Science.gov

Sample records for cold cluster reactions

  1. Skin Reactions to Cold

    PubMed Central

    Talpash, Orest

    1976-01-01

    Although skin reactions to cold are seen surprisingly infrequently in Canada, it is important to manage them correctly when they do occur. Frostbite, cold urticarias, Raynaud's disease and phenomenon, and several miscellaneous changes are discussed. PMID:21308019

  2. Chemical Reactions in Clusters

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-11-04

    NH 3)n, n _> 4, clusters has been attributed to the (solvated) naphtholate anion.3a A single picosecond decay measurement has been reported which...vibrational energy in the cluster Sl state. The data are summarized in Table I. A model to explain these decay results can be constructed based on a proton...11 TITLE (Include Security Classification) Chemical Reactions in Clusters 12 PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Elliot R. Bernstein 13a TYPE OF REPORT 13b TIME COVERED

  3. Nuclear waste vitrification efficiency: cold cap reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Hrma, Pavel R.; Kruger, Albert A.; Pokorny, Richard

    2012-12-15

    The cost and schedule of nuclear waste treatment and immobilization are greatly affected by the rate of glass production. Various factors influence the performance of a waste-glass melter. One of the most significant, and also one of the least understood, is the process of batch melting. Studies are being conducted to gain fundamental understanding of the batch reactions, particularly those that influence the rate of melting, and models are being developed to link batch makeup and melter operation to the melting rate. Batch melting takes place within the cold cap, i.e., a batch layer floating on the surface of molten glass. The conversion of batch to glass consists of various chemical reactions, phase transitions, and diffusion-controlled processes. These include water evaporation (slurry feed contains as high as 60% water), gas evolution, the melting of salts, the formation of borate melt, reactions of borate melt with molten salts and with amorphous oxides (Fe2O3 and Al2O3), the formation of intermediate crystalline phases, the formation of a continuous glass-forming melt, the growth and collapse of primary foam, and the dissolution of residual solids. To this list we also need to add the formation of secondary foam that originates from molten glass but accumulates on the bottom of the cold cap. This study presents relevant data obtained for a high-level-waste melter feed and introduces a one-dimensional (1D) mathematical model of the cold cap as a step toward an advanced three-dimensional (3D) version for a complete model of the waste glass melter. The 1D model describes the batch-to-glass conversion within the cold cap as it progresses in a vertical direction. With constitutive equations and key parameters based on measured data, and simplified boundary conditions on the cold-cap interfaces with the glass melt and the plenum space of the melter, the model provides sensitivity analysis of the response of the cold cap to the batch makeup and melter conditions

  4. NUCLEAR WASTE VITRIFICATION EFFICIENCY COLD CAP REACTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    KRUGER AA; HRMA PR; POKORNY R

    2011-07-29

    The cost and schedule of nuclear waste treatment and immobilization are greatly affected by the rate of glass production. Various factors influence the performance of a waste-glass melter. One of the most significant, and also one of the least understood, is the process of batch melting. Studies are being conducted to gain fundamental understanding of the batch reactions, particularly those that influence the rate of melting, and models are being developed to link batch makeup and melter operation to the melting rate. Batch melting takes place within the cold cap, i.e., a batch layer floating on the surface of molten glass. The conversion of batch to glass consists of various chemical reactions, phase transitions, and diffusion-controlled processes. These include water evaporation (slurry feed contains as high as 60% water), gas evolution, the melting of salts, the formation of borate melt, reactions of borate melt with molten salts and with amorphous oxides (Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}), the formation of intermediate crystalline phases, the formation of a continuous glass-forming melt, the growth and collapse of primary foam, and the dissolution of residual solids. To this list we also need to add the formation of secondary foam that originates from molten glass but accumulates on the bottom of the cold cap. This study presents relevant data obtained for a high-level-waste melter feed and introduces a one-dimensional (1D) mathematical model of the cold cap as a step toward an advanced three-dimensional (3D) version for a complete model of the waste glass melter. The 1D model describes the batch-to-glass conversion within the cold cap as it progresses in a vertical direction. With constitutive equations and key parameters based on measured data, and simplified boundary conditions on the cold-cap interfaces with the glass melt and the plenum space of the melter, the model provides sensitivity analysis of the response of the cold cap to the batch makeup

  5. Cold Fronts in Clusters of Galaxies: Observations and Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markevitch, Maxim

    2012-01-01

    Mergers of galaxy clusters -- some of the most energetic events in the Universe -- produce disturbances in hot intracluster medium, such as shocks and cold fronts, that can be used as tools to study the physics of galaxy clusters. Cold fronts may constrain viscosity and the structure and strength of the cluster magnetic fields. Combined with radio data, these observations also shed light on the production of ultrarelativistic particles that are known to coexist with the cluster thermal plasma. This talk will summarize the current X-ray observations of cluster mergers, as well as some recent radio data and high resolution hydrodynamic simulations.

  6. Cold state-selected molecular collisions and reactions.

    PubMed

    Stuhl, Benjamin K; Hummon, Matthew T; Ye, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Over the past decade, and particularly the past five years, a quiet revolution has been building at the border between atomic physics and experimental quantum chemistry. The rapid development of techniques for producing cold and even ultracold molecules without a perturbing rare-gas cluster shell is now enabling the study of chemical reactions and scattering at the quantum scattering limit with only a few partial waves contributing to the incident channel. Moreover, the ability to perform these experiments with nonthermal distributions comprising one or a few specific states enables the observation and even full control of state-to-state collision rates in this computation-friendly regime: This is perhaps the most elementary study possible of scattering and reaction dynamics.

  7. Cold molecular gas in cooling flow clusters of galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salomé, P.; Combes, F.

    2003-12-01

    The results of a CO line survey in central cluster galaxies with cooling flows are presented. Cold molecular gas is detected with the IRAM 30 m telescope, through CO(1-0) and CO(2-1) emission lines in 6-10 among 32 galaxies. The corresponding gas masses are between 3*E8 and 4*E10 Msun. These results are in agreement with recent CO detections by \\cite{Edg01}. A strong correlation between the CO emission and the Hα luminosity is also confirmed. Cold gas exists in the center of cooling flow clusters and these detections may be interpreted as evidence of the long searched for very cold residual of the hot cooling gas. Tables 1-4 are also available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/A+A/412/657

  8. Transfer-type products accompanying cold fusion reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Adamian, G.G.; Antonenko, N.V.

    2005-12-15

    Production of nuclei heavier than the target is treated for projectile-target combinations used in cold fusion reactions leading to superheavy nuclei. These products are related to transfer-type or to asymmetry-exit-channel quasifission reactions. The production of isotopes in the transfer-type reactions emitting of {alpha} particles with large energies is discussed.

  9. Signatures of Star Cluster Formation by Cold Collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsova, Aleksandra; Hartmann, Lee; Ballesteros-Paredes, Javier

    2015-12-01

    Subvirial gravitational collapse is one mechanism by which star clusters may form. Here we investigate whether this mechanism can be inferred from observations of young clusters. To address this question, we have computed smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations of the initial formation and evolution of a dynamically young star cluster through cold (subvirial) collapse, starting with an ellipsoidal, turbulently seeded distribution of gas, and forming sink particles representing (proto)stars. While the initial density distributions of the clouds do not have large initial mass concentrations, gravitational focusing due to the global morphology leads to cluster formation. We use the resulting structures to extract observable morphological and kinematic signatures for the case of subvirial collapse. We find that the signatures of the initial conditions can be erased rapidly as the gas and stars collapse, suggesting that kinematic observations need to be made early in cluster formation and/or at larger scales, away from the growing cluster core. Our results emphasize that a dynamically young system is inherently evolving on short timescales, so that it can be highly misleading to use current-epoch conditions to study aspects such as star formation rates as a function of local density. Our simulations serve as a starting point for further studies of collapse including other factors such as magnetic fields and stellar feedback.

  10. SIGNATURES OF STAR CLUSTER FORMATION BY COLD COLLAPSE

    SciTech Connect

    Kuznetsova, Aleksandra; Hartmann, Lee; Ballesteros-Paredes, Javier

    2015-12-10

    Subvirial gravitational collapse is one mechanism by which star clusters may form. Here we investigate whether this mechanism can be inferred from observations of young clusters. To address this question, we have computed smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations of the initial formation and evolution of a dynamically young star cluster through cold (subvirial) collapse, starting with an ellipsoidal, turbulently seeded distribution of gas, and forming sink particles representing (proto)stars. While the initial density distributions of the clouds do not have large initial mass concentrations, gravitational focusing due to the global morphology leads to cluster formation. We use the resulting structures to extract observable morphological and kinematic signatures for the case of subvirial collapse. We find that the signatures of the initial conditions can be erased rapidly as the gas and stars collapse, suggesting that kinematic observations need to be made early in cluster formation and/or at larger scales, away from the growing cluster core. Our results emphasize that a dynamically young system is inherently evolving on short timescales, so that it can be highly misleading to use current-epoch conditions to study aspects such as star formation rates as a function of local density. Our simulations serve as a starting point for further studies of collapse including other factors such as magnetic fields and stellar feedback.

  11. Effects of the cosmological constant on cold dark matter clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Membrado, M.; Pacheco, A. F.

    2014-07-01

    Context. Cold dark matter inhomogeneities are considered in a homogeneous background of matter, radiation, and the cosmological constant in a flat universe. Aims: We investigate the influence of the cosmological constant on the non-linear collapse of cold dark matter clusters. Methods: For simplicity, a spherical infall model has been used to describe the collapse of non-relativistic mass shells; besides, an average distribution of density around a cluster of galaxies has been taken. Boundary conditions are imposed by the solution of the linearized equation for the growth of matter perturbations and by the cold dark matter power spectrum. Results: For an average cluster, the radii of shells and masses enclosed by them have been obtained at their zero proper acceleration (ZA) redshifts, at their turn-around (TA) redshifts and at their virialization (VIR) redshifts. According to our results at present, the shell that reaches its turn-around point shows [rTA] 0 = 6.85 Mpc and [ℳTA] 0 = 6.76 × 1014 ℳ⊙. The virializing shell fulfills [rTA] 0 = 4.57 [rVIR] 0 and [ℳTA] 0 = 1.95 [ℳVIR] 0. These results differ appreciably from those derived from a model with cosmological constant equal to zero in a flat universe: [rTA(Λ = 0)] 0 = 6.62 [rVIR(Λ = 0)] 0 and [ℳTA(Λ = 0)] 0 = 5.26 [ℳVIR(Λ = 0)] 0; this discrepancy could be considered as a new independent proof of the existence of dark energy. The shell with zero proper acceleration presents [rZA] 0 = 1.59 [rTA] 0 and [ℳZA] 0 = 1.63 [ℳTA] 0. We have found that there is a limit to the mass of the average cluster, which is able to virialize; its value is { ℳVIR } MAX = 8.1 × 1014 M⊙. As expected, we found that shells present null proper acceleration at redshift values that are smaller than 0.755. Conclusions: We have noticed that the cosmological constant imposes an upper limit for the mass enclosed by shells, which are able to reach zero proper velocity. Hence, this mass is the maximum mass of the

  12. Synthesis of the heaviest nuclei in cold fusion reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Münzenberg, G.; Morita, K.

    2015-12-01

    Cold fusion of heavy ions paved the way to superheavy elements. It was proposed by Yu.Ts. Oganessian more than forty years ago in 1974 [1,2]. First experiments were carried out at JINR Dubna, starting with the reaction 40Ar + 208Pb → 248Fm* where several hundreds to thousand atoms were produced on one day. The large production rate indicating an enhancement of the fusion cross section, especially for the evaporation of two or three neutrons, proved the concept of cold-fusion with the use of the doubly magic nucleus 208Pb as a target. The Dubna experiments were extended to the transactinide region beyond rutherfordium. The breakthrough came with the separation in-flight. Two different approaches were used: kinematic separation with the velocity filter SHIP [3] at GSI Darmstadt, and with the gasfilled separator GARIS [4,5] at RIKEN. With SHIP the concept of cold fusion of massive nuclear systems was convincingly confirmed by the observation of the one-neutron evaporation channel in the production of 247Rf in an irradiation of 208Pb with 50Ti [6] in 1981 which opened the way to the transactinide region. At SHIP the elements bohrium (107) to copernicium (112) were discovered [7]. A new closed shell region around hassium was found. The RIKEN experiments started in 2002. They confirmed the GSI results and in addition improved the data on structure and production of elements hassium to copernicium significantly. The heaviest element ever created in a cold fusion reaction, Z = 113, was observed at GARIS [8,9].

  13. A HIGH FIDELITY SAMPLE OF COLD FRONT CLUSTERS FROM THE CHANDRA ARCHIVE

    SciTech Connect

    Owers, Matt S.; Nulsen, Paul E. J.; Markevitch, Maxim; Couch, Warrick J.

    2009-10-20

    This paper presents a sample of 'cold front' clusters selected from the Chandra archive. The clusters are selected based purely on the existence of surface brightness edges in their Chandra images which are modeled as density jumps. A combination of the derived density and temperature jumps across the fronts is used to select nine robust examples of cold front clusters: 1ES0657 - 558, Abell 1201, Abell 1758N, MS1455.0+2232, Abell 2069, Abell 2142, Abell 2163, RXJ1720.1+2638, and Abell 3667. This sample is the subject of an ongoing study aimed at relating cold fronts to cluster merger activity, and understanding how the merging environment affects the cluster constituents. Here, temperature maps are presented along with the Chandra X-ray images. A dichotomy is found in the sample in that there exists a subsample of cold front clusters which are clearly mergers based on their X-ray morphologies, and a second subsample of clusters which harbor cold fronts, but have surprisingly relaxed X-ray morphologies, and minimal evidence for merger activity at other wavelengths. For this second subsample, the existence of a cold front provides the sole evidence for merger activity at X-ray wavelengths. We discuss how cold fronts can provide additional information which may be used to constrain merger histories, and also the possibility of using cold fronts to distinguish major and minor mergers.

  14. Cold gas stripping in satellite galaxies: from pairs to clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Toby; Catinella, Barbara; Cortese, Luca; Lagos, Claudia del P.; Davé, Romeel; Kilborn, Virginia; Haynes, Martha P.; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Rafieferantsoa, Mika

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, we investigate environment-driven gas depletion in satellite galaxies, taking full advantage of the atomic hydrogen (H I) spectral stacking technique to quantify the gas content for the entire gas-poor to -rich regimes. We do so using a multiwavelength sample of 10 600 satellite galaxies, selected according to stellar mass (log M⋆/M⊙ ≥ 9) and redshift (0.02 ≤ z ≤ 0.05) from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, with H I data from the Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA survey. Using key H I-to-stellar mass scaling relations, we present evidence that the gas content of satellite galaxies is, to a significant extent, dependent on the environment in which a galaxy resides. For the first time, we demonstrate that systematic environmental suppression of gas content at both fixed stellar mass and fixed specific star formation rate in satellite galaxies begins in halo masses typical of the group regime (log Mh/M⊙ < 13.5), well before galaxies reach the cluster environment. We also show that environment-driven gas depletion is more closely associated with halo mass than local density. Our results are then compared with state-of-the-art semi-analytic models and hydrodynamical simulations and discussed within this framework, showing that more work is needed if models are to reproduce the observations. We conclude that the observed decrease of gas content in the group and cluster environments cannot be reproduced by starvation of the gas supply alone and invoke fast acting processes such as ram-pressure stripping of cold gas to explain this.

  15. THE PROPERTIES OF X-RAY COLD FRONTS IN A STATISTICAL SAMPLE OF SIMULATED GALAXY CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Hallman, Eric J.; Skillman, Samuel W.; Smith, Britton D.; Burns, Jack O.; Jeltema, Tesla E.; Norman, Michael L.

    2010-12-10

    We examine the incidence of cold fronts in a large sample of galaxy clusters extracted from a (512 h {sup -1} Mpc) hydrodynamic/N-body cosmological simulation with adiabatic gas physics computed with the Enzo adaptive mesh refinement code. This simulation contains a sample of roughly 4000 galaxy clusters with M {>=}10{sup 14} M{sub sun} at z = 0. For each simulated galaxy cluster, we have created mock 0.3-8.0 keV X-ray observations and spectroscopic-like temperature maps. We have searched these maps with a new automated algorithm to identify the presence of cold fronts in projection. Using a threshold of a minimum of 10 cold front pixels in our images, corresponding to a total comoving length L{sub cf}>156 h {sup -1} kpc, we find that roughly 10%-12% of all projections in a mass-limited sample would be classified as cold front clusters. Interestingly, the fraction of clusters with extended cold front features in our synthetic maps of a mass-limited sample trends only weakly with redshift out to z = 1.0. However, when using different selection functions, including a simulated flux limit, the trending with redshift changes significantly. The likelihood of finding cold fronts in the simulated clusters in our sample is a strong function of cluster mass. In clusters with M>7.5 x 10{sup 14} M{sub sun} the cold front fraction is 40%-50%. We also show that the presence of cold fronts is strongly correlated with disturbed morphology as measured by quantitative structure measures. Finally, we find that the incidence of cold fronts in the simulated cluster images is strongly dependent on baryonic physics.

  16. Catalytic reactions on neutral Rh oxide clusters more efficient than on neutral Rh clusters.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Akira; Miyajima, Ken; Mafuné, Fumitaka

    2012-03-28

    Gas phase catalytic reactions involving the reduction of N(2)O and oxidation of CO were observed at the molecular level on isolated neutral rhodium clusters, Rh(n) (n = 10-28), using mass spectrometry. Sequential oxygen transfer reactions, Rh(n)O(m-1) + N(2)O → Rh(n)O(m) + N(2) (m = 1, 2, 3,…), were monitored and the rate constant for each reaction step was determined as a function of the cluster size. Oxygen extraction reactions by a CO molecule, Rh(n)O(m) + CO → Rh(n)O(m-1) + CO(2) (m = 1, 2, 3,…), were also observed when a small amount of CO was mixed with the reactant N(2)O gas. The rate constants of the oxygen extraction reactions by CO for m ≥ 4 were found to be two or three orders of magnitude higher than the rate constants for m ≤ 3, which indicates that the catalytic reaction proceeds more efficiently when the reaction cycles turn over around Rh(n)O(m) (m ≥ 4) than around bare Rh(n). Rhodium clusters operate as more efficient catalysts when they are oxidized than non- or less-oxidized rhodium clusters, which is consistent with theoretical and experimental studies on the catalytic CO oxidation reaction on a rhodium surface.

  17. An unusual reaction to cold: a sporadic case of familial polymorphous cold eruption?

    PubMed

    Urano, Y; Shikiji, T; Sasaki, S; Fukuhara, K; Arase, S

    1998-09-01

    A 14-year-old Japanese girl had a lifelong history of skin lesions developing after generalized exposure to cold air; the lesions were often accompanied by systemic symptoms such as fever and chills. The skin lesions were non-pruritic, maculopapular, erythematous eruptions and were neither urticarial nor angioedematous. An ice-cube test was negative. Laboratory examinations showed marked leucocytosis during an acute attack. On the basis of clinical features, histological findings and laboratory data, although these symptoms were sporadic, the most likely diagnosis was familial polymorphous cold eruption, which has also been referred to as familial cold urticaria. Serum levels of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor and interleukin 6 were significantly elevated during an acute attack after cold exposure, suggesting that both cytokines played important parts in the development of her condition.

  18. Redshift space clustering of galaxies and cold dark matter model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bahcall, Neta A.; Cen, Renyue; Gramann, Mirt

    1993-01-01

    The distorting effect of peculiar velocities on the power speturm and correlation function of IRAS and optical galaxies is studied. The observed redshift space power spectra and correlation functions of IRAS and optical the galaxies over the entire range of scales are directly compared with the corresponding redshift space distributions using large-scale computer simulations of cold dark matter (CDM) models in order to study the distortion effect of peculiar velocities on the power spectrum and correlation function of the galaxies. It is found that the observed power spectrum of IRAS and optical galaxies is consistent with the spectrum of an Omega = 1 CDM model. The problems that such a model currently faces may be related more to the high value of Omega in the model than to the shape of the spectrum. A low-density CDM model is also investigated and found to be consistent with the data.

  19. Nanochemistry - Chemical Reactions of Iron and Benzene Within Molecular Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feigerle, C. S.; Bililign, S.; Miller, John C.

    2000-06-01

    Molecular clusters represent a nanoscale test tube where chemical reactions can be examined in a unique way for the effects of the local environment and the possibility of size-dependent reactions. Previous experiments have shown that the ionization/dissociation of iron pentacarbonyl clusters can lead to the formation of iron ions and iron cluster ions and that these species can further react with dopant molecules to yield chemically rearranged products. The present experiments characterize similar reactions with benzene molecules and clusters. Heteroclusters of the form [Fe(CO)5]m(C6H6)nArp are created in an expanding supersonic jet of the component molecules. Following ionization by a 30 ps, 266 nm laser pulse, extensive dissociation, aggregation, and chemical rearrangement occurs leading to ionic products which are characterized by mass spectrometry. Cluster ions of the type Fem(C6H6)n + are observed as products. The stability of the sandwich form of the ion, Fe(benzene)2 +, is inferred from the data. Evidence for a similar special stability for the double-decker, Fe2(benzene)3 +, is presented.

  20. The Therapist Personal Reaction Questionnaire: A Cluster Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tryon, Georgiana Shick

    1989-01-01

    Analyzed Therapist Personal Reaction Questionnaire. Participants consisted of 6 practicum trainee graduate students and 208 undergraduate clients. Found two clusters--one related to counselor feelings toward client, one related to counselor feelings toward interview. Results indicated that more attractive clients were seen more frequently and for…

  1. STREAMING COLD COSMIC-RAY BACK-REACTION AND THERMAL INSTABILITIES ALONG THE BACKGROUND MAGNETIC FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Nekrasov, Anatoly K.; Shadmehri, Mohsen E-mail: nekrasov.anatoly@gmail.com

    2012-09-01

    Using a multi-fluid approach, we investigate the streaming and thermal instabilities of electron-ion-cosmic-ray astrophysical objects in which homogeneous cold cosmic rays have a drift velocity perpendicular to the background magnetic field. One-dimensional perturbations along the magnetic field are considered. The induced return current of the background plasma and back-reaction of cosmic rays are taken into account. It is shown that the cosmic-ray back-reaction results in a streaming instability with considerably higher growth rates than that due to the return current of the background plasma. This increase is by a factor of the square root of the ratio of the background plasma mass density to the cosmic-ray mass density. The maximal growth rate and the corresponding wavenumber are then found. Thermal instability is shown to be not subject to the action of cosmic rays in the model under consideration. The dispersion relation for thermal instability includes ion inertia. In the limit of a fast thermal energy exchange between electrons and ions, the isobaric and isochoric growth rates are obtained. The results can be useful for the investigation of electron-ion astrophysical objects such as galaxy clusters, including the dynamics of streaming cosmic rays.

  2. Ionization reactions of ion complexes in mesoscopic water clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Consta, Styliani; Kapral, Raymond

    1999-12-01

    The free energy and dynamics of the dissociation reactions of the [Na+(Cl-)2] ion complex in mesoscopic water clusters are examined. The free energy surface shows the existence of stable single and double solvent-separated complex species formed from ionization of the stable double-contact ion complex. The reaction occurs on the cluster surface for mesoscale clusters composed of tens of water molecules. Passage between stable species is an activated process but barrier crossing has a large diffusive component so that dynamical corrections to transition state theory are large. The structure of the decay of the time-dependent rate constant reflects the diffusive character of the recrossing dynamics so that a plateau is not established on a 10 ps time scale in contrast to ionization dynamics in bulk fluids.

  3. Cluster description of cold (neutronless) α ternary fission of 252Cf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Săndulescu, A.; Carstoiu, F.; Bulboacă, I.; Greiner, W.

    1999-10-01

    A coplanar three body cluster model (two deformed fragments and an α particle) similar to the model used for the description of cold binary fission was employed for the description of cold (neutronless) α accompanied fission of 252Cf. No preformation factors were considered. The three body potential was computed with the help of a double folding potential generated by the M3Y-NN effective interaction and realistic fragment ground state deformations. From the minimum action principle, the α particle trajectory equations, the corresponding ternary barriers, and an approximate WKB expression for the barrier penetrability are obtained. The relative cold ternary yields were calculated as the ratio of the penetrability of a given ternary fragmentation and the sum of the penetrabilities of all possible cold ternary fragmentations. Different scenarios were considered depending on the trajectories of the fragments. It was shown that two regions of cold fragmentation exist, a deformed one corresponding to large fragment deformations and a spherical one around 132Sn, similarly to the case of the cold binary fission of 252Cf. We have shown that for the scenario corresponding to the Lagrange point, where all forces acting on the α particle are in equilibrium, the cold α ternary yields of 252Cf are strongly correlated with the cold binary yields of the daughter nucleus 248Cm into the same heavy fragments. For all other scenarios only the spherical splittings are favored. We concluded that due to the present available experimental data on cold α ternary yields only the Lagrange scenario could describe the cold α ternary fission of 252Cf.

  4. Is Cold Dark Matter Still a Strong Buy? The Lesson From Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Governato, Fabio; Ghigna, Sebastiano; Moore, Ben

    For the last few years the Cold Dark Matter model (ticker: CDM), has been the dominant theory of structure formation. We briefly review the recent advancements and predictions of the model in the field of galaxy clusters. A new set of very high resolution simulations of galaxy clusters show that they have (1) density profiles with central slopes very close to -1.6 and (2) abundance of subhalos similar to the ones observed in real clusters. These results show a remarkably small cluster to cluster variation and a weak dependence from the particular CDM cosmology chosen (LCDM having ~40% less substructure than SCDM). While still a speculative theory with a high prediction/evidence ratio, subject to strong challenges from observational data and competition from other hierarchical theories, we give CDM a rating of ``market outperform'' and of ``long term BUY''.

  5. Modeling Active Galactic Nucleus Feedback in Cool-core Clusters: The Formation of Cold Clumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yuan; Bryan, Greg L.

    2014-07-01

    We perform high-resolution (15-30 pc) adaptive mesh simulations to study the impact of momentum-driven active galactic nucleus (AGN) feedback in cool-core clusters, focusing in this paper on the formation of cold clumps. The feedback is jet-driven with an energy determined by the amount of cold gas within 500 pc of the super-massive black hole. When the intracluster medium in the core of the cluster becomes marginally stable to radiative cooling, with the thermal instability to the free-fall timescale ratio t TI/t ff < 3-10, cold clumps of gas start to form along the propagation direction of the AGN jets. By tracing the particles in the simulations, we find that these cold clumps originate from low entropy (but still hot) gas that is accelerated by the jet to outward radial velocities of a few hundred km s-1. This gas is out of hydrostatic equilibrium and so can cool. The clumps then grow larger as they decelerate and fall toward the center of the cluster, eventually being accreted onto the super-massive black hole. The general morphology, spatial distribution, and estimated Hα morphology of the clumps are in reasonable agreement with observations, although we do not fully replicate the filamentary morphology of the clumps seen in the observations, probably due to missing physics.

  6. Modeling active galactic nucleus feedback in cool-core clusters: The formation of cold clumps

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yuan; Bryan, Greg L.

    2014-07-10

    We perform high-resolution (15-30 pc) adaptive mesh simulations to study the impact of momentum-driven active galactic nucleus (AGN) feedback in cool-core clusters, focusing in this paper on the formation of cold clumps. The feedback is jet-driven with an energy determined by the amount of cold gas within 500 pc of the super-massive black hole. When the intracluster medium in the core of the cluster becomes marginally stable to radiative cooling, with the thermal instability to the free-fall timescale ratio t{sub TI}/t{sub ff} < 3-10, cold clumps of gas start to form along the propagation direction of the AGN jets. By tracing the particles in the simulations, we find that these cold clumps originate from low entropy (but still hot) gas that is accelerated by the jet to outward radial velocities of a few hundred km s{sup –1}. This gas is out of hydrostatic equilibrium and so can cool. The clumps then grow larger as they decelerate and fall toward the center of the cluster, eventually being accreted onto the super-massive black hole. The general morphology, spatial distribution, and estimated Hα morphology of the clumps are in reasonable agreement with observations, although we do not fully replicate the filamentary morphology of the clumps seen in the observations, probably due to missing physics.

  7. Cold Fronts and Gas Sloshing in Galaxy Clusters with Anisotropic Thermal Conduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ZuHone, J. A.; Markevitch, M.; Ruszkowski, M.; Lee, D.

    2013-01-01

    Cold fronts in cluster cool cores should be erased on short timescales by thermal conduction, unless protected by magnetic fields that are "draped" parallel to the front surfaces, suppressing conduction perpendicular to the sloshing fronts. We present a series of MHD simulations of cold front formation in the core of a galaxy cluster with anisotropic thermal conduction, exploring a parameter space of conduction strengths parallel and perpendicular to the field lines. Including conduction has a strong effect on the temperature distribution of the core and the appearance of the cold fronts. Though magnetic field lines are draping parallel to the front surfaces, preventing conduction directly across them, the temperature jumps across the fronts are nevertheless reduced. The geometry of the field is such that the cold gas below the front surfaces can be connected to hotter regions outside via field lines along directions perpendicular to the plane of the sloshing motions and along sections of the front that are not perfectly draped. This results in the heating of this gas below the front on a timescale of a Gyr, but the sharpness of the density and temperature jumps may nevertheless be preserved. By modifying the gas density distribution below the front, conduction may indirectly aid in suppressing Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities. If conduction along the field lines is unsuppressed, we find that the characteristic sharp jumps seen in Chandra observations of cold front clusters do not form. Therefore, the presence of cold fronts in hot clusters is in contradiction with our simulations with full Spitzer conduction. This suggests that the presence of cold fronts in hot clusters could be used to place upper limits on conduction in the bulk of the intracluster medium. Finally, the combination of sloshing and anisotropic thermal conduction can result in a larger flux of heat to the core than either process in isolation. While still not sufficient to prevent a cooling

  8. COLD FRONTS AND GAS SLOSHING IN GALAXY CLUSTERS WITH ANISOTROPIC THERMAL CONDUCTION

    SciTech Connect

    ZuHone, J. A.; Markevitch, M.; Lee, D.

    2013-01-10

    Cold fronts in cluster cool cores should be erased on short timescales by thermal conduction, unless protected by magnetic fields that are 'draped' parallel to the front surfaces, suppressing conduction perpendicular to the sloshing fronts. We present a series of MHD simulations of cold front formation in the core of a galaxy cluster with anisotropic thermal conduction, exploring a parameter space of conduction strengths parallel and perpendicular to the field lines. Including conduction has a strong effect on the temperature distribution of the core and the appearance of the cold fronts. Though magnetic field lines are draping parallel to the front surfaces, preventing conduction directly across them, the temperature jumps across the fronts are nevertheless reduced. The geometry of the field is such that the cold gas below the front surfaces can be connected to hotter regions outside via field lines along directions perpendicular to the plane of the sloshing motions and along sections of the front that are not perfectly draped. This results in the heating of this gas below the front on a timescale of a Gyr, but the sharpness of the density and temperature jumps may nevertheless be preserved. By modifying the gas density distribution below the front, conduction may indirectly aid in suppressing Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities. If conduction along the field lines is unsuppressed, we find that the characteristic sharp jumps seen in Chandra observations of cold front clusters do not form. Therefore, the presence of cold fronts in hot clusters is in contradiction with our simulations with full Spitzer conduction. This suggests that the presence of cold fronts in hot clusters could be used to place upper limits on conduction in the bulk of the intracluster medium. Finally, the combination of sloshing and anisotropic thermal conduction can result in a larger flux of heat to the core than either process in isolation. While still not sufficient to prevent a cooling

  9. Knockout driven reactions in complex molecules and their clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatchell, Michael; Zettergren, Henning

    2016-08-01

    Energetic ions lose some of their kinetic energy when interacting with electrons or nuclei in matter. Here, we discuss combined experimental and theoretical studies on such impulse driven reactions in polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), fullerenes, and pure or mixed clusters of these molecules. These studies show that the nature of excitation is important for how complex molecular systems respond to ion/atom impact. Rutherford-like nuclear scattering processes may lead to prompt atom knockout and formation of highly reactive fragments, while heating of the molecular electron clouds in general lead to formation of more stable and less reactive fragments. In this topical review, we focus on recent studies of knockout driven reactions, and present new calculations of the angular dependent threshold (displacement) energies for such processes in PAHs. The so-formed fragments may efficiently form covalent bonds with neighboring molecules in clusters. These unique molecular growth processes may be important in astrophysical environments such as low velocity shock waves.

  10. Reactions and clustering of water with silica surface.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yuchen; Foster, A S; Nieminen, R M

    2005-04-08

    The interaction between silica surface and water is an important topic in geophysics and materials science, yet little is known about the reaction process. In this study we use first-principles molecular dynamics to simulate the hydrolysis process of silica surface using large cluster models. We find that a single water molecule is stable near the surface but can easily dissociate at three-coordinated silicon atom defect sites in the presence of other water molecules. These extra molecules provide a mechanism for hydrogen transfer from the original water molecule, hence catalyzing the reaction. The two-coordinated silicon atom is inert to the water molecule, and water clusters up to pentamer could be stably adsorbed at this site at room temperature.

  11. Considerations on immunization anxiety-related reactions in clusters.

    PubMed

    Palacios, Ricardo

    2014-01-01

    A cluster of adverse events following immunization (AEFI) represents a stress test for an immunization program. The community can suspect on vaccine-related reaction leading to mistrust on the immunization program. An immunization anxiety-related reaction is one of the hypotheses to be tested and can be reasonably accepted when the vaccine-related and immunization error-related reactions are ruled out and no coincidental events can explain the cases. Immunization program approaches widely accepted to understand and respond to adverse events are root-cause analysis and systems analysis. Psychiatric cognitive frame will support the root-cause analysis assigning a causal relationship to individual temporary disorders of the affected vaccinees. Communication will focus on vaccine safety and absence of errors in the immunization program. Systems analysis addresses the whole context considering the fear spread as a systemic threat. Socio-psychological frame offers a broader opportunity to understand and respond to a specific community. Management is based on communication to change community belief in misperceptions of vaccine risks and support the idea of immunization as a causal factor, different from the vaccine. Communities can consider use of psychiatric labels, Mass Psychogenic Illness or Mass Hysteria, as an act of inconsiderateness. Labels like immunization anxiety-related reactions in clusters or collective immunization anxiety-related reactions are recommended to bridge the causal perception of the community with the result of the scientific investigation of the cases.

  12. Galaxy clusters and cold dark matter - A low-density unbiased universe?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bahcall, Neta A.; Cen, Renyue

    1992-01-01

    Large-scale simulations of a universe dominated by cold dark matter (CDM) are tested against two fundamental properties of clusters of galaxies: the cluster mass function and the cluster correlation function. We find that standard biased CDM models are inconsistent with these observations for any bias parameter b. A low-density, low-bias CDM-type model, with or without a cosmological constant, appears to be consistent with both the cluster mass function and the cluster correlations. The low-density model agrees well with the observed correlation function of the Abell, Automatic Plate Measuring Facility (APM), and Edinburgh-Durham cluster catalogs. The model is in excellent agreement with the observed dependence of the correlation strength on cluster mean separation, reproducing the measured universal dimensionless cluster correlation. The low-density model is also consistent with other large-scale structure observations, including the APM angular galaxy-correlations, and for lambda = 1-Omega with the COBE results of the microwave background radiation fluctuations.

  13. The peculiar velocities of rich clusters in the hot and cold dark matter scenarios

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhee, George F.; West, Michael J.; Villumsen, Jens V.

    1993-01-01

    We present the results of a study of the peculiar velocities of rich clusters of galaxies. The peculiar motion of rich clusters in various cosmological scenarios is of interest for a number of reasons. Observationally, one can measure the peculiar motion of clusters to greater distances than galaxies because cluster peculiar motions can be determined to greater accuracy. One can also test the slope of distance indicator relations using clusters to see if galaxy properties vary with environment. We have used N-body simulations to measure the amplitude and rms cluster peculiar velocity as a function of bias parameter in the hot and cold dark matter scenarios. In addition to measuring the mean and rms peculiar velocity of clusters in the two models, we determined whether the peculiar velocity vector of a given cluster is well aligned with the gravity vector due to all the particles in the simulation and the gravity vector due to the particles present only in the clusters. We have investigated the peculiar velocities of rich clusters of galaxies in the cold dark matter and hot dark matter galaxy formation scenarios. We have derived peculiar velocities and associated errors for the scenarios using four values of the bias parameter ranging from b = 1 to b = 2.5. The growth of the mean peculiar velocity with scale factor has been determined and compared to that predicted by linear theory. In addition, we have compared the orientation of force and velocity in these simulations to see if a program such as that proposed by Bertschinger and Dekel (1989) for elliptical galaxy peculiar motions can be applied to clusters. The method they describe enables one to recover the density field from large scale redshift distance samples. The method makes it possible to do this when only radial velocities are known by assuming that the velocity field is curl free. Our analysis suggests that this program if applied to clusters is only realizable for models with a low value of the bias

  14. Combustion Synthesis Reaction Behavior of Cold-Rolled Ni/Al and Ti/Al Multilayers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-04-01

    6   Figure 4 . Combustion synthesis process of the cold-rolled Ni/Al multilayer foils: (a) reaction front of the displacement of the reaction...Reactive Nanostructured Foil Used as a Heat Source for Joining Titanium . J. Appl. Phys. 2004, 96 ( 4 ), 2336–2342. 16. Wang, J.; Besnoin, E...2011 2. REPORT TYPE Final 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) January 2006–January 2008 4 . TITLE AND SUBTITLE Combustion Synthesis Reaction Behavior of

  15. Dielectron attachment and hydrogen evolution reaction in water clusters.

    PubMed

    Barnett, Robert N; Giniger, Rina; Cheshnovsky, Ori; Landman, Uzi

    2011-06-30

    Binding of excess electrons to nanosize water droplets, with a focus on the hitherto largely unexplored properties of doubly-charged clusters, were investigated experimentally using mass spectrometry and theoretically with large-scale first-principles simulations based on spin-density-functional theory, with all the valence electrons (that is, 8e per water molecule) and excess electrons treated quantum mechanically. Singly-charged clusters (H(2)O)(n)(-1) were detected for n = 6-250, and our calculated vertical detachment energies agree with previously measured values in the entire range 15 ≤ n ≤ 105, giving a consistent interpretation in terms of internal, surface and diffuse states of the excess electron. Doubly-charged clusters were measured in the range of 83 ≤ n ≤ 123, with (H(2)O)(n)(-2) clusters found for 83 ≤ n < 105, and mass-shifted peaks corresponding to (H(2)O)(n-2)(OH(-))(2) detected for n ≥ 105. The simulations revealed surface and internal dielectron, e(-)(2), localization modes and elucidated the mechanism of the reaction (H(2)O)(n)(-2) → (H(2)O)(n-2) (OH(-))(2) + H(2) (for n ≥ 105), which was found to occur via concerted approach of a pair of protons belonging to two water molecules located in the first shell of the dielectron internal hydration cavity, culminating in formation of a hydrogen molecule 2H(+) + e(-)(2) → H(2). Instability of the dielectron internal localization impedes the reaction for smaller (n < 105) doubly-charged clusters.

  16. A Lagrangian analysis of cold cloud clusters and their life cycles with satellite observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esmaili, Rebekah Bradley; Tian, Yudong; Vila, Daniel Alejandro; Kim, Kyu-Myong

    2016-10-01

    Cloud movement and evolution signify the complex water and energy transport in the atmosphere-ocean-land system. Detecting, clustering, and tracking clouds as semicoherent clusters enable study of their evolution which can complement climate model simulations and enhance satellite retrieval algorithms, where there are gaps between overpasses. Using a cluster tracking algorithm, in this study we examine the trajectories, size, and brightness temperature of millions of cloud clusters over their lifespan, from infrared satellite observations at 30 min, 4 km resolution, for a period of 11 years. We found that the majority of cold clouds were both small and short lived and that their frequency and location are influenced by El Niño. Also, this large sample of individually tracked clouds shows their horizontal size and temperature evolution. Long-lived clusters tended to achieve their temperature and size maturity milestones at different times, while these stages often occurred simultaneously in short-lived clusters. On average, clusters with this lag also exhibited a greater rainfall contribution than those where minimum temperature and maximum size stages occurred simultaneously. Furthermore, by examining the diurnal cycle of cluster development over Africa and the Indian subcontinent, we observed differences in the local timing of the maximum occurrence at different life cycle stages. Over land there was a strong diurnal peak in the afternoon, while over the ocean there was a semidiurnal peak composed of longer-lived clusters in the early morning hours and shorter-lived clusters in the afternoon. Building on regional specific work, this study provides a global long-term survey of object-based cloud characteristics.

  17. Dissolution, speciation, and reaction of acetaldehyde in cold sulfuric acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michelsen, Rebecca R.; Ashbourn, Samantha F. M.; Iraci, Laura T.

    2004-12-01

    The uptake of gas-phase acetaldehyde [CH3CHO, ethanal] by aqueous sulfuric acid solutions was studied under upper tropospheric/lower stratospheric (UT/LS) conditions. The solubility of acetaldehyde was found to be low, between 2 × 102 M atm-1 and 1.5 × 105 M atm-1 under the ranges of temperature (211-241 K) and acid composition (39-76 weight percent, wt%, H2SO4) studied. Under most conditions, acetaldehyde showed simple solubility behavior when exposed to sulfuric acid. Under moderately acidic conditions (usually 47 wt% H2SO4), evidence of reaction was observed. Enhancement of uptake at long times was occasionally detected in conjunction with reaction. The source of these behaviors and the effect of acetaldehyde speciation on solubility are discussed. Implications for the uptake of oxygenated organic compounds by tropospheric aerosols are considered.

  18. Formation of superheavy elements in cold fusion reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smolańczuk, Robert

    2001-04-01

    We calculate the formation cross sections of transactinides (superheavy elements), as well as heavy actinides (No and Lr), which have been or might be obtained in fusion reactions with the evaporation of only one neutron. We use both more realistic fusion barrier and survival probability of the compound nucleus in comparison with the original phenomenological model [Phys. Rev. C 59, 2634 (1999)] that prompted the Berkeley experiment on the synthesis of a new superheavy element 118 [Phys. Rev. Lett. 83, 1104 (1999)]. Calculations are performed for asymmetric and symmetric target-projectile combinations and for reactions with stable and radioactive-ion beams. The formation cross sections measured at GSI-Darmstadt for transactinides and heavy actinides, as well as that for superheavy element 118 reported by the LBNL-Berkeley group, are reproduced within a factor of 2.4, on average. Based on the obtained relatively large cross sections, we predict that optimal reactions with stable beams for the synthesis of so far unobserved superheavy elements 119, 120, and 121 are 209Bi(86Kr, 1n)294119, 208Pb(88Sr, 1n)295120, and 209Bi(88Sr, 1n)296121, respectively. This is because of the magic of both the target and the projectile that leads to larger Q value and, consequently, lower effective fusion barrier with larger transmission probability. The same effect is responsible for relatively large cross sections predicted for the symmetric reactions 136Xe(124Sn, 1n)259Rf, 136Xe(136Xe, 1n)271Hs,138Ba(136Xe, 1n)273110, and 140Ce(136Xe, 1n)275112. Although shell effects in the magic nuclei 124Sn, 136Xe, 138Ba, and 140Ce are not as strong as in 208Pb and 209Bi, they act on both the target and the projectile and lead to the prediction of measurable cross sections.

  19. THE EFFECT OF ANISOTROPIC VISCOSITY ON COLD FRONTS IN GALAXY CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    ZuHone, J. A.; Markevitch, M.; Biffi, V.

    2015-01-10

    Cold fronts—contact discontinuities in the intracluster medium (ICM) of galaxy clusters—should be disrupted by Kelvin-Helmholtz (K-H) instabilities due to the associated shear velocity. However, many observed cold fronts appear stable. This opens the possibility of placing constraints on microphysical mechanisms that stabilize them, such as the ICM viscosity and/or magnetic fields. We performed exploratory high-resolution simulations of cold fronts arising from subsonic gas sloshing in cluster cores using the grid-based Athena MHD code, comparing the effects of isotropic Spitzer and anisotropic Braginskii viscosity (expected in a magnetized plasma). Magnetized simulations with full Braginskii viscosity or isotropic Spitzer viscosity reduced by a factor f ∼ 0.1 are both in qualitative agreement with observations in terms of suppressing K-H instabilities. The rms velocity of turbulence within the sloshing region is only modestly reduced by Braginskii viscosity. We also performed unmagnetized simulations with and without viscosity and find that magnetic fields have a substantial effect on the appearance of the cold fronts, even if the initial field is weak and the viscosity is the same. This suggests that determining the dominant suppression mechanism of a given cold front from X-ray observations (e.g., viscosity or magnetic fields) by comparison with simulations is not straightforward. Finally, we performed simulations including anisotropic thermal conduction, and find that including Braginskii viscosity in these simulations does not significantly affect the evolution of cold fronts; they are rapidly smeared out by thermal conduction, as in the inviscid case.

  20. Progress towards antihydrogen production by the reaction of cold antiprotons with positronium atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Charlton, M.; Laricchia, G.; Deutch, B.I.

    1995-03-01

    An experiment aimed at producing antihydrogen atoms by the reaction of cold antiprotons stored in a Penning trap with injected ground state positronium atoms is described. The apparatus developed in an attempt to observe the charge conjugate reaction using proton projectiles is discussed. Technically feasible upgrades to this apparatus are identified which may allow, in conjunction with the PS200 trap, antihydrogen production at LEAR.

  1. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha release during systemic reaction in cold urticaria.

    PubMed

    Tillie-Leblond, I; Gosset, P; Janin, A; Dalenne, R; Joseph, M; Wallaert, B; Tonnel, A B

    1994-02-01

    Primary cold urticaria (PCU) characterized by the association of urticaria, angioedema, and sometimes a shock-like reaction after cold exposure, is usually considered to be linked with histamine and prostaglandin D2 release by mast cells. To determine the involvement of cytokines, we studied the release of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) in the blood of the efferent vein after immersion of the hand in chilled water. Five patients with PCU were compared with a control population (three patients with nonphysical urticaria and three healthy subjects). Among patients with PCU who underwent the cold immersion test, two exhibited a shock-like reaction with a large urticarial plaque (patients 1 and 2), one had only a mild cutaneous reaction, and two had no reaction. Patient 1 was reevaluated after 6 months of treatment with H1 and H2 antihistamines: he did not respond to this challenge. All controls were strictly negative. Histamine was released within the first minute after the challenge in the three patients with PCU, but at a higher level for the two patients who had a systemic reaction. TNF-alpha was undetectable in the blood of the patient with only a mild cutaneous reaction, whereas TNF-alpha release was observed for the two patients with a systemic reaction, 2 and 6 minutes after the end of the cold immersion test. The two other patients and the control subjects released neither histamine nor TNF-alpha. In parallel, pathologic and immunohistochemical (with a rabbit anti-TNF-alpha antibody) studies were performed on skin biopsy specimens collected 10 minutes after ice-cube test.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. Cosmology and astrophysics from relaxed galaxy clusters – V. Consistency with cold dark matter structure formation

    DOE PAGES

    Mantz, A. B.; Allen, S. W.; Morris, R. G.

    2016-07-15

    This is the fifth in a series of papers studying the astrophysics and cosmology of massive, dynamically relaxed galaxy clusters. Our sample comprises 40 clusters identified as being dynamically relaxed and hot in Papers I and II of this series. Here we use constraints on cluster mass profiles from X-ray data to test some of the basic predictions of cosmological structure formation in the cold dark matter (CDM) paradigm. In addition, we present constraints on the concentration–mass relation for massive clusters, finding a power-law mass dependence with a slope of κm = –0.16 ± 0.07, in agreement with CDM predictions.more » For this relaxed sample, the relation is consistent with a constant as a function of redshift (power-law slope with 1 + z of κζ = –0.17 ± 0.26), with an intrinsic scatter of σln c = 0.16 ± 0.03. We investigate the shape of cluster mass profiles over the radial range probed by the data (typically ~50 kpc–1 Mpc), and test for departures from the simple Navarro–Frenk–White (NFW) form, for which the logarithmic slope of the density profile tends to –1 at small radii. Specifically, we consider as alternatives the generalized NFW (GNFW) and Einasto parametrizations. For the GNFW model, we find an average value of (minus) the logarithmic inner slope of β = 1.02 ± 0.08, with an intrinsic scatter of σβ = 0.22 ± 0.07, while in the Einasto case we constrain the average shape parameter to be α = 0.29 ± 0.04 with an intrinsic scatter of σα = 0.12 ± 0.04. Our results are thus consistent with the simple NFW model on average, but we clearly detect the presence of intrinsic, cluster-to-cluster scatter about the average.« less

  3. Cosmology and astrophysics from relaxed galaxy clusters – V. Consistency with cold dark matter structure formation

    SciTech Connect

    Mantz, A. B.; Allen, S. W.; Morris, R. G.

    2016-07-15

    This is the fifth in a series of papers studying the astrophysics and cosmology of massive, dynamically relaxed galaxy clusters. Our sample comprises 40 clusters identified as being dynamically relaxed and hot in Papers I and II of this series. Here we use constraints on cluster mass profiles from X-ray data to test some of the basic predictions of cosmological structure formation in the cold dark matter (CDM) paradigm. We present constraints on the concentration–mass relation for massive clusters, finding a power-law mass dependence with a slope of κm = -0.16 ± 0.07, in agreement with CDM predictions. For this relaxed sample, the relation is consistent with a constant as a function of redshift (power-law slope with 1 + z of κζ = -0.17 ± 0.26), with an intrinsic scatter of σln c = 0.16 ± 0.03. We investigate the shape of cluster mass profiles over the radial range probed by the data (typically ~50 kpc–1 Mpc), and test for departures from the simple Navarro–Frenk–White (NFW) form, for which the logarithmic slope of the density profile tends to -1 at small radii. Specifically, we consider as alternatives the generalized NFW (GNFW) and Einasto parametrizations. For the GNFW model, we find an average value of (minus) the logarithmic inner slope of β = 1.02 ± 0.08, with an intrinsic scatter of σβ = 0.22 ± 0.07, while in the Einasto case we constrain the average shape parameter to be α = 0.29 ± 0.04 with an intrinsic scatter of σα = 0.12 ± 0.04. Our results are thus consistent with the simple NFW model on average, but we clearly detect the presence of intrinsic, cluster-to-cluster scatter about the average.

  4. Deep Chandra observation and numerical studies of the nearest cluster cold front in the sky

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, N.; ZuHone, J. A.; Zhuravleva, I.; Ichinohe, Y.; Simionescu, A.; Allen, S. W.; Markevitch, M.; Fabian, A. C.; Keshet, U.; Roediger, E.; Ruszkowski, M.; Sanders, J. S.

    2016-01-01

    We present the results of a very deep (500 ks) Chandra observation, along with tailored numerical simulations, of the nearest, best resolved cluster cold front in the sky, which lies 90 kpc (19 arcmin) to the north-west of M 87. The northern part of the front appears the sharpest, with a width smaller than 2.5 kpc (1.5 Coulomb mean free paths; at 99 per cent confidence). Everywhere along the front, the temperature discontinuity is narrower than 4-8 kpc and the metallicity gradient is narrower than 6 kpc, indicating that diffusion, conduction and mixing are suppressed across the interface. Such transport processes can be naturally suppressed by magnetic fields aligned with the cold front. Interestingly, comparison to magnetohydrodynamic simulations indicates that in order to maintain the observed sharp density and temperature discontinuities, conduction must also be suppressed along the magnetic field lines. However, the northwestern part of the cold front is observed to have a non-zero width. While other explanations are possible, the broadening is consistent with the presence of Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities (KHI) on length-scales of a few kpc. Based on comparison with simulations, the presence of KHI would imply that the effective viscosity of the intracluster medium is suppressed by more than an order of magnitude with respect to the isotropic Spitzer-like temperature dependent viscosity. Underneath the cold front, we observe quasi-linear features that are ˜10 per cent brighter than the surrounding gas and are separated by ˜15 kpc from each other in projection. Comparison to tailored numerical simulations suggests that the observed phenomena may be due to the amplification of magnetic fields by gas sloshing in wide layers below the cold front, where the magnetic pressure reaches ˜5-10 per cent of the thermal pressure, reducing the gas density between the bright features.

  5. Deep Chandra Observation and Numerical Studies of the Nearest Cluster Cold Front in the Sky

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Werner, N.; ZuHone, J. A.; Zhuravleva, I.; Ichinohe, Y.; Simionescu, A.; Allen, S. W.; Markevitch, M.; Fabian, A. C.; Keshet, U.; Roediger, E.; Ruszkowski, M.; Sanders, J. S.

    2015-01-01

    We present the results of a very deep (500 ks) Chandra observation, along with tailored numerical simulations, of the nearest, best resolved cluster cold front in the sky, which lies 90 kpc (19 arcmin) to the north-west of M87. The northern part of the front appears the sharpest, with a width smaller than 2.5 kpc (1.5 Coulomb mean free paths; at 99 per cent confidence). Everywhere along the front, the temperature discontinuity is narrower than 4-8 kpc and the metallicity gradient is narrower than 6 kpc, indicating that diffusion, conduction and mixing are suppressed across the interface. Such transport processes can be naturally suppressed by magnetic fields aligned with the cold front. Interestingly, comparison to magnetohydrodynamic simulations indicates that in order to maintain the observed sharp density and temperature discontinuities, conduction must also be suppressed along the magnetic field lines. However, the northwestern part of the cold front is observed to have a non-zero width. While other explanations are possible, the broadening is consistent with the presence of Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities (KHI) on length-scales of a few kpc. Based on comparison with simulations, the presence of KHI would imply that the effective viscosity of the intracluster medium is suppressed by more than an order of magnitude with respect to the isotropic Spitzer-like temperature dependent viscosity. Underneath the cold front, we observe quasi-linear features that are approximately 10 per cent brighter than the surrounding gas and are separated by approximately 15 kpc from each other in projection. Comparison to tailored numerical simulations suggests that the observed phenomena may be due to the amplification of magnetic fields by gas sloshing in wide layers below the cold front, where the magnetic pressure reaches approximately 5-10 per cent of the thermal pressure, reducing the gas density between the bright features.

  6. Possibilities for synthesis of new isotopes of superheavy nuclei in cold fusion reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, X. J.; Gao, Y.; Li, J. Q.; Zhang, H. F.

    2016-04-01

    In order to find a way to produce superheavy nuclei (SHN), which appear in the gap between the SHN synthesized by cold fusion and those by hot fusion, or those so far not yet been produced in the laboratory, we tried to make use of a set of projectile isotopic chains, to use a radioactive beam projectile, and to test symmetric fusion reactions for gaining more neutrons to synthesize neutron-richer SHN based on the dinuclear system (DNS) model via cold fusion reactions. It is found that the nuclei 265Mt,Ds,272268,273Rg, and 274,275,276Cn may be produced with the detectable evaporation residual cross sections. The intensities of radioactive beams are significantly less than those of the stable beams, therefore using a stable beam is predicted to be the most favorable method for producing SHN. From the symmetric reaction system 136Xe+136Xe , no fusion event was found.

  7. DYNAMICS AND MAGNETIZATION IN GALAXY CLUSTER CORES TRACED BY X-RAY COLD FRONTS

    SciTech Connect

    Keshet, Uri; Markevitch, Maxim; Birnboim, Yuval; Loeb, Abraham

    2010-08-10

    Cold fronts (CFs)-density and temperature plasma discontinuities-are ubiquitous in cool cores of galaxy clusters, where they appear as X-ray brightness edges in the intracluster medium, nearly concentric with the cluster center. We analyze the thermodynamic profiles deprojected across core CFs found in the literature. While the pressure appears continuous across these CFs, we find that all of them require significant centripetal acceleration beneath the front. This is naturally explained by a tangential, nearly sonic bulk flow just below the CF, and a tangential shear flow involving a fair fraction of the plasma beneath the front. Such shear should generate near-equipartition magnetic fields on scales {approx}<50pc from the front and could magnetize the entire core. Such fields would explain the apparent stability of cool core CFs and the recently reported CF-radio minihalo association.

  8. Galaxy and cluster formation in a universe dominated by cold dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Primack, J.R.

    1984-07-01

    The dark matter (DM) that appears to be gravitationally dominant on all astronomical scales larger than the cores of galaxies can be classified, on the basis of its characteristic free-streaming damping mass M/sub D/, as hot (M/sub D/ approx. 10/sup 15/ M/sub mass/), warm (M/sub D/ approx. 10/sup 11/ M/sub mass/), or cold (M/sub D < 10/sup 8/ M/sub mass/). For the case of cold DM, the shape of the DM fluctuation spectrum is determined by (a) the primordial spectrum (on scales larger than the horizon), and (b) stagspansion, the stagnation of the growth of DM fluctuations that enter the horizon while the universe is still radiation-dominated. An attractive feature of the cold dark matter hypothesis is its considerable predictive power: the post-recombination fluctuation spectrum is calculable, and it in turn governs the formation of galaxies and clusters. Good agreement with the data is obtained for a Zeldovich spectrum of primordial fluctuations.

  9. The evolution of X-ray clusters in a cold plus hot dark matter universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryan, Greg L.; Klypin, Anatoly; Loken, Chris; Norman, Michael L.; Burns, Jack O.

    1994-01-01

    We present the first self-consistently computed results on the evolution of X-ray properties of galaxy clusters in a cold + hot dark matter (CHDM) model. We have performed a hydrodynamic plus N-body simulation for the COBE-compatible CHDM model with standard mass components: Omega(sub hot) = 0.3, Omega (sub cold) = 0.6 and Omega(sub baryon) = 0.1 (h = 0.5). In contrast with the CDM model, which fails to reproduce the observed temperature distribution function dN/dT (Bryan et al. 1994b), the CHDM model fits the observational dN/dT quite well. Our results on X-ray luminosity are less firm but even more intriguing. We find that the resulting X-ray luminosity functions at redshifts z = 0.0, 0.2, 0.4, 0.7 are well fit by observations, where they overlap. The fact that both temperatures and luminosities provide a reasonable fit to the available observational data indicates that, unless we are missing some essential physics, there is neither room nor need for a large fraction of gas in rich clusters: 10% (or less) in baryons is sufficient to explain their X-ray properties. We also see a tight correlation between X-ray luminosity and gas temperature.

  10. Cold Electron Reactions Producing the Energetic Isomer of Hydrogen Cyanide in Interstellar Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendes, Mario B.; Buhr, Henrik; Berg, Max H.; Froese, Michael; Grieser, Manfred; Heber, Oded; Jordon-Thaden, Brandon; Krantz, Claude; Novotný, Oldřich; Novotny, Steffen; Orlov, Dmitry A.; Petrignani, Annemieke; Rappaport, Michael L.; Repnow, Roland; Schwalm, Dirk; Shornikov, Andrey; Stützel, Julia; Zajfman, Daniel; Wolf, Andreas

    2012-02-01

    Using event-by-event fragment momentum spectroscopy in a storage-ring merged-beams experiment, we find laboratory evidence that in the dissociative recombination (DR) of HCNH+ with cold electrons the energetic isomer HNC is produced with a high yield, similar to that of HCN. With a newly implemented mass-sensitive fragment imaging detector, we analyze the kinetic energy release of the triatomic fragments DCN/DNC from the DR reaction of the isotopologue DCND+ with cold (near 10 K) electrons. The results show that the internal energy of these fragments is extremely high, far exceeding the isomerization barrier between DNC and DCN. From this laboratory characterization of the DR reaction we conclude that also the triatomic fragment HCN/HNC from the DR of HCNH+ will carry a large amount of ro-vibrational excitation and show that this implies an isomeric production ratio in a narrow range near unity.

  11. COLD ELECTRON REACTIONS PRODUCING THE ENERGETIC ISOMER OF HYDROGEN CYANIDE IN INTERSTELLAR CLOUDS

    SciTech Connect

    Mendes, Mario B.; Buhr, Henrik; Berg, Max H.; Froese, Michael; Grieser, Manfred; Jordon-Thaden, Brandon; Krantz, Claude; Novotny, Oldrich; Novotny, Steffen; Orlov, Dmitry A.; Petrignani, Annemieke; Repnow, Roland; Schwalm, Dirk; Shornikov, Andrey; Stuetzel, Julia; Wolf, Andreas; Heber, Oded; Rappaport, Michael L.; Zajfman, Daniel

    2012-02-10

    Using event-by-event fragment momentum spectroscopy in a storage-ring merged-beams experiment, we find laboratory evidence that in the dissociative recombination (DR) of HCNH{sup +} with cold electrons the energetic isomer HNC is produced with a high yield, similar to that of HCN. With a newly implemented mass-sensitive fragment imaging detector, we analyze the kinetic energy release of the triatomic fragments DCN/DNC from the DR reaction of the isotopologue DCND{sup +} with cold (near 10 K) electrons. The results show that the internal energy of these fragments is extremely high, far exceeding the isomerization barrier between DNC and DCN. From this laboratory characterization of the DR reaction we conclude that also the triatomic fragment HCN/HNC from the DR of HCNH{sup +} will carry a large amount of ro-vibrational excitation and show that this implies an isomeric production ratio in a narrow range near unity.

  12. Role of the neck degree of freedom in cold fusion reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamian, G. G.; Antonenko, N. V.; Lenske, H.

    2015-05-01

    Mass parameters for collective variables of dinuclear systems formed in cold fusion reactions are microscopically calculated with the linear response theory making use of the width of single-particle states and the fluctuation-dissipation theorem. The single-particle spectrum and potential energy surface of the adiabatic two-center shell model are used. The microscopical mass parameter in the neck is found to be much larger than one obtained with the hydrodynamical model. Therefore, the dinuclear system lives a rather long time, comparable to the characteristic time of fusion and, correspondingly, the fusion can be considered at fixed neck parameter. With an adiabatic melting of the dinuclear system along the internuclear distance into a compound system one cannot explain the experimental trends in cold fusion reactions.

  13. The rise and fall of a challenger: the Bullet Cluster in Λ cold dark matter simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Robert; Davé, Romeel; Nagamine, Kentaro

    2015-09-01

    The Bullet Cluster has provided some of the best evidence for the Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM) model via direct empirical proof of the existence of collisionless dark matter, while posing a serious challenge owing to the unusually high inferred pairwise velocities of its progenitor clusters. Here, we investigate the probability of finding such a high-velocity pair in large-volume N-body simulations, particularly focusing on differences between halo-finding algorithms. We find that algorithms that do not account for the kinematics of infalling groups yield vastly different statistics and probabilities. When employing the ROCKSTAR halo finder that considers particle velocities, we find numerous Bullet-like pair candidates that closely match not only the high pairwise velocity, but also the mass, mass ratio, separation distance, and collision angle of the initial conditions that have been shown to produce the Bullet Cluster in non-cosmological hydrodynamic simulations. The probability of finding a high pairwise velocity pair among haloes with Mhalo ≥ 1014 M⊙ is 4.6 × 10-4 using ROCKSTAR, while it is ≈34 × lower using a friends-of-friends (FoF)-based approach as in previous studies. This is because the typical spatial extent of Bullet progenitors is such that FoF tends to group them into a single halo despite clearly distinct kinematics. Further requiring an appropriately high average mass among the two progenitors, we find the comoving number density of potential Bullet-like candidates to be of the order of ≈10-10 Mpc-3. Our findings suggest that ΛCDM straightforwardly produces massive, high relative velocity halo pairs analogous to Bullet Cluster progenitors, and hence the Bullet Cluster does not present a challenge to the ΛCDM model.

  14. The rise and fall of a challenger: the Bullet Cluster in Λ cold darkmatter simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Robert; Dave, Romeel; Nagamine, Kentaro

    2016-01-01

    The Bullet Cluster has provided some of the best evidence for the Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM) model via direct empirical proof of the existence of collisionless dark matter, while posing a serious challenge owing to the unusually high inferred pairwise velocities of its progenitor clusters. Here we investigate the probability of finding such a high-velocity pair in large-volume N-body simulations, particularly focusing on differences between halo finding algorithms. We find that algorithms that do not account for the kinematics of infalling groups yield vastly different statistics and probabilities. When employing the Rockstar (RS) halo finder that considers particle velocities, we find numerous Bullet-like pair candidates that closely match not only the high pairwise velocity, but also the mass, mass ratio, separation distance, and collision angle of the initial conditions that have been shown to produce the Bullet Cluster in non-cosmological hydrodynamic simulations. The probability of finding a high pairwise velocity pair among haloes with Mhalo≥1014 M⊙ is 4.6×10-4 using RS, while it is ≈34× lower using a friends-of-friends (FOF) based approach as in previous studies. This is because the typical spatial extent of Bullet progenitors is such that FOF tends to group them into a single halo despite clearly distinct kinematics. Further requiring an appropriately high average mass among the two progenitors, we find the comoving number density of potential Bullet-like candidates to be on the order of ≈10-10 Mpc-3. Our findings suggest that ΛCDM straightforwardly produces massive, high relative velocity halo pairs analogous to Bullet Cluster progenitors, and hence the Bullet Cluster does not present a challenge to the ΛCDM model.

  15. Formation of complex organic molecules in cold objects: the role of gas-phase reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balucani, Nadia; Ceccarelli, Cecilia; Taquet, Vianney

    2015-04-01

    While astrochemical models are successful in reproducing many of the observed interstellar species, they have been struggling to explain the observed abundances of complex organic molecules. Current models tend to privilege grain surface over gas-phase chemistry in their formation. One key assumption of those models is that radicals trapped in the grain mantles gain mobility and react on lukewarm ( ≳ 30 K) dust grains. Thus, the recent detections of methyl formate (MF) and dimethyl ether (DME) in cold objects represent a challenge and may clarify the respective role of grain-surface and gas-phase chemistry. We propose here a new model to form DME and MF with gas-phase reactions in cold environments, where DME is the precursor of MF via an efficient reaction overlooked by previous models. Furthermore, methoxy, a precursor of DME, is also synthesized in the gas phase from methanol, which is desorbed by a non-thermal process from the ices. Our new model reproduces fairly well the observations towards L1544. It also explains, in a natural way, the observed correlation between DME and MF. We conclude that gas-phase reactions are major actors in the formation of MF, DME and methoxy in cold gas. This challenges the exclusive role of grain-surface chemistry and favours a combined grain-gas chemistry.

  16. Cold-induced precipitation of a monoclonal IgM: a negative activation enthalpy reaction.

    PubMed

    Meliga, Stefano C; Farrugia, William; Ramsland, Paul A; Falconer, Robert J

    2013-01-17

    Cold-induced precipitation of a monoclonal IgM cryoglobulin isolated from a patient with Waldenström's macroglobulinemia was observed to have a negative activation enthalpy. The rate of the reaction increased, as the temperature decreased. Differential scanning calorimetry of the monoclonal IgM showed precipitation as an inverted peak during a downward temperature scan. The transition temperature was between 14 and 15 °C and was possibly concentration dependent. At temperatures below the transition the precipitation was best described by second-order kinetics. The difference in change in enthalpy between precipitation and disassociation suggests that cold-induced precipitation had a fast precipitation stage followed by a slower consolidation reaction. Negligible curvature of the Eyring plot suggested the precipitation reaction was dominated by van der Waal forces and hydrogen bonding. Conversely, during an upward temperature scan, disassociation was observed as a positive enthalpy peak. This reaction had two stages, a reaction undoing consolidation followed by heat-induced disassociation that had first-order kinetics.

  17. Cosmology and astrophysics from relaxed galaxy clusters – V. Consistency with cold dark matter structure formation

    SciTech Connect

    Mantz, A. B.; Allen, S. W.; Morris, R. G.

    2016-07-15

    This is the fifth in a series of papers studying the astrophysics and cosmology of massive, dynamically relaxed galaxy clusters. Our sample comprises 40 clusters identified as being dynamically relaxed and hot in Papers I and II of this series. Here we use constraints on cluster mass profiles from X-ray data to test some of the basic predictions of cosmological structure formation in the cold dark matter (CDM) paradigm. In addition, we present constraints on the concentration–mass relation for massive clusters, finding a power-law mass dependence with a slope of κm = –0.16 ± 0.07, in agreement with CDM predictions. For this relaxed sample, the relation is consistent with a constant as a function of redshift (power-law slope with 1 + z of κζ = –0.17 ± 0.26), with an intrinsic scatter of σln c = 0.16 ± 0.03. We investigate the shape of cluster mass profiles over the radial range probed by the data (typically ~50 kpc–1 Mpc), and test for departures from the simple Navarro–Frenk–White (NFW) form, for which the logarithmic slope of the density profile tends to –1 at small radii. Specifically, we consider as alternatives the generalized NFW (GNFW) and Einasto parametrizations. For the GNFW model, we find an average value of (minus) the logarithmic inner slope of β = 1.02 ± 0.08, with an intrinsic scatter of σβ = 0.22 ± 0.07, while in the Einasto case we constrain the average shape parameter to be α = 0.29 ± 0.04 with an intrinsic scatter of σα = 0.12 ± 0.04. Our results are thus consistent with the simple NFW model on average, but we clearly detect the presence of intrinsic, cluster-to-cluster scatter about the average.

  18. Investigating the mechanism of the selective hydrogenation reaction of cinnamaldehyde catalyzed by Ptn clusters.

    PubMed

    Li, Laicai; Wang, Wei; Wang, Xiaolan; Zhang, Lin

    2016-08-01

    Cinnamaldehyde (CAL) belongs to the group of aromatic α,β-unsaturated aldehydes; the selective hydrogenation of CAL plays an important role in the fine chemical and pharmaceutical industries. Using Ptn clusters as catalytic models, we studied the selective hydrogenation reaction mechanism for CAL catalyzed by Ptn (n = 6, 10, 14, 18) clusters by means of B3LYP in density functional theory at the 6-31+ G(d) level (the LanL2DZ extra basis set was used for the Pt atom). The rationality of the transition state was proved by vibration frequency analysis and intrinsic reaction coordinate computation. Moreover, atoms in molecules theory and nature bond orbital theory were applied to discuss the interaction among orbitals and the bonding characteristics. The results indicate that three kinds of products, namely 3-phenylpropyl aldehyde, 3-phenyl allyl alcohol and cinnamyl alcohol, are produced in the selective hydrogenation reaction catalyzed by Ptn clusters; each pathway possesses two reaction channels. Ptn clusters are more likely to catalyze the activation and hydrogenation of the C = O bond in CAL molecules, eventually producing cinnamic alcohol, which proves that Ptn clusters have a strong reaction selectivity to catalyze CAL. The reaction selectivity of the catalyzer cluster is closely related to the size of the Ptn cluster, with Pt14 clusters having the greatest reaction selectivity. Graphical Abstract The reaction mechanism for the selective hydrogenation reaction ofcinnamaldehyde catalyzed by Ptn clusters was studied by densityfunctional theory. The reactionselectivity of cluster catalyzer was concluded to be closely related to the size of Ptn clusters, with Pt14 clusters having the greatest reaction selectivity.

  19. Nucleus-nucleus cold fusion reactions analyzed with the l-dependent 'fusion by diffusion' model

    SciTech Connect

    Cap, T.; Siwek-Wilczynska, K.; Wilczynski, J.

    2011-05-15

    We present a modified version of the Fusion by Diffusion (FBD) model aimed at describing the synthesis of superheavy nuclei in cold fusion reactions, in which a low excited compound nucleus emits only one neutron. The modified FBD model accounts for the angular momentum dependence of three basic factors determining the evaporation residue cross section: the capture cross section {sigma}{sub cap}(l), the fusion probability P{sub fus}(l), and the survival probability P{sub surv}(l). The fusion hindrance factor, the inverse of P{sub fus}(l), is treated in terms of thermal fluctuations in the shape degrees of freedom and is expressed as a solution of the Smoluchowski diffusion equation. The l dependence of P{sub fus}(l) results from the l-dependent potential energy surface of the colliding system. A new parametrization of the distance of starting point of the diffusion process is introduced. An analysis of a complete set of 27 excitation functions for production of superheavy nuclei in cold fusion reactions, studied in experiments at GSI Darmstadt, RIKEN Tokyo, and LBNL Berkeley, is presented. The FBD model satisfactorily reproduces shapes and absolute cross sections of all the cold fusion excitation functions. It is shown that the peak position of the excitation function for a given 1n reaction is determined by the Q value of the reaction and the height of the fission barrier of the final nucleus. This fact could possibly be used in future experiments (with well-defined beam energy) for experimental determination of the fission barrier heights.

  20. A new mathematical model to simulate AVA cold-induced vasodilation reaction to local cooling.

    PubMed

    Rida, Mohamad; Karaki, Wafaa; Ghaddar, Nesreen; Ghali, Kamel; Hoballah, Jamal

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of this work was to integrate a new mathematical model with a bioheat model, based on physiology and first principles, to predict thermoregulatory arterio-venous anastomoses (AVA) and cold-induced vasodilation (CIVD) reaction to local cooling. The transient energy balance equations of body segments constrained by thermoregulatory controls were solved numerically to predict segmental core and skin temperatures, and arterial blood flow for given metabolic rate and environmental conditions. Two similar AVA-CIVD mechanisms were incorporated. The first was activated during drop in local skin temperature (<32 °C). The second mechanism was activated at a minimum finger skin temperature, T(CIVD, min), where the AVA flow is dilated and constricted once the skin temperature reached a maximum value. The value of T(CIVD,min) was determined empirically from values reported in literature for hand immersions in cold fluid. When compared with published data, the model predicted accurately the onset time of CIVD at 25 min and T(CIVD,min) at 10 °C for hand exposure to still air at 0 °C. Good agreement was also obtained between predicted finger skin temperature and experimentally published values for repeated immersion in cold water at environmental conditions of 30, 25, and 20 °C. The CIVD thermal response was found related to core body temperature, finger skin temperature, and initial finger sensible heat loss rate upon exposure to cold fluid. The model captured central and local stimulations of the CIVD and accommodated observed variability reported in literature of onset time of CIVD reaction and T(CIVD,min).

  1. High-resolution electron microscopy observation and dislocation reaction mechanism of fivefold twinning in a Cu-rich precipitate in a cold rolled ferritic steel containing copper

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Ling; Wang, Wei; Chen, Bolin; Zhou, Xiying; Li, Zhongwen; Zhou, Bangxin; Wang, Lumin

    2014-09-15

    Ferritic steels containing copper have been studied as model systems for clusters/precipitate formation in reactor pressure vessel steels. The samples were aged at 400 °C for 4000 h and subsequently cold rolled to 30% reduction at room temperature. The microstructural characteristics of the samples were analyzed using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. Direct evidence was found that the fivefold twinning occurs via simultaneous emission of two Shockley partial dislocations from two particular α-Fe/Cu interfaces, and then the pileup tips of the twofold twin. - Highlights: • Fivefold twin is observed in a Cu-rich precipitate in cold rolled ferritic steels. • A dislocation reaction mechanism for the fivefold twin formation is proposed. • Two particular mismatching α-Fe/Cu-rich precipitate interfaces play a critical role.

  2. Chemisorption and reactions on clusters of nickel atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waber, J. T.; Adachi, H.; Yu, T.

    1982-01-01

    The nucleation and growth of metallic clusters on a substantially amorphous substrate are discussed with emphasis on the geometrical and electronic structure of the clusters. Several clusters of different symmetry containing five to nine nickel atoms were studied. It was found that the energy range of primary d-like states is not significantly different from the width of the d-band states in nickel metal, as long as the interatomic distance is comparable to that in the bulk metal. The approach of one or more molecules to the cluster is examined using at the hydrogenation of acetylene and the dehydrogenation of ethylene as examples.

  3. Molecular-dynamics analysis of mobile helium cluster reactions near surfaces of plasma-exposed tungsten

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Lin; Maroudas, Dimitrios; Hammond, Karl D.; Wirth, Brian D.

    2015-10-28

    We report the results of a systematic atomic-scale analysis of the reactions of small mobile helium clusters (He{sub n}, 4 ≤ n ≤ 7) near low-Miller-index tungsten (W) surfaces, aiming at a fundamental understanding of the near-surface dynamics of helium-carrying species in plasma-exposed tungsten. These small mobile helium clusters are attracted to the surface and migrate to the surface by Fickian diffusion and drift due to the thermodynamic driving force for surface segregation. As the clusters migrate toward the surface, trap mutation (TM) and cluster dissociation reactions are activated at rates higher than in the bulk. TM produces W adatoms and immobile complexes of helium clusters surrounding W vacancies located within the lattice planes at a short distance from the surface. These reactions are identified and characterized in detail based on the analysis of a large number of molecular-dynamics trajectories for each such mobile cluster near W(100), W(110), and W(111) surfaces. TM is found to be the dominant cluster reaction for all cluster and surface combinations, except for the He{sub 4} and He{sub 5} clusters near W(100) where cluster partial dissociation following TM dominates. We find that there exists a critical cluster size, n = 4 near W(100) and W(111) and n = 5 near W(110), beyond which the formation of multiple W adatoms and vacancies in the TM reactions is observed. The identified cluster reactions are responsible for important structural, morphological, and compositional features in the plasma-exposed tungsten, including surface adatom populations, near-surface immobile helium-vacancy complexes, and retained helium content, which are expected to influence the amount of hydrogen re-cycling and tritium retention in fusion tokamaks.

  4. MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC SIMULATIONS OF THE FORMATION OF COLD FRONTS IN CLUSTERS OF GALAXIES: EFFECTS OF ANISOTROPIC VISCOSITY

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Kentaro; Ogawa, Takayuki; Matsumoto, Yosuke; Matsumoto, Ryoji E-mail: ogawa@astro.s.chiba-u.ac.jp E-mail: matumoto@astro.s.chiba-u.ac.jp

    2013-05-10

    We carried out three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations to study the effects of plasma viscosity on the formation of sharp discontinuities of density and temperature distributions, cold fronts, in clusters of galaxies. By fixing the gravitational potential that confines the cool, dense plasma in a moving subcluster, we simulated its interaction with the hot, lower density plasma around the subcluster. At the initial state, the intracluster medium (ICM) is assumed to be threaded by uniform magnetic fields. The enhancement of plasma viscosity along the direction of magnetic fields is incorporated as anisotropic viscosity depending on the direction of magnetic fields. We found that the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability at the surface of the subcluster grows even in models with anisotropic viscosity, because its effects on the velocity shear across the magnetic field lines are suppressed. We also found that magnetic fields around the interface between the subcluster and ICM are amplified even in the presence of viscosity, while magnetic fields behind the subcluster are amplified up to {beta}{sup -1} {approx} 0.01 in models with viscosity, whereas they are amplified up to {beta}{sup -1} {approx} 0.1 in models without viscosity, where {beta} is the ratio of gas pressure to magnetic pressure.

  5. THE NATURE OF FILAMENTARY COLD GAS IN THE CORE OF THE VIRGO CLUSTER

    SciTech Connect

    Werner, N.; Canning, R. E. A.; Allen, S. W.; Simionescu, A.; Von der Linden, A.; Oonk, J. B. R.; Kos, J.; Van Weeren, R. J.; Nulsen, P. E. J.; Edge, A. C.; Fabian, A. C.; Reynolds, C. S.; Ruszkowski, M.

    2013-04-20

    We present a multi-wavelength study of the emission-line nebulae located {approx}38'' (3 kpc in projection) southeast of the nucleus of M87, the central dominant galaxy of the Virgo Cluster. We report the detection of far-infrared (FIR) [C II] line emission at 158 {mu}m from the nebulae using observations made with the Herschel Photodetector Array Camera and Spectrometer (PACS). The infrared line emission is extended and co-spatial with optical H{alpha}+ [N II], far-ultraviolet C IV lines, and soft X-ray emission. The filamentary nebulae evidently contain multi-phase material spanning a temperature range of at least five orders of magnitude, from {approx}100 K to {approx}10{sup 7} K. This material has most likely been uplifted by the active galactic nucleus from the center of M87. The thermal pressure of the 10{sup 4} K phase appears to be significantly lower than that of the surrounding hot intracluster medium (ICM), indicating the presence of additional turbulent and magnetic pressure in the filaments. If the turbulence in the filaments is subsonic then the magnetic field strength required to balance the pressure of the surrounding ICM is B {approx} 30-70 {mu}G. The spectral properties of the soft X-ray emission from the filaments indicate that it is due to thermal plasma with kT {approx} 0.5-1 keV, which is cooling by mixing with the cold gas and/or radiatively. Charge exchange can be ruled out as a significant source of soft X-rays. Both cooling and mixing scenarios predict gas with a range of temperatures. This is at first glance inconsistent with the apparent lack of X-ray emitting gas with kT < 0.5 keV. However, we show that the missing very soft X-ray emission could be absorbed by the cold gas in the filaments with an integrated hydrogen column density of N{sub H} {approx} 1.6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 21} cm{sup -2}, providing a natural explanation for the apparent temperature floor to the X-ray emission at kT {approx} 0.5 keV. The FIR through ultraviolet

  6. Photonuclear reaction to test cluster structure of Lithium

    SciTech Connect

    Akkurt, Iskender

    2008-11-11

    The lithium can be pictured as an {alpha} particle with 2 extra nucleon surrounding it. A photonuclear reaction experiment has been performed to test this structure at Maxlab in Lund-Sweden. The cross-section of the {sup 6}Li({gamma},n) reaction have been measured using TOF methods and the results were compared with results of {sup 6}Li({gamma},p) and also {sup 4}He({gamma},n) reaction.

  7. Conversion of Nuclear Waste to Molten Glass: Cold-Cap Reactions in Crucible Tests

    DOE PAGES

    Xu, Kai; Hrma, Pavel; Rice, Jarrett A.; ...

    2016-05-23

    The feed-to-glass conversion, which comprises complex chemical reactions and phase transitions, occurs in the cold cap during nuclear waste vitrification. Here, to investigate the conversion process, we analyzed heat-treated samples of a simulated high-level waste feed using X-ray diffraction, electron probe microanalysis, leaching tests, and residual anion analysis. Feed dehydration, gas evolution, and borate phase formation occurred at temperatures below 700°C before the emerging glass-forming melt was completely connected. Above 700°C, intermediate aluminosilicate phases and quartz particles gradually dissolved in the continuous borosilicate melt, which expanded with transient foam. Finally, knowledge of the chemistry and physics of feed-to-glass conversion willmore » help us control the conversion path by changing the melter feed makeup to maximize the glass production rate.« less

  8. Conversion of Nuclear Waste to Molten Glass: Cold-Cap Reactions in Crucible Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Kai; Hrma, Pavel; Rice, Jarrett A.; Schweiger, Michael J.; Riley, Brian J.; Overman, Nicole R.; Kruger, Albert A.

    2016-05-23

    The feed-to-glass conversion, which comprises complex chemical reactions and phase transitions, occurs in the cold cap during nuclear waste vitrification. Here, to investigate the conversion process, we analyzed heat-treated samples of a simulated high-level waste feed using X-ray diffraction, electron probe microanalysis, leaching tests, and residual anion analysis. Feed dehydration, gas evolution, and borate phase formation occurred at temperatures below 700°C before the emerging glass-forming melt was completely connected. Above 700°C, intermediate aluminosilicate phases and quartz particles gradually dissolved in the continuous borosilicate melt, which expanded with transient foam. Finally, knowledge of the chemistry and physics of feed-to-glass conversion will help us control the conversion path by changing the melter feed makeup to maximize the glass production rate.

  9. Constraints on cold dark matter theories from observations of massive x-ray-luminous clusters of galaxies at high redshift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luppino, G. A.; Gioia, I. M.

    1995-01-01

    During the course of a gravitational lensing survey of distant, X-ray selected Einstein Observatory Extended Medium Sensitivity Survey (EMSS) clusters of galaxies, we have studied six X-ray-luminous (L(sub x) greater than 5 x 10(exp 44)(h(sub 50)(exp -2))ergs/sec) clusters at redshifts exceeding z = 0.5. All of these clusters are apparently massive. In addition to their high X-ray luminosity, two of the clusters at z approximately 0.6 exhibit gravitationally lensed arcs. Furthermore, the highest redshift cluster in our sample, MS 1054-0321 at z = 0.826, is both extremely X-ray luminous (L(sub 0.3-3.5keV)=9.3 x 10(exp 44)(h(sub 50)(exp -2))ergs/sec) and exceedingly rich with an optical richness comparable to an Abell Richness Class 4 cluster. In this Letter, we discuss the cosmological implications of the very existence of these clusters for hierarchical structure formation theories such as standard Omega = 1 CDM (cold dark matter), hybrid Omega = 1 C + HDM (hot dark matter), and flat, low-density Lambda + CDM models.

  10. Ambient preparation and reactions of gas phase silver cluster cations and anions.

    PubMed

    Wleklinski, Michael; Sarkar, Depanjan; Hollerbach, Adam; Pradeep, Thalappil; Cooks, R Graham

    2015-07-28

    Electrospray ionization of metal salt solutions followed by ambient heating transforms the resulting salt clusters into new species, primarily naked ionic metal clusters. The experiment is done by passing the clusters through a heated coiled loop outside the mass spectrometer which releases the counter-anion while generating the anionic or cationic naked metal cluster. The nature of the anion in the starting salt determines the type of metal cluster observed. For example, silver acetate upon heating generates only positive silver clusters, Ag(n)(+), but silver fluoride generates both positive and negative silver clusters, Ag(n)(+/-) (3 < n < 20). Both unheated and heated metal salt sprays yield ions with characteristic geometric and electronic magic numbers. There is also a strong odd/even effect in the cationic and anionic silver clusters. Thermochemical control is suggested as the basis for favored formation of the observed clusters, with anhydride elimination occurring from the acetates and fluorine elimination from the fluorides to give cationic and anionic clusters, respectively. Data on the intermediates observed as the temperature is ramped support this. The naked metal clusters react with gaseous reagents in the open air, including methyl substituted pyridines, hydrocarbons, common organic solvents, ozone, ethylene, and propylene. Argentation of hydrocarbons, including saturated hydrocarbons, is shown to occur and serves as a useful analytical ionization method. The new cluster formation methodology allows investigation of ligand-metal binding including in reactions of industrial importance, such as olefin epoxidation. These reactions provide insight into the physicochemical properties of silver cluster anions and cations. The potential use of the ion source in ion soft landing is demonstrated by reproducing the mass spectra of salts heated in air using a custom surface science instrument.

  11. Spatiotemporal clustering and temporal order in the excitable BZ reaction.

    PubMed

    Hastings, Harold M; Sobel, Sabrina G; Lemus, Arely; Yuen, Fiona; Peralta, Catalina; Cammalleri, Carolyn; Chabrel, Johan; Chaterpaul, Stephen; Frank, Claudia; Hilaire, Christian; Lang, Daniel; Ravinovitch, Daniel; Zaharakis, Alex

    2005-08-08

    The prototype experimental example of "spontaneous" pattern formation in an unstirred chemical medium is the oscillatory Belousov-Zhabotinsky (BZ) reaction: target patterns of outward-moving concentric rings are readily observed when the reaction is run in a thin layer in a Petri dish. In many experimental runs, new target centers appeared to form closer to pre-existing target centers than expected in a randomized model. Here we describe a simple direct test for the presence of temporal order in the spatiotemporal dynamics of target nucleation, and apply this test to detect significant temporal order in target formation in the ferroin-catalyzed BZ reaction. We also describe how mixing heterogeneity can generate temporal order, even in the absence of heterogeneous physical nucleating centers.

  12. Development of an enzymatic reaction device using magnetic bead-cluster handling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shikida, Mitsuhiro; Takayanagi, Kentaro; Honda, Hiroyuki; Ito, Hiroshi; Sato, Kazuo

    2006-09-01

    We previously proposed a magnetic bead-cluster handling device for Micro-total analysis systems (Micro-TAS) and investigated its operation principle. The device does not need mechanical fluidic devices, such as pumps and valves, for handling solutions. We further developed the biochemical reaction unit chip, which is a key component in Micro-TAS, by applying a bead-cluster handling mechanism. We were able to do the enzymatic reaction by using hydrolysis between alkaline phosphatase and p-nitrophenyl phosphate. We also confirmed that the obtained calibration curves were linear during the enzymatic reaction. We had 70% reaction efficiency on the reaction chip by performing a comparative experiment. From these results, we concluded that our developed reaction chip is applicable to enzymatic immuno-assay systems.

  13. Characterization of Anionic Cluster Nucleophilic Substitution Reaction Intermediates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cyr, Donna Marie

    Recent theoretical and experimental developments in the arena of the gas phase S_{rm N}2 reaction (X^- + RY to RX + Y^-) has rekindled interest in this classic chemical reaction. Consideration of the gas phase S_{rm N} 2 double minima potential surface from a valence bond perspective, advocated by Shaik et. al., predicts the presence of a low lying excited electronic state corresponding to electron transfer. In this work we take advantage of long range ion-molecule induced forces to stabilize the S_{rm N}2 reactants in a complex, X^-cdot RY, allowing us to search for this charge transfer excited state from the well defined location on the potential energy surface. Photoelectron spectroscopy of X^ - cdot RY confirms the identification of the species as essentially charge-localized. Vibrational fine structure observed in the case of I^- cdot CH_3I is found to be consistent with small distortions of the CH_3I neutral upon complexation to form a stable intermediate in the S_{rm N}2 identity reaction. A narrow photofragmentation band lies just below the vertical electron detachment energy and is assigned to the X^- cdot RY to X cdotcdot (RY) ^- charge transfer excited state. More detailed study of the photofragmentation band reveals the photoexcitation mechanism is not direct charge transfer but is mediated by a weakly bound negative ion state. The excited state photochemistry of the X ^- cdot RY reaction intermediates is characterized by the formation of the endothermic halide abstraction product XY^-. Trends in the formation of the dihalide product are strongly dependent of the nature of the R group and these results are consistent with a preferential ion binding site in the complex. Search for the XY^- dihalide product in the bimolecular ground state reaction at supra-thermal collision energies revealed halide abstraction as a competitive product channel to the well known Walden inversion mechanism. All of these results are integrated in the development a picture of

  14. Production of Protonated Methanol Ions Via Intermolecular Reactions within Van der Waals Clusters of Dime Dimethyl Ether. Revision

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-02-02

    preparation (17) This result also suggests that the protonated methanol ion is not produced via a reaction between the DME cluster and a water impurity. In...include Security Classification) Production ol Protonated Methanol Ions via "Intermolecular" Reactions within van der Waals Clusters of Dimethyl Ether...2/90 Production of Protonated Methanol Ions via "Intermolecular" Reactions within van der Waals Clusters of Dimethyl Ether M. Todd Coolbaugh, William

  15. On the Bonding Mechanism in Cold Spray of Deformable hex-BN-Ni Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neshastehriz, M.; Smid, I.; Segall, A. E.; Eden, T. J.

    2016-06-01

    Bond strength and the lubrication potential of coatings made of 7 µm Hexagonal Boron Nitride particles encapsulated with nickel (hBN-Ni), and deposited onto aluminum 6061 substrates via cold spray were examined; for all tests, N2 was used as the carrier gas at a temperature of 480 °C and pressure of 2.4 MPa. Results showed significant improvement in both wear resistance and reduced surface friction. Coated samples also demonstrated unexpected high bond strength, which was much greater than pure nickel cold sprayed onto aluminum. However, while the results were truly promising, the primary reason for the observed high bond strength could not be explained using existing cold spray theories which were primarily developed for pure metal particles. Based on the present findings compared to cold-sprayed layers of composite nickel-nickel (nickel particles encapsulated with nickel), a mechanism for bonding of hBN-Ni particles to aluminum based on the level of plastic deformation and hardenability is proposed. Indeed, the high bond strength between the coating and substrate is related to the relatively high initial ductility of the nickel encapsulation, compliance of the hBN, as well as the ensuing significant plastic deformation of the composite particles during cold spray deposition.

  16. Cold gas in cluster cores: global stability analysis and non-linear simulations of thermal instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhury, Prakriti Pal; Sharma, Prateek

    2016-04-01

    We perform global linear stability analysis and idealized numerical simulations in global thermal balance to understand the condensation of cold gas from hot/virial atmospheres (coronae), in particular the intracluster medium (ICM). We pay particular attention to geometry (e.g. spherical versus plane-parallel) and the nature of the gravitational potential. Global linear analysis gives a similar value for the fastest growing thermal instability modes in spherical and Cartesian geometries. Simulations and observations suggest that cooling in haloes critically depends on the ratio of the cooling time to the free-fall time (tcool/tff). Extended cold gas condenses out of the ICM only if this ratio is smaller than a threshold value close to 10. Previous works highlighted the difference between the nature of cold gas condensation in spherical and plane-parallel atmospheres; namely, cold gas condensation appeared easier in spherical atmospheres. This apparent difference due to geometry arises because the previous plane-parallel simulations focused on in situ condensation of multiphase gas but spherical simulations studied condensation anywhere in the box. Unlike previous claims, our non-linear simulations show that there are only minor differences in cold gas condensation, either in situ or anywhere, for different geometries. The amount of cold gas depends on the shape of tcool/tff; gas has more time to condense if gravitational acceleration decreases towards the centre. In our idealized plane-parallel simulations with heating balancing cooling in each layer, there can be significant mass/energy/momentum transfer across layers that can trigger condensation and drive tcool/tff far beyond the critical value close to 10.

  17. X-ray clusters from a high-resolution hydrodynamic PPM simulation of the cold dark matter universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryan, Greg L.; Cen, Renyue; Norman, Michael L.; Ostriker, Jermemiah P.; Stone, James M.

    1994-01-01

    A new three-dimensional hydrodynamic code based on the piecewise parabolic method (PPM) is utilized to compute the distribution of hot gas in the standard Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE)-normalized cold dark matter (CDM) universe. Utilizing periodic boundary conditions, a box with size 85 h(exp-1) Mpc, having cell size 0.31 h(exp-1) Mpc, is followed in a simulation with 270(exp 3)=10(exp 7.3) cells. Adopting standard parameters determined from COBE and light-element nucleosynthesis, Sigma(sub 8)=1.05, Omega(sub b)=0.06, we find the X-ray-emitting clusters, compute the luminosity function at several wavelengths, the temperature distribution, and estimated sizes, as well as the evolution of these quantities with redshift. The results, which are compared with those obtained in the preceding paper (Kang et al. 1994a), may be used in conjuction with ROSAT and other observational data sets. Overall, the results of the two computations are qualitatively very similar with regard to the trends of cluster properties, i.e., how the number density, radius, and temeprature depend on luminosity and redshift. The total luminosity from clusters is approximately a factor of 2 higher using the PPM code (as compared to the 'total variation diminishing' (TVD) code used in the previous paper) with the number of bright clusters higher by a similar factor. The primary conclusions of the prior paper, with regard to the power spectrum of the primeval density perturbations, are strengthened: the standard CDM model, normalized to the COBE microwave detection, predicts too many bright X-ray emitting clusters, by a factor probably in excess of 5. The comparison between observations and theoretical predictions for the evolution of cluster properties, luminosity functions, and size and temperature distributions should provide an important discriminator among competing scenarios for the development of structure in the universe.

  18. Cluster geometry and survival probability in systems driven by reaction diffusion dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Windus, Alastair; Jensen, Henrik J.

    2008-11-01

    We consider a reaction-diffusion model incorporating the reactions A→phi, A→2A and 2A→3A. Depending on the relative rates for sexual and asexual reproduction of the quantity A, the model exhibits either a continuous or first-order absorbing phase transition to an extinct state. A tricritical point separates the two phase lines. While we comment on this critical behaviour, the main focus of the paper is on the geometry of the population clusters that form. We observe the different cluster structures that arise at criticality for the three different types of critical behaviour and show that there exists a linear relationship for the survival probability against initial cluster size at the tricritical point only.

  19. Model of defect reactions and the influence of clustering in pulse-neutron-irradiated Si

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, S. M.; Cooper, P. J.; Wampler, W. R.

    2008-08-15

    Transient reactions among irradiation defects, dopants, impurities, and carriers in pulse-neutron-irradiated Si were modeled taking into account the clustering of the primal defects in recoil cascades. Continuum equations describing the diffusion, field drift, and reactions of relevant species were numerically solved for a submicrometer spherical volume, within which the starting radial distributions of defects could be varied in accord with the degree of clustering. The radial profiles corresponding to neutron irradiation were chosen through pair-correlation-function analysis of vacancy and interstitial distributions obtained from the binary-collision code MARLOWE, using a spectrum of primary recoil energies computed for a fast-burst fission reactor. Model predictions of transient behavior were compared with a variety of experimental results from irradiated bulk Si, solar cells, and bipolar-junction transistors. The influence of defect clustering during neutron bombardment was further distinguished through contrast with electron irradiation, where the primal point defects are more uniformly dispersed.

  20. Dependence of the Reaction Probability of Benzene on the Size of Gaseous Niobium Clusters.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-01-14

    of NbxC6 to that of NbxC,6 + Nb4 ’M6 at low excimer laser intensities is used as a measure of the observed conversion of NbC&H6 into Nb C5. This...gives an expanded version of the reaction product mass spectrum in the Nb4 to Nb ! range. Marked on the figure are the mass peaks for the NbxC6H6 and...6 being more intense. Reaction of the NbxO, clusters goes essentially unnoticed in the benzene reaction spectrum. Only in the region from Nb4 to

  1. Gas phase vibrational spectroscopy of cold (TiO2)n(-) (n = 3-8) clusters.

    PubMed

    Weichman, Marissa L; Song, Xiaowei; Fagiani, Matias R; Debnath, Sreekanta; Gewinner, Sandy; Schöllkopf, Wieland; Neumark, Daniel M; Asmis, Knut R

    2016-03-28

    We report infrared photodissociation (IRPD) spectra for the D2-tagged titanium oxide cluster anions (TiO2)n(-) with n = 3-8 in the spectral region from 450 to 1200 cm(-1). The IRPD spectra are interpreted with the aid of harmonic spectra from BP86/6-311+G* density functional theory calculations of energetically low-lying isomers. We conclusively assign the IRPD spectra of the n = 3 and n = 6 clusters to global minimum energy structures with Cs and C2 symmetry, respectively. The vibrational spectra of the n = 4 and n = 7 clusters can be attributed to contributions of at most two low-lying structures. While our calculations indicate that the n = 5 and n = 8 clusters have many more low-lying isomers than the other clusters, the dominant contributions to their spectra can be assigned to the lowest energy structures. Through comparison between the calculated and experimental spectra, we can draw conclusions about the size-dependent evolution of the properties of (TiO2)n(-) clusters, and on their potential utility as model systems for catalysis on a bulk TiO2 surface.

  2. Photonuclear reaction as a probe for α -clustering nuclei in the quasi-deuteron region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, B. S.; Ma, Y. G.; He, W. B.

    2017-03-01

    Photon-nuclear reaction in a transport model frame, namely an extended quantum molecular dynamics model, has been realized at the photon energy of 70-140 MeV in the quasi-deuteron regime. For an important application, we pay a special focus on photonuclear reactions of 12C(γ ,n p )10B where 12C is considered as different configurations including α clustering. Obvious differences for some observables have been observed among different configurations, which can be attributed to spatial-momentum correlation of a neutron-proton pair inside nucleus, and therefore it gives us a sensitive probe to distinguish the different configurations including α clustering with the help of the photonuclear reaction mechanism.

  3. Hot gas in the cold dark matter scenario: X-ray clusters from a high-resolution numerical simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kang, Hyesung; Cen, Renyue; Ostriker, Jeremiah P.; Ryu, Dongsu

    1994-01-01

    A new, three-dimensional, shock-capturing hydrodynamic code is utilized to determine the distribution of hot gas in a standard cold dark matter (CDM) model of the universe. Periodic boundary conditions are assumed: a box with size 85 h(exp -1) Mpc having cell size 0.31 h(exp -1) Mpc is followed in a simulation with 270(exp 3) = 10(exp 7.3) cells. Adopting standard parameters determined from COBE and light-element nucleosynthesis, sigma(sub 8) = 1.05, omega(sub b) = 0.06, and assuming h = 0.5, we find the X-ray-emitting clusters and compute the luminosity function at several wavelengths, the temperature distribution, and estimated sizes, as well as the evolution of these quantities with redshift. We find that most of the total X-ray emissivity in our box originates in a relatively small number of identifiable clusters which occupy approximately 10(exp -3) of the box volume. This standard CDM model, normalized to COBE, produces approximately 5 times too much emission from clusters having L(sub x) is greater than 10(exp 43) ergs/s, a not-unexpected result. If all other parameters were unchanged, we would expect adequate agreement for sigma(sub 8) = 0.6. This provides a new and independent argument for lower small-scale power than standard CDM at the 8 h(exp -1) Mpc scale. The background radiation field at 1 keV due to clusters in this model is approximately one-third of the observed background, which, after correction for numerical effects, again indicates approximately 5 times too much emission and the appropriateness of sigma(sub 8) = 0.6. If we have used the observed ratio of gas to total mass in clusters, rather than basing the mean density on light-element nucleosynthesis, then the computed luminosity of each cluster would have increased still further, by a factor of approximately 10. The number density of clusters increases to z approximately 1, but the luminosity per typical cluster decreases, with the result that evolution in the number density of bright

  4. Hot gas in the cold dark matter scenario: X-ray clusters from a high-resolution numerical simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Hyesung; Cen, Renyue; Ostriker, Jeremiah P.; Ryu, Dongsu

    1994-06-01

    A new, three-dimensional, shock-capturing hydrodynamic code is utilized to determine the distribution of hot gas in a standard cold dark matter (CDM) model of the universe. Periodic boundary conditions are assumed: a box with size 85 h-1 Mpc having cell size 0.31 h-1 Mpc is followed in a simulation with 2703 = 107.3 cells. Adopting standard parameters determined from COBE and light-element nucleosynthesis, sigma8 = 1.05, omegab = 0.06, and assuming h = 0.5, we find the X-ray-emitting clusters and compute the luminosity function at several wavelengths, the temperature distribution, and estimated sizes, as well as the evolution of these quantities with redshift. We find that most of the total X-ray emissivity in our box originates in a relatively small number of identifiable clusters which occupy approximately 10-3 of the box volume. This standard CDM model, normalized to COBE, produces approximately 5 times too much emission from clusters having Lx is greater than 1043 ergs/s, a not-unexpected result. If all other parameters were unchanged, we would expect adequate agreement for sigma8 = 0.6. This provides a new and independent argument for lower small-scale power than standard CDM at the 8 h-1 Mpc scale. The background radiation field at 1 keV due to clusters in this model is approximately one-third of the observed background, which, after correction for numerical effects, again indicates approximately 5 times too much emission and the appropriateness of sigma8 = 0.6. If we have used the observed ratio of gas to total mass in clusters, rather than basing the mean density on light-element nucleosynthesis, then the computed luminosity of each cluster would have increased still further, by a factor of approximately 10. The number density of clusters increases to z approximately 1, but the luminosity per typical cluster decreases, with the result that evolution in the number density of bright clusters is moderate in this redshift range, showing a broad peak near z = 0

  5. Theoretical study of the reactions of 2-chlorophenol over the dehydrated and hydroxylated silica clusters.

    PubMed

    Pan, Wenxiao; Zhong, Wenhui; Zhang, Dongju; Liu, Chengbu

    2012-01-12

    Silica is the main component of combustion-generated fly ash and is expected to have an important impact on the formation of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs) and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs) in municipal waste incinerators. In this work, we theoretically studied the reactions of 2-chlorinated phenol (2-CP) over the clusters (SiO(2))(3) and (SiO(2))(3)O(2)H(4), which mimic the dehydrated and hydroxylated silica structures, respectively. The dehydrated cluster is much more active toward the attack of 2-CP to form highly stable 2-chlorophenolate than the hydroxylated silica cluster. The further dissociation of chlorophenolates to form CP radicals (CPRs) is calculated to be very difficult. The calculated energy barrier of the reaction of 2-CP over the dehydrated (SiO(2))(3) cluster and IR data are in good agreement with early experimental observations. On the basis of the calculated results, we propose that the formation of PCDD/Fs from CPs over silica surfaces may not involve CPRs, but be relevant to the further conversion of chlorophenolates over silica surfaces. This mechanism is very different from the corresponding reactions mediated by transition metal oxides. The results presented here may be helpful to understand the chemisorption mechanism of CPs on silica surfaces in real waste combustion.

  6. Structural requirements and reaction pathways in dimethyl ether combustion catalyzed by supported Pt clusters.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Akio; Neurock, Matthew; Iglesia, Enrique

    2007-10-31

    The identity and reversibility of the elementary steps required for catalytic combustion of dimethyl ether (DME) on Pt clusters were determined by combining isotopic and kinetic analyses with density functional theory estimates of reaction energies and activation barriers to probe the lowest energy paths. Reaction rates are limited by C-H bond activation in DME molecules adsorbed on surfaces of Pt clusters containing chemisorbed oxygen atoms at near-saturation coverages. Reaction energies and activation barriers for C-H bond activation in DME to form methoxymethyl and hydroxyl surface intermediates show that this step is more favorable than the activation of C-O bonds to form two methoxides, consistent with measured rates and kinetic isotope effects. This kinetic preference is driven by the greater stability of the CH3OCH2* and OH* intermediates relative to chemisorbed methoxides. Experimental activation barriers on Pt clusters agree with density functional theory (DFT)-derived barriers on oxygen-covered Pt(111). Measured DME turnover rates increased with increasing DME pressure, but decreased as the O2 pressure increased, because vacancies (*) on Pt surfaces nearly saturated with chemisorbed oxygen are required for DME chemisorption. DFT calculations show that although these surface vacancies are required, higher oxygen coverages lead to lower C-H activation barriers, because the basicity of oxygen adatoms increases with coverage and they become more effective in hydrogen abstraction from DME. Water inhibits reaction rates via quasi-equilibrated adsorption on vacancy sites, consistent with DFT results indicating that water binds more strongly than DME on vacancies. These conclusions are consistent with the measured kinetic response of combustion rates to DME, O2, and H2O, with H/D kinetic isotope effects, and with the absence of isotopic scrambling in reactants containing isotopic mixtures of 18O2-16O2 or 12CH3O12CH3-13CH3O13CH3. Turnover rates increased with Pt

  7. Structural Requirements and Reaction Pathways in Dimethyl Ether Combustion Catalyzed by Supported Pt Clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Ishikawa, Akio; Neurock, Matthew; Iglesia, Enrique

    2007-10-31

    The research described in this product was performed in part in the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, a national scientific user facility sponsored by the Department of Energy's Office of Biological and Environmental Research and located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The identity and reversibility of the elementary steps required for catalytic combustion of dimethyl ether (DME) on Pt clusters were determined by combining isotopic and kinetic analyses with density functional theory estimates of reaction energies and activation barriers to probe the lowest energy paths. Reaction rates are limited by C-H bond activation in DME molecules adsorbed on surfaces of Pt clusters containing chemisorbed oxygen atoms at near-saturation coverages. Reaction energies and activation barriers for C-H bond activation in DME to form methoxymethyl and hydroxyl surface intermediates show that this step is more favorable than the activation of C-O bonds to form two methoxides, consistent with measured rates and kinetic isotope effects. This kinetic preference is driven by the greater stability of the CH3OCH2* and OH* intermediates relative to chemisorbed methoxides. Experimental activation barriers on Pt clusters agree with density functional theory (DFT)-derived barriers on oxygen-covered Pt(111). Measured DME turnover rates increased with increasing DME pressure, but decreased as the O2 pressure increased, because vacancies (*) on Pt surfaces nearly saturated with chemisorbed oxygen are required for DME chemisorption. DFT calculations show that although these surface vacancies are required, higher oxygen coverages lead to lower C-H activation barriers, because the basicity of oxygen adatoms increases with coverage and they become more effective in hydrogen abstraction from DME. Water inhibits reaction rates via quasi-equilibrated adsorption on vacancy sites, consistent with DFT results indicating that water binds more strongly than DME on vacancies. These

  8. Cluster chemical reactions at mineral–liquid interface in metal leaching by photo-electroactive water-and-gas emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekisov, AG

    2017-02-01

    Possibility of cluster (inter-cluster) reactions at the interface of mineral and liquid phases in leaching of metals mainly in dispersed cluster form by photo-electrically activated water-and-gas emulsions is theoretically evaluated. The governing role of active clusters of water and clustered hydrate envelopes generated under dissolution of active oxygen forms is determined. The scope of the study covers possible processes of transformation of clustered gold in mineral substance under direct interaction with the components of the active water-and-gas emulsions.

  9. Specific and nonspecific reactions of mouse immune system under the effect of short-term exposure in warm and/or cold water.

    PubMed

    Kalenova, L F; Sukhovei, Yu G; Fisher, T A

    2005-12-01

    Transient changes in environmental temperature produce a short-term, but significant effect on the immune system reactions in laboratory mice. Activities of nonspecific resistance factors (peritoneal macrophages) in mice exposed in warm or cold water were characterized by similar reactions, while the reactions of cellular and humoral immunity were opposite. Exposure to cold water activated cellular immunity, while warm water activated humoral immune system. The most significant changes in the immune system reactions were observed during the first 3 days of thermal exposure. Temperature alteration from cold to warm leads to activation of cellular and suppression of humoral components of the immune system. Alteration of water temperature from warm to cold leads to activation of nonspecific resistance factors, cellular and humoral immunity.

  10. The environmental history of group and cluster galaxies in a Λ cold dark matter universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Lucia, Gabriella; Weinmann, Simone; Poggianti, Bianca M.; Aragón-Salamanca, Alfonso; Zaritsky, Dennis

    2012-06-01

    We use publicly available galaxy merger trees, obtained applying semi-analytic techniques to a large high-resolution cosmological simulation, to study the environmental history of group and cluster galaxies. Our results highlight the existence of an intrinsic history bias which makes the nature versus nurture (as well as the mass versus environment) debate inherently ill posed. In particular, we show that (i) surviving massive satellites were accreted later than their less massive counterparts, from more massive haloes and (ii) the mixing of galaxy populations is incomplete during halo assembly, which creates a correlation between the time a galaxy becomes satellite and its present distance from the parent halo centre. The weakest trends are found for the most massive satellites, as a result of efficient dynamical friction and late formation times of massive haloes. A large fraction of the most massive group/cluster members are accreted on to the main progenitor of the final halo as central galaxies, while about half of the galaxies with low and intermediate stellar masses are accreted as satellites. Large fractions of group and cluster galaxies (in particular those of low stellar mass) have therefore been ‘pre-processed’ as satellites of groups with mass ˜1013 M⊙. To quantify the relevance of hierarchical structure growth on the observed environmental trends, we have considered observational estimates of the passive galaxy fractions and their variation as a function of halo mass and clustercentric distance. Comparisons with our theoretical predictions require relatively long times (˜5-7 Gyr) for the suppression of star formation in group and cluster satellites. It is unclear how such a gentle mode of strangulation can be achieved by simply relaxing the assumption of instantaneous stripping of the hot gas reservoir associated with accreting galaxies, or if the difficulties encountered by recent galaxy formation models in reproducing the observed trends

  11. Kinetics of Cold-Cap Reactions for Vitrification of Nuclear Waste Glass Based on Simultaneous Differential Scanning Calorimetry - Thermogravimetry (DSC-TGA) and Evolved Gas Analysis (EGA)

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, Carmen P.; Pierce, David A.; Schweiger, Michael J.; Kruger, Albert A.; Chun, Jaehun; Hrma, Pavel R.

    2013-12-03

    For vitrifying nuclear waste glass, the feed, a mixture of waste with glass-forming and modifying additives, is charged onto the cold cap that covers 90-100% of the melt surface. The cold cap consists of a layer of reacting molten glass floating on the surface of the melt in an all-electric, continuous glass melter. As the feed moves through the cold cap, it undergoes chemical reactions and phase transitions through which it is converted to molten glass that moves from the cold cap into the melt pool. The process involves a series of reactions that generate multiple gases and subsequent mass loss and foaming significantly influence the mass and heat transfers. The rate of glass melting, which is greatly influenced by mass and heat transfers, affects the vitrification process and the efficiency of the immobilization of nuclear waste. We studied the cold-cap reactions of a representative waste glass feed using both the simultaneous differential scanning calorimetry thermogravimetry (DSC-TGA) and the thermogravimetry coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometer (TGA-GC-MS) as complementary tools to perform evolved gas analysis (EGA). Analyses from DSC-TGA and EGA on the cold-cap reactions provide a key element for the development of an advanced cold-cap model. It also helps to formulate melter feeds for higher production rate.

  12. Nuclear reaction rate uncertainties and the 22Ne( p,gamma)23Na reaction: Classical novae and globular clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, Keegan John

    The overall theme of this thesis is the advancement of nuclear astrophysics via the analysis of stellar processes in the presence of varying levels of precision in the available nuclear data. With regard to classical novae, the level of mixing that occurs between the outer layers of the white dwarf core and the solar accreted material in oxygen-neon novae is presently undetermined by stellar models, but the nuclear data relevant to these explosive phenomena are fairly precise. This precision allowed for the identification of a series of elemental ratios indicative of the level of mixing occurring in novae. Direct comparisons of the modelled elemental ratios to observations showed that there is likely to be much less of this mixing than was previously assumed. Thus, our understanding of classical novae was altered via the investigation of the nuclear reactions relevant to this phenomenon. However, this level of experimental precision is rare and large nuclear reaction uncertainties can hinder our understanding of certain astrophysical phenomena. For example, it is commonly believed that uncertainties in the 22Ne(p,g)23Na reaction rate at temperatures relevant to thermally-pulsing asymptotic giant branch stars are largely responsible for our inability to explain the observed sodium-oxygen anti-correlation in globular clusters. With this motivation, resonances in the 22Ne(p,g) 23Na reaction at E_{c.m.} = 458, 417, 178, and 151 keV were measured. The direct-capture contribution was also measured at E_{lab} = 425 keV. It was determined that the 22Ne(p,g)23Na reaction rate in the astrophysically relevant temperature range is dominated by the resonances at 178 and 151 keV and that the total reaction rate is greater than the previously assumed rate by a factor of approximately ˜40 at 0.15 GK. This increased reaction rate impacts the expected nucleosynthesis that occurs in these stars and will shed light onto the origin of this anti-correlation as it is incorporated into

  13. Diffusion and Interface Reaction of Cu/Si (100) Films Prepared by Cluster Beam Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xing-Xin; Jia, Yan-Hui; Li, Gong-Ping; Cho, Seong-Jin; Kim, Hee

    2011-03-01

    Cu thin films are deposited on Si (100) substrates by neutral cluster beams and ionized cluster beams. The atomic diffusion and interface reaction between the Cu films and the Si substrates of as-deposited and annealed at different temperatures (230°C, 450°C, 500°C and 600°C) are investigated by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) and x-ray diffraction (XRD). Some significant results are obtained on the following aspects: (1) For the Cu/Si(100) samples prepared by neutral cluster beams and ionized cluster beams at Va = 0kV, atomic diffusion phenomena are observed clearly in the as-deposited samples. With the increase of annealing temperature, the interdiffusion becomes more apparent. However, the diffusion intensities of the RBS spectra of the Cu/Si(100) films using neutral cluster beams are always higher than that of the Cu/Si(100) films using ionized cluster beams at Va=0kV in the as-deposited and samples annealed at the same temperature. The compound of Cu3Si is observed in the as-deposited samples. (2) For the Cu/Si(100) samples prepared by ionized cluster beams at Va=1, 3, 5kV, atomic diffusion phenomena are observed in the as-deposited samples at Va=1, 5kV. For the samples prepared at Va = 3kV, the interdiffusion phenomenon is observed until 500°C annealing temperature. The reason for the difference is discussed.

  14. Tombaugh 2: the first open cluster with a significant abundance spread or embedded in a cold stellar stream?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frinchaboy, P. M.; Marino, A. F.; Villanova, S.; Carraro, G.; Majewski, S. R.; Geisler, D.

    2008-11-01

    dispersions. However, we explore other possible explanations for the observed spread in abundances and two possible subpopulations, with the most likely explanation being that the metal poor ([Fe/H] = -0.28), more centrally concentrated population being the true To2 clusters stars and the metal-rich ([Fe/H] = -0.06) population being an overlapping, and kinematically associated, but `cold' (σV < 2kms-1) stellar stream at Rgc >= 15kpc. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory (ESO), Chile; Proposal 076.B-0263. E-mail: pmf@astro.wisc.edu (PMF); anna.marino@unipd.it (AFM); sandro.villanova@unipd.it (SV); gcarraro@eso.org (GC); srm4n@virginia.edu (SRM); dgeisler@astro-udec.cl (DG) ‡ National Science Foundation Astronomy & Astrophysics Postdoctoral Fellow. § Any opinions, findings and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.

  15. Monitoring the dissolution process of metals in the gas phase: reactions of nanoscale Al and Ga metal atom clusters and their relationship to similar metalloid clusters.

    PubMed

    Burgert, Ralf; Schnöckel, Hansgeorg

    2008-05-14

    Formation and dissolution of metals are two of the oldest technical chemical processes. On the atomic scale, these processes are based on the formation and cleavage of metal-metal bonds. During the past 15 years we have studied intensively the intermediates during the formation process of metals, i.e. the formation of compounds containing many metal-metal bonds between naked metal atoms in the center and ligand-bearing metal atoms at the surface. We have called the clusters metalloid or, more generally, elementoid clusters. Via a retrosynthetic route, the many different Al and Ga metalloid clusters which have been structurally characterized allow us to understand also the dissolution process; i.e. the cleavage of metal-metal (M-M) bonds. However, this process can be detected much more directly by the reaction of single metal atom clusters in the gas phase under high vacuum conditions. A suitable tool to monitor the dissolution process of a metal cluster in the gas phase is FT-ICR (Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance) mass spectrometry. Snapshots during these cleavage processes are possible because only every 1-10 s is there a contact between a cluster molecule and an oxidizing molecule (e.g. Cl2). This period is long, i.e. the formation of the primary product (a smaller metal atom cluster) is finished before the next collision happens. We have studied three different types of reaction:(1) Step-by-step fragmentation of a structurally known metalloid cluster allows us to understand the bonding principle of these clusters because in every step only the weakest bond is broken.(2) There are three oxidation reactions of an Al13(-) cluster molecule with Cl2, HCl and O2 central to this review. These three reactions represent three different reaction types, (a) an exothermic reaction (Cl2), (b) an endothermic reaction (HCl), and (c) a kinetically limited reaction based on spin conservation rules (O2).(3) Finally, we present the reaction of a metalloid cluster with Cl2

  16. The Herschel Virgo Cluster Survey. X. The relationship between cold dust and molecular gas content in Virgo spirals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbelli, E.; Bianchi, S.; Cortese, L.; Giovanardi, C.; Magrini, L.; Pappalardo, C.; Boselli, A.; Bendo, G. J.; Davies, J.; Grossi, M.; Madden, S. C.; Smith, M. W. L.; Vlahakis, C.; Auld, R.; Baes, M.; De Looze, I.; Fritz, J.; Pohlen, M.; Verstappen, J.

    2012-06-01

    Aims: We examine whether dust mass can trace the total or molecular gas mass in late-type Virgo cluster galaxies, and how the environment affects the dust-to-gas ratio and the molecular fraction. Methods: Using the far-infrared emission, as observed by the Herschel Virgo Cluster Survey (HeViCS), and the integrated HI 21-cm and CO J = 1-0 line brightness, we infer the dust and total gas mass for a magnitude limited sample of 35 metal rich spiral galaxies. Environmental disturbances on each galaxy are considered by means of the HI deficiency parameter. Results: The CO flux correlates tightly and linearly with far-infrared fluxes observed by Herschel, especially with the emission at 160, 250 and 350 μm. Molecules in these galaxies are more closely related to cold dust rather than to dust heated by star formation or to optical/NIR brightness. We show that dust mass establishes a stronger correlation with the total gas mass than with the atomic or molecular component alone. The correlation is non-linear since lower mass galaxies have a lower dust-to-gas ratio. The dust-to-gas ratio increases as the HI deficiency increases, but in highly HI deficient galaxies it stays constant. Dust is in fact less affected than atomic gas by weak cluster interactions, which remove most of the HI gas from outer and high latitudes regions. Highly disturbed galaxies, in a dense cluster environment, can instead loose a considerable fraction of gas and dust from the inner regions of the disk keeping constant the dust-to-gas ratio. There is evidence that the molecular phase is also quenched. This quencing becomes evident by considering the molecular gas mass per unit stellar mass. Its amplitude, if confirmed by future studies, highlights that molecules are missing in Virgo HI deficient spirals, but to a somewhat lesser extent than dust. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from

  17. Magnetophoretic potential at the movement of cluster products of electrochemical reactions in an inhomogeneous magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Gorobets, O. Yu. Gorobets, Yu. I.; Rospotniuk, V. P.

    2015-08-21

    An electric field arises from the influence of a nonuniform static magnetic field on charged colloid particles with magnetic susceptibility different from that of the surrounding liquid. It arises, for example, under the influence of a nonuniform static magnetic field in clusters of electrochemical reaction products created during metal etching, deposition, and corrosion processes without an external electric current passing through an electrolyte near a magnetized electrode surface. The corresponding potential consists of a Nernst potential of inhomogeneous distribution of concentration of colloid particles and a magnetophoretic potential (MPP). This potential has been calculated using a thermodynamic approach based on the equations of thermodynamics of nonequilibrium systems and the Onsager relations for a mass flow of correlated magnetic clusters under a gradient magnetic force in the electrolyte. The conditions under which the MPP contribution to the total electric potential may be significant are discussed with a reference to the example of a corroding spherical ferromagnetic steel electrode.

  18. Heterogeneous reaction probabilities, solubilities, and the physical state of cold volcanic aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toon, O.; Browell, E.; Gary, B.; Lait, L.; Livingston, J.; Newman, P.; Pueschel, R.; Russell, P.; Schoeberl, M.; Toon, G.

    1993-01-01

    On 19 January 1992, heterogeneous loss of HNO3, ClNO3, and HCl was observed in part of the Mount Pinatubo volcanic cloud that had cooled as a result of forced ascent. Portions of the volcanic cloud froze near 191 kelvin. The reaction probability of ClNO3 and the solubility of HNO3 were close to laboratory measurements on liquid sulfuric acid. The magnitude of the observed loss of HCl suggests that it underwent a heterogeneous reaction. Such reactions could lead to substantial loss of HCl on background sulfuric acid particles and so be important for polar ozone loss.

  19. How much can we learn from a merging cold front cluster? Insights from X-ray temperature and radio maps of A3667

    SciTech Connect

    Datta, Abhirup; Schenck, David E.; Burns, Jack O.; Skillman, Samuel W.; Hallman, Eric J.

    2014-10-01

    The galaxy cluster A3667 is an ideal laboratory to study the plasma processes in the intracluster medium. High-resolution Chandra X-ray observations show a cold front in A3667. At radio wavelengths, A3667 reveals a double radio-relic feature in the outskirts of the cluster. These suggest multiple merger events in this cluster. In this paper, we analyze the substantial archival X-ray observations of A3667 from the Chandra X-ray Observatory and compare these with existing radio observations as well as state-of-the-art adaptive mesh refinement MHD cosmological simulations using Enzo. We have used two temperature map making techniques, weighted Voronoi tessellation and adaptive circular binning, to produce the high-resolution and largest field-of-view temperature maps of A3667. These high-fidelity temperature maps allow us to study the X-ray shocks in the cluster using a new two-dimensional shock-finding algorithm. We have also estimated the Mach numbers from the shocks inferred from previous ATCA radio observations. The combined shock statistics from the X-ray and radio data are in agreement with the shock statistics in a simulated MHD cluster. We have also studied the profiles of the thermodynamic properties across the cold front using ∼447 ks from the combined Chandra observations on A3667. Our results show that the stability of the cold front in A3667 can be attributed to the suppression of the thermal conduction across the cold front by a factor of ∼100-700 compared to the classical Spitzer value.

  20. Reactions of silver atoms and clusters in Ag-NaA zeolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waşowicz, Tomasz; Michalik, Jacek

    The agglomeration of silver in hydrated and dehydrated Ag-NaA zeolites gamma irradiated at 77 K has been studied by ESR. The agglomeration process is radiation-induced in hydrated samples whereas in dehydrated ones is initiated by thermal autoreduction. In the result different silver clusters are stabilized at room temperature, Ag 2+3…Ag + becomes stabilized in hydrated zeolites and Ag n+ 6 in dehydrated ones. Silver hexamers have been reacted with various molecular adsorbates. The reaction rate depends on molecular size and nucleophilic character of adsorbate. In the presence of water and small alcohols silver hexamers are transformed to the elongated tetramers.

  1. Is gold actor or spectator in the reaction of small AunPd{m/+} clusters with O2?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Sandra M.; Frank, Anja; Fleischer, Irene; Bernhardt, Thorsten M.

    2013-01-01

    The reactivity of free binary gold-palladium clusters (AuPd2+, Au2Pd+, Au2Pd2+, and Au2Pd3+) toward molecular oxygen was investigated in an ion trap experiment under multi-collision conditions and compared to the reactivities of bare Aun+ and Pdm+ (n, m = 2 - 5) clusters. Reaction kinetics measurements revealed that the reaction rate is mainly determined by the number of palladium atoms in the clusters and only weakly influenced by additional gold atoms. The same holds true for the observed reaction product distributions. Most interestingly, the most reactive cluster ions Pd3+, Au2Pd3+, and Pd5+ exhibit a strong preference to form tetroxide products, AunPdmO4+. In addition, employing temperature dependent mass spectrometry, a second adsorption species consisting of several weakly bound oxygen molecules was identified for all investigated palladium containing clusters which is, however, only formed at cryogenic temperatures. All these observations suggest that the gold atoms largely act upon a spectator role in the reaction of the binary clusters. Nevertheless, a rough estimation of the relative O2 binding energies via statistical rate theory indicates that the addition of gold to the Pdn+ clusters decreases the O2-cluster interaction strength, although the reaction rate stays constant. This effect in the binary clusters may be of importance to a potential activation and dissociation of the adsorbed O2 molecules. ISSPIC 16 - 16th International Symposium on Small Particles and Inorganic Clusters, edited by Kristiaan Temst, Margriet J. Van Bael, Ewald Janssens, H.-G. Boyen and Françoise Remacle.

  2. Platinum single-atom and cluster catalysis of the hydrogen evolution reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Niancai; Stambula, Samantha; Wang, Da; Banis, Mohammad Norouzi; Liu, Jian; Riese, Adam; Xiao, Biwei; Li, Ruying; Sham, Tsun-Kong; Liu, Li-Min; Botton, Gianluigi A.; Sun, Xueliang

    2016-11-01

    Platinum-based catalysts have been considered the most effective electrocatalysts for the hydrogen evolution reaction in water splitting. However, platinum utilization in these electrocatalysts is extremely low, as the active sites are only located on the surface of the catalyst particles. Downsizing catalyst nanoparticles to single atoms is highly desirable to maximize their efficiency by utilizing nearly all platinum atoms. Here we report on a practical synthesis method to produce isolated single platinum atoms and clusters using the atomic layer deposition technique. The single platinum atom catalysts are investigated for the hydrogen evolution reaction, where they exhibit significantly enhanced catalytic activity (up to 37 times) and high stability in comparison with the state-of-the-art commercial platinum/carbon catalysts. The X-ray absorption fine structure and density functional theory analyses indicate that the partially unoccupied density of states of the platinum atoms' 5d orbitals on the nitrogen-doped graphene are responsible for the excellent performance.

  3. Reactions between cold methyl halide molecules and alkali-metal atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Lutz, Jesse J.; Hutson, Jeremy M.

    2014-01-07

    We investigate the potential energy surfaces and activation energies for reactions between methyl halide molecules CH{sub 3}X (X = F, Cl, Br, I) and alkali-metal atoms A (A = Li, Na, K, Rb) using high-level ab initio calculations. We examine the anisotropy of each intermolecular potential energy surface (PES) and the mechanism and energetics of the only available exothermic reaction pathway, CH{sub 3}X + A → CH{sub 3} + AX. The region of the transition state is explored using two-dimensional PES cuts and estimates of the activation energies are inferred. Nearly all combinations of methyl halide and alkali-metal atom have positive barrier heights, indicating that reactions at low temperatures will be slow.

  4. Chiral glycine formation on cold interstellar grains by quantum tunneling hydrogen-deuterium substitution reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oba, Yasuhiro; Watanabe, Naoki; Osamura, Yoshihiro; Kouchi, Akira

    2015-08-01

    We report experimental evidence that chiral glycine (NH2CHDCOOH) is formed by the surface reaction of normal glycine (NH2CH2COOH) solid with deuterium (D) atom at 12 K under the simulative conditions of interstellar molecular clouds. Chiral glycine formation is most likely initiated by the tunneling abstraction reaction of H atom by D atom followed by the addition of D atom to the glycine radical (NH2CHCOOH). Given that chiral glycine can form in such a primordial low-temperature environment, it might source molecular chirality as molecular clouds evolve into planetary systems.

  5. Cluster states and container picture in light nuclei, and triple-alpha reaction rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funaki, Yasuro

    2015-04-01

    The excited states in 12C are investigated by using an extended version of the so- called Tohsaki-Horiuchi-Schuck-Röpke (THSR) wave function, where both the 3α condensate and 8Be + α cluster asymptotic configurations are included. We focus on the structures of the “Hoyle band” states, 2+2, and 4+2 states, which are recently observed above the Hoyle state, and of the 0+3 and 0+4 states, which are also quite recently identified in experiment. We show that the Hoyle band is not simply considered to be the 8Be(0+) + α rotation as suggested by previous cluster model calculations, nor to be a rotation of a rigid-body triangle-shaped object composed of the 3α particles. We also discuss the rate of the triple-alpha radiative capture reaction, applyng the imaginary-time method. Results of the triple-alpha reaction rate are consistent with NACRE rate for both high (≈ 109K) and low (≈ 107 K) temperatures. We show that the rate of the imaginary-time calculation in coupled-channels approach has a large enhancement for low temperatures if we truncate the number of channels.

  6. Accelerated carbonation using municipal solid waste incinerator bottom ash and cold-rolling wastewater: Performance evaluation and reaction kinetics.

    PubMed

    Chang, E-E; Pan, Shu-Yuan; Yang, Liuhanzi; Chen, Yi-Hung; Kim, Hyunook; Chiang, Pen-Chi

    2015-09-01

    Accelerated carbonation of alkaline wastes including municipal solid waste incinerator bottom ash (MSWI-BA) and the cold-rolling wastewater (CRW) was investigated for carbon dioxide (CO2) fixation under different operating conditions, i.e., reaction time, CO2 concentration, liquid-to-solid ratio, particle size, and CO2 flow rate. The MSWI-BA before and after carbonation process were analyzed by the thermogravimetry and differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray diffraction, and scanning electron microscopy equipped with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The MSWI-BA exhibits a high carbonation conversion of 90.7%, corresponding to a CO2 fixation capacity of 102g perkg of ash. Meanwhile, the carbonation kinetics was evaluated by the shrinking core model. In addition, the effect of different operating parameters on carbonation conversion of MSWI-BA was statistically evaluated by response surface methodology (RSM) using experimental data to predict the maximum carbonation conversion. Furthermore, the amount of CO2 reduction and energy consumption for operating the proposed process in refuse incinerator were estimated. Capsule abstract: CO2 fixation process by alkaline wastes including bottom ash and cold-rolling wastewater was developed, which should be a viable method due to high conversion.

  7. Cluster Emission in 13C + 12C and 12C + 12C Reactions at ~ 6 Mev/nucleon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rana, T. K.; Bhattacharya, C.; Kundu, S.; Banerjee, K.; Bhattacharya, S.; Mukherjee, G.; Ghosh, T. K.; Meena, J. K.; Dhara, P.; Biswas, M.; Pai, H.; Mahata, K.; Kumar, Suresh; Ramachandran, K.; Rout, P. C.; Pandit, S. K.; Nanal, V.; Pillay, R. G.

    Cluster state formation viz. the population of unbound 8Be and the Hoyle state of 12C produced in the reactions 12C(77 MeV) + 12C and 13C(75 MeV) + 12C have been studied using resonance particle spectroscopy. It was observed that there is a large difference in the cluster state formation in these two reactions and the yield of neutron rich isotopes of different fragments is more in the 13C + 12C compared to 12C + 12C reactions at 6 MeV/u.

  8. Photoreduction and reoxidation of the three iron-sulfur clusters of reaction centers of green sulfur bacteria.

    PubMed

    Sétif, P; Seo, D; Sakurai, H

    2001-09-01

    Iron-sulfur clusters are the terminal electron acceptors of the photosynthetic reaction centers of green sulfur bacteria and photosystem I. We have studied electron-transfer reactions involving these clusters in the green sulfur bacterium Chlorobium tepidum, using flash-absorption spectroscopic measurements. We show for the first time that three different clusters, named F(X), F(1), and F(2), can be photoreduced at room temperature during a series of consecutive flashes. The rates of electron escape to exogenous acceptors depend strongly upon the number of reduced clusters. When two or three clusters are reduced, the escape is biphasic, with the fastest phase being 12-14-fold faster than the slowest phase, which is similar to that observed after single reduction. This is explained by assuming that escape involves mostly the second reducible cluster. Evidence is thus provided for a functional asymmetry between the two terminal acceptors F(1) and F(2). From multiple-flash experiments, it was possible to derive the intrinsic recombination rates between P840(+) and reduced iron-sulfur clusters: values of 7, 14, and 59 s(-1) were found after one, two and three electron reduction of the clusters, respectively. The implications of our results for the relative redox potentials of the three clusters are discussed.

  9. [Effect of training on treadmill performance, aerobic capacity and body reactions to acute cold exposure].

    PubMed

    Iakushkin, A V; Akimov, E B; Andreev, R S; Kalenov, Iu N; Kozlov, A V; Kuznetsova, O V; Son'kin, V D

    2014-01-01

    An attempt was made to test the hypothesis that regular physical activity at the anaerobic threshold is able to stimulate an increase in the amount of body fat brown or beige, which can manifest itself in increasing lactate utilization during exercise and increase the reactivity in response to acute regional cooling. The methods used are: ramp test, regional acute cold exposure, measurement of gas exchange, lactate and glucose in the blood, heart rate, and heart rate variability, blood pressure and respiration variability at rest and during standard functional tests; infrared thermal imaging, statistical methods of results analysis. Workout 10 physically active volunteers (7 males and 3 females) on a treadmill at a speed corresponding to 75-80% of the persona VO2max for 30 minutes 3 times per week at a fixed ambient temperature 21-22°C for 6 weeks resulted in a significant (from 19 to 39%) increase in test work duration but VO2max on average changed little. The increase in power of anaerobic threshold was associated with a sharp slowdown in the accumulation of lactate in progress of ramp test. Lactate utilization rate during the recovery period, on the contrary, increased. In general, significantly increased work efficiency at a test load. Not revealed noticeable changes in the condition and response to a standard functional tests of autonomic systems, as judged by heart rate variability, blood pressure and respiration variability at rest and during orthostatic tests and imposed breathing rhythm. The functional response of the body to acute cold exposure (1 minute cooling of the feet in ice water) is not changed after a cycle of training--either in terms of metabolism (oxygen consumption, etc.), or the dynamics of the skin temperature in areas of most probable location of brown adipose tissue (BAT). These data do not confirm the previously expressed (2010) hypothesis about the function of BAT as a universal homeostatic instrument in the body. Probably, if under

  10. Waterhammer Modeling for the Ares I Upper Stage Reaction Control System Cold Flow Development Test Article

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Jonathan H.

    2010-01-01

    The Upper Stage Reaction Control System provides three-axis attitude control for the Ares I launch vehicle during active Upper Stage flight. The system design must accommodate rapid thruster firing to maintain the proper launch trajectory and thus allow for the possibility to pulse multiple thrusters simultaneously. Rapid thruster valve closure creates an increase in static pressure, known as waterhammer, which propagates throughout the propellant system at pressures exceeding nominal design values. A series of development tests conducted in the fall of 2009 at Marshall Space Flight Center were performed using a water-flow test article to better understand fluid performance characteristics of the Upper Stage Reaction Control System. A subset of the tests examined waterhammer along with the subsequent pressure and frequency response in the flight-representative system and provided data to anchor numerical models. This thesis presents a comparison of waterhammer test results with numerical model and analytical results. An overview of the flight system, test article, modeling and analysis are also provided.

  11. Study of 10 Be and 16 C cluster structure by means of breakup reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dell'Aquila, D.

    2016-03-01

    The study of cluster structures in nuclei far from stability represents a valid tool to explore the nuclear force in few-body systems. In this paper we discuss a new experimental investigation of the structure of 10Be and 16C nuclei by means of projectile sequential break-up reactions induced on CH2 target at intermediate-energies. Their spectroscopy is obtained via a relative energy analysis of break-up fragments with the CHIMERA multi-detector. From 4He+6He correlations we suggest the presence of a new state at about 13.5MeV in 10Be. The inspection of 6He+10Be break-up channel reveals the existence of a possible high-lying excited state at 20.6MeV in 16C. Finally, new perspectives concerning the improvement of the present results are discussed.

  12. Al13@Pt42 Core-Shell Cluster for Oxygen Reduction Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, B. B.; Zhu, Y. F.; Lang, X. Y.; Wen, Z.; Jiang, Q.

    2014-01-01

    To increase Pt utilization for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in fuel cells, reducing particle sizes of Pt is a valid way. However, poisoning or surface oxidation limits the smallest size of Pt particles at 2.6 nm with a low utility of 20%. Here, using density functional theory calculations, we develop a core-shell Al13@Pt42 cluster as a catalyst for ORR. Benefit from alloying with Al in this cluster, the covalent Pt-Al bonding effectively activates the Pt atoms at the edge sites, enabling its high utility up to 70%. Valuably, the adsorption energy of O is located at the optimal range with 0.0–0.4 eV weaker than Pt(111), while OH-poisoning does not observed. Moreover, ORR comes from O2 dissociation mechanism where the rate-limiting step is located at OH formation from O and H with a barrier of 0.59 eV, comparable with 0.50 eV of OH formation from O and H2O on Pt(111). PMID:24902886

  13. Photo-induced reactions of hemin (DMSO) n clusters (n = 0-3) produced with electrospray ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nonose, S.; Tanaka, H.; Okai, N.; Shibakusa, T.; Fuke, K.

    2002-09-01

    Photo-induced reaction of [Fe(III)-protoporphyrin]^+ (hemin^+) ions solvated with dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) is investigated by using a tandem mass spectrometer with electrospray ionization. We measure the photodissociation yields of mass-selected hemin^+(DMSO)n clusters for n = 0 3 in the energy region of 15 800 28 200 cm^{-1}. The mass spectra of the fragment ions show the β-cleavage of carboxymethyl groups in addition to the evaporation of solvent molecules. Yield of the β-cleavage reaction is found to depend strongly on the excitation energy and the number of solvent molecules. We also examine the metastable decomposition of the clusters following primary mass selection and determine the incremental solvent binding energies and internal energies for the clusters using evaporative ensemble model. From these results, we investigate the reaction mechanism of β-cleavage of hemin^+ ion.

  14. The molecular mechanism of the ligand exchange reaction of an antibody against a glutathione-coated gold cluster.

    PubMed

    Rojas-Cervellera, Víctor; Raich, Lluís; Akola, Jaakko; Rovira, Carme

    2017-03-02

    The labeling of proteins with heavy atom clusters is of paramount importance in biomedical research, but its detailed molecular mechanism remains unknown. Here we uncover it for the particular case of the anti-influenza N9 neuraminidase NC10 antibody against a glutathione-coated gold cluster by means of ab initio QM/MM calculations. We show that the labeling reaction follows an associative double SN2-like reaction mechanism, involving a proton transfer, with low activation barriers only if one of the two distinct peptide/peptidic ligands (the one that occupies the side position) is substituted. Positively charged residues in the vicinity of the incoming thiol result in strong interactions between the antibody and the AuMPC, favoring the ligand exchange reaction for suitable protein mutants. These results pave the way for future investigations aimed at engineering biomolecules to increase their reactivity towards a desired gold atom cluster.

  15. Accelerated carbonation using municipal solid waste incinerator bottom ash and cold-rolling wastewater: Performance evaluation and reaction kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, E-E; Pan, Shu-Yuan; Yang, Liuhanzi; Chen, Yi-Hung; Kim, Hyunook; Chiang, Pen-Chi

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • Carbonation was performed using CO{sub 2}, wastewater and bottom ash in a slurry reactor. • A maximum capture capacity of 102 g CO{sub 2} per kg BA was achieved at mild conditions. • A maximum carbonation conversion of MSWI-BA was predicted to be 95% by RSM. • The CO{sub 2} emission from Bali incinerator could be expected to reduce by 6480 ton/y. • The process energy consumption per ton CO{sub 2} captured was estimated to be 180 kW h. - Abstract: Accelerated carbonation of alkaline wastes including municipal solid waste incinerator bottom ash (MSWI-BA) and the cold-rolling wastewater (CRW) was investigated for carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) fixation under different operating conditions, i.e., reaction time, CO{sub 2} concentration, liquid-to-solid ratio, particle size, and CO{sub 2} flow rate. The MSWI-BA before and after carbonation process were analyzed by the thermogravimetry and differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray diffraction, and scanning electron microscopy equipped with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The MSWI-BA exhibits a high carbonation conversion of 90.7%, corresponding to a CO{sub 2} fixation capacity of 102 g per kg of ash. Meanwhile, the carbonation kinetics was evaluated by the shrinking core model. In addition, the effect of different operating parameters on carbonation conversion of MSWI-BA was statistically evaluated by response surface methodology (RSM) using experimental data to predict the maximum carbonation conversion. Furthermore, the amount of CO{sub 2} reduction and energy consumption for operating the proposed process in refuse incinerator were estimated. Capsule abstract: CO{sub 2} fixation process by alkaline wastes including bottom ash and cold-rolling wastewater was developed, which should be a viable method due to high conversion.

  16. Sensing Size through Clustering in Non-Equilibrium Membranes and the Control of Membrane-Bound Enzymatic Reactions.

    PubMed

    Vagne, Quentin; Turner, Matthew S; Sens, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    The formation of dynamical clusters of proteins is ubiquitous in cellular membranes and is in part regulated by the recycling of membrane components. We show, using stochastic simulations and analytic modeling, that the out-of-equilibrium cluster size distribution of membrane components undergoing continuous recycling is strongly influenced by lateral confinement. This result has significant implications for the clustering of plasma membrane proteins whose mobility is hindered by cytoskeletal "corrals" and for protein clustering in cellular organelles of limited size that generically support material fluxes. We show how the confinement size can be sensed through its effect on the size distribution of clusters of membrane heterogeneities and propose that this could be regulated to control the efficiency of membrane-bound reactions. To illustrate this, we study a chain of enzymatic reactions sensitive to membrane protein clustering. The reaction efficiency is found to be a non-monotonic function of the system size, and can be optimal for sizes comparable to those of cellular organelles.

  17. Platinum single-atom and cluster catalysis of the hydrogen evolution reaction

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Niancai; Stambula, Samantha; Wang, Da; Banis, Mohammad Norouzi; Liu, Jian; Riese, Adam; Xiao, Biwei; Li, Ruying; Sham, Tsun-Kong; Liu, Li-Min; Botton, Gianluigi A.; Sun, Xueliang

    2016-01-01

    Platinum-based catalysts have been considered the most effective electrocatalysts for the hydrogen evolution reaction in water splitting. However, platinum utilization in these electrocatalysts is extremely low, as the active sites are only located on the surface of the catalyst particles. Downsizing catalyst nanoparticles to single atoms is highly desirable to maximize their efficiency by utilizing nearly all platinum atoms. Here we report on a practical synthesis method to produce isolated single platinum atoms and clusters using the atomic layer deposition technique. The single platinum atom catalysts are investigated for the hydrogen evolution reaction, where they exhibit significantly enhanced catalytic activity (up to 37 times) and high stability in comparison with the state-of-the-art commercial platinum/carbon catalysts. The X-ray absorption fine structure and density functional theory analyses indicate that the partially unoccupied density of states of the platinum atoms' 5d orbitals on the nitrogen-doped graphene are responsible for the excellent performance. PMID:27901129

  18. The Effects of One-Dimensional Glide On the Reaction Kinetics of Interstitial Clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Heinisch, Howard L.; Singh, B. N.; Golubov, S. I.

    2000-09-01

    Collision cascades in metals produce small interstitial clusters and perfect dislocation loops that glide in thermally activated, one-dimensional (1D) random walks. These gliding defects can change their Burgers vectors by thermal activation or by interactions with other defects. Their migration is therefore ?mixed 1D/3D migration? along a 3D path consisting of 1D segments. The defect reaction kinetics under mixed 1D/3D diffusion are different from both pure 1D diffusion and pure 3D diffusion, both of which can be formulated within analytical rate theory models of microstructure evolution under irradiation. Atomic-scale Kinetic Monte Carlo defect migration simulations are used to investigate the effects of mixed 1D/3D migration on defect reaction kinetics as a guide for implementing mixed 1D/3D migration into the theory. The dependence of sink strength on the size and concentration of sinks under mixed 1D/3D migration lies between those for pure 1D and pure 3D migration and varies with the average distance between direction changes, L. The sink strength for sinks of size R under mixed 1D/3D migration can be approximated by an expression that varies directly as R2 for values of L greater than the sink size. The transition from mixed 1D/3D to pure 3D diffusion as L decreases is demonstrated in the simulations.

  19. Statistical properties of nanosized clusters on a surface in overdamped stochastic reaction-Cattaneo systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharchenko, Vasyl O.; Kharchenko, Dmitrii O.; Dvornichenko, Alina V.

    2014-12-01

    In this work we study an overdamped stochastic reaction-Cattaneo model describing nanosized pattern formation on a surface at monolayer deposition. We study and compare an influence of both primary and secondary mechanisms onto pattern formation processes. The primary mechanisms relate to the rates of chemical reactions and interaction strength of adsorbate; the secondary mechanisms are related to finite atomic disturbance propagation speed and stochastic contribution satisfying fluctuation-dissipation relation. Considering statistical properties of surface structures we discuss transitions between homogeneous phases related to low and high density states. We illustrate that these transitions are accompanied by a formation of adsorbate or vacancy islands. It was found that spherical adsorbate and vacancy islands are characterized by different distribution functions over their sizes for different symmetry of substrate lattice. We have shown that depending on system control parameters island size distributions can change their modality. The size of localized nano-clusters can be controlled by both primary and secondary mechanisms of pattern formation.

  20. Pairwise velocities of dark matter haloes: a test for the Λ cold dark matter model using the bullet cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Robert; Nagamine, Kentaro

    2012-02-01

    The existence of a bullet cluster (such as 1E 0657-56) poses a challenge to the concordance Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM) model. Here we investigate the velocity distribution of dark matter (DM) halo pairs in large N-body simulations with differing box sizes (250 h-1 Mpc? Gpc) and resolutions. We examine various basic statistics such as the halo masses, pairwise halo velocities (v12), collisional angles and pair separation distances. We then compare our results to the initial conditions required to reproduce the observational properties of 1E 0657-56 in non-cosmological hydrodynamical simulations. We find that the high-velocity tail of the v12 distribution extends to greater velocities as we increase the simulation box size. We also find that the number of high v12 pairs increases as we increase the particle count and resolution with a fixed box size; however, this increase is mostly due to lower mass haloes which do not match the observed masses of 1E 0657-56. We find that the redshift evolution effect is not very strong for the v12 distribution function between z= 0.0 and z˜ 0.5. We identify some pairs whose v12 resemble the required initial conditions, however, even the best candidates have either wrong halo mass ratios or too large separations. Our simulations suggest that it is very difficult to produce such initial conditions at z= 0.0, 0.296 and 0.489 in comoving volumes as large as (2 h-1 Gpc)3. Based on the extrapolation of our cumulative v12 function, we find that one needs a simulation with a comoving box size of (4.48 h-1 Gpc)3 and 22403 DM particles in order to produce at least one pair of haloes that resembles the required v12 and observed masses of 1E 0657-56. From our simulated v12 probability distribution function, we find that the probability of finding a halo pair with v12≥ 3000 km s-1 and masses ? to be 2.76 × 10-8 at z= 0.489. We conclude that either 1E 0657-56 is incompatible with the concordance ΛCDM universe or the initial conditions

  1. Mapping cellular Fe-S cluster uptake and exchange reactions - divergent pathways for iron-sulfur cluster delivery to human ferredoxins.

    PubMed

    Fidai, Insiya; Wachnowsky, Christine; Cowan, J A

    2016-12-07

    Ferredoxins are protein mediators of biological electron-transfer reactions and typically contain either [2Fe-2S] or [4Fe-4S] clusters. Two ferredoxin homologues have been identified in the human genome, Fdx1 and Fdx2, that share 43% identity and 69% similarity in protein sequence and both bind [2Fe-2S] clusters. Despite the high similarity, the two ferredoxins play very specific roles in distinct physiological pathways and cannot replace each other in function. Both eukaryotic and prokaryotic ferredoxins and homologues have been reported to receive their Fe-S cluster from scaffold/delivery proteins such as IscU, Isa, glutaredoxins, and Nfu. However, the preferred and physiologically relevant pathway for receiving the [2Fe-2S] cluster by ferredoxins is subject to speculation and is not clearly identified. In this work, we report on in vitro UV-visible (UV-vis) circular dichroism studies of [2Fe-2S] cluster transfer to the ferredoxins from a variety of partners. The results reveal rapid and quantitative transfer to both ferredoxins from several donor proteins (IscU, Isa1, Grx2, and Grx3). Transfer from Isa1 to Fdx2 was also observed to be faster than that of IscU to Fdx2, suggesting that Fdx2 could receive its cluster from Isa1 instead of IscU. Several other transfer combinations were also investigated and the results suggest a complex, but kinetically detailed map for cellular cluster trafficking. This is the first step toward building a network map for all of the possible iron-sulfur cluster transfer pathways in the mitochondria and cytosol, providing insights on the most likely cellular pathways and possible redundancies in these pathways.

  2. NASA Ares I Launch Vehicle Upper Stage Reaction Control System (ReCS) Cold Flow Development Test Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dervan, Melanie; Williams, Hunter; Holt, Kim; Sivak, Amy; Morris, Jon D.

    2010-01-01

    NASA s Ares I launch vehicle, consisting of a five segment solid rocket booster first stage and a liquid bi-propellant J2-X engine Upper Stage, is the vehicle that s been chosen to launch the Orion Crew Module, which will return humans to the Moon, Mars, and beyond. After First Stage booster separation, the Reaction Control System (ReCS), a monopropellant hydrazine system, will provide the Upper Stage element with three degrees of freedom control as needed. This paper provides an overview of the system level development testing that has taken place on the Ares I launch vehicle Upper Stage ReCS. The ReCS System Development Test Article (SDTA) was built as a flight representative water flow test article whose primary test objective was to obtain fluid system performance data to evaluate the integrate system performance characteristics and verify analytical models. Water is the industry standard for cold flow testing of hydrazine systems, because the densities are very close and the speeds of sound are well characterized. The completion of this development level test program was considered necessary to support the ReCS Critical Design Review. This paper will address the design approach taken in building the test article, the objectives of the test program, types of testing completed, general results, the ability of the program to meet the test objectives, and lessons learned

  3. The Effects of One-Dimensional Glide on the Reaction Kinetics of Interstitial Clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Heinisch, Howard L.; Singh, B. N.; Golubov, S. I.

    2000-12-01

    Collision cascades in metals produce small interstitial clusters and perfect dislocation loops that glide in thermally activated one-dimensional (1D) random walks. These gliding defects can change their Burgers vectors by thermal activation or by interactions with other defects. Their migration is therefore "mixed 1D/3D migration" along a 3D path consisting of 1D segments. The defect reaction kinetics under mixed 1D/3D diffusion are different from pure 1D diffusion and pure 3D diffusion, both of which can be formulated within analytical rate theory models of microstructure evolution under irradiation. Atomic-scale kinetic Monte Carlo (kMC) defect migration simulations are used to investigate the effects of mixed 1D/3D migration on defect reaction kinetics as a guide for implementing mixed 1D/3D migration into the analytical rate theory. The functional dependence of the sink strength on the sixe and concentration of sinks under mixed 1D/3D migration is shown to lie between that for pure 1D and pure 3D migration and varies with L, the average distance between direction changes of the gliding defects. It is shown that the sink strength in simulations for spherical sinks of radius R under mixed 1D/3D migration for values of L greater than R can be approximated by an expression that varies directly as R2. For small L, the form of the transition from mixed 1D/3D to pure 3D diffusion as L decreases is demonstrated in the simulations, the results of which can be used in the future development of an analytical expression describing this transition region.

  4. Local traps as nanoscale reaction-diffusion probes: B clustering in c-Si

    SciTech Connect

    Pawlak, B. J.; Cowern, N. E. B.; Ahn, C.; Vandervorst, W.; Gwilliam, R.; Berkum, J. G. M. van

    2014-12-01

    A series of B implantation experiments into initially amorphized and not fully recrystallized Si, i.e., into an existing a/c-Si bi-layer material, have been conducted. We varied B dose, energy, and temperature during implantation process itself. Significant B migration has been observed within c-Si part near the a/c-interface and near the end-of-range region before any activation annealing. We propose a general concept of local trapping sites as experimental probes of nanoscale reaction-diffusion processes. Here, the a/c-Si interface acts as a trap, and the process itself is explored as the migration and clustering of mobile BI point defects in nearby c-Si during implantation at temperatures from 77 to 573 K. We find that at room temperature—even at B concentrations as high as 1.6 atomic %, the key B-B pairing step requires diffusion lengths of several nm owing to a small, ∼0.1 eV, pairing energy barrier. Thus, in nanostructures doped by ion implantation, the implant distribution can be strongly influenced by thermal migration to nearby impurities, defects, and interfaces.

  5. Oxygen reduction reaction on Cu-doped Ag cluster for fuel-cell cathode.

    PubMed

    Ma, Wenqiang; Chen, Fuyi; Zhang, Nan; Wu, Xiaoqiang

    2014-10-01

    The development of fuel cells as clean-energy technologies is largely limited by the prohibitive cost of the noble-metal catalysts needed for catalyzing the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in fuel cells. A fundamental understanding of catalyst design principle that links material structures to the catalytic activity can accelerate the search for highly active and abundant bimetallic catalysts to replace platinum. Here, we present a first-principles study of ORR on Ag12Cu cluster in alkaline environment. The adsorptions of O2, OOH, and OH on Cu-doped Ag13 are stronger than on Ag13. The d-band centers of adsorption sites show the Cu-doping makes d-electrons transferred to higher energy state, and improves O2 dissociation. ORR processes on Ag12Cu and Ag13 indicate Cu-doping can strongly promote ORR, and ORR process can be better preformed on Ag12Cu than on Ag13. For four-electron transfer, the effective reversible potential is 0.401 V/RHE on Ag12Cu in alkaline medium.

  6. Local traps as nanoscale reaction-diffusion probes: B clustering in c-Si

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawlak, B. J.; Cowern, N. E. B.; Ahn, C.; Vandervorst, W.; Gwilliam, R.; van Berkum, J. G. M.

    2014-12-01

    A series of B implantation experiments into initially amorphized and not fully recrystallized Si, i.e., into an existing a/c-Si bi-layer material, have been conducted. We varied B dose, energy, and temperature during implantation process itself. Significant B migration has been observed within c-Si part near the a/c-interface and near the end-of-range region before any activation annealing. We propose a general concept of local trapping sites as experimental probes of nanoscale reaction-diffusion processes. Here, the a/c-Si interface acts as a trap, and the process itself is explored as the migration and clustering of mobile BI point defects in nearby c-Si during implantation at temperatures from 77 to 573 K. We find that at room temperature—even at B concentrations as high as 1.6 atomic %, the key B-B pairing step requires diffusion lengths of several nm owing to a small, ˜0.1 eV, pairing energy barrier. Thus, in nanostructures doped by ion implantation, the implant distribution can be strongly influenced by thermal migration to nearby impurities, defects, and interfaces.

  7. [Thyroid reactions in Wistar rats during the circadian rhythm after ganglionectomy at normal temperature and under cold exposure with regard to the influence of the epiphysis cerebri].

    PubMed

    Peschke, E; Peshke, D; Peil, J; Rúzsás, C; Mess, B

    1986-01-01

    Serum thyroxin (T4), serum TSH, and pituitary TSH were measured by radioimmunoassay (RIA) and serum cholesterol by Liebermann-Burchard reaction in rats 4 times a day (light-dark cycle: 14 L: 10 D) after gangliectomy (bilateral extirpation of the Ganglia cervicalia superiora) at cold and normal temperature conditions. 80 male Wistar rats were divided into 4 groups: sham-operated group, 24 degrees C (297 K); sham-operated group, 10 degrees C (283 K); gangliectomy, 24 degrees C (297 K), and gangliectomy, 10 degrees C (283 K). We have sacrificed the rats 30 d after operations at the following day-times: middle light, middle darkness, 1 h after light "on" and 1 h after light "off" (they were exposed to cold 72 h before killing). It was found that gangliectomy significantly depressed blood level of thyroxin. On the other hand, it enhanced the serum cholesterol and TSH levels as well as the pituitary TSH content. Exposure to cold increased thyroxin, serum TSH and pituitary TSH. The cholesterol level, however, was significantly decreased. Gangliectomy causes a reduction of the cold-induced stimulation of thyroxin (significant), serum TSH, and pituitary TSH content (significant). The cholesterol (in relation to the cold-exposure alone) was significantly increased under these conditions. We have found similar results in another long-time experiment (90 d exposure) after gangliectomy as well as after pinealectomy. There also appears a lowered thyroxin and an increased cholesterol level (in dependency on the seasons). Gangliectomy induced a decrease of the pineal weight and a compensatory thyroid growth. Exposure to cold induced an increase of pituitary and pineal weights. Gangliectomy provokes a reduction of the cold-induced augmentation of the pineal weight. The results indicate that gangliectomy diminishes the total levels of circulating T4 in the presence of an intact pineal gland and reduces the cold-induced increase of T4 in long-time experiments (30 and 90 d post

  8. Mechanism for the stabilization of protein clusters above the solubility curve: the role of non-ideal chemical reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutsko, J. F.

    2016-06-01

    Dense protein clusters are known to play an important role in nucleation of protein crystals from dilute solutions. While these have generally been thought to be formed from a metastable phase, the observation of similar, if not identical, clusters above the critical point for the dilute-solution/strong-solution phase transition has thrown this into doubt. Furthermore, the observed clusters are stable for relatively long times. Because protein aggregation plays a central role in some pathologies, understanding the nature of such clusters is an important problem. One mechanism for the stabilization of such structures was proposed by Pan, Vekilov and Lubchenko and was investigated using a dynamical density functional theory model which confirmed the viability of the model. Here, we revisit that model and incorporate additional physics in the form of state-dependent reaction rates. We show by a combination of numerical results and general arguments that the state-dependent rates disrupt the stability mechanism. Finally, we argue that the state-dependent reactions correct unphysical aspects of the model with ideal (state-independent) reactions and that this necessarily leads to the failure of the proposed mechanism.

  9. Assessment of Density Functional Theory in Predicting Structures and Free Energies of Reaction of Atmospheric Prenucleation Clusters.

    PubMed

    Elm, Jonas; Bilde, Merete; Mikkelsen, Kurt V

    2012-06-12

    This work assesses different computational strategies for predicting structures and Gibb's free energies of reaction of atmospheric prenucleation clusters. The performance of 22 Density Functional Theory functionals in predicting equilibrium structures of molecules and water prenucleation clusters of atmospheric relevance is evaluated against experimental data using a test set of eight molecules and prenucleation clusters: SO2, H2SO4, CO2·H2O, CS2·H2O, OCS·H2O, SO2·H2O, SO3·H2O, and H2SO4·H2O. Furthermore, the functionals are tested and compared for their ability to predict the free energy of reaction for the formation of five benchmark atmospheric prenucleation clusters: H2SO4·H2O, H2SO4·(H2O)2, H2SO4·NH3, HSO4(-)·H2O, and HSO4(-)·(H2O)2. The performance is evaluated against experimental data, coupled cluster, and complete basis set extrapolation procedure methods. Our investigation shows that the utilization of the M06-2X functional with the 6-311++G(3df,3pd) basis set represents an improved approach compared to the conventionally used PW91 functional, yielding mean absolute errors of 0.48 kcal/mol and maximum errors of 0.67 kcal/mol compared to experimental results.

  10. Condensed Matter Cluster Reactions in LENR Power Cells for a Radical New Type of Space Power Source

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Xiaoling; Miley, George H.; Hora, Heinz

    2009-03-16

    This paper reviews previous theoretical and experimental study on the possibility of nuclear events in multilayer thin film electrodes (Lipson et al., 2004 and 2005; Miley et al., 2007), including the correlation between excess heat and transmutations (Miley and Shrestha, 2003) and the cluster theory that predicts it. As a result of this added understanding of cluster reactions, a new class of electrodes is under development at the University of Illinois. These electrodes are designed to enhance cluster formation and subsequent reactions. Two approaches are under development. The first employs improved loading-unloading techniques, intending to obtain a higher volumetric density of sites favoring cluster formation. The second is designed to create nanostructures on the electrode where the cluster state is formed by electroless deposition of palladium on nickel micro structures. Power units employing these electrodes should offer unique advantages for space applications. This is a fundamental new nuclear energy source that is environmentally compatible with a minimum of radiation involvement, high specific power, very long lifetime, and scalable from micro power to kilowatts.

  11. Iron-sulfur cluster exchange reactions mediated by the human Nfu protein.

    PubMed

    Wachnowsky, Christine; Fidai, Insiya; Cowan, J A

    2016-10-01

    Human Nfu is an iron-sulfur cluster protein that has recently been implicated in multiple mitochondrial dysfunctional syndrome (MMDS1). The Nfu family of proteins shares a highly homologous domain that contains a conserved active site consisting of a CXXC motif. There is less functional conservation between bacterial and human Nfu proteins, particularly concerning their Iron-sulfur cluster binding and transfer roles. Herein, we characterize the cluster exchange chemistry of human Nfu and its capacity to bind and transfer a [2Fe-2S] cluster. The mechanism of cluster uptake from a physiologically relevant [2Fe-2S](GS)4 cluster complex, and extraction of the Nfu-bound iron-sulfur cluster by glutathione are described. Human holo Nfu shows a dimer-tetramer equilibrium with a protein to cluster ratio of 2:1, reflecting the Nfu-bridging [2Fe-2S] cluster. This cluster can be transferred to apo human ferredoxins at relatively fast rates, demonstrating a direct role for human Nfu in the process of [2Fe-2S] cluster trafficking and delivery.

  12. A Study of the Cold Gas and Stellar Populations of the Antlia Cluster with KAT-7 and WISE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hess, Kelley; Carignan, C.; Jarrett, T.; Goedhart, S.; Passmoor, S. S.; Wilcots, E. M.

    2014-01-01

    We present neutral hydrogen (HI) observations of the Antlia Galaxy Cluster from the Karoo Array Telescope (KAT-7), a MeerKAT/SKA pathfinder array in South Africa, and describe some of the data reduction challenges overcome by the science commissioning team. Antlia is the third most nearby, massive galaxy cluster, yet it is poorly studied because it lies at low Galactic latitude (l=+19'○) in the Southern hemisphere. We combine the KAT-7 HI data with WISE infrared observations to study the gaseous and stellar components of the galaxy population of this dynamically young system. The velocity information from KAT-7 allows us to confirm gas rich cluster members that lack optical spectroscopic redshifts. Antlia is an ideal target for KAT-7 spectral line commissioning because the recessional velocity of cluster members is not confused with Galactic hydrogen, and the telescope resolution is such that we recover the full HI flux of galaxies, while not suffering from source confusion. The WISE observations cut through Galactic extinction to provide a more complete census of cluster member candidates. Blind HI observations have shown that the presence of gas rich objects around the dense environments of clusters and massive groups is an excellent tracer of substructure, highlighting filaments where galaxies are being accreted within the dark matter halo. With two distinct concentrations of galaxies centered on each of two large elliptical galaxies, the cluster is likely still in the process of merging, making it an interesting target for environmentally driven galaxy evolution studies.

  13. Hot versus cold: The dichotomy in spherical accretion of cooling flows onto supermassive black holes in elliptical galaxies, galaxy groups, and clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Fulai; Mathews, William G.

    2014-01-10

    Feedback heating from active galactic nuclei (AGNs) has been commonly invoked to suppress cooling flows predicted in hot gas in elliptical galaxies, galaxy groups, and clusters. Previous studies have focused on if and how AGN feedback heats the gas but have little paid attention to its triggering mechanism. Using spherically symmetric simulations, we investigate how large-scale cooling flows are accreted by central supermassive black holes (SMBHs) in eight well-observed systems and find an interesting dichotomy. In massive clusters, the gas develops a central cooling catastrophe within about the cooling time (typically ∼100-300 Myr), resulting in cold-mode accretion onto SMBHs. However, in our four simulated systems on group and galaxy scales at a low metallicity Z = 0.3 Z {sub ☉}, the gas quickly settles into a long-term state that has a cuspy central temperature profile extending to several tens to about 100 pc. At the more realistic solar metallicity, two groups (with R {sub e} ∼ 4 kpc) still host the long-term, hot-mode accretion. Both accretion modes naturally appear in our idealized calculations where only cooling, gas inflow, and compressional heating are considered. The long-term, hot-mode accretion is maintained by the quickly established closeness between the timescales of these processes, preferably in systems with low gas densities, low gas metallicities, and importantly, compact central galaxies, which result in strong gravitational acceleration and compressional heating at the intermediate radii. Our calculations predict that central cuspy temperature profiles appear more often in smaller systems than galaxy clusters, which instead often host significant cold gas and star formation.

  14. Cluster expansion reactions of group 6 and 8 metallaboranes using transition metal carbonyl compounds of groups 7-9.

    PubMed

    Geetharani, K; Bose, Shubhankar Kumar; Sahoo, Satyanarayan; Varghese, Babu; Mobin, Shaikh M; Ghosh, Sundargopal

    2011-06-20

    The reinvestigation of an early synthesis of heterometallic cubane-type clusters has led to the isolation of a number of new clusters which have been characterized by spectroscopic and crystallographic techniques. The thermolysis of [(Cp*Mo)(2)B(4)H(4)E(2)] (1: E = S; 2: E = Se; Cp* = η(5)-C(5)Me(5)) in presence of [Fe(2)(CO)(9)] yielded cubane-type clusters [(Cp*Mo)(2)(μ(3)-E)(2)B(2)H(μ-H){Fe(CO)(2)}(2)Fe(CO)(3)], 4 and 5 (4: E = S; 5: E = Se) together with fused clusters [(Cp*Mo)(2)B(4)H(4)E(2)Fe(CO)(2)Fe(CO)(3)] (8: E = S; 9: E = Se). In a similar fashion, reaction of [(Cp*RuCO)(2)B(2)H(6)], 3, with [Fe(2)(CO)(9)] yielded [(Cp*Ru)(2)(μ(3)-CO)(2)B(2)H(μ-H){Fe(CO)(2)}(2)Fe(CO)(3)], 6, and an incomplete cubane cluster [(μ(3)-BH)(3)(Cp*Ru)(2){Fe(CO)(3)}(2)], 7. Clusters 4-6 can be described as heterometallic cubane clusters containing a Fe(CO)(3) moiety exo-bonded to the cubane, while 7 has an incomplete cubane [Ru(2)Fe(2)B(3)] core. The geometry of both compounds 8 and 9 consist of a bicapped octahedron [Mo(2)Fe(2)B(3)E] and a trigonal bipyramidal [Mo(2)B(2)E] core, fused through a common three vertex [Mo(2)B] triangular face. In addition, thermolysis of 3 with [Mn(2)(CO)(10)] permits the isolation of arachno-[(Cp*RuCO)(2)B(3)H(7)], 10. Cluster 10 constitutes a diruthenaborane analogue of 8-sep pentaborane(11) and has a structural isomeric relationship to 1,2-[{Cp*Ru}(2)(CO)(2)B(3)H(7)].

  15. X-ray clusters in a cold dark matter + lambda universe: A direct, large-scale, high-resolution, hydrodynamic simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cen, Renyue; Ostriker, Jeremiah P.

    1994-01-01

    A new, three-dimensional, shock-capturing, hydrodynamic code is utilized to determine the distribution of hot gas in a cold dark matter (CDM) + lambda model universe. Periodic boundary conditions are assumed: a box with size 85/h Mpc, having cell size 0.31/h Mpc, is followed in a simulation with 270(exp 3) = 10(exp 7.3) cells. We adopt omega = 0.45, lambda = 0.55, h identically equal to H/100 km/s/Mpc = 0.6, and then, from the cosmic background explorer (COBE) and light element nucleosynthesis, sigma(sub 8) = 0.77, omega(sub b) = 0.043. We identify the X-ray emitting clusters in the simulation box, compute the luminosity function at several wavelength bands, the temperature function and estimated sizes, as well as the evolution of these quantities with redshift. This open model succeeds in matching local observations of clusters in contrast to the standard omega = 1, CDM model, which fails. It predicts an order of magnitude decline in the number density of bright (h nu = 2-10 keV) clusters from z = 0 to z = 2 in contrast to a slight increase in the number density for standard omega = 1, CDM model. This COBE-normalized CDM + lambda model produces approximately the same number of X-ray clusters having L(sub x) greater than 10(exp 43) erg/s as observed. The background radiation field at 1 keV due to clusters is approximately the observed background which, after correction for numerical effects, again indicates that the model is consistent with observations.

  16. Cluster Based Reaction Probabilities for Boron with Oxygen, Hydrogen, Water, Nitrogen, Nitrous Oxide, Carbon Dioxide, Carbon Monoxide, Methane, Tetrafluoromethane, and Silane

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-10-28

    measured for reactions of boron cluster ions with the gases in question. We present both total reaction probabilities and also the branching fractions...Water, Nitrogen, Nitrous Oxide, Carbon Dioxide, Carbon Monoxide, Methane, Tetrafluoromethane , and Silane Paul A. Hintz, Stephen A. Ruatta, and Scott...detailed study of boron cluster ion reaction dynamics, we have tried to present our cross section measurements in a form most useful to combustion

  17. Reactions induced in (CF{sub 3}I){sub n} clusters by femtosecond UV laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Apatin, V. M.; Kompanets, V. O.; Lokhman, V. N.; Ogurok, N.-D. D.; Poydashev, D. G.; Ryabov, E. A. Chekalin, S. V.

    2012-10-15

    The excitation and ionization of CF{sub 3}I molecules and their clusters by femtosecond UV laser pulses is studied. It is concluded that the types of excitation of free CF{sub 3}I molecules and their clusters by femtosecond UV laser pulses are different. The composition and kinetic energy of ion products observed upon the ionization of (CF{sub 3}I){sub n} clusters by femtosecond pulses are found to differ considerably from those obtained upon ionization by nanosecond pulses. It is shown that the molecular I{sub 2}{sup +} ion is produced in reactions induced in (CF{sub 3}I){sub n} clusters by UV radiation. Using the pump-probe method, we found the two channels of producing I{sub 2}{sup +} ions with characteristic times {tau}{sub 1} Almost-Equal-To 1 ps and {tau}{sub 2} Almost-Equal-To 7 ps. A model of the reactions under study proposed in the paper is consistent with our experimental results.

  18. [Fuzzy cluster for analysis of the relationship between the structure of cephalosporins and immune cross-reaction].

    PubMed

    Hu, C Q; Jin, S H; Sun, X L; Ren, M D

    1990-09-01

    Six parameters (molecular negentropy, acidic group number, basic group number, proton donor group number, proton acceptor group number, and a ratio of C atomic group number to total atomic group number) for characterizing the structure of an antibody combining site in a R1 chain of cephalosporins were selected. Although 12 parameters characterized the site A and site B in a R1 chain were used in fuzzy cluster, Fischer weighting ratio (Fi) indicated that only 5 parameters, 4 of them characterized the structure of site A, play an important part in the cluster. Therefore it was speculated that the site A was the major combining site in the antigen-antibody interaction. According to the similarity of the R1 chains, cephalosporins could be clustered into 4 groups among which less cross-reaction took place. Using the "relative Hamming distance" of the R1 chains for description of their similarity, we found that the intensity of the cross-reaction assayed by immune tests had a close correlation with the "relative Hamming distance", so the distance was used for prediction of the intensity of the cross-reaction of cephalosporins.

  19. Reactions of simple aromatic heterocycles with niobium cluster ions (n<=30)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfeffer, Britta; Jaberg, Stephanie; Niedner-Schatteburg, Gereon

    2009-11-01

    Prior work on benzene activation by size selected niobium cluster cations and anions of up to 30 atoms is extended systematically through studying aromatic poly- and heterocyclic molecules such as naphthalene, pyridine, thiophene, pyrrole, furan, and benzofuran. Naphthalene is found to act much like benzene when reacting under single collision conditions with individual clusters. The most likely process is carbidization through complete dehydrogenation. Some clusters of particular sizes (most notably n=19) fail to activate both homocyclic molecules. Instead seemingly intact adsorption is observed which proves that activation is kinetically hindered at some point. All of the five studied heterocyclic aromatic molecules react unconditionally and by complete dehydrogenation with cationic niobium clusters, while they only attach to or react with anionic clusters larger than a minimum size of n=19-21. These findings are taken as strong evidence for initial coordination to the metal clusters of the heterocycles through their lone pair orbitals. The paper comprehends the observations in terms of cluster surface structure and reactivity.

  20. The state of the warm and cold gas in the extreme starburst at the core of the Phoenix galaxy cluster (SPT-CLJ2344-4243)

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, Michael; Bautz, Marshall W.; Swinbank, Mark; Edge, Alastair C.; Hogan, Michael T.; Wilner, David J.; Bayliss, Matthew B.; Veilleux, Sylvain; Benson, Bradford A.; Marrone, Daniel P.; McNamara, Brian R.; Wei, Lisa H.

    2014-03-20

    We present new optical integral field spectroscopy (Gemini South) and submillimeter spectroscopy (Submillimeter Array) of the central galaxy in the Phoenix cluster (SPT-CLJ2344-4243). This cluster was previously reported to have a massive starburst (∼800 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}) in the central, brightest cluster galaxy, most likely fueled by the rapidly cooling intracluster medium. These new data reveal a complex emission-line nebula, extending for >30 kpc from the central galaxy, detected at [O II]λλ3726, 3729, [O III]λλ4959, 5007, Hβ, Hγ, Hδ, [Ne III]λ3869, and He II λ4686. The total Hα luminosity, assuming Hα/Hβ = 2.85, is L {sub Hα} = 7.6 ± 0.4 ×10{sup 43} erg s{sup –1}, making this the most luminous emission-line nebula detected in the center of a cool core cluster. Overall, the relative fluxes of the low-ionization lines (e.g., [O II], Hβ) to the UV continuum are consistent with photoionization by young stars. In both the center of the galaxy and in a newly discovered highly ionized plume to the north of the galaxy, the ionization ratios are consistent with both shocks and active galactic nucleus (AGN) photoionization. We speculate that this extended plume may be a galactic wind, driven and partially photoionized by both the starburst and central AGN. Throughout the cluster we measure elevated high-ionization line ratios (e.g., He II/Hβ, [O III]/Hβ), coupled with an overall high-velocity width (FWHM ≳ 500 km s{sup –1}), suggesting that shocks are likely important throughout the interstellar medium of the central galaxy. These shocks are most likely driven by a combination of stellar winds from massive young stars, core-collapse supernovae, and the central AGN. In addition to the warm, ionized gas, we detect a substantial amount of cold, molecular gas via the CO(3-2) transition, coincident in position with the galaxy center. We infer a molecular gas mass of M{sub H{sub 2}} = 2.2 ± 0.6 × 10{sup 10} M {sub ☉}, which implies that

  1. The State of the Warm and Cold Gas in the Extreme Starburst at the Core of the Phoenix Galaxy Cluster (SPT-CLJ2344-4243)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, Michael; Swinbank, Mark; Edge, Alastair C.; Wilner, David J.; Veilleux, Sylvain; Benson, Bradford A.; Hogan, Michael T.; Marrone, Daniel P.; McNamara, Brian R.; Wei, Lisa H.; Bayliss, Matthew B.; Bautz, Marshall W.

    2014-03-01

    We present new optical integral field spectroscopy (Gemini South) and submillimeter spectroscopy (Submillimeter Array) of the central galaxy in the Phoenix cluster (SPT-CLJ2344-4243). This cluster was previously reported to have a massive starburst (~800 M ⊙ yr-1) in the central, brightest cluster galaxy, most likely fueled by the rapidly cooling intracluster medium. These new data reveal a complex emission-line nebula, extending for >30 kpc from the central galaxy, detected at [O II]λλ3726, 3729, [O III]λλ4959, 5007, Hβ, Hγ, Hδ, [Ne III]λ3869, and He II λ4686. The total Hα luminosity, assuming Hα/Hβ = 2.85, is L Hα = 7.6 ± 0.4 ×1043 erg s-1, making this the most luminous emission-line nebula detected in the center of a cool core cluster. Overall, the relative fluxes of the low-ionization lines (e.g., [O II], Hβ) to the UV continuum are consistent with photoionization by young stars. In both the center of the galaxy and in a newly discovered highly ionized plume to the north of the galaxy, the ionization ratios are consistent with both shocks and active galactic nucleus (AGN) photoionization. We speculate that this extended plume may be a galactic wind, driven and partially photoionized by both the starburst and central AGN. Throughout the cluster we measure elevated high-ionization line ratios (e.g., He II/Hβ, [O III]/Hβ), coupled with an overall high-velocity width (FWHM gsim 500 km s-1), suggesting that shocks are likely important throughout the interstellar medium of the central galaxy. These shocks are most likely driven by a combination of stellar winds from massive young stars, core-collapse supernovae, and the central AGN. In addition to the warm, ionized gas, we detect a substantial amount of cold, molecular gas via the CO(3-2) transition, coincident in position with the galaxy center. We infer a molecular gas mass of M_{H_2} = 2.2 ± 0.6 × 1010 M ⊙, which implies that the starburst will consume its fuel in ~30 Myr if it is not

  2. Reaction between HN and SN: a possible channel for the interstellar formation of N2 and SH in the cold interstellar clouds.

    PubMed

    Bhasi, Priya; Nhlabatsi, Zanele P; Sitha, Sanyasi

    2015-12-28

    Using computational calculations the potential energy surface (PES) of the reaction between NH and NS has been analysed. The PES of the reaction shows the formation of two very stable species, HNSN and HNNS. Out of these two, HNNS which has the signature N-N linkage was found to be the most stable species in the PES. In view of the highly exothermic nature of the reaction surface, it has been proposed that these two species can possibly be detected in the interstellar space. For the first time it has also been shown that the reaction between the NH and NS can lead to the possible formation of N2via the isomer HNNS, and how the effect of tunnelling can make this reaction very much feasible, even under the extremely low temperature conditions prevailing in the interstellar medium. Based on the already reported results, a similar kind of behaviour for the NH + NO reaction surface has also been proposed. These dissociation reactions leading to the formation of N2 can be considered as potential secondary contributing channels while accounting for the total estimates of N2 in the interstellar medium, and thus HNNS as well as HNNO can be considered as stable reservoir molecules for interstellar N2. Besides the formation of N2, the formation of another astronomically important radical, SH in the cold interstellar clouds, has also been proposed.

  3. Grouping techniques for large-scale cluster dynamics simulations of reaction diffusion processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohnert, Aaron A.; Wirth, Brian D.

    2017-01-01

    Cluster dynamics is a powerful, high fidelity, mesoscale method for modeling the kinetic evolution of point defects, impurities, and their clusters in materials and is commonly used in studying radiation damage. These methods excel at modeling nucleation, but often require too many equations to successfully model the long term growth and coarsening that govern microstructural evolution. One solution to this problem is to group equations into a coarser approximation of the cluster size distribution function which can reduce the cost of solution by many orders of magnitude. While such grouping methods have been advanced for a limited class of problems, no reliable method currently exists for the general case. This paper advances a framework for grouping arbitrary cluster dynamics problems, and develops several competing schemes based on that framework. These schemes are each evaluated against a variety of test problems designed to assess their accuracy, robustness, and efficiency.

  4. Assessment of climate change impacts on watershed in cold-arid region: an integrated multi-GCM-based stochastic weather generator and stepwise cluster analysis method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuang, X. W.; Li, Y. P.; Huang, G. H.; Liu, J.

    2016-07-01

    An integrated multi-GCM-based stochastic weather generator and stepwise cluster analysis (MGCM-SWG-SCA) method is developed, through incorporating multiple global climate models (MGCM), stochastic weather generator (SWG), and stepwise-clustered hydrological model (SCHM) within a general framework. MGCM-SWG-SCA can investigate uncertainties of projected climate changes as well as create watershed-scale climate projections from large-scale variables. It can also assess climate change impacts on hydrological processes and capture nonlinear relationship between input variables and outputs in watershed systems. MGCM-SWG-SCA is then applied to the Kaidu watershed with cold-arid characteristics in the Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region of northwest China, for demonstrating its efficiency. Results reveal that the variability of streamflow is mainly affected by (1) temperature change during spring, (2) precipitation change during winter, and (3) both temperature and precipitation changes in summer and autumn. Results also disclose that: (1) the projected minimum and maximum temperatures and precipitation from MGCM change with seasons in different ways; (2) various climate change projections can reproduce the seasonal variability of watershed-scale climate series; (3) SCHM can simulate daily streamflow with a satisfactory degree, and a significant increasing trend of streamflow is indicated from future (2015-2035) to validation (2006-2011) periods; (4) the streamflow can vary under different climate change projections. The findings can be explained that, for the Kaidu watershed located in the cold-arid region, glacier melt is mainly related to temperature changes and precipitation changes can directly cause the variability of streamflow.

  5. Probing the Statistical Decay and α-clustering effects in 12C + 12C and 14N + 10B reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morelli, L.; Baiocco, G.; D'Agostino, M.; Bruno, M.; Gulminelli, F.; Cinausero, M.; Degerlier, M.; Fabris, D.; Gramegna, F.; Marchi, T.; Barlini, S.; Bini, M.; Casini, G.; Gelli, N.; Lopez, A.; Pasquali, G.; Piantelli, S.; Valdrè, S.

    2014-03-01

    An experimental campaign has been undertaken at Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro (LNL INFN), Italy, in order to progress in our understanding of the statistical properties of light nuclei at excitation energies above particle emission threshold, by measuring exclusive data from fusion-evaporation reactions. On the experimental side, a first reaction: 12C+12C at 95 MeV beam energy has been measured, using the GARFIELD + Ring Counter (RCo) apparatuses. Fusion-evaporation events have been exclusively selected out of the entire data set. The comparison to a dedicated Hauser-Feshbach calculation allows us to give constraints on the nuclear level density at high excitation energy for light systems ranging from C up to Mg. Out-of-equilibrium aα emission has been evidenced and attributed both to an entrance channel effect (favoured by the cluster nature of reaction partners), and, in more dissipative events, to the persistence of cluster correlations well above the 24Mg threshold for 6 α's decay. In order to study the same 24Mg compound nucleus at similar excitation energy with respect to this first reaction a new measurement, 14N + 10B at 5.7 A.MeV, was performed at LNL laboratories with the same experimental setup. The comparison between the two systems would allow us to further constrain the level density of light nuclei in the mass-excitation energy range of interest. In this perspective, deviations from a statistical behaviour can be used as a tool to get information on nuclear clustering, both in the ground-state for projectile and target and in the hot source formed in the collision.

  6. Computational studies of atmospherically-relevant chemical reactions in water clusters and on liquid water and ice surfaces.

    PubMed

    Gerber, R Benny; Varner, Mychel E; Hammerich, Audrey D; Riikonen, Sampsa; Murdachaew, Garold; Shemesh, Dorit; Finlayson-Pitts, Barbara J

    2015-02-17

    CONSPECTUS: Reactions on water and ice surfaces and in other aqueous media are ubiquitous in the atmosphere, but the microscopic mechanisms of most of these processes are as yet unknown. This Account examines recent progress in atomistic simulations of such reactions and the insights provided into mechanisms and interpretation of experiments. Illustrative examples are discussed. The main computational approaches employed are classical trajectory simulations using interaction potentials derived from quantum chemical methods. This comprises both ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) and semiempirical molecular dynamics (SEMD), the latter referring to semiempirical quantum chemical methods. Presented examples are as follows: (i) Reaction of the (NO(+))(NO3(-)) ion pair with a water cluster to produce the atmospherically important HONO and HNO3. The simulations show that a cluster with four water molecules describes the reaction. This provides a hydrogen-bonding network supporting the transition state. The reaction is triggered by thermal structural fluctuations, and ultrafast changes in atomic partial charges play a key role. This is an example where a reaction in a small cluster can provide a model for a corresponding bulk process. The results support the proposed mechanism for production of HONO by hydrolysis of NO2 (N2O4). (ii) The reactions of gaseous HCl with N2O4 and N2O5 on liquid water surfaces. Ionization of HCl at the water/air interface is followed by nucleophilic attack of Cl(-) on N2O4 or N2O5. Both reactions proceed by an SN2 mechanism. The products are ClNO and ClNO2, precursors of atmospheric atomic chlorine. Because this mechanism cannot result from a cluster too small for HCl ionization, an extended water film model was simulated. The results explain ClNO formation experiments. Predicted ClNO2 formation is less efficient. (iii) Ionization of acids at ice surfaces. No ionization is found on ideal crystalline surfaces, but the process is efficient on

  7. Laser initiated reactions in N{sub 2}O clusters studied by time-sliced ion velocity imaging technique

    SciTech Connect

    Honma, Kenji

    2013-07-28

    Laser initiated reactions in N{sub 2}O clusters were studied by a time-sliced velocity imaging technique. The N{sub 2}O clusters, (N{sub 2}O){sub n}, generated by supersonic expansion were irradiated by an ultraviolet laser around 204 nm to convert reactant pairs, O({sup 1}D{sub 2})-(N{sub 2}O){sub n−1}. The NO molecules formed from these reactant pairs were ionized by the same laser pulse and their velocity distribution was determined by the time-sliced velocity imaging technique. At low nozzle pressure, lower than 1.5 atm, the speed distribution in the frame moving with the clusters consists of two components. These components were ascribed to the products appeared in the backward and forward directions in the center-of-mass frame, respectively. The former consists of the vibrational ground state and the latter consists of highly vibrational excited states. At higher nozzle pressure, a single broad speed distribution became dominant for the product NO. The pressure and laser power dependences suggested that this component is attributed to the product formed in the clusters larger than dimer, (N{sub 2}O){sub n} (n ≥ 3)

  8. Formaldehyde and methanol formation from reaction of carbon monoxide and hydrogen on neutral Fe2S2 clusters in the gas phase.

    PubMed

    Yin, Shi; Wang, Zhechen; Bernstein, Elliot R

    2013-04-07

    Reaction of CO with H2 on neutral FemSn clusters in a fast flow reactor is investigated both experimentally and theoretically. Single photon ionization at 118 nm is used to detect neutral cluster distributions through time of flight mass spectrometry. FemSn clusters are generated through laser ablation of a mixed iron-sulfur target in the presence of a pure helium carrier gas. A strong size dependent reactivity of (FeS)m clusters toward CO is characterized. The reaction FeS + CO → Fe + OCS is found for the FeS cluster, and the association product Fe2S2CO is observed for the Fe2S2 cluster. Products Fe2S2(13)COH2 and Fe2S2(13)COH4 are identified for reactions of (13)CO and H2 on Fe2S2 clusters: this suggests that the Fe2S2 cluster has a high catalytic activity for hydrogenation reactions of CO to form formaldehyde and methanol. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations are performed to explore the potential energy surfaces for the two reactions: Fe2S2 + CO + 2H2 → Fe2S2 + CH3OH; and Fe2S2 + CO + H2 → Fe2S2 + CH2O. A barrierless, thermodynamically favorable pathway is obtained for both catalytic processes. Catalytic cycles for formaldehyde and methanol formation from CO and H2 on a Fe2S2 cluster are proposed based on our experimental and theoretical investigations. The various reaction mechanisms explored by DFT are in good agreement with the experimental results. Condensed phase iron sulfide, which contains exposed Fe2S2 units on its surface, is suggested to be a good catalyst for low temperature formaldehyde/methanol synthesis.

  9. Near Fermi Energy reaction dynamics and clustering in alpha-conjugate systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Xiguang; Schmidt, Katarzyna; Kim, E.-J.; Hagel, K.; Barbui, M.; Wuenschel, S.; Natowitz, J. B.; Zheng, H.; Blando, N.; Bonasera, A.; Giuliani, G.

    2015-10-01

    Theoretical study predicted that the self-organizing of alpha cluster is favored over deuteron below a critical density with moderate temperature, where the possible Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) is expected to occur. However the experimental information about the alpha states at low density is scarce. It is natural to pursue experiments with α conjugate beams and advanced detection apparatus to explore the collective dynamics of alpha clustered systems at low density. Systematical experiments were carried out with 40Ca and 28Si beams at 10, 25, 35 MeV/u incident on 28Si, 12C, 40Ca and 180Ta targets, detected with the NIMROD-ISiS 4 Pi detector array. It is found that there is a strong neck-like emission, which consists mainly of alpha-like fragments. The characteristic of the α emission source is explored by shape analysis, multi-particle correlation and quantum fluctuation approaches. How these observables reveal the possible alpha BEC in low density and possible exotic toroidal and linear chain configurations made out of alpha clusters is discussed.

  10. Reactions with a Metalloid Tin Cluster {Sn10[Si(SiMe3)3]4}(2-): Ligand Elimination versus Coordination Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Schrenk, Claudio; Gerke, Birgit; Pöttgen, Rainer; Clayborne, Andre; Schnepf, Andreas

    2015-05-26

    Chemistry that uses metalloid tin clusters as a starting material is of fundamental interest towards understanding the reactivity of such compounds. Since we identified {Sn10[Si(SiMe3)3]4}(2-) 7 as an ideal candidate for such reactions, we present a further step in the understanding of metalloid tin cluster chemistry. In contrast to germanium chemistry, ligand elimination seems to be a major reaction channel, which leads to the more open metalloid cluster {Sn10[Si(SiMe3)3]3}(-) 9, in which the Sn core is only shielded by three Si(SiMe3)3 ligands. Compound 9 is obtained through different routes and is crystallised together with two different countercations. Besides the structural characterisation of this novel metalloid tin cluster, the electronic structure is analysed by (119)Sn Mössbauer spectroscopy. Additionally, possible reaction pathways are discussed. The presented first step into the chemistry of metalloid tin clusters thus indicates that, with respect to metalloid germanium clusters, more reaction channels are accessible, thereby leading to a more complex reaction system.

  11. Exploring excited-state hydrogen atom transfer along an ammonia wire cluster: Competitive reaction paths and vibrational mode selectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanner, Christian; Manca, Carine; Leutwyler, Samuel

    2005-05-01

    The excited-state hydrogen-atom transfer (ESHAT) reaction of the 7-hydroxyquinoline•(NH3)3 cluster involves a crossing from the initially excited π1π* to a π1σ* state. The nonadiabatic coupling between these states induces homolytic dissociation of the O-H bond and H-atom transfer to the closest NH3 molecule, forming a biradical structure denoted HT1, followed by two more Grotthus-type translocation steps along the ammonia wire. We investigate this reaction at the configuration interaction singles level, using a basis set with diffuse orbitals. Intrinsic reaction coordinate calculations of the enol→HT1 step predict that the H-atom transfer is preceded and followed by extensive twisting and bending of the ammonia wire, as well as large O -H⋯NH3 hydrogen bond contraction and expansion. The calculations also predict an excited-state proton transfer path involving synchronous proton motions; however, it lies 20-25kcal/mol above the ESHAT path. Higher singlet and triplet potential curves are calculated along the ESHAT reaction coordinate: Two singlet-triplet curve crossings occur within the HT1 product well and intersystem crossing to these Tn states branches the reaction back to the enol reactant side, decreasing the ESHAT yield. In fact, a product yield of ≈40% 7-ketoquinoline•(NH3)3 is experimentally observed. The vibrational mode selectivity of the enol→HT1 reaction step [C. Manca, C. Tanner, S. Coussan, A. Bach, and S. Leutwyler, J. Chem. Phys. 121, 2578 (2004)] is shown to be due to the large sensitivity of the diffuse πσ* state to vibrational displacements along the intermolecular coordinates.

  12. Cold Stress

    MedlinePlus

    ... Publications and Products Programs Contact NIOSH NIOSH COLD STRESS Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Workers who ... cold environments may be at risk of cold stress. Extreme cold weather is a dangerous situation that ...

  13. Bond Activation and Hydrogen Evolution from Water through Reactions with M3S4 (M = Mo, W) and W3S3 Anionic Clusters.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Corrine A; Saha, Arjun; Raghavachari, Krishnan

    2017-03-02

    Transition metal sulfides (TMS) are being investigated with increased frequency because of their ability to efficiently catalyze the hydrogen evolution reaction. We have studied the trimetallic TMS cluster ions, Mo3S4(-), W3S4(-), and W3S3(-), and probed their efficiency for bond activation and hydrogen evolution from water. These clusters have geometries that are related to the edge sites on bulk MoS2 surfaces that are known to play a role in hydrogen evolution. Using density functional theory, the electronic structures of these clusters and their chemical reactivity with water have been investigated. The reaction mechanism involves the initial formation of hydroxyl and thiol groups, hydrogen migration to form an intermediate with a metal hydride bond, and finally, combination of a hydride and a proton to eliminate H2. Using this mechanism, free energy profiles of the reactions of the three metal clusters with water have been constructed. Unlike previous reactivity studies of other related cluster systems, there is no overall energy barrier in the reactions involving the M3S4 systems. The energy required for the rate-determining step of the reaction (the initial addition of the cluster by water) is lower than the separated reactants (-0.8 kcal/mol for Mo and -5.1 kcal/mol for W). They confirm the M3S4(-) cluster's ability to efficiently activate the chemical bonds in water to release H2. Though the W3S3(-) cluster is not as efficient at bond activation, it provides insights into the factors that contribute to the success of the M3S4 anionic systems in hydrogen evolution.

  14. An accurate potential energy surface for the F + H2 → HF + H reaction by the coupled-cluster method.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jun; Sun, Zhigang; Zhang, Dong H

    2015-01-14

    A three dimensional potential energy surface for the F + H2 → HF + H reaction has been computed by the spin unrestricted coupled cluster method with singles, doubles, triples, and perturbative quadruples [UCCSDT(2)Q] using the augmented correlation-consistent polarised valence quadruple zeta basis set for the fluorine atom and the correlation-consistent polarised valence quadruple zeta basis set for the hydrogen atom. All the calculations are based on the restricted open-shell Hartree-Fock orbitals, together with the frozen core approximations, and the UCCSD(T)/complete basis set (CBS) correction term was included. The global potential energy surface was calculated by fitting the sampled ab initio points without any scaling factor for the correlation energy part using a neutral network function method. Extensive dynamics calculations have been carried out on the potential energy surface. The reaction rate constants, integral cross sections, product rotational states distribution, and forward and backward scattering as a function of collision energy of the F + HD → HF + D, F + HD → DF + H, and F + H2 reaction, were calculated by the time-independent quantum dynamics scattering theory using the new surface. The satisfactory agreement with the reported experimental observations previously demonstrates the accuracy of the new potential energy surface.

  15. Cold gas in hot star clusters: the wind from the red supergiant W26 in Westerlund 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackey, Jonathan; Castro, Norberto; Fossati, Luca; Langer, Norbert

    2015-10-01

    The massive red supergiant W26 in Westerlund 1 is one of a growing number of red supergiants shown to have winds that are ionized from the outside in. The fate of this dense wind material is important for models of second generation star formation in massive star clusters. Mackey et al. (2014, Nature, 512, 282) showed that external photoionization can stall the wind of red supergiants and accumulate mass in a dense static shell. We use spherically symmetric radiation-hydrodynamic simulations of an externally photoionized wind to predict the brightness distribution of Hα and [N II] emission arising from photoionized winds both with and without a dense shell. We analyse spectra of the Hα and [N II] emission lines in the circumstellar environment around W26 and compare them with simulations to investigate whether W26 has a wind that is confined by external photoionization. Simulations of slow winds that are decelerated into a dense shell show strongly limb-brightened line emission, with line radial velocities that are independent of the wind speed. Faster winds (≳22 km s-1) do not form a dense shell, have less limb-brightening, and the line radial velocity is a good tracer of the wind speed. The brightness of the [N II] and Hα lines as a function of distance from W26 agrees reasonably well with observations when only the line flux is considered. The radial velocity of the simulated winds disagrees with observations, however: the brightest observed emission is blueshifted by ≈25 km s-1 relative to the radial velocity of the star, whereas a spherically symmetric wind has the brightest emission at zero radial velocity because of limb brightening. Our results show that the bright nebula surrounding W26 must be asymmetric, and we suggest that it is confined by external ram pressure from the extreme wind of the nearby supergiant W9. We obtain a lower limit on the nitrogen abundance within the nebula of 2.35 times solar. The line ratio strongly favours photoionization

  16. Size and structure effects of Pt{sub N} (N = 12 − 13) clusters for the oxygen reduction reaction: First-principles calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Rodríguez-Kessler, P. L.; Rodríguez-Domínguez, A. R.

    2015-11-14

    Size and structure effects on the oxygen reduction reaction on Pt{sub N} clusters with N = 12–13 atoms have been investigated using periodic density functional theory calculations with the generalized gradient approximation. To describe the catalytic activity, we calculated the O and OH adsorption energies on the cluster surface. The oxygen binding on the 3-fold hollow sites on stable Pt{sub 12−13} cluster models resulted more favorable for the reaction with O, compared with the Pt{sub 13}(I{sub h}) and Pt{sub 55}(I{sub h}) icosahedral particles, in which O binds strongly. However, the rate-limiting step resulted in the removal of the OH species due to strong adsorptions on the vertex sites, reducing the utility of the catalyst surface. On the other hand, the active sites of Pt{sub 12−13} clusters have been localized on the edge sites. In particular, the OH adsorption on a bilayer Pt{sub 12} cluster is the closest to the optimal target; with 0.0-0.2 eV weaker than the Pt(111) surface. However, more progress is necessary to activate the vertex sites of the clusters. The d-band center of Pt{sub N} clusters shows that the structural dependence plays a decisive factor in the cluster reactivity.

  17. Gas-Phase Reactions of Silver Cluster Ions Produced by Fast Atom Bombardment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-03-20

    oxide , AgO, produces Ag.* clusters with x = 1 -9 and Ag.O , y = 1 and 2 (fig. 3). Similar spectra are obtained from FAB of Ag20 and from...Ag5 + Ethene AgL4+ NR a Ag31-6+ NR NR Propene AgL2’ AgL2+ Ag3L3 + NR NR 1 - Butene AgL2+ AgL2+ Ag3 1 -3 + Ag4L+ NR Cis-2- Butene AgL2+ AgL2+ Ag3 1 -3...C)4 0 S3 C 0 CC 0: o4:rC Figure 3 C CNC CNC I).6 ( x CN Cl + + N 000 1 ( N q N LON en C.C 0 CNC CYV) 0Y CC3 cv 0C) 0 C) C0 3 C

  18. Charge-Transfer Effects in Ligand Exchange Reactions of Au25 Monolayer-Protected Clusters.

    PubMed

    Carducci, Tessa M; Blackwell, Raymond E; Murray, Royce W

    2015-04-16

    Reported here are second-order rate constants of associative ligand exchanges of Au25L18 nanoparticles (L = phenylethanethiolate) of various charge states, measured by proton nuclear magnetic resonance at room temperature and below. Differences in second-order rate constants (M(-1) s(-1)) of ligand exchange (positive clusters ∼1.9 × 10(-5) versus negative ones ∼1.2 × 10(-4)) show that electron depletion retards ligand exchange. The ordering of rate constants between the ligands benzeneselenol > 4-bromobenzene thiol > benzenethiol reveals that exchange is accelerated by higher acidity and/or electron donation capability of the incoming ligand. Together, these observations indicate that partial charge transfer occurs between the nanoparticle and ligand during the exchange and that this is a rate-determining effect in the process.

  19. Buffer Gas Modifiers Effect Resolution in Ion Mobility Spectrometry through Selective Ion-Molecule Clustering Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Maestre, Roberto; Wu, Ching; Hill, Herbert H.

    2013-01-01

    RATIONALE When polar molecules (modifiers) are introduced into the buffer gas of an ion mobility spectrometer, most ion mobilities decrease due to the formation of ion-modifier clusters. METHODS We used ethyl lactate, nitrobenzene, 2-butanol, and tetrahydrofuran-2-carbonitrile as buffer gas modifiers and electrospray ionization ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) coupled to quadrupole mass spectrometry. Ethyl lactate, nitrobenzene, and tetrahydrofuran-2-carbonitrile had not been tested as buffer gas modifiers and 2-butanol had not been used with basic amino acids. RESULTS The ion mobilities of several diamines (arginine, histidine, lysine, and atenolol) were not affected or only slightly reduced when these modifiers were introduced into the buffer gas (3.4% average reduction in an analyte's mobility for the three modifiers). Intramolecular bridges caused limited change in the ion mobilities of diamines when modifiers were added to the buffer gas; these bridges hindered the attachment of modifier molecules to the positive charge of ions and delocalized the charge, which deterred clustering. There was also a tendency towards large changes in ion mobility when the mass of the analyte decreased; ethanolamine, the smallest compound tested, had the largest reduction in ion mobility with the introduction of modifiers into the buffer gas (61%). These differences in mobilities, together with the lack of shift in bridge-forming ions, were used to separate ions that overlapped in IMS, such as isoleucine and lysine, and arginine and phenylalanine, and made possible the prediction of separation or not of overlapping ions. CONCLUSIONS The introduction of modifiers into the buffer gas in IMS can selectively alter the mobilities of analytes to aid in compound identification and/or enable the separation of overlapping analyte peaks. PMID:22956312

  20. Discovery of a rich proto-cluster at z = 2.9 and associated diffuse cold gas in the VIMOS Ultra-Deep Survey (VUDS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cucciati, O.; Zamorani, G.; Lemaux, B. C.; Bardelli, S.; Cimatti, A.; Le Fèvre, O.; Cassata, P.; Garilli, B.; Le Brun, V.; Maccagni, D.; Pentericci, L.; Tasca, L. A. M.; Thomas, R.; Vanzella, E.; Zucca, E.; Amorin, R.; Capak, P.; Cassarà, L. P.; Castellano, M.; Cuby, J. G.; de la Torre, S.; Durkalec, A.; Fontana, A.; Giavalisco, M.; Grazian, A.; Hathi, N. P.; Ilbert, O.; Moreau, C.; Paltani, S.; Ribeiro, B.; Salvato, M.; Schaerer, D.; Scodeggio, M.; Sommariva, V.; Talia, M.; Taniguchi, Y.; Tresse, L.; Vergani, D.; Wang, P. W.; Charlot, S.; Contini, T.; Fotopoulou, S.; López-Sanjuan, C.; Mellier, Y.; Scoville, N.

    2014-10-01

    a rest frame EW of 10.8 ± 3.7 Å, with a detection S/N of ~4. We verify that this measurement is not likely to be due to noise fluctuations. These EW values imply a high column density (N(HI) ~ 3-20 × 1019 cm-2), consistent with a scenario where such absorption is due to intervening cold streams of gas that are falling into the halo potential wells of the proto-cluster galaxies. Nevertheless, we cannot rule out the hypothesis that this absorption line is related to the diffuse gas within the overdensity. Based on data obtained with the European Southern Observatory Very Large Telescope, Paranal, Chile, under Large Program 185.A-0791.

  1. Reaction Norms in Natural Conditions: How Does Metabolic Performance Respond to Weather Variations in a Small Endotherm Facing Cold Environments?

    PubMed Central

    Petit, Magali; Vézina, François

    2014-01-01

    Reaction norms reflect an organisms' capacity to adjust its phenotype to the environment and allows for identifying trait values associated with physiological limits. However, reaction norms of physiological parameters are mostly unknown for endotherms living in natural conditions. Black-capped chickadees (Poecile atricapillus) increase their metabolic performance during winter acclimatization and are thus good model to measure reaction norms in the wild. We repeatedly measured basal (BMR) and summit (Msum) metabolism in chickadees to characterize, for the first time in a free-living endotherm, reaction norms of these parameters across the natural range of weather variation. BMR varied between individuals and was weakly and negatively related to minimal temperature. Msum varied with minimal temperature following a Z-shape curve, increasing linearly between 24°C and −10°C, and changed with absolute humidity following a U-shape relationship. These results suggest that thermal exchanges with the environment have minimal effects on maintenance costs, which may be individual-dependent, while thermogenic capacity is responding to body heat loss. Our results suggest also that BMR and Msum respond to different and likely independent constraints. PMID:25426860

  2. Reaction norms in natural conditions: how does metabolic performance respond to weather variations in a small endotherm facing cold environments?

    PubMed

    Petit, Magali; Vézina, François

    2014-01-01

    Reaction norms reflect an organisms' capacity to adjust its phenotype to the environment and allows for identifying trait values associated with physiological limits. However, reaction norms of physiological parameters are mostly unknown for endotherms living in natural conditions. Black-capped chickadees (Poecile atricapillus) increase their metabolic performance during winter acclimatization and are thus good model to measure reaction norms in the wild. We repeatedly measured basal (BMR) and summit (Msum) metabolism in chickadees to characterize, for the first time in a free-living endotherm, reaction norms of these parameters across the natural range of weather variation. BMR varied between individuals and was weakly and negatively related to minimal temperature. Msum varied with minimal temperature following a Z-shape curve, increasing linearly between 24°C and -10°C, and changed with absolute humidity following a U-shape relationship. These results suggest that thermal exchanges with the environment have minimal effects on maintenance costs, which may be individual-dependent, while thermogenic capacity is responding to body heat loss. Our results suggest also that BMR and Msum respond to different and likely independent constraints.

  3. Measurement of the parity-violating triton emission asymmetry in the reaction {sup 6}Li(n,{alpha}){sup 3}H with polarized cold neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Vesna, V. A.; Shulgina, E. V.; Gledenov, Yu. M.; Sedyshev, P. V.; Nesvizhevsky, V. V.; Petoukhov, A. K.; Soldner, T.; Zimmer, O.

    2008-03-15

    We describe measurements of the parity-violating (P-odd) triton emission asymmetry coefficient a{sub P-odd} in the {sup 6}Li(n,{alpha}){sup 3}H reaction with polarized cold neutrons. Experiments were carried out at the Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute (Gatchina, Russia) and at the Institut Laue-Langevin (Grenoble, France). We employed an ionisation chamber in a configuration allowing us to suppress the left-right asymmetry well below 10{sup -8}. An additional test for a false asymmetry due to eventual target impurities (''zero test'') resulted in a{sub 0-test}=(0.0{+-}0.5)x10{sup -8}. As final result of this series of experiments we obtained a{sub P-odd}=(-8.8{+-}2.1)x10{sup -8}.

  4. Collinear cluster tripartition channel in the reaction {sup 235}U(n{sub th}, f)

    SciTech Connect

    Pyatkov, Yu. V.; Kamanin, D. V.; Kopach, Yu. N.; Alexandrov, A. A.; Alexandrova, I. A.; Borzakov, S. B.; Voronov, Yu. N.; Zhuchko, V. E.; Kuznetsova, E. A. Panteleev, Ts.; Tyukavkin, A. N.

    2010-08-15

    Investigation of the {sup 235}U(n{sub th}, f) reaction using the miniFOBOS double-arm time-of-flight spectrometer of fission fragments confirmed manifestations of the earlier unknown many-body, at least ternary, decay involving almost collinear decay-product escape, which were first observed in the spontaneous fission of {sup 252}Cf(sf). The use of variables sensitive to the nuclear charge of fission fragments allowed the reliability of identification of decay events to be increased and new decay modes to be revealed.

  5. Reactions of the tetrahedral clusters [MCo(3)(CO)(12)](-) (M = Ru, Fe) with functional mono- and diynes.

    PubMed

    Choualeb, Aldjia; Braunstein, Pierre; Rosé, Jacky; Welter, Richard

    2004-01-12

    The tetrahedral cluster [RuCo(3)(CO)(12)](-) reacts with various alkynes, including the new PhCtbd1;CC(O)NHCH(2)Ctbd1;CH (L(1)()), to afford the butterfly clusters [RuCo(3)(CO)(10)(micro(4)-eta(2)-RC(2)R')](-) (1, R = R' = C(O)OMe; 2, R = H, R' = Ph; 3, R = H, R' = MeC=CH(2); 4, R = H, R' = CH(2)OCH(2)Ctbd1;CH; 5, R = H, R' = CH(2)NHC(O)Ctbd1;CPh), in which the ruthenium atom occupies a hinge position and the alkyne is coordinated in a micro(4)-eta(2) fashion. Reaction of the anions 1-3 with [Cu(NCMe)(4)]BF(4) led to selective loss of the 12e fragment Co(CO)(-) to form [RuCo(2)(CO)(9)(micro(3)-eta(2)-RC(2)R')] (6, R = R' = C(O)OMe; 7, R = H, R' = Ph; 8, R = H, R' = MeC=CH(2)). To prepare functionalized RuCo(3) or FeCo(3) clusters that could be subsequently condensed with a silica matrix via the sol-gel method, we reacted [MCo(3)(CO)(12)](-) (M = Ru, Fe) with the alkyne PhCtbd1;CC(O)NH(CH(2))(3)Si(OMe)(3)(L(2)()) and obtained the butterfly clusters [MCo(3)(CO)(10)(micro(4)-eta(2)-PhC(2)C(O)NH(CH(2))(3)Si(OMe)(3))](-) 9 and 10, respectively. Air-stable [RuCo(3)(CO)(10)(micro(4)-eta(2)-Me(3)SiC(2)Ctbd1;CSiMe(3))](-) (11) was obtained from 1,4-bis(trimethylsilyl)butadiyne and reacted with [Cu(NCMe)(4)]BF(4) to give [RuCo(2)(CO)(9)(micro(3)-eta(2)-HC(2)Ctbd1;CSiMe(3))] (12), owing to partial ligand proto-desilylation, and not the expected [RuCo(2)(CO)(9)(micro(3)-eta(2)-Me(3)SiC(2)Ctbd1;CSiMe(3))]. Reaction of 11 with [NO]BF(4) afforded, in addition to 12, [RuCo(3)(CO)(9)(NO)(micro(4)-eta(2)-Me(3)SiC(2)Ctbd1;CSiMe(3))] (13) owing to selective CO substitution on a wing-tip cobalt atom with NO. The thermal reaction of 11 with [AuCl(PPh(3))] led to replacement of a CO on Ru by the PPh(3) originating from [AuCl(PPh(3))] and afforded [RuCo(3)(CO)(9)(PPh(3))(micro(4)-eta(2)-Me(3)SiC(2)Ctbd1;CSiMe(3))](-) (14), also obtained directly by reaction of 11 with one equivalent of PPh(3). Proto-desilylation of 11 using TBAF/THF-H(2)O afforded [RuCo(3)(CO)(10)(micro(4)-eta(2)-Me(3)Si

  6. On-surface reaction of tetraphenylporphyrins with Os3(CO)12 precursors and Os clusters: A scanning tunnelling microscopy investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sağlam, Özge; Yetik, Görsel; Reichert, Joachim; Barth, Johannes V.; Papageorgiou, Anthoula C.

    2016-04-01

    The ability of porphyrin molecules to incorporate metal atoms into the cavity of the macrocycle is the primary factor that enables the plethora of their applications. The fabrication and characterisation of surface confined metal-organic architectures by employing porphyrins promise unique technical applications in the field of nanotechnology. Here we report on the efforts to use triosmium dodecacarbonyl as a metal precursor for the on-surface Os functionalisation of porphyrins under ultra-high vacuum conditions. We address the effects of the temperature treatment of mixtures of tetraphenylporphyrins and the Os precursor molecules, which can decompose to yield Os clusters, on Ag(111) via scanning tunnelling microscopy, a technique that provides real-space visualisation of the reaction products formed. It is shown that free base porphyrins can be metallated to osmium porphyrins. Furthermore the presence of Os on the Ag(111) surface catalyses intramolecular cyclodehydrogenations in tetraphenylporphyrins, as well as intermolecular tetraphenylporphyrin polymerisation.

  7. Pharmacovigilance from social media: mining adverse drug reaction mentions using sequence labeling with word embedding cluster features

    PubMed Central

    Sarker, Abeed; O’Connor, Karen; Ginn, Rachel

    2015-01-01

    Objective Social media is becoming increasingly popular as a platform for sharing personal health-related information. This information can be utilized for public health monitoring tasks, particularly for pharmacovigilance, via the use of natural language processing (NLP) techniques. However, the language in social media is highly informal, and user-expressed medical concepts are often nontechnical, descriptive, and challenging to extract. There has been limited progress in addressing these challenges, and thus far, advanced machine learning-based NLP techniques have been underutilized. Our objective is to design a machine learning-based approach to extract mentions of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) from highly informal text in social media. Methods We introduce ADRMine, a machine learning-based concept extraction system that uses conditional random fields (CRFs). ADRMine utilizes a variety of features, including a novel feature for modeling words’ semantic similarities. The similarities are modeled by clustering words based on unsupervised, pretrained word representation vectors (embeddings) generated from unlabeled user posts in social media using a deep learning technique. Results ADRMine outperforms several strong baseline systems in the ADR extraction task by achieving an F-measure of 0.82. Feature analysis demonstrates that the proposed word cluster features significantly improve extraction performance. Conclusion It is possible to extract complex medical concepts, with relatively high performance, from informal, user-generated content. Our approach is particularly scalable, suitable for social media mining, as it relies on large volumes of unlabeled data, thus diminishing the need for large, annotated training data sets. PMID:25755127

  8. Application of evolved gas analysis to cold-cap reactions of melter feeds for nuclear waste vitrification

    SciTech Connect

    Kruger, Albert A.; Chun, Jaehun; Hrma, Pavel R.; Rodriguez, Carmen P.; Schweiger, Michael J.

    2014-04-30

    In the vitrification of nuclear wastes, the melter feed (a mixture of nuclear waste and glass-forming and modifying additives) experiences multiple gas-evolving reactions in an electrical glass-melting furnace. We employed the thermogravimetry-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (TGA-GC-MS) combination to perform evolved gas analysis (EGA). Apart from identifying the gases evolved, we performed quantitative analysis relating the weighed sum of intensities of individual gases linearly proportional with the differential themogravimetry. The proportionality coefficients were obtained by three methods based on the stoichiometry, least squares, and calibration. The linearity was shown to be a good first-order approximation, in spite of the complicated overlapping reactions.

  9. Production of cold target-like fragments in the reaction of /sup 48/Ca+/sup 248/Cm

    SciTech Connect

    Gaeggeler, H.; Bruechle, W.; Bruegger, M.; Schaedel, M.; Suemmerer, K.; Wirth, G.; Kratz, J.V.; Lerch, M.; Blaich, T.; Herrmann, G.

    1986-06-01

    Yields for isotopes of Rn through Pu have been measured in the reaction /sup 48/Ca+/sup 248/Cm at an energy of 248--263 MeV (1.04--1.10 times the Coulomb barrier). Despite the low bombarding energy, high and essentially constant integral yields of about 1 to 2 mb for the elements Rn through U were observed. There is evidence that these nuclides are produced with little excitation energy.

  10. The mechanism of emerging catalytic activity of gold nano-clusters on rutile TiO2(110) in CO oxidation reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitsuhara, K.; Tagami, M.; Matsuda, T.; Visikovskiy, A.; Takizawa, M.; Kido, Y.

    2012-03-01

    This paper reveals the fact that the O adatoms (Oad) adsorbed on the 5-fold Ti rows of rutile TiO2(110) react with CO to form CO2 at room temperature and the oxidation reaction is pronouncedly enhanced by Au nano-clusters deposited on the above O-rich TiO2(110) surfaces. The optimum activity is obtained for 2D clusters with a lateral size of ˜1.5 nm and two-atomic layer height corresponding to ˜50 Au atoms/cluster. This strong activity emerging is attributed to an electronic charge transfer from Au clusters to O-rich TiO2(110) supports observed clearly by work function measurement, which results in an interface dipole. The interface dipoles lower the potential barrier for dissociative O2 adsorption on the surface and also enhance the reaction of CO with the Oad atoms to form CO2 owing to the electric field of the interface dipoles, which generate an attractive force upon polar CO molecules and thus prolong the duration time on the Au nano-clusters. This electric field is screened by the valence electrons of Au clusters except near the perimeter interfaces, thereby the activity is diminished for three-dimensional clusters with a larger size.

  11. The mechanism of emerging catalytic activity of gold nano-clusters on rutile TiO{sub 2}(110) in CO oxidation reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Mitsuhara, K.; Tagami, M.; Matsuda, T.; Visikovskiy, A.; Kido, Y.; Takizawa, M.

    2012-03-28

    This paper reveals the fact that the O adatoms (O{sub ad}) adsorbed on the 5-fold Ti rows of rutile TiO{sub 2}(110) react with CO to form CO{sub 2} at room temperature and the oxidation reaction is pronouncedly enhanced by Au nano-clusters deposited on the above O-rich TiO{sub 2}(110) surfaces. The optimum activity is obtained for 2D clusters with a lateral size of {approx}1.5 nm and two-atomic layer height corresponding to {approx}50 Au atoms/cluster. This strong activity emerging is attributed to an electronic charge transfer from Au clusters to O-rich TiO{sub 2}(110) supports observed clearly by work function measurement, which results in an interface dipole. The interface dipoles lower the potential barrier for dissociative O{sub 2} adsorption on the surface and also enhance the reaction of CO with the O{sub ad} atoms to form CO{sub 2} owing to the electric field of the interface dipoles, which generate an attractive force upon polar CO molecules and thus prolong the duration time on the Au nano-clusters. This electric field is screened by the valence electrons of Au clusters except near the perimeter interfaces, thereby the activity is diminished for three-dimensional clusters with a larger size.

  12. The mechanism of emerging catalytic activity of gold nano-clusters on rutile TiO2(110) in CO oxidation reaction.

    PubMed

    Mitsuhara, K; Tagami, M; Matsuda, T; Visikovskiy, A; Takizawa, M; Kido, Y

    2012-03-28

    This paper reveals the fact that the O adatoms (O(ad)) adsorbed on the 5-fold Ti rows of rutile TiO(2)(110) react with CO to form CO(2) at room temperature and the oxidation reaction is pronouncedly enhanced by Au nano-clusters deposited on the above O-rich TiO(2)(110) surfaces. The optimum activity is obtained for 2D clusters with a lateral size of ∼1.5 nm and two-atomic layer height corresponding to ∼50 Au atoms∕cluster. This strong activity emerging is attributed to an electronic charge transfer from Au clusters to O-rich TiO(2)(110) supports observed clearly by work function measurement, which results in an interface dipole. The interface dipoles lower the potential barrier for dissociative O(2) adsorption on the surface and also enhance the reaction of CO with the O(ad) atoms to form CO(2) owing to the electric field of the interface dipoles, which generate an attractive force upon polar CO molecules and thus prolong the duration time on the Au nano-clusters. This electric field is screened by the valence electrons of Au clusters except near the perimeter interfaces, thereby the activity is diminished for three-dimensional clusters with a larger size.

  13. Comproportionation reactions to manganese(III/IV) pivalate clusters: a new half-integer spin single-molecule magnet.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Shreya; Abboud, Khalil A; Wernsdorfer, Wolfgang; Christou, George

    2013-01-18

    The comproportionation reaction between Mn(II) and Mn(VII) reagents under acidic conditions has been investigated in the presence of pivalic acid as a route to new high oxidation state manganese pivalate clusters containing some Mn(IV). The reaction of Mn(O(2)CBu(t))(2) and NBu(n)(4)MnO(4) with an excess of pivalic acid in the presence of Mn(ClO(4))(2) and NBu(n)(4)Cl in hot MeCN led to the isolation of [Mn(8)O(6)(OH)(O(2)CBu(t))(9)Cl(3)(Bu(t)CO(2)H)(0.5)(MeCN)(0.5)] (1). In contrast, the reaction of Mn(NO(3))(2) and NBu(n)(4)MnO(4) in hot MeCN with an excess of pivalic acid gave a different octanuclear complex, [Mn(8)O(9)(O(2)CBu(t))(12)] (2). The latter reaction but with Mn(O(2)CBu(t))(2) in place of Mn(NO(3))(2), and in a MeCN/THF solvent medium, gave [Mn(9)O(7)(O(2)CBu(t))(13)(THF)(2)] (3). Complexes 1-3 possess rare or unprecedented Mn(x) topologies: 1 possesses a [Mn(III)(7)Mn(IV)(μ(3)-O)(4)(μ(4)-O)(2)(μ(3)-OH)(μ(4)-Cl)(μ(2)-Cl)](8+) core consisting of two body-fused Mn(4) butterfly units attached to the remaining Mn atoms via bridging O(2-), OH(-), and Cl(-) ions. In contrast, 2 possesses a [Mn(6)(IV)Mn(2)(III)(μ(3)-O)(6)(μ-O)(3)](12+) core consisting of two [Mn(3)O(4)] incomplete cubanes linked by their O(2-) ions to two Mn(III) atoms. The cores of 1 and 2 are unprecedented in Mn chemistry. The [Mn(III)(9)(μ(3)-O)(7)](13+) core of 3 also contains two body-fused Mn(4) butterfly units, but they are linked to the remaining Mn atoms in a different manner than in 1. Solid-state direct current (dc) and/or alternating current (ac) magnetic susceptibility data established S = (15)/(2), S = 2, and S = 1 ground states for 1·MeCN, 2·(1)/(4)MeCN, and 3, respectively. The ac susceptibility data also revealed nonzero, frequency-dependent out-of-phase (χ″(M)) signals for 1·MeCN at temperatures below 3 K, suggesting possible single-molecule magnet behavior, which was confirmed by single-crystal magnetization vs dc field scans that exhibited hysteresis loops

  14. Common Cold

    MedlinePlus

    ... nose, coughing - everyone knows the symptoms of the common cold. It is probably the most common illness. In ... avoid colds. There is no cure for the common cold. For relief, try Getting plenty of rest Drinking ...

  15. Structural water cluster as a possible proton acceptor in the adduct decay reaction of oat phototropin 1 LOV2 domain.

    PubMed

    Chan, Ruby H; Bogomolni, Roberto A

    2012-09-06

    LOV domains (Light, Oxygen, Voltage) are the light-sensory modules of phototropins, the blue-light photoreceptor kinases in plants, and of a wide variety of flavoproteins found in all three domains of life. These 12 kDa modules bind a flavin chromophore (FMN or FAD) noncovalently and undergo a photochemical activation in which the sulfur atom of a conserved cysteine forms an adduct to the C(4a) carbon of the flavin. The adduct breaks spontaneously in a base-catalyzed reaction involving a rate-limiting proton-transfer step, regenerating the dark state in seconds. This photocycle involves chromophore and protein structural changes that activate the C-terminal serine/threonine kinase. Previous studies (Biochemistry 2007, 46, 7016-7021) showed that decreased hydration obtained at high glycerol concentrations stabilizes the adduct state in a manner similar to that attained at low temperatures, resulting in much longer adduct decay times. This kinetic effect was attributed to an increased protein rigidity that hindered structural fluctuations necessary for the decay reaction. In this work, we studied the adduct decay kinetics of oat phototropin 1 (phot1) LOV2 at varying hydration using a specially designed chamber that allowed for measurement of UV-visible and FTIR spectra of the same samples. Therefore, we obtained LOV protein concentrations, adduct decay kinetics, and the different populations of bound water by deconvolution of the broad water absorption peak around 3500 cm(-1). A linear dependence of the adduct decay rate constant on the concentration of double and triple hydrogen-bonded waters strongly suggests that the adduct decay is a pseudo-first-order reaction in which both the adduct and the strongly bound waters are reactants. We suggest that a cluster of strongly bound water functions as the proton acceptor in the rate-limiting step of adduct decay.

  16. Cluster Composition Distributions of Pure Ethanol: Influence of Water and Ion–Molecule Reactions Revealed by Liquid-Ionization Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Tsuchiya, Masahiko; Fukaya, Haruhiko; Shida, Yasuo

    2013-01-01

    Studies of clusters in condensed phase at atmospheric pressure are very important for understanding the properties and structures of liquids. Liquid-ionization (LPI) mass spectrometry is useful to study hydrogen-bonded clusters at the liquid surface and in a gas phase. An improved ion source connected to a tandem mass spectrometer provides detailed information about clusters. Mass spectra of pure ethanol (99.5%) observed by the first mass analyzer (Q1) showed neat ethanol cluster ions (C2H5OH)mH+ with m up to 10 and hydrate ions (C2H5OH)m(H2O)nH+ with m larger than 7 and n=1, such as those with m-n=8-1 and 9-1. When the flow rate of ethanol (liquid) was increased, large ethanol cluster ions with m larger than 25 were observed by the second mass analyzer (Q3). It is interesting to note that neat ethanol cluster ions are more abundant than corresponding (with the same m) hydrate ions (n=1), and major hydrate ions contain only one molecule of water. Results indicate that ion–molecule reactions occur between Q1 and Q3, because such mass spectra have never been observed by Q1. Various results indicate that neat ethanol clusters exist at the liquid surface and are ionized to give cluster ions. PMID:24349916

  17. Stereochemical course of hydrolytic reaction catalyzed by alpha-galactosidase from cold adaptable marine bacterium of genus Pseudoalteromonas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakunina, Irina; Balabanova, Larissa; Golotin, Vasiliy; Slepchenko, Lyubov; Isakov, Vladimir; Rasskazov, Valeriy

    2014-10-01

    The recombinant α-galactosidase of the marine bacterium (α-PsGal) was synthesized with the use of the plasmid 40Gal, consisting of plasmid pET-40b (+) (Novagen) and the gene corresponding to the open reading frame of the mature α-galactosidase of marine bacterium Pseudoalteromonas sp. KMM 701, transformed into the E. coli Rosetta(DE3) cells. In order to understand the mechanism of action, the stereochemistry of hydrolysis of 4-nitrophenyl α-D-galactopyranoside (4-NPGP) by α-PsGal was measured by 1H NMR spectroscopy. The kinetics of formation of α- and β-anomer of galactose showed that α-anomer initially formed and accumulated, and then an appreciable amount of β-anomer appeared as a result of mutarotation. The data clearly show that the enzymatic hydrolysis of 4-NPGP proceeds with the retention of anomeric configuration, probably, due to a double displacement mechanism of reaction.

  18. The reaction rates of O2 with closed-shell and open-shell Al(x)⁻ and Ga(x)⁻ clusters under single-collision conditions: experimental and theoretical investigations toward a generally valid model for the hindered reactions of O2 with metal atom clusters.

    PubMed

    Neumaier, Marco; Olzmann, Matthias; Kiran, Boggavarapu; Bowen, Kit H; Eichhorn, Bryan; Stokes, Sarah T; Buonaugurio, Angela; Burgert, Ralf; Schnöckel, Hansgeorg

    2014-03-05

    In order to characterize the oxidation of metallic surfaces, the reactions of O2 with a number of Al(x)(-) and, for the first time, Ga(x)(-) clusters as molecular models have been investigated, and the results are presented here for x = 9-14. The rate coefficients were determined with FT-ICR mass spectrometry under single-collision conditions at O2 pressures of ~10(-8) mbar. In this way, the qualitatively known differences in the reactivities of the even- and odd-numbered clusters toward O2 could be quantified experimentally. To obtain information about the elementary steps, we additionally performed density functional theory calculations. The results show that for both even- and odd-numbered clusters the formation of the most stable dioxide species, [M(x)O2](-), proceeds via the less stable peroxo species, [M(x)(+)···O2(2-)](-), which contains M-O-O-M moieties. We conclude that the formation of these peroxo intermediates may be a reason for the decreased reactivity of the metal clusters toward O2. This could be one of the main reasons why O2 reactions with metal surfaces proceed more slowly than Cl2 reactions with such surfaces, even though O2 reactions with both Al metal and Al clusters are more exothermic than are reactions of Cl2 with them. Furthermore, our results indicate that the spin-forbidden reactions of (3)O2 with closed-shell clusters and the spin-allowed reactions with open-shell clusters to give singlet [M(x)(+)···O2(2-)](-) are the root cause for the observed even/odd differences in reactivity.

  19. Gas-Phase Reactions of Cationic Vanadium-Phosphorus Oxide Clusters with C2Hx (x=4, 6): A DFT-Based Analysis of Reactivity Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Dietl, Nicolas; Zhang, Xinhao; van der Linde, Christian; Beyer, Martin K; Schlangen, Maria; Schwarz, Helmut

    2013-01-01

    The reactivities of the adamantane-like heteronuclear vanadium-phosphorus oxygen cluster ions [VxP4−xO10].+ (x=0, 2–4) towards hydrocarbons strongly depend on the V/P ratio of the clusters. Possible mechanisms for the gas-phase reactions of these heteronuclear cations with ethene and ethane have been elucidated by means of DFT-based calculations; homolytic C–H bond activation constitutes the initial step, and for all systems the P–O. unit of the clusters serves as the reactive site. More complex oxidation processes, such as oxygen-atom transfer to, or oxidative dehydrogenation of the hydrocarbons require the presence of a vanadium atom to provide the electronic prerequisites which are necessary to bring about the 2e− reduction of the cationic clusters. PMID:23322620

  20. Compound nucleus formation probability PCN determined within the dynamical cluster-decay model for various "hot" fusion reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Arshdeep; Chopra, Sahila; Gupta, Raj K.

    2014-08-01

    The compound nucleus (CN) fusion/formation probability PCN is defined and its detailed variations with the CN excitation energy E*, center-of-mass energy Ec .m., fissility parameter χ, CN mass number ACN, and Coulomb interaction parameter Z1Z2 are studied for the first time within the dynamical cluster-decay model (DCM). The model is a nonstatistical description of the decay of a CN to all possible processes. The (total) fusion cross section σfusion is the sum of the CN and noncompound nucleus (nCN) decay cross sections, each calculated as the dynamical fragmentation process. The CN cross section σCN is constituted of evaporation residues and fusion-fission, including intermediate-mass fragments, each calculated for all contributing decay fragments (A1, A2) in terms of their formation and barrier penetration probabilities P0 and P. The nCN cross section σnCN is determined as the quasi-fission (qf) process, where P0=1 and P is calculated for the entrance-channel nuclei. The DCM, with effects of deformations and orientations of nuclei included in it, is used to study the PCN for about a dozen "hot" fusion reactions forming a CN of mass number A ˜100 to superheavy nuclei and for various different nuclear interaction potentials. Interesting results are that PCN=1 for complete fusion, but PCN<1 or PCN≪1 due to the nCN contribution, depending strongly on different parameters of the entrance-channel reaction but found to be independent of the nuclear interaction potentials used.

  1. Experimental and theoretical study of the reactions between MO2- (M = Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, and Zn) cluster anions and hydrogen sulfide.

    PubMed

    Jia, Mei-Ye; Ding, Xun-Lei; He, Sheng-Gui; Ge, Mao-Fa

    2013-09-05

    Transition metal oxide cluster anions M(m)(18)O(n)(-) (M = Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, and Zn) were prepared by laser ablation and reacted with H2S in a fast flow reactor under thermal collision conditions. A time-of-flight mass spectrometer was used to detect the cluster distributions before and after the interactions with H2S. The experiments reveal a suite of oxygen/sulfur (O/S) exchange and oxygen/sulfydryl (O/SH) exchange reactions. The O/S exchange reaction to release water was evidenced for all of the MO2(-) cluster anions: MO2(-) + H2S → MOS(-) + H2O, whereas the O/SH exchange reaction to derive MOSH(-) and OH species was only observed for reactions of NiO2(-), CuO2(-), and ZnO2(-). Density functional theory calculations were performed for reaction mechanisms of MO2(-) + H2S (M = Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, and Zn). The computational results are generally in good agreement with the experimental results. This gas-phase study provides an insight into the metal dependent reactivity in the removal of H2S over metal oxides.

  2. [Cold-induced urticaria].

    PubMed

    Delorme, N; Drouet, M; Thibaudeau, A; Verret, J L

    2002-09-01

    Cold urticaria is characterized by the development of urticaria, usually superficial and/or angioedematous reaction after cold contact. It was found predominantly in young women. The diagnosis is based on the history and ice cube test. Patients with a negative ice cube test may have represented systemic cold urticaria (atypical acquired cold urticaria) induced by general body cooling. The pathogenesis is poorly understood. Cold urticaria can be classified into acquired and familial disorders, with an autosomal dominant inheritance. Idiopathic cold urticaria is most common type but the research of a cryopathy is necessary. Therapy is often difficult. It is essential that the patient be warned of the dangers of swimming in cold water because systemic hypotension can occur. H1 antihistamines can be used for treatment of cold urticaria but the clinical responses are highly variable. The combination with an H2 antagonists is more effective. Doxepin may be useful in the treatment. Leukotriene receptor antagonists may be a novel, promising drug entity. In patients who do not respond to previous treatments, induction of cold tolerance may be tried.

  3. The Aftermath of a Suicide Cluster in the Age of Online Social Networking: A Qualitative Analysis of Adolescent Grief Reactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heffel, Carly J.; Riggs, Shelley A.; Ruiz, John M.; Ruggles, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Although suicide clusters have been identified in many populations, research exploring the role of online communication in the aftermath of a suicide cluster is extremely limited. This study used the Consensual Qualitative Research method to analyze interviews with ten high school students 1 year after a suicide cluster in a small suburban school…

  4. Structure Determination and Excited State Proton Transfer Reaction of 1-NAPHTHOL-AMMONIA Clusters in the S_{1} State Studied by Uv-Ir Mid-Ir Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshikawa, Shunpei; Miyazaki, Mitsuhiko; Martin, Weiler; Ishikawa, Haruki; Fujii, Masaaki

    2013-06-01

    1-naphthol ammonia clusters have been studied long time as a benchmark system of the excited state proton transfer (ESPT) reactions. Understanding the ESPT reaction in this system has still not been fully established. To detect the cluster size dependence of the S_{1} state properties, many researcher extensively investigated such as emission spectra, lifetime, solvents (ammonia) evaporation pattern. Curiously, cluster structure that is fundamental to discuss the reaction has not been determined for the system. Thus we applied an IR spectroscopy to the S_{1} states of the system to determine the cluster structure and to discuss the minimum size inducing the ionic dissociation of the O-H bond in the S_{1} state. IR spectra were recorded not only the O-H and N-H stretching region (3 {μ}m) but also the skeletal vibrational region (5.5-10 {μ}m). Though O-H and N-H stretching vibrations do not provide useful structural information due to the broadness, the skeletal vibrations hold the sharpness even in the S_{1} states. Changes in the skeletal vibrations due to the ammonia solvation, e.g. C-O stretching and C-O-H bending, will be discussed based on a comparison with theoretical calculations. O. Cheshnovsky and S. Leutwylar, J. Chem. Phys. 1, 4127 (1988). S. K. Kim et al., Chem. Phys. lett. 228, 369 (1994). C. Dedonder-Lardeux et al., Phys. Chem, Chem, Phys. 3, 4316 (2001).

  5. Does the MgO(100)-support facilitate the reaction of nitrogen and hydrogen molecules catalyzed by Zr2Pd2 clusters? A computational study.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsov, Aleksey E; Musaev, Djamaladdin G

    2010-03-01

    Reactions of the "naked" and MgO(100) supported Zr(2)Pd(2) cluster with nitrogen and four hydrogen molecules were studied at the density functional level using the periodic slab approach (VASP). It was shown that adsorption of the Zr(2)Pd(2) cluster on the MgO(100) surface does not change its gas-phase geometry and electronic structure significantly. In spite of this the N(2) coordination to the MgO(100)-supported Zr(2)Pd(2) cluster, I/MgO, is found to be almost 30 kcal/mol less favorable than for the "naked" one. The addition of the first H(2) molecule to the resulting II/MgO, that is, II/MgO + H(2) --> IV/MgO reaction, proceeds with a relatively small, 9.0 kcal/mol, barrier and is exothermic by 8.3 kcal/mol. The same reaction for the "naked" Zr(2)Pd(2) cluster requires a slightly larger barrier (10.1 kcal/mol) and is highly exothermic (by 23.3 kcal/mol). The interaction of the H(2) molecule with the intermediate IV/MgO (i.e., the second H(2) molecule addition to II/MgO) requires larger energy barrier, 23.3 kcal/mol vs 8.8 kcal/mol for the "naked" cluster, and is exothermic by 20.5 kcal/mol (vs 18.2 kcal/mol reported for the "naked" Zr(2)Pd(2) cluster). The addition of the H(2) molecule to VI/MgO and VI (i.e., the third H(2) molecule addition to II/MgO and II, respectively) requires similar barriers, 12.0 versus 16.8 kcal/mol, respectively, but is highly exothermic for the supported cluster compared to the "naked" one, 13.6 versus 0.1 kcal/mol. The addition of the fourth H(2) molecule occurs with almost twice larger barrier for the "naked" cluster compared to the adsorbed species, 30.7 versus 15.9 kcal/mol. Furthermore, this reaction step is endothermic (by 11.4 kcal/mol) for the gas-phase cluster but exothermic by 7.8 kcal/mol for the adsorbed cluster. Dissociation of the formed hydrazine molecule from the on-surface complex X/MgO and the "naked" complex X requires 19.1 and 26.3 kcal/mol, respectively. Thus, the Zr(2)Pd(2) adsorption on the MgO(100) surface

  6. Common cold

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000678.htm Common cold To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The common cold most often causes a runny nose, nasal congestion, ...

  7. Helium Find Thaws the Cold Fusion Trail.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennisi, E.

    1991-01-01

    Reported is a study of cold fusion in which trace amounts of helium, possible evidence of an actual fusion reaction, were found. Research methodology is detailed. The controversy over the validity of experimental results with cold fusion are reviewed. (CW)

  8. {alpha}-cluster states in {sup 38}Ar observed via the {sup 34}S({sup 7}Li,t{alpha}){sup 34}S reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Fukada, M.; Ohmura, M.; Harima, F.; Ogino, K.; Takimoto, K.; Ohkubo, S.

    2005-06-01

    To study the {alpha}-cluster states in the {sup 38}Ar nucleus, angular correlation functions between t and {alpha} in the {sup 34}S({sup 7}Li, t{alpha}){sup 38}Ar reaction have been measured. Seven states at 10.2, 10.8, 11.4, 12.2, 12.7, 14.3, and 15.0 MeV were newly observed.

  9. Guided ion beam studies of the reactions of Con+ (n=1-18) with N2: Cobalt cluster mononitride and dinitride bond energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fuyi; Li, Ming; Tan, Lin; Armentrout, P. B.

    2008-05-01

    The reactions of Con+ (n=1-18) with N2 are measured as a function of kinetic energy over a range of 0-15eV in a guided ion beam tandem mass spectrometer. A variety of Com+, ComN+, and ComN2+ (m⩽n) product ions are observed, all in endothermic processes, with collision-induced dissociation dominating the products for all clusters. Bond dissociation energies for both cobalt cluster nitrides and dinitrides are derived from threshold analysis of the energy dependence of the endothermic reactions using several different approaches. These values show only a mild dependence on cluster size over the range studied, although the Co13+-N bond energy is relatively weak. The bond energies of Con+-N for larger clusters suggest that a reasonable value for the desorption energy of atomic nitrogen from bulk phase cobalt is 6.3±0.2eV, which is somewhat lower than the only available value in the literature, an estimate based on the enthalpy of formation of bulk cobalt nitride. The trends in the cobalt nitride thermochemistry are also compared to previously determined metal-metal bond energies, D0(Con+-Co), and to D0(Fen+-N). Implications for catalytic ammonia production using cobalt versus iron are discussed.

  10. Reaction of anionic and cationic silicon clusters with tungsten hexafluoride studied by fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reents, W. D., Jr.; Mandich, M. L.; Bondybey, V. E.

    1986-10-01

    Anionic and cationic silicon clusters react exothermically with WF 6 to give a variety of tungsten and silicon fluorides. All the silicon anionic clusters transfer their charge to WF 6. The electron affinities of Si 2-6 are estimated to be less than the electron affinity of WF 6 (350 kJ/mole (3.6 eV)).

  11. Synthesis and Ligand-Exchange Reactions of a Tri-Tungsten Cluster with Applications in Biomedical Imaging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noey, Elizabeth; Curtis, Jeff C.; Tam, Sylvia; Pham, David M.; Jones, Ella F.

    2011-01-01

    In this experiment students are exposed to concepts in inorganic synthesis and various spectroscopies as applied to a tri-tungsten cluster with applications in biomedical imaging. The tungsten-acetate cluster, Na[W[superscript 3](mu-O)[subscript 2](CH[superscript 3]COO)[superscript 9

  12. How Accurate Can a Local Coupled Cluster Approach Be in Computing the Activation Energies of Late-Transition-Metal-Catalyzed Reactions with Au, Pt, and Ir?

    PubMed

    Kang, Runhua; Lai, Wenzhen; Yao, Jiannian; Shaik, Sason; Chen, Hui

    2012-09-11

    To improve the accuracy of local coupled cluster (LCC) methods in computing activation energies, we propose herein a new computational scheme. Its applications to various types of late-transition-metal-catalyzed reactions involving Au, Pt, and Ir indicate that the new corrective approach for LCC methods can downsize the mean unsigned deviation and maximum deviation, from the CCSD(T)/CBS reference, to about 0.3 and 0.9 kcal/mol. Using this method, we also calibrated the performance of popular density functionals, with respect to the same test set of reactions. It is concluded that the best functional is the general-purpose double hybrid functional B2GP-PLYP. Other well-performing functionals include the "kinetic" functionals M06-2X and BMK, which have a large percentage of HF exchange, and general-purpose functionals like PBE0 and wB97X. Comparatively, general-purpose functionals like PBE0 and TPSSh perform much better than the tested "kinetic" functionals for Pt-/Ir-catalyzed reactions, while the opposite is true for Au-catalyzed reactions. In contrast, wB97X performs more uniformly in these two classes of reactions. These findings hint that even within the scope of late transition metals, different types of reactions may require different types of optimal DFT methods. Empirical dispersion correction of DFT was found to have a small or no effect on the studied reactions barriers.

  13. Equilibrium and rate constants, and reaction mechanism of the HF dissociation in the HF(H2O)7 cluster by ab initio rare event simulations.

    PubMed

    Elena, Alin Marin; Meloni, Simone; Ciccotti, Giovanni

    2013-12-12

    We perform restrained hybrid Monte Carlo (MC) simulations to compute the equilibrium constant of the dissociation reaction of HF in HF(H2O)7. We find that the HF is a stronger acid in the cluster than in the bulk, and its acidity is higher at lower T. The latter phenomenon has a vibrational entropic origin, resulting from a counterintuitive balance of intra- and intermolecular terms. We find also a temperature dependence of the reactions mechanism. At low T (≤225 K) the dissociation reaction follows a concerted path, with the H atoms belonging to the relevant hydrogen bond chain moving synchronously. At higher T (300 K), the first two hydrogen atoms move together, forming an intermediate metastable state having the structure of an eigen ion (H9O4(+)), and then the third hydrogen migrates completing the reaction. We also compute the dissociation rate constant, kRP. At very low T (≤75 K) kRP depends strongly on the temperature, whereas it gets almost constant at higher T’s. With respect to the bulk, the HF dissociation in the HF(H2O)7 is about 1 order of magnitude faster. This is due to a lower free energy barrier for the dissociation in the cluster.

  14. The cold reading technique.

    PubMed

    Dutton, D L

    1988-04-15

    For many people, belief in the paranormal derives from personal experience of face-to-face interviews with astrologers, palm readers, aura and Tarot readers, and spirit mediums. These encounters typically involve cold reading, a process in which a reader makes calculated guesses about a client's background and problems and, depending on the reaction, elaborates a reading which seems to the client so uniquely appropriate that it carries with it the illusion of having been produced by paranormal means. The cold reading process is shown to depend initially on the Barnum effect, the tendency for people to embrace generalized personality descriptions as idiosyncratically their own. Psychological research into the Barnum effect is critically reviewed, and uses of the effect by a professional magician are described. This is followed by detailed analysis of the cold reading performances of a spirit medium. Future research should investigate the degree to which cold readers may have convinced themselves that they actually possess psychic or paranormal abilities.

  15. Water-soluble Mo3S4 clusters bearing hydroxypropyl diphosphine ligands: synthesis, crystal structure, aqueous speciation, and kinetics of substitution reactions.

    PubMed

    Basallote, Manuel G; Fernández-Trujillo, M Jesús; Pino-Chamorro, Jose Ángel; Beltrán, Tomás F; Corao, Carolina; Llusar, Rosa; Sokolov, Maxim; Vicent, Cristian

    2012-06-18

    The [Mo(3)S(4)Cl(3)(dhprpe)(3)](+) (1(+)) cluster cation has been prepared by reaction between Mo(3)S(4)Cl(4)(PPh(3))(3) (solvent)(2) and the water-soluble 1,2-bis(bis(hydroxypropyl)phosphino)ethane (dhprpe, L) ligand. The crystal structure of [1](2)[Mo(6)Cl(14)] has been determined by X-ray diffraction methods and shows the typical incomplete cuboidal structure with a capping and three bridging sulfides. The octahedral coordination around each metal center is completed with a chlorine and two phosphorus atoms of the diphosphine ligand. Depending on the pH, the hydroxo group of the functionalized diphosphine can substitute the chloride ligands and coordinate to the cluster core to give new clusters with tridentate deprotonated dhprpe ligands of formula [Mo(3)S(4)(dhprpe-H)(3)](+) (2(+)). A detailed study based on stopped-flow, (31)P{(1)H} NMR, and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry techniques has been carried out to understand the behavior of acid-base equilibria and the kinetics of interconversion between the 1(+) and the 2(+) forms. Both conversion of 1(+) to 2(+) and its reverse process occur in a single kinetic step, so that reactions proceed at the three metal centers with statistically controlled kinetics. The values of the rate constants under different conditions are used to discuss on the mechanisms of opening and closing of the chelate rings with coordination or dissociation of chloride.

  16. Gold atomic clusters extracting the valence electrons to shield the carbon monoxide passivation on near-monolayer core-shell nanocatalysts in methanol oxidation reactions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tsan-Yao; Li, Hong Dao; Lee, Guo-Wei; Huang, Po-Chun; Yang, Po-Wei; Liu, Yu-Ting; Liao, Yen-Fa; Jeng, Horng-Tay; Lin, Deng-Sung; Lin, Tsang-Lang

    2015-06-21

    Atomic-scale gold clusters were intercalated at the inter-facet corner sites of Pt-shell Ru-core nanocatalysts with near-monolayer shell thickness. We demonstrated that these unique clusters could serve as a drain of valence electrons in the kink region of the core-shell heterojunction. As jointly revealed by density functional theory calculations and valence band spectra, these Au clusters extract core-level electrons to the valence band. They prevent corrosion due to protonation and enhance the tolerance of CO by increasing the electronegativity at the outermost surface of the NCs during the methanol oxidation reaction (MOR). In these circumstances, the retained current density of Pt-shell Ru-core NCs is doubled in a long-term (2 hours) MOR at a fixed voltage (0.5 V vs. SCE) by intercalating these sub-nanometer gold clusters. Such novel structural confinement provides a possible strategy for developing direct-methanol fuel cell (DMFC) modules with high power and stability.

  17. Si-rich W silicide films composed of W-atom-encapsulated Si clusters deposited using gas-phase reactions of WF6 with SiH4.

    PubMed

    Okada, Naoya; Uchida, Noriyuki; Kanayama, Toshihiko

    2016-02-28

    We formed Si-rich W silicide films composed of Sin clusters, each of which encapsulates a W atom (WSi(n) clusters with 8 < n ≤ ∼ 12), by using a gas-phase reaction between WF6 and SiH4 in a hot-wall reactor. The hydrogenated WSi(n)H(x) clusters with reduced F concentration were synthesized in a heated gas phase and subsequently deposited on a substrate heated to 350-420 °C, where they dehydrogenated and coalesced into the film. Under a gas pressure of SiH4 high enough for the WSi(n)H(x) reactant to collide a sufficient number of times with SiH4 molecules before reaching the substrate, the resulting film was composed of WSi(n) clusters with a uniform n, which was determined by the gas temperature. The formed films were amorphous semiconductors with an optical gap of ∼0.8-1.5 eV and an electrical mobility gap of ∼0.05-0.12 eV, both of which increased as n increased from 8 to 12. We attribute this dependence to the reduction of randomness in the Si network as n increased, which decreased the densities of band tail states and localized states.

  18. Clumpy cold dark matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silk, Joseph; Stebbins, Albert

    1993-01-01

    A study is conducted of cold dark matter (CDM) models in which clumpiness will inhere, using cosmic strings and textures suited to galaxy formation. CDM clumps of 10 million solar mass/cu pc density are generated at about z(eq) redshift, with a sizable fraction surviving. Observable implications encompass dark matter cores in globular clusters and in galactic nuclei. Results from terrestrial dark matter detection experiments may be affected by clumpiness in the Galactic halo.

  19. Origin of high oxygen reduction reaction activity of Pt12 and strategy to obtain better catalyst using sub-nanosized Pt-alloy clusters

    PubMed Central

    Miyazaki, Kasumi; Mori, Hirotoshi

    2017-01-01

    In the present study, methods to enhance the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity of sub-nanosized Pt clusters were investigated in a theoretical manner. Using ab initio molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo simulations based on density functional theory, we have succeeded in determining the origin of the superior ORR activity of Pt12 compared to that of Pt13. That is, it was clarified that the electronic structure of Pt12 fluctuates to a greater extent compared to that of Pt13, which leads to stronger resistance against catalyst poisoning by O/OH. Based on this conclusion, a set of sub-nanosized Pt-alloy clusters was also explored to find catalysts with better ORR activities and lower financial costs. It was suggested that Ga4Pt8, Ge4Pt8, and Sn4Pt8 would be good candidates for ORR catalysts. PMID:28349985

  20. Idiopathic cold urticaria and anaphylaxis.

    PubMed

    Işk, Sakine; Arkan-Ayyldz, Zeynep; Sozmen, Sule Caglayan; Karaman, Özkan; Uzuner, Nevin

    2014-01-01

    Cold urticaria (CU) is a subtype of physical urticaria characterized by the development of urticaria and angioedema after cold exposure. Symptoms typically occur minutes after skin exposure to cold air, liquids, and objects. Most common method to confirm the diagnosis of CU is through ice cube challenge test, but 20% of patients with CU have negative ice cube challenge test results. The greatest risk with this kind of urticaria is the development of systemic reaction resulting in a hemodynamic collapse during generalized cold exposure. We report a case of a patient who developed CU and anaphylaxis during swimming and diving in the sea.

  1. The H + HeH(+) → He + H2(+) reaction from the ultra-cold regime to the three-body breakup: exact quantum mechanical integral cross sections and rate constants.

    PubMed

    De Fazio, Dario

    2014-06-21

    In this work, we present a quantum mechanical scattering study of the title reaction from 1 mK to 2000 K. Total integral cross sections and thermal rate constants are compared with previous theoretical and experimental data and with simpler theoretical models to understand the range of validity of the approximations used in the previous studies. The obtained quantum reactive observables have been found to be nearly insensitive to the roto-vibrational energy of the reactants at high temperatures. More sensitive to the reactant's roto-vibrational energy are the data in the cold and ultra-cold regimes. The implications of the new data presented here in the early universe scenario are also discussed and analyzed.

  2. Cold injuries.

    PubMed

    Kruse, R J

    1995-01-01

    There are two categories of cold injury. The first is hypothermia, which is a systemic injury to cold, and the second is frostbite, which is a local injury. Throughout history, entire armies, from George Washington to the Germans on the Russian Front in World War II, have fallen prey to prolonged cold exposure. Cold injury is common and can occur in all seasons if ambient temperature is lower than the core body temperature. In the 1985 Boston Marathon, even though it was 76 degrees and sunny, there were 75 runners treated for hypothermia. In general, humans adapt poorly to cold exposure. Children are at particular risk because of their relatively greater surface area/body mass ratio, causing them to cool even more rapidly than adults. Because of this, the human's best defense against cold injury is to limit his/her exposure to cold and to dress appropriately. If cold injury has occurred and is mild, often simple passive rewarming such as dry blankets and a warm room are sufficient treatment.

  3. Size, adsorption site, and spin effects in the reaction of Al clusters with water molecules: Al17 and Al28 as examples.

    PubMed

    Álvarez-Barcia, Sonia; Flores, Jesús R

    2012-08-02

    The first step of the reaction of two relatively large Alm clusters (m = 17, 28) with a few water molecules has been studied by electronic structure methods. The complexes Alm·(H2O)n (n = 1-2) have been characterized, and the saddle points corresponding to the first step in the reaction, namely, formation of HAlmOH·(H2O)n-1 systems, have been located. The Al28 cluster is special in the sense it has two electronic states, singlet and triplet, which are very close in energy and also have quite similar equilibrium structures. The preferred adsorption and reaction sites have been determined. We find quite clear preferences toward some sites, the effect of cluster distortion being moderately significant in the stability of the complexes. The interaction with water does not appear, in general, to bring the triplet state of the Al28·(H2O)2 adducts below the singlet; not even the corresponding saddle points appear to be lower in energy. The rate coefficients, tunneling transmission factors, and activation free energies have been computed and compared with those of the Al13 and Al3 clusters, even with those of the Al atom. It turns out the rates are quite close to those of Al3 and much larger than those of Al and Al13. There is no dramatic difference between the reactivity of the singlet and triplet state of Al28; however, there are very significant differences between different sites. Finally, we studied the interaction between the lowest-lying singlet and triplet states of Al28 through multireference configuration interaction (MRCI) spin-orbit computations. The vertical excitation energies corresponding to a number of low-lying singlet and triplet states are also determined by MRCI computations. It turns out that the spin-orbit interaction is very weak, which suggests that both states, the lowest-lying singlet and triplet, could evolve somehow independently, at least when interacting with closed-shell molecules. It is suggested that the situation could be quite

  4. Clustering effects in fusion evaporation reactions with light even-even N = Z nuclei. The {sup 24}Mg and {sup 28}Si cases

    SciTech Connect

    Morelli, L. D’Agostino, M.; Bruno, M.; Baiocco, G.; Gulminelli, F.; Cinausero, M.; Gramegna, F.; Marchi, T.; Degerlier, M.; Fabris, D.; Barlini, S.; Bini, M.; Casini, G.; Gelli, N.; Olmi, A.; Pasquali, G.; Piantelli, S.

    2015-10-15

    In the recent years, cluster structures have been evidenced in many ground and excited states of light nuclei [1, 2]. Within the currently ongoing experimental campaign by the NUCL-EX collaboration we have measured the {sup 12}C+{sup 12}C and {sup 14}N+{sup 10}B reactions at 95 MeV and 80 MeV respectively, and compared experimental data corresponding to complete fusion of target and projectile into an excited {sup 24}Mg nucleus to the results of a pure statistical model[3, 4]. We found clear deviations from the statstical model in the decay pattern: emission channels involving multiple α particles are more probable than expected from a purely statistical behavior. To continue the investigation on light systems, we have recentely measured the {sup 16}O+{sup 12}C reaction at three different beam energies, namely E{sub beam} = 90, 110 and 130 MeV.

  5. A multi purpose source chamber at the PLEIADES beamline at SOLEIL for spectroscopic studies of isolated species: Cold molecules, clusters, and nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindblad, Andreas; Söderström, Johan; Nicolas, Christophe; Robert, Emmanuel; Miron, Catalin

    2013-11-01

    This paper describes the philosophy and design goals regarding the construction of a versatile sample environment: a source capable of producing beams of atoms, molecules, clusters, and nanoparticles in view of studying their interaction with short wavelength (vacuum ultraviolet and x-ray) synchrotron radiation. In the design, specific care has been taken of (a) the use standard components, (b) ensuring modularity, i.e., that swiftly switching between different experimental configurations was possible. To demonstrate the efficiency of the design, proof-of-principle experiments have been conducted by recording x-ray absorption and photoelectron spectra from isolated nanoparticles (SiO2) and free mixed clusters (Ar/Xe). The results from those experiments are showcased and briefly discussed.

  6. A multi purpose source chamber at the PLEIADES beamline at SOLEIL for spectroscopic studies of isolated species: Cold molecules, clusters, and nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Lindblad, Andreas; Söderström, Johan; Nicolas, Christophe; Robert, Emmanuel; Miron, Catalin

    2013-11-15

    This paper describes the philosophy and design goals regarding the construction of a versatile sample environment: a source capable of producing beams of atoms, molecules, clusters, and nanoparticles in view of studying their interaction with short wavelength (vacuum ultraviolet and x-ray) synchrotron radiation. In the design, specific care has been taken of (a) the use standard components, (b) ensuring modularity, i.e., that swiftly switching between different experimental configurations was possible. To demonstrate the efficiency of the design, proof-of-principle experiments have been conducted by recording x-ray absorption and photoelectron spectra from isolated nanoparticles (SiO{sub 2}) and free mixed clusters (Ar/Xe). The results from those experiments are showcased and briefly discussed.

  7. A multi purpose source chamber at the PLEIADES beamline at SOLEIL for spectroscopic studies of isolated species: cold molecules, clusters, and nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Lindblad, Andreas; Söderström, Johan; Nicolas, Christophe; Robert, Emmanuel; Miron, Catalin

    2013-11-01

    This paper describes the philosophy and design goals regarding the construction of a versatile sample environment: a source capable of producing beams of atoms, molecules, clusters, and nanoparticles in view of studying their interaction with short wavelength (vacuum ultraviolet and x-ray) synchrotron radiation. In the design, specific care has been taken of (a) the use standard components, (b) ensuring modularity, i.e., that swiftly switching between different experimental configurations was possible. To demonstrate the efficiency of the design, proof-of-principle experiments have been conducted by recording x-ray absorption and photoelectron spectra from isolated nanoparticles (SiO2) and free mixed clusters (Ar/Xe). The results from those experiments are showcased and briefly discussed.

  8. Clusters: Elucidating the dynamics of ionization events and ensuing reactions in the condensed phase. Final technical report, March 1, 1991--February 28, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Castleman, A.W. Jr.

    1994-10-01

    Chemical reactions that proceed following either a photophysical or ionizing event, are directly influenced by the mechanisms of energy transfer and dissipation away from the site of absorption. Neighboring solvent or solute molecules can affect this by collisional deactivation (removal of energy), through effects in which dissociating molecules are kept in relatively close proximity for comparatively long periods of time due to the presence of the solvent, and in other ways where the solvent influences the energetics of the reaction coordinate. Research on clusters offers promise of elucidating the molecular details of these processes. The studies have focused on providing critical information on problems in radiation biology through investigations of reactions of molecules which simulate functional groups in biological systems, as they proceed following the absorption of ionizing radiation. The overall objective of the program has been to undertake basic underpinning research that contributes to a quantification of the behavior of radionuclides and pollutants associated with advanced energy activities after these materials emanate from their source and are transferred through the environment to the biota and human receptor. Some of the studies have dealt with the interaction of electromagnetic radiation with matter yielding new data that finds value in assessing photoinduced transformation of pollutants including reactions which take place on aerosol particles, as well as those of species which become transformed into aerosols as a result of their chemical and physical interactions.

  9. Elementary steps of the catalytic NO{sub x} reduction with NH{sub 3}: Cluster studies on reaction paths and energetics at vanadium oxide substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Gruber, M.; Hermann, K.

    2013-12-28

    We consider different reaction scenarios of the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO in the presence of ammonia at perfect as well as reduced vanadium oxide surfaces modeled by V{sub 2}O{sub 5}(010) without and with oxygen vacancies. Geometric and energetic details as well as reaction paths are evaluated using extended cluster models together with density-functional theory. Based on earlier work of adsorption, diffusion, and reaction of the different surface species participating in the SCR we confirm that at Brønsted acid sites (i.e., OH groups) of the perfect oxide surface nitrosamide, NH{sub 2}NO, forms a stable intermediate. Here adsorption of NH{sub 3} results in NH{sub 4} surface species which reacts with gas phase NO to produce the intermediate. Nitrosamide is also found as intermediate of the SCR near Lewis acid sites of the reduced oxide surface (i.e., near oxygen vacancies). However, here the adsorbed NH{sub 3} species is dehydrogenated to surface NH{sub 2} before it reacts with gas phase NO to produce the intermediate. The calculations suggest that reaction barriers for the SCR are overall higher near Brønsted acid sites of the perfect surface compared with Lewis acid sites of the reduced surface, examined for the first time in this work. The theoretical results are consistent with experimental findings and confirm the importance of surface reduction for the SCR process.

  10. Elementary steps of the catalytic NOx reduction with NH3: Cluster studies on reaction paths and energetics at vanadium oxide substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruber, M.; Hermann, K.

    2013-12-01

    We consider different reaction scenarios of the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO in the presence of ammonia at perfect as well as reduced vanadium oxide surfaces modeled by V2O5(010) without and with oxygen vacancies. Geometric and energetic details as well as reaction paths are evaluated using extended cluster models together with density-functional theory. Based on earlier work of adsorption, diffusion, and reaction of the different surface species participating in the SCR we confirm that at Brønsted acid sites (i.e., OH groups) of the perfect oxide surface nitrosamide, NH2NO, forms a stable intermediate. Here adsorption of NH3 results in NH4 surface species which reacts with gas phase NO to produce the intermediate. Nitrosamide is also found as intermediate of the SCR near Lewis acid sites of the reduced oxide surface (i.e., near oxygen vacancies). However, here the adsorbed NH3 species is dehydrogenated to surface NH2 before it reacts with gas phase NO to produce the intermediate. The calculations suggest that reaction barriers for the SCR are overall higher near Brønsted acid sites of the perfect surface compared with Lewis acid sites of the reduced surface, examined for the first time in this work. The theoretical results are consistent with experimental findings and confirm the importance of surface reduction for the SCR process.

  11. Quantum Chemical Insight into the LiF Interlayer Effects in Organic Electronics: Reactions between Al Atom and LiF Clusters.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shui-Xing; Kan, Yu-He; Li, Hai-Bin; Zhao, Liang; Wu, Yong; Su, Zhong-Min

    2015-08-06

    It is well known that the aluminum cathode performs dramatically better when a thin lithium fluoride (LiF) layer inserted in organic electronic devices. The doping effect induced by the librated Li atom via the chemical reactions producing AlF3 as byproduct was previously proposed as one of possible mechanisms. However, the underlying mechanism discussion is quite complicated and not fully understood so far, although the LiF interlayer is widely used. In this paper, we perform theoretical calculations to consider the reactions between an aluminum atom and distinct LiF clusters. The reaction pathways of the Al-(LiF)n (n = 2, 4, 16) systems were discovered and the energetics were theoretically evaluated. The release of Li atom and the formation of AlF3 were found in two different chemical reaction routes. The undissociated Al-(LiF)n systems have chances to change to some structures with loosely bound electrons. Our findings about the interacted Al-(LiF)n systems reveal new insights into the LiF interlayer effects in organic electronics applications.

  12. On the Critical Effect of the Metal (Mo vs. W) on the [3+2] Cycloaddition Reaction of M3 S4 Clusters with Alkynes: Insights from Experiment and Theory.

    PubMed

    Bustelo, Emilio; Gushchin, Artem L; Fernández-Trujillo, M Jesús; Basallote, Manuel G; Algarra, Andrés G

    2015-10-12

    Whereas the cluster [Mo3 S4 (acac)3 (py)3 ](+) ([1](+) , acac=acetylacetonate, py=pyridine) reacts with a variety of alkynes, the cluster [W3 S4 (acac)3 (py)3 ](+) ([2](+) ) remains unaffected under the same conditions. The reactions of cluster [1](+) show polyphasic kinetics, and in all cases clusters bearing a bridging dithiolene moiety are formed in the first step through the concerted [3+2] cycloaddition between the C≡C atoms of the alkyne and a Mo(μ-S)2 moiety of the cluster. A computational study has been conducted to analyze the effect of the metal on these concerted [3+2] cycloaddition reactions. The calculations suggest that the reactions of cluster [2](+) with alkynes feature ΔG(≠) values only slightly larger than its molybdenum analogue, however, the differences in the reaction free energies between both metal clusters and the same alkyne reach up to approximately 10 kcal mol(-1) , therefore indicating that the differences in the reactivity are essentially thermodynamic. The activation strain model (ASM) has been used to get more insights into the critical effect of the metal center in these cycloadditions, and the results reveal that the change in reactivity is entirely explained on the basis of the differences in the interaction energies Eint between the cluster and the alkyne. Further decomposition of the Eint values through the localized molecular orbital-energy decomposition analysis (LMO-EDA) indicates that substitution of the Mo atoms in cluster [1](+) by W induces changes in the electronic structure of the cluster that result in weaker intra- and inter-fragment orbital interactions.

  13. Direct observation of preferential processing of clustered abasic DNA damages with APE1 in TATA box and CpG island by reaction kinetics and fluorescence dynamics.

    PubMed

    Singh, Vandana; Kumari, Bhavini; Maity, Banibrata; Seth, Debabrata; Das, Prolay

    2014-01-01

    Sequences like the core element of TATA box and CpG island are frequently encountered in the genome and related to transcription. The fate of repair of clustered abasic sites in such sequences of genomic importance is largely unknown. This prompted us to investigate the sequence dependence of cleavage efficiency of APE1 enzyme at abasic sites within the core sequences of TATA box and CpG island using fluorescence dynamics and reaction kinetics. Simultaneous molecular dynamics study through steady state and time resolved fluorescence spectroscopy using unique ethidium bromide dye release assay confirmed an elevated amount of abasic site cleavage of the TATA box sequence as compared to the core CpG island. Reaction kinetics showed that catalytic efficiency of APE1 for abasic site cleavage of core CpG island sequence was ∼4 times lower as compared to that of the TATA box. Higher value of Km was obtained from the core CpG island sequence than the TATA box sequence. This suggests a greater binding effect of APE1 enzyme on TATA sequence that signifies a prominent role of the sequence context of the DNA substrate. Evidently, a faster response from APE1 was obtained for clustered abasic damage repair of TATA box core sequences than CpG island consensus sequences. The neighboring bases of the abasic sites in the complementary DNA strand were found to have significant contribution in addition to the flanking bases in modulating APE1 activity. The repair refractivity of the bistranded clustered abasic sites arise from the slow processing of the second abasic site, consequently resulting in decreased overall production of potentially lethal double strand breaks.

  14. Cold intolerance

    MedlinePlus

    Some causes of cold intolerance are: Anemia Anorexia nervosa Blood vessel problems, such as Raynaud phenomenon Chronic severe illness General poor health Underactive thyroid ( hypothyroidism ) Problem with the hypothalamus (a part ...

  15. Nuclear Clusters in Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubono, S.; Binh, Dam N.; Hayakawa, S.; Hashimoto, H.; Kahl, D.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Yamaguchi, H.; Teranishi, T.; Iwasa, N.; Komatsubara, T.; Kato, S.; Khiem, Le H.

    2010-03-01

    The role of nuclear clustering is discussed for nucleosynthesis in stellar evolution with Cluster Nucleosynthesis Diagram (CND) proposed before. Special emphasis is placed on α-induced stellar reactions together with molecular states for O and C burning.

  16. Cold fusion; Myth versus reality

    SciTech Connect

    Rabinowitz, M. )

    1990-01-01

    Experiments indicate that several different nuclear reactions are taking place. Some of the experiments point to D-D fusion with a cominant tritium channel as one of the reactions. The article notes a similarity between Prometheus and the discoveries of cold fusion.

  17. Using a novel technique to shape a refractory castable by Cold Isostatic Pressing and a study of the effect of pressure on the hydration reaction of high-alumina cement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emadi, Rahmatollah; Monshi, Ahmad; Shafyei, Ali

    2007-02-01

    Calcium aluminate cements are the most hydraulically setting cements used for refractory castables. The anhydrous phases of this type of cements incorporate CA, CA2 and traces of C12A7 and alpha-alumina where C and A stand for CaO and Al2O3, respectively. Hydration starts to form the hexagonal crystals of CAH10 (H denoting H2O) and C2AH8, which convert to the cubic crystals of C3AH6 and AH3 by the passage of hydration time. In this work, Al2O3-C (alumina-graphite) castables were shaped by cold isostatic pressing at 100 to 400 bars (≈100 to 400 Kg/cm2). Hydration and conversion reactions were studied using the Ratio of Slopes Method for quantitative XRD studies after 3 and 28 days. The results showed that by increasing the pressure, the kinetics of the hydration reaction will increase and higher strengths can be obtained, which supports the idea of forming this graphite containing castable by Cold Isostatic Pressing (CIP) in industrial applications for special refractories.

  18. Buffered-cluster method for hybridization of density-functional theory and classical molecular dynamics: Application to stress-dependent reaction of H2 O on nanostructured Si

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogata, Shuji

    2005-07-01

    A hybrid density-functional-theory and molecular-dynamics simulation scheme was proposed [Ogata , Comput. Phys. Commun. 149, 30 (2002)] in which a total atomistic system is partitioned, in real space, into the quantum (QM) region whose electronic structure is calculated with the density-functional theory and the classical (CL) region treated with the interatomic potential for the molecular dynamics. In the scheme, the link-atom method that uses hydrogen atoms for termination of the QM atoms is adopted to couple the QM and CL regions mechanically. A proper choice of the QM region that retains the original atomic configuration is limited in the link-atom method. In this paper we propose a coupling method, called the buffered-cluster method, with the introduction of buffer atoms to minimize possible effects arising from the finiteness of the size of the QM region. The buffered-cluster method is applicable to any reasonable choice of the QM region in a wide range of ceramics and semiconductor materials. The accuracy of the buffered-cluster method is analyzed by applying it to crystalline Si and alumina systems, to find little differences around the QM-CL boundaries in both relaxed configuration of the atoms and recoil forces on them due to their trial displacements. The insensitivity of the atomic forces to the choice of the QM region in the buffered-cluster method makes it possible to rechoose the QM region adaptively during the hybrid simulation run for fast computation. The hybrid simulation scheme with the buffered-cluster method is applied to analyze adsorption and dissociation processes of an H2O molecule on a notched Si-slab system with or without strains, in which the H2O interacts with the notch-bottom facet of Si(100)-(2×1) dimer structure. The QM region is chosen in the system to cover the reaction region. Energy variations along the reaction paths show that the adsorption energy and the dissociation barrier of the H2O molecule on the Si(100) facet in the

  19. Photodissociation of pyrrole-ammonia clusters by velocity map imaging: mechanism for the H-atom transfer reaction.

    PubMed

    Rubio-Lago, L; Amaral, G A; Oldani, A N; Rodríguez, J D; González, M G; Pino, G A; Bañares, L

    2011-01-21

    The photodissociation dynamics of pyrrole-ammonia clusters (PyH·(NH(3))(n), n = 2-6) has been studied using a combination of velocity map imaging and non-resonant detection of the NH(4)(NH(3))(n-1) products. The excited state hydrogen-atom transfer mechanism (ESHT) is evidenced through delayed ionization and presents a threshold around 236.6 nm, in agreement with previous reports. A high resolution determination of the kinetic energy distributions (KEDs) of the products reveals slow (∼0.15 eV) and structured distributions for all the ammonia cluster masses studied. The low values of the measured kinetic energy rule out the existence of a long-lived intermediate state, as it has been proposed previously. Instead, a direct N-H bond rupture, in the fashion of the photodissociation of bare pyrrole, is proposed. This assumption is supported by a careful analysis of the structure of the measured KEDs in terms of a discrete vibrational activity of the pyrrolyl co-fragment.

  20. An accurate potential energy surface for the F + H{sub 2} → HF + H reaction by the coupled-cluster method

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jun; Sun, Zhigang E-mail: zhangdh@dicp.ac.cn; Zhang, Dong H. E-mail: zhangdh@dicp.ac.cn

    2015-01-14

    A three dimensional potential energy surface for the F + H{sub 2} → HF + H reaction has been computed by the spin unrestricted coupled cluster method with singles, doubles, triples, and perturbative quadruples [UCCSDT(2){sub Q}] using the augmented correlation-consistent polarised valence quadruple zeta basis set for the fluorine atom and the correlation-consistent polarised valence quadruple zeta basis set for the hydrogen atom. All the calculations are based on the restricted open-shell Hartree-Fock orbitals, together with the frozen core approximations, and the UCCSD(T)/complete basis set (CBS) correction term was included. The global potential energy surface was calculated by fitting the sampled ab initio points without any scaling factor for the correlation energy part using a neutral network function method. Extensive dynamics calculations have been carried out on the potential energy surface. The reaction rate constants, integral cross sections, product rotational states distribution, and forward and backward scattering as a function of collision energy of the F + HD → HF + D, F + HD → DF + H, and F + H{sub 2} reaction, were calculated by the time-independent quantum dynamics scattering theory using the new surface. The satisfactory agreement with the reported experimental observations previously demonstrates the accuracy of the new potential energy surface.

  1. Chemistry Within Molecular Clusters

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-01-01

    DME )nCH3OCH 2 +). We speculate that this is due to the fragments being consumed by an ion-molecule reaction within the cluster. One likely candidate is...the ion-molecule reaction of the fragment cations with a neutral DME , within the bulk cluster to form a trimethyloxonlum cation intermediate. This...the observed products. We therefore speculate that the DME cluster reactions leading to the same products, should involve the same mechanism found to

  2. Chemistry Within Molecular Clusters

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-06-01

    and ( DME ).CH 3OCH2+). We speculate that this is due to the fragments being consumed by an ion-molecule reaction within the cluster. A likely candidate...is the ion-molecule reaction of the fragment cations with a neutral DME within the bulk cluster, to form a trimethyloxonium cation intermediate...a trimethyloxonium intermediate as the common intermediate for the observed products. We therefore speculate that the DME cluster reactions leading to

  3. Cold nuclear fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Tsyganov, E. N.

    2012-02-15

    Recent accelerator experiments on fusion of various elements have clearly demonstrated that the effective cross-sections of these reactions depend on what material the target particle is placed in. In these experiments, there was a significant increase in the probability of interaction when target nuclei are imbedded in a conducting crystal or are a part of it. These experiments open a new perspective on the problem of so-called cold nuclear fusion.

  4. Molecular markers associated with cold-hardiness in Camellia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sequence-characterized amplified region (SCAR) markers from expressed sequence tag-polymerase chain reaction (EST-PCR) and random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers were developed with the goal to separate cold hardy camellias from non-cold hardy ones. A total of 28 cold hardy and non-cold h...

  5. Cold injuries.

    PubMed

    Long, William B; Edlich, Richard F; Winters, Kathryne L; Britt, L D

    2005-01-01

    Exposure to cold can produce a variety of injuries that occur as a result of man's inability to adapt to cold. These injuries can be divided into localized injury to a body part, systemic hypothermia, or a combination of both. Body temperature may fall as a result of heat loss by radiation, evaporation, conduction, and convection. Hypothermia or systemic cold injury occurs when the core body temperature has decreased to 35 degrees C (95 degrees F) or less. The causes of hypothermia are either primary or secondary. Primary, or accidental, hypothermia occurs in healthy individuals inadequately clothed and exposed to severe cooling. In secondary hypothermia, another illness predisposes the individual to accidental hypothermia. Hypothermia affects multiple organs with symptoms of hypothermia that vary according to the severity of cold injury. The diagnosis of hypothermia is easy if the patient is a mountaineer who is stranded in cold weather. However, it may be more difficult in an elderly patient who has been exposed to a cold environment. In either case, the rectal temperature should be checked with a low-reading thermometer. The general principals of prehospital management are to (1) prevent further heat loss, (2) rewarm the body core temperature in advance of the shell, and (3) avoid precipitating ventricular fibrillation. There are two general techniques of rewarming--passive and active. The mechanisms of peripheral cold injury can be divided into phenomena that affect cells and extracellular fluids (direct effects) and those that disrupt the function of the organized tissue and the integrity of the circulation (indirect effects). Generally, no serious damage is seen until tissue freezing occurs. The mildest form of peripheral cold injury is frostnip. Chilblains represent a more severe form of cold injury than frostnip and occur after exposure to nonfreezing temperatures and damp conditions. Immersion (trench) foot, a disease of the sympathetic nerves and blood

  6. Cold urticaria.

    PubMed

    Claudy, A

    2001-11-01

    Cold urticaria is one form of urticaria that may be associated with other forms of physical urticarias. Frequency is generally estimated at two or three per 100. The triggering effect of cold is found at history taking in most of the cases. The urticaria is usually superficial, and more rarely associated with deep and/or mucosal urticaria. The diagnosis is based on history taking and the ice cube test. An exhaustive search for an etiologic factor is often unfruitful, and the presence of a cryopathy should lead to a complete work-up. Therapy of cold urticaria may prove to be difficult. In patients with secondary cold urticaria, underlying disease must be treated in order to resolve the skin symptoms. H1-antihistamines can be used but the clinical responses are highly variable. Short-time treatment with low concentration corticosteroids suppresses the symptoms only partially and temporarily. In patients who do not respond to previous treatments, induction of cold tolerance may be proposed but the procedure is difficult to carry out in daily life over an extended period. Key word: cryoglobulins.

  7. COLD TRAP

    DOEpatents

    Milleron, N.

    1963-03-12

    An improved linear-flow cold trap is designed for highvacuum applications such as mitigating back migration of diffusion pump oil moiecules. A central pot of liquid nitrogen is nested within and supported by a surrounding, vertical, helical coil of metai sheet, all enveloped by a larger, upright, cylindrical, vacuum vessel. The vertical interstices between successive turns of the coil afford lineal, axial, high-vacuum passages between open mouths at top and bottom of said vessel, while the coil, being cold by virtue of thermal contact of its innermost turn with the nitrogen pot, affords expansive proximate condensation surfaces. (AEC)

  8. Some Like It Hot, Some like It Cold

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silberman, Robert G.

    2004-01-01

    In order to find the right combination to construct a cold pack for athletic injuries, students mix liquids and solids in a calorimeter, and use a thermometer to ascertain whether the chemical reaction is hot or cold. Many formulae for chemical reactions are given, the first of which is used for commercial cold packs.

  9. Adiabatic channel capture theory applied to cold atom-molecule reactions: Li + CaH \\to LiH + Ca at 1K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tscherbul, Timur V.; Buchachenko, Alexei A.

    2015-03-01

    We use quantum and classical adiabatic capture theories to study the chemical reaction Li + CaH \\to LiH + Ca. Using a recently developed ab initio potential energy surface, which provides an accurate representation of long-range interactions in the entrance reaction channel, we calculate the adiabatic channel potentials by diagonalizing the Li-CaH Hamiltonian as a function of the atom-molecule separation. The resulting adiabatic channel potentials are used to calculate both the classical and quantum capture probabilities as a function of collision energy, as well as the temperature dependencies of the partial and total reaction rates. The calculated reaction rate agrees well with the measured value at 1 K (V Singh et al 2012 Phys. Rev. Lett. 108 203201), suggesting that the title reaction proceeds without an activation barrier. The calculated classical adiabatic capture rate agrees well with the quantum result in the multiple-partial-wave regime of relevance to the experiment. Significant differences are found only in the ultracold limit (T\\lt 1 mK), demonstrating that adiabatic capture theories can predict the reaction rates with nearly quantitative accuracy in the multiple-partial-wave regime.

  10. Low energy (0-4 eV) electron impact to N{sub 2}O clusters: Dissociative electron attachment, ion-molecule reactions, and vibrational Feshbach resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Vizcaino, Violaine; Denifl, Stephan; Maerk, Tilmann D.; Scheier, Paul; Illenberger, Eugen

    2010-10-21

    Electron attachment to clusters of N{sub 2}O in the energy range of 0-4 eV yields the ionic complexes [(N{sub 2}O){sub n}O]{sup -}, [(N{sub 2}O){sub n}NO]{sup -}, and (N{sub 2}O){sub n}{sup -} . The shape of the ion yields of the three homologous series differs substantially reflecting the different formation mechanisms. While the generation of [(N{sub 2}O){sub n}O]{sup -} can be assigned to dissociative electron attachment (DEA) of an individual N{sub 2}O molecule in the target cluster, the formation of [(N{sub 2}O){sub n}NO]{sup -} is interpreted via a sequence of ion molecule reactions involving the formation of O{sup -} via DEA in the first step. The nondecomposed complexes (N{sub 2}O){sub n}{sup -} are preferentially formed at very low energies (below 0.5 eV) as a result of intramolecular stabilization of a diffuse molecular anion at low energy. The ion yields of [(N{sub 2}O){sub n}O]{sup -} and (N{sub 2}O){sub n}{sup -} versus electron energy show sharp peaks at the threshold region, which can be assigned to vibrational Feshbach resonances mediated by the diffuse anion state as already observed in an ultrahigh resolution electron attachment study of N{sub 2}O clusters [E. Leber, S. Barsotti, J. Boemmels, J. M. Weber, I. I. Fabrikant, M.-W. Ruf, and H. Hotop, Chem. Phys. Lett. 325, 345 (2000)].

  11. Photoionization of cold gas phase coronene and its clusters: Autoionization resonances in monomer, dimer, and trimer and electronic structure of monomer cation

    SciTech Connect

    Bréchignac, Philippe Falvo, Cyril; Parneix, Pascal; Pino, Thomas; Pirali, Olivier; Garcia, Gustavo A.; Nahon, Laurent; Joblin, Christine; Kokkin, Damian; Bonnamy, Anthony; Mulas, Giacomo

    2014-10-28

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are key species encountered in a large variety of environments such as the Interstellar Medium (ISM) and in combustion media. Their UV spectroscopy and photodynamics in neutral and cationic forms are important to investigate in order to learn about their structure, formation mechanisms, and reactivity. Here, we report an experimental photoelectron-photoion coincidence study of a prototypical PAH molecule, coronene, and its small clusters, in a molecular beam using the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) photons provided by the SOLEIL synchrotron facility. Mass-selected high resolution threshold photoelectron (TPES) and total ion yield spectra were obtained and analyzed in detail. Intense series of autoionizing resonances have been characterized as originating from the monomer, dimer, and trimer neutral species, which may be used as spectral fingerprints for their detection in the ISM by VUV absorption spectroscopy. Finally, a full description of the electronic structure of the monomer cation was made and discussed in detail in relation to previous spectroscopic optical absorption data. Tentative vibrational assignments in the near-threshold TPES spectrum of the monomer have been made with the support of a theoretical approach based on density functional theory.

  12. Cold Sores

    MedlinePlus

    ... causes oral herpes, or cold sores. Type 1 herpes virus infects more than half of the U.S. population by the time they reach their 20s. Type 2 usually affects the genital area Some people have no symptoms from the ...

  13. Study of cluster structures in 10Be and 16C neutron-rich nuclei via break-up reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dell'Aquila, D.; Acosta, L.; Amorini, F.; Andolina, R.; Auditore, L.; Berceanu, I.; Cardella, G.; Chatterjiee, M. B.; De Filippo, E.; Francalanza, L.; Gnoffo, B.; Grzeszczuk, A.; Lanzalone, G.; Lombardo, I.; Martorana, N.; Minniti, T.; Pagano, A.; Pagano, E. V.; Papa, M.; Pirrone, S.; Politi, G.; Pop, A.; Porto, F.; Quattrocchi, L.; Rizzo, F.; Rosato, E.; Russotto, P.; Trifirò, A.; Trimarchi, M.; Verde, G.; Vigilante, M.

    2016-05-01

    Projectile break-up reactions induced on polyethylene (CH2) target are used in order to study the spectroscopy of 10Be and 16C nuclei. For the present experiment we used 10Be and 16C beams delivered by the FRIBs facility at INFN-LNS, and the CHIMERA 4π multi-detector. 10Be and 16C structures are studied via a relative energy analysis of break-up fragments. The 4He+6He break-up channel allowed us to study the spectroscopy of 10Be; in particular we find evidence of a new state in 10Be at 13.5 MeV excitation energy. The 16C nucleus is studied via 6He-10Be correlation; we find the fingerprint of a possible state at about 20.6 MeV

  14. Hydrogen evolution reaction catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Subbaraman, Ram; Stamenkovic, Vojislav; Markovic, Nenad; Tripkovic, Dusan

    2016-02-09

    Systems and methods for a hydrogen evolution reaction catalyst are provided. Electrode material includes a plurality of clusters. The electrode exhibits bifunctionality with respect to the hydrogen evolution reaction. The electrode with clusters exhibits improved performance with respect to the intrinsic material of the electrode absent the clusters.

  15. Thermochemistry of the activation of N2 on iron cluster cations: Guided ion beam studies of the reactions of Fen+ (n=1-19) with N2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Lin; Liu, Fuyi; Armentrout, P. B.

    2006-02-01

    The kinetic energy dependences of the reactions of Fen+ (n=1-19) with N2 are studied in a guided ion beam tandem mass spectrometer over the energy range of 0-15eV. In addition to collision-induced dissociation forming Fem+ ions, which dominate the product spectra, a variety of FemN2+ and FemN+ product ions, where m ⩽n, is observed. All processes are observed to exhibit thresholds. Fem+-N and Fem+-2N bond energies as a function of cluster size are derived from the threshold analysis of the kinetic energy dependences of the endothermic reactions. The trends in this thermochemistry are compared to the isoelectronic D0(Fen+-CH), and to bulk phase values. A fairly uniform barrier of 0.48±0.03eV at 0K is observed for formation of the FenN2+ product ions (n =12, 15-19) and can be related to the rate-limiting step in the Haber process for catalytic ammonia production.

  16. Hot, Cold, and Really Cold.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leyden, Michael

    1997-01-01

    Describes a physics experiment investigating temperature prediction and the relationship between the physical properties of heat units, melting, dissolving, states of matter, and energy loss. Details the experimental setup, which requires hot and cold water, a thermometer, and ice. Notes that the experiment employs a deliberate counter-intuitive…

  17. Results of an attempt to measure increased rates of the reaction D-2 + D-2 yields He-3 + n in a nonelectrochemical cold fusion experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fralick, Gustave C.; Decker, Arthur J.; Blue, James W.

    1989-01-01

    An experiment was performed to look for evidence of deuterium fusion in palladium. The experiment, which involved introducing deuterium into the palladium filter of a hydrogen purifier, was designed to detect neutrons produced in the reaction D-2 + D-2 yields He-3 + n as well as heat production. The neutron counts for deuterium did not differ significantly from background or from the counts for a hydrogen control. Heat production was detected when deuterium, but not hydrogen, was pumped from the purifier.

  18. Ab initio molecular-orbital study on successive hydrogen-elimination reactions with low activation energies in the a-Si:H formation process: Cluster-size dependence of activation energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Kota; Honna, Hiroshi; Iwabuchi, Susumu; Hirano, Tsuneo; Koinuma, Hideomi

    1994-07-01

    Successive hydrogen-elimination reactions with low activation energies during the formation of a-Si:H by silane plasma chemical-vapor deposition proposed by us were studied by using a larger cluster model on the basis of an ab initio molecular-orbital method. The activation energy of the first step, the reaction of a dangling-bond site with an adjacent tetrahedrally coordinated silicon, was found to be 18.2 kcal/mol (0.79 eV) by employing a larger cluster model. The total process was also shown to be thermodynamically more favorable by using larger cluster models. Thus, the successive process is considered to play an important role in a-Si:H formation processes.

  19. Cold Fusion, A Journalistic Investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krivit, Steven B.

    2005-03-01

    Author of the recent book, The Rebirth of Cold Fusion, and founder of New Energy Times, Steven B. Krivit presents a summary of cold fusion's, past, present and possible future. This talk will briefly review five highlights of the recent New Energy Times investigation into cold fusion research:1. Analysis of early studies that supposedly disproved cold fusion.2. Key early corroborations that supported the claims of Fleischmann and Pons.3. The evolving understanding of cold fusion reaction paths and by-products.4. A look at volumetric power density.5. Brief comparison of the progress in hot fusion research as compared to cold fusion research.New Energy Times, founded in 2000, is an independent communications company which currently specializes in reporting on cold fusion researchootnotetextReferences and copies of the presentation are available at www.newenergytimes.com/reports/aps2005.htmhttp://www.newenergytimes.com/reports/aps2005.htm. It has no affiliations with any organization, entity or party which invests in these technologies, nor any individual researcher or research facility.

  20. Cold urticaria with persistent weals.

    PubMed

    Juhlin, L

    1981-06-01

    A patient with cold urticaria is described in whom weals appeared immediately after an ice cube test for 3 min and persisted for a week as a red, tender swelling. The duration of the oedema was dependent on the intensity of the immediate reaction. If the immediate wealing was blocked by treatment with an oral antihistamine 3 h before the ice cube test, no delayed reaction was seen. Antihistamines given after the immediate wealing had occurred did not influence the delayed reaction. Reactions to intradermally injected histamine, prostaglandin E, kallikrein, serotonin and serum appeared normal.

  1. Fluorescence measurements show stronger cold inhibition of photosynthetic light reactions in Scots pine compared to Norway spruce as well as during spring compared to autumn

    PubMed Central

    Linkosalo, Tapio; Heikkinen, Juha; Pulkkinen, Pertti; Mäkipää, Raisa

    2014-01-01

    We studied the photosynthetic activity of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) and Norway spruce (Picea abies [L.] Karst) in relation to air temperature changes from March 2013 to February 2014. We measured the chlorophyll fluorescence of approximately 50 trees of each species growing in southern Finland. Fluorescence was measured 1–3 times per week. We began by measuring shoots present in late winter (i.e., March 2013) before including new shoots once they started to elongate in spring. By July, when the spring shoots had achieved similar fluorescence levels to the older ones, we proceeded to measure the new shoots only. We analyzed the data by fitting a sigmoidal model containing four parameters to link sliding averages of temperature and fluorescence. A parameter defining the temperature range over which predicted fluorescence increased most rapidly was the most informative with in describing temperature dependence of fluorescence. The model generated similar fluorescence patterns for both species, but differences were observed for critical temperature and needle age. Down regulation of the light reaction was stronger in spring than in autumn. Pine showed more conservative control of the photosynthetic light reactions, which were activated later in spring and more readily attenuated in autumn. Under the assumption of a close correlation of fluorescence and photosynthesis, spruce should therefore benefit more than pine from the increased photosynthetic potential during warmer springs, but be more likely to suffer frost damage with a sudden cooling following a warm period. The winter of 2013–2014 was unusually mild and similar to future conditions predicted by global climate models. During the mild winter, the activity of photosynthetic light reactions of both conifers, especially spruce, remained high. Because light levels during winter are too low for photosynthesis, this activity may translate to a net carbon loss due to respiration. PMID:24982664

  2. Fluorescence measurements show stronger cold inhibition of photosynthetic light reactions in Scots pine compared to Norway spruce as well as during spring compared to autumn.

    PubMed

    Linkosalo, Tapio; Heikkinen, Juha; Pulkkinen, Pertti; Mäkipää, Raisa

    2014-01-01

    We studied the photosynthetic activity of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) and Norway spruce (Picea abies [L.] Karst) in relation to air temperature changes from March 2013 to February 2014. We measured the chlorophyll fluorescence of approximately 50 trees of each species growing in southern Finland. Fluorescence was measured 1-3 times per week. We began by measuring shoots present in late winter (i.e., March 2013) before including new shoots once they started to elongate in spring. By July, when the spring shoots had achieved similar fluorescence levels to the older ones, we proceeded to measure the new shoots only. We analyzed the data by fitting a sigmoidal model containing four parameters to link sliding averages of temperature and fluorescence. A parameter defining the temperature range over which predicted fluorescence increased most rapidly was the most informative with in describing temperature dependence of fluorescence. The model generated similar fluorescence patterns for both species, but differences were observed for critical temperature and needle age. Down regulation of the light reaction was stronger in spring than in autumn. Pine showed more conservative control of the photosynthetic light reactions, which were activated later in spring and more readily attenuated in autumn. Under the assumption of a close correlation of fluorescence and photosynthesis, spruce should therefore benefit more than pine from the increased photosynthetic potential during warmer springs, but be more likely to suffer frost damage with a sudden cooling following a warm period. The winter of 2013-2014 was unusually mild and similar to future conditions predicted by global climate models. During the mild winter, the activity of photosynthetic light reactions of both conifers, especially spruce, remained high. Because light levels during winter are too low for photosynthesis, this activity may translate to a net carbon loss due to respiration.

  3. Product PCNPsurv or the "reduced" evaporation residue cross section σER/σfusion for "hot" fusion reactions studied with the dynamical cluster-decay model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chopra, Sahila; Kaur, Arshdeep; Hemdeep, Gupta, Raj K.

    2016-04-01

    The product PCNPsurv of compound nucleus (CN) fusion probability PCN and survival probability Psurv is calculated to determine the reduced evaporation residue cross section σER/σfusion , denoted σERreduced, with (total) fusion cross section σfusion given as a sum of CN-formation cross section σCN and non-CN cross section σnCN for each reaction, where σCN is the sum of evaporation residue cross section σER and fusion-fission cross section σff and σnCN, if not measured, is estimated empirically as the difference between measured and calculated σfusion. Our calculations of PCN and Psurv, based on the dynamical cluster-decay model, were successfully made for some 17 "hot" fusion reactions, forming different CN of mass numbers ACN˜100 -300 , with deformations of nuclei up to hexadecapole deformations and "compact" orientations for both coplanar (Φc=0∘ ) and noncoplanar (Φc≠0∘ ) configurations, using various different nuclear interaction potentials. Interesting variations of σERreduced with CN excitation energy E*, fissility parameter χ , CN mass ACN, and Coulomb parameter Z1Z2 show that, independent of entrance channel, different isotopes of CN, and nuclear interaction potentials used, the dominant quantity in the product is Psurv, which classifies all the studied CN into three groups of weakly fissioning, radioactive, and strongly fissioning superheavy nuclei, with relative magnitudes of σERreduced˜1 , ˜10-6 , and ˜10-11 , which, like for PCN, get further grouped in two dependencies of (i) weakly fissioning and strongly fissioning superheavy nuclei decreasing with increasing E* and (ii) radioactive nuclei increasing with increasing E*.

  4. COLD TRAPS

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, W.I.

    1958-09-30

    A cold trap is presented for removing a condensable component from a gas mixture by cooling. It consists of a shell, the exterior surface of which is chilled by a refrigerant, and conductive fins welded inside the shell to condense the gas, and distribute the condensate evenly throughout the length of the trap, so that the trap may function until it becomes completely filled with the condensed solid. The contents may then be removed as either a gas or as a liquid by heating the trap. This device has particuinr use as a means for removing uranium hexafluoride from the gaseous diffusion separation process during equipment breakdown and repair periods.

  5. Resonances in SN2 reactions: Two-mode quantum calculations for Cl-+CH3Br on a coupled-cluster potential energy surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmatz, Stefan; Botschwina, Peter; Hauschildt, Jan; Schinke, Reinhard

    2002-12-01

    An effective two-dimensional potential energy surface has been constructed for the SN2 reaction Cl-+CH3Br→ClCH3+Br- from coupled-cluster calculations with a large basis set. In the quantum dynamics calculations Radau coordinates were employed to describe the Cl-C and C-Br stretching modes. Making use of the filter diagonalization method and an optical potential, bound states as well as resonance states up to energies far above the dissociation threshold have been calculated. The resonance widths fluctuate over several orders of magnitude. In addition to a majority of Feshbach-type resonances there are also exceedingly long-lived shape resonances, which can only decay by tunneling. Owing to a smaller width of the potential barrier and a larger density of states, tunneling through the barrier is more important for Cl-+CH3Br than for Cl-+CH3Cl despite the larger total mass of this system. Excitation of the C-Br stretching vibration enhances the tunneling probability of the entrance channel complex.

  6. Chemistry within Molecular Clusters

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-05-29

    molecule reaction of the fragment cations with a neutral DME within the bulk cluster, to form a trimethyloxonium cation intermediate. Similar ion...trimethyloxonium intermediate as the common intermediate for the observed products. We therefore speculate that the DME cluster reactions leading to the same...1982, 20, 51, Ibid. Kinetics of Ion-Molecule Reactions ; Ausloos, P., Ed.; Plenum, New York, 1979; p. 69. (18) Ono, Y.; Ng, C. Y. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 1982

  7. Cold and ultracold dynamics of the barrierless D(+) + H2 reaction: Quantum reactive calculations for ∼R(-4) long range interaction potentials.

    PubMed

    Lara, Manuel; Jambrina, P G; Aoiz, F J; Launay, J-M

    2015-11-28

    Quantum reactive and elastic cross sections and rate coefficients have been calculated for D(+) + H2 (v = 0, j = 0) collisions in the energy range from 10(-8) K (deep ultracold regime), where only one partial wave is open, to 150 K (Langevin regime) where many of them contribute. In systems involving ions, the ∼R(-4) behavior extends the interaction up to extremely long distances, requiring a special treatment. To this purpose, we have used a modified version of the hyperspherical quantum reactive scattering method, which allows the propagations up to distances of 10(5) a0 needed to converge the elastic cross sections. Interpolation procedures are also proposed which may reduce the cost of exact dynamical calculations at such low energies. Calculations have been carried out on the PES by Velilla et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 129, 084307 (2008)] which accurately reproduces the long range interactions. Results on its prequel, the PES by Aguado et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 112, 1240 (2000)], are also shown in order to emphasize the significance of the inclusion of the long range interactions. The calculated reaction rate coefficient changes less than one order of magnitude in a collision energy range of ten orders of magnitude, and it is found in very good agreement with the available experimental data in the region where they exist (10-100 K). State-to-state reaction probabilities are also provided which show that for each partial wave, the distribution of HD final states remains essentially constant below 1 K.

  8. Nanofriction in cold ion traps.

    PubMed

    Benassi, A; Vanossi, A; Tosatti, E

    2011-01-01

    Sliding friction between crystal lattices and the physics of cold ion traps are so far non-overlapping fields. Two sliding lattices may either stick and show static friction or slip with dynamic friction; cold ions are known to form static chains, helices or clusters, depending on the trapping conditions. Here we show, based on simulations, that much could be learnt about friction by sliding, through, for example, an electric field, the trapped ion chains over a corrugated potential. Unlike infinite chains, in which the theoretically predicted Aubry transition to free sliding may take place, trapped chains are always pinned. Yet, a properly defined static friction still vanishes Aubry-like at a symmetric-asymmetric structural transition, found for decreasing corrugation in both straight and zig-zag trapped chains. Dynamic friction is also accessible in ringdown oscillations of the ion trap. Long theorized static and dynamic one-dimensional friction phenomena could thus become accessible in future cold ion tribology.

  9. Cold Urticaria

    PubMed Central

    Wasserman, Stephen I.; Soter, Nicholas A.; Center, David M.; Austen, K. Frank

    1977-01-01

    Sera were obtained from the venous effluents of cold-challenged arms of patients with idiopathic cold urticaria without plasma or serum cryoproteins; these sera exhibited increased neutrophil chemotactic activity without alterations of the complement system. A two- to fourfold augmentation of the base-line neutrophil chemotactic activity of serum from the immersed extremity began within 1 min, peaked at 2 min, and returned to base-line levels within 15 min, whereas there was no change in the serum chemotactic activity in the control arm. The augmented chemotactic activity in the serum specimens from the challenged arm of each patient appeared in a high molecular-weight region, as assessed by the difference in activity recovered after Sephadex G-200 gel filtration of the paired lesional and control specimens. Sequential purification of this high molecular-weight activity by anion- and cation-exchange chromatography revealed a single peak of activity at both steps. The partially purified material continued to exhibit a high molecular weight, being excluded on Sepharose 4B, and had a neutral isoelectric point. The partially purified material showed a preferential chemotactic activity for neutrophilic polymorphonuclear leukocytes, required a gradient for expression of this function, and exhibited a capacity to deactivate this cell type. This active principle, termed high molecular-weight neutrophil chemotactic factor, exhibited a time-course of release that could be superimposed upon that of histamine and the low molecular-weight eosinophil chemotactic factor and may represent another mast cell-derived mediator. PMID:874083

  10. Mathematical modeling of cold cap

    SciTech Connect

    Pokorny, Richard; Hrma, Pavel R.

    2012-10-13

    The ultimate goal of studies of cold cap behavior in glass melters is to increase the rate of glass processing in an energy-efficient manner. Regrettably, mathematical models, which are ideal tools for assessing the responses of melters to process parameters, have not paid adequate attention to the cold cap. In this study, we consider a cold cap resting on a pool of molten glass from which it receives a steady heat flux while temperature, velocity, and extent of conversion are functions of the position along the vertical coordinate. A one-dimensional (1D) mathematical model simulates this process by solving the differential equations for mass and energy balances with appropriate boundary conditions and constitutive relationships for material properties. The sensitivity analyses on the effects of incoming heat fluxes to the cold cap through its lower and upper boundaries show that the cold cap thickness increases as the heat flux from above increases, and decreases as the total heat flux increases. We also discuss the effects of foam, originating from batch reactions and from redox reactions in molten glass and argue that models must represent the foam layer to achieve a reliable prediction of the melting rate as a function of feed properties and melter conditions.

  11. Relationships of self-identified cold tolerance and cold-induced vasodilatation in the finger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Joonhee; Lee, Joo-Young

    2016-04-01

    This study was conducted to investigate relationships of self-identified cold tolerance and cold-induced vasodilatation (CIVD) in the finger. Nine males and 34 females participated in the following 2 tests: a CIVD test and a self-reported survey. The CIVD test was conducted 30-min cold-water immersion (3.8 ± 0.3 °C) of the middle finger at an air temperature of 27.9 ± 0.1 °C. The self-reported questionnaire consisted of 28 questions about whole and local body cold and heat tolerances. By a cluster analysis on the survey results, the participants were divided into two groups: high self-identified cold tolerance (HSCT, n = 25) and low self-identified cold tolerance (LSCT, n = 18). LSCT had lower self-identified cold tolerance ( P < 0.001), preferred hot thermal stimulation ( P = 0.006), and wore heavier clothing during daily life ( P < 0.001) than HSCT. LSCT had significantly lower maximal finger temperatures ( T max) ( P = 0.040), smaller amplitude ( P = 0.029), and delayed onset time of CIVD ( P = 0.080) when compared to HSCT. Some questions examining the self-identified cold or heat tolerance had relationships with cold tolerance index, T max, and amplitude ( P < 0.1). These results indicate that self-identified cold tolerance classified through a standardized survey could be a good index to predict physiological cold tolerance.

  12. Relationships of self-identified cold tolerance and cold-induced vasodilatation in the finger.

    PubMed

    Park, Joonhee; Lee, Joo-Young

    2016-04-01

    This study was conducted to investigate relationships of self-identified cold tolerance and cold-induced vasodilatation (CIVD) in the finger. Nine males and 34 females participated in the following 2 tests: a CIVD test and a self-reported survey. The CIVD test was conducted 30-min cold-water immersion (3.8 ± 0.3 °C) of the middle finger at an air temperature of 27.9 ± 0.1 °C. The self-reported questionnaire consisted of 28 questions about whole and local body cold and heat tolerances. By a cluster analysis on the survey results, the participants were divided into two groups: high self-identified cold tolerance (HSCT, n = 25) and low self-identified cold tolerance (LSCT, n = 18). LSCT had lower self-identified cold tolerance (P < 0.001), preferred hot thermal stimulation (P = 0.006), and wore heavier clothing during daily life (P < 0.001) than HSCT. LSCT had significantly lower maximal finger temperatures (T max) (P = 0.040), smaller amplitude (P = 0.029), and delayed onset time of CIVD (P = 0.080) when compared to HSCT. Some questions examining the self-identified cold or heat tolerance had relationships with cold tolerance index, T max, and amplitude (P < 0.1). These results indicate that self-identified cold tolerance classified through a standardized survey could be a good index to predict physiological cold tolerance.

  13. Nuclear Cluster Aspects in Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubono, Shigeru

    2010-03-01

    The role of nuclear clustering is discussed for nucleosynthesis in stellar evolution with Cluster Nucleosynthesis Diagram (CND) proposed before. Special emphasis is placed on α-induced stellar reactions together with molecular states for O and C burning.

  14. Cluster Physics with Merging Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molnar, Sandor

    Collisions between galaxy clusters provide a unique opportunity to study matter in a parameter space which cannot be explored in our laboratories on Earth. In the standard ΛCDM model, where the total density is dominated by the cosmological constant (Λ) and the matter density by cold dark matter (CDM), structure formation is hierarchical, and clusters grow mostly by merging. Mergers of two massive clusters are the most energetic events in the universe after the Big Bang, hence they provide a unique laboratory to study cluster physics. The two main mass components in clusters behave differently during collisions: the dark matter is nearly collisionless, responding only to gravity, while the gas is subject to pressure forces and dissipation, and shocks and turbulence are developed during collisions. In the present contribution we review the different methods used to derive the physical properties of merging clusters. Different physical processes leave their signatures on different wavelengths, thus our review is based on a multifrequency analysis. In principle, the best way to analyze multifrequency observations of merging clusters is to model them using N-body/HYDRO numerical simulations. We discuss the results of such detailed analyses. New high spatial and spectral resolution ground and space based telescopes will come online in the near future. Motivated by these new opportunities, we briefly discuss methods which will be feasible in the near future in studying merging clusters.

  15. Cough & Cold Medicine Abuse

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Cough & Cold Medicine Abuse KidsHealth > For Teens > Cough & Cold ... Someone Quit? Avoiding DXM Why Do People Use Cough and Cold Medicines to Get High? There's an ...

  16. Cold confusion

    SciTech Connect

    Chapline, G.

    1989-07-01

    On March 23 two chemists, Martin Fleischmann and Stanley Pons startled the world with a press conference at the University of Utah where they announced that they had achieved nuclear fusion at room temperatures. As evidence they cited the production of ''excess'' amounts of heat in an electrochemical apparatus and observation of neutron production. While the production of heat in a chemical apparatus is not in itself unusual the observation of neutrons is certainly extraordinary. As it turned out, though, careful measurements of the neutron production in electrochemical apparatus similar to that used by Fleischmann and Pons carried out at dozens of other laboratories has shown that the neutron production fails by many orders of magnitude to support the assertion by Fleischmann and Pons that their discovery represents a new and cheap source of fusion power. In particular, independent measurements of the neutron production rate suggest that the actual rate of fusion energy production probably does not exceed 1 trillionth of a watt. This paper discusses the feasibility that cold fusion is actually being achieved. 7 refs.

  17. [Cold-induced urticaria and angioedema. Classification, diagnosis and therapy].

    PubMed

    Krause, K; Degener, F; Altrichter, S; Ardelean, E; Kalogeromitros, D; Magerl, M; Metz, M; Siebenhaar, F; Weller, K; Maurer, M

    2010-09-01

    The onset of wheals and/or angioedema following the exposure to cold may be associated with a number of different diseases. Most frequently this occurs in cold contact urticaria, a type of physical urticaria, which is characterized by a positive cold stimulation test. The clinical symptoms are based on cold-dependent mast cell activation with subsequent release of proinflammatory mediators. In cases of negative or atypical reaction to cold stimulation testing rare acquired atypical or familiar cold urticaria forms may be suspected. Strict avoidance of cold should be recommended as far as possible. As the underlying causes of cold contact urticaria are widely unknown, the symptomatic use of non-sedating antihistamines is the treatment of first choice. The very rare familiar cold auto-inflammatory syndrome (FCAS) is based on CIAS1/NLRP3 mutations and may be treated effectively by neutralization of pathogenic interleukin 1beta.

  18. Cold energy

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, John P.

    2015-12-04

    Deviations in Q for resonant superconducting radio frequency niobium accelerator cavities are generally correlated with resistivity loss mechanisms. Field dependent Qs are not well modeled by these classical loss mechanisms, but rather can represent a form of precision cavity surface thermometry. When the field dependent Q variation shows improvement with increasing B field level the classical treatment of this problem is inadequate. To justify this behavior hydrogen as a ubiquitous impurity in niobium, which creates measurable property changes, even at very low concentrations is typically considered the cause of such anomalous behavior. This maybe the case in some instances, but more importantly any system operating with a highly coherent field with a significant time dependent magnetic component at near 2° K will have the ability to organize the remaining free spins within the London penetration depth to form a coupled energy reservoir in the form of low mass spin waves. The niobium resonant cavities are composed of a single isotope with a large nuclear spin. When the other loss mechanisms are stripped away this may be the gain medium activated by the low level residual magnetic fields. It was found that one resonant cavity heat treatment produced optimum surface properties and then functioned as a MASER extracting energy from the 2° K thermal bath while cooling the cavity walls. The cavity operating in this mode is a simulator of what can take place in the wider but not colder universe using the cosmic microwave background (CMB) as a thermal source. The low mass, long lifetimes, and the scale of the magnetic spin waves on the weakly magnetized interstellar medium allows energy to be stored that is many orders of magnitude colder than the cosmic microwave background. A linear accelerator cavity becomes a tool to explore the properties of the long wave length magnetic spin waves that populate this cold low energy regime.

  19. Site specific ligand substitution in cubane-type Mo3FeS(4)(4+) clusters: kinetics and mechanism of reaction and isolation of mixed ligand Cl/SPh complexes.

    PubMed

    Algarra, Andrés G; Basallote, Manuel G; Fernandez-Trujillo, M J; Llusar, Rosa; Pino-Chamorro, Jose A; Sorribes, Ivan; Vicent, Cristian

    2010-04-21

    The synthesis, crystal structure and solution characterization of the cubane-type [Mo(3)(FeCl)S(4)(dmpe)(3)Cl(3)] (1) (dmpe = 1,2-bis(dimethylphophane-ethane)) cluster are reported and the ligand substitution processes of chloride by thiophenolate investigated. The kinetics and the intimate mechanism of these substitutions reveal that compound 1 undergoes a number of Fe and Mo site specific ligand substitution reactions in acetonitrile solutions. In particular, PhS(-) coordination at the tetrahedral Fe site proceeds in a single resolved kinetic step whereas such substitutions at the Mo sites proceed more slowly. The effect of the presence of acids in the reaction media is also investigated and reveals that an acid excess hinders substitution reactions both at the Fe and Mo sites; however, an acid-promoted solvolysis of the Fe-Cl bonds is observed. Electrospray ionization (ESI) and tandem (ESI-MS/MS) mass spectrometry allow the identification of all the reaction intermediates proposed on the basis of stopped-flow measurements. The distinctive site specific reactivity made it possible to isolate two new clusters of the Mo(3)FeS(4)(4+) family featuring mixed chlorine/thiophenolate ligands, namely Mo(3)S(4)(FeSPh)(dmpe)(3)Cl(3) (2) and [Mo(3)S(4)(FeSPh)(dmpe)(3)(SPh)(3)] (3). A detailed computational study has also been carried out to understand the details of the mechanism of substitution at the M-Cl (M = Mo and Fe) bonds as well as the solvolysis at the Fe-Cl sites, with particular emphasis on the role of acids on the substitution process. The results of the calculations are in agreement with the experimental observations, thus justifying the non-existence of an accelerating effect of acids on the thiophenolate substitution reaction, which differs from previous proposals for the Fe(4)S(4) and MoFe(3)S(4) clusters and some related compounds.

  20. Cold remedies (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Sore throat, cough, stuffy nose, sneezing, runny nose, fever, chills, and muscle aches are all symptoms associated with the common cold. Over-the-counter medicines for a cold only alleviate cold symptoms but do not shorten the duration of a cold. As always, ...

  1. Determination of the compound nucleus survival probability Psurv for various "hot" fusion reactions based on the dynamical cluster-decay model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chopra, Sahila; Kaur, Arshdeep; Gupta, Raj K.

    2015-03-01

    After a successful attempt to define and determine recently the compound nucleus (CN) fusion/ formation probability PCN within the dynamical cluster-decay model (DCM), we introduce and estimate here for the first time the survival probability Psurv of CN against fission, again within the DCM. Calculated as the dynamical fragmentation process, Psurv is defined as the ratio of the evaporation residue (ER) cross section σER and the sum of σER and fusion-fission (ff) cross section σff, the CN formation cross section σCN, where each contributing fragmentation cross section is determined in terms of its formation and barrier penetration probabilities P0 and P . In DCM, the deformations up to hexadecapole and "compact" orientations for both in-plane (coplanar) and out-of-plane (noncoplanar) configurations are allowed. Some 16 "hot" fusion reactions, forming a CN of mass number ACN˜100 to superheavy nuclei, are analyzed for various different nuclear interaction potentials, and the variation of Psurv on CN excitation energy E*, fissility parameter χ , CN mass ACN, and Coulomb parameter Z1Z2 is investigated. Interesting results are that three groups, namely, weakly fissioning, radioactive, and strongly fissioning superheavy nuclei, are identified with Psurv, respectively, ˜1 ,˜10-6 , and ˜10-10 . For the weakly fissioning group (100

  2. Preparation of the triiron phosphinidene-imido clusters Fe[sub 3]([mu][sub 3]-PBu[sup t])([mu][sub 3]-NR)(CO)[sub 9] (R = Et, Ph) and their reactions with alkynes

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Jeongsup; Geoffroy, G.L. ); Rheingold, A.L. )

    1992-04-15

    The compounds Fe[sub 3]([mu][sub 3]-PBu[sup t])([mu][sub 3]-NR)(CO)[sub 9] (R = Ph (2a), Et (2b)), which are the first examples of clusters possessing both capping imido and phosphinidene ligands, have been prepared in good yield by the photochemical reaction of the corresponding H[sub 2]Fe[sub 3]([mu][sub 3]-NR)(CO)[sub 9] cluster with Bu[sup t]PCl[sub 2]. Cluster 2a has been crystallographically characterized: C[sub 19]H[sub 14]NO[sub 9]PFe[sub 3], orthorhombic,. Like Fe[sub 3]([mu][sub 3]-NPh)[sub 2](CO)[sub 9], the cluster consists of an isosceles triangle of iron atoms with two Fe-Fe bonds and with capping phosphinidene and imido ligands above and below the metal triangle. Both clusters have been observed to react with alkynes to give a variety of products, the most interesting of which is the binuclear compound Fe[sub 2]([mu][sub 2],[eta][sup 3]-PhNC(Ph) [double bond] C(Ph)PBu[sup t])([mu][sub 2],[eta][sup 4]PhC [double bond] C(Ph)C(Ph) [double bond] CPh)(CO)[sub 4] (3) which results from the reaction of PhC [triple bond] C(Ph)PBu[sup t] ligand formed by insertion of the alkyne between the phosphinidene and imido ligands and also has a ferracyclopentadiene ligand formed by coupling of two additional alkynes: C[sub 56]H[sub 44]NO[sub 4]PFe[sub 2], triclinic.

  3. Formation of Metal Clusters or Nitrogen-Bridged Adducts by Reaction of a Bis(amino)stannylene with Halides of Two-Valent Transition Metals.

    PubMed

    Veith, Michael; Müller, Alice; Stahl, Lothar; Nötzel, Martin; Jarczyk, Maria; Huch, Volker

    1996-06-19

    be isostructural. The molecules have an inner Sn(4)M pentametallic core (mean distances: Sn-Ni 2.463 Å, Sn-Pd 2.544 Å) with the transition metal in the center of a slightly distorted square formed by the four tin atoms, the distortion from planarity resulting in a weak paramagnetism of 0.2 &mgr;(B) for the nickel compound. The halogen atoms form bridges between two of the tin atoms and have no bonding interaction with the transition metal. The nickel compound has also been prepared by direct interaction of Br(2) or NR(4)Br(3) with [Me(2)Si(NtBu)(2)Sn](4)Ni as a minor product, the main products being Me(2)Si(NtBu)(2)Sn(NtBu)(2)SiMe(2,) Me(2)Si(NtBu)(2)SnBr(2), NiBr(2) and SnBr(2). Other metal clusters have been obtained by the reaction of Me(2)Si(NtBu)(2)Sn with tetrakis(triphenyphosphine)palladium or by the reaction of Me(2)Si(NtBu)(2)Ge with RhCl(PPh(3))(3). In the first case Ph(3)PPd[Sn(NtBu)(2)SiMe(2)](3)PdPPh(3) (rhombohedral, space group R3c, a = b = 21.397(12) Å, c = 57.01(5) Å, alpha = beta = 90 degrees, gamma = 120 degrees, Z = 12) is formed and is characterized by X-ray techniques to be composed of a central PdSn(3)Pd trigonal bipyramid with the tin atoms occupying the equatorial positions (Pd-Sn = 2.702(5) Å). In the second reaction all the triphenylphosphine ligands are replaced from rhodium and Rh[Ge(NtBu)(2)SiMe(2)](4)Cl is formed (monoclinic, space group P2(1)/n, a = 12.164(2) Å, b = 23.625(5) Å, c = 24.128(5) Å, beta = 102.74(3) degrees, Z = 4). The central core of this molecule is made up of a rhodium atom which is almost square planarly coordinated by the germanium atoms, two of which are bridged by chlorine (mean Ge-Rh = 2.355 Å).

  4. Cluster Headache

    MedlinePlus

    Cluster headache Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Cluster headaches, which occur in cyclical patterns or clusters, are one of the most painful types of headache. A cluster headache commonly awakens you ...

  5. Properties and uses of cold neutron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, David D.

    1992-07-01

    Cold neutrons are conventionally defined as those with energy below 0.005 eV; the corresponding velocity and wavelength arc 980 m/s and 4 angstroms. The first extensive use of cold neutrons was in the 1960's by condensed matter physicists for investigations of spatial structure and internal dynamics of solids and liquids. Different experiments place different requirements on neutron beams, but it is usually advantageous to eliminate the faster neutrons and the gamma rays that are present in normal reactor beams. Several types of filters that pass only the low-energy portion of an incident Maxwellian spectrum have been developed and will be discussed. Examples include single crystal quartz or bismuth (room temperature or cooled), polycrystalline beryllium, and neutron guides. For any of these shifting the incident neutrons to a lower energy spectrum by use of a cold moderator leads to large increases in the intensity of cold neutrons. The properties of the beams resulting from the particular combination of a cold moderator and a neutron guide will be discussed. These include the changes in beam intensity and spectral shape as warm neutrons in a typical reactor spectrum first interact with a cold moderator and then pass through a straight or curved neutron guide. The spatial and angular distribution of the neutrons at the exit of the guide will be described. One further important effect for cold neutron beam experiments involving nuclear reactions is the increase in reaction rates because of the usual 1/v dependence of reaction cross sections and another is the considerable simplification with cold neutrons in the problems of collimating, shielding, and stopping the beam. The resulting benefits for studies of nuclear energy levels by neutron capture gamma-ray and conversion electron experiments and for the analysis of materials by PGNAA will be discussed. Neutron depth profiling is also improved with cold neutrons. (author)

  6. Toxicity evaluation and hazard review Cold Smoke

    SciTech Connect

    Archuleta, M.M.; Stocum, W.E.

    1993-12-01

    Cold Smoke is a dense white smoke produced by the reaction of titanium tetrachloride and aqueous ammonia aerosols. Early studies on the toxicity of this nonpyrotechnically generated smoke indicated that the smoke itself is essentially non-toxic (i.e. exhibits to systemic toxicity or organ damage due to exposure) under normal deployment conditions. The purpose of this evaluation was to review and summarize the recent literature data available on the toxicity of Cold Smoke, its chemical constituents, and its starting materials.

  7. Transfer reactions with heavy elements

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, D.C.

    1986-04-01

    Transfer reactions for several transuranium elements are studied. (/sup 248/Cm, /sup 249/Bk, /sup 249/CF, /sup 254/Es), /sup 16,18/O, /sup 20,22/Ne, and /sup 40,48/Ca projectiles are used. The production of neutron-rich heavy actinides is enhanced by the use of neutron-rich projectiles /sup 18/O and /sup 22/Ne. The maxima of the isotopic distributions occur at only 2 to 3 mass numbers larger for /sup 48/Ca than for /sup 40/Ca reactions with /sup 248/Cm. The cross sections decrease rapidly with the number of nucleons transferred. The use of neutron-rich targets favors the production of neutron-rich isotopes. ''Cold'' heavy targets are produced. Comparisons with simple calculations of the product excitation energies assuming binary transfers indicate that the maxima of the isotopic distributions occur at the lightest product isotope for which the energy exceeds the reaction barrier. The cross sections for transfer of the same nucleon clusters appear to be comparable for a wide variety of systems. 23 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  8. Collision-Induced Dissociation of Electrosprayed NaCl Clusters: Using Molecular Dynamics Simulations to Visualize Reaction Cascades in the Gas Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schachel, Tilo D.; Metwally, Haidy; Popa, Vlad; Konermann, Lars

    2016-11-01

    Infusion of NaCl solutions into an electrospray ionization (ESI) source produces [Na( n+1)Cl n ]+ and other gaseous clusters. The n = 4, 13, 22 magic number species have cuboid ground state structures and exhibit elevated abundance in ESI mass spectra. Relatively few details are known regarding the mechanisms whereby these clusters undergo collision-induced dissociation (CID). The current study examines to what extent molecular dynamics (MD) simulations can be used to garner insights into the sequence of events taking place during CID. Experiments on singly charged clusters reveal that the loss of small neutrals is the dominant fragmentation pathway. MD simulations indicate that the clusters undergo extensive structural fluctuations prior to decomposition. Consistent with the experimentally observed behavior, most of the simulated dissociation events culminate in ejection of small neutrals ([NaCl] i , with i = 1, 2, 3). The MD data reveal that the prevalence of these dissociation channels is linked to the presence of short-lived intermediates where a relatively compact core structure carries a small [NaCl] i protrusion. The latter can separate from the parent cluster via cleavage of a single Na-Cl contact. Fragmentation events of this type are kinetically favored over other dissociation channels that would require the quasi-simultaneous rupture of multiple electrostatic contacts. The CID behavior of NaCl cluster ions bears interesting analogies to that of collisionally activated protein complexes. Overall, it appears that MD simulations represent a valuable tool for deciphering the dissociation of noncovalently bound systems in the gas phase.

  9. Cold Stress and the Cold Pressor Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silverthorn, Dee U.; Michael, Joel

    2013-01-01

    Temperature and other environmental stressors are known to affect blood pressure and heart rate. In this activity, students perform the cold pressor test, demonstrating increased blood pressure during a 1- to 2-min immersion of one hand in ice water. The cold pressor test is used clinically to evaluate autonomic and left ventricular function. This…

  10. Cold and Cough Medicines

    MedlinePlus

    ... What can you do for your cold or cough symptoms? Besides drinking lots of fluids and getting ... medicines. There are lots of different cold and cough medicines, and they do different things. Nasal decongestants - ...

  11. Cold medicines and children

    MedlinePlus

    ... aspx . Accessed July 26, 2016. Cherry JD. The common cold. In: Cherry JD, Harrison GJ, Kaplan SL, Steinbach ... 2014:chap 7. Miller EK, Williams JV. The common cold. In: Kliegman RM, Stanton BF, St. Geme JW, ...

  12. Cold knife cone biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... biopsy; Pap smear - cone biopsy; HPV - cone biopsy; Human papilloma virus - cone biopsy; Cervix - cone biopsy; Colposcopy - cone biopsy Images Female reproductive anatomy Cold cone biopsy Cold cone removal References American ...

  13. H-cluster stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, X. Y.; Gao, C. Y.; Xu, R. X.

    2013-06-01

    The study of dense matter at ultrahigh density has a very long history, which is meaningful for us to understand not only cosmic events in extreme circumstances but also fundamental laws of physics. It is well known that the state of cold matter at supranuclear density depends on the non-perturbative nature of quantum chromodynamics (QCD) and is essential for modelling pulsars. A so-called H-cluster matter is proposed in this paper as the nature of dense matter in reality. In compact stars at only a few nuclear densities but low temperature, quarks could be interacting strongly with each other there. That might render quarks grouped in clusters, although the hypothetical quark clusters in cold dense matter have not been confirmed due to the lack of both theoretical and experimental evidence. Motivated by recent lattice QCD simulations of the H-dibaryons (with structure uuddss), we therefore consider here a possible kind of quark clusters, H-clusters, that could emerge inside compact stars during their initial cooling as the dominant components inside (the degree of freedom could then be H-clusters there). Taking into account the in-medium stiffening effect, we find that at baryon densities of compact stars H-cluster matter could be more stable than nuclear matter. We also find that for the H-cluster matter with lattice structure, the equation of state could be so stiff that it would seem to be `superluminal' in the most dense region. However, the real sound speed for H-cluster matter is in fact difficult to calculate, so at this stage we do not put constraints on our model from the usual requirement of causality. We study the stars composed of H-clusters, i.e. H-cluster stars, and derive the dependence of their maximum mass on the in-medium stiffening effect, showing that the maximum mass could be well above 2 M⊙ as observed and that the resultant mass-radius relation fits the measurement of the rapid burster under reasonable parameters. Besides a general

  14. Dissociative Excitation Transfer in the Reaction of O2(a(1)delta(g)) with OH-(H2O)1,2 Clusters

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-04

    much more rapidly than in diatomic ions . In hun- dreds of reactions studied, the curvature typical of excited states is not present for polyatomic ...with a variety of anions in a selected ion flow tube (SIFT).1"’ In these experiments, 02(a’As) and 02(X 3Ip were produced in a chemical reaction1...estimated from ion -quadrupole capture theory. ~ We discuss the possibility of whether the reaction then proceeds sequentially, OH"(H20) + 02(a’ A

  15. Gas Density Discontinuities in Merging Clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mushotzky, Richard (Technical Monitor); Markevitch, Maxim

    2005-01-01

    Chandra has discovered a new phenomenon in galaxy clusters, the sharp gas density edges. Depending on the sign of the temperature jump across the edge, these features may either be bow shocks or cold fronts. While bow shocks obviously are driven by merging sub-clusters, what causes cold fronts is not entirely clear, as they are observed both in mergers and in relaxed clusters. The purpose of the XMM study of A3376, an interesting cluster with density edges, is to understand the origin of cold fronts and to look for possible shocks. The XMM data for A3376 have been mostly analyzed (the X-ray edge turned out to be a cold front). Preliminary results have been shown at a conference and a paper is in preparation. We also have Chandra data for this cluster, and are comparing and combining the two datasets. In the course of analyzing the X-ray data for this cluster as well as several others, it has become apparent that we need the help of hydrodynamic simulations to study the precise mechanism by which cold fronts are formed, the main goal of the present project. A postdoc (Yago Ascasibar) is currently running SPH simulations of an idealized sub- cluster merger. These advanced simulations are nearing completion and two papers with their results are in preparation.

  16. Extensive regularization of the coupled cluster methods based on the generating functional formalism: Application to gas-phase benchmarks and to the SN2 reaction of CHCl3 and OH- in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalski, Karol; Valiev, Marat

    2009-12-01

    The recently introduced energy expansion based on the use of generating functional (GF) [K. Kowalski and P. D. Fan, J. Chem. Phys. 130, 084112 (2009)] provides a way of constructing size-consistent noniterative coupled cluster (CC) corrections in terms of moments of the CC equations. To take advantage of this expansion in a strongly interacting regime, the regularization of the cluster amplitudes is required in order to counteract the effect of excessive growth of the norm of the CC wave function. Although proven to be efficient, the previously discussed form of the regularization does not lead to rigorously size-consistent corrections. In this paper we address the issue of size-consistent regularization of the GF expansion by redefining the equations for the cluster amplitudes. The performance and basic features of proposed methodology are illustrated on several gas-phase benchmark systems. Moreover, the regularized GF approaches are combined with quantum mechanical molecular mechanics module and applied to describe the SN2 reaction of CHCl3 and OH- in aqueous solution.

  17. Extensive regularization of the coupled cluster methods based on the generating functional formalism: application to gas-phase benchmarks and to the SN2 reaction of CHCl3 and OH- in water.

    PubMed

    Kowalski, Karol; Valiev, Marat

    2009-12-21

    The recently introduced energy expansion based on the use of generating functional (GF) [K. Kowalski and P. D. Fan, J. Chem. Phys. 130, 084112 (2009)] provides a way of constructing size-consistent noniterative coupled cluster (CC) corrections in terms of moments of the CC equations. To take advantage of this expansion in a strongly interacting regime, the regularization of the cluster amplitudes is required in order to counteract the effect of excessive growth of the norm of the CC wave function. Although proven to be efficient, the previously discussed form of the regularization does not lead to rigorously size-consistent corrections. In this paper we address the issue of size-consistent regularization of the GF expansion by redefining the equations for the cluster amplitudes. The performance and basic features of proposed methodology are illustrated on several gas-phase benchmark systems. Moreover, the regularized GF approaches are combined with quantum mechanical molecular mechanics module and applied to describe the S(N)2 reaction of CHCl(3) and OH(-) in aqueous solution.

  18. DFT study of the formation mechanism of anthraquinone from the reaction of NO2 and anthracene on NaCl clusters: the role of NaNO3.

    PubMed

    Luo, Chao; Yu, Qiming; Wang, Hongming

    2016-12-08

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and oxygenated-PAHs are globally worrisome air pollutants because of their highly direct-acting mutagenicity and carcinogenicity. The formation of oxygenated-PAHs is of crucial importance for the prevention of their atmospheric pollution successfully. In this paper, the formation mechanism of oxygenated-PAHs from the heterogeneous reaction of NO2 with anthracene on the surface of NaCl was studied by density functional theory (DFT) calculations. At first, the various adsorption configurations of NO2 and N2O4 on NaCl were investigated. The chemical conversion mechanisms among these configurations were also investigated. It is found that these structures can easily interconvert due to their low energy barriers. NaNO3 was found to be the main product of the reaction of NO2/N2O4 on NaCl. Then the oxidation mechanism of anthracene by NO2 on the NaCl surface showed that NaNO3 is able to oxidize anthracene and plays a catalytic role in the reaction process. This means that the formation of NaNO3 is very important to promote the formation of 9,10-anthraquinone from the heterogeneous reaction of NO2 with anthracene. Our calculations also showed that the introduction of water can greatly accelerate this reaction process.

  19. Decay of {sup 118,122}Ba* compound nuclei formed in {sup 78,82}Kr+{sup 40}Ca reactions using the dynamical cluster-decay model of preformed clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Raj; Gupta, Raj K.

    2009-03-15

    Application of the preformed clusters based dynamical cluster-decay model (DCM) is made to the recent data on decay of the compound systems {sup 118,122}Ba* at a relatively low bombarding energy of 5.5 MeV/A. The same model has been applied earlier to the intermediate mass fragment (IMF) data of {sup 116}Ba*, observed at medium and higher incident energies. For the heavier {sup 118,122}Ba* systems, however, a complete mass fragmentation spectrum is observed experimentally. Except for a small narrow region of heavier mass fragments (8{<=}Z{sub L}{<=}15), the DCM gives an overall reasonable description of the observed data on both the intermediate mass fragments and the fusion-fission cross-sections, whereas the statistical model calculations based on BUSCO and GEMINI codes describe the intermediate mass fragment data and the heavier mass fragment and fusion-fission data, respectively. Within the DCM (with preformation factor P{sub 0}=1), the possibility of non-compound-nucleus decay contributing to the region 8{<=}Z{sub L}{<=}15 of heavier mass fragments is also explored. All three models use the maximum angular momentum l{sub max} as a fitting parameter, which in the DCM is fixed via a neck-length parameter for the penetrability P{yields}1.

  20. CLUSTER CHEMISTRY

    SciTech Connect

    Muetterties, Earl L.

    1980-05-01

    Metal cluster chemistry is one of the most rapidly developing areas of inorganic and organometallic chemistry. Prior to 1960 only a few metal clusters were well characterized. However, shortly after the early development of boron cluster chemistry, the field of metal cluster chemistry began to grow at a very rapid rate and a structural and a qualitative theoretical understanding of clusters came quickly. Analyzed here is the chemistry and the general significance of clusters with particular emphasis on the cluster research within my group. The importance of coordinately unsaturated, very reactive metal clusters is the major subject of discussion.

  1. How cold is cold dark matter?

    SciTech Connect

    Armendariz-Picon, Cristian; Neelakanta, Jayanth T. E-mail: jtneelak@syr.edu

    2014-03-01

    If cold dark matter consists of particles, these must be non-interacting and non-relativistic by definition. In most cold dark matter models however, dark matter particles inherit a non-vanishing velocity dispersion from interactions in the early universe, a velocity that redshifts with cosmic expansion but certainly remains non-zero. In this article, we place model-independent constraints on the dark matter temperature to mass ratio, whose square root determines the dark matter velocity dispersion. We only assume that dark matter particles decoupled kinetically while non-relativistic, when galactic scales had not entered the horizon yet, and that their momentum distribution has been Maxwellian since that time. Under these assumptions, using cosmic microwave background and matter power spectrum observations, we place upper limits on the temperature to mass ratio of cold dark matter today (away from collapsed structures). These limits imply that the present cold dark matter velocity dispersion has to be smaller than 54 m/s. Cold dark matter has to be quite cold, indeed.

  2. Combined temperature-programmed reaction and in-situ x-ray scattering studies of size-selected silver clusters under realistic reaction conditions in the epoxidation of propene.

    SciTech Connect

    Vajda, S.; Lee, S.; Sell, K.; Barke, I.; Kleibert, A.; von Oeynhausen, V.; Meiwes-Broer, K. H.; Rodriguez, A. F.; Elam, J. W.; Pellin, M. M.; Lee, B.; Seifert, S.; Winans, R. W.; Yale Univ.; Univ. Rostock; Swiss Light Source

    2009-09-28

    The catalytic activity and dynamical shape changes in size-selected nanoclusters at work are studied under realistic reaction conditions by using a combination of simultaneous temperature-programmed reaction with in situ grazing-incidence small angle x-ray scattering. This approach allows drawing a direct correlation between nanocatalyst size, composition, shape, and its function under realistic reaction conditions for the first time. The approach is illustrated in a chemical industry highly relevant selective partial oxidation of propene on a monodisperse silver nanocatalyst. The shape of the catalyst undergoes rapid change already at room temperature upon the exposure to the reactants, followed by a complex evolution of shape with increasing temperature. Acrolein formation is observed around 50 C while the formation of the propylene oxide exhibits a sharp onset at 80 C and is leveling off at 150 C. At lower temperatures acrolein is produced preferentially to propylene oxide; at temperatures above 100 C propylene oxide is favored.

  3. Cold nuclear fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsyganov, E. N.; Bavizhev, M. D.; Buryakov, M. G.; Dabagov, S. B.; Golovatyuk, V. M.; Lobastov, S. P.

    2015-07-01

    If target deuterium atoms were implanted in a metal crystal in accelerator experiments, a sharp increase in the probability of DD-fusion reaction was clearly observed when compared with the reaction's theoretical value. The electronic screening potential, which for a collision of free deuterium atoms is about 27 eV, reached 300-700 eV in the case of the DD-fusion in metallic crystals. These data leads to the conclusion that a ban must exist for deuterium atoms to be in the ground state 1s in a niche filled with free conduction electrons. At the same time, the state 2p whose energy level is only 10 eV above that of state 1s is allowed in these conditions. With anisotropy of 2p, 3p or above orbitals, their spatial positions are strictly determined in the lattice coordinate system. When filling out the same potential niches with two deuterium atoms in the states 2p, 3p or higher, the nuclei of these atoms can be permanently positioned without creating much Coulomb repulsion at a very short distance from each other. In this case, the transparency of the potential barrier increases dramatically compared to the ground state 1s for these atoms. The probability of the deuterium nuclei penetrating the Coulomb barrier by zero quantum vibration of the DD-system also increases dramatically. The so-called cold nuclear DD-fusion for a number of years was registered in many experiments, however, was still rejected by mainstream science for allegedly having no consistent scientific explanation. Finally, it received the validation. Below, we outline the concept of this explanation and give the necessary calculations. This paper also considers the further destiny of the formed intermediate state of 4He∗.

  4. Decay of {sup 246}Bk* formed in similar entrance channel reactions of {sup 11}B+{sup 235}U and {sup 14}N+{sup 232}Th at low energies using the dynamical cluster-decay model

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, BirBikram; Sharma, Manoj K.; Gupta, Raj K.

    2008-05-15

    The decay of the {sup 246}Bk* nucleus, formed in entrance channel reactions {sup 11}B+{sup 235}U and {sup 14}N+{sup 232}Th at different incident energies, is studied by using the dynamical cluster-decay model (DCM) extended to include the deformations and orientations of nuclei. The main decay mode here is fission. The other (weaker) decay channels are the light particles evaporation (A{<=}4) and intermediate mass fragments (5{<=}A{<=}20). All decay products are calculated as emissions of preformed clusters through the interaction barriers. The calculated fission cross sections {sigma}{sub fiss}, taken as a sum of the energetically favored symmetric and near symmetric fragments (A{sub CN}/2{+-}7 and A=106-110 plus complementary fragments) show an excellent agreement with experimental data at all experimental incident c.m. energies for both reactions, except for the top three energies in the case of the {sup 11}B+{sup 235}U reaction. The disagreement between the DCM calculations and data at higher incident c.m. energies for the {sup 11}B+{sup 235}U entrance channel is associated with the presence of additional effects of noncompound, quasifission (qf) components, in contradiction with the measured anisotropy effects which indicate the other entrance channel {sup 14}N+{sup 232}Th to contain the noncompound nucleus contribution. The prediction of two fission windows, the symmetric fission (SF) and near symmetric or heavy mass fragments (HMFs), suggests the presence of a fine structure of fission fragments, which also need an experimental verification. The only parameter of the model is the neck length parameter {delta}R whose value is shown to depend strongly on limiting angular momentum, which in turn depends on the use of sticking or nonsticking moment of inertia for angular momentum effects.

  5. Decay of Bk246* formed in similar entrance channel reactions of B11+U235 and N14+Th232 at low energies using the dynamical cluster-decay model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Birbikram; Sharma, Manoj K.; Gupta, Raj K.

    2008-05-01

    The decay of the Bk246* nucleus, formed in entrance channel reactions B11+U235 and N14+Th232 at different incident energies, is studied by using the dynamical cluster-decay model (DCM) extended to include the deformations and orientations of nuclei. The main decay mode here is fission. The other (weaker) decay channels are the light particles evaporation (A⩽4) and intermediate mass fragments (5⩽A⩽20). All decay products are calculated as emissions of preformed clusters through the interaction barriers. The calculated fission cross sections σfiss, taken as a sum of the energetically favored symmetric and near symmetric fragments (ACN/2±7 and A=106-110 plus complementary fragments) show an excellent agreement with experimental data at all experimental incident c.m. energies for both reactions, except for the top three energies in the case of the B11+U235 reaction. The disagreement between the DCM calculations and data at higher incident c.m. energies for the B11+U235 entrance channel is associated with the presence of additional effects of noncompound, quasifission (qf) components, in contradiction with the measured anisotropy effects which indicate the other entrance channel N14+Th232 to contain the noncompound nucleus contribution. The prediction of two fission windows, the symmetric fission (SF) and near symmetric or heavy mass fragments (HMFs), suggests the presence of a fine structure of fission fragments, which also need an experimental verification. The only parameter of the model is the neck length parameter ▵R whose value is shown to depend strongly on limiting angular momentum, which in turn depends on the use of sticking or nonsticking moment of inertia for angular momentum effects.

  6. Supersonic Bare Metal Cluster Beams. Technical Progress Report, March 16, 1984 - April 1, 1985

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Smalley, R. E.

    1985-01-01

    There have been four major areas of concentration for the study of bare metal cluster beams: neutral cluster, chemical reactivity, cold cluster ion source development (both positive and negative), bare cluster ion ICR (ion cyclotron resonance) development, and photofragmentation studies of bare metal cluster ions.

  7. Cold fusion, Alchemist's dream

    SciTech Connect

    Clayton, E.D.

    1989-09-01

    In this report the following topics relating to cold fusion are discussed: muon catalysed cold fusion; piezonuclear fusion; sundry explanations pertaining to cold fusion; cosmic ray muon catalysed cold fusion; vibrational mechanisms in excited states of D{sub 2} molecules; barrier penetration probabilities within the hydrogenated metal lattice/piezonuclear fusion; branching ratios of D{sub 2} fusion at low energies; fusion of deuterons into {sup 4}He; secondary D+T fusion within the hydrogenated metal lattice; {sup 3}He to {sup 4}He ratio within the metal lattice; shock induced fusion; and anomalously high isotopic ratios of {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He.

  8. Status of cold fusion (2010).

    PubMed

    Storms, Edmund

    2010-10-01

    The phenomenon called cold fusion has been studied for the last 21 years since its discovery by Profs. Fleischmann and Pons in 1989. The discovery was met with considerable skepticism, but supporting evidence has accumulated, plausible theories have been suggested, and research is continuing in at least eight countries. This paper provides a brief overview of the major discoveries and some of the attempts at an explanation. The evidence supports the claim that a nuclear reaction between deuterons to produce helium can occur in special materials without application of high energy. This reaction is found to produce clean energy at potentially useful levels without the harmful byproducts normally associated with a nuclear process. Various requirements of a model are examined.

  9. Cold stress and the cold pressor test.

    PubMed

    Silverthorn, Dee U; Michael, Joel

    2013-03-01

    Temperature and other environmental stressors are known to affect blood pressure and heart rate. In this activity, students perform the cold pressor test, demonstrating increased blood pressure during a 1- to 2-min immersion of one hand in ice water. The cold pressor test is used clinically to evaluate autonomic and left ventricular function. This activity is easily adapted to an inquiry format that asks students to go to the scientific literature to learn about the test and then design a protocol for carrying out the test in classmates. The data collected are ideal for teaching graphical presentation of data and statistical analysis.

  10. Evidence from FTIR difference spectroscopy that D1-Asp61 influences the water reactions of the oxygen-evolving Mn4CaO5 cluster of photosystem II.

    PubMed

    Debus, Richard J

    2014-05-13

    Understanding the mechanism of photosynthetic water oxidation requires characterizing the reactions of the water molecules that serve as substrate or that otherwise interact with the oxygen-evolving Mn4CaO5 cluster. FTIR difference spectroscopy is a powerful tool for studying the structural changes of hydrogen bonded water molecules. For example, the O-H stretching mode of water molecules having relatively weak hydrogen bonds can be monitored near 3600 cm(-1), the D-O-D bending mode can be monitored near 1210 cm(-1), and highly polarizable networks of hydrogen bonds can be monitored as broad features between 3000 and 2000 cm(-1). The two former regions are practically devoid of overlapping vibrational modes from the protein. In Photosystem II, water oxidation requires a precisely choreographed sequence of proton and electron transfer steps in which proton release is required to prevent the redox potential of the Mn4CaO5 cluster from rising to levels that would prevent its subsequent oxidation. Proton release takes place via one or more proton egress pathways leading from the Mn4CaO5 cluster to the thylakoid lumen. There is growing evidence that D1-D61 is the initial residue of one dominant proton egress pathway. This residue interacts directly with water molecules in the first and second coordination spheres of the Mn4CaO5 cluster. In this study, we explore the influence of D1-D61 on the water reactions accompanying oxygen production by characterizing the FTIR properties of the D1-D61A mutant of the cyanobacterium, Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. On the basis of mutation-induced changes to the carbonyl stretching region near 1747 cm(-1), we conclude that D1-D61 participates in the same extensive networks of hydrogen bonds that have been identified previously by FTIR studies. On the basis of mutation-induced changes to the weakly hydrogen-bonded O-H stretching region, we conclude that D1-D61 interacts with water molecules that are located near the Cl(-)(1) ion and that

  11. First insertion of NO into a transition-metal cluster-carbon bond: regioselective formation, structure, and reactions of the first alkanenitrile oxide complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Goldhaber, A.; Vollhardt, K.P.C.; Walborsky, E.C.; Wolfgruber, M.

    1986-02-05

    The chemistry of NO in the presence of transition metals is receiving considerable current attention because of its role in air pollution, its potential in organic synthesis by carbon-nitrogen bond formation, and an increasing interest in its basic features. The nitrosyl cation has been reacted with many mono and polynuclear metal systems, leading mainly to substitution and reduction. Insertion into alkyl and aryl metal bonds in mono-metallic complexes is documented. The unprecedented title reaction and some preliminary chemistry of the products are reported here. 27 references, 1 figure.

  12. Reactions of metal ions and their clusters in the gas phase using laser ionization: Fourier transform mass spectrometry. Progress report, February 1, 1993--January 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Freiser, B.S.

    1993-09-01

    This report focuses on progress in seven areas: (1) Gas-Phase Reactions of Fe(Benzyne){sup +} with Simple Alkyl Halides; (2) Photodissociation and Collision-Induced Dissociation of Molecular Ions From Methylphenol and Chloromethylphenol; (3) Isotopomer Differentiation Using Metal Ion Chemical Ionization Reagents; (4) Multiple Excitation Collisional Activation (MECA) in Fourier Transform Mass Spectrometry; (5) Chemistry of Fe{sup +}-Arene Ions with Halobenzenes; (6) Gas-Phase Photodissociaton Study of Ag(Benzene){sup +} and Ag(Toluene){sup +}; and (7) Reactivity of Ti{sup 2+} and V{sup 2+} with Small Alkanes.

  13. Reaction of the C3(X(1)Σg (+)) carbon cluster with H2S(X(1)A1), hydrogen sulfide: photon-induced formation of C3S, tricarbon sulfur.

    PubMed

    Roehr, Nathan P; Szczepanski, Jan; Fu, Yi; Polfer, Nicolas C; Vala, Martin

    2014-11-28

    In this paper we report on the neutral-neutral reaction of the C3 carbon cluster with H2S in solid inert argon at 12 K, conditions that mimic, in part, the surfaces of interstellar grains. In the first step of the reaction, a C3•H2S complex is formed via an almost barrierless entrance addition mechanism. This complex, stabilized by an estimated 7.45 kJ/mol (CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pVTZ//B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) level), is formed by the interaction of a terminal carbon of C3 with a hydrogen in H2S. This con-covalent complex displays a band at 2044.1 cm(-1) observed via Fourier transform infrared absorption spectroscopy. With the help of the MP2/aug-ccpVDZ level method, this band is assigned to the CC asymmetric vibration mode. When the complex is exposed to UV-visible photons (hν < 5.5 eV) the tricarbon sulfur C3S molecule is identified, based on the appearance of a characteristic CC stretching band at 2047.5 cm(-1). Calculated ground-state potential energy surfaces also confirm the concomitant formation of molecular H2. This facile reaction pathway involves an attainable transition state of 174.4 kJ/mol. Conversely, competing lower-energy reaction pathways that would lead to the generation of H2C3S (propadienethione), or C2H2 (acetylene) and CS, involve much more complex, multi-stage pathways, and are not observed experimentally.

  14. Reaction of the C3(X1Σg+) carbon cluster with H2S(X1A1), hydrogen sulfide: Photon-induced formation of C3S, tricarbon sulfur

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roehr, Nathan P.; Szczepanski, Jan; Fu, Yi; Polfer, Nicolas C.; Vala, Martin

    2014-11-01

    In this paper we report on the neutral-neutral reaction of the C3 carbon cluster with H2S in solid inert argon at 12 K, conditions that mimic, in part, the surfaces of interstellar grains. In the first step of the reaction, a C3•H2S complex is formed via an almost barrierless entrance addition mechanism. This complex, stabilized by an estimated 7.45 kJ/mol (CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pVTZ//B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) level), is formed by the interaction of a terminal carbon of C3 with a hydrogen in H2S. This con-covalent complex displays a band at 2044.1 cm-1 observed via Fourier transform infrared absorption spectroscopy. With the help of the MP2/aug-ccpVDZ level method, this band is assigned to the CC asymmetric vibration mode. When the complex is exposed to UV-visible photons (hν < 5.5 eV) the tricarbon sulfur C3S molecule is identified, based on the appearance of a characteristic CC stretching band at 2047.5 cm-1. Calculated ground-state potential energy surfaces also confirm the concomitant formation of molecular H2. This facile reaction pathway involves an attainable transition state of 174.4 kJ/mol. Conversely, competing lower-energy reaction pathways that would lead to the generation of H2C3S (propadienethione), or C2H2 (acetylene) and CS, involve much more complex, multi-stage pathways, and are not observed experimentally.

  15. Note: High density pulsed molecular beam for cold ion chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Kokish, M. G.; Rajagopal, V.; Marler, J. P.; Odom, B. C.

    2014-08-15

    A recent expansion of cold and ultracold molecule applications has led to renewed focus on molecular species preparation under ultrahigh vacuum conditions. Meanwhile, molecular beams have been used to study gas phase chemical reactions for decades. In this paper, we describe an apparatus that uses pulsed molecular beam technology to achieve high local gas densities, leading to faster reaction rates with cold trapped ions. We characterize the beam's spatial profile using the trapped ions themselves. This apparatus could be used for preparation of molecular species by reactions requiring excitation of trapped ion precursors to states with short lifetimes or for obtaining a high reaction rate with minimal increase of background chamber pressure.

  16. Exercise in the Cold

    PubMed Central

    Fudge, Jessie

    2016-01-01

    Context: Hypothermia and frostbite injuries occur in cold weather activities and sporting events. Evidence Acquisition: A PubMed search was used to identify original research and review articles related to cold, frostbite, and hypothermia. Inclusion was based on their relevance to prevention and treatment of cold-related injuries in sports and outdoor activities. Dates of review articles were limited to those published after 2010. No date limit was set for the most recent consensus statements or original research. Study Design: Clinical review. Level of Evidence: Level 5. Results: Frostbite and hypothermia are well-documented entities with good prevention strategies and prehospital treatment recommendations that have changed very little with time. A layered approach to clothing is the best way to prevent injury and respond to weather changes. Each athlete, defined as a participant in a cold weather sport or activity, will respond to cold differently depending on anthropometric measurements and underlying medical risk factors. An understanding of wind-chill temperatures, wetness, and the weather forecast allows athletes and event coordinators to properly respond to changing weather conditions. At the first sign of a freezing cold injury, ensure warm, dry clothes and move to a protected environment. Conclusion: Cold injuries can be prevented, and cold weather activities are safe with proper education, preparation, and response to changing weather conditions or injury. PMID:26857732

  17. Cold fusion research

    SciTech Connect

    1989-11-01

    I am pleased to forward to you the Final Report of the Cold Fusion Panel. This report reviews the current status of cold fusion and includes major chapters on Calorimetry and Excess Heat, Fusion Products and Materials Characterization. In addition, the report makes a number of conclusions and recommendations, as requested by the Secretary of Energy.

  18. Cold-Weather Sports

    MedlinePlus

    ... Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Cold-Weather Sports KidsHealth > For Teens > Cold-Weather Sports Print A A A What's in this ... Equipment Ahh, winter! Shorter days. Frigid temperatures. Foul weather. What better time to be outdoors? Winter sports ...

  19. Cold Sores (HSV-1)

    MedlinePlus

    ... A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Cold Sores (HSV-1) KidsHealth > For Teens > Cold Sores (HSV-1) A A A What's in this article? ... or around a person's lips, are caused by herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1) . But they don't ...

  20. Chilling Out With Colds

    MedlinePlus

    ... Your head hurts. You don't have the energy to even get out of bed. And you can't breathe out of your nose. What's wrong? You may have a cold! Having a cold is the #1 reason kids visit the doctor and stay home from school. Kids can get six to ten ...

  1. Dynamical cluster-decay model for hot and rotating light-mass nuclear systems applied to the low-energy {sup 32}S+{sup 24}Mg{yields}{sup 56}Ni{sup *} reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Raj K.; Kumar, Rajesh; Singh, Dalip; Balasubramaniam, M.; Beck, C.

    2005-01-01

    The dynamical cluster-decay model (DCM) is developed further for the decay of hot and rotating compound nuclei (China) formed in light heavy-ion reactions. The model is worked out in terms of only one parameter, namely the neck-length parameter, which is related to the total kinetic energy TKE(T) or effective Q value Q{sub eff}(T) at temperature T of the hot CN and is defined in terms of the CN binding energy and ground-state binding energies of the emitted fragments. The emission of both the light particles (LP), with A{<=}4,Z{<=}2, as well as the complex intermediate mass fragments (IMF), with 42, is considered as the dynamical collective mass motion of preformed clusters through the barrier. Within the same dynamical model treatment, the LPs are shown to have different characteristics compared to those of the IMFs. The systematic variations of the LP emission cross section {sigma}{sub LP} and IMF emission cross section {sigma}{sub IMF} calculated from the present DCM match exactly the statistical fission model predictions. A nonstatistical dynamical description is developed for the first time for emission of light particles from hot and rotating CN. The model is applied to the decay of {sup 56}Ni* formed in the {sup 32}S+{sup 24}Mg reaction at two incident energies E{sub c.m.}=51.6 and 60.5 MeV. Both the IMFs and average TKE{sup lowbar} spectra are found to compare resonably well with the experimental data, favoring asymmetric mass distributions. The LPs' emission cross section is shown to depend strongly on the type of emitted particles and their multiplicities.

  2. Dissociative excitation transfer in the reaction of O2(a1Δg) with OH-(H2O)1,2 clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viggiano, Albert A.; Midey, Anthony; Eyet, Nicole; Bierbaum, Veronica M.; Troe, Jürgen

    2009-09-01

    Rate constants for the dissociation of OH-(H2O) and OH-(H2O)2 by transfer of electronic energy from O2(a1Δg) were measured. Values of 1.8×10-11 and 2.2×10-11 cm3 molecule-1 s-1, respectively, at 300 K were derived and temperature dependences were obtained from 300 to 500 K for OH-(H2O) and from 300 to 400 K for OH-(H2O)2. Dissociative excitation transfer with OH-(H2O) is slightly endothermic and the reaction appears to have a positive temperature dependence, but barely outside the uncertainty range. In contrast, the reaction of OH-(H2O)2 is exothermic and appears to have a negative temperature dependence. The rate constants are analyzed in terms of unimolecular rate theory, which suggests that the dissociation is prompt and is not affected by collisions with the helium buffer gas.

  3. Cold-fusion television show angers APS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartwright, Jon

    2009-06-01

    Cold fusion has been controversial since its inception on 23 March 1989, when chemists Martin Fleischmann and Stanley Pons at the University of Utah in the US announced that they had achieved a sustained nuclear-fusion reaction at room temperature. Two decades on, a US television documentary about the field has stirred up fresh debate after it linked the American Physical Society (APS) to an evaluation of some cold-fusion results by Robert Duncan, a physicist and vice chancellor of the University of Missouri.

  4. Mass spectrometric study of three-body ion-molecule clustering reactions of CpHq+ ions with N2 or CH4 in N2-CH4 mixtures.

    PubMed

    Speller, C V; Vacher, J R; Duc, E; Fitaire, M

    1995-01-01

    Thermochemical data for several ion-molecule clustering of hydrocarbon ions with N2 or CH4 were obtained from clustering equilibria studies in gas mixtures irradiated by alpha-particles. High-pressure mass spectrometry was used to determine the enthalpy and entropy changes of clustering (delta H0 and delta S0, respectively) for the reactions X+(N2)n-1 + 2N2 <==> X(+)(N2)n + N2 with X = CH5, n = 1-2; X = C2H5, n = 1-4; and X = C3H7, n = 1. For X = CH5, the values (delta H0; delta S0) are found to be (-6.8 kcal mol-1; -19.7 cal mol-1 K-1) for n = 1, and (-5.3 kcal mol-1; -15.9 cal mol-1 K-1) for n = 2. For X = C2H5, (delta H0; delta S0) = (-6.9 kcal mol-1; -18.2 cal mol-1 K-1), for n = 1, and (-4.6 kcal mol-1; -20.8 cal mol-1 K-1) for n = 2. From the equilibrium measurements at 129 K, estimates of the thermochemical values could be obtained for n = 3-4. The results obtained for the free energy, delta G0, were -1.4 kcal mol-1 for n = 3, and -1.1 kcal mol-1 for n = 4. For X = C3H7 we found delta G0 = -0.7 kcal mol-1 at 213 K. The association reactions X+ + 2CH4 <==> X+(CH4) + CH4 with X = CH5, C2H5, C2H7, and C3H7 were also studied, resulting in free energy values at 206 K of -3.1, -1.9, -0.5 and -1.3 kcal mol-1, respectively. The results for CH5, C2H5 and C3H7 are compared with previously reported measurements.

  5. Mass spectrometric study of three-body ion-molecule clustering reactions of C pH q+ ions with N 2 or CH 4 in N 2CH 4 mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speller, C. V.; Vacher, J. R.; Duc, E.; Fitaire, M.

    1995-02-01

    Thermochemical data for several ion-molecule clustering of hydrocarbon ions with N 2 or CH 4 were obtained from clustering equilibria studies in gas mixtures irradiated by α-particles. High-pressure mass spectrometry was used to determine the enthalpy and entropy changes of clustering ( ΔH° and ΔS°, respectively) for the reactions X +(N 2) n-1 +2N 2⇋ X +(N 2) n+N 2 with X = CH 5, n = 1-2; X = C 2H 5, n = 1-4; and X = C 3H 7, n = 1. For X = CH 5, the values ( ΔH°; ΔS°) are found to be (-6.8 kcal mol -1; -19.7 cal mol -1 K -1) for n = 1, and (-5.3 kcal mol -1; -15.9 cal mol -1K -1) for n = 2. For X = C 2H 5, ( ΔH°; ΔS°) = (-6.9 kcal mol -1; -18.2 cal mol -1 K -1), for n = 1, and (-4.6 kcal mol -1; -20.8 cal mol -1 K -1) for n = 2. From the equilibrium measurements at 129 K, estimates of the thermochemical values could be obtained for n = 3-4. The results obtained for the free energy, ΔG°, were -1.4 kcal mol -1 for n = 3, and -1.1 kcal mol -1 for n = 4. For X = C 3H 7 we found ΔG° = -0.7 kcal mol -1 at 213 K. The association reactions X ++2CH 4⇋ X +(CH 4)+CH 4 with X = CH 5, C 2H 5, C 2H 7, and C 3H 7 were also studied, resulting in free energy values at 206 K of -3.1, -1.9, -0.5 and -1.3 kcal mol -1, respectively. The results for CH 5, C 2H 5 and C 3H 7 are compared with previously reported measurements.

  6. Cluster headache

    MedlinePlus

    Histamine headache; Headache - histamine; Migrainous neuralgia; Headache - cluster; Horton's headache; Vascular headache - cluster ... be related to the body's sudden release of histamine (chemical in the body released during an allergic ...

  7. Optimization of culture conditions for production of a novel cold-active lipase from Pichia lynferdii NRRL Y-7723

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lipases with abnormal properties such as thermo stability, alkalinity, acidity and cold-activity receive industrial attention because of their usability under restricted reaction conditions. Most microbial cold-active lipases originate from psychrotrophic and psychrophilic microorganisms found in An...

  8. Thermochemistry of the activation of N{sub 2} on iron cluster cations: Guided ion beam studies of the reactions of Fe{sub n}{sup +} (n=1-19) with N{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Tan Lin; Liu Fuyi; Armentrout, P.B.

    2006-02-28

    The kinetic energy dependences of the reactions of Fe{sub n}{sup +} (n=1-19) with N{sub 2} are studied in a guided ion beam tandem mass spectrometer over the energy range of 0-15 eV. In addition to collision-induced dissociation forming Fe{sub m}{sup +} ions, which dominate the product spectra, a variety of Fe{sub m}N{sub 2}{sup +} and Fe{sub m}N{sup +} product ions, where m{<=}n, is observed. All processes are observed to exhibit thresholds. Fe{sub m}{sup +}-N and Fe{sub m}{sup +}-2N bond energies as a function of cluster size are derived from the threshold analysis of the kinetic energy dependences of the endothermic reactions. The trends in this thermochemistry are compared to the isoelectronic D{sub 0}(Fe{sub n}{sup +}-CH), and to bulk phase values. A fairly uniform barrier of 0.48{+-}0.03 eV at 0 K is observed for formation of the Fe{sub n}N{sub 2}{sup +} product ions (n=12, 15-19) and can be related to the rate-limiting step in the Haber process for catalytic ammonia production.

  9. Meaningful Clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Sanfilippo, Antonio P.; Calapristi, Augustin J.; Crow, Vernon L.; Hetzler, Elizabeth G.; Turner, Alan E.

    2004-05-26

    We present an approach to the disambiguation of cluster labels that capitalizes on the notion of semantic similarity to assign WordNet senses to cluster labels. The approach provides interesting insights on how document clustering can provide the basis for developing a novel approach to word sense disambiguation.

  10. Influence of the ligand alkyl chain length on the solubility, aqueous speciation, and kinetics of substitution reactions of water-soluble M3S4 (M = Mo, W) clusters bearing hydroxyalkyl diphosphines.

    PubMed

    Beltrán, Tomás F; Llusar, Rosa; Sokolov, Maxim; Basallote, Manuel G; Fernández-Trujillo, M Jesús; Pino-Chamorro, Jose Ángel

    2013-08-05

    Water-soluble [M3S4X3(dhbupe)3](+) diphosphino complexes (dhbupe = 1,2-bis(bis(hydroxybutyl)phosphino)ethane), 1(+) (M = Mo, X = Cl) and 2(+) (M = W; X = Br), have been synthesized by extending the procedure used for the preparation of their hydroxypropyl analogues by reaction of the M3S4(PPh3)3X4(solvent)x molecular clusters with the corresponding 1,2-bis(bishydroxyalkyl)diphosphine. The solid state structure of the [M3S4X3(dhbupe)3](+) cation possesses a C3 symmetry with a cuboidal M3S4 unit, and the outer positions are occupied by one halogen and two phosphorus atoms of the diphosphine ligand. At a basic pH, the halide ligands are substituted by hydroxo groups to afford the corresponding [Mo3S4(OH)3(dhbupe)3](+) (1OH(+)) and [W3S4(OH)3(dhbupe)3](+) (2OH(+)) complexes. This behavior is similar to that found in 1,2-bis(bis(hydroxymethyl)phosphino)ethane (dhmpe) complexes and differs from that observed for 1,2-bis(bis(hydroxypropyl)phosphino)ethane (dhprpe) derivatives. In the latter case, an alkylhydroxo group of the functionalized diphosphine replaces the chlorine ligands to afford Mo3S4 complexes in which the deprotonated dhprpe acts in a tridentate fashion. Detailed studies based on stopped-flow, (31)P{(1)H} NMR, and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry techniques have been carried out in order to understand the solution behavior and kinetics of interconversion between the different species formed in solution: 1 and 1OH(+) or 2 and 2OH(+). On the basis of the kinetic results, a mechanism with two parallel reaction pathways involving water and OH(-) attacks is proposed for the formal substitution of halides by hydroxo ligands. On the other hand, reaction of the hydroxo clusters with HX acids occurs with protonation of the OH(-) ligands followed by substitution of coordinated water by X(-).

  11. Cold subcutaneous abscesses.

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, R.; Stephens, L.; Kelly, A. P.

    1990-01-01

    Cold abscesses are defined as having no associated erythema, heat, or tenderness. They may be present in immunodeficiency disorders, deep mycoses, and other infectious diseases. As there is a dearth information on this subject in the dermatology, surgery, and infectious disease literature, we present a case of cold abscesses secondary to coccidioidomycosis and discuss the possible role of humoral immunity, cell-mediated immunity, prostaglandins, T cells, and other mediators in cold abscess pathogenesis. In addition, therapeutic guidelines for abscesses are reviewed. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:2280425

  12. Miniature cold gas thrusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bzibziak, R. J., Sr.

    1992-07-01

    Cold gas thrusters provide a safe, inexpensive, lightweight and reliable means of propulsive control for small satellites, projectiles and maneuvering control systems. Moog Inc. has designed and developed a family of miniature cold gas thrusters for use on Strategic Defense Iniative flight simulation experiments, sounding rockets, small satellite applications, astronaut control systems, and close proximity maneuvering systems for Space System. Construction features such as coil assembly, core assembly, armature assembly, external housing and valve body are discussed. The design approach, performance characteristics and functional description of cold gas thrusters designed for various applications are presented.

  13. About the Clusters Program

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Environmental Technology Innovation Clusters Program advises cluster organizations, encourages collaboration between clusters, tracks U.S. environmental technology clusters, and connects EPA programs to cluster needs.

  14. Cold hardiness in molluscs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansart, Armelle; Vernon, Philippe

    2003-05-01

    Molluscs inhabit all types of environments: seawater, intertidal zone, freshwater and land, and of course may have to deal with subzero temperatures. Ectotherm animals survive cold conditions by avoiding it by extensive supercooling (freezing avoidant species) or by bearing the freezing of their extracellular body fluids (freezing tolerant species). Although some studies on cold hardiness are available for intertidal molluscs, they are scarce for freshwater and terrestrial ones. Molluscs often exhibit intermediary levels of cold hardiness, with a moderate or low ability to supercool and a limited survival to the freezing of their tissues. Several factors could be involved: their dependence on water, their ability to enter dormancy, the probability of inoculative freezing in their environment, etc. Size is an important parameter in the development of cold hardiness abilities: it influences supercooling ability in land snails, which are rather freezing avoidant and survival to ice formation in intertidal organisms, which generally tolerate freezing.

  15. Colds and flus - antibiotics

    MedlinePlus

    Fashner J, Ericson K, Werner S. Treatment of the common cold in children and adults. Am Fam Physician. 2012; ... gov/pubmed/22962927 . Melio FR, Berge LR. Upper respiratory tract infections. In: Marx JA, Hockberger RS, Walls RM, et ...

  16. Coping with Colds

    MedlinePlus

    ... re hungry. And you might have heard that chicken soup can cure a cold. There's no real ... you have strep throat and need treatment with antibiotics. If your doctor does prescribe antibiotics, be sure ...

  17. Role of clusters in nuclear astrophysics with Cluster Nucleosynthesis Diagram (CND)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubono, S.; Binh, Dam N.; Hayakawa, S.; Hashimoto, H.; Kahl, D.; Yamaguchi, H.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Teranishi, T.; Iwasa, N.; Komatsubara, T.; Kato, S.; Chen, A.; Cherubini, S.; Choi, S. H.; Hahn, I. S.; He, J. J.; Khiem, Le Hong; Lee, C. S.; Kwon, Y. K.; Wanajo, S.; Janka, H.-T.

    2013-04-01

    The role of nuclear clustering in stellar reactions is discussed, with Cluster Nucleosynthesis Diagram (CND) proposed before, for nucleosynthesis in stellar evolution and explosive stellar phenomena. Special emphasis is placed on α-induced stellar reactions. We report here the first experimental evidence that a cluster resonances dominate the (α,p) stellar reaction cross sections that is crucial for the vp-process in core-collapse supernovae.

  18. Cold urticaria associated with acute serologic toxoplasmosis.

    PubMed

    Miralles López, J C; López Andreu, F R; Sánchez-Gascón, F; López Rodríguez, C; Negro Alvarez, J M

    2005-01-01

    Cold urticaria is defined as a urticarial and/or angioedematous reaction of the skin to contact with cold objects, water or air. Types of urticaria associated with infectious diseases, such as mononucleosis, rubeola, varicella, syphilis, hepatitis, and HIV infection have been reported. We present the case of a patient who developed cold urticaria associated with acute serologic toxoplasmosis. The patient was a 34-year-old man who for the previous 2 months had presented cutaneous pruritus accompanied by several papular lesions in parts of the skin exposed to cold as well as those in contact with cold water. The result of an "ice-cube test" was positive. Serologic tests for Toxoplasma gondii showed an IgG level of 68 UI/ml and were positive for IgM, while a test for cryoglobulins was positive. One month later cryoglobulins were negative and a serologic test for T. gondii showed an IgG concentration of 75 UI/ml and positive IgM. Three months later cryoglobulins were still negative, IgG for T. gondii was 84 UI/ml, and IgM was positive. After 6 months cryoglobulins were still negative, IgG level was 68 UI/ml and IgM was still slightly positive. In the final evaluation, 14 months later, IgG level was 32 UI/ml and IgM was negative. The patient continues to present clinical manifestations of cold urticaria, although he has experienced some improvement and his tolerance to cold has increased after treatment with cetirizine.

  19. Cool Cluster Correctly Correlated

    SciTech Connect

    Varganov, Sergey Aleksandrovich

    2005-01-01

    Atomic clusters are unique objects, which occupy an intermediate position between atoms and condensed matter systems. For a long time it was thought that physical and chemical properties of atomic dusters monotonically change with increasing size of the cluster from a single atom to a condensed matter system. However, recently it has become clear that many properties of atomic clusters can change drastically with the size of the clusters. Because physical and chemical properties of clusters can be adjusted simply by changing the cluster's size, different applications of atomic clusters were proposed. One example is the catalytic activity of clusters of specific sizes in different chemical reactions. Another example is a potential application of atomic clusters in microelectronics, where their band gaps can be adjusted by simply changing cluster sizes. In recent years significant advances in experimental techniques allow one to synthesize and study atomic clusters of specified sizes. However, the interpretation of the results is often difficult. The theoretical methods are frequently used to help in interpretation of complex experimental data. Most of the theoretical approaches have been based on empirical or semiempirical methods. These methods allow one to study large and small dusters using the same approximations. However, since empirical and semiempirical methods rely on simple models with many parameters, it is often difficult to estimate the quantitative and even qualitative accuracy of the results. On the other hand, because of significant advances in quantum chemical methods and computer capabilities, it is now possible to do high quality ab-initio calculations not only on systems of few atoms but on clusters of practical interest as well. In addition to accurate results for specific clusters, such methods can be used for benchmarking of different empirical and semiempirical approaches. The atomic clusters studied in this work contain from a few atoms to

  20. Teaching in a Cold Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ewert, Alan

    1979-01-01

    Designed to help teachers deal with students in a cold environment, this article explains cold physiology and fundamental laws of heat; describes 14 common cold injuries and their current treatment; and lists a number of useful teaching techniques for cold environments. (SB)

  1. Teaching in a Cold Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ewert, Alan

    Instructors who teach outdoors in an environment so cold as to cause injury must satisfy program objectives while avoiding cold injury to themselves and students, help students focus on learning instead of discomfort, and alleviate some students' intense fear of the cold. Dealing with the cold successfully requires a thorough knowledge of:…

  2. Understanding Colds: Anatomy of the Nose

    MedlinePlus

    ... Colds Prevention Treatment Children Complications Special Features References Common Cold Understanding Colds Anatomy of the Nose The nose ... cm (3/8 inch) per minute. What a Common Cold Is A common cold is an illness caused ...

  3. A DFT and TD-DFT approach to the understanding of statistical kinetics in substitution reactions of M3Q4 (M = Mo, W; Q = S, Se) cuboidal clusters.

    PubMed

    Algarra, Andrés G; Fernández-Trujillo, M Jesús; Basallote, Manuel G

    2012-04-16

    For many years it has been known that the nine water molecules in [M(3)Q(4)(H(2)O)(9)](4+) cuboidal clusters (M = Mo, W; Q = S, Se) can be replaced by entering ligands, such as chloride or thiocyanate, and kinetic studies carried out mainly on the substitution of the first water molecule at each metal centre reveal that the reaction at the three metal centres occurs with statistical kinetics; that is, a single exponential with a rate constant corresponding to the reaction at the third centre is observed instead of the expected three-exponential kinetic trace. Such simplification of the kinetic equations requires the simultaneous fulfilment of two conditions: first that the three consecutive rate constants are in statistical ratio, and second that the metal centres behave as independent chromophores. The validity of those simplifications has been checked for the case of the reaction of [Mo(3)S(4)(H(2)O)(9)](4+) with Cl(-) by using DFT and TD-DFT theoretical calculations. The results of those calculations are in agreement with the available experimental information, which indicates that the H(2)O ligands trans to the μ-S undergo substitution much faster than those trans to the μ(3)-S. Moreover, the energy barriers for the substitution of the first water molecule at the three metal centres are close to each other, the differences being compatible with the small changes in the numerical values of the rate constants required for observation of statistical kinetics. TD-DFT calculations lead to calculated electronic spectra, which are in reasonable agreement with those experimentally measured, but the calculations do not indicate that the three metal centres behave as independent chromophores, although the mathematical conditions required for simplification of the kinetic traces to a single exponential are reasonably well fulfilled at certain wavelengths. A re-examination of the kinetics of the reaction by using global fitting procedures yields results, which are

  4. Data Clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagstaff, Kiri L.

    2012-03-01

    On obtaining a new data set, the researcher is immediately faced with the challenge of obtaining a high-level understanding from the observations. What does a typical item look like? What are the dominant trends? How many distinct groups are included in the data set, and how is each one characterized? Which observable values are common, and which rarely occur? Which items stand out as anomalies or outliers from the rest of the data? This challenge is exacerbated by the steady growth in data set size [11] as new instruments push into new frontiers of parameter space, via improvements in temporal, spatial, and spectral resolution, or by the desire to "fuse" observations from different modalities and instruments into a larger-picture understanding of the same underlying phenomenon. Data clustering algorithms provide a variety of solutions for this task. They can generate summaries, locate outliers, compress data, identify dense or sparse regions of feature space, and build data models. It is useful to note up front that "clusters" in this context refer to groups of items within some descriptive feature space, not (necessarily) to "galaxy clusters" which are dense regions in physical space. The goal of this chapter is to survey a variety of data clustering methods, with an eye toward their applicability to astronomical data analysis. In addition to improving the individual researcher’s understanding of a given data set, clustering has led directly to scientific advances, such as the discovery of new subclasses of stars [14] and gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) [38]. All clustering algorithms seek to identify groups within a data set that reflect some observed, quantifiable structure. Clustering is traditionally an unsupervised approach to data analysis, in the sense that it operates without any direct guidance about which items should be assigned to which clusters. There has been a recent trend in the clustering literature toward supporting semisupervised or constrained

  5. Predicted halflives for cluster radioactivities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poenaru, D. N.; Greiner, W.; Ivascu, M.

    1989-10-01

    The main results of the analytical superasymmetric fission model, describing in a unified manner cluster radioactivities, alpha-decay and cold fission processes, are briefly reviewed. Predicted halflives for 14C, 24, 25, 26Ne, 28, 30Mg and 32Si radioactivities in the range 10 11-10 26 s and the corresponding branching ratios relative to α-decay 10 -16 - 10 -9 have been experimentally confirmed within 1.5 orders of magnitude.

  6. Cold moderators at ORNL

    SciTech Connect

    Lucas, A. T.

    1997-09-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) cold moderators were not an 'Oak Ridge first', but would have been the largest both physically and in terms of cold neutron flux. Two cold moderators were planned each 410 mm in diameter and containing about 30L of liquid deuterium. They were to be completely independent of each other. A modular system design was used to provide greater reliability and serviceability. When the ANS was terminated, up–grading of the resident High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) was examined and an initial study was made into the feasibility of adding a cold source. Because the ANS design was modular, it was possible to use many identical design features. Sub-cooled liquid at 4 bar abs was initially chosen for the HFIR design concept, but this was subsequently changed to 15 bar abs to operate above the critical pressure. As in the ANS, the hydrogen will operate at a constant pressure throughout the temperature range and a completely closed loop with secondary containment was adopted. The heat load of 2 kW made the heat flux comparable with that of the ANS. Subsequent studies into the construction of cryogenic moderators for the proposed new Synchrotron Neutron source indicated that again many of the same design concepts could be used. By connecting the two cold sources together in series, the total heat load of 2 kW is very close to that of the HFIR allowing a very similar supercritical hydrogen system to be configured. The two hydrogen moderators of the SNS provide a comparable heat load to the HFIR moderator. It is subsequently planned to connect the two in series and operate from a single cold loop system, once again using supercritical hydrogen. The spallation source also provided an opportunity to re-examine a cold pellet solid methane moderator operating at 20K.

  7. Major differences observed in transcript profiles of blueberry during cold acclimation under field and cold room conditions.

    PubMed

    Dhanaraj, Anik L; Alkharouf, Nadim W; Beard, Hunter S; Chouikha, Imed B; Matthews, Benjamin F; Wei, Hui; Arora, Rajeev; Rowland, Lisa J

    2007-02-01

    Our laboratory has been working toward increasing our understanding of the genetic control of cold hardiness in blueberry (Vaccinium section Cyanococcus) to ultimately use this information to develop more cold hardy cultivars for the industry. Here, we report using cDNA microarrays to monitor changes in gene expression at multiple times during cold acclimation under field and cold room conditions. Microarrays contained over 2,500 cDNA inserts, approximately half of which had been picked and single-pass sequenced from each of two cDNA libraries that were constructed from cold acclimated floral buds and non-acclimated floral buds of the fairly cold hardy cv. Bluecrop (Vaccinium corymbosum L.). Two biological samples were examined at each time point. Microarray data were analyzed statistically using t tests, ANOVA, clustering algorithms, and online analytical processing (OLAP). Interestingly, more transcripts were found to be upregulated under cold room conditions than under field conditions. Many of the genes induced only under cold room conditions could be divided into three major types: (1) genes associated with stress tolerance; (2) those that encode glycolytic and TCA cycle enzymes, and (3) those associated with protein synthesis machinery. A few of the genes induced only under field conditions appear to be related to light stress. Possible explanations for these differences are discussed in physiological context. Although many similarities exist in how plants respond during cold acclimation in the cold room and in the field environment, there are major differences suggesting caution should be taken in interpreting results based only on artificial, cold room conditions.

  8. Methanation process utilizing split cold gas recycle

    DOEpatents

    Tajbl, Daniel G.; Lee, Bernard S.; Schora, Jr., Frank C.; Lam, Henry W.

    1976-07-06

    In the methanation of feed gas comprising carbon monoxide and hydrogen in multiple stages, the feed gas, cold recycle gas and hot product gas is mixed in such proportions that the mixture is at a temperature sufficiently high to avoid carbonyl formation and to initiate the reaction and, so that upon complete reaction of the carbon monoxide and hydrogen, an excessive adiabatic temperature will not be reached. Catalyst damage by high or low temperatures is thereby avoided with a process that utilizes extraordinarily low recycle ratios and a minimum of investment in operating costs.

  9. The physics and modes of star cluster formation: observations.

    PubMed

    Lada, Charles J

    2010-02-28

    Stellar clusters are born in cold and dusty molecular clouds and the youngest clusters are embedded to various degrees in a dusty dark molecular material. Such embedded clusters can be considered protocluster systems. The most deeply buried examples are so heavily obscured by dust that they are only visible at infrared wavelengths. These embedded protoclusters constitute the nearest laboratories for a direct astronomical investigation of the physical processes of cluster formation and early evolution. I review the present state of empirical knowledge concerning embedded-cluster systems and discuss the implications for understanding their formation and subsequent evolution to produce bound stellar clusters.

  10. Natural Variation of Cold Deacclimation Correlates with Variation of Cold-Acclimation of the Plastid Antioxidant System in Arabidopsis thaliana Accessions.

    PubMed

    Juszczak, Ilona; Cvetkovic, Jelena; Zuther, Ellen; Hincha, Dirk K; Baier, Margarete

    2016-01-01

    Temperature variations impact on the balance between photosynthetic electron transport and electron-consuming assimilation reactions and transiently increase generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Previous studies demonstrated that the expression of C-repeat binding factors (CBFs), which activate cold acclimation reactions, respond to chloroplast ROS signals and that cold deacclimation is partly halted for days after the transfer of acclimated plants to optimal growth conditions in four Arabidopsis accessions from cold-continental habitats. We hypothesized that these accessions differ from others in the regulation of the plastid antioxidant system (PAS). In the present study, we compared the expression intensity of the 12 most prominent PAS genes for peroxidases, superoxide dismutase and low molecular weight antioxidant regenerating enzymes in 10 Arabidopsis accessions with regulation of CBF and COR (cold regulated genes) transcript levels and cold-regulated metabolite levels prior to cold, after 2 week long cold acclimation and during the first 3 days of deacclimation. In the accessions with prolonged activation of cold responses, by trend, weaker induction of various cold-inducible PAS genes and stronger decreases in the expression of negatively cold-regulated PAS genes were observed. Low PAS gene expression delayed the post-cold decrease in H2O2 levels after transfer of the plants from cold to optimal growth conditions. We conclude that weaker expression of various PAS genes in the cold is an adapted strategy of the Arabidopsis accessions N14, N13, Ms-0, and Kas-1 to avoid full inactivation of cold-responses in the first days after the end of the cold period.

  11. Natural Variation of Cold Deacclimation Correlates with Variation of Cold-Acclimation of the Plastid Antioxidant System in Arabidopsis thaliana Accessions

    PubMed Central

    Juszczak, Ilona; Cvetkovic, Jelena; Zuther, Ellen; Hincha, Dirk K.; Baier, Margarete

    2016-01-01

    Temperature variations impact on the balance between photosynthetic electron transport and electron-consuming assimilation reactions and transiently increase generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Previous studies demonstrated that the expression of C-repeat binding factors (CBFs), which activate cold acclimation reactions, respond to chloroplast ROS signals and that cold deacclimation is partly halted for days after the transfer of acclimated plants to optimal growth conditions in four Arabidopsis accessions from cold-continental habitats. We hypothesized that these accessions differ from others in the regulation of the plastid antioxidant system (PAS). In the present study, we compared the expression intensity of the 12 most prominent PAS genes for peroxidases, superoxide dismutase and low molecular weight antioxidant regenerating enzymes in 10 Arabidopsis accessions with regulation of CBF and COR (cold regulated genes) transcript levels and cold-regulated metabolite levels prior to cold, after 2 week long cold acclimation and during the first 3 days of deacclimation. In the accessions with prolonged activation of cold responses, by trend, weaker induction of various cold-inducible PAS genes and stronger decreases in the expression of negatively cold-regulated PAS genes were observed. Low PAS gene expression delayed the post-cold decrease in H2O2 levels after transfer of the plants from cold to optimal growth conditions. We conclude that weaker expression of various PAS genes in the cold is an adapted strategy of the Arabidopsis accessions N14, N13, Ms-0, and Kas-1 to avoid full inactivation of cold-responses in the first days after the end of the cold period. PMID:27014325

  12. Temperature and heat production patterns inside organism clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyaw Tha Paw, U.

    1988-06-01

    Clustering of organisms under cold air temperature conditions is modelled with a finite-difference method. Metabolic functions of temperature are used to simulate completely ectothermic, completely endothermic, and other organisms. To adequately match real conditions, the core temperature is kept constant at a high level, while the periphery of the organism cluster is assigned a lower temperature representing the cold conditions under which clustering is observed for organisms. The numerical model reasonably predicts the observed temperature distribution in honeybee clusters. The results do not support suggestions that organisms could overheat in the core of a cluster if they do not use thermoregulatory mechanisms to cool down. Endothermic organisms are not as efficient as ectothermic ones in heating a cluster core temperature to a given level. The general ectothermic metabolic rate function exhibited one of the highest efficiencies for heating the cluster.

  13. Anomalous deepening of a belt of intraslab earthquakes in the Pacific slab crust under Kanto, central Japan: Possible anomalous thermal shielding, dehydration reactions, and seismicity caused by shallower cold slab material

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hasegawa, A.; Nakajima, J.; Kita, S.; Okada, T.; Matsuzawa, T.; Kirby, S.H.

    2007-01-01

    A belt of intraslab seismicity in the Pacific slab crust parallel to iso-depth contours of the plate interface has been found beneath Hokkaido and Tohoku. Hypocenter relocations have shown that this seismic belt does not run parallel to but obliquely to the iso-depth contours beneath Kanto, deepening toward the north from ???100 km to ???140 km depth. The depth limit of the contact zone with the overlying Philippine Sea slab is located close to and parallel to this obliquely oriented seismic belt, suggesting that the deepening of the seismic belt there is caused by the contact with the overlying slab. The contact with this cold slab hinders the heating of the Pacific slab crust by hot mantle wedge, which would cause delay of eclogite-forming phase transformations and hence deepening of the seismic belt there. The depth limit of the subducting low-velocity crust also deepens toward the north, supporting this idea. Copyright 2007 by the American Geophysical Union.

  14. Theory of laser enhancement and suppression of cold reactions: the fermion-boson 6Li+7Li2<-->(variant Planck's over 2pi omega0) 6Li7Li+7Li radiative collision.

    PubMed

    Li, Xuan; Parker, Gregory A; Brumer, Paul; Thanopulos, Ioannis; Shapiro, Moshe

    2008-03-28

    We present a nonperturbative time-dependent quantum mechanical theory of the laser catalysis and control of a bifurcating A+BC<-->(variant Planck's over 2pi omega(0))ABC*(v)<-->(variant Planck's over 2pi omega(0) )AB+C reaction, with ABC*(v) denoting an intermediate, electronically excited, complex of ABC in the vth vibrational state. We apply this theory to the low collision energy fermion-boson light-induced exchange reaction, (6)Li((2)S)+(7)Li(2)((3)Sigma(u)(+))<-->(variant Planck's over 2pi omega(0))((6)Li(7)Li(7)Li)*<-->(variant Planck's over 2pi omega(0))(6)Li(7)Li((3)Sigma(+))+(7)Li((2)S). We show that at very low collision energies and energetically narrow (approximately 0.01 cm(-1)) initial reactant wave packets, it is possible to tune the yield of the exchange reaction from 0 to near-unity (yield >or=99%) values. Controllability is somewhat reduced at collisions involving energetically wider (approximately 1 cm(-1)) initial reactant wave packets. At these energetic bandwidths, the radiative reactive control, although still impressive, is limited to the 0%-76% reactive-probabilities range.

  15. Sleeve reaction chamber system

    DOEpatents

    Northrup, M. Allen; Beeman, Barton V.; Benett, William J.; Hadley, Dean R.; Landre, Phoebe; Lehew, Stacy L.; Krulevitch, Peter A.

    2009-08-25

    A chemical reaction chamber system that combines devices such as doped polysilicon for heating, bulk silicon for convective cooling, and thermoelectric (TE) coolers to augment the heating and cooling rates of the reaction chamber or chambers. In addition the system includes non-silicon-based reaction chambers such as any high thermal conductivity material used in combination with a thermoelectric cooling mechanism (i.e., Peltier device). The heat contained in the thermally conductive part of the system can be used/reused to heat the device, thereby conserving energy and expediting the heating/cooling rates. The system combines a micromachined silicon reaction chamber, for example, with an additional module/device for augmented heating/cooling using the Peltier effect. This additional module is particularly useful in extreme environments (very hot or extremely cold) where augmented heating/cooling would be useful to speed up the thermal cycling rates. The chemical reaction chamber system has various applications for synthesis or processing of organic, inorganic, or biochemical reactions, including the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and/or other DNA reactions, such as the ligase chain reaction.

  16. Cold urticaria: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    La Shell, Mark S; Tankersley, Michael S; Kobayashi, Machiko

    2005-10-01

    Cold urticaria represents a form of physical urticaria. The disorder is uncommon, and patients with the condition are at risk for systemic reactions and thus must be identified, counseled, and treated accordingly. Diagnosis principally is clinical and is confirmed by the results of cold stimulation tests such as placing an ice cube on the patient's forearm. Treatment primarily consists of preventive counseling, epinephrine autoinjections, and antihistamines. We present the case of a 9-year-old girl with acquired cold urticaria and review the literature.

  17. Chemistry within Molecular van der Waals Clusters

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-07-18

    fragment cations with a neutral DME , within the cluster, to form a trimethyloxonlum cation intermediate. This type of ion-molecule reaction has been...therefore speculate that the DME cluster reactions leading to the same products should involve the same mechanism found to occur on zeolite catalysts. That...Compton, R. N. J. Chem. Phys. 1978 69, 1644, Mots, C. E. Radiat. Phys. Chem. 1982, 20, 51. Ibed. Kinetics of Ion-Molecule Reactions ; Ausloos, P., Ed

  18. Analogs of the giant dipole and spin-dipole resonances in {sup 4}He and in {alpha} clusters of {sup 6,7}Li studied by the {sup 4}He,{sup 6,7}Li({sup 7}Li,{sup 7}Be{gamma}) reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Nakayama, S.; Matsumoto, E.; Fushimi, K.; Hayami, R.; Kawasuso, H.; Yasuda, K.; Yamagata, T.; Akimune, H.; Ikemizu, H.; Asaji, S.; Ishida, T.; Kudoh, T.; Sagara, K.; Fujiwara, M.; Hashimoto, H.; Kawase, K.; Nakanishi, K.; Oota, T.; Yosoi, M.; Greenfield, M. B.

    2008-07-15

    We studied analogs of the giant dipole resonance (GDR) and spin-dipole resonance (SDR) in {sup 4}He and in the {alpha} clusters of {sup 6,7}Li via the ({sup 7}Li,{sup 7}Be{gamma}) reactions on {sup 4}He, {sup 6}Li, and {sup 7}Li at an incident energy of 455 MeV and at a scattering angle of 0 deg. by measuring spin-nonflip and spin-flip spectra. The reaction Q-values for the analogs of the GDR and SDR in the {alpha} clusters of {sup 6,7}Li were found to be more negative than those in {sup 4}He by 2.0{+-}0.5 MeV. The ratios of the cross section for the analog of the GDR to that for the analog of the SDR in {sup 4}He and in the {alpha} clusters of {sup 6}Li and {sup 7}Li were found to be the same within errors, 0.5{+-}0.1. The cross sections for the analogs of the GDR as well as those for the analogs of the SDR in the {alpha} clusters of {sup 6,7}Li were 0.6{approx}0.8 times smaller than those in {sup 4}He. These results suggest that excitations of {alpha} clusters embedded in nuclei are suppressed as compared with excitations of free {alpha} particles.

  19. Fast Simulations of Gas Sloshing and Cold Front Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roediger, E.; ZuHone, J. A.

    2012-01-01

    We present a simplified and fast method for simulating minor mergers between galaxy clusters. Instead of following the evolution of the dark matter halos directly by the N-body method, we employ a rigid potential approximation for both clusters. The simulations are run in the rest frame of the more massive cluster and account for the resulting inertial accelerations in an optimised way. We test the reliability of this method for studies of minor merger induced gas sloshing by performing a one-to-one comparison between our simulations and hydro+N-body ones. We find that the rigid potential approximation reproduces the sloshing-related features well except for two artifacts: the temperature just outside the cold fronts is slightly over-predicted, and the outward motion of the cold fronts is delayed by typically 200 Myr. We discuss reasons for both artifacts.

  20. Fast Simulations of Gas Sloshing and Cold Front Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roediger, E.; ZuHone, J. A.

    2011-01-01

    We present a simplified and fast method for simulating minor mergers between galaxy clusters. Instead of following the evolution of the dark matter halos directly by the N-body method, we employ a rigid potential approximation for both clusters. The simulations are run in the rest frame of the more massive cluster and account for the resulting inertial accelerations in an optimised way. We test the reliability of this method for studies of minor merger induced gas sloshing by performing a one-to-one comparison between our simulations and hydro+N-body ones. We find that the rigid potential approximation reproduces the sloshing-related features well except for two artefacts: the temperature just outside the cold fronts is slightly over-predicted, and the outward motion of the cold fronts is delayed by typically 200 Myr. We discuss reasons for both artefacts.

  1. Quintuplet Cluster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Penetrating 25,000 light-years of obscuring dust and myriad stars, NASA's Hubble Space Telescope has provided the clearest view yet of one of the largest young clusters of stars inside our Milky Way galaxy, located less than 100 light-years from the very center of the Galaxy. Having the equivalent mass greater than 10,000 stars like our sun, the monster cluster is ten times larger than typical young star clusters scattered throughout our Milky Way. It is destined to be ripped apart in just a few million years by gravitational tidal forces in the galaxy's core. But in its brief lifetime it shines more brightly than any other star cluster in the Galaxy. Quintuplet Cluster is 4 million years old. It has stars on the verge of blowing up as supernovae. It is the home of the brightest star seen in the galaxy, called the Pistol star. This image was taken in infrared light by Hubble's NICMOS camera in September 1997. The false colors correspond to infrared wavelengths. The galactic center stars are white, the red stars are enshrouded in dust or behind dust, and the blue stars are foreground stars between us and the Milky Way's center. The cluster is hidden from direct view behind black dust clouds in the constellation Sagittarius. If the cluster could be seen from earth it would appear to the naked eye as a 3rd magnitude star, 1/6th of a full moon's diameter apart.

  2. Out in the cold.

    PubMed

    Bates, Jane

    2016-05-04

    Every now and then, you say something to a patient and wonder whether you should have kept quiet. On this occasion, a female patient and I were indulging in a moment of shared empathy over an annoying symptom we both experience - permanently cold feet.

  3. Teaching "In Cold Blood."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berbrich, Joan D.

    1967-01-01

    The Truman Capote nonfiction novel, "In Cold Blood," which reflects for adolescents the immediacy of the real world, illuminates (1) social issues--capital punishment, environmental influence, and the gap between the "haves" and "have-nots," (2) moral issues--the complexity of man's nature, the responsibility of one…

  4. Cold Facts about Viruses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pea, Celeste; Sterling, Donna R.

    2002-01-01

    Provides ways for students to demonstrate their understanding of scientific concepts and skills. Describes a mini-unit around the cold in which students can relate humans to viruses. Includes activities and a modified simulation that provides questions to guide students. Discusses ways that allows students to apply prior knowledge, take ownership…

  5. Recent Cold War Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pineo, Ronn

    2003-01-01

    Cold War historiography has undergone major changes since the 1991 collapse of the Soviet Union. For two years (1992-1993) the principal Soviet archives fell open to scholars, and although some of the richest holdings are now once again closed, new information continues to find its way out. Moreover, critical documentary information has become…

  6. Cold spray nozzle design

    DOEpatents

    Haynes, Jeffrey D.; Sanders, Stuart A.

    2009-06-09

    A nozzle for use in a cold spray technique is described. The nozzle has a passageway for spraying a powder material, the passageway having a converging section and a diverging section, and at least the diverging section being formed from polybenzimidazole. In one embodiment of the nozzle, the converging section is also formed from polybenzimidazole.

  7. Expert Cold Structure Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atkins, T.; Demuysere, P.

    2011-05-01

    The EXPERT Program is funded by ESA. The objective of the EXPERT mission is to perform a sub-orbital flight during which measurements of critical aero- thermodynamic phenomena will be obtained by using state-of-the-art instrumentation. As part of the EXPERT Flight Segment, the responsibility of the Cold Structure Development Design, Manufacturing and Validation was committed to the Belgian industrial team SONACA/SABCA. The EXPERT Cold Structure includes the Launcher Adapter, the Bottom Panel, the Upper Panel, two Cross Panels and the Parachute Bay. An additional Launcher Adapter was manufactured for the separation tests. The selected assembly definition and manufacturing technologies ( machined parts and sandwich panels) were dictated classically by the mass and stiffness, but also by the CoG location and the sensitive separation interface. Used as support for the various on-board equipment, the Cold Structure is fixed to but thermally uncoupled from the PM 1000 thermal shield. It is protect on its bottom panel by a thermal blanket. As it is a protoflight, analysis was the main tool for the verification. Low level stiffness and modal analysis tests have also been performed on the Cold Structure equipped with its ballast. It allowed to complete its qualification and to prepare SONACA/SABCA support for the system dynamic tests foreseen in 2011. The structure was finally coated with a thermal control black painting and delivered on time to Thales Alenia Space-Italy end of March 201.

  8. Spitzer Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krick, Kessica

    This proposal is a specific response to the strategic goal of NASA's research program to "discover how the universe works and explore how the universe evolved into its present form." Towards this goal, we propose to mine the Spitzer archive for all observations of galaxy groups and clusters for the purpose of studying galaxy evolution in clusters, contamination rates for Sunyaev Zeldovich cluster surveys, and to provide a database of Spitzer observed clusters to the broader community. Funding from this proposal will go towards two years of support for a Postdoc to do this work. After searching the Spitzer Heritage Archive, we have found 194 unique galaxy groups and clusters that have data from both the Infrared array camera (IRAC; Fazio et al. 2004) at 3.6 - 8 microns and the multiband imaging photometer for Spitzer (MIPS; Rieke et al. 2004) at 24microns. This large sample will add value beyond the individual datasets because it will be a larger sample of IR clusters than ever before and will have sufficient diversity in mass, redshift, and dynamical state to allow us to differentiate amongst the effects of these cluster properties. An infrared sample is important because it is unaffected by dust extinction while at the same time is an excellent measure of both stellar mass (IRAC wavelengths) and star formation rate (MIPS wavelengths). Additionally, IRAC can be used to differentiate star forming galaxies (SFG) from active galactic nuclei (AGN), due to their different spectral shapes in this wavelength regime. Specifically, we intend to identify SFG and AGN in galaxy groups and clusters. Groups and clusters differ from the field because the galaxy densities are higher, there is a large potential well due mainly to the mass of the dark matter, and there is hot X-ray gas (the intracluster medium; ICM). We will examine the impact of these differences in environment on galaxy formation by comparing cluster properties of AGN and SFG to those in the field. Also, we will

  9. Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Christopher J. Miller

    2012-03-01

    There are many examples of clustering in astronomy. Stars in our own galaxy are often seen as being gravitationally bound into tight globular or open clusters. The Solar System's Trojan asteroids cluster at the gravitational Langrangian in front of Jupiter’s orbit. On the largest of scales, we find gravitationally bound clusters of galaxies, the Virgo cluster (in the constellation of Virgo at a distance of ˜50 million light years) being a prime nearby example. The Virgo cluster subtends an angle of nearly 8◦ on the sky and is known to contain over a thousand member galaxies. Galaxy clusters play an important role in our understanding of theUniverse. Clusters exist at peaks in the three-dimensional large-scale matter density field. Their sky (2D) locations are easy to detect in astronomical imaging data and their mean galaxy redshifts (redshift is related to the third spatial dimension: distance) are often better (spectroscopically) and cheaper (photometrically) when compared with the entire galaxy population in large sky surveys. Photometric redshift (z) [Photometric techniques use the broad band filter magnitudes of a galaxy to estimate the redshift. Spectroscopic techniques use the galaxy spectra and emission/absorption line features to measure the redshift] determinations of galaxies within clusters are accurate to better than delta_z = 0.05 [7] and when studied as a cluster population, the central galaxies form a line in color-magnitude space (called the the E/S0 ridgeline and visible in Figure 16.3) that contains galaxies with similar stellar populations [15]. The shape of this E/S0 ridgeline enables astronomers to measure the cluster redshift to within delta_z = 0.01 [23]. The most accurate cluster redshift determinations come from spectroscopy of the member galaxies, where only a fraction of the members need to be spectroscopically observed [25,42] to get an accurate redshift to the whole system. If light traces mass in the Universe, then the locations

  10. Thermoregulatory modeling for cold stress.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaojiang; Tikuisis, Peter

    2014-07-01

    Modeling for cold stress has generated a rich history of innovation, has exerted a catalytic influence on cold physiology research, and continues to impact human activity in cold environments. This overview begins with a brief summation of cold thermoregulatory model development followed by key principles that will continue to guide current and future model development. Different representations of the human body are discussed relative to the level of detail and prediction accuracy required. In addition to predictions of shivering and vasomotor responses to cold exposure, algorithms are presented for thermoregulatory mechanisms. Various avenues of heat exchange between the human body and a cold environment are reviewed. Applications of cold thermoregulatory modeling range from investigative interpretation of physiological observations to forecasting skin freezing times and hypothermia survival times. While these advances have been remarkable, the future of cold stress modeling is still faced with significant challenges that are summarized at the end of this overview.

  11. Cycloaddition reactions of ICNO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasinszki, Tibor; Krebsz, Melinda; Hajgató, Balázs

    2009-05-01

    The mechanism and selectivity of cycloaddition reactions of iodonitrile oxide, ICNO, have been studied with theoretical methods for the first time using MR-AQCC coupled-cluster and B3LYP DFT methods. Calculations have predicted that the favoured ICNO dimerisation process is a multi-step reaction to diiodofuroxan involving dinitrosoethylene-like intermediates. The ICNO cycloaddition with nitriles and ethynyl derivatives is a synchronous process favouring the formation of 1,2,4-oxadiazole and 1,2-oxazole derivatives, respectively. The cycloaddition reactions of ICNO have been studied experimentally by generating ICNO from AgCNO and iodine. Diiodofuroxan is obtained, however, even at the presence of nitriles.

  12. Star clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labhardt, Lukas; Binggeli, Bruno

    Star clusters are at the heart of astronomy, being key objects for our understanding of stellar evolution and galactic structure. Observations with the Hubble Space Telescope and other modern equipment have revealed fascinating new facts about these galactic building blocks. This book provides two comprehensive and up-to-date, pedagogically designed reviews on star clusters by two well-known experts in the field. Bruce Carney presents our current knowledge of the relative and absolute ages of globular clusters and the chemical history of our Galaxy. Bill Harris addresses globular clusters in external galaxies and their use as tracers of galaxy formation and cosmic distance indicators. The book is written for graduate students as well as professionals in astronomy and astrophysics.

  13. Occupational Clusters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pottawattamie County School System, Council Bluffs, IA.

    The 15 occupational clusters (transportation, fine arts and humanities, communications and media, personal service occupations, construction, hospitality and recreation, health occupations, marine science occupations, consumer and homemaking-related occupations, agribusiness and natural resources, environment, public service, business and office…

  14. Cluster generator

    DOEpatents

    Donchev, Todor I.; Petrov, Ivan G.

    2011-05-31

    Described herein is an apparatus and a method for producing atom clusters based on a gas discharge within a hollow cathode. The hollow cathode includes one or more walls. The one or more walls define a sputtering chamber within the hollow cathode and include a material to be sputtered. A hollow anode is positioned at an end of the sputtering chamber, and atom clusters are formed when a gas discharge is generated between the hollow anode and the hollow cathode.

  15. Chandra, Cold Fronts, and ICM Physics: The Importance of Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ZuHone, John

    2014-11-01

    One of the most prominent features that the superb spatial resolution of Chandra has revealed in the galaxy cluster plasma is cold fronts: sharp surface brightness and temperature discontinuities formed by the motion of cold, dense gas. Cold fronts should be susceptible to disruption by fluid instabilites and smoothing out by thermal conduction, but many appear to be resilient to these effects, indicating suppression by microphysical processes. I will summarize a series of MHD simulations of sloshing cold fronts in galaxy clusters with anisotropic viscosity and thermal conduction. I will show that the power of cold front studies to provide constraints on the plasma conductivity is potentially strong, whereas the outlook for constraining the plasma viscosity is more uncertain.

  16. Remedies for Common Cold Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Penny F.

    1991-01-01

    Individuals suffering from intolerable symptoms of the common cold can now be advised of safe and effective products for symptomatic relief. This article describes and discusses four categories of drugs used to treat the common cold. To simplify the product selection process for family physicians, suggestions are included for possible ingredients for treatments of specific cold symptoms. PMID:21234087

  17. Human whole body cold adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Daanen, Hein A.M.; Van Marken Lichtenbelt, Wouter D.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Reviews on whole body human cold adaptation generally do not distinguish between population studies and dedicated acclimation studies, leading to confusing results. Population studies show that indigenous black Africans have reduced shivering thermogenesis in the cold and poor cold induced vasodilation in fingers and toes compared to Caucasians and Inuit. About 40,000 y after humans left Africa, natives in cold terrestrial areas seems to have developed not only behavioral adaptations, but also physiological adaptations to cold. Dedicated studies show that repeated whole body exposure of individual volunteers, mainly Caucasians, to severe cold results in reduced cold sensation but no major physiological changes. Repeated cold water immersion seems to slightly reduce metabolic heat production, while repeated exposure to milder cold conditions shows some increase in metabolic heat production, in particular non-shivering thermogenesis. In conclusion, human cold adaptation in the form of increased metabolism and insulation seems to have occurred during recent evolution in populations, but cannot be developed during a lifetime in cold conditions as encountered in temperate and arctic regions. Therefore, we mainly depend on our behavioral skills to live in and survive the cold. PMID:27227100

  18. Cold and ultracold dynamics of the barrierless D{sup +} + H{sub 2} reaction: Quantum reactive calculations for ∼R{sup −4} long range interaction potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Lara, Manuel; Jambrina, P. G.; Aoiz, F. J.; Launay, J.-M.

    2015-11-28

    Quantum reactive and elastic cross sections and rate coefficients have been calculated for D{sup +} + H{sub 2} (v = 0, j = 0) collisions in the energy range from 10{sup −8} K (deep ultracold regime), where only one partial wave is open, to 150 K (Langevin regime) where many of them contribute. In systems involving ions, the ∼R{sup −4} behavior extends the interaction up to extremely long distances, requiring a special treatment. To this purpose, we have used a modified version of the hyperspherical quantum reactive scattering method, which allows the propagations up to distances of 10{sup 5} a{sub 0} needed to converge the elastic cross sections. Interpolation procedures are also proposed which may reduce the cost of exact dynamical calculations at such low energies. Calculations have been carried out on the PES by Velilla et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 129, 084307 (2008)] which accurately reproduces the long range interactions. Results on its prequel, the PES by Aguado et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 112, 1240 (2000)], are also shown in order to emphasize the significance of the inclusion of the long range interactions. The calculated reaction rate coefficient changes less than one order of magnitude in a collision energy range of ten orders of magnitude, and it is found in very good agreement with the available experimental data in the region where they exist (10-100 K). State-to-state reaction probabilities are also provided which show that for each partial wave, the distribution of HD final states remains essentially constant below 1 K.

  19. Cold-start characteristics of polymer electrolyte fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Mishler, Jeff; Mukundan, Rangachary; Wang, Yun; Mishler, Jeff; Mukherjee, Partha P

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the electrochemical reaction kinetics, species transport, and solid water dynamics in a polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) during cold start. A simplitied analysis is developed to enable the evaluation of the impact of ice volume fraction on cell performance during coldstart. Supporting neutron imaging data are also provided to reveal the real-time water evolution. Temperature-dependent voltage changes due to the reaction kinetics and ohmic loss are also analyzed based on the ionic conductivity of the membrane at subfreezing temperature. The analysis is valuable for the fundamental study of PEFC cold-start.

  20. Hot News for Cold Dark Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-06-01

    Astronomers have used NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory to make the most detailed probe yet of the distribution of dark matter in a massive cluster of galaxies. Their results indicate that about 80 percent of the matter in the universe consists of cold dark matter - mysterious subatomic particles left over from the dense early universe. Chandra observed a cluster of galaxies called Abell 2029 located about a billion light years from Earth. The cluster is composed of thousands of galaxies enveloped in a gigantic cloud of hot gas, and an amount of dark matter equivalent to more than a hundred trillion Suns. At the center of this cluster is an enormous, elliptically shaped galaxy that is thought to have been formed from the mergers of many smaller galaxies. The X-ray data show that the density of dark matter increases smoothly all the way into the central galaxy of the cluster. This discovery agrees with the predictions of cold dark matter models, and is contrary to other dark matter models that predict a leveling off of the amount of dark matter in the center of the cluster. "I was really surprised at how well we could measure the dark matter so deep into the core of a rich cluster," said Aaron Lewis of the University of California, Irvine, lead author of a paper describing the results in a recent issue of The Astrophysical Journal. "We still have very little idea as to the exact nature of these particles, but our results show that they must behave like cold dark matter." Cold dark matter gets its name from the assumption that the dark matter particles were moving slowly when galaxies and galaxy clusters began to form. Dark matter particles interact with each other and "normal" matter only through gravity. The astronomers' success in placing such tight constraints on the dark matter distribution was partly due to Chandra's ability to make a high resolution intensity and temperature map, and partly due to their choice of a target. The cluster and central galaxy are

  1. Radial cold trap

    DOEpatents

    Grundy, Brian R.

    1981-01-01

    The radial cold trap comprises a housing having a plurality of mesh bands disposed therein. The mesh bands comprise concentrically arranged bands of mesh with the mesh specific surface area of each band increasing from the outermost mesh band to the innermost mesh band. An inlet nozzle is attached to the outside section of the housing while an outlet nozzle is attached to the inner portion of the housing so as to be concentrically connected to the innermost mesh band. An inlet baffle having orifices therein may be disposed around the outermost mesh band and within the housing for directing the flow of the fluid from the inlet nozzle to the outermost mesh band in a uniform manner. The flow of fluid passes through each consecutive mesh band and into the outlet nozzle. The circular pattern of the symmetrically arranged mesh packing allows for better utilization of the entire cold trap volume.

  2. Radial cold trap

    DOEpatents

    Grundy, B.R.

    1981-09-29

    The radial cold trap comprises a housing having a plurality of mesh bands disposed therein. The mesh bands comprise concentrically arranged bands of mesh with the mesh specific surface area of each band increasing from the outermost mesh band to the innermost mesh band. An inlet nozzle is attached to the outside section of the housing while an outlet nozzle is attached to the inner portion of the housing so as to be concentrically connected to the innermost mesh band. An inlet baffle having orifices therein may be disposed around the outermost mesh band and within the housing for directing the flow of the fluid from the inlet nozzle to the outermost mesh band in a uniform manner. The flow of fluid passes through each consecutive mesh band and into the outlet nozzle. The circular pattern of the symmetrically arranged mesh packing allows for better utilization of the entire cold trap volume. 2 figs.

  3. Electronic Equipment Cold Plates

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-04-01

    equations for such a flow regiae. For laainar flow and Moderate teaperature differwwe« between the well «nd coolant, a aodifled Sieder -Tate...con- figuration. The heat-transfer coefficients, therefore, were determined by using both the Sieder -Tate and McAdams equations and the coaputed...values used In the analytical predictions. As with th* previous cold Plates, the Sieder -Tate equation gave too low of values for the heat- transfer

  4. Cold Climate Heat Pump

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-01

    central heating , cooling, and air conditioning (HVAC) system . Both buildings had two zones for heating and cooling, which allowed for a direct...section calls for improved efficiency of mechanical systems as well as an increase of renewable resource usage. Current heating technologies in cold... heated refrigerant is injected into a mixing chamber between the two compressors. The injection leads to a gain in performance of the system through

  5. Adiabatic theory for anisotropic cold molecule collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Pawlak, Mariusz; Shagam, Yuval; Narevicius, Edvardas; Moiseyev, Nimrod

    2015-08-21

    We developed an adiabatic theory for cold anisotropic collisions between slow atoms and cold molecules. It enables us to investigate the importance of the couplings between the projection states of the rotational motion of the atom about the molecular axis of the diatom. We tested our theory using the recent results from the Penning ionization reaction experiment {sup 4}He(1s2s {sup 3}S) + HD(1s{sup 2}) → {sup 4}He(1s{sup 2}) + HD{sup +}(1s) + e{sup −} [Lavert-Ofir et al., Nat. Chem. 6, 332 (2014)] and demonstrated that the couplings have strong effect on positions of shape resonances. The theory we derived provides cross sections which are in a very good agreement with the experimental findings.

  6. Differential Metabolic Rearrangements after Cold Storage Are Correlated with Chilling Injury Resistance of Peach Fruits.

    PubMed

    Bustamante, Claudia A; Monti, Laura L; Gabilondo, Julieta; Scossa, Federico; Valentini, Gabriel; Budde, Claudio O; Lara, María V; Fernie, Alisdair R; Drincovich, María F

    2016-01-01

    Reconfiguration of the metabolome is a key component involved in the acclimation to cold in plants; however, few studies have been devoted to the analysis of the overall metabolite changes after cold storage of fruits prior to consumption. Here, metabolite profiling of six peach varieties with differential susceptibility to develop mealiness, a chilling-injury (CI) symptom, was performed. According to metabolic content at harvest; after cold treatment; and after ripening, either following cold treatment or not; peach fruits clustered in distinct groups, depending on harvest-time, cold treatment, and ripening state. Both common and distinct metabolic responses among the six varieties were found; common changes including dramatic galactinol and raffinose rise; GABA, Asp, and Phe increase; and 2-oxo-glutarate and succinate decrease. Raffinose content after long cold treatment quantitatively correlated to the degree of mealiness resistance of the different peach varieties; and thus, raffinose emerges as a candidate biomarker of this CI disorder. Xylose increase after cold treatment was found only in the susceptible genotypes, indicating a particular cell wall reconfiguration of these varieties while being cold-stored. Overall, results indicate that peach fruit differential metabolic rearrangements due to cold treatment, rather than differential metabolic priming before cold, are better related with CI resistance. The plasticity of peach fruit metabolism renders it possible to induce a diverse metabolite array after cold, which is successful, in some genotypes, to avoid CI.

  7. Differential Metabolic Rearrangements after Cold Storage Are Correlated with Chilling Injury Resistance of Peach Fruits

    PubMed Central

    Bustamante, Claudia A.; Monti, Laura L.; Gabilondo, Julieta; Scossa, Federico; Valentini, Gabriel; Budde, Claudio O.; Lara, María V.; Fernie, Alisdair R.; Drincovich, María F.

    2016-01-01

    Reconfiguration of the metabolome is a key component involved in the acclimation to cold in plants; however, few studies have been devoted to the analysis of the overall metabolite changes after cold storage of fruits prior to consumption. Here, metabolite profiling of six peach varieties with differential susceptibility to develop mealiness, a chilling-injury (CI) symptom, was performed. According to metabolic content at harvest; after cold treatment; and after ripening, either following cold treatment or not; peach fruits clustered in distinct groups, depending on harvest-time, cold treatment, and ripening state. Both common and distinct metabolic responses among the six varieties were found; common changes including dramatic galactinol and raffinose rise; GABA, Asp, and Phe increase; and 2-oxo-glutarate and succinate decrease. Raffinose content after long cold treatment quantitatively correlated to the degree of mealiness resistance of the different peach varieties; and thus, raffinose emerges as a candidate biomarker of this CI disorder. Xylose increase after cold treatment was found only in the susceptible genotypes, indicating a particular cell wall reconfiguration of these varieties while being cold-stored. Overall, results indicate that peach fruit differential metabolic rearrangements due to cold treatment, rather than differential metabolic priming before cold, are better related with CI resistance. The plasticity of peach fruit metabolism renders it possible to induce a diverse metabolite array after cold, which is successful, in some genotypes, to avoid CI. PMID:27746802

  8. Cold Stowage Flight Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campana, Sharon E.; Melendez, David T.

    2011-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) provides a test bed for researchers to perform science experiments in a variety of fields, including human research, life sciences, and space medicine. Many of the experiments being conducted today require science samples to be stored and transported in a temperature controlled environment. NASA provides several systems which aid researchers in preserving their science. On orbit systems provided by NASA include the Minus Eighty Laboratory freezer for ISS (MELFI), Microgravity Experiment Research Locker Incubator (MERLIN), and Glacier. These freezers use different technologies to provide rapid cooling and cold stowage at different temperature levels on board ISS. Systems available to researchers during transportation to and from ISS are MERLIN, Glacier, and Coldbag. Coldbag is a passive cold stowage system that uses phase change materials to maintain temperature. Details of these current technologies are provided along with operational experience gained to date. This paper discusses the capability of the current cold stowage hardware and how it may continue to support NASA s mission on ISS and in future exploration missions.

  9. Cold Stowage Flight Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campana, Sharon

    2010-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) provides a test bed for researchers to perform science experiments in a variety of fields, including human research, life sciences, and space medicine. Many of the experiments being conducted today require science samples to be stored and transported in a temperature controlled environment. NASA provides several systems which aide researchers in preserving their science. On orbit systems provided by NASA include the Minus Eighty Laboratory freezer for ISS (MELFI), Microgravity Experiment Research Locker Incubator (MERLIN), and Glacier. These freezers use different technologies to provide rapid cooling and cold stowage at different temperature levels on board ISS. Systems available to researchers during transportation to and from ISS are MERLIN, Glacier, and Coldbag. Coldbag is a passive cold stowage system that uses phase change materials. Details of these current technologies will be provided along with operational experience gained to date. With shuttle retirement looming, NASA has protected the capability to provide a temperature controlled environment during transportation to and from the ISS with the use of Glacier and Coldbags, which are compatible with future commercial vehicles including SpaceX's Dragon Capsule, and Orbital s Cygnus vehicle. This paper will discuss the capability of the current cold stowage hardware and how it may continue to support NASA s mission on ISS and in future exploration missions.

  10. Anterior knee pain and cold knees: a possible association in women.

    PubMed

    Selfe, James; Sutton, Chris; Hardaker, Natalie J; Greenhalgh, Sue; Karki, Anne; Dey, Paola

    2010-10-01

    Abnormal reactions to environmental cold have been observed in some patients with Anterior Knee Pain (AKP). The aims of this study were to investigate whether palpation of the knee could classify patients into those with and those without cold knees; whether this classification could be objectively validated using thermal imaging; whether the cold and not cold knee groups varied in response to a cold stress test and in patient-reported measures. Fifty eight patients were recruited; palpation classified them into cold and not cold groups. Twenty-one (36%) patients were classified as having a cold knee by palpation: fourteen (36%) females and seven males (37%). Preliminary analysis suggested gender might be an effect modifier and the number of men was small, therefore the analysis focussed on females. Women with cold knees had a significantly smaller patellar skin fold, lower levels of activity and worse scores on the MFIQ, there also appeared to be an association with a traumatic onset. Women with cold knees were more likely to report cold weather affected their knees and they preferred a hot water bottle compared to an ice-pack on their knee; there was also a trend towards having to wear extra tights/long johns in the winter. This study has helped to define a clinical profile for a group of females with AKP and cold knees. This group appears to demonstrate a mild form of Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy.

  11. Clusters of Galaxies in Infrared Domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wszołek, B.

    2008-12-01

    Far infrared emission (FIR) of the sky is generally thought to originate mainly in cold dust grains distributed in space. The FIR emission of galaxy clusters may be considered therefore as a tracer of the dust constituent of the intracluster medium. The presence of dust distributed in the intergalactic medium of galaxy clusters is of considerable interest for several studies. Based on IRAS and COBE/DIRBE sky surveys we found excess FIR emission from the sky area occupied by galaxy cluster ZW5897. Very good positional and extensional coincidence between infrared source and ZW5897 may suggest intracluster origin of the emission. We studied the distribution of stars and galaxies in the cluster area using Palomar Survey data to check whether these distributions are affected by local dust. We found that a foreground obscuring cloud, overlapping accidentally the distant cluster ZW5897, may be responsible for some part of the detected FIR emission.

  12. Microbial Diversity in Sediments Collected from the Deepest Cold-Seep Area, the Japan Trench.

    PubMed

    Li; Kato; Horikoshi

    1999-07-01

    : The Japan Trench land slope at a depth of 6,400 m is the deepest cold-seep environment with Calyptogena communities. Sediment samples from inside and beside the Calyptogena communities were collected, and the microbial diversity in the sediment samples was studied by molecular phylogenetic techniques. From DNA extracted directly from the sediment samples, 16S rDNAs were amplified by the polymerase chain reaction method. The sequences of the amplified 16S rDNAs selected by restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis were determined and compared with sequences in DNA databases. The results showed that 33 different bacterial 16S rDNA sequences from the two samples analyzed fell into similar phylogenetic categories, the alpha-, gamma-, delta-, and varepsilon-subdivisions of Proteobacteria, Cytophaga, and gram-positive bacteria; some of the 16S rDNA sequences were common to both samples. delta- and varepsilon-Proteobacteria-related sequences were abundant in both sediments. These sequences are mostly related to sulfate-reducing or sulfur-reducing bacteria and epibionts, respectively. Eight different archaeal 16S rDNA sequences were cloned from the sediments. The majority of the archaeal 16S rDNA sequences clustered in Crenarchaeota and showed high similarities to marine group I archaeal rDNA. A Methanococcoides burtonii-related sequence obtained from the sediment clustered in the Euryarchaeota indicating that M. burtonii-related strains in the area of Calyptogena communities may contribute to production of methane in this environment. From these results, we propose a possible model of sulfur circulation within the microbial community and that of Calyptogena clams in the cold-seep environment.

  13. Nonthermal Emission from Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storm, Emma

    Galaxy clusters are the most massive gravitationally-bound objects in the universe. The bulk of the mass in a cluster is dark matter, while the dominant baryonic component is a thermal, X-ray emitting plasma. Radio observations of diffuse synchrotron emission indicate that galaxy clusters host a population of cosmic rays; however, the nature of this nonthermal component is not well-understood. In this dissertation, I investigate three sources of nonthermal emission in galaxy clusters. The first is star formation in galaxies, which is correlated to gamma-ray emission. I derive lower limits on the gamma-ray emission for nearby clusters by considering the emission from star formation in cluster galaxies. These lower limits sit about an order of magnitude below current upper limits on gamma rays in clusters and will be an important contributor to gamma-ray emission as upper limits improve over time. Dark matter annihilation, which produces relativistic particles that can result in a broad spectrum of emission in cluster environments, is another source of nonthermal emission. I use nondetections and marginal detections of diffuse radio emission in clusters to constrain dark matter annihilation. I derive limits on the annihilation cross section that are competitive with limits from the nondetection of gamma rays in clusters and show that the best objects for study in the radio are different than those in gamma rays, indicating that dark matter searches in the radio can be complementary to searches in other energy bands. I also investigate the cosmic ray population in the merging cluster A2319, which hosts a previously detected radio halo. I present new observations which reveal a two-component radio halo: a 2 Mpc region that extends far past the observable X-ray emission, and an 800 kpc "core" that is bounded by the X-ray cold front. I speculate on the origins of this structure, and show that a hadronic origin for this radio halo is disfavored. Finally, I discuss current

  14. Clusters in neutron-rich light nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jelavić Malenica, D.; Milin, M.; Di Pietro, A.; Figuera, P.; Lattuada, M.; Miljanić, D.; Musumarra, A.; Pellegriti, M. G.; Prepolec, L.; Scuderi, V.; Skukan, N.; Soić, N.; Torresi, D.; Uroić, M.

    2016-05-01

    Due to their high selectivity, transfer and sequential decay reactions are powerful tools for studies of both single particle (nucleon) and cluster states in light nuclei. Their use is particularly simple for investigations of α-particle clustering (because α-particle has Jπ=0+, which simplifies spin and parity assignments to observed cluster states), but they are also easily applicable to other types of clustering. Recent results on clustering in neutron-rich isotopes of beryllium, boron and carbon obtained measuring the 10B+10B reactions (at 50 and 72 MeV) are presented. The highly efficient and segmented detector systems used, built from 4 Double Sided Silicon Strip Detectors (DSSSD) allowed detection of double and multiple coincidences and, in that way, studies of states populated in transfer reactions, as well as their sequential decay.

  15. Heat, cold, noise, and vibration

    SciTech Connect

    Horvath, S.M.; Bedi, J.F. )

    1990-03-01

    Exposure to a cold environment induces a number of physiological alterations, the most serious being hypothermia. This state can occur in all individuals, but the very young and the elderly are more susceptible. Environmental and industrially generated high ambient temperature can place further stress on aged individuals and workers, resulting in a complex symptom picture. Morbidity and death may result from such exposures. Causative factors have been identified. Noise exposure induces hearing losses above those secondary to the aging process. Psychophysiological effects during noise exposure are considered to result from the sympathetic activity secondary to a general stress reaction. Vibration from the use of power tools results in Raynaud's phenomenon. However, modification of power tools has reduced the symptoms associated with vibration exposure. Termination of exposure to vibration appears eventually to reduce symptoms related to white-finger spasms. Interaction between these stressors has not been clarified because of the complex effects of each. The need for additional information about the response to these stressors is evident. 38 references.

  16. MINOR MERGER-INDUCED COLD FRONTS IN ABELL 2142 AND RXJ1720.1+2638

    SciTech Connect

    Owers, Matt S.; Couch, Warrick J.; Nulsen, Paul E. J.

    2011-11-10

    We present evidence for the existence of substructure in the 'relaxed appearing' cold front clusters Abell 2142 and RXJ1720.1+2638. The detection of these substructures was made possible by comprehensive multi-object optical spectroscopy obtained with the Hectospec and DEep Imaging Multi-Object Spectrograph instruments on the 6.5 m MMT and 10 m Keck II telescope, respectively. These observations produced 956 and 400 spectroscopically confirmed cluster members within a projected radius of 3 Mpc from the centers of A2142 and RXJ1720.1+2638, respectively. The substructure manifests itself as local peaks in the spatial distribution of member galaxies and also as regions of localized velocity substructure. For both Abell 2142 and RXJ1720.1+2638, we identify group-scale substructures which, when considering the morphology of the cold fronts and the time since pericentric passage of a perturber estimated from the cold front radii, could plausibly have perturbed the cluster cores and generated the cold fronts observed in Chandra images. The results presented here are consistent with cold fronts being the result of merger activity and with cold fronts in relaxed appearing clusters being due to minor merger activity.

  17. K-band Properties of Galaxy Clusters and Groups: Brightest Cluster Galaxies and Intracluster Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yen-Ting; Mohr, Joseph J.

    2004-12-01

    agreement with the value derived from cosmic microwave background observations. The inclusion of ICL reduces the discrepancy between the observed cluster cold baryon fraction and that found in hydrodynamical simulations. Based on the observed iron abundance in the intracluster medium, we find that the ICL predicted by our model, together with the observed galaxy light, match the iron mass-to-light ratio expected from simple stellar population models, provided that the Salpeter initial mass function is adopted. The ICL also makes it easier to produce the ``iron excess'' found in the central regions of cool-core clusters.

  18. The genome of the polar eukaryotic microalga Coccomyxa subellipsoidea reveals traits of cold adaptation

    SciTech Connect

    Blanc, Guillaume; Agarkova, Irina; Grimwood, Jane; Kuo, Alan; Brueggeman, Andrew; Dunigan, David D.; Gurnon, James; Ladunga, Istvan; Lindquist, Erika; Lucas, Susan; Pangilinan, Jasmyn; Proschold, Thomas; Salamov, Asaf; Schmutz, Jeremy; Weeks, Donald; Tamada, Takashi; Lomsadze, Alexandre; Borodovsky, Mark; Claverie, Jean-Michel; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Van Etten, James L.

    2012-02-13

    Background Little is known about the mechanisms of adaptation of life to the extreme environmental conditions encountered in polar regions. Here we present the genome sequence of a unicellular green alga from the division chlorophyta, Coccomyxa subellipsoidea C-169, which we will hereafter refer to as C-169. This is the first eukaryotic microorganism from a polar environment to have its genome sequenced. Results The 48.8 Mb genome contained in 20 chromosomes exhibits significant synteny conservation with the chromosomes of its relatives Chlorella variabilis and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The order of the genes is highly reshuffled within synteny blocks, suggesting that intra-chromosomal rearrangements were more prevalent than inter-chromosomal rearrangements. Remarkably, Zepp retrotransposons occur in clusters of nested elements with strictly one cluster per chromosome probably residing at the centromere. Several protein families overrepresented in C. subellipsoidae include proteins involved in lipid metabolism, transporters, cellulose synthases and short alcohol dehydrogenases. Conversely, C-169 lacks proteins that exist in all other sequenced chlorophytes, including components of the glycosyl phosphatidyl inositol anchoring system, pyruvate phosphate dikinase and the photosystem 1 reaction center subunit N (PsaN). Conclusions We suggest that some of these gene losses and gains could have contributed to adaptation to low temperatures. Comparison of these genomic features with the adaptive strategies of psychrophilic microbes suggests that prokaryotes and eukaryotes followed comparable evolutionary routes to adapt to cold environments.

  19. The Isis cold moderators

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, G. M.; Broome, T. A.; Burridge, R. A.; Cragg, D.; Hall, R.; Haynes, D.; Hirst, J.; Hogston, J. R.; Jones, H. H.; Sexton, J.; Wright, P.

    1997-09-01

    ISIS is a pulsed spallation neutron source where neutrons are produced by the interaction of a 160 kW proton beam of energy 800 MeV in a water-cooled Tantalum Target. The fast neutrons produced are thermalized in four moderators: two ambient water, one liquid methane operating at 100K and a liquid hydrogen moderator at 20 K. This paper gives a description of the construction of both cold moderator systems, details of the operating experience and a description of the current development program.

  20. Paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria.

    PubMed

    Shanbhag, Satish; Spivak, Jerry

    2015-06-01

    Paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria is a rare cause of autoimmune hemolytic anemia predominantly seen as an acute form in young children after viral illnesses and in a chronic form in some hematological malignancies and tertiary syphilis. It is a complement mediated intravascular hemolytic anemia associated with a biphasic antibody against the P antigen on red cells. The antibody attaches to red cells at colder temperatures and causes red cell lysis when blood recirculates to warmer parts of the body. Treatment is mainly supportive and with red cell transfusion, but immunosuppressive therapy may be effective in severe cases.

  1. Cold Fusion Verification.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-03-01

    published work, talking with others in the field, and attending conferences, that CNF probably is chimera and will go the way of N-rays and polywater ...way of N-rays and polywater . To date, no one, including Pons and Fleischmann, has been able to construct a so-called CNF electrochemical cell that...Cold Nuclear Fusion (CNF), as originally reported in 1989. The conclusion is that CNF probably is chimera and will go the way of N-rays and polywater

  2. [Reactions to insect stings and bites].

    PubMed

    Ljubojević, Suzana; Lipozencić, Jasna

    2011-01-01

    Reaction to insect sting and bite may be local, such as erythema, edema and pruritus, or systemic, such as anaphylactic reaction. Diagnosis can be made by patient history, clinical picture, skin testing, total and specific IgE level, and provocation test. Local reactions are treated with cold compresses, topical corticosteroids and oral antihistamines. Oral and intramuscular antihistamines and corticosteroids are used for the treatment of mild systemic reactions, and in severe reaction epinephrine injections are added. Hyposensitization is indicated in patients with severe systemic reaction, positive skin tests and high level of specific IgE antibodies.

  3. Exotic shapes and exotic clusterization

    SciTech Connect

    Cseh, J.; Darai, J.; Algora, A.

    2011-10-28

    The interrelation of the largely elongated nuclear shapes and clusterization is discussed by applying semimicroscopic methods. {sup 36}Ar is considered as a specific example, where recent experimental heavy-ion scattering data seem to justify the theoretical predictions on the hyperdeformed states. Alpha-emitting reactions are also suggested for its population.

  4. Cardiovascular responses to cold exposure.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhongjie

    2010-01-01

    The prevalence of hypertension is increased in winter and in cold regions of the world. Cold temperatures make hypertension worse and trigger cardiovascular complications (stroke, myocardial infarction, heart failure, etc.). Chronic or intermittent exposure to cold causes hypertension and cardiac hypertrophy in animals. The purpose of this review is to provide the recent advances in the mechanistic investigation of cold-induced hypertension (CIH). Cold temperatures increase the activities of the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) and the renin-angiotensin system (RAS). The SNS initiates CIH via the RAS. Cold exposure suppresses the expression of eNOS and formation of NO, increases the production of endothelin-1 (ET-1), up-regulates ETA receptors, but down-regulates ETB receptors. The roles of these factors and their relations in CIH will be reviewed.

  5. Cardiovascular responses to cold exposure

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Zhongjie

    2010-01-01

    The prevalence of hypertension is increased in winter and in cold regions of the world. Cold temperatures make hypertension worse and trigger cardiovascular complications (stroke, myocardial infarction, heart failure, etc.). Chronic or intermittent exposure to cold causes hypertension and cardiac hypertrophy in animals. The purpose of this review is to provide the recent advances in the mechanistic investigation of cold-induced hypertension (CIH). Cold temperatures increase the activities of the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) and the renin-angiotensin system (RAS). The SNS initiates CIH via the RAS. Cold exposure suppresses the expression of eNOS and formation of NO, increases the production of endothelin-1 (ET-1), up-regulates ETA receptors, but down-regulates ETB receptors. The roles of these factors and their relations in CIH will be reviewed. PMID:20036896

  6. Cold prebiotic evolution, tunneling, chirality and exobiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldanskii, Vitalii I.

    1996-07-01

    The extra-terrestrial scenario of the origin of life suggested by Svante Arrhenius (1) as the `panspermia' hypothesis was revived by the discovery of a low-temperature quantum limit of a chemical reaction rate caused by the molecular tunneling (2). Entropy factors play no role near absolute zero, and slow molecular tunneling can lead to the exothermic formation of quite complex molecules. Interstellar grains or particles of cometary tails could serve as possible cold seeds of life, with acetic acid, urea and products of their polycondensation as quasi-equilibrium intermediates. Very cold solid environment hinders racemization and stabilizes optical activity under conditions typical for outer space. Neither `advantage' factors can secure the evolutionary formation of chiral purity of initial prebiotic monomeric medium-even being temporary achieved it cannot be maintained at subsequent stages of prebiotic evolution because of counteraction of `enantioselective pressure'. Only bifurcational mechanism of the formation of prebiotic homochiral-monomeric and afterwards polymeric-medium and its subsequent transformation in `homochiral chemical automata' (`biological big bang'-passage from `stochastic' to `algorithmic' chemistry) is possible and can be realized. Extra-terrestrial (cold, solid phase) scenarios of the origin of life seem to be more promising from that point of view than terrestrial (warm) scenarios. Within a scheme of five main stages of prebiological evolution some problems important for further investigation are briefly discussed.

  7. Multivariate analysis of the risk in chronic obstructive lung disease (COLD)

    SciTech Connect

    Spinaci, S.; Bugiani, M.; Arossa, W.; Bucca, C.; Rolla, G.

    1985-01-01

    This study was undertaken to assess the validity of cluster analysis for stratifying patients with severe COLD into homogenous subgroups in view of further prospective studies. To this aim, physiological measurements and questionnaire data were obtained from 532 outpatients with severe COLD (e.g. a 1 sec forced expiratory volume (FEV1) below 1.5-1/sec). The model variables selected for the partition in cluster were FEV1, PaO/sub 2/, response to bronchodilators and heart rate. Two subgroups of patients were identified by the analysis: cluster I with significantly greater physiological impairment than cluster II. The comparison of the prevalences of the variables outside the model between the 2 clusters showed, in fact, that cluster I had a significantly higher prevalence of subjects with heavy smoking (p less than 0.01), prolonged occupational exposure (p less than 0.05), low body weight (p less than 0.05), recent hospitalizations for respiratory troubles (p less than 0.02) and emphysema (p less than 0.01). In conclusion, cluster analysis based on few physiological variables was able to identify, among patients with severe COLD, those with poorer general conditions and higher exposure to specific risk factors, for whom a worse prognosis of life can be expected. The advantages of cluster analysis in comparison to other techniques of classification in this kind of patient is discussed.

  8. Galaxy formation through hierarchical clustering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Simon D. M.; Frenk, Carlos S.

    1991-01-01

    Analytic methods for studying the formation of galaxies by gas condensation within massive dark halos are presented. The present scheme applies to cosmogonies where structure grows through hierarchical clustering of a mixture of gas and dissipationless dark matter. The simplest models consistent with the current understanding of N-body work on dissipationless clustering, and that of numerical and analytic work on gas evolution and cooling are adopted. Standard models for the evolution of the stellar population are also employed, and new models for the way star formation heats and enriches the surrounding gas are constructed. Detailed results are presented for a cold dark matter universe with Omega = 1 and H(0) = 50 km/s/Mpc, but the present methods are applicable to other models. The present luminosity functions contain significantly more faint galaxies than are observed.

  9. Cluster bulleticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massey, Richard; Kitching, Thomas; Nagai, Daisuke

    2011-05-01

    The unique properties of dark matter are revealed during collisions between clusters of galaxies, such as the bullet cluster (1E 0657-56) and baby bullet (MACS J0025-12). These systems provide evidence for an additional, invisible mass in the separation between the distributions of their total mass, measured via gravitational lensing, and their ordinary 'baryonic' matter, measured via its X-ray emission. Unfortunately, the information available from these systems is limited by their rarity. Constraints on the properties of dark matter, such as its interaction cross-section, are therefore restricted by uncertainties in the individual systems' impact velocity, impact parameter and orientation with respect to the line of sight. Here we develop a complementary, statistical measurement in which every piece of substructure falling into every massive cluster is treated as a bullet. We define 'bulleticity' as the mean separation between dark matter and ordinary matter, and we measure the signal in hydrodynamical simulations. The phase space of substructure orbits also exhibits symmetries that provide an equivalent control test. Any detection of bulleticity in real data would indicate a difference in the interaction cross-sections of baryonic and dark matter that may rule out hypotheses of non-particulate dark matter that are otherwise able to model individual systems. A subsequent measurement of bulleticity could constrain the dark matter cross-section. Even with conservative estimates, the existing Hubble Space Telescope archive should yield an independent constraint tighter than that from the bullet cluster. This technique is then trivially extendable to and benefits enormously from larger, future surveys.

  10. Oxygen atom transfer reactions from dioxygen to phosphines via a bridging sulfur dioxide in a trinuclear cluster complex of rhenium, [(Ph(3)P)(2)N][Re(3)(mu(3)-S)(mu-S)(2)(mu-SO(2))Cl(6)(PMe(2)Ph)(3)].

    PubMed

    Saito, Taro; Sunaga, Tomoaki; Sakai, Nobuaki; Nakamura, Yoichi; Yamamoto, Saori; Iriuchijima, Daisuke; Yoza, Kenji

    2005-06-13

    A trinuclear rhenium sulfide cluster complex, [(Ph(3)P)(2)N][Re(3)(mu(3)-S)(mu-S)(3)Cl(6)(PMe(2)Ph)(3)], synthesized from Re(3)S(7)Cl(7), dimethylphenylphosphine, and [(Ph(3)P)(2)N]Cl is readily converted to a bridging SO(2) complex, [(Ph(3)P)(2)N][Re(3)(mu(3)-S)(mu-S)(2)(mu-SO(2))Cl(6)(PMe(2)Ph)(3)], by reaction with O(2). The oxygen atoms on the SO(2) ligand react with phosphines or phosphites to form phosphine oxides or phosphates, and the original cluster complex is recovered. The reaction course has been monitored by (31)P NMR as well as by UV-vis spectroscopy. The catalytic oxygenation of PMePh(2) in the presence of the SO(2) complex shows that turnovers are 8 per hour at 23 degrees C in CDCl(3). The X-ray structures of the cluster complexes are described.

  11. Experiments in cold fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, E.P.

    1986-03-28

    The work of Steve Jones and others in muon-catalyzed cold fusion of deuterium and hydrogen suggests the possibility of such fusion catalyzed by ions, or combinations of atoms, or more-or-less free electrons in solid and liquid materials. A hint that this might occur naturally comes from the heat generated in volcanic action in subduction zones on the earth. It is questionable whether the potential energy of material raised to the height of a midocean ridge and falling to the depth of an ocean trench can produce the geothermal effects seen in the volcanoes of subduction zones. If the ridge, the trench, the plates, and the asthenosphere are merely visible effects of deeper density-gradient driven circulations, it is still uncertain that observed energy-concentration effects fit the models.

  12. Cold isopressing method

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Jack C.; Stawisuck, Valerie M.; Prasad, Ravi

    2003-01-01

    A cold isopressing method in which two or more layers of material are formed within an isopressing mold. One of the layers consists of a tape-cast film. The layers are isopressed within the isopressing mold, thereby to laminate the layers and to compact the tape-cast film. The isopressing mold can be of cylindrical configuration with the layers being coaxial cylindrical layers. The materials used in forming the layers can contain green ceramic materials and the resultant structure can be fired and sintered as necessary and in accordance with known methods to produce a finished composite, ceramic structure. Further, such green ceramic materials can be of the type that are capable of conducting hydrogen or oxygen ions at high temperature with the object of utilizing the finished composite ceramic structure as a ceramic membrane element.

  13. Nonfreezing Cold-Induced Injuries

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    circumstances. This chapter explores the history, epidemiology , pathophysiology, and current prevention and treatments of NFCI, as well as pernio...environment should mean that NFCI is preventable in most circumstances. This chapter explores the history, epidemiology , pathophysi- ology, and current...prevention and treatments of NFCI, as well as pernio (chilblains), cryoglobulinemia, and cold urticaria. Epidemiology Individuals suffering cold

  14. Palladium clusters deposited on the heterogeneous substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kun; Liu, Juanfang; Chen, Qinghua

    2016-07-01

    To improve the performance of the Pd composite membrane prepared by the cold spraying technology, it is extremely essential to give insights into the deposition process of the cluster and the heterogeneous deposition of the big Pd cluster at the different incident velocities on the atomic level. The deposition behavior, morphologies, energetic and interfacial configuration were examined by the molecular dynamic simulation and characterized by the cluster flattening ratio, the substrate maximum local temperature, the atom-embedded layer number and the surface-alloy formation. According to the morphology evolution, three deposition stages and the corresponding structural and energy evolution were clearly identified. The cluster deformation and penetrating depth increased with the enhancement of the incident velocity, but the increase degree also depended on the substrate hardness. The interfacial interaction between the cluster and the substrate can be improved by the higher substrate local temperature. Furthermore, it is found that the surface alloys were formed by exchanging sites between the cluster and substrate atoms, and the cluster atoms rearranged following as the substrate lattice arrangement from bottom to up in the deposition course. The ability and scope of the structural reconstruction are largely determined by both the size and incident energy of the impacted cluster.

  15. Enhanced momentum feedback from clustered supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gentry, Eric S.; Krumholz, Mark R.; Dekel, Avishai; Madau, Piero

    2017-02-01

    Young stars typically form in star clusters, so the supernovae (SNe) they produce are clustered in space and time. This clustering of SNe may alter the momentum per SN deposited in the interstellar medium (ISM) by affecting the local ISM density, which in turn affects the cooling rate. We study the effect of multiple SNe using idealized 1D hydrodynamic simulations which explore a large parameter space of the number of SNe, and the background gas density and metallicity. The results are provided as a table and an analytic fitting formula. We find that for clusters with up to ∼100 SNe, the asymptotic momentum scales superlinearly with the number of SNe, resulting in a momentum per SN which can be an order of magnitude larger than for a single SN, with a maximum efficiency for clusters with 10-100 SNe. We argue that additional physical processes not included in our simulations - self-gravity, breakout from a galactic disc, and galactic shear - can slightly reduce the momentum enhancement from clustering, but the average momentum per SN still remains a factor of 4 larger than the isolated SN value when averaged over a realistic cluster mass function for a star-forming galaxy. We conclude with a discussion of the possible role of mixing between hot and cold gas, induced by multidimensional instabilities or pre-existing density variations, as a limiting factor in the build-up of momentum by clustered SNe, and suggest future numerical experiments to explore these effects.

  16. Globular cluster formation with multiple stellar populations from hierarchical star cluster complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekki, Kenji

    2017-01-01

    Most old globular clusters (GCs) in the Galaxy are observed to have internal chemical abundance spreads in light elements. We discuss a new GC formation scenario based on hierarchical star formation within fractal molecular clouds. In the new scenario, a cluster of bound and unbound star clusters (`star cluster complex', SCC) that have a power-law cluster mass function with a slope (β) of 2 is first formed from a massive gas clump developed in a dwarf galaxy. Such cluster complexes and β = 2 are observed and expected from hierarchical star formation. The most massive star cluster (`main cluster'), which is the progenitor of a GC, can accrete gas ejected from asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars initially in the cluster and other low-mass clusters before the clusters are tidally stripped or destroyed to become field stars in the dwarf. The SCC is initially embedded in a giant gas hole created by numerous supernovae of the SCC so that cold gas outside the hole can be accreted onto the main cluster later. New stars formed from the accreted gas have chemical abundances that are different from those of the original SCC. Using hydrodynamical simulations of GC formation based on this scenario, we show that the main cluster with the initial mass as large as [2 - 5] × 105M⊙ can accrete more than 105M⊙ gas from AGB stars of the SCC. We suggest that merging of hierarchical star cluster complexes can play key roles in stellar halo formation around GCs and self-enrichment processes in the early phase of GC formation.

  17. Effect of cold cap chemistry on waste melter vitrification kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, H.D.; Smith, G.L.; Tracey, E.M.; Peeler, D.K.

    1996-12-31

    Cold-cap chemistry affects the vitrification rates of simulated waste glass melter feeds that produce the same final glass composition. Laboratory- and engineering-scale melter experiments were conducted to evaluate the melting performance of melter feeds produced from pretreated simulated waste using glycolic acid in one instance and two nitric acid based feeds. The two nitric based melter feeds were pretreated with nitric acid in one case and nitric plus boric acid in the other. These melter feeds melt at significantly different rates (glycolic faster than nitric plus boric which is faster than nitric). Closer examination of cold cap samples indicated that silica was being digested faster in the glycolic-treated feed than in the nitric-treated feeds. Laboratory off gas testing results of the two nitric based melter feeds indicated that a lower temperature eutectic melt was produced in the nitric plus boric acid melter feed. Other reactions, such as salt melt accumulations at the base of the cold cap, occurred with all three melter feeds. It is also possible that exothermic reactions in the cold cap may play a roll in increasing the melting rate. Oxidation of glycolate (an exothermic reaction) occurred in the melter feed treated with glycolic acid.

  18. Quantum simulation with cold molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rey, Ana Maria

    2014-03-01

    Recent experimental developments on cooling, trapping, manipulating and loading ultra-cold ground state molecules in an optical lattice have opened the door for the exploration of quantum magnetism and the observation of complex quantum dynamics. In this talk I will discuss recent developments towards the implementation of controllable spin lattice models in polar molecules with the spin degrees of freedom encoded in rotational states. The spin-spin couplings are generated by direct dipolar interactions and can be fully controlled by dc electromagnetic fields and microwaves. The spin models realized in this way are long range, anisotropic and can even feature direction-dependent spin interactions. They can emulate Hamiltonians ranging from the Heisenberg spin model, to Hamiltonians with symmetry protected topological phases to Hamiltonians without solid state counterpart. At JILA we have been able to realize for the first time a lattice spin model with fermionic KRb molecules pinned in a 3D lattice. We observe clear manifestation of dipolar exchange interactions in Ramsey spectroscopy even at substantially less than unit lattice filling. I will describe the new theoretical methods that we developed to model the spin dynamics and show that those reproduce the experimental observations. Even though so far the spin dynamics has been restricted to pinned molecules, in part to prevent chemical reactions, I will finish by presenting theoretical calculations supported by experimental measurement at JILA that demonstrate that the continuous quantum Zeno mechanism can actually suppress loss in this highly reactive system. This finding opens the exciting possibility of observing itinerant quantum magnetism in near term experiments. This work is supported by ARO, ARO-DARPA-OLE, NSF-PFC and NSF-PIF

  19. Giant Star Clusters Near Galactic Core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    A video sequence of still images goes deep into the Milky Way galaxy to the Arches Cluster. Hubble, penetrating through dust and clouds, peers into the core where two giant clusters shine more brightly than any other clusters in the galaxy. Footage shows the following still images: (1) wide view of Sagittarius constellation; (2) the Palomar Observatory's 2 micron all-sky survey; and (3) an image of the Arches Cluster taken with the Hubble Space Telescope NICMOS instrument. Dr. Don Figer of the Space Telescope Science Institute discusses the significance of the observations and relates his first reaction to the images.

  20. Detection of interstellar hydrogen sulfide in cold, dark clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minh, Y. C.; Irvine, W. M.; Ziurys, L. M.

    1989-01-01

    Interstellar H2S has been detected toward the cold, dark clouds L134N and TMC 1. Total column densities at the SO peak of L134N and the NH3 peak of TMC 1 are found to be about 2.6 X 10 to the 13th/sq cm and 7.0 X 10 to the 12th/sq cm, respectively. The results suggest that grain surface reactions may play a major role in the synthesis of H2S in cold, dark clouds.

  1. Protective coatings of metal surfaces by cold plasma treatment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manory, R.; Grill, A.

    1985-01-01

    The cold plasma techniques for deposition of various types of protective coatings are reviewed. The main advantage of these techniques for deposition of ceramic films is the lower process temperature, which enables heat treating of the metal prior to deposition. In the field of surface hardening of steel, significant reduction of treatment time and energy consumption were obtained. A simple model for the plasma - surface reactions in a cold plasma system is presented, and the plasma deposition techniques are discussed in view of this model.

  2. Cold-Weather Sports and Your Family

    MedlinePlus

    ... Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Cold-Weather Sports and Your Family KidsHealth > For Parents > Cold- ... once the weather turns frosty. Beating the Cold-Weather Blahs Once a chill is in the air, ...

  3. Cough and Cold Medicine Abuse (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Cough and Cold Medicine Abuse KidsHealth > For Parents > Cough ... cough and cold medicine. Why Do Kids Abuse Cough and Cold Remedies? Before the U.S. Food and ...

  4. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based methods for detection/identification of mycotoxigenic fungi targeting fumonisin biosynthetic genes: Use of variation in FUM cluster location to distinguish between and quantify

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The fungus Fusarium is an agricultural problem because it can cause disease on most crop plants and can contaminate crops with mycotoxins. There is considerable variation in the presence/absence and genomic location of gene clusters responsible for synthesis of mycotoxins and other secondary metabol...

  5. The discovery of large amounts of cold, X-ray absorbing matter in cooling flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, D. A.; Fabian, A. C.; Johnstone, R. M.; Mushotzky, R. F.; Arnaud, K. A.

    1991-01-01

    The discovery of significant excess absorption in the X-ray spectra of 12 clusters of galaxies is reported. The spectra also require a cooling-flow component, which confirms the results of imaging studies of the clusters showing the strongly peaked emission characteristic of cooling flows. The total mass of absorbing gas is determined on the assumption that it is distributed through the cooling flow region and has cosmic abundance. It is shown that the gas is most likely in the form of small cold clouds. The excess absorption is interpreted as being due to photoelectric absorption in cold gas clouds distributed through the cooling flows.

  6. Cold urticaria and celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Pedrosa Delgado, M; Martín Muñoz, F; Polanco Allué, I; Martín Esteban, M

    2008-01-01

    Cold urticaria can be associated with blood and thyroid disorders, drugs, or infections. Celiac disease is an autoimmune enteropathy caused by permanent gluten intolerance. It is often associated with other autoimmune diseases, such as chronic idiopathic urticaria. Nevertheless, association with cold urticaria has not yet been described. A boy aged 3 years 8 months presented local urticaria-angioedema when exposed to cold temperatures. An ice cube test was positive and iron deficiency anemia was demonstrated. He later developed legume intolerance, rhinoconjunctivitis related to pollen sensitization, and asthma. Due to persistence of cold urticaria symptoms and refractory anemia, a test for immunoglobulin A autoantibodies to tissue transglutaminase and an intestinal biopsy were performed. Results of both tests were compatible with celiac disease.A study of human leukocyte antigen indicated a high risk phenotype (HLA, DR6/DR7; DQA 0501, 0201; DQB 0301, 0201). After 7 months of a gluten-free diet, the boy's anemia resolved and he is free of symptoms when exposed to cold. This is a first description of the possibility of an association between celiac disease and cold urticaria. A poor course of cold urticaria in the absence of evidence of another underlying condition should lead to suspicion of celiac disease.

  7. Regulation of microtubule cold stability by calmodulin-dependent and -independent phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Job, D; Rauch, C T; Fischer, E H; Margolis, R L

    1983-07-01

    Cold-labile microtubule protein can be rendered cold-stable by addition of a fraction containing a small number of polypeptides that are derived from cold-stable microtubules. These polypeptides can be obtained from purified cold-stable microtubules by passage through a DEAE-cellulose (DE-52) ion exchange column from which they emerge in the first eluate fraction. The stabilizing activity of these proteins is abolished by phosphorylation catalyzed by two types of protein kinases, one dependent on calmodulin and the other independent of that regulatory protein. The calmodulin-dependent reaction appears to phosphorylate mainly two polypeptides, 56 and 72 kilodaltons; the reaction is blocked by trifluoperazine. The calmodulin-independent reaction appears to phosphorylate different cold-stable microtubule-associated proteins. That reaction is observed only in purified material obtained from vigorously homogenized brain tissue. Gently homogenization yields cold-stable microtubules that are responsive only to the calmodulin-dependent protein kinase. A distinguishing feature of the calmodulin-independent reaction is that it does not occur on polypeptides while they are bound to the microtubules.

  8. Cold fusion studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hembree, D. M.; Burchfield, L. A.; Fuller, E. L., Jr.; Perey, F. G.; Mamantov, G.

    1990-06-01

    A series of experiments designed to detect the by-products expected from deuterium fusion occurring in the palladium and titanium cathodes of heavy water, D2O, electrolysis cells is reported. The primary purpose of this account is to outline the integrated experimental design developed to test the cold fusion hypothesis and to report preliminary results that support continuing the investigation. Apparent positive indicators of deuterium fusion were observed, but could not be repeated or proved to originate from the electrochemical cells. In one instance, two large increases in the neutron count rate, the largest of which exceeded the background by 27 standard deviations, were observed. In a separate experiment, one of the calorimetry cells appeared to be producing approximately 18 percent more power that the input value, but thermistor failure prevented an accurate recording of the event as a function of time. In general, the tritium levels in most cells followed the slow enrichment expected from the electrolysis of D2O containing a small amount of tritium. However, after 576 hours of electrolysis, one cell developed a tritium concentration approximately seven times greater than expected level.

  9. Cold fusion verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    North, M. H.; Mastny, G. F.; Wesley, E. J.

    1991-03-01

    The objective of this work to verify and reproduce experimental observations of Cold Nuclear Fusion (CNF), as originally reported in 1989. The method was to start with the original report and add such additional information as became available to build a set of operational electrolytic CNF cells. Verification was to be achieved by first observing cells for neutron production, and for those cells that demonstrated a nuclear effect, careful calorimetric measurements were planned. The authors concluded, after laboratory experience, reading published work, talking with others in the field, and attending conferences, that CNF probably is chimera and will go the way of N-rays and polywater. The neutron detector used for these tests was a completely packaged unit built into a metal suitcase that afforded electrostatic shielding for the detectors and self-contained electronics. It was battery-powered, although it was on charge for most of the long tests. The sensor element consists of He detectors arranged in three independent layers in a solid moderating block. The count from each of the three layers as well as the sum of all the detectors were brought out and recorded separately. The neutron measurements were made with both the neutron detector and the sample tested in a cave made of thick moderating material that surrounded the two units on the sides and bottom.

  10. Versatile cold atom target apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Goetz, Simone; Hoeltkemeier, Bastian; Hofmann, Christoph S.; Litsch, Dominic; DePaola, Brett D.; Weidemueller, Matthias

    2012-07-15

    We report on a compact and transportable apparatus that consists of a cold atomic target at the center of a high resolution recoil ion momentum spectrometer. Cold rubidium atoms serve as a target which can be operated in three different modes: in continuous mode, consisting of a cold atom beam generated by a two-dimensional magneto-optical trap, in normal mode in which the atoms from the beam are trapped in a three-dimensional magneto-optical trap (3D MOT), and in high density mode in which the 3D MOT is operated in dark spontaneous optical trap configuration. The targets are characterized using photoionization.

  11. Plants in a cold climate.

    PubMed Central

    Smallwood, Maggie; Bowles, Dianna J

    2002-01-01

    Plants are able to survive prolonged exposure to sub-zero temperatures; this ability is enhanced by pre-exposure to low, but above-zero temperatures. This process, known as cold acclimation, is briefly reviewed from the perception of cold, through transduction of the low-temperature signal to functional analysis of cold-induced gene products. The stresses that freezing of apoplastic water imposes on plant cells is considered and what is understood about the mechanisms that plants use to combat those stresses discussed, with particular emphasis on the role of the extracellular matrix. PMID:12171647

  12. The richness dependence of galaxy cluster correlations: results from a redshift survey of rich APM clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croft, R. A. C.; Dalton, G. B.; Efstathiou, G.; Sutherland, W. J.; Maddox, S. J.

    1997-10-01

    We analyse the spatial clustering properties of a new catalogue of very rich galaxy clusters with newly measured redshifts selected from the APM Galaxy Survey. These clusters are of comparable richness and space density to Abell richness class≯1 clusters, but selected using an objective algorithm from a catalogue demonstrably free of artificial inhomogeneities. Evaluation of the two-point correlation function xi_cc(r) for the full sample and for richer subsamples reveals that the correlation amplitude is consistent with that measured for lower richness APM clusters and X-ray selected clusters. We apply a maximum likelihood estimator to find the best-fitting slope and amplitude of a power-law fit to xi_cc(r), and to estimate the correlation length r_0 [the value of r at which xi_cc(r) is equal to unity]. For clusters with a mean space density of 1.6x10^-6 h^3 Mpc^-3 (equivalent to the space density of Abell richness≯2 clusters), we find r_0=21.3^+11.1_-9.3 h^-1 Mpc (95 per cent confidence limits). This is consistent with the weak richness dependence of xi_cc(r) expected in Gaussian models of structure formation. In particular, the amplitude of xi_cc(r) at all richnesses matches that of xi_cc(r) for clusters selected in N-body simulations of a low-density cold dark matter model.

  13. Modeling of surface reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, T.R.

    1993-01-01

    Mathematical models are used to elucidate properties of the monomer-monomer and monomer-dimer type chemical reactions on a two-dimensional surface. The authors use mean-field and lattice gas models, detailing similarities and differences due to correlations in the lattice gas model. The monomer-monomer, or AB surface reaction model, with no diffusion, is investigated for various reaction rates k. Study of the exact rate equations reveals that poisoning always occurs if the adsorption rates of the reactants are unequal. If the adsorption rates of the reactants are equal, simulations show slow poisoning, associated with clustering of reactants. This behavior is also shown for the two-dimensional voter model. The authors analyze precisely the slow poisoning kinetics by an analytic treatment for the AB reaction with infinitesimal reaction rate, and by direct comparison with the voter model. They extend the results to incorporate the effects of place-exchange diffusion, and they compare the AB reaction with infinitesimal reaction rate and no diffusion to the voter model with diffusion at rate 1/2. They also consider the relationship of the voter model to the monomer-dimer model, and investigate the latter model for small reaction rates. The monomer-dimer, or AB[sub 2] surface reaction model is also investigated. Specifically, they consider the ZGB-model for CO-oxidation, and in generalizations of this model which include adspecies diffusion. A theory of nucleation to describe properties of non-equilibrium first-order transitions, specifically the evolution between [open quote]reactive[close quote] steady states and trivial adsorbing states, is derived. The behavior of the [open quote]epidemic[close quote] survival probability, P[sub s], for a non-poisoned patch surrounded by a poisoned background is determined below the poisoning transition.

  14. Gas loss in simulated galaxies as they fall into clusters

    PubMed Central

    Cen, Renyue; Pop, Ana Roxana; Bahcall, Neta A.

    2014-01-01

    We use high-resolution cosmological hydrodynamic galaxy formation simulations to gain insights into how galaxies lose their cold gas at low redshift as they migrate from the field to the high-density regions of clusters of galaxies. We find that beyond three cluster virial radii, the fraction of gas-rich galaxies is constant, representing the field. Within three cluster-centric radii, the fraction of gas-rich galaxies declines steadily with decreasing radius, reaching <10% near the cluster center. Our results suggest galaxies start to feel the effect of the cluster environment on their gas content well beyond the cluster virial radius. We show that almost all gas-rich galaxies at the cluster virial radius are falling in for the first time at nearly radial orbits. Furthermore, we find that almost no galaxy moving outward at the cluster virial radius is gas-rich (with a gas-to-baryon ratio greater than 1%). These results suggest that galaxies that fall into clusters lose their cold gas within a single radial round-trip. PMID:24843167

  15. Gas loss in simulated galaxies as they fall into clusters.

    PubMed

    Cen, Renyue; Pop, Ana Roxana; Bahcall, Neta A

    2014-06-03

    We use high-resolution cosmological hydrodynamic galaxy formation simulations to gain insights into how galaxies lose their cold gas at low redshift as they migrate from the field to the high-density regions of clusters of galaxies. We find that beyond three cluster virial radii, the fraction of gas-rich galaxies is constant, representing the field. Within three cluster-centric radii, the fraction of gas-rich galaxies declines steadily with decreasing radius, reaching <10% near the cluster center. Our results suggest galaxies start to feel the effect of the cluster environment on their gas content well beyond the cluster virial radius. We show that almost all gas-rich galaxies at the cluster virial radius are falling in for the first time at nearly radial orbits. Furthermore, we find that almost no galaxy moving outward at the cluster virial radius is gas-rich (with a gas-to-baryon ratio greater than 1%). These results suggest that galaxies that fall into clusters lose their cold gas within a single radial round-trip.

  16. Cluster production within antisymmetrized molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, Akira

    2016-06-01

    Clusters are quite important at various situations in heavy-ion collisions. Antisymmetrized molecular dynamics was improved to take into account the correlations to form light clusters, such as deuterons and α particles, and light nuclei composed of several clusters. The momentum fluctuations of emitted particles are also taken into account by a simple method. Formation of fragments and light clusters in a wide range of heavy-ion collisions was well described with a single set of model parameters. Fragmentation in a proton induced reaction was also well reproduced by introducing cluster correlations. Calculated results demonstrate strong impacts of clusters in various observables including those usually regarded as probes of the density dependence of symmetry energy.

  17. Chaotic cold accretion on to black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaspari, M.; Ruszkowski, M.; Oh, S. Peng

    2013-07-01

    many systems, such as hot galactic haloes, groups and clusters. In this mode, the black hole can quickly react to the state of the entire host galaxy, leading to efficient self-regulated AGN feedback and the symbiotic Magorrian relation. Chaotic accretion can generate high-velocity clouds, likely leading to strong variations in the AGN luminosity, and the deflection or mass-loading of jets. During phases of overheating, the hot mode becomes the single channel of accretion, though strongly suppressed by turbulence. High-resolution data could determine the current mode of accretion: assuming quiescent feedback, the cold mode results in a quasi-flat-temperature core as opposed to the cuspy profile of the hot mode.

  18. ANS cold source neutronics analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Lillie, R.A.

    1994-06-01

    This paper describes the calculational procedures employed in the ongoing neutronics analysis of the ANS cold source and presents in chronological order some of the more important results from the one- and two-dimensional discrete calculations performed to date in support of the ANS cold source design. In particular, cold neutron currents from cryostat shapes which can be adequately modeled with two-dimensional geometries are compared with and without reentrant cavities. Also, results are presented from one-dimensional comparative liquid hydrogen vs liquid deuterium calculations in which the density, placement, and para-ortho mixture of liquid hydrogen is investigated. In addition, the evolution of the ANS conceptual design cold source from an initial short cylindrical cryostat with hemispherical upper and lower heads employing a natural convection liquid deuterium circulation system to the final spherical design employing a pumped system is described. Finally, performance data and heating rates are presented for some possible alternate ANS cryostat and vacuum jacket materials.

  19. Prescription Drugs and Cold Medicines

    MedlinePlus

    ... Alerts Alcohol Club Drugs Cocaine Hallucinogens Heroin Inhalants Marijuana MDMA (Ecstasy/Molly) Methamphetamine Opioids Prescription Drugs & Cold ... and over-the-counter (OTC) drugs are, after marijuana (and alcohol), the most commonly abused substances by ...

  20. A facility for using cluster research to study environmental problems

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-11-01

    This report begins by describing the general application of cluster based research to environmental chemistry and the development of a Cluster Structure and Dynamics Research Facility (CSDRF). Next, four important areas of cluster research are described in more detail, including how they can impact environmental problems. These are: surface-supported clusters, water and contaminant interactions, time-resolved dynamic studies in clusters, and cluster structures and reactions. These facilities and equipment required for each area of research are then presented. The appendices contain workshop agenda and a listing of the researchers who participated in the workshop discussions that led to this report.

  1. Cold regions hydrology and hydraulics

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, W.L. ); Crissman, R.D. )

    1990-01-01

    This monograph addresses a narrow aspect of cold regions engineering, namely the effects of cold weather on the traditional civil engineering disciplines of hydrology and hydraulics. Hydrologic and hydraulic considerations in the design, construction, and operation of civil works are very important. Many of the problems encountered in the design and construction of buildings, transportation systems, water supply facilities, waste treatment facilities, and hazardous waste disposal facilities, for example are closely tied to the characteristics of the site hydrology.

  2. Cold urticaria and HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Lin, R Y; Schwartz, R A

    1993-10-01

    Three patients, all seropositive for HIV antibody, complained of swelling and pruritus on the head and limbs when exposed to the cold. All three had received zidovudine for significant CD4 cell depletion, but had no AIDS-defining illnesses. An ice-cube test was positive on each individual. There was no evidence of cold agglutinins, cryoglobulins, syphilis, or other concurrent diseases in any of the patients. This association may represent yet another allergic manifestation in HIV infection.

  3. Cold prebiotic evolution, tunneling, chirality and exobiology

    SciTech Connect

    Goldanskii, V.I.

    1996-07-01

    The extra-terrestrial scenario of the origin of life suggested by Svante Arrhenius (1) as the {open_quote}panspermia{close_quote} hypothesis was revived by the discovery of a low-temperature quantum limit of a chemical reaction rate caused by the molecular tunneling (2). Entropy factors play no role near absolute zero, and slow molecular tunneling can lead to the exothermic formation of quite complex molecules. Interstellar grains or particles of cometary tails could serve as possible cold seeds of life, with acetic acid, urea and products of their polycondensation as quasi-equilibrium intermediates. Very cold solid environment hinders racemization and stabilizes optical activity under conditions typical for outer space. Neither {open_quote}advantage{close_quote} factors can secure the evolutionary formation of chiral purity of initial prebiotic monomeric medium{emdash}even being temporary achieved it cannot be maintained at subsequent stages of prebiotic evolution because of counteraction of {open_quote}enantioselective pressure{close_quote}. Only bifurcational mechanism of the formation of prebiotic homochiral{emdash}monomeric and afterwards polymeric{emdash}medium and its subsequent transformation in {open_quote}homochiral chemical automata{close_quote} ({open_quote}biological big bang{close_quote}{emdash}passage from {open_quote}stochastic{close_quote} to {open_quote}algorithmic{close_quote} chemistry) is possible and can be realized. Extra-terrestrial (cold, solid phase) scenarios of the origin of life seem to be more promising from that point of view than terrestrial (warm) scenarios. Within a scheme of five main stages of prebiological evolution some problems important for further investigation are briefly discussed. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  4. Cluster headache

    PubMed Central

    Leroux, Elizabeth; Ducros, Anne

    2008-01-01

    Cluster headache (CH) is a primary headache disease characterized by recurrent short-lasting attacks (15 to 180 minutes) of excruciating unilateral periorbital pain accompanied by ipsilateral autonomic signs (lacrimation, nasal congestion, ptosis, miosis, lid edema, redness of the eye). It affects young adults, predominantly males. Prevalence is estimated at 0.5–1.0/1,000. CH has a circannual and circadian periodicity, attacks being clustered (hence the name) in bouts that can occur during specific months of the year. Alcohol is the only dietary trigger of CH, strong odors (mainly solvents and cigarette smoke) and napping may also trigger CH attacks. During bouts, attacks may happen at precise hours, especially during the night. During the attacks, patients tend to be restless. CH may be episodic or chronic, depending on the presence of remission periods. CH is associated with trigeminovascular activation and neuroendocrine and vegetative disturbances, however, the precise cautive mechanisms remain unknown. Involvement of the hypothalamus (a structure regulating endocrine function and sleep-wake rhythms) has been confirmed, explaining, at least in part, the cyclic aspects of CH. The disease is familial in about 10% of cases. Genetic factors play a role in CH susceptibility, and a causative role has been suggested for the hypocretin receptor gene. Diagnosis is clinical. Differential diagnoses include other primary headache diseases such as migraine, paroxysmal hemicrania and SUNCT syndrome. At present, there is no curative treatment. There are efficient treatments to shorten the painful attacks (acute treatments) and to reduce the number of daily attacks (prophylactic treatments). Acute treatment is based on subcutaneous administration of sumatriptan and high-flow oxygen. Verapamil, lithium, methysergide, prednisone, greater occipital nerve blocks and topiramate may be used for prophylaxis. In refractory cases, deep-brain stimulation of the hypothalamus and

  5. Formation of Cluster Complexes by Cluster-Cluster-Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichihashi, Masahiko; Odaka, Hideho

    2015-03-01

    Multi-element clusters are interested in their chemical and physical properties, and it is expected that they are utilized as catalysts, for example. Their properties critically depend on the size, composition and atomic ordering, and it should be important to adjust the above parameters for their functionality. One of the ways to form a multi-element cluster is to employ a low-energy collision between clusters. Here, we show characteristic results obtained in the collision between a neutral Ar cluster and a size-selected Co cluster ion. Low-energy collision experiment was accomplished by using a newly developed merging-beam apparatus. Cobalt cluster ions were produced by laser ablation, and mass-selected. On the other hand, argon clusters were prepared by the supersonic expansion of Ar gas. Both cluster beams were merged together in an ion guide, and ionic cluster complexes were mass-analyzed. In the collision of Co2+ and ArN, Co2Arn+ (n = 1 - 30) were observed, and the total intensity of Co2Arn+ (n >= 1) is inversely proportional to the relative velocity between Co2+ and ArN. This suggests that the charge-induced dipole interaction between Co2+ and a neutral Ar cluster is dominant in the formation of the cluster complex, Co2+Arn.

  6. One-dimensional cold cap model for melters with bubblers

    DOE PAGES

    Pokorny, Richard; Hilliard, Zachary J.; Dixon, Derek R.; ...

    2015-07-28

    The rate of glass production during vitrification in an all-electrical melter greatly impacts the cost and schedule of nuclear waste treatment and immobilization. The feed is charged to the melter on the top of the molten glass, where it forms a layer of reacting and melting material, called the cold cap. During the final stages of the batch-to-glass conversion process, gases evolved from reactions produce primary foam, the growth and collapse of which controls the glass production rate. The mathematical model of the cold cap was revised to include functional representation of primary foam behavior and to account for themore » dry cold cap surface. The melting rate is computed as a response to the dependence of the primary foam collapse temperature on the heating rate and melter operating conditions, including the effect of bubbling on the cold cap bottom and top surface temperatures. The simulation results are in good agreement with experimental data from laboratory-scale and pilot-scale melter studies. Lastly, the cold cap model will become part of the full three-dimensional mathematical model of the waste glass melter.« less

  7. The role of free radicals in cold injuries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhaumik, G.; Srivastava, K. K.; Selvamurthy, W.; Purkayastha, S. S.

    1995-12-01

    Cold injury is a tissue trauma produced by exposure to freezing temperatures and even brief exposure to a severely cold and windy environment. Rewarming of frozen tissue is associated with blood reperfusion and the simultaneous generation of free oxygen radicals. In this review is discussed the current understanding of the mechanism of action of free oxygen radicals as related to cold injury during rewarming. Decreased energy stores during ischaemia lead to the accumulation of adenine nucleotides and liberation of free fatty acids due to the breakdown of lipid membranes. On rewarming, free fatty acids are metabolized via cyclo-oxygenase and adenine nucleotides are metabolized via the xanthine oxidase pathway. These may be the source of free oxygen radicals. Leukocytes may also play a major role in the pathogenesis of cold injury. Oxygen radical scavengers, such as superoxide dismutase and catalase, may help to reduce the cold induced injury but their action is limited due to the inability readily to cross the plasma membrane. Lipid soluble antioxidants are likely to be more effective scavengers because of their presence in membranes where peroxidative reactions can be arrested.

  8. One-dimensional cold cap model for melters with bubblers

    SciTech Connect

    Pokorny, Richard; Hilliard, Zachary J.; Dixon, Derek R.; Schweiger, Michael J.; Guillen, Donna P.; Kruger, Albert A.; Hrma, Pavel

    2015-07-28

    The rate of glass production during vitrification in an all-electrical melter greatly impacts the cost and schedule of nuclear waste treatment and immobilization. The feed is charged to the melter on the top of the molten glass, where it forms a layer of reacting and melting material, called the cold cap. During the final stages of the batch-to-glass conversion process, gases evolved from reactions produce primary foam, the growth and collapse of which controls the glass production rate. The mathematical model of the cold cap was revised to include functional representation of primary foam behavior and to account for the dry cold cap surface. The melting rate is computed as a response to the dependence of the primary foam collapse temperature on the heating rate and melter operating conditions, including the effect of bubbling on the cold cap bottom and top surface temperatures. The simulation results are in good agreement with experimental data from laboratory-scale and pilot-scale melter studies. Lastly, the cold cap model will become part of the full three-dimensional mathematical model of the waste glass melter.

  9. Garlic for the common cold.

    PubMed

    Lissiman, Elizabeth; Bhasale, Alice L; Cohen, Marc

    2014-11-11

    Background Garlic is alleged to have antimicrobial and antiviral properties that relieve the common cold, among other beneficial effects. There is widespread usage of garlic supplements. The common cold is associated with significant morbidity and economic consequences. On average, children have six to eight colds per year and adults have two to four.Objectives To determine whether garlic (Allium sativum) is effective for the prevention or treatment of the common cold, when compared to placebo, no treatment or other treatments.Search methods We searched CENTRAL (2014, Issue 7),OLDMEDLINE (1950 to 1965),MEDLINE (January 1966 to July week 5, 2014), EMBASE(1974 to August 2014) and AMED (1985 to August 2014).Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials of common cold prevention and treatment comparing garlic with placebo, no treatment or standard treatment.Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently reviewed and selected trials from searches, assessed and rated study quality and extracted relevant data.Main results In this updated review, we identified eight trials as potentially relevant from our searches. Again, only one trial met the inclusion criteria.This trial randomly assigned 146 participants to either a garlic supplement (with 180 mg of allicin content) or a placebo (once daily)for 12 weeks. The trial reported 24 occurrences of the common cold in the garlic intervention group compared with 65 in the placebo group (P value < 0.001), resulting in fewer days of illness in the garlic group compared with the placebo group (111 versus 366). The number of days to recovery from an occurrence of the common cold was similar in both groups (4.63 versus 5.63). Only one trial met the inclusion criteria, therefore limited conclusions can be drawn. The trial relied on self reported episodes of the common cold but was of reasonable quality in terms of randomisation and allocation concealment. Adverse effects included rash and odour. Authors' conclusions

  10. Distinction between cold-sensitive and -tolerant jute by DNA polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Mohammad Belayat; Awal, Aleya; Rahman, Mohammad Aminur; Haque, Samiul; Khan, Haseena

    2003-09-30

    Jute is the principal coarse fiber for commercial production and use in Bangladesh. Therefore, the development of a high-yielding and environmental-stress tolerant jute variety would be beneficial for the agro economy of Bangladesh. Two molecular fingerprinting techniques, random-amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and amplified-fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) were applied on six jute samples. Two of them were cold-sensitive varieties and the remaining four were cold-tolerant accessions. RAPD and AFLP fingerprints were employed to generate polymorphism between the cold-sensitive varieties and cold-tolerant accessions because of their simplicity, and also because there is no available sequence information on jute. RAPD data were obtained by using 30 arbitrary oligonucleotide primers. Five primers were found to give polymorphism between the varieties that were tested. AFLP fingerprints were generated using 25 combinations of selective-amplification primers. Eight primer combinations gave the best results with 93 polymorphic fragments, and they were able to discriminate the two cold-sensitive and four cold-tolerant jute populations. A cluster analysis, based on the RAPD and AFLP fingerprint data, showed the population-specific grouping of individuals. This information could be useful later in marker-aided selection between the cold-sensitive varieties and cold-tolerant jute accessions.

  11. Cold charge nickel hydrogen geosynchronous satellite batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, J.C.

    1997-12-01

    It has been well recognized for the last twenty years that the capacity of nickel hydrogen batteries is improved if the batteries are operated at relatively cool temperatures ({approximately}0 to 10 C). This is somewhat contra-intuitive relative to other batteries and is generally ascribed to the competition between the useful nickel electrode recharge reaction and the parasitic electrolysis of water. The Cold Charge concept exploits the difference in charge vs. discharge kinetics and the fixed rates and periods of geosynchronous operation to increase the name plate capacity of IPV Ni/H{sub 2} by forcing discharge to occur at a higher temperature than charge. In practice battery recharge is completed ({approximately}90% {yields} 100% SOC) under taper charge conditions (C/10 {yields} C/100) with a battery temperature {approximately}{minus}20 C. Prior to high rate discharge the temperature of the battery is artificially increased (via the battery heaters) to {minus}10C to 0C. The net result is a 15% increase in practical battery capacity and hence reduction in battery weight. This is achieved with essentially no increase in battery cell cost. The Cold Charge process is fully qualified and is presently in use on two large geosynchronous communications satellites. It is base lined for all future Space Systems/Loral geosynchronous spacecraft.

  12. 2008 Molecular and Ionic Clusters - September 7-12, 2008

    SciTech Connect

    Jeremy M. Hutson

    2009-09-21

    The Gordon Research Conference on Molecular and Ionic Clusters was held at Centre Paul Langevin, Aussois, France, September 7-12, 2008. The Conference was well-attended with 129 participants (attendees list attached). The attendees represented the spectrum of endeavor in this field coming from academia, industry, and government laboratories, both U.S. and foreign scientists, senior researchers, young investigators, and students. The conference covered the spectroscopy, dynamics, and reactivity of a wide range of cluster types and sizes, including helium nanodroplets, metal clusters, ionic clusters, hydrogen-bonded networks, and clusters involving biological molecules. Special sessions on cold-molecule collisions and aerosols are also planned. Both experimental and theoretical aspects of cluster science will be well-represented at the conference.

  13. Structures and Components in Galaxy Clusters: Observations and Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bykov, A. M.; Churazov, E. M.; Ferrari, C.; Forman, W. R.; Kaastra, J. S.; Klein, U.; Markevitch, M.; de Plaa, J.

    2015-05-01

    Clusters of galaxies are the largest gravitationally bounded structures in the Universe dominated by dark matter. We review the observational appearance and physical models of plasma structures in clusters of galaxies. Bubbles of relativistic plasma which are inflated by supermassive black holes of AGNs, cooling and heating of the gas, large scale plasma shocks, cold fronts, non-thermal halos and relics are observed in clusters. These constituents are reflecting both the formation history and the dynamical properties of clusters of galaxies. We discuss X-ray spectroscopy as a tool to study the metal enrichment in clusters and fine spectroscopy of Fe X-ray lines as a powerful diagnostics of both the turbulent plasma motions and the energetics of the non-thermal electron populations. The knowledge of the complex dynamical and feedback processes is necessary to understand the energy and matter balance as well as to constrain the role of the non-thermal components of clusters.

  14. Ionization dynamics of small water clusters: Proton transfer rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tachikawa, Hiroto; Takada, Tomoya

    2016-08-01

    The surfaces of icy planets and comets are composed of frozen water (H2O), carbon dioxide (CO2), and methane (CH4). These surfaces are irradiated by solar wind and cosmic rays from the interstellar space and they cause ionization of surface molecules. In this report, the effects of ionization of cold water clusters have been investigated using a direct ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) method to elucidate the rate of proton transfer (PT) in cations of small water clusters (H2O)n (n = 2-7). After ionization of the water clusters, PT occurred in all the cluster cations, and dissociation of the OH radical occurred for n = 4-7. The time of PT decreased with increasing the cluster size at n = 2-5 and reached a limiting value at n = 6 and 7. The mechanism of the PT process in ionized water clusters was discussed based on the theoretical results.

  15. The shape-alignment relation in Λ cold dark matter cosmic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basilakos, S.; Plionis, M.; Yepes, G.; Gottlöber, S.; Turchaninov, V.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we study the supercluster-cluster morphological properties using one of the largest (2 × 5123) smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH)+N-body simulations of large-scale structure formation in a Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM) model, based on the publicly available code GADGET. We find that filamentary (prolate-like) shapes are the dominant supercluster and cluster dark matter halo morphological feature, in agreement with previous studies. However, the baryonic gas component of the clusters is predominantly spherical. We investigate the alignment between cluster haloes (using either their dark matter or their baryonic components) and their parent supercluster major-axis orientation, finding that clusters show such a preferential alignment. Combining the shape and the alignment statistics, we also find that the amplitude of supercluster-cluster alignment increases, although weakly, with supercluster filamentariness.

  16. A study of cooling flows in poor clusters of galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kriss, Gerard A.; Dillingham, Stephen

    1995-01-01

    We observed three poor clusters with central dominant galaxies (AWM 4, MKW 4, and MKW 3's) using the Position Sensitive Proportional Counter on the ROSAT X-ray satellite. The images reveal smooth, symmetrical X-ray emission filling the cluster with a sharp peak on each central galaxy. The cluster surface brightness profiles can be decomposed using superposed King models for the central galaxy and the intracluster medium. The King model parameters for the cluster portions are consistent with previous observations of these clusters. The newly measured King model parameters for the central galaxies are typical of the X-ray surface brightness distributions of isolated elliptical galaxies. Spatially resolved temperature measurements in annular rings throughout the clusters show a nearly isothermal profile. Temperatures are consistent with previously measured values, but are much better determined. There is no significant drop in temperature noted in the innermost bins where cooling flows are likely to be present, nor is any excess absorption by cold gas required. All cold gas columns are consistent with galactic foreground absorption. We derive mass profiles for the clusters assuming both isothermal temperature profiles and cooling flow models with constant mass flow rates. Our results are consistent with previous Einstein IPC observations by Kriss, Cioffi, & Canizares, but extend the mass profiles out to 1 Mpc in these poor clusters.

  17. Recycling of cold-stable microtubules: evidence that cold stability is due to substoichiometric polymer blocks.

    PubMed

    Job, D; Rauch, C T; Fischer, E H; Margolis, R L

    1982-02-02

    A substantial subpopulation of mammalian brain crude extract microtubules is resistant to cold-temperature disassembly. We propose here that microtubules are rendered cold stable by rare substoichiometric blocks. Mild shearing of rat brain cold-stable microtubules makes them largely cold labile. In addition, cold-stable microtubules can be destabilized by exposure to low concentrations of calmodulin (5 microM) in the presence of calcium at 0 degree C. Cold-disassembled microtubule protein, obtained from sheared or calmodulin-treated cold-stable preparations, re-forms a cold-stable subpopulation upon reassembly. These observations allow strategies for the recycling purification of cold-stable microtubules. Comparison of purified cold-labile and cold-stable material by gel electrophoresis shows enrichment for a few unique polypeptides, of 135, 70-82, and 56 kilodaltons, in the cold-stable preparation. The 64-kilodalton "switch protein", previously identified as uniquely dephosphorylated in cold-stable microtubules, is equally represented in recycled cold-stable and cold-labile microtubule preparations. Furthermore, when disassembled, cold-stable microtubule proteins are passed through a calmodulin affinity column on which the polypeptides characteristic of cold-stable microtubules are specifically retained, the breakthrough (unbound) material repolymerizes into cold-labile microtubules only. Based on the above data, a model is presented in which microtubules are rendered cold stable by the presence of substoichiometric, calmodulin-sensitive blocks that randomly reshuffle upon reassembly of cold-stable microtubules.

  18. Coping with the cold: the cold shock response in the Gram-positive soil bacterium Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Michael H W; Marahiel, Mohamed A

    2002-01-01

    All organisms examined to date, respond to a sudden change in environmental temperature with a specific cascade of adaptation reactions that, in some cases, have been identified and monitored at the molecular level. According to the type of temperature change, this response has been termed heat shock response (HSR) or cold shock response (CSR). During the HSR, a specialized sigma factor has been shown to play a central regulatory role in controlling expression of genes predominantly required to cope with heat-induced alteration of protein conformation. In contrast, after cold shock, nucleic acid structure and proteins interacting with the biological information molecules DNA and RNA appear to play a major cellular role. Currently, no cold-specific sigma factor has been identified. Therefore, unlike the HSR, the CSR appears to be organized as a complex stimulon rather than resembling a regulon. This review has been designed to draw a refined picture of our current understanding of the CSR in Bacillus subtilis. Important processes such as temperature sensing, membrane adaptation, modification of the translation apparatus, as well as nucleoid reorganization and some metabolic aspects, are discussed in brief. Special emphasis is placed on recent findings concerning the nucleic acid binding cold shock proteins, which play a fundamental role, not only during cold shock adaptation but also under optimal growth conditions. PMID:12171653

  19. Microscopic cold fission yields of {sup 252}Cf

    SciTech Connect

    Mirea, M.; Delion, D. S.; Sandulescu, A.

    2010-04-15

    We show that the sharp maximum corresponding to {sup 107}Mo in the fragment distribution of the {sup 252}Cf cold fission is actually a Sn-like radioactivity, similar to other decay processes in which magic nuclei are involved, namely alpha decay and heavy cluster emission, also called Pb-like radioactivity. It turns out that the mass asymmetry degree of freedom has a key role in connecting initial Sn with the final Mo isotopes along the fission path. We investigate the cold rearrangement of nucleons within the framework of the two-center shell model in order to compute the cold valleys in the charge equilibrated fragmentation potential. The fission yields are estimated by using the semiclassical penetration approach. We consider 5 degrees of freedom, namely the interfragment distance, the shapes of fragments, the neck parameter, and mass asymmetry. We found an isomeric minimum between the internal and external barriers. It turns out that the inner cold valley of the total potential energy is connected to the doubly magic isotope {sup 132}Sn.

  20. Magnetic Trapping of Cold Methyl Radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yang; Vashishta, Manish; Djuricanin, Pavle; Zhou, Sida; Zhong, Wei; Mittertreiner, Tony; Carty, David; Momose, Takamasa

    2017-03-01

    We have demonstrated that a supersonic beam of methyl radicals (CH3 ) in the ground rotational state of both para and ortho species has been slowed down to standstill with a magnetic molecular decelerator, and successfully captured spatially in an anti-Helmholtz magnetic trap for >1 s . The trapped CH3 radicals have a mean translational temperature of about 200 mK with an estimated density of >5.0 ×1 07 cm-3 . The methyl radical is an ideal system for the study of cold molecules not only because of its high reactivities at low temperatures, but also because further cooling below 1 mK is plausible via sympathetic cooling with ultracold atoms. The demonstrated trapping capability of methyl radicals opens up various possibilities for realizing ultracold ensembles of molecules towards Bose-Einstein condensation of polyatomic molecules and investigations of reactions governed by quantum statistics.

  1. Extensive Variation in Fried Chip Color and Tuber Composition in Cold-Stored Tubers of Wild Potato (Solanum) Germplasm

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cold-induced sweetening and browning in the Maillard reaction have driven extensive research in the areas of plant physiology, biochemistry, and food science in Solanum tuberosum. To date, research in these areas excluded wild relatives of potato. This is the first assessment of cold-stored tuber c...

  2. Primary (idiopathic) cold urticaria and cholinergic urticaria.

    PubMed

    Kim, Gene

    2004-11-30

    A 76-year-old man with a longstanding history of cold sensitivity developed wheals after the application of an ice cube. Cold urticaria is a type of physical urticaria that is characterized urticaria and angioedema after exposure to cold. It may be idiopathic or secondary to hematologic or infectious diseases. Treatment of primary cold urticaria includes antihistamines; however, ketotifen, doxantrazole, zafirlukast, cyclosporine, and cold-tolerance induction may be tried in refractory cases.

  3. The Structure and Evolution of Cold Dark Matter Halos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diemand, Jürg; Moore, Ben

    2011-02-01

    In the standard cosmological model a mysterious cold dark matter (CDM) component dominates the formation of structures. Numerical studies of the f ormation of CDM halos have produced several robust results that allow unique tests of the hierarchical clustering paradigm. Universal properties of halos, including their mass profiles and substructure properties are roughly consistent with observational data from the scales of dwarf galaxies to galaxy clusters. Resolving the fine grained structure of halos has enabled us to make predictions for ongoing and planned direct and indirect dark matter detection experiments. While simulations of pure CDM halos are now very accurate and in good agreement (recently claimed discrepancies are addressed in detail in this review), we are still unable to make robust, quantitative predictions about galaxy formation and about how the dark matter distribution changes in the process. Whilst discrepancies between observations and simulations have been the subject of much debate in the literature, galaxy formation and evolution needs to be understood in more detail in order to fully test the CDM paradigm. Whatever the true nature of the dark matter particle is, its clustering properties must not be too different from a cold neutralino like particle to maintain all the successes of the model in matching large scale structure data and the global properties of halos which are mostly in good agreement with observations.

  4. Surface deposition and encapsulation of metallic clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hund, Jared Franklin

    In this work metallic clusters are produced by both encapsulation in an aerogel matrix and deposition on a surface. Entrapment of metal clusters inside aerogels is accomplished though synthesis of a hydrogel precursor, washing it with an aqueous metal salt solution, and controlled reduction of the metal. Although the aerogel matrix stabilizes and prevents subsequent loss or aggregation of the clusters once they are produced, controlling the rate of reduction is key to the size and morphology of the clusters. In order to do this, both radiolytic and chemical reduction methods are used. The radiolytic technique for the formation of metal cluster aerogel composites utilizes gamma radiation to reduce the solution of Ag+ or [AuCl 4]- ions inside of the hydrogel precursor. After exposure to gamma rays, the previously colorless gels have the coloration typical of colloids of Au (pink) and Ag (yellow/brown) clusters. Typical gamma doses are between 2 to 3.5 kGy for hydrogels containing 10-4 to 10-3 mol·L-1 metal solutions. Subsequent characterization confirmed the presence of metal clusters with a fcc structure. The cluster diameters varied between 10 and 200nm, depending on the synthesis parameters. More conventional chemical reduction is also employed in this work to produce noble metal clusters in an aerogel matrix. Hydrogels were washed in a basic solution of Ag+ or [AuCl4]- ions, and formaldehyde was added to the solution. The reduction proceeded relatively slowly, allowing the formaldehyde to diffuse into the hydrogel before complete reduction took place. This procedure was also used to produce alloys of gold and silver clusters embedded in silica aerogels. Also included in this dissertation is the surface deposition of metallic clusters on a silicon surface. The apparatus built produces a cold beam of gas droplets that pick up evaporated metal clusters and deposit them on a surface. The gas clusters are produced by supersonic expansion of a gas (Ar, He, or N2

  5. Cold air systems: Sleeping giant

    SciTech Connect

    MacCracken, C.D. )

    1994-04-01

    This article describes how cold air systems help owners increase the profits from their buildings by reducing electric costs and improving indoor air quality through lower relative humidity levels. Cold air distribution involves energy savings, cost savings, space savings, greater comfort, cleaner air, thermal storage, tighter ducting, coil redesign, lower relative humidities, retrofitting, and improved indoor air quality (IAQ). It opens a door for architects, engineers, owners, builders, environmentalists, retrofitters, designers, occupants, and manufacturers. Three things have held up cold air's usage: multiple fan-powered boxes that ate up the energy savings of primary fans. Cold air room diffusers that provided inadequate comfort. Condensation from ducts, boxes, and diffusers. Such problems have been largely eliminated through research and development by utilities and manufacturers. New cold air diffusers no longer need fan powered boxes. It has also been found that condensation is not a concern so long as the ducts are located in air conditioned space, such as drop ceilings or central risers, where relative humidity falls quickly during morning startup.

  6. Spectroscopy with cold and ultra-cold neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abele, Hartmut; Jenke, Tobias; Konrad, Gertrud

    2015-05-01

    We present two new types of spectroscopy methods for cold and ultra-cold neutrons. The first method, which uses the R×B drift effect to disperse charged particles in a uniformly curved magnetic field, allows to study neutron β-decay. We aim for a precision on the 10-4 level. The second method that we refer to as gravity resonance spectroscopy (GRS) allows to test Newton's gravity law at short distances. At the level of precision we are able to provide constraints on any possible gravity-like interaction. In particular, limits on dark energy chameleon fields are improved by several orders of magnitude.

  7. Method of operating a cold cathode-cold reservoir thyratron

    SciTech Connect

    Tauber, A.; Finnegan, R.D.; Rothwarf, F.

    1984-05-22

    A method is disclosed of operating a cold-cathode-cold-reservoir thyratron for laser/radar and other systems employing high voltage and current pulses using ZrVFe as the hydrogen thyratron material. According to the method, a hydride of ZrVFe is first formed and the hydrided material then placed in the cathode structure of the thyratron. The tube is then pumped down to its operating pressure of approximately 10/sup -3/ atmospheres, the hydrided material then acting as a ballast to maintain that partial pressure of hydrogen at room temperature.

  8. Energy distribution among reaction products. IV.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maylotte, D. H.; Polanyi, J. C.; Woodall, K. B.

    1972-01-01

    Use of an infrared chemiluminescence technique, called 'Method II,' or the 'method of arrested relaxation' to measure the distribution of energy among products of the Cl + HI and Cl + DI reactions. Preliminary results are also given for the Br + HI and Cl + HBr reactions. Instead of measuring vibrational relaxation, Method II attempts to arrest vibrational and rotational relaxation by the rapid removal of excited products at a cold surface.

  9. Cluster: A fleet of four spacecraft to study plasma structures in three dimensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, R.; Goldstein, M. L.

    1988-01-01

    The four Cluster spacecraft are spin stabilized spacecraft which are designed and built under stringent requirements as far as electromagnetic cleanliness is concerned. Conductive surfaces and low electromagnetic background noise are mandatory for accurate electric field and cold plasma measurements. The mission is implemented in collaboration between ESA and NASA. A Russian mission will be closely coordinated with Cluster.

  10. Negative ion photoelectron spectroscopic studies of transition metal cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcy, Timothy Paul

    The studies reported in this thesis were performed using a negative ion photoelectron spectrometer consisting of a cold cathode DC discharge ion source, a flowing afterglow ion-molecule reactor, a magnetic sector mass analyzer, an argon ion laser for photodetachment and a hemispherical electron kinetic energy analyzer and microchannel plate detector for photoelectron spectrum generation. The 476.5 nm (2.601 eV), 488.0 nm (2.540 eV) and 514.5 nm (2.410 eV) negative ion photoelectron spectra of VMn are reported and compared to the previously studied spectra of isoelectronic Cr2.1 The photoelectron spectra are remarkably similar to those of Cr2 in electron affinity and vibrational frequencies. The 488.0 nm photoelectron spectra and electron affinities of Nb n- (n = 1 - 9) are reported with discussion of observed vibrational structure. There are transitions to several electronic states of Nb2 in the reported spectra with overlapping vibrational progressions. The spectra of Nb3, Nb4 and Nb6 show partially resolved vibrational structure in the transitions to the lowest observed electronic state of each cluster. There is a single distinct active vibrational mode in the transition to the ground state of Nb8. Spin-orbit energies of Nb- are also reported. The 488.0 nm negative ion photoelectron spectra of Nb3H(D) are reported and compared to those of Nb3. There is a single vibrational mode active in the spectra of Nb3H(D) which is very similar to the most distinct mode active in the spectrum of Nb3. The 488.0 nm photoelectron spectra of the NbxCyH(D) y- (x = 1, 2, 3, y = 2, 4, 6) dehydrogenated products of the reactions of ethylene with niobium cluster anions are reported. Temperature studies of some of these species give evidence for the presence of multiple isomers of each molecule in the ion beam. The spectra of NbC6H(D) 6 are identical to those obtained from the reactions of benzene with niobium clusters and indicate that benzene is being formed from ethylene in the flow

  11. Cold Denaturation Unveiled: Molecular Mechanism of the Asymmetric Unfolding of Yeast Frataxin.

    PubMed

    Sanfelice, Domenico; Morandi, Edoardo; Pastore, Annalisa; Niccolai, Neri; Temussi, Piero Andrea

    2015-12-01

    What is the mechanism that determines the denaturation of proteins at low temperatures, which is, by now, recognized as a fundamental property of all proteins? We present experimental evidence that clarifies the role of specific interactions that favor the entrance of water into the hydrophobic core, a mechanism originally proposed by Privalov but never proved experimentally. By using a combination of molecular dynamics simulation, molecular biology, and biophysics, we identified a cluster of negatively charged residues that represents a preferential gate for the entrance of water molecules into the core. Even single-residue mutations in this cluster, from acidic to neutral residues, affect cold denaturation much more than heat denaturation, suppressing cold denaturation at temperatures above zero degrees. The molecular mechanism of the cold denaturation of yeast frataxin is intrinsically different from that of heat denaturation.

  12. Early dynamical evolution of young substructured clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorval, Julien; Boily, Christian

    2017-03-01

    Stellar clusters form with a high level of substructure, inherited from the molecular cloud and the star formation process. Evidence from observations and simulations also indicate the stars in such young clusters form a subvirial system. The subsequent dynamical evolution can cause important mass loss, ejecting a large part of the birth population in the field. It can also imprint the stellar population and still be inferred from observations of evolved clusters. Nbody simulations allow a better understanding of these early twists and turns, given realistic initial conditions. Nowadays, substructured, clumpy young clusters are usually obtained through pseudo-fractal growth and velocity inheritance. We introduce a new way to create clumpy initial conditions through a ''Hubble expansion'' which naturally produces self consistent clumps, velocity-wise. In depth analysis of the resulting clumps shows consistency with hydrodynamical simulations of young star clusters. We use these initial conditions to investigate the dynamical evolution of young subvirial clusters. We find the collapse to be soft, with hierarchical merging leading to a high level of mass segregation. The subsequent evolution is less pronounced than the equilibrium achieved from a cold collapse formation scenario.

  13. Perspective: Ultracold molecules and the dawn of cold controlled chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balakrishnan, N.

    2016-10-01

    Ultracold molecules offer unprecedented opportunities for the controlled interrogation of molecular events, including chemical reactivity in the ultimate quantum regime. The proliferation of methods to create, cool, and confine them has allowed the investigation of a diverse array of molecular systems and chemical reactions at temperatures where only a single partial wave contributes. Here we present a brief account of recent progress on the experimental and theoretical fronts on cold and ultracold molecules and the opportunities and challenges they provide for a fundamental understanding of bimolecular chemical reaction dynamics.

  14. Incorporating Cold Cap Behavior in a Joule-heated Waste Glass Melter Model

    SciTech Connect

    Varija Agarwal; Donna Post Guillen

    2013-08-01

    In this paper, an overview of Joule-heated waste glass melters used in the vitrification of high level waste (HLW) is presented, with a focus on the cold cap region. This region, in which feed-to-glass conversion reactions occur, is critical in determining the melting properties of any given glass melter. An existing 1D computer model of the cold cap, implemented in MATLAB, is described in detail. This model is a standalone model that calculates cold cap properties based on boundary conditions at the top and bottom of the cold cap. Efforts to couple this cold cap model with a 3D STAR-CCM+ model of a Joule-heated melter are then described. The coupling is being implemented in ModelCenter, a software integration tool. The ultimate goal of this model is to guide the specification of melter parameters that optimize glass quality and production rate.

  15. COLD-SAT dynamic model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Neil S.; Bollenbacher, Gary

    1992-01-01

    This report discusses the development and underlying mathematics of a rigid-body computer model of a proposed cryogenic on-orbit liquid depot storage, acquisition, and transfer spacecraft (COLD-SAT). This model, referred to in this report as the COLD-SAT dynamic model, consists of both a trajectory model and an attitudinal model. All disturbance forces and torques expected to be significant for the actual COLD-SAT spacecraft are modeled to the required degree of accuracy. Control and experimental thrusters are modeled, as well as fluid slosh. The model also computes microgravity disturbance accelerations at any specified point in the spacecraft. The model was developed by using the Boeing EASY5 dynamic analysis package and will run on Apollo, Cray, and other computing platforms.

  16. Evolution of star clusters in a cosmological tidal field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieder, Steven; Ishiyama, Tomoaki; Langelaan, Paul; Makino, Junichiro; McMillan, Stephen L. W.; Portegies Zwart, Simon

    2013-12-01

    We present a method to couple N-body star cluster simulations to a cosmological tidal field, using AMUSE (Astrophysical Multipurpose Software Environment). We apply this method to star clusters embedded in the CosmoGrid dark matter only Lambda cold dark matter simulation. Our star clusters are born at z = 10 (corresponding to an age of the universe of about 500 Myr) by selecting a dark matter particle and initializing a star cluster with 32 000 stars on its location. We then follow the dynamical evolution of the star cluster within the cosmological environment. We compare the evolution of star clusters in two Milky Way size haloes with a different accretion history. The mass-loss of the star clusters is continuous irrespective of the tidal history of the host halo, but major merger events tend to increase the rate of mass-loss. From the selected two dark matter haloes, the halo that experienced the larger number of mergers tends to drive a smaller mass-loss rate from the embedded star clusters, even though the final masses of both haloes are similar. We identify two families of star clusters: native clusters, which become part of the main halo before its final major merger event, and the immigrant clusters, which are accreted upon or after this event; native clusters tend to evaporate more quickly than immigrant clusters. Accounting for the evolution of the dark matter halo causes immigrant star clusters to retain more mass than when the z = 0 tidal field is taken as a static potential. The reason for this is the weaker tidal field experienced by immigrant star clusters before merging with the larger dark matter halo.

  17. Drug Reactions

    MedlinePlus

    Most of the time, medicines make our lives better. They reduce aches and pains, fight infections, and control problems such as high blood pressure or diabetes. But medicines can also cause unwanted reactions. One problem is ...

  18. Avionics Box Cold Plate Damage Prevention

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stambolian, Damon B.; Larchar, Steven W.; Henderson, Gena; Tran, Donald; Barth, Tim

    2012-01-01

    Problem Introduction: 1. Prevent Cold Plate Damage in Space Shuttle. 1a. The number of cold plate problems had increased from an average of 16.5 per/year between 1990 through 2000, to an average of 39.6 per year between 2001through 2005. 1b. Each complete set of 80 cold plates cost approximately $29 million, an average of $362,500 per cold plate. 1c It takes four months to produce a single cold plate. 2. Prevent Cold Plate Damage in Future Space Vehicles.

  19. Accretion and Feedback from Supermassive Black Holes in Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Yu; Bogdanovic, Tamara; Park, KwangHo

    2017-01-01

    A significant fraction of galaxy clusters, namely the cool-core clusters, exhibit a dip in their central temperature profiles, with radiative cooling times much shorter than the Hubble time. Unchecked, radiative cooling of this magnitude is expected to cause the accumulation of cold gas at the cluster center that leads to star formation rates 100-1000 times higher than those inferred by observations. This discrepancy suggests the existence of active heating mechanisms that counteract the overcooling in cluster centers. The dominant mechanism has now been widely recognized as the mechanical feedback from the radio-loud active galactic nuclei. However, recent observations find substantial amounts of cold gas in a number of cool-core clusters, as well as evidence that some clusters host quasars in their central dominant galaxies, raising concerns about the significance of radiative feedback in such systems. Motivated by these findings we use 3D radiation hydrodynamic simulations to explore the joint role of the radio- and quasar-mode feedback in the accretion and feedback cycle of supermassive black holes in cool-core clusters.

  20. Studies of the evolution of the x ray emission of clusters of galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henry, J. Patrick

    1990-01-01

    The x ray luminosity function of clusters of galaxies was determined at different cosmic epoches using data from the Einstein Observatory Extended Medium Survey. The sample consisted of 67 x ray selected clusters that were grouped into three redshift shells. Evolution was detected in the x ray properties of clusters. The present volume density of high luminosity clusters was found to be greater than it was in the past. This result is the first convincing evidence for evolution in the x ray properties of clusters. Investigations into the constraints provided by these data on various Cold Dark Matter models are underway.

  1. The effect of the dynamical state of clusters on gas expulsion and infant mortality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodwin, Simon P.

    2009-12-01

    The star-formation efficiency (SFE) of a star cluster is thought to be the critical factor in determining if the cluster can survive for a significant (>50 Myr) time. There is an often quoted critical SFE of ˜30% for a cluster to survive gas expulsion. I reiterate that the SFE is not the critical factor; rather, it is the dynamical state of the stars (as measured by their virial ratio) immediately before gas expulsion. If the stars in a star cluster are born in an (even slightly) cold dynamical state, then the survivability of a cluster can be greatly increased.

  2. OT2_baltieri_5: Star formation in proto-clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altieri, B.

    2011-09-01

    Massive clusters of galaxies have been found to date from as early as 3-4 billion years after the Big Bang. Cosmological simulations using the current cold dark matter model predict that these systems should descend from 'proto-clusters' - early overdensities of massive galaxies that merge hierarchically to form a cluster. These protocluster regions themselves are built up hierarchically and so are expected to contain extremely massive galaxies, progenitors of the quiescent behemoths observed in cores of the present day massive galaxy clusters. Observational evidence for this picture, however, is sparse because high-redshift proto-clusters are rare and difficult to observe. Here we propose to probe with Herschel SPIRE the very beginning of the cluster and massive galaxies formation process by observing 5 proto-clusters at 3cluster galaxies with those of field galaxies at similar redshift. Determining whether cluster galaxies differ from field galaxies when the proto-cluster was still forming, tells us whether any of the difference observed today is driven by nature as apposed to nurture.

  3. Formation of Globular Clusters in Hierarchical Cosmology: ART and Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnedin, Oleg Y.; Prieto, José L.

    We test the hypothesis that globular clusters form in supergiant molecular clouds within high-redshift galaxies. Numerical simulations demonstrate that such large, dense, and cold gas clouds assemble naturally in current hierarchical models of galaxy formation. These clouds are enriched with heavy elements from earlier stars and could produce star clusters in a similar way to nearby molecular clouds. The masses and sizes of the model clusters are in excellent agreement with the observations of young massive clusters. Do these model clusters evolve into globular clusters that we see in our and external galaxies? In order to study their dynamical evolution, we calculate the orbits of model clusters using the outputs of the cosmological simulation of a Milky Way-sized galaxy. We find that at present the orbits are isotropic in the inner 50 kpc of the Galaxy and preferentially radial at larger distances. All clusters located outside 10 kpc from the center formed in the now-disrupted satellite galaxies. The spatial distribution of model clusters is spheroidal, with a power-law density profile consistent with observations. The combination of two-body scattering, tidal shocks, and stellar evolution results in the evolution of the cluster mass function from an initial power law to the observed log-normal distribution. However, not all initial conditions and not all evolution scenarios are consistent with the observed mass function.

  4. "Stone Cold": Worthy of Study?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Douthwaite, Alison

    2015-01-01

    This article draws on my experiences of teaching "Stone Cold" to respond to a blog post suggesting that the novel holds little educational value. I argue that the novel's narrative style helps to foster criticality while its subject matter can help students see the relevance of literature to the world around them. Relating this to…

  5. Underwater cold tap machine tested

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-05-01

    Tests are complete on a strategic cold tap machine for underwater lines. The system was designed around Total's Norway-UK Frigg gas line. It provides a permanent, easily mobilized, mechanical insurance against damage to the Frigg line but also provides a proven, workable principle for the repair or modification of other lines. The design of the system is discussed.

  6. Cold plasma decontamination of foods

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cold plasma is a novel nonthermal food processing technology which uses energetic, reactive gases to inactivate contaminating microbes on meats, poultry and fruits and vegetables. This flexible sanitizing method uses electricity and a carrier gas such as air, oxygen, nitrogen or helium; antimicrobi...

  7. Advances in cold plasma technology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Foodborne pathogens continue to be an issue on a variety of commodities, prompting research into novel interventions. Cold plasma is a nonthermal food processing technology which uses energetic, reactive gases to inactivate contaminating microbes on meats, poultry and fruits and vegetables. The prim...

  8. The Cold Blooded Killer: Hypothermia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keller, Rosanne

    Part of a series of home literacy readers with conversational text and sketches, this booklet depicts the subarctic Alaskan environment where cold makes extreme demands on body metabolism. Body temperature must be maintained above 80F (26.7C). A condition of too little body-heat is termed hypo- ('deficit') thermia ('heat'). Hypothermia is the…

  9. In honour of N. Yngve Öhrn: surveying proton cancer therapy reactions with Öhrn's electron nuclear dynamics method. Aqueous clusters radiolysis and DNA-base damage by proton collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mclaurin, Patrick M.; Privett, Austin J.; Stopera, Christopher; Grimes, Thomas V.; Perera, Ajith; Morales, Jorge A.

    2015-02-01

    Proton cancer therapy (PCT) utilises high-energy H+ projectiles to cure cancer. PCT healing arises from its DNA damage in cancerous cells, which is mostly inflicted by the products from PCT water radiolysis reactions. While clinically established, a complete microscopic understanding of PCT remains elusive. To help in the microscopic elucidation of PCT, Professor Öhrn's simplest-level electron nuclear dynamics (SLEND) method is herein applied to H+ + (H2O)3-4 and H+ + DNA-bases at ELab = 1.0 keV. These are two types of computationally feasible prototypes to study water radiolysis reactions and H+-induced DNA damage, respectively. SLEND is a time-dependent, variational, non-adiabatic and direct-dynamics method that adopts a nuclear classical-mechanics description and an electronic single-determinantal wavefunction. Additionally, our SLEND + effective-core-potential method is herein employed to simulate some computationally demanding PCT reactions. Due to these attributes, SLEND proves appropriate for the simulation of various types of PCT reactions accurately and feasibly. H+ + (H2O)3-4 simulations reveal two main processes: H+ projectile scattering and the simultaneous formation of H and OH fragments; the latter process is quantified through total integrals cross sections. H+ + DNA-base simulations reveal atoms and groups displacements, ring openings and base-to-proton electron transfers as predominant damage processes. The authors warmly dedicate this SLEND investigation in honour of Professor N. Yngve Öhrn on the occasion of his 80th birthday celebration during the 54th Sanibel Symposium in St. Simons' Island, Georgia, on February 16-21, 2014. Associate Professor Jorge A. Morales was a former chemistry PhD student under the mentorship of Professor Öhrn and Dr Ajith Perera took various quantum chemistry courses taught by Professor Öhrn during his chemistry PhD studies. Both Jorge and Ajith look back to those great times of their scientific formation under

  10. Hexaruthenium carbonyl cluster complexes with basal edge-bridged square pyramidal metallic skeleton: efficient synthesis of 2-imidopyridine derivatives and determination of their reactive sites in carbonyl substitution reactions.

    PubMed

    Cabeza, Javier A; del Río, Ignacio; García-Alvarez, Pablo; Miguel, Daniel; Riera, Víctor

    2004-08-23

    The reactions of [Ru(3)(CO)(12)] with half equivalent of 2-amino-6-methylpyridine (H(2)ampy) or 2-aminopyridine (H(2)apy) in refluxing xylene give the hexanuclear products [Ru(6)(mu(3)-H)(2)(mu(5)-eta(2)-L)(mu-CO)(2)(CO)(14)] (L = ampy, 1; apy, 2). These reactions represent the first high-yield syntheses of hexanuclear complexes with a basal edge-bridged square pyramidal metallic skeleton. Five metal atoms of these complexes are bridged by the N-donor ligand in such a way that the edge-bridging metal atom is attached to the pyridine nitrogen, while the basal atoms of the square pyramid are capped by an imido fragment that arises from the activation of both N-H bonds of the NH(2) group. The reactive sites of these complexes in CO substitution reactions have been determined by studying the reactivity of 1 with triphenylphosphine. Two kinetically controlled monosubstitutions take place on the edge-bridging metal atom in positions cis to the pyridine nitrogen, leading to a mixture of two isomers of formula [Ru(6)(mu(3)-H)(2)(mu(5)-eta(2)-ampy)(mu-CO)(2)(CO)(13)(PPh(3))] (3 and 4). On heating at 80 degrees C, these monosubstituted isomers are transformed, via a dissociative pathway, into the product of thermodynamic control (5), which has the PPh(3) ligand on the apical Ru atom. The di- and trisubstituted derivatives [Ru(6)(mu(3)-H)(2)(mu(5)-eta(2)-ampy)(mu-CO)(2)(CO)(12)(PPh(3))(2)] (6) and [Ru(6)(mu(3)-H)(2)(mu(5)-eta(2)-ampy)(mu-CO)(2)(CO)(11)(PPh(3))(3)] (7) are stepwise formed from 3-5 and PPh(3). Compound 6 has the PPh(3) ligands on the edge-bridging and apical Ru atoms, and compound 7 has an additional PPh(3) ligand on an unbridged basal Ru atom. The compound [Ru(6)(mu(3)-H)(2)(mu(5)-eta(2)-ampy)(mu-CO)(2)(CO)(12)(mu-dppm)] (8), in which a basal and the apical Ru atoms are spanned by the dppm ligand, has been isolated from the reaction of 1 with bis(diphenylphosphino)methane.

  11. EDITORIAL: Cold Quantum GasesEditorial: Cold Quantum Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vassen, W.; Hemmerich, A.; Arimondo, E.

    2003-04-01

    This Special Issue of Journal of Optics B: Quantum and Semiclassical Optics brings together the contributions of various researchers working on theoretical and experimental aspects of cold quantum gases. Different aspects of atom optics, matter wave interferometry, laser manipulation of atoms and molecules, and production of very cold and degenerate gases are presented. The variety of subjects demonstrates the steadily expanding role associated with this research area. The topics discussed in this issue, extending from basic physics to applications of atom optics and of cold atomic samples, include: bulletBose--Einstein condensation bulletFermi degenerate gases bulletCharacterization and manipulation of quantum gases bulletCoherent and nonlinear cold matter wave optics bulletNew schemes for laser cooling bulletCoherent cold molecular gases bulletUltra-precise atomic clocks bulletApplications of cold quantum gases to metrology and spectroscopy bulletApplications of cold quantum gases to quantum computing bulletNanoprobes and nanolithography. This special issue is published in connection with the 7th International Workshop on Atom Optics and Interferometry, held in Lunteren, The Netherlands, from 28 September to 2 October 2002. This was the last in a series of Workshops organized with the support of the European Community that have greatly contributed to progress in this area. The scientific part of the Workshop was managed by A Hemmerich, W Hogervorst, W Vassen and J T M Walraven, with input from members of the International Programme Committee who are listed below. The practical aspects of the organization were ably handled by Petra de Gijsel from the Vrije Universiteit in Amsterdam. The Workshop was funded by the European Science Foundation (programme BEC2000+), the European Networks 'Cold Quantum Gases (CQG)', coordinated by E Arimondo, and 'Cold Atoms and Ultraprecise Atomic Clocks (CAUAC)', coordinated by J Henningsen, by the German Physical Society (DFG), by

  12. Reaction of the C{sub 3}(X{sup 1}Σ{sub g}{sup +}) carbon cluster with H{sub 2}S(X{sup 1}A{sub 1}), hydrogen sulfide: Photon-induced formation of C{sub 3}S, tricarbon sulfur

    SciTech Connect

    Roehr, Nathan P.; Szczepanski, Jan; Fu, Yi; Polfer, Nicolas C.; Vala, Martin

    2014-11-28

    In this paper we report on the neutral-neutral reaction of the C{sub 3} carbon cluster with H{sub 2}S in solid inert argon at 12 K, conditions that mimic, in part, the surfaces of interstellar grains. In the first step of the reaction, a C{sub 3}•H{sub 2}S complex is formed via an almost barrierless entrance addition mechanism. This complex, stabilized by an estimated 7.45 kJ/mol (CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pVTZ//B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) level), is formed by the interaction of a terminal carbon of C{sub 3} with a hydrogen in H{sub 2}S. This con-covalent complex displays a band at 2044.1 cm{sup −1} observed via Fourier transform infrared absorption spectroscopy. With the help of the MP2/aug-ccpVDZ level method, this band is assigned to the CC asymmetric vibration mode. When the complex is exposed to UV-visible photons (hν < 5.5 eV) the tricarbon sulfur C{sub 3}S molecule is identified, based on the appearance of a characteristic CC stretching band at 2047.5 cm{sup −1}. Calculated ground-state potential energy surfaces also confirm the concomitant formation of molecular H{sub 2}. This facile reaction pathway involves an attainable transition state of 174.4 kJ/mol. Conversely, competing lower-energy reaction pathways that would lead to the generation of H{sub 2}C{sub 3}S (propadienethione), or C{sub 2}H{sub 2} (acetylene) and CS, involve much more complex, multi-stage pathways, and are not observed experimentally.

  13. PREFACE: Nuclear Cluster Conference; Cluster'07

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freer, Martin

    2008-05-01

    The Cluster Conference is a long-running conference series dating back to the 1960's, the first being initiated by Wildermuth in Bochum, Germany, in 1969. The most recent meeting was held in Nara, Japan, in 2003, and in 2007 the 9th Cluster Conference was held in Stratford-upon-Avon, UK. As the name suggests the town of Stratford lies upon the River Avon, and shortly before the conference, due to unprecedented rainfall in the area (approximately 10 cm within half a day), lay in the River Avon! Stratford is the birthplace of the `Bard of Avon' William Shakespeare, and this formed an intriguing conference backdrop. The meeting was attended by some 90 delegates and the programme contained 65 70 oral presentations, and was opened by a historical perspective presented by Professor Brink (Oxford) and closed by Professor Horiuchi (RCNP) with an overview of the conference and future perspectives. In between, the conference covered aspects of clustering in exotic nuclei (both neutron and proton-rich), molecular structures in which valence neutrons are exchanged between cluster cores, condensates in nuclei, neutron-clusters, superheavy nuclei, clusters in nuclear astrophysical processes and exotic cluster decays such as 2p and ternary cluster decay. The field of nuclear clustering has become strongly influenced by the physics of radioactive beam facilities (reflected in the programme), and by the excitement that clustering may have an important impact on the structure of nuclei at the neutron drip-line. It was clear that since Nara the field had progressed substantially and that new themes had emerged and others had crystallized. Two particular topics resonated strongly condensates and nuclear molecules. These topics are thus likely to be central in the next cluster conference which will be held in 2011 in the Hungarian city of Debrechen. Martin Freer Participants and Cluster'07

  14. Cold Stress and Urinary Frequency.

    PubMed

    Ishizuka, Osamu; Imamura, Tetsuya; Nishizawa, Osamu

    2012-03-01

    There have been few studies regarding the onset of urinary sensations and frequent urination induced by sudden whole-body cooling. In this article, we review the relationship between cold stress and urinary frequency based mainly on our previous studies. A recent study showed that cold stress induces bladder overactivity in conscious rats, and these effects were mediated, at least in part, by α1A -adrenergic receptor (AR) and α1D -AR. Another study suggested that the resiniferatoxin-sensitive nerves present in the urinary bladder may also be involved in the regulation of detrusor activity associated with cold stress. The mammalian transient receptor potential (TRP) channel family consists of 28 channels subdivided into five different classes: TRPV (vanilloid), TRPC (canonical), TRPM (melastatin), TRPML (mucolipin), and TRPA (ankyrin). TRP channels function as multifunctional sensors at the cellular level. They can be activated by physical (voltage, heat, cold, mechanical stress) or chemical stimuli and binding of specific ligands. In 2002, it was reported that a nonselective cation channel, TRPM8, could be activated by both menthol and thermal stimuli (8-28 °C). We demonstrated the presence of TRPM8 in the skin from the legs and back of rats by immunofluorescence staining and that stimulation of this receptor by menthol causes urinary frequency. There have been other reports demonstrating roles of TRPM8 not related to its thermosensory function. Further studies are needed to clarify the mechanism of cold stress-induced urinary frequency, and the roles of TRPM8 in the micturition control system.

  15. Coughs and Colds: Medicines or Home Remedies?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Issues Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Coughs and Colds: Medicines or Home Remedies? Page Content Article Body ​Medicines Over-the-counter (OTC) cough and cold medicines can cause serious side effects ...

  16. [The skin, cold and winter sports].

    PubMed

    Claes, G; Henry, F; Letawe, C; Piérard, G E

    2001-04-01

    Winter sports are responsible for various dermatoses which could be often avoided by simple preventive procedures. Both the severity and duration of cold exposure combined with wind speed, altitude and environmental hygrometric value govern the potential types of cold injuries.

  17. Cold Medicines for Kids: What's the Risk?

    MedlinePlus

    ... or difficult breathing. There's no cure for the common cold, but you can help your child feel better ... Pediatrics; 2009:1934. Pappas DE, et al. The common cold in children: Management and prevention. http://www.uptodate. ...

  18. Zinc for Colds: The Final Word?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Eby GA, et al. Reduction in duration of common colds by zinc gluconate lozenges in a double-blind ... 2014;28:4. Sexton DJ, et al. The common cold in adults: Treatment and prevention. http://www.uptodate. ...

  19. Vitamin C and the Common Cold Revisited.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Travis, H. Richard

    1984-01-01

    Various studies indicate that Vitamin C does not prevent or cure a cold, but it may ameliorate symptoms in some individuals. The development of a balanced life-style is more effective towards cold prevention. (DF)

  20. Common cold - how to treat at home

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000466.htm Common cold - how to treat at home To use the ... Antibiotics are almost never needed to treat a common cold. Acetaminophen (Tylenol) and ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin) help lower ...

  1. Photosynthesis-dependent physiological and genetic crosstalk between cold acclimation and cold-induced resistance to fungal pathogens in triticale (Triticosecale Wittm.).

    PubMed

    Szechyńska-Hebda, Magdalena; Wąsek, Iwona; Gołębiowska-Pikania, Gabriela; Dubas, Ewa; Żur, Iwona; Wędzony, Maria

    2015-04-01

    The breeding for resistance against fungal pathogens in winter triticale (Triticosecale Wittm.) continues to be hindered by a complexity of the resistance mechanisms, strong interaction with environmental conditions, and dependence on the plant genotype. We showed, that temperature below 4 °C induced the plant genotype-dependent resistance against the fungal pathogen Microdochium nivale. The mechanism involved, at least, the adjustment of the reactions in the PSII proximity and photoprotection, followed by an improvement of the growth and development. The genotypes capable to develop the cold-induced resistance, showed a higher maximum quantum yield of PSII and a more efficient integration of the primary photochemistry of light reactions with the dark reactions. Moreover, induction of the photoprotective mechanism, involving at least the peroxidases scavenging hydrogen peroxide, was observed for such genotypes. Adjustment of the photosynthesis and stress acclimation has enabled fast plant growth and avoidance of the developmental stages sensitive to fungal infection. The same mechanisms allowed the quick regrow of plants during the post-disease period. In contrast, genotypes that were unable to develop resistance despite cold hardening had less flexible balancing of the photoprotection and photoinhibition processes. Traits related to: photosynthesis-dependent cold-acclimation and cold-induced resistance; biomass accumulation and growth; as well as protection system involving peroxidases; were integrated also at a genetic level. Analysing 95 lines of the mapping population SaKa3006×Modus we determined region on chromosomes 5B and 7R shared within all tested traits. Moreover, similar expression pattern of a set of the genes related to PSII was determined with the metaanalysis of the multiple microarray experiments. Comparable results for peroxidases, involving APXs and GPXs and followed by PRXs, indicated a similar function during cold acclimation and defense

  2. Formation and decay of the compound nucleus *220Th within the dynamical cluster-decay model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemdeep, Chopra, Sahila; Kaur, Arshdeep; Gupta, Raj K.

    2017-01-01

    Background: The radioactive *220Th compound nucleus (CN) is of interest since the evaporation residue (ER) cross sections are available for various entrance channels 16O+204Pb , 40Ar+180Hf , 48Ca+172Yb , and 82Se+138Ba at near barrier energies. Within the dynamical cluster-decay model (DCM), the radioactive CNs *215Fr, *242Pu, *246Bk, and *254Fm are studied where the main decay mode is fission, with very small predicted ER cross section. *220Th provides a first case with experimentally observed ER cross section instead of fission. Purpose: To look for the optimum "hot-compact" target-projectile (t-p) combinations for the synthesis of "cold"*. For best fitting of the measured ER cross sections, with quasifission (qf) content, if any, the fusion-fission (ff) component is predicted. The magic-shell structure and entrance channel mass-asymmetry effects are analyzed, and the behavior of CN formation and survival probabilities PCN and Psurv is studied. Methods: The quantum-mechanical fragmentation theory (QMFT) is used to predict the possible cold t-p combinations for synthesizing *220Th, and the QMFT-based DCM is used to analyze its decay channels for the experimentally studied entrance channels. The only parameter of the model, the neck length Δ R , varies smoothly with the excitation energy E* of CN and is used to best fit the ER data and predict qf and ff cross sections. Results: The hot-compact and "cold-elongated" fragmentation paths show dissimilar results, whose comparisons with measured fission yields result in t-p combinations, the cold reaction valleys. For the decay process, the fixed Δ R fit the measured ER cross section nicely, but not the individual decay-channel cross sections, which require the presence of qf effects, less so for asymmetric t-p combinations, and large (predicted) ff cross section. Conclusions: The calculated yields for hot-compact fragmentation path compared favorably with the observed asymmetric fission-mass distribution, resulting in

  3. Global identification of the genetic networks and cis-regulatory elements of the cold response in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Peng; Liu, Mingli; Zhang, Dong; Wang, Jinfeng; Niu, Hongbo; Liu, Yimeng; Wu, Zhichao; Han, Bingshe; Zhai, Wanying; Shen, Yu; Chen, Liangbiao

    2015-01-01

    The transcriptional programs of ectothermic teleosts are directly influenced by water temperature. However, the cis- and trans-factors governing cold responses are not well characterized. We profiled transcriptional changes in eight zebrafish tissues exposed to mildly and severely cold temperatures using RNA-Seq. A total of 1943 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified, from which 34 clusters representing distinct tissue and temperature response expression patterns were derived using the k-means fuzzy clustering algorithm. The promoter regions of the clustered DEGs that demonstrated strong co-regulation were analysed for enriched cis-regulatory elements with a motif discovery program, DREME. Seventeen motifs, ten known and seven novel, were identified, which covered 23% of the DEGs. Two motifs predicted to be the binding sites for the transcription factors Bcl6 and Jun, respectively, were chosen for experimental verification, and they demonstrated the expected cold-induced and cold-repressed patterns of gene regulation. Protein interaction modeling of the network components followed by experimental validation suggested that Jun physically interacts with Bcl6 and might be a hub factor that orchestrates the cold response in zebrafish. Thus, the methodology used and the regulatory networks uncovered in this study provide a foundation for exploring the mechanisms of cold adaptation in teleosts. PMID:26227973

  4. Galaxy clustering on large scales.

    PubMed Central

    Efstathiou, G

    1993-01-01

    I describe some recent observations of large-scale structure in the galaxy distribution. The best constraints come from two-dimensional galaxy surveys and studies of angular correlation functions. Results from galaxy redshift surveys are much less precise but are consistent with the angular correlations, provided the distortions in mapping between real-space and redshift-space are relatively weak. The galaxy two-point correlation function, rich-cluster two-point correlation function, and galaxy-cluster cross-correlation function are all well described on large scales ( greater, similar 20h-1 Mpc, where the Hubble constant, H0 = 100h km.s-1.Mpc; 1 pc = 3.09 x 10(16) m) by the power spectrum of an initially scale-invariant, adiabatic, cold-dark-matter Universe with Gamma = Omegah approximately 0.2. I discuss how this fits in with the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) satellite detection of large-scale anisotropies in the microwave background radiation and other measures of large-scale structure in the Universe. PMID:11607400

  5. The cold equation of state of tantalum

    SciTech Connect

    Greeff, Carl W; Rudin, Sven P; Corckett, Scott D; Wills, John M

    2009-01-01

    In high-pressure isentropic compression experiments (ICE), the pressure is dominated by the cold curve. In order to obtain an accurate semi-empirical cold curve for Ta, we calculate the thermal pressure from ab initio phonon and electronic excitation spectra. The cold curve is then inferred from ultrasonic and shock data. Our empirical cold pressure is compared to density functional calculations and found to be closer to GGA results at low pressure and to approach LDA at high pressure.

  6. Cold Tolerance of Plants Used for Cold-Regions Revegetation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-10-01

    also interact among themselves. Evaporation, insolation (sunlight), soil-forming processes, soil microbiota , plant Leaf chlorosis cadfrost banding...that can etation applications. cold harden will do so with 10-14 days of exposure to Soluble carbohydrates depress freezing points and temperatures...water, melting point depression , and tissue Belding, R.D. and E. Young (1987) Shoot and root water content. Botanical Gazette, 137: 313-317. temperature

  7. Different types of cold adaptation in humans.

    PubMed

    Makinen, Tiina Maria

    2010-06-01

    Human adaptation to cold may occur through acclimatization or acclimation and includes genetic, physiologic, morphological or behavioural responses. It has been studied in indigenous populations, during polar or ski expeditions, sporting activities, military training, in urban people, or under controlled conditions involving exposures to cold air or water. Although divergent results exist between the studies, the main cold adaptation responses are either insulative (circulatory adjustments, increase of fat layer) or metabolic (shivering or nonshivering thermogenesis) and may be positive (enhanced) or negative (blunted). The pattern of cold adaptation is dependent on the type (air, water) and intensity (continuous, intermittent) of the cold exposure. In addition, several individual factors like age, sex, body composition, exercise, diet, fitness and health modify the responses to cold. Habituation of thermal sensations to cold develops first, followed by cardiovascular, metabolic and endocrinological responses. If the repeated cold stimulus is discontinued, adaptation will gradually disappear. The functional significance of physiological cold adaptation is unclear, and some of the responses can even be harmful and predispose to cold injuries. The article summarises recent research information concerning with the thermoregulatory responses related to repeated exposures to cold (air or water), and also discusses the determinants of cold adaptation, as well as its functional significance.

  8. Common Cold in Babies: Symptoms and Causes

    MedlinePlus

    Common cold in babies Symptoms and causes By Mayo Clinic Staff Symptoms The first indication of the common cold in a baby is often: A congested or ... or green Other signs and symptoms of a common cold in a baby may include: Fever Sneezing Coughing ...

  9. Delayed-type hypersensitivity, contact sensitivity, and phytohemagglutinin skin-test responses of heat- and cold-stressed calves.

    PubMed

    Kelley, K W; Greenfield, R E; Evermann, J F; Parish, S M; Perryman, L E

    1982-05-01

    Three-week-old Holstein bull calves were used to investigate the effect of a 2-week chronic heat (35 C) or cold (-5 C) exposure on delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) reactions to purified protein derivative after sensitization with heat-killed Mycobacterium tuberculosis, contact sensitivity (CS) reactions to 1-fluoro-2,4-dinitrobenzene, and phytohemagglutinin (PHA) skin tests. Heat exposure reduced expression of DTH reactions by 42% and CS reactions by 38% at 24 hours after elicitation of the responses. The PHA-induced skin tests were not affected after 1 week of heat exposure, but this reaction was reduced by 20% after 2 weeks of heat exposure. The immune response of calves exposed to cold air temperatures was more complex. Cold exposure suppressed CS reactions by 39% at the end of both the 1st and 2nd weeks. The PHA response was reduced by 39% after 2 weeks of cold exposure. The DTH response depended on duration of cold exposure. The DTH reaction was increased by 42% after 1 week, but was reduced by 14% after 2 weeks. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that environmental stressors alter host resistance by affecting the immune system. Furthermore, these stress-induced changes in immune events depend on the type of immune response, the nature of the environmental stressor, and the length of time that calves are exposed to the stressor.

  10. 77 FR 43117 - Meeting of the Cold War Advisory Committee for the Cold War Theme Study

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-23

    ... National Park Service Meeting of the Cold War Advisory Committee for the Cold War Theme Study AGENCY... with the Federal Advisory Committee Act, 5 U.S.C. Appendix, that the Cold War Advisory Committee for the Cold War Theme Study will conduct a teleconference meeting on August 3, 2012. Members of...

  11. Cluster of Legionnaires disease in a newly built block of flats, Denmark, December 2008 - January 2009.

    PubMed

    Krøjgaard, L H; Krogfelt, K A; Albrechtsen, H J; Uldum, S A

    2011-01-06

    During December 2008 to January 2009, two persons contracted Legionnaires’ disease in a newly built block of flats in a suburb of Copenhagen in Denmark. Polymerase chain reaction and culture was used to diagnose Legionnaires’ disease in this cluster. Isolates from both patients tested positive for Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 subgroup Philadelphia sequence type 1 and the same strain was detected in hot water samples taken from the residential area indicating that the hot water supply system was the most likely source of infection. Legionella was not detected in the cold water. Two interventions were conducted to limit the Legionella colonisation of the piping and storage tanks and the effect was monitored by investigating water samples from various sites in the block of flats. Only the second intervention had a sufficient effect on the Legionella colonisation. The cluster described here points to several risk factors regarding growth of Legionella in hot water systems: (i) stagnancy of water from when the building is constructed and piping installed and until residents move in, (ii) stagnancy and low temperature (from room temperature to approximately 38°C) of water in shower hoses and (iii) failure in operation of and control measures for the hot water system.

  12. Hot outflows in galaxy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirkpatrick, C. C.; McNamara, B. R.

    2015-10-01

    The gas-phase metallicity distribution has been analysed for the hot atmospheres of 29 galaxy clusters using Chandra X-ray Observatory observations. All host brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) with X-ray cavity systems produced by radio AGN. We find high elemental abundances projected preferentially along the cavities of 16 clusters. The metal-rich plasma was apparently lifted out of the BCGs with the rising X-ray cavities (bubbles) to altitudes between twenty and several hundred kiloparsecs. A relationship between the maximum projected altitude of the uplifted gas (the `iron radius') and jet power is found with the form R_Fe ∝ P_jet^{0.45}. The estimated outflow rates are typically tens of solar masses per year but exceed 100 M⊙ yr- 1 in the most powerful AGN. The outflow rates are 10-20 per cent of the cooling rates, and thus alone are unable to offset a cooling inflow. Nevertheless, hot outflows effectively redistribute the cooling gas and may play a significant role at regulating star formation and AGN activity in BCGs and presumably in giant elliptical galaxies. The metallicity distribution overall can be complex, perhaps due to metal-rich gas returning in circulation flows or being blown around in the hot atmospheres. Roughly 15 per cent of the work done by the cavities is expended lifting the metal-enriched gas, implying their nuclear black holes have increased in mass by at least ˜107-109 M⊙. Finally, we show that hot outflows can account for the broad, gas-phase metallicity distribution compared to the stellar light profiles of BCGs, and we consider a possible connection between hot outflows and cold molecular gas flows discovered in recent Atacama Large Millimeter Array observations.

  13. Allergic Reactions

    MedlinePlus

    ... that is right for you. In many instances, allergy immunotherapy in the form of shots or tablets is an effective, cost-efficient long term treatment approach. While there is not yet ... Healthy Tips • Allergy symptoms are the result of a chain reaction ...

  14. Gold-bismuth clusters.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Ana

    2014-08-07

    Metal clusters have interesting characteristics, such as the relationship between properties and size of the cluster. This is not always apparent, so theoretical studies can provide relevant information. In this report, optimized structures and electron donor-acceptor properties of AunBim clusters are reported (n + m = 2-7, 20). Density functional theory calculations were performed to obtain optimized structures. The ground states of gold clusters formed with up to seven atoms are planar. The presence of Bi modifies the structure, and the clusters become 3-D. Several optimized geometries have at least one Bi atom bonded to gold or bismuth atoms and form structures similar to NH3. This fragment is also present in clusters with 20 atoms, where the formation of Au3Bi stabilizes the structures. Bismuth clusters are better electron donors and worse electron acceptors than gold clusters. Mixed clusters fall in between these two extremes. The presence of Bi atoms in gold clusters modifies the electron donor-acceptor properties of the clusters, but there is no correlation between the number of Bi atoms present in the cluster and the capacity for donating electrons. The effect of planarity in Au19Bi clusters is the same as that in Au20 clusters. The properties of pure gold clusters are certainly interesting, but clusters formed by Bi and Au are more important because the introduction of different atoms modifies the geometry, the stability, and consequently the physical and chemical properties. Apparently, the presence of Bi may increase the reactivity of gold clusters, but further studies are necessary to corroborate this hypothesis.

  15. The Richness Dependence of Galaxy Cluster Correlations: Results From A Redshift Survey Of Rich APM Clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Croft, R. A. C.; Dalton, G. B.; Efstathiou, G.; Sutherland, W. J.; Maddox, S. J.

    1997-01-01

    We analyze the spatial clustering properties of a new catalog of very rich galaxy clusters selected from the APM Galaxy Survey. These clusters are of comparable richness and space density to Abell Richness Class greater than or equal to 1 clusters, but selected using an objective algorithm from a catalog demonstrably free of artificial inhomogeneities. Evaluation of the two-point correlation function xi(sub cc)(r) for the full sample and for richer subsamples reveals that the correlation amplitude is consistent with that measured for lower richness APM clusters and X-ray selected clusters. We apply a maximum likelihood estimator to find the best fitting slope and amplitude of a power law fit to x(sub cc)(r), and to estimate the correlation length r(sub 0) (the value of r at which xi(sub cc)(r) is equal to unity). For clusters with a mean space density of 1.6 x 10(exp -6) h(exp 3) MpC(exp -3) (equivalent to the space density of Abell Richness greater than or equal to 2 clusters), we find r(sub 0) = 21.3(+11.1/-9.3) h(exp -1) Mpc (95% confidence limits). This is consistent with the weak richness dependence of xi(sub cc)(r) expected in Gaussian models of structure formation. In particular, the amplitude of xi(sub cc)(r) at all richnesses matches that of xi(sub cc)(r) for clusters selected in N-Body simulations of a low density Cold Dark Matter model.

  16. Anthranilate degradation by a cold-adapted Pseudomonas sp.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dockyu; Yoo, Miyoun; Kim, Eungbin; Hong, Soon Gyu

    2015-03-01

    An alpine soil bacterium Pseudomonas sp. strain PAMC 25931 was characterized as eurypsychrophilic (both psychrophilic and mesotolerant) with a broad temperature range of 5-30 °C both for anthranilate (2-aminobenzoate) degradation and concomitant cell growth. Two degradative gene clusters (antABC and catBCA) were detected from a fosmid clone in the PAMC 25931 genomic library; each cluster was confirmed to be specifically induced by anthranilate. When expressed in Escherichia coli, the recombinant AntABC (anthranilate 1,2-dioxygenase, AntDO) converted anthranilate into catechol, exhibiting strict specificity toward anthranilate. Recombinant CatA (catechol 1,2-dioxygenase, C12O) from the organism was active over a broad temperature range (5-37 °C). However, CatA rapidly lost the enzyme activity when incubated at above 25 °C. For example, 1 h-preincubation at 37 °C resulted in 100% loss of enzyme activity, while a counterpart from mesophilic Pseudomonas putida mt-2 did not show any negative effect on the initial enzyme activity. These results suggest that CatA is a new cold-adapted thermolabile enzyme, which might be a product through the adaptation process of PAMC 25931 to naturally cold environments and contribute to its ability to grow on anthranilate there.

  17. Tabletop nucleosynthesis driven by cluster Coulomb explosion.

    PubMed

    Last, Isidore; Jortner, Joshua

    2006-10-27

    Coulomb explosion of completely ionized (CH4)n, (NH3)n, and (H2O)n clusters will drive tabletop nuclear reactions of protons with 12C6+, 14N7+, and 16O8+ nuclei, extending the realm of nuclear reactions driven by ultraintense laser-heterocluster interaction. The realization for nucleosynthesis in exploding cluster beams requires complete electron stripping from the clusters (at laser intensities I(M) > or = 10(19) W cm(-2)), the utilization of nanodroplets of radius 300-700 A for vertical ionization, and the attainment of the highest energies for the nuclei (i.e., approximately 30 MeV for heavy nuclei and approximately 3 MeV for protons).

  18. Cold dark matter heats up.

    PubMed

    Pontzen, Andrew; Governato, Fabio

    2014-02-13

    A principal discovery in modern cosmology is that standard model particles comprise only 5 per cent of the mass-energy budget of the Universe. In the ΛCDM paradigm, the remaining 95 per cent consists of dark energy (Λ) and cold dark matter. ΛCDM is being challenged by its apparent inability to explain the low-density 'cores' of dark matter measured at the centre of galaxies, where centrally concentrated high-density 'cusps' were predicted. But before drawing conclusions, it is necessary to include the effect of gas and stars, historically seen as passive components of galaxies. We now understand that these can inject heat energy into the cold dark matter through a coupling based on rapid gravitational potential fluctuations, explaining the observed low central densities.

  19. Ultra-cold molecule production.

    SciTech Connect

    Ramirez-Serrano, Jamie; Chandler, David W.; Strecker, Kevin; Rahn, Larry A.

    2005-12-01

    The production of Ultra-cold molecules is a goal of many laboratories through out the world. Here we are pursuing a unique technique that utilizes the kinematics of atomic and molecular collisions to achieve the goal of producing substantial numbers of sub Kelvin molecules confined in a trap. Here a trap is defined as an apparatus that spatially localizes, in a known location in the laboratory, a sample of molecules whose temperature is below one degree absolute Kelvin. Further, the storage time for the molecules must be sufficient to measure and possibly further cool the molecules. We utilize a technique unique to Sandia to form cold molecules from near mass degenerate collisions between atoms and molecules. This report describes the progress we have made using this novel technique and the further progress towards trapping molecules we have cooled.

  20. Subaru Weak Lensing Measurements of Four Strong Lensing Clusters: Are Lensing Clusters Over-Concentrated?

    SciTech Connect

    Oguri, Masamune; Hennawi, Joseph F.; Gladders, Michael D.; Dahle, Haakon; Natarajan, Priyamvada; Dalal, Neal; Koester, Benjamin P.; Sharon, Keren; Bayliss, Matthew

    2009-01-29

    We derive radial mass profiles of four strong lensing selected clusters which show prominent giant arcs (Abell 1703, SDSS J1446+3032, SDSS J1531+3414, and SDSS J2111-0115), by combining detailed strong lens modeling with weak lensing shear measured from deep Subaru Suprime-cam images. Weak lensing signals are detected at high significance for all four clusters, whose redshifts range from z = 0.28 to 0.64. We demonstrate that adding strong lensing information with known arc redshifts significantly improves constraints on the mass density profile, compared to those obtained from weak lensing alone. While the mass profiles are well fitted by the universal form predicted in N-body simulations of the {Lambda}-dominated cold dark matter model, all four clusters appear to be slightly more centrally concentrated (the concentration parameters c{sub vir} {approx} 8) than theoretical predictions, even after accounting for the bias toward higher concentrations inherent in lensing selected samples. Our results are consistent with previous studies which similarly detected a concentration excess, and increases the total number of clusters studied with the combined strong and weak lensing technique to ten. Combining our sample with previous work, we find that clusters with larger Einstein radii are more anomalously concentrated. We also present a detailed model of the lensing cluster Abell 1703 with constraints from multiple image families, and find the dark matter inner density profile to be cuspy with the slope consistent with -1, in agreement with expectations.