation provides impetus for analysis of other complex networks of side-chain interactions at the helix-helix interface. Here, we describe a combination of experimental and bioinformatics studies that show that d'--d--d' triads have much less impact on pairing preference than do a'--a--a' triads in a small, designed antiparallel coiled-coil dimer. However, the influence of the d'--d--d' triad depends on the lateral a'--d interaction. Taken together, these results strengthen the emerging understanding that simple pairwise interactions are not sufficient to describe side-chain interactions and overall stability in antiparallel coiled-coil dimers; higher-order interactions must be considered as well.

  15. Structure-function analysis of the heat shock factor-binding protein reveals a protein composed solely of a highly conserved and dynamic coiled-coil trimerization domain.

    PubMed

    Tai, Li-Jung; McFall, Sally M; Huang, Kai; Demeler, Borries; Fox, Sue G; Brubaker, Kurt; Radhakrishnan, Ishwar; Morimoto, Richard I

    2002-01-04

    Heat shock factor-binding protein (HSBP) 1 is a small, evolutionarily conserved protein originally identified in a yeast two-hybrid screen using the trimerization domain of heat shock factor (HSF) 1 as the bait. Similar in size to HSF1 trimerization domain, human HSBP1 contains two arrays of hydrophobic heptad repeats (designated HR-N and HR-C) characteristic of coiled-coil proteins. Proteins of the HSBP family are relatively small (<100 residues), comprising solely a putative coiled-coil oligomerization domain without any other readily recognizable structural or functional motif. Our biophysical and biochemical characterization of human HSBP1 reveals a cooperatively folded protein with high alpha-helical content and moderate stability. NMR analyses reveal a single continuous helix encompassing both HR-N and HR-C in the highly conserved central region, whereas the less conserved carboxyl terminus is unstructured and accessible to proteases. Unlike previously characterized coiled-coils, backbone 15N relaxation measurements implicate motional processes on the millisecond time scale in the coiled-coil region. Analytical ultracentrifugation and native PAGE studies indicate that HSBP1 is predominantly trimeric over a wide concentration range. NMR analyses suggest a rotationally symmetric trimer. Because the highly conserved hydrophobic heptad repeats extend over 60% of HSBP1, we propose that HSBP most likely regulates the function of other proteins through coiled-coil interactions.

  16. Single-molecule observation of helix staggering, sliding, and coiled coil misfolding

    PubMed Central

    Xi, Zhiqun; Gao, Ying; Sirinakis, George; Guo, Honglian; Zhang, Yongli

    2012-01-01

    The biological functions of coiled coils generally depend on efficient folding and perfect pairing of their α-helices. Dynamic changes in the helical registry that lead to staggered helices have only been proposed for a few special systems and not found in generic coiled coils. Here, we report our observations of multiple staggered helical structures of two canonical coiled coils. The partially folded structures are formed predominantly by coiled coil misfolding and occasionally by helix sliding. Using high-resolution optical tweezers, we characterized their energies and transition kinetics at a single-molecule level. The staggered states occur less than 2% of the time and about 0.1% of the time at zero force. We conclude that dynamic changes in helical registry may be a general property of coiled coils. Our findings should have broad and unique implications in functions and dysfunctions of proteins containing coiled coils. PMID:22451899

  17. Design of a single-chain polypeptide tetrahedron assembled from coiled-coil segments.

    PubMed

    Gradišar, Helena; Božič, Sabina; Doles, Tibor; Vengust, Damjan; Hafner-Bratkovič, Iva; Mertelj, Alenka; Webb, Ben; Šali, Andrej; Klavžar, Sandi; Jerala, Roman

    2013-06-01

    Protein structures evolved through a complex interplay of cooperative interactions, and it is still very challenging to design new protein folds de novo. Here we present a strategy to design self-assembling polypeptide nanostructured polyhedra based on modularization using orthogonal dimerizing segments. We designed and experimentally demonstrated the formation of the tetrahedron that self-assembles from a single polypeptide chain comprising 12 concatenated coiled coil-forming segments separated by flexible peptide hinges. The path of the polypeptide chain is guided by a defined order of segments that traverse each of the six edges of the tetrahedron exactly twice, forming coiled-coil dimers with their corresponding partners. The coincidence of the polypeptide termini in the same vertex is demonstrated by reconstituting a split fluorescent protein in the polypeptide with the correct tetrahedral topology. Polypeptides with a deleted or scrambled segment order fail to self-assemble correctly. This design platform provides a foundation for constructing new topological polypeptide folds based on the set of orthogonal interacting polypeptide segments.

  18. Biochemical and molecular dynamic simulation analysis of a weak coiled coil association between kinesin-II stalks.

    PubMed

    Doodhi, Harinath; Jana, Swadhin C; Devan, Pavithra; Mazumdar, Shyamalava; Ray, Krishanu

    2012-01-01

    Kinesin-2 refers to the family of motor proteins represented by conserved, heterotrimeric kinesin-II and homodimeric Osm3/Kif17 class of motors. Kinesin-II, a microtubule-based anterograde motor, is composed of three different conserved subunits, named KLP64D, KLP68D and DmKAP in Drosophila. Although previous reports indicated that coiled coil interaction between the middle segments of two dissimilar motor subunits established the heterodimer, the molecular basis of the association is still unknown. Here, we present a detailed heterodimeric association model of the KLP64D/68D stalk supported by extensive experimental analysis and molecular dynamic simulations. We find that KLP64D stalk is unstable, but forms a weak coiled coil heteroduplex with the KLP68D stalk when coexpressed in bacteria. Local instabilities, relative affinities between the C-terminal stalk segments, and dynamic long-range interactions along the stalks specify the heterodimerization. Thermal unfolding studies and independent simulations further suggest that interactions between the C-terminal stalk fragments are comparatively stable, whereas the N-terminal stalk reversibly unfolds at ambient temperature. Results obtained in this study suggest that coiled coil interaction between the C-terminal stalks of kinesin-II motor subunits is held together through a few hydrophobic and charged interactions. The N-terminal stalk segments are flexible and could uncoil reversibly during a motor walk. This supports the requirement for a flexible coiled coil association between the motor subunits, and its role in motor function needs to be elucidated.

  19. The promotion of angiogenesis by growth factors integrated with ECM proteins through coiled-coil structures.

    PubMed

    Assal, Yasmine; Mie, Masayasu; Kobatake, Eiry

    2013-04-01

    An appropriate method to bind extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins and growth factors using advanced protein engineering techniques has the potential to enhance cell proliferation and differentiation for tissue regeneration and repair. In this study we developed a method to co-immobilize non-covalently an ECM protein to three different types of growth factors: basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), epidermal growth factor (EGF) and single-chain vascular endothelial growth factor (scVEGF121) through a coiled-coil structure formed by helixA/helixB in order to promote angiogenesis. The designed ECM was established by fusing two repeats of elastin-derived unit (APGVGV)(12), cell-adhesive sequence (RGD), laminin-derived IKVAV sequence and collagen-binding domain (CBD) to obtain CBDEREI2. HelixA was fused to each growth factor and helixB to the engineered ECM. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were cultured on engineered ECM and growth factors connected through the coiled-coil formation between helixA and helixB. Cell proliferation and capillary tube-like formation were monitored. Moreover, the differentiated cells with high expression of Ang-2 suggested the ECM remodeling. Our approach of non-covalent coupling method should provide a protein-release control system as a new contribution in biomaterial for tissue engineering field.

  20. Dimeric coiled-coil structure of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Atg16 and its functional significance in autophagy.

    PubMed

    Fujioka, Yuko; Noda, Nobuo N; Nakatogawa, Hitoshi; Ohsumi, Yoshinori; Inagaki, Fuyuhiko

    2010-01-08

    Atg16 interacts with the Atg12-Atg5 protein conjugate through its N-terminal domain and self-assembles through its coiled-coil domain (CCD). Formation of the Atg12-Atg5.Atg16 complex is essential for autophagy, the bulk degradation process conserved among most eukaryotes. Here, we report the crystal structures of full-length Saccharomyces cerevisiae Atg16 at 2.8 A resolution and its CCD at 2.5 A resolution. The CCD and full-length Atg16 each exhibit an extended alpha-helix, 90 and 130 A, respectively, and form a parallel coiled-coil dimer in the crystals. Although the apparent molecular weight of Atg16 observed by gel-filtration chromatography suggests that Atg16 is tetrameric, an analytical ultracentrifugation study showed Atg16 as a dimer in solution, consistent with the crystal structure. Evolutionary conserved surface residues clustered at the C-terminal half of Atg16 CCD were shown to be crucial for autophagy. These results will give a structural basis for understanding the molecular functions and significance of Atg16 in autophagy.

  1. Thermodynamic analysis of self-assembly in coiled-coil biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Tsang, Betty P; Bretscher, Heidi S; Kokona, Bashkim; Manning, Robert S; Fairman, Robert

    2011-10-11

    Coiled-coil protein structural motifs have proven amenable to the design of structurally well-defined biomaterials. Mesoscale structural properties can be fairly well predicted based on rules governing the chemical interactions between the helices that define this structural motif. We explore the role of the hydrophobic core residues on the self-assembly of a coiled-coil polymer through a mutational analysis coupled with a salting-out procedure. Because the resultant polymers remain in solution, a thermodynamic approach is applied to characterize the polymer assembly using conventional equations from polymer theory to extract nucleation and elongation parameters. The stabilities and lengths of the polymers are measured using circular dichroism spectropolarimetry, sizing methods including dynamic light scattering and analytical ultracentrifugation, and atomic force microscopy to assess mesoscale morphology. Upon mutating isoleucines at two core positions to serines, we find that polymer stability is decreased while the degree of polymerization is about the same. Differences in results from circular dichroism and dynamic light scattering experiments suggest the presence of a stable intermediate state, and a scheme is proposed for how this intermediate might relate to the monomer and polymer states.

  2. NMR insight into myosin-binding subunit coiled-coil structure reveals binding interface with protein kinase G-Iα leucine zipper in vascular function.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Alok K; Birrane, Gabriel; Anklin, Clemens; Rigby, Alan C; Alper, Seth L

    2017-04-28

    Nitrovasodilators relax vascular smooth-muscle cells in part by modulating the interaction of the C-terminal coiled-coil domain (CC) and/or the leucine zipper (LZ) domain of the myosin light-chain phosphatase component, myosin-binding subunit (MBS), with the N-terminal LZ domain of protein kinase G (PKG)-Iα. Despite the importance of vasodilation in cardiovascular homeostasis and therapy, our structural understanding of the MBS CC interaction with LZ PKG-1α has remained limited. Here, we report the 3D NMR solution structure of homodimeric CC MBS in which amino acids 932-967 form a coiled-coil of two monomeric α-helices in parallel orientation. We found that the structure is stabilized by non-covalent interactions, with dominant contributions from hydrophobic residues at a and d heptad positions. Using NMR chemical-shift perturbation (CSP) analysis, we identified a subset of hydrophobic and charged residues of CC MBS (localized within and adjacent to the C-terminal region) contributing to the dimer-dimer interaction interface between homodimeric CC MBS and homodimeric LZ PKG-Iα. (15)N backbone relaxation NMR revealed the dynamic features of the CC MBS interface residues identified by NMR CSP. Paramagnetic relaxation enhancement- and CSP-NMR-guided HADDOCK modeling of the dimer-dimer interface of the heterotetrameric complex exhibits the involvement of non-covalent intermolecular interactions that are localized within and adjacent to the C-terminal regions of each homodimer. These results deepen our understanding of the binding restraints of this CC MBS·LZ PKG-Iα low-affinity heterotetrameric complex and allow reevaluation of the role(s) of myosin light-chain phosphatase partner polypeptides in regulation of vascular smooth-muscle cell contractility. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  3. A switch from parallel to antiparallel strand orientation in a coiled-coil X-ray structure via two core hydrophobic mutations

    SciTech Connect

    Malashkevich, Vladimir N.; Higgins, Chelsea D.; Almo, Steven C.; Lai, Jonathan R.

    2015-05-06

    The coiled-coil is one of the most ubiquitous and well studied protein structural motifs. Significant effort has been devoted to dissecting subtle variations of the typical heptad repeat sequence pattern that can designate larger topological features such as relative α-helical orientation and oligomer size. Here in this paper we report the X-ray structure of a model coiled-coil peptide, HA2-Del-L2seM, which forms an unanticipated core antiparallel dimer with potential sites for discrete higher-order multimerization (trimer or tetramer). In the X-ray structure, a third, partially-ordered α-helix is weakly associated with the antiparallel dimer and analytical ultracentrifugation experiments indicate the peptide forms a well-defined tetramer in solution. The HA2-Del-L2seM sequence is closely related to a parent model peptide, HA2-Del, which we previously reported adopts a parallel trimer; HA2-Del-L2seM differs by only hydrophobic leucine to selenomethione mutations and thus this subtle difference is sufficient to switch both relative α-helical topology and number of α-helices participating in the coiled-coil. Comparison of the X-ray structures of HA2-Del-L2seM (reported here) with the HA2-Del parent (reported previously) reveals novel interactions involving the selenomethionine residues that promote antiparallel coiled-coil configuration and preclude parallel trimer formation. Finally, these novel atomic insights are instructive for understanding subtle features that can affect coiled-coil topology and provide additional information for design of antiparallel coiled-coils.

  4. A switch from parallel to antiparallel strand orientation in a coiled-coil X-ray structure via two core hydrophobic mutations

    DOE PAGES

    Malashkevich, Vladimir N.; Higgins, Chelsea D.; Almo, Steven C.; ...

    2015-05-06

    The coiled-coil is one of the most ubiquitous and well studied protein structural motifs. Significant effort has been devoted to dissecting subtle variations of the typical heptad repeat sequence pattern that can designate larger topological features such as relative α-helical orientation and oligomer size. Here in this paper we report the X-ray structure of a model coiled-coil peptide, HA2-Del-L2seM, which forms an unanticipated core antiparallel dimer with potential sites for discrete higher-order multimerization (trimer or tetramer). In the X-ray structure, a third, partially-ordered α-helix is weakly associated with the antiparallel dimer and analytical ultracentrifugation experiments indicate the peptide forms amore » well-defined tetramer in solution. The HA2-Del-L2seM sequence is closely related to a parent model peptide, HA2-Del, which we previously reported adopts a parallel trimer; HA2-Del-L2seM differs by only hydrophobic leucine to selenomethione mutations and thus this subtle difference is sufficient to switch both relative α-helical topology and number of α-helices participating in the coiled-coil. Comparison of the X-ray structures of HA2-Del-L2seM (reported here) with the HA2-Del parent (reported previously) reveals novel interactions involving the selenomethionine residues that promote antiparallel coiled-coil configuration and preclude parallel trimer formation. Finally, these novel atomic insights are instructive for understanding subtle features that can affect coiled-coil topology and provide additional information for design of antiparallel coiled-coils.« less

  5. Structural basis for cargo binding and autoinhibition of Bicaudal-D1 by a parallel coiled-coil with homotypic registry

    SciTech Connect

    Terawaki, Shin-ichi; Yoshikane, Asuka; Higuchi, Yoshiki; Wakamatsu, Kaori

    2015-05-01

    Bicaudal-D1 (BICD1) is an α-helical coiled-coil protein mediating the attachment of specific cargo to cytoplasmic dynein. It plays an essential role in minus end-directed intracellular transport along microtubules. The third C-terminal coiled-coil region of BICD1 (BICD1 CC3) has an important role in cargo sorting, including intracellular vesicles associating with the small GTPase Rab6 and the nuclear pore complex Ran binding protein 2 (RanBP2), and inhibiting the association with cytoplasmic dynein by binding to the first N-terminal coiled-coil region (CC1). The crystal structure of BICD1 CC3 revealed a parallel homodimeric coiled-coil with asymmetry and complementary knobs-into-holes interactions, differing from Drosophila BicD CC3. Furthermore, our binding study indicated that BICD1 CC3 possesses a binding surface for two distinct cargos, Rab6 and RanBP2, and that the CC1-binding site overlaps with the Rab6-binding site. These findings suggest a molecular basis for cargo recognition and autoinhibition of BICD proteins during dynein-dependent intracellular retrograde transport. - Highlights: • BICD1 CC3 is a parallel homodimeric coiled-coil with axial asymmetry. • The coiled-coil packing of BICD1 CC3 is adapted to the equivalent heptad position. • BICD1 CC3 has distinct binding sites for two classes of cargo, Rab6 and RanBP2. • The CC1-binding site of BICD1 CC3 overlaps with the Rab6-binding site.

  6. Isolation and cloning of Omp alpha, a coiled-coil protein spanning the periplasmic space of the ancestral eubacterium Thermotoga maritima.

    PubMed Central

    Engel, A M; Cejka, Z; Lupas, A; Lottspeich, F; Baumeister, W

    1992-01-01

    We have discovered a new oligomeric protein component associated with the outer membrane of the ancestral eubacterium Thermotoga maritima. In electron micrographs, the protein, Omp alpha, appears as a rod-shaped spacer that spans the periplasm, connecting the outer membrane to the inner cell body. Purification, biochemical characterization and sequencing of Omp alpha suggest that it is a homodimer composed of two subunits of 380 amino acids with a calculated M(r) of 43,000 and a pI of 4.54. The sequence of the omp alpha gene indicates a tripartite organization of the protein with a globular NH2-terminal domain of 64 residues followed by a putative coiled-coil segment of 300 residues and a COOH-terminal, membrane-spanning segment. The predicted length of the coiled-coil segment (45 nm) correlates closely with the spacing between the inner and outer membranes. Despite sequence similarity to a large number of coiled-coil proteins and high scores in a coiled-coil prediction algorithm, the sequence of the central rod-shaped domain of Omp alpha does not have the typical 3.5 periodicity of coiled-coil proteins but rather has a periodicity of 3.58 residues. Such a periodicity was also found in the central domain of staphylococcal M protein and beta-giardin and might be indicative of a subclass of fibrous proteins with packing interactions that are distinct from the ones seen in other two-stranded coiled-coils. Images PMID:1330536

  7. Rice Cellulose SynthaseA8 Plant-Conserved Region Is a Coiled-Coil at the Catalytic Core Entrance

    SciTech Connect

    Rushton, Phillip S.; Olek, Anna T.; Makowski, Lee; Badger, John; Steussy, C. Nicklaus; Carpita, Nicholas C.; Stauffacher, Cynthia V.

    2016-11-22

    The crystallographic structure of a rice (Oryza sativa) cellulose synthase, OsCesA8, plant-conserved region (P-CR), one of two unique domains in the catalytic domain of plant CesAs, was solved to 2.4 Å resolution. Two antiparallel α-helices form a coiled-coil domain linked by a large extended connector loop containing a conserved trio of aromatic residues. The P-CR structure was fit into a molecular envelope for the P-CR domain derived from small-angle X-ray scattering data. The P-CR structure and molecular envelope, combined with a homology-based chain trace of the CesA8 catalytic core, were modeled into a previously determined CesA8 small-angle X-ray scattering molecular envelope to produce a detailed topological model of the CesA8 catalytic domain. The predicted position for the P-CR domain from the molecular docking models places the P-CR connector loop into a hydrophobic pocket of the catalytic core, with the coiled-coil aligned near the entrance of the substrate UDP-glucose into the active site. In this configuration, the P-CR coiled-coil alone is unlikely to regulate substrate access to the active site, but it could interact with other domains of CesA, accessory proteins, or other CesA catalytic domains to control substrate delivery.

  8. Rho-associated coiled-coil containing kinases (ROCK)

    PubMed Central

    Julian, Linda; Olson, Michael F

    2014-01-01

    Rho-associated coiled-coil containing kinases (ROCK) were originally identified as effectors of the RhoA small GTPase.1–5 They belong to the AGC family of serine/threonine kinases6 and play vital roles in facilitating actomyosin cytoskeleton contractility downstream of RhoA and RhoC activation. Since their discovery, ROCK kinases have been extensively studied, unveiling their manifold functions in processes including cell contraction, migration, apoptosis, survival, and proliferation. Two mammalian ROCK homologs have been identified, ROCK1 (also called ROCK I, ROKβ, Rho-kinase β, or p160ROCK) and ROCK2 (also known as ROCK II, ROKα, or Rho kinase), hereafter collectively referred to as ROCK. In this review, we will focus on the structure, regulation, and functions of ROCK. PMID:25010901

  9. Repeats in transforming acidic coiled-coil (TACC) genes.

    PubMed

    Trivedi, Seema

    2013-06-01

    Transforming acidic coiled-coil proteins (TACC1, 2, and 3) are essential proteins associated with the assembly of spindle microtubules and maintenance of bipolarity. Dysregulation of TACCs is associated with tumorigenesis, but studies of microsatellite instability in TACC genes have not been extensive. Microsatellite or simple sequence repeat instability is known to cause many types of cancer. The present in silico analysis of SSRs in human TACC gene sequences shows the presence of mono- to hexa-nucleotide repeats, with the highest densities found for mono- and di-nucleotide repeats. Density of repeats is higher in introns than in exons. Some of the repeats are present in regulatory regions and retained introns. Human TACC genes show conservation of many repeat classes. Microsatellites in TACC genes could be valuable markers for monitoring numerical chromosomal aberrations and or cancer.

  10. Membrane fusion mediated by coiled coils: a hypothesis.

    PubMed Central

    Bentz, J

    2000-01-01

    A molecular model of the low-pH-induced membrane fusion by influenza hemagglutinin (HA) is proposed based upon the hypothesis that the conformational change to the extended coiled coil creates a high-energy hydrophobic membrane defect in the viral envelope or HA expressing cell. It is known that 1) an aggregate of at least eight HAs is required at the fusion site, yet only two or three of these HAs need to undergo the "essential" conformational change for the first fusion pore to form (Bentz, J. 2000. Biophys. J. 78:000-000); 2) the formation of the first fusion pore signifies a stage of restricted lipid flow into the nascent fusion site; and 3) some HAs can partially insert their fusion peptides into their own viral envelopes at low pH. This suggests that the committed step for HA-mediated fusion begins with a tightly packed aggregate of HAs whose fusion peptides are inserted into their own viral envelope, which causes restricted lateral lipid flow within the HA aggregate. The transition of two or three HAs in the center of the aggregate to the extended coiled coil extracts the fusion peptide and creates a hydrophobic defect in the outer monolayer of the virion, which is stabilized by the closely packed HAs. These HAs are inhibited from diffusing away from the site to admit lateral lipid flow, in part because that would initially increase the surface area of hydrophobic exposure. The other obvious pathway to heal this hydrophobic defect, or some descendent, is recruitment of lipids from the outer monolayer of the apposed target membrane, i.e., fusion. Other viral fusion proteins and the SNARE fusion protein complex appear to fit within this hypothesis. PMID:10653801

  11. Assembly of Acanthamoeba myosin-II minifilaments. Definition of C-terminal residues required to form coiled-coils, dimers, and octamers.

    PubMed

    Turbedsky, Kirsi; Pollard, Thomas D

    2005-01-14

    Acanthamoeba myosin-II forms bipolar octamers by three successive steps of dimerization of the C-terminal, coiled-coil tail. In this study, we generated N-terminal and C-terminal truncation constructs and point mutants of the Acanthamoeba myosin-II tail to delineate the structural requirements for assembly of bipolar mini-filaments. By the use of light-scattering, CD spectroscopy, analytical ultracentrifugation, and tryptophan fluorescence experiments, we determined that: (1) the C-terminal 14 heptad repeats plus most of the tailpiece (residues 1381-1509) are required to form antiparallel dimers of coiled-coils; (2) amino acid residues within heptads 23-32 (residues 1254-1325) are required to form tetramers; (3) the C-terminal 32 heptad repeats suffice to assemble octameric minifilaments; (4) A1378 is outside of the interaction interface; (5) the mutation L1475W inhibits dimerization; and (6) F1443 is involved in the dimerization interface but is exposed to the solvent. We propose that the tailpiece (residues 1483-1509) interacts with two heptads (13 and 14, residues 1381-1393), which are important for dimerization and coiled-coil formation. These results support a model in which hydrophobic as well as electrostatic interactions control the register between myosin-II coiled-coils and guide sequential steps of dimerization that generate stable, octameric mini-filaments.

  12. The Human Centriolar Protein CEP135 Contains a Two-Stranded Coiled-Coil Domain Critical for Microtubule Binding.

    PubMed

    Kraatz, Sebastian; Guichard, Paul; Obbineni, Jagan M; Olieric, Natacha; Hatzopoulos, Georgios N; Hilbert, Manuel; Sen, Indrani; Missimer, John; Gönczy, Pierre; Steinmetz, Michel O

    2016-07-20

    Centrioles are microtubule-based structures that play important roles notably in cell division and cilium biogenesis. CEP135/Bld10p family members are evolutionarily conserved microtubule-binding proteins important for centriole formation. Here, we analyzed in detail the microtubule-binding activity of human CEP135 (HsCEP135). X-ray crystallography and small-angle X-ray scattering in combination with molecular modeling revealed that the 158 N-terminal residues of HsCEP135 (HsCEP135-N) form a parallel two-stranded coiled-coil structure. Biochemical, cryo-electron, and fluorescence microscopy analyses revealed that in vitro HsCEP135-N interacts with tubulin, protofilaments, and microtubules and induces the formation of microtubule bundles. We further identified a 13 amino acid segment spanning residues 96-108, which represents a major microtubule-binding site in HsCEP135-N. Within this segment, we identified a cluster of three lysine residues that contribute to the microtubule bundling activity of HsCEP135-N. Our results provide the first structural information on CEP135/Bld10p proteins and offer insights into their microtubule-binding mechanism.

  13. Thermodynamic aspects in a simplified model for the folding of two-stranded coiled-coils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prolongo, Silvia G.; Rubio, Ana M.; Rey, Antonio

    2000-12-01

    We have investigated the thermodynamic properties of a simple model representing the thermal folding/unfolding transition of two-stranded coiled-coils. The transition temperature and the energy change for the process are analyzed in terms of the peptide concentration, using the standard properties and calculations involved in experimental work. The integration of the heat capacity curves provides realistic and correct results for the model, as it does the variation of the transition temperature with concentration. On the other hand, the van't Hoff analysis of the equilibrium constant for the unfolding process produces apparently odd results. They can only be rationalized through a careful analysis of the reaction stoichiometry, according to the reference state defined for the very simple model interactions, and the definition of the unfolded state. This point is extensively discussed, for its possible implications in the correct analysis of this and other simulation models.

  14. Exploring alternate states and oligomerization preferences of coiled-coils by de novo structure modeling.

    PubMed

    Rämisch, Sebastian; Lizatović, Robert; André, Ingemar

    2015-02-01

    Homomeric coiled-coils can self-assemble into a wide range of structural states with different helix topologies and oligomeric states. In this study, we have combined de novo structure modeling with stability calculations to simultaneously predict structure and oligomeric states of homomeric coiled-coils. For dimers an asymmetric modeling protocol was developed. Modeling without symmetry constraints showed that backbone asymmetry is important for the formation of parallel dimeric coiled-coils. Collectively, our results demonstrate that high-resolution structure of coiled-coils, as well as parallel and antiparallel orientations of dimers and tetramers, can be accurately predicted from sequence. De novo modeling was also used to generate models of competing oligomeric states, which were used to compare stabilities and thus predict the native stoichiometry from sequence. In a benchmark set of 33 coiled-coil sequences, forming dimers to pentamers, up to 70% of the oligomeric states could be correctly predicted. The calculations demonstrated that the free energy of helix folding could be an important factor for determining stability and oligomeric state of homomeric coiled-coils. The computational methods developed here should be broadly applicable to studies of sequence-structure relationships in coiled-coils and the design of higher order assemblies with improved oligomerization specificity. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Molecular basis of the STIL coiled coil oligomerization explains its requirement for de-novo formation of centrosomes in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    David, Ahuvit; Amartely, Hadar; Rabinowicz, Noa; Shamir, Mai; Friedler, Assaf; Izraeli, Shai

    2016-04-14

    The STIL protein is essential for centriole replication and for the non-templated, de novo centriole biogenesis that is required for mammalian embryogenesis. Here we performed quantitative biophysical and structural analysis of the central short coiled coil domain (CCD) of STIL that is critical for its function. Using biophysical, biochemical and cell biology approaches, we identified the specific residues in the CCD that mediate the oligomerization, centrosomal localization and protein interactions of STIL. We characterized the structural properties of the coiled coil peptide using circular dichroism spectroscopy and size exclusion chromatography. We identified two regions in this domain, containing eight hydrophobic residues, which mediate the coiled coil oligomerization. Mutations in these residues destabilized the coiled coil thermodynamically but in most cases did not affect its secondary structure. Reconstituting mouse embryonic fibroblasts lacking endogenous Stil, we show that STIL oligomerization mediated by these residues is not only important for the centrosomal functions of STIL during the canonical duplication process but also for de-novo formation of centrosomes.

  16. Molecular basis of the STIL coiled coil oligomerization explains its requirement for de-novo formation of centrosomes in mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    David, Ahuvit; Amartely, Hadar; Rabinowicz, Noa; Shamir, Mai; Friedler, Assaf; Izraeli, Shai

    2016-01-01

    The STIL protein is essential for centriole replication and for the non-templated, de novo centriole biogenesis that is required for mammalian embryogenesis. Here we performed quantitative biophysical and structural analysis of the central short coiled coil domain (CCD) of STIL that is critical for its function. Using biophysical, biochemical and cell biology approaches, we identified the specific residues in the CCD that mediate the oligomerization, centrosomal localization and protein interactions of STIL. We characterized the structural properties of the coiled coil peptide using circular dichroism spectroscopy and size exclusion chromatography. We identified two regions in this domain, containing eight hydrophobic residues, which mediate the coiled coil oligomerization. Mutations in these residues destabilized the coiled coil thermodynamically but in most cases did not affect its secondary structure. Reconstituting mouse embryonic fibroblasts lacking endogenous Stil, we show that STIL oligomerization mediated by these residues is not only important for the centrosomal functions of STIL during the canonical duplication process but also for de-novo formation of centrosomes. PMID:27075531

  17. Structure-function evolution of the Transforming acidic coiled coil genes revealed by analysis of phylogenetically diverse organisms

    PubMed Central

    Still, Ivan H; Vettaikkorumakankauv, Ananthalakshmy K; DiMatteo, Anthony; Liang, Ping

    2004-01-01

    Background Examination of ancient gene families can provide an insight into how the evolution of gene structure can relate to function. Functional homologs of the evolutionarily conserved transforming acidic coiled coil (TACC) gene family are present in organisms from yeast to man. However, correlations between functional interactions and the evolution of these proteins have yet to be determined. Results We have performed an extensive database analysis to determine the genomic and cDNA sequences of the TACCs from phylogenetically diverse organisms. This analysis has determined the phylogenetic relationship of the TACC proteins to other coiled coil proteins, the resolution of the placement of the rabbit TACC4 as the orthologue of human TACC3, and RHAMM as a distinct family of coiled coil proteins. We have also extended the analysis of the TACCs to the interaction databases of C. elegans and D. melanogaster to identify potentially novel TACC interactions. The validity of this modeling was confirmed independently by the demonstration of direct binding of human TACC2 to the nuclear hormone receptor RXRβ. Conclusion The data so far suggest that the ancestral TACC protein played a role in centrosomal/mitotic spindle dynamics. TACC proteins were then recruited to complexes involved in protein translation, RNA processing and transcription by interactions with specific bridging proteins. However, during evolution, the TACC proteins have now acquired the ability to directly interact with components of these complexes (such as the LSm proteins, nuclear hormone receptors, GAS41, and transcription factors). This suggests that the function of the TACC proteins may have evolved from performing assembly or coordination functions in the centrosome to include a more intimate role in the functional evolution of chromatin remodeling, transcriptional and posttranscriptional complexes in the cell. PMID:15207008

  18. The Golgin Family of Coiled-Coil Tethering Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Witkos, Tomasz M.; Lowe, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The golgins are a family of predominantly coiled-coil proteins that are localized to the Golgi apparatus. Golgins are present in all eukaryotes, suggesting an evolutionary conserved function. Golgins are anchored to the Golgi membrane by their carboxy terminus and are predicted to adopt an extended conformation that projects into the surrounding cytoplasm. This arrangement is ideal for the capture or tethering of nearby membranes or cytoskeletal elements. Golgin-mediated tethering is thought to be important for vesicular traffic at the Golgi apparatus, the maintenance of Golgi architecture, as well as the positioning of the Golgi apparatus within cells. In addition to acting as tethers, some golgins can also sequester various factors at the Golgi membrane, allowing for the spatiotemporal regulation of downstream cellular functions. Although it is now established that golgins are membrane and cytoskeleton tethers, the mechanisms underlying tethering remain poorly defined. Moreover, the importance of golgin-mediated tethering in a physiological context remains to be fully explored. This review will describe our current understanding of golgin function, highlighting recent progress that has been made, and goes on to discuss outstanding questions and potential avenues for future research with regard to this family of conserved Golgi-associated proteins. PMID:26793708

  19. Force modulated conductance of artificial coiled-coil protein monolayers.

    PubMed

    Atanassov, Alexander; Hendler, Ziv; Berkovich, Inbal; Ashkenasy, Gonen; Ashkenasy, Nurit

    2013-01-01

    Studies of charge transport through proteins bridged between two electrodes have been the subject of intense research in recent years. However, the complex structure of proteins makes it difficult to elucidate transport mechanisms, and the use of simple peptide oligomers may be an over simplified model of the proteins. To bridge this structural gap, we present here studies of charge transport through artificial parallel coiled-coil proteins conducted in dry environment. Protein monolayers uniaxially oriented at an angle of ∼ 30° with respect to the surface normal were prepared. Current voltage measurements, obtained using conductive-probe atomic force microscopy, revealed the mechano-electronic behavior of the protein films. It was found that the low voltage conductance of the protein monolayer increases linearly with applied force, mainly due to increase in the tip contact area. Negligible compression of the films for loads below 26 nN allowed estimating a tunneling attenuation factor, β(0) , of 0.5-0.6 Å(-1) , which is akin to charge transfer by tunneling mechanism, despite the comparably large charge transport distance. These studies show that mechano-electronic behavior of proteins can shed light on their complex charge transport mechanisms, and on how these mechanisms depend on the detailed structure of the proteins. Such studies may provide insightful information on charge transfer in biological systems.

  20. Coiled-coil protein composition of 22 proteomes – differences and common themes in subcellular infrastructure and traffic control

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Annkatrin; Schraegle, Shannon J; Stahlberg, Eric A; Meier, Iris

    2005-01-01

    Background Long alpha-helical coiled-coil proteins are involved in diverse organizational and regulatory processes in eukaryotic cells. They provide cables and networks in the cyto- and nucleoskeleton, molecular scaffolds that organize membrane systems and tissues, motors, levers, rotating arms, and possibly springs. Mutations in long coiled-coil proteins have been implemented in a growing number of human diseases. Using the coiled-coil prediction program MultiCoil, we have previously identified all long coiled-coil proteins from the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana and have established a searchable Arabidopsis coiled-coil protein database. Results Here, we have identified all proteins with long coiled-coil domains from 21 additional fully sequenced genomes. Because regions predicted to form coiled-coils interfere with sequence homology determination, we have developed a sequence comparison and clustering strategy based on masking predicted coiled-coil domains. Comparing and grouping all long coiled-coil proteins from 22 genomes, the kingdom-specificity of coiled-coil protein families was determined. At the same time, a number of proteins with unknown function could be grouped with already characterized proteins from other organisms. Conclusion MultiCoil predicts proteins with extended coiled-coil domains (more than 250 amino acids) to be largely absent from bacterial genomes, but present in archaea and eukaryotes. The structural maintenance of chromosomes proteins and their relatives are the only long coiled-coil protein family clearly conserved throughout all kingdoms, indicating their ancient nature. Motor proteins, membrane tethering and vesicle transport proteins are the dominant eukaryote-specific long coiled-coil proteins, suggesting that coiled-coil proteins have gained functions in the increasingly complex processes of subcellular infrastructure maintenance and trafficking control of the eukaryotic cell. PMID:16288662

  1. Crystal Structure of a Super Leucine Zipper an Extended Two-Stranded Super Long Coiled Coil

    SciTech Connect

    J Diao

    2011-12-31

    Coiled coil is a ubiquitous structural motif in proteins, with two to seven alpha helices coiled together like the strands of a rope, and coiled coil folding and assembly is not completely understood. A GCN4 leucine zipper mutant with four mutations of K3A, D7A, Y17W, and H18N has been designed, and the crystal structure has been determined at 1.6 {angstrom} resolution. The peptide monomer shows a helix trunk with short curved N- and C-termini. In the crystal, two monomers cross in 35{sup o} and form an X-shaped dimer, and each X-shaped dimer is welded into the next one through sticky hydrophobic ends, thus forming an extended two-stranded, parallel, super long coiled coil rather than a discrete, two-helix coiled coil of the wild-type GCN4 leucine zipper. Leucine residues appear at every seventh position in the super long coiled coil, suggesting that it is an extended super leucine zipper. Compared to the wild-type leucine zipper, the N-terminus of the mutant has a dramatic conformational change and the C-terminus has one more residue Glu 32 determined. The mutant X-shaped dimer has a large crossing angle of 35{sup o} instead of 18{sup o} in the wild-type dimer. The results show a novel assembly mode and oligomeric state of coiled coil, and demonstrate that mutations may affect folding and assembly of the overall coiled coil. Analysis of the formation mechanism of the super long coiled coil may help understand and design self-assembling protein fibers.

  2. Critical evaluation of in silico methods for prediction of coiled-coil domains in proteins.

    PubMed

    Li, Chen; Ching Han Chang, Catherine; Nagel, Jeremy; Porebski, Benjamin T; Hayashida, Morihiro; Akutsu, Tatsuya; Song, Jiangning; Buckle, Ashley M

    2016-03-01

    Coiled-coils refer to a bundle of helices coiled together like strands of a rope. It has been estimated that nearly 3% of protein-encoding regions of genes harbour coiled-coil domains (CCDs). Experimental studies have confirmed that CCDs play a fundamental role in subcellular infrastructure and controlling trafficking of eukaryotic cells. Given the importance of coiled-coils, multiple bioinformatics tools have been developed to facilitate the systematic and high-throughput prediction of CCDs in proteins. In this article, we review and compare 12 sequence-based bioinformatics approaches and tools for coiled-coil prediction. These approaches can be categorized into two classes: coiled-coil detection and coiled-coil oligomeric state prediction. We evaluated and compared these methods in terms of their input/output, algorithm, prediction performance, validation methods and software utility. All the independent testing data sets are available at http://lightning.med.monash.edu/coiledcoil/. In addition, we conducted a case study of nine human polyglutamine (PolyQ) disease-related proteins and predicted CCDs and oligomeric states using various predictors. Prediction results for CCDs were highly variable among different predictors. Only two peptides from two proteins were confirmed to be CCDs by majority voting. Both domains were predicted to form dimeric coiled-coils using oligomeric state prediction. We anticipate that this comprehensive analysis will be an insightful resource for structural biologists with limited prior experience in bioinformatics tools, and for bioinformaticians who are interested in designing novel approaches for coiled-coil and its oligomeric state prediction.

  3. Natural templates for coiled-coil biomaterials from praying mantis egg cases.

    PubMed

    Walker, Andrew A; Weisman, Sarah; Kameda, Tsunenori; Sutherland, Tara D

    2012-12-10

    Whereas there is growing interest in producing biomaterials containing coiled-coils, relatively few studies have made use of naturally occurring fibrous proteins. In this study, we have characterized fibrous proteins used by mother praying mantises to produce an extensive covering for their eggs called an ootheca and demonstrate the production of artificial ootheca using recombinantly produced proteins. Examination of natural oothecae by infrared spectroscopy and solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance revealed the material to consist of proteins organized predominately as coiled-coils. Two structural proteins, Mantis Fibroin 1 and Mantis Fibroin 2, were identified in ootheca from each of three species. Between species, the primary sequences of both proteins had diverged considerably, but other features were tightly conserved, including low molecular weight, high abundance of Ala, Glu, Lys, and Ser, and a triblock-like architecture with extensive central coiled-coil domain. Mantis fibroin hydrophobic cores had an unusual composition containing high levels of alanine and aromatic residues. Recombinantly produced mantis fibroins folded into coiled-coils in solution and could be fabricated into solid materials with high coiled-coil content. The structural features of mantis fibroins and their straightforward recombinant production make them promising templates for the production of coiled-coil biomimetics materials.

  4. Coiled-Coil Formation on Lipid Bilayers—Implications for Docking and Fusion Efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Pähler, Gesa; Panse, Cornelia; Diederichsen, Ulf; Janshoff, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Coiled-coil formation of four different oligopeptides was characterized in solution, on hydrogels, and on membranes by employing circular dichroism spectroscopy, surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy, attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy, and ellipsometry. Peptide sequences rich in either glutamic acid (E: E3Cys, i-E3Cys) or lysine (K: K3Cys, i-K3Cys) were used to represent minimal mimics of eukaryotic SNARE motifs. Half of the peptides were synthesized in reverse sequence, so that parallel and antiparallel heptad coiled-coil structures were formed. Either E-peptides or K-peptides were attached covalently to phospholipid anchors via maleimide chemistry, and served as receptors for the recognition of the corresponding binding partners added to solution. Attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy of single bilayers confirmed the formation of coiled-coil complexes at the membrane interface. Coiled-coil formation in solution, as compared with association at the membrane surface, displays considerably larger binding constants that are largely attributed to loss of translational entropy at the interface. Finally, the fusogenicity of the various coiled-coil motifs was explored, and the results provide clear evidence that hemifusion followed by full fusion requires a parallel orientation of α-helices, whereas antiparallel oriented coiled-coil motifs display only docking. PMID:23283228

  5. Structural characteristics of the redox-sensing coiled coil in the voltage-gated H+ channel.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Yuichiro; Takeshita, Kohei; Nakagawa, Atsushi; Okamura, Yasushi

    2013-06-21

    Oxidation is an important biochemical defense mechanism, but it also elicits toxicity; therefore, oxidation must be under strict control. In phagocytotic events in neutrophils, the voltage-gated H(+) (Hv) channel is a key regulator of the production of reactive oxygen species against invading bacteria. The cytoplasmic domain of the Hv channel forms a dimeric coiled coil underpinning a dimerized functional unit. Importantly, in the alignment of the coiled-coil core, a conserved cysteine residue forms a potential intersubunit disulfide bond. In this study, we solved the crystal structures of the coiled-coil domain in reduced, oxidized, and mutated (Cys → Ser) states. The crystal structures indicate that a pair of Cys residues forms an intersubunit disulfide bond dependent on the redox conditions. CD spectroscopy revealed that the disulfide bond increases the thermal stability of the coiled-coil protein. We also reveal that two thiol modifier molecules are able to bind to Cys in a redox-dependent manner without disruption of the dimeric coiled-coil assembly. Thus, the biochemical properties of the cytoplasmic coiled-coil domain in the Hv channel depend on the redox condition, which may play a role in redox sensing in the phagosome.

  6. Septin phosphorylation and coiled-coil domains function in cell and septin ring morphology in the filamentous fungus Ashbya gossypii.

    PubMed

    Meseroll, Rebecca A; Occhipinti, Patricia; Gladfelter, Amy S

    2013-02-01

    Septins are a class of GTP-binding proteins conserved throughout many eukaryotes. Individual septin subunits associate with one another and assemble into heteromeric complexes that form filaments and higher-order structures in vivo. The mechanisms underlying the assembly and maintenance of higher-order structures in cells remain poorly understood. Septins in several organisms have been shown to be phosphorylated, although precisely how septin phosphorylation may be contributing to the formation of high-order septin structures is unknown. Four of the five septins expressed in the filamentous fungus, Ashbya gossypii, are phosphorylated, and we demonstrate here the diverse roles of these phosphorylation sites in septin ring formation and septin dynamics, as well as cell morphology and viability. Intriguingly, the alteration of specific sites in Cdc3p and Cdc11p leads to a complete loss of higher-order septin structures, implicating septin phosphorylation as a regulator of septin structure formation. Introducing phosphomimetic point mutations to specific sites in Cdc12p and Shs1p causes cell lethality, highlighting the importance of normal septin modification in overall cell function and health. In addition to discovering roles for phosphorylation, we also present diverse functions for conserved septin domains in the formation of septin higher-order structure. We previously showed the requirement for the Shs1p coiled-coil domain in limiting septin ring size and reveal here that, in contrast to Shs1p, the coiled-coil domains of Cdc11p and Cdc12p are required for septin ring formation. Our results as a whole reveal novel roles for septin phosphorylation and coiled-coil domains in regulating septin structure and function.

  7. Oncogenic TPM3-ALK activation requires dimerization through the coiled-coil structure of TPM3

    SciTech Connect

    Amano, Yosuke; Ishikawa, Rie; Sakatani, Toshio; Ichinose, Junji; Sunohara, Mitsuhiro; Watanabe, Kousuke; Kage, Hidenori; Nakajima, Jun; Nagase, Takahide; Ohishi, Nobuya; Takai, Daiya

    2015-02-13

    Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor (IMT) is a mesenchymal tumor that can arise from anywhere in the body. Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene rearrangements, most often resulting in the tropomyosin 3 (TPM3)-ALK fusion gene, are the main causes of IMT. However, the mechanism of malignant transformation in IMT has yet to be elucidated. The purpose of this study was to clarify the role of the TPM3 region in the transformation of IMT via TPM3-ALK. Lentivirus vectors containing a TPM3-ALK fusion gene lacking various lengths of TPM3 were constructed and expressed in HEK293T and NIH3T3 cell lines. Focus formation assay revealed loss of contact inhibition in NIH3T3 cells transfected with full-length TPM3-ALK, but not with ALK alone. Blue-native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (BN-PAGE) revealed that TPM3-ALK dimerization increased in proportion to the length of TPM3. Western blot showed phosphorylation of ALK, ERK1/2, and STAT3 in HEK293T cells transfected with TPM3-ALK. Thus, the coiled-coil structure of TPM3 contributes to the transforming ability of the TPM3-ALK fusion protein, and longer TPM3 region leads to higher dimer formation. - Highlights: • TPM3-ALK fusion protein dimerizes through the coiled-coil structure of TPM3. • Longer coiled-coil structure of TPM3 leads to higher TPM3-ALK dimer formation. • Presence of TPM3-ALK dimer leads to ALK, STAT3, and ERK1/2 phosphorylation. • Presence of TPM3-ALK leads to loss of contact inhibition. • BN-PAGE is a simple technique for visualizing oncogenic dimerization.

  8. Functional investigation of the plant-specific long coiled-coil proteins PAMP-INDUCED COILED-COIL (PICC) and PICC-LIKE (PICL) in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Venkatakrishnan, Sowmya; Mackey, David; Meier, Iris

    2013-01-01

    We have identified and characterized two Arabidopsis long coiled-coil proteins PAMP-INDUCED COILED-COIL (PICC) and PICC-LIKE (PICL). PICC (147 kDa) and PICL (87 kDa) are paralogs that consist predominantly of a long coiled-coil domain (expanded in PICC), with a predicted transmembrane domain at the immediate C-terminus. Orthologs of PICC and PICL were found exclusively in vascular plants. PICC and PICL GFP fusion proteins are anchored to the cytoplasmic surface of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane by a C-terminal transmembrane domain and a short tail domain, via a tail-anchoring mechanism. T-DNA-insertion mutants of PICC and PICL as well as the double mutant show an increased sensitivity to the plant abiotic stress hormone abscisic acid (ABA) in a post-germination growth response. PICC, but not PICL gene expression is induced by the bacterial pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP) flg22. T-DNA insertion alleles of PICC, but not PICL, show increased susceptibility to the non-virulent strain P. syringae pv. tomato DC3000 hrcC, but not to the virulent strain P. syringae pv. tomato DC3000. This suggests that PICC mutants are compromised in PAMP-triggered immunity (PTI). The data presented here provide first evidence for the involvement of a plant long coiled-coil protein in a plant defense response.

  9. Functional Investigation of the Plant-Specific Long Coiled-Coil Proteins PAMP-INDUCED COILED-COIL (PICC) and PICC-LIKE (PICL) in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Venkatakrishnan, Sowmya; Mackey, David; Meier, Iris

    2013-01-01

    We have identified and characterized two Arabidopsis long coiled-coil proteins PAMP-INDUCED COILED-COIL (PICC) and PICC-LIKE (PICL). PICC (147 kDa) and PICL (87 kDa) are paralogs that consist predominantly of a long coiled-coil domain (expanded in PICC), with a predicted transmembrane domain at the immediate C-terminus. Orthologs of PICC and PICL were found exclusively in vascular plants. PICC and PICL GFP fusion proteins are anchored to the cytoplasmic surface of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane by a C-terminal transmembrane domain and a short tail domain, via a tail-anchoring mechanism. T-DNA-insertion mutants of PICC and PICL as well as the double mutant show an increased sensitivity to the plant abiotic stress hormone abscisic acid (ABA) in a post-germination growth response. PICC, but not PICL gene expression is induced by the bacterial pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP) flg22. T-DNA insertion alleles of PICC, but not PICL, show increased susceptibility to the non-virulent strain P. syringae pv. tomato DC3000 hrcC, but not to the virulent strain P. syringae pv. tomato DC3000. This suggests that PICC mutants are compromised in PAMP-triggered immunity (PTI). The data presented here provide first evidence for the involvement of a plant long coiled-coil protein in a plant defense response. PMID:23451199

  10. Kinetics and thermodynamics of the unfolding and refolding of the three-stranded alpha-helical coiled coil, Lpp-56.

    PubMed

    Dragan, Anatoly I; Potekhin, Sergey A; Sivolob, Andrei; Lu, Min; Privalov, Peter L

    2004-11-30

    Temperature-induced reversible unfolding and refolding of the three-stranded alpha-helical coiled coil, Lpp-56, were studied by kinetic and thermodynamic methods, using CD spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering, and scanning calorimetry. It was found that both unfolding and refolding reactions of this protein in neutral solution in the presence of 100 mM NaCl are characterized by unusually slow kinetics, which permits detailed investigation of the mechanism of these reactions. Kinetic analyses show that the unfolding of this coiled coil represents a single-stage first-order reaction, while the refolding represents a single-stage third-order reaction. The activation enthalpy and entropy for unfolding do not depend noticeably on temperature and are both significantly greater than those for the folding reaction, which show a significant dependence on temperature. The activation heat capacity change for the unfolding reaction is close to zero, while it is quite significant for the folding reaction. The correlation between the activation and structural parameters obtained for the Lpp-56 coiled coil suggests that interhelical van der Waals interactions are disrupted in the transition state, which is nevertheless still compact, and water has not yet penetrated into the interface; the transition from the transient state to the unfolded state results in hydration of exposed apolar groups of the interface and the disruption of helices. The low propensity for the Lpp-56 strands to fold and associate is caused by the high number of charged groups at neutral pH. On one hand, these charges give rise to considerable repulsive forces destabilizing the helical conformation of the strands. On the other hand, they align the folded helices in parallel and in register so that the apolar sides face each other, and the oppositely charged groups may form salt links, which are important for the formation of the trimeric coiled coil. A decrease in pH, which eliminates the salt links

  11. Heterochiral Jun and Fos bZIP peptides form a coiled-coil heterodimer that is competent for DNA binding.

    PubMed

    Kamada, Rui; Nakagawa, Natsumi; Oyama, Taiji; Sakaguchi, Kazuyasu

    2017-07-01

    Coiled coils, consisting of at least two α-helices, have important roles in the regulation of transcription, cell differentiation, and cell growth. Peptides composed of d-amino acids (d-peptides) have received great attention for their potential in biomedical applications, because they give large diversity for the design of peptidyl drug and are more resistant to proteolytic digestion than l-peptides. However, the interactions between l-peptides/l-protein and d-peptides in the formation of complex are poorly understood. In this study, stereoisomer-specific peptides were constructed corresponding to regions of the basic-leucine-zipper domains of Jun and Fos proteins. basic-leucine-zipper domains consist of an N-terminal basic domain, which is responsible for DNA binding, and a C-terminal domain that enables homodimerization or heterodimerization via formation of a coiled-coil. By combining peptides with different stereochemistries, the d-l heterochiral Jun-Fos heterodimer formation induced DNA binding by the basic domains of Jun-Fos. Our study provides new insight into the interaction between l-peptide and d-peptide enantiomers for developing d-peptide materials and drugs. Copyright © 2017 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Self-Assembly of Coiled-coil Tetramers in the 1.40 A Structure of a Leucine-zipper Mutant

    SciTech Connect

    Deng,Y.; Zheng, Q.; Liu, J.; Cheng, C.; Kallenbach, N.; Lu, M.

    2007-01-01

    The hydrophobic core of the GCN4 leucine-zipper dimerization domain is formed by a parallel helical association between nonpolar side chains at the a and d positions of the heptad repeat. Here we report a self-assembling coiled-coil array formed by the GCN4-pAe peptide that differs from the wild-type GCN4 leucine zipper by alanine substitutions at three charged e positions. GCN4-pAe is incompletely folded in normal solution conditions yet self-assembles into an antiparallel tetraplex in crystals by formation of unanticipated hydrophobic seams linking the last two heptads of two parallel doublestranded coiled coils. The GCN4-pAe tetramers in the lattice associate laterally through the identical interactions to those in the intramolecular dimer-dimer interface. The van der Waals packing interaction in the solid state controls extended supramolecular assembly of the protein, providing an unusual atomic scale view of a mesostructure.

  13. The Tiam1 Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factor is Auto-inhibited by its Pleckstrin Homology Coiled-Coil Extension Domain.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhen; Gakhar, Lokesh; Bain, Fletcher E; Spies, Maria; Fuentes, Ernesto J

    2017-09-07

    T-cell lymphoma invasion and metastasis 1 (Tiam1) is a Dbl-family guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) that specifically activates the Rho-family GTPase Rac1 in response to upstream signals, thereby regulating cellular processes including cell adhesion and migration. Tiam1 contains multiple domains, including an N-terminal Pleckstrin homology coiled-coiled extension (PHn-CC-Ex) and catalytic Dbl-homology and C-terminal Pleckstrin homology (DH-PHc) domain. Previous studies indicate that larger fragments of Tiam1, such the region encompassing the N-terminal to C-terminal Pleckstrin homology domains (PHn-PHc) are auto-inhibited. However, the domains in this region responsible for inhibition remain unknown. Here, we show that the PHn-CC-Ex domain inhibits Tiam1 GEF activity by directly interacting with the catalytic DH-PHc domain, preventing Rac1 binding and activation. Enzyme kinetics experiments suggested that Tiam1 is auto-inhibited through occlusion of the catalytic site, rather than by allostery. Small angle X-ray scattering and ensemble modeling yielded models of the PHn-PHc fragment that indicate it is in equilibrium between open and closed conformational states. Finally, single-molecule experiments support a model in which conformational sampling between the open and closed states of Tiam1 contributes to Rac1 dissociation. Our results highlight the role of the PHn-CC-Ex domain in Tiam1 GEF regulation, and suggest a combinatorial model for GEF inhibition and activation of the Rac1 signaling pathway. Copyright © 2017, The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  14. Macromolecule-induced assembly of coiled-coils in alternating multiblock polymers.

    PubMed

    Sahin, Erinc; Kiick, Kristi L

    2009-10-12

    The bioconjugation of proteins and peptides with synthetic polymers is a promising method for tailoring the chemical, biological, and physical properties of both the polymeric and protein-based components. Here, we describe macromolecular assemblies of polyethylene glycol-coiled-coil alternating multiblock polymers guided by hetero- and homodimeric association of coiled-coils. High molecular weight, alternating block polymers of polyethylene glycol (PEG) and coiled-coil peptides were formed via facile NHS-activated amide bond formation under strictly anhydrous conditions. Confirmation of multiblock formation was assessed via a combination of NMR spectroscopy, size-exclusion chromatography, and electrophoretic analysis. Formation of the alternating multiblock polymers of PEG with coiled-coil peptides through the f-position on the heptads did not impair the ability of the coiled-coils to form heterodimers, as assessed via circular dichroic spectroscopy. Interestingly, the conjugation triggered homooligomer formation in one of the peptides that is monomeric in the absence of PEG. The macromolecular assembly of the homooligomer was characterized via circular dichroic spectroscopy and analytical ultracentrifugation, as well as via dynamic and static light scattering. The assembled structures formed in phosphate buffered saline even at very dilute concentrations of multiblock polymer and exhibited controlled sizes relevant in applications such as drug delivery and controlled release.

  15. Inhibition of the 26S proteasome by peptide mimics of the coiled-coil region of its ATPase subunits.

    PubMed

    Inobe, Tomonao; Genmei, Reiko

    Regulation of proteasomal degradation is an indispensable tool for biomedical studies. Thus, there is demand for novel proteasome inhibitors. Proteasomal degradation requires formation of coiled-coil structure by the N-terminal region of ATPase subunits of the proteasome cap. Here we show that peptides that mimic the N-terminal coiled-coil region of ATPase subunits interfere with proteasome function. These results suggest that coiled-coil peptides represent promising new proteasome inhibitors and that N-terminal coiled-coil regions of ATPase subunits are targets for proteasome inhibition. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Central domain of DivIB caps the C-terminal regions of the FtsL/DivIC coiled-coil rod.

    PubMed

    Masson, Soizic; Kern, Thomas; Le Gouëllec, Audrey; Giustini, Cécile; Simorre, Jean-Pierre; Callow, Philip; Vernet, Thierry; Gabel, Frank; Zapun, André

    2009-10-02

    DivIB(FtsQ), FtsL, and DivIC(FtsB) are enigmatic membrane proteins that are central to the process of bacterial cell division. DivIB(FtsQ) is dispensable in specific conditions in some species, and appears to be absent in other bacterial species. The presence of FtsL and DivIC(FtsB) appears to be conserved despite very low sequence conservation. The three proteins form a complex at the division site, FtsL and DivIC(FtsB) being associated through their extracellular coiled-coil region. We report here structural investigations by NMR, small-angle neutron and x-ray scattering, and interaction studies by surface plasmon resonance, of the complex of DivIB, FtsL, and DivIC from Streptococcus pneumoniae, using soluble truncated forms of the proteins. We found that one side of the "bean"-shaped central beta-domain of DivIB interacts with the C-terminal regions of the dimer of FtsL and DivIC. This finding is corroborated by sequence comparisons across bacterial genomes. Indeed, DivIB is absent from species with shorter FtsL and DivIC proteins that have an extracellular domain consisting only of the coiled-coil segment without C-terminal conserved regions (Campylobacterales). We propose that the main role of the interaction of DivIB with FtsL and DivIC is to help the formation, or to stabilize, the coiled-coil of the latter proteins. The coiled-coil of FtsL and DivIC, itself or with transmembrane regions, could be free to interact with other partners.

  17. AglZ Is a Filament-Forming Coiled-Coil Protein Required for Adventurous Gliding Motility of Myxococcus xanthus

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ruifeng; Bartle, Sarah; Otto, Rebecca; Stassinopoulos, Angela; Rogers, Matthew; Plamann, Lynda; Hartzell, Patricia

    2004-01-01

    The aglZ gene of Myxococcus xanthus was identified from a yeast two-hybrid assay in which MglA was used as bait. MglA is a 22-kDa cytoplasmic GTPase required for both adventurous and social gliding motility and sporulation. Genetic studies showed that aglZ is part of the A motility system, because disruption or deletion of aglZ abolished movement of isolated cells and aglZ sglK double mutants were nonmotile. The aglZ gene encodes a 153-kDa protein that interacts with purified MglA in vitro. The N terminus of AglZ shows similarity to the receiver domain of two-component response regulator proteins, while the C terminus contains heptad repeats characteristic of coiled-coil proteins, such as myosin. Consistent with this motif, expression of AglZ in Escherichia coli resulted in production of striated lattice structures. Similar to the myosin heavy chain, the purified C-terminal coiled-coil domain of AglZ forms filament structures in vitro. PMID:15342587

  18. Two coiled-coil domains of Chlamydia trachomatis IncA affect membrane fusion events during infection.

    PubMed

    Ronzone, Erik; Paumet, Fabienne

    2013-01-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis replicates in a parasitophorous membrane-bound compartment called an inclusion. The inclusions corrupt host vesicle trafficking networks to avoid the degradative endolysosomal pathway but promote fusion with each other in order to sustain higher bacterial loads in a process known as homotypic fusion. The Chlamydia protein IncA (Inclusion protein A) appears to play central roles in both these processes as it participates to homotypic fusion and inhibits endocytic SNARE-mediated membrane fusion. How IncA selectively inhibits or activates membrane fusion remains poorly understood. In this study, we analyzed the spatial and molecular determinants of IncA's fusogenic and inhibitory functions. Using a cell-free membrane fusion assay, we found that inhibition of SNARE-mediated fusion requires IncA to be on the same membrane as the endocytic SNARE proteins. IncA displays two coiled-coil domains showing high homology with SNARE proteins. Domain swap and deletion experiments revealed that although both these domains are capable of independently inhibiting SNARE-mediated fusion, these two coiled-coil domains cooperate in mediating IncA multimerization and homotypic membrane interaction. Our results support the hypothesis that Chlamydia employs SNARE-like virulence factors that positively and negatively affect membrane fusion and promote infection.

  19. Structural Characterization of an LPA1 Second Extracellular Loop Mimetic with a Self-Assembling Coiled-Coil Folding Constraint.

    PubMed

    Young, John K; Clayton, Benjamin T; Kikonyogo, Alexandra; Pham, Truc-Chi T; Parrill, Abby L

    2013-01-29

    G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) structures are of interest as a means to understand biological signal transduction and as tools for therapeutic discovery. The growing number of GPCR crystal structures demonstrates that the extracellular loops (EL) connecting the membrane-spanning helices show tremendous structural variability relative to the more structurally-conserved seven transmembrane α-helical domains. The EL of the LPA(1) receptor have not yet been conclusively resolved, and bear limited sequence identity to known structures. This study involved development of a peptide to characterize the intrinsic structure of the LPA(1) GPCR second EL. The loop was embedded between two helices that assemble into a coiled-coil, which served as a receptor-mimetic folding constraint (LPA(1)-CC-EL2 peptide). The ensemble of structures from multi-dimensional NMR experiments demonstrated that a robust coiled-coil formed without noticeable deformation due to the EL2 sequence. In contrast, the EL2 sequence showed well-defined structure only near its C-terminal residues. The NMR ensemble was combined with a computational model of the LPA(1) receptor that had previously been validated. The resulting hybrid models were evaluated using docking. Nine different hybrid models interacted with LPA 18:1 as expected, based on prior mutagenesis studies, and one was additionally consistent with antagonist affinity trends.

  20. NMR assignment and secondary structure of coiled coil domain of C-terminal myosin binding subunit of myosin phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Alok K; Rigby, Alan C

    2014-07-01

    Protein-protein interactions between the C-terminal domain of Myosin Binding Subunit (MBS) of MLC Phosphatase (MBS(CT180); C-terminal 180 aa) and the N-terminal coiled coil (CC) leucine zipper (LZ) domain of PKGIα, PKG-Iα(1-159) play an important role in the process of Smooth Muscle Cell relaxation. The paucity of three-dimensional structural information for MBS(CT180) prevents an atomic level understanding of the MBS-PKG contractile complex. MBS(CT180) is comprised of three structurally different sub-domains including a non-canonical CC, a CC, and a LZ. Recently we reported polypeptide purification and biophysical characterization of the CC domain and the LZ domain of MBS(CT180) (Sharma et al, Prot Expr Purif 2012). Here we report (1)H, (13)C, (15)N chemical shift assignments of homodimeric CC MBS domain encompassing amino acid residues Asp931-Leu980 using 2D and 3D heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy. Secondary structure analyses deduced from these NMR chemical shift data have identified a contiguous stretch of 36 residues from Phe932 to Ala967 that is involved in the formation of coiled coil α-helical region within CC MBS domain. The N-terminal residue Asp931 and the C-terminally positioned residues Thr968-Ala975, Arg977, and Ser978 adopt nonhelical loop conformations.

  1. AglZ is a filament-forming coiled-coil protein required for adventurous gliding motility of Myxococcus xanthus.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ruifeng; Bartle, Sarah; Otto, Rebecca; Stassinopoulos, Angela; Rogers, Matthew; Plamann, Lynda; Hartzell, Patricia

    2004-09-01

    The aglZ gene of Myxococcus xanthus was identified from a yeast two-hybrid assay in which MglA was used as bait. MglA is a 22-kDa cytoplasmic GTPase required for both adventurous and social gliding motility and sporulation. Genetic studies showed that aglZ is part of the A motility system, because disruption or deletion of aglZ abolished movement of isolated cells and aglZ sglK double mutants were nonmotile. The aglZ gene encodes a 153-kDa protein that interacts with purified MglA in vitro. The N terminus of AglZ shows similarity to the receiver domain of two-component response regulator proteins, while the C terminus contains heptad repeats characteristic of coiled-coil proteins, such as myosin. Consistent with this motif, expression of AglZ in Escherichia coli resulted in production of striated lattice structures. Similar to the myosin heavy chain, the purified C-terminal coiled-coil domain of AglZ forms filament structures in vitro.

  2. Two Coiled-Coil Domains of Chlamydia trachomatis IncA Affect Membrane Fusion Events during Infection

    PubMed Central

    Ronzone, Erik; Paumet, Fabienne

    2013-01-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis replicates in a parasitophorous membrane-bound compartment called an inclusion. The inclusions corrupt host vesicle trafficking networks to avoid the degradative endolysosomal pathway but promote fusion with each other in order to sustain higher bacterial loads in a process known as homotypic fusion. The Chlamydia protein IncA (Inclusion protein A) appears to play central roles in both these processes as it participates to homotypic fusion and inhibits endocytic SNARE-mediated membrane fusion. How IncA selectively inhibits or activates membrane fusion remains poorly understood. In this study, we analyzed the spatial and molecular determinants of IncA’s fusogenic and inhibitory functions. Using a cell-free membrane fusion assay, we found that inhibition of SNARE-mediated fusion requires IncA to be on the same membrane as the endocytic SNARE proteins. IncA displays two coiled-coil domains showing high homology with SNARE proteins. Domain swap and deletion experiments revealed that although both these domains are capable of independently inhibiting SNARE-mediated fusion, these two coiled-coil domains cooperate in mediating IncA multimerization and homotypic membrane interaction. Our results support the hypothesis that Chlamydia employs SNARE-like virulence factors that positively and negatively affect membrane fusion and promote infection. PMID:23936096

  3. Accessing Three-Dimensional Crystals with Incorporated Guests through Metal-Directed Coiled-Coil Peptide Assembly.

    PubMed

    Nepal, Manish; Sheedlo, Michael J; Das, Chittaranjan; Chmielewski, Jean

    2016-08-31

    Obtaining three-dimensional (3D) protein and peptide crystals on demand requires a precisely orchestrated hierarchical assembly of biopolymer building blocks. In this work, we disclose a metal-ion-mediated strategy to assemble trimeric coiled-coil peptides in a head-to-tail fashion into linear strands with interstrand interactions. This design led to hexagonal 3D peptide crystal formation within 30 min in the presence of divalent metal ions. The crystal morphology could be controlled by varying the metal ion/peptide ratio, resulting in hexagonal discs to rods. Diffraction studies elucidated the head-to-tail arrangement of the coiled-coil linear strands and their hexagonal, antiparallel packing within the crystal. Unsatisfied ligands at the hexagonal ends of the crystals were harnessed as a powerful means to direct His-tagged fluorophores to distinct locations within the crystals. Overall, the designed hierarchical assembly provides a facile means to obtain 3D peptide crystals and incorporate His-tag-based cargoes and may have potential use in drug delivery and sensor design.

  4. Noncationic Rigid and Anisotropic Coiled-Coil Proteins Exhibit Cell-Penetration Activity.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Norihisa; Hagiwara, Kyoji; Ito, Yoshihiro; Ijiro, Kuniharu; Osada, Yoshihito; Sano, Ken-ichi

    2015-08-04

    Numerous cationic peptides that penetrate cells have been studied intensively as drug delivery system carriers for cellular delivery. However, cationic molecules tend to be cytotoxic and cause inflammation, and their stability in the blood is usually low. We have previously demonstrated that a rigid and fibrous cationic coiled-coil protein exhibited cell-penetrating ability superior to that of previously reported cell-penetrating peptides. Making use of structural properties, here we describe the cell-penetrating activity of a rigid and fibrous coiled-coil protein with a noncationic surface. A fibrous coiled-coil protein of pI 6.5 penetrated 100% of the cells tested in vitro at a concentration of 500 nM, which is comparable to that of previously reported cell-penetrating peptides. We also investigated the effect of cell-strain dependency and short-term cytotoxicity.

  5. X-ray scattering indicates that the leucine zipper is a coiled coil

    SciTech Connect

    Rasmussen, R.; Benvegnu, D. ); O'Shea, E.K.; Kim, P.S. Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge ); Alber, T. Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City )

    1991-01-15

    Dimerization of the bZIP class of eukaryotic transcriptional control proteins requires a sequence motif called the leucine zipper. The authors have grown two distinct crystal forms of a 33-amino acid peptide corresponding to the leucine zipper of the yeast transcriptional activator GCN4. This peptide is known to form a dimer of parallel helices in solution. X-ray scattering from both crystal forms shows reflections that are diagnostic of coiled coils. The most notable reflections occur at {approximately}5.2{angstrom} resolution and correspond to the pitch of helices in coiled coils. There is no diffraction maximum near 5.4{angstrom}, the characteristic pitch of straight helices. The results provide direct evidence that the leucine zipper of GCN4 is a coiled coil.

  6. α-Helical coiled-coil peptide materials for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yaoying; Collier, Joel H

    2017-03-01

    Self-assembling coiled coils, which occur commonly in native proteins, have received significant interest for the design of new biomaterials-based medical therapies. Considerable effort over recent years has led to a detailed understanding of the self-assembly process of coiled coils, and a diverse collection of strategies have been developed for designing functional materials using this motif. The ability to engineer the interface between coiled coils allows one to achieve variously connected components, leading to precisely defined structures such as nanofibers, nanotubes, nanoparticles, networks, gels, and combinations of these. Currently these materials are being developed for a range of biotechnological and medical applications, including drug delivery systems for controlled release, targeted nanomaterials, 'drug-free' therapeutics, vaccine delivery systems, and others. WIREs Nanomed Nanobiotechnol 2017, 9:e1424. doi: 10.1002/wnan.1424 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Mechanical Response and Conformational Amplification in α-Helical Coiled Coils

    PubMed Central

    Yogurtcu, Osman N.; Wolgemuth, Charles W.; Sun, Sean X.

    2010-01-01

    α-Helical coiled coils (CCs) are ubiquitous tertiary structural domains that are often found in mechanoproteins. CCs have mechanical rigidity and are often involved in force transmission between protein domains. Although crystal structures of CCs are available, information about their conformational flexibility is limited. The role of hydrophobic interactions in determining the CC conformation is not clear. In this work we examined the mechanical responses of typical CCs and constructed a coarse-grained mechanical model to describe the conformation of the protein. The model treats α-helices as elastic rods. Hydrophobic bonds arranged in a repeated pattern determine the CC structure. The model is compared with molecular-dynamics simulations of CCs under force. We also estimate the effective bending and twisting persistence length of the CC. The model allows us to examine unconventional responses of the CC, including significant conformational amplification upon binding of a small molecule. We find that the CC does not behave as a simple elastic rod and shows complex nonlinear responses. These results are significant for understanding the role of CC structures in chemoreceptors, motor proteins, and mechanotransduction in general. PMID:21156131

  8. NEMO trimerizes through its coiled-coil C-terminal domain.

    PubMed

    Agou, Fabrice; Ye, Fei; Goffinont, Stéphane; Courtois, Gilles; Yamaoka, Shoji; Israël, Alain; Véron, Michel

    2002-05-17

    NEMO/IkappaB kinase (IKK) gamma is the regulatory component of the IKK complex comprising the two protein kinases, IKKalpha and IKKbeta. To investigate the self-assembly properties of NEMO and to understand further the mechanism of activation of the IKK complex, we purified wild-type and mutant NEMO expressed in Escherichia coli. In the absence of its IKK partners, recombinant NEMO (rNEMO) is a metastable functional monomer correctly folded, according to its fluorescence and far-UV CD spectra, which is binding specifically to the IKK complex. A minor fraction of rNEMO was found tightly associated with DnaK (E. coli Hsp70). We also examined the interaction of NEMO with prokaryotic and eukaryotic Hsp70, and we showed that the Hsp70-NEMO complex forms a supramolecular structure probably corresponding to an assembly intermediate. In vivo cross-linking experiments indicate that native NEMO in association with IKK is in equilibrium between a dimeric and a trimeric form. Similarly to native NEMO, a NEMO mutant deleted from its IKK binding N-terminal domain (residues 242-388) forms a stable trimeric coiled-coil, suggesting that the association of NEMO with IKK or with Hsp70 prevents incorrect interdomain pairing reactions that could lead to aggregation or to an non-native oligomeric state of rNEMO. We propose a model in which the activation of the IKK complex occurs through the trimerization of NEMO upon binding to a not yet identified upstream activator.

  9. An engineered coiled-coil polypeptide assembled onto quantum dots for targeted cell imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Ming-Hao; Yang, Jie; Song, Ji-Tao; Zhang, Lin; Fang, Bi-Yun; Zhao, Dong-Hui; Xia, Rui-Xue; Jin, Rui-Mei; Zhao, Yuan-Di; Liu, Bo

    2015-12-01

    Quantum dot (QD)-polypeptide probes have been developed through the specific metal-affinity interaction between polypeptides appended with N-terminal polyhistidine sequences and CdSe/ZnS core-shell QDs. The size and charge of a QD-polypeptide can be tuned by using different coiled-coil polypeptides. Compared to glutathione-capped QDs (QD-GSH), QD-polypeptide probes showed an approximately two- to three-fold luminescence increase, and the luminescence increase was not obviously related to the charge of the polypeptide. QD-polypeptide probes with different charge have a great effect on nonspecific cellular uptake. QD-polypeptide probes with negative charge exhibited lower nonspecific cellular uptake in comparison to the QD-GSH, while positively charged QD-polypeptide probes presented higher cellular uptake than the QD-GSH. A targeted QD-ARGD probe can obviously increase targeted cellular uptake in α v β 3 overexpressing HeLa cells compared to QD-A. In addition, QD-polypeptide probes showed lower in vitro cytotoxicity compared to the original QDs. These results demonstrate that these QD-polypeptide probes with high specific cellular uptake, high fluorescence intensity and low background noise are expected to have great potential applications in targeted cell imaging.

  10. Functional Analysis of the Bacteriophage T4 Rad50 Homolog (gp46) Coiled-coil Domain.

    PubMed

    Barfoot, Tasida; Herdendorf, Timothy J; Behning, Bryanna R; Stohr, Bradley A; Gao, Yang; Kreuzer, Kenneth N; Nelson, Scott W

    2015-09-25

    Rad50 and Mre11 form a complex involved in the detection and processing of DNA double strand breaks. Rad50 contains an anti-parallel coiled-coil with two absolutely conserved cysteine residues at its apex. These cysteine residues serve as a dimerization domain and bind a Zn(2+) cation in a tetrathiolate coordination complex known as the zinc-hook. Mutation of the zinc-hook in bacteriophage T4 is lethal, indicating the ability to bind Zn(2+) is critical for the functioning of the MR complex. In vitro, we found that complex formation between Rad50 and a peptide corresponding to the C-terminal domain of Mre11 enhances the ATPase activity of Rad50, supporting the hypothesis that the coiled-coil is a major conduit for communication between Mre11 and Rad50. We constructed mutations to perturb this domain in the bacteriophage T4 Rad50 homolog. Deletion of the Rad50 coiled-coil and zinc-hook eliminates Mre11 binding and ATPase activation but does not affect its basal activity. Mutation of the zinc-hook or disruption of the coiled-coil does not affect Mre11 or DNA binding, but their activation of Rad50 ATPase activity is abolished. Although these mutants excise a single nucleotide at a normal rate, they lack processivity and have reduced repetitive exonuclease rates. Restricting the mobility of the coiled-coil eliminates ATPase activation and repetitive exonuclease activity, but the ability to support single nucleotide excision is retained. These results suggest that the coiled-coiled domain adopts at least two conformations throughout the ATPase/nuclease cycle, with one conformation supporting enhanced ATPase activity and processivity and the other supporting nucleotide excision. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  11. De novo design of fibrils made of short alpha-helical coiled coil peptides.

    PubMed

    Potekhin, S A; Melnik, T N; Popov, V; Lanina, N F; Vazina, A A; Rigler, P; Verdini, A S; Corradin, G; Kajava, A V

    2001-11-01

    The alpha-helical coiled coil structures formed by 25-50 residues long peptides are recognized as one of Nature's favorite ways of creating an oligomerization motif. Known de novo designed and natural coiled coils use the lateral dimension for oligomerization but not the axial one. Previous attempts to design alpha-helical peptides with a potential for axial growth led to fibrous aggregates which have an unexpectedly big and irregular thickness. These facts encouraged us to design a coiled coil peptide which self-assembles into soluble oligomers with a fixed lateral dimension and whose alpha-helices associate in a staggered manner and trigger axial growth of the coiled coil. Designing the coiled coil with a large number of subunits, we also pursue the practical goal of obtaining a valuable scaffold for the construction of multivalent fusion proteins. The designed 34-residue peptide self-assembles into long fibrils at slightly acid pH and into spherical aggregates at neutral pH. The fibrillogenesis is completely reversible upon pH change. The fibrils were characterized using circular dichroism spectroscopy, sedimentation diffusion, electron microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry and X-ray fiber diffraction. The peptide was deliberately engineered to adopt the structure of a five-stranded coiled coil rope with adjacent alpha-helices, staggered along the fibril axis. As shown experimentally, the most likely structure matches the predicted five-stranded arrangement. The fact that the peptide assembles in an expected fibril arrangement demonstrates the credibility of our conception of design. The discovery of a short peptide with fibril-forming ability and stimulus-sensitive behavior opens new opportunities for a number of applications.

  12. pH sensitive coiled coils: a strategy for enhanced liposomal drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reja, Rahi M.; Khan, Mohsina; Singh, Sumeet K.; Misra, Rajkumar; Shiras, Anjali; Gopi, Hosahudya N.

    2016-02-01

    Stimuli responsive controlled release from liposome based vesicles is a promising strategy for the site specific delivery of drugs. Herein, we report the design of pH sensitive coiled coils and their incorporation into the liposome as triggers for the controlled release of encapsulated drugs. The designed coiled coil peptides with the incorporation of environment sensitive fluorescent amino acids were found to be stable at physiological pH and unstructured while changing the pH of the environment to either acidic or basic. This pH dependent conformational switch of the coiled-coil polypeptides was exploited as triggers for the enhanced release of the encapsulated drug molecules from liposomes. The SEM, DLS and TEM analysis revealed the uniform morphology of the peptide liposome hybrid vesicles. Further, the drug encapsulated liposome internalization experiments with cancer cells revealed the enhanced release and accumulation of drugs in the acidic lysosomal compartments in comparison with liposomes without coiled coils.Stimuli responsive controlled release from liposome based vesicles is a promising strategy for the site specific delivery of drugs. Herein, we report the design of pH sensitive coiled coils and their incorporation into the liposome as triggers for the controlled release of encapsulated drugs. The designed coiled coil peptides with the incorporation of environment sensitive fluorescent amino acids were found to be stable at physiological pH and unstructured while changing the pH of the environment to either acidic or basic. This pH dependent conformational switch of the coiled-coil polypeptides was exploited as triggers for the enhanced release of the encapsulated drug molecules from liposomes. The SEM, DLS and TEM analysis revealed the uniform morphology of the peptide liposome hybrid vesicles. Further, the drug encapsulated liposome internalization experiments with cancer cells revealed the enhanced release and accumulation of drugs in the acidic

  13. Role of the Simian Virus 5 Fusion Protein N-Terminal Coiled-Coil Domain in Folding and Promotion of Membrane Fusion

    PubMed Central

    West, Dava S.; Sheehan, Michael S.; Segeleon, Patrick K.; Dutch, Rebecca Ellis

    2005-01-01

    Formation of a six-helix bundle comprised of three C-terminal heptad repeat regions in antiparallel orientation in the grooves of an N-terminal coiled-coil is critical for promotion of membrane fusion by paramyxovirus fusion (F) proteins. We have examined the effect of mutations in four residues of the N-terminal heptad repeat in the simian virus 5 (SV5) F protein on protein folding, transport, and fusogenic activity. The residues chosen have previously been shown from study of isolated peptides to have differing effects on stability of the N-terminal coiled-coil and six-helix bundle (R. E. Dutch, G. P. Leser, and R. A. Lamb, Virology 254:147-159, 1999). The mutant V154M showed reduced proteolytic cleavage and surface expression, indicating a defect in intracellular transport, though this mutation had no effect when studied in isolated peptides. The mutation I137M, previously shown to lower thermostability of the six-helix bundle, resulted in an F protein which was properly processed and transported to the cell surface but which had reduced fusogenic activity. Finally, mutations at L140M and L161M, previously shown to disrupt α-helix formation of isolated N-1 peptides but not to affect six-helix bundle formation, resulted in F proteins that were properly processed. Interestingly, the L161M mutant showed increased syncytium formation and promoted fusion at lower temperatures than the wild-type F protein. These results indicate that interactions separate from formation of an N-terminal coiled-coil or six-helix bundle are important in the initial folding and transport of the SV5 F protein and that mutations that destabilize the N-terminal coiled-coil can result in stimulation of membrane fusion. PMID:15650180

  14. Rice Cellulose SynthaseA8 Plant-Conserved Region Is a Coiled-Coil at the Catalytic Core Entrance1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Rushton, Phillip S.; Olek, Anna T.; Makowski, Lee; Badger, John

    2017-01-01

    The crystallographic structure of a rice (Oryza sativa) cellulose synthase, OsCesA8, plant-conserved region (P-CR), one of two unique domains in the catalytic domain of plant CesAs, was solved to 2.4 Å resolution. Two antiparallel α-helices form a coiled-coil domain linked by a large extended connector loop containing a conserved trio of aromatic residues. The P-CR structure was fit into a molecular envelope for the P-CR domain derived from small-angle X-ray scattering data. The P-CR structure and molecular envelope, combined with a homology-based chain trace of the CesA8 catalytic core, were modeled into a previously determined CesA8 small-angle X-ray scattering molecular envelope to produce a detailed topological model of the CesA8 catalytic domain. The predicted position for the P-CR domain from the molecular docking models places the P-CR connector loop into a hydrophobic pocket of the catalytic core, with the coiled-coil aligned near the entrance of the substrate UDP-glucose into the active site. In this configuration, the P-CR coiled-coil alone is unlikely to regulate substrate access to the active site, but it could interact with other domains of CesA, accessory proteins, or other CesA catalytic domains to control substrate delivery. PMID:27879387

  15. The intrinsic factor-vitamin B12 receptor, cubilin, is assembled into trimers via a coiled-coil alpha-helix.

    PubMed

    Lindblom, A; Quadt, N; Marsh, T; Aeschlimann, D; Mörgelin, M; Mann, K; Maurer, P; Paulsson, M

    1999-03-05

    A large protein was purified from bovine kidney, using selective extraction with EDTA to solubilize proteins anchored by divalent cation-dependent interactions. An antiserum raised against the purified protein labeled the apical cell surface of the epithelial cells in proximal tubules and the luminal surface of small intestine. Ten peptide sequences, derived from the protein, all matched the recently published sequences for rat (Moestrup, S. K., Kozyraki, R., Kristiansen, M., Kaysen, J. H., Holm Rasmussen, H., Brault, D., Pontillon, F., Goda, F. O., Christensen, E. I., Hammond, T. G., and Verroust, P. J. (1998) J. Biol. Chem. 273, 5235-5242) and human cubilin, a receptor for intrinsic factor-vitamin B12 complexes, identifying the protein as bovine cubilin. In electron microscopy, a three-armed structure was seen, indicating an oligomerization of three identical subunits. This model was supported by the Mr values of about 1,500,000 for the intact protein and 440,000 for its subunits obtained by analytical ultracentrifugation. In a search for a potential assembly domain, we identified a region of heptad repeats in the N-terminal part of the cubilin sequence. Computer-assisted analysis supported the presence of a coiled-coil alpha-helix between amino acids 103 and 132 of the human cubilin sequence and predicted the formation of a triple coiled-coil. We therefore conclude that cubilin forms a noncovalent trimer of identical subunits connected by an N-terminal coiled-coil alpha-helix.

  16. Self-sorting heterodimeric coiled coil peptides with defined and tuneable self-assembly properties

    PubMed Central

    Aronsson, Christopher; Dånmark, Staffan; Zhou, Feng; Öberg, Per; Enander, Karin; Su, Haibin; Aili, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Coiled coils with defined assembly properties and dissociation constants are highly attractive components in synthetic biology and for fabrication of peptide-based hybrid nanomaterials and nanostructures. Complex assemblies based on multiple different peptides typically require orthogonal peptides obtained by negative design. Negative design does not necessarily exclude formation of undesired species and may eventually compromise the stability of the desired coiled coils. This work describe a set of four promiscuous 28-residue de novo designed peptides that heterodimerize and fold into parallel coiled coils. The peptides are non-orthogonal and can form four different heterodimers albeit with large differences in affinities. The peptides display dissociation constants for dimerization spanning from the micromolar to the picomolar range. The significant differences in affinities for dimerization make the peptides prone to thermodynamic social self-sorting as shown by thermal unfolding and fluorescence experiments, and confirmed by simulations. The peptides self-sort with high fidelity to form the two coiled coils with the highest and lowest affinities for heterodimerization. The possibility to exploit self-sorting of mutually complementary peptides could hence be a viable approach to guide the assembly of higher order architectures and a powerful strategy for fabrication of dynamic and tuneable nanostructured materials. PMID:26370878

  17. The Rad50 coiled-coil domain is indispensable for Mre11 complex functions.

    PubMed

    Hohl, Marcel; Kwon, Youngho; Galván, Sandra Muñoz; Xue, Xiaoyu; Tous, Cristina; Aguilera, Andrés; Sung, Patrick; Petrini, John H J

    2011-09-04

    The Mre11 complex (Mre11, Rad50 and Xrs2 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae) influences diverse functions in the DNA damage response. The complex comprises the globular DNA-binding domain and the Rad50 hook domain, which are linked by a long and extended Rad50 coiled-coil domain. In this study, we constructed rad50 alleles encoding truncations of the coiled-coil domain to determine which Mre11 complex functions required the full length of the coils. These mutations abolished telomere maintenance and meiotic double-strand break (DSB) formation, and severely impaired homologous recombination, indicating a requirement for long-range action. Nonhomologous end joining, which is probably mediated by the globular domain of the Mre11 complex, was also severely impaired by alteration of the coiled-coil and hook domains, providing the first evidence of their influence on this process. These data show that functions of Mre11 complex are integrated by the coiled coils of Rad50.

  18. A high-resolution structure that provides insight into coiled-coil thiodepsipeptide dynamic chemistry.

    PubMed

    Dadon, Zehavit; Samiappan, Manickasundaram; Shahar, Anat; Zarivach, Raz; Ashkenasy, Gonen

    2013-09-16

    Stable and reactive: A crystal structure at 1.35 Å of a thioester coiled-coil protein reveals high similarity to all-peptide-bond proteins. In these assemblies, the thioester bonds are kept reactive towards thiol molecules in the mixture. This enables efficient domain exchange between proteins in response to changes in folding conditions or introduction of external templates.

  19. Allosteric effects in coiled-coil proteins folding and lanthanide-ion binding.

    PubMed

    Samiappan, Manickasundaram; Alasibi, Samaa; Cohen-Luria, Rivka; Shanzer, Abraham; Ashkenasy, Gonen

    2012-10-07

    Peptide sequences modified with lanthanide-chelating groups at their N-termini, or at their lysine side chains, were synthesized, and new Ln(III) complexes were characterized. We show that partial folding of the conjugates to form trimer coiled coil structures induces coordination of lanthanides to the ligand, which in turn further stabilizes the 3D structure.

  20. Baculovirus FP25K Localization: Role of the Coiled-Coil Domain.

    PubMed

    Garretson, Tyler A; McCoy, Jason C; Cheng, Xiao-Wen

    2016-11-01

    Two types of viruses are produced during the baculovirus life cycle: budded virus (BV) and occlusion-derived virus (ODV). A particular baculovirus protein, FP25K, is involved in the switch from BV to ODV production. Previously, FP25K from the model alphabaculovirus Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) was shown to traffic ODV envelope proteins. However, FP25K localization and the domains involved are inconclusive. Here we used a quantitative approach to study FP25K subcellular localization during infection using an AcMNPV bacmid virus that produces a functional AcMNPV FP25K-green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion protein. During cell infection, FP25K-GFP localized primarily to the cytoplasm, particularly amorphous structures, with a small fraction being localized in the nucleus. To investigate the sequences involved in FP25K localization, an alignment of baculovirus FP25K sequences revealed that the N-terminal putative coiled-coil domain is present in all alphabaculoviruses but absent in betabaculoviruses. Structural prediction indicated a strong relatedness of AcMNPV FP25K to long interspersed element 1 (LINE-1) open reading frame 1 protein (ORF1p), which contains an N-terminal coiled-coil domain responsible for cytoplasmic retention. Point mutations and deletions of this domain lead to a change in AcMNPV FP25K localization from cytoplasmic to nuclear. The coiled-coil and C-terminal deletion viruses increased BV production. Furthermore, a betabaculovirus FP25K protein lacking this N-terminal coiled-coil domain localized predominantly to the nucleus and exhibited increased BV production. These data suggest that the acquisition of this N-terminal coiled-coil domain in FP25K is important for the evolution of alphabaculoviruses. Moreover, with the divergence of preocclusion nuclear membrane breakdown in betabaculoviruses and membrane integrity in alphabaculoviruses, this domain represents an alphabaculovirus adaptation for nuclear trafficking

  1. Automated de novo phasing and model building of coiled-coil proteins.

    PubMed

    Rämisch, Sebastian; Lizatović, Robert; André, Ingemar

    2015-03-01

    Models generated by de novo structure prediction can be very useful starting points for molecular replacement for systems where suitable structural homologues cannot be readily identified. Protein-protein complexes and de novo-designed proteins are examples of systems that can be challenging to phase. In this study, the potential of de novo models of protein complexes for use as starting points for molecular replacement is investigated. The approach is demonstrated using homomeric coiled-coil proteins, which are excellent model systems for oligomeric systems. Despite the stereotypical fold of coiled coils, initial phase estimation can be difficult and many structures have to be solved with experimental phasing. A method was developed for automatic structure determination of homomeric coiled coils from X-ray diffraction data. In a benchmark set of 24 coiled coils, ranging from dimers to pentamers with resolutions down to 2.5 Å, 22 systems were automatically solved, 11 of which had previously been solved by experimental phasing. The generated models contained 71-103% of the residues present in the deposited structures, had the correct sequence and had free R values that deviated on average by 0.01 from those of the respective reference structures. The electron-density maps were of sufficient quality that only minor manual editing was necessary to produce final structures. The method, named CCsolve, combines methods for de novo structure prediction, initial phase estimation and automated model building into one pipeline. CCsolve is robust against errors in the initial models and can readily be modified to make use of alternative crystallographic software. The results demonstrate the feasibility of de novo phasing of protein-protein complexes, an approach that could also be employed for other small systems beyond coiled coils.

  2. Modulation of elasticity in functionally distinct domains of the tropomyosin coiled-coil.

    PubMed

    Lakkaraju, Sirish Kaushik; Hwang, Wonmuk

    2009-03-01

    Alpha-helical coiled-coils are common protein structural motifs. Whereas vast information is available regarding their structure, folding, and stability, far less is known about their elastic properties, even though they play mechanical roles in many cases such as tropomyosin in muscle contraction or neck stalks of kinesin or myosin motor proteins. Using computer simulations, we characterized elastic properties of coiled-coils, either globally or locally. Global bending stiffness of standard leucine zipper coiled-coils was calculated using normal mode analysis. Mutations in hydrophobic residues involved in the knob-into-hole interface between the two alpha-helices affect elasticity significantly, whereas charged side chains forming inter-helical salt bridges do not. This suggests that coiled-coils with less regular heptad periodicity may have regional variations in flexibility. We show this by the flexibility map of tropomyosin, which was constructed by a local fluctuation analysis. Overall, flexibility varies by more than twofold and increases towards the C-terminal region of the molecule. Describing the coiled-coil as a twisted tape, it is generally more flexible in the splay bending than in the bending of the broad face. Actin binding sites in alpha zones show local rigidity minima. Broken core regions due to acidic residues at the hydrophobic face such as the Asp137 and the Glu218 are found to be the most labile with moduli for splay and broad face bending as 70 nm and 116 nm respectively. Such variation in flexibility could be relevant to the tropomyosin function, especially for moving across the non-uniform surface of F-actin to regulate myosin binding.

  3. Modulation of elasticity in functionally distinct domains of the tropomyosin coiled-coil

    PubMed Central

    Lakkaraju, Sirish Kaushik; Hwang, Wonmuk

    2009-01-01

    Alpha-helical coiled-coils are common protein structural motifs. Whereas vast information is available regarding their structure, folding, and stability, far less is known about their elastic properties, even though they play mechanical roles in many cases such as tropomyosin in muscle contraction or neck stalks of kinesin or myosin motor proteins. Using computer simulations, we characterized elastic properties of coiled-coils, either globally or locally. Global bending stiffness of standard leucine zipper coiled-coils was calculated using normal mode analysis. Mutations in hydrophobic residues involved in the knob-into-hole interface between the two α-helices affect elasticity significantly, whereas charged side chains forming inter-helical salt bridges do not. This suggests that coiled-coils with less regular heptad periodicity may have regional variations in flexibility. We show this by the flexibility map of tropomyosin, which was constructed by a local fluctuation analysis. Overall, flexibility varies by more than twofold and increases towards the C-terminal region of the molecule. Describing the coiled-coil as a twisted tape, it is generally more flexible in the splay bending than in the bending of the broad face. Actin binding sites in α zones show local rigidity minima. Broken core regions due to acidic residues at the hydrophobic face such as the Asp137 and the Glu218 are found to be the most labile with moduli for splay and broad face bending as 70 nm and 116 nm respectively. Such variation in flexibility could be relevant to the tropomyosin function, especially for moving across the non-uniform surface of F-actin to regulate myosin binding. PMID:19830262

  4. Is Five Percent Too Small? Analysis of the Overlaps between Disorder, Coiled Coil and Collagen Predictions in Complete Proteomes

    PubMed Central

    Gáspári, Zoltán

    2014-01-01

    Identification of intrinsic disorder in proteins and proteomes has revealed important novel aspects of protein function and interactions. However, it has been pointed out that several oligomeric fibrillar protein motifs such as coiled coils and collagen triple helical segments can also identified as intrinsically disordered. This feature has not yet been investigated in more detail at the proteome level. The present work aims at the identification and quantification of such overlaps in full proteomes to assess their significance in large-scale studies of protein disorder. It was found that the percentage of cross-predicted residues is around 5% in the human proteome and is generally near that value in other metazoan ones but shows remarkable variation in different organisms. In particular, smaller proteomes are increasingly prone to such cross-predictions, thus, especially the analysis of viral proteomes requires the use of specific prediction tools. PMID:28250370

  5. Structure Based Engineering of Internal Cavities in Coiled-Coil Peptides†§

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Maneesh K.; Redman, James E.; Leman, Luke J.; Alvarez-Gutiérrez, Julietta M.; Zhang, Yanming; Stout, C. David; Ghadiri, M. Reza

    2007-01-01

    Cavities and clefts are frequently important sites of interaction between natural enzymes or receptors with their corresponding substrate or ligand molecules and exemplify the types of molecular surfaces that would facilitate engineering artificial catalysts and receptors. Even so, structural characterizations of designed cavities are rare. To address this issue, we performed a systematic study of the structural effects of single amino acid substitutions within the hydrophobic cores of tetrameric coiled-coil peptides. Peptides containing single glycine, serine, alanine, or threonine amino acid substitutions at the buried L9, L16, L23, and I26 hydrophobic core positions of a GCN4-based sequence were synthesized and studied by solution-phase and crystallographic techniques. All peptides adopt the expected tetrameric state and contain tunnels or internal cavities ranging in size from 80 Å3 to 370 Å3. Two closely-related sequences containing an L16G substitution, one of which adopts an antiparallel configuration and one of which adopts a parallel configuration, illustrate that cavities of different volumes and shapes can be engineered from identical core substitutions. Finally, we demonstrate that two of the peptides (L9G and L9A) bind the small molecule iodobenzene when present during crystallization, leaving the general peptide quaternary structure intact but altering the local peptide conformation and certain superhelical parameters. These high-resolution descriptions of varied molecular surfaces within solvent-occluded internal cavities illustrate the breadth of design space available in even closely-related peptides and offer valuable models for the engineering of de novo helical proteins. PMID:16008357

  6. Mechanism of fibrotic cardiomyopathy in mice expressing truncated Rho-associated coiled-coil protein kinase 1

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiangsheng; Li, Qi; Lin, Xi; Ma, Yanlin; Yue, Xiaojing; Tao, Zhenyin; Wang, Fen; Mckeehan, Wallace L.; Wei, Lei; Schwartz, Robert J.; Chang, Jiang

    2012-01-01

    We have previously found that in failing human hearts, Rho-associated coiled-coil protein kinase 1 (ROCK1) is processed by caspase-3 into an active isoform, ROCKΔ1. The purpose of the current investigation was to elucidate the pathological consequences of truncated ROCK1 accumulation in the heart, the associated molecular mechanism of ROCKΔ1-mediated cardiac phenotype, and the molecular signaling between Rho kinase activation in cardiomyocytes and extracellular matrix response. We generated transgenic mice expressing ROCKΔ1 in cardiomyocytes to mimic the situation observed in human heart disease, whereas an additional kinase-deficient mouse was generated as a control. The ROCKΔ1 transgenic mice developed fibrotic cardiomyopathy with diastolic dysfunction. Transgenic hearts displayed activated TGFβ1 and NF-κB signaling and a release of a subset of cytokines and were susceptible to angiotensin II stress. Treatment with a Rho kinase inhibitor attenuated the fibrotic phenotype. Cardiac fibroblasts differentiated into myofibroblasts when cocultured with transgenic cardiomyocytes but not with wild-type cardiomyocytes. Inhibitors of Rho kinase as well as TGFβR1 and NF-κB decreased these effects. The serum response factor-dependent TGFβ1 regulation was shown to be responsible for the Rho kinase-mediated activation of TGFβ1 signaling. We conclude that ROCKΔ1 is a novel fibrotic factor. Activation of TGFβ1 and NF-κB signaling contributes to the Rho kinase-mediated pathological fibrosis.—Yang, X., Li, Q., Lin, X., Ma, Y., Yue, X., Tao, Z., Wang, F., Mckeehan, W. L., Wei, L., Schwartz, R. J., Chang, J. Mechanism of fibrotic cardiomyopathy in mice expressing truncated Rho-associated coiled-coil protein kinase 1. PMID:22278938

  7. Four-stranded coiled-coil elastic protein in the byssus of the giant clam, Tridacna maxima.

    PubMed

    Miserez, Ali; Li, Youli; Cagnon, Joel; Weaver, James C; Waite, J Herbert

    2012-02-13

    An elastic protein with a secondary structure distinct from all well-known load-bearing proteins is found in the byssus of the giant clam, Tridacna maxima . The byssus consists of a bundle of hundreds of individual threads, each measuring about about 100 μm in diameter, which exhibit a tendon-like mechanical response. The amino acid composition of Tridacna byssus, however, is unlike tendon collagen, lacking high glycine, proline, and hydroxyproline. Wide-angle X-ray scattering (WAXS) and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) measurements suggest that the constituent nanofibrils of the byssal threads are distinct from known secondary structure motifs previously reported for elastic proteins including the collagen triple-helix, the β-sheet nanocrystalline domains of silks, or the double-stranded coiled-coil regions of intermediate filaments. Instead, X-ray diffraction data indicate a structural organization in which four coiled-coil α-helices form a stable rope-like structure, which then further pack in a pseudohexagonal lattice to form nanofibrils. Amino acid composition analysis shows unusually high concentrations of acidic as well as basic residues, suggesting that the four-helix structure is stabilized by strong ionic interactions between oppositely charged residues in neighboring strands. The composition also suggests additional stabilization by disulfide cross-linking. On a larger scale, scanning and conventional transmission electron microscope (STEM and TEM) observations indicate that the nanofibrils exhibit an alternating periodicity of about 500 nm along the axial direction. A molecular model that combines the mechanical properties with the structural characteristics of the Tridacna byssal threads is proposed.

  8. The effects of pK(a) tuning on the thermodynamics and kinetics of folding: design of a solvent-shielded carboxylate pair at the a-position of a coiled-coil.

    PubMed

    Lau, Wai Leung; Degrado, William F; Roder, Heinrich

    2010-10-06

    The tuning of the pK(a) of ionizable residues plays a critical role in various protein functions, such as ligand-binding, catalysis, and allostery. Proteins harness the free energy of folding to position ionizable groups in highly specific environments that strongly affect their pK(a) values. To investigate the interplay among protein folding kinetics, thermodynamics, and pK(a) modulation, we introduced a pair of Asp residues at neighboring interior positions of a coiled-coil. A single Asp residue was replaced for an Asn side chain at the a-position of the coiled-coil from GCN4, which was also crosslinked at the C-terminus via a flexible disulfide bond. The thermodynamic and kinetic stability of the system was measured by circular dichroism and stopped-flow fluorescence as a function of pH and concentration of guanidine HCl. Both sets of data are consistent with a two-state equilibrium between fully folded and unfolded forms. Distinct pK(a) values of 6.3 and 5.35 are assigned to the first and second protonation of the Asp pair; together they represent an energetic difference of 5 kcal/mol relative to the protonation of two Asp residues with unperturbed pK(a) values. Analysis of the rate data as a function of pH and denaturant concentration allowed calculation of the kinetic constants for the conformational transitions of the peptide with the Asp residues in the doubly protonated, singly protonated, and unprotonated forms. The doubly and singly protonated forms fold rapidly, and a ϕ-value analysis shows that their contribution to folding occurs subsequent to the transition state ensemble for folding. By contrast, the doubly charged state shows a reduced rate of folding and a ϕ-value near 0.5 indicative of a repulsive interaction, and possibly also heterogeneity in the transition state ensemble.

  9. Coiled-Coil Irregularities and Instabilities in Group A Streptococcus M1 Are Required for Virulence

    SciTech Connect

    McNamara, Case; Zinkernagel, Annelies S.; Macheboeuf, Pauline; Cunningham, Madeleine W.; Nizet, Victor; Ghosh, Partho

    2008-07-21

    Antigenically variable M proteins are major virulence factors and immunogens of the human pathogen group A Streptococcus (GAS). Here, we report the -3 angstrom resolution structure of a GAS M1 fragment containing the regions responsible for eliciting type-specific, protective immunity and for binding fibrinogen, which promotes M1 proinflammatory and antiphagocytic functions. The structure revealed substantial irregularities and instabilities throughout the coiled coil of the M1 fragment. Similar structural irregularities occur in myosin and tropomyosin, explaining the patterns of cross-reactivity seen in autoimmune sequelae of GAS infection. Sequence idealization of a large segment of the M1 coiled coil enhanced stability but diminished fibrinogen binding, proinflammatory effects, and antibody cross-reactivity, whereas it left protective immunogenicity undiminished. Idealized M proteins appear to have promise as vaccine immunogens.

  10. Using alpha-helical coiled-coils to design nanostructured metalloporphyrin arrays.

    PubMed

    McAllister, Karen A; Zou, Hongling; Cochran, Frank V; Bender, Gretchen M; Senes, Alessandro; Fry, H Christopher; Nanda, Vikas; Keenan, Patricia A; Lear, James D; Saven, Jeffery G; Therien, Michael J; Blasie, J Kent; DeGrado, William F

    2008-09-10

    We have developed a computational design strategy based on the alpha-helical coiled-coil to generate modular peptide motifs capable of assembling into metalloporphyrin arrays of varying lengths. The current study highlights the extension of a two-metalloporphyrin array to a four-metalloporphyrin array through the incorporation of a coiled-coil repeat unit. Molecular dynamics simulations demonstrate that the initial design evolves rapidly to a stable structure with a small rmsd compared to the original model. Biophysical characterization reveals elongated proteins of the desired length, correct cofactor stoichiometry, and cofactor specificity. The successful extension of the two-porphyrin array demonstrates how this methodology serves as a foundation to create linear assemblies of organized electrically and optically responsive cofactors.

  11. Coiled-coil forming peptides for the induction of silver nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Božič Abram, Sabina; Aupič, Jana; Dražić, Goran; Gradišar, Helena; Jerala, Roman

    2016-04-08

    Biopolymers with defined sequence patterns offer an attractive alternative for the formation of silver nanoparticle (AgNP). A set of coiled-coil dimer forming peptides was tested for their AgNP formation ability. Seventeen of those peptides mediated the formation of AgNPs in aqueous solution at neutral pH, while the formation of a coiled-coil dimer inhibited the nanoparticle generation. A QSAR regression model on the relationship between sequence and function suggests that in this peptide type the patterns KXQQ and KXEE are favorable, whereas Ala residues appear to have an inhibitory effect. UV–VIS spectra of the obtained nanoparticles gave a peak at around 420 nm, typical for AgNPs in the size range around 40 nm, which was confirmed by dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscopy. Peptide-induced AgNPs exhibited good antibacterial activity, even after a 15 min contact time, while they had low toxicity to human cells at the same concentrations. These results show that our designed peptides generate AgNPs with antibacterial activity at mild conditions and might be used for antibacterial coatings. - Highlights: • 17 of the 30 tested coiled-coil forming peptides induce AgNP formation. • Coiled-coil dimer formation suppresses AgNP generation of individual peptides. • Size of the peptide-induced silver nanoparticles is around 40 nm. • QSAR analysis points to the importance of KXQQ and KXEE motifs for AgNP generation. • Peptide-induced silver nanoparticles exhibit antibacterial activity.

  12. CCBuilder 2.0: Powerful and accessible coiled-coil modeling.

    PubMed

    Wood, Christopher W; Woolfson, Derek N

    2017-08-24

    The increased availability of user-friendly and accessible computational tools for biomolecular modeling would expand the reach and application of biomolecular engineering and design. For protein modeling, one key challenge is to reduce the complexities of 3D protein folds to sets of parametric equations that nonetheless capture the salient features of these structures accurately. At present, this is possible for a subset of proteins, namely, repeat proteins. The α-helical coiled coil provides one such example, which represents ≈ 3-5% of all known protein-encoding regions of DNA. Coiled coils are bundles of α helices that can be described by a small set of structural parameters. Here we describe how this parametric description can be implemented in an easy-to-use web application, called CCBuilder 2.0, for modeling and optimizing both α-helical coiled coils and polyproline-based collagen triple helices. This has many applications from providing models to aid molecular replacement for X-ray crystallography, in silico model building and engineering of natural and designed protein assemblies, and through to the creation of completely de novo "dark matter" protein structures. CCBuilder 2.0 is available as a web-based application, the code for which is open-source and can be downloaded freely. http://coiledcoils.chm.bris.ac.uk/ccbuilder2. We have created CCBuilder 2.0, an easy to use web-based application that can model structures for a whole class of proteins, the α-helical coiled coil, which is estimated to account for 3-5% of all proteins in nature. CCBuilder 2.0 will be of use to a large number of protein scientists engaged in fundamental studies, such as protein structure determination, through to more-applied research including designing and engineering novel proteins that have potential applications in biotechnology. © 2017 The Authors Protein Science published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The Protein Society.

  13. Fine-tuning of protein domain boundary by minimizing potential coiled coil regions.

    PubMed

    Iwaya, Naoko; Goda, Natsuko; Unzai, Satoru; Fujiwara, Kenichiro; Tanaka, Toshiki; Tomii, Kentaro; Tochio, Hidehito; Shirakawa, Masahiro; Hiroaki, Hidekazu

    2007-01-01

    Structural determination of individual protein domains isolated from multidomain proteins is a common approach in the post-genomic era. Novel and thus uncharacterized domains liberated from intact proteins often self-associate due to incorrectly defined domain boundaries. Self-association results in missing signals, poor signal dispersion and a low signal-to-noise ratio in (1)H-(15)N HSQC spectra. We have found that a putative, non-canonical coiled coil region close to a domain boundary can cause transient hydrophobic self-association and monomer-dimer equilibrium in solution. Here we propose a rational method to predict putative coiled coil regions adjacent to the globular core domain using the program COILS. Except for the amino acid sequence, no preexisting knowledge concerning the domain is required. A small number of mutant proteins with a minimized coiled coil region have been rationally designed and tested. The engineered domains exhibit decreased self-association as assessed by (1)H-(15)N HSQC spectra with improved peak dispersion and sharper cross peaks. Two successful examples of isolating novel N-terminal domains from AAA-ATPases are demonstrated. Our method is useful for the experimental determination of domain boundaries suited for structural genomics studies.

  14. CCFold: rapid and accurate prediction of coiled-coil structures and application to modeling intermediate filaments.

    PubMed

    Guzenko, Dmytro; Strelkov, Sergei V

    2017-09-04

    Accurate molecular structure of the protein dimer representing the elementary building block of intermediate filaments (IFs) is essential towards the understanding of the filament assembly, rationalizing their mechanical properties and explaining the effect of disease-related IF mutations. The dimer contains a ~300-residue long α-helical coiled coil which cannot be assessed by either direct experimental structure determination or modelling using standard approaches. At the same time, coiled coils are well-represented in structural databases. Here we present CCFold, a generally applicable threading-based algorithm which produces coiled-coil models from protein sequence only. The algorithm is based on a statistical analysis of experimentally determined structures and can handle any hydrophobic repeat patterns in addition to the most common heptads. We demonstrate that CCFold outperforms general-purpose computational folding in terms of accuracy, while being faster by orders of magnitude. By combining the CCFold algorithm and Rosetta folding we generate representative dimer models for all IF protein classes. The source code is freely available at https://github.com/biocryst/IF ; a web server to run the program is at http://pharm.kuleuven.be/Biocrystallography/cc. sergei.strelkov@kuleuven.be. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  15. Cardiac small conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channel subunits form heteromultimers via the coiled-coil domains in the C termini of the channels.

    PubMed

    Tuteja, Dipika; Rafizadeh, Sassan; Timofeyev, Valeriy; Wang, Shuyun; Zhang, Zheng; Li, Ning; Mateo, Robertino K; Singapuri, Anil; Young, J Nilas; Knowlton, Anne A; Chiamvimonvat, Nipavan

    2010-10-01

    Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels are present in a wide variety of cells. We have previously reported the presence of small conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) (SK or K(Ca)) channels in human and mouse cardiac myocytes that contribute functionally toward the shape and duration of cardiac action potentials. Three isoforms of SK channel subunits (SK1, SK2, and SK3) are found to be expressed. Moreover, there is differential expression with more abundant SK channels in the atria and pacemaking tissues compared with the ventricles. SK channels are proposed to be assembled as tetramers similar to other K(+) channels, but the molecular determinants driving their subunit interaction and assembly are not defined in cardiac tissues. To investigate the heteromultimeric formation and the domain necessary for the assembly of 3 SK channel subunits (SK1, SK2, and SK3) into complexes in human and mouse hearts. Here, we provide evidence to support the formation of heteromultimeric complexes among different SK channel subunits in native cardiac tissues. SK1, SK2, and SK3 subunits contain coiled-coil domains (CCDs) in the C termini. In vitro interaction assay supports the direct interaction between CCDs of the channel subunits. Moreover, specific inhibitory peptides derived from CCDs block the Ca(2+)-activated K(+) current in atrial myocytes, which is important for cardiac repolarization. The data provide evidence for the formation of heteromultimeric complexes among different SK channel subunits in atrial myocytes. Because SK channels are predominantly expressed in atrial myocytes, specific ligands of the different isoforms of SK channel subunits may offer a unique therapeutic opportunity to directly modify atrial cells without interfering with ventricular myocytes.

  16. RIC-3 affects properties and quantity of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors via a mechanism that does not require the coiled-coil domains.

    PubMed

    Ben-Ami, Hagit Cohen; Yassin, Lina; Farah, Hanna; Michaeli, Avner; Eshel, Margalit; Treinin, Millet

    2005-07-29

    Members of the RIC-3 gene family are effectors of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) expression in vertebrates and invertebrates. In Caenorhabditis elegans RIC-3 is needed for functional expression of multiple nAChRs, including the DEG-3/DES-2 nAChR. Effects of RIC-3 on DEG-3/DES-2 functional expression are found in vivo and following heterologous expression in Xenopus leavis oocytes. We now show that in X. leavis oocytes RIC-3 also affects the kinetics and agonist affinity properties of the DEG-3/DES-2 receptor. Because these effects are mimicked by increasing the ratio of DEG-3 subunits within DEG-3/DES-2 receptors, this suggests that RIC-3 may preferentially promote maturation of DEG-3-rich receptors. Indeed, effects of RIC-3 on functional expression of DEG-3/DES-2 positively correlate with the DEG-3 to DES-2 ratio. All RIC-3 family members have two transmembrane domains followed by one or two coiled-coil domains. Here we show that the effects of RIC-3 on functional expression and on receptor properties are mediated by the transmembrane domains and do not require the coiled-coil domains. In agreement with this, mammals express a RIC-3 transcript lacking the coiled-coil domain that is capable of promoting DEG-3/DES-2 functional expression. Last, we show that RIC-3 affects DEG-3 quantity, suggesting stabilization of receptors or receptor intermediates by RIC-3. Together our results suggest that subunit-specific interactions of RIC-3 with nAChR subunits, mediated by the transmembrane domains, are sufficient for the effects of RIC-3 on nAChR quantity and quality.

  17. The microtubule-binding and coiled-coil domains of Kid are required to turn off the polar ejection force at anaphase.

    PubMed

    Soeda, Shou; Yamada-Nomoto, Kaori; Ohsugi, Miho

    2016-10-01

    Mitotic chromosomes move dynamically along the spindle microtubules using the forces generated by motor proteins such as chromokinesin Kid (also known as KIF22). Kid generates a polar ejection force and contributes to alignment of the chromosome arms during prometaphase and metaphase, whereas during anaphase, Kid contributes to chromosome compaction. How Kid is regulated and how this regulation is important for chromosome dynamics remains unclear. Here, we address these questions by expressing mutant forms of Kid in Kid-deficient cells. We demonstrate that Cdk1-mediated phosphorylation of Thr463 is required to generate the polar ejection force on Kid-binding chromosomes, whereas dephosphorylation of Thr463 prevents generation of the ejection force on such chromosomes. In addition to activation of the second microtubule-binding domain through dephosphorylation of Thr463, the coiled-coil domain is essential in suspending generation of the polar ejection force, preventing separated chromosomes from becoming recongressed during anaphase. We propose that phosphorylation of Thr463 switches the mitotic chromosome movement from an anti-poleward direction to a poleward direction by converting the Kid functional mode from polar-ejection-force-ON to -OFF during the metaphase-anaphase transition, and that both the second microtubule-binding domain and the coiled-coil domain are involved in this switching process.

  18. Gas-phase IR spectra of intact [alpha]-helical coiled coil protein complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagel, Kevin; Kupser, Peter; Bierau, Frauke; Polfer, Nicolas C.; Steill, Jeffrey D.; Oomens, Jos; Meijer, Gerard; Koksch, Beate; von Helden, Gert

    2009-06-01

    Electrospray ionization (ESI) is the softest ionization method that is currently available and it is widely accepted, that ESI generated ions of proteins and protein assemblies at certain conditions retain characteristic aspects of their solution-state conformation. ESI mass spectrometry (MS) therefore evolved as a useful tool to obtain information on composition, stoichiometry, and dynamics of non-covalently associated protein complexes. While tertiary structure information of proteins can be obtained from ion mobility spectrometry (IMS), only a few techniques yield direct information on the secondary structure of gas-phase peptides and proteins. We present here the mid-IR spectroscopic secondary structural analysis of three de novo designed [alpha]-helical coiled coil model peptides and their non-covalently associated complexes in the gas-phase. The conformational stability of such coiled coil peptides in solution is primarily driven by aggregation. Isolated monomers usually remain unfolded. Two of the investigated peptides were designed to assemble into stable [alpha]-helical complexes in acidic solution, while the third one remains monomeric and unfolded at these conditions. Monomer ions of all three peptides show comparable photodissociation IR spectra and therefore suggest an unfolded conformation in the gas phase. In contrast, considerable CO stretch (amide-I) and N-H bend (amide-II) band shifts have been observed for the dimers which is consistent with an elevated H-bond content. These findings provide evidence that at least a fraction of the condensed phase [alpha]-helical structure is retained in the gas-phase coiled coil complexes.

  19. Type I macrophage scavenger receptor contains α-helical and collagen-like coiled coils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodama, Tatsuhiko; Freeman, Mason; Rohrer, Lucia; Zabrecky, James; Matsudaira, Paul; Krieger, Monty

    1990-02-01

    The macrophage scavenger receptor is a trimeric membrane glycoprotein with unusual ligand-binding properties which has been implicated in the development of atherosclerosis. The trimeric structure of the bovine type I scavenger receptor, deduced by complementary DNA cloning, contains three extracellular C-terminal cysteine-rich domains connected to the transmembrane domain by a long fibrous stalk. This stalk structure, composed of an a-helical coiled coil and a collagen-like triple helix, has not previously been observed in an integral membrane protein.

  20. Protein-based hydrogels self-assembled from genetically engineered triblock polypeptides containing coiled-coil domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Chunyu

    Protein-based biomaterials have great potential in biomedical applications due to their similar composition with biological organisms. Environment-sensitive hydrogels based on proteins can undergo sol-gel transition due to the conformational change of the proteins in response to external stimuli. The physical properties of these hydrogels can be tailored by modification of the protein structures. Two major hypotheses were made in this dissertation. One was that coiled-coil folding motifs could be a good candidate for physical crosslinking in protein-based hydrogels, and the other was that the conformational change of coiled-coils in response to external stimuli could mediate the sol-gel transition of the protein-based hydrogels. The first part established synthesis strategies of the coiled-coil containing proteins using a genetic engineering technique. An important observation was made that the fusion sequence on the proteins could influence the thermal stability of the proteins. In the second part of the research, the self-assembly of hydrogels from a series of triblock polypeptides containing coiled-coils was evaluated. It was found that the hydrogels had a porous interconnected network microstructure. The hydrogels responded to temperature and pH, which correlated to the temperature- and pH-triggered structural transition of the coiled-coil domains. In addition, the formation of hydrogels was reversible in the present or absence of guanidine hydrochloride (GdnHCl). The last part of the research attempted to explore the relationship between the structure of the protein polymers and the physical property of the hydrogels, and to investigate the parameters influencing the hydrogel formation and physical properties. Triblock and diblock polypeptides were designed to contain different lengths of coiled-coil domains. Tyrosine residues were incorporated at selected solvent-exposed positions in order to increase the hydrophobicity of the coiled-coil domains. The

  1. The heterotrimeric laminin coiled-coil domain exerts anti-adhesive effects and induces a pro-invasive phenotype.

    PubMed

    Santos-Valle, Patricia; Guijarro-Muñoz, Irene; Cuesta, Angel M; Alonso-Camino, Vanesa; Villate, Maider; Alvarez-Cienfuegos, Ana; Blanco, Francisco J; Sanz, Laura; Alvarez-Vallina, Luis

    2012-01-01

    Laminins are large heterotrimeric cross-shaped extracellular matrix glycoproteins with terminal globular domains and a coiled-coil region through which the three chains are assembled and covalently linked. Laminins are key components of basement membranes, and they serve as attachment sites for cell adhesion, migration and proliferation. In this work, we produced a recombinant fragment comprising the entire laminin coiled-coil of the α1-, β1-, and γ1-chains that assemble into a stable heterotrimeric coiled-coil structure independently of the rest of the molecule. This domain was biologically active and not only failed to serve as a substrate for cell attachment, spreading and focal adhesion formation but also inhibited cell adhesion to laminin when added to cells in a soluble form at the time of seeding. Furthermore, gene array expression profiling in cells cultured in the presence of the laminin coiled-coil domain revealed up-regulation of genes involved in cell motility and invasion. These findings were confirmed by real-time quantitative PCR and zymography assays. In conclusion, this study shows for the first time that the laminin coiled-coil domain displays anti-adhesive functions and has potential implications for cell migration during matrix remodeling.

  2. A procedure for refining a coiled coil protein structure using x-ray fiber diffraction and modeling.

    PubMed Central

    Briki, Fatma; Doucet, Jean; Etchebest, Catherine

    2002-01-01

    We describe a combined use of experimental and simulation techniques to configure side chains in a coiled coil structure. As already demonstrated in a previous work, x-ray diffraction patterns from hard alpha-keratin fibers in the 5.15 A meridian zone reflect the global configuration of the chi(1) dihedral angle of the coiled coil side chains. Molecular simulations, such as energy minimization and molecular dynamics, and rotameric representation in the PDB, are used here on a heterodimeric coiled coil to investigate the dihedral angle distribution along the sequence. Different procedures have been used to build the structure, the quality assessment was based on the agreement between the simulated diffraction patterns and the experimental ones in the fingerprint region of coiled coils (5.15 A). The best one for building a realistic coiled coil structure consists of placing the side chains using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, followed by side chain positioning using SMD or SCWRL procedures. The side chains and the backbone are equilibrated during the MD until they reach an equilibrium state for the t/g(+) ratio. Positioning the side chains on the resulting backbone, using the above procedures, gives rise to a well-defined 5.15 A meridian reflection. PMID:12324400

  3. The Heterotrimeric Laminin Coiled-Coil Domain Exerts Anti-Adhesive Effects and Induces a Pro-Invasive Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Santos-Valle, Patricia; Guijarro-Muñoz, Irene; Cuesta, Ángel M.; Alonso-Camino, Vanesa; Villate, Maider; Álvarez-Cienfuegos, Ana; Blanco, Francisco J.; Sanz, Laura; Álvarez-Vallina, Luis

    2012-01-01

    Laminins are large heterotrimeric cross-shaped extracellular matrix glycoproteins with terminal globular domains and a coiled-coil region through which the three chains are assembled and covalently linked. Laminins are key components of basement membranes, and they serve as attachment sites for cell adhesion, migration and proliferation. In this work, we produced a recombinant fragment comprising the entire laminin coiled-coil of the α1-, β1-, and γ1-chains that assemble into a stable heterotrimeric coiled-coil structure independently of the rest of the molecule. This domain was biologically active and not only failed to serve as a substrate for cell attachment, spreading and focal adhesion formation but also inhibited cell adhesion to laminin when added to cells in a soluble form at the time of seeding. Furthermore, gene array expression profiling in cells cultured in the presence of the laminin coiled-coil domain revealed up-regulation of genes involved in cell motility and invasion. These findings were confirmed by real-time quantitative PCR and zymography assays. In conclusion, this study shows for the first time that the laminin coiled-coil domain displays anti-adhesive functions and has potential implications for cell migration during matrix remodeling. PMID:22723936

  4. Folding Topology of a Short Coiled-Coil Peptide Structure Templated by an Oligonucleotide Triplex.

    PubMed

    Lou, Chenguang; Christensen, Niels Johan; Martos-Maldonado, Manuel C; Midtgaard, Søren Roi; Ejlersen, Maria; Thulstrup, Peter W; Sørensen, Kasper K; Jensen, Knud J; Wengel, Jesper

    2017-07-12

    The rational design of a well-defined protein-like tertiary structure formed by small peptide building blocks is still a formidable challenge. By using peptide-oligonucleotide conjugates (POC) as building blocks, we present the self-assembly of miniature coiled-coil α-helical peptides guided by oligonucleotide duplex and triplex formation. POC synthesis was achieved by copper-free alkyne-azide cycloaddition between three oligonucleotides and a 23-mer peptide, which by itself exhibited multiple oligomeric states in solution. The oligonucleotide domain was designed to furnish a stable parallel triplex under physiological pH, and to be capable of templating the three peptide sequences to constitute a small coiled-coil motif displaying remarkable α-helicity. The formed trimeric complex was characterized by ultraviolet thermal denaturation, gel electrophoresis, circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), and molecular modeling. Stabilizing cooperativity was observed between the trimeric peptide and the oligonucleotide triplex domains, and the overall molecular size (ca. 12 nm) in solution was revealed to be independent of concentration. The topological folding of the peptide moiety differed strongly from those of the individual POC strands and the unconjugated peptide, exclusively adopting the designed triple helical structure. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Directed surface attachment of nanomaterials via coiled-coil-driven self-assembly

    PubMed Central

    Szymonik, Michal; Wardingley, Richard A; Pye, Douglas; Davies, A Giles; Wälti, Christoph; Stockley, Peter G

    2016-01-01

    Numerous nanoscale devices and materials have been fabricated in recent years using a variety of biological scaffolds. However, the interfacing of these devices and materials into existing circuits and ordered arrays has proved problematic. Here, we describe a simple solution to this problem using self-assembly of the peptide coiled-coil heterodimer ACID:BASE to immobilize M13 bacteriophage particles to specific locations on a patterned gold surface. Surface plasmon resonance demonstrated that free ACID peptides will assemble onto a surface derivatized with BASE. We then displayed the ACID peptide on the pIX coat protein of M13 and showed that these phage particles permit formation of the coiled-coil resulting in specific surface attachment. The ACID:immobilized BASE affinities appear to be similar for free peptide and phage-displayed ACID. Finally, we fabricated two gold electrodes, separated by a 200 nm gap, coated one of them with BASE and showed that this allows localization of the M13:ACID onto the functionalized electrode. PMID:23154792

  6. Principles Governing the Self-Assembly of Coiled-Coil Protein Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Indelicato, Giuliana; Wahome, Newton; Ringler, Philippe; Müller, Shirley A.; Nieh, Mu-Ping; Burkhard, Peter; Twarock, Reidun

    2016-01-01

    Self-assembly refers to the spontaneous organization of individual building blocks into higher order structures. It occurs in biological systems such as spherical viruses, which utilize icosahedral symmetry as a guiding principle for the assembly of coat proteins into a capsid shell. In this study, we characterize the self-assembling protein nanoparticle (SAPN) system, which was inspired by such viruses. To facilitate self-assembly, monomeric building blocks have been designed to contain two oligomerization domains. An N-terminal pentameric coiled-coil domain is linked to a C-terminal coiled-coil trimer by two glycine residues. By combining monomers with inherent propensity to form five- and threefold symmetries in higher order agglomerates, the supposition is that nanoparticles will form that exhibit local and global symmetry axes of order 3 and 5. This article explores the principles that govern the assembly of such a system. Specifically, we show that the system predominantly forms according to a spherical core-shell morphology using a combination of scanning transmission electron microscopy and small angle neutron scattering. We introduce a mathematical toolkit to provide a specific description of the possible SAPN morphologies, and we apply it to characterize all particles with maximal symmetry. In particular, we present schematics that define the relative positions of all individual chains in the symmetric SAPN particles, and provide a guide of how this approach can be generalized to nonspherical morphologies, hence providing unprecedented insights into their geometries that can be exploited in future applications. PMID:26840729

  7. ACCORD: an assessment tool to determine the orientation of homodimeric coiled-coils

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Byeong-Won; Jung, Yang Ouk; Kim, Min Kyung; Kwon, Do Hoon; Park, Si Hoon; Kim, Jun Hoe; Kuk, Yong-Boo; Oh, Sun-Joo; Kim, Leehyeon; Kim, Bong Heon; Yang, Woo Seok; Song, Hyun Kyu

    2017-01-01

    The coiled-coil (CC) domain is a very important structural unit of proteins that plays critical roles in various biological functions. The major oligomeric state of CCs is a dimer, which can be either parallel or antiparallel. The orientation of each α-helix in a CC domain is critical for the molecular function of CC-containing proteins, but cannot be determined easily by sequence-based prediction. We developed a biochemical method for assessing differences between parallel and antiparallel CC homodimers and named it ACCORD (Assessment tool for homodimeric Coiled-Coil ORientation Decision). To validate this technique, we applied it to 15 different CC proteins with known structures, and the ACCORD results identified these proteins well, especially with long CCs. Furthermore, ACCORD was able to accurately determine the orientation of a CC domain of unknown directionality that was subsequently confirmed by X-ray crystallography and small angle X-ray scattering. Thus, ACCORD can be used as a tool to determine CC directionality to supplement the results of in silico prediction. PMID:28266564

  8. Directed surface attachment of nanomaterials via coiled-coil-driven self-assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Simon J.; Johnson, Steven; Szymonik, Michal; Wardingley, Richard A.; Pye, Douglas; Davies, A. Giles; Wälti, Christoph; Stockley, Peter G.

    2012-12-01

    Numerous nanoscale devices and materials have been fabricated in recent years using a variety of biological scaffolds. However, the interfacing of these devices and materials into existing circuits and ordered arrays has proved problematic. Here, we describe a simple solution to this problem using self-assembly of the peptide coiled-coil heterodimer ACID:BASE to immobilize M13 bacteriophage particles to specific locations on a patterned gold surface. Surface plasmon resonance demonstrated that free ACID peptides will assemble onto a surface derivatized with BASE. We then displayed the ACID peptide on the pIX coat protein of M13 and showed that these phage particles permit formation of the coiled-coil resulting in specific surface attachment. The ACID:immobilized BASE affinities appear to be similar for free peptide and phage-displayed ACID. Finally, we fabricated two gold electrodes, separated by a 200 nm gap, coated one of them with BASE and showed that this allows localization of the M13:ACID onto the functionalized electrode.

  9. Immunogenicity of coiled-coil based drug-free macromolecular therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Kverka, Miloslav; Hartley, Jonathan M.; Chu, Te-Wei; Yang, Jiyuan; Heidchen, Regina; Kopeček, Jindřich

    2014-01-01

    A two-component CD20 (non-internalizing) receptor crosslinking system based on the biorecognition of complementary coiled-coil forming peptides was evaluated. Exposure of B cells to Fab’-peptide1 conjugate decorates the cell surface with peptide1; further exposure of the decorated cells to P-(peptide2)x (P is the N-(2-hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide (HPMA) copolymer backbone) results in the formation of coiled-coil heterodimers at the cell surface with concomitant induction of apoptosis. The aim of this study was to determine the potential immunogenicity of this therapeutic system that does not contain low molecular weight drugs. Enantiomeric peptides (L- and D-CCE and L- and D-CCK), HPMA copolymer-peptide conjugates, and Fab’ fragment-peptide conjugates were synthesized and the immunological properties of peptide conjugates evaluated in vitro on RAW264.7 macrophages and in vivo on immunocompetent BALB/c mice. HPMA copolymer did not induce immune response in vitro and in vivo. Administration of P-peptide conjugates with strong adjuvant resulted in antibody response directed to the peptide. Fab’ was responsible for macrophage activation of Fab’-peptide conjugates and a major factor in the antibody induction following i.v. administration of Fab’ conjugates. There was no substantial difference in the ability of conjugates of D-peptides and conjugates of L-peptides to induce Ab response. PMID:24767787

  10. Coiled-coil forming peptides for the induction of silver nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Božič Abram, Sabina; Aupič, Jana; Dražić, Goran; Gradišar, Helena; Jerala, Roman

    2016-04-08

    Biopolymers with defined sequence patterns offer an attractive alternative for the formation of silver nanoparticle (AgNP). A set of coiled-coil dimer forming peptides was tested for their AgNP formation ability. Seventeen of those peptides mediated the formation of AgNPs in aqueous solution at neutral pH, while the formation of a coiled-coil dimer inhibited the nanoparticle generation. A QSAR regression model on the relationship between sequence and function suggests that in this peptide type the patterns KXQQ and KXEE are favorable, whereas Ala residues appear to have an inhibitory effect. UV-VIS spectra of the obtained nanoparticles gave a peak at around 420 nm, typical for AgNPs in the size range around 40 nm, which was confirmed by dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscopy. Peptide-induced AgNPs exhibited good antibacterial activity, even after a 15 min contact time, while they had low toxicity to human cells at the same concentrations. These results show that our designed peptides generate AgNPs with antibacterial activity at mild conditions and might be used for antibacterial coatings.

  11. Principles Governing the Self-Assembly of Coiled-Coil Protein Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Indelicato, Giuliana; Wahome, Newton; Ringler, Philippe; Müller, Shirley A; Nieh, Mu-Ping; Burkhard, Peter; Twarock, Reidun

    2016-02-02

    Self-assembly refers to the spontaneous organization of individual building blocks into higher order structures. It occurs in biological systems such as spherical viruses, which utilize icosahedral symmetry as a guiding principle for the assembly of coat proteins into a capsid shell. In this study, we characterize the self-assembling protein nanoparticle (SAPN) system, which was inspired by such viruses. To facilitate self-assembly, monomeric building blocks have been designed to contain two oligomerization domains. An N-terminal pentameric coiled-coil domain is linked to a C-terminal coiled-coil trimer by two glycine residues. By combining monomers with inherent propensity to form five- and threefold symmetries in higher order agglomerates, the supposition is that nanoparticles will form that exhibit local and global symmetry axes of order 3 and 5. This article explores the principles that govern the assembly of such a system. Specifically, we show that the system predominantly forms according to a spherical core-shell morphology using a combination of scanning transmission electron microscopy and small angle neutron scattering. We introduce a mathematical toolkit to provide a specific description of the possible SAPN morphologies, and we apply it to characterize all particles with maximal symmetry. In particular, we present schematics that define the relative positions of all individual chains in the symmetric SAPN particles, and provide a guide of how this approach can be generalized to nonspherical morphologies, hence providing unprecedented insights into their geometries that can be exploited in future applications.

  12. Invited review the coiled coil silk of bees, ants, and hornets.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, Tara D; Weisman, Sarah; Walker, Andrew A; Mudie, Stephen T

    2012-06-01

    In this article, we review current knowledge about the silk produced by the larvae of bees, ants, and hornets [Apoidea and Vespoidea: Hymenoptera]. Different species use the silk either alone or in composites for a variety of purposes including mechanical reinforcement, thermal regulation, or humidification. The characteristic molecular structure of this silk is α-helical proteins assembled into tetrameric coiled coils. Gene sequences from seven species are available, and each species possesses a copy of each of four related silk genes that encode proteins predicted to form coiled coils. The proteins are ordered at multiple length scales within the labial gland of the final larval instar before spinning. The insects control the morphology of the silk during spinning to produce either fibers or sheets. The silk proteins are small and non repetitive and have been produced artificially at high levels by fermentation in E. coli. The artificial silk proteins can be fabricated into materials with structural and mechanical properties similar to those of native silks.

  13. Hybrid hydrogels assembled from synthetic polymers and coiled-coil protein domains.

    PubMed

    Wang, C; Stewart, R J; Kopecek, J

    1999-02-04

    Stimuli-sensitive polymer hydrogels, which swell or shrink in response to changes in the environmental conditions, have been extensively investigated and used as 'smart' biomaterials and drug-delivery systems. Most of these responsive hydrogels are prepared from a limited number of synthetic polymers and their derivatives, such as copolymers of (meth)acrylic acid, acrylamide and N-isopropyl acrylamide. Water-soluble synthetic polymers have also been crosslinked with molecules of biological origin, such as oligopeptides and oligodeoxyribonucleotides, or with intact native proteins. Very often there are several factors influencing the relationship between structure and properties in these systems, making it difficult to engineer hydrogels with specified responses to particular stimuli. Here we report a hybrid hydrogel system assembled from water-soluble synthetic polymers and a well-defined protein-folding motif, the coiled coil. These hydrogels undergo temperature-induced collapse owing to the cooperative conformational transition of the coiled-coil protein domain. This system shows that well-characterized water-soluble synthetic polymers can be combined with well-defined folding motifs of proteins in hydrogels with engineered volume-change properties.

  14. ELKS controls the pool of readily releasable vesicles at excitatory synapses through its N-terminal coiled-coil domains

    PubMed Central

    Held, Richard G; Liu, Changliang; Kaeser, Pascal S

    2016-01-01

    In a presynaptic nerve terminal, synaptic strength is determined by the pool of readily releasable vesicles (RRP) and the probability of release (P) of each RRP vesicle. These parameters are controlled at the active zone and vary across synapses, but how such synapse specific control is achieved is not understood. ELKS proteins are enriched at vertebrate active zones and enhance P at inhibitory hippocampal synapses, but ELKS functions at excitatory synapses are not known. Studying conditional knockout mice for ELKS, we find that ELKS enhances the RRP at excitatory synapses without affecting P. Surprisingly, ELKS C-terminal sequences, which interact with RIM, are dispensable for RRP enhancement. Instead, the N-terminal ELKS coiled-coil domains that bind to Liprin-α and Bassoon are necessary to control RRP. Thus, ELKS removal has differential, synapse-specific effects on RRP and P, and our findings establish important roles for ELKS N-terminal domains in synaptic vesicle priming. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14862.001 PMID:27253063

  15. Roles of the novel coiled-coil protein Rng10 in septum formation during fission yeast cytokinesis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yajun; Lee, I-Ju; Sun, Mingzhai; Lower, Casey A.; Runge, Kurt W.; Ma, Jianjie; Wu, Jian-Qiu

    2016-01-01

    Rho GAPs are important regulators of Rho GTPases, which are involved in various steps of cytokinesis and other processes. However, regulation of Rho-GAP cellular localization and function is not fully understood. Here we report the characterization of a novel coiled-coil protein Rng10 and its relationship with the Rho-GAP Rga7 in fission yeast. Both rng10Δ and rga7Δ result in defective septum and cell lysis during cytokinesis. Rng10 and Rga7 colocalize on the plasma membrane at the cell tips during interphase and at the division site during cell division. Rng10 physically interacts with Rga7 in affinity purification and coimmunoprecipitation. Of interest, Rga7 localization is nearly abolished without Rng10. Moreover, Rng10 and Rga7 work together to regulate the accumulation and dynamics of glucan synthases for successful septum formation in cytokinesis. Our results show that cellular localization and function of the Rho-GAP Rga7 are regulated by a novel protein, Rng10, during cytokinesis in fission yeast. PMID:27385337

  16. Mapping of the Neisseria meningitidis NadA Cell-Binding Site: Relevance of Predicted α-Helices in the NH2-Terminal and Dimeric Coiled-Coil Regions▿

    PubMed Central

    Tavano, Regina; Capecchi, Barbara; Montanari, Paolo; Franzoso, Susanna; Marin, Oriano; Sztukowska, Maryta; Cecchini, Paola; Segat, Daniela; Scarselli, Maria; Aricò, Beatrice; Papini, Emanuele

    2011-01-01

    NadA is a trimeric autotransporter protein of Neisseria meningitidis belonging to the group of oligomeric coiled-coil adhesins. It is implicated in the colonization of the human upper respiratory tract by hypervirulent serogroup B N. meningitidis strains and is part of a multiantigen anti-serogroup B vaccine. Structure prediction indicates that NadA is made by a COOH-terminal membrane anchor (also necessary for autotranslocation to the bacterial surface), an intermediate elongated coiled-coil-rich stalk, and an NH2-terminal region involved in cell interaction. Electron microscopy analysis and structure prediction suggest that the apical region of NadA forms a compact and globular domain. Deletion studies proved that the NH2-terminal sequence (residues 24 to 87) is necessary for cell adhesion. In this study, to better define the NadA cell binding site, we exploited (i) a panel of NadA mutants lacking sequences along the coiled-coil stalk and (ii) several oligoclonal rabbit antibodies, and their relative Fab fragments, directed to linear epitopes distributed along the NadA ectodomain. We identified two critical regions for the NadA-cell receptor interaction with Chang cells: the NH2 globular head domain and the NH2 dimeric intrachain coiled-coil α-helices stemming from the stalk. This raises the importance of different modules within the predicted NadA structure. The identification of linear epitopes involved in receptor binding that are able to induce interfering antibodies reinforces the importance of NadA as a vaccine antigen. PMID:20971901

  17. Mapping of the Neisseria meningitidis NadA cell-binding site: relevance of predicted {alpha}-helices in the NH2-terminal and dimeric coiled-coil regions.

    PubMed

    Tavano, Regina; Capecchi, Barbara; Montanari, Paolo; Franzoso, Susanna; Marin, Oriano; Sztukowska, Maryta; Cecchini, Paola; Segat, Daniela; Scarselli, Maria; Aricò, Beatrice; Papini, Emanuele

    2011-01-01

    NadA is a trimeric autotransporter protein of Neisseria meningitidis belonging to the group of oligomeric coiled-coil adhesins. It is implicated in the colonization of the human upper respiratory tract by hypervirulent serogroup B N. meningitidis strains and is part of a multiantigen anti-serogroup B vaccine. Structure prediction indicates that NadA is made by a COOH-terminal membrane anchor (also necessary for autotranslocation to the bacterial surface), an intermediate elongated coiled-coil-rich stalk, and an NH(2)-terminal region involved in cell interaction. Electron microscopy analysis and structure prediction suggest that the apical region of NadA forms a compact and globular domain. Deletion studies proved that the NH(2)-terminal sequence (residues 24 to 87) is necessary for cell adhesion. In this study, to better define the NadA cell binding site, we exploited (i) a panel of NadA mutants lacking sequences along the coiled-coil stalk and (ii) several oligoclonal rabbit antibodies, and their relative Fab fragments, directed to linear epitopes distributed along the NadA ectodomain. We identified two critical regions for the NadA-cell receptor interaction with Chang cells: the NH(2) globular head domain and the NH(2) dimeric intrachain coiled-coil α-helices stemming from the stalk. This raises the importance of different modules within the predicted NadA structure. The identification of linear epitopes involved in receptor binding that are able to induce interfering antibodies reinforces the importance of NadA as a vaccine antigen.

  18. Effect of helix length on the stability of the Lac repressor antiparallel coiled coil.

    PubMed

    Little, Wheaton; Robblee, James P; Dahlberg, Caroline L; Kokona, Bashkim; Fairman, Robert

    2015-07-01

    The helix length dependence of the stability of antiparallel four-chain coiled coils is investigated using eight synthetic peptides (Lac21-Lac28) whose sequences are derived from the tetramerization domain of the Lac repressor protein. Previous studies using analytical ultracentrifugation sedimentation equilibrium experiments to characterize Lac21 and Lac28 justifies the use of a two state model to describe the unfolding behavior of these two peptides. Using circular dichroism spectropolarimetry as a measure of tetramer assembly, both chemical and thermal denaturation experiments were carried out to determine thermodynamic parameters. We found that the hydrophobic core residues provide the greatest impact on stability and, as a consequence, must reorganize the register of the antiparallel helices to accommodate the burial of the nonpolar amino acids. Addition of noncore residues appears to have only a minor effect on stability, and in some cases, show a slight destabilization. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Integration of Rotation and Piston Motions in Coiled-Coil Signal Transduction▿

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Rong; Lynn, David G.

    2007-01-01

    A coordinated response to a complex and dynamic environment requires an organism to simultaneously monitor and interpret multiple signaling cues. In bacteria and some eukaryotes, environmental responses depend on the histidine autokinases (HKs). For example, VirA, a large integral membrane HK from Agrobacterium tumefaciens, regulates the expression of virulence genes in response to signals from multiple molecular classes (phenol, pH, and sugar). The ability of this pathogen to perceive inputs from different known host signals within a single protein receptor provides an opportunity to understand the mechanisms of signal integration. Here we exploited the conserved domain organization of the HKs and engineered chimeric kinases to explore the signaling mechanisms of phenol sensing and pH/sugar integration. Our data implicate a piston-assisted rotation of coiled coils for integration of multiple inputs and regulation of critical responses during pathogenesis. PMID:17573470

  20. Rho-associated coiled-coil containing kinases (ROCK): structure, regulation, and functions.

    PubMed

    Julian, Linda; Olson, Michael F

    2014-01-01

    Rho-associated coiled-coil containing kinases (ROCK) were originally identified as effectors of the RhoA small GTPase. (1)(-) (5) They belong to the AGC family of serine/threonine kinases (6) and play vital roles in facilitating actomyosin cytoskeleton contractility downstream of RhoA and RhoC activation. Since their discovery, ROCK kinases have been extensively studied, unveiling their manifold functions in processes including cell contraction, migration, apoptosis, survival, and proliferation. Two mammalian ROCK homologs have been identified, ROCK1 (also called ROCK I, ROKβ, Rho-kinase β, or p160ROCK) and ROCK2 (also known as ROCK II, ROKα, or Rho kinase), hereafter collectively referred to as ROCK. In this review, we will focus on the structure, regulation, and functions of ROCK.

  1. A coiled coil switch mediates cold sensing by the thermosensory protein DesK.

    PubMed

    Saita, Emilio; Abriata, Luciano A; Tsai, Yi Ting; Trajtenberg, Felipe; Lemmin, Thomas; Buschiazzo, Alejandro; Dal Peraro, Matteo; de Mendoza, Diego; Albanesi, Daniela

    2015-10-01

    The thermosensor histidine kinase DesK from Bacillus subtilis senses changes in membrane fluidity initiating an adaptive response. Structural changes in DesK have been implicated in transmembrane signaling, but direct evidence is still lacking. On the basis of structure-guided mutagenesis, we now propose a mechanism of DesK-mediated signal sensing and transduction. The data indicate that stabilization/destabilization of a 2-helix coiled coil, which connects the transmembrane sensory domain of DesK to its cytosolic catalytic region, is crucial to control its signaling state. Computational modeling and simulations reveal couplings between protein, water and membrane mechanics. We propose that membrane thickening is the main driving force for signal sensing and that it acts by inducing helix stretching and rotation prompting an asymmetric kinase-competent state. Overall, the known structural changes of the sensor kinase, as well as further dynamic rearrangements that we now predict, consistently link structure determinants to activity modulation.

  2. De novo designed coiled-coil proteins with variable conformations as components of molecular electronic devices.

    PubMed

    Shlizerman, Clara; Atanassov, Alexander; Berkovich, Inbal; Ashkenasy, Gonen; Ashkenasy, Nurit

    2010-04-14

    Conformational changes of proteins are widely used in nature for controlling cellular functions, including ligand binding, oligomerization, and catalysis. Despite the fact that different proteins and artificial peptides have been utilized as electron-transfer mediators in electronic devices, the unique propensity of proteins to switch between different conformations has not been used as a mechanism to control device properties and performance. Toward this aim, we have designed and prepared new dimeric coiled-coil proteins that adopt different conformations due to parallel or antiparallel relative orientations of their monomers. We show here that controlling the conformation of these proteins attached as monolayers to gold, which dictates the direction and magnitude of the molecular dipole relative to the surface, results in quantitative modulation of the gold work function. Furthermore, charge transport through the proteins as molecular bridges is controlled by the different protein conformations, producing either rectifying or ohmic-like behavior.

  3. D-Cysteine Ligands Control Metal Geometries within de Novo Designed Three-Stranded Coiled Coils.

    PubMed

    Pecoraro, Vincent Louis; Ruckthong, Leela; Peacock, Anna F A; Pascoe, Cherilyn E; Hemmingsen, Lars; Stuckey, Jeanne A

    2017-04-06

    While metal ion binding to naturally occurring L-amino acid proteins is well documented, understanding the impact of the opposite chirality (D) amino acids on the structure and stereochemistry of metals is in its infancy. We examine the effect of a D-configuration cysteine within a designed L-amino acid three-stranded coiled coil in order to enforce a precise coordination number on a metal center. The D-chirality does not alter the native fold, but the side-chain reorientation modifies the sterics of the metal binding pocket. L-Cys side-chains within the coiled-coil have previously been shown to rotate substantially from their preferred positions in the apo structure to create a binding site for a tetra-coordinate metal ion. However, here we show by x-ray crystallography that D-Cys side chains are preorganized with suitable geometry to bind such a ligand. This is confirmed by comparison of the Zn(II)Cl(CSL16DC)₃²¯ to the published Zn(II)(H₂O)(GRAND-CSL12AL16LC)₃¯.¹ Spectroscopic analysis indicates that the Cd(II) geometry observed using L-Cys ligands (a mixture of 3- and 4- coordinate Cd(II)) is altered to a single 4-coordinate specie when D-Cys is present. This work opens a new avenue for the control of metal site environment in man-made proteins, by simply altering the binding ligand with its mirror imaged D-configuration. Thus, use of D amino acids in a metal's coordination sphere promises to be a powerful tool for controlling the properties of future metalloproteins.

  4. Evidence that the stalk of Drosophila kinesin heavy chain is an alpha- helical coiled coil

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    Kinesin is a mechanochemical enzyme composed of three distinct domains: a globular head domain, a rodlike stalk domain, and a small globular tail domain. The stalk domain has sequence features characteristic of alpha-helical coiled coils. To gain insight into the structure of the kinesin stalk, we expressed it from a segment of the Drosophila melanogaster kinesin heavy chain gene and purified it from Escherichia coli. When observed by EM, this protein formed a rodlike structure 40- 55 nm long that was occasionally bent at a hingelike region near the middle of the molecule. An additional EM study and a chemical cross- linking study showed that this protein forms a parallel dimer and that the two chains are in register. Finally, using circular dichroism spectroscopy, we showed that this protein is approximately 55-60% alpha- helical in physiological aqueous solution at 25 degrees C, and approximately 85-90% alpha-helical at 4 degrees C. From these results, we conclude that the stalk of kinesin heavy chain forms an alpha- helical coiled coil structure. The temperature dependence of the circular dichroism signal has two major transitions, at 25-30 degrees C and at 45-50 degrees C, which suggests that a portion of the alpha- helical structure in the stalk is less stable than the rest. By producing the amino-terminal (coil 1) and carboxy-terminal (coil 2) halves of the stalk separately in E. coli, we showed that the region that melts below 30 degrees C lies within coil 1, while the majority of coil 2 melts above 45 degrees C. We suggest that this difference in stability may play a role in the force-generating mechanism or regulation of kinesin. PMID:1734025

  5. Designed Coiled-Coil Peptides Inhibit the Type Three Secretion System of Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Larzábal, Mariano; Mercado, Elsa C.; Vilte, Daniel A.; Salazar-González, Hector; Cataldi, Angel; Navarro-Garcia, Fernando

    2010-01-01

    Background Enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC) and enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC) are two categories of E. coli strains associated with human disease. A major virulence factor of both pathotypes is the expression of a type three secretion system (TTSS), responsible for their ability to adhere to gut mucosa causing a characteristic attaching and effacing lesion (A/E). The TTSS translocates effector proteins directly into the host cell that subvert mammalian cell biochemistry. Methods/Principal Findings We examined synthetic peptides designed to inhibit the TTSS. CoilA and CoilB peptides, both representing coiled-coil regions of the translocator protein EspA, and CoilD peptide, corresponding to a coiled–coil region of the needle protein EscF, were effective in inhibiting the TTSS dependent hemolysis of red blood cells by the EPEC E2348/69 strain. CoilA and CoilB peptides also reduced the formation of actin pedestals by the same strain in HEp-2 cells and impaired the TTSS-mediated protein translocation into the epithelial cell. Interestingly, CoilA and CoilB were able to block EspA assembly, destabilizing the TTSS and thereby Tir translocation. This blockage of EspA polymerization by CoilA or CoilB peptides, also inhibited the correct delivery of EspB and EspD as detected by immunoblotting. Interestingly, electron microscopy of bacteria incubated with the CoilA peptide showed a reduction of the length of EspA filaments. Conclusions Our data indicate that coiled-coil peptides can prevent the assembly and thus the functionality of the TTSS apparatus and suggest that these peptides could provide an attractive tool to block EPEC and EHEC pathogenesis. PMID:20140230

  6. The cytoplasmic coiled-coil mediates cooperative gating temperature sensitivity in the voltage-gated H(+) channel Hv1.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Yuichiro; Kurokawa, Tatsuki; Takeshita, Kohei; Kobayashi, Megumi; Okochi, Yoshifumi; Nakagawa, Atsushi; Okamura, Yasushi

    2012-05-08

    Hv1/VSOP is a dimeric voltage-gated H(+) channel in which the gating of one subunit is reportedly coupled to that of the other subunit within the dimer. The molecular basis for dimer formation and intersubunit coupling, however, remains unknown. Here we show that the carboxy terminus ends downstream of the S4 voltage-sensor helix twist in a dimer coiled-coil architecture, which mediates cooperative gating. We also show that the temperature-dependent activation of H(+) current through Hv1/VSOP is regulated by thermostability of the coiled-coil domain, and that this regulation is altered by mutation of the linker between S4 and the coiled-coil. Cooperative gating within the dimer is also dependent on the linker structure, which circular dichroism spectrum analysis suggests is α-helical. Our results indicate that the cytoplasmic coiled-coil strands form continuous α-helices with S4 and mediate cooperative gating to adjust the range of temperatures over which Hv1/VSOP operates.

  7. Identification of kinesin neck region as a stable alpha-helical coiled coil and its thermodynamic characterization.

    PubMed

    Morii, H; Takenawa, T; Arisaka, F; Shimizu, T

    1997-02-18

    The kinesin heavy chain consists of an N-terminal globular domain, referred to as the motor domain, a rod-like middle region, and a C-terminal domain. In this study, the human kinesin neck region, the region adjacent to the motor domain which promotes dimerization, has been investigated. First, we predicted coiled-coil regions including the neck region by our newly devised statistical method. The sequence (335-372) was predominated by a unique heptad amphipathy. A comparison of the bacterially expressed human kinesin heavy chain fragments, K349 (1-349), a monomeric motor domain, and K379 (1-379), a dimer, by circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy showed that K379 had more alpha-helical content. Chemically synthesized peptides, (332-349), (350-379), and (332-369), gave CD spectra with an alpha-helix-rich pattern, but the spectra varied depending on the peptide concentration. Analysis of the molar ellipticity at 222 nm indicated that those peptides were in monomer-dimer equilibria, and the dissociation isotherms established dissociation constants of 9.6 mM. 60 microM, and 62 nM for the above peptides, respectively. Sedimentation equilibrium measurements verified that the peptide (332-369) existed as a dimeric form. These results strongly suggest that the sequence from 332 to 369 of the neck region forms an alpha-helical coiled coil. The differential peptide of K349 and K379, (350-379), did not show sufficient ability to make K379 dimeric. It is likely that the region (350-379) forms a stable alpha-helical coiled coil only together with the (332-349) region. Fluorescence energy transfer studies of [Cys363]-(332-369) labeled with a fluorescence donor and an acceptor revealed that the peptide formed a parallel coiled coil. This coiled coil was thermodynamically stable against urea and thermal denaturation, and peptide exchange of the coiled coil was undetectable, or extremely slow, at neutral pH. The dissociation free energy was estimated to be 57.7 kJ mol-1 at a peptide

  8. Truncated and Helix-Constrained Peptides with High Affinity and Specificity for the cFos Coiled-Coil of AP-1

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Tara; Ruiz-Gómez, Gloria; Hill, Timothy A.; Hoang, Huy N.; Fairlie, David P.; Mason, Jody M.

    2013-01-01

    Protein-based therapeutics feature large interacting surfaces. Protein folding endows structural stability to localised surface epitopes, imparting high affinity and target specificity upon interactions with binding partners. However, short synthetic peptides with sequences corresponding to such protein epitopes are unstructured in water and promiscuously bind to proteins with low affinity and specificity. Here we combine structural stability and target specificity of proteins, with low cost and rapid synthesis of small molecules, towards meeting the significant challenge of binding coiled coil proteins in transcriptional regulation. By iteratively truncating a Jun-based peptide from 37 to 22 residues, strategically incorporating i→i+4 helix-inducing constraints, and positioning unnatural amino acids, we have produced short, water-stable, α-helical peptides that bind cFos. A three-dimensional NMR-derived structure for one peptide (24) confirmed a highly stable α-helix which was resistant to proteolytic degradation in serum. These short structured peptides are entropically pre-organized for binding with high affinity and specificity to cFos, a key component of the oncogenic transcriptional regulator Activator Protein-1 (AP-1). They competitively antagonized the cJun–cFos coiled-coil interaction. Truncating a Jun-based peptide from 37 to 22 residues decreased the binding enthalpy for cJun by ∼9 kcal/mol, but this was compensated by increased conformational entropy (TΔS ≤7.5 kcal/mol). This study demonstrates that rational design of short peptides constrained by α-helical cyclic pentapeptide modules is able to retain parental high helicity, as well as high affinity and specificity for cFos. These are important steps towards small antagonists of the cJun-cFos interaction that mediates gene transcription in cancer and inflammatory diseases. PMID:23544065

  9. Differential backbone dynamics of companion helices in the extended helical coiled-coil domain of a bacterial chemoreceptor

    PubMed Central

    Bartelli, Nicholas L; Hazelbauer, Gerald L

    2015-01-01

    Cytoplasmic domains of transmembrane bacterial chemoreceptors are largely extended four-helix coiled coils. Previous observations suggested the domain was structurally dynamic. We probed directly backbone dynamics of this domain of the transmembrane chemoreceptor Tar from Escherichia coli using site-directed spin labeling and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. Spin labels were positioned on solvent-exposed helical faces because EPR spectra for such positions reflect primarily polypeptide backbone movements. We acquired spectra for spin-labeled, intact receptor homodimers solubilized in detergent or inserted into native E. coli lipid bilayers in Nanodiscs, characterizing 16 positions distributed throughout the cytoplasmic domain and on both helices of its helical hairpins, one amino terminal to the membrane-distal tight turn (N-helix), and the other carboxyl terminal (C-helix). Detergent solubilization increased backbone dynamics for much of the domain, suggesting that loss of receptor activities upon solubilization reflects wide-spread destabilization. For receptors in either condition, we observed an unanticipated difference between the N- and C-helices. For bilayer-inserted receptors, EPR spectra from sites in the membrane-distal protein-interaction region and throughout the C-helix were typical of well-structured helices. In contrast, for approximately two-thirds of the N-helix, from its origin as the AS-2 helix of the membrane-proximal HAMP domain to the beginning of the membrane-distal protein-interaction region, spectra had a significantly mobile component, estimated by spectral deconvolution to average approximately 15%. Differential helical dynamics suggests a four-helix bundle organization with a pair of core scaffold helices and two more dynamic partner helices. This newly observed feature of chemoreceptor structure could be involved in receptor function. PMID:26257396

  10. Rho-associated coiled-coil kinase (ROCK) protein controls microtubule dynamics in a novel signaling pathway that regulates cell migration.

    PubMed

    Schofield, Alice V; Steel, Rohan; Bernard, Ora

    2012-12-21

    The two members of the Rho-associated coiled-coil kinase (ROCK1 and 2) family are established regulators of actin dynamics that are involved in the regulation of the cell cycle as well as cell motility and invasion. Here, we discovered a novel signaling pathway whereby ROCK regulates microtubule (MT) acetylation via phosphorylation of the tubulin polymerization promoting protein 1 (TPPP1/p25). We show that ROCK phosphorylation of TPPP1 inhibits the interaction between TPPP1 and histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6), which in turn results in increased HDAC6 activity followed by a decrease in MT acetylation. As a consequence, we show that TPPP1 phosphorylation by ROCK increases cell migration and invasion via modulation of cellular acetyl MT levels. We establish here that the ROCK-TPPP1-HDAC6 signaling pathway is important for the regulation of cell migration and invasion.

  11. Rho/Rho-Associated Coiled-Coil Forming Kinase Pathway as Therapeutic Targets for Statins in Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Sawada, Naoki

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: The 3-hydroxy-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors or statins are important therapeutic agents for lowering serum cholesterol levels. However, recent studies suggest that statins may exert atheroprotective effects beyond cholesterol lowering. These so-called “pleiotropic effects” include effects of statins on vascular and inflammatory cells. Thus, it is important to understand whether other signaling pathways that are involved in atherosclerosis could be targets of statins, and if so, whether individuals with “overactivity” of these pathways could benefit from statin therapy, regardless of serum cholesterol level. Recent Advances: Statins inhibit the synthesis of isoprenoids, which are important for the function of the Rho/Rho-associated coiled-coil containing kinase (ROCK) pathway. Indeed, recent studies suggest that inhibition of the Rho/ROCK pathway by statins could lead to improved endothelial function and decreased vascular inflammation and atherosclerosis. Thus, the Rho/ROCK pathway has emerged as an important target of statin therapy for reducing atherosclerosis and possibly cardiovascular disease. Critical Issues: Because atherosclerosis is both a lipid and an inflammatory disease, it is important to understand how inhibition of Rho/ROCK pathway could contribute to statins' antiatherosclerotic effects. Future Directions: The role of ROCKs (ROCK1 and ROCK2) in endothelial, smooth muscle, and inflammatory cells needs to be determined in the context of atherogenesis. This could lead to the development of specific ROCK1 or ROCK2 inhibitors, which could have greater therapeutic benefits with less toxicity. Also, clinical trials will need to be performed to determine whether inhibition of ROCKs, with and without statins, could lead to further reduction in atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 1251–1267. PMID:23919640

  12. Structural Basis of HIV-1 Neutralization by Affinity Matured Fabs Directed against the Internal Trimeric Coiled-Coil of gp41

    SciTech Connect

    Gustchina, Elena; Li, Mi; Louis, John M.; Anderson, D.Eric; Lloyd, John; Frisch, Christian; Bewley, Carole A.; Gustchina, Alla; Wlodawer, Alexander; Clore, G.Marius

    2010-12-03

    The conserved internal trimeric coiled-coil of the N-heptad repeat (N-HR) of HIV-1 gp41 is transiently exposed during the fusion process by forming a pre-hairpin intermediate, thus representing an attractive target for the design of fusion inhibitors and neutralizing antibodies. In previous studies we reported a series of broadly neutralizing mini-antibodies derived from a synthetic naive human combinatorial antibody library by panning against a mimetic of the trimeric N-HR coiled coil, followed by affinity maturation using targeted diversification of the CDR-H2 loop. Here we report crystal structures of the N-HR mimetic 5-Helix with two Fabs that represent the extremes of this series: Fab 8066 is broadly neutralizing across a wide panel of B and C type HIV-1 viruses, whereas Fab 8062 is non-neutralizing. The crystal structures reveal important differences in the conformations of the CDR-H2 loops in the complexes that propagate into other regions of the antigen-antibody interface, and suggest that both neutralization properties and affinity for the target can be attributed, at least in part, to the differences in the interactions of the CDR-H2 loops with the antigen. Furthermore, modeling of the complex of an N-HR trimer with three Fabs suggests that the CDR-H2 loop may be involved in close intermolecular contacts between neighboring antibody molecules, and that such contacts may hinder the formation of complexes between the N-HR trimer and more than one antibody molecule depending on the conformation of the bound CDR-H2 loop which is defined by its interactions with antigen. Comparison with the crystal structure of the complex of 5-Helix with another neutralizing monoclonal antibody known as D5, derived using an entirely different antibody library and panning procedure, reveals remarkable convergence in the optimal sequence and conformation of the CDR-H2 loop.

  13. Missense mutation in DISC1 C-terminal coiled-coil has GSK3β signaling and sex-dependent behavioral effects in mice.

    PubMed

    Dachtler, James; Elliott, Christina; Rodgers, R John; Baillie, George S; Clapcote, Steven J

    2016-01-05

    Disrupted-in-Schizophrenia 1 (DISC1) is a risk factor for schizophrenia and affective disorders. The full-length DISC1 protein consists of an N-terminal 'head' domain and a C-terminal tail domain that contains several predicted coiled-coils, structural motifs involved in protein-protein interactions. To probe the in vivo effects of missense mutation of DISC1's C-terminal tail, we tested mice carrying mutation D453G within a predicted α-helical coiled-coil region. We report that, relative to wild-type littermates, female DISC1(D453G) mice exhibited novelty-induced hyperlocomotion, an anxiogenic profile in the elevated plus-maze and open field tests, and reduced social exploration of unfamiliar mice. Male DISC1(D453G) mice displayed a deficit in passive avoidance, while neither males nor females exhibited any impairment in startle reactivity or prepulse inhibition. Whole brain homogenates showed normal levels of DISC1 protein, but decreased binding of DISC1 to GSK3β, decreased phospho-inhibition of GSK3β at serine 9, and decreased levels of β-catenin in DISC1(D453G) mice of either sex. Interrupted GSK3β signaling may thus be part of the mechanism underlying the behavioral phenotype associated with D453G, in common with the previously described N-terminal domain mutations Q31L and L100P in mice, and the schizophrenia risk-conferring variant R264Q in humans.

  14. Expression, purification, and characterization of coiled coil and leucine zipper domains of C-terminal myosin binding subunit of myosin phosphatase for solution NMR studies.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Alok K; Sawhney, Paramvir; Memisoglu, Gonen; Rigby, Alan C

    2012-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions between MBS and PKG are mediated by the involvement of C-terminal domain of MBS, MBS(CT180) and N-terminal coiled coil (CC) leucine zipper (LZ) domain of PKG-Iα, PKG-Iα1(-59). MBS(CT180) is comprised of three structurally variant domains of non-CC, CC, and LZ nature. Paucity of three-dimensional structural information of these MBS domains precludes atomic level understanding of MBS-PKG contractile complex structure. Here we present data on cloning, expression, and purification of CC, LZ, and CCLZ domains of MBS(CT180) and their biophysical characterization using size exclusion chromatography (SEC), circular dichroism (CD), and two-dimensional (1)H-(15)N HSQC NMR. The methods as detailed resulted in high level protein expression and high milligram quantities of purified isotopically ((15)N and (13)C) enriched polypeptides. SEC, CD, and (1)H-(15)N HSQC NMR experiments demonstrated that recombinantly expressed MBS CC domain is well folded and exists as a dimer within physiologic pH range, which is supported by our previous findings. The dimerization of CC MBS is likely mediated through formation of coiled coil conformation. In contrast, MBS LZ domain was almost unfolded that exists as non-stable low structured monomer within physiologic pH range. Protein folding and stability of MBS LZ was improved as a function of decrease in pH that adopts a folded, stable, and structured conformation at acidified pH 4.5. SEC and NMR analyses of LZ vs. CCLZ MBS domains indicated that inclusion of CC domain partially improves protein folding of LZ domain.

  15. Rationally designed coiled-coil DNA looping peptides control DNA topology

    PubMed Central

    Gowetski, Daniel B.; Kodis, Erin J.; Kahn, Jason D.

    2013-01-01

    Artificial DNA looping peptides were engineered to study the roles of protein and DNA flexibility in controlling the geometry and stability of protein-mediated DNA loops. These LZD (leucine zipper dual-binding) peptides were derived by fusing a second, C-terminal, DNA-binding region onto the GCN4 bZip peptide. Two variants with different coiled-coil lengths were designed to control the relative orientations of DNA bound at each end. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays verified formation of a sandwich complex containing two DNAs and one peptide. Ring closure experiments demonstrated that looping requires a DNA-binding site separation of 310 bp, much longer than the length needed for natural loops. Systematic variation of binding site separation over a series of 10 constructs that cyclize to form 862-bp minicircles yielded positive and negative topoisomers because of two possible writhed geometries. Periodic variation in topoisomer abundance could be modeled using canonical DNA persistence length and torsional modulus values. The results confirm that the LZD peptides are stiffer than natural DNA looping proteins, and they suggest that formation of short DNA loops requires protein flexibility, not unusual DNA bendability. Small, stable, tunable looping peptides may be useful as synthetic transcriptional regulators or components of protein–DNA nanostructures. PMID:23825092

  16. Midbody Targeting of the ESCRT Machinery by a Noncanonical Coiled Coil in CEP55

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Hyung Ho; Elia, Natalie; Ghirlando, Rodolfo; Lippincott-Schwartz, Jennifer; Hurley, James H.

    2008-11-14

    The ESCRT (endosomal sorting complex required for transport) machinery is required for the scission of membrane necks in processes including the budding of HIV-1 and cytokinesis. An essential step in cytokinesis is recruitment of the ESCRT-I complex and the ESCRT-associated protein ALIX to the midbody (the structure that tethers two daughter cells) by the protein CEP55. Biochemical experiments show that peptides from ALIX and the ESCRT-I subunit TSG101 compete for binding to the ESCRT and ALIX-binding region (EABR) of CEP55. We solved the crystal structure of EABR bound to an ALIX peptide at a resolution of 2.0 angstroms. The structure shows that EABR forms an aberrant dimeric parallel coiled coil. Bulky and charged residues at the interface of the two central heptad repeats create asymmetry and a single binding site for an ALIX or TSG101 peptide. Both ALIX and ESCRT-I are required for cytokinesis, which suggests that multiple CEP55 dimers are required for function.

  17. Expression and characterization of transmembrane and coiled-coil domain family 3

    PubMed Central

    Sohn, Wern-Joo; Kim, Jae-Young; Kim, Dongbum; Park, Jeong-A; Lee, Younghee; Kwon, Hyung-Joo

    2016-01-01

    Transmembrane and coiled-coil domain family 3 (TMCC3) has been reported to be expressed in the human brain; however, its function is still unknown. Here, we found that expression of TMCC3 is higher in human whole brain, testis and spinal cord compared to other human tissues. TMCC3 was expressed in mouse developing hind brain, lung, kidney and somites, with strongest expression in the mesenchyme of developing tongue. By expression of recombinant TMCC3 and its deletion mutants, we found that TMCC3 proteins self-assemble to oligomerize. Immunostaining and confocal microscopy data revealed that TMCC3 proteins are localized in endoplasmic reticulum through transmembrane domains. Based on immunoprecipitation and mass spectroscopy data, TMCC3 proteins associate with TMCC3 and 14-3-3 proteins. This supports the idea that TMCC3 proteins form oligomers and that 14-3-3 may be involved in the function of TMCC3. Taken together, these results may be useful for better understanding of uncharacterized function of TMCC3. PMID:27697108

  18. Ndm, a coiled-coil domain protein that suppresses macropinocytosis and has effects on cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Kelsey, Jessica S.; Fastman, Nathan M.; Noratel, Elizabeth F.; Blumberg, Daphne D.

    2012-01-01

    The ampA gene has a role in cell migration in Dictyostelium discoideum. Cells overexpressing AmpA show an increase in cell migration, forming large plaques on bacterial lawns. A second-site suppressor of this ampA-overexpressing phenotype identified a previously uncharacterized gene, ndm, which is described here. The Ndm protein is predicted to contain a coiled-coil BAR-like domain—a domain involved in endocytosis and membrane bending. ndm-knockout and Ndm-monomeric red fluorescent protein–expressing cell lines were used to establish a role for ndm in suppressing endocytosis. An increase in the rate of endocytosis and in the number of endosomes was detected in ndm− cells. During migration ndm− cells formed numerous endocytic cups instead of the broad lamellipodia structure characteristic of moving cells. A second lamellipodia-based function—cell spreading—was also defective in the ndm− cells. The increase in endocytosis and the defect in lamellipodia formation were associated with reduced chemotaxis in ndm− cells. Immunofluorescence results and glutathione S-transferase pull-down assays revealed an association of Ndm with coronin and F-actin. The results establish ndm as a gene important in regulating the balance between formation of endocytic cups and lamellipodia structures. PMID:22809629

  19. Structural Plasticity of Helical Nanotubes Based on Coiled-Coil Assemblies

    DOE PAGES

    Egelman, Edward H.; Xu, C.; DiMaio, F.; ...

    2015-01-22

    Numerous instances can be seen in evolution in which protein quaternary structures have diverged while the sequences of the building blocks have remained fairly conserved. However, the path through which such divergence has taken place is usually not known. We have designed two synthetic 29-residue α-helical peptides, based on the coiled-coil structural motif, that spontaneously self-assemble into helical nanotubes in vitro. Using electron cryomicroscopy with a newly available direct electron detection capability, we can achieve near-atomic resolution of these thin structures. We show how conservative changes of only one or two amino acids result in dramatic changes in quaternary structure,more » in which the assemblies can be switched between two very different forms. This system provides a framework for understanding how small sequence changes in evolution can translate into very large changes in supramolecular structure, a phenomenon that may have significant implications for the de novo design of synthetic peptide assemblies.« less

  20. Polymer therapeutics with a coiled coil motif targeted against murine bcl1 leukemia.

    PubMed

    Pola, Robert; Laga, Richard; Ulbrich, Karel; Sieglová, Irena; Král, Vlastimil; Fábry, Milan; Kabešová, Martina; Kovář, Marek; Pechar, Michal

    2013-03-11

    The specificity of polymer conjugates based on N-(2-hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide (HPMA) bearing cytostatic drugs for cancer cells could be significantly increased by the incorporation of a suitable targeting ligand, such as a monoclonal antibody (mAb). However, direct binding of the protein to the polymer carrier could cause considerable problems, such as decreasing the binding capacity of mAb to its target. Here, we introduce a novel strategy of joining a targeting moiety to a polymeric conjugate with cytostatic drug. The scFv of B1 mAb (specific for BCL1 leukemia cells) was tagged with peptide K ((VAALKEK)4). Peptide E ((VAALEKE)4), which forms a stable coiled coil structure heterodimer with peptide K, was assembled with the HPMA copolymers bearing doxorubicin. Such targeted polymeric conjugates possess very selective and high binding activity toward BCL1 cells. Similarly, targeted polymeric conjugates exert approximately 100 times higher cytostatic activity toward BCL1 cells in comparison to nontargeted conjugates in vitro. At the same time, the conjugates have comparable and rather low cytostatic activity for 38C13 cells, which are used as a negative control, in vitro.

  1. Novel Anti-Nicotine Vaccine Using a Trimeric Coiled-Coil Hapten Carrier.

    PubMed

    Miller, Keith D; Roque, Richard; Clegg, Christopher H

    2014-01-01

    Tobacco addiction represents one of the largest public health problems in the world and is the leading cause of cancer and heart disease, resulting in millions of deaths a year. Vaccines for smoking cessation have shown considerable promise in preclinical models, although functional antibody responses induced in humans are only modestly effective in preventing nicotine entry into the brain. The challenge in generating serum antibodies with a large nicotine binding capacity is made difficult by the fact that this drug is non-immunogenic and must be conjugated as a hapten to a protein carrier. To circumvent the limitations of traditional carriers like keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH), we have synthesized a short trimeric coiled-coil peptide (TCC) that creates a series of B and T cell epitopes with uniform stoichiometry and high density. Here we compared the relative activities of a TCC-nic vaccine and two control KLH-nic vaccines using Alum as an adjuvant or GLA-SE, which contains a synthetic TLR4 agonist formulated in a stable oil-in-water emulsion. The results showed that the TCC's high hapten density correlated with a better immune response in mice as measured by anti-nicotine Ab titer, affinity, and specificity, and was responsible for a reduction in anti-carrier immunogenicity. The Ab responses achieved with this synthetic vaccine resulted in a nicotine binding capacity in serum that could prevent >90% of a nicotine dose equivalent to three smoked cigarettes (0.05 mg/kg) from reaching the brain.

  2. A family of small coiled-coil-forming proteins functioning at the late endosome in yeast.

    PubMed

    Kranz, A; Kinner, A; Kölling, R

    2001-03-01

    The multispanning membrane protein Ste6, a member of the ABC-transporter family, is transported to the yeast vacuole for degradation. To identify functions involved in the intracellular trafficking of polytopic membrane proteins, we looked for functions that block Ste6 transport to the vacuole upon overproduction. In our screen, we identified several known vacuolar protein sorting (VPS) genes (SNF7/VPS32, VPS4, and VPS35) and a previously uncharacterized open reading frame, which we named MOS10 (more of Ste6). Sequence analysis showed that Mos10 is a member of a small family of coiled-coil-forming proteins, which includes Snf7 and Vps20. Deletion mutants of all three genes stabilize Ste6 and show a "class E vps phenotype." Maturation of the vacuolar hydrolase carboxypeptidase Y was affected in the mutants and the endocytic tracer FM4-64 and Ste6 accumulated in a dot or ring-like structure next to the vacuole. Differential centrifugation experiments demonstrated that about half of the hydrophilic proteins Mos10 and Vps20 was membrane associated. The intracellular distribution was further analyzed for Mos10. On sucrose gradients, membrane-associated Mos10 cofractionated with the endosomal t-SNARE Pep12, pointing to an endosomal localization of Mos10. The growth phenotypes of the mutants suggest that the "Snf7-family" members are involved in a cargo-specific event.

  3. Transforming the Energy Landscape of a Coiled-Coil Peptide via Point Mutations.

    PubMed

    Röder, Konstantin; Wales, David J

    2017-03-14

    We analyze the effect of point mutations on the energy landscape of a coiled-coil peptide, GCN4-pLI, where the native state is a parallel tetrameric configuration formed from two identical dimers. Experimentally, a single mutation, E20S, supports both antiparallel and parallel structures. Here, we analyze the potential energy landscapes of the dimeric units for the parent sequence and four mutants, namely E20S, E20A, E20P, and E20G. Despite sharing characteristic funnels containing the parallel and antiparallel structures, the point mutations change some parts of the landscape quite dramatically, and we predict new intermediate structures and characterize the associated heat capacities. For the mutants we predict that kinked intermediate structures facilitate the transition between parallel and antiparallel morphologies, in contrast to the parent sequence. Furthermore, we predict a change from a multifunnel energy landscape in the E20S mutant to a landscape dominated by an underlying single funnel in the parent sequence, with accompanying heat capacity signatures. Our results imply that changes in the landscape due to mutations might provide useful tools for functional protein design.

  4. Confined Discotic Liquid Crystalline Self-Assembly in a Novel Coil-Coil-Disk Triblock Oligomer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Li; Sics, Igors

    2005-03-01

    An asymmetric ABC coil-coil-disk triblock oligomer, based on polyethylene-block-poly(ethylene oxide)-block-pentakis(pentyloxy)triphenylene (PE-b-PEO-b-P5T or EEO-P5T), was successfully synthesized by coupling a hydroxyl group terminated PE-b-PEO diblock oligomer and 2-hydroxy-3,6,7,10,11-pentakis(pentyloxy)triphenylene using oxalyl chloride. The structure and morphology of supramolecular self-assembly in bulk EEO-P5T was studied by small- and wide-angle X-ray scatterings and transmission electron microscopy. The PE block was found to crystallize into interdigitated, extended chain crystals with a chain-tilting angle of 23^o from the lamellar normal, where their melting temperature (Tm) was at 93.8^o C. The PEO block remained in the amorphous state because both its ends were tethered to other two blocks. Bilayer P5Ts, sandwiched between amorphous PEO layers, exhibited a nematic columnar (Ncol) to nematic discotic (ND) transition at ca. 23^o C. Intriguingly, the ND to isotropic (or vise versa) transition was observed to coincide with the melting (or crystallization) of the PE block.

  5. The coiled-coil domain of zebrafish TRPM7 regulates Mg·nucleotide sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Jansen, Chad; Sahni, Jaya; Suzuki, Sayuri; Horgen, F. David; Penner, Reinhold; Fleig, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    TRPM7 is a member of the Transient-Receptor-Potential Melastatin ion channel family. TRPM7 is a unique fusion protein of an ion channel and an α-kinase. Although mammalian TRPM7 is well characterized biophysically and its pivotal role in cancer, ischemia and cardiovascular disease is becoming increasingly evident, the study of TRPM7 in mouse models has been hampered by embryonic lethality of transgenic ablations. In zebrafish, functional loss of TRPM7 (drTRPM7) manifests itself in an array of non-lethal physiological malfunctions. Here, we investigate the regulation of wild type drTRPM7 and multiple C-terminal truncation mutants. We find that the biophysical properties of drTRPM7 are very similar to mammalian TRPM7. However, pharmacological profiling reveals that drTRPM7 is facilitated rather than inhibited by 2-APB, and that the TRPM7 inhibitor waixenicin A has no effect. This is reminiscent of the pharmacological profile of human TRPM6, the sister channel kinase of TRPM7. Furthermore, using truncation mutations, we show that the coiled-coil domain of drTRPM7 is involved in the channel’s regulation by magnesium (Mg) and Mg·adenosine triphosphate (Mg·ATP). We propose that drTRPM7 has two protein domains that regulate inhibition by intracellular magnesium and nucleotides, and one domain that is concerned with sensing magnesium only. PMID:27628598

  6. Balance between Coiled-Coil Stability and Dynamics Regulates Activity of BvgS Sensor Kinase in Bordetella

    PubMed Central

    Lesne, E.; Krammer, E.-M.; Dupre, E.; Locht, C.; Lensink, M. F.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The two-component system BvgAS controls the expression of the virulence regulon of Bordetella pertussis. BvgS is a prototype of bacterial sensor kinases with extracytoplasmic Venus flytrap perception domains. Following its transmembrane segment, BvgS harbors a cytoplasmic Per-Arnt-Sim (PAS) domain and then a predicted 2-helix coiled coil that precede the dimerization-histidine-phosphotransfer domain of the kinase. BvgS homologs have a similar domain organization, or they harbor only a predicted coiled coil between the transmembrane and the dimerization-histidine-phosphotransfer domains. Here, we show that the 2-helix coiled coil of BvgS regulates the enzymatic activity in a mechanical manner. Its marginally stable hydrophobic interface enables a switch between a state of great rotational dynamics in the kinase mode and a more rigid conformation in the phosphatase mode in response to signal perception by the periplasmic domains. We further show that the activity of BvgS is controlled in the same manner if its PAS domain is replaced with the natural α-helical sequences of PAS-less homologs. Clamshell motions of the Venus flytrap domains trigger the shift of the coiled coil’s dynamics. Thus, we have uncovered a general mechanism of regulation for the BvgS family of Venus flytrap-containing two-component sensor kinases. PMID:26933056

  7. Coiled-coil unwinding at the smooth muscle myosin head-rod junction is required for optimal mechanical performance.

    PubMed Central

    Lauzon, A M; Fagnant, P M; Warshaw, D M; Trybus, K M

    2001-01-01

    Myosin II has two heads that are joined together by an alpha-helical coiled-coil rod, which can separate in the region adjacent to the head-rod junction (Trybus, K. M. 1994. J. Biol. Chem. 269:20819-20822). To test whether this flexibility at the head-rod junction is important for the mechanical performance of myosin, we used the optical trap to measure the unitary displacements of heavy meromyosin constructs in which a stable coiled-coil sequence derived from the leucine zipper was introduced into the myosin rod. The zipper was positioned either immediately after the heads (0-hep zip) or following 15 heptads of native sequence (15-hep zip). The unitary displacement (d) decreased from d = 9.7 +/- 0.6 nm for wild-type heavy meromyosin (WT HMM) to d = 0.1 +/- 0.3 nm for the 0-hep zip construct (mean +/- SE). Native values were restored in the 15-hep zip construct (d = 7.5 +/- 0.7 nm). We conclude that flexibility at the myosin head-rod junction, which is provided by an unstable coiled-coil region, is essential for optimal mechanical performance. PMID:11259302

  8. Core residue replacements cause coiled-coil orientation switching in vitro and in vivo: structure-function correlations for osmosensory transporter ProP.

    PubMed

    Tsatskis, Yonit; Kwok, Stanley C; Becker, Elisabeth; Gill, Chad; Smith, Michelle N; Keates, Robert A B; Hodges, Robert S; Wood, Janet M

    2008-01-08

    Protein ProP acts as an osmosensory transporter in diverse bacteria. C-Terminal residues 468-497 of Escherichia coli ProP (ProPEc) form a four-heptad homodimeric alpha-helical coiled coil. Arg 488, at a core heptad a position, causes it to assume an antiparallel orientation. Arg in the hydrophobic core of coiled coils is destabilizing, but Arg 488 forms stabilizing interstrand salt bridges with Asp 475 and Asp 478. Mutation R488I destabilizes the coiled coil and elevates the osmotic pressure at which ProPEc activates. It may switch the coiled-coil orientation to parallel by eliminating the salt bridges and increasing the hydrophobicity of the core. In this study, mutations D475A and D478A, which disrupt the salt bridges without increasing the hydrophobicity of the coiled-coil core, had the expected modest impacts on the osmotic activation of ProPEc. The five-heptad coiled coil of Agrobacterium tumefaciens ProP (ProPAt) has K498 and R505 at a positions. Mutation K498I had little effect on the osmotic activation of ProPAt, and ProPAt-R505I was activated only at high osmotic pressure; on the other hand, the double mutant was refractory to osmotic activation. Both a synthetic peptide corresponding to ProPAt residues 478-516 and its K498I variant maintained the antiparallel orientation. The single R505I substitution created an unstable coiled coil with little orientation preference. Double mutation K498I/R505I switched the alignment, creating a stable parallel coiled coil. In vivo cross-linking showed that the C-termini of ProPAt and ProPAt-K498I/R505I were antiparallel and parallel, respectively. Thus, the antiparallel orientation of the ProP coiled coil is contingent on Arg in the hydrophobic core and interchain salt bridges. Two key amino acid replacements can convert it to a stable parallel structure, in vitro and in vivo. An intermolecular antiparallel coiled coil, present on only some orthologues, lowers the osmotic pressure required to activate ProP. Formation of

  9. Structural Correlation of the Neck Coil with the Coiled-coil (CC1)-Forkhead-associated (FHA) Tandem for Active Kinesin-3 KIF13A.

    PubMed

    Ren, Jinqi; Huo, Lin; Wang, Wenjuan; Zhang, Yong; Li, Wei; Lou, Jizhong; Xu, Tao; Feng, Wei

    2016-02-12

    Processive kinesin motors often contain a coiled-coil neck that controls the directionality and processivity. However, the neck coil (NC) of kinesin-3 is too short to form a stable coiled-coil dimer. Here, we found that the coiled-coil (CC1)-forkhead-associated (FHA) tandem (that is connected to NC by Pro-390) of kinesin-3 KIF13A assembles as an extended dimer. With the removal of Pro-390, the NC-CC1 tandem of KIF13A unexpectedly forms a continuous coiled-coil dimer that can be well aligned into the CC1-FHA dimer. The reverse introduction of Pro-390 breaks the NC-CC1 coiled-coil dimer but provides the intrinsic flexibility to couple NC with the CC1-FHA tandem. Mutations of either NC, CC1, or the FHA domain all significantly impaired the motor activity. Thus, the three elements within the NC-CC1-FHA tandem of KIF13A are structurally interrelated to form a stable dimer for activating the motor. This work also provides the first direct structural evidence to support the formation of a coiled-coil neck by the short characteristic neck domain of kinesin-3.

  10. Structural Correlation of the Neck Coil with the Coiled-coil (CC1)-Forkhead-associated (FHA) Tandem for Active Kinesin-3 KIF13A*

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Jinqi; Huo, Lin; Wang, Wenjuan; Zhang, Yong; Li, Wei; Lou, Jizhong; Xu, Tao; Feng, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Processive kinesin motors often contain a coiled-coil neck that controls the directionality and processivity. However, the neck coil (NC) of kinesin-3 is too short to form a stable coiled-coil dimer. Here, we found that the coiled-coil (CC1)-forkhead-associated (FHA) tandem (that is connected to NC by Pro-390) of kinesin-3 KIF13A assembles as an extended dimer. With the removal of Pro-390, the NC-CC1 tandem of KIF13A unexpectedly forms a continuous coiled-coil dimer that can be well aligned into the CC1-FHA dimer. The reverse introduction of Pro-390 breaks the NC-CC1 coiled-coil dimer but provides the intrinsic flexibility to couple NC with the CC1-FHA tandem. Mutations of either NC, CC1, or the FHA domain all significantly impaired the motor activity. Thus, the three elements within the NC-CC1-FHA tandem of KIF13A are structurally interrelated to form a stable dimer for activating the motor. This work also provides the first direct structural evidence to support the formation of a coiled-coil neck by the short characteristic neck domain of kinesin-3. PMID:26680000

  11. Novel Anti-Nicotine Vaccine Using a Trimeric Coiled-Coil Hapten Carrier

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Keith D.; Roque, Richard; Clegg, Christopher H.

    2014-01-01

    Tobacco addiction represents one of the largest public health problems in the world and is the leading cause of cancer and heart disease, resulting in millions of deaths a year. Vaccines for smoking cessation have shown considerable promise in preclinical models, although functional antibody responses induced in humans are only modestly effective in preventing nicotine entry into the brain. The challenge in generating serum antibodies with a large nicotine binding capacity is made difficult by the fact that this drug is non-immunogenic and must be conjugated as a hapten to a protein carrier. To circumvent the limitations of traditional carriers like keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH), we have synthesized a short trimeric coiled-coil peptide (TCC) that creates a series of B and T cell epitopes with uniform stoichiometry and high density. Here we compared the relative activities of a TCC-nic vaccine and two control KLH-nic vaccines using Alum as an adjuvant or GLA-SE, which contains a synthetic TLR4 agonist formulated in a stable oil-in-water emulsion. The results showed that the TCC's high hapten density correlated with a better immune response in mice as measured by anti-nicotine Ab titer, affinity, and specificity, and was responsible for a reduction in anti-carrier immunogenicity. The Ab responses achieved with this synthetic vaccine resulted in a nicotine binding capacity in serum that could prevent >90% of a nicotine dose equivalent to three smoked cigarettes (0.05 mg/kg) from reaching the brain. PMID:25494044

  12. Crystal structure of the signaling helix coiled-coil domain of the β1 subunit of the soluble guanylyl cyclase

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) is a heterodimeric enzyme that, upon activation by nitric oxide, stimulates the production of the second messenger cGMP. Each sGC subunit harbor four domains three of which are used for heterodimerization: H-NOXA/H-NOBA domain, coiled-coil domain (CC), and catalytic guanylyl cyclase domain. The CC domain has previously been postulated to be part of a larger CC family termed the signaling helix (S-helix) family. Homodimers of sGC have also been observed but are not functionally active yet are likely transient awaiting their intended heterodimeric partner. Results To investigate the structure of the CC S-helix region, we crystallized and determined the structure of the CC domain of the sGCβ1 subunit comprising residues 348-409. The crystal structure was refined to 2.15 Å resolution. Conclusions The CC structure of sGCβ1 revealed a tetrameric arrangement comprised of a dimer of CC dimers. Each monomer is comprised of a long a-helix, a turn near residue P399, and a short second a-helix. The CC structure also offers insights as to how sGC homodimers are not as stable as (functionally) active heterodimers via a possible role for inter-helix salt-bridge formation. The structure also yielded insights into the residues involved in dimerization. In addition, the CC region is also known to harbor a number of congenital and man-made mutations in both membrane and soluble guanylyl cyclases and those function-affecting mutations have been mapped onto the CC structure. This mutant analysis indicated an importance for not only certain dimerization residue positions, but also an important role for other faces of the CC dimer which might perhaps interact with adjacent domains. Our results also extend beyond guanylyl cyclases as the CC structure is, to our knowledge, the first S-helix structure and serves as a model for all S-helix containing family members. PMID:20105301

  13. Crystal Structure of the Signaling Helix Coiled-coil Domain of the b1 Subunit of the Soluble guanylyl Cyclase

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, X.; Beuve, A; van den Akker, F

    2010-01-01

    The soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) is a heterodimeric enzyme that, upon activation by nitric oxide, stimulates the production of the second messenger cGMP. Each sGC subunit harbor four domains three of which are used for heterodimerization: H-NOXA/H-NOBA domain, coiled-coil domain (CC), and catalytic guanylyl cyclase domain. The CC domain has previously been postulated to be part of a larger CC family termed the signaling helix (S-helix) family. Homodimers of sGC have also been observed but are not functionally active yet are likely transient awaiting their intended heterodimeric partner. To investigate the structure of the CC S-helix region, we crystallized and determined the structure of the CC domain of the sGC{beta}1 subunit comprising residues 348-409. The crystal structure was refined to 2.15 {angstrom} resolution. The CC structure of sGC{beta}1 revealed a tetrameric arrangement comprised of a dimer of CC dimers. Each monomer is comprised of a long a-helix, a turn near residue P399, and a short second a-helix. The CC structure also offers insights as to how sGC homodimers are not as stable as (functionally) active heterodimers via a possible role for inter-helix salt-bridge formation. The structure also yielded insights into the residues involved in dimerization. In addition, the CC region is also known to harbor a number of congenital and man-made mutations in both membrane and soluble guanylyl cyclases and those function-affecting mutations have been mapped onto the CC structure. This mutant analysis indicated an importance for not only certain dimerization residue positions, but also an important role for other faces of the CC dimer which might perhaps interact with adjacent domains. Our results also extend beyond guanylyl cyclases as the CC structure is, to our knowledge, the first S-helix structure and serves as a model for all S-helix containing family members.

  14. Crystal structure of the signaling helix coiled-coil domain of the beta1 subunit of the soluble guanylyl cyclase.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiaolei; Beuve, Annie; van den Akker, Focco

    2010-01-27

    The soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) is a heterodimeric enzyme that, upon activation by nitric oxide, stimulates the production of the second messenger cGMP. Each sGC subunit harbor four domains three of which are used for heterodimerization: H-NOXA/H-NOBA domain, coiled-coil domain (CC), and catalytic guanylyl cyclase domain. The CC domain has previously been postulated to be part of a larger CC family termed the signaling helix (S-helix) family. Homodimers of sGC have also been observed but are not functionally active yet are likely transient awaiting their intended heterodimeric partner. To investigate the structure of the CC S-helix region, we crystallized and determined the structure of the CC domain of the sGCbeta1 subunit comprising residues 348-409. The crystal structure was refined to 2.15 A resolution. The CC structure of sGCbeta1 revealed a tetrameric arrangement comprised of a dimer of CC dimers. Each monomer is comprised of a long a-helix, a turn near residue P399, and a short second a-helix. The CC structure also offers insights as to how sGC homodimers are not as stable as (functionally) active heterodimers via a possible role for inter-helix salt-bridge formation. The structure also yielded insights into the residues involved in dimerization. In addition, the CC region is also known to harbor a number of congenital and man-made mutations in both membrane and soluble guanylyl cyclases and those function-affecting mutations have been mapped onto the CC structure. This mutant analysis indicated an importance for not only certain dimerization residue positions, but also an important role for other faces of the CC dimer which might perhaps interact with adjacent domains. Our results also extend beyond guanylyl cyclases as the CC structure is, to our knowledge, the first S-helix structure and serves as a model for all S-helix containing family members.

  15. Adenovirus E4-ORF3-dependent relocalization of TIF1{alpha} and TIF1{gamma} relies on access to the Coiled-Coil motif

    SciTech Connect

    Vink, Elizabeth I.; Yondola, Mark A.; Wu, Kai; Hearing, Patrick

    2012-01-20

    The adenovirus E4-ORF3 protein promotes viral replication by relocalizing cellular proteins into nuclear track structures, interfering with potential anti-viral activities. E4-ORF3 targets transcriptional intermediary factor 1 alpha (TIF1{alpha}), but not homologous TIF1{beta}. Here, we introduce TIF1{gamma} as a novel E4-ORF3-interacting partner. E4-ORF3 relocalizes endogenous TIF1{gamma} in virus-infected cells in vivo and binds to TIF1{gamma} in vitro. We used the homologous nature, yet differing binding capabilities, of these proteins to study how E4-ORF3 targets proteins for track localization. We mapped the ability of E4-ORF3 to interact with specific TIF1 subdomains, demonstrating that E4-ORF3 interacts with the Coiled-Coil domains of TIF1{alpha}, TIF1{beta}, and TIF1{gamma}, and that the C-terminal half of TIF1{beta} interferes with this interaction. The results of E4-ORF3-directed TIF1 protein relocalization assays performed in vivo were verified using coimmunoprecipitation assays in vitro. These results suggest that E4-ORF3 targets proteins for relocalization through a loosely homologous sequence dependent on accessibility.

  16. Second coiled-coil domain of KCNQ channel controls current expression and subfamily specific heteromultimerization by salt bridge networks

    PubMed Central

    Nakajo, Koichi; Kubo, Yoshihiro

    2008-01-01

    KCNQ channels carry the slowly activating, voltage-dependent M-current in excitable cells such as neurons. Although the KCNQ2 homomultimer can form a functional voltage-gated K+ channel, heteromultimerization with KCNQ3 produces a > 10-fold increase in current amplitude. All KCNQ channels contain double coiled-coil domains (TCC1 and TCC2, or A-domain Head and Tail), of which TCC2 (A-domain Tail) is thought to be important for subunit recognition, channel assembly and surface expression. The mechanism by which TCC2 recognizes and associates with its partner is not fully understood, however. Our aim in the present study was to elucidate the recognition mechanism by examining the phenotypes of TCC2-deletion mutants, TCC2-swapped chimeras and point mutants. Electrophysiological analysis using Xenopus oocytes under two-electrode voltage clamp revealed that homotetrameric KCNQ3 TCC2 is a negative regulator of current expression in the absence of KCNQ2 TCC2. Recent structural analysis of KCNQ4 TCC2 revealed the presence of intercoil salt bridge networks. We therefore swapped the sign of the charged residues reportedly involved in the salt bridge formation and functionally confirmed that the intercoil salt bridge network is responsible for the subunit recognition between KCNQ2 and KCNQ3. Finally, we constructed TCC2-swapped KCNQ2/KCNQ3 mutants with KCNQ1 TCC2 or GCN4-pLI, a coiled-coil domain from an unrelated protein, and found that TCC2 is substitutable and even GCN4-pLI can work as a substitute for TCC2. Our present data provide some new insights into the role played by TCC2 during current expression, and also provide functional evidence of the importance of the intercoil salt bridge network for subunit recognition and coiled-coil formation, as is suggested by recent crystallographic data. PMID:18440995

  17. Control of Recombination Directionality by the Listeria Phage A118 Protein Gp44 and the Coiled-Coil Motif of Its Serine Integrase.

    PubMed

    Mandali, Sridhar; Gupta, Kushol; Dawson, Anthony R; Van Duyne, Gregory D; Johnson, Reid C

    2017-06-01

    The serine integrase of phage A118 catalyzes integrative recombination between attP on the phage and a specific attB locus on the chromosome of Listeria monocytogenes, but it is unable to promote excisive recombination between the hybrid attL and attR sites found on the integrated prophage without assistance by a recombination directionality factor (RDF). We have identified and characterized the phage-encoded RDF Gp44, which activates the A118 integrase for excision and inhibits integration. Gp44 binds to the C-terminal DNA binding domain of integrase, and we have localized the primary binding site to be within the mobile coiled-coil (CC) motif but distinct from the distal tip of the CC that is required for recombination. This interaction is sufficient to inhibit integration, but a second interaction involving the N-terminal end of Gp44 is also required to activate excision. We provide evidence that these two contacts modulate the trajectory of the CC motifs as they extend out from the integrase core in a manner dependent upon the identities of the four att sites. Our results support a model whereby Gp44 shapes the Int-bound complexes to control which att sites can synapse and recombine.IMPORTANCE Serine integrases mediate directional recombination between bacteriophage and bacterial chromosomes. These highly regulated site-specific recombination reactions are integral to the life cycle of temperate phage and, in the case of Listeria monocytogenes lysogenized by A118 family phage, are an essential virulence determinant. Serine integrases are also utilized as tools for genetic engineering and synthetic biology because of their exquisite unidirectional control of the DNA exchange reaction. Here, we identify and characterize the recombination directionality factor (RDF) that activates excision and inhibits integration reactions by the phage A118 integrase. We provide evidence that the A118 RDF binds to and modulates the trajectory of the long coiled-coil motif that

  18. PspF-binding domain PspA1-144 and the PspA·F complex: New insights into the coiled-coil-dependent regulation of AAA+ proteins.

    PubMed

    Osadnik, Hendrik; Schöpfel, Michael; Heidrich, Eyleen; Mehner, Denise; Lilie, Hauke; Parthier, Christoph; Risselada, H Jelger; Grubmüller, Helmut; Stubbs, Milton T; Brüser, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    Phage shock protein A (PspA) belongs to the highy conserved PspA/IM30 family and is a key component of the stress inducible Psp system in Escherichia coli. One of its central roles is the regulatory interaction with the transcriptional activator of this system, the σ(54) enhancer-binding protein PspF, a member of the AAA+ protein family. The PspA/F regulatory system has been intensively studied and serves as a paradigm for AAA+ enzyme regulation by trans-acting factors. However, the molecular mechanism of how exactly PspA controls the activity of PspF and hence σ(54) -dependent expression of the psp genes is still unclear. To approach this question, we identified the minimal PspF-interacting domain of PspA, solved its structure, determined its affinity to PspF and the dissociation kinetics, identified residues that are potentially important for PspF regulation and analyzed effects of their mutation on PspF in vivo and in vitro. Our data indicate that several characteristics of AAA+ regulation in the PspA·F complex resemble those of the AAA+ unfoldase ClpB, with both proteins being regulated by a structurally highly conserved coiled-coil domain. The convergent evolution of both regulatory domains points to a general mechanism to control AAA+ activity for divergent physiologic tasks via coiled-coil domains.

  19. Design considerations in coiled-coil fusion constructs for the structural determination of a problematic region of the human cardiac myosin rod.

    PubMed

    Andreas, Michael P; Ajay, Gautam; Gellings, Jaclyn A; Rayment, Ivan

    2017-07-22

    X-ray structural determination of segments of the myosin rod has proved difficult because of the strong salt-dependent aggregation properties and repeating pattern of charges on the surface of the coiled-coil that lead to the formation of paracrystals. This problem has been resolved in part through the use of globular assembly domains that improve protein folding and prevent aggregation. The primary consideration now in designing coiled-coil fusion constructs for myosin is deciding where to truncate the coiled-coil and which amino acid residues to include from the folding domain. This is especially important for myosin that contains numerous regions of low predicted coiled-coil propensity. Here we describe the strategy adopted to determine the structure of the region that extends from Arg1677 - Leu1797 that included two areas that do not show a strong sequence signature of a conventional left-handed coiled coil or canonical heptad repeat. This demonstrates again that, with careful choice of fusion constructs, overlapping structures exhibit very similar conformations for the myosin rod fragments in the canonical regions. However, conformational variability is seen around Leu1706 which is a hot spot for cardiomyopathy mutations suggesting that this might be important for function. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. The coiled-coil and nucleotide binding domains of the Potato Rx disease resistance protein function in pathogen recognition and signaling.

    PubMed

    Rairdan, Gregory J; Collier, Sarah M; Sacco, Melanie A; Baldwin, Thomas T; Boettrich, Teresa; Moffett, Peter

    2008-03-01

    Plant genomes encode large numbers of nucleotide binding and leucine-rich repeat (NB-LRR) proteins, some of which mediate the recognition of pathogen-encoded proteins. Following recognition, the initiation of a resistance response is thought to be mediated by the domains present at the N termini of NB-LRR proteins, either a Toll and Interleukin-1 Receptor or a coiled-coil (CC) domain. In order to understand the role of the CC domain in NB-LRR function, we have undertaken a systematic structure-function analysis of the CC domain of the potato (Solanum tuberosum) CC-NB-LRR protein Rx, which confers resistance to Potato virus X. We show that the highly conserved EDVID motif of the CC domain mediates an intramolecular interaction that is dependent on several domains within the rest of the Rx protein, including the NB and LRR domains. Other conserved and nonconserved regions of the CC domain mediate the interaction with the Ran GTPase-activating protein, RanGAP2, a protein required for Rx function. Furthermore, we show that the Rx NB domain is sufficient for inducing cell death typical of hypersensitive plant resistance responses. We describe a model of CC-NB-LRR function wherein the LRR and CC domains coregulate the signaling activity of the NB domain in a recognition-specific manner.

  1. Crystal structure of TRIM20 C-terminal coiled-coil/B30.2 fragment: implications for the recognition of higher order oligomers.

    PubMed

    Weinert, Christopher; Morger, Damien; Djekic, Aleksandra; Grütter, Markus G; Mittl, Peer R E

    2015-06-04

    Many tripartite motif-containing (TRIM) proteins, comprising RING-finger, B-Box, and coiled-coil domains, carry additional B30.2 domains on the C-terminus of the TRIM motif and are considered to be pattern recognition receptors involved in the detection of higher order oligomers (e.g. viral capsid proteins). To investigate the spatial architecture of domains in TRIM proteins we determined the crystal structure of the TRIM20Δ413 fragment at 2.4 Å resolution. This structure comprises the central helical scaffold (CHS) and C-terminal B30.2 domains and reveals an anti-parallel arrangement of CHS domains placing the B-box domains 170 Å apart from each other. Small-angle X-ray scattering confirmed that the linker between CHS and B30.2 domains is flexible in solution. The crystal structure suggests an interaction between the B30.2 domain and an extended stretch in the CHS domain, which involves residues that are mutated in the inherited disease Familial Mediterranean Fever. Dimerization of B30.2 domains by means of the CHS domain is crucial for TRIM20 to bind pro-IL-1β in vitro. To exemplify how TRIM proteins could be involved in binding higher order oligomers we discuss three possible models for the TRIM5α/HIV-1 capsid interaction assuming different conformations of B30.2 domains.

  2. All-atom simulations and free-energy calculations of coiled-coil peptides with lipid bilayers: binding strength, structural transition, and effect on lipid dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Sun Young; Lee, Hwankyu

    2016-01-01

    Peptides E and K, which are synthetic coiled-coil peptides for membrane fusion, were simulated with lipid bilayers composed of lipids and cholesterols at different ratios using all-atom models. We first calculated free energies of binding from umbrella sampling simulations, showing that both E and K peptides tend to adsorb onto the bilayer surface, which occurs more strongly in the bilayer composed of smaller lipid headgroups. Then, unrestrained simulations show that K peptides more deeply insert into the bilayer with partially retaining the helical structure, while E peptides less insert and predominantly become random coils, indicating the structural transition from helices to random coils, in quantitative agreement with experiments. This is because K peptides electrostatically interact with lipid phosphates, as well as because hydrocarbons of lysines of K peptide are longer than those of glutamic acids of E peptide and thus form stronger hydrophobic interactions with lipid tails. This deeper insertion of K peptide increases the bilayer dynamics and a vacancy below the peptide, leading to the rearrangement of smaller lipids. These findings help explain the experimentally observed or proposed differences in the insertion depth, binding strength, and structural transition of E and K peptides, and support the snorkeling effect. PMID:26926570

  3. All-atom simulations and free-energy calculations of coiled-coil peptides with lipid bilayers: binding strength, structural transition, and effect on lipid dynamics.

    PubMed

    Woo, Sun Young; Lee, Hwankyu

    2016-03-01

    Peptides E and K, which are synthetic coiled-coil peptides for membrane fusion, were simulated with lipid bilayers composed of lipids and cholesterols at different ratios using all-atom models. We first calculated free energies of binding from umbrella sampling simulations, showing that both E and K peptides tend to adsorb onto the bilayer surface, which occurs more strongly in the bilayer composed of smaller lipid headgroups. Then, unrestrained simulations show that K peptides more deeply insert into the bilayer with partially retaining the helical structure, while E peptides less insert and predominantly become random coils, indicating the structural transition from helices to random coils, in quantitative agreement with experiments. This is because K peptides electrostatically interact with lipid phosphates, as well as because hydrocarbons of lysines of K peptide are longer than those of glutamic acids of E peptide and thus form stronger hydrophobic interactions with lipid tails. This deeper insertion of K peptide increases the bilayer dynamics and a vacancy below the peptide, leading to the rearrangement of smaller lipids. These findings help explain the experimentally observed or proposed differences in the insertion depth, binding strength, and structural transition of E and K peptides, and support the snorkeling effect.

  4. All-atom simulations and free-energy calculations of coiled-coil peptides with lipid bilayers: binding strength, structural transition, and effect on lipid dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woo, Sun Young; Lee, Hwankyu

    2016-03-01

    Peptides E and K, which are synthetic coiled-coil peptides for membrane fusion, were simulated with lipid bilayers composed of lipids and cholesterols at different ratios using all-atom models. We first calculated free energies of binding from umbrella sampling simulations, showing that both E and K peptides tend to adsorb onto the bilayer surface, which occurs more strongly in the bilayer composed of smaller lipid headgroups. Then, unrestrained simulations show that K peptides more deeply insert into the bilayer with partially retaining the helical structure, while E peptides less insert and predominantly become random coils, indicating the structural transition from helices to random coils, in quantitative agreement with experiments. This is because K peptides electrostatically interact with lipid phosphates, as well as because hydrocarbons of lysines of K peptide are longer than those of glutamic acids of E peptide and thus form stronger hydrophobic interactions with lipid tails. This deeper insertion of K peptide increases the bilayer dynamics and a vacancy below the peptide, leading to the rearrangement of smaller lipids. These findings help explain the experimentally observed or proposed differences in the insertion depth, binding strength, and structural transition of E and K peptides, and support the snorkeling effect.

  5. Variants of the Sir4 Coiled-Coil Domain Improve Binding to Sir3 for Heterochromatin Formation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Samel, Anke; Rudner, Adam; Ehrenhofer-Murray, Ann E.

    2017-01-01

    Heterochromatin formation in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is characterized by the assembly of the Silent Information Regulator (SIR) complex, which consists of the histone deacetylase Sir2 and the structural components Sir3 and Sir4, and binds to unmodified nucleosomes to provide gene silencing. Sir3 contains an AAA+ ATPase-like domain, and mutations in an exposed loop on the surface of this domain abrogate Sir3 silencing function in vivo, as well in vitro binding to the Sir2/Sir4 subcomplex. Here, we found that the removal of a single methyl group in the C-terminal coiled-coil domain (mutation T1314S) of Sir4 was sufficient to restore silencing at the silent mating-type loci HMR and HML to a Sir3 version with a mutation in this loop. Restoration of telomeric silencing required further mutations of Sir4 (E1310V and K1325R). Significantly, these mutations in Sir4 restored in vitro complex formation between Sir3 and the Sir4 coiled-coil, indicating that the improved affinity between Sir3 and Sir4 is responsible for the restoration of silencing. Altogether, these observations highlight remarkable properties of selected amino-acid changes at the Sir3-Sir4 interface that modulate the affinity of the two proteins. PMID:28188183

  6. An engineered right-handed coiled coil domain imparts extreme thermostability to the KcsA channel.

    PubMed

    Yuchi, Zhiguang; Pau, Victor P T; Lu, Bridget X; Junop, Murray; Yang, Daniel S C

    2009-11-01

    KcsA, a potassium channel from Streptomyces lividans, was the first ion channel to have its transmembrane domain structure determined by crystallography. Previously we have shown that its C-terminal cytoplasmic domain is crucial for the thermostability and the expression of the channel. Expression was almost abolished in its absence, but could be rescued by the presence of an artificial left-handed coiled coil tetramerization domain GCN4. In this study, we noticed that the handedness of GCN4 is not the same as the bundle crossing of KcsA. Therefore, a compatible right-handed coiled coil structure was identified from the Protein Data Bank and used to replace the C-terminal domain of KcsA. The hybrid channel exhibited a higher expression level than the wild-type and is extremely thermostable. Surprisingly, this stable hybrid channel is equally active as the wild-type channel in conducting potassium ions through a lipid bilayer at an acidic pH. We suggest that a similar engineering strategy could be applied to other ion channels for both functional and structural studies.

  7. Directed assembly of defined oligomeric photosynthetic reaction centres through adaptation with programmable extra-membrane coiled-coil interfaces.

    PubMed

    Swainsbury, David J K; Harniman, Robert L; Di Bartolo, Natalie D; Liu, Juntai; Harper, William F M; Corrie, Alexander S; Jones, Michael R

    2016-12-01

    A challenge associated with the utilisation of bioenergetic proteins in new, synthetic energy transducing systems is achieving efficient and predictable self-assembly of individual components, both natural and man-made, into a functioning macromolecular system. Despite progress with water-soluble proteins, the challenge of programming self-assembly of integral membrane proteins into non-native macromolecular architectures remains largely unexplored. In this work it is shown that the assembly of dimers, trimers or tetramers of the naturally monomeric purple bacterial reaction centre can be directed by augmentation with an α-helical peptide that self-associates into extra-membrane coiled-coil bundle. Despite this induced oligomerisation the assembled reaction centres displayed normal spectroscopic properties, implying preserved structural and functional integrity. Mixing of two reaction centres modified with mutually complementary α-helical peptides enabled the assembly of heterodimers in vitro, pointing to a generic strategy for assembling hetero-oligomeric complexes from diverse modified or synthetic components. Addition of two coiled-coil peptides per reaction centre monomer was also tolerated despite the challenge presented to the pigment-protein assembly machinery of introducing multiple self-associating sequences. These findings point to a generalised approach where oligomers or longer range assemblies of multiple light harvesting and/or redox proteins can be constructed in a manner that can be genetically-encoded, enabling the construction of new, designed bioenergetic systems in vivo or in vitro.

  8. Structure of a truncated form of leucine zipper II of JIP3 reveals an unexpected antiparallel coiled-coil arrangement.

    PubMed

    Llinas, Paola; Chenon, Mélanie; Nguyen, T Quyen; Moreira, Catia; de Régibus, Annélie; Coquard, Aline; Ramos, Maria J; Guérois, Raphaël; Fernandes, Pedro A; Ménétrey, Julie

    2016-03-01

    JIP3 and JIP4, two highly related scaffolding proteins for MAP kinases, are binding partners for two molecular motors as well as for the small G protein ARF6. The leucine zipper II (LZII) region of JIP3/4 is the binding site for these three partners. Previously, the crystal structure of ARF6 bound to JIP4 revealed LZII in a parallel coiled-coil arrangement. Here, the crystal structure of an N-terminally truncated form of LZII of JIP3 alone shows an unexpected antiparallel arrangement. Using molecular dynamics and modelling, the stability of this antiparallel LZII arrangement, as well as its specificity for ARF6, were investigated. This study highlights that N-terminal truncation of LZII can change its coiled-coil orientation without affecting its overall stability. Further, a conserved buried asparagine residue was pinpointed as a possible structural determinant for this dramatic structural rearrangement. Thus, LZII of JIP3/4 is a versatile structural motif, modifications of which can impact partner recognition and thus biological function.

  9. Variants of the Sir4 Coiled-Coil Domain Improve Binding to Sir3 for Heterochromatin Formation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Samel, Anke; Rudner, Adam; Ehrenhofer-Murray, Ann E

    2017-04-03

    Heterochromatin formation in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is characterized by the assembly of the Silent Information Regulator (SIR) complex, which consists of the histone deacetylase Sir2 and the structural components Sir3 and Sir4, and binds to unmodified nucleosomes to provide gene silencing. Sir3 contains an AAA(+) ATPase-like domain, and mutations in an exposed loop on the surface of this domain abrogate Sir3 silencing function in vivo, as well in vitro binding to the Sir2/Sir4 subcomplex. Here, we found that the removal of a single methyl group in the C-terminal coiled-coil domain (mutation T1314S) of Sir4 was sufficient to restore silencing at the silent mating-type loci HMR and HML to a Sir3 version with a mutation in this loop. Restoration of telomeric silencing required further mutations of Sir4 (E1310V and K1325R). Significantly, these mutations in Sir4 restored in vitro complex formation between Sir3 and the Sir4 coiled-coil, indicating that the improved affinity between Sir3 and Sir4 is responsible for the restoration of silencing. Altogether, these observations highlight remarkable properties of selected amino-acid changes at the Sir3-Sir4 interface that modulate the affinity of the two proteins.

  10. [Correlation between the expression level of coiled-coil domain-containing protein 80 and obesity].

    PubMed

    Li, Liangli; Zhang, Yifeng; Du, Hongyi; He, Ping; Li, Guiling; Liu, Xiuwei; Zhao, Shujing; Wu, Min; He, Gengsheng

    2015-03-01

    To explore the relationship between expression of coiled-coil domain-containing protein 80(CCDC80) and obesity in serum and adipose tissues. A cross-sectional survey was conducted in a hospital in Tangshan in September 2010. 100 people including 78 healthy people and 22 with type-2 diabetes were recruited. Another 36 female patients with benign tumor of Obstetrics and Gynecology were also recruited. Demographic characteristics and serum samples were collected from all subjects, basic biochemical indicators were tested. All subjects were divided into 'Normal Weight' and 'Overweight and Obese' according to their BMI (BMI <24.0 kg/m(2); BMI≥24 kg/m(2)). Serum CCDC80 of the 100 subjects was detected by ELISA. Visceral and subcutaneous fat were derived from the other 36 female subjects, and Real-time PCR was used to detect CCDC80 mRNA expression in adipose tissues. Pearson correlation and multiple linear regression were used to analyze the correlation between serum or adipose CCDC80 expression and waist, BMI, and other biochemical indicators. The age of 100 subjects was (52.9±8.4) years old. 44% of them were women (44 cases) and 56% of them were men (56 cases). After dividing them into three groups according to their BMI, covariance analysis were conducted, and age and gender were adjusted. The HDL-C level was significantly different among three groups (F = 10.73, P < 0.001): 'Overweight and obese combined with diabetes' group ((0.90±0.06) mmol/L)< 'Overweight and obese' group ((1.14±0.04) mmol/L) < 'Normal weight' group ((1.28±0.05) mmol/L). The adjusted expression of serum CCDC80 of the 100 subjects was (5.84±0.16) pg/ml, (5.81±0.98) pg/ml among men and (5.97±0.89) pg/ml among women, and there was no significant difference (t = -0.812, P = 0.419) between genders. ANOVA revealed that there was no significant differences of the expression of serum CCDC80 among three groups (F = 1.06, P = 0.351), 'Normal weight' group was (5.84±0.16) pg/ml, 'overweight and

  11. Neither helix in the coiled coil region of the axle of F1-ATPase plays a significant role in torque production.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Mohammad Delawar; Furuike, Shou; Maki, Yasushi; Adachi, Kengo; Suzuki, Toshiharu; Kohori, Ayako; Itoh, Hiroyasu; Yoshida, Masasuke; Kinosita, Kazuhiko

    2008-11-15

    F(1)-ATPase is an ATP-driven rotary molecular motor in which the central gamma-subunit rotates inside the cylinder made of alpha(3)beta(3) subunits. The amino and carboxy termini of the gamma-subunit form the axle, an alpha-helical coiled coil that deeply penetrates the stator cylinder. We previously truncated the axle step by step, starting with the longer carboxy terminus and then cutting both termini at the same levels, resulting in a slower yet considerably powerful rotation. Here we examine the role of each helix by truncating only the carboxy terminus by 25-40 amino-acid residues. Longer truncation impaired the stability of the motor complex severely: 40 deletions failed to yield rotating the complex. Up to 36 deletions, however, the mutants produced an apparent torque at nearly half of the wild-type torque, independent of truncation length. Time-averaged rotary speeds were low because of load-dependent stumbling at 120 degrees intervals, even with saturating ATP. Comparison with our previous work indicates that half the normal torque is produced at the orifice of the stator. The very tip of the carboxy terminus adds the other half, whereas neither helix in the middle of the axle contributes much to torque generation and the rapid progress of catalysis. None of the residues of the entire axle played a specific decisive role in rotation.

  12. Neither Helix in the Coiled Coil Region of the Axle of F1-ATPase Plays a Significant Role in Torque Production

    PubMed Central

    Hossain, Mohammad Delawar; Furuike, Shou; Maki, Yasushi; Adachi, Kengo; Suzuki, Toshiharu; Kohori, Ayako; Itoh, Hiroyasu; Yoshida, Masasuke; Kinosita, Kazuhiko

    2008-01-01

    F1-ATPase is an ATP-driven rotary molecular motor in which the central γ-subunit rotates inside the cylinder made of α3β3 subunits. The amino and carboxy termini of the γ-subunit form the axle, an α-helical coiled coil that deeply penetrates the stator cylinder. We previously truncated the axle step by step, starting with the longer carboxy terminus and then cutting both termini at the same levels, resulting in a slower yet considerably powerful rotation. Here we examine the role of each helix by truncating only the carboxy terminus by 25–40 amino-acid residues. Longer truncation impaired the stability of the motor complex severely: 40 deletions failed to yield rotating the complex. Up to 36 deletions, however, the mutants produced an apparent torque at nearly half of the wild-type torque, independent of truncation length. Time-averaged rotary speeds were low because of load-dependent stumbling at 120° intervals, even with saturating ATP. Comparison with our previous work indicates that half the normal torque is produced at the orifice of the stator. The very tip of the carboxy terminus adds the other half, whereas neither helix in the middle of the axle contributes much to torque generation and the rapid progress of catalysis. None of the residues of the entire axle played a specific decisive role in rotation. PMID:18708468

  13. Stability of 100 homo and heterotypic coiled-coil a-a' pairs for ten amino acids (A, L, I, V, N, K, S, T, E, and R).

    PubMed

    Acharya, Asha; Rishi, Vikas; Vinson, Charles

    2006-09-26

    We present the thermal stability monitored by circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy at 222 nm of 100 heterodimers that contain all possible coiled-coil a-a' pairs for 10 amino acids (I, V, L, N, A, K S, T, E, and R). This includes the stability of 36 heterodimers for 6 amino acids (I, V, L, N, A, and K) previously described and 64 new heterodimers including the 4 amino acids (S, T, E, and R). We have calculated a double mutant alanine thermodynamic cycle to determine a-a' pair coupling energies to evaluate which a-a' pairs encourage specific dimerization partners. The four new homotypic a-a' pairs (T-T, S-S, R-R, E-E) are repulsive relative to A-A and have destabilizing coupling energies. Among the 90 heterotypic a-a' pairs, the stabilizing coupling energies contain lysine or arginine paired with either an aliphatic or a polar amino acid. The range in coupling energies for each amino acid reveals its potential to regulate dimerization specificity. The a-a' pairs containing isoleucine and asparagine have the greatest range in coupling energies and thus contribute dramatically to dimerization specificity, which is to encourage homodimerization. In contrast, the a-a' pairs containing charged amino acids (K, R, and E) show the least range in coupling energies and promiscuously encourage heterodimerization.

  14. Amino acid duplication in the coiled-coil structure of collagen XVII alters its maturation and trimerization causing mild junctional epidermolysis bullosa.

    PubMed

    Kroeger, Jasmin K; Hofmann, Silke C; Leppert, Juna; Has, Cristina; Franzke, Claus-Werner

    2017-02-01

    The function and stability of collagens depend on the accurate triple helix formation of three distinct polypeptide chains. Disruption of this triple-helical structure can result in connective-tissue disorders. Triple helix formation is thought to depend on three-stranded coiled-coil oligomerization sites within non-collagenous domains. However, only little is known about the physiological relevance of these coiled-coil structures. Transmembrane collagen XVII, also known as 180 kDa bullous pemphigoid antigen provides mechanical stability through the anchorage of epithelial cells to the basement membrane. Mutations in the collagen XVII gene, COL17A1, cause junctional epidermolysis bullosa (JEB), characterized by chronic trauma-induced skin blistering. Here we exploited a novel naturally occurring COL17A1 mutation, leading to an in-frame lysine duplication within the coiled-coil structure of the juxtamembranous NC16A domain of collagen XVII, which resulted in a mild phenotype of JEB due to reduced membrane-anchored collagen XVII molecules. This mutation causes structural changes in the mutant molecule and interferes with its maturation. The destabilized coiled-coil structure of the mutant collagen XVII unmasks a furin cleavage site that results in excessive and non-physiological ectodomain shedding during its maturation. Furthermore, it decreases its triple-helical stability due to defective coiled-coil oligomerization, which makes it highly susceptible to proteolytic degradation. As a consequence of altered maturation and decreased stability of collagen XVII trimers, reduced collagen XVII is incorporated into the cell membrane, resulting in compromised dermal-epidermal adhesion. Taken together, using this genetic model, we provide the first proof that alteration of the coiled-coil structure destabilizes oligomerization and impairs physiological shedding of collagen XVII in vivo. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For

  15. A De Novo Designed Coiled-Coil Peptide with a Reversible pH-Induced Oligomerization Switch.

    PubMed

    Lizatović, Robert; Aurelius, Oskar; Stenström, Olof; Drakenberg, Torbjörn; Akke, Mikael; Logan, Derek T; André, Ingemar

    2016-06-07

    Protein conformational switches have many useful applications but are difficult to design rationally. Here we demonstrate how the isoenergetic energy landscape of higher-order coiled coils can enable the formation of an oligomerization switch by insertion of a single destabilizing element into an otherwise stable computationally designed scaffold. We describe a de novo designed peptide that was discovered to switch between a parallel symmetric pentamer at pH 8 and a trimer of antiparallel dimers at pH 6. The transition between pentamer and hexamer is caused by changes in the protonation states of glutamatic acid residues with highly upshifted pKa values in both oligomer forms. The drastic conformational change coupled with the narrow pH range makes the peptide sequence an attractive candidate for introduction of pH sensing into other proteins. The results highlight the remarkable ability of simple-α helices to self-assemble into a vast range of structural states.

  16. The Structures of Coiled-Coil Domains from Type III Secretion System Translocators Reveal Homology to Pore-Forming Toxins

    SciTech Connect

    Barta, Michael L.; Dickenson, Nicholas E.; Patil, Mrinalini; Keightley, Andrew; Wyckoff, Gerald J.; Picking, William D.; Picking, Wendy L.; Geisbrecht, Brian V.

    2012-03-26

    Many pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria utilize type III secretion systems (T3SSs) to alter the normal functions of target cells. Shigella flexneri uses its T3SS to invade human intestinal cells to cause bacillary dysentery (shigellosis) that is responsible for over one million deaths per year. The Shigella type III secretion apparatus is composed of a basal body spanning both bacterial membranes and an exposed oligomeric needle. Host altering effectors are secreted through this energized unidirectional conduit to promote bacterial invasion. The active needle tip complex of S. flexneri is composed of a tip protein, IpaD, and two pore-forming translocators, IpaB and IpaC. While the atomic structure of IpaD has been elucidated and studied, structural data on the hydrophobic translocators from the T3SS family remain elusive. We present here the crystal structures of a protease-stable fragment identified within the N-terminal regions of IpaB from S. flexneri and SipB from Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium determined at 2.1 {angstrom} and 2.8 {angstrom} limiting resolution, respectively. These newly identified domains are composed of extended-length (114 {angstrom} in IpaB and 71 {angstrom} in SipB) coiled-coil motifs that display a high degree of structural homology to one another despite the fact that they share only 21% sequence identity. Further structural comparisons also reveal substantial similarity to the coiled-coil regions of pore-forming proteins from other Gram-negative pathogens, notably, colicin Ia. This suggests that these mechanistically separate and functionally distinct membrane-targeting proteins may have diverged from a common ancestor during the course of pathogen-specific evolutionary events.

  17. THE STRUCTURES OF COILED-COIL DOMAINS FROM TYPE THREE SECRETION SYSTEM TRANSLOCATORS REVEAL HOMOLOGY TO PORE-FORMING TOXINS

    PubMed Central

    Barta, Michael L.; Dickenson, Nicholas E.; Patil, Mrinalini; Keightley, Andrew; Wyckoff, Gerald J.; Picking, William D.; Picking, Wendy L.; Geisbrecht, Brian V.

    2012-01-01

    Many pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria utilize type III secretion systems (T3SS) to alter the normal functions of target cells. Shigella flexneri uses its T3SS to invade human intestinal cells to cause bacillary dysentery (shigellosis) which is responsible for over one million deaths per year. The Shigella type III secretion apparatus (T3SA) is comprised of a basal body spanning both bacterial membranes and an exposed oligomeric needle. Host altering effectors are secreted through this energized unidirectional conduit to promote bacterial invasion. The active needle tip complex of S. flexneri is composed of a tip protein, IpaD, and two pore-forming translocators, IpaB and IpaC. While the atomic structure of IpaD has been elucidated and studied, structural data on the hydrophobic translocators from the T3SS family remain elusive. We present here the crystal structures of a protease-stable fragment identified within the N-terminal regions of IpaB from S. flexneri and SipB from Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium determined at 2.1 Å and 2.8 Å limiting resolution, respectively. These newly identified domains are comprised of extended length (114 Å in IpaB and 71 Å in SipB) coiled-coil motifs that display a high degree of structural homology to one another despite the fact that they share only 21% sequence identity. Further structural comparisons also reveal substantial similarity to the coiled-coil regions of pore-forming proteins from other Gram-negative pathogens, notably colicin Ia. This suggests that these mechanistically-separate and functionally-distinct membrane-targeting proteins may have diverged from a common ancestor during the course of pathogen-specific evolutionary events. PMID:22321794

  18. Insights on the structure and stability of Licanantase: a trimeric acid-stable coiled-coil lipoprotein from Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans

    PubMed Central

    Abarca, Fernando; Gutierrez-Maldonado, Sebastian E.; Parada, Pilar; Martinez, Patricio; Maass, Alejandro

    2014-01-01

    Licanantase (Lic) is the major component of the secretome of Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans when grown in elemental sulphur. When used as an additive, Lic improves copper recovery from bioleaching processes. However, this recovery enhancement is not fully understood. In this context, our aim is to predict the 3D structure of Lic, to shed light on its structure-function relationships. Bioinformatics analyses on the amino acid sequence of Lic showed a great similarity with Lpp, an Escherichia coli Lipoprotein that can form stable trimers in solution. Lic and Lpp share the secretion motif, intracellular processing and alpha helix structure, as well as the distribution of hydrophobic residues in heptads forming a hydrophobic core, typical of coiled-coil structures. Cross-linking experiments showed the presence of Lic trimers, supporting our predictions. Taking the in vitro and in silico evidence as a whole, we propose that the most probable structure for Lic is a trimeric coiled-coil. According to this prediction, a suitable model for Lic was produced using the de novo algorithm “Rosetta Fold-and-Dock”. To assess the structural stability of our model, Molecular Dynamics (MD) and Replica Exchange MD simulations were performed using the structure of Lpp and a 14-alanine Lpp mutant as controls, at both acidic and neutral pH. Our results suggest that Lic was the most stable structure among the studied proteins in both pH conditions. This increased stability can be explained by a higher number of both intermonomer hydrophobic contacts and hydrogen bonds, key elements for the stability of Lic’s secondary and tertiary structure. PMID:25165619

  19. Insights on the structure and stability of Licanantase: a trimeric acid-stable coiled-coil lipoprotein from Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans.

    PubMed

    Abarca, Fernando; Gutierrez-Maldonado, Sebastian E; Parada, Pilar; Martinez, Patricio; Maass, Alejandro; Perez-Acle, Tomas

    2014-01-01

    Licanantase (Lic) is the major component of the secretome of Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans when grown in elemental sulphur. When used as an additive, Lic improves copper recovery from bioleaching processes. However, this recovery enhancement is not fully understood. In this context, our aim is to predict the 3D structure of Lic, to shed light on its structure-function relationships. Bioinformatics analyses on the amino acid sequence of Lic showed a great similarity with Lpp, an Escherichia coli Lipoprotein that can form stable trimers in solution. Lic and Lpp share the secretion motif, intracellular processing and alpha helix structure, as well as the distribution of hydrophobic residues in heptads forming a hydrophobic core, typical of coiled-coil structures. Cross-linking experiments showed the presence of Lic trimers, supporting our predictions. Taking the in vitro and in silico evidence as a whole, we propose that the most probable structure for Lic is a trimeric coiled-coil. According to this prediction, a suitable model for Lic was produced using the de novo algorithm "Rosetta Fold-and-Dock". To assess the structural stability of our model, Molecular Dynamics (MD) and Replica Exchange MD simulations were performed using the structure of Lpp and a 14-alanine Lpp mutant as controls, at both acidic and neutral pH. Our results suggest that Lic was the most stable structure among the studied proteins in both pH conditions. This increased stability can be explained by a higher number of both intermonomer hydrophobic contacts and hydrogen bonds, key elements for the stability of Lic's secondary and tertiary structure.

  20. The Symmetrical Structure of Structural Maintenance of Chromosomes (SMC) and MukB Proteins: Long, Antiparallel Coiled Coils, Folded at a Flexible Hinge

    PubMed Central

    Melby, Thomas E.; Ciampaglio, Charles N.; Briscoe, Gina; Erickson, Harold P.

    1998-01-01

    Structural maintenance of chromosomes (SMC) proteins function in chromosome condensation and several other aspects of DNA processing. They are large proteins characterized by an NH2-terminal nucleotide triphosphate (NTP)-binding domain, two long segments of coiled coil separated by a hinge, and a COOH-terminal domain. Here, we have visualized by EM the SMC protein from Bacillus subtilis (BsSMC) and MukB from Escherichia coli, which we argue is a divergent SMC protein. Both BsSMC and MukB show two thin rods with globular domains at the ends emerging from the hinge. The hinge appears to be quite flexible: the arms can open up to 180°, separating the terminal domains by 100 nm, or close to near 0°, bringing the terminal globular domains together. A surprising observation is that the ∼300–amino acid–long coiled coils are in an antiparallel arrangement. Known coiled coils are almost all parallel, and the longest antiparallel coiled coils known previously are 35–45 amino acids long. This antiparallel arrangement produces a symmetrical molecule with both an NH2- and a COOH-terminal domain at each end. The SMC molecule therefore has two complete and identical functional domains at the ends of the long arms. The bifunctional symmetry and a possible scissoring action at the hinge should provide unique biomechanical properties to the SMC proteins. PMID:9744887

  1. The N-terminal pleckstrin, coiled-coil, and IQ domains of the exchange factor Ras-GRF act cooperatively to facilitate activation by calcium.

    PubMed

    Buchsbaum, R; Telliez, J B; Goonesekera, S; Feig, L A

    1996-09-01

    We have recently shown that the neuronal exchange factor p140 Ras-GRF becomes activated in vivo in response to elevated calcium levels [C. L. Farnsworth, N. W. Freshney, L. B. Rosen, A. Ghosh, M. E. Greenberg, and L. A. Feig, Nature (London) 376:524-527, 1995]. Activation is mediated by calcium-induced calmodulin binding to an IQ domain near the N terminus of Ras-GRF. Here we show that the adjacent N-terminal pleckstrin homology (PH), coiled-coil, and IQ domains function cooperatively to allow Ras-GRF activation. Deletion of the N-terminal PH domain redistributes a large percentage of Ras-GRF from the particulate to the cytosolic fraction of cells and renders the protein insensitive to calcium stimulation. A similar cellular distribution and biological activity are observed when only the core catalytic domain is expressed. Although the PH domain is necessary for particulate association of Ras-GRF, it is not sufficient for targeting the core catalytic domain to this cellular location. This requires the PH domain and the adjacent coiled-coil and IQ sequences. Remarkably, this form of Ras-GRF is constitutively activated. The PH and coiled-coil domains must also perform an additional function, since targeting to the particulate fraction of cells is not sufficient to allow Ras-GRF activation by calcium. A Ras-GRF mutant containing the PH domain from Ras-GTPase-activating protein in place of its own N-terminal PH domain localizes to the particulate fraction of cells but does not respond to calcium. Similar phenotypes are seen with mutant Ras-GRFs containing point mutations in either the PH or coiled-coil domain. These findings argue that the N-terminal PH, coiled-coil, and IQ domains of Ras-GRF function together to connect Ras-GRF to multiple components in the particulate fractions of cells that are required for responsiveness of the protein to calcium signaling.

  2. Acidic pH triggers conformational changes at the NH2-terminal propeptide of the precursor of pulmonary surfactant protein B to form a coiled coil structure.

    PubMed

    Bañares-Hidalgo, A; Pérez-Gil, J; Estrada, P

    2014-07-01

    Pulmonary surfactant protein SP-B is synthesized as a larger precursor, proSP-B. We report that a recombinant form of human SP-BN forms a coiled coil structure at acidic pH. The protonation of a residue with pK=4.8±0.06 is the responsible of conformational changes detected by circular dichroism and intrinsic fluorescence emission. Sedimentation velocity analysis showed protein oligomerisation at any pH condition, with an enrichment of the species compatible with a tetramer at acidic pH. Low 2,2,2,-trifluoroethanol concentration promoted β-sheet structures in SP-BN, which bind Thioflavin T, at acidic pH, whereas it promoted coiled coil structures at neutral pH. The amino acid stretch predicted to form β-sheet parallel association in SP-BN overlaps with the sequence predicted by several programs to form coiled coil structure. A synthetic peptide ((60)W-E(85)) designed from the sequence of the amino acid stretch of SP-BN predicted to form coiled coil structure showed random coil conformation at neutral pH but concentration-dependent helical structure at acidic pH. Sedimentation velocity analysis of the peptide indicated monomeric state at neutral pH (s20, w=0.55S; Mr~3kDa) and peptide association (s20, w=1.735S; Mr=~14kDa) at acidic pH, with sedimentation equilibrium fitting to a Monomer-Nmer-Mmer model with N=6 and M=4 (Mr=14692Da). We propose that protein oligomerisation through coiled-coil motifs could then be a general feature in the assembly of functional units in saposin-like proteins in general and in the organization of SP-B in a functional surfactant, in particular.

  3. gpwac of the T4-Type Bacteriophages: Structure, Function, and Evolution of a Segmented Coiled-Coil Protein That Controls Viral Infectivity

    PubMed Central

    Letarov, A.; Manival, X.; Desplats, C.; Krisch, H. M.

    2005-01-01

    The wac gene product (gpwac) or fibritin of bacteriophage T4 forms the six fibers that radiate from the phage neck. During phage morphogenesis these whiskers bind the long tail fibers (LTFs) and facilitate their attachment to the phage baseplate. After the cell lysis, the gpwac fibers function as part of an environmental sensing device that retains the LTFs in a retracted configuration and thus prevents phage adsorption in unfavorable conditions. A comparative analysis of the sequences of 5 wac gene orthologs from various T4-type phages reveals that the ∼50-amino-acid N-terminal domain is the only highly conserved segment of the protein. This sequence conservation is probably a direct consequence of the domain's strong and specific interactions with the neck proteins. The sequence of the central fibrous region of gpwac is highly plastic, with only the heptad periodicity of the coiled-coil structure being conserved. In the various gpwac sequences, the small C-terminal domain essential for initiation of the folding of T4 gpwac is replaced by unrelated sequences of unknown origin. When a distant T4-type phage has a novel C-terminal gpwac sequence, the phage's gp36 sequence that is located at the knee joint of the LTF invariably has a novel domain in its C terminus as well. The covariance of these two sequences is compatible with genetic data suggesting that the C termini of gpwac and gp36 engage in a protein-protein interaction that controls phage infectivity. These results add to the limited evidence for domain swapping in the evolution of phage structural proteins. PMID:15659683

  4. TACC2 (transforming acidic coiled-coil protein 2) in breast carcinoma as a potent prognostic predictor associated with cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Onodera, Yoshiaki; Takagi, Kiyoshi; Miki, Yasuhiro; Takayama, Ken-Ichi; Shibahara, Yukiko; Watanabe, Mika; Ishida, Takanori; Inoue, Satoshi; Sasano, Hironobu; Suzuki, Takashi

    2016-08-01

    Transforming acidic coiled-coil protein 2 (TACC2) belongs to TACC family proteins and involved in a variety of cellular processes through interactions with some molecules involved in centrosomes/microtubules dynamics. Mounting evidence suggests that TACCs is implicated in the progression of some human malignancies, but significance of TACC2 protein in breast carcinoma is still unknown. Therefore, in this study, we examined the clinical significance of TACC2 in breast carcinoma and biological functions by immunohistochemistry and in vitro experiments. Immunohistochemistry for TACC2 was performed in 154 cases of invasive ductal carcinoma. MCF-7 and MDA-MB-453 breast carcinoma cell lines were transfected with small interfering RNA (siRNA) for TACC2, and subsequently, cell proliferation, 5-Bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU), and invasion assays were performed. TACC2 immunoreactivity was detected in 78 out of 154 (51%) breast carcinoma tissues, and it was significantly associated with Ki-67 LI. The immunohistochemical TACC2 status was significantly associated with increased incidence of recurrence and breast cancer-specific death of the patients, and multivariate analyses demonstrated TACC2 status as an independent prognostic factor for both disease-free and breast cancer-specific survival. Subsequent in vitro experiments showed that TACC2 significantly increased the proliferation activity of MCF-7 and MDA-MB-453. These results suggest that TACC2 plays an important role in the cell proliferation of breast carcinoma and therefore immunohistochemical TACC2 status is a candidate of worse prognostic factor in breast cancer cases. © 2016 The Authors. Cancer Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. The coiled-coil domain containing protein CCDC151 is required for the function of IFT-dependent motile cilia in animals.

    PubMed

    Jerber, Julie; Baas, Dominique; Soulavie, Fabien; Chhin, Brigitte; Cortier, Elisabeth; Vesque, Christine; Thomas, Joëlle; Durand, Bénédicte

    2014-02-01

    Cilia are evolutionarily conserved organelles endowed with essential physiological and developmental functions. In humans, disruption of cilia motility or signaling leads to complex pleiotropic genetic disorders called ciliopathies. Cilia motility requires the assembly of multi-subunit motile components such as dynein arms, but mechanisms underlying their assembly pathway and transport into the axoneme are still largely unknown. We identified a previously uncharacterized coiled-coil domain containing protein CCDC151, which is evolutionarily conserved in motile ciliated species and shares ancient features with the outer dynein arm-docking complex 2 of Chlamydomonas. In Drosophila, we show that CG14127/CCDC151 is associated with motile intraflagellar transport (IFT)-dependent cilia and required for geotaxis behavior of adult flies. In zebrafish, Ccdc151 is expressed in tissues with motile cilia, and morpholino-induced depletion of Ccdc151 leads to left-right asymmetry defects and kidney cysts. We demonstrate that Ccdc151 is required for proper motile function of cilia in the Kupffer's vesicle and in the pronephros by controlling dynein arm assembly, showing that Ccdc151 is a novel player in the control of IFT-dependent dynein arm assembly in animals. However, we observed that CCDC151 is also implicated in other cellular functions in vertebrates. In zebrafish, ccdc151 is involved in proper orientation of cell divisions in the pronephros and genetically interacts with prickle1 in this process. Furthermore, knockdown experiments in mammalian cells demonstrate that CCDC151 is implicated in the regulation of primary cilium length. Hence, CCDC151 is required for motile cilia function in animals but has acquired additional non-motile functions in vertebrates.

  6. Structural Dynamics of the Vimentin Coiled-coil Contact Regions Involved in Filament Assembly as Revealed by Hydrogen-Deuterium Exchange.

    PubMed

    Premchandar, Aiswarya; Mücke, Norbert; Poznański, Jarosław; Wedig, Tatjana; Kaus-Drobek, Magdalena; Herrmann, Harald; Dadlez, Michał

    2016-11-25

    Intermediate filaments (IF) are major constituents of the cytoskeleton of metazoan cells. They are not only responsible for the mechanical properties but also for various physiological activities in different cells and tissues. The building blocks of IFs are extended coiled-coil-forming proteins exhibiting a characteristic central α-helical domain ("rod"). The fundamental principles of the filament assembly mechanism and the network formation have been widely elucidated for the cytoplasmic IF protein vimentin. Also, a comprehensive structural model for the tetrameric complex of vimentin has been obtained by X-ray crystallography in combination with various biochemical and biophysical techniques. To extend these static data and to investigate the dynamic properties of the full-length proteins in solution during the various assembly steps, we analyzed the patterns of hydrogen-deuterium exchange in vimentin and in four variants carrying point mutations in the IF consensus motifs present at either end of the α-helical rod that cause an assembly arrest at the unit-length filament (ULF) stage. The results yielded unique insights into the structural properties of subdomains within the full-length vimentin, in particular in regions of contact in α-helical and linker segments that stabilize different oligomeric forms such as tetramers, ULFs, and mature filaments. Moreover, hydrogen-deuterium exchange analysis of the point-mutated variants directly demonstrated the active role of the IF consensus motifs in the oligomerization mechanism of tetramers during ULF formation. Ultimately, using molecular dynamics simulation procedures, we provide a structural model for the subdomain-mediated tetramer/tetramer interaction via "cross-coiling" as the first step of the assembly process.

  7. VSGdb: a database for trypanosome variant surface glycoproteins, a large and diverse family of coiled coil proteins

    PubMed Central

    Marcello, Lucio; Menon, Suraj; Ward, Pauline; Wilkes, Jonathan M; Jones, Nicola G; Carrington, Mark; Barry, J David

    2007-01-01

    Background Trypanosomes are coated with a variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) that is so densely packed that it physically protects underlying proteins from effectors of the host immune system. Periodically cells expressing a distinct VSG arise in a population and thereby evade immunity. The main structural feature of VSGs are two long α-helices that form a coiled coil, and sets of relatively unstructured loops that are distal to the plasma membrane and contain most or all of the protective epitopes. The primary structure of different VSGs is highly variable, typically displaying only ~20% identity with each other. The genome has nearly 2000 VSG genes, which are located in subtelomeres. Only one VSG gene is expressed at a time, and switching between VSGs primarily involves gene conversion events. The archive of silent VSGs undergoes diversifying evolution rapidly, also involving gene conversion. The VSG family is a paradigm for α helical coiled coil structures, epitope variation and GPI-anchor signals. At the DNA level, the genes are a paradigm for diversifying evolutionary processes and for the role of subtelomeres and recombination mechanisms in generation of diversity in multigene families. To enable ready availability of VSG sequences for addressing these general questions, and trypanosome-specific questions, we have created VSGdb, a database of all known sequences. Description VSGdb contains fully annotated VSG sequences from the genome sequencing project, with which it shares all identifiers and annotation, and other available sequences. The database can be queried in various ways. Sequence retrieval, in FASTA format, can deliver protein or nucleotide sequence filtered by chromosomes or contigs, gene type (functional, pseudogene, etc.), domain and domain sequence family. Retrieved sequences can be stored as a temporary database for BLAST querying, reports from which include hyperlinks to the genome project database (GeneDB) CDS Info and to individual VSGdb

  8. Design of beta-domain swapping, alpha/beta-protein, environmentally sensitive coiled coil and peptide functionalized titania materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagarkar, Radhika P.

    2009-12-01

    The objective of this dissertation is to apply rational peptide design to fabricate nanomaterials via self-assembly. This has been demonstrated in structurally diverse systems with an aim of deciphering the underlying principles governing how sequence affects the peptide's ability to adopt a specific secondary structure and ultimate material properties that are realized from the association of these secondary structural elements. Several amyloidogenic proteins have been shown to self-assemble into fibrils using a mechanism known as domain swapping. Here, discreet units of secondary structure are exchanged among discreet proteins during self-assembly to form extended networks with precise three dimensional organization. The possibility of using these mechanisms to design peptides capable of controlled assembly and fibril formation leading to materials with targeted properties is explored. By altering the placement of a beta-turn sequence that varies the size and location of the exchanged strand, twisting, non-twisting and laminated fibrillar nanostructures are obtained. Hydrogels prepared from these strand swapping beta-hairpins have varied rheological properties due to differences in their fibrillar nanostructures. In a second distinct design, alpha/beta-proteins are used to prepare environmentally sensitive hydrogels. Here, multiple distinct motifs for structural integrity and dynamic response within a single self-assembling peptide allow the amyloid-like fibrils formed to controllably alter their nano-topography in response to an external stimulus such as temperature. The development of these self-assembling alpha/beta-protein motifs also necessitated the design of pH sensitive antiparallel coiled coils. Exploring the basic principles responsible for pH dependent conformational changes in coiled coils can lead to new insights in the control of protein structure and function. Lastly, this dissertation discusses the interface between biomolecules and inorganic

  9. Lamellipodial localization of Dictyostelium myosin heavy chain kinase A is mediated via F-actin binding by the coiled-coil domain.

    PubMed

    Steimle, Paul A; Licate, Lucila; Côté, Graham P; Egelhoff, Thomas T

    2002-04-10

    Myosin heavy chain kinase A (MHCK A) modulates myosin II filament assembly in the amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum. MHCK A localization in vivo is dynamically regulated during chemotaxis, phagocytosis, and other polarized cell motility events, with preferential recruitment into anterior filamentous actin (F-actin)-rich structures. The current work reveals that an amino-terminal segment of MHCK A, previously identified as forming a coiled-coil, mediates anterior localization. MHCK A co-sediments with F-actin, and deletion of the amino-terminal domain eliminated actin binding. These results indicate that the anterior localization of MHCK A is mediated via direct binding to F-actin, and reveal the presence of an actin-binding function not previously detected by primary sequence evaluation of the coiled-coil domain.

  10. Loss of coiled-coil domain containing 80 negatively modulates glucose homeostasis in diet-induced obese mice.

    PubMed

    Tremblay, Frédéric; Huard, Christine; Dow, Jessie; Gareski, Tiffany; Will, Sarah; Richard, Ann-Marie; Syed, Jameel; Bailey, Steven; Brenneman, Karrie A; Martinez, Robert V; Perreault, Mylène; Lin, Qingcong; Gimeno, Ruth E

    2012-09-01

    Coiled-coil domain containing 80 (Ccdc80) is a secreted protein highly enriched in mouse and human white adipose tissue (WAT) that plays an important role during adipocyte differentiation in vitro. To investigate the physiological function of Ccdc80 in energy and glucose homeostasis, we generated mice in which the gene encoding Ccdc80 was disrupted. Mice lacking Ccdc80 showed increased sensitivity to diet-induced hyperglycemia and glucose intolerance while displaying reduced glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in vivo. Gene expression analysis by microarray revealed that only 10 transcripts were simultaneously altered in pancreas, skeletal muscle, and WAT from Ccdc80(-/-) mice, including some components of the circadian clock. Expression of the core clock member Arntl/Bmal1 was reduced whereas that of the oscillating transcription factors Dbp and Tef was increased in all tissues examined. Furthermore, knockdown of Ccdc80 in 3T3-L1 cells led to an increase of Dbp mRNA levels during adipocyte differentiation, suggesting that Ccdc80 might be involved in the regulation of this gene in a cell-autonomous manner. Importantly, transcriptional alterations in Ccdc80(-/-) mice were associated with changes in feeding behavior, increased caloric intake, decreased energy expenditure, and obesity. Taken together, our results suggest that Ccdc80 is a novel modulator of glucose and energy homeostasis during diet-induced obesity.

  11. Mcp4, a Meiotic Coiled-Coil Protein, Plays a Role in F-Actin Positioning during Schizosaccharomyces pombe Meiosis▿

    PubMed Central

    Ohtaka, Ayami; Okuzaki, Daisuke; Saito, Takamune T.; Nojima, Hiroshi

    2007-01-01

    Some meiosis-specific proteins of Schizosaccharomyces pombe harbor coiled-coil motifs and play essential roles in meiotic progression. Here we describe Mcp4, a novel meiosis-specific protein whose expression is abruptly induced at the horsetail phase and which remains expressed until sporulation is finished. Fluorescence microscopic analysis revealed that Mcp4 alters its subcellular localization during meiosis in a manner that partially resembles the movement of F-actin during meiosis. Mcp4 and F-actin never colocalize; rather, they are located in a side-by-side manner. When forespore membrane formation begins at metaphase II, the Mcp4 signals assemble at the lagging face of the dividing nuclei. At this stage, they are sandwiched between F-actin and the nucleus. Mcp4, in turn, appears to sandwich F-actin with Meu14. In mcp4Δ cells at anaphase II, the F-actin, which is normally dumbbell-shaped, adopts an abnormal balloon shape. Spores of mcp4Δ cells were sensitive to NaCl, although their shape and viability were normal. Taken together, we conclude that Mcp4 plays a role in the accurate positioning of F-actin during S. pombe meiosis. PMID:17435009

  12. Heteronuclear NMR assignments and secondary structure of the coiled coil trimerization domain from cartilage matrix protein in oxidized and reduced forms.

    PubMed Central

    Wiltscheck, R.; Kammerer, R. A.; Dames, S. A.; Schulthess, T.; Blommers, M. J.; Engel, J.; Alexandrescu, A. T.

    1997-01-01

    The C-terminal oligomerization domain of chicken cartilage matrix protein is a trimeric coiled coil comprised of three identical 43-residue chains. NMR spectra of the protein show equivalent magnetic environments for each monomer, indicating a parallel coiled coil structure with complete threefold symmetry. Sequence-specific assignments for 1H-, 15N-, and 13C-NMR resonances have been obtained from 2D 1H NOESY and TOCSY spectra, and from 3D HNCA, 15N NOESY-HSQC, and HCCH-TOCSY spectra. A stretch of alpha-helix encompassing five heptad repeats (35 residues) has been identified from intra-chain HN-HN and HN-H alpha NOE connectivities. 3JHNH alpha coupling constants, and chemical shift indices. The alpha-helix begins immediately downstream of inter-chain disulfide bonds between residues Cys 5 and Cys 7, and extends to near the C-terminus of the molecule. The threefold symmetry of the molecule is maintained when the inter-chain disulfide bonds that flank the N-terminus of the coiled coil are reduced. Residues Ile 21 through Glu 36 show conserved chemical shifts and NOE connectivities, as well as strong protection from solvent exchange in the oxidized and reduced forms of the protein. By contrast, residues Ile 10 through Val 17 show pronounced chemical shift differences between the oxidized and reduced protein. Strong chemical exchange NOEs between HN resonances and water indicate solvent exchange on time scales faster than 10 s, and suggests a dynamic fraying of the N-terminus of the coiled coil upon reduction of the disulfide bonds. Possible roles for the disulfide crosslinks of the oligomerization domain in the function of cartilage matrix protein are proposed. PMID:9260286

  13. Examination of a novel head-stalk protein family in Giardia lamblia characterised by the pairing of ankyrin repeats and coiled-coil domains.

    PubMed

    Elmendorf, Heidi G; Rohrer, Sally C; Khoury, Rasha S; Bouttenot, Rachel E; Nash, Theodore E

    2005-08-01

    The intestinal pathogen Giardia lamblia possesses several unusual organelle features, including two equivalent nuclei, no mitochondria or peroxisomes, and a developmentally regulated rough endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi. Giardia also possesses a number of complex and unique cytoskeleton structures that dictate cell shape, motility and attachment. Our investigations of cytoskeletal proteins have revealed the presence of a new protein family. Proteins in this family contain both ankyrin repeats and coiled-coil domains; although these are common protein motifs, their pairing is unique, thus establishing a new class of head-stalk proteins. Examination of the G. lamblia genome shows evidence for at least 18 genes coding for proteins with a series of ankyrin repeats followed by a lengthy coiled-coil domain and at least an additional 14 genes coding for proteins with a prominent coiled-coil domain flanked by two series of ankyrin repeats. We have examined one of these proteins, Giardia Axoneme Associated Protein (GASP-180), in detail. GASP-180 is a 180 kDa protein containing five ankyrin repeats in a 200 amino acid N-terminal domain separated by a short spacer from an approximately 1375 amino acid coiled-coil domain. Using anti-peptide antibodies raised against a unique 20 amino acid sequence found at the C-terminus, we have determined that GASP-180 is present in cytoskeleton extractions of the parasite and localises to the proximal base of the anterior flagellar axonemes. The combination of the localisation and the structural and functional motifs of GASP-180 make it a strong candidate to participate in control of flagellar activity.

  14. An alternative conformation of the gp41 heptad repeat 1 region coiled coil exists in the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) envelope glycoprotein precursor

    SciTech Connect

    Mische, Claudia C.; Yuan Wen; Strack, Bettina; Craig, Stewart; Farzan, Michael; Sodroski, Joseph . E-mail: joseph_sodroski@dfci.harvard.edu

    2005-07-20

    The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) transmembrane envelope glycoprotein, gp41, which mediates virus-cell fusion, exists in at least three different conformations within the trimeric envelope glycoprotein complex. The structures of the prefusogenic and intermediate states are unknown; structures representing the postfusion state have been solved. In the postfusion conformation, three helical heptad repeat 2 (HR2) regions pack in an antiparallel fashion into the hydrophobic grooves on the surface of a triple-helical coiled coil formed by the heptad repeat 1 (HR1) regions. We studied the prefusogenic conformation of gp41 by mutagenic alteration of membrane-anchored and soluble forms of the HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins. Our results indicate that, in the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein precursor, the gp41 HR1 region is in a conformation distinct from that of a trimeric coiled coil. Thus, the central gp41 coiled coil is formed during the transition of the HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins from the precursor state to the receptor-bound intermediate.

  15. Oxime side-chain cross-links in an α-helical coiled-coil protein: structure, thermodynamics, and folding-templated synthesis of bicyclic species.

    PubMed

    Haney, Conor M; Horne, W Seth

    2013-08-19

    Covalent side-chain cross-links are a versatile method to control peptide folding, particularly when α-helical secondary structure is the target. Here, we examine the application of oxime bridges, formed by the chemoselective reaction between aminooxy and aldehyde side chains, for the stabilization of a helical peptide involved in a protein-protein complex. A series of sequence variants of the dimeric coiled coil GCN4-p1 bearing oxime bridges at solvent-exposed positions were prepared and biophysically characterized. Triggered unmasking of a side-chain aldehyde in situ and subsequent cyclization proceed rapidly and cleanly at pH 7 in the folded protein complex. Comparison of folding thermodynamics among a series of different oxime bridges show that the cross links are consistently stabilizing to the coiled coil, with the extent of stabilization sensitive to the exact size and structure of the macrocycle. X-ray crystallographic analysis of a coiled coil with the best cross link in place and a second structure of its linear precursor show how the bridge is accommodated into an α-helix. Preparation of a bicyclic oligomer by simultaneous formation of two linkages in situ demonstrates the potential use of triggered oxime formation to both trap and stabilize a particular peptide folded conformation in the bound state.

  16. Characterization of the baculovirus Choristoneura fumiferana multicapsid nuclear polyhedrosis virus p10 gene indicates that the polypeptide contains a coiled-coil domain.

    PubMed

    Wilson, J A; Hill, J E; Kuzio, J; Faulkner, P

    1995-12-01

    The DNA sequence and transcription pattern of the p10 gene from the spruce budworm baculovirus Choristoneura fumiferana multicapsid nuclear polyhedrosis virus (CfMNPV) were analysed. The CfMNPV p10 gene codes for a protein 81 amino acids in length: this is the shortest p10 peptide identified thus far. A novel characteristic of the CfMNPV p10 gene is that it contains tandem late initiation sites (TAAG) having different temporal transcription patterns. Comparative analysis of CfMNPV p10 and the amino acid sequences of other p10 gene products showed that they each appear to have a similar N-terminal structure: an amphipathic alpha-helical terminus which condenses as coiled-coil multimers. Another feature of the p10 N terminus is that the central region of the coiled-coil domain resembles a bend or hairpin loop and could fold into a hairpin or form a bent rod structure. The condensation of p10 monomers to coiled-coil multimers is likely to be a step leading to the formation of p10 fibrous bodies in infected cells.

  17. Natural immune response to Plasmodium vivax alpha-helical coiled coil protein motifs and its association with the risk of P. vivax malaria.

    PubMed

    Céspedes, Nora; Li Wai Suen, Connie S N; Koepfli, Cristian; França, Camila T; Felger, Ingrid; Nebie, Issa; Arévalo-Herrera, Myriam; Mueller, Ivo; Corradin, Giampietro; Herrera, Sócrates

    2017-01-01

    Protein α-helical coiled coil structures are known to induce antibodies able to block critical functions in different pathogens. In a previous study, a total of 50 proteins of Plasmodium vivax erythrocytic asexual stages containing α-helical coiled coil structural motifs were identified in silico, and the corresponding peptides were chemically synthesized. A total of 43 peptides were recognized by naturally acquired antibodies in plasma samples from both Papua New Guinea (PNG) and Colombian adult donors. In this study, the association between IgG antibodies to these peptides and clinical immunity was further explored by measuring total IgG antibody levels to 24 peptides in baseline samples from a longitudinal study of children aged 1-3 years (n = 164) followed for 16 months. Samples were reactive to all peptides tested. Eight peptides were recognized by >50% of individuals, whereas only one peptide had < 20% reactivity. Children infected at baseline were seropositive to 23/24 peptides. No significant association was observed between antibody titers and age or molecular force of infection, suggesting that antibody levels had already reached an equilibrium. There was a strong association between antibody levels to all peptides and protection against P. vivax clinical episodes during the 16 months follow-up. These results suggest that the selected coiled coil antigens might be good markers of both exposure and acquired immunity to P. vivax malaria, and further preclinical investigation should be performed to determine their potential as P. vivax vaccine antigens.

  18. Spontaneous adsorption of coiled-coil model peptides K and E to a mixed lipid bilayer.

    PubMed

    Pluhackova, Kristyna; Wassenaar, Tsjerk A; Kirsch, Sonja; Böckmann, Rainer A

    2015-03-26

    A molecular description of the lipid-protein interactions underlying the adsorption of proteins to membranes is crucial for understanding, for example, the specificity of adsorption or the binding strength of a protein to a bilayer, or for characterizing protein-induced changes of membrane properties. In this paper, we extend an automated in silico assay (DAFT) for binding studies and apply it to characterize the adsorption of the model fusion peptides E and K to a mixed phospholipid/cholesterol membrane using coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations. In addition, we couple the coarse-grained protocol to reverse transformation to atomistic resolution, thereby allowing to study molecular interactions with high detail. The experimentally observed differential binding of the peptides E and K to membranes, as well as the increased binding affinity of helical over unstructered peptides, could be well reproduced using the polarizable Martini coarse-grained (CG) force field. Binding to neutral membranes is shown to be dominated by initial binding of the positively charged N-terminus to the phospholipid headgroup region, followed by membrane surface-aligned insertion of the peptide at the interface between the hydrophobic core of the membrane and its polar headgroup region. Both coarse-grained and atomistic simulations confirm a before hypothesized snorkeling of lysine side chains for the membrane-bound state of the peptide K. Cholesterol was found to be enriched in peptide vicinity, which is probably of importance for the mechanism of membrane fusion. The applied sequential multiscale method, using coarse-grained simulations for the slow adsorption process of peptides to membranes followed by backward transformation to atomistic detail and subsequent atomistic simulations of the preformed peptide-lipid complexes, is shown to be a versatile approach to study the interactions of peptides or proteins with biomembranes.

  19. Coiled coil miniprotein randomization on phage leads to charge pattern mimicry of the receptor recognition determinant of interleukin 5.

    PubMed

    Li, Chuanzhao; Plugariu, Carmela G; Bajgier, Joanna; White, John R; Liefer, Kristin M; Wu, Sheng-Jiun; Chaiken, Irwin

    2002-01-01

    Phage display was used to identify sequences that mimic structural determinants in interleukin5 (IL5) for IL5 receptor recognition. A coiled coil stem loop (CCSL) miniprotein scaffold library was constructed with its turn region randomized and panned for binding variants against human IL5 receptor alpha chain (IL5Ralpha). Competition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays identified CCSL-phage selectants for which binding to IL5Ralpha was competed by IL5. The most frequently selected and IL5-competed CCSL-phage contain charged residues Arg and Glu in their turn sequences, in this regard resembling a beta strand sequence in the 'CD turn' region, of IL5, that has been proposed to present a key determinant for IL5 receptor alpha chain recognition. The most dominant CCSL-phage selectant sequence, PVEGRV, contains a negative/positive charge pattern similar to that seen in the original CD turn. To test the relatedness of CCSL-phage selectant sequences to the IL5 receptor recognition epitope, PVEGRV was grafted into the sequence 87--92 of a monomeric IL5. The resulting IL5 variant, [(87)PVEGRV(92)]GM1, was able to bind to IL5Ralpha in biosensor assays, to elicit TF-1 cell proliferation and to induce STAT5 phosphorylation in TF-1 cells. The results help discern sequence patterns in the IL5 CD turn region which are key in driving receptor recognition and demonstrate the utility of CCSL miniprotein scaffold phage display to identify local IL5 mimetic sequence arrangements that may ultimately lead to IL5 antagonists.

  20. Crystal structure and characterization of coiled-coil domain of the transient receptor potential channel PKD2L1.

    PubMed

    Molland, Katrina L; Paul, Lake N; Yernool, Dinesh A

    2012-03-01

    The cation-permeable channel PKD2L1 forms a homomeric assembly as well as heteromeric associations with both PKD1 and PKD1L3, with the cytoplasmic regulatory domain (CRD) of PKD2L1 often playing a role in assembly and/or function. Our previous work indicated that the isolated PKD2L1 CRD assembles as a trimer in a manner dependent on the presence of a proposed oligomerization domain. Herein we describe the 2.7Å crystal structure of a segment containing the PKD2L1 oligomerization domain which indicates that trimerization is driven by the β-branched residues at the first and fourth positions of a heptad repeat (commonly referred to as "a" and "d") and by a conserved R-h-x-x-h-E salt bridge motif that is largely unique to parallel trimeric coiled coils. Further analysis of the PKD2L1 CRD indicates that trimeric association is sufficiently strong that no other species are present in solution in an analytical ultracentrifugation experiment at the lowest measurable concentration of 750nM. Conversely, mutation of the "a" and "d" residues leads to formation of an exclusively monomeric species, independent of concentration. Although both monomeric and WT CRDs are stable in solution and bind calcium with 0.9μM affinity, circular dichroism studies reveal that the monomer loses 25% more α-helical content than WT when stripped of this ligand, suggesting that the CRD structure is stabilized by trimerization in the ligand-free state. This stability could play a role in the function of the full-length complex, indicating that trimerization may be important for both homo- and possibly heteromeric assemblies of PKD2L1. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Coiled Coil Domain-containing Protein 56 (CCDC56) Is a Novel Mitochondrial Protein Essential for Cytochrome c Oxidase Function*

    PubMed Central

    Peralta, Susana; Clemente, Paula; Sánchez-Martínez, Álvaro; Calleja, Manuel; Hernández-Sierra, Rosana; Matsushima, Yuichi; Adán, Cristina; Ugalde, Cristina; Fernández-Moreno, Miguel Ángel; Kaguni, Laurie S.; Garesse, Rafael

    2012-01-01

    In Drosophila melanogaster, the mitochondrial transcription factor B1 (d-mtTFB1) transcript contains in its 5′-untranslated region a conserved upstream open reading frame denoted as CG42630 in FlyBase. We demonstrate that CG42630 encodes a novel protein, the coiled coil domain-containing protein 56 (CCDC56), conserved in metazoans. We show that Drosophila CCDC56 protein localizes to mitochondria and contains 87 amino acids in flies and 106 in humans with the two proteins sharing 42% amino acid identity. We show by rapid amplification of cDNA ends and Northern blotting that Drosophila CCDC56 protein and mtTFB1 are encoded on a bona fide bicistronic transcript. We report the generation and characterization of two ccdc56 knock-out lines in Drosophila carrying the ccdc56D6 and ccdc56D11 alleles. Lack of the CCDC56 protein in flies induces a developmental delay and 100% lethality by arrest of larval development at the third instar. ccdc56 knock-out larvae show a significant decrease in the level of fully assembled cytochrome c oxidase (COX) and in its activity, suggesting a defect in complex assembly; the activity of the other oxidative phosphorylation complexes remained either unaffected or increased in the ccdc56 knock-out larvae. The lethal phenotype and the decrease in COX were partially rescued by reintroduction of a wild-type UAS-ccdc56 transgene. These results indicate an important role for CCDC56 in the oxidative phosphorylation system and in particular in COX function required for proper development in D. melanogaster. We propose CCDC56 as a candidate factor required for COX biogenesis/assembly. PMID:22610097

  2. Structural Comparisons of Apo- and Metalated Three-Stranded Coiled Coils Clarify Metal Binding Determinants in Thiolate Containing Designed Peptides

    SciTech Connect

    Chakraborty, Saumen; Touw, Debra S.; Peacock, Anna F.A.; Stuckey, Jeanne; Pecoraro, Vincent L.

    2010-11-05

    Over the past two decades, designed metallopeptides have held the promise for understanding a variety of fundamental questions in metallobiochemistry; however, these dreams have not yet been realized because of a lack of structural data to elaborate the protein scaffolds before metal complexation and the resultant metalated structures which ultimately exist. This is because there are few reports of structural characterization of such systems either in their metalated or nonmetalated forms and no examples where an apo structure and the corresponding metalated peptide assembly have both been defined by X-ray crystallography. Herein we present X-ray structures of two de novo designed parallel three-stranded coiled coils (designed using the heptad repeat (a {yields} g)) CSL9C (CS = Coil Ser) and CSL19C in their nonmetalated forms, determined to 1.36 and 2.15 {angstrom} resolutions, respectively. Leucines from either position 9 (a site) or 19 (d site) are replaced by cysteine to generate the constructs CSL9C and CSL19C, respectively, yielding thiol-rich pockets at the hydrophobic interior of these peptides, suitable to bind heavy metals such as As(III), Hg(II), Cd(II), and Pb(II). We use these structures to understand the inherent structural differences between a and d sites to clarify the basis of the observed differential spectroscopic behavior of metal binding in these types of peptides. Cys side chains of (CSL9C){sub 3} show alternate conformations and are partially preorganized for metal binding, whereas cysteines in (CSL19C){sub 3} are present as a single conformer. Zn(II) ions, which do not coordinate or influence Cys residues at the designed metal sites but are essential for forming X-ray quality crystals, are bound to His and Glu residues at the crystal packing interfaces of both structures. These 'apo' structures are used to clarify the changes in metal site organization between metalated As(CSL9C){sub 3} and to speculate on the differential basis of Hg

  3. quick-to-court, a Drosophila mutant with elevated levels of sexual behavior, is defective in a predicted coiled-coil protein.

    PubMed Central

    Gaines, P; Tompkins, L; Woodard, C T; Carlson, J R

    2000-01-01

    Remarkably little is known about the molecular mechanisms that drive sexual behavior. We have identified a new gene, quick-to-court (qtc), whose mutations cause males to show high levels of male-male courtship. qtc males also show a novel phenotype: when placed in the presence of a virgin female, they begin courtship abnormally quickly. qtc mutations are striking in their specificity, in that many aspects of male sexual behavior are normal. We have cloned the qtc gene and found that it encodes a predicted coiled-coil protein and is expressed in the olfactory organs, central nervous system, and male reproductive tract. PMID:10747058

  4. Methods for Solving Highly Symmetric de Novo Designed Metalloproteins: Crystallographic Examination of a Novel Three Stranded Coiled Coil structure containing D-amino Acids

    PubMed Central

    Ruckthong, Leela; Stuckey, Jeanne A.; Pecoraro, Vincent L.

    2017-01-01

    The core objective of de Novo metalloprotein design is to define metal-protein relationships that control the structure and function of metal centers by using simplified proteins. An essential requirement to achieve this goal is to obtain high resolution structural data using either NMR or crystallographic studies in order to evaluate successful design. X-ray crystal structures have proved that a four heptad repeat scaffold contained in the three stranded coiled coil (3SCC), called CoilSer, provides an excellent motif for modeling a three Cys binding environment capable of chelating metals into geometries that resemble heavy metal sites in metalloregulatory systems. However, new generations of more complicated designs that feature, for example, a D-amino acid or multiple metal ligand sites in the helical sequence require a more stable construct. In doing so, an extra heptad was introduced into the original CoilSer sequence, yielding a GRAND-CoilSer to retain the 3SCC folding. An apo-(GRAND-CSL12DLL16C)3 crystal structure, designed for Cd(II)S3 complexation, proved to be a well-folded parallel 3SCC. Because this structure is novel, protocols for crystallization, structural determination and refinements of the apo-(GRAND-CSL12DLL16C)3 are described. This report should be generally useful for future crystallographic studies of related coiled coil designs. PMID:27586331

  5. N-terminal aliphatic residues dictate the structure, stability, assembly, and small molecule binding of the coiled-coil region of cartilage oligomeric matrix protein.

    PubMed

    Gunasekar, Susheel K; Asnani, Mukta; Limbad, Chandani; Haghpanah, Jennifer S; Hom, Wendy; Barra, Hanna; Nanda, Soumya; Lu, Min; Montclare, Jin Kim

    2009-09-15

    The coiled-coil domain of cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMPcc) assembles into a homopentamer that naturally recognizes the small molecule 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3) (vit D). To identify the residues critical for the structure, stability, oligomerization, and binding to vit D as well as two other small molecules, all-trans-retinol (ATR) and curcumin (CCM), here we perform an alanine scanning mutagenesis study. Ten residues lining the hydrophobic pocket of COMPcc were mutated into alanine; of the mutated residues, the N-terminal aliphatic residues L37, L44, V47, and L51 are responsible for maintaining the structure and function. Furthermore, two polar residues, T40 and Q54, within the N-terminal region when converted into alanine improve the alpha-helical structure, stability, and self-assembly behavior. Helical stability, oligomerization, and binding appear to be linked in a manner in which mutations that abolish helical structure and assembly bind poorly to vit D, ATR, and CCM. These results provide not only insight into COMPcc and its functional role but also useful guidelines for the design of stable, pentameric coiled-coils capable of selectively storing and delivering various small molecules.

  6. Mcp7, a meiosis-specific coiled-coil protein of fission yeast, associates with Meu13 and is required for meiotic recombination

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Takamune T.; Tougan, Takahiro; Kasama, Takashi; Okuzaki, Daisuke; Nojima, Hiroshi

    2004-01-01

    We previously showed that Meu13 of Schizosaccharomyces pombe functions in homologous pairing and recombination at meiosis I. Here we show that a meiosis-specific gene encodes a coiled-coil protein that complexes with Meu13 during meiosis in vivo. This gene denoted as mcp7+ (after meiotic coiled-coil protein) is an ortholog of Mnd1 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Mcp7 proteins are detected on meiotic chromatin. The phenotypes of mcp7Δ cells are similar to those of meu13Δ cells as they show reduced recombination rates and spore viability and produce spores with abnormal morphology. However, a delay in initiation of meiosis I chromosome segregation of mcp7Δ cells is not so conspicuous as meu13Δ cells, and no meiotic delay is observed in mcp7Δmeu13Δ cells. Mcp7 and Meu13 proteins depend on each other differently; Mcp7 becomes more stable in meu13Δ cells, whereas Meu13 becomes less stable in mcp7Δ cells. Genetic analysis shows that Mcp7 acts in the downstream of Dmc1, homologs of Escherichia coli RecA protein, for both recombination and subsequent sporulation. Taken together, we conclude that Mcp7 associates with Meu13 and together they play a key role in meiotic recombination. PMID:15210864

  7. Mcp7, a meiosis-specific coiled-coil protein of fission yeast, associates with Meu13 and is required for meiotic recombination.

    PubMed

    Saito, Takamune T; Tougan, Takahiro; Kasama, Takashi; Okuzaki, Daisuke; Nojima, Hiroshi

    2004-01-01

    We previously showed that Meu13 of Schizosaccharomyces pombe functions in homologous pairing and recombination at meiosis I. Here we show that a meiosis-specific gene encodes a coiled-coil protein that complexes with Meu13 during meiosis in vivo. This gene denoted as mcp7+ (after meiotic coiled-coil protein) is an ortholog of Mnd1 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Mcp7 proteins are detected on meiotic chromatin. The phenotypes of mcp7Delta cells are similar to those of meu13Delta cells as they show reduced recombination rates and spore viability and produce spores with abnormal morphology. However, a delay in initiation of meiosis I chromosome segregation of mcp7Delta cells is not so conspicuous as meu13Delta cells, and no meiotic delay is observed in mcp7Deltameu13Delta cells. Mcp7 and Meu13 proteins depend on each other differently; Mcp7 becomes more stable in meu13Delta cells, whereas Meu13 becomes less stable in mcp7Delta cells. Genetic analysis shows that Mcp7 acts in the downstream of Dmc1, homologs of Escherichia coli RecA protein, for both recombination and subsequent sporulation. Taken together, we conclude that Mcp7 associates with Meu13 and together they play a key role in meiotic recombination.

  8. Epitope mapping and direct visualization of the parallel, in-register arrangement of the double-stranded coiled-coil in the NuMA protein.

    PubMed Central

    Harborth, J; Weber, K; Osborn, M

    1995-01-01

    NuMA, a 238 kDa protein present in the nucleus during interphase, translocates to the spindle poles in mitosis. NuMA plays an essential role in mitosis, since microinjection of the NuMA SPN-3 monoclonal antibody causes mitotic arrest and micronuclei formation. We have mapped the approximate position of the epitopes of six monoclonal NuMA antibodies using recombinant NuMA fragments. The SPN-3 epitope has been located to residues 255-267 at the C-terminus of the first helical subdomain of the central rod domain and several residues crucial for antibody binding have been identified. To gain insight into the ultrastructure of NuMA, several defined fragments, as well as the full-length recombinant protein, were expressed in Escherichia coli and purified to homogeneity. They were then characterized by chemical cross-linking, circular dichroism spectra and electron microscopy. The results directly reveal the tripartate structure of NuMA. A long central rod domain is flanked by globular end domains. The rod is 207 nm long and is at least 90% alpha-helical. It reflects a double-stranded coiled-coil with the alpha-helices arranged parallel and in register. The NuMA protein thus forms the longest coiled-coil currently known. Our analyses reveal no indication that recombinant NuMA assembles into filaments or other higher order structures. Images PMID:7781599

  9. The Coiled-Coil Domain Containing 80 (ccdc80) gene regulates gadd45β2 expression in the developing somites of zebrafish as a new player of the hedgehog pathway.

    PubMed

    Della Noce, Isabella; Carra, Silvia; Brusegan, Chiara; Critelli, Rosina; Frassine, Andrea; De Lorenzo, Carlo; Giordano, Antonio; Bellipanni, Gianfranco; Villa, Erica; Cotelli, Franco; Pistocchi, Anna; Schepis, Filippo

    2015-04-01

    The Coiled-Coil Domain Containing 80 (CCDC80) gene has been identified as strongly induced in rat thyroid PC CL3 cells immortalized by the adenoviral E1A gene. In human, CCDC80 is a potential oncosoppressor due to its down-regulation in several tumor cell lines and tissues and it is expressed in almost all tissues. CCDC80 has homologous in mouse, chicken, and zebrafish. We cloned the zebrafish ccdc80 and analyzed its expression and function during embryonic development. The in-silico translated zebrafish protein shares high similarity with its mammalian homologous, with nuclear localization signals and a signal peptide. Gene expression analysis demonstrates that zebrafish ccdc80 is maternally and zygotically expressed throughout the development. In particular, ccdc80 is strongly expressed in the notochord and it is under the regulation of the Hedgehog pathway. In this work we investigated the functional effects of ccdc80-loss-of-function during embryonic development and verified its interaction with gadd45β2 in somitogenesis. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. An Evolutionarily Conserved Family of Virion Tail Needles Related to Bacteriophage P22 gp26: Correlation between Structural Stability and Length of the -Helical Trimeric Coiled Coil

    SciTech Connect

    Bhardwaj, A.; Walker-Kopp, N; Casjens, S; Cingolani, G

    2009-01-01

    Bacteriophages of the Podoviridae family use short noncontractile tails to inject their genetic material into Gram-negative bacteria. In phage P22, the tail contains a thin needle, encoded by the phage gene 26, which is essential both for stabilization and for ejection of the packaged viral genome. Bioinformatic analysis of the N-terminal domain of gp26 (residues 1-60) led us to identify a family of genes encoding putative homologues of the tail needle gp26. To validate this idea experimentally and to explore their diversity, we cloned the gp26-like gene from phages HK620, Sf6 and HS1, and characterized these gene products in solution. All gp26-like factors contain an elongated {alpha}-helical coiled-coil core consisting of repeating, adjacent trimerization heptads and form trimeric fibers with length ranging between about 240 to 300 {angstrom}. gp26 tail needles display a high level of structural stability in solution, with Tm (temperature of melting) between 85 and 95 C. To determine how the structural stability of these phage fibers correlates with the length of the {alpha}-helical core, we investigated the effect of insertions and deletions in the helical core. In the P22 tail needle, we identified an 85-residue-long helical domain, termed MiCRU (minimal coiled-coil repeat unit), that can be inserted in-frame inside the gp26 helical core, preserving the straight morphology of the fiber. Likewise, we were able to remove three quarters of the helical core of the HS1 tail needle, minimally decreasing the stability of the fiber. We conclude that in the gp26 family of tail needles, structural stability increases nonlinearly with the length of the {alpha}-helical core. Thus, the overall stability of these bacteriophage fibers is not solely dependent on the number of trimerization repeats in the {alpha}-helical core.

  11. Fiber knob domain lacking the shaft sequence but fused to a coiled coil is a candidate subunit vaccine against egg-drop syndrome.

    PubMed

    Harakuni, Tetsuya; Andoh, Kiyohiko; Sakamoto, Ryu-Ichi; Tamaki, Yukihiro; Miyata, Takeshi; Uefuji, Hirotaka; Yamazaki, Ken-Ichi; Arakawa, Takeshi

    2016-06-08

    Egg-drop syndrome (EDS) virus is an avian adenovirus that causes a sudden drop in egg production and in the quality of the eggs when it infects chickens, leading to substantial economic losses in the poultry industry. Inactivated EDS vaccines produced in embryonated duck eggs or cell culture systems are available for the prophylaxis of EDS. However, recombinant subunit vaccines that are efficacious and inexpensive are a desirable alternative. In this study, we engineered chimeric fusion proteins in which the trimeric fiber knob domain lacking the triple β-spiral motif in the fiber shaft region was genetically fused to trimeric coiled coils, such as those of the engineered form of the GCN4 leucine zipper peptide or chicken cartilage matrix protein (CMP). The fusion proteins were expressed predominantly as soluble trimeric proteins in Escherichia coli at levels of 15-80mg/L of bacterial culture. The single immunization of chickens with the purified fusion proteins, at a dose equivalent to 10μg of the knob moiety, elicited serum antibodies with high hemagglutination inhibition (HI) activities, similar to those induced by an inactivated EDS vaccine. A dose-response analysis indicated that a single immunization with as little as 1μg of the knob moiety of the CMP-knob fusion protein was as effective as the inactivated vaccine in inducing antibodies with HI activity. The immunization of laying hens had no apparent adverse effects on egg production and effectively prevented clinical symptoms of EDS when the chickens were challenged with pathogenic EDS virus. This study demonstrates that the knob domain lacking the shaft sequence but fused to a trimeric coiled coil is a promising candidate subunit vaccine for the prophylaxis of EDS in chickens. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Far3p domains involved in the interactions of Far proteins and pheromone-induced cell cycle arrest in budding yeast.

    PubMed

    Lai, Fenju; Wu, Rentian; Wang, Jiafeng; Li, Chunming; Zou, Lan; Lu, Yongjun; Liang, Chun

    2011-02-01

    Far3p (factor arrest), a protein that interacts with Far7-11p, is required for the pheromone-mediated cell cycle arrest in G1 phase. We used a combination of computational and experimental strategies to identify the Far3p self-association, to map the Far3p domains that interact with Far3p itself and with other Far proteins, and to reveal the importance of the two coiled-coil motifs of Far3p in the integrity and function of the Far complex. We show that Far3p self-associates through its central region and its C-terminal coiled-coil domain, that the amino acid 61-100 region of Far3p interacts with Far7p, and that the Far3p N-terminal coiled-coil domain interacts with Far9p and Far10p. Mutation of the N-terminal coiled coil disrupts the interactions of Far3p with Far9p and Far10p, and mutation of the C-terminal domain weakens the Far3p self-interaction. Although the N- and C-terminal coiled-coil mutants reserve some of the interactions with itself and some other Far proteins, both mutants are defective in the pheromone-mediated G1 arrest, indicating that both coiled-coil motifs of Far3p are essential for the integrity and the function of the Far complex.

  13. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Structures of GCN4p Are Largely Conserved When Ion Pairs Are Disrupted at Acidic pH but Show a Relaxation of the Coiled Coil Superhelix.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Anne R; Brady, Megan R; Maciejewski, Mark W; Kammerer, Richard A; Alexandrescu, Andrei T

    2017-03-09

    To understand the roles ion pairs play in stabilizing coiled coils, we determined nuclear magnetic resonance structures of GCN4p at three pH values. At pH 6.6, all acidic residues are fully charged; at pH 4.4, they are half-charged, and at pH 1.5, they are protonated and uncharged. The α-helix monomer and coiled coil structures of GCN4p are largely conserved, except for a loosening of the coiled coil quaternary structure with a decrease in pH. Differences going from neutral to acidic pH include (i) an unwinding of the coiled coil superhelix caused by the loss of interchain ion pair contacts, (ii) a small increase in the separation of the monomers in the dimer, (iii) a loosening of the knobs-into-holes packing motifs, and (iv) an increased separation between oppositely charged residues that participate in ion pairs at neutral pH. Chemical shifts (HN, N, C', Cα, and Cβ) of GCN4p display a seven-residue periodicity that is consistent with α-helical structure and is invariant with pH. By contrast, periodicity in hydrogen exchange rates at neutral pH is lost at acidic pH as the exchange mechanism moves into the EX1 regime. On the basis of (1)H-(15)N nuclear Overhauser effect relaxation measurements, the α-helix monomers experience only small increases in picosecond to nanosecond backbone dynamics at acidic pH. By contrast, (13)C rotating frame T1 relaxation (T1ρ) data evince an increase in picosecond to nanosecond side-chain dynamics at lower pH, particularly for residues that stabilize the coiled coil dimerization interface through ion pairs. The results on the structure and dynamics of GCNp4 over a range of pH values help rationalize why a single structure at neutral pH poorly predicts the pH dependence of the unfolding stability of the coiled coil.

  14. Site-specific experiments on folding/unfolding of Jun coiled coils: thermodynamic and kinetic parameters from spin inversion transfer nuclear magnetic resonance at leucine-18.

    PubMed

    d'Avignon, D André; Bretthorst, G Larry; Holtzer, Marilyn Emerson; Schwarz, Kathleen A; Angeletti, Ruth Hogue; Mints, Lisa; Holtzer, Alfred

    2006-10-15

    The 32-residue leucine zipper subsequence, called here Jun-lz, associates in benign media to form a parallel two-stranded coiled coil. Studies are reported of its thermal unfolding/folding transition by circular dichroism (CD) on samples of natural isotopic abundance and by both equilibrium and spin inversion transfer (SIT) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) on samples labeled at the leucine-18 alpha-carbon with 99% 13C. The data cover a wide range of temperature and concentration, and show that Jun-lz unfolds below room temperature, being far less stable than some other leucine zippers such as GCN4. 13C-NMR shows two well-separated resonances. We ascribe the upfield one to 13C spins on unfolded single chains and the downfield one to 13C spins on coiled-coil dimers. Their relative intensities provide a measure of the unfolding equilibrium constant. In SIT NMR, the recovery of the equilibrium magnetization after one resonance is inverted is modulated in part by the unfolding and folding rate constants, which are accessible from the data. Global Bayesian analysis of the equilibrium and SIT NMR data provide values for the standard enthalpy, entropy, and heat capacity of unfolding, and show the latter to be unusually large. The CD results are compatible with the NMR findings. Global Bayesian analysis of the SIT NMR data yields the corresponding activation parameters for unfolding and folding. The results show that both reaction directions are activated processes. Activation for unfolding is entropy driven, enthalpy opposed. Activation for folding is strongly enthalpy opposed and somewhat entropy opposed, falsifying the idea that the barrier for folding is solely due to a purely entropic search for properly registered partners. The activation heat capacity is much larger for folding, so almost the entire overall change is due to the folding direction. This latter finding, if it applies to GCN4 leucine zippers, clears up an extant apparent disagreement between folding rate

  15. Phage phi29 DNA replication organizer membrane protein p16.7 contains a coiled coil and a dimeric, homeodomain-related, functional domain.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Espín, Daniel; Mateu, Mauricio G; Villar, Laurentino; Marina, Anabel; Salas, Margarita; Meijer, Wilfried J J

    2004-11-26

    The Bacillus subtilis phage varphi29-encoded membrane protein p16.7 is one of the few proteins known to be involved in prokaryotic membrane-associated DNA replication. Protein p16.7 contains an N-terminal transmembrane domain responsible for membrane localization. A soluble variant lacking the N-terminal membrane anchor, p16.7A, forms dimers in solution, binds to DNA, and has affinity for the varphi29 terminal protein. Here we show that the soluble N-terminal half of p16.7A can form a dimeric coiled coil. However, a second domain, located in the C-terminal half of the protein, has been characterized as being the main domain responsible for p16.7 dimerization. This 70-residue C-terminal domain, named p16.7C, also constitutes the functional part of the protein as it binds to DNA and terminal protein. Sequence alignments, secondary structure predictions, and spectroscopic analyses suggest that p16.7C is evolutionarily related to DNA binding homeodomains, present in many eukaryotic transcriptional regulator proteins. Based on the results, a structural model of p16.7 is presented.

  16. Hydrogen-Rich Medium Attenuated Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Monocyte-Endothelial Cell Adhesion and Vascular Endothelial Permeability via Rho-Associated Coiled-Coil Protein Kinase.

    PubMed

    Xie, Keliang; Wang, Weina; Chen, Hongguang; Han, Huanzhi; Liu, Daquan; Wang, Guolin; Yu, Yonghao

    2015-07-01

    Sepsis is the leading cause of death in critically ill patients. In recent years, molecular hydrogen, as an effective free radical scavenger, has been shown a selective antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effect, and it is beneficial in the treatment of sepsis. Rho-associated coiled-coil protein kinase (ROCK) participates in junction between normal cells, and regulates vascular endothelial permeability. In this study, we used lipopolysaccharide to stimulate vascular endothelial cells and explored the effects of hydrogen-rich medium on the regulation of adhesion of monocytes to endothelial cells and vascular endothelial permeability. We found that hydrogen-rich medium could inhibit adhesion of monocytes to endothelial cells and decrease levels of adhesion molecules, whereas the levels of transepithelial/endothelial electrical resistance values and the expression of vascular endothelial cadherin were increased after hydrogen-rich medium treatment. Moreover, hydrogen-rich medium could lessen the expression of ROCK, as a similar effect of its inhibitor Y-27632. In addition, hydrogen-rich medium could also inhibit adhesion of polymorphonuclear neutrophils to endothelial cells. In conclusion, hydrogen-rich medium could regulate adhesion of monocytes/polymorphonuclear neutrophils to endothelial cells and vascular endothelial permeability, and this effect might be related to the decreased expression of ROCK protein.

  17. cDNA cloning and chromosomal mapping of a predicted coiled-coil proline-rich protein immunogenic in meningioma patients.

    PubMed

    Heckel, D; Brass, N; Fischer, U; Blin, N; Steudel, I; Türeci, O; Fackler, O; Zang, K D; Meese, E

    1997-11-01

    There is increasing evidence that tumor expressed genes induce immune responses in cancer patients. To identify meningioma expressed antigens, we established a meningioma expression library which was screened with autologous serum. Out of 20 positive cDNA clones eight share high sequence homologies as determined by sequence analysis. These eight clones can be grouped into three classes which differ in length and which are characterized by specific sequence variations. The longest open reading frame was found to be 2412 bp encoding an immunoreactive antigen termed meningioma expressed antigen 6 (MEA6). Using five sequence specific primer pairs, somatic hybrid panel mapping revealed locations of the three classes on several human chromosomes including chromosomes 2, 3, 6, 7, 9, 13 and 14. The mapping results were confirmed by fluorescence in situ hybridization. RT-PCR showed consistent expression of all classes in several meningiomas and additional tissues using the same set of primer pairs as for chromosomal mapping. The expression data were confirmed by northern blot analysis. For the predicted amino acid sequence BLASTX revealed a homology to a human C219-reactive peptide which was previously isolated by an antibody directed against p-glycoprotein. Sequence properties of the MEA protein include an acidic activation domain, a proline-rich region and two coiled-coil domains indicating protein binding and activation functions.

  18. Identification and characterization of the Escherichia coli envC gene encoding a periplasmic coiled-coil protein with putative peptidase activity.

    PubMed

    Hara, Hiroshi; Narita, Setsuko; Karibian, Doris; Park, James T; Yamamoto, Yoshihiro; Nishimura, Yukinobu

    2002-07-02

    PM61 is a chain-forming envC strain of Escherichia coli with a leaky outer membrane. It was found to have an oversized penicillin-binding protein 3, which was the result of an IS4 insertion in the prc gene. The other properties of PM61 were caused by the envC mutation. We cloned the envC (yibP) gene and identified the mutation site, causing a single residue substitution, H366Y, in the PM61 envC allele. The gene product was predicted to be a periplasmic protein having coiled-coil structure in the N-terminal region and homology to lysostaphin in the C-terminal region. Overexpression of envC inhibited cell growth, and overexpression of the PM61 mutant allele caused cell lysis. Disruption of the chromosomal envC caused the same defects as the envC point mutation, indicating the gene is dispensable for growth but important for normal septation/separation and cell envelope integrity.

  19. Bivalent Formation 1, a plant-conserved gene, encodes an OmpH/coiled-coil motif-containing protein required for meiotic recombination in rice.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Lian; Han, Jingluan; Chen, Yuanling; Wang, Yingxiang; Liu, Yao-Guang

    2017-03-24

    Meiosis is essential for eukaryotic sexual reproduction and plant fertility. In comparison with over 80 meiotic genes identified in Arabidopsis, there are only ~30 meiotic genes characterized in rice (Oryza sativa L.). Many genes involved in the regulation of meiotic progression remain to be determined. In this study, we identified a sterile rice mutant and cloned a new meiotic gene, OsBVF1 (Bivalent Formation 1) by map-based cloning. Molecular genetics and cytological approaches were carried out to address the function of OsBVF1 in meiosis. Phylogenetic analyses were used to study the evolution of OsBVF1 and its homologs in plant species. Here we showed that the bvf1 male meiocytes were defective in formation of meiotic double strand break, thereby resulting in a failure of bivalent formation in diakinesis and unequal chromosome segregation in anaphase I. The causal gene, OsBVF1, encodes a unique OmpH/coiled-coil motif-containing protein and its homologs are highly conserved in the plant kingdom and seem to be a single-copy gene in the majority of plant species. Our study demonstrates that OsBVF1 is a novel plant-conserved factor involved in meiotic recombination in rice, providing a new insight into understanding of meiotic progression regulation.

  20. The Drosophila SUN protein Spag4 cooperates with the coiled-coil protein Yuri Gagarin to maintain association of the basal body and spermatid nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Kracklauer, Martin P.; Wiora, Heather M.; Deery, William J.; Chen, Xin; Bolival, Benjamin; Romanowicz, Dwight; Simonette, Rebecca A.; Fuller, Margaret T.; Fischer, Janice A.; Beckingham, Kathleen M.

    2010-01-01

    Maintaining the proximity of centrosomes to nuclei is important in several cellular contexts, and LINC complexes formed by SUN and KASH proteins are crucial in this process. Here, we characterize the presumed Drosophila ortholog of the mammalian SUN protein, sperm-associated antigen 4 (Spag4, previously named Giacomo), and demonstrate that Spag4 is required for centriole and nuclear attachment during spermatogenesis. Production of spag4 mRNA is limited to the testis, and Spag4 protein shows a dynamic pattern of association with the germline nuclei, including a concentration of protein at the site of attachment of the single spermatid centriole. In the absence of Spag4, nuclei and centrioles or basal bodies (BBs) dissociate from each other after meiosis. This role of Spag4 in centriolar attachment does not involve either of the two KASH proteins of the Drosophila genome (Klarsicht and MSP-300), but does require the coiled-coil protein Yuri Gagarin. Yuri shows an identical pattern of localization at the nuclear surface to Spag4 during spermatogenesis, and epistasis studies show that the activities of Yuri and dynein-dynactin are downstream of spag4 in this centriole attachment pathway. The later defects in spermatogenesis seen for yuri and spag4 mutants are similar, suggesting they could be secondary to initial disruption of events at the nuclear surface. PMID:20647369

  1. The Drosophila SUN protein Spag4 cooperates with the coiled-coil protein Yuri Gagarin to maintain association of the basal body and spermatid nucleus.

    PubMed

    Kracklauer, Martin P; Wiora, Heather M; Deery, William J; Chen, Xin; Bolival, Benjamin; Romanowicz, Dwight; Simonette, Rebecca A; Fuller, Margaret T; Fischer, Janice A; Beckingham, Kathleen M

    2010-08-15

    Maintaining the proximity of centrosomes to nuclei is important in several cellular contexts, and LINC complexes formed by SUN and KASH proteins are crucial in this process. Here, we characterize the presumed Drosophila ortholog of the mammalian SUN protein, sperm-associated antigen 4 (Spag4, previously named Giacomo), and demonstrate that Spag4 is required for centriole and nuclear attachment during spermatogenesis. Production of spag4 mRNA is limited to the testis, and Spag4 protein shows a dynamic pattern of association with the germline nuclei, including a concentration of protein at the site of attachment of the single spermatid centriole. In the absence of Spag4, nuclei and centrioles or basal bodies (BBs) dissociate from each other after meiosis. This role of Spag4 in centriolar attachment does not involve either of the two KASH proteins of the Drosophila genome (Klarsicht and MSP-300), but does require the coiled-coil protein Yuri Gagarin. Yuri shows an identical pattern of localization at the nuclear surface to Spag4 during spermatogenesis, and epistasis studies show that the activities of Yuri and dynein-dynactin are downstream of spag4 in this centriole attachment pathway. The later defects in spermatogenesis seen for yuri and spag4 mutants are similar, suggesting they could be secondary to initial disruption of events at the nuclear surface.

  2. A CC-SAM, for coiled coil-sterile α motif, domain targets the scaffold KSR-1 to specific sites in the plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Koveal, Dorothy; Schuh-Nuhfer, Natasha; Ritt, Daniel; Page, Rebecca; Morrison, Deborah K; Peti, Wolfgang

    2012-12-18

    Kinase suppressor of Ras-1 (KSR-1) is an essential scaffolding protein that coordinates the assembly of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) module, consisting of the MAPK kinase kinase Raf, the MAPK kinase MEK (mitogen-activated or extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase kinase), and the MAPK ERK (extracellular signal-regulated kinase) to facilitate activation of MEK and thus ERK. Although KSR-1 is targeted to the cell membrane in part by its atypical C1 domain, which binds to phospholipids, other domains may be involved. We identified another domain in KSR-1 that we termed CC-SAM, which is composed of a coiled coil (CC) and a sterile α motif (SAM). The CC-SAM domain targeted KSR-1 to specific signaling sites at the plasma membrane in growth factor-treated cells, and it bound directly to various micelles and bicelles in vitro, indicating that the CC-SAM functioned as a membrane-binding module. By combining nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and experiments in cultured cells, we found that membrane binding was mediated by helix α3 of the CC motif and that mutating residues in α3 abolished targeting of KSR-1 to the plasma membrane. Thus, in addition to the atypical C1 domain, the CC-SAM domain is required to target KSR-1 to the plasma membrane.

  3. A heterozygous dominant-negative mutation in the coiled-coil domain of STAT1 is the cause of autosomal-dominant Mendelian susceptibility to mycobacterial diseases.

    PubMed

    Ueki, Masahiro; Yamada, Masafumi; Ito, Kenta; Tozawa, Yusuke; Morino, Saeko; Horikoshi, Yuho; Takada, Hidetoshi; Abdrabou, Shimaa Said Mohamed Ali; Takezaki, Shunichiro; Kobayashi, Ichiro; Ariga, Tadashi

    2017-01-01

    Heterozygous dominant-negative mutations of STAT1 are responsible for autosomal-dominant Mendelian susceptibility to mycobacterial diseases (AD-MSMD). So far, only 7 mutations have been previously described and are localized to 3 domains: the DNA-binding domain, the SH2 domain, and the tail segment. In this study, we demonstrated the first coiled-coil domain (CCD) mutation of c.749G>C, p.G250A (G250A) in STAT1 as a genetic cause of AD-MSMD in a patient with mycobacterial multiple osteomyelitis. This de novo heterozygous mutation was shown to have a dominant-negative effect on the gamma-activated sequence (GAS) transcriptional activity following IFN-γ stimulation, which could be attributable to the abolished phosphorylation of STAT1 from the wild-type (WT) allele. The three-dimensional structure of STAT1 revealed the G250 residue was located distant from a cluster of residues affected by gain-of-function mutations responsible for chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis.

  4. From coiled coils to small globular proteins: design of a native-like three-helix bundle.

    PubMed Central

    Bryson, J. W.; Desjarlais, J. R.; Handel, T. M.; DeGrado, W. F.

    1998-01-01

    A monomolecular native-like three-helix bundle has been designed in an iterative process, beginning with a peptide that noncooperatively assembled into an antiparallel three-helix bundle. Three versions of the protein were designed in which specific interactions were incrementally added. The hydrodynamic and spectroscopic properties of the proteins were examined by size exclusion chromatography, sedimentation equilibrium, fluorescence spectroscopy, and NMR. The thermodynamics of folding were evaluated by monitoring the thermal and guanidine-induced unfolding transitions using far UV circular dichroism spectroscopy. The attainment of a unique, native-like state was achieved through the introduction of: (1) helix capping interactions; (2) electrostatic interactions between partially exposed charged residues; (3) a diverse collection of apolar side chains within the hydrophobic core. PMID:9655345

  5. Antibody elicited against the gp41 N-heptad repeat (NHR) coiled-coil can neutralize HIV-1 with modest potency but non-neutralizing antibodies also bind to NHR mimetics.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Josh D; Kinkead, Heather; Brunel, Florence M; Leaman, Dan; Jensen, Richard; Louis, John M; Maruyama, Toshiaki; Bewley, Carole A; Bowdish, Katherine; Clore, G Marius; Dawson, Philip E; Frederickson, Shana; Mage, Rose G; Richman, Douglas D; Burton, Dennis R; Zwick, Michael B

    2008-07-20

    Following CD4 receptor binding to the HIV-1 envelope spike (Env), the conserved N-heptad repeat (NHR) region of gp41 forms a coiled-coil that is a precursor to the fusion reaction. Although it has been a target of drug and vaccine design, there are few monoclonal antibody (mAb) tools with which to probe the antigenicity and immunogenicity specifically of the NHR coiled-coil. Here, we have rescued HIV-1-neutralizing anti-NHR mAbs from immune phage display libraries that were prepared (i) from b9 rabbits immunized with a previously described mimetic of the NHR coiled-coil, N35(CCG)-N13, and (ii) from an HIV-1 infected individual. We describe a rabbit single-chain Fv fragment (scFv), 8K8, and a human Fab, DN9, which specifically recognize NHR coiled-coils that are unoccupied by peptide corresponding to the C-heptad repeat or CHR region of gp41 (e.g. C34). The epitopes of 8K8 and DN9 were found to partially overlap with that of a previously described anti-NHR mAb, IgG D5; however, 8K8 and DN9 were much more specific than D5 for unoccupied NHR trimers. The mAbs, including a whole IgG 8K8 molecule, neutralized primary HIV-1 of clades B and C in a pseudotyped virus assay with comparable, albeit relatively modest potency. Finally, a human Fab T3 and a rabbit serum (both non-neutralizing) were able to block binding of D5 and 8K8 to a gp41 NHR mimetic, respectively, but not the neutralizing activity of these mAbs. We conclude from these results that NHR coiled-coil analogs of HIV-1 gp41 elicit many Abs during natural infection and through immunization, but that due to limited accessibility to the corresponding region on fusogenic gp41 few can neutralize. Caution is therefore required in targeting the NHR for vaccine design. Nevertheless, the mAb panel may be useful as tools for elucidating access restrictions to the NHR of gp41 and in designing potential improvements to mimetics of receptor-activated Env.

  6. Antibody elicited against the gp41 N-heptad repeat (NHR) coiled-coil can neutralize HIV-1 with modest potency but non-neutralizing antibodies also bind to NHR mimetics

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Josh D.; Kinkead, Heather; Brunel, Florence M.; Leaman, Dan; Jensen, Richard; Louis, John M.; Maruyama, Toshiaki; Bewley, Carole A.; Bowdish, Katherine; Clore, G. Marius; Dawson, Philip E.; Frederickson, Shana; Mage, Rose G.; Richman, Douglas D.; Burton, Dennis R.; Zwick, Michael B.

    2008-07-20

    Following CD4 receptor binding to the HIV-1 envelope spike (Env), the conserved N-heptad repeat (NHR) region of gp41 forms a coiled-coil that is a precursor to the fusion reaction. Although it has been a target of drug and vaccine design, there are few monoclonal antibody (mAb) tools with which to probe the antigenicity and immunogenicity specifically of the NHR coiled-coil. Here, we have rescued HIV-1-neutralizing anti-NHR mAbs from immune phage display libraries that were prepared (i) from b9 rabbits immunized with a previously described mimetic of the NHR coiled-coil, N35{sub CCG}-N13, and (ii) from an HIV-1 infected individual. We describe a rabbit single-chain Fv fragment (scFv), 8K8, and a human Fab, DN9, which specifically recognize NHR coiled-coils that are unoccupied by peptide corresponding to the C-heptad repeat or CHR region of gp41 (e.g. C34). The epitopes of 8K8 and DN9 were found to partially overlap with that of a previously described anti-NHR mAb, IgG D5; however, 8K8 and DN9 were much more specific than D5 for unoccupied NHR trimers. The mAbs, including a whole IgG 8K8 molecule, neutralized primary HIV-1 of clades B and C in a pseudotyped virus assay with comparable, albeit relatively modest potency. Finally, a human Fab T3 and a rabbit serum (both non-neutralizing) were able to block binding of D5 and 8K8 to a gp41 NHR mimetic, respectively, but not the neutralizing activity of these mAbs. We conclude from these results that NHR coiled-coil analogs of HIV-1 gp41 elicit many Abs during natural infection and through immunization, but that due to limited accessibility to the corresponding region on fusogenic gp41 few can neutralize. Caution is therefore required in targeting the NHR for vaccine design. Nevertheless, the mAb panel may be useful as tools for elucidating access restrictions to the NHR of gp41 and in designing potential improvements to mimetics of receptor-activated Env.

  7. A silk purse from a sow's ear-bioinspired materials based on α-helical coiled coils.

    PubMed

    Quinlan, Roy A; Bromley, Elizabeth H; Pohl, Ehmke

    2015-02-01

    This past few years have heralded remarkable times for intermediate filaments with new revelations of their structural properties that has included the first crystallographic-based model of vimentin to build on the experimental data of intra-filament interactions determined by chemical cross-linking. Now with these and other advances on their assembly, their biomechanical and their cell biological properties outlined in this review, the exploitation of the biomechanical and structural properties of intermediate filaments, their nanocomposites and biomimetic derivatives in the biomedical and private sectors has started.

  8. The DNA rearrangement that generates the TRK-T3 oncogene involves a novel gene on chromosome 3 whose product has a potential coiled-coil domain.

    PubMed Central

    Greco, A; Mariani, C; Miranda, C; Lupas, A; Pagliardini, S; Pomati, M; Pierotti, M A

    1995-01-01

    Oncogenic rearrangements of the NTRK1 gene (also designated TRKA), encoding one of the receptors for the nerve growth factor, are frequently detected in thyroid carcinomas. Such rearrangements fuse the NTRK1 tyrosine kinase domain to 5'-end sequences belonging to different genes. In previously reported studies we have demonstrated that NTRK1 oncogenic activation involves two genes, TPM3 and TPR, both localized similarly to the receptor tyrosine kinase, on the q arm of chromosome 1. Here we report the characterization of a novel NTRK1-derived thyroid oncogene, named TRK-T3. A cDNA clone, capable of transforming activity, was isolated from a transformant cell line. Sequence analysis revealed that TRK-T3 contains 1,412 nucleotides of NTRK1 preceded by 598 nucleotides belonging to a novel gene that we have named TFG (TRK-fused gene). The TRK-T3 amino acid sequence displays, within the TFG region, a coiled-coil motif that could endow the oncoprotein with the capability to form complexes. The TRK-T3 oncogene encodes a 68-kDa cytoplasmic protein reacting with NTRK1-specific antibodies. By sedimentation gradient experiments the TRK-T3 oncoprotein was shown to form, in vivo, multimeric complexes, most likely trimers or tetramers. The TFG gene is ubiquitously expressed and is located on chromosome 3. The breakpoint producing the TRK-T3 oncogene occurs within exons of both the TFG gene and the NTRK1 gene and produces a chimeric exon that undergoes alternative splicing. Molecular analysis of the NTRK1 rearranged fragments indicated that the chromosomal rearrangement is reciprocal and balanced and involves loss of a few nucleotides of germ line sequences. PMID:7565764

  9. CC2D2A, Encoding A Coiled-Coil and C2 Domain Protein, Causes Autosomal-Recessive Mental Retardation with Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Noor, Abdul; Windpassinger, Christian; Patel, Megha; Stachowiak, Beata; Mikhailov, Anna; Azam, Matloob; Irfan, Muhammad; Siddiqui, Zahid Kamal; Naeem, Farooq; Paterson, Andrew D.; Lutfullah, Muhammad; Vincent, John B.; Ayub, Muhammad

    2008-01-01

    Autosomal-recessive inheritance is believed to be relatively common in mental retardation (MR), although only four genes for nonsyndromic autosomal-recessive mental retardation (ARMR) have been reported. In this study, we ascertained a consanguineous Pakistani family with ARMR in four living individuals from three branches of the family, plus an additional affected individual later identified as a phenocopy. Retinitis pigmentosa was present in affected individuals, but no other features suggestive of a syndromic form of MR were found. We used Affymetrix 500K microarrays to perform homozygosity mapping and identified a homozygous and haploidentical region of 11.2 Mb on chromosome 4p15.33-p15.2. Linkage analysis across this region produced a maximum two-point LOD score of 3.59. We sequenced genes within the critical region and identified a homozygous splice-site mutation segregating in the family, within a coiled-coil and C2 domain-containing gene, CC2D2A. This mutation leads to the skipping of exon 19, resulting in a frameshift and a truncated protein lacking the C2 domain. Conservation analysis for CC2D2A suggests a functional domain near the C terminus as well as the C2 domain. Preliminary functional studies of CC2D2A suggest a possible role in Ca2+-dependent signal transduction. Identifying the function of CC2D2A, and a possible common pathway with CC2D1A, in correct neuronal development and functioning may help identify possible therapeutic targets for MR. PMID:18387594

  10. MicroRNA-148a Acts As a Tumor Suppressor in Osteosarcoma Via Targeting Rho-Associated Coiled-Coil Kinase.

    PubMed

    Yang, HaiYan; Peng, ZhiGang; Da, ZhenZhen; Li, Xin; Cheng, YeXiao; Tan, BinBin; Xiang, Xin; Zheng, HaiPing; Li, Yan; Chen, LanHua; Mo, Ning; Yan, XueXin; Li, Xiaolin; Hu, XiaoHua

    2017-01-23

    MicroRNAs (miRs) have been demonstrated to be involved in the development and progression of osteosarcoma (OS), but themolecular mechanism still remains to be fully investigated. The present study aimed to investigate the function of miR-148a in osteosarcoma, as well as the underlying mechanism. Our data showed that miR-148a was significantly downregulated in OS tissues compared to their matched adjacent normal tissues, and also in OS cell lines compared to normal human osteoblast cells. Low expression of miR-148a was significantly associated with tumor progression and poor prognosis of OS patients. Rho-associated coiled-coil kinase (ROCK) 1 was then identified as a target of miR-148a in Saos-2 and U2OS cells, and the expression of ROCK1 was significantly increased in OS tissues and cell lines. Moreover, the protein expression of ROCK1 was markedly reduced in miR-148a-overexpressing Saos-2 and U2OS cells, but significantly increased in miR-148a-downregulating Saos-2 and U2OS cells. Further investigation indicated that miR-148a had suppressive effects on the proliferating, migratory, and invasive capacities of Saos-2 and U2OS cells. Moreover, overexpression of ROCK1 attenuated the inhibitory effects of miR-148a upregulation on the malignant phenotypes of Saos-2 and U2OS cells. In addition, overexpression of miR-148a significantly inhibited the tumor growth of U2OS cells in nude mice. Taken these data together, we demonstrate that miR-148a acts as a tumor suppressor in OS, partly at least, via targeting ROCK1. Therefore, the miR-148a/ROCK1 axis may become a potential therapeutic target for OS.

  11. A C-Terminal Coiled-Coil Region of CagL is Responsible for Helicobacter Pylori-Induced Il-8 Expression.

    PubMed

    Wiedemann, Tobias; Hofbaur, Stefan; Loell, Eva; Rieder, Gabriele

    2016-09-29

    Interleukin-8 (IL-8) is a potent neutrophil-activating chemokine which triggers the infiltration and migration of neutrophils into areas of bacterial infection. Helicobacter pylori-infected patient studies as well as animal models have revealed that H. pylori type I strains carrying an intact cytotoxin-associated gene pathogenicity island (cag-PAI) with a functional type IV secretion system (T4SS) induce IL-8 expression and secretion in gastric mucosa. This gastric mucosal IL-8 expression correlates with severe histological changes due to H. pylori infection. In the present study, we explored a new recognition pattern on the bacterial adhesion protein CagL inducing IL-8 expression in H. pylori-infected host cells. To analyze the secreted IL-8 concentration, we performed IL-8 enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). To investigate the H. pylori-induced IL-8 expression on the transcriptional level, we transiently transfected gastric epithelial cells (AGS) with a human IL-8 luciferase reporter construct. The results of this study demonstrate that specifically the C-terminal coiled-coil region of the H. pylori CagL protein, a protein described to be located on the tip of the T4SS-pilus, is responsible for several in vitro observations: 1) H. pylori-induced IL-8 secretion via the transforming growth factor (TGF)-α activated epidermal growth factor-receptor (EGF-R) signaling pathway; 2) H. pylori-induced elongation of the cells, a typical CagA-induced phenotype; and 3) the bridging of the T4SS to its human target cells. This novel bacterial-host recognition sequence allows a new insight into how H. pylori induces the inflammatory response in gastric epithelial cells and facilitates the development of precancerous conditions.

  12. A C-Terminal Coiled-Coil Region of CagL is Responsible for Helicobacter Pylori-Induced Il-8 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Wiedemann, Tobias; Hofbaur, Stefan; Loell, Eva; Rieder, Gabriele

    2016-01-01

    Interleukin-8 (IL-8) is a potent neutrophil-activating chemokine which triggers the infiltration and migration of neutrophils into areas of bacterial infection. Helicobacter pylori-infected patient studies as well as animal models have revealed that H. pylori type I strains carrying an intact cytotoxin-associated gene pathogenicity island (cag-PAI) with a functional type IV secretion system (T4SS) induce IL-8 expression and secretion in gastric mucosa. This gastric mucosal IL-8 expression correlates with severe histological changes due to H. pylori infection. In the present study, we explored a new recognition pattern on the bacterial adhesion protein CagL inducing IL-8 expression in H. pylori-infected host cells. To analyze the secreted IL-8 concentration, we performed IL-8 enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). To investigate the H. pylori-induced IL-8 expression on the transcriptional level, we transiently transfected gastric epithelial cells (AGS) with a human IL-8 luciferase reporter construct. The results of this study demonstrate that specifically the C-terminal coiled-coil region of the H. pylori CagL protein, a protein described to be located on the tip of the T4SS-pilus, is responsible for several in vitro observations: 1) H. pylori-induced IL-8 secretion via the transforming growth factor (TGF)-α activated epidermal growth factor-receptor (EGF-R) signaling pathway; 2) H. pylori-induced elongation of the cells, a typical CagA-induced phenotype; and 3) the bridging of the T4SS to its human target cells. This novel bacterial-host recognition sequence allows a new insight into how H. pylori induces the inflammatory response in gastric epithelial cells and facilitates the development of precancerous conditions. PMID:27766167

  13. Functional and mechanistic analyses of biomimetic aminoacyl transfer reactions in de novo designed coiled coil peptides via rational active site engineering.

    PubMed

    Leman, Luke J; Weinberger, Dana A; Huang, Zheng-Zheng; Wilcoxen, Keith M; Ghadiri, M Reza

    2007-03-14

    Ribosomes and nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) carry out instructed peptide synthesis through a series of directed intermodular aminoacyl transfer reactions. We recently reported the design of coiled-coil assemblies that could functionally mimic the elementary aminoacyl loading and intermodular aminoacyl transfer steps of NRPSs. These peptides were designed initially to accelerate aminoacyl transfer mainly through catalysis by approximation by closely juxtaposing four active site moieties, two each from adjacent noncovalently associated helical modules. In our designs peptide self-assembly positions a cysteine residue that is used to covalently capture substrates from solution via transthiolesterification (substrate loading step to generate the aminoacyl donor site) adjacent to an aminoacyl acceptor site provided by a covalently tethered amino acid or modeled by the epsilon-amine of an active site lysine. However, through systematic functional analyses of 48 rationally designed peptide sequences, we have now determined that the substrate loading and intermodular aminoacyl transfer steps can be significantly influenced (up to approximately 103-fold) by engineering changes in the active site microenvironment through amino acid substitutions and variations in the inter-residue distances and geometry. Mechanistic studies based on 15N NMR and kinetic analysis further indicate that certain active site constellations furnish an unexpectedly large pK(a) depression (1.5 pH units) of the aminoacyl-acceptor moiety, helping to explain the observed high rates of aminoacyl transfer in those constructs. Taken together, our studies demonstrate the feasibility of engineering efficient de novo peptide sequences possessing active sites and functions reminiscent of those in natural enzymes.

  14. Klotho gene delivery ameliorates renal hypertrophy and fibrosis in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats by suppressing the Rho-associated coiled-coil kinase signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Deng, Minghong; Luo, Yumei; Li, Yunkui; Yang, Qiuchen; Deng, Xiaoqin; Wu, Ping; Ma, Houxun

    2015-07-01

    The present study aimed to investigate whether klotho gene delivery attenuated renal hypertrophy and fibrosis in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. A recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) carrying mouse klotho full-length cDNA (rAAV.mKL), was constructed for in vivo investigation of klotho expression. Diabetes was induced in rats by a single tail vein injection of 60 mg/kg streptozotocin. Subsequently, the diabetic rats received an intravenous injection of rAAV.mKL, rAAV.green fluorescent protein (GFP) or phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). The Sprague-Dawley rat group received PBS and served as the control group. After 12 weeks, all the rats were sacrificed and ELISA, immunohistochemical and histological analyses, fluorescence microscopy, semi-quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and western blottin were performed. A single dose of rAAV.mKL was found to prevent the progression of renal hypertrophy and fibrosis for at least 12 weeks (duration of study). Klotho expression was suppressed in the diabetic rats, but was increased by rAAV.mKL delivery. rAAV.mKL significantly suppressed diabetes-induced renal hypertrophy and histopathological changes, reduced renal collagen fiber generation and decreased kidney hypertrophy index. In addition, rAAV.mKL decreased the protein expression levels of fibronectin and vimentin, while it downregulated the mRNA expression and activity of Rho-associated coiled-coil kinase (ROCK)I in the kidneys of the diabetic rats. These results indicated that klotho gene delivery ameliorated renal hypertrophy and fibrosis in diabetic rats, possibly by suppressing the ROCK signaling pathway. This may offer a novel approach for the long-term control and renoprotection of diabetes.

  15. Protein kinase A inhibitor, H89, enhances survival and clonogenicity of dissociated human embryonic stem cells through Rho-associated coiled-coil containing protein kinase (ROCK) inhibition.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liang; Xu, Yanqing; Xu, Jiandong; Wei, Yuping; Xu, Xia

    2016-04-01

    Can cell survival of dissociated human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) be increased during culture? A protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor, H89, can significantly enhance survival and clonogenicity of dissociated hESCs without affecting their pluripotency. hESCs are vulnerable to massive cell death upon cellular detachment and dissociation. hESCs were dissociated into single cells and then cultured in feeder-dependent and -independent manners. H89 was added to the culture medium at different concentrations for 1 day. The statistical results were obtained from at least three independent experiments (n ≥ 4). The group without treatment was used as the negative control. 4 µM H89 was added in the culture medium to promote cell survival and colony formation of dissociated hESCs. MTT method and propidium iodide (PI) staining were used to determine cell proliferation, cell death and cell cycle, respectively. To count colony formation, alkaline phosphatase (AP) staining was carried out. Western blot was performed to determine protein expression. Except AP staining, immunofluorescence, RT-PCR and karyotype analysis were used to confirm the pluripotent state of H89 treated hESCs. H89 inhibits the dissociation-induced phosphorylation of PKA and two substrates of Rho-associated coiled-coil containing protein kinase (ROCK), myosin light chain (MLC2) and myosin phosphatase target subunit 1 (MYPT1), significantly increases cell survival and colony formation, and strongly depresses dissociation-induced cell death and cell blebbing without affecting the pluripotency of hESCs and their differentiation in vitro. Appropriate H89 concentration should be used and 1 day of H89 treatment is sufficient for promoting survival and colony formation of dissociated hESCs. These results provide an alternative for human pluripotent stem cell (hPSC) culture, broaden the scope of participants in the cell death of single hES cells after dissociation and further enlighten clues to understand the

  16. Complexes of neutralizing and non-neutralizing affinity matured Fabs with a mimetic of the internal trimeric coiled-coil of HIV-1 gp41.

    PubMed

    Gustchina, Elena; Li, Mi; Ghirlando, Rodolfo; Schuck, Peter; Louis, John M; Pierson, Jason; Rao, Prashant; Subramaniam, Sriram; Gustchina, Alla; Clore, G Marius; Wlodawer, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    A series of mini-antibodies (monovalent and bivalent Fabs) targeting the conserved internal trimeric coiled-coil of the N-heptad repeat (N-HR) of HIV-1 gp41 has been previously constructed and reported. Crystal structures of two closely related monovalent Fabs, one (Fab 8066) broadly neutralizing across a wide panel of HIV-1 subtype B and C viruses, and the other (Fab 8062) non-neutralizing, representing the extremes of this series, were previously solved as complexes with 5-Helix, a gp41 pre-hairpin intermediate mimetic. Binding of these Fabs to covalently stabilized chimeric trimers of N-peptides of HIV-1 gp41 (named (CCIZN36)3 or 3-H) has now been investigated using X-ray crystallography, cryo-electron microscopy, and a variety of biophysical methods. Crystal structures of the complexes between 3-H and Fab 8066 and Fab 8062 were determined at 2.8 and 3.0 Å resolution, respectively. Although the structures of the complexes with the neutralizing Fab 8066 and its non-neutralizing counterpart Fab 8062 were generally similar, small differences between them could be correlated with the biological properties of these antibodies. The conformations of the corresponding CDRs of each antibody in the complexes with 3-H and 5-Helix are very similar. The adaptation to a different target upon complex formation is predominantly achieved by changes in the structure of the trimer of N-HR helices, as well as by adjustment of the orientation of the Fab molecule relative to the N-HR in the complex, via rigid-body movement. The structural data presented here indicate that binding of three Fabs 8062 with high affinity requires more significant changes in the structure of the N-HR trimer compared to binding of Fab 8066. A comparative analysis of the structures of Fabs complexed to different gp41 intermediate mimetics allows further evaluation of biological relevance for generation of neutralizing antibodies, as well as provides novel structural insights into immunogen design.

  17. Structural analysis of the predicted coiled-coil rod domain of the cytoplasmic bullous pemphigoid antigen (BPAG1). Empirical localization of the N-terminal globular domain-rod boundary.

    PubMed

    Tang, H Y; Chaffotte, A F; Thacher, S M

    1996-04-19

    The bullous pemphigoid antigen BPAG1 is required for keratin filament linkage to the hemidesmosome, an adhesion complex in epithelial basal cells. BPAG1 structural organization is similar to the intermediate filament-associated proteins desmoplakin I (DPI) and plectin. All three proteins have predicted dumbbell-like structure with central alpha-helical coiled-coil rod and regions of N- and C-terminal homology. To characterize the size of the N-terminal globular domain in BPAG1, two polypeptides spanning possible boundaries with the coiled-coil rod domain of BPAG1 were expressed in Escherichia coli. BP-1 (Mr = 111,000), containing amino acids 663-1581 of BPAG1 (Sawamura, D., Li, K., Chu, M.-L., and Uitto, J. (1991) J. Biol. Chem. 266, 17784-17790), and BP-1A, with a 186 amino acid N-terminal deletion, were purified. BP-1 and BP-1A behave as highly asymmetric dimers in aqueous solution according to velocity sedimentation and gel filtration. Both have globular heads with rod-like tails of roughly equal length, 55-60 nm, upon rotary shadowing. BP-1A content of alpha-helix, determined by circular dichroism, is approximately 90%, consistent with alpha-helical coiled-coil formation in the rod-like tails. The estimated rod length, 383 +/- 57 amino acids (0.15 nm/amino acid), implies that globular folding in the BPAG1 N-terminal extends to the end of N-terminal homology with DPI and plectin. These findings support the existence of a common domain structure in the N-terminal regions of the BPAG1/DPI/plectin family.

  18. N- and C-terminal residues combine in the fusion-pH influenza hemagglutinin HA2 subunit to form an N cap that terminates the triple-stranded coiled coil

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jue; Skehel, John J.; Wiley, Don C.

    1999-01-01

    The structure of a stable recombinant ectodomain of influenza hemagglutinin HA2 subunit, EHA2 (23–185), defined by proteolysis studies of the intact bacterial-expressed ectodomain, was determined to 1.9-Å resolution by using x-ray crystallography. The structure reveals a domain composed of N- and C-terminal residues that form an N cap terminating both the N-terminal α-helix and the central coiled coil. The N cap is formed by a conserved sequence, and part of it is found in the neutral pH conformation of HA. The C-terminal 23 residues of the ectodomain form a 72-Å long nonhelical structure ordered to within 7 residues of the transmembrane anchor. The structure implies that continuous α helices are not required for membrane fusion at either the N or C termini. The difference in stability between recombinant molecules with and without the N cap sequences suggests that additional free energy for membrane fusion may become available after the formation of the central triple-stranded coiled coil and insertion of the fusion peptide into the target membrane. PMID:10430879

  19. Contribution of hydrophobic interactions to protein stability.

    PubMed

    Pace, C Nick; Fu, Hailong; Fryar, Katrina Lee; Landua, John; Trevino, Saul R; Shirley, Bret A; Hendricks, Marsha McNutt; Iimura, Satoshi; Gajiwala, Ketan; Scholtz, J Martin; Grimsley, Gerald R

    2011-05-06

    Our goal was to gain a better understanding of the contribution of hydrophobic interactions to protein stability. We measured the change in conformational stability, Δ(ΔG), for hydrophobic mutants of four proteins: villin headpiece subdomain (VHP) with 36 residues, a surface protein from Borrelia burgdorferi (VlsE) with 341 residues, and two proteins previously studied in our laboratory, ribonucleases Sa and T1. We compared our results with those of previous studies and reached the following conclusions: (1) Hydrophobic interactions contribute less to the stability of a small protein, VHP (0.6±0.3 kcal/mol per -CH(2)- group), than to the stability of a large protein, VlsE (1.6±0.3 kcal/mol per -CH(2)- group). (2) Hydrophobic interactions make the major contribution to the stability of VHP (40 kcal/mol) and the major contributors are (in kilocalories per mole) Phe18 (3.9), Met13 (3.1), Phe7 (2.9), Phe11 (2.7), and Leu21 (2.7). (3) Based on the Δ(ΔG) values for 148 hydrophobic mutants in 13 proteins, burying a -CH(2)- group on folding contributes, on average, 1.1±0.5 kcal/mol to protein stability. (4) The experimental Δ(ΔG) values for aliphatic side chains (Ala, Val, Ile, and Leu) are in good agreement with their ΔG(tr) values from water to cyclohexane. (5) For 22 proteins with 36 to 534 residues, hydrophobic interactions contribute 60±4% and hydrogen bonds contribute 40±4% to protein stability. (6) Conformational entropy contributes about 2.4 kcal/mol per residue to protein instability. The globular conformation of proteins is stabilized predominantly by hydrophobic interactions. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Contribution of Hydrophobic Interactions to Protein Stability

    PubMed Central

    Pace, C. Nick; Fu, Hailong; Fryar, Katrina Lee; Landua, John; Trevino, Saul R.; Shirley, Bret A.; Hendricks, Marsha McNutt; Iimura, Satoshi; Gajiwala, Ketan; Scholtz, J. Martin; Grimsley, Gerald R.

    2011-01-01

    Our goal was to gain a better understanding of the contribution of hydrophobic interactions to protein stability. We measured the change in conformational stability, Δ(ΔG), for hydrophobic mutants of four proteins: villin head piece subdomain (VHP) with 36 residues, a surface protein from Borrelia burgdorferi (VlsE) with 341 residues, and two proteins previously studied in our laboratory, ribonucleases Sa and T1. We compare our results with previous studies and reach the following conclusions. 1. Hydrophobic interactions contribute less to the stability of a small protein, VHP (0.6 ± 0.3 kcal/mole per –CH2– group), than to the stability of a large protein, VlsE (1.6 ± 0.3 kcal/mol per –CH2– group). 2. Hydrophobic interactions make the major contribution to the stability of VHP (40 kcal/mol) and the major contributors are (in kcal/mol): Phe 18 (3.9), Met 13 (3.1), Phe 7 (2.9), Phe 11 (2.7), and Leu 21 (2.7). 3. Based on Δ(ΔG) values for 148 hydrophobic mutants in 13 proteins, burying a –CH2– group on folding contributes, on average, 1.1 ± 0.5 kcal/mol to protein stability. 4. The experimental Δ(ΔG) values for aliphatic side chains (Ala, Val, Ile, and Leu) are in good agreement with their ΔGtr values from water to cyclohexane. 5. For 22 proteins with 36 to 534 residues, hydrophobic interactions contribute 60 ± 4% and hydrogen bonds 40 ± 4% to protein stability. 6. Conformational entropy contributes about 2.4 kcal/mol per residue to protein instability. The globular conformation of proteins is stabilized predominately by hydrophobic interactions. PMID:21377472

  1. Monoclonal anti-mouse laminin antibodies: AL-1 reacts with laminin alpha1 chain, AL-2 with laminin beta1 chain, and AL-4 with the coiled-coil domain of laminin beta1 chain.

    PubMed

    Schéele, Susanne; Sasaki, Takako; Arnal-Estapé, Anna; Durbeej, Madeleine; Ekblom, Peter

    2006-07-01

    We analyzed the reactivity of three different commercially available rat monoclonal antibodies raised against mouse laminin-alpha1beta1gamma1 (laminin-111), AL-1, AL-2, and AL-4. Using ELISA assays, Western blot analysis and immunostainings we present refined epitope maps for these three laminin monoclonals. AL-1 reacted, as predicted with laminin alpha1 chain. AL-4 has also been marketed as an alpha1 chain specific probe, but we show here that AL-4 detects mouse laminin beta1 chain, in the distal part of the coiled-coil region. AL-2 was predicted to react with all three chains near the cross-region, but seems to primarily react with laminin beta1 chain.

  2. Direct interactions between the coiled-coil tip of DksA and the trigger loop of RNA polymerase mediate transcriptional regulation

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    E. coli DksA is in a class of transcription factors that modify RNA polymerase (RNAP) in all three kingdoms of life. DksA potentiates the effects of the global regulator ppGpp and the initiating NTP, controlling transcription initiation without binding to DNA. Incorporating benzoyl-phenylalanine (Bp...

  3. F-actin asymmetry and the endoplasmic reticulum-associated TCC-1 protein contribute to stereotypic spindle movements in the Caenorhabditis elegans embryo.

    PubMed

    Berends, Christian W H; Muñoz, Javier; Portegijs, Vincent; Schmidt, Ruben; Grigoriev, Ilya; Boxem, Mike; Akhmanova, Anna; Heck, Albert J R; van den Heuvel, Sander

    2013-07-01

    The microtubule spindle apparatus dictates the plane of cell cleavage in animal cells. During development, dividing cells control the position of the spindle to determine the size, location, and fate of daughter cells. Spindle positioning depends on pulling forces that act between the cell periphery and astral microtubules. This involves dynein recruitment to the cell cortex by a heterotrimeric G-protein α subunit in complex with a TPR-GoLoco motif protein (GPR-1/2, Pins, LGN) and coiled-coil protein (LIN-5, Mud, NuMA). In this study, we searched for additional factors that contribute to spindle positioning in the one-cell Caenorhabditis elegans embryo. We show that cortical actin is not needed for Gα-GPR-LIN-5 localization and pulling force generation. Instead, actin accumulation in the anterior actually reduces pulling forces, possibly by increasing cortical rigidity. Examining membrane-associated proteins that copurified with GOA-1 Gα, we found that the transmembrane and coiled-coil domain protein 1 (TCC-1) contributes to proper spindle movements. TCC-1 localizes to the endoplasmic reticulum membrane and interacts with UNC-116 kinesin-1 heavy chain in yeast two-hybrid assays. RNA interference of tcc-1 and unc-116 causes similar defects in meiotic spindle positioning, supporting the concept of TCC-1 acting with kinesin-1 in vivo. These results emphasize the contribution of membrane-associated and cortical proteins other than Gα-GPR-LIN-5 in balancing the pulling forces that position the spindle during asymmetric cell division.

  4. Tubulin polymerization promoting protein 1 (Tppp1) phosphorylation by Rho-associated coiled-coil kinase (rock) and cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (Cdk1) inhibits microtubule dynamics to increase cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Schofield, Alice V; Gamell, Cristina; Suryadinata, Randy; Sarcevic, Boris; Bernard, Ora

    2013-03-15

    Tubulin polymerization promoting protein 1 (Tppp1) regulates microtubule (MT) dynamics via promoting MT polymerization and inhibiting histone deacetylase 6 (Hdac6) activity to increase MT acetylation. Our results reveal that as a consequence, Tppp1 inhibits cell proliferation by delaying the G1/S-phase and the mitosis to G1-phase transitions. We show that phosphorylation of Tppp1 by Rho-associated coiled-coil kinase (Rock) prevents its Hdac6 inhibitory activity to enable cells to enter S-phase. Whereas, our analysis of the role of Tppp1 during mitosis revealed that inhibition of its MT polymerizing and Hdac6 regulatory activities were necessary for cells to re-enter the G1-phase. During this investigation, we also discovered that Tppp1 is a novel Cyclin B/Cdk1 (cyclin-dependent kinase) substrate and that Cdk phosphorylation of Tppp1 inhibits its MT polymerizing activity. Overall, our results show that dual Rock and Cdk phosphorylation of Tppp1 inhibits its regulation of the cell cycle to increase cell proliferation.

  5. A role for the Rho-p160 Rho coiled-coil kinase axis in the chemokine stromal cell-derived factor-1alpha-induced lymphocyte actomyosin and microtubular organization and chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Vicente-Manzanares, Miguel; Cabrero, José Román; Rey, Mercedes; Pérez-Martínez, Manuel; Ursa, Angeles; Itoh, Kazuyuki; Sánchez-Madrid, Francisco

    2002-01-01

    The possible involvement of the Rho-p160ROCK (Rho coiled-coil kinase) pathway in the signaling induced by the chemokine Stromal cell-derived factor (SDF)-1alpha has been studied in human PBL. SDF-1alpha induced activation of RhoA, but not that of Rac. RhoA activation was followed by p160ROCK activation mediated by RhoA, which led to myosin light chain (MLC) phosphorylation, which was dependent on RhoA and p160ROCK activities. The kinetics of MLC activation was similar to that of RhoA and p160ROCK. The role of this cascade in overall cell morphology and functional responses to the chemokine was examined employing different chemical inhibitors. Inhibition of either RhoA or p160ROCK did not block SDF-1alpha-induced short-term actin polymerization, but induced the formation of long spikes arising from the cell body, which were found to be microtubule based. This morphological change was associated with an increase in microtubule instability, which argues for an active microtubule polymerization in the formation of these spikes. Inhibition of the Rho-p160ROCK-MLC kinase signaling cascade at different steps blocked lymphocyte migration and the chemotaxis induced by SDF-1alpha. Our results indicate that the Rho-p160ROCK axis plays a pivotal role in the control of the cell shape as a step before lymphocyte migration toward a chemotactic gradient.

  6. Weak-interaction contributions to hyperfine splitting and Lamb shift

    SciTech Connect

    Eides, M.I.

    1996-05-01

    Weak-interaction contributions to hyperfine splitting and the Lamb shift in hydrogen and muonium are discussed. The problem of sign of the weak-interaction contribution to HFS is clarified, and simple physical arguments that make this sign evident are presented. It is shown that weak-interaction contributions to HFS in hydrogen and muonium have opposite signs. A weak-interaction contribution to the Lamb shift is obtained. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  7. The Rab interacting lysosomal protein (RILP) homology domain functions as a novel effector domain for small GTPase Rab36: Rab36 regulates retrograde melanosome transport in melanocytes.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Takahide; Ohbayashi, Norihiko; Fukuda, Mitsunori

    2012-08-17

    Small GTPase Rab functions as a molecular switch that drives membrane trafficking through specific interaction with its effector molecule. Thus, identification of its specific effector domain is crucial to revealing the molecular mechanism that underlies Rab-mediated membrane trafficking. Because of the large numbers of Rab isoforms in higher eukaryotes, however, the effector domains of most of the vertebrate- or mammalian-specific Rabs have yet to be determined. In this study we screened for effector molecules of Rab36, a previously uncharacterized Rab isoform that is largely conserved in vertebrates, and we succeeded in identifying nine Rab36-binding proteins, including RILP (Rab interacting lysosomal protein) family members. Sequence comparison revealed that five of nine Rab36-binding proteins, i.e. RILP, RILP-L1, RILP-L2, and JIP3/4, contain a conserved coiled-coil domain. We identified the coiled-coil domain as a RILP homology domain (RHD) and characterized it as a common Rab36-binding site. Site-directed mutagenesis of the RHD of RILP revealed the different contributions by amino acids in the RHD to binding activity toward Rab7 and Rab36. Expression of RILP in melanocytes, but not expression of its Rab36 binding-deficient mutants, induced perinuclear aggregation of melanosomes, and this effect was clearly attenuated by knockdown of endogenous Rab36 protein. Moreover, knockdown of Rab36 in Rab27A-deficient melanocytes, which normally exhibit perinuclear melanosome aggregation because of increased retrograde melanosome transport activity, caused dispersion of melanosomes from the perinucleus to the cell periphery, but knockdown of Rab7 did not. Our findings indicated that Rab36 mediates retrograde melanosome transport in melanocytes through interaction with RILP.

  8. Ginseng (Panax quinquefolius) attenuates leptin-induced cardiac hypertrophy through inhibition of p115Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor-RhoA/Rho-associated, coiled-coil containing protein kinase-dependent mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway activation.

    PubMed

    Moey, Melissa; Rajapurohitam, Venkatesh; Zeidan, Asad; Karmazyn, Morris

    2011-12-01

    Leptin is a 16-kDa peptide primarily derived from white adipocytes and is typically elevated in plasma of obese individuals. Although leptin plays a critical role in appetite regulation, leptin receptors have been identified in numerous tissues including the heart and have been shown to directly mediate cardiac hypertrophy through RhoA/ROCK (Ras homolog gene family, member A/Rho-associated, coiled-coil containing protein kinase)-dependent p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activation; however, the basis for RhoA stimulation is unknown. Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) catalyze the exchange of GDP for GTP resulting in Rho activation and may be the potential upstream factors mediating leptin-induced RhoA activation and therefore a potential target for inhibition. We investigated the effects of North American ginseng (Panax quinquefolius), reported to reduce cardiac hypertrophy, on RhoA/ROCK and MAPK activation in ventricular cardiomyocytes exposed to leptin (50 ng/ml) and the possible role of p115RhoGEF and p63RhoGEF in these responses. Leptin produced a robust hypertrophic response that was associated with RhoA/ROCK activation resulting in a significant increase in cofilin-2 phosphorylation and actin polymerization, the latter evidenced by a reduction in the G/F actin ratio. These effects were prevented by ginseng (10 μg/ml). The stimulation of RhoA/ROCK by leptin was associated with significantly increased p115RhoGEF gene and protein expression and exchange activity, all of which were completely prevented by ginseng. The ability of ginseng to prevent leptin-induced activation of RhoA/ROCK was further associated with diminished p38 MAPK activation and nuclear translocation. These results demonstrate a potent inhibitory effect of ginseng against leptin-induced cardiac hypertrophy, an effect associated with prevention of p115RhoGEF-RhoA/ROCK-dependent p38 MAPK activation.

  9. Molecular cloning of a coiled-coil-nucleotide-binding-site-leucine-rich repeat gene from pearl millet and its expression pattern in response to the downy mildew pathogen.

    PubMed

    Veena, Mariswamy; Melvin, Prasad; Prabhu, Sreedhara Ashok; Shailasree, Sekhar; Shetty, Hunthrike Shekar; Kini, Kukkundoor Ramachandra

    2016-03-01

    Downy mildew caused by Sclerospora graminicola is a devastating disease of pearl millet. Based on candidate gene approach, a set of 22 resistance gene analogues were identified. The clone RGPM 301 (AY117410) containing a partial sequence shared 83% similarity to rice R-proteins. A full-length R-gene RGA RGPM 301 of 3552 bp with 2979 bp open reading frame encoding 992 amino acids was isolated by the degenerate primers and rapid amplification of cDNA ends polymerase chain reaction (RACE-PCR) approach. It had a molecular mass of 113.96 kDa and isoelectric point (pI) of 8.71. The sequence alignment and phylogenetic analysis grouped it to a non-TIR NBS LRR group. The quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis revealed higher accumulation of the transcripts following inoculation with S. graminicola in the resistant cultivar (IP18296) compared to susceptible cultivar (7042S). Further, significant induction in the transcript levels were observed when treated with abiotic elicitor β-aminobutyric acid (BABA) and biotic elicitor Pseudomonas fluorescens. Exogenous application of phytohormones jasmonic acid or salicylic acid also up-regulated the expression levels of RGA RGPM 301. The treatment of cultivar IP18296 with mitogen-activated protein kinase (MPK) inhibitors (PD98059 and U0126) suppressed the levels of RGA RGPM 301. A 3.5 kb RGA RGPM 301 which is a non-TIR NBS-LRR protein was isolated from pearl millet and its up-regulation during downy mildew interaction was demonstrated by qRT-PCR. These studies indicate a role for this RGA in pearl millet downy mildew interaction.

  10. The mei-P26 Gene Encodes a RING Finger B-box Coiled-Coil-NHL Protein That Regulates Seizure Susceptibility in Drosophilia

    PubMed Central

    Glasscock, Edward; Singhania, Ayush; Tanouye, Mark A.

    2005-01-01

    Seizure-suppressor mutations provide unique insight into the genes and mechanisms involved in regulating nervous system excitability. Drosophila bang-sensitive (BS) mutants present a useful tool for identifying seizure suppressors since they are a well-characterized epilepsy model. Here we describe the isolation and characterization of a new Drosophila seizure-suppressor mutant that results from disruption of the meiotic gene mei-P26, which belongs to the RBCC-NHL family of proteins. The mei-P26 mutation reduces seizures in easily shocked (eas) and slamdance (sda) epileptic flies following mechanical stimulation and electroconvulsive shock. In addition, mutant mei-P26 flies exhibit seizure thresholds at least threefold greater than those of wild type. The mei-P26 phenotypes appear to result from missense mutation of a critical residue in the NHL protein-protein interaction domain of the protein. These results reveal a surprising role for mei-P26 outside of the germline as a regulator of seizure susceptibility, possibly by affecting synaptic development as a ubiquitin ligase. PMID:15937125

  11. The mei-P26 gene encodes a RING finger B-box coiled-coil-NHL protein that regulates seizure susceptibility in Drosophilia.

    PubMed

    Glasscock, Edward; Singhania, Ayush; Tanouye, Mark A

    2005-08-01

    Seizure-suppressor mutations provide unique insight into the genes and mechanisms involved in regulating nervous system excitability. Drosophila bang-sensitive (BS) mutants present a useful tool for identifying seizure suppressors since they are a well-characterized epilepsy model. Here we describe the isolation and characterization of a new Drosophila seizure-suppressor mutant that results from disruption of the meiotic gene mei-P26, which belongs to the RBCC-NHL family of proteins. The mei-P26 mutation reduces seizures in easily shocked (eas) and slamdance (sda) epileptic flies following mechanical stimulation and electroconvulsive shock. In addition, mutant mei-P26 flies exhibit seizure thresholds at least threefold greater than those of wild type. The mei-P26 phenotypes appear to result from missense mutation of a critical residue in the NHL protein-protein interaction domain of the protein. These results reveal a surprising role for mei-P26 outside of the germline as a regulator of seizure susceptibility, possibly by affecting synaptic development as a ubiquitin ligase.

  12. Quantifying dissipative contributions in nanoscale interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Sergio; Gadelrab, Karim R.; Souier, Tewfik; Stefancich, Marco; Chiesa, Matteo

    2012-01-01

    Imaging with nanoscale resolution has become routine practice with the use of scanning probe techniques. Nevertheless, quantification of material properties and processes has been hampered by the complexity of the tip-surface interaction and the dependency of the dynamics on operational parameters. Here, we propose a framework for the quantification of the coefficients of viscoelasticity, surface energy, surface energy hysteresis and elastic modulus. Quantification of these parameters at the nanoscale will provide a firm ground to the understanding and modelling of tribology and nanoscale sciences with true nanoscale resolution.

  13. Solving coiled-coil protein structures

    DOE PAGES

    Dauter, Zbigniew

    2015-02-26

    With the availability of more than 100,000 entries stored in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) that can be used as search models, molecular replacement (MR) is currently the most popular method of solving crystal structures of macromolecules. Significant methodological efforts have been directed in recent years towards making this approach more powerful and practical. This resulted in the creation of several computer programs, highly automated and user friendly, that are able to successfully solve many structures even by researchers who, although interested in structures of biomolecules, are not very experienced in crystallography.

  14. Solving coiled-coil protein structures

    SciTech Connect

    Dauter, Zbigniew

    2015-02-26

    With the availability of more than 100,000 entries stored in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) that can be used as search models, molecular replacement (MR) is currently the most popular method of solving crystal structures of macromolecules. Significant methodological efforts have been directed in recent years towards making this approach more powerful and practical. This resulted in the creation of several computer programs, highly automated and user friendly, that are able to successfully solve many structures even by researchers who, although interested in structures of biomolecules, are not very experienced in crystallography.

  15. Multiple Domains of Human CLASP Contribute to Microtubule Dynamics and Organization In Vitro and in Xenopus Egg Extracts

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Kieren; Nogales, Eva; Heald, Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    Cytoplasmic linker associated proteins (CLASPs) comprise a class of microtubule (MT) plus end-binding proteins (+TIPs) that contribute to the dynamics and organization of MTs during many cellular processes, among them mitosis. Human CLASP proteins contain multiple MT-binding domains, including tumor over-expressed gene (TOG) domains, and a Ser-x-Ile-Pro (SxIP) motif known to target some +TIPs though interaction with end-binding protein 1 (EB1). However, how individual domains contribute to CLASP function is poorly understood. We generated full-length recombinant human CLASP1 and a series of truncation mutants and found that two N-terminal TOG domains make the strongest contribution to MT polymerization and bundling, but also identified a third TOG domain that further contributes to CLASP activity. Plus end tracking by CLASP requires the SxIP motif and interaction with EB1. The C-terminal coiled-coil domain mediates dimerization and association with many other factors, including the kinetochore motor centromere protein E (CENP-E), and the chromokinesin Xkid. Only the full-length protein was able to rescue spindle assembly in Xenopus egg extracts depleted of endogenous CLASP. Deletion of the C-terminal domain caused aberrant MT polymerization and dramatic spindle phenotypes, even with small amounts of added protein, indicating that proper localization of CLASP activity is essential to control MT polymerization during mitosis. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc PMID:22278908

  16. Plant pararetroviruses: interactions of cauliflower mosaic virus with plants and insects.

    PubMed

    Hohn, Thomas

    2013-12-01

    Virion associated protein (VAP) binds to the icosahedral capsid of cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) - a plant pararetrovirus. The interactive coiled-coil domains of this protein can interact with the coiled-coils of either the movement protein or the aphid transmission factor, thereby mediating both cell-to-cell movement and aphid transmission. The host counters CaMV infection with two lines of defense: innate immunity and silencing. The viral protein 'transactivator/viroplasmin' (TAV) is recognized as an effector and either initiates the innate immunity reaction in a non-permissive host or interferes with it in a permissive host. As a silencing suppressor, TAV interferes with dicing of dsRNAs.

  17. Contribution of cation-π interactions in iminium catalysis.

    PubMed

    Mori, Yukie; Yamada, Shinji

    2012-02-21

    Ab initio calculations were carried out for a benzyl-substituted iminium cation derived from (E)-crotonaldehyde and a chiral imidazolidinone that was developed as an organocatalyst by MacMillan et al. At the MP2 level of theory it is predicted that the phenyl group is close to the iminium moiety in the most stable conformer, suggesting that the cation-π interaction contributes to the stabilization of this conformer. Energy decomposition analyses on model systems indicate that the electrostatic and polarization terms make significant contribution to the attractive interactions between the benzene ring and the iminium cation.

  18. A Contribution to the Theory of Preferential Interaction Coefficients

    PubMed Central

    Schurr, J. Michael; Rangel, David P.; Aragon, Sergio R.

    2005-01-01

    A simple and complete derivation of the relation between concentration-based preferential interaction coefficients and integrals over the relevant pair correlation functions is presented for the first time. Certain omissions from the original treatment of pair correlation functions in multicomponent thermodynamics are also addressed. Connections between these concentration-based quantities and the more common molality-based preferential interaction coefficients are also derived. The pair correlation functions and preferential interaction coefficients of both solvent (water) and cosolvent (osmolyte) in the neighborhood of a macromolecule contain contributions from short-range repulsions and generic long-range attractions originating from the macromolecule, as well as from osmolyte-solvent exchange reactions beyond the macromolecular surface. These contributions are evaluated via a heuristic analysis that leads to simple insightful expressions for the preferential interaction coefficients in terms of the volumes excluded to the centers of the water and osmolyte molecules and a sum over the contributions of exchanging sites in the surrounding solution. The preferential interaction coefficients are predicted to exhibit the experimentally observed dependence on osmolyte concentration. Molality-based preferential interaction coefficients that were reported for seven different osmolytes interacting with bovine serum albumin are analyzed using the this formulation together with geometrical parameters reckoned from the crystal structure of human serum albumin. In all cases, the excluded volume contribution, which is the volume excluded to osmolyte centers minus that excluded to water centers in units of \\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} \\begin{equation*}{\\bar {V}}_{1},\\end

  19. Vibrational solvatochromism. III. Rigorous treatment of the dispersion interaction contribution.

    PubMed

    Błasiak, Bartosz; Cho, Minhaeng

    2015-10-28

    A rigorous first principles theory of vibrational solvatochromism including the intermolecular dispersion interaction, which is based on the effective fragment potential method, is developed. The present theory is an extended version of our previous vibrational solvatochromism model that took into account the Coulomb, exchange-repulsion, and induction interactions. We show that the frequency shifts of the amide I mode of N-methylacetamide in H2O and CDCl3, when combined with molecular dynamics simulations, can be quantitatively reproduced by the theory, which indicates that the dispersion interaction contribution to the vibrational frequency shift is not always negligibly small. Nonetheless, the reason that the purely Coulombic interaction model for vibrational solvatochromism works well for describing amide I mode frequency shifts in polar solvents is because the electrostatic contribution is strong and highly sensitive to the relative orientation of surrounding solvent molecules, which is in stark contrast with polarization, dispersion, and exchange-repulsion contributions. It is believed that the theory presented and discussed here will be of great use in quantitatively describing vibrational solvatochromism and electrochromism of infrared probes in not just polar solvent environments but also in biopolymers such as proteins.

  20. Vibrational solvatochromism. III. Rigorous treatment of the dispersion interaction contribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Błasiak, Bartosz; Cho, Minhaeng

    2015-10-01

    A rigorous first principles theory of vibrational solvatochromism including the intermolecular dispersion interaction, which is based on the effective fragment potential method, is developed. The present theory is an extended version of our previous vibrational solvatochromism model that took into account the Coulomb, exchange-repulsion, and induction interactions. We show that the frequency shifts of the amide I mode of N-methylacetamide in H2O and CDCl3, when combined with molecular dynamics simulations, can be quantitatively reproduced by the theory, which indicates that the dispersion interaction contribution to the vibrational frequency shift is not always negligibly small. Nonetheless, the reason that the purely Coulombic interaction model for vibrational solvatochromism works well for describing amide I mode frequency shifts in polar solvents is because the electrostatic contribution is strong and highly sensitive to the relative orientation of surrounding solvent molecules, which is in stark contrast with polarization, dispersion, and exchange-repulsion contributions. It is believed that the theory presented and discussed here will be of great use in quantitatively describing vibrational solvatochromism and electrochromism of infrared probes in not just polar solvent environments but also in biopolymers such as proteins.

  1. Delivery of AAV2/9-Microdystrophin Genes Incorporating Helix 1 of the Coiled-Coil Motif in the C-Terminal Domain of Dystrophin Improves Muscle Pathology and Restores the Level of α1-Syntrophin and α-Dystrobrevin in Skeletal Muscles of mdx Mice

    PubMed Central

    Koo, Taeyoung; Malerba, Alberto; Athanasopoulos, Takis; Trollet, Capucine; Boldrin, Luisa; Ferry, Arnaud; Popplewell, Linda; Foster, Helen; Foster, Keith

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a severe X-linked inherited muscle wasting disorder caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene. Adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors have been extensively used to deliver genes efficiently for dystrophin expression in skeletal muscles. To overcome limited packaging capacity of AAV vectors (<5 kb), truncated recombinant microdystrophin genes with deletions of most of rod and carboxyl-terminal (CT) domains of dystrophin have been developed. We have previously shown the efficiency of mRNA sequence–optimized microdystrophin (ΔR4-23/ΔCT, called MD1) with deletion of spectrin-like repeat domain 4 to 23 and CT domain in ameliorating the pathology of dystrophic mdx mice. However, the CT domain of dystrophin is thought to recruit part of the dystrophin-associated protein complex, which acts as a mediator of signaling between extracellular matrix and cytoskeleton in muscle fibers. In this study, we extended the ΔR4-23/ΔCT microdystrophin by incorporating helix 1 of the coiled-coil motif in the CT domain of dystrophin (MD2), which contains the α1-syntrophin and α-dystrobrevin binding sites. Intramuscular injection of AAV2/9 expressing CT domain–extended microdystrophin showed efficient dystrophin expression in tibialis anterior muscles of mdx mice. The presence of the CT domain of dystrophin in MD2 increased the recruitment of α1-syntrophin and α-dystrobrevin at the sarcolemma and significantly improved the muscle resistance to lengthening contraction–induced muscle damage in the mdx mice compared with MD1. These results suggest that the incorporation of helix 1 of the coiled-coil motif in the CT domain of dystrophin to the microdystrophins will substantially improve their efficiency in restoring muscle function in patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy. PMID:21453126

  2. Evaluating Australian football league player contributions using interactive network simulation.

    PubMed

    Sargent, Jonathan; Bedford, Anthony

    2013-01-01

    This paper focuses on the contribution of Australian Football League (AFL) players to their team's on-field network by simulating player interactions within a chosen team list and estimating the net effect on final score margin. A Visual Basic computer program was written, firstly, to isolate the effective interactions between players from a particular team in all 2011 season matches and, secondly, to generate a symmetric interaction matrix for each match. Negative binomial distributions were fitted to each player pairing in the Geelong Football Club for the 2011 season, enabling an interactive match simulation model given the 22 chosen players. Dynamic player ratings were calculated from the simulated network using eigenvector centrality, a method that recognises and rewards interactions with more prominent players in the team network. The centrality ratings were recorded after every network simulation and then applied in final score margin predictions so that each player's match contribution-and, hence, an optimal team-could be estimated. The paper ultimately demonstrates that the presence of highly rated players, such as Geelong's Jimmy Bartel, provides the most utility within a simulated team network. It is anticipated that these findings will facilitate optimal AFL team selection and player substitutions, which are key areas of interest to coaches. Network simulations are also attractive for use within betting markets, specifically to provide information on the likelihood of a chosen AFL team list "covering the line ". Key pointsA simulated interaction matrix for Australian Rules football players is proposedThe simulations were carried out by fitting unique negative binomial distributions to each player pairing in a sideEigenvector centrality was calculated for each player in a simulated matrix, then for the teamThe team centrality measure adequately predicted the team's winning marginA player's net effect on margin could hence be estimated by replacing him in

  3. Multiple DNA Interactions Contribute to the Initiation of Telomerase Elongation.

    PubMed

    Karademir Andersson, Ahu; Gustafsson, Cecilia; Krishnankutty, Roopesh; Cohn, Marita

    2017-07-07

    Telomerase maintains telomere length and chromosome integrity by adding short tandem repeats of single-stranded DNA to the 3' ends, via reverse transcription of a defined template region of its RNA subunit. To further understand the telomerase elongation mechanism, we studied the primer utilization and extension activity of the telomerase from the budding yeast Naumovozyma castellii (Saccharomyces castellii), which displays a processive nucleotide and repeat addition polymerization. For the efficient initiation of canonical elongation, telomerase required 4-nt primer 3' end complementarity to the template RNA. This DNA-RNA hybrid formation was highly important for the stabilization of an initiation-competent telomerase-DNA complex. Anchor site interactions with the DNA provided additional stabilization to the complex. Our studies indicate three additional separate interactions along the length of the DNA primer, each providing different and distinct contributions to the initiation event. A sequence-independent anchor site interaction acts immediately adjacent to the base-pairing 3' end, indicating a protein anchor site positioned very close to the catalytic site. Two additional anchor regions further 5' on the DNA provide sequence-specific contributions to the initiation of elongation. Remarkably, a non-telomeric sequence in the distal 25- to 32-nt region negatively influences the initiation of telomerase elongation, suggesting an anchor site with a regulatory role in the telomerase elongation decision. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Magnetic interactions in strongly correlated systems: Spin and orbital contributions

    SciTech Connect

    Secchi, A.; Lichtenstein, A.I.; Katsnelson, M.I.

    2015-09-15

    We present a technique to map an electronic model with local interactions (a generalized multi-orbital Hubbard model) onto an effective model of interacting classical spins, by requiring that the thermodynamic potentials associated to spin rotations in the two systems are equivalent up to second order in the rotation angles, when the electronic system is in a symmetry-broken phase. This allows to determine the parameters of relativistic and non-relativistic magnetic interactions in the effective spin model in terms of equilibrium Green’s functions of the electronic model. The Hamiltonian of the electronic system includes, in addition to the non-relativistic part, relativistic single-particle terms such as the Zeeman coupling to an external magnetic field, spin–orbit coupling, and arbitrary magnetic anisotropies; the orbital degrees of freedom of the electrons are explicitly taken into account. We determine the complete relativistic exchange tensors, accounting for anisotropic exchange, Dzyaloshinskii–Moriya interactions, as well as additional non-diagonal symmetric terms (which may include dipole–dipole interaction). The expressions of all these magnetic interactions are determined in a unified framework, including previously disregarded features such as the vertices of two-particle Green’s functions and non-local self-energies. We do not assume any smallness in spin–orbit coupling, so our treatment is in this sense exact. Finally, we show how to distinguish and address separately the spin, orbital and spin–orbital contributions to magnetism, providing expressions that can be computed within a tight-binding Dynamical Mean Field Theory.

  5. Intramolecular Interactions and Regulation of Cofactor Binding by the Four Repressive Elements in the Caspase Recruitment Domain-containing Protein 11 (CARD11) Inhibitory Domain*♦

    PubMed Central

    Jattani, Rakhi P.; Tritapoe, Julia M.

    2016-01-01

    The CARD11 signaling scaffold transmits signaling between antigen receptors on B and T lymphocytes and the transcription factor NF-κB during the adaptive immune response. CARD11 activity is controlled by an inhibitory domain (ID), which participates in intramolecular interactions and prevents cofactor binding prior to receptor triggering. Oncogenic CARD11 mutations associated with the activated B cell-like subtype of diffuse large B cell lymphoma somehow perturb ID-mediated autoinhibition to confer CARD11 with the dysregulated spontaneous signaling to NF-κB that is required for the proliferation and survival of the lymphoma. Here, we investigate how the four repressive elements (REs) we have discovered in the CARD11 ID function to inhibit CARD11 activity with cooperativity and redundancy. We find that each RE contributes to the maintenance of the closed inactive state of CARD11 that predominates in the absence of receptor engagement. Each RE also contributes to the prevention of Bcl10 binding in the basal unstimulated state. RE1, RE2, and RE3 participate in intramolecular interactions with other CARD11 domains and share domain targets for binding. Remarkably, diffuse large B cell lymphoma-associated gain-of-function mutations in the caspase recruitment domain, LATCH, or coiled coil can perturb intramolecular interactions mediated by multiple REs, suggesting how single amino acid oncogenic CARD11 mutations can perturb or bypass the action of redundant inhibitory REs to achieve the level of hyperactive CARD11 signaling required to support lymphoma growth. PMID:26884334

  6. Tensor interaction contributions to single-particle energies

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, B. A.; Duguet, T.; Otsuka, T.; Abe, D.; Suzuki, T.

    2006-12-15

    We calculate the contribution of the nucleon-nucleon tensor interaction to single-particle energies with finite-range G-matrix potentials and with zero-range Skyrme potentials. The Skx Skyrme parameters including the zero-range tensor terms with strengths calibrated to the finite-range results are refitted to nuclear properties. The fit allows the zero-range proton-neutron tensor interaction as calibrated to the finite-range potential results which gives the observed change in the single-particle gap {epsilon}(h{sub 11/2})-{epsilon}(g{sub 7/2}) going from {sup 114}Sn to {sup 132}Sn. However, the experimental l dependence of the spin-orbit splittings in {sup 132}Sn and {sup 208}Pb is not well described when the tensor is added, owing to a change in the radial dependence of the total spin-orbit potential. The gap shift and a good fit to the l dependence can be recovered when the like-particle tensor interaction is opposite in sign to that required for the G matrix.

  7. Human Foamy Virus Capsid Formation Requires an Interaction Domain in the N Terminus of Gag

    PubMed Central

    Tobaly-Tapiero, Joelle; Bittoun, Patricia; Giron, Marie-Lou; Neves, Manuel; Koken, Marcel; Saïb, Ali; de Thé, Hugues

    2001-01-01

    Retroviral Gag expression is sufficient for capsid assembly, which occurs through interaction between distinct Gag domains. Human foamy virus (HFV) capsids assemble within the cytoplasm, although their budding, which mainly occurs in the endoplasmic reticulum, requires the presence of homologous Env. Yet little is known about the molecular basis of HFV Gag precursor assembly. Using fusions between HFV Gag and a nuclear reporter protein, we have identified a strong interaction domain in the N terminus of HFV Gag which is predicted to contain a conserved coiled-coil motif. Deletion within this region in an HFV provirus abolishes viral production through inhibition of capsid assembly. PMID:11287585

  8. Interactive Research and Joint Learning for Practical Contributions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holmquist, Mats

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine whether universities can find ways to make more practical contributions through collaboration, collective reflection and joint learning. Design/methodology/approach: The approach takes the form of action research and cooperation in three different development networks in Sweden. Data are analyzed by…

  9. Gene-Environment Interactions in Stress Response Contribute Additively to a Genotype-Environment Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Matsui, Takeshi; Ehrenreich, Ian M.

    2016-01-01

    How combinations of gene-environment interactions collectively give rise to genotype-environment interactions is not fully understood. To shed light on this problem, we genetically dissected an environment-specific poor growth phenotype in a cross of two budding yeast strains. This phenotype is detectable when certain segregants are grown on ethanol at 37°C (‘E37’), a condition that differs from the standard culturing environment in both its carbon source (ethanol as opposed to glucose) and temperature (37°C as opposed to 30°C). Using recurrent backcrossing with phenotypic selection, we identified 16 contributing loci. To examine how these loci interact with each other and the environment, we focused on a subset of four loci that together can lead to poor growth in E37. We measured the growth of all 16 haploid combinations of alleles at these loci in all four possible combinations of carbon source (ethanol or glucose) and temperature (30 or 37°C) in a nearly isogenic population. This revealed that the four loci act in an almost entirely additive manner in E37. However, we also found that these loci have weaker effects when only carbon source or temperature is altered, suggesting that their effect magnitudes depend on the severity of environmental perturbation. Consistent with such a possibility, cloning of three causal genes identified factors that have unrelated functions in stress response. Thus, our results indicate that polymorphisms in stress response can show effects that are intensified by environmental stress, thereby resulting in major genotype-environment interactions when multiple of these variants co-occur. PMID:27437938

  10. Gene-Environment Interactions in Stress Response Contribute Additively to a Genotype-Environment Interaction.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Takeshi; Ehrenreich, Ian M

    2016-07-01

    How combinations of gene-environment interactions collectively give rise to genotype-environment interactions is not fully understood. To shed light on this problem, we genetically dissected an environment-specific poor growth phenotype in a cross of two budding yeast strains. This phenotype is detectable when certain segregants are grown on ethanol at 37°C ('E37'), a condition that differs from the standard culturing environment in both its carbon source (ethanol as opposed to glucose) and temperature (37°C as opposed to 30°C). Using recurrent backcrossing with phenotypic selection, we identified 16 contributing loci. To examine how these loci interact with each other and the environment, we focused on a subset of four loci that together can lead to poor growth in E37. We measured the growth of all 16 haploid combinations of alleles at these loci in all four possible combinations of carbon source (ethanol or glucose) and temperature (30 or 37°C) in a nearly isogenic population. This revealed that the four loci act in an almost entirely additive manner in E37. However, we also found that these loci have weaker effects when only carbon source or temperature is altered, suggesting that their effect magnitudes depend on the severity of environmental perturbation. Consistent with such a possibility, cloning of three causal genes identified factors that have unrelated functions in stress response. Thus, our results indicate that polymorphisms in stress response can show effects that are intensified by environmental stress, thereby resulting in major genotype-environment interactions when multiple of these variants co-occur.

  11. The interactive account of ventral occipitotemporal contributions to reading.

    PubMed

    Price, Cathy J; Devlin, Joseph T

    2011-06-01

    The ventral occipitotemporal cortex (vOT) is involved in the perception of visually presented objects and written words. The Interactive Account of vOT function is based on the premise that perception involves the synthesis of bottom-up sensory input with top-down predictions that are generated automatically from prior experience. We propose that vOT integrates visuospatial features abstracted from sensory inputs with higher level associations such as speech sounds, actions and meanings. In this context, specialization for orthography emerges from regional interactions without assuming that vOT is selectively tuned to orthographic features. We discuss how the Interactive Account explains left vOT responses during normal reading and developmental dyslexia; and how it accounts for the behavioural consequences of left vOT damage. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Neurobiological Mechanisms Contributing to Alcohol-Stress-Anxiety Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Silberman, Yuval; Bajo, Michal; Chappell, Ann M.; Christian, Daniel T.; Cruz, Maureen; Diaz, Marvin R.; Kash, Thomas; Lack, Anna K.; Messing, Robert O.; Siggins, George R.; Winder, Danny; Roberto, Marisa; McCool, Brian A.; Weiner, Jeff L.

    2009-01-01

    This article summarizes the proceedings of a symposium that was presented at a conference entitled “Alcoholism and Stress: A Framework for Future Treatment Strategies”. The conference was held in Volterra, Italy on May 6–9, 2008 and this symposium was chaired by Jeff L. Weiner. The overall goal of this session was to review recent findings that may shed new light on the neurobiological mechanisms that underlie the complex relationships between stress, anxiety, and alcoholism. Dr. Danny Winder described a novel interaction between D1 receptor activation and the CRF system that leads to an increase in glutamatergic synaptic transmission in the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis. Dr. Marisa Roberto presented recent data describing how PKCε, ethanol, and CRF interact to alter GABAergic inhibition in the central nucleus of the amygdala. Dr. Jeff Weiner presented recent advances in our understanding of inhibitory circuitry within the basolateral amygdala and how acute ethanol exposure enhances GABAergic inhibition in these pathways. Finally, Dr. Brian McCool discussed recent findings on complementary glutamatergic and GABAergic adaptations to chronic ethanol exposure and withdrawal in the basolateral amygdala. Collectively, these investigators have identified novel mechanisms through which neurotransmitter and neuropeptide systems interact to modulate synaptic activity in stress and anxiety circuits. Their studies have also begun to describe how acute and chronic ethanol exposure influence excitatory and inhibitory synaptic communication in these pathways. These findings point toward a number of novel neurobiological targets that may prove useful for the development of more effective treatment strategies for alcohol use disorders. PMID:19913194

  13. Neurobiological mechanisms contributing to alcohol-stress-anxiety interactions.

    PubMed

    Silberman, Yuval; Bajo, Michal; Chappell, Ann M; Christian, Daniel T; Cruz, Maureen; Diaz, Marvin R; Kash, Thomas; Lack, Anna K; Messing, Robert O; Siggins, George R; Winder, Danny; Roberto, Marisa; McCool, Brian A; Weiner, Jeff L

    2009-11-01

    This article summarizes the proceedings of a symposium that was presented at a conference entitled "Alcoholism and Stress: A Framework for Future Treatment Strategies." The conference was held in Volterra, Italy on May 6-9, 2008 and this symposium was chaired by Jeff L. Weiner. The overall goal of this session was to review recent findings that may shed new light on the neurobiological mechanisms that underlie the complex relationships between stress, anxiety, and alcoholism. Dr. Danny Winder described a novel interaction between D1 receptor activation and the corticotrophin-releasing factor (CRF) system that leads to an increase in glutamatergic synaptic transmission in the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis. Dr. Marisa Roberto presented recent data describing how protein kinase C epsilon, ethanol, and CRF interact to alter GABAergic inhibition in the central nucleus of the amygdala. Dr. Jeff Weiner presented recent advances in our understanding of inhibitory circuitry within the basolateral amygdala (BLA) and how acute ethanol exposure enhances GABAergic inhibition in these pathways. Finally, Dr. Brian McCool discussed recent findings on complementary glutamatergic and GABAergic adaptations to chronic ethanol exposure and withdrawal in the BLA. Collectively, these investigators have identified novel mechanisms through which neurotransmitter and neuropeptide systems interact to modulate synaptic activity in stress and anxiety circuits. Their studies have also begun to describe how acute and chronic ethanol exposure influence excitatory and inhibitory synaptic communication in these pathways. These findings point toward a number of novel neurobiological targets that may prove useful for the development of more effective treatment strategies for alcohol use disorders.

  14. Head and rod 1 interactions in vimentin: identification of contact sites, structure, and changes with phosphorylation using site-directed spin labeling and electron paramagnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Aziz, Atya; Hess, John F; Budamagunta, Madhu S; FitzGerald, Paul G; Voss, John C

    2009-03-13

    We have used site-directed spin labeling (SDSL) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) to identify residues 17 and 137 as sites of interaction between the head domain and rod domain 1A of the intermediate filament protein vimentin. This interaction was maximal when compared with the spin labels placed at up- and downstream positions in both head and rod regions, indicating that residues 17 and 137 were the closest point of interaction in this region. SDSL EPR characterization of residues 120-145, which includes the site of head contact with rod 1A, reveals that this region exhibits the heptad repeat pattern indicative of alpha-helical coiled-coil structure, but that this heptad repeat pattern begins to decay near residue 139, suggesting a transition out of coiled-coil structure. By monitoring the spectra of spin labels placed at the 17 and 137 residues during in vitro assembly, we show that 17-137 interaction occurs early in the assembly process. We also explored the effect of phosphorylation on the 17-137 interaction and found that phosphorylation-induced changes affected the head-head interaction (17-17) in the dimer, without significantly influencing the rod-rod (137-137) and head-rod (17-137) interactions in the dimer. These data provide the first direct evidence for, and location of, head-rod interactions in assembled intermediate filaments, as well as direct evidence of coiled-coil structure in rod 1A. Finally, the data identify changes in the structure in this region following in vitro phosphorylation.

  15. An N-terminal glycine-rich sequence contributes to retrovirus trimer of hairpins stability

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, Kirilee A.; Maerz, Anne L.; Baer, Severine; Drummer, Heidi E.; Poumbourios, Pantelis . E-mail: apoumbourios@burnet.edu.au

    2007-08-10

    Retroviral transmembrane proteins (TMs) contain a glycine-rich segment linking the N-terminal fusion peptide and coiled coil core. Previously, we reported that the glycine-rich segment (Met-326-Ser-337) of the human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) TM, gp21, is a determinant of membrane fusion function [K.A. Wilson, S. Baer, A.L. Maerz, M. Alizon, P. Poumbourios, The conserved glycine-rich segment linking the N-terminal fusion peptide to the coiled coil of human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 transmembrane glycoprotein gp21 is a determinant of membrane fusion function, J. Virol. 79 (2005) 4533-4539]. Here we show that the reduced fusion activity of an I334A mutant correlated with a decrease in stability of the gp21 trimer of hairpins conformation, in the context of a maltose-binding protein-gp21 chimera. The stabilizing influence of Ile-334 required the C-terminal membrane-proximal sequence Trp-431-Ser-436. Proline substitution of four of five Gly residues altered gp21 trimer of hairpins stability. Our data indicate that flexibility within and hydrophobic interactions mediated by this region are determinants of gp21 stability and membrane fusion function.

  16. Intersegment interactions and helix-coil transition within the generalized model of polypeptide chains approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badasyan, A. V.; Hayrapetyan, G. N.; Tonoyan, Sh. A.; Mamasakhlisov, Y. Sh.; Benight, A. S.; Morozov, V. F.

    2009-09-01

    The generalized model of polypeptide chains is extended to describe the helix-coil transition in a system comprised of two chains interacting side-by-side. The Hamiltonian of the model takes into account four possible types of interactions between repeated units of the two chains, i.e., helix-helix, helix-coil, coil-helix, and coil-coil. Analysis reveals when the energy Ihh+Icc of (h-h, c-c) interactions overwhelms the energy Ihc+Ich of mixed (h-c, c-h) interactions, the correlation length rises substantially, resulting in narrowing of the transition interval. In the opposite case, when Ihh+Iccinteractions from the same theoretical perspective.

  17. Novel protein-protein interaction family proteins involved in chloroplast movement response.

    PubMed

    Kodama, Yutaka; Suetsugu, Noriyuki; Wada, Masamitsu

    2011-04-01

    To optimize photosynthetic activity, chloroplasts change their intracellular location in response to ambient light conditions; chloroplasts move toward low intensity light to maximize light capture, and away from high intensity light to avoid photodamage. Although several proteins have been reported to be involved in the chloroplast photorelocation movement response, any physical interaction among them was not found so far. We recently found a physical interaction between two plant-specific coiled-coil proteins, WEB1 (Weak Chloroplast Movement under Blue Light 1) and PMI2 (Plastid Movement Impaired 2), that were identified to regulate chloroplast movement velocity. Since the both coiled-coil regions of WEB1 and PMI2 were classified into an uncharacterized protein family having DUF827 (DUF: Domain of Unknown Function) domain, it was the first report that DUF827 proteins could mediate protein-protein interaction. In this mini-review article, we discuss regarding molecular function of WEB1 and PMI2, and also define a novel protein family composed of WEB1, PMI2 and WEB1/PMI2-like proteins for protein-protein interaction in land plants.

  18. Interactive Contributions of Cumulative Peer Stress and Executive Function Deficits to Depression in Early Adolescence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agoston, Anna M.; Rudolph, Karen D.

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to peer stress contributes to adolescent depression, yet not all youth experience these effects. Thus, it is important to identify individual differences that shape the consequences of peer stress. This research investigated the interactive contribution of cumulative peer stress during childhood (second-fifth grades) and executive…

  19. Interactive Contributions of Cumulative Peer Stress and Executive Function Deficits to Depression in Early Adolescence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agoston, Anna M.; Rudolph, Karen D.

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to peer stress contributes to adolescent depression, yet not all youth experience these effects. Thus, it is important to identify individual differences that shape the consequences of peer stress. This research investigated the interactive contribution of cumulative peer stress during childhood (second-fifth grades) and executive…

  20. Shaping Learner Contributions in an EFL Classroom: Implications for L2 Classroom Interactional Competence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Can Daskin, Nilüfer

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the interactional patterns for shaping learner contributions in an EFL classroom with reference to Walsh's classroom interactional competence (CIC). In doing so, an EFL class at an English preparatory school in a Turkish state university was both videotaped and audiotaped in the course of six classroom hours. Conversation…

  1. Shaping Learner Contributions in an EFL Classroom: Implications for L2 Classroom Interactional Competence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Can Daskin, Nilüfer

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the interactional patterns for shaping learner contributions in an EFL classroom with reference to Walsh's classroom interactional competence (CIC). In doing so, an EFL class at an English preparatory school in a Turkish state university was both videotaped and audiotaped in the course of six classroom hours. Conversation…

  2. Subject Line Preferences and Other Factors Contributing to Coherence and Interaction in Student Discussion Forums

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skogs, Julie

    2013-01-01

    A number of factors may affect student interaction in an asynchronous online discussion forum used in learning. This study deals with student preferences for the subject line of messages and in what ways the choice of subject line contributes to coherence and interaction reflected in the textual and interpersonal functions of the linguistic items…

  3. Subject Line Preferences and Other Factors Contributing to Coherence and Interaction in Student Discussion Forums

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skogs, Julie

    2013-01-01

    A number of factors may affect student interaction in an asynchronous online discussion forum used in learning. This study deals with student preferences for the subject line of messages and in what ways the choice of subject line contributes to coherence and interaction reflected in the textual and interpersonal functions of the linguistic items…

  4. Modelling packing interactions in parallel helix bundles: pentameric bundles of nicotinic receptor M2 helices.

    PubMed

    Sankararamakrishnan, R; Sansom, M S

    1995-11-01

    The transbilayer pore of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) is formed by a pentameric bundle of M2 helices. Models of pentameric bundles of M2 helices have been generated using simulated annealing via restrained molecular dynamics. The influence of: (a) the initial C alpha template; and (b) screening of sidechain electrostatic interactions on the geometry of the resultant M2 helix bundles is explored. Parallel M2 helices, in the absence of sidechain electrostatic interactions, pack in accordance with simple ridges-in-grooves considerations. This results in a helix crossing angle of ca. +12 degrees, corresponding to a left-handed coiled coil structure for the bundle as a whole. Tilting of M2 helices away from the central pore axis at their C-termini and/or inclusion of sidechain electrostatic interactions may perturb such ridges-in-grooves packing. In the most extreme cases right-handed coiled coils are formed. An interplay between inter-helix H-bonding and helix bundle geometry is revealed. The effects of changes in electrostatic screening on the dimensions of the pore mouth are described and the significance of these changes in the context of models for the nAChR pore domain is discussed.

  5. A key centriole assembly interaction interface between human PLK4 and STIL appears to not be conserved in flies.

    PubMed

    Cottee, Matthew A; Johnson, Steven; Raff, Jordan W; Lea, Susan M

    2017-03-15

    A small number of proteins form a conserved pathway of centriole duplication. In humans and flies, the binding of PLK4/Sak to STIL/Ana2 initiates daughter centriole assembly. In humans, this interaction is mediated by an interaction between the Polo-Box-3 (PB3) domain of PLK4 and the coiled-coil domain of STIL (HsCCD). We showed previously that the Drosophila Ana2 coiled-coil domain (DmCCD) is essential for centriole assembly, but it forms a tight parallel tetramer in vitro that likely precludes an interaction with PB3. Here, we show that the isolated HsCCD and HsPB3 domains form a mixture of homo-multimers in vitro, but these readily dissociate when mixed to form the previously described 1:1 HsCCD:HsPB3 complex. In contrast, although Drosophila PB3 (DmPB3) adopts a canonical polo-box fold, it does not detectably interact with DmCCD in vitro Thus, surprisingly, a key centriole assembly interaction interface appears to differ between humans and flies.

  6. A key centriole assembly interaction interface between human PLK4 and STIL appears to not be conserved in flies

    PubMed Central

    Cottee, Matthew A.; Johnson, Steven; Lea, Susan M.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT A small number of proteins form a conserved pathway of centriole duplication. In humans and flies, the binding of PLK4/Sak to STIL/Ana2 initiates daughter centriole assembly. In humans, this interaction is mediated by an interaction between the Polo-Box-3 (PB3) domain of PLK4 and the coiled-coil domain of STIL (HsCCD). We showed previously that the Drosophila Ana2 coiled-coil domain (DmCCD) is essential for centriole assembly, but it forms a tight parallel tetramer in vitro that likely precludes an interaction with PB3. Here, we show that the isolated HsCCD and HsPB3 domains form a mixture of homo-multimers in vitro, but these readily dissociate when mixed to form the previously described 1:1 HsCCD:HsPB3 complex. In contrast, although Drosophila PB3 (DmPB3) adopts a canonical polo-box fold, it does not detectably interact with DmCCD in vitro. Thus, surprisingly, a key centriole assembly interaction interface appears to differ between humans and flies. PMID:28202467

  7. Higher-order genetic interactions and their contribution to complex traits

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Matthew B.; Ehrenreich, Ian M.

    2014-01-01

    The contribution of genetic interactions involving three or more loci to complex traits is poorly understood. Because these higher-order genetic interactions (HGIs) are difficult to detect in genetic mapping studies, very few examples of them have been described. However, the lack of data on HGIs should not be misconstrued as proof that this class of genetic effect is unimportant. To the contrary, evidence from model organisms suggests that HGIs frequently influence genetic studies and contribute to many complex traits. Here, we review the growing literature on HGIs and discuss the future of research on this topic. PMID:25284288

  8. Rewiring of PDZ Domain-Ligand Interaction Network Contributed to Eukaryotic Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jinho; Kim, Inhae; Yang, Jae-Seong; Shin, Young-Eun; Hwang, Jihye; Park, Solip; Choi, Yoon Sup; Kim, Sanguk

    2012-01-01

    PDZ domain-mediated interactions have greatly expanded during metazoan evolution, becoming important for controlling signal flow via the assembly of multiple signaling components. The evolutionary history of PDZ domain-mediated interactions has never been explored at the molecular level. It is of great interest to understand how PDZ domain-ligand interactions emerged and how they become rewired during evolution. Here, we constructed the first human PDZ domain-ligand interaction network (PDZNet) together with binding motif sequences and interaction strengths of ligands. PDZNet includes 1,213 interactions between 97 human PDZ proteins and 591 ligands that connect most PDZ protein-mediated interactions (98%) in a large single network via shared ligands. We examined the rewiring of PDZ domain-ligand interactions throughout eukaryotic evolution by tracing changes in the C-terminal binding motif sequences of the PDZ ligands. We found that interaction rewiring by sequence mutation frequently occurred throughout evolution, largely contributing to the growth of PDZNet. The rewiring of PDZ domain-ligand interactions provided an effective means of functional innovations in nervous system development. Our findings provide empirical evidence for a network evolution model that highlights the rewiring of interactions as a mechanism for the development of new protein functions. PDZNet will be a valuable resource to further characterize the organization of the PDZ domain-mediated signaling proteome. PMID:22346764

  9. Seeds of strategic and interactional psychotherapies: seminal contributions of Milton H. Erickson.

    PubMed

    Zeig, J K; Geary, B B

    1990-10-01

    The life and work of Milton H. Erickson exerts a considerable influence upon the development of strategic and interactional psychotherapies. In this paper we trace the historical course of Erickson's impact in these areas from his early associations with Gregory Bateson and Margaret Mead through his contributions to the ideologies of Jay Haley and practitioners at the Mental Research Institute. We have identified seven philosophical and methodological realms which represent the incorporation of Ericksonian principles into strategic and interactional family therapy models.

  10. On the non-classical contribution in lone-pair-π interaction: IQA perspective.

    PubMed

    Badri, Zahra; Foroutan-Nejad, Cina; Kozelka, Jiri; Marek, Radek

    2015-10-21

    In the present work the nature of lone-pair-π interactions between water molecules and a number of π-rings with different substituents/hetero-atoms in the light of quantum chemical topology approaches is studied. The Quantum Theory of Atoms in Molecules (QTAIM) and Interacting Quantum Atoms (IQA) were employed for distinguishing the role of heteroatoms and electron withdrawing substituents in the complex formation between water and π-rings. Our IQA study identified three classes of water-π complexes on the basis of the relative role of electrostatics (classical) and exchange-correlation (non-classical) factors in the interaction energy between the oxygen of water (the lone-pair donor) and the sp(2) atoms of the π-ring, i.e. the primary lp-π interaction. Considering both the primary and secondary (the rest of interatomic interactions except Owater-π-ring atoms) interactions demonstrates that the exchange-correlation is the dominant contributor to the binding energy. This proves a non-negligible contribution of non-classical factors in the stabilization of the lone-pair-π complexes. However, in spite of a relatively large contribution of the exchange-correlation, this part of the interaction energy is virtually counterbalanced by the deformation energy, i.e. the increase in atomic kinetic energy upon complexation. This finding clarifies why water-π interactions can be modelled by simple electrostatics without the need to invoke quantum effects.

  11. ALDH16A1 is a novel non-catalytic enzyme that may be involved in the etiology of gout via protein–protein interactions with HPRT1

    PubMed Central

    Vasiliou, Vasilis; Sandoval, Monica; Backos, Donald S.; Jackson, Brian C.; Chen, Ying; Reigan, Philip; Lanaspa, Miguel A.; Johnson, Richard J.; Koppaka, Vindhya; Thompson, David C.

    2013-01-01

    Gout, a common form of inflammatory arthritis, is strongly associated with elevated uric acid concentrations in the blood (hyperuricemia). A recent study in Icelanders identified a rare missense single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the ALDH16A1 gene, ALDH16A1*2, to be associated with gout and serum uric acid levels. ALDH16A1 is a novel and rather unique member of the ALDH superfamily in relation to its gene and protein structures. ALDH16 genes are present in fish, amphibians, protista, bacteria but absent from archaea, fungi and plants. In most mammalian species, two ALDH16A1 spliced variants (ALDH16A1, long form and ALDH16A1_v2, short form) have been identified and both are expressed in HepG-2, HK-2 and HK-293 human cell lines. The ALDH16 proteins contain two ALDH domains (as opposed to one in the other members of the superfamily), four transmembrane and one coiled-coil domains. The active site of ALDH16 proteins from bacterial, frog and lower animals contain the catalytically important cysteine residue (Cys-302); this residue is absent from the mammalian and fish orthologs. Molecular modeling predicts that both the short and long forms of human ALDH16A1 protein would lack catalytic activity but may interact with the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT1) protein, a key enzyme involved in uric acid metabolism and gout. Interestingly, such protein-protein interactions with HPRT1 are predicted to be impaired for the long or short forms of ALDH16A1*2. These results lead to the intriguing possibility that association between ALDH16A1 and HPRT1 may be required for optimal HPRT activity with disruption of this interaction possibly contributing to the hyperuricemia seen in ALDH16A1*2 carriers. PMID:23348497

  12. Early Markers of Language and Attention: Mutual Contributions and the Impact of Parent-Infant Interactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gartstein, Maria A.; Crawford, Jennifer; Robertson, Christopher D.

    2008-01-01

    This study was conducted to explore the contribution of attentional skills to early language, and the influence of early language markers on the development of attention, simultaneously examining the impact of parent-child interaction factors (reciprocity/synchrony and sensitivity/responsivity), including their potential moderator effects. All…

  13. Activities Contributing a Great Deal to the Students' Interactive Skills in Foreign Language Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asatryan, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    While teaching speaking it is desired to provide a rich environment in class for meaningful communication to take place. With this aim, various speaking activities can contribute a great deal to students in developing their interactive skills necessary for life. These activities make students active in the learning process and at the same time…

  14. Assessing Energetic Contributions to Binding from a Disordered Region in a Protein-Protein Interaction

    SciTech Connect

    S Cho; C Swaminathan; D Bonsor; M Kerzic; R Guan; J Yang; C Kieke; P Anderson; D Kranz; et al.

    2011-12-31

    Many functional proteins are at least partially disordered prior to binding. Although the structural transitions upon binding of disordered protein regions can influence the affinity and specificity of protein complexes, their precise energetic contributions to binding are unknown. Here, we use a model protein-protein interaction system in which a locally disordered region has been modified by directed evolution to quantitatively assess the thermodynamic and structural contributions to binding of disorder-to-order transitions. Through X-ray structure determination of the protein binding partners before and after complex formation and isothermal titration calorimetry of the interactions, we observe a correlation between protein ordering and binding affinity for complexes along this affinity maturation pathway. Additionally, we show that discrepancies between observed and calculated heat capacities based on buried surface area changes in the protein complexes can be explained largely by heat capacity changes that would result solely from folding the locally disordered region. Previously developed algorithms for predicting binding energies of protein-protein interactions, however, are unable to correctly model the energetic contributions of the structural transitions in our model system. While this highlights the shortcomings of current computational methods in modeling conformational flexibility, it suggests that the experimental methods used here could provide training sets of molecular interactions for improving these algorithms and further rationalizing molecular recognition in protein-protein interactions.

  15. Structural Basis of the Interaction between Tuberous Sclerosis Complex 1 (TSC1) and Tre2-Bub2-Cdc16 Domain Family Member 7 (TBC1D7).

    PubMed

    Qin, Jiayue; Wang, Zhizhi; Hoogeveen-Westerveld, Marianne; Shen, Guobo; Gong, Weimin; Nellist, Mark; Xu, Wenqing

    2016-04-15

    Mutations in TSC1 or TSC2 cause tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC), an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by the occurrence of benign tumors in various vital organs and tissues. TSC1 and TSC2, the TSC1 and TSC2 gene products, form the TSC protein complex that senses specific cellular growth conditions to control mTORC1 signaling. TBC1D7 is the third subunit of the TSC complex, and helps to stabilize the TSC1-TSC2 complex through its direct interaction with TSC1. Homozygous inactivation of TBC1D7 causes intellectual disability and megaencephaly. Here we report the crystal structure of a TSC1-TBC1D7 complex and biochemical characterization of the TSC1-TBC1D7 interaction. TBC1D7 interacts with the C-terminal region of the predicted coiled-coil domain of TSC1. The TSC1-TBC1D7 interface is largely hydrophobic, involving the α4 helix of TBC1D7. Each TBC1D7 molecule interacts simultaneously with two parallel TSC1 helices from two TSC1 molecules, suggesting that TBC1D7 may stabilize the TSC complex by tethering the C-terminal ends of two TSC1 coiled-coils.

  16. Contributions of cation-π interactions to the collagen triple helix stability.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chia-Ching; Hsu, Wei; Hwang, Kuo-Chu; Hwu, Jih Ru; Lin, Chun-Cheng; Horng, Jia-Cherng

    2011-04-01

    Cation-π interactions are found to be an important noncovalent force in proteins. Collagen is a right-handed triple helix composed of three left-handed PPII helices, in which (X-Y-Gly) repeats dominate in the sequence. Molecular modeling indicates that cation-π interactions could be formed between the X and Y positions in adjacent collagen strands. Here, we used a host-guest peptide system: (Pro-Hyp-Gly)(3)-(Pro-Y-Gly-X-Hyp-Gly)-(Pro-Hyp-Gly)(3), where X is an aromatic residue and Y is a cationic residue, to study the cation-π interaction in the collagen triple helix. Circular dichroism (CD) measurements and Tm data analysis show that the cation-π interactions involving Arg have a larger contribution to the conformational stability than do those involving Lys, and Trp forms a weaker cation-π interaction with cationic residues than expected as a result of steric effects. The results also show that the formation of cation-π interactions between Arg and Phe depends on their relative positions in the strand. Moreover, the fluorinated and methylated Phe substitutions show that an electron-withdrawing or electron-donating substituent on the aromatic ring can modulate its π-electron density and the cation-π interaction in collagen. Our data demonstrate that the cation-π interaction could play an important role in stabilizing the collagen triple helix.

  17. Interaction of interstitial atoms and configurational contribution to their thermodynamic activity in V, Nb, and Ta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanter, M. S.; Dmitriev, V. V.; Mogutnov, B. M.; Ruban, A. V.

    2017-02-01

    The pairwise interaction energies of O-O and N-N in bcc metals of group VB, which were calculated earlier using first-principles methods, have been employed to analyze the effect of the interatomic interactions on the configurational contribution to the thermodynamic activity. The strong effect of interstitial- interstitial interaction has been shown. The configurational contribution grows in the row (Nb-N) → (V-N) → (Ta-N) → (Nb-O) → (V-O) → (Ta-O), which is caused by a weakening of the mutual attraction of interstitial atoms in these solid solutions. The strong repulsion that characterizes the majority of coordination shells only weakly affects the thermodynamic activity. The character of the temperature dependence of the configurational contribution is defined by the strength of the mutual attraction of the interstitial atoms, i.e., upon strong attraction, the contribution increases with increasing temperature (Nb-N, V-N, Ta-N, and Nb-O) and, upon weak attraction, it decreases (V-O and Ta-O).

  18. A bivariate mann-whitney approach for unraveling genetic variants and interactions contributing to comorbidity.

    PubMed

    Wen, Yalu; Schaid, Daniel J; Lu, Qing

    2013-04-01

    Although comorbidity among complex diseases (e.g., drug dependence syndromes) is well documented, genetic variants contributing to the comorbidity are still largely unknown. The discovery of genetic variants and their interactions contributing to comorbidity will likely shed light on underlying pathophysiological and etiological processes, and promote effective treatments for comorbid conditions. For this reason, studies to discover genetic variants that foster the development of comorbidity represent high-priority research projects, as manifested in the behavioral genetics studies now underway. The yield from these studies can be enhanced by adopting novel statistical approaches, with the capacity of considering multiple genetic variants and possible interactions. For this purpose, we propose a bivariate Mann-Whitney (BMW) approach to unravel genetic variants and interactions contributing to comorbidity, as well as those unique to each comorbid condition. Through simulations, we found BMW outperformed two commonly adopted approaches in a variety of underlying disease and comorbidity models. We further applied BMW to datasets from the Study of Addiction: Genetics and Environment, investigating the contribution of 184 known nicotine dependence (ND) and alcohol dependence (AD) single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) to the comorbidity of ND and AD. The analysis revealed a candidate SNP from CHRNA5, rs16969968, associated with both ND and AD, and replicated the findings in an independent dataset with a P-value of 1.06 × 10(-03) .

  19. Conditioned place preference for social interaction in rats: contribution of sensory components.

    PubMed

    Kummer, Kai; Klement, Sabine; Eggart, Vincent; Mayr, Michael J; Saria, Alois; Zernig, Gerald

    2011-01-01

    A main challenge in the therapy of drug dependent individuals is to help them reactivate interest in non-drug-associated activities. We previously developed a rat experimental model based on the conditioned place preference (CPP) paradigm in which only four 15-min episodes of social interaction with a gender- and weight-matched male Sprague Dawley rat (1) reversed CPP from cocaine to social interaction despite continuing cocaine training and (2) prevented the reinstatement of cocaine CPP. In the present study, we investigated which of the sensory modalities of the composite stimulus "social interaction" contributes most to the rats' preference for it. If touch was limited by steel bars spaced at a distance of 2 cm and running across the whole length of a partitioning, CPP was still acquired, albeit to a lesser degree. If both rats were placed on the same side of a partitioning, rats did not develop CPP for social interaction. Thus, decreasing the available area for social interaction from 750 to 375 cm(2) prevented the acquisition of CPP to social interaction despite the fact that animals could touch each other more intensely than through the bars of the partitioning. When touch was fully restricted by a glass screen dividing the conditioning chambers, and the only sensory modalities left were visual and olfactory cues, place preference shifted to place aversion. Overall, our findings indicate that the major rewarding sensory component of the composite stimulus "social interaction" is touch (taction).

  20. Structure and membrane interactions of the homodimeric antibiotic peptide homotarsinin

    PubMed Central

    Verly, Rodrigo M.; Resende, Jarbas M.; Junior, Eduardo F. C.; de Magalhães, Mariana T. Q.; Guimarães, Carlos F. C. R.; Munhoz, Victor H. O.; Bemquerer, Marcelo Porto; Almeida, Fábio C. L.; Santoro, Marcelo M.; Piló-Veloso, Dorila; Bechinger, Burkhard

    2017-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) from amphibian skin are valuable template structures to find new treatments against bacterial infections. This work describes for the first time the structure and membrane interactions of a homodimeric AMP. Homotarsinin, which was found in Phyllomedusa tarsius anurans, consists of two identical cystine-linked polypeptide chains each of 24 amino acid residues. The high-resolution structures of the monomeric and dimeric peptides were determined in aqueous buffers. The dimer exhibits a tightly packed coiled coil three-dimensional structure, keeping the hydrophobic residues screened from the aqueous environment. An overall cationic surface of the dimer assures enhanced interactions with negatively charged membranes. An extensive set of biophysical data allowed us to establish structure-function correlations with antimicrobial assays against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Although both peptides present considerable antimicrobial activity, the dimer is significantly more effective in both antibacterial and membrane biophysical assays. PMID:28102305

  1. Structure and membrane interactions of the homodimeric antibiotic peptide homotarsinin.

    PubMed

    Verly, Rodrigo M; Resende, Jarbas M; Junior, Eduardo F C; de Magalhães, Mariana T Q; Guimarães, Carlos F C R; Munhoz, Victor H O; Bemquerer, Marcelo Porto; Almeida, Fábio C L; Santoro, Marcelo M; Piló-Veloso, Dorila; Bechinger, Burkhard

    2017-01-19

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) from amphibian skin are valuable template structures to find new treatments against bacterial infections. This work describes for the first time the structure and membrane interactions of a homodimeric AMP. Homotarsinin, which was found in Phyllomedusa tarsius anurans, consists of two identical cystine-linked polypeptide chains each of 24 amino acid residues. The high-resolution structures of the monomeric and dimeric peptides were determined in aqueous buffers. The dimer exhibits a tightly packed coiled coil three-dimensional structure, keeping the hydrophobic residues screened from the aqueous environment. An overall cationic surface of the dimer assures enhanced interactions with negatively charged membranes. An extensive set of biophysical data allowed us to establish structure-function correlations with antimicrobial assays against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Although both peptides present considerable antimicrobial activity, the dimer is significantly more effective in both antibacterial and membrane biophysical assays.

  2. Structure and membrane interactions of the homodimeric antibiotic peptide homotarsinin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verly, Rodrigo M.; Resende, Jarbas M.; Junior, Eduardo F. C.; de Magalhães, Mariana T. Q.; Guimarães, Carlos F. C. R.; Munhoz, Victor H. O.; Bemquerer, Marcelo Porto; Almeida, Fábio C. L.; Santoro, Marcelo M.; Piló-Veloso, Dorila; Bechinger, Burkhard

    2017-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) from amphibian skin are valuable template structures to find new treatments against bacterial infections. This work describes for the first time the structure and membrane interactions of a homodimeric AMP. Homotarsinin, which was found in Phyllomedusa tarsius anurans, consists of two identical cystine-linked polypeptide chains each of 24 amino acid residues. The high-resolution structures of the monomeric and dimeric peptides were determined in aqueous buffers. The dimer exhibits a tightly packed coiled coil three-dimensional structure, keeping the hydrophobic residues screened from the aqueous environment. An overall cationic surface of the dimer assures enhanced interactions with negatively charged membranes. An extensive set of biophysical data allowed us to establish structure-function correlations with antimicrobial assays against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Although both peptides present considerable antimicrobial activity, the dimer is significantly more effective in both antibacterial and membrane biophysical assays.

  3. Glycan-dependent and -independent Interactions Contribute to Cellular Substrate Recruitment by Calreticulin*

    PubMed Central

    Wijeyesakere, Sanjeeva J.; Rizvi, Syed M.; Raghavan, Malini

    2013-01-01

    Calreticulin is an endoplasmic reticulum chaperone with specificity for monoglucosylated glycoproteins. Calreticulin also inhibits precipitation of nonglycosylated proteins and thus contains generic protein-binding sites, but their location and contributions to substrate folding are unknown. We show that calreticulin binds glycosylated and nonglycosylated proteins with similar affinities but distinct interaction kinetics. Although both interactions involve the glycan-binding site or its vicinity, the arm-like proline-rich (P-) domain of calreticulin contributes to binding non/deglycosylated proteins. Correspondingly, ensemble FRET spectroscopy measurements indicate that glycosylated and nonglycosylated proteins induce “open” and “closed” P-domain conformations, respectively. The co-chaperone ERp57 influences substrate-binding kinetics and induces a closed P-domain conformation. Together with analysis of the interactions of calreticulin with cellular proteins, these findings indicate that the recruitment of monoglucosylated proteins to calreticulin is kinetically driven, whereas the P-domain and co-chaperone contribute to stable substrate binding. Substrate sequestration in the cleft between the glycan-binding site and P-domain is a likely mechanism for calreticulin-assisted protein folding. PMID:24100026

  4. ARG1 (altered response to gravity) encodes a DnaJ-like protein that potentially interacts with the cytoskeleton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sedbrook, J. C.; Chen, R.; Masson, P. H.

    1999-01-01

    Gravitropism allows plant organs to direct their growth at a specific angle from the gravity vector, promoting upward growth for shoots and downward growth for roots. Little is known about the mechanisms underlying gravitropic signal transduction. We found that mutations in the ARG1 locus of Arabidopsis thaliana alter root and hypocotyl gravitropism without affecting phototropism, root growth responses to phytohormones or inhibitors of auxin transport, or starch accumulation. The positional cloning of ARG1 revealed a DnaJ-like protein containing a coiled-coil region homologous to coiled coils found in cytoskeleton-interacting proteins. These data suggest that ARG1 participates in a gravity-signaling process involving the cytoskeleton. A combination of Northern blot studies and analysis of ARG1-GUS fusion-reporter expression in transgenic plants demonstrated that ARG1 is expressed in all organs. Ubiquitous ARG1 expression in Arabidopsis and the identification of an ortholog in Caenorhabditis elegans suggest that ARG1 is involved in other essential processes.

  5. An analysis of the correlation energy contribution to the interaction energy of inert gas dimers.

    PubMed

    Snook, Ian; Per, Manolo C; Russo, Salvy P

    2008-10-28

    An accurate description of electron correlation is essential for the calculation of interaction energies in cases where dispersion energy is a major component, for example, for the rare gas atoms, physisorption on graphite, and graphene-graphene interactions. Such calculations are computationally demanding using supermolecule methods and the energies calculated lack a simple, physical interpretation. Alternatively density functional theories (DFTs) may be used to give an approximate estimate of the correlation energy. However, the physical nature of this DFT estimate of electron correlation energy is not well understood and, in fact, most current DFT methods do not describe dispersion energy at all. Hence, an analysis of the correlation energy contribution to interaction energies where dispersion energy is important is needed. In order to do this we provide an analysis of the correlation energy contribution to the potential energy curves of He(2), Ne(2), and Ar(2) in terms of the Hartree-Fock (HF) interaction term DeltaE(int) (HF), a dispersion energy term E(disp) and an electron correlation term DeltaE(int) (C). DeltaE(int) (C) includes all other correlation energy effects besides E(disp) and is shown to be repulsive, of a similar short range character to, but of smaller magnitude than DeltaE(int) (HF). This analysis was used to develop a theoretical model which gives a very good estimate of the potential energy wells for He(2), Ne(2), Ar(2), HeNe, HeAr, and NeAr.

  6. Floral scent contributes to interaction specificity in coevolving plants and their insect pollinators.

    PubMed

    Friberg, Magne; Schwind, Christopher; Roark, Lindsey C; Raguso, Robert A; Thompson, John N

    2014-09-01

    Chemical defenses, repellents, and attractants are important shapers of species interactions. Chemical attractants could contribute to the divergence of coevolving plant-insect interactions, if pollinators are especially responsive to signals from the local plant species. We experimentally investigated patterns of daily floral scent production in three Lithophragma species (Saxifragaceae) that are geographically isolated and tested how scent divergence affects attraction of their major pollinator-the floral parasitic moth Greya politella (Prodoxidae). These moths oviposit through the corolla while simultaneously pollinating the flower with pollen adhering to the abdomen. The complex and species-specific floral scent profiles were emitted in higher amounts during the day, when these day-flying moths are active. There was minimal divergence found in petal color, which is another potential floral attractant. Female moths responded most strongly to scent from their local host species in olfactometer bioassays, and were more likely to oviposit in, and thereby pollinate, their local host species in no-choice trials. The results suggest that floral scent is an important attractant in this interaction. Local specialization in the pollinator response to a highly specific plant chemistry, thus, has the potential to contribute importantly to patterns of interaction specificity among coevolving plants and highly specialized pollinators.

  7. Contributions of different tidal interactions to fortnightly variation in tidal duration asymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Wenyun; Song, Dehai; Wang, Xiao Hua; Ding, Pingxing; Ge, Jianzhong

    2016-08-01

    The general framework for identifying tidal duration asymmetry proposed by Song et al. (2011) is extended to express fortnightly variability in duration asymmetry. The extended metrics are verified and studied using observed sea level data at 481 stations worldwide. The results reveal that fortnightly variability is universal and that duration asymmetry can be stronger during neap tide than during spring tide. The fortnightly variability in duration asymmetry is primarily induced by three types of tidal interactions: interactions within the principal tidal constituents, interactions between high-frequency and principal tidal constituents, and interactions between long-period and principal tidal constituents. Among these interactions, the first type is most important at most of the stations and is related to the form number F. The contributions of different interactions can be quantified using their frequencies, amplitudes and phases. Global patterns of the fortnightly variation are illustrated using TOPEX/Poseidon altimetry data. The findings show that remarkable fortnightly variation in the tidal duration asymmetry occurs in most open oceans and is significant around an amphidromic point. The metrics derived in this study can be used to examine any time-varying characteristics in tidal asymmetry (not limited to duration asymmetry) by selecting a suitable frequency threshold.

  8. CFL3D Contribution to the AIAA Supersonic Shock Boundary Layer Interaction Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rumsey, Christopher L.

    2010-01-01

    This paper documents the CFL3D contribution to the AIAA Supersonic Shock Boundary Layer Interaction Workshop, held in Orlando, Florida in January 2010. CFL3D is a Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes code. Four shock boundary layer interaction cases are computed using a one-equation turbulence model widely used for other aerodynamic problems of interest. Two of the cases have experimental data available at the workshop, and two of the cases do not. The effect of grid, flux scheme, and thin-layer approximation are investigated. Comparisons are made to the available experimental data. All four cases exhibit strong three-dimensional behavior in and near the interaction regions, resulting from influences of the tunnel side-walls.

  9. β-arrestin-1 contributes to brown fat function and directly interacts with PPARα and PPARγ

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Congcong; Zeng, Xianglu; Zhou, Zhaocai; Zhao, Jian; Pei, Gang

    2016-01-01

    The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) family plays central roles in brown adipose tissue (BAT) adipogenesis and contributes to body temperature maintenance. The transcriptional activity of PPAR family has been shown to be tightly controlled by cellular signal networks. β-arrestins function as major secondary messengers of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR) signaling by functional interactions with diverse proteins. Here, we report that β-arrestin-1 knock-out mice show enhanced cold tolerance. We found that β-arrestin-1 directly interacts with PPARα and PPARγ through a LXXXLXXXL motif, while D371 in PPARα and L311/N312/D380 in PPARγ are required for their interactions with β-arrestin-1. Further mechanistic studies showed that β-arrestin-1 promotes PPARα- but represses PPARγ-mediated transcriptional activities, providing potential regulatory pathway for BAT function. PMID:27301785

  10. Conformational Contribution to the Heat Capacity of Interacting System of Carbohydrate Polymer - Water.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyda, Marek; Wunderlich, Bernhard

    2001-03-01

    Based on the measured heat capacities of amorphous, dry starch and starch with low concentration of water above the partial glass transition of starch, the calculated Cp has been estimated from its vibrational, external, and conformational contributions. The conformational part is evaluated from a fit of the experimental Cp of starch and starch-water, decreased by the vibrational and the external Cp to a one-dimensional Ising-type model for two discrete states, and stiffness, cooperativity, and degeneracy parameters. These differences above the glass transition are interpreted as contributions of different conformational heat capacities from interacting chains of carbohydrate with water. The vibrational contribution was calculated as the heat capacity contributions from group and skeletal vibrations. The external contribution was computed based on thermal expansivity and compressibility as a function of temperature from experimental data of the partial liquid state of both dry starch and starch-water. The calculated and experimental heat capacities of starch-water and dry starch are compared over the whole range of temperatures measurements from 8 to 490 K. NSF, Polymers Program, DMR-9703692, and the Div. of Mat. Sci., BES, DOE at ORNL, managed UT-Batelle, LLC, for the U.S. Department of Energy, under contract number DOE- AC05-00OR22725.

  11. Robust cross-links in molluscan adhesive gels: Testing for contributions from hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions

    PubMed Central

    Smith, A.M.; Robinson, T. M.; Salt, M. D.; Hamilton, K. S.; Silvia, B. E.; Blasiak, R.

    2009-01-01

    The cross-linking interactions that provide cohesive strength to molluscan adhesive gels were investigated. Metal-based interactions have been shown to play an important role in the glue of the slug Arion subfuscus (Draparnaud), but other types of interactions may also contribute to the glue's strength and their role has not been investigated. This study shows that treatments that normally disrupt hydrophobic or electrostatic interactions have little to no effect on the slug glue. High salt concentrations and non-ionic detergent do not affect the solubility of the proteins in the glue or the ability of the glue proteins to stiffen gels. In contrast, metal chelation markedly disrupts the gel. Experiments with gel filtration chromatography identify a 40 kDa protein that is a central component of the cross-links in the glue. This 40 kDa protein forms robust macromolecular aggregations that are stable even in the presence of high concentrations of salt, non-ionic detergent, urea or metal chelators. Metal chelation during glue secretion, however, may block some of these cross-links. Such robust, non-specific interactions in an aqueous environment are highly unusual for hydrogels and reflect an intriguing cross-linking mechanism. PMID:18952190

  12. Contributions of Sinorhizobium meliloti Transcriptional Regulator DksA to Bacterial Growth and Efficient Symbiosis with Medicago sativa.

    PubMed

    Wippel, Kathrin; Long, Sharon R

    2016-05-01

    The stringent response, mediated by the (p)ppGpp synthetase RelA and the RNA polymerase-binding protein DksA, is triggered by limiting nutrient conditions. For some bacteria, it is involved in regulation of virulence. We investigated the role of two DksA-like proteins from the Gram-negative nitrogen-fixing symbiont Sinorhizobium meliloti in free-living culture and in interaction with its host plant Medicago sativa The two paralogs, encoded by the genes SMc00469 and SMc00049, differ in the constitution of two major domains required for function in canonical DksA: the DXXDXA motif at the tip of a coiled-coil domain and a zinc finger domain. Using mutant analyses of single, double, and triple deletions for SMc00469(designated dksA),SMc00049, and relA, we found that the ΔdksA mutant but not the ΔSMc00049 mutant showed impaired growth on minimal medium, reduced nodulation on the host plant, and lower nitrogen fixation activity in early nodules, while its nod gene expression was normal. The ΔrelA mutant showed severe pleiotropic phenotypes under all conditions tested. Only S. meliloti dksA complemented the metabolic defects of an Escherichia coli dksA mutant. Modifications of the DXXDXA motif in SMc00049 failed to establish DksA function. Our results imply a role for transcriptional regulator DksA in the S. meliloti-M. sativa symbiosis. The stringent response is a bacterial transcription regulation process triggered upon nutritional stress.Sinorhizobium meliloti, a soil bacterium establishing agriculturally important root nodule symbioses with legume plants, undergoes constant molecular adjustment during host interaction. Analyzing the components of the stringent response in this alphaproteobacterium helps understand molecular control regarding the development of plant interaction. Using mutant analyses, we describe how the lack of DksA influences symbiosis with Medicago sativa and show that a second paralogous S. meliloti protein cannot substitute for this missing

  13. Contributions of Sinorhizobium meliloti Transcriptional Regulator DksA to Bacterial Growth and Efficient Symbiosis with Medicago sativa

    PubMed Central

    Wippel, Kathrin

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The stringent response, mediated by the (p)ppGpp synthetase RelA and the RNA polymerase-binding protein DksA, is triggered by limiting nutrient conditions. For some bacteria, it is involved in regulation of virulence. We investigated the role of two DksA-like proteins from the Gram-negative nitrogen-fixing symbiont Sinorhizobium meliloti in free-living culture and in interaction with its host plant Medicago sativa. The two paralogs, encoded by the genes SMc00469 and SMc00049, differ in the constitution of two major domains required for function in canonical DksA: the DXXDXA motif at the tip of a coiled-coil domain and a zinc finger domain. Using mutant analyses of single, double, and triple deletions for SMc00469 (designated dksA), SMc00049, and relA, we found that the ΔdksA mutant but not the ΔSMc00049 mutant showed impaired growth on minimal medium, reduced nodulation on the host plant, and lower nitrogen fixation activity in early nodules, while its nod gene expression was normal. The ΔrelA mutant showed severe pleiotropic phenotypes under all conditions tested. Only S. meliloti dksA complemented the metabolic defects of an Escherichia coli dksA mutant. Modifications of the DXXDXA motif in SMc00049 failed to establish DksA function. Our results imply a role for transcriptional regulator DksA in the S. meliloti-M. sativa symbiosis. IMPORTANCE The stringent response is a bacterial transcription regulation process triggered upon nutritional stress. Sinorhizobium meliloti, a soil bacterium establishing agriculturally important root nodule symbioses with legume plants, undergoes constant molecular adjustment during host interaction. Analyzing the components of the stringent response in this alphaproteobacterium helps understand molecular control regarding the development of plant interaction. Using mutant analyses, we describe how the lack of DksA influences symbiosis with Medicago sativa and show that a second paralogous S. meliloti protein cannot

  14. Geometrical contributions to the exchange constants: Free electrons with spin-orbit interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freimuth, Frank; Blügel, Stefan; Mokrousov, Yuriy

    2017-05-01

    Using thermal quantum field theory, we derive an expression for the exchange constant that resembles Fukuyama's formula for orbital magnetic susceptibility (OMS). Guided by this formal analogy between the exchange constant and OMS, we identify a contribution to the exchange constant that arises from the geometrical properties of the band structure in mixed phase space. We compute the exchange constants for free electrons and show that the geometrical contribution is generally important. Our formalism allows us to study the exchange constants in the presence of spin-orbit interaction. Thereby, we find sizable differences between the exchange constants of helical and cycloidal spin spirals. Furthermore, we discuss how to calculate the exchange constants based on a gauge-field approach in the case of the Rashba model with an additional exchange splitting, and we show that the exchange constants obtained from this gauge-field approach are in perfect agreement with those obtained from the quantum field theoretical method.

  15. Social inequalities in health: measuring the contribution of housing deprivation and social interactions for Spain

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Social factors have been proved to be main determinants of individuals’ health. Recent studies have also analyzed the contribution of some of those factors, such as education and job status, to socioeconomic inequalities in health. The aim of this paper is to provide new evidence about the factors driving socioeconomic inequalities in health for the Spanish population by including housing deprivation and social interactions as health determinants. Methods Cross-sectional study based on the Spanish sample of European Statistics on Income and Living Conditions (EU-SILC) for 2006. The concentration index measuring income-related inequality in health is decomposed into the contribution of each determinant. Several models are estimated to test the influence of different regressors for three proxies of ill-health. Results Health inequality favouring the better-off is observed in the distribution of self-assessed health, presence of chronic diseases and presence of limiting conditions. Inequality is mainly explained, besides age, by social factors such as labour status and financial deprivation. Housing deprivation contributes to pro-rich inequality in a percentage ranging from 7.17% to 13.85%, and social interactions from 6.16% to 10.19%. The contribution of some groups of determinants significantly differs depending on the ill-health variable used. Conclusions Health inequalities can be mostly reduced or shaped by policy, as they are mainly explained by social determinants such as labour status, education and other socioeconomic conditions. The major role played on health inequality by variables taking part in social exclusion points to the need to focus on the most vulnerable groups. JEL Codes H51, I14, I18 PMID:23241384

  16. Bacteria-bacteria interactions within the microbiota of the ancestral metazoan Hydra contribute to fungal resistance.

    PubMed

    Fraune, Sebastian; Anton-Erxleben, Friederike; Augustin, René; Franzenburg, Sören; Knop, Mirjam; Schröder, Katja; Willoweit-Ohl, Doris; Bosch, Thomas C G

    2015-07-01

    Epithelial surfaces of most animals are colonized by diverse microbial communities. Although it is generally agreed that commensal bacteria can serve beneficial functions, the processes involved are poorly understood. Here we report that in the basal metazoan Hydra, ectodermal epithelial cells are covered with a multilayered glycocalyx that provides a habitat for a distinctive microbial community. Removing this epithelial microbiota results in lethal infection by the filamentous fungus Fusarium sp. Restoring the complex microbiota in gnotobiotic polyps prevents pathogen infection. Although mono-associations with distinct members of the microbiota fail to provide full protection, additive and synergistic interactions of commensal bacteria are contributing to full fungal resistance. Our results highlight the importance of resident microbiota diversity as a protective factor against pathogen infections. Besides revealing insights into the in vivo function of commensal microbes in Hydra, our findings indicate that interactions among commensal bacteria are essential to inhibit pathogen infection.

  17. Bacteria–bacteria interactions within the microbiota of the ancestral metazoan Hydra contribute to fungal resistance

    PubMed Central

    Fraune, Sebastian; Anton-Erxleben, Friederike; Augustin, René; Franzenburg, Sören; Knop, Mirjam; Schröder, Katja; Willoweit-Ohl, Doris; Bosch, Thomas CG

    2015-01-01

    Epithelial surfaces of most animals are colonized by diverse microbial communities. Although it is generally agreed that commensal bacteria can serve beneficial functions, the processes involved are poorly understood. Here we report that in the basal metazoan Hydra, ectodermal epithelial cells are covered with a multilayered glycocalyx that provides a habitat for a distinctive microbial community. Removing this epithelial microbiota results in lethal infection by the filamentous fungus Fusarium sp. Restoring the complex microbiota in gnotobiotic polyps prevents pathogen infection. Although mono-associations with distinct members of the microbiota fail to provide full protection, additive and synergistic interactions of commensal bacteria are contributing to full fungal resistance. Our results highlight the importance of resident microbiota diversity as a protective factor against pathogen infections. Besides revealing insights into the in vivo function of commensal microbes in Hydra, our findings indicate that interactions among commensal bacteria are essential to inhibit pathogen infection. PMID:25514534

  18. Contribution of excited states to stellar weak-interaction rates in odd-A nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarriguren, P.

    2016-05-01

    Weak-interaction rates, including β decay and electron capture, are studied in several odd-A nuclei in the p f -shell region at various densities and temperatures of astrophysical interest. Special attention is paid to the relative contribution to these rates of thermally populated excited states in the decaying nucleus. The nuclear structure involved in the weak processes is studied within a quasiparticle random-phase approximation with residual interactions in both particle-hole and particle-particle channels on top of a deformed Skyrme Hartree-Fock mean field with pairing correlations. In the range of densities and temperatures considered, it is found that the total rates do not differ much from the rates of the ground state fully populated. In any case, the changes are not larger than the uncertainties due to the nuclear-model dependence of the rates.

  19. Isolating the non-polar contributions to the intermolecular potential for water-alkane interactions.

    PubMed

    Ballal, Deepti; Venkataraman, Pradeep; Fouad, Wael A; Cox, Kenneth R; Chapman, Walter G

    2014-08-14

    Intermolecular potential models for water and alkanes describe pure component properties fairly well, but fail to reproduce properties of water-alkane mixtures. Understanding interactions between water and non-polar molecules like alkanes is important not only for the hydrocarbon industry but has implications to biological processes as well. Although non-polar solutes in water have been widely studied, much less work has focused on water in non-polar solvents. In this study we calculate the solubility of water in different alkanes (methane to dodecane) at ambient conditions where the water content in alkanes is very low so that the non-polar water-alkane interactions determine solubility. Only the alkane-rich phase is simulated since the fugacity of water in the water rich phase is calculated from an accurate equation of state. Using the SPC/E model for water and TraPPE model for alkanes along with Lorentz-Berthelot mixing rules for the cross parameters produces a water solubility that is an order of magnitude lower than the experimental value. It is found that an effective water Lennard-Jones energy ε(W)/k = 220 K is required to match the experimental water solubility in TraPPE alkanes. This number is much higher than used in most simulation water models (SPC/E-ε(W)/k = 78.2 K). It is surprising that the interaction energy obtained here is also higher than the water-alkane interaction energy predicted by studies on solubility of alkanes in water. The reason for this high water-alkane interaction energy is not completely understood. Some factors that might contribute to the large interaction energy, such as polarizability of alkanes, octupole moment of methane, and clustering of water at low concentrations in alkanes, are examined. It is found that, though important, these factors do not completely explain the anomalously strong attraction between alkanes and water observed experimentally.

  20. Interaction of TACC proteins with the FHL family: implications for ERK signaling.

    PubMed

    Lauffart, Brenda; Sondarva, Gautam V; Gangisetty, Omkaram; Cincotta, Melissa; Still, Ivan H

    2007-06-01

    The Transforming acidic coiled coil (TACC) proteins play a conserved role in normal development and tumorigenesis through interactions with multiple complexes involved in transcription, translation, and centrosomal dynamics. However, despite significant work on the function of TACC3 in the control of centrosomal mechanics, relatively little functional data is known about the family's founding member, TACC1. From a continued analysis of clones isolated by an unbiased yeast two-hybrid assay, we now show direct physical interactions between the TACC1 and the FHL (Four and a Half LIM-only) family of proteins. The authenticity of these interactions was validated both in vitro and in cellular systems. The FHLs exhibit diverse biological roles such as the regulation of the actin cytoskeleton and are promiscuous coregulators for several transcription factors. The interaction of the endogenous TACC-FHL proteins is primarily localized to the nucleus. However, similar to FHL2, overexpression of TACC1A in HEK293 is able to sequester serum activated ERK to the cytoplasm. This has the effect of reducing the serum induced transcriptional response of the c-fos and c-jun genes. The observation that TACCs can interact with the FHLs and alter their serum induced activities raises the possibility that the TACCs participate in crosstalk between cell signaling pathways important for cancer development and tumor progression. The transforming acidic coiled coil genes are known to be important prognostic indicators for breast, ovarian and lung cancer. In this manuscript, we identify a novel interaction between the TACCs and the FHL protein family. This interaction has an affect on ERK and may in part explain the variable associations and changes in subcellular locations of each family with specific subtypes of malignancy.

  1. Interaction of TACC proteins with the FHL family: implications for ERK signaling

    PubMed Central

    Lauffart, Brenda; Sondarva, Gautam V.; Gangisetty, Omkaram; Cincotta, Melissa

    2007-01-01

    The Transforming acidic coiled coil (TACC) proteins play a conserved role in normal development and tumorigenesis through interactions with multiple complexes involved in transcription, translation, and centrosomal dynamics. However, despite significant work on the function of TACC3 in the control of centrosomal mechanics, relatively little functional data is known about the family’s founding member, TACC1. From a continued analysis of clones isolated by an unbiased yeast two-hybrid assay, we now show direct physical interactions between the TACC1 and the FHL (Four and a Half LIM-only) family of proteins. The authenticity of these interactions was validated both in vitro and in cellular systems. The FHLs exhibit diverse biological roles such as the regulation of the actin cytoskeleton and are promiscuous coregulators for several transcription factors. The interaction of the endogenous TACC-FHL proteins is primarily localized to the nucleus. However, similar to FHL2, overexpression of TACC1A in HEK293 is able to sequester serum activated ERK to the cytoplasm. This has the effect of reducing the serum induced transcriptional response of the c-fos and c-jun genes. The observation that TACCs can interact with the FHLs and alter their serum induced activities raises the possibility that the TACCs participate in crosstalk between cell signaling pathways important for cancer development and tumor progression. The transforming acidic coiled coil genes are known to be important prognostic indicators for breast, ovarian and lung cancer. In this manuscript, we identify a novel interaction between the TACCs and the FHL protein family. This interaction has an affect on ERK and may in part explain the variable associations and changes in subcellular locations of each family with specific subtypes of malignancy. PMID:18481206

  2. Interacting partners of macrophage-secreted cathepsin B contribute to HIV-induced neuronal apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    CANTRES-ROSARIO, Yisel M.; HERNANDEZ, Natalia; NEGRON, Karla; PEREZ-LASPIUR, Juliana; LESZYK, John; SHAFFER, Scott A.; MELENDEZ, Loyda M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective HIV-1 infection of macrophages increases cathepsin B secretion and induces neuronal apoptosis, but the molecular mechanism remains unclear. Design We identified macrophage secreted cathepsin B protein interactions extracellularly and their contribution to neuronal death in vitro. Methods Cathepsin B was immunoprecipitated from monocyte-derived macrophage supernatants after 12 days post-infection. The cathepsin B interactome was quantified by label-free tandem mass spectrometry and compared to uninfected supernatants. Proteins identified were validated by western blot. Neurons were exposed to macrophage-conditioned media in presence or absence of antibodies against cathepsin B and interacting proteins. Apoptosis was measured using TUNEL labeling. Immunohistochemistry of post-mortem brain tissue samples from healthy, HIV-infected, and Alzheimer’s disease patients was performed to observe the ex vivo expression of the proteins identified. Results Nine proteins co-immunoprecipitated differentially with cathepsin B between uninfected and HIV-infected macrophages. Serum amyloid p component (SAPC) -cathepsin B interaction increased in HIV-infected macrophage supernatants, while matrix metalloprotease 9 (MMP-9) -cathepsin B interaction decreased. Pre-treatment of HIV-infected macrophage-conditioned media with antibodies against cathepsin B and SAPC decreased neuronal apoptosis. The addition of MMP-9 antibodies was not protective. SAPC was over-expressed in post-mortem brain tissue from HIV-positive neurocognitive impaired patients compared to HIV positive with normal cognition and healthy controls, while MMP-9 expression was similar in all tissues. Conclusions Inhibiting SAPC-cathepsin B interaction protects against HIV–induced neuronal death and may help to find alternative treatments for HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders. PMID:26208400

  3. Genetic variations and miRNA-target interactions contribute to natural phenotypic variations in Populus.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jinhui; Xie, Jianbo; Chen, Beibei; Quan, Mingyang; Li, Ying; Li, Bailian; Zhang, Deqiang

    2016-10-01

    Variation in regulatory factors, including microRNAs (miRNAs), contributes to variation in quantitative and complex traits. However, in plants, variants in miRNAs and their target genes that contribute to natural phenotypic variation, and the underlying regulatory networks, remain poorly characterized. We investigated the associations and interactions of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in miRNAs and their target genes with phenotypes in 435 individuals from a natural population of Populus. We used RNA-seq to identify 217 miRNAs differentially expressed in a tension wood system, and identified 1196 candidate target genes; degradome sequencing confirmed 60 of the target sites. In addition, 72 miRNA-target pairs showed significant co-expression. Gene ontology (GO) term analysis showed that most of the genes in the co-regulated pairs participate in biological regulation. Genome resequencing found 5383 common SNPs (frequency ≥ 0.05) in 139 miRNAs and 31 037 SNPs in 819 target genes. Single-SNP association analyses identified 232 significant associations between wood traits (P ≤ 0.05) and SNPs in 102 miRNAs and 1387 associations with 478 target genes. Among these, 102 miRNA-target pairs associated with the same traits. Multi-SNP associations found 102 epistatic pairs associated with traits. Furthermore, a reconstructed regulatory network contained 12 significantly co-expressed pairs, including eight miRNAs and nine targets associated with traits. Lastly, both expression and genetic association showed that miR156i, miR156j, miR396a and miR6445b were involved in the formation of tension wood. This study shows that variants in miRNAs and target genes contribute to natural phenotypic variation and annotated roles and interactions of miRNAs and their target genes by genetic association analysis. © 2016 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2016 New Phytologist Trust.

  4. Vapor-liquid equilibria simulation and an equation of state contribution for dipole-quadrupole interactions.

    PubMed

    Vrabec, Jadran; Gross, Joachim

    2008-01-10

    A systematic investigation on vapor-liquid equilibria (VLEs) of dipolar and quadrupolar fluids is carried out by molecular simulation to develop a new Helmholtz energy contribution for equations of state (EOSs). Twelve two-center Lennard-Jones plus point dipole and point quadrupole model fluids (2CLJDQ) are studied for different reduced dipolar moments micro*2=6 or 12, reduced quadrupolar moments Q*2=2 or 4 and reduced elongations L*=0, 0.505, or 1. Temperatures cover a wide range from about 55% to 95% of the critical temperature of each fluid. The NpT+test particle method is used for the calculation of vapor pressure, saturated densities, and saturated enthalpies. Critical data and the acentric factor are obtained from fits to the simulation data. On the basis of this data, an EOS contribution for the dipole-quadrupole cross-interactions of nonspherical molecules is developed. The expression is based on a third-order perturbation theory, and the model constants are adjusted to the present 2CLJDQ simulation results. When applied to mixtures, the model is found to be in excellent agreement with results from simulation and experiment. The new EOS contribution is also compatible with segment-based EOS, such as the various forms of the statistical associating fluid theory EOS.

  5. Intermonomer Interactions in Hemagglutinin Subunits HA1 and HA2 Affecting Hemagglutinin Stability and Influenza Virus Infectivity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; DeFeo, Christopher J; Alvarado-Facundo, Esmeralda; Vassell, Russell; Weiss, Carol D

    2015-10-01

    Influenza virus hemagglutinin (HA) mediates virus entry by binding to cell surface receptors and fusing the viral and endosomal membranes following uptake by endocytosis. The acidic environment of endosomes triggers a large-scale conformational change in the transmembrane subunit of HA (HA2) involving a loop (B loop)-to-helix transition, which releases the fusion peptide at the HA2 N terminus from an interior pocket within the HA trimer. Subsequent insertion of the fusion peptide into the endosomal membrane initiates fusion. The acid stability of HA is influenced by residues in the fusion peptide, fusion peptide pocket, coiled-coil regions of HA2, and interactions between the surface (HA1) and HA2 subunits, but details are not fully understood and vary among strains. Current evidence suggests that the HA from the circulating pandemic 2009 H1N1 influenza A virus [A(H1N1)pdm09] is less stable than the HAs from other seasonal influenza virus strains. Here we show that residue 205 in HA1 and residue 399 in the B loop of HA2 (residue 72, HA2 numbering) in different monomers of the trimeric A(H1N1)pdm09 HA are involved in functionally important intermolecular interactions and that a conserved histidine in this pair helps regulate HA stability. An arginine-lysine pair at this location destabilizes HA at acidic pH and mediates fusion at a higher pH, while a glutamate-lysine pair enhances HA stability and requires a lower pH to induce fusion. Our findings identify key residues in HA1 and HA2 that interact to help regulate H1N1 HA stability and virus infectivity. Influenza virus hemagglutinin (HA) is the principal antigen in inactivated influenza vaccines and the target of protective antibodies. However, the influenza A virus HA is highly variable, necessitating frequent vaccine changes to match circulating strains. Sequence changes in HA affect not only antigenicity but also HA stability, which has important implications for vaccine production, as well as viral adaptation

  6. Intermonomer Interactions in Hemagglutinin Subunits HA1 and HA2 Affecting Hemagglutinin Stability and Influenza Virus Infectivity

    PubMed Central

    DeFeo, Christopher J.; Alvarado-Facundo, Esmeralda; Vassell, Russell

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Influenza virus hemagglutinin (HA) mediates virus entry by binding to cell surface receptors and fusing the viral and endosomal membranes following uptake by endocytosis. The acidic environment of endosomes triggers a large-scale conformational change in the transmembrane subunit of HA (HA2) involving a loop (B loop)-to-helix transition, which releases the fusion peptide at the HA2 N terminus from an interior pocket within the HA trimer. Subsequent insertion of the fusion peptide into the endosomal membrane initiates fusion. The acid stability of HA is influenced by residues in the fusion peptide, fusion peptide pocket, coiled-coil regions of HA2, and interactions between the surface (HA1) and HA2 subunits, but details are not fully understood and vary among strains. Current evidence suggests that the HA from the circulating pandemic 2009 H1N1 influenza A virus [A(H1N1)pdm09] is less stable than the HAs from other seasonal influenza virus strains. Here we show that residue 205 in HA1 and residue 399 in the B loop of HA2 (residue 72, HA2 numbering) in different monomers of the trimeric A(H1N1)pdm09 HA are involved in functionally important intermolecular interactions and that a conserved histidine in this pair helps regulate HA stability. An arginine-lysine pair at this location destabilizes HA at acidic pH and mediates fusion at a higher pH, while a glutamate-lysine pair enhances HA stability and requires a lower pH to induce fusion. Our findings identify key residues in HA1 and HA2 that interact to help regulate H1N1 HA stability and virus infectivity. IMPORTANCE Influenza virus hemagglutinin (HA) is the principal antigen in inactivated influenza vaccines and the target of protective antibodies. However, the influenza A virus HA is highly variable, necessitating frequent vaccine changes to match circulating strains. Sequence changes in HA affect not only antigenicity but also HA stability, which has important implications for vaccine production, as well

  7. Contribution of temperament to eating disorder symptoms in emerging adulthood: Additive and interactive effects.

    PubMed

    Burt, Nicole M; Boddy, Lauren E; Bridgett, David J

    2015-08-01

    Temperament characteristics, such as higher negative emotionality (NE) and lower effortful control (EC), are individual difference risk factors for developmental psychopathology. Research has also noted relations between temperament and more specific manifestations of psychopathology, such as eating disorders (EDs). Although work is emerging that indicates that NE and EC may additively contribute to risk for ED symptoms, no studies have considered the interactive effects of NE and EC in relation to ED symptoms. In the current investigation, we hypothesized that (1) low EC would be associated with increased ED symptoms, (2) high NE would be associated with increased ED symptoms, and (3) these temperament traits would interact, such that the relationship between NE and ED symptoms would be strongest in the presence of low EC. After controlling for gender and child trauma history, emerging adults' (N=160) lower EC (i.e., more difficulties with self-regulation) was associated with more ED symptoms. NE did not emerge as a direct predictor of ED symptoms. However, the anticipated interaction of these temperament characteristics on ED symptoms was found. The association between NE and ED symptoms was only significant in the context of low EC. These findings provide evidence that elevated NE may only be a risk factor for the development of eating disorders when individuals also have self-regulation difficulties. The implications of these findings for research and interventions are discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Four-loop static contribution to the gravitational interaction potential of two point masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damour, Thibault; Jaranowski, Piotr

    2017-04-01

    We compute a subset of three, velocity-independent four-loop (and fourth post-Newtonian) contributions to the harmonic-coordinates effective action of a gravitationally interacting system of two point masses. We find that, after summing the three terms, the coefficient of the total contribution is rational, due to a remarkable cancellation between the various occurrences of π2. This result, obtained by a classical field-theory calculation, corrects the recent effective-field-theory-based calculation by Foffa et al. [arXiv:1612.00482]. Besides showing the usefulness of the saddle-point approach to the evaluation of the effective action, and of x -space computations, our result brings a further confirmation of the current knowledge of the fourth post-Newtonian effective action. We also show how the use of the generalized Riesz formula [Phys. Rev. D 57, 7274 (1998)10.1103/PhysRevD.57.7274] allows one to analytically compute a certain four-loop scalar master integral (represented by a four-spoked wheel diagram) which was, so far, only numerically computed.

  9. Two Fundamentally Distinct PCNA Interaction Peptides Contribute to Chromatin Assembly Factor 1 Function▿

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Shahar, Tom Rolef; Castillo, Araceli G.; Osborne, Michael J.; Borden, Katherine L. B.; Kornblatt, Jack; Verreault, Alain

    2009-01-01

    Chromatin assembly factor 1 (CAF-1) deposits histones H3 and H4 rapidly behind replication forks through an interaction with the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), a DNA polymerase processivity factor that also binds to a number of replication enzymes and other proteins that act on nascent DNA. The mechanisms that enable CAF-1 and other PCNA-binding proteins to function harmoniously at the replication fork are poorly understood. Here we report that the large subunit of human CAF-1 (p150) contains two distinct PCNA interaction peptides (PIPs). The N-terminal PIP binds strongly to PCNA in vitro but, surprisingly, is dispensable for nucleosome assembly and only makes a modest contribution to targeting p150 to DNA replication foci in vivo. In contrast, the internal PIP (PIP2) lacks one of the highly conserved residues of canonical PIPs and binds weakly to PCNA. Surprisingly, PIP2 is essential for nucleosome assembly during DNA replication in vitro and plays a major role in targeting p150 to sites of DNA replication. Unlike canonical PIPs, such as that of p21, the two p150 PIPs are capable of preferentially inhibiting nucleosome assembly, rather than DNA synthesis, suggesting that intrinsic features of these peptides are part of the mechanism that enables CAF-1 to function behind replication forks without interfering with other PCNA-mediated processes. PMID:19822659

  10. Biochemical and Genetic Evidence for a SAP-PKC-θ Interaction Contributing to IL-4 Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Cannons, Jennifer L.; Wu, Julie Z.; Gomez-Rodriguez, Julio; Zhang, Jinyi; Dong, Baoxia; Liu, Yin; Shaw, Stephen; Siminovitch, Katherine A.; Schwartzberg, Pamela L.

    2012-01-01

    SAP, an adaptor molecule that recruits Fyn to the SLAM-family of immunomodulatory receptors, is mutated in X-linked lymphoproliferative disease. CD4+ T cells from SAP-deficient mice have defective TCR-induced IL-4 production and impaired T cell-mediated help for germinal center formation; however, the downstream intermediates contributing to these defects remain unclear. We previously found that SAP-deficient CD4+ T cells exhibit decreased PKC-θ recruitment upon TCR stimulation. We demonstrate here using GST-pulldowns and co-immunoprecipitation studies that SAP constitutively associates with PKC-θ in T cells. SAP-PKC-θ interactions required R78 of SAP, a residue previously implicated in Fyn recruitment, yet SAP’s interactions with PKC-θ occurred independent of phosphotyrosine binding and Fyn. Overexpression of SAP in T cells increased and sustained PKC-θ recruitment to the immune synapse and elevated IL-4 production in response to TCR plus SLAM-mediated stimulation. Moreover, PKC-θ, like SAP, was required for SLAM-mediated increases in IL-4 production and conversely, membrane-targeted PKC-θ mutants rescued IL-4 expression in SAP−/− CD4+ T cells, providing genetic evidence that PKC-θ is a critical component of SLAM/SAP-mediated pathways that influence TCR-driven IL-4 production. PMID:20668219

  11. Maternal Dispositional Empathy and Electrodermal Reactivity: Interactive Contributions to Maternal Sensitivity with Toddler-Aged Children

    PubMed Central

    Emery, Helen T.; McElwain, Nancy L.; Groh, Ashley M.; Haydon, Katherine C.; Roisman, Glenn I.

    2015-01-01

    The present study investigated maternal dispositional empathy and skin conductance level (SCL) reactivity to infant emotional cues as joint predictors of maternal sensitivity. Sixty-four mother-toddler dyads (31 boys) were observed across a series of interaction tasks during a laboratory visit, and maternal sensitivity was coded from approximately 55 minutes of observation per family. In a second, mother-only laboratory visit, maternal SCL reactivity to infant cues was assessed using a cry-laugh audio paradigm. Mothers reported on their dispositional empathy via a questionnaire. As hypothesized, mothers with greater dispositional empathy exhibited more sensitive behavior at low, but not high, levels of SCL reactivity to infant cues. Analyses examining self-reported emotional reactivity to the cry-laugh audio paradigm yielded a similar finding: dispositional empathy was related to greater sensitivity when mothers reported low, but not high, negative emotional reactivity. Results provide support for Dix’s (1991) affective model of parenting that underscores the combined contribution of the parent’s empathic tendencies and his/her own emotional experience in response to child emotions. Specificity of the Empathy × Reactivity interaction is discussed with respect to the context in which reactivity was assessed (infant cry versus laugh) and the type of sensitivity examined (sensitivity to the child’s distress versus non-distress). PMID:24955589

  12. Tumor loci and their interactions on mouse chromosome 19 that contribute to testicular germ cell tumors

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Complex genetic factors underlie testicular germ cell tumor (TGCT) development. One experimental approach to dissect the genetics of TGCT predisposition is to use chromosome substitution strains, such as the 129.MOLF-Chr 19 (M19). M19 carries chromosome (Chr) 19 from the MOLF whereas all other chromosomes are from the 129 strain. 71% of M19 males develop TGCTs in contrast to 5% in 129 strain. To identify and map tumor loci from M19 we generated congenic strains harboring MOLF chromosome 19 segments on 129 strain background and monitored their TGCT incidence. Results We found 3 congenic strains that each harbored tumor promoting loci that had high (14%-32%) whereas 2 other congenics had low (4%) TGCT incidences. To determine how multiple loci influence TGCT development, we created double and triple congenic strains. We found additive interactions were predominant when 2 loci were combined in double congenic strains. Surprisingly, we found an example where 2 loci, both which do not contribute significantly to TGCT, when combined in a double congenic strain resulted in greater than expected TGCT incidence (positive interaction). In an opposite example, when 2 loci with high TGCT incidences were combined, males of the double congenic showed lower than expected TGCT incidence (negative interaction). For the triple congenic strain, depending on the analysis, the overall TGCT incidence could be additive or could also be due to a positive interaction of one region with others. Additionally, we identified loci that promote bilateral tumors or testicular abnormalities. Conclusions The congenic strains each with their characteristic TGCT incidences, laterality of tumors and incidence of testicular abnormalities, are useful for identification of TGCT susceptibility modifier genes that map to Chr 19 and also for studies on the genetic and environmental causes of TGCT development. TGCTs are a consequence of aberrant germ cell and testis development. By defining

  13. Interaction of Mycoplasma gallisepticum with Chicken Tracheal Epithelial Cells Contributes to Macrophage Chemotaxis and Activation

    PubMed Central

    Majumder, Sanjukta

    2015-01-01

    Mycoplasma gallisepticum colonizes the chicken respiratory mucosa and mediates a severe inflammatory response hallmarked by subepithelial leukocyte infiltration. We recently reported that the interaction of M. gallisepticum with chicken tracheal epithelial cells (TECs) mediated the upregulation of chemokine and inflammatory cytokine genes in these cells (S. Majumder, F. Zappulla, and L. K. Silbart, PLoS One 9:e112796, http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0112796). The current study extends these observations and sheds light on how this initial interaction may give rise to subsequent inflammatory events. Conditioned medium from TECs exposed to the virulent Rlow strain induced macrophage chemotaxis to a much higher degree than the nonvirulent Rhigh strain. Coculture of chicken macrophages (HD-11) with TECs exposed to live mycoplasma revealed the upregulation of several proinflammatory genes associated with macrophage activation, including interleukin-1β (IL-1β), IL-6, IL-8, CCL20, macrophage inflammatory protein 1β (MIP-1β), CXCL-13, and RANTES. The upregulation of these genes was similar to that observed upon direct contact of HD-11 cells with live M. gallisepticum. Coculture of macrophages with Rlow-exposed TECs also resulted in prolonged expression of chemokine genes, such as those encoding CXCL-13, MIP-1β, RANTES, and IL-8. Taken together, these studies support the notion that the initial interaction of M. gallisepticum with host respiratory epithelial cells contributes to macrophage chemotaxis and activation by virtue of robust upregulation of inflammatory cytokine and chemokine genes, thereby setting the stage for chronic tissue inflammation. PMID:26527215

  14. Repaglinide-gemfibrozil drug interaction: inhibition of repaglinide glucuronidation as a potential additional contributing mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Gan, Jinping; Chen, Weiqi; Shen, Hong; Gao, Ling; Hong, Yang; Tian, Yuan; Li, Wenying; Zhang, Yueping; Tang, Yuwei; Zhang, Hongjian; Humphreys, William Griffith; Rodrigues, A David

    2010-01-01

    AIM To further explore the mechanism underlying the interaction between repaglinide and gemfibrozil, alone or in combination with itraconazole. METHODS Repaglinide metabolism was assessed in vitro (human liver subcellular fractions, fresh human hepatocytes, and recombinant enzymes) and the resulting incubates were analyzed, by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) and radioactivity counting, to identify and quantify the different metabolites therein. Chemical inhibitors, in addition to a trapping agent, were also employed to elucidate the importance of each metabolic pathway. Finally, a panel of human liver microsomes (genotyped for UGT1A1*28 allele status) was used to determine the importance of UGT1A1 in the direct glucuronidation of repaglinide. RESULTS The results of the present study demonstrate that repaglinide can undergo direct glucuronidation, a pathway that can possibly contribute to the interaction with gemfibrozil. For example, [3H]-repaglinide formed glucuronide and oxidative metabolites (M2 and M4) when incubated with primary human hepatocytes. Gemfibrozil effectively inhibited (∼78%) both glucuronide and M4 formation, but had a minor effect on M2 formation. Concomitantly, the overall turnover of repaglinide was also inhibited (∼80%), and was completely abolished when gemfibrozil was co-incubated with itraconazole. These observations are in qualitative agreement with the in vivo findings. UGT1A1 plays a significant role in the glucuronidation of repaglinide. In addition, gemfibrozil and its glucuronide inhibit repaglinide glucuronidation and the inhibition by gemfibrozil glucuronide is time-dependent. CONCLUSIONS Inhibition of UGT enzymes, especially UGT1A1, by gemfibrozil and its glucuronide is an additional mechanism to consider when rationalizing the interaction between repaglinide and gemfibrozil. PMID:21175442

  15. Repaglinide-gemfibrozil drug interaction: inhibition of repaglinide glucuronidation as a potential additional contributing mechanism.

    PubMed

    Gan, Jinping; Chen, Weiqi; Shen, Hong; Gao, Ling; Hong, Yang; Tian, Yuan; Li, Wenying; Zhang, Yueping; Tang, Yuwei; Zhang, Hongjian; Humphreys, William Griffith; Rodrigues, A David

    2010-12-01

    To further explore the mechanism underlying the interaction between repaglinide and gemfibrozil, alone or in combination with itraconazole. Repaglinide metabolism was assessed in vitro (human liver subcellular fractions, fresh human hepatocytes, and recombinant enzymes) and the resulting incubates were analyzed, by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) and radioactivity counting, to identify and quantify the different metabolites therein. Chemical inhibitors, in addition to a trapping agent, were also employed to elucidate the importance of each metabolic pathway. Finally, a panel of human liver microsomes (genotyped for UGT1A1*28 allele status) was used to determine the importance of UGT1A1 in the direct glucuronidation of repaglinide. The results of the present study demonstrate that repaglinide can undergo direct glucuronidation, a pathway that can possibly contribute to the interaction with gemfibrozil. For example, [³H]-repaglinide formed glucuronide and oxidative metabolites (M2 and M4) when incubated with primary human hepatocytes. Gemfibrozil effectively inhibited (∼78%) both glucuronide and M4 formation, but had a minor effect on M2 formation. Concomitantly, the overall turnover of repaglinide was also inhibited (∼80%), and was completely abolished when gemfibrozil was co-incubated with itraconazole. These observations are in qualitative agreement with the in vivo findings. UGT1A1 plays a significant role in the glucuronidation of repaglinide. In addition, gemfibrozil and its glucuronide inhibit repaglinide glucuronidation and the inhibition by gemfibrozil glucuronide is time-dependent. Inhibition of UGT enzymes, especially UGT1A1, by gemfibrozil and its glucuronide is an additional mechanism to consider when rationalizing the interaction between repaglinide and gemfibrozil. © 2010 The Authors. British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology © 2010 The British Pharmacological Society.

  16. Occludin S471 Phosphorylation Contributes to Epithelial Monolayer Maturation.

    PubMed

    Bolinger, Mark T; Ramshekar, Aniket; Waldschmidt, Helen V; Larsen, Scott D; Bewley, Maria C; Flanagan, John M; Antonetti, David A

    2016-08-01

    Multiple organ systems require epithelial barriers for normal function, and barrier loss is a hallmark of diseases ranging from inflammation to epithelial cancers. However, the molecular processes regulating epithelial barrier maturation are not fully elucidated. After contact, epithelial cells undergo size-reductive proliferation and differentiate, creating a dense, highly ordered monolayer with high resistance barriers. We provide evidence that the tight junction protein occludin contributes to the regulation of epithelial cell maturation upon phosphorylation of S471 in its coiled-coil domain. Overexpression of a phosphoinhibitory occludin S471A mutant prevents size-reductive proliferation and subsequent tight junction maturation in a dominant manner. Inhibition of cell proliferation in cell-contacted but immature monolayers recapitulated this phenotype. A kinase screen identified G-protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs) targeting S471, and GRK inhibitors delayed epithelial packing and junction maturation. We conclude that occludin contributes to the regulation of size-reductive proliferation and epithelial cell maturation in a phosphorylation-dependent manner. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  17. Occludin S471 Phosphorylation Contributes to Epithelial Monolayer Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Bolinger, Mark T.; Waldschmidt, Helen V.; Larsen, Scott D.; Bewley, Maria C.; Flanagan, John M.

    2016-01-01

    Multiple organ systems require epithelial barriers for normal function, and barrier loss is a hallmark of diseases ranging from inflammation to epithelial cancers. However, the molecular processes regulating epithelial barrier maturation are not fully elucidated. After contact, epithelial cells undergo size-reductive proliferation and differentiate, creating a dense, highly ordered monolayer with high resistance barriers. We provide evidence that the tight junction protein occludin contributes to the regulation of epithelial cell maturation upon phosphorylation of S471 in its coiled-coil domain. Overexpression of a phosphoinhibitory occludin S471A mutant prevents size-reductive proliferation and subsequent tight junction maturation in a dominant manner. Inhibition of cell proliferation in cell-contacted but immature monolayers recapitulated this phenotype. A kinase screen identified G-protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs) targeting S471, and GRK inhibitors delayed epithelial packing and junction maturation. We conclude that occludin contributes to the regulation of size-reductive proliferation and epithelial cell maturation in a phosphorylation-dependent manner. PMID:27185880

  18. The Contribution of Pin End-Cup Interactions to Clot Strength Assessed with Thrombelastography.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Vance G

    2016-01-01

    Viscoelastic methods have been developed to assess the contribution of plasma proteins and platelets to coagulation in vitro to guide clinical transfusion therapy. One of the cardinal precepts of determining clot strength is making sure that the viscoelastic technique includes complete exposure of the plastic pin in the testing chamber with the fluid analyzed so as to assure maximal interaction of the cup wall with the pin surface. However, the various contributions of the pin surface area to final clot strength have not been investigated. That is, it is not clear what is more important in the in vitro determination of clot strength, the surface area shared between the cup and pin filled with fluid or the final viscoelastic resistance of the gel matrix formed. Thus, the purpose of this investigation was to determine the clot strength when only the tip of the pin was engaged with plasma thrombus and to compare these values with clot strength values obtained when the pin was completely in plasma. After determining the minimal amount of plasma required to cover a pin tip in a thrombelastographic system (30 μL), clot strength (elastic modulus, G) was determined in plasma samples of 30 or 360 μL final volume (n = 12 per condition) after tissue factor activation. The G value with 30 μL volume was 1057 ± 601 dynes/cm (mean ± SD; 95% confidence interval, 675-1439 dynes/cm), which was (P = 0.0015) smaller than the G value associated with 360-μL sample volumes, that was 1712 ± 48 dynes/cm (confidence interval, 1681-1742 dynes/cm). In conclusion, these data demonstrate that clot strength is not determined by a simple ratio of surface area of pin and cup to volume of sample, but rather strength is importantly influenced by the viscoelastic resistance of the fluid assessed.

  19. Complex T Cell Interactions Contribute to Helicobacter pylori Gastritis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Brian M.; Fontaine, Clinton A.; Poe, Sara A.

    2013-01-01

    Disease due to the gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori varies in severity from asymptomatic to peptic ulcer disease and cancer. Accumulating evidence suggests that one source of this variation is an abnormal host response. The goal of this study was to use a mouse model of H. pylori gastritis to investigate the roles of regulatory T cells (Treg) as well as proinflammatory T cells (Th1 and Th17) in gastritis, gastric T cell engraftment, and gastric cytokine production. Our results support published data indicating that severe gastritis in T cell recipient mice is due to failure of Treg engraftment, that Treg ameliorate gastritis, and that the proinflammatory response is attributable to interactions between several cell subsets and cytokines. We confirmed that gamma interferon (IFN-γ) is essential for induction of gastritis but showed that IFN-γ-producing CD4 T cells are not necessary. Interleukin 17A (IL-17A) also contributed to gastritis, but to a lesser extent than IFN-γ. Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and IL-17F were also elevated in association with disease. These results indicate that while H. pylori-specific CD4+ T cells and IFN-γ are both essential for induction of gastritis due to H. pylori, IFN-γ production by T cells is not essential. It is likely that other proinflammatory cytokines, such as IL-17F and TNF-α, shown to be elevated in this model, also contribute to the induction of disease. We suggest that gastritis due to H. pylori is associated with loss of immunoregulation and alteration of several cytokines and cell subsets and cannot be attributed to a single immune pathway. PMID:23264048

  20. Function and Interaction of the Coupled Genes Responsible for Pik-h Encoded Rice Blast Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Nan; Lin, Fei; Liu, Zhe; Dong, Zhongqiu; Wang, Ling; Pan, Qinghua

    2014-01-01

    Pik-h, an allele of Pik, confers resistance against the rice blast pathogen Magnaporthe oryzae. Its positional cloning has shown that it comprises a pair of NBS-LRR genes, Pikh-1 and Pikh-2. While Pikh-1 appears to be constitutively transcribed, the transcript abundance of Pikh-2 responds to pathogen challenge. The Pikh-1 CC (coiled coil) domain interacts directly with both AvrPik-h and Pikh-2. Transient expression assays demonstrated that Pikh-2 mediates the initiation of the host defence response. Nucleocytoplasmic partitioning of both Pikh-1 and Pikh-2 is required for their functionalities. In a proposed mechanistic model of Pik-h resistance, it is suggested that Pikh-1 acts as an adaptor between AvrPik-h and Pikh-2, while Pikh-2 transduces the signal to trigger Pik-h-specific resistance. PMID:24896089

  1. Dimerization of TRAF-interacting protein (TRAIP) regulates the mitotic progression.

    PubMed

    Park, I Seul; Jo, Ku-Sung; Won, Hyung-Sik; Kim, Hongtae

    2015-08-07

    The homo- or hetero-dimerization of proteins plays critical roles in the mitotic progression. The TRAF-interacting protein (TRAIP) is crucial in early mitotic progression and chromosome alignment defects in the metaphase. The TRAIP is a 469 amino acid protein, including the Really Interesting New Gene (RING), coiled-coil (CC), and leucine zipper (LZ) domain. In general, the CC or LZ domain containing proteins forms homo- or hetero-dimerization to achieve its activity. In this study, a number of TRAIP mutants were used to define the TRAIP molecular domains responsible for its homo-dimerization. A co-immunoprecipitation assay indicated that the TRAIP forms homo-dimerization through the CC domain. The cells, expressing the CC domain-deleted mutant that could not form a homo-dimer, increased the mitotic index and promoted mitotic progression.

  2. Assessment of odor activity value coefficient and odor contribution based on binary interaction effects in waste disposal plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chuandong; Liu, Jiemin; Yan, Luchun; Chen, Haiying; Shao, Huiqi; Meng, Tian

    2015-02-01

    Odor activity value (OAV) has been widely used for the assessment of odor pollution from various sources. However, little attention has been paid to the extreme OAV variation and potential inaccuracies of odor contribution assessment caused by odor interaction effects. The objective of this study is to assess the odor interaction effect for precise assessment of odor contribution. In this paper, samples were collected from a food waste disposal plant, and analyzed by instrumental and olfactory method to conclude odorants' occurrence and OAV. Then odor activity value coefficient (γ) was first proposed to evaluate the type and the level of binary interaction effects based on determination of OAV variation. By multiplying OAV and γ, odor activity factor (OAF) was used to reflect the real OAV. Correlation between the sum of OAF and odor concentration reached 80.0 ± 5.7%, which was 10 times higher than the sum of OAV used before. Results showed that hydrogen sulfide contributed most (annual average 66.4 ± 15.8%) to odor pollution in the waste disposal plant. However, as odor intensity of samples in summer rising, odor contribution of trimethylamine increased to 48.3 ± 3.7% by the strong synergistic interaction effect, while odor contribution of phenol decreased to 0.1 ± 0.02% for the increasing antagonistic interaction effect.

  3. Interacting vegetative and thermal contributions to water movement in desert soil

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garcia, C.A.; Andraski, B.J.; Stonestrom, D.A.; Cooper, C.A.; Šimůnek, J.; Wheatcraft, S.W.

    2011-01-01

    Thermally driven water-vapor flow can be an important component of total water movement in bare soil and in deep unsaturated zones, but this process is often neglected when considering the effects of soil–plant–atmosphere interactions on shallow water movement. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the coupled and separate effects of vegetative and thermal-gradient contributions to soil water movement in desert environments. The evaluation was done by comparing a series of simulations with and without vegetation and thermal forcing during a 4.7-yr period (May 2001–December 2005). For vegetated soil, evapotranspiration alone reduced root-zone (upper 1 m) moisture to a minimum value (25 mm) each year under both isothermal and nonisothermal conditions. Variations in the leaf area index altered the minimum storage values by up to 10 mm. For unvegetated isothermal and nonisothermal simulations, root-zone water storage nearly doubled during the simulation period and created a persistent driving force for downward liquid fluxes below the root zone (total net flux ~1 mm). Total soil water movement during the study period was dominated by thermally driven vapor fluxes. Thermally driven vapor flow and condensation supplemented moisture supplies to plant roots during the driest times of each year. The results show how nonisothermal flow is coupled with plant water uptake, potentially influencing ecohydrologic relations in desert environments.

  4. Interacting vegetative and thermal contributions to water movement in desert soil

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garcia, C.A.; Andraski, B.J.; Stonestrom, D.A.; Cooper, C.A.; Simunek, J.; Wheatcraft, S.W.

    2011-01-01

    Thermally driven water-vapor flow can be an important component of total water movement in bare soil and in deep unsaturated zones, but this process is often neglected when considering the effects of soil-plant-atmosphere interactions on shallow water movement. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the coupled and separate effects of vegetative and thermal-gradient contributions to soil water movement in desert environments. The evaluation was done by comparing a series of simulations with and without vegetation and thermal forcing during a 4.7-yr period (May 2001-December 2005). For vegetated soil, evapotranspiration alone reduced root-zone (upper 1 m) moisture to a minimum value (25 mm) each year under both isothermal and nonisothermal conditions. Variations in the leaf area index altered the minimum storage values by up to 10 mm. For unvegetated isothermal and nonisothermal simulations, root-zone water storage nearly doubled during the simulation period and created a persistent driving force for downward liquid fluxes below the root zone (total net flux ~1 mm). Total soil water movement during the study period was dominated by thermally driven vapor fluxes. Thermally driven vapor flow and condensation supplemented moisture supplies to plant roots during the driest times of each year. The results show how nonisothermal flow is coupled with plant water uptake, potentially influencing ecohydrologic relations in desert environments. ?? Soil Science Society of America 5585 Guilford Rd., Madison, WI 53711 USA. All rights reserved.

  5. Chiral symmetry and the A 1 contribution to the nucleon-nucleon interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durso, J. W.; Brown, G. E.; Saarela, M.

    1984-12-01

    The contribution of A 1 exchange to the nucleon-nucleon potential is studied in a broken chiral symmetric model. The A 1 is treated as a finite-width resonance in the πρ s-wave. Connections between pseudoscalar and pseudovector pion-nucleon coupling in the underlying model lagrangian are studied in detail. It is found that large terms in the NN interaction arising from πρ exchange with pseudoscalar coupling are suppressed by interference with a 1 exchange. With pseudovector coupling there is a suppression of the A 1 exchange by the so-called "seagull" terms in πρ exchange which arise from gauge invariance. The suppression becomes an exact cancellation in the limit of infinite ρ and a 1 masses and exact chiral symmetry. We found that inclusion of the a 1 decay into the πρ state strongly modifies the a 1] exchange potential, suppressing the tensor part but leaving the spin-spin part almost unchanged.

  6. Do Halogen-Hydrogen Bond Donor Interactions Dominate the Favorable Contribution of Halogens to Ligand-Protein Binding?

    PubMed

    Lin, Fang-Yu; MacKerell, Alexander D

    2017-07-20

    Halogens are present in a significant number of drugs, contributing favorably to ligand-protein binding. Currently, the contribution of halogens, most notably chlorine and bromine, is largely attributed to halogen bonds involving favorable interactions with hydrogen bond acceptors. However, we show that halogens acting as hydrogen bond acceptors potentially make a more favorable contribution to ligand binding than halogen bonds based on quantum mechanical calculations. In addition, bioinformatics analysis of ligand-protein crystal structures shows the presence of significant numbers of such interactions. It is shown that interactions between halogens and hydrogen bond donors (HBDs) are dominated by perpendicular C-X···HBD orientations. Notably, the orientation dependence of the halogen-HBD (X-HBD) interactions is minimal over greater than 100° with favorable interaction energies ranging from -2 to -14 kcal/mol. This contrasts halogen bonds in that X-HBD interactions are substantially more favorable, being comparable to canonical hydrogen bonds, with a smaller orientation dependence, such that they make significant, favorable contributions to ligand-protein binding and, therefore, should be actively considered during rational ligand design.

  7. Anxious and Depressive Symptomatology Among Male Youth: The Joint and Interactive Contribution of Temperament and Executive Functioning.

    PubMed

    Latzman, Robert D; Shishido, Yuri; Latzman, Natasha E; Clark, Lee Anna

    2016-12-01

    Few studies have investigated the combined effects of temperament and executive functioning (EF) on anxious and depressive symptomatology in youth. The current study is the first to investigate the joint and interactive contribution of mother- and youth self-reported affective dimensions of temperament and EF to the explanation of anxious and depressive symptomatology. Participants included 174 adolescent males (M age = 13.6 ± 1.35). Results confirmed the joint and interactive contribution of temperament in the explanation of anxious and depressive symptomatology. Further, EF contributed to the explanation of anxious/depressive symptomatology via interaction with youth-, but not mother-reported, temperament; it was not a unique predictor. Results support the need to consider both affective dimensions of temperament and EF in etiological models of anxious and depressive symptomatology, which has implications for identifying at-risk youth and developing early intervention and targeted problem-specific prevention programs.

  8. Predicting Children's Interactions with Unfamiliar Peers: Contributions of Parent-Child Interaction Style and Child Individual Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carrillo, Sonia; And Others

    This study examined children's play interaction styles with unfamiliar peers; used mother-child and father-child dyadic qualities independently to predict children's social behavior; determined the relationship between children's individual behaviors and peer dyadic characteristics; and compared mother-child and father-child interactions on both…

  9. Intermolecular interactions of oligothienoacenes: Do S⋯S interactions positively contribute to crystal structures of sulfur-containing aromatic molecules?

    PubMed

    Tsuzuki, Seiji; Orita, Hideo; Sato, Naoki

    2016-11-07

    Intermolecular interactions in the crystals of tetra- and penta-thienoacene were studied using ab initio molecular orbital calculations for evaluating the magnitude of characteristic S⋯S interactions with great attention paid to their origin. The interactions between the π-stacked neighboring molecules are significantly greater than those between the neighboring molecules exhibiting the S⋯S contact, although it has sometimes been claimed that the S⋯S interactions play important roles in adjusting the molecular arrangement of sulfur-containing polycyclic aromatic molecules in the crystals owing to short S⋯S contacts. The coupled cluster calculations with single and double substitutions with noniterative triple excitation interaction energies at the basis set limit estimated for the π-stacked and S⋯S contacted neighboring molecules in the tetrathienoacene crystal are -11.17 and -4.27 kcal/mol, respectively. Those for π-stacked molecules in the pentathienoacene crystal is -14.38 kcal/mol, while those for S⋯S contacted molecules are -7.02 and -6.74 kcal/mol. The dispersion interaction is the major source of the attraction between the π-stacked and S⋯S contacted molecules, while the orbital-orbital interactions are repulsive: The orbital-orbital interactions, which are significant for charge carrier transport properties, are not much more than the results of the short S⋯S contact caused by the strong dispersion interactions. Besides, the intermolecular interaction energy calculated for a trithienoacene dimer has strong orientation dependence.

  10. Mortality from desiccation contributes to a genotype–temperature interaction for cold survival in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Kobey, Robert L.; Montooth, Kristi L.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Survival at cold temperatures is a complex trait, primarily because of the fact that the physiological cause of injury may differ across degrees of cold exposure experienced within the lifetime of an ectothermic individual. In order to better understand how chill-sensitive insects experience and adapt to low temperatures, we investigated the physiological basis for cold survival across a range of temperature exposures from −4 to 6°C in five genetic lines of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. Genetic effects on cold survival were temperature dependent and resulted in a significant genotype–temperature interaction for survival across cold temperature exposures that differ by as little as 2°C. We investigated desiccation as a potential mechanism of injury across these temperature exposures. Flies were dehydrated following exposures near 6°C, whereas flies were not dehydrated following exposures near −4°C. Furthermore, decreasing humidity during cold exposure decreased survival, and increasing humidity during cold exposure increased survival at 6°C, but not at −4°C. These results support the conclusion that in D. melanogaster there are multiple physiological mechanisms of cold-induced mortality across relatively small differences in temperature, and that desiccation contributes to mortality for exposures near 6°C but not for subzero temperatures. Because D. melanogaster has recently expanded its range from tropical to temperate latitudes, the complex physiologies underlying cold tolerance are likely to be important traits in the recent evolutionary history of this fruit fly. PMID:23197100

  11. Probing the Solution Structure of IκB Kinase (IKK) Subunit γ and Its Interaction with Kaposi Sarcoma-associated Herpes Virus Flice-interacting Protein and IKK Subunit β by EPR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Bagnéris, Claire; Rogala, Kacper B; Baratchian, Mehdi; Zamfir, Vlad; Kunze, Micha B A; Dagless, Selina; Pirker, Katharina F; Collins, Mary K; Hall, Benjamin A; Barrett, Tracey E; Kay, Christopher W M

    2015-07-03

    Viral flice-interacting protein (vFLIP), encoded by the oncogenic Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpes virus (KSHV), constitutively activates the canonical nuclear factor κ-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) pathway. This is achieved through subversion of the IκB kinase (IKK) complex (or signalosome), which involves a physical interaction between vFLIP and the modulatory subunit IKKγ. Although this interaction has been examined both in vivo and in vitro, the mechanism by which vFLIP activates the kinase remains to be determined. Because IKKγ functions as a scaffold, recruiting both vFLIP and the IKKα/β subunits, it has been proposed that binding of vFLIP could trigger a structural rearrangement in IKKγ conducive to activation. To investigate this hypothesis we engineered a series of mutants along the length of the IKKγ molecule that could be individually modified with nitroxide spin labels. Subsequent distance measurements using electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy combined with molecular modeling and molecular dynamics simulations revealed that IKKγ is a parallel coiled-coil whose response to binding of vFLIP or IKKβ is localized twisting/stiffening and not large-scale rearrangements. The coiled-coil comprises N- and C-terminal regions with distinct registers accommodated by a twist: this structural motif is exploited by vFLIP, allowing it to bind and subsequently activate the NF-κB pathway. In vivo assays confirm that NF-κB activation by vFLIP only requires the N-terminal region up to the transition between the registers, which is located directly C-terminal of the vFLIP binding site.

  12. Probing the Solution Structure of IκB Kinase (IKK) Subunit γ and Its Interaction with Kaposi Sarcoma-associated Herpes Virus Flice-interacting Protein and IKK Subunit β by EPR Spectroscopy*

    PubMed Central

    Bagnéris, Claire; Rogala, Kacper B.; Baratchian, Mehdi; Zamfir, Vlad; Kunze, Micha B. A.; Dagless, Selina; Pirker, Katharina F.; Collins, Mary K.; Hall, Benjamin A.; Barrett, Tracey E.; Kay, Christopher W. M.

    2015-01-01

    Viral flice-interacting protein (vFLIP), encoded by the oncogenic Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpes virus (KSHV), constitutively activates the canonical nuclear factor κ-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) pathway. This is achieved through subversion of the IκB kinase (IKK) complex (or signalosome), which involves a physical interaction between vFLIP and the modulatory subunit IKKγ. Although this interaction has been examined both in vivo and in vitro, the mechanism by which vFLIP activates the kinase remains to be determined. Because IKKγ functions as a scaffold, recruiting both vFLIP and the IKKα/β subunits, it has been proposed that binding of vFLIP could trigger a structural rearrangement in IKKγ conducive to activation. To investigate this hypothesis we engineered a series of mutants along the length of the IKKγ molecule that could be individually modified with nitroxide spin labels. Subsequent distance measurements using electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy combined with molecular modeling and molecular dynamics simulations revealed that IKKγ is a parallel coiled-coil whose response to binding of vFLIP or IKKβ is localized twisting/stiffening and not large-scale rearrangements. The coiled-coil comprises N- and C-terminal regions with distinct registers accommodated by a twist: this structural motif is exploited by vFLIP, allowing it to bind and subsequently activate the NF-κB pathway. In vivo assays confirm that NF-κB activation by vFLIP only requires the N-terminal region up to the transition between the registers, which is located directly C-terminal of the vFLIP binding site. PMID:25979343

  13. Blast resistance of CC-NB-LRR protein Pb1 is mediated by WRKY45 through protein-protein interaction.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Haruhiko; Hayashi, Nagao; Matsushita, Akane; Xinqiong, Liu; Nakayama, Akira; Sugano, Shoji; Jiang, Chang-Jie; Takatsuji, Hiroshi

    2013-06-04

    Panicle blast 1 (Pb1) is a panicle blast resistance gene derived from the indica rice cultivar "Modan." Pb1 encodes a coiled-coil-nucleotide-binding site-leucine-rich repeat (CC-NB-LRR) protein and confers durable, broad-spectrum resistance to Magnaporthe oryzae races. Here, we investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying Pb1-mediated blast resistance. The Pb1 protein interacted with WRKY45, a transcription factor involved in induced resistance via the salicylic acid signaling pathway that is regulated by the ubiquitin proteasome system. Pb1-mediated panicle blast resistance was largely compromised when WRKY45 was knocked down in a Pb1-containing rice cultivar. Leaf-blast resistance by Pb1 overexpression (Pb1-ox) was also compromised in WRKY45 knockdown/Pb1-ox rice. Blast infection induced higher accumulation of WRKY45 in Pb1-ox than in control Nipponbare rice. Overexpression of Pb1-Quad, a coiled-coil domain mutant that had weak interaction with WRKY45, resulted in significantly weaker blast resistance than that of wild-type Pb1. Overexpression of Pb1 with a nuclear export sequence failed to confer blast resistance to rice. These results suggest that the blast resistance of Pb1 depends on its interaction with WRKY45 in the nucleus. In a transient system using rice protoplasts, coexpression of Pb1 enhanced WRKY45 accumulation and increased WRKY45-dependent transactivation activity, suggesting that protection of WRKY45 from ubiquitin proteasome system degradation is possibly involved in Pb1-dependent blast resistance.

  14. Genome-wide interaction of genotype by erythrocyte n-3 PUFAs contributes to phenotypic variance of diabetes-related traits

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    While genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and candidate gene approach have identified many genetic variants that contribute to disease risk as main effects, the impact of genotype by environment (GxE) interactions remains rather under-surveyed. The present study aimed to examine variance contribu...

  15. Macrophages and Fc-receptor interactions contribute to the antitumour activities of the anti-CD40 antibody SGN-40.

    PubMed

    Oflazoglu, E; Stone, I J; Brown, L; Gordon, K A; van Rooijen, N; Jonas, M; Law, C-L; Grewal, I S; Gerber, H-P

    2009-01-13

    SGN-40 is a therapeutic antibody targeting CD40, which induces potent anti-lymphoma activities via direct apoptotic signalling cells and by cell-mediated cytotoxicity. Here we show antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis (ADCP) by macrophages to contribute significantly to the therapeutic activities and that the antitumour effects of SGN-40 depend on Fc interactions.

  16. The nature of interactions that contribute to postzygotic reproductive isolation in hybrid copepods.

    PubMed

    Willett, Christopher S

    2011-05-01

    Deleterious interactions within the genome of hybrids can lower fitness and result in postzygotic reproductive isolation. Understanding the genetic basis of these deleterious interactions, known as Dobzhansky-Muller incompatibilities, is the subject of intense current study that seeks to elucidate the nature of these deleterious interactions. Hybrids from crosses of individuals from genetically divergent populations of the intertidal copepod Tigriopus californicus provide a useful model in which to study Dobzhansky-Muller incompatibilities. Studies of the basis of postzygotic reproductive isolation in this species have revealed a number of patterns. First, there is evidence for a breakdown in genomic coadaptation between mtDNA-encoded and nuclear-encoded proteins that can result in a reduction in hybrid fitness in some crosses. It appears from studies of the individual genes involved in these interactions that although this coadaptation could lead to asymmetries between crosses, patterns of genotypic viabilities are not often consistent with simple models of genomic coadaptation. Second, there is a large impact of environmental factors on these deleterious interactions suggesting that they are not strictly intrinsic in nature. Temperature in particular appears to play an important role in determining the nature of these interactions. Finally, deleterious interactions in these hybrid copepods appear to be complex in terms of the number of genetic factors that interact to lead to reductions in hybrid fitness. This complexity may stem from three or more factors that all interact to cause a single incompatibility or the same factor interacting with multiple other factors independently leading to multiple incompatibilities.

  17. Model for evaluating patterned charge-regulation contributions to electrostatic interactions between low-dielectric spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollenbeck, Dawn; Martini, K. Michael; Langner, Andreas; Harkin, Anthony; Ross, David S.; Thurston, George M.

    2010-09-01

    We study the electrostatic contribution to the effective potential between two spherical low-dielectric particles that carry proton-titratable sites within a linearized setting. To evaluate the needed work of charging for each possible proton occupancy configuration, together with its crucial dependence on sphere separation, we numerically solve a coarse-grained linear Debye-Hückel model that incorporates nonuniform dielectric and ionic solution properties at a series of intersphere separations and for chosen titratable charge locations on each sphere. We combine the resulting work-of-charging matrix with site-specific chemical potentials of proton binding to construct the Boltzmann-weighted probabilities of each possible occupancy pattern of the titratable sites as functions of intersphere separation. With the use of these probabilities we find that a nonmonotonic average electrostatic potential can result that is repulsive at larger sphere separations but attractive at close separations. The nonmonotonic potential corresponds to particular choices of site-specific unoccupied charge values and their corresponding proton affinities, and its occurrence is dependent on pH in relation to the pKa values of the titratable groups. For the chosen titratable groups, we identify the particular change from repulsive to attractive proton occupancy patterns with decreasing intersphere separation that gives rise to the modeled nonmonotonic dependence and derive more general conditions under which such a nonmonotonic dependence can occur. Within the present model we find that stationary points of the charge-regulated average electrostatic potential, considered as a function of intersphere separation, occur when a normalized Boltzmann-averaged intersphere charge number product equals its covariance with an average free energy of charging divided by kBT . We derive more general conditions for the location and nature of critical points in the electrostatic intersphere potential

  18. Arms race co-evolution of Magnaporthe oryzae AVR-Pik and rice Pik genes driven by their physical interactions.

    PubMed

    Kanzaki, Hiroyuki; Yoshida, Kentaro; Saitoh, Hiromasa; Fujisaki, Koki; Hirabuchi, Akiko; Alaux, Ludovic; Fournier, Elisabeth; Tharreau, Didier; Terauchi, Ryohei

    2012-12-01

    Attack and counter-attack impose strong reciprocal selection on pathogens and hosts, leading to development of arms race evolutionary dynamics. Here we show that Magnaporthe oryzae avirulence gene AVR-Pik and the cognate rice resistance (R) gene Pik are highly variable, with multiple alleles in which DNA replacements cause amino acid changes. There is tight recognition specificity of the AVR-Pik alleles by the various Pik alleles. We found that AVR-Pik physically binds the N-terminal coiled-coil domain of Pik in a yeast two-hybrid assay as well as in an in planta co-immunoprecipitation assay. This binding specificity correlates with the recognition specificity between AVR and R genes. We propose that AVR-Pik and Pik are locked into arms race co-evolution driven by their direct physical interactions. © 2012 The Authors. The Plant Journal © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  19. Characterization of a novel human sperm-associated antigen 9 (SPAG9) having structural homology with c-Jun N-terminal kinase-interacting protein

    PubMed Central

    Jagadish, Nirmala; Rana, Ritu; Selvi, Ramasamy; Mishra, Deepshikha; Garg, Manoj; Yadav, Shikha; Herr, John C.; Okumura, Katsuzumi; Hasegawa, Akiko; Koyama, Koji; Suri, Anil

    2005-01-01

    We report a novel SPAG9 (sperm-associated antigen 9) protein having structural homology with JNK (c-Jun N-terminal kinase)-interacting protein 3. SPAG9, a single copy gene mapped to the human chromosome 17q21.33 syntenic with location of mouse chromosome 11, was earlier shown to be expressed exclusively in testis [Shankar, Mohapatra and Suri (1998) Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 243, 561–565]. The SPAG9 amino acid sequence analysis revealed identity with the JNK-binding domain and predicted coiled-coil, leucine zipper and transmembrane domains. The secondary structure analysis predicted an α-helical structure for SPAG9 that was confirmed by CD spectra. Microsequencing of higher-order aggregates of recombinant SPAG9 by tandem MS confirmed the amino acid sequence and mono atomic mass of 83.9 kDa. Transient expression of SPAG9 and its deletion mutants revealed that both leucine zipper with extended coiled-coil domains and transmembrane domain of SPAG9 were essential for dimerization and proper localization. Studies of MAPK (mitogenactivated protein kinase) interactions demonstrated that SPAG9 interacted with higher binding affinity to JNK3 and JNK2 compared with JNK1. No interaction was observed with p38α or extracellular-signal-regulated kinase pathways. Polyclonal antibodies raised against recombinant SPAG9 recognized native protein in human sperm extracts and localized specifically on the acrosomal compartment of intact human spermatozoa. Acrosome-reacted spermatozoa demonstrated SPAG9 immunofluorescence, indicating its retention on the equatorial segment after the acrosome reaction. Further, anti-SPAG9 antibodies inhibited the binding of human spermatozoa to intact human oocytes as well as to matched hemizona. This is the first report of sperm-associated JNK-binding protein that may have a role in spermatozoa–egg interaction. PMID:15693750

  20. Complex deleterious interactions associated with malic enzyme may contribute to reproductive isolation in the copepod Tigriopus californicus.

    PubMed

    Willett, Christopher S

    2011-01-01

    Dobzhansky-Muller incompatibilities can result from the interactions of more than a single pair of interacting genes and there are several different models of how such complex interactions can be structured. Previous empirical work has identified complex conspecific epistasis as a form of complex interaction that has contributed to postzygotic reproductive isolation between taxa, but other forms of complexity are also possible. Here, I probe the genetic basis of reproductive isolation in crosses of the intertidal copepod Tigriopus californicus by looking at the impact of markers in genes encoding metabolic enzymes in F(2) hybrids. The region of the genome associated with the locus ME2 is shown to have strong, repeatable impacts on the fitness of hybrids in crosses and epistatic interactions with another chromosomal region marked by the GOT2 locus in one set of crosses. In a cross between one of these populations and a third population, these two regions do not appear to interact despite the continuation of a large effect of the ME2 region itself in both crosses. The combined results suggest that the ME2 chromosomal region is involved in incompatibilities with several unique partners. If these deleterious interactions all stem from the same factor in this region, that would suggest a different form of complexity from complex conspecific epistasis, namely, multiple independent deleterious interactions stemming from the same factor. Confirmation of this idea will require more fine-scale mapping of the interactions of the ME2 region of the genome.

  1. Complex Deleterious Interactions Associated with Malic Enzyme May Contribute to Reproductive Isolation in the Copepod Tigriopus californicus

    PubMed Central

    Willett, Christopher S.

    2011-01-01

    Dobzhansky-Muller incompatibilities can result from the interactions of more than a single pair of interacting genes and there are several different models of how such complex interactions can be structured. Previous empirical work has identified complex conspecific epistasis as a form of complex interaction that has contributed to postzygotic reproductive isolation between taxa, but other forms of complexity are also possible. Here, I probe the genetic basis of reproductive isolation in crosses of the intertidal copepod Tigriopus californicus by looking at the impact of markers in genes encoding metabolic enzymes in F2 hybrids. The region of the genome associated with the locus ME2 is shown to have strong, repeatable impacts on the fitness of hybrids in crosses and epistatic interactions with another chromosomal region marked by the GOT2 locus in one set of crosses. In a cross between one of these populations and a third population, these two regions do not appear to interact despite the continuation of a large effect of the ME2 region itself in both crosses. The combined results suggest that the ME2 chromosomal region is involved in incompatibilities with several unique partners. If these deleterious interactions all stem from the same factor in this region, that would suggest a different form of complexity from complex conspecific epistasis, namely, multiple independent deleterious interactions stemming from the same factor. Confirmation of this idea will require more fine-scale mapping of the interactions of the ME2 region of the genome. PMID:21731664

  2. Contributions of soil moisture interactions to future precipitation changes in the GLACE-CMIP5 experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    May, Wilhelm; Rummukainen, Markku; Chéruy, Frederique; Hagemann, Stefan; Meier, Arndt

    2017-09-01

    Changes in soil moisture are likely to contribute to future changes in latent heat flux and various characteristics of daily precipitation. Such contributions during the second half of the twenty-first century are assessed using the simulations from the GLACE-CMIP5 experiment, applying a linear regression analysis to determine the magnitude of these contributions. As characteristics of daily precipitation, mean daily precipitation, the frequency of wet days and the intensity of precipitation on wet days are considered. Also, the frequency and length of extended wet and dry spells are studied. Particular focus is on the regional (for nine selected regions) as well as seasonal variations in the magnitude of the contributions of the projected differences in soil moisture to the future changes in latent heat flux and in the characteristics of daily precipitation. The results reveal the overall tendency that the projected differences in soil moisture contribute to the future changes in response to the anthropogenic climate forcing for all the meteorological variables considered here. These contributions are stronger and more robust (i.e., there are smaller deviations between individual climate models) for the latent heat flux than for the characteristics of daily precipitation. It is also found that the contributions of the differences in soil moisture to the future changes are generally stronger and more robust for the frequency of wet days than for the intensity of daily precipitation. Consistent with the contributions of the projected differences in soil moisture to the future changes in the frequency of wet days, soil moisture generally contributes to the future changes in the characteristics of wet and dry spells. The magnitude of these contributions does not differ systematically between the frequency and the length of such extended spells, but the contributions are generally slightly stronger for dry spells than for wet spells. Distinguishing between the nine

  3. Contributions of soil moisture interactions to future precipitation changes in the GLACE-CMIP5 experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    May, Wilhelm; Rummukainen, Markku; Chéruy, Frederique; Hagemann, Stefan; Meier, Arndt

    2016-10-01

    Changes in soil moisture are likely to contribute to future changes in latent heat flux and various characteristics of daily precipitation. Such contributions during the second half of the twenty-first century are assessed using the simulations from the GLACE-CMIP5 experiment, applying a linear regression analysis to determine the magnitude of these contributions. As characteristics of daily precipitation, mean daily precipitation, the frequency of wet days and the intensity of precipitation on wet days are considered. Also, the frequency and length of extended wet and dry spells are studied. Particular focus is on the regional (for nine selected regions) as well as seasonal variations in the magnitude of the contributions of the projected differences in soil moisture to the future changes in latent heat flux and in the characteristics of daily precipitation. The results reveal the overall tendency that the projected differences in soil moisture contribute to the future changes in response to the anthropogenic climate forcing for all the meteorological variables considered here. These contributions are stronger and more robust (i.e., there are smaller deviations between individual climate models) for the latent heat flux than for the characteristics of daily precipitation. It is also found that the contributions of the differences in soil moisture to the future changes are generally stronger and more robust for the frequency of wet days than for the intensity of daily precipitation. Consistent with the contributions of the projected differences in soil moisture to the future changes in the frequency of wet days, soil moisture generally contributes to the future changes in the characteristics of wet and dry spells. The magnitude of these contributions does not differ systematically between the frequency and the length of such extended spells, but the contributions are generally slightly stronger for dry spells than for wet spells. Distinguishing between the nine

  4. Exploring the Contribution of a Content-Infused Interactive Whiteboard for School Readiness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McManis, Lilla D.; Gunnewig, Susan B.; McManis, Mark H.

    2010-01-01

    This exploratory study examined the relationship between use of an interactive (touchscreen) whiteboard and development of school readiness skills. Over one school year, public school regular education prekindergarten classrooms used an interactive whiteboard with preloaded literacy and math activities. The children were low-income and English…

  5. Sense of Community in Graduate Online Education: Contribution of Learner to Learner Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shackelford, Jo L.; Maxwell, Marge

    2012-01-01

    Distance learning technologies offer a multitude of ways to build interaction into online courses to support learning. Based on social constructivism theory, this study explored which types of interaction are most predictive of students' sense of community in online graduate courses at a regional comprehensive university. Surveys were used to…

  6. Interactions within the MHC contribute to the genetic architecture of celiac disease

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, Gad; Kikianty, Eder; Wang, Qiao; Rawlinson, Dave; Shi, Fan; Haviv, Izhak; Stern, Linda

    2017-01-01

    Interaction analysis of GWAS can detect signal that would be ignored by single variant analysis, yet few robust interactions in humans have been detected. Recent work has highlighted interactions in the MHC region between known HLA risk haplotypes for various autoimmune diseases. To better understand the genetic interactions underlying celiac disease (CD), we have conducted exhaustive genome-wide scans for pairwise interactions in five independent CD case-control studies, using a rapid model-free approach to examine over 500 billion SNP pairs in total. We found 14 independent interaction signals within the MHC region that achieved stringent replication criteria across multiple studies and were independent of known CD risk HLA haplotypes. The strongest independent CD interaction signal corresponded to genes in the HLA class III region, in particular PRRC2A and GPANK1/C6orf47, which are known to contain variants for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and early menopause, co-morbidities of celiac disease. Replicable evidence for statistical interaction outside the MHC was not observed. Both within and between European populations, we observed striking consistency of two-locus models and model distribution. Within the UK population, models of CD based on both interactions and additive single-SNP effects increased explained CD variance by approximately 1% over those of single SNPs. The interactions signal detected across the five cohorts indicates the presence of novel associations in the MHC region that cannot be detected using additive models. Our findings have implications for the determination of genetic architecture and, by extension, the use of human genetics for validation of therapeutic targets. PMID:28282431

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