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Sample records for cold leg thermocouple

  1. Seebeck Changes Due to Residual Cold-Work and Reversible Effects in Type K Bare-Wire Thermocouples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, E. S.

    2017-09-01

    Type K thermocouples are the most commonly used thermocouple for industrial measurements because of their low cost, wide temperature range, and durability. As with all base-metal thermocouples, Type K is made to match a mathematical temperature-to-emf relationship and not a prescribed alloy formulation. Because different manufacturers use varying alloy formulations and manufacturing techniques, different Type K thermocouples exhibit a range of drift and hysteresis characteristics, largely due to ordering effects in the positive (K+) thermoelement. In this study, these effects are assessed in detail for temperatures below 700°C in the Type K wires from nine manufacturers. A linear gradient furnace and a high-resolution homogeneity scanner combined with the judicious use of annealing processes allow measurements that separately identify the effects of cold-work, ordering, and oxidation to be made. The results show most K+ alloys develop significant errors, but the magnitudes of the contributions of each process vary substantially between the different K+ wires. In practical applications, the measurement uncertainties achievable with Type K therefore depend not only on the wire formulation but also on the temperature, period of exposure, and, most importantly, the thermal treatments prior to use.

  2. Thermocouple shield

    DOEpatents

    Ripley, Edward B.

    2009-11-24

    A thermocouple shield for use in radio frequency fields. In some embodiments the shield includes an electrically conductive tube that houses a standard thermocouple having a thermocouple junction. The electrically conductive tube protects the thermocouple from damage by an RF (including microwave) field and mitigates erroneous temperature readings due to the microwave or RF field. The thermocouple may be surrounded by a ceramic sheath to further protect the thermocouple. The ceramic sheath is generally formed from a material that is transparent to the wavelength of the microwave or RF energy. The microwave transparency property precludes heating of the ceramic sheath due to microwave coupling, which could affect the accuracy of temperature measurements. The ceramic sheath material is typically an electrically insulating material. The electrically insulative properties of the ceramic sheath help avert electrical arcing, which could damage the thermocouple junction. The electrically conductive tube is generally disposed around the thermocouple junction and disposed around at least a portion of the ceramic sheath. The concepts of the thermocouple shield may be incorporated into an integrated shielded thermocouple assembly.

  3. Thermocouple installation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, W. B.; Potter, L. R.; Macdavid, K. S. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A thermocouple assembly which includes a plug having a pair of small diameter holes near one end thereof which are spaced a small distance apart to leave a thin quantity of plug material between the holes is presented. There are a pair of thermocouple wires extending through the different holes and with the outer ends of the wires joined to the thin quantity of plug material which lies between the holes to form a thermocouple junction.

  4. High temperature, oxidation resistant noble metal-Al alloy thermocouple

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smialek, James L. (Inventor); Gedwill, Michael G. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A thermocouple is disclosed. The thermocouple is comprised of an electropositive leg formed of a noble metal-Al alloy and an electronegative leg electrically joined to form a thermocouple junction. The thermocouple provides for accurate and reproducible measurement of high temperatures (600 - 1300 C) in inert, oxidizing or reducing environments, gases, or vacuum. Furthermore, the thermocouple circumvents the need for expensive, strategic precious metals such as rhodium as a constituent component. Selective oxidation of rhodium is also thereby precluded.

  5. Thermocouple tape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazaris, G. A., Jr.; Thomas, R. D.

    1972-01-01

    Preformed, low cost, thin film thermocouples on adhesive tapes were fabricated. Metal strips of two dissimilar metals were laid on opposite edges of plastic substrate so that they overlap in center portion, forming thermocouple junction. Useful temperature range for polyimide films was 4 to 673 K.

  6. High-Temperature, Oxidation-Resistant Thermocouples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smialek, James L.; Gedwill, Michael A.

    1994-01-01

    Aluminum substituted for rhodium, which is scarce and expensive. Electromotive force increases with aluminum content in Pt/Al leg of Pt(Pt/Al) thermocouple. Wires baked longer in aluminizing bed produce larger voltages. Thermocouples containing platinum/aluminum legs used instead of thermocouples of type R in furnaces, heat engines, and chemical reactors. Expecially suited to high-velocity oxidizing environments. Constructed as thin-film sensors on turbine blades and vanes, where pre-oxidation provides insulating film needed between thermocouple legs. Because aluminum content slowly depleted by oxidation, long-term use recommended only where maximum temperature is 1,200 degrees C or less.

  7. Thermocouple assembly

    DOEpatents

    Thermos, Anthony Constantine; Rahal, Fadi Elias

    2002-01-01

    A thermocouple assembly includes a thermocouple; a plurality of lead wires extending from the thermocouple; an insulating jacket extending along and enclosing the plurality of leads; and at least one internally sealed area within the insulating jacket to prevent fluid leakage along and within the insulating jacket. The invention also provides a method of preventing leakage of a fluid along and through an insulating jacket of a thermocouple including the steps of a) attaching a plurality of lead wires to a thermocouple; b) adding a heat sensitive pseudo-wire to extend along the plurality of lead wires; c) enclosing the lead wires and pseudo-wire inside an insulating jacket; d) locally heating axially spaced portions of the insulating jacket to a temperature which melts the pseudo-wire and fuses it with an interior surface of the jacket.

  8. High temperature thermocouple operates in reduction atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoff, R. G.

    1966-01-01

    Thermocouple continuously measures a flowing gas up to 4500 degrees F in a hazardous environment. The thermocouple combines rhenium and tungsten in the probe, housing, and swaged extension lead. The wires extend continuously from the cold junction to the probe tip to eliminate errors from secondary thermocouple effects.

  9. Water-hammer in the cold leg during an SBLOCA due to cold ECCS injection

    SciTech Connect

    Ortiz, M.G.; Ghan, L.S.

    1991-12-01

    Water-hammer might occur in the cold leg of pressurized water reactors (PWR) during small break loss-of-coolant accidents (SBLOCA`s), when cold emergency core cooling system (ECCS) water is injected into a pipe that may be partially filled with saturated steam. The water may mix with the steam and cause it to condense abruptly. Depending on the flow regime present, slugs of liquid may then be accelerated towards each other or against the piping structure. The possibility of this phenomenon is of concern to us because it may become a dominant phenomenon and change the character of the transient. In performing the code scaling, applicability, and uncertainty study (CSAU) on a SBLOCA scenario, we had to examine the possibility that the transient being analyzed could experience water-hammer and thus depart from the scope of the study. Two criteria for water-hammer initiation were investigated and tested using a RELAP5/MOD3 simulation of the transient. Our results indicated a very low likelihood of occurrence of the phenomenon. 8 refs., 6 figs.

  10. Water-hammer in the cold leg during an SBLOCA due to cold ECCS injection

    SciTech Connect

    Ortiz, M.G.; Ghan, L.S.

    1991-01-01

    Water-hammer might occur in the cold leg of pressurized water reactors (PWR) during small break loss-of-coolant accidents (SBLOCA's), when cold emergency core cooling system (ECCS) water is injected into a pipe that may be partially filled with saturated steam. The water may mix with the steam and cause it to condense abruptly. Depending on the flow regime present, slugs of liquid may then be accelerated towards each other or against the piping structure. The possibility of this phenomenon is of concern to us because it may become a dominant phenomenon and change the character of the transient. In performing the code scaling, applicability, and uncertainty study (CSAU) on a SBLOCA scenario, we had to examine the possibility that the transient being analyzed could experience water-hammer and thus depart from the scope of the study. Two criteria for water-hammer initiation were investigated and tested using a RELAP5/MOD3 simulation of the transient. Our results indicated a very low likelihood of occurrence of the phenomenon. 8 refs., 6 figs.

  11. Thermocouple tape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, R. D. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A thermocouple which may be rolled as a tape until needed and a method of making it are described. Thermoelectrically different metals are applied to a strip of electrically nonconductive material in longitudinally overlapping relationship. Apertures may be provided along the tape in overlapping region at predetermined intervals. An adhesive material is applied to the side of the tape opposite the thermoelectric metals either before or after the thermoelectric metals are deposited. The tape may be cut or torn to form a thermocouple device which is ready for application to a body whose temperature is to be monitored or measured.

  12. Locating hot and cold-legs in a nuclear powered steam generation system

    DOEpatents

    Ekeroth, Douglas E.; Corletti, Michael M.

    1993-01-01

    A nuclear reactor steam generator includes a reactor vessel for heating water and a steam generator with a pump casing at the lowest point on the steam generator. A cold-leg pipe extends horizontally between the steam generator and the reactor vessel to return water from the steam generator to the reactor vessel. The bottom of the cold-leg pipe is at a first height above the bottom of the reactor vessel. A hot-leg pipe with one end connected to the steam generator and a second end connected to the reactor vessel has a first pipe region extending downwardly from the steam generator to a location between the steam generator and the reactor vessel at which a bottom of the hot-leg pipe is at a second height above the bottom of the reactor vessel. A second region extends from that location in a horizontal direction at the second height to the point at which the hot-leg pipe connects to the reactor vessel. A pump is attached to the casing at a location below the first and second heights and returns water from the steam generator to the reactor vessel over the cold-leg. The first height is greater than the second height and the bottom of the steam generator is at a height above the bottom of the reactor vessel that is greater than the first and second heights. A residual heat recovery pump is below the hot-leg and has an inlet line from the hot-leg that slopes down continuously to the pump inlet.

  13. Locating hot and cold-legs in a nuclear powered steam generation system

    DOEpatents

    Ekeroth, D.E.; Corletti, M.M.

    1993-11-16

    A nuclear reactor steam generator includes a reactor vessel for heating water and a steam generator with a pump casing at the lowest point on the steam generator. A cold-leg pipe extends horizontally between the steam generator and the reactor vessel to return water from the steam generator to the reactor vessel. The bottom of the cold-leg pipe is at a first height above the bottom of the reactor vessel. A hot-leg pipe with one end connected to the steam generator and a second end connected to the reactor vessel has a first pipe region extending downwardly from the steam generator to a location between the steam generator and the reactor vessel at which a bottom of the hot-leg pipe is at a second height above the bottom of the reactor vessel. A second region extends from that location in a horizontal direction at the second height to the point at which the hot-leg pipe connects to the reactor vessel. A pump is attached to the casing at a location below the first and second heights and returns water from the steam generator to the reactor vessel over the cold-leg. The first height is greater than the second height and the bottom of the steam generator is at a height above the bottom of the reactor vessel that is greater than the first and second heights. A residual heat recovery pump is below the hot-leg and has an inlet line from the hot-leg that slopes down continuously to the pump inlet. 2 figures.

  14. Instrumentation System Diagnoses a Thermocouple

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perotti, Jose; Santiago, Josephine; Mata, Carlos; Vokrot, Peter; Zavala, Carlos; Burns, Bradley

    2008-01-01

    An improved self-validating thermocouple (SVT) instrumentation system not only acquires readings from a thermocouple but is also capable of detecting deterioration and a variety of discrete faults in the thermocouple and its lead wires. Prime examples of detectable discrete faults and deterioration include open- and short-circuit conditions and debonding of the thermocouple junction from the object, the temperature of which one seeks to measure. Debonding is the most common cause of errors in thermocouple measurements, but most prior SVT instrumentation systems have not been capable of detecting debonding. The improved SVT instrumentation system includes power circuitry, a cold-junction compensator, signal-conditioning circuitry, pulse-width-modulation (PWM) thermocouple-excitation circuitry, an analog-to-digital converter (ADC), a digital data processor, and a universal serial bus (USB) interface. The system can operate in any of the following three modes: temperature measurement, thermocouple validation, and bonding/debonding detection. The software running in the processor includes components that implement statistical algorithms to evaluate the state of the thermocouple and the instrumentation system. When the power is first turned on, the user can elect to start a diagnosis/ monitoring sequence, in which the PWM is used to estimate the characteristic times corresponding to the correct configuration. The user also has the option of using previous diagnostic values, which are stored in an electrically erasable, programmable read-only memory so that they are available every time the power is turned on.

  15. Hybrid thermocouple development program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garvey, L. P.; Krebs, T. R.; Lee, E.

    1971-01-01

    The design and development of a hybrid thermocouple, having a segmented SiGe-PbTe n-leg encapsulated within a hollow cylindrical p-SiGe leg, is described. Hybrid couple efficiency is calculated to be 10% to 15% better than that of a all-SiGe couple. A preliminary design of a planar RTG, employing hybrid couples and a water heat pipe radiator, is described as an example of a possible system application. Hybrid couples, fabricated initially, were characterized by higher than predicted resistance and, in some cases, bond separations. Couples made later in the program, using improved fabrication techniques, exhibited normal resistances, both as-fabricated and after 700 hours of testing. Two flat-plate sections of the reference design thermoelectric converter were fabricated and delivered to NASA Lewis for testing and evaluation.

  16. Oxidation Protection for Thermocouples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richter, R.

    1984-01-01

    Thin platinum film on thermocouple sheath protects non-noble-metal thermocouples from deterioration in oxygen-rich atmosphere. Coating works on nickel-alloy sheathed thermocouples otherwise destroyed by corrosion in pure oxygen at 1,000 degrees C.

  17. Theory and performance of plated thermocouples.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pesko, R. N.; Ash, R. L.; Cupschalk, S. G.; Germain, E. F.

    1972-01-01

    A theory has been developed to describe the performance of thermocouples which have been formed by electroplating portions of one thermoelectric material with another. The electroplated leg of the thermocouple was modeled as a collection of infinitesimally small homogeneous thermocouples connected in series. Experiments were performed using several combinations of Constantan wire sizes and copper plating thicknesses. A transient method was used to develop the thermoelectric calibrations, and the theory was found to be in quite good agreement with the experiments. In addition, data gathered in a Soviet experiment were also found to be in close agreement with the theory.

  18. SPACE code simulation of cold leg small break LOCA in the ATLAS integral test

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, B. J.; Kim, H. T.; Kim, J.; Kim, K. D.

    2012-07-01

    SPACE code is a system analysis code for pressurized water reactors. This code uses a two-fluid and three-field model. For a few years, intensive validations have been performed to secure the prediction accuracy of models and correlations for two-phase flow and heat transfer. Recently, the code version 1.0 was released. This study is to see how well SPACE code predicts thermal hydraulic phenomena of an integral effect test. The target experiment is a cold leg small break LOCA in the ATLAS facility, which has the same two-loop features as APR1400. Predicted parameters were compared with experimental observations. (authors)

  19. Human thermal responses during leg-only exercise in cold water.

    PubMed Central

    Golden, F S; Tipton, M J

    1987-01-01

    1. Exercise during immersion in cold water has been reported by several authors to accelerate the rate of fall of core temperature when compared with rates seen during static immersion. The nature of the exercise performed, however, has always been whole-body in nature. 2. In the present investigation fifteen subjects performed leg exercise throughout a 40 min head-out immersion in water at 15 degrees C. The responses obtained were compared with those seen when the subjects performed an identical static immersion. 3. Aural and rectal temperatures were found to fall by greater amounts during static immersion. 4. It is concluded that 'the type of exercise performed' should be included in the list of factors which affect core temperature during cold water immersion. PMID:3443951

  20. Self-Validating Thermocouple

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perotti, Jose M. (Inventor); Mata, Carlos T. (Inventor); Santiago, Josephine B. (Inventor); Vokrot, Peter (Inventor); Zavala, Carlos E. (Inventor); Burns, Bradley M. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Self-Validating Thermocouple (SVT) Systems capable of detecting sensor probe open circuits, short circuits, and unnoticeable faults such as a probe debonding and probe degradation are useful in the measurement of temperatures. SVT Systems provide such capabilities by incorporating a heating or excitation element into the measuring junction of the thermocouple. By heating the measuring junction and observing the decay time for the detected DC voltage signal, it is possible to indicate whether the thermocouple is bonded or debonded. A change in the thermal transfer function of the thermocouple system causes a change in the rise and decay times of the thermocouple output. Incorporation of the excitation element does not interfere with normal thermocouple operation, thus further allowing traditional validation procedures as well.

  1. HIGH TEMPERATURE THERMOCOUPLE

    DOEpatents

    Eshayu, A.M.

    1963-02-12

    This invention contemplates a high temperature thermocouple for use in an inert or a reducing atmosphere. The thermocouple limbs are made of rhenium and graphite and these limbs are connected at their hot ends in compressed removable contact. The rhenium and graphite are of high purity and are substantially stable and free from diffusion into each other even without shielding. Also, the graphite may be thick enough to support the thermocouple in a gas stream. (AEC)

  2. Thin film ceramic thermocouples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, Otto (Inventor); Fralick, Gustave (Inventor); Wrbanek, John (Inventor); You, Tao (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A thin film ceramic thermocouple (10) having two ceramic thermocouple (12, 14) that are in contact with each other in at least on point to form a junction, and wherein each element was prepared in a different oxygen/nitrogen/argon plasma. Since each element is prepared under different plasma conditions, they have different electrical conductivity and different charge carrier concentration. The thin film thermocouple (10) can be transparent. A versatile ceramic sensor system having an RTD heat flux sensor can be combined with a thermocouple and a strain sensor to yield a multifunctional ceramic sensor array. The transparent ceramic temperature sensor that could ultimately be used for calibration of optical sensors.

  3. Thermocouple design for measuring temperatures of small insects.

    PubMed

    Hanson, A A; Venette, R C

    2013-01-01

    Contact thermocouples often are used to measure surface body temperature changes of insects during cold exposure. However, small temperature changes of minute insects can be difficult to detect, particularly during the measurement of supercooling points. We developed two thermocouple designs, which use 0.51 mm diameter or 0.127 mm diameter copper-constantan wires, to improve our ability to resolve insect exotherms. We tested the designs with adults from three parasitoid species: Tetrastichus planipennisi, Spathius agrili, and S. floridanus. These species are <3 mm long and <0.1 mg. Mean exotherms were greater for fine-gauge thermocouples than thick-gauge thermocouples for the smallest species tested, T. planipennisi. This difference was not apparent for larger species S. agrili and S. floridanus. Thermocouple design did not affect the mean supercooling point for any of the species. The cradle thermocouple design developed with the fine gauge wire was reusable and allowed for easy insect recovery after cold exposure.

  4. Modern Thermocouple Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, K. N.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Describes a thermocouple circuit used to measure Joule heating as well as Peltier heating and cooling for a copper-Constantan metallic junction. Shows how the Seebeck effect from a thermocouple can monitor the temperature condition of a junction with regard to input power and Peltier effect. (Author/GA)

  5. Modern Thermocouple Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, K. N.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Describes a thermocouple circuit used to measure Joule heating as well as Peltier heating and cooling for a copper-Constantan metallic junction. Shows how the Seebeck effect from a thermocouple can monitor the temperature condition of a junction with regard to input power and Peltier effect. (Author/GA)

  6. High-temperature rapid-response thermocouple for reducing atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gracey, C. M.; Hoff, R. G.

    1970-01-01

    Thermocouple measures continuously in flowing gaseous hydrogen at temperatures up to 4000 deg F, in environments made hazardous by radiation, and where rapid response and calibration reproducibility are critically important. Thermocouple wires extend continuously, without splice or foreign material, from cold junction to probe's tip.

  7. Thermocouple design for measuring temperatures of small insects

    Treesearch

    A.A. Hanson; R.C. Venette

    2013-01-01

    Contact thermocouples often are used to measure surface body temperature changes of insects during cold exposure. However, small temperature changes of minute insects can be difficult to detect, particularly during the measurement of supercooling points. We developed two thermocouple designs, which use 0.51 mm diameter or 0.127 mm diameter copper-constantan wires, to...

  8. Multiwire thermocouples: Frequency response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forney, L. J.; Fralick, G. C.

    1994-01-01

    Experimental measurements are made with a novel two wire thermocouple. Signals from two wires of unequal diameters are recorded from the thermocouple suspended in constant flow with a periodic temperature fluctuation. It is demonstrated that the reconstructed signal from the two wire thermocouple requires no compensation for omega less than or equal to 2 omega(sub 1) where omega is the natural frequency of the smaller wire. A compensation factor is recommended for larger frequencies omega greater than 2 omega(sub 1). Theory and experimental measurements are compared with a novel three wire thermocouple. Signals from three wires of unequal diameters are recorded from the thermocouple suspended in constant flow with a periodic temperature fluctuation. It is demonstrated that the reconstructed signal from the three wire thermocouple requires no compensation for omega less than or equal to 5 omega(sub 1) where omega (sub 1) is the natural frequency of the smaller wire. The latter result represents a significant improvement compared to previous work with two wire thermocouples. A correction factor has also been derived to account for wires of arbitrary diameter. Measurements are recorded for multiwire thermocouples consisting of either two or three wires of unequal diameters. Signals from the multiwire probe are recorded for a reversing gas flow with a periodic temperature fluctuation. It is demonstrated that the reconstructed signal from the multiwire thermocouple requires no compensation provided omega/omega(sub 1) is less than 2.3 for two wires or omega/omega(sub 1) is less than 3.6 for three wires where omega(sub 1) is the natural frequency of the smaller wire based on the maximum gas velocity. The latter results were possible provided Fourier transformed data were used and knowledge of the gas velocity is available.

  9. Spring loaded thermocouple module

    DOEpatents

    McKelvey, T.E.; Guarnieri, J.J.

    1984-03-13

    A thermocouple arrangement is provided for mounting in a blind hole of a specimen. The thermocouple arrangement includes a cup-like holder member, which receives an elongated thermal insulator, one end of which is seated at an end wall of the holder. A pair of thermocouple wires, threaded through passageways in the insulator, extend beyond the insulator member, terminating in free ends which are joined together in a spherical weld bead. A spring, held captive within the holder, applies a bias force to the weld bead, through the insulator member. The outside surface of the holder is threaded for engagement with the blind hole of the specimen. When the thermocouple is installed in the specimen, the spherical contact surface of the weld bead is held in contact with the end wall of the blind hole, with a predetermined bias force.

  10. Spring loaded thermocouple module

    DOEpatents

    McKelvey, Thomas E.; Guarnieri, Joseph J.

    1985-01-01

    A thermocouple arrangement is provided for mounting in a blind hole of a specimen. The thermocouple arrangement includes a cup-like holder member, which receives an elongated thermal insulator, one end of which is seated at an end wall of the holder. A pair of thermocouple wires, threaded through passageways in the insulator, extend beyond the insulator member, terminating in free ends which are joined together in a spherical weld bead. A spring, held captive within the holder, applies a bias force to the weld bead, through the insulator member. The outside surface of the holder is threaded for engagement with the blind hole of the specimen. When the thermocouple is installed in the specimen, the spherical contact surface of the weld bead is held in contact with the end wall of the blind hole, with a predetermined bias force.

  11. ITS-90 Thermocouple Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 60 NIST ITS-90 Thermocouple Database (Web, free access)   Web version of Standard Reference Database 60 and NIST Monograph 175. The database gives temperature -- electromotive force (emf) reference functions and tables for the letter-designated thermocouple types B, E, J, K, N, R, S and T. These reference functions have been adopted as standards by the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) and the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC).

  12. COMMIX-1A analysis of fluid and thermal mixing in a model cold leg and downcomer of a PWR

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, B.C.J.; Cha, B.K.; Miao, C.C.; Sha, W.T.; Kim, J.H.; Sun, B.K.H.

    1983-01-01

    The issue of thermal shock of a PWR pressure vessel has been under considerable attention recently. A number of experimental as well as analytical studies have been performed to investigate the effect of the thermal transient on the pressure vessel due to the high pressure injection (HPI) of the cold fluid into the cold leg. This process has been called Pressurized Thermal Shock (PTS). This paper is an analytical study of PTS by using COMMIX-1A. Experimental investigations were performed at CREARE and SAI. In the CREARE experiment, a 1/5 scale model was set up to simulate a cold leg and downcomer of a PWR. Tests with several different ratios of hot loop flow versus cold HPI flow were performed to study the effect of the flow ratio on the fluid and thermal mixing process in the system, especially in the downcomer region. Analytical investigations also proceeded in parallel with the experiments. Quite a few analytical investigations were performed with the COMMIX-1A code. However, in this version of COMMIX, the effect of the numerical diffusion was not addressed.

  13. Threaded average temperature thermocouple

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ward, Stanley W. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A threaded average temperature thermocouple 11 is provided to measure the average temperature of a test situs of a test material 30. A ceramic insulator rod 15 with two parallel holes 17 and 18 through the length thereof is securely fitted in a cylinder 16, which is bored along the longitudinal axis of symmetry of threaded bolt 12. Threaded bolt 12 is composed of material having thermal properties similar to those of test material 30. Leads of a thermocouple wire 20 leading from a remotely situated temperature sensing device 35 are each fed through one of the holes 17 or 18, secured at head end 13 of ceramic insulator rod 15, and exit at tip end 14. Each lead of thermocouple wire 20 is bent into and secured in an opposite radial groove 25 in tip end 14 of threaded bolt 12. Resulting threaded average temperature thermocouple 11 is ready to be inserted into cylindrical receptacle 32. The tip end 14 of the threaded average temperature thermocouple 11 is in intimate contact with receptacle 32. A jam nut 36 secures the threaded average temperature thermocouple 11 to test material 30.

  14. Clinical use of cold atmospheric pressure argon plasma in chronic leg ulcers: A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Ulrich, C; Kluschke, F; Patzelt, A; Vandersee, S; Czaika, V A; Richter, H; Bob, A; Hutten, J von; Painsi, C; Hüge, R; Kramer, A; Assadian, O; Lademann, J; Lange-Asschenfeldt, B

    2015-05-01

    In the age of multiresistant microbes and the increasing lack of efficient antibiotics, conventional antiseptics play a critical role in the prevention and therapy of wound infections. Recent studies have demonstrated the antiseptic effects of cold atmospheric pressure plasma (APP). In this pilot, study we investigate the overall suitability of one of the first APP sources for wound treatment focusing on its potential antimicrobial effects. The wound closure rate and the bacterial colonisation of the wounds were investigated. Patients suffering from chronic leg ulcers were treated in a clinical controlled monocentric trial with either APP or octenidine (OCT). In patients who presented with more than one ulceration in different locations, one was treated with APP and the other one with OCT. Each group was treated three times a week over a period of two weeks. The antimicrobial efficacy was evaluated immediately after and following two weeks of treatment. Wounds treated with OCT showed a significantly higher microbial reduction (64%) compared to wounds treated with APP (47%) immediately after the treatment. Over two weeks of antiseptic treatment the bacterial density was reduced within the OCT group (-35%) compared to a slight increase in bacterial density in the APP-treated group (+12%). Clinically, there were no signs of delayed wound healing observed in either group and both treatments were well tolerated. The immediate antimicrobial effects of the APP prototype source were almost comparable to OCT without any signs of cytotoxicity. This pilot study is limited by current configurations of the plasma source, where the narrow plasma beam made it difficult to cover larger wound surface areas and in order to avoid untreated areas of the wound bed, smaller wounds were assigned to the APP-treatment group. This limits the significance of AAP-related effects on the wound healing dynamics, as smaller wounds tend to heal faster than larger wounds. However, clinical wound

  15. Thermocouple-Signal-Conditioning Circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, Richard A.

    1991-01-01

    Thermocouple-signal-conditioning circuit acting in conjunction with thermocouple, exhibits electrical behavior of voltage in series with resistance. Combination part of input bridge circuit of controller. Circuit configured for either of two specific applications by selection of alternative resistances and supply voltages. Includes alarm circuit detecting open circuit in thermocouple and provides off-scale output to signal malfunctions.

  16. Program Processes Thermocouple Readings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quave, Christine A.; Nail, William, III

    1995-01-01

    Digital Signal Processor for Thermocouples (DART) computer program implements precise and fast method of converting voltage to temperature for large-temperature-range thermocouple applications. Written using LabVIEW software. DART available only as object code for use on Macintosh II FX or higher-series computers running System 7.0 or later and IBM PC-series and compatible computers running Microsoft Windows 3.1. Macintosh version of DART (SSC-00032) requires LabVIEW 2.2.1 or 3.0 for execution. IBM PC version (SSC-00031) requires LabVIEW 3.0 for Windows 3.1. LabVIEW software product of National Instruments and not included with program.

  17. Advanced thin film thermocouples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kreider, K. G.; Semancik, S.; Olson, C.

    1984-01-01

    The fabrication, materials characterization, and performance of thin film platinum rhodium thermocouples on gas turbine alloys was investigated. The materials chosen for the study were the turbine blade alloy systems MAR M200+Hf with NiCoCrAlY and FeCrAlY coatings, and vane alloy systems MAR M509 with FeCrAlY. Research was focussed on making improvements in the problem areas of coating substrate stability, adhesion, and insulation reliability and durability. Diffusion profiles between the substrate and coating with and without barrier coatings of Al2O3 are reported. The relationships between fabrication parameters of thermal oxidation and sputtering of the insulator and its characterization and performance are described. The best thin film thermocouples were fabricated with the NiCoCrAlY coatings which were thermally oxidized and sputter coated with Al2O3.

  18. Magnetic effects on thermocouples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beguš, Samo; Bojkovski, Jovan; Drnovšek, Janko; Geršak, Gregor

    2014-03-01

    Thermometers in laboratory environment and industrial applications are often subject to extraneous, usually unwanted and uncontrolled magnetic fields. Magnetic field influence can be minimized, but cannot be fully cancelled out. Even more, in most cases, there is no awareness of the existence of magnetic fields, let alone their effect on measurement instrumentation. In the past, sensitivity to high dc magnetic fields has been investigated in cryogenics and at high temperatures. More recently, the magnetic effect on weak dc magnetic fields was presented. The goal of this paper was to analyse and empirically and experimentally prove the magnetic sensitivity of thermocouples exposed to low magnetic fields: both dc and ac. Precision and uniform alternating and direct magnetic flux densities were generated by means of permanent magnets and power amplifiers with air-cored coils. The magnetic effect on ferromagnetic and non-ferromagnetic thermocouples at liquid-nitrogen-boiling point (-196 °C), ice point (0 °C), in water (17 °C) and at melting point of gallium fixed point cell (29.7646 °C) was investigated. Magnetic-field-dependent temperature errors of up to 700 mK (at 5.3 mT: dc) and up to 1 °C (at 10 mT: ac 50 Hz magnetic fields) were detected. From the results, it can be concluded that, ideally for temperature measurements of the highest accuracy in the above-cryogenic temperature range, magnetic sensitivity should be estimated and taken into account either as the correction of an error and/or as an additional source of measurement uncertainty. Special consideration should be given to thermocouple orientation relative to the magnetic field direction, influence of metal enclosures and magnetization effects on ferromagnetic components of thermocouples.

  19. Additive effects of caffeine and cold water during submaximal leg exercise.

    PubMed

    Doubt, T J; Hsieh, S S

    1991-04-01

    Ten males exercised for 55 min at 1.5 W.kg-1 in 28 degrees C and 18 degrees C water to determine whether cold water plus caffeine (CF) ingestion had additive effects on energy production or core temperature. Two immersions were done at each water temperature, once with CF (5 mg.kg-1) and once with placebo (PL). Cold water alone (28 PL vs 18 PL) decreased free fatty acid (FFA, -13 +/- 8%) and glycerol (-37 +/- 15%) and increased lactate (18 +/- 12%), VO2 (11 +/- 3%), and minute ventilation (VE, 8 +/- 4%) but did not change glucose, heart rate (HR), respiratory exchange ratio (RER), or rectal temperature. CF alone (28 PL vs 28 CF) increased FFA (52 +/- 18%), glycerol (14 +/- 8%), lactate (28 +/- 10%), VO2 (9 +/- 3%), VE (7 +/- 5%), HR (4 +/- 1%), and rectal temperature (2 +/- 0.4%) but did not alter RER. Significant additive effects of cold water + CF (28 PL vs 18 CF) were noted for FFA, glycerol, lactate, VO2, and VE but not for RER and rectal temperature. These findings indicate that additive effects of cold water + CF alter substrate availability and increase energy production, but without a change in lipid utilization or core temperature. It may be concluded that use of CF during exercise in cold water has no physiological benefit.

  20. EBR-II in-vessel natural circulation experiments on hot and cold pool stratification

    SciTech Connect

    Ragland, W.A.; Feldman, E.E.

    1990-01-01

    The Experimental Breeder Reactor II is located in a cylindrical pool of liquid sodium which is part of the cold-leg of the primary flow circuit. A vertical string of 32 thermocouples spans the 8 m tank height, at each of two diametrically opposed locations in the primary tank. Local temperatures were measured with these 64 thermocouples during dynamic tests. The instantaneous spacial temperature distribution obtained from a string of thermocouples can be viewed on a personal computer. The animation which results from displaying successive spacial distributions provide a very effective way to quickly obtain physical insights. The design of the two strings of thermocouples, the software used to create the animation, measured data from three different types of tests--two unprotected reactor transients, and one with the reactor at decay power levels and the reactor cover lifted, are discussed. 5 refs., 3 figs.

  1. Method for forming a thermocouple

    DOEpatents

    Metz, Hugh J.

    1979-01-01

    A method is provided for producing a fast response, insulated junction thermocouple having a uniform diameter outer sheath in the region of the measuring junction. One step is added to the usual thermocouple fabrication process that consists in expanding the thermocouple sheath following the insulation removal step. This makes it possible to swage the sheath back to the original diameter and compact the insulation to the desired high density in the final fabrication step.

  2. Advanced Microscopic Integrated Thermocouple Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pettigrew, Penny J.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to develop and refine a technique for making microscopic thermocouple arrays for use in measuring the temperature gradient across a solid-liquid interface during the solidification process. Current thermocouple technology does not allow for real-time measurements across the interface due to the prohibitive size of available thermocouples. Microscopic thermocouple arrays will offer a much greater accuracy and resolution of temperature measurements across the solid-liquid interface which will lead to a better characterization of the solidification process and interface reaction which affect the properties of the resulting material.

  3. Liquid trap seals thermocouple leads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruppe, E. P.

    1966-01-01

    Liquid trap seals thermocouple leads coming out of a brazing retort that operates with a controlled atmosphere so that air cannot enter the retort and hydrogen cannot escape. The trap is fastened to a duct welded to the retort. Thermocouple leads are led out through the duct and trap, with the fluid forming a gastight seal between the atmosphere and the retort.

  4. High-temperature thermocouples and related methods

    DOEpatents

    Rempe, Joy L [Idaho Falls, ID; Knudson, Darrell L [Firth, ID; Condie, Keith G [Idaho Falls, ID; Wilkins, S Curt [Idaho Falls, ID

    2011-01-18

    A high-temperature thermocouple and methods for fabricating a thermocouple capable of long-term operation in high-temperature, hostile environments without significant signal degradation or shortened thermocouple lifetime due to heat induced brittleness.

  5. Annealing Increases Stability Of Iridium Thermocouples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Germain, Edward F.; Daryabeigi, Kamran; Alderfer, David W.; Wright, Robert E.; Ahmed, Shaffiq

    1989-01-01

    Metallurgical studies carried out on samples of iridium versus iridium/40-percent rhodium thermocouples in condition received from manufacturer. Metallurgical studies included x-ray, macroscopic, resistance, and metallographic studies. Revealed large amount of internal stress caused by cold-working during manufacturing, and large number of segregations and inhomogeneities. Samples annealed in furnace at temperatures from 1,000 to 2,000 degree C for intervals up to 1 h to study effects of heat treatment. Wire annealed by this procedure found to be ductile.

  6. Annealing Increases Stability Of Iridium Thermocouples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Germain, Edward F.; Daryabeigi, Kamran; Alderfer, David W.; Wright, Robert E.; Ahmed, Shaffiq

    1989-01-01

    Metallurgical studies carried out on samples of iridium versus iridium/40-percent rhodium thermocouples in condition received from manufacturer. Metallurgical studies included x-ray, macroscopic, resistance, and metallographic studies. Revealed large amount of internal stress caused by cold-working during manufacturing, and large number of segregations and inhomogeneities. Samples annealed in furnace at temperatures from 1,000 to 2,000 degree C for intervals up to 1 h to study effects of heat treatment. Wire annealed by this procedure found to be ductile.

  7. Assessment of RELAP/MOD3 using BETHSY 6.2TC 6-inch cold leg side break comparative test

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Young-Jong; Jeong, Jae-Jun; Chang, Won-Pyo; Kim, Dong-Su

    1996-10-01

    This report presents the results of the RELAP5/MOD3 Version 7j assessment on BETHSY 6.2TC. BETHSY 6.2TC test corresponding to a six inch cold leg break LOCA of the Pressurizer Water Reactor(PWR). The primary objective of the test was to provide reference data of two facilities of different scales (BETHSY and LSTF facility). On the other hand, the present calculation aims at analysis of RELAP5/N4OD3 capability on the small break LOCA simulation, The results of calculation have shown that the RELAP5/MOD3 reasonably predicts occurrences as well as trends of the major phenomena such as primary pressure, timing of loop seal clearing, liquid hold up, etc. However, some disagreements also have been found in the predictions of loop seal clearing, collapsed core water level after loop seal clearing, and accumulator injection behaviors. For better understanding of discrepancies in same predictions, several sensitivity calculations have been performed as well. These include the changes of two-phase discharge coefficient at the break junction and some corrections of the interphase drag term. As result, change of a single parameter has not improved the overall predictions and it has been found that the interphase drag model has still large uncertainties.

  8. Blackbody comparator for thermocouple calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Ojanen, M.; Hahtela, O. M.; Heinonen, M.

    2013-09-11

    MIKES is developing a measurement set-up for calibrating thermocouples in the temperature range 960 °C - 1500 °C. The calibration method is based on direct comparison of thermocouples and radiation thermometers. We have designed a graphite blackbody comparator cell, which is operated in a horizontal single-zone tube furnace. The cell includes two blackbody cavities for radiation temperature measurements. The cavities have openings on opposite sides of the cell, allowing simultaneous measurement with two radiation thermometers. The design of the comparator allows three thermocouples to be calibrated simultaneously. The thermocouples to be calibrated are inserted in thermometer wells around one of the measurement cavities. We characterize the blackbody comparator in terms of repeatability, temperature distribution and emissivity. Finally, we validate the uncertainty analysis by comparing calibration results obtained for type B and S thermocouples to the calibration results reported by Technical Research Institute of Sweden (SP), and MIKES. The agreement in the temperature range 1000 °C - 1500 °C is within 0.90 °C, the average deviation being 0.17 °C.

  9. Temperature monitoring device and thermocouple assembly therefor

    DOEpatents

    Grimm, Noel P.; Bauer, Frank I.; Bengel, Thomas G.; Kothmann, Richard E.; Mavretish, Robert S.; Miller, Phillip E.; Nath, Raymond J.; Salton, Robert B.

    1991-01-01

    A temperature monitoring device for measuring the temperature at a surface of a body, composed of: at least one first thermocouple and a second thermocouple; support members supporting the thermocouples for placing the first thermocouple in contact with the body surface and for maintaining the second thermocouple at a defined spacing from the body surface; and a calculating circuit connected to the thermocouples for receiving individual signals each representative of the temperature reading produced by a respective one of the first and second thermocouples and for producing a corrected temperature signal having a value which represents the temperature of the body surface and is a function of the difference between the temperature reading produced by the first thermocouple and a selected fraction of the temperature reading provided by the second thermocouple.

  10. Heat penetration and thermocouple location in home canning.

    PubMed

    Etzel, Mark R; Willmore, Paola; Ingham, Barbara H

    2015-01-01

    We processed applesauce, tomato juice, and cranberries in pint jars in a boiling water canner to test thermal processing theories against home canning of high-acid foods. For each product, thermocouples were placed at various heights in the jar. Values for f h (heating), f cl (cooling), and F 82.2°C (lethality) were determined for each thermocouple location, and did not depend substantially on thermocouple location in accordance with heat transfer theory. There was a cold spot in the jar, but the cold spot during heating became the hot spot during cooling. During heating, the geometric center was the last to heat, and remained coldest the longest, but during coooling, it was also the last to cool, and remained hottest the longest. The net effect was that calculated lethality in home canning was not affected by thermocouple location. Most of the lethality during home canning occurred during air cooling, making cooling of home canned foods of great importance. Calculated lethality was far greater than the required 5-log reduction of spores in tomato juice and vegetative cells in cranberries, suggesting a wide margin of safety for approved home-canning processes for high-acid foods.

  11. Heat penetration and thermocouple location in home canning

    PubMed Central

    Etzel, Mark R; Willmore, Paola; Ingham, Barbara H

    2015-01-01

    We processed applesauce, tomato juice, and cranberries in pint jars in a boiling water canner to test thermal processing theories against home canning of high-acid foods. For each product, thermocouples were placed at various heights in the jar. Values for fh (heating), fcl (cooling), and F82.2°C (lethality) were determined for each thermocouple location, and did not depend substantially on thermocouple location in accordance with heat transfer theory. There was a cold spot in the jar, but the cold spot during heating became the hot spot during cooling. During heating, the geometric center was the last to heat, and remained coldest the longest, but during coooling, it was also the last to cool, and remained hottest the longest. The net effect was that calculated lethality in home canning was not affected by thermocouple location. Most of the lethality during home canning occurred during air cooling, making cooling of home canned foods of great importance. Calculated lethality was far greater than the required 5-log reduction of spores in tomato juice and vegetative cells in cranberries, suggesting a wide margin of safety for approved home-canning processes for high-acid foods. PMID:25649758

  12. Thermocouples for forest fire research

    Treesearch

    Erwin H. Breuer

    1965-01-01

    Thermocouples have proved valuable in research conducted by the Fire Physics Project at the Northern Forest Fire Laboratory because they can measure several important fire variables besides flame and convection column temperatures. These include rate of spread and flame residence time. Describes a simple, rapid method of fabrication and reports useful and diverse...

  13. Simulation of a small cold-leg-break experiment at the PMK-2 test facility using the RELAP5 and ATHLET codes

    SciTech Connect

    Ezsoel, G.; Guba, A.; Perneczky, L.; Krepper, E.; Prasser, H.M.; Schaefer, F.

    1997-05-01

    Results of a small-break loss-of-coolant accident experiment, conducted on the PMK-2 integral-type test facility are presented. The experiment simulated a 1% break in the cold leg of a VVER-440-type reactor. The main phenomena of the experiment are discussed, and in the case of selected events, a more detailed interpretation with the help of measured void fraction, obtained by a special measurement device, is given. Two thermohydraulic computer codes, RELAP5 and ATHLET, are used for posttest calculations. The aim of these calculations is to investigate the code capability for modeling natural circulation phenomena in VVER-440-type reactors. Therefore, the results of the experiment and both calculations are compared. Both codes predict most of the transient events well, with the exception that RELAP5 fails to predict the dryout period in the core. In the experiment, the hot- and cold-leg loop-seal clearing is accompanied by natural circulation instabilities, which can be explained by means of the ATHLET calculation.

  14. A study of thermal stratification in the cold legs during the subcooled blowdown phase of a loss of coolant accident in the OSU APEX thermal hydraulic testing facility.

    SciTech Connect

    Wachs, D. M.

    1998-11-04

    Thermal stratification, which has been linked to the occurrence of pressurized thermal shock (PTS), is observed to occur during the early stages of simulated loss of coolant accidents (LOCAS) in the Oregon State University Advanced Plant Experiment (OSU APEX) Thermal Hydraulic Test Facility. The OSU APEX Test Facility is a scaled model of the Westinghouse AP600 nuclear power plant. Analysis of the OSU APEX facility data has allowed the determination of an onset criteria for thermal stratification and has provided support for the postulated mechanisms leading to thermal stratification. CFX 4.1, a computational fluid dynamics code, was used to generate a model of the cold legs and the downcomer that described the phenomena occurring within them. Some mixing phenomena were predicted that lead to non-uniformity between the two cold legs attached to the steam generator on the side of the facility containing the Passive Residual Heat Removal (PRHR) injection system. The stratification was found to be two phase and unlikely to be a factor in PTS.

  15. Thermocouple, multiple junction reference oven

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leblanc, L. P. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    An improved oven for maintaining the junctions of a plurality of reference thermocouples at a common and constant temperature is described. The oven is characterized by a cylindrical body defining a heat sink with axially extended-cylindrical cavity a singularized heating element which comprises a unitary cylindrical heating element consisting of a resistance heating coil wound about the surface of metallic spool with an axial bore defined and seated in the cavity. Other features of the oven include an annular array of radially extended bores defined in the cylindrical body and a plurality of reference thermocouple junctions seated in the bores in uniformly spaced relation with the heating element, and a temperature sensing device seated in the axial bore for detecting temperature changes as they occur in the spool and circuit to apply a voltage across the coil in response to detected drops in temperatures of the spool.

  16. Measurement of Inhomogeneities in MIMS Thermocouples Using a Linear-Gradient Furnace and Dual Heat-Pipe Scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, E. S.; White, D. R.; Edgar, H.

    2015-03-01

    This paper describes a linear-gradient furnace and a thermocouple homogeneity scanner that, together, measure changes in the Seebeck coefficient as a function of time and temperature. The furnace first exposes the test thermocouple to all temperatures in the range spanned by the furnace gradient. The homogeneity scanner then measures the Seebeck coefficient along the length of the thermocouple. By correlating the position on the thermocouple with the temperature in the furnace, changes in the Seebeck coefficient can be correlated with the temperature to which that part of the thermocouple was exposed. Repeat exposures for different durations allow the rapid accumulation of data describing drift versus temperature and time. The known profile of the furnace combined with the high resolution of the dual heat-pipe scanner enable the detection of Seebeck coefficient changes of less than 0.02 % over sub-millimeter distances. The high resolution of the scanner also minimizes the underestimation of short-range changes in the Seebeck coefficient. With the addition of other treatment processes, such as annealing, quenching, and cold work, the system can assess the full variety of reversible and irreversible effects in thermocouples. Preliminary experiments on base-metal thermocouples confirm much of the known long-term behavior. However, the system has also exposed the rapid onset of some of these effects at low temperatures, the large amount and variability of cold work in new thermocouples, and large variations between different thermocouples of the same type.

  17. Thermal Preconditioning of MIMS Type K Thermocouples to Reduce Drift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, E. S.

    2017-01-01

    Type K thermocouples are the most widely used temperature sensors in industry and are often used in the convenient mineral-insulated metal-sheathed (MIMS) format. The MIMS format provides almost total immunity to oxide-related drift in the 800°C-1000°C range. However, crystalline ordering of the atomic structure causes drift in the range 200°C-600°C. Troublesomely, the effects of this ordering are reversible, leading to hysteresis in some applications. Typically, MIMS cable is subjected to a post-manufacturing high-temperature recrystallization anneal to remove cold-work and place the thermocouple in a `known state.' However, variations in the temperatures and times of these exposures can lead to variations in the `as-received state.' This study gives guidelines on the best thermal preconditioning of 3 mm MIMS Type K thermocouples in order to minimize drift and achieve the most reproducible temperature measurements. Experimental results demonstrate the consequences of using Type K MIMS thermocouples in different states, including the as-received state, after a high-temperature recrystallization anneal and after preconditioning anneals at 200°C, 300°, 400°C and and 500°C. It is also shown that meaningful calibration is possible with the use of regular preconditioning anneals.

  18. Correction for Thermal EMFs in Thermocouple Feedthroughs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ziemke, Robert A.

    2006-01-01

    A straightforward measurement technique provides for correction of thermal-electromotive-force (thermal-EMF) errors introduced by temperature gradients along the pins of non-thermocouple-alloy hermetic feedthrough connectors for thermocouple extension wires that must pass through bulkheads. This technique is an alternative to the traditional technique in which the thermal-EMF errors are eliminated by use of custom-made multipin hermetic feedthrough connectors that contain pins made of the same alloys as those of the thermocouple extension wires. One disadvantage of the traditional technique is that it is expensive and time-consuming to fabricate multipin custom thermocouple connectors. In addition, the thermocouple-alloy pins in these connectors tend to corrode easily and/or tend to be less rugged compared to the non-thermocouple-alloy pins of ordinary connectors. As the number of thermocouples (and thus pins) is increased in a given setup, the magnitude of these disadvantages increases accordingly. The present technique is implemented by means of a little additional hardware and software, the cost of which is more than offset by the savings incurred through the use of ordinary instead of thermocouple connectors. The figure schematically depicts a typical measurement setup to which the technique is applied. The additional hardware includes an isothermal block (made of copper) instrumented with a reference thermocouple and a compensation thermocouple. The reference thermocouple is connected to an external data-acquisition system (DAS) through a two-pin thermocouple-alloy hermetic feedthrough connector, but this is the only such connector in the apparatus. The compensation thermocouple is connected to the DAS through two pins of the same ordinary multipin connector that connects the measurement thermocouples to the DAS.

  19. Method for bonding thin film thermocouples to ceramics

    DOEpatents

    Kreider, Kenneth G.

    1993-01-01

    A method is provided for adhering a thin film metal thermocouple to a ceramic substrate used in an environment up to 700 degrees Centigrade, such as at a cylinder of an internal combustion engine. The method includes the steps of: depositing a thin layer of a reactive metal on a clean ceramic substrate; and depositing thin layers of platinum and a platinum-10% rhodium alloy forming the respective legs of the thermocouple on the reactive metal layer. The reactive metal layer serves as a bond coat between the thin noble metal thermocouple layers and the ceramic substrate. The thin layers of noble metal are in the range of 1-4 micrometers thick. Preferably, the ceramic substrate is selected from the group consisting of alumina and partially stabilized zirconia. Preferably, the thin layer of reactive metal is in the range of 0.015-0.030 micrometers (15-30 nanometers) thick. The preferred reactive metal is chromium. Other reactive metals may be titanium or zirconium. The thin layer of reactive metal may be deposited by sputtering in ultra high purity argon in a vacuum of approximately 2 milliTorr (0.3 Pascals).

  20. Apparatus Tests Thermocouples For Seebeck Inhomogeneity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burkett, Cecil G., Jr.; Bauserman, Willard A., Jr.; West, James W.

    1995-01-01

    Automated apparatus reveals sources of error not revealed in calibration. Computer-controlled apparatus detects and measures Seebeck inhomogeneities in sheathed thermocouples. Measures thermocouple output voltage as function of position of probe along sharp gradient of temperature. Abnormal variations in voltage-versus-position data indicative of Seebeck inhomogeneities. Prototype for development of standard method and equipment for routine acceptance/rejection testing of sheathed thermocouples in industrial and research laboratories.

  1. Probe with integrated heater and thermocouple pack

    DOEpatents

    McCulloch, Reginald W.; Dial, Ralph E.; Finnell, Wilber K. R.

    1988-01-01

    A probe for measuring heat includes an elongate rod fitted within a sheath, and a plurality of annular recesses are formed on the surface of the rod in a spaced-apart relationship to form annular chambers that are resistant to heat flow. A longitudinal bore extends axially into the rod and within the cylinders defined by the annular chambers, and an integrated heater and thermocouple pack is dimensioned to fit within the bore. In construction, the integrated pack includes a plurality of wires disposed in electrical insulation within a sheath and a heater cable. These wires include one common wire and a plurality of thermocouple wires. The common wire is constructed of one type of conductive material while the thermocouple wires are each constructed of two types of materials so that at least one thermocouple junction is formed therein. All of the wires extend the length of the integrated pack and are connected together at their ends. The thermocouple wires are constructed to form thermocouple junctions proximate to each annular chamber for producing electromotive forces corresponding to the temperature of the rod within the annular chambers relative to outside the chambers. In the preferred embodiment, each thermocouple wire forms two thermocouple junctions, one junction being disposed within an annular chamber and the second junction being disposed outside of, but proximate to, the same annular chamber. In one embodiment two thermocouple wires are configured to double the sensitivity of the probe in one region.

  2. Probe with integrated heater and thermocouple pack

    SciTech Connect

    McCulloch, R.W.; Dial, R.E.; Finnell, W.F.R.

    1988-02-16

    This patent describes a gamma thermometer probe for detecting heat produced within the thermometer probe. It comprises: an outer elongate thermometer sheath; an elongate rod; annular recesses; a longitudinal bore; and an integrated thermocouple pack. The thermocouple pack comprises: a first type wire, and second type wires. The second type wires comprises: an outer section; and an inner segment.

  3. Probe with integrated heater and thermocouple pack

    DOEpatents

    McCulloch, Reg W.; Dial, Ralph E.; Finnell, Wilber K. R.

    1990-01-01

    A probe for measuring heat includes an elongate rod fitted within a sheath, and a plurality of annular recesses are formed on the surface of the rod in a spaced-apart relationship to form annular chambers that are resistant to heat flow. A longitudinal bore extends axially into the rod and within the cylinders defined by the annular chambers, and an integrated heater and thermocouple pack is dimensioned to fit within the bore. In construction, the integrated pack includes a plurality of wires disposed in electrical insulation within a sheath and a heater cable. These wires include one common wire and a plurality of thermocuple wires. The common wire is constructed of one type of conductive material while the thermocouple wires are each constructed of two types of materials so that at least one thermocouple junction is formed therein. All of the wires extend the length of the integrated pack and are connected together at their ends. The thermocouple wires are constructed to form thermocouple junctions proximate to each annular chamber for producing electromotive forces corresponding to the temperature of the rod within the annular chambers relative to outside the chambers. In the preferred embodiment, each thermocouple wire forms two thermocouple junctions, one junction being disposed within an annular chamber and the second junction being disposed outside of, but proximate to, the same annular chamber. In one embodiment two thermocouple wires are configured to double the sensitivity of the probe in one region.

  4. Attaching Thermocouples by Peening or Crimping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murtland, Kevin; Cox, Robert; Immer, Christopher

    2006-01-01

    Two simple, effective techniques for attaching thermocouples to metal substrates have been devised for high-temperature applications in which attachment by such conventional means as welding, screws, epoxy, or tape would not be effective. The techniques have been used successfully to attach 0.005- in. (0.127-mm)-diameter type-S thermocouples to substrates of niobium alloy C-103 and stainless steel 416 for measuring temperatures up to 2,600 F (1,427 C). The techniques are equally applicable to other thermocouple and substrate materials. In the first technique, illustrated in the upper part of the figure, a hole slightly wider than twice the diameter of one thermocouple wire is drilled in the substrate. The thermocouple is placed in the hole, then the edge of the hole is peened in one or more places by use of a punch (see figure). The deformed material at the edge secures the thermocouple in the hole. In the second technique a hole is drilled as in the first technique, then an annular relief area is machined around the hole, resulting in structure reminiscent of a volcano in a crater. The thermocouple is placed in the hole as in the first technique, then the "volcano" material is either peened by use of a punch or crimped by use of sidecutters to secure the thermocouple in place. This second technique is preferable for very thin thermocouples [wire diameter .0.005 in. (.0.127 mm)] because standard peening poses a greater risk of clipping one or both of the thermocouple wires. These techniques offer the following advantages over prior thermocouple-attachment techniques: . Because these techniques involve drilling of very small holes, they are minimally invasive . an important advantage in that, to a first approximation, the thermal properties of surrounding areas are not appreciably affected. . These techniques do not involve introduction of any material, other than the substrate and thermocouple materials, that could cause contamination, could decompose, or oxidize

  5. Using self-calibrating thermocouples in industry

    SciTech Connect

    Ruppel, F.R.

    1989-01-01

    The self-calibrating thermocouple is a thermocouple with a low melting point, high-purity metal encapsulated near but metallurgically isolated from its thermojunction. It is designed to provide a single-point calibration of the thermocouple at the melting point of the encapsulated metal because the time-temperature curve of the thermocouple will plateau at this temperature during heating or cooling. The calibration procedure consists of comparing the plateau temperature with the known melting point temperature of the encapsulated metal. The difference between these two values is the thermocouple error at the calibration point. The device is commercially available, but to be effective in industry it must be augmented with a data acquisition system with an algorithm that will automatically report the calibration error. 5 refs., 7 figs.

  6. Improving thermocouple service life in slagging gasifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, James P.; Kwong, Kyei-Sing; Powell, Cynthia A.; Thomas, Hugh; Krabbe, Rick

    2005-01-01

    The measurement of temperature within slagging gasifiers for long periods of time is difficult/impossible because of sensor failure or blockage of inputs used to monitor gasifier temperature. One of the most common means of temperature measurement in a gasifier is physically, through the use of thermocouples in a gasifier sidewall. These units can fail during startup, standby, or during the first 40-90 days of gasifier service. Failure can be caused by a number of issues; including thermocouple design, construction, placement in the gasifier, gasifier operation, and molten slag attack of the materials used in a thermocouple assembly. Lack of temperature control in a gasifier can lead to improper preheating, slag buildup on gasifier sidewalls, slag attack of gasifier refractories used to line a gasifier, or changes in desired gas output from a gasifier. A general outline of thermocouple failure issues and attempts by the Albany Research Center to improve the service life of thermocouples will be discussed.

  7. AGR-1 Thermocouple Data Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Jeff Einerson

    2012-05-01

    This report documents an effort to analyze measured and simulated data obtained in the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) fuel irradiation test program conducted in the INL's Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) to support the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) R&D program. The work follows up on a previous study (Pham and Einerson, 2010), in which statistical analysis methods were applied for AGR-1 thermocouple data qualification. The present work exercises the idea that, while recognizing uncertainties inherent in physics and thermal simulations of the AGR-1 test, results of the numerical simulations can be used in combination with the statistical analysis methods to further improve qualification of measured data. Additionally, the combined analysis of measured and simulation data can generate insights about simulation model uncertainty that can be useful for model improvement. This report also describes an experimental control procedure to maintain fuel target temperature in the future AGR tests using regression relationships that include simulation results. The report is organized into four chapters. Chapter 1 introduces the AGR Fuel Development and Qualification program, AGR-1 test configuration and test procedure, overview of AGR-1 measured data, and overview of physics and thermal simulation, including modeling assumptions and uncertainties. A brief summary of statistical analysis methods developed in (Pham and Einerson 2010) for AGR-1 measured data qualification within NGNP Data Management and Analysis System (NDMAS) is also included for completeness. Chapters 2-3 describe and discuss cases, in which the combined use of experimental and simulation data is realized. A set of issues associated with measurement and modeling uncertainties resulted from the combined analysis are identified. This includes demonstration that such a combined analysis led to important insights for reducing uncertainty in presentation of AGR-1 measured data (Chapter 2) and interpretation of

  8. Side-welded fast response sheathed thermocouple

    DOEpatents

    Carr, Kenneth R.

    1981-01-01

    A method of fabricating the measuring junction of a grounded-junction sheathed thermocouple to obtain fast time response and good thermal cycling performance is provided. Slots are tooled or machined into the sheath wall at the measuring junction, the thermocouple wires are laser-welded into the slots. A thin metal closure cap is then laser-welded over the end of the sheath. Compared to a conventional grounded-junction thermocouple, the response time is 4-5 times faster and the thermal shock and cycling capabilities are substantially improved.

  9. Side-welded fast response sheathed thermocouple

    DOEpatents

    Carr, K.R.

    A method of fabricating the measuring junction of a grounded-junction sheathed thermocouple to obtain fast time response and good thermal cycling performance is provided. Slots are tooled or machined into the sheath wall at the measuring junction, the thermocouple wires are laser-welded into the slots. A thin metal closure cap is then laser-welded over the end of the sheath. Compared to a conventional grounded-junction thermocouple, the response time is 4 to 5 times faster and the thermal shock and cycling capabilities are substantially improved.

  10. Gold ink coating of thermocouple sheaths

    DOEpatents

    Ruhl, H. Kenneth

    1992-01-01

    A method is provided for applying a gold ink coating to a thermocouple sheath which includes the steps of electropolishing and oxidizing the surface of the thermocouple sheath, then dipping the sheath into liquid gold ink, and finally heat curing the coating. The gold coating applied in this manner is highly reflective and does not degrade when used for an extended period of time in an environment having a temperature over 1000.degree. F. Depending on the application, a portion of the gold coating covering the tip of the thermocouple sheath is removed by abrasion.

  11. Connecting to Thermocouples with Fewer Lead Wires

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldsby, Jon C.

    2003-01-01

    A simple technique has been devised to reduce the number of lead wires needed to connect an array of thermocouples to the instruments (e.g., voltmeters) used to read their output voltages. Because thermocouple wires are usually made of expensive metal alloys, reducing the number of lead wires can effect a considerable reduction in the cost of such an array. Reducing the number of wires also reduces the number of terminals and the amount of space needed to accommodate the wires.

  12. Tubular electric heater with a thermocouple assembly

    DOEpatents

    House, R.K.; Williams, D.E.

    1975-08-01

    This patent relates to a thermocouple or other instrumentation which is installed within the walls of a tubular sheath surrounding a process device such as an electric heater. The sheath comprises two concentric tubes, one or both of which have a longitudinal, concave crease facing the other tube. The thermocouple is fixedly positioned within the crease and the outer tube is mechanically reduced to form an interference fit onto the inner tube. (auth)

  13. Improvement of COBRA-TF for modeling of PWR cold- and hot-legs during reactor transients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salko, Robert K.

    capture of more advanced physics in the coolant-line that can be expected during Loss-of-Coolant Accident. One of the package's benefits is its ability to be used as a platform for future coolant-line model development and implementation, including capturing of the important de-entrainment behavior in reactor hot-legs (steam-binding effect) and flow convection in the upper-plenum region of the vessel.

  14. A coaxial thermocouple for shock tunnel applications.

    PubMed

    Menezes, Viren; Bhat, Sandeep

    2010-10-01

    A chromel-constantan coaxial surface junction thermocouple has been designed, fabricated, calibrated, and tested to measure the temperature-time history on the surface of a body in a hypersonic freestream of Mach 8 in a shock tunnel. The coaxial thermocouple with a diameter of 3.25 mm was flush mounted in the surface of a hemisphere of 25 mm diameter. The hypersonic freestream was of a very low temperature and density, and had a flow time of about a millisecond. Preliminary test results indicate that the thermocouple is quite sensitive to low temperature-rarefied freestreams, and also has a response time of a few microseconds (≈5 μs) to meet the requirements of short duration transient measurements. The sensor developed is accurate, robust, reproducible, and is highly inexpensive.

  15. Semiconductor cooling by thin-film thermocouples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tick, P. A.; Vilcans, J.

    1970-01-01

    Thin-film, metal alloy thermocouple junctions do not rectify, change circuit impedance only slightly, and require very little increase in space. Although they are less efficient cooling devices than semiconductor junctions, they may be applied to assist conventional cooling techniques for electronic devices.

  16. A thermocouple thermode for small animals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, B. A.

    1972-01-01

    Thermode composed of two thin-walled stainless steel hypodermic needles and cooper-constantan thermocouple or small thermistor to indicate temperature at point of perfusion is used to measure brain temperature in animals. Because of relatively small size of thermode, structural damage to brain is minimized.

  17. Welding Wires To Thin Thermocouple Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holanda, Raymond; Kim, Walter S.; Danzey, Gerald A.; Pencil, Eric; Wadel, Mary

    1993-01-01

    Parallel-gap resistance welding yields joints surviving temperatures of about 1,000 degrees C. Much faster than thermocompression bonding. Also exceeds conductive-paste bonding and sputtering thin films through porous flame-sprayed insulation on prewelded lead wires. Introduces no foreign material into thermocouple circuit and does not require careful control of thickness of flame-sprayed material.

  18. Welding Wires To Thin Thermocouple Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holanda, Raymond; Kim, Walter S.; Danzey, Gerald A.; Pencil, Eric; Wadel, Mary

    1993-01-01

    Parallel-gap resistance welding yields joints surviving temperatures of about 1,000 degrees C. Much faster than thermocompression bonding. Also exceeds conductive-paste bonding and sputtering thin films through porous flame-sprayed insulation on prewelded lead wires. Introduces no foreign material into thermocouple circuit and does not require careful control of thickness of flame-sprayed material.

  19. Performance evaluation of an infrared thermocouple.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chiachung; Weng, Yu-Kai; Shen, Te-Ching

    2010-01-01

    The measurement of the leaf temperature of forests or agricultural plants is an important technique for the monitoring of the physiological state of crops. The infrared thermometer is a convenient device due to its fast response and nondestructive measurement technique. Nowadays, a novel infrared thermocouple, developed with the same measurement principle of the infrared thermometer but using a different detector, has been commercialized for non-contact temperature measurement. The performances of two-kinds of infrared thermocouples were evaluated in this study. The standard temperature was maintained by a temperature calibrator and a special black cavity device. The results indicated that both types of infrared thermocouples had good precision. The error distribution ranged from -1.8 °C to 18 °C as the reading values served as the true values. Within the range from 13 °C to 37 °C, the adequate calibration equations were the high-order polynomial equations. Within the narrower range from 20 °C to 35 °C, the adequate equation was a linear equation for one sensor and a two-order polynomial equation for the other sensor. The accuracy of the two kinds of infrared thermocouple was improved by nearly 0.4 °C with the calibration equations. These devices could serve as mobile monitoring tools for in situ and real time routine estimation of leaf temperatures.

  20. Performance Evaluation of an Infrared Thermocouple

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chiachung; Weng, Yu-Kai; Shen, Te-Ching

    2010-01-01

    The measurement of the leaf temperature of forests or agricultural plants is an important technique for the monitoring of the physiological state of crops. The infrared thermometer is a convenient device due to its fast response and nondestructive measurement technique. Nowadays, a novel infrared thermocouple, developed with the same measurement principle of the infrared thermometer but using a different detector, has been commercialized for non-contact temperature measurement. The performances of two-kinds of infrared thermocouples were evaluated in this study. The standard temperature was maintained by a temperature calibrator and a special black cavity device. The results indicated that both types of infrared thermocouples had good precision. The error distribution ranged from −1.8 °C to 18 °C as the reading values served as the true values. Within the range from 13 °C to 37 °C, the adequate calibration equations were the high-order polynomial equations. Within the narrower range from 20 °C to 35 °C, the adequate equation was a linear equation for one sensor and a two-order polynomial equation for the other sensor. The accuracy of the two kinds of infrared thermocouple was improved by nearly 0.4 °C with the calibration equations. These devices could serve as mobile monitoring tools for in situ and real time routine estimation of leaf temperatures. PMID:22163458

  1. Thermocouple for heating and cooling of memory metal actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Charles (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    A semiconductor thermocouple unit is provided for heating and cooling memory metal actuators. The semiconductor thermocouple unit is mounted adjacent to a memory metal actuator and has a heat sink attached to it. A flexible thermally conductive element extends between the semiconductor thermocouple and the actuator and serves as a heat transfer medium during heating and cooling operations.

  2. A preliminary study of factors affecting the calibration stability of the iridium versus iridium-40 percent rhodium thermocouple

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahmed, Shaffiq; Germain, Edward F.; Daryabeigi, Kamran; Alderfer, David W.; Wright, Robert E.

    1987-01-01

    An iridium versus iridium-40% rhodium thermocouple was studied. Problems associated with the use of this thermocouple for high temperature applications (up to 2000 C) were investigated. The metallurgical studies included X-ray, macroscopic, resistance, and metallographic studies. The thermocouples in the as-received condition from the manufacturer revealed large amounts of internal stress caused by cold working during manufacturing. The thermocouples also contained a large amount of inhomogeneities and segregations. No phase transformations were observed in the alloy up to 1100 C. It was found that annealing the thermocouple at 1800 C for two hours, and then at 1400 C for 2 to 3 hours yielded a fine grain structure, relieving some of the strains, and making the wire more ductile. It was also found that the above annealing procedure stabilized the thermal emf behavior of the thermocouple for application below 1800 C (an improvement from + or - 1% to + or - 0.02% within the range of the test parameters used).

  3. Computer program for pulsed thermocouples with corrections for radiation effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Will, H. A.

    1981-01-01

    A pulsed thermocouple was used for measuring gas temperatures above the melting point of common thermocouples. This was done by allowing the thermocouple to heat until it approaches its melting point and then turning on the protective cooling gas. This method required a computer to extrapolate the thermocouple data to the higher gas temperatures. A method that includes the effect of radiation in the extrapolation is described. Computations of gas temperature are provided, along with the estimate of the final thermocouple wire temperature. Results from tests on high temperature combustor research rigs are presented.

  4. Frequency response in short thermocouple wires

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forney, L. J.; Meeks, E. L.; Ma, J.; Fralick, G. C.

    1992-01-01

    Theoretical expressions are derived for the steady state frequency response of a thermocouple wire. In particular, the effects of axial heat conduction are demonstrated for a nonuniform wire with unequal material properties and wire diameters across the junction. The amplitude ratio at low frequency omega approaches 0 agrees with the results of Scadron and Warshawsky (1952) for a steady state temperature distribution. Moreover, the frequency response for a nonuniform wire in the limit of infinite length l approaches infinity is shown to reduce to a simple expression that is analogous to the classic first order solution for a thermocouple wire with uniform properties. Theoretical expressions are also derived for the steady state frequency response of a supported thermocouple wire. In particular, the effects of axial heat conduction are demonstrated for both a supported one material wire and a two material wire with unequal material properties across the junction. For the case of a one material supported wire, an exact solution is derived which compares favorably with an approximate expression that only matches temperatures at the support junction. Moreover, for the case of a two material supported wire, an analytical expression is derived that closely correlates numerical results. Experimental measurements are made for the steady state frequency response of a supported thermocouple wire. In particular, the effects of axial heat conduction are demonstrated for both a supported one material wire (type K) and a two material wire (type T) with unequal material properties across the junction. The data for the amplitude ratio and phase angle are correlated to within 10 pct. with the theoretical predictions of Forney and Fralick (1991). This is accomplished by choosing a natural frequency omega sub n for the wire data to correlate the first order response at large gas temperature frequencies. It is found that a large bead size, however, will increase the amplitude ratio at

  5. A Slimline Integrated Self-Validating Thermocouple: Initial Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliott, C. J.; Greenen, A. D.; Tucker, D.; Ford, T.; Pearce, J. V.

    2017-09-01

    NPL, in collaboration with CCPI Europe, have designed a slimline integrated self-validating ("inseva") thermocouple with the same external form factor as conventional thermocouples, with the aim of making them suitable as direct replacements for existing thermocouples in process. Type S thermocouples have been manufactured in recrystallized alumina-sheathed assemblies, with Cu and Co-C reference ingots, with an outer diameter of 7 mm. The new slimline inseva thermocouple is, in principle, suitable for use in the same positions and conditions as the conventional thermocouple which it replaces. This paper reports the initial reference ingot melt and freeze plateaus successfully observed using the first inseva thermocouples, and demonstrates observation of furnace sensitivity and ramp rate sensitivity of the plateau temperatures.

  6. Use of manganin-constantan thermocouples in thermometry units designed for copper-constantan thermocouples.

    PubMed

    Hoh, L L; Waterman, F M

    1995-01-01

    Commercial ultrasound hyperthermia systems typically include thermometry units designed for copper-constantan thermocouples. Replacing these copper-constantan thermocouples with manganin-constantan thermocouples is advantageous in reducing the measurement error caused by the conduction of heat along the copper wire, but their performance in these thermometry units is uncertain. The accuracy of manganin-constantan thermocouples in the Labthermics LT-100, Clini-Therm TS1200/TM100, and Physitemp TM-12 thermometry units was investigated using a temperature controlled circulating water bath monitored by a mercury thermometer having a calibration traceable to NIST. The results demonstrate that an accuracy of +/- 0.2 degrees C can be achieved with manganin-constantan thermocouples over the range 35-55 degrees C without hardware modification provided specific calibration procedures are followed. With the Labthermics LT-100, a double point calibration should be carried out at 35 and 55 degrees C. With the Clini-Therm TS1200/TM100, a self-calibration of the unit using its internal calibration well plus a single point calibration using an external temperature standard provides sufficient accuracy. The Physitemp TM-12 requires an external computer for read out and the user must provide additional software to correct for the error by either a single or multiple point calibration.

  7. Broken Leg

    MedlinePlus

    ... through — like when you try to break a green stick of wood. Most broken bones in children ... subside before they are casted. Immobilization Restricting the movement of a broken bone in your leg is ...

  8. Genetics Home Reference: restless legs syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... are some genetic conditions more common in particular ethnic groups? Genetic Changes Restless legs syndrome likely results from ... medications, including certain drugs used to treat nausea, depression and other mental health disorders, colds and allergies, ...

  9. Protective sheath for a continuous measurement thermocouple

    DOEpatents

    Phillippi, R.M.

    1991-12-03

    Disclosed is a protective thermocouple sheath of a magnesia graphite refractory material for use in continuous temperature measurements of molten metal in a metallurgical ladle and having a basic slag layer thereon. The sheath includes an elongated torpedo-shaped sheath body formed of a refractory composition and having an interior borehole extending axially therethrough and adapted to receive a thermocouple. The sheath body includes a lower end which is closed about the borehole and forms a narrow, tapered tip. The sheath body also includes a first body portion integral with the tapered tip and having a relatively constant cross section and providing a thin wall around the borehole. The sheath body also includes a second body portion having a relatively constant cross section larger than the cross section of the first body portion and providing a thicker wall around the borehole. The borehole terminates in an open end at the second body portion. The tapered tip is adapted to penetrate the slag layer and the thicker second body portion and its magnesia constituent material are adapted to withstand chemical attack thereon from the slag layer. The graphite constituent improves thermal conductivity of the refractory material and, thus, enhances the thermal responsiveness of the device. 4 figures.

  10. Protective sheath for a continuous measurement thermocouple

    DOEpatents

    Phillippi, R. Michael

    1991-01-01

    Disclosed is a protective thermocouple sheath of a magnesia graphite refractory material for use in continuous temperature measurements of molten metal in a metallurgical ladle and having a basic slag layer thereon. The sheath includes an elongated torpedo-shaped sheath body formed of a refractory composition and having an interior borehole extending axially therethrough and adapted to receive a thermocouple. The sheath body includes a lower end which is closed about the borehole and forms a narrow, tapered tip. The sheath body also includes a first body portion integral with the tapered tip and having a relatively constant cross section and providing a thin wall around the borehole. The sheath body also includes a second body portion having a relatively constant cross section larger than the cross section of the first body portion and providing a thicker wall around the borehole. The borehole terminates in an open end at the second body portion. The tapered tip is adapted to penetrate the slag layer and the thicker second body portion and its magnesia constituent material are adapted to withstand chemical attack thereon from the slag layer. The graphite constituent improves thermal conductivity of the refractory material and, thus, enhances the thermal responsiveness of the device.

  11. Protective sheath for a continuous measurement thermocouple

    SciTech Connect

    Phillippi, R.M.

    1991-12-03

    Disclosed is a protective thermocouple sheath of a magnesia graphite refractory material for use in continuous temperature measurements of molten metal in a metallurgical ladle and having a basic slag layer thereon. The sheath includes an elongated torpedo-shaped sheath body formed of a refractory composition and having an interior borehole extending axially therethrough and adapted to receive a thermocouple. The sheath body includes a lower end which is closed about the borehole and forms a narrow, tapered tip. The sheath body also includes a first body portion integral with the tapered tip and having a relatively constant cross section and providing a thin wall around the borehole. The sheath body also includes a second body portion having a relatively constant cross section larger than the cross section of the first body portion and providing a thicker wall around the borehole. The borehole terminates in an open end at the second body portion. The tapered tip is adapted to penetrate the slag layer and the thicker second body portion and its magnesia constituent material are adapted to withstand chemical attack thereon from the slag layer. The graphite constituent improves thermal conductivity of the refractory material and, thus, enhances the thermal responsiveness of the device. 4 figures.

  12. Performance of Core Exit Thermocouple for PWR Accident Management Action in Vessel Top Break LOCA Simulation Experiment at OECD/NEA ROSA Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Mitsuhiro; Takeda, Takeshi; Nakamura, Hideo

    Presented are experiment results of the Large Scale Test Facility (LSTF) conducted at the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) with a focus on core exit thermocouple (CET) performance to detect core overheat during a vessel top break loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) simulation experiment. The CET temperatures are used to start accident management (AM) action to quickly depressurize steam generator (SG) secondary side in case of core temperature excursion. Test 6-1 is the first test of the OECD/NEA ROSA Project started in 2005, simulating withdraw of a control rod drive mechanism penetration nozzle at the vessel top head. The break size is equivalent to 1.9% cold leg break. The AM action was initiated when CET temperature rose up to 623K. There was no reflux water fallback onto the CETs during the core heat-up period. The core overheat, however, was detected with a time delay of about 230s. In addition, a large temperature discrepancy was observed between the CETs and the hottest core region. This paper clarifies the reasons of time delay and temperature discrepancy between the CETs and heated core during boil-off including three-dimensional steam flows in the core and core exit. The paper discusses applicability of the LSTF CET performance to pressurized water reactor (PWR) conditions and a possibility of alternative indicators for earlier AM action than in Test 6-1 is studied by using symptom-based plant parameters such as a reactor vessel water level detection.

  13. Thin film thermocouples for high temperature measurement on ceramic materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holanda, Raymond

    1992-01-01

    Thin film thermocouples have been developed for use on metal parts in jet engines to 1000 C. However, advanced propulsion systems are being developed that will use ceramic materials and reach higher temperatures. The purpose of this work is to develop thin film thermocouples for use on ceramic materials. The thin film thermocouples are Pt13Rh/Pt fabricated by the sputtering process. Lead wires are attached using the parallel-gap welding process. The ceramic materials are silicon nitride, silicon carbide, aluminum oxide, and mullite. Both steady state and thermal cycling furnace tests were performed in the temperature range to 1500 C. High-heating-rate tests were performed in an arc lamp heat-flux-calibration facility. The fabrication of the thin film thermocouples is described. The thin film thermocouple output was compared to a reference wire thermocouple. Drift of the thin film thermocouples was determined, and causes of drift are discussed. The results of high-heating-rate tests up to 2500 C/sec are presented. The stability of the ceramic materials is examined. It is concluded that Pt13Rh/Pt thin film thermocouples are capable of meeting lifetime goals of 50 hours or more up to temperatures of 1500 C depending on the stability of the particular ceramic substrate.

  14. Thermocouple Extension-Wire-Connections and Low Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Figueroa, Fernando; Mitchell, Mark; Richardson, Gregory

    2000-01-01

    Experiments were carried out to determine the casue of erroneous readings from thermocouples of type K when measuring temperatures of liquid hydrogen. It was believed to be linked to te temperature of the connector used to extend the thermocouple wires to the voltage meter.

  15. Automatic thermocouple positioner for use in vacuum furnaces

    DOEpatents

    Mee, David K.; Stephens, Albert E.

    1981-01-01

    The invention is a simple and reliable mechanical arrangement for automatically positioning a thermocouple-carrying rod in a vacuum-furnace assembly of the kind including a casing, a furnace mounted in the casing, and a charge-containing crucible mounted in the furnace for vertical movement between a lower (loading) position and a raised (charge-melting) position. In a preferred embodiment, a welded-diaphragm metal bellows is mounted above the furnace, the upper end of the bellows being fixed against movement and the lower end of the bellows being affixed to support means for a thermocouple-carrying rod which is vertically oriented and extends freely through the furnace lid toward the mouth of the crucible. The support means and rod are mounted for relative vertical movement. Before pumpdown of the furnace, the differential pressure acting on the bellows causes it to contract and lift the thermocouple rod to a position where it will not be contacted by the crucible charge when the crucible is elevated to its raised position. During pumpdown, the bellows expands downward, lowering the thermocouple rod and its support. The bellows expands downward beyond a point where downward movement of the thermocouple rod is arrested by contact with the crucible charge and to a point where the upper end of the thermocouple extends well above the thermocouple support. During subsequent melting of the charge, the thermocouple sinks into the melt to provide an accurate measurement of melt temperatures.

  16. Automatic thermocouple positioner for use in vacuum furnaces

    DOEpatents

    Mee, D.K.; Stephens, A.E.

    1980-06-06

    The invention is a simple and reliable mechanical arrangement for automatically positioning a thermocouple-carrying rod in a vacuum-furnace assembly of the kind including a casing, a furnace mounted in the casing, and a charge-containing crucible mounted in the furnace for vertical movement between a lower (loading) position and a raised (charge-melting) position. In a preferred embodiment, a welded-diaphragm metal bellows is mounted above the furnace, the upper end of the bellows being fixed against movement and the lower end of the bellows being affixed to support means for a thermocouple-carrying rod which is vertically oriented and extends freely through the furnace lid toward the mouth of the crucible. The support means and rod are mounted for relative vertical movement. Before pumpdown of the furnace, the differential pressure acting on the bellows causes it to contract and lift the thermocouple rod to a position where it will not be contacted by the crucible charge when the crucible is elevated to its raised position. During pumpdown, the bellows expands downward, lowering the thermocouple rod and its support. The bellows expands downward beyond a point where downward movement of the thermocouple rod is arrested by contact with the crucible charge and to a point where the upper end of the thermocouple extends well above the thermocouple support. During subsequent melting of the charge, the thermocouple sinks into the melt to provide an accurate measurement of melt temperatures.

  17. Leg Problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... your lower leg that may have started after physical activity such as running or jumping?YesNoDo you have pain, swelling, redness or warmth in your calf?YesNoDo you have twisted dark blue or purple veins near the surface of the skin of your calf, and do you have pain ...

  18. Probe with integrated heater and thermocouple pack

    SciTech Connect

    McCulloch, R.W.; Dial, R.E.; Finnell, W.R.

    1988-02-16

    A gamma thermometer probe for detecting heat produced within the thermometer probe is described comprising: an outer elongate thermometer sheath having a cylindrical cross-section, a length, an outer end and an inner end; an elongate rod having a cylindrical cross-section fitted within the elongate thermometer sheath, the rod being constructed of material that absorbs radiation and produces heat; annular recesses formed between the rod, and sheath and being spaced apart along the length of the rod, the recesses forming annular chambers that are resistive to heat flow; a longitudinal bore extending axially into the rod and being positioned to extend through the cylinders defined by the annular chambers; and an integrated thermocouple pack dimensioned to fit within the longitudinal bore and extending through the cylinders defined by the annular chambers.

  19. Base metal thermocouples drift rate dependence from thermoelement diameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlasek, P.; Duris, S.; Palencar, R.

    2015-02-01

    Temperature measurements are one of the key factors in many industrial applications that directly affect the quality, effectiveness and safety of manufacturing processes. In many industrial applications these temperature measurements are realized by thermocouples. Accuracy of thermocouples directly affects the quality of the final product of manufacturing and their durability determines the safety margins required. One of the significant effects that affect the precision of the thermocouples is short and long term stability of their voltage output. This stability issue occurs in every type of thermocouples and is caused by multiple factors. In general these factors affect the Seebeck coefficient which is a material constant, which determines the level of generated voltage when exposed to a temperature gradient. Changes of this constant result in the change of the thermocouples voltage output thus indicated temperature which can result in production quality issues, safety and health hazards. These alternations can be caused by physical and chemical changes within the thermocouple lead material. Modification of this material constant can be of temporary nature or permanent. This paper concentrates on the permanent, or irreversible changes of the Seebeck coefficient that occur in commonly used swaged MIMS Type N thermocouples. These permanent changes can be seen as systematic change of the EMF of the thermocouple when it is exposed to a high temperature over a period of time. This change of EMF by time is commonly known as the drift of the thermocouple. This work deals with the time instability of thermocouples EMF at temperatures above 1200 °C. Instability of the output voltage was taken into relation with the lead diameter of the tested thermocouples. This paper concentrates in detail on the change of voltage output of thermocouples of different diameters which were tested at high temperatures for the overall period of more than 210 hours. The gather data from this

  20. Quantifying the calibration uncertainty attributable to thermocouple inhomogeneity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, K. D.; Gee, D. J.

    2013-09-01

    Inhomogeneity in the Seebeck coefficient as a function of position along a thermocouple wire frequently dominates the uncertainty budgets of thermocouple calibration and use. The calibration process itself, simply through exposure to elevated temperatures for relatively modest times, generates both reversible and irreversible changes to the thermocouple that are a complex function of time, temperature, alloy composition, sheath structure, etc. We present data acquired using a salt bath at 250 °C to provide the step-function-like gradient that is our spatial probe of thermoelectric homogeneity. We show how the finite width of the step-function limits our ability to assess the "true" inhomogeneity of the thermocouple, and explore how the inhomogeneity impacts the calibration uncertainty attainable with the various thermal sources used for the calibration of thermocouples (based on their characteristic temperature gradients).

  1. Evaluation of disinfection techniques for, and their effects on, rectal thermocouple catheters.

    PubMed

    MAHER, J T; ROGERS, M R; PETERSON, D W

    1961-07-01

    The antibacterial activities of an iodophor (Wescodyne G), a quaternary ammonium compound (Roccal), and an iodine tincture as agents for the cold disinfection of rectal catheters contaminated in vitro were determined. Following thorough cleaning with an alcoholic solution of soft soap, each of the three disinfectants tested showed satisfactory results (100% kill) in 5 min against the enteric test bacteria (Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhosa) as well as a test species of the genus Pseudomonas, among the bacteria most resistant to surface-active agents. An aqueous solution of Wescodyne G containing 75 ppm available iodine was used both as a wiping solution and for subsequent disinfection of rectal catheters contaminated in vivo. Total bacterial destruction was found to follow a 60-min soak preceded by the wiping procedure. Rectal catheters subjected to prolonged immersion in each of the test disinfectants were found to be essentially unaffected, retaining their initial calibrations within a permissible tolerance. Neither Roccal nor Wescodyne G solutions were found to measurably attack bare thermocouples. Alcoholic iodine 0.5% did, however, exert a deteriorating effect on bare thermocouples in a short time, as measured by change in resistance characteristics. The results of this study have led to the recommendation that Wescodyne G containing 75 ppm available iodine be used in standing operating procedures for the initial cleaning and subsequent disinfection of rectal thermocouple catheters.

  2. Evaluation of Disinfection Techniques for, and Their Effects on, Rectal Thermocouple Catheters1

    PubMed Central

    Maher, J. T.; Rogers, M. R.; Peterson, D. W.

    1961-01-01

    The antibacterial activities of an iodophor (Wescodyne G), a quaternary ammonium compound (Roccal), and an iodine tincture as agents for the cold disinfection of rectal catheters contaminated in vitro were determined. Following thorough cleaning with an alcoholic solution of soft soap, each of the three disinfectants tested showed satisfactory results (100% kill) in 5 min against the enteric test bacteria (Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhosa) as well as a test species of the genus Pseudomonas, among the bacteria most resistant to surface-active agents. An aqueous solution of Wescodyne G containing 75 ppm available iodine was used both as a wiping solution and for subsequent disinfection of rectal catheters contaminated in vivo. Total bacterial destruction was found to follow a 60-min soak preceded by the wiping procedure. Rectal catheters subjected to prolonged immersion in each of the test disinfectants were found to be essentially unaffected, retaining their initial calibrations within a permissible tolerance. Neither Roccal nor Wescodyne G solutions were found to measurably attack bare thermocouples. Alcoholic iodine 0.5% did, however, exert a deteriorating effect on bare thermocouples in a short time, as measured by change in resistance characteristics. The results of this study have led to the recommendation that Wescodyne G containing 75 ppm available iodine be used in standing operating procedures for the initial cleaning and subsequent disinfection of rectal thermocouple catheters. Images Fig. 1 PMID:13765378

  3. Metallic and ceramic thin film thermocouples for gas turbine engines.

    PubMed

    Tougas, Ian M; Amani, Matin; Gregory, Otto J

    2013-11-08

    Temperatures of hot section components in today's gas turbine engines reach as high as 1,500 °C, making in situ monitoring of the severe temperature gradients within the engine rather difficult. Therefore, there is a need to develop instrumentation (i.e., thermocouples and strain gauges) for these turbine engines that can survive these harsh environments. Refractory metal and ceramic thin film thermocouples are well suited for this task since they have excellent chemical and electrical stability at high temperatures in oxidizing atmospheres, they are compatible with thermal barrier coatings commonly employed in today's engines, they have greater sensitivity than conventional wire thermocouples, and they are non-invasive to combustion aerodynamics in the engine. Thin film thermocouples based on platinum:palladium and indium oxynitride:indium tin oxynitride as well as their oxide counterparts have been developed for this purpose and have proven to be more stable than conventional type-S and type-K thin film thermocouples. The metallic and ceramic thin film thermocouples described within this paper exhibited remarkable stability and drift rates similar to bulk (wire) thermocouples.

  4. Metallic and Ceramic Thin Film Thermocouples for Gas Turbine Engines

    PubMed Central

    Tougas, Ian M.; Amani, Matin; Gregory, Otto J.

    2013-01-01

    Temperatures of hot section components in today's gas turbine engines reach as high as 1,500 °C, making in situ monitoring of the severe temperature gradients within the engine rather difficult. Therefore, there is a need to develop instrumentation (i.e., thermocouples and strain gauges) for these turbine engines that can survive these harsh environments. Refractory metal and ceramic thin film thermocouples are well suited for this task since they have excellent chemical and electrical stability at high temperatures in oxidizing atmospheres, they are compatible with thermal barrier coatings commonly employed in today's engines, they have greater sensitivity than conventional wire thermocouples, and they are non-invasive to combustion aerodynamics in the engine. Thin film thermocouples based on platinum:palladium and indium oxynitride:indium tin oxynitride as well as their oxide counterparts have been developed for this purpose and have proven to be more stable than conventional type-S and type-K thin film thermocouples. The metallic and ceramic thin film thermocouples described within this paper exhibited remarkable stability and drift rates similar to bulk (wire) thermocouples. PMID:24217356

  5. Applications of Thin Film Thermocouples for Surface Temperature Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Lisa C.; Holanda, Raymond

    1994-01-01

    Thin film thermocouples provide a minimally intrusive means of measuring surface temperature in hostile, high temperature environments. Unlike wire thermocouples, thin films do not necessitate any machining of the surface, therefore leaving intact its structural integrity. Thin films are many orders of magnitude thinner than wire, resulting in less disruption to the gas flow and thermal patterns that exist in the operating environment. Thin film thermocouples have been developed for surface temperature measurement on a variety of engine materials. The sensors are fabricated in the NASA Lewis Research Center's Thin Film Sensor Lab, which is a class 1000 clean room. The thermocouples are platinum-13 percent rhodium versus platinum and are fabricated by the sputtering process. Thin film-to-leadwire connections are made using the parallel-gap welding process. Thermocouples have been developed for use on superalloys, ceramics and ceramic composites, and intermetallics. Some applications of thin film thermocouples are: temperature measurement of space shuttle main engine turbine blade materials, temperature measurement in gas turbine engine testing of advanced materials, and temperature and heat flux measurements in a diesel engine. Fabrication of thin film thermocouples is described. Sensor durability, drift rate, and maximum temperature capabilities are addressed.

  6. Thermocouple Calibration and Accuracy in a Materials Testing Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lerch, B. A.; Nathal, M. V.; Keller, D. J.

    2002-01-01

    A consolidation of information has been provided that can be used to define procedures for enhancing and maintaining accuracy in temperature measurements in materials testing laboratories. These studies were restricted to type R and K thermocouples (TCs) tested in air. Thermocouple accuracies, as influenced by calibration methods, thermocouple stability, and manufacturer's tolerances were all quantified in terms of statistical confidence intervals. By calibrating specific TCs the benefits in accuracy can be as great as 6 C or 5X better compared to relying on manufacturer's tolerances. The results emphasize strict reliance on the defined testing protocol and on the need to establish recalibration frequencies in order to maintain these levels of accuracy.

  7. Development of Thin Film Ceramic Thermocouples for High Temperature Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wrbanek, John D.; Fralick, Gustave C.; Farmer, Serene C.; Sayir, Ali; Blaha, Charles A.; Gonzalez, Jose M.

    2004-01-01

    The maximum use temperature of noble metal thin film thermocouples of 1100 C (2000 F) may not be adequate for use on components in the increasingly harsh conditions of advanced aircraft and next generation launch technology. Ceramic-based thermocouples are known for their high stability and robustness at temperatures exceeding 1500 C, but are typically found in the form of rods or probes. NASA Glenn Research Center is investigating the feasibility of ceramics as thin film thermocouples for extremely high temperature applications to take advantage of the stability and robustness of ceramics and the non-intrusiveness of thin films. This paper will discuss the current state of development in this effort.

  8. Self-replaceable thermocouple for molten steel bath - A concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blau, P.; Zellner, G.

    1971-01-01

    Thermocouple wires, consisting of tungsten-rhenium alloy protected by ablative ceramic coating, are wound on a reel and fed continuously into bath. Tests indicate accuracy and reliability are comparable to conventional devices.

  9. Processing Techniques for Correlation of LDA and Thermocouple Signals,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    particular when few seeding particles are present in the flow. The thermocouple signal was analog compensated in frequency and the effect of the value of time constant on the velocity temperature correlation was studied.

  10. High Temperature Irradiation Resistant Thermocouple (HTIR-TC)

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    INL researchers have created a new thermocouple that can resist high temperature and radiation. This device will improve safety and reduce costs associated with unit failures. Learn more about INL research at http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory

  11. High Temperature Irradiation Resistant Thermocouple (HTIR-TC)

    SciTech Connect

    2011-01-01

    INL researchers have created a new thermocouple that can resist high temperature and radiation. This device will improve safety and reduce costs associated with unit failures. Learn more about INL research at http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory

  12. SP-100 W/Re thermocouple calibration techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Cannon, N.S.; Knight, R.C.

    1992-01-01

    The accuracy requirement of the SP-100 Temperature Sensor Program for the reference tungsten/rhenium metal-sheathed thermocouple sensor is {plus minus}1.4% of the reading (in Kelvin) at space reactor operating temperature (nominally 1375 K) over the operating life of the reactor. This is a stringent requirement considering that the as-fabricated base wire limits of error'' are generally specified at roughly {plus minus}1.0% for exposure temperatures above 700 K. Although the thermocouples will be located out of the reactor's neutron field so that irradiation decalibration is expected to be negligible, thermal exposure effects will probably cause the thermocouple to drift out of specification during the 10-yr reactor operating life. A plan to accurately quantify thermocouple drift with aging time, and thus provide on-board calibration for the sensor is described.

  13. Thin-Film Ceramic Thermocouples Fabricated and Tested

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wrbanek, John D.; Fralick, Gustave C.; Farmer, Serene C.; Sayir, Ali; Gregory, Otto J.; Blaha, Charles A.

    2004-01-01

    The Sensors and Electronics Technology Branch of the NASA Glenn Research Center is developing thin-film-based sensors for surface measurement in propulsion system research. Thin-film sensors do not require special machining of the components on which they are mounted, and they are considerably thinner than wire- or foil-based sensors. One type of sensor being advanced is the thin-film thermocouple, specifically for applications in high-temperature combustion environments. Ceramics are being demonstrated as having the potential to meet the demands of thin-film thermocouples in advanced aerospace environments. The maximum-use temperature of noble metal thin-film thermocouples, 1500 C (2700 F), may not be adequate for components used in the increasingly harsh conditions of advanced aircraft and next-generation launch vehicles. Ceramic-based thermocouples are known for their high stability and robustness at temperatures exceeding 1500 C, but are typically in the form of bulky rods or probes. As part of ASTP, Glenn's Sensors and Electronics Technology Branch is leading an in-house effort to apply ceramics as thin-film thermocouples for extremely high-temperature applications as part of ASTP. Since the purity of the ceramics is crucial for the stability of the thermocouples, Glenn's Ceramics Branch and Case Western Reserve University are developing high-purity ceramic sputtering targets for fabricating high-temperature sensors. Glenn's Microsystems Fabrication Laboratory, supported by the Akima Corporation, is using these targets to fabricate thermocouple samples for testing. The first of the materials used were chromium silicide (CrSi) and tantalum carbide (TaC). These refractory materials are expected to survive temperatures in excess of 1500 C. Preliminary results indicate that the thermoelectric voltage output of a thin-film CrSi versus TaC thermocouple is 15 times that of the standard type R (platinum-rhodium versus platinum) thermocouple, producing 20 mV with a 200

  14. Error sources affecting thermocouple thermometry in RF electromagnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, D P; Brezovich, I A

    1982-03-01

    Thermocouple thermometry errors in radiofrequency (typically 13, 56 MHZ) electromagnetic fields such as are encountered in hyperthermia are described. RF currents capacitatively or inductively coupled into the thermocouple-detector circuit produce errors which are a combination of interference, i.e., 'pick-up' error, and genuine rf induced temperature changes at the junction of the thermocouple. The former can be eliminated by adequate filtering and shielding; the latter is due to (a) junction current heating in which the generally unequal resistances of the thermocouple wires cause a net current flow from the higher to the lower resistance wire across the junction, (b) heating in the surrounding resistive material (tissue in hyperthermia), and (c) eddy current heating of the thermocouple wires in the oscillating magnetic field. Low frequency theories are used to estimate these errors under given operating conditions and relevant experiments demonstrating these effects and precautions necessary to minimize the errors are described. It is shown that at 13.56 MHz and voltage levels below 100 V rms these errors do not exceed 0.1 degrees C if the precautions are observed and thermocouples with adequate insulation (e.g., Bailey IT-18) are used. Results of this study are being currently used in our clinical work with good success.

  15. Sea Legs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macdonald, Kenneth C.

    Forty-foot, storm-swept seas, Spitzbergen polar bears roaming vast expanses of Arctic ice, furtive exchanges of forbidden manuscripts in Cold War Moscow, the New York city fashion scene, diving in mini-subs to the sea floor hot srings, life with the astronauts, romance and heartbreak, and invading the last bastions of male exclusivity: all are present in this fast-moving, non-fiction account of one woman' fascinating adventures in the world of marine geology and oceanography.

  16. Leg Injuries and Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... legs. Common leg injuries include sprains and strains, joint dislocations, and fractures. These injuries can affect the entire leg, or just the foot, ankle, knee, or hip. Certain diseases also lead to ...

  17. Low-Temperature Drift in MIMS Base-Metal Thermocouples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, E. S.

    2014-04-01

    Inhomogeneities are known to develop within thermoelements exposed to elevated temperatures, resulting in temperature measurement errors. While the Seebeck coefficient drift in base-metal thermocouples due to aging at temperatures over has been extensively investigated, there have been very few investigations into possible Seebeck changes at lower temperatures. Despite warnings about possible effects, most practitioners assume changes in homogeneity are either not significant or not able to develop at temperatures less than . This study reports on measurements of inhomogeneities in base-metal thermocouples arising from heat treatment at temperatures in the region of . Thermoelectric scans of thermocouples were carried out following exposure of a range of mineral-insulated metal-sheathed base-metal thermocouples, from two large manufacturers, of Types E, J, K, N, and T, to either a linear-gradient furnace within the range of to or uniform temperature zones of , , and . The experiments reveal noticeable drift in all base-metal types for temperatures as low as and exposure times as short as 1 h. The most sensitive thermoelement alloys appear to be Constantan, Alumel, and Nicrosil. It is concluded that the common working assumption that base-metal thermocouples suffer no thermally induced changes in the Seebeck coefficient below is false. This observation has significant implications for many high-stability monitoring and control systems reliant on base-metal thermocouples that operate in the range of to . Additionally, thermoelectric scanning of base-metal thermocouples should be carried out at temperatures well below to avoid erasure of strain effects or imprinting of new thermal signatures.

  18. Irradiation testing of a niobium-molybdenum developmental thermocouple

    SciTech Connect

    Knight, R.C.; Greenslade, D.L.

    1991-10-01

    A need exists for a radiation-resistant thermocouple capable of monitoring temperatures in excess of the limits of the chromel/alumel system. Tungsten/rhenium and platinum/rhodium thermocouples have sufficient temperature capability but have proven to be unstable because of irradiation-induced decalibration. The niobium/molybdenum system is believed to hold great potential for nuclear applications at temperatures up to 2000 K. However, the fragility of pure niobium and fabrication problems with niobium/molybdenum alloys have limited development of this system. Utilizing the Fast Flux Test Facility, a developmental thermocouple with a thermoelement pair consisting of a pure molybdenum and a niobium-1%zirconium alloy wire was irradiated fro 7200 hours at a temperature of 1070 K. The thermocouple performed flawlessly for the duration of the experiment and exhibited stability comparable to a companion chromel/alumel unit. A second thermocouple, operating at 1375 K, is currently being employed to monitor a fusion materials experiment in the Fast Flux Test Facility. This experiment, also scheduled for 7200 hours, will serve to further evaluate the potential of the niobium-1%zirconium/molybdenum thermoelement system. 7 refs., 7 figs.

  19. Design and Analysis of Novel Micromachined Thermocouples with Vertical Free-Standing High-Aspect-Ratio Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wick, M.; Hedler, H.; Seidel, H.

    2015-06-01

    This paper describes the design and analysis of free-standing three-dimensional (3D) thermocouples (TCs) for uncooled high-resolution infrared imaging. In contrast to the conventional horizontal thermocouple design, our 3D TCs consist of vertically oriented coaxial thermoelectric legs covered by an infrared absorber plate. The high aspect ratio of the 3D TCs of up to 100:1 leads to increased thermal resistance and, thus, higher electrical responsivity. Furthermore, reduced lateral dimensions of the device are achieved by coaxial mounting. This allows a closely packed arrangement of 3D TCs, which results in a high-resolution microarray sensor setup. These features represent the 3D TC's innovative uniqueness and open up new possibilities for further minimized uncooled thermal sensors and low-cost high-resolution imagers. We developed a fabrication process for 3D TCs with doped polysilicon as thermoelectric legs and a geometry with diameter of m and length of m. Performance analysis has been carried out using the lumped-heat-capacity method, resulting in an electrical responsivity and specific detectivity of a 3D TC of 383 V/W and cm /W, respectively.

  20. Traceable Co-C eutectic points for thermocouple calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Jahan, F.; Ballico, M. J.

    2013-09-11

    National Measurement Institute of Australia (NMIA) has developed a miniature crucible design suitable for measurement by both thermocouples and radiation thermometry, and has established an ensemble of five Co-C eutectic-point cells based on this design. The cells in this ensemble have been individually calibrated using both ITS-90 radiation thermometry and thermocouples calibrated on the ITS-90 by the NMIA mini-coil methodology. The assigned ITS-90 temperatures obtained using these different techniques are both repeatable and consistent, despite the use of different furnaces and measurement conditions. The results demonstrate that, if individually calibrated, such cells can be practically used as part of a national traceability scheme for thermocouple calibration, providing a useful intermediate calibration point between Cu and Pd.

  1. High Temperature Thermocouples For In-pile Applications

    SciTech Connect

    J. L. Rempe; S. C. Wilkins

    2005-10-01

    Traditional methods for measuring temperature in-pile degrade at temperatures above 1080 degrees C. Hence, a project has been initiated to explore the use of specialized thermocouples that are composed of materials that are able to withstand higher temperature, in-pile test conditions. Results from efforts to develop, fabricate and evaluate the performance of these specialized thermocouples are reported in this paper. Candidate materials were evaluated for their ability to withstand irradiation, to resit material interactions and to remain ductile at high temperatures. In addition, candidate thermocouples were evaluated based on their resolution over the temperature ranges of interest. Results from these evaluations are reported, and additional on-going development activities are summarized.

  2. Frequency response of a thermocouple wire: Effects of axial conduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forney, L. J.; Fralick, G. C.

    1990-01-01

    Theoretical expressions are derived for the steady-state frequency response of a thermocouple wire. In particular, the effects of axial heat conduction are demonstrated for both a uniform thermocouple wire and a nonuniform wire with unequal material properties and wire diameters across the junction. For the case of a uniform wire, the amplitude ratio and phase angle compare favorably with the series solution of Scadron and Warshawsky (1952) except near the ends of the wire. For the case of a non-uniform wire, the amplitude ratio at low frequency omega yields 0 agrees with the results of Scadron and Warshawsky for a steady-state temperature distribution. Moreover, the frequency response for a non-uniform wire in the limit of infinite length l yields infinity is shown to reduce to a simple expression that is analogous to the classic first order solution for a thermocouple wire with uniform properties.

  3. An Innovative Flow-Measuring Device: Thermocouple Boundary Layer Rake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwang, Danny P.; Fralick, Gustave C.; Martin, Lisa C.; Wrbanek, John D.; Blaha, Charles A.

    2001-01-01

    An innovative flow-measuring device, a thermocouple boundary layer rake, was developed. The sensor detects the flow by using a thin-film thermocouple (TC) array to measure the temperature difference across a heater strip. The heater and TC arrays are microfabricated on a constant-thickness quartz strut with low heat conductivity. The device can measure the velocity profile well into the boundary layer, about 65 gm from the surface, which is almost four times closer to the surface than has been possible with the previously used total pressure tube.

  4. A calibration model for screen-caged Peltier thermocouple psychrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, R. W.; Bartos, D. L.

    1982-07-01

    A calibration model for screen-caged Peltier thermocouple psychrometers was developed that applies to a water potential range of 0 to 80 bars, over a temperature range of 0 to 40 C, and for cooling times of 15 to 60 seconds. In addition, the model corrects for the effects of temperature gradients over zero-offsets from -60 to +60 microvolts. Complete details of model development are discussed, together with the theory of thermocouple psychrometers, and techniques of calibration and cleaning. Also, information for computer programing and tabular summaries of model characteristics are provided.

  5. Measurements of fluctuating gas temperatures using compensated fine wire thermocouples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nina, M. N. R.; Pita, G. P.

    1985-09-01

    Thermocouples with three different wire diameters (15, 40 and 50 microns) were used in association with an analog compensation circuit connected to a data acquisition system. Measurements of the time constant were performed using two different heating techniques; Joule effect and external heating by laser beam. The thermocouples were used to quantify the fluctuating temperature field in a hot air jet and in a premixed propane flame. In the reacting case the catalytic effect was evaluated by comparing coated and uncoated wires. Conclusions were also obtained regarding frequency spectra, temperature probability distribution function and time constant.

  6. Failure of sheathed thermocouples due to thermal cycling

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, R.L.; Ludwig, R.L.

    1982-03-01

    Open circuit failures (up to 100%) in small-diameter thermocouples used in electrically heated nuclear fuel rod simulator prototypes during thermal cycling tests were investigated to determine the cause(s) of the failures. The experiments conducted to determine the relative effects of differential thermal expansion, wire size, grain size, and manufacturing technology are described. It was concluded that the large grain size and embrittlement which result from certain common manufacturing annealing and drawing procedures were a major contributing factor in the breakage of the thermocouple wires.

  7. Thermocouples For High Temperature In-Pile Testing

    SciTech Connect

    J. L. Rempe

    2005-11-01

    Many advanced nuclear reactor designs require new fuel, cladding and structural materials. Data are needed to characeterize the performance of these new materials in high temperature, oxidizing and radiation conditions. To obtain this data, robust instrumentation is needed htat can survive proposed test conditions. Traditional methods for measuring temperature in-pile degrade at temperatures above 1080 degrees C. Hence, a project was intiated to develop specialized thermocouples for high temperature in-pile applications (see Rempe and Wilkins, 2005). This paper summarizes efforts to develop, fabricate and evaluate these specialized thermocouples.

  8. Thermocouples of molybdenum and iridium alloys for more stable vacuum-high temperature performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, J. F. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    Thermocouples providing stability and performance reliability in systems involving high temperatures and vacuums by employing a bimetallic thermocouple sensor are described. Each metal of the sensor is selected from a group of metals comprising molybdenum and iridium and alloys containing only those two metals. The molybdenum, iridium thermocouple sensor alloys provide bare metal thermocouple sensors having advantageous vapor pressure compatibility and performance characteristics. The compatibility and physical characteristics of the thermocouple sensor alloys result in improved emf, temperature properties and thermocouple hot junction performance.

  9. A Comparison of Contemporary Gold Versus Platinum Thermocouples with NIST SRM 1749-Based Thermocouples and Reference Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coleman, M. J.; Wiandt, T. J.; Harper, T.

    2015-12-01

    Fluke Calibration (formerly Hart Scientific) in American Fork, Utah, USA is a manufacturer of temperature calibration instruments. The company manufactured reference standard gold versus platinum (Au-Pt) thermocouples from 1992 to about 2002. Manufacturing was halted in 2002 because a trend of poor curve-fit results was observed in new batches of wire. After reviewing the possible sources of the problem, it was decided to sample wire from multiple manufacturers and investigate ways to make the curve-fit work better. This paper presents the results from the study of the wire and a characterization technique to help improve characterization of thermocouples made with lower purity wire. Calibration results from NIST SRM material and older Fluke thermocouples are included as well to provide a means of comparison of contemporary wire to NIST SRM era wire.

  10. A Multiple-range Self-balancing Thermocouple Potentiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warshawsky, I; Estrin, M

    1951-01-01

    A multiple-range potentiometer circuit is described that provides automatic measurement of temperatures or temperature differences with any one of several thermocouple-material pairs. Techniques of automatic reference junction compensation, span adjustment, and zero suppression are described that permit rapid selection of range and wire material, without the necessity for restandardization, by setting of two external tap switches.

  11. Thermocouples--The Most Widely Used Temperature Sensor in Manufacturing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitts, Charles R.

    2006-01-01

    Researchers predict that future developments in nanotechnology will bring incredible, almost inconceivable, change to the manufacturing industry. For now, though, one of technology's most trusted tools remains very relevant: In the field of thermometry, thermocouples are a tried and true technology. As a consequence, material on thermocouples…

  12. Low-Cost Thermocouple Signal-Conditioning Module

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lenzi, Marcelo K.; Silva, Fabricio M.; Lima, Enrique L.; Pinto, Jose Carlos; Cunningham, Michael F.

    2005-01-01

    It is well known that reaction rates and physical properties of any substance depend on the temperature. Therefore, an accurate temperature measurement is a key factor for successful activities both in chemical laboratories and industrial plants. Although plenty of sensors can be adopted for temperature measurements, thermocouples are the most…

  13. Low-Cost Thermocouple Signal-Conditioning Module

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lenzi, Marcelo K.; Silva, Fabricio M.; Lima, Enrique L.; Pinto, Jose Carlos; Cunningham, Michael F.

    2005-01-01

    It is well known that reaction rates and physical properties of any substance depend on the temperature. Therefore, an accurate temperature measurement is a key factor for successful activities both in chemical laboratories and industrial plants. Although plenty of sensors can be adopted for temperature measurements, thermocouples are the most…

  14. Thermocouples--The Most Widely Used Temperature Sensor in Manufacturing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitts, Charles R.

    2006-01-01

    Researchers predict that future developments in nanotechnology will bring incredible, almost inconceivable, change to the manufacturing industry. For now, though, one of technology's most trusted tools remains very relevant: In the field of thermometry, thermocouples are a tried and true technology. As a consequence, material on thermocouples…

  15. High temperature thermocouple development program, part A and part B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toenshoff, D. A.; Zysk, E. D.; Fleischner, P. L.

    1972-01-01

    The problem of extending the useful life of thermocouples intended for in-core and out-of-core thermionic applications in a vacuum environment at temperatures up to 2273 K for periods of time up to 10,000 hours was investigated. Many factors that may influence this useful life were examined, and a basic probe design was developed. With a few modifications, twenty-three thermocouple assemblies were fabricated. Generally the finished thermocouple consisted of solid doped W-3% Re and W-25% Re wires and high purity and high density BeO insulators, and was sheathed in a high purity tantalum tube. In a few probes, stranded thermocouple wires were substituted; commercial grade BeO was used; and in two cases, CVD W-22% Re tubing was used. Each of the components was made of the highest purity materials available; was subjected to special cleaning steps, and was assembled in a class 10,000 clean room. Pertinent physical and chemical properties were determined on each of the components. Special processing techniques were used in the fabrication of the high purity (99.95%), high density (over 95% of theoretical) BeO.

  16. [Rapid freezing of biologic tissue. Measurement of temperature and rate of freezing by thin-layer thermocouple].

    PubMed

    Escaig, J; Géraud, G; Nicolas, G

    1977-06-13

    An apparatus for rapid freezing of biological tissues by contact with a copper block cooled by liquid helium has been devised to reduce the contamination of copper block surface. It prevents the precooling of the specimen while going through the layers of cold helium gas surrounding the copper block and reduces the quantity of helium necessary for freezing. It also enables one to obtain easily reproducible results from freezing by immersion in liquid coolants. Freezing rates are measured directly, related to the specimen thickness, by a thin film thermocouple; its low thermal inertia gives speed measurements of the order of 100,000 degrees C/s.

  17. Turbine blade metal temperature measurement with a sputtered thin film chromel-alumel thermocouple

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liebert, C. H.; Mazaris, G. A.; Brandhorst, H. W., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    A technique for fabricating Chromel and Alumel thin film thermocouples was developed. Turbine blade metal temperatures measured with the thin film thermocouple installation were compared with those of a reference sheathed (wire) thermocouple. Good agreement was obtained, and the results are encouraging.

  18. Leg MRI scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... resonance imaging) scan of the leg uses strong magnets to create pictures of the leg. This may ... in your eyes) Because the MRI contains strong magnets, metal objects are not allowed into the room ...

  19. Tungsten-rhenium thin film thermocouples for SiC-based ceramic matrix composites.

    PubMed

    Tian, Bian; Zhang, Zhongkai; Shi, Peng; Zheng, Chen; Yu, Qiuyue; Jing, Weixuan; Jiang, Zhuangde

    2017-01-01

    A tungsten-rhenium thin film thermocouple is designed and fabricated, depending on the principle of thermal-electric effect caused by the high temperature. The characteristics of thin film thermocouples in different temperatures are investigated via numerical analysis and analog simulation. The working mechanism and thermo-electric features of the thermocouples are analyzed depending on the simulation results. Then the thin film thermocouples are fabricated and calibrated. The calibration results show that the thin film thermocouples based on the tungsten-rhenium material achieve ideal static characteristics and work well in the practical applications.

  20. Tungsten-rhenium thin film thermocouples for SiC-based ceramic matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Bian; Zhang, Zhongkai; Shi, Peng; Zheng, Chen; Yu, Qiuyue; Jing, Weixuan; Jiang, Zhuangde

    2017-01-01

    A tungsten-rhenium thin film thermocouple is designed and fabricated, depending on the principle of thermal-electric effect caused by the high temperature. The characteristics of thin film thermocouples in different temperatures are investigated via numerical analysis and analog simulation. The working mechanism and thermo-electric features of the thermocouples are analyzed depending on the simulation results. Then the thin film thermocouples are fabricated and calibrated. The calibration results show that the thin film thermocouples based on the tungsten-rhenium material achieve ideal static characteristics and work well in the practical applications.

  1. Micro-thermocouple probe for measurement of cellular thermal responses.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, M; Kakuta, N; Mabuchi, K; Yamada, Y

    2005-01-01

    We have produced micro-thermocouple probes for the measurement of cellular thermal responses. Cells generate heat with their metabolisms and more heat with reactions to a certain physical or chemical stimulation. Therefore, the analysis of the cellular thermal responses would provide new physiological information. However, a real-time thermal measurement technique on a target of a single cell has not been established. In this study, glass micropipettes, which are widely used in bioengineering and medicine, are used for the base of the thermocouple probes. Using microfabrication techniques, the junction of two different metal films is formed at the micropipette tip with a diameter of 1 μm. This probe can inject a chemical substance into a cell and to detect its subsequent temperature changes simultaneously.

  2. Material Problems in Using High-Temperature Thermocouples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edler, F.

    2011-08-01

    The material compatibility and thermal stability of ceramic-composite coatings of different oxide ceramics deposited on alumina tubes to prevent the reduction of the alumina were investigated in the high-temperature range between 1750 °C and 1850 °C. It turned out that the coatings were thermally unstable and did not provide adequate protection against the reduction of the alumina tubes. The oxide ceramics formed eutectic compositions with low melting temperatures and were also prone to reduction to elementary metals by carbon. A new type of high-temperature thermocouple on the basis of refractory and noble metals was tested in the temperature range between 1325 °C and 1800 °C. Two metal-sheathed prototypes were constructed. The thermoelectric behavior of the tungsten5%rhenium/iridium thermocouples (W5%Re/Ir) was investigated by different high-temperature exposures, and the thermoelectric stability was checked by repeated measurements at the ice point.

  3. Substrate temperature measurements using ultrasonically bonded Platinel II thermocouples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westerheim, A. C.; Anderson, Alfredo C.; Cima, M. J.

    1992-04-01

    The accurate measurement of substrate temperature is important for thin-film deposition processes. In this paper, we report a simple and reproducible method to bond thermocouples directly to a substrate, thus circumventing many difficulties of other temperature measurement techniques. We have ultrasonically bonded 25-μm-diam wires of two different Au-Pt-Pd alloys (14%-31%-55% and 65%-0%-35%), commercially known as Platinel II, to gold bonding pads evaporated onto several surfaces: stainless steel, LaAlO3, Al2O3, and YBa2Cu3O7-x (YBCO) thin films. The ultrasonic bonding process does not change the thermal emf of the thermocouple from the bulk value, and the resultant bond is able to withstand temperature cycling from room temperature to at least 800 °C without detachment of the thermocouple from the surface or change in its thermal emf. We have used these thermocouples to measure the surface temperature of a LaAlO3 substrate and a 2000-Å YBCO film on a LaAlO3 substrate in order to evaluate the effectiveness of silver paste as a thermal contact to anchor substrates to a heater block during the sputter deposition of YBCO thin films. Silver paste is found to provide an excellent contact. At a heater temperature of 750 °C, the temperature difference between the surface of the LaAlO3 substrate and the surface of the heater was 348 °C without silver paste and only 2 °C with silver paste.

  4. A calibration model for screen-caged Peltier thermocouple psychrometers

    Treesearch

    Ray W. Brown; Dale L. Bartos

    1982-01-01

    A calibration model for screen-caged Peltier thermocouple psychrometers was developed that applies to a water potential range of 0 to-80 bars, over a temperature range of 0° to 40° C, and for cooling times of 15 to 60 seconds. In addition, the model corrects for the effects of temperature gradients over zero-offsets from -60 to + 60 microvolts. Complete details of...

  5. Hysteresis Effects and Strain-Induced Homogeneity Effects in Base Metal Thermocouples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlasek, P.; Elliott, C. J.; Pearce, J. V.; Duris, S.; Palencar, R.; Koval, M.; Machin, G.

    2015-03-01

    Thermocouples are used in a wide variety of industrial applications in which they play an important role for temperature control and monitoring. Wire inhomogeneity and hysteresis effects are major sources of uncertainty in thermocouple measurements. To efficiently mitigate these effects, it is first necessary to explore the impact of strain-induced inhomogeneities and hysteresis, and their contribution to the uncertainty. This article investigates homogeneity and hysteresis effects in Types N and K mineral-insulated metal-sheathed (MIMS) thermocouples. Homogeneity of thermocouple wires is known to change when mechanical strain is experienced by the thermoelements. To test this influence, bends of increasingly small radii, typical in industrial applications, were made to a number of thermocouples with different sheath diameters. The change in homogeneity was determined through controlled immersion of the thermocouple into an isothermal liquid oil bath at and was found to be very small at for Type K thermocouples, with no measureable change in Type N thermocouples found. An experiment to determine the hysteresis effect in thermocouples was performed on swaged, MIMS Type N and Type K thermocouples, in the temperature range from to . The hysteresis measurements presented simulate the conditions that thermocouples may be exposed to in industrial applications through continuous cycling over 136 h. During this exposure, a characteristic drift from the reference function has been observed but no considerable difference between the heating and cooling measurements was measureable. The measured differences were within the measurement uncertainties; therefore, no hysteresis was observed.

  6. Thin film thermocouples for thermoelectric characterization of nanostructured materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grayson, Matthew; Zhou, Chuanle; Varrenti, Andrew; Chyung, Seung Hye; Long, Jieyi; Memik, Seda

    2011-03-01

    The increased use of nanostructured materials as thermoelectrics requires reliable and accurate characterization of the anisotropic thermal coefficients of small structures, such as superlattices and quantum wire networks. Thin evaporated metal films can be used to create thermocouples with a very small thermal mass and low thermal conductivity, in order to measure thermal gradients on nanostructures and thereby measure the thermal conductivity and the Seebeck coefficient of the nanostructure. In this work we confirm the known result that thin metal films have lower Seebeck coefficients than bulk metals, and we also calibrate the Seebeck coefficient of a thin-film Ni/Cr thermocouple with 50 nm thickness, showing it to have about 1/4 the bulk value. We demonstrate reproducibility of this thin-filmSeebeck coefficient on multiple substrates, and we show that this coefficient does, in fact, change as a function of film thickness. We will discuss prototype measurement designs and preliminary work as to how these thin films can be used to study both Seebeck coefficients and thermal conductivities of superlattices in various geometries. The same technology can in principle be used on integrated circuits for thermal mapping, under the name ``Integrated On-Chip Thermocouple Array'' (IOTA).

  7. Evaluation of Piecewise Polynomial Equations for Two Types of Thermocouples

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Andrew; Chen, Chiachung

    2013-01-01

    Thermocouples are the most frequently used sensors for temperature measurement because of their wide applicability, long-term stability and high reliability. However, one of the major utilization problems is the linearization of the transfer relation between temperature and output voltage of thermocouples. The linear calibration equation and its modules could be improved by using regression analysis to help solve this problem. In this study, two types of thermocouple and five temperature ranges were selected to evaluate the fitting agreement of different-order polynomial equations. Two quantitative criteria, the average of the absolute error values |e|ave and the standard deviation of calibration equation estd, were used to evaluate the accuracy and precision of these calibrations equations. The optimal order of polynomial equations differed with the temperature range. The accuracy and precision of the calibration equation could be improved significantly with an adequate higher degree polynomial equation. The technique could be applied with hardware modules to serve as an intelligent sensor for temperature measurement. PMID:24351627

  8. A joint computational and experimental study to evaluate Inconel-sheathed thermocouple performance in flames.

    SciTech Connect

    Brundage, Aaron L.; Nicolette, Vernon F.; Donaldson, A. Burl; Kearney, Sean Patrick; Gill, Walter

    2005-09-01

    A joint experimental and computational study was performed to evaluate the capability of the Sandia Fire Code VULCAN to predict thermocouple response temperature. Thermocouple temperatures recorded by an Inconel-sheathed thermocouple inserted into a near-adiabatic flat flame were predicted by companion VULCAN simulations. The predicted thermocouple temperatures were within 6% of the measured values, with the error primarily attributable to uncertainty in Inconel 600 emissivity and axial conduction losses along the length of the thermocouple assembly. Hence, it is recommended that future thermocouple models (for Inconel-sheathed designs) include a correction for axial conduction. Given the remarkable agreement between experiment and simulation, it is recommended that the analysis be repeated for thermocouples in flames with pollutants such as soot.

  9. Thermocouples of tantalum and rhenium alloys for more stable vacuum-high temperature performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, J. F. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    Thermocouples of the present invention provide stability and performance reliability in systems involving high temperatures and vacuums by employing a bimetallic thermocouple sensor wherein each metal of the sensor is selected from a group of metals comprising tantalum and rhenium and alloys containing only those two metals. The tantalum, rhenium thermocouple sensor alloys provide bare metal thermocouple sensors having advantageous vapor pressure compatibilities and performance characteristics. The compatibility and physical characteristics of the thermocouple sensor alloys of the present invention result in improved emf, temperature properties and thermocouple hot junction performance. The thermocouples formed of the tantalum, rhenium alloys exhibit reliability and performance stability in systems involving high temperatures and vacuums and are adaptable to space propulsion and power systems and nuclear environments.

  10. Enhancements to High Temperature In-Pile Thermocouple Performance

    SciTech Connect

    J. C. Crepeau; J. L. Rempe; J. E. Daw; D. L. Knudson; K. G. Condie; S. C. Wilkins

    2008-03-01

    A joint University of Idaho (UI) and Idaho National Laboratory (INL) University Nuclear Research Initiative (UNERI) was to initiated to extend initial INL efforts to develop doped lybdenum/niobium alloy High Temperature Irradiation Resistant Thermocouples (HTIR-TCs). The overall objective of this UNERI was to develop recommendations for an optimized thermocouple design for high temperature, long duration, in-pile testing by expanding upon results from initial INL efforts. Tasks to quantify the impact of candidate enhancements, such as alternate alloys, alternate geometries, and alternate thermocouple fabrication techniques, on thermocouple performance were completed at INL's High Temperature Test Laboratory (HTTL), a state of the art facility equipped with specialized equipment and trained staff in the area of high temperature instrumentation development and evaluation. Key results of these evaluations, which are documented in this report, are as follows. The doped molybdenum and Nb-1%Zr, which were proposed in the initial INL HTIR-TC design, were found to retain ductility better than the developmental molybdenum-low niobium alloys and the niobium-low molybdenum alloys evaluated. Hence, the performance and lower cost of the commercially available KW-Mo makes a thermocouple containing KW-Mo and Nb-1%Zr the best option at this time. HTIR-TCs containing larger diameter wires offer the potential to increase HTIR-TC stability and reliability at higher temperatures. HTIR-TC heat treatment temperatures and times should be limited to not more than 100 °C above the proposed operating temperatures and to durations of at least 4 to 5 hours. Preliminary investigations suggest that the performance of swaged and loose assembly HTIR-TC designs is similar. However, the swaged designs are less expensive and easier to construct. In addition to optimizing HTIR-TC performance, This UNERI project provided unique opportunities to several University of Idaho students, allowing them to

  11. Enhancements to High Temperature In-Pile Thermocouple Performance

    SciTech Connect

    J.C. Crepeau; J.L. Rempe; J.E. Daw; D.L. Knudson: K.G. Condie; S.C. Wilkins

    2008-03-31

    A joint University of Idaho (UI) and Idaho National Laboratory (INL) University Nuclear Research Initiative (UNERI) was to initiated to extend initial INL efforts to develop doped molybdenum/niobium alloy High Temperature Irradiation Resistant Thermocouples (HTIR-TCs). The overall objective of this UNERI was to develop recommendations for an optimized thermocouple design for high temperature, long duration, in-pile testing by expanding upon results from initial INL efforts. Tasks to quantify the impact of candidate enhancements, such as alternate alloys, alternate geometries, and alternate thermocouple fabrication techniques, on thermocouple performance were completed at INL's High Temperature Test Laboratory (HTTL), a state of the art facility equipped with specialized equipment and trained staff in the area of high temperature instrumentation development and evaluation. Key results of these evaluations, which are documented in this report, are as follows. The doped molybdenum and Nb-1%Zr, which were proposed in the initial INL HTIR-TC design, were found to retain ductility better than the developmental molybdenum-low niobium alloys and the niobium-low molybdenum alloys evaluated. Hence, the performance and lower cost of the commercially available KW-Mo makes a thermocouple containing KW-Mo and Nb-1%Zr the best option at this time. HTIR-TCs containing larger diameter wires offer the potential to increase HTIR-TC stability and reliability at higher temperatures. HTIR-TC heat treatment temperatures and times should be limited to not more than 100 C above the proposed operating temperatures and to durations of at least 4 to 5 hours. Preliminary investigations suggest that the performance of swaged and loose assembly HTIR-TC designs is similar. However, the swaged designs are less expensive and easier to construct. In addition to optimizing HTIR-TC performance, This UNERI project provided unique opportunities to several University of Idaho students, allowing them to

  12. Characterization of a Method for Inverse Heat Conduction Using Real and Simulated Thermocouple Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pizzo, Michelle E.; Glass, David E.

    2017-01-01

    It is often impractical to instrument the external surface of high-speed vehicles due to the aerothermodynamic heating. Temperatures can instead be measured internal to the structure using embedded thermocouples, and direct and inverse methods can then be used to estimate temperature and heat flux on the external surface. Two thermocouples embedded at different depths are required to solve direct and inverse problems, and filtering schemes are used to reduce noise in the measured data. Accuracy in the estimated surface temperature and heat flux is dependent on several factors. Factors include the thermocouple location through the thickness of a material, the sensitivity of the surface solution to the error in the specified location of the embedded thermocouples, and the sensitivity to the error in thermocouple data. The effect of these factors on solution accuracy is studied using the methodology discussed in the work of Pizzo, et. al.1 A numerical study is performed to determine if there is an optimal depth at which to embed one thermocouple through the thickness of a material assuming that a second thermocouple is installed on the back face. Solution accuracy will be discussed for a range of embedded thermocouple depths. Moreover, the sensitivity of the surface solution to (a) the error in the specified location of the embedded thermocouple and to (b) the error in the thermocouple data are quantified using numerical simulation, and the results are discussed.

  13. Management of leg ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, P; Ballantyne, S

    2000-01-01

    Leg ulcer is a leading cause of morbidity among older subjects, especially women in the Western world. About 400 years BC, Hippocrates wrote, "In case of an ulcer, it is not expedient to stand, especially if the ulcer be situated on the leg". Hippocrates himself had a leg ulcer. The best treatment of any leg ulcer depends upon the accurate diagnosis and the underlying aetiology. The majority of leg ulcers are due to venous disease and/or arterial disease, but the treatment of the underlying cause is far more important than the choice of dressing. The aetiology, pathogenesis, treatment, and the future trends in the management of the leg ulcers are discussed in this review.
 PMID:11060140

  14. Nocturnal leg cramps.

    PubMed

    Monderer, Renee S; Wu, Winfred P; Thorpy, Michael J

    2010-01-01

    Nocturnal leg cramps are a frequent cause of sleep disturbance among the general population, especially among the elderly. These painful episodes can delay sleep onset and awaken the patient from sleep, as well as delay subsequent return to sleep. Different mechanisms have been proposed to explain this phenomenon. Although most cases of leg cramps are idiopathic, multiple secondary causes of sleep-related leg cramps have been identified as well. In this article, we review the epidemiology, pathophysiology, and risk factors and discuss the salient features of the diagnosis and workup. Finally, we review the wide array of behavioral and pharmacologic treatments that have been studied for nocturnal leg cramps.

  15. Summary of Thermocouple Performance During Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Irradiation Experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor and Out-of-Pile Thermocouple Testing in Support of Such Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    A. J. Palmer; DC Haggard; J. W. Herter; M. Scervini; W. D. Swank; D. L. Knudson; R. S. Cherry

    2011-07-01

    High temperature gas reactor experiments create unique challenges for thermocouple based temperature measurements. As a result of the interaction with neutrons, the thermoelements of the thermocouples undergo transmutation, which produces a time dependent change in composition and, as a consequence, a time dependent drift of the thermocouple signal. This drift is particularly severe for high temperature platinum-rhodium thermocouples (Types S, R, and B); and tungsten-rhenium thermocouples (Types C and W). For lower temperature applications, previous experiences with type K thermocouples in nuclear reactors have shown that they are affected by neutron irradiation only to a limited extent. Similarly type N thermocouples are expected to be only slightly affected by neutron fluxes. Currently the use of these Nickel based thermocouples is limited when the temperature exceeds 1000°C due to drift related to phenomena other than nuclear irradiation. High rates of open-circuit failure are also typical. Over the past ten years, three long-term Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) experiments have been conducted with measured temperatures ranging from 700oC – 1200oC. A variety of standard Type N and specialty thermocouple designs have been used in these experiments with mixed results. A brief summary of thermocouple performance in these experiments is provided. Most recently, out of pile testing has been conducted on a variety of Type N thermocouple designs at the following (nominal) temperatures and durations: 1150oC and 1200oC for 2000 hours at each temperature, followed by 200 hours at 1250oC, and 200 hours at 1300oC. The standard Type N design utilizes high purity crushed MgO insulation and an Inconel 600 sheath. Several variations on the standard Type N design were tested, including Haynes 214 alloy sheath, spinel (MgAl2O4) insulation instead of MgO, a customized sheath developed at the University of Cambridge, and finally a loose assembly thermocouple with hard fired alumina

  16. Summary of thermocouple performance during advanced gas reactor fuel irradiation experiments in the advanced test reactor and out-of-pile thermocouple testing in support of such experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, A. J.; Haggard, DC; Herter, J. W.; Swank, W. D.; Knudson, D. L.; Cherry, R. S.; Scervini, M.

    2015-07-01

    High temperature gas reactor experiments create unique challenges for thermocouple-based temperature measurements. As a result of the interaction with neutrons, the thermoelements of the thermocouples undergo transmutation, which produces a time-dependent change in composition and, as a consequence, a time-dependent drift of the thermocouple signal. This drift is particularly severe for high temperature platinum-rhodium thermocouples (Types S, R, and B) and tungsten-rhenium thermocouples (Type C). For lower temperature applications, previous experiences with Type K thermocouples in nuclear reactors have shown that they are affected by neutron irradiation only to a limited extent. Similarly, Type N thermocouples are expected to be only slightly affected by neutron fluence. Currently, the use of these nickel-based thermocouples is limited when the temperature exceeds 1000 deg. C due to drift related to phenomena other than nuclear irradiation. High rates of open-circuit failure are also typical. Over the past 10 years, three long-term Advanced Gas Reactor experiments have been conducted with measured temperatures ranging from 700 deg. C - 1200 deg. C. A variety of standard Type N and specialty thermocouple designs have been used in these experiments with mixed results. A brief summary of thermocouple performance in these experiments is provided. Most recently, out-of-pile testing has been conducted on a variety of Type N thermocouple designs at the following (nominal) temperatures and durations: 1150 deg. C and 1200 deg. C for 2,000 hours at each temperature, followed by 200 hours at 1250 deg. C and 200 hours at 1300 deg. C. The standard Type N design utilizes high purity, crushed MgO insulation and an Inconel 600 sheath. Several variations on the standard Type N design were tested, including a Haynes 214 alloy sheath, spinel (MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}) insulation instead of MgO, a customized sheath developed at the University of Cambridge, and finally a loose assembly

  17. Correction of thermal gradient errors in stem thermocouple hygrometers.

    PubMed

    Michel, B E

    1979-01-01

    Stem thermocouple hygrometers were subjected to transient and stable thermal gradients while in contact with reference solutions of NaCl. Both dew point and psychrometric voltages were directly related to zero offset voltages, the latter reflecting the size of the thermal gradient. Although slopes were affected by absolute temperature, they were not affected by water potential. One hygrometer required a correction of 1.75 bars water potential per microvolt of zero offset, a value that was constant from 20 to 30 C.

  18. Recent improvements on micro-thermocouple based SThM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, TP; Thiery, L.; Teyssieux, D.; Briand, D.; Vairac, P.

    2017-01-01

    The scanning thermal microscope (SThM) has become a versatile tool for local surface temperature mapping or measuring thermal properties of solid materials. In this article, we present recent improvements in a SThM system, based on a micro-wire thermocouple probe associated with a quartz tuning fork for contact strength detection. Some results obtained on an electrothermal micro-hotplate device, operated in active and passive modes, allow demonstrating its performance as a coupled force detection and thermal measurement system.

  19. Correction of Thermal Gradient Errors in Stem Thermocouple Hygrometers

    PubMed Central

    Michel, Burlyn E.

    1979-01-01

    Stem thermocouple hygrometers were subjected to transient and stable thermal gradients while in contact with reference solutions of NaCl. Both dew point and psychrometric voltages were directly related to zero offset voltages, the latter reflecting the size of the thermal gradient. Although slopes were affected by absolute temperature, they were not affected by water potential. One hygrometer required a correction of 1.75 bars water potential per microvolt of zero offset, a value that was constant from 20 to 30 C. PMID:16660685

  20. Linearly enhanced response of thermopower in cascaded array of dual-stripe single-metal thermocouples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Gang; Han, Danhong; Yang, Fan; Wang, Zhenhai; Pi, Yudan; Wang, Wei; Xu, Shengyong

    2017-05-01

    Based on the width dependence of thermopower, cascaded single-metal thermocouples were demonstrated in this report. The cascaded thermocouples were made from 100 nm thick Ni films with a 100 μm wide stripe and a 5 μm narrow stripe. The experiment results showed a linearly enhanced response of thermopower. The 64-cascaded thermocouple achieved an equivalent Seebeck coefficient of up to 55.69 μV/K, which is higher than that of a commercial type-K thermocouple (39.6 μV/K). The single-metal thermocouples were also fabricated on flexible substrates. With the simple fabrication process and remarkable temperature sensing ability, the cascaded single-metal thermocouples may find promising applications in temperature measurement of modern flexible electronic products and wearable devices.

  1. Temporary Thermocouple Attachment for Thermal/Vacuum Testing at Non-Extreme Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ungar, Eugene K.; Wright, Sarah E.

    2016-01-01

    Post-test examination and data analysis that followed a two week long vacuum test showed that numerous self-stick thermocouples became detached from the test article. The thermocouples were reattached with thermally conductive epoxy and the test was repeated to obtain the required data. Because the thermocouple detachment resulted in significant expense and rework, it was decided to investigate the temporary attachment methods used around NASA and to perform a test to assess their efficacy. The present work describes the original test and the analysis that showed that the thermocouples had become detached, temporary thermocouple attachment methods assessed in the retest and in the thermocouple attachment test, and makes a recommendation for attachment methods for future tests.

  2. Acute Effects of Normobaric Hypoxia on Hand-Temperature Responses During and After Local Cold Stress

    PubMed Central

    Kölegård, Roger; Mekjavic, Igor B.; Eiken, Ola

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Keramidas, Michail E, Roger Kölegård, Igor B. Mekjavic, and Ola Eiken. Acute effects of normobaric hypoxia on hand-temperature responses during and after local cold stress. High Alt Med Biol. 15:183–191, 2014.—The purpose was to investigate acute effects of normobaric hypoxia on hand-temperature responses during and after a cold-water hand immersion test. Fifteen males performed two right-hand immersion tests in 8°C water, during which they were inspiring either room air (Fio2: 0.21; AIR), or a hypoxic gas mixture (Fio2: 0.14; HYPO). The tests were conducted in a counterbalanced order and separated by a 1-hour interval. Throughout the 30-min cold-water immersion (CWI) and the 15-min spontaneous rewarming (RW) phases, finger-skin temperatures were measured continuously with thermocouple probes; infrared thermography was also employed during the RW phase to map all segments of the hand. During the CWI phase, the average skin temperature (Tavg) of the fingers did not differ between the conditions (AIR: 10.2±0.5°C, HYPO: 10.0±0.5°C; p=0.67). However, Tavg was lower in the HYPO than the AIR RW phase (AIR: 24.5±3.4°C; HYPO: 22.0±3.8°C; p=0.002); a response that was alike in all regions of the immersed hand. Accordingly, present findings suggest that acute exposure to normobaric hypoxia does not aggravate the cold-induced drop in hand temperature of normothermic males. Still, hypoxia markedly impairs the rewarming responses of the hand. PMID:24666109

  3. Thin-Film Thermocouple Technology Demonstrated for Reliable Heat Transfer Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Exploratory work is in progress to apply thin-film thermocouples to localized heat transfer measurements on turbine engine vanes and blades. The emerging thin-film thermocouple technology shows great potential to improve the accuracy of local heat transfer measurements. To verify and master the experimental methodology of thin-film thermocouples, the NASA Lewis Research Center conducted a proof-of-concept experiment in a controlled environment before applying the thin-film sensors to turbine tests.

  4. Stability of cable thermocouples at the upper temperature limit of their working range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulanovskiy, A. A.; Zemba, E. S.; Belenkiy, A. M.; Chibizova, S. I.; Bursin, A. N.

    2013-09-01

    Experimental results of EMF stability research are presented for MIMS thermocouples of types K and N of external diameters 1.5; 3.0 and 5.0 mm. All thermocouples had heat resistant sheath and were not used before the tests. They were subjected to every-day cyclic heating and cooling. During each cycle there was 6 h annealing in air at the temperature 1200 °C Results shows, that stability of a cable thermocouple in air at the temperature 1200 °C depends, mainly, on its diameter, instead of on thermocouple type or metal sheath material. Acceptable time of operation in a thermal cycling mode for 1.5 mm cable thermocouples is limited by (15, 16) h, and for 3 mm thermocouples it is equal to (40, 45) h. Besides, the effect of signal shunting is shown in the work for a thermocouple under heating of its average part to the temperature 1200 °C Experiment has shown that use of long cable thermocouple of 1.5 mm diameter at the temperatures above 1000°C can lead to serious errors in temperature measurement. Heating of 400 mm thermocouple length to 1100 °C causes positive EMF in the 1.5 mm cable thermocouple equivalent to +3.4 °C and +18 °C at 1200°C. For 3 mm cable thermocouple EMF at 1200 °C reaches the value equivalent to +2.3 °C, but double increase in heating length makes the value greater to +13.5 °C. The given facts are necessary to consider while using of thin (1, 3) mm cable thermocouples at the temperatures (1100, 1200) °C.

  5. Study of performance characteristics of noble metal thermocouple materials to 2000 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeze, P. D.; Thomas, D.; Edelman, S.; Stern, J.

    1972-01-01

    Three performance characteristics of noble metal thermocouples in various environments are discussed. Catalytic effects cause significant errors when noble metal thermocouple materials are exposed to air containing unburned gases in temperature ranges from 25 C to 1500 C. The thermoelectric stability of the iridium 40 rhodium to iridium thermocouple system at 2000 C in an oxidizing medium is described. The effects of large and small temperature gradients on the accuracy and stability of temperature measurements are analyzed.

  6. Restless Legs Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Restless Legs Syndrome Share Print Restless Legs Syndrome Table of Contents1. Overview2. Symptoms3. Diagnosis4. Treatment5. Questions OverviewWhat ... twitch when you try and sleep (also called periodic limb movements of sleep or PLMS). DiagnosisHow does ...

  7. Pt/Pd thermocouple resilience over 327 operating hours in an industrial calibration laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliott, C. J.; Pearce, J. V.; Machin, G.; Ford, T.; Hicks, K.

    2013-09-01

    Two Pt/Pd thermocouples have been manufactured industrially at CCPI-Europe to a robust design optimised by NPL. The first has been exposed to temperatures up to 1000 °C for 93 operating hours and the second exposed to higher temperatures (up to 1300 °C) for 327 operating hours, over the course of a year. No significant drift is observed in the temperature measurement for either Pt/Pd thermocouple, when compared against reference Type R thermocouples. This work demonstrates the long-term stability and reliability of Pt/Pd thermocouples in use within an industrial calibration environment with this optimised, robust design.

  8. Operation and Service Manual for Thermocouple Checkout Box 52E440047,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    for testing spacecraft thermocouples and their associated wiring harnesses . The STDR describes the unit, its controls and their function and contains servicing instructions for preventive maintenance. (Author)

  9. Heat flux measurements on ceramics with thin film thermocouples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holanda, Raymond; Anderson, Robert C.; Liebert, Curt H.

    1993-01-01

    Two methods were devised to measure heat flux through a thick ceramic using thin film thermocouples. The thermocouples were deposited on the front and back face of a flat ceramic substrate. The heat flux was applied to the front surface of the ceramic using an arc lamp Heat Flux Calibration Facility. Silicon nitride and mullite ceramics were used; two thicknesses of each material was tested, with ceramic temperatures to 1500 C. Heat flux ranged from 0.05-2.5 MW/m2(sup 2). One method for heat flux determination used an approximation technique to calculate instantaneous values of heat flux vs time; the other method used an extrapolation technique to determine the steady state heat flux from a record of transient data. Neither method measures heat flux in real time but the techniques may easily be adapted for quasi-real time measurement. In cases where a significant portion of the transient heat flux data is available, the calculated transient heat flux is seen to approach the extrapolated steady state heat flux value as expected.

  10. An Accurate Temperature Correction Model for Thermocouple Hygrometers 1

    PubMed Central

    Savage, Michael J.; Cass, Alfred; de Jager, James M.

    1982-01-01

    Numerous water relation studies have used thermocouple hygrometers routinely. However, the accurate temperature correction of hygrometer calibration curve slopes seems to have been largely neglected in both psychrometric and dewpoint techniques. In the case of thermocouple psychrometers, two temperature correction models are proposed, each based on measurement of the thermojunction radius and calculation of the theoretical voltage sensitivity to changes in water potential. The first model relies on calibration at a single temperature and the second at two temperatures. Both these models were more accurate than the temperature correction models currently in use for four psychrometers calibrated over a range of temperatures (15-38°C). The model based on calibration at two temperatures is superior to that based on only one calibration. The model proposed for dewpoint hygrometers is similar to that for psychrometers. It is based on the theoretical voltage sensitivity to changes in water potential. Comparison with empirical data from three dewpoint hygrometers calibrated at four different temperatures indicates that these instruments need only be calibrated at, e.g. 25°C, if the calibration slopes are corrected for temperature. PMID:16662241

  11. An accurate temperature correction model for thermocouple hygrometers.

    PubMed

    Savage, M J; Cass, A; de Jager, J M

    1982-02-01

    Numerous water relation studies have used thermocouple hygrometers routinely. However, the accurate temperature correction of hygrometer calibration curve slopes seems to have been largely neglected in both psychrometric and dewpoint techniques.In the case of thermocouple psychrometers, two temperature correction models are proposed, each based on measurement of the thermojunction radius and calculation of the theoretical voltage sensitivity to changes in water potential. The first model relies on calibration at a single temperature and the second at two temperatures. Both these models were more accurate than the temperature correction models currently in use for four psychrometers calibrated over a range of temperatures (15-38 degrees C). The model based on calibration at two temperatures is superior to that based on only one calibration.The model proposed for dewpoint hygrometers is similar to that for psychrometers. It is based on the theoretical voltage sensitivity to changes in water potential. Comparison with empirical data from three dewpoint hygrometers calibrated at four different temperatures indicates that these instruments need only be calibrated at, e.g. 25 degrees C, if the calibration slopes are corrected for temperature.

  12. High Temperature Irradiation-Resistant Thermocouple Performance Improvements

    SciTech Connect

    Joshua Daw; Joy Rempe; Darrell Knudson; John Crepeau; S. Curtis Wilkins

    2009-04-01

    Traditional methods for measuring temperature in-pile degrade at temperatures above 1100 ºC. To address this instrumentation need, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) developed and evaluated the performance of a high temperature irradiation-resistant thermocouple (HTIR-TC) that contains alloys of molybdenum and niobium. Data from high temperature (up to 1500 ºC) long duration (up to 4000 hours) tests and on-going irradiations at INL’s Advanced Test Reactor demonstrate the superiority of these sensors to commercially-available thermocouples. However, several options have been identified that could further enhance their reliability, reduce their production costs, and allow their use in a wider range of operating conditions. This paper presents results from on-going Idaho National Laboratory (INL)/University of Idaho (UI) efforts to investigate options to improve HTIR-TC ductility, reliability, and resolution by investigating specially-formulated alloys of molybdenum and niobium and alternate diameter thermoelements (wires). In addition, on-going efforts to evaluate alternate fabrication approaches, such as drawn and loose assembly techniques will be discussed. Efforts to reduce HTIR-TC fabrication costs, such as the use of less expensive extension cable will also be presented. Finally, customized HTIR-TC designs developed for specific customer needs will be summarized to emphasize the varied conditions under which these sensors may be used.

  13. Cold Stress

    MedlinePlus

    ... Publications and Products Programs Contact NIOSH NIOSH COLD STRESS Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Workers who ... cold environments may be at risk of cold stress. Extreme cold weather is a dangerous situation that ...

  14. [Prevention of leg ulcer].

    PubMed

    Marinović Kulisić, Sandra

    2013-10-01

    Lower leg ulcers is the most common form of ulceration of the lower extremities. The prevalence of leg ulcer varies among studies from 0.1% to 0.6%. In the majority of studies, 1% of the population develop leg ulcer at least once in lifetime. The prevalence is higher in elderly people. There are several hypotheses used to explain the pathophysiological steps leading from the popliteal venous hypertension in value. Currently, the treatment of leg ulcer relies on due knowledge of ulcer pathophysiology and making an accurate diagnosis. Venous disease has a significant impact on quality of life and work productivity. In addition, costs associated with the prevention and treatment of lower leg ulcers are significant.

  15. Restless legs syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bayard, Max; Avonda, Thomas; Wadzinski, James

    2008-07-15

    Restless legs syndrome is a common neurologic movement disorder that affects approximately 10 percent of adults. Of those affected with this condition, approximately one third have symptoms severe enough to require medical therapy. Restless legs syndrome may be a primary condition, or it may be secondary to iron deficiency, renal failure, pregnancy, or the use of certain medications. The diagnosis is clinical, requiring an urge to move the legs usually accompanied by an uncomfortable sensation, occurrence at rest, improvement with activity, and worsening of symptoms in the evening or at night. Restless legs syndrome causes sleep disturbances, is associated with anxiety and depression, and has a negative effect on quality of life. Treatment of secondary causes of restless legs syndrome may result in improvement or resolution of symptoms. Currently, there is little information regarding the effects of lifestyle changes on the symptoms of restless legs syndrome. If medications are needed, dopamine agonists are the primary medications for moderate to severe restless legs syndrome. Other medications that may be effective include gabapentin, carbidopa/levodopa, opioids, and benzodiazepines.

  16. Nocturnal leg cramps.

    PubMed

    Allen, Richard E; Kirby, Karl A

    2012-08-15

    Up to 60 percent of adults report that they have had nocturnal leg cramps. The recurrent, painful tightening usually occurs in the calf muscles and can cause severe insomnia. The exact mechanism is unknown, but the cramps are probably caused by muscle fatigue and nerve dysfunction rather than electrolyte or other abnormalities. Nocturnal leg cramps are associated with vascular disease, lumbar canal stenosis, cirrhosis, hemodialysis, pregnancy, and other medical conditions. Medications that are strongly associated with leg cramps include intravenous iron sucrose, conjugated estrogens, raloxifene, naproxen, and teriparatide. A history and physical examination are usually sufficient to differentiate nocturnal leg cramps from other conditions, such as restless legs syndrome, claudication, myositis, and peripheral neuropathy. Laboratory evaluation and specialized testing usually are unnecessary to confirm the diagnosis. Limited evidence supports treating nocturnal leg cramps with exercise and stretching, or with medications such as magnesium, calcium channel blockers, carisoprodol, or vitamin B(12). Quinine is no longer recommended to treat leg cramps. Copyright © 2012 American Academy of Family Physicians.

  17. Development of a Sheathed Miniature Aerothermal Reentry Thermocouple for Thermal Protection System Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martinez, Edward R.; Weber, Carissa Tudryn; Oishi, Tomo; Santos, Jose; Mach, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    The Sheathed Miniature Aerothermal Reentry Thermocouple is a micro-miniature thermocouple for high temperature measurement in extreme environments. It is available for use in Thermal Protection System materials for ground testing and flight. This paper discusses the heritage, and design of the instrument. Experimental and analytical methods used to verify its performance and limitations are described.

  18. Development of thin film thermocouples on ceramic materials for advanced propulsion system applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holanda, Raymond

    1993-01-01

    Thin film thermocouples were developed for use on metal parts in jet engines to 1000 C. However, advanced propulsion systems are being developed that will use ceramic materials and reach higher temperatures. The purpose is to develop thin film thermocouples for use on ceramic materials. The new thin film thermocouples are Pt13Rh/Pt fabricated by the sputtering process. Lead wires are attached using the parallel-gap welding process. The ceramic materials tested are silicon nitride, silicon carbide, aluminum oxide, and mullite. Both steady state and thermal cycling furnace tests were performed in the temperature range to 1500 C. High-heating-rate tests were performed in an arc lamp heat-flux-calibration facility. The fabrication of the thin film thermocouples is described. The thin film thermocouple output was compared to a reference wire thermocouple. Drift of the thin film thermocouples was determined, and causes of drift are discussed. The results of high heating rate tests up to 2500 C/sec are presented. The stability of the ceramic materials is examined. It is concluded that Pt13Rh/Pt thin film thermocouples are capable of meeting lifetime goals of 50 hr or more up to temperatures of 1500 C depending on the stability of the particular ceramic substrate.

  19. Development of Thin Film Thermocouples on Ceramic Materials for Advanced Propulsion System Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holanda, R.

    1992-01-01

    Thin film thermocouples have been developed for use on metal parts in jet engines to 1000 c. However, advanced propulsion systems are being developed that will use ceramic materials and reach higher temperatures. The purpose of this work is to develop thin film thermocouples for use on ceramic materials. The new thin film thermocouples are Pt13Rh/Pt fabricated by the sputtering process. Lead wires are attached using the parallel-gap welding process. The ceramic materials tested are silicon nitride, silicon carbide, aluminum oxide, and mullite. Both steady state and thermal cycling furnace tests were performed in the temperature range to 1500 C. High-heating-rate tests were performed in an arc lamp heat-flux-calibration facility. The fabrication of the thin film thermocouples is described. The thin film thermocouple output was compared to a reference wire thermocouple. Drift of the thin film thermocouples was determined, and causes of drift are discussed. The results of high heating rate tests up to 2500 C/sec are presented. The stability of the ceramic materials is examined. It is concluded that Pt13Rh/Pt thin film thermocouples are capable of meeting lifetime goals of 50 hours or more up to temperature of 1500 C depending on the stability of the particular ceramic substrate.

  20. Refractory oxide insulated thermocouple designed and analyzed for high temperature applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Popper, G. F.; Zeren, T. Z.

    1969-01-01

    Study establishes design criteria for constructing high temperature thermocouple to measure nuclear fuel pin temperature. The study included a literature search to determine the compatibility of material useful for thermocouples, a hot zone error analysis, and a prototype design for hot junction and connector pin connections.

  1. High-Temperature, Thin-Film Ceramic Thermocouples Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sayir, Ali; Blaha, Charles A.; Gonzalez, Jose M.

    2005-01-01

    To enable long-duration, more distant human and robotic missions for the Vision for Space Exploration, as well as safer, lighter, quieter, and more fuel efficient vehicles for aeronautics and space transportation, NASA is developing instrumentation and material technologies. The high-temperature capabilities of thin-film ceramic thermocouples are being explored at the NASA Glenn Research Center by the Sensors and Electronics Branch and the Ceramics Branch in partnership with Case Western Reserve University (CWRU). Glenn s Sensors and Electronics Branch is developing thin-film sensors for surface measurement of strain, temperature, heat flux, and surface flow in propulsion system research. Glenn s Ceramics Branch, in conjunction with CWRU, is developing structural and functional ceramic technology for aeropropulsion and space propulsion.

  2. Thermoelectric effect in very thin film Pt/Au thermocouples

    SciTech Connect

    Salvadori, M.C.; Vaz, A.R.; Teixeira, F.S.; Cattani, M.; Brown,I.G.

    2006-01-10

    The thickness dependence of the thermoelectric power of Pt films of variable thickness on a reference Au film has been determined for the case when the Pt film thickness, t, is not large compared to the charge carrier mean free path, {ell}, that is, t/{ell}. Pt film thicknesses down to 2.2 nm were investigated. We find that {Delta}S{sub F} = S{sub B}-S{sub F} (where S{sub B} and S{sub F} are the thermopowers of the Pt bulk and film, respectively) does not vary linearly as 1/t as is the case for thin film thermocouples when the film thickness is large compared to the charge carrier mean free path.

  3. Reference data for thermocouple materials below the ice point.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sparks, L. L.; Powell, R. L.

    1972-01-01

    Standard thermoelectric data have been determined for four thermocouple combinations used below the ice point: commercial types E, K, and T and the special combination of KP vs Au-0.07 at.% Fe. Power series coefficients necessary to generate E = f(T) data for these combinations are given. In addition, extensive tests were carried out to ascertain the variability between materials from different manufacturers. Typical wires processed for low-temperature usage often have slightly thermoelectric properties (up to 1%) from those, nominally identical, wires made for high-temperature applications. Generally, type E is the most satisfactory standardized commercial combination. The Au-0.07 at.% Fe material has been examined in particular detail, because it is not yet an ISA standard material. It has excellent sensitivity in the liquid helium/liquid hydrogen temperature range and a nearly linear thermovoltage at higher temperatures.

  4. Comparison of interpretation methods of thermocouple psychrometer readouts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guz, Łukasz; Majerek, Dariusz; Sobczuk, Henryk; Guz, Ewa; Połednik, Bernard

    2017-07-01

    Thermocouple psychrometers allow to determine the water potential, which can be easily recalculated into relative humidity of air in cavity of porous materials. The available typical measuring range of probe is very narrow. The lower limit of water potential measurements is about -200 kPa. On the other hand, the upper limit is approximately equal to -7000 kPa and depends on many factors. These paper presents a comparison of two interpretation methods of thermocouple microvolt output regarding: i) amplitude of voltage during wet-bulb temperature depression, ii) field under microvolt output curve. Previous results of experiments indicate that there is a robust correlation between water potential and field under microvolt output curve. In order to obtain correct results of water potential, each probe should be calibrated. The range of NaCl salt solutions with molality from 0.75M to 2.25M was used for calibration, which enable to obtain the osmotic potential from -3377 kPa to -10865 kPa. During measurements was applied 5mA heating current over a span 5 s and 5 mA cooling current aver a span 30s. The conducted study proves that using only different interpretation method based on field under microvolt output it is possible to achieve about 1000 kPa wider range of water potential. The average relative mean square error (RMSE) of this interpretation method is 1199 kPa while voltage amplitude based method yields average RMSE equaling 1378 kPa during calibration in temperature not stabilized conditions.

  5. Night Leg Cramps

    MedlinePlus

    ... feet or thighs might cramp as well. Forcefully stretching the contracted muscle relieves the pain. Most of ... include: Drinking plenty of fluids to avoid dehydration Stretching your leg muscles or riding a stationary bicycle ...

  6. Peripheral artery disease - legs

    MedlinePlus

    ... pale. When PAD becomes severe, you may have: Impotence Pain and cramps at night Pain or tingling ... emboli that block small arteries Coronary artery disease Impotence Open sores (ischemic ulcers on the lower legs) ...

  7. Peripheral artery bypass - leg

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007394.htm Peripheral artery bypass - leg To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Peripheral artery bypass is surgery to reroute the blood supply ...

  8. Restless legs syndrome.

    PubMed

    Venkateshiah, Saiprakash B; Ioachimescu, Octavian C

    2015-07-01

    Restless legs syndrome is a common sensorimotor disorder characterized by an urge to move, and associated with uncomfortable sensations in the legs (limbs). Restless legs syndrome can lead to sleep-onset or sleep-maintenance insomnia, and occasionally excessive daytime sleepiness, all leading to significant morbidity. Brain iron deficiency and dopaminergic neurotransmission abnormalities play a central role in the pathogenesis of this disorder, along with other nondopaminergic systems, although the exact mechanisms are still. Intensive care unit patients are especially vulnerable to have unmasking or exacerbation of restless legs syndrome because of sleep deprivation, circadian rhythm disturbance, immobilization, iron deficiency, and use of multiple medications that can antagonize dopamine. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Method of preventing leakage of a fluid along and through an insulating jacket of a thermocouple

    DOEpatents

    Thermos, Anthony Constantine; Rahal, Fadi Elias

    2002-01-01

    A thermocouple assembly includes a thermocouple; a plurality of lead wires extending from the thermocouple; an insulating jacket extending along and enclosing the plurality of leads; and at least one internally sealed area within the insulating jacket to prevent fluid leakage along and within the insulating jacket. The invention also provides a method of preventing leakage of a fluid along and through an insulating jacket of a thermocouple including the steps of a) attaching a plurality of lead wires to a thermocouple; b) adding a heat sensitive pseudo-wire to extend along the plurality of lead wires; c) enclosing the lead wires and pseudo-wire inside an insulating jacket; d) locally heating axially spaced portions of the insulating jacket to a temperature which melts the pseudo-wire and fuses it with an interior surface of the jacket.

  10. Investigation of factors affecting the heater wire method of calibrating fine wire thermocouples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keshock, E. G.

    1972-01-01

    An analytical investigation was made of a transient method of calibrating fine wire thermocouples. The system consisted of a 10 mil diameter standard thermocouple (Pt, Pt-13% Rh) and an 0.8 mil diameter chromel-alumel thermocouple attached to a 20 mil diameter electrically heated platinum wire. The calibration procedure consisted of electrically heating the wire to approximately 2500 F within about a seven-second period in an environment approximating atmospheric conditions at 120,000 feet. Rapid periodic readout of the standard and fine wire thermocouple signals permitted a comparison of the two temperature indications. An analysis was performed which indicated that the temperature distortion at the heater wire produced by the thermocouple junctions appears to be of negligible magnitude. Consequently, the calibration technique appears to be basically sound, although several practical changes which appear desirable are presented and discussed. Additional investigation is warranted to evaluate radiation effects and transient response characteristics.

  11. Development of Local Gas Temperature Measurement Technique inside a Combustion Chamber Using Two-Wire Thermocouple

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Shigemi; Moriyoshi, Yasuo; Enomoto, Yoshiteru

    Thermocouples are widely used to measure the local gas temperature due to its accuracy and convenience. However, it is difficult to use thermocouples in a transient phenomenon such as reacting fields. In this study, the unsteady gas temperature inside a combustion chamber was measured by using an improved two-wire thermocouple technique. Based on previous two-wire methods, some modifications were examined. Firstly, numerical analysis of heat transfer between transient flow and thermocouple was performed to see what kind of modification was required. Secondly, a correction term was added to the basic equation, which was validated by experiments using a Rapid Compression and Expansion Machine. Finally, an improved two-wire thermocouple technique was evaluated by measuring the transient gas temperature inside a combustion chamber and compared to the estimated temperature using measured pressure data and assumptions of chemical equilibrium.

  12. Thermocouples fabricated on trench sidewall in microfluidic channel bonded with film cover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Takahiro; Shibata, Masahiro; Kumagai, Shinya; Sasaki, Minoru

    2015-03-01

    Thermocouples on a trench sidewall fronting a flow are fabricated by three-dimensional (3D) photolithography. The conventional thermocouples on the wafer top surface are also fabricated. The performances of these devices are compared. Without the flow inside the microchannel, the thermocouple on the trench sidewall shows the same output voltage as that on the wafer top surface positioned 40 µm from the channel. As a static response, when the microchannel is heated and room-temperature air flows inside the channel, the thermocouple on the sidewall shows a lower voltage. As a dynamic response, when hot air flows inside the channel and replaces the room-temperature air, the thermocouple on the sidewall shows a faster response, increasing its output voltage, and the local temperature of the flow can be measured more precisely.

  13. Actuator device for artificial leg

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burch, J. L. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    An actuator device is described for moving an artificial leg of a person having a prosthesis replacing an entire leg and hip joint. The device includes a first articulated hip joint assembly carried by the natural leg and a second articulated hip joint assembly carried by the prosthesis whereby energy from the movement of the natural leg is transferred by a compressible fluid from the first hip joint assembly to the second hip joint assembly for moving the artificial leg.

  14. Common Cold

    MedlinePlus

    ... nose, coughing - everyone knows the symptoms of the common cold. It is probably the most common illness. In ... avoid colds. There is no cure for the common cold. For relief, try Getting plenty of rest Drinking ...

  15. Cold Urticaria

    MedlinePlus

    ... throat when consuming cold food or drink Severe reactions may include: A whole-body response (anaphylaxis), which ... to cold water. The majority of cold urticaria reactions occur when skin is exposed to temperatures lower ...

  16. Venous leg ulcers.

    PubMed

    Nelson, E Andrea

    2011-12-21

    Leg ulcers usually occur secondary to venous reflux or obstruction, but 20% of people with leg ulcers have arterial disease, with or without venous disorders. Between 1.5 and 3.0/1000 people have active leg ulcers. Prevalence increases with age to about 20/1000 in people aged over 80 years. We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of standard treatments, adjuvant treatments, and organisational interventions for venous leg ulcers? What are the effects of advice about self-help interventions in people receiving usual care for venous leg ulcers? What are the effects of interventions to prevent recurrence of venous leg ulcers? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to June 2011 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). We found 101 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: compression bandages and stockings, cultured allogenic (single or bilayer) skin replacement, debriding agents, dressings (cellulose, collagen, film, foam, hyaluronic acid-derived, semi-occlusive alginate), hydrocolloid (occlusive) dressings in the presence of compression, intermittent pneumatic compression, intravenous prostaglandin E1, larval therapy, laser treatment (low-level), leg ulcer clinics, multilayer elastic system, multilayer elastomeric (or non-elastomeric) high-compression regimens or bandages, oral treatments (aspirin, flavonoids, pentoxifylline, rutosides, stanozolol, sulodexide

  17. Venous leg ulcers

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Leg ulcers usually occur secondary to venous reflux or obstruction, but 20% of people with leg ulcers have arterial disease, with or without venous disorders. Between 1.5 and 3.0/1000 people have active leg ulcers. Prevalence increases with age to about 20/1000 in people aged over 80 years. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of standard treatments, adjuvant treatments, and organisational interventions for venous leg ulcers? What are the effects of advice about self-help interventions in people receiving usual care for venous leg ulcers? What are the effects of interventions to prevent recurrence of venous leg ulcers? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to June 2011 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 101 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: compression bandages and stockings, cultured allogenic (single or bilayer) skin replacement, debriding agents, dressings (cellulose, collagen, film, foam, hyaluronic acid-derived, semi-occlusive alginate), hydrocolloid (occlusive) dressings in the presence of compression, intermittent pneumatic compression, intravenous prostaglandin E1, larval therapy, laser treatment (low-level), leg ulcer clinics, multilayer elastic system, multilayer elastomeric (or non-elastomeric) high-compression regimens or bandages, oral treatments (aspirin, flavonoids

  18. Contact Thermocouple Methodology and Evaluation for Temperature Measurement in the Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brewer, Ethan J.; Pawlik, Ralph J.; Krause, David L.

    2013-01-01

    Laboratory testing of advanced aerospace components very often requires highly accurate temperature measurement and control devices, as well as methods to precisely analyze and predict the performance of such components. Analysis of test articles depends on accurate measurements of temperature across the specimen. Where possible, this task is accomplished using many thermocouples welded directly to the test specimen, which can produce results with great precision. However, it is known that thermocouple spot welds can initiate deleterious cracks in some materials, prohibiting the use of welded thermocouples. Such is the case for the nickel-based superalloy MarM-247, which is used in the high temperature, high pressure heater heads for the Advanced Stirling Converter component of the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator space power system. To overcome this limitation, a method was developed that uses small diameter contact thermocouples to measure the temperature of heater head test articles with the same level of accuracy as welded thermocouples. This paper includes a brief introduction and a background describing the circumstances that compelled the development of the contact thermocouple measurement method. Next, the paper describes studies performed on contact thermocouple readings to determine the accuracy of results. It continues on to describe in detail the developed measurement method and the evaluation of results produced. A further study that evaluates the performance of different measurement output devices is also described. Finally, a brief conclusion and summary of results is provided.

  19. Temporary Thermocouple Attachment for Thermal/Vacuum Testing at Non-Extreme Temperatures - Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, Sarah E.; Ungar, Eugene K.

    2017-01-01

    Post-test examination and data analysis that followed a two week long vacuum test showed that numerous self-stick thermocouples became detached from the test article. The thermocouples were reattached with thermally conductive epoxy and the test was repeated to obtain the required data. Because the thermocouple detachment resulted in significant expense and rework, it was decided to investigate the temporary attachment methods used around NASA and to perform a test to assess their efficacy. The present work describes the testing that was performed in early and mid-2017. The test article and the temporary thermocouple attachment methods tested are described. During the first test, fully half of the thermocouples detached - although the detachment showed subtly in the data for some. The second test was performed to confirm the data from the first test and to investigate the effect of test article and thermocouple grounding. The results of the testing over temperatures ranging from -150 to 200degF are detailed and preliminary recommendations are made for temporary thermocouple attachment methods.

  20. Athletes' leg pains.

    PubMed Central

    Orava, S.; Puranen, J.

    1979-01-01

    The frequency and nature of exertion pains of the leg in athletes were studied in 2,750 cases of overuse injuries treated at the Sports Clinic of the Deaconess Institute of Oulu, Finland, during the years 1972-1977. 465 cases of exertion pain (18%) were located in the shin. The medial tibial syndrome was the most common overuse injury among these athletes, comprising 9.5% of all exertion injuries and 60% of the leg exertion pains. Together with stress fracture of the tibia, the second most common exertion pain of the leg, it accounted for 75% of the total leg pains. There are certain difficulties in differentiating between the medial tibial syndrome and stress fracture of the tibia. They both occur at the same site with similar symptoms. Radiological examination and isotope scanning are needed. The medial tibial syndrome is an overuse injury at the medial tibial border caused by running exercises. The pain is elicited by exertional ischaemia. The pathogenesis is explained by increased pressure in the fascial compartment of the deep flexor muscles due to prolonged exercise. Similar chronic ischaemic pains from exercise are also found in other fascial compartments of the leg, especially in the anterior compartment. The only treatment needed for stress fractures is rest from training. Fascial compartment pains also usually subside. If chronic fascial syndromes prevent training, fasciotomy is recommended as a reliable method to restore the athlete to normal training without pains. PMID:486888

  1. [Restless legs syndrome].

    PubMed

    Lai, Szu-Chia; Chen, Rou-Shayn

    2008-03-01

    The restless legs syndrome (RLS) is a common neurological disorder to take possession of increasing attention. RLS is characterized by an urge to move the legs, usually accompanied by uncomfortable or unpleasant sensations, that occurs or worsen at rest and is relieved by activity. The symptoms of RLS have a major impact on nocturnal sleep and daytime functions. The clinical diagnostic criteria were established and published in 2003 by International Restless Legs Syndrome Study Group (IRLSSG). All four essential criteria must be met for a positive diagnosis. However, RLS encompassed an idiopathic form of genetic or unknown origin and secondary forms associated with many causes. Special awareness should be kept for differential diagnosis such as uremia, iron deficiency anemia, polyneuropathy, rheumatoid arthritis, and other neurodegenerative diseases. Polysomnography, actinography, L-dopa loading test, and suggested immobilization test (SIT) are helpful tools to reduce the diagnostic puzzle of false positive and false negative. Pathophysiological concepts of RLS are essentially based on the neuroimaging and neurophysiological data to assume a dysfunction of the dopaminergic system, possibly on the All neuron group localized in the hypothalamus. These neurons modulate spinal excitability and alter the sensory processing predominantly of leg afferents. Treatment may be closely linked to the dopaminergic system and iron metabolism. Dopaminergic stimulation with levodopa or dopamine agonists is the first choice in idiopathic restless legs syndrome, but the long-term adverse effect of augmentation should be carefully monitored.

  2. Cold adaptations.

    PubMed

    Launay, Jean-Claude; Savourey, Gustave

    2009-07-01

    Nowdays, occupational and recreational activities in cold environments are common. Exposure to cold induces thermoregulatory responses like changes of behaviour and physiological adjustments to maintain thermal balance either by increasing metabolic heat production by shivering and/or by decreasing heat losses consecutive to peripheral cutaneous vasoconstriction. Those physiological responses present a great variability among individuals and depend mainly on biometrical characteristics, age, and general cold adaptation. During severe cold exposure, medical disorders may occur such as accidental hypothermia and/or freezing or non-freezing cold injuries. General cold adaptations have been qualitatively classified by Hammel and quantitatively by Savourey. This last classification takes into account the quantitative changes of the main cold reactions: higher or lower metabolic heat production, higher or lesser heat losses and finally the level of the core temperature observed at the end of a standardized exposure to cold. General cold adaptations observed previously in natives could also be developed in laboratory conditions by continuous or intermittent cold exposures. Beside general cold adaptation, local cold adaptation exists and is characterized by a lesser decrease of skin temperature, a more pronounced cold induced vasodilation, less pain and a higher manual dexterity. Adaptations to cold may reduce the occurrence of accidents and improve human performance as surviving in the cold. The present review describes both general and local cold adaptations in humans and how they are of interest for cold workers.

  3. Investigations of Thermocouple Drift Irregularity Impact on Error of their Inhomogeneity Correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jun, Su; Kochan, Orest

    2014-02-01

    The article examines: (i) the reasons of error due to thermoelectric inhomogeneity of electrodes of thermocouples acquired during prolonged use; (ii) the neural network method of error correction based on a generalization of verification results in several temperature fields; (iii) the method of investigating the impact of changing the speed of the conversion characteristic drift of thermocouple on error correction; (iv) results of this investigation. It is shown that residual error for type K thermocouples at the 5 % level of significance does not exceed μ±0.46 oС and one at the 10 % level of significance does not exceed ±0.25 °С

  4. Thin film thermocouples for high temperature turbine application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Lisa C.

    1991-01-01

    The objective is to develop thin film thermocouples (TFTC) for Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) components such as the high pressure fuel turbopump (HPFTP) blades and to test TFTC survivability and durability in the SSME environment. The purpose for developing TFTC's for SSME components is to obtain blade temperatures for computational models developed for fluid mechanics and structures. The TFTC must be able to withstand the presence of high temperature, high pressure hydrogen as well as a severe thermal transient due to a cryogenic to combustion temperature change. The TFTC's will eventually be installed and tested on SSME propulsion system components in the SSME test bed engine. The TFTC's were successfully fabricated on flat coupons of MAR-M 246 (Hf+), which is the superalloy material used for HPFTP turbine blades. The TFTC's fabricated on flat coupons survived thermal shock cycling as well as testing in a heat flux measurement facility which provided a rapid thermal transient. The same fabrication procedure was used to deposit TFTC's on HPFTP first stage rotor blades. Other results from the experiments are presented, and future testing plans are discussed.

  5. Field installed brazed thermocouple feedthroughs for high vacuum experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, P. M.; Messick, C.

    1983-12-01

    In order to reduce the occurrence of vacuum leaks and to increase the availability of the DIII vacuum vessel for experimental operation, effort was applied to developing a vacuum-tight brazed feedthrough system for sheathed thermocouples, stainless steel sheathed conductor cables and tubes for cooling fluids. This brazed technique is a replacement for elastomer O ring sealed feedthroughs that have proven vulnerable to leaks caused by thermal cycling, etc. To date, about 200 feedthroughs were used. Up to 91 were grouped on a single conflat flange mounted in a bulkhead connector configuration which facilitates installation and removal. Investigation was required to select a suitable braze alloy, flux and installation procedure. Braze alloy selection was challenging since the alloy was required to have: (1) melting temperature in excess of the 250 C (482 F) bakeout temperature; (2) no high vapor pressure elements; (3) good wetting properties when used in air with acceptable flux; and (4) good wettability to 300 series stainless steel and Inconel.

  6. Calibration of thermocouple psychrometers and moisture measurements in porous materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guz, Łukasz; Sobczuk, Henryk; Połednik, Bernard; Guz, Ewa

    2016-07-01

    The paper presents in situ method of peltier psychrometric sensors calibration which allow to determine water potential. Water potential can be easily recalculated into moisture content of the porous material. In order to obtain correct results of water potential, each probe should be calibrated. NaCl salt solutions with molar concentration of 0.4M, 0.7M, 1.0M and 1.4M, were used for calibration which enabled to obtain osmotic potential in range: -1791 kPa to -6487 kPa. Traditionally, the value of voltage generated on thermocouples during wet-bulb temperature depression is calculated in order to determine the calibration function for psychrometric in situ sensors. In the new method of calibration, the field under psychrometric curve along with peltier cooling current and duration was taken into consideration. During calibration, different cooling currents were applied for each salt solution, i.e. 3, 5, 8 mA respectively, as well as different cooling duration for each current (from 2 to 100 sec with 2 sec step). Afterwards, the shape of each psychrometric curve was thoroughly examined and a value of field under psychrometric curve was computed. Results of experiment indicate that there is a robust correlation between field under psychrometric curve and water potential. Calibrations formulas were designated on the basis of these features.

  7. Venous leg ulcers

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Leg ulcers usually occur secondary to venous reflux or obstruction, but 20% of people with leg ulcers have arterial disease, with or without venous disorders. Between 1.5 and 3.0/1000 people have active leg ulcers. Prevalence increases with age to about 20/1000 in people aged over 80 years. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of standard treatments, adjuvant treatments, and organisational interventions for venous leg ulcers? What are the effects of interventions to prevent recurrence of venous leg ulcers? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to September 2007 (BMJ Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 80 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: compression bandages and stockings, cultured allogenic (single or bilayer) skin replacement, debriding agents, dressings (cellulose, collagen, film, foam, hyaluronic acid-derived, semi-occlusive alginate), hydrocolloid (occlusive) dressings in the presence of compression, intermittent pneumatic compression, intravenous prostaglandin E1, larval therapy, laser treatment (low-level), leg ulcer clinics, multilayer elastic system, multilayer elastomeric (or non-elastomeric) high-compression regimens or bandages, oral treatments (aspirin, flavonoids, pentoxifylline, rutosides, stanozolol, sulodexide, thromboxane alpha2 antagonists, zinc), peri

  8. Venous leg ulcers.

    PubMed

    Nelson, E Andrea; Jones, June

    2008-09-15

    Leg ulcers usually occur secondary to venous reflux or obstruction, but 20% of people with leg ulcers have arterial disease, with or without venous disorders. Between 1.5 and 3.0/1000 people have active leg ulcers. Prevalence increases with age to about 20/1000 in people aged over 80 years. We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of standard treatments, adjuvant treatments, and organisational interventions for venous leg ulcers? What are the effects of interventions to prevent recurrence of venous leg ulcers? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to September 2007 (BMJ Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). We found 80 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: compression bandages and stockings, cultured allogenic (single or bilayer) skin replacement, debriding agents, dressings (cellulose, collagen, film, foam, hyaluronic acid-derived, semi-occlusive alginate), hydrocolloid (occlusive) dressings in the presence of compression, intermittent pneumatic compression, intravenous prostaglandin E1, larval therapy, laser treatment (low-level), leg ulcer clinics, multilayer elastic system, multilayer elastomeric (or non-elastomeric) high-compression regimens or bandages, oral treatments (aspirin, flavonoids, pentoxifylline, rutosides, stanozolol, sulodexide, thromboxane alpha(2) antagonists, zinc), peri-ulcer injection of granulocyte-macrophage colony

  9. Hemoglobinopathies and Leg Ulcers.

    PubMed

    Alavi, Afsaneh; Kirsner, Robert S

    2015-09-01

    Major hemoglobinopathies, including sickle cell anemia, are becoming a global health issue. Leg ulcers are the most common cutaneous manifestation of sickle cell disease and an important contributor to morbidity burden in this population. Leg ulcers following sickling disorders are extremely painful, and hard to heal. The clinical evidence for the optimal management of these ulcers is limited. Treating the cause and the strategies to prevent sickling are the mainstay of treatment. The basic principles of wound bed preparation and compression therapy is beneficial in these patients.

  10. 20. DETAIL, TYPICAL LEG CONNECTION, CROSS BRACING AT LEG, WITH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. DETAIL, TYPICAL LEG CONNECTION, CROSS BRACING AT LEG, WITH CROSSED BRACE BLOCK, GROUND WIRES AND GUIDE WIRE. - Hat Point Fire Lookout Tower, Forest Service Road #4340, 24 miles from Imnaha, Imnaha, Wallowa County, OR

  11. Restless legs syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ekbom, Karl; Ulfberg, J

    2009-11-01

    Restless legs syndrome (RLS) is a common neurological sensory-motor disorder that is characterized by intense restlessness and unpleasant creeping sensations deep inside the lower legs. Symptoms appear when the legs are at rest and are worst in the evening and at night. They force patients to keep moving their legs, and often to get out of bed and wander about. Periodic limb movements (PLMS) are also common during sleep amongst those suffering from RLS, and sleep efficiency is severely reduced. There are idiopathic as well as symptomatic forms of RLS, the latter being associated with e.g. pregnancy, iron deficiency and chronic renal failure. A family history of RLS is very common and pedigrees in these cases suggest an autosomal-dominant transmission with high penetrance. Genetic investigations have been performed in order to identify genes associated with RLS. Several loci have been found (on chromosomes 12q, 14q, 9p, 2q, 20p and 16p). Pathophysiology of RLS remains incompletely understood. However, advanced brain imaging studies and positive results of dopaminergic treatment suggest that RLS may be generated by dopamine dysfunction locally within the central nervous system. At present, there is a wide range of treatment options including levodopa, dopamine agonists, opioids, benzodiazepines, antiepileptic drugs and iron supplements.

  12. Leg lengthening - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... Indications URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100127.htm Leg lengthening - series—Indications To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Go to slide 1 out of 3 Go to slide 2 ...

  13. Design and Operation of a Fast, Thin-Film Thermocouple Probe on a Turbine Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meredith, Roger D.; Wrbanek, John D.; Fralick, Gustave C.; Greer, Lawrence C., III; Hunter, Gary W.; Chen, Liang-Yu

    2014-01-01

    As a demonstration of technology maturation, a thin-film temperature sensor probe was fabricated and installed on a F117 turbofan engine via a borescope access port to monitor the temperature experienced in the bleed air passage of the compressor area during an engine checkout test run. To withstand the harsh conditions experienced in this environment, the sensor probe was built from high temperature materials. The thin-film thermocouple sensing elements were deposited by physical vapor deposition using pure metal elements, thus avoiding the inconsistencies of sputter-depositing particular percentages of materials to form standardized alloys commonly found in thermocouples. The sensor probe and assembly were subjected to a strict protocol of multi-axis vibrational testing as well as elevated temperature pressure testing to be qualified for this application. The thin-film thermocouple probe demonstrated a faster response than a traditional embedded thermocouple during the engine checkout run.

  14. Thermocouples calibration and analysis of the influence of the length of the sensor coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noriega, M.; Ramírez, R.; López, R.; Vaca, M.; Morales, J.; Terres, H.; Lizardi, A.; Chávez, S.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the design and construction of a lab prototype, with a much lower cost compared to the ones commercially sold, enabling the manufacture of thermocouples which are then calibrated to verify their functionality and acceptance. We also analyze the influence of the external insulation over the wires, to determine whether it influences temperature measurement. The tested lengths ranged from 0.00 m up to 0.030 m. The thermocouple was compared against the behavior of a thermocouple of the same type that was purchased with a commercial supplier. The obtained measurement showed less than 1 °C difference in some points. This makes the built thermocouple reliable, since the standard allows a difference of up to 2.2 °C.

  15. Evaluation of miniature single-wire sheathed thermocouples for turbine blade temperature measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollanda, R.

    1979-01-01

    Chromel Alumel thermocouples were used, with sheath diameters of 0.15 and 0.25 mm. Tests were conducted at temperatures ranging from 750 to 1250 K. Both steady state and thermal cycling tests were performed for times up to 200 hours. Initial testing was performed in a low velocity gas stream for long time periods using a Meker-type burner. Additional testing was done in a high velocity gas stream for short time periods using a hot gas tunnel and also in a J75 jet engine. A total of eleven 0.15 mm diameter thermocouples and six 0.25 mm diameter thermocouples were tested. Drift rates up to 2.5% in 10 hours were observed. Photomicrographs show that this design is near the limit of miniaturization based on present manufacturing capabilities. Results indicate that the effects of miniaturization on reliability and accuracy must be considered when choosing thermocouples for a particular application.

  16. Options to Extend the Applicability of High Temperature Irradiation Resistant Thermocouples

    SciTech Connect

    Joy L. Rempe; Darrell L. Knudson; Keith G. Condie; S. Curtis Wilkins; John C. Crepeau; Joshua E. Daw; Patrick J. Green

    2007-09-01

    Several options have been identified that could further enhance the reliability and increase the applicability of recently developed Idaho National Laboratory (INL) High Temperature Irradiation Resistant thermocouples (HTIR-TCs) for in-pile testing, allowing their use in higher temperature applications (up to at least 1700 °C). INL and the University of Idaho (UI) are investigating these options with the ultimate objective of providing recommendations for alternate thermocouple designs that are optimized for various applications. This paper reports the status of INL/UI investigations. Results are reported from tests completed to evaluate the ductility, resolution, transient response, and stability of thermocouples made from specially formulated alloys of molybdenum and niobium. In addition, this paper reports preliminary insights gained by comparing the performance of thermocouples fabricated with various heat treatments and alternate geometries.

  17. Long Duration Testing of Type C Thermocouples at 1500 °C

    SciTech Connect

    Joy L. Rempe; Darrell L. Knudson; J. E. Daw; S. C. Wilkins

    2008-04-01

    Experience with Type C thermocouples operating for long periods in the 1400 to 1600 °C temperature range indicate that significant decalibration occurs, often leading to expensive downtime and material waste. As part of an effort to understand the mechanisms causing drift in these thermocouples, the Idaho National Laboratory conducted a long duration test at 1500 °C containing eight Type C thermocouples. As report in this document, results from this long duration test were adversely affected due to oxygen ingress. Nevertheless, results provide key insights about the impact of precipitate formation on thermoelectric response. Post-test examinations indicate that thermocouple signal was not adversely impacted by the precipitates detected after 1,000 hours of heating at 1,500 °C and suggest that the signal would not have been adversely impacted by these precipitates for longer durations (if oxygen ingress had not occurred in this test).

  18. Foot, leg, and ankle swelling

    MedlinePlus

    ... feet - legs; Ankle swelling; Foot swelling; Leg swelling; Edema - peripheral; Peripheral edema ... 51. Trayes KP, Studdiford JS, Pickle S, Tully AS. Edema: Diagnosis and management. Am Fam Phys . 2013;88( ...

  19. Film Thickness Influences on the Thermoelectric Properties of NiCr/NiSi Thin Film Thermocouples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y. Z.; Jiang, H. C.; Zhang, W. L.; Liu, X. Z.; Jiang, S. W.

    2013-06-01

    NiCr/NiSi thin film thermocouples (TFTCs) with a multi-layer structure were fabricated on Ni-based superalloy substrates (95 mm × 35 mm × 2 mm) by magnetron sputtering and electron beam evaporation. The five-layer structure is composed of NiCrAlY buffer layer (2 μm), thermally grown Al2O3 bond layer (200 nm), Al2O3 insulating layer (10 μm), NiCr/NiSi TFTCs (1 μm), and Al2O3 protective layer (500 nm). Influences of thermocouple layer thickness on thermoelectric properties were investigated. Seebeck coefficient of the samples with the increase in thermocouple layer thickness from 0.5 μm to 1 μm increased from 27.8 μV/°C to 33.8 μV/°C, but exhibited almost no change with further increase in thermocouple layer thickness from 1 μm to 2 μm. Dependence on temperature of the thermal electromotive force of the samples almost followed standard thermocouple characteristic curves when the thickness of the thermocouple layer was 1 μm and 2 μm. Sensitive coefficient K of the samples increased greatly with the increase in thickness of the thermocouple layer from 0.5 μm to 1 μm, but decreased insignificantly with the increase in thermocouple layer thickness from 1 μm to 2 μm, and continuously decreased with the increase in temperature. The sensitive coefficient and the stability of NiCr/NiSi TFTCs were both improved after annealing at 600°C.

  20. Miniature Fixed-Point Cell Approaches for Monitoring of Thermocouple Stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Failleau, G.; Elliott, C. J.; Deuzé, T.; Pearce, J. V.; Machin, G.; Sadli, M.

    2014-07-01

    In the framework of the European Metrology Research Project ENG08 "MetroFission," LNE-Cnam and NPL have undertaken cooperative research into the development of temperature measurement solutions for the next generation of nuclear fission power plants. Currently, in-pile temperature monitoring is usually performed with nickel-based (Type K or N) thermocouples. When these thermocouples are exposed to a neutron flux, the thermoelements transmute, leading to large and unknown drifts in output. In addition, it is impossible to routinely recalibrate the thermocouples after irradiation for obvious reasons of safety. To alleviate this problem, both LNE-Cnam and NPL have developed, via differing approaches, in situ calibration methods for the thermocouples. The self-validating thermocouple methodologies are based on the principle of a miniature fixed-point cell to be co-located with the thermocouple measurement junction in use. The drift of the thermocouple can be monitored and corrected for by regular determination of the output at the phase transition of the fixed-point material: in effect performing regular in situ calibration checks. The two institutes have constructed miniature fixed-point cells for use at three different temperatures; the freezing point of silver ; LNE-Cnam), the freezing point of copper ; LNE-Cnam and NPL), and the melting point of Fe-C (; NPL). This paper introduces the construction and validation of the miniature fixed-point cells prior to use, to ensure traceability to the ITS-90. A comparison of the performance of the two cell designs is discussed, where typical industrial Type N thermocouples have been used for measurement of the fixed-point cells. Such initial measurements demonstrate the feasibility of each of these two approaches.

  1. Attachment of Free Filament Thermocouples for Temperature Measurements on CMC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lei, Jih-Fen; Cuy, Michael D.; Wnuk, Stephen P.

    1997-01-01

    Ceramic Matrix Composites (CMC) are being developed for use as enabling materials for advanced aeropropulsion engine and high speed civil transport applications. The characterization and testing of these advanced materials in hostile, high-temperature environments require accurate measurement of the material temperatures. Commonly used wire Thermo-Couples (TC) can not be attached to this ceramic based material via conventional spot-welding techniques. Attachment of wire TC's with commercially available ceramic cements fail to provide sufficient adhesion at high temperatures. While advanced thin film TC technology provides minimally intrusive surface temperature measurement and has good adhesion on the CMC, its fabrication requires sophisticated and expensive facilities and is very time consuming. In addition, the durability of lead wire attachments to both thin film TC's and the substrate materials requires further improvement. This paper presents a newly developed attachment technique for installation of free filament wire TC's with a unique convoluted design on ceramic based materials such as CMC's. Three CMC's (SiC/SiC CMC and alumina/alumina CMC) instrumented with type IC, R or S wire TC's were tested in a Mach 0.3 burner rig. The CMC temperatures measured from these wire TC's were compared to that from the facility pyrometer and thin film TC's. There was no sign of TC delamination even after several hours exposure to 1200 C. The test results proved that this new technique can successfully attach wire TC's on CMC's and provide temperature data in hostile environments. The sensor fabrication process is less expensive and requires very little time compared to that of the thin film TC's. The same installation technique/process can also be applied to attach lead wires for thin film sensor systems.

  2. Development of a smart temperature measurement system based on a self-calibrating thermocouple

    SciTech Connect

    Ruppel, F.R.

    1989-04-01

    A smart temperature measurement system was developed that consists of a commercially available self-calibrating thermocouple (a thermocouple with a high-purity, low melting-point metal encapsulated near the thermojunction) connected to a data acquisition system with a specially designed algorithm capable of automatically detecting the calibration temperature of the self-calibrating thermocouple. A variety of self-calibrating thermocouples withstood long-term integrity testing, proving their worthiness as a front end to a smart temperature measurement system. A computer simulation program was written to explain the thermodynamic behavior of the system. Based on a literature review and simulation analysis, a method was developed to recognize which point on the melting or freezing plateau curve is the phase transition temperature of the encapsulated metal. The actual phase transition temperature is compared with the experimentally reported melting or freezing point of the encapsulated metal of the self-calibrating thermocouple to determine the magnitude of error in the thermocouple output. 25 refs., 29 figs.

  3. Thermocouples in an alternating magnetic field (AMF) for studying magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartzell, S.; Boekelheide, Z.

    Magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia, a method of cancer therapy, is currently a subject of active research. A critical parameter during therapy or laboratory research is the temperature of the system (tissue or nanoparticle suspension). Thermocouples are affordable and ubiquitous temperature sensors which could be used in this capacity; however, their metallic nature results in self-heating due to eddy currents when placed in an AMF. This presentation will quantitatively discuss calculations and measurements of the self-heating of three common types of thermocouples. Type T, K, and E thermocouples of both thin (40 gauge) and thick (20 gauge) wires were tested in a range of applied magnetic field magnitudes (235 kHz, 0-0.4 T rms). Among the thermocouples, all three types demonstrated large self-heating in 20 gauge wires. For the 40 gauge wires, type K showed large self-heating, while type T showed small but significant self-heating and type E showed no significant self-heating in comparison to the background. Our results indicate that thin type E thermocouples can be accurately used as temperature sensors in an AMF environment similar to the one used here, and type T thermocouples may be appropriate under conditions with lower magnetic field strength or frequency.

  4. High reliability sheathed, beryllia insulated, tungsten-rhenium alloy thermocouple assemblies; their fabrication and EMF stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, G. W.; Hurst, W. S.; Scroger, M. G.

    1974-01-01

    Tantalum sheathed, BeO insulated, W-3% Re/W-25% Re thermocouple assemblies were fabricated and their emf drift determined during 2059 hours of exposure at 2073 K in a gaseous helium environment. The sheathed thermocouple assemblies were constructed from aged thermoelements, specially heat-treated BeO insulators, and specially cleaned and etched tantalum sheaths. Their thermal emf drifts ranged from the equivalent of only -0.3 to -0.8 K drift per 1000 hours of exposure at 2073 K. No evidence of any gross chemical attack or degradation of the component materials was found. The emf drift and material behavior of some unsheathed, BeO insulated, W-3% Re/W-25% Re thermocouples at 2250 and 2400 K were also determined. Unsheathed thermocouples tested in an argon environment at 2250 K for 1100 hours and at 2400 K for 307 hours exhibited changes in thermal emf that typically ranged from the equivalent of a few degrees K to as much as +11 K. Post-test examinations of these thermocouples revealed some undesirable material degradation and interaction which included erosion of the BeO insulators and contamination of the thermoelements by tantalum from the tantalum blackbody enclosure in which the thermocouples were contained.

  5. Effective leg stiffness in running.

    PubMed

    Blum, Yvonne; Lipfert, Susanne W; Seyfarth, Andre

    2009-10-16

    Leg stiffness is a common parameter used to characterize leg function during bouncing gaits, like running and hopping. In the literature, different methods to approximate leg stiffness based on kinetic and kinematic parameters are described. A challenging point in estimating leg stiffness is the definition of leg compression during contact. In this paper four methods (methods A-D) based on ground reaction forces (GRF) and one method (method E) relying on temporal parameters are described. Leg stiffness calculated by these five methods is compared with running patterns, predicted by the spring mass model. The best and simplest approximation of leg stiffness is method E. It requires only easily accessible parameters (contact time, flight time, resting leg length, body mass and the leg's touch down angle). Method D is of similar quality but additionally requires the time-dependent progression of the GRF. The other three methods show clear differences from the model predictions by over- or underestimating leg stiffness, especially at slow speeds. Leg stiffness is derived from a conceptual model of legged locomotion and does not exist without this model. Therefore, it is important to prove which experimental method is suited best for approximating the stiffness in a specific task. This will help to interpret the predictions of the conceptual model in comparison with experimental data.

  6. INITIAL RESULTS FROM INVESTIGATIONS TO ENHANCE THE PERFORMANCE OF HIGH TEMPERATURE IRRADIATION-RESISTANT THERMOCOUPLES

    SciTech Connect

    Crepeau, John; Rempe, Joy; Wilkins, S. Curtis; Knudson, Darrell L.; Condie, Keith G.; Daw, Joshua

    2007-04-01

    New fuel, cladding, and structural materials offer the potential for safer and more economic energy from existing reactor and advanced nuclear reactor designs. However, insufficient data are available to characterize these materials in high temperature, radiation conditions. To evaluate candidate material performance, robust instrumentation is needed that can survive these conditions. However, traditional thermocouples either drift due to degradation at high temperatures (above 1100 °C) or due to transmutation of thermocouple components. Thermocouples are needed which can withstand both high temperature and high radiation environments. To address this instrumentation need, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) recently developed the design and evaluated the performance of a high temperature radiation-resistant thermocouple that contains commercially-available alloys of molybdenum and niobium (Rempe, 2006). Candidate thermocouple component materials were first identified based on their ability to withstand high temperature and radiation. Then, components were selected based on data obtained from materials interaction tests, ductility investigations, and resolution evaluations. Results from long duration (over 4000 hours) tests at high temperatures (up to 1400 °C) and thermal cycling tests demonstrate the stability and reliability of the INL-developed design. Tests in INL’s Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) are underway to demonstrate the in-pile performance of these thermocouples. However, several options have been identified that could further enhance the lifetime and reliability of the INL-developed thermocouples, allowing their use in higher temperature applications (up to at least 1700 °C). A joint University of Idaho (UI) and INL University Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (UNERI) is underway to investigate these options and ultimately, provide recommendations for an enhanced thermocouple design. This paper presents preliminary results from this UI/INL effort

  7. ORTHOPEDIC LEG BRACE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, William Neil (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    Knee braces generally have been rigid in both the knee bending direction and in the knee straightening direction unless a manually operated release is incorporated in them to allow the knee to bend. Desirably a braced knee joint should effectively duplicate the compound, complex, actions of a normal knee. The key to knee braces is the knee joint housing. The housing herein carries a number of cam action pawls. with teeth adapted to engage the internal teeth of a ratchet ring mounted in the housing. Cam action return springs and the shape of the cam action pawl teeth allow rotation of the ratchet ring in a leg straightening direction while still supporting a load. The leg can then be extended during walking while at the same time being prevented by the cam action pawls from buckling in the knee bending direction.

  8. Restless legs syndrome.

    PubMed

    Klingelhoefer, Lisa; Bhattacharya, Kalyan; Reichmann, Heinz

    2016-08-01

    Restless legs syndrome (RLS), also known as Willis-Ekbom disease (WED), is a common movement disorder characterised by an uncontrollable urge to move because of uncomfortable, sometimes painful sensations in the legs with a diurnal variation and a release with movement. The pathophysiology is only partially known and a genetic component together with dopaminergic and brain iron dysregulation plays an important role. Secondary causes for RLS need to be excluded. Treatment depends on the severity and frequency of RLS symptoms, comprises non-pharmacological (eg lifestyle changes) and pharmacological interventions (eg dopaminergic medication, alpha-2-delta calcium channel ligands, opioids) and relieves symptoms only. Augmentation is the main complication of long-term dopaminergic treatment of RLS. This article will provide a clinically useful overview of RLS with provision of diagnostic criteria, differential diagnoses, possible investigations and different treatment strategies with their associated complications. © 2016 Royal College of Physicians.

  9. Venous Leg Ulcers.

    PubMed

    Vivas, Alejandra; Lev-Tov, Hadar; Kirsner, Robert S

    2016-08-02

    This issue provides a clinical overview of venous leg ulcers, focusing on prevention, diagnosis, treatment, and practice improvement. The content of In the Clinic is drawn from the clinical information and education resources of the American College of Physicians (ACP), including MKSAP (Medical Knowledge and Self-Assessment Program). Annals of Internal Medicine editors develop In the Clinic in collaboration with the ACP's Medical Education and Publishing divisions and with the assistance of additional science writers and physician writers.

  10. Common cold

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000678.htm Common cold To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The common cold most often causes a runny nose, nasal congestion, ...

  11. Comparison of Co-C Eutectic-Point Cells for Thermocouple Calibration Between SP and NMIJ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogura, H.; Holmsten, M.; Klason, P.

    2015-03-01

    As recently reported, the metal-carbon eutectic points seem to be useful as practical reference points for calibrating thermocouples. The melting temperature of the cobalt-carbon eutectic point (Co-C, is an ideal solution for a reference point being at approximately the middle between the freezing point of copper and the melting point of palladium . In this study, a comparison of reference Co-C cells used for thermocouple calibration service was performed between the Technical Institute of Sweden (SP) and the National Metrology Institute of Japan (NMIJ) by means of two circulating Pt/Pd thermocouples and one circulating Co-C cell in order to investigate the reliability of thermocouple calibration at the Co-C eutectic point. The reference Co-C cell at SP was designed and constructed in the National Physical Laboratory (NPL), and provided to SP, while the reference Co-C cell at NMIJ as well as the circulating cell was designed and constructed at NMIJ. The melting temperature of the reference Co-C cells at SP and NMIJ were evaluated by using the calibrated radiation thermometers at NPL and NMIJ, respectively, prior to the circulation of the thermocouples and the cell between SP and NMIJ. The temperature difference between the reference cells of SP and NMIJ, as measured by means of the circulating thermocouples, was found to be within , while that measured by means of the circulating cell was found to be within . The temperature of reference cells at SP and NMIJ was found to agree within an expanded uncertainty in spite of different temperature traceability chains. This means that the calibration of thermocouples at the Co-C eutectic point was sufficiently reliable.

  12. Effect of the Thermocouple on Measuring the Temperature Discontinuity at a Liquid-Vapor Interface.

    PubMed

    Kazemi, Mohammad Amin; Nobes, David S; Elliott, Janet A W

    2017-07-18

    The coupled heat and mass transfer that occurs in evaporation is of interest in a large number of fields such as evaporative cooling, distillation, drying, coating, printing, crystallization, welding, atmospheric processes, and pool fires. The temperature jump that occurs at an evaporating interface is of central importance to understanding this complex process. Over the past three decades, thermocouples have been widely used to measure the interfacial temperature jumps at a liquid-vapor interface during evaporation. However, the reliability of these measurements has not been investigated so far. In this study, a numerical simulation of a thermocouple when it measures the interfacial temperatures at a liquid-vapor interface is conducted to understand the possible effects of the thermocouple on the measured temperature and features in the temperature profile. The differential equations of heat transfer in the solid and fluids as well as the momentum transfer in the fluids are coupled together and solved numerically subject to appropriate boundary conditions between the solid and fluids. The results of the numerical simulation showed that while thermocouples can measure the interfacial temperatures in the liquid correctly, they fail to read the actual interfacial temperatures in the vapor. As the results of our numerical study suggest, the temperature jumps at a liquid-vapor interface measured experimentally by using a thermocouple are larger than what really exists at the interface. For a typical experimental study of evaporation of water at low pressure, it was found that the temperature jumps measured by a thermocouple are overestimated by almost 50%. However, the revised temperature jumps are still in agreement with the statistical rate theory of interfacial transport. As well as addressing the specific application of the liquid-vapor temperature jump, this paper provides significant insight into the role that heat transfer plays in the operation of thermocouples

  13. Cold Sore

    MedlinePlus

    ... genitals. Most people who are infected with the virus that causes cold sores never develop signs and symptoms. Cold sores ... an infection — test positive for evidence of the virus that causes cold sores. People who have weakened immune systems are ...

  14. Mixing Hot and Cold Water Streams at a T-Junction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharp, David; Zhang, Mingqian; Xu, Zhenghe; Ryan, Jim; Wanke, Sieghard; Afacan, Artin

    2008-01-01

    A simple mixing of a hot- and cold-water stream at a T-junction was investigated. The main objective was to use mass and energy balance equations to predict mass low rates and the temperature of the mixed stream after the T-junction, and then compare these with the measured values. Furthermore, the thermocouple location after the T-junction and…

  15. Mixing Hot and Cold Water Streams at a T-Junction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharp, David; Zhang, Mingqian; Xu, Zhenghe; Ryan, Jim; Wanke, Sieghard; Afacan, Artin

    2008-01-01

    A simple mixing of a hot- and cold-water stream at a T-junction was investigated. The main objective was to use mass and energy balance equations to predict mass low rates and the temperature of the mixed stream after the T-junction, and then compare these with the measured values. Furthermore, the thermocouple location after the T-junction and…

  16. Assessment of tungsten/rhenium thermocouples with metal-carbon eutectic fixed points up to 1500°C

    SciTech Connect

    Gotoh, M.

    2013-09-11

    Four Type A thermocouples and two Type C thermocouples were calibrated at the Au fixed point and Co-C and Pd-C eutectic fixed points. The thermocouples were exposed to 1330 °C for a total of 100 hours. The maximum drift due to the exposure was found to be 4.8 °C. The fixed-point calibration EMF of these thermocouples deviated by less than 0.86% from the temperature specified by the standards ASTM E230-2003 for Type C and GOSTR 8.585-2001 for Type A. The length of one of Type A thermocouples A52 is longer than the others by 150mm. Making use of this provision it was possible to place annealed part of A52 to the temperature gradient part of calibration arrangement every time. Therefore observed aging effect was as low as 0.5 °C compared to the other thermocouples.

  17. Leg size and muscle functions associated with leg compliance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Convertino, Victor A.; Doerr, Donald F.; Flores, Jose F.; Hoffler, G. Wyckliffe; Buchanan, Paul

    1988-01-01

    The relationship between the leg compliance and factors related to the size of leg muscle and to physical fitness was investigated in ten healthy subjects. Vascular compliance of the leg, as determined by a mercury strain gauge, was found to be not significantly correlated with any variables associated with physical fitness per se (e.g., peak O2 uptake, calf strength, age, body weight, or body composition. On the other hand, leg compliance correlated with the calf cross-sectional area (CSA) and the calculated calf volume, with the CSA of calf muscle being the most dominant contributing factor (while fat and bone were poor predicators). It is suggested that leg compliance can be lowered by increasing calf muscle mass, thus providing structural support to limit the expansion of leg veins.

  18. Leg size and muscle functions associated with leg compliance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Convertino, Victor A.; Doerr, Donald F.; Flores, Jose F.; Hoffler, G. Wyckliffe; Buchanan, Paul

    1988-01-01

    The relationship between the leg compliance and factors related to the size of leg muscle and to physical fitness was investigated in ten healthy subjects. Vascular compliance of the leg, as determined by a mercury strain gauge, was found to be not significantly correlated with any variables associated with physical fitness per se (e.g., peak O2 uptake, calf strength, age, body weight, or body composition. On the other hand, leg compliance correlated with the calf cross-sectional area (CSA) and the calculated calf volume, with the CSA of calf muscle being the most dominant contributing factor (while fat and bone were poor predicators). It is suggested that leg compliance can be lowered by increasing calf muscle mass, thus providing structural support to limit the expansion of leg veins.

  19. Modeling a self-calibrating thermocouple for use in a smart temperature measurement system

    SciTech Connect

    Ruppel, F.R.

    1989-01-01

    A smart temperature measurement system was developed that consists of a commercially available self-calibrating thermocouple connected to a data-acquisition system with a specially designed algorithm capable of automatically detecting the calibration temperature of the self-calibrating thermocouple. The self-calibrating thermocouple has a high-purity, low melting point metal encapsulated near its thermojunction. The time-temperature record of the thermocouple forms a plateau at the phase transition temperature of the encapsulated metal, providing a single-point calibration. Since the plateau is usually not horizontal, a major effort of the work reported here was to determine which point of the phase transition plateau is the actual phase transition temperature. A finite difference computer simulation program was written to explain the thermodynamic behavior of the system. Based on a literature review and simulation analysis, a method was developed to recognize which point on the melting or freezing plateau curve is the actual phase transition temperature of the encapsulated metal. The known phase transition temperature is compared to the reported melting or freezing point of the encapsulated metal to determine the magnitude of error in the thermocouple output. 10 refs., 12 figs.

  20. The Influence of Size Effect on Sensitivity of Cu/CuNi Thin- film Thermocouple

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Lihong; Zhao, Yuanshen; Feng, Cenming; Zhou, Hua

    In this paper, the influence of size effect on the sensitivity of Cu/CuNi thin-film thermocouple was studied through experiments and theoretical analysis. Cu/CuNi thin-film thermocouples with different thicknesses of 0.5 μm, 1.0 μm, 1.5 μm and 2.0 μm were fabricated on the substrate with SiO2 lining by means of reactive magnetron sputtering. After static calibration, the sensitivities of the thermocouples were obtained respectively of 46.49 μV/°C, 45.23 μ/°C, 44.56 μV/°C and 43.94 μV/°C. According to the experimental results, it can be seen that the sensitivity of Cu/CuNi thin-film thermocouple is higher than that of the bulk Cu/CuNi thermocouple, and the sensitivity S will increase with the reciprocal of the thickness 1/δ as long as the thickness of the film is greater than the critical value.

  1. Establishment of the Co-C Eutectic Fixed-Point Cell for Thermocouple Calibrations at NIMT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ongrai, O.; Elliott, C. J.

    2017-08-01

    In 2015, NIMT first established a Co-C eutectic temperature reference (fixed-point) cell measurement capability for thermocouple calibration to support the requirements of Thailand's heavy industries and secondary laboratories. The Co-C eutectic fixed-point cell is a facility transferred from NPL, where the design was developed through European and UK national measurement system projects. In this paper, we describe the establishment of a Co-C eutectic fixed-point cell for thermocouple calibration at NIMT. This paper demonstrates achievement of the required furnace uniformity, the Co-C plateau realization and the comparison data between NIMT and NPL Co-C cells by using the same standard Pt/Pd thermocouple, demonstrating traceability. The NIMT measurement capability for noble metal type thermocouples at the new Co-C eutectic fixed point (1324.06°C) is estimated to be within ± 0.60 K (k=2). This meets the needs of Thailand's high-temperature thermocouple users—for which previously there has been no traceable calibration facility.

  2. Noncatalytic thermocouple coatings produced with chemical vapor deposition for flame temperature measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahlawane, N.; Struckmeier, U.; Kasper, T. S.; Oßwald, P.

    2007-01-01

    Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) have been employed to develop alumina thin films in order to protect thermocouples from catalytic overheating in flames and to minimize the intrusion presented to the combustion process. Alumina films obtained with a CVD process using AlCl3 as the precursor are dense, not contaminated, and crystallize in the corundum structure, while MOCVD using Al(acetylwidth="0.3em"/>acetone)3 allows the growth of corundum alumina with improved growth rates. These films, however, present a porous columnar structure and show some carbon contamination. Therefore, coated thermocouples using AlCl3-CVD were judged more suitable for flame temperature measurements and were tested in different fuels over a typical range of stoichiometries. Coated thermocouples exhibit satisfactory measurement reproducibility, no temporal drifts, and do not suffer from catalytic effects. Furthermore, their increased radiative heat loss (observed by infrared spectroscopy) allows temperature measurements over a wider range when compared to uncoated thermocouples. A flame with a well-known temperature profile established with laser-based techniques was used to determine the radiative heat loss correction to account for the difference between the apparent temperature measured by the coated thermocouple and the true flame temperature. The validity of the correction term was confirmed with temperature profile measurements for several flames previously studied in different laboratories with laser-based techniques.

  3. Instruments and Methods A physically based method for correcting temperature profile measurements made using thermocouples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cathles, L. Maclagan, IV; Cathles, L. M., III; Albert, M. R.

    High-frequency (diurnal) temperature variations occur simultaneously at multiple depths separated by meters of snow in at least several and probably many Arctic and Antarctic thermocouple datasets. These temperature variations cannot be caused by heat conduction from the surface because their amplitudes are too large and there is no phase lag with depth, and they cannot be caused by heat advection because the air flux required is greater than is available. Rather, the simultaneous temperature variations (STVs) appear to originate within the box that houses the data logger as thermocouple-like offset voltages, wire heating or thermistor error. The STVs can be corrected by requiring that the temperatures vary smoothly with time at the greatest depth at which temperature is measured. The correction voltage determined in this fashion, when applied to the thermocouples at other depths, corrects the entire dataset. The method successfully removes STVs with 24 hour period that are up to 3.8°C in amplitude, and is superior to the averaging techniques commonly used to correct thermocouple data because it introduces no spurious (non-physical) temperature variations. The correction method described can be applied to all thermocouple data where temperature measurements have been made at depths > ˜0.5 m into the snowpack. The corrections should allow more physical process and parameter information to be extracted more confidently from existing firn temperature data. Identification of the STVs and their probable cause also suggests how better data might be collected in the future.

  4. Leg cramps and restless legs syndrome during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Hensley, Jennifer G

    2009-01-01

    Sleep disturbance during pregnancy can result in excessive daytime sleepiness, diminished daytime performance, inability to concentrate, irritability, and the potential for an increased length of labor and increased risk of operative birth. Sleep disturbance may be the result of a sleep disorder, such as leg cramps, a common yet benign disorder, or restless legs syndrome, a sensorimotor disorder. Both disrupt sleep, are distressing to the pregnant woman, and mimic one another and other serious disorders. During pregnancy, up to 30% of women can be affected by leg cramps, and up to 26% can be affected by restless legs syndrome.

  5. [Problems of using a thermocouple for measurements of skin temperature rise during the exposure to millimeter waves].

    PubMed

    Alekseev, S I; Ziskin, M S; Fesenko, E E

    2011-01-01

    The possibility of using thermocouples for the artifact-free measurements of skin temperature during millimeter wave exposure was studied. The distributions of the specific absorption rate (SAR) in the human skin were calculated for different orientations of the thermocouple relative to the E-field of exposure. It was shown that, at the parallel orientation of a thermocouple relative to the E-field, SAR significantly increased at the tip of the thermocouple. This can result in an overheating of the thermocouple. At the perpendicular orientation of a thermocouple, the distortions of the SAR were insignificant. The data obtained confirm that the skin temperature can be measured with a thermocouple during exposure under the condition that the thermocouple is located perpendicular to the E-vector of the electromagnetic field. For the accurate determination of SAR from the rate of the initial temperature rise, it is necessary to fit the temperature kinetics measured with the thermocouple to the solution of the bio-heat transfer equation.

  6. Low cross-section Mo-Nb thermocouples for nuclear application: The state-of-the-art

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkins, S.C.

    1988-01-01

    Long-term high-temperature measurements in nuclear environments have long posed difficult problems. The tungsten-rhenium alloy thermocouples typically used in such applications undergo large decalibrations resulting from nuclear transmutation of the component materials. An alternative thermocouple, comprising pure molybdenum and niobium thermoelements, is virtually immune to transmutation effects, but is limited in utility by other properties. Thermocouples composed of molybdenum-niobium alloys show promise of significant improvement over the pure-metal combination. The W-Re decalibration problem is detailed and the status of Mo-Nb thermocouple development reviewed, including recent efforts at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. 18 refs., 4 figs.

  7. Dynamically Stable Legged Locomotion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-09-01

    Borvansky DISTIBUTIo~ j 3T ENT A Approved for pubtc (eLaz-; Distribution Unkn!r hd MIT Artificial Intelligence Laboratory 90 oU3 2?. 0h22 RLAD INSTRUC.TIONS...DATE Advanced Research P rojects Agency September 1989 1400 Wilson Blvd. 13. NUMfiEROF PAGES Arlington, VA 22209 203 14 MONITORING AGENCY NAME A ...this researchi is to bl)id a founidation of knowledge that can leadl bothi to tile coiistl luctionl of useful legged veldlis and to a better

  8. Difference equation approach to two-thermocouple sensor characterization in constant velocity flow environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, P. C.; Irwin, G.; Kee, R.; McLoone, S.

    2005-02-01

    Thermocouples are one of the most popular devices for temperature measurement due to their robustness, ease of manufacture and installation, and low cost. However, when used in certain harsh environments, for example, in combustion systems and engine exhausts, large wire diameters are required, and consequently the measurement bandwidth is reduced. This article discusses a software compensation technique to address the loss of high frequency fluctuations based on measurements from two thermocouples. In particular, a difference equation (DE) approach is proposed and compared with existing methods both in simulation and on experimental test rig data with constant flow velocity. It is found that the DE algorithm, combined with the use of generalized total least squares for parameter identification, provides better performance in terms of time constant estimation without any a priori assumption on the time constant ratios of the thermocouples.

  9. Prototype thin-film thermocouple/heat-flux sensor for a ceramic-insulated diesel engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Walter S.; Barrows, Richard F.

    1988-01-01

    A platinum versus platinum-13 percent rhodium thin-film thermocouple/heat-flux sensor was devised and tested in the harsh, high-temperature environment of a ceramic-insulated, low-heat-rejection diesel engine. The sensor probe assembly was developed to provide experimental validation of heat transfer and thermal analysis methodologies applicable to the insulated diesel engine concept. The thin-film thermocouple configuration was chosen to approximate an uninterrupted chamber surface and provide a 1-D heat-flux path through the probe body. The engine test was conducted by Purdue University for Integral Technologies, Inc., under a DOE-funded contract managed by NASA Lewis Research Center. The thin-film sensor performed reliably during 6 to 10 hr of repeated engine runs at indicated mean surface temperatures up to 950 K. However, the sensor suffered partial loss of adhesion in the thin-film thermocouple junction area following maximum cyclic temperature excursions to greater than 1150 K.

  10. Direct measurements of electrocaloric effect in ferroelectrics using thin-film thermocouples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsushita, Yuji; Nochida, Atsushi; Yoshimura, Takeshi; Fujimura, Norifumi

    2016-10-01

    A direct measurement method for investigating the electrocaloric (EC) effect was developed using a thin-film thermocouple deposited on samples. A T-type thin-film thermocouple was fabricated by RF magnetron sputtering at room temperature. Two types of measurement were carried out using rectangular pulses and sine waves with a DC offset. The EC coefficients (ΔT/ΔE) of BaTiO3 ceramics were determined as 0.35 × 10-6 and 0.48 × 10-6 K·m/V in the measurements at Curie temperature. The EC temperature change of a (Ba0.9,Ca0.1)TiO3 thin film was measured using sine waves with the DC offset. The EC coefficient was 0.0018 × 10-6 K·m/V at room temperature. These results suggest that thin-film thermocouples are useful for the direct measurement of the EC effect.

  11. Analysis of shell thickness irregularity in continuously cast middle carbon steel slabs using mold thermocouple data

    SciTech Connect

    Suni, J.P.; Henein, H.

    1996-12-01

    Thermocouples buried in the mold wall of a continuous caster are used to investigate the nature and source of shell thickness irregularity in middle carbon steel slabs. Fourier analysis is used in conjunction with digital filters to determine the power spectra of time series mold temperature and mold level measurements. Direct evidence is obtained on the physical dimension of irregularity, as well as the phase relationships between neighboring thermocouples in both the transverse and longitudinal directions. In addition, mold thermocouple readings are used to set the boundary heat flux conditions for use in self-consistent mathematical modeling of mold thermal profiles. Temperature readings--average, minimum, and maximum--allow for the calculation of an envelope of shell thicknesses around the average distribution. These techniques are used to help explain a mechanism for the occurrence of shell thickness irregularity, in terms of both meniscus disturbances and shell deflections in response to such disturbances.

  12. Printed organic conductive polymers thermocouples in textile and smart clothing applications.

    PubMed

    Seeberg, Trine M; Røyset, Arne; Jahren, Susannah; Strisland, Frode

    2011-01-01

    This work reports on an experimental investigation of the potential of using selected commercially available organic conductive polymers as active ingredients in thermocouples printed on textiles. Poly(3, 4-ethylenedioxythiophene): poly(4 styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) and polyaniline (PANI) were screen printed onto woven cotton textile. The influence of multiple thermocycles between 235 K (-38 °C) and 350 K (+77 °C) on resistivity and thermoelectric properties was examined. The Seebeck coefficients of PEDOT:PSS and PANI were found to be about +18 μV/K and +15 uV/K, respectively, when "metal-polymer" thermocouples were realized by combining the polymer with copper. When "polymer-polymer" thermocouples were formed by combining PEDOT:PSS and PANI, a thermoelectric voltage of about +10 μV/K was observed. A challenge recognized in the experiments is that the generated voltage exhibited drift and fluctuations.

  13. Improving the dependability of critical thermocouple thermometry for fossil-fuel gasifiers and retorts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, R. P.

    1982-07-01

    Critical thermocouple thermometry is such a measurement in which either excessive error or loss of signal can result in unacceptable consequences. To avoid these consequences it is necessary that the thermometry survive whatever adverse environment accompanies the measurement; however, it is just as essential to accomplish definite, adequate, demonstrated accuracy. This report describes some of the more significant problems involved in applying thermocouple thermometry in hostile environments. For example a hostile environment is encountered in some locations in gasifiers and retorts; there sensor damage is likely. A model of defective thermocouples is used to describe several damage mechanisms, their effects on dependability, and the symptoms that allow their detection. The model illustrates why many significant errors can occur unrecognized and demonstrates the practical need for real-time validation diagnostics. Special continual diagnostic techniques are described that can help to establish the dependability of critical measurement throughout the period of use.

  14. Frequency response of a supported thermocouple wire: Effects of axial conduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forney, L. J.; Meeks, E. L.; Fralick, G. C.

    1991-01-01

    Theoretical expressions are derived for the steady-state frequency response of a supported thermocouple wire. In particular, the effects of axial heat conduction are demonstrated for both a supported one material wire and a two material wire with unequal material properties across the junction. For the case of a one material supported wire, an exact solution is derived which compares favorably with an approximate expression that only matches temperatures at the support junction. Moreover, for the case of a two material supported wire, an analytical expression is derived that closely correlates numerical results. Experimental data were taken with a type K supported thermocouple. The test thermocouple was constructed with dimensions to demonstrate the effects of axial heat conduction assuming constant physical properties across the junction.

  15. Biomechanics of Counterweighted One-Legged Cycling.

    PubMed

    Elmer, Steven J; McDaniel, John; Martin, James C

    2016-02-01

    One-legged cycling has served as a valuable research tool and as a training and rehabilitation modality. Biomechanics of one-legged cycling are unnatural because the individual must actively lift the leg during flexion, which can be difficult to coordinate and cause premature fatigue. We compared ankle, knee, and hip biomechanics between two-legged, one-legged, and counterweighted (11.64 kg) one-legged cycling. Ten cyclists performed two-legged (240 W), one-legged (120 W), and counterweighted one-legged (120 W) cycling (80 rpm). Pedal forces and limb kinematics were recorded to determine work during extension and flexion. During counterweighted one-legged cycling relative ankle dorsiflexion, knee flexion, and hip flexion work were less than one-legged but greater than two-legged cycling (all P < .05). Relative ankle plantar flexion and hip extension work for counterweighted one-legged cycling were greater than one-legged but less than two-legged cycling (all P < .05). Relative knee extension work did not differ across conditions. Counterweighted one-legged cycling reduced but did not eliminate differences in joint flexion and extension actions between one- and two-legged cycling. Even with these differences, counterweighted one-legged cycling seemed to have advantages over one-legged cycling. These results, along with previous work highlighting physiological characteristics and training adaptations to counterweighted one-legged cycling, demonstrate that this exercise is a viable alternative to one-legged cycling.

  16. Thermocouple error correction for measuring the flame temperature with determination of emissivity and heat transfer coefficient.

    PubMed

    Hindasageri, V; Vedula, R P; Prabhu, S V

    2013-02-01

    Temperature measurement by thermocouples is prone to errors due to conduction and radiation losses and therefore has to be corrected for precise measurement. The temperature dependent emissivity of the thermocouple wires is measured by the use of thermal infrared camera. The measured emissivities are found to be 20%-40% lower than the theoretical values predicted from theory of electromagnetism. A transient technique is employed for finding the heat transfer coefficients for the lead wire and the bead of the thermocouple. This method does not require the data of thermal properties and velocity of the burnt gases. The heat transfer coefficients obtained from the present method have an average deviation of 20% from the available heat transfer correlations in literature for non-reacting convective flow over cylinders and spheres. The parametric study of thermocouple error using the numerical code confirmed the existence of a minimum wire length beyond which the conduction loss is a constant minimal. Temperature of premixed methane-air flames stabilised on 16 mm diameter tube burner is measured by three B-type thermocouples of wire diameters: 0.15 mm, 0.30 mm, and 0.60 mm. The measurements are made at three distances from the burner tip (thermocouple tip to burner tip/burner diameter = 2, 4, and 6) at an equivalence ratio of 1 for the tube Reynolds number varying from 1000 to 2200. These measured flame temperatures are corrected by the present numerical procedure, the multi-element method, and the extrapolation method. The flame temperatures estimated by the two-element method and extrapolation method deviate from numerical results within 2.5% and 4%, respectively.

  17. Thermocouple error correction for measuring the flame temperature with determination of emissivity and heat transfer coefficient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hindasageri, V.; Vedula, R. P.; Prabhu, S. V.

    2013-02-01

    Temperature measurement by thermocouples is prone to errors due to conduction and radiation losses and therefore has to be corrected for precise measurement. The temperature dependent emissivity of the thermocouple wires is measured by the use of thermal infrared camera. The measured emissivities are found to be 20%-40% lower than the theoretical values predicted from theory of electromagnetism. A transient technique is employed for finding the heat transfer coefficients for the lead wire and the bead of the thermocouple. This method does not require the data of thermal properties and velocity of the burnt gases. The heat transfer coefficients obtained from the present method have an average deviation of 20% from the available heat transfer correlations in literature for non-reacting convective flow over cylinders and spheres. The parametric study of thermocouple error using the numerical code confirmed the existence of a minimum wire length beyond which the conduction loss is a constant minimal. Temperature of premixed methane-air flames stabilised on 16 mm diameter tube burner is measured by three B-type thermocouples of wire diameters: 0.15 mm, 0.30 mm, and 0.60 mm. The measurements are made at three distances from the burner tip (thermocouple tip to burner tip/burner diameter = 2, 4, and 6) at an equivalence ratio of 1 for the tube Reynolds number varying from 1000 to 2200. These measured flame temperatures are corrected by the present numerical procedure, the multi-element method, and the extrapolation method. The flame temperatures estimated by the two-element method and extrapolation method deviate from numerical results within 2.5% and 4%, respectively.

  18. Printable tiny thermocouple by liquid metal gallium and its matching metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Haiyan; Yang, Yang; Liu, Jing

    2012-08-01

    Direct printing of thermocouples by the liquid metal was proposed. The fabricated temperature sensor composed of gallium and its matching metal exhibited excellent linear dependence between thermoelectric voltage and temperature within the range from 0 to 200 °C. Further, it was disclosed that liquid metals with high purity could be used for high precision thermocouples with tiny size, which were quite convenient to be used in micro channel measurement due to their fluidity in making sensors; while liquid metals with a small amount of oxides were handy for depositing on the substrate by "hand-written" style, with thin film thickness of approximately 50 μm.

  19. Measurement and simulation of thermoelectric efficiency for single leg

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Xiaokai; Yamamoto, Atsushi Ohta, Michihiro; Nishiate, Hirotaka

    2015-04-15

    Thermoelectric efficiency measurements were carried out on n-type bismuth telluride legs with the hot-side temperature at 100 and 150°C. The electric power and heat flow were measured individually. Water coolant was utilized to maintain the cold-side temperature and to measure heat flow out of the cold side. Leg length and vacuum pressure were studied in terms of temperature difference across the leg, open-circuit voltage, internal resistance, and heat flow. Finite-element simulation on thermoelectric generation was performed in COMSOL Multiphysics, by inputting two-side temperatures and thermoelectric material properties. The open-circuit voltage and resistance were in good agreement between the measurement and simulation. Much larger heat flows were found in measurements, since they were comprised of conductive, convective, and radiative contributions. Parasitic heat flow was measured in the absence of bismuth telluride leg, and the conductive heat flow was then available. Finally, the maximum thermoelectric efficiency was derived in accordance with the electric power and the conductive heat flow.

  20. Measurement and simulation of thermoelectric efficiency for single leg.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiaokai; Yamamoto, Atsushi; Ohta, Michihiro; Nishiate, Hirotaka

    2015-04-01

    Thermoelectric efficiency measurements were carried out on n-type bismuth telluride legs with the hot-side temperature at 100 and 150°C. The electric power and heat flow were measured individually. Water coolant was utilized to maintain the cold-side temperature and to measure heat flow out of the cold side. Leg length and vacuum pressure were studied in terms of temperature difference across the leg, open-circuit voltage, internal resistance, and heat flow. Finite-element simulation on thermoelectric generation was performed in COMSOL Multiphysics, by inputting two-side temperatures and thermoelectric material properties. The open-circuit voltage and resistance were in good agreement between the measurement and simulation. Much larger heat flows were found in measurements, since they were comprised of conductive, convective, and radiative contributions. Parasitic heat flow was measured in the absence of bismuth telluride leg, and the conductive heat flow was then available. Finally, the maximum thermoelectric efficiency was derived in accordance with the electric power and the conductive heat flow.

  1. Differentiating nocturnal leg cramps and restless legs syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rana, Abdul Qayyum; Khan, Fatima; Mosabbir, Abdullah; Ondo, William

    2014-07-01

    Leg pain and discomfort are common complaints in any primary physician's clinic. Two common causes of pain or discomfort in legs are nocturnal leg cramps (NLC) and restless leg syndrome (RLS). NLC present as painful and sudden contractions mostly in part of the calf. Diagnosis of NLC is mainly clinical and sometimes involves investigations to rule out other mimics. RLS is a condition characterized by the discomfort or urge to move the lower limbs, which occurs at rest or in the evening/night. The similarity of RLS and leg cramps poses the issue of errors in diagnosing and differentiating the two. In this paper we review the pathopysiology of each entity and their diagnosis as well as treatment. The two conditions are then compared to appreciate the differences and similarities. Finally, suggestions are recommended for complete assessment.

  2. [Restless-legs syndrome].

    PubMed

    Karroum, E; Konofal, E; Arnulf, I

    2008-01-01

    Restless-legs syndrome (RLS) is a sensorimotor disorder, characterized by an irresistible urge to move the legs usually accompanied or caused by uncomfortable and unpleasant sensations. It begins or worsens during periods of rest or inactivity, is partially or totally relieved by movements and is exacerbated or occurs at night and in the evening. RLS sufferers represent 2 to 3% of the general population in Western countries. Supportive criteria include a family history, the presence of periodic-leg movements (PLM) when awake or asleep and a positive response to dopaminergic treatment. The RLS phenotypes include an early onset form, usually idiopathic with a familial history and a late onset form, usually secondary to peripheral neuropathy. Recently, an atypical RLS phenotype without PLM and l-DOPA resistant has been characterized. RLS can occur in childhood and should be distinguished from attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder, growing pains and sleep complaints in childhood. RLS should be included in the diagnosis of all patients consulting for sleep complaints or discomfort in the lower limbs. It should be differentiated from akathisia, that is, an urge to move the whole body without uncomfortable sensations. Polysomnographic studies and the suggested immobilization test can detect PLM. Furthermore, an l-DOPA challenge has recently been validated to support the diagnosis of RLS. RLS may cause severe-sleep disturbances, poor quality of life, depressive and anxious symptoms and may be a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. In most cases, RLS is idiopathic. It may also be secondary to iron deficiency, end-stage renal disease, pregnancy, peripheral neuropathy and drugs, such as antipsychotics and antidepressants. The small-fiber neuropathy can mimic RLS or even trigger it. RLS is associated with many neurological and sleep disorders including Parkinson's disease, but does not predispose to these diseases. The pathophysiology of RLS includes an altered brain

  3. Long term out-of-pile thermocouple tests in conditions representative for nuclear gas-cooled high temperature reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Laurie, M.; Fourrez, S.; Fuetterer, M. A.; Lapetite, J. M.

    2011-07-01

    During irradiation tests at high temperature, failure of commercial Inconel 600 sheathed thermocouples is commonly encountered. To understand and remedy this problem, out-of-pile tests were performed with thermocouples in carburizing atmospheres which can be assumed to be at least locally representative for High Temperature Reactors. The objective was to screen those thermocouples which would consecutively be used under irradiation. Two such screening tests have been performed with a set of thermocouples embedded in graphite (mainly conventional Type N thermocouples and thermocouples with innovative sheaths) in a dedicated furnace with helium flushing. Performance indicators such as thermal drift, insulation and loop resistance were monitored and compared to those from conventional Type N thermocouples. Several parameters were investigated: niobium sleeves, bending, thickness, sheath composition, temperature as well as the chemical environment. After the tests, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) examinations were performed to analyze possible local damage in wires and in the sheath. The present paper describes the two experiments, summarizes results and outlines further work, in particular to further analyze the findings and to select suitable thermocouples for qualification under irradiation. (authors)

  4. Cold injuries.

    PubMed

    Kruse, R J

    1995-01-01

    There are two categories of cold injury. The first is hypothermia, which is a systemic injury to cold, and the second is frostbite, which is a local injury. Throughout history, entire armies, from George Washington to the Germans on the Russian Front in World War II, have fallen prey to prolonged cold exposure. Cold injury is common and can occur in all seasons if ambient temperature is lower than the core body temperature. In the 1985 Boston Marathon, even though it was 76 degrees and sunny, there were 75 runners treated for hypothermia. In general, humans adapt poorly to cold exposure. Children are at particular risk because of their relatively greater surface area/body mass ratio, causing them to cool even more rapidly than adults. Because of this, the human's best defense against cold injury is to limit his/her exposure to cold and to dress appropriately. If cold injury has occurred and is mild, often simple passive rewarming such as dry blankets and a warm room are sufficient treatment.

  5. Low drift type N thermocouples in out-of-pile advanced gas reactor mock-up test: metallurgical analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Scervini, M.; Palmer, J.; Haggard, D.C.; Swank, W.D.

    2015-07-01

    Thermocouples are the most commonly used sensors for temperature measurement in nuclear reactors. They are crucial for the control of current nuclear reactors and for the development of GEN IV reactors. In nuclear applications thermocouples are strongly affected by intense neutron fluxes. As a result of the interaction with neutrons, the thermoelements of the thermocouples undergo transmutation, which produces a time dependent change in composition and, as a consequence, a time dependent drift of the thermocouple signal. Thermocouple drift can be very significant for in-pile temperature measurements and may render the temperature sensors unreliable after exposure to nuclear radiation for relatively short times compared to the life required for temperature sensors in nuclear applications. Previous experiences with type K thermocouples in nuclear reactors have shown that they are affected by neutron irradiation only to a limited extent. Similarly type N thermocouples are expected to be only slightly affected by neutron fluxes. Currently the use of Nickel based thermocouples is limited to temperatures lower than 1000 deg. C due to drift related to phenomena other than nuclear irradiation. As part of a collaboration between Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and the University of Cambridge a variety of Type N thermocouples have been exposed at INL in an Advanced Gas Reactor mock-up test at 1150 deg. C for 2000 h, 1200 deg. C for 2000 h, 125 deg. C for 200 h and 1300 deg. C for 200 h, and later analysed metallurgically at the University of Cambridge. The use of electron microscopy allows to identify the metallurgical changes occurring in the thermocouples during high temperature exposure and correlate the time dependent thermocouple drift with the microscopic changes experienced by the thermoelements of different thermocouple designs. In this paper conventional Inconel 600 sheathed type N thermocouples and a type N using a customized sheath developed at the University of

  6. Performance and Durability of Thin Film Thermocouple Array on a Porous Electrode

    PubMed Central

    Guk, Erdogan; Ranaweera, Manoj; Venkatesan, Vijay; Kim, Jung-Sik

    2016-01-01

    Management of solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) thermal gradients is vital to limit thermal expansion mismatch and thermal stress. However, owing to harsh operation conditions of SOFCs and limited available space in stack configuration, the number of techniques available to obtain temperature distribution from the cell surface is limited. The authors previously developed and studied a thermocouple array pattern to detect surface temperature distribution on an SOFC in open circuit conditions. In this study, the performance in terms of mechanical durability and oxidation state of the thin film thermoelements of the thermocouple array on the porous SOFC cathode is investigated. A thin-film multi-junction thermocouple array was sputter deposited using a magnetron sputter coater. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) characterisation techniques were carried out to understand characteristics of the thin film before and after temperature (20 °C–800 °C) measurement. Temperature readings from the sensor agreed well with the closely placed commercial thermocouple during heating segments. However, a sensor failure occurred at around 350 °C during the cooling segment. The SEM and XPS tests revealed cracks on the thin film thermoelements and oxidation to the film thickness direction. PMID:27563893

  7. Beyond "fire temperatures": calibrating thermocouple probes and modeling their response to surface fires in hardwood fuels

    Treesearch

    Anthony S. Bova; Matthew B. Dickinson

    2008-01-01

    The maximum temperatures of thermocouples, temperature-sensitive paints, and calorimeters exposed to flames in wildland fires are often called "fire temperatures" but are determined as much by the properties and deployment of the measurement devices as by the fires themselves. Rather than report device temperatures that are not generally comparable among...

  8. Modeling a self-calibrating thermocouple for use in a smart temperature measurement system

    SciTech Connect

    Ruppel, F.R. )

    1990-12-01

    A finite-difference computer-simulation program was developed to explain the thermodynamic behavior of the self-calibrating thermocouple. Based on a literature review and simulation analysis, a method was developed to recognize which point on the time-temperature curve is the calibration point. A description of the model and results of parametric studies are given.

  9. A computer-controlled apparatus for Seebeck inhomogeneity testing of sheathed thermocouples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burkett, Cecil G., Jr.; Bauserman, Willard A., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    Mineral-insulated metal-sheathed (MIMS) thermocouple assemblies are used throughout industry and research facilities as a method of temperature measurement where requirements for either harsh environmental conditions exist, or where rigidity of the measurement probe is required. Seebeck inhomogeneity is the abnormal variation of the Seebeck coefficient from point to point in a material. It is not disclosed in conventional calibration. A standardized method of measuring thermoelectric inhomogeneity along the thermocouple probe length is not available. Therefore, calibration for sheathed probes normally does not include testing of probe inhomogeneity. The measurement accuracy would be severely impacted if significant inhomogeneity and a temperature gradient were present in the same region of the probe. A computer-controlled system for determining inhomogeneities was designed, fabricated, and tested. This system provides an accurate method for the identification of the location of inhomogeneity along the length of a sheathed thermocouple and for the quantification of the inhomogeneity. This paper will discuss the apparatus and procedure used to perform these tests and will present data showing tests performed on sheathed thermocouple probes.

  10. Measuring skin temperature before, during and after exercise: a comparison of thermocouples and infrared thermography.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Alex de Andrade; Amorim, Paulo Roberto dos Santos; Brito, Ciro José; de Moura, Anselmo Gomes; Moreira, Danilo Gomes; Costa, Carlos Magno Amaral; Sillero-Quintana, Manuel; Marins, João Carlos Bouzas

    2014-02-01

    Measuring skin temperature (TSK) provides important information about the complex thermal control system and could be interesting when carrying out studies about thermoregulation. The most common method to record TSK involves thermocouples at specific locations; however, the use of infrared thermal imaging (IRT) has increased. The two methods use different physical processes to measure TSK, and each has advantages and disadvantages. Therefore, the objective of this study was to compare the mean skin temperature (MTSK) measurements using thermocouples and IRT in three different situations: pre-exercise, exercise and post-exercise. Analysis of the residual scores in Bland-Altman plots showed poor agreement between the MTSK obtained using thermocouples and those using IRT. The averaged error was -0.75 °C during pre-exercise, 1.22 °C during exercise and -1.16 °C during post-exercise, and the reliability between the methods was low in the pre- (ICC = 0.75 [0.12 to 0.93]), during (ICC = 0.49 [-0.80 to 0.85]) and post-exercise (ICC = 0.35 [-1.22 to 0.81] conditions. Thus, there is poor correlation between the values of MTSK measured by thermocouples and IRT pre-exercise, exercise and post-exercise, and low reliability between the two forms of measurement.

  11. In-vessel fluid flow measurements using thermocouples cross-correlation.

    SciTech Connect

    NguyenLe, Q.

    1998-05-08

    Fluid flow rate in high temperature and pressure vessels can be difficult to measure due to the associated harsh environment, inaccessible locations and pressure boundary integrity concerns. However, by using quick response miniature thermocouples to measure the naturally occurring temperature variations within the flow, the fluid velocity can be inferred from the transit time analysis. This flow measurement technique has other advantages such as the flow profile is not significantly disturbed, no additional flow restrictions introduced and the system fiction factor is not increased. Furthermore, since the measured flow rate is generally unaffected by the global system dynamics, such as heat increases or losses, as well as changes in the flow regimes, the location of the thermocouple pairs is extremely flexible. Due to the mentioned advantages, the thermocouple cross-correlation flow measurement method has been developed for use at the Purdue University Multi-Dimensional Integral Test Assembly (PUMA). Currently, thermocouple cross-correlation technique is used to measure the Reactor Pressure Vessel downcomer fluid velocity and the suppression pool in-vessel natural circulation velocity.

  12. 'Incremental thermocouple probe' for testing insulation erosion on a rocket motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gould, Reginald J.

    1993-01-01

    An incremental thermocouple probe was developed to measure insulation erosion during a solid rocket motor firing. The probe's new and unique design is described along with its theory of operation. Data from an actual firing are reported which show that the probe's performance greatly exceeded predictions and present technology as a temperature measurement device and as an event gage.

  13. Measuring soil and tree temperatures during prescribed fires with thermocouple probes

    Treesearch

    Stephen S. Sackett; Sally M. Haase

    1992-01-01

    Soil and cambium temperatures must be known to ascertain certain effects of prescribed fires on trees. Thermocouple-based systems were devised for measuring soil and cambium temperatures during prescribed fires. The systems, which incorporate both commercially available and custom components, perform three basic functions: data collection, data retrieval, and data...

  14. Development and Evaluation of a Co-C Eutectic-Point Cell for Thermocouple Calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmsten, M.; Ogura, H.; Klason, P.; Ljungblad, S.

    2015-08-01

    The cobalt-carbon (Co-C) eutectic point at has in previous studies proved to be suitable as a reference for thermocouple calibration above . For types S, R, and B, it fills the gap between the copper point and the palladium point, and for Pt/Pd thermocouples, it extends the range from the copper point. This work describes the implementation of the Co-C reference point at the Technical Institute of Sweden (SP). A Co-C cell was developed and manufactured at SP in a collaboration project with the National Metrology Institute of Japan (NMIJ). The principle of the cell is a hybrid design with double walls, both for the outer crucible and the inner thermometer well, with graphite foil between the walls. To evaluate the performance of the developed cell (SP cell), a comparison between the SP cell and another cell, manufactured and provided from the National Physics Laboratory (NPL) in England, is performed using Pt/Pd thermocouples as transfer standards. The comparison showed very good agreement, with differences below 40 mK, using the same furnace and two different thermocouples. The expanded uncertainty for the comparison was estimated to be 70 mK.

  15. Performance and Durability of Thin Film Thermocouple Array on a Porous Electrode.

    PubMed

    Guk, Erdogan; Ranaweera, Manoj; Venkatesan, Vijay; Kim, Jung-Sik

    2016-08-23

    Management of solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) thermal gradients is vital to limit thermal expansion mismatch and thermal stress. However, owing to harsh operation conditions of SOFCs and limited available space in stack configuration, the number of techniques available to obtain temperature distribution from the cell surface is limited. The authors previously developed and studied a thermocouple array pattern to detect surface temperature distribution on an SOFC in open circuit conditions. In this study, the performance in terms of mechanical durability and oxidation state of the thin film thermoelements of the thermocouple array on the porous SOFC cathode is investigated. A thin-film multi-junction thermocouple array was sputter deposited using a magnetron sputter coater. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) characterisation techniques were carried out to understand characteristics of the thin film before and after temperature (20 °C-800 °C) measurement. Temperature readings from the sensor agreed well with the closely placed commercial thermocouple during heating segments. However, a sensor failure occurred at around 350 °C during the cooling segment. The SEM and XPS tests revealed cracks on the thin film thermoelements and oxidation to the film thickness direction.

  16. Design of Thermocouple Probes for Measurement of Rocket Exhaust Plume Temperatures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-06-01

    increase the temperatures the probe could sustain . The mass flow rate of coolant in the probe was 0.0295 kg/s. The thermocouples were type K chromel...in the supersonic stream. 4.3 Accuracy of probe temperature measurements It would be denimable to be able to estimate the accuracy of the temperatures

  17. Oxidation-resisting technology of W-Re thermocouples and their industrial applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, K.; Dai, M.; Dong, J.; Wang, L.; Wang, T.

    2013-09-01

    We use DSC/TG, SEM and EPMA approaches to investigate the high temperature oxidation behaviors of the Type C W-Re thermocouple wires and W-Re powders which the wires were made from. To solve the oxidization of W-Re thermocouples the chemical method, other than the commonly used physical method, i.e. vacuum-pumping method, was developed. Several solid-packed techniques such as stuffing with inert material, chemical deoxidizing, gas-absorbing and sealing were employed to prevent the W-Re thermocouples from oxidizing. Based on comprehensive consideration of various parameters in process industries, a series of industrial W-Re thermocouples has been successfully used in oxidizing and reducing atmospheres, high temperature alkali and other harsh environments. The service life is 6 to 12 months in strong oxidizing atmosphere of Cr2O3-Al2O3 brick kiln and 2 to 3 months in high temperature alkali and in reducing atmosphere of CO.

  18. Computational Modeling of Temperature, Flow, and Crystallization of Mold Slag During Double Hot Thermocouple Technique Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Lejun; Wang, Wanlin; Liu, Rui; Thomas, Brian G.

    2013-10-01

    A three-dimensional finite-difference model has been developed to study heat transfer, fluid flow, and isothermal crystallization of mold slag during double hot thermocouple technique (DHTT) experiments. During the preheating stage, temperature in the middle of the mold slag sample was found to be significantly [~350 K (~77 °C)] lower than near the two thermocouples. During the quenching stage, the mold slag temperature decreases with the cooled thermocouple. The temperature across the mold slag achieves a steady, nonlinear temperature profile during the holding stage; the insulating effect of the crystallizing layer in the middle of the slag sample causes the high temperature region to become hotter, while the lower temperature mold slag becomes cooler. Fluid flow is driven by Marangoni forces along the mold slag surface from the hotter region to the cooler region, and then recirculates back through the interior. Slag velocities reach 7 mm/s. Crystallization is predicted to start in the middle of the slag sample first and then grows toward both thermocouples, which matches well with observations of the DHTT experiment.

  19. National Inter-laboratory Comparison of Thermocouples in the Temperature Range from to

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arifoviç, N.; Kalemci, M.

    2015-08-01

    One of the main criteria demonstrating the competence of a calibration laboratory is successful participation in inter-laboratory comparisons. Real capability of the laboratory including claimed uncertainties could be demonstrated based on the results of comparisons, evaluated either through -criteria or other acceptable measures. As a number of accredited laboratories with scopes covering calibration services in the field of thermometry have been increasing, the demand for organization of inter-laboratory comparisons with participation of accredited laboratories occurs. Based on this fact, a national inter-laboratory comparison of thermocouple calibrations in the temperature range from to in the field of temperature was launched by TUBITAK UME in 2011. The purpose of the inter-laboratory comparison was to compare the results of the participating laboratories during calibration of the thermocouples in the range from to . Three type S thermocouples were constructed and calibrated by TUBITAK UME which is the pilot laboratory of the comparison. It was recommended that the participants use their standard procedure for the calibration of thermocouples and follow the instructions of comparison protocol during the calibration. The inter-laboratory comparison was carried out among eleven national accredited laboratories. In this paper, the temperature differences obtained by participating laboratories with associated uncertainties of the results and values will be presented. The metrological equivalence of all laboratories was demonstrated, with all values being less than 1.0.

  20. Evaluation of Specialized Thermocouples for High-Temperature In-Pile Testing

    SciTech Connect

    J. L. Rempe; D. L. Knudson; K. G. Condie; S. C. Wilkins

    2006-06-01

    Many advanced nuclear reactor designs require new fuel, cladding, and structural materials. Data are needed to characterize the performance of these new materials in high temperature, oxidizing, and radiation conditions. To obtain this data, robust instrumentation is needed that can survive proposed test conditions. Standard thermocuoples for measuring temperature in-pile degrade at temperatures above 1100 ºC. Hence, INL initiated a project to develop specialized thermocouples for high temperature in-pile applications. Results from efforts to develop, fabricate, and evaluate specialized high-temperature thermocouples for in-pile applications suggest that several material combinations are viable. Tests show that several low neutron cross-section candidate materials are resistant to material interactions and remain ductile at high temperatures. In addition, results indicate that the thermoelectric response is singlevalued and repeatable with acceptable resolution for the candidate thermoelements considered. The final selection of the thermocouple materials will depend on the desired peak temperature and accuracy requirements. If thermocouples are needed that measure temperatures at 1600 ºC or higher, the doped Mo / Nb-1%Zr and Mo-1.6% Nb / Nb-1%Zr thermoelement wire combinations are recommended with HfO2 insulation, and a Nb-1%Zr sheath. Additional evaluations are underway to characterize the performance of this proposed thermocouple design. INL has worked to optimize this thermocouple’s stability. With appropriate heat treatment and fabrication approaches, results indicate that the effects of thermal cycling on the calibration of the proposed thermocouple design can be minimized. INL has initiated a series of high temperature (from 1200 to 1800 ºC) long duration (up to six months) tests. Initial results indicate the INL-developed thermocouple’s termoelectric response is stable with less than 15 ºC drift observed in over 3500 hours of the planned 4000 hours

  1. Long-Term Monitoring of Thermocouple Stability with Miniature Fixed-Point Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliott, C. J.; Failleau, G.; Deuzé, T.; Sadli, M.; Pearce, J. V.; Machin, G.

    2014-04-01

    In the framework of the European Metrology Research Programme ENG08 "MetroFission" project, two National Measurement Institutes, LNE-Cnam (France) and NPL (UK), have cooperatively developed methods of in situ validation of thermocouple output for application in next-generation nuclear fission power plants. Miniature fixed-point cells for use at three temperatures were constructed in the first step of this project: at the freezing point of silver (), the freezing point of copper (), and the melting point of the iron-carbon eutectic (). This paper reports the results of a second step in the study, where the robustness of the self-validation method has been investigated. Typical industrial Type N thermocouples have been employed with each of the miniature fixed-point devices installed, and repeatedly thermally cycled through the melting and freezing transitions of the fixed-point ingots. The devices have been exposed to a total of up to 90 h in the molten state. Furthermore, the LNE-Cnam devices were also subjected to fast cool-down rates, on five occasions, where the rate is estimated to have been between and . The devices are shown to be repeatable, reliable, and robust over the course of these tests. The drift of the Type N thermocouple has been identified separately to the behavior of the device. A reliable method for improving thermocouple performance and process control is therefore demonstrated. Requirements for implementation and the advantages of each approach for monitoring and correcting thermocouple drift are discussed, and an uncertainty budget for self-validation is presented.

  2. Leg discomfort: beyond the joints.

    PubMed

    Berger, Douglas

    2014-05-01

    Although simple characterization of discomfort as cramps, heaviness, shooting pains, and so forth can be misleading, history and examination are key to accurate diagnosis. Absence of both dorsalis pedis and posterior tibial pulses strongly suggests peripheral arterial disease (PAD), and the presence of either pulse makes PAD less likely. Hydroxymethylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors (statins) are a common cause of lower extremity myalgias. Restless legs syndrome causes nocturnal discomfort but must be distinguished from confounding“mimics." Neurologic causes of leg symptoms include lumbar spinal stenosis, radiculopathy, distal symmetric polyneuropathy, and entrapment neuropathy. Many common causes of leg discomfort can be managed conservatively.

  3. Getting Your Sea Legs

    PubMed Central

    Stoffregen, Thomas A.; Chen, Fu-Chen; Varlet, Manuel; Alcantara, Cristina; Bardy, Benoît G.

    2013-01-01

    Sea travel mandates changes in the control of the body. The process by which we adapt bodily control to life at sea is known as getting one's sea legs. We conducted the first experimental study of bodily control as maritime novices adapted to motion of a ship at sea. We evaluated postural activity (stance width, stance angle, and the kinematics of body sway) before and during a sea voyage. In addition, we evaluated the role of the visible horizon in the control of body sway. Finally, we related data on postural activity to two subjective experiences that are associated with sea travel; seasickness, and mal de debarquement. Our results revealed rapid changes in postural activity among novices at sea. Before the beginning of the voyage, the temporal dynamics of body sway differed among participants as a function of their (subsequent) severity of seasickness. Body sway measured at sea differed among participants as a function of their (subsequent) experience of mal de debarquement. We discuss implications of these results for general theories of the perception and control of bodily orientation, for the etiology of motion sickness, and for general phenomena of perceptual-motor adaptation and learning. PMID:23840560

  4. Cold intolerance

    MedlinePlus

    Some causes of cold intolerance are: Anemia Anorexia nervosa Blood vessel problems, such as Raynaud phenomenon Chronic severe illness General poor health Underactive thyroid ( hypothyroidism ) Problem with the hypothalamus (a part ...

  5. Cell integrated multi-junction thermocouple array for solid oxide fuel cell temperature sensing: N+1 architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranaweera, Manoj; Kim, Jung-Sik

    2016-05-01

    Understanding the cell temperature distribution of solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) stacks during normal operation has multifaceted advantages in performance and degradation studies. Present efforts on measuring temperature from operating SOFCs measure only the gas channel temperature and do not reveal the cell level temperature distribution, which is more important for understanding a cell's performance and its temperature-related degradation. The authors propose a cell-integrated, multi-junction thermocouple array for in-situ cell surface temperature monitoring of an operational SOFC. The proposed thermocouple array requires far fewer numbers of thermoelements than that required by sets of thermocouples for the same number of temperature sensing points. Hence, the proposed array causes lower disturbance to cell performance than thermocouples. The thermoelement array was sputter deposited on the cathode of a commercial SOFC using alumel (Ni:Al:Mn:Si - 95:2:2:1 by wt.) and chromel (Ni:Cr - 90:10 by wt.). The thermocouple array was tested in a furnace over the entire operating temperature range of a typical SOFC. The individual sensing points of the array were shown to measure temperature independently from each other with equivalent accuracy to a thermocouple. Thus, the concept of multi-junction thermocouples is experimentally validated and its stability on a porous SOFC cathode is confirmed.

  6. [Restless legs syndrome - a review].

    PubMed

    Sveinsson, Olafur Arni; Sigurdsson, Albert Pall

    2012-01-01

    Restless legs syndrome (RLS) is a common disorder with a prevalence between 10-20% in Iceland. There are two forms of RLS, idiopathic and secondary. Symptom onset of RLS before the age of 45 suggests an idiopathic form with no known underlying cause but inheritance. Symptom onset after age of 45 indicates a secondary form with an underlying cause without inheritance. Causes for secondary forms are for example: iron depletion, uraemia and polyneuropathy. Symptoms of RLS are uncomfortable and unpleasant deep sensations in the legs that are felt at rest, accompanied by an urge to move the legs, typically just before sleep. Accompanying RLS is a sleep disturbance that can lead to daytime somnolence, decreased quality of life, poor concentration, memory problems, depression and decreased energy. Dopamine agonists are currently the first line treatment for RLS. restless legs, periodic limb movements, sleep disturbance, dopamine agonists.

  7. Restless legs syndrome. A review.

    PubMed

    O'Keeffe, S T

    1996-02-12

    Restless legs syndrome is characterized by unpleasant, deep-seated paresthesias in the legs and sometimes the arms. These sensations occur at rest and are relieved by movement. Sleep disturbance is common. Many patients also have periodic movements of sleep. Mild symptoms of restless legs occur in up to 5% of the population. Restless legs syndrome is idiopathic in most patients, but it may be the presenting feature of iron deficiency and is also common in uremia, pregnancy, diabetes mellitus, rheumatoid arthritis, and polyneuropathy. Treatment of the underlying cause, when possible, usually relieves the symptoms. For patients with severe symptoms, levodopa, bromocriptine mesylate, opioids, carbamazepine, clonazepam, and clonidine hydrochloride have proved to be effective.

  8. Restless leg syndrome in pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Grover, Aarti; Clark-Bilodeau, Courtney

    2015-01-01

    Restless leg syndrome, more recently renamed Willis-Ekbom disease, is a condition that disrupts sleep and occurs more frequently in the pregnant population. We present a 39-year-old woman with restless legs syndrome in the third trimester and discuss the epidemiology, pathophysiology and therapeutic options in the pregnant population while highlighting the challenges posed by the lack of safety data of approved drugs. PMID:27512466

  9. Restless leg syndrome in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Grover, Aarti; Clark-Bilodeau, Courtney; D'Ambrosio, Carolyn M

    2015-09-01

    Restless leg syndrome, more recently renamed Willis-Ekbom disease, is a condition that disrupts sleep and occurs more frequently in the pregnant population. We present a 39-year-old woman with restless legs syndrome in the third trimester and discuss the epidemiology, pathophysiology and therapeutic options in the pregnant population while highlighting the challenges posed by the lack of safety data of approved drugs.

  10. Restless legs syndrome.

    PubMed

    Miletić, Vladimir; Relja, Maja

    2011-12-01

    Being of the most frequent causes of insomnia, which in the end leads to chronic fatigue, inadequate performance of daily activities, and serious disruption of quality of living, restless legs syndrome (RLS) is nowadays not only a serious medical problem but a socio-economical one as well. Prevalence of the disorder in general population is estimated at 5 to 15%. Family history is positive in over 50% of idiopathic RLS patients which points to genetic basis of the disorder. The characteristics of the secondary or acquired form of RLS are symptoms that start later in life as well as a rapid progression of the disease. On the other hand, idiopathic RLS more often starts at a younger age and the prognoses are better. Over twenty disorders and conditions are brought in connection with secondary RLS. Although the cause of primary RLS is still unknown, there is a strong connection between central metabolism of iron as well as dopamine levels and RLS manifestation. A differential diagnosis of RLS includes a wide specter of motor and sensory disorders. Diagnosis is based on clinical features and the history of disease. To correctly diagnose idiopathic RLS one must first eliminate secondary causes of RLS and then also exclude any disorders with clinical features that mimic those of RLS. It has been estimated that some 20 to 25% of patients need pharmacological therapy. Best initial therapy is the application of nonergot dopamine agonists. Anticonvulsants, benzodiazepines and opioides can be given to patients who are refractory to dopaminergic therapy, those suffering from RLS with emphasized painful sensory component and those with RLS connected with insomnia.

  11. Method for collecting thermocouple data via secured shell over a wireless local area network in real time.

    PubMed

    Arnold, F; DeMallie, I; Florence, L; Kashinski, D O

    2015-03-01

    This manuscript addresses the design, hardware details, construction, and programming of an apparatus allowing an experimenter to monitor and record high-temperature thermocouple measurements of dynamic systems in real time. The apparatus uses wireless network technology to bridge the gap between a dynamic (moving) sample frame and the static laboratory frame. Our design is a custom solution applied to samples that rotate through large angular displacements where hard-wired and typical slip-ring solutions are not practical because of noise considerations. The apparatus consists of a Raspberry PI mini-Linux computer, an Arduino micro-controller, an Ocean Controls thermocouple multiplexer shield, and k-type thermocouples.

  12. Method for collecting thermocouple data via secured shell over a wireless local area network in real time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, F.; DeMallie, I.; Florence, L.; Kashinski, D. O.

    2015-03-01

    This manuscript addresses the design, hardware details, construction, and programming of an apparatus allowing an experimenter to monitor and record high-temperature thermocouple measurements of dynamic systems in real time. The apparatus uses wireless network technology to bridge the gap between a dynamic (moving) sample frame and the static laboratory frame. Our design is a custom solution applied to samples that rotate through large angular displacements where hard-wired and typical slip-ring solutions are not practical because of noise considerations. The apparatus consists of a Raspberry PI mini-Linux computer, an Arduino micro-controller, an Ocean Controls thermocouple multiplexer shield, and k-type thermocouples.

  13. Some Effects of Exposure to Exhaust-gas Streams on Emittance and Thermoelectric Power of Bare-wire Platinum Rhodium - Platinum Thermocouples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glawe, George E; Shepard, Charles E

    1954-01-01

    Thermocouples were exposed to exhaust gases from the combustion of propane, 72-octane gasoline, and JP-4 fuel. Exposure increased the emissivity of the thermocouple wire, which increased its radiation error. Two methods are presented for determining the emittance of the wires. The emissivity of a clean platinum rhodium-platinum thermocouple was approximately 0.2 in the temperature range investigated, while the emittance of an exposed thermocouple coated with exhaust residue was about 0.5. The exposure caused negligible change in the thermoelectric power of the thermocouples.

  14. Cold injuries.

    PubMed

    Long, William B; Edlich, Richard F; Winters, Kathryne L; Britt, L D

    2005-01-01

    Exposure to cold can produce a variety of injuries that occur as a result of man's inability to adapt to cold. These injuries can be divided into localized injury to a body part, systemic hypothermia, or a combination of both. Body temperature may fall as a result of heat loss by radiation, evaporation, conduction, and convection. Hypothermia or systemic cold injury occurs when the core body temperature has decreased to 35 degrees C (95 degrees F) or less. The causes of hypothermia are either primary or secondary. Primary, or accidental, hypothermia occurs in healthy individuals inadequately clothed and exposed to severe cooling. In secondary hypothermia, another illness predisposes the individual to accidental hypothermia. Hypothermia affects multiple organs with symptoms of hypothermia that vary according to the severity of cold injury. The diagnosis of hypothermia is easy if the patient is a mountaineer who is stranded in cold weather. However, it may be more difficult in an elderly patient who has been exposed to a cold environment. In either case, the rectal temperature should be checked with a low-reading thermometer. The general principals of prehospital management are to (1) prevent further heat loss, (2) rewarm the body core temperature in advance of the shell, and (3) avoid precipitating ventricular fibrillation. There are two general techniques of rewarming--passive and active. The mechanisms of peripheral cold injury can be divided into phenomena that affect cells and extracellular fluids (direct effects) and those that disrupt the function of the organized tissue and the integrity of the circulation (indirect effects). Generally, no serious damage is seen until tissue freezing occurs. The mildest form of peripheral cold injury is frostnip. Chilblains represent a more severe form of cold injury than frostnip and occur after exposure to nonfreezing temperatures and damp conditions. Immersion (trench) foot, a disease of the sympathetic nerves and blood

  15. Assignment of Temperature to a Vertical Co-C Cell for Thermocouple Calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García Izquierdo, C.; Martín, M. J.; Mantilla, J. M.; del Campo, D.

    2015-03-01

    Noble metal thermocouples are often required to be calibrated up to in fixed points in order to get the lowest uncertainties. The International Temperature Scale of 1990 (ITS-90) defines the temperature of fixed points until the copper point (). At higher temperatures, the metal carbon fixed points can be used, and the needed traceability to the ITS-90 is given by means of a standard radiation thermometer. This paper presents the method developed by the Centro Español de Metrologia to give traceability to the ITS-90 to the Co-C cell used to calibrate thermocouples by means of a mirror and a standard radiation thermometer with an expanded uncertainty () of.

  16. Attachment of Free Filament Thermocouples for Temperature Measurements on Ceramic Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lei, Jih-Fen; Cuy, Michael D.; Wnuk, Stephen P.

    1998-01-01

    At the NASA Lewis Research Center, a new installation technique utilizing convoluted wire thermocouples (TC's) was developed and proven to produce very good adhesion on CMC's, even in a burner rig environment. Because of their unique convoluted design, such TC's of various types and sizes adhere to flat or curved CMC specimens with no sign of delamination, open circuits, or interactions-even after testing in a Mach 0.3 burner rig to 1200 C (2200 F) for several thermal cycles and at several hours at high temperatures. Large differences in thermal expansion between metal thermocouples and low-expansion materials, such as CMC's, normally generate large stresses in the wires. These stresses cause straight wires to detach, but convoluted wires that are bonded with strips of coating allow bending in the unbonded portion to relieve these expansion stresses.

  17. Comparison of nickel carbon and iron carbon eutectic fixed point cells for the calibration of thermocouples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edler, F.; Baratto, A. C.

    2006-12-01

    Three nickel-carbon (Ni-C) and three iron-carbon (Fe-C) eutectic fixed points cells of a new design, meeting the requirements for reliable applications and being suitable for the calibration of thermocouples, were constructed at PTB and Inmetro. Their melting temperatures were compared by using the high-temperature furnace of PTB (HTF-R) and two platinum/palladium (Pt/Pd) thermocouples. The measured emfs of the Ni-C eutectic fixed point cells at the inflection points of the melting curves agree within a temperature equivalent of about 0.29 °C, compared with an agreement of about 0.09 °C found for the Fe-C cells. Additional comparison measurements of two Fe-C eutectic fixed point cells in a second high-temperature furnace (HTF-M, Inmetro) demonstrate the applicability of the Fe-C eutectic cells as transfer standards for the dissemination of temperatures.

  18. Evaluation of a 6-wire thermocouple psychrometer for determination of in-situ water potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Loskot, C.L.; Rousseau, J.P.; Kurzmack, M.A.

    1994-12-31

    A 6-wire, Peltier-type thermocouple psychrometer was designed and evaluated by the U.S. Geological Survey for monitoring in-situ water potentials in dry-drilled boreholes in the unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada. The psychrometer consists of a wet-bulb, chromel-constantan, sensing junction and a separate dry-bulb, copper-constantan, reference junction. Two additional reference junctions are formed where the chromel and constantan wires of the wet-bulb sensing junction are soldered to separate, paired, copper, lead wires. In contrast, in the standard 3-wire thermocouple psychrometer, both the wet bulb and dry bulb share a common wire. The new design has resulted in a psychrometer that has an expanded range and greater reliability, sensitivity, and accuracy compared to the standard model.

  19. Cold urticaria.

    PubMed

    Claudy, A

    2001-11-01

    Cold urticaria is one form of urticaria that may be associated with other forms of physical urticarias. Frequency is generally estimated at two or three per 100. The triggering effect of cold is found at history taking in most of the cases. The urticaria is usually superficial, and more rarely associated with deep and/or mucosal urticaria. The diagnosis is based on history taking and the ice cube test. An exhaustive search for an etiologic factor is often unfruitful, and the presence of a cryopathy should lead to a complete work-up. Therapy of cold urticaria may prove to be difficult. In patients with secondary cold urticaria, underlying disease must be treated in order to resolve the skin symptoms. H1-antihistamines can be used but the clinical responses are highly variable. Short-time treatment with low concentration corticosteroids suppresses the symptoms only partially and temporarily. In patients who do not respond to previous treatments, induction of cold tolerance may be proposed but the procedure is difficult to carry out in daily life over an extended period. Key word: cryoglobulins.

  20. Restless Legs Syndrome and Leg Motor Restlessness in Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Keisuke; Miyamoto, Masayuki; Miyamoto, Tomoyuki; Hirata, Koichi

    2015-01-01

    Sleep disturbances are important nonmotor symptoms in Parkinson's disease (PD) that are associated with a negative impact on quality of life. Restless legs syndrome (RLS), which is characterized by an urge to move the legs accompanied by abnormal leg sensations, can coexist with PD, although the pathophysiology of these disorders appears to be different. RLS and PD both respond favorably to dopaminergic treatment, and several investigators have reported a significant relationship between RLS and PD. Sensory symptoms, pain, motor restlessness, akathisia, and the wearing-off phenomenon observed in PD should be differentiated from RLS. RLS in PD may be confounded by chronic dopaminergic treatment; thus, more studies are needed to investigate RLS in drug-naïve patients with PD. Recently, leg motor restlessness (LMR), which is characterized by an urge to move the legs that does not fulfill the diagnostic criteria for RLS, has been reported to be observed more frequently in de novo patients with PD than in age-matched healthy controls, suggesting that LMR may be a part of sensorimotor symptoms intrinsic to PD. In this paper, we provide an overview of RLS, LMR, and PD and of the relationships among these disorders. PMID:26504610

  1. Sheathed thermocouples for continuous molten steel temperature measurement during the ladle treatment process

    SciTech Connect

    Phillippi, R.M. . Accumetrix Div.)

    1989-09-01

    The evolution of a thermocouple protection sheath for use in liquid steel during the ladle treatment process is described. Five different designs constructed of boron nitride, alumina-graphite, and magnesia-graphite were evaluated. Results show that excellent slag wear characteristics are possible using magnesia-graphite but improvements in thermal shock resistance and response time are required. Temperature profiles during argon stirring, addition of chill scrap, and natural cooling are presented. 3 refs., 19 figs.

  2. Microwave design and analysis of a micromachined self-heating power sensor based on matching thermocouples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhiqiang; Liao, Xiaoping

    2017-08-01

    Microwave performance is a basic index of the sensors used at microwave frequencies, but also affects the sensing output. For the purpose of low-loss microwave applications, it is important for different microwave sensors to develop microwave design. This paper presents the microwave design and analysis of a micromachined self-heating microwave power sensor in the GaAs MMIC process, where the microwave power is dissipated and converted into output thermovoltages by two matching thermocouples. A dc-blocking capacitor is connected to the thermocouples in series and used to avoid the output short-circuit. In order to characterize the microwave performance, an S-parameter model of this self-heating power sensor is established. Using the model, the effects of the capacitor and the thermocouples on the reflection loss are investigated under different microwave frequencies. To demonstrate the validity of the microwave model, the microwave performance of the self-heating sensor is simulated using an electromagnetic software. In the simulation, the relationship between the substrate membrane underneath the thermocouples and the reflection loss is analyzed. Measured reflection losses of the self-heating sensor are between  -15.5 to  -15.9 dB at 8-12 GHz. The measured results show good agreement with the microwave model and simulation, and the source of small deviations is discussed. The proposed microwave design and analysis contributes to achieving low reflection loss for the sensor, with the fact that more power is used to convert into the thermovoltages.

  3. Performance of Chromel versus Alumel and Nicrosil versus Nisil thermocouple assemblies in vacuum and argon between 1000 deg C and 1200 deg C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludtka, G. M.; Kollie, T. G.; Anderson, R. L.; Christie, W. H.

    1984-10-01

    Prior work showed that Nicrosil versus Nisil (Type N) thermocouples exhibit improved thermoelectric stability at elevated temperatures in oxidizing environments greater than existing nickel base thermocouple alloys. This research evaluated the performance of Chromel versus Alumel and Nicrosil versus Nisil thermocouple assemblies in vacuum and argon between 1000(0)C and 1200(0)C. Both sheathed and bare thermocouple wires of various thicknesses were tested. The thermocouples were compared after exposure to the elevated temperatures by measuring thermoelectric drift from initial calibration data and by performing in place inhomogeneity tests. Under these test conditions, comparable behavior was exhibited by the Type K and Type N thermocouples. However, several conclusions could be made. Thick, bare thermocouples did as well as sheathed thermocouples especially at elevated temperatures where reaction with insulating materials is likely for sheathed thermocouples. Stainless steel sheathed thermocouples tended to exhibit larger maximum errors than Inconel sheathed thermocouples which is a result of contamination by diffusion of sheath component species into the thermoelements.

  4. Relating Composition and Thermoelectric Stability of Pt-Rh Alloy Thermocouples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearce, J. V.; Greenen, A. D.; Smith, A.; Elliott, C. J.

    2017-02-01

    A simple model is presented which relates the electromotive force drift rate of Pt-Rh thermoelements to dS/dc, the sensitivity of the Seebeck coefficient, S, to rhodium mass fraction, c. The model has been tested by repeated measurements of a Pt-Rh thermocouple assembly consisting of five thermoelements, using a Co-C high-temperature fixed point (1324°C) for a total duration of 500 h. By considering various thermocouples from the assembly, it is demonstrated that in this case, remarkably, there is a linear relationship between the measured drift rate and the combined dS/dc, where the combination is determined by addition of the individual values for each wire. Particular emphasis is placed on evaluation of the uncertainties associated with the calculations. This result supports previous findings that the thermoelectric stability of Pt-Rh thermoelements improves as the rhodium mass fraction increases. Within this paradigm, it is shown that for a selected Pt-Rh thermoelement of any given composition, there exists a second thermoelement having a composition that yields a minimum drift when combined with the first to form a thermocouple.

  5. Application of Thin-Film Thermocouples to Localized Heat Transfer Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lepicovsky, J.; Bruckner, R. J.; Smith, F. A.

    1995-01-01

    The paper describes a proof-of-concept experiment on thin-film thermocouples used for localized heat transfer measurements applicable to experiments on hot parts of turbine engines. The paper has three main parts. The first part describes the thin-film sensors and manufacturing procedures. Attention is paid to connections between thin-film thermocouples and lead wires, which has been a source of problems in the past. The second part addresses the test arrangement and facility used for the heat transfer measurements modeling the conditions for upcoming warm turbine tests at NASA LeRC. The paper stresses the advantages of a modular approach to the test rig design. Finally, we present the results of bulk and local heat flow rate measurements, as well as overall heat transfer coefficients obtained from measurements in a narrow passage with an aspect ratio of 11.8. The comparison of bulk and local heat flow rates confirms applicability of thin-film thermocouples to upcoming warm turbine tests.

  6. Validation of a Blackbody Comparator-Based System for Thermocouple Calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ojanen, M.; Hahtela, O.; Heinonen, M.

    2014-04-01

    A blackbody comparator for thermocouple calibration in the temperature range from to has previously been developed at the Centre for Metrology and Accreditation (MIKES). The calibration system is based on direct comparison of thermocouples and a radiation thermometer. In this article, the blackbody comparator is exploited by comparing an absolute calibrated irradiance mode filter radiometer and a linear pyrometer calibrated according to the International Temperature Scale of 1990 (ITS-90) to each other in the temperature range from to . The results of the comparison are in agreement within uncertainties (). Furthermore, thermal gradients in the blackbody comparator are studied by means of numerical simulation, as the gradients were found to be the major source of uncertainty in previous work. A thermal model was constructed with COMSOL software, and the radial and longitudinal gradients were studied in the comparator. The results of the modeling are in agreement with the uncertainty determination carried out in previous work, but the gradients still remain a significant uncertainty contribution. The validation of the calibration system was completed by comparing calibration results obtained with the system for a Pt/Pd thermocouple to calibration results reported by the National Physical Laboratory (NPL), UK. The results of the comparison agree within the expanded uncertainty () of the comparison.

  7. A Quantitative Model for the Thermocouple Effect Using Statistical and Quantum Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bramley, Paul; Clark, Stewart

    2003-09-01

    This paper employs statistical and quantum mechanics to develop a model for the mechanism underlying the Seebeck effect. The conventional view of the equilibrium criterion for valence electrons in a material is that the Fermi Energy should be constant throughout the system. However, this criterion is an approximation and it is shown to be inadequate for thermocouple systems. An improved equilibrium criterion is developed by applying statistical and quantum mechanics to determine the total flow of electrons across an arbitrary boundary within a system. Dynamic equilibrium is then considered to be the situation where the Fermi Energy either side of the boundary is such that the flow of electrons in each direction is the same. This equilibrium criterion is then applied to the conditions along the thermocouple wires and at the junctions in order to generate a model for the Seebeck effect. The equations involved for calculating the electronic structure of a material cannot be solved analytically, so a solution is achieved using numeric models employing CASTEP code running on a Sun Beowulf cluster and iterative algorithms written in the Excel™ VBA language on a PC. The model is used to calculate the EMF versus temperature function for the gold versus platinum thermocouple, which is then compared with established experimental data.

  8. A Multi-Point Measurement Method for Thermal Characterization of Foil Bearings Using Customized Thermocouples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubieniecki, Michał; Roemer, Jakub; Martowicz, Adam; Wojciechowski, Krzysztof; Uhl, Tadeusz

    2016-03-01

    Gas foil bearings have become widespread covering the applications of micro-turbines, motors, compressors, and turbocharges, prevalently of small size. The specific construction of the bearing, despite all of its advantages, makes it vulnerable to a local difference in heat generation rates that can be extremely detrimental. The developing thermal gradients may lead to thermal runaway or seizure that eventually causes bearing failure, usually abrupt in nature. The authors propose a method for thermal gradient removal with the use of current-controlled thermoelectric modules. To fulfill the task of control law adoption the numerical model of the heat distribution in a bearing has been built. Although sparse readings obtained experimentally with standard thermocouples are enough to determine thermal gradients successfully, validation of the bearing numerical model may be impeded. To improve spatial resolution of the experimental measurements the authors proposed a matrix of customized thermocouples located on the top foil. The foil acts as a shared conductor for each thermocouple that reduces the number of cable connections. The proof of concept of the control and measurement systems has been demonstrated in a still bearing heated by a cartridge heater.

  9. COLD TRAP

    DOEpatents

    Milleron, N.

    1963-03-12

    An improved linear-flow cold trap is designed for highvacuum applications such as mitigating back migration of diffusion pump oil moiecules. A central pot of liquid nitrogen is nested within and supported by a surrounding, vertical, helical coil of metai sheet, all enveloped by a larger, upright, cylindrical, vacuum vessel. The vertical interstices between successive turns of the coil afford lineal, axial, high-vacuum passages between open mouths at top and bottom of said vessel, while the coil, being cold by virtue of thermal contact of its innermost turn with the nitrogen pot, affords expansive proximate condensation surfaces. (AEC)

  10. Pipe crawler with extendable legs

    DOEpatents

    Zollinger, William T.

    1992-01-01

    A pipe crawler for moving through a pipe in inchworm fashion having front and rear leg assemblies separated by air cylinders to increase and decrease the spacing between assemblies. Each leg of the four legs of an assembly is moved between a wall-engaging, extended position and a retracted position by a separate air cylinder. The air cylinders of the leg assemblies are preferably arranged in pairs of oppositely directed cylinders with no pair lying in the same axial plane as another pair. Therefore, the cylinders can be as long a leg assembly is wide and the crawler can crawl through sections of pipes where the diameter is twice that of other sections. The crawler carries a valving system, a manifold to distribute air supplied by a single umbilical air hose to the various air cylinders in a sequence controlled electrically by a controller. The crawler also utilizes a rolling mechanism, casters in this case, to reduce friction between the crawler and pipe wall thereby further extending the range of the pipe crawler.

  11. Pipe crawler with extendable legs

    DOEpatents

    Zollinger, W.T.

    1992-06-16

    A pipe crawler for moving through a pipe in inchworm fashion having front and rear leg assemblies separated by air cylinders to increase and decrease the spacing between assemblies. Each leg of the four legs of an assembly is moved between a wall-engaging, extended position and a retracted position by a separate air cylinder. The air cylinders of the leg assemblies are preferably arranged in pairs of oppositely directed cylinders with no pair lying in the same axial plane as another pair. Therefore, the cylinders can be as long as a leg assembly is wide and the crawler can crawl through sections of pipes where the diameter is twice that of other sections. The crawler carries a valving system, a manifold to distribute air supplied by a single umbilical air hose to the various air cylinders in a sequence controlled electrically by a controller. The crawler also utilizes a rolling mechanism, casters in this case, to reduce friction between the crawler and pipe wall thereby further extending the range of the pipe crawler. 8 figs.

  12. Restless legs syndrome and periodic leg movements of sleep.

    PubMed

    Rye, David B; Trotti, Lynn Marie

    2012-11-01

    Women are more commonly affected than men by restless legs syndrome, and prevalence is highest amongst those of northern European heritage. The motor manifestations include nonvolitional myoclonus (periodic leg movements). Disinhibition of spinal sensorimotor circuits may underlie these primary features and can be affected by peripheral as well as supraspinal networks. Insufficient mobilizable iron stores increase expressivity in some individuals. The sensorimotor features are relieved by dopamine, especially dopamine agonists, gabapentin and its derivatives, and opioids. A diagnosis relies on recognition of key primary and supportive features, and treatments are generally well tolerated, efficacious, and life-changing. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Cold Sores

    MedlinePlus

    ... causes oral herpes, or cold sores. Type 1 herpes virus infects more than half of the U.S. population by the time they reach their 20s. Type 2 usually affects the genital area Some people have no symptoms from the ...

  14. Cold Hands

    MedlinePlus

    ... you have a problem with the nerves or blood circulation or a problem with tissue damage in your hands or fingers. ... of causes. Having cold hands could signal a problem with your blood circulation or the blood vessels in your hands. Make ...

  15. Project COLD.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kazanjian, Wendy C.

    1982-01-01

    Describes Project COLD (Climate, Ocean, Land, Discovery) a scientific study of the Polar Regions, a collection of 35 modules used within the framework of existing subjects: oceanography, biology, geology, meterology, geography, social science. Includes a partial list of topics and one activity (geodesic dome) from a module. (Author/SK)

  16. Measured drift of irradiated and unirradiated W3%Re/W25%Re thermocouples at a nominal 2000 K.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heckelman, J. D.; Kozar, R. P.

    1972-01-01

    Seven tantalum sheathed, BeO insulated, 0.157-cm-diam, grounded-junction W-3%Re/W-25%Re thermocouples were irradiated in a helium-argon environment at a temperature of 1900 to 2100 K. Six other thermocouples from the same lot were operated out-of-pile with the same temperature history as the in-pile thermocouples. Drift-in-pile was determined by periodically replacing a 'reference' thermocouple in the irradiation capsule. Drift out-of-pile was determined with an optical pyrometer. After 8000 hours irradiation, the estimated neutron fluence was 4 x 10 to the 21st power thermal neutrons/sq cm and 0.9 x 10 to the 21st power fast neutrons/sq cm (E greater than 0.18 MeV). At this time the in-pile group had decreased in output the equivalent of 340 K at 2073 K, while the out-of-pile group had decreased in output the equivalent of 54 K at 2073 K. The maximum deviation in drift between thermocouples of the in-pile group and between thermocouples of the out-of-pile group was less than plus or minus 15 K and less than plus or minus 10 K, respectively.

  17. Radiation of anginal pain to the legs.

    PubMed

    Kolettis, M T; Kalogeropoulos, C K; Tzannetis, G C; Vitakis, S K; Xaplanteris, P P; Novas, I A

    1986-02-01

    Pain radiated from the chest to one or both legs (17 cases), or from the legs to the chest (two cases) in 19 patients with angina or acute myocardial infarction. The leg pain was assumed to be related to the angina pectoris when both were of a similar character and occurred together, when the leg pain occurred at rest, and when there were normal peripheral pulses in the leg. Pain was felt in the left leg by 10 patients, the right leg by two patients, and in both legs by seven. Three patients experienced pain in the thigh(s), six in the shin(s), and 10 had pain in both. In six patients the pain extended down to the inner two to four toes. The pain was always felt in front of the legs. This distribution accords with the suggestion that some sensory cardiac nerve fibres occur in the lumbar sympathetic ganglia and that pain is projected into the corresponding dermatomes.

  18. Prometheus Hot Leg Piping Concept

    SciTech Connect

    Gribik, Anastasia M.; DiLorenzo, Peter A.

    2007-01-30

    The Naval Reactors Prime Contractor Team (NRPCT) recommended the development of a gas cooled reactor directly coupled to a Brayton energy conversion system as the Space Nuclear Power Plant (SNPP) for NASA's Project Prometheus. The section of piping between the reactor outlet and turbine inlet, designated as the hot leg piping, required unique design features to allow the use of a nickel superalloy rather than a refractory metal as the pressure boundary. The NRPCT evaluated a variety of hot leg piping concepts for performance relative to SNPP system parameters, manufacturability, material considerations, and comparison to past high temperature gas reactor (HTGR) practice. Manufacturability challenges and the impact of pressure drop and turbine entrance temperature reduction on cycle efficiency were discriminators between the piping concepts. This paper summarizes the NRPCT hot leg piping evaluation, presents the concept recommended, and summarizes developmental issues for the recommended concept.

  19. Promethus Hot Leg Piping Concept

    SciTech Connect

    AM Girbik; PA Dilorenzo

    2006-01-24

    The Naval Reactors Prime Contractor Team (NRPCT) recommended the development of a gas cooled reactor directly coupled to a Brayton energy conversion system as the Space Nuclear Power Plant (SNPP) for NASA's Project Prometheus. The section of piping between the reactor outlet and turbine inlet, designated as the hot leg piping, required unique design features to allow the use of a nickel superalloy rather than a refractory metal as the pressure boundary. The NRPCT evaluated a variety of hot leg piping concepts for performance relative to SNPP system parameters, manufacturability, material considerations, and comparison to past high temperature gas reactor (HTGR) practice. Manufacturability challenges and the impact of pressure drop and turbine entrance temperature reduction on cycle efficiency were discriminators between the piping concepts. This paper summarizes the NRPCT hot leg piping evaluation, presents the concept recommended, and summarizes developmental issues for the recommended concept.

  20. Laser therapy for leg veins.

    PubMed

    Kunishige, Joy H; Goldberg, Leonard H; Friedman, Paul M

    2007-01-01

    Visible veins on the leg are a common cosmetic concern affecting approximately 80% of women in the United States (Engel A, Johnson MI, Haynes SG. Health effects of sunlight exposure in the United States: results from the first national health and nutrition examination survey, 1971-1974. Arch Dermatol 1988;124:72-9). Without a quick and noninvasive treatment available, leg veins present a therapeutic challenge. This challenge has been tackled by the design of lasers with longer pulse durations, and the use of lasers with longer wavelengths and cooling devices. Recent studies show the efficacy of laser treatment beginning to approach that of sclerotherapy, the gold standard. This review outlines the principles guiding laser treatment, the current available options, and a clinically oriented approach to treating leg veins.

  1. Prometheus Hot Leg Piping Concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gribik, Anastasia M.; DiLorenzo, Peter A.

    2007-01-01

    The Naval Reactors Prime Contractor Team (NRPCT) recommended the development of a gas cooled reactor directly coupled to a Brayton energy conversion system as the Space Nuclear Power Plant (SNPP) for NASA's Project Prometheus. The section of piping between the reactor outlet and turbine inlet, designated as the hot leg piping, required unique design features to allow the use of a nickel superalloy rather than a refractory metal as the pressure boundary. The NRPCT evaluated a variety of hot leg piping concepts for performance relative to SNPP system parameters, manufacturability, material considerations, and comparison to past high temperature gas reactor (HTGR) practice. Manufacturability challenges and the impact of pressure drop and turbine entrance temperature reduction on cycle efficiency were discriminators between the piping concepts. This paper summarizes the NRPCT hot leg piping evaluation, presents the concept recommended, and summarizes developmental issues for the recommended concept.

  2. Intramuscular pressures beneath elastic and inelastic leggings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, G.; Ballard, R. E.; Breit, G. A.; Watenpaugh, D. E.; Hargens, A. R.

    1994-01-01

    Leg compression devices have been used extensively by patients to combat chronic venous insufficiency and by astronauts to counteract orthostatic intolerance following spaceflight. However, the effects of elastic and inelastic leggings on the calf muscle pump have not been compared. The purpose of this study was to compare in normal subjects the effects of elastic and inelastic compression on leg intramuscular pressure (IMP), an objective index of calf muscle pump function. IMP in soleus and tibialis anterior muscles was measured with transducer-tipped catheters. Surface compression between each legging and the skin was recorded with an air bladder. Subjects were studied under three conditions: (1) control (no legging), (2) elastic legging, and (3) inelastic legging. Pressure data were recorded for each condition during recumbency, sitting, standing, walking, and running. Elastic leggings applied significantly greater surface compression during recumbency (20 +/- 1 mm Hg, mean +/- SE) than inelastic leggings (13 +/- 2 mm Hg). During recumbency, elastic leggings produced significantly higher soleus IMP of 25 +/- 1 mm Hg and tibialis anterior IMP of 28 +/- 1 mm Hg compared to 17 +/- 1 mm Hg and 20 +/- 2 mm Hg, respectively, generated by inelastic leggings and 8 +/- 1 mm Hg and 11 +/- 1 mm Hg, respectively, without leggings. During sitting, walking, and running, however, peak IMPs generated in the muscular compartments by elastic and inelastic leggings were similar. Our results suggest that elastic leg compression applied over a long period in the recumbent posture may impede microcirculation and jeopardize tissue viability.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

  3. Bilateral Leg Replantation in a 3-Month-Old Baby After a Knee Level Crush Amputation-A 2-Year Follow-up.

    PubMed

    Bulic, Kresimir; Antabak, Anko; Dujmovic, Anto; Kisic, Hrvoje; Lorencin, Mia

    2017-03-01

    We present a case of a successful bilateral leg replantation in a 3-month-old baby after a knee-level crush amputation with the loss of both knee joints. The legs were replanted after 4 hours of warm and an additional 2.5 and 3.5 hours of cold ischemia time. Both legs show motor and sensory reinnervation, without additional procedures performed on the right leg, and after a nerve reconstruction with cadaveric allografts on the left leg. Both replanted legs exhibit excellent bony and soft tissue growth. Two years after the injury, the patient is progressing well with rehabilitation, with favourable odds of having knee reconstructions performed at a later age. This is the youngest patient reported to have had successful replantation of both legs.

  4. Rotigotine for restless legs syndrome.

    PubMed

    Davies, Shelley

    2009-09-01

    Restless legs syndrome (RLS) is a neurological disorder related to abnormal and unpleasant sensations and movements in the legs. It usually occurs at nighttime and thus has a detrimental impact on the ability to sleep, leading to poor patient quality of life. UCB has been developing rotigotine transdermal patch system (Neupro; SPM-962) as a treatment for RLS. This system is designed to replace levels of dopamine in the body via once-daily application of the patch, in a bid to restore proper motor functioning. The rotigotine patch has been authorized for the treatment of RLS since August 2008.

  5. HYPERTENSIVE-ISCHEMIC LEG ULCERS

    PubMed Central

    Farber, Eugene M.; Schmidt, Otto E. L.

    1950-01-01

    Ischemic ulcers of the leg having characteristics different from those of ordinary leg ulcers have been observed in a small number of hypertensive patients, mostly women, during the past few years. Such ulcers are usually located above the ankle. They begin with a small area of purplish discoloration at the site of slight trauma, and progress to acutely tender ulceration. In studies of tissue removed from the margin and the base of an ulcer of this kind, obliterative arteriolar sclerotic changes, ischemic-appearing connective tissue and inflammatory changes were noted. Two additional cases are reported. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4. PMID:15398887

  6. Hot, Cold, and Really Cold.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leyden, Michael

    1997-01-01

    Describes a physics experiment investigating temperature prediction and the relationship between the physical properties of heat units, melting, dissolving, states of matter, and energy loss. Details the experimental setup, which requires hot and cold water, a thermometer, and ice. Notes that the experiment employs a deliberate counter-intuitive…

  7. Hot, Cold, and Really Cold.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leyden, Michael

    1997-01-01

    Describes a physics experiment investigating temperature prediction and the relationship between the physical properties of heat units, melting, dissolving, states of matter, and energy loss. Details the experimental setup, which requires hot and cold water, a thermometer, and ice. Notes that the experiment employs a deliberate counter-intuitive…

  8. Relationship of the Cold-Heat Sensation of the Limbs and Abdomen with Physiological Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Lee, JeongHoon; Kim, GaYul; Song, JiYeon

    2016-01-01

    The present study explored the relationship between the regional Cold-Heat sensation, the key indicator of the Cold-Heat patterns in traditional East Asian medicine (TEAM), and various biomarkers in Korean population. 734 apparently healthy volunteers aged 20 years and older were enrolled. Three scale self-report questions on the general thermal feel in hands, legs, and abdomen were examined. We found that 65% of women tended to perceive their body, particularly their hands and legs, to be cold, versus 25% of men. Energy expenditure and temperature load at resting state were lower in women, independently of body mass index (BMI). Those with warm hands and warm legs had a 0.74 and 0.52 kg/m2 higher BMI than those with cold hands and cold legs, respectively, regardless of age, gender, and body weight. Norepinephrine was higher, whereas the dynamic changes in glucose and insulin during an oral glucose tolerance test were lower in those with cold extremities, particularly hands. No consistent differences in biomarkers were found for the abdominal dimension. These results suggest that gender, BMI, the sympathetic nervous system, and glucose metabolism are potential determinants of the Cold-Heat sensation in the hands and legs, but not the abdomen. PMID:27818698

  9. Other Causes of Leg Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... in the same position for a long time Injuries caused by: A torn or overstretched muscle (strain) Hairline crack in the bone (stress fracture) Inflamed tendon (tendinitis) Shin splints—pain in the front of your leg related to overuse or repetitive pounding Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) , which occurs when ...

  10. Rotational joint for prosthetic leg

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. C.; Owens, L. J.

    1977-01-01

    Device is installed in standard 30 millimeter tubing used for lower leg prosthetics. Unit allows proper rotation (about 3 degrees) of foot relative to the hip, during normal walking or running. Limited rotational movement with restoring force results in a more natural gait.

  11. Rotational joint for prosthetic leg

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. C.; Owens, L. J.

    1977-01-01

    Device is installed in standard 30 millimeter tubing used for lower leg prosthetics. Unit allows proper rotation (about 3 degrees) of foot relative to the hip, during normal walking or running. Limited rotational movement with restoring force results in a more natural gait.

  12. Fruits, Veggies May Benefit Your Legs, Too

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_165706.html Fruits, Veggies May Benefit Your Legs, Too Healthy diet ... May 18, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Eating plenty of fruits and vegetables may help keep your leg arteries ...

  13. In situ temperature measurements with thermocouple probes during laser interstitial thermotherapy (LITT): quantification and correction of a measurement artifact.

    PubMed

    Manns, F; Milne, P J; Gonzalez-Cirre, X; Denham, D B; Parel, J M; Robinson, D S

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to quantify the magnitude of an artifact induced by stainless steel thermocouple probes in temperature measurements made in situ during experimental laser interstitial thermo-therapy (LITT). A procedure for correction of this observational error is outlined. A CW Nd:YAG laser system emitting 20W for 25-30 s delivered through a fiber-optic probe was used to create localized heating. The temperature field around the fiber-optic probe during laser irradiation was measured every 0.3 s in air, water, 0.4% intralipid solution, and fatty cadaver pig tissue, with a field of up to fifteen needle thermocouple probes. Direct absorption of Nd:YAG laser radiation by the thermocouple probes induced an overestimation of the temperature, ranging from 1.8 degrees C to 118.6 degrees C in air, 2.2 degrees C to 9.9 degrees C in water, 0.7 C to 4.7 C in intralipid and 0.3 C to 17.9 C in porcine tissue after irradiation at 20W for 30 s and depending on the thermocouple location. The artifact in porcine tissue was removed by applying exponential and linear fits to the measured temperature curves. Light absorption by thermocouple probes can induce a significant artifact in the measurement of laser-induced temperature increases. When the time constant of the thermocouple effect is much smaller than the thermal relaxation time of the surrounding tissue, the artifact can be accurately quantified. During LITT experiments where temperature differences of a few degrees are significant, the thermocouple artifact must be removed in order to be able accurately to predict the treatment outcome.

  14. The one-leg standing radiograph

    PubMed Central

    Naratrikun, K.; Kanitnate, S.; Sangkomkamhang, T.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to compare the joint space width between one-leg and both-legs standing radiographs in order to diagnose a primary osteoarthritis of the knee. Methods Digital radiographs of 100 medial osteoarthritic knees in 50 patients were performed. The patients had undergone one-leg standing anteroposterior (AP) views by standing on the affected leg while a both-legs standing AP view was undertaken while standing on both legs. The severity of the osteoarthritis was evaluated using the joint space width and Kellgren-Lawrence (KL) radiographic classification. The t-test was used for statistical analysis. Results The mean medial joint space width found in the one-leg and in the both-legs standing view were measured at 1.8 mm and 2.4 mm, respectively (p < 0.001, 95% CI 0.5 to 0.7). 33%, 47.4% and 23.1% of the knees diagnosed with a KL grade of I, II and III in the both-legs standing views were changed to KL grade II, III and IV in the one-leg standing views, respectively. No changes for KL IV osteoarthritis diagnoses have been found between both- and one-leg standing views. Conclusions One-leg standing radiographs better represent joint space width than both-legs standing radiographs. 32% of both-legs standing radiographs have changed the KL grading to a more severe grade than that in the one-leg standing radiographs. Cite this article: P. Pinsornsak, K. Naratrikun, S. Kanitnate, T. Sangkomkamhang. The one-leg standing radiograph: An improved technique to evaluate the severity of knee osteoarthritis. Bone Joint Res 2016;5:436–441. DOI: 10.1302/2046-3758.59.BJR-2016-0049.R1. PMID:27683299

  15. The contributions to drift of positive and negative thermoelements in type K MIMS thermocouples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scervini, M.; Rae, C.

    2013-09-01

    As part of the European project HEATTOP a study on drift of MIMS type K thermocouples above 1000°C has been undertaken: in particular the investigation focused on type K thermoelements of Rescal composition. The approach of this study is based on separating the contributions of each thermoelement to the drift which allows a deeper level of understanding of the contributions of different metallurgical modifications for each thermoelement. At temperature above 1000°C contamination of the thermoelements from the sheath becomes an important factor. The negative thermoelement is particularly prone to drift in MIMS configurations.

  16. Simple method for measuring vibration amplitude of high power airborne ultrasonic transducer: using thermo-couple.

    PubMed

    Saffar, Saber; Abdullah, Amir

    2014-03-01

    Vibration amplitude of transducer's elements is the influential parameters in the performance of high power airborne ultrasonic transducers to control the optimum vibration without material yielding. The vibration amplitude of elements of provided high power airborne transducer was determined by measuring temperature of the provided high power airborne transducer transducer's elements. The results showed that simple thermocouples can be used both to measure the vibration amplitude of transducer's element and an indicator to power transmission to the air. To verify our approach, the power transmission to the air has been investigated by other common method experimentally. The experimental results displayed good agreement with presented approach.

  17. Measurement of body fat using leg to leg bioimpedance

    PubMed Central

    Sung, R; Lau, P; Yu, C; Lam, P; Nelson, E

    2001-01-01

    AIMS—(1) To validate a leg to leg bioimpedance analysis (BIA) device in the measurement of body composition in children by assessment of its agreement with dual energy x ray absorptiometry (DXA) and its repeatability. (2) To establish a reference range of percentage body fat in Hong Kong Chinese children.
METHODS—Sequential BIA and DXA methods were used to determine body composition in 49 children aged 7-18 years; agreement between the two methods was calculated. Repeatability for the BIA method was established from duplicate measurements. Body composition was then determined by BIA in 1139 girls and 1243 boys aged 7-16 years, who were randomly sampled in eight local primary and secondary schools to establish reference ranges.
RESULTS—The 95% limits of agreement between BIA and DXA methods were considered acceptable (−3.3 kg to −0.5 kg fat mass and −3.9 to 0.6% body fat). The percentage body fat increased with increasing age. Compared to the 1993 Hong Kong growth survey, these children had higher body mass index. Mean (SD) percentage body fat at 7years of age was 17.2% (4.4%) and 14.0% (3.4%) respectively for boys and girls, which increased to 19.3% (4.8%) and 27.8% (6.3%) at age 16.
CONCLUSION—Leg to leg BIA is a valid alternative method to DXA for the measurement of body fat. Provisional reference ranges for percentage body fat for Hong Kong Chinese children aged 7-16 years are provided.

 PMID:11517118

  18. [Restless legs syndrome and nocturnal leg pain : Differential diagnosis and treatment].

    PubMed

    Hornyak, M; Stiasny-Kolster, K; Evers, S; Happe, S

    2011-09-01

    Pain in the legs belongs to the five most frequent regional pain symptoms. Restless legs syndrome (RLS) presents a particular differential diagnosis for pain in the legs, which is characterized by a nocturnal urge to move the legs often associated with painful sensations in the legs. It is one of the most common neurological disorders and probably the leading cause of nocturnal pain in the legs. In this overview, the diagnosis and therapy of RLS as well as aspects of pain therapy of the disorder are presented. In addition, the differential diagnoses for exclusion of other specific causes of nocturnal pain in the legs are discussed.

  19. Gimbals in the insect leg.

    PubMed

    Frantsevich, Leonid; Wang, Weiying

    2009-01-01

    We studied the common kinematic features of the coxa and trochanter in cursorial and raptorial legs, which are the short size of the podomers, predominantly monoaxial joints, and the approximate orthogonality of adjacent joint axes. The chain coxa-trochanter with its short elements and serial orthogonality of joint axes resembles the gimbals which combine versatility and tolerance to external perturbations. The geometry of legs was studied in 23 insect species of 12 orders. Insects with monoaxial joints were selected. The joint between the trochanter and the femur (TFJ) is defined either by two vestigial condyles or by a straight anterior hinge. Direction of the joint axes in the two basal podomers was assessed by 3D measurements or by goniometry in two planes. Length of the coxa is <15% (mostly <8%) of the total length of the cursorial leg, that of the trochanter <10%. Angles between the proximal and distal joint axes in the middle coxa range from 124 to 84 degrees (mean 97+/-14 degrees ), in the trochanter (in all legs studied) from 125 to 72 degrees (mean 90+/-13 degrees ). Vectors of the distal axis in the coxa are concentrated about the normal to the plane defined by the proximal axis and the midpoint between the distal condyles. These vectors in the trochanter lie at various angles to the normal; angles are correlated with the direction of the TFJ relative to the femur. Range of reduction about the TFJ is over 60 degrees in the foreleg of Ranatra linearis, Mantispa lobata and the hind leg in Carabus coriaceus (confirming observations of previous authors), 40-60 degrees in the foreleg of Vespa crabro and in the middle one in Ammophila campestris, 10-30 degrees in other studied specimens. The special role of the trochanter in autotomy and in active propulsion in some insect groups is discussed. The majority of insects possess small trochanters and slightly movable TFJs with the joint axis laying in the femur-tibia plane. We pose the hypothesis that the TFJ

  20. Thermocouple Positioning For The Application Of The Non-Integer System Identification Approach To HIFIRE-5 Fins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lohle, Stefan; Bohrk, Hannah; Fuchs, Ulf

    2011-05-01

    The German Aerospace Center developed a ceramic fin experiment (FinEx) for HIFiRE-5 flight in order to test the performance of new structure designs during hyper- sonic flight. Aero-thermal analysis is provided by 8 thermocouple data channels for all four symmetrically arranged fins. In this paper the analysis of the geometry and thermophysical characteristics of the fins to optimize thermocouple positioning is discussed. The main goal is to gather as much information as possible from these few temperature sensors in these three dimensional structures. Not only is the absolute temperature value of interest but also the reason of the temperature rise. A thorough calculation of the temperature gradients in the fin structure is used to define an optimal positioning layout, where particular focus lies on the localization of the heat fluxes at the surface from the in-depth thermocouple measurement. In conclusion, two fins are equipped with 3 thermocouples each and two are equipped with only 1 thermocouple. The paper closes with some first results based on the calibration data of the fins and the nominal trajectory values.

  1. COLD TRAPS

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, W.I.

    1958-09-30

    A cold trap is presented for removing a condensable component from a gas mixture by cooling. It consists of a shell, the exterior surface of which is chilled by a refrigerant, and conductive fins welded inside the shell to condense the gas, and distribute the condensate evenly throughout the length of the trap, so that the trap may function until it becomes completely filled with the condensed solid. The contents may then be removed as either a gas or as a liquid by heating the trap. This device has particuinr use as a means for removing uranium hexafluoride from the gaseous diffusion separation process during equipment breakdown and repair periods.

  2. Cold Stress and Urinary Frequency.

    PubMed

    Ishizuka, Osamu; Imamura, Tetsuya; Nishizawa, Osamu

    2012-03-01

    There have been few studies regarding the onset of urinary sensations and frequent urination induced by sudden whole-body cooling. In this article, we review the relationship between cold stress and urinary frequency based mainly on our previous studies. A recent study showed that cold stress induces bladder overactivity in conscious rats, and these effects were mediated, at least in part, by α1A -adrenergic receptor (AR) and α1D -AR. Another study suggested that the resiniferatoxin-sensitive nerves present in the urinary bladder may also be involved in the regulation of detrusor activity associated with cold stress. The mammalian transient receptor potential (TRP) channel family consists of 28 channels subdivided into five different classes: TRPV (vanilloid), TRPC (canonical), TRPM (melastatin), TRPML (mucolipin), and TRPA (ankyrin). TRP channels function as multifunctional sensors at the cellular level. They can be activated by physical (voltage, heat, cold, mechanical stress) or chemical stimuli and binding of specific ligands. In 2002, it was reported that a nonselective cation channel, TRPM8, could be activated by both menthol and thermal stimuli (8-28 °C). We demonstrated the presence of TRPM8 in the skin from the legs and back of rats by immunofluorescence staining and that stimulation of this receptor by menthol causes urinary frequency. There have been other reports demonstrating roles of TRPM8 not related to its thermosensory function. Further studies are needed to clarify the mechanism of cold stress-induced urinary frequency, and the roles of TRPM8 in the micturition control system.

  3. Life Expectancy Study of Small Diameter Type E, K, and N Mineral-Insulated Thermocouples Above 1000 °C in Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sloneker, K. C.

    2011-01-01

    Very little if any current data is available for the life expectancy of very small diameter thermocouples operating at high temperatures, greater than 1000 °C. Over the past 10 years significant changes in the supply stream of the materials used to manufacture base metal thermocouples have occurred. In many industrial applications, small diameter thermocouples are the only solution for high-temperature measurements. This study has been undertaken to assess the performance of small diameter magnesium oxide insulated metal sheathed thermocouple sensors at or above 1000 °C. Three different American Society of Testing and Materials (ASTM) standard letter designation thermocouple types have been included in this study, Types E, K, and N. Inconel 600 and 316 stainless, for three different sizes, 0.5 mm, 1.0 mm, and 1.5 mm, have been tested for different thermocouple types. Each group of sensors was placed in an equalization block in air for a maximum of 500 h or until failure. The performance of 0.5 mm diameter thermocouples varies widely depending on the thermocouple type, sheath material, and test temperature. Larger diameter Type K and N thermocouples show very little drift up to 500 h at 1100 °C. The data for each test was collected at 10 s intervals for the entire duration of the test. Data for the sensor drift and subsequent failure are presented.

  4. Restless legs syndrome in multiple system atrophy.

    PubMed

    Ghorayeb, Imad; Dupouy, Sandrine; Tison, François; Meissner, Wassilios G

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the frequency of restless legs syndrome in 30 patients with multiple system atrophy. Eight patients complained from restless legs syndrome, their severity score was 19.4 ± 4.1. Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index scores were significantly higher in patients with restless legs syndrome than those without (9.3 ± 3.7 vs. 4.8 ± 2.9, p = 0.00165). Periodic limb movements were found in 75% of patients with restless legs syndrome. Restless legs syndrome is more prevalent in multiple system atrophy as compared to the acknowledged prevalence in the general population.

  5. Acceptance test report for tank bottom thermocouples on Tank 241-SY-101

    SciTech Connect

    Zuehlke, A.C.

    1994-12-01

    This test report documents testing performed per WHC-SD-WM-ATP-069, Rev. 2. The proper monitoring of the 241-SY-101 Tank Bottom and Side Thermocouples (TBSTC) by the Data Acquisition and Control System (DACS) will be tested to establish continued operability of the system. During this test, an end-to-end verification of all of the sensor circuits associated with the TBSTCs, which provide signals both to the DACS computer system and an installed temporary Data Logger, shall be performed by injecting a signal at the appropriate field terminal and verifying the circuit completely through the system to the computer in the DACS trailer and the computer monitor used to display the output of the Data Logger. Each injected signal will be adjusted for appropriate `near zero`, `mid range` and `near full scale` values for the sensor being tested. The TBSTC screen, which provides for operator interface with the TBSTCs, will be utilized to monitor testing at the DACS computers. Testing per this procedure shall be conducted after the installation of the temporary Data Logger for the TBSTCs is complete. The temporary Data Logger will be installed to monitor the temperature readings of 13 of the 26 Tank Bottom Thermocouples in support of SY-101 excavation testing.

  6. Advances in Thin Film Thermocouple Durability Under High Temperature and Pressure Testing Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Lisa C.; Fralick, Gustave C.; Taylor, Keith F.

    1999-01-01

    Thin film thermocouples for measuring material surface temperature have been previously demonstrated on several material systems and in various hostile test environments. A well-developed thin film fabrication procedure utilizing shadow masking for patterning the sensors elements had produced thin films with sufficient durability for applications in high temperature and pressure environments that exist in air-breathing and hydrogen-fueled burner rig and engine test facilities. However, while shadow masking had been a reliable method for specimens with flat and gently curved surfaces, it had not been consistently reliable for use on test components with sharp contours. This work reports on the feasibility of utilizing photolithography processing for patterning thin film thermocouples. Because this patterning process required changes in the thin film deposition process from that developed for shadow masking, the effect of these changes on thin film adherence during burner rig testing was evaluated. In addition to the results of changing the patterning method, the effects on thin film adherence of other processes used in the thin film fabrication procedure is also presented.

  7. High temperature blackbody BB2000/40 for calibration of radiation thermometers and thermocouple

    SciTech Connect

    Ogarev, S. A.; Khlevnoy, B. B.; Samoylov, M. L.; Puzanov, A. V.

    2013-09-11

    The cavity-type high temperature blackbody (HTBB) models of BB3200/3500 series are the most spread among metrological institutes worldwide as sources for radiometry and radiation thermometry, due to their ultra high working temperatures, high emissivity and stability. The materials of radiating cavities are graphite, pyrolytic graphite (PG) and their combination. The paper describes BB2000/40 blackbody with graphite-tube cavity that was developed for calibration of radiation thermometers at SCEI (Singapore). The peculiarity of BB2000/40 is a possibility to use it, besides calibration of pyrometers, as an instrument for thermocouples calibration. Operating within the temperature range from 900 °C to 2000 °C, the blackbody has a wide cavity opening of 40 mm. Emissivity of the cavity, with PG heater rings replaced partly by graphite elements, was estimated as 0.998 ± 0.0015 in the spectral range from 350 nm to 2000 nm. The uniformity along the cavity axis, accounting for 10 °C, was measured using a B-type thermocouple at 1500 °C. The BB2000/40, if necessary, can be easily modified, by replacing the graphite radiator with a set of PG rings, to be able to reach temperatures as high as 3200 °C. The HTBB utilizes an optical feedback system which allows temperature stabilization within 0.1 °C. This rear-view feedback allows the whole HTBB aperture to be used for measurements.

  8. Anodic vacuum arc developed nanocrystalline Cu-Ni and Fe-Ni thin film thermocouples

    SciTech Connect

    Mukherjee, S. K.; Sinha, M. K.; Pathak, B.; Rout, S. K.; Barhai, P. K.

    2009-12-01

    This paper deals with the development of nanocrystalline Cu-Ni and Fe-Ni thin film thermocouples (TFTCs) by using ion-assisted anodic vacuum arc deposition technique. The crystallographic structure and surface morphology of individual layer films have been studied by x-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy, respectively. The resistivity, temperature coefficient of resistance, and thermoelectric power of as deposited and annealed films have been measured. The observed departure of these transport parameters from their respective bulk values can be understood in terms of intrinsic scattering due to enhanced crystallite boundaries. From the measured values of thermoelectric power and the corresponding temperature coefficient of resistance of annealed Cu, Ni, and Fe films, the calculated values of log derivative of the mean free path of conduction electrons at the Fermi surface with respect to energy (U) are found to be -0.51, 3.22, and -8.39, respectively. The thermoelectric response of annealed Cu-Ni and Fe-Ni TFTCs has been studied up to a maximum temperature difference of 300 deg. C. Reproducibility of TFTCs has been examined in terms of the standard deviation in thermoelectric response of 16 test samples for each pair. Cu-Ni and Fe-Ni TFTCs agree well with their wire thermocouple equivalents. The thermoelectric power values of Cu-Ni and Fe-Ni TFTCs at 300 deg. C are found to be 0.0178 and 0.0279 mV/ deg. C, respectively.

  9. Anodic vacuum arc developed nanocrystalline Cu-Ni and Fe-Ni thin film thermocouples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, S. K.; Sinha, M. K.; Pathak, B.; Rout, S. K.; Barhai, P. K.

    2009-12-01

    This paper deals with the development of nanocrystalline Cu-Ni and Fe-Ni thin film thermocouples (TFTCs) by using ion-assisted anodic vacuum arc deposition technique. The crystallographic structure and surface morphology of individual layer films have been studied by x-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy, respectively. The resistivity, temperature coefficient of resistance, and thermoelectric power of as deposited and annealed films have been measured. The observed departure of these transport parameters from their respective bulk values can be understood in terms of intrinsic scattering due to enhanced crystallite boundaries. From the measured values of thermoelectric power and the corresponding temperature coefficient of resistance of annealed Cu, Ni, and Fe films, the calculated values of log derivative of the mean free path of conduction electrons at the Fermi surface with respect to energy (U) are found to be -0.51, 3.22, and -8.39, respectively. The thermoelectric response of annealed Cu-Ni and Fe-Ni TFTCs has been studied up to a maximum temperature difference of 300°C. Reproducibility of TFTCs has been examined in terms of the standard deviation in thermoelectric response of 16 test samples for each pair. Cu-Ni and Fe-Ni TFTCs agree well with their wire thermocouple equivalents. The thermoelectric power values of Cu-Ni and Fe-Ni TFTCs at 300°C are found to be 0.0178 and 0.0279mV/°C, respectively.

  10. Elastic actuation for legged locomotion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Chongjing; Conn, Andrew

    2017-04-01

    The inherent elasticity of dielectric elastomer actuators (DEAs) gives this technology great potential in energy efficient locomotion applications. In this work, a modular double cone DEA is developed with reduced manufacturing and maintenance time costs. This actuator can lift 45 g of mass (5 times its own weight) while producing a stroke of 10.4 mm (23.6% its height). The contribution of the elastic energy stored in antagonistic DEA membranes to the mechanical work output is experimentally investigated by adding delay into the DEA driving voltage. Increasing the delay time in actuation voltage and hence reducing the duty cycle is found to increase the amount of elastic energy being recovered but an upper limit is also noticed. The DEA is then applied to a three-segment leg that is able to move up and down by 17.9 mm (9% its initial height), which demonstrates the feasibility of utilizing this DEA design in legged locomotion.

  11. [Compression therapy in leg ulcers].

    PubMed

    Dissemond, J; Protz, K; Reich-Schupke, S; Stücker, M; Kröger, K

    2016-04-01

    Compression therapy is well-tried treatment with only few side effects for most patients with leg ulcers and/or edema. Despite the very long tradition in German-speaking countries and good evidence for compression therapy in different indications, recent scientific findings indicate that the current situation in Germany is unsatisfactory. Today, compression therapy can be performed with very different materials and systems. In addition to the traditional bandaging with Unna Boot, short-stretch, long-stretch, or multicomponent bandage systems, medical compression ulcer stockings are available. Other very effective but far less common alternatives are velcro wrap systems. When planning compression therapy, it is also important to consider donning devices with the patient. In addition to compression therapy, intermittent pneumatic compression therapy can be used. Through these various treatment options, it is now possible to develop an individually accepted, geared to the needs of the patients, and functional therapy strategy for nearly all patients with leg ulcers.

  12. Cold Urticaria

    PubMed Central

    Wasserman, Stephen I.; Soter, Nicholas A.; Center, David M.; Austen, K. Frank

    1977-01-01

    Sera were obtained from the venous effluents of cold-challenged arms of patients with idiopathic cold urticaria without plasma or serum cryoproteins; these sera exhibited increased neutrophil chemotactic activity without alterations of the complement system. A two- to fourfold augmentation of the base-line neutrophil chemotactic activity of serum from the immersed extremity began within 1 min, peaked at 2 min, and returned to base-line levels within 15 min, whereas there was no change in the serum chemotactic activity in the control arm. The augmented chemotactic activity in the serum specimens from the challenged arm of each patient appeared in a high molecular-weight region, as assessed by the difference in activity recovered after Sephadex G-200 gel filtration of the paired lesional and control specimens. Sequential purification of this high molecular-weight activity by anion- and cation-exchange chromatography revealed a single peak of activity at both steps. The partially purified material continued to exhibit a high molecular weight, being excluded on Sepharose 4B, and had a neutral isoelectric point. The partially purified material showed a preferential chemotactic activity for neutrophilic polymorphonuclear leukocytes, required a gradient for expression of this function, and exhibited a capacity to deactivate this cell type. This active principle, termed high molecular-weight neutrophil chemotactic factor, exhibited a time-course of release that could be superimposed upon that of histamine and the low molecular-weight eosinophil chemotactic factor and may represent another mast cell-derived mediator. PMID:874083

  13. Thick legs - not always lipedema.

    PubMed

    Reich-Schupke, Stefanie; Altmeyer, Peter; Stücker, Markus

    2013-03-01

    Due to its increased presence in the press and on television, the diagnosis of lipedema is on the way to becoming a trendy diagnosis for those with thick legs. Despite this, one must recognize that lipedema is a very rare disease. It is characterized by disproportional obesity of the extremities, especially in the region of the hip and the legs, hematoma development after minimal trauma, and increased pressure-induced or spontaneous pain. Aids for making the correct diagnosis are (duplex) sonography, the waist-hip index or the waist-height index and lymphoscintigraphy. Important differential diagnoses are constitutional variability of the legs, lipohypertrophy in obesity, edema in immobility, edema in chronic venous insufficiency and rheumatic diseases. The symptom-based therapy of lipedema consists of conservative (compression, manual lymphatic drainage, exercise) and surgical treatments (liposuction). Until now there is no curative therapy. Obesity is an important risk factor for the severity and prognosis of lipedema. Further studies for a better understanding of the pathogenesis of lipedema and in the end possible curative treatments are urgently needed. © The Authors | Journal compilation © Blackwell Verlag GmbH, Berlin.

  14. Bed inventory overturn in a circulating fluid bed riser with pant-leg structure

    SciTech Connect

    Jinjing Li; Wei Wang; Hairui Yang; Junfu Lv; Guangxi Yue

    2009-05-15

    The special phenomenon, nominated as bed inventory overturn, in circulating fluid bed (CFB) riser with pant-leg structure was studied with model calculation and experimental work. A compounded pressure drop mathematic model was developed and validated with the experimental data in a cold experimental test rig. The model calculation results agree well with the measured data. In addition, the intensity of bed inventory overturn is directly proportional to the fluidizing velocity and is inversely proportional to the branch point height. The results in the present study provide significant information for the design and operation of a CFB boiler with pant-leg structure. 15 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  15. A fine-wire thermocouple probe for measurement of stagnation temperatures in real gas hypersonic flows of nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollis, Brian R.; Griffith, Wayland C.; Yanta, William J.

    1991-01-01

    A fine-wire thermocouple probe was used to determine freestream stagnation temperatures in hypersonic flows. Data were gathered in a N2 blowdown wind tunnel with runtimes of 1-5 s. Tests were made at supply pressures between 30 and 1400 atm and supply temperatures between 700 and 1900 K, with Mach numbers of 14 to 16. An iterative procedure requiring thermocouple data, pilot pressure measurements, and supply conditions was used to determine test cell stagnation temperatures. Probe conduction and radiation losses, as well as real gas behavior of N2, were accounted for during analysis. Temperature measurement error was found to be 5 to 10 percent. A correlation was drawn between thermocouple diameter Reynolds number and temperature recovery ratio. Transient probe behavior was studied and was found to be adequate in temperature gradients up to 1000 K/s.

  16. A fine-wire thermocouple probe for measurement of stagnation temperatures in real gas hypersonic flows of nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollis, Brian R.; Griffith, Wayland C.; Yanta, William J.

    1991-01-01

    A fine-wire thermocouple probe was used to determine freestream stagnation temperatures in hypersonic flows. Data were gathered in a N2 blowdown wind tunnel with runtimes of 1-5 s. Tests were made at supply pressures between 30 and 1400 atm and supply temperatures between 700 and 1900 K, with Mach numbers of 14 to 16. An iterative procedure requiring thermocouple data, pilot pressure measurements, and supply conditions was used to determine test cell stagnation temperatures. Probe conduction and radiation losses, as well as real gas behavior of N2, were accounted for during analysis. Temperature measurement error was found to be 5 to 10 percent. A correlation was drawn between thermocouple diameter Reynolds number and temperature recovery ratio. Transient probe behavior was studied and was found to be adequate in temperature gradients up to 1000 K/s.

  17. A fine-wire thermocouple probe for measurement of stagnation temperatures in real gas hypersonic flows of nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollis, Brian R.; Griffith, Wayland C.; Yanta, William J.

    A fine-wire thermocouple probe was used to determine freestream stagnation temperatures in hypersonic flows. Data were gathered in a N2 blowdown wind tunnel with runtimes of 1-5 s. Tests were made at supply pressures between 30 and 1400 atm and supply temperatures between 700 and 1900 K, with Mach numbers of 14 to 16. An iterative procedure requiring thermocouple data, pilot pressure measurements, and supply conditions was used to determine test cell stagnation temperatures. Probe conduction and radiation losses, as well as real gas behavior of N2, were accounted for during analysis. Temperature measurement error was found to be 5 to 10 percent. A correlation was drawn between thermocouple diameter Reynolds number and temperature recovery ratio. Transient probe behavior was studied and was found to be adequate in temperature gradients up to 1000 K/s.

  18. A Grid of Fine Wire Thermocouples to Study the Spatial Coherence of Turbulence within Katabatic Flow through a Vineyard Canopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Everard, K.; Christen, A.; Sturman, A.; Skaloud, P.

    2016-12-01

    Knowledge of the dynamics and thermodynamics of katabatic flow is relevant in vineyards, where grapevines are sensitive to temperature changes (frost protection and cooling). Basic understanding of the occurrence and evolution of, and turbulence within, katabatic flow is well known over bare slopes. However, little work has been completed to extend this understanding to mid-sized canopies and how the presence of a canopy affects the turbulent exchange of momentum and heat within the flow. Measurements were carried out over a 6° vineyard slope near Oliver, BC, Canada in the Okanagan Valley between July 5 and July 22, 2016. The set-up consisted of an array of five vertically arranged CSAT 3D (Campbell Scientific, Inc.) ultrasonic anemometers at z = 0.45 m, 0.90 m, 1.49 m, 2.34 m, and 4.73 m above ground level (AGL), and a 2-D grid of 40 Type-E (copper-constantan) fine-wire thermocouples (FWTC) arranged at the same heights as the CSAT 3D array on 8 masts extending in the upslope (flow) direction at locations x = 0.0 m (CSAT 3D tower), 0.5 m, 1.0 m, 2.0 m, 4.0 m, 8.0 m, 16.0 m, and 32.0 m. The FWTC array formed a sheet of 40 sampling points in the upslope-vertical plane. The height of the grapevine canopy (h) was approximately 2 m AGL, and rows were aligned along the local slope direction with a row spacing of 2.45 m. CSAT-3s were sampled at 60 Hz with 20 Hz data recording, the FWTCs were sampled at 2 Hz, all synchronized by a data logger. Katabatic flow was observed on several nights during the campaign, with a wind speed maximum located within the canopy. This contribution will focus on the measurement techniques, combining ultrasonic anemometer data with the spatially synchronized FWTC array using image process techniques. We identify the dynamics and structure of the katabatic flow, relevant for heat exchange, using the spatial coherence of the temperature field given by the FWTC array. Improved knowledge of the vertical structure and the dynamics of katabatic

  19. Range Analysis of Thermal Stress and Optimal Design for Tungsten-Rhenium Thin Film Thermocouples Based on Ceramic Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhongkai; Tian, Bian; Yu, Qiuyue; Shi, Peng; Lin, Qijing; Zhao, Na; Jing, Weixuan; Jiang, Zhuangde

    2017-01-01

    A thermal stress range analysis of tungsten-rhenium thin film thermocouples based on ceramic substrates is presented to analyze the falling off and breakage problems caused by the mismatch of the thermal stresses in thin film thermocouples (TFTCs) and substrate, and nano-indentation experiments are done to measure and calculate the film stress to compare with the simulation results. Optimal design and fabrication of tungsten-rhenium TFTCs based on ceramic substrates is reported. Static high temperature tests are carried out, which show the optimization design can effectively reduce the damage caused by the thermal stress mismatch. PMID:28420088

  20. Roll type conducting polymer legs for rigid-flexible thermoelectric generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Teahoon; Lim, Hanwhuy; Hwang, Jong Un; Na, Jongbeom; Lee, Hyunki; Kim, Eunkyoung

    2017-07-01

    A roll-type conducting polymer film was explored as a flexible organic p-type thermoelectric leg using poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) doped with tosylate. The PEDOT films were prepared through solution casting polymerization and rolled up for a roll-type leg. Due to the high flexibility, the roll-type PEDOT leg enabled easy contact to both top and bottom electrodes. Simulation on the dynamic heat transfer and convective cooling for a vertically roosted rod- and roll-type PEDOT leg showed that the temperature difference (ΔT) between the hot and cold sides of the leg was much higher in the roll than that of the rod. The PEDOT legs were integrated with n-type Bi2Te3 blocks, to give a 36-couple rigid-flexible thermoelectric generator (RF-TEG). The maximum output voltage from the 36-couple RF-TEG under a ΔT of 7.9 K was determined as 36.7 mV along with a high output power of 115 nW. A wearable RF-TEG was prepared upon the combination of the 36-couple RF-TEG with an arm warmer, to afford an output voltage of 10.6 mV, which was generated constantly and steadily from human wrist heat.

  1. Leg cramps in relation to metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    ManiIa, M N

    2009-01-01

    A leg cramp is a pain that comes from a leg muscle. It is due to a muscle spasm which usually occurs in a calf muscle, below and behind a knee. Leg cramps (often called night cramps) usually occur most commonly at night when in bed. Night leg cramps are involuntary painful contractions of skeletal muscles arose in the calves and soles of the feet. Although in most cases they aren't harmful and resolve easily in some instances they have a long duration and can result in intense pain, disturb normal sleep and make a person feel anxious. Pathophysiology of leg cramps is poorly understood. The aim of our study was to determine the role of metabolic syndrome in relation to night leg cramps. The study included 86 subjects aged 34 to 88 years. Metabolic syndrome group consisted of 40 subjects (10 men (25%) and 30 women (75%)); the control group consisted of 46 persons (9 men (19.5%) and 37 women (80.5%)). According to frequency and intensity of manifestation leg cramps were subdivided into less frequent and frequent leg cramps. Blood samples were analysed for lipids, fasting glucose, red blood cells and electrolytes. Persons were screened for leg vein insufficiency as well. The investigation showed that 77.5% (31/40) of patients with metabolic syndrome had leg cramps, from which 60% (24/40) had frequent leg cramps. In control group 73.9% (34/46) had leg cramps, from which 50% (23/46) had frequent leg cramps. Among known predisposing factors leg cramps most often were associated with deep vein insufficiency and superficial vein varicose. High frequency of night leg cramps in our study is due to female predominance (75% versus 25% women and men, respectively) and age distribution in our study population (from 34 to 88 years old). The investigation showed that people often experience nocturnal leg cramps. Leg cramp is slightly increasing among the patients with metabolic syndrome. Frequent leg cramps were observed in 60% of cases in metabolic syndrome group versus 50% of

  2. Cough & Cold Medicine Abuse

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Cough & Cold Medicine Abuse KidsHealth > For Teens > Cough & Cold ... tos y el resfriado Why Do People Use Cough and Cold Medicines to Get High? There's an ...

  3. Cold symptoms (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Colds are caused by a virus and can occur year-round. The common cold generally involves a runny nose, nasal congestion, and sneezing. Other symptoms include sore throat, cough, and headache. A cold usually lasts ...

  4. Cough & Cold Medicine Abuse

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Cough & Cold Medicine Abuse KidsHealth > For Teens > Cough & Cold ... Someone Quit? Avoiding DXM Why Do People Use Cough and Cold Medicines to Get High? There's an ...

  5. [Epidemiology of restless legs syndrome].

    PubMed

    Ghorayeb, I; Tison, F

    2009-01-01

    Restless legs syndrome (RLS) is a chronic sensorimotor disorder where patients complain of an almost irresistible urge to move their legs. This urge can often be accompanied by pain or other unpleasant sensations, it either occurs or worsens with rest particularly at night, and improves with activity. The International Restless Legs Syndrome Study Group has established four essential criteria for clinical diagnosis of RLS. Affecting an estimated 7.2 to 11.5% of the adult population, the symptoms of RLS may be associated with significant sleep disturbance and may have a negative impact on quality of life. The prevalence of RLS increases with age, and women are more frequently affected than men. In France, the estimated prevalence is 8.5%. Among sufferers, 4.4% complain of very severe symptoms. Although RLS is mainly idiopathic, several clinical conditions have been associated with it, especially iron deficiency with or without anemia, end-stage renal disease and pregnancy. These conditions may share a common pathophysiological mechanism involving a disorder of iron metabolism. By contrast, controversy persists as to whether polyneuropathy, particularly when associated with diabetes, is to be considered as an important cause of secondary RLS. This association is difficult to demonstrate as conventional electromyography is not adequate to detect small fiber neuropathy often associated with diabetes. RLS is often underdiagnosed and few subjects receive recommended RLS drug treatment. There is a clear need for complementary education to improve the accurate diagnosis of RLS. Indeed, better knowledge of this syndrome is a prerequisite to prompt an appropriate therapeutic management.

  6. Bending of floating flexible legs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Kun Joong; Kim, Ho-Young

    When long thin flexible solid objects, such as the legs of water striders, disposable spoons and human hairs, are pressed against a liquid surface, they bend due to interfacial and hydrostatic forces. To understand the phenomenon, we study the bending of a sheet touching the liquid surface at an angle while clamped at the other end, to find its deflection and the load that the sheet can support before sinking. The theoretically predicted shapes of the sheet and the meniscus match well with experiments. Our theory shows that flexible sheets can support more load than rigid ones before sinking when the sheets are highly hydrophobic.

  7. Novel assessment of microvascular changes in idiopathic restless legs syndrome (Willis-Ekbom disease).

    PubMed

    Anderson, Kirstie N; Di Maria, Costanzo; Allen, John

    2013-06-01

    Many patients with restless legs syndrome (Willis-Ekbom disease) complain of burning sensations in their feet associated with the desire to move, such that they seek cooler environments. This pilot study aimed to characterise the microvascular skin changes in 12 patients with restless legs syndrome compared with 12 age- and sex-matched controls. Patients with moderate or severe restless legs syndrome and controls underwent detailed thermovascular assessment in a controlled temperature room at three different stages (normothermic phase 23 °C, hot phase 30 °C, cold phase 18 °C). Microvascular activity was recorded during all phases by bilateral great toe laser-Doppler flowmetry and also by whole-body thermography. Patient and control measurements were compared. The study protocol was well tolerated. Parameters extracted from the laser-Doppler flowmetry measurements were used to model a logistic function using binary logistic regression. This demonstrated a statistically significant difference between patients with restless legs syndrome and healthy controls (P < 0.001). Visual inspection of the body thermography image sequences showed increased lower limb movement in patients with restless legs syndrome patients compared with controls. Thermography analysis also showed significant differences between foot temperatures in patients with restless legs syndrome compared with controls during the hot phase (P = 0.011). Notably, patients with restless legs syndrome had more uniform foot temperatures, whereas controls had a wider variability in surface temperature across the feet. This novel study demonstrates impaired microvascular circulation in patients with restless legs syndrome in comparison to matched controls and a potential mechanism for the sensation of burning feet. The protocol also provides an experimental paradigm to test therapeutic interventions for the future. © 2013 European Sleep Research Society.

  8. Fabrication and Use of Thin-film Thermocouples on Nonmetallics in Gas Turbine Engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niska, Raymond H.

    2003-09-01

    The gas turbine engine industry has been developing nonmetallics such as ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) and monolithic silicon nitride for use in hot-section hardware. New product development requires characterization of the hardware during component and engine testing. Of primary importance in propulsion engine hot sections such as the combustor and turbines is knowledge of thermal patterns and profiles, identification of hot streaks, and component maximum temperatures. This is especially critical information to estimate hardware life and time-in-service between required maintenance inspections and teardowns. Thin-film thermocouples and flame-sprayed aluminum oxide installation methods have been developed and are being used for temperature measurements on these new materials.

  9. High temperature thermocouple and heat flux gauge using a unique thin film-hardware hot juncture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liebert, C. H.; Holanda, R.; Hippensteele, S. A.; Andracchio, C. A.

    1984-01-01

    A special thin film-hardware material thermocouple (TC) and heat flux gauge concept for a reasonably high temperature and high flux flat plate heat transfer experiment was fabricated and tested to gauge temperatures of 911 K. This concept was developed for minimal disturbance of boundary layer temperature and flow over the plates and minimal disturbance of heat flux through the plates. Comparison of special heat flux gauge Stanton number output at steady-state conditions with benchmark literature data was good and agreement was within a calculated uncertainty of the measurement system. Also, good agreement of special TC and standard TC outputs was obtained and the results are encouraging. Oxidation of thin film thermoelements was a primary failure mode after about 5 of operation.

  10. Operating Temperatures of a Sodium-Cooled Exhaust Valve as Measured by a Thermocouple

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, J C; Wilsted, H D; Mulcahy, B A

    1943-01-01

    Report presents the results of a thermocouple installed in the crown of a sodium-cooled exhaust valve. The valve was tested in an air-cooled engine cylinder and valve temperatures under various engine operating conditions were determined. A temperature of 1337 degrees F. was observed at a fuel-air ratio of 0.064, a brake mean effective pressure of 179 pounds per square inch, and an engine speed of 2000 r.p.m. Fuel-air ratio was found to have a large influence on valve temperature, but cooling-air pressure and variation in spark advance had little effect. An increase in engine power by change of speed or mean effective pressure increased the valve temperature. It was found that the temperature of the rear-spark-plug bushing was not a satisfactory indication of the temperature of the exhaust valve.

  11. Operating Temperatures of a Sodium-Cooled Exhaust Valve as Measured by a Thermocouple

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, J. C.; Wilsted, H. D.; Mulcahy, B. A.

    1943-01-01

    A thermocouple was installed in the crown of a sodium-cooled exhaust valve. The valve was then tested in an air-cooled engine cylinder and valve temperatures under various engine operating conditions were determined. A temperature of 1337 F was observed at a fuel-air ratio of 0.064, a brake mean effective pressure of 179 pounds per square inch, and an engine speed of 2000 rpm. Fuel-air ratio was found to have a large influence on valve temperature, but cooling-air pressure and variation in spark advance had little effect. An increase in engine power by change of speed or mean effective pressure increased the valve temperature. It was found that the temperature of the rear spark-plug bushing was not a satisfactory indication of the temperature of the exhaust valve.

  12. In Situ Field Measurement of Leaf Water Potential Using Thermocouple Psychrometers 1

    PubMed Central

    Savage, Michael J.; Wiebe, Herman H.; Cass, Alfred

    1983-01-01

    Thermocouple psychrometers are the only instruments which can measure the in situ water potential of intact leaves, and which can possibly be used to monitor leaf water potential. Unfortunately, their usefulness is limited by a number of difficulties, among them fluctuating temperatures and temperature gradients within the psychrometer, sealing of the psychrometer chamber to the leaf, shading of the leaf by the psychrometer, and resistance to water vapor diffusion by the cuticle when the stomates are closed. Using Citrus jambhiri, we have tested several psychrometer design and operational modifications and showed that in situ psychrometric measurements compared favorably with simultaneous Scholander pressure chamber measurements on neighboring leaves when the latter were corrected for the osmotic potential. PMID:16663267

  13. Boiling point measurement of a small amount of brake fluid by thermocouple and its application.

    PubMed

    Mogami, Kazunari

    2002-09-01

    This study describes a new method for measuring the boiling point of a small amount of brake fluid using a thermocouple and a pear shaped flask. The boiling point of brake fluid was directly measured with an accuracy that was within approximately 3 C of that determined by the Japanese Industrial Standards method, even though the sample volume was only a few milliliters. The method was applied to measure the boiling points of brake fluid samples from automobiles. It was clear that the boiling points of brake fluid from some automobiles dropped to approximately 140 C from about 230 C, and that one of the samples from the wheel cylinder was approximately 45 C lower than brake fluid from the reserve tank. It is essential to take samples from the wheel cylinder, as this is most easily subjected to heating.

  14. Time-series investigation of anomalous thermocouple responses in a liquid-metal-cooled reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Gross, K.C.; Planchon, H.P.; Poloncsik, J.

    1988-03-24

    A study was undertaken using SAS software to investigate the origin of anomalous temperature measurements recorded by thermocouples (TCs) in an instrumented fuel assembly in a liquid-metal-cooled nuclear reactor. SAS macros that implement univariate and bivariate spectral decomposition techniques were employed to analyze data recorded during a series of experiments conducted at full reactor power. For each experiment, data from physical sensors in the tests assembly were digitized at a sampling rate of 2/s and recorded on magnetic tapes for subsequent interactive processing with CMS SAS. Results from spectral and cross-correlation analyses led to the identification of a flow rate-dependent electromotive force (EMF) phenomenon as the origin of the anomalous TC readings. Knowledge of the physical mechanism responsible for the discrepant TC signals enabled us to device and justify a simple correction factor to be applied to future readings.

  15. Peltier effect exchanges in contact thermocouples - Application to the characterization of new thermoelectric circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berrached, N.-E.

    Results from an investigation of coupling in thermoelectric circuits manufactured by electrodeposition of a metallic conductor on a conducting foil made of a different material are presented. The study was undertaken to define the significant factors in the design and manufacture of thermal fluxmeters. Theoretical considerations indicate that the voltage appearing between output connections is proportional to the average spatial thermal gradient on the sensitive surface of the thermoelement. A figure of merit is defined for the coupling of the contact thermocouples. Localized thermal exchanges of opposite sign are shown to occur due to the passage of current, and are concentrated at the boundaries of each thermoelement. Nonisothermal tangential thermal gradients appear on the surface of the circuit. Experimental studies confirm the appearance of the gradients by their IR signatures. Finally, the gradients are determined to be affected by the thickness and conductivity of the medium placed between the emitter and detector circuits.

  16. Tile Surface Thermocouple Measurement Challenges from the Orbiter Boundary Layer Transition Flight Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Charles H.; Berger, Karen; Anderson, Brian

    2012-01-01

    Hypersonic entry flight testing motivated by efforts seeking to characterize boundary layer transition on the Space Shuttle Orbiters have identified challenges in our ability to acquire high quality quantitative surface temperature measurements versus time. Five missions near the end of the Space Shuttle Program implemented a tile surface protuberance as a boundary layer trip together with tile surface thermocouples to capture temperature measurements during entry. Similar engineering implementations of these measurements on Discovery and Endeavor demonstrated unexpected measurement voltage response during the high heating portion of the entry trajectory. An assessment has been performed to characterize possible causes of the issues experienced during STS-119, STS-128, STS-131, STS-133 and STS-134 as well as similar issues encountered during other orbiter entries.

  17. Effects of water temperature on breeding phenology, growth and timing of metamorphosis of foothill yellow-legged frogs (Rana boylii) on the mainstem and selected tributaries of California's Trinity River - 2004-2009.

    Treesearch

    Clara Wheeler; James Bettaso; Donald Ashton; Hartwell Welsh

    2013-01-01

    The cold temperatures maintained in the Trinity River are beneficial to fish but may be problematic for foothill yellow-legged frogs. We examined the timing of breeding, reproductive output, and growth and development of tadpoles for populations of foothill yellow-legged frogs on the mainstem and six tributaries of the Trinity River. On the colder mainstem, onset of...

  18. A fundamental mechanism of legged locomotion with hip torque and leg damping.

    PubMed

    Shen, Z H; Seipel, J E

    2012-12-01

    New models and theories of legged locomotion are needed to better explain and predict the robustly stable legged locomotion of animals and some bio-inspired robots. In this paper we observe that a hip-torque and leg-damping mechanism is fundamental to many legged robots and some animals and determine its affect on locomotion dynamics. We discuss why this hip-torque-and-leg-damping mechanism is not so easily understood. We investigate how hip-torque and leg-damping affect the stability and robustness of locomotion using a mathematical model: First, we extend the canonical spring-loaded-inverted-pendulum model to include constant hip torque and leg damping proportional to leg length speed. Then, we calculate the stability and robustness of locomotion as a function of increasing levels of torque and damping, starting from zero-the energy conserving and marginally stable special case-to high levels of torque and damping. We find that the stabilizing effects of hip-torque and leg-damping occur in the context of the piecewise-continuous dynamics of legged locomotion, and so linear intuition does not apply. We discover that adding hip torque and leg damping changes the stability of legged locomotion in an unexpected way. When a small amount of torque and damping are added, legged locomotion is initially destabilized. As more torque and damping are added, legged locomotion turns stable and becomes increasingly more stable and more robust the more torque and damping are added. Also, stable locomotion becomes more probable over the biologically-relevant region of the parameter space, indicating greater prediction and explanatory capabilities of the model. These results provide a more clear understanding of the hip-torque-and-leg-damping mechanism of legged locomotion, and extend existing theory of legged locomotion towards a greater understanding of robustly stable locomotion.

  19. Multisystemic Sarcoidosis Presenting as Pretibial Leg Ulcers.

    PubMed

    Wollina, Uwe; Baunacke, Anja; Hansel, Gesina

    2016-09-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multisystemic disease of unknown etiology. Up to 30% of patients develop cutaneous manifestations, either specific or nonspecific. Ulcerating sarcoidosis leading to leg ulcers is a rare observation that may lead to confusions with other, more common types of chronic leg ulcers. We report the case of a 45-year-old female patient with chronic multisystemic sarcoidosis presenting with pretibial leg ulcers. Other etiology could be excluded. Histology revealed nonspecific findings. Therefore, the diagnosis of nonspecific leg ulcers in sarcoidosis was confirmed. Treatment consisted of oral prednisolone and good ulcer care. Complete healing was achieved within 6 months. Sarcoidosis is a rare cause of leg ulcers and usually sarcoid granulomas can be found. Our patient illustrates that even in the absence of sarcoid granulomas, leg ulcers can be due to sarcoidosis. © The Author(s) 2016.

  20. Drift in Type K Bare-Wire Thermocouples from Different Manufacturers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, E. S.

    2017-05-01

    Base-metal thermocouples play a significant role in industrial measurements, and among the many varieties and formats, bare-wire Type K is often preferred. The reason for this preference is its low cost, durability and tolerance of high temperature. Unfortunately, Type K, like all base-metal thermocouples, is made based on a temperature-to-emf relationship and not on a specific metallurgical formulation. The original Hoskins Chromel/Alumel couple was simple in composition, and it had known thermal drift characteristics associated with reversible crystallographic changes and irreversible oxidation, and these two drift mechanisms led to large instabilities in use. To improve the stability of Type K, most modern manufacturers now adopt compositions with alterations that can depart significantly from those of the original formulation. These alterations are usually made to improve the stability and/or manufacturing processing of their wire. So, although the wire is made to meet the limits of error and tables, this is only true at the time of manufacture. As soon as the wire is exposed to temperatures above 150°C, the supplier-dependent alloys can exhibit a wide range of drift behaviors that depend on composition and even the batch of the wire. This study investigates the change in Seebeck coefficient as a function of temperature for Type K bare-wires from different suppliers by using a linear-gradient furnace and a high-resolution homogeneity scanner. Wires were exposed to temperatures over the range {˜ }20°C to 950°C for time periods between 24 h and 500 h. The results show that most wires have very different drift behaviors, which the end user could not realistically predict or correct.

  1. Tool Blunts Cotter Pin Legs for Safety

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stein, J. A.; Helble, D. R.

    1982-01-01

    Jaws on new insertion tool contain upset point and anvil. Point forces cotter-pin legs into loop as it engages anvil. Cotter pin before insertion consists of loop and straight shaft composed of two legs welded together as tips. After insertion, welded legs have been shaped into loop. Tool used to prevent bent loose ends of cotter pins from scratching workers' fingers or cutting and entangling wires.

  2. Cold confusion

    SciTech Connect

    Chapline, G.

    1989-07-01

    On March 23 two chemists, Martin Fleischmann and Stanley Pons startled the world with a press conference at the University of Utah where they announced that they had achieved nuclear fusion at room temperatures. As evidence they cited the production of ''excess'' amounts of heat in an electrochemical apparatus and observation of neutron production. While the production of heat in a chemical apparatus is not in itself unusual the observation of neutrons is certainly extraordinary. As it turned out, though, careful measurements of the neutron production in electrochemical apparatus similar to that used by Fleischmann and Pons carried out at dozens of other laboratories has shown that the neutron production fails by many orders of magnitude to support the assertion by Fleischmann and Pons that their discovery represents a new and cheap source of fusion power. In particular, independent measurements of the neutron production rate suggest that the actual rate of fusion energy production probably does not exceed 1 trillionth of a watt. This paper discusses the feasibility that cold fusion is actually being achieved. 7 refs.

  3. Mount Everest and Makalu cold injury amputation: 40 years on.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Shawnda A; Gorjanc, Jurij; Mekjavic, Igor B

    2014-04-01

    Freezing cold injuries (frostbite) of the extremities are a common injury among alpinists participating in high altitude expeditions, particularly during inclement weather conditions. Anecdotally, a digit that has suffered frostbite may be at greater risk to future cold injuries. In this case study, we profile a 62-year-old elite alpinist who suffered multiple digit amputations on both his hands and foot after historic summit attempts on Makalu (8481 m) and Mt. Everest (8848 m) in 1974-1979. We describe the clinical treatment he received at that time, and follow up his case 40 years after the first incidence of frostbite utilizing a noninvasive evaluation of hand and foot function to a cold stress test, including rates of re-warming to both injured and non-injured digits. Finger rates of recovery to the cold stress test were not different (0.8 vs. 1.0°C·min(-1)) except one (injured, left middle finger, distal phalanx; 0.4°C·min(-1)). Toe recovery rates after cold-water immersion were identical between previously injured and non-injured toes (0.2°C·min(-1)). Thermocouple data indicate that this alpinist's previous frostbite injuries may not have significantly altered his digit rates of re-warming during passive recovery compared to his non-injured digits.

  4. Investigation of the viscous heating artefact arising from the use of thermocouples in a focused ultrasound field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Hugh; Rivens, Ian; Shaw, Adam; ter Haar, Gail

    2008-09-01

    Accurate temperature measurements in therapeutic ultrasound fields are necessary for understanding damage mechanisms, verification of thermal modelling and calibration of non-invasive clinical thermometry. However, artefactual heating, primarily due to viscous forces which result from motion relative to the surrounding tissue, occurs when metal thermocouples are used in an ultrasound field. The magnitude and time dependence of this artefact has been characterized by comparison with novel thin-film thermocouples (TFTs) at 1-2 cm focal depths in fresh degassed ex vivo bovine liver. High-intensity focused ultrasound exposures (1.7 MHz; free-field spatial-peak temporal-average intensities 40-600 W cm-2) were used. Subtraction of the TFT data from that obtained for other thermocouples yielded the time dependence of the viscous heating artefact. This was found to be intensity independent up to 600 W cm-2 (below the threshold for cavitation and lesion formation) and remained significant at radial distances out to the first side lobe in the focal plane. The contribution of viscous heating to cooling was also found to be significant for at least 5 s after the end of insonation. The ratio of viscous artefact to absorptive heating after 5 s was: 1.76 ± 0.07 for a fine-wire, 0.45 ± 0.07 and 1.93 ± 0.07 for two different sheathed-wires and 0.24 ± 0.07 for a needle thermocouple.

  5. Label-Free Detection of Small Organic Molecules by Molecularly Imprinted Polymer Functionalized Thermocouples: Toward In Vivo Applications

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs), synthetic polymeric receptors, have been combined successfully with thermal transducers for the detection of small molecules in recent years. However, up until now they have been combined with planar electrodes which limits their use for in vivo applications. In this work, a new biosensor platform is developed by roll-coating MIP particles onto thermocouples, functionalized with polylactic acid (PLLA). As a first proof-of-principle, MIPs for the neurotransmitter dopamine were incorporated into PLLA-coated thermocouples. The response of the synthetic receptor layer to an increasing concentration of dopamine in buffer was analyzed using a homemade heat-transfer setup. Binding of the template to the MIP layer blocks the heat transport through the thermocouple, leading to less heat loss to the environment and an overall higher temperature in the measuring chamber. The measured temperature increase is correlated to the neurotransmitter concentration, which enables measurement of dopamine levels in the micromolar regime. To demonstrate the general applicability of the proposed biosensor platform, thermocouples were functionalized with similar MIPs for cortisol and serotonin, indicating a similar response and limit-of-detection. As the platform does not require planar electrodes, it can easily be integrated in, e.g., a catheter. In this way, it is an excellent fit for the current niche in the market of therapeutics and diagnostics. Moreover, the use of a biocompatible and disposable PLLA-layer further illustrates its potential for in vivo diagnostics. PMID:28480332

  6. Optimizing Heat Treatment of Gas Turbine Blades with a Co C Fixed Point for Improved In-service Thermocouples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearce, J. V.; Machin, G.; Ford, T.; Wardle, S.

    2008-02-01

    Improvement of energy efficiency of jet aircraft is achieved by operating gas turbine engines at higher temperatures. To facilitate this, gas turbine engine manufacturers are continuously developing new alloys for hot-zone turbine blades that will withstand the increased in-service temperatures. A critical part of the manufacture of these blades is heat treatment to ensure that they attain the necessary metallurgical characteristics. Current heat-treatment temperature-control requirements are at the limit of what is achievable with conventional thermocouple calibrations. A project that will allow thermocouple manufacturer CCPI Europe Ltd. to realize uncertainties of ± 1°C, or better, in the calibration of its noble metal thermocouples is described. This will be realized through implementing a Co C eutectic fixed point in CCPI’s calibration chain. As this melts at 1,324°C, very close to the heat-treatment temperatures required, low uncertainties will be obtained. This should yield an increase in effectiveness of the heat-treatment process performed by Bodycote Heat Treatments Ltd., allowing them to respond effectively to the increasingly stringent demands of engine manufacturers. Outside the current project, there is a strong requirement by industry for lower uncertainties at and above 1,300°C. Successful implementation of the current fixed point in an industrial setting is likely to result in rapid take-up by other companies, probably through the supply of ultra-low uncertainty thermocouples, looking to improve their high-temperature processes.

  7. Validity and reliability of temperature measurement by heat flow thermistors, flexible thermocouple probes and thermistors in a stirred water bath.

    PubMed

    Versey, Nathan G; Gore, Christopher J; Halson, Shona L; Plowman, Jamie S; Dawson, Brian T

    2011-09-01

    We determined the validity and reliability of heat flow thermistors, flexible thermocouple probes and general purpose thermistors compared with a calibrated reference thermometer in a stirred water bath. Validity (bias) was defined as the difference between the observed and criterion values, and reliability as the repeatability (standard deviation or typical error) of measurement. Data were logged every 5 s for 10 min at water temperatures of 14, 26 and 38 °C for ten heat flow thermistors and 24 general purpose thermistors, and at 35, 38 and 41 °C for eight flexible thermocouple probes. Statistical analyses were conducted using spreadsheets for validity and reliability, where an acceptable bias was set at ±0.1 °C. None of the heat flow thermistors, 17% of the flexible thermocouple probes and 71% of the general purpose thermistors met the validity criterion for temperature. The inter-probe reliabilities were 0.03 °C for heat flow thermistors, 0.04 °C for flexible thermocouple probes and 0.09 °C for general purpose thermistors. The within trial intra-probe reliability of all three temperature probes was 0.01 °C. The results suggest that these temperature sensors should be calibrated individually before use at relevant temperatures and the raw data corrected using individual linear regression equations.

  8. Investigation of the viscous heating artefact arising from the use of thermocouples in a focused ultrasound field.

    PubMed

    Morris, Hugh; Rivens, Ian; Shaw, Adam; Haar, Gail Ter

    2008-09-07

    Accurate temperature measurements in therapeutic ultrasound fields are necessary for understanding damage mechanisms, verification of thermal modelling and calibration of non-invasive clinical thermometry. However, artefactual heating, primarily due to viscous forces which result from motion relative to the surrounding tissue, occurs when metal thermocouples are used in an ultrasound field. The magnitude and time dependence of this artefact has been characterized by comparison with novel thin-film thermocouples (TFTs) at 1-2 cm focal depths in fresh degassed ex vivo bovine liver. High-intensity focused ultrasound exposures (1.7 MHz; free-field spatial-peak temporal-average intensities 40-600 W cm(-2)) were used. Subtraction of the TFT data from that obtained for other thermocouples yielded the time dependence of the viscous heating artefact. This was found to be intensity independent up to 600 W cm(-2) (below the threshold for cavitation and lesion formation) and remained significant at radial distances out to the first side lobe in the focal plane. The contribution of viscous heating to cooling was also found to be significant for at least 5 s after the end of insonation. The ratio of viscous artefact to absorptive heating after 5 s was: 1.76 +/- 0.07 for a fine-wire, 0.45 +/- 0.07 and 1.93 +/- 0.07 for two different sheathed-wires and 0.24 +/- 0.07 for a needle thermocouple.

  9. Radiation of anginal pain to the legs.

    PubMed Central

    Kolettis, M T; Kalogeropoulos, C K; Tzannetis, G C; Vitakis, S K; Xaplanteris, P P; Novas, I A

    1986-01-01

    Pain radiated from the chest to one or both legs (17 cases), or from the legs to the chest (two cases) in 19 patients with angina or acute myocardial infarction. The leg pain was assumed to be related to the angina pectoris when both were of a similar character and occurred together, when the leg pain occurred at rest, and when there were normal peripheral pulses in the leg. Pain was felt in the left leg by 10 patients, the right leg by two patients, and in both legs by seven. Three patients experienced pain in the thigh(s), six in the shin(s), and 10 had pain in both. In six patients the pain extended down to the inner two to four toes. The pain was always felt in front of the legs. This distribution accords with the suggestion that some sensory cardiac nerve fibres occur in the lumbar sympathetic ganglia and that pain is projected into the corresponding dermatomes. PMID:3942655

  10. Leg automaticity is stronger than arm automaticity during simultaneous arm and leg cycling.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Masanori; Tazoe, Toshiki; Nakajima, Tsuyoshi; Endoh, Takashi; Komiyama, Tomoyoshi

    2014-04-03

    Recent studies indicate that human locomotion is quadrupedal in nature. An automatic rhythm-generating system is thought to play a crucial role in controlling arm and leg movements. In the present study, we attempted to elucidate differences between intrinsic arm and leg automaticity by investigating cadence variability during simultaneous arm and leg (AL) cycling. Participants performed AL cycling with visual feedback of arm or leg cadence. Participants were asked to focus their attention to match the predetermined cadence; this affects the automaticity of the rhythm-generating system. Leg cadence variability was only mildly affected when the participants intended to precisely adjust either their arm or leg cycling cadence to a predetermined value. In contrast, arm cadence variability significantly increased when the participants adjusted their leg cycling cadence to a predetermined value. These findings suggest that different neural mechanisms underlie the automaticities of arm and leg cycling and that the latter is stronger than the former during AL cycling.

  11. Restless legs syndrome and periodic leg movements in patients with movement disorders: Specific considerations.

    PubMed

    Högl, Birgit; Stefani, Ambra

    2017-05-01

    Restless legs syndrome is a frequent neurological disorder with potentially serious and highly distressing treatment complications. The role and potential implications of periodic leg movements during sleep range from being a genetic risk marker for restless legs syndrome to being a cardiovascular risk factor. The diagnosis of restless legs syndrome in patients with daytime movement disorders is challenging and restless legs syndrome needs to be differentiated from other sleep-related movement disorders. This article provides an update on the diagnosis of restless legs syndrome as an independent disorder and the role of periodic leg movements and reviews the association of restless legs syndrome with Parkinson's disease and other movement disorders. © 2017 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society. © 2017 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  12. Space Elevator Base Leg Architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swan, C.; Swan, P. A.

    While the Space Elevator stretches for 104,000 kilometers, the region of most concern, from the survival perspective, is 2,500 kms and below. The threats inside this dangerous arena include debris, spacecraft, meteorites, lightening, winds, rogue waves, aircraft, and intentional human acts. Two major questions will be addressed that will influence the overall systems architecture of a Space Elevator. While the deployment phase of the development of the Space Elevator will only have a single ribbon from the surface of the Earth to well beyond the Geosynchronous altitude, a mature Space Elevator must never allow a complete sever of the system. Design approaches, materials selections, international policy development and assembly must ensure that the integrity of the Space Elevator be maintained. The trade space analysis will address the probability of an individual ribbon being severed, the length of time to repair, and the potential for a catastrophic Space Elevator cut. The architecture proposed for the base leg portion will address two questions: Shall there be multiple base legs to 2,500 kms altitude? And Should the anchor be based on land or at sea?

  13. Treatment of restless legs syndrome.

    PubMed

    Comella, Cynthia L

    2014-01-01

    Restless legs syndrome (RLS) is a common disorder diagnosed by the clinical characteristics of restlessness in the legs associated often with abnormal sensations that start at rest and are improved by activity, occurring with a diurnal pattern of worsened symptoms at night and improvement in the morning. RLS is the cause of impaired quality of life in those more severely afflicted. Treatment of RLS has undergone considerable change over the last few years. Several classes of medications have demonstrated efficacy, including the dopaminergic agents and the alpha-2-delta ligands. Levodopa was the first dopaminergic agent found to be successful. However, chronic use of levodopa is frequently associated with augmentation that is defined as an earlier occurrence of symptoms frequently associated with worsening severity and sometimes spread to other body areas. The direct dopamine agonists, including ropinirole, pramipexole, and rotigotine patch, are also effective, although side effects, including daytime sleepiness, impulse control disorders, and augmentation, may limit usefulness. The alpha-2-delta ligands, including gabapentin, gabapentin enacarbil, and pregabalin, are effective for RLS without known occurrence of augmentation or impulse control disorders, although sedation and dizziness can occur. Other agents, including the opioids and clonazepam do not have sufficient evidence to recommend them as treatment for RLS, although in an individual patient, they may provide benefit.

  14. Targinact for restless legs syndrome.

    PubMed

    2016-04-01

    Idiopathic restless legs syndrome (RLS)--also known as Willis-Ekbom disease--is a neurological condition characterised by an overwhelming urge to move the legs, occurring during rest or inactivity, especially at night. Symptoms are highly variable in frequency and severity, and can affect sleep and quality of life. First-line management includes addressing precipitating or aggravating factors and providing explanation, reassurance and advice on self-help strategies. Drug therapy (e.g. a dopamine agonist) is used for patients with more severe symptoms. In December 2014, the marketing authorisation for a modified-release preparation containing oxycodone and naloxone (Targinact-Napp Pharmaceuticals) was expanded to include use in the treatment of severe to very severe RLS after failure of dopaminergic therapy.(10)Here we review the management of adults with RLS, including the place of oxycodone/naloxone. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  15. Cold energy

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, John P.

    2015-12-04

    Deviations in Q for resonant superconducting radio frequency niobium accelerator cavities are generally correlated with resistivity loss mechanisms. Field dependent Qs are not well modeled by these classical loss mechanisms, but rather can represent a form of precision cavity surface thermometry. When the field dependent Q variation shows improvement with increasing B field level the classical treatment of this problem is inadequate. To justify this behavior hydrogen as a ubiquitous impurity in niobium, which creates measurable property changes, even at very low concentrations is typically considered the cause of such anomalous behavior. This maybe the case in some instances, but more importantly any system operating with a highly coherent field with a significant time dependent magnetic component at near 2° K will have the ability to organize the remaining free spins within the London penetration depth to form a coupled energy reservoir in the form of low mass spin waves. The niobium resonant cavities are composed of a single isotope with a large nuclear spin. When the other loss mechanisms are stripped away this may be the gain medium activated by the low level residual magnetic fields. It was found that one resonant cavity heat treatment produced optimum surface properties and then functioned as a MASER extracting energy from the 2° K thermal bath while cooling the cavity walls. The cavity operating in this mode is a simulator of what can take place in the wider but not colder universe using the cosmic microwave background (CMB) as a thermal source. The low mass, long lifetimes, and the scale of the magnetic spin waves on the weakly magnetized interstellar medium allows energy to be stored that is many orders of magnitude colder than the cosmic microwave background. A linear accelerator cavity becomes a tool to explore the properties of the long wave length magnetic spin waves that populate this cold low energy regime.

  16. Cold energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, John P.

    2015-12-01

    Deviations in Q for resonant superconducting radio frequency niobium accelerator cavities are generally correlated with resistivity loss mechanisms. Field dependent Qs are not well modeled by these classical loss mechanisms, but rather can represent a form of precision cavity surface thermometry. When the field dependent Q variation shows improvement with increasing B field level the classical treatment of this problem is inadequate. To justify this behavior hydrogen as a ubiquitous impurity in niobium, which creates measurable property changes, even at very low concentrations is typically considered the cause of such anomalous behavior. This maybe the case in some instances, but more importantly any system operating with a highly coherent field with a significant time dependent magnetic component at near 2° K will have the ability to organize the remaining free spins within the London penetration depth to form a coupled energy reservoir in the form of low mass spin waves. The niobium resonant cavities are composed of a single isotope with a large nuclear spin. When the other loss mechanisms are stripped away this may be the gain medium activated by the low level residual magnetic fields. It was found that one resonant cavity heat treatment produced optimum surface properties and then functioned as a MASER extracting energy from the 2° K thermal bath while cooling the cavity walls. The cavity operating in this mode is a simulator of what can take place in the wider but not colder universe using the cosmic microwave background (CMB) as a thermal source. The low mass, long lifetimes, and the scale of the magnetic spin waves on the weakly magnetized interstellar medium allows energy to be stored that is many orders of magnitude colder than the cosmic microwave background. A linear accelerator cavity becomes a tool to explore the properties of the long wave length magnetic spin waves that populate this cold low energy regime.

  17. The Relationship among Leg Strength, Leg Power and Alpine Skiing Success.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gettman, Larry R.; Huckel, Jack R.

    The purpose of this study was to relate leg strength and power to alpine skiing success as measured by FIS points. Isometric leg strength was represented by the knee extension test described by Clarke. Leg power was measured by the vertical jump test and the Margaria-Kalamen stair run. Results in the strength and power tests were correlated with…

  18. Restless legs syndrome mimicking S1 radiculopathy.

    PubMed

    Zambelis, Th; Wolgamuth, B R; Papoutsi, S N; Economou, N T

    2016-01-01

    Α case of a chronic idiopathic form of a severe type of Restless Legs Syndrome (RLS), which developed during pregnancy and persisted after this, misdiagnosed for 34 years as radiculopathy S1, is reported. In spite of the thorough clinical and laboratory investigation, in addition to constant changes of the therapeutic approach, the diagnosis of S1 radiculopathy could not be confirmed, resulting in a chronic clinical course; the latter was characterized by relapses and remissions not attributed or linked in any way to the treatment (various types of). In fact, it was due to a routine workup in a sleep clinic, where the patient was referred because of a coincident chronic insomnia (Restless Legs Syndrome is a known and important cause of insomnia/chronic insomnia), which resulted in a proper diagnosis and treatment of this case. With the use of Restless Legs Syndrome appropriate treatment (Pramipexole 0.18 mg taken at bedtime, a dopaminergic agent and Level A recommended drug for Restless Legs Syndrome) an excellent response and immediate elimination of symptoms was achieved. Restless Legs Syndrome may present with a variety of symptoms (with the most prominent shortly being reported with the acronym URGE: Urge to move the legs usually associated with unpleasant leg sensations, Rest induces symptoms, Getting active brings relief, Evening and night deteriorate symptoms); given the fact that Restless Legs Syndrome presents with a great variety and heterogeneity of symptoms (mostly pain, dysesthesia and paresthesia), which may occur in several other diseases (the so called "RLS mimics"), proper diagnosis of Restless Legs Syndrome usually fails. Restless Legs Syndrome misinterpreted as S1 radiculopathy, to the best of our knowledge, has not been reported yet in the literature. Here, case history, clinical course and common RLS mimics are presented. Different forms of Restless Legs Syndrome manifestations, which are commonly -as in this case- misinterpreted due to their

  19. Running with a load increases leg stiffness.

    PubMed

    Silder, Amy; Besier, Thor; Delp, Scott L

    2015-04-13

    Spring-mass models have been used to characterize running mechanics and leg stiffness in a variety of conditions, yet it remains unknown how running while carrying a load affects running mechanics and leg stiffness. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that running with a load increases leg stiffness. Twenty-seven subjects ran at a constant speed on a force-measuring treadmill while carrying no load, and while wearing weight vests loaded with 10%, 20%, and 30% of body weight. We measured lower extremity motion and created a scaled musculoskeletal model of each subject, which we used to estimate lower extremity joint angles and leg length. We estimated dimensionless leg stiffness as the ratio of the peak vertical ground reaction force (normalized to body weight) and the change in stance phase leg length (normalized to leg length at initial foot contact). Leg length was calculated as the distance from the center of the pelvis to the center-of-pressure under the foot. We found that dimensionless leg stiffness increased when running with load (p=0.001); this resulted from an increase in the peak vertical ground reaction force (p<0.001) and a smaller change in stance phase leg length (p=0.025). When running with load, subjects had longer ground contact times (p<0.020), greater hip (p<0.001) and knee flexion (p=0.048) at the time of initial foot contact, and greater peak stance phase hip, knee, and ankle flexion (p<0.05). Our results reveal that subjects run in a more crouched posture and with higher leg stiffness to accommodate an added load. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Epilepsy and restless legs syndrome.

    PubMed

    Geyer, James D; Geyer, Emery E; Fetterman, Zachary; Carney, Paul R

    2017-03-01

    Restless legs syndrome (RLS) is a common neurological movement disorder occurring in approximately 10% of the general population. The prevalence of moderately severe RLS is 2.7% overall (3.7% for women and 1.7% for men). Epilepsy is also a common neurological disorder with significant associated morbidity and impact on quality of life. We evaluated the severity and frequency of primary RLS in patients with localization-related temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) and investigated the role of prodromal RLS symptoms as a warning sign and lateralizing indicator. All epilepsy patients seen in the outpatient clinic were screened for movement disorders from 2005 to 2015. Ninety-eight consecutive patients with localization-related TLE (50 right TLE and 48 left TLE) who met inclusion criteria were seen in the outpatient clinic. The control group consisted of 50 individuals with no history or immediate family history of epilepsy. Each patient was evaluated with the International Restless Legs Study Group (IRLSSG) questionnaire, NIH RLS diagnostic criteria, ferritin level, and comprehensive sleep screening including polysomnography. Furthermore, patients with obstructive sleep apnea or a definite cause of secondary restless legs syndrome such as low serum ferritin or serum iron levels were also excluded from the study. There was a significant association between the type of epilepsy and whether or not patients had RLS χ(2) (1)=10.17, p<.01, using the χ(2) Goodness of Fit Test. Based on the odds ratio, the odds of patients having RLS were 4.60 times higher if they had right temporal epilepsy than if they had left temporal epilepsy, serving as a potential lateralizing indicator. A prodromal sensation of worsening RLS occurred in some patients providing the opportunity to intervene at an earlier stage in this subgroup. We identified frequent moderate to severe RLS in patients with epilepsy. The frequency of RLS was much more common than would typically be seen in patients of similar

  1. Colds and the Flu

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2014October 2014familydoctor.org editorial staff OverviewWhat is the common cold and the flu?The common cold and the flu are viral infections of the ... have a cold or the flu?Although the common cold and the flu share many similar symptoms, they ...

  2. Cold remedies (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Sore throat, cough, stuffy nose, sneezing, runny nose, fever, chills, and muscle aches are all symptoms associated with the common cold. Over-the-counter medicines for a cold only alleviate cold symptoms but do not shorten the duration of a cold. As always, ...

  3. Facts about the Common Cold

    MedlinePlus

    ... Diseases > Lung Disease Lookup > Influenza Facts About The Common Cold What Is a Cold? Colds are minor infections ... for 10 to 40 percent of colds. Other common cold viruses include coronavirus and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) . ...

  4. X-Ray Exam: Femur (Upper Leg)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Habits for TV, Video Games, and the Internet X-Ray Exam: Femur (Upper Leg) KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Femur (Upper Leg) Print A A A ... You Have Questions What It Is A femur X-ray is a safe and painless test that uses ...

  5. Diagnosis and treatment of restless legs syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sales, Samantha; Sanghera, Manjit K; Klocko, David J; Stewart, R Malcolm

    2016-07-01

    Restless legs syndrome (RLS) is a disorder characterized by an irresistible urge to move the legs during rest, usually accompanied by uncomfortable sensations in the affected extremity or extremities. RLS can manifest at any age but prevalence increases with advancing age. This article describes the symptoms of RLS, associated comorbidities, and how to diagnose and manage RLS.

  6. Ropinirole treatment for restless legs syndrome.

    PubMed

    Molnar, Miklos Zsolt; Fornadi, Katalin; Shapiro, Colin M

    2006-09-01

    In this paper we discuss therapy with ropinirole (known as adartrel in the United Kingdom) in patients with restless legs syndrome. Restless legs syndrome is characterized by an urge to move the legs, uncomfortable sensations in the legs and worsening of these symptoms during rest with at least temporary relief brought on by activity. Current recommendations suggest dopaminergic therapy (levodopa or dopamine receptor agonists like ropinirole) as the first-line treatment for restless legs syndrome. Based on the results of randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind trials, we conclude that ropinirole is effective in reducing symptoms of restless legs syndrome in the general population. Ropinirole has no serious or common side effects that would limit its use significantly. Rebound and augmentation problems are relatively rarely seen with ropinirole, although properly designed comparative trials are still needed to address this question. It must be noted, however, that most published studies with ropinirole compare this drug with placebo. Very few studies have compared ropinirole with other drugs (L-dopa, gabapentin, opioids, benzodiazepines, other dopaminergic agents and selegiline hydrochloride). No cost-effectiveness trial has been published yet. Treatment of restless legs syndrome with ropinirole shows it to be effective, well-tolerated and safe and it can be used in restless legs syndrome in general.

  7. Why do flamingos stand on one leg?

    PubMed

    Anderson, Matthew J; Williams, Sarah A

    2010-01-01

    A series of observational studies of captive Caribbean flamingos Phoenicopterus ruber were conducted to determine why flamingos rest on one leg. While frequently asked by the general public, this basic question has remained unanswered by the scientific community. Here we suggest that the latency of flamingos to initiate forward locomotion following resting on one leg is significantly longer than following resting on two, discounting the possibility that unipedal resting reduces muscle fatigue or enhances predatory escape. Additionally, we demonstrate that flamingos do not display lateral preferences at the individual or group levels when resting on one leg, with each bird dividing its resting time across both legs. We show that while flamingos prefer resting on one leg to two regardless of location, the percentage of birds resting on one leg is significantly higher among birds standing in the water than among those on land. Finally, we demonstrate a negative relationship between temperature and the percentage of observed birds resting on one leg, such that resting on one leg decreases as temperature rises. Results strongly suggest that unipedal resting aids flamingos in thermoregulation.

  8. Opioids for restless legs syndrome.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, César Osório; Carvalho, Luciane Bc; Carlos, Karla; Conti, Cristiane; de Oliveira, Marcio M; Prado, Lucila Bf; Prado, Gilmar F

    2016-06-29

    Restless legs syndrome (RLS) is a distressing and common neurological disorder that may have a huge impact in the quality of life of those with frequent and intense symptoms. Patients complain of unpleasant sensations in the legs, at or before bedtime, and feel an urge to move the legs, which improves with movement, such as walking. Symptoms start with the patient at rest (e.g. sitting or lying down), and follow a circadian pattern, increasing during the evening or at night. Many pharmacological intervention are available for RLS, including drugs used to treat Parkinson's disease (L-Dopa and dopaminergic agonists), epilepsy (anticonvulsants), anxiety (benzodiazepines), and pain (opioids). Dopaminergic drugs are those most frequently used for treatment of RLS, but some patients do not respond effectively and require other medication. Opioids, a class of medications used to treat severe pain, seem to be effective in treating RLS symptoms, and are recommended for patients with severe symptoms, because RLS and pain appear to share the same mechanism in the central nervous system. All available drugs are associated to some degree with side effects, which can impede treatment. Opioids are associated with adverse events such as constipation, tolerance, and dependence. This justifies the conduct of a systematic review to ascertain whether opioids are safe and effective for treatment of RLS. To asses the effects of opioids compared to placebo treatment for restless legs syndrome in adults. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled trials, CENTRAL 2016, issue 4 and MEDLINE, EMBASE, and LILACS up to April 2016, using a search strategy adapted by Cochraneto identify randomised clinical trials. We checked the references of each study and established personal communication with other authors to identify any additional studies. We considered publications in all languages. Randomised controlled clinical trials of opioid treatment in adults with idiopathic RLS. Two

  9. Update in restless legs syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Salas, Rachel E.; Gamaldo, Charlene E.; Allen, Richard P.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review Although restless legs syndrome (RLS) is a disorder recognized in the medical literature since the 17th century, there have only recently been significant clinical and scientific advances in diagnosis, epidemiology and understanding the disorder, mainly due to the advent of dopaminergic treatment. Recent findings Recent discoveries have uncovered the iron–dopamine connection in RLS and the basic dopaminergic pathology related to the RLS symptoms. These have led to new understanding of the morbidity of RLS and the many conditions associated with RLS, which have also supported new approaches to treatment. These developments are each briefly described here. Summary Although there has been progress in understanding, diagnosing and treating RLS, it remains an underdiagnosed and undertreated condition severely impairing functioning of patients with moderate-to-severe disease. Much work is needed to improve on current, as well as other novel therapies. PMID:20581683

  10. A Hydroxyurea-induced Leg Ulcer

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Seon-Wook; Hong, Soon-Kwon; Kim, Sang-Hyun; Seo, Jong-Keun; Sung, Ho-Suk

    2009-01-01

    Hydroxyurea is a cytostatic agent that has recently become the drug of choice in the treatment of various myeloproliferative diseases. The cutaneous side effects of hydroxyurea include xerosis, hyperpigmentation, nail discoloration, and scaling. Leg ulcers have only rarely been reported in association with hydroxyurea treatment. A 75-year-old woman presented with leg ulcers, nail discoloration, and xerosis. The leg ulcers were refractory to conventional treatment. She had been taking oral hydroxyurea since being diagnosed with essential thrombocytosis in 2002. Hence, we suspected hydroxyurea-induced leg ulcers and discontinued her hydroxyurea treatment; the ulcers gradually healed thereafter. We present a rare case of hydroxyurea-induced leg ulcers in Korea. PMID:20548853

  11. Drug-induced restless legs syndrome.

    PubMed

    2010-08-01

    Restless legs syndrome can be very troublesome but it has no serious physical complications. The underlying causes are unknown, but it can be triggered or aggravated by a drug. In early 2010, about 60 cases of drug-induced restless legs syndrome had been published in detail. The drugs implicated were mainly psychotropics, especially antidepressants and neuroleptics. Some drugs used to treat restless legs syndrome, especially dopaminergic drugs, can in fact aggravate symptoms. Drug-induced restless legs syndrome generally resolves when the dose is reduced or the drug is withdrawn. Dysfunction of the dopaminergic system has been implicated in some cases. In practice, when a patient presents with restless legs syndrome, the role of a drug, especially a psychotropic, should be considered. Drug withdrawal or a dose reduction may be beneficial.

  12. Desensitization of menthol-activated cold receptors in lower extremities during local cooling in young women with a cold constitution.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Fumio; Sone, Ryoko

    2017-03-01

    To test the hypothesis that topical menthol-induced reactivity of cold sensation and cutaneous vasoconstriction to local cooling is augmented in individuals with a cold constitution, we examined thermal sensation and cutaneous vasoconstrictor responses at menthol-treated and untreated sites in the legs during local skin cooling in young women complaining of chilliness (C group) and young women with no complaint as a normal control group (N group). During local skin cooling, the sensitivity to cold sensation was greater in the C group than in the N group. The application of menthol enhanced the cold sensation at a low temperature in the N group, but not in the C group. Cutaneous vasoconstrictor responses to local skin cooling were not altered by menthol treatment in either of the two groups. These findings suggest the desensitization of menthol-activated cold receptors in the legs of C group subjects, and a minor role of cold receptor activity in cutaneous vasoconstrictor response to local cooling.

  13. High temperature exposure of in-situ thermocouple fixed-point cells: stability with up to three months of continuous use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliott, C. J.; Greenen, A.; Lowe, D.; Pearce, J. V.; Machin, G.

    2015-04-01

    To categorise thermocouples in batches, manufacturers state an expected operating tolerance for when the thermocouples are as-new. In use, thermocouple behaviour can rapidly change and the tolerance becomes invalid, especially when used at high temperatures (i.e. above 1000 °C) as the processes leading to de-calibration, such as oxidation and contamination, can be very fast and lead to erroneous readings. In-situ thermocouple self-validation provides a method to track the drift and correct the thermocouple reading in real-time, but it must be shown to be reliable. Two miniature temperature fixed-point cells designed at NPL for in-situ thermocouple self-validation, the first containing a Pt-C eutectic alloy and the second containing a Ru-C eutectic alloy, have been exposed to temperatures close to their melting point for 2200 h and 1570 h, respectively, and continuously, for up to three months. Recalibration after this long-term high-temperature exposure, where a tantalum-sheathed thermocouple was always in place, is used to show that no significant change of the temperature reference point (the melting temperature) has occurred in either the Pt-C ingot or the Ru-C ingot, over timescales far longer than previously demonstrated and approaching that required by industry for practical use of the device.

  14. Steerable Hopping Six-Legged Robot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Younse, Paulo; Aghazarian, Hrand

    2010-01-01

    The figure depicts selected aspects of a six-legged robot that moves by hopping and that can be steered in the sense that it can be launched into a hop in a controllable direction. This is a prototype of hopping robots being developed for use in scientific exploration of rough terrain on remote planets that have surface gravitation less than that of Earth. Hopping robots could also be used on Earth, albeit at diminished hopping distances associated with the greater Earth gravitation. The upper end of each leg is connected through two universal joints to an upper and a lower hexagonal frame, such that the tilt of the leg depends on the relative position of the two frames. Two non-back-driveable worm-gear motor drives are used to control the relative position of the two frames along two axes 120 apart, thereby controlling the common tilt of all six legs and thereby, further, controlling the direction of hopping. Each leg includes an upper and a lower aluminum frame segment with a joint between them. A fiberglass spring, connected via hinges to both segments, is used to store hopping energy prior to launch into a hop and to cushion the landing at the end of the hop. A cable for loading the spring is run into each leg through the center of the universal joints and then down along the center lines of the segments to the lower end of the leg. A central spool actuated by a motor with a harmonic drive and an electromagnetic clutch winds in all six cables to compress all six springs (thereby also flexing all six legs) simultaneously. To ensure that all the legs push off and land in the same direction, timing- belt pulley drives are attached to the leg segments, restricting the flexing and extension of all six legs to a common linear motion. In preparation for a hop, the spool can be driven to load the spring legs by an amount corresponding to a desired hop distance within range. The amount of compression can be computed from the reading of a shaft-angle encoder that

  15. Preparation of W-Ta thin-film thermocouple on diamond anvil cell for in-situ temperature measurement under high pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Jie; Li Ming; Zhang Honglin; Gao Chunxiao

    2011-04-15

    In this paper, a W-Ta thin-film thermocouple has been integrated on a diamond anvil cell by thin-film deposition and photolithography methods. The thermocouple was calibrated and its thermal electromotive force was studied under high pressure. The results indicate that the thermal electromotive force of the thermocouple exhibits a linear relationship with temperature and is not associated with pressure. The resistivity measurement of ZnS powders under high pressure at different temperatures shows that the phase transition pressure decreases as the temperature increases.

  16. Preparation of W-Ta thin-film thermocouple on diamond anvil cell for in-situ temperature measurement under high pressure.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jie; Li, Ming; Zhang, Honglin; Gao, Chunxiao

    2011-04-01

    In this paper, a W-Ta thin-film thermocouple has been integrated on a diamond anvil cell by thin-film deposition and photolithography methods. The thermocouple was calibrated and its thermal electromotive force was studied under high pressure. The results indicate that the thermal electromotive force of the thermocouple exhibits a linear relationship with temperature and is not associated with pressure. The resistivity measurement of ZnS powders under high pressure at different temperatures shows that the phase transition pressure decreases as the temperature increases.

  17. Preparation of W-Ta thin-film thermocouple on diamond anvil cell for in-situ temperature measurement under high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jie; Li, Ming; Zhang, Honglin; Gao, Chunxiao

    2011-04-01

    In this paper, a W-Ta thin-film thermocouple has been integrated on a diamond anvil cell by thin-film deposition and photolithography methods. The thermocouple was calibrated and its thermal electromotive force was studied under high pressure. The results indicate that the thermal electromotive force of the thermocouple exhibits a linear relationship with temperature and is not associated with pressure. The resistivity measurement of ZnS powders under high pressure at different temperatures shows that the phase transition pressure decreases as the temperature increases.

  18. Summary Results of the Neptun Boil-Off Experiments to Investigate the Accuracy and Cooling Influence of LOFT Cladding-Surface Thermocouples (System 00)

    SciTech Connect

    E. L. Tolman S. N. Aksan

    1981-10-01

    Nine boil-off experiments were conducted in the Swiss NEPTUN Facility primarily to obtain experimental data for assessing the perturbation effects of LOFT thermocouples during simulated small-break core uncovery conditions. The data will also be useful in assessing computer model capability to predict thermal hydraulic response data for this type of experiment. System parameters that were varied for these experiments included heater rod power, system pressure, and initial coolant subcooling. The experiments showed that the LOFT thermocouples do not cause a significant cooling influence in the rods to which they are attached. Furthermore, the accuracy of the LOFT thermocouples is within 20 K at the peak cladding temperature zone.

  19. Thermocouple and Infrared Sensor-Based Measurement of Temperature Distribution in Metal Cutting

    PubMed Central

    Kus, Abdil; Isik, Yahya; Cakir, M. Cemal; Coşkun, Salih; Özdemir, Kadir

    2015-01-01

    In metal cutting, the magnitude of the temperature at the tool-chip interface is a function of the cutting parameters. This temperature directly affects production; therefore, increased research on the role of cutting temperatures can lead to improved machining operations. In this study, tool temperature was estimated by simultaneous temperature measurement employing both a K-type thermocouple and an infrared radiation (IR) pyrometer to measure the tool-chip interface temperature. Due to the complexity of the machining processes, the integration of different measuring techniques was necessary in order to obtain consistent temperature data. The thermal analysis results were compared via the ANSYS finite element method. Experiments were carried out in dry machining using workpiece material of AISI 4140 alloy steel that was heat treated by an induction process to a hardness of 50 HRC. A PVD TiAlN-TiN-coated WNVG 080404-IC907 carbide insert was used during the turning process. The results showed that with increasing cutting speed, feed rate and depth of cut, the tool temperature increased; the cutting speed was found to be the most effective parameter in assessing the temperature rise. The heat distribution of the cutting tool, tool-chip interface and workpiece provided effective and useful data for the optimization of selected cutting parameters during orthogonal machining. PMID:25587976

  20. Practical system for the direct measurement of magneto-caloric effect by micro-thermocouples.

    PubMed

    Kamarád, J; Kaštil, J; Arnold, Z

    2012-08-01

    A system for direct measurements of the magneto-caloric effect (MCE) exploits a rapid transport of a sample into or from magnetic field in permanent Halbach-type (1 T) or superconducting (4.7 T) magnets. Time dependence of induced changes of the sample temperature, ΔT(t), is detected directly by the differential Cu-Constantan-Cu micro-thermocouples with time steps of 300 ms. A sample placed inside an evacuated simple LN(2) cryostat is either totally isolated (adiabatic conditions) or partly connected with the copper sample holder (non-adiabatic conditions). The last arrangement (a model of the Brayton cycle) is used to simulate an application of MCE in refrigeration techniques. The relations describing ΔT(t) that allow an analysis of MCE of the studied materials are based on the general cooling law. The effect of the first-order magnetic transition on MCE of selected sample is also demonstrated by non-standard ΔT(t) curves measured in the last mentioned experimental arrangements.

  1. In-situ temperature measurement in lithium ion battery by transferable flexible thin film thermocouples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mutyala, Madhu Santosh K.; Zhao, Jingzhou; Li, Jianyang; Pan, Hongen; Yuan, Chris; Li, Xiaochun

    2014-08-01

    Temperature monitoring is important for improving the safety and performance of Lithium Ion Batteries (LIB). This paper presents the feasibility study to insert flexible polymer embedded thin film thermocouples (TFTCs) in a lithium ion battery pouch cell for in-situ temperature monitoring. A technique to fabricate polyimide embedded TFTC sensors on glass substrates and later transfer it onto thin copper foils is presented. The sensor transfer process can be easily integrated into the assembly process of a pouch cell, thus holding promise in implementing in Battery Management Systems (BMS). Internal temperature of the LIB pouch cell was measured in-situ when the sensor embedded battery was operated at high rate charge-discharge cycles. The polyimide embedded TFTCs survived the battery assembly process and the battery electrolyte environment. It is observed that the heat generation inside the battery is dominant during the high-rate of discharges. The developed technique can serve to improve the battery safety and performance when implemented in battery management systems and enhance the understanding of heat generation and its effects.

  2. Thermocouple psychrometer measurements of in situ water potential changes in heated welded tuff

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, Nai-hsien; Wang, H.F.

    1991-10-01

    Ten thermocouple psychrometers (TCPs) to measure water potential (WP) were installed in three holes in G-Tunnel at the Nevada Test Site as part of the Prototype Engineered Barrier System Field Tests. We calibrated the TCPs in NaCl solutions up to 80{degrees}C (176{degrees}F) in the laboratory. In two holes, we used rubber sleeves and packers to house TCPs, and in the third hole, we used foam. All three holes were grouted behind the TCP assemblages. The initial moisture condition indicated by TCP data was about 99.5% relative humidity or a WP of about {minus}5 bar. This corresponded to 15.4 g/m{sup 3} of water in the air near the borehole wall, which was much wetter than we expected. A drying and re-wetting cycle peaked at about day 140 with a WP of {minus}65 bar in borehole P3, located below the heater. A similar cycle but reduced in scale was found at about day 175 with a WP of {minus}45 bar in borehole P2, above the heater. This difference is drying behavior above and below the heater was also observed from neutron data and was explained as a gravity effect.

  3. Comparison of two surface temperature measurement using thermocouples and infrared camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michalski, Dariusz; Strąk, Kinga; Piasecka, Magdalena

    This paper compares two methods applied to measure surface temperatures at an experimental setup designed to analyse flow boiling heat transfer. The temperature measurements were performed in two parallel rectangular minichannels, both 1.7 mm deep, 16 mm wide and 180 mm long. The heating element for the fluid flowing in each minichannel was a thin foil made of Haynes-230. The two measurement methods employed to determine the surface temperature of the foil were: the contact method, which involved mounting thermocouples at several points in one minichannel, and the contactless method to study the other minichannel, where the results were provided with an infrared camera. Calculations were necessary to compare the temperature results. Two sets of measurement data obtained for different values of the heat flux were analysed using the basic statistical methods, the method error and the method accuracy. The experimental error and the method accuracy were taken into account. The comparative analysis showed that although the values and distributions of the surface temperatures obtained with the two methods were similar but both methods had certain limitations.

  4. Modeling of the Thermal Footprint at the Strike Point and Fast Thermocouples in Carbon Tiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nygren, R. E.; Watkins, J. G.; Buchenauer, D. A.; Makowski, M. A.; Leonard, A. W.

    2013-10-01

    Thermal broadening can complicate interpretation of IR images at the strike point because the peaked profile of surface temperature widens as the tile heats due to lateral conduction away from the peak, so the instantaneous values of λq extracted from IR images increases during the shot. Detailed 3D thermal analyses of divertor tiles complement data from edge probes, fast thermocouples (FTCs) and IR thermography and aids interpretation. But the surface temperature reflects the integrated heat load over time, so changes in power or movement of the plasma complicates this interpretation. The array of 16 embedded FTCs in DIII-D divertor tiles are 8 mm below the surface.The poster focuses on the degree to which the FTCs can help resolve the absolute value of the surface temperature and the extracted profile of surface temperature and related peaked heat load.We include a series of detailed 3D thermal analyses of one DIII-D tile exposed to a (theoretical) peaked heat load characterized by the commonly-used two-parameter fit. Work supported by the US DOE under DE-AC04-94AL85000, DE-AC52-07N27344 & DE-FC02-04ER54698.

  5. Thermocouple and infrared sensor-based measurement of temperature distribution in metal cutting.

    PubMed

    Kus, Abdil; Isik, Yahya; Cakir, M Cemal; Coşkun, Salih; Özdemir, Kadir

    2015-01-12

    In metal cutting, the magnitude of the temperature at the tool-chip interface is a function of the cutting parameters. This temperature directly affects production; therefore, increased research on the role of cutting temperatures can lead to improved machining operations. In this study, tool temperature was estimated by simultaneous temperature measurement employing both a K-type thermocouple and an infrared radiation (IR) pyrometer to measure the tool-chip interface temperature. Due to the complexity of the machining processes, the integration of different measuring techniques was necessary in order to obtain consistent temperature data. The thermal analysis results were compared via the ANSYS finite element method. Experiments were carried out in dry machining using workpiece material of AISI 4140 alloy steel that was heat treated by an induction process to a hardness of 50 HRC. A PVD TiAlN-TiN-coated WNVG 080404-IC907 carbide insert was used during the turning process. The results showed that with increasing cutting speed, feed rate and depth of cut, the tool temperature increased; the cutting speed was found to be the most effective parameter in assessing the temperature rise. The heat distribution of the cutting tool, tool-chip interface and workpiece provided effective and useful data for the optimization of selected cutting parameters during orthogonal machining.

  6. Differences and correlations in knee and hip mechanics during single-leg landing, single-leg squat, double-leg landing, and double-leg squat tasks.

    PubMed

    Donohue, Michael R; Ellis, Samantha M; Heinbaugh, Erika M; Stephenson, Mitchell L; Zhu, Qin; Dai, Boyi

    2015-01-01

    Landing and squat tasks have been utilized to assess lower extremity biomechanics associated with anterior cruciate ligament loading and injury risks. The purpose of this study was to identify the differences and correlations in knee and hip mechanics during a single-leg landing, a single-leg squat, a double-leg landing, and a double-leg squat. Seventeen male and 17 female recreational athletes performed landings and squats when kinematic and kinetic data were collected. ANOVAs showed significant differences (p < 0.00001) for maximum knee flexion angles, maximum hip flexion angles, maximum knee abduction angles, maximum hip adduction angles, and maximum external knee abduction moments among squats and landings. For maximum knee and hip flexion angles, significant correlations (r ≥ 0.5, p ≤ 0.003) were observed between the two landings and between the two squats. For maximum knee abduction and hip adduction angles and maximum external knee abduction moments, significant correlations were mostly found between the two landings, and between the single-leg squat and landings (r ≥ 0.54, p ≤ 0.001). Individuals are likely to demonstrate different profiles of injury risks when screened using different tasks. While a double-leg landing should be considered as a priority in screening, a single-leg squat may be used as a surrogate to assess frontal plane motion and loading.

  7. Expansion Compression Contacts for Thermoelectric Legs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakamoto, Jeffrey

    2009-01-01

    In a proposed alternative to previous approaches to making hot-shoe contacts to the legs of thermoelectric devices, one relies on differential thermal expansion to increase contact pressures for the purpose of reducing the electrical resistances of contacts as temperatures increase. The proposed approach is particularly applicable to thermoelectric devices containing p-type (positive-charge-carrier) legs made of a Zintl compound (specifically, Yb14MnSb11) and n-type (negative charge-carrier) legs made of SiGe. This combination of thermoelectric materials has been selected for further development, primarily on the basis of projected thermoelectric performance. However, it is problematic to integrate, into a practical thermoelectric device, legs made of these materials along with a metal or semiconductor hot shoe that is required to be in thermal and electrical contact with the legs. This is partly because of the thermal-expansion mismatch of these materials: The coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of SiGe is 4.5 x 10(exp -6) C (exp -1), while the CTE of Yb14MnSb11 is 20 x 10(exp -6) C(exp -1). Simply joining a Yb14MnSb11 and a SiGe leg to a common hot shoe could be expected to result in significant thermal stresses in either or both legs during operation. Heretofore, such thermal stresses have been regarded as disadvantageous. In the proposed approach, stresses resulting from the CTE mismatch would be turned to advantage.

  8. HIGH TEMPERATURE IRRADIATION RESISTANT THERMOCOUPLES – A LOW COST SENSOR FOR IN-PILE TESTING AT HIGH TEMPERATURES

    SciTech Connect

    Joy L. Rempe; Darrell L. Knudson; Keith G. Condie; S. Curtis Wilkins; Joshua E. Daw

    2008-06-01

    Several options have been identified to improve recently-developed Idaho National Laboratory (INL) High Temperature Irradiation Resistant ThermoCouples (HTIR-TCs) for in-pile testing. These options have the potential to reduce fabrication costs and allow HTIR-TC use in higher temperature applications (up to at least 1800 °C). The INL and the University of Idaho (UI) investigated these options with the ultimate objective of providing recommendations for alternate thermocouple designs that are optimized for various applications. This paper summarizes results from these INL/UI investigations. Specifically, results are reported about several options found to enhance HTIR-TC performance, such as improved heat treatments, alternate geometries, alternate fabrication techniques, and the use of copper/nickel alloys as soft extension cable.

  9. Proposal of a New Type Thin Film Vacuum Sensor Using the Short Circuit Current-Detection Type Thermocouple

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takashima, Noriaki; Kimura, Mitsuteru

    We have proposed the thin film vacuum sensor that has a cantilever structure with new temperature difference sensors of the short circuit Seebeck-Current-Detection type thermocouple in order to get higher sensitivity in the higher vacuum range. Temperature difference, which should be zero under the higher vacuum, between microheater and thermally isolated heading area from the microheater is measured under the vacuum pressure. Even a little temperature difference in our new sensor can be measured in very lower vacuum pressure range by the signal amplification than that of the traditional Pirani vacuum sensor. In our experiments, the short circuit Seebeck-Current-Detection type thermocouple is used to measure the very small temperature difference. Measurement of very wide vacuum pressure range between 105-10-2 Pa is achieved by the prototype sensor.

  10. Nuclear Power Plant Thermocouple Sensor-Fault Detection and Classification Using Deep Learning and Generalized Likelihood Ratio Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, Shyamapada; Santhi, B.; Sridhar, S.; Vinolia, K.; Swaminathan, P.

    2017-06-01

    In this paper, an online fault detection and classification method is proposed for thermocouples used in nuclear power plants. In the proposed method, the fault data are detected by the classification method, which classifies the fault data from the normal data. Deep belief network (DBN), a technique for deep learning, is applied to classify the fault data. The DBN has a multilayer feature extraction scheme, which is highly sensitive to a small variation of data. Since the classification method is unable to detect the faulty sensor; therefore, a technique is proposed to identify the faulty sensor from the fault data. Finally, the composite statistical hypothesis test, namely generalized likelihood ratio test, is applied to compute the fault pattern of the faulty sensor signal based on the magnitude of the fault. The performance of the proposed method is validated by field data obtained from thermocouple sensors of the fast breeder test reactor.

  11. Leg stiffness and expertise in men jumping.

    PubMed

    Laffaye, Guillaume; Bardy, Benoît G; Durey, Alain

    2005-04-01

    The aim of the present study is to investigate: a) the leg spring behavior in the one-leg vertical jump, b) the contribution of impulse parameters to this behavior, and c) the effect of jumping expertise on leg stiffness. Four categories of experts (handball, basketball, volleyball players, and Fosbury athletes), as well as novice subjects performed a run-and-jump test to touch a ball with the head. Five experimental conditions were tested from 55 to 95% of the maximum jump height. Kinematic and kinetic data were collected using six cameras and a force plate. The mechanical behavior of the musculoskeleton component of the human body can be modeled as a simple mass-spring system, from which leg stiffness values can be extracted to better understand energy transfer during running or jumping. The results indicate that leg stiffness (mean value of 11.5 kN.m) decreased with jumping height. Leg shortening at takeoff also increased with jumping height, whereas contact time decreased (-18%). No difference was found between experts and novices for leg stiffness. However, a principal components analysis (PCA) indicated the contribution of two main factors to the performance. The first factor emerged out of vertical force, stiffness, and duration of impulse. The second factor included leg shortening and jumping height. Differences between experts and novices were observed in terms of the contribution of leg stiffness to jump height, and more importantly, clear differences existed between experts in jumping parameters. The analysis performed on the sport categories indeed revealed different jumping profiles, characterized by specific, sport-related impulse parameters.

  12. External Attachment of Titanium Sheathed Thermocouples to Zirconium Nuclear Fuel Rods For The Loss-Of-Fluid-Test (LOFT) Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welty, Richard K.

    1980-10-01

    The Exxon Nuclear Company, Inc. acting as a Subcontractor to EG&G Idaho Inc.3 Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho Falls, Idaho, has developed a welding process to attach titanium sheathed thermocouples to the outside of the zircaloy clad fuel rods. The fuel rods and thermocouples are used to test simulated loss-of-coolant-accident (LOCA) conditions in a pressurized water reactor (LOFT Reactor, Idaho National Laboratory). The design goals were to (1) reliably attach thermocouples to the zircaloy fuel rods, (2) achieve or exceed a life expectancy of 6,000 hours of reactor operation in a borated water environment of 316°C at 2260 psi, (3) provide and sustain repeatable physical and metallurgical properties in the instrumented rods subjected to transient temperatures up to 1538°C with blowdown, shock, loading, and fast quench. A laser beam was selected as the optimum welding process because of the extremely high energy input per unit volume that can be achieved allowing local fusion of a small area irrespective of the difference in material thickness to be joined. A commercial pulsed laser and energy control system was installed along with specialized welding fixtures. Laser room facility requirements and tolerances were established. Performance qualifications and detailed welding procedures were also developed. Product performance tests were conducted to assure that engineering design requirements could be met on a production basis. Irradiation tests showed no degradation of thermocouples or weld structure. Fast thermal cycle and heater rod blowdown reflood tests were made to subject the weldments to high temperatures, high pressure steam, and fast water quench cycles. From the behavior of these tests, it was concluded that the attachment welds would survive a series of reactor safety tests.

  13. Design and Investigation of Pd-C Eutectic Fixed-Point Cells for Thermocouple Calibration at NMIA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jahan, F.; Ogura, H.; Ballico, M. J.; van der Ham, E. W. M.; Sasajima, N.

    2017-05-01

    The calibration of Pt/Rh thermocouples up to 1560°C at NMIA currently uses the conventional `melt-wire technique' to realize Gold (Au) and Palladium (Pd) melting points, resulting in the loss of 20 mm of wire from the junction end for each calibration. To avoid this loss, NMIA intends to replace the melt-wire technique with the use of miniature fixed-point cells. NMIA has established Copper (Cu) and Cobalt-Carbon (Co-C) eutectic cells for calibration of thermocouples to 1324°C. To extend the calibration up to 1500°C, miniature Palladium-Carbon (Pd-C) eutectic cells (1492°C) have been constructed and tested in collaboration with NMIJ, AIST. Although these cells are made of high-purity reference materials, careful consideration must be given to contamination introduced during the manufacture and filling of the crucibles and by their long-term use. These issues can only be assessed by measurement of cell-to-cell temperature differences within the ensemble of cells traceable to ITS-90. In the work presented here, 3 NMIA-design mini Pd-C cells were constructed: 1 at NMIA and 2 at NMIJ. These cells were compared, together with a "large" NMIJ Pd-C cell, using type-R, type-B and Pt/Pd thermocouples and radiation thermometry. Although the cells are found to be stable and repeatable, significant problems arising from migration of Pd to the thermocouples were identified.

  14. Hypothalamic temperature: a key regulator in homeostatic restoration of sleep during chronic cold exposure in rats.

    PubMed

    Kaushik, Mahesh K; Kumar, Velayudhan Mohan; Mallick, Hruda Nanda

    2012-01-01

    Exposure to cold ambient temperature (Ta) affects sleep-wake (S-W) state. The vigilance states on the other hand influence thermal status of the animals. Simultaneous recording of body temperature (Tb) with S-W is crucial to understand the homeostatic relationship between the two. In the present study we recorded both Tb and hypothalamic temperature (Thy) along with S-W, during acute and chronic exposure to mild cold (Ta). Electrooculogram (EOG), electroencephalogram (EEG) and electromyogram (EMG) electrodes were chronically implanted in rats to assess S-W. A thermocouple, near the preoptic area, and radio transmitter in the peritoneum, were implanted, to record Thy and Tb respectively. After three days of baseline recordings of S-W, Thy and Tb at Ta of 26 dergrees C, the rats were exposed to mild cold Ta (18 degrees C) for 28 days. All the parameters were recorded during cold exposure and also for five days after the termination of cold exposure. On the first day of cold exposure there was a decrease in slow wave sleep and paradoxical sleep, but they were restored by the 21st day of continued exposure. The Thy remained decreased throughout the cold exposure. Though the Tb showed a slight decrease on the first day of cold exposure, there was no appreciable change during the subsequent days. The Thy came back to near pre exposure level on termination of cod exposure. The decrease in Thy during mild cold exposure would have triggered cold defense mechanisms. Increase in wakefulness during acute cold exposure and non-shivering thermogenesis during chronic cold exposure are probably responsible for the maintenance of Tb. Decrease in Thy is probably the key trigger for initiating thermoregulatory measures to maintain Tb and homeostatic restoration of sleep.

  15. Cold Stress and the Cold Pressor Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silverthorn, Dee U.; Michael, Joel

    2013-01-01

    Temperature and other environmental stressors are known to affect blood pressure and heart rate. In this activity, students perform the cold pressor test, demonstrating increased blood pressure during a 1- to 2-min immersion of one hand in ice water. The cold pressor test is used clinically to evaluate autonomic and left ventricular function. This…

  16. Cold Stress and the Cold Pressor Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silverthorn, Dee U.; Michael, Joel

    2013-01-01

    Temperature and other environmental stressors are known to affect blood pressure and heart rate. In this activity, students perform the cold pressor test, demonstrating increased blood pressure during a 1- to 2-min immersion of one hand in ice water. The cold pressor test is used clinically to evaluate autonomic and left ventricular function. This…

  17. Hot Leg Piping Materials Issues

    SciTech Connect

    V. Munne

    2006-07-19

    With Naval Reactors (NR) approval of the Naval Reactors Prime Contractor Team (NRPCT) recommendation to develop a gas cooled reactor directly coupled to a Brayton power conversion system as the space nuclear power plant (SNPP) for Project Prometheus (References a and b) the reactor outlet piping was recognized to require a design that utilizes internal insulation (Reference c). The initial pipe design suggested ceramic fiber blanket as the insulation material based on requirements associated with service temperature capability within the expected range, very low thermal conductivity, and low density. Nevertheless, it was not considered to be well suited for internal insulation use because its very high surface area and proclivity for holding adsorbed gases, especially water, would make outgassing a source of contaminant gases in the He-Xe working fluid. Additionally, ceramic fiber blanket insulating materials become very friable after relatively short service periods at working temperatures and small pieces of fiber could be dislodged and contaminate the system. Consequently, alternative insulation materials were sought that would have comparable thermal properties and density but superior structural integrity and greatly reduced outgassing. This letter provides technical information regarding insulation and materials issues for the Hot Leg Piping preconceptual design developed for the Project Prometheus space nuclear power plant (SNPP).

  18. Benzodiazepines for restless legs syndrome.

    PubMed

    Carlos, Karla; Prado, Gilmar F; Teixeira, Camila Dm; Conti, Cristiane; de Oliveira, Marcio M; Prado, Lucila Bf; Carvalho, Luciane Bc

    2017-03-20

    Restless legs syndrome (RLS) is a common disease affecting about 5% to 15% of the population. Symptoms of RLS can be severe in a minority of and can have a major impact on sleep, mostly sleep initiation, and quality of life. Benzodiazepines are drugs that can induce and maintain sleep and, hence, intuitively are thought to be beneficial to people with RLS. Altough benzodiazepines, particularly clonazepam, are used to treat RLS symptoms, a systematic review done by the American Academy of Sleep Medicine stated that benzodiazepines should not be used as a first-line treatment, although could be used as a coadjuvant therapy. To evaluate the efficacy and safety of benzodiazepine compared to placebo or other treatment for idiopathic RLS, including unconfounded trials comparing benzodiazepines versus open control. In March 2016 we searched CENTRAL, MEDLINE, Embase and LILACS We checked the references of each study and contacted study authors to identify any additional studies. We considered studies published in any language. Randomised clinical trials of benzodiazepine treatment in idiopathic RLS. We did not perform data collection and analysis, since we did not include any studies, MAIN RESULTS: We did not identify any studies that met the inclusion criteria of the review. Two cross-over studies are awaiting classification because the cross-over trials did not give data at the end of the first cross-over period. The effectiveness of benzodiazepines for RLS treatment is currently unknown.

  19. Pharmacotherapy for restless legs syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ferini-Strambi, Luigi; Marelli, Sara

    2014-06-01

    Restless legs syndrome (RLS) is a common condition characterized by paresthesia and an urge to move. Predominantly, symptoms occur at rest in the evening or at night, and they are alleviated by moving the affected extremity. RLS prevalence in the general population has been estimated to be approximately 5%. This review presents all options for the treatment of RLS. Pharmacological treatment should be limited to those patients who suffer from clinically relevant RLS, that is, when symptoms impair the patient's quality of life, daytime functioning, social functioning or sleep. Treatment on demand is a clinical need in some RLS patients, and medications include carbidopa/levodopa, pramipexole, ropinirole, oxycodone, methadone, codeine and tramadol. Chronic RLS should be treated with either a nonergot dopamine agonist or an α-2-δ calcium channel ligand. A dopamine agonist is a more appropriate choice in the presence of depression and overweight. As α-2-δ ligands can alleviate chronic pain and may be helpful in treating anxiety and insomnia, the presence of any of these comorbidities may favor their use. For RLS present through much of the day and night, the use of long-acting agents, such as the rotigotine patch or gabapentin enacarbil should be considered. In refractory RLS, oral prolonged release oxycodone-naloxone should be considered.

  20. Passive leg raising during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Marques, Nicole Ribeiro; Martinello, Caroline; Kramer, George C; Costantine, Maged M; Vadhera, Rakesh B; Saade, George R; Hankins, Gary D; Pacheco, Luis D

    2015-03-01

    To determine if passive leg raising (PLR) significantly increases cardiac output in a cohort of healthy pregnant women during the third trimester. Using a noninvasive monitor, baseline hemodynamic measurements for arterial blood pressure, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, heart rate, cardiac output, cardiac index, stroke volume, and systemic vascular resistances were obtained with patients in the semirecumbent position. Measurements were repeated after a 3-minute PLR maneuver in supine, right lateral decubitus, and left lateral decubitus positions. After 10 minutes of bed rest, the cohort's mean baseline heart rate was 80 ± 12 beats/minute. Baseline stroke volume was 98 ± 14 mL, mean cardiac output was 7.8 ± 1.2 L/min, and mean cardiac index was 4.32 ± 0.63 L/min. The baseline systemic vascular resistance value was 893 ± 160 dynes/sec/cm(5). Baseline mean arterial blood pressure was 84 ± 11 mm Hg. Following a PLR maneuver in the supine position, heart rate decreased significantly. No difference was noted in other measurements. Findings were similar with PLR in the left lateral decubitus. PLR in the right lateral decubitus resulted in significantly decreased heart rate, cardiac output, and cardiac index. PLR did not result in cardiac output recruitment in a cohort of healthy pregnant women during the third trimester. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  1. Comparisons of Gas-phase Temperature Measurements in a Flame Using Thin-Filament Pyrometry and Thermocouples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Struk, Peter; Dietrich, Daniel; Valentine, Russell; Feier, Ioan

    2003-01-01

    Less-intrusive, fast-responding, and full-field temperature measurements have long been a desired tool for the research community. Recently, the emission of a silicon-carbide (SiC) fiber placed in a flowing hot (or reacting) gas has been used to measure the temperature profile along the length of the fiber. The relationship between the gas and fiber temperature comes from an energy balance on the fiber. In the present work, we compared single point flame temperature measurements using thin-filament pyrometry (TFP) and thermocouples. The data was from vertically traversing a thermocouple and a SiC fiber through a methanol/air diffusion flame of a porous-metal wick burner. The results showed that the gas temperature using the TFP technique agreed with the thermocouple measurements (25.4 m diameter wire) within 3.5% for temperatures above 1200 K. Additionally, we imaged the entire SiC fiber (with a spatial resolution of 0.14 mm) while it was in the flame using a high resolution CCD camera. The intensity level along the fiber length is a function of the temperature. This results in a one-dimensional temperature profiles at various heights above the burner wick. This temperature measurement technique, while having a precision of less than 1 K, showed data scatter as high as 38 K. Finally, we discuss the major sources of uncertainty in gas temperature measurement using TFP.

  2. A thermocouple-based remote temperature controller of an electrically floated sample to study plasma CVD growth of carbon nanotube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, Takuya; Xie, Wei; Yanase, Takashi; Nagahama, Taro; Shimada, Toshihiro

    2015-09-01

    Plasma chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is now gathering attention from a novel viewpoint, because it is easy to combine plasma processes and electrochemistry by applying a bias voltage to the sample. In order to explore electrochemistry during the plasma CVD, the temperature of the sample must be controlled precisely. In traditional equipment, the sample temperature is measured by a radiation thermometer. Since emissivity of the sample surface changes in the course of the CVD growth, it is difficult to measure the exact temperature using the radiation thermometer. In this work, we developed new equipment to control the temperature of electrically floated samples by thermocouple with Wi-Fi transmission. The growth of the CNT was investigated using our plasma CVD equipment. We examined the temperature accuracy and stability controlled by the thermocouple with monitoring the radiation thermometer. We noticed that the thermocouple readings were stable, whereas the readings of the radiation thermometer changes significantly (20 °C) during plasma CVD. This result clearly shows that the sample temperature should be measured with direct connection. On the result of CVD experiment, different structures of carbon including CNT were obtained by changing the bias voltages.

  3. New fixed-point mini-cell to investigate thermocouple drift in a high-temperature environment under neutron irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Laurie, M.; Vlahovic, L.; Rondinella, V.V.; Sadli, M.; Failleau, G.; Fuetterer, M.; Lapetite, J.M.; Fourrez, S.

    2015-07-01

    Temperature measurements in the nuclear field require a high degree of reliability and accuracy. Despite their sheathed form, thermocouples subjected to nuclear radiations undergo changes due to radiation damage and transmutation that lead to significant EMF drift during long-term fuel irradiation experiment. For the purpose of a High Temperature Reactor fuel irradiation to take place in the High Flux Reactor Petten, a dedicated fixed-point cell was jointly developed by LNE-Cnam and JRC-IET. The developed cell to be housed in the irradiation rig was tailor made to quantify the thermocouple drift during the irradiation (about two year duration) and withstand high temperature (in the range 950 deg. C - 1100 deg. C) in the presence of contaminated helium in a graphite environment. Considering the different levels of temperature achieved in the irradiation facility and the large palette of thermocouple types aimed at surveying the HTR fuel pebble during the qualification test both copper (1084.62 deg. C) and gold (1064.18 deg. C) fixed-point materials were considered. The aim of this paper is to first describe the fixed-point mini-cell designed to be embedded in the reactor rig and to discuss the preliminary results achieved during some out of pile tests as much as some robustness tests representative of the reactor scram scenarios. (authors)

  4. Three-dimensional printing (3DP) of neonatal head phantom for ultrasound: thermocouple embedding and simulation of bone.

    PubMed

    Gatto, Matteo; Memoli, Gianluca; Shaw, Adam; Sadhoo, Neelaksh; Gelat, Pierre; Harris, Russell A

    2012-09-01

    A neonatal head phantom, comprising of an ellipsoidal geometry and including a circular aperture for simulating the fontanel was designed and fabricated, in order to allow an objective assessment of thermal rise in tissues during trans-cranial ultrasonic scanning of pre-term neonates. The precise position of a series of thermocouples was determined on the basis of finite-element analysis, which identified crucial target points for the thermal monitoring within the phantom geometry. Three-Dimensional Printing (3DP) was employed for the manufacture of the skull phantom, which was subsequently filled with dedicated brain-mimic material. A novel 3DP material combination was found to be able to mimic the acoustic properties of neonatal skull bone. Similarly, variations of a standard recipe for tissue mimic were examined, until one was found to mimic the brain of an infant. A specific strategy was successfully pursued to embed a thermocouple within the 3DP skull phantom during the manufacturing process. An in-process machine vision system was used to assess the correct position of the deposited thermocouple inside the fabricated skull phantom. An external silicone-made skin-like covering completed the phantom and was manufactured through a Direct Rapid Tooling (DRT) technique. Copyright © 2011 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Leg stiffness: comparison between unilateral and bilateral hopping tasks.

    PubMed

    Brauner, Torsten; Sterzing, Thorsten; Wulf, Mathias; Horstmann, Thomas

    2014-02-01

    Leg stiffness is a predictor of athletic performance and injury and typically evaluated during bilateral hopping. The contribution of each limb to bilateral leg stiffness, however, is not well understood. This study investigated leg stiffness during unilateral and bilateral hopping to address the following research questions: (1) does the magnitude and variability of leg stiffness differ between dominant and non-dominant legs? (2) Does unilateral leg stiffness differ from bilateral leg stiffness? and (3) Is bilateral leg stiffness determined by unilateral leg stiffness? Thirty-two physically active males performed repeated hopping tests on a force platform for each of the three conditions: bilateral hopping, unilateral hopping on the dominant leg, and unilateral hopping on the non-dominant leg. Leg stiffness was estimated as the ratio of the peak vertical force and the maximum displacement using a simple 1-D mass-spring model. Neither the magnitude nor variability of leg stiffness differed between dominant and non-dominant limbs. Unilateral leg stiffness was 24% lower than bilateral stiffness and showed less variability between consecutive hops and subjects. Unilateral leg stiffness explained 76% of the variance in bilateral leg stiffness. We conclude that leg stiffness estimates during unilateral hopping are preferable for intervention studies because of their low variability. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Cold Weather Pet Safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... accordingly. You will probably need to shorten your dog’s walks in very cold weather to protect you ... slipping and falling. Long-haired or thick-coated dogs tend to be more cold-tolerant, but are ...

  7. Cold and Cough Medicines

    MedlinePlus

    ... What can you do for your cold or cough symptoms? Besides drinking lots of fluids and getting ... medicines. There are lots of different cold and cough medicines, and they do different things. Nasal decongestants - ...

  8. Vitamin C and colds

    MedlinePlus

    ... belief is that vitamin C can cure the common cold . However, research about this claim is conflicting. Although ... Fashner J, Ericson K, Werner S. Treatment of the common cold in children and adults. Am Fam Physician. 2012; ...

  9. Cold medicines and children

    MedlinePlus

    ... aspx . Accessed July 26, 2016. Cherry JD. The common cold. In: Cherry JD, Harrison GJ, Kaplan SL, Steinbach ... 2014:chap 7. Miller EK, Williams JV. The common cold. In: Kliegman RM, Stanton BF, St. Geme JW, ...

  10. Skin Reactions to Cold

    PubMed Central

    Talpash, Orest

    1976-01-01

    Although skin reactions to cold are seen surprisingly infrequently in Canada, it is important to manage them correctly when they do occur. Frostbite, cold urticarias, Raynaud's disease and phenomenon, and several miscellaneous changes are discussed. PMID:21308019

  11. Cold knife cone biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... biopsy; Pap smear - cone biopsy; HPV - cone biopsy; Human papilloma virus - cone biopsy; Cervix - cone biopsy; Colposcopy - cone biopsy Images Female reproductive anatomy Cold cone biopsy Cold cone removal References American ...

  12. Temperature distributions measurement of high intensity focused ultrasound using a thin-film thermocouple array and estimation of thermal error caused by viscous heating.

    PubMed

    Matsuki, Kosuke; Narumi, Ryuta; Azuma, Takashi; Yoshinaka, Kiyoshi; Sasaki, Akira; Okita, Kohei; Takagi, Shu; Matsumoto, Yoichiro

    2013-01-01

    To improve the throughput of high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment, we have considered a focus switching method at two points. For this method, it is necessary to evaluate the thermal distribution under exposure to ultrasound. The thermal distribution was measured using a prototype thin-film thermocouple array, which has the advantage of minimizing the influence of the thermocouple on the acoustic and temperature fields. Focus switching was employed to enlarge the area of temperature increase and evaluate the proposed evaluation parameters with respect to safety and uniformity. The results indicate that focus switching can effectively expand the thermal lesion while maintaining a steep thermal boundary. In addition, the influence caused by the thin-film thermocouple array was estimated experimentally. This thermocouple was demonstrated to be an effective tool for the measurement of temperature distributions induced by HIFU.

  13. California Red-legged Frog - Stipulated Injunction

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA will make effects determinations and initiate consultation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, regarding the potential effects of 66 pesticide active ingredient registrations on the California red-legged frog.

  14. Sturge-Weber syndrome - legs (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... here on the legs). This is an unusual case, due to the large size of the lesion (extensive involvement). Occasionally seizures or learning disorders are also associated with Sturge-Weber syndrome.

  15. Passive zero-gravity leg restraint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Christopher R. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A passive zero or microgravity leg restraint is described which includes a central support post with a top and a bottom. Extending from the central support post are a calf pad tab, to which calf pad is attached, and a foot pad tab, to which foot tab is attached. Also extending from central support post are knee pads. When the restraint is in use the user's legs are forced between pads by a user imposed scissors action of the legs. The user's body is then supported in a zero or microgravity neutral body posture by the leg restraint. The calf pad has semi-ridig elastic padding material covering structural stiffener. The foot pad has padding material and a structural stiffener. Knee pads have s structural tube stiffener at their core.

  16. Support Leg Loading in Punt Kicking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kermond, John; Konz, Stephen

    1978-01-01

    Maximum distance in football punt kicking is associated with a maximum force transfer to the ball rather than a maximum force transfer through the ground via the support leg. For maximum distance, tred lightly. (Author)

  17. Poison ivy on the leg (image)

    MedlinePlus

    This is a typical early appearance of a poison ivy rash, located on the leg. These early lesions ... line where the skin has brushed against the poison ivy plant. The rash is caused by skin contact ...

  18. [Pentoxifylline medication within the scope of leg-ulcer therapy. Results of a field study using Trental 400].

    PubMed

    Pemler, K; Penth, B; Adams, H J

    1979-06-07

    513 patients with chronic ulcers of the leg were treated with Trental 400 orally in addition to local therapy. Regarding the reduction of the symptoms: ulcer extension, coldness of the leg, paraesthesia, resting pain and improvement of walking distance, 215 patients were classified as considerably improved, 195 distinctly improved, 53 slightly improved and 44 unchanged. Four cases worsened, two cases could not be classified. The possibility of combining oral therapy with local treatment and surgical measures (skin-flaps) is shown in three case reports. Gastro-intestinal tolerance of Trental 400 was good, interactions with concomitantly administered drugs were not reported.

  19. Integration of thermocouple microelectrode in the scanning electrochemical microscope at variable temperatures: simultaneous temperature and electrochemical imaging and its kinetic studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, He; Zhang, Hailing; Lai, Junhui; Gu, Xiaoxin; Sun, Jianjun; Tang, Jing; Jin, Tao

    2017-03-01

    We describe herein a method for the simultaneous measurement of temperature and electrochemical signal with a new type of thermocouple microelectrode. The thermocouple microelectrode can be used not only as a thermometer but also as a scanning electrochemical microscope (SECM) tip in the reaction between tip-generated bromine and a heated Cu sample. The influence of temperature on the SECM imaging process and the related kinetic parameters have been studied, such as kinetic constant and activation energy.

  20. Integration of thermocouple microelectrode in the scanning electrochemical microscope at variable temperatures: simultaneous temperature and electrochemical imaging and its kinetic studies

    PubMed Central

    Pan, He; Zhang, Hailing; Lai, Junhui; Gu, Xiaoxin; Sun, Jianjun; Tang, Jing; Jin, Tao

    2017-01-01

    We describe herein a method for the simultaneous measurement of temperature and electrochemical signal with a new type of thermocouple microelectrode. The thermocouple microelectrode can be used not only as a thermometer but also as a scanning electrochemical microscope (SECM) tip in the reaction between tip-generated bromine and a heated Cu sample. The influence of temperature on the SECM imaging process and the related kinetic parameters have been studied, such as kinetic constant and activation energy. PMID:28338002

  1. Characterizing convective cold pools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drager, Aryeh J.; van den Heever, Susan C.

    2017-06-01

    Cold pools produced by convective storms play an important role in Earth's climate system. However, a common framework does not exist for objectively identifying convective cold pools in observations and models. The present study investigates convective cold pools within a simulation of tropical continental convection that uses a cloud-resolving model with a coupled land-surface model. Multiple variables are assessed for their potential in identifying convective cold pool boundaries, and a novel technique is developed and tested for identifying and tracking cold pools in numerical model simulations. This algorithm is based on surface rainfall rates and radial gradients in the density potential temperature field. The algorithm successfully identifies near-surface cold pool boundaries and is able to distinguish between connected cold pools. Once cold pools have been identified and tracked, composites of cold pool evolution are then constructed, and average cold pool properties are investigated. Wet patches are found to develop within the centers of cold pools where the ground has been soaked with rainwater. These wet patches help to maintain cool surface temperatures and reduce cold pool dissipation, which has implications for the development of subsequent convection.

  2. The common cold.

    PubMed

    2009-02-01

    1) Most colds are due to viruses and resolve spontaneously after a few days. Available drugs do not modify the course of a viral cold; 2) Some drugs used to treat colds carry a risk of serious adverse effects. This includes nasal sprays, especially vasoconstrictors such as pseudo-ephedrine and, in young children, menthol, camphor, and terpene derivatives.

  3. Coping with Cold Sores

    MedlinePlus

    ... found inside the mouth.) What Causes Cold Sores? Cold sores are caused by a virus called herpes (say: HUR-peez). Herpes is one ... the world. The medical name for the specific virus that causes cold sores is herpes simplex. There are two types ...

  4. Microgravity, Mesh-Crawling Legged Robots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Behar, Alberto; Marzwell, Neville; Matthews, Jaret; Richardson, Krandalyn; Wall, Jonathan; Poole, Michael; Foor, David; Rodgers, Damian

    2008-01-01

    The design, fabrication, and microgravity flight-testing are part of a continuing development of palm-sized mobile robots that resemble spiders (except that they have six legs apiece, whereas a spider has eight legs). Denoted SpiderBots (see figure), they are prototypes of proposed product line of relatively inexpensive walking robots that could be deployed in large numbers to function cooperatively in construction, repair, exploration, search, and rescue activities in connection with exploration of outer space and remote planets.

  5. Painful leg and moving toes syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    Painful leg and moving toes (PLMT) syndrome is a distinct clinical entity and in majority of the patients there are some underlying causes related to spinal cord, cauda equina, or peripheral neuropathy. However, some cases are cryptogenic with no identifiable underlying cause. Response to treatment is disappointing in most of the cases. We report a 60-year-old lady who presented with very severe type of painful legs and moving toes (PLMT) with no underlying cause. PMID:26713024

  6. Rotational joint assembly for the prosthetic leg

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owens, L. J.; Jones, W. C. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A rotational joint assembly for a prosthetic leg has been devised, which enables an artificial foot to rotate slightly when a person is walking, running or turning. The prosthetic leg includes upper and lower tubular members with the rotational joint assembly interposed between them. The assembly includes a restrainer mechanism which consists of a pivotably mounted paddle element. This device applies limiting force to control the rotation of the foot and also restores torque to return the foot back to its initial position.

  7. Clinical characteristics of leg restlessness in Parkinson's disease compared with idiopathic Restless Legs Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiao-Ying; Liu, Ye; Zhang, Xiao-Jin; Yang, Wen-Hao; Feng, Ya; Ondo, William G; Tan, Eng-King; Wu, Yun-Cheng

    2015-10-15

    There is limited data on motor restlessness in Parkinson's disease (PD). Here we evaluate for clinical differences between cohorts of idiopathic Restless Legs Syndrome (iRLS), PD patients with leg restlessness, and PD with RLS. We examined 276 consecutive PD patients for leg restlessness symptoms, we compared clinical features of PD patients with RLS, PD patients with leg restlessness but not meeting RLS criteria, PD patient without RLS and iRLS. A total of 262 PD patients who satisfied the inclusion criteria were analyzed. After excluding 23 possible secondary RLS or mimics, 28 were diagnosed with RLS and 18 with leg motor restlessness (LMR). Compared with iRLS patients, PD patients with RLS or LMR had older age of RLS/LMR onset, shorter duration of leg restlessness, less positive family history, different seasonal trends and more unilaterality of leg restlessness symptom (P<0.01) which were often in accordance with dominant Parkinsonism side and related with Parkinsonism severity. PD patients with RLS/LMR had lower daily dosage (P<0.01) and shorter duration (P<0.05) of dopaminergic medication when RLS/LMR symptom onset than PD without leg restlessness. PD with LMR had less severe Parkinsonism (P<0.05) and leg restlessness (P<0.01) symptoms than PD with RLS. Clinical characteristics of PD patients with RLS and LMR were different from iRLS, differentiating these various subtypes can facilitate optimal treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. [MRI and leg stump neuroma].

    PubMed

    Martinet, N; Foisneau-Lottin, A; Henrot, P; Paysant, J; Blum, A; André, J M

    2001-12-01

    To describe RMI aspects of leg stump neuroma and to evaluate RMI scan interest for neuroma diagnosis and management. During a 2 years period, 224 amputated patients consulting for pain or prostetics problems were studied. In 10 cases, a characteristic pain leads to neurona diagnosis. This is described as a sensation of ascending or descending electric shock induced by the stimulation of an identified point with a reproducible topography. In all these cases, RMI scans were performed. In thirty two other cases, a RMI scan was performed to confirm a pathology (bursitis, bone abnormality) or in order to establish an etiologic diagnosis. Twelve neuromas were diagnosed. RMI scan showed a neuroma in the ten cases with a clinical suspicion and two asymptomatic neuromas were diagnosed out of the 32 patients without clinical suspicion. Medium delay between amputation and neuroma diagnosis is 11,6 year. In six cases, staking was modified and in six other cases, surgery was necessary. In aIl cases, clinical manifestations disappeared. Vanous RMI aspects ofneuromas are described and illustrated. Neuroma is observed on the extremity of a nerve that have a wavy aspect on its top. The neuroma is an oblong structure, with clear limits. There is an hyposignal with Ti sequence and variable signal with T2 and after gadolinium injection. RMI scan is a good way to diagnose amputee neuroma. It makes it possible to demonstrate the pathological character of the neuroma. It has to be performed when a neuroma is suspected. It enables to confirm the diagnosis and establish the exact topography and anatomic connection. Mechanical strains role as a factor of discovering the neuroma is discussed because of the concomitant evolution of associated lesions (bursitis, bone edema). Surgical repair takes place after correcting abnormal mechanical strains.

  9. Long Hole Film Cooling Dataset for CFD Development . Part 1; Infrared Thermography and Thermocouple Surveys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shyam, Vikram; Thurman, Douglas; Poinsatte, Phillip; Ameri, Ali; Eichele, Peter; Knight, James

    2013-01-01

    An experiment investigating flow and heat transfer of long (length to diameter ratio of 18) cylindrical film cooling holes has been completed. In this paper, the thermal field in the flow and on the surface of the film cooled flat plate is presented for nominal freestream turbulence intensities of 1.5 and 8 percent. The holes are inclined at 30deg above the downstream direction, injecting chilled air of density ratio 1.0 onto the surface of a flat plate. The diameter of the hole is 0.75 in. (0.01905 m) with center to center spacing (pitch) of 3 hole diameters. Coolant was injected into the mainstream flow at nominal blowing ratios of 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0. The Reynolds number of the freestream was approximately 11,000 based on hole diameter. Thermocouple surveys were used to characterize the thermal field. Infrared thermography was used to determine the adiabatic film effectiveness on the plate. Hotwire anemometry was used to provide flowfield physics and turbulence measurements. The results are compared to existing data in the literature. The aim of this work is to produce a benchmark dataset for Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) development to eliminate the effects of hole length to diameter ratio and to improve resolution in the near-hole region. In this report, a Time-Filtered Navier Stokes (TFNS), also known as Partially Resolved Navier Stokes (PRNS), method that was implemented in the Glenn-HT code is used to model coolant-mainstream interaction. This method is a high fidelity unsteady method that aims to represent large scale flow features and mixing more accurately.

  10. Bilateral leg edema in an older woman.

    PubMed

    Thaler, H W; Pienaar, S; Wirnsberger, G; Roller-Wirnsberger, R E

    2015-01-01

    Bilateral leg edema is a frequent symptom in older people and an important concern in geriatric medicine. Further evaluation is frequently not performed and simple therapy with diuretics is prescribed. Particularly in older patients, long-term use of diuretics can lead to severe electrolyte imbalances, volume depletion, and falls. In this case report we want to focus the physicians' attention on the necessity to determine the cause and show a correspondingly effective treatment for bilateral leg edema in older people. A thorough approach is required to recognize diseases and to avoid adverse drug events as geriatric patients often show an atypical presentation or minor symptoms. The cause of swollen legs is often multifactorial; therefore, the patient's individual history and an appropriate physical examination are important. Depending on the clinical symptoms, evaluation including basic laboratory tests, urinalysis, chest radiography, and echocardiogram may be indicated. The most probable cause of bilateral edema in older patients is chronic venous insufficiency. Heart failure is also a common cause. Other systemic causes such as renal disease or liver disease are much rarer. Antihypertensive and anti-inflammatory drugs can frequently cause leg edema, but the incidence of drug-induced leg swelling is unknown. With the help of this special case we tried to develop an approach to the diagnosis of symmetric leg edema in older patients, a problem frequently neglected in geriatric medicine.

  11. Passive legged, multi-segmented, robotic vehicle.

    SciTech Connect

    Hayward, David R.

    2003-11-01

    The Passive-legged, Multi-segmented, Robotic Vehicle concept is a simple legged vehicle that is modular and scaleable, and can be sized to fit through confined areas that are slightly larger than the size of the vehicle. A specific goal of this project was to be able to fit through the opening in the fabric of a chain link fence. This terrain agile robotic platform will be composed of multiple segments that are each equipped with appendages (legs) that resemble oars extending from a boat. Motion is achieved by pushing with these legs that can also flex to fold next to the body when passing through a constricted area. Each segment is attached to another segment using an actuated joint. This joint represents the only actuation required for mobility. The major feature of this type of mobility is that the terrain agility advantage of legs can be attained without the complexity of the multiple-actuation normally required for the many joints of an active leg. The minimum number of segments is two, but some concepts require three or more segments. This report discusses several concepts for achieving this type of mobility, their design, and the results obtained for each.

  12. Thermocouple tests: a quick-look report on failures during loss-of-fluid tests L2-6 (LOFT L2-6)

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, R.L.; Cannon, C.P.

    1984-03-01

    Tests were conducted to determine the operating limits of fuel cladding thermocouples installed inside the fuel rods for the loss-of-fluid test (LOFT) F2 fuel bundle test. This investigation was conducted to determine (a) the range of time and temperature exposure over which reliable performance can be expected for the dual diameter, 0.040/0.020-in.-diam, Inconel-clad, MgO-insulated, type K thermocouples installed in the LOFT F2 fuel bundle, and (b) the effect of reactor fuel preconditioning at various reactor power levels. Grounded, ungrounded, and unjunctioned thermocouples were tested in temperature profiles estimated for reactor power levels of 8, 10, 12, and 14 kW/ft. The estimated peak temperature was 2160/sup 0/F for the highest power level. The effects of fuel preconditioning for eight hours at peak temperatures of 1950/sup 0/F were measured. The results showed that (a) in expected LOFT F2 temperature profiles, thermocouple read-out errors remained less than 1% up to a peak temperature of 1900 to 1950/sup 0/F; (b) thermocouple read-out errors from virtual junction effects increase rapidly with temperatures above 1950/sup 0/F; (c) wire breakage in peak temperature regions did not occur in any of the tests; and (d) thermocouple performance did not measurably improve nor degrade as a result of eight hours of preconditioning at 1950/sup 0/F. The test data taken with the estimated profiles establish an upper bound on performance errors.

  13. Performance of Pt-C, CrC-CrC, CrC-C, and Ru-C Fixed Points for Thermocouple Calibrations Above 1600 C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearce, J. V.; Elliott, C. J.; Lowe, D. H.; Failleau, G.; Deuzé, T.; Bourson, F.; Sadli, M.; Machin, G.

    2014-04-01

    A series of high-temperature fixed points (HTFPs) Pt-C (1738 , and Ru-C (1953 ) have been constructed at the National Physical Laboratory (NPL) and the Laboratoire National de métrologie et d'Essais and Conservatoire national des arts et métiers (LNE-Cnam). These are required for the calibration of high-temperature thermocouples in the framework of work package 6 of the European Metrology Research Programme IND01 project "HiTeMS." The goal of this work package is to establish a European capability that can determine low-uncertainty reference functions of non-standard high-temperature thermocouples. For reference functions to be widely applicable, measurements must be performed by more than one institute and preferably by more than one method. Due to the high price of the ingot materials, miniature HTFP cells are used. NPL and LNE-Cnam constructed their HTFP cells with different designs; these are described here, together with the performance of the cells using both radiation thermometry and thermocouples. The melting temperature of the Ru-C cells (for thermocouple calibrations) was determined using radiation thermometry at both NPL and LNE-Cnam, and the two results are compared. The suitability of the cells for calibration of W-Re and Rh-Ir thermocouples is evaluated, and some results are presented. Some discussion is given regarding the materials challenges when calibrating Rh-Ir thermocouples up to 2000 C.

  14. Ankle Joint Angle and Lower Leg Musculotendinous Unit Responses to Cryotherapy.

    PubMed

    Akehi, Kazuma; Long, Blaine C; Warren, Aric J; Goad, Carla L

    2016-09-01

    Akehi, K, Long, BC, Warren, AJ, and Goad, CL. Ankle joint angle and lower leg musculotendinous unit responses to cryotherapy. J Strength Cond Res 30(9): 2482-2492, 2016-The use of cold application has been debated for its influence on joint range of motion (ROM) and stiffness. The purpose of this study was to determine whether a 30-minute ice bag application to the plantarflexor muscles or ankle influences passive ankle dorsiflexion ROM and lower leg musculotendinous stiffness (MTS). Thirty-five recreationally active college-aged individuals with no history of lower leg injury 6 months before data collection volunteered. On each testing day, we measured maximum passive ankle dorsiflexion ROM (°) and plantarflexor torque (N·m) on an isokinetic dynamometer to calculate the passive plantarflexor MTS (N·m per degree) at 4 joint angles before, during, and after a treatment. Surface electromyography amplitudes (μV), and skin surface and ambient air temperature (°C) were also measured. Subjects received an ice bag to the posterior lower leg, ankle joint, or nothing for 30 minutes in different days. Ice bag application to the lower leg and ankle did not influence passive ROM (F(12,396) = 0.67, p = 0.78). Passive torque increased after ice bag application to the lower leg (F(12,396) = 2.21, p = 0.011). Passive MTS at the initial joint angle increased after ice bag application to the lower leg (F(12,396) = 2.14, p = 0.014) but not at the other joint angles (p > 0.05). Surface electromyography amplitudes for gastrocnemius and soleus muscles increased after ice application to the lower leg (F(2,66) = 5.61, p = 0.006; F(12,396) = 3.60, p < 0.001). Ice bag application to the lower leg and ankle joint does not alter passive dorsiflexion ROM but increases passive ankle plantarflexor torque in addition to passive ankle plantarflexor MTS at the initial joint angle.

  15. Cough and Cold Medicine Abuse

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home » Publications » DrugFacts » Cough and Cold Medicine Abuse Cough and Cold Medicine Abuse Email Facebook Twitter Revised ... syrup is sometimes diverted for abuse. How Are Cough and Cold Medicines Abused? Cough and cold medicines ...

  16. Phase controlled metal-insulator transition in multi-leg quasiperiodic optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maiti, Santanu K.; Sil, Shreekantha; Chakrabarti, Arunava

    2017-07-01

    A tight-binding model of a multi-leg ladder network with a continuous quasiperiodic modulation in both the site potential and the inter-arm hopping integral is considered. The model mimics optical lattices where ultra-cold fermionic or bosonic atoms are trapped in double well potentials. It is observed that, the relative phase difference between the on-site potential and the inter-arm hopping integral, which can be controlled by the tuning of the interfering laser beams trapping the cold atoms, can result in a mixed spectrum of one or more absolutely continuous subband(s) and point like spectral measures. This opens up the possibility of a re-entrant metal-insulator transition. The subtle role played by the relative phase difference mentioned above is revealed, and we corroborate it numerically by working out the multi-channel electronic transmission for finite two-, and three-leg ladder networks. The extension of the calculation beyond the two-leg case is trivial, and is discussed in the work.

  17. [Responses of Arma chinensis cold tolerance to rapid cold hardening and underlying physiological mechanisms].

    PubMed

    Li, Xing-Peng; Song, Li-Wen; Zhang, Hong-Hao; Chen, Yue-Qu; Zuo, Tong-Tong; Wang, Jun; Sun, Wei

    2012-03-01

    Rapid cold hardening can enhance the cold tolerance of some insects. To explore the effects of different cold hardening induction temperature on the cold tolerance of Arma chinensis and related physiological mechanisms, the 3rd generation A. chinensis adults reared indoor were treated with cooling at 15, 10, and 4 degrees C for 4 h, respectively, or with gradual cooling from 15 degrees C for 4 h to 10 degrees C for 4 h, and finally to 4 degrees C for 4 h. The super-cooling point, water content, and the contents of low molecular carbohydrates, glycerol, and amino acids of the adults after cooling and the adults cold tolerance at 0, -5, and -10 degrees C were measured by thermocouple, high performance liquid chromatography, and other analytical techniques. When exposed at -10 degrees C after cooling, the survival rate of the adults treated with gradual cooling or treated with cooling at 4 degrees C for 4 h was averagely 58.3%, while that of the adults reared at room temperature (25 degrees C +/- 2 degrees C) or treated with cooling at 15 degrees C or 10 degrees C for 4 h decreased significantly, with an average of 8.9%. The super-cooling point of the adults treated with gradual cooling or with cooling at 4 degrees C for 4 h was -15.6 degrees C, which was averagely 1.3 degrees C lower than that of the other treatments. The water content of the adults had no significant difference among all treatments, with an average of 61.8%, but the glucose, sorbitolum, glycerol, Ala, and Glu contents in treatments gradual cooling and cooling at 4 degrees C for 4 h increased by 2.82-fold, 2.65-fold, 3.49-fold, 51.3%, and 80.2%, while the fucose, mannose, and Pro contents decreased by 68.4%, 52.2%, and 30.2%, respectively, as compared with the other treatments. The fructose content showed no significant difference among all treatments. It was suggested that rapid cool hardening had a critical temperature to induce the physiological metabolism process of adult A. chinensis, and

  18. Strength training adaptations after cold-water immersion.

    PubMed

    Fröhlich, Michael; Faude, Oliver; Klein, Markus; Pieter, Andrea; Emrich, Eike; Meyer, Tim

    2014-09-01

    Several studies analyzed the effectiveness of cold-water immersion (CWI) to support recovery after strenuous exercise, but the overall results seem to be conflicting. Most of these studies analyzed only short-term recovery effects, whereas the adaptational aspect has been widely neglected. Therefore, we analyzed the effects of repeated cooling after training sessions (CWI) on adaptations to strength training. Seventeen trained male students volunteered the study. After a 2-week familiarization period, a pretest (T1) of 1 repetition maximum (RM) and 12RM was conducted followed by the 5-week strength training period (within-subject design). After the posttest (T2) and a 2-week detraining period, a retention test (T3) was carried out. Directly after each training session, CWI was applied for 1 randomly assigned leg. Cooling consisted of 3 4-minute intervals with a 30-second rest period. The other leg was not cooled. A significant increase in 1RM and 12RM from baseline to T2 and T3 (p < 0.001), respectively, and a further significant increase in 12RM from T2 to T3 (p ≤ 0.05) were observed. In addition, a tendency for a large leg effect with higher values for the "control leg" in both parameters (p = 0.08 each) and a moderate time × leg interaction in favor of the control leg was found (1RM: p = 0.11; 12RM: p = 0.09). The percentage change differences between both conditions were 1.6% for the increase in 1RM from T1 to T2 and 2.0% from T1 to T3 in favor of the control leg. Long-term strength training adaptations in trained subjects can be negatively affected by CWI. However, effects were small, and the practical relevance relative to possible recovery effects needs to be considered in a sports practical setting.

  19. Cold plasma brush generated at atmospheric pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Duan Yixiang; Huang, C.; Yu, Q. S.

    2007-01-15

    A cold plasma brush is generated at atmospheric pressure with low power consumption in the level of several watts (as low as 4 W) up to tens of watts (up to 45 W). The plasma can be ignited and sustained in both continuous and pulsed modes with different plasma gases such as argon or helium, but argon was selected as a primary gas for use in this work. The brush-shaped plasma is formed and extended outside of the discharge chamber with typical dimension of 10-15 mm in width and less than 1.0 mm in thickness, which are adjustable by changing the discharge chamber design and operating conditions. The brush-shaped plasma provides some unique features and distinct nonequilibrium plasma characteristics. Temperature measurements using a thermocouple thermometer showed that the gas phase temperatures of the plasma brush are close to room temperature (as low as 42 deg. C) when running with a relatively high gas flow rate of about 3500 ml/min. For an argon plasma brush, the operating voltage from less than 500 V to about 2500 V was tested, with an argon gas flow rate varied from less than 1000 to 3500 ml/min. The cold plasma brush can most efficiently use the discharge power as well as the plasma gas for material and surface treatment. The very low power consumption of such an atmospheric argon plasma brush provides many unique advantages in practical applications including battery-powered operation and use in large-scale applications. Several polymer film samples were tested for surface treatment with the newly developed device, and successful changes of the wettability property from hydrophobic to hydrophilic were achieved within a few seconds.

  20. Cold plasma brush generated at atmospheric pressure.

    PubMed

    Duan, Yixiang; Huang, C; Yu, Q S

    2007-01-01

    A cold plasma brush is generated at atmospheric pressure with low power consumption in the level of several watts (as low as 4 W) up to tens of watts (up to 45 W). The plasma can be ignited and sustained in both continuous and pulsed modes with different plasma gases such as argon or helium, but argon was selected as a primary gas for use in this work. The brush-shaped plasma is formed and extended outside of the discharge chamber with typical dimension of 10-15 mm in width and less than 1.0 mm in thickness, which are adjustable by changing the discharge chamber design and operating conditions. The brush-shaped plasma provides some unique features and distinct nonequilibrium plasma characteristics. Temperature measurements using a thermocouple thermometer showed that the gas phase temperatures of the plasma brush are close to room temperature (as low as 42 degrees C) when running with a relatively high gas flow rate of about 3500 ml/min. For an argon plasma brush, the operating voltage from less than 500 V to about 2500 V was tested, with an argon gas flow rate varied from less than 1000 to 3500 ml/min. The cold plasma brush can most efficiently use the discharge power as well as the plasma gas for material and surface treatment. The very low power consumption of such an atmospheric argon plasma brush provides many unique advantages in practical applications including battery-powered operation and use in large-scale applications. Several polymer film samples were tested for surface treatment with the newly developed device, and successful changes of the wettability property from hydrophobic to hydrophilic were achieved within a few seconds.

  1. How cold is cold dark matter?

    SciTech Connect

    Armendariz-Picon, Cristian; Neelakanta, Jayanth T. E-mail: jtneelak@syr.edu

    2014-03-01

    If cold dark matter consists of particles, these must be non-interacting and non-relativistic by definition. In most cold dark matter models however, dark matter particles inherit a non-vanishing velocity dispersion from interactions in the early universe, a velocity that redshifts with cosmic expansion but certainly remains non-zero. In this article, we place model-independent constraints on the dark matter temperature to mass ratio, whose square root determines the dark matter velocity dispersion. We only assume that dark matter particles decoupled kinetically while non-relativistic, when galactic scales had not entered the horizon yet, and that their momentum distribution has been Maxwellian since that time. Under these assumptions, using cosmic microwave background and matter power spectrum observations, we place upper limits on the temperature to mass ratio of cold dark matter today (away from collapsed structures). These limits imply that the present cold dark matter velocity dispersion has to be smaller than 54 m/s. Cold dark matter has to be quite cold, indeed.

  2. Limb oxygenation during the cold pressor test in spinal cord-injured humans.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Hisayoshi; Hobara, Hiroaki; Uematsu, Azusa; Ogata, Toru

    2012-04-01

    To investigate changes in tissue oxygenation in the arm and leg during the cold pressor test in humans with spinal cord injury (SCI). Subjects with SCI at cervical 6 (n=7) and subjects with SCI at thoracic 5 or thoracic 6 (n=5) experienced 3-min cold water immersion of the foot and subsequent 10-min recovery. Changes in tissue oxygenation and blood pressure were determined. Tissue oxygenation was assessed by hemoglobin/myoglobin concentration (Hb/MbO2) measured using near-infrared spectroscopy. Mean arterial blood pressures increased significantly by 15±9 and 6±6 mmHg during cold water immersion in the cervical and thoracic SCI groups, respectively (P<0.001). Hb/MbO2 in the arm decreased significantly by 23±15 μM cm during cold water immersion only in the cervical SCI group (P<0.001), whereas Hb/MbO2 in the leg decreased significantly by 82±56 μM cm during cold water immersion only in the thoracic SCI group (P<0.001). Afferent activity coming from below the lesion due to cold stimuli would reflexively enhance sympathetic activity in both the arm and leg in individuals with cervical SCI but only in the leg in individuals with thoracic SCI. A decrease in tissue oxygenation might have been caused by sympathetic vasoconstriction. The reduction of tissue oxygenation in the arm was marked in individuals with cervical SCI, suggesting differential control of arm oxygenation and leg oxygenation in the region below SCI.

  3. An index for breathlessness and leg fatigue.

    PubMed

    Borg, E; Borg, G; Larsson, K; Letzter, M; Sundblad, B-M

    2010-08-01

    The features of perceived symptoms causing discontinuation of strenuous exercise have been scarcely studied. The aim was to characterize the two main symptoms causing the discontinuation of heavy work in healthy persons as well as describe the growth of symptoms during exercise. Breathlessness (b) and leg fatigue (l) were assessed using the Borg CR10 Scale and the Borg CR100 (centiMax) Scale, during a standardized exercise test in 38 healthy subjects (24-71 years). The b/l-relationships were calculated for terminal perceptions (ERI(b/l)), and the growth of symptoms determined by power functions for the whole test, as well as by growth response indexes (GRI). This latter index was constructed as a ratio between power levels corresponding to a very strong and a moderate perception. In the majority (71%) of the test subjects, leg fatigue was the dominant symptom at the conclusion of exercise (P<0.001) and the b/l ratio was 0.77 (CR10) and 0.75 (CR100), respectively. The GRI for breathlessness and leg fatigue was similar, with good correlations between GRI and the power function exponent (P<0.005). In healthy subjects, leg fatigue is the most common cause for discontinuing an incremental exercise test. The growth functions for breathlessness and leg fatigue during work are, however, almost parallel.

  4. Temperature dependence of the thermoelectric inhomogeneity for type B thermocouples from 180 °C to 960 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yong-Gyoo; Lee, Young Hee; Joung, Wukchul

    2017-04-01

    For noble metal thermocouples, thermoelectric inhomogeneity is the most important factor of the calibration uncertainty. For type R and S thermocouples, it is possible to perform a scan at low temperature of around 200 °C, and extrapolate the calculated inhomogeneity to a higher temperature range. However, there has been little experimental study on the thermoelectric scan of type B thermocouples covering low temperature to high temperature of about 1000 °C. In order to determine the practical temperature dependence of the inhomogeneity of type B thermocouples, two used thermocouples were selected and tested from 180 °C to 960 °C based on the single temperature gradient immersion technique. Two liquid baths, one a silicon oil bath at 180 °C and the other a salt bath at 400 °C, were used, and a sodium-heat pipe furnace was used above 600 °C with intervals of around 120 °C. The tested thermocouples generated large emf variations with the immersion depth, and the amount of the variation increased with the test temperature. The calculated inhomogeneity showed the largest value at the lowest temperature, and decreased gradually with increasing temperature to 600 °C. Above this temperature, the inhomogeneity was nearly constant with temperature change, indicating that it was possible to extrapolate the uncertainty due to the inhomogeneity at 600 °C to higher temperatures. From the measured results, it was recommended that a thermoelectric scan be performed at a temperature of at least 600 °C using the sodium-heat pipe furnace to obtain a small calibration uncertainty of a type B thermocouple.

  5. Leg extension is an important predictor of paretic leg propulsion in hemiparetic walking.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Carrie L; Cheng, Jing; Kautz, Steven A; Neptune, Richard R

    2010-10-01

    Forward propulsion is a central task of walking that depends on the generation of appropriate anterior-posterior ground reaction forces (AP GRFs). The AP impulse (i.e., time integral of the AP GRF) generated by the paretic leg relative to the non-paretic leg is a quantitative measure of the paretic leg's contribution to forward propulsion and is variable across hemiparetic subjects. The purpose of this study was to investigate the underlying mechanisms of propulsion generation in hemiparetic walking by identifying the biomechanical predictors of AP impulses. Three-dimensional kinematics and GRFs were recorded from 51 hemiparetic and 21 age-matched control subjects walking at similar speeds on an instrumented treadmill. Hierarchical regression models were generated for each leg to predict the AP impulse from independent biomechanical variables. Leg extension was a significant predictor and positively related to the propulsive impulse in the paretic, non-paretic and control legs. Secondarily, the hip flexor moment impulse was negatively related to the propulsive impulse. Also, the relationship of paretic and non-paretic ankle moments with the propulsive impulse depended on the paretic step ratio, suggesting the plantar flexor contribution to the propulsive impulse depends on leg angle. These results suggest that increasing paretic leg extension will increase propulsion. Increasing paretic plantar flexor output and decreasing paretic hip flexor output could also increase paretic leg propulsion. While increased pre-swing hip flexor output has been suggested to compensate for decreased plantar flexor output, such output may further impair propulsion by the paretic leg if it occurs too soon in the gait cycle.

  6. Increasing trunk flexion transforms human leg function into that of birds despite different leg morphology.

    PubMed

    Aminiaghdam, Soran; Rode, Christian; Müller, Roy; Blickhan, Reinhard

    2017-02-01

    Pronograde trunk orientation in small birds causes prominent intra-limb asymmetries in the leg function. As yet, it is not clear whether these asymmetries induced by the trunk reflect general constraints on the leg function regardless of the specific leg architecture or size of the species. To address this, we instructed 12 human volunteers to walk at a self-selected velocity with four postures: regular erect, or with 30 deg, 50 deg and maximal trunk flexion. In addition, we simulated the axial leg force (along the line connecting hip and centre of pressure) using two simple models: spring and damper in series, and parallel spring and damper. As trunk flexion increases, lower limb joints become more flexed during stance. Similar to birds, the associated posterior shift of the hip relative to the centre of mass leads to a shorter leg at toe-off than at touchdown, and to a flatter angle of attack and a steeper leg angle at toe-off. Furthermore, walking with maximal trunk flexion induces right-skewed vertical and horizontal ground reaction force profiles comparable to those in birds. Interestingly, the spring and damper in series model provides a superior prediction of the axial leg force across trunk-flexed gaits compared with the parallel spring and damper model; in regular erect gait, the damper does not substantially improve the reproduction of the human axial leg force. In conclusion, mimicking the pronograde locomotion of birds by bending the trunk forward in humans causes a leg function similar to that of birds despite the different morphology of the segmented legs.

  7. LEG EXTENSION IS AN IMPORTANT PREDICTOR OF PARETIC LEG PROPULSION IN HEMIPARETIC WALKING

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Carrie L.; Cheng, Jing; Kautz, Steven A.; Neptune, Richard R.

    2010-01-01

    Forward propulsion is a central task of walking that depends on the generation of appropriate anterior-posterior ground reaction forces (AP GRFs). The AP impulse (i.e., time integral of the AP GRF) generated by the paretic relative to non-paretic leg is a quantitative measure of the paretic leg’s contribution to forward propulsion and is variable across hemiparetic subjects. The purpose of this study was to investigate the underlying mechanisms of propulsion generation in hemiparetic walking by identifying the biomechanical predictors of AP impulses. Three-dimensional kinematics and GRFs were recorded from 51 hemiparetic and 21 age-matched control subjects walking at similar speeds on an instrumented treadmill. Hierarchical regression models were generated for each leg to predict the AP impulse from independent biomechanical variables. Leg extension was a significant predictor and positively related to the propulsive impulse in the paretic, non-paretic and control legs. Secondarily, the hip flexor impulse was negatively related to the propulsive impulse. Also, the relationship of paretic and non-paretic ankle moments with the propulsive impulse depended on the paretic step ratio, suggesting the plantar flexor contribution to the propulsive impulse depends on leg angle. These results suggest that increasing paretic leg extension will increase propulsion. Increasing paretic leg plantar flexor output and decreasing paretic leg hip flexor output could also increase paretic leg propulsion. While increased pre-swing hip flexor output has been suggested to compensate for decreased plantar flexor output, such output may further impair propulsion by the paretic leg if it occurs too soon in the gait cycle. PMID:20656492

  8. The effect of leg length on jumping performance of short- and long-legged leafhopper insects.

    PubMed

    Burrows, M; Sutton, G P

    2008-04-01

    To assess the effect of leg length on jumping ability in small insects, the jumping movements and performance of a sub-family of leafhopper insects (Hemiptera, Auchenorrhyncha, Cicadellidae, Ulopinae) with short hind legs were analysed and compared with other long-legged cicadellids (Hemiptera, Auchenorrhyncha, Cicadellidae). Two species with the same jumping characteristics but distinctively different body shapes were analysed: Ulopa, which had an average body length of 3 mm and was squat, and Cephalelus, which had an average body length of 13 mm with an elongated body and head. In both, the hind legs were only 1.4 times longer than the front legs compared with 1.9-2.3 times in other cicadellid leafhoppers. When the length of the hind legs was normalised relative to the cube root of their body mass, their hind legs had a value of 1-1.1 compared with 1.6-2.3 in other cicadellids. The hind legs of Cephalelus were only 20% of the body length. The propulsion for a jump was delivered by rapid and synchronous rotation of the hind legs about their coxo-trochanteral joints in a three-phase movement, as revealed by high-speed sequences of images captured at rates of 5000 s(-1). The hind tarsi were initially placed outside the lateral margins of the body and not apposed to each other beneath the body as in long-legged leafhoppers. The hind legs were accelerated in 1.5 ms (Ulopa) and 2 ms (Cephalelus) and thus more quickly than in the long-legged cicadellids. In their best jumps these movements propelled Ulopa to a take-off velocity of 2.3 m s(-1) and Cephalelus to 2 m s(-1), which matches that of the long-legged cicadellids. Both short-legged species had the same mean take-off angle of 56 degrees but Cephalelus adopted a lower angle of the body relative to the ground (mean 15 degrees) than Ulopa (mean 56 degrees). Once airborne, Cephalelus pitched slowly and rolled quickly about its long axis and Ulopa rotated quickly about both axes. To achieve their best performances

  9. Scanning thermal microscopy based on a quartz tuning fork and a micro-thermocouple in active mode (2ω method)

    SciTech Connect

    Bontempi, Alexia; Nguyen, Tran Phong; Salut, Roland; Thiery, Laurent; Teyssieux, Damien; Vairac, Pascal

    2016-06-15

    A novel probe for scanning thermal microscope using a micro-thermocouple probe placed on a Quartz Tuning Fork (QTF) is presented. Instead of using an external deflection with a cantilever beam for contact detection, an original combination of piezoelectric resonator and thermal probe is employed. Due to a non-contact photothermal excitation principle, the high quality factor of the QTF allows the probe-to-surface contact detection. Topographic and thermal scanning images obtained on a specific sample points out the interest of our system as an alternative to cantilevered resistive probe systems which are the most spread.

  10. Scanning thermal microscopy based on a quartz tuning fork and a micro-thermocouple in active mode (2ω method).

    PubMed

    Bontempi, Alexia; Nguyen, Tran Phong; Salut, Roland; Thiery, Laurent; Teyssieux, Damien; Vairac, Pascal

    2016-06-01

    A novel probe for scanning thermal microscope using a micro-thermocouple probe placed on a Quartz Tuning Fork (QTF) is presented. Instead of using an external deflection with a cantilever beam for contact detection, an original combination of piezoelectric resonator and thermal probe is employed. Due to a non-contact photothermal excitation principle, the high quality factor of the QTF allows the probe-to-surface contact detection. Topographic and thermal scanning images obtained on a specific sample points out the interest of our system as an alternative to cantilevered resistive probe systems which are the most spread.

  11. Attachment of lead wires to thin film thermocouples mounted on high temperature materials using the parallel gap welding process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holanda, Raymond; Kim, Walter S.; Pencil, Eric; Groth, Mary; Danzey, Gerald A.

    1990-01-01

    Parallel gap resistance welding was used to attach lead wires to sputtered thin film sensors. Ranges of optimum welding parameters to produce an acceptable weld were determined. The thin film sensors were Pt13Rh/Pt thermocouples; they were mounted on substrates of MCrAlY-coated superalloys, aluminum oxide, silicon carbide and silicon nitride. The entire sensor system is designed to be used on aircraft engine parts. These sensor systems, including the thin-film-to-lead-wire connectors, were tested to 1000 C.

  12. Evaluation of the self-calibrating thermocouple as a front end to a smart temperature measurement system

    SciTech Connect

    Ruppel, F.R.

    1991-01-01

    An evaluation of the novel self-calibrating thermocouple was performed to determine whether the sensor would be acceptable as a front end to a smart temperature measurement system. The evaluation consisted of a fast-ramp test, long-term drift tests, and physical examinations including X rays, microphotography, and energy-dispersive spectrometry. The results of the tests show that the sensor is a viable industrial-grade device worthy for use in this application. However, recommendations for improving fabrication of the assembly are made and caveats are given for conditions that may constrain the use of the sensor in certain situations. 4 refs., 17 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Study of Thermocurrents in ILC cavities via measurements of the Seebeck Effect in niobium, titanium, and stainless steel thermocouples

    SciTech Connect

    Cooley, Victoria

    2014-01-01

    The goals of Fermilab’s Superconductivity and Radio Frequency Development Department are to engineer, fabricate, and improve superconducting radio frequency (SCRF) cavities in the interest of advancing accelerator technology. Improvement includes exploring possible limitations on cavity performance and mitigating such impediments. This report focuses on investigating and measuring the Seebeck Effect observed in cavity constituents titanium, niobium, and stainless steel arranged in thermocouples. These junctions exist between cavities, helium jackets, and bellows, and their connection can produce a loop of electrical current and magnetic flux spontaneously during cooling. The experimental procedure and results are described and analyzed. Implications relating the results to cavity performance are discussed.

  14. Uncooled antenna-coupled terahertz detectors with 22 μs response time based on BiSb/Sb thermocouples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huhn, Anna K.; Spickermann, Gunnar; Ihring, Andreas; Schinkel, Uwe; Meyer, Hans-Georg; Haring Bolívar, Peter

    2013-03-01

    We report on fast terahertz detectors based on antenna-coupled BiSb/Sb thermoelements operating at room temperature. A response time of the thermocouples as low as 22 μs and a noise equivalent power of 170 pW/√Hz at 1 kHz modulation frequency is measured in air at room temperature. The integration capability of these mass producible devices enables large-scale detector arrays for real-time terahertz imaging applications. Due to the fast response time, multiplexing of the detectors can be used to reduce the required readout circuits.

  15. Dimensional synthesis of a leg mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pop, F.; Lovasz, E.-Ch; Pop, C.; Dolga, V.

    2016-08-01

    An eight bar leg mechanism dimensional synthesis is presented. The mathematical model regarding the synthesis is described and the results obtained after computation are verified with help of 2D mechanism simulation in Matlab. This mechanism, inspired from proposed solution of Theo Jansen, is integrated into the structure of a 2 DOF quadruped robot. With help of the kinematic synthesis method described, it is tried to determine new dimensions for the mechanism, based on a set of initial conditions. These are established by taking into account the movement of the end point of the leg mechanism, which enters in contact with the ground, during walking. An optimization process based on the results obtained can be conducted further in order to find a better solution for the leg mechanism.

  16. Split Thickness Skin Graft to Lower Leg.

    PubMed

    Fuller, David A

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this video is to demonstrate the steps of harvesting, meshing, and applying a split thickness skin graft (STSG) to a lower leg to cover a lateral fasciotomy wound. A patient with a gunshot wound to his tibia has already undergone intramedullary rodding of the fracture and has had and medial and lateral fasciotomies for compartment syndrome. In the video, the lateral leg wound is covered with an STSG from the ipsilateral, lateral thigh. The graft is harvested with a dermatome, then meshed, and then inset for full coverage of the wound. A sterile, negative pressure dressing is applied at the conclusion of the case. The video is 5 minutes, 46 seconds duration in time and 1,922,884,000 bytes in size. Various techniques of STSG have been described. This video demonstrates a successful strategy for coverage of a lateral leg wound with an STSG and negative pressure dressing.

  17. [Physical treatment modalities for chronic leg ulcers].

    PubMed

    Dissemond, J

    2010-05-01

    An increasing numbers of physical treatment options are available for chronic leg ulcer. In this review article, compression therapy, therapeutic ultrasound, negative pressure therapy, extracorporeal shock wave therapy, electrostimulation therapy, electromagnetic therapy, photodynamic therapy, water-filtered infrared-A-radiation and hydrotherapy are discussed in terms of their practical applications and the underlying evidence. With the exception of compression therapy for most of these treatments, good scientific data are not available. However this is a widespread problem in the treatment of chronic wounds. Nevertheless, several of the described methods such as negative pressure therapy represent one of the gold standards in practical treatment of patients with chronic leg ulcers. Although the use of physical treatment modalities may improve healing in patients with chronic leg ulcers, the diagnosis and treatment of the underlying causes are essential for long-lasting success.

  18. Conjoined legs: Sirenomelia or caudal regression syndrome?

    PubMed Central

    Das, Sakti Prasad; Ojha, Niranjan; Ganesh, G Shankar; Mohanty, Ram Narayan

    2013-01-01

    Presence of single umbilical persistent vitelline artery distinguishes sirenomelia from caudal regression syndrome. We report a case of a12-year-old boy who had bilateral umbilical arteries presented with fusion of both legs in the lower one third of leg. Both feet were rudimentary. The right foot had a valgus rocker-bottom deformity. All toes were present but rudimentary. The left foot showed absence of all toes. Physical examination showed left tibia vara. The chest evaluation in sitting revealed pigeon chest and elevated right shoulder. Posterior examination of the trunk showed thoracic scoliosis with convexity to right. The patient was operated and at 1 year followup the boy had two separate legs with a good aesthetic and functional results. PMID:23960288

  19. Probabilistic Mechanical Reliability Prediction of Thermoelectric Legs

    SciTech Connect

    Jadaan, Osama M.; Wereszczak, Andrew A

    2009-05-01

    The probability of failure, Pf, for various square-arrayed thermoelectric device designs using bismuth telluride, lead telluride, or skutterudite thermoelectric materials were estimated. Only volume- or bulk-based Pf analysis was considered in this study. The effects of the choice of the thermoelectric material, the size of the leg array, the height of the thermoelectric legs, and the boundary conditions on the Pf of thermoelectric devices were investigated. Yielding of the solder contacts and mounting layer was taken into account. The modeling results showed that the use of longer legs, using skutterudites, allowing the thermoelectric device to freely deform while under a thermal gradient, and using smaller arrays promoted higher probabilities of survival.

  20. Sympathetic adaptations to one-legged training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, C. A.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine the effect of leg exercise training on sympathetic nerve responses at rest and during dynamic exercise. Six men were trained by using high-intensity interval and prolonged continuous one-legged cycling 4 day/wk, 40 min/day, for 6 wk. Heart rate, mean arterial pressure (MAP), and muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA; peroneal nerve) were measured during 3 min of upright dynamic one-legged knee extensions at 40 W before and after training. After training, peak oxygen uptake in the trained leg increased 19 +/- 2% (P < 0.01). At rest, heart rate decreased from 77 +/- 3 to 71 +/- 6 beats/min (P < 0.01) with no significant changes in MAP (91 +/- 7 to 91 +/- 11 mmHg) and MSNA (29 +/- 3 to 28 +/- 1 bursts/min). During exercise, both heart rate and MAP were lower after training (108 +/- 5 to 96 +/- 5 beats/min and 132 +/- 8 to 119 +/- 4 mmHg, respectively, during the third minute of exercise; P < 0.01). MSNA decreased similarly from rest during the first 2 min of exercise both before and after training. However, MSNA was significantly less during the third minute of exercise after training (32 +/- 2 to 22 +/- 3 bursts/min; P < 0.01). This training effect on MSNA remained when MSNA was expressed as bursts per 100 heartbeats. Responses to exercise in five untrained control subjects were not different at 0 and 6 wk. These results demonstrate that exercise training prolongs the decrease in MSNA during upright leg exercise and indicates that attenuation of MSNA to exercise reported with forearm training also occurs with leg training.