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Sample records for cold agglutinin evidence

  1. When blood runs cold: cold agglutinins and cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Findlater, Rhonda R; Schnell-Hoehn, Karen N

    2011-01-01

    Cold agglutinins are particular cold-reactive antibodies that react with red blood cells when the blood temperature drops below normal body temperature causing increased blood viscosity and red blood cell clumping. Most individuals with cold agglutinins are not aware of their presence, as these antibodies have little effect on daily living, often necessitating no treatment. However, when those with cold agglutinins are exposed to hypothermic situations or undergo procedures such as cardiopulmonary bypass with hypothermia during cardiac surgery, lethal complications of hemolysis, microvascular occlusion and organ failure can occur. By identifying those suspected of possessing cold agglutinins through a comprehensive nursing assessment and patient history, cold agglutinin screening can be performed prior to surgery to determine a diagnosis of cold agglutinin disease. With a confirmed diagnosis of cold agglutinin disease, the plan of care can be focused on measures to maintain the patient's blood temperature above the thermal amplitude throughout their hospitalization including the use of normothermic cardiopulmonary bypass with warm myocardial preservation techniques to prevent these fatal complications. Using a case report approach, the authors review the mechanism, clinical manifestations, detection and nursing management of a patient with cold agglutinins undergoing scheduled cardiac surgery. Cold agglutinin disease is rare. However, the risk to patients warrants an increased awareness of cold agglutinins and screening for those who are suspected of carrying these antibodies. PMID:21630629

  2. Cold agglutinin-mediated autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Berentsen, Sigbjørn; Randen, Ulla; Tjønnfjord, Geir E

    2015-06-01

    Cold antibody types account for about 25% of autoimmune hemolytic anemias. Primary chronic cold agglutinin disease (CAD) is characterized by a clonal lymphoproliferative disorder. Secondary cold agglutinin syndrome (CAS) complicates specific infections and malignancies. Hemolysis in CAD and CAS is mediated by the classical complement pathway and is predominantly extravascular. Not all patients require treatment. Successful CAD therapy targets the pathogenic B-cell clone. Complement modulation seems promising in both CAD and CAS. Further development and documentation are necessary before clinical use. We review options for possible complement-directed therapy.

  3. Diagnosis and treatment of cold agglutinin mediated autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Berentsen, Sigbjørn; Tjønnfjord, Geir E

    2012-05-01

    Exact diagnosis of the subtype has essential therapeutic consequences in autoimmune hemolytic anemia. Cold-antibody types include primary chronic cold agglutinin disease (CAD) and rare cases of cold agglutinin syndrome (CAS) secondary to cancer or acute infection. Primary CAD is a clonal lymphoproliferative disorder. Not all patients require pharmacological therapy, but treatment seems indicated more often than previously thought. Corticosteroids should not be used to treat primary CAD. Half of the patients respond to rituximab monotherapy; median response duration is 11 months. The most efficient treatment to date is fludarabine and rituximab in combination, resulting in responses in 75%, complete responses in 20% and median response duration of more than 66 months. Toxicity may be a concern, and an individualized approach is discussed. Erythrocyte transfusions can be given provided specific precautions are undertaken. No evidence-based therapy exists in secondary CAS, but optimal treatment of the underlying disorder is essential when feasible.

  4. Transient cold agglutinins associated with Mycoplasma cynos pneumonia in a dog.

    PubMed

    Pinkos, Alyssa C; Friedrichs, Kristen R; Monaghan, Kelly N; Sample, Saundra H; Trepanier, Lauren A

    2015-12-01

    This report details a case of reversible cold agglutinins in a dog with Mycoplasma cynos pneumonia. An 11-month-old female spayed Rhodesian Ridgeback was presented for lethargy and cough. Thoracic radiographs revealed an alveolar pattern present bilaterally in the cranioventral lung lobes. Septic neutrophilic inflammation with suspected Mycoplasma sp. organisms was noted on cytologic examination of a trans-tracheal wash, and the dog was treated empirically with IV ampicillin/sulbactam and enrofloxacin pending culture results. Red blood cell agglutination was noted unexpectedly on several blood film reviews during hospitalization; however, the dog never developed clinical or laboratory evidence of hemolysis. Cold agglutinins were demonstrated based on the results of a saline dilution and cold agglutinin test that showed agglutination at 4°C but not at room temperature (21°C) or 37°C. Based on a positive culture for M cynos, the dog was treated for 8 weeks with oral enrofloxacin. After clinical and radiographic resolution of the pneumonia, repeated saline dilution and cold agglutinin tests of peripheral blood were negative at all temperatures. Reversible, asymptomatic cold agglutinins are common in human patients with mycoplasma pneumonia, but this is the first reported case in a dog.

  5. [Cold agglutinins with new specificity against type 2 chains].

    PubMed

    Hack, H; Kreft, H; Roelcke, D

    1994-01-01

    Two examples of IgM lambda cold agglutinins (CA) with a new specificity are characterized. 1. CAs ZI and BR react with newborn as well as with adult red cells. 2. Both CAs react with I- and i-active animal red cells. 3. The CAs are inhibited by linear and branched type 2 chains. 4. Endo-beta-galactosidase, splitting type 2 chains from human red cells, abolishes reactivity of both CAs. Both CAs recognize linear as well as branched type 2 chains.

  6. Cold agglutinin disease in sepsis: A rare entity

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Ravinder; Kukar, Neetu; Bajwa, Sukhminder Jit Singh; Kaur, Shaminder

    2015-01-01

    Cold agglutinin disease (CAgD) is a type of autoimmune hemolytic anemia which generally occurs in adults and is characterized by the presence of IgM antibodies directed against polysaccharide antigens on red blood cell surface. A 16-year-old male, having clinical picture of sepsis and anemia, presented to the Emergency Department of our Institute in an Hemodynamically unstable condition. Investigation profile revealed hemolysis due to CAgD, which responded to corticosteroids, antibiotics and supportive treatment. This case highlights the importance of recognizing this entity in such type of cases presenting with sepsis and anemia. PMID:26229347

  7. Cold-agglutinin hemolytic diseases, a rheo-optical study.

    PubMed

    Plá, Laura Verónica; Stoltz, Jean François; Valverde, Juana R; Riquelme, Bibiana D

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the strength of red blood cells agglutination, induced by autoantibodies in patients with Cold-Agglutinin Hemolytic Disease (CAHD), and the hemorheological profile (deformability and osmotic fragility) by the utilization of rheo-optical techniques. The strength of the antigen-antibody reaction was approached by the work required to dissociate mechanically red blood cells agglutinates. It is focused on the evaluation of the qualitative adhesiveness of cell approached by the dissociation kinetics carried out in a Couette flow (erythroaggregameter). The analysis was performed by recording the increase of the reflectivity signal as the agglutinates are dissociated by shear into smaller ones. A total of eight patients aged <54 years with recent diagnostic of CAHD detected by positive Direct Anti-globulin Test (DAT) and very low RBC counts at 20 degrees C, were studied. Two parametric values were interesting: the dimensionless energy parameter and the characteristic dissociation time, which showed good correlation with hematological parameters. In conclusion, the dissociation method provides a powerful tool for estimating the qualitative adhesiveness of red blood cells agglutinated by autoantibodies in patients suffering of cold-agglutinin hemolytic disease and it would be very interesting to evaluate the severity of the disease. PMID:18198409

  8. Glucocorticoid-Responsive Cold Agglutinin Disease in a Patient with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Honne, Kyoko; Nagashima, Takao; Iwamoto, Masahiro; Kamesaki, Toyomi; Minota, Seiji

    2015-01-01

    A 57-year-old man with rheumatoid arthritis developed severe anemia during treatment with adalimumab plus methotrexate. Cold agglutinin disease was diagnosed because haptoglobin was undetectable, cold agglutinin was positive (1 : 2048), and the direct Coombs test was positive (only to complement). Although the cold agglutinin titer was normalized (1 : 64) after treatment with prednisolone (0.7 mg/kg/day for two weeks), the patient's hemoglobin did not increase above 8 g/dL. When cold agglutinins were reexamined using red blood cells suspended in bovine serum albumin, the titer was still positive at 1 : 1024. Furthermore, the cold agglutinin had a wide thermal amplitude, since the titer was 1 : 16 at 30°C and 1 : 1 at 37°C. This suggested that the cold agglutinin would show pathogenicity even at body temperature. After the dose of prednisolone was increased to 1 mg/kg/day, the patient's hemoglobin rapidly returned to the normal range. The thermal amplitude test using red blood cells suspended in bovine serum albumin is more sensitive than the standard test for detecting pathogenic cold agglutinins. PMID:26346552

  9. Postoperative Recurrence of Invasive Thymoma with Cold Agglutinin Disease and Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia.

    PubMed

    Yoneda, Taro; Koba, Hayato; Tanimura, Kota; Ogawa, Naohiko; Watanabe, Satoshi; Hara, Johsuke; Abo, Miki; Sone, Takashi; Kimura, Hideharu; Kasahara, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    A 50-year-old man presented to our hospital in 1995. Invasive thymoma was diagnosed and extended thymectomy and left upper lobe partial resection were performed. In 2013, he complained of dyspnea. Chest computed tomography showed postoperative recurrence of invasive thymoma. Several chemotherapies were administered. Severe anemia and an increase in the total bilirubin level were observed with chemotherapies. In additional, an examination showed that the direct Coombs test was positive. Cold agglutinin was also high. We herein experienced a rare case of postoperative recurrence of invasive thymoma with cold agglutinin disease and autoimmune hemolytic anemia. PMID:27629968

  10. Bentall Surgery in a Patient with Cold Agglutinin and Antiphospholipid Antibody: Double Trouble.

    PubMed

    Raut, Monish S; Rohra, Gulshan; Shivnani, Ganesh; Maheshwari, Arun; Dubey, Sumir; Bhathiwal, Rajpal Singh; Sharma, Deevakar

    2016-06-01

    Cold agglutinin disease is an uncommon disease with potential to cause hemolysis and thrombosis during hypothermic cardiac surgery. Antiphospholipid syndrome is also rare disease with hypercoagulation tendacy. Perioperative management of both these diseases is challenging. We present successful perioperative management of high risk Bentall surgery in patient with both these dreadful diseases. PMID:27578899

  11. Cold agglutinin disease in fibrolamellar hepatocellular carcinoma: a rare association with a rare cancer variant.

    PubMed

    Al-Matham, Khalid; Alabed, Iehab; Zaidi, Syed Z A; Qushmaq, Khalid A

    2011-01-01

    Cold agglutinin disease (CAD) is a rare autoimmune hemolytic anemia. Although it can occur secondary to lymphoproliferative disorders and autoimmune or infectious diseases, CAD is rarely reported as secondary to solid tumors. We report a case of a woman aged 18 years diagnosed with a well-differentiated hepatocellular carcinoma of the fibrolamellar subtype, who was shown to have CAD also. Her general condition, including CAD, improved after targeted therapy with sorafenib for the hepatocellular carcinoma and only conservative measures for the CAD that consisted of avoidance of cold. In summary, although it is an extremely rare association and less common than lymphoproliferative disorders, CAD can be associated with solid tumors. PMID:21293066

  12. Two cases of primary cold agglutinin disease associated with megaloblastic anemia.

    PubMed

    Imashuku, Shinsaku; Kudo, Naoko; Takagishi, Katsushige; Saigo, Katsuyasu

    2015-01-01

    We report two cases of primary cold agglutinin disease (CAD) associated with megaloblastic anemia in Japanese elderly patients. Case 1 was a 67-year-old male and Case 2 was a 55-year-old male. Both patients were diagnosed with primary CAD, with continuously high cold agglutinin titers (1 : >8,192 and 1 : 16,834, resp.), monoclonal IgM-kappa light chains, and no underlying disease. In addition, both patients had megaloblastic anemia due to vitamin B12 deficiency. One patient received rituximab and both received vitamin 12 supplementation. To date, no cooccurrence of primary CAD and megaloblastic anemia has been emphasized. Thus, the association of these hematological diseases may be incidental; however, given that CAD is an autoimmune disease which may show antibodies against intrinsic factor and gastric parietal cells, this association was thought to be probably not a coincidence. Clinicians should be aware of the possible simultaneous presence of autoimmune hemolytic/megaloblastic anemia in patients with primary CAD. PMID:25918651

  13. Anti-j: human cold agglutinins recognizing linear (i) and branched (I) type 2 chains.

    PubMed

    Roelcke, D; Kreft, H; Hack, H; Stevenson, F K

    1994-01-01

    Two IgM lambda cold agglutinins (CAs) reacted with protease- and sialidase-resistant antigens expressed in equal strength on human adult (I), newborn (i), i adult, rabbit (I) and rhesus monkey (i) erythrocytes. The antibodies were inhibited by the linear type 2 sequence lacto-N-neotetraose and the branched type 2 sequence lacto-N-neohexaose. Endo-beta-galactosidase treatment of red cells, which splits type 2 chains from the surface, abolished CA reactivity. The CAs expressed the idiotype recognized by the anti-idiotype 9G4 specific for anti-I and anti-i CAs. The data suggest that the two CAs recognize linear (i) as well as branched (I) type 2 chains. It is proposed to term these CAs anti-j.

  14. IgA cold agglutinins recognize Pr and Sa antigens expressed on glycophorins.

    PubMed

    Roelcke, D; Hack, H; Kreft, H; MacDonald, B; Pereira, A; Habibi, B

    1993-06-01

    Three cases of IgA kappa cold agglutinins (CAs) were studied. One had anti-Pr1 specificity, one had anti-Pra, and one had anti-Sa. The CAs recognize O-glycans of glycophorins. The findings supplement previous data on anti-Pr1 specificities of four IgA kappa CAs. Because all IgA kappa CAs described recognize O-glycans of glycophorins, a close association between the CA IgA isotype and specificities for O-glycans becomes apparent. It is unlikely, however, that the striking association reflects interrelations between IgA CA structure and specificity, because anti-Sa specificity and all anti-Pr subspecificities were originally defined with IgM CAs.

  15. Extensive cutaneous necrosis in a 12-year-old girl: an unusual complication of secondary cold agglutinin syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Kirtisudha; Singla, Shilpy; Batra, Vineeta Vijay; Basu, Srikanta; Kumar, Praveen

    2013-12-01

    Cold agglutinin syndrome (CAS) secondary to infection is rare, usually presenting with anaemia and minor skin changes. A 12-year-old girl with secondary CAS associated with extensive cutaneous necrosis is reported. She presented with fever and multiple necrotic lesions over both cheeks, the tip of nose, ear margins, hands and buttocks, along with pallor, hepatospenomegaly, acrocyanosis and gangrene of the fifth digit of the right hand. She had anaemia, unconjugated hyperbilirubinaemia and a positive direct antiglobulin test owing to cold agglutinins of the IgM type with anti-i specificity and titres of 1:512 at 4°C. Results of bone marrow examination were normal and cryoglobulins were negative. Cold antibodies released even during a brief, self-limited febrile illness can cause widespread cutaneous gangrene. We believe this is the first report in the paediatric age group. PMID:24091086

  16. Cold Agglutinin Autoantibodies in a Patient without a Visible Coronary Sinus Ostium: Strategies for Myocardial Protection without Using Retrograde Cardioplegia.

    PubMed

    Heath, Michele; Yalamuri, Suraj; Walker, Julie; Maxwell, Cory; Williams, Adam; McCartney, Sharon; Daneshmand, Mani

    2016-06-01

    The presence of cold agglutinins (CA) during cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass usually creates the need for an altered surgical plan. In this case, the CA were discovered after the initiation of bypass, limiting the time, and cardioplegia solutions that could be used in the new approach. The inability to cannulate the coronary sinus with a retrograde cardioplegia catheter excluded the standard approach to myocardial preservation with CA of using continuous warm blood. For this case, we used intermittent cold crystalloid delivered via the antegrade needle for the first half of the procedure and through the saphenous vein graft anastomosis during the aortic valve portion of the cross-clamp period. PMID:27578898

  17. An atypical IgM class platelet cold agglutinin induces GPVI-dependent aggregation of human platelets.

    PubMed

    Sánchez Guiu, I M; Martínez-Martinez, I; Martínez, C; Navarro-Fernandez, J; García-Candel, F; Ferrer-Marín, F; Vicente, V; Watson, S P; Andrews, R K; Gardiner, E E; Lozano, M L; Rivera, J

    2015-08-01

    Platelet cold agglutinins (PCA) cause pseudothrombocytopenia, spurious thrombocytopenia due to ex vivo platelet clumping, complicating clinical diagnosis, but mechanisms and consequences of PCA are not well defined. Here, we characterised an atypical immunoglobulin (Ig)M PCA in a 37-year-old woman with lifelong bleeding and chronic moderate thrombocytopenia, that induces activation and aggregation of autologous or allogeneic platelets via interaction with platelet glycoprotein (GP)VI. Patient temperature-dependent pseudothrombocytopenia was EDTA-independent, but was prevented by integrin αIIbβ3 blockade. Unstimulated patient platelets revealed elevated levels of bound IgM, increased expression of activation markers (P-selectin and CD63), low GPVI levels and abnormally high thromboxane (TX)A2 production. Patient serum induced temperature- and αIIbβ3-dependent decrease of platelet count in allogeneic donor citrated platelet-rich plasma (PRP), but not in PRP from Glanzmann's thrombasthenia or afibrinogenaemia patients. In allogeneic platelets, patient plasma induced shape change, P-selectin and CD63 expression, (14)C-serotonin release, and TXA2 production. Activation was not inhibited by aspirin, cangrelor or blocking anti-Fc receptor (FcγRIIA) antibody, but was abrogated by inhibitors of Src and Syk, and by a soluble GPVI-Fc fusion protein. GPVI-deficient platelets were not activated by patient plasma. These data provide the first evidence for an IgM PCA causing platelet activation/aggregation via GPVI. The PCA activity persisted over a five-year follow-up period, supporting a causative role in patient chronic thrombocytopenia and bleeding. PMID:25994029

  18. An atypical IgM class platelet cold agglutinin induces GPVI-dependent aggregation of human platelets.

    PubMed

    Sánchez Guiu, I M; Martínez-Martinez, I; Martínez, C; Navarro-Fernandez, J; García-Candel, F; Ferrer-Marín, F; Vicente, V; Watson, S P; Andrews, R K; Gardiner, E E; Lozano, M L; Rivera, J

    2015-08-01

    Platelet cold agglutinins (PCA) cause pseudothrombocytopenia, spurious thrombocytopenia due to ex vivo platelet clumping, complicating clinical diagnosis, but mechanisms and consequences of PCA are not well defined. Here, we characterised an atypical immunoglobulin (Ig)M PCA in a 37-year-old woman with lifelong bleeding and chronic moderate thrombocytopenia, that induces activation and aggregation of autologous or allogeneic platelets via interaction with platelet glycoprotein (GP)VI. Patient temperature-dependent pseudothrombocytopenia was EDTA-independent, but was prevented by integrin αIIbβ3 blockade. Unstimulated patient platelets revealed elevated levels of bound IgM, increased expression of activation markers (P-selectin and CD63), low GPVI levels and abnormally high thromboxane (TX)A2 production. Patient serum induced temperature- and αIIbβ3-dependent decrease of platelet count in allogeneic donor citrated platelet-rich plasma (PRP), but not in PRP from Glanzmann's thrombasthenia or afibrinogenaemia patients. In allogeneic platelets, patient plasma induced shape change, P-selectin and CD63 expression, (14)C-serotonin release, and TXA2 production. Activation was not inhibited by aspirin, cangrelor or blocking anti-Fc receptor (FcγRIIA) antibody, but was abrogated by inhibitors of Src and Syk, and by a soluble GPVI-Fc fusion protein. GPVI-deficient platelets were not activated by patient plasma. These data provide the first evidence for an IgM PCA causing platelet activation/aggregation via GPVI. The PCA activity persisted over a five-year follow-up period, supporting a causative role in patient chronic thrombocytopenia and bleeding.

  19. [Cold agglutinin disease -  no response to glucocorticoids and rituximab, what treatment is best for the 3rd line of therapy? Case report and review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Adam, Z; Pejchalová, A; Chlupová, G; Ríhová, L; Pour, L; Krejčí, M; Cervinek, L; Král, Z; Mayer, J

    2013-09-01

    Acquired autoimmune haemolytic anaemia is divided according to the characteristics of immunoglobulin causing haemolysis. The most frequent are haemolytic anaemia with thermal antibodies. They bind to erythrocytes and initiate their destruction in the reticuloendothelial system cells, leading to extravascular haemolysis. Cold agglutinin disease differs significantly from haemolytic anaemia with thermal antibodies. Agglutination is caused by monoclonal antibodies, in most cases class IgM and very rarely class IgG. Under cold conditions they bind to erythrocytes and cause their agglutination and subsequent disorder of blood circulation in body parts with a lower temperature. Agglutinins binding initiate the binding of the complement to the erythrocytes. Under warm conditions the binding becomes loose but the parts of the complement, which are already bound, cause haemolysis, which is mainly of an intravascular nature. The loose haemoglobin causes haemoglobinuria. Description of a patient with the disease. The 1st symptoms of the disease, i.e. anaemia + circulatory disorders in the acral parts of the body, disappearing under warm conditions followed with haemoglobinuria, led to the dia-gnosis of cold agglutinin disease. The 1st line treatment, prednison, did not show any response. The 2nd line treatment used was rituximab and dexametazon. Rituximab was administered in doses of 500 mg/ m2 to 4 times in a row in weekly intervals. Dexametazon was administered in doses of 40 mg from 1st to 4th day and from 15th to 18th day of the cycle. This treatment, however, did not show any response either. Therefore this article brings an overview of all publications regarding the disease treatment with the aim of choosing the most effective treatment options in the case of failure of the monotherapy using rituximab. The 1st line treatment for cold agglutinin disease is rituximab in monotherapy, usually administered once per week at least for 4 weeks. This treatment shows a response

  20. A new phosphoglycerolipid, 'phosphatidylglucose', found in human cord red cells by multi-reactive monoclonal anti-i cold agglutinin, mAb GL-1/GL-2.

    PubMed

    Nagatsuka, Y; Kasama, T; Ohashi, Y; Uzawa, J; Ono, Y; Shimizu, K; Hirabayashi, Y

    2001-05-25

    Cord red cell membranes express many differentiation-related molecules. To study such molecules, we have established human cell lines, termed GL-1 and GL-2, by the Epstein-Barr virus transformation method, both of which produce monoclonal anti-i cold agglutinin [Y. Nagatsuka et al., Immunol. Lett. 46 (1995) 93-100]. Thin layer chromatography immunoblotting analysis revealed that these antibodies had broad specificities reacting with a variety of glycolipid antigens. Of the immunoreactive lipid antigens, a new phosphoglycerolipid containing glucose from human cord red cells was found. The isolated lipid was unstable to alkaline hydrolysis and contained glucose as a sole sugar. Secondary ion mass spectrum-collision-induced dissociation mass spectrometric analysis of this lipid gave the main molecular ion peak at m/z 885 corresponding to phosphatidylhexose. This antigen was susceptible to phospholipases A2, C and D but resistant to phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C. Two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy confirmed that glucose is linked to the sn-glycerol 3-phosphate residue with a beta-anomeric configuration. Based upon these combined results, we identified this lipid as phosphatidyl-beta-D-glucose. This is the first report showing the presence of the glucosylated glycerophospholipid in mammalian sources. PMID:11377429

  1. Early Serologic Diagnosis of Mycoplasma pneumoniae Pneumonia: An Observational Study on Changes in Titers of Specific-IgM Antibodies and Cold Agglutinins

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sung-Churl; Youn, You-Sook; Rhim, Jung-Woo; Kang, Jin-Han; Lee, Kyung-Yil

    2016-01-01

    Abstract There have been some limitations on early diagnosis of Mycoplasma pneumoniae (MP) infection because of no immunoglobulin M (IgM) responses and variable detection rates of polymerase chain reaction in the early stage of the disease. We wanted to discuss regarding early diagnostic method using short-term paired titration of MP-specific IgM and cold agglutinins (CAs) in the early stage of MP pneumonia. The participants of this study were 418 children with MP pneumonia during 2 recent epidemics (2006–2007 and 2011), and they were diagnosed by an anti-MP IgM antibody test (Serodia Myco II) examined twice during hospitalization at presentation and around discharge (mean of 3.4 ± 1.3 days apart). CA titers were simultaneously examined twice during study period. Anti-MP IgM antibody titer ≥1:40 and CA titer ≥1:4 were considered positive, respectively. The relationships between 2 IgM antibodies in the early stage were evaluated. Regarding MP-specific antibody titers, 148 patients showed a seroconversion, 245 patients exhibited increased titers, and 25 patients had unchanged higher titers (≥1:640) during hospitalization. The median MP-specific antibody titers at each examination time were 1:80 and 1:640, respectively; those of CAs were 1:8 and 1:32, respectively. Illness duration prior to admission showed a trend of association with both titers, and patients with shorter illness duration had a higher rate of negative titers or lower titers at each examination time. CAs and MP-specific antibody titers were correlated in the total patients at presentation and at 2nd examination (P < 0.001, respectively), and the diagnostic corresponding rates of CAs to IgM antibody test were 81% to 96% in patient subgroups. Short-term paired MP specific-IgM determinations in the acute stage may be used as a definitive diagnostic method for MP pneumonia. Paired CA titers showed a correlation with MP-specific antibody titers, suggesting they can be used as an adjuvant

  2. Primary structure of a Thomsen-Friedenreich-antigen-specific lectin, jacalin [Artocarpus integrifolia (jack fruit) agglutinin]. Evidence for the presence of an internal repeat.

    PubMed

    Mahanta, S K; Sanker, S; Rao, N V; Swamy, M J; Surolia, A

    1992-05-15

    Jacalin [Artocarpus integrifolia (jack fruit) agglutinin] is made up of two types of chains, heavy and light, with M(r) values of 16,200 +/- 1200 and 2090 +/- 300 respectively (on the basis of gel-permeation chromatography under denaturing conditions). Its complete amino acid sequence was determined by manual degradation using a 4-dimethylaminoazobenzene 4'-isothiocyanate double-coupling method. Peptide fragments for sequence analysis were obtained by chemical cleavages of the heavy chain with CNBr, hydroxylamine hydrochloride and iodosobenzoic acid and enzymic cleavage with Staphylococcus aureus proteinase. The peptides were purified by a combination gel-permeation and reverse-phase chromatography. The light chains, being only 20 residues long, could be sequenced without fragmentation. Amino acid analyses and carboxypeptidase-Y-digestion C-terminal analyses of the subunits provided supportive evidence for their sequence. Computer-assisted alignment of the jacalin heavy-chain sequence failed to show sequence similarity to that of any lectin for which the complete sequence is known. Analyses of the sequence showed the presence of an internal repeat spanning residues 7-64 and 76-130. The internal repeat was found to be statistically significant.

  3. Identification of IgG alloantibodies in patients with high-titer IgM cold agglutinins by serum/plasma affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Stahl, D; Kreft, H; Hack, H; Schraven, B; Roelcke, D

    1997-01-01

    The detection of IgG alloantibodies in the presence of high-titer cold autoagglutinins (CAs) can be extremely difficult, especially under pressure of time when transfusion of red blood cells is urgently needed. Here we demonstrate that IgG alloantibodies in the presence of high-titer IgM CAs can be easily detected by quantitative IgG purification from serum or plasma by affinity chromatography. In comparison with the routinely used methods for IgG alloantibody identification, affinity chromatography shows better or identical results and is the method leading to results most rapidly.

  4. Hemagglutinins and bacterial agglutinins of earthworms.

    PubMed

    Stein, E A; Younai, S; Cooper, E L

    1987-01-01

    The biological roles of invertebrate agglutinins have been and remain an unresolved subject of controversy. Classical studies on agglutinins, beginning with the pioneer work of Noguchi (1903) on Limulus polyphemus and Homarus americanus have emphasized their hemagglutinating properties, an approach that has been criticized for its lack of biological relevance. While erythrocyte agglutination has proven useful for determining various properties of invertebrate agglutinins, it does not address the question of their natural function. More recently, invertebrate agglutinins have been investigated for their ability to interact with pathogenic agents such as bacteria (for review, see Pistole, 1982), yeast (Van der Knapp et al., 1982; Renwrantz and Stahmer, 1983) and parasitic protozoans (Ingram et al., 1984). In addition, the possible relationship of agglutinins to defense mechanisms of both vertebrates and invertebrates has been indicated by the observation that limulin, the major agglutinin of Limulus polyphemus, bears a number of similarities to vertebrate C-reactive proteins (Robey and Liu, 1981). In annelids, there have been no studies on bacterial agglutinins prior to our work with Lumbricus (Stein et al., 1985; Stein et al., submitted). Earthworms are particularly appropriate for studying bacterial agglutinins since their coelomic fluid contains constant low levels of bacteria and fungal spores, and their agglutinins are both naturally occurring and inducible. Although our initial studies on Lumbricus agglutinins were directed toward their hemagglutinating properties, our recent observations using bacteria have allowed us to reach the following conclusions: 1) Lumbricus coelomic fluid normally contains agglutinins against both erythrocytes and bacteria. After injecting worms with either erythrocytes or bacteria, agglutinin titers increase in coelomic fluid. This increase appears to be due to both an increase in numbers of agglutinins as well as levels of specific

  5. Hemagglutinins and bacterial agglutinins of earthworms.

    PubMed

    Stein, E A; Younai, S; Cooper, E L

    1987-01-01

    The biological roles of invertebrate agglutinins have been and remain an unresolved subject of controversy. Classical studies on agglutinins, beginning with the pioneer work of Noguchi (1903) on Limulus polyphemus and Homarus americanus have emphasized their hemagglutinating properties, an approach that has been criticized for its lack of biological relevance. While erythrocyte agglutination has proven useful for determining various properties of invertebrate agglutinins, it does not address the question of their natural function. More recently, invertebrate agglutinins have been investigated for their ability to interact with pathogenic agents such as bacteria (for review, see Pistole, 1982), yeast (Van der Knapp et al., 1982; Renwrantz and Stahmer, 1983) and parasitic protozoans (Ingram et al., 1984). In addition, the possible relationship of agglutinins to defense mechanisms of both vertebrates and invertebrates has been indicated by the observation that limulin, the major agglutinin of Limulus polyphemus, bears a number of similarities to vertebrate C-reactive proteins (Robey and Liu, 1981). In annelids, there have been no studies on bacterial agglutinins prior to our work with Lumbricus (Stein et al., 1985; Stein et al., submitted). Earthworms are particularly appropriate for studying bacterial agglutinins since their coelomic fluid contains constant low levels of bacteria and fungal spores, and their agglutinins are both naturally occurring and inducible. Although our initial studies on Lumbricus agglutinins were directed toward their hemagglutinating properties, our recent observations using bacteria have allowed us to reach the following conclusions: 1) Lumbricus coelomic fluid normally contains agglutinins against both erythrocytes and bacteria. After injecting worms with either erythrocytes or bacteria, agglutinin titers increase in coelomic fluid. This increase appears to be due to both an increase in numbers of agglutinins as well as levels of specific

  6. Bacterial agglutinin activity in the saliva of human identical and fraternal twins.

    PubMed

    Malamud, D; Christensen, C M; Navazesh, M; Davis, C

    1988-01-01

    The major factor in human saliva responsible for the specific aggregation of oral streptococci is a high molecular-weight glycoprotein (agglutinin). To determine if the level of this glycoprotein in whole and parotid saliva was genetically determined, agglutinin activity for Streptococcus sanguis and Streptococcus mutans in saliva obtained from identical and fraternal twins was compared. Evidence for the heritability of agglutinin activity and also parotid flow rate and total protein was obtained. There was no evidence for a significant genetic contribution to salivary sodium concentration.

  7. You Turn Me Cold: Evidence for Temperature Contagion

    PubMed Central

    Featherstone, Eric; Voon, Valerie; Singer, Tania; Critchley, Hugo D.; Harrison, Neil A.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction During social interactions, our own physiological responses influence those of others. Synchronization of physiological (and behavioural) responses can facilitate emotional understanding and group coherence through inter-subjectivity. Here we investigate if observing cues indicating a change in another's body temperature results in a corresponding temperature change in the observer. Methods Thirty-six healthy participants (age; 22.9±3.1 yrs) each observed, then rated, eight purpose-made videos (3 min duration) that depicted actors with either their right or left hand in visibly warm (warm videos) or cold water (cold videos). Four control videos with the actors' hand in front of the water were also shown. Temperature of participant observers' right and left hands was concurrently measured using a thermistor within a Wheatstone bridge with a theoretical temperature sensitivity of <0.0001°C. Temperature data were analysed in a repeated measures ANOVA (temperature × actor's hand × observer's hand). Results Participants rated the videos showing hands immersed in cold water as being significantly cooler than hands immersed in warm water, F(1,34) = 256.67, p<0.001. Participants' own hands also showed a significant temperature-dependent effect: hands were significantly colder when observing cold vs. warm videos F(1,34) = 13.83, p = 0.001 with post-hoc t-test demonstrating a significant reduction in participants' own left (t(35) = −3.54, p = 0.001) and right (t(35) = −2.33, p = 0.026) hand temperature during observation of cold videos but no change to warm videos (p>0.1). There was however no evidence of left-right mirroring of these temperature effects p>0.1). Sensitivity to temperature contagion was also predicted by inter-individual differences in self-report empathy. Conclusions We illustrate physiological contagion of temperature in healthy individuals, suggesting that empathetic understanding for primary low

  8. Characterization of the purified Chlamydomonas minus agglutinin

    PubMed Central

    1985-01-01

    Chlamydomonas flagellar sexual agglutinins are responsible for the adhesion of opposite mating-type (plus and minus) gametes during the first stages of mating. Purification and partial characterization of the plus agglutinin was previously reported (Adair, W. S., C. J. Hwang, and U. W. Goodenough, 1983, Cell, 33:183-193). Here we characterize the purified minus molecule. We show it to be a high molecular weight, hydroxyproline-rich glycoprotein that migrates in the 3% stacking region of an SDS-polyacrylamide gel and is absent from two nonagglutinating minus mutants. Plus and minus agglutinins are remarkably similar, although nonidentical, in amino acid composition, molecular morphology, and reactivity in vivo and in vitro with monoclonal antibodies raised against the plus agglutinin. Moreover, the adhesiveness of both plus and minus agglutinins, when coupled to agarose beads, is abolished by thermolysin, trypsin, periodate, alkaline borohydride, reducing agents, or heat, but unaffected by exo- or endoglycosidases. The minus agglutinin, however, migrates just ahead of the plus molecule on SDS PAGE, is excluded from an anion-exchange (Mono Q) column, elutes earlier during hydrophobic interaction (Bio-gel TSK Phenyl 5PW) chromatography, and is sensitive to chymotrypsin digestion (unlike the plus agglutinin); therefore, it differs from the plus agglutinin in apparent molecular weight, net charge, relative hydrophobicity and proteolytic susceptibility. Nevertheless, our results generally demonstrate a high degree of homology between these complementary cell-cell recognition/adhesion molecules, which suggests that they are specified by genes that have a common evolutionary origin. PMID:2411736

  9. Antibody interactions with Ricinus communis agglutinins studied by biolayer interferometry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two related agglutinins are present in the seeds of Ricinus communis (castor): ricin, a dichain ribosome-inactivating protein and Ricinus communis agglutinin-1 (RCA-1), a much less toxic hemagglutinin. Because ricin has been used for experimental cancer chemotherapy as well as for intentional poison...

  10. [Alpha and beta natural agglutinin titers in neoplasms].

    PubMed

    Gota, F

    1979-01-01

    A serological analysis of alpha and beta agglutinin titres has been carried out in cancer patients. Statistics of the patients' blood groups were also taken. The study showed an increased agglutinin titre, the expression of the functioning of the organism's defensive powers. Only in the terminal stage of the neoplastic disease were antibody titres low, the sign of low antibody reactivity of the affected organism.

  11. Direct Evidence of Cold Gas in DLA 0812+32B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorgenson, Regina A.; Wolfe, Arthur M.; Prochaska, J. Xavier; Carswell, Robert F.

    2009-10-01

    We present the first direct evidence for cold gas in a high redshift DLA galaxy. We measured several multiplets of weak neutral carbon (C I) transitions in order to perform a curve of growth analysis. A Δ χ2 test constrains the best-fit Doppler parameter, b = 0.33+0.05 -0.04 km s-1 and log N(C I) = 13.30 ± 0.2 cm-2. This Doppler parameter constrains the kinetic temperature of the gas to T <= 78 K (T <= 115 K, 2σ). We used the associated C I fine structure lines to constrain the volume density of the gas, n(H I) ~40-200 cm-3 (2σ), resulting in a lower limit on the cloud size of approximately 0.1-1 parsec. While it is difficult to determine the metallicity of the cold component, the absence of Cr II indicates that the cold cloud suffers a high level of dust depletion. Additionally, the large amount of Lyman and Werner-band molecular hydrogen absorption (log N(H2)total = 19.88 cm-2, f _H_2 ≥ 0.06) with an excitation temperature of T ex = 46 K as determined by the rotational J = 0 and J = 1 states, is consistent with the presence of cold gas. We propose that this cloud may be gravitationally confined and may represent a transition gas phase from primarily neutral atomic gas, to a colder, denser molecular phase that will eventually host star formation.

  12. Public-Interest and Level-of-Evidence Considerations in Cold Fusion Public Policy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grinshaw, Thomas

    2008-03-01

    Cold fusion (CF) protagonists and antagonists would no doubt agree that scientific processes have been challenged in the CF case. The public interest in CF turns on two questions: What are the potential benefits? What is the probability that CF is ``real''? Potential benefits have been agreed on since CF announcement in 1989. The probability of CF reality may be assessed based on level of evidence (LoE): preponderance of evidence (PoE); clear and convincing evidence (CCE); and beyond a reasonable doubt (BRD). PoE, from civil law, indicates a probability of 50% or higher. BRD, from criminal law, has a probability approaching 90%. CCE, in between, thus has a 70-75% probability. CF experimental evidence, based on: 1) initial affirmations, 2) the large number of corroborations since marginalization, and 3) particularly demonstrative experiments, reasonably indicates at least a PoE level of evidence for excess heat. A case can also be made for a CCE (but probably not for a BRD) LoE. In either the PoE or CCE scenario a clear need is demonstrated for change in policy toward CR, given its potential benefits to humanity.

  13. Use of an Intravascular Warming Catheter during Off-Pump Coronary Artery Bypass Surgery in a Patient with Severe Cold Hemagglutinin Disease.

    PubMed

    Tholpady, Ashok; Bracey, Arthur W; Baker, Kelty R; Reul, Ross M; Chen, Alice J

    2016-08-01

    Cold hemagglutinin disease with broad thermal amplitude and high titers presents challenges in treating cardiac-surgery patients. Careful planning is needed to prevent the activation of cold agglutinins and the agglutination of red blood cells as the patient's temperature drops during surgery. We describe our approach to mitigating cold agglutinin formation in a 77-year-old man with severe cold hemagglutinin disease who underwent off-pump coronary artery bypass surgery without the use of preoperative plasmapheresis. This experience shows that the use of an intravascular warming catheter can maintain normothermia and prevent the activation and subsequent formation of cold agglutinins. To our knowledge, this is the first reported use of this technique in a patient with cold hemagglutinin disease. The chief feature in this approach is the use of optimal thermal maintenance-rather than the more usual decrease in cold-agglutinin content by means of therapeutic plasma exchange. PMID:27547154

  14. Use of an Intravascular Warming Catheter during Off-Pump Coronary Artery Bypass Surgery in a Patient with Severe Cold Hemagglutinin Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bracey, Arthur W.; Baker, Kelty R.; Reul, Ross M.; Chen, Alice J.

    2016-01-01

    Cold hemagglutinin disease with broad thermal amplitude and high titers presents challenges in treating cardiac-surgery patients. Careful planning is needed to prevent the activation of cold agglutinins and the agglutination of red blood cells as the patient's temperature drops during surgery. We describe our approach to mitigating cold agglutinin formation in a 77-year-old man with severe cold hemagglutinin disease who underwent off-pump coronary artery bypass surgery without the use of preoperative plasmapheresis. This experience shows that the use of an intravascular warming catheter can maintain normothermia and prevent the activation and subsequent formation of cold agglutinins. To our knowledge, this is the first reported use of this technique in a patient with cold hemagglutinin disease. The chief feature in this approach is the use of optimal thermal maintenance—rather than the more usual decrease in cold-agglutinin content by means of therapeutic plasma exchange. PMID:27547154

  15. Evidence of sirenian cold stress syndrome in dugongs Dugong dugon from southeast Queensland, Australia.

    PubMed

    Owen, Helen C; Flint, Mark; Limpus, Colin J; Palmieri, Chiara; Mills, Paul C

    2013-03-13

    Cold stress syndrome (CSS) is the term used to describe the range of clinical signs and chronic disease processes that can occur in Florida, USA, manatees Trichechus manatus latirostris exposed to water temperatures below 20°C for extended periods. Although no cold-related adverse events have been described in the closely related dugong Dugong dugon thus far, it has been established that they make movements in response to water temperatures lower than about 17 to 18°C. In this study, archive reports for dugong carcasses submitted to The University of Queensland School of Veterinary Science for post mortem examination during 2010 to 2012 were examined. These animals had been recovered from Moreton Bay, southeast Queensland, Australia, and 10 out of 14 fulfilled the criteria for 'potential cold stress cases.' Epidermal hyperplasia and secondary bacterial infection, serous atrophy of pericardial adipose tissue, and multisystem abscessation were features commonly noted in these cases. Water temperature data were correlated with the time of year that carcasses were submitted for examination. Higher numbers of carcasses diagnosed with potential CSS were noted during sustained periods in which water temperature was below 20°C. Given the pattern of increased submission of non-specifically, chronically unwell animals in the colder months and evidence that environmental conditions known to precipitate CSS occur in southeast Queensland, it is probable that, like manatees, dugongs in this area are affected by CSS. Further investigation to confirm and to better characterize the syndrome is recommended to refine management practices and improve treatment of affected animals. PMID:23482380

  16. Sea urchin coelomic fluid agglutinin mediates coelomocyte adhesion.

    PubMed

    Canicattì, C; Pagliara, P; Stabili, L

    1992-08-01

    The sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus coelomic fluid was found to contain agglutinin which agglutinates animal erythrocytes and promotes adhesion of autologous coelomocytes. Hemagglutinating activity depended upon the presence of calcium ions and was relatively heat-stable. Through a combination of methods including ammonium sulfate precipitation and both size exclusion and ion exchange chromatographies, we purified the anti-rabbit agglutinating factor. The intact agglutinin migrates as a single band with an apparent M(r) of over 200,000. Three distinct protein bands with a calculated M(r) of 174,000, 137,000, and 76,000, respectively were observed under reducing conditions. The purified agglutinin strongly promoted the in vitro adhesion of autologous coelomocytes. PMID:1425767

  17. Binding profile of Artocarpus integrifolia agglutinin (Jacalin).

    PubMed

    Wu, Albert M; Wu, June H; Lin, Li-Hua; Lin, Shin-Hua; Liu, Jia-Hau

    2003-04-01

    Artocarpus integrifolia agglutinin (Jacalin) from the seeds of jack fruits has attracted considerable attention for its diverse biological activities and has been recognized as a Galbeta1-->3GalNAc (T) specific lectin. In previous studies, the information of its binding was limited to the inhibition results of monosaccharides and several T related disaccharides, but its interaction with other carbohydrate structural units occurring in natural glycans has not been characterized. For this reason, the binding profile of this lectin was studied by enzyme linked lectinosorbent assay (ELLSA) with our glycan/ligand collection. Among glycoproteins (gps) tested for binding, high density of multi-Galbeta1-->3GalNAcalpha1--> (mT(alpha)) and GalNAcalpha1-->Ser/Thr (mTn) containing gps reacted most avidly with Jacalin. As inhibitors expressed as nanograms yielding 50% inhibition, these mT(alpha) and mTn containing glycans were about 7.1 x 10(3), 4.0 x 10(5), and 7.8 x 10(5) times more potent than monomeric T(alpha), GalNAc, and Gal. Of the sugars tested and expressed as nanomoles for 50% inhibition, Tn containing peptides, T(alpha), and the human P blood group active disaccharide (P(alpha), GalNAcbeta1-->3Galalpha1-->) were the best and about 283 times more active than Gal. We conclude that the most potent ligands for this lectin are mTn, mT, and possibly P(alpha) glycotopes, while GalNAcbeta1-->4Galbeta1-->, GalNAcalpha1-->3Gal, GalNAcalpha1-->3GalNAc, and Galalpha1-->3Gal determinants were poor inhibitors. Thus, the overall binding profile of Jacalin can be defined in decreasing order as high density of mTn, and mT(alpha) > simple Tn cluster > monomeric T(alpha) > monomeric P(alpha) > monomeric Tn > monomeric T > GalNAc > Gal > Methylalpha1-->Man z.Gt; Man and Glc (inactive). Our finding should aid in the selection of this lectin for biological applications.

  18. Three decade old cold case murder solved with evidence from a sexual assault kit.

    PubMed

    Connery, Sheila A

    2013-05-01

    Sexual assault occurs at alarming rates in America. The true incidence remains unknown as many victims fail to both report for immediate medical care and notify law enforcement of the crime committed. For those who do seek medical assistance, a Sexual Assault Kit is available in Emergency Departments with established protocols for the forwarding of collected specimens to law enforcement. A crime lab analyzes the evidence to identify the offender's DNA. A DNA profile is then created and archived into a database. This case involved a woman who not only endured a sexual assault, but also sustained multiple gun shot wounds, and witnessed the murder of her friend nearly three decades ago. At that time, she was treated for her injuries and evidence was collected and secured into a Sexual Assault Kit. A DNA profile was then created from a predetermined crime lab. In 2011, a Cold Case Investigator, who was reviewing all archived DNA profiles of currently incarcerated individuals in the city where the initial crime was committed, was able to match a current prisoner's DNA to that of the DNA profile created from specimens collected during the sexual assault exam nearly thirty years ago. The perpetrator subsequently was charged with murder by the criminal justice system and received a thirty year sentence without opportunity for parole.

  19. Isolation of Soybean Agglutinin (SBA) from Soy Meal.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sattsangi, Prem D.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Describes a straight-forward and relatively inexpensive method for routine isolation of purified soybean agglutinin, suitable for use as a starting material in most studies, especially for fluorescent-labeling experiments. The process is used as a project to provide advanced laboratory training at a two-year college. (Author/JN)

  20. A search for evidence of cold dust around naked T Tauri stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skinner, Stephen L.; Brown, Alexander; Walter, Frederick M.

    1991-01-01

    Results of millimeter/ submillimeter photometry of 16 naked T Tauri stars, 11 of which lie in the nearby Taurus-Auriga star-forming region, are presented. Evidence of cold circumstellar dust, which could exist around these objects in the form of remnant disks if NTTS evolved from classical T Tauri stars, is explored. The only star detected at the primary observing wavelength of 1100 microns was V836 Tau, which was also detected at 800 microns with an upper limit obtained at 450 microns. Its spectral energy distribution longward of 10 microns is consistent with that expected for a flat axisymmetric moderately active disk with a solar mass of 0.04. Upper limits on the disk masses of undetected stars in Taurus-Auriga are typically 0.02 solar mass, for an assumed temperature of not less than 6 K at the outer disk radius. It is argued that the high levels of magnetic activity found in NTTS may produce detectable gyrosynchroton emission at millimeter wavelengths.

  1. Agglutinins to Coxiella burnetii and Brucella spp, with particular reference to Brucella canis, in wild animals of southern Texas.

    PubMed

    Randhawa, A S; Kelly, V P; Baker, E F

    1977-11-01

    The prevalence of agglutinins to Coxiella burnetii and Brucella spp, particularly Brucella canis, was determined in 269 wild animals (14 species) in southern Texas. Serologic evidence of coxiellosis and brucellosis, including B canis infection, was shown for coyotes, raccoons, opossums, badgers, jackrabbits, and feral hogs. Using the microagglutination test, the seroprevalence of C burnetii, phases I and II (titer greater than or equal to 4) was 4.1 and 27.9%, respectively. For brucella agglutinins, prevalence rates were 7.1, 8.9, and 6.7%, as determined by the brucellosis card test, the rapid slide agglutination test, and the salt 2-mercaptoethanol tube agglutination (titer greater than or equal to 50) test, respectively.

  2. Evidence for ACD5 ceramide kinase activity involvement in Arabidopsis response to cold stress.

    PubMed

    Dutilleul, Christelle; Chavarria, Heidy; Rézé, Nathalie; Sotta, Bruno; Baudouin, Emmanuel; Guillas, Isabelle

    2015-12-01

    Although sphingolipids emerged as important signals for plant response to low temperature, investigations have been limited so far to the function of long-chain base intermediates. The formation and function of ceramide phosphates (Cer-Ps) in chilled Arabidopsis were explored. Cer-Ps were analysed by thin layer chromatography (TLC) following in vivo metabolic radiolabelling. Ceramide kinase activity, gene expression and growth phenotype were determined in unstressed and cold-stressed wild type (WT) and Arabidopsis ceramide kinase mutant acd5. A rapid and transient formation of Cer-P occurs in cold-stressed WT Arabidopsis plantlets and cultured cells, which is strongly impaired in acd5 mutant. Although concomitant, Cer-P formation is independent of long-chain base phosphate (LCB-P) formation. No variation of ceramide kinase activity was measured in vitro in WT plantlets upon cold stress but the activity in acd5 mutant was further reduced by cold stress. At the seedling stage, acd5 response to cold was similar to that of WT. Nevertheless, acd5 seed germination was hypersensitive to cold and abscisic acid (ABA), and ABA-dependent gene expression was modified in acd5 seeds when germinated at low temperature. Our data involve for the first time Cer-P and ACD5 in low temperature response and further underline the complexity of sphingolipid signalling operating during cold stress.

  3. Why was there increased moisture in the eastern Caribbean when Europe was cold? Evidence from Speleothems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winter, Amos; Vieten, Rolf-martin; Miller, Thomas; Mangini, Augusto; Scholz, Denis; Kushnir, Yochanan; Black, David

    2014-05-01

    We present evidence for the last 10,000 years from speleothems collected from the eastern Caribbean showing that this region was anomalously moist at the same time that Europe and the north Atlantic were unusually cold. The most noticeable period for this association was during the 8.2ka event when Greenland ice cores (GISP2) show that northern Europe and the north Atlantic were cooler by 3 - 6 deg C. The trigger for the 8.2ka event is thought to be pulsed melt water discharges from a multi-event drainage of proglacial lakes associated with the decaying Laurentide Ice Sheet margin. The melt water apparently slowed the thermohaline circulation decreasing warmth to northern Europe. At the same time moisture transfer to the northern latitudes may have slowed resulting in the observed lower latitude precipitation patterns. The eastern Caribbean seems to be especially sensitive to the changes in the strength of the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC). Higher precipitation values may also have increased lowland flooding along the coastal areas of north eastern South America, already affected by early Holocene sea-level change, and are linked to social territory reshuffling which stimulated the earliest migrations into the Caribbean Archipelago shortly afterwards. Our age models based on precise MC ICPMS 230ThU dating indicate that the eastern Caribbean stalagmites all grew at about the same rate of 15 cm through the 8.2ka event, much faster than during any other growth period, except today when they are also growing at an accelerated rate.

  4. Mutational Evidence for the Critical Role of CBF Transcription Factors in Cold Acclimation in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chunzhao; Zhang, Zhengjing; Xie, Shaojun; Si, Tong; Li, Yuanya; Zhu, Jian-Kang

    2016-08-01

    The three tandemly arranged CBF genes, CBF1, CBF2, and CBF3, are involved in cold acclimation. Due to the lack of stable loss-of-function Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) mutants deficient in all three CBF genes, it is still unclear whether the CBF genes are essential for freezing tolerance and whether they may have other functions besides cold acclimation. In this study, we used the CRISPR/Cas9 system to generate cbf single, double, and triple mutants. Compared to the wild type, the cbf triple mutants are extremely sensitive to freezing after cold acclimation, demonstrating that the three CBF genes are essential for cold acclimation. Our results show that the three CBF genes also contribute to basal freezing tolerance. Unexpectedly, we found that the cbf triple mutants are defective in seedling development and salt stress tolerance. Transcript profiling revealed that the CBF genes regulate 414 cold-responsive (COR) genes, of which 346 are CBF-activated genes and 68 are CBF-repressed genes. The analysis suggested that CBF proteins are extensively involved in the regulation of carbohydrate and lipid metabolism, cell wall modification, and gene transcription. Interestingly, like the triple mutants, cbf2 cbf3 double mutants are more sensitive to freezing after cold acclimation compared to the wild type, but cbf1 cbf3 double mutants are more resistant, suggesting that CBF2 is more important than CBF1 and CBF3 in cold acclimation-dependent freezing tolerance. Our results not only demonstrate that the three CBF genes together are required for cold acclimation and freezing tolerance, but also reveal that they are important for salt tolerance and seedling development. PMID:27252305

  5. Complex regional pain syndrome: evidence for warm and cold subtypes in a large prospective clinical sample.

    PubMed

    Bruehl, Stephen; Maihöfner, Christian; Stanton-Hicks, Michael; Perez, Roberto S G M; Vatine, Jean-Jacques; Brunner, Florian; Birklein, Frank; Schlereth, Tanja; Mackey, Sean; Mailis-Gagnon, Angela; Livshitz, Anatoly; Harden, R Norman

    2016-08-01

    Limited research suggests that there may be Warm complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) and Cold CRPS subtypes, with inflammatory mechanisms contributing most strongly to the former. This study for the first time used an unbiased statistical pattern recognition technique to evaluate whether distinct Warm vs Cold CRPS subtypes can be discerned in the clinical population. An international, multisite study was conducted using standardized procedures to evaluate signs and symptoms in 152 patients with clinical CRPS at baseline, with 3-month follow-up evaluations in 112 of these patients. Two-step cluster analysis using automated cluster selection identified a 2-cluster solution as optimal. Results revealed a Warm CRPS patient cluster characterized by a warm, red, edematous, and sweaty extremity and a Cold CRPS patient cluster characterized by a cold, blue, and less edematous extremity. Median pain duration was significantly (P < 0.001) shorter in the Warm CRPS (4.7 months) than in the Cold CRPS subtype (20 months), with pain intensity comparable. A derived total inflammatory score was significantly (P < 0.001) elevated in the Warm CRPS group (compared with Cold CRPS) at baseline but diminished significantly (P < 0.001) over the follow-up period, whereas this score did not diminish in the Cold CRPS group (time × subtype interaction: P < 0.001). Results support the existence of a Warm CRPS subtype common in patients with acute (<6 months) CRPS and a relatively distinct Cold CRPS subtype most common in chronic CRPS. The pattern of clinical features suggests that inflammatory mechanisms contribute most prominently to the Warm CRPS subtype but that these mechanisms diminish substantially during the first year postinjury. PMID:27023422

  6. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy provides an evidence of papain denaturation and aggregation during cold storage.

    PubMed

    Rašković, Brankica; Popović, Milica; Ostojić, Sanja; Anđelković, Boban; Tešević, Vele; Polović, Natalija

    2015-01-01

    Papain is a cysteine protease with wide substrate specificity and many applications. Despite its widespread applications, cold stability of papain has never been studied. Here, we used differential spectroscopy to monitor thermal denaturation process. Papain was the most stabile from 45 °C to 60 °C with ΔG°321 of 13.9±0.3 kJ/mol and Tm value of 84±1 °C. After cold storage, papain lost parts of its native secondary structures elements which gave an increase of 40% of intermolecular β-sheet content (band maximum detected at frequency of 1621 cm(-1) in Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectrum) indicating the presence of secondary structures necessary for aggregation. The presence of protein aggregates after cold storage was also proven by analytical size exclusion chromatography. After six freeze-thaw cycles around 75% of starting enzyme activity of papain was lost due to cold denaturation and aggregation of unfolded protein. Autoproteolysis of papain did not cause significant loss of the protein activity. Upon the cold storage, papain underwent structural rearrangements and aggregation that correspond to other cold denatured proteins, rather than autoproteolysis which could have the commercial importance for the growing polypeptide based industry. PMID:26051646

  7. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy provides an evidence of papain denaturation and aggregation during cold storage.

    PubMed

    Rašković, Brankica; Popović, Milica; Ostojić, Sanja; Anđelković, Boban; Tešević, Vele; Polović, Natalija

    2015-01-01

    Papain is a cysteine protease with wide substrate specificity and many applications. Despite its widespread applications, cold stability of papain has never been studied. Here, we used differential spectroscopy to monitor thermal denaturation process. Papain was the most stabile from 45 °C to 60 °C with ΔG°321 of 13.9±0.3 kJ/mol and Tm value of 84±1 °C. After cold storage, papain lost parts of its native secondary structures elements which gave an increase of 40% of intermolecular β-sheet content (band maximum detected at frequency of 1621 cm(-1) in Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectrum) indicating the presence of secondary structures necessary for aggregation. The presence of protein aggregates after cold storage was also proven by analytical size exclusion chromatography. After six freeze-thaw cycles around 75% of starting enzyme activity of papain was lost due to cold denaturation and aggregation of unfolded protein. Autoproteolysis of papain did not cause significant loss of the protein activity. Upon the cold storage, papain underwent structural rearrangements and aggregation that correspond to other cold denatured proteins, rather than autoproteolysis which could have the commercial importance for the growing polypeptide based industry.

  8. Documentary evidence of climate variability during cold seasons in Lesotho, southern Africa, 1833-1900

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grab, S. W.; Nash, D. J.

    2009-04-01

    This study presents the first 19th century cold season climate chronology for the Kingdom of Lesotho in southern Africa. The chronology is constructed using a variety of documentary sources including letters, diaries, reports, monographs and newspaper articles obtained from southern African and British archives. Information relating to cold season weather phenomena during the austral autumn, winter and early spring months were recorded verbatim. Each of the cold seasons from 1833 to 1900 was then classified as ‘very severe', ‘severe' or ‘normal/mild', with a confidence rating ranging from low (1) to high (3) awarded against each annual classification. The accuracy of the document-derived chronology was verified against temperature data for Maseru for the period 1893-1900. Excellent correspondence of the document-derived chronology with the Maseru instrumental data and also with other global proxy temperature records for the 19th century is achieved. The results indicate 12 (18% of the total) very severe, 16 (23%) severe and 40 (59%) normal/mild cold seasons between 1833 and 1900. The overall trend is for more severe and snow-rich cold seasons during the early part of the study period (1833-1854) compared with the latter half of the 19th century (with the exception of the 1880s). A reduction in the duration of the frost season by over 20 days during the 19th century is also tentatively identified. Several severe to very severe cold seasons in Lesotho follow after major tropical and SH volcanic eruptions; such years are usually characterized by early frosts, and frequent and heavy snowfalls. The blocking of solar radiation and the enhanced northward displacement of polar fronts that are directly or indirectly associated with volcanic events, may account for many of the most severe Lesotho winters during the 19th century. Keywords: Cold season chronology, 19th century, Lesotho, volcanic forcing

  9. Documentary evidence of climate variability during cold seasons in Lesotho, southern Africa, 1833-1900

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grab, Stefan W.; Nash, David J.

    2010-03-01

    This study presents the first 19th century cold season climate chronology for the Kingdom of Lesotho in southern Africa. The chronology is constructed using a variety of documentary sources including letters, diaries, reports, monographs and newspaper articles obtained from southern African and British archives. Information relating to cold season weather phenomena during the austral autumn, winter and early spring months were recorded verbatim. Each of the cold seasons from 1833 to 1900 was then classified as “very severe”, “severe” or “normal/mild”, with a confidence rating ranging from low (1) to high (3) awarded against each annual classification. The accuracy of the document-derived chronology was verified against temperature data for Maseru for the period 1893-1900. Excellent correspondence of the document-derived chronology with the Maseru instrumental data and also with other global proxy temperature records for the 19th century is achieved. The results indicate 12 (18% of the total) very severe, 16 (23%) severe and 40 (59%) normal/mild cold seasons between 1833 and 1900. The overall trend is for more severe and snow-rich cold seasons during the early part of the study period (1833-1854) compared with the latter half of the 19th century (with the exception of the 1880s). A reduction in the duration of the frost season by over 20 days during the 19th century is also tentatively identified. Several severe to very severe cold seasons in Lesotho follow after major tropical and SH volcanic eruptions; such years are usually characterized by early frosts, and frequent and heavy snowfalls. The blocking of solar radiation and the enhanced northward displacement of polar fronts that are directly or indirectly associated with volcanic events, may account for many of the most severe Lesotho winters during the 19th century.

  10. fMRI evidence of a hot-cold empathy gap in hypothetical and real aversive choices.

    PubMed

    Kang, Min J; Camerer, Colin F

    2013-01-01

    Hypothetical bias is the common finding that hypothetical monetary values for "goods" are higher than real values. We extend this research to the domain of "bads" such as consumer and household choices made to avoid aversive outcomes (e.g., insurance). Previous evidence of hot-cold empathy gaps suggest food disgust is likely to be strongly underestimated in hypothetical (cold) choice. Depending on relative underestimation of food disgust and pain of spending, the hypothetical bias for aversive bad scan go in the typical direction for goods, disappear, or reverse in sign. We find that the bias is reversed in sign-subjects pay more to avoid bads when choice is real. fMRI shows that real choice more strongly activates striatum and medial prefrontal cortex (reward regions) and shows distinct activity in insula and amygdala (disgust and fear regions). The neural findings suggest ways to exogeneously manipulate or record brain activity in order to create better forecasts of actual consumer choice.

  11. Individual differences in temperature perception: evidence of common processing of sensation intensity of warmth and cold.

    PubMed

    Green, Barry G; Akirav, Carol

    2007-01-01

    The longstanding question of whether temperature is sensed via separate sensory systems for warmth and cold was investigated by measuring individual differences in perception of nonpainful heating and cooling. Sixty-two subjects gave separate ratings of the intensity of thermal sensations (warmth, cold) and nociceptive sensations (burning/stinging/pricking) produced by cooling (29 degrees C) or heating (37 degrees C) local regions of the forearm. Stimuli were delivered via a 4 x 4 array of 8 mm x 8 mm Peltier thermoelectric modules that enabled test temperatures to be presented sequentially to individual modules or simultaneously to the full array. Stimulation of the full array showed that perception of warmth and cold were highly correlated (Pearson r = 0.83, p < 0.05). Ratings of nonpainful nociceptive sensations produced by the two temperatures were also correlated, but to a lesser degree (r = 0.44), and the associations between nociceptive and thermal sensations (r = 0.35 and 0.22 for 37 and 29 degrees C, respectively) were not significant after correction for multiple statistical tests. Intensity ratings for individual modules indicated that the number of responsive sites out of 16 was a poor predictor of temperature sensations but a significant predictor of nociceptive sensations. The very high correlation between ratings of thermal sensations conflicts with the classical view that warmth and cold are mediated by separate thermal modalities and implies that warm-sensitive and cold-sensitive spinothalamic pathways converge and undergo joint modulation in the central nervous system. Integration of thermal stimulation from the skin and body core within the thermoregulatory system is suggested as the possible source of this convergence.

  12. Evidence of Active Methanogen Communities in Shallow Sediments of the Sonora Margin Cold Seeps

    PubMed Central

    L'Haridon, Stéphane; Godfroy, Anne; Roussel, Erwan G.; Cragg, Barry A.; Parkes, R. John; Toffin, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    In the Sonora Margin cold seep ecosystems (Gulf of California), sediments underlying microbial mats harbor high biogenic methane concentrations, fueling various microbial communities, such as abundant lineages of anaerobic methanotrophs (ANME). However, the biodiversity, distribution, and metabolism of the microorganisms producing this methane remain poorly understood. In this study, measurements of methanogenesis using radiolabeled dimethylamine, bicarbonate, and acetate showed that biogenic methane production in these sediments was mainly dominated by methylotrophic methanogenesis, while the proportion of autotrophic methanogenesis increased with depth. Congruently, methane production and methanogenic Archaea were detected in culture enrichments amended with trimethylamine and bicarbonate. Analyses of denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) fingerprinting and reverse-transcribed PCR-amplified 16S rRNA sequences retrieved from these enrichments revealed the presence of active methylotrophic Methanococcoides burtonii relatives and several new autotrophic Methanogenium lineages, confirming the cooccurrence of Methanosarcinales and Methanomicrobiales methanogens with abundant ANME populations in the sediments of the Sonora Margin cold seeps. PMID:25769831

  13. Occurrence and characterization of lympho-agglutinins in Indian plants.

    PubMed

    Arora, J S; Sandhu, R S; Kamboj, S S; Chopra, S K

    1987-01-01

    Lympho-agglutinins have been detected and characterized in 31 plant species. Out of these, 14 agglutinated only the neuraminidase-treated cells. The lectin-rich genera included Crotalaria and Erythrina (Fabaceae), Amaranthus (Amaranthaceae), Artocarpus (Moraceae) and Clerodendron (Verbenaceae). The new lectins varied in their potency and biological action spectra. The 3 Artocarpus species were found to be exceptionally potent and specific for melibiose, an alpha-D-galactoside. Among the most effective sugar inhibitors for other lectins were N-acetyl-galactosamine, lactose, galactose and asialofetuin/fetuin.

  14. The Urtica dioica Agglutinin Is a Complex Mixture of Isolectins.

    PubMed

    Van Damme, E J; Broekaert, W F; Peumans, W J

    1988-02-01

    Rhizomes of stinging nettle (Urtica dioica) contain a complex mixture of isolectins. Ion exchange chromatography with a high resolution fast protein liquid chromatography system revealed six isoforms which exhibit identical agglutination properties and carbohydrate-binding specificity and in addition have the same molecular structure and virtually identical biochemical properties. However, since the U. dioica agglutinin isolectins differ definitely with respect to their amino acid composition, it is likely that at least some of them are different polypeptides coded for by different genes. PMID:16665952

  15. The Detection of Cold Dust in Cassiopeia A: Evidence for the Formation of Metallic Needles in the Ejecta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwek, Eli

    2004-06-01

    give rise to observable polarized emission. The detection of submillimeter polarization will therefore offer definitive proof for a needle origin for the cold dust emission. Supernovae may yet be proven to be important sources of interstellar dust, but the evidence is still inconclusive.

  16. Biogenesis and fate of the cell-cell adhesion molecule, agglutinin, during gametogenesis and fertilization of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    SciTech Connect

    Hunnicutt, G.R.

    1989-01-01

    Fertilization in Chlamydomonas begins with the species-specific recognition and adhesion between gametes of opposite mating types via agglutinin molecules on the flagellar surface. This adhesion generates a cAMP-mediated sexual signal that initiates the subsequent events of call wall release, mating structure activation, and cell fusion. Although flagella of paired gametes remain attached to each other until the zygote forms, the process is dynamic. Engaged agglutinins rapidly become inactivated and turnover, requiring the constant supply of new agglutinins to replace the lost molecules. A population of cell body associated agglutinins has been postulated to the pool of agglutinins recruited during this turnover. Cell body agglutinins, therefore were identified, purified, localized within the cells and compared to flagellar agglutinins. The relationship between these two agglutinin populations was also examined. Cell body agglutinins were biochemically indistinguishable from the flagellar form with respect to their M{sub r}, sedimentation coefficient, and hydrophobicity elution properties. Functionally, however, these molecules were inactive in situ. The calculated surface density of agglutinins in the cell body and flagellar domains was similar and thus could not explain their functional difference, but two domains contiguous and yet distinctive suggested they may be separated by a functional barrier. To test this, a method was developed, using a monoclonal antibody and cycloheximide, that removed the flagellar agglutinins so movement between the domains could be monitored. Mobilization of agglutinins onto the flagella did not occur unless sexual signaling was induced with cAMP and papaverine.

  17. Methane sources in gas hydrate-bearing cold seeps: Evidence from radiocarbon and stable isotopes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pohlman, J.W.; Bauer, J.E.; Canuel, E.A.; Grabowski, K.S.; Knies, D.L.; Mitchell, C.S.; Whiticar, Michael J.; Coffin, R.B.

    2009-01-01

    Fossil methane from the large and dynamic marine gas hydrate reservoir has the potential to influence oceanic and atmospheric carbon pools. However, natural radiocarbon (14C) measurements of gas hydrate methane have been extremely limited, and their use as a source and process indicator has not yet been systematically established. In this study, gas hydrate-bound and dissolved methane recovered from six geologically and geographically distinct high-gas-flux cold seeps was found to be 98 to 100% fossil based on its 14C content. Given this prevalence of fossil methane and the small contribution of gas hydrate (??? 1%) to the present-day atmospheric methane flux, non-fossil contributions of gas hydrate methane to the atmosphere are not likely to be quantitatively significant. This conclusion is consistent with contemporary atmospheric methane budget calculations. In combination with ??13C- and ??D-methane measurements, we also determine the extent to which the low, but detectable, amounts of 14C (~ 1-2% modern carbon, pMC) in methane from two cold seeps might reflect in situ production from near-seafloor sediment organic carbon (SOC). A 14C mass balance approach using fossil methane and 14C-enriched SOC suggests that as much as 8 to 29% of hydrate-associated methane carbon may originate from SOC contained within the upper 6??m of sediment. These findings validate the assumption of a predominantly fossil carbon source for marine gas hydrate, but also indicate that structural gas hydrate from at least certain cold seeps contains a component of methane produced during decomposition of non-fossil organic matter in near-surface sediment.

  18. Hepatitis B vaccine freezing in the Indonesian cold chain: evidence and solutions.

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Carib M.; Wibisono, Hariadi; Purwanto, Hary; Mansyur, Isa; Moniaga, Vanda; Widjaya, Anton

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To document and characterize freezing temperatures in the Indonesian vaccine cold chain and to evaluate the feasibility of changes designed to reduce the occurrence of freezing. METHODS: Data loggers were used to measure temperatures of shipments of hepatitis B vaccine from manufacturer to point of use. Baseline conditions and three intervention phases were monitored. During each of the intervention phases, vaccines were removed progressively from the standard 2-8 degrees C cold chain. FINDINGS: Freezing temperatures were recorded in 75% of baseline shipments. The highest rates of freezing occurred during transport from province to district, storage in district-level ice-lined refrigerators, and storage in refrigerators in health centres. Interventions reduced freezing, without excessive heat exposure. CONCLUSIONS: Inadvertent freezing of freeze-sensitive vaccines is widespread in Indonesia. Simple strategies exist to reduce freezing - for example, selective transport and storage of vaccines at ambient temperatures. The use of vaccine vial monitors reduces the risk associated with heat-damaged vaccines in these scenarios. Policy changes that allow limited storage of freeze-sensitive vaccines at temperatures >2-8 degrees C would enable flexible vaccine distribution strategies that could reduce vaccine freezing, reduce costs, and increase capacity. PMID:15042231

  19. Palaeobotanical evidence for warm summers in the East Siberian Arctic during the last cold stage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kienast, Frank; Schirrmeister, Lutz; Siegert, Christine; Tarasov, Pavel

    2005-05-01

    Plant macrofossils from the "Mamontovy Khayata" permafrost sequence (71°60'N, 129°25'E) on the Bykovsky Peninsula reflect climate and plant biodiversity in west Beringia during the last cold stage. 70 AMS and 20 conventional 14C dates suggest sediment accumulation between about 60,000 and 7500 14C yr B.P. The plant remains prove that during the last cold-stage arctic species ( Minuartia arctica, Draba spp., Kobresia myosuroides) coexisted with aquatic ( Potamogeton vaginatus, Callitriche hermaphroditica), littoral ( Ranunculus reptans, Rumex maritimus), meadow ( Hordeum brevisubulatum, Puccinellia tenuiflora) and steppe taxa ( Alyssum obovatum, Silene repens, Koeleria cristata, Linum perenne). The reconstructed vegetation composition is similar to modern vegetation mosaics in central and northeast Yakutian relict steppe areas. Thus, productive meadow and steppe communities played an important role in the Siberian Arctic vegetation during the late Pleistocene and could have served as food resource for large populations of herbivores. The floristic composition reflects an extremely continental, arid climate with winters colder and summers distinctly warmer than at present. Holocene macrofossil assemblages indicate a successive paludification possibly connected with marine transgression, increased oceanic influence and atmospheric humidity. Although some steppe taxa were still present in the early Holocene, they disappeared completely before ˜2900 14C yr B.P.

  20. Malacological and palynological evidence of the Lower Pleistocene cold phase at the Carpathian Foothills (Southern Poland)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stworzewicz, Ewa; Granoszewski, Wojciech; Wójcik, Antoni

    2012-05-01

    Early Pleistocene sediments bearing gastropod shells and pollen flora were found during coring at Jawornik (South Poland) at a depth interval of 54.30-39.00 m, beneath the oldest till of the Carpathians. Thirteen land-snail taxa identified in 55 samples of the core formed two molluscan assemblages. In the bottom part, typical cold-loving snails were found (e.g. Vallonia tenuilabris, Pupilla loessica, Vertigo genesii, Columella columella), whereas in the upper part only Semilimax kotulae was present. The succession of molluscan assemblages may suggest that at the site of deposition, after a phase of tundra, steppe-tundra or forest-steppe landscape with patches of wet habitats in cold climate, the climate became slightly milder but still cool, favourable to the spreading of boreal (coniferous) woodlands. Pollen analysis was performed only for the upper part of the profile. The pollen spectra, besides the Tertiary (Miocene) elements, contained sporomorphs common to the Tertiary and Quaternary floras. Among them, the highest percentages were noted for Pinus haploxylon t., P. diploxylon t., Picea, Quercus, Ericaceae, Betula, and Ulmus. The fact that the sediments with organic remains underlie the oldest Scandinavian till suggests that they are older than the oldest glacial unit of the South-Polish Complex (Narevian = Menapian, ~ 1.2 Ma).

  1. Optical and microphysical properties of a cold cirrus cloud - Evidence for regions of small ice particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Platt, C. M. R.; Spinhirne, J. D.; Hart, W. D.

    1989-01-01

    An airborne lidar and a scanning radiometer aboard an ER-2 aircraft were used to observe a cold cirrus cloud, and a Forward Scattering Spectrometer Probe (FSSP) was used to obtain simultaneous in situ microphysical observations at two altitudes within the cloud. Lidar depolarization ratio data show that the clouds were composed predominantly of ice crystals. At an altitude where the temperature was -62.7 C, the lidar and radiometer analysis gave a visible extinction to infrared absorption ratio (alpha) of 2.3, while the cloud microphysics data provided an alpha value of 3.77. The discrepancy is attributed to undersizing of particles by the FSSP. Direct and remote measurements showed better agreement for a lower layer where the temperature was -47.3 C.

  2. Direct evidence of three-body interactions in a cold {sup 85}Rb Rydberg gas

    SciTech Connect

    Han Jianing

    2010-11-15

    Cold Rydberg atoms trapped in a magneto-optical trap (MOT) are not isolated and they interact through dipole-dipole and multipole-multipole interactions. First-order dipole-dipole interactions and van der Waals interactions between two atoms have been intensively studied. However, the facts that the first-order dipole-dipole interactions and van der Waals interactions show the same size of broadening [A. Reinhard, K. C. Younge, T. C. Liebisch, B. Knuffman, P. R. Berman, and G. Raithel, Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 233201 (2008)] and there are transitions between two dimer states [S. M. Farooqi, D. Tong, S. Krishnan, J. Stanojevic, Y. P. Zhang, J. R. Ensher, A. S. Estrin, C. Boisseau, R. Cote, E. E. Eyler, and P. L. Gould, Phys. Rev. Lett. 91, 183002 (2003); K. R. Overstreet, Arne Schwettmann, Jonathan Tallant, and James P. Shaffer, Phys. Rev. A 76, 011403(R) (2007)] cannot be explained by the two-atom picture. The purpose of this article is to show the few-body nature of a dense cold Rydberg gas by studying the molecular-state microwave spectra. Specifically, three-body energy levels have been calculated. Moreover, the transition from three-body energy levels to two-body coupled molecular energy levels and to isolated atomic energy levels as a function of the internuclear spacing is studied. Finally, single-body, two-body, and three-body interaction regions are estimated according to the experimental data. The results reported here provides useful information for plasma formation, further cooling, and superfluid formation.

  3. Direct evidence of three-body interactions in a cold Rb85 Rydberg gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jianing

    2010-11-01

    Cold Rydberg atoms trapped in a magneto-optical trap (MOT) are not isolated and they interact through dipole-dipole and multipole-multipole interactions. First-order dipole-dipole interactions and van der Waals interactions between two atoms have been intensively studied. However, the facts that the first-order dipole-dipole interactions and van der Waals interactions show the same size of broadening [A. Reinhard, K. C. Younge, T. C. Liebisch, B. Knuffman, P. R. Berman, and G. Raithel, Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.100.233201 100, 233201 (2008)] and there are transitions between two dimer states [S. M. Farooqi, D. Tong, S. Krishnan, J. Stanojevic, Y. P. Zhang, J. R. Ensher, A. S. Estrin, C. Boisseau, R. Cote, E. E. Eyler, and P. L. Gould, Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.91.183002 91, 183002 (2003); K. R. Overstreet, Arne Schwettmann, Jonathan Tallant, and James P. Shaffer, Phys. Rev. APLRAAN1050-294710.1103/PhysRevA.76.011403 76, 011403(R) (2007)] cannot be explained by the two-atom picture. The purpose of this article is to show the few-body nature of a dense cold Rydberg gas by studying the molecular-state microwave spectra. Specifically, three-body energy levels have been calculated. Moreover, the transition from three-body energy levels to two-body coupled molecular energy levels and to isolated atomic energy levels as a function of the internuclear spacing is studied. Finally, single-body, two-body, and three-body interaction regions are estimated according to the experimental data. The results reported here provides useful information for plasma formation, further cooling, and superfluid formation.

  4. Evidence of diffuse noxious inhibitory controls (DNIC) elicited by cold noxious stimulation in patients with provoked vestibulodynia.

    PubMed

    Johannesson, Ulrika; de Boussard, Catharina Nygren; Brodda Jansen, Gunilla; Bohm-Starke, Nina

    2007-07-01

    Provoked vestibulodynia is a common cause of superficial dyspareunia in young women. Recent evidence has pointed out the importance of studying endogenous pain modulation in these women. An impairment of diffuse noxious inhibitory controls (DNIC) has been suggested in chronic pain conditions with a female predominance such as fibromyalgia and temporomandibular disorder. Our aim was to examine whether patients with provoked vestibulodynia and healthy women with or without combined oral contraceptives (COC) display a DNIC response to cold noxious stimulation. Twenty patients with provoked vestibulodynia not using COC, 20 healthy women on COC and 20 healthy women without COC were included and tested days 7-11 of their menstrual cycle. Pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) and pain ratings using VAS were measured on the arm and leg before and during a cold pressor test. A socio-medical questionnaire, the Hospital and Anxiety Depression Scale and the Short Form-36 were completed. The majority of the subjects in all three study groups significantly increased their PPTs during cold noxious stimulation indicating a DNIC response. The patients displayed lower PPTs compared to the healthy women. Depression, anxiety and bodily pain were more often reported by the patients. No differences related to the intake of COC were observed between the healthy women. In conclusion, women with provoked vestibulodynia as well as healthy women irrespective of COC status display a DNIC response indicating an endogenous pain inhibition. However, the results imply a systemic hypersensitivity in women with vestibulodynia with low general pain thresholds as compared to healthy women. PMID:17169489

  5. Evidence for microbial methane oxidation at cold seeps along the main active fault in the Marmara Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chevalier, Nicolas; Birgel, Daniel; Lopez-Garcia, Purificacion; Taphanel, Marie-Helene; Bouloubassi, Ioanna

    2010-05-01

    The North Anatolian Fault in the Marmara Sea is a spectacular example of a seismically active fault where, in recent years, numerous sites of active fluid venting have been discovered and explored. During the MARNAUT cruise (2007), multidisciplinary sampling was carried out with the Nautile submersible in order to investigate biogeochemical and hydrogeological processes taking place at these newly discovered cold seeps. We have studied short sediment cores (< 20 cm) and authigenic carbonate crusts retrieved with the Nautile submersible from sub-basins of the Marmara Sea, aiming at gaining insight into microbial processes and assemblages in this recently discovered methane-rich setting and at comparing it with previously studied cold seeps. To do so, we investigated diagnostic microbial lipids and their carbon isotope composition, and, in selected sediment samples, we carried out cloning and sequencing of 16S rRNA genes. The sediment core retrieved from the southern slope of the Çinarcik Basin, in an area of black patches, bacterial mats and polychaetes, contained abundant and strongly 13C-depleted archaeal and bacterial lipids. Archaeal lipids consisted mainly of archaeol, sn-2-hydroxyarchaeol, crocetane, and unsaturated PMIs, and showed δ13C values as low as -125 per mille. Concurrently, bacterial lipids (e.g. cyclopropyl-C17:0, C16:1?5, i-/ai-C15:0, and non-isoprenoidal glycerol monoethers), previously assigned to sulphate reducing bacteria (SRB), were identified with low δ13C values (-55 to -115 per mille). The structural and isotopic features of microbial lipids provided compelling evidence for anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) taking place within the upper 17 cm of the sediment core, mediated by methanotrophic archaea (ANME) and sulphate reducing bacteria. No biomarker evidence for aerobic oxidation of methane was found. Depth profiles of microbial lipids revealed the vertical zonation of AOM and associated microbial biomass, and implied that AOM is

  6. fMRI evidence of a hot-cold empathy gap in hypothetical and real aversive choices.

    PubMed

    Kang, Min J; Camerer, Colin F

    2013-01-01

    Hypothetical bias is the common finding that hypothetical monetary values for "goods" are higher than real values. We extend this research to the domain of "bads" such as consumer and household choices made to avoid aversive outcomes (e.g., insurance). Previous evidence of hot-cold empathy gaps suggest food disgust is likely to be strongly underestimated in hypothetical (cold) choice. Depending on relative underestimation of food disgust and pain of spending, the hypothetical bias for aversive bad scan go in the typical direction for goods, disappear, or reverse in sign. We find that the bias is reversed in sign-subjects pay more to avoid bads when choice is real. fMRI shows that real choice more strongly activates striatum and medial prefrontal cortex (reward regions) and shows distinct activity in insula and amygdala (disgust and fear regions). The neural findings suggest ways to exogeneously manipulate or record brain activity in order to create better forecasts of actual consumer choice. PMID:23772205

  7. Microfossils, a Key to Unravel Cold-Water Carbonate Mound Evolution through Time: Evidence from the Eastern Alboran Sea

    PubMed Central

    Stalder, Claudio; Vertino, Agostina; Rosso, Antonietta; Rüggeberg, Andres; Pirkenseer, Claudius; Spangenberg, Jorge E.; Spezzaferri, Silvia; Camozzi, Osvaldo; Rappo, Sacha; Hajdas, Irka

    2015-01-01

    Cold-water coral (CWC) ecosystems occur worldwide and play a major role in the ocean's carbonate budget and atmospheric CO2 balance since the Danian (~65 m.y. ago). However their temporal and spatial evolution against climatic and oceanographic variability is still unclear. For the first time, we combine the main macrofaunal components of a sediment core from a CWC mound of the Melilla Mounds Field in the Eastern Alboran Sea with the associated microfauna and we highlight the importance of foraminifera and ostracods as indicators of CWC mound evolution in the paleorecord. Abundances of macrofauna along the core reveal alternating periods dominated by distinct CWC taxa (mostly Lophelia pertusa, Madrepora oculata) that correspond to major shifts in foraminiferal and ostracod assemblages. The period dominated by M. oculata coincides with a period characterized by increased export of refractory organic matter to the seafloor and rather unstable oceanographic conditions at the benthic boundary layer with periodically decreased water energy and oxygenation, variable bottom water temperature/density and increased sediment flow. The microfaunal and geochemical data strongly suggest that M. oculata and in particular Dendrophylliidae show a higher tolerance to environmental changes than L. pertusa. Finally, we show evidence for sustained CWC growth during the Alleröd-Younger-Dryas in the Eastern Alboran Sea and that this period corresponds to stable benthic conditions with cold/dense and well oxygenated bottom waters, high fluxes of labile organic matter and relatively strong bottom currents PMID:26447699

  8. Microfossils, a Key to Unravel Cold-Water Carbonate Mound Evolution through Time: Evidence from the Eastern Alboran Sea.

    PubMed

    Stalder, Claudio; Vertino, Agostina; Rosso, Antonietta; Rüggeberg, Andres; Pirkenseer, Claudius; Spangenberg, Jorge E; Spezzaferri, Silvia; Camozzi, Osvaldo; Rappo, Sacha; Hajdas, Irka

    2015-01-01

    Cold-water coral (CWC) ecosystems occur worldwide and play a major role in the ocean's carbonate budget and atmospheric CO2 balance since the Danian (~65 m.y. ago). However their temporal and spatial evolution against climatic and oceanographic variability is still unclear. For the first time, we combine the main macrofaunal components of a sediment core from a CWC mound of the Melilla Mounds Field in the Eastern Alboran Sea with the associated microfauna and we highlight the importance of foraminifera and ostracods as indicators of CWC mound evolution in the paleorecord. Abundances of macrofauna along the core reveal alternating periods dominated by distinct CWC taxa (mostly Lophelia pertusa, Madrepora oculata) that correspond to major shifts in foraminiferal and ostracod assemblages. The period dominated by M. oculata coincides with a period characterized by increased export of refractory organic matter to the seafloor and rather unstable oceanographic conditions at the benthic boundary layer with periodically decreased water energy and oxygenation, variable bottom water temperature/density and increased sediment flow. The microfaunal and geochemical data strongly suggest that M. oculata and in particular Dendrophylliidae show a higher tolerance to environmental changes than L. pertusa. Finally, we show evidence for sustained CWC growth during the Alleröd-Younger-Dryas in the Eastern Alboran Sea and that this period corresponds to stable benthic conditions with cold/dense and well oxygenated bottom waters, high fluxes of labile organic matter and relatively strong bottom currents.

  9. fMRI evidence of a hot-cold empathy gap in hypothetical and real aversive choices

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Min J.; Camerer, Colin F.

    2013-01-01

    Hypothetical bias is the common finding that hypothetical monetary values for “goods” are higher than real values. We extend this research to the domain of “bads” such as consumer and household choices made to avoid aversive outcomes (e.g., insurance). Previous evidence of hot-cold empathy gaps suggest food disgust is likely to be strongly underestimated in hypothetical (cold) choice. Depending on relative underestimation of food disgust and pain of spending, the hypothetical bias for aversive bad scan go in the typical direction for goods, disappear, or reverse in sign. We find that the bias is reversed in sign—subjects pay more to avoid bads when choice is real. fMRI shows that real choice more strongly activates striatum and medial prefrontal cortex (reward regions) and shows distinct activity in insula and amygdala (disgust and fear regions). The neural findings suggest ways to exogeneously manipulate or record brain activity in order to create better forecasts of actual consumer choice. PMID:23772205

  10. Microfossils, a Key to Unravel Cold-Water Carbonate Mound Evolution through Time: Evidence from the Eastern Alboran Sea.

    PubMed

    Stalder, Claudio; Vertino, Agostina; Rosso, Antonietta; Rüggeberg, Andres; Pirkenseer, Claudius; Spangenberg, Jorge E; Spezzaferri, Silvia; Camozzi, Osvaldo; Rappo, Sacha; Hajdas, Irka

    2015-01-01

    Cold-water coral (CWC) ecosystems occur worldwide and play a major role in the ocean's carbonate budget and atmospheric CO2 balance since the Danian (~65 m.y. ago). However their temporal and spatial evolution against climatic and oceanographic variability is still unclear. For the first time, we combine the main macrofaunal components of a sediment core from a CWC mound of the Melilla Mounds Field in the Eastern Alboran Sea with the associated microfauna and we highlight the importance of foraminifera and ostracods as indicators of CWC mound evolution in the paleorecord. Abundances of macrofauna along the core reveal alternating periods dominated by distinct CWC taxa (mostly Lophelia pertusa, Madrepora oculata) that correspond to major shifts in foraminiferal and ostracod assemblages. The period dominated by M. oculata coincides with a period characterized by increased export of refractory organic matter to the seafloor and rather unstable oceanographic conditions at the benthic boundary layer with periodically decreased water energy and oxygenation, variable bottom water temperature/density and increased sediment flow. The microfaunal and geochemical data strongly suggest that M. oculata and in particular Dendrophylliidae show a higher tolerance to environmental changes than L. pertusa. Finally, we show evidence for sustained CWC growth during the Alleröd-Younger-Dryas in the Eastern Alboran Sea and that this period corresponds to stable benthic conditions with cold/dense and well oxygenated bottom waters, high fluxes of labile organic matter and relatively strong bottom currents. PMID:26447699

  11. Bacterial growth in the cold: Evidence for an enhanced substrate requirement

    SciTech Connect

    Wiebe, W.J.; Sheldon, W.M. Jr.; Pomeroy, L.R. )

    1992-01-01

    Growth responses and biovolume changes for four facultatively psychrophilic bacterial isolates from Conception Bay, Newfoundland, and the Arctic Ocean were examined at temperatures from {minus}1.5 to 35C, with substrate concentrations of 0.15, 1.5, and 1,500 mg of proteose peptone-yeast extract per liter. For two cultures, growth in 0.1, 1.0, and 1,000 mg of proline per liter was also examined. At 10 to 15C and above, growth rates showed no marked effect of substrate concentration, while at {minus}1.5 and 0C, there was an increasing requirement for organic nutrients, with generation times in low-nutrient media that were two to three times longer than in high-nutrient media. Biovolume showed a clear dependence on substrate concentration and quality; the largest cells were in the highest-nutrient media. Biovolume was also affected by temperature; the largest cells were found at the lowest temperatures. These data have implications for both food web structure and carbon flow in cold waters and for the effects of global climate change, since the change in growth rate is most dramatic at the lowest temperatures.

  12. A COLD COMPLEX CHEMISTRY TOWARD THE LOW-MASS PROTOSTAR B1-b: EVIDENCE FOR COMPLEX MOLECULE PRODUCTION IN ICES

    SciTech Connect

    Oeberg, Karin I.; Bottinelli, Sandrine; Joergensen, Jes K.; Van Dishoeck, Ewine F.

    2010-06-10

    Gas-phase complex organic molecules have been detected toward a range of high- and low-mass star-forming regions at abundances which cannot be explained by any known gas-phase chemistry. Recent laboratory experiments show that UV irradiation of CH{sub 3}OH-rich ices may be an important mechanism for producing complex molecules and releasing them into the gas phase. To test this ice formation scenario, we mapped the B1-b dust core and nearby protostar in CH{sub 3}OH gas using the IRAM 30 m telescope to identify locations of efficient non-thermal ice desorption. We find three CH{sub 3}OH abundance peaks tracing two outflows and a quiescent region on the side of the core facing the protostar. The CH{sub 3}OH gas has a rotational temperature of {approx}10 K at all locations. The quiescent CH{sub 3}OH abundance peak and one outflow position were searched for complex molecules. Narrow, 0.6-0.8 km s{sup -1} wide, HCOOCH{sub 3} and CH{sub 3}CHO lines originating in cold gas are clearly detected, CH{sub 3}OCH{sub 3} is tentatively detected, and C{sub 2}H{sub 5}OH and HOCH{sub 2}CHO are undetected toward the quiescent core, while no complex molecular lines were found toward the outflow. The core abundances with respect to CH{sub 3}OH are {approx}2.3% and 1.1% for HCOOCH{sub 3} and CH{sub 3}CHO, respectively, and the upper limits are 0.7%-1.1%, which is similar to most other low-mass sources. The observed complex molecule characteristics toward B1-b and the pre-dominance of HCO-bearing species suggests a cold ice (below 25 K, the sublimation temperature of CO) formation pathway followed by non-thermal desorption through, e.g., UV photons traveling through outflow cavities. The observed complex gas composition together with the lack of any evidence of warm gas-phase chemistry provides clear evidence of efficient complex molecule formation in cold interstellar ices.

  13. Evidence for an early pliocene cold event in the southern oceans

    SciTech Connect

    Burckle, L.H.; Mortlock, R.A. ); Rudolph, S. )

    1993-01-01

    Although it is generally agreed that the early Pliocene witnessed the last great climate warming before the onset of Northern Hemisphere glaciation, it is generally not recognized that this time interval also witnessed what appear to be major glaciations in both northern and southern Hemispheres. This describes a study of brief, intense warm events in the early Pliocene as well as evidence for at least one major glaciation during this time interval. 13 refs.

  14. The Liverwort Marchantia polymorpha Expresses Orthologs of the Fungal Agaricus bisporus Agglutinin Family1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Peumans, Willy J.; Fouquaert, Elke; Jauneau, Alain; Rougé, Pierre; Lannoo, Nausicaä; Hamada, Hiroki; Alvarez, Richard; Devreese, Bart; Van Damme, Els J.M.

    2007-01-01

    A lectin different from the previously described mannose-binding agglutinins has been isolated from the liverwort Marchantia polymorpha. Biochemical characterization of the purified lectin combined with the data from earlier transcriptome analyses demonstrated that the novel M. polymorpha agglutinin is not related to any of the known plant lectin families, but closely resembles the Agaricus bisporus-type lectins, which hitherto have been found exclusively in fungi. Immunolocalization studies confirmed that lectin is exclusively associated with plant cells, ruling out the possibility of a fungal origin. Extensive screening of publicly accessible databases confirmed that, apart from fungi, the occurrence of A. bisporus-type lectins is confined to M. polymorpha and the moss Tortula ruralis. Expression of a typical fungal protein in a liverwort and a moss raises the question of the origin of the corresponding genes. Regardless of the evolutionary origin, the presence of a functional A. bisporus lectin ortholog in M. polymorpha provides evidence for the expression of an additional carbohydrate-binding domain in Viridiplantae. PMID:17041032

  15. Metabolism and cold tolerance of overwintering adult mountain pine beetles (Dendroctonus ponderosae): evidence of facultative diapause?

    PubMed

    Lester, Jack D; Irwin, Jason T

    2012-06-01

    We sought evidence for a distinct diapause in adult overwintering mountain pine beetles (Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins) by measuring metabolic rate and supercooling ability of field collected beetles throughout the year. Metabolic rates measured at 0, 5, and 10°C declined significantly from October through November, then rose slowly, reaching levels as high as those recorded in October by late May. From December to February metabolic rates were not correlated with minimum weekly phloem temperatures (R(2)=0.0%, P=0.592), but were correlated with phloem temperatures as winter advanced to spring (R(2)=44.8%, P=0.010), a pattern consistent with progression through the maintenance and termination phases of diapause. Supercooling points were also significantly lower in winter compared to fall and spring (F((8,143))=32.6, P<0.001) and were closely correlated with metabolic rates (R(2)>79% for all three temperatures). Dry mass declined linearly with winter progression (F((8,150))=8.34, P<0.001), explained by catabolism of metabolic reserves, with a concomitant accumulation of metabolic water (F((8,147))=35.24, P<0.001). The strong mid-winter metabolic suppression correlated with improved supercooling ability, coupled with their lack of response to variation in environmental temperature, are evidence of possible diapause in adult overwintering mountain pine beetles.

  16. Infrared and millimetre-wavelength evidence for cold accretion within a z = 2.83 Lyman α blob

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Daniel J. B.; Jarvis, Matt J.; Lacy, Mark; Martínez-Sansigre, Alejo

    2008-09-01

    This paper discusses infrared and millimetre-wavelength observations of a Lyman α blob (LAB) discovered by Smith & Jarvis, a candidate for ionization by the cold accretion scenario discussed in Fardal et al. and Dijkstra et al. We have observed the counterpart galaxy at infrared wavelengths in deep observations with the Spitzer Space Telescope using the IRAC 3.6, 4.5, 5.8 and 8.0μm and MIPS 24 μm bands, as well as using the Max-Planck Millimeter Bolometer (MAMBO-2) at a wavelength of 1.2mm with the IRAM 30 m telescope. These observations probe the >~95kpc Lyman α halo for the presence of obscured active galactic nucleus (AGN) components or the presence of a violent period of star formation invoked by other models of ionization for these mysterious objects. 24 μm observations suggest that an obscured AGN would be insufficiently luminous to ionize the halo, and that the star formation rate within the halo may be as low as <140Msolaryr-1 depending on the model spectral energy distribution (SED) used. This is reinforced by our observations at 1.2mm using MAMBO-2, which yield an upper limit of star formation rate <550Msolaryr-1 from our non-detection to a 3σ flux limit of 0.86 mJy beam-1. Finding no evidence for either AGN or extensive star formation, we conclude that this halo is ionized by a cold accretion process. We derive model SEDs for the host galaxy, and use the Bruzual & Charlot and Maraston libraries to show that the galaxy is well described by composite stellar populations of total mass 3.42 +/- 0.13 × 1011 or 4.35 +/- 0.16 × 1011Msolar depending on the model SEDs used.

  17. Experimental Evidence for Weathering and Martian Sulfate Formation Under Extremely Cold Weather-Limited Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niles, Paul B.; Golden, D. C.; Michalski, J.

    2013-01-01

    High resolution photography and spectroscopy of the martian surface (MOC, HiRISE) from orbit has revolutionized our view of Mars with one of the most important discoveries being wide-spread layered sedimentary deposits associated with sulfate minerals across the low to mid latitude regions of Mars [1, 2]. The mechanism for sulfate formation on Mars has been frequently attributed to playa-like evaporative environments under prolonged warm conditions [3]. However, there are several problems with the presence of prolonged surface temperatures on Mars above 273 K during the Noachian including the faint young Sun [4] and the presence of suitable greenhouse gases [5]. The geomorphic evidence for early warm conditions may instead be explained by periodic episodes of warming rather than long term prolonged warm temperatures [6]. An alternate view of the ancient martian climate contends that prolonged warm temperatures were never present and that the atmosphere and climate has been similar to modern conditions throughout most of its history [6]. This view is more consistent with the climate models, but has had a difficult time explaining the sedimentary history of Mars and in particular the presence of sulfate minerals. We suggest here that mixtures of atmospheric aerosols, ice, and dust have the potential for creating small films of cryo-concentrated acidic solutions that may represent an important unexamined environment for understanding weathering processes on Mars [7, 8]. This study seeks to test whether sulfate formation may be possible at temperatures well below 0 C in water limited environments removing the need for prolonged warm periods to form sulfates on early Mars.

  18. Evidence and biogeochemical implications for glacially-derived sediments in an active margin cold seep

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pohlman, John W.; Riedel, Michael; Novosel, Ivana; Bauer, James E.; Canuel, Elizabeth A.; Paull, Charles K.; Coffin, Richard B.; Grabowski, Kenneth S.; Knies, David L.; Hyndman, Roy D.; Spence, George D.

    2011-01-01

    Delineating sediment organic matter origins and sediment accumulation rates at gas hydratebearing and hydrocarbon seeps is complicated by the microbial transfer of 13C-depleted and 14Cdepleted methane carbon into sedimentary pools. Sediment 13C and 14C measurements from four cores recovered at Bullseye vent on the northern Cascadia margin are used to identify methane carbon assimilation into different carbon pools. While the total organic carbon (TOC) is mostly unaltered and primarily terrigenous in origin, planktonic foraminifera and the bulk carbonate display evidence of methane overprinting. Mass balance models are applied to determine the extent to which methane overprinting increased the radiocarbon ages of the biogenic foraminifera. The corrected and calibrated foraminifera ages between sediment depths of 70 and 573 cm are from 14.9 to 15.9 ka BP, which coincides with the retreat of the late Quaternary Cordilleran Ice Sheet from Vancouver Island. Uniform TOC _13C values of -24.5 ± 0.5‰ from the upper 8 meters of sediment at Bullseye vent suggest all cored material is Pleistocene-derived glacimarine material deposited as the ice edge retreated landward. Bullseye vent is located within an uplifted sediment block isolated from turbidite deposition and has been a site of non-deposition since the ice sheet retreated from the shelf. Biogeochemical implications of seep sediments being dominated by aged, organic-poor (<0.4 wt% TOC) material are that methane is the primary energy source, and microbes directly and indirectly associated with the anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) will dominate the seep microbial community.

  19. Characterization of Ricin and R. communis Agglutinin Reference Materials.

    PubMed

    Worbs, Sylvia; Skiba, Martin; Söderström, Martin; Rapinoja, Marja-Leena; Zeleny, Reinhard; Russmann, Heiko; Schimmel, Heinz; Vanninen, Paula; Fredriksson, Sten-Åke; Dorner, Brigitte G

    2015-11-26

    Ricinus communis intoxications have been known for centuries and were attributed to the toxic protein ricin. Due to its toxicity, availability, ease of preparation, and the lack of medical countermeasures, ricin attracted interest as a potential biological warfare agent. While different technologies for ricin analysis have been established, hardly any universally agreed-upon "gold standards" are available. Expert laboratories currently use differently purified in-house materials, making any comparison of accuracy and sensitivity of different methods nearly impossible. Technically challenging is the discrimination of ricin from R. communis agglutinin (RCA120), a less toxic but highly homologous protein also contained in R. communis. Here, we established both highly pure ricin and RCA120 reference materials which were extensively characterized by gel electrophoresis, liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ESI MS/MS), and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight approaches as well as immunological and functional techniques. Purity reached >97% for ricin and >99% for RCA120. Different isoforms of ricin and RCA120 were identified unambiguously and distinguished by LC-ESI MS/MS. In terms of function, a real-time cytotoxicity assay showed that ricin is approximately 300-fold more toxic than RCA120. The highly pure ricin and RCA120 reference materials were used to conduct an international proficiency test.

  20. Characterization of Ricin and R. communis Agglutinin Reference Materials.

    PubMed

    Worbs, Sylvia; Skiba, Martin; Söderström, Martin; Rapinoja, Marja-Leena; Zeleny, Reinhard; Russmann, Heiko; Schimmel, Heinz; Vanninen, Paula; Fredriksson, Sten-Åke; Dorner, Brigitte G

    2015-12-01

    Ricinus communis intoxications have been known for centuries and were attributed to the toxic protein ricin. Due to its toxicity, availability, ease of preparation, and the lack of medical countermeasures, ricin attracted interest as a potential biological warfare agent. While different technologies for ricin analysis have been established, hardly any universally agreed-upon "gold standards" are available. Expert laboratories currently use differently purified in-house materials, making any comparison of accuracy and sensitivity of different methods nearly impossible. Technically challenging is the discrimination of ricin from R. communis agglutinin (RCA120), a less toxic but highly homologous protein also contained in R. communis. Here, we established both highly pure ricin and RCA120 reference materials which were extensively characterized by gel electrophoresis, liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ESI MS/MS), and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight approaches as well as immunological and functional techniques. Purity reached >97% for ricin and >99% for RCA120. Different isoforms of ricin and RCA120 were identified unambiguously and distinguished by LC-ESI MS/MS. In terms of function, a real-time cytotoxicity assay showed that ricin is approximately 300-fold more toxic than RCA120. The highly pure ricin and RCA120 reference materials were used to conduct an international proficiency test. PMID:26703723

  1. Characterization of Ricin and R. communis Agglutinin Reference Materials

    PubMed Central

    Worbs, Sylvia; Skiba, Martin; Söderström, Martin; Rapinoja, Marja-Leena; Zeleny, Reinhard; Russmann, Heiko; Schimmel, Heinz; Vanninen, Paula; Fredriksson, Sten-Åke; Dorner, Brigitte G.

    2015-01-01

    Ricinus communis intoxications have been known for centuries and were attributed to the toxic protein ricin. Due to its toxicity, availability, ease of preparation, and the lack of medical countermeasures, ricin attracted interest as a potential biological warfare agent. While different technologies for ricin analysis have been established, hardly any universally agreed-upon “gold standards” are available. Expert laboratories currently use differently purified in-house materials, making any comparison of accuracy and sensitivity of different methods nearly impossible. Technically challenging is the discrimination of ricin from R. communis agglutinin (RCA120), a less toxic but highly homologous protein also contained in R. communis. Here, we established both highly pure ricin and RCA120 reference materials which were extensively characterized by gel electrophoresis, liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ESI MS/MS), and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight approaches as well as immunological and functional techniques. Purity reached >97% for ricin and >99% for RCA120. Different isoforms of ricin and RCA120 were identified unambiguously and distinguished by LC-ESI MS/MS. In terms of function, a real-time cytotoxicity assay showed that ricin is approximately 300-fold more toxic than RCA120. The highly pure ricin and RCA120 reference materials were used to conduct an international proficiency test. PMID:26703723

  2. Differential agglutination by soybean agglutinin of human leukemia and neuroblastoma cell lines: potential application to autologous bone marrow transplantation.

    PubMed

    Reisner, Y

    1983-11-01

    Normal human bone marrow cells were mixed with radioactively labeled tumor cells from different leukemia and neuroblastoma cell lines, and the cell mixtures were separated by differential agglutination with soybean agglutinin. It is shown that the cell fraction unagglutinated by soybean agglutinin, which was previously found to be capable of reconstituting the hematopoietic system of lethally irradiated recipients, can be purged of tumor cells with varying efficiency depending on the tumor cell expression of soybean agglutinin receptors as detected by flow cytofluorimetry with fluoresceinated soybean agglutinin.

  3. Urtica dioica agglutinin. A superantigenic lectin from stinging nettle rhizome.

    PubMed

    Galelli, A; Truffa-Bachi, P

    1993-08-15

    Urtica dioica agglutinin (UDA) is an unusual plant lectin that differs from all other known plant lectins with respect to its molecular structure and its extremely low specific agglutination activity. We recently reported that this small lectin (8.5 kDa) is a T cell mitogen distinguishable from classical T cell lectin mitogens by its ability to discriminate a particular population of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells as well as its capacity to induce an original pattern of T cell activation and cytokine production. The mechanism by which UDA activates T cells was investigated and compared with the conventional T cell mitogen Con A and the known superantigen staphylococcal enterotoxin B. Our data show that T cell proliferation induced by UDA is strictly dependent on AC expressing MHC class II molecules but is not MHC restricted. This proliferation can be partially inhibited by anti-I-A or anti-I-E mAb and completely blocked by a mAb recognizing monomorphic determinants on the Ia molecule. UDA indeed binds to specific carbohydrate structures present on class II molecules. UDA-induced T cell stimulation is dependent on TCR recognition of the unprocessed intact molecule in association with various Ia molecules. T cell response to UDA is clonally expressed and correlates with particular TCR V beta gene families usage. This stimulation leads to a sixfold enrichment of V beta 8.3+ T cells within 3 days. Therefore, UDA appears to use the same molecular mechanism as structurally unrelated bacterial or retroviral superantigens and we propose that this lectin is a superantigen. UDA, which is not a pathogenicity factor, could provide a useful probe for the analysis of T cell activation by superantigens. PMID:8345184

  4. Stable isotope record from Seneca Lake, New York: Evidence for a cold paleoclimate following the Younger Dryas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, William T.; Mullins, Henry T.; Ito, Emi

    1997-02-01

    A radiocarbon controlled stable isotope record from Seneca Lake, New York, has defined a relatively cold paleoclimate (10.1 8.2 ka) that was younger, and regionally of greater magnitude, than the well-known Younger Dryas cold interval. These new isotope results are supported by published pollen records, from throughout the Great Lakes region, that also define a relatively cold paleoclimate at this time. This cold paleoclimate occurred during global meltwater pulse IB when large volumes of cold, isotopically light (low δ18O) meltwater flowed into the Great Lakes from the rapidly retreating Laurentide ice sheet. The discharge of cold glacial meltwaters into the Great Lakes during pulse IB suppressed downwind summer temperatures in the Finger Lakes region and provided a source of isotopically light precipitation. Published proxy data from Greenland, Norway, and Alaska also record relatively cold paleoclimates following the Younger Dryas, suggesting widespread Northern Hemisphere cooling as a direct result of the rapid melting of the Laurentide ice sheet between 10 and 8 ka.

  5. [Effect of presowing treatment of spring wheat seeds with wheat germ agglutinin on the chlorophyll content, lectin activity in leaves and nitrogen-fixing capacity of rhizospheric microorganisms].

    PubMed

    Kyrychenko, O V

    2008-01-01

    The response of spring wheat and rhizospheric nitrogen-fixing micro-organisms to the presowing treatment of seeds by wheat germ agglutinin was investigated in conditions of green house experiments. It was shown, that exogenous lectin induced the metabolic changes in plants and caused an increase in chlorophyll content and activity of endogenous lectins in the leaves, as well as enhanced accumulation of plants biomass and nitrogen-fixing capacity of the rhizospheric micro-organisms. These results evidence for the considerable role of exogenous lectin as a regulator of growth and development of plants and activity of the nitrogen-fixing microorganisms. PMID:18710035

  6. Mechanism of neutrophil chemiluminescence induced by wheat germ agglutinin: partial characterization of the antigens recognized by wheat germ agglutinin

    SciTech Connect

    Ozaki, Y.; Iwata, J.; Ohashi, T.

    1984-11-01

    Wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) stimulated neutrophils to produce significant levels of luminol-dependent chemiluminescence (CL). Since WGA is known to bind N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) oligomers and N-acetylneuraminic acid (NANA), we attempted to determine which binding property of WGA is essential for induction of CL. The succinylated form of WGA (SuWGA), which is no longer able to bind NANA, was still able to induce CL. N-Acetylglucosamine at a concentration of 20 mmol/L almost completely inhibited WGA-induced CL production by neutrophils, whereas bovine submaxillary gland mucin, a potent blocker of NANA binding of WGA, failed to inhibit CL production. Lectins with the GlcNAc-binding property were examined for their ability to induce CL. Those that have higher valences and have a tendency to bind GlcNAc oligomers in the internal portion of glycoconjugates were able to induce CL, whereas those that have low valences and bind terminal GlcNAc of glycoconjugates failed to induce CL even at high concentrations. Attempts were made to characterize the neutrophil membrane proteins recognized by WGA. Glycoproteins with a molecular weight of 25,000 daltons were identified by a 50 mmol/L GlcNAc elution of WGA gels loaded with /sup 125/I-labeled neutrophil membrane proteins. Elution with 500 mumol/L GlcNAc trimer produced several glycoproteins of different molecular weights in addition to the glycoproteins of 25,000 daltons. /sup 125/I-labeled WGA and SuWGA were used for autoradiographic analysis of cell extracts of the neutrophils separated on sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gels. WGA recognized multiple glycoproteins of different molecular weights, whereas SuWGA bound only a few of them. Glycoproteins of 25,000 daltons, probably corresponding to those identified by 50 mmol/L GlcNAc elution, were also recognized.

  7. Interglacial occurrence of cold-water corals off Cape Lookout (NW Atlantic): First evidence of the Gulf Stream influence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matos, Lélia; Mienis, Furu; Wienberg, Claudia; Frank, Norbert; Kwiatkowski, Cornelia; Groeneveld, Jeroen; Thil, François; Abrantes, Fatima; Cunha, Marina R.; Hebbeln, Dierk

    2015-11-01

    Climatic and oceanographic changes, as occurring at a glacial-interglacial scale, may alter the environmental conditions needed for the development of prolific cold-water coral reefs and mounds. Studies constraining the temporal distribution of cold-water corals in the NE Atlantic suggested the cyclic changes of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation as the main driver for the development and dispersal of cold-water coral ecosystems. However, conclusions were hindered by lack of data from the NW Atlantic. Aiming to overcome this lack of data, the temporal occurrence of cold-water corals in the Cape Lookout area along the southeastern US margin was explored by U-series dating. Furthermore, the local influence of the regional water masses, namely the Gulf Stream, on cold-water coral proliferation and occurrence since the Last Glacial Maximum was examined. Results suggest that the occurrence of cold-water corals in the Cape Lookout area is restricted to interglacial periods, with corals being present during the last ~7 kyr and also during the Eemian (~125 ka). The reconstructed local environmental conditions suggest an offshore displacement of the Gulf Stream and increased influence from the Mid-Atlantic Bight shelf waters during the last glacial period. During the deglacial sea level rise, the Gulf Stream moved coastward providing present-day-like conditions to the surface waters. Nevertheless, present-day conditions at the ocean sea floor were not established before 7.5 cal ka BP once the ultimate demise of the Laurentide ice-sheet caused the final sea level rise and the displacement of the Gulf Stream to its present location. Occasional presence of the Gulf Stream over the site during the Mid- to Late Holocene coincides with enhanced bottom current strength and a slightly higher bottom water temperature, which are environmental conditions that are favorable for cold-water coral growth.

  8. Cold Sores

    MedlinePlus

    ... delivered directly to your desktop! more... What Are Cold Sores? Article Chapters What Are Cold Sores? Cold ... January 2012 Previous Next Related Articles: Canker and Cold Sores Aloe Vera May Help Relieve Mouth Sores ...

  9. Insecticidal properties of Sclerotinia sclerotiorum agglutinin and its interaction with insect tissues and cells.

    PubMed

    Hamshou, Mohamad; Smagghe, Guy; Shahidi-Noghabi, Shahnaz; De Geyter, Ellen; Lannoo, Nausicaä; Van Damme, Els J M

    2010-12-01

    This project studied in detail the insecticidal activity of a fungal lectin from the sclerotes of Sclerotinia sclerotiorum, referred to as S. sclerotiorum agglutinin or SSA. Feeding assays with the pea aphid (Acyrthosiphon pisum) on an artificial diet containing different concentrations of SSA demonstrated a high mortality caused by this fungal lectin with a median insect toxicity value (LC50) of 66 (49-88) μg/ml. In an attempt to unravel the mode of action of SSA the binding and interaction of the lectin with insect tissues and cells were investigated. Histofluorescence studies on sections from aphids fed on an artificial liquid diet containing FITC-labeled SSA, indicated the insect midgut with its brush border zone as the primary target for SSA. In addition, exposure of insect midgut CF-203 cells to 25 μg/ml SSA resulted in a total loss of cell viability, the median cell toxicity value (EC50) being 4.0 (2.4-6.7) μg/ml. Interestingly, cell death was accompanied with DNA fragmentation, but the effect was caspase-3 independent. Analyses using fluorescence confocal microscopy demonstrated that FITC-labeled SSA was not internalized in the insect midgut cells, but bound to the cell surface. Prior incubation of the cells with saponin to achieve a higher cell membrane permeation resulted in an increased internalization of SSA in the insect midgut cells, but no increase in cell toxicity. Furthermore, since the toxicity of SSA for CF-203 cells was significantly reduced when SSA was incubated with GalNAc and asialomucin prior to treatment of the cells, the data of this project provide strong evidence that SSA binds with specific carbohydrate moieties on the cell membrane proteins to start a signaling transduction cascade leading to death of the midgut epithelial cells, which in turn results in insect mortality. The potential use of SSA in insect control is discussed.

  10. Isolation and characterization of agglutinins from the hemolymph of an acorn barnacle, Megabalanus volcano.

    PubMed

    Kamiya, H; Muramoto, K; Goto, R

    1987-01-01

    Two agglutinins, MVA-1 and MVA-2, were isolated from the hemolymph of the acorn barnacle, Megabalanus volcano. They agglutinated human erythrocytes irrespective of the ABO blood group and also rabbit and sheep blood cells. Lactose and fetuin strongly inhibited the hemagglutinating activity. D-galactose, D-arabinose and N-acetylneuraminic acid were also moderate inhibitors. In sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, both MVA-1 and MVA-2 gave a single band corresponding to 38,000 daltons. It split into one major band with a molecular weight of 23,000 in the presence of 2-mercaptoethanol. The two agglutinins showed the same apparent molecular weight of 116,000 by gel filtration. In isoelectric focusing MVA-1 showed one band at pH 4.8, whereas MVA-2 gave a main band at pH 4.4 with few faint ones in the range between pH 4.0 and 4.8. The agglutinins were glycoproteins containing D-mannose and L-fucose as carbohydrate components. No precipitation reaction was observed in Ouchterlony immuno-diffusion tests using rabbit antisera against the agglutinins from the phylogenetically related Megabalanus rosa.

  11. Analysis of castor by ELISAs that distinguish Ricin and Ricinus communis agglutinin (RCA)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To facilitate the analysis of castor (Ricinus communis L.) seed fractions and germplasm for ricin content, we investigated the use of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) methods to differentiate between ricin toxin and the related Ricinus communis agglutinin (RCA). Both proteins are based on ...

  12. Structure of the Chlamydomonas agglutinin and related flagellar surface proteins in vitro and in situ

    PubMed Central

    1985-01-01

    Using the quick-freeze, deep-etch technique, we compare the structure of the cane-shaped plus and minus sexual agglutinin molecules purified from gametes of Chlamydomonas reinhardi. We also describe the structure of three additional gamete-specific fibrillar molecules, called short canes, loops, and crescents, which are structurally related to the agglutinins. Four non-agglutinating mutant strains are found to produce the three latter fibrils but not canes, supporting our identification of the cane-shaped molecule as the agglutinin. The heads of the plus and minus canes are shown to differ in morphology. Moreover, two treatments that inactivate the plus agglutinin in vitro--thermolysin digestion and disulfide reduction/alkylation--bring about detectable structural changes only in the head domain of the cane, suggesting that the head may play an indispensible role in affecting gametic recognition/adhesion. We also present quick-freeze, deep-etch images of the flagellar surfaces of gametic, vegetative, and mutant cells of Chlamydomonas reinhardi. The gametic flagella are shown to carry the canes, short canes, loops, and crescents present in in vitro preparations. The cane and crescent proteins self-associate on the flagellar surface into stout fibers of uniform caliber, and they align along the longitudinal axis of the flagellum. The short canes and loops co-purify with flagella but, in the presence of mica, dissociate so that they lie to the sides of the flagella. The agglutinin canes of both mating types are oriented with their hooks at the membrane surface and their heads directed outward, where they are positioned to participate in the initial events of sexual agglutination. PMID:4030899

  13. Molecular evidence that phylogenetically diverged ciliates are active in microbial mats of deep-sea cold-seep sediment.

    PubMed

    Takishita, Kiyotaka; Kakizoe, Natsuki; Yoshida, Takao; Maruyama, Tadashi

    2010-01-01

    Cold seeps are areas of the seafloor where hydrogen sulfide- and methane-rich fluid seepage occurs, often sustaining chemosynthetic ecosystems. It is well known that both archaea and bacteria oxidize sulfides and methane to produce chemical energy and that several endemic animals use this energy to thrive in cold seeps. On the other hand, there is little knowledge regarding diversity and ecology of microbial eukaryotes in this ecosystem. In this study we isolated environmental RNA and DNA from microbial mats of cold-seep sediment in Sagami Bay, Japan, and retrieved eukaryotic small-subunit ribosomal RNA sequences with polymerase chain reaction methods followed by clone library construction. Most RNA-derived clones obtained were from ciliates, although DNA-derived clones were mainly from the fungus Cryptococcus curvatus, suggesting that ciliates are active in the environment. The ciliate sequences were phylogenetically diverse, and represented eight known class lineages as well as undesignated lineages. Because most ciliates are bacterivorous, it is highly likely that the ciliates for which sequences were recovered play a role in the food web of this ecosystem as grazers of microbial mats. In addition, given that the environment studied is under highly reduced (anoxic) conditions, based on the prokaryotic community structure deduced from T-RFLP profiles, the ciliates detected may be obligatory or facultative anaerobes.

  14. Magnetostratigraphic evidence from the Cold Creek bar for onset of ice-age cataclysmic floods in eastern Washington during the early Pleistocene

    SciTech Connect

    Pluhar, Christopher J.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Reidel, Steve P.; Coe, Robert S.; Nelson, Paul B.

    2006-01-01

    This study provides a detailed magnetostratigraphy of sediments composing the Cold Creek cataclysmic flood bar in the Pasco Basin, Washington. Our interpretation suggests onset of Missoula floods or similar events prior to 1.1 myr, later than previously suggested by Bjornstad et al. [Bjornstad B.N., Fecht, K.R., Pluhar, C.J., 2001]. Long history of pre-Wisconsin, Ice Age cataclysmic floods: evidence from southeastern Washington State. [Journal of Geology 109 (6), 695-713]. Nonetheless these data suggest that Channeled Scabland features formed over a much longer timespan than commonly cited, that continental ice sheets of the early Pleistocene reached as far south as those of the late Pleistocene, and that similar physiography existed in eastern Washington and perhaps Montana to both generate and route Missoula-flood-like events. This study adds paleomagnetic polarity results from 213 new samples of silts and sands derived from nine new drill cores penetrating the Cold Creek cataclysmic flood bar to our previous database of 53 samples from four boreholes, resulting in a much more robust and detailed magnetostratigraphy. Rock magnetic studies on these sediments show pure magnetite to be the predominant remanence-carrying magnetic mineral, ruling out widespread remagnetization by secondary mineralization. The magnetostratigraphy at eastern Cold Creek bar is characterized by a normal polarity interval bracketed by reversed polarities. Equating the normal zone with the Jaramillo subchron (0.99-1.07 myr) affords the simplest correlation to the magnetic polarity timescale. Western Cold Creek bar was likely deposited during the Brunhes chron (0-0.78 myr) since it exhibits mainly normal polarities with only two thin reversed-polarity horizons that we interpret as magnetic excursions during the Brunhes.

  15. Cold Stress

    MedlinePlus

    ... be at risk of cold stress. Extreme cold weather is a dangerous situation that can bring on ... the country. In regions relatively unaccustomed to winter weather, near freezing temperatures are considered factors for cold ...

  16. Common Cold

    MedlinePlus

    ... nose, coughing - everyone knows the symptoms of the common cold. It is probably the most common illness. In ... avoid colds. There is no cure for the common cold. For relief, try Getting plenty of rest Drinking ...

  17. Isotype and antigen specificity of pertussis agglutinins following whole-cell pertussis vaccination and infection with Bordetella pertussis.

    PubMed Central

    Mink, C M; O'Brien, C H; Wassilak, S; Deforest, A; Meade, B D

    1994-01-01

    Elevated agglutinin titers have been shown to correlate with protection from disease following whole-cell pertussis vaccination, but the isotype and antigen specificity of human agglutinating antibodies is unknown. In 13 immunoassays, immunoglobulin G antifimbria antibodies had the strongest correlation with agglutinin titers following culture-proven infection with Bordetella pertussis (R' = 0.79; P < 0.0001) and following whole-cell pertussis vaccination (R' = 0.87, P < 0.0001). PMID:7509316

  18. Endless cold: a seasonal reconstruction of temperature and precipitation in the Burgundian Low Countries during the 15th century based on documentary evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camenisch, C.

    2015-08-01

    This paper applies the methods of historical climatology to present a climate reconstruction for the area of the Burgundian Low Countries during the 15th century. The results are based on documentary evidence that has been handled very carefully, especially with regard to the distinction between contemporary and non-contemporary sources. Approximately 3000 written records derived from about 100 different sources were examined and converted into seasonal seven-degree indices for temperature and precipitation. For the Late Middle Ages only a few climate reconstructions exist. There are even fewer reconstructions which include spring and autumn temperature or any precipitation information at all. This paper therefore constitutes a useful contribution to the understanding of climate and weather conditions in the less well researched but highly interesting 15th century. The extremely cold winter temperatures during the 1430s and an extremely cold winter in 1407/1408 are striking. Moreover, no other year in this century was as hot and dry as 1473. At the beginning and the end of the 1480s and at the beginning of the 1490s summers were considerably wetter than average.

  19. Allergenicity Assessment of Allium sativum Leaf Agglutinin, a Potential Candidate Protein for Developing Sap Sucking Insect Resistant Food Crops

    PubMed Central

    Mondal, Hossain Ali; Chakraborti, Dipankar; Majumder, Pralay; Roy, Pampa; Roy, Amit; Bhattacharya, Swati Gupta; Das, Sampa

    2011-01-01

    Background Mannose-binding Allium sativum leaf agglutinin (ASAL) is highly antinutritional and toxic to various phloem-feeding hemipteran insects. ASAL has been expressed in a number of agriculturally important crops to develop resistance against those insects. Awareness of the safety aspect of ASAL is absolutely essential for developing ASAL transgenic plants. Methodology/Principal Findings Following the guidelines framed by the Food and Agriculture Organization/World Health Organization, the source of the gene, its sequence homology with potent allergens, clinical tests on mammalian systems, and the pepsin resistance and thermostability of the protein were considered to address the issue. No significant homology to the ASAL sequence was detected when compared to known allergenic proteins. The ELISA of blood sera collected from known allergy patients also failed to show significant evidence of cross-reactivity. In vitro and in vivo assays both indicated the digestibility of ASAL in the presence of pepsin in a minimum time period. Conclusions/Significance With these experiments, we concluded that ASAL does not possess any apparent features of an allergen. This is the first report regarding the monitoring of the allergenicity of any mannose-binding monocot lectin having insecticidal efficacy against hemipteran insects. PMID:22110739

  20. Major histocompatibility class I molecules present Urtica dioica agglutinin, a superantigen of vegetal origin, to T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Rovira, P; Buckle, M; Abastado, J P; Peumans, W J; Truffa-Bachi, P

    1999-05-01

    The Urtica dioica agglutinin (UDA) shares with the superantigens the property of activating T cell subsets bearing particular Vbeta segments of the TCR. However, UDA is a lectin capable of binding to many glycoproteins on cell membranes. The implication of MHC versus other glycoproteins in UDA presentation was presently studied. Using mutant mice lacking MHC class I (MHC-I), MHC class II (MHC-II) or both MHC antigens, we provided evidence that MHC-I and MHC-II molecules serve as UDA receptors. Presentation by either one of these molecules ensured similar T cell responses and co-stimulatory signals were mandatory for optimal T cell activation and proliferation both in MHC-I and MHC-II contexts. Remarkably, in the absence of MHC molecules, UDA could not be efficiently presented to T cells by other glycosylated proteins. Surface plasmon resonance studies were used to confirm the binding of UDA to MHC-I molecules using a fusion protein consisting of MHC-I domains and beta2-microglobulin. The results indicated that the interaction between UDA and MHC-I molecules implicated lectin-binding site(s) of UDA. Taken together, our data demonstrate that, in addition to MHC-II antigens, MHC-I molecules serve as an alternative ligand for UDA.

  1. Empirical evidence of cold stress induced cell mediated and humoral immune response in common myna ( Sturnus tristis)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandhu, Mansur A.; Zaib, Anila; Anjum, Muhammad S.; Qayyum, Mazhar

    2015-11-01

    Common myna ( Sturnus tristis) is a bird indigenous to the Indian subcontinent that has invaded many parts of the world. At the onset of our investigation, we hypothesized that the immunological profile of myna makes it resistant to harsh/new environmental conditions. In order to test this hypothesis, a number of 40 mynas were caught and divided into two groups, i.e., 7 and 25 °C for 14 days. To determine the effect of cold stress, cell mediated and humoral immune responses were assessed. The macrophage engulfment percentage was significantly ( P < 0.05) higher at 25 °C rather than 7 °C either co-incubated with opsonized or unopsonized sheep red blood cells (SRBC). Macrophage engulfment/cell and nitric oxide production behaved in a similar manner. However, splenic cells plaque formation, heterophil to lymphocyte (H/L) ratio, and serum IgM or IgG production remained non-significant. There was a significant increase of IgG antibody production after a second immunization by SRBC. To the best of our knowledge, these findings have never been reported in the progression of this bird's invasion in frosty areas of the world. The results revealed a strengthened humoral immune response of myna and made this bird suitable for invasion in the areas of harsh conditions.

  2. Empirical evidence of cold stress induced cell mediated and humoral immune response in common myna (Sturnus tristis).

    PubMed

    Sandhu, Mansur A; Zaib, Anila; Anjum, Muhammad S; Qayyum, Mazhar

    2015-11-01

    Common myna (Sturnus tristis) is a bird indigenous to the Indian subcontinent that has invaded many parts of the world. At the onset of our investigation, we hypothesized that the immunological profile of myna makes it resistant to harsh/new environmental conditions. In order to test this hypothesis, a number of 40 mynas were caught and divided into two groups, i.e., 7 and 25 °C for 14 days. To determine the effect of cold stress, cell mediated and humoral immune responses were assessed. The macrophage engulfment percentage was significantly (P < 0.05) higher at 25 °C rather than 7 °C either co-incubated with opsonized or unopsonized sheep red blood cells (SRBC). Macrophage engulfment/cell and nitric oxide production behaved in a similar manner. However, splenic cells plaque formation, heterophil to lymphocyte (H/L) ratio, and serum IgM or IgG production remained non-significant. There was a significant increase of IgG antibody production after a second immunization by SRBC. To the best of our knowledge, these findings have never been reported in the progression of this bird's invasion in frosty areas of the world. The results revealed a strengthened humoral immune response of myna and made this bird suitable for invasion in the areas of harsh conditions.

  3. IRREGULAR SLOSHING COLD FRONTS IN THE NEARBY MERGING GROUPS NGC 7618 AND UGC 12491: EVIDENCE FOR KELVIN-HELMHOLTZ INSTABILITIES

    SciTech Connect

    Roediger, E.; Kraft, R. P.; Machacek, M. E.; Forman, W. R.; Nulsen, P. E. J.; Jones, C.; Murray, S. S.

    2012-08-01

    We present results from two {approx}30 ks Chandra observations of the hot atmospheres of the merging galaxy groups centered around NGC 7618 and UGC 12491. Our images show the presence of arc-like sloshing cold fronts (CFs) wrapped around each group center and {approx}100 kpc long spiral tails in both groups. Most interestingly, the CFs are highly distorted in both groups, exhibiting 'wings' along the fronts. These features resemble the structures predicted from non-viscous hydrodynamic simulations of gas sloshing, where Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities (KHIs) distort the CFs. This is in contrast to the structure seen in many other sloshing and merger CFs, which are smooth and featureless at the current observational resolution. Both magnetic fields and viscosity have been invoked to explain the absence of KHIs in these smooth CFs, but the NGC 7618/UGC 12491 pair are two in a growing number of both sloshing and merger CFs that appear distorted. Magnetic fields and/or viscosity may be able to suppress the growth of KHIs at the CFs in some clusters and groups, but clearly not in all. We propose that the presence or absence of KHI distortions in CFs can be used as a measure of the effective viscosity and/or magnetic field strengths in the intracluster medium.

  4. Cold climate deglaciation prior to termination 2 implied by new evidence for high sea-levels at 132 KA

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, R.G. . Dept. of Geology and Geophysics)

    1992-01-01

    Radioisotope dating of corals from reefs and beaches suggests a high sea stand just prior to termination 2. Lack of precision in the ages, stratigraphic uncertainties, and possible diagenetic alterations in the corals have prevented a widespread acceptance of this sea stand. These disadvantages can be avoided by an approach that uses differential uplift measurements to determine the duration of the interval of generally high sea-levels. The last interglacial terrace on Barbados has features indicating two intervals of constant sea-level: an older wave-cut at the inshore edge of the terrace, and a younger cut formed near present eustatic sea-level, below the crest, and just before the earliest Wisconsin glacial buildup. The differential uplift between these two features, measured at five locations having uplift rates between 0.18 and 0.39m/ka, yields a eustatic sea-level differences of 5.4m and a minimal duration of 12.1 [+-] 0.6ka between the two still stands. The assigned age of the younger wave-cut is 120 [+-] 0.5ka, based on sea-level regression due to ice sheet buildup implied by a Little Ice Age analog and rapidly falling Milankovitch summer insolation. The resulting minimal age of the first high sea-stand is 132.1 [+-] 1.1ka, about 7ka before termination 2. This age implies a major early deglaciation caused by a deficit of moisture transported to the great ice sheets, and occurring under relatively cold climate conditions.

  5. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of the complex of Maclura pomifera agglutinin with the disaccharide Gal beta 1-3GalNAc.

    PubMed

    Lee, X; Johnston, R A; Rose, D R; Young, N M

    1989-12-01

    Single crystals of Maclura pomifera agglutinin, a seed lectin from the Moraceae family, complexed with the disaccharide Gal beta 1-3GalNAc have been obtained by the method of vapor diffusion with Li2SO4 as precipitant at pH 4.5. The crystals belong to the trigonal space group P3(1)21 or P3(2)21, with a = b = 67.4 A, c = 149.3 A. They contain two subunits per asymmetric unit and diffract beyond 2.7 A. This and other evidence indicate that both this lectin and the Artocarpus integrifolia lectin, jacalin, have dimeric structures rather than the tetrameric structures previously proposed.

  6. Common cold

    MedlinePlus

    ... been tried for colds, such as vitamin C, zinc supplements, and echinacea. Talk to your health care ... nih.gov/pubmed/22962927 . Singh M, Das RR. Zinc for the common cold. Cochrane Database of Systematic ...

  7. Common Cold

    MedlinePlus

    ... News & Events Volunteer NIAID > Health & Research Topics > Common Cold Skip Website Tools Website Tools Print this page ... Help people who are suffering from the common cold by volunteering for NIAID clinical studies on ClinicalTrials. ...

  8. Differentiation of coagulase-positive and coagulase-negative staphylococci by lectins and plant agglutinins.

    PubMed

    Davidson, S K; Keller, K F; Doyle, R J

    1982-04-01

    The screening of staphylococci with a panel of 14 lectins and extracts demonstrating lectin-like activity led to the development of a rapid agglutination slide test for the differentiation of certain coagulase-negative staphylococci and human strains of Staphylococcus aureus. The coagulase-negative staphylococci were agglutinated by agglutinins from Mangifera indica, Triticum vulgaris, and crude Limulus polyphemus. The test is rapid, requiring only 5 to 15 min to identify an unknown strain of staphylococci, as opposed to the 4 to 16 h required to perform the conventional tube coagulase test.

  9. Insect erythrocyte agglutinins. In vitro opsonization experiments with Clitumnus extradentatus and Periplaneta americana haemocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Rowley, A F; Ratcliffe, N A

    1980-01-01

    The effect of naturally occurring haemagglutinins on the in vitro phagocytosis of sheep erythrocytes by the blood cells (haemocytes) of Clitumnus extradentatus and Periplaneta americana was studied. The results showed that the haemagglutinins in both species failed to act as opsonins. Indeed, in some instances, incubation of erythrocytes in haemolymph resulted in less avid ingestion as compared with the saline-incubated controls. This reduced phagocytosis was probably caused by the clumping of erythrocytes on the haemocyte monolayers, leaving fewer single red cells available for uptake. The possible roles of these erythrocyte agglutinins in the host defence systems of insects are discussed. Images Figures 1-3 Figures 6-7 PMID:7000682

  10. Differentiation of coagulase-positive and coagulase-negative staphylococci by lectins and plant agglutinins.

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, S K; Keller, K F; Doyle, R J

    1982-01-01

    The screening of staphylococci with a panel of 14 lectins and extracts demonstrating lectin-like activity led to the development of a rapid agglutination slide test for the differentiation of certain coagulase-negative staphylococci and human strains of Staphylococcus aureus. The coagulase-negative staphylococci were agglutinated by agglutinins from Mangifera indica, Triticum vulgaris, and crude Limulus polyphemus. The test is rapid, requiring only 5 to 15 min to identify an unknown strain of staphylococci, as opposed to the 4 to 16 h required to perform the conventional tube coagulase test. PMID:7068834

  11. Candida albicans-induced agglutinin and immunoglobulin E responses in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Winterrowd, G E; Cutler, J E

    1983-01-01

    Mice varied in their ability to make detectable antibody responses to cell surface determinants of Candida albicans depending upon the antigen preparation and the immunization schedule used. Immunoglobulin M (IgM) appeared to be the major class of antibody responsible for the C. albicans-agglutinating activity of the immune sera. Various inbred strains of mice injected with a ribosomal fraction from C. albicans produced a low titer (average, 4 to 8) of yeast cell agglutinins and a higher titer (64 to 512) of IgE antibodies detected by passive cutaneous anaphylaxis (PCA) in rats. The two kinds of antibodies appeared to be specific for different antigens because the agglutinin, but not IgE, could be removed by absorbing the serum with a polysaccharide from the cell wall of C. albicans, but the polysaccharide did not provoke the PCA reaction. C. albicans-specific IgE antibodies showed cross-reactivity (PCA) with ribosomal antigens from a strain of C. albicans and C. tropicalis, but PCA reactions could not be elicited with similar antigen preparations from other yeast species. IgE responses were also detected in over 20% of the mice infected intravenously or intraperitoneally with live C. albicans. PMID:6190755

  12. A chromophore-containing agglutinin from Haliclona manglaris: purification and biochemical characterization.

    PubMed

    Carneiro, Rômulo Farias; de Almeida, Alexandra Sampaio; de Melo, Arthur Alves; de Alencar, Daniel Barroso; de Sousa, Oscarina Viana; Delatorre, Plínio; do Nascimento, Kyria Santiago; Saker-Sampaio, Silvana; Cavada, Benildo Sousa; Nagano, Celso Shiniti; Sampaio, Alexandre Holanda

    2015-01-01

    A new chromophore-containing agglutinin (Haliclona manglaris agglutinin (HMA)) was isolated from the tropical sponge H. manglaris. HMA was purified by a combination of hydrophobic interaction chromatography and ion exchange chromatography. Native HMA is a heterotrimer formed by two β-chains (15 kDa) and one α-chain (22 kDa). HMA is a glycoprotein and possesses three intrachain disulfide bonds. Hemagglutinating activity of HMA was stable at neutral pH and temperatures up to 60 °C. HMA was only inhibited by thyroglobulin. Mass spectrometry sequencing and Edman degradation revealed a unique amino acid sequence of about 30%. Moreover, HMA has an organic chromophore of 581 Da, and this characteristic seems to be important to its antioxidant activity. Interestingly, while HMA showed no toxicity against Artemia nauplii and was unable to agglutinate bacterial cells, it did show a high capacity to protect β-carotene against oxidation. Thus, our findings suggest the putative involvement of HMA in the protection of the sponge against oxidation. PMID:25312602

  13. A pathway for cell wall anchorage of Saccharomyces cerevisiae alpha-agglutinin.

    PubMed Central

    Lu, C F; Kurjan, J; Lipke, P N

    1994-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae alpha-agglutinin is a cell wall-anchored adhesion glycoprotein. The previously identified 140-kDa form, which contains a glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor (D. Wojciechowicz, C.-F. Lu, J. Kurjan, and P. N. Lipke, Mol. Cell. Biol. 13:2554-2563, 1993), and additional forms of 80, 150, 250 to 300, and > 300 kDa had the properties of intermediates in a transport and cell wall anchorage pathway. N glycosylation and additional modifications resulted in successive increases in size during transport. The 150- and 250- to 300-kDa forms were membrane associated and are likely to be intermediates between the 140-kDa form and a cell surface GPI-anchored form of > 300 kDa. A soluble form of > 300 kDa that lacked the GPI anchor had properties of a periplasmic intermediate between the plasma membrane form and the > 300-kDa cell wall-anchored form. These results constitute experimental support for the hypothesis that GPI anchors act to localize alpha-agglutinin to the plasma membrane and that cell wall anchorage involves release from the GPI anchor to produce a periplasmic intermediate followed by linkage to the cell wall. Images PMID:8007981

  14. Enrichment for CFU-C from murine and human bone marrow using soybean agglutinin

    SciTech Connect

    Reisner, Y.; Kapoor, N.; Hodes, M.Z.; O'Reilly, R.J.; Good, R.A.

    1982-02-01

    Mouse bone marrow and spleen cells agglutinated by soybean agglutinin (SBA) or peanut agglutinin (PNA) were previously shown to be enriched for spleen colony-forming cells (CFU-S) and sufficiently depleted of graft-versus-host reaction producing cells to allow hematologic reconstitution of lethally irradiated allogeneic recipient mice. A similar enrichment for cells capable of forming colonies in soft agar culture (CFU-C) has now been found in the SBA-agglutinated fraction of mouse bone marrow cells, in contrast to the finding that in human bone marrow the majority of the CFU-C are in the fraction not agglutinated by SBA. Cytofluorometric studies with fluorescein-labeled SBA (FITC-SBA) revealed that the majority of both mouse and human bone marrow cells bind the lectin. Experiments mixing the human marrow fractions separated by SBA reveal that true enrichment for CFU-C is achieved in the unagglutinated fraction, as opposed to a possible depletion of a suppressor cell population. Granulocytic, monocytic, and mixed cell colonies were all enriched in the SBA-unagglutinated cell fraction from human bone marrow.

  15. Helium Find Thaws the Cold Fusion Trail.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennisi, E.

    1991-01-01

    Reported is a study of cold fusion in which trace amounts of helium, possible evidence of an actual fusion reaction, were found. Research methodology is detailed. The controversy over the validity of experimental results with cold fusion are reviewed. (CW)

  16. A cold-wet middle-latitude environment on Mars during the Hesperian-Amazonian transition: Evidence from northern Arabia valleys and paleolakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Sharon A.; Howard, Alan D.; Moore, Jeffrey M.; Grant, John A.

    2016-09-01

    The growing inventory of post-Noachian fluvial valleys may represent a late, widespread episode of aqueous activity on Mars, contrary to the paradigm that fluvial activity largely ceased around the Noachian-Hesperian boundary. Fresh shallow valleys (FSVs) are widespread from ~30 to 45° in both hemispheres with a high concentration in northern Arabia Terra. Valleys in northern Arabia Terra characteristically start abruptly on steeper slopes and terminate in topographic depressions at elevations corresponding to model-predicted lake levels. Longer valley systems flowed into and out of chains of paleolakes. Minimum discharges based on the dimensions of the incised channel assuming medium to coarse sand-size grains ranges from tens to hundreds of m3 s-1, respectively, consistent with formation via snowmelt from surface or sub-ice flows. Hydrologic calculations indicate the valleys likely formed in hundreds of years or less, and crater statistics constrain the timing of fluvial activity to between the Hesperian and middle Amazonian. Several craters with channels extending radially outward supports evidence for overflow of interior crater lakes possibly fed by groundwater. Most FSVs occur away from young impact craters which make an association with impact processes improbable. The widespread occurrence of FSVs along with their similar morphology and shared modest state of degradation is consistent with most forming during a global interval of favorable climate, perhaps contemporaneous with alluvial fan formation in equatorial and midlatitudes. Evidence for a snowmelt-based hydrology and considerable depths of water on the landscape in Arabia supports a cold, wet, and possibly habitable environment late in Martian history.

  17. Cold injuries.

    PubMed

    Kruse, R J

    1995-01-01

    There are two categories of cold injury. The first is hypothermia, which is a systemic injury to cold, and the second is frostbite, which is a local injury. Throughout history, entire armies, from George Washington to the Germans on the Russian Front in World War II, have fallen prey to prolonged cold exposure. Cold injury is common and can occur in all seasons if ambient temperature is lower than the core body temperature. In the 1985 Boston Marathon, even though it was 76 degrees and sunny, there were 75 runners treated for hypothermia. In general, humans adapt poorly to cold exposure. Children are at particular risk because of their relatively greater surface area/body mass ratio, causing them to cool even more rapidly than adults. Because of this, the human's best defense against cold injury is to limit his/her exposure to cold and to dress appropriately. If cold injury has occurred and is mild, often simple passive rewarming such as dry blankets and a warm room are sufficient treatment.

  18. Expression of Monstera deliciosa agglutinin gene (mda) in tobacco confers resistance to peach-potato aphids.

    PubMed

    Kai, Guoyin; Ji, Qian; Lu, Yang; Qian, Zhongying; Cui, Lijie

    2012-08-01

    The aphid is one of the most serious pests that causes damage to crops worldwide. Lectins from Araceae plant had been proved useful to control the aphid. Herein, the full-length cDNA of Monstera deliciosa agglutinin (mda) gene was cloned and then introduced into tobacco and the influence of the expression of mda in transgenic tobacco against peach-potato aphids (Myzus persicae) was investigated. Among 92 regenerated plants, 59 positive tobacco lines were obtained. Real-time PCR assays and aphid bioassay test revealed that there is a positive correlation between the expression level of mda and the inhibitory effect on peach-potato aphids. The average anti-pests ability of mda transgenic tobacco was 74%, which was higher than that of other reported lectins from Araceae plant. These results indicated that MDA is one of promising insect resistance proteins selected for the control of peach-potato aphids.

  19. Wheat germ agglutinin as a counterstain for immunofluorescence studies of equine hoof lamellae.

    PubMed

    Clark, Robert K; Galantino-Homer, Hannah L

    2014-09-01

    Equine laminitis is a common, painful, debilitating condition of the hoof that is a leading cause of disability in horses, often necessitating euthanasia. The equine hoof represents an extreme evolutionary adaptation of an epidermal structure homologous to the human or murine nail units. Immunohistochemistry is frequently utilized in the study of the pathophysiology of laminitis. The complex, multilayered, extensively interdigitated epidermal-dermal lamellar interface renders precise interpretation of immunofluorescence localization difficult, especially when effective technique and reagents render non-reactive tissues completely dark. Fluorescent-conjugated wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) selectively labels dermal extracellular matrix fibres and epidermal cell membranes in tissue sections of horse hoof lamellae, is compatible with indirect immunofluorescence and augments interpretation of indirect immunofluorescence antigen localization. The current report details the use of WGA as a rapid, simple, economical counterstain for immunofluorescence studies of the equine hoof and may have application to other complex epidermal tissue structures. PMID:25040657

  20. Subunit unbinding mechanics of dimeric wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) studied by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Afrin, Rehana; Ikai, Atsushi

    2014-11-28

    Wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) is an oligomeric lectin widely used as a model of sugar moieties in biochemistry. Subunit association is important for the crosslinking function of WGA, so we used atomic force microscopy to measure the subunit unbinding force of dimeric WGA. We found that the average unbinding force of dimeric WGA is ∼55 pN at ∼1 nN/s loading rate, whereas this unbinding force is increased at least up to 100 pN when WGA is bound to glycophorin A. Moreover, the dissociation rate constant of WGA was calculated to be 1–2 × 10(−2) s(−1), suggesting that dimer dissociation is relatively fast. PMID:25448988

  1. Novel dietary strategy for overcoming the antinutritional effects of soyabean whey of high agglutinin content.

    PubMed

    Pusztai, A; Grant, G; Bardocz, S; Gelencser, E; Hajos, G

    1997-06-01

    A diet-switching experiment, which aimed to improve the utilization of soyabean whey was carried out for 61 d with young rats. Feeding was arranged in such a way that after a few days on the soyabean diet, the rats were switched to a high-quality lactalbumin diet for a short period, after which the cycle was repeated several times. The weights of the rats at the end of the soyabean phases were significantly less than those of animals pair-fed on a high-quality diet throughout. However, the test group regained the weight loss after switching to the lactalbumin diet. After three cycles there were no significant differences between the weights of the test rats fed on a poor soyabean diet for over a third of the experiment and those fed on the lactalbumin diet throughout. Feed conversion was always significantly higher with test rats in the lactalbumin period than with continually pair-fed controls. Similarly, faecal N losses were significantly higher for test rats in the soyabean phase, but these differences disappeared after switching to the lactalbumin diet. At the end of the experiment there were no significant differences in body protein or lipids between the groups although the pancreas was significantly heavier while the liver was lighter in soyabean-fed rats. The high destruction of trypsin inhibitors in the gut suggests that they probably had little effect on protein digestion in the gut. In contrast, as selective depletion of the agglutinin from soyabean whey removed the nutritional benefit in the lactalbumin part of the cycle, the improved feed conversion in this period must have been the result mainly of the survival and functionality of soyabean agglutinin and the benefits due to the hyperplastic growth and faster renewal of the gut surface it induced. As processing is unnecessary, this novel method is cheap and can be easily adapted for the use of soyabean whey, regarded as a waste product. PMID:9227190

  2. Further characterization of the saccharide specificity of peanut (Arachis hypogaea) agglutinin.

    PubMed

    Swamy, M J; Gupta, D; Mahanta, S K; Surolia, A

    1991-06-25

    2-Dansylamino-2-deoxy-D-galactose (GalNDns) has been shown to bind to peanut (Arachis hypogaea) agglutinin (PNA) in a saccharide-specific manner. This binding was accompanied by a five-fold increase in the fluorescence of GalNDns. The interaction was characterized by an association constant of 0.15 mM at 15 degrees and delta H and delta S values of -57.04 kJ.mol-1 and -118.1J.mol-1.K-1, respectively. Binding of a variety of other mono-, di- and oligo-saccharides to PNA, studied by monitoring their ability to dissociate the PNA GalNDns complex, revealed that PNA interacts with several T-antigen-related structures, such as beta-D-Galp-(1----3)-D-GalNAc, beta-D-Galp-(1----3)-alpha-D-GalpNAcOMe, and beta-D-Galp-(1----3)-alpha-D-GalpNAc-(1----3)-Ser, as well as the asialo-GM1 tetrasaccharide, with comparable affinity, thus showing that this lectin does not discriminate between saccharides in which the penultimate sugar of the beta-D-Galp-(1----3)-D-GalNAc unit is the alpha or beta anomer, in contrast to jacalin (Artocarpus integrifolia agglutinin), another anti T-lectin which preferentially binds to beta-D-Galp-(1----3)-alpha-D-GalNAc and does not recognize beta-D-Galp-(1----3)-beta-D-GalNAc or the related asialo-GM1 oligosaccharide. These studies also indicated that, in the extended combining region of PNA which accommodates a disaccharide, the primary subsite (subsite A) is highly specific for D-galactose, whereas the secondary subsite (subsite B) is less specific and can accommodate various structures, such as D-galactose, 2-acetamido-2-deoxy-D-galactose, D-glucose, and 2-acetamido-2-deoxy-D-glucose.

  3. Cold intolerance

    MedlinePlus

    Some causes of cold intolerance are: Anemia Anorexia nervosa Blood vessel problems, such as Raynaud phenomenon Chronic severe illness General poor health Underactive thyroid ( hypothyroidism ) Problem with the hypothalamus (a part ...

  4. Cold injuries.

    PubMed

    Long, William B; Edlich, Richard F; Winters, Kathryne L; Britt, L D

    2005-01-01

    Exposure to cold can produce a variety of injuries that occur as a result of man's inability to adapt to cold. These injuries can be divided into localized injury to a body part, systemic hypothermia, or a combination of both. Body temperature may fall as a result of heat loss by radiation, evaporation, conduction, and convection. Hypothermia or systemic cold injury occurs when the core body temperature has decreased to 35 degrees C (95 degrees F) or less. The causes of hypothermia are either primary or secondary. Primary, or accidental, hypothermia occurs in healthy individuals inadequately clothed and exposed to severe cooling. In secondary hypothermia, another illness predisposes the individual to accidental hypothermia. Hypothermia affects multiple organs with symptoms of hypothermia that vary according to the severity of cold injury. The diagnosis of hypothermia is easy if the patient is a mountaineer who is stranded in cold weather. However, it may be more difficult in an elderly patient who has been exposed to a cold environment. In either case, the rectal temperature should be checked with a low-reading thermometer. The general principals of prehospital management are to (1) prevent further heat loss, (2) rewarm the body core temperature in advance of the shell, and (3) avoid precipitating ventricular fibrillation. There are two general techniques of rewarming--passive and active. The mechanisms of peripheral cold injury can be divided into phenomena that affect cells and extracellular fluids (direct effects) and those that disrupt the function of the organized tissue and the integrity of the circulation (indirect effects). Generally, no serious damage is seen until tissue freezing occurs. The mildest form of peripheral cold injury is frostnip. Chilblains represent a more severe form of cold injury than frostnip and occur after exposure to nonfreezing temperatures and damp conditions. Immersion (trench) foot, a disease of the sympathetic nerves and blood

  5. Cold injuries.

    PubMed

    Long, William B; Edlich, Richard F; Winters, Kathryne L; Britt, L D

    2005-01-01

    Exposure to cold can produce a variety of injuries that occur as a result of man's inability to adapt to cold. These injuries can be divided into localized injury to a body part, systemic hypothermia, or a combination of both. Body temperature may fall as a result of heat loss by radiation, evaporation, conduction, and convection. Hypothermia or systemic cold injury occurs when the core body temperature has decreased to 35 degrees C (95 degrees F) or less. The causes of hypothermia are either primary or secondary. Primary, or accidental, hypothermia occurs in healthy individuals inadequately clothed and exposed to severe cooling. In secondary hypothermia, another illness predisposes the individual to accidental hypothermia. Hypothermia affects multiple organs with symptoms of hypothermia that vary according to the severity of cold injury. The diagnosis of hypothermia is easy if the patient is a mountaineer who is stranded in cold weather. However, it may be more difficult in an elderly patient who has been exposed to a cold environment. In either case, the rectal temperature should be checked with a low-reading thermometer. The general principals of prehospital management are to (1) prevent further heat loss, (2) rewarm the body core temperature in advance of the shell, and (3) avoid precipitating ventricular fibrillation. There are two general techniques of rewarming--passive and active. The mechanisms of peripheral cold injury can be divided into phenomena that affect cells and extracellular fluids (direct effects) and those that disrupt the function of the organized tissue and the integrity of the circulation (indirect effects). Generally, no serious damage is seen until tissue freezing occurs. The mildest form of peripheral cold injury is frostnip. Chilblains represent a more severe form of cold injury than frostnip and occur after exposure to nonfreezing temperatures and damp conditions. Immersion (trench) foot, a disease of the sympathetic nerves and blood

  6. Large-scale production and purification of recombinant Galanthus nivalis agglutinin (GNA) expressed in the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Baumgartner, Philippe; Harper, Karen; Raemaekers, Romaan J M; Durieux, Alain; Gatehouse, Angharad M R; Davies, Howard V; Taylor, Mark A

    2003-08-01

    The gene coding for agglutinin from Galanthus nivalis (GNA) was expressed in, and secreted by, the methylotrophic yeast, Pichia pastoris. Transformants of P. pastoris were selected and a process to produce and purify gram quantities of recombinant GNA was developed. GNA was secreted at approximately 80 mg l(-1) at the 200 1 scale and was purified to 95% homogeneity using hydrophobic interaction chromatography. The recombinant protein was similar to the protein synthesised in plant with respect to structure and biological activity.

  7. COLD TRAP

    DOEpatents

    Milleron, N.

    1963-03-12

    An improved linear-flow cold trap is designed for highvacuum applications such as mitigating back migration of diffusion pump oil moiecules. A central pot of liquid nitrogen is nested within and supported by a surrounding, vertical, helical coil of metai sheet, all enveloped by a larger, upright, cylindrical, vacuum vessel. The vertical interstices between successive turns of the coil afford lineal, axial, high-vacuum passages between open mouths at top and bottom of said vessel, while the coil, being cold by virtue of thermal contact of its innermost turn with the nitrogen pot, affords expansive proximate condensation surfaces. (AEC)

  8. Detachment of agglutinin-bonded red blood cells. III. Mechanical analysis for large contact areas.

    PubMed Central

    Berk, D.; Evans, E.

    1991-01-01

    An experimental method and analysis are introduced which provide direct quantitation of the strength of adhesive contact for large agglutinin-bonded regions between macroscopically smooth membrane capsules (e.g., red blood cells). The approach yields intrinsic properties for separation of adherent regions independent of mechanical deformation of the membrane capsules during detachment. Conceptually, the micromechanical method involves one rigid test-capsule surface (in the form of a perfect sphere) held fixed by a micropipette and a second deformable capsule maneuvered with another micropipette to force contact with the test capsule. Only the test capsule is bound with agglutinin so that the maximum number of cross-bridges can be formed without steric interference. Following formation of a large adhesion region by mechanical impingement, the deformable capsule is detached from the rigid capsule surface by progressive aspiration into the micropipette. For the particular case modeled here, the deformable capsule is assumed to be a red blood cell which is preswollen by slight osmotic hydration before the test. The caliber of the detachment pipette is chosen so that the capsule will form a smooth cylindrical "piston" inside the pipette as it is aspirated. Because of the high flexibility of the membrane, the capsule naturally seals against the tube wall by pressurization even though it does not adhere to the glass. This arrangement maintains perfect axial symmetry and prevents the membrane from folding or buckling. Hence, it is possible to rigorously analyze the mechanics of deformation of the cell body to obtain the crucial "transducer" relation between pipette suction force and the membrane tension applied directly at the perimeter of the adhesive contact. Further, the geometry of the cell throughout the detachment process is predicted which provides accurate specification of the contact angle theta c between surfaces at the perimeter of the contact. A full analysis

  9. Project COLD.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kazanjian, Wendy C.

    1982-01-01

    Describes Project COLD (Climate, Ocean, Land, Discovery) a scientific study of the Polar Regions, a collection of 35 modules used within the framework of existing subjects: oceanography, biology, geology, meterology, geography, social science. Includes a partial list of topics and one activity (geodesic dome) from a module. (Author/SK)

  10. Mild desiccation rapidly increases freeze tolerance of the goldenrod gall fly, Eurosta solidaginis: evidence for drought-induced rapid cold-hardening.

    PubMed

    Levis, Nicholas A; Yi, Shu-Xia; Lee, Richard E

    2012-11-01

    Overwintering insects may experience extreme cold and desiccation stress. Both freezing and desiccation require cells to tolerate osmotic challenge as solutes become concentrated in the hemolymph. Not surprisingly, physiological responses to low temperature and desiccation share common features and may confer cross-tolerance against these stresses. Freeze-tolerant larvae of the goldenrod gall fly, Eurosta solidaginis (Diptera: Tephritidae), experience extremely dry and cold conditions in winter. To determine whether mild desiccation can improve freeze tolerance at organismal and cellular levels, we assessed survival, hemolymph osmolality and glycerol levels of control and desiccated larvae. Larvae that lost only 6-10% of their body mass, in as little as 6 h, had markedly higher levels of freeze tolerance. Mild, rapid desiccation increased freezing tolerance at -15°C in September-collected larvae (33.3±6.7 to 73.3±12%) and at -20°C in October-collected larvae (16.7±6.7 to 46.7±3.3%). Similarly, 6 h of desiccation improved in vivo survival by 17-43% in fat body, Malpighian tubule, salivary gland and tracheal cells at -20°C. Desiccation also enhanced intrinsic levels of cold tolerance in midgut cells frozen ex vivo (38.7±4.6 to 89.2±5.5%). Whereas hemolymph osmolality increased significantly with desiccation treatment from 544±16 to 720±26 mOsm, glycerol levels did not differ between control and desiccated groups. The rapidity with which a mild desiccation stress increased freeze tolerance closely resembles the rapid cold-hardening response, which occurs during brief sub-lethal chilling, and suggests that drought stress can induce rapid cold-hardening.

  11. Compact acid-induced state of Clitoria ternatea agglutinin retains its biological activity.

    PubMed

    Naeem, A; Saleemuddin, M; Khan, R H

    2009-10-01

    The effects of pH on Clitoria ternatea agglutinin (CTA) were studied by spectroscopy, size-exclusion chromatography, and by measuring carbohydrate specificity. At pH 2.6, CTA lacks well-defined tertiary structure, as seen by fluorescence and near-UV CD spectra. Far-UV CD spectra show retention of 50% native-like secondary structure. The mean residue ellipticity at 217 nm plotted against pH showed a transition around pH 4.0 with loss of secondary structure leading to the formation of an acid-unfolded state. This state is relatively less denatured than the state induced by 6 M guanidine hydrochloride. With a further decrease in pH, this unfolded state regains ~75% secondary structure at pH 1.2, leading to the formation of the A-state with native-like near-UV CD spectral features. Enhanced 8-anilino-1-naphthalene-sulfonate binding was observed in A-state, indicating a "molten-globule" like conformation with exposed hydrophobic residues. Acrylamide quenching data exhibit reduced accessibility of quencher to tryptophan, suggesting a compact conformation at low pH. Size-exclusion chromatography shows the presence of a compact intermediate with hydrodynamic size corresponding to a monomer. Thermal denaturation of the native state was cooperative single-step transition and of the A-state was non-cooperative two-step transition. A-State regains 72% of the carbohydrate-binding activity. PMID:19916921

  12. Targeted systemic mesenchymal stem cell delivery using hyaluronate - wheat germ agglutinin conjugate.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yun Seop; Kong, Won Ho; Kim, Hyemin; Hahn, Sei Kwang

    2016-11-01

    A variety of receptors for hyaluronate (HA), a natural linear polysaccharide, were found in the body, which have been exploited as target sites for HA-based drug delivery systems. In this work, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were surface-modified with HA - wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) conjugate for targeted systemic delivery of MSCs to the liver. WGA was conjugated to HA by coupling reaction between aldehyde-modified HA and amine group of WGA. The conjugation of WGA to HA was corroborated by gel permeation chromatography (GPC) and the successful surface modification of MSCs with HA-WGA conjugate was confirmed by confocal microscopy. The synthesized HA-WGA conjugate could be incorporated onto the cellular membrane by agglutinating the cell-associated carbohydrates. Fluorescent imaging for in vivo biodistribution visualized the targeted delivery of the HA-WGA/MSC complex to the liver after intravenous injection. This new strategy for targeted delivery of MSCs using HA-WGA conjugate might be successfully exploited for various regenerative medicines including cell therapy. PMID:27569867

  13. Wheat Germ Agglutinin Induces NADPH-Oxidase Activity in Human Neutrophils by Interaction with Mobilizable Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Karlsson, Anna

    1999-01-01

    Wheat germ agglutinin (WGA), a lectin with specificity for N-acetylglucosamine and sialic acid, was investigated with respect to its ability to activate the NADPH-oxidase of in vivo-exudated neutrophils (obtained from a skin chamber), and the activity was compared to that of peripheral blood neutrophils. The exudate cells responded to WGA, by both releasing reactive oxygen species into the extracellular milieu and producing oxygen metabolites intracellularly. The peripheral blood cells were unresponsive. To mimic the in vivo-exuded neutrophils with regards to receptor exposure, peripheral blood neutrophils were induced to mobilize their granules and vesicles to varying degrees (in vitro priming), prior to challenge with WGA. The oxidative response to WGA increased with increasing levels of granule mobilization, and the receptor(s) could be shown to reside in the secretory vesicles and/or the gelatinase granules in resting neutrophils. Several WGA-binding glycoproteins were detected in subcellular fractions containing these organelles. The extra- and intracellular NADPH-oxidase responses showed differences in sialic acid dependency, indicating that these two responses are mediated by different receptor structures. PMID:10377127

  14. Bauhinia purprea agglutinin-modified liposomes for human prostate cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Ikemoto, Keisuke; Shimizu, Kosuke; Ohashi, Kento; Takeuchi, Yoshihito; Shimizu, Motohiro; Oku, Naoto

    2016-01-01

    Bauhinia purprea agglutinin (BPA) is a well-known lectin that recognizes galactosyl glycoproteins and glycolipids. In the present study, we firstly found that BPA bound to human prostate cancer specimens but not to normal prostate ones. Therefore, we sought to develop BPA-PEG-modified liposomes (BPA-PEG-LP) encapsulating anticancer drugs for the treatment of prostate cancer. We examined the tumor targetability of BPA-PEG-LP with human prostate cancer DU145 cells, and observed that fluorescently labeled BPA-PEG-LP dominantly associated with the cells via the interaction between liposome-surface BPA and cell-surface galactosyl molecules. We also observed that BPA-PEG-LP accumulated in the prostate cancer tissue after the i.v. injection to DU145 solid cancer-bearing mice, and strongly bound to the cancer cells. In a therapeutic study, DU145 solid cancer-bearing mice were i.v. injected thrice with BPA-PEG-LP encapsulating doxorubicin (BPA-PEG-LPDOX, 2 mg/kg/day as the DOX dosage) or PEG-modified liposomes encapsulating DOX (PEG-LPDOX). As a result, BPA-PEG-LPDOX significantly suppressed the growth of the DU145 cancer cells, whereas PEG-LPDOX at the same dosage as DOX showed little anti-cancer effect. The present study suggested that BPA-PEG-LP could be a useful drug carrier for the treatment of human prostate cancers. PMID:26495901

  15. Purification and partial characterization of an agglutinin from Octopus maya serum.

    PubMed

    Alpuche, Juan; Pereyra, Ali; Mendoza-Hernández, Guillermo; Agundis, Concepción; Rosas, Carlos; Zenteno, Edgar

    2010-05-01

    A 66-kDa lectin (OmA) was purified from the serum of the Yucatan peninsula endemic octopus (Octopus maya) by a single step affinity chromatography on glutaraldehyde-fixed stroma from rat erythrocytes. OmA corresponds to 0.8% of the total circulating protein in the hemolymph; it is composed of three equal subunits of 22kDa each, and 7.4% of linked carbohydrates. The amino acids' composition indicated that agglutinin contained mainly aspartic and glutamic acids, and cysteine and methionine were identified in minor proportion. OmA agglutinates mainly rat, guinea pig, and rabbit erythrocytes, and this activity is partially inhibited by galactosamine, melobiose, galacturonic acid, mannose, and methyl alpha and beta galactosides. Hemagglutinating activity is not dependent on divalent cations, such as Ca(2+), Mg(2+), or Mn(2+). The OmA subunits showed no identity for any lectin in databases but partial identity with the type A hemocyanin from Octopus dolfleini hemolymph; the main similarities are related to tyrosinase domains and copper A and B sites that conform to the oxygen-binding site of hemocyanin. PMID:20105460

  16. Molecular Mechanism Underlying the Entomotoxic Effect of Colocasia esculenta Tuber Agglutinin against Dysdercus cingulatus

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Amit; Das, Sampa

    2015-01-01

    Colocasia esculenta tuber agglutinin (CEA), a mannose binding lectin, exhibits insecticidal efficacy against different hemipteran pests. Dysdercus cingulatus, red cotton bug (RCB), has also shown significant susceptibility to CEA intoxication. However, the molecular basis behind such entomotoxicity of CEA has not been addressed adequately. The present study elucidates the mechanism of insecticidal efficacy of CEA against RCB. Confocal and scanning electron microscopic analyses documented CEA binding to insect midgut tissue, resulting in an alteration of perimicrovillar membrane (PMM) morphology. Internalization of CEA into insect haemolymph and ovary was documented by western blotting analyses. Ligand blot followed by mass spectrometric identification revealed the cognate binding partners of CEA as actin, ATPase and cytochrome P450. Deglycosylation and mannose inhibition assays indicated the interaction to probably be mannose mediated. Bioinformatic identification of putative glycosylation or mannosylation sites in the binding partners further supports the sugar mediated interaction. Correlating entomotoxicity of CEA with immune histological and binding assays to the insect gut contributes to a better understanding of the insecticidal potential of CEA and endorses its future biotechnological application.

  17. Anti-tumor and anti-viral activities of Galanthus nivalis agglutinin (GNA)-related lectins.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lei; Bao, Jin-Ku

    2013-04-01

    Galanthus nivalis agglutinin (GNA)-related lectin family, a superfamily of strictly mannose-binding specific lectins widespread among monocotyledonous plants, is well-known to possess a broad range of biological functions such as anti-tumor, anti-viral and anti-fungal activities. Herein, we mainly focused on exploring the precise molecular mechanisms by which GNA-related lectins induce cancer cell apoptotic and autophagic death targeting mitochondria-mediated ROS-p38-p53 apoptotic or autophagic pathway, Ras-Raf and PI3K-Akt anti-apoptotic or anti-autophagic pathways. In addition, we further discussed the molecular mechanisms of GNA-related lectins exerting anti-viral activities by blocking the entry of the virus into its target cells, preventing transmission of the virus as well as forcing virus to delete glycan in its envelope protein and triggering neutralizing antibody. In conclusion, these findings may provide a new perspective of GNA-related lectins as potential drugs for cancer and virus therapeutics in the future.

  18. Identical homologs of the Galanthus nivalis agglutinin in Zea mays and Fusarium verticillioides.

    PubMed

    Fouquaert, Elke; Peumans, Willy J; Gheysen, Godelieve; Van Damme, Els J M

    2011-01-01

    The structural domain corresponding to the Galanthus nivalis agglutinin (GNA) is a mannose-binding motif that was originally discovered in plants but according to recent data also occurs in other eukaryotes and prokaryotes. Transcriptome analyses revealed that Fusarium verticillioides expresses a protein (FvGLLc1) identical to a recently identified cytoplasmic/nuclear GNA-like lectin from maize (ZmGLLc). The FvGLLc1 and ZmGLLc gene sequences are nearly identical in the coding region as well as in the intron and the 5 and 3 prime untranslated regions. However, whereas the Fusarium genome contains only a single gene with an intron, both an intronless and an intron containing lectin gene can be amplified from maize DNA. Southern blot analysis confirmed the presence of this cytoplasmic GNA-like gene in the maize and rice genome. A comparative analysis of the products amplified by different PCRs using genomic DNA from Fusarium species and maize DNA samples from sterile as well as contaminated plant material strongly indicated that the GNA-like sequence found in maize grown under sterile conditions is not derived from a contaminating Fusarium species. Furthermore, using a PCR-based approach it could be demonstrated that this particular type of lectin occurs also in other plants from distant taxa and is markedly conserved.

  19. Impact of snowdrop lectin (Galanthus nivalis agglutinin; GNA) on adults of the green lacewing, Chrysoperla carnea.

    PubMed

    Li, Yunhe; Romeis, Jörg

    2009-02-01

    Based on the finding that Galanthus nivalis agglutinin (GNA) has direct negative effects on larvae of Chrysoperla carnea, laboratory experiments were conducted to investigate its toxicity to the adults. While the ingestion of GNA dissolved in an artificial diet did not affect adult longevity, there were concentration-dependent negative effects on the pre-oviposition period, daily fecundity and total fecundity (number of eggs laid). When GNA was ingested by larvae of C. carnea, it caused a significant extension of larval development time. Adults that had emerged from GNA-fed larvae did not differ from those that developed from control larvae in terms of adult fresh weight, pre-oviposition period and daily or total fecundity. However, fertility (proportion of hatching eggs) was significantly decreased in adults raised from GNA-treated larvae. Western blots revealed that GNA ingested by larvae of C. carnea was partly transferred to the adult stage and was subsequently excreted or digested within a few days. Our toxicity studies (Tier-1 tests) clearly established a hazard of GNA to adult C. carnea when administered to larvae or adults at high concentrations. Implications of these toxicity data for the non-target risk assessment of GNA-expressing transgenic crops are discussed.

  20. Synergistic antiviral effect of Galanthus nivalis agglutinin and nelfinavir against feline coronavirus.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Li-En; Lin, Chao-Nan; Su, Bi-Ling; Jan, Tong-Rong; Chen, Chi-Min; Wang, Ching-Ho; Lin, Dah-Sheng; Lin, Chung-Tien; Chueh, Ling-Ling

    2010-10-01

    Feline infectious peritonitis (FIP) is a fatal disease in domestic and nondomestic felids caused by feline coronavirus (FCoV). Currently, no effective vaccine is available for the prevention of this disease. In searching for agents that may prove clinically effective against FCoV infection, 16 compounds were screened for their antiviral activity against a local FCoV strain in Felis catus whole fetus-4 cells. The results showed that Galanthus nivalis agglutinin (GNA) and nelfinavir effectively inhibited FCoV replication. When the amount of virus preinoculated into the test cells was increased to mimic the high viral load present in the target cells of FIP cats, GNA and nelfinavir by themselves lost their inhibitory effect. However, when the two agents were added together to FCoV-infected cells, a synergistic antiviral effect defined by complete blockage of viral replication was observed. These results suggest that the combined use of GNA and nelfinavir has therapeutic potential in the prophylaxis and treatment of cats with early-diagnosed FIP.

  1. Localization and topogenesis studies of cytoplasmic and vacuolar homologs of the Galanthus nivalis agglutinin.

    PubMed

    Fouquaert, Elke; Hanton, Sally L; Brandizzi, Federica; Peumans, Willy J; Van Damme, Els J M

    2007-07-01

    The Galanthus nivalis agglutinin (GNA) is synthesized as a preproprotein. To corroborate the role of the different targeting peptides in the topogenesis of GNA and related proteins, different constructs were made whereby both the complete original GNA gene and different truncated sequences were coupled to the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP). In addition, a GNA ortholog from rice that lacks the signal peptide and C-terminal propeptide sequence was fused to EGFP. These fusion constructs were expressed in tobacco BY-2 cells and their localization analyzed by confocal fluorescence microscopy. We observed that the processed preproprotein of GNA was directed towards the vacuolar compartment, whereas both the truncated forms of GNA corresponding to the mature lectin polypeptide and the rice ortholog of GNA were located in the nucleus and the cytoplasm. It can be concluded, therefore, that removal of the C-terminal propeptide and the signal peptide is sufficient to change the subcellular targeting of a normally vacuolar protein to the nuclear/cytoplasmic compartment of the BY-2 cells. These findings support the proposed hypothesis that cytoplasmic/nuclear GNA-like proteins and their vacuolar homologs are evolutionarily related and that the classical GNA-related lectins might have evolved from cytoplasmic orthologs through an evolutionary event involving the insertion of a signal peptide and a C-terminal propeptide.

  2. Stress-induced accumulation of wheat germ agglutinin and abscisic acid in roots of wheat seedlings

    SciTech Connect

    Cammue, B.P.A.; Broekaert, W.F.; Kellens, J.T.C.; Peumans, W.J. ); Raikhel, N.V. )

    1989-12-01

    Wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) levels in roots of 2-day-old wheat seedlings increased up to three-fold when stressed by air-drying. Similar results were obtained when seedling roots were incubated either in 0.5 molar mannitol or 180 grams per liter polyethylene glycol 6,000, with a peak level of WGA after 5 hours of stress. Longer periods of osmotic treatment resulted in a gradual decline of WGA in the roots. Since excised wheat roots incorporate more ({sup 35}S)cysteine into WGA under stress conditions, the observed increase of lectin levels is due to de novo synthesis. Measurement of abscisic acid (ABA) levels in roots of control and stressed seedlings indicated a 10-fold increase upon air-drying. Similarly, a five- and seven-fold increase of ABA content of seedling roots was found after 2 hours of osmotic stress by polyethylene glycol 6,000 and mannitol, respectively. Finally, the stress-induced increase of WGA in wheat roots could be inhibited by growing seedlings in the presence of fluridone, an inhibitor of ABA synthesis. These results indicate that roots of water-stressed wheat seedlings (a) contain more WGA as a result of an increased de novo synthesis of this lectin, and (b) exhibit higher ABA levels. The stress-induced increase of lectin accumulation seems to be under control of ABA.

  3. Fluorescent imaging of endothelial glycocalyx layer with wheat germ agglutinin using intravital microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kataoka, Hanae; Ushiyama, Akira; Kawakami, Hayato; Akimoto, Yoshihiro; Matsubara, Sachie; Iijima, Takehiko

    2016-01-01

    Endothelial glycocalyx (GCX) is located on the apical surface of vascular endothelial cells and is composed of a negatively-charged network of proteoglycans and glycoproteins. The GCX plays an important role in maintaining the integrity of vascular walls and preventing leakage of plasma. Therefore, degradation of the GCX is believed to lead to pathological leakage of plasma. Because the GCX is a very thin layer, its ultrastructural image has been demonstrated on electron microscope. To explore the function of the GCX, it should be visualized by a microscope in vivo. Thus, we developed in vivo visualization technique of the GCX under fluorescence microscopy using a mouse dorsal skinfold chamber (DSC) model. To label and visualize the GCX, we used fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-labeled lectin, which has a high specificity for sugar moieties. We examined the affinity of the different lectins to epivascular regions under an intravital fluorescent microscope. Among seven different lectins we examined, FITC labeled Triticum vulgaris (wheat germ) agglutinin (WGA) delineated the GCX most clearly. Binding of WGA to the GCX was inhibited by chitin hydrolysate, which contained WGA-binding polysaccharide chains. Furthermore, the septic condition attenuated this structure, suggesting structural degradation of endothelial GCX layer. In conclusion, FITC-labeled WGA lectin enabled visualization of endothelial GCX under in vivo fluorescence microscopy.

  4. Nematotoxicity of Marasmius oreades Agglutinin (MOA) Depends on Glycolipid Binding and Cysteine Protease Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Wohlschlager, Therese; Butschi, Alex; Zurfluh, Katrin; Vonesch, Sibylle C.; auf dem Keller, Ulrich; Gehrig, Peter; Bleuler-Martinez, Silvia; Hengartner, Michael O.; Aebi, Markus; Künzler, Markus

    2011-01-01

    Fruiting body lectins have been proposed to act as effector proteins in the defense of fungi against parasites and predators. The Marasmius oreades agglutinin (MOA) is a Galα1,3Gal/GalNAc-specific lectin from the fairy ring mushroom that consists of an N-terminal ricin B-type lectin domain and a C-terminal dimerization domain. The latter domain shows structural similarity to catalytically active proteins, suggesting that, in addition to its carbohydrate-binding activity, MOA has an enzymatic function. Here, we demonstrate toxicity of MOA toward the model nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. This toxicity depends on binding of MOA to glycosphingolipids of the worm via its lectin domain. We show further that MOA has cysteine protease activity and demonstrate a critical role of this catalytic function in MOA-mediated nematotoxicity. The proteolytic activity of MOA was dependent on high Ca2+ concentrations and favored by slightly alkaline pH, suggesting that these conditions trigger activation of the toxin at the target location. Our results suggest that MOA is a fungal toxin with intriguing similarities to bacterial binary toxins and has a protective function against fungivorous soil nematodes. PMID:21757752

  5. Uptake of Marasmius oreades agglutinin disrupts integrin-dependent cell adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Juillot, Samuel; Cott, Catherine; Madl, Josef; Claudinon, Julie; van der Velden, Niels Sebastiaan Johannes; Künzler, Markus; Thuenauer, Roland; Römer, Winfried

    2016-01-01

    Background Fruiting body lectins have been proposed to act as effector proteins in the defense of fungi against parasites and predators. The Marasmius oreades agglutinin (MOA) is a lectin from the fairy ring mushroom with specificity for Galα1-3Gal containing carbohydrates. This lectin is composed of an N-terminal carbohydrate-binding domain and a C-terminal dimerization domain. The dimerization domain of MOA shows in addition calcium-dependent cysteine protease activity, similar to the calpain family. Methods Cell detachment assay, cell viability assay, immunofluorescence, live cell imaging and Western blot using MDCKII cell line. Results In this study, we demonstrate in MDCKII cells that after internalization, MOA protease activity induces profound physiological cellular responses, like cytoskeleton rearrangement, cell detachment and cell death. These changes are preceded by a decrease in FAK phosphorylation and an internalization and degradation of β1-integrin, consistent with a disruption of integrin-dependent cell adhesion signaling. Once internalized, MOA accumulates in late endosomal compartments. Conclusion Our results suggest a possible toxic mechanism of MOA, which consists of disturbing the cell adhesion and the cell viability. General significance After being ingested by a predator, MOA might exert a protective role by diminishing host cell integrity. PMID:26546712

  6. Spreading of wheat germ agglutinin-induced erythrocyte contact by formation of spatially discrete contacts.

    PubMed

    Darmani, H; Coakley, W T; Hann, A C; Brain, A

    1990-06-01

    The time dependence of agglutination and cell-cell contact spreading in human erythrocytes exposed to wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) was characterized by light and electron microscopy. Cells (3 x 10(7)/mL) had a threshold lectin concentration in the range of 0.6-2.0 micrograms/mL for initial cell contact. Spreading was essentially completed within 60 and 2 min in undisturbed and gently agitated suspensions, respectively. The cells in large WGA agglutinates retained features of their initial disk form in contrast to the convex outlines of polycation or polyethylene glycol-induced agglutinates. Spreading of contact area was accompanied by development of a pattern of discrete contact regions separated by a distance of the order of 1 micron. Freeze fracture electron microscopy and studies with ferritin-labeled WGA showed no significant aggregation of intramembrane particles or specific lectin receptors under conditions when contact spreading occurred. It is argued that flow stress effects on cells in suspended agglutinates give rise to a situation where opposite membranes, at the leading edge of cell contact, are separated by a thin aqueous layer. When this intercellular water layer exceeds a critical length, it becomes unstable. The layer breaks up by surface wave development to form an array of intracellular water spaces. Formation of the aqueous spaces causes opposite membrane regions to move synchronously toward each other. Lectin molecules crosslink the wave crests to give spatially periodic contact points.

  7. Binding of porphyrins by the tumor-specific lectin, jacalin [Jack fruit (Artocarpus integrifolia) agglutinin].

    PubMed

    Komath, S S; Bhanu, K; Maiya, B G; Swamy, M J

    2000-08-01

    Jacalin (Artocarpus integrifolia agglutinin) specifically recognizes the tumor-associated T-antigenic disaccharide structure, Gal beta13GalNAc. Porphyrins and their derivatives are currently used as photosensitizers in photodynamic therapy to treat malignant tumors. In this study, the interaction of several free base porphyrins and their metal derivatives with jacalin is investigated by absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy. Each lectin subunit was found to bind one porphyrin molecule and the association constants were estimated to be in the range of 2.4 x 10(3) M(-1) to 1.3 x 10(5) M(-1) at room temperature for the interaction of different porphyrins with jacalin. These values are in the same range as those obtained for the interaction of monosaccharides to jacalin. Both free lectin and lectin saturated with the specific saccharide were found to bind different porphyrins with comparable binding strength indicating that porphyrin binding takes place at a site different from the sugar binding site. Further, both anionic and cationic porphyrins were found to interact with the lectin with comparable affinity, clearly indicating that the charge on the porphyrin does not play any role in the binding process and that most likely the interaction is mediated by hydrophobic forces. These results suggest that jacalin and other lectins may potentially be useful for targeted delivery of porphyrins to tumor tissues in photodynamic therapy.

  8. Structural Insights into the Anti-HIV Activity of the Oscillatoria agardhii Agglutinin Homolog Lectin Family*

    PubMed Central

    Koharudin, Leonardus M. I.; Kollipara, Sireesha; Aiken, Christopher; Gronenborn, Angela M.

    2012-01-01

    Oscillatoria agardhii agglutinin homolog (OAAH) proteins belong to a recently discovered lectin family. All members contain a sequence repeat of ∼66 amino acids, with the number of repeats varying among different family members. Apart from data for the founding member OAA, neither three-dimensional structures, information about carbohydrate binding specificities, nor antiviral activity data have been available up to now for any other members of the OAAH family. To elucidate the structural basis for the antiviral mechanism of OAAHs, we determined the crystal structures of Pseudomonas fluorescens and Myxococcus xanthus lectins. Both proteins exhibit the same fold, resembling the founding family member, OAA, with minor differences in loop conformations. Carbohydrate binding studies by NMR and x-ray structures of glycan-lectin complexes reveal that the number of sugar binding sites corresponds to the number of sequence repeats in each protein. As for OAA, tight and specific binding to α3,α6-mannopentaose was observed. All the OAAH proteins described here exhibit potent anti-HIV activity at comparable levels. Altogether, our results provide structural details of the protein-carbohydrate interaction for this novel lectin family and insights into the molecular basis of their HIV inactivation properties. PMID:22865886

  9. Internalization of Sambucus nigra agglutinins I and II in insect midgut CF-203 cells.

    PubMed

    Shahidi-Noghabi, Shahnaz; Van Damme, Els J M; De Vos, Winnok H; Smagghe, Guy

    2011-04-01

    In this project, the uptake mechanisms and localization of two lectins from Sambucus nigra, further referred to as S. nigra agglutinin (SNA)-I and SNA-II, into insect midgut CF-203 cells were studied. SNA-I is a chimeric lectin belonging to the class of ribosome-inactivating proteins, whereas SNA-II is a hololectin devoid of enzymatic activity. Internalization of the fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled lectin was investigated using confocal microscopy. Both lectins were internalized into the cytoplasm of CF-203 cells at similar rates. Preexposure of the insect midgut cells to specific inhibitors of clathrin- and caveolae-mediated endocytosis resulted in an inhibition of lectin uptake in CF-203 cells and caspase-induced cytotoxicity caused by SNA-I and SNA-II, confirming the involvement of both endocytosis pathways. Further studies demonstrated that the uptake mechanism(s) for both lectins required phosphoinositide 3-kinases, but did not depend on the actin cytoskeleton. Since the hololectin SNA-II apparently uses a similar endocytosis pathway as the chimerolectin SNA-I, it can be concluded that the endocytosis process mainly relies on the carbohydrate-binding activity of the lectins under investigation. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:21254203

  10. Identification of the zebrafish red nucleus using Wheat Germ Agglutinin transneuronal tracing

    PubMed Central

    Matsui, Hideaki; Namikawa, Kazuhiko; Köster, Reinhard W.

    2014-01-01

    The red nucleus is located in the rostral midbrain of the vertebrate brain and controls motor coordination during locomotion. It receives input from the cerebellum and sends its output to the spinal cord. The presence of the red nucleus is well established in tetrapods, and its existence has also been suggested in teleosts but its presence and position has still been under discussion. By using wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) as a genetically encoded anterograde tracer, we recently identified contralateral projections from the cerebellum to a putative red nucleus in the zebrafish midbrain tegmentum. In this report we further revealed red nucleus derived from this contralateral afferent from the cerebellum using WGA and contralateral projections to the hindbrain-spinal cord junction site using DiI-mediated retrograde tracing. Thus the structure that we have identified by anterograde and retrograde tracing fulfills the anatomical demands for the red nucleus: the location in the midbrain tegmentum, contralateral afferent from the cerebellum (cerebello-ruber projection) and contralateral efferent to the spinal cord (rubro-spinal projection). PMID:26480025

  11. V beta-specific deletion of mature thymocytes induced by the plant superantigen Urtica dioica agglutinin.

    PubMed

    Delcourt, M; Peumans, W J; Wagner, M C; Truffa-Bachi, P

    1996-03-15

    Urtica dioica agglutinin (UDA), a plant protein, is a superantigen activating in a MHC class II-restricted manner the V beta 8. 3-bearing T-cells (Galelli and Truffa-Bachi, J. Immunol. 151, 1821, 1993). Administration of UDA to adult mice provokes the clonal expansion of the responding cells which is followed by the deletion of the major fraction of the UDA-sensitive cells, whereas the remaining cells become anergic (Galelli et al., J. Immunol. 154, 2600, 1995). We have analyzed the effect of UDA on thymocytes. Injection of UDA resulted in a rapid, but transient, deletion of a large fraction of the V beta 8.3-bearing mature T-cells. In contrast to other exogenous superantigens, this deletion was not preceded by the clonal expansion of the UDA-responding thymocytes. Moreover, the V beta 8.3-bearing mature T-cells escaping the deletion were not anergic to an in vitro UDA restimulation. UDA and the other superantigens also differ as the general, V beta-unrestricted, thymic atrophy induced by classical superantigens was not observed with UDA. PMID:8640861

  12. Characterization of Urtica dioica agglutinin isolectins and the encoding gene family.

    PubMed

    Does, M P; Ng, D K; Dekker, H L; Peumans, W J; Houterman, P M; Van Damme, E J; Cornelissen, B J

    1999-01-01

    Urtica dioica agglutinin (UDA) has previously been found in roots and rhizomes of stinging nettles as a mixture of UDA-isolectins. Protein and cDNA sequencing have shown that mature UDA is composed of two hevein domains and is processed from a precursor protein. The precursor contains a signal peptide, two in-tandem hevein domains, a hinge region and a carboxyl-terminal chitinase domain. Genomic fragments encoding precursors for UDA-isolectins have been amplified by five independent polymerase chain reactions on genomic DNA from stinging nettle ecotype Weerselo. One amplified gene was completely sequenced. As compared to the published cDNA sequence, the genomic sequence contains, besides two basepair substitutions, two introns located at the same positions as in other plant chitinases. By partial sequence analysis of 40 amplified genes, 16 different genes were identified which encode seven putative UDA-isolectins. The deduced amino acid sequences share 78.9-98.9% identity. In extracts of roots and rhizomes of stinging nettle ecotype Weerselo six out of these seven isolectins were detected by mass spectrometry. One of them is an acidic form, which has not been identified before. Our results demonstrate that UDA is encoded by a large gene family. PMID:10080699

  13. Antinutritive effects of wheat-germ agglutinin and other N-acetylglucosamine-specific lectins.

    PubMed

    Pusztai, A; Ewen, S W; Grant, G; Brown, D S; Stewart, J C; Peumans, W J; Van Damme, E J; Bardocz, S

    1993-07-01

    Incorporation of N-acetylglucosamine-specific agglutinins from wheat germ (Triticum aestivum; WGA), thorn apple (Datura stramonium) or nettle (Urtica dioica) rhizomes in the diet at the level of 7 g/kg reduced the apparent digestibility and utilization of dietary proteins and the growth of rats, with WGA being the most damaging. As a result of their binding and endocytosis by the epithelial cells of the small intestine, all three lectins were growth factors for the gut and interfered with its metabolism and function to varying degrees. WGA was particularly effective; it induced extensive polyamine-dependent hyperplastic and hypertrophic growth of the small bowel by increasing its content of proteins, RNA and DNA. Furthermore, an appreciable portion of the endocytosed WGA was transported across the gut wall into the systemic circulation, where it was deposited in the walls of the blood and lymphatic vessels. WGA also induced the hypertrophic growth of the pancreas and caused thymus atrophy. Although the transfer of the gene of WGA into crop plants has been advocated to increase their insect resistance, as the presence of this lectin in the diet may harm higher animals at the concentrations required to be effective against most pests, its use in plants as natural insecticide is not without health risks for man. PMID:8399111

  14. Wheat germ agglutinin modified liposomes for the photodynamic inactivation of bacteria.

    PubMed

    Yang, Kewei; Gitter, Burkhard; Rüger, Ronny; Albrecht, Volker; Wieland, Gerhard D; Fahr, Alfred

    2012-01-01

    Photodynamic inactivation (PDI) of bacteria is a promising approach for combating the increasing emergence of antibiotic resistance in pathogenic bacteria. To further improve the PDI efficiency on bacteria, a bacteria-targeting liposomal formulation was investigated. A generation II photosensitizer (temoporfin) was incorporated into liposomes, followed by conjugation with a specific lectin (wheat germ agglutinin, WGA) on the liposomal surface. WGA was successfully coupled to temoporfin-loaded liposomes using an activated phospholipid containing N-hydroxylsuccinimide residue. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were selected to evaluate the WGA modified liposomes in terms of bacteria targeted delivery and in vitro PDI test. Fluorescence microscopy revealed that temoporfin was delivered to both kinds of bacteria, while flow cytometry demonstrated that WGA- modified liposomes delivered more temoporfin to bacteria compared to nonmodified liposomes. Consequently, the WGA- modified liposomes eradicated all MRSA and significantly enhanced the PDI of P. aeruginosa. In conclusion, the WGA- modified liposomes are a promising formulation for bacteria targeted delivery of temoporfin and for improving the PDI efficiency of temoporfin on both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial cells.

  15. Effect of galactose on acid induced molten globule state of Soybean Agglutinin: Biophysical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, Parvez; Naseem, Farha; Abdelhameed, Ali Saber; Khan, Rizwan Hasan

    2015-11-01

    In the present study the formation of molten globule-like unfolding intermediate Soybean Agglutinin (SBA) in acidic pH range has been established with the help of acrylamide quenching, intrinsic fluorescence, ANS fluorescence measurement, far UV CD and dynamic light scattering measurement. A marked increase in ANS fluorescence was observed at pH 2.2. Ksv of acrylamide quenching was found to be higher at pH 2.2 than that of native SBA at pH 7. Far UV CD spectra of pH induced state suggest that SBA shows significant retention of secondary structure closure to native. Hydrodynamic radius of SBA at pH 2.2 was found be more as compared to native state and also in other pH induced states. Further we checked the effect of galactose on the molten globule state of SBA. This study suggests that SBA exist as molten globule at pH 2.2 and this study will help in acid induced molten globule state of other proteins.

  16. Why Being Cold Might Foster a Cold

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_159805.html Why Being Cold Might Foster a Cold Healthy body temperature boosts ability of immune system ... proving Mom right: Your odds of avoiding a cold get better if you bundle up and stay ...

  17. Hot, Cold, and Really Cold.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leyden, Michael

    1997-01-01

    Describes a physics experiment investigating temperature prediction and the relationship between the physical properties of heat units, melting, dissolving, states of matter, and energy loss. Details the experimental setup, which requires hot and cold water, a thermometer, and ice. Notes that the experiment employs a deliberate counter-intuitive…

  18. Chilling Out with Colds

    MedlinePlus

    ... most common cold virus, but more than 200 viruses can cause colds. Because there are so many, ... to help you feel better. Take that, cold viruses! continue How Kids Catch Colds Mucus (say: MYOO- ...

  19. Coping with Cold Sores

    MedlinePlus

    ... Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes Coping With Cold Sores KidsHealth > For Kids > Coping With Cold Sores ... sore." What's that? Adam wondered. What Is a Cold Sore? Cold sores are small blisters that is ...

  20. Identification of a ligand-binding site in an immunoglobulin fold domain of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae adhesion protein alpha-agglutinin.

    PubMed Central

    de Nobel, H; Lipke, P N; Kurjan, J

    1996-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae adhesion protein alpha-agglutinin (Ag alpha 1p) is expressed by alpha cells and binds to the complementary a-agglutinin expressed by a cells. The N-terminal half of alpha-agglutinin is sufficient for ligand binding and has been proposed to contain an immunoglobulin (Ig) fold domain. Based on a structural homology model for this domain and a previously identified critical residue (His292), we made Ag alpha 1p mutations in three discontinuous patches of the domain that are predicted to be in close proximity to His292 in the model. Residues in each of the three patches were identified that are important for activity and therefore define a putative ligand binding site, whereas mutations in distant loops had no effect on activity. This putative binding site is on a different surface of the Ig fold than the defined binding sites of immunoglobulins and other members of the Ig superfamily. Comparison of protein interaction sites by structural and mutational analysis has indicated that the area of surface contact is larger than the functional binding site identified by mutagenesis. The putative alpha-agglutinin binding site is therefore likely to identify residues that contribute to the functional binding site within a larger area that contacts a-agglutinin. Images PMID:8741846

  1. Effects of Soybean Agglutinin on Intestinal Barrier Permeability and Tight Junction Protein Expression in Weaned Piglets

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yuan; Qin, Guixin; Sun, Zewei; Che, Dongsheng; Bao, Nan; Zhang, Xiaodong

    2011-01-01

    This study was developed to provide further information on the intestinal barrier permeability and the tight junction protein expression in weaned piglets fed with different levels of soybean agglutinin (SBA). Twenty-five weaned crossbred barrows (Duroc × Landrace × Yorkshire) were selected and randomly allotted to five groups, each group with five replicates. The piglets in the control group were not fed with leguminous products. 0.05, 0.1, 0.15 and 0.2% SBA was added to the control diet to form four experimental diets, respectively. After the experimental period of 7 days (for each group), all the piglets were anesthetized with excess procaine and slaughtered. The d-lactic acid in plasma and the Ileal mucosa diamine oxidase (DAO) was analyzed to observe the change in the intestinal permeability. The tight junction proteins occludin and ZO-1 in the jejunum tissue distribution and relative expression were detected by immunohistochemistry and Western Blot. The results illustrated that a high dose of SBA (0.1–0.2%) could increase the intestinal permeability and reduce piglet intestinal epithelial tight junction protein occludin or ZO-1 expression, while low dose of SBA (0.05% of total diet) had no significant affects. The contents of DAO, d-lactic acid, occludin or ZO-1, had a linear relationship with the SBA levels (0–0.2%) in diets. The high dose SBA (0.1–0.2%) could increase the intestinal permeability and reduce piglet intestinal epithelial tight junction protein occludin or ZO-1 expression, while low dose of SBA (0.05% of total diet) had no affects. PMID:22272087

  2. Soybean agglutinin-conjugated silver nanoparticles nanocarriers in the treatment of breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Casañas Pimentel, Rocio Guadalupe; Robles Botero, Viviana; San Martín Martínez, Eduardo; Gómez García, Consuelo; Hinestroza, Juan Paulo

    2016-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) induce diverse cell-death mechanisms, similar to those promoted by anticancer chemotherapeutics; however, they have not been tested in vivo because their action is not limited to cancer cells. Therefore, in vivo evaluations of their effectiveness should be developed with targeting systems. Breast cancer shows changes in the sugar expression patterns on cell surfaces, related to cancer progression and metastases; those changes have been identified previously by the specific binding of soybean agglutinin (SBA). Here is proposed the use of SBA to target the AgNP activity in breast cancer. For that, the present work reports the synthesis of AgNPs (3.89 ± 0.90 nm) through the polyol method, the generation of AgNP nanocarriers, and the bioconjugation protocol of the nanocarrier with SBA. The free AgNPs, the AgNP nanocarriers, and the SBA-bioconjugated AgNP nanocarriers were tested for cytotoxicity in breast cancerous (MDA-MB-231and MCF7) and non cancerous (MCF 10A) cells, using the MTT assay. AgNPs demonstrated cytotoxic activity in vitro, the non cancerous cells (MCF 10A) being more sensible than the cancerous cells (MDA-MB-231 and MCF7) showing LD(50) values of 128, 205, and 319 μM Ag, respectively; the nanoencapsulation decreased the cytotoxic effect of AgNPs in non cancerous cells, maintaining or increasing the effect on the cancer-derived cells, whereas the SBA-bioconjugation allowed AgNP cytotoxic activity with a similar behavior to the nanocarriers. Future experiments need to be developed to evaluate the targeting effect of the SBA-bioconjugated AgNP nanocarriers to study their functionality in vivo.

  3. Datura stramonium agglutinin: cloning, molecular characterization and recombinant production in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Nishimoto, Keisuke; Tanaka, Kaori; Murakami, Takahiro; Nakashita, Hideo; Sakamoto, Hikaru; Oguri, Suguru

    2015-02-01

    Datura stramonium seeds contain at least three chitin-binding isolectins [termed Datura stramonium agglutinin (DSA)] as homo- or heterodimers of A and B subunits. We isolated a cDNA encoding isolectin B (DSA-B) from an immature fruit cDNA library; this contained an open reading frame encoding 279 deduced amino acids, which was confirmed by partial sequencing of the native DSA-B peptide. The sequence consisted of: (i) a cysteine (Cys)-rich carbohydrate-binding domain composed of four conserved chitin-binding domains and (ii) an extensin-like domain of 37 residues containing four SerPro4-6 motifs that was inserted between the second and third chitin-binding domains (CBDs). Although each chitin-binding domain contained eight conserved Cys residues, only the second chitin-binding domain contained an extra Cys residue, which may participate in dimerization through inter-disulfide bridge formation. Using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry, the molecular mass of homodimeric lectin composed of two B-subunits was determined as 68,821 Da. The molecular mass of the S-pyridilethylated B-subunit were found to be 37,748 Da and that of the de-glycosylated form was 26,491 Da, which correlated with the molecular weight estimated from the deduced sequence. Transgenic Arabidopsis plants overexpressing the dsa-b demonstrated hemagglutinating activity. Recombinant DSA-B was produced as a homodimeric glycoprotein with a similar molecular mass to that of the native form. Moreover, the N-terminus of the purified recombinant DSA-B protein was identical to that of the native DSA-B, confirming that the cloned cDNA encoded DSA-B. PMID:25246348

  4. Holothuria grisea agglutinin (HGA): the first invertebrate lectin with anti-inflammatory effects.

    PubMed

    Moura, Raniere da M; Aragão, Karoline S; de Melo, Arthur A; Carneiro, Rômulo F; Osório, César B H; Luz, Patricia B; de Queiroz, Alexandre F S; Dos Santos, Elizeu A; de Alencar, Nylane M N; Cavada, Benildo S

    2013-12-01

    Holothuria grisea agglutinin (HGA) is a dimeric lectin of molecular mass 228 kDa by gel filtration with monomers of 105 kDa by SDS-PAGE. The lectin is highly thermostable as it retains full activity for 1 h at 70 °C. Unlike other lectins purified from marine invertebrates, the hemagglutination activity of HGA does not require any divalent metal ions. The affinity analysis of HGA showed that only mucin was able to inhibit the hemagglutinating activity. HGA administered intravenously was tested in classical models of nociception and inflammation. HGA was able to inhibit neutrophil migration into the peritoneal cavity induced by carrageenan. This inhibitory effect was 68% at a dose of 1 mg/kg. In acetic acid-induced writhing tests, a significant antinociceptive effect was observed by treatment with HGA (0.1; 1 or 10 mg/kg) reducing constrictions by 27, 90 and 84%, respectively. In formalin tests, HGA at a dose of 10 mg/kg showed antinociceptive effect only in the inflammatory phase (phase 2). Nevertheless, in hot-plate tests, HGA did not show any nociceptive effect. In rota-rod and open-field tests, HGA did not alter the animals' behavior. The treatment with HGA 10 mg/kg presented diminished myeloperoxidase activity activity (81.6% inhibition) and raised the circulating levels of NO by 50.4% when compared with the carrageenan group. HGA has demonstrated the ability to modulate the inflammatory response in models of inflammation in vivo. HGA is the first marine invertebrate lectin that showed an anti-inflammatory effect. This finding opens a new perspective on the potential of lectins from the marine environment. PMID:22943744

  5. Evolution of the rapidly mutating human salivary agglutinin gene (DMBT1) and population subsistence strategy

    PubMed Central

    Polley, Shamik; Louzada, Sandra; Forni, Diego; Sironi, Manuela; Balaskas, Theodosius; Hains, David S.; Yang, Fengtang; Hollox, Edward J.

    2015-01-01

    The dietary change resulting from the domestication of plant and animal species and development of agriculture at different locations across the world was one of the most significant changes in human evolution. An increase in dietary carbohydrates caused an increase in dental caries following the development of agriculture, mediated by the cariogenic oral bacterium Streptococcus mutans. Salivary agglutinin [SAG, encoded by the deleted in malignant brain tumors 1 (DMBT1) gene] is an innate immune receptor glycoprotein that binds a variety of bacteria and viruses, and mediates attachment of S. mutans to hydroxyapatite on the surface of the tooth. In this study we show that multiallelic copy number variation (CNV) within DMBT1 is extensive across all populations and is predicted to result in between 7–20 scavenger–receptor cysteine-rich (SRCR) domains within each SAG molecule. Direct observation of de novo mutation in multigeneration families suggests these CNVs have a very high mutation rate for a protein-coding locus, with a mutation rate of up to 5% per gamete. Given that the SRCR domains bind S. mutans and hydroxyapatite in the tooth, we investigated the association of sequence diversity at the SAG-binding gene of S. mutans, and DMBT1 CNV. Furthermore, we show that DMBT1 CNV is also associated with a history of agriculture across global populations, suggesting that dietary change as a result of agriculture has shaped the pattern of CNV at DMBT1, and that the DMBT1-S. mutans interaction is a promising model of host-pathogen-culture coevolution in humans. PMID:25848046

  6. Tumor affinity of radiolabeled peanut agglutinin compared with that of Ga-67 citrate in animal models

    SciTech Connect

    Yokoyama, K.; Aburano, T.; Watanabe, N.; Kawabata, S.; Ishida, H.; Mukai, K.; Tonami, N.; Hisada, K.

    1985-05-01

    Peanut agglutinin (PNA) binds avidly to the immunodominant group of the tumor associated T antigen. The purpose of this study was to evaluate oncodiagnostic potential of radiolabeled PNA in animal models. PNA was labeled with I-125 or I-131 by Iodogen and also with In-111 by cyclic DTPA anhydride. The biological activity of PNA was examined by a hemaglutination titer with a photometer before and after labeling. Animal tumor models used were Lewis Lung Cancer(LLC), B-16 Melanotic Melanoma(MM), Yoshida Sarcoma(YS), Ehrlich Ascites Tumor(EAT and Hepatoma AH109A(HAH). Inflammatory tissue induced by turpentine oil was used as an abscess model. Serial scintigraphic images were obtained following IV injections of 100 ..mu..Ci of I-131 or In-111-DTPA-PNA. The tumor affinity of Ga-67 citrate was studied to compare that of radiolabeled PNA. Tissue biodistribution was studied in EAT bearing mice. All of these tumor models except HAH were clearly visible by radiolabeled PNA without subtraction techniques. In the models of LLC and EAT, PNA showed the better accumulation into the tumor tissue than Ga-67 citrate. In YS and MM, PNA represented almost the same accumulation as Ga-67 citrate. The localization of PNA into abscess tissue wasn't found although Ga-67 citrate markedly accumulated into abscess tissue as well as tumor tissue. The clearance of PNA from tumor was slower than those from any other organs. Tumor to muscle ratio was 5.1 at 48hrs. and tumor to blood ratio increased with time to 2.3 at 96hrs. These results suggested that radiolabeled PNA may have a potential in the detection of tumor.

  7. Evolution of the rapidly mutating human salivary agglutinin gene (DMBT1) and population subsistence strategy.

    PubMed

    Polley, Shamik; Louzada, Sandra; Forni, Diego; Sironi, Manuela; Balaskas, Theodosius; Hains, David S; Yang, Fengtang; Hollox, Edward J

    2015-04-21

    The dietary change resulting from the domestication of plant and animal species and development of agriculture at different locations across the world was one of the most significant changes in human evolution. An increase in dietary carbohydrates caused an increase in dental caries following the development of agriculture, mediated by the cariogenic oral bacterium Streptococcus mutans. Salivary agglutinin [SAG, encoded by the deleted in malignant brain tumors 1 (DMBT1) gene] is an innate immune receptor glycoprotein that binds a variety of bacteria and viruses, and mediates attachment of S. mutans to hydroxyapatite on the surface of the tooth. In this study we show that multiallelic copy number variation (CNV) within DMBT1 is extensive across all populations and is predicted to result in between 7-20 scavenger-receptor cysteine-rich (SRCR) domains within each SAG molecule. Direct observation of de novo mutation in multigeneration families suggests these CNVs have a very high mutation rate for a protein-coding locus, with a mutation rate of up to 5% per gamete. Given that the SRCR domains bind S. mutans and hydroxyapatite in the tooth, we investigated the association of sequence diversity at the SAG-binding gene of S. mutans, and DMBT1 CNV. Furthermore, we show that DMBT1 CNV is also associated with a history of agriculture across global populations, suggesting that dietary change as a result of agriculture has shaped the pattern of CNV at DMBT1, and that the DMBT1-S. mutans interaction is a promising model of host-pathogen-culture coevolution in humans.

  8. The gene for stinging nettle lectin (Urtica dioica agglutinin) encodes both a lectin and a chitinase.

    PubMed

    Lerner, D R; Raikhel, N V

    1992-06-01

    Chitin-binding proteins are present in a wide range of plant species, including both monocots and dicots, even though these plants contain no chitin. To investigate the relationship between in vitro antifungal and insecticidal activities of chitin-binding proteins and their unknown endogenous functions, the stinging nettle lectin (Urtica dioica agglutinin, UDA) cDNA was cloned using a synthetic gene as the probe. The nettle lectin cDNA clone contained an open reading frame encoding 374 amino acids. Analysis of the deduced amino acid sequence revealed a 21-amino acid putative signal sequence and the 86 amino acids encoding the two chitin-binding domains of nettle lectin. These domains were fused to a 19-amino acid "spacer" domain and a 244-amino acid carboxyl extension with partial identity to a chitinase catalytic domain. The authenticity of the cDNA clone was confirmed by deduced amino acid sequence identity with sequence data obtained from tryptic digests, RNA gel blot, and polymerase chain reaction analyses. RNA gel blot analysis also showed the nettle lectin message was present primarily in rhizomes and inflorescence (with immature seeds) but not in leaves or stems. Chitinase enzymatic activity was found when the chitinase-like domain alone or the chitinase-like domain with the chitin-binding domains were expressed in Escherichia coli. This is the first example of a chitin-binding protein with both a duplication of the 43-amino acid chitin-binding domain and a fusion of the chitin-binding domains to a structurally unrelated domain, the chitinase domain. PMID:1375935

  9. COLD TRAPS

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, W.I.

    1958-09-30

    A cold trap is presented for removing a condensable component from a gas mixture by cooling. It consists of a shell, the exterior surface of which is chilled by a refrigerant, and conductive fins welded inside the shell to condense the gas, and distribute the condensate evenly throughout the length of the trap, so that the trap may function until it becomes completely filled with the condensed solid. The contents may then be removed as either a gas or as a liquid by heating the trap. This device has particuinr use as a means for removing uranium hexafluoride from the gaseous diffusion separation process during equipment breakdown and repair periods.

  10. Effects of detergent on the binding of solubilized sodium channels to immobilized wheat germ agglutinin: structural implications.

    PubMed

    Weiner, J S; Rudy, B

    1988-10-20

    The binding of the solubilized voltage-dependent sodium channel from rat brain to immobilized wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) is detergent-dependent. When solubilized in sodium cholate, only 11% of total recovered channels bound to a WGA-Sepharose column. When solubilized in Triton X-100 or CHAPS, however, 80% and 60% could bind, respectively. The effect of cholate on sodium channel binding is relatively specific: the major rat brain glycoproteins which bind to immobilized WGA are roughly the same in either Triton or cholate, as analyzed by SDS gel electrophoresis. The structural implications for the channel are discussed.

  11. Envelope glycoproteins of HIV-1, HIV-2, and SIV purified with Galanthus nivalis agglutinin induce strong immune responses.

    PubMed

    Gilljam, G

    1993-05-01

    Lectin affinity chromatography was used to purify in a single step the envelope glycoproteins of HIV-1, HIV-2, and SIV. Envelope glycoproteins carry the major determinants essential for protection by the humoral immune response. The purification of these proteins has previously been a laborious procedure. The glycoproteins were purified by a one-step procedure to a high level of purity by using Galanthus nivalis agglutinin (GNA). The purified glycoprotein had CD4-binding and antigenic reactivities. Strong immune responses to envelope proteins and peptides were seen in mice and primates after immunization with these preparations.

  12. Experimental evidence of twin fast metastable H(2(2)S) atoms from dissociation of cold H2 induced by electrons.

    PubMed

    Robert, J; Zappa, F; de Carvalho, C R; Jalbert, Ginette; Nascimento, R F; Trimeche, A; Dulieu, O; Medina, Aline; Carvalho, Carla; Faria, N V de Castro

    2013-11-01

    We report the direct detection of two metastable H(2^{2}S) atoms coming from the dissociation of a single cold H(2) molecule, in coincidence measurements. The molecular dissociation was induced by electron impact in order to avoid limitations by the selection rules governing radiative transitions. Two detectors, placed close to the collision center, measure the neutral metastable H(2(2)S) through a localized quenching process, which mixes the H(2^{2}S) state with the H(2^{2}P), leading to a Lyman-α detection. Our data show the accomplishment of a coincidence measurement which proves for the first time the existence of the H(2(2)S)-H(2(2)S) dissociation channel.

  13. Dietary wheat germ agglutinin modulates ovalbumin-induced immune responses in Brown Norway rats.

    PubMed

    Watzl, B; Neudecker, C; Hänsch, G M; Rechkemmer, G; Pool-Zobel, B L

    2001-04-01

    The trend towards an increased consumption of minimally processed plant food results in a higher intake of non-nutritive compounds such as lectins. Lectins are typically globular proteins that are resistant to digestion in the gastrointestinal tract. They affect the integrity of the intestinal epithelium and the absorption of dietary antigens, and induce the release of allergic mediators from mast cells in vitro. Based on this information we have studied whether dietary wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) could be involved in triggering food allergies. Brown Norway rats were immunized intraperitoneally using ovalbumin (OVA; 10 microg/rat) and 10 d later treated for five consecutive days with WGA (10 mg/rat per d) administered intragastrically. Rats were then orally challenged with OVA (100 microg/rat) 1 h after the last WGA application, and blood was collected 4 h later. Immunological responses (anti-OVA immunoglobulins E and G, rat mast cell protease II, interferon-gamma and lymphocyte proliferation) were measured and lymphocyte subpopulations were determined. In immunized rats WGA treatment resulted in increased serum rat mast cell protease II concentrations (pre-challenge 0.26 (SE 0.08) microg/ml, post-challenge 0.49 (SE 0.09) microg/ml; P < 0.01) 4 h after the OVA challenge. After 5 d serum concentrations of anti-OVA immunoglobulin E were significantly increased only in the immunized controls (absorbance at 405 nm on days 14 and 19 was 0.09 (SE 0.008) and 0.24 (SE 0.046) respectively; P = 0.02), while in WGA-treated rats no significant increase was seen (0.08 (SE 0.004) and 0.15 (SE 0.037 respectively; P = 0.14). CD4+ : CD8+ T lymphocytes in the spleen was significantly increased at this time (OVA 1.1 (SD 0.2), 1.4 (sd 0.1), P < 0.05). The treatment did not impair the proliferation and interferon-gamma production of mesenteric lymphocytes. In conclusion, these data suggest that high dietary intake of lectins such as WGA may affect the allergic response towards oral

  14. Colchicum autumnale agglutinin activates all murine T-lymphocytes but does not induce the proliferation of all activated cells.

    PubMed

    Bemer, V; Van Damme, E J; Peumans, W J; Perret, R; Truffa-Bachi, P

    1996-08-25

    Plant lectins with mitogenic properties for T-lymphocytes have been particularly useful for the study of T-cell activation and effector functions. In the search for mitogenic lectins possessing activation features different from the ones associated with the already known mitogens, we found that an agglutinin isolated from Colchicum autumnale tubers, Colchicum autumnale agglutinin (CAA), possesses interesting properties. First, contrasting with the classical mitogens, CAA induces the proliferation of a fraction of the CD4+ and CD8+ mouse T-lymphocytes. Second, the CAA-induced proliferation requires MHC class II and CD4 molecules. Third, although only a fraction of T-cells enters into the cell cycle, all T-lymphocytes are activated and express high levels of the activation markers CD69 and CD44. Finally, CAA-stimulation is characterized by a particular pattern of the cytokine gene expression, reflected by the transcription of the IL2, IL5, and IFN-gamma genes, while the IL4 and IL10 genes remained silent. Taken together these data demonstrate that CAA activation does not conform to the pathway of T-cell triggering observed with classical mitogenes and represents a new tool for the analysis of T-cell activation.

  15. Structural studies of Helix aspersa agglutinin complexed with GalNAc: A lectin that serves as a diagnostic tool.

    PubMed

    Pietrzyk, Agnieszka J; Bujacz, Anna; Mak, Paweł; Potempa, Barbara; Niedziela, Tomasz

    2015-11-01

    Lectins belong to a differentiated group of proteins known to possess sugar-binding properties. Due to this fact, they are interesting research targets in medical diagnostics. Helix aspersa agglutinin (HAA) is a lectin that recognizes the epitopes containing α-d-N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc), which is present at the surface of metastatic cancer cells. Although several reports have already described the use of HAA as a diagnostic tool, this protein was not characterized on the molecular level. Here, we present for the first time the structural information about lectin isolated from mucus of Helix aspersa (garden snail). The amino acid sequence of this agglutinin was determined by Edman degradation and tertiary as well as quaternary structure by X-ray crystallography. The high resolution crystal structure (1.38Å) and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry analysis provide the detailed information about a large part of the HAA natural glycan chain. The topology of the GalNAc binding cleft and interaction with lectin are very well defined in the structure and fully confirmed by STD HSQC NMR spectroscopy. Together, this provides structural clues regarding HAA specificity and opens possibilities to rational modifications of this important diagnostic tool.

  16. Cough & Cold Medicine Abuse

    MedlinePlus

    ... I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Cough & Cold Medicine Abuse KidsHealth > For Teens > Cough & Cold Medicine Abuse ... DXM Why Do People Use Cough and Cold Medicines to Get High? There's an ingredient in many ...

  17. Cold symptoms (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Colds are caused by a virus and can occur year-round. The common cold generally involves a runny nose, nasal congestion, and ... symptoms include sore throat, cough, and headache. A cold usually lasts about 7 days, with perhaps a ...

  18. Vitamin C and colds

    MedlinePlus

    Colds and vitamin C ... is that vitamin C can cure the common cold . However, research about this claim is conflicting. Although ... vitamin C may help reduce how long a cold lasts. They do not protect against getting a ...

  19. Influence of the maillard reaction on the allergenicity of rAra h 2, a recombinant major allergen from peanut (Arachis hypogaea), its major epitopes, and peanut agglutinin.

    PubMed

    Gruber, Patrick; Becker, Wolf-Meinhard; Hofmann, Thomas

    2005-03-23

    The influence of thermal processing and nonenzymatic browning reactions on the IgE-binding activity of rAra h 2 was studied and compared to findings recently reported for the allergen's natural counterpart. ELISA experiments as well as inhibition assays revealed that thermal treatment of rAra h 2 in the presence of reactive carbohydrates and carbohydrate breakdown products induces a strong increase of the IgE-binding activity, thus collaborating with the data reported for the natural protein isolated from peanuts. To localize the Ara h 2 sequences responsible for the formation of highly IgE-affine glycation sites, model peptides have been synthesized mimicking sequences which contain possible targets for glycation as well as the immunodominant epitopes. Immunological evaluation of these peptides heated in the absence or presence of reducing sugars and carbonyls, respectively, revealed that neither the two lysine residues of Ara h 2 nor its N-terminus are involved in the formation of IgE-affine structures by Maillard reaction. Also, the cysteine-containing major epitope 3 (aa 27-36) was found to lose its IgE-binding capacity upon heating. By contrast, the overlapping major epitopes 6 and 7, which do not contain any lysine or arginine moieties, showed a distinct higher level of IgE binding when subjected to Maillard reaction, thus giving the first evidence that nonbasic amino acids might be accessible for nonenzymatic glycation reactions and that these posttranslational modifications might induce increased IgE binding of the glycated Ara h 2. Analogous experiments were performed with peanut agglutinin, considered in the literature as a minor allergen. ELISA experiments revealed that the majority of tested sera samples from peanut-sensitive patients showed a high level of IgE binding to the lectin even after heat treatment. In contradiction to published data, nonenzymatic browning reactions seem to deteriorate the IgE affinity of the lectin. PMID:15769170

  20. Discussion of “Deglacial paleoclimate in the southwestern United States: an abrupt 18.6 cold event and evidence for a North Atlantic forcing of Termination I” by M.S. Lachniet, Y. Asmerom and V. Polyak

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Winograd, Isaac J.

    2012-01-01

    Utilizing a stable isotopic time series obtained from a speleothem (PC-1), which grew between 20.1 and 15.6 ka, Lachniet, Asmeron and Polyak (2011; hereafter LAP) present evidence for a significant cold event in the southern Great Basin at 18.6 ka, a finding that we accept. Supplementing this short record with a literature review, they go on to claim, as their central thesis, that the paleoclimate of the southwestern US was driven by “the transmission of atmospheric anomalies to the southwest…that coincided with deglacial climate changes in Greenland and the North Atlantic region”, not by a “dominant Pacific Ocean SST control” as suggested by SST time series off California and by the Devils Hole δ18O time series from the southern Great Basin. We do not find their central thesis supportable.

  1. Garlic for the common cold.

    PubMed

    Lissiman, Elizabeth; Bhasale, Alice L; Cohen, Marc

    2014-01-01

    There is insufficient clinical trial evidence regarding the effects of garlic in preventing or treating the common cold. A single trial suggested that garlic may prevent occurrences of the common cold but more studies are needed to validate this finding. Claims of effectiveness appear to rely largely on poor-quality evidence. PMID:25386977

  2. Garlic for the common cold.

    PubMed

    Lissiman, Elizabeth; Bhasale, Alice L; Cohen, Marc

    2014-11-11

    There is insufficient clinical trial evidence regarding the effects of garlic in preventing or treating the common cold. A single trial suggested that garlic may prevent occurrences of the common cold but more studies are needed to validate this finding. Claims of effectiveness appear to rely largely on poor-quality evidence.

  3. In silico analysis of molecular mechanisms of Galanthus nivalis agglutinin-related lectin-induced cancer cell death from carbohydrate-binding motif evolution hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Qi-Jia; Li, Zi-Yue; Yao, Shun; Ming, Miao; Wang, Shu-Ya; Liu, Bo; Bao, Jin-Ku

    2011-10-01

    Galanthus nivalis agglutinin-related lectins, a superfamily of strictly mannose-binding-specific lectins widespread amongst monotyledonous plants, have drawn a rising attention for their remarkable anti-proliferative and apoptosis-inducing activities toward various types of cancer cells; however, the precise molecular mechanisms by which they induce tumor cell apoptosis are still only rudimentarily understood. Herein, we found that the three conserved motifs "QXDXNXVXY," the mannose-specific binding sites, could mutate at one or more amino acid sites, which might be a driving force for the sequential evolution and thus ultimately leading to the complete disappearance of the three conserved motifs. In addition, we found that the motif evolution could result in the diversification of sugar-binding types that G. nivalis agglutinin-related lectins could bind from specific mannose receptors to more types of sugar-containing receptors in cancer cells. Subsequently, we indicated that some sugar-containing receptors such as TNFR1, EGFR, Hsp90, and Hsp70 could block downstream anti-apoptotic or survival signaling pathways, which, in turn, resulted in tumor cell apoptosis. Taken together, our hypothesis that carbohydrate-binding motif evolution may impact the G. nivalis agglutinin-related lectin-induced survival or anti-apoptotic pathways would provide a new perspective for further elucidating the intricate relationships between the carbohydrate-binding specificities and complex molecular mechanisms by which G. nivalis agglutinin-related lectins induce cancer cell death.

  4. Metal-poor, Cool Gas in the Circumgalactic Medium of a z = 2.4 Star-forming Galaxy: Direct Evidence for Cold Accretion?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crighton, Neil H. M.; Hennawi, Joseph F.; Prochaska, J. Xavier

    2013-10-01

    In our current galaxy formation paradigm, high-redshift galaxies are predominantly fueled by accretion of cool, metal-poor gas from the intergalactic medium. Hydrodynamical simulations predict that this material should be observable in absorption against background sightlines within a galaxy's virial radius, as optically thick Lyman limit systems (LLSs) with low metallicities. Here we report the discovery of exactly such a strong metal-poor absorber at an impact parameter R = 58 kpc from a star-forming galaxy at z = 2.44. Besides strong neutral hydrogen (N_{{H}^0}=10^{19.50+/- 0.16}\\, cm^{-2}) we detect neutral deuterium and oxygen, allowing a precise measurement of the metallicity: log10(Z/Z ⊙) = -2.0 ± 0.17, or (7-15) × 10-3 solar. Furthermore, the narrow deuterium linewidth requires a cool temperature <20,000 K. Given the striking similarities between this system and the predictions of simulations, we argue that it represents the direct detection of a high-redshift cold-accretion stream. The low-metallicity gas cloud is a single component of an absorption system exhibiting a complex velocity, ionization, and enrichment structure. Two other components have metallicities >0.1 solar, 10 times larger than the metal-poor component. We conclude that the photoionized circumgalactic medium (CGM) of this galaxy is highly inhomogeneous: the majority of the gas is in a cool, metal-poor and predominantly neutral phase, but the majority of the metals are in a highly ionized phase exhibiting weak neutral hydrogen absorption but strong metal absorption. If such inhomogeneity is common, then high-resolution spectra and detailed ionization modeling are critical to accurately appraise the distribution of metals in the high-redshift CGM. .

  5. METAL-POOR, COOL GAS IN THE CIRCUMGALACTIC MEDIUM OF A z = 2.4 STAR-FORMING GALAXY: DIRECT EVIDENCE FOR COLD ACCRETION?

    SciTech Connect

    Crighton, Neil H. M.; Hennawi, Joseph F.; Prochaska, J. Xavier

    2013-10-20

    In our current galaxy formation paradigm, high-redshift galaxies are predominantly fueled by accretion of cool, metal-poor gas from the intergalactic medium. Hydrodynamical simulations predict that this material should be observable in absorption against background sightlines within a galaxy's virial radius, as optically thick Lyman limit systems (LLSs) with low metallicities. Here we report the discovery of exactly such a strong metal-poor absorber at an impact parameter R = 58 kpc from a star-forming galaxy at z = 2.44. Besides strong neutral hydrogen (N{sub H{sup 0}}=10{sup 19.50±0.16} cm{sup -2}) we detect neutral deuterium and oxygen, allowing a precise measurement of the metallicity: log{sub 10}(Z/Z {sub ☉}) = –2.0 ± 0.17, or (7-15) × 10{sup –3} solar. Furthermore, the narrow deuterium linewidth requires a cool temperature <20,000 K. Given the striking similarities between this system and the predictions of simulations, we argue that it represents the direct detection of a high-redshift cold-accretion stream. The low-metallicity gas cloud is a single component of an absorption system exhibiting a complex velocity, ionization, and enrichment structure. Two other components have metallicities >0.1 solar, 10 times larger than the metal-poor component. We conclude that the photoionized circumgalactic medium (CGM) of this galaxy is highly inhomogeneous: the majority of the gas is in a cool, metal-poor and predominantly neutral phase, but the majority of the metals are in a highly ionized phase exhibiting weak neutral hydrogen absorption but strong metal absorption. If such inhomogeneity is common, then high-resolution spectra and detailed ionization modeling are critical to accurately appraise the distribution of metals in the high-redshift CGM.

  6. Cold energy

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, John P.

    2015-12-04

    Deviations in Q for resonant superconducting radio frequency niobium accelerator cavities are generally correlated with resistivity loss mechanisms. Field dependent Qs are not well modeled by these classical loss mechanisms, but rather can represent a form of precision cavity surface thermometry. When the field dependent Q variation shows improvement with increasing B field level the classical treatment of this problem is inadequate. To justify this behavior hydrogen as a ubiquitous impurity in niobium, which creates measurable property changes, even at very low concentrations is typically considered the cause of such anomalous behavior. This maybe the case in some instances, but more importantly any system operating with a highly coherent field with a significant time dependent magnetic component at near 2° K will have the ability to organize the remaining free spins within the London penetration depth to form a coupled energy reservoir in the form of low mass spin waves. The niobium resonant cavities are composed of a single isotope with a large nuclear spin. When the other loss mechanisms are stripped away this may be the gain medium activated by the low level residual magnetic fields. It was found that one resonant cavity heat treatment produced optimum surface properties and then functioned as a MASER extracting energy from the 2° K thermal bath while cooling the cavity walls. The cavity operating in this mode is a simulator of what can take place in the wider but not colder universe using the cosmic microwave background (CMB) as a thermal source. The low mass, long lifetimes, and the scale of the magnetic spin waves on the weakly magnetized interstellar medium allows energy to be stored that is many orders of magnitude colder than the cosmic microwave background. A linear accelerator cavity becomes a tool to explore the properties of the long wave length magnetic spin waves that populate this cold low energy regime.

  7. Cold energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, John P.

    2015-12-01

    Deviations in Q for resonant superconducting radio frequency niobium accelerator cavities are generally correlated with resistivity loss mechanisms. Field dependent Qs are not well modeled by these classical loss mechanisms, but rather can represent a form of precision cavity surface thermometry. When the field dependent Q variation shows improvement with increasing B field level the classical treatment of this problem is inadequate. To justify this behavior hydrogen as a ubiquitous impurity in niobium, which creates measurable property changes, even at very low concentrations is typically considered the cause of such anomalous behavior. This maybe the case in some instances, but more importantly any system operating with a highly coherent field with a significant time dependent magnetic component at near 2° K will have the ability to organize the remaining free spins within the London penetration depth to form a coupled energy reservoir in the form of low mass spin waves. The niobium resonant cavities are composed of a single isotope with a large nuclear spin. When the other loss mechanisms are stripped away this may be the gain medium activated by the low level residual magnetic fields. It was found that one resonant cavity heat treatment produced optimum surface properties and then functioned as a MASER extracting energy from the 2° K thermal bath while cooling the cavity walls. The cavity operating in this mode is a simulator of what can take place in the wider but not colder universe using the cosmic microwave background (CMB) as a thermal source. The low mass, long lifetimes, and the scale of the magnetic spin waves on the weakly magnetized interstellar medium allows energy to be stored that is many orders of magnitude colder than the cosmic microwave background. A linear accelerator cavity becomes a tool to explore the properties of the long wave length magnetic spin waves that populate this cold low energy regime.

  8. Evidence that transient changes in sudomotor output with cold and warm fluid ingestion are independently modulated by abdominal, but not oral thermoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Morris, Nathan B; Bain, Anthony R; Cramer, Matthew N; Jay, Ollie

    2014-04-15

    Two studies were performed to 1) characterize changes in local sweat rate (LSR) following fluid ingestion of different temperatures during exercise, and 2) identify the potential location of thermoreceptors along the gastrointestinal tract that independently modify sudomotor activity. In study 1, 12 men cycled at 50% Vo2peak for 75 min while ingesting 3.2 ml/kg of 1.5°C, 37°C, or 50°C fluid 5 min before exercise; and after 15, 30, and 45-min of exercise. In study 2, 8 men cycled at 50% Vo2peak for 75 min while 3.2 ml/kg of 1.5°C or 50°C fluid was delivered directly into the stomach via a nasogastric tube (NG trials) or was mouth-swilled only (SW trials) after 15, 30, and 45 min of exercise. Rectal (Tre), aural canal (Tau), and mean skin temperature (Tsk); and LSR on the forehead, upper-back, and forearm were measured. In study 1, Tre, Tau, and Tsk were identical between trials, but after each ingestion, LSR was significantly suppressed at all sites with 1.5°C fluid and was elevated with 50°C fluid compared with 37°C fluid (P < 0.001). The peak difference in mean LSR between 1.5°C and 50°C fluid after ingestion was 0.29 ± 0.06 mg·min(-1)·cm(-2). In study 2, LSR was similar between 1.5°C and 50°C fluids with SW trials (P = 0.738), but lower at all sites with 1.5°C fluid in NG trials (P < 0.001) despite no concurrent differences in Tre, Tau, and Tsk. These data demonstrate that 1) LSR is transiently altered by cold and warm fluid ingestion despite similar core and skin temperatures; and 2) thermoreceptors that independently and acutely modulate sudomotor output during fluid ingestion probably reside within the abdominal area, but not the mouth.

  9. Evidence that transient changes in sudomotor output with cold and warm fluid ingestion are independently modulated by abdominal, but not oral thermoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Nathan B.; Bain, Anthony R.; Cramer, Matthew N.

    2014-01-01

    Two studies were performed to 1) characterize changes in local sweat rate (LSR) following fluid ingestion of different temperatures during exercise, and 2) identify the potential location of thermoreceptors along the gastrointestinal tract that independently modify sudomotor activity. In study 1, 12 men cycled at 50% V̇o2peak for 75 min while ingesting 3.2 ml/kg of 1.5°C, 37°C, or 50°C fluid 5 min before exercise; and after 15, 30, and 45-min of exercise. In study 2, 8 men cycled at 50% V̇o2peak for 75 min while 3.2 ml/kg of 1.5°C or 50°C fluid was delivered directly into the stomach via a nasogastric tube (NG trials) or was mouth-swilled only (SW trials) after 15, 30, and 45 min of exercise. Rectal (Tre), aural canal (Tau), and mean skin temperature (Tsk); and LSR on the forehead, upper-back, and forearm were measured. In study 1, Tre, Tau, and Tsk were identical between trials, but after each ingestion, LSR was significantly suppressed at all sites with 1.5°C fluid and was elevated with 50°C fluid compared with 37°C fluid (P < 0.001). The peak difference in mean LSR between 1.5°C and 50°C fluid after ingestion was 0.29 ± 0.06 mg·min−1·cm−2. In study 2, LSR was similar between 1.5°C and 50°C fluids with SW trials (P = 0.738), but lower at all sites with 1.5°C fluid in NG trials (P < 0.001) despite no concurrent differences in Tre, Tau, and Tsk. These data demonstrate that 1) LSR is transiently altered by cold and warm fluid ingestion despite similar core and skin temperatures; and 2) thermoreceptors that independently and acutely modulate sudomotor output during fluid ingestion probably reside within the abdominal area, but not the mouth. PMID:24577060

  10. Evidence of Cold Climate Slope Processes from the New Jersey Coastal Plain: Debris Flow Stratigraphy at Haines Corner, Camden County, New Jersey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Newell, Wayne L.

    2005-01-01

    distributed surficial deposits of the New Jersey Coastal Plain were active during the maximum cold period of the late Pleistocene (around 18,000 years ago).

  11. Wheat Germ Agglutinin Staining as a Suitable Method for Detection and Quantification of Fibrosis in Cardiac Tissue after Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Emde, B.; Heinen, A.; Gödecke, A.; Bottermann, K.

    2014-01-01

    The quantification of fibrotic tissue is an important task in the analysis of cardiac remodeling. The use of established fibrosis staining techniques is limited on frozen cardiac tissue sections due to a reduced color contrast compared to paraffin embedded sections. We therefore used FITC-labeled wheat germ agglutinin (WGA), which marks fibrotic tissue in comparable quality as the established picrosirius red (SR) staining, for the staining of post myocardial infarction scar tissue. The fibrosis amount was quantified in a histogram-based approach using the non-commercial image processing program ImageJ. Our results clearly demonstrate that WGA-FITC is a suitable marker for cardiac fibrosis in frozen tissue sections. In combination with the histogram-based analysis, this new quantification approach is i) easy and fast to perform; ii) suitable for raw frozen tissue sections; and iii) allows the use of additional antibodies in co-immunostaining. PMID:25578975

  12. Polyoxin D inhibits colloidal gold-wheat germ agglutinin labelling of chitin in dimorphic forms of Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Hilenski, L L; Naider, F; Becker, J M

    1986-06-01

    Yeasts and mycelia of the pathogen Candida albicans grown in the presence of polyoxin D, a competitive inhibitor of chitin synthase, formed chains of swollen bulbous cells as observed by fluorescence microscopy. Wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) complexed to colloidal gold (Au) was used as a specific label at the ultrastructural level to visualize chitin in walls of control and polyoxin-treated cells. In control cells, Au-WGA labelling was preferentially localized in the innermost wall layers and was predominant at bud scars and septa. After 4.5 h in 4 mM-polyoxin D, budding in yeasts and lateral wall growth in mycelia continued, but primary septa failed to form and no Au-WGA labelling was detected in the walls. These results demonstrated that the morphological alterations caused by polyoxin D were due to the absence of chitin, a wall component important for formation of primary septa and for maintenance of structural integrity during morphogenesis.

  13. Myosin-driven intercellular transportation of wheat germ agglutinin mediated by membrane nanotubes between human lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhi-Gang; Liu, Shu-Lin; Tian, Zhi-Quan; Zhang, Zhi-Ling; Tang, Hong-Wu; Pang, Dai-Wen

    2012-11-27

    Membrane nanotubes can facilitate direct intercellular communication between cells and provide a unique channel for intercellular transfer of cellular contents. However, the transport mechanisms of membrane nanotubes remain poorly understood between cancer cells. Also largely unknown is the transport pattern mediated by membrane nanotubes. In this work, wheat germ agglutinin (WGA), a widely used drug carrier and potential antineoplastic drug, was labeled with quantum dots (QDs-WGA) as a model for exploring the intercellular transportation via membrane nanotubes. We found that membrane nanotubes allowed effective transfer of QDs-WGA. Long-term single-particle tracking indicated that the movements of QDs-WGA exhibited a slow and directed motion pattern in nanotubes. Significantly, the transport of QDs-WGA was driven by myosin molecular motors in an active and unidirectional manner. These results contribute to a better understanding of cell-to-cell communication for cancer research.

  14. Structural characterisation of the native fetuin-binding protein Scilla campanulata agglutinin: a novel two-domain lectin.

    PubMed

    Wright, L M; Reynolds, C D; Rizkallah, P J; Allen, A K; Van Damme, E J; Donovan, M J; Peumans, W J

    2000-02-18

    The three-dimensional structure of a 244-residue, multivalent, fetuin-binding lectin, SCAfet, isolated from bluebell (Scilla campanulata) bulbs, has been solved at 3.3 A resolution by molecular replacement using the coordinates of the 119-residue, mannose-binding lectin, SCAman, also from bluebell bulbs. Unlike most monocot mannose-binding lectins, such as Galanthus nivalis agglutinin from snowdrop bulbs, which fold into a single domain, SCAfet contains two domains with approximately 55% sequence identity, joined by a linker peptide. Both domains are made up of a 12-stranded beta-prism II fold, with three putative carbohydrate-binding sites, one on each subdomain. SCAfet binds to the complex saccharides of various animal glycoproteins but not to simple sugars.

  15. Effect of Urtica dioica agglutinin and Arabidopsis thaliana Chia4 chitinase on the protozoan Phytomonas françai.

    PubMed

    Gomes Rocha, Graça Celeste; Nicolich, Rebecca; Romeiro, Alexandre; Margis-Pinheiro, Márcia; Attias, Márcia; Alves-Ferreira, Márcio

    2003-09-12

    The genus Phytomonas is responsible for many diseases in different crop plant species. The finding that chitin is an exposed cell surface polysaccharide in Phytomonas françai and the observation that chitinases can inhibit fungal growth raises expectations about the potential effect of plant chitinases on the P. françai cell membrane surface. The plant chitinases Urtica dioica agglutinin (UDA) and Arabidopsis thaliana Chia4 (ATCHIT4) proteins were over-expressed in bacteria and the interaction between these proteins and P. françai surface was analyzed by immunocytochemistry. We showed that UDA and ATCHIT4 proteins can interact with surface-exposed chitin from P. françai.

  16. Characterization of onion lectin (Allium cepa agglutinin) as an immunomodulatory protein inducing Th1-type immune response in vitro.

    PubMed

    Prasanna, Vaddi K; Venkatesh, Yeldur P

    2015-06-01

    Onion (Allium cepa), a bulb crop of economic importance, is known to have many health benefits. The major objective of the present study is to address the immunomodulatory properties of onion lectin (A. cepa agglutinin; ACA). ACA was purified from onion extract by D-mannose-agarose chromatography (yield: ~1 mg/kg). ACA is non-glycosylated and showed a molecular mass of ~12 kDa under reducing/non-reducing SDS-PAGE; glutaraldehyde cross-linking indicated that ACA is a non-covalent tetramer of ~12 kDa subunits. Its N-terminal sequence (RNVLLNNEGL; UniProt KB Accn. C0HJM8) showed 70-90% homology to mannose-specific Allium agglutinins. ACA showed specific hemagglutination activity of 8200 units/mg and is stable in the pH range 6-10 and up to 45° C. The immunomodulatory activity of ACA was assessed using the macrophage cell line, RAW264.7 and rat peritoneal macrophages; at 0.1 μg/well, it showed a significant increase (6-8-fold vs. control) in the production of nitric oxide at 24h, and significantly stimulated (2-4-fold vs. control) the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α and IL-12) at 24h. ACA (0.1 μg/well) enhanced the proliferation of murine thymocytes by ~4 fold (vs. control) at 24h; however, ACA does not proliferate B cell-enriched rat splenocytes. Further, it significantly elevated the expression levels of cytokines (IFN-γ and IL-2) over the control in murine thymocytes. Taken together, purified ACA induces a Th1-type immune response in vitro. Though present in low amounts, ACA may contribute to the immune-boosting potential of the popular spice onion since considerable amounts are consumed on a daily basis universally.

  17. Wheat germ agglutinin and other selected lectins increase synthesis of decay-accelerating factor in human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Bryant, R W; Granzow, C A; Siegel, M I; Egan, R W; Billah, M M

    1991-09-15

    Decay accelerating factor (DAF) is a cell-surface phosphatidylinositol-anchored protein that protects the cell from inadvertent complement attack by binding to and inactivating C3 and C5 convertases. We have measured DAF on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) by immunoradiometric assay after its removal by phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C or Nonidet P-40 detergent extraction and have previously demonstrated that DAF synthesis can be stimulated by phorbol ester activation of protein kinase C. We now report that although stimulation (4-48 h) of HUVEC with various cytokines, including TNF, IL-1, and IFN-gamma, did not alter DAF levels, wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) (5-50 micrograms/ml), a lectin specific for binding N-acetyl neuraminic acid and N-acetyl glucosamine residues, increased DAF levels fivefold when incubated with HUVEC for 12 to 24 h. The lectins Con A and PHA also stimulated DAF expression twofold, whereas a number of others including Ulex europaeus, Bandeiraea simplicifolia lectin I, and Ricinus communis agglutinin I, which bind to endothelial cells, were inactive. The increase in DAF by WGA was inhibited by N-acetyl glucosamine (10-50 mM) but by neither N-acetyl neuraminic acid nor removal of surface N-acetyl neuraminic acid with neuraminidase. However, succinylated WGA, which has unaltered affinity for N-acetyl glucosamine but not longer binds N-acetyl neuraminic acid, was inactive. These data suggest that the binding of WGA to sugar residues alone is not sufficient to trigger DAF expression and that occupation of additional, specific sites are required. The increase in DAF levels on HUVEC was blocked by inhibitors of RNA and protein synthesis. We conclude that continuous occupation by WGA of specific binding sites on HUVEC triggers events leading to DAF synthesis. This unique, long term stimulation of endothelial cells by lectins may be relevant to cell:cell interactions at the endothelium.

  18. The heat-resistant agglutinin family includes a novel adhesin from enteroaggregative Escherichia coli strain 60A.

    PubMed

    Mancini, Justin; Weckselblatt, Brooke; Chung, Yoonjie K; Durante, Julia C; Andelman, Steven; Glaubman, Jessica; Dorff, Justin D; Bhargava, Samhita; Lijek, Rebeccah S; Unger, Katherine P; Okeke, Iruka N

    2011-09-01

    Heat-resistant agglutinin 1 (Hra1) is an accessory colonization factor of enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC) strain 042. Tia, a close homolog of Hra1, is an invasin and adhesin that has been described in enterotoxigenic E. coli. We devised a PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism screen for the associated genes and found that they occur among 55 (36.7%) of the enteroaggregative E. coli isolates screened, as well as lower proportions of enterotoxigenic, enteropathogenic, enterohemorrhagic, and commensal E. coli isolates. Overall, 25%, 8%, and 3% of 150 EAEC strains harbored hra1 alone, tia alone, or both genes, respectively. One EAEC isolate, 60A, produced an amplicon with a unique restriction profile, distinct from those of hra1 and tia. We cloned and sequenced the full-length agglutinin gene from strain 60A and have designated it hra2. The hra2 gene was not detected in any of 257 diarrheagenic E. coli isolates in our collection but is present in the genome of Salmonella enterica serovar Heidelberg strain SL476. The cloned hra2 gene from strain 60A, which encodes a predicted amino acid sequence that is 64% identical to that of Hra1 and 68% identical to that of Tia, was sufficient to confer adherence on E. coli K-12. We constructed an hra2 deletion mutant of EAEC strain 60A. The mutant was deficient in adherence but not autoaggregation or invasion, pointing to a functional distinction from the autoagglutinin Hra1 and the Tia invasin. Hra1, Tia, and the novel accessory adhesin Hra2 are members of a family of integral outer membrane proteins that confer different colonization-associated phenotypes. PMID:21764925

  19. Endless cold: a seasonal reconstruction of temperature and precipitation in the Burgundian Low Countries during the 15th century based on documentary evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camenisch, C.

    2015-03-01

    This paper applies the methods of historical climatology to present a climate reconstruction for the area of the Burgundian Low Countries during the 15th century. The results are based on documentary evidence that has been handled very carefully, especially with regard to the distinction between contemporary and non-contemporary sources. Approximately 3000 written records deriving from about 100 different sources were examined and converted into seasonal seven-degree indices for temperature and precipitation. For the Late Middle Ages only a few climate reconstructions exist. There are even fewer reconstructions which include winter and autumn temperature or precipitation at all. This paper therefore constitutes a useful contribution to the understanding of climate and weather conditions in the less well researched but highly interesting 15th century.

  20. Evidence of divergent selection for drought and cold tolerance at landscape and local scales in Abies alba Mill. in the French Mediterranean Alps.

    PubMed

    Roschanski, Anna M; Csilléry, Katalin; Liepelt, Sascha; Oddou-Muratorio, Sylvie; Ziegenhagen, Birgit; Huard, Frédéric; Ullrich, Kristian K; Postolache, Dragos; Vendramin, Giovanni G; Fady, Bruno

    2016-02-01

    Understanding local adaptation in forest trees is currently a key research and societal priority. Geographically and ecologically marginal populations provide ideal case studies, because environmental stress along with reduced gene flow can facilitate the establishment of locally adapted populations. We sampled European silver fir (Abies alba Mill.) trees in the French Mediterranean Alps, along the margin of its distribution range, from pairs of high- and low-elevation plots on four different mountains situated along a 170-km east-west transect. The analysis of 267 SNP loci from 175 candidate genes suggested a neutral pattern of east-west isolation by distance among mountain sites. F(ST) outlier tests revealed 16 SNPs that showed patterns of divergent selection. Plot climate was characterized using both in situ measurements and gridded data that revealed marked differences between and within mountains with different trends depending on the season. Association between allelic frequencies and bioclimatic variables revealed eight genes that contained candidate SNPs, of which two were also detected using F(ST) outlier methods. All SNPs were associated with winter drought, and one of them showed strong evidence of selection with respect to elevation. Q(ST)-F(ST) tests for fitness-related traits measured in a common garden suggested adaptive divergence for the date of bud flush and for growth rate. Overall, our results suggest a complex adaptive picture for A. alba in the southern French Alps where, during the east-to-west Holocene recolonization, locally advantageous genetic variants established at both the landscape and local scales. PMID:26676992

  1. Large ice-wedge networks and tundra gley horizons in Northern France Upper Pleistocene loess: evidences of extreme cold events and cyclic millennial changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antoine, Pierre; Moine, Olivier; Guerin, Gilles

    2015-04-01

    Northern France loess-palaeosol sequences from the last interglacial-glacial cycle (Eemian-Weichselian) have been intensely studied during the last 20 years (about 100 individual sequences). Despite thickness variations of the different stratigraphic units, the sequences from the last interglacial-glacial cycle exhibit a particularly constant pedosedimentary pattern, including well-identified pedological and periglacial marker horizons that can be followed north- and eastward in Belgium and Germany. Within this system, new field investigations and luminescence (OSL) datings put in evidence at least four generations of large ice-wedge networks (10-14 m) preserved by loess deposits between ca. 50 and 20 ka. The best- and most systematically preserved network is presently dated at about 31-32 ka according to the OSL ages from its loess infilling. This main ice-wedge cast horizon systematically occurs at the boundary between Middle Pleniglacial brown soil complexes and the base of the Upper Pleniglacial typical loess cover. Consequently, it represents a major stratigraphic marker for correlations in Western Europe. According to recent OSL dating results, the first thick typical loess unit of the Upper Pleniglacial, covering the main ice-wedge cast horizon, has been deposited shortly after GIS-5 interstadial and could be contemporaneous of H3 event in deep-sea cores. In addition, it is shown that all the large ice wedge casts are developed from the surface of a tundra gley horizon (0.3 to 0.5 m in thickness). As it has been previously demonstrated that tundra gley layers were mainly formed during short interstadial events (malacology, sedimentology), a model linking tundra gley horizons, and ice wedges network regarding to DO stadial-interstadial cycles during the last glacial is proposed.

  2. Identification of two new hemagglutinins of Escherichia coli, N-acetyl-D-glucosamine-specific fimbriae and a blood group M-specific agglutinin, by cloning the corresponding genes in Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed Central

    Rhen, M; Klemm, P; Korhonen, T K

    1986-01-01

    Genes encoding the Escherichia coli IH11165 hemagglutinins with specificity for terminal N-acetyl-D-glucosamine and blood group M antigen, respectively, were cloned by a cosmid cloning procedure. A 22-kilobase-pair subclone expressed both hemagglutination specificities in the nonhemagglutinating E. coli HB101 recipient strain. Derivatives obtained by insertion and deletion mutagenesis expressed either one of the two hemagglutination specificities. Both agglutinins were purified; the agglutinin recognizing terminal N-acetyl-D-glucosamine was associated with a new type of fimbria (G fimbria) with an apparent subunit molecular mass of 19.5 kilodaltons, whereas the blood group M agglutinin (M agglutinin) was nonfimbrial and had an apparent subunit mass of 21 kilodaltons. Images PMID:2877972

  3. [Cold autoimmune hemolytic anemia complicated with relapsed myelodysplastic syndrome after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation].

    PubMed

    Okamura, Hiroshi; Nakane, Takahiko; Fujino, Keizo; Koh, Shiro; Yoshimura, Takuro; Nishimoto, Mitsutaka; Hayashi, Yoshiki; Koh, Hideo; Nakao, Yoshitaka; Nakamae, Hirohisa; Hino, Masayuki

    2015-04-01

    Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is known to often be complicated by a range of autoimmune diseases. We herein present a case with MDS complicated by cold autoimmune hemolytic anemia (cold AIHA). The patient was a 51-year-old woman. She was diagnosed with MDS (refractory cytopenia with multilineage dysplasia) in May 2009. In January 2010, she underwent unrelated allogeneic bone marrow transplantation but was re-admitted in October 2010 for treatment of relapsed MDS. Despite daily transfusions of red blood cells, her anemia failed to improve. Her laboratory examinations showed a low haptoglobin level and elevation of indirect bilirubin and LDH. The direct Coombs test was positive at a low and at room temperature and cold agglutinin was negative. After confirming the diagnosis of cold AIHA, all transfusion fluids were warmed but her anemia still failed to improve. In addition to the warmed transfusion fluids, we administered corticosteroids, immunosuppressive agents and high-dose intravenous immunoglobulin infusions. This management strategy ameliorated the patient's hemolytic anemia. To our knowledge, MDS cases complicated by cold AIHA are rare. Our patient thus provides a valuable contribution to medical knowledge.

  4. Cold Stress and the Cold Pressor Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silverthorn, Dee U.; Michael, Joel

    2013-01-01

    Temperature and other environmental stressors are known to affect blood pressure and heart rate. In this activity, students perform the cold pressor test, demonstrating increased blood pressure during a 1- to 2-min immersion of one hand in ice water. The cold pressor test is used clinically to evaluate autonomic and left ventricular function. This…

  5. Cognitive Egocentrism Differentiates Warm and Cold People.

    PubMed

    Boyd, Ryan L; Bresin, Konrad; Ode, Scott; Robinson, Michael D

    2013-02-01

    Warmth-coldness is a fundamental dimension of social behavior. Cold individuals are egocentric in their social relations, whereas warm individuals are not. Previous theorizing suggests that cognitive egocentrism underlies social egocentrism. It was hypothesized that higher levels of interpersonal coldness would predict greater cognitive egocentrism. Cognitive egocentrism was assessed in basic terms through tasks wherein priming a lateralized self-state biased subsequent visual perceptions in an assimilation-related manner. Such effects reflect a tendency to assume that the self's incidental state provides meaningful information concerning the external world. Cognitive egocentrism was evident at high, but not low, levels of interpersonal coldness. The findings reveal a basic difference between warm and cold people, encouraging future research linking cognitive egocentrism to variability in relationship functioning.

  6. Cognitive Egocentrism Differentiates Warm and Cold People.

    PubMed

    Boyd, Ryan L; Bresin, Konrad; Ode, Scott; Robinson, Michael D

    2013-02-01

    Warmth-coldness is a fundamental dimension of social behavior. Cold individuals are egocentric in their social relations, whereas warm individuals are not. Previous theorizing suggests that cognitive egocentrism underlies social egocentrism. It was hypothesized that higher levels of interpersonal coldness would predict greater cognitive egocentrism. Cognitive egocentrism was assessed in basic terms through tasks wherein priming a lateralized self-state biased subsequent visual perceptions in an assimilation-related manner. Such effects reflect a tendency to assume that the self's incidental state provides meaningful information concerning the external world. Cognitive egocentrism was evident at high, but not low, levels of interpersonal coldness. The findings reveal a basic difference between warm and cold people, encouraging future research linking cognitive egocentrism to variability in relationship functioning. PMID:23564985

  7. Cold and Cough Medicines

    MedlinePlus

    ... What can you do for your cold or cough symptoms? Besides drinking lots of fluids and getting ... medicines. There are lots of different cold and cough medicines, and they do different things. Nasal decongestants - ...

  8. Cold knife cone biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003910.htm Cold knife cone biopsy To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. A cold knife cone biopsy (conization) is surgery to remove ...

  9. Cold Sores (Orofacial Herpes)

    MedlinePlus

    ... rash and rashes clinical tools newsletter | contact Share | Cold Sores (Orofacial Herpes) Information for adults A A ... face, known as orofacial herpes simplex, herpes labialis, cold sores, or fever blisters, is a common, recurrent ...

  10. Bi- to tetravalent glycoclusters presenting GlcNAc/GalNAc as inhibitors: from plant agglutinins to human macrophage galactose-type lectin (CD301) and galectins.

    PubMed

    André, Sabine; O'Sullivan, Shane; Koller, Christiane; Murphy, Paul V; Gabius, Hans-Joachim

    2015-04-14

    Emerging insights into the functional spectrum of tissue lectins leads to identification of new targets for the custom-made design of potent inhibitors, providing a challenge for synthetic chemistry. The affinity and selectivity of a carbohydrate ligand for a lectin may immensely be increased by a number of approaches, which includes varying geometrical or topological features. This perspective leads to the design and synthesis of glycoclusters and their testing using assays of physiological relevance. Herein, hydroquinone, resorcinol, benzene-1,3,5-triol and tetra(4-hydroxyphenyl)ethene have been employed as scaffolds and propargyl derivatives obtained. The triazole-containing linker to the α/β-O/S-glycosides of GlcNAc/GalNAc presented on these scaffolds was generated by copper-catalysed azide-alkyne cycloaddition. This strategy was used to give a panel of nine glycoclusters with bi-, tri- and tetravalency. Maintained activity for lectin binding after conjugation was ascertained for both sugars in solid-phase assays with the plant agglutinins WGA (GlcNAc) and DBA (GalNAc). Absence of cross-reactivity excluded any carbohydrate-independent reactivity of the bivalent compounds, allowing us to proceed to further testing with a biomedically relevant lectin specific for GalNAc. Macrophage galactose(-binding C)-type lectin, involved in immune defence by dendritic cells and in virus uptake, was produced as a soluble protein without/with its α-helical coiled-coil stalk region. Binding to ligands presented on a matrix and on cell surfaces was highly susceptible to the presence of the tetravalent inhibitor derived from the tetraphenylethene-containing scaffold, and presentation of GalNAc with an α-thioglycosidic linkage proved favorable. Cross-reactivity of this glycocluster to human galectins-3 and -4, which interact with Tn-antigen-presenting mucins, was rather small. Evidently, the valency and spatial display of α-GalNAc residues is a key factor to design potent and

  11. Bi- to tetravalent glycoclusters presenting GlcNAc/GalNAc as inhibitors: from plant agglutinins to human macrophage galactose-type lectin (CD301) and galectins.

    PubMed

    André, Sabine; O'Sullivan, Shane; Koller, Christiane; Murphy, Paul V; Gabius, Hans-Joachim

    2015-04-14

    Emerging insights into the functional spectrum of tissue lectins leads to identification of new targets for the custom-made design of potent inhibitors, providing a challenge for synthetic chemistry. The affinity and selectivity of a carbohydrate ligand for a lectin may immensely be increased by a number of approaches, which includes varying geometrical or topological features. This perspective leads to the design and synthesis of glycoclusters and their testing using assays of physiological relevance. Herein, hydroquinone, resorcinol, benzene-1,3,5-triol and tetra(4-hydroxyphenyl)ethene have been employed as scaffolds and propargyl derivatives obtained. The triazole-containing linker to the α/β-O/S-glycosides of GlcNAc/GalNAc presented on these scaffolds was generated by copper-catalysed azide-alkyne cycloaddition. This strategy was used to give a panel of nine glycoclusters with bi-, tri- and tetravalency. Maintained activity for lectin binding after conjugation was ascertained for both sugars in solid-phase assays with the plant agglutinins WGA (GlcNAc) and DBA (GalNAc). Absence of cross-reactivity excluded any carbohydrate-independent reactivity of the bivalent compounds, allowing us to proceed to further testing with a biomedically relevant lectin specific for GalNAc. Macrophage galactose(-binding C)-type lectin, involved in immune defence by dendritic cells and in virus uptake, was produced as a soluble protein without/with its α-helical coiled-coil stalk region. Binding to ligands presented on a matrix and on cell surfaces was highly susceptible to the presence of the tetravalent inhibitor derived from the tetraphenylethene-containing scaffold, and presentation of GalNAc with an α-thioglycosidic linkage proved favorable. Cross-reactivity of this glycocluster to human galectins-3 and -4, which interact with Tn-antigen-presenting mucins, was rather small. Evidently, the valency and spatial display of α-GalNAc residues is a key factor to design potent and

  12. Cold Fronts in Cold Dark Matter Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagai, Daisuke; Kravtsov, Andrey V.

    2003-04-01

    Recently, high-resolution Chandra observations revealed the existence of very sharp features in the X-ray surface brightness and temperature maps of several clusters. These features, called cold fronts, are characterized by an increase in surface brightness by a factor >~2 over 10-50 kpc accompanied by a drop in temperature of a similar magnitude. The existence of such sharp gradients can be used to put interesting constraints on the physics of the intracluster medium (ICM) if their mechanism and longevity are well understood. Here, we present results of a search for cold fronts in high-resolution simulations of galaxy clusters in cold dark matter models. We show that sharp gradients with properties similar to those of observed cold fronts naturally arise in cluster mergers when the shocks heat gas surrounding the merging subcluster, while its dense core remains relatively cold. The compression induced by supersonic motions and shock heating during the merger enhance the amplitude of gas density and temperature gradients across the front. Our results indicate that cold fronts are nonequilibrium transient phenomena and can be observed for a period of less than a billion years. We show that the velocity and density fields of gas surrounding the cold front can be very irregular, which would complicate analyses aiming to put constraints on the physical conditions of the ICM in the vicinity of the front.

  13. Candida albicans ALS1: domains related to a Saccharomyces cerevisiae sexual agglutinin separated by a repeating motif.

    PubMed

    Hoyer, L L; Scherer, S; Shatzman, A R; Livi, G P

    1995-01-01

    Transfer of budding Candida albicans yeast cells from the rich, complex medium YEPD to the defined tissue culture medium RPMI 1640 (RPMI) at 37 degrees C and 5% CO2 causes rapid onset of hyphal induction. Among the genes induced under these conditions are hyphal-specific genes as well as genes expressed in response to changes in temperature, CO2 and specific media components. A cDNA library constructed from cells incubated for 20 min in RPMI was differentially screened with yeast (YEPD)- and hyphal (RPMI)-specific probes resulting in identification of a gene expressed in response to culture conditions but not regulated by the yeast-hyphal transition. The deduced gene product displays significant identity to Saccharomyces cerevisiae alpha-agglutinin, encoded by AG alpha 1, an adhesion glycoprotein that mediates mating of haploid cells. The presence of this gene in C. albicans is curious since the organism has not been observed to undergo meiosis. We designate the C. albicans gene ALS1 (for agglutinin-like sequence). While the N- and C-termini of the predicted 1260-amino-acid ALS1 protein resemble those of the 650-amino-acid AG alpha 1, ALS1 contains a central domain of tandem repeats consisting of a highly conserved 36-amino-acid sequence not present in AG alpha 1. These repeats are also present on the nucleotide level as a highly conserved 108 bp motif. Southern and Northern blot analyses indicate a family of C. albicans genes that contain the tandem repeat motif; at least one gene in addition to ALS1 is expressed under conditions similar to those for ALS1 expression. Genomic Southern blots from several C. albicans isolates indicate that the number of copies of the tandem repeat element in ALS1 differs across strains and, in some cases, between ALS1 alleles in the same strain, suggesting a strain-dependent variability in ALS1 protein size. Potential roles for the ALS1 protein are discussed.

  14. Peripheral cold acclimatization in Antarctic scuba divers.

    PubMed

    Bridgman, S A

    1991-08-01

    Peripheral acclimatization to cold in scuba divers stationed at the British Antarctic Survey's Signy Station was investigated during a year in Antarctica. Five divers and five non-diver controls underwent monthly laboratory tests of index finger immersion in cold water for 30 min. Index finger pulp temperature and time of onset of cold-induced vasodilatation (CIVD) were measured. Pain was recorded with verbal and numerical psychophysical subjective pain ratings. Average finger temperatures and median finger pain from 6-30 min of immersion, maximum finger temperatures during the first CIVD cycle, and finger temperatures at the onset of CIVD were calculated. Comparison of the variables recorded from divers and non-divers were performed with analysis of variance. No significant differences were found among the variables recorded from divers and non-divers. From a review of the literature, divers have responses typical of non-cold-adapted Caucasians. There is, therefore, no evidence that Signy divers peripherally acclimatized to cold. We suggest that these findings occur because either the whole body cooling which divers undergo inhibits peripheral acclimatization or because of insufficiently frequent or severe cold exposure while diving. Further basic studies on the duration, frequency and severity of cold exposure necessary to induce peripheral cold acclimatization are required before this question can be satisfactorily answered.

  15. Cough and Cold Medicine Abuse

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Cold Medicine Abuse DrugFacts: Cough and Cold Medicine Abuse Email Facebook Twitter Revised May 2014 Some ... diverted for abuse. How Are Cough and Cold Medicines Abused? Cough and cold medicines are usually consumed ...

  16. Evidence for sialylated type 1 blood group chains on human erythrocyte membranes revealed by agglutination of neuraminidase-treated erythrocytes with Waldenström's macroglobulin IgMWOO and hybridoma antibody FC 10.2.

    PubMed

    Picard, J K; Loveday, D; Feizi, T

    1985-01-01

    Haemagglutination studies have been performed with untreated and neuraminidase-treated human erythrocytes of the three Lewis antigen types Le(a-b-), Le(a+b-) and Le(a-b+) using two monoclonal antibodies, IgMWOO and FC 10.2, which were previously shown to recognize the type 1 based blood group chains: Gal beta 1----3GlcNAc beta 1----3Gal beta 1----4Glc/GlcNAc (for explanation of abbreviations see table IV legend). Both antibodies behaved as cold agglutinins with neuraminidase-treated but not with untreated erythrocytes of the three Lewis antigen types. Neuraminidase-treated erythrocytes of i antigen type were similarly agglutinated. This haemagglutination was specifically inhibited by the type 1 based milk oligosaccharide lacto-N-tetraose. Thus, there is strong evidence for the occurrence of sialylated type 1 chains on human erythrocyte membranes of I and i antigen types. In addition, evidence for the presence of type 1 chains which are both sialylated and fucosylated was obtained by (1) haemagglutination of Le(a+b-) erythrocytes with the monoclonal antibody 19.9; (2) increased haemagglutination of neuraminidase-treated erythrocytes with anti-H antibodies of Bombay serum; (3) increased haemagglutination of neuraminidase-treated Le(a+b-) cells with anti-Lea antibodies, and (4) the appearance of Lea antigen activity on neuraminidase-treated erythrocytes of Le(a-b+) type.

  17. Effects of Soybean Agglutinin on Mechanical Barrier Function and Tight Junction Protein Expression in Intestinal Epithelial Cells from Piglets

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Li; Qin, Guixin; Zhao, Yuan; Wang, Jun; Liu, Feifei; Che, Dongsheng

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we sought to investigate the role of soybean agglutinin (SBA) in mediating membrane permeability and the mechanical barrier function of intestinal epithelial cells. The IPEC-J2 cells were cultured and treated with 0, 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, 2.5, or 3.0 mg/mL SBA. Transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) and alkaline phosphatase (AP) activity were measured to evaluate membrane permeability. The results showed a significant decrease in TEER values (p < 0.05) in a time- and dose-dependent manner, and a pronounced increase in AP activity (p < 0.05). Cell growth and cell morphology were used to evaluate the cell viability. A significant cell growth inhibition (p < 0.05) and alteration of morphology were observed when the concentration of SBA was increased. The results of western blotting showed that the expression levels of occludin and claudin-3 were decreased by 31% and 64% compared to those of the control, respectively (p < 0.05). In addition, immunofluorescence labeling indicated an obvious decrease in staining of these targets and changes in their localizations. In conclusion, SBA increased the membrane permeability, inhibited the cell viability and reduced the levels of tight junction proteins (occludin and claudin-3), leading to a decrease in mechanical barrier function in intestinal epithelial cells. PMID:24189218

  18. Synthesis of tetravalent LacNAc-glycoclusters as high-affinity cross-linker against Erythrina cristagalli agglutinin.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Makoto; Chuma, Yasushi; Yasumoto, Yoshinori; Onoda, Takashi; Umemura, Myco; Usui, Taichi; Park, Enoch Y

    2016-01-01

    Four kinds of tetravalent double-headed glycoclusters [(LacNAc)4-DHGs] were designed with linkers of varying lengths consisting of alkanedioic carboxyamido groups (C6, C12, C18 and C24) between two bi-antennary LacNAc-glycosides. These glycoclusters served as high-affinity cross-linking ligands for the LacNAc-binding lectin Erythrina cristagalli agglutinin (ECA). The binding activity and cross-linking between each ligand and ECA were characterized by a hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assay, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), a quantitative precipitation assay and dynamic light scattering (DLS). For the precipitation assay and DLS measurement, the synthesized (LacNAc)4-DHGs were found to be capable of binding and precipitating the ECA as multivalent ligands. ITC analysis indicated the binding of (LacNAc)4-DHGs was driven by a favorable enthalpy change. Furthermore, the entropy penalty from binding (LacNAc)4-DHGs clearly decreased in a spacer length-dependent manner. The binding affinities of flexible (LacNAc)4-DHGs (C18 and C24) with long spacers were found to be more favorable than those of the clusters having short spacers (C6 and C12). These results were supported by molecular dynamics simulations with explicit water molecules for the tetravalent glycoclusters with ECA. We concluded that the subtle modification in the epitope-presenting scaffolds exerts the significant effect in the recognition efficiency involved in the LacNAc moieties by ECA.

  19. Salivary agglutinin is the major component in human saliva that modulates the lectin pathway of the complement system.

    PubMed

    Gunput, Sabrina Tg; Wouters, Diana; Nazmi, Kamran; Cukkemane, Nivedita; Brouwer, Mieke; Veerman, Enno Ci; Ligtenberg, Antoon Jm

    2016-05-01

    Saliva interacts with blood after mucosal damage or leakage of gingival crevicular fluid. Surface-adsorbed salivary agglutinin (SAG) activates the lectin pathway (LP) of the complement system via mannose-binding lectin, while SAG in solution inhibits complement activation. In the present study we investigated if, next to SAG, whole and glandular saliva itself and other salivary glycoproteins activate or inhibit the LP. Complement activation was measured by detecting C4 deposition on microtiter plates coated with saliva or purified proteins. Complement inhibition was measured after incubating serum with saliva or proteins in microtiter plates coated with mannan, an LP activator. Adsorbed whole, sublingual and submandibular saliva showed LP-dependent complement activation. Blood group secretors, but not non-secretors, activated the LP. Saliva of both secretors and non-secretors inhibited C4 deposition on mannan. After depletion of SAG, saliva no longer inhibited the LP. Other salivary proteins, including amylase, MUC5B and histatin 2, did not activate or inhibit the LP. Surface-adsorbed whole saliva and glandular saliva samples activate the LP of complement, depending on the presence of SAG and the secretor status of the donor. In solution, saliva inhibits the LP, depending on the presence of SAG, but independent of the secretor status. PMID:27048414

  20. Wisteria Floribunda Agglutinin-Labeled Perineuronal Nets in the Mouse Inferior Colliculus, Thalamic Reticular Nucleus and Auditory Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Fader, Sarah M.; Imaizumi, Kazuo; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Lee, Charles C.

    2016-01-01

    Perineuronal nets (PNNs) are specialized extracellular matrix molecules that are associated with the closing of the critical period, among other functions. In the adult brain, PNNs surround specific types of neurons, however the expression of PNNs in the auditory system of the mouse, particularly at the level of the midbrain and forebrain, has not been fully described. In addition, the association of PNNs with excitatory and inhibitory cell types in these structures remains unknown. Therefore, we sought to investigate the expression of PNNs in the inferior colliculus (IC), thalamic reticular nucleus (TRN) and primary auditory cortex (A1) of the mouse brain by labeling with wisteria floribunda agglutinin (WFA). To aid in the identification of inhibitory neurons in these structures, we employed the vesicular GABA transporter (VGAT)-Venus transgenic mouse strain, which robustly expresses an enhanced yellow-fluorescent protein (Venus) natively in nearly all gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA)-ergic inhibitory neurons, thus enabling a rapid and unambiguous assessment of inhibitory neurons throughout the nervous system. Our results demonstrate that PNNs are expressed throughout the auditory midbrain and forebrain, but vary in their local distribution. PNNs are most dense in the TRN and least dense in A1. Furthermore, PNNs are preferentially associated with inhibitory neurons in A1 and the TRN, but not in the IC of the mouse. These data suggest regionally specific roles for PNNs in auditory information processing. PMID:27089371

  1. Synthesis of tetravalent LacNAc-glycoclusters as high-affinity cross-linker against Erythrina cristagalli agglutinin.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Makoto; Chuma, Yasushi; Yasumoto, Yoshinori; Onoda, Takashi; Umemura, Myco; Usui, Taichi; Park, Enoch Y

    2016-01-01

    Four kinds of tetravalent double-headed glycoclusters [(LacNAc)4-DHGs] were designed with linkers of varying lengths consisting of alkanedioic carboxyamido groups (C6, C12, C18 and C24) between two bi-antennary LacNAc-glycosides. These glycoclusters served as high-affinity cross-linking ligands for the LacNAc-binding lectin Erythrina cristagalli agglutinin (ECA). The binding activity and cross-linking between each ligand and ECA were characterized by a hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assay, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), a quantitative precipitation assay and dynamic light scattering (DLS). For the precipitation assay and DLS measurement, the synthesized (LacNAc)4-DHGs were found to be capable of binding and precipitating the ECA as multivalent ligands. ITC analysis indicated the binding of (LacNAc)4-DHGs was driven by a favorable enthalpy change. Furthermore, the entropy penalty from binding (LacNAc)4-DHGs clearly decreased in a spacer length-dependent manner. The binding affinities of flexible (LacNAc)4-DHGs (C18 and C24) with long spacers were found to be more favorable than those of the clusters having short spacers (C6 and C12). These results were supported by molecular dynamics simulations with explicit water molecules for the tetravalent glycoclusters with ECA. We concluded that the subtle modification in the epitope-presenting scaffolds exerts the significant effect in the recognition efficiency involved in the LacNAc moieties by ECA. PMID:26672510

  2. Binding of the Galanthus nivalis agglutinin to thymocytes reveals alterations in surface glycosylation during T-cell development.

    PubMed

    Sinkora, J; Kolínská, J; Reháková, Z; Cerný, J; Doubravská, L

    2002-02-01

    Surface binding of the Galanthus nivalis agglutinin (GNA) to thymocyte subsets has been studied in pigs and rodents by multicolour flow cytometry. In all the species examined, analogous staining profiles have been recorded. Counter-staining with anti-CD3epsilon, anti-CD4 and anti-CD8 monoclonal antibodies (MoAb) revealed that a significant increase of the GNA targets on the cell surface occurred during early thymocyte differentiation and reached its maximum at the level of the CD3loCD4+CD8+ small cortical thymocyte. This was followed by a decrease in the GNA binding capacity upon terminal maturation to the single positive thymocytes. PAGE analysis has revealed a dominant GNA-binding glycoprotein (molar mass approx. 90 kDa) present on thymocyte plasma membranes and absent on the surface of splenic lymphocytes, although both the whole cell lysates from both organs contained GNA ligands of the same size. Our findings are in agreement with previous data showing that immature thymocytes differ from their mature counterparts and peripheral T lymphocytes in the surface glycosylation pattern, and support the hypothesis that lectin-glycoprotein interaction plays a significant role in the cell-to-cell crosstalk in the thymic cortex.

  3. Candida albicans Agglutinin-Like Sequence (Als) Family Vignettes: A Review of Als Protein Structure and Function

    PubMed Central

    Hoyer, Lois L.; Cota, Ernesto

    2016-01-01

    Approximately two decades have passed since the description of the first gene in the Candida albicans ALS (agglutinin-like sequence) family. Since that time, much has been learned about the composition of the family and the function of its encoded cell-surface glycoproteins. Solution of the structure of the Als adhesive domain provides the opportunity to evaluate the molecular basis for protein function. This review article is formatted as a series of fundamental questions and explores the diversity of the Als proteins, as well as their role in ligand binding, aggregative effects, and attachment to abiotic surfaces. Interaction of Als proteins with each other, their functional equivalence, and the effects of protein abundance on phenotypic conclusions are also examined. Structural features of Als proteins that may facilitate invasive function are considered. Conclusions that are firmly supported by the literature are presented while highlighting areas that require additional investigation to reveal basic features of the Als proteins, their relatedness to each other, and their roles in C. albicans biology. PMID:27014205

  4. Wisteria Floribunda Agglutinin-Labeled Perineuronal Nets in the Mouse Inferior Colliculus, Thalamic Reticular Nucleus and Auditory Cortex.

    PubMed

    Fader, Sarah M; Imaizumi, Kazuo; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Lee, Charles C

    2016-01-01

    Perineuronal nets (PNNs) are specialized extracellular matrix molecules that are associated with the closing of the critical period, among other functions. In the adult brain, PNNs surround specific types of neurons, however the expression of PNNs in the auditory system of the mouse, particularly at the level of the midbrain and forebrain, has not been fully described. In addition, the association of PNNs with excitatory and inhibitory cell types in these structures remains unknown. Therefore, we sought to investigate the expression of PNNs in the inferior colliculus (IC), thalamic reticular nucleus (TRN) and primary auditory cortex (A1) of the mouse brain by labeling with wisteria floribunda agglutinin (WFA). To aid in the identification of inhibitory neurons in these structures, we employed the vesicular GABA transporter (VGAT)-Venus transgenic mouse strain, which robustly expresses an enhanced yellow-fluorescent protein (Venus) natively in nearly all gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA)-ergic inhibitory neurons, thus enabling a rapid and unambiguous assessment of inhibitory neurons throughout the nervous system. Our results demonstrate that PNNs are expressed throughout the auditory midbrain and forebrain, but vary in their local distribution. PNNs are most dense in the TRN and least dense in A1. Furthermore, PNNs are preferentially associated with inhibitory neurons in A1 and the TRN, but not in the IC of the mouse. These data suggest regionally specific roles for PNNs in auditory information processing. PMID:27089371

  5. The anti-tumor effect of Euchema serra agglutinin on colon cancer cells in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Yuki; Sugahara, Takuya; Ueno, Masashi; Fukuta, Yusuke; Ochi, Yukari; Akiyama, Koichi; Miyazaki, Tatsuhiko; Masuda, Seizo; Kawakubo, Akihiro; Kato, Keiichi

    2006-09-01

    Eucheuma serra agglutinin (ESA) is a lectin derived from a marine red alga E. serra and binds specifically to mannose-rich sugar chains. Previous reports have indicated that ESA associates with several cancer cells via sugar chains on cell surfaces and induces apoptotic cell death. In this study, we investigated the effect of ESA on Colon26 mouse colon adenocarcinoma cells both in vitro and in vivo. ESA induced cell death against Colon26 cells in vitro, and the expression of caspase-3 and the translocation of phosphatidylserine in ESA-treated Colon26 cells suggested that this cell death was induced through apoptosis. An intravenous injection of ESA significantly inhibited the growth of Colon26 tumors in BALB/c mice; moreover, DNA fragmentation was detected in tumor cells following ESA treatment. These results indicated that ESA is effective as an anti-cancer drug not only in vitro but also in vivo. The side-effects of ESA were not considered to be serious because the decrease in body weight of the mice injected with it was negligible. These observations suggest that ESA has the potential to be an effective anti-tumor drug. PMID:16940804

  6. In vitro and in vivo anti-tumor effects of novel Span 80 vesicles containing immobilized Eucheuma serra agglutinin.

    PubMed

    Omokawa, Yousuke; Miyazaki, Tatsuhiko; Walde, Peter; Akiyama, Koichi; Sugahara, Takuya; Masuda, Seizo; Inada, Akihiro; Ohnishi, Yasuyuki; Saeki, Toshiaki; Kato, Keiichi

    2010-04-15

    The lectin Eucheuma serra agglutinin (ESA) is known from previous studies to specifically bind to high-mannose type N-glycans and to induce apoptotic cancer cell death in vitro. In this study, Span 80 vesicles, with an average diameter between about 200 and 400 nm, containing immobilized ESA were prepared from the nonionic surfactant Span 80, also known as sorbitan monooleate. The vesicles were investigated in vitro and in vivo to evaluate the vesicles's potential applicability as novel drug delivery system. The results obtained are promising since the following was observed: (i) vesicular ESA had the same hemagglutinating activity as free ESA, demonstrating its biological activity when bound to the vesicles; (ii) vesicles containing immobilized ESA decreased the viability of Colo201 cancer cells in vitro while the growth of normal cells was not affected; (iii) the vesicles showed binding to Colo201 cells in vitro and caused inhibition of cancer cell growth in nude mice to which the vesicle-treated cells were added; (iv) the vesicles diminished tumor growth after intravenous administration to nude mice which contained an implanted Colo201 tumor; (v) the vesicles showed a tendency to accumulate at the site of the tumor 6h after i.v. administration to nude mice. Thus, all measurements carried out indicate that this type of Span 80 vesicle can be considered as promising alternatives to conventional phospholipid-based vesicles. PMID:20100554

  7. How cold is cold dark matter?

    SciTech Connect

    Armendariz-Picon, Cristian; Neelakanta, Jayanth T. E-mail: jtneelak@syr.edu

    2014-03-01

    If cold dark matter consists of particles, these must be non-interacting and non-relativistic by definition. In most cold dark matter models however, dark matter particles inherit a non-vanishing velocity dispersion from interactions in the early universe, a velocity that redshifts with cosmic expansion but certainly remains non-zero. In this article, we place model-independent constraints on the dark matter temperature to mass ratio, whose square root determines the dark matter velocity dispersion. We only assume that dark matter particles decoupled kinetically while non-relativistic, when galactic scales had not entered the horizon yet, and that their momentum distribution has been Maxwellian since that time. Under these assumptions, using cosmic microwave background and matter power spectrum observations, we place upper limits on the temperature to mass ratio of cold dark matter today (away from collapsed structures). These limits imply that the present cold dark matter velocity dispersion has to be smaller than 54 m/s. Cold dark matter has to be quite cold, indeed.

  8. Cold denaturation of monoclonal antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Lazar, Kristi L; Patapoff, Thomas W

    2010-01-01

    The susceptibility of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) to undergo cold denaturation remains unexplored. In this study, the phenomenon of cold denaturation was investigated for a mAb, mAb1, through thermodynamic and spectroscopic analyses. tryptophan fluorescence and circular dichroism (CD) spectra were recorded for the guanidine hydrochloride (GuHCl)-induced unfolding of mAb1 at pH 6.3 at temperatures ranging from −5 to 50°C. A three-state unfolding model incorporating the linear extrapolation method was fit to the fluorescence data to obtain an apparent free energy of unfolding, ΔGu, at each temperature. CD studies revealed that mAb1 exhibited polyproline II helical structure at low temperatures and at high GuHCl concentrations. the Gibbs-Helmholtz expression fit to the ΔGu versus temperature data from fluorescence gave a ΔCp of 8.0 kcal mol−1 K−1, a maximum apparent stability of 23.7 kcal mol−1 at 18°C, and an apparent cold denaturation temperature (TCD) of −23°C. ΔGu values for another mAb (mAb2) with a similar framework exhibited less stability at low temperatures, suggesting a depressed protein stability curve and a higher relative TCD. Direct experimental evidence of the susceptibility of mAb1 and mAb2 to undergo cold denaturation in the absence of denaturant was confirmed at pH 2.5. thus, mAbs have a potential to undergo cold denaturation at storage temperatures near −20°C (pH 6.3), and this potential needs to be evaluated independently for individual mAbs. PMID:20093856

  9. Cold injury in early infancy.

    PubMed

    Cohen, I J

    1977-04-01

    Sixteen cases of neonatal cold injury, five of them fatal, were seen in the winter of 1974-75. The affected infants, who weighed from 2.5 to 3 kg. had developed symptoms when the ambient termperature was below 10 C. Few of them were referred as cases of hypothermia. Refusal to eat was the most common complaint and less often edema and/or apathy. No correlation was found between death and ethnic origin, sex, duration of illness or minimum temperature. Admission weight, however, tended to be lower in the infants who died. The consistent finding of thrombocytopenia and the suspected bleeding phenomena suggested that disseminated intravascular coagulation may have been a factor in the unfavorable outcome of some of the cases. Evidence supporting such a hypothesis and proposals for the prevention. Diagnosis and treatment of neonatal cold injury are presented. PMID:326724

  10. Cold pool dissipation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, Leah D.; Heever, Susan C.

    2016-02-01

    The mechanisms by which sensible heat fluxes (SHFs) alter cold pool characteristics and dissipation rates are investigated in this study using idealized two-dimensional numerical simulations and an environment representative of daytime, dry, continental conditions. Simulations are performed with no SHFs, SHFs calculated using a bulk formula, and constant SHFs for model resolutions with horizontal (vertical) grid spacings ranging from 50 m (25 m) to 400 m (200 m). In the highest resolution simulations, turbulent entrainment of environmental air into the cold pool is an important mechanism for dissipation in the absence of SHFs. Including SHFs enhances cold pool dissipation rates, but the processes responsible for the enhanced dissipation differ depending on the SHF formulation. The bulk SHFs increase the near-surface cold pool temperatures, but their effects on the overall cold pool characteristics are small, while the constant SHFs influence the near-surface environmental stability and the turbulent entrainment rates into the cold pool. The changes to the entrainment rates are found to be the most significant of the SHF effects on cold pool dissipation. SHFs may also influence the timing of cold pool-induced convective initiation by altering the environmental stability and the cold pool intensity. As the model resolution is coarsened, cold pool dissipation is found to be less sensitive to SHFs. Furthermore, the coarser resolution simulations not only poorly but sometimes wrongly represent the SHF impacts on the cold pools. Recommendations are made regarding simulating the interaction of cold pools with convection and the land surface in cloud-resolving models.

  11. Cold fusion, Alchemist's dream

    SciTech Connect

    Clayton, E.D.

    1989-09-01

    In this report the following topics relating to cold fusion are discussed: muon catalysed cold fusion; piezonuclear fusion; sundry explanations pertaining to cold fusion; cosmic ray muon catalysed cold fusion; vibrational mechanisms in excited states of D{sub 2} molecules; barrier penetration probabilities within the hydrogenated metal lattice/piezonuclear fusion; branching ratios of D{sub 2} fusion at low energies; fusion of deuterons into {sup 4}He; secondary D+T fusion within the hydrogenated metal lattice; {sup 3}He to {sup 4}He ratio within the metal lattice; shock induced fusion; and anomalously high isotopic ratios of {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He.

  12. A search for cold water rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheney, R. E.

    1981-01-01

    SAR imagery obtained by Seasat in the Sargasso Sea during 1978 is examined for cold ring signatures. One orbit on August 26 is thought to have imaged the edge of a cold ring, although the ring's position was not well known at the time. During another orbit on September 23, drifting buoy and expendable bathythermography data furnished conclusive evidence that the ring was centered directly in the SAR swath. Although some suggestive patterns are visible in the images, it is not clear that cold rings can be identified by SAR, even though dynamically similar features, such as the Gulf Stream and warm rings, can be accurately detected. The suggestion is made that cold rings may be imaged inadequately because of their lack of surface temperature gradient.

  13. Cold stress and the cold pressor test.

    PubMed

    Silverthorn, Dee U; Michael, Joel

    2013-03-01

    Temperature and other environmental stressors are known to affect blood pressure and heart rate. In this activity, students perform the cold pressor test, demonstrating increased blood pressure during a 1- to 2-min immersion of one hand in ice water. The cold pressor test is used clinically to evaluate autonomic and left ventricular function. This activity is easily adapted to an inquiry format that asks students to go to the scientific literature to learn about the test and then design a protocol for carrying out the test in classmates. The data collected are ideal for teaching graphical presentation of data and statistical analysis.

  14. Effects of wheat germ agglutinin on human gastrointestinal epithelium: Insights from an experimental model of immune/epithelial cell interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Pellegrina, Chiara Dalla; Perbellini, Omar; Scupoli, Maria Teresa; Tomelleri, Carlo; Zanetti, Chiara; Zoccatelli, Gianni; Fusi, Marina; Peruffo, Angelo; Rizzi, Corrado; Chignola, Roberto

    2009-06-01

    Wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) is a plant protein that binds specifically to sugars expressed, among many others, by human gastrointestinal epithelial and immune cells. WGA is a toxic compound and an anti-nutritional factor, but recent works have shown that it may have potential as an anti-tumor drug and as a carrier for oral drugs. To quantitate the toxicity threshold for WGA on normal epithelial cells we previously investigated the effects of the lectin on differentiated Caco2 cells, and showed that in the micromolar range of concentrations WGA could alter the integrity of the epithelium layer and increase its permeability to both mannitol and dextran. WGA was shown to be uptaken by Caco2 cells and only {approx} 0.1% molecules were observed to cross the epithelium layer by transcytosis. Here we show that at nanomolar concentrations WGA is unexpectedly bioactive on immune cells. The supernatants of WGA-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) can alter the integrity of the epithelium layer when administered to the basolateral side of differentiated Caco2 cells and the effects can be partially inhibited by monoclonal antibodies against IL1, IL6 and IL8. At nanomolar concentrations WGA stimulates the synthesis of pro-inflammatory cytokines and thus the biological activity of WGA should be reconsidered by taking into account the effects of WGA on the immune system at the gastrointestinal interface. These results shed new light onto the molecular mechanisms underlying the onset of gastrointestinal disorders observed in vivo upon dietary intake of wheat-based foods.

  15. Development of Transgenic Cotton Lines Expressing Allium sativum Agglutinin (ASAL) for Enhanced Resistance against Major Sap-Sucking Pests

    PubMed Central

    Nunna, Hariprasad Rao; Puligundla, Sateesh Kumar; Vudem, Dashavantha Reddy; Khareedu, Venkateswara Rao

    2013-01-01

    Mannose-specific Allium sativum leaf agglutinin encoding gene (ASAL) and herbicide tolerance gene (BAR) were introduced into an elite cotton inbred line (NC-601) employing Agrobacterium-mediated genetic transformation. Cotton transformants were produced from the phosphinothricin (PPT)-resistant shoots obtained after co-cultivation of mature embryos with the Agrobacterium strain EHA105 harbouring recombinant binary vector pCAMBIA3300-ASAL-BAR. PCR and Southern blot analysis confirmed the presence and stable integration of ASAL and BAR genes in various transformants of cotton. Basta leaf-dip assay, northern blot, western blot and ELISA analyses disclosed variable expression of BAR and ASAL transgenes in different transformants. Transgenes, ASAL and BAR, were stably inherited and showed co-segregation in T1 generation in a Mendelian fashion for both PPT tolerance and insect resistance. In planta insect bioassays on T2 and T3 homozygous ASAL-transgenic lines revealed potent entomotoxic effects of ASAL on jassid and whitefly insects, as evidenced by significant decreases in the survival, development and fecundity of the insects when compared to the untransformed controls. Furthermore, the transgenic cotton lines conferred higher levels of resistance (1–2 score) with minimal plant damage against these major sucking pests when bioassays were carried out employing standard screening techniques. The developed transgenics could serve as a potential genetic resource in recombination breeding aimed at improving the pest resistance of cotton. This study represents the first report of its kind dealing with the development of transgenic cotton resistant to two major sap-sucking insects. PMID:24023750

  16. A novel glycobiomarker, Wisteria floribunda agglutinin macrophage colony-stimulating factor receptor, for predicting carcinogenesis of liver cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Iio, Etsuko; Ocho, Makoto; Togayachi, Akira; Nojima, Masanori; Kuno, Atsushi; Ikehara, Yuzuru; Hasegawa, Izumi; Yatsuhashi, Hiroshi; Yamasaki, Kazumi; Shimada, Noritomo; Ide, Tatsuya; Shinkai, Noboru; Nojiri, Shunske; Fujiwara, Kei; Joh, Takashi; Mizokami, Masashi; Narimatsu, Hisashi; Tanaka, Yasuhito

    2016-03-15

    Recently, we identified a novel liver fibrosis glycobiomarker, Wisteria floribunda agglutinin (WFA)-reactive colony stimulating factor 1 receptor (WFA(+) -CSF1R), using a glycoproteomics-based strategy. The aim of this study was to assess the value of measuring WFA(+) -CSF1R levels for the prognosis of carcinogenesis and outcome in liver cirrhosis (LC) patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV). WFA(+) -CSF1R and Total-CSF1R levels were measured in serum samples from 214 consecutive HCV-infected patients to evaluate their impact on carcinogenesis and the survival of LC patients. Serum WFA(+) -CSF1R levels were significantly higher in LC patients than chronic hepatitis (CH) patients (p < 0.001). The AUC of WFA(+) -CSF1R for predicting overall survival, calculated by time-dependent ROC analysis, was 0.691 and the HR (per 1-SD increase) was 1.80 (95% CI, 1.23-2.62, p < 0.001). Furthermore, the survival rate of LC patients with high WFA(+) -CSF1R levels (≥ 310 ng/ml) was significantly worse than those with lower levels (p < 0.01). The AUC of WFA(+) /total-CSF1R percentage (WFA(+) -CSF1R%) for predicting the cumulative carcinogenesis rate was 0.760, with an HR of 1.66 (95% CI 1.26-2.20, p < 0.001). In fact, the carcinogenesis rate was significantly higher in LC patients with a high WFA(+) -CSF1R% (≥ 35%, p = 0.006). Assessing serum levels of WFA(+) -CSF1R has diagnostic value for predicting carcinogenesis and the survival of LC patients.

  17. Crystallographic refinement and structure analysis of the complex of wheat germ agglutinin with a bivalent sialoglycopeptide from glycophorin A.

    PubMed

    Wright, C S; Jaeger, J

    1993-07-20

    Wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) elicits a number of biological effects in erythrocytes as a result of specific binding to the transmembrane protein glycophorin A. The structure of co-crystals of WGA (isolectin 1: WGA1) with a bivalent sialoglycopeptide fragment of glycophorin A (T5), determined at 2.0 A resolution, has been further refined and analyzed with respect to ligand-induced changes in the tertiary structure, mobility, solvation, saccharide conformation and protein/saccharide interactions at three independent N-acetyl-D-neuraminic (NeuNAc) binding sites. The final model, which includes the two independent WGA1 monomers (composed of domains A, B, C and D), two positions for bound T5 sialo-tetrasaccharide (NeuNAc-alpha 2,3-Gal-beta 1,3-(alpha 2,6-NeuNAc)GalNAc) and 386 water molecules, refined to a crystallographic R-factor of 17.1% (Fo > 1.0 sigma) and an average temperature factor of 31.99 A2. Comparisons between the tertiary structures of the liganded and unliganded WGA1 dimers indicate that the largest deviations from 2-fold symmetry are localized in domains engaged in sugar binding (B1 and C2) and at the C-terminal domain of monomer II (D2), forming a strong lattice contact. Interactions of the tetrasaccharide with amino acid ligands in the three binding sites and with water were carefully analyzed and compared. Bound conformations of terminal NeuNAc match to within a root-mean-square delta r of 0.3 A. The specificity-determining N-acetyl group superimposes best in comparison with other substituents of the sugar ring. Of the five domain binding sites that are not occupied in this dimeric crosslinked complex, only one is accessible to the NeuNAc monosaccharide as determined from a difference Fourier map at 3.0 A resolution.

  18. Peripheral injury and anterograde transport of wheat germ agglutinin-horse radish peroxidase to the spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Valtschanoff, J G; Weinberg, R J; Rustioni, A

    1992-10-01

    Previous observations have revealed labeling in the extracellular space surrounding boutons and unmyelinated fibers in superficial laminae of the spinal cord after injection of the tracer wheat germ agglutinin conjugated to horseradish peroxidase in dorsal root ganglia. The degree of extracellular labeling appeared related to the extent of the damage to the ganglia at the time of the injection. To determine whether injury might produce extracellular labeling, we investigated the effects of unilateral nerve crush or transection on spinal labeling after bilateral injections of the tracer into sciatic nerves. Confirming previous reports, labeling was confined to small dorsal root ganglion cells and to spinal laminae I and II, suggesting a selective affinity of this tracer for unmyelinated fibers. Labeling of both ganglion neurons and superficial spinal laminae was increased on the injured side, probably as a result of increased efficiency of receptor-mediated endocytosis. Electron microscopical observations revealed that the tracer was largely confined to unmyelinated dorsal root fibers bilaterally; a higher percentage of these fibers were labeled on the injured side. In the dorsal horn, the tracer was predominantly within unmyelinated axons and their terminals on the control side, whereas most of the labeling was extracellular and transneuronal on the injured side. The extracellular labeling surrounded unmyelinated fibers and their terminals in the spinal cord, but was excluded from the synaptic cleft. The demonstration that injury is accompanied by significantly increased release of this tracer from the terminals of unmyelinated fibers into the extracellular space suggests that endogenous substances may be released after peripheral lesions as a central signal of injury.

  19. Wheat germ agglutinin-conjugated PLGA nanoparticles for enhanced intracellular delivery of paclitaxel to colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chunxia; Ho, Paul C; Lim, Lee Yong

    2010-11-15

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the potentiation of the anticancer activity and enhanced cellular retention of paclitaxel-loaded PLGA nanoparticles after surface conjugation with wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) against colon cancer cells. Glycosylation patterns of representative colon cancer cells confirmed the higher expression levels of WGA-binding glycoproteins in the Caco-2 and HT-29 cells, than in the CCD-18Co cells. Cellular uptake and in vitro cytotoxicity of WNP (final formulation) against colon cell lines was evaluated alongside control formulations. Confocal microscopy and quantitative analysis of intracellular paclitaxel were used to monitor the endocytosis and retention of nanoparticles inside the cells. WNP showed enhanced anti-proliferative activity against Caco-2 and HT-29 cells compared to corresponding nanoparticles without WGA conjugation (PNP). The greater efficacy of WNP was associated with higher cellular uptake and sustained intracellular retention of paclitaxel, which in turn was attributed to the over-expression of N-acetyl-D-glucosamine-containing glycoprotein on the colon cell membrane. WNP also demonstrated increased intracellular retention in the Caco-2 (30% of uptake) and HT-29 (40% of uptake) cells, following post-uptake incubation with fresh medium, compared to the unconjugated PNP nanoparticles (18% in Caco-2) and (27% in HT-29), respectively. Cellular trafficking study of WNP showed endocytosed WNP could successful escape from the endo-lysosome compartment and release into the cytosol with increasing incubation time. It may be concluded that WNP has the potential to be applied as a targeted delivery platform for paclitaxel in the treatment of colon cancer. PMID:20804835

  20. Wheat Germ Agglutinin Enhanced Cerebral Uptake of Anti-Aß Antibody after Intranasal Administration in 5XFAD Mice

    PubMed Central

    Chauhan, Neelima B.; Davis, Francesca; Chun, Xiao

    2011-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the 6th leading cause of death in United States afflicting >5 million Americans. This number is estimated to triple by the middle of the century if effective treatments are not discovered. Current therapy for AD is mainly symptomatic. Effective disease-modifying treatments are needed that would eliminate the cause rather than the symptoms of the disease. Polymerization of monomeric beta-amyloid peptide (Aß) into dimers, soluble oligomers and insoluble fibrils is considered the prime causative factor in triggering AD pathogenesis. Based on these facts, removal/reduction of Aß has gained importance as a primary therapeutic target in treating the cause of the disease. In that regard, passive immunotherapy with direct delivery of anti-Aß antibodies to the brain has shown great promise, but awaits the challenge of overcoming greater influx of anti-Aß antibody into the brain. This investigation was undertaken to maximize direct delivery of immunotherapeutics to the brain by using Wheat Germ Agglutinin (WGA) as a novel axonal transporter-carrier to be conjugated with anti-Aß antibody (6E10) raised against EFRHDS 3-8 amino acid (aa) epitopes of Aß known to react with 1-16 aa residues of mono-/di-/oligomeric Aß. This is the first report showing the use of WGA as an efficient axonal transporter carrier that not only enhanced the influx of anti-Aß antibody directly into the brain but also resulted in greater reduction of cerebral Aß compared to the unconjugated anti-Aß antibody delivered intranasally in Alzheimer's 5XFAD model. PMID:21840361

  1. Establishment and characterization of monoclonal antibodies to carbohydrate antigens on peanut agglutinin receptor glycoprotein of gastric cancer KATO-III.

    PubMed

    Uetsuki, S; Kato, A; Nagakura, H; Fujimoto, K; Kato, Y; Itsuki, Y; Adachi, M; Nakayama, Y

    1992-08-01

    Eight mouse monoclonal antibodies, GOM-1, GOM-2, GOM-3, GOM-5, GOM-6, GOM-7, GOM-8 and GOM-9 were established that recognized carbohydrate antigens on the human gastric cancer cell line KATO-III. Their binding specificities were studied by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, cellular enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, flow cytometry analysis and thin layer chromatography immunostaining. All these monoclonal antibodies bound to peanut agglutinin receptor glycoproteins and neutral glycolipids extracted from KATO-III cells, but they could be divided into three groups, namely GOM-1, -3, -9 group, GOM-5 and GOM-2, -6, -7, -8 group. GOM-3 specifically bound to the Le(a) structure, Gal beta 1-3 (Fuc alpha 1-4) GlcNAc beta 1-, and GOM-5 specifically bound to the Lec structure, Gal beta 1-3GlcNAc beta-. GOM-2 showed specific binding to KATO-III, but little or no binding to various other cell lines examined or to normal human leukocytic cells. It also did not bind to the synthetic glycoconjugates tested, carrying 10 different terminal sugar chains including T, Tn, Le(a), Lec and Le(x) structures. The binding specificity of GOM-2 was also different from those of the monoclonal antibodies anti-Le(x), anti-Leb and anti-Ley. These results suggest that GOM-2 recognizes a new carbohydrate antigen on KATO-III cells that is distinct from Le(a), Leb, Lec, Le(x), Ley, T and Tn structures. PMID:1398682

  2. Cold Sores (HSV-1)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Help a Friend Who Cuts? Cold Sores (HSV-1) KidsHealth > For Teens > Cold Sores (HSV-1) Print A A A Text Size What's in ... person's lips, are caused by herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1) . But they don't just show ...

  3. Hot and cold fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-08-01

    This article presents an overview of research in cold fusion research and development in cold fusion at the Tokomak Fusion Test Reactor at the Princeton Plasma Physics Lab, and at the inertial containment facility at Lawrence Livermore National Lab. is described.

  4. Liquid metal cold trap

    DOEpatents

    Hundal, Rolv

    1976-01-01

    A cold trap assembly for removing impurities from a liquid metal being provided with a hole between the incoming impure liquid metal and purified outgoing liquid metal which acts as a continuous bleed means and thus prevents the accumulation of cover gases within the cold trap assembly.

  5. Urtica dioica agglutinin, a V beta 8.3-specific superantigen, prevents the development of the systemic lupus erythematosus-like pathology of MRL lpr/lpr mice.

    PubMed

    Musette, P; Galelli, A; Chabre, H; Callard, P; Peumans, W; Truffa-Bachi, P; Kourilsky, P; Gachelin, G

    1996-08-01

    The V beta 8.3-specific superantigenic lectin Urtica dioica agglutinin (UDA) was used to delete the V beta 8.3+ T cells in MRL lpr/lpr mice. In contrast to the systemic lupus erythematosus-like pathology which progresses with age in the phosphate-buffered saline-injected MRL lpr/lpr controls, UDA-treated animals did not develop overt clinical signs of lupus and nephritis. The pathogenic T cell clones thus reside within the V beta 8.3+ T cell population, which includes an expanded T cell clone described previously. Finally, UDA alters the production of autoantibodies in a sex-dependent manner. PMID:8765010

  6. Ultrastructural localization of wheat germ agglutinin binding sites on the sperm surface of water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis). A fracture label study.

    PubMed

    Bains, H K; Pabst, M A; Werner, G; Bawa, S R

    1993-10-01

    In the present study we have examined the plasma membrane surface organization employing fluorescein isothiocyanate linked wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) of the cauda epididymal and ejaculated spermatozoa of water buffalo. Intramembrane particle distribution pattern in the various segments of the spermatozoa has also been observed. WGA-ovomucoid gold has been used to study the distribution of sialoproteins on the sperm surface. With fracture label, WGA receptor sites have been identified on the fractured membrane halves of the sperm plasma membrane overlying the acrosome as well as the middle piece and the principle piece.

  7. Status of cold fusion (2010).

    PubMed

    Storms, Edmund

    2010-10-01

    The phenomenon called cold fusion has been studied for the last 21 years since its discovery by Profs. Fleischmann and Pons in 1989. The discovery was met with considerable skepticism, but supporting evidence has accumulated, plausible theories have been suggested, and research is continuing in at least eight countries. This paper provides a brief overview of the major discoveries and some of the attempts at an explanation. The evidence supports the claim that a nuclear reaction between deuterons to produce helium can occur in special materials without application of high energy. This reaction is found to produce clean energy at potentially useful levels without the harmful byproducts normally associated with a nuclear process. Various requirements of a model are examined.

  8. Status of cold fusion (2010)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storms, Edmund

    2010-10-01

    The phenomenon called cold fusion has been studied for the last 21 years since its discovery by Profs. Fleischmann and Pons in 1989. The discovery was met with considerable skepticism, but supporting evidence has accumulated, plausible theories have been suggested, and research is continuing in at least eight countries. This paper provides a brief overview of the major discoveries and some of the attempts at an explanation. The evidence supports the claim that a nuclear reaction between deuterons to produce helium can occur in special materials without application of high energy. This reaction is found to produce clean energy at potentially useful levels without the harmful byproducts normally associated with a nuclear process. Various requirements of a model are examined.

  9. Analysis of dynamics and mechanism of ligand binding to Artocarpus integrifolia agglutinin. A 13C and 19F NMR study.

    PubMed

    Krishna Sastry, M V; Swamy, M J; Surolia, A

    1988-10-15

    Binding of 13C-labeled N-acetylgalactosamine (13C-GalNAc) and N-trifluoroacetylgalactosamine (19F-GalNAc) to Artocarpus integrifolia agglutinin has been studied using 13C and 19F nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, respectively. Binding of these saccharides resulted in broadening of the resonances, and no change in chemical shift was observed, suggesting that the alpha- and beta-anomers of 13C-GalNAc and 19F-GalNAc experience a magnetically equivalent environment in the lectin combining site. The alpha- and beta-anomers of 13C-GalNAc and 19F-GalNAc were found to be in slow exchange between free and protein bound states. Binding of 13C-GalNAc was studied as a function of temperature. From the temperature dependence of the line broadening, the thermodynamic and kinetic parameters were evaluated. The association rate constants obtained for the alpha-anomers of 13C-GalNAc and 19F-GalNAc (k+1 = 1.01 x 10(5) M-1.s-1 and 0.698 x 10(5) M-1.s-1, respectively) are in close agreement with those obtained for the corresponding beta-anomers (k+1 = 0.95 x 10(5) M-1.s-1 and 0.65 x 10(5) M-1.s-1, respectively), suggesting that the two anomers bind to the lectin by a similar mechanism. In addition these values are several orders of magnitude slower than those obtained for diffusion controlled processes. The dissociation rate constants obtained are 49.9, 56.9, 42, and 43 s-1, respectively, for the alpha- and beta-anomers of 13C-GalNAc and 19F-GalNAc. A two-step mechanism has been proposed for the interaction of 13C-GalNAc and 19F-GalNAc with A. integrifolia lectin in view of the slow association rates and high activation entropies. The thermodynamic parameters obtained for the association and dissociation reactions suggest that the binding process is entropically favored and that there is a small enthalpic contribution.

  10. Cold-induced thermoregulation and biological aging.

    PubMed

    Florez-Duquet, M; McDonald, R B

    1998-04-01

    Aging is associated with diminished cold-induced thermoregulation (CIT). The mechanisms accounting for this phenomenon have yet to be clearly elucidated but most likely reflect a combination of increased heat loss and decreased metabolic heat production. The inability of the aged subject to reduce heat loss during cold exposure is associated with diminished reactive tone of the cutaneous vasculature and, to a lesser degree, alterations in the insulative properties of body fat. Cold-induced metabolic heat production via skeletal muscle shivering thermogenesis and brown adipose tissue nonshivering thermogenesis appears to decline with age. Few investigations have directly linked diminished skeletal muscle shivering thermogenesis with the age-related reduction in cold-induced thermoregulatory capacity. Rather, age-related declines in skeletal muscle mass and metabolic activity are cited as evidence for decreased heat production via shivering. Reduced mass, GDP binding to brown fat mitochondria, and uncoupling protein (UCP) levels are cited as evidence for attenuated brown adipose tissue cold-induced nonshivering thermogenic capacity during aging. The age-related reduction in brown fat nonshivering thermogenic capacity most likely reflects altered cellular signal transduction rather than changes in neural and hormonal signaling. The discussion in this review focuses on how alterations in CIT during the life span may offer insight into possible mechanisms of biological aging. Although the preponderance of evidence presented here demonstrates that CIT declines with chronological time, the mechanism reflecting this attenuated function remains to be elucidated. The inability to draw definitive conclusions regarding biological aging and CIT reflects the lack of a clear definition of aging. It is unlikely that the mechanisms accounting for the decline in cold-induced thermoregulation during aging will be determined until biological aging is more precisely defined. PMID

  11. Cold-induced thermoregulation and biological aging.

    PubMed

    Florez-Duquet, M; McDonald, R B

    1998-04-01

    Aging is associated with diminished cold-induced thermoregulation (CIT). The mechanisms accounting for this phenomenon have yet to be clearly elucidated but most likely reflect a combination of increased heat loss and decreased metabolic heat production. The inability of the aged subject to reduce heat loss during cold exposure is associated with diminished reactive tone of the cutaneous vasculature and, to a lesser degree, alterations in the insulative properties of body fat. Cold-induced metabolic heat production via skeletal muscle shivering thermogenesis and brown adipose tissue nonshivering thermogenesis appears to decline with age. Few investigations have directly linked diminished skeletal muscle shivering thermogenesis with the age-related reduction in cold-induced thermoregulatory capacity. Rather, age-related declines in skeletal muscle mass and metabolic activity are cited as evidence for decreased heat production via shivering. Reduced mass, GDP binding to brown fat mitochondria, and uncoupling protein (UCP) levels are cited as evidence for attenuated brown adipose tissue cold-induced nonshivering thermogenic capacity during aging. The age-related reduction in brown fat nonshivering thermogenic capacity most likely reflects altered cellular signal transduction rather than changes in neural and hormonal signaling. The discussion in this review focuses on how alterations in CIT during the life span may offer insight into possible mechanisms of biological aging. Although the preponderance of evidence presented here demonstrates that CIT declines with chronological time, the mechanism reflecting this attenuated function remains to be elucidated. The inability to draw definitive conclusions regarding biological aging and CIT reflects the lack of a clear definition of aging. It is unlikely that the mechanisms accounting for the decline in cold-induced thermoregulation during aging will be determined until biological aging is more precisely defined.

  12. Antiproliferative effect of T/Tn specific Artocarpus lakoocha agglutinin (ALA) on human leukemic cells (Jurkat, U937, K562) and their imaging by QD-ALA nanoconjugate.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Urmimala; Bose, Partha Pratim; Dey, Sharmistha; Singh, Tej P; Chatterjee, Bishnu P

    2008-11-01

    T/Tn specificity of Artocarpus lakoocha agglutinin (ALA), isolated from the seeds of A. lakoocha (Moraceae) fruit and a heterodimer (16 kD and 12 kD) of molecular mass 28 kD, was further confirmed by SPR analysis using T/Tn glycan containing mammalian glycoproteins. N-terminal amino acid sequence analysis of ALA showed homology at 15, 19-21, 24-27, and 29 residues with other lectin members of Moraceae family viz., Artocarpus integrifolia (jacalin) lectin, Artocarpus hirsuta lectin, and Maclura pomifera agglutinin. It is mitogenic to human PBMC and the maximum proliferation was observed at 1 ng/ml. It showed an antiproliferative effect on leukemic cells, with the highest effect toward Jurkat cells (IC(50) 13.15 ng/ml). Synthesized CdS quantum dot-ALA nanoconjugate was employed to detect the expression of T/Tn glycans on Jurkat, U937, and K562 leukemic cells surfaces as well as normal lymphocytes by fluorescence microscopy. No green fluorescence was observed with normal lymphocytes indicating that T/Tn determinants, which are recognized as human tumor associated structures were cryptic on normal lymphocyte surfaces, whereas intense green fluorescent dots appeared during imaging of leukemic cells, where such determinants were present in unmasked form. The above results indicated that QD-ALA nanoconjugate is an efficient fluorescent marker for identification of leukemic cell lines that gives rise to high quality images.

  13. Burkholderia oklahomensis agglutinin is a canonical two-domain OAA-family lectin: structures, carbohydrate binding and anti-HIV activity.

    PubMed

    Whitley, Matthew J; Furey, William; Kollipara, Sireesha; Gronenborn, Angela M

    2013-05-01

    Burkholderia oklahomensis EO147 agglutinin (BOA) is a 29 kDa member of the Oscillatoria agardhii agglutinin (OAA) family of lectins. Members of the OAA family recognize high-mannose glycans, and, by binding to the HIV envelope glycoprotein 120 (gp120), block the virus from binding to and entering the host cell, thereby inhibiting infection. OAA-family lectins comprise either one or two homologous domains, with a single domain possessing two glycan binding sites. We solved the structure of BOA in the ligand-free form as well as in complex with four molecules of 3α,6α-mannopentaose, the core unit of the N-linked high-mannose structures found on gp120 in vivo. This is the first structure of a double-domain OAA-family lectin in which all four binding sites are occupied by ligand. The structural details of the BOA-glycan interactions presented here, together with determination of affinity constants and HIV inactivation data, shed further light onto the structure-function relationship in this important class of anti-HIV proteins.

  14. Binding of insecticidal lectin Colocasia esculenta tuber agglutinin (CEA) to midgut receptors of Bemisia tabaci and Lipaphis erysimi provides clues to its insecticidal potential.

    PubMed

    Roy, Amit; Gupta, Sumanti; Hess, Daniel; Das, Kali Pada; Das, Sampa

    2014-07-01

    The insecticidal potential of Galanthus nivalis agglutinin-related lectins against hemipterans has been experimentally proven. However, the basis behind the toxicity of these lectins against hemipterans remains elusive. The present study elucidates the molecular basis behind insecticidal efficacy of Colocasia esculenta tuber agglutinin (CEA) against Bemisia tabaci and Lipaphis erysimi. Confocal microscopic analyses highlighted the binding of 25 kDa stable homodimeric lectin to insect midgut. Ligand blots followed by LC MS/MS analyses identified binding partners of CEA as vacuolar ATP synthase and sarcoplasmic endoplasmic reticulum type Ca(2+) ATPase from B. tabaci, and ATP synthase, heat shock protein 70 and clathrin heavy chain assembly protein from L. erysimi. Internalization of CEA into hemolymph was confirmed by Western blotting. Glycoprotein nature of the receptors was identified through glycospecific staining. Deglycosylation assay indicated the interaction of CEA with its receptors to be probably glycan mediated. Surface plasmon resonance analysis revealed the interaction kinetics between ATP synthase of B. tabaci with CEA. Pathway prediction study based on Drosophila homologs suggested the interaction of CEA with insect receptors that probably led to disruption of cellular processes causing growth retardation and loss of fecundity of target insects. Thus, the present findings strengthen our current understanding of the entomotoxic potentiality of CEA, which will facilitate its future biotechnological applications.

  15. Binding of insecticidal lectin Colocasia esculenta tuber agglutinin (CEA) to midgut receptors of Bemisia tabaci and Lipaphis erysimi provides clues to its insecticidal potential.

    PubMed

    Roy, Amit; Gupta, Sumanti; Hess, Daniel; Das, Kali Pada; Das, Sampa

    2014-07-01

    The insecticidal potential of Galanthus nivalis agglutinin-related lectins against hemipterans has been experimentally proven. However, the basis behind the toxicity of these lectins against hemipterans remains elusive. The present study elucidates the molecular basis behind insecticidal efficacy of Colocasia esculenta tuber agglutinin (CEA) against Bemisia tabaci and Lipaphis erysimi. Confocal microscopic analyses highlighted the binding of 25 kDa stable homodimeric lectin to insect midgut. Ligand blots followed by LC MS/MS analyses identified binding partners of CEA as vacuolar ATP synthase and sarcoplasmic endoplasmic reticulum type Ca(2+) ATPase from B. tabaci, and ATP synthase, heat shock protein 70 and clathrin heavy chain assembly protein from L. erysimi. Internalization of CEA into hemolymph was confirmed by Western blotting. Glycoprotein nature of the receptors was identified through glycospecific staining. Deglycosylation assay indicated the interaction of CEA with its receptors to be probably glycan mediated. Surface plasmon resonance analysis revealed the interaction kinetics between ATP synthase of B. tabaci with CEA. Pathway prediction study based on Drosophila homologs suggested the interaction of CEA with insect receptors that probably led to disruption of cellular processes causing growth retardation and loss of fecundity of target insects. Thus, the present findings strengthen our current understanding of the entomotoxic potentiality of CEA, which will facilitate its future biotechnological applications. PMID:24753494

  16. Biological safety assessment of mutant variant of Allium sativum leaf agglutinin (mASAL), a novel antifungal protein for future transgenic application.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Prithwi; Roy, Amit; Chakraborty, Joydeep; Das, Sampa

    2013-12-01

    Genetic engineering has established itself to be an important tool for crop improvement. Despite the success, there is always a risk of food allergy induced by alien gene products. The present study assessed the biosafety of mutant Allium sativum leaf agglutinin (mASAL), a potent antifungal protein generated by site directed mutagenesis of Allium sativum leaf agglutinin (ASAL). mASAL was cloned in pET28a+ and expressed in E. coli, and the safety assessment was carried out according to the FAO/WHO guideline (2001). Bioinformatics analysis, pepsin digestion, and thermal stability assay showed the protein to be nonallergenic. Targeted sera screening revealed no significant IgE affinity of mASAL. Furthermore, mASAL sensitized Balb/c mice showed normal histopathology of lung and gut tissue. All results indicated the least possibility of mASAL being an allergen. Thus, mASAL appears to be a promising antifungal candidate protein suitable for agronomical biotechnology.

  17. The cold reading technique.

    PubMed

    Dutton, D L

    1988-04-15

    For many people, belief in the paranormal derives from personal experience of face-to-face interviews with astrologers, palm readers, aura and Tarot readers, and spirit mediums. These encounters typically involve cold reading, a process in which a reader makes calculated guesses about a client's background and problems and, depending on the reaction, elaborates a reading which seems to the client so uniquely appropriate that it carries with it the illusion of having been produced by paranormal means. The cold reading process is shown to depend initially on the Barnum effect, the tendency for people to embrace generalized personality descriptions as idiosyncratically their own. Psychological research into the Barnum effect is critically reviewed, and uses of the effect by a professional magician are described. This is followed by detailed analysis of the cold reading performances of a spirit medium. Future research should investigate the degree to which cold readers may have convinced themselves that they actually possess psychic or paranormal abilities.

  18. Cold wave lotion poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Thioglycolate poisoning ... Below are symptoms of cold wave lotion poisoning in different parts of the body. EYES, EARS, NOSE, AND THROAT Mouth irritation Burning and redness of the eyes Possibly serious damage to ...

  19. Colds and flus - antibiotics

    MedlinePlus

    Fashner J, Ericson K, Werner S. Treatment of the common cold in children and adults. Am Fam Physician. 2012; ... gov/pubmed/22962927 . Melio FR, Berge LR. Upper respiratory tract infections. In: Marx JA, Hockberger RS, Walls RM, et ...

  20. Neutron measurements in search of cold fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, R.E.; Goulding, C.A.; Johnson, M.W.; Butterfield, K.B.; Gottesfeld, S.; Baker, D.A.; Springer, T.E.; Garzon, F.H.; Bolton, R.D.; Leonard, E.M.; Chancellor, T.

    1990-01-01

    We have conducted a research for neutron emission from cold fusion systems of the electrochemical type and, to a lesser extent, the high-pressure gas cell type. Using a high-efficiency well counter and an NE 213 scintillator, the experiments were conducted on the earth's surface and in a shielded cave approximately 50 ft underground. After approximately 6500 h of counting time, we have obtained no evidence for cold fusion processes leading to neutron production. However, we have observed all three types of neutron data that have been presented as evidence for cold fusion: large positive fluctuations in the neutron counting rate, weak peaks near 2.5 MeV in the neutron energy spectrum, and bursts of up to 145 neutrons in 500-{mu}s intervals. The data were obtained under circumstances that clearly show our results to be data encountered as a part of naturally occurring neutron background, which is due primarily to cosmic rays. Thus, observing these types of data does not, of itself, provide evidence for the existence of cold fusion processes. Artifacts in the data that were due to counter misbehavior were also to lead to long-term neutron bursts'' whose time duration varied from several hours to several days. We conclude that any experiments which attempt to observe neutron emission must include strong steps to ensure that the experiments deal adequately with both cosmic-ray processes and counter misbehavior. 13 refs., 14 figs.

  1. Cold Hardening in Citrus Stems

    PubMed Central

    Yelenosky, George

    1975-01-01

    Stem cold hardening developed to different levels in citrus types tested in controlled environments. Exotherms indicated ice spread was more uniform and rapid in unhardened than in cold-hardened stems. All attempts to inhibit the functioning of citrus leaves resulted in less cold hardening in the stems. Citrus leaves contribute a major portion of cold hardening in the wood. PMID:16659340

  2. Teaching in a Cold Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ewert, Alan

    1979-01-01

    Designed to help teachers deal with students in a cold environment, this article explains cold physiology and fundamental laws of heat; describes 14 common cold injuries and their current treatment; and lists a number of useful teaching techniques for cold environments. (SB)

  3. Teaching in a Cold Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ewert, Alan

    Instructors who teach outdoors in an environment so cold as to cause injury must satisfy program objectives while avoiding cold injury to themselves and students, help students focus on learning instead of discomfort, and alleviate some students' intense fear of the cold. Dealing with the cold successfully requires a thorough knowledge of:…

  4. Progress toward cold antihydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Gabrielse, G.; Estrada, J.; Peil, S.; Roach, T.; Tan, J. N.; Yesley, P.

    1999-12-10

    The production and study of cold antihydrogen will require the manipulation of dense and cold, single component plasmas of antiprotons and positrons. The undertaking will build upon the experience of the nonneutral plasma physics community. Annihilations of the antimatter particles in the plasmas can be imaged, offering unique diagnostic opportunities not available to this community when electrons and protons are used. The techniques developed by our TRAP collaboration to capture and cool antiprotons will certainly be used by our expanded ATRAP collaboration, and by the competing ATHENA Collaboration, both working at the nearly completed AD facility of CERN. We recently demonstrated a new techniques for accumulating cold positrons directly into a cryogenic vacuum system. The closest we have come to low energy antihydrogen so far is to confine cold positrons and cold antiprotons within the same trap structure and vacuum container. Finally, we mention that stored electrons have been cooled to 70 mK, the first time that elementary particles have been cooled below 4 K. In such an apparatus it should be possible to study highly magnetized plasmas of electrons or positrons at this new low temperature.

  5. 2.2 A resolution structure analysis of two refined N-acetylneuraminyl-lactose--wheat germ agglutinin isolectin complexes.

    PubMed

    Wright, C S

    1990-10-20

    The crystal structures of complexes of isolectins 1 and 2 of wheat germ agglutinin (WGA1 and WGA2) with N-acetylneuraminyl-lactose (NeuNAc-alpha(2-3)-Gal-beta(1-4)-Glc) have been refined on the basis of data in the 8 to 2.2 A resolution range to final crystallographic R-factors of 17.2% and 15.3% (Fo greater than 1 sigma), respectively. Specific binding interactions and water association, as well as changes in conformation and mobility of the structure upon ligand binding, were compared in the two complexes. The temperature factors (B = 16.3 A2 and 18.4 A2) were found to be much lower compared with those of their respective native structures (19 to 22 A2). Residues involved in sugar binding, dimerization and in lattice contacts exhibit the largest decreases in B-value, suggesting that sugar binding reduces the overall mobility of the protein molecules in the crystal lattice. The binding mode of this sialyl-trisaccharide, an important cell receptor analogue, has been compared in the two isolectins. Only one of the two unique binding sites (4 per dimer), located in the subunit/subunit interface, is occupied in the crystals. This site, termed the "primary" binding site, contains one of the five amino acid substitutions that differentiate WGA1 and WGA2. Superposition of the refined models in each of the independent crystallographic environments indicates a close match only of the terminal non-reducing NeuNAc residue (root-mean-square delta r of 0.5 to 0.6 A). The Gal-Glc portion was found to superimpose poorly, lack electron density, and possess high atomic thermal factors. In both complexes NeuNAc is stabilized through contact with six amino acid side-chains (Ser114 and Glu115 of subunit 1 and Ser62, Tyr64, Tyr(His)66 and Tyr73 of subunit 2), involving all NeuNAc ring substituents. Refinement has allowed accurate assessment of the contact distances for four hydrogen bonds, a strong buried non-polar contact with the acetamido CH3 group and a large number of van der

  6. Cold sea survival.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veghte, J. H.

    1972-01-01

    Two prototype three-man life rafts were evaluated during the winter months in Arctic waters off Kodiak Island, Alaska, to assess potential survival problems and determine tolerance limits. Each raft incorporated thermal characteristics specifically designed for cold water. Water and air temperatures varied from 0 to +2 C and -5 to +4 C respectively. All subjects were removed upon reaching subjective tolerance. The results showed that none of the clothing assemblies was adequate to maintain a person in comfort even with dry boarding. No significant biochemical shifts in the blood or urine were found. The TUL raft was found to be superior in its thermal characteristics and afforded better subject protection. General tolerance for cold water immersion, wet and dry, and cold water raft exposures are depicted graphically, based on previously reported data.

  7. Assessment of cold stress.

    PubMed

    Holmér, I

    1991-01-01

    Cold stress may be present in terms of a risk for skin surface cooling (wind chill), extremity cooling and whole body cooling. Measures of cold stress differ for the various situations. The most common approach, however, has been to apply more or less complex formulas for heat balance calculations. The combined effect of several climatic factors (air temperature, mean radiant temperature, humidity and air velocity) and the activity level determines the cooling power of the environment. The cooling power can be easily converted into a required insulation value, that applies both to parts of the body and to the body as a whole. The value provides information about cold stress in two ways; (a) by specifying necessary behavioural adjustments in terms of required activity level and clothing insulation level, and (b) by quantifying the thermal imbalance and tolerance time, when protection worn does not provide sufficient insulation.

  8. Cold asymmetrical fermion superfluids

    SciTech Connect

    Caldas, Heron

    2003-12-19

    The recent experimental advances in cold atomic traps have induced a great amount of interest in fields from condensed matter to particle physics, including approaches and prospects from the theoretical point of view. In this work we investigate the general properties and the ground state of an asymmetrical dilute gas of cold fermionic atoms, formed by two particle species having different densities. We have show in a recent paper, that a mixed phase composed of normal and superfluid components is the energetically favored ground state of such a cold fermionic system. Here we extend the analysis and verify that in fact, the mixed phase is the preferred ground state of an asymmetrical superfluid in various situations. We predict that the mixed phase can serve as a way of detecting superfluidity and estimating the magnitude of the gap parameter in asymmetrical fermionic systems.

  9. Exposure to cold and acute upper respiratory tract infection.

    PubMed

    Eccles, R; Wilkinson, J E

    2015-06-01

    The incidence of acute upper respiratory tract viral infections (URTI) is directly correlated to air temperature with most URTI occurring seasonally in cold weather. This review looks at four types of cold exposure and examines the evidence and possible mechanisms for any relationship to URTI. The effects of cold are discussed as: 1) Chilling of the nose and upper respiratory tract by breathing cold air, 2) Chilling of the mouth and upper digestive tract by ingestion of cold drinks and food, 3) Acute chilling of the body surface, and, 4) Chilling of the body as a whole with a fall in body temperature, hypothermia. Some studies were found to support a relationship between breathing cold air and chilling the body surface with the development of URTI, although this area is controversial. No evidence was found in the literature to support any relationship between ingestion of cold drinks and food and URTI, and similarly no evidence was found to link hypothermia and URTI. PMID:26030031

  10. Cold-Rydberg-gas dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Walz-Flannigan, A.; Guest, J.R.; Choi, J.-H.; Raithel, G.

    2004-06-01

    Using state-selective field ionization, the state distributions of Rydberg atoms in cold Rydberg gases are measured for various initially excited Rydberg levels, populations, and evolution times. We provide direct experimental evidence for l-changing collisions that we previously observed indirectly [S. K. Dutta, D. Feldbaum, A. Walz-Flannigan, J. R. Guest, and G. Raithel, Phys. Rev. Lett. 86, 3993 (2001)]. We also observe n-mixing and find that its effects are largely in agreement with recent theoretical work on n-changing collisions between electrons and Rydberg atoms, thus enabling an estimation of the electron temperature. Unexpectedly large populations of atoms are found in states with principal quantum numbers much lower than that of the initially excited atoms. We explain this observation by collisions between high-l Rydberg atoms, which are highly polar and can collide due to static electric-dipole forces between them.

  11. Study of agglutination of mouse mammary carcinoma (FM3A) cell induced by egg agglutinin of Rana catesbiana. II. Phytohemagglutinin P and protamine.

    PubMed

    Takeda, S; Kubota, K; Endo, Y; Matsuzawa, T

    1981-01-01

    When mouse mammary carcinoma (FM3A) cells were treated with egg agglutinin of Rana catesbiana for 15 min at 25 degrees C, percent total particle number of both cell aggregates and single cells was in direct proportion to the cell electrophoretic mobility. Phytohemagglutinin P mediated agglutination proceeded with biphasic kinetics: the higher the concentration of phytohemagglutinin P the shorter was the lag period between the first and second stages of agglutination. In protamine-mediated agglutination, the percent total particle number was reduced at low concentrations, while the electrophoretic mobility reduced only at high concentrations. Agglutinating and cytotoxic activities of these three reagents were in an intimate relation: the higher the agglutinating activity, the greater was their cytotoxic activity. PMID:6969671

  12. Adsorption in vitro to Escherichia coli of antibodies and other proteins in bovine serum and colostrum and its effects on the production of E. coli agglutinins.

    PubMed Central

    Steel, E D

    1975-01-01

    IgGl, IgG2, IgA and IgM from bovine serum and colostrum are adsorbed by Escherichia coli in vitro; lactoferrin is also adsorbed from colostrum and alpha2 macroglobulin from serum. The colostral adsorbed proteins on E. coli appear to reduce formation of agglutinins when the treated bacteria are injected into rabbits and guinea-pigs. Assay of the concentration of proteins dissociated from colostrum-treated cells showed equal amounts of secretory IgA AND IgGl, half that amount of IgG2, and traces of IgM and lactoferrin. Dissociation of proteins from serum-treated E. coli yielded equal amounts of IgGl and IgG2, traces of IgA and an alpha2 macroglobulin, but no IgM. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 2 PMID:1095472

  13. Low-dose intragastric administration of Phaseolus vulgaris agglutinin (PHA) does not induce immunoglobulin E (IgE) production in Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Haas, H; Herzig, K H; André, S; Galle, J; Gronow, A; Gabius, H J

    2001-04-01

    Native Phaseolus vulgaris agglutinin (PHA) poses a potential health threat, when ingested with improperly cooked red kidney beans. Since PHA triggers human basophilic granulocytes in culture to rapidly release considerable amounts of interleukin-(IL-)4 and IL-13, key cytokines for inducing immunoglobulin E (IgE) production, the question was addressed whether this lectin can evoke in vivo IgE production. IgE-low-responder (Sprague-Dawley) rats received PHA (6 mg/rat/day) intragastrically by gavage over a period of 10 days. Up to day 35, there was no IgE induction regardless of whether the animals were boostered subcutaneously with PHA or not, indicating that PHA cannot be regarded as a general IgE inducer in rats. PMID:11788794

  14. Large reptiles and cold temperatures: Do extreme cold spells set distributional limits for tropical reptiles in Florida?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mazzotti, Frank J.; Cherkiss, Michael S.; Parry, Mark; Beauchamp, Jeff; Rochford, Mike; Smith, Brian J.; Hart, Kristen M.; Brandt, Laura A.

    2016-01-01

    Distributional limits of many tropical species in Florida are ultimately determined by tolerance to low temperature. An unprecedented cold spell during 2–11 January 2010, in South Florida provided an opportunity to compare the responses of tropical American crocodiles with warm-temperate American alligators and to compare the responses of nonnative Burmese pythons with native warm-temperate snakes exposed to prolonged cold temperatures. After the January 2010 cold spell, a record number of American crocodiles (n = 151) and Burmese pythons (n = 36) were found dead. In contrast, no American alligators and no native snakes were found dead. American alligators and American crocodiles behaved differently during the cold spell. American alligators stopped basking and retreated to warmer water. American crocodiles apparently continued to bask during extreme cold temperatures resulting in lethal body temperatures. The mortality of Burmese pythons compared to the absence of mortality for native snakes suggests that the current population of Burmese pythons in the Everglades is less tolerant of cold temperatures than native snakes. Burmese pythons introduced from other parts of their native range may be more tolerant of cold temperatures. We documented the direct effects of cold temperatures on crocodiles and pythons; however, evidence of long-term effects of cold temperature on their populations within their established ranges remains lacking. Mortality of crocodiles and pythons outside of their current established range may be more important in setting distributional limits.

  15. Expert Cold Structure Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atkins, T.; Demuysere, P.

    2011-05-01

    The EXPERT Program is funded by ESA. The objective of the EXPERT mission is to perform a sub-orbital flight during which measurements of critical aero- thermodynamic phenomena will be obtained by using state-of-the-art instrumentation. As part of the EXPERT Flight Segment, the responsibility of the Cold Structure Development Design, Manufacturing and Validation was committed to the Belgian industrial team SONACA/SABCA. The EXPERT Cold Structure includes the Launcher Adapter, the Bottom Panel, the Upper Panel, two Cross Panels and the Parachute Bay. An additional Launcher Adapter was manufactured for the separation tests. The selected assembly definition and manufacturing technologies ( machined parts and sandwich panels) were dictated classically by the mass and stiffness, but also by the CoG location and the sensitive separation interface. Used as support for the various on-board equipment, the Cold Structure is fixed to but thermally uncoupled from the PM 1000 thermal shield. It is protect on its bottom panel by a thermal blanket. As it is a protoflight, analysis was the main tool for the verification. Low level stiffness and modal analysis tests have also been performed on the Cold Structure equipped with its ballast. It allowed to complete its qualification and to prepare SONACA/SABCA support for the system dynamic tests foreseen in 2011. The structure was finally coated with a thermal control black painting and delivered on time to Thales Alenia Space-Italy end of March 201.

  16. Teaching "In Cold Blood."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berbrich, Joan D.

    1967-01-01

    The Truman Capote nonfiction novel, "In Cold Blood," which reflects for adolescents the immediacy of the real world, illuminates (1) social issues--capital punishment, environmental influence, and the gap between the "haves" and "have-nots," (2) moral issues--the complexity of man's nature, the responsibility of one man for another, and the place…

  17. Recent Cold War Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pineo, Ronn

    2003-01-01

    Cold War historiography has undergone major changes since the 1991 collapse of the Soviet Union. For two years (1992-1993) the principal Soviet archives fell open to scholars, and although some of the richest holdings are now once again closed, new information continues to find its way out. Moreover, critical documentary information has become…

  18. Cold War Propaganda.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Paul W.

    1988-01-01

    Briefly discusses the development of Cold War propaganda in the United States, Canada, and the USSR after 1947. Presents two movie reviews and a Canadian magazine advertisement of the period which illustrate the harshness of propaganda used by both sides in the immediate postwar years. (GEA)

  19. Cold Facts about Viruses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pea, Celeste; Sterling, Donna R.

    2002-01-01

    Provides ways for students to demonstrate their understanding of scientific concepts and skills. Describes a mini-unit around the cold in which students can relate humans to viruses. Includes activities and a modified simulation that provides questions to guide students. Discusses ways that allows students to apply prior knowledge, take ownership…

  20. Cold spray nozzle design

    DOEpatents

    Haynes, Jeffrey D.; Sanders, Stuart A.

    2009-06-09

    A nozzle for use in a cold spray technique is described. The nozzle has a passageway for spraying a powder material, the passageway having a converging section and a diverging section, and at least the diverging section being formed from polybenzimidazole. In one embodiment of the nozzle, the converging section is also formed from polybenzimidazole.

  1. Spatial distribution of cold antihydrogen formation.

    PubMed

    Madsen, N; Amoretti, M; Amsler, C; Bonomi, G; Bowe, P D; Carraro, C; Cesar, C L; Charlton, M; Doser, M; Fontana, A; Fujiwara, M C; Funakoshi, R; Genova, P; Hangst, J S; Hayano, R S; Jørgensen, L V; Kellerbauer, A; Lagomarsino, V; Landua, R; Lodi-Rizzini, E; Macri, M; Mitchard, D; Montagna, P; Pruys, H; Regenfus, C; Rotondi, A; Testera, G; Variola, A; Venturelli, L; van der Werf, D P; Yamazaki, Y; Zurlo, N

    2005-01-28

    Antihydrogen is formed when antiprotons are mixed with cold positrons in a nested Penning trap. We present experimental evidence, obtained using our antihydrogen annihilation detector, that the spatial distribution of the emerging antihydrogen atoms is independent of the positron temperature and axially enhanced. This indicates that antihydrogen is formed before the antiprotons are in thermal equilibrium with the positron plasma. This result has important implications for the trapping and spectroscopy of antihydrogen.

  2. Prescription Drugs and Cold Medicines

    MedlinePlus

    ... Abuse » Prescription Drugs & Cold Medicines Prescription Drugs & Cold Medicines Email Facebook Twitter What is Prescription Drug Abuse: ... treatment of addiction. Read more Safe Disposal of Medicines Disposal of Unused Medicines: What You Should Know ( ...

  3. Thermoregulatory modeling for cold stress.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaojiang; Tikuisis, Peter

    2014-07-01

    Modeling for cold stress has generated a rich history of innovation, has exerted a catalytic influence on cold physiology research, and continues to impact human activity in cold environments. This overview begins with a brief summation of cold thermoregulatory model development followed by key principles that will continue to guide current and future model development. Different representations of the human body are discussed relative to the level of detail and prediction accuracy required. In addition to predictions of shivering and vasomotor responses to cold exposure, algorithms are presented for thermoregulatory mechanisms. Various avenues of heat exchange between the human body and a cold environment are reviewed. Applications of cold thermoregulatory modeling range from investigative interpretation of physiological observations to forecasting skin freezing times and hypothermia survival times. While these advances have been remarkable, the future of cold stress modeling is still faced with significant challenges that are summarized at the end of this overview. PMID:24944030

  4. Thermoregulatory modeling for cold stress.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaojiang; Tikuisis, Peter

    2014-07-01

    Modeling for cold stress has generated a rich history of innovation, has exerted a catalytic influence on cold physiology research, and continues to impact human activity in cold environments. This overview begins with a brief summation of cold thermoregulatory model development followed by key principles that will continue to guide current and future model development. Different representations of the human body are discussed relative to the level of detail and prediction accuracy required. In addition to predictions of shivering and vasomotor responses to cold exposure, algorithms are presented for thermoregulatory mechanisms. Various avenues of heat exchange between the human body and a cold environment are reviewed. Applications of cold thermoregulatory modeling range from investigative interpretation of physiological observations to forecasting skin freezing times and hypothermia survival times. While these advances have been remarkable, the future of cold stress modeling is still faced with significant challenges that are summarized at the end of this overview.

  5. Human whole body cold adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Daanen, Hein A.M.; Van Marken Lichtenbelt, Wouter D.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Reviews on whole body human cold adaptation generally do not distinguish between population studies and dedicated acclimation studies, leading to confusing results. Population studies show that indigenous black Africans have reduced shivering thermogenesis in the cold and poor cold induced vasodilation in fingers and toes compared to Caucasians and Inuit. About 40,000 y after humans left Africa, natives in cold terrestrial areas seems to have developed not only behavioral adaptations, but also physiological adaptations to cold. Dedicated studies show that repeated whole body exposure of individual volunteers, mainly Caucasians, to severe cold results in reduced cold sensation but no major physiological changes. Repeated cold water immersion seems to slightly reduce metabolic heat production, while repeated exposure to milder cold conditions shows some increase in metabolic heat production, in particular non-shivering thermogenesis. In conclusion, human cold adaptation in the form of increased metabolism and insulation seems to have occurred during recent evolution in populations, but cannot be developed during a lifetime in cold conditions as encountered in temperate and arctic regions. Therefore, we mainly depend on our behavioral skills to live in and survive the cold. PMID:27227100

  6. Human whole body cold adaptation.

    PubMed

    Daanen, Hein A M; Van Marken Lichtenbelt, Wouter D

    2016-01-01

    Reviews on whole body human cold adaptation generally do not distinguish between population studies and dedicated acclimation studies, leading to confusing results. Population studies show that indigenous black Africans have reduced shivering thermogenesis in the cold and poor cold induced vasodilation in fingers and toes compared to Caucasians and Inuit. About 40,000 y after humans left Africa, natives in cold terrestrial areas seems to have developed not only behavioral adaptations, but also physiological adaptations to cold. Dedicated studies show that repeated whole body exposure of individual volunteers, mainly Caucasians, to severe cold results in reduced cold sensation but no major physiological changes. Repeated cold water immersion seems to slightly reduce metabolic heat production, while repeated exposure to milder cold conditions shows some increase in metabolic heat production, in particular non-shivering thermogenesis. In conclusion, human cold adaptation in the form of increased metabolism and insulation seems to have occurred during recent evolution in populations, but cannot be developed during a lifetime in cold conditions as encountered in temperate and arctic regions. Therefore, we mainly depend on our behavioral skills to live in and survive the cold.

  7. Human whole body cold adaptation.

    PubMed

    Daanen, Hein A M; Van Marken Lichtenbelt, Wouter D

    2016-01-01

    Reviews on whole body human cold adaptation generally do not distinguish between population studies and dedicated acclimation studies, leading to confusing results. Population studies show that indigenous black Africans have reduced shivering thermogenesis in the cold and poor cold induced vasodilation in fingers and toes compared to Caucasians and Inuit. About 40,000 y after humans left Africa, natives in cold terrestrial areas seems to have developed not only behavioral adaptations, but also physiological adaptations to cold. Dedicated studies show that repeated whole body exposure of individual volunteers, mainly Caucasians, to severe cold results in reduced cold sensation but no major physiological changes. Repeated cold water immersion seems to slightly reduce metabolic heat production, while repeated exposure to milder cold conditions shows some increase in metabolic heat production, in particular non-shivering thermogenesis. In conclusion, human cold adaptation in the form of increased metabolism and insulation seems to have occurred during recent evolution in populations, but cannot be developed during a lifetime in cold conditions as encountered in temperate and arctic regions. Therefore, we mainly depend on our behavioral skills to live in and survive the cold. PMID:27227100

  8. Remedies for Common Cold Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Penny F.

    1991-01-01

    Individuals suffering from intolerable symptoms of the common cold can now be advised of safe and effective products for symptomatic relief. This article describes and discusses four categories of drugs used to treat the common cold. To simplify the product selection process for family physicians, suggestions are included for possible ingredients for treatments of specific cold symptoms. PMID:21234087

  9. Cold shivering activity after unilateral destruction of the vestibular apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuzmina, G. I.

    1980-01-01

    The bioelectric activity of muscles (flexors and extensors of the forelimbs and hindlimbs) during cold shivering after unilateral destruction of the vestibular apparatus. It was found, that unilateral delabyrinthing produces bilateral facilitation of cold shivering in the flexor extremities more pronounced on the ipsilateral side. In the extensor muscles there was an absence of bioelectric activity both before and after delabyrinthing. Enhancement of cold shivering in the flexor extremities following intervention was evidently conditioned by removal of the inhibiting effect of the vestibulary apparatus on the function of special centers.

  10. Ionic mechanisms of spinal neuronal cold hypersensitivity in ciguatera.

    PubMed

    Patel, Ryan; Brice, Nicola L; Lewis, Richard J; Dickenson, Anthony H

    2015-12-01

    Cold hypersensitivity is evident in a range of neuropathies and can evoke sensations of paradoxical burning cold pain. Ciguatoxin poisoning is known to induce a pain syndrome caused by consumption of contaminated tropical fish that can persist for months and include pruritus and cold allodynia; at present no suitable treatment is available. This study examined, for the first time, the neural substrates and molecular components of Pacific ciguatoxin-2-induced cold hypersensitivity. Electrophysiological recordings of dorsal horn lamina V/VI wide dynamic range neurones were made in non-sentient rats. Subcutaneous injection of 10 nm ciguatoxin-2 into the receptive field increased neuronal responses to innocuous and noxious cooling. In addition, neuronal responses to low-threshold but not noxious punctate mechanical stimuli were also elevated. The resultant cold hypersensitivity was not reversed by 6-({2-[2-fluoro-6-(trifluoromethyl)phenoxy]-2-methylpropyl}carbamoyl)pyridine-3-carboxylic acid, an antagonist of transient receptor potential melastatin 8 (TRPM8). Both mechanical and cold hypersensitivity were completely prevented by co-injection with the Nav 1.8 antagonist A803467, whereas the transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) antagonist A967079 only prevented hypersensitivity to innocuous cooling and partially prevented hypersensitivity to noxious cooling. In naive rats, neither innocuous nor noxious cold-evoked neuronal responses were inhibited by antagonists of Nav 1.8, TRPA1 or TRPM8 alone. Ciguatoxins may confer cold sensitivity to a subpopulation of cold-insensitive Nav 1.8/TRPA1-positive primary afferents, which could underlie the cold allodynia reported in ciguatera. These data expand the understanding of central spinal cold sensitivity under normal conditions and the role of these ion channels in this translational rat model of ciguatoxin-induced hypersensitivity. PMID:26454262

  11. WISPy cold dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arias, Paola; Cadamuro, Davide; Goodsell, Mark; Jaeckel, Joerg; Redondo, Javier; Ringwald, Andreas

    2012-06-01

    Very weakly interacting slim particles (WISPs), such as axion-like particles (ALPs) or hidden photons (HPs), may be non-thermally produced via the misalignment mechanism in the early universe and survive as a cold dark matter population until today. We find that, both for ALPs and HPs whose dominant interactions with the standard model arise from couplings to photons, a huge region in the parameter spaces spanned by photon coupling and ALP or HP mass can give rise to the observed cold dark matter. Remarkably, a large region of this parameter space coincides with that predicted in well motivated models of fundamental physics. A wide range of experimental searches — exploiting haloscopes (direct dark matter searches exploiting microwave cavities), helioscopes (searches for solar ALPs or HPs), or light-shining-through-a-wall techniques — can probe large parts of this parameter space in the foreseeable future.

  12. Radial cold trap

    DOEpatents

    Grundy, B.R.

    1981-09-29

    The radial cold trap comprises a housing having a plurality of mesh bands disposed therein. The mesh bands comprise concentrically arranged bands of mesh with the mesh specific surface area of each band increasing from the outermost mesh band to the innermost mesh band. An inlet nozzle is attached to the outside section of the housing while an outlet nozzle is attached to the inner portion of the housing so as to be concentrically connected to the innermost mesh band. An inlet baffle having orifices therein may be disposed around the outermost mesh band and within the housing for directing the flow of the fluid from the inlet nozzle to the outermost mesh band in a uniform manner. The flow of fluid passes through each consecutive mesh band and into the outlet nozzle. The circular pattern of the symmetrically arranged mesh packing allows for better utilization of the entire cold trap volume. 2 figs.

  13. Radial cold trap

    DOEpatents

    Grundy, Brian R.

    1981-01-01

    The radial cold trap comprises a housing having a plurality of mesh bands disposed therein. The mesh bands comprise concentrically arranged bands of mesh with the mesh specific surface area of each band increasing from the outermost mesh band to the innermost mesh band. An inlet nozzle is attached to the outside section of the housing while an outlet nozzle is attached to the inner portion of the housing so as to be concentrically connected to the innermost mesh band. An inlet baffle having orifices therein may be disposed around the outermost mesh band and within the housing for directing the flow of the fluid from the inlet nozzle to the outermost mesh band in a uniform manner. The flow of fluid passes through each consecutive mesh band and into the outlet nozzle. The circular pattern of the symmetrically arranged mesh packing allows for better utilization of the entire cold trap volume.

  14. Clumpy cold dark matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silk, Joseph; Stebbins, Albert

    1993-01-01

    A study is conducted of cold dark matter (CDM) models in which clumpiness will inhere, using cosmic strings and textures suited to galaxy formation. CDM clumps of 10 million solar mass/cu pc density are generated at about z(eq) redshift, with a sizable fraction surviving. Observable implications encompass dark matter cores in globular clusters and in galactic nuclei. Results from terrestrial dark matter detection experiments may be affected by clumpiness in the Galactic halo.

  15. Cold nuclear fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Tsyganov, E. N.

    2012-02-15

    Recent accelerator experiments on fusion of various elements have clearly demonstrated that the effective cross-sections of these reactions depend on what material the target particle is placed in. In these experiments, there was a significant increase in the probability of interaction when target nuclei are imbedded in a conducting crystal or are a part of it. These experiments open a new perspective on the problem of so-called cold nuclear fusion.

  16. Cold denaturation of encapsulated ubiquitin.

    PubMed

    Pometun, Maxim S; Peterson, Ronald W; Babu, Charles R; Wand, A Joshua

    2006-08-23

    Theoretical considerations suggest that protein cold denaturation can potentially provide a means to explore the cooperative substructure of proteins. Protein cold denaturation is generally predicted to occur well below the freezing point of water. Here NMR spectroscopy of ubiquitin encapsulated in reverse micelles dissolved in low viscosity alkanes is used to follow cold-induced unfolding to temperatures below -25 degrees C. Comparison of cold-induced structural transitions in a variety of reverse micelle-buffer systems indicate that protein-surfactant interactions are negligible and allow the direct observation of the multistate cold-induced unfolding of the protein.

  17. Cold Stowage Flight Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campana, Sharon

    2010-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) provides a test bed for researchers to perform science experiments in a variety of fields, including human research, life sciences, and space medicine. Many of the experiments being conducted today require science samples to be stored and transported in a temperature controlled environment. NASA provides several systems which aide researchers in preserving their science. On orbit systems provided by NASA include the Minus Eighty Laboratory freezer for ISS (MELFI), Microgravity Experiment Research Locker Incubator (MERLIN), and Glacier. These freezers use different technologies to provide rapid cooling and cold stowage at different temperature levels on board ISS. Systems available to researchers during transportation to and from ISS are MERLIN, Glacier, and Coldbag. Coldbag is a passive cold stowage system that uses phase change materials. Details of these current technologies will be provided along with operational experience gained to date. With shuttle retirement looming, NASA has protected the capability to provide a temperature controlled environment during transportation to and from the ISS with the use of Glacier and Coldbags, which are compatible with future commercial vehicles including SpaceX's Dragon Capsule, and Orbital s Cygnus vehicle. This paper will discuss the capability of the current cold stowage hardware and how it may continue to support NASA s mission on ISS and in future exploration missions.

  18. Cold Stowage Flight Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campana, Sharon E.; Melendez, David T.

    2011-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) provides a test bed for researchers to perform science experiments in a variety of fields, including human research, life sciences, and space medicine. Many of the experiments being conducted today require science samples to be stored and transported in a temperature controlled environment. NASA provides several systems which aid researchers in preserving their science. On orbit systems provided by NASA include the Minus Eighty Laboratory freezer for ISS (MELFI), Microgravity Experiment Research Locker Incubator (MERLIN), and Glacier. These freezers use different technologies to provide rapid cooling and cold stowage at different temperature levels on board ISS. Systems available to researchers during transportation to and from ISS are MERLIN, Glacier, and Coldbag. Coldbag is a passive cold stowage system that uses phase change materials to maintain temperature. Details of these current technologies are provided along with operational experience gained to date. This paper discusses the capability of the current cold stowage hardware and how it may continue to support NASA s mission on ISS and in future exploration missions.

  19. Effects of repeated short-term cold exposures on cold induced thermogenesis of women

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silami-Garcia, E.; Haymes, E. M.

    1989-12-01

    The effects of repeated exposures to resting cold air (10°C) on the shivering and thermogenic responses of women to standard cold stress were investigated. Ten women, aged 18 to 34 years, were divided into two groups of five women each. One group, the acclimated (A) was exposed ten times within 2 weeks, the first and the last exposures being the pre-and post-tests respectively. The second group, the control (C) was exposed twice within 18 days. Measurements of rectal and skin temperatures, oxygen uptake, time to onset of shivering (TOS), and perceived cold were performed during all exposures. Shivering responses were evaluated by electromyography and visually. A significant ( P<0.05), increase was seen in TOS (from 26.2 min to 55.6 min), and a significant decrease was seen in thermoregulatory heat production (from 14.78 kcal/h to -2.64 kcal/h) in group A; these changes were evident after about five exposures. It is concluded that the women became cold acclimated as a result of the repeated short-term resting cold air exposures.

  20. Anomalous cold in the Pangaean tropics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Soreghan, G.S.; Soreghan, M.J.; Poulsen, C.J.; Young, R.A.; Eble, C.F.; Sweet, D.E.; Davogustto, O.C.

    2008-01-01

    The late Paleozoic archives the greatest glaciation of the Phanerozoic. Whereas high-latitude Gondwanan strata preserve widespread evidence for continental ice, the Permo-Carboniferous tropics have long been considered analogous to today's: warm and shielded from the highlatitude cold. Here, we report on glacial and periglacial indicators that record episodes of freezing continental temperatures in western equatorial Pangaea. An exhumed glacial valley and associated deposits record direct evidence for glaciation that extended to low paleoelevations in the ancestral Rocky Mountains. Furthermore, the Permo-Carboniferous archives the only known occurrence of widespread tropical loess in Earth's history; the volume, chemistry, and provenance of this loess(ite) is most consistent with glacial derivation. Together with emerging indicators for cold elsewhere in low-latitude Pangaea, these results suggest that tropical climate was not buffered from the high latitudes and may record glacial-interglacial climate shifts of very large magnitude. Coupled climate-ice sheet model simulations demonstrate that low atmospheric CO2 and solar luminosity alone cannot account for such cold, and that other factors must be considered in attempting to explain this 'best-known' analogue to our present Earth. ?? 2008 The Geological Society of America.

  1. Transcriptome profiling of Vitis amurensis, an extremely cold-tolerant Chinese wild Vitis species, reveals candidate genes and events that potentially connected to cold stress.

    PubMed

    Xu, Weirong; Li, Ruimin; Zhang, Ningbo; Ma, Fuli; Jiao, Yuntong; Wang, Zhenping

    2014-11-01

    Vitis amurensis Rupr. is an exceptional wild-growing Vitis (grape) species that can safely survive a wide range of cold conditions, but the underlying cold-adaptive mechanism associated with gene regulation is poorly investigated. We have analyzed the physiochemical and transcriptomic changes caused by cold stress in a cold-tolerant accession, 'Heilongjiang seedling', of Chinese wild V. amurensis. We statistically determined that a total of 6,850 cold-regulated transcripts were involved in cold regulation, including 3,676 up-regulated and 3,174 down-regulated transcripts. A global survey of messenger RNA revealed that skipped exon is the most prevalent form of alternative spicing event. Importantly, we found that the total splicing events increased with the prolonged cold stress. We also identified thirty-eight major TF families that were involved in cold regulation, some of which were previously unknown. Moreover, a large number of candidate pathways for the metabolism or biosynthesis of secondary metabolites were found to be regulated by cold, which is of potential importance in coordinating cold tolerance with growth and development. Several heat shock proteins and heat shock factors were also detected to be intensively cold-regulated. Furthermore, we validated the expression profiles of 16 candidates using qRT-PCR to further confirm the accuracy of the RNA-seq data. Our results provide a genome-wide view of the dynamic changes in the transcriptome of V. amurensis, in which it is evident that various structural and regulatory genes are crucial for cold tolerance/adaptation. Moreover, our robust dataset advances our knowledge of the genes involved in the complex regulatory networks of cold stress and leads to a better understanding of cold tolerance mechanisms in this extremely cold-tolerant Vitis species.

  2. Resolving the Large Scale Spectral Variability of the Luminous Seyfert 1 Galaxy 1H 0419-577: Evidence for a New Emission Component and Absorption by Cold Dense Matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pounds, K. A.; Reeves, J. N.; Page, K. L.; OBrien, P. T.

    2004-01-01

    An XMM-Newton observation of the luminous Seyfert 1 galaxy 1H 0419-577 in September 2002, when the source was in an extreme low-flux state, found a very hard X-ray spectrum at 1-10 keV with a strong soft excess below -1 keV. Comparison with an earlier XMM-Newton observation when 1H 0419-577 was X-ray bright indicated the dominant spectral variability was due to a steep power law or cool Comptonised thermal emission. Four further XMM-Newton observations, with 1H 0419-577 in intermediate flux states, now support that conclusion, while we also find the variable emission component in intermediate state difference spectra to be strongly modified by absorption in low ionisation matter. The variable soft excess then appears to be an artefact of absorption of the underlying continuum while the core soft emission can be attributed to re- combination in an extended region of more highly ionised gas. We note the wider implications of finding substantial cold dense matter overlying (or embedded in) the X-ray continuum source in a luminous Seyfert 1 galaxy.

  3. Evidence of incomplete annealing at 800 °C and the effects of 120 °C baking on the crystal orientation and the surface superconducting properties of cold-worked and chemically polished Nb

    SciTech Connect

    Sung, Z. -H.; Dzyuba, A.; Lee, P. J.; Larbalestier, D C; Cooley, L. D.

    2015-07-01

    High-purity niobium rods were cold-worked by wire-drawing, followed by various combinations of chemical polishing and high-vacuum baking at 120 °C or annealing at 800 °C in order to better understand changes to the surface superconducting properties resulting from typical superconducting radio-frequency cavity processing. AC susceptibility measurements revealed an enhanced upper transition Tc at ~ 9.3–9.4 K in all samples that was stable through all annealing steps, a value significantly above the accepted Tc of 9.23 K for pure annealed niobium. Corresponding elevations were seen in the critical fields, the ratio of the surface critical field Hc3 to the bulk upper critical field Hc2 rising to 2.3, well above the Ginzburg–Landau value of 1.695. Orientation imaging revealed an extensive dislocation rich sub-grain structure in the as-drawn rods, a small reduction of the surface strain after baking at 120 °C, and a substantial but incomplete recrystallization near the surface after annealing at 800 °C. We interpret these changes in surface superconducting and structural properties to extensive changes in the near-surface interstitial contamination produced by baking and annealing and to synergistic interactions between H and surface O introduced during electropolishing and buffered chemical polishing.

  4. Evidence of incomplete annealing at 800 °C and the effects of 120 °C baking on the crystal orientation and the surface superconducting properties of cold-worked and chemically polished Nb

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sung, Z. -H.; Dzyuba, A.; Lee, P. J.; Larbalestier, D C; Cooley, L. D.

    2015-07-01

    High-purity niobium rods were cold-worked by wire-drawing, followed by various combinations of chemical polishing and high-vacuum baking at 120 °C or annealing at 800 °C in order to better understand changes to the surface superconducting properties resulting from typical superconducting radio-frequency cavity processing. AC susceptibility measurements revealed an enhanced upper transition Tc at ~ 9.3–9.4 K in all samples that was stable through all annealing steps, a value significantly above the accepted Tc of 9.23 K for pure annealed niobium. Corresponding elevations were seen in the critical fields, the ratio of the surface critical field Hc3 to the bulk uppermore » critical field Hc2 rising to 2.3, well above the Ginzburg–Landau value of 1.695. Orientation imaging revealed an extensive dislocation rich sub-grain structure in the as-drawn rods, a small reduction of the surface strain after baking at 120 °C, and a substantial but incomplete recrystallization near the surface after annealing at 800 °C. We interpret these changes in surface superconducting and structural properties to extensive changes in the near-surface interstitial contamination produced by baking and annealing and to synergistic interactions between H and surface O introduced during electropolishing and buffered chemical polishing.« less

  5. Stimulation of S14 mRNA and lipogenesis in brown fat by hypothyroidism, cold exposure, and cafeteria feeding: evidence supporting a general role for S14 in lipogenesis and lipogenesis in the maintenance of thermogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Freake, H.C.; Oppenheimer, J.H.

    1987-05-01

    In liver, thyroid hormone rapidly induces S14 mRNA, which encodes a small acidic protein. This sequence is abundantly expressed only in lipogenic tissues and is thought to have some function in fat metabolism. In the euthyroid rat, we measured 20-fold higher levels of S14 mRNA in interscapular brown adipose tissue than liver. Furthermore, whereas in liver or epididymal fat, hypothyroidism resulted in an 80% fall in S14 mRNA, in brown fat the level of this sequence increased a further 3-fold. In all three tissues, the expression of S14 mRNA correlated well with lipogenesis, as assessed by /sup 3/H/sub 2/O incorporation. Physiological activation of brown fat by chronic cold exposure or cafeteria feeding increased the concentration of S14 mRNA in this tissue and again this was accompanied by a greater rate of fatty acid synthesis. Overall, in liver and white and brown adipose tissue, S14 mRNA and lipogenesis were well correlated and strongly suggest a function of the S14 protein related to fat synthesis. These studies suggest that the S14 protein and lipogenesis may be important for thyroid hormone-induced and brown adipose tissue thermogenesis and that stimulation of these functions in hypothyroid brown fat is a consequence of decreased thyroid hormone-induced thermogenesis elsewhere.

  6. Experimental hypothermia and cold perception.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, R G; Pozos, R S

    1989-10-01

    Twelve subjects clothed in flotation suits were immersed in 10 degrees C cold water and their surface temperatures at the back and groin, as well as core temperatures, were continuously monitored. Subjects were unable to reliably assess how cold they were, with the highest correlation observed between perceived temperature and actual temperature reaching only 0.51. This was felt to be partially due to the uneven distribution of surface temperatures seen in this experiment and in most cold water immersions. Rapid cooling in cold water also produced the perceptual phenomenon of "overshooting" previously observed in cold air studies, characterized by sudden temperature drops being perceived as cold sensations of greater magnitude. The results suggest that subjects who are rapidly cooled in water may have considerable difficulty separating feelings of cold from feelings of pain and discomfort, which can have serious implications in survival situations and highlights the subjective and highly variable nature of cold perception. Perceived cold sensation may be a very poor, and possibly dangerous, predictor in cold water immersion situations.

  7. Successful treatment of refractory cold hemagglutinemia in MYD88 L265P mutation-negative Waldenström's macroglobulinemia with bortezomib.

    PubMed

    Izumi, Mayuko; Tsunemine, Hiroko; Suzuki, Yasuhiro; Tomita, Akihiro; Kusumoto, Toshiko; Kodaka, Taiichi; Itoh, Kiminari; Takahashi, Takayuki

    2015-08-01

    We report here the successful treatment of cold agglutinin-associated refractory hemolysis with bortezomib in a patient with Waldenström's macroglobulinemia (WM). A 78-year-old man was referred to our hospital with cold hemagglutinemia of unknown cause. Laboratory examination revealed a hemoglobin concentration of 6.9 g/dL, serum IgM concentration of 1904 mg/dL, and a titer of cold hemagglutinin of over ×8192. Serum immunoelectrophoresis demonstrated monoclonal protein of the IgM-κ type. A bone marrow aspirate showed many lymphoplasmacytic cells, which were positive for CD19, CD20, CD38, and cytoplasmic μ and κ light chains. A diagnosis of WM-associated cold hemagglutinemia was made. Because of red blood cell transfusion-dependency, we treated him with intravenous fludarabine, oral melphalan-prednisolone, cyclophosphamide, and melphalan, and two courses of R-CHOP in sequence with a marked decrease of serum IgM (928 mg). We then started weekly bortezomib plus dexamethasone (BD) therapy, as he was still transfusion-dependent. Soon after the initiation of BD, he achieved transfusion independence, with a further decrease in serum levels of IgM and marked improvement of anemia. Interestingly, his marrow abnormal lymphocytes were later found not to carry the MYD88 L265P mutation. The successful treatment with bortezomib for WM lacking this mutation is discussed.

  8. The Isis cold moderators

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, G. M.; Broome, T. A.; Burridge, R. A.; Cragg, D.; Hall, R.; Haynes, D.; Hirst, J.; Hogston, J. R.; Jones, H. H.; Sexton, J.; Wright, P.

    1997-09-01

    ISIS is a pulsed spallation neutron source where neutrons are produced by the interaction of a 160 kW proton beam of energy 800 MeV in a water-cooled Tantalum Target. The fast neutrons produced are thermalized in four moderators: two ambient water, one liquid methane operating at 100K and a liquid hydrogen moderator at 20 K. This paper gives a description of the construction of both cold moderator systems, details of the operating experience and a description of the current development program.

  9. Heat, cold, noise, and vibration

    SciTech Connect

    Horvath, S.M.; Bedi, J.F. )

    1990-03-01

    Exposure to a cold environment induces a number of physiological alterations, the most serious being hypothermia. This state can occur in all individuals, but the very young and the elderly are more susceptible. Environmental and industrially generated high ambient temperature can place further stress on aged individuals and workers, resulting in a complex symptom picture. Morbidity and death may result from such exposures. Causative factors have been identified. Noise exposure induces hearing losses above those secondary to the aging process. Psychophysiological effects during noise exposure are considered to result from the sympathetic activity secondary to a general stress reaction. Vibration from the use of power tools results in Raynaud's phenomenon. However, modification of power tools has reduced the symptoms associated with vibration exposure. Termination of exposure to vibration appears eventually to reduce symptoms related to white-finger spasms. Interaction between these stressors has not been clarified because of the complex effects of each. The need for additional information about the response to these stressors is evident. 38 references.

  10. Ricinus communis agglutinin I leads to rapid down-regulation of VEGFR-2 and endothelial cell apoptosis in tumor blood vessels.

    PubMed

    You, Weon-Kyoo; Kasman, Ian; Hu-Lowe, Dana D; McDonald, Donald M

    2010-04-01

    Ricinus communis agglutinin I (RCA I), a galactose-binding lectin from castor beans, binds to endothelial cells at sites of plasma leakage, but little is known about the amount and functional consequences of binding to tumor endothelial cells. We addressed this issue by examining the effects of RCA I on blood vessels of spontaneous pancreatic islet-cell tumors in RIP-Tag2 transgenic mice. After intravenous injection, RCA I bound strongly to tumor vessels but not to normal blood vessels. At 6 minutes, RCA I fluorescence of tumor vessels was largely diffuse, but over the next hour, brightly fluorescent dots appeared as the lectin was internalized by endothelial cells. RCA I injection led to a dose- and time-dependent decrease in vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 (VEGFR-2) immunoreactivity in tumor endothelial cells, with 95% loss over 6 hours. By comparison, VEGFR-3, CD31, and CD105 had decreases in the range of 21% to 33%. Loss of VEGFR-2 was followed by increased activated caspase-3 in tumor vessels. Prior inhibition of VEGF signaling by AG-028262 decreased RCA I binding and internalization into tumor vessels. These findings indicate RCA I preferentially binds to and is internalized by tumor endothelial cells, which leads to VEGFR-2 down-regulation, endothelial cell apoptosis, and tumor vessel regression. Together, the results illustrate the selective impact of RCA I on VEGF signaling in tumor blood vessels.

  11. Electrogenerated chemiluminescence biosensing for the detection of prostate PC-3 cancer cells incorporating antibody as capture probe and ruthenium complex-labelled wheat germ agglutinin as signal probe.

    PubMed

    Yang, Haiying; Li, Zhejian; Shan, Meng; Li, Congcong; Qi, Honglan; Gao, Qiang; Wang, Jinyi; Zhang, Chengxiao

    2015-03-10

    A highly selective and sensitive electrogenerated chemiluminescence (ECL) biosensor for the detection of prostate PC-3 cancer cells was designed using a prostate specific antibody as a capture probe and ruthenium complex-labelled wheat germ agglutinin as a signal probe. The ECL biosensor was fabricated by covalently immobilising the capture probe on a graphene oxide-coated glassy carbon electrode. Target PC-3 cells were selectively captured on the surface of the biosensor, and then, the signal probe was bound with the captured PC-3 cells to form a sandwich. In the presence of tripropylamine, the ECL intensity of the sandwich biosensor was logarithmically directly proportion to the concentration of PC-3 cells over a range from 7.0×10(2) to 3.0×10(4) cells mL(-1), with a detection limit of 2.6×10(2) cells mL(-1). The ECL biosensor was also applied to detect prostate specific antigen with a detection limit of 0.1 ng mL(-1). The high selectivity of the biosensor was demonstrated in comparison with that of a lectin-based biosensor. The strategy developed in this study may be a promising approach and could be extended to the design of ECL biosensors for highly sensitive and selective detection of other cancer-related cells or cancer biomarkers using different probes.

  12. In vivo toxicity and immunogenicity of wheat germ agglutinin conjugated poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(lactic acid) nanoparticles for intranasal delivery to the brain

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Qingfeng; Shao Xiayan; Chen Jie; Shen Yehong; Feng Chengcheng; Gao Xiaoling; Zhao Yue; Li Jingwei; Zhang Qizhi Jiang, Xinguo

    2011-02-15

    Biodegradable polymer-based nanoparticles have been widely studied to deliver therapeutic agents to the brain after intranasal administration. However, knowledge as to the side effects of nanoparticle delivery system to the brain is limited. The aim of this study was to investigate the in vivo toxicity and immunogenicity of wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) conjugated poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(lactic acid) nanoparticles (WGA-NP) after intranasal instillation. Sprague-Dawley rats were intranasally given WGA-NP for 7 continuous days. Amino acid neurotransmitters, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity, reduced glutathione (GSH), acetylcholine, acetylcholinesterase activity, tumor necrosis factor {alpha} (TNF-{alpha}) and interleukin-8 (IL-8) in rat olfactory bulb (OB) and brain were measured to estimate the in vivo toxicity of WGA-NP. Balb/C mice were intranasally immunized by WGA-NP and then WGA-specific antibodies in serum and nasal wash were detected by indirect ELISA. WGA-NP showed slight toxicity to brain tissue, as evidenced by increased glutamate level in rat brain and enhanced LDH activity in rat OB. No significant changes in acetylcholine level, acetylcholinesterase activity, GSH level, TNF-{alpha} level and IL-8 level were observed in rat OB and brain for the WGA-NP group. WGA-specific antibodies in mice serum and nasal wash were not increased after two intranasal immunizations of WGA-NP. These results demonstrate that WGA-NP is a safe carrier system for intranasal delivery of therapeutic agents to the brain.

  13. The effect of concanavalin A and wheat germ agglutinin on the ultrastructure and permeability of rat intestine. A possible model for an intestinal allergic reaction.

    PubMed

    Sjölander, A; Magnusson, K E; Latkovic, S

    1984-01-01

    Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to lectins, either concanavalin A (Con A) or wheat germ agglutinin (WGA). The lectins were instilled into a ligated segment of the distal small intestine together with permeability markers, fluoresceinated dextran (MW 3,000) or a mixture of differently sized polyethylene glycols (MW 400, 600 and 1,000). WGA-treated rats showed a decreased permeability to small molecules (MW less than 600) of polyethylene glycol but an increase for a larger dextran molecule (MW 3,000). These effects as well as the morphological findings might mimic the situation in patients with food allergy or celiac disease. Con A-treated rats had decreased intestinal permeability to the larger dextran molecules (MW 3,000), whereas the passage of small molecules was unaffected and the ultrastructural effects were minute. The Con A-induced changes could result from a mucotractive effect, associated with a low-grade gut allergy. These observations suggest that lectins can affect both the ultrastructure and the permeability of the intestine, in a way assumed to mimic allergic reactions to food constituents.

  14. Toxicity studies of coumarin 6-encapsulated polystyrene nanospheres conjugated with peanut agglutinin and poly(N-vinylacetamide) as a colonoscopic imaging agent in rats

    PubMed Central

    Sakuma, Shinji; Kumagai, Hironori; Shimosato, Moe; Kitamura, Tokio; Mohri, Kohta; Ikejima, Tetsuya; Hiwatari, Ken-ichiro; Koike, Seiji; Tobita, Etsuo; McClure, Richard; Gore, John C.; Pham, Wellington

    2015-01-01

    We are investigating an imaging agent that detects early-stage primary colorectal cancer on the mucosal surface in real time under colonoscopic observation. The imaging agent, which is named the nanobeacon, is fluorescent nanospheres conjugated with peanut agglutinin and poly(N-vinylacetamide). Its potential use as an imaging tool for colorectal cancer has been thoroughly validated in numerous studies. Here, toxicities of the nanobeacon were assessed in rats. The nanobeacon was prepared according to the synthetic manner which is being established as the Good Manufacturing Practice-guided production. The rat study was performed in accordance with Good Laboratory Practice regulations. No nanobeacon treatment-related toxicity was observed. The no observable adverse effect levels (NOAEL) of the nanobeacon in 7-day consecutive oral administration and single intrarectal administration were estimated to be more than 1000 mg/kg/day and 50 mg/kg/day, respectively. We concluded that the nanobeacon could be developed as a safe diagnostic agent for colonoscopy applications. PMID:25725490

  15. Comparative studies of strains Ictero No. I and RGA as the type strain of Leptospira interrogans: agglutinin absorption test, protein and antigen profiles, and enzyme activities.

    PubMed

    Hata, K; Ono, E; Yanagawa, R

    1988-01-01

    Strain Ictero No. I, the first isolate of Leptospira, isolated by Inada and Ido in 1914, was found to be sufficiently qualified to be the type strain of Leptospira interrogans rather than strain RGA. In an agglutinin absorption test, anti-Ictero No. I serum was not absorbed completely with strain RGA, and 25% of the homologous titer remained unabsorbed, while anti-RGA serum was completely absorbed with strain Ictero No. I. Thus, strain Ictero No. I was not serologically identical with strain RGA, and the two strains were considered to be different serovars. A protein band with a molecular weight of approximately 33,000 daltons was detected in strain Ictero No. I but not in strain RGA by SDS-PAGE. By Western blotting, this protein band was detectable with anti-Ictero No. I serum but not with anti-RGA serum. The presence of the 33K protein in strain Ictero No. I, but not in strain RGA, was confirmed by radioimmunoprecipitation using [125I]-labeled antigens, indicating that the protein antigen was surface-exposed. Only 8 of the 89 enzymes activities were different between strains Ictero No. I and RGA (line Sapporo). From the above results, we propose that strain Ictero No. I should be designated as the type strain of L. interrogans instead of strain RGA.

  16. Direct and indirect sublethal effects of Galanthus nivalis agglutinin (GNA) on the development of a potato-aphid parasitoid, Aphelinus abdominalis (Hymenoptera: Aphelinidae).

    PubMed

    Couty, A; de la Viña, G; Clark, S J.; Kaiser, L; Pham-Delègue, M -H.; Poppy, G M.

    2001-06-01

    Snowdrop lectin (Galanthus nivalis agglutinin, GNA), has been shown to confer partial resistance to two potato aphids Myzus persicae and Aulacorthum solani, when incorporated in artificial diet and/or expressed in transgenic potato. First-tier laboratory-scale experiments were conducted to assess the potential effect of GNA on the aphid parasitoid Aphelinus abdominalis. GNA (0.1% w/v) was successfully delivered to Macrosiphum euphorbiae via artificial diet and induced a reduced growth rate and increased mortality compared to aphids fed a control diet. As aphid parasitoid larvae are endophagous, they may be exposed to GNA during their larval development and potential "chronic toxicity" on A. abdominalis was investigated. The amounts of GNA present in aphid and parasitoid tissues were estimated by western blotting. Results suggest that parasitoids excrete most of the GNA ingested. Sublethal effects of GNA on several parasitoid fitness parameters (parasitism success, parasitoid development and size, emergence success, progeny survival and sex ratio) were studied. No direct detrimental effect of GNA on A. abdominalis was observed. However, GNA had an indirect host-size-mediated effect on the sex ratio and the size of parasitoids developing in GNA-fed aphids. This work highlights the need to determine the exact "causes and effects" when assessing the ecological impact of transgenic plants on non-target beneficial insects. Such bioassays form the basis of a tiered risk assessment moving from laboratory studies assessing individuals towards field-scale experiments assessing populations.

  17. Sensitivity of transmitted and founder human immunodeficiency virus type 1 envelopes to carbohydrate-binding agents griffithsin, cyanovirin-N and Galanthus nivalis agglutinin.

    PubMed

    Hu, Bodan; Du, Tao; Li, Chang; Luo, Sukun; Liu, Yalan; Huang, Xin; Hu, Qinxue

    2015-12-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) transmission often results from infection by a single transmitted/founder (T/F) virus. Here, we investigated the sensitivity of T/F HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins (Envs) to microbicide candidate carbohydrate-binding agents (CBAs) griffithsin (GRFT), cyanovirin-N (CV-N) and Galanthus nivalis agglutinin (GNA), showing that T/F Envs demonstrated different sensitivity to CBAs, with IC50 values ranging from 0.006 ± 0.0003 to >10 nM for GRFT, from 0.6 ± 0.2 to 28.9 ± 2.9 nM for CV-N and from 1.3 ± 0.2 to >500 nM for GNA. We further revealed that deglycosylation at position 295 or 448 decreased the sensitivity of T/F Env to GRFT, and at 339 to both CV-N and GNA. Mutation of all the three glcyans rendered a CBA-sensitive T/F Env largely resistant to GRFT, indicating that the sensitivity of T/F Env to GRFT is mainly determined by glycans at 295, 339 and 448. Our study identified specific T/F Env residues associated with CBA sensitivity.

  18. [Obtainment of transgenic wheat with the insecticidal lectin from snowdrop (Galanthus nivalis agglutinin; GNA) gene and analysis of resistance to aphid].

    PubMed

    Liang, Hui; Zhu, Yin-Feng; Zhu, Zhen; Sun, Dong-Fa; Jia, Xu

    2004-02-01

    Snowdrop lectin (Galanthus nivalis agglutinin; GNA) is toxic to sap sucking injurious insects of Homopteran. A new gna gene has been transferred into common spring wheat Zhong60634 and winter wheat Yumai66 with high yield by using the biolistic transformation method. Transgenic wheat plants have been obtained in both of the two varieties. Two transgenic plants (T0) have been obtained from the bombarded 535 immature embryos of Zhong60634. Bioassay results show that the development of aphid could be slowed down and the survival rate of young aphid could be reduced by gna gene. Seventeen transgenic plants (T0) were obtained from the bombarded 4636 immature embryos of Yumai66. Twenty plantlets with good resistance to Rhopalosiphum padi and Macrosiphum avenae, which are mainly aphid in north wheat area, were identified from the transgenic plants of T1 generation that came from 8 T0 transgenic plants with good resistance to aphid. The anti-aphid bioassay shows that resistance to the different grain aphid is not the same in transgenic wheat plants. To Rhopalosiphum padi, the rate of survival aphid 8 days after exposing transgenic plants to aphids is significantly lower than that of nontransgenic plants. To Macrosiphum avenae, growth speed of aphids is slowed down but not killed. At the same time, the death rate of young aphids is increased. Anyway, feeding of the two kinds of aphids has been controlled in a certain degree by gna gene when aphids can free to move in plants.

  19. Resistance to green leafhopper (Nephotettix virescens) and brown planthopper (Nilaparvata lugens) in transgenic rice expressing snowdrop lectin (Galanthus nivalis agglutinin; GNA).

    PubMed

    Foissac, X; Thi Loc, N; Christou, P; Gatehouse, A M.R.; Gatehouse, J A.

    2000-04-01

    Transgenic rice plants expressing snowdrop lectin (Galanthus nivalis agglutinin; GNA) were screened for resistance to green leafhopper (Nephotettix virescens; GLH), a major homopteran pest of rice. Survival was reduced by 29% and 53% (P<0.05) respectively, on plants where GNA expression was tissue-specific (phloem and epidermal layer) or constitutive. Similar levels of resistance in GNA-expressing transgenic rice were previously reported for rice brown planthopper (Nilaparvata lugens; BPH). GNA binding to glycoproteins in gut tissues showed that BPH contained more "receptors" than GLH, and that the binding affinity was stronger, particularly in the midgut. Subsequent toxicity of GNA is thus unlikely to be directly related to the amount of lectin bound. GNA was not detected in the honeydew of either insect species when they were fed on GNA-expressing plants, in contrast to results from artificial diet studies. This result suggests that GNA is not being delivered to the insect efficiently. When offered a free choice vs control plants, BPH nymphs tended to avoid plants expressing GNA; avoidance was less pronounced and took longer to develop on plants where GNA expression was tissue-specific, In contrast to BPH, GLH nymphs were attracted to plants expressing GNA, whether constitutively or in a tissue-specific manner.

  20. Peanut agglutinin appearance in the blood circulation after peanut ingestion mimics the action of endogenous galectin-3 to promote metastasis by interaction with cancer-associated MUC1.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qicheng; Duckworth, Carrie A; Wang, Weikun; Guo, Xiuli; Barrow, Hannah; Pritchard, D Mark; Rhodes, Jonathan M; Yu, Lu-Gang

    2014-12-01

    Peanut agglutinin (PNA), which accounts for ~0.15% of the weight of the common peanut, is a carbohydrate-binding protein that binds the oncofoetal Thomsen-Friedenreich (TF) disaccharide (galactoseβ1,3N-acetylgalactosamineα-) that is overexpressed by ~90% of human cancers. Previous studies have shown that PNA is highly resistant to cooking and digestion and rapidly enters the human blood circulation after peanut ingestion. This study investigates the hypothesis that PNA appearance in the circulation after peanut ingestion may mimic the actions of endogenous TF-binding human galectin-3 in metastasis promotion. It shows that PNA at concentrations similar to those found in blood circulation after peanut ingestion increases cancer cell heterotypic adhesion to the blood vascular endothelium and enhances the formation of tumour cell homotypic aggregates, two important steps in the metastasis cascade, and enhances metastasis in a mouse metastasis model. These effects of PNA are shown to result from its interaction with the cancer-associated TF disaccharide on the transmembrane mucin protein MUC1, causing MUC1 cell surface polarization that reveals underlying cell surface adhesion molecules. Thus, PNA appearance in the blood circulation after peanut ingestion mimics the actions of endogenous galectin-3 and promotes cancer cell metastatic spread by interaction with cancer-associated TF/MUC1. As metastasis accounts for the majority of cancer-associated fatality, regular consumption of peanuts by cancer patients would therefore be expected to have an adverse effect on cancer survival.

  1. Exposure of insect midgut cells to Sambucus nigra L. agglutinins I and II causes cell death via caspase-dependent apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Shahidi-Noghabi, Shahnaz; Van Damme, Els J M; Iga, Masatoshi; Smagghe, Guy

    2010-09-01

    Sambucus nigra agglutinins I and II, further referred to as SNA-I and SNA-II, are two ricin-related lectins from elderberry. SNA-I is a chimeric lectin composed of an A-chain with enzymatic activity and a B-chain with carbohydrate-binding activity, and therefore belongs to the group of type 2 ribosome-inactivating proteins. In contrast, SNA-II consists only of carbohydrate-binding B-chains. The physiological effect of SNA-I was tested on different insect cell lines (midgut, ovary, fat body, embryo). In sensitive midgut CF-203 cells, SNA-I induced cell death with typical characteristics such as cell shrinkage, plasma membrane blebbing, nuclear condensation and DNA fragmentation. The effect was dose-dependent with 50% death of 4-day-exposed cells at 3nM. SNA-I exposure induced caspase-3 like activities, suggesting that SNA-I can induce the apoptotic pathway. Interestingly, the hololectin SNA-II also induced apoptosis in CF-203 cells at similar doses with the same physiological events. SNA-I and SNA-II both induced caspase-dependent apoptosis at low concentrations (nM order), leading to typical symptoms of cell death in sensitive cells. This effect seems independent from the catalytic activity of the A-chain, but depends on the carbohydrate-binding B-chain.

  2. Differential binding of human blood group Sd(a+) and Sd(a-) Tamm-Horsfall glycoproteins with Dolichos biflorus and Vicia villosa-B4 agglutinins.

    PubMed

    Wu, A M; Wu, J H; Watkins, W M; Chen, C P; Song, S C; Chen, Y Y

    1998-06-16

    The binding patterns of human blood group Sd(a+) and Sd(a-) Tamm-Horsfall glycoproteins (THGPs) with respect to four GalNAc specific agglutinins were studied by quantitative precipitin assay (QPA) and enzyme linked lectinosorbent assay (ELLSA). Of the native and asialo Sd(a+) and Sd(a-) THGP tested by QPA and ELLSA, only native and asialo Sd(a+) bound well with Dolichos biflorus (DBA) and Vicia villosa-B4 (VVA-B4), while Sd(a-) THGP reacted poorly with these two lectins. Neither Sd(a+) nor Sd(a-) THGPs reacted with two other GalNAc alpha-anomer specific lectins: Codium fragile subspecies tomentosoides and Artocarpus integrifolia. Furthermore, the binding of asialo Sd(a+)THGP-VVA-B4 and native Sd(a+)THGP-DBA through GalNAc beta--> was confirmed by inhibition assay. These results demonstrate that DBA and VVA-B4 are useful reagents to differentiate between Sd(a+) and Sd(a-) THGP.

  3. Jacalin and peanut agglutinin (PNA) bindings in the taste bud cells of the rat: new reliable markers for type IV cells of the rat taste buds.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Ryo; Shi, Lei; Fujii, Masae; Ueda, Katsura; Honma, Shiho; Wakisaka, Satoshi

    2005-12-01

    Lectin histochemistry of Jacalin (Artocarpus integrifolia) and peanut agglutinin (PNA), specific lectins for galactosyl (beta-1, 3) N-acetylgalactosamine (galactosyl (beta-1, 3) GalNAc), was applied to the gustatory epithelium of the adult rat. In the ordinary lingual epithelium, Jacalin and PNA labeled the cell membrane from the basal to granular cell layer. They also bound membranes of rounded-cells at the basal portion of taste buds, but the number of PNA labeled cells was smaller than that of Jacalin labeled cells. There was no apparent difference in the binding patterns of Jacalin and PNA among the taste buds of the lingual papillae and those of the palatal epithelium. Occasionally, a few spindle-shaped cells were labeled with Jacalin, but not with PNA. Double labeling of Jacalin and alpha-gustducin, a specific marker for type II cells, revealed that Jacalin-labeled spindle-shaped taste cells were immunonegative for alpha-gustducin. Spindle-shaped cells expressing protein gene product 9.5 (PGP 9.5) immunoreactivity lacked Jacalin labeling. During the development of taste buds in circumvallate papillae, the binding pattern of Jacalin became almost identical from postnatal day 5. The present results indicate that rounded cells at the basal portion of the taste buds cells (type IV cells) bind to Jacalin and PNA, and these lectins are specific markers for type IV cells of the rat taste cells.

  4. Active Targeting to Osteosarcoma Cells and Apoptotic Cell Death Induction by the Novel Lectin Eucheuma serra Agglutinin Isolated from a Marine Red Alga

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Keita; Walde, Peter; Miyazaki, Tatsuhiko; Sakayama, Kenshi; Nakamura, Atsushi; Kameda, Kenji; Masuda, Seizo; Umakoshi, Hiroshi; Kato, Keiichi

    2012-01-01

    Previously, we demonstrated that the novel lectin Eucheuma serra agglutinin from a marine red alga (ESA) induces apoptotic cell death in carcinoma. We now find that ESA induces apoptosis also in the case of sarcoma cells. First, propidium iodide assays with OST cells and LM8 cells showed a decrease in cell viability after addition of ESA. With 50 μg/ml ESA, the viabilities after 24 hours decreased to 54.7 ± 11.4% in the case of OST cells and to 41.7 ± 12.3% for LM8 cells. Second, using fluorescently labeled ESA and flow cytometric and fluorescence microscopic measurements, it could be shown that ESA does not bind to cells that were treated with glycosidases, indicating importance of the carbohydrate chains on the surface of the cells for efficient ESA-cell interactions. Third, Span 80 vesicles with surface-bound ESA as active targeting ligand were shown to display sarcoma cell binding activity, leading to apoptosis and complete OST cell death after 48 hours at 2 μg/ml ESA. The findings indicate that Span 80 vesicles with surface-bound ESA are a potentially useful drug delivery system not only for the treatment of carcinoma but also for the treatment of osteosarcoma. PMID:23346404

  5. Active Targeting to Osteosarcoma Cells and Apoptotic Cell Death Induction by the Novel Lectin Eucheuma serra Agglutinin Isolated from a Marine Red Alga.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Keita; Walde, Peter; Miyazaki, Tatsuhiko; Sakayama, Kenshi; Nakamura, Atsushi; Kameda, Kenji; Masuda, Seizo; Umakoshi, Hiroshi; Kato, Keiichi

    2012-01-01

    Previously, we demonstrated that the novel lectin Eucheuma serra agglutinin from a marine red alga (ESA) induces apoptotic cell death in carcinoma. We now find that ESA induces apoptosis also in the case of sarcoma cells. First, propidium iodide assays with OST cells and LM8 cells showed a decrease in cell viability after addition of ESA. With 50 μg/ml ESA, the viabilities after 24 hours decreased to 54.7 ± 11.4% in the case of OST cells and to 41.7 ± 12.3% for LM8 cells. Second, using fluorescently labeled ESA and flow cytometric and fluorescence microscopic measurements, it could be shown that ESA does not bind to cells that were treated with glycosidases, indicating importance of the carbohydrate chains on the surface of the cells for efficient ESA-cell interactions. Third, Span 80 vesicles with surface-bound ESA as active targeting ligand were shown to display sarcoma cell binding activity, leading to apoptosis and complete OST cell death after 48 hours at 2 μg/ml ESA. The findings indicate that Span 80 vesicles with surface-bound ESA are a potentially useful drug delivery system not only for the treatment of carcinoma but also for the treatment of osteosarcoma. PMID:23346404

  6. The cytotoxic effect of Eucheuma serra agglutinin (ESA) on cancer cells and its application to molecular probe for drug delivery system using lipid vesicles.

    PubMed

    Sugahara, T; Ohama, Y; Fukuda, A; Hayashi, M; Kawakubo, A; Kato, K

    2001-07-01

    Eucheuma serra agglutinin (ESA) derived from a marine red alga, Eucheuma serra, is a lectin that specifically binds to mannose-rich carbohydrate chains. ESA is a monomeric molecule, with a molecular weight of29,000. ESA induced cell death against several cancer cell lines, such as colon cancer Colo201 cells and cervix cancer HeLa cells. DNA ladder detection and the induction of caspase-3 activity suggested that the cell death induced by ESA against cancer cells was apoptosis. ESA bound to the cell surface of Colo201 cells in the sugar chain dependent manner. This means that the binding of ESA to the cell surface is specific for mannose-rich sugar chains recognized by ESA. The binding of ESA to the cell surface of Colo201 cells was slightly suppressed by the high concentrations of serum because of the competition with serum components possessing the mannose-rich sugar chain motifs. On the other hand, a lipid vesicle is a very useful microcapsule constructed by multilamellar structure,and adopted as drug or gene carrier. ESA was immobilized on the surface of the lipid vesicles to apply the lipid vesicles to cancer specific drug delivery system. ESA-immobilized lipid vesicles were effectively bound to cancer cell lines compared with plane vesicles. PMID:19003319

  7. An Unusual Member of the Papain Superfamily: Mapping the Catalytic Cleft of the Marasmius oreades agglutinin (MOA) with a Caspase Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Cordara, Gabriele; van Eerde, André; Grahn, Elin M.; Winter, Harry C.; Goldstein, Irwin J.; Krengel, Ute

    2016-01-01

    Papain-like cysteine proteases (PLCPs) constitute the largest group of thiol-based protein degrading enzymes and are characterized by a highly conserved fold. They are found in bacteria, viruses, plants and animals and involved in a number of physiological and pathological processes, parasitic infections and host defense, making them interesting targets for drug design. The Marasmius oreades agglutinin (MOA) is a blood group B-specific fungal chimerolectin with calcium-dependent proteolytic activity. The proteolytic domain of MOA presents a unique structural arrangement, yet mimicking the main structural elements in known PLCPs. Here we present the X-ray crystal structure of MOA in complex with Z-VAD-fmk, an irreversible caspase inhibitor known to cross-react with PLCPs. The structural data allow modeling of the substrate binding geometry and mapping of the fundamental enzyme-substrate interactions. The new information consolidates MOA as a new, yet strongly atypical member of the papain superfamily. The reported complex is the first published structure of a PLCP in complex with the well characterized caspase inhibitor Z-VAD-fmk. PMID:26901797

  8. Exposure of insect midgut cells to Sambucus nigra L. agglutinins I and II causes cell death via caspase-dependent apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Shahidi-Noghabi, Shahnaz; Van Damme, Els J M; Iga, Masatoshi; Smagghe, Guy

    2010-09-01

    Sambucus nigra agglutinins I and II, further referred to as SNA-I and SNA-II, are two ricin-related lectins from elderberry. SNA-I is a chimeric lectin composed of an A-chain with enzymatic activity and a B-chain with carbohydrate-binding activity, and therefore belongs to the group of type 2 ribosome-inactivating proteins. In contrast, SNA-II consists only of carbohydrate-binding B-chains. The physiological effect of SNA-I was tested on different insect cell lines (midgut, ovary, fat body, embryo). In sensitive midgut CF-203 cells, SNA-I induced cell death with typical characteristics such as cell shrinkage, plasma membrane blebbing, nuclear condensation and DNA fragmentation. The effect was dose-dependent with 50% death of 4-day-exposed cells at 3nM. SNA-I exposure induced caspase-3 like activities, suggesting that SNA-I can induce the apoptotic pathway. Interestingly, the hololectin SNA-II also induced apoptosis in CF-203 cells at similar doses with the same physiological events. SNA-I and SNA-II both induced caspase-dependent apoptosis at low concentrations (nM order), leading to typical symptoms of cell death in sensitive cells. This effect seems independent from the catalytic activity of the A-chain, but depends on the carbohydrate-binding B-chain. PMID:20230823

  9. Screening method of carbohydrate-binding proteins in biological sources by capillary affinity electrophoresis and its application to determination of Tulipa gesneriana agglutinin in tulip bulbs.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Kazuki; Kinoshita, Mitsuhiro; Oda, Yasuo; Masuko, Takashi; Kaku, Hanae; Shibuya, Naoto; Kakehi, Kazuaki

    2004-09-01

    We developed capillary affinity electrophoresis (CAE) to analyze the molecular interaction between carbohydrate chains and proteins in solution state. A mixture of oligosaccharides derived from a glycoprotein was labeled with 8-aminopyrene-1,3,6-trisulfonate (APTS), and used as glycan library without isolation. Interaction of a carbohydrate-binding protein with each oligosaccharide in the mixture could be simultaneously observed, and relative affinities of oligosaccharides toward the protein were accurately determined. In this study, we applied CAE to detect the presence of lectins in some plants (Japanese elderberry bark and tulip bulb). In the crude extract of the elderberry bark, binding activity toward sialo-carbohydrate chains could be easily detected. We also examined the presence of lectins in the crude extract of tulip bulbs and determined the detailed carbohydrate-binding specificity of Tulipa gesneriana agglutinin (TGA), one of the lectins from tulip bulbs. Kinetic studies demonstrated that TGA showed novel carbohydrate-binding specificity and preferentially recognized triantennary oligosaccharides with Gal residues at nonreducing termini and a Fuc residue linked through alpha(1-6) linkage at chitobiose portion of the reducing termini but not tetraantennary carbohydrates. The results described here indicate that CAE will be a valuable method for both screening of lectins in natural sources and determination of their detailed carbohydrate-binding specificities.

  10. Cold isopressing method

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Jack C.; Stawisuck, Valerie M.; Prasad, Ravi

    2003-01-01

    A cold isopressing method in which two or more layers of material are formed within an isopressing mold. One of the layers consists of a tape-cast film. The layers are isopressed within the isopressing mold, thereby to laminate the layers and to compact the tape-cast film. The isopressing mold can be of cylindrical configuration with the layers being coaxial cylindrical layers. The materials used in forming the layers can contain green ceramic materials and the resultant structure can be fired and sintered as necessary and in accordance with known methods to produce a finished composite, ceramic structure. Further, such green ceramic materials can be of the type that are capable of conducting hydrogen or oxygen ions at high temperature with the object of utilizing the finished composite ceramic structure as a ceramic membrane element.

  11. Experiments in cold fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, E.P.

    1986-03-28

    The work of Steve Jones and others in muon-catalyzed cold fusion of deuterium and hydrogen suggests the possibility of such fusion catalyzed by ions, or combinations of atoms, or more-or-less free electrons in solid and liquid materials. A hint that this might occur naturally comes from the heat generated in volcanic action in subduction zones on the earth. It is questionable whether the potential energy of material raised to the height of a midocean ridge and falling to the depth of an ocean trench can produce the geothermal effects seen in the volcanoes of subduction zones. If the ridge, the trench, the plates, and the asthenosphere are merely visible effects of deeper density-gradient driven circulations, it is still uncertain that observed energy-concentration effects fit the models.

  12. Magnetospheric electrostatic emissions and cold plasma densities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hubbard, R. F.; Birmingham, T. J.

    1978-01-01

    A synoptic study of electric wave, magnetometer, and plasma data from IMP-6 was carried out for times when banded electrostatic waves are observed between harmonics of the electron gyrofrequency in the earth's outer magnetosphere. Four separate classes of such waves were previously identified. The spatial and temporal occurrences of waves in each class are summarized here, as are correlations of occurrence with geomagnetic activity. Most importantly, associations between the observations of waves of different classes and the relative portions of cold and hot electrons present at the position of the spacecraft are established. Finally, evidence for the signature of the loss cone is sought in the plasma data.

  13. Anomalous cold in the Pangaean tropics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soreghan, Gerilyn S.; Soreghan, Michael J.; Poulsen, Christopher J.; Young, Roger A.; Eble, Cortland F.; Sweet, Dustin E.; Davogustto, Oswaldo C.

    2008-08-01

    The late Paleozoic archives the greatest glaciation of the Phanerozoic.Whereas high-latitude Gondwanan strata preserve widespread evidencefor continental ice, the Permo-Carboniferous tropics have longbeen considered analogous to today's: warm and shielded fromthe high-latitude cold. Here, we report on glacial and periglacialindicators that record episodes of freezing continental temperaturesin western equatorial Pangaea. An exhumed glacial valley andassociated deposits record direct evidence for glaciation thatextended to low paleoelevations in the ancestral Rocky Mountains.Furthermore, the Permo-Carboniferous archives the only knownoccurrence of widespread tropical loess in Earth's history;the volume, chemistry, and provenance of this loess(ite) ismost consistent with glacial derivation. Together with emergingindicators for cold elsewhere in low-latitude Pangaea, theseresults suggest that tropical climate was not buffered fromthe high latitudes and may record glacial-interglacial climateshifts of very large magnitude. Coupled climate-ice sheetmodel simulations demonstrate that low atmospheric CO2 and solarluminosity alone cannot account for such cold, and that otherfactors must be considered in attempting to explain this "best-known"analogue to our present Earth.

  14. The status of cold fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storms, E.

    This report attempts to update the status of the phenomenon of cold fusion. The new field is continuing to grow as a variety of nuclear reactions are discovered to occur in a variety of chemical environments at modest temperatures. However, it must be cautioned that most scientists consider cold fusion as something akin to UFO's, ESP, and numerology.

  15. A Cold and Wet Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fairén, A. G.; Davila, A. F.; Duport, L. G.; Uceda, E. R.; Lim, D. S.; Amils, R.; McKay, C. P.

    2008-03-01

    Here we consider the hypothesis that cold and hypersaline liquid solutions have been stable on the surface of Mars under subzero mean temperatures and for relatively extended periods of time, completing a hydrogeological cycle in a water-enriched but cold planet.

  16. Zinc gluconate and the common cold. Review of randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, S.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the evidence of seven randomized controlled trials (RCT) on the therapeutic effectiveness of zinc gluconate lozenges for treating the common cold. DATA SOURCES: Using the MeSH headings common cold and zinc gluconate, MEDLINE was searched from 1966 on for all published RCTs evaluating use of zinc gluconate for treating the common cold. STUDY SELECTION: For this study, only double-blind RCTs were included. SYNTHESIS: Fair evidence suggests that zinc gluconate lozenges have a therapeutic effect in treating the common cold. Starting therapy with zinc gluconate lozenges within 24 to 48 hours of onset of cold symptoms reduces the duration and severity of the cold. Patients must suck lozenges every 2 hours while awake during the cold. Minimum effective dose appears to be 13.3 mg of elemental zinc per lozenge. Evidence suggests that compounds such as citric acid, sorbitol, and mannitol bind the free zinc ion in the mouth, and this could account for variations in therapeutic benefit. Bad taste and nausea are important side effects of zinc lozenges. CONCLUSION: Evidence supports use of zinc gluconate lozenges for reducing the symptoms and duration of the common cold, but the side effects, bad taste, and therapeutic protocol might limit patient compliance. PMID:9612589

  17. Translating Research from Animal Models: Does It Matter that Our Rodents are So Cold?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Does it matter that preclinical rodent models are routinely housed below their thermoneutral zone and are thereby cold-stressed? We compile evidence showing that rodents housed below their thermoneutral zone are cold-stressed, hypermetalbolic, hypertensive, sleep-deprived, obesi...

  18. Cold-Weather Sports and Your Family

    MedlinePlus

    ... 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Cold-Weather Sports and Your Family KidsHealth > For Parents > Cold- ... once the weather turns frosty. Beating the Cold-Weather Blahs Once a chill is in the air, ...

  19. Cold dark matter halos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubinski, John Joseph

    The dark halos arising in the Cold Dark Matter (CDM) cosmology are simulated to investigate the relationship between the structure and kinematics of dark halos and galaxies. Realistic cosmological initial conditions and tidal field boundary conditions are used in N-body simulations of the collapse of density peaks to form dark halos. The core radii of dark halos are no greater than the softening radius, rs = 1.4 kpc. The density profiles can be fit with an analytical Hernquist (1990) profile with an effective power law which varies between -1 in the center to -4 at large radii. The rotation curves of dark halos resemble the flat rotation curves of spiral galaxies in the observed range, 1.5 approximately less than r approximately less than 30 kpc. The halos are strongly triaxial and very flat with (c/a) = 0.50 and (b/a) = 0.71. The distribution of ellipticities for dark halos reaches a maximum at epsilon = 0.5 in contrast to the distribution for elliptical galaxies which peaks at epsilon = 0.2 suggesting that ellipticals are much rounder than dark halos. Dark halos are generally flatter than their progenitor density peaks. The final shape and orientation of a dark halo are largely determined by tidal torquing and are sensitive to changes in the strength and orientation of a tidal field. Dark halos are pressure supported objects with negligible rotational support as indicated by the mean dimensionless spin, lamda = 0.042 +/- 0.024. The angular momentum vector tends to align with the true minor axis of dark halos. Elliptical galaxies have a similar behavior implied by the observation of the tendency for alignment of the rotation vector and the apparent minor axis. The origin of this behavior may be traced to the tendency for tidal torques to misalign with the major axis of a density peak. Tidal torques are found to isotropize the velocity ellipsoids of dark halos at large radii, contrary to the expectation of radially anisotropic velocity ellipsoids in cold collapse

  20. Halo cold dark matter and microlensing

    SciTech Connect

    Gates, Evalyn; Turner, Michael S.

    1993-12-01

    There is good evidence that most of the baryons in the Universe are dark and some evidence that most of the matter in the Universe is nonbaryonic with cold dark matter (cdm) being a promising possibility. We discuss expectations for the abundance of baryons and cdm in the halo of our galaxy and locally. We show that in plausible cdm models the local density of cdm is at least $10^{-25}\\gcmm3$. We also discuss what one can learn about the the local cdm density from microlensing of stars in the LMC by dark stars in the halo and, based upon a suite of reasonable two-component halo models, conclude that microlensing is not a sensitive probe of the local cdm density.

  1. Cold fusion studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hembree, D. M.; Burchfield, L. A.; Fuller, E. L., Jr.; Perey, F. G.; Mamantov, G.

    1990-06-01

    A series of experiments designed to detect the by-products expected from deuterium fusion occurring in the palladium and titanium cathodes of heavy water, D2O, electrolysis cells is reported. The primary purpose of this account is to outline the integrated experimental design developed to test the cold fusion hypothesis and to report preliminary results that support continuing the investigation. Apparent positive indicators of deuterium fusion were observed, but could not be repeated or proved to originate from the electrochemical cells. In one instance, two large increases in the neutron count rate, the largest of which exceeded the background by 27 standard deviations, were observed. In a separate experiment, one of the calorimetry cells appeared to be producing approximately 18 percent more power that the input value, but thermistor failure prevented an accurate recording of the event as a function of time. In general, the tritium levels in most cells followed the slow enrichment expected from the electrolysis of D2O containing a small amount of tritium. However, after 576 hours of electrolysis, one cell developed a tritium concentration approximately seven times greater than expected level.

  2. Zitterbewegung in Cold Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penteado, Poliana; Egues, J. Carlos

    2013-03-01

    In condensed matter systems, the coupling between spatial and spin degrees of freedom through the spin-orbit (SO) interaction offers the possibility of manipulating the electron spin via its orbital motion. The proposal by Datta and Das of a `spin transistor' for example, highlights the use of the SO interaction to control the electron spin via electrical means. Recently, arrangements of crossed lasers and magnetic fields have been used to trap and cool atoms in optical lattices and also to create light-induced gauge potentials, which mimic the SO interactions in real solids. In this work, we investigate the Zitterbewegung in cold atoms by starting from the effective SO Hamiltonian derived in Ref.. Cross-dressed atoms as effective spins can provide a proper setting in which to observe this effect, as the relevant parameter range of SO strengths may be more easily attainable in this context. We find a variety of peculiar Zitterbewegung orbits in real and pseudo-spin spaces, e.g., cycloids and ellipses - all of which obtained with realistic parameters. This work is supported by FAPESP, CAPES and CNPq.

  3. Derivative of wheat germ agglutinin specifically inhibits formyl-peptide-induced polymorphonuclear leukocyte chemotaxis by blocking re-expression (or recycling) of receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Perez, H.D.; Elfman, F.; Lobo, E.; Sklar, L.; Chenoweth, D.; Hooper, C.

    1986-03-01

    The mechanism of action of a derivative of wheat germ agglutinin (WGA-D) which specifically and irreversibly inhibits N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (FMLP)-induced polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) chemotaxis was examined. At a concentration that completely inhibited PMN chemotaxis, WGA-D had no effect on either the uptake or release of (/sup 3/H)-FMLP by PMN. Similarly, WGA-D did not affect either the short-term binding to, or internalization by, PMN of a fluoresceinated FMLP analog. WGA-D did interfere, however, with the re-expression (or recycling) of FMLP receptors by PMN that had been preincubated with 1 ..mu..M FMLP for 10 min at 4/sup 0/C. This effect was specific for WGA-D, because it was not observed when concanavalin A was used. Scatchard plot analysis of FMLP binding to PMN after receptor re-expression demonstrated that WGA-D-treated PMN had a significant diminution in the number of high affinity receptors. WGA-D-mediated inhibition of FMLP receptor re-expression was associated with inhibition of FMLP-induced PMN chemotaxis, but had no effect on either FMLP-induced PMN superoxide anion generation or degranulation. Studies using (/sup 12/%I)-WGA-D demonstrated that PMN did not internalize WGA-D spontaneously. The data indicate that WGA-D perhaps by binding to the FMLP receptor, inhibits FMLP-induced PMN chemotaxis by blocking the re-expression (or recycling) of a population of receptors required for continuous migration.

  4. Crystal Structure of the C-terminal Region of Streptococcus mutans Antigen I/II and Characterization of Salivary Agglutinin Adherence Domains

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, Matthew R.; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta R.; Crowley, Paula J.; Kelly, Charles; Mitchell, Tim J.; Brady, L. Jeannine; Deivanayagam, Champion

    2012-05-29

    The Streptococcus mutans antigen I/II (AgI/II) is a cell surface-localized protein that adheres to salivary components and extracellular matrix molecules. Here we report the 2.5 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure of the complete C-terminal region of AgI/II. The C-terminal region is comprised of three major domains: C{sub 1}, C{sub 2}, and C{sub 3}. Each domain adopts a DE-variant IgG fold, with two {beta}-sheets whose A and F strands are linked through an intramolecular isopeptide bond. The adherence of the C-terminal AgI/II fragments to the putative tooth surface receptor salivary agglutinin (SAG), as monitored by surface plasmon resonance, indicated that the minimal region of binding was contained within the first and second DE-variant-IgG domains (C{sub 1} and C{sub 2}) of the C terminus. The minimal C-terminal region that could inhibit S. mutans adherence to SAG was also confirmed to be within the C{sub 1} and C{sub 2} domains. Competition experiments demonstrated that the C- and N-terminal regions of AgI/II adhere to distinct sites on SAG. A cleft formed at the intersection between these C{sub 1} and C{sub 2} domains bound glucose molecules from the cryo-protectant solution, revealing a putative binding site for its highly glycosylated receptor SAG. Finally, electron microscopy images confirmed the elongated structure of AgI/II and enabled building a composite tertiary model that encompasses its two distinct binding regions.

  5. Impact of Wisteria floribunda Agglutinin-Positive Mac-2-Binding Protein in Patients with Hepatitis C Virus-Related Compensated Liver Cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Hasegawa, Kunihiro; Takata, Ryo; Nishikawa, Hiroki; Enomoto, Hirayuki; Ishii, Akio; Iwata, Yoshinori; Miyamoto, Yuho; Ishii, Noriko; Yuri, Yukihisa; Nakano, Chikage; Nishimura, Takashi; Yoh, Kazunori; Aizawa, Nobuhiro; Sakai, Yoshiyuki; Ikeda, Naoto; Takashima, Tomoyuki; Iijima, Hiroko; Nishiguchi, Shuhei

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to examine the effect of Wisteria floribunda agglutinin-positive Mac-2-binding protein (WFA+-M2BP) level on survival comparing with other laboratory liver fibrosis markers in hepatitis C virus (HCV)-related compensated liver cirrhosis (LC) (n = 165). For assessing prognostic performance of continuous fibrosis markers, we adapted time-dependent receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curves for clinical outcome. In time-dependent ROC analysis, annual area under the ROCs (AUROCs) were plotted. We also calculated the total sum of AUROCs in all time-points (TAAT score) in each fibrosis marker. WFA+-M2BP value ranged from 0.66 cutoff index (COI) to 19.95 COI (median value, 5.29 COI). Using ROC analysis for survival, the optimal cutoff point for WFA+-M2BP was 6.15 COI (AUROC = 0.79348, sensitivity = 80.0%, specificity = 74.78%). The cumulative five-year survival rate in patients with WFA+-M2BP ≥ 6.15 COI (n = 69) was 43.99%, while that in patients with WFA+-M2BP < 6.15 COI (n = 96) was 88.40% (p < 0.0001). In the multivariate analysis, absence of hepatocellular carcinoma (p = 0.0008), WFA+-M2BP < 6.15 COI (p = 0.0132), achievement of sustained virological response (p < 0.0001) and des-γ-carboxy prothrombin < 41 mAU/mL (p = 0.0018) were significant favorable predictors linked to survival. In time-dependent ROC analysis in all cases, WFA+-M2BP had the highest TAAT score among liver fibrosis markers. In conclusion, WFA+-M2BP can be a useful predictor in HCV-related compensated LC. PMID:27626413

  6. A dopaminergic projection to the rat mammillary nuclei demonstrated by retrograde transport of wheat germ agglutinin-horseradish peroxidase and tyrosine hydroxylase immunohistochemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonzalo-Ruiz, A.; Alonso, A.; Sanz, J. M.; Llinas, R. R.

    1992-01-01

    The presence and distribution of dopaminergic neurons and terminals in the hypothalamus of the rat were studied by tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) immunohistochemistry. Strongly labelled TH-immunoreactive neurons were seen in the dorsomedial hypothalamic nucleus, periventricular region, zona incerta, arcuate nucleus, and supramammillary nucleus. A few TH-positive neurons were also identified in the dorsal and ventral premammillary nucleus, as well as the lateral hypothalamic area. TH-immunoreactive fibres and terminals were unevenly distributed in the mammillary nuclei; small, weakly labelled terminals were scattered in the medial mammillary nucleus, while large, strongly labelled, varicose terminals were densely concentrated in the internal part of the lateral mammillary nucleus. A few dorsoventrally oriented TH-positive axon bundles were also identified in the lateral mammillary nucleus. A dopaminergic projection to the mammillary nuclei from the supramammillary nucleus and lateral hypothalamic area was identified by double labelling with retrograde transport of wheat germ agglutinin-horseradish peroxidase and TH-immunohistochemistry. The lateral mammillary nucleus receives a weak dopaminergic projection from the medial, and stronger projections from the lateral, caudal supramammillary nucleus. The double-labelled neurons in the lateral supramammillary nucleus appear to encapsulate the caudal end of the mammillary nuclei. The medial mammillary nucleus receives a very light dopaminergic projection from the caudal lateral hypothalamic area. These results suggest that the supramammillary nucleus is the principal source of the dopaminergic input to the mammillary nuclei, establishing a local TH-pathway in the mammillary complex. The supramammillary cell groups are able to modulate the limbic system through its dopaminergic input to the mammillary nuclei as well as through its extensive dopaminergic projection to the lateral septal nucleus.

  7. Stoichiometry of wheat germ agglutinin as a morphology controlling agent and as a morphology controlling agent and as a morphology protective agent for the human erythrocyte.

    PubMed

    Lovrien, R E; Anderson, R A

    1980-06-01

    The lectin wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) is an unusually effective agent in controlling both the forward and reverse reactions of the reversible morphology conversion discocyte in equilibrium with echinocyte for the human erythrocyte. Under conditions severe enough to drive the reactions to completion in either direction without the lectin, WGA is able to stabilize both these morphologies and to fully prevent conversion of either morphology. The lectin can quantitatively block both reactions. The ability of WGA to carry out these functions has no obvious rate limitation. Its effectiveness depends mainly on its binding stoichiometry, particularly toward the transmembrane glycoprotein, glycophorin. The critical binding stoichiometries for both the lectin and the echinocytic agent were determined in relation to the binding isotherms using 125I-labeled WGA and 35S-labeled dodecyl sulfate. There appear to be two principal stoichiometries for WGA binding that are important in its control of erythrocyte morphology. The first stoichiometry marks the threshold of obvious protection of the discocyte against strong echinocytic agents such as detergents and, likely, is simply a 1:1 stoichiometry of WGA: glycophorin, assuming currently recognized values of 3--5 x 10(5) copies of glycophorin per cell. The second important stoichiometry, whereby the cell's morphology is protected against extremely severe stress, involves binding of approximately 4--5 WGA molecules per glycophorin. The controls that WGA exerts can be instantly abolished by added N-acetylglucosamine. However, N-acetylglucosamine ligands on the erythrocyte are of less importance than membrane neuraminic acid residues in enabling WGA to control the cell's morphology, as is shown by comparing intact cells with completely desialated cells. WGA can also be used to produce elliptocytes in vitro, but it does this at levels approaching monolayer coverage of the cell with WGA.

  8. Mouse T-lymphocyte activation by Urtica dioica agglutinin. II.--Original pattern of cell activation and cytokine production induced by UDA.

    PubMed

    Le Moal, M A; Colle, J H; Galelli, A; Truffa-Bachi, P

    1992-09-01

    Urtica dioica agglutinin (UDA) is a T-lymphocyte-specific polyclonal activator that differs from ConA, the classical mouse T-cell mitogen, by inducing a late and limited proliferation of a distinct T-cell subset recruited among both CD4+ and CD8+ lymphocytes. We investigated the possibility that the particular kinetics may originate from UDA-specific activation processes in which the known early mandatory signals were completed only after an extended delay. We report that the time of contact required between lectin and the cell membrane to acquire the capacity to proceed into cell cycle was much longer (36-40 h) for UDA than for ConA (8-10 h). Addition of phorbol ester, which artificially induces PKC translocation, or ionomycin, which provokes Ca2+ mobilization, did not accelerate the proliferative kinetics, suggesting that these early mandatory signals are not the limiting factors in the delayed proliferation. The induction of c-myc was retarded in the UDA group, and there was a good correlation between the kinetics of c-myc induction and the kinetics of cell proliferation. The comparison of the level of transcription of the genes encoding different cytokines revealed additional differences between the two mitogens: the whole wave of cytokine gene expression was delayed with UDA. In particular, IL2, IL3 and IFN gamma gene expression was retarded compared to the ConA-induced single wave. An even later transcriptional wave took place at around 72 h for IL4 and IL5. Finally, this particular kinetics corresponded to an unusually high level of IL3 and IFN gamma and a low level of IL4 and IL5 gene transcripts.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1439142

  9. Selective expansion followed by profound deletion of mature V beta 8.3+ T cells in vivo after exposure to the superantigenic lectin Urtica dioica agglutinin.

    PubMed

    Galelli, A; Delcourt, M; Wagner, M C; Peumans, W; Truffa-Bachi, P

    1995-03-15

    Urtica dioica agglutinin (UDA) is a superantigen that, in vitro, binds to specific carbohydrate structures on class II and induces a sixfold enrichment of V beta 8.3+ BALB/c mice splenic T cells. Superantigens have pleiotropic effects in vivo, causing the activation, proliferation, and deletion of specific T cells, but are heterogenous in regard to their effects on T cell tolerization. We, therefore, compared the responses of peripheral T cells from adult BALB/c mice with the i.v. injection of 50 micrograms UDA or the bacterial superantigen staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB) that also recognizes the V beta 8.3 gene product. The data presented indicate that activation, clonal expansion, anergy, and death of V beta 8.3+ T cells occur sequentially after UDA administration. Two days after UDA injection, the proportion of V beta 8.3+ T cells in the periphery is elevated to approximately twice that of normal mice. This expansion occurs in both CD4+ and CD8+ subsets. V beta 8.3+ T cells from UDA-primed mice are anergic to UDA restimulation and fail to proliferate or to produce IL-2. Futhermore, the proliferation of V beta 8.3+ T cells is followed by their rapid disappearance concomitant with their specific elimination by apoptosis. In 1 wk, all CD4+ V beta 8.3+ peripheral T cells are deleted. The decline of V beta 8.3+ T cells in the CD4+ subset is more than in the CD8+ subset. This occurs in thymectomized and in thymus-intact animals. Two months after UDA priming, the percentage of V beta 8.3+ T cells is still lower than in control mice. PMID:7876535

  10. Versatile cold atom target apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Goetz, Simone; Hoeltkemeier, Bastian; Hofmann, Christoph S.; Litsch, Dominic; DePaola, Brett D.; Weidemueller, Matthias

    2012-07-15

    We report on a compact and transportable apparatus that consists of a cold atomic target at the center of a high resolution recoil ion momentum spectrometer. Cold rubidium atoms serve as a target which can be operated in three different modes: in continuous mode, consisting of a cold atom beam generated by a two-dimensional magneto-optical trap, in normal mode in which the atoms from the beam are trapped in a three-dimensional magneto-optical trap (3D MOT), and in high density mode in which the 3D MOT is operated in dark spontaneous optical trap configuration. The targets are characterized using photoionization.

  11. Plants in a cold climate.

    PubMed Central

    Smallwood, Maggie; Bowles, Dianna J

    2002-01-01

    Plants are able to survive prolonged exposure to sub-zero temperatures; this ability is enhanced by pre-exposure to low, but above-zero temperatures. This process, known as cold acclimation, is briefly reviewed from the perception of cold, through transduction of the low-temperature signal to functional analysis of cold-induced gene products. The stresses that freezing of apoplastic water imposes on plant cells is considered and what is understood about the mechanisms that plants use to combat those stresses discussed, with particular emphasis on the role of the extracellular matrix. PMID:12171647

  12. Genomic and Expression Analyses of Cold-Adapted Microorganisms.

    SciTech Connect

    Bakermans, Corien; Bergholz, Peter W.; Rodrigues, Debora F.; Vishnivetskaya, T.; Ayala-del-Río, Hector L.; Tiedje, James M.

    2011-01-01

    Contents 7.1 Introduction 7.2 Ecological evidence of bacterial adaptation to cold 7.2.1 Characteristics of cold environments and implications for microbial ecology 7.2.2 Ecological adaptation in Exiguobacterium spp. and Psychrobacter spp. 7.3 Gene Expression Responses to the Cold 7.3.1 Fundamentals of Gene Expression Responses to Cold 7.3.2 Acclimation for Life in Cold Habitats 7.3.2.1 Translation and Chaperone Proteins: Safeguarding the functional units of cellular physiology 7.3.2.2 Carbon and Energy metabolism: resource efficiency over long generation times 7.3.2.3 Amino Acid Biosynthesis: Species-specific responses to species-specific deficiencies 7.3.2.4 Compatible solutes: a concomitant response in cryoenvironments 7.3.2.5 Membrane fluidity: A major role in the overall metabolic rate at temperature 7.3.2.6 The cell wall at low temperature: A poorly understood growth rate determinant 7.3.2.7 Transporters: The balance between local nutrient uptake and depletion 7.3.2.8 Genome plasticity. The potential role of transposases and repeated sequences. 7.4 Protein adaptations to cold 7.4.1 The low temperature challenge 7.4.2 The stability activity relationship 7.4.3 Structural features of cold adapted enzymes. 7.4.4 Hydrophobic interactions 7.4.5 Electrostatic interactions 7.4.5.1 Arginine 7.4.5.2 Acidic residues 7.4.6 Structural elements 7.4.6.1 -helices and -sheets 7.4.6.2 Proline and Glycine 7.4.6.3 Disordered regions 7.5 Comparison of cold- and warm-adapted Exiguobacterium strains 7.5.1 Phylogeny reflects adaptations to environmental conditions 7.5.2 Genomic comparison of two strains 7.6 Summary and future directions

  13. Measuring the Cold Mask Offset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roye, E.; Krist, J.; Schultz, A. B.; Wiklind, T.

    2003-04-01

    An unexpected increase in measured thermal background during the Cycle 11 early calibration program caused speculation that the cold mask position could have shifted since Cycle 7. To address this concern, a single orbit NICMOS program was executed (Program ID: 9704) to obtain deep PSF images of the star LHS1846 in all three cameras. Analysis of this data using the Phase Retrieval software package revealed a minimal amount of cold mask shift since Cycle 7 and provided new, more accurate cold mask values for the Tiny Tim PSF modeling software. It was concluded that the cold mask position was not the cause of increased thermal background observed during the Cycle 11 early calibration program. Increased thermal background has since been determined to be the result of increased thermal load on the HST aft shroud due to the addition of ACS and NCS during SM3b.

  14. Cold nuclear fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsyganov, E. N.; Bavizhev, M. D.; Buryakov, M. G.; Dabagov, S. B.; Golovatyuk, V. M.; Lobastov, S. P.

    2015-07-01

    If target deuterium atoms were implanted in a metal crystal in accelerator experiments, a sharp increase in the probability of DD-fusion reaction was clearly observed when compared with the reaction's theoretical value. The electronic screening potential, which for a collision of free deuterium atoms is about 27 eV, reached 300-700 eV in the case of the DD-fusion in metallic crystals. These data leads to the conclusion that a ban must exist for deuterium atoms to be in the ground state 1s in a niche filled with free conduction electrons. At the same time, the state 2p whose energy level is only 10 eV above that of state 1s is allowed in these conditions. With anisotropy of 2p, 3p or above orbitals, their spatial positions are strictly determined in the lattice coordinate system. When filling out the same potential niches with two deuterium atoms in the states 2p, 3p or higher, the nuclei of these atoms can be permanently positioned without creating much Coulomb repulsion at a very short distance from each other. In this case, the transparency of the potential barrier increases dramatically compared to the ground state 1s for these atoms. The probability of the deuterium nuclei penetrating the Coulomb barrier by zero quantum vibration of the DD-system also increases dramatically. The so-called cold nuclear DD-fusion for a number of years was registered in many experiments, however, was still rejected by mainstream science for allegedly having no consistent scientific explanation. Finally, it received the validation. Below, we outline the concept of this explanation and give the necessary calculations. This paper also considers the further destiny of the formed intermediate state of 4He∗.

  15. Antihydrogen from merged plasmas - cold enough to trap?

    SciTech Connect

    Madsen, Niels

    2006-10-18

    The merging of antiprotons with a positron plasma is the predominant and highest efficient method for cold antihydrogen formation used to date. We present experimental evidence that this method has serious disadvantages for producing antihydrogen cold enough to be trapped. Antihydrogen is neutral but may be trapped in a magnetic field minimum. However, the depth of such traps are of order 1 K, shallow compared to the kinetic energies in current antihydrogen experiments. Studying the spatial distribution of the antihydrogen emerging from the ATHENA positron plasma we have, by comparison with a simple model, extracted information about the temperature of the antihydrogen formed. We find that antihydrogen is formed before thermal equilibrium is attained between the antiprotons and the positrons, and thus that further positron cooling may not be sufficient for producing antihydrogen cold enough to be trapped. We discuss the implications for trapping of antihydrogen in a magnetic trap, important for ongoing work by the ALPHA collaboration.

  16. Cold Accretion from the Cosmic Web

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-06-01

    The cosmic web is a vast, foam-like network of filaments and voids stretching throughout the universe. How did the first galaxies form within the cosmic web, at the intersections of filaments? New observations of a protodisk a galaxy in the early stages of formation may provide a clue.Models for Galaxy FormationNarrowband image of the candidate protodisk (marked with a white ellipse) and filaments (outlined in white). [Adapted from Martin et al. 2016]The standard model for galaxy formation, known as the hot accretion model, argues that galaxies form out of collapsing, virialized gas that forms a hot halo and then slowly cools, fueling star and galaxy formation at its center.But what if galaxies are actually formed from cool gas? In this contrasting picture, the cold accretion model, cool (temperature of ~104 K) unshocked gas from cosmic web filaments flows directly onto galactic disks forming at the filamentary intersections. The narrow streams of cold gas deliver fuel for star formation.A signature of the cold accretion model is that the streams of cold gas form a disk as the gas spirals inward, sinking toward the central protogalaxy. Detecting these cold-flow disks could be strong evidence in support of this model and last year, a team of authors reported just such a detection! This year theyre back again with a second object that may provide confirmation of cold accretion from the cosmic web.A Candidate ProtodiskThe team, led by Christopher Martin (California Institute of Technology), made the discovery using the Palomar Cosmic Web Imager, an instrument designed to observe faint emission from the intergalactic medium. Martin and collaborators found a large (R 100 kpc, more than six times the radius of the Milky Way), rotating structure of hydrogen gas, illuminated by the nearby quasi-stellar object QSO HS1549+1919. The system is located at a redshift of z~2.8.The authors testthree potential kinematic models of the candidate protodisk and filaments. In (a) two

  17. Cold and lonely: does social exclusion literally feel cold?

    PubMed

    Zhong, Chen-Bo; Leonardelli, Geoffrey J

    2008-09-01

    Metaphors such as icy stare depict social exclusion using cold-related concepts; they are not to be taken literally and certainly do not imply reduced temperature. Two experiments, however, revealed that social exclusion literally feels cold. Experiment 1 found that participants who recalled a social exclusion experience gave lower estimates of room temperature than did participants who recalled an inclusion experience. In Experiment 2, social exclusion was directly induced through an on-line virtual interaction, and participants who were excluded reported greater desire for warm food and drink than did participants who were included. These findings are consistent with the embodied view of cognition and support the notion that social perception involves physical and perceptual content. The psychological experience of coldness not only aids understanding of social interaction, but also is an integral part of the experience of social exclusion. PMID:18947346

  18. Accidental hypothermia and death from cold in urban areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Masatoshi; Tokudome, Shogo

    1991-12-01

    Hypothermia is considered a sericus problem in big cities. In order to clarify factors contributing to urban hypothermia and death from cold which will continue to be an issue in cities in the future, we analyzed autopsy reports recorded in the Tokyo Medical Examiner's Office from 1974 to 1983. In a total of 18346 autopsy reports 157 deaths had been diagnosed as due to exposure to cold. Of these cases, the greatest number were males in their forties and fifties, and most of these were inebriated and/or homeless. Eighty-four perent of urban hypothermia cases occurred when the outdoor temperature was below 5°C, and 50% of deaths from cold occurred when the outdoor temperature was between 0° and 5°C. There were no incidences of death from cold when the minimum outdoor temperature had remained above 16°C. Seventy-four percent of deaths from cold occurred during the winter months of December, January and February, and most of the remaining deaths occurred in March and November. There were no deaths from cold from June to August. More than half of all deaths from cold occurred from 3.00 a.m. to 9.00 a.m., with the peak occurring at 5.00 a.m. A blood alcohol concentration of over 2.5 mg/ml had often been found in those in their forties and fifties who had died from hypothermia, and autopsy had often revealed disorders of the liver, digestive system, and circulatory system. Chronic lesions of the liver, probably due to alcoholism, were found in many cases; few cases showed no evidence of alcoholism and these were significantly different from the former group.

  19. Airway cooling and mucosal injury during cold weather exercise.

    PubMed

    Davis, M S; Lockard, A J; Marlin, D J; Freed, A N

    2002-09-01

    In human subjects that exercise strenuously in cold weather, there is evidence that hyperventilation with cold air leads to peripheral airway cooling, desiccation and mucosal injury. Our hypothesis was that hyperventilation with cold air can result in penetration of unconditioned air (air that is not completely warmed and humidified) into the peripheral airways of exercising horses, resulting in peripheral airway mucosal injury. To test this hypothesis, a thermister-tipped catheter was inserted through the midcervical trachea and advanced into a sublobar bronchus in three horses that cantered on a treadmill at 6.6 m/s while breathing cold (5 degrees C) air. The mean (+/- s.e.) intra-airway temperature during cantering was 33.3 +/- 0.4 degrees C, a value comparable to the bronchial lumen temperatures measured in man during maximal exercise while breathing subfreezing dry air. In a second experiment, 6 fit Thoroughbred racehorses with satisfactory performance were used to determine whether strenuous exercise in cold conditions can produce airway injury. Horses were assigned to Exercise (E) or Control (C) groups in a random crossover design. Samples of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) in the E treatment were recovered within 30 min of galloping exercise in 4 degrees C, 100% relative humidity (E), while in C BALF samples were obtained when the horses had not performed any exercise for at least 48 h prior. Ciliated epithelial cells in BALF were higher in E than in the C treatment. Similar results have been found in human athletes and laboratory animal models of cold weather exercise. These results support the hypothesis that, similar to man, horses that exercise in cold weather experience peripheral airway mucosal injury due to the penetration of unconditioned air. Furthermore, these results suggest that airway cooling and desiccation may be a factor in airway inflammation commonly found in equine athletes.

  20. Spectroscopy with cold and ultra-cold neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abele, Hartmut; Jenke, Tobias; Konrad, Gertrud

    2015-05-01

    We present two new types of spectroscopy methods for cold and ultra-cold neutrons. The first method, which uses the R×B drift effect to disperse charged particles in a uniformly curved magnetic field, allows to study neutron β-decay. We aim for a precision on the 10-4 level. The second method that we refer to as gravity resonance spectroscopy (GRS) allows to test Newton's gravity law at short distances. At the level of precision we are able to provide constraints on any possible gravity-like interaction. In particular, limits on dark energy chameleon fields are improved by several orders of magnitude.

  1. Mathematical modeling of cold cap

    SciTech Connect

    Pokorny, Richard; Hrma, Pavel R.

    2012-10-13

    The ultimate goal of studies of cold cap behavior in glass melters is to increase the rate of glass processing in an energy-efficient manner. Regrettably, mathematical models, which are ideal tools for assessing the responses of melters to process parameters, have not paid adequate attention to the cold cap. In this study, we consider a cold cap resting on a pool of molten glass from which it receives a steady heat flux while temperature, velocity, and extent of conversion are functions of the position along the vertical coordinate. A one-dimensional (1D) mathematical model simulates this process by solving the differential equations for mass and energy balances with appropriate boundary conditions and constitutive relationships for material properties. The sensitivity analyses on the effects of incoming heat fluxes to the cold cap through its lower and upper boundaries show that the cold cap thickness increases as the heat flux from above increases, and decreases as the total heat flux increases. We also discuss the effects of foam, originating from batch reactions and from redox reactions in molten glass and argue that models must represent the foam layer to achieve a reliable prediction of the melting rate as a function of feed properties and melter conditions.

  2. Cold air systems: Sleeping giant

    SciTech Connect

    MacCracken, C.D. )

    1994-04-01

    This article describes how cold air systems help owners increase the profits from their buildings by reducing electric costs and improving indoor air quality through lower relative humidity levels. Cold air distribution involves energy savings, cost savings, space savings, greater comfort, cleaner air, thermal storage, tighter ducting, coil redesign, lower relative humidities, retrofitting, and improved indoor air quality (IAQ). It opens a door for architects, engineers, owners, builders, environmentalists, retrofitters, designers, occupants, and manufacturers. Three things have held up cold air's usage: multiple fan-powered boxes that ate up the energy savings of primary fans. Cold air room diffusers that provided inadequate comfort. Condensation from ducts, boxes, and diffusers. Such problems have been largely eliminated through research and development by utilities and manufacturers. New cold air diffusers no longer need fan powered boxes. It has also been found that condensation is not a concern so long as the ducts are located in air conditioned space, such as drop ceilings or central risers, where relative humidity falls quickly during morning startup.

  3. Search for cold debris disks around M-dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lestrade, J.-F.; Wyatt, M. C.; Bertoldi, F.; Dent, W. R. F.; Menten, K. M.

    2006-12-01

    Debris disks are believed to be related to planetesimals left over around stars after planet formation has ceased. The frequency of debris disks around M-dwarfs which account for 70% of the stars in the Galaxy is unknown while constrains have already been found for A- to K-type stars. We have searched for cold debris disks around 32 field M-dwarfs by conducting observations at λ = 850~μm with the SCUBA bolometer array camera at the JCMT and at λ = 1.2 mm with the MAMBO array at the IRAM 30-m telescopes. This is the first survey of a large sample of M-dwarfs conducted to provide statistical constraints on debris disks around this type of stars. We have detected a new debris disk around the M0.5 dwarf GJ 842.2 at λ = 850~μm, providing evidence for cold dust at large distance from this star (~300 AU). By combining the results of our survey with the ones of Liu et al. (2004), we estimate for the first time the detection rate of cold debris disks around field M-dwarfs with ages between 20 and 200 Myr. This detection rate is 13+6-8% and is consistent with the detection rate of cold debris disks (9-23%) around A- to K-type main sequence stars of the same age. This is an indication that cold disks may be equally prevalent across stellar spectral types.

  4. A HIGH FIDELITY SAMPLE OF COLD FRONT CLUSTERS FROM THE CHANDRA ARCHIVE

    SciTech Connect

    Owers, Matt S.; Nulsen, Paul E. J.; Markevitch, Maxim; Couch, Warrick J.

    2009-10-20

    This paper presents a sample of 'cold front' clusters selected from the Chandra archive. The clusters are selected based purely on the existence of surface brightness edges in their Chandra images which are modeled as density jumps. A combination of the derived density and temperature jumps across the fronts is used to select nine robust examples of cold front clusters: 1ES0657 - 558, Abell 1201, Abell 1758N, MS1455.0+2232, Abell 2069, Abell 2142, Abell 2163, RXJ1720.1+2638, and Abell 3667. This sample is the subject of an ongoing study aimed at relating cold fronts to cluster merger activity, and understanding how the merging environment affects the cluster constituents. Here, temperature maps are presented along with the Chandra X-ray images. A dichotomy is found in the sample in that there exists a subsample of cold front clusters which are clearly mergers based on their X-ray morphologies, and a second subsample of clusters which harbor cold fronts, but have surprisingly relaxed X-ray morphologies, and minimal evidence for merger activity at other wavelengths. For this second subsample, the existence of a cold front provides the sole evidence for merger activity at X-ray wavelengths. We discuss how cold fronts can provide additional information which may be used to constrain merger histories, and also the possibility of using cold fronts to distinguish major and minor mergers.

  5. Cold sensitivity of TRPA1 is unveiled by the prolyl hydroxylation blockade-induced sensitization to ROS.

    PubMed

    Miyake, Takahito; Nakamura, Saki; Zhao, Meng; So, Kanako; Inoue, Keisuke; Numata, Tomohiro; Takahashi, Nobuaki; Shirakawa, Hisashi; Mori, Yasuo; Nakagawa, Takayuki; Kaneko, Shuji

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) is a polymodal nociceptor that plays an important role in pain generation, but its role as a cold nociceptor is still controversial. Here, we propose that TRPA1 can sense noxious cold via transduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) signalling. We show that inhibiting hydroxylation of a proline residue within the N-terminal ankyrin repeat of human TRPA1 by mutation or using a prolyl hydroxylase (PHD) inhibitor potentiates the cold sensitivity of TRPA1 in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. Inhibiting PHD in mice triggers mouse TRPA1 sensitization sufficiently to sense cold-evoked ROS, which causes cold hypersensitivity. Furthermore, this phenomenon underlies the acute cold hypersensitivity induced by the chemotherapeutic agent oxaliplatin or its metabolite oxalate. Thus, our findings provide evidence that blocking prolyl hydroxylation reveals TRPA1 sensitization to ROS, which enables TRPA1 to convert ROS signalling into cold sensitivity. PMID:27628562

  6. Cold sensitivity of TRPA1 is unveiled by the prolyl hydroxylation blockade-induced sensitization to ROS

    PubMed Central

    Miyake, Takahito; Nakamura, Saki; Zhao, Meng; So, Kanako; Inoue, Keisuke; Numata, Tomohiro; Takahashi, Nobuaki; Shirakawa, Hisashi; Mori, Yasuo; Nakagawa, Takayuki; Kaneko, Shuji

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) is a polymodal nociceptor that plays an important role in pain generation, but its role as a cold nociceptor is still controversial. Here, we propose that TRPA1 can sense noxious cold via transduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) signalling. We show that inhibiting hydroxylation of a proline residue within the N-terminal ankyrin repeat of human TRPA1 by mutation or using a prolyl hydroxylase (PHD) inhibitor potentiates the cold sensitivity of TRPA1 in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. Inhibiting PHD in mice triggers mouse TRPA1 sensitization sufficiently to sense cold-evoked ROS, which causes cold hypersensitivity. Furthermore, this phenomenon underlies the acute cold hypersensitivity induced by the chemotherapeutic agent oxaliplatin or its metabolite oxalate. Thus, our findings provide evidence that blocking prolyl hydroxylation reveals TRPA1 sensitization to ROS, which enables TRPA1 to convert ROS signalling into cold sensitivity. PMID:27628562

  7. Cold welded laser mirror assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Chaffee, E.G.

    1989-02-07

    A gas laser apparatus is described comprising: (a) a gas laser tube having a bore extending between cathode and anode ends; (b) the laser tube terminating at each end with a bellows assembly operative to extend the length of the tube bore; (c) each bellows assembly comprising: (i) an adjustably positionable metal bellows secured to a selected end of the tube; (ii) a tubular pedestal secured at one end to the bellows to form an extension thereof and at the opposite end providing a mirror mount surface; (iii) a mirror secured to the surface; (iv) a cold weld material located between the mirror and mirror mount surface; and (v) retaining means secured to the pedestal encasing the outer portion of the mirror and operative to apply pressure to the cold weld material to establish a cold weld seal between the mirror and mirror mount surface to retain the mirror on and prevent shifting of the mirror with respect to the mirror mount surface.

  8. COLD-SAT dynamic model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Neil S.; Bollenbacher, Gary

    1992-01-01

    This report discusses the development and underlying mathematics of a rigid-body computer model of a proposed cryogenic on-orbit liquid depot storage, acquisition, and transfer spacecraft (COLD-SAT). This model, referred to in this report as the COLD-SAT dynamic model, consists of both a trajectory model and an attitudinal model. All disturbance forces and torques expected to be significant for the actual COLD-SAT spacecraft are modeled to the required degree of accuracy. Control and experimental thrusters are modeled, as well as fluid slosh. The model also computes microgravity disturbance accelerations at any specified point in the spacecraft. The model was developed by using the Boeing EASY5 dynamic analysis package and will run on Apollo, Cray, and other computing platforms.

  9. Glutathione Transferases Superfamily: Cold-Inducible Expression of Distinct GST Genes in Brassica oleracea

    PubMed Central

    Vijayakumar, Harshavardhanan; Thamilarasan, Senthil Kumar; Shanmugam, Ashokraj; Natarajan, Sathishkumar; Jung, Hee-Jeong; Park, Jong-In; Kim, HyeRan; Chung, Mi-Young; Nou, Ill-Sup

    2016-01-01

    Plants, as sessile organisms, can suffer serious growth and developmental consequences under cold stress conditions. Glutathione transferases (GSTs, EC 2.5.1.18) are ubiquitous and multifunctional conjugating proteins, which play a major role in stress responses by preventing oxidative damage by reactive oxygen species (ROS). Currently, understanding of their function(s) during different biochemical and signaling pathways under cold stress condition remain unclear. In this study, using combined computational strategy, we identified 65 Brassica oleracea glutathione transferases (BoGST) and characterized them based on evolutionary analysis into 11 classes. Inter-species and intra-species duplication was evident between BoGSTs and Arabidopsis GSTs. Based on localization analyses, we propose possible pathways in which GST genes are involved during cold stress. Further, expression analysis of the predicted putative functions for GST genes were investigated in two cold contrasting genotypes (cold tolerance and susceptible) under cold condition, most of these genes were highly expressed at 6 h and 1 h in the cold tolerant (CT) and cold susceptible (CS) lines, respectively. Overall, BoGSTU19, BoGSTU24, BoGSTF10 are candidate genes highly expressed in B. oleracea. Further investigation of GST superfamily in B. oleracea will aid in understanding complex mechanism underlying cold tolerance in plants. PMID:27472324

  10. Glutathione Transferases Superfamily: Cold-Inducible Expression of Distinct GST Genes in Brassica oleracea.

    PubMed

    Vijayakumar, Harshavardhanan; Thamilarasan, Senthil Kumar; Shanmugam, Ashokraj; Natarajan, Sathishkumar; Jung, Hee-Jeong; Park, Jong-In; Kim, HyeRan; Chung, Mi-Young; Nou, Ill-Sup

    2016-01-01

    Plants, as sessile organisms, can suffer serious growth and developmental consequences under cold stress conditions. Glutathione transferases (GSTs, EC 2.5.1.18) are ubiquitous and multifunctional conjugating proteins, which play a major role in stress responses by preventing oxidative damage by reactive oxygen species (ROS). Currently, understanding of their function(s) during different biochemical and signaling pathways under cold stress condition remain unclear. In this study, using combined computational strategy, we identified 65 Brassica oleracea glutathione transferases (BoGST) and characterized them based on evolutionary analysis into 11 classes. Inter-species and intra-species duplication was evident between BoGSTs and Arabidopsis GSTs. Based on localization analyses, we propose possible pathways in which GST genes are involved during cold stress. Further, expression analysis of the predicted putative functions for GST genes were investigated in two cold contrasting genotypes (cold tolerance and susceptible) under cold condition, most of these genes were highly expressed at 6 h and 1 h in the cold tolerant (CT) and cold susceptible (CS) lines, respectively. Overall, BoGSTU19, BoGSTU24, BoGSTF10 are candidate genes highly expressed in B. oleracea. Further investigation of GST superfamily in B. oleracea will aid in understanding complex mechanism underlying cold tolerance in plants. PMID:27472324

  11. Antihydrogen Formation using Cold Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Madsen, N.; Bowe, P.D.; Hangst, J.S.; Amoretti, M.; Carraro, C.; Macri, M.; Testera, G.; Variola, A.; Amsler, C.; Johnson, I.; Pruys, H.; Regenfus, C.; Bonomi, G.; Bouchta, A.; Doser, M.; Kellerbauer, A.; Landua, R.; Cesar, C.L.; Charlton, M.; Joergensen, L.V.

    2004-10-20

    Antihydrogen, the antimatter counterpart of the hydrogen atom, can be formed by mixing cold samples of antiprotons and positrons. In 2002 the ATHENA collaboration succeeded in the first production of cold antihydrogen. By observing and imaging the annihilation products of the neutral, non-confined, antihydrogen atoms annihilating on the walls of the trap we can observe the production in quasi-real-time and study the dynamics of the formation mechanism. The formation mechanism strongly influences the final state of the formed antihydrogen atoms, important for future spectroscopic comparison with hydrogen. This paper briefly summarizes the current understanding of the antihydrogen formation in ATHENA.

  12. Dentin and pulp sense cold stimulus.

    PubMed

    Tokuda, Masayuki; Tatsuyama, Shoko; Fujisawa, Mari; Morimoto-Yamashita, Yoko; Kawakami, Yoshiko; Shibukawa, Yoshiyuki; Torii, Mistuso

    2015-05-01

    Dentin hypersensitivity is a common symptom, and recent convergent evidences have reported transient receptor potential (TRP) channels in odontoblasts act as mechanical and thermal molecular sensor, which detect stimulation applied on the exposed dentin surface, to drive multiple odontoblastic cellular functions, such as sensory transduction and/or dentin formation. In the present study, we confirmed expression of TRP melastatin subfamily member-8 (TRPM8) channels in primary cultured cells derived from human dental pulp cells (HPCs) and mouse odontoblast-lineage cells (OLCs) as well as in dentin matrix protein-1 (DMP-1) and dentin sialoprotein (DSP) positive acutely isolated rat odontoblasts from dental pulp tissue slice culture by immunohistochemical analyses. In addition, we detected TRPM8 channel expression on HPCs and OLCs by RT-PCR and Western blotting analyses. These results indicated that both odontoblasts and dental pulp cells express TRPM8 channels in rat, mouse and human, and therefore we hypothesize they may contribute as cold sensor in tooth.

  13. Natural variation in cold tolerance in the nematode Pristionchus pacificus: the role of genotype and environment

    PubMed Central

    McGaughran, Angela; Sommer, Ralf J.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Low temperature is a primary determinant of growth and survival among organisms and almost all animals need to withstand temperature fluctuations in their surroundings. We used the hermaphroditic nematode Pristionchus pacificus to examine variation in cold tolerance in samples collected from 18 widespread locations. Samples were challenged by exposure to both direct and gradual low temperature after culture in the laboratory at 20°C. A short-term acclimation treatment was also applied to assess cold tolerance following a pre-exposure cold treatment. Finally, genotype-by-environment (G × E) analysis was performed on a subset of samples cultured at two additional temperatures (15°C and 25°C). P. pacificus displayed a high degree of natural variation in cold tolerance, corresponding to the presence of three distinct phenotypic classes among samples: cold tolerant, non-cold tolerant, cold tolerant plastic. Survival of gradual cold exposure was significantly higher than survival of direct exposure to low temperature and a cold exposure pre-treatment significantly enhanced cold tolerance in some samples. By focusing on a sub-set of well-sampled locations from tropical La Réunion Island, we found evidence of significant effects of genotype and environment on cold tolerance, and we also showed that, within the different Réunion locations sampled, all three phenotypic classes are generally well represented. Taken together, our results show that P. pacificus exhibits a highly plastic tolerance to cold exposure that may be partly driven by differential trait sensitivity in diverse environments. PMID:25150278

  14. How consistent are the transcriptome changes associated with cold acclimation in two species of the Drosophila virilis group?

    PubMed Central

    Parker, D J; Vesala, L; Ritchie, M G; Laiho, A; Hoikkala, A; Kankare, M

    2015-01-01

    For many organisms the ability to cold acclimate with the onset of seasonal cold has major implications for their fitness. In insects, where this ability is widespread, the physiological changes associated with increased cold tolerance have been well studied. Despite this, little work has been done to trace changes in gene expression during cold acclimation that lead to an increase in cold tolerance. We used an RNA-Seq approach to investigate this in two species of the Drosophila virilis group. We found that the majority of genes that are differentially expressed during cold acclimation differ between the two species. Despite this, the biological processes associated with the differentially expressed genes were broadly similar in the two species. These included: metabolism, cell membrane composition, and circadian rhythms, which are largely consistent with previous work on cold acclimation/cold tolerance. In addition, we also found evidence of the involvement of the rhodopsin pathway in cold acclimation, a pathway that has been recently linked to thermotaxis. Interestingly, we found no evidence of differential expression of stress genes implying that long-term cold acclimation and short-term stress response may have a different physiological basis. PMID:25669607

  15. Avionics Box Cold Plate Damage Prevention

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stambolian, Damon B.; Larchar, Steven W.; Henderson, Gena; Tran, Donald; Barth, Tim

    2012-01-01

    Problem Introduction: 1. Prevent Cold Plate Damage in Space Shuttle. 1a. The number of cold plate problems had increased from an average of 16.5 per/year between 1990 through 2000, to an average of 39.6 per year between 2001through 2005. 1b. Each complete set of 80 cold plates cost approximately $29 million, an average of $362,500 per cold plate. 1c It takes four months to produce a single cold plate. 2. Prevent Cold Plate Damage in Future Space Vehicles.

  16. Cold plasma decontamination of foods

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cold plasma is a novel nonthermal food processing technology which uses energetic, reactive gases to inactivate contaminating microbes on meats, poultry and fruits and vegetables. This flexible sanitizing method uses electricity and a carrier gas such as air, oxygen, nitrogen or helium; antimicrobi...

  17. The Cold Blooded Killer: Hypothermia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keller, Rosanne

    Part of a series of home literacy readers with conversational text and sketches, this booklet depicts the subarctic Alaskan environment where cold makes extreme demands on body metabolism. Body temperature must be maintained above 80F (26.7C). A condition of too little body-heat is termed hypo- ('deficit') thermia ('heat'). Hypothermia is the…

  18. Cold War Geopolitics: Embassy Locations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vogeler, Ingolf

    1995-01-01

    Asserts that the geopolitics of the Cold War can be illustrated by the diplomatic ties among countries, particularly the superpowers and their respective allies. Describes a classroom project in which global patterns of embassy locations are examined and compared. Includes five maps and a chart indicating types of embassy locations. (CFR)

  19. Images of the Cold War.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chomsky, Noam

    1989-01-01

    The conventional U.S. picture traces the Cold War to Soviet violation of wartime agreements, while the U.S.S.R. defends its actions as responses to American violations and foreign adventurism. An understanding of how ideology is shaped by national self-interest will help students see beyond propaganda and myth in interpreting past and current…

  20. Cold fusion; Myth versus reality

    SciTech Connect

    Rabinowitz, M. )

    1990-01-01

    Experiments indicate that several different nuclear reactions are taking place. Some of the experiments point to D-D fusion with a cominant tritium channel as one of the reactions. The article notes a similarity between Prometheus and the discoveries of cold fusion.

  1. "Stone Cold": Worthy of Study?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Douthwaite, Alison

    2015-01-01

    This article draws on my experiences of teaching "Stone Cold" to respond to a blog post suggesting that the novel holds little educational value. I argue that the novel's narrative style helps to foster criticality while its subject matter can help students see the relevance of literature to the world around them. Relating this to…

  2. Cold-sensing regulates Drosophila growth through insulin-producing cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qiaoran; Gong, Zhefeng

    2015-01-01

    Across phyla, body size is linked to climate. For example, rearing fruit flies at lower temperatures results in bigger body sizes than those observed at higher temperatures. The underlying molecular basis of this effect is poorly understood. Here we provide evidence that the temperature-dependent regulation of Drosophila body size depends on a group of cold-sensing neurons and insulin-producing cells (IPCs). Electrically silencing IPCs completely abolishes the body size increase induced by cold temperature. IPCs are directly innervated by cold-sensing neurons. Stimulation of these cold-sensing neurons activates IPCs, promotes synthesis and secretion of Drosophila insulin-like peptides and induces a larger body size, mimicking the effects of rearing the flies in cold temperature. Taken together, these findings reveal a neuronal circuit that mediates the effects of low temperature on fly growth. PMID:26648410

  3. Combustion heated cold sealed TEC

    SciTech Connect

    Yarygin, V.I.; Klepikov, V.V.; Meleta, Y.A.; Mikheyev, A.S.; Yarygin, D.V.; Wolff, L.R.

    1997-12-31

    The development of a thermionic domestic boiler system using natural gas, which as performed under an ECS-project in 1992 to 1994 by a Russian-Dutch team of researchers, will be continued again. Thanks to financial support on the part of the Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research (NWO), the major effort in 1997 to 1999 will be focused on the development, manufacture and testing of an improved, easier to fabricate, more repairable and less expensive combustion heated TEC with a longer life-time. The achievement of the aim of this project will make it possible to expand the field of the terrestrial thermionics application and to embark on the commercialization stage. This report discusses the concept of the combustion heated Cold Seal TEC. A Cold Seal TEC will be developed and tested, in which the rubber O-ring seal will electrically insulate the hot shell from the collector heat pipe. The Cold Seal TEC will use a noble gas + cesium as the working medium (the idea of such a TEC was first proposed in 1973 by Professor Musa from Romania). In its cold state, the cesium will short circuit the emitter and the collector. During operation, the interelectrode space will be filled with cesium vapor. The upper part of a Cold Seal TEC will be filled with a noble gas. This noble gas will prevent the O-ring seal from being attacked by the cesium. The TEC output characteristics will be considerably improved by using electrode materials that were developed earlier in the course of an ECS-project for the development of low temperature TEC electrodes.

  4. A compilation of cold cases using scanning electron microscopy at the University of Rhode Island

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platek, Michael J.; Gregory, Otto J.

    2015-10-01

    Scanning electron microscopy combined with microchemical analysis has evolved into one of the most widely used instruments in forensic science today. In particular, the environmental scanning electron microscope (SEM) in conjunction with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), has created unique opportunities in forensic science in regard to the examination of trace evidence; i.e. the examination of evidence without altering the evidence with conductive coatings, thereby enabling criminalists to solve cases that were previously considered unsolvable. Two cold cases were solved at URI using a JEOL 5900 LV SEM in conjunction with EDS. A cold case murder and a cold missing person case will be presented from the viewpoint of the microscopist and will include sample preparation, as well as image and chemical analysis of the trace evidence using electron microscopy and optical microscopy.

  5. Vitamin C and the Common Cold Revisited.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Travis, H. Richard

    1984-01-01

    Various studies indicate that Vitamin C does not prevent or cure a cold, but it may ameliorate symptoms in some individuals. The development of a balanced life-style is more effective towards cold prevention. (DF)

  6. Herpes Simplex (Cold Sores and Genital Herpes)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Select a Language: Fact Sheet 508 Herpes Simplex (Cold Sores and Genital Herpes) WHAT IS HERPES? HSV ... virus 1 (HSV1) is the common cause of cold sores (oral herpes) around the mouth. HSV2 normally ...

  7. Tips to Protect Workers in Cold Environments

    MedlinePlus

    ... Anti-Retaliation Tips To Protect Workers In Cold Environments Prolonged exposure to freezing or cold temperatures may ... 321-OSHA. Freedom of Information Act | Privacy & Security Statement | Disclaimers | Important Web Site Notices | International | Contact Us ...

  8. Calcium signaling mediates cold sensing in insect tissues.

    PubMed

    Teets, Nicholas M; Yi, Shu-Xia; Lee, Richard E; Denlinger, David L

    2013-05-28

    The ability to rapidly respond to changes in temperature is a critical adaptation for insects and other ectotherms living in thermally variable environments. In a process called rapid cold hardening (RCH), insects significantly enhance cold tolerance following brief (i.e., minutes to hours) exposure to nonlethal chilling. Although the ecological relevance of RCH is well-established, the underlying physiological mechanisms that trigger RCH are poorly understood. RCH can be elicited in isolated tissues ex vivo, suggesting cold-sensing and downstream hardening pathways are governed by brain-independent signaling mechanisms. We previously provided preliminary evidence that calcium is involved in RCH, and here we firmly establish that calcium signaling mediates cold sensing in insect tissues. In tracheal cells of the freeze-tolerant goldenrod gall fly, Eurosta solidaginis, chilling to 0 °C evoked a 40% increase in intracellular calcium concentration as determined by live-cell confocal imaging. Downstream of calcium entry, RCH conditions significantly increased the activity of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) while reducing phosphorylation of the inhibitory Thr306 residue. Pharmacological inhibitors of calcium entry, calmodulin activation, and CaMKII activity all prevented ex vivo RCH in midgut and salivary gland tissues, indicating that calcium signaling is required for RCH to occur. Similar results were obtained for a freeze-intolerant species, adults of the flesh fly, Sarcophaga bullata, suggesting that calcium-mediated cold sensing is a general feature of insects. Our results imply that insect tissues use calcium signaling to instantly detect decreases in temperature and trigger downstream cold-hardening mechanisms.

  9. Calcium signaling mediates cold sensing in insect tissues

    PubMed Central

    Teets, Nicholas M.; Yi, Shu-Xia; Lee, Richard E.; Denlinger, David L.

    2013-01-01

    The ability to rapidly respond to changes in temperature is a critical adaptation for insects and other ectotherms living in thermally variable environments. In a process called rapid cold hardening (RCH), insects significantly enhance cold tolerance following brief (i.e., minutes to hours) exposure to nonlethal chilling. Although the ecological relevance of RCH is well-established, the underlying physiological mechanisms that trigger RCH are poorly understood. RCH can be elicited in isolated tissues ex vivo, suggesting cold-sensing and downstream hardening pathways are governed by brain-independent signaling mechanisms. We previously provided preliminary evidence that calcium is involved in RCH, and here we firmly establish that calcium signaling mediates cold sensing in insect tissues. In tracheal cells of the freeze-tolerant goldenrod gall fly, Eurosta solidaginis, chilling to 0 °C evoked a 40% increase in intracellular calcium concentration as determined by live-cell confocal imaging. Downstream of calcium entry, RCH conditions significantly increased the activity of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) while reducing phosphorylation of the inhibitory Thr306 residue. Pharmacological inhibitors of calcium entry, calmodulin activation, and CaMKII activity all prevented ex vivo RCH in midgut and salivary gland tissues, indicating that calcium signaling is required for RCH to occur. Similar results were obtained for a freeze-intolerant species, adults of the flesh fly, Sarcophaga bullata, suggesting that calcium-mediated cold sensing is a general feature of insects. Our results imply that insect tissues use calcium signaling to instantly detect decreases in temperature and trigger downstream cold-hardening mechanisms. PMID:23671084

  10. Adapted cold shower as a potential treatment for depression.

    PubMed

    Shevchuk, Nikolai A

    2008-01-01

    Depression is a debilitating mood disorder that is among the top causes of disability worldwide. It can be characterized by a set of somatic, emotional, and behavioral symptoms, one of which is a high risk of suicide. This work presents a hypothesis that depression may be caused by the convergence of two factors: (A) A lifestyle that lacks certain physiological stressors that have been experienced by primates through millions of years of evolution, such as brief changes in body temperature (e.g. cold swim), and this lack of "thermal exercise" may cause inadequate functioning of the brain. (B) Genetic makeup that predisposes an individual to be affected by the above condition more seriously than other people. To test the hypothesis, an approach to treating depression is proposed that consists of adapted cold showers (20 degrees C, 2-3 min, preceded by a 5-min gradual adaptation to make the procedure less shocking) performed once or twice daily. The proposed duration of treatment is several weeks to several months. The following evidence appears to support the hypothesis: Exposure to cold is known to activate the sympathetic nervous system and increase the blood level of beta-endorphin and noradrenaline and to increase synaptic release of noradrenaline in the brain as well. Additionally, due to the high density of cold receptors in the skin, a cold shower is expected to send an overwhelming amount of electrical impulses from peripheral nerve endings to the brain, which could result in an anti-depressive effect. Practical testing by a statistically insignificant number of people, who did not have sufficient symptoms to be diagnosed with depression, showed that the cold hydrotherapy can relieve depressive symptoms rather effectively. The therapy was also found to have a significant analgesic effect and it does not appear to have noticeable side effects or cause dependence. In conclusion, wider and more rigorous studies would be needed to test the validity of the

  11. Calcium signaling mediates cold sensing in insect tissues.

    PubMed

    Teets, Nicholas M; Yi, Shu-Xia; Lee, Richard E; Denlinger, David L

    2013-05-28

    The ability to rapidly respond to changes in temperature is a critical adaptation for insects and other ectotherms living in thermally variable environments. In a process called rapid cold hardening (RCH), insects significantly enhance cold tolerance following brief (i.e., minutes to hours) exposure to nonlethal chilling. Although the ecological relevance of RCH is well-established, the underlying physiological mechanisms that trigger RCH are poorly understood. RCH can be elicited in isolated tissues ex vivo, suggesting cold-sensing and downstream hardening pathways are governed by brain-independent signaling mechanisms. We previously provided preliminary evidence that calcium is involved in RCH, and here we firmly establish that calcium signaling mediates cold sensing in insect tissues. In tracheal cells of the freeze-tolerant goldenrod gall fly, Eurosta solidaginis, chilling to 0 °C evoked a 40% increase in intracellular calcium concentration as determined by live-cell confocal imaging. Downstream of calcium entry, RCH conditions significantly increased the activity of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) while reducing phosphorylation of the inhibitory Thr306 residue. Pharmacological inhibitors of calcium entry, calmodulin activation, and CaMKII activity all prevented ex vivo RCH in midgut and salivary gland tissues, indicating that calcium signaling is required for RCH to occur. Similar results were obtained for a freeze-intolerant species, adults of the flesh fly, Sarcophaga bullata, suggesting that calcium-mediated cold sensing is a general feature of insects. Our results imply that insect tissues use calcium signaling to instantly detect decreases in temperature and trigger downstream cold-hardening mechanisms. PMID:23671084

  12. Topography of the combining region of a Thomsen-Friedenreich-antigen-specific lectin jacalin (Artocarpus integrifolia agglutinin). A thermodynamic and circular-dichroism spectroscopic study.

    PubMed

    Mahanta, S K; Sastry, M V; Surolia, A

    1990-02-01

    Thermodynamic analysis of carbohydrate binding by Artocarpus integrifolia (jackfruit) agglutinin (jacalin) shows that, among monosaccharides, Me alpha GalNAc (methyl-alpha-N-acetylgalactosamine) is the strongest binding ligand. Despite its strong affinity for Me alpha GalNAc and Me alpha Gal, the lectin binds very poorly when Gal and GalNAc are in alpha-linkage with other sugars such as in A- and B-blood-group trisaccharides, Gal alpha 1-3Gal and Gal alpha 1-4Gal. These binding properties are explained by considering the thermodynamic parameters in conjunction with the minimum energy conformations of these sugars. It binds to Gal beta 1-3GalNAc alpha Me with 2800-fold stronger affinity over Gal beta 1-3GalNAc beta Me. It does not bind to asialo-GM1 (monosialoganglioside) oligosaccharide. Moreover, it binds to Gal beta 1-3GalNAc alpha Ser, the authentic T (Thomsen-Friedenreich)-antigen, with about 2.5-fold greater affinity as compared with Gal beta 1-3GalNAc. Asialoglycophorin A was found to be about 169,333 times stronger an inhibitor than Gal beta 1-3GalNAc. The present study thus reveals the exquisite specificity of A. integrifolia lectin for the T-antigen. Appreciable binding of disaccharides Glc beta 1-3GalNAc and GlcNAc beta 1-3Gal and the very poor binding of beta-linked disaccharides, which instead of Gal and GalNAc contain other sugars at the reducing end, underscore the important contribution made by Gal and GalNAc at the reducing end for recognition by the lectin. The ligand-structure-dependent alterations of the c.d. spectrum in the tertiary structural region of the protein allows the placement of various sugar units in the combining region of the lectin. These studies suggest that the primary subsite (subsite A) can accommodate only Gal or GalNAc or alpha-linked Gal or GalNAc, whereas the secondary subsite (subsite B) can associate either with GalNAc beta Me or Gal beta Me. Considering these factors a likely arrangement for various disaccharides in the

  13. The cold equation of state of tantalum

    SciTech Connect

    Greeff, Carl W; Rudin, Sven P; Corckett, Scott D; Wills, John M

    2009-01-01

    In high-pressure isentropic compression experiments (ICE), the pressure is dominated by the cold curve. In order to obtain an accurate semi-empirical cold curve for Ta, we calculate the thermal pressure from ab initio phonon and electronic excitation spectra. The cold curve is then inferred from ultrasonic and shock data. Our empirical cold pressure is compared to density functional calculations and found to be closer to GGA results at low pressure and to approach LDA at high pressure.

  14. Cold moderators for pulsed neutron sources

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, J.M.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reviews cold moderators in pulsed neutron sources and provides details of the performance of different cold moderator materials and configurations. Analytical forms are presented which describe wavelength spectra and emission time distributions. Several types of cooling arrangements used in pulsed source moderators are described. Choices of materials are surveyed. The author examines some of the radiation damage effects in cold moderators, including the phenomenon of burping'' in irradiated cold solid methane. 9 refs., 15 figs., 4 tabs.

  15. Vernalizing cold is registered digitally at FLC.

    PubMed

    Angel, Andrew; Song, Jie; Yang, Hongchun; Questa, Julia I; Dean, Caroline; Howard, Martin

    2015-03-31

    A fundamental property of many organisms is an ability to sense, evaluate, and respond to environmental signals. In some situations, generation of an appropriate response requires long-term information storage. A classic example is vernalization, where plants quantitatively sense long-term cold and epigenetically store this cold-exposure information to regulate flowering time. In Arabidopsis thaliana, stable epigenetic memory of cold is digital: following long-term cold exposure, cells respond autonomously in an all-or-nothing fashion, with the fraction of cells that stably silence the floral repressor flowering locus C (FLC) increasing with the cold exposure duration. However, during cold exposure itself it is unknown whether vernalizing cold is registered at FLC in individual cells in an all-or-nothing (digital) manner or is continuously varying (analog). Using mathematical modeling, we found that analog registration of cold temperature is problematic due to impaired analog-to-digital conversion into stable memory. This disadvantage is particularly acute when responding to short cold periods, but is absent when cold temperatures are registered digitally at FLC. We tested this prediction experimentally, exposing plants to short periods of cold interrupted with even shorter warm breaks. For FLC expression, we found that the system responds similarly to both interrupted and uninterrupted cold, arguing for a digital mechanism integrating long-term temperature exposure.

  16. Is It a Cold or an Allergy?

    MedlinePlus

    ... C AT I O N S IS IT A Cold OR AN Allergy  ? COLD Common Slight Sometimes Rare or never Usual Common Common Common Rare 3 to 14 days Cold ■■ Antihistamines ■■ Decongestants ■■ Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medicines ■■ Wash your ...

  17. Catching a Cold When It's Warm

    MedlinePlus

    ... our exit disclaimer . Subscribe Catching a Cold When It’s Warm What’s the Deal with Summertime Sniffles? Most ... be more unfair than catching a cold when it’s warm? How can cold symptoms arise when it’s ...

  18. Complementary and alternative medicine for prevention and treatment of the common cold

    PubMed Central

    Nahas, Richard; Balla, Agneta

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Objective To review the evidence supporting complementary and alternative medicine approaches to treatment and prevention of the common cold in adults. Quality of Evidence MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews were searched from January 1966 to September 2009 combining the key words common cold or influenza with echinacea, garlic, ginseng, probiotics, vitamin C, and zinc. Clinical trials and prospective studies were included. Main Message For prevention, vitamin C demonstrated benefit in a large meta-analysis, with possibly increased benefit in patients subjected to cold stress. There is inconsistent evidence for Asian ginseng (Panax ginseng) and North American ginseng (Panax quinquefolius). Allicin was highly effective in 1 small trial. For treatment, Echinacea purpurea is the most consistently useful variety; it was effective in 5 of 6 trials. Zinc lozenges were effective in 5 of 9 trials, likely owing to dose and formulation issues. Overall, the evidence suggests no benefit from probiotics for prevention or treatment of the common cold. Conclusion Vitamin C can be recommended to Canadian patients for prevention of the common cold. There is moderate evidence supporting the use of Echinacea purpurea and zinc lozenges for treatment. Ginseng and allicin warrant further research. PMID:21322286

  19. 77 FR 43117 - Meeting of the Cold War Advisory Committee for the Cold War Theme Study

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-23

    ... National Park Service Meeting of the Cold War Advisory Committee for the Cold War Theme Study AGENCY... with the Federal Advisory Committee Act, 5 U.S.C. Appendix, that the Cold War Advisory Committee for the Cold War Theme Study will conduct a teleconference meeting on August 3, 2012. Members of...

  20. Mechanisms and efficacy of heat and cold therapies for musculoskeletal injury.

    PubMed

    Malanga, Gerard A; Yan, Ning; Stark, Jill

    2015-01-01

    Nonpharmacological treatment strategies for acute musculoskeletal injury revolve around pain reduction and promotion of healing in order to facilitate a return to normal function and activity. Heat and cold therapy modalities are often used to facilitate this outcome despite prevalent confusion about which modality (heat vs cold) to use and when to use it. Most recommendations for the use of heat and cold therapy are based on empirical experience, with limited evidence to support the efficacy of specific modalities. This literature review provides information for practitioners on the use of heat and cold therapies based on the mechanisms of action, physiological effects, and the medical evidence to support their clinical use. The physiological effects of cold therapy include reductions in pain, blood flow, edema, inflammation, muscle spasm, and metabolic demand. There is limited evidence from randomized clinical trials (RCTs) supporting the use of cold therapy following acute musculoskeletal injury and delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS). The physiological effects of heat therapy include pain relief and increases in blood flow, metabolism, and elasticity of connective tissues. There is limited overall evidence to support the use of topical heat in general; however, RCTs have shown that heat-wrap therapy provides short-term reductions in pain and disability in patients with acute low back pain and provides significantly greater pain relief of DOMS than does cold therapy. There remains an ongoing need for more sufficiently powered high-quality RCTs on the effects of cold and heat therapy on recovery from acute musculoskeletal injury and DOMS. PMID:25526231

  1. Cold-induced mortality of invasive Burmese pythons in south Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mazzotti, Frank J.; Cherkiss, Michael S.; Hart, Kristen M.; Snow, Ray W.; Rochford, Michael R.; Dorcas, Michael E.; Reed, Robert N.

    2011-01-01

    A recent record cold spell in southern Florida (2-11 January 2010) provided an opportunity to evaluate responses of an established population of Burmese pythons (Python molurus bivittatus) to a prolonged period of unusually cold weather. We observed behavior, characterized thermal biology, determined fate of radio-telemetered (n = 10) and non-telemetered (n = 104) Burmese pythons, and analyzed habitat and environmental conditions experienced by pythons during and after a historic cold spell. Telemetered pythons had been implanted with radio-transmitters and temperature-recording data loggers prior to the cold snap. Only one of 10 telemetered pythons survived the cold snap, whereas 59 of 99 (60%) non-telemetered pythons for which we determined fate survived. Body temperatures of eight dead telemetered pythons fluctuated regularly prior to 9 January 2010, then declined substantially during the cold period (9-11 January) and exhibited no further evidence of active thermoregulation indicating they were likely dead. Unusually cold temperatures in January 2010 were clearly associated with mortality of Burmese pythons in the Everglades. Some radiotelemetered pythons appeared to exhibit maladaptive behavior during the cold spell, including attempting to bask instead of retreating to sheltered refugia. We discuss implications of our findings for persistence and spread of introduced Burmese pythons in the United States and for maximizing their rate of removal.

  2. Cold dark matter heats up.

    PubMed

    Pontzen, Andrew; Governato, Fabio

    2014-02-13

    A principal discovery in modern cosmology is that standard model particles comprise only 5 per cent of the mass-energy budget of the Universe. In the ΛCDM paradigm, the remaining 95 per cent consists of dark energy (Λ) and cold dark matter. ΛCDM is being challenged by its apparent inability to explain the low-density 'cores' of dark matter measured at the centre of galaxies, where centrally concentrated high-density 'cusps' were predicted. But before drawing conclusions, it is necessary to include the effect of gas and stars, historically seen as passive components of galaxies. We now understand that these can inject heat energy into the cold dark matter through a coupling based on rapid gravitational potential fluctuations, explaining the observed low central densities.

  3. Ultra-cold molecule production.

    SciTech Connect

    Ramirez-Serrano, Jamie; Chandler, David W.; Strecker, Kevin; Rahn, Larry A.

    2005-12-01

    The production of Ultra-cold molecules is a goal of many laboratories through out the world. Here we are pursuing a unique technique that utilizes the kinematics of atomic and molecular collisions to achieve the goal of producing substantial numbers of sub Kelvin molecules confined in a trap. Here a trap is defined as an apparatus that spatially localizes, in a known location in the laboratory, a sample of molecules whose temperature is below one degree absolute Kelvin. Further, the storage time for the molecules must be sufficient to measure and possibly further cool the molecules. We utilize a technique unique to Sandia to form cold molecules from near mass degenerate collisions between atoms and molecules. This report describes the progress we have made using this novel technique and the further progress towards trapping molecules we have cooled.

  4. Medical problems from cold exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Dembert, M.L.

    1982-01-01

    Problems resulting from cold exposure can be successfully treated when a coordinated emergency medical transport system and appropriate equipment are available, as well as medical personnel knowledgeable in the management of frostbite and hypothermia. Clinical suspicion of these disorders is essential. Profoundly hypothermic individuals with no recordable vital signs have been resuscitated after controlled, rapid rewarming measures and the use of emergency life-support systems.

  5. Acclimatization to cold in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaciuba-Uscilko, Hanna; Greenleaf, John E.

    1989-01-01

    This review focuses on the responses and mechanisms of both natural and artificial acclimatization to a cold environment in mammals, with specific reference to human beings. The purpose is to provide basic information for designers of thermal protection systems for astronauts during intra- and extravehicular activities. Hibernation, heat production, heat loss, vascular responses, body insulation, shivering thermogenesis, water immersion, exercise responses, and clinical symptoms and hypothermia in the elderly are discussed.

  6. Cold cathode vacuum discharge tube

    DOEpatents

    Boettcher, Gordon E.

    1998-01-01

    A cold cathode vacuum discharge tube, and method for making same, with an interior surface of the trigger probe coated with carbon deposited by carbon vapor deposition (CVD) or diamond-like carbon (DLC) deposition. Preferably a solid graphite insert is employed in the probe-cathode structure in place of an aluminum bushing employed in the prior art. The CVD or DLC probe face is laser scribed to allow resistance trimming to match available trigger voltage signals and to reduce electrical aging.

  7. A cold and wet Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fairén, Alberto G.

    2010-07-01

    Water on Mars has been explained by invoking controversial and mutually exclusive solutions based on warming the atmosphere with greenhouse gases (the "warm and wet" Mars) or on local thermal energy sources acting in a global freezing climate (the "cold and dry" Mars). Both have critical limitations and none has been definitively accepted as a compelling explanation for the presence of liquid water on Mars. Here is considered the hypothesis that cold, saline and acidic liquid solutions have been stable on the sub-zero surface of Mars for relatively extended periods of time, completing a hydrogeological cycle in a water-enriched but cold planet. Computer simulations have been developed to analyze the evaporation processes of a hypothetical martian fluid with a composition resulting from the acid weathering of basalt. This model is based on orbiter- and lander-observed surface mineralogy of Mars, and is consistent with the sequence and time of deposition of the different mineralogical units. The hydrological cycle would have been active only in periods of dense atmosphere, as having a minimum atmospheric pressure is essential for water to flow, and relatively high temperatures (over ˜245 K) are required to trigger evaporation and snowfall; minor episodes of limited liquid water on the surface could have occurred at lower temperatures (over ˜225 K). During times with a thin atmosphere and even lesser temperatures (under ˜225 K), only transient liquid water can potentially exist on most of the martian surface. Assuming that surface temperatures have always been maintained below 273 K, Mars can be considered a "cold and wet" planet for a substantial part of its geological history.

  8. A Cold Strontium Ion Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erickson, Christopher J.; Lyon, Mary; Blaser, Kelvin; Harper, Stuart; Durfee, Dallin

    2010-03-01

    We present a cold ion source for strontium 87. The source is based off of a standard Low-Velocity-Intense-Source (LVIS) for strontium using permanent magnets in place of anti-Helmholtz coils. Atoms from the LVIS are then ionized in a two photon process as they pass a 20kV anode plate. The result is a mono-energetic beam of ions whose velocity is tunable. Applications for the ions include spectroscopy and ion interferometry.

  9. Cold exposure induces alterations in porcine triiodothyronine tissue distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Quesada, M.H.; Reed, H.L.; Hesslink, R.; Licauco, G.; Castro, S.; Homer, L.; Young, B. Univ. of Alberta, Edmonton )

    1991-03-11

    Evidence suggests that thyroid hormone plays an active role in modulation of tissue metabolism in response to cold challenge. In an attempts to identify tissues that may have increased capacity for triiodothyronine (T{sub 3}) and be actively involved in the thermogenic process, the authors investigated the T{sub 3} tissue distribution in 5 month old swine exposed to cold (4C) (N = 5) for three weeks, compared with controls at a thermoneutral temperature (20C) (N = 4). Both groups were injected I.V. with ({sup 125}I)T{sub 3} three hours before sacrifice. ({sup 125}I)T{sub 3} was organically extracted from heart, kidney, thyroid gland, adrenal, brain, 4 different types of striated muscles and fat tissues and counted to determine the CPM/gm of tissue. Serum total T{sub 3} and free T{sub 3} were elevated. The bulk of the tissue/serum ratios of cold exposed swine compared with controls were unchanged. However, calculation of the T{sub 3} organ pools revealed that the majority was elevated 2 to 3 times over control. Increases in tissue distribution volume (TVD) occurred in hip fat. Body and organ weights tended to increase but not to a significant degree except for the thyroid gland, which increased 66% over the average control value. The physiological significance of the cold associated augmented organ pool and the increased TCD in hip fat needs to be explored.

  10. HOT AND COLD DUST NEAR H II REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Sreenilayam, Gopika; Fich, Michel

    2011-07-15

    We estimate the mass, temperature, and luminosity of the hot ({>=}100 K), cool (20-40 K), and cold ({<=}20 K) dust in the environs of Galactic H II regions using Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS) and Submillimeter Common User Bolometric Array (SCUBA) data. A total of 83 clouds have been examined using IRAS data. A two-component model spectral energy distribution (SED) of hot and cool dust is used to fit the IRAS data. All of the SEDs use a graphite/silicate mix of grains in an MRN distribution. A three-component model SED is fitted to combined SCUBA and IRAS data for 15 clouds near H II regions to measure the cold dust component. Surprisingly, the ratio of the bolometric luminosity of the cool dust to the hot dust appears to be the same (2.8) in virtually all objects. The cool dust has typically four-five orders of magnitude greater mass than the hot dust. However, the mass in cold dust is much greater than the mass in cool and hot dust. We also find some evidence for a relationship between the cool and cold dust masses. These results may prove useful for using IR observations for estimating gas masses in extragalactic systems with active high-mass star formation.

  11. The Passive Film Characteristics of Cold Deformed Pure Copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fattah-Alhosseini, Arash; Naseri, Majid; Imantalab, Omid; Gholami, Davood; Haghshenas, Meysam

    2016-09-01

    In the present study, the effect of cold deformation on the electrochemical and passive behaviors of pure copper in 0.01 M NaOH solution was investigated. The dislocation density in cold deformation was calculated using a recently developed JAVA-based software, materials analysis using diffraction, based on Rietveld's whole x-ray pattern fitting methodology. At the thickness reduction of 70%, the microhardness measured as 125.30 HV, which is 1.56 times than that in the annealed pure copper (80.25 HV). Potentiodynamic polarization plots and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements showed that increasing the cold deformation offers better conditions for forming the passive films. In the Mott-Schottky analysis, no evidence for n-type behavior was obtained which indicates that the oxygen vacancies and the copper interstitials did not have any significant population density in the passive films. Also, this analysis revealed that with increasing cold deformation, the acceptor density of the passive films decreased.

  12. Cold cathode vacuum gauging system

    DOEpatents

    Denny, Edward C.

    2004-03-09

    A vacuum gauging system of the cold cathode type is provided for measuring the pressure of a plurality of separate vacuum systems, such as in a gas centrifuge cascade. Each casing is fitted with a gauge tube assembly which communicates with the vacuum system in the centrifuge casing. Each gauge tube contains an anode which may be in the form of a slender rod or wire hoop and a cathode which may be formed by the wall of the gauge tube. The tube is provided with an insulated high voltage connector to the anode which has a terminal for external connection outside the vacuum casing. The tube extends from the casing so that a portable magnet assembly may be inserted about the tube to provide a magnetic field in the area between the anode and cathode necessary for pressure measurements in a cold cathode-type vacuum gauge arrangement. The portable magnetic assembly is provided with a connector which engages the external high voltage terminal for providing power to the anode within in the gauge tube. Measurement is made in the same manner as the prior cold cathode gauges in that the current through the anode to the cathode is measured as an indication of the pressure. By providing the portable magnetic assembly, a considerable savings in cost, installation, and maintenance of vacuum gauges for pressure measurement in a gas centrifuge cascade is realizable.

  13. Mars: Always Cold, Sometimes Wet?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Pascal; McKay, Christoper P.

    2003-01-01

    A synthesis of a diverse suite of observations of H2O-related landforms that are possible Mars analogs from terrestrial polar regions (Devon Island in the Arctic; the Dry Valleys of Antarctica) put into question any requirement for extended episode(s) of warm and wet climate in Mars past. Geologically transient episodes of localized H2O cycling, forced by exogenic impacts, enhanced endogenic heat flow, and/or orbit-driven short-term local environmental change under an otherwise cold, low pressure (=10(exp 2) mbar) global climate, may be sufficient to account for the martian surface's exposed record of aqueous activity. A Mars that was only sometimes locally warm and wet while remaining climatically cold throughout its history is consistent with results (difficulties) encountered in modeling efforts attempting to support warm martian climate hypotheses. Possible analogs from terrestrial cold climate regions for the recent gully features on Mars also illustrate how transient localized aqueous activity might, under specific circumstances, also occur on Mars under the present frigid global climatic regime.

  14. The COLD-SAT program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, William J.

    1990-01-01

    The Cryogenic On-Orbit Liquid Depot Storage, Acquisition and Transfer (COLD-SAT) satellite is an experimental spacecraft launched from an expendable launch vehicle which is designed to investigate the systems and technologies required for efficient and reliable management of cryogenic fluid in the reduced-gravity space environment. Future applications such as Space Station, Space Transportation Vehicle (STV), external tank (ET), aft cargo carrier (ACC) propellant scavenging, storage depots, and lunar and interplanetary missions, among others, have provided the impetus to pursue this technology in a timely manner to support the design efforts. A refined conceptual approach has been developed and an overview of the COLD-SAT program is described which includes the following: (1) a definition of the technology needs and the accompanying experimental six-month baseline mission; (2) a description of the experiment subsystem, major features, and rationale for satisfaction of primary and secondary experiment requirements using LH2 as the test fluid; and (3) a presentation of the conceptual design of the COLD-SAT spacecraft subsystems which support the on-orbit experiment with emphasis on those areas which posed the greatest technical challenge.

  15. Axion cold dark matter revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visinelli, L.; Gondolo, P.

    2010-01-01

    We study for what specific values of the theoretical parameters the axion can form the totality of cold dark matter. We examine the allowed axion parameter region in the light of recent data collected by the WMAP5 mission plus baryon acoustic oscillations and supernovae [1], and assume an inflationary scenario and standard cosmology. We also upgrade the treatment of anharmonicities in the axion potential, which we find important in certain cases. If the Peccei-Quinn symmetry is restored after inflation, we recover the usual relation between axion mass and density, so that an axion mass ma = (85 ± 3) μeV makes the axion 100% of the cold dark matter. If the Peccei-Quinn symmetry is broken during inflation, the axion can instead be 100% of the cold dark matter for ma < 15 meV provided a specific value of the initial misalignment angle θi is chosen in correspondence to a given value of its mass ma. Large values of the Peccei-Quinn symmetry breaking scale correspond to small, perhaps uncomfortably small, values of the initial misalignment angle θi.

  16. Micro-Kelvin cold molecules.

    SciTech Connect

    Strecker, Kevin E.; Chandler, David W.

    2009-10-01

    We have developed a novel experimental technique for direct production of cold molecules using a combination of techniques from atomic optical and molecular physics and physical chemistry. The ability to produce samples of cold molecules has application in a broad spectrum of technical fields high-resolution spectroscopy, remote sensing, quantum computing, materials simulation, and understanding fundamental chemical dynamics. Researchers around the world are currently exploring many techniques for producing samples of cold molecules, but to-date these attempts have offered only limited success achieving milli-Kelvin temperatures with low densities. This Laboratory Directed Research and Development project is to develops a new experimental technique for producing micro-Kelvin temperature molecules via collisions with laser cooled samples of trapped atoms. The technique relies on near mass degenerate collisions between the molecule of interest and a laser cooled (micro-Kelvin) atom. A subset of collisions will transfer all (nearly all) of the kinetic energy from the 'hot' molecule, cooling the molecule at the expense of heating the atom. Further collisions with the remaining laser cooled atoms will thermally equilibrate the molecules to the micro-Kelvin temperature of the laser-cooled atoms.

  17. Unusual spontaneous cold auto-hemagglutination phenomenon in blood units stored under blood bank condition: A retrospective analysis

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Sanmukh R.; Naik, Rupal A.; Gupte, Snehlata C.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cold agglutinins (CA) are benign naturally occurring low titer autoantibodies present in most individuals. Those with moderate strength are found in infections, malignancies or autoimmune conditions with diagnostic importance. Aim: Present report deals with CA that brought spontaneous hemagglutination in blood units stored at 2-6°C. Study design: Over 32 months period between July 1993 and December 1995, blood units were inspected for spontaneous cold auto-hemagglutination (SpCA) phenomenon. The plasma from these units was separated and investigated for serological specificity using in house red cell panel and standard serological methods. Results: Among 51,671 blood units, 112 units showed SpCA phenomenon. A rising trend seen in first half of study period significantly fell in remaining half. Specificities of the antibodies detected include anti-I (27), anti-i (53), anti-Pr (21) with remaining few being undetermined specificity. Absorption of serum using enzyme-treated red cells revealed a presence of anti-Pr among the cases, the two of which with new specificities that reacted preferentially with red cells from either new-born or adults and were tentatively named as anti-PrFetal and anti-Pradult, respectively. While 9 cases showed optimum reaction at neutral pH of 7, 68 (62%) cases reacted at pH 5.8 through 8.0, 28 (26%) cases preferred an acidic pH 5.8 and 4 cases opted an alkaline pH 8. Of 28 cases with antibodies preferentially reacting in acidic medium, 17 (60%) cases were anti-i and 7 (25%) cases were anti-Pr. Conclusion: Unique SpCA phenomenon observed in blood units stored under blood bank conditions seems to be due to CA developed in response to vector-borne infectious agents. Majority of the cases displayed their specificities, otherwise are rare to be encountered. PMID:26420932

  18. Functional phytohemagglutinin (PHA) and Galanthus nivalis agglutinin (GNA) expressed in Pichia pastoris correct N-terminal processing and secretion of heterologous proteins expressed using the PHA-E signal peptide.

    PubMed

    Raemaekers, R J; de Muro, L; Gatehouse, J A; Fordham-Skelton, A P

    1999-10-01

    Phytohemagglutinin (Phaseolus vulgaris agglutinin; PHA; E- and L-forms) and snowdrop lectin (Galanthus nivalis agglutinin; GNA) were expressed in Pichia pastoris using native signal peptides, or the Saccharomyces alpha-factor preprosequence, to direct proteins into the secretory pathway. PHA and GNA were present as soluble, functional proteins in culture supernatants when expressed from constructs containing the alpha-factor preprosequence. The recombinant lectins, purified by affinity chromatography, agglutinated rabbit erythrocytes at concentrations similar to the respective native lectins. However, incomplete processing of the signal sequence resulted in PHA-E, PHA-L and GNA with heterogenous N-termini, with the majority of the protein containing N-terminal extensions derived from the alpha-factor prosequence. Polypeptides in which most of the alpha-factor prosequence was present were also glycosylated. Inclusion of Glu-Ala repeats at the C-terminal end of the alpha-factor preprosequence led to efficient processing N-terminal to the Glu-Ala sequence, but inefficient removal of the repeats themselves, resulting in polypeptides with heterogenous N-termini still containing N-terminal extensions. In contrast, PHA expressed with the native signal peptide was secreted, correctly processed, and also fully functional. No expression of GNA from a construct containing the native GNA signal peptide was observed. The PHA-E signal peptide directed correct processing and secretion of both GNA and green fluorescent protein (GFP) when used in expression constructs, and is suggested to have general utility for synthesis of correctly processed proteins in Pichia.

  19. Physiological characteristics of cold acclimatization in man

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathew, Lazar; Purkayastha, S. S.; Jayashankar, A.; Nayar, H. S.

    1981-09-01

    Studies were conducted on 15 healthy young soldiers to evaluate the effect of a cold acclimatization schedule on the thermoregulatory and metabolic activity on exposure to acute cold stress. These men were exposed to cold (10‡C) for 4 h daily wearing only shorts for 21 days, in a cold chamber. They were subjected to a standard cold test at 10 ± 1‡C the day 1, 6, 11 and 21. The subjects were made to relax in a thermoneutral room (26 28‡C) for 1 h and their heart rate, blood pressure, oxygen consumption, oral temperature, mean skin temperature, mean body temperature, peripheral temperatures, and shivering activity were recorded. Then they were exposed to 10‡C and measurements were repeated at 30 min intervals, for 2 h. The cold induced vasodilatation (CIVD), cold pressor response and thermoregulatory efficiency tests were measured initially and at the end of acclimatization schedule. The data show that the procedure resulted in elevated resting metabolism, less fall in body temperature during acute cold stress, reduction in shivering, improvement in CIVD and thermoregulatory efficiency and less rise in BP and HR during cold pressor response. The data suggest the possibility of cold acclimatization in man by repeated exposure to moderately severe cold stress.

  20. Cold Pools in the Columbia Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Whiteman, Charles D.; Zhong, Shiyuan; Shaw, William J.; Hubbe, John M.; Bian, Xindi; Mittelstadt, J.

    2001-01-01

    Persistent midwinter cold air pools produce multi-day periods of cold, dreary weather in valleys and basins. Persistent stable stratification leads to the buildup of pollutants and moisture in the pool. Because the pool sometimes has temperatures below freezing while the air above is warmer, freezing precipitation often occurs with consequent effects on transportation and safety. Forecasting the buildup and breakdown of these cold pools is difficult because the physical mechanisms leading to their formation, maintenance, and destruction have received little study. This paper provides a succinct meteorological definition of a cold pool, develops a climatology of Columbia Basin cold pools, and analyzes remote and in situ temperature and wind sounding data for two winter cold pool episodes that were accompanied by fog and stratus, illustrating many of the physical mechanisms affecting cold pool evolution.

  1. Staying cold through dinner: cold-climate bats rewarm with conspecifics but not sunset during hibernation.

    PubMed

    Czenze, Zenon J; Park, Andrew D; Willis, Craig K R

    2013-08-01

    For temperate endotherms (i.e., mammals and birds) energy costs are highest during winter but food availability is lowest and many mammals depend on hibernation as a result. Hibernation is made up of energy-saving torpor bouts [periods of controlled reduction in body temperature (T b)], which are interrupted by brief periodic arousals to normothermic T b. What triggers these arousals in free-ranging hibernators is not well understood. Some temperate bats with intermittent access to flying insects during winter synchronize arousals with sunset, which suggests that, in some species, feeding opportunities influence arousal timing. We tested whether hibernating bats from a cold climate without access to food during winter also maintain a circadian rhythm for arousals or whether cues from conspecifics in the same cluster are more important. We used temperature telemetry to monitor skin temperature (T sk) of free-ranging little brown bats (Myotis lucifugus) hibernating in central Manitoba, Canada, where temperatures from 22 October to 22 March were too cold for flying insects. We found no evidence bats synchronized arousals with photoperiod but they did arouse synchronously with other bats in the same cluster. Thus, in the northern part of their range where flying insects are almost never available during winter, little brown bats exhibit no circadian pattern to arousals. Warming synchronously with others could reduce the energetic costs of arousal for individuals or could reflect disturbance of torpid bats by cluster-mates. PMID:23539327

  2. Staying cold through dinner: cold-climate bats rewarm with conspecifics but not sunset during hibernation.

    PubMed

    Czenze, Zenon J; Park, Andrew D; Willis, Craig K R

    2013-08-01

    For temperate endotherms (i.e., mammals and birds) energy costs are highest during winter but food availability is lowest and many mammals depend on hibernation as a result. Hibernation is made up of energy-saving torpor bouts [periods of controlled reduction in body temperature (T b)], which are interrupted by brief periodic arousals to normothermic T b. What triggers these arousals in free-ranging hibernators is not well understood. Some temperate bats with intermittent access to flying insects during winter synchronize arousals with sunset, which suggests that, in some species, feeding opportunities influence arousal timing. We tested whether hibernating bats from a cold climate without access to food during winter also maintain a circadian rhythm for arousals or whether cues from conspecifics in the same cluster are more important. We used temperature telemetry to monitor skin temperature (T sk) of free-ranging little brown bats (Myotis lucifugus) hibernating in central Manitoba, Canada, where temperatures from 22 October to 22 March were too cold for flying insects. We found no evidence bats synchronized arousals with photoperiod but they did arouse synchronously with other bats in the same cluster. Thus, in the northern part of their range where flying insects are almost never available during winter, little brown bats exhibit no circadian pattern to arousals. Warming synchronously with others could reduce the energetic costs of arousal for individuals or could reflect disturbance of torpid bats by cluster-mates.

  3. Cold Fusion Has Now Come Out of the Cold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storms, Edmund

    2003-10-01

    The phenomenon called cold fusion or LENR (Low-Energy-Nuclear-Reaction) has now achieved a level of reproducibility and understanding that warrants re-examination of the claims. A summary of what is known and want is being done worldwide to obtain more knowledge will be given. Rather than disappearing as better data are obtained, the effects are becoming more reproducible and of greater magnitude. Justification for this claim can be obtained at www.LENR-CANR.org. The phenomenon is too important to ignore any longer even though it conflicts with conventional theory.

  4. Is cold or warm blood cardioplegia superior for myocardial protection?

    PubMed

    Abah, Udo; Garfjeld Roberts, Patrick; Ishaq, Muhammad; De Silva, Ravi

    2012-06-01

    A best evidence topic in cardiac surgery was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was whether the use of warm or cold blood cardioplegia has superior myocardial protection. More than 192 papers were found using the reported search, of which 20 represented the best evidence to answer the clinical question. The authors, journal, date, country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes and results of these papers are tabulated. A good breadth of high-level evidence addressing this clinical dilemma is available, including a recent meta-analysis and multiple large randomized clinical trials. Yet despite this level of evidence, no clear significant clinical benefit has been demonstrated by warm or cold blood cardioplegia. This suggests that neither method is significantly superior and that both provide similar efficacy of myocardial protection. The meta-analysis, including 41 randomized control trials (5879 patients in total), concluded that although a lower cardiac enzyme release and improved postoperative cardiac index was demonstrated in the warm cardioplegia group, this benefit was not reflected in clinical outcomes, which were similar in both groups. This theme of benefit in biochemical markers, physiological metrics and non-fatal postoperative events in the warm cardioplegia group ran throughout the literature, in particular the 'Warm Heart investigators' who conducted a randomized trial of 1732 patients, demonstrated a reduction in postoperative low output syndrome (6.1 versus 9.3%, P = 0.01) in the warm cardioplegia group, but no significant drop in 30-day all-cause mortality (1.4 versus 2.5%, P = 0.12). However, their later follow-up indicates non-fatal postoperative events predict reduced late survival, independent of cardioplegia. A minority of studies suggested a benefit of cold cardioplegia over warm in particular patient subgroups: One group conducted a retrospective study of 520 patients who

  5. Cold adaptation increases rates of nutrient flow and metabolic plasticity during cold exposure in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Williams, Caroline M; McCue, Marshall D; Sunny, Nishanth E; Szejner-Sigal, Andre; Morgan, Theodore J; Allison, David B; Hahn, Daniel A

    2016-09-14

    Metabolic flexibility is an important component of adaptation to stressful environments, including thermal stress and latitudinal adaptation. A long history of population genetic studies suggest that selection on core metabolic enzymes may shape life histories by altering metabolic flux. However, the direct relationship between selection on thermal stress hardiness and metabolic flux has not previously been tested. We investigated flexibility of nutrient catabolism during cold stress in Drosophila melanogaster artificially selected for fast or slow recovery from chill coma (i.e. cold-hardy or -susceptible), specifically testing the hypothesis that stress adaptation increases metabolic turnover. Using (13)C-labelled glucose, we first showed that cold-hardy flies more rapidly incorporate ingested carbon into amino acids and newly synthesized glucose, permitting rapid synthesis of proline, a compound shown elsewhere to improve survival of cold stress. Second, using glucose and leucine tracers we showed that cold-hardy flies had higher oxidation rates than cold-susceptible flies before cold exposure, similar oxidation rates during cold exposure, and returned to higher oxidation rates during recovery. Additionally, cold-hardy flies transferred compounds among body pools more rapidly during cold exposure and recovery. Increased metabolic turnover may allow cold-adapted flies to better prepare for, resist and repair/tolerate cold damage. This work illustrates for the first time differences in nutrient fluxes associated with cold adaptation, suggesting that metabolic costs associated with cold hardiness could invoke resource-based trade-offs that shape life histories. PMID:27605506

  6. Cold adaptation increases rates of nutrient flow and metabolic plasticity during cold exposure in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Williams, Caroline M; McCue, Marshall D; Sunny, Nishanth E; Szejner-Sigal, Andre; Morgan, Theodore J; Allison, David B; Hahn, Daniel A

    2016-09-14

    Metabolic flexibility is an important component of adaptation to stressful environments, including thermal stress and latitudinal adaptation. A long history of population genetic studies suggest that selection on core metabolic enzymes may shape life histories by altering metabolic flux. However, the direct relationship between selection on thermal stress hardiness and metabolic flux has not previously been tested. We investigated flexibility of nutrient catabolism during cold stress in Drosophila melanogaster artificially selected for fast or slow recovery from chill coma (i.e. cold-hardy or -susceptible), specifically testing the hypothesis that stress adaptation increases metabolic turnover. Using (13)C-labelled glucose, we first showed that cold-hardy flies more rapidly incorporate ingested carbon into amino acids and newly synthesized glucose, permitting rapid synthesis of proline, a compound shown elsewhere to improve survival of cold stress. Second, using glucose and leucine tracers we showed that cold-hardy flies had higher oxidation rates than cold-susceptible flies before cold exposure, similar oxidation rates during cold exposure, and returned to higher oxidation rates during recovery. Additionally, cold-hardy flies transferred compounds among body pools more rapidly during cold exposure and recovery. Increased metabolic turnover may allow cold-adapted flies to better prepare for, resist and repair/tolerate cold damage. This work illustrates for the first time differences in nutrient fluxes associated with cold adaptation, suggesting that metabolic costs associated with cold hardiness could invoke resource-based trade-offs that shape life histories.

  7. The Tully-Fisher relation of COLD GASS Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiley, Alfred L.; Bureau, Martin; Saintonge, Amélie; Topal, Selcuk; Davis, Timothy A.; Torii, Kazufumi

    2016-10-01

    We present the stellar mass (M*) and Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer absolute Band 1 magnitude (MW1) Tully-Fisher relations (TFRs) of subsets of galaxies from the CO Legacy Database for the GALEX Arecibo SDSS Survey (COLD GASS). We examine the benefits and drawbacks of several commonly used fitting functions in the context of measuring CO(1-0) linewidths (and thus rotation velocities), favouring the Gaussian Double Peak function. We find the MW1 and M* TFR, for a carefully selected sub-sample, to be M_{W1} = (-7.1± 0.6) [log {(W_{50}/sin {i}/km s^{-1})}-2.58] - 23.83 ± 0.09 and log {(M_{{ast }}/M_{{⊙}})} = (3.3± 0.3) [log {(W_{50//sin {i}}{km s^{-1}})}-2.58] + 10.51± 0.04, respectively, where W50 is the width of a galaxy's CO(1-0) integrated profile at 50 per cent of its maximum and the inclination i is derived from the galaxy axial ratio measured on the Sloan Digitized Sky Survey r-band image. We find no evidence for any significant offset between the TFRs of COLD GASS galaxies and those of comparison samples of similar redshifts and morphologies. The slope of the COLD GASS M* TFR agrees with the relation of Pizagno et al. However, we measure a comparatively shallower slope for the COLD GASS MW1 TFR as compared to the relation of Tully & Pierce. We attribute this to the fact that the COLD GASS sample comprises galaxies of various (late-type) morphologies. Nevertheless, our work provides a robust reference point with which to compare future CO TFR studies.

  8. Antibiotics for the common cold: expectations of Germany's general population.

    PubMed

    Faber, M S; Heckenbach, K; Velasco, E; Eckmanns, T

    2010-09-02

    Physicians mention patients' expectations as a reason for prescribing antibiotics for common (viral) upper respiratory tract infections despite clinical evidence against their use and the physicians' better judgement. We aimed to assess the prevalence of such expectations and factors of influence (knowledge and attitudes) in Germany's general population. In November 2008, 1,778 persons registered with a large market research company were invited to complete an online questionnaire on expectations concerning prescription of antibiotics and on knowledge and attitudes regarding the effectiveness and use of antibiotics for upper respiratory tract infections. A total of 1,076 persons aged 15-78 years participated (response: 61%), of whom 91.8% reported using antibiotics 'only if absolutely necessary'. Prescription of antibiotics was expected by 113 (10.5%) of the 1,076 respondents for the common cold and by 997 (92.7%) for pneumonia. In a logistic regression analysis, predictors for expecting a prescription for antibiotics for the common cold included the following opinions: 'common cold or flu can effectively be treated with antibiotics' (prevalence: 37.6%; odds ratio (OR): 9.6; 95% confidence interval (CI): 3.8 to 24.3) and 'antibiotics should be taken when having a sore throat to prevent more serious illness' (prevalence 8.6%; OR: 7.6; 95% CI: 3.9 to 14.5). Among those expecting a prescription (n=113), 80 (71%) reported that they would trust their physician when he or she deems a prescription unnecessary; a further eight (7%) would be unsatisfied, but would accept the decision. Our results suggest that only a minority expects antibiotics for the treatment of cold symptoms. Physicians should be educated that their decisions not to prescribe antibiotics for the common cold, even when against patients' expectations, are apparently accepted by the majority.

  9. Probing Cold Dense Nuclear Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subedi, R.; Shneor, R.; Monaghan, P.; Anderson, B. D.; Aniol, K.; Annand, J.; Arrington, J.; Benaoum, H.; Benmokhtar, F.; Boeglin, W.; Chen, J.-P.; Choi, Seonho; Cisbani, E.; Craver, B.; Frullani, S.; Garibaldi, F.; Gilad, S.; Gilman, R.; Glamazdin, O.; Hansen, J.-O.; Higinbotham, D. W.; Holmstrom, T.; Ibrahim, H.; Igarashi, R.; de Jager, C. W.; Jans, E.; Jiang, X.; Kaufman, L. J.; Kelleher, A.; Kolarkar, A.; Kumbartzki, G.; LeRose, J. J.; Lindgren, R.; Liyanage, N.; Margaziotis, D. J.; Markowitz, P.; Marrone, S.; Mazouz, M.; Meekins, D.; Michaels, R.; Moffit, B.; Perdrisat, C. F.; Piasetzky, E.; Potokar, M.; Punjabi, V.; Qiang, Y.; Reinhold, J.; Ron, G.; Rosner, G.; Saha, A.; Sawatzky, B.; Shahinyan, A.; Širca, S.; Slifer, K.; Solvignon, P.; Sulkosky, V.; Urciuoli, G. M.; Voutier, E.; Watson, J. W.; Weinstein, L. B.; Wojtsekhowski, B.; Wood, S.; Zheng, X.-C.; Zhu, L.

    2008-06-01

    The protons and neutrons in a nucleus can form strongly correlated nucleon pairs. Scattering experiments, in which a proton is knocked out of the nucleus with high-momentum transfer and high missing momentum, show that in carbon-12 the neutron-proton pairs are nearly 20 times as prevalent as proton-proton pairs and, by inference, neutron-neutron pairs. This difference between the types of pairs is due to the nature of the strong force and has implications for understanding cold dense nuclear systems such as neutron stars.

  10. Cold cathode vacuum discharge tube

    DOEpatents

    Boettcher, G.E.

    1998-03-10

    A cold cathode vacuum discharge tube, and method for making same, are disclosed with an interior surface of the trigger probe coated with carbon deposited by carbon vapor deposition (CVD) or diamond-like carbon (DLC) deposition. Preferably a solid graphite insert is employed in the probe-cathode structure in place of an aluminum bushing employed in the prior art. The CVD or DLC probe face is laser scribed to allow resistance trimming to match available trigger voltage signals and to reduce electrical aging. 15 figs.

  11. Cold cathode vacuum discharge tube

    DOEpatents

    Boettcher, G.E.

    1998-04-14

    A cold cathode vacuum discharge tube, and method for making same, with an interior surface of the trigger probe coated with carbon deposited by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) or diamond-like carbon (DLC) deposition are disclosed. Preferably a solid graphite insert is employed in the probe-cathode structure in place of an aluminum bushing employed in the prior art. The CVD or DLC probe face is laser scribed to allow resistance trimming to match available trigger voltage signals and to reduce electrical aging. 14 figs.

  12. Lunar cold spots and crater production on the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Jean-Pierre; Bandfield, Joshua

    2016-10-01

    A new class of small, fresh impact craters has been recently identified on the Moon through the systematic mapping of lunar surface temperatures by the Diviner Lunar Radiometer instrument aboard the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter [1]. These craters are distinguished by anomalously low nighttime temperatures at distances ~10–100 crater radii. This thermal behavior indicates that impacts modify the surrounding regolith surfaces making them highly insulating with little evidence for either significant deposition or erosion of surface material [2]. These thermophysically distinct surfaces, or "cold spots", appear to be common to all recent impacts and provide a means of uniquely identifying the most recent impact craters on the Moon. We have conducted a survey of the crater population associated with cold spots. Comparison with existing crater chronology models [e.g., 3] constrains the retention-age of the cold spots to ~200,000 yr with a size-frequency distribution (SFD) slope that is consistent with the modeled production function. This implies the rate at which cold spots fade to background levels is independent of initial cold spot size and that the SFD of crater production in the last 200 ka is similar to the long-term average used to establish modeled production functions, though the rate of cratering may have varied [4]. In addition, we observe a longitudinal heterogeneity in cold spot crater density that is consistent with that predicted to occur as a result of the Moon's synchronous rotation [5] and has been observed in the rayed crater population [6], with the cold spot density at the apex of motion (90°W) nearly twice that observed at the antapex (90°E).[1] Bandfield, J., et al. (2011) JGR 116, E00H02. [2] Bandfield, J., et al. (2014) Icarus, 231, 221-231. [3] Neukum, G., et al. (2001) SSR 96, 55–86. [4] Mazrouei, S. et al. (2015) LPSC 46, 2331. [5] Le Fleuvre, M., and Wieczorek, M. A. (2011) Icarus 214, 1-20. [6] Morota, T. and Furumoto, M. (2002) EPSL

  13. International workshop on cold neutron sources

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, G.J.; West, C.D. )

    1991-08-01

    The first meeting devoted to cold neutron sources was held at the Los Alamos National Laboratory on March 5--8, 1990. Cosponsored by Los Alamos and Oak Ridge National Laboratories, the meeting was organized as an International Workshop on Cold Neutron Sources and brought together experts in the field of cold-neutron-source design for reactors and spallation sources. Eighty-four people from seven countries attended. Because the meeting was the first of its kind in over forty years, much time was spent acquainting participants with past and planned activities at reactor and spallation facilities worldwide. As a result, the meeting had more of a conference flavor than one of a workshop. The general topics covered at the workshop included: Criteria for cold source design; neutronic predictions and performance; energy deposition and removal; engineering design, fabrication, and operation; material properties; radiation damage; instrumentation; safety; existing cold sources; and future cold sources.

  14. TRPA1 Contributes to Cold Hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Camino, Donato del; Murphy, Sarah; Heiry, Melissa; Barrett, Lee B.; Earley, Taryn J.; Cook, Colby A.; Petrus, Matt J.; Zhao, Michael; D'Amours, Marc; Deering, Nate; Brenner, Gary J.; Costigan, Michael; Hayward, Neil J.; Chong, Jayhong A.; Fanger, Christopher M.; Woolf, Clifford J.; Patapoutian, Ardem; Moran, Magdalene M.

    2010-01-01

    TRPA1 is a non-selective cation channel expressed by nociceptors. While it is widely accepted that TRPA1 serves as a broad irritancy receptor for a variety of reactive chemicals, its role in cold sensation remains controversial. Here, we demonstrate that mild cooling markedly increases agonist-evoked rat TRPA1 currents. In the absence of an agonist, even noxious cold only increases current amplitude slightly. These results suggest that TRPA1 is a key mediator of cold hypersensitivity in pathological conditions where reactive oxygen species and pro-inflammatory activators of the channel are present, but likely plays a comparatively minor role in acute cold sensation. Supporting this, cold hypersensitivity can be induced in wild-type but not Trpa1-/- mice by subcutaneous administration of a TRPA1 agonist. Furthermore, the selective TRPA1 antagonist HC-030031 reduces cold hypersensitivity in rodent models of inflammatory and neuropathic pain. PMID:21068322

  15. Effects of diapause and cold acclimation on egg ultrastructure: new insights into the cold hardiness mechanisms of the Asian tiger mosquito Aedes (Stegomyia) albopictus.

    PubMed

    Kreß, Aljoscha; Kuch, Ulrich; Oehlmann, Jörg; Müller, Ruth

    2016-06-01

    The Asian tiger mosquito, Aedes albopictus (Diptera: Culicidae, SKUSE), is an important threat to public health due to its rapid spread and its potential as a vector. The eggs of Ae. albopictus are the most cold resistant life stage and thus, the cold hardiness of eggs is used to predict the future occurrence of the species in distribution models. However, the mechanism of cold hardiness has yet to be revealed. To address this question, we analyzed the layers of diapausing and cold acclimatized eggs of a temperate population of Ae. albopictus in a full factorial test design using transmission electron microscopy. We reviewed the hypotheses that a thickened wax layer or chorion is the cause of cold hardiness but found no evidence. As a result of the induced diapause, the thickness of the dark endochorion as a layer of high electron density and thus an assumed location for waxes was decreasing. We therefore hypothesized a qualitative alteration of the wax layer due to compaction. Cold acclimation was causing an increase in the thickness of the middle serosa cuticle indicating a detachment of serosa membrane from the endochorion as a potential adaptation strategy to isolate inoculating ice formations in the inter-membranous space. PMID:27232137

  16. Role of CBFs as Integrators of Chloroplast Redox, Phytochrome and Plant Hormone Signaling during Cold Acclimation

    PubMed Central

    Kurepin, Leonid V.; Dahal, Keshav P.; Savitch, Leonid V.; Singh, Jas; Bode, Rainer; Ivanov, Alexander G.; Hurry, Vaughan; Hüner, Norman P. A.

    2013-01-01

    Cold acclimation of winter cereals and other winter hardy species is a prerequisite to increase subsequent freezing tolerance. Low temperatures upregulate the expression of C-repeat/dehydration-responsive element binding transcription factors (CBF/DREB1) which in turn induce the expression of COLD-REGULATED (COR) genes. We summarize evidence which indicates that the integration of these interactions is responsible for the dwarf phenotype and enhanced photosynthetic performance associated with cold-acclimated and CBF-overexpressing plants. Plants overexpressing CBFs but grown at warm temperatures mimic the cold-tolerant, dwarf, compact phenotype; increased photosynthetic performance; and biomass accumulation typically associated with cold-acclimated plants. In this review, we propose a model whereby the cold acclimation signal is perceived by plants through an integration of low temperature and changes in light intensity, as well as changes in light quality. Such integration leads to the activation of the CBF-regulon and subsequent upregulation of COR gene and GA 2-oxidase (GA2ox) expression which results in a dwarf phenotype coupled with increased freezing tolerance and enhanced photosynthetic performance. We conclude that, due to their photoautotrophic nature, plants do not rely on a single low temperature sensor, but integrate changes in light intensity, light quality, and membrane viscosity in order to establish the cold-acclimated state. CBFs appear to act as master regulators of these interconnecting sensing/signaling pathways. PMID:23778089

  17. Piezoelectric Actuators On A Cold Finger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuo, Chin-Po; Garba, John A.; Glaser, Robert J.

    1995-01-01

    Developmental system for active suppression of vibrations of cold finger includes three piezoelectric actuators bonded to outer surface. Actuators used to suppress longitudinal and lateral vibrations of upper end of cold finger by applying opposing vibrations. Cold finger in question is part of a cryogenic system associated with an infrared imaging detector. When fully developed, system would be feedback sensor/control/actuator system automatically adapting to changing vibrational environment and suppresses pressure-induced vibrations by imposing compensatory vibrations via actuators.

  18. Avionics Box Cold Plate Damage Prevention

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stambolian, Damon; Larcher, Steven; Henderson, Gena; Tran, Donald

    2011-01-01

    Over the years there have been several occurrences of damage to Space Shuttle Orbiter cold plates during removal and replacement of avionics boxes. Thus a process improvement team was put together to determine ways to prevent these kinds of damage. From this effort there were many solutions including, protective covers, training, and improved operations instructions. The focus of this paper is to explain the cold plate damage problem and the corrective actions for preventing future damage to aerospace avionics cold plate designs.

  19. Global transcriptional profiling of a cold-tolerant rice variety under moderate cold stress reveals different cold stress response mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Junliang; Zhang, Shaohong; Yang, Tifeng; Zeng, Zichong; Huang, Zhanghui; Liu, Qing; Wang, Xiaofei; Leach, Jan; Leung, Hei; Liu, Bin

    2015-07-01

    Gene expression profiling under severe cold stress (4°C) has been conducted in plants including rice. However, rice seedlings are frequently exposed to milder cold stresses under natural environments. To understand the responses of rice to milder cold stress, a moderately low temperature (8°C) was used for cold treatment prior to genome-wide profiling of gene expression in a cold-tolerant japonica variety, Lijiangxintuanheigu (LTH). A total of 5557 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were found at four time points during moderate cold stress. Both the DEGs and differentially expressed transcription factor genes were clustered into two groups based on their expression, suggesting a two-phase response to cold stress and a determinative role of transcription factors in the regulation of stress response. The induction of OsDREB2A under cold stress is reported for the first time in this study. Among the anti-oxidant enzyme genes, glutathione peroxidase (GPX) and glutathione S-transferase (GST) were upregulated, suggesting that the glutathione system may serve as the main reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenger in LTH. Changes in expression of genes in signal transduction pathways for auxin, abscisic acid (ABA) and salicylic acid (SA) imply their involvement in cold stress responses. The induction of ABA response genes and detection of enriched cis-elements in DEGs suggest that ABA signaling pathway plays a dominant role in the cold stress response. Our results suggest that rice responses to cold stress vary with the specific temperature imposed and the rice genotype.

  20. Review on Cold-Formed Steel Connections

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Cher Siang; Mohammad, Shahrin; Md Tahir, Mahmood; Shek, Poi Ngian

    2014-01-01

    The concept of cold-formed light steel framing construction has been widespread after understanding its structural characteristics with massive research works over the years. Connection serves as one of the important elements for light steel framing in order to achieve its structural stability. Compared to hot-rolled steel sections, cold-formed steel connections perform dissimilarity due to the thin-walled behaviour. This paper aims to review current researches on cold-formed steel connections, particularly for screw connections, storage rack connections, welded connections, and bolted connections. The performance of these connections in the design of cold-formed steel structures is discussed. PMID:24688448

  1. Cold H I in faint dwarf galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patra, Narendra Nath; Chengalur, Jayaram N.; Karachentsev, Igor D.; Kaisin, Serafim S.; Begum, Ayesha

    2016-03-01

    We present the results of a study of the amount and distribution of cold atomic gas, as well its correlation with recent star formation in a sample of extremely faint dwarf irregular galaxies. Our sample is drawn from the Faint Irregular Galaxy GMRT Survey (FIGGS) and its extension, FIGGS2. We use two different methods to identify cold atomic gas. In the first method, line-of-sight H I spectra were decomposed into multiple Gaussian components and narrow Gaussian components were identified as cold H I. In the second method, the brightness temperature (TB ) is used as a tracer of cold H I. We find that the amount of cold gas identified using the TB method is significantly larger than the amount of gas identified using Gaussian decomposition. We also find that a large fraction of the cold gas identified using the TB method is spatially coincident with regions of recent star formation, although the converse is not true. That is only a small fraction of the regions with recent star formation are also covered by cold gas. For regions where the star formation and the cold gas overlap, we study the relationship between the star formation rate density and the cold H I column density. We find that the star formation rate density has a power-law dependence on the H I column density, but that the slope of this power law is significantly flatter than that of the canonical Kennicutt-Schmidt relation.

  2. Cold vacuum drying facility design requirements

    SciTech Connect

    IRWIN, J.J.

    1999-07-01

    This document provides the detailed design requirements for the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project Cold Vacuum Drying Facility. Process, safety, and quality assurance requirements and interfaces are specified.

  3. Medical Evaluation for Exposure Extremes: Cold.

    PubMed

    Fudge, Jessie R; Bennett, Brad L; Simanis, Juris P; Roberts, William O

    2015-09-01

    Risk of injury in cold environments is related to a combination of athlete preparedness, preexisting medical conditions, and the body's physiologic response to environmental factors, including ambient temperature, windchill, and wetness. The goal of this section is to decrease the risk of hypothermia, frostbite, and nonfreezing cold injuries as well as to prevent worsening of preexisting conditions in cold environments using a preparticipation screening history, examination, and counseling. Cold weather exercise can be done safely with education, proper preparation, and appropriate response to changing weather conditions.

  4. Medical Evaluation for Exposure Extremes: Cold.

    PubMed

    Fudge, Jessie R; Bennett, Brad L; Simanis, Juris P; Roberts, William O

    2015-12-01

    Risk of injury in cold environments is related to a combination of athlete preparedness, preexisting medical conditions, and the body's physiologic response to environmental factors, including ambient temperature, windchill, and wetness. The goal of this section is to decrease the risk of hypothermia, frostbite, and nonfreezing cold injuries as well as to prevent worsening of preexisting conditions in cold environments using a preparticipation screening history, examination, and counseling. Cold weather exercise can be done safely with education, proper preparation, and appropriate response to changing weather conditions.

  5. Review on cold-formed steel connections.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yeong Huei; Tan, Cher Siang; Mohammad, Shahrin; Tahir, Mahmood Md; Shek, Poi Ngian

    2014-01-01

    The concept of cold-formed light steel framing construction has been widespread after understanding its structural characteristics with massive research works over the years. Connection serves as one of the important elements for light steel framing in order to achieve its structural stability. Compared to hot-rolled steel sections, cold-formed steel connections perform dissimilarity due to the thin-walled behaviour. This paper aims to review current researches on cold-formed steel connections, particularly for screw connections, storage rack connections, welded connections, and bolted connections. The performance of these connections in the design of cold-formed steel structures is discussed.

  6. Review on cold-formed steel connections.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yeong Huei; Tan, Cher Siang; Mohammad, Shahrin; Tahir, Mahmood Md; Shek, Poi Ngian

    2014-01-01

    The concept of cold-formed light steel framing construction has been widespread after understanding its structural characteristics with massive research works over the years. Connection serves as one of the important elements for light steel framing in order to achieve its structural stability. Compared to hot-rolled steel sections, cold-formed steel connections perform dissimilarity due to the thin-walled behaviour. This paper aims to review current researches on cold-formed steel connections, particularly for screw connections, storage rack connections, welded connections, and bolted connections. The performance of these connections in the design of cold-formed steel structures is discussed. PMID:24688448

  7. Evaporative cooling enhanced cold storage system

    DOEpatents

    Carr, Peter

    1991-01-01

    The invention provides an evaporatively enhanced cold storage system wherein a warm air stream is cooled and the cooled air stream is thereafter passed into contact with a cold storage unit. Moisture is added to the cooled air stream prior to or during contact of the cooled air stream with the cold storage unit to effect enhanced cooling of the cold storage unit due to evaporation of all or a portion of the added moisture. Preferably at least a portion of the added moisture comprises water condensed during the cooling of the warm air stream.

  8. Evaporative cooling enhanced cold storage system

    DOEpatents

    Carr, P.

    1991-10-15

    The invention provides an evaporatively enhanced cold storage system wherein a warm air stream is cooled and the cooled air stream is thereafter passed into contact with a cold storage unit. Moisture is added to the cooled air stream prior to or during contact of the cooled air stream with the cold storage unit to effect enhanced cooling of the cold storage unit due to evaporation of all or a portion of the added moisture. Preferably at least a portion of the added moisture comprises water condensed during the cooling of the warm air stream. 3 figures.

  9. VAMP7 regulates constitutive membrane incorporation of the cold-activated channel TRPM8.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Debapriya; Pinto, Silvia; Danglot, Lydia; Vandewauw, Ine; Segal, Andrei; Van Ranst, Nele; Benoit, Melissa; Janssens, Annelies; Vennekens, Rudi; Vanden Berghe, Pieter; Galli, Thierry; Vriens, Joris; Voets, Thomas

    2016-02-04

    The cation channel TRPM8 plays a central role in the somatosensory system, as a key sensor of innocuously cold temperatures and cooling agents. Although increased functional expression of TRPM8 has been implicated in various forms of pathological cold hypersensitivity, little is known about the cellular and molecular mechanisms that determine TRPM8 abundance at the plasma membrane. Here we demonstrate constitutive transport of TRPM8 towards the plasma membrane in atypical, non-acidic transport vesicles that contain lysosomal-associated membrane protein 1 (LAMP1), and provide evidence that vesicle-associated membrane protein 7 (VAMP7) mediates fusion of these vesicles with the plasma membrane. In line herewith, VAMP7-deficient mice exhibit reduced functional expression of TRPM8 in sensory neurons and concomitant deficits in cold avoidance and icilin-induced cold hypersensitivity. Our results uncover a cellular pathway that controls functional plasma membrane incorporation of a temperature-sensitive TRP channel, and thus regulates thermosensitivity in vivo.

  10. Three-dimensional structure of fluid conduits sustaining an active deep marine cold seep

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hornbach, M. J.; Ruppel, C.; Van Dover, C. L.

    2007-03-01

    Cold seeps in deep marine settings emit fluids to the overlying ocean and are often associated with such seafloor flux indicators as chemosynthetic biota, pockmarks, and authigenic carbonate rocks. Despite evidence for spatiotemporal variability in the rate, locus, and composition of cold seep fluid emissions, the shallow subseafloor plumbing systems have never been clearly imaged in three dimensions. Using a novel, high-resolution approach, we produce the first three-dimensional image of possible fluid conduits beneath a cold seep at a study site within the Blake Ridge gas hydrate province. Complex, dendritic features diverge upward toward the seafloor from feeder conduits at depth and could potentially draw flow laterally by up to 103 m from the known seafloor seep, a pattern similar to that suggested for some hydrothermal vents. The biodiversity, community structure, and succession dynamics of chemosynthetic communities at cold seeps may largely reflect these complexities of subseafloor fluid flow.

  11. Three-dimensional structure of fluid conduits sustaining an active deep marine cold seep

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hornbach, M.J.; Ruppel, C.; Van Dover, C.L.

    2007-01-01

    Cold seeps in deep marine settings emit fluids to the overlying ocean and are often associated with such seafloor flux indicators as chemosynthetic biota, pockmarks, and authigenic carbonate rocks. Despite evidence for spatiotemporal variability in the rate, locus, and composition of cold seep fluid emissions, the shallow subseafloor plumbing systems have never been clearly imaged in three dimensions. Using a novel, high-resolution approach, we produce the first three-dimensional image of possible fluid conduits beneath a cold seep at a study site within the Blake Ridge gas hydrate province. Complex, dendritic features diverge upward toward the seafloor from feeder conduits at depth and could potentially draw flow laterally by up to 103 m from the known seafloor seep, a pattern similar to that suggested for some hydrothermal vents. The biodiversity, community structure, and succession dynamics of chemosynthetic communities at cold seeps may largely reflect these complexities of subseafloor fluid flow.

  12. Expression of Ixodes scapularis Antifreeze Glycoprotein Enhances Cold Tolerance in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Neelakanta, Girish; Hudson, Andrew M.; Sultana, Hameeda; Cooley, Lynn; Fikrig, Erol

    2012-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster experience cold shock injury and die when exposed to low non-freezing temperatures. In this study, we generated transgenic D. melanogaster that express putative Ixodes scapularis antifreeze glycoprotein (IAFGP) and show that the presence of IAFGP increases the ability of flies to survive in the cold. Male and female adult iafgp-expressing D. melanogaster exhibited higher survival rates compared with controls when placed at non-freezing temperatures. Increased hatching rates were evident in embryos expressing IAFGP when exposed to the cold. The TUNEL assay showed that flight muscles from iafgp-expressing female adult flies exhibited less apoptotic damage upon exposure to non-freezing temperatures in comparison to control flies. Collectively, these data suggest that expression of iafgp increases cold tolerance in flies by preventing apoptosis. This study defines a molecular basis for the role of an antifreeze protein in cryoprotection of flies. PMID:22428051

  13. Dentin and pulp sense cold stimulus.

    PubMed

    Tokuda, Masayuki; Tatsuyama, Shoko; Fujisawa, Mari; Morimoto-Yamashita, Yoko; Kawakami, Yoshiko; Shibukawa, Yoshiyuki; Torii, Mistuso

    2015-05-01

    Dentin hypersensitivity is a common symptom, and recent convergent evidences have reported transient receptor potential (TRP) channels in odontoblasts act as mechanical and thermal molecular sensor, which detect stimulation applied on the exposed dentin surface, to drive multiple odontoblastic cellular functions, such as sensory transduction and/or dentin formation. In the present study, we confirmed expression of TRP melastatin subfamily member-8 (TRPM8) channels in primary cultured cells derived from human dental pulp cells (HPCs) and mouse odontoblast-lineage cells (OLCs) as well as in dentin matrix protein-1 (DMP-1) and dentin sialoprotein (DSP) positive acutely isolated rat odontoblasts from dental pulp tissue slice culture by immunohistochemical analyses. In addition, we detected TRPM8 channel expression on HPCs and OLCs by RT-PCR and Western blotting analyses. These results indicated that both odontoblasts and dental pulp cells express TRPM8 channels in rat, mouse and human, and therefore we hypothesize they may contribute as cold sensor in tooth. PMID:25665859

  14. Cold dark matter: Controversies on small scales

    PubMed Central

    Weinberg, David H.; Bullock, James S.; Governato, Fabio; Kuzio de Naray, Rachel; Peter, Annika H. G.

    2015-01-01

    The cold dark matter (CDM) cosmological model has been remarkably successful in explaining cosmic structure over an enormous span of redshift, but it has faced persistent challenges from observations that probe the innermost regions of dark matter halos and the properties of the Milky Way’s dwarf galaxy satellites. We review the current observational and theoretical status of these “small-scale controversies.” Cosmological simulations that incorporate only gravity and collisionless CDM predict halos with abundant substructure and central densities that are too high to match constraints from galaxy dynamics. The solution could lie in baryonic physics: Recent numerical simulations and analytical models suggest that gravitational potential fluctuations tied to efficient supernova feedback can flatten the central cusps of halos in massive galaxies, and a combination of feedback and low star formation efficiency could explain why most of the dark matter subhalos orbiting the Milky Way do not host visible galaxies. However, it is not clear that this solution can work in the lowest mass galaxies, where discrepancies are observed. Alternatively, the small-scale conflicts could be evidence of more complex physics in the dark sector itself. For example, elastic scattering from strong dark matter self-interactions can alter predicted halo mass profiles, leading to good agreement with observations across a wide range of galaxy mass. Gravitational lensing and dynamical perturbations of tidal streams in the stellar halo provide evidence for an abundant population of low-mass subhalos in accord with CDM predictions. These observational approaches will get more powerful over the next few years. PMID:25646464

  15. Cold dark matter: Controversies on small scales.

    PubMed

    Weinberg, David H; Bullock, James S; Governato, Fabio; Kuzio de Naray, Rachel; Peter, Annika H G

    2015-10-01

    The cold dark matter (CDM) cosmological model has been remarkably successful in explaining cosmic structure over an enormous span of redshift, but it has faced persistent challenges from observations that probe the innermost regions of dark matter halos and the properties of the Milky Way's dwarf galaxy satellites. We review the current observational and theoretical status of these "small-scale controversies." Cosmological simulations that incorporate only gravity and collisionless CDM predict halos with abundant substructure and central densities that are too high to match constraints from galaxy dynamics. The solution could lie in baryonic physics: Recent numerical simulations and analytical models suggest that gravitational potential fluctuations tied to efficient supernova feedback can flatten the central cusps of halos in massive galaxies, and a combination of feedback and low star formation efficiency could explain why most of the dark matter subhalos orbiting the Milky Way do not host visible galaxies. However, it is not clear that this solution can work in the lowest mass galaxies, where discrepancies are observed. Alternatively, the small-scale conflicts could be evidence of more complex physics in the dark sector itself. For example, elastic scattering from strong dark matter self-interactions can alter predicted halo mass profiles, leading to good agreement with observations across a wide range of galaxy mass. Gravitational lensing and dynamical perturbations of tidal streams in the stellar halo provide evidence for an abundant population of low-mass subhalos in accord with CDM predictions. These observational approaches will get more powerful over the next few years.

  16. Cold dark matter: Controversies on small scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinberg, David H.; Bullock, James S.; Governato, Fabio; Kuzio de Naray, Rachel; Peter, Annika H. G.

    2015-10-01

    The cold dark matter (CDM) cosmological model has been remarkably successful in explaining cosmic structure over an enormous span of redshift, but it has faced persistent challenges from observations that probe the innermost regions of dark matter halos and the properties of the Milky Way's dwarf galaxy satellites. We review the current observational and theoretical status of these "small-scale controversies." Cosmological simulations that incorporate only gravity and collisionless CDM predict halos with abundant substructure and central densities that are too high to match constraints from galaxy dynamics. The solution could lie in baryonic physics: Recent numerical simulations and analytical models suggest that gravitational potential fluctuations tied to efficient supernova feedback can flatten the central cusps of halos in massive galaxies, and a combination of feedback and low star formation efficiency could explain why most of the dark matter subhalos orbiting the Milky Way do not host visible galaxies. However, it is not clear that this solution can work in the lowest mass galaxies, where discrepancies are observed. Alternatively, the small-scale conflicts could be evidence of more complex physics in the dark sector itself. For example, elastic scattering from strong dark matter self-interactions can alter predicted halo mass profiles, leading to good agreement with observations across a wide range of galaxy mass. Gravitational lensing and dynamical perturbations of tidal streams in the stellar halo provide evidence for an abundant population of low-mass subhalos in accord with CDM predictions. These observational approaches will get more powerful over the next few years.

  17. Cold dark matter: Controversies on small scales.

    PubMed

    Weinberg, David H; Bullock, James S; Governato, Fabio; Kuzio de Naray, Rachel; Peter, Annika H G

    2015-10-01

    The cold dark matter (CDM) cosmological model has been remarkably successful in explaining cosmic structure over an enormous span of redshift, but it has faced persistent challenges from observations that probe the innermost regions of dark matter halos and the properties of the Milky Way's dwarf galaxy satellites. We review the current observational and theoretical status of these "small-scale controversies." Cosmological simulations that incorporate only gravity and collisionless CDM predict halos with abundant substructure and central densities that are too high to match constraints from galaxy dynamics. The solution could lie in baryonic physics: Recent numerical simulations and analytical models suggest that gravitational potential fluctuations tied to efficient supernova feedback can flatten the central cusps of halos in massive galaxies, and a combination of feedback and low star formation efficiency could explain why most of the dark matter subhalos orbiting the Milky Way do not host visible galaxies. However, it is not clear that this solution can work in the lowest mass galaxies, where discrepancies are observed. Alternatively, the small-scale conflicts could be evidence of more complex physics in the dark sector itself. For example, elastic scattering from strong dark matter self-interactions can alter predicted halo mass profiles, leading to good agreement with observations across a wide range of galaxy mass. Gravitational lensing and dynamical perturbations of tidal streams in the stellar halo provide evidence for an abundant population of low-mass subhalos in accord with CDM predictions. These observational approaches will get more powerful over the next few years. PMID:25646464

  18. The geochemistry characteristic and dating of cold seepage carbonates of the Pearl River Mouth Basin, eastern of South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Yunxin; Fu, Shaoying

    2015-04-01

    Cold seepage carbonates are usually formed by the interaction of methane oxidizing archaea, sulfate reducing bacteria and cold seepage which contain abundant venting hydrocarbon gases. The presence of cold seepage carbonates on the seabed is one of the evidences that the area exist venting hydrocarbon gases, which are usually result by the dissociation of gas hydrate. The cold seepage property and fluid flow rate can influence the oxidation-deoxidation environment of the bottom water and sediment. Many previous studies focused on the mineral composition, microstructure, elemental composition, isotope composition of the cold seepage carbonates and isotopic dating for the cold seepage carbonates. The isotopic dating for the cold seepage carbonates can provide the information of the gas hydrate formation and dissociation in some area of the South China Sea. High precision TIMS-U dating and 14C dating are used as routine method for the dating of the Quaternary carbonates and fossils. The cold seepage carbonates in the study include the samples collected by ROV on the seabed and the drilling for gas hydrate in the Pearl River Mouth Basin, eastern of the South China Sea. The authigenic carbonate occurred in different depth in the A, B and C drilling site. They may be represent different events of gas hydrate formation and dissociation in the Quaternary. The dating study for all the cold seepage carbonates can provide the relative accurate eras of the gas hydrate dissociation events in certain area of the South China Sea.

  19. Age and Ethnic Differences in Cold Weather and Contagion Theories of Colds and Flu

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sigelman, Carol K.

    2012-01-01

    Age and ethnic group differences in cold weather and contagion or germ theories of infectious disease were explored in two studies. A cold weather theory was frequently invoked to explain colds and to a lesser extent flu but became less prominent with age as children gained command of a germ theory of disease. Explanations of how contact with…

  20. Effect of short-term cold exposure on skeletal muscle protein breakdown in rats.

    PubMed

    Manfredi, L H; Zanon, N M; Garófalo, M A; Navegantes, L C C; Kettelhut, I C

    2013-11-01

    Although it is well established that carbohydrate and lipid metabolism are profoundly altered by cold stress, the effects of short-term cold exposure on protein metabolism in skeletal muscle are still poorly understood. Because cold acclimation requires that an organism adjust its metabolic flux, and muscle amino acids may be an important energy source for heat production, we hypothesize that muscle proteolysis is increased and protein synthesis is decreased under such a stress condition. Herein, cold exposure for 24 h decreased rates of protein synthesis and increased overall proteolysis in both soleus and extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles, but it did not affect muscle weight. An increase in proteolysis was accompanied by hyperactivity of the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) in both soleus and EDL, and Ca(2+)-dependent proteolysis in EDL. Furthermore, muscles of rats exposed to cold showed increased mRNA and protein levels of atrogin-1 and muscle RING finger enzyme-1 (MuRF1). Additionally, cold stress reduced phosphorylation of Akt and Forkhead box class O1 (FoxO1), a well-known effect that increases FoxO translocation to the nucleus and leads to activation of proteolysis. Plasma insulin levels were lower, whereas catecholamines, corticosterone, and thyroid hormones were higher in cold-exposed rats compared with control rats. The present data provide the first direct evidence that short-term cold exposure for 24 h decreases rates of protein synthesis and increases the UPS and Ca(2+)-dependent proteolytic processes, and increases expression of atrogin-1 and MuRF1 in skeletal muscles of young rats. The activation of atrophy induced by acute cold stress seems to be mediated at least in part through the inactivation of Akt/FoxO signaling and activation of AMP-activated protein kinase.

  1. The cold-fog test

    SciTech Connect

    Chisholm, W.A.; Ringler, K.G.; Erven, C.C.

    1996-10-01

    The electrical performance of outdoor insulation degrades severely during combinations of factors that include surface contamination (C), ice (I), fog (F) and an ambient temperature that rises through 0 C (T{sub 0{degree}}). Failures at operating voltage on 115-kV, 230-kV and 500-kV systems occur with increasing probability under these conditions. A new CFT{sub 0{degree}} or cold-fog test method has been developed to reproduce the flashovers at all three voltage levels. Three options are identified for improving CFT{sub 0{degree}} performance: use of semi-conductive glazes, substitution of silicone for porcelain and use of silicone coatings on existing porcelain insulators.

  2. Cold warriors target arms control

    SciTech Connect

    Isaacs, J.

    1995-09-01

    While disagreements over the conflict in Bosnia have strained US relations with Western Europe and Russia, these divisions will pale in comparison to the tensions that will arise if recent congressional arms control decisions become law. If the Republicans who dominate Congress are successful, a series of arms control agreements painstakingly negotiated by Republican and Democratic presidents could be consigned to the ash heap. This list includes the Start I and Start II nuclear reduction agreements, the 1972 Anti-Ballistic Missile (ABM) Treaty and the ongoing negotiations to achieve a comprehensive test ban (CTB) by 1996. US leadership in the post-Cold War era will undermined as the international community, already skeptical about this country`s direction, will question the ability of the executive branch to surmount isolantionist impulses.

  3. Compensating for cold war cancers.

    PubMed

    Parascandola, Mark J

    2002-07-01

    Although the Cold War has ended, thousands of workers involved in nuclear weapons production are still living with the adverse health effects of working with radioactive materials, beryllium, and silica. After a series of court battles, the U.S. government passed the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Act in October 2000 to financially assist workers whose health has been compromised by these occupational exposures. Now work is underway to set out guidelines for determining which workers will be compensated. The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health has been assigned the task of developing a model that can scientifically make these determinations, a heavy task considering the controversies that lie in estimating low-level radiation risks and the inadequate worker exposure records kept at many of the plants.

  4. Brazilian disc experiments on a cold spray material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braithwaite, C. H.; Aydelotte, B.; Jardine, A. P.

    2014-05-01

    A series of experiments were performed to probe the tensile behaviour of a cold sprayed reactive metal composite material containing a mixture of nickel and aluminium. Data were acquired at two different strain rates and were collected using high speed photography, strain gauges, force-extension measurements and were analysed using digital image correlation techniques. Comparisons were made with modelling on representative microstructural elements in the CTH code, supporting the conclusion that the material failed in shear rather than tension, in a manner dictated by the microstructure. Fairly high sample to sample variation was observed as well as minimal evidence of strain rate dependent behaviour.

  5. Cold-spots and glassy nematicity in underdoped cuprates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kyungmin; Kivelson, Steven A.; Kim, Eun-Ah

    2016-07-01

    There is now copious direct experimental evidence of various forms of (short-range) charge order in underdoped cuprate high temperature superconductors, and spectroscopic signatures of a nodal-antinodal dichotomy in the structure of the single-particle spectral functions. In this context we analyze the Bogoliubov quasiparticle spectrum in a superconducting nematic glass. The coincidence of the superconducting "nodal points" and the nematic "cold-spots" on the Fermi surface naturally accounts for many of the most salient features of the measured spectral functions (from angle-resolved photoemission) and the local density of states (from scanning tunneling microscopy).

  6. Evolution of CO2 and H2O on Mars: A cold Early History?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niles, P. B.; Michalski, J.

    2011-01-01

    The martian climate has long been thought to have evolved substantially through history from a warm and wet period to the current cold and dry conditions on the martian surface. This view has been challenged based primarily on evidence that the early Sun had a substantially reduced luminosity and that a greenhouse atmosphere would be difficult to sustain on Mars for long periods of time. In addition, the evidence for a warm, wet period of martian history is far from conclusive with many of the salient features capable of being explained by an early cold climate. An important test of the warm, wet early Mars hypothesis is the abundance of carbonates in the crust [1]. Recent high precision isotopic measurements of the martian atmosphere and discoveries of carbonates on the martian surface provide new constraints on the evolution of the martian atmosphere. This work seeks to apply these constraints to test the feasibility of the cold early scenario

  7. Human origins and evolution: Cold Spring Harbor, deja vu.

    PubMed

    White, T D

    2009-01-01

    The Cold Spring Harbor Symposia of the 1950s were key to integrating human evolutionary studies into biology. That integration provided a solid foundation for systematic and functional interpretations of an expanding base of fossil and molecular evidence during the latter half of the 20th century. Today, the paleontological record of human evolution amassed during the last 150 years illuminates the human clade on life's tree. However, the rise of Hennegian parsimony cladistics and punctuationalism during the end of the last century witnessed the partial abandonment of classificatory conventions cemented by Mayr, Simpson, Dobzhansky, and others at Cold Spring Harbor. This has led to an artificial, postmillennial amplification of apparent species diversity in the hominid clade. Work on a stratigraphically thick and temporally deep sedimentary sequence in the Middle Awash study area of Ethiopia's Afar Depression reveals an assembly order of hominid anatomies and behaviors that was impossible for Darwin to discern. Large parts of that record appear to reflect phyletic evolution, consistent with the lessons and expectations of Cold Spring Harbor in 1950. Molecular biology cannot reveal the assembly sequences or contexts of human origins and evolution without reference to adequate geological, geochronological, paleobiological, and archaeological records. Today's consilience of these disparate data sets would have impressed Charles Darwin. PMID:19776166

  8. Human origins and evolution: Cold Spring Harbor, deja vu.

    PubMed

    White, T D

    2009-01-01

    The Cold Spring Harbor Symposia of the 1950s were key to integrating human evolutionary studies into biology. That integration provided a solid foundation for systematic and functional interpretations of an expanding base of fossil and molecular evidence during the latter half of the 20th century. Today, the paleontological record of human evolution amassed during the last 150 years illuminates the human clade on life's tree. However, the rise of Hennegian parsimony cladistics and punctuationalism during the end of the last century witnessed the partial abandonment of classificatory conventions cemented by Mayr, Simpson, Dobzhansky, and others at Cold Spring Harbor. This has led to an artificial, postmillennial amplification of apparent species diversity in the hominid clade. Work on a stratigraphically thick and temporally deep sedimentary sequence in the Middle Awash study area of Ethiopia's Afar Depression reveals an assembly order of hominid anatomies and behaviors that was impossible for Darwin to discern. Large parts of that record appear to reflect phyletic evolution, consistent with the lessons and expectations of Cold Spring Harbor in 1950. Molecular biology cannot reveal the assembly sequences or contexts of human origins and evolution without reference to adequate geological, geochronological, paleobiological, and archaeological records. Today's consilience of these disparate data sets would have impressed Charles Darwin.

  9. Formation and photodetachment of cold metal cluster negative ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, L.-S.; Brucat, P. J.; Pettiette, C. L.; Yang, S.; Smalley, R. E.

    1985-10-01

    A general method is described for the formation of cold metal cluser negative ion beams which serve as excellent sources for photodetachment experiments. The method involves the pulsed laser vaporization of a metal target at the throat of a pulsed supersonic helium expansion. By the optimization of source conditions, intense beams (greater than 105 ions/pulse) of both positive and negative ions are produced routinely. Ionization of the metal cluster molecules, either during vaporization or by irradiation with 193 nm light, occurs prior to supersonic expansion and produces a cold plasma entrained in the neural flow that is renitent to stray electric and magnetic fields, unlike photoions produced in the collisionless downstream molecular beam. The enhancement of the negative ion flux by 193 nm irradiation is believed to be evidence for efficient electron attachment of low energy photoelectrons generated in the nozzle region. This attachment process, however, is apparently not effective for molecules containing less than ˜4 metal atoms. Laser irradition of mass-selected cluster anions extracted from these cold ion beams reveal that photodetachment of the metal cluster negative ion is always the preferred pathway, even when fragmentation of the ion is possible. This new negative ion production technique should therefore permit measurement of both electron affinities and photoelectron spectra as a function of cluster size and composition.

  10. Viruses and Bacteria in the Etiology of the Common Cold

    PubMed Central

    Mäkelä, Mika J.; Puhakka, Tuomo; Ruuskanen, Olli; Leinonen, Maija; Saikku, Pekka; Kimpimäki, Marko; Blomqvist, Soile; Hyypiä, Timo; Arstila, Pertti

    1998-01-01

    Two hundred young adults with common colds were studied during a 10-month period. Virus culture, antigen detection, PCR, and serology with paired samples were used to identify the infection. Viral etiology was established for 138 of the 200 patients (69%). Rhinoviruses were detected in 105 patients, coronavirus OC43 or 229E infection was detected in 17, influenza A or B virus was detected in 12, and single infections with parainfluenza virus, respiratory syncytial virus, adenovirus, and enterovirus were found in 14 patients. Evidence for bacterial infection was found in seven patients. Four patients had a rise in antibodies against Chlamydia pneumoniae, one had a rise in antibodies against Haemophilus influenzae, one had a rise in antibodies against Streptococcus pneumoniae, and one had immunoglobulin M antibodies against Mycoplasma pneumoniae. The results show that although approximately 50% of episodes of the common cold were caused by rhinoviruses, the etiology can vary depending on the epidemiological situation with regard to circulating viruses. Bacterial infections were rare, supporting the concept that the common cold is almost exclusively a viral disease. PMID:9466772

  11. Neandertal cold adaptation: physiological and energetic factors.

    PubMed

    Steegmann, A Theodore; Cerny, Frank J; Holliday, Trenton W

    2002-01-01

    European Neandertals employed a complex set of physiological cold defenses, homologous to those seen in contemporary humans and nonhuman primates. While Neandertal morphological patterns, such as foreshortened extremities and low relative surface-area, may have explained some of the variance in cold resistance, it is suggested the adaptive package was strongly dependent on a rich array of physiological defenses. A summary of the environmental cold conditions in which the Neandertals lived is presented, and a comparative ethnographic model from Tierra del Fuego is used. Muscle and subcutaneous fat are excellent "passive" insulators. Neandertals were quite muscular, but it is unlikely that they could maintain enough superficial body fat to offer much cold protection. A major, high-energy metabolic adaptation facilitated by modest amounts of highly thermogenic brown adipose tissue (BAT) is proposed. In addition, Neandertals would have been protected by general mammalian cold defenses based on systemic vasoconstriction and intensified by acclimatization, aerobic fitness, and localized cold--induced vasodilation. However, these defenses are energetically expensive. Based on contemporary data from circumpolar peoples, it is estimated that Neandertals required 3,360 to 4,480 kcal per day to support strenuous winter foraging and cold resistance costs. Several specific genetic cold adaptations are also proposed--heat shock protein (actually, stress shock protein), an ACP*1 locus somatic growth factor, and a specialized calcium metabolism not as yet understood. PMID:12203812

  12. Electrodeposition process reduces cost of cold plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruppe, E. P.

    1980-01-01

    Efficient nickel heat-exchanger cold plates can be fabricated less expensively than stainless steel plates. If adapted to mass production, it is estimated that nickel cold plates might be made for about 30 percent less than stainless-steel plates.

  13. Cold plasma processing technology makes advances

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cold plasma (AKA nonthermal plasma, cool plasma, gas plasma, etc.) is a rapidly maturing antimicrobial process being developed for applications in the food industry. A wide array of devices can be used to create cold plasma, but the defining characteristic is that they operate at or near room temper...

  14. Cold head maintenance with minimal service interruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radovinsky, A. L.; Michael, P. C.; Zhukovsky, A.; Forton, E.; Paradis, Y.; Nuttens, V.; Minervini, J. V.

    2015-12-01

    Turn-key superconducting magnet systems are increasingly conduction-cooled by cryogenerators. Gifford-McMahon systems are reliable and cost effective, but require annual maintenance. A usual method of servicing is replacing the cold head of the cryocooler. It requires a complicated design with a vacuum chamber separate from the main vacuum of the cryostat, as well as detachable thermal contacts, which add to the thermal resistance of the cooling heat path and reduce the reliability of the system. We present a rapid warm-up scheme to bring the cold head body, which remains rigidly affixed to the cold mass, to room temperature, while the cold mass remains at cryogenic temperature. Electric heaters thermally attached to the cold head stations are used to warm them up, which permits conventional cold head maintenance with no danger of contaminating the inside of the cold head body. This scheme increases the efficiency of the cooling system, facilitates annual maintenance of the cold head and returning the magnet to operation in a short time.

  15. The Origins of the Cold War.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paterson, Thomas G.

    1986-01-01

    Briefly reviews conventional reasoning about the start of the Cold War. Describes contemporary revisionist views of the Cold War and the reasons they arose. Maintains that American leaders exaggerated the Soviet ideological and military threat, spurring an American arms build-up which ultimately led to the present-day arms race. (JDH)

  16. Is It a Cold or the Flu?

    MedlinePlus

    IS IT A Cold OR THE Flu ? SYMPTOMS FEVER HEADACHE GENERAL ACHES, PAINS FATIGUE, WEAKNESS EXTREME EXHAUSTION STUFFY NOSE SNEEZING SORE THROAT CHEST ... P L I C AT I O N S COLD Rare Rare Slight Sometimes Never Common Usual Common ...

  17. Lessons on the Cold War. Lesson Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cunningham, Susan J.

    1994-01-01

    Contends that the end of the Cold War requires teachers to change their teaching methods and content. Presents six lessons, most with three individual student activities, that trace the Cold War from the pre-World War I era through the end of the Vietnam War. (CFR)

  18. Cold, Ice, and Snow Safety (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Cold, Ice, and Snow Safety KidsHealth > For Parents > Cold, Ice, and Snow Safety Print A A A Text Size What's ... a few. Plus, someone has to shovel the snow, right? Once outdoors, however, take precautions to keep ...

  19. 21 CFR 890.5700 - Cold pack.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cold pack. 890.5700 Section 890.5700 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices § 890.5700 Cold pack. (a) Identification....

  20. 21 CFR 890.5700 - Cold pack.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cold pack. 890.5700 Section 890.5700 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices § 890.5700 Cold pack. (a) Identification....

  1. 21 CFR 890.5700 - Cold pack.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cold pack. 890.5700 Section 890.5700 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices § 890.5700 Cold pack. (a) Identification....

  2. Cold plasma as a food processing technology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cold plasma uses energetic, reactive gases to inactivate contaminating microbes on a variety of foods, such as meats, poultry and fruits and vegetables. The primary modes of action are reactive chemical species and ultraviolet light. Various cold plasma systems are under development, operating at am...

  3. Biotechnology of Cold-Active Proteases

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Swati; Satyanarayana, Tulasi

    2013-01-01

    The bulk of Earth’s biosphere is cold (<5 °C) and inhabited by psychrophiles. Biocatalysts from psychrophilic organisms (psychrozymes) have attracted attention because of their application in the ongoing efforts to decrease energy consumption. Proteinases as a class represent the largest category of industrial enzymes. There has been an emphasis on employing cold-active proteases in detergents because this allows laundry operations at ambient temperatures. Proteases have been used in environmental bioremediation, food industry and molecular biology. In view of the present limited understanding and availability of cold-active proteases with diverse characteristics, it is essential to explore Earth’s surface more in search of an ideal cold-active protease. The understanding of molecular and mechanistic details of these proteases will open up new avenues to tailor proteases with the desired properties. A detailed account of the developments in the production and applications of cold-active proteases is presented in this review. PMID:24832807

  4. Social science in the Cold War.

    PubMed

    Engerman, David C

    2010-06-01

    This essay examines ways in which American social science in the late twentieth century was--and was not--a creature of the Cold War. It identifies important work by historians that calls into question the assumption that all social science during the Cold War amounts to "Cold War social science." These historians attribute significant agency to social scientists, showing how they were enmeshed in both long-running disciplinary discussions and new institutional environments. Key trends in this scholarship include a broadening historical perspective to see social scientists in the Cold War as responding to the ideas of their scholarly predecessors; identifying the institutional legacies of World War II; and examining in close detail the products of extramural--especially governmental--funding. The result is a view of social science in the Cold War in which national security concerns are relevant, but with varied and often unexpected impacts on intellectual life.

  5. Social science in the Cold War.

    PubMed

    Engerman, David C

    2010-06-01

    This essay examines ways in which American social science in the late twentieth century was--and was not--a creature of the Cold War. It identifies important work by historians that calls into question the assumption that all social science during the Cold War amounts to "Cold War social science." These historians attribute significant agency to social scientists, showing how they were enmeshed in both long-running disciplinary discussions and new institutional environments. Key trends in this scholarship include a broadening historical perspective to see social scientists in the Cold War as responding to the ideas of their scholarly predecessors; identifying the institutional legacies of World War II; and examining in close detail the products of extramural--especially governmental--funding. The result is a view of social science in the Cold War in which national security concerns are relevant, but with varied and often unexpected impacts on intellectual life. PMID:20718280

  6. Echinacea for preventing and treating the common cold

    PubMed Central

    Karsch-Völk, Marlies; Barrett, Bruce; Kiefer, David; Bauer, Rudolf; Ardjomand-Woelkart, Karin; Linde, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    Background Echinacea plant preparations (family Asteraceae) are widely used in Europe and North America for common colds. Most consumers and physicians are not aware that products available under the term Echinacea differ appreciably in their composition, mainly due to the use of variable plant material, extraction methods and the addition of other components. Objectives To assess whether there is evidence that Echinacea preparations are effective and safe compared to placebo in the prevention and treatment of the common cold. Search methods We searched CENTRAL 2013, Issue 5, MEDLINE (1946 to May week 5, 2013), EMBASE (1991 to June 2013), CINAHL (1981 to June 2013), AMED (1985 to February 2012), LILACS (1981 to June 2013), Web of Science (1955 to June 2013), CAMBASE (no time limits), the Centre for Complementary Medicine Research (1988 to September 2007), WHO ICTRP and clinicaltrials.gov (last searched 5 June 2013), screened references and asked experts in the field about published and unpublished studies. Selection criteria Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing mono-preparations of Echinacea with placebo. Data collection and analysis At least two review authors independently assessed eligibility and trial quality and extracted data. The primary efficacy outcome was the number of individuals with at least one cold in prevention trials and the duration of colds in treatment trials. For all included trials the primary safety and acceptability outcome was the number of participants dropping out due to adverse events. We assessed trial quality using the Cochrane ’Risk of bias’ tool. Main results Twenty-four double-blind trials with 4631 participants including a total of 33 comparisons of Echinacea preparations and placebo met the inclusion criteria. A variety of different Echinacea preparations based on different species and parts of plant were used. Evidence from seven trials was available for preparations based on the aerial parts of Echinacea purpurea

  7. Transcriptomic analysis of cold response in tomato fruits identifies dehydrin as a marker of cold stress.

    PubMed

    Weiss, J; Egea-Cortines, M

    2009-01-01

    Tomato is sensitive to cold during vegetative growth, fruit set, development, and ripening. We have characterized the effect of cold stress (6xC for up to 48 h) on the transcriptome of Micro-Tom tomato fruits during ripening by subtractive PCR. The cold stress caused modifications in gene expression of housekeeping genes. From a total of 38 genes up-regulated by cold, only one clone - a dehydrin homologue - was related to previously identified cold-stress genes. Phylogenetic analysis showed its clustering with other cold-induced dehydrins, and increased distances from dehydrins activated by abscisic acid. Quantitative expression analysis of tomato dehydrin showed it was activated by cold treatment in leaves and fruits. As dehydrin is a member of the Sl-CBF1 regulon from tomato, we analyzed the cold-responsive transcription factor Sl-CBF1 in mature leaves and ripening fruits stored at 6xC. Leaves of Micro-Tom showed high basal levels of the transcription factor Sl-CBF1, compared to fruits. Cold treatment caused increased levels of Sl-CBF1 expression in leaves but not in fruits of Micro-Tom and Demisem (a commercial cultivar). Tomato dehydrin can be used as a transcriptional marker of cold stress in leaves and ripening fruits. However, our results indicate that the cold response activation of dehydrin gene in tomato fruits is the consequence of an alternative pathway, different from the Sl-CBF1 regulon. PMID:19875881

  8. Relationships of self-identified cold tolerance and cold-induced vasodilatation in the finger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Joonhee; Lee, Joo-Young

    2016-04-01

    This study was conducted to investigate relationships of self-identified cold tolerance and cold-induced vasodilatation (CIVD) in the finger. Nine males and 34 females participated in the following 2 tests: a CIVD test and a self-reported survey. The CIVD test was conducted 30-min cold-water immersion (3.8 ± 0.3 °C) of the middle finger at an air temperature of 27.9 ± 0.1 °C. The self-reported questionnaire consisted of 28 questions about whole and local body cold and heat tolerances. By a cluster analysis on the survey results, the participants were divided into two groups: high self-identified cold tolerance (HSCT, n = 25) and low self-identified cold tolerance (LSCT, n = 18). LSCT had lower self-identified cold tolerance ( P < 0.001), preferred hot thermal stimulation ( P = 0.006), and wore heavier clothing during daily life ( P < 0.001) than HSCT. LSCT had significantly lower maximal finger temperatures ( T max) ( P = 0.040), smaller amplitude ( P = 0.029), and delayed onset time of CIVD ( P = 0.080) when compared to HSCT. Some questions examining the self-identified cold or heat tolerance had relationships with cold tolerance index, T max, and amplitude ( P < 0.1). These results indicate that self-identified cold tolerance classified through a standardized survey could be a good index to predict physiological cold tolerance.

  9. Cold and heat strain during cold-weather field training with nuclear, biological, and chemical protective clothing.

    PubMed

    Rissanen, Sirkka; Rintamäki, Hannu

    2007-02-01

    The objective of this study was to quantify the thermal strain of soldiers wearing nuclear, biological, and chemical protective clothing during short-term field training in cold conditions. Eleven male subjects performed marching exercises at moderate and heavy activity levels for 60 minutes. Rectal temperature (Tre), skin temperatures, and heart rate were monitored. Ambient temperature (Ta) varied from -33 to 0 degrees C. Tre was affected by changes in metabolism, rather than in Ta. Tre increased above 38 degrees during heavy exercise even at -33 degrees C. The mean skin temperature decreased to tolerance level (25 degrees C) at Ta below -25 degrees C with moderate exercise. Finger temperature decreased below 15 degrees C (performance degradation) at Ta of -15 degrees C or cooler. The present results from the field confirm the previous results based on laboratory studies and show that risk of both heat and cold strain is evident, with cooling of extremities being most critical, while wearing nuclear, biological, and chemical protective clothing during cold-weather training.

  10. Working smarter on cold cases: identifying factors associated with successful cold case investigations.

    PubMed

    Davis, Robert C; Jensen, Carl J; Burgette, Lane; Burnett, Kathryn

    2014-03-01

    Cold case squads have garnered much attention; however, they have yet to undergo significant empirical scrutiny. In the present study, the authors interviewed investigators and reviewed 189 solved and unsolved cold cases in Washington, D.C., to determine whether there are factors that can predict cold case solvability. In the interviews, new information from witnesses or information from new witnesses was cited as the most prevalent reason for case clearance. The case reviews determined that there were factors in each of the following domains that predicted whether cases would be solved during cold case investigations: Crime Context, Initial Investigation Results, Basis for Opening Cold Case, and Cold Case Investigator Actions. The results suggest that it is possible to prioritize cold case work based on the likelihood of investigations leading to clearances. PMID:24502665

  11. Cold, clumpy accretion onto an active supermassive black hole.

    PubMed

    Tremblay, Grant R; Oonk, J B Raymond; Combes, Françoise; Salomé, Philippe; O'Dea, Christopher P; Baum, Stefi A; Voit, G Mark; Donahue, Megan; McNamara, Brian R; Davis, Timothy A; McDonald, Michael A; Edge, Alastair C; Clarke, Tracy E; Galván-Madrid, Roberto; Bremer, Malcolm N; Edwards, Louise O V; Fabian, Andrew C; Hamer, Stephen; Li, Yuan; Maury, Anaëlle; Russell, Helen R; Quillen, Alice C; Urry, C Megan; Sanders, Jeremy S; Wise, Michael W

    2016-06-01

    Supermassive black holes in galaxy centres can grow by the accretion of gas, liberating energy that might regulate star formation on galaxy-wide scales. The nature of the gaseous fuel reservoirs that power black hole growth is nevertheless largely unconstrained by observations, and is instead routinely simplified as a smooth, spherical inflow of very hot gas. Recent theory and simulations instead predict that accretion can be dominated by a stochastic, clumpy distribution of very cold molecular clouds--a departure from the 'hot mode' accretion model--although unambiguous observational support for this prediction remains elusive. Here we report observations that reveal a cold, clumpy accretion flow towards a supermassive black hole fuel reservoir in the nucleus of the Abell 2597 Brightest Cluster Galaxy (BCG), a nearby (redshift z = 0.0821) giant elliptical galaxy surrounded by a dense halo of hot plasma. Under the right conditions, thermal instabilities produce a rain of cold clouds that fall towards the galaxy's centre, sustaining star formation amid a kiloparsec-scale molecular nebula that is found at its core. The observations show that these cold clouds also fuel black hole accretion, revealing 'shadows' cast by the molecular clouds as they move inward at about 300 kilometres per second towards the active supermassive black hole, which serves as a bright backlight. Corroborating evidence from prior observations of warmer atomic gas at extremely high spatial resolution, along with simple arguments based on geometry and probability, indicate that these clouds are within the innermost hundred parsecs of the black hole, and falling closer towards it. PMID:27279215

  12. Cold, clumpy accretion onto an active supermassive black hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tremblay, Grant R.; Oonk, J. B. Raymond; Combes, Françoise; Salomé, Philippe; O'Dea, Christopher P.; Baum, Stefi A.; Voit, G. Mark; Donahue, Megan; McNamara, Brian R.; Davis, Timothy A.; McDonald, Michael A.; Edge, Alastair C.; Clarke, Tracy E.; Galván-Madrid, Roberto; Bremer, Malcolm N.; Edwards, Louise O. V.; Fabian, Andrew C.; Hamer, Stephen; Li, Yuan; Maury, Anaëlle; Russell, Helen R.; Quillen, Alice C.; Urry, C. Megan; Sanders, Jeremy S.; Wise, Michael W.

    2016-06-01

    Supermassive black holes in galaxy centres can grow by the accretion of gas, liberating energy that might regulate star formation on galaxy-wide scales. The nature of the gaseous fuel reservoirs that power black hole growth is nevertheless largely unconstrained by observations, and is instead routinely simplified as a smooth, spherical inflow of very hot gas. Recent theory and simulations instead predict that accretion can be dominated by a stochastic, clumpy distribution of very cold molecular clouds—a departure from the ‘hot mode’ accretion model—although unambiguous observational support for this prediction remains elusive. Here we report observations that reveal a cold, clumpy accretion flow towards a supermassive black hole fuel reservoir in the nucleus of the Abell 2597 Brightest Cluster Galaxy (BCG), a nearby (redshift z = 0.0821) giant elliptical galaxy surrounded by a dense halo of hot plasma. Under the right conditions, thermal instabilities produce a rain of cold clouds that fall towards the galaxy’s centre, sustaining star formation amid a kiloparsec-scale molecular nebula that is found at its core. The observations show that these cold clouds also fuel black hole accretion, revealing ‘shadows’ cast by the molecular clouds as they move inward at about 300 kilometres per second towards the active supermassive black hole, which serves as a bright backlight. Corroborating evidence from prior observations of warmer atomic gas at extremely high spatial resolution, along with simple arguments based on geometry and probability, indicate that these clouds are within the innermost hundred parsecs of the black hole, and falling closer towards it.

  13. Cold, clumpy accretion onto an active supermassive black hole.

    PubMed

    Tremblay, Grant R; Oonk, J B Raymond; Combes, Françoise; Salomé, Philippe; O'Dea, Christopher P; Baum, Stefi A; Voit, G Mark; Donahue, Megan; McNamara, Brian R; Davis, Timothy A; McDonald, Michael A; Edge, Alastair C; Clarke, Tracy E; Galván-Madrid, Roberto; Bremer, Malcolm N; Edwards, Louise O V; Fabian, Andrew C; Hamer, Stephen; Li, Yuan; Maury, Anaëlle; Russell, Helen R; Quillen, Alice C; Urry, C Megan; Sanders, Jeremy S; Wise, Michael W

    2016-06-08

    Supermassive black holes in galaxy centres can grow by the accretion of gas, liberating energy that might regulate star formation on galaxy-wide scales. The nature of the gaseous fuel reservoirs that power black hole growth is nevertheless largely unconstrained by observations, and is instead routinely simplified as a smooth, spherical inflow of very hot gas. Recent theory and simulations instead predict that accretion can be dominated by a stochastic, clumpy distribution of very cold molecular clouds--a departure from the 'hot mode' accretion model--although unambiguous observational support for this prediction remains elusive. Here we report observations that reveal a cold, clumpy accretion flow towards a supermassive black hole fuel reservoir in the nucleus of the Abell 2597 Brightest Cluster Galaxy (BCG), a nearby (redshift z = 0.0821) giant elliptical galaxy surrounded by a dense halo of hot plasma. Under the right conditions, thermal instabilities produce a rain of cold clouds that fall towards the galaxy's centre, sustaining star formation amid a kiloparsec-scale molecular nebula that is found at its core. The observations show that these cold clouds also fuel black hole accretion, revealing 'shadows' cast by the molecular clouds as they move inward at about 300 kilometres per second towards the active supermassive black hole, which serves as a bright backlight. Corroborating evidence from prior observations of warmer atomic gas at extremely high spatial resolution, along with simple arguments based on geometry and probability, indicate that these clouds are within the innermost hundred parsecs of the black hole, and falling closer towards it.

  14. Global Association of Cold Spells and Adverse Health Effects: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ryti, Niilo R.I.; Guo, Yuming; Jaakkola, Jouni J.K.

    2015-01-01

    Background There is substantial evidence that mortality increases in low temperatures. Less is known about the role of prolonged cold periods denoted as cold spells. Objective We conducted the first systematic review and meta-analysis to summarize the evidence on the adverse health effects of cold spells in varying climates. Data sources and extraction Four databases (Ovid Medline, PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science) were searched for all years and languages available. “Cold spell” was defined as an event below a temperature threshold lasting for a minimum duration of 2 days. Of 1,527 identified articles, 26 satisfied our eligibility criteria for the systematic review, and 9 were eligible for meta-analyses. The articles were grouped by the three main study questions into Overall-effect Group, Added-effect Group, and Temperature-change-effect Group. Data synthesis Based on random-effects models in the meta-analyses, cold spells were associated with increased mortality from all or all nonaccidental causes (summary rate ratio = 1.10; 95% CI: 1.04, 1.17 based on 9 estimates from five studies), cardiovascular diseases (1.11; 95% CI: 1.03, 1.19; 12 estimates from eight studies), and respiratory diseases (1.21; 95% CI: 0.97, 1.51; 8 estimates from four studies). Estimated associations were stronger for people ≥ 65 years of age (1.06; 95% CI: 1.00, 1.12) than for people 0–64 years of age (1.01; 95% CI: 1.00, 1.03). Study-specific effect estimates from a limited number of studies suggested an increased morbidity related to cold spells, but it was not possible to quantitatively summarize the evidence. Conclusions Cold spells are associated with increased mortality rates in populations around the world. The body of evidence suggests that cold spells also have other adverse health effects. There was substantial heterogeneity among the studies, which should be taken into account in the interpretation of the results. Citation Ryti NR, Guo Y, Jaakkola JJ. 2016. Global

  15. "Hot", "Cold" and "Warm" Information and Higher Education Decision-Making

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slack, K.; Mangan, J.; Hughes, A.; Davies, P.

    2014-01-01

    This paper draws on the notions of "hot" and "cold" knowledge in analysing the responses of students to the relevance of different information and sources of such information in university choice. Analysis of questionnaire and focus group data from prospective and first-year undergraduate students provides evidence that many…

  16. States of Insecurity: Cold War Memory, "Global Citizenship" and Its Discontents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roman, Leslie G.

    2004-01-01

    This article situates the dominant discourses of "global citizenship" employed in North American universities to internationalize the curricula, drawing in part on evidence from one Pacific northwestern Canadian university in the post-September-11 context of recent restrictive immigration policies, anti-terrorist measures and evocative Cold War…

  17. Some Chinese folk prescriptions for wind-cold type common cold.

    PubMed

    Hai-Long, Zhai; Shimin, Chen; Yalan, Lu

    2015-07-01

    Although self-limiting, the common cold (gǎn mào) is highly prevalent. There are no effective antivirals to cure the common cold and few effective measures to prevent it, However, for thousands years, Chinese people have treated the common cold with natural herbs, According to the traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) theory ( zhōng yī lǐ lùn), the common cold is considered as an exterior syndrome, which can be further divided into the wind-cold type ( fēng hán xíng), the wind-heat type ( fēng rè xíng), and the summer heat dampness type ( shǔ rè xíng). Since the most common type of common cold caught in winter and spring is the wind-cold type, the article introduced some Chinese folk prescriptions for the wind-cold type common cold with normal and weak physique, respectively. For thousands of years, Chinese folk prescriptions for the common cold, as complementary and alternative medicine (CAM; bǔ chōng yǔ tì dài yī xué), have been proven to be effective, convenient, cheap, and most importantly, safe. The Chinese folk prescriptions ( zhōng guó mín jiān chǔ fāng) for the wind-cold type common cold are quite suitable for general practitioners or patients with the wind-cold type common cold, to treat the disease. Of course, their pharmacological features and mechanisms of action need to be further studied.

  18. 13. VIEW FROM COLD CALIBRATION BLOCKHOUSE LOOKING DOWN CONNECTING TUNNEL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. VIEW FROM COLD CALIBRATION BLOCKHOUSE LOOKING DOWN CONNECTING TUNNEL TO COLD CALIBRATION TEST STAND BASEMENT, SHOWING HARD WIRE CONNECTION (INSTRUMENTATION AND CONTROL). - Marshall Space Flight Center, East Test Area, Cold Calibration Test Stand, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  19. Colds and the flu - what to ask your doctor - child

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000250.htm Colds and the flu - what to ask your doctor - ... enable JavaScript. Many different germs, called viruses, cause colds. Symptoms of the common cold include: Runny nose ...

  20. Cold, Flu, or Allergy? Know the Difference for Best Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Human Services Latest Issue This Issue Features Sweet Stuff Cold, Flu, or Allergy? Health Capsules Genetic Clues ... infection, middle ear infection, asthma search Features Sweet Stuff Cold, Flu, or Allergy? Wise Choices Links Cold, ...