Science.gov

Sample records for cold multi-proton-pair transfer

  1. Transfer-type products accompanying cold fusion reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Adamian, G.G.; Antonenko, N.V.

    2005-12-15

    Production of nuclei heavier than the target is treated for projectile-target combinations used in cold fusion reactions leading to superheavy nuclei. These products are related to transfer-type or to asymmetry-exit-channel quasifission reactions. The production of isotopes in the transfer-type reactions emitting of {alpha} particles with large energies is discussed.

  2. Efficient inter-trap transfer of cold francium atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J.; Collister, R.; Shiells, K.; Tandecki, M.; Aubin, S.; Behr, J. A.; Gomez, E.; Gorelov, A.; Gwinner, G.; Orozco, L. A.; Pearson, M. R.; Zhao, Y.

    2016-12-01

    We report on the status of the FrPNC experiments and summarize our plans for measurements of parity non-conservation (PNC) in a sample of cold francium. The FrPNC collaboration has commissioned a laser cooling apparatus at the TRIUMF accelerator that collects and cools francium atoms for PNC experiments. We have recently demonstrated the robust, high efficiency transfer (50 %) of laser cooled francium atoms to a second laser cooling apparatus, located 0.7 m below the first, where the PNC experiments will be conducted.

  3. Resonant Energy Transfer in a System of Cold Trapped Molecules

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-17

    collisions between cold ammonia molecules and ultracold rubidium atoms, (4) creation and deceleration of velocity controlled beams of rotationally excited...affected collisions between cold ammonia molecules and ultracold rubidium atoms, (4) creation and deceleration of velocity controlled beams of...elastic and inelastic collision cross-sections between rubidium atoms (Rb) and ammonia Fig. 1: Measured decay curves and simulation results for ND3

  4. Temperature-difference-driven mass transfer through the vapor from a cold to a warm liquid.

    PubMed

    Struchtrup, Henning; Kjelstrup, Signe; Bedeaux, Dick

    2012-06-01

    Irreversible thermodynamics provides interface conditions that yield temperature and chemical potential jumps at phase boundaries. The interfacial jumps allow unexpected transport phenomena, such as the inverted temperature profile [Pao, Phys. Fluids 14, 306 (1971)] and mass transfer from a cold to a warm liquid driven by a temperature difference across the vapor phase [Mills and Phillips, Chem. Phys. Lett. 372, 615 (2002)]. Careful evaluation of the thermodynamic laws has shown [Bedeaux et al., Physica A 169, 263 (1990)] that the inverted temperature profile is observed for processes with a high heat of vaporization. In this paper, we show that cold to warm mass transfer through the vapor from a cold to a warm liquid is only possible when the heat of evaporation is sufficiently small. A necessary criterium for the size of the mass transfer coefficient is given.

  5. Heat transfer resistances in the measurements of cold helium vapour temperature in a subatmospheric process line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamczyk, A.; Pietrowicz, S.; Fydrych, J.

    2017-02-01

    The superfluid helium technology, which is essentially used in particle accelerators, requires complex cryogenic systems that include long lines transferring cold helium vapours at a subathmospheric pressure below 50 mbar. Usually in large systems the subatmospheric pressure is generated by a set of warm and cold compressors. In consequence, the heat loads to the line and especially the helium temperature in the inlet to the cold compressors are crucial parameters. In order to measure the helium temperature the temperature sensors are usually fixed to the external surface of the process lines. However, this technique can lead to unwanted measurement errors and affect the temperature measurement dynamics mainly due to low thermal conductivity of the pipe wall material, large pipe diameters and low helium density. Assembling a temperature sensor in a well (cold finger) reaching the centerline of the flowing helium is a technique that can improve the measurement quality and dynamics (response time). The paper presents the numerical simulations of heat transfers occurring in the both measurement techniques and discusses the impacts of the heat transfer resistances on the temperature measurement dynamics.

  6. Gas Flow, Particle Acceleration, and Heat Transfer in Cold Spray: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Shuo; Meyer, Morten; Li, Wenya; Liao, Hanlin; Lupoi, Rocco

    2016-06-01

    Cold spraying is increasingly attracting attentions from both scientific and industrial communities due to its unique `low-temperature' coating build-up process and its potential applications in the additive manufacturing across a variety of industries. The existing studies mainly focused on the following subjects: particle acceleration and heating, coating build-up, coating formation mechanism, coating properties, and coating applications, among which particle acceleration and heating can be regarded as the premise of the other subjects because it directly determines whether particles have sufficient energy to deposit and form the coating. Investigations on particle acceleration and heating behavior in cold spraying have been widely conducted both numerically and experimentally over decades, where many valuable conclusions were drawn. However, existing literature on this topic is vast; a systematical summery and review work is still lack so far. Besides, some curtail issues involved in modeling and experiments are still not quite clear, which needs to be further clarified. Hence, a comprehensive summary and review of the literature are very necessary. In this paper, the gas flow, particle acceleration, and heat transfer behavior in the cold spray process are systematically reviewed. Firstly, a brief introduction is given to introduce the early analytical models for predicting the gas flow and particle velocity in cold spraying. Subsequently, special attention is directed towards the application of computational fluid dynamics technique for cold spray modeling. Finally, the experimental observations and measurements in cold spraying are summarized.

  7. Cryogenic On-Orbit Liquid Depot Storage, Acquisition, and Transfer satellite (COLD-SAT) feasibility study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, William J.; Weiner, Stephen P.; Beekman, Douglas H.; Dennis, Mark F.; Martin, Timothy A.

    1990-01-01

    The Cryogenic On-Orbit Liquid Depot Storage, Acquisition, and Transfer Satellite (COLD-SAT) is an experimental spacecraft launched from an expendable launch vehicle which is designed to investigate the systems and technologies required for efficient, effective, and reliable management of cryogenic fluid in the reduced gravity space environment. The COLD-SAT program will provide the necessary data base and provide low-g proving of fluid and thermal models of cryogenic storage, transfer, and resupply concepts and processes. A conceptual approach was developed and an overview of the results of the 24 month COLD-SAT Phase A feasibility is described which includes: (1) a definition of the technology needs and the accompanying experimental 3 month baseline mission; (2) a description of the experiment subsystem, major features and rationale for satisfaction of primary and secondary experiment requirements using liquid hydrogen as the test fluid; and (3) a presentation of the conceptual design of the COLD-SAT spacecraft subsystems which support the on-orbit experiment with emphasis on areas of greatest challenge.

  8. In the shadow of giants: Superpower arms transfers and Third World conflict during the Cold War

    SciTech Connect

    Kinsella, D.T.

    1993-01-01

    This is an investigation of the impact of superpower arms transfers on interstate rivalry in the Third World during the Cold War. The study is anchored in a theoretical framework which conceives of interstate rivalry as the basis for the development of security complexes in the international system. In the case of Third World rivalries, these security complexes tend to be local in scope. The superpower security complex was global. The theoretical framework emphasizes the tendency of one security complex to encroach upon another. This study focuses on the extent to which the Cold War was externalized through the process of superpower arms transfers to local rivals. The empirical investigation consists of statistical analysis of four enduring rivalries in the Third World: those between the Arab states and Israel, Iran and Iraq, India and Pakistan, and Ethiopia and Somalia. The author employs a time-series methodology - vector autoregression - which permits a rather rigorous discrimination between cause and effect. A rigorous methodology is essential to decipher the relationship between arms transfer and interstate conflict since there is reason to suspect that causality may be mutual. Historical narratives for each of of the four rivalries facilitate an interpretation of the statistical results, but also serve to highlight anomalies. The results suggest that the impact of superpower arms transfers was most pronounced in the Middle East and the Persian Gulf. Soviet arms transfers to Egypt and Syria tended to exacerbate the Arab-Israeli rivalry. In the case of the Iran-Iraq rivalry, it was American arms transfers to Iran that were influential, but the effect appears to have been a restraining one. An action-reaction dynamic in superpower arms transfers is evident in both these cases. The statistical results are not enlightening for either the India-Pakistan or Ethiopia-Somalia rivalries. Some theoretical refinements to the security-complexes framework are suggested.

  9. Cryogenic On-Orbit Liquid Depot Storage, Acquisition, and Transfer Satellite (COLD-SAT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuster, John R.; Russ, Edwin J.; Wachter, Joseph P.

    1990-01-01

    The Cryogenic On-Orbit Liquid Depot Storage, Acquisition, and Transfer Satellite (COLD-SAT) will perform subcritical liquid hydrogen handling experiments under low gravity conditions to provide engineering data for future space transportation missions. Comprising the four Class 1 enabling experiments are tank press control, tank chilldown, tank no-vent fill, and liquid acquisition device fill/refill. The nine Class 2 enhancing experiments are tanker thermal performance, pressurization, low-gravity setting and outflow, liquid acquisition device performance, transfer line chilldown, outflow subcooling, low-gravity vented fill, fluid dumping, and advanced instrumentation. Consisting of an experiment module mated to a spacecraft bus, COLD-SAT will be placed in an initial 1300 km circular orbit by an Atlas commercial launch vehicle, and will perform experiments in a semi-autonomous mode for a period of up to six months. The three-axis controlled spacecraft bus provides electric power, control and data management, communications, and attitude control along with propulsive acceleration levels ranging from 10(exp -6) to 10(exp -4) g. It is desired to understand the effects that low acceleration levels might have on the heat and mass transfer processes involved in some of the experiments. The experiment module contains the three liquid hydrogen tanks, valves, pressurization and pumping equipment, and instrumentation. Within the highly insulated tanks are specialized fluid management equipment that might be used in future space transportation systems. At launch all the liquid hydrogen for the experiments is contained in the largest tank, which has helium-purged insulation to prevent cryo-pumping of air on the launch pad. The tank is loaded by the hydrogen tanking system used for the Centaur upper stage of the Atlas. After reaching orbit the two smaller tanks become receivers for fluid transfers, and when tanked, become the vessels for performing many of the experiments.

  10. Al-Si-Mn Alloy Coating on Aluminum Substrate Using Cold Metal Transfer (CMT) Welding Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajeev, G. P.; Kamaraj, M.; Bakshi, S. R.

    2014-06-01

    The cold metal transfer (CMT) process was explored as a weld overlay technique for synthesizing Al-Si-Mn alloy coating on a commercially pure Al plate. The effect of welding speed on the bead geometry, deposition rate, and the dilution were studied and the best parameter was used to synthesize the coatings. The CMT process can be used to produce thick coatings (>2.5 mm) without porosity and with low dilution levels. The Vickers hardness number of the Al substrate increased from 28 in the bulk to 57 in the coating. It is suggested that the CMT process can be an effective and energy-efficient technique for depositing thick coatings and is useful in weld repair of aluminum alloy components.

  11. Heat-and-mass transfer analysis from vegetable and fruit products stored in cold conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tashtoush, B.

    Heat and mass transfer process taking place during fruit and vegetable products in cold storage are studied. A mathematical model describing these processes is presented and the resulting governing equations are solved for different storing conditions. The relative humidity of the ventilating air and the temperature of the stored product bulk are found for different initial air relative humidity and airflow rates. As the product bulk depth increased up to 4.2m, the relative humidity of the ventilating air approaches the steady state value. When the relative humidity is larger than the equilibrium relative humidity value, an increase in the ventilating air rate reduces the losses of the product during the period of its storage, while larger losses occur when the relative humidity values are lower than the equilibrium ones.

  12. ``Cold Denaturation'' induces inversion of dipole and spin transfer in chiral peptide monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Soumyajit; Eckshtain-Levi, Meital; Capua, Eyal; Refaely-Abramson, Sivan; Gavrilov, Yulian; Mathew, Shinto; Paltiel, Yossi; Levy, Yaakov; Kronik, Leeor; Naaman, Ron

    Using a combination of several experimental and computational techniques, we show that the α-helix structure of oligopeptides based on alanine and aminoisobutyric acid is transformed to a more linear conformation upon cooling, due to interaction with neighboring molecules in a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) structure. This process is similar to the known ``cold denaturation'' in peptides, but here the SAM plays the role of the solvent. Our DFT-based first principles calculations show that the structural change results in a flip in the direction of the electrical dipole moment of the adsorbed molecules. The dipole flip is accompanied by an associated change in the spin channel that is preferred in electron transfer through the molecules. This is also experimentally observed via a new solid state hybrid organic-inorganic device that is based on the Hall effect, but operates with no external magnetic field or magnetic material.

  13. Cold denaturation induces inversion of dipole and spin transfer in chiral peptide monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckshtain-Levi, Meital; Capua, Eyal; Refaely-Abramson, Sivan; Sarkar, Soumyajit; Gavrilov, Yulian; Mathew, Shinto P.; Paltiel, Yossi; Levy, Yaakov; Kronik, Leeor; Naaman, Ron

    2016-02-01

    Chirality-induced spin selectivity is a recently-discovered effect, which results in spin selectivity for electrons transmitted through chiral peptide monolayers. Here, we use this spin selectivity to probe the organization of self-assembled α-helix peptide monolayers and examine the relation between structural and spin transfer phenomena. We show that the α-helix structure of oligopeptides based on alanine and aminoisobutyric acid is transformed to a more linear one upon cooling. This process is similar to the known cold denaturation in peptides, but here the self-assembled monolayer plays the role of the solvent. The structural change results in a flip in the direction of the electrical dipole moment of the adsorbed molecules. The dipole flip is accompanied by a concomitant change in the spin that is preferred in electron transfer through the molecules, observed via a new solid-state hybrid organic-inorganic device that is based on the Hall effect, but operates with no external magnetic field or magnetic material.

  14. Cold denaturation induces inversion of dipole and spin transfer in chiral peptide monolayers

    PubMed Central

    Eckshtain-Levi, Meital; Capua, Eyal; Refaely-Abramson, Sivan; Sarkar, Soumyajit; Gavrilov, Yulian; Mathew, Shinto P.; Paltiel, Yossi; Levy, Yaakov; Kronik, Leeor; Naaman, Ron

    2016-01-01

    Chirality-induced spin selectivity is a recently-discovered effect, which results in spin selectivity for electrons transmitted through chiral peptide monolayers. Here, we use this spin selectivity to probe the organization of self-assembled α-helix peptide monolayers and examine the relation between structural and spin transfer phenomena. We show that the α-helix structure of oligopeptides based on alanine and aminoisobutyric acid is transformed to a more linear one upon cooling. This process is similar to the known cold denaturation in peptides, but here the self-assembled monolayer plays the role of the solvent. The structural change results in a flip in the direction of the electrical dipole moment of the adsorbed molecules. The dipole flip is accompanied by a concomitant change in the spin that is preferred in electron transfer through the molecules, observed via a new solid-state hybrid organic–inorganic device that is based on the Hall effect, but operates with no external magnetic field or magnetic material. PMID:26916536

  15. A simplified heat transfer model for predicting temperature change inside food package kept in cold room.

    PubMed

    Raval, A H; Solanki, S C; Yadav, Rajvir

    2013-04-01

    A simple analytical heat flow model for a closed rectangular food package containing fruits or vegetables is proposed for predicting time temperature distribution during transient cooling in a controlled environment cold room. It is based on the assumption of only conductive heat transfer inside a closed food package with effective thermal properties, and convective and radiative heat transfer at the outside of the package. The effective thermal conductivity of the food package is determined by evaluating its effective thermal resistance to heat conduction in the packages. Food packages both as an infinite slab and a finite slab have been investigated. The finite slab solution has been obtained as the product of three infinite slab solutions describe in ASHRAE guide and data book. Time temperature variation has been determined and is presented graphically. The cooling rate and the half cooling time were also obtained. These predicted values, are compared with the experimentally measured values for both the finite and infinite closed packages containing oranges. An excellent agreement between them validated the simple proposed model.

  16. On the mechanisms of sensible heat transfer between snow and a cold atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helgason, W.; Pomeroy, J. W.

    2009-12-01

    The mechanisms of heat exchange between the atmosphere and the snowpack during cold, stable periods are imperfectly understood. Air flow over smooth snow surfaces under weak synoptic forcing creates weak or intermittently turbulent mixing conditions, strong thermal stratification, interaction of non-turbulent motions, and the possible decoupling of the boundary layer from the surface. These conditions pose serious challenges for modeling snow thermodynamics (including melt) and snow-atmosphere interactions. Numerous modellers have discovered that realistic energy balance simulations are extremely sensitive to the nature of the stability corrections used, and in many cases have found it necessary to include a windless exchange coefficient in order to maintain some sensible heat transfer to the snowpack during periods of low mechanical mixing. Snow energetics under cold atmospheric conditions in mid-winter were investigated by making direct measurement of all the snow mass and energy balance components at a homogeneous, flat, and open snow field near Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada. The energy balance was dominated by the net radiation flux, which was usually negative due to longwave radiation losses during clear sky conditions. Owing to the aerodynamically smooth surface and often stable conditions, the measured turbulent heat fluxes were very small (much smaller than the net radiation flux). Surface temperatures declined dramatically under strongly negative net radiation conditions and were poorly coupled to the atmospheric temperature, however the near-surface internal temperatures of the snowpack were not observed to cool significantly, but rather they tracked near to the air temperature. In order to maintain the observed thermal conditions of the snowpack, the true sensible heat flux to the snowpack would have to be much larger than that which was measured by eddy correlation technique and could be expected to closely mirror the net longwave radiation. The

  17. Luminescence studies of trace gases through metastable transfer in cold helium jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilde, Scott Colton

    Among the elements, Helium has the largest steps among its internal energy structure that can keep for long periods of time, hence the metastable helium moniker. It is referred to as a "nano-grenade" in some circles because of how much energy it can deliver to a space roughly the size of an atom. This work demonstrates a method to create metastable helium abundantly and it is used to excite trace amounts of oxygen to the point where the signal received from the oxygen was larger than the signal received from the helium in a cold atomized jet. Further cooling of the jet and turbulence added by a liquid helium surface worked to increase the oxygen signal and decrease the helium signal. This work investigates the possibility of forming a strong metastable helium source from a flowing helium gas jet excited by passing through ring electrodes introduced into a cryogenic environment using evaporated helium as a buffer gas. Prior study of luminescence from trace gases at cold helium temperatures is virtually absent and so it is the motivation for this work to blaze the trail in this subject. The absence of ionic oxygen spectral lines from the transfer of energy that was well over the first ionization potential of oxygen made for a deeper understanding of collision dynamics with multiple collision partners. This opened the possibility of using the high energy states of oxygen after metastable transfer as a lasing transition previously unavailable and a preliminary analysis suggested that the threshold for lasing action should be easily overcome if feedback were introduced by an optical cavity. To better understand the thermodynamics of the jet it was proposed to use diatomic nitrogen as an in situ thermometer, investigating whether the rotational degrees of freedom of the nitrogen molecule were in thermal equilibrium with the surrounding environment. If the gas was truly in thermodynamic equilibrium then the temperature given by the method of using collisions of a buffer

  18. Spent Nuclear Fuel Dry Transfer System Cold Demonstration Project Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen, Max R; McKinnon, M. A.

    1999-12-01

    The spent nuclear fuel dry transfer system (DTS) provides an interface between large and small casks and between storage-only and transportation casks. It permits decommissioning of reactor pools after shutdown and allows the use of large storage-only casks for temporary onsite storage of spent nuclear fuel irrespective of reactor or fuel handling limitations at a reactor site. A cold demonstration of the DTS prototype was initiated in August 1996 at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The major components demonstrated included the fuel assembly handling subsystem, the shield plug/lid handling subsystem, the cask interface subsystem, the demonstration control subsystem, a support frame, and a closed circuit television and lighting system. The demonstration included a complete series of DTS operations from source cask receipt and opening through fuel transfer and closure of the receiving cask. The demonstration included both normal operations and recovery from off-normal events. It was designed to challenge the system to determine whether there were any activities that could be made to jeopardize the activities of another function or its safety. All known interlocks were challenged. The equipment ran smoothly and functioned as designed. A few "bugs" were corrected. Prior to completion of the demonstration testing, a number of DTS prototype systems were modified to apply lessons learned to date. Additional testing was performed to validate the modifications. In general, all the equipment worked exceptionally well. The demonstration also helped confirm cost estimates that had been made at several points in the development of the system.

  19. Coherence and spectral weight transfer in the dynamic structure factor of cold lattice bosons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaleski, T. A.; Kopeć, T. K.

    2017-01-01

    Ultracold atoms have been used to create novel correlated quantum phases allowing to address many solid-state physics problems using the quasi-particle concept, which is the foundation of our understanding of many-body quantum systems. For bosons, the simplest kinds of excited states involve two particles and they are connected to the dynamic structure factor S (k , ω) , measured using Bragg spectroscopy, similarly to the angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) in solid state physics - a major tool in the study of high-Tc cuprates. Calculation of S (k , ω) requires a significant numerical effort to determine multidimensional convolutions of momentum and frequency dependent constituents functions, which we achieve using parallelized fast Fourier transform. As a result, we are able to show that spectral weight transfer between low and high energies is an intrinsic property of the strongly correlated Bose system in close analogy to the doped Mott-Hubbard electronic insulator. Furthermore, the appearance of sharp coherence peaks in the superfluid phase of the cold bosons closely resembles the formation of sharply defined quasiparticle excitations below Tc in cuprates suggesting an intimate connection between the intrinsic nature of these seemingly different systems.

  20. Towards thermal design optimization of tubular digesters in cold climates: a heat transfer model.

    PubMed

    Perrigault, Thibault; Weatherford, Vergil; Martí-Herrero, Jaime; Poggio, Davide

    2012-11-01

    A cold climate, low cost, tubular digester is monitored and temperatures from different parts of the slurry, greenhouse, and adobe walls are presented, discussing the thermal performance of the digester. The slurry exhibits a vertical gradient of 6°C, with a mean value of 24.5°C, while the ambient temperature varies from 10°C to 30°C, showing the efficiency of the system as a solar heat collector with thermal inertia. A simple time-dependent thermal model is developed using inputs of solar radiation, wind velocity, ambient temperature, and digester geometry. The model outputs include temperatures of the slurry, the biogas, its holding membrane and the greenhouse air, wall and cover. Radiative, convective and conductive heat transfer phenomena are considered between all system elements. The model has 0.47°C (2%) standard error for the average slurry temperature. This model can be used to predict the influence of geometry and materials on the performance of the digester.

  1. Achieving High Strength Joint of Pure Copper Via Laser-Cold Metal Transfer Arc Hybrid Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yulong; Chen, Cong; Gao, Ming; Zeng, Xiaoyan

    2016-06-01

    Fiber laser-cold metal transfer arc hybrid welding of pure copper was studied. Weld porosity was tested by X-ray nondestructive testing. Microstructure and fracture features were observed by scanning electron microscopy. Mechanical properties were evaluated by cross weld tensile test. Full penetrated and continuous welds were obtained by hybrid welding once the laser power reached 2 kW, while they could not be obtained by laser welding alone, even though the laser power reached 5 kW. The ultimate tensile strength (UTS), the yield strength (YS), and the elongation of the best hybrid weld material were up to 227, 201 MPa, and 21.5 pct, respectively. The joint efficiencies in UTS and YS of hybrid weld were up to 84 and 80 pct of the BM, respectively. The fracture location changes from the fusion zone to the heat-affected zone with the increase of laser power. Besides, the mechanisms of process stability and porosity suppression were clarified by laser-arc interaction and pool behavior. The strengthening mechanism was discussed by microstructure characteristics.

  2. Research on heat transfer characteristics and cold trap capacity of a water catcher during vacuum pre-cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Enhai; Liu, Yin; Wang, Changzhong; Liu, Shiqi

    2017-01-01

    Effect of vacuum pre-cooling process on apples was a complex process of heat and mass transfers. The research is based on the physical properties of apples and their heat and mass transfer mechanisms during vacuum pre-cooling. As for the heat transfer characteristics of a water catcher in vacuum pre-cooling, the research studied the heat transfer mechanism and calculated the cold trap capacity by experimental means, and it cold trap capacity were evaluated to supply references for future research into the practical applications of such vacuum pre-cooling techniques. The results provide a theoretical basis for exploring better pre-cooling process conditions and the design of water catchers. The experimental results show that, when the wall temperature of the water catcher is -5°C, the optimal cold trap capacity is about 90.72g and the required cooling capacity is 210.13W in the vacuum pre-cooling of 201.9g of apples.

  3. Rhinovirus contamination of surfaces in homes of adults with natural colds: transfer of virus to fingertips during normal daily activities.

    PubMed

    Winther, B; McCue, K; Ashe, K; Rubino, J; Hendley, J O

    2011-05-01

    Multiple surfaces contaminated with rhinovirus were detected in hotel rooms by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) following occupancy by a cold sufferer. Whether infectious rhinovirus contaminates surfaces in homes and is transferred from surfaces to fingertips through normal activities is not known. Nasal secretions from 30 subjects with new colds were tested for rhinovirus genome by RT-PCR; infectious rhinovirus was sought with tissue cultures. Each subject identified 10 sites in their home touched during the preceding 24 hr. Samples from sites were tested for rhinovirus by RT-PCR and cell culture. Later, each subject's mucus (stored at -70°C) was deposited on surfaces for testing transfer to fingertips through daily life activities such as flipping a light switch, touching the telephone keypad, and holding the telephone handset. Nasal secretions from 16/30 subjects were positive for rhinovirus by RT-PCR; 66 (41%) of 160 surfaces in homes were positive. Contaminated surfaces included doorknobs (6 positive/18 tested), refrigerator door handles (8/14), TV remote controls (5/10), and bathroom faucets (8/10). Five (19%) of 26 RT-PCR positive sites from culture positive subjects were positive in cell culture. Nasal mucus from six culture positive subjects was deposited on objects. Infectious rhinovirus was detected on 22% of fingertips following contact with objects contaminated for 1 hr; transfer dropped to 3% after 24 hr of contamination, and 0% after 48 hr. Infectious rhinovirus found on surfaces in homes of people with colds can be transferred to fingertips, but infectivity of virus in mucus declines by 24 hr after deposition.

  4. Feasibility study for a Cryogenic On-Orbit Liquid Depot-Storage, Acquisition and Transfer (COLD-SAT) satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rybak, S. C.; Willen, G. S.; Follett, W. H.; Hanna, G. J.; Cady, E. C.; Distefano, E.; Meserole, J. S.

    1990-01-01

    This feasibility study presents the conceptual design of a spacecraft for performing a series of cryogenic fluid management flight experiments. This spacecraft, the Cryogenic On-Orbit Liquid Depot-Storage, Acquisition, and Transfer (COLD-SAT) satellite, will use liquid hydrogen as the test fluid, be launched on a Delta expendable launch vehicle, and conduct a series of experiments over a two to three month period. These experiments will investigate the physics of subcritical cryogens in the low gravity space environment to characterize their behavior and to correlate the data with analytical and numerical models of in-space cryogenic fluid management systems. Primary technologies addressed by COLD-SAT are: (1) pressure control; (2) chilldown; (3) no-vent fill; (4) liquid acquisition device fill; (5) pressurization; (6) low-g fill and drain; (7) liquid acquisition device expulsion; (8) line chilldown; (9) thermodynamic state control; and (10) fluid dumping.

  5. Wetting and Interfacial Characteristics of Mg AZ61 Alloy/Galvanized Steel in Cold Metal Transfer Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Qiaoli; Yang, Fan; Cao, Rui; Chen, Jianhong; Guo, Tingbiao

    2015-09-01

    The dynamic sessile drop method was used to study the wetting behavior of galvanized steel by molten Mg AZ61 alloy under cold metal transfer condition. The interfacial microstructures were also analyzed by using scanning electron microscope and energy dispersive spectrometry. The observed results showed that the wetting behavior was directly determined by the wire feed speed (or the heat input). The Al-Fe intermetallic layer and Zn-rich zone were observed both at the interface and at the close of triple line. The formations of these interfacial characteristics satisfy the thermodynamic characteristic of Mg-Al/Fe and Mg-Zn/Fe systems.

  6. A portable cryostat for the cold transfer of polarized solid HD targets: HDice-I

    SciTech Connect

    Bass, C. D.; Bade, C.; Blecher, M.; Caracappa, A.; D'Angelo, A.; Deur, A.; Dezern, G.; Glueckler, H.; Hanretty, C.; Ho, D.; Honig, A.; Kageya, T.; Khandaker, M.; Laine, V.; Lincoln, F.; Lowry, M. M.; Mahon, J. C.; O'Connell, T.; Pap, M.; Peng, P.; Preedom, B.; Sandorfi, A. M.; Seyfarth, H.; Stroeher, H.; Thorn, C. E.; Wei, X.; Whisnant, C. S.

    2014-02-01

    We developed a device with moveable liquid nitrogen and liquid helium volumes that is capable of reaching over 2 m into the coldest regions of a cryostat or dilution refrigerator and reliably extracting or installing a target of solid, polarized hydrogen deuteride (HD). This Transfer Cryostat incorporates a cylindrical neodymium rare-earth magnet that is configured as a Halbach dipole, which is maintained at 77 K and produces a 0.1 T field around the HD target. Multiple layers provide a hermetic 77 K-shield as the device is used to maintain a target at 2 K during a transfer between cryostats. Our tests with frozen-spin HD show very little polarization loss for either H (-1±2%, relative) or D (0±3%, relative) over typical transfer periods. Multiple target transfers with this apparatus have shown an overall reliability of about 95% per transfer, which is a significant improvement over earlier versions of the device.

  7. A portable cryostat for the cold transfer of polarized solid HD targets: HDice-I

    SciTech Connect

    Bass, Christopher D.; Sandorfi, Andy M.; Bade, C.; Blecher, M.; Caracappa, A.; D'Angelo, A.; Deur, A.; Dezern, G.; Glueckler, H.; Hanretty, C.; Ho, D.; Kageya, T.; Khandaker, M.; Laine, V.; Lincoln, F.; Lowry, M. M.; Mahon, J. C.; Connell, T. O.; Peng, P.; Preedom, B.; Seyfarth, H.; Stroeher, H.; Thorn, C. E.; Wei, X.; Whisnant, C. S.

    2014-02-01

    A device has been developed with moveable liquid nitrogen and liquid helium volumes that is capable of reaching over two meters into the coldest regions of a cryostat or dilution refrigerator and reliably extracting or installing a target of solid, polarized hydrogen deuteride (HD). This Transfer Cryostat incorporates a cylindrical neodymium rare-earth magnet that is configured as a Halbach dipole, which is maintained at 77 K and produces a 0.1 T field around the HD target. Multiple layers provide a hermetic 77 K-shield as the device is used to maintain a target at 2 K during a transfer between cryostats. Tests with frozen-spin HD show negligible polarization loss for either H or D over typical transfer periods. Multiple target transfers with this apparatus have shown an overall reliability of about 95% per transfer, which is a significant improvement over earlier versions of the device.

  8. Fluid and mass transfer into the cold mantle wedge of subduction zones: budgets and seismic constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abers, G. A.; Hacker, B. R.; Van Keken, P. E.; Nakajima, J.; Kita, S.

    2015-12-01

    Dehydration of subducting plates should hydrate the shallow overlying mantle wedge where mantle is cold. In the shallow mantle wedge hydrous phases, notably serpentines, chlorite, brucite and talc should be stable to form a significant reservoir for H2O. Beneath this cold nose thermal models suggest only limited slab dehydration occurs at depths less than ca. 80 km except in warm subduction zones, but fluids may flow updip from deeper within the subducting plate to hydrate the shallow mantle. We estimate the total water storage capacity in cold noses, at temperatures where hydrous phases are stable, to be roughly 2-3% the mass of the global ocean. At modern subduction flux rates its full hydration could be achieved in 50-100 Ma if all subducting water devolatilized in the upper 100 km flows into the wedge; these estimates have at least a factor of two uncertainty. To investigate the extent to which wedge hydration actually occurs we compile and generate seismic images of forearc mantle regions. The compilation includes P- and S-velocity images with good sampling below the Moho and above the downgoing slab in forearcs, from active-source imaging, local earthquake tomography and receiver functions, while avoiding areas of complex tectonics. Well-resolved images exist for Cascadia, Alaska, the Andes, Central America, North Island New Zealand, and Japan. We compare the observed velocities to those predicted from thermal-petrologic models. Among these forearcs, Cascadia stands out as having upper-mantle seismic velocities lower than overriding crust, consistent with high (>50%) hydration. Most other forearcs show Vp close to 8.0 km/s and Vp/Vs of 1.73-1.80. We compare these observations to velocities predicted from thermal-mineralogical models. Velocities are slightly slower than expected for dry peridotite and allow 10-20% hydration, but also could also be explained as relict accreted rock, or delaminated, relaminated, or offscraped crustal material mixed with mantle

  9. Heat transfer model of hyporthermic intracarotid infusion of cold saline for stroke therapy.

    PubMed

    Neimark, Matthew A; Konstas, Angelos-Aristeidis; Laine, Andrew F; Pile-Spellman, John

    2006-01-01

    A 3-dimensional hemispheric computational brain model is developed to simulate infusion of cold saline in the carotid arteries in terms of brain cooling for stroke therapy. The model is based on the Pennes bioheat equation, with four tissue layers: white matter, gray matter, skull, and scalp. The stroke lesion is simulated by reducing blood flow to a selected volume of the brain by a factor of one-third, and brain metabolism by 50%. A stroke penumbra was also generated surrounding the core lesion (blood volume reduction 25%, metabolism reduction 20%). The finite difference method was employed to solve the system of partial differential equations. This model demonstrated a reduction in brain temperature, at the stroke lesion, to 32 degrees C in less than 10 minutes.

  10. "Hot or cold": how do charge transfer states at the donor-acceptor interface of an organic solar cell dissociate?

    PubMed

    Bässler, Heinz; Köhler, Anna

    2015-11-21

    Electron transfer from an excited donor to an acceptor in an organic solar cell (OSC) is an exothermic process, determined by the difference in the electronegativities of donor and acceptor. It has been suggested that the associated excess energy facilitates the escape of the initially generated electron-hole pair from their mutual coulomb well. Recent photocurrent excitation spectroscopy on conjugated polymer/PCBM cells challenged this view. In this perspective we shall briefly outline the strengths and weaknesses of relevant experimental approaches and concepts. We shall enforce the notion that the charge separating state is a vibrationally cold charge transfer (CT) state. It can easily dissociate provided that (i) there is electrostatic screening at the interface and (ii) the charge carriers are delocalized, e.g. if the donor is a well ordered conjugated polymer. Both effects diminish the coulomb attraction and assure that the in-built electric field existing in the OSC under short current condition is already sufficient to separate most the CT states. The remaining CT excitations relax towards tail states of the disorder controlled density of states distribution, such as excimer forming states, that are more tightly bound and have longer lifetimes.

  11. Cold Weather Wind Turbines: A Joint NASA/NSF/DOE Effort in Technology Transfer and Commercialization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flynn, Michael; Bubenheim, David; Chiang, Erick; Goldman, Peter; Kohout, Lisa; Norton, Gary; Kliss, Mark (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Renewable energy sources and their integration with other power sources to support remote communities is of interest for Mars applications as well as Earth communities. The National Science Foundation (NSF), NASA, and the Department of Energy (DOE) have been jointly supporting development of a 100 kW cold weather wind turbine through grants and SBIRs independently managed by each agency but coordinated by NASA. The NSF grant addressed issues associated with the South Pole application and a 3 kW direct drive unit is being tested there in anticipation of the 100 kW unit operation. The DOE-NREL contract focused on development of the 100 kW direct drive generator. The NASA SBIR focused on the development of the 100 kW direct drive wind turbine. The success of this effort has required coordination and team involvement of federal agencies and the industrial partners. Designs of the wind turbine and component performance testing results will be presented. Plans for field testing of wind turbines, based on this design, in village energy systems in Alaska and in energy production at the South Pole Station will be discussed. Also included will be a discussion of terrestrial and space use of hybrid energy systems, including renewable energy sources, such as the wind turbine, to support remote communities.

  12. Dry and wet heat transfer through clothing dependent on the clothing properties under cold conditions.

    PubMed

    Richards, Mark G M; Rossi, René; Meinander, Harriet; Broede, Peter; Candas, Victor; den Hartog, Emiel; Holmér, Ingvar; Nocker, Wolfgang; Havenith, George

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of moisture on the heat transfer through clothing in relation to the water vapour resistance, type of underwear, location of the moisture and climate. This forms part of the work performed for work package 2 of the European Union THERMPROTECT project. Thermal manikin results of dry and wet heat loss are presented from different laboratories for a range of 2-layer clothing with similar dry insulations but different water vapour permeabilities and absorptive properties. The results obtained from the different manikins are generally consistent with each other. For each climate, total wet heat loss is predominately dependent on the permeability of the outer layer. At 10 degrees C, the apparent evaporative heat loss is markedly higher than expected from evaporation alone (measured at 34 degrees C), which is attributed to condensation within the clothing and to increased conductivity of the wet clothing layers.

  13. COLD-SAT: Cryogenic On-Orbit Liquid Depot-Storage, Acquisition and Transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    NASA is entering an era of expanded space activity. Space-based transportation systems will carry cargo and humans from low earth orbit to geosynchronous orbit, to lunar bases, and to the Martian surface. Support of these future missions will require new, long lived, on-orbit systems using subcritical cryogens for propellants and life support systems. Such on-orbit systems present low gravity fluid management challenges of long term storage and efficient fluid transfer and supply techniques. Development of these cryogenic systems requires on-orbit experimentation to demonstrate the capability of performing these fluid management tasks and to obtain the engineering data base required to correlate analytical tools used for system design.

  14. Cryogenic on-orbit liquid depot storage acquisition and transfer (COLD-SAT) experiment subsystem instrumentation and wire harness design report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, Lawrence G.

    1994-01-01

    Subcritical cryogens such as liquid hydrogen (LH2) and liquid oxygen (LO2) are required for space based transportation propellant, reactant, and life support systems. Future long-duration space missions will require on-orbit systems capable of long-term cryogen storage and efficient fluid transfer capabilities. COLD-SAT, which stands for cryogenic orbiting liquid depot-storage acquisition and transfer, is a free-flying liquid hydrogen management flight experiment. Experiments to determine optimum methods of fluid storage and transfer will be performed on the COLD-SAT mission. The success of the mission is directly related to the type and accuracy of measurements made. The instrumentation and measurement techniques used are therefore critical to the success of the mission. This paper presents the results of the COLD-SAT experiment subsystem instrumentation and wire harness design effort. Candidate transducers capable of fulfilling the COLD-SAT experiment measurement requirements are identified. Signal conditioning techniques, data acquisition requirements, and measurement uncertainty analysis are presented. Electrical harnessing materials and wiring techniques for the instrumentation designed to minimize heat conduction to the cryogenic tanks and provide optimum measurement accuracy are listed.

  15. Cryogenic on-orbit liquid depot storage acquisition and transfer (COLD-SAT) experiment subsystem instrumentation and wire harness design report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, Lawrence G.

    1994-03-01

    Subcritical cryogens such as liquid hydrogen (LH2) and liquid oxygen (LO2) are required for space based transportation propellant, reactant, and life support systems. Future long-duration space missions will require on-orbit systems capable of long-term cryogen storage and efficient fluid transfer capabilities. COLD-SAT, which stands for cryogenic orbiting liquid depot-storage acquisition and transfer, is a free-flying liquid hydrogen management flight experiment. Experiments to determine optimum methods of fluid storage and transfer will be performed on the COLD-SAT mission. The success of the mission is directly related to the type and accuracy of measurements made. The instrumentation and measurement techniques used are therefore critical to the success of the mission. This paper presents the results of the COLD-SAT experiment subsystem instrumentation and wire harness design effort. Candidate transducers capable of fulfilling the COLD-SAT experiment measurement requirements are identified. Signal conditioning techniques, data acquisition requirements, and measurement uncertainty analysis are presented. Electrical harnessing materials and wiring techniques for the instrumentation designed to minimize heat conduction to the cryogenic tanks and provide optimum measurement accuracy are listed.

  16. Investigation of the effect of a bend in a transfer line that separates a pulse tube cold head and a pressure wave generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dev, A. A.; Atrey, M. D.; Vanapalli, S.

    2017-02-01

    A transfer line between a pulse tube cold head and a pressure wave generator is usually required to isolate the cold head from the vibrations of the compressor. Although it is a common practice to use a thin and narrow straight tube, a bent tube would allow design flexibility and easy mounting of the cold head, such as in a split Stirling type pulse tube cryocooler. In this paper, we report a preliminary investigation on the effect of the bending of the tube on the flow transfer characteristics. A numerical study using commercial computational fluid dynamics model is performed to gain insight into the flow characteristics in the bent tube. Oscillating flow experiments are performed with a straight and a bent tube at a filling pressure of 15 bar and an operating frequency of 40, 50 and 60 Hz. The data and the corresponding numerical simulations point to the hypothesis that the secondary flow in the bent tube causes a decrease in flow at a fixed pressure amplitude.

  17. A 1. 5--4 Kelvin detachable cold-sample transfer system: Application to inertially confined fusion with spin-polarized hydrogens fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, N.; Barden, J.; Fan, Q.; Honig, A.

    1990-01-01

    A compact cold-transfer apparatus for engaging and retrieving samples at liquid helium temperatures (1.5--4K), maintaining the samples at such temperatures for periods of hours, and subsequently inserting them in diverse apparatuses followed by disengagement, is described. The properties of several thermal radiation-insulating shrouds, necessary for very low sample temperatures, are presented. The immediate intended application is transportable target-shells containing highly spin-polarized deuterons in solid HD or D{sub 2} for inertially confined fusion (ICF) experiments. The system is also valuable for unpolarized high-density fusion fuels, as well as for other applications which are discussed. 9 refs., 6 figs.

  18. Effects of cold exposure on feed protein degradation, microbial protein synthesis and transfer of plasma urea to the rumen of sheep.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, P M; Christopherson, R J; Milligan, L P

    1982-05-01

    1. Three diets of barley-canola-seed (Brassica campestris), lucerne (Medicago sativa) or chopped brome-grass (Bromus inermis) were given at intervals of 3 h to closely-shorn Suffolk wethers held at a temperature of 1-5 degree (cold) or 22-24 degree (warm). Apparent digestibility of organic matter (OM) and nitrogen was reduced by 0.08-0.05 and 0.04 units respectively for lucerne and brome-grass diets given to cold-exposed sheep, but no treatment effects on digestibility were observed for the barley-CSM diet. Measurements achieved using infusion of the digesta markers 58Co-EDTA and 103Ru-phenanthroline (103Ru-P) showed that cold exposure depressed apparent OM digestion in the stomach and intestines by 33 and 42 g/d for the lucerne diet, and 13 and 35 g/d for the brome-grass diet respectively. 2. The turnover time (h) of the 103Ru-P marker in the rumen of warm sheep was 38.9 for barley-CSM, 18.4 for lucerne, and 15.6 for brome-grass. In cold-exposed sheep, 103Ru-P turnover time (h) tended to be reduced to 32.3, 12.3 and 15.3 for the three diets, respectively. OM fermentation in the stomach was highly related to 103RU-P turnover time for lucerne and brome-grass diets. 3. Cold exposure increased the escape of dietary N from the abomasum by 0.04 and 0.09 of dietary N intake for sheep given lucerne and brome-grass diets respectively. Dietary N degradation was closely related to 103Ru-P turnover time for lucerne, and to the proportion of large particles in rumen digesta for the brome-grass diet. Estimates of feed N degradation made by use of information on the rate of fermentation of the diet in nylon bags and 103Ru-P turnover time were consistently lower than those observed in vivo for barley-CSM and lucerne diets. Intestinal digestibility of non-ammonia N was not significantly changed by cold exposure. 4. Transfer of urea from plasma to the rumen was 1.4-2.5 g N/d for the barley-CSM and lucerne diets, but the value for brome-grass was 4.5-4.9 g N/d. Cold exposure did not

  19. Cold Stress

    MedlinePlus

    ... Publications and Products Programs Contact NIOSH NIOSH COLD STRESS Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Workers who ... cold environments may be at risk of cold stress. Extreme cold weather is a dangerous situation that ...

  20. Cryogenic On-Orbit Liquid Depot-Storage, Acquisition and Transfer (COLD-SAT) Experiment Conceptual Design and Feasibility Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kramer, Edward (Editor)

    1998-01-01

    The cryogenic fluid management technologies required for the exploration of the solar system can only be fully developed via space-based experiments. A dedicated spacecraft is the most efficient way to perform these experiments. This report documents the extended conceptual design of the COLD-SAT spacecraft, capable of meeting these experimental requirements. All elements, including the spacecraft, ground segment, launch site modifications and launch vehicle operations, and flight operations are included. Greatly expanded coverage is provided for those areas unique to this cryogenic spacecraft, such as the experiment system, attitude control system, and spacecraft operations. Supporting analyses are included as are testing requirements, facilities surveys, and proposed project timelines.

  1. Experimental comparison of the MIG, friction stir welding, cold metal transfer and hybrid laser-MIG processes for AA 6005-T6 aluminium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caruso, Serafino; Sgambitterra, Emanuele; Rinaldi, Sergio; Gallone, Antonello; Viscido, Lucio; Filice, Luigino; Umbrello, Domenico

    2016-10-01

    In this study, the mechanical properties of welded joints of AA 6005-T6 aluminum alloy obtained with hybrid laser-MIG and cold metal transfer (CMT) welding were analyzed. The performance of hybrid laser-MIG and CMT welded joints were identified using tensile, bending, shear and fatigue life tests. Taking into account the process conditions and requirements, hybrid laser-MIG and CMT welding processes were compared with friction stir welding (FSW) and conventional metal inert gas (MIG) welding processes, shown in a previous work, to understand the advantages and disadvantages of the processes for welding applications of studied Al alloy. Better tensile, bending and shear strength and fatigue life behavior were obtained with hybrid laser-MIG and FSW welded joints compared with conventional MIG processes.

  2. Senstitivity analysis of horizontal heat and vapor transfer coefficients for a cloud-topped marine boundary layer during cold-air outbreaks. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Y. V.

    1986-01-01

    The effects of external parameters on the surface heat and vapor fluxes into the marine atmospheric boundary layer (MABL) during cold-air outbreaks are investigated using the numerical model of Stage and Businger (1981a). These fluxes are nondimensionalized using the horizontal heat (g1) and vapor (g2) transfer coefficient method first suggested by Chou and Atlas (1982) and further formulated by Stage (1983a). In order to simplify the problem, the boundary layer is assumed to be well mixed and horizontally homogeneous, and to have linear shoreline soundings of equivalent potential temperature and mixing ratio. Modifications of initial surface flux estimates, time step limitation, and termination conditions are made to the MABL model to obtain accurate computations. The dependence of g1 and g2 in the cloud topped boundary layer on the external parameters (wind speed, divergence, sea surface temperature, radiative sky temperature, cloud top radiation cooling, and initial shoreline soundings of temperature, and mixing ratio) is studied by a sensitivity analysis, which shows that the uncertainties of horizontal transfer coefficients caused by changes in the parameters are reasonably small.

  3. Common Cold

    MedlinePlus

    ... nose, coughing - everyone knows the symptoms of the common cold. It is probably the most common illness. In ... avoid colds. There is no cure for the common cold. For relief, try Getting plenty of rest Drinking ...

  4. Common cold

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000678.htm Common cold To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The common cold most often causes a runny nose, nasal congestion, ...

  5. Electronic Equipment Cold Plates

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-04-01

    equations for such a flow regiae. For laainar flow and Moderate teaperature differwwe« between the well «nd coolant, a aodifled Sieder -Tate...con- figuration. The heat-transfer coefficients, therefore, were determined by using both the Sieder -Tate and McAdams equations and the coaputed...values used In the analytical predictions. As with th* previous cold Plates, the Sieder -Tate equation gave too low of values for the heat- transfer

  6. Cold injuries.

    PubMed

    Kruse, R J

    1995-01-01

    There are two categories of cold injury. The first is hypothermia, which is a systemic injury to cold, and the second is frostbite, which is a local injury. Throughout history, entire armies, from George Washington to the Germans on the Russian Front in World War II, have fallen prey to prolonged cold exposure. Cold injury is common and can occur in all seasons if ambient temperature is lower than the core body temperature. In the 1985 Boston Marathon, even though it was 76 degrees and sunny, there were 75 runners treated for hypothermia. In general, humans adapt poorly to cold exposure. Children are at particular risk because of their relatively greater surface area/body mass ratio, causing them to cool even more rapidly than adults. Because of this, the human's best defense against cold injury is to limit his/her exposure to cold and to dress appropriately. If cold injury has occurred and is mild, often simple passive rewarming such as dry blankets and a warm room are sufficient treatment.

  7. Cold intolerance

    MedlinePlus

    Some causes of cold intolerance are: Anemia Anorexia nervosa Blood vessel problems, such as Raynaud phenomenon Chronic severe illness General poor health Underactive thyroid ( hypothyroidism ) Problem with the hypothalamus (a part ...

  8. Cold injuries.

    PubMed

    Long, William B; Edlich, Richard F; Winters, Kathryne L; Britt, L D

    2005-01-01

    Exposure to cold can produce a variety of injuries that occur as a result of man's inability to adapt to cold. These injuries can be divided into localized injury to a body part, systemic hypothermia, or a combination of both. Body temperature may fall as a result of heat loss by radiation, evaporation, conduction, and convection. Hypothermia or systemic cold injury occurs when the core body temperature has decreased to 35 degrees C (95 degrees F) or less. The causes of hypothermia are either primary or secondary. Primary, or accidental, hypothermia occurs in healthy individuals inadequately clothed and exposed to severe cooling. In secondary hypothermia, another illness predisposes the individual to accidental hypothermia. Hypothermia affects multiple organs with symptoms of hypothermia that vary according to the severity of cold injury. The diagnosis of hypothermia is easy if the patient is a mountaineer who is stranded in cold weather. However, it may be more difficult in an elderly patient who has been exposed to a cold environment. In either case, the rectal temperature should be checked with a low-reading thermometer. The general principals of prehospital management are to (1) prevent further heat loss, (2) rewarm the body core temperature in advance of the shell, and (3) avoid precipitating ventricular fibrillation. There are two general techniques of rewarming--passive and active. The mechanisms of peripheral cold injury can be divided into phenomena that affect cells and extracellular fluids (direct effects) and those that disrupt the function of the organized tissue and the integrity of the circulation (indirect effects). Generally, no serious damage is seen until tissue freezing occurs. The mildest form of peripheral cold injury is frostnip. Chilblains represent a more severe form of cold injury than frostnip and occur after exposure to nonfreezing temperatures and damp conditions. Immersion (trench) foot, a disease of the sympathetic nerves and blood

  9. Cold urticaria.

    PubMed

    Claudy, A

    2001-11-01

    Cold urticaria is one form of urticaria that may be associated with other forms of physical urticarias. Frequency is generally estimated at two or three per 100. The triggering effect of cold is found at history taking in most of the cases. The urticaria is usually superficial, and more rarely associated with deep and/or mucosal urticaria. The diagnosis is based on history taking and the ice cube test. An exhaustive search for an etiologic factor is often unfruitful, and the presence of a cryopathy should lead to a complete work-up. Therapy of cold urticaria may prove to be difficult. In patients with secondary cold urticaria, underlying disease must be treated in order to resolve the skin symptoms. H1-antihistamines can be used but the clinical responses are highly variable. Short-time treatment with low concentration corticosteroids suppresses the symptoms only partially and temporarily. In patients who do not respond to previous treatments, induction of cold tolerance may be proposed but the procedure is difficult to carry out in daily life over an extended period. Key word: cryoglobulins.

  10. COLD TRAP

    DOEpatents

    Milleron, N.

    1963-03-12

    An improved linear-flow cold trap is designed for highvacuum applications such as mitigating back migration of diffusion pump oil moiecules. A central pot of liquid nitrogen is nested within and supported by a surrounding, vertical, helical coil of metai sheet, all enveloped by a larger, upright, cylindrical, vacuum vessel. The vertical interstices between successive turns of the coil afford lineal, axial, high-vacuum passages between open mouths at top and bottom of said vessel, while the coil, being cold by virtue of thermal contact of its innermost turn with the nitrogen pot, affords expansive proximate condensation surfaces. (AEC)

  11. Cold Sores

    MedlinePlus

    ... causes oral herpes, or cold sores. Type 1 herpes virus infects more than half of the U.S. population by the time they reach their 20s. Type 2 usually affects the genital area Some people have no symptoms from the ...

  12. Hot, Cold, and Really Cold.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leyden, Michael

    1997-01-01

    Describes a physics experiment investigating temperature prediction and the relationship between the physical properties of heat units, melting, dissolving, states of matter, and energy loss. Details the experimental setup, which requires hot and cold water, a thermometer, and ice. Notes that the experiment employs a deliberate counter-intuitive…

  13. COLD TRAPS

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, W.I.

    1958-09-30

    A cold trap is presented for removing a condensable component from a gas mixture by cooling. It consists of a shell, the exterior surface of which is chilled by a refrigerant, and conductive fins welded inside the shell to condense the gas, and distribute the condensate evenly throughout the length of the trap, so that the trap may function until it becomes completely filled with the condensed solid. The contents may then be removed as either a gas or as a liquid by heating the trap. This device has particuinr use as a means for removing uranium hexafluoride from the gaseous diffusion separation process during equipment breakdown and repair periods.

  14. Photoassociation of cold atoms with chirped laser pulses: Time-dependent calculations and analysis of the adiabatic transfer within a two-state model

    SciTech Connect

    Luc-Koenig, E.; Masnou-Seeuws, F.; Kosloff, R.; Vatasescu, M.

    2004-09-01

    This theoretical paper presents numerical calculations for the photoassociation of ultracold cesium atoms with a chirped laser pulse and a detailed analysis of the results. In contrast with earlier work, the initial state is represented by a stationary continuum wave function. In the chosen example, it is shown that an important population transfer is achieved to {approx_equal}15 vibrational levels in the vicinity of the v=98 bound level in the external well of the 0{sub g}{sup -}(6s+6p{sub 3/2}) potential. Such levels lie in the energy range swept by the instantaneous frequency of the pulse, thus defining a 'photoassociation window'. Levels outside this window may be significantly excited during the pulse, but no population remains there after the pulse. Finally, the population transfer to the last vibrational levels of the ground a {sup 3}{sigma}{sub u}{sup +}(6s+6s) state is significant, making stable molecules. The results are interpreted in the framework of a two-state model as an adiabatic inversion mechanism, efficient only within the photoassociation window. The large value found for the photoassociation rate suggests promising applications. The present chirp has been designed in view of creating in the excited state a vibrational wave packet that is focusing at the barrier of the double-well potential.

  15. Cold Urticaria

    PubMed Central

    Wasserman, Stephen I.; Soter, Nicholas A.; Center, David M.; Austen, K. Frank

    1977-01-01

    Sera were obtained from the venous effluents of cold-challenged arms of patients with idiopathic cold urticaria without plasma or serum cryoproteins; these sera exhibited increased neutrophil chemotactic activity without alterations of the complement system. A two- to fourfold augmentation of the base-line neutrophil chemotactic activity of serum from the immersed extremity began within 1 min, peaked at 2 min, and returned to base-line levels within 15 min, whereas there was no change in the serum chemotactic activity in the control arm. The augmented chemotactic activity in the serum specimens from the challenged arm of each patient appeared in a high molecular-weight region, as assessed by the difference in activity recovered after Sephadex G-200 gel filtration of the paired lesional and control specimens. Sequential purification of this high molecular-weight activity by anion- and cation-exchange chromatography revealed a single peak of activity at both steps. The partially purified material continued to exhibit a high molecular weight, being excluded on Sepharose 4B, and had a neutral isoelectric point. The partially purified material showed a preferential chemotactic activity for neutrophilic polymorphonuclear leukocytes, required a gradient for expression of this function, and exhibited a capacity to deactivate this cell type. This active principle, termed high molecular-weight neutrophil chemotactic factor, exhibited a time-course of release that could be superimposed upon that of histamine and the low molecular-weight eosinophil chemotactic factor and may represent another mast cell-derived mediator. PMID:874083

  16. Cough & Cold Medicine Abuse

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Cough & Cold Medicine Abuse KidsHealth > For Teens > Cough & Cold ... Someone Quit? Avoiding DXM Why Do People Use Cough and Cold Medicines to Get High? There's an ...

  17. COLD-SAT dynamic model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Neil S.; Bollenbacher, Gary

    1992-01-01

    This report discusses the development and underlying mathematics of a rigid-body computer model of a proposed cryogenic on-orbit liquid depot storage, acquisition, and transfer spacecraft (COLD-SAT). This model, referred to in this report as the COLD-SAT dynamic model, consists of both a trajectory model and an attitudinal model. All disturbance forces and torques expected to be significant for the actual COLD-SAT spacecraft are modeled to the required degree of accuracy. Control and experimental thrusters are modeled, as well as fluid slosh. The model also computes microgravity disturbance accelerations at any specified point in the spacecraft. The model was developed by using the Boeing EASY5 dynamic analysis package and will run on Apollo, Cray, and other computing platforms.

  18. Cold confusion

    SciTech Connect

    Chapline, G.

    1989-07-01

    On March 23 two chemists, Martin Fleischmann and Stanley Pons startled the world with a press conference at the University of Utah where they announced that they had achieved nuclear fusion at room temperatures. As evidence they cited the production of ''excess'' amounts of heat in an electrochemical apparatus and observation of neutron production. While the production of heat in a chemical apparatus is not in itself unusual the observation of neutrons is certainly extraordinary. As it turned out, though, careful measurements of the neutron production in electrochemical apparatus similar to that used by Fleischmann and Pons carried out at dozens of other laboratories has shown that the neutron production fails by many orders of magnitude to support the assertion by Fleischmann and Pons that their discovery represents a new and cheap source of fusion power. In particular, independent measurements of the neutron production rate suggest that the actual rate of fusion energy production probably does not exceed 1 trillionth of a watt. This paper discusses the feasibility that cold fusion is actually being achieved. 7 refs.

  19. Cold energy

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, John P.

    2015-12-04

    Deviations in Q for resonant superconducting radio frequency niobium accelerator cavities are generally correlated with resistivity loss mechanisms. Field dependent Qs are not well modeled by these classical loss mechanisms, but rather can represent a form of precision cavity surface thermometry. When the field dependent Q variation shows improvement with increasing B field level the classical treatment of this problem is inadequate. To justify this behavior hydrogen as a ubiquitous impurity in niobium, which creates measurable property changes, even at very low concentrations is typically considered the cause of such anomalous behavior. This maybe the case in some instances, but more importantly any system operating with a highly coherent field with a significant time dependent magnetic component at near 2° K will have the ability to organize the remaining free spins within the London penetration depth to form a coupled energy reservoir in the form of low mass spin waves. The niobium resonant cavities are composed of a single isotope with a large nuclear spin. When the other loss mechanisms are stripped away this may be the gain medium activated by the low level residual magnetic fields. It was found that one resonant cavity heat treatment produced optimum surface properties and then functioned as a MASER extracting energy from the 2° K thermal bath while cooling the cavity walls. The cavity operating in this mode is a simulator of what can take place in the wider but not colder universe using the cosmic microwave background (CMB) as a thermal source. The low mass, long lifetimes, and the scale of the magnetic spin waves on the weakly magnetized interstellar medium allows energy to be stored that is many orders of magnitude colder than the cosmic microwave background. A linear accelerator cavity becomes a tool to explore the properties of the long wave length magnetic spin waves that populate this cold low energy regime.

  20. Cold remedies (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Sore throat, cough, stuffy nose, sneezing, runny nose, fever, chills, and muscle aches are all symptoms associated with the common cold. Over-the-counter medicines for a cold only alleviate cold symptoms but do not shorten the duration of a cold. As always, ...

  1. Cold Stress and the Cold Pressor Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silverthorn, Dee U.; Michael, Joel

    2013-01-01

    Temperature and other environmental stressors are known to affect blood pressure and heart rate. In this activity, students perform the cold pressor test, demonstrating increased blood pressure during a 1- to 2-min immersion of one hand in ice water. The cold pressor test is used clinically to evaluate autonomic and left ventricular function. This…

  2. Cold and Cough Medicines

    MedlinePlus

    ... What can you do for your cold or cough symptoms? Besides drinking lots of fluids and getting ... medicines. There are lots of different cold and cough medicines, and they do different things. Nasal decongestants - ...

  3. Cold medicines and children

    MedlinePlus

    ... aspx . Accessed July 26, 2016. Cherry JD. The common cold. In: Cherry JD, Harrison GJ, Kaplan SL, Steinbach ... 2014:chap 7. Miller EK, Williams JV. The common cold. In: Kliegman RM, Stanton BF, St. Geme JW, ...

  4. Skin Reactions to Cold

    PubMed Central

    Talpash, Orest

    1976-01-01

    Although skin reactions to cold are seen surprisingly infrequently in Canada, it is important to manage them correctly when they do occur. Frostbite, cold urticarias, Raynaud's disease and phenomenon, and several miscellaneous changes are discussed. PMID:21308019

  5. Cold knife cone biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... biopsy; Pap smear - cone biopsy; HPV - cone biopsy; Human papilloma virus - cone biopsy; Cervix - cone biopsy; Colposcopy - cone biopsy Images Female reproductive anatomy Cold cone biopsy Cold cone removal References American ...

  6. Probing Cold Dense Nuclear Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Subedi, Ramesh; Shneor, R.; Monaghan, Peter; Anderson, Bryon; Aniol, Konrad; Annand, John; Arrington, John; Benaoum, Hachemi; Benmokhtar, Fatiha; Bertozzi, William; Boeglin, Werner; Chen, Jian-Ping; Choi, Seonho; Cisbani, Evaristo; Craver, Brandon; Frullani, Salvatore; Garibaldi, Franco; Gilad, Shalev; Gilman, Ronald; Glamazdin, Oleksandr; Hansen, Jens-Ole; Higinbotham, Douglas; Holmstrom, Timothy; Ibrahim, Hassan; Igarashi, Ryuichi; De Jager, Cornelis; Jans, Eddy; Jiang, Xiaodong; Kaufman, Lisa; Kelleher, Aidan; Kolarkar, Ameya; Kumbartzki, Gerfried; LeRose, John; Lindgren, Richard; Liyanage, Nilanga; Margaziotis, Demetrius; Markowitz, Pete; Marrone, Stefano; Mazouz, Malek; Meekins, David; Michaels, Robert; Moffit, Bryan; Perdrisat, Charles; Piasetzky, Eliazer; Potokar, Milan; Punjabi, Vina; Qiang, Yi; Reinhold, Joerg; Ron, Guy; Rosner, Guenther; Saha, Arunava; Sawatzky, Bradley; Shahinyan, Albert; Sirca, Simon; Slifer, Karl; Solvignon, Patricia; Sulkosky, Vince; Sulkosky, Vincent; Sulkosky, Vince; Sulkosky, Vincent; Urciuoli, Guido; Voutier, Eric; Watson, John; Weinstein, Lawrence; Wojtsekhowski, Bogdan; Wood, Stephen; Zheng, Xiaochao; Zhu, Lingyan

    2008-06-01

    The protons and neutrons in a nucleus can form strongly correlated nucleon pairs. Scattering experiments, in which a proton is knocked out of the nucleus with high-momentum transfer and high missing momentum, show that in carbon-12 the neutron-proton pairs are nearly 20 times as prevalent as proton-proton pairs and, by inference, neutron-neutron pairs. This difference between the types of pairs is due to the nature of the strong force and has implications for understanding cold dense nuclear systems such as neutron stars.

  7. How cold is cold dark matter?

    SciTech Connect

    Armendariz-Picon, Cristian; Neelakanta, Jayanth T. E-mail: jtneelak@syr.edu

    2014-03-01

    If cold dark matter consists of particles, these must be non-interacting and non-relativistic by definition. In most cold dark matter models however, dark matter particles inherit a non-vanishing velocity dispersion from interactions in the early universe, a velocity that redshifts with cosmic expansion but certainly remains non-zero. In this article, we place model-independent constraints on the dark matter temperature to mass ratio, whose square root determines the dark matter velocity dispersion. We only assume that dark matter particles decoupled kinetically while non-relativistic, when galactic scales had not entered the horizon yet, and that their momentum distribution has been Maxwellian since that time. Under these assumptions, using cosmic microwave background and matter power spectrum observations, we place upper limits on the temperature to mass ratio of cold dark matter today (away from collapsed structures). These limits imply that the present cold dark matter velocity dispersion has to be smaller than 54 m/s. Cold dark matter has to be quite cold, indeed.

  8. Cold Ion Escape from Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fränz, M.; Dubinin, E.; Wei, Y.; Morgan, D.; Andrews, D.; Barabash, S.; Lundin, R.; Fedorov, A.

    2013-09-01

    It has always been challenging to observe the flux of ions with energies of less than 10eV escaping from the planetary ionospheres. We here report on new measurements of the ionospheric ion flows at Mars by the ASPERA-3 experiment on board Mars Express in combination with the MARSIS radar experiment. We first compare calculations of the mean ion flux observed by ASPERA-3 alone with previously published results. We then combine observations of the cold ion velocity by ASPERA-3 with observations of the cold plasma density by MARSIS since ASPERA-3 misses the cold core of the ion distribution. We show that the mean density of the nightside plasma observed by MARSIS is about two orders higher than observed by ASPERA-3 (Fig.1). Combining both datasets we show that the main escape channel is along the shadow boundary on the tailside of Mars (Fig. 2). At a distance of about 0.5 R_M the flux settles at a constant value (Fig. 3) which indicates that about half of the transterminator ionospheric flow escapes from the planet. Possible mechanism to generate this flux can be the ionospheric pressure gradient between dayside and nightside or momentum transfer from the solar wind via the induced magnetic field since the flow velocity is in the Alfvénic regime.

  9. Micro-Kelvin cold molecules.

    SciTech Connect

    Strecker, Kevin E.; Chandler, David W.

    2009-10-01

    We have developed a novel experimental technique for direct production of cold molecules using a combination of techniques from atomic optical and molecular physics and physical chemistry. The ability to produce samples of cold molecules has application in a broad spectrum of technical fields high-resolution spectroscopy, remote sensing, quantum computing, materials simulation, and understanding fundamental chemical dynamics. Researchers around the world are currently exploring many techniques for producing samples of cold molecules, but to-date these attempts have offered only limited success achieving milli-Kelvin temperatures with low densities. This Laboratory Directed Research and Development project is to develops a new experimental technique for producing micro-Kelvin temperature molecules via collisions with laser cooled samples of trapped atoms. The technique relies on near mass degenerate collisions between the molecule of interest and a laser cooled (micro-Kelvin) atom. A subset of collisions will transfer all (nearly all) of the kinetic energy from the 'hot' molecule, cooling the molecule at the expense of heating the atom. Further collisions with the remaining laser cooled atoms will thermally equilibrate the molecules to the micro-Kelvin temperature of the laser-cooled atoms.

  10. [Cold-induced urticaria].

    PubMed

    Delorme, N; Drouet, M; Thibaudeau, A; Verret, J L

    2002-09-01

    Cold urticaria is characterized by the development of urticaria, usually superficial and/or angioedematous reaction after cold contact. It was found predominantly in young women. The diagnosis is based on the history and ice cube test. Patients with a negative ice cube test may have represented systemic cold urticaria (atypical acquired cold urticaria) induced by general body cooling. The pathogenesis is poorly understood. Cold urticaria can be classified into acquired and familial disorders, with an autosomal dominant inheritance. Idiopathic cold urticaria is most common type but the research of a cryopathy is necessary. Therapy is often difficult. It is essential that the patient be warned of the dangers of swimming in cold water because systemic hypotension can occur. H1 antihistamines can be used for treatment of cold urticaria but the clinical responses are highly variable. The combination with an H2 antagonists is more effective. Doxepin may be useful in the treatment. Leukotriene receptor antagonists may be a novel, promising drug entity. In patients who do not respond to previous treatments, induction of cold tolerance may be tried.

  11. Cold fusion, Alchemist's dream

    SciTech Connect

    Clayton, E.D.

    1989-09-01

    In this report the following topics relating to cold fusion are discussed: muon catalysed cold fusion; piezonuclear fusion; sundry explanations pertaining to cold fusion; cosmic ray muon catalysed cold fusion; vibrational mechanisms in excited states of D{sub 2} molecules; barrier penetration probabilities within the hydrogenated metal lattice/piezonuclear fusion; branching ratios of D{sub 2} fusion at low energies; fusion of deuterons into {sup 4}He; secondary D+T fusion within the hydrogenated metal lattice; {sup 3}He to {sup 4}He ratio within the metal lattice; shock induced fusion; and anomalously high isotopic ratios of {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He.

  12. Cold stress and the cold pressor test.

    PubMed

    Silverthorn, Dee U; Michael, Joel

    2013-03-01

    Temperature and other environmental stressors are known to affect blood pressure and heart rate. In this activity, students perform the cold pressor test, demonstrating increased blood pressure during a 1- to 2-min immersion of one hand in ice water. The cold pressor test is used clinically to evaluate autonomic and left ventricular function. This activity is easily adapted to an inquiry format that asks students to go to the scientific literature to learn about the test and then design a protocol for carrying out the test in classmates. The data collected are ideal for teaching graphical presentation of data and statistical analysis.

  13. Cold stress induces lower urinary tract symptoms.

    PubMed

    Imamura, Tetsuya; Ishizuka, Osamu; Nishizawa, Osamu

    2013-07-01

    Cold stress as a result of whole-body cooling at low environmental temperatures exacerbates lower urinary tract symptoms, such as urinary urgency, nocturia and residual urine. We established a model system using healthy conscious rats to explore the mechanisms of cold stress-induced detrusor overactivity. In this review, we summarize the basic findings shown by this model. Rats that were quickly transferred from room temperature (27 ± 2°C) to low temperature (4 ± 2°C) showed detrusor overactivity including increased basal pressure and decreased voiding interval, micturition volume, and bladder capacity. The cold stress-induced detrusor overactivity is mediated through a resiniferatoxin-sensitve C-fiber sensory nerve pathway involving α1-adrenergic receptors. Transient receptor potential melastatin 8 channels, which are sensitive to thermal changes below 25-28°C, also play an important role in mediating the cold stress responses. Additionally, the sympathetic nervous system is associated with transient hypertension and decreases of skin surface temperature that are closely correlated with the detrusor overactivity. With this cold stress model, we showed that α1-adrenergic receptor antagonists have the potential to treat cold stress-exacerbated lower urinary tract symptoms. In addition, we showed that traditional Japanese herbal mixtures composed of Hachimijiogan act, in part, by increasing skin temperature and reducing the number of cold sensitive transient receptor potential melastatin channels in the skin. The effects of herbal mixtures have the potential to treat and/or prevent the exacerbation of lower urinary tract symptoms by providing resistance to the cold stress responses. Our model provides new opportunities for utilizing animal disease models with altered lower urinary tract functions to explore the effects of novel therapeutic drugs.

  14. Exercise in the Cold

    PubMed Central

    Fudge, Jessie

    2016-01-01

    Context: Hypothermia and frostbite injuries occur in cold weather activities and sporting events. Evidence Acquisition: A PubMed search was used to identify original research and review articles related to cold, frostbite, and hypothermia. Inclusion was based on their relevance to prevention and treatment of cold-related injuries in sports and outdoor activities. Dates of review articles were limited to those published after 2010. No date limit was set for the most recent consensus statements or original research. Study Design: Clinical review. Level of Evidence: Level 5. Results: Frostbite and hypothermia are well-documented entities with good prevention strategies and prehospital treatment recommendations that have changed very little with time. A layered approach to clothing is the best way to prevent injury and respond to weather changes. Each athlete, defined as a participant in a cold weather sport or activity, will respond to cold differently depending on anthropometric measurements and underlying medical risk factors. An understanding of wind-chill temperatures, wetness, and the weather forecast allows athletes and event coordinators to properly respond to changing weather conditions. At the first sign of a freezing cold injury, ensure warm, dry clothes and move to a protected environment. Conclusion: Cold injuries can be prevented, and cold weather activities are safe with proper education, preparation, and response to changing weather conditions or injury. PMID:26857732

  15. Cold fusion research

    SciTech Connect

    1989-11-01

    I am pleased to forward to you the Final Report of the Cold Fusion Panel. This report reviews the current status of cold fusion and includes major chapters on Calorimetry and Excess Heat, Fusion Products and Materials Characterization. In addition, the report makes a number of conclusions and recommendations, as requested by the Secretary of Energy.

  16. Cold-Weather Sports

    MedlinePlus

    ... Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Cold-Weather Sports KidsHealth > For Teens > Cold-Weather Sports Print A A A What's in this ... Equipment Ahh, winter! Shorter days. Frigid temperatures. Foul weather. What better time to be outdoors? Winter sports ...

  17. Cold Sores (HSV-1)

    MedlinePlus

    ... A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Cold Sores (HSV-1) KidsHealth > For Teens > Cold Sores (HSV-1) A A A What's in this article? ... or around a person's lips, are caused by herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1) . But they don't ...

  18. Chilling Out With Colds

    MedlinePlus

    ... Your head hurts. You don't have the energy to even get out of bed. And you can't breathe out of your nose. What's wrong? You may have a cold! Having a cold is the #1 reason kids visit the doctor and stay home from school. Kids can get six to ten ...

  19. Improvements in Cold-Plate Fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaffetti, Mark A.; Taddey, Edmund P.; Laurin, Michael B.; Chabebe, Natalia

    2012-01-01

    Five improvements are reported in cold-plate fabrication. This cold plate is part of a thermal control system designed to serve on space missions. The first improvement is the merging of the end sheets of the cold plate with the face sheets of the structural honeycomb panel. The cold plate, which can be a brazed assembly, uses the honeycomb face sheet as its end sheet. Thus, when the honeycomb panel is fabricated, the face sheet that is used is already part of the cold plate. In addition to reducing weight, costs, and steps, the main benefit of this invention is that it creates a more structurally sound assembly. The second improvement involves incorporation of the header into the closure bar to pass the fluid to a lower layer. Conventional designs have used a separate header, which increases the geometry of the system. The improvement reduces the geometry, thus allowing the cold plate to fit into smaller area. The third improvement eliminates the need of hose, tube, or manifold to supply the cooling fluid externally. The external arrangement can be easily damaged and is vulnerable to leakage. The new arrangement incorporates an internal fluid transfer tube. This allows the fluid to pass from one cold plate to the other without any exposed external features. The fourth improvement eliminates separate fabrication of cold plate(s) and structural members followed by a process of attaching them to each other. Here, the structural member is made of material that can be brazed just as that of the cold plate. Now the structural member and the cold plate can be brazed at the same time, creating a monolithic unit, and thus a more structurally sound assembly. Finally, the fifth improvement is the elimination of an additional welding step that can damage the braze joints. A tube section, which is usually welded on after the braze process, is replaced with a more structurally sound configuration that can be brazed at the same time as the rest of the cold plate.

  20. Cold press sintering of simulated lunar basalt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Altemir, D. A.

    1993-01-01

    In order to predict the conditions for which the lunar regolith may be adequately sintered, experiments were conducted in which samples of simulated lunar basalt (MLS-1) were pressed at high pressures and then heated in an electric furnace. This sintering process may be referred to as cold press sintering since the material is pressed at room temperature. Although test articles were produced which possessed compressive strengths comparable to that of terrestrial concrete, the cold press sintering process requires very high press pressures and sintering temperatures in order to achieve that strength. Additionally, the prospect of poor internal heat transfer adversely affecting the quality of sintered lunar material is a major concern. Therefore, it is concluded that cold press sintering will most likely be undesirable for the production of lunar construction materials.

  1. Cold subcutaneous abscesses.

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, R.; Stephens, L.; Kelly, A. P.

    1990-01-01

    Cold abscesses are defined as having no associated erythema, heat, or tenderness. They may be present in immunodeficiency disorders, deep mycoses, and other infectious diseases. As there is a dearth information on this subject in the dermatology, surgery, and infectious disease literature, we present a case of cold abscesses secondary to coccidioidomycosis and discuss the possible role of humoral immunity, cell-mediated immunity, prostaglandins, T cells, and other mediators in cold abscess pathogenesis. In addition, therapeutic guidelines for abscesses are reviewed. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:2280425

  2. Miniature cold gas thrusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bzibziak, R. J., Sr.

    1992-07-01

    Cold gas thrusters provide a safe, inexpensive, lightweight and reliable means of propulsive control for small satellites, projectiles and maneuvering control systems. Moog Inc. has designed and developed a family of miniature cold gas thrusters for use on Strategic Defense Iniative flight simulation experiments, sounding rockets, small satellite applications, astronaut control systems, and close proximity maneuvering systems for Space System. Construction features such as coil assembly, core assembly, armature assembly, external housing and valve body are discussed. The design approach, performance characteristics and functional description of cold gas thrusters designed for various applications are presented.

  3. Cold hardiness in molluscs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansart, Armelle; Vernon, Philippe

    2003-05-01

    Molluscs inhabit all types of environments: seawater, intertidal zone, freshwater and land, and of course may have to deal with subzero temperatures. Ectotherm animals survive cold conditions by avoiding it by extensive supercooling (freezing avoidant species) or by bearing the freezing of their extracellular body fluids (freezing tolerant species). Although some studies on cold hardiness are available for intertidal molluscs, they are scarce for freshwater and terrestrial ones. Molluscs often exhibit intermediary levels of cold hardiness, with a moderate or low ability to supercool and a limited survival to the freezing of their tissues. Several factors could be involved: their dependence on water, their ability to enter dormancy, the probability of inoculative freezing in their environment, etc. Size is an important parameter in the development of cold hardiness abilities: it influences supercooling ability in land snails, which are rather freezing avoidant and survival to ice formation in intertidal organisms, which generally tolerate freezing.

  4. Colds and flus - antibiotics

    MedlinePlus

    Fashner J, Ericson K, Werner S. Treatment of the common cold in children and adults. Am Fam Physician. 2012; ... gov/pubmed/22962927 . Melio FR, Berge LR. Upper respiratory tract infections. In: Marx JA, Hockberger RS, Walls RM, et ...

  5. Coping with Colds

    MedlinePlus

    ... re hungry. And you might have heard that chicken soup can cure a cold. There's no real ... you have strep throat and need treatment with antibiotics. If your doctor does prescribe antibiotics, be sure ...

  6. The cold reading technique.

    PubMed

    Dutton, D L

    1988-04-15

    For many people, belief in the paranormal derives from personal experience of face-to-face interviews with astrologers, palm readers, aura and Tarot readers, and spirit mediums. These encounters typically involve cold reading, a process in which a reader makes calculated guesses about a client's background and problems and, depending on the reaction, elaborates a reading which seems to the client so uniquely appropriate that it carries with it the illusion of having been produced by paranormal means. The cold reading process is shown to depend initially on the Barnum effect, the tendency for people to embrace generalized personality descriptions as idiosyncratically their own. Psychological research into the Barnum effect is critically reviewed, and uses of the effect by a professional magician are described. This is followed by detailed analysis of the cold reading performances of a spirit medium. Future research should investigate the degree to which cold readers may have convinced themselves that they actually possess psychic or paranormal abilities.

  7. Teaching in a Cold Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ewert, Alan

    1979-01-01

    Designed to help teachers deal with students in a cold environment, this article explains cold physiology and fundamental laws of heat; describes 14 common cold injuries and their current treatment; and lists a number of useful teaching techniques for cold environments. (SB)

  8. Teaching in a Cold Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ewert, Alan

    Instructors who teach outdoors in an environment so cold as to cause injury must satisfy program objectives while avoiding cold injury to themselves and students, help students focus on learning instead of discomfort, and alleviate some students' intense fear of the cold. Dealing with the cold successfully requires a thorough knowledge of:…

  9. Understanding Colds: Anatomy of the Nose

    MedlinePlus

    ... Colds Prevention Treatment Children Complications Special Features References Common Cold Understanding Colds Anatomy of the Nose The nose ... cm (3/8 inch) per minute. What a Common Cold Is A common cold is an illness caused ...

  10. ORNL rod-bundle heat-transfer test data. Volume 6. Thermal-hydraulic test facility experimental data report for test 3. 05. 5B - double-ended cold-leg break simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Mullins, C.B.; Felde, D.K.; Sutton, A.G.; Gould, S.S.; Morris, D.G.; Robinson, J.J.; Schwinkendorf, K.N.

    1982-05-18

    Thermal-Hydraulic Test Facility (THTF) Test 3.05.5B was conducted by members of the ORNL PWR Blowdown Heat Transfer Separate-Effects Program on July 3, 1980. The objective of the program is to investigate heat transfer phenomena believed to occur in PWRs during accidents, including small and large break loss-of-coolant accidents. Test 3.05.5B was designed to provide transient thermal-hydraulics data in rod bundle geometry under reactor accident-type conditions. Reduced instrument responses are presented. Also included are uncertainties in the instrument responses, calculated mass flows, and calculated rod powers.

  11. Natural Variation of Cold Deacclimation Correlates with Variation of Cold-Acclimation of the Plastid Antioxidant System in Arabidopsis thaliana Accessions.

    PubMed

    Juszczak, Ilona; Cvetkovic, Jelena; Zuther, Ellen; Hincha, Dirk K; Baier, Margarete

    2016-01-01

    Temperature variations impact on the balance between photosynthetic electron transport and electron-consuming assimilation reactions and transiently increase generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Previous studies demonstrated that the expression of C-repeat binding factors (CBFs), which activate cold acclimation reactions, respond to chloroplast ROS signals and that cold deacclimation is partly halted for days after the transfer of acclimated plants to optimal growth conditions in four Arabidopsis accessions from cold-continental habitats. We hypothesized that these accessions differ from others in the regulation of the plastid antioxidant system (PAS). In the present study, we compared the expression intensity of the 12 most prominent PAS genes for peroxidases, superoxide dismutase and low molecular weight antioxidant regenerating enzymes in 10 Arabidopsis accessions with regulation of CBF and COR (cold regulated genes) transcript levels and cold-regulated metabolite levels prior to cold, after 2 week long cold acclimation and during the first 3 days of deacclimation. In the accessions with prolonged activation of cold responses, by trend, weaker induction of various cold-inducible PAS genes and stronger decreases in the expression of negatively cold-regulated PAS genes were observed. Low PAS gene expression delayed the post-cold decrease in H2O2 levels after transfer of the plants from cold to optimal growth conditions. We conclude that weaker expression of various PAS genes in the cold is an adapted strategy of the Arabidopsis accessions N14, N13, Ms-0, and Kas-1 to avoid full inactivation of cold-responses in the first days after the end of the cold period.

  12. Natural Variation of Cold Deacclimation Correlates with Variation of Cold-Acclimation of the Plastid Antioxidant System in Arabidopsis thaliana Accessions

    PubMed Central

    Juszczak, Ilona; Cvetkovic, Jelena; Zuther, Ellen; Hincha, Dirk K.; Baier, Margarete

    2016-01-01

    Temperature variations impact on the balance between photosynthetic electron transport and electron-consuming assimilation reactions and transiently increase generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Previous studies demonstrated that the expression of C-repeat binding factors (CBFs), which activate cold acclimation reactions, respond to chloroplast ROS signals and that cold deacclimation is partly halted for days after the transfer of acclimated plants to optimal growth conditions in four Arabidopsis accessions from cold-continental habitats. We hypothesized that these accessions differ from others in the regulation of the plastid antioxidant system (PAS). In the present study, we compared the expression intensity of the 12 most prominent PAS genes for peroxidases, superoxide dismutase and low molecular weight antioxidant regenerating enzymes in 10 Arabidopsis accessions with regulation of CBF and COR (cold regulated genes) transcript levels and cold-regulated metabolite levels prior to cold, after 2 week long cold acclimation and during the first 3 days of deacclimation. In the accessions with prolonged activation of cold responses, by trend, weaker induction of various cold-inducible PAS genes and stronger decreases in the expression of negatively cold-regulated PAS genes were observed. Low PAS gene expression delayed the post-cold decrease in H2O2 levels after transfer of the plants from cold to optimal growth conditions. We conclude that weaker expression of various PAS genes in the cold is an adapted strategy of the Arabidopsis accessions N14, N13, Ms-0, and Kas-1 to avoid full inactivation of cold-responses in the first days after the end of the cold period. PMID:27014325

  13. Cold moderators at ORNL

    SciTech Connect

    Lucas, A. T.

    1997-09-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) cold moderators were not an 'Oak Ridge first', but would have been the largest both physically and in terms of cold neutron flux. Two cold moderators were planned each 410 mm in diameter and containing about 30L of liquid deuterium. They were to be completely independent of each other. A modular system design was used to provide greater reliability and serviceability. When the ANS was terminated, up–grading of the resident High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) was examined and an initial study was made into the feasibility of adding a cold source. Because the ANS design was modular, it was possible to use many identical design features. Sub-cooled liquid at 4 bar abs was initially chosen for the HFIR design concept, but this was subsequently changed to 15 bar abs to operate above the critical pressure. As in the ANS, the hydrogen will operate at a constant pressure throughout the temperature range and a completely closed loop with secondary containment was adopted. The heat load of 2 kW made the heat flux comparable with that of the ANS. Subsequent studies into the construction of cryogenic moderators for the proposed new Synchrotron Neutron source indicated that again many of the same design concepts could be used. By connecting the two cold sources together in series, the total heat load of 2 kW is very close to that of the HFIR allowing a very similar supercritical hydrogen system to be configured. The two hydrogen moderators of the SNS provide a comparable heat load to the HFIR moderator. It is subsequently planned to connect the two in series and operate from a single cold loop system, once again using supercritical hydrogen. The spallation source also provided an opportunity to re-examine a cold pellet solid methane moderator operating at 20K.

  14. Digitized Heat Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohseni, Kamran; Young, Patrick

    2007-11-01

    This presentation presents theoretical and numerical results describing digitized heat transfer (DHT), an active thermal management technique for high-power electronics and integrated micro systems. In digitized heat transfer discrete droplets are employed. The internal flow inside a discrete droplet is dominated by internal circulation imposed by the boundaries. This internal circulation imposes a new timescale for recirculating cold liquid from the middle of the droplet to the boundary. This internal circulation produces periodic oscillation in the overall convective heat transfer rate. Numerical simulations are presented for heat transfer in the droplet for both constant temperature and flux boundary conditions. The effectiveness of DHT for managing both localized temperature spikes and steady state cooling is demonstrated, identifying key parameters for optimization of the DHT method.

  15. Production and application of translationally cold molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bethlem, Hendrick L.; Meijer, Gerard

    Inspired by the spectacular successes in the field of cold atoms, there is currently great interest in cold molecules. Cooling molecules is useful for various fundamental physics studies and gives access to an exotic regime in chemistry where the wave property of the molecules becomes important. Although cooling molecules has turned out to be considerably more difficult than cooling atoms, a number of methods to produce samples of cold molecules have been demonstrated over the last few years. This paper aims to review the application of cold molecules and the methods to produce them. Emphasis is put on the deceleration of polar molecules using time-varying electric fields. The operation principle of the array of electrodes that is used to decelerate polar molecules is described in analogy with, and using terminology from, charged-particle accelerators. It is shown that, by applying an appropriately timed high voltage burst, molecules can be decelerated while the phase-space density, i.e. the number of molecules per position-velocity interval, remains constant. In this way the high density and low temperature in the moving frame of a pulsed molecular beam can be transferred to the laboratory frame. Experiments on metastable CO in states that are either repelled by or attracted to high electric fields are presented. Loading of slow molecules into traps and storage rings is discussed.

  16. Out in the cold.

    PubMed

    Bates, Jane

    2016-05-04

    Every now and then, you say something to a patient and wonder whether you should have kept quiet. On this occasion, a female patient and I were indulging in a moment of shared empathy over an annoying symptom we both experience - permanently cold feet.

  17. Teaching "In Cold Blood."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berbrich, Joan D.

    1967-01-01

    The Truman Capote nonfiction novel, "In Cold Blood," which reflects for adolescents the immediacy of the real world, illuminates (1) social issues--capital punishment, environmental influence, and the gap between the "haves" and "have-nots," (2) moral issues--the complexity of man's nature, the responsibility of one…

  18. Cold Facts about Viruses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pea, Celeste; Sterling, Donna R.

    2002-01-01

    Provides ways for students to demonstrate their understanding of scientific concepts and skills. Describes a mini-unit around the cold in which students can relate humans to viruses. Includes activities and a modified simulation that provides questions to guide students. Discusses ways that allows students to apply prior knowledge, take ownership…

  19. Recent Cold War Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pineo, Ronn

    2003-01-01

    Cold War historiography has undergone major changes since the 1991 collapse of the Soviet Union. For two years (1992-1993) the principal Soviet archives fell open to scholars, and although some of the richest holdings are now once again closed, new information continues to find its way out. Moreover, critical documentary information has become…

  20. Cold spray nozzle design

    DOEpatents

    Haynes, Jeffrey D.; Sanders, Stuart A.

    2009-06-09

    A nozzle for use in a cold spray technique is described. The nozzle has a passageway for spraying a powder material, the passageway having a converging section and a diverging section, and at least the diverging section being formed from polybenzimidazole. In one embodiment of the nozzle, the converging section is also formed from polybenzimidazole.

  1. Expert Cold Structure Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atkins, T.; Demuysere, P.

    2011-05-01

    The EXPERT Program is funded by ESA. The objective of the EXPERT mission is to perform a sub-orbital flight during which measurements of critical aero- thermodynamic phenomena will be obtained by using state-of-the-art instrumentation. As part of the EXPERT Flight Segment, the responsibility of the Cold Structure Development Design, Manufacturing and Validation was committed to the Belgian industrial team SONACA/SABCA. The EXPERT Cold Structure includes the Launcher Adapter, the Bottom Panel, the Upper Panel, two Cross Panels and the Parachute Bay. An additional Launcher Adapter was manufactured for the separation tests. The selected assembly definition and manufacturing technologies ( machined parts and sandwich panels) were dictated classically by the mass and stiffness, but also by the CoG location and the sensitive separation interface. Used as support for the various on-board equipment, the Cold Structure is fixed to but thermally uncoupled from the PM 1000 thermal shield. It is protect on its bottom panel by a thermal blanket. As it is a protoflight, analysis was the main tool for the verification. Low level stiffness and modal analysis tests have also been performed on the Cold Structure equipped with its ballast. It allowed to complete its qualification and to prepare SONACA/SABCA support for the system dynamic tests foreseen in 2011. The structure was finally coated with a thermal control black painting and delivered on time to Thales Alenia Space-Italy end of March 201.

  2. Slurry fired heater cold-flow modelling

    SciTech Connect

    Moujaes, S.F.

    1983-07-01

    This report summarizes the experimental and theoretical work leading to the scale-up of the SRC-I Demonstration Plant slurry fired heater. The scale-up involved a theoretical model using empirical relations in the derivation, and employed variables such as flow conditions, liquid viscosity, and slug frequency. Such variables have been shown to affect the heat transfer characteristics ofthe system. The model assumes that, if all other variables remain constant, the heat transfer coefficient can be scaled up proportional to D/sup -2/3/ (D = inside diameter of the fired heater tube). All flow conditions, liquid viscosities, and pipe inclinations relevant to the demonstration plant have indicated a slug flow regime in the slurry fired heater. The annular and stratified flow regimes should be avoided to minimize the potential for excessive pipe erosion and to decrease temperature gradients along the pipe cross section leading to coking and thermal stresses, respectively. Cold-flow studies in 3- and 6.75-in.-inside-diameter (ID) pipes were conducted to determine the effect of scale-up on flow regime, slug frequency, and slug dimensions. The developed model assumes that conduction heat transfer occurs through the liquid film surrounding the gas slug and laminar convective heat transfer to the liquid slug. A weighted average of these two heat transfer mechanisms gives a value for the average pipe heat transfer coefficient. The cold-flow work showed a decrease in the observed slug frequency between the 3- and 6.75-ID pipes. Data on the ratio of gas to liquid slug length in the 6.75-in. pipe are not yet complete, but are expected to yield generally lower values than those obtained in the 3-in. pipe; this will probably affect the scale-up to demonstration plant conditions. 5 references, 15 figures, 7 tables.

  3. Thermoregulatory modeling for cold stress.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaojiang; Tikuisis, Peter

    2014-07-01

    Modeling for cold stress has generated a rich history of innovation, has exerted a catalytic influence on cold physiology research, and continues to impact human activity in cold environments. This overview begins with a brief summation of cold thermoregulatory model development followed by key principles that will continue to guide current and future model development. Different representations of the human body are discussed relative to the level of detail and prediction accuracy required. In addition to predictions of shivering and vasomotor responses to cold exposure, algorithms are presented for thermoregulatory mechanisms. Various avenues of heat exchange between the human body and a cold environment are reviewed. Applications of cold thermoregulatory modeling range from investigative interpretation of physiological observations to forecasting skin freezing times and hypothermia survival times. While these advances have been remarkable, the future of cold stress modeling is still faced with significant challenges that are summarized at the end of this overview.

  4. COLD-SAT feasibility study safety analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mchenry, Steven T.; Yost, James M.

    1991-01-01

    The Cryogenic On-orbit Liquid Depot-Storage, Acquisition, and Transfer (COLD-SAT) satellite presents some unique safety issues. The feasibility study conducted at NASA-Lewis desired a systems safety program that would be involved from the initial design in order to eliminate and/or control the inherent hazards. Because of this, a hazards analysis method was needed that: (1) identified issues that needed to be addressed for a feasibility assessment; and (2) identified all potential hazards that would need to be controlled and/or eliminated during the detailed design phases. The developed analysis method is presented as well as the results generated for the COLD-SAT system.

  5. Cold Expansion and Interference for Extending the Fatigue Life of Multi- Layer Metal Joints

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-10-01

    quickly rupture any oxide film, leading to cold welding of the asperities and then their fracture from high strain fatigue . Material is thus transferred...MELBOURNE, VICTORIA Research Report 17 COLD EXPANSION AND INTERFERENCE FOR EXTENDING THE FATIGUE LIFE OF MULTI-LAYER METAL, JOINTS by . . . J.M. FINNEY...AND TECHNOLOGY ORGANISATION ",1 AERONAUTICAL RESEARCH LABORATORY Research Report 17 COLD EXVANSION AND INTERFERENCE FOR EXTENDING THE FATIGUE LIFE OF

  6. Remedies for Common Cold Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Penny F.

    1991-01-01

    Individuals suffering from intolerable symptoms of the common cold can now be advised of safe and effective products for symptomatic relief. This article describes and discusses four categories of drugs used to treat the common cold. To simplify the product selection process for family physicians, suggestions are included for possible ingredients for treatments of specific cold symptoms. PMID:21234087

  7. Human whole body cold adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Daanen, Hein A.M.; Van Marken Lichtenbelt, Wouter D.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Reviews on whole body human cold adaptation generally do not distinguish between population studies and dedicated acclimation studies, leading to confusing results. Population studies show that indigenous black Africans have reduced shivering thermogenesis in the cold and poor cold induced vasodilation in fingers and toes compared to Caucasians and Inuit. About 40,000 y after humans left Africa, natives in cold terrestrial areas seems to have developed not only behavioral adaptations, but also physiological adaptations to cold. Dedicated studies show that repeated whole body exposure of individual volunteers, mainly Caucasians, to severe cold results in reduced cold sensation but no major physiological changes. Repeated cold water immersion seems to slightly reduce metabolic heat production, while repeated exposure to milder cold conditions shows some increase in metabolic heat production, in particular non-shivering thermogenesis. In conclusion, human cold adaptation in the form of increased metabolism and insulation seems to have occurred during recent evolution in populations, but cannot be developed during a lifetime in cold conditions as encountered in temperate and arctic regions. Therefore, we mainly depend on our behavioral skills to live in and survive the cold. PMID:27227100

  8. Sodium heat transfer system modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, A. F.; Fewell, M. E.

    1983-11-01

    The sodium heat transfer system of the international energy agency (IEA) small solar power systems (SSPS) central receiver system (CRS), which includes the heliostat field, receiver, hot and cold storage vessels, and sodium/water steam generator was modeled. The computer code SOLTES (simulator of large thermal energy systems), was used to model this system. The results from SOLTES are compared to measured data.

  9. Radial cold trap

    DOEpatents

    Grundy, Brian R.

    1981-01-01

    The radial cold trap comprises a housing having a plurality of mesh bands disposed therein. The mesh bands comprise concentrically arranged bands of mesh with the mesh specific surface area of each band increasing from the outermost mesh band to the innermost mesh band. An inlet nozzle is attached to the outside section of the housing while an outlet nozzle is attached to the inner portion of the housing so as to be concentrically connected to the innermost mesh band. An inlet baffle having orifices therein may be disposed around the outermost mesh band and within the housing for directing the flow of the fluid from the inlet nozzle to the outermost mesh band in a uniform manner. The flow of fluid passes through each consecutive mesh band and into the outlet nozzle. The circular pattern of the symmetrically arranged mesh packing allows for better utilization of the entire cold trap volume.

  10. Radial cold trap

    DOEpatents

    Grundy, B.R.

    1981-09-29

    The radial cold trap comprises a housing having a plurality of mesh bands disposed therein. The mesh bands comprise concentrically arranged bands of mesh with the mesh specific surface area of each band increasing from the outermost mesh band to the innermost mesh band. An inlet nozzle is attached to the outside section of the housing while an outlet nozzle is attached to the inner portion of the housing so as to be concentrically connected to the innermost mesh band. An inlet baffle having orifices therein may be disposed around the outermost mesh band and within the housing for directing the flow of the fluid from the inlet nozzle to the outermost mesh band in a uniform manner. The flow of fluid passes through each consecutive mesh band and into the outlet nozzle. The circular pattern of the symmetrically arranged mesh packing allows for better utilization of the entire cold trap volume. 2 figs.

  11. Clumpy cold dark matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silk, Joseph; Stebbins, Albert

    1993-01-01

    A study is conducted of cold dark matter (CDM) models in which clumpiness will inhere, using cosmic strings and textures suited to galaxy formation. CDM clumps of 10 million solar mass/cu pc density are generated at about z(eq) redshift, with a sizable fraction surviving. Observable implications encompass dark matter cores in globular clusters and in galactic nuclei. Results from terrestrial dark matter detection experiments may be affected by clumpiness in the Galactic halo.

  12. Cold nuclear fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Tsyganov, E. N.

    2012-02-15

    Recent accelerator experiments on fusion of various elements have clearly demonstrated that the effective cross-sections of these reactions depend on what material the target particle is placed in. In these experiments, there was a significant increase in the probability of interaction when target nuclei are imbedded in a conducting crystal or are a part of it. These experiments open a new perspective on the problem of so-called cold nuclear fusion.

  13. Cold Climate Heat Pump

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-01

    central heating , cooling, and air conditioning (HVAC) system . Both buildings had two zones for heating and cooling, which allowed for a direct...section calls for improved efficiency of mechanical systems as well as an increase of renewable resource usage. Current heating technologies in cold... heated refrigerant is injected into a mixing chamber between the two compressors. The injection leads to a gain in performance of the system through

  14. Cold Stowage Flight Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campana, Sharon E.; Melendez, David T.

    2011-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) provides a test bed for researchers to perform science experiments in a variety of fields, including human research, life sciences, and space medicine. Many of the experiments being conducted today require science samples to be stored and transported in a temperature controlled environment. NASA provides several systems which aid researchers in preserving their science. On orbit systems provided by NASA include the Minus Eighty Laboratory freezer for ISS (MELFI), Microgravity Experiment Research Locker Incubator (MERLIN), and Glacier. These freezers use different technologies to provide rapid cooling and cold stowage at different temperature levels on board ISS. Systems available to researchers during transportation to and from ISS are MERLIN, Glacier, and Coldbag. Coldbag is a passive cold stowage system that uses phase change materials to maintain temperature. Details of these current technologies are provided along with operational experience gained to date. This paper discusses the capability of the current cold stowage hardware and how it may continue to support NASA s mission on ISS and in future exploration missions.

  15. Cold Stowage Flight Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campana, Sharon

    2010-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) provides a test bed for researchers to perform science experiments in a variety of fields, including human research, life sciences, and space medicine. Many of the experiments being conducted today require science samples to be stored and transported in a temperature controlled environment. NASA provides several systems which aide researchers in preserving their science. On orbit systems provided by NASA include the Minus Eighty Laboratory freezer for ISS (MELFI), Microgravity Experiment Research Locker Incubator (MERLIN), and Glacier. These freezers use different technologies to provide rapid cooling and cold stowage at different temperature levels on board ISS. Systems available to researchers during transportation to and from ISS are MERLIN, Glacier, and Coldbag. Coldbag is a passive cold stowage system that uses phase change materials. Details of these current technologies will be provided along with operational experience gained to date. With shuttle retirement looming, NASA has protected the capability to provide a temperature controlled environment during transportation to and from the ISS with the use of Glacier and Coldbags, which are compatible with future commercial vehicles including SpaceX's Dragon Capsule, and Orbital s Cygnus vehicle. This paper will discuss the capability of the current cold stowage hardware and how it may continue to support NASA s mission on ISS and in future exploration missions.

  16. Nuclear waste vitrification efficiency: cold cap reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Hrma, Pavel R.; Kruger, Albert A.; Pokorny, Richard

    2012-12-15

    . The model demonstrates that batch foaming has a decisive influence on the rate of melting. Understanding the dynamics of the foam layer at the bottom of the cold cap and the heat transfer through it appears crucial for a reliable prediction of the rate of melting as a function of the melter-feed makeup and melter operation parameters. Although the study is focused on a batch for waste vitrification, the authors expect that the outcome will also be relevant for commercial glass melting.

  17. NUCLEAR WASTE VITRIFICATION EFFICIENCY COLD CAP REACTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    KRUGER AA; HRMA PR; POKORNY R

    2011-07-29

    and melter conditions. The model demonstrates that batch foaming has a decisive influence on the rate of melting. Understanding the dynamics of the foam layer at the bottom of the cold cap and the heat transfer through it appears crucial for a reliable prediction of the rate of melting as a function of the melter-feed makeup and melter operation parameters. Although the study is focused on a batch for waste vitrification, the authors expect that the outcome will also be relevant for commercial glass melting.

  18. The effect of cold priming on the fitness of Arabidopsis thaliana accessions under natural and controlled conditions

    PubMed Central

    Cvetkovic, Jelena; Müller, Klaus; Baier, Margarete

    2017-01-01

    Priming improves an organism's performance upon a future stress. To test whether cold priming supports protection in spring and how it is affected by cold acclimation, we compared seven Arabidopsis accessions with different cold acclimation potentials in the field and in the greenhouse for growth, photosynthetic performance and reproductive fitness in March and May after a 14 day long cold-pretreatment at 4 °C. In the plants transferred to the field in May, the effect of the cold pretreatment on the seed yield correlated with the cold acclimation potential of the accessions. In the March transferred plants, the reproductive fitness was most supported by the cold pretreatment in the accessions with the weakest cold acclimation potential. The fitness effect was linked to long-term effects of the cold pretreatment on photosystem II activity stabilization and leaf blade expansion. The study demonstrated that cold priming stronger impacts on plant fitness than cold acclimation in spring in accessions with intermediate and low cold acclimation potential. PMID:28276450

  19. The Isis cold moderators

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, G. M.; Broome, T. A.; Burridge, R. A.; Cragg, D.; Hall, R.; Haynes, D.; Hirst, J.; Hogston, J. R.; Jones, H. H.; Sexton, J.; Wright, P.

    1997-09-01

    ISIS is a pulsed spallation neutron source where neutrons are produced by the interaction of a 160 kW proton beam of energy 800 MeV in a water-cooled Tantalum Target. The fast neutrons produced are thermalized in four moderators: two ambient water, one liquid methane operating at 100K and a liquid hydrogen moderator at 20 K. This paper gives a description of the construction of both cold moderator systems, details of the operating experience and a description of the current development program.

  20. Paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria.

    PubMed

    Shanbhag, Satish; Spivak, Jerry

    2015-06-01

    Paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria is a rare cause of autoimmune hemolytic anemia predominantly seen as an acute form in young children after viral illnesses and in a chronic form in some hematological malignancies and tertiary syphilis. It is a complement mediated intravascular hemolytic anemia associated with a biphasic antibody against the P antigen on red cells. The antibody attaches to red cells at colder temperatures and causes red cell lysis when blood recirculates to warmer parts of the body. Treatment is mainly supportive and with red cell transfusion, but immunosuppressive therapy may be effective in severe cases.

  1. Cold Fusion Verification.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-03-01

    published work, talking with others in the field, and attending conferences, that CNF probably is chimera and will go the way of N-rays and polywater ...way of N-rays and polywater . To date, no one, including Pons and Fleischmann, has been able to construct a so-called CNF electrochemical cell that...Cold Nuclear Fusion (CNF), as originally reported in 1989. The conclusion is that CNF probably is chimera and will go the way of N-rays and polywater

  2. Cardiovascular responses to cold exposure.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhongjie

    2010-01-01

    The prevalence of hypertension is increased in winter and in cold regions of the world. Cold temperatures make hypertension worse and trigger cardiovascular complications (stroke, myocardial infarction, heart failure, etc.). Chronic or intermittent exposure to cold causes hypertension and cardiac hypertrophy in animals. The purpose of this review is to provide the recent advances in the mechanistic investigation of cold-induced hypertension (CIH). Cold temperatures increase the activities of the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) and the renin-angiotensin system (RAS). The SNS initiates CIH via the RAS. Cold exposure suppresses the expression of eNOS and formation of NO, increases the production of endothelin-1 (ET-1), up-regulates ETA receptors, but down-regulates ETB receptors. The roles of these factors and their relations in CIH will be reviewed.

  3. Cardiovascular responses to cold exposure

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Zhongjie

    2010-01-01

    The prevalence of hypertension is increased in winter and in cold regions of the world. Cold temperatures make hypertension worse and trigger cardiovascular complications (stroke, myocardial infarction, heart failure, etc.). Chronic or intermittent exposure to cold causes hypertension and cardiac hypertrophy in animals. The purpose of this review is to provide the recent advances in the mechanistic investigation of cold-induced hypertension (CIH). Cold temperatures increase the activities of the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) and the renin-angiotensin system (RAS). The SNS initiates CIH via the RAS. Cold exposure suppresses the expression of eNOS and formation of NO, increases the production of endothelin-1 (ET-1), up-regulates ETA receptors, but down-regulates ETB receptors. The roles of these factors and their relations in CIH will be reviewed. PMID:20036896

  4. Idiopathic cold urticaria and anaphylaxis.

    PubMed

    Işk, Sakine; Arkan-Ayyldz, Zeynep; Sozmen, Sule Caglayan; Karaman, Özkan; Uzuner, Nevin

    2014-01-01

    Cold urticaria (CU) is a subtype of physical urticaria characterized by the development of urticaria and angioedema after cold exposure. Symptoms typically occur minutes after skin exposure to cold air, liquids, and objects. Most common method to confirm the diagnosis of CU is through ice cube challenge test, but 20% of patients with CU have negative ice cube challenge test results. The greatest risk with this kind of urticaria is the development of systemic reaction resulting in a hemodynamic collapse during generalized cold exposure. We report a case of a patient who developed CU and anaphylaxis during swimming and diving in the sea.

  5. Experiments in cold fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, E.P.

    1986-03-28

    The work of Steve Jones and others in muon-catalyzed cold fusion of deuterium and hydrogen suggests the possibility of such fusion catalyzed by ions, or combinations of atoms, or more-or-less free electrons in solid and liquid materials. A hint that this might occur naturally comes from the heat generated in volcanic action in subduction zones on the earth. It is questionable whether the potential energy of material raised to the height of a midocean ridge and falling to the depth of an ocean trench can produce the geothermal effects seen in the volcanoes of subduction zones. If the ridge, the trench, the plates, and the asthenosphere are merely visible effects of deeper density-gradient driven circulations, it is still uncertain that observed energy-concentration effects fit the models.

  6. Cold isopressing method

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Jack C.; Stawisuck, Valerie M.; Prasad, Ravi

    2003-01-01

    A cold isopressing method in which two or more layers of material are formed within an isopressing mold. One of the layers consists of a tape-cast film. The layers are isopressed within the isopressing mold, thereby to laminate the layers and to compact the tape-cast film. The isopressing mold can be of cylindrical configuration with the layers being coaxial cylindrical layers. The materials used in forming the layers can contain green ceramic materials and the resultant structure can be fired and sintered as necessary and in accordance with known methods to produce a finished composite, ceramic structure. Further, such green ceramic materials can be of the type that are capable of conducting hydrogen or oxygen ions at high temperature with the object of utilizing the finished composite ceramic structure as a ceramic membrane element.

  7. Nonfreezing Cold-Induced Injuries

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    circumstances. This chapter explores the history, epidemiology , pathophysiology, and current prevention and treatments of NFCI, as well as pernio...environment should mean that NFCI is preventable in most circumstances. This chapter explores the history, epidemiology , pathophysi- ology, and current...prevention and treatments of NFCI, as well as pernio (chilblains), cryoglobulinemia, and cold urticaria. Epidemiology Individuals suffering cold

  8. 2. Detail of tower foundation with lightning transfer wire, southeast ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Detail of tower foundation with lightning transfer wire, southeast corner - Cold Mountain Fire Lookout Station, Lookout Tower, Krassel District, Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness, Dixie, Idaho County, ID

  9. Cold-Weather Sports and Your Family

    MedlinePlus

    ... Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Cold-Weather Sports and Your Family KidsHealth > For Parents > Cold- ... once the weather turns frosty. Beating the Cold-Weather Blahs Once a chill is in the air, ...

  10. Cough and Cold Medicine Abuse (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Cough and Cold Medicine Abuse KidsHealth > For Parents > Cough ... cough and cold medicine. Why Do Kids Abuse Cough and Cold Remedies? Before the U.S. Food and ...

  11. COLD-SAT orbital experiment configured for Atlas launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shuster, J. R.; Bennett, F. O.; Wachter, J. P.

    1989-01-01

    The design and requirements for the proposed cryogenic on-orbit liquid depot storage, acquisition, and transfer (COLD-SAT) satellite experiment, which is to be launched by Atlas I, are examined. The COLD-SAT experiments are categorized as class I and II; class I involves technology related to space transportation missions and class II represents alternative fluid management operations and data. The hardware for the COLD-SAT experiments consists of three hydrogen tanks contained in the experimental module; the experimental module is connected to a three-axis-controlled spacecraft bus, and thrusters are positioned on the forward and aft ends of the spacecraft and on the cylindrical portion of the experimental module. The components and systems of the experiment module and the types of experiments that can be conducted in each tank are described. Diagrams of the spacecraft configuration are provided.

  12. Proteomic analysis of endothelial cold-adaptation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Understanding how human cells in tissue culture adapt to hypothermia may aid in developing new clinical procedures for improved ischemic and hypothermic protection. Human coronary artery endothelial cells grown to confluence at 37°C and then transferred to 25°C become resistant over time to oxidative stress and injury induced by 0°C storage and rewarming. This protection correlates with an increase in intracellular glutathione at 25°C. To help understand the molecular basis of endothelial cold-adaptation, isolated proteins from cold-adapted (25°C/72 h) and pre-adapted cells were analyzed by quantitative proteomic methods and differentially expressed proteins were categorized using the DAVID Bioinformatics Resource. Results Cells adapted to 25°C expressed changes in the abundance of 219 unique proteins representing a broad range of categories such as translation, glycolysis, biosynthetic (anabolic) processes, NAD, cytoskeletal organization, RNA processing, oxidoreductase activity, response-to-stress and cell redox homeostasis. The number of proteins that decreased significantly with cold-adaptation exceeded the number that increased by 2:1. Almost half of the decreases were associated with protein metabolic processes and a third were related to anabolic processes including protein, DNA and fatty acid synthesis. Changes consistent with the suppression of cytoskeletal dynamics provided further evidence that cold-adapted cells are in an energy conserving state. Among the specific changes were increases in the abundance and activity of redox proteins glutathione S-transferase, thioredoxin and thioredoxin reductase, which correlated with a decrease in oxidative stress, an increase in protein glutathionylation, and a recovery of reduced protein thiols during rewarming from 0°C. Increases in S-adenosylhomocysteine hydrolase and nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase implicate a central role for the methionine-cysteine transulfuration pathway in increasing

  13. Cold urticaria and celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Pedrosa Delgado, M; Martín Muñoz, F; Polanco Allué, I; Martín Esteban, M

    2008-01-01

    Cold urticaria can be associated with blood and thyroid disorders, drugs, or infections. Celiac disease is an autoimmune enteropathy caused by permanent gluten intolerance. It is often associated with other autoimmune diseases, such as chronic idiopathic urticaria. Nevertheless, association with cold urticaria has not yet been described. A boy aged 3 years 8 months presented local urticaria-angioedema when exposed to cold temperatures. An ice cube test was positive and iron deficiency anemia was demonstrated. He later developed legume intolerance, rhinoconjunctivitis related to pollen sensitization, and asthma. Due to persistence of cold urticaria symptoms and refractory anemia, a test for immunoglobulin A autoantibodies to tissue transglutaminase and an intestinal biopsy were performed. Results of both tests were compatible with celiac disease.A study of human leukocyte antigen indicated a high risk phenotype (HLA, DR6/DR7; DQA 0501, 0201; DQB 0301, 0201). After 7 months of a gluten-free diet, the boy's anemia resolved and he is free of symptoms when exposed to cold. This is a first description of the possibility of an association between celiac disease and cold urticaria. A poor course of cold urticaria in the absence of evidence of another underlying condition should lead to suspicion of celiac disease.

  14. Cold Fusion, A Journalistic Investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krivit, Steven B.

    2005-03-01

    Author of the recent book, The Rebirth of Cold Fusion, and founder of New Energy Times, Steven B. Krivit presents a summary of cold fusion's, past, present and possible future. This talk will briefly review five highlights of the recent New Energy Times investigation into cold fusion research:1. Analysis of early studies that supposedly disproved cold fusion.2. Key early corroborations that supported the claims of Fleischmann and Pons.3. The evolving understanding of cold fusion reaction paths and by-products.4. A look at volumetric power density.5. Brief comparison of the progress in hot fusion research as compared to cold fusion research.New Energy Times, founded in 2000, is an independent communications company which currently specializes in reporting on cold fusion researchootnotetextReferences and copies of the presentation are available at www.newenergytimes.com/reports/aps2005.htmhttp://www.newenergytimes.com/reports/aps2005.htm. It has no affiliations with any organization, entity or party which invests in these technologies, nor any individual researcher or research facility.

  15. Cold fusion studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hembree, D. M.; Burchfield, L. A.; Fuller, E. L., Jr.; Perey, F. G.; Mamantov, G.

    1990-06-01

    A series of experiments designed to detect the by-products expected from deuterium fusion occurring in the palladium and titanium cathodes of heavy water, D2O, electrolysis cells is reported. The primary purpose of this account is to outline the integrated experimental design developed to test the cold fusion hypothesis and to report preliminary results that support continuing the investigation. Apparent positive indicators of deuterium fusion were observed, but could not be repeated or proved to originate from the electrochemical cells. In one instance, two large increases in the neutron count rate, the largest of which exceeded the background by 27 standard deviations, were observed. In a separate experiment, one of the calorimetry cells appeared to be producing approximately 18 percent more power that the input value, but thermistor failure prevented an accurate recording of the event as a function of time. In general, the tritium levels in most cells followed the slow enrichment expected from the electrolysis of D2O containing a small amount of tritium. However, after 576 hours of electrolysis, one cell developed a tritium concentration approximately seven times greater than expected level.

  16. Cold fusion verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    North, M. H.; Mastny, G. F.; Wesley, E. J.

    1991-03-01

    The objective of this work to verify and reproduce experimental observations of Cold Nuclear Fusion (CNF), as originally reported in 1989. The method was to start with the original report and add such additional information as became available to build a set of operational electrolytic CNF cells. Verification was to be achieved by first observing cells for neutron production, and for those cells that demonstrated a nuclear effect, careful calorimetric measurements were planned. The authors concluded, after laboratory experience, reading published work, talking with others in the field, and attending conferences, that CNF probably is chimera and will go the way of N-rays and polywater. The neutron detector used for these tests was a completely packaged unit built into a metal suitcase that afforded electrostatic shielding for the detectors and self-contained electronics. It was battery-powered, although it was on charge for most of the long tests. The sensor element consists of He detectors arranged in three independent layers in a solid moderating block. The count from each of the three layers as well as the sum of all the detectors were brought out and recorded separately. The neutron measurements were made with both the neutron detector and the sample tested in a cave made of thick moderating material that surrounded the two units on the sides and bottom.

  17. Versatile cold atom target apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Goetz, Simone; Hoeltkemeier, Bastian; Hofmann, Christoph S.; Litsch, Dominic; DePaola, Brett D.; Weidemueller, Matthias

    2012-07-15

    We report on a compact and transportable apparatus that consists of a cold atomic target at the center of a high resolution recoil ion momentum spectrometer. Cold rubidium atoms serve as a target which can be operated in three different modes: in continuous mode, consisting of a cold atom beam generated by a two-dimensional magneto-optical trap, in normal mode in which the atoms from the beam are trapped in a three-dimensional magneto-optical trap (3D MOT), and in high density mode in which the 3D MOT is operated in dark spontaneous optical trap configuration. The targets are characterized using photoionization.

  18. Plants in a cold climate.

    PubMed Central

    Smallwood, Maggie; Bowles, Dianna J

    2002-01-01

    Plants are able to survive prolonged exposure to sub-zero temperatures; this ability is enhanced by pre-exposure to low, but above-zero temperatures. This process, known as cold acclimation, is briefly reviewed from the perception of cold, through transduction of the low-temperature signal to functional analysis of cold-induced gene products. The stresses that freezing of apoplastic water imposes on plant cells is considered and what is understood about the mechanisms that plants use to combat those stresses discussed, with particular emphasis on the role of the extracellular matrix. PMID:12171647

  19. The COLD-SAT experiment for cryogenic fluid management technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuster, J. R.; Wachter, J. P.; Vento, D. M.

    1990-01-01

    The COLD-SAT spacecraft design experiments are described. COLD-SAT will be placed into an initial 1300 km circular orbit by an Atlas commercial launch vehicle. Electric power, experiment control and data management, attitude control, and propulsive accelarations for the experiments will be provided by the three-axis-controlled spacecraft bus. To provide data on the effects that low gravity levels might have on the heat and mass transfer processes involved, low levels of accelaration will be created. The COLD-SAT experiment will be configured into a module. The spacecraft experiment module will include three liquid hydrogen tanks; fluid transfer, pressurization and venting equipment; and instrumentation. Since the largest tank has helium-purged MLI to prevent ingress and freezing of air on the launchpad, it will contain all the liquid hydrogen at the point of launching. The hydrogen tanking system used for the Centaur upper stage of the Atlas will load and top off this tank. Atlas, with its liquid hydrogen upper stage, large payload fairing, and large launch margin, simplifies COLD-SAT design and integration.

  20. Motion and Arrest of a Molten Liquid on Cold Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavakoli-Dastjerdi, Faryar

    Spreading of liquid drop on cold solid substrates followed by solidification involves heat transfer, fluid dynamics, and phase change physics. Coupling of these physical phenomena, although present in many industrial applications and nature, renders the physical understanding of the process challenging. Here, the key aspects of molten liquid spreading and solidifying on cold solid substrate are examined experimentally and theoretically. A novel hypothesis of spreading solidifying drops on cold solid substrates is introduced that emphasizes on early stages of the drop solidification at the solid-liquid-gas interface. The derived equations of the drop motion and arrest, stemmed from the development of the presented hypothesis, are in accord with obtained empirical results. The hypothesis is then thoroughly tested with new sets of experiments: i) Drop impact experiments, ii) Inclined plate experiments. In addition, the solidification of static supercooled drops and the initiation mechanism of an intermittent stage (recalescence) are addressed. Also, a peculiar delay-freezing property of hydrophobic surfaces is examined under varying liquid flow rates and substrate temperatures. Moreover, a new phenomenon of cold-induced spreading of water drops on hydrophobic surfaces due to premature condensation followed by thin-film formation at the trijunction is explored and the effect of physical parameters such as relative humidity, the substrate temperature, initial contact angle, surface roughness, and drop volume are investigated. This study will significantly advance the current understanding of dynamic interaction between molten liquid and cold solid substrates.

  1. Technology transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Handley, Thomas

    1992-01-01

    The requirements for a successful technology transfer program and what such a program would look like are discussed. In particular, the issues associated with technology transfer in general, and within the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) environment specifically are addressed. The section on background sets the stage, identifies the barriers to successful technology transfer, and suggests actions to address the barriers either generally or specifically. The section on technology transfer presents a process with its supporting management plan that is required to ensure a smooth transfer process. Viewgraphs are also included.

  2. ANS cold source neutronics analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Lillie, R.A.

    1994-06-01

    This paper describes the calculational procedures employed in the ongoing neutronics analysis of the ANS cold source and presents in chronological order some of the more important results from the one- and two-dimensional discrete calculations performed to date in support of the ANS cold source design. In particular, cold neutron currents from cryostat shapes which can be adequately modeled with two-dimensional geometries are compared with and without reentrant cavities. Also, results are presented from one-dimensional comparative liquid hydrogen vs liquid deuterium calculations in which the density, placement, and para-ortho mixture of liquid hydrogen is investigated. In addition, the evolution of the ANS conceptual design cold source from an initial short cylindrical cryostat with hemispherical upper and lower heads employing a natural convection liquid deuterium circulation system to the final spherical design employing a pumped system is described. Finally, performance data and heating rates are presented for some possible alternate ANS cryostat and vacuum jacket materials.

  3. Prescription Drugs and Cold Medicines

    MedlinePlus

    ... Alerts Alcohol Club Drugs Cocaine Hallucinogens Heroin Inhalants Marijuana MDMA (Ecstasy/Molly) Methamphetamine Opioids Prescription Drugs & Cold ... and over-the-counter (OTC) drugs are, after marijuana (and alcohol), the most commonly abused substances by ...

  4. Cold nuclear fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsyganov, E. N.; Bavizhev, M. D.; Buryakov, M. G.; Dabagov, S. B.; Golovatyuk, V. M.; Lobastov, S. P.

    2015-07-01

    If target deuterium atoms were implanted in a metal crystal in accelerator experiments, a sharp increase in the probability of DD-fusion reaction was clearly observed when compared with the reaction's theoretical value. The electronic screening potential, which for a collision of free deuterium atoms is about 27 eV, reached 300-700 eV in the case of the DD-fusion in metallic crystals. These data leads to the conclusion that a ban must exist for deuterium atoms to be in the ground state 1s in a niche filled with free conduction electrons. At the same time, the state 2p whose energy level is only 10 eV above that of state 1s is allowed in these conditions. With anisotropy of 2p, 3p or above orbitals, their spatial positions are strictly determined in the lattice coordinate system. When filling out the same potential niches with two deuterium atoms in the states 2p, 3p or higher, the nuclei of these atoms can be permanently positioned without creating much Coulomb repulsion at a very short distance from each other. In this case, the transparency of the potential barrier increases dramatically compared to the ground state 1s for these atoms. The probability of the deuterium nuclei penetrating the Coulomb barrier by zero quantum vibration of the DD-system also increases dramatically. The so-called cold nuclear DD-fusion for a number of years was registered in many experiments, however, was still rejected by mainstream science for allegedly having no consistent scientific explanation. Finally, it received the validation. Below, we outline the concept of this explanation and give the necessary calculations. This paper also considers the further destiny of the formed intermediate state of 4He∗.

  5. Cold regions hydrology and hydraulics

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, W.L. ); Crissman, R.D. )

    1990-01-01

    This monograph addresses a narrow aspect of cold regions engineering, namely the effects of cold weather on the traditional civil engineering disciplines of hydrology and hydraulics. Hydrologic and hydraulic considerations in the design, construction, and operation of civil works are very important. Many of the problems encountered in the design and construction of buildings, transportation systems, water supply facilities, waste treatment facilities, and hazardous waste disposal facilities, for example are closely tied to the characteristics of the site hydrology.

  6. Cold urticaria and HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Lin, R Y; Schwartz, R A

    1993-10-01

    Three patients, all seropositive for HIV antibody, complained of swelling and pruritus on the head and limbs when exposed to the cold. All three had received zidovudine for significant CD4 cell depletion, but had no AIDS-defining illnesses. An ice-cube test was positive on each individual. There was no evidence of cold agglutinins, cryoglobulins, syphilis, or other concurrent diseases in any of the patients. This association may represent yet another allergic manifestation in HIV infection.

  7. Cooled electronic system with thermal spreaders coupling electronics cards to cold rails

    DOEpatents

    Chainer, Timothy J; Gaynes, Michael A; Graybill, David P; Iyengar, Madhusudan K; Kamath, Vinod; Kochuparambil, Bejoy J; Schmidt, Roger R; Schultz, Mark D; Simco, Daniel P; Steinke, Mark E

    2013-07-23

    Liquid-cooled electronic systems are provided which include an electronic assembly having an electronics card and a socket with a latch at one end. The latch facilitates securing of the card within the socket or removal of the card from the socket. A liquid-cooled cold rail is disposed at the one end of the socket, and a thermal spreader couples the electronics card to the cold rail. The thermal spreader includes first and second thermal transfer plates coupled to first and second surfaces on opposite sides of the card, and thermally conductive extensions extending from end edges of the plates, which couple the respective transfer plates to the liquid-cooled cold rail. The thermally conductive extensions are disposed to the sides of the latch, and the card is securable within or removable from the socket using the latch without removing the cold rail or the thermal spreader.

  8. Garlic for the common cold.

    PubMed

    Lissiman, Elizabeth; Bhasale, Alice L; Cohen, Marc

    2014-11-11

    Background Garlic is alleged to have antimicrobial and antiviral properties that relieve the common cold, among other beneficial effects. There is widespread usage of garlic supplements. The common cold is associated with significant morbidity and economic consequences. On average, children have six to eight colds per year and adults have two to four.Objectives To determine whether garlic (Allium sativum) is effective for the prevention or treatment of the common cold, when compared to placebo, no treatment or other treatments.Search methods We searched CENTRAL (2014, Issue 7),OLDMEDLINE (1950 to 1965),MEDLINE (January 1966 to July week 5, 2014), EMBASE(1974 to August 2014) and AMED (1985 to August 2014).Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials of common cold prevention and treatment comparing garlic with placebo, no treatment or standard treatment.Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently reviewed and selected trials from searches, assessed and rated study quality and extracted relevant data.Main results In this updated review, we identified eight trials as potentially relevant from our searches. Again, only one trial met the inclusion criteria.This trial randomly assigned 146 participants to either a garlic supplement (with 180 mg of allicin content) or a placebo (once daily)for 12 weeks. The trial reported 24 occurrences of the common cold in the garlic intervention group compared with 65 in the placebo group (P value < 0.001), resulting in fewer days of illness in the garlic group compared with the placebo group (111 versus 366). The number of days to recovery from an occurrence of the common cold was similar in both groups (4.63 versus 5.63). Only one trial met the inclusion criteria, therefore limited conclusions can be drawn. The trial relied on self reported episodes of the common cold but was of reasonable quality in terms of randomisation and allocation concealment. Adverse effects included rash and odour. Authors' conclusions

  9. Effect of Feeding Rate on the Cold Cap Configuration in a Laboratory-Scale Melter

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, Derek R.; Schweiger, Michael J.; Hrma, Pavel R.

    2013-02-25

    High level waste melter feed is converted into glass in a joule heated melter, where it forms a floating layer of reacting feed, called the cold cap. After the glass-forming phase becomes connected, evolving gases produce bubbles that form a foam layer under the cold cap. The bubbles coalesce into cavities that escape around the edges of the cold cap. The foam layer insulates the cold cap from the heat transferred from the molten glass below. More information is needed about the formation and behavior of the foam layer to control, limit and possibly avoid foaming, thus allowing for a higher rate of melting. The cold cap behavior was investigated in a laboratory scale assembly with a sealed silica-glass crucible. A high alumina waste simulant was fed into the crucible and the feed charging rate was varied from 3 to 7 mL min-1. After a fixed amount of time (35 min), feed charging was stopped and the crucible was removed from the furnace and quenched on a copper block to preserve the structure of the cold cap and foam during cooling. During the rapid quenching, thermal cracking of the glass and cold cap allowed it to be broken up into sections for analysis. The effect of the charging rate on the height, area and volume of the cold cap was determined. The size of the bubbles collected in the foam layer under the cold cap increased as the cold cap expanded. Under the cold cap, the bubbles coalesced into oblong cavities. These cavities allowed the evolved gases to escape around the edges of the cold cap through the molten glass into the melter plenum.

  10. Recycling of cold-stable microtubules: evidence that cold stability is due to substoichiometric polymer blocks.

    PubMed

    Job, D; Rauch, C T; Fischer, E H; Margolis, R L

    1982-02-02

    A substantial subpopulation of mammalian brain crude extract microtubules is resistant to cold-temperature disassembly. We propose here that microtubules are rendered cold stable by rare substoichiometric blocks. Mild shearing of rat brain cold-stable microtubules makes them largely cold labile. In addition, cold-stable microtubules can be destabilized by exposure to low concentrations of calmodulin (5 microM) in the presence of calcium at 0 degree C. Cold-disassembled microtubule protein, obtained from sheared or calmodulin-treated cold-stable preparations, re-forms a cold-stable subpopulation upon reassembly. These observations allow strategies for the recycling purification of cold-stable microtubules. Comparison of purified cold-labile and cold-stable material by gel electrophoresis shows enrichment for a few unique polypeptides, of 135, 70-82, and 56 kilodaltons, in the cold-stable preparation. The 64-kilodalton "switch protein", previously identified as uniquely dephosphorylated in cold-stable microtubules, is equally represented in recycled cold-stable and cold-labile microtubule preparations. Furthermore, when disassembled, cold-stable microtubule proteins are passed through a calmodulin affinity column on which the polypeptides characteristic of cold-stable microtubules are specifically retained, the breakthrough (unbound) material repolymerizes into cold-labile microtubules only. Based on the above data, a model is presented in which microtubules are rendered cold stable by the presence of substoichiometric, calmodulin-sensitive blocks that randomly reshuffle upon reassembly of cold-stable microtubules.

  11. Primary (idiopathic) cold urticaria and cholinergic urticaria.

    PubMed

    Kim, Gene

    2004-11-30

    A 76-year-old man with a longstanding history of cold sensitivity developed wheals after the application of an ice cube. Cold urticaria is a type of physical urticaria that is characterized urticaria and angioedema after exposure to cold. It may be idiopathic or secondary to hematologic or infectious diseases. Treatment of primary cold urticaria includes antihistamines; however, ketotifen, doxantrazole, zafirlukast, cyclosporine, and cold-tolerance induction may be tried in refractory cases.

  12. Mathematical modeling of cold cap

    SciTech Connect

    Pokorny, Richard; Hrma, Pavel R.

    2012-10-13

    The ultimate goal of studies of cold cap behavior in glass melters is to increase the rate of glass processing in an energy-efficient manner. Regrettably, mathematical models, which are ideal tools for assessing the responses of melters to process parameters, have not paid adequate attention to the cold cap. In this study, we consider a cold cap resting on a pool of molten glass from which it receives a steady heat flux while temperature, velocity, and extent of conversion are functions of the position along the vertical coordinate. A one-dimensional (1D) mathematical model simulates this process by solving the differential equations for mass and energy balances with appropriate boundary conditions and constitutive relationships for material properties. The sensitivity analyses on the effects of incoming heat fluxes to the cold cap through its lower and upper boundaries show that the cold cap thickness increases as the heat flux from above increases, and decreases as the total heat flux increases. We also discuss the effects of foam, originating from batch reactions and from redox reactions in molten glass and argue that models must represent the foam layer to achieve a reliable prediction of the melting rate as a function of feed properties and melter conditions.

  13. Cold air systems: Sleeping giant

    SciTech Connect

    MacCracken, C.D. )

    1994-04-01

    This article describes how cold air systems help owners increase the profits from their buildings by reducing electric costs and improving indoor air quality through lower relative humidity levels. Cold air distribution involves energy savings, cost savings, space savings, greater comfort, cleaner air, thermal storage, tighter ducting, coil redesign, lower relative humidities, retrofitting, and improved indoor air quality (IAQ). It opens a door for architects, engineers, owners, builders, environmentalists, retrofitters, designers, occupants, and manufacturers. Three things have held up cold air's usage: multiple fan-powered boxes that ate up the energy savings of primary fans. Cold air room diffusers that provided inadequate comfort. Condensation from ducts, boxes, and diffusers. Such problems have been largely eliminated through research and development by utilities and manufacturers. New cold air diffusers no longer need fan powered boxes. It has also been found that condensation is not a concern so long as the ducts are located in air conditioned space, such as drop ceilings or central risers, where relative humidity falls quickly during morning startup.

  14. Spectroscopy with cold and ultra-cold neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abele, Hartmut; Jenke, Tobias; Konrad, Gertrud

    2015-05-01

    We present two new types of spectroscopy methods for cold and ultra-cold neutrons. The first method, which uses the R×B drift effect to disperse charged particles in a uniformly curved magnetic field, allows to study neutron β-decay. We aim for a precision on the 10-4 level. The second method that we refer to as gravity resonance spectroscopy (GRS) allows to test Newton's gravity law at short distances. At the level of precision we are able to provide constraints on any possible gravity-like interaction. In particular, limits on dark energy chameleon fields are improved by several orders of magnitude.

  15. Method of operating a cold cathode-cold reservoir thyratron

    SciTech Connect

    Tauber, A.; Finnegan, R.D.; Rothwarf, F.

    1984-05-22

    A method is disclosed of operating a cold-cathode-cold-reservoir thyratron for laser/radar and other systems employing high voltage and current pulses using ZrVFe as the hydrogen thyratron material. According to the method, a hydride of ZrVFe is first formed and the hydrided material then placed in the cathode structure of the thyratron. The tube is then pumped down to its operating pressure of approximately 10/sup -3/ atmospheres, the hydrided material then acting as a ballast to maintain that partial pressure of hydrogen at room temperature.

  16. Vibrational Cooling of Photoassociated Homonuclear Cold Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passagem, Henry; Ventura, Paulo; Tallant, Jonathan; Marcassa, Luis

    2015-05-01

    In this work, we produce vibrationally cold homonuclear Rb molecules using spontaneous optical pumping. The vibrationally cooled molecules are produced in three steps. In the first step, we use a photoassociation laser to produce molecules in high vibrational levels of the singlet ground state. Then in a second step, a 50 W broadband laser at 1071 nm, which bandwidth is about 2 nm, is used to transfer the molecules to lower vibrational levels via optical pumping through the excited state. This process transfers the molecules from vibrational levels around ν ~= 113 to a distribution of levels below ν = 35 . The molecules can be further cooled using a broadband light source near 685 nm. In order to obtain such broadband source, we have used a 5 mW superluminescent diode, which is amplified in a tapered amplifier using a double pass configuration. After the amplification, the spectrum is properly shaped and we end up with about 90 mW distributed in the 682-689 nm range. The final vibrational distribution is probed using resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization with a pulsed dye laser near 670 nm operating at 4KHz. The results are presented and compared with theoretical simulations. This work was supported by Fapesp and INCT-IQ.

  17. Technology transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penaranda, Frank E.

    1992-01-01

    The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: international comparison of R&D expenditures in 1989; NASA Technology Transfer Program; NASA Technology Utilization Program thrusts for FY 1992 and FY 1993; National Technology Transfer Network; and NTTC roles.

  18. Nanofriction in cold ion traps.

    PubMed

    Benassi, A; Vanossi, A; Tosatti, E

    2011-01-01

    Sliding friction between crystal lattices and the physics of cold ion traps are so far non-overlapping fields. Two sliding lattices may either stick and show static friction or slip with dynamic friction; cold ions are known to form static chains, helices or clusters, depending on the trapping conditions. Here we show, based on simulations, that much could be learnt about friction by sliding, through, for example, an electric field, the trapped ion chains over a corrugated potential. Unlike infinite chains, in which the theoretically predicted Aubry transition to free sliding may take place, trapped chains are always pinned. Yet, a properly defined static friction still vanishes Aubry-like at a symmetric-asymmetric structural transition, found for decreasing corrugation in both straight and zig-zag trapped chains. Dynamic friction is also accessible in ringdown oscillations of the ion trap. Long theorized static and dynamic one-dimensional friction phenomena could thus become accessible in future cold ion tribology.

  19. The COLD-SAT Experiment for Cryogenic Fluid Management Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuster, J. R.; Wachter, J. P.; Vento, D. M.

    1990-01-01

    Future national space transportation missions will depend on the use of cryogenic fluid management technology development needs for these missions. In-space testing will be conducted in order to show low gravity cryogenic fluid management concepts and to acquire a technical data base. Liquid H2 is the preferred test fluid due to its propellant use. The design of COLD-SAT (Cryogenic On-orbit Liquid Depot Storage, Acquisition, and Transfer Satellite), an Expendable Launch Vehicle (ELV) launched orbital spacecraft that will perform subcritical liquid H2 storage and transfer experiments under low gravity conditions is studied. An Atlas launch vehicle will place COLD-SAT into a circular orbit, and the 3-axis controlled spacecraft bus will provide electric power, experiment control, and data management, attitude control, and propulsive accelerations for the experiments. Low levels of acceleration will provide data on the effects that low gravity might have on the heat and mass transfer processes used. The experiment module will contain 3 liquid H2 tanks; fluid transfer, pressurization and venting equipment; and instrumentation.

  20. Thermal de-acclimation: how permanent are leaf phenotypes when cold-acclimated plants experience warming?

    PubMed

    Gorsuch, Peter A; Pandey, Subedar; Atkin, Owen K

    2010-07-01

    We quantified a broad range of Arabidopsis thaliana (Col-0) leaf phenotypes for initially warm-grown (25/20 degrees C day/night) plants that were exposed to cold (5 degrees C) for periods of a few hours to 45 d before being transferred back to the warm, where leaves were allowed to mature. This allowed us to address the following questions: (1) For how long do warm-grown plants have to experience cold before developing leaves become irreversibly cold acclimated? (2) To what extent is the de-acclimation process associated with changes in leaf anatomy and physiology? We show that leaves that experience cold for extended periods during early development exhibit little plasticity in either photosynthesis or respiration, and they do not revert to a warm-associated carbohydrate profile. The eventual expansion rate in the warm was inversely related to the duration of previous cold treatment. Moreover, cold exposure of immature/developing leaves for as little as 5 d resulted in irreversible changes in the morphology of leaves that subsequently matured in the warm, with 15 d cold being sufficient for a permanent alteration of leaf anatomy. Collectively, these results highlight the impact of transitory cold during early leaf development in determining the eventual phenotype of leaves that mature in the warm.

  1. Comparative analysis of gene expression in response to cold stress in diverse rice genotypes.

    PubMed

    Moraes de Freitas, Gabriela Peres; Basu, Supratim; Ramegowda, Venkategowda; Braga, Eugenia Bolacel; Pereira, Andy

    2016-02-26

    Cold stress is a major factor affecting rice (Oryza sativa) growth and productivity, limiting its distribution worldwide. Rice production is affected primarily due to its vulnerability to cold stress at seedling stage, as well as reproductive stage leading to spikelet sterility. We report here the analysis of 21 diverse rice genotypes from the USDA mini-core collection for cold tolerance and categorized their tolerance levels on the basis of reduction in growth measured by root and shoot length. The screening identified 12 cold tolerant genotypes from which six tolerant genotypes were characterized at the vegetative stage for cold tolerance and gas-exchange parameters. Two tolerant and two sensitive genotypes were used further for gene expression analysis. Lipid Transfer Protein (LTP) genes showed a clear difference in expression between cold tolerant and sensitive genotypes suggesting that they are good candidates for engineering cold tolerance in rice. Nipponbare was identified as a cold tolerant genotype with stress tolerance mechanism potentially operating via both ABA dependent and independent pathways.

  2. Avionics Box Cold Plate Damage Prevention

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stambolian, Damon B.; Larchar, Steven W.; Henderson, Gena; Tran, Donald; Barth, Tim

    2012-01-01

    Problem Introduction: 1. Prevent Cold Plate Damage in Space Shuttle. 1a. The number of cold plate problems had increased from an average of 16.5 per/year between 1990 through 2000, to an average of 39.6 per year between 2001through 2005. 1b. Each complete set of 80 cold plates cost approximately $29 million, an average of $362,500 per cold plate. 1c It takes four months to produce a single cold plate. 2. Prevent Cold Plate Damage in Future Space Vehicles.

  3. Cryoprotectin: a plant lipid-transfer protein homologue that stabilizes membranes during freezing.

    PubMed Central

    Hincha, Dirk K

    2002-01-01

    Plants from temperate and cold climates are able to increase their freezing tolerance during exposure to low non-freezing temperatures. It has been shown that several genes are induced in a coordinated manner during this process of cold acclimation. The functional role of most of the corresponding cold-regulated proteins is not yet known. We summarize our knowledge of those cold-regulated proteins that are able to stabilize membranes during a freeze-thaw cycle. Special emphasis is placed on cryoprotectin, a lipid-transfer protein homologue that was isolated from cold-acclimated cabbage leaves and that protects isolated chloroplast thylakoid membranes from freeze-thaw damage. PMID:12171654

  4. "Stone Cold": Worthy of Study?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Douthwaite, Alison

    2015-01-01

    This article draws on my experiences of teaching "Stone Cold" to respond to a blog post suggesting that the novel holds little educational value. I argue that the novel's narrative style helps to foster criticality while its subject matter can help students see the relevance of literature to the world around them. Relating this to…

  5. Underwater cold tap machine tested

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-05-01

    Tests are complete on a strategic cold tap machine for underwater lines. The system was designed around Total's Norway-UK Frigg gas line. It provides a permanent, easily mobilized, mechanical insurance against damage to the Frigg line but also provides a proven, workable principle for the repair or modification of other lines. The design of the system is discussed.

  6. Cold fusion; Myth versus reality

    SciTech Connect

    Rabinowitz, M. )

    1990-01-01

    Experiments indicate that several different nuclear reactions are taking place. Some of the experiments point to D-D fusion with a cominant tritium channel as one of the reactions. The article notes a similarity between Prometheus and the discoveries of cold fusion.

  7. Cold plasma decontamination of foods

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cold plasma is a novel nonthermal food processing technology which uses energetic, reactive gases to inactivate contaminating microbes on meats, poultry and fruits and vegetables. This flexible sanitizing method uses electricity and a carrier gas such as air, oxygen, nitrogen or helium; antimicrobi...

  8. Advances in cold plasma technology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Foodborne pathogens continue to be an issue on a variety of commodities, prompting research into novel interventions. Cold plasma is a nonthermal food processing technology which uses energetic, reactive gases to inactivate contaminating microbes on meats, poultry and fruits and vegetables. The prim...

  9. The Cold Blooded Killer: Hypothermia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keller, Rosanne

    Part of a series of home literacy readers with conversational text and sketches, this booklet depicts the subarctic Alaskan environment where cold makes extreme demands on body metabolism. Body temperature must be maintained above 80F (26.7C). A condition of too little body-heat is termed hypo- ('deficit') thermia ('heat'). Hypothermia is the…

  10. EDITORIAL: Cold Quantum GasesEditorial: Cold Quantum Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vassen, W.; Hemmerich, A.; Arimondo, E.

    2003-04-01

    This Special Issue of Journal of Optics B: Quantum and Semiclassical Optics brings together the contributions of various researchers working on theoretical and experimental aspects of cold quantum gases. Different aspects of atom optics, matter wave interferometry, laser manipulation of atoms and molecules, and production of very cold and degenerate gases are presented. The variety of subjects demonstrates the steadily expanding role associated with this research area. The topics discussed in this issue, extending from basic physics to applications of atom optics and of cold atomic samples, include: bulletBose--Einstein condensation bulletFermi degenerate gases bulletCharacterization and manipulation of quantum gases bulletCoherent and nonlinear cold matter wave optics bulletNew schemes for laser cooling bulletCoherent cold molecular gases bulletUltra-precise atomic clocks bulletApplications of cold quantum gases to metrology and spectroscopy bulletApplications of cold quantum gases to quantum computing bulletNanoprobes and nanolithography. This special issue is published in connection with the 7th International Workshop on Atom Optics and Interferometry, held in Lunteren, The Netherlands, from 28 September to 2 October 2002. This was the last in a series of Workshops organized with the support of the European Community that have greatly contributed to progress in this area. The scientific part of the Workshop was managed by A Hemmerich, W Hogervorst, W Vassen and J T M Walraven, with input from members of the International Programme Committee who are listed below. The practical aspects of the organization were ably handled by Petra de Gijsel from the Vrije Universiteit in Amsterdam. The Workshop was funded by the European Science Foundation (programme BEC2000+), the European Networks 'Cold Quantum Gases (CQG)', coordinated by E Arimondo, and 'Cold Atoms and Ultraprecise Atomic Clocks (CAUAC)', coordinated by J Henningsen, by the German Physical Society (DFG), by

  11. Cold Stress and Urinary Frequency.

    PubMed

    Ishizuka, Osamu; Imamura, Tetsuya; Nishizawa, Osamu

    2012-03-01

    There have been few studies regarding the onset of urinary sensations and frequent urination induced by sudden whole-body cooling. In this article, we review the relationship between cold stress and urinary frequency based mainly on our previous studies. A recent study showed that cold stress induces bladder overactivity in conscious rats, and these effects were mediated, at least in part, by α1A -adrenergic receptor (AR) and α1D -AR. Another study suggested that the resiniferatoxin-sensitive nerves present in the urinary bladder may also be involved in the regulation of detrusor activity associated with cold stress. The mammalian transient receptor potential (TRP) channel family consists of 28 channels subdivided into five different classes: TRPV (vanilloid), TRPC (canonical), TRPM (melastatin), TRPML (mucolipin), and TRPA (ankyrin). TRP channels function as multifunctional sensors at the cellular level. They can be activated by physical (voltage, heat, cold, mechanical stress) or chemical stimuli and binding of specific ligands. In 2002, it was reported that a nonselective cation channel, TRPM8, could be activated by both menthol and thermal stimuli (8-28 °C). We demonstrated the presence of TRPM8 in the skin from the legs and back of rats by immunofluorescence staining and that stimulation of this receptor by menthol causes urinary frequency. There have been other reports demonstrating roles of TRPM8 not related to its thermosensory function. Further studies are needed to clarify the mechanism of cold stress-induced urinary frequency, and the roles of TRPM8 in the micturition control system.

  12. Coughs and Colds: Medicines or Home Remedies?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Issues Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Coughs and Colds: Medicines or Home Remedies? Page Content Article Body ​Medicines Over-the-counter (OTC) cough and cold medicines can cause serious side effects ...

  13. [The skin, cold and winter sports].

    PubMed

    Claes, G; Henry, F; Letawe, C; Piérard, G E

    2001-04-01

    Winter sports are responsible for various dermatoses which could be often avoided by simple preventive procedures. Both the severity and duration of cold exposure combined with wind speed, altitude and environmental hygrometric value govern the potential types of cold injuries.

  14. Helium Find Thaws the Cold Fusion Trail.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennisi, E.

    1991-01-01

    Reported is a study of cold fusion in which trace amounts of helium, possible evidence of an actual fusion reaction, were found. Research methodology is detailed. The controversy over the validity of experimental results with cold fusion are reviewed. (CW)

  15. Cold Medicines for Kids: What's the Risk?

    MedlinePlus

    ... or difficult breathing. There's no cure for the common cold, but you can help your child feel better ... Pediatrics; 2009:1934. Pappas DE, et al. The common cold in children: Management and prevention. http://www.uptodate. ...

  16. Zinc for Colds: The Final Word?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Eby GA, et al. Reduction in duration of common colds by zinc gluconate lozenges in a double-blind ... 2014;28:4. Sexton DJ, et al. The common cold in adults: Treatment and prevention. http://www.uptodate. ...

  17. Vitamin C and the Common Cold Revisited.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Travis, H. Richard

    1984-01-01

    Various studies indicate that Vitamin C does not prevent or cure a cold, but it may ameliorate symptoms in some individuals. The development of a balanced life-style is more effective towards cold prevention. (DF)

  18. Common cold - how to treat at home

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000466.htm Common cold - how to treat at home To use the ... Antibiotics are almost never needed to treat a common cold. Acetaminophen (Tylenol) and ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin) help lower ...

  19. The cold equation of state of tantalum

    SciTech Connect

    Greeff, Carl W; Rudin, Sven P; Corckett, Scott D; Wills, John M

    2009-01-01

    In high-pressure isentropic compression experiments (ICE), the pressure is dominated by the cold curve. In order to obtain an accurate semi-empirical cold curve for Ta, we calculate the thermal pressure from ab initio phonon and electronic excitation spectra. The cold curve is then inferred from ultrasonic and shock data. Our empirical cold pressure is compared to density functional calculations and found to be closer to GGA results at low pressure and to approach LDA at high pressure.

  20. Cold Tolerance of Plants Used for Cold-Regions Revegetation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-10-01

    also interact among themselves. Evaporation, insolation (sunlight), soil-forming processes, soil microbiota , plant Leaf chlorosis cadfrost banding...that can etation applications. cold harden will do so with 10-14 days of exposure to Soluble carbohydrates depress freezing points and temperatures...water, melting point depression , and tissue Belding, R.D. and E. Young (1987) Shoot and root water content. Botanical Gazette, 137: 313-317. temperature

  1. Different types of cold adaptation in humans.

    PubMed

    Makinen, Tiina Maria

    2010-06-01

    Human adaptation to cold may occur through acclimatization or acclimation and includes genetic, physiologic, morphological or behavioural responses. It has been studied in indigenous populations, during polar or ski expeditions, sporting activities, military training, in urban people, or under controlled conditions involving exposures to cold air or water. Although divergent results exist between the studies, the main cold adaptation responses are either insulative (circulatory adjustments, increase of fat layer) or metabolic (shivering or nonshivering thermogenesis) and may be positive (enhanced) or negative (blunted). The pattern of cold adaptation is dependent on the type (air, water) and intensity (continuous, intermittent) of the cold exposure. In addition, several individual factors like age, sex, body composition, exercise, diet, fitness and health modify the responses to cold. Habituation of thermal sensations to cold develops first, followed by cardiovascular, metabolic and endocrinological responses. If the repeated cold stimulus is discontinued, adaptation will gradually disappear. The functional significance of physiological cold adaptation is unclear, and some of the responses can even be harmful and predispose to cold injuries. The article summarises recent research information concerning with the thermoregulatory responses related to repeated exposures to cold (air or water), and also discusses the determinants of cold adaptation, as well as its functional significance.

  2. Common Cold in Babies: Symptoms and Causes

    MedlinePlus

    Common cold in babies Symptoms and causes By Mayo Clinic Staff Symptoms The first indication of the common cold in a baby is often: A congested or ... or green Other signs and symptoms of a common cold in a baby may include: Fever Sneezing Coughing ...

  3. 77 FR 43117 - Meeting of the Cold War Advisory Committee for the Cold War Theme Study

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-23

    ... National Park Service Meeting of the Cold War Advisory Committee for the Cold War Theme Study AGENCY... with the Federal Advisory Committee Act, 5 U.S.C. Appendix, that the Cold War Advisory Committee for the Cold War Theme Study will conduct a teleconference meeting on August 3, 2012. Members of...

  4. High flux isotope reactor cold source preconceptual design study report

    SciTech Connect

    Selby, D.L.; Bucholz, J.A.; Burnette, S.E.

    1995-12-01

    In February 1995, the deputy director of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) formed a group to examine the need for upgrades to the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) system in light of the cancellation of the Advanced Neutron Source Project. One of the major findings of this study was that there was an immediate need for the installation of a cold neutron source facility in the HFIR complex. The anticipated cold source will consist of a cryogenic LH{sub 2} moderator plug, a cryogenic pump system, a refrigerator that uses helium gas as a refrigerant, a heat exchanger to interface the refrigerant with the hydrogen loop, liquid hydrogen transfer lines, a gas handling system that includes vacuum lines, and an instrumentation and control system to provide constant system status monitoring and to maintain system stability. The scope of this project includes the development, design, safety analysis, procurement/fabrication, testing, and installation of all of the components necessary to produce a working cold source within an existing HFIR beam tube. This project will also include those activities necessary to transport the cold neutron beam to the front face of the present HFIR beam room. The cold source project has been divided into four phases: (1) preconceptual, (2) conceptual design and research and development (R and D), (3) detailed design and procurement, and (4) installation and operation. This report marks the conclusion of the preconceptual phase and establishes the concept feasibility. The information presented includes the project scope, the preliminary design requirements, the preliminary cost and schedule, the preliminary performance data, and an outline of the various plans for completing the project.

  5. Cold urticaria associated with C4 deficiency and elevated IgM.

    PubMed

    Stafford, C T; Jamieson, D M

    1986-04-01

    Various immunologic abnormalities have been implicated in cold urticaria. This is the first report of cold urticaria associated with C4 deficiency and elevated IgM. A 12-year-old male developed urticaria upon exposure to cold. He denied fever, purpura, hemoglobinuria, Raynaud's disease, or arthralgias. Family history was negative for cold urticaria. Immunologic studies revealed elevated IgM (186 mg/dL) as well as decreased CH100 and C4 (8.0 mg/dL). C1, C2, and C3 were normal. Ice cube skin test was positive, but passive transfer tests were negative. Biopsy was not diagnostic for vasculitis, although it revealed a few immunofluorescent deposits of IgM and C4. Complement genetic studies revealed deficiency of two half-null C4 haplotypes expressed as C4A*3QO and B*2QO.

  6. New measurements of multilayer insulation at variable cold temperature and elevated residual gas pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funke, Th; Haberstroh, Ch

    2015-12-01

    New MLI measurements at the TU Dresden flow type calorimeter have been carried out. Specimens of 20 layer double side aluminized polyester film were tested. A cylindrical cold surface of 0.9 m2 is held at the desired cold boundary temperature between approximately 30 K and 300 K. The heat transfer through the MLI is measured by recording the mass flow as well as the inlet and the outlet temperature of the cooling fluid. Measurements at varied cold boundary temperatures have been performed. Moreover the effect of an additional vacuum degradation - as it might occur by decreasing getter material performance in real systems at elevated temperatures - is studied by a controlled inlet of nitrogen gas. Thus the vacuum pressure was varied over a range of 10-7 mbar to 10-2 mbar. Different cold boundary temperatures between 35 K and 110 K were investigated. Test results for 20 layer MLI are presented.

  7. Cold dark matter heats up.

    PubMed

    Pontzen, Andrew; Governato, Fabio

    2014-02-13

    A principal discovery in modern cosmology is that standard model particles comprise only 5 per cent of the mass-energy budget of the Universe. In the ΛCDM paradigm, the remaining 95 per cent consists of dark energy (Λ) and cold dark matter. ΛCDM is being challenged by its apparent inability to explain the low-density 'cores' of dark matter measured at the centre of galaxies, where centrally concentrated high-density 'cusps' were predicted. But before drawing conclusions, it is necessary to include the effect of gas and stars, historically seen as passive components of galaxies. We now understand that these can inject heat energy into the cold dark matter through a coupling based on rapid gravitational potential fluctuations, explaining the observed low central densities.

  8. Ultra-cold molecule production.

    SciTech Connect

    Ramirez-Serrano, Jamie; Chandler, David W.; Strecker, Kevin; Rahn, Larry A.

    2005-12-01

    The production of Ultra-cold molecules is a goal of many laboratories through out the world. Here we are pursuing a unique technique that utilizes the kinematics of atomic and molecular collisions to achieve the goal of producing substantial numbers of sub Kelvin molecules confined in a trap. Here a trap is defined as an apparatus that spatially localizes, in a known location in the laboratory, a sample of molecules whose temperature is below one degree absolute Kelvin. Further, the storage time for the molecules must be sufficient to measure and possibly further cool the molecules. We utilize a technique unique to Sandia to form cold molecules from near mass degenerate collisions between atoms and molecules. This report describes the progress we have made using this novel technique and the further progress towards trapping molecules we have cooled.

  9. Acclimatization to cold in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaciuba-Uscilko, Hanna; Greenleaf, John E.

    1989-01-01

    This review focuses on the responses and mechanisms of both natural and artificial acclimatization to a cold environment in mammals, with specific reference to human beings. The purpose is to provide basic information for designers of thermal protection systems for astronauts during intra- and extravehicular activities. Hibernation, heat production, heat loss, vascular responses, body insulation, shivering thermogenesis, water immersion, exercise responses, and clinical symptoms and hypothermia in the elderly are discussed.

  10. Medical problems from cold exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Dembert, M.L.

    1982-01-01

    Problems resulting from cold exposure can be successfully treated when a coordinated emergency medical transport system and appropriate equipment are available, as well as medical personnel knowledgeable in the management of frostbite and hypothermia. Clinical suspicion of these disorders is essential. Profoundly hypothermic individuals with no recordable vital signs have been resuscitated after controlled, rapid rewarming measures and the use of emergency life-support systems.

  11. Cold cathode vacuum discharge tube

    DOEpatents

    Boettcher, Gordon E.

    1998-01-01

    A cold cathode vacuum discharge tube, and method for making same, with an interior surface of the trigger probe coated with carbon deposited by carbon vapor deposition (CVD) or diamond-like carbon (DLC) deposition. Preferably a solid graphite insert is employed in the probe-cathode structure in place of an aluminum bushing employed in the prior art. The CVD or DLC probe face is laser scribed to allow resistance trimming to match available trigger voltage signals and to reduce electrical aging.

  12. Magnesium Repair by Cold Spray

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-05-01

    were conducted using microstructural analysis, hardness, bond strength, and corrosion testing. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Cold spray, magnesium, aluminum ... corrosion pitting are the primary causes for removing the components from service. In addition, any repair must be confined to nonstructural areas of...unlimited. 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT The U.S. Army has experienced significant corrosion problems with magnesium alloys that are used to

  13. Small Cold Temperature Instrument Packages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, P. E.; Millar, P. S.; Yeh, P. S.; Feng, S.; Brigham, D.; Beaman, B.

    We are developing a small cold temperature instrument package concept that integrates a cold temperature power system with ultra low temperature ultra low power electronics components and power supplies now under development into a 'cold temperature surface operational' version of a planetary surface instrument package. We are already in the process of developing a lower power lower temperature version for an instrument of mutual interest to SMD and ESMD to support the search for volatiles (the mass spectrometer VAPoR, Volatile Analysis by Pyrolysis of Regolith) both as a stand alone instrument and as part of an environmental monitoring package. We build on our previous work to develop strategies for incorporating Ultra Low Temperature/Ultra Low Power (ULT/ULP) electronics, lower voltage power supplies, as well as innovative thermal design concepts for instrument packages. Cryotesting has indicated that our small Si RHBD CMOS chips can deliver >80% of room temperature performance at 40K (nominal minimum lunar surface temperature). We leverage collaborations, past and current, with the JPL battery development program to increase power system efficiency in extreme environments. We harness advances in MOSFET technology that provide lower voltage thresholds for power switching circuits incorporated into our low voltage power supply concept. Conventional power conversion has a lower efficiency. Our low power circuit concept based on 'synchronous rectification' could produce stable voltages as low as 0.6 V with 85% efficiency. Our distributed micro-battery-based power supply concept incorporates cold temperature power supplies operating with a 4 V or 8 V battery. This work will allow us to provide guidelines for applying the low temperature, low power system approaches generically to the widest range of surface instruments.

  14. Characterizing a High-Level Waste Cold Cap via Elemental and Structural Configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, Derek R.; Schweiger, Michael J.; Hrma, Pavel R.

    2014-06-02

    The process of converting high-level waste feed to an immobilized glass form takes place within a cold cap which covers a high-temperature (1150°C) glass melt in a Joule or induction heated melter. Liquid slurry feed is continuously charged through the top of a melter. Within the cold cap, many glass forming reactions occur and the glass-forming melt becomes connected. Gases trapped in the glass-forming melt arrange into bubbles which create a layer of foam below the reacting feed that collapses into cavities. This foam layer thermally insulates the reacting feed limiting heat transfer from the molten glass below, thus affecting the rate of glass formation. Information about the glass formation is desired for incorporation in a mathematical model designed to simulate the melting in a cold cap. To explore this, a set of high-level waste feed simulant samples were heat-treated at 5 K min-1 to temperatures ranging from 400°C to 1200°C for comparison with cold cap sections generated in a laboratory-scale melter. To estimate the temperature distribution in laboratory-produced cold caps, structural (bubble size and shape) and optical (color) properties of heat-treated samples and cold-cap sections were compared along with elemental maps, the shapes and sizes of the silica particles, and the connectivity of the glass matrix. These results will be used to verify the recently developed mathematical model of the cold-cap.

  15. Thermal-hydraulic studies of the Advanced Neutron Source cold source

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, P.T.; Lucas, A.T.

    1995-08-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS), in its conceptual design phase at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, was to be a user-oriented neutron research facility producing the most intense steady-state flux of thermal and cold neutrons in the world. Among its many scientific applications, the production of cold neutrons was a significant research mission for the ANS. The cold neutrons come from two independent cold sources positioned near the reactor core. Contained by an aluminum alloy vessel, each cold source is a 410-mm-diam sphere of liquid deuterium that functions both as a neutron moderator and a cryogenic coolant. With nuclear heating of the containment vessel and internal baffling, steady-state operation requires close control of the liquid deuterium flow near the vessel`s inner surface. Preliminary thermal-hydraulic analyses supporting the cold source design were performed with heat conduction simulations of the vessel walls and multidimensional computational fluid dynamics simulations of the liquid deuterium flow and heat transfer. This report presents the starting phase of a challenging program and describes the cold source conceptual design, the thermal-hydraulic feasibility studies of the containment vessel, and the future computational and experimental studies that were planned to verify the final design.

  16. Technology Transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Nanette R.

    1995-01-01

    The objective of this summer's work was to attempt to enhance Technology Application Group (TAG) ability to measure the outcomes of its efforts to transfer NASA technology. By reviewing existing literature, by explaining the economic principles involved in evaluating the economic impact of technology transfer, and by investigating the LaRC processes our William & Mary team has been able to lead this important discussion. In reviewing the existing literature, we identified many of the metrics that are currently being used in the area of technology transfer. Learning about the LaRC technology transfer processes and the metrics currently used to track the transfer process enabled us to compare other R&D facilities to LaRC. We discuss and diagram impacts of technology transfer in the short run and the long run. Significantly, it serves as the basis for analysis and provides guidance in thinking about what the measurement objectives ought to be. By focusing on the SBIR Program, valuable information regarding the strengths and weaknesses of this LaRC program are to be gained. A survey was developed to ask probing questions regarding SBIR contractors' experience with the program. Specifically we are interested in finding out whether the SBIR Program is accomplishing its mission, if the SBIR companies are providing the needed innovations specified by NASA and to what extent those innovations have led to commercial success. We also developed a survey to ask COTR's, who are NASA employees acting as technical advisors to the SBIR contractors, the same type of questions, evaluating the successes and problems with the SBIR Program as they see it. This survey was developed to be implemented interactively on computer. It is our hope that the statistical and econometric studies that can be done on the data collected from all of these sources will provide insight regarding the direction to take in developing systematic evaluations of programs like the SBIR Program so that they can

  17. Pharmacological blockade of the cold receptor TRPM8 attenuates autonomic and behavioral cold defenses and decreases deep body temperature.

    PubMed

    Almeida, M Camila; Hew-Butler, Tamara; Soriano, Renato N; Rao, Sara; Wang, Weiya; Wang, Judy; Tamayo, Nuria; Oliveira, Daniela L; Nucci, Tatiane B; Aryal, Prafulla; Garami, Andras; Bautista, Diana; Gavva, Narender R; Romanovsky, Andrej A

    2012-02-08

    We studied N-(2-aminoethyl)-N-(4-(benzyloxy)-3-methoxybenzyl)thiophene-2-carboxamide hydrochloride (M8-B), a selective and potent antagonist of the transient receptor potential melastatin-8 (TRPM8) channel. In vitro, M8-B blocked cold-induced and TRPM8-agonist-induced activation of rat, human, and murine TRPM8 channels, including those on primary sensory neurons. In vivo, M8-B decreased deep body temperature (T(b)) in Trpm8(+/+) mice and rats, but not in Trpm8(-/-) mice, thus suggesting an on-target action. Intravenous administration of M8-B was more effective in decreasing T(b) in rats than intrathecal or intracerebroventricular administration, indicating a peripheral action. M8-B attenuated cold-induced c-Fos expression in the lateral parabrachial nucleus, thus indicating a site of action within the cutaneous cooling neural pathway to thermoeffectors, presumably on sensory neurons. A low intravenous dose of M8-B did not affect T(b) at either a constantly high or a constantly low ambient temperature (T(a)), but the same dose readily decreased T(b) if rats were kept at a high T(a) during the M8-B infusion and transferred to a low T(a) immediately thereafter. These data suggest that both a successful delivery of M8-B to the skin (high cutaneous perfusion) and the activation of cutaneous TRPM8 channels (by cold) are required for the hypothermic action of M8-B. At tail-skin temperatures <23°C, the magnitude of the M8-B-induced decrease in T(b) was inversely related to skin temperature, thus suggesting that M8-B blocks thermal (cold) activation of TRPM8. M8-B affected all thermoeffectors studied (thermopreferendum, tail-skin vasoconstriction, and brown fat thermogenesis), thus suggesting that TRPM8 is a universal cold receptor in the thermoregulation system.

  18. Pharmacological blockade of the cold receptor TRPM8 attenuates autonomic and behavioral cold defenses and decreases deep body temperature

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, M. Camila; Hew-Butler, Tamara; Soriano, Renato N.; Rao, Sara; Wang, Weiya; Wang, Judy; Tamayo, Nuria; Oliveira, Daniela L.; Nucci, Tatiane B.; Aryal, Prafulla; Garami, Andras; Bautista, Diana; Gavva, Narender R.; Romanovsky, Andrej A.

    2012-01-01

    We studied M8-B, a selective and potent antagonist of the transient receptor potential melastatin-8 (TRPM8) channel. In vitro, M8-B blocked cold-induced and TRPM8-agonist-induced activation of rat, human, and murine TRPM8 channels, including those on primary sensory neurons. In vivo, M8-B decreased deep body temperature (Tb) in Trpm8+/+ mice and rats, but not in Trpm8−/− mice, thus suggesting an on-target action. The intravenous administration of M8-B was more effective in decreasing Tb in rats than the intrathecal or intracerebroventricular administration, indicating a peripheral action. M8-B attenuated cold-induced c-Fos expression in the lateral parabrachial nucleus, thus indicating a site of action within the cutaneous cooling neural pathway to thermoeffectors, presumably on sensory neurons. A low intravenous dose of M8-B did not affect Tb at either a constantly high or a constantly low ambient temperature (Ta), but the same dose readily decreased Tb if rats were kept at a high Ta during the M8-B infusion and transferred to a low Ta immediately thereafter. These data suggest that both a successful delivery of M8-B to the skin (high cutaneous perfusion) and the activation of cutaneous TRPM8 channels (by cold) are required for the hypothermic action of M8-B. At tail skin temperatures < 23°C, the magnitude of the M8-B-induced decrease in Tb was inversely related to skin temperature, thus suggesting that M8-B blocks thermal (cold) activation of TRPM8. M8-B affected all thermoeffectors studied (thermopreferendum, tail skin vasoconstriction, and brown fat thermogenesis), thus suggesting that TRPM8 is a universal cold receptor in the thermoregulation system. PMID:22323721

  19. Cold cathode vacuum gauging system

    DOEpatents

    Denny, Edward C.

    2004-03-09

    A vacuum gauging system of the cold cathode type is provided for measuring the pressure of a plurality of separate vacuum systems, such as in a gas centrifuge cascade. Each casing is fitted with a gauge tube assembly which communicates with the vacuum system in the centrifuge casing. Each gauge tube contains an anode which may be in the form of a slender rod or wire hoop and a cathode which may be formed by the wall of the gauge tube. The tube is provided with an insulated high voltage connector to the anode which has a terminal for external connection outside the vacuum casing. The tube extends from the casing so that a portable magnet assembly may be inserted about the tube to provide a magnetic field in the area between the anode and cathode necessary for pressure measurements in a cold cathode-type vacuum gauge arrangement. The portable magnetic assembly is provided with a connector which engages the external high voltage terminal for providing power to the anode within in the gauge tube. Measurement is made in the same manner as the prior cold cathode gauges in that the current through the anode to the cathode is measured as an indication of the pressure. By providing the portable magnetic assembly, a considerable savings in cost, installation, and maintenance of vacuum gauges for pressure measurement in a gas centrifuge cascade is realizable.

  20. Mars: Always Cold, Sometimes Wet?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Pascal; McKay, Christoper P.

    2003-01-01

    A synthesis of a diverse suite of observations of H2O-related landforms that are possible Mars analogs from terrestrial polar regions (Devon Island in the Arctic; the Dry Valleys of Antarctica) put into question any requirement for extended episode(s) of warm and wet climate in Mars past. Geologically transient episodes of localized H2O cycling, forced by exogenic impacts, enhanced endogenic heat flow, and/or orbit-driven short-term local environmental change under an otherwise cold, low pressure (=10(exp 2) mbar) global climate, may be sufficient to account for the martian surface's exposed record of aqueous activity. A Mars that was only sometimes locally warm and wet while remaining climatically cold throughout its history is consistent with results (difficulties) encountered in modeling efforts attempting to support warm martian climate hypotheses. Possible analogs from terrestrial cold climate regions for the recent gully features on Mars also illustrate how transient localized aqueous activity might, under specific circumstances, also occur on Mars under the present frigid global climatic regime.

  1. Physiological characteristics of cold acclimatization in man

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathew, Lazar; Purkayastha, S. S.; Jayashankar, A.; Nayar, H. S.

    1981-09-01

    Studies were conducted on 15 healthy young soldiers to evaluate the effect of a cold acclimatization schedule on the thermoregulatory and metabolic activity on exposure to acute cold stress. These men were exposed to cold (10‡C) for 4 h daily wearing only shorts for 21 days, in a cold chamber. They were subjected to a standard cold test at 10 ± 1‡C the day 1, 6, 11 and 21. The subjects were made to relax in a thermoneutral room (26 28‡C) for 1 h and their heart rate, blood pressure, oxygen consumption, oral temperature, mean skin temperature, mean body temperature, peripheral temperatures, and shivering activity were recorded. Then they were exposed to 10‡C and measurements were repeated at 30 min intervals, for 2 h. The cold induced vasodilatation (CIVD), cold pressor response and thermoregulatory efficiency tests were measured initially and at the end of acclimatization schedule. The data show that the procedure resulted in elevated resting metabolism, less fall in body temperature during acute cold stress, reduction in shivering, improvement in CIVD and thermoregulatory efficiency and less rise in BP and HR during cold pressor response. The data suggest the possibility of cold acclimatization in man by repeated exposure to moderately severe cold stress.

  2. Cold Pools in the Columbia Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Whiteman, Charles D.; Zhong, Shiyuan; Shaw, William J.; Hubbe, John M.; Bian, Xindi; Mittelstadt, J.

    2001-01-01

    Persistent midwinter cold air pools produce multi-day periods of cold, dreary weather in valleys and basins. Persistent stable stratification leads to the buildup of pollutants and moisture in the pool. Because the pool sometimes has temperatures below freezing while the air above is warmer, freezing precipitation often occurs with consequent effects on transportation and safety. Forecasting the buildup and breakdown of these cold pools is difficult because the physical mechanisms leading to their formation, maintenance, and destruction have received little study. This paper provides a succinct meteorological definition of a cold pool, develops a climatology of Columbia Basin cold pools, and analyzes remote and in situ temperature and wind sounding data for two winter cold pool episodes that were accompanied by fog and stratus, illustrating many of the physical mechanisms affecting cold pool evolution.

  3. Preliminary thermal design of the COLD-SAT spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arif, Hugh

    1991-01-01

    The COLD-SAT free-flying spacecraft was to perform experiments with LH2 in the cryogenic fluid management technologies of storage, supply and transfer in reduced gravity. The Phase A preliminary design of the Thermal Control Subsystem (TCS) for the spacecraft exterior and interior surfaces and components of the bus subsystems is described. The TCS was composed of passive elements which were augmented with heaters. Trade studies to minimize the parasitic heat leakage into the cryogen storage tanks are described. Selection procedure for the thermally optimum on-orbit spacecraft attitude was defined. TRASYS-2 and SINDA'85 verification analysis was performed on the design and the results are presented.

  4. Statistic analysis of operational influences on the cold start behaviour of PEM fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oszcipok, M.; Riemann, D.; Kronenwett, U.; Kreideweis, M.; Zedda, M.

    For portable fuel cell systems a multitude of applications have been presented over the past few years. Most of these applications were developed for indoor use, and not optimised for outdoor conditions. The key problem concerning this case is the cold start ability of the polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). This topic was first investigated by the automotive industry, which has the same requirements for alternative traction systems as for conventional combustion engines. The technical challenge is the fact that produced water freezes to ice after shut-down of the PEMFC and during start-up when the temperature is below 0 °C. To investigate the basic cold start behaviour isothermal, potentiostatic single cell experiments were performed and the results are presented. The cold start behaviour is evaluated using the calculated cumulated charge transfer through the membrane which directly corresponds with the amount of produced water in the PEMFC. The charge transfer curves were mathematically fitted to obtain only three parameters describing the cold start-up with the cumulated charge transfer density and the results are analysed using the statistical software Cornerstone 4.0. The results of the statistic regression analyses are used to establish a statistic-based prediction model of the cold start behaviour which describes the behaviour of the current density during the experiment. The regression shows that the initial start current mainly depends on the membrane humidity and the operation voltage. After the membrane humidity has reached its maximum, the current density drops down to zero. The current decay also depends on the constant gas flows of the reactant gases. Ionic conductivity of the membrane and charge transfer resistance were investigated by a series of ac impedance spectra during potentiostatic operation of the single cell at freezing temperatures. Cyclic voltammetry and polarisation curves between cold start experiments show degradation

  5. Ion-Atom Cold Collisions and Atomic Clocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestage, John D.; Maleki, Lute; Tjoelker, Robert L.

    1997-01-01

    Collisions between ultracold neutral atoms have for some time been the subject of investigation, initially with hydrogen and more recently with laser cooled alkali atoms. Advances in laser cooling and trapping of neutral atoms in a Magneto-Optic Trap (MOT) have made cold atoms available as the starting point for many laser cooled atomic physics investigations. The most spectacularly successful of these, the observation of Bose-Einstein Condensation (BEC) in a dilute ultra-cold spin polarized atomic vapor, has accelerated the study of cold collisions. Experimental and theoretical studies of BEC and the long range interaction between cold alkali atoms is at the boundary of atomic and low temperature physics. Such studies have been difficult and would not have been possible without the development and advancement of laser cooling and trapping of neutral atoms. By contrast, ion-atom interactions at low temperature, also very difficult to study prior to modern day laser cooling, have remained largely unexplored. But now, many laboratories worldwide have almost routine access to cold neutral atoms. The combined technologies of ion trapping, together with laser cooling of neutrals has made these studies experimentally feasible and several very important, novel applications might come out of such investigations . This paper is an investigation of ion-atom interactions in the cold and ultra-cold temperature regime. Some of the collisional ion-atom interactions present at room temperature are very much reduced in the low temperature regime. Reaction rates for charge transfer between unlike atoms, A + B(+) approaches A(+) + B, are expected to fall rapidly with temperature, approximately as T(sup 5/2). Thus, cold mixtures of atoms and ions are expected to coexist for very long times, unlike room temperature mixtures of the same ion-atom combination. Thus, it seems feasible to cool ions via collisions with laser cooled atoms. Many of the conventional collisional interactions

  6. Plant adaptation to cold climates

    PubMed Central

    Körner, Christian

    2016-01-01

    In this short review, I will first summarize criteria by which environments can be considered “cold”, with plant stature (size, height above ground) playing a central role for the climate actually experienced. Plants adapted to such environments have to cope with both extremes and with gradual influences of low temperature. The first requires freezing resistance, which is tightly coupled to developmental state (phenology) and prehistory (acclimation). Gradual low temperature constraints affect the growth process (meristems) long before they affect photosynthetic carbon gain. Hence, plants growing in cold climates are commonly not carbon limited. PMID:27990251

  7. Cold urticaria with persistent weals.

    PubMed

    Juhlin, L

    1981-06-01

    A patient with cold urticaria is described in whom weals appeared immediately after an ice cube test for 3 min and persisted for a week as a red, tender swelling. The duration of the oedema was dependent on the intensity of the immediate reaction. If the immediate wealing was blocked by treatment with an oral antihistamine 3 h before the ice cube test, no delayed reaction was seen. Antihistamines given after the immediate wealing had occurred did not influence the delayed reaction. Reactions to intradermally injected histamine, prostaglandin E, kallikrein, serotonin and serum appeared normal.

  8. Window performance in extreme cold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flanders, S. N.; Buska, J. S.; Barrett, S. A.

    1982-12-01

    Extreme cold causes heavy buildup of frost, ice and condensation on many windows. It also increases the incentive for improving the airtightness of windows against heat loss. Our study shows that tightening specifications for Alaskan windows to permit only 30% of the air leakage allowed by current American airtightness standards is economically attractive. We also recommend triple glazing in much of Alaska to avoid window icing in homes and barracks. We base our conclusions on a two year field study of Alaskan military bases that included recording humidity and temperature data, observing moisture accumulation on windows and measuring airtightness with a fan pressurized device.

  9. Cold cathode vacuum discharge tube

    DOEpatents

    Boettcher, G.E.

    1998-03-10

    A cold cathode vacuum discharge tube, and method for making same, are disclosed with an interior surface of the trigger probe coated with carbon deposited by carbon vapor deposition (CVD) or diamond-like carbon (DLC) deposition. Preferably a solid graphite insert is employed in the probe-cathode structure in place of an aluminum bushing employed in the prior art. The CVD or DLC probe face is laser scribed to allow resistance trimming to match available trigger voltage signals and to reduce electrical aging. 15 figs.

  10. Cold cathode vacuum discharge tube

    DOEpatents

    Boettcher, G.E.

    1998-04-14

    A cold cathode vacuum discharge tube, and method for making same, with an interior surface of the trigger probe coated with carbon deposited by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) or diamond-like carbon (DLC) deposition are disclosed. Preferably a solid graphite insert is employed in the probe-cathode structure in place of an aluminum bushing employed in the prior art. The CVD or DLC probe face is laser scribed to allow resistance trimming to match available trigger voltage signals and to reduce electrical aging. 14 figs.

  11. Rapid cold hardening and expression of heat shock protein genes in the B-biotype Bemisia tabaci.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haihong; Lei, Zhongren; Li, Xue; Oetting, Ronald D

    2011-02-01

    This paper describes the rapid cold hardening processes of the sweetpotato whitefly, Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius). It was found that all developmental stages of B. tabaci have the capacity of rapid cold hardening and the length of time required to induce maximal cold hardiness at 0 °C varies with stage. There was only 18.3% survival when adult whiteflies were transferred directly from 26 °C to -8.5 °C for 2 h. However, exposure to 0 °C for 1 h before transfer to -8.5 °C increased the survival to 81.2%. The whiteflies show "prefreeze" mortality when they were exposed to temperatures above the supercooling point (SCP), although the range of SCP of whiteflies is -26 °C to -29 °C. The rapid cold hardening had no effect on SCP and reduced the lower lethal temperature of adults from -9 °C to -11 °C. Rapid cold-hardened adults had a similar lifespan as the control group but deposited fewer eggs than nonhardened individuals. The expression profiles during cold hardening and recovery from this process revealed that HSP90 did not respond to cold stress. However, HSP70 and HSP20 were significantly induced by cold with different temporal expression patterns. These results suggest that the rapid cold hardening response is possibly advantageous to whiteflies that are often exposed to drastic temperature fluctuations in spring or autumn in northern China, and the expression of HSP70 and HSP20 may be associated with the cold tolerance of B. tabaci.

  12. Cold thermoregulatory responses following exertional fatigue.

    PubMed

    Castellani, John W; Sawka, Michael N; DeGroot, David W; Young, Andrew J

    2010-06-01

    Participants in prolonged, physically demanding cold-weather activities are at risk for a condition called "thermoregulatory fatigue". During cold exposure, the increased gradient favoring body heat loss to the environment is opposed by physiological responses and clothing and behavioral strategies that conserve body heat stores to defend body temperature. The primary human physiological responses elicited by cold exposure are shivering and peripheral vasoconstriction. Shivering increases thermogenesis and replaces body heat losses, while peripheral vasoconstriction improves thermal insulation of the body and retards the rate of heat loss. A body of scientific literature supports the concept that prolonged and/or repeated cold exposure, fatigue induced by sustained physical exertion, or both together, can impair the shivering and vasoconstrictor responses to cold ("thermoregulatory fatigue"). The mechanisms accounting for this thermoregulatory impairment are not clear, but there is evidence to suggest that changes in central thermoregulatory control or peripheral sympathetic responsiveness to cold lead to thermoregulatory fatigue and increased susceptibility to hypothermia.

  13. Rational elicitation of cold-sensitive phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Baliga, Chetana; Majhi, Sandipan; Mondal, Kajari; Bhattacharjee, Antara; Varadarajan, Raghavan

    2016-01-01

    Cold-sensitive phenotypes have helped us understand macromolecular assembly and biological phenomena, yet few attempts have been made to understand the basis of cold sensitivity or to elicit it by design. We report a method for rational design of cold-sensitive phenotypes. The method involves generation of partial loss-of-function mutants, at either buried or functional sites, coupled with selective overexpression strategies. The only essential input is amino acid sequence, although available structural information can be used as well. The method has been used to elicit cold-sensitive mutants of a variety of proteins, both monomeric and dimeric, and in multiple organisms, namely Escherichia coli, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and Drosophila melanogaster. This simple, yet effective technique of inducing cold sensitivity eliminates the need for complex mutations and provides a plausible molecular mechanism for eliciting cold-sensitive phenotypes. PMID:27091994

  14. Diagnosis and management of cold urticaria.

    PubMed

    Singleton, Reid; Halverstam, Caroline P

    2016-01-01

    Cold urticaria is a physical urticaria characterized by a localized or systemic eruption of papules upon exposure of the skin to cold air, liquids, and/or objects. In some cases, angioedema and anaphylaxis also may occur. The symptoms of cold urticaria can have a negative impact on patients' quality of life. Second-generation H1 antihistamines are the first line of treatment in cold urticaria; however, patients who are unresponsive to initial treatment with H1 antihistamines may require further management options. Avoidance of cold exposure is the most effective prophylactic measure. In mild to moderate cases, the primary goal of therapy is to improve the patient's quality of life. In more severe cases, treatment measures to protect the patient's airway, breathing, and circulation may be necessary. We report the case of a 23-year-old man with cold urticaria who was refractory to initial therapy with H1 antihistamines. A review of the literature also is provided.

  15. TRPA1 Contributes to Cold Hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Camino, Donato del; Murphy, Sarah; Heiry, Melissa; Barrett, Lee B.; Earley, Taryn J.; Cook, Colby A.; Petrus, Matt J.; Zhao, Michael; D'Amours, Marc; Deering, Nate; Brenner, Gary J.; Costigan, Michael; Hayward, Neil J.; Chong, Jayhong A.; Fanger, Christopher M.; Woolf, Clifford J.; Patapoutian, Ardem; Moran, Magdalene M.

    2010-01-01

    TRPA1 is a non-selective cation channel expressed by nociceptors. While it is widely accepted that TRPA1 serves as a broad irritancy receptor for a variety of reactive chemicals, its role in cold sensation remains controversial. Here, we demonstrate that mild cooling markedly increases agonist-evoked rat TRPA1 currents. In the absence of an agonist, even noxious cold only increases current amplitude slightly. These results suggest that TRPA1 is a key mediator of cold hypersensitivity in pathological conditions where reactive oxygen species and pro-inflammatory activators of the channel are present, but likely plays a comparatively minor role in acute cold sensation. Supporting this, cold hypersensitivity can be induced in wild-type but not Trpa1-/- mice by subcutaneous administration of a TRPA1 agonist. Furthermore, the selective TRPA1 antagonist HC-030031 reduces cold hypersensitivity in rodent models of inflammatory and neuropathic pain. PMID:21068322

  16. International workshop on cold neutron sources

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, G.J.; West, C.D. )

    1991-08-01

    The first meeting devoted to cold neutron sources was held at the Los Alamos National Laboratory on March 5--8, 1990. Cosponsored by Los Alamos and Oak Ridge National Laboratories, the meeting was organized as an International Workshop on Cold Neutron Sources and brought together experts in the field of cold-neutron-source design for reactors and spallation sources. Eighty-four people from seven countries attended. Because the meeting was the first of its kind in over forty years, much time was spent acquainting participants with past and planned activities at reactor and spallation facilities worldwide. As a result, the meeting had more of a conference flavor than one of a workshop. The general topics covered at the workshop included: Criteria for cold source design; neutronic predictions and performance; energy deposition and removal; engineering design, fabrication, and operation; material properties; radiation damage; instrumentation; safety; existing cold sources; and future cold sources.

  17. Transfer reactions with heavy elements

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, D.C.

    1986-04-01

    Transfer reactions for several transuranium elements are studied. (/sup 248/Cm, /sup 249/Bk, /sup 249/CF, /sup 254/Es), /sup 16,18/O, /sup 20,22/Ne, and /sup 40,48/Ca projectiles are used. The production of neutron-rich heavy actinides is enhanced by the use of neutron-rich projectiles /sup 18/O and /sup 22/Ne. The maxima of the isotopic distributions occur at only 2 to 3 mass numbers larger for /sup 48/Ca than for /sup 40/Ca reactions with /sup 248/Cm. The cross sections decrease rapidly with the number of nucleons transferred. The use of neutron-rich targets favors the production of neutron-rich isotopes. ''Cold'' heavy targets are produced. Comparisons with simple calculations of the product excitation energies assuming binary transfers indicate that the maxima of the isotopic distributions occur at the lightest product isotope for which the energy exceeds the reaction barrier. The cross sections for transfer of the same nucleon clusters appear to be comparable for a wide variety of systems. 23 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  18. Avionics Box Cold Plate Damage Prevention

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stambolian, Damon; Larcher, Steven; Henderson, Gena; Tran, Donald

    2011-01-01

    Over the years there have been several occurrences of damage to Space Shuttle Orbiter cold plates during removal and replacement of avionics boxes. Thus a process improvement team was put together to determine ways to prevent these kinds of damage. From this effort there were many solutions including, protective covers, training, and improved operations instructions. The focus of this paper is to explain the cold plate damage problem and the corrective actions for preventing future damage to aerospace avionics cold plate designs.

  19. Extended Lyα emission from cold accretion streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosdahl, J.; Blaizot, J.

    2012-06-01

    We investigate the observability of cold accretion streams at redshift 3 via Lyα emission and the feasibility of cold accretion as the main driver of Lyα blobs (LABs). We run cosmological zoom simulations focusing on three haloes spanning almost two orders of magnitude in mass, roughly from 1011 to ?. We use a version of the RAMSES code that includes radiative transfer of ultraviolet (UV) photons, and we employ a refinement strategy that allows us to resolve accretion streams in their natural environment to an unprecedented level. For the first time in a simulation, we self-consistently model self-shielding in the cold streams from the cosmological UV background, which enables us to predict their temperatures, ionization states and Lyα luminosities with improved accuracy. We find the efficiency of gravitational heating in cold streams in a ? halo to be around 10-20 per cent throughout most of the halo but reaching much higher values close to the centre. As a result, most of the Lyα luminosity comes from gas which is concentrated at the central 20 per cent of the halo radius, leading to Lyα emission which is not extended. In more massive haloes, of ?, cold accretion is complex and disrupted, and gravitational heating does not happen as a steady process. Ignoring the factors of Lyα scattering, local UV enhancement and supernovae feedback, the cold 'messy' accretion alone in these massive haloes can produce LABs that largely agree with observations in terms of morphology, extent and luminosity. Our simulations slightly and systematically overpredict LAB abundances, perhaps hinting that the interplay of these ignored factors may have a negative net effect on extent and luminosity. We predict that a factor of a few increase in sensitivity from current observational limits should unambiguously reveal continuum-free accretion streams around massive galaxies at z= 3. Animations of our simulations can be found at and are available as Supporting Information with the

  20. Isocurvature cold dark matter fluctuations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Efstathiou, G.; Bond, J. R.

    1986-01-01

    According to Preskill et al. (1983), the axion field represents a particularly attractive candidate for the dark matter in the universe. In many respects it behaves like other forms of cold dark matter, such as massive gravitinos, photinos, and monopoles. It is, however, a pseudo-Goldstone boson of very low mass, and it is only because of rapid coherent oscillations of the field that it can dominate the mass density of the universe. In the present paper it is assumed that the isocurvature mode is dominant. The linear evolution calculations conducted do not depend upon specific details of particle physics. For this reason, the conducted discussion is applicable to any cold dark matter model with isocurvature perturbations. The results of the study lead to the conclusion that scale-invariant isocurvature perturbations do not seem an attractive possibility for the origin of large-scale structure. The findings strengthen the review that primordial adiabatic perturbations were the dominant fluctuations in the early stages of the Big Bang.

  1. COLD-SAT: A technology satellite for cryogenic experimentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arif, H.; Kroeger, E. W.

    1989-01-01

    NASA-Lewis (LeRC) is involved in the development and validation of analytical models which describe the fluid dynamic and thermodynamic processes associated with the storage, acquisition and transfer of subcritical cryogenic fluids in low gravity. Four concurrent studies, including one in-house at LeRC, are underway to determine the feasibility of performing model validation experiments aboard a free-flying spacecraft (S/C) called Cryogenic On-Orbit Liquid Depot-Storage, Acquisition and Transfer (COLD-SAT), using liquid hydrogen as the cryogen. The technology requirements for the experiments are described along with the initial LeRC concepts for the S/C and an experiment subsystem comprising of cryogenic tankage (a supply dewar and three receiver tanks), gas pressurization bottles (both helium and autogenous hydrogen), their associated plumbing, and instrumentation for data collection. Experiments were categorized into enabling/high priority Class 1 technologies and component/system Class 2 demonstrations. As initially envisioned by LeRC, COLD-SAT would have had a 1997 launch aboard a Delta-2 for a 6 month active lifetime in a 925 km orbit with a pseudo-inertial attitude.

  2. COLD-SAT: An orbital cryogenic hydrogen technology experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuster, J. R.; Wachter, Joseph P.; Powers, Albert G.

    1989-01-01

    The COLD-SAT spacecraft will perform subcritical liquid hydrogen storage and transfer experiments under low-gravity conditions to provide engineering data for future space transportation missions. Consisting of an experiment module mated to a spacecraft bus, COLD-SAT will be placed in an initial 460 km circular orbit by an Atlas I commercial launch vehicle. After deployment, the three-axis-controlled spacecraft bus will provide electric power, experiment control and data management, communications, and attitude control along with propulsive acceleration levels ranging from 10(-6) to 10(-4)g. These accelerations are an important aspect of some of the experiments, as it is desired to know the effects that low gravity levels might have on the heat and mass transfer processes involved. The experiment module will contain the three liquid hydrogen tanks, valves, pressurization equipment, and instrumentation. At launch all the hydrogen will be in the largest tank, which has helium-purged MLI and is loaded and topped off by the hydrogen tanking system used for the Centaur upper stage of the Atlas. The two smaller tanks will be utilized in orbit for performing some of the experiments. The experiments are grouped into two classes on the basis of their priority, and include six regarded as enabling technology and nine regarded as enhancing technology.

  3. COLD-SAT - An orbital cryogenic hydrogen technology experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuster, J. R.; Wachter, Joseph P.; Powers, Albert G.

    1989-01-01

    The COLD-SAT spacecraft will perform subcritical liquid hydrogen storage and transfer experiments under low-gravity conditions to provide engineering data for future space transportation missions. Consisting of an experiment module mated to a spacecraft bus, COLD-SAT will be placed in an initial 460 km circular orbit by an Atlas I commercial launch vehicle. After deployment, the three-axis-controlled spacecraft bus will provide electric power, experiment control and data management, communications, and attitude control along with propulsive acceleration levels ranging from 10 (-6) to 10(-4) g. These accelerations are an important aspect of some of the experiments, as it is desired to know the effects that low gravity levels might have on the heat and mass transfer processes involved. The experiment module will contain the three liquid hydrogen tanks, valves, pressurization equipment, and instrumentation. At launch all the hydrogen will be in the largest tank, which has helium-purged MLI and is loaded and topped off by the hydrogen tanking system used for the Centaur upper stage of the Atlas. The two smaller tanks will be utilized in orbit for performing some of the experiments. The experiments are grouped into two classes on the basis of their priority, and include six regarded as enabling technology and nine regarded as enhancing technology.

  4. Cold vacuum drying facility design requirements

    SciTech Connect

    IRWIN, J.J.

    1999-07-01

    This document provides the detailed design requirements for the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project Cold Vacuum Drying Facility. Process, safety, and quality assurance requirements and interfaces are specified.

  5. Review on cold-formed steel connections.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yeong Huei; Tan, Cher Siang; Mohammad, Shahrin; Tahir, Mahmood Md; Shek, Poi Ngian

    2014-01-01

    The concept of cold-formed light steel framing construction has been widespread after understanding its structural characteristics with massive research works over the years. Connection serves as one of the important elements for light steel framing in order to achieve its structural stability. Compared to hot-rolled steel sections, cold-formed steel connections perform dissimilarity due to the thin-walled behaviour. This paper aims to review current researches on cold-formed steel connections, particularly for screw connections, storage rack connections, welded connections, and bolted connections. The performance of these connections in the design of cold-formed steel structures is discussed.

  6. Evaporative cooling enhanced cold storage system

    DOEpatents

    Carr, P.

    1991-10-15

    The invention provides an evaporatively enhanced cold storage system wherein a warm air stream is cooled and the cooled air stream is thereafter passed into contact with a cold storage unit. Moisture is added to the cooled air stream prior to or during contact of the cooled air stream with the cold storage unit to effect enhanced cooling of the cold storage unit due to evaporation of all or a portion of the added moisture. Preferably at least a portion of the added moisture comprises water condensed during the cooling of the warm air stream. 3 figures.

  7. Evaporative cooling enhanced cold storage system

    DOEpatents

    Carr, Peter

    1991-01-01

    The invention provides an evaporatively enhanced cold storage system wherein a warm air stream is cooled and the cooled air stream is thereafter passed into contact with a cold storage unit. Moisture is added to the cooled air stream prior to or during contact of the cooled air stream with the cold storage unit to effect enhanced cooling of the cold storage unit due to evaporation of all or a portion of the added moisture. Preferably at least a portion of the added moisture comprises water condensed during the cooling of the warm air stream.

  8. Cold H I in faint dwarf galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patra, Narendra Nath; Chengalur, Jayaram N.; Karachentsev, Igor D.; Kaisin, Serafim S.; Begum, Ayesha

    2016-03-01

    We present the results of a study of the amount and distribution of cold atomic gas, as well its correlation with recent star formation in a sample of extremely faint dwarf irregular galaxies. Our sample is drawn from the Faint Irregular Galaxy GMRT Survey (FIGGS) and its extension, FIGGS2. We use two different methods to identify cold atomic gas. In the first method, line-of-sight H I spectra were decomposed into multiple Gaussian components and narrow Gaussian components were identified as cold H I. In the second method, the brightness temperature (TB ) is used as a tracer of cold H I. We find that the amount of cold gas identified using the TB method is significantly larger than the amount of gas identified using Gaussian decomposition. We also find that a large fraction of the cold gas identified using the TB method is spatially coincident with regions of recent star formation, although the converse is not true. That is only a small fraction of the regions with recent star formation are also covered by cold gas. For regions where the star formation and the cold gas overlap, we study the relationship between the star formation rate density and the cold H I column density. We find that the star formation rate density has a power-law dependence on the H I column density, but that the slope of this power law is significantly flatter than that of the canonical Kennicutt-Schmidt relation.

  9. Review on Cold-Formed Steel Connections

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Cher Siang; Mohammad, Shahrin; Md Tahir, Mahmood; Shek, Poi Ngian

    2014-01-01

    The concept of cold-formed light steel framing construction has been widespread after understanding its structural characteristics with massive research works over the years. Connection serves as one of the important elements for light steel framing in order to achieve its structural stability. Compared to hot-rolled steel sections, cold-formed steel connections perform dissimilarity due to the thin-walled behaviour. This paper aims to review current researches on cold-formed steel connections, particularly for screw connections, storage rack connections, welded connections, and bolted connections. The performance of these connections in the design of cold-formed steel structures is discussed. PMID:24688448

  10. Blood histamine levels following graded cold challenge in atypical acquired cold urticaria.

    PubMed

    Miller, S D; Pritchard, D; Crowley, J P

    1992-01-01

    Acquired cold urticaria with a negative cold stimulation test has been described in seven patients in whom the standard ice cube test did not induce localized urticaria. Subsequent total body cold exposure induced a generalized urticaria. A patient with this syndrome is presented where blood histamine levels rose from 9 to 60 micrograms/dL after a negative local cold stimulation test and from 60 to 90 micrograms/dL after total body cold exposure. Urticaria occurred only after generalized cold exposure. Blood histamine levels following the ice cube test may represent a sensitive method to diagnose this form of atypical acquired cold urticaria, without subjecting the patient to the risk of anaphylaxis reported following total body cold exposure.

  11. Development of Holistic Three-Dimensional Models for Cold Spray Supersonic Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahiri, S. H.; Phan, T. D.; Masood, S. H.; Jahedi, M.

    2014-08-01

    A three-dimensional, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model is developed to estimate cold spray gas conditions. This model is calibrated and validated with respect to thermal history of a substrate exposed to the cold spray supersonic jet. The proposed holistic model is important to track state of gas and particles from injection point to the substrate surface with significant benefits for optimization of very rapid "nanoseconds" cold spray deposition. The three-dimensional model is developed with careful attention with respect to computation time to benefit broader cold spray industry with limited access to supercomputers. The k-ɛ-type CFD model is evaluated using measured temperature for a titanium substrate exposed to cold spray nitrogen at 800 °C and 3 MPa. The model important parameters are detailed including domain meshing method with turbulence, and dissipation coefficients during spraying. Heat transfer and radiation are considered for the de Laval nozzle used in experiments. The calibrated holistic model successfully estimated state of the gas for chosen high temperature and high pressure cold spray parameters used in this study. Further to this, the holistic model predictions with respect to the substrate maximum temperature had a good agreement with earlier findings in the literature.

  12. A role for jasmonates in the release of dormancy by cold stratification in wheat.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qian; Truong, Thy T; Barrero, Jose M; Jacobsen, John V; Hocart, Charles H; Gubler, Frank

    2016-05-01

    Hydration at low temperatures, commonly referred to as cold stratification, is widely used for releasing dormancy and triggering germination in a wide range of species including wheat. However, the molecular mechanism that underlies its effect on germination has largely remained unknown. Our previous studies showed that methyl-jasmonate, a derivative of jasmonic acid (JA), promotes dormancy release in wheat. In this study, we found that cold-stimulated germination of dormant grains correlated with a transient increase in JA content and expression of JA biosynthesis genes in the dormant embryos after transfer to 20 (o)C. The induction of JA production was dependent on the extent of cold imbibition and precedes germination. Blocking JA biosynthesis with acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) inhibited the cold-stimulated germination in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, we have explored the relationship between JA and abscisic acid (ABA), a well-known dormancy promoter, in cold regulation of dormancy. We found an inverse relationship between JA and ABA content in dormant wheat embryos following stratification. ABA content decreased rapidly in response to stratification, and the decrease was reversed by addition of ASA. Our results indicate that the action of JA on cold-stratified grains is mediated by suppression of two key ABA biosynthesis genes, TaNCED1 and TaNCED2.

  13. Cold shock protein 1 chaperones mRNAs during translation in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Juntawong, Piyada; Sorenson, Reed; Bailey-Serres, Julia

    2013-06-01

    RNA binding proteins (RBPs) function post-transcriptionally to fine-tune gene regulation. Arabidopsis thaliana has four Gly-rich, zinc finger-containing RBPs called cold shock proteins 1-4 (CSP1-CSP4), that possess an evolutionary conserved cold shock domain. Here, we determined that CSP1 associates with polyribosomes (polysomes) via an RNA-mediated interaction. Both the abundance and polysomal co-fractionation of CSP1 was enhanced in the cold (4°C), but did not influence global levels of polysomes, which were minimally perturbed by above freezing cold temperatures. Using a polyclonal antiserum, CSP1 was co-immunopurified with several hundred transcripts from rosettes of plants cultivated at 23°C or transferred to 4°C for 12 h. CSP1-associated mRNAs were characterized by G+C-rich 5' untranslated regions and gene ontologies related to cellular respiration, mRNA binding and translation. The majority of the CSP1-associated mRNAs were constitutively expressed and stable in the cold. CSP1 abundance was correlated with improved translation of ribosomal protein mRNAs during cold stress and improved maintenance of homeostasis and translation of mRNAs under water-deficit stress. In summary, CSP1 selectively chaperones mRNAs, providing translational enhancement during stress.

  14. A role for jasmonates in the release of dormancy by cold stratification in wheat

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Qian; Truong, Thy T.; Barrero, Jose M.; Jacobsen, John V.; Hocart, Charles H.; Gubler, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Hydration at low temperatures, commonly referred to as cold stratification, is widely used for releasing dormancy and triggering germination in a wide range of species including wheat. However, the molecular mechanism that underlies its effect on germination has largely remained unknown. Our previous studies showed that methyl-jasmonate, a derivative of jasmonic acid (JA), promotes dormancy release in wheat. In this study, we found that cold-stimulated germination of dormant grains correlated with a transient increase in JA content and expression of JA biosynthesis genes in the dormant embryos after transfer to 20 oC. The induction of JA production was dependent on the extent of cold imbibition and precedes germination. Blocking JA biosynthesis with acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) inhibited the cold-stimulated germination in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, we have explored the relationship between JA and abscisic acid (ABA), a well-known dormancy promoter, in cold regulation of dormancy. We found an inverse relationship between JA and ABA content in dormant wheat embryos following stratification. ABA content decreased rapidly in response to stratification, and the decrease was reversed by addition of ASA. Our results indicate that the action of JA on cold-stratified grains is mediated by suppression of two key ABA biosynthesis genes, TaNCED1 and TaNCED2. PMID:27140440

  15. EDITORIAL: Focus on Cold and Ultracold Molecules FOCUS ON COLD AND ULTRACOLD MOLECULES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, Lincoln D.; Ye, Jun

    2009-05-01

    Cold and ultracold molecules are the next wave of ultracold physics, giving rise to an exciting array of scientific opportunities, including many body physics for novel quantum phase transitions, new states of matter, and quantum information processing. Precision tests of fundamental physical laws benefit from the existence of molecular internal structure with exquisite control. The study of novel collision and reaction dynamics will open a new chapter of quantum chemistry. Cold molecules bring together researchers from a variety of fields, including atomic, molecular, and optical physics, chemistry and chemical physics, quantum information science and quantum simulations, condensed matter physics, nuclear physics, and astrophysics, a truly remarkable synergy of scientific explorations. For the past decade there have been steady advances in direct cooling techniques, from buffer-gas cooling to cold molecular beams to electro- and magneto-molecular decelerators. These techniques have allowed a large variety of molecules to be cooled for pioneering studies. Recent amazing advances in experimental techniques combining the ultracold and the ultraprecise have furthermore brought molecules to the point of quantum degeneracy. These latter indirect cooling techniques magnetically associate atoms from a Bose-Einstein condensate and/or a quantum degenerate Fermi gas, transferring at 90% efficiency highly excited Fano-Feshbach molecules, which are on the order of 10 000 Bohr radii in size, to absolute ground state molecules just a few Bohr across. It was this latter advance, together with significant breakthroughs in internal state manipulations, which inspired us to coordinate this focus issue now, and is the reason why we say the next wave of ultracold physics has now arrived. Whether directly or indirectly cooled, heteronuclear polar molecules offer distinct new features in comparison to cold atoms, while sharing all of their advantages (purity, high coherence

  16. Age and Ethnic Differences in Cold Weather and Contagion Theories of Colds and Flu

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sigelman, Carol K.

    2012-01-01

    Age and ethnic group differences in cold weather and contagion or germ theories of infectious disease were explored in two studies. A cold weather theory was frequently invoked to explain colds and to a lesser extent flu but became less prominent with age as children gained command of a germ theory of disease. Explanations of how contact with…

  17. Technology transfer.

    PubMed

    Rutherford, Jesse Jayne

    2010-01-01

    Technology transfer has served the field of biomedical engineering well. Although the process is fraught with obstacles and may appear to be a distraction from more important work in the laboratory, application of technology is crucial to the furthering of the field and to public health in general. A given inventor may not want to take over the administrative tasks of protecting IP, developing a regulatory strategy, and developing a business model, and he or she does not necessarily have to; however, the inventor needs to at least know about the strategies and know there are people to turn to for leadership and guidance outside of the laboratory early in the process. And that can be all an inventor wants to do or can do: to simply turn the invention over to someone else and move on to more research in the hopes that the invention will help improve patients' health and perhaps afford the inventor and the research institution some financial reward. However, in turning an invention over completely, an inventor also loses power over how, for whom, and at what price the invention will be offered, and that is a reason to become more informed about the process, to know what you can ask for, and to stand by your invention's side in whatever capacity you are equipped to do so throughout the entire technology transfer process.

  18. Status of cold fusion (2010).

    PubMed

    Storms, Edmund

    2010-10-01

    The phenomenon called cold fusion has been studied for the last 21 years since its discovery by Profs. Fleischmann and Pons in 1989. The discovery was met with considerable skepticism, but supporting evidence has accumulated, plausible theories have been suggested, and research is continuing in at least eight countries. This paper provides a brief overview of the major discoveries and some of the attempts at an explanation. The evidence supports the claim that a nuclear reaction between deuterons to produce helium can occur in special materials without application of high energy. This reaction is found to produce clean energy at potentially useful levels without the harmful byproducts normally associated with a nuclear process. Various requirements of a model are examined.

  19. The cold-fog test

    SciTech Connect

    Chisholm, W.A.; Ringler, K.G.; Erven, C.C.

    1996-10-01

    The electrical performance of outdoor insulation degrades severely during combinations of factors that include surface contamination (C), ice (I), fog (F) and an ambient temperature that rises through 0 C (T{sub 0{degree}}). Failures at operating voltage on 115-kV, 230-kV and 500-kV systems occur with increasing probability under these conditions. A new CFT{sub 0{degree}} or cold-fog test method has been developed to reproduce the flashovers at all three voltage levels. Three options are identified for improving CFT{sub 0{degree}} performance: use of semi-conductive glazes, substitution of silicone for porcelain and use of silicone coatings on existing porcelain insulators.

  20. Compensating for cold war cancers.

    PubMed Central

    Parascandola, Mark J

    2002-01-01

    Although the Cold War has ended, thousands of workers involved in nuclear weapons production are still living with the adverse health effects of working with radioactive materials, beryllium, and silica. After a series of court battles, the U.S. government passed the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Act in October 2000 to financially assist workers whose health has been compromised by these occupational exposures. Now work is underway to set out guidelines for determining which workers will be compensated. The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health has been assigned the task of developing a model that can scientifically make these determinations, a heavy task considering the controversies that lie in estimating low-level radiation risks and the inadequate worker exposure records kept at many of the plants. PMID:12117658

  1. Cold warriors target arms control

    SciTech Connect

    Isaacs, J.

    1995-09-01

    While disagreements over the conflict in Bosnia have strained US relations with Western Europe and Russia, these divisions will pale in comparison to the tensions that will arise if recent congressional arms control decisions become law. If the Republicans who dominate Congress are successful, a series of arms control agreements painstakingly negotiated by Republican and Democratic presidents could be consigned to the ash heap. This list includes the Start I and Start II nuclear reduction agreements, the 1972 Anti-Ballistic Missile (ABM) Treaty and the ongoing negotiations to achieve a comprehensive test ban (CTB) by 1996. US leadership in the post-Cold War era will undermined as the international community, already skeptical about this country`s direction, will question the ability of the executive branch to surmount isolantionist impulses.

  2. Cold plasma processing to improve food safety

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cold plasma is an antimicrobial process being developed for application as a food processing technology. This novel intervention is the subject of an expanding research effort by groups around the world. A variety of devices can be used to generate cold plasma and apply it to the food commodity bein...

  3. Lessons on the Cold War. Lesson Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cunningham, Susan J.

    1994-01-01

    Contends that the end of the Cold War requires teachers to change their teaching methods and content. Presents six lessons, most with three individual student activities, that trace the Cold War from the pre-World War I era through the end of the Vietnam War. (CFR)

  4. Physiological Acceptance Criteria for Cold Weather Clothing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-04-01

    subjective feelings of thermal comfort and temperature sensation were examined. Under many conditions that Navy cold weather clothing items are worn, it...is not practical to expect that the optimal level of thermal comfort can be obtained. Allowing for a moderate level of cold sensation and thermal

  5. Gauss Sum Factorization with Cold Atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Gilowski, M.; Wendrich, T.; Mueller, T.; Ertmer, W.; Rasel, E. M.; Jentsch, Ch.; Schleich, W. P.

    2008-01-25

    We report the first implementation of a Gauss sum factorization algorithm by an internal state Ramsey interferometer using cold atoms. A sequence of appropriately designed light pulses interacts with an ensemble of cold rubidium atoms. The final population in the involved atomic levels determines a Gauss sum. With this technique we factor the number N=263193.

  6. 21 CFR 890.5700 - Cold pack.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cold pack. 890.5700 Section 890.5700 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices § 890.5700 Cold pack. (a) Identification....

  7. 21 CFR 890.5700 - Cold pack.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cold pack. 890.5700 Section 890.5700 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices § 890.5700 Cold pack. (a) Identification....

  8. 21 CFR 890.5700 - Cold pack.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cold pack. 890.5700 Section 890.5700 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices § 890.5700 Cold pack. (a) Identification....

  9. 21 CFR 890.5700 - Cold pack.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cold pack. 890.5700 Section 890.5700 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices § 890.5700 Cold pack. (a) Identification....

  10. 21 CFR 890.5700 - Cold pack.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cold pack. 890.5700 Section 890.5700 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices § 890.5700 Cold pack. (a) Identification....

  11. Cold urticaria. Clinical findings in 220 patients.

    PubMed

    Neittaanmäki, H

    1985-10-01

    Patients with cold urticaria, a total of 220, were studied in Finland. Sixty-three percent of the patients were female. The diagnosis was based on a positive ice cube test in 90% of cases, and the other cold tests were needed to certify the diagnosis for the remainder of patients. The mean age at the onset of the disease was 25.1 years (range, 1-74), and the mean duration of symptoms was 6.3 years (range, 3 weeks to 37 years). Cold urticaria symptoms had disappeared in fifty-three patients (24%), but there was a recurrence of the disease in twelve. Idiopathic (primary acquired) cold urticaria was present in 96% of the patients. Only two patients had a secondary acquired cold urticaria. Two patients had cold-induced, "cholinergic" urticaria, and four patients had a delayed type of cold urticaria. Twenty-one percent of the patients had dermatographism, 8% had cholinergic urticaria, and two patients (1%) had heat urticaria concurrently with cold urticaria.

  12. Cold plasma as a food processing technology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cold plasma uses energetic, reactive gases to inactivate contaminating microbes on a variety of foods, such as meats, poultry and fruits and vegetables. The primary modes of action are reactive chemical species and ultraviolet light. Various cold plasma systems are under development, operating at am...

  13. Cold plasma processing technology makes advances

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cold plasma (AKA nonthermal plasma, cool plasma, gas plasma, etc.) is a rapidly maturing antimicrobial process being developed for applications in the food industry. A wide array of devices can be used to create cold plasma, but the defining characteristic is that they operate at or near room temper...

  14. Cold-Weather Sports and Your Family

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2-Year-Old Cold-Weather Sports and Your Family KidsHealth > For Parents > Cold-Weather Sports and Your Family Print A A A What's in this article? ... outside and keep fit — for you and your family. But what if everyone in your house believes ...

  15. Computer model for analyzing sodium cold traps

    SciTech Connect

    McPheeters, C C; Raue, D J

    1983-05-01

    A computer model was developed to simulate the processes that occur in sodium cold traps. The Model for Analyzing Sodium Cold Traps (MASCOT) simulates any desired configuration of mesh arrangements and dimensions and calculates pressure drops and flow distributions, temperature profiles, impurity concentration profiles, and impurity mass distributions. The calculated pressure drop as a function of impurity mass content determines the capacity of the cold trap. The accuracy of the model was checked by comparing calculated mass distributions with experimentally determined mass distributions from literature publications and with results from our own cold trap experiments. The comparisons were excellent in all cases. A parametric study was performed to determine which design variables are most important in maximizing cold trap capacity.

  16. Biotechnology of Cold-Active Proteases

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Swati; Satyanarayana, Tulasi

    2013-01-01

    The bulk of Earth’s biosphere is cold (<5 °C) and inhabited by psychrophiles. Biocatalysts from psychrophilic organisms (psychrozymes) have attracted attention because of their application in the ongoing efforts to decrease energy consumption. Proteinases as a class represent the largest category of industrial enzymes. There has been an emphasis on employing cold-active proteases in detergents because this allows laundry operations at ambient temperatures. Proteases have been used in environmental bioremediation, food industry and molecular biology. In view of the present limited understanding and availability of cold-active proteases with diverse characteristics, it is essential to explore Earth’s surface more in search of an ideal cold-active protease. The understanding of molecular and mechanistic details of these proteases will open up new avenues to tailor proteases with the desired properties. A detailed account of the developments in the production and applications of cold-active proteases is presented in this review. PMID:24832807

  17. Cognitive Egocentrism Differentiates Warm and Cold People

    PubMed Central

    Boyd, Ryan L.; Bresin, Konrad; Ode, Scott; Robinson, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    Warmth-coldness is a fundamental dimension of social behavior. Cold individuals are egocentric in their social relations, whereas warm individuals are not. Previous theorizing suggests that cognitive egocentrism underlies social egocentrism. It was hypothesized that higher levels of interpersonal coldness would predict greater cognitive egocentrism. Cognitive egocentrism was assessed in basic terms through tasks wherein priming a lateralized self-state biased subsequent visual perceptions in an assimilation-related manner. Such effects reflect a tendency to assume that the self's incidental state provides meaningful information concerning the external world. Cognitive egocentrism was evident at high, but not low, levels of interpersonal coldness. The findings reveal a basic difference between warm and cold people, encouraging future research linking cognitive egocentrism to variability in relationship functioning. PMID:23564985

  18. Cognitive Egocentrism Differentiates Warm and Cold People.

    PubMed

    Boyd, Ryan L; Bresin, Konrad; Ode, Scott; Robinson, Michael D

    2013-02-01

    Warmth-coldness is a fundamental dimension of social behavior. Cold individuals are egocentric in their social relations, whereas warm individuals are not. Previous theorizing suggests that cognitive egocentrism underlies social egocentrism. It was hypothesized that higher levels of interpersonal coldness would predict greater cognitive egocentrism. Cognitive egocentrism was assessed in basic terms through tasks wherein priming a lateralized self-state biased subsequent visual perceptions in an assimilation-related manner. Such effects reflect a tendency to assume that the self's incidental state provides meaningful information concerning the external world. Cognitive egocentrism was evident at high, but not low, levels of interpersonal coldness. The findings reveal a basic difference between warm and cold people, encouraging future research linking cognitive egocentrism to variability in relationship functioning.

  19. Social science in the Cold War.

    PubMed

    Engerman, David C

    2010-06-01

    This essay examines ways in which American social science in the late twentieth century was--and was not--a creature of the Cold War. It identifies important work by historians that calls into question the assumption that all social science during the Cold War amounts to "Cold War social science." These historians attribute significant agency to social scientists, showing how they were enmeshed in both long-running disciplinary discussions and new institutional environments. Key trends in this scholarship include a broadening historical perspective to see social scientists in the Cold War as responding to the ideas of their scholarly predecessors; identifying the institutional legacies of World War II; and examining in close detail the products of extramural--especially governmental--funding. The result is a view of social science in the Cold War in which national security concerns are relevant, but with varied and often unexpected impacts on intellectual life.

  20. The impact of cold spells on mortality and effect modification by cold spell characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lijun; Liu, Tao; Hu, Mengjue; Zeng, Weilin; Zhang, Yonghui; Rutherford, Shannon; Lin, Hualiang; Xiao, Jianpeng; Yin, Peng; Liu, Jiangmei; Chu, Cordia; Tong, Shilu; Ma, Wenjun; Zhou, Maigeng

    2016-12-01

    In China, the health impact of cold weather has received little attention, which limits our understanding of the health impacts of climate change. We collected daily mortality and meteorological data in 66 communities across China from 2006 to 2011. Within each community, we estimated the effect of cold spell exposure on mortality using a Distributed Lag Nonlinear Model (DLNM). We also examined the modification effect of cold spell characteristics (intensity, duration, and timing) and individual-specific factors (causes of death, age, gender and education). Meta-analysis method was finally used to estimate the overall effects. The overall cumulative excess risk (CER) of non-accidental mortality during cold spell days was 28.2% (95% CI: 21.4%, 35.3%) compared with non-cold spell days. There was a significant increase in mortality when the cold spell duration and intensity increased or occurred earlier in the season. Cold spell effects and effect modification by cold spell characteristics were more pronounced in south China. The elderly, people with low education level and those with respiratory diseases were generally more vulnerable to cold spells. Cold spells statistically significantly increase mortality risk in China, with greater effects in southern China. This effect is modified by cold spell characteristics and individual-level factors.

  1. Relationships of self-identified cold tolerance and cold-induced vasodilatation in the finger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Joonhee; Lee, Joo-Young

    2016-04-01

    This study was conducted to investigate relationships of self-identified cold tolerance and cold-induced vasodilatation (CIVD) in the finger. Nine males and 34 females participated in the following 2 tests: a CIVD test and a self-reported survey. The CIVD test was conducted 30-min cold-water immersion (3.8 ± 0.3 °C) of the middle finger at an air temperature of 27.9 ± 0.1 °C. The self-reported questionnaire consisted of 28 questions about whole and local body cold and heat tolerances. By a cluster analysis on the survey results, the participants were divided into two groups: high self-identified cold tolerance (HSCT, n = 25) and low self-identified cold tolerance (LSCT, n = 18). LSCT had lower self-identified cold tolerance ( P < 0.001), preferred hot thermal stimulation ( P = 0.006), and wore heavier clothing during daily life ( P < 0.001) than HSCT. LSCT had significantly lower maximal finger temperatures ( T max) ( P = 0.040), smaller amplitude ( P = 0.029), and delayed onset time of CIVD ( P = 0.080) when compared to HSCT. Some questions examining the self-identified cold or heat tolerance had relationships with cold tolerance index, T max, and amplitude ( P < 0.1). These results indicate that self-identified cold tolerance classified through a standardized survey could be a good index to predict physiological cold tolerance.

  2. The impact of cold spells on mortality and effect modification by cold spell characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lijun; Liu, Tao; Hu, Mengjue; Zeng, Weilin; Zhang, Yonghui; Rutherford, Shannon; Lin, Hualiang; Xiao, Jianpeng; Yin, Peng; Liu, Jiangmei; Chu, Cordia; Tong, Shilu; Ma, Wenjun; Zhou, Maigeng

    2016-01-01

    In China, the health impact of cold weather has received little attention, which limits our understanding of the health impacts of climate change. We collected daily mortality and meteorological data in 66 communities across China from 2006 to 2011. Within each community, we estimated the effect of cold spell exposure on mortality using a Distributed Lag Nonlinear Model (DLNM). We also examined the modification effect of cold spell characteristics (intensity, duration, and timing) and individual-specific factors (causes of death, age, gender and education). Meta-analysis method was finally used to estimate the overall effects. The overall cumulative excess risk (CER) of non-accidental mortality during cold spell days was 28.2% (95% CI: 21.4%, 35.3%) compared with non-cold spell days. There was a significant increase in mortality when the cold spell duration and intensity increased or occurred earlier in the season. Cold spell effects and effect modification by cold spell characteristics were more pronounced in south China. The elderly, people with low education level and those with respiratory diseases were generally more vulnerable to cold spells. Cold spells statistically significantly increase mortality risk in China, with greater effects in southern China. This effect is modified by cold spell characteristics and individual-level factors. PMID:27922084

  3. Relationships of self-identified cold tolerance and cold-induced vasodilatation in the finger.

    PubMed

    Park, Joonhee; Lee, Joo-Young

    2016-04-01

    This study was conducted to investigate relationships of self-identified cold tolerance and cold-induced vasodilatation (CIVD) in the finger. Nine males and 34 females participated in the following 2 tests: a CIVD test and a self-reported survey. The CIVD test was conducted 30-min cold-water immersion (3.8 ± 0.3 °C) of the middle finger at an air temperature of 27.9 ± 0.1 °C. The self-reported questionnaire consisted of 28 questions about whole and local body cold and heat tolerances. By a cluster analysis on the survey results, the participants were divided into two groups: high self-identified cold tolerance (HSCT, n = 25) and low self-identified cold tolerance (LSCT, n = 18). LSCT had lower self-identified cold tolerance (P < 0.001), preferred hot thermal stimulation (P = 0.006), and wore heavier clothing during daily life (P < 0.001) than HSCT. LSCT had significantly lower maximal finger temperatures (T max) (P = 0.040), smaller amplitude (P = 0.029), and delayed onset time of CIVD (P = 0.080) when compared to HSCT. Some questions examining the self-identified cold or heat tolerance had relationships with cold tolerance index, T max, and amplitude (P < 0.1). These results indicate that self-identified cold tolerance classified through a standardized survey could be a good index to predict physiological cold tolerance.

  4. Genetics Home Reference: cold-induced sweating syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Conditions cold-induced sweating syndrome cold-induced sweating syndrome Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse ... PDF Open All Close All Description Cold-induced sweating syndrome is characterized by problems with regulating body ...

  5. Cold or Allergies: Which Is It? (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... a lingering cold? – Michelle Seasonal allergies and the common cold can be so much alike that it's sometimes ... What Is Skin Testing for Allergies? First Aid: Common Cold Why Is Hand Washing So Important? Can Kids ...

  6. When Working in Cold, Be Prepared and Be Aware

    MedlinePlus

    ... Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Some cold weather dangers are obvious, but others are harder to ... the cold, there are many risks. Some cold weather dangers are obvious, but others are harder to ...

  7. 13. VIEW FROM COLD CALIBRATION BLOCKHOUSE LOOKING DOWN CONNECTING TUNNEL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. VIEW FROM COLD CALIBRATION BLOCKHOUSE LOOKING DOWN CONNECTING TUNNEL TO COLD CALIBRATION TEST STAND BASEMENT, SHOWING HARD WIRE CONNECTION (INSTRUMENTATION AND CONTROL). - Marshall Space Flight Center, East Test Area, Cold Calibration Test Stand, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  8. 2. VIEW NORTHWEST FROM LEFT TO RIGHT: COLD CALIBRATION BLOCKHOUSE, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. VIEW NORTHWEST FROM LEFT TO RIGHT: COLD CALIBRATION BLOCKHOUSE, COLD CALIBRATION TEST STAND FOR FL ENGINE FOR SATURN V. EXHAUST DUCT IN FOREGROUND. - Marshall Space Flight Center, East Test Area, Cold Calibration Test Stand, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  9. Colds and the flu - what to ask your doctor - adult

    MedlinePlus

    ... germs, called viruses, cause colds. Symptoms of the common cold include: Runny nose Nasal congestion Sneezing Sore throat ... flu symptoms are similar to those of a common cold. Flu can symptoms can also include fever, muscle ...

  10. Colds and the flu - what to ask your doctor - child

    MedlinePlus

    ... germs, called viruses, cause colds. Symptoms of the common cold include: Runny nose Nasal congestion Sneezing Sore throat ... Read More Acute respiratory distress syndrome Avian influenza Common cold Cough Fever Flu H1N1 influenza (Swine flu) Immune ...

  11. Some Chinese folk prescriptions for wind-cold type common cold

    PubMed Central

    Hai-long, Zhai; Shimin, Chen; Yalan, Lu

    2015-01-01

    Although self-limiting, the common cold (感冒gǎn mào) is highly prevalent. There are no effective antivirals to cure the common cold and few effective measures to prevent it, However, for thousands years, Chinese people have treated the common cold with natural herbs, According to the traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) theory (中醫理論 zhōng yī lǐ lùn), the common cold is considered as an exterior syndrome, which can be further divided into the wind-cold type (風寒型 fēng hán xíng), the wind-heat type (風熱型 fēng rè xíng), and the summer heat dampness type (暑熱型 shǔ rè xíng). Since the most common type of common cold caught in winter and spring is the wind-cold type, the article introduced some Chinese folk prescriptions for the wind-cold type common cold with normal and weak physique, respectively. For thousands of years, Chinese folk prescriptions for the common cold, as complementary and alternative medicine (CAM; 補充與替代醫學 bǔ chōng yǔ tì dài yī xué), have been proven to be effective, convenient, cheap, and most importantly, safe. The Chinese folk prescriptions (中國民間處方 zhōng guó mín jiān chǔ fāng) for the wind-cold type common cold are quite suitable for general practitioners or patients with the wind-cold type common cold, to treat the disease. Of course, their pharmacological features and mechanisms of action need to be further studied. PMID:26151024

  12. Reversibility of cold-induced hypertension after removal of rats from cold.

    PubMed

    Shechtman, O; Papanek, P E; Fregly, M J

    1990-07-01

    Chronic exposure of rats to cold air induces hypertension, including elevation of blood pressure and cardiac hypertrophy. The present study was designed to assess reversibility of these changes after removal from cold. Five groups of six male rats each were exposed to cold (5 +/- 2 degrees C) for 39 days, while six control rats were maintained at 26 +/- 2 degrees C. Systolic blood pressures of the rats in one of the cold-treated groups, as well as the controls, were measured twice weekly throughout the experiment. Blood pressure of the cold-exposed rats (150 +/- 3 mmHg; 1 mmHg = 133.3 Pa) became elevated significantly above that of controls (129 +/- 3 mmHg) within 4 weeks. On day 39 of cold exposure, one group (six rats) of the cold-treated rats was sacrificed while still in the cold. The remaining four groups of cold-treated rats were than removed from cold and kept at 26 +/- 2 degrees C. One group of cold-treated rats was sacrificed weekly thereafter. During the last week, the six control rats were also sacrificed. At death, the heart, kidneys, and adrenal glands were removed and weighed. Mean heart weight of the cold-treated group (346 +/- 7 mg/100 g body weight), sacrificed prior to removal from cold, was significantly (p less than 0.01) greater than that of controls (268 +/- 5 mg/100 g body weight). The increased heart weight of the cold-treated group appeared to result mainly from an increase in left ventricular weight.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. Some Chinese folk prescriptions for wind-cold type common cold.

    PubMed

    Hai-Long, Zhai; Shimin, Chen; Yalan, Lu

    2015-07-01

    Although self-limiting, the common cold (gǎn mào) is highly prevalent. There are no effective antivirals to cure the common cold and few effective measures to prevent it, However, for thousands years, Chinese people have treated the common cold with natural herbs, According to the traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) theory ( zhōng yī lǐ lùn), the common cold is considered as an exterior syndrome, which can be further divided into the wind-cold type ( fēng hán xíng), the wind-heat type ( fēng rè xíng), and the summer heat dampness type ( shǔ rè xíng). Since the most common type of common cold caught in winter and spring is the wind-cold type, the article introduced some Chinese folk prescriptions for the wind-cold type common cold with normal and weak physique, respectively. For thousands of years, Chinese folk prescriptions for the common cold, as complementary and alternative medicine (CAM; bǔ chōng yǔ tì dài yī xué), have been proven to be effective, convenient, cheap, and most importantly, safe. The Chinese folk prescriptions ( zhōng guó mín jiān chǔ fāng) for the wind-cold type common cold are quite suitable for general practitioners or patients with the wind-cold type common cold, to treat the disease. Of course, their pharmacological features and mechanisms of action need to be further studied.

  14. Properties and uses of cold neutron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, David D.

    1992-07-01

    Cold neutrons are conventionally defined as those with energy below 0.005 eV; the corresponding velocity and wavelength arc 980 m/s and 4 angstroms. The first extensive use of cold neutrons was in the 1960's by condensed matter physicists for investigations of spatial structure and internal dynamics of solids and liquids. Different experiments place different requirements on neutron beams, but it is usually advantageous to eliminate the faster neutrons and the gamma rays that are present in normal reactor beams. Several types of filters that pass only the low-energy portion of an incident Maxwellian spectrum have been developed and will be discussed. Examples include single crystal quartz or bismuth (room temperature or cooled), polycrystalline beryllium, and neutron guides. For any of these shifting the incident neutrons to a lower energy spectrum by use of a cold moderator leads to large increases in the intensity of cold neutrons. The properties of the beams resulting from the particular combination of a cold moderator and a neutron guide will be discussed. These include the changes in beam intensity and spectral shape as warm neutrons in a typical reactor spectrum first interact with a cold moderator and then pass through a straight or curved neutron guide. The spatial and angular distribution of the neutrons at the exit of the guide will be described. One further important effect for cold neutron beam experiments involving nuclear reactions is the increase in reaction rates because of the usual 1/v dependence of reaction cross sections and another is the considerable simplification with cold neutrons in the problems of collimating, shielding, and stopping the beam. The resulting benefits for studies of nuclear energy levels by neutron capture gamma-ray and conversion electron experiments and for the analysis of materials by PGNAA will be discussed. Neutron depth profiling is also improved with cold neutrons. (author)

  15. Technology Transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bullock, Kimberly R.

    1995-01-01

    The development and application of new technologies in the United States has always been important to the economic well being of the country. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has been an important source of these new technologies for almost four decades. Recently, increasing global competition has emphasized the importance of fully utilizing federally funded technologies. Today NASA must meet its mission goals while at the same time, conduct research and development that contributes to securing US economic growth. NASA technologies must be quickly and effectively transferred into commercial products. In order to accomplish this task, NASA has formulated a new way of doing business with the private sector. Emphasis is placed on forming mutually beneficial partnerships between NASA and US industry. New standards have been set in response to the process that increase effectiveness, efficiency, and timely customer response. This summer I have identified potential markets for two NASA inventions: including the Radially Focused Eddy Current Sensor for Characterization of Flaws in Metallic Tubing and the Radiographic Moire. I have also worked to establish a cooperative program with TAG, private industry, and a university known as the TAG/Industry/Academia Program.

  16. Repairing Student Misconceptions in Heat Transfer Using Inquiry-Based Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prince, Michael; Vigeant, Margot; Nottis, Katharyn

    2016-01-01

    Eight inquiry-based activities, described here in sufficient detail for faculty to adopt in their own courses, were designed to teach students fundamental concepts in heat transfer. The concept areas chosen were (1) factors affecting the rate vs. amount of heat transfer, (2) temperature vs. perceptions of hot and cold, (3) temperature vs. energy…

  17. Heat, cold, noise, and vibration

    SciTech Connect

    Horvath, S.M.; Bedi, J.F. )

    1990-03-01

    Exposure to a cold environment induces a number of physiological alterations, the most serious being hypothermia. This state can occur in all individuals, but the very young and the elderly are more susceptible. Environmental and industrially generated high ambient temperature can place further stress on aged individuals and workers, resulting in a complex symptom picture. Morbidity and death may result from such exposures. Causative factors have been identified. Noise exposure induces hearing losses above those secondary to the aging process. Psychophysiological effects during noise exposure are considered to result from the sympathetic activity secondary to a general stress reaction. Vibration from the use of power tools results in Raynaud's phenomenon. However, modification of power tools has reduced the symptoms associated with vibration exposure. Termination of exposure to vibration appears eventually to reduce symptoms related to white-finger spasms. Interaction between these stressors has not been clarified because of the complex effects of each. The need for additional information about the response to these stressors is evident. 38 references.

  18. Microbiological Interactions with Cold Plasma.

    PubMed

    Bourke, Paula; Zuizina, Dana; Han, Lu; Cullen, P J; Gilmore, Brendan F

    2017-02-28

    There is a diverse range of microbiological challenges facing the food, healthcare and clinical sectors. The increasing and pervasive resistance to broad-spectrum antibiotics and health related concerns with many biocidal agents drives research for novel and complementary antimicrobial approaches. Biofilms display increased mechanical and antimicrobial stability and are the subject of extensive research. Cold plasmas (CP) have rapidly evolved as a technology for microbial decontamination, wound healing and cancer treatment, owing to the chemical and bio-active radicals generated known collectively as reactive oxygen (ROS) and nitrogen species (RONS). This review outlines the basics of CP technology and discusses interactions with a range of microbiological targets. Advances in mechanistic insights are presented and applications to food and clinical issues are discussed. The possibility of tailoring CP to control specific microbiological challenges is apparent. This review focuses on microbiological issues in relation to food and health care associated human infections, the role of CP in their elimination and the current status of plasma mechanisms of action. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  19. Cold dust in hot regions

    SciTech Connect

    Sreenilayam, Gopika; Fich, Michel; Ade, Peter; Bintley, Dan; Chapin, Ed; Chrysostomou, Antonio; Jenness, Tim; Dunlop, James S.; Holland, Wayne S.; Ivison, Rob; Gibb, Andy; Halpern, Mark; Scott, Douglas; Greaves, Jane S.; Robson, Ian

    2014-03-01

    We mapped five massive star-forming regions with the SCUBA-2 camera on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope. Temperature and column density maps are obtained from the SCUBA-2 450 and 850 μm images. Most of the dense clumps we find have central temperatures below 20 K, with some as cold as 8 K, suggesting that they have no internal heating due to the presence of embedded protostars. This is surprising, because at the high densities inferred from these images and at these low temperatures such clumps should be unstable, collapsing to form stars and generating internal heating. The column densities at the clump centers exceed 10{sup 23} cm{sup –2}, and the derived peak visual extinction values are from 25 to 500 mag for β = 1.5-2.5, indicating highly opaque centers. The observed cloud gas masses range from ∼10 to 10{sup 3} M {sub ☉}. The outer regions of the clumps follow an r {sup –2.36±0.35} density distribution, and this power-law structure is observed outside of typically 10{sup 4} AU. All these findings suggest that these clumps are high-mass starless clumps and most likely contain high-mass starless cores.

  20. Hot flakes in cold cases.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Harald; Sommerer, Thomas; Rand, Steve; Wiegand, Peter

    2011-07-01

    In the past, it was almost impossible for forensic scientists to separate DNA from an undefined number of different individuals in mixed stains where, for example, two or more suspects had handled the same weapon. Such samples often contain complex mixtures with the consequence of ambiguous or inconclusive mixed DNA profiles. Using the method described of comprehensive and/or targeted screening of shed cells adhering to tapings of garments or objects enables such stains to be individualized. To evaluate the method, 500 microscopically selected single skin flakes were analyzed using two different commercial STR kits to compare the success rates for each PCR typing system. The method has been validated for use in routine casework and has been shown to be rapid, sensitive, and reproducible. It can be predicted that many cases in the archives with body tapings, which have not yet been examined will benefit from this new or perhaps more appropriate, reanimated, technical development, and of particular importance are serious crimes, the so-called cold cases. The remarkable forensic value of this simple but time-consuming technique is exemplified by 2 out of approximately 100 cases already successfully solved using this approach.

  1. Neutron interferometry with cold stage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mineeva, Taisiya; Arif, M.; Huber, M. G.; Shahi, C. B.; Clark, C. W.; Cory, D. G.; Nsofini, J.; Sarenac, D.; Pushin, D. A.

    Neutron interferometry (NI) is amongst the most precise methods for characterizing neutron interactions by measuring the relative difference between two neutron paths, one of which contains a sample-of-interest. Because neutrons carry magnetic moment and are deeply penetrating, they are excellent probes to investigate properties of magnetic materials. The advantage of NI is its unique sensitivity which allows to directly measure magnetic and structural transitions in materials. Up to now NI has been sparingly used in material research due to its sensitivity to environmental noise. However, recent successes in implementing Quantum Error Correction principles lead to an improved NI design making it robust against mechanical vibrations. Following these advances, a new user facility at the National Institute for Standards and Technology was built to study condensed matter applications, biology and quantum physics. Incorporating cold sample stage inside NI is the first of its kind experiment which can be carried out on large range of temperatures down to 4K. Upon successful realization, it will open new frontiers to characterize magnetic domains, phase transitions and spin properties in a variety of materials such as, for example, iron-based superconductors and spintronic materials. Supported in part by CERC, CIFAR, NSERC and CREATE.

  2. Cold atoms coupled with mechanical oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valencia, Jose; Montoya, Cris; Ranjit, Gambhir; Geraci, Andrew; Eardley, Matt; Kitching, John

    2015-05-01

    Mechanical resonators can be used to probe and manipulate atomic spins with nanometer spatial resolution and single-spin sensitivity, ultimately enabling new approaches in neutral-atom quantum computation, quantum simulation, or precision sensing. We describe our experiment that manipulates the spin of trapped, cold Rb atoms using magnetic material on a cantilever. Cold atoms can also be used as a coolant for mechanical resonators: we estimate that ground state cooling of an optically trapped nano-sphere is achievable when starting at room temperature, by sympathetic cooling of a cold atomic gas optically coupled to the nanoparticle.

  3. Low gravity transfer line chilldown

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antar, Basil N.; Collins, Frank G.; Kawaji, Masahiro

    1992-01-01

    The progress to date is presented in providing predictive capabilities for the transfer line chilldown problem in low gravity environment. A low gravity experimental set up was designed and flown onboard the NASA/KC-135 airplane. Some results of this experimental effort are presented. The cooling liquid for these experiments was liquid nitrogen. The boiling phenomenon was investigated in this case using flow visualization techniques as well as recording wall temperatures. The flow field was established by injecting cold liquid in a heated tube whose temperature was set above saturation values. The tubes were vertically supported with the liquid injected from the lower end of the tube. The results indicate substantial differences in the flow patterns established during boiling between the ground based, (1-g), experiments and the flight experiments, (low-g). These differences in the flow patterns will be discussed and some explanations will be offered.

  4. Coral mucus fuels the sponge loop in warm- and cold-water coral reef ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Rix, Laura; de Goeij, Jasper M; Mueller, Christina E; Struck, Ulrich; Middelburg, Jack J; van Duyl, Fleur C; Al-Horani, Fuad A; Wild, Christian; Naumann, Malik S; van Oevelen, Dick

    2016-01-07

    Shallow warm-water and deep-sea cold-water corals engineer the coral reef framework and fertilize reef communities by releasing coral mucus, a source of reef dissolved organic matter (DOM). By transforming DOM into particulate detritus, sponges play a key role in transferring the energy and nutrients in DOM to higher trophic levels on Caribbean reefs via the so-called sponge loop. Coral mucus may be a major DOM source for the sponge loop, but mucus uptake by sponges has not been demonstrated. Here we used laboratory stable isotope tracer experiments to show the transfer of coral mucus into the bulk tissue and phospholipid fatty acids of the warm-water sponge Mycale fistulifera and cold-water sponge Hymedesmia coriacea, demonstrating a direct trophic link between corals and reef sponges. Furthermore, 21-40% of the mucus carbon and 32-39% of the nitrogen assimilated by the sponges was subsequently released as detritus, confirming a sponge loop on Red Sea warm-water and north Atlantic cold-water coral reefs. The presence of a sponge loop in two vastly different reef environments suggests it is a ubiquitous feature of reef ecosystems contributing to the high biogeochemical cycling that may enable coral reefs to thrive in nutrient-limited (warm-water) and energy-limited (cold-water) environments.

  5. Cold adaptation regulated by cryptic prophage excision in Shewanella oneidensis.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Zhenshun; Liu, Xiaoxiao; Yao, Jianyun; Guo, Yunxue; Li, Baiyuan; Li, Yangmei; Jiao, Nianzhi; Wang, Xiaoxue

    2016-12-01

    Among the environmental stresses experienced by bacteria, temperature shifts are one of the most important. In this study, we discovered a novel cold adaptation mechanism in Shewanella oneidensis that occurs at the DNA level and is regulated by cryptic prophage excision. Previous studies on bacterial cold tolerance mainly focus on the structural change of cell membrane and changes at the RNA and protein levels. Whether or not genomic change can also contribute to this process has not been explored. Here we employed a whole-genome deep-sequencing method to probe the changes at DNA level in a model psychrotrophic bacteria strain. We found that temperature downshift induced a 10 000-fold increase of the excision of a novel P4-like cryptic prophage. Importantly, although prophage excision only occurred in a relatively small population of bacteria, it was able to facilitate biofilm formation and promote the survival of the entire population. This prophage excision affected cell physiology by disrupting a critical gene encoding transfer-messenger RNA (tmRNA). In addition, we found that the histone-like nucleoid-structuring protein (H-NS) could silence prophage excision via binding to the promoter of the putative excisionase gene at warm temperatures. H-NS level was reduced at cold temperatures, leading to de-repression of prophage excision. Collectively, our results reveal that cryptic prophage excision acts as a regulatory switch to enable the survival of the host at low temperature by controlling the activity of tmRNA and biofilm formation.

  6. Cold Helium Gas Pressurization For Spacecraft Cryogenic Propulsion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morehead, Robert L.; Atwell. Matthew J.; Hurlbert, Eric A.; Melcher, J. C.

    2017-01-01

    To reduce the dry mass of a spacecraft pressurization system, helium pressurant may be stored at low temperature and high pressure to increase mass in a given tank volume. Warming this gas through an engine heat exchanger prior to tank pressurization both increases the system efficiency and simplifies the designs of intermediate hardware such as regulators, valves, etc. since the gas is no longer cryogenic. If this type of cold helium pressurization system is used in conjunction with a cryogenic propellant, though, a loss in overall system efficiency can be expected due to heat transfer from the warm ullage gas to the cryogenic propellant which results in a specific volume loss for the pressurant, interpreted as the Collapse Factor. Future spacecraft with cryogenic propellants will likely have a cold helium system, with increasing collapse factor effects as vehicle sizes decrease. To determine the collapse factor effects and overall implementation strategies for a representative design point, a cold helium system was hotfire tested on the Integrated Cryogenic Propulsion Test Article (ICPTA) in a thermal vacuum environment at the NASA Glenn Research Center Plum Brook Station. The ICPTA vehicle is a small lander-sized spacecraft prototype built at NASA Johnson Space Center utilizing cryogenic liquid oxygen/liquid methane propellants and cryogenic helium gas as a pressurant to operate one 2,800lbf 5:1 throttling main engine, two 28lbf Reaction Control Engines (RCE), and two 7lbf RCEs (Figure 1). This vehicle was hotfire tested at a variety of environmental conditions at NASA Plum Brook, ranging from ambient temperature/simulated high altitude, deep thermal/high altitude, and deep thermal/high vacuum conditions. A detailed summary of the vehicle design and testing campaign may be found in Integrated Cryogenic Propulsion Test Article Thermal Vacuum Hotfire Testing, AIAA JPC 2017.

  7. Cold adaptation regulated by cryptic prophage excision in Shewanella oneidensis

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Zhenshun; Liu, Xiaoxiao; Yao, Jianyun; Guo, Yunxue; Li, Baiyuan; Li, Yangmei; Jiao, Nianzhi; Wang, Xiaoxue

    2016-01-01

    Among the environmental stresses experienced by bacteria, temperature shifts are one of the most important. In this study, we discovered a novel cold adaptation mechanism in Shewanella oneidensis that occurs at the DNA level and is regulated by cryptic prophage excision. Previous studies on bacterial cold tolerance mainly focus on the structural change of cell membrane and changes at the RNA and protein levels. Whether or not genomic change can also contribute to this process has not been explored. Here we employed a whole-genome deep-sequencing method to probe the changes at DNA level in a model psychrotrophic bacteria strain. We found that temperature downshift induced a 10 000-fold increase of the excision of a novel P4-like cryptic prophage. Importantly, although prophage excision only occurred in a relatively small population of bacteria, it was able to facilitate biofilm formation and promote the survival of the entire population. This prophage excision affected cell physiology by disrupting a critical gene encoding transfer-messenger RNA (tmRNA). In addition, we found that the histone-like nucleoid-structuring protein (H-NS) could silence prophage excision via binding to the promoter of the putative excisionase gene at warm temperatures. H-NS level was reduced at cold temperatures, leading to de-repression of prophage excision. Collectively, our results reveal that cryptic prophage excision acts as a regulatory switch to enable the survival of the host at low temperature by controlling the activity of tmRNA and biofilm formation. PMID:27482926

  8. A mitochondrial complex I defect impairs cold-regulated nuclear gene expression.

    PubMed

    Lee, Byeong-ha; Lee, Hojoung; Xiong, Liming; Zhu, Jian-Kang

    2002-06-01

    To study low-temperature signaling in plants, we previously screened for cold stress response mutants using bioluminescent Arabidopsis plants that express the firefly luciferase reporter gene driven by the stress-responsive RD29A promoter. Here, we report on the characterization and cloning of one mutant, frostbite1 (fro1), which shows reduced luminescence induction by cold. fro1 plants display reduced cold induction of stress-responsive genes such as RD29A, KIN1, COR15A, and COR47. fro1 leaves have a reduced capacity for cold acclimation, appear water-soaked, leak electrolytes, and accumulate reactive oxygen species constitutively. FRO1 was isolated through positional cloning and found to encode a protein with high similarity to the 18-kD Fe-S subunit of complex I (NADH dehydrogenase, EC 1.6.5.3) in the mitochondrial electron transfer chain. Confocal imaging shows that the FRO1:green fluorescent protein fusion protein is localized in mitochondria. These results suggest that cold induction of nuclear gene expression is modulated by mitochondrial function.

  9. Cold tolerance in sealworm ( Pseudoterranova decipiens) due to heat-shock adaptations.

    PubMed

    Stormo, S K; Praebel, K; Elvevoll, E O

    2009-09-01

    Third-stage larvae of Pseudoterranova decipiens commonly infect whitefish such as cod, and the parasite can be transferred to humans through lightly prepared (sushi) meals. Because little is known about the nematode's cold tolerance capacity, we examined the nematode's ability to supercool, and whether or not cold acclimation could induce physiological changes that might increase its ability to tolerate freezing conditions. Even if third-stage Pseudoterranova decipiens larvae have some supercooling ability, they show no potential for freezing avoidance because they are not able to withstand inoculative freezing. Still, they have the ability to survive freezing at high subzero temperatures, something which suggests that these nematodes have a moderate freeze tolerance. We also show that acclimation to high temperatures triggers trehalose accumulation to an even greater extent than cold acclimation. Trehalose is a potential cryoprotectant which has been shown to play a vital role in the freeze tolerance of nematodes. We suggest that the trehalose accumulation observed for the cold acclimation is a general response to thermal stress, and that the nematode's moderate freeze tolerance may be acquired through adaptation to heat rather than coldness.

  10. Cold fiber solid-phase microextraction device based on thermoelectric cooling of metal fiber.

    PubMed

    Haddadi, Shokouh Hosseinzadeh; Pawliszyn, Janusz

    2009-04-03

    A new cold fiber solid-phase microextraction device was designed and constructed based on thermoelectric cooling. A three-stage thermoelectric cooler (TEC) was used for cooling a copper rod coated with a poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) hollow fiber, which served as the solid-phase microextraction (SPME) fiber. The copper rod was mounted on a commercial SPME plunger and exposed to the cold surface of the TEC, which was enclosed in a small aluminum box. A heat sink and a fan were used to dissipate the generated heat at the hot side of the TEC. By applying an appropriate dc voltage to the TEC, the upper part of the copper rod, which was in contact to the cold side of the TEC, was cooled and the hollow fiber reached a lower temperature through heat transfer. A thermocouple was embedded in the cold side of the TEC for indirect measurement of the fiber temperature. The device was applied in quantitative analysis of off-flavors in a rice sample. Hexanal, nonanal, and undecanal were chosen as three off-flavors in rice. They were identified according to their retention times and analyzed by GC-flame ionization detection instrument. Headspace extraction conditions (i.e., temperature and time) were optimized. Standard addition calibration graphs were obtained at the optimized conditions and the concentrations of the three analytes were calculated. The concentration of hexanal was also measured using a conventional solvent extraction method (697+/-143ng/g) which was comparable to that obtained from the cold fiber SPME method (644+/-8). Moreover, the cold fiber SPME resulted in better reproducibility and shorter analysis time. Cold fiber SPME with TEC device can also be used as a portable device for field sampling.

  11. Modulation of alternative oxidase to enhance tolerance against cold stress of chickpea by chemical treatments.

    PubMed

    Erdal, Serkan; Genisel, Mucip; Turk, Hulya; Dumlupinar, Rahmi; Demir, Yavuz

    2015-03-01

    The alternative oxidase (AOX) is the enzyme responsible for the alternative respiratory pathway. This experiment was conducted to examine the influence on cold tolerance ability of chickpea (Cicer aurentium cv. Müfitbey) seedlings of AOX activator (pyruvate), AOX inhibitor (salicylhydroxamic acid (SHAM)) and an inhibitor of the cytochrome pathway of respiration (antimycin A) treatments. 5mM pyruvate, 2μM antimycin A and 4mM SHAM solutions were exogenously applied to thirteen-day-old chickpea leaves and then the seedlings were transferred to a different plant growth chamber arranged to 10/5°C (day/night) for 48h. Cold stress markedly increased the activities of antioxidant enzymes compared to controls. Pyruvate and antimycin A significantly increased the cold-induced increase in antioxidant activity but SHAM decreased it. Cold-induced increases in superoxide anion, hydrogen peroxide, and lipid peroxidation levels were significantly reduced by pyruvate and antimycin A, but increased by SHAM treatment. Pyruvate and antimycin A application increased both the activity and protein expression of AOX in comparison to cold stress alone. However, SHAM significantly decreased activity of AOX but did not affect its expression. Total cellular respiration values (TCRV) supported the changes in activity and expression of AOX. While TCRV were increased by cold and pyruvate, they were significantly reduced by SHAM and especially antimycin A. These results indicate that pyruvate and antimycin A applications were effective in reducing oxidative stress by activating the alternative respiratory pathway as well as antioxidant activity. Furthermore, direct activation of AOX, rather than inhibition of the cytochrome pathway, was the most effective way to mitigate cold stress.

  12. Technology Transfer: Marketing Tomorrow's Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tcheng, Erene

    1995-01-01

    The globalization of the economy and the end of the Cold War have triggered many changes in the traditional practices of U.S. industry. To effectively apply the resources available to the United States, the federal government has firmly advocated a policy of technology transfer between private industry and government labs, in this case the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). NASA Administrator Daniel Goldin is a strong proponent of this policy and has organized technology transfer or commercialization programs at each of the NASA field centers. Here at Langley Research Center, the Technology Applications Group (TAG) is responsible for facilitating the transfer of Langley developed research and technology to U.S. industry. Entering the program, I had many objectives for my summer research with TAG. Certainly, I wanted to gain a more thorough understanding of the concept of technology transfer and Langley's implementation of a system to promote it to both the Langley community and the community at large. Also, I hoped to become more familiar with Langley's research capabilities and technology inventory available to the public. More specifically, I wanted to learn about the technology transfer process at Langley. Because my mentor is a member of Materials and Manufacturing marketing sector of the Technology Transfer Team, another overriding objective for my research was to take advantage of his work and experience in materials research to learn about the Advanced Materials Research agency wide and help market these developments to private industry. Through the various projects I have been assigned to work on in TAG, I have successfully satisfied the majority of these objectives. Work on the Problem Statement Process for TAG as well as the development of the Advanced Materials Research Brochure have provided me with the opportunity to learn about the technology transfer process from the outside looking in and the inside looking out. Because TAG covers

  13. Performance test on PELICAN - a multi-purpose time of flight cold neutron spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Dehong; Mole, Richard. A.; Kearley, Gordon J.

    2015-01-01

    Pelican, a direct geometry multi-purpose cold neutron spectrometer has recently been commissioned at the Bragg Institute, ANSTO. The energy resolution and flux at the sample position as a function of neutron wavelength has been evaluated and time focusing at selected energy transfers has also been demonstrated. Several test experiments of quasi-elastic and inelastic neutron scatterings have been performed and these have indicated the realisation of the design specifications and performance of the instrument.

  14. Cold and wet at the roots of U.S. Cordilleran high elevation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berry, M. A.; Lowry, A. R.; Schutt, D.; Kanda, R. V. S.; Buehler, J. S.

    2015-12-01

    Mechanisms for high elevation and large-scale deformation of the western U.S. Cordillera have long been a source of controversy. Lowry and Pérez-Gussinyé (2011) suggested abundant quartz in the Cordilleran crust, evidenced by low seismic velocity ratio vP/vS, might be one clue. Here we examine thermal transfer processes to look for additional insight. We calculate temperature at the Moho by modeling the conductive 1D geotherm from observed surface heat flow, and compare these estimates to measurements derived from Pn velocity tomography and mineral physics (Schutt et al., 2015). Moho temperature is moderately sensitive to assumptions regarding crustal radiogenic heating and thermal conductivity, but differences between modeled and measured temperatures exceed the range consistent with reasonable variations in these parameters. Residual (measured minus modeled) Moho temperatures are "cold" in regions deformed during the Laramide flat-slab subduction event. A simple model of transient cooling by cold subducting slab at the base of the lithosphere chills the Moho by a small fraction (<20%) of the observed anomaly. Intriguingly, the "cold-Moho anomaly" strongly correlates (R = 0.71) to high elevation (opposite the relationship expected) and also correlates with crustal vP/vS, which in turn correlates to surface heat flow. Recent analyses (Guerri et al., 2015) suggest low crustal vP/vS and density may signal hydration. Geotherm models are sensitive to assumed advective thermal transfer, and we modeled advection consistent with lithospheric extensional strain (i.e., increasing with depth). If instead volatile transfer dominates advection, geotherm modeling predicts a better match of surface heat flow to Moho temperature. We hypothesize that the "cold-Moho anomaly" actually reflects enhanced volatile flux and advective heat transfer from fluids derived from Laramide subduction, and associated volumetric expansion of the crust contributes to high elevation.

  15. Animal Adaptation and Acclimatization to Cold

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, R. E.; Watson, C. A.

    1977-01-01

    This article examines the mechanisms of adaptation and acclimatization of animals to cold temperatures. The differences between the two processes are explained and terms are defined. Graphs and drawings illustrate the article. (MA)

  16. Cold-War Echoes in American Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winn, Ira Jay

    1984-01-01

    The author believes a cold war ideology permeates our culture and poisons the minds of youth. The challenge to education is to awaken people to a historical and global perspective and raise public consciousness of the necessity for peace. (MD)

  17. Soap Bubbles on a Cold Day.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waiveris, Charles

    1994-01-01

    Discusses the effects of blowing bubbles in extremely cold weather. Describes the freezing conditions of the bubbles and some physical properties. Suggests using the activity with all ages of students. (MVL)

  18. Caring for Your Child's Cold or Flu

    MedlinePlus

    ... Print Share Caring for Your Child’s Cold or Flu Page Content ​Unfortunately, there's no cure for the ... Liquid Medicine Safely for more information. Prevent & Treatment: Flu vaccine Children 6 months or older should get ...

  19. Cold-induced changes in amphibian oocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Angelier, N.; Moreau, N.A.; N'Da, E.A.; Lautredou, N.F. )

    1989-08-01

    Female Pleurodeles waltl newts (Amphibia, urodele), usually raised at 20 degrees C, were submitted to low temperatures; oocytes responded to this cold stress by drastic changes both in lampbrush chromosome structure and in protein pattern. Preexisting lateral loops of lampbrush chromosomes were reduced in size and number, while cold-induced loops which were tremendously developed, occurred on defined bivalents of the oocyte at constant, reproducible sites. A comparison of protein patterns in control and stressed oocytes showed two main differences: in stressed oocytes, overall protein synthesis was reduced, except for a set of polypeptides, the cold-stress proteins; second, there was a striking inversion of the relative amount of beta- and gamma-actin found in the oocyte nucleus before and after cold stress. Whereas beta-actin was the predominant form in control oocytes, gamma-actin became the major form in stressed oocytes.

  20. A Lonely Heart Could Worsen a Cold

    MedlinePlus

    ... cold," said study co-author Angie LeRoy, a psychology graduate student at Rice University in Houston. "Millions ... The findings were published March 30 in Health Psychology . SOURCE: Rice University and the American Psychological Association, ...

  1. Compatible Transfusion Therapy for Paroxysmal Cold Hemoglobinuria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rausen, Aaron R.; And Others

    1975-01-01

    Presented are case histories of two children, ages 2 and 4 years, with paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria (PCH, a syndrome characterized by acute intravascular hemoglobin dissolution and hemoglobin in the urine). (Author/CL)

  2. Wire and Cable Cold Bending Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colozza, Anthony

    2010-01-01

    One of the factors in assessing the applicability of wire or cable on the lunar surface is its flexibility under extreme cold conditions. Existing wire specifications did not address their mechanical behavior under cold, cryogenic temperature conditions. Therefore tests were performed to provide this information. To assess this characteristic 35 different insulated wire and cable pieces were cold soaked in liquid nitrogen. The segments were then subjected to bending and the force was recorded. Any failure of the insulation or jacketing was also documented for each sample tested. The bending force tests were performed at room temperature to provide a comparison to the change in force needed to bend the samples due to the low temperature conditions. The results from the bending tests were plotted and showed how various types of insulated wire and cable responded to bending under cold conditions. These results were then used to estimate the torque needed to unroll the wire under these low temperature conditions.

  3. Cold vacuum drying facility design requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Irwin, J.J.

    1997-09-24

    This release of the Design Requirements Document is a complete restructuring and rewrite to the document previously prepared and released for project W-441 to record the design basis for the design of the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility.

  4. A search for cold water rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheney, R. E.

    1981-01-01

    SAR imagery obtained by Seasat in the Sargasso Sea during 1978 is examined for cold ring signatures. One orbit on August 26 is thought to have imaged the edge of a cold ring, although the ring's position was not well known at the time. During another orbit on September 23, drifting buoy and expendable bathythermography data furnished conclusive evidence that the ring was centered directly in the SAR swath. Although some suggestive patterns are visible in the images, it is not clear that cold rings can be identified by SAR, even though dynamically similar features, such as the Gulf Stream and warm rings, can be accurately detected. The suggestion is made that cold rings may be imaged inadequately because of their lack of surface temperature gradient.

  5. Difference between Sinusitis and a Cold

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disabilities Obesity Orthopedic Prevention Sexually Transmitted ... is an inflammation of the lining of the nose and sinuses. It is a very common infection in children. Viral sinusitis usually accompanies a cold. Allergic sinusitis may ...

  6. Technology transfer within NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St.cyr, William

    1992-01-01

    Viewgraphs on technology transfer within NASA are provided. Assessment of technology transfer process, technology being transfered, issues and barriers, and observations and suggestions are addressed. Topics covered include: technology transfer within an organization (and across organization lines/codes) and space science/instrument technology and the role of universities in the technology development/transfer process.

  7. Physical and genetic analysis of the ColD plasmid.

    PubMed

    Frey, J; Ghersa, P; Palacios, P G; Belet, M

    1986-04-01

    The plasmid ColD-CA23, a high-copy-number plasmid of 5.12 kilobases, encodes colicin D, a protein of approximately 87,000 daltons which inhibits bacterial protein synthesis. Colicin D production is under the control of the Escherichia coli SOS regulatory system and is released to the growth medium via the action of the lysis gene product(s). A detailed map of the ColD plasmid was established for 10 restriction enzymes. Using in vitro insertional omega mutagenesis and in vivo insertional Tn5 mutagenesis, we localized the regions of the plasmid responsible for colicin D activity (cda), for mitomycin C-induced lysis (cdl), and for colicin D immunity (cdi). These genes were all located contiguously on a 2,400-base-pair fragment similar to a large number of other Col plasmids (A, E1, E2, E3, E8, N, and CloDF). The ColD plasmid was mobilizable by conjugative transfer by helper plasmids of the IncFII incompatibility group, but not by plasmids belonging to the groups IncI-alpha or IncP. The location of the mobilization functions was determined by deletion analysis. The plasmid needs a segment of 400 base pairs, which is located between the mob genes and the gene for autolysis, for its replication.

  8. Physical and genetic analysis of the ColD plasmid.

    PubMed Central

    Frey, J; Ghersa, P; Palacios, P G; Belet, M

    1986-01-01

    The plasmid ColD-CA23, a high-copy-number plasmid of 5.12 kilobases, encodes colicin D, a protein of approximately 87,000 daltons which inhibits bacterial protein synthesis. Colicin D production is under the control of the Escherichia coli SOS regulatory system and is released to the growth medium via the action of the lysis gene product(s). A detailed map of the ColD plasmid was established for 10 restriction enzymes. Using in vitro insertional omega mutagenesis and in vivo insertional Tn5 mutagenesis, we localized the regions of the plasmid responsible for colicin D activity (cda), for mitomycin C-induced lysis (cdl), and for colicin D immunity (cdi). These genes were all located contiguously on a 2,400-base-pair fragment similar to a large number of other Col plasmids (A, E1, E2, E3, E8, N, and CloDF). The ColD plasmid was mobilizable by conjugative transfer by helper plasmids of the IncFII incompatibility group, but not by plasmids belonging to the groups IncI-alpha or IncP. The location of the mobilization functions was determined by deletion analysis. The plasmid needs a segment of 400 base pairs, which is located between the mob genes and the gene for autolysis, for its replication. Images PMID:3007432

  9. A Theoretical Study of Cold Air Damming.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Qin

    1990-12-01

    The dynamics of cold air damming are examined analytically with a two-layer steady state model. The upper layer is a warm and saturated cross-mountain (easterly or southeasterly onshore) flow. The lower layer is a cold mountain-parallel (northerly) jet trapped on the windward (eastern) side of the mountain. The interface between the two layers represents a coastal front-a sloping inversion layer coupling the trapped cold dome with the warm onshore flow above through pressure continuity.An analytical expression is obtained for the inviscid upper-layer flow with hydrostatic and moist adiabatic approximations. Blackadar's PBL parameterization of eddy viscosity is used in the lower-layer equations. Solutions for the mountain-parallel jet and its associated secondary transverse circulation are obtained by expanding asymptotically upon a small parameter proportional to the square root of the inertial aspect ratio-the ratio between the mountain height and the radius of inertial oscillation. The geometric shape of the sloping interface is solved numerically from a differential-integral equation derived from the pressure continuity condition imposed at the interface.The observed flow structures and force balances of cold air damming events are produced qualitatively by the model. In the cold dome the mountain-parallel jet is controlled by the competition between the mountain-parallel pressure gradient and friction: the jet is stronger with smoother surfaces, higher mountains, and faster mountain-normal geostrophic winds. In the mountain-normal direction the vertically averaged force balance in the cold dome is nearly geostrophic and controls the geometric shape of the cold dome. The basic mountain-normal pressure gradient generated in the cold dome by the negative buoyancy distribution tends to flatten the sloping interface and expand the cold dome upstream against the mountain-normal pressure gradient (produced by the upper-layer onshore wind) and Coriolis force (induced

  10. Photosynthetic microorganisms in cold environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kviderova, Jana; Hajek, Josef; Elster, Josef; Bartak, Milos; Vaczi, Peter; Nedbalova, Linda

    and their physiological processes are inactive. If hydrated, they are physiologically active even at subzero temperatures (Kappen et al., 1996). Although living in cold environments, the growth optimum temperature of typical phycobiont Trebouxia (Chlorophyta) sp. is above 15 ° C, so these algae are considered to be rather psychrotolerant. Acknowledgement The work was supported from projects GA AS CR Nos. KJB 601630808 and KJ KJB600050708, CAREX and long-term institutional research plan of the Institute of Botany AS CR AV0Z600050516 and the Masaryk University. Prof. Martin Backor (Safarik University in Kosice) is kindly ac-knowledged for providing the strains Trebouxia erici and T. glomerata (Backor). References Elster, J. , Benson, E.E. Life in the polar terrestrial environment with a focus on algae and cyanobacteria, in Fuller, B.J., Lane, N. , Benson, E.E. (Eds), Life in the Frozen State. CRC Press, pp. 111-150, 2004. Kappen, L., Schroeter, B., Scheidegger, C., Sommerkorn, M. , Hestmark, G. Cold resistance and metabolic activity of lichens below 0 ° C. Adv. Space Res. 18, 119-128, 1996. Kviderova, J. Characterization of the community of snow algae and their photochemical performance in situ in the Giant Mountains, Czech Republic. Arct. Antarct. Alp. Res. accepted, 2010. Nedbalova, L., Kocianova, M. , Lukavsky, J. Ecology of snow algae in the Giant Mountains and their relation to cryoseston in Europe. Opera Corcontica 45, 59-68, 2008.

  11. Cold Memories: An Examination of U.S. Army Doctrine for Combat in Cold Regions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-03-14

    enormous loss of combat. power due to cold injuries caused a massive study by the Surgeon General’s office before the invasion of Italy, and the immediate...dense cold air. and the trapping of the cold air by temperature inversions. These cause local concentrations of extremely low ambient. air...temperatures. Thus. short days can cause the subarctic regions of Siberia, Alaska, and Canada to produce the coldest temperatures on Earth’. CoM Rl•iimx Pbemwena

  12. Fullerene Type Multilayer Insulation Blanket on a Spherical Cold Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohmori, T.; Shinozaki, T.; Kaneko, H.

    2010-04-01

    Fullerene type multilayer insulation blanket is proposed for the insulation around a spherical cold surface, and has been applied to a 10 liter spherical tank of liquid nitrogen. As fullerene has 32 faces with 90 edges, 32 polygons of stacked insulation sheets must be connected each other to fabricate such a MLI blanket. The MLI blanket has 90 slots at connecting part between the polygons where thermal radiation heat transfer should be reduced. The size of the polygon made by the insulation films must be chosen so as to avoid excess compressive pressure between stacked insulation sheets. The design principle and the method to fabricate the blanket were studied, and the experimental results obtained by the fullerene type MLI blanket applied to the 10 liter spherical tank were measured.

  13. Stochastic gravitational wave background from cold dark matter halos

    SciTech Connect

    Carbone, Carmelita; Baccigalupi, Carlo; Matarrese, Sabino

    2006-03-15

    The current knowledge of cosmological structure formation suggests that Cold Dark Matter (CDM) halos possess a nonspherical density profile, implying that cosmic structures can be potential sources of gravitational waves via power transfer from scalar perturbations to tensor metric modes in the nonlinear regime. By means of a previously developed mathematical formalism and a triaxial collapse model, we numerically estimate the stochastic gravitational-wave background generated by CDM halos during the fully nonlinear stage of their evolution. Our results suggest that the energy density associated with this background is comparable to that produced by primordial tensor modes at frequencies {nu}{approx_equal}10{sup -18}-10{sup -17} Hz if the energy scale of inflation is V{sup 1/4}{approx_equal}1-2x10{sup 15} GeV, and that these gravitational waves could give rise to several cosmological effects, including secondary CMB anisotropy and polarization.

  14. Quantum simulation with cold molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rey, Ana Maria

    2014-03-01

    Recent experimental developments on cooling, trapping, manipulating and loading ultra-cold ground state molecules in an optical lattice have opened the door for the exploration of quantum magnetism and the observation of complex quantum dynamics. In this talk I will discuss recent developments towards the implementation of controllable spin lattice models in polar molecules with the spin degrees of freedom encoded in rotational states. The spin-spin couplings are generated by direct dipolar interactions and can be fully controlled by dc electromagnetic fields and microwaves. The spin models realized in this way are long range, anisotropic and can even feature direction-dependent spin interactions. They can emulate Hamiltonians ranging from the Heisenberg spin model, to Hamiltonians with symmetry protected topological phases to Hamiltonians without solid state counterpart. At JILA we have been able to realize for the first time a lattice spin model with fermionic KRb molecules pinned in a 3D lattice. We observe clear manifestation of dipolar exchange interactions in Ramsey spectroscopy even at substantially less than unit lattice filling. I will describe the new theoretical methods that we developed to model the spin dynamics and show that those reproduce the experimental observations. Even though so far the spin dynamics has been restricted to pinned molecules, in part to prevent chemical reactions, I will finish by presenting theoretical calculations supported by experimental measurement at JILA that demonstrate that the continuous quantum Zeno mechanism can actually suppress loss in this highly reactive system. This finding opens the exciting possibility of observing itinerant quantum magnetism in near term experiments. This work is supported by ARO, ARO-DARPA-OLE, NSF-PFC and NSF-PIF

  15. Toxicity evaluation and hazard review Cold Smoke

    SciTech Connect

    Archuleta, M.M.; Stocum, W.E.

    1993-12-01

    Cold Smoke is a dense white smoke produced by the reaction of titanium tetrachloride and aqueous ammonia aerosols. Early studies on the toxicity of this nonpyrotechnically generated smoke indicated that the smoke itself is essentially non-toxic (i.e. exhibits to systemic toxicity or organ damage due to exposure) under normal deployment conditions. The purpose of this evaluation was to review and summarize the recent literature data available on the toxicity of Cold Smoke, its chemical constituents, and its starting materials.

  16. Properties of the Central American cold surge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcguirk, James P.; Reding, Philip J.; Zhang, Yuxia

    1993-01-01

    The Central American cold surge (CACS) is a frontal incursion from the United States into Central America and resembles the East Asian cold surge. They occur more frequently than analyzed by NMC or by published results, based on our observations between 1979 and 1990. Climatology and structure are quantified, based on surface and upper air stations throughout Central America and satellite products from GOES visible and infrared sensors and SSM/I precipitable water and rain rate sensors.

  17. Cold acclimation allows Drosophila flies to maintain mitochondrial functioning under cold stress.

    PubMed

    Colinet, Hervé; Renault, David; Roussel, Damien

    2017-01-01

    Environmental stress generally disturbs cellular homeostasis. Researchers have hypothesized that chilling injury is linked to a shortage of ATP. However, previous studies conducted on insects exposed to nonfreezing low temperatures presented conflicting results. In this study, we investigated the mitochondrial bioenergetics of Drosophila melanogaster flies exposed to chronic cold stress (4 °C). We assessed mitochondrial oxygen consumption while monitoring the rate of ATP synthesis at various times (0, 1, 2, and 3 days) during prolonged cold stress and at two assay temperatures (25 and 4 °C). We compared organelle responses between cold-susceptible and cold-acclimated phenotypes. Continuous exposure to low temperature provoked temporal declines in the rates of mitochondrial respiration and ATP synthesis. Respiratory control ratios (RCRs) suggested that mitochondria were not critically uncoupled. Nevertheless, after 3 days of continuous cold stress, a sharp decline in the mitochondrial ATP synthesis rate was observed in control flies when they were assayed at low temperature. This change was associated with reduced survival capacity in control flies. In contrast, cold-acclimated flies exhibited high survival and maintained higher rates of mitochondrial ATP synthesis and coupling (i.e., higher RCRs). Adaptive changes due to cold acclimation observed in the whole organism were thus manifested in isolated mitochondria. Our observations suggest that cold tolerance is linked to the ability to maintain bioenergetics capacity under cold stress.

  18. Genetic AVP deficiency abolishes cold-induced diuresis but does not attenuate cold-induced hypertension.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhongjie

    2006-06-01

    Chronic cold exposure causes hypertension and diuresis. The aim of this study was to determine whether vasopressin (AVP) plays a role in cold-induced hypertension and diuresis. Two groups of Long-Evans (LE) and two groups of homozygous AVP-deficient Brattleboro (VD) rats were used. Blood pressure (BP) was not different among the four groups during a 2-wk control period at room temperature (25 degrees C, warm). After the control period, one LE group and one VD group were exposed to cold (5 degrees C); the remaining groups were kept at room temperature. BP and body weight were measured weekly during exposure to cold. Food intake, water intake, urine output, and urine osmolality were measured during weeks 1, 3, and 5 of cold exposure. At the end of week 5, all animals were killed and blood was collected for measurement of plasma AVP. Kidneys were removed for measurement of renal medulla V2 receptor mRNA and aquaporin-2 (AQP-2) protein expression. BP of LE and VD rats increased significantly by week 2 of cold exposure and reached a high level by week 5. BP elevations developed at approximately the same rate and to the same degree in LE and VD rats. AVP deficiency significantly increased urine output and solute-free water clearance and decreased urine osmolality. Chronic cold exposure increased urine output and solute-free water clearance and decreased urine osmolality in LE rats, indicating that cold exposure caused diuresis in LE rats. Cold exposure failed to affect these parameters in VD rats, suggesting that the AVP system is responsible for cold-induced diuresis. Cold exposure did not alter plasma AVP in LE rats. Renal medulla V2 receptor mRNA and AQP-2 protein expression levels were decreased significantly in the cold-exposed LE rats, suggesting that cold exposure inhibited renal V2 receptors and AVP-inducible AQP-2 water channels. We conclude that 1) AVP may not be involved in the pathogenesis of cold-induced hypertension, 2) the AVP system plays a critical role

  19. Cold Osmotic Shock in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Patching, J. W.; Rose, A. H.

    1971-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae NCYC 366 is susceptible to cold osmotic shock. Exponentially growing cells from batch cultures grown in defined medium at 30 C, after being suspended in 0.8 m mannitol containing 10 mm ethylenedia-minetetraacetic acid and then resuspended in ice-cold 0.5 mm MgCl2, accumulated the nonmetabolizable solutes d-glucosamine-hydrochloride and 2-aminoisobutyrate at slower rates than unshocked cells; shocked cells retained their viability. Storage of unshocked batch-grown cells in buffer at 10 C led to an increase in ability to accumulate glucosamine, and further experiments were confined to cells grown in a chemostat under conditions of glucose limitation, thereby obviating the need for storing cells before use. A study was made of the effect of the different stages in the cold osmotic shock procedure, including the osmotic stress, the chelating agent, and the cold Mg2+-containing diluent, on viability and solute-accumulating ability. Growth of shocked cells in defined medium resembled that of unshocked cells; however, in malt extract-yeast extract-glucose-peptone medium, the shocked cells had a longer lag phase of growth and initially grew at a slower rate. Cold osmotic shock caused the release of low-molecular-weight compounds and about 6 to 8% of the cell protein. Neither the cell envelope enzymes, invertase, acid phosphatase and l-leucine-β-naphthylamidase, nor the cytoplasmic enzyme, alkaline phosphatase, were released when yeast cells were subjected to cold osmotic shock. PMID:5001201

  20. TRPA1 contributes to cold hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    del Camino, Donato; Murphy, Sarah; Heiry, Melissa; Barrett, Lee B; Earley, Taryn J; Cook, Colby A; Petrus, Matt J; Zhao, Michael; D'Amours, Marc; Deering, Nate; Brenner, Gary J; Costigan, Michael; Hayward, Neil J; Chong, Jayhong A; Fanger, Christopher M; Woolf, Clifford J; Patapoutian, Ardem; Moran, Magdalene M

    2010-11-10

    TRPA1 is a nonselective cation channel expressed by nociceptors. Although it is widely accepted that TRPA1 serves as a broad irritancy receptor for a variety of reactive chemicals, its role in cold sensation remains controversial. Here, we demonstrate that mild cooling markedly increases agonist-evoked rat TRPA1 currents. In the absence of an agonist, even noxious cold only increases current amplitude slightly. These results suggest that TRPA1 is a key mediator of cold hypersensitivity in pathological conditions in which reactive oxygen species and proinflammatory activators of the channel are present, but likely plays a comparatively minor role in acute cold sensation. Supporting this, cold hypersensitivity can be induced in wild-type but not Trpa1(-/-) mice by subcutaneous administration of a TRPA1 agonist. Furthermore, the selective TRPA1 antagonist HC-030031 [2-(1,3-dimethyl-2,6-dioxo-1,2,3,6-tetrahydro-7H-purin-7-yl)-N-(4-isopropylphenyl)acetamide] reduces cold hypersensitivity in rodent models of inflammatory and neuropathic pain.

  1. 21 CFR 880.5760 - Chemical cold pack snakebite kit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Chemical cold pack snakebite kit. 880.5760 Section... Therapeutic Devices § 880.5760 Chemical cold pack snakebite kit. (a) Identification. A chemical cold pack snakebit kit is a device consisting of a chemical cold pack and tourniquet used for first-aid treatment...

  2. 21 CFR 880.5760 - Chemical cold pack snakebite kit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Chemical cold pack snakebite kit. 880.5760 Section... Therapeutic Devices § 880.5760 Chemical cold pack snakebite kit. (a) Identification. A chemical cold pack snakebit kit is a device consisting of a chemical cold pack and tourniquet used for first-aid treatment...

  3. 21 CFR 880.5760 - Chemical cold pack snakebite kit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Chemical cold pack snakebite kit. 880.5760 Section... Therapeutic Devices § 880.5760 Chemical cold pack snakebite kit. (a) Identification. A chemical cold pack snakebit kit is a device consisting of a chemical cold pack and tourniquet used for first-aid treatment...

  4. 21 CFR 880.5760 - Chemical cold pack snakebite kit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Chemical cold pack snakebite kit. 880.5760 Section... Therapeutic Devices § 880.5760 Chemical cold pack snakebite kit. (a) Identification. A chemical cold pack snakebit kit is a device consisting of a chemical cold pack and tourniquet used for first-aid treatment...

  5. Systemic cold-induced urticaria--clinical and laboratory characterization.

    PubMed

    Kivity, S; Schwartz, Y; Wolf, R; Topilsky, M

    1990-01-01

    Six patients are described with a history of cold-related urticaria in whom standard tests (water-immersion and ice-cube) did not induce symptoms. Only total-body cold exposure induced generalized urticaria. Systemic cold urticaria should, therefore, be included in the differential diagnosis of cold-dependent allergic disorders.

  6. Experiences issues with plastic parts at cold temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandor, Mike; Agarwal, Shri

    2005-01-01

    Missions to MARS/planets/asteroids require electronic parts to operate and survive at extreme cold conditions. At extreme cold temperatures many types of cold related failures can occur. Office 514 is currently evaluating plastic parts under various cold temperature conditions and applications. Evaluations, screens, and qualifications are conducted on flight parts.

  7. Gene expression analysis to understand cold tolerance in citrus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Citrus cultivars show a wide range of tolerance to cold temperatures. Lemons and limes are known to be sensitive to cold while certain mandarins and trifoliate oranges can endure severe winters. To understand the mechanism of cold tolerance in citrus, we selected three known cold-sensitive and three...

  8. Molecular markers associated with cold-hardiness in Camellia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sequence-characterized amplified region (SCAR) markers from expressed sequence tag-polymerase chain reaction (EST-PCR) and random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers were developed with the goal to separate cold hardy camellias from non-cold hardy ones. A total of 28 cold hardy and non-cold h...

  9. US conventional arms transfer policy. Strategy research project

    SciTech Connect

    Langhorst, R.H.

    1996-04-15

    Millions of people around the world have been killed by conventional arms since the end of World War II. If increasing access to conventional arms is partly responsible for political and military aggression in post-Cold War Europe, what should be the United States` response. This study explores the new US Conventional Arms Transfer Policy of February 1995 in terms of ends1 ways and means and its linkages to US National Security and National Military Strategies. Analysis focuses mainly on post- Cold War Europe, providing examples of multilateral arms control successes and recommendations for US policy implementation.

  10. Cold-moderator scattering kernel methods

    SciTech Connect

    MacFarlane, R. E.

    1998-01-01

    An accurate representation of the scattering of neutrons by the materials used to build cold sources at neutron scattering facilities is important for the initial design and optimization of a cold source, and for the analysis of experimental results obtained using the cold source. In practice, this requires a good representation of the physics of scattering from the material, a method to convert this into observable quantities (such as scattering cross sections), and a method to use the results in a neutron transport code (such as the MCNP Monte Carlo code). At Los Alamos, the authors have been developing these capabilities over the last ten years. The final set of cold-moderator evaluations, together with evaluations for conventional moderator materials, was released in 1994. These materials have been processed into MCNP data files using the NJOY Nuclear Data Processing System. Over the course of this work, they were able to develop a new module for NJOY called LEAPR based on the LEAP + ADDELT code from the UK as modified by D.J. Picton for cold-moderator calculations. Much of the physics for methane came from Picton`s work. The liquid hydrogen work was originally based on a code using the Young-Koppel approach that went through a number of hands in Europe (including Rolf Neef and Guy Robert). It was generalized and extended for LEAPR, and depends strongly on work by Keinert and Sax of the University of Stuttgart. Thus, their collection of cold-moderator scattering kernels is truly an international effort, and they are glad to be able to return the enhanced evaluations and processing techniques to the international community. In this paper, they give sections on the major cold moderator materials (namely, solid methane, liquid methane, and liquid hydrogen) using each section to introduce the relevant physics for that material and to show typical results.

  11. Cold urticaria associated with acute serologic toxoplasmosis.

    PubMed

    Miralles López, J C; López Andreu, F R; Sánchez-Gascón, F; López Rodríguez, C; Negro Alvarez, J M

    2005-01-01

    Cold urticaria is defined as a urticarial and/or angioedematous reaction of the skin to contact with cold objects, water or air. Types of urticaria associated with infectious diseases, such as mononucleosis, rubeola, varicella, syphilis, hepatitis, and HIV infection have been reported. We present the case of a patient who developed cold urticaria associated with acute serologic toxoplasmosis. The patient was a 34-year-old man who for the previous 2 months had presented cutaneous pruritus accompanied by several papular lesions in parts of the skin exposed to cold as well as those in contact with cold water. The result of an "ice-cube test" was positive. Serologic tests for Toxoplasma gondii showed an IgG level of 68 UI/ml and were positive for IgM, while a test for cryoglobulins was positive. One month later cryoglobulins were negative and a serologic test for T. gondii showed an IgG concentration of 75 UI/ml and positive IgM. Three months later cryoglobulins were still negative, IgG for T. gondii was 84 UI/ml, and IgM was positive. After 6 months cryoglobulins were still negative, IgG level was 68 UI/ml and IgM was still slightly positive. In the final evaluation, 14 months later, IgG level was 32 UI/ml and IgM was negative. The patient continues to present clinical manifestations of cold urticaria, although he has experienced some improvement and his tolerance to cold has increased after treatment with cetirizine.

  12. Asymptomatic myocardial ischemia following cold provocation

    SciTech Connect

    Shea, M.J.; Deanfield, J.E.; deLandsheere, C.M.; Wilson, R.A.; Kensett, M.; Selwyn, A.P.

    1987-09-01

    Cold is thought to provoke angina in patients with coronary disease either by an increase in myocardial demand or an increase in coronary vascular resistance. We investigated and compared the effects of cold pressor stimulation and symptom-limited supine bicycle exercise on regional myocardial perfusion in 35 patients with stable angina and coronary disease and in 10 normal subjects. Regional myocardial perfusion was assessed with positron emission tomography and rubidium-82. Following cold pressor stimulation 24 of 35 patients demonstrated significant abnormalities of regional myocardial perfusion with reduced cation uptake in affected regions of myocardium: 52 +/- 9 to 43 +/- 9 (p less than 0.001 vs normal subjects). Among these 24 patients only nine developed ST depression and only seven had angina. In contrast, 29 of 35 patients underwent supine exercise, and abnormal regional myocardial perfusion occurred in all 29, with a reduction in cation intake from 48 +/- 10 to 43 +/- 14 (p less than 0.001 vs normal subjects). Angina was present in 27 of 29 and ST depression in 25 of 29. Although the absolute decrease in cation uptake was somewhat greater following cold as opposed to exercise, the peak heart rate after cold was significantly lower than that after exercise (82 +/- 12 vs 108 +/- 16 bpm, p less than 0.05). Peak systolic blood pressures after cold and exercise were similar (159 +/- 24 vs 158 +/- 28). Thus, cold produces much more frequent asymptomatic disturbances of regional myocardial perfusion in patients with stable angina and coronary disease than is suggested by pain or ECG changes.

  13. Cold Regions - Environmental Testing of Individual Soldier Clothing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-17

    This Test Operations Procedure (TOP) provides testing guidelines for individual Soldier cold weather clothing and footwear in a cold regions...Cold weather clothing test Cold weather footwear test Environmental clothing test Environmental footwear test 16...1983; TOP 10-3-512 Cold Regions Environmental Test of Boot and Similar Footwear , dated 9 May 1980; and TOP 10-4-005 Arctic Environmental Test of

  14. Cold-hearted or cool-headed: physical coldness promotes utilitarian moral judgment.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Hiroko; Ito, Yuichi; Honma, Yoshiko; Mori, Takuya; Kawaguchi, Jun

    2014-01-01

    In the current study, we examine the effect of physical coldness on personal moral dilemma judgment. Previous studies have indicated that utilitarian moral judgment-sacrificing a few people to achieve the greater good for others-was facilitated when: (1) participants suppressed an initial emotional response and deliberately thought about the utility of outcomes; (2) participants had a high-level construal mindset and focused on abstract goals (e.g., save many); or (3) there was a decreasing emotional response to sacrificing a few. In two experiments, we exposed participants to extreme cold or typical room temperature and then asked them to make personal moral dilemma judgments. The results of Experiment 1 indicated that coldness prompted utilitarian judgment, but the effect of coldness was independent from deliberate thought or abstract high-level construal mindset. As Experiment 2 revealed, coldness facilitated utilitarian judgment via reduced empathic feelings. Therefore, physical coldness did not affect the "cool-headed" deliberate process or the abstract high-level construal mindset. Rather, coldness biased people toward being "cold-hearted," reduced empathetic concern, and facilitated utilitarian moral judgments.

  15. Cognitive, Psychomotor, and Physical Performance in Cold Air After Cooling by Exercise in Cold Water

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-01

    Saybrook, CT ) were at- tached at 11 skin sites: foot, calf, anterior thigh, abdo - men, chest, triceps, anterior aspect of the forearm, sub- scapular...Effects of cold experience and training on administration of emergency medical treatment in the cold. Groton, CT : Naval Submarine Medical Research

  16. The cold driver: Cold stress while driving results in dangerous behavior.

    PubMed

    Morris, Drew M; Pilcher, June J

    2016-10-01

    Cool vehicle cabin temperatures can induce short-term non-hypothermic cold stress. The current study created a cold condition to examine the impact of cold stress on driving behavior. Forty-four participants drove a high-fidelity driving simulator during a thermal neutral or local torso cooled condition. Participants performed additional tasks to assess attention, psychomotor vigilance, and manual dexterity. Skin temperature was significantly lower in the cold condition while internal temperature was unaffected. Participants who had higher subjective ratings of cold followed lead vehicles closer and started to brake later. Participants in the cold condition followed the lead car 22% (0.82s) closer and started braking 20% (2.35s) later when approaching a stop sign during the car-following task. No change in attention, psychomotor vigilance, or dexterity was observed. The current results suggest that cold environmental conditions can contribute to dangerous driving behaviors. Measures of cold perception were also shown to predict changes in driving behavior.

  17. Cold War Paradigms and the Post-Cold War High School History Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAninch, Stuart A.

    1995-01-01

    Discusses how Cold War ideological models provide a way to examine the U.S. role in world affairs. Discusses and compares on the writings of Paul Gagnon and Noam Chomsky on this topic. Concludes that students should stand outside both models to develop a meaningful perspective on the U.S. role during the Cold War. (CFR)

  18. Cold-hearted or cool-headed: physical coldness promotes utilitarian moral judgment

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Hiroko; Ito, Yuichi; Honma, Yoshiko; Mori, Takuya; Kawaguchi, Jun

    2014-01-01

    In the current study, we examine the effect of physical coldness on personal moral dilemma judgment. Previous studies have indicated that utilitarian moral judgment—sacrificing a few people to achieve the greater good for others—was facilitated when: (1) participants suppressed an initial emotional response and deliberately thought about the utility of outcomes; (2) participants had a high-level construal mindset and focused on abstract goals (e.g., save many); or (3) there was a decreasing emotional response to sacrificing a few. In two experiments, we exposed participants to extreme cold or typical room temperature and then asked them to make personal moral dilemma judgments. The results of Experiment 1 indicated that coldness prompted utilitarian judgment, but the effect of coldness was independent from deliberate thought or abstract high-level construal mindset. As Experiment 2 revealed, coldness facilitated utilitarian judgment via reduced empathic feelings. Therefore, physical coldness did not affect the “cool-headed” deliberate process or the abstract high-level construal mindset. Rather, coldness biased people toward being “cold-hearted,” reduced empathetic concern, and facilitated utilitarian moral judgments. PMID:25324800

  19. Kinetics of Cold-Cap Reactions for Vitrification of Nuclear Waste Glass Based on Simultaneous Differential Scanning Calorimetry - Thermogravimetry (DSC-TGA) and Evolved Gas Analysis (EGA)

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, Carmen P.; Pierce, David A.; Schweiger, Michael J.; Kruger, Albert A.; Chun, Jaehun; Hrma, Pavel R.

    2013-12-03

    For vitrifying nuclear waste glass, the feed, a mixture of waste with glass-forming and modifying additives, is charged onto the cold cap that covers 90-100% of the melt surface. The cold cap consists of a layer of reacting molten glass floating on the surface of the melt in an all-electric, continuous glass melter. As the feed moves through the cold cap, it undergoes chemical reactions and phase transitions through which it is converted to molten glass that moves from the cold cap into the melt pool. The process involves a series of reactions that generate multiple gases and subsequent mass loss and foaming significantly influence the mass and heat transfers. The rate of glass melting, which is greatly influenced by mass and heat transfers, affects the vitrification process and the efficiency of the immobilization of nuclear waste. We studied the cold-cap reactions of a representative waste glass feed using both the simultaneous differential scanning calorimetry thermogravimetry (DSC-TGA) and the thermogravimetry coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometer (TGA-GC-MS) as complementary tools to perform evolved gas analysis (EGA). Analyses from DSC-TGA and EGA on the cold-cap reactions provide a key element for the development of an advanced cold-cap model. It also helps to formulate melter feeds for higher production rate.

  20. Age and ethnic differences in cold weather and contagion theories of colds and flu.

    PubMed

    Sigelman, Carol K

    2012-02-01

    Age and ethnic group differences in cold weather and contagion or germ theories of infectious disease were explored in two studies. A cold weather theory was frequently invoked to explain colds and to a lesser extent flu but became less prominent with age as children gained command of a germ theory of disease. Explanations of how contact with other people causes disease were more causally sophisticated than explanations of how cold weather causes it. Finally, Mexican American and other minority children were more likely than European American children to subscribe to cold weather theories, a difference partially but not wholly attributable to ethnic group differences in parent education. Findings support the value of an intuitive or naïve theories perspective in understanding developmental and sociocultural differences in concepts of disease and in planning health education to help both children and their parents shed misconceptions so that they can focus on effective preventive actions.

  1. Characterising Cold Weather for the UK mainland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fradley, Kate; Dacre, Helen; Ambaum, Maarten

    2016-04-01

    Excess Winter Mortality is a peak in the population's mortality rate during winter months and is correlated with low outdoor temperatures. Excess Winter Mortality has adverse impacts, including increased demand on health services. The management of resources for such increased demands maybe improved through incorporation of weather forecasting information to advanced warnings. For the UK, prolonged cold periods are associated with easterly advection, and high pressure systems. Characterisation of the synoptic conditions associated with cold periods is important to understand forecast performance. Principal Component Analysis has been used with mean sea level pressure from 35 years of ERA interim reanalysis to capture synoptic variability on a continuous scale. Cold events in the North and South of the UK mainland have been identified as having different synoptic variability using this method. Furthermore extending the Principal Component Analysis to investigate the skill of forecasts has identified systematic under prediction of some cold weather synoptic conditions. Ensemble forecasts are used to quantify the uncertainty associated with these cold weather synoptic conditions. This information maybe be used to improve the value of existing weather warnings.

  2. Assessment of cold stress in outdoor work.

    PubMed

    Anttonen, H; Virokannas, H

    1994-01-01

    The evaluation of cold stress in working life was done in 13, mainly outdoor, occupations and 143 workers using local temperatures, body cooling and thermal sensations. The subjects in the study were young, healthy men and they wore the type of winter clothing generally used in those ambient temperatures (+6...-29 degrees C), for in a work load of from 112 to 480 W. Local temperatures on finger skin indicated that manual dexterity was often reduced in outdoor work. A risk of frostbite was frequently found on the cheek and the wind chill index predicted the risk quite well. Body cooling was often temporarily too high when measured by heat debt and mean skin temperature. Thermal sensations were cool or cold occasionally in 28% of the workers interviewed. The insulation of clothing worn was often lower than the IREQmin-value recommends. The results showed that in outdoor work in winter time cold stress frequently reduced (70%) working ability at least for a short period. Mean skin temperature seems to be, in practice, a useful indicator for body cooling and the IREQmin-value was suitable, especially in light work, to indicate body cooling. A very sensitive factor for the expression of cold stress was finger temperature, at least as an indicator of finger dexterity. Due to the adverse health effects found the cold stress should also be evaluated more systematically in occupational health and safety with health examinations, with protective clothing and technical preventive means.

  3. Cold atmospheric plasma in cancer therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Keidar, Michael; Shashurin, Alex; Volotskova, Olga; Ann Stepp, Mary; Srinivasan, Priya; Sandler, Anthony; Trink, Barry

    2013-05-15

    Recent progress in atmospheric plasmas has led to the creation of cold plasmas with ion temperature close to room temperature. This paper outlines recent progress in understanding of cold plasma physics as well as application of cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) in cancer therapy. Varieties of novel plasma diagnostic techniques were developed recently in a quest to understand physics of CAP. It was established that the streamer head charge is about 10{sup 8} electrons, the electrical field in the head vicinity is about 10{sup 7} V/m, and the electron density of the streamer column is about 10{sup 19} m{sup −3}. Both in-vitro and in-vivo studies of CAP action on cancer were performed. It was shown that the cold plasma application selectively eradicates cancer cells in-vitro without damaging normal cells and significantly reduces tumor size in-vivo. Studies indicate that the mechanism of action of cold plasma on cancer cells is related to generation of reactive oxygen species with possible induction of the apoptosis pathway. It is also shown that the cancer cells are more susceptible to the effects of CAP because a greater percentage of cells are in the S phase of the cell cycle.

  4. Two cold-season derechoes in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatzen, Christoph; Púčik, Tomas; Ryva, David

    2011-06-01

    In this study, we apply for the first time the definition of a derecho (Johns and Hirt, 1987) to European cold-season convective storm systems. These occurred on 18 January 2007 and 1 March 2008, respectively, and they are shown to fulfill the criteria of a derecho. Damaging winds were reported over a distance of 1500 km and locally reached F3 intensity. Synoptic analysis for the events reveal strongly forced situations that have been described for cold-season derechoes in the United States. A comparison of swaths of damaging winds, radar structures, detected lightning, cold pool development, and cloud-top temperatures indicates that both derechoes formed along cold fronts that were affected by strong quasi-geostrophic forcing. It seems that the overlap of the cold front position with the strong differential cyclonic vorticity advection at the cyclonic flank of mid-level jet streaks favoured intense convection and high winds. The movement and path width of the two derechoes seemed to be related to this overlap. The wind gust intensity that was also different for both events is discussed and could be related to the component of the mid-level winds perpendicular to the gust fronts.

  5. Cold Hole Over Jupiter's Pole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Observations with two NASA telescopes show that Jupiter has an arctic polar vortex similar to a vortex over Earth's Antarctica that enables depletion of Earth's stratospheric ozone.

    These composite images of Jupiter's north polar region from the Hubble Space Telescope (right) and the Infrared Telescope Facility (left) show a quasi-hexagonal shape that extends vertically from the stratosphere down into the top of the troposphere. A sharp temperature drop, compared to surrounding air masses, creates an eastward wind that tends to keep the polar atmosphere, including the stratospheric haze, isolated from the rest of the atmosphere.

    The linear striations in the composite projections are artifacts of the image processing. The area closest to the pole has been omitted because it was too close to the edge of the planet in the original images to represent the planet reliably.

    The composite on the right combines images from the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 of the Hubble Space Telescope taken at a wavelength of 890 nanometers, which shows stratospheric haze particles.

    The sharp boundary and wave-like structure of the haze layer suggest a polar vortex and a similarity to Earth's stratospheric polar clouds. Images of Jupiter's thermal radiation clinch that identification. The composite on the left, for example, is made from images taken with Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Mid-Infrared Large-Well Imager at NASA's Infrared Telescope Facility at a wavelength of 17 microns. It shows polar air mass that is 5 to 6 degrees Celsius (9 to 10 degrees Fahrenheit) colder than its surroundings, with the same border as the stratospheric haze. Similar observations at other infrared wavelengths show the cold air mass extends at least as high as the middle stratosphere down to the top of the troposphere.

    These images were taken Aug. 11 through Aug. 13, 1999, near a time when Jupiter's north pole was most visible from Earth. Other Infrared Telescope Facility images at

  6. Plasmids of psychrophilic and psychrotolerant bacteria and their role in adaptation to cold environments

    PubMed Central

    Dziewit, Lukasz; Bartosik, Dariusz

    2014-01-01

    Extremely cold environments are a challenge for all organisms. They are mostly inhabited by psychrophilic and psychrotolerant bacteria, which employ various strategies to cope with the cold. Such harsh environments are often highly vulnerable to the influence of external factors and may undergo frequent dynamic changes. The rapid adjustment of bacteria to changing environmental conditions is crucial for their survival. Such “short-term” evolution is often enabled by plasmids—extrachromosomal replicons that represent major players in horizontal gene transfer. The genomic sequences of thousands of microorganisms, including those of many cold-active bacteria have been obtained over the last decade, but the collected data have yet to be thoroughly analyzed. This report describes the results of a meta-analysis of the NCBI sequence databases to identify and characterize plasmids of psychrophilic and psychrotolerant bacteria. We have performed in-depth analyses of 66 plasmids, almost half of which are cryptic replicons not exceeding 10 kb in size. Our analyses of the larger plasmids revealed the presence of numerous genes, which may increase the phenotypic flexibility of their host strains. These genes encode enzymes possibly involved in (i) protection against cold and ultraviolet radiation, (ii) scavenging of reactive oxygen species, (iii) metabolism of amino acids, carbohydrates, nucleotides and lipids, (iv) energy production and conversion, (v) utilization of toxic organic compounds (e.g., naphthalene), and (vi) resistance to heavy metals, metalloids and antibiotics. Some of the plasmids also contain type II restriction-modification systems, which are involved in both plasmid stabilization and protection against foreign DNA. Moreover, approx. 50% of the analyzed plasmids carry genetic modules responsible for conjugal transfer or mobilization for transfer, which may facilitate the spread of these replicons among various bacteria, including across species

  7. Transfer Readiness Pilot Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott-Skillman, Thelma; And Others

    The California Community Colleges (CCC) has implemented a prototype model for determining student transfer readiness as a primary means of assessing community college transfer effectiveness. This report provides definitions of transfer readiness and guidelines for colleges participating in the CCC transfer readiness study. First, a memorandum from…

  8. Cold gas in cluster cores: global stability analysis and non-linear simulations of thermal instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhury, Prakriti Pal; Sharma, Prateek

    2016-04-01

    We perform global linear stability analysis and idealized numerical simulations in global thermal balance to understand the condensation of cold gas from hot/virial atmospheres (coronae), in particular the intracluster medium (ICM). We pay particular attention to geometry (e.g. spherical versus plane-parallel) and the nature of the gravitational potential. Global linear analysis gives a similar value for the fastest growing thermal instability modes in spherical and Cartesian geometries. Simulations and observations suggest that cooling in haloes critically depends on the ratio of the cooling time to the free-fall time (tcool/tff). Extended cold gas condenses out of the ICM only if this ratio is smaller than a threshold value close to 10. Previous works highlighted the difference between the nature of cold gas condensation in spherical and plane-parallel atmospheres; namely, cold gas condensation appeared easier in spherical atmospheres. This apparent difference due to geometry arises because the previous plane-parallel simulations focused on in situ condensation of multiphase gas but spherical simulations studied condensation anywhere in the box. Unlike previous claims, our non-linear simulations show that there are only minor differences in cold gas condensation, either in situ or anywhere, for different geometries. The amount of cold gas depends on the shape of tcool/tff; gas has more time to condense if gravitational acceleration decreases towards the centre. In our idealized plane-parallel simulations with heating balancing cooling in each layer, there can be significant mass/energy/momentum transfer across layers that can trigger condensation and drive tcool/tff far beyond the critical value close to 10.

  9. Scaling up: human genetics as a Cold War network.

    PubMed

    Lindee, Susan

    2014-09-01

    In this commentary I explore how the papers here illuminate the processes of collection that have been so central to the history of human genetics since 1945. The development of human population genetics in the Cold War period produced databases and biobanks that have endured into the present, and that continue to be used and debated. In the decades after the bomb, scientists collected and transferred human biological materials and information from populations of interest, and as they moved these biological resources or biosocial resources acquired new meanings and uses. The papers here collate these practices and map their desires and ironies. They explore how a large international network of geneticists, biological anthropologists, virologists and other physicians and scientists interacted with local informants, research subjects and public officials. They also track the networks and standards that mobilized the transfer of information, genealogies, tissue and blood samples. As Joanna Radin suggests here, the massive collections of human biological materials and data were often understood to be resources for an "as-yet-unknown" future. The stories told here contain elements of surveillance, extraction, salvage and eschatology.

  10. Cold fission as heavy ion emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poenaru, D. N.; Maruhn, J. A.; Greiner, W.; Ivaşcu, M.; Mazilu, D.; Gherghescu, R.

    1987-09-01

    The last version of the analytical superasymmetric fission model is applied to study cold fission processes. Strong shell effects are present either in one or both fission fragments. A smooth behaviour is observed when the proton or the neutron numbers are changed by four units. Increasing Z and N, in the transuranium region, a sharp transition from asymmetry with a large peak-to-valley ratio to symmetry at Z=100 and/or N=164 is obtained. The transition toward asymmetry at higher Z and N is much smoother. The most probable cold fission light fragments from234U,236U,239Np and240Pu are100Zr,104Mo,106Mo and106Mo, respectively, in good agreement with experimental data. The unified treatment of alpha decay, heavy ion radioactivities and cold fission is illustrated for234U — the first nucleus in which all three groups have been already observed.

  11. Sympathetic cooling of nanospheres with cold atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montoya, Cris; Witherspoon, Apryl; Ranjit, Gambhir; Casey, Kirsten; Kitching, John; Geraci, Andrew

    2016-05-01

    Ground state cooling of mesoscopic mechanical structures could enable new hybrid quantum systems where mechanical oscillators act as transducers. Such systems could provide coupling between photons, spins and charges via phonons. It has recently been shown theoretically that optically trapped dielectric nanospheres could reach the ground state via sympathetic cooling with trapped cold atoms. This technique can be beneficial in cases where cryogenic operation of the oscillator is not practical. We describe experimental advances towards coupling an optically levitated dielectric nanosphere to a gas of cold Rubidium atoms. The sphere and the cold atoms are in separate vacuum chambers and are coupled using a one-dimensional optical lattice. This work is partially supported by NSF, Grant Nos. PHY-1205994,PHY-1506431.

  12. [Technical problems associated with the cold chain].

    PubMed

    Gac, A

    2001-01-01

    After having covered the current status of the cold chain in France, the author highlights the economic impact of refrigerated storage and processing involving refrigeration. Lose reduction is such that the return on investments is estimated as being roughly 3 years. In years to come, progress will be achieved in the field of plant design. Some information on design trends is provided. Operators in general, and carriers in particular, are faced with an increasingly complex regulatory framework leading to a competition imbalance. The current cold chain developmental trend is characterized by complex computer management of logistics: the flow of goods is modulated in order to meet the production to the distribution needs as cost effectively as possible. This logistic strategy enables management of downstream to upstream interfaces involving various operators. Finally, the author indicates the main causes of non-compliance with the cold chain, generally at retail and consumer levels.

  13. Cold urticaria and infectious mononucleosis in children.

    PubMed

    Morais-Almeida, M; Marinho, S; Gaspar, A; Arêde, C; Loureiro, V; Rosado-Pinto, J

    2004-01-01

    Physical urticaria includes a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by the development of urticarial lesions and/or angioedema after exposure to certain physical stimuli. The authors present the case of a child with severe acquired cold urticaria secondary to infectious mononucleosis. Avoidance of exposure to cold was recommended; prophylactic treatment with ketotifen and cetirizine was begun and a self-administered epinephrine kit was prescribed. The results of ice cube test and symptoms significantly improved. Physical urticaria, which involves complex pathogenesis, clinical course and therapy, may be potentially life threatening. Evaluation and diagnosis are especially important in children. To our knowledge this is the first description of persistent severe cold-induced urticaria associated with infectious mononucleosis in a child.

  14. Normal modes of confined cold ionic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Schiffer, J.P.; Dubin, D.H.

    1995-08-01

    The normal modes of a cloud of confined ions forming a strongly-correlated plasma were investigated. The results of molecular-dynamics simulations were compared to predictions of a cold fluid mode. Mode frequencies are observed to shift slightly compared to the cold fluid predictions, and the modes are also observed to damp in time. Simulations also reveal a set of torsional oscillations which have no counterpart in cold fluid theory. The frequency shift, damping, and torsional effects are compared to a model that treats trapped plasmas as a visco-elastic spheroid. It may be possible to measure high-frequency bulk and shear moduli of a strongly-correlated plasma from mode excitation experiments on trapped non-neutral plasmas. An example of the results of the calculation is presented.

  15. Cold weather injuries in an arctic environment.

    PubMed

    Schissel, D J; Barney, D L; Keller, R

    1998-08-01

    The cases of eight Special Forces soldiers who sustained cold weather-related injuries while conducting winter training as part of Operation Arctic Saber in the Northwest Territories and Arctic Circle are reported. Environmentally related injuries can represent difficult diagnostic and treatment challenges in the field. Moreover, they may compromise the overall mission if they are not identified and treated early. Cold weather injuries can also result in long-term disfigurement and disability that may limit a soldier's future worldwide deployability. Mission requirements, equipment utilization, and environmental exposure place soldiers at particular risk for cold weather-related injuries in such austere settings. Nonetheless, with appropriate education and safety precautions, these potentially life-threatening risks can be greatly minimized.

  16. The use of cold plasma technology to reduce carryover in screening assays.

    PubMed

    Akhlaq, Mohammed; Rosethorne, Elizabeth M; Sattikar, Afrah; Kent, Toby C

    2013-08-01

    The accurate transfer of biological reagents represents a fundamental step in the drug screening process, and the elimination of carryover is critical for the generation of accurate measurements of biological activity. The introduction of automated liquid robotics into screening laboratories has transformed the drug screening process, enabling accurate and reproducible transfer of liquids to become a high-throughput activity, but has also introduced a new challenge for drug discoverers: to establish screening workflows that limit analyte carryover for the generation of high-quality screening data. The widespread use of pipetting tips on automated liquid handlers often necessitates the use of optimized wash protocols for removing contaminants and frequently requires the use and disposal of large quantities of organic solvents. Furthermore, many chemical and biological reagents are recalcitrant to removal from pipetting tips by treatment with organic solvents. The use of cold atmospheric plasma technology provides an alternative approach for removal of contaminants and offers many advantages over traditional decontamination protocols commonly used during biological screening. This report describes the evaluation of a cold plasma tip-cleaning system for reducing carryover in a range of biological screening assays requiring the transfer of low molecular weight compound, nucleic acid, and bacterial liquid transfers. The validation of this technology for biological screening assays is presented, and the impact of this technology for screening workflows is discussed.

  17. [Cold-induced urticaria and angioedema. Classification, diagnosis and therapy].

    PubMed

    Krause, K; Degener, F; Altrichter, S; Ardelean, E; Kalogeromitros, D; Magerl, M; Metz, M; Siebenhaar, F; Weller, K; Maurer, M

    2010-09-01

    The onset of wheals and/or angioedema following the exposure to cold may be associated with a number of different diseases. Most frequently this occurs in cold contact urticaria, a type of physical urticaria, which is characterized by a positive cold stimulation test. The clinical symptoms are based on cold-dependent mast cell activation with subsequent release of proinflammatory mediators. In cases of negative or atypical reaction to cold stimulation testing rare acquired atypical or familiar cold urticaria forms may be suspected. Strict avoidance of cold should be recommended as far as possible. As the underlying causes of cold contact urticaria are widely unknown, the symptomatic use of non-sedating antihistamines is the treatment of first choice. The very rare familiar cold auto-inflammatory syndrome (FCAS) is based on CIAS1/NLRP3 mutations and may be treated effectively by neutralization of pathogenic interleukin 1beta.

  18. On air motion trajectories in cold fronts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reeder, Michael J.; Smith, Roger K.

    1988-01-01

    This paper examines air parcel trajectories in the two-dimensional model for a cold front by Reeder and Smith (1987). These are found to be in close agreement with trajectories deduced from analyses of summertime 'cool changes' in southeastern Australia, adding further support to the applicability of the numerical model to this kind of cold front. The favorable comparison points also to the dynamical consistency of the conceptual model for the cool change, which has evolved from the analysis of data from observational experiments.

  19. Cold-fusion television show angers APS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartwright, Jon

    2009-06-01

    Cold fusion has been controversial since its inception on 23 March 1989, when chemists Martin Fleischmann and Stanley Pons at the University of Utah in the US announced that they had achieved a sustained nuclear-fusion reaction at room temperature. Two decades on, a US television documentary about the field has stirred up fresh debate after it linked the American Physical Society (APS) to an evaluation of some cold-fusion results by Robert Duncan, a physicist and vice chancellor of the University of Missouri.

  20. Alcohol cold starting - A theoretical study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Browning, L. H.

    1983-01-01

    Two theoretical computer models have been developed to study cold starting problems with alcohol fuels. The first model, a droplet fall-out and sling-out model, shows that droplets must be smaller than 50 microns to enter the cylinder under cranking conditions without being slung-out in the intake manifold. The second model, which examines the fate of droplets during the compression process, shows that the heat of compression can be used to vaporize small droplets (less than 50 microns) producing flammable mixtures below freezing ambient temperatures. While droplet size has the greater effect on startability, a very high compression ratio can also aid cold starting.

  1. Therapeutic Hypothermia: What's Hot about Cold.

    PubMed

    Kerber, Richard E

    2011-01-01

    Reducing body temperature to 33 °C in patients who have been resuscitated from cardiac arrest but who remain comatose can ameliorate anoxic encephalopathy and improve recovery. Experimental animal studies have suggested that cooling to 33 °C also aids the resuscitative process itself, facilitating the resumption of spontaneous circulation (ROSC). The mechanism of cooling benefit is probably the reduction of metabolic demand of most organs, and reduced production of toxic metabolites and reactive oxygen species. External cooling by application of ice or pads through which cold water circulates is effective but requires up to 8 hours to achieve the target temperature of 33 °C. Our goal was to develop a faster method of cooling that could be initiated during cardiopulmonary resuscitation. In anesthetized swine, we induced ventricular fibrillation by passing alternating current down an electrode catheter in the right ventricle. We then ventilated the animals' lungs with liquid perfluorocarbons (PFCs), a technique known as total liquid ventilation (TLV). Perfluorocarbons are oxygen-carrying modules; we pre-oxygenated the PFCs by bubbling 100% O(2) through the solution for 2 minutes before use, and pre-cooled the PFCs to -15 °C. The cold oxygenated PFCs reduced pulmonary artery temperature (a surrogate for myocardial temperature) to 33 °C in about 6 minutes. Using this technique we achieved ROSC in 8 of 11 (82%) animals given TLV versus 3 of 11 (27%) control animals receiving conventional CPR without PFCs (P<0.05). We also compared the cold TLV technique with the administration of intravenous iced saline to achieve hypothermia. Both the cold TLV and cold saline techniques produced rapid hypothermia, but we could achieve ROSC in only 2 of 8 (25%) animals given cold saline versus 7 of 8 (88%) given cold TLV. This result is likely due to the rise in right atrial pressure and corresponding reduction in coronary perfusion pressure caused by volume loading with IV saline

  2. Is the moon hot or cold.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, D. L.; Hanks, T. C.

    1972-01-01

    Basic observations are discussed which do not demand a presently cold moon and are consistent with a hot moon. It is suggested that an iron-deficient, highly resistive, hot lunar interior, capped by a cool, rigid lunar lithosphere with a thickness of several hundred kilometers, can explain the relevant observations and is a reasonable model of the moon today. The strength of the moon, lunar electrical conductivity profiles, the relative absence of present-day volcanic activity, and thermal history considerations are examined. Whether the deep interior of the moon is hot or cold has an important bearing on the overall composition of the moon and its origin.

  3. Cold Temperatures Increase Cold Hardiness in the Next Generation Ophraella communa Beetles

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Zhong-Shi; Rasmann, Sergio; Li, Min; Guo, Jian-Ying; Chen, Hong-Song; Wan, Fang-Hao

    2013-01-01

    The leaf beetle, Ophraella communa, has been introduced to control the spread of the common ragweed, Ambrosia artemisiifolia, in China. We hypothesized that the beetle, to be able to track host-range expansion into colder climates, can phenotypically adapt to cold temperatures across generations. Therefore, we questioned whether parental experience of colder temperatures increases cold tolerance of the progeny. Specifically, we studied the demography, including development, fecundity, and survival, as well as physiological traits, including supercooling point (SCP), water content, and glycerol content of O. communa progeny whose parents were maintained at different temperature regimes. Overall, the entire immature stage decreased survival of about 0.2%–4.2% when parents experienced cold temperatures compared to control individuals obtained from parents raised at room temperature. However, intrinsic capacity for increase (r), net reproductive rate (R0) and finite rate of increase (λ) of progeny O. communa were maximum when parents experienced cold temperatures. Glycerol contents of both female and male in progeny was significantly higher when maternal and paternal adults were cold acclimated as compared to other treatments. This resulted in the supercooling point of the progeny adults being significantly lower compared to beetles emerging from parents that experienced room temperatures. These results suggest that cold hardiness of O. communa can be promoted by cold acclimation in previous generation, and it might counter-balance reduced survival in the next generation, especially when insects are tracking their host-plants into colder climates. PMID:24098666

  4. Cold temperatures increase cold hardiness in the next generation Ophraella communa beetles.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhong-Shi; Rasmann, Sergio; Li, Min; Guo, Jian-Ying; Chen, Hong-Song; Wan, Fang-Hao

    2013-01-01

    The leaf beetle, Ophraella communa, has been introduced to control the spread of the common ragweed, Ambrosia artemisiifolia, in China. We hypothesized that the beetle, to be able to track host-range expansion into colder climates, can phenotypically adapt to cold temperatures across generations. Therefore, we questioned whether parental experience of colder temperatures increases cold tolerance of the progeny. Specifically, we studied the demography, including development, fecundity, and survival, as well as physiological traits, including supercooling point (SCP), water content, and glycerol content of O. communa progeny whose parents were maintained at different temperature regimes. Overall, the entire immature stage decreased survival of about 0.2%-4.2% when parents experienced cold temperatures compared to control individuals obtained from parents raised at room temperature. However, intrinsic capacity for increase (r), net reproductive rate (R 0) and finite rate of increase (λ) of progeny O. communa were maximum when parents experienced cold temperatures. Glycerol contents of both female and male in progeny was significantly higher when maternal and paternal adults were cold acclimated as compared to other treatments. This resulted in the supercooling point of the progeny adults being significantly lower compared to beetles emerging from parents that experienced room temperatures. These results suggest that cold hardiness of O. communa can be promoted by cold acclimation in previous generation, and it might counter-balance reduced survival in the next generation, especially when insects are tracking their host-plants into colder climates.

  5. Advanced Heat Transfer and Thermal Storage Fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Moens, L.; Blake, D.

    2005-01-01

    The design of the next generation solar parabolic trough systems for power production will require the development of new thermal energy storage options with improved economics or operational characteristics. Current heat-transfer fluids such as VP-1?, which consists of a eutectic mixture of biphenyl and diphenyl oxide, allow a maximum operating temperature of ca. 300 C, a limit above which the vapor pressure would become too high and would require pressure-rated tanks. The use of VP-1? also suffers from a freezing point around 13 C that requires heating during cold periods. One of the goals for future trough systems is the use of heat-transfer fluids that can act as thermal storage media and that allow operating temperatures around 425 C combined with lower limits around 0 C. This paper presents an outline of our latest approach toward the development of such thermal storage fluids.

  6. A field study of cold effects among cold store workers in China.

    PubMed

    Chen, F; Li, T; Huang, H; Holmér, I

    1991-01-01

    A field study was carried out among cold store workers in China. A self administrative questionnaire and health check-up were taken among 463 male workers from two different types of cold stores, all during their whole daily work. 296 men from Lower Temperature Stores (LTS), where the air temperature was between -10 to -25 degrees C, and 167 men from Ice Stores (IS), where the air temperature was between -5 and +5 degrees C participated. Another group of 152 men working in normal stores and exposed to an air temperature between 20 and 30 degrees C served as a control group. The study did not indicate any special disease attributable to the cold environment. The number of complaints of lower back pain and knee pain in the cold exposed group were significantly higher than that of the control group (in LTS: 42.3%, 46.6%; IS: 52.7%, 50.8%; control group: 9.2%, 14.5%; low back and knee pain, respectively). After 5 years of cold exposure work, the lower back and knee symptoms were very frequent. The point press pain on the knees of the cooler group (LTS) was higher than in the moderate cold group (IS). We suppose that the cold factor contributed to lower back and knee pain. 12.2% of 463 cold exposed workers had frostbite on the body extremities viz: hand, foot and ear. Self estimation of health indicated more problems among cold exposed workers (28.0%) than control group (2.7%).

  7. Anoxic stress and rapid cold hardening enhance cold tolerance of the migratory locust.

    PubMed

    Cui, Feng; Wang, Hongsheng; Zhang, Hanying; Kang, Le

    2014-10-01

    Anoxia and rapid cold hardening (RCH) can increase the cold tolerance of many animals. However, mechanisms underlying these two kinds of stresses remain unclear. In this study, we aimed to explore the relationship of acclimation to cold stress with acclimation to anoxic stress in the migratory locust, Locusta migratoria. RCH at 0°C for 3h promoted the survival of cold stress-exposed locusts. Anoxic hypercapnia (CO2 anoxic treatment) for 40 min exerted an effect similar to that of RCH. Anoxic hypercapnia within 1h can all promote the cold hardiness of locusts. We investigated the transcript levels of six heat shock protein (Hsp) genes, namely, Hsp20.5, Hsp20.6, Hsp20.7, Hsp40, Hsp70, and Hsp90. Four genes, namely, Hsp90, Hsp40, Hsp20.5, and Hsp20.7, showed differential responses to RCH and anoxic hypercapnia treatments. Under cold stress, locusts exposed to the two regimens showed different responses for Hsp90, Hsp20.5, and Hsp20.7. However, the varied responses disappeared after recovery from cold stress. Compared with the control group, the transcript levels of six Hsp genes were generally downregulated in locusts subjected to anoxic hypercapnia or/and RCH. These results indicate that anoxic stress and RCH have different mechanisms of regulating the transcription of Hsp family members even if the two treatments exerted similar effects on cold tolerance of the migratory locust. However, Hsps may not play a major role in the promotion of cold hardiness by the two treatments.

  8. Enhanced cold wall CVD reactor growth of horizontally aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Wei; Kwak, Eun-Hye; Chen, Bingan; Huang, Shirong; Edwards, Michael; Fu, Yifeng; Jeppson, Kjell; Teo, Kenneth; Jeong, Goo-Hwan; Liu, Johan

    2016-05-01

    HASynthesis of horizontally-aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes (HA-SWCNTs) by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) directly on quartz seems very promising for the fabrication of future nanoelectronic devices. In comparison to hot-wall CVD, synthesis of HA-SWCNTs in a cold-wall CVD chamber not only means shorter heating, cooling and growth periods, but also prevents contamination of the chamber. However, since most synthesis of HA-SWCNTs is performed in hot-wall reactors, adapting this well-established process to a cold-wall chamber becomes extremely crucial. Here, in order to transfer the CVD growth technology from a hot-wall to a cold-wall chamber, a systematic investigation has been conducted to determine the influence of process parameters on the HA-SWCNT's growth. For two reasons, the cold-wall CVD chamber was upgraded with a top heater to complement the bottom substrate heater; the first reason to maintain a more uniform temperature profile during HA-SWCNTs growth, and the second reason to preheat the precursor gas flow before projecting it onto the catalyst. Our results show that the addition of a top heater had a significant effect on the synthesis. Characterization of the CNTs shows that the average density of HA-SWCNTs is around 1 - 2 tubes/ μm with high growth quality as shown by Raman analysis. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  9. Design and Analyisi of a Self-centered Cold Mass Support for the MICE Coupling Magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Li; Pan, Heng; Wu, Hong; Li, S. Y.; Guo, Xing Long; Zheng, Shi Xian; Green, Michael A.

    2011-05-04

    The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) consists of eighteen superconducting solenoid coils in seven modules, which are magnetically hooked together since there is no iron to shield the coils and the return flux. The RF coupling coil (RFCC) module consists of a superconducting coupling solenoid mounted around four conventional conducting 201.25 MHz closed RF cavities. The coupling coil will produce up to a 2.2 T magnetic field on the centerline to keep the beam within the RF cavities. The peak magnetic force on the coupling magnet from other magnets in MICE is up to 500 kN in longitudinal direction, which will be transferred to the base of the RF coupling coil (RFCC) module through a cold mass support system. A self-centered double-band cold mass support system with intermediate thermal interruption is applied to the coupling magnet, and the design is introduced in detail in this paper. The thermal and structural analysis on the cold mass support assembly has been carried out using ANSYS. The present design of the cold mass support can satisfy with the stringent requirements for the magnet center and axis azimuthal angle at 4.2 K and fully charged.

  10. Identification of a novel thylakoid protein gene involved in cold acclimation in cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Li, Weizhi; Gao, Hong; Yin, Chuntao; Xu, Xudong

    2012-09-01

    In cyanobacteria, genes involved in cold acclimation can be upregulated in response to cold stress with or without light. By inactivating 17 such genes in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, slr0815 (ccr2) was identified to be a novel gene required for survival at 15 °C. It was upregulated by cold stress in the light. Upon exposure to low temperature, a ccr2-null mutant showed greatly reduced photosynthetic and respiratory activities within 12 h relative to the wild-type. At 48 h, the photosystem (PS)II-mediated electron transport in the mutant was reduced to less than one-third of the wild-type level, and the duration of electron transfer from the Q(B) binding site of PSII to PSI was increased to about eight times the wild-type level, whereas the PSI-mediated electron transport remained unchanged. Using an antibody against GFP, a Ccr2-GFP fusion protein was localized to the thylakoid membrane rather than the cytoplasmic and outer membranes. Homologues to Ccr2 can be found in most cyanobacteria, algae and higher plants with sequenced genomes. Ccr2 is probably representative of a group of novel thylakoid proteins involved in acclimation to cold or other stresses.

  11. Conventional Middle East arms control: Impact of the end of the cold war. Study project report

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, L.L.; Johnsen, W.T.

    1993-03-31

    The end of the Gulf War brought to the forefront concern for dangers posed by unrestrained militarization of the Middle East. In response, on 29 May 1991 President Bush unveiled a comprehensive Middle East arms control policy in a speech at the U.S. Air Force Academy. A key element of the policy banned the sale of the most dangerous conventional weapons to the region. Although the major arms suppliers (which also happen to be the five permanent members of the U.N. Security Council) have held a series of high level meetings to discuss options for restricting sales to the region, all continue conventional arms transfers to the Middle East and are likely to continue to do so. This paper contends that the end of the Cold War put additional economic pressure on the major suppliers to export arms to the Middle East; and, their interests are so compelling that the suppliers are unlikely to support President Bush's proposal. This position is supported by analyzing the interests that influence major arms suppliers to sell arms abroad. The format for this analysis includes an assessment of: each country's interest in selling arms during the Cold War; the impact of the Cold War's end on those interests; and whether the post Cold War interests conflict with President Bush's conventional arms control proposal. The paper concludes with recommendations for US policy in the region.

  12. Hematological variations at rest and during maximal and submaximal exercise in a cold (0°C) environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogelaere, P.; Brasseur, M.; Quirion, A.; Leclercq, R.; Laurencelle, L.; Bekaert, S.

    1990-03-01

    The affect of negative thermal stress on hematological variables at rest, and during submaximal (sub ex) and maximal exercise (max ex) were observed for young males who volunteered in two experimental sessions, performed in cold (0°C) and in normal room temperature (20°C). At rest, hematological variables such as RBC and derivates Hb and Hct were significantly increased ( P<0.05) during cold stress exposure, while plasma volume decreased. The findings of this study suggest that the major factor inducing hypovolemia during low thermal stress can be imputed to local plasma water-shift mechanisms and especially to a transient shift of plasma water from intrato extravascular compartments. Rest values for WBC and platelets (Pla) were also slightly increased during cold stress exposure. However this increase can partly be related to hemoconcentration but also to the cold induced hyperventilation activating the lung circulation. Maximal exhaustive exercise induced, in both experimental temperatures, significant ( P<0.05) increments of RBC, Hb, Hct, and WBC while plasma volume decreased. However, Pla increase was less marked. On the other hand, cold stress raised slightly the observed variations of the different hematological variables. Submaximal exercise induced a similar, though non-significant, pattern for the different hematological variables in both experimental conditions. Observed plasma volume (Δ PV%) reduction appears during exercise. However cold stress induced resting plasma volume variations that are transferred at every exercise level. Neither exercise nor cold inducement significantly modified the hematological indices (MCH, MCV, MCHC). In conclusion hematological variables are affected by cold stress exposure, even when subjects perform a physical activity.

  13. ENSO’s far reaching connection to Indian cold waves

    PubMed Central

    Ratnam, J. V.; Behera, Swadhin K.; Annamalai, H.; Ratna, Satyaban B.; Rajeevan, M.; Yamagata, Toshio

    2016-01-01

    During boreal winters, cold waves over India are primarily due to transport of cold air from higher latitudes. However, the processes associated with these cold waves are not yet clearly understood. Here by diagnosing a suite of datasets, we explore the mechanisms leading to the development and maintenance of these cold waves. Two types of cold waves are identified based on observed minimum surface temperature and statistical analysis. The first type (TYPE1), also the dominant one, depicts colder than normal temperatures covering most parts of the country while the second type (TYPE2) is more regional, with significant cold temperatures only noticeable over northwest India. Quite interestingly the first (second) type is associated with La Niña (El Niño) like conditions, suggesting that both phases of ENSO provide a favorable background for the occurrence of cold waves over India. During TYPE1 cold wave events, a low-level cyclonic anomaly generated over the Indian region as an atmospheric response to the equatorial convective anomalies is seen advecting cold temperatures into India and maintaining the cold waves. In TYPE2 cold waves, a cyclonic anomaly generated over west India anomalously brings cold winds to northwest India causing cold waves only in those parts. PMID:27876871

  14. ENSO’s far reaching connection to Indian cold waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratnam, J. V.; Behera, Swadhin K.; Annamalai, H.; Ratna, Satyaban B.; Rajeevan, M.; Yamagata, Toshio

    2016-11-01

    During boreal winters, cold waves over India are primarily due to transport of cold air from higher latitudes. However, the processes associated with these cold waves are not yet clearly understood. Here by diagnosing a suite of datasets, we explore the mechanisms leading to the development and maintenance of these cold waves. Two types of cold waves are identified based on observed minimum surface temperature and statistical analysis. The first type (TYPE1), also the dominant one, depicts colder than normal temperatures covering most parts of the country while the second type (TYPE2) is more regional, with significant cold temperatures only noticeable over northwest India. Quite interestingly the first (second) type is associated with La Niña (El Niño) like conditions, suggesting that both phases of ENSO provide a favorable background for the occurrence of cold waves over India. During TYPE1 cold wave events, a low-level cyclonic anomaly generated over the Indian region as an atmospheric response to the equatorial convective anomalies is seen advecting cold temperatures into India and maintaining the cold waves. In TYPE2 cold waves, a cyclonic anomaly generated over west India anomalously brings cold winds to northwest India causing cold waves only in those parts.

  15. ENSO's far reaching connection to Indian cold waves.

    PubMed

    Ratnam, J V; Behera, Swadhin K; Annamalai, H; Ratna, Satyaban B; Rajeevan, M; Yamagata, Toshio

    2016-11-23

    During boreal winters, cold waves over India are primarily due to transport of cold air from higher latitudes. However, the processes associated with these cold waves are not yet clearly understood. Here by diagnosing a suite of datasets, we explore the mechanisms leading to the development and maintenance of these cold waves. Two types of cold waves are identified based on observed minimum surface temperature and statistical analysis. The first type (TYPE1), also the dominant one, depicts colder than normal temperatures covering most parts of the country while the second type (TYPE2) is more regional, with significant cold temperatures only noticeable over northwest India. Quite interestingly the first (second) type is associated with La Niña (El Niño) like conditions, suggesting that both phases of ENSO provide a favorable background for the occurrence of cold waves over India. During TYPE1 cold wave events, a low-level cyclonic anomaly generated over the Indian region as an atmospheric response to the equatorial convective anomalies is seen advecting cold temperatures into India and maintaining the cold waves. In TYPE2 cold waves, a cyclonic anomaly generated over west India anomalously brings cold winds to northwest India causing cold waves only in those parts.

  16. Condensation of galactic cold dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Visinelli, Luca

    2016-07-07

    We consider the steady-state regime describing the density profile of a dark matter halo, if dark matter is treated as a Bose-Einstein condensate. We first solve the fluid equation for “canonical” cold dark matter, obtaining a class of density profiles which includes the Navarro-Frenk-White profile, and which diverge at the halo core. We then solve numerically the equation obtained when an additional “quantum pressure” term is included in the computation of the density profile. The solution to this latter case is finite at the halo core, possibly avoiding the “cuspy halo problem” present in some cold dark matter theories. Within the model proposed, we predict the mass of the cold dark matter particle to be of the order of M{sub χ}c{sup 2}≈10{sup −24} eV, which is of the same order of magnitude as that predicted in ultra-light scalar cold dark matter models. Finally, we derive the differential equation describing perturbations in the density and the pressure of the dark matter fluid.

  17. 75 FR 52213 - Cold Treatment Regulations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-25

    ... Health Inspection Service, USDA. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: We are adopting as a final rule, with... tamperproof temperature recording devices specifically. These actions relieve certain requirements that we... effective. Immediate action was necessary to amend the cold treatment regulations to ensure that...

  18. Strip edge cracking simulation in cold rolling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubert, C.; Dubar, L.; Dubar, M.; Dubois, A.

    2011-01-01

    This research work focuses on a specific defect which occurs during cold rolling of steel strips: edge-serration. Investigations on the industrial processes have led to the conclusion that this defect is the result of the edge-trimming and cold rolling sequences. The aim of this research work is to analyze the effect of the cutting process and the cold rolling on cracks occurrence, especially on strip edges. This study is performed using an experimental testing stand called Upsetting Rolling Test (URT). It allows to reproduce cold rolling contact parameters such as forward slip, reduction ratio and friction coefficients. Specimens sampled near trimmed industrial strip edges are deformed using the URT stand. Two sets of specimens with different stress states, obtained by annealing, are submitted to two reduction passes with extreme forward slips. Scanning electron microscopy observations added to 3D optical surface profiler topographies show that on one hand, forward slip has a major effect on cracks opening. On the other hand, cracks opening decreases according to high roll strip speed gradient. Concerning the heat-treated specimens, no crack appeared after all reduction passes, showing a large influence of the cutting process and consequently of the local stress state in the vicinity of the burnish and fracture regions.

  19. Is It a Cold or the Flu?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Common Sometimes Chest Discomfort, Cough Mild to moderate; hacking cough Common; can become severe Treatment Antihistamines Decongestant Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medicines Antiviral medicines— See your doctor Prevention Wash your hands often Avoid close contact with anyone with a cold Annual ...

  20. On Air Shutter for Cold Storage Room

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuhara, Isamu; Tsuji, Katsuhiko

    Air curtains are frequently placed at doorway of cold storage room or freezing chamber. As an opening of jet flow in these air curtains is relatively narrow and speed of jet flow is fast, air entrained from surroundings increases in quantity. Therefore, we consider that jet flow with narrow opening can not effectively isolate inside air from the external atmosphere, but the one with relatively wide opening can decrease air entrained from surroundings. Then, when air curtain which has a wide opening (we call it air shutter) is installed at cold storage room, and isolating performances of air shutter are compared with the air curtain. First, as various conditions can be easily changed in numerical calculation, we compare a velocity and temperature field in cold storage room under these conditions when velocity of jet flow is changed by using numerical method. Second, we measure a temperature and velocity distribution in an actual cold storage room under three conditions (air shutter operates, air curtain operates and no operation). From these results, it was found that air shutter is more efficient than air curtain.

  1. Cold weather properties and performance of biodiesel

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biodiesel is an alternative fuel made from vegetable oil or animal fat that can be employed in compression-ignition (diesel) engines. Biodiesel is more prone to start-up and operability problems during cold weather than conventional diesel fuels (petrodiesel). This work reviews impacts that exposu...

  2. Astronomical Constraints on Quantum Cold Dark Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spivey, Shane; Musielak, Z.; Fry, J.

    2012-01-01

    A model of quantum (`fuzzy') cold dark matter that accounts for both the halo core problem and the missing dwarf galaxies problem, which plague the usual cold dark matter paradigm, is developed. The model requires that a cold dark matter particle has a mass so small that its only allowed physical description is a quantum wave function. Each such particle in a galactic halo is bound to a gravitational potential that is created by luminous matter and by the halo itself, and the resulting wave function is described by a Schrödinger equation. To solve this equation on a galactic scale, we impose astronomical constraints that involve several density profiles used to fit data from simulations of dark matter galactic halos. The solutions to the Schrödinger equation are quantum waves which resemble the density profiles acquired from simulations, and they are used to determine the mass of the cold dark matter particle. The effects of adding certain types of baryonic matter to the halo, such as a dwarf elliptical galaxy or a supermassive black hole, are also discussed.

  3. Astrochemical Properties of Planck Cold Clumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatematsu, Ken’ichi; Liu, Tie; Ohashi, Satoshi; Sanhueza, Patricio; Nguyễn Lu’o’ng, Quang; Hirota, Tomoya; Liu, Sheng-Yuan; Hirano, Naomi; Choi, Minho; Kang, Miju; Thompson, Mark A.; Fuller, Gary; Wu, Yuefang; Li, Di; Di Francesco, James; Kim, Kee-Tae; Wang, Ke; Ristorcelli, Isabelle; Juvela, Mika; Shinnaga, Hiroko; Cunningham, Maria; Saito, Masao; Lee, Jeong-Eun; Tóth, L. Viktor; He, Jinhua; Sakai, Takeshi; Kim, Jungha; JCMT Large Program “SCOPE” collaboration; TRAO Key Science Program “TOP” collaboration

    2017-02-01

    We observed 13 Planck cold clumps with the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope/SCUBA-2 and with the Nobeyama 45 m radio telescope. The N2H+ distribution obtained with the Nobeyama telescope is quite similar to SCUBA-2 dust distribution. The 82 GHz HC3N, 82 GHz CCS, and 94 GHz CCS emission are often distributed differently with respect to the N2H+ emission. The CCS emission, which is known to be abundant in starless molecular cloud cores, is often very clumpy in the observed targets. We made deep single-pointing observations in DNC, HN13C, N2D+, and cyclic-C3H2 toward nine clumps. The detection rate of N2D+ is 50%. Furthermore, we observed the NH3 emission toward 15 Planck cold clumps to estimate the kinetic temperature, and confirmed that most targets are cold (≲20 K). In two of the starless clumps we observed, the CCS emission is distributed as it surrounds the N2H+ core (chemically evolved gas), which resembles the case of L1544, a prestellar core showing collapse. In addition, we detected both DNC and N2D+. These two clumps are most likely on the verge of star formation. We introduce the chemical evolution factor (CEF) for starless cores to describe the chemical evolutionary stage, and analyze the observed Planck cold clumps.

  4. Laser-Free Cold-Atom Gymnastics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gould, Harvey; Feinberg, Benedict; Munger, Charles T., Jr.; Nishimura, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    We have performed beam transport simulations on ultra cold (2 μK) and cold (130 μK) neutral Cs atoms in the F = M = + 4 (magnetic weak-field seeking) ground state. We use inhomogeneous magnetic fields to focus and accelerate the atoms. Acceleration of neutral atoms by an inhomogeneous magnetic field was demonstrated by Stern and Gerlach in 1922. In the simulations, a two mm diameter cloud of atoms is released to fall under gravity. A magnetic coil focuses the falling atoms. After falling 41 cm, the atoms are reflected in the magnetic fringe field of a solenoid. They return to their starting height, about 0.7 s later, having passed a second time through the focusing coil. The simulations show that > 98 % of ultra cold Cs atoms and > 70 % of cold Cs atoms will survive at least 15 round trips (assuming perfect vacuum). More than 100 simulations were run to optimize coil currents and focusing coil diameter and height. Simulations also show that atoms can be launched into a fountain. An experimental apparatus to test the simulations, is being constructed. This technique may find application in atomic fountain clocks, interferometers, and gravitometers, and may be adaptable for use in microgravity. It may also work with Bose-Einstein condensates of paramagnetic atoms.

  5. Structural Assembly for Cold Plate Cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaffetti, Mark A. (Inventor); Taddey, Edmund P. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A device including a structural member having a heat spreader and an electronic device mounted directly to a first surface of the heat spreader of the structural member. The device also includes a cold plate mounted directly to the first surface of the heat spreader of the structural member.

  6. Decontamination of foods by cold plasma

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cold plasma is a novel nonthermal food processing technology for meats, poultry, fruits, and vegetables. This flexible sanitizing method uses electricity and a carrier gas, such as air, oxygen, nitrogen, or helium to inactivate microbes without the use of conventional antimicrobial chemical agents. ...

  7. Cold plasma technology close-up

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This month’s column discusses cold plasma, an emerging technology that has potential applications as an antimicrobial process for fresh and fresh-cut fruits and vegetables, low-moisture foods, and food contact surfaces. Brendan A. Niemira, the coauthor of this month’s column, is the research leader ...

  8. Confronting Common Folklore: Catching a Cold

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keeley, Page

    2012-01-01

    Almost every child has experienced the sniffly, stuffy, and achy congestion of the common cold. In addition, many have encountered the "old wives tales" that forge a link between personal actions and coming down with this common respiratory infection. Much of this health folklore has been passed down from generation to generation (e.g., getting a…

  9. Ultra-Cold Atoms on Optical Lattices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ghosh, Parag

    2009-01-01

    The field of ultra-cold atoms, since the achievement of Bose-Einstein Condensation (Anderson et al., 1995; Davis et al., 1995; Bradley et al., 1995), have seen an immensely growing interest over the past decade. With the creation of optical lattices, new possibilities of studying some of the widely used models in condensed matter have opened up.…

  10. Cold Arctic Mesopause Project (CAMP): Scientific objectives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bjorn, L.

    1982-01-01

    During late summer 1978 a rocket campaign was carried out at Esrange. The ion chemistry and composition at and around the extremely cold arctic mesopause, particularly in connection with observations of noctilucent clouds (NLC) was studied. Several plasma parameters were measured, for example, density of electrons and positive ions and composition of both positive and negative ions.

  11. EVALUATION OF THE COLD PIPE PRECHARGER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The article gives results of an evaluation of the performance of the cold pipe precharger, taking a more rigorous approach than had been previously taken. The approach required detailed descriptions of electrical characteristics, electro-hydrodynamics, and charging theory. The co...

  12. Strip edge cracking simulation in cold rolling

    SciTech Connect

    Hubert, C.; Dubar, L.; Dubar, M.; Dubois, A.

    2011-01-17

    This research work focuses on a specific defect which occurs during cold rolling of steel strips: edge-serration. Investigations on the industrial processes have led to the conclusion that this defect is the result of the edge-trimming and cold rolling sequences. The aim of this research work is to analyze the effect of the cutting process and the cold rolling on cracks occurrence, especially on strip edges.This study is performed using an experimental testing stand called Upsetting Rolling Test (URT). It allows to reproduce cold rolling contact parameters such as forward slip, reduction ratio and friction coefficients. Specimens sampled near trimmed industrial strip edges are deformed using the URT stand. Two sets of specimens with different stress states, obtained by annealing, are submitted to two reduction passes with extreme forward slips.Scanning electron microscopy observations added to 3D optical surface profiler topographies show that on one hand, forward slip has a major effect on cracks opening. On the other hand, cracks opening decreases according to high roll strip speed gradient. Concerning the heat-treated specimens, no crack appeared after all reduction passes, showing a large influence of the cutting process and consequently of the local stress state in the vicinity of the burnish and fracture regions.

  13. Wireless adiabatic power transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Rangelov, A.A.; Suchowski, H.; Silberberg, Y.; Vitanov, N.V.

    2011-03-15

    Research Highlights: > Efficient and robust mid-range wireless energy transfer between two coils. > The adiabatic energy transfer is analogous to adiabatic passage in quantum optics. > Wireless energy transfer is insensitive to any resonant constraints. > Wireless energy transfer is insensitive to noise in the neighborhood of the coils. - Abstract: We propose a technique for efficient mid-range wireless power transfer between two coils, by adapting the process of adiabatic passage for a coherently driven two-state quantum system to the realm of wireless energy transfer. The proposed technique is shown to be robust to noise, resonant constraints, and other interferences that exist in the neighborhood of the coils.

  14. Cold Atmosphere Plasma in Cancer Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keidar, Michael

    2012-10-01

    Plasma is an ionized gas that is typically generated in high-temperature laboratory conditions. Recent progress in atmospheric plasmas led to the creation of cold plasmas with ion temperature close to room temperature. Areas of potential application of cold atmospheric plasmas (CAP) include dentistry, drug delivery, dermatology, cosmetics, wound healing, cellular modifications, and cancer treatment. Various diagnostic tools have been developed for characterization of CAP including intensified charge-coupled device cameras, optical emission spectroscopy and electrical measurements of the discharge propertied. Recently a new method for temporally resolved measurements of absolute values of plasma density in the plasma column of small-size atmospheric plasma jet utilizing Rayleigh microwave scattering was proposed [1,2]. In this talk we overview state of the art of CAP diagnostics and understanding of the mechanism of plasma action of biological objects. The efficacy of cold plasma in a pre-clinical model of various cancer types (long, bladder, and skin) was recently demonstrated [3]. Both in-vitro and in-vivo studies revealed that cold plasmas selectively kill cancer cells. We showed that: (a) cold plasma application selectively eradicates cancer cells in vitro without damaging normal cells. For instance a strong selective effect was observed; the resulting 60--70% of lung cancer cells were detached from the plate in the zone treated with plasma, whereas no detachment was observed in the treated zone for the normal lung cells under the same treatment conditions. (b) Significantly reduced tumor size in vivo. Cold plasma treatment led to tumor ablation with neighbouring tumors unaffected. These experiments were performed on more than 10 mice with the same outcome. We found that tumors of about 5mm in diameter were ablated after 2 min of single time plasma treatment. The two best known cold plasma effects, plasma-induced apoptosis and the decrease of cell migration

  15. Cold weather exercise and airway cytokine expression.

    PubMed

    Davis, Michael S; Malayer, Jerry R; Vandeventer, Lori; Royer, Christopher M; McKenzie, Erica C; Williamson, Katherine K

    2005-06-01

    Athletes who perform repeated exercise while breathing cold air have a high prevalence of asthmalike chronic airway disease, but the mechanism linking such activity to airway inflammation is unknown. We used a novel animal model (exercising horses) to test the hypothesis that exercise-induced chronic airway disease is caused by exposure of intrapulmonary airways to unconditioned air, resulting in the upregulation of cytokine expression. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was obtained from eight horses 5 h after submaximal exercise while they breathed room temperature or subfreezing air in a random crossover design. BALF total and differential nucleated cell counts were determined, and relative cytokine mRNA expression in BALF nucleated cells was quantified by real-time RT-PCR using primer and probe sequences specific for equine targets. There were no significant changes in total or differential cell concentrations between BALF recovered after warm and cold air exercise, although there was a strong trend toward increased concentrations of airway epithelial cells after cold air exercise (P = 0.0625). T(H)2 cytokines IL-4, IL-5, and IL-10 were preferentially upregulated after cold air exercise 12-, 9-, and 10-fold, respectively, compared with warm air exercise. Other cytokines (IL-2 and IL-6) were upregulated to a lesser extent (6- and 3-fold, respectively) or not at all (IL-1, IL-8, IFN-gamma, and TNF-alpha). These results suggest that cold weather exercise can lead to asthmalike airway disease through the local induction of cytokines typical of the T(H)2 phenotype.

  16. LADEE Propulsion System Cold Flow Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Jonathan Hunter; Chapman, Jack M.; Trinh, Hau, P.; Bell, James H.

    2013-01-01

    Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE) is a NASA mission that will orbit the Moon. Its main objective is to characterize the atmosphere and lunar dust environment. The spacecraft development is being led by NASA Ames Research Center and scheduled for launch in 2013. The LADEE spacecraft will be operated with a bi-propellant hypergolic propulsion system using MMH and NTO as the fuel and oxidizer, respectively. The propulsion system utilizes flight-proven hardware on major components. The propulsion layout is composed of one 100-lbf main thruster and four 5-lbf RCS thrusters. The propellants are stored in four tanks (two parallel-connected tanks per propellant component). The propellants will be pressurized by regulated helium. A simulated propulsion system has been built for conducting cold flow test series to characterize the transient fluid flow of the propulsion system feed lines and to verify the critical operation modes, such as system priming, waterhammer, and crucial mission duty cycles. Propellant drainage differential between propellant tanks will also be assessed. Since the oxidizer feed line system has a higher flow demand than the fuel system does, the cold flow test focuses on the oxidizer system. The objective of the cold flow test is to simulate the LADEE propulsion fluid flow operation through water cold flow test and to obtain data for anchoring analytical models. The models will be used to predict the transient and steady state flow behaviors in the actual flight operations. The test activities, including the simulated propulsion test article, cold flow test, and analytical modeling, are being performed at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. At the time of the abstract submission, the test article checkout is being performed. The test series will be completed by November, 2012

  17. Preserving Alaska's early Cold War legacy.

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffecker, J.; Whorton, M.

    1999-03-08

    The US Air Force owns and operates numerous facilities that were constructed during the Cold War era. The end of the Cold War prompted many changes in the operation of these properties: missions changed, facilities were modified, and entire bases were closed or realigned. The widespread downsizing of the US military stimulated concern over the potential loss of properties that had acquired historical value in the context of the Cold War. In response, the US Department of Defense in 1991 initiated a broad effort to inventory properties of this era. US Air Force installations in Alaska were in the forefront of these evaluations because of the role of the Cold War in the state's development and history and the high interest on the part of the Alaska State Historic Preservation Officer (SHPO) in these properties. The 611th Air Support Group (611 ASG) owns many of Alaska's early Cold War properties, most were associated with strategic air defense. The 611 ASG determined that three systems it operates, which were all part of the integrated defense against Soviet nuclear strategic bomber threat, were eligible for the National Register of Historic Places (NRHP) and would require treatment as historic properties. These systems include the Aircraft Control and Warning (AC&W) System, the Distant Early Warning (DEW) Line, and Forward Operating Bases (FOBs). As part of a massive cleanup operation, Clean Sweep, the 611 ASG plans to demolish many of the properties associated with these systems. To mitigate the effects of demolition, the 611 ASG negotiated agreements on the system level (e.g., the DEW Line) with the Alaska SHPO to document the history and architectural/engineering features associated with these properties. This system approach allowed the US Air Force to mitigate effects on many individual properties in a more cost-effective and efficient manner.

  18. [Introduction of cold light to endoscopy].

    PubMed

    Kieser, C W

    2008-03-01

    It is the aim of the paper to describe how, 40 years ago, optic glass fibers were developed, and what has been K. Storz's contribution to the new technology. In 1951 the term "Cold Light" was used the first time for illumination of a French type film- and photoendoscope. In 1957 the gastroenterologist B. Hirschowitz at Ann Arbor, U.S.A. succeeded making glass fibers of high light-guiding properties. In 1961 the Cystoscope Makers Inc (ACMI) at New York using these fibers brought the first flexible gastroscope on the market, still equipped with a conventional electric lamp. But in 1960, the year before, the physicist's of ACMI, J. H. Hett and L. Curtiss built the first cold light endoscope using glass fibers for both light and images conduction. In the following years ACMI equipped all of his endoscopes with this new type of illumination. Not before 1963 did K. Storz and the other German manufacturers produce their first cold light cystoscopes. Not possessing the know-how of glass fiber manufacturing, they had to get their fibers from abroad. K. Storz transmitted the term "cold light", which before had been the label of his French-type endoscopes, to the new glass fiber illumination. He constructed an excellent light source for fiber illumination without having light cables of his own fabrication. That is why his name is intimately connected with cold light illumination. But, nevertheless, the invention of the new glass fiber illumination must be credited to B. Hirschowitz and the physicists of ACMI in the U.S.A.

  19. An unusual reaction to cold: a sporadic case of familial polymorphous cold eruption?

    PubMed

    Urano, Y; Shikiji, T; Sasaki, S; Fukuhara, K; Arase, S

    1998-09-01

    A 14-year-old Japanese girl had a lifelong history of skin lesions developing after generalized exposure to cold air; the lesions were often accompanied by systemic symptoms such as fever and chills. The skin lesions were non-pruritic, maculopapular, erythematous eruptions and were neither urticarial nor angioedematous. An ice-cube test was negative. Laboratory examinations showed marked leucocytosis during an acute attack. On the basis of clinical features, histological findings and laboratory data, although these symptoms were sporadic, the most likely diagnosis was familial polymorphous cold eruption, which has also been referred to as familial cold urticaria. Serum levels of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor and interleukin 6 were significantly elevated during an acute attack after cold exposure, suggesting that both cytokines played important parts in the development of her condition.

  20. MISR Browse Images: Cold Land Processes Experiment (CLPX)

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-02

    ... MISR Browse Images: Cold Land Processes Experiment (CLPX) These MISR Browse images provide a ... over the region observed during the NASA Cold Land Processes Experiment (CLPX). CLPX involved ground, airborne, and satellite measurements ...

  1. Is It a Cold or the Flu (For Parents)?

    MedlinePlus

    ... flu that's been going around? Or just a common cold ? Although the flu (or influenza ) usually causes symptoms ... someone feel worse than symptoms associated with a common cold, it's not always easy to tell the difference ...

  2. Cold-Weather Foot Care Key for Diabetics

    MedlinePlus

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_163022.html Cold-Weather Foot Care Key for Diabetics It's important to ... potentially serious foot problems, especially during the cold weather, a foot and ankle specialist warns. "When it ...

  3. Cough and Cold Medicine (DXM and Codeine Syrup)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Medicine (DXM and Codeine Syrup) Cough and Cold Medicine (DXM and Codeine Syrup) Street names: Candy, Drank, Robo Print What are cough and cold medicines? Also known as: Robotripping, Robo, Tussin, Triple C, ...

  4. Common Cold Can Be Dangerous After Bone Marrow Transplant

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_164206.html Common Cold Can Be Dangerous After Bone Marrow Transplant Rhinovirus ... 2017 TUESDAY, March 21, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- The common cold can be deadly for patients recovering from bone ...

  5. High Blood Pressure and Cold Remedies: Which Are Safe?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Feb. 25, 2016. Sexton DJ, et al. The common cold in adults: Treatment and prevention. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Feb. 25, 2016. Common cold: Protect yourself and others. National Institute of Allergy ...

  6. Actively controlling coolant-cooled cold plate configuration

    DOEpatents

    Chainer, Timothy J.; Parida, Pritish R.

    2016-04-26

    Cooling apparatuses are provided to facilitate active control of thermal and fluid dynamic performance of a coolant-cooled cold plate. The cooling apparatus includes the cold plate and a controller. The cold plate couples to one or more electronic components to be cooled, and includes an adjustable physical configuration. The controller dynamically varies the adjustable physical configuration of the cold plate based on a monitored variable associated with the cold plate or the electronic component(s) being cooled by the cold plate. By dynamically varying the physical configuration, the thermal and fluid dynamic performance of the cold plate are adjusted to, for example, optimally cool the electronic component(s), and at the same time, reduce cooling power consumption used in cooling the electronic component(s). The physical configuration can be adjusted by providing one or more adjustable plates within the cold plate, the positioning of which may be adjusted based on the monitored variable.

  7. Pharmacological Blockade of TRPM8 Ion Channels Alters Cold and Cold Pain Responses in Mice

    PubMed Central

    McCoy, Daniel D.; McKemy, David D.

    2011-01-01

    TRPM8 (Transient Receptor Potential Melastatin-8) is a cold- and menthol-gated ion channel necessary for the detection of cold temperatures in the mammalian peripheral nervous system. Functioning TRPM8 channels are required for behavioral responses to innocuous cool, noxious cold, injury-evoked cold hypersensitivity, cooling-mediated analgesia, and thermoregulation. Because of these various roles, the ability to pharmacologically manipulate TRPM8 function to alter the excitability of cold-sensing neurons may have broad impact clinically. Here we examined a novel compound, PBMC (1-phenylethyl-4-(benzyloxy)-3-methoxybenzyl(2-aminoethyl)carbamate) which robustly and selectively inhibited TRPM8 channels in vitro with sub-nanomolar affinity, as determined by calcium microfluorimetry and electrophysiology. The actions of PBMC were selective for TRPM8, with no functional effects observed for the sensory ion channels TRPV1 and TRPA1. PBMC altered TRPM8 gating by shifting the voltage-dependence of menthol-evoked currents towards positive membrane potentials. When administered systemically to mice, PBMC treatment produced a dose-dependent hypothermia in wildtype animals while TRPM8-knockout mice remained unaffected. This hypothermic response was reduced at lower doses, whereas responses to evaporative cooling were still significantly attenuated. Lastly, systemic PBMC also diminished cold hypersensitivity in inflammatory and nerve-injury pain models, but was ineffective against oxaliplatin-induced neuropathic cold hypersensitivity, despite our findings that TRPM8 is required for the cold-related symptoms of this pathology. Thus PBMC is an attractive compound that serves as a template for the formulation of highly specific and potent TRPM8 antagonists that will have utility both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:21984952

  8. Cold rearing improves cold-flight performance in Drosophila via changes in wing morphology.

    PubMed

    Frazier, Melanie R; Harrison, Jon F; Kirkton, Scott D; Roberts, Stephen P

    2008-07-01

    We use a factorial experimental design to test whether rearing at colder temperatures shifts the lower thermal envelope for flight of Drosophila melanogaster Meigen to colder temperatures. D. melanogaster that developed in colder temperatures (15 degrees C) had a significant flight advantage in cold air compared to flies that developed in warmer temperatures (28 degrees C). At 14 degrees C, cold-reared flies failed to perform a take-off flight approximately 47% of the time whereas warm-reared flies failed approximately 94% of the time. At 18 degrees C, cold- and warm-reared flies performed equally well. We also compared several traits in cold- and warm-developing flies to determine if cold-developing flies had better flight performance at cold temperatures due to changes in body mass, wing length, wing loading, relative flight muscle mass or wing-beat frequency. The improved ability to fly at low temperatures was associated with a dramatic increase in wing area and an increase in wing length (after controlling for wing area). Flies that developed at 15 degrees C had approximately 25% more wing area than similarly sized flies that developed at 28 degrees C. Cold-reared flies had slower wing-beat frequencies than similarly sized flies from warmer developmental environments, whereas other traits did not vary with developmental temperature. These results demonstrate that developmental plasticity in wing dimensions contributes to the improved flight performance of D. melanogaster at cold temperatures, and ultimately, may help D. melanogaster live in a wide range of thermal environments.

  9. The new Cold Neutron Chopper Spectrometer at the Spallation Neutron Source -- Design and Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Ehlers, Georg; Podlesnyak, Andrey A.; Niedziela, Jennifer L.; Iverson, Erik B.; Sokol, Paul E.

    2011-01-01

    The design and performance of the new cold neutron chopper spectrometer (CNCS) at the Spallation Neutron Source in Oak Ridge are described. CNCS is a direct-geometry inelastic time-of-flight spectrometer, designed essentially to cover the same energy and momentum transfer ranges as IN5 at ILL, LET at ISIS, DCS at NIST, TOFTOF at FRM-II, AMATERAS at J-PARC, PHAROS at LANSCE, and NEAT at HZB, at similar energy resolution. Measured values of key figures such as neutron flux at sample position and energy resolution are compared between measurements and ray tracing Monte Carlo simulations, and good agreement (better than 20% of absolute numbers) has been achieved. The instrument performs very well in the cold and thermal neutron energy ranges, and promises to become a workhorse for the neutron scattering community for quasielastic and inelastic scattering experiments.

  10. The new cold neutron chopper spectrometer at the Spallation Neutron Source: Design and performance

    SciTech Connect

    Ehlers, G.; Podlesnyak, A. A.; Niedziela, J. L.; Iverson, E. B.; Sokol, P. E.

    2011-08-15

    The design and performance of the new cold neutron chopper spectrometer (CNCS) at the Spallation Neutron Source in Oak Ridge are described. CNCS is a direct-geometry inelastic time-of-flight spectrometer, designed essentially to cover the same energy and momentum transfer ranges as IN5 at ILL, LET at ISIS, DCS at NIST, TOFTOF at FRM-II, AMATERAS at J-PARC, PHAROS at LANSCE, and NEAT at HZB, at similar energy resolution. Measured values of key figures such as neutron flux at sample position and energy resolution are compared between measurements and ray tracing Monte Carlo simulations, and good agreement (better than 20% of absolute numbers) has been achieved. The instrument performs very well in the cold and thermal neutron energy ranges, and promises to become a workhorse for the neutron scattering community for quasielastic and inelastic scattering experiments.

  11. Formation of molecular ions by radiative association of cold trapped atoms and ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dulieu, Olivier; da Silva, Humberto, Jr.; Aymar, Mireille; Raoult, Maurice

    2015-05-01

    Radiative emission during cold collisions between trapped laser-cooled Rb atoms and alkaline-earth ions (Ca+ , Sr+ , Ba+) and Yb+ are studied theoretically, using accurate effective-core-potential based quantum chemistry calculations of potential energy curves and transition dipole moments of the related molecular ions. Radiative association of molecular ions is predicted to occur for all systems with a cross section two to ten times larger than the radiative charge transfer one. Partial and total rate constants are also calculated and compared to available experiments. Narrow shape resonances are expected, which could be detectable at low temperature with an experimental resolution at the limit of the present standards. Vibrational distributions show that the final molecular ions are not created in their ground state level. Supported by the Marie-Curie ITN ``COMIQ: Cold Molecular Ions at the Quantum limit'' of the EU (#607491).

  12. MEASURED AND CALCULATED HEATING AND DOSE RATES FOR THE HFIR HB4 BEAM TUBE AND COLD SOURCE

    SciTech Connect

    Slater, Charles O; Primm, Trent; Pinkston, Daniel; Cook, David Howard; Selby, Douglas L; Ferguson, Phillip D; Bucholz, James A; Popov, Emilian L

    2009-03-01

    The High Flux Isotope Reactor at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory was upgraded to install a cold source in horizontal beam tube number 4. Calculations were performed and measurements were made to determine heating within the cold source and dose rates within and outside a shield tunnel surrounding the beam tube. This report briefly describes the calculations and presents comparisons of the measured and calculated results. Some calculated dose rates are in fair to good agreement with the measured results while others, particularly those at the shield interfaces, differ greatly from the measured results. Calculated neutron exposure to the Teflon seals in the hydrogen transfer line is about one fourth of the measured value, underpredicting the lifetime by a factor of four. The calculated cold source heating is in good agreement with the measured heating.

  13. Pressure effects on wall heat transfer during flame quenching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vosen, S. R.; Westbrook, C. K.

    1984-05-01

    Rates of time dependent wall heat transfer in high temperature and high pressure combustion chambers were predicted. Laminar flow near the cold wall is assumed, and global chemical kinetic mechanisms are used to describe the combustion of methane air and propane air mixtures. The effects of variations in fuel type, pressure, equivalence ratio, and thermal boundary layers on the wall heat flux are examined, and the calculated results are correlated in terms of characteristic time and energy units.

  14. Cutaneous microvascular response during local cold exposure - the effect of female sex hormones and cold perception.

    PubMed

    Cankar, Ksenija; Music, Mark; Finderle, Zare

    2016-11-01

    It is generally known that differences exist between males and females with regard to sensitivity to cold. Similar differences even among females in different hormonal balance might influence microvascular response during cold provocation testing. The aim of the present study was to measure sex hormone levels, cold and cold pain perception thresholds and compare them to cutaneous laser-Doppler flux response during local cooling in both the follicular and luteal phases of the menstrual cycle. In the luteal phase a more pronounced decrease in laser-Doppler flux was observed compared to follicular phase during local cooling at 15°C (significant difference by Dunnett's test, p<0.05). In addition, statistically significant correlations between progesterone level and laser-Doppler flux response to local cooling were observed during the follicular (R=-0.552, p=0.0174) and during the luteal phases (R=0.520, p=0.0271). In contrast, the correlation between estradiol level and laser-Doppler flux response was observed only in the follicular phase (R=-0.506, p=0.0324). Our results show that individual sensitivity to cold influences cutaneous microvascular response to local cooling; that microvascular reactivity is more pronounced during the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle; and that reactivity correlates with hormone levels. The effect of specific sex hormone levels is related to the cold-provocation temperature.

  15. Prevention and Management of Cold-Weather Injuries

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-04-01

    metabolism.) TB MED 508 11 d. Diuresis and fluid balance. (1) A widely recognized effect of exposure to cold is an increase...in urine flow rate, that is, cold-induced diuresis (CID). This response is likely caused by a redistribution of body fluids from the extremities and...CID cold-induced diuresis CIVD cold-induced vasodilation CO carbon monoxide CO2 carbon dioxide CPR cardiopulmonary resuscitation

  16. 21 CFR 880.6085 - Hot/cold water bottle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Hot/cold water bottle. 880.6085 Section 880.6085... Devices § 880.6085 Hot/cold water bottle. (a) Identification. A hot/cold water bottle is a device intended for medical purposes that is in the form of a container intended to be filled with hot or cold...

  17. 21 CFR 880.6085 - Hot/cold water bottle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hot/cold water bottle. 880.6085 Section 880.6085... Devices § 880.6085 Hot/cold water bottle. (a) Identification. A hot/cold water bottle is a device intended for medical purposes that is in the form of a container intended to be filled with hot or cold...

  18. 21 CFR 880.6085 - Hot/cold water bottle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Hot/cold water bottle. 880.6085 Section 880.6085... Devices § 880.6085 Hot/cold water bottle. (a) Identification. A hot/cold water bottle is a device intended for medical purposes that is in the form of a container intended to be filled with hot or cold...

  19. 21 CFR 880.6085 - Hot/cold water bottle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Hot/cold water bottle. 880.6085 Section 880.6085... Devices § 880.6085 Hot/cold water bottle. (a) Identification. A hot/cold water bottle is a device intended for medical purposes that is in the form of a container intended to be filled with hot or cold...

  20. Heat transfer during quenching of gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambraziavichius, A.

    Results of theoretical and experimental investigations of gas-side heat transfer of subsonic laminar or turbulent flows of diatomic gases (air or nitrogen) heated to 5000 K in cold-wall pipes are presented. While determining the mixing length, physical parameters which consider local temperatures of the boundary layer were adopted. Thus, the generalized fields of velocities and temperatures in the turbulent region of the boundary layer are identical for both moderate and high gas temperature ranges, and Pr-sub-t may be considered constant and approximately equal to 0.9. The temperature level of gases in turblent flow is shown to insignificantly affect heat transfer equations, provided the physical parameters in the similarity numbers are chosen according to the bulk flow temperature. A calculation technique is developed for heat transfer of dissociated diatomic gases in annular and rectangular channels, in slots, and over bundles of square tubes in cross flow. Also, a relation is shown between the heat transfer coefficient, quenching velocity, and nitrogen oxide concentration in the air exhaust of a nitrogen oxide quenching apparatus.

  1. Transfer of Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1999

    This document contains four symposium papers on transfer of learning. In "Learning Transfer in a Social Service Agency: Test of an Expectancy Model of Motivation" (Reid A. Bates) structural equation modeling is used to test the validity of a valence-instrumentality-expectancy approach to motivation to transfer learning. "The…

  2. Transfer Index: One Definition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heinselman, James L.

    A transfer index of the proportion of students in California's community colleges transferring to the University of California (UC) and the California State University (CSU) system for fall 1982, 1983, and 1984 is presented in this report. Introductory material provides one definition of an appropriate index of transfer rates, i.e., the ratio of…

  3. Transfer of Learning Transformed

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larsen-Freeman, Diane

    2013-01-01

    Instruction is motivated by the assumption that students can transfer their learning, or apply what they have learned in school to another setting. A common problem arises when the expected transfer does not take place, what has been referred to as the inert knowledge problem. More than an academic inconvenience, the failure to transfer is a major…

  4. 40 CFR 63.462 - Batch cold cleaning machine standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 10 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Batch cold cleaning machine standards... National Emission Standards for Halogenated Solvent Cleaning § 63.462 Batch cold cleaning machine standards. (a) Each owner or operator of an immersion batch cold solvent cleaning machine shall comply with...

  5. 40 CFR 63.462 - Batch cold cleaning machine standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Batch cold cleaning machine standards... National Emission Standards for Halogenated Solvent Cleaning § 63.462 Batch cold cleaning machine standards. (a) Each owner or operator of an immersion batch cold solvent cleaning machine shall comply with...

  6. 40 CFR 63.462 - Batch cold cleaning machine standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 10 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Batch cold cleaning machine standards... National Emission Standards for Halogenated Solvent Cleaning § 63.462 Batch cold cleaning machine standards. (a) Each owner or operator of an immersion batch cold solvent cleaning machine shall comply with...

  7. 40 CFR 63.462 - Batch cold cleaning machine standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Batch cold cleaning machine standards... National Emission Standards for Halogenated Solvent Cleaning § 63.462 Batch cold cleaning machine standards. (a) Each owner or operator of an immersion batch cold solvent cleaning machine shall comply with...

  8. Cold or Allergies: Which Is It? (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Year-Old A Cold or Allergies: Which Is It? KidsHealth > For Parents > A Cold or Allergies: Which Is It? Print A A A My son has been ... common cold can be so much alike that it's sometimes hard to tell the two apart. But ...

  9. Some Like It Hot, Some like It Cold

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silberman, Robert G.

    2004-01-01

    In order to find the right combination to construct a cold pack for athletic injuries, students mix liquids and solids in a calorimeter, and use a thermometer to ascertain whether the chemical reaction is hot or cold. Many formulae for chemical reactions are given, the first of which is used for commercial cold packs.

  10. 7 CFR 305.16 - Cold treatment schedules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Cold treatment schedules. 305.16 Section 305.16 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PHYTOSANITARY TREATMENTS Cold Treatments § 305.16 Cold...

  11. Cold Regions Test of Tracked and Wheeled Vehicles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-11

    of light, which can make objects appear closer or further away than the actual distances. Temperature inversions may also cause sounds to become...are cold temperatures , strong seasonality with distinct changes in insolation, frozen atmospheric moisture, frozen ground, and freeze thaw of water...characteristics of a cold region are cold temperatures , strong seasonality with distinct changes in insolation, frozen atmospheric moisture, frozen

  12. Anti-oxidative responses of zebrafish (Danio rerio) gill, liver and brain tissues upon acute cold shock.

    PubMed

    Wu, Su Mei; Liu, Jia-Hao; Shu, Li-Hsin; Chen, Ching Hsein

    2015-09-01

    The present study seeks to detect oxidative damage and to compare anti-oxidative responses among liver, gills and brain of adult zebrafish that were cooled from 28 °C (control) to 12 °C (treatment) for 0-24 h. The lipid peroxidation of liver, gill and brain tissues significantly increased at 1h after transfer, but reactive oxygen species in the treatment group increased significantly after 24 h as compared to the control. The fish were found to develop a cascading anti-oxidative mechanism beginning with an increase in Cu/Zn-SOD levels, followed by increased CAT and GPx mRNA expressions in the three tissue types. Both smtB and mt2 mRNAs increased in the hepatic and brain tissues following 1h of cold stress, but only smtB exhibited a significant increase in the gills at 1 h and 6 h after transfer to 12 °C. Furthermore, cellular apoptosis in the brain was not evident after cold shock, but liver and gills showed cellular apoptosis at 1-3 h, with another peak in the liver at 6 h after cold shock. The results suggest that the cold shock induced oxidative stress, and the enzymatic (SOD, GPx and CAT) and non-enzymatic (mt-2 and smt-B) mRNA expressions all play a role in the resulting anti-oxidation within 1-6 h of cold shock. A functional comparison showed that the brain had the most powerful antioxidant defense system of the three tissue types since it had the highest smtB mRNA expression and a lower level of cell apoptosis than the liver and gills after exposure to cold stress.

  13. Artificial hybridization of rubber-bearing guayule with cold-tolerant Parthenium ligulatum

    SciTech Connect

    Hashemi, A.; Estilai, A.; West, J.E.; Waines, J.G. Univ. of California, Davis )

    1988-02-01

    Caespitose and cold-tolerant plants of Parthenium ligulatum (Jones) Barneby (Asteraceae) from a native population in the Uinta Basin, Utah, were uprooted, potted, and transferred to a greenhouse in California. Approximately two years after transfer, the plants flowered and subsequently were crossed to diploid guayule (Parthenium argentatum Gray), the rubber-bearing species, native to the state of Durango, Mexico. Only female guayule {times} male P. ligulatum crosses produced F{sub 1} hybrids. Only crosses involving guayule as female parent and F{sub 1} plants as male parent produced backcross (BC{sub 1}) plants. Hybrid plants were variable with respect to their growth habit, inflorescence, and leaf shape. Both parents and F{sub 1} hybrids had 2n = 36 chromosomes. Unlike the parents, however, meiosis was irregular in the hybrids which showed a range of 0-5 and an average of 2.1 univalents at metaphase I. Hybrids averages 0.87 laggards at anaphase I and 0.83 micronuclei at the tetrad stage. The crossability of guayule and P. ligulatum, the high degree of chromosome pairing of the F{sub 1} hybrids, and the production of BC{sub 1} plants indicate that the two species are related in spite of their of distinct morphological and ecological differences. This study suggests that the cold-tolerance trait of P. ligulatum may be transferred to guayule through interspecific hybridization followed by backcrossing.

  14. Cold Treatment Breaks Dormancy but Jeopardizes Flower Quality in Camellia japonica L.

    PubMed

    Berruti, Andrea; Christiaens, Annelies; Keyser, Ellen De; Labeke, Marie-Christine Van; Scariot, Valentina

    2015-01-01

    Camellia japonica L. is an evergreen shrub whose cultivars are of great ornamental value. In autumn, after flower bud differentiation, dormancy is initiated. As in many other spring flowering woody ornamentals, winter low temperatures promote dormancy release of both flower and vegetative buds. However, warm spells during late autumn and winter can lead to unfulfilled chilling requirements leading to erratic and delayed flowering. We hypothesized that storing plants at no light and low temperature could favor dormancy breaking and lead to early and synchronized flowering in response to forcing conditions in C. japonica 'Nuccio's Pearl'. Plants with fully developed floral primordia were stored at dark, 7°C, and RH > 90% for up to 8 weeks. To monitor endodormancy release during the storage, we evaluated the content of abscisic acid (ABA) in flower buds and the expression profiles of five putative genes related to dormancy and cold acclimation metabolism in leaves and flower buds. In addition, the expression of four anthocyanin biosynthesis pathway genes was profiled in flower buds to assess the effect of the treatment on flower pigment biosynthesis. At 0, 4, 6, and 8 weeks of cold treatment, 10 plants were transferred to the greenhouse and forced to flower. Forced plant flower qualities and growth were observed. The ABA content and the expression profiles of two dormancy-related genes (CjARP and CjDEH) suggested that dormancy breaking occurred after 6-8 weeks of cold treatment. Overall, plants treated for 6-8 weeks showed earlier vegetative sprouting, enhanced, and homogeneous flowering with reduced forcing time. Prolonged cold treatments also reduced flower size and longevity, anthocyanin content, and pigment biosynthesis-related gene transcripts. In conclusion, the cold treatment had a promotive effect on dormancy breaking but caused severe drawbacks on flower quality.

  15. Cold Treatment Breaks Dormancy but Jeopardizes Flower Quality in Camellia japonica L.

    PubMed Central

    Berruti, Andrea; Christiaens, Annelies; Keyser, Ellen De; Labeke, Marie-Christine Van; Scariot, Valentina

    2015-01-01

    Camellia japonica L. is an evergreen shrub whose cultivars are of great ornamental value. In autumn, after flower bud differentiation, dormancy is initiated. As in many other spring flowering woody ornamentals, winter low temperatures promote dormancy release of both flower and vegetative buds. However, warm spells during late autumn and winter can lead to unfulfilled chilling requirements leading to erratic and delayed flowering. We hypothesized that storing plants at no light and low temperature could favor dormancy breaking and lead to early and synchronized flowering in response to forcing conditions in C. japonica ‘Nuccio’s Pearl’. Plants with fully developed floral primordia were stored at dark, 7°C, and RH > 90% for up to 8 weeks. To monitor endodormancy release during the storage, we evaluated the content of abscisic acid (ABA) in flower buds and the expression profiles of five putative genes related to dormancy and cold acclimation metabolism in leaves and flower buds. In addition, the expression of four anthocyanin biosynthesis pathway genes was profiled in flower buds to assess the effect of the treatment on flower pigment biosynthesis. At 0, 4, 6, and 8 weeks of cold treatment, 10 plants were transferred to the greenhouse and forced to flower. Forced plant flower qualities and growth were observed. The ABA content and the expression profiles of two dormancy-related genes (CjARP and CjDEH) suggested that dormancy breaking occurred after 6–8 weeks of cold treatment. Overall, plants treated for 6–8 weeks showed earlier vegetative sprouting, enhanced, and homogeneous flowering with reduced forcing time. Prolonged cold treatments also reduced flower size and longevity, anthocyanin content, and pigment biosynthesis-related gene transcripts. In conclusion, the cold treatment had a promotive effect on dormancy breaking but caused severe drawbacks on flower quality. PMID:26617623

  16. Cold Remedies: What Works, What Doesn't, What Can't Hurt

    MedlinePlus

    ... can't hurt There's no cure for the common cold. But what about cold remedies that claim to ... Cold remedies are almost as common as the common cold, but are they effective? Nothing can cure a ...

  17. Heat transfer system

    DOEpatents

    Not Available

    1980-03-07

    A heat transfer system for a nuclear reactor is described. Heat transfer is accomplished within a sealed vapor chamber which is substantially evacuated prior to use. A heat transfer medium, which is liquid at the design operating temperatures, transfers heat from tubes interposed in the reactor primary loop to spaced tubes connected to a steam line for power generation purposes. Heat transfer is accomplished by a two-phase liquid-vapor-liquid process as used in heat pipes. Condensible gases are removed from the vapor chamber through a vertical extension in open communication with the chamber interior.

  18. Cold atom quantum sensors for space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Yeshpal

    2016-07-01

    Quantum sensors based on cold atoms offer the opportunity to perform highly accurate measurements of physical phenomena related to time, gravity and rotation. The deployment of such technologies in the microgravity environment of space may enable further enhancement of their performance, whilst permitting the detection of these physical phenomena over much larger scales than is possible with a ground-based instrument. In this talk, I will present an overview of the activities of the UK National Quantum Hub in Sensors and Metrology in developing cold atoms technology for space. Our activities are focused in two main areas: optical clocks and atom interferometers. I will also discuss our contributions to recent initiatives including STE-QUEST and AI-GOAT, the ESA/NASA initiative aiming at an atom interferometer gravitational wave detector in space.

  19. Axion cold dark matter in nonstandard cosmologies

    SciTech Connect

    Visinelli, Luca; Gondolo, Paolo

    2010-03-15

    We study the parameter space of cold dark matter axions in two cosmological scenarios with nonstandard thermal histories before big bang nucleosynthesis: the low-temperature reheating (LTR) cosmology and the kination cosmology. If the Peccei-Quinn symmetry breaks during inflation, we find more allowed parameter space in the LTR cosmology than in the standard cosmology and less in the kination cosmology. On the contrary, if the Peccei-Quinn symmetry breaks after inflation, the Peccei-Quinn scale is orders of magnitude higher than standard in the LTR cosmology and lower in the kination cosmology. We show that the axion velocity dispersion may be used to distinguish some of these nonstandard cosmologies. Thus, axion cold dark matter may be a good probe of the history of the Universe before big bang nucleosynthesis.

  20. Cold fusion catalyzed by muons and electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Kulsrud, R.M.

    1990-10-01

    Two alternative methods have been suggested to produce fusion power at low temperature. The first, muon catalyzed fusion or MCF, uses muons to spontaneously catalyze fusion through the muon mesomolecule formation. Unfortunately, this method fails to generate enough fusion energy to supply the muons, by a factor of about ten. The physics of MCF is discussed, and a possible approach to increasing the number of MCF fusions generated by each muon is mentioned. The second method, which has become known as Cold Fusion,'' involves catalysis by electrons in electrolytic cells. The physics of this process, if it exists, is more mysterious than MCF. However, it now appears to be an artifact, the claims for its reality resting largely on experimental errors occurring in rather delicate experiments. However, a very low level of such fusion claimed by Jones may be real. Experiments in cold fusion will also be discussed.

  1. Outer crust of nonaccreting cold neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rüster, Stefan B.; Hempel, Matthias; Schaffner-Bielich, Jürgen

    2006-03-01

    The properties of the outer crust of nonaccreting cold neutron stars are studied by using modern nuclear data and theoretical mass tables, updating in particular the classic work of Baym, Pethick, and Sutherland. Experimental data from the atomic mass table from Audi, Wapstra, and Thibault of 2003 are used and a thorough comparison of many modern theoretical nuclear models, both relativistic and nonrelativistic, is performed for the first time. In addition, the influences of pairing and deformation are investigated. State-of-the-art theoretical nuclear mass tables are compared to check their differences concerning the neutron drip line, magic neutron numbers, the equation of state, and the sequence of neutron-rich nuclei up to the drip line in the outer crust of nonaccreting cold neutron stars.

  2. Lunar Cold Trap Contamination by Landing Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shipley, Scott T.; Metzger, Philip T.; Lane, John E.

    2014-01-01

    Tools have been developed to model and simulate the effects of lunar landing vehicles on the lunar environment (Metzger, 2011), mostly addressing the effects of regolith erosion by rocket plumes and the fate of the ejected lunar soil particles (Metzger, 2010). These tools are being applied at KSC to predict ejecta from the upcoming Google Lunar X-Prize Landers and how they may damage the historic Apollo landing sites. The emerging interest in lunar mining poses a threat of contamination to pristine craters at the lunar poles, which act as "cold traps" for water and may harbor other valuable minerals Crider and Vondrak (2002). The KSC Granular Mechanics and Regolith Operations Lab tools have been expanded to address the probability for contamination of these pristine "cold trap" craters.

  3. Cryogenic target formation using cold gas jets

    DOEpatents

    Hendricks, Charles D.

    1981-01-01

    A method and apparatus using cold gas jets for producing a substantially uniform layer of cryogenic materials on the inner surface of hollow spherical members having one or more layers, such as inertially imploded targets. By vaporizing and quickly refreezing cryogenic materials contained within a hollow spherical member, a uniform layer of the materials is formed on an inner surface of the spherical member. Basically the method involves directing cold gas jets onto a spherical member having one or more layers or shells and containing the cryogenic material, such as a deuterium-tritium (DT) mixture, to freeze the contained material, momentarily heating the spherical member so as to vaporize the contained material, and quickly refreezing the thus vaporized material forming a uniform layer of cryogenic material on an inner surface of the spherical member.

  4. Cryogenic target formation using cold gas jets

    DOEpatents

    Hendricks, C.D.

    1980-02-26

    A method and apparatus using cold gas jets for producing a substantially uniform layer of cryogenic materials on the inner surface of hollow spherical members having one or more layers, such as inertially imploded targets are disclosed. By vaporizing and quickly refreezing cryogenic materials contained within a hollow spherical member, a uniform layer of the materials is formed on an inner surface of the spherical member. Basically the method involves directing cold gas jets onto a spherical member having one or more layers or shells and containing the cryogenic material, such as a deuterium-tritium (DT) mixture, to freeze the contained material, momentarily heating the spherical member so as to vaporize the contained material, and quickly refreezing the thus vaporized material forming a uniform layer of cryogenic material on an inner surface of the spherical member. 4 figs.

  5. Cryogenic target formation using cold gas jets

    DOEpatents

    Hendricks, Charles D. [Livermore, CA

    1980-02-26

    A method and apparatus using cold gas jets for producing a substantially uniform layer of cryogenic materials on the inner surface of hollow spherical members having one or more layers, such as inertially imploded targets. By vaporizing and quickly refreezing cryogenic materials contained within a hollow spherical member, a uniform layer of the materials is formed on an inner surface of the spherical member. Basically the method involves directing cold gas jets onto a spherical member having one or more layers or shells and containing the cryogenic material, such as a deuterium-tritium (DT) mixture, to freeze the contained material, momentarily heating the spherical member so as to vaporize the contained material, and quickly refreezing the thus vaporized material forming a uniform layer of cryogenic material on an inner surface of the spherical member.

  6. Cold-start hydrocarbon emissions control

    SciTech Connect

    1995-10-01

    This article describes an effective, energy-efficient strategy for dealing with this problem using HC traps and heat-exchange related catalyst beds that have been successfully tested. The worldwide regulatory climate for continued and dramatic reductions in vehicle exhaust emissions will continue unabated for some time. The best known of these mandates includes California Air Resources Board`s Low Emission Vehicle (CARB LEV) program, the Ozone Transport Commission`s recent petition to the EPA for partial adoption of CARB`s LEV program, and the European Economic Community`s proposed staged multi-tier approach to reduce auto exhaust pollution. Since up to 70% of hydrocarbon tailpipe emissions occur during the cold-start portion of the Federal Test Procedure (FTP), significant reductions in total FTP HC emissions must include a cold-start HC abatement strategy.

  7. Impact of Hight Velocity Cold Spray Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Dykhuizen, R.C.; Gilmore, D.L.; Jiang, X.; Neiser, R.A.; Sampath, S.; Smith, M.F.

    1998-12-01

    This paper presents experimental data and an computational model of the cold spray solid particle impact process. Copper particles impacting onto a polished stainless steel substrate are examined. The high velocity impact causes significant plastic deformation of both the particle and the sub- strate, but no melting is observed. The plastic deformation exposes clean surfaces that, under the high impact pressures, result in significant bond strengths between the particle and substrate. Experimental measurements of the splat and crater sizes compare well with the numerical calculations. It is shown that the crater depth is significant and increases with impact velocity. However, the splat diameter is much less sensitive to the impact velocity. It is also shown that the geometric lengths of the splat and crater scale linearly with the diameter of the impacting particle. It is hoped that the results presented will allow better understanding of the bonding process during cold spray.

  8. Adiabatic theory for anisotropic cold molecule collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Pawlak, Mariusz; Shagam, Yuval; Narevicius, Edvardas; Moiseyev, Nimrod

    2015-08-21

    We developed an adiabatic theory for cold anisotropic collisions between slow atoms and cold molecules. It enables us to investigate the importance of the couplings between the projection states of the rotational motion of the atom about the molecular axis of the diatom. We tested our theory using the recent results from the Penning ionization reaction experiment {sup 4}He(1s2s {sup 3}S) + HD(1s{sup 2}) → {sup 4}He(1s{sup 2}) + HD{sup +}(1s) + e{sup −} [Lavert-Ofir et al., Nat. Chem. 6, 332 (2014)] and demonstrated that the couplings have strong effect on positions of shape resonances. The theory we derived provides cross sections which are in a very good agreement with the experimental findings.

  9. Fundamental Study of Direct Contact Cold Energy Release by Flowing Hot Air through Ice Particles Packed Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoyama, Sigeo; Inaba, Hideo

    This paper has dealt with the direct contact heat exchange characteristics between ice particles (average ice particle diameter : 3.10mm) packed in the rectangular cold energy storage vessel and flowing hot air as a heat transfer medium. The hot air bubbles ascended in the fluidized ice particles layer, and they were cooled down directly by melting ice particles. The temperature efficiency increased as Reynolds number Re increased because the hot air flowing in the layer became active. The dehumidity efficiency increased with an increase in modified Stefan number and Re, since the heat capacity of inlet air and heat transfer coefficient increased. Finally, some empirical correlations for temperature efficiency, dehumidity efficiency and the completion time of cold energy release were derived in terms of various nondimensional parameters.

  10. Improvement of cold resistance and performance of broilers by acute cold exposure during late embryogenesis.

    PubMed

    Shinder, D; Ruzal, M; Giloh, M; Druyan, S; Piestun, Y; Yahav, S

    2011-03-01

    The aim of this study was to fine-tune previous acute cold exposure treatments of broiler embryos during late embryogenesis to improve lifelong cold resistance and performance. Six hundred Cobb hatching eggs were incubated under standard conditions and then exposed to 3 treatments: control; cold treatment in which embryos were exposed to 15°C for 30 min on d 18 and 19 of incubation (30 × 2); and cold treatment similar to 30 × 2 but with 60-min exposures (60 × 2). Egg shell temperature (T(egg)) and heart rate (HR) were monitored pre- and posttreatment. Upon hatching, hatchability, body weight, and body temperature were recorded. From 14 to 35 d of age, three quarters of the chickens in each treatment were raised under ascites-inducing conditions (AIC) and the remaining birds were raised under standard brooding conditions (SBC). The T(egg) and HR decreased significantly in response to increased exposure time on d 18 of incubation. On d 19 of incubation, before the second cold exposure, the 30 × 2 group showed greater T(egg) and HR than the controls, and during the second exposure they maintained these parameters better than the 60 × 2 embryos. No treatment effect on hatchability was observed. At 35 d of age ascites incidence among 30 × 2 chickens under AIC was significantly less than that among the controls (P < 0.01), and body weight of these chickens under either SBC or AIC was significantly higher than that of the controls. Under SBC relative breast muscle weight was significantly higher in 60 × 2 chickens, whereas the relative heart weight was higher in both cold-treated groups than in the controls. It can be concluded that repeated short acute cold exposures during late embryogenesis significantly reduced ascites incidence and improved growth rate under either SBC or AIC. These results may be related to a prenatal epigenetic adaptation of the thermoregulatory and cardiovascular systems to low ambient temperature.

  11. How cold is it? TRPM8 and TRPA1 in the molecular logic of cold sensation.

    PubMed

    McKemy, David D

    2005-04-22

    Recognition of temperature is a critical element of sensory perception and allows us to evaluate both our external and internal environments. In vertebrates, the somatosensory system can discriminate discrete changes in ambient temperature, which activate nerve endings of primary afferent fibers. These thermosensitive nerves can be further segregated into those that detect either innocuous or noxious (painful) temperatures; the latter neurons being nociceptors. We now know that thermosensitive afferents express ion channels of the transient receptor potential (TRP) family that respond at distinct temperature thresholds, thus establishing the molecular basis for thermosensation. Much is known of those channels mediating the perception of noxious heat; however, those proposed to be involved in cool to noxious cold sensation, TRPM8 and TRPA1, have only recently been described. The former channel is a receptor for menthol, and links the sensations provided by this and other cooling compounds to temperature perception. While TRPM8 almost certainly performs a critical role in cold signaling, its part in nociception is still at issue. The latter channel, TRPA1, is activated by the pungent ingredients in mustard and cinnamon, but has also been postulated to mediate our perception of noxious cold temperatures. However, a number of conflicting reports have suggested that the role of this channel in cold sensation needs to be confirmed. Thus, the molecular logic for the perception of cold-evoked pain remains enigmatic. This review is intended to summarize our current understanding of these cold thermoreceptors, as well as address the current controversy regarding TRPA1 and cold signaling.

  12. Design calculations for the ANS (Advanced Neutron Source) cold source

    SciTech Connect

    Lillie, R.A.; Alsmiller, R.G. Jr.

    1988-01-01

    The calculation procedure, based on discrete ordinates transport methods, that is being used to carry out design calculations for the Advanced Neutron Source cold source is described. Calculated results on the gain in cold neutron flux produced by a liquid deuterium cold source are compared with experimental data and with calculated data previously obtained by P. Ageron et al., at the Institute Max von Laue-Paul Langevin in Grenoble, France. Calculated results are also presented that indicated how the flux of cold neutrons vary with cold source parameters. 23 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. Cold Vacuum Drying Facility hazard analysis report

    SciTech Connect

    Krahn, D.E.

    1998-02-23

    This report describes the methodology used in conducting the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF) hazard analysis to support the CVDF phase 2 safety analysis report (SAR), and documents the results. The hazard analysis was performed in accordance with DOE-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for US Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports, and implements the requirements of US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports.

  14. Cold worked ferritic alloys and components

    DOEpatents

    Korenko, Michael K.

    1984-01-01

    This invention relates to liquid metal fast breeder reactor and steam generator precipitation hardening fully ferritic alloy components which have a microstructure substantially free of the primary precipitation hardening phase while having cells or arrays of dislocations of varying population densities. It also relates to the process by which these components are produced, which entails solution treating the alloy followed by a final cold working step. In this condition, the first significant precipitation hardening of the component occurs during high temperature use.

  15. Cold Atoms, Statistical Physics and Quantum Simulations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-07-22

    to be the development of robust theoretical techniques for the simulations of ultra-cold Bose gases and other quantum phenomena, such theoretical...finite-temperature effects in atom-chip interferometry of Bose -Einstein condensates, R. G. Scott, et al., Physical Review A, 063624 (2009). A copy of...March 2009. Mr Hodder was supported through a University of Otago Scholarship. He initially developed a simple single-site Hubbard model, which can be

  16. Temporal characteristics of cold pain perception.

    PubMed

    Frölich, Michael A; Bolding, Mark S; Cutter, Gary R; Ness, Timothy J; Zhang, Kui

    2010-08-09

    Adaptation to a sustained stimulus is an important phenomenon in psychophysical experiments. When studying the response to an experimental task, the investigator has to account for the change in perceived stimulus intensity with repeated stimulus application and, if the stimulus is sustained, for the change in intensity during the presentation. An example of a sustained stimulus is the cold pressor task (CPT). The task has been used both as an experimental pain task and to study cardiovascular physiology. In functional imaging research, the CPT has been used to evaluate cognitive processing of a noxious stimulus. Investigators typically model the stimulus in a block design as a categorical (on-off) stimulus and do not account for a temporal change in stimulus perception. If the perceived stimulus changes over time, the results may be misleading. Therefore, we characterized the time course of cold pain in human volunteers and developed a model of the temporal characteristics of perceived cold pain. Fifteen healthy participants underwent cold pain testing by immersing their right foot into a container filled with ice water (2 degrees C) for 30s alternating with a 30s immersion into a container filled with tepid water 32 degrees C (control). Participants rated the pain intensity using an electronic slide algometer. Using a mixed general linear model (effectively a polynomial regression model), we determined that pain ratings follow a crescendo-decrescendo pattern that can be described well using a quadratic model. We conclude that the time course of quantitative perception differs fundamentally from the time course of stimulus presentation. This may be important when looking for the physiological correlates of perception as opposed to the presence of a stimulus per se.

  17. Combined cold compressor/ejector helium refrigerator

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Donald P.

    1985-01-01

    A refrigeration apparatus having an ejector operatively connected with a cold compressor to form a two-stage pumping system. This pumping system is used to lower the pressure, and thereby the temperature of a bath of boiling refrigerant (helium). The apparatus as thus arranged and operated has substantially improved operating efficiency when compared to other processes or arrangements for achieving a similar low pressure.

  18. Combined cold compressor/ejector helium refrigerator

    DOEpatents

    Brown, D.P.

    1984-06-05

    A refrigeration apparatus having an ejector operatively connected with a cold compressor to form a two-stage pumping system. This pumping system is used to lower the pressure, and thereby the temperature of a bath of boiling refrigerant (helium). The apparatus as thus arranged and operated has substantially improved operating efficiency when compared to other processes or arrangements for achieving a similar low pressure.

  19. Pump battery assessment: cold, old, or dead!

    PubMed

    Leong, M S; Carpentier, B W

    2001-07-01

    Intraspinal drug delivery systems are becoming increasingly utilized for the management of patients with pain or spasticity. Numerous potential complications associated with the use of this technology have previously been described in the literature. We have had experience with a new complication of the internal alarm being triggered by the instillation of cold solution into the pump resevoir. This new finding could have implications for patients with respect to unnecessary reevaluations of the pump, or possible premature scheduling of pump replacement surgery.

  20. Air Source Cold Climate Heat Pump

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-01

    The buildings were modified so that one zone used the cold climate heat pump and the other zone used its original modern central HVAC system . Both...been updated with insulation, a sheet metal roof, and a modern central HVAC system . Both buildings had two zones for heating and cooling, which...climate heat pump and the other zone used its original modern central HVAC system . Both zones were instrumented so that energy consumption and

  1. The Cold War: An Assessment of Strategy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-04-01

    capitalized on their vulnerabilities even at the expense of the U.S. economy, and directly contributed to the demise of the USSR. INSIGHTS GAINED FOR... capital . This was an ideological war, but the difference between ideologies was political and economic views. In the post-Cold War world order...SDI", Foreign Affairs. Spring, 1988. Larson, Deborah W. Origins of Containment: A Psycological E.x.planation Princton Univ. Press, 1985. Lippmann

  2. Cold War Conflict: American Intervention in Greece

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-05-01

    King.4 0 Undoubtedly, the majority was more of a vote against the Left than it was for the King. Nonetheless, the King returned and further insulated ...much stock in any pledge by the King to prevent such a regime would probably be less responsive to American influence and desire then it more pliable ...London: Hart- Davis, MacGibbon. 1976. Woods , Randall B., and Jones, Howard. Dawning of the Cold War: The United States’ Ouest For Order. Athens

  3. Anomalous cold in the Pangaean tropics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Soreghan, G.S.; Soreghan, M.J.; Poulsen, C.J.; Young, R.A.; Eble, C.F.; Sweet, D.E.; Davogustto, O.C.

    2008-01-01

    The late Paleozoic archives the greatest glaciation of the Phanerozoic. Whereas high-latitude Gondwanan strata preserve widespread evidence for continental ice, the Permo-Carboniferous tropics have long been considered analogous to today's: warm and shielded from the highlatitude cold. Here, we report on glacial and periglacial indicators that record episodes of freezing continental temperatures in western equatorial Pangaea. An exhumed glacial valley and associated deposits record direct evidence for glaciation that extended to low paleoelevations in the ancestral Rocky Mountains. Furthermore, the Permo-Carboniferous archives the only known occurrence of widespread tropical loess in Earth's history; the volume, chemistry, and provenance of this loess(ite) is most consistent with glacial derivation. Together with emerging indicators for cold elsewhere in low-latitude Pangaea, these results suggest that tropical climate was not buffered from the high latitudes and may record glacial-interglacial climate shifts of very large magnitude. Coupled climate-ice sheet model simulations demonstrate that low atmospheric CO2 and solar luminosity alone cannot account for such cold, and that other factors must be considered in attempting to explain this 'best-known' analogue to our present Earth. ?? 2008 The Geological Society of America.

  4. Cold atom quantum emulation of ultrafast processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajagopal, Shankari; Geiger, Zachary; Fujiwara, Kurt; Singh, Kevin; Senaratne, Ruwan; Weld, David

    2016-05-01

    Pulsed lasers are an invaluable probe of fast electron dynamics in condensed matter systems. However, despite tremendous progress, physical limitations on lasers and a lack of exact theoretical models still limit the exploration of ultrafast processes in solids. We discuss a possible complementary approach, in which lattice-trapped cold neutral atoms driven far from equilibrium are used as a quantum emulator of ultrafast physics at sub-cycle timescales. The cold atom context is in many ways a natural choice for such experiments: equilibration timescales are more than ten orders of magnitude slower than those in solids, and strong driving forces are easily produced and manipulated. Our experimental approach uses ultracold strontium in optical traps. Multiple stable isotopes and a long-lived metastable state provide control over interaction strengths, while a narrow-linewidth transition expands the typical cold-atom toolbox of readout techniques. We discuss initial efforts in quantum emulation of tunnel ionization and development of a platform for more complicated endeavors, including the study of multiple-pulse sequences and recollision processes. We acknowledge support from the NSF GRFP, the AFOSR, the ARO and DURIP program, the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, and the University of California Office of the President.

  5. Cold prebiotic evolution, tunneling, chirality and exobiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldanskii, Vitalii I.

    1996-07-01

    The extra-terrestrial scenario of the origin of life suggested by Svante Arrhenius (1) as the `panspermia' hypothesis was revived by the discovery of a low-temperature quantum limit of a chemical reaction rate caused by the molecular tunneling (2). Entropy factors play no role near absolute zero, and slow molecular tunneling can lead to the exothermic formation of quite complex molecules. Interstellar grains or particles of cometary tails could serve as possible cold seeds of life, with acetic acid, urea and products of their polycondensation as quasi-equilibrium intermediates. Very cold solid environment hinders racemization and stabilizes optical activity under conditions typical for outer space. Neither `advantage' factors can secure the evolutionary formation of chiral purity of initial prebiotic monomeric medium-even being temporary achieved it cannot be maintained at subsequent stages of prebiotic evolution because of counteraction of `enantioselective pressure'. Only bifurcational mechanism of the formation of prebiotic homochiral-monomeric and afterwards polymeric-medium and its subsequent transformation in `homochiral chemical automata' (`biological big bang'-passage from `stochastic' to `algorithmic' chemistry) is possible and can be realized. Extra-terrestrial (cold, solid phase) scenarios of the origin of life seem to be more promising from that point of view than terrestrial (warm) scenarios. Within a scheme of five main stages of prebiological evolution some problems important for further investigation are briefly discussed.

  6. Time Resolved Measurements of Speciated Tailpipe Emissions from Motor Vehicles: Trends with Emission Control Technology, Cold Start Effects, and Speciation.

    PubMed

    Drozd, Greg T; Zhao, Yunliang; Saliba, Georges; Frodin, Bruce; Maddox, Christine; Weber, Robert J; Chang, M-C Oliver; Maldonado, Hector; Sardar, Satya; Robinson, Allen L; Goldstein, Allen H

    2016-12-20

    Experiments were conducted at the California Air Resources Board Haagen-Smit Laboratory to understand changes in vehicle emissions in response to stricter emissions standards over the past 25 years. Measurements included a wide range of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) for a wide range of spark ignition gasoline vehicles meeting varying levels of emissions standards, including all certifications from Tier 0 up to Partial Zero Emission Vehicle. Standard gas chromatography (GC) and high performance liquid chromatography (HLPC) analyses were employed for drive-cycle phase emissions. A proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometer measured time-resolved emissions for a wide range of VOCs. Cold-start emissions occur almost entirely in the first 30-60 s for newer vehicles. Cold-start emissions have compositions that are not significantly different across all vehicles tested and are markedly different from neat fuel. Hot-stabilized emissions have varying importance depending on species and may require a driving distance of 200 miles to equal the emissions from a single cold start. Average commute distances in the U.S. suggest the majority of in-use vehicles have emissions dominated by cold starts. The distribution of vehicle ages in the U.S. suggests that within several years only a few percent of vehicles will have significant driving emissions compared to cold-start emissions.

  7. An increase in expression of Pyruvate Pi Dikinase and its high activation energy correspond to cold-tolerant C4 photosynthesis of Miscanthus x giganteus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Miscanthus x giganteus is exceptional among C4 plants in its ability to produce leaves and photosynthesize at low temperature. While the most cold-adapted Zea mays lines show loss of photosynthetic capacity when transferred to 14 oC, M. x giganteus shows no loss and can continue photosynthesis down ...

  8. An increase in expression of Pyruvate Pi Dikinase and its high activation energy correspond to cold-tolerant C4 photosynthesis of Miscanthus x giganteus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Miscanthus x giganteus is exceptional among C4 plants in its ability to produce leaves and photosynthesize at low temperature. While the most cold-adapted Zea mays lines show loss of photosynthetic capacity when transferred to 14 deg C, M. x giganteus shows no loss and can continue photosynthesis do...

  9. Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD) Facility Sampling and Analysis Plan

    SciTech Connect

    IRWIN, J.J.

    2000-09-22

    The Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD) Facility provides the required process systems, supporting equipment, and facilities needed for the conditioning of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) from the Hanford K-Basins prior to storage at the Canister Storage Building (CSB). The process water conditioning (PWC) system collects and treats the selected liquid effluent streams generated by the CVD process. The PWC system uses ion exchange modules (IXMs) and filtration to remove radioactive ions and particulate from CVD effluent streams. Water treated by the PWC is collected in a 5000-gallon storage tank prior to shipment to an on-site facility for additional treatment and disposal. The purpose of this sampling and analysis plan is to document the basis for achieving the following data quality objectives: (1) Measurement of the radionuclide content of the water transferred from the multi-canister overpack (MCO), vacuum purge system (VPS) condensate tank, MCO/Cask annulus and deionized water flushes to the PWC system receiver tanks. (2) Trending the radionuclide inventory of IXMs to assure that they do not exceed the limits prescribed in HNF-2760, Rev. 0-D, ''Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (Onsite) Ion Exchange Modules,'' and HNF-EP-0063 Rev. 5, ''Hanford Site Solid Waste Acceptance Criteria'' for Category 3, non-TRU, low level waste (LLW). (3) Determining the radionuclide content of the PWC system bulk water storage tank to assure that it meets the limits set forth in HNF-3 172, Rev. 0, ''Hanford Site Liquid Waste Acceptance Criteria,'' to permit transfer and disposal at the Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) located at the 200 East Area.

  10. The Molecular and Cellular Basis of Cold Sensation

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Of somatosensory modalities, cold is one of the more ambiguous percepts, evoking the pleasant sensation of cooling, the stinging bite of cold pain, and welcome relief from chronic pain. Moreover, unlike the precipitous thermal thresholds for heat activation of thermosensitive afferent neurons, thresholds for cold fibers are across a range of cool to cold temperatures that spans over 30 °C. Until recently, how cold produces this myriad of biological effects has been poorly studied, yet new advances in our understanding of cold mechanisms may portend a better understanding of sensory perception as well as provide novel therapeutic approaches. Chief among these was the identification of a number of ion channels that either serve as the initial detectors of cold as a stimulus in the peripheral nervous system, or are part of rather sophisticated differential expression patterns of channels that conduct electrical signals, thereby endowing select neurons with properties that are amenable to electrical signaling in the cold. This review highlights the current understanding of the channels involved in cold transduction as well as presents a hypothetical model to account for the broad range of cold thermal thresholds and distinct functions of cold fibers in perception, pain, and analgesia. PMID:23421674

  11. Cold and ambient deck storage prior to processing as a critical control point for patulin accumulation.

    PubMed

    Morales, Héctor; Marín, Sonia; Centelles, Xavier; Ramos, Antonio J; Sanchis, Vicente

    2007-05-10

    Patulin, a mycotoxin produced primarily by Penicillium expansum, is currently of great concern because of its undesirable effects in human health. It has been proven that patulin can damage organs and tissues in animals and some studies revealed carcinogenic and teratogenic effects. Patulin is found mainly in low quality apples diverted to production of apple by-products. Apples from cold storage or recently harvested (usually ground harvested or low quality apples) are stored under ambient conditions (deck storage) until they are processed. The present assay studies the consequences of this type of storage in development of lesions and patulin accumulation. The assayed factors were the size of lesions when apples were taken out from cold storage, time the apples stayed at room temperature after cold storage (as a simulation of deck storage) and intraspecific differences between 2 isolates of P. expansum. A sublot of P. expansum inoculated apples was cold stored until lesions achieved concrete sizes. Then, apples were either transferred to a 20 degrees C storage room for 0 to 5 days or were analysed for patulin immediately. The rest of the apples were directly stored at 20 degrees C. Each treatment had three replicates. Increase of lesion size with time at 20 degrees C depended on initial lesion size after cold storage. Bigger lesions were always achieved in apples with bigger initial lesion size. Initial lesion size and time at 20 degrees C significantly influenced patulin accumulation. No significant amounts of patulin were found in apples with lesions up to 2 cm after cold storage. Patulin amounts significantly increased on the 2nd day at 20 degrees C day and remained constant until the 5th day. Patulin accumulation tended to be higher when initial lesions were bigger. The assay showed the influence of apple quality (measured as overall lesion size) after cold storage on patulin accumulation during deck storage, as well as the importance of duration of deck

  12. Analysis of cold worked holes for structural life extension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wieland, David H.; Cutshall, Jon T.; Burnside, O. Hal; Cardinal, Joseph W.

    1994-01-01

    Cold working holes for improved fatigue life of fastener holes are widely used on aircraft. This paper presents methods used by the authors to determine the percent of cold working to be applied and to analyze fatigue crack growth of cold worked fastener holes. An elastic, perfectly-plastic analysis of a thick-walled tube is used to determine the stress field during the cold working process and the residual stress field after the process is completed. The results of the elastic/plastic analysis are used to determine the amount of cold working to apply to a hole. The residual stress field is then used to perform damage tolerance analysis of a crack growing out of a cold worked fastener hole. This analysis method is easily implemented in existing crack growth computer codes so that the cold worked holes can be used to extend the structural life of aircraft. Analytical results are compared to test data where appropriate.

  13. Thyroid function and cold acclimation in the hamster, Mesocricetus auratus

    SciTech Connect

    Tomasi, T.E.; Horwitz, B.A.

    1987-02-01

    Basal metabolic rate (BMR), thyroxine utilization rate (T4U), and triiodothyronine utilization rate (T3U) were measured in cold-acclimated (CA) and room temperature-acclimated (RA) male golden hamsters, Mesocricetus auratus. Hormone utilization rates were calculated via the plasma disappearance technique using SVI-labeled hormones and measuring serum hormone levels via radioimmunoassay. BMR showed a significant 28% increase with cold acclimation. The same cold exposure also produced a 32% increase in T4U, and a 204% increase in T3U. The much greater increase in T3U implies that previous assessments of the relationship between cold acclimation and thyroid function may have been underestimated and that cold exposure induces both quantitative and qualitative changes in thyroid function. It is concluded that in the cold-acclimated state, T3U more accurately reflects thyroid function than does T4U. A mechanism for the cold-induced change in BMR is proposed.

  14. Acute cooling of the body surface and the common cold.

    PubMed

    Eccles, R

    2002-09-01

    There is a widely held belief that acute viral respiratory infections are the result of a "chill" and that the onset of a respiratory infection such as the common cold is often associated with acute cooling of the body surface, especially as the result of wet clothes and hair. However, experiments involving inoculation of common cold viruses into the nose, and periods of cold exposure, have failed to demonstrate any effect of cold exposure on susceptibility to infection with common cold viruses. Present scientific opinion dismisses any cause-and-effect relationship between acute cooling of the body surface and common cold. This review proposes a hypothesis; that acute cooling of the body surface causes reflex vasoconstriction in the nose and upper airways, and that this vasoconstrictor response may inhibit respiratory defence and cause the onset of common cold symptoms by converting an asymptomatic subclinical viral infection into a symptomatic clinical infection.

  15. SPACE code simulation of cold leg small break LOCA in the ATLAS integral test

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, B. J.; Kim, H. T.; Kim, J.; Kim, K. D.

    2012-07-01

    SPACE code is a system analysis code for pressurized water reactors. This code uses a two-fluid and three-field model. For a few years, intensive validations have been performed to secure the prediction accuracy of models and correlations for two-phase flow and heat transfer. Recently, the code version 1.0 was released. This study is to see how well SPACE code predicts thermal hydraulic phenomena of an integral effect test. The target experiment is a cold leg small break LOCA in the ATLAS facility, which has the same two-loop features as APR1400. Predicted parameters were compared with experimental observations. (authors)

  16. Collective strong coupling of cold potassium atoms in a ring cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Culver, R.; Lampis, A.; Megyeri, B.; Pahwa, K.; Mudarikwa, L.; Holynski, M.; Courteille, Ph W.; Goldwin, J.

    2016-11-01

    We present experiments on ensemble cavity quantum electrodynamics with cold potassium atoms in a high-finesse ring cavity. Potassium-39 atoms are cooled in a two-dimensional magneto-optical trap and transferred to a three-dimensional trap which intersects the cavity mode. The apparatus is described in detail and the first observations of strong coupling with potassium atoms are presented. Collective strong coupling of atoms and light is demonstrated via the splitting of the cavity transmission spectrum and the avoided crossing of the normal modes.

  17. D-0 North End Cap Calorimeter Cold Test Results

    SciTech Connect

    Michael, J.; /Fermilab

    1990-08-02

    The North endcap calorimeter vessel was recieved on July 1, 1990. A cooldown of the pressure vessel with liquid nitrogen was performed on July 10-11 to check the vessel's integrity. With the pressure vessel cold, the insulating vacuum was monitored for leaks. Through out the testing, the insulating vacuum remained good and the vessel passed the test. The cold test was carried out per the procedures of D-Zero engineering note 3740.220-EN-250. The test was very similar to the cold test performed on the Central Calorimeter in October of 1987. Reference D-Zero engineering notes 3740.210-EN-122, 3740.000-EN107, and 3740.210-EN-110 for information about the CC cold test. The insulating vacuum space was pumped on while equipment was being connected to the pressure vessel. Two hours after starting to pump with the blower the vacuum space pressure was at about 210 microns. Pumping on the vacuum space for the next 15 hours showed no progress and a leak detector was connected to the pumping line. A leak check showed a leak in a thermocouple feedthru on the vacuum space relief plate. After fixing the leak, the pressure dropped to 16 microns in less than one hour. A rate of rise test was performed starting at a pressure of 13 microns. The pressure rose to 39 microns within 8 minutes and then only rose to 43 microns in 2.5 hours (1.6 microns/hour). After all connections were made to the pressure vessel, a vacuum pump with an estimated effective pumping speed of about 70 scfm was valved on. The lowest pressure achieved after 2 days of pumping was 80 microns. Valving out the pump for 30 minutes resulted in a 5 micron per minute rate of rise. The rate of rise was considered acceptable since there were known leak paths through the bolts of the signal ports. The EC North vessel was rolled outside of Lab A in preparation for a 5000 gallon liquid nitrogen trailer which arrived July, 10 at 8:00am. Before filling the vessel, the vacuum space pump was valved off. The pressure in the

  18. Cold shock and cold acclimation proteins in the psychrotrophic bacterium Arthrobacter globiformis SI55.

    PubMed Central

    Berger, F; Morellet, N; Menu, F; Potier, P

    1996-01-01

    The psychrotrophic bacterium Arthrobacter globiformis SI55 was grown at 4 and 25 degrees C, and the cell protein contents were analyzed by two-dimensional electrophoresis. Cells subjected to cold shocks of increasing magnitude were also analyzed. Correspondence analysis of protein appearance distinguished four groups of physiological significance. Group I contained cold shock proteins (Csps) overexpressed only after a large temperature downshift. Group II contained Csps with optimal expression after mild shocks. Group III contained proteins overexpressed after all cold shocks. These last proteins were also overexpressed in cells growing at 4 degrees C and were considered to be early cold acclimation proteins (Caps). Group IV contained proteins which were present at high concentrations only in 4 degrees C steady-state cells and appeared to be late Caps. A portion of a gene very similar to the Escherichia coli cspA gene (encoding protein CS7.4) was identified. A synthetic peptide was used to produce an antibody which detected a CS7.4-like protein (A9) by immunoblotting two-dimensional electrophoresis gels of A. globiformis SI55 total proteins. Unlike mesophilic microorganisms, this CS7.4-like protein was still produced during prolonged growth at low temperature, and it might have a particular adaptive function needed for balanced growth under harsh conditions. However, A9 was induced at high temperature by chloramphenicol, suggesting that CS7.4-like proteins have a more general role than their sole implication in cold acclimation processes. PMID:8655472

  19. Predicting survival time for cold exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tikuisis, Peter

    1995-06-01

    The prediction of survival time (ST) for cold exposure is speculative as reliable controlled data of deep hypothermia are unavailable. At best, guidance can be obtained from case histories of accidental exposure. This study describes the development of a mathematical model for the prediction of ST under sedentary conditions in the cold. The model is based on steady-state heat conduction in a single cylinder comprised of a core and two concentric annular shells representing the fat plus skin and the clothing plus still boundary layer, respectively. The ambient condition can be either air or water; the distinction is made by assigning different values of insulation to the still boundary layer. Metabolic heat production ( M) is comprised of resting and shivering components with the latter predicted by temperature signals from the core and skin. Where the cold exposure is too severe for M to balance heat loss, ST is largely determined by the rate of heat loss from the body. Where a balance occurs, ST is governed by the endurance time for shivering. End of survival is marked by the deep core temperature reaching a value of 30° C. The model was calibrated against survival data of cold water (0 to 20° C) immersion and then applied to cold air exposure. A sampling of ST predictions for the nude exposure of an average healthy male in relatively calm air (1 km/h wind speed) are the following: 1.8, 2.5, 4.1, 9.0, and >24 h for -30, -20, -10, 0, and 10° C, respectively. With two layers of loose clothing (average thickness of 1 mm each) in a 5 km/h wind, STs are 4.0, 5.6, 8.6, 15.4, and >24 h for -50, -40, -30, -20, and -10° C. The predicted STs must be weighted against the extrapolative nature of the model. At present, it would be prudent to use the predictions in a relative sense, that is, to compare or rank-order predicted STs for various combinations of ambient conditions and clothing protection.

  20. The cold air drainage model KLAM_21

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kossmann, M.

    2010-09-01

    A brief description of the physics and numerical techniques of the cold air drainage model KLAM_21 is presented. The model has been developed by the Deutscher Wetterdienst (Sievers, 2005) for simulations of nocturnal airflow in hilly and mountainous terrain under dry fair weather conditions. The model has been widely used as an environmental consultancy tool. Typical model applications include frost protection (cold air ponding) and air quality (nocturnal ventilation). The single-layer model calculates the depth and the mean wind of a surface based stable layer that evolves from a neutrally stratified atmosphere during nighttime. The prediction of the velocity and direction of the cold air drainage is based on vertically averaged momentum tendency equations. Temporal changes in the total heat deficit in the cold air layer are calculated from a prescribed local heat loss rate (describing turbulent and radiative cooling) and advection (donor-cell algorithm). The depth of the cold air layer (depth of the surface based temperature inversion) is calculated diagnostically from the total heat loss deficit. The model is initialised with neutral stratification at sunset (onset time of nocturnal cooling). Optionally, effects of an ambient (regional) wind and/or the dispersion of a passive tracer can be simulated. Integration over time is carried out on a regular Arakawa C grid using dynamically calculated time steps. Spatial gradients are discretised using centred differential quotients. The standard size of the computational domains can reach up to 1500 x 1500 grid cells. Grid resolutions usually range between 10 m and 500 m. High resolution simulation can be limited to a nested inner grid domain, while the courser outer domain is covering the entire airshed of interest. A friendly user interface allows easy setup, control, and evaluation of model simulations. Some selected examples of KLAM_21 applications are shown to illustrate the features and capabilities of the model

  1. Improving the cold chain for vaccines.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, J S

    1977-01-01

    The cold chain may be defined as a system for transporting and storing vaccines at very low temperataures, particularly in tropical countries. In Ghana, efforts are being made, with the assistance of the World Health Organization (WHO) to develop and test a new cold chain technology. Emphasis is on local production in order to meet the needs of the countrywide immunization program, and, if possible, of similar programs in other West African nations. Focus in this discussion is on the losses resulting from mishandling of vaccines during storage and in transit through various stages in the cold chain as well as the problems, requirements, and proposed solutions. In most countries with immunization programs, breakdowns in refrigeration during the transport and storage of vaccines in remote rural areas or at the regional and national central stores have led to great losses of vaccine. The losses are often caused by inappropriate management and technology. The most promising recent development in the area of storage is an enzyme-based time/temperature indicator contained in a paper tab which is attached to the vaccine packet. In order to reduce to a minimum the handling of vaccines at the national central store it is proposed that the ministry of health submit details of regional requirements in their requisition to the manufacturer. Then the manufacturer can make presealed packages which are dispatched by air to the national central store and from there to the regions, while they are still sealed. Insulated boxes for this purpose have been tested in Sweden and been shown to maintain deep-freezing temperatures for 5 days. Road communications to the regional centers are good in Ghana and the 5-day cold boxes give adequate safety margins. The plan for the immunization program in Ghana is to employ a combination of teams from both fixed and mobile centers. 3 contacts, 3 months apart, will be made by the fixed teams; mobile teams will make 2 contacts, 2 months apart. Mobile

  2. Cold-atom gravimetry with a Bose-Einstein condensate

    SciTech Connect

    Debs, J. E.; Altin, P. A.; Barter, T. H.; Doering, D.; Dennis, G. R.; McDonald, G.; Close, J. D.; Robins, N. P.; Anderson, R. P.

    2011-09-15

    We present a cold-atom gravimeter operating with a sample of Bose-condensed {sup 87}Rb atoms. Using a Mach-Zehnder configuration with the two arms separated by a two-photon Bragg transition, we observe interference fringes with a visibility of (83{+-}6)% at T=3 ms. We exploit large momentum transfer (LMT) beam splitting to increase the enclosed space-time area of the interferometer using higher-order Bragg transitions and Bloch oscillations. We also compare fringes from condensed and thermal sources and observe a reduced visibility of (58{+-}4)% for the thermal source. We suspect the loss in visibility is caused partly by wave-front aberrations, to which the thermal source is more susceptible due to its larger transverse momentum spread. Finally, we discuss briefly the potential advantages of using a coherent atomic source for LMT, and we present a simple mean-field model to demonstrate that with currently available experimental parameters, interaction-induced dephasing will not limit the sensitivity of inertial measurements using freely falling, coherent atomic sources.

  3. Cold-atom gravimetry with a Bose-Einstein condensate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debs, J. E.; Altin, P. A.; Barter, T. H.; Döring, D.; Dennis, G. R.; McDonald, G.; Anderson, R. P.; Close, J. D.; Robins, N. P.

    2011-09-01

    We present a cold-atom gravimeter operating with a sample of Bose-condensed 87Rb atoms. Using a Mach-Zehnder configuration with the two arms separated by a two-photon Bragg transition, we observe interference fringes with a visibility of (83±6)% at T=3 ms. We exploit large momentum transfer (LMT) beam splitting to increase the enclosed space-time area of the interferometer using higher-order Bragg transitions and Bloch oscillations. We also compare fringes from condensed and thermal sources and observe a reduced visibility of (58±4)% for the thermal source. We suspect the loss in visibility is caused partly by wave-front aberrations, to which the thermal source is more susceptible due to its larger transverse momentum spread. Finally, we discuss briefly the potential advantages of using a coherent atomic source for LMT, and we present a simple mean-field model to demonstrate that with currently available experimental parameters, interaction-induced dephasing will not limit the sensitivity of inertial measurements using freely falling, coherent atomic sources.

  4. Experimental Study on Heat Transfer in a Rolling Ash Cooler used in the CFB Boiler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, W.; Li, J. J.; Yang, S.; Si, X. D.; Yang, H. R.; Lu, J. F.; Yue, G. X.

    From the view of the reliability and the techno-economy, the rolling ash cooler is feasible for the large-scale CFB boilers. However, existing studies on heat transfer in rolling ash cooler mainly focused on heat balance calculation and cold, hot test on the ash cooler outputs. In the heat balance calculation, the value of the overall heat transfer coefficient (a) is usually estimated by the experience, lacking of the support of experimental data.

  5. Proton transfer in histidine-tryptophan heterodimers embedded in helium droplets

    SciTech Connect

    Bellina, Bruno; Merthe, Daniel J.; Kresin, Vitaly V.

    2015-03-21

    We used cold helium droplets as nano-scale reactors to form and ionize, by electron bombardment and charge transfer, aromatic amino acid heterodimers of histidine with tryptophan, methyl-tryptophan, and indole. The molecular interaction occurring through an N–H ⋅ ⋅ ⋅ N hydrogen bond leads to a proton transfer from the indole group of tryptophan to the imidazole group of histidine in a radical cationic environment.

  6. Robotic technology evolution and transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marzwell, Neville I.

    1992-01-01

    A report concerning technology transfer in the area of robotics is presented in vugraph form. The following topics are discussed: definition of technology innovation and tech-transfer; concepts relevant for understanding tech-transfer; models advanced to portray tech-transfer process; factors identified as promoting tech-transfer; factors identified as impeding tech-transfer; what important roles do individuals fulfill in tech-transfer; federal infrastructure for promoting tech-transfer; federal infrastructure for promoting tech-transfer; robotic technology evolution; robotic technology transferred; and recommendations for successful robotics tech-transfer.

  7. Cold Accretion from the Cosmic Web

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-06-01

    The cosmic web is a vast, foam-like network of filaments and voids stretching throughout the universe. How did the first galaxies form within the cosmic web, at the intersections of filaments? New observations of a protodisk a galaxy in the early stages of formation may provide a clue.Models for Galaxy FormationNarrowband image of the candidate protodisk (marked with a white ellipse) and filaments (outlined in white). [Adapted from Martin et al. 2016]The standard model for galaxy formation, known as the hot accretion model, argues that galaxies form out of collapsing, virialized gas that forms a hot halo and then slowly cools, fueling star and galaxy formation at its center.But what if galaxies are actually formed from cool gas? In this contrasting picture, the cold accretion model, cool (temperature of ~104 K) unshocked gas from cosmic web filaments flows directly onto galactic disks forming at the filamentary intersections. The narrow streams of cold gas deliver fuel for star formation.A signature of the cold accretion model is that the streams of cold gas form a disk as the gas spirals inward, sinking toward the central protogalaxy. Detecting these cold-flow disks could be strong evidence in support of this model and last year, a team of authors reported just such a detection! This year theyre back again with a second object that may provide confirmation of cold accretion from the cosmic web.A Candidate ProtodiskThe team, led by Christopher Martin (California Institute of Technology), made the discovery using the Palomar Cosmic Web Imager, an instrument designed to observe faint emission from the intergalactic medium. Martin and collaborators found a large (R 100 kpc, more than six times the radius of the Milky Way), rotating structure of hydrogen gas, illuminated by the nearby quasi-stellar object QSO HS1549+1919. The system is located at a redshift of z~2.8.The authors testthree potential kinematic models of the candidate protodisk and filaments. In (a) two

  8. Fuel transfer system

    DOEpatents

    Townsend, H.E.; Barbanti, G.

    1994-03-01

    A nuclear fuel bundle fuel transfer system includes a transfer pool containing water at a level above a reactor core. A fuel transfer machine therein includes a carriage disposed in the transfer pool and under the water for transporting fuel bundles. The carriage is selectively movable through the water in the transfer pool and individual fuel bundles are carried vertically in the carriage. In a preferred embodiment, a first movable bridge is disposed over an upper pool containing the reactor core, and a second movable bridge is disposed over a fuel storage pool, with the transfer pool being disposed therebetween. A fuel bundle may be moved by the first bridge from the reactor core and loaded into the carriage which transports the fuel bundle to the second bridge which picks up the fuel bundle and carries it to the fuel storage pool. 6 figures.

  9. Fuel transfer system

    DOEpatents

    Townsend, Harold E.; Barbanti, Giancarlo

    1994-01-01

    A nuclear fuel bundle fuel transfer system includes a transfer pool containing water at a level above a reactor core. A fuel transfer machine therein includes a carriage disposed in the transfer pool and under the water for transporting fuel bundles. The carriage is selectively movable through the water in the transfer pool and individual fuel bundles are carried vertically in the carriage. In a preferred embodiment, a first movable bridge is disposed over an upper pool containing the reactor core, and a second movable bridge is disposed over a fuel storage pool, with the transfer pool being disposed therebetween. A fuel bundle may be moved by the first bridge from the reactor core and loaded into the carriage which transports the fuel bundle to the second bridge which picks up the fuel bundle and carries it to the fuel storage pool.

  10. Monitoring of Sedimentary Fluxes in Cold Environments: The SEDIBUD (Sediment Budgets in Cold Environments) Programme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beylich, Achim A.

    2014-05-01

    Projected climate change in cold regions is expected to alter melt season duration and intensity, along with the number of extreme rainfall events, total annual precipitation and the balance between snowfall and rainfall. Similarly, changes to the thermal balance are expected to reduce the extent of permafrost and seasonal ground frost and increase active layer depths. These effects will undoubtedly change surface environments in cold regions and alter the fluxes of sediments, nutrients and solutes, but the absence of quantitative data and coordinated geomorphic process monitoring and analysis to understand the sensitivity of the Earth surface environment is acute in cold climate environments. The International Association of Geomorphologists` (I.A.G. / A.I.G.) SEDIBUD (Sediment Budgets in Cold Environments) Program (2005 - 2017) is addressing this existing key knowledge gap. The central research question of this global group of scientists is to: Assess and model the contemporary sedimentary fluxes in cold climates, with emphasis on both particulate and dissolved components. Research carried out at each of the ca. 50 defined SEDIBUD key test sites varies by program, logistics and available resources, but typically represent interdisciplinary collaborations of geomorphologists, hydrologists, ecologists, permafrost scientists and glaciologists. SEDIBUD has developed manuals and protocols (SEDIFLUX Manual) with a key set of primary surface process monitoring and research data requirements to incorporate results from these diverse projects and allow coordinated quantitative analysis across the program. Defined SEDIBUD key tasks for the coming years include (i) The continued generation and compilation of comparable longer-term datasets on contemporary sedimentary fluxes and sediment yields from SEDIBUD key test sites worldwide, (ii) The continued extension of the SEDIBUD metadata database with these datasets, (iii) The testing of defined SEDIBUD hypotheses (available

  11. Settled Cryogenic Propellant Transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kutter, Bernard F.; Zegler, Frank; Sakla, Steve; Wall, John; Hopkins, Josh; Saks, Greg; Duffey, Jack; Chato, David J.

    2006-01-01

    Cryogenic propellant transfer can significantly benefit NASA s space exploration initiative. LMSSC parametric studies indicate that "Topping off" the Earth Departure Stage (EDS) in LEO with approx.20 mT of additional propellant using cryogenic propellant transfer increases the lunar delivered payload by 5 mT. Filling the EDS to capacity in LEO with 78 mT of propellants increases the delivered payload by 20 mT. Cryogenic propellant transfer is directly extensible to Mars exploration in that it provides propellant for the Mars Earth Departure stage and in-situ propellant utilization at Mars. To enable the significant performance increase provided by cryogenic propellant transfer, the reliability and robustness of the transfer process must be guaranteed. By utilizing low vehicle acceleration during the cryogenic transfer the operation is significantly simplified and enables the maximum use of existing, reliable, mature upper stage cryogenic-fluid-management (CFM) techniques. Due to settling, large-scale propellant transfer becomes an engineering effort, and not the technology development endeavor required with zero-gravity propellant transfer. The following key CFM technologies are all currently implemented by settling on both the Centaur and Delta IV upper stages: propellant acquisition, hardware chilldown, pressure control, and mass gauging. The key remaining technology, autonomous rendezvous and docking, is already in use by the Russians, and must be perfected for NASA whether the use of propellant transfer is utilized or not.

  12. Bacterial transfer RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Shepherd, Jennifer; Ibba, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Transfer RNA is an essential adapter molecule that is found across all three domains of life. The primary role of transfer RNA resides in its critical involvement in the accurate translation of messenger RNA codons during protein synthesis and, therefore, ultimately in the determination of cellular gene expression. This review aims to bring together the results of intensive investigations into the synthesis, maturation, modification, aminoacylation, editing and recycling of bacterial transfer RNAs. Codon recognition at the ribosome as well as the ever-increasing number of alternative roles for transfer RNA outside of translation will be discussed in the specific context of bacterial cells. PMID:25796611

  13. The impacts of repeated cold exposure on insects.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Katie E; Sinclair, Brent J

    2012-05-15

    Insects experience repeated cold exposure (RCE) on multiple time scales in natural environments, yet the majority of studies of the effects of cold on insects involve only a single exposure. Three broad groups of experimental designs have been employed to examine the effects of RCE on insect physiology and fitness, defined by the control treatments: 'RCE vs cold', which compares RCE with constant cold conditions; 'RCE vs warm', which compares RCE with constant warm conditions; and 'RCE vs matched cold' which compares RCE with a prolonged period of cold matched by time to the RCE condition. RCE are generally beneficial to immediate survival, and increase cold hardiness relative to insects receiving a single prolonged cold exposure. However, the effects of RCE depend on the study design, and RCE vs warm studies cannot differentiate between the effects of cold exposure in general vs RCE in particular. Recent studies of gene transcription, immune function, feeding and reproductive output show that the responses of insects to RCE are distinct from the responses to single cold exposures. We suggest that future research should attempt to elucidate the mechanistic link between physiological responses and fitness parameters. We also recommend that future RCE experiments match the time spent at the stressful low temperature in all experimental groups, include age controls where appropriate, incorporate a pilot study to determine time and intensity of exposure, and measure sub-lethal impacts on fitness.

  14. Inhibition of phosphodiesterase-1 attenuates cold-induced pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Crosswhite, Patrick; Sun, Zhongjie

    2013-03-01

    Chronic exposure to cold caused pulmonary arterial hypertension (cold-induced pulmonary hypertension [CIPH]) and increased phosphodiesterase-1C (PDE-1C) expression in pulmonary arteries (PAs) in rats. The purpose of this study is to investigate a hypothesis that inhibition of PDE-1 would decrease inflammatory infiltrates and superoxide production leading to attenuation of CIPH. Three groups of male rats were exposed to moderate cold (5±1°C) continuously, whereas 3 groups were maintained at room temperature (23.5±1°C, warm; 6 rats/group). After 8-week exposure to cold, 3 groups in each temperature condition received continuous intravenous infusion of 8-isobutyl-methylxanthine (8-IBMX) (PDE-1 inhibitor), apocynin (NADPH oxidase inhibitor) or vehicle, respectively, for 1 week. Cold exposure significantly increased right-ventricular systolic pressure compared with warm groups (33.8±3.2 versus 18.6±0.3 mm Hg), indicating that animals developed CIPH. Notably, treatment with 8-IBMX significantly attenuated the cold-induced increase in right ventricular pressure (23.5±1.8 mm Hg). Cold exposure also caused right-ventricular hypertrophy, whereas 8-IBMX reversed cold-induced right ventricular hypertrophy. Cold exposure increased PDE-1C protein expression, macrophage infiltration, NADPH oxidase activity, and superoxide production in PAs and resulted in PA remodeling. 8-IBMX abolished cold-induced upregulation of PDE-1C in PAs. Interestingly, inhibition of PDE-1 eliminated cold-induced macrophage infiltration, NADPH oxidase activation, and superoxide production in PAs and reversed PA remodeling. Inhibition of NADPH oxidase by apocynin abolished cold-induced superoxide production and attenuated CIPH and PA remodeling. In conclusion, inhibition of PDE-1 attenuated CIPH and reversed cold-induced PA remodeling by suppressing macrophage infiltration and superoxide production, suggesting that upregulation of PDE-1C expression may be involved in the pathogenesis of CIPH.

  15. Fluid flow and heat transfer in polygonal micro heat pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Sai; Wong, Harris

    2015-11-01

    Micro heat pipes have been used to cool microelectronic devices, but their heat transfer coefficients are low compared with those of conventional heat pipes. We model heat and mass transfer in triangular, square, hexagonal, and rectangular micro heat pipes under small imposed temperature differences. A micro heat pipe is a closed microchannel filled with a wetting liquid and a long vapor bubble. When a temperature difference is applied across a micro heat pipe, the equilibrium vapor pressure at the hot end is higher than that at the cold end, and the difference drives a vapor flow. As the vapor moves, the vapor pressure at the hot end drops below the saturation pressure. This pressure drop induces continuous evaporation from the interface. Two dimensionless numbers emerge from the momentum and energy equations: the heat-pipe number H, and the evaporation exponent S. When H >> 1 and S >> 1, vapor-flow heat transfer dominates and a thermal boundary layer appears at the hot end, the thickness of which scales as L/S, where L is the half-length of the pipe. A similar boundary layer exists at the cold end. Outside the boundary layers, the temperature is uniform. We also find a dimensionless optimal pipe length Sm =Sm(H) for maximum evaporative heat transfer. Thus, our model suggests that micro heat pipes should be designed with H >> 1 and S =Sm. We calculate H and S for four published micro-heat-pipe experiments, and find encouraging support for our design criterion.

  16. Heat transfer in pressurized circulating fluidized beds

    SciTech Connect

    Wirth, K.E.

    1997-12-31

    The wall-to-suspension heat transfer in circulating fluidized beds (CFBs) operated at almost atmospheric pressure depends on the fluid mechanics immediately near the wall and on the thermal properties of the gas used. No influence of the superficial gas velocity adjusted is present. Consequently, the wall-to-suspension heat transfer coefficient in the form of the Nusselt number can be described by the Archimedes number of the gas-solid-system and the pressure drop number. The last number relates the cross-sectional average solids concentration to the solids concentration at minimum fluidization condition. However, with pressurized CFBs an influence of the superficial gas velocity on the wall-to-suspension heat transfer can be observed. Normalizing the superficial gas velocity in the form of the particle Froude number, two cases for the heat transfer in pressurized CFBs can be detected: with small particle Froude numbers (smaller than four) the same flow behavior and consequently the same heat transfer correlation is valid as it is for CFBs operated at almost atmospheric conditions; and with high particle Froude numbers (for example higher than four) the flow behavior immediately near the heat exchanger surface (CFB wall) can change. Instead of curtains of solids falling down with almost atmospheric pressure swirls of gas and solids can occur in the vicinity of the CFB wall when the static pressure is increased. With the change of the flow pattern near the CFB wall, i.e., the heat exchanger surface, a change of the heat transfer coefficient takes place. For the same Archimedes number, i.e., the same gas-solid system, and the same pressure drop number, i.e., the same cross-sectional average solids concentration, the Nusselt number, i.e., the heat transfer coefficient, increases when the flow pattern near the CFB wall changes from the curtain-type flow to that of the swirl-type flow. From experimentally obtained data in a cold running CFB a very simple correlation was

  17. Study on Solidification of CO2 by using Cold Energy of Liquefied Natural Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeuchi, Yoshiyuki; Fujiwara, Atsushi

    In conventional natural gas combustion power plants, vaporization heat of liquefied natural gas (LNG) has been supplied by sea water and/or air. In the plants, cold vaporization energy has been lost without any effective utilization. An advanced technology has been developed in which carbon dioxide in the flue gas is solidified and separated as dry-ice. Carbon dioxide in the flue gas of a LNG combined cycle is cooled and solidified by the evaporation of LNG. Fundamental studies on fluidized bed heat exchanger were carried out to analyze heat transfer phenomena at low temperature. And the fluidized bed type heat exchanger was confirmed that they had high efficiency by striping off frost solidified on the surface of heat exchanger tube. The heat transfer coefficient at -135°C was calculated about 330-370 (W/m2•K) at the condition where C02 gas was solidified.

  18. Peripheral body temperature and thermogenic drinking in cold-treated rats.

    PubMed

    Nelson, E L; Fregly, M J; Tyler, P E

    1975-12-01

    Transfer of rats abruptly from air at 5 degrees C to air at 26 degrees C was accompanied by a significant increase in water intake (thermogenic drinking) during the first hour after transfer. A possibility existed that the increased water intake observed under these conditions was attributable to the rapid change in skin temperature. Thus, the objective of this study was to determine the effect on thermogenic drinking of a slow, as opposed to an abrupt, change in ambient temperature. The results indicated that warming room air rates of either 0.5 or 1.0 centigrade deg/min had no effect on thermogenic drinking when compared with the water intake of rats removed abruptly from cold. Thermogenic drinking does not appear to be initiated by a specific pattern of changes in peripheral temperature relative to colonic temperature.

  19. Cold Model Investigations of Melting of Ice in a Gas-Stirred Vessel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, Ajay Kumar; Dmitry, Ryabov; Volkova, Olena; Scheller, Piotr R.; Deo, Brahma

    2011-02-01

    The melting of steel scrap in high temperature liquid iron melt is investigated by conducting cold model experiments of the melting of ice sample of different geometries and sizes in an argon-stirred vessel containing water. The melting process of ice samples is observed using a high-speed camera. Design of experiments is based on similarity criteria. The relationships between non-dimensional groups related to heat transfer (Nu, Re, Pr, and Gr) are derived for different experimental conditions. The results are compared with those reported in the literature. The heat transfer coefficient is estimated as a function of mixing power and is found to be in good agreement with the calculated values obtained by using reported relationships in literature.

  20. Galactic cold cores. III. General cloud properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juvela, M.; Ristorcelli, I.; Pagani, L.; Doi, Y.; Pelkonen, V.-M.; Marshall, D. J.; Bernard, J.-P.; Falgarone, E.; Malinen, J.; Marton, G.; McGehee, P.; Montier, L. A.; Motte, F.; Paladini, R.; Tóth, L. V.; Ysard, N.; Zahorecz, S.; Zavagno, A.

    2012-05-01

    Context. In the project galactic cold cores we are carrying out Herschel photometric observations of cold regions of the interstellar clouds as previously identified with the Planck satellite. The aim of the project is to derive the physical properties of the population of cold clumps and to study its connection to ongoing and future star formation. Aims: We examine the cloud structure around the Planck detections in 71 fields observed with the Herschel SPIRE instrument by the summer of 2011. We wish to determine the general physical characteristics of the fields and to examine the morphology of the clouds where the cold high column density clumps are found. Methods: Using the Herschel SPIRE data, we derive colour temperature and column density maps of the fields. Together with ancillary data, we examine the infrared spectral energy distributions of the main clumps. The clouds are categorised according to their large scale morphology. With the help of recently released WISE satellite data, we look for signs of enhanced mid-infrared scattering ("coreshine"), an indication of growth of the dust grains, and have a first look at the star formation activity associated with the cold clumps. Results: The mapped clouds have distances ranging from ~100 pc to several kiloparsecs and cover a range of sizes and masses from cores of less than 10 M⊙ to clouds with masses in excess of 10 000 M⊙. Most fields contain some filamentary structures and in about half of the cases a filament or a few filaments dominate the morphology. In one case out of ten, the clouds show a cometary shape or have sharp boundaries indicative of compression by an external force. The width of the filaments is typically ~0.2-0.3 pc. However, there is significant variation from 0.1 pc to 1 pc and the estimates are sensitive to the methods used and the very definition of a filament. Enhanced mid-infrared scattering, coreshine, was detected in four clouds with six additional tentative detections. The