Science.gov

Sample records for cold trapped ions

  1. Nanofriction in cold ion traps.

    PubMed

    Benassi, A; Vanossi, A; Tosatti, E

    2011-01-01

    Sliding friction between crystal lattices and the physics of cold ion traps are so far non-overlapping fields. Two sliding lattices may either stick and show static friction or slip with dynamic friction; cold ions are known to form static chains, helices or clusters, depending on the trapping conditions. Here we show, based on simulations, that much could be learnt about friction by sliding, through, for example, an electric field, the trapped ion chains over a corrugated potential. Unlike infinite chains, in which the theoretically predicted Aubry transition to free sliding may take place, trapped chains are always pinned. Yet, a properly defined static friction still vanishes Aubry-like at a symmetric-asymmetric structural transition, found for decreasing corrugation in both straight and zig-zag trapped chains. Dynamic friction is also accessible in ringdown oscillations of the ion trap. Long theorized static and dynamic one-dimensional friction phenomena could thus become accessible in future cold ion tribology.

  2. Observation of Cold Collisions between Trapped Ions and Trapped Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grier, Andrew T.; Cetina, Marko; Oručević, Fedja; Vuletić, Vladan

    2009-06-01

    We study cold collisions between trapped ions and trapped atoms in the semiclassical (Langevin) regime. Using Yb+ ions confined in a Paul trap and Yb atoms in a magneto-optical trap, we investigate charge-exchange collisions of several isotopes over three decades of collision energies down to 3μeV (kB×35mK). The minimum measured rate coefficient of 6×10-10cm3s-1 is in good agreement with that derived from a Langevin model for an atomic polarizability of 143 a.u.

  3. Cryogenic linear Paul trap for cold highly charged ion experiments.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, M; Versolato, O O; Windberger, A; Brunner, F R; Ballance, T; Eberle, S N; Ullrich, J; Schmidt, P O; Hansen, A K; Gingell, A D; Drewsen, M; López-Urrutia, J R Crespo

    2012-08-01

    Storage and cooling of highly charged ions require ultra-high vacuum levels obtainable by means of cryogenic methods. We have developed a linear Paul trap operating at 4 K capable of very long ion storage times of about 30 h. A conservative upper bound of the H(2) partial pressure of about 10(-15) mbar (at 4 K) is obtained from this. External ion injection is possible and optimized optical access for lasers is provided, while exposure to black body radiation is minimized. First results of its operation with atomic and molecular ions are presented. An all-solid state laser system at 313 nm has been set up to provide cold Be(+) ions for sympathetic cooling of highly charged ions.

  4. Precision Spectroscopy on Single Cold Trapped Molecular Nitrogen Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegi, Gregor; Najafian, Kaveh; Germann, Matthias; Sergachev, Ilia; Willitsch, Stefan

    2016-06-01

    The ability to precisely control and manipulate single cold trapped particles has enabled spectroscopic studies on narrow transitions of ions at unprecedented levels of precision. This has opened up a wide range of applications, from tests of fundamental physical concepts, e.g., possible time-variations of fundamental constants, to new and improved frequency standards. So far most of these experiments have concentrated on atomic ions. Recently, however, attention has also been focused on molecular species, and molecular nitrogen ions have been identified as promising candidates for testing a possible time-variation of the proton/electron mass ratio. Here, we report progress towards precision-spectroscopic studies on dipole-forbidden vibrational transitions in single trapped N2+ ions. Our approach relies on the state-selective generation of single N2+ ions, subsequent infrared excitation using high intensity, narrow-band quantum-cascade lasers and a quantum-logic scheme for non-destructive state readout. We also characterize processes limiting the state lifetimes in our experiment, which impair the measurement fidelity. P. O. Schmidt et. al., Science 309 (2005), 749. M. Kajita et. al., Phys. Rev. A 89 (2014), 032509 M. Germann , X. Tong, S. Willitsch, Nature Physics 10 (2014), 820. X. Tong, A. Winney, S. Willitsch, Phys. Rev. Lett. 105 (2010), 143001

  5. Stick-slip nanofriction in cold-ion traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandelli, Davide; Vanossi, Andrea; Tosatti, Erio

    2013-03-01

    Trapped cold ions are known to form linear or planar zigzag chains, helices or clusters depending on trapping conditions. They may be forced to slide over a laser induced corrugated potential, a mimick of sliding friction. We present MD simulations of an incommensurate 101 ions chain sliding subject to an external electric field. As expected with increasing corrugation, we observe the transition from a smooth-sliding, highly lubric regime to a strongly dissipative stick-slip regime. Owing to inhomogeneity the dynamics shows features reminiscent of macroscopic frictional behaviors. While the chain extremities are pinned, the incommensurate central part is initially free to slide. The onset of global sliding is preceded by precursor events consisting of partial slips of chain portions further from the center. We also look for frictional anomalies expected for the chain sliding across the linear-zigzag structural phase transition. Although the chain is too short for a proper critical behavior, the sliding friction displays a frank rise near the transition, due to opening of a new dissipative channel via excitations of transverse modes. Research partly sponsored by Sinergia Project CRSII2 136287/1.

  6. COLD TRAPS

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, W.I.

    1958-09-30

    A cold trap is presented for removing a condensable component from a gas mixture by cooling. It consists of a shell, the exterior surface of which is chilled by a refrigerant, and conductive fins welded inside the shell to condense the gas, and distribute the condensate evenly throughout the length of the trap, so that the trap may function until it becomes completely filled with the condensed solid. The contents may then be removed as either a gas or as a liquid by heating the trap. This device has particuinr use as a means for removing uranium hexafluoride from the gaseous diffusion separation process during equipment breakdown and repair periods.

  7. Quantum dynamics of cold trapped ions with application to quantum computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, D. F. V.

    1998-02-01

    The theory of interactions between lasers and cold trapped ions as it pertains to the design of Cirac-Zoller quantum computers is discussed. The mean positions of the trapped ions, the eigenvalues and eigenmodes of the ions' oscillations, the magnitude of the Rabi frequencies for both allowed and forbidden internal transitions of the ions, and the validity criterion for the required Hamiltonian are calculated. Energy level data for a variety of ion species are also presented.

  8. COLD TRAP

    DOEpatents

    Milleron, N.

    1963-03-12

    An improved linear-flow cold trap is designed for highvacuum applications such as mitigating back migration of diffusion pump oil moiecules. A central pot of liquid nitrogen is nested within and supported by a surrounding, vertical, helical coil of metai sheet, all enveloped by a larger, upright, cylindrical, vacuum vessel. The vertical interstices between successive turns of the coil afford lineal, axial, high-vacuum passages between open mouths at top and bottom of said vessel, while the coil, being cold by virtue of thermal contact of its innermost turn with the nitrogen pot, affords expansive proximate condensation surfaces. (AEC)

  9. Formation of molecular ions by radiative association of cold trapped atoms and ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dulieu, Olivier; da Silva, Humberto, Jr.; Aymar, Mireille; Raoult, Maurice

    2015-05-01

    Radiative emission during cold collisions between trapped laser-cooled Rb atoms and alkaline-earth ions (Ca+ , Sr+ , Ba+) and Yb+ are studied theoretically, using accurate effective-core-potential based quantum chemistry calculations of potential energy curves and transition dipole moments of the related molecular ions. Radiative association of molecular ions is predicted to occur for all systems with a cross section two to ten times larger than the radiative charge transfer one. Partial and total rate constants are also calculated and compared to available experiments. Narrow shape resonances are expected, which could be detectable at low temperature with an experimental resolution at the limit of the present standards. Vibrational distributions show that the final molecular ions are not created in their ground state level. Supported by the Marie-Curie ITN ``COMIQ: Cold Molecular Ions at the Quantum limit'' of the EU (#607491).

  10. Realization of Translational Symmetry in Trapped Cold Ion Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hao-Kun; Urban, Erik; Noel, Crystal; Chuang, Alexander; Xia, Yang; Ransford, Anthony; Hemmerling, Boerge; Wang, Yuan; Li, Tongcang; Häffner, Hartmut; Zhang, Xiang

    2017-02-01

    We crystallize up to 15 40Ca+ ions in a ring with a microfabricated silicon surface Paul trap. Delocalization of the Doppler laser-cooled ions shows that the translational symmetry of the ion ring is preserved at millikelvin temperatures. By characterizing the collective motion of the ion crystals, we identify homogeneous electric fields as the dominant symmetry-breaking mechanism at this energy scale. With increasing ion numbers, such detrimental effects are reduced. We predict that, with only a ten-ion ring, uncompensated homogeneous fields will not break the translational symmetry of the rotational ground state. This experiment opens a door towards studying quantum many-body physics with translational symmetry at the single-particle level.

  11. Ion selectivity of crown ethers investigated by UV and IR spectroscopy in a cold ion trap.

    PubMed

    Inokuchi, Yoshiya; Boyarkin, Oleg V; Kusaka, Ryoji; Haino, Takeharu; Ebata, Takayuki; Rizzo, Thomas R

    2012-04-26

    Electronic and vibrational spectra of benzo-15-crown-5 (B15C5) and benzo-18-crown-6 (B18C6) complexes with alkali metal ions, M(+)•B15C5 and M(+)•B18C6 (M = Li, Na, K, Rb, and Cs), are measured using UV photodissociation (UVPD) and IR-UV double resonance spectroscopy in a cold, 22-pole ion trap. We determine the structure of conformers with the aid of density functional theory calculations. In the Na(+)•B15C5 and K(+)•B18C6 complexes, the crown ethers open the most and hold the metal ions at the center of the ether ring, demonstrating an optimum matching in size between the cavity of the crown ethers and the metal ions. For smaller ions, the crown ethers deform the ether ring to decrease the distance and increase the interaction between the metal ions and oxygen atoms; the metal ions are completely surrounded by the ether ring. In the case of larger ions, the metal ions are too large to enter the crown cavity and are positioned on it, leaving one of its sides open for further solvation. Thermochemistry data calculated on the basis of the stable conformers of the complexes suggest that the ion selectivity of crown ethers is controlled primarily by the enthalpy change for the complex formation in solution, which depends strongly on the complex structure.

  12. Experiments with an ion-neutral hybrid trap: cold charge-exchange collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, W. W.; Goodman, D. S.; Sivarajah, I.; Wells, J. E.; Banerjee, S.; Côté, R.; Michels, H. H.; Mongtomery, J. A.; Narducci, F. A.

    2014-01-01

    Due to their large trap depths (˜1 eV or 10,000 K), versatility, and ease of construction, Paul traps have important uses in high-resolution spectroscopy, plasma physics, and precision measurements of fundamental constants. An ion-neutral hybrid trap consisting of two separate but spatially concentric traps [a magneto-optic trap (MOT) for the neutral species and a mass-selective linear Paul trap for the ionic species] is an ideal apparatus for sympathetic cooling. However, over the past few years, hybrid traps have proven most useful in measuring elastic and charge-exchange rate constants of ion-neutral collisions over a wide temperature range from kilo-Kelvin to nano-Kelvin. We report some initially surprising results from a hybrid trap system in our laboratory where we have loaded the Paul trap with Ca+ ions in the presence of a Na MOT (localized dense gas of cold Na atoms). We find a strong loss of Ca+ ions with MOT exposure, attributed to an exothermic, non-resonant ion-neutral charge-exchange process with an activation barrier, which leads to the formation of Na+ ions. We propose a detailed mechanism for this process. We obtain an estimated measure of the rate constant for this charge exchange of ˜2 × 10-11 cm3/s, much less than the Langevin rate, which suggests that the Langevin assumption of unit efficiency in the reaction region is not correct in this case.

  13. Bound-Free and Bound-Bound Spectroscopy of Cold Trapped Molecular Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wester, Roland

    2016-06-01

    Cryogenic radiofrequency ion traps have become a versatile tool to study the spectroscopy and state-selected collision dynamics of molecular ions. Different types of action spectroscopy have been developed to obtain a precise and sensitive spectroscopic signature. In this talk I will give an introduction to molecular ion spectroscopy in multipole traps. Then I will present recent experimental and theoretical investigations from our group on photodetachment spectroscopy and state-selected collisions of cold OH- anions colliding with helium and hydrogen. Based on these results we performed high resolution terahertz spectroscopy on the two lowest rotational transitions of OD-. Work is in progress to extend the rotational spectroscopy to polyatomic molecular anions.

  14. Hybrid ion-atom trap for studying ultra-cold collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makarov, Oleg P.; Lin, Jian; Smith, W. W.

    2003-05-01

    We built an apparatus for studying ultra-cold collisions between atoms and atomic or molecular ions. Atomic sodium vapor is produced from getters in the ultra-high vacuum chamber. The atoms are trapped in a vapor-cell magneto-optical trap (MOT) by capturing a low-velocity component of a thermal distribution into the region between two anti-Helmholtz coils. A localized cloud of cold Na atoms was successfully generated for MOT types I and II. The cooling transitions were stimulated by the red-detuned Na D2 line emission from a single-frequency stabilized ring-dye laser. The repumping frequency was generated by an electro-optical modulator (EOM) at 1.712 GHz. The loading time constant, ˜ 500 ms, was measured from the fluorescence intensity increase when the magnetic field is suddenly turned on. A linear Paul ion trap, centered on the MOT, is designed to trap Ca^+ ions, produced by electronic bombardment of neutral calcium atoms from a tube oven. A detector is provided for product ions from charge-transfer collisions or photoassociative ionization. We are testing the various components of the completed apparatus. This work is supported by NSF grant # PHY-9988215 and in part by the University of CT Research Foundation.

  15. Uv-Uv Hole-Burning Spectroscopy of a Protonated Adenine Dimer in a Cold Quadrupole Ion Trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Hyuk

    2015-06-01

    A novel method for double-resonance photofragmentation spectroscopy in a cold quadrupole ion trap has been developed and utilized to differentiate the structures of a cold protonated adenine dimer. A burn laser generates a population hole of a certain conformer of the dimer stored in a cold quadrupole ion trap, and an auxiliary dipolar RF ejects the photofragments by the burn laser from the trap. A probe laser detects depletion of a certain conformer by the burn laser, and a conformer-specific UV or IR spectrum of a cold ion is obtained by scanning the wavelength of the burn or the probe laser. This simple and versatile method is applicable to any type of double-resonance photofragmentation spectroscopy in a cold quadrupole ion trap. To demonstrate its capability, it was applied to UV-UV hole-burning spectroscopy of a protonated adenine dimer. It is proved that a cold protonated adenine dimer has at least two hydrogen-bonding geometries and each has multiple electronically excited states with significantly different spectral bandwidths, possibly due to different excited state dynamics.

  16. Dynamics of a Cold Trapped Ion in a Bose-Einstein Condensate

    SciTech Connect

    Schmid, Stefan; Haerter, Arne; Denschlag, Johannes Hecker

    2010-09-24

    We investigate the interaction of a laser-cooled trapped ion (Ba{sup +} or Rb{sup +}) with an optically confined {sup 87}Rb Bose-Einstein condensate. The system features interesting dynamics of the ion and the atom cloud as determined by their collisions and their motion in their respective traps. Elastic as well as inelastic processes are observed and their respective cross sections are determined. We demonstrate that a single ion can be used to probe the density profile of an ultracold atom cloud.

  17. Radial cold trap

    DOEpatents

    Grundy, Brian R.

    1981-01-01

    The radial cold trap comprises a housing having a plurality of mesh bands disposed therein. The mesh bands comprise concentrically arranged bands of mesh with the mesh specific surface area of each band increasing from the outermost mesh band to the innermost mesh band. An inlet nozzle is attached to the outside section of the housing while an outlet nozzle is attached to the inner portion of the housing so as to be concentrically connected to the innermost mesh band. An inlet baffle having orifices therein may be disposed around the outermost mesh band and within the housing for directing the flow of the fluid from the inlet nozzle to the outermost mesh band in a uniform manner. The flow of fluid passes through each consecutive mesh band and into the outlet nozzle. The circular pattern of the symmetrically arranged mesh packing allows for better utilization of the entire cold trap volume.

  18. Radial cold trap

    DOEpatents

    Grundy, B.R.

    1981-09-29

    The radial cold trap comprises a housing having a plurality of mesh bands disposed therein. The mesh bands comprise concentrically arranged bands of mesh with the mesh specific surface area of each band increasing from the outermost mesh band to the innermost mesh band. An inlet nozzle is attached to the outside section of the housing while an outlet nozzle is attached to the inner portion of the housing so as to be concentrically connected to the innermost mesh band. An inlet baffle having orifices therein may be disposed around the outermost mesh band and within the housing for directing the flow of the fluid from the inlet nozzle to the outermost mesh band in a uniform manner. The flow of fluid passes through each consecutive mesh band and into the outlet nozzle. The circular pattern of the symmetrically arranged mesh packing allows for better utilization of the entire cold trap volume. 2 figs.

  19. Sympathetic cooling and detection of a hot trapped ion by a cold one

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guggemos, M.; Heinrich, D.; Herrera-Sancho, O. A.; Blatt, R.; Roos, C. F.

    2015-10-01

    We investigate the dynamics of an ion sympathetically cooled by another laser-cooled ion or small ion crystal. To this end, we develop simple models of the cooling dynamics in the limit of weak Coulomb interactions. Experimentally, we create a two-ion crystal of Ca+ and Al+ by photo-ionization of neutral atoms produced by laser ablation. We characterize the velocity distribution of the laser-ablated atoms crossing the trap by time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. We observe neutral atom velocities much higher than the ones of thermally heated samples and find as a consequence long sympathethic cooling times before crystallization occurs. Our key result is a new technique for detecting the loading of an initially hot ion with energy in the eV range by monitoring the motional state of a Doppler-cooled ion already present in the trap. This technique not only detects the ion but also provides information about the dynamics of the sympathetic cooling process.

  20. Cold Highly Charged Ions in a Penning Trap: Experiment and Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Holder, J P; Gruber, L; Church, D A; Schneider, D

    2001-08-18

    Using the LLNL EBIT/RETRAP system non-neutral plasmas of highly charged ions were produced and cooled to temperatures around one Kelvin. These strongly coupled plasmas can model white dwarf astrophysical plasmas in the laboratory. These systems may also have potential application to quantum computation. The experimental results from the last operations of the trap at Livermore are discussed. Molecular dynamics simulation results are discussed as a guide to past and future experiments. The status and future plans for RETRAP at LBNL's 88 inch Cyclotron are discussed.

  1. Ion trap simulation tools.

    SciTech Connect

    Hamlet, Benjamin Roger

    2009-02-01

    Ion traps present a potential architecture for future quantum computers. These computers are of interest due to their increased power over classical computers stemming from the superposition of states and the resulting capability to simultaneously perform many computations. This paper describes a software application used to prepare and visualize simulations of trapping and maneuvering ions in ion traps.

  2. Microfabricated ion trap array

    DOEpatents

    Blain, Matthew G.; Fleming, James G.

    2006-12-26

    A microfabricated ion trap array, comprising a plurality of ion traps having an inner radius of order one micron, can be fabricated using surface micromachining techniques and materials known to the integrated circuits manufacturing and microelectromechanical systems industries. Micromachining methods enable batch fabrication, reduced manufacturing costs, dimensional and positional precision, and monolithic integration of massive arrays of ion traps with microscale ion generation and detection devices. Massive arraying enables the microscale ion traps to retain the resolution, sensitivity, and mass range advantages necessary for high chemical selectivity. The reduced electrode voltage enables integration of the microfabricated ion trap array with on-chip circuit-based rf operation and detection electronics (i.e., cell phone electronics). Therefore, the full performance advantages of the microfabricated ion trap array can be realized in truly field portable, handheld microanalysis systems.

  3. Cold Strontium Ion Source for Ion Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Jarom; Durfee, Dallin

    2015-05-01

    We are working on a cold source of Sr Ions to be used in an ion interferometer. The beam will be generated from a magneto-optical trap (MOT) of Sr atoms by optically ionizing atoms leaking out a carefully prepared hole in the MOT. A single laser cooling on the resonant transition (461 nm) in Sr should be sufficient for trapping, as we've calculated that losses to the atom beam will outweigh losses to dark states. Another laser (405 nm), together with light from the trapping laser, will drive a two photon transition in the atom beam to an autoionizing state. Supported by NSF Award No. 1205736.

  4. Quadrupole ion traps.

    PubMed

    March, Raymond E

    2009-01-01

    The extraordinary story of the three-dimensional radiofrequency quadrupole ion trap, accompanied by a seemingly unintelligible theoretical treatment, is told in some detail because of the quite considerable degree of commercial success that quadrupole technology has achieved. The quadrupole ion trap, often used in conjunction with a quadrupole mass filter, remained a laboratory curiosity until 1979 when, at the American Society for Mass Spectrometry Conference in Seattle, George Stafford, Jr., of Finnigan Corp., learned of the Masters' study of Allison Armitage of a combined quadrupole ion trap/quadrupole mass filter instrument for the observation of electron impact and chemical ionization mass spectra of simple compounds eluting from a gas chromatograph. Stafford developed subsequently the mass-selective axial instability method for obtaining mass spectra from the quadrupole ion trap alone and, in 1983, Finnigan Corp. announced the first commercial quadrupole ion trap instrument as a detector for a gas chromatograph. In 1987, confinement of ions generated externally to the ion trap was demonstrated and, soon after, the new technique of electrospray ionization was shown to be compatible with the ion trap.

  5. Microfabricated cylindrical ion trap

    DOEpatents

    Blain, Matthew G.

    2005-03-22

    A microscale cylindrical ion trap, having an inner radius of order one micron, can be fabricated using surface micromachining techniques and materials known to the integrated circuits manufacturing and microelectromechanical systems industries. Micromachining methods enable batch fabrication, reduced manufacturing costs, dimensional and positional precision, and monolithic integration of massive arrays of ion traps with microscale ion generation and detection devices. Massive arraying enables the microscale cylindrical ion trap to retain the resolution, sensitivity, and mass range advantages necessary for high chemical selectivity. The microscale CIT has a reduced ion mean free path, allowing operation at higher pressures with less expensive and less bulky vacuum pumping system, and with lower battery power than conventional- and miniature-sized ion traps. The reduced electrode voltage enables integration of the microscale cylindrical ion trap with on-chip integrated circuit-based rf operation and detection electronics (i.e., cell phone electronics). Therefore, the full performance advantages of microscale cylindrical ion traps can be realized in truly field portable, handheld microanalysis systems.

  6. Trapping ions in a segmented ring trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabakov, B. P.; Sterk, J. D.; Benito, F.; Haltli, R.; Tigges, C. P.; Stick, D.; Blain, M. G.; Moehring, D. L.

    2012-06-01

    We demonstrate robust trapping in an ion trap which has a ring shaped RF node. Ions are back-side loaded through a small 10 μm diameter loading hole and we have demonstrated thousands of complete circuits around the trap. Each circuit passes through 44 trapping zones; the trap has 89 independent DC control electrodes. Measurements of the tangential secular frequency indicate a weak dependence on the RF and the loading hole. The ion trap is fabricated using four metal layers, allowing for the inner islanded electrodes to be electrically routed underneath the trap with negligible effects on the trapped ions. [4pt] This work was supported by the Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity (IARPA). Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the US Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  7. Nonlinear integrable ion traps

    SciTech Connect

    Nagaitsev, S.; Danilov, V.; /SNS Project, Oak Ridge

    2011-10-01

    Quadrupole ion traps can be transformed into nonlinear traps with integrable motion by adding special electrostatic potentials. This can be done with both stationary potentials (electrostatic plus a uniform magnetic field) and with time-dependent electric potentials. These potentials are chosen such that the single particle Hamilton-Jacobi equations of motion are separable in some coordinate systems. The electrostatic potentials have several free adjustable parameters allowing for a quadrupole trap to be transformed into, for example, a double-well or a toroidal-well system. The particle motion remains regular, non-chaotic, integrable in quadratures, and stable for a wide range of parameters. We present two examples of how to realize such a system in case of a time-independent (the Penning trap) as well as a time-dependent (the Paul trap) configuration.

  8. Asymmetric ion trap

    DOEpatents

    Barlow, S.E.; Alexander, M.L.; Follansbee, J.C.

    1997-12-02

    An ion trap having two end cap electrodes disposed asymmetrically about a center of a ring electrode is disclosed. The inner surface of the end cap electrodes are conformed to an asymmetric pair of equipotential lines of the harmonic formed by the application of voltages to the electrodes. The asymmetry of the end cap electrodes allows ejection of charged species through the closer of the two electrodes which in turn allows for simultaneously detecting anions and cations expelled from the ion trap through the use of two detectors charged with opposite polarity. 4 figs.

  9. Asymmetric ion trap

    DOEpatents

    Barlow, Stephan E.; Alexander, Michael L.; Follansbee, James C.

    1997-01-01

    An ion trap having two end cap electrodes disposed asymmetrically about a center of a ring electrode. The inner surface of the end cap electrodes are conformed to an asymmetric pair of equipotential lines of the harmonic formed by the application of voltages to the electrodes. The asymmetry of the end cap electrodes allows ejection of charged species through the closer of the two electrodes which in turn allows for simultaneously detecting anions and cations expelled from the ion trap through the use of two detectors charged with opposite polarity.

  10. Ion trap in a semiconductor chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stick, D.; Hensinger, W. K.; Olmschenk, S.; Madsen, M. J.; Schwab, K.; Monroe, C.

    2006-01-01

    The electromagnetic manipulation of isolated atoms has led to many advances in physics, from laser cooling and Bose-Einstein condensation of cold gases to the precise quantum control of individual atomic ions. Work on miniaturizing electromagnetic traps to the micrometre scale promises even higher levels of control and reliability. Compared with `chip traps' for confining neutral atoms, ion traps with similar dimensions and power dissipation offer much higher confinement forces and allow unparalleled control at the single-atom level. Moreover, ion microtraps are of great interest in the development of miniature mass-spectrometer arrays, compact atomic clocks and, most notably, large-scale quantum information processors. Here we report the operation of a micrometre-scale ion trap, fabricated on a monolithic chip using semiconductor micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) technology. We confine, laser cool and measure heating of a single 111Cd+ ion in an integrated radiofrequency trap etched from a doped gallium-arsenide heterostructure.

  11. Computer model for analyzing sodium cold traps

    SciTech Connect

    McPheeters, C C; Raue, D J

    1983-05-01

    A computer model was developed to simulate the processes that occur in sodium cold traps. The Model for Analyzing Sodium Cold Traps (MASCOT) simulates any desired configuration of mesh arrangements and dimensions and calculates pressure drops and flow distributions, temperature profiles, impurity concentration profiles, and impurity mass distributions. The calculated pressure drop as a function of impurity mass content determines the capacity of the cold trap. The accuracy of the model was checked by comparing calculated mass distributions with experimentally determined mass distributions from literature publications and with results from our own cold trap experiments. The comparisons were excellent in all cases. A parametric study was performed to determine which design variables are most important in maximizing cold trap capacity.

  12. Ion Trap Quantum Computing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-12-01

    an inspiring speech at the MIT Physics of Computation 1st Conference in 1981, Feynman proposed the development of a computer that would obey the...on ion trap based 36 quantum computing for physics and computer science students would include lecture notes, slides, lesson plans, a syllabus...reading lists, videos, demonstrations, and laboratories. 37 LIST OF REFERENCES [1] R. P. Feynman , “Simulating physics with computers,” Int. J

  13. Modeling and Optimizing RF Multipole Ion Traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fanghaenel, Sven; Asvany, Oskar; Schlemmer, Stephan

    2016-06-01

    Radio frequency (rf) ion traps are very well suited for spectroscopy experiments thanks to the long time storage of the species of interest in a well defined volume. The electrical potential of the ion trap is determined by the geometry of its electrodes and the applied voltages. In order to understand the behavior of trapped ions in realistic multipole traps it is necessary to characterize these trapping potentials. Commercial programs like SIMION or COMSOL, employing the finite difference and/or finite element method, are often used to model the electrical fields of the trap in order to design traps for various purposes, e.g. introducing light from a laser into the trap volume. For a controlled trapping of ions, e.g. for low temperature trapping, the time dependent electrical fields need to be known to high accuracy especially at the minimum of the effective (mechanical) potential. The commercial programs are not optimized for these applications and suffer from a number of limitations. Therefore, in our approach the boundary element method (BEM) has been employed in home-built programs to generate numerical solutions of real trap geometries, e.g. from CAD drawings. In addition the resulting fields are described by appropriate multipole expansions. As a consequence, the quality of a trap can be characterized by a small set of multipole parameters which are used to optimize the trap design. In this presentation a few example calculations will be discussed. In particular the accuracy of the method and the benefits of describing the trapping potentials via multipole expansions will be illustrated. As one important application heating effects of cold ions arising from non-ideal multipole fields can now be understood as a consequence of imperfect field configurations.

  14. Quantum computing with trapped ions

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, R.J.

    1998-01-01

    The significance of quantum computation for cryptography is discussed. Following a brief survey of the requirements for quantum computational hardware, an overview of the ion trap quantum computation project at Los Alamos is presented. The physical limitations to quantum computation with trapped ions are analyzed and an assessment of the computational potential of the technology is made.

  15. Optimization of RF multipole ion trap geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fanghänel, Sven; Asvany, Oskar; Schlemmer, Stephan

    2017-02-01

    Radio-frequency (rf) traps are ideal places to store cold ions for spectroscopic experiments. Specific multipole configurations are suited best for different applications but have to be modified to allow e.g. for a proper overlap of a laser beam waist with the ion cloud. Therefore the corresponding trapping fields should be shaped accordingly. To achieve this goal highly accurate electrical potentials of rf multipole traps and the resulting effective trapping potentials are calculated using the boundary element method (BEM). These calculations are used to evaluate imperfections and to optimize the field geometry. For that purpose the complex fields are reduced to a small set of multipole expansion coefficients. Desirable values for these coefficients are met by systematic changes of real trap dimensions from CAD designs. The effect of misalignment of a linear quadrupole, the optimization of an optically open Paul trap, the influence of steering electrodes (end electrode and ring electrode) on a 22-pole ion trap and the effect of the micro motion on the lowest reachable temperatures in such a trap are discussed.

  16. Mini ion trap mass spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Dietrich, D.D.; Keville, R.F.

    1995-09-19

    An ion trap is described which operates in the regime between research ion traps which can detect ions with a mass resolution of better than 1:10{sup 9} and commercial mass spectrometers requiring 10{sup 4} ions with resolutions of a few hundred. The power consumption is kept to a minimum by the use of permanent magnets and a novel electron gun design. By Fourier analyzing the ion cyclotron resonance signals induced in the trap electrodes, a complete mass spectra in a single combined structure can be detected. An attribute of the ion trap mass spectrometer is that overall system size is drastically reduced due to combining a unique electron source and mass analyzer/detector in a single device. This enables portable low power mass spectrometers for the detection of environmental pollutants or illicit substances, as well as sensors for on board diagnostics to monitor engine performance or for active feedback in any process involving exhausting waste products. 10 figs.

  17. Mini ion trap mass spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Dietrich, Daniel D.; Keville, Robert F.

    1995-01-01

    An ion trap which operates in the regime between research ion traps which can detect ions with a mass resolution of better than 1:10.sup.9 and commercial mass spectrometers requiring 10.sup.4 ions with resolutions of a few hundred. The power consumption is kept to a minimum by the use of permanent magnets and a novel electron gun design. By Fourier analyzing the ion cyclotron resonance signals induced in the trap electrodes, a complete mass spectra in a single combined structure can be detected. An attribute of the ion trap mass spectrometer is that overall system size is drastically reduced due to combining a unique electron source and mass analyzer/detector in a single device. This enables portable low power mass spectrometers for the detection of environmental pollutants or illicit substances, as well as sensors for on board diagnostics to monitor engine performance or for active feedback in any process involving exhausting waste products.

  18. Ion funnel ion trap and process

    DOEpatents

    Belov, Mikhail E [Richland, WA; Ibrahim, Yehia M [Richland, WA; Clowers, Biran H [West Richland, WA; Prior, David C [Hermiston, OR; Smith, Richard D [Richland, WA

    2011-02-15

    An ion funnel trap is described that includes a inlet portion, a trapping portion, and a outlet portion that couples, in normal operation, with an ion funnel. The ion trap operates efficiently at a pressure of .about.1 Torr and provides for: 1) removal of low mass-to-charge (m/z) ion species, 2) ion accumulation efficiency of up to 80%, 3) charge capacity of .about.10,000,000 elementary charges, 4) ion ejection time of 40 to 200 .mu.s, and 5) optimized variable ion accumulation times. Ion accumulation with low concentration peptide mixtures has shown an increase in analyte signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) of a factor of 30, and a greater than 10-fold improvement in SNR for multiply charged analytes.

  19. Universal collisional activation ion trap mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    McLuckey, S.A.; Goeringer, D.E.; Glish, G.L.

    1993-04-27

    A universal collisional activation ion trap comprises an ion trapping means containing a bath gas and having connected thereto a noise signal generator. A method of operating a universal collisional activation ion trap comprises the steps of: providing an ion trapping means; introducing into the ion trapping means a bath gas; and, generating a noise signal within the ion trapping means; introducing into the ion trapping means a substance that, when acted upon by the noise signal, undergoes collisional activation to form product ions.

  20. Universal collisional activation ion trap mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    McLuckey, Scott A.; Goeringer, Douglas E.; Glish, Gary L.

    1993-01-01

    A universal collisional activation ion trap comprises an ion trapping means containing a bath gas and having connected thereto a noise signal generator. A method of operating a universal collisional activation ion trap comprises the steps of: providing an ion trapping means; introducing into the ion trapping means a bath gas; and, generating a noise signal within the ion trapping means; introducing into the ion trapping means a substance that, when acted upon by the noise signal, undergoes collisional activation to form product ions.

  1. Ion Trapping in the Accumulator

    SciTech Connect

    Marriner, J.

    1985-02-18

    The beam space charge (- for {bar p}'s) will attract positive ions. In the absence of additional fields (clearing electrodes, e.g.) these ions will be trapped in the beam potential well. The depth of this potential well has been calculated for some geometries relevant for the accumulator.

  2. Electrostatic ion beam trap for electron collision studies

    SciTech Connect

    Heber, O.; Witte, P.D.; Diner, A.; Bhushan, K.G.; Strasser, D.; Toker, Y.; Rappaport, M.L.; Ben-Itzhak, I.; Altstein, N.; Schwalm, D.; Wolf, A.; Zajfman, D.

    2005-01-01

    We describe a system combining an ion beam trap and a low energy electron target in which the interaction between electrons and vibrationally cold molecular ions and clusters can be studied. The entire system uses only electrostatic fields for both trapping and focusing, thus being able to store particles without a mass limit. Preliminary results for the electron impact neutralization of C{sub 2}{sup -} ions and aluminum clusters are presented.

  3. Lunar Cold Trap Contamination by Landing Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shipley, Scott T.; Metzger, Philip T.; Lane, John E.

    2014-01-01

    Tools have been developed to model and simulate the effects of lunar landing vehicles on the lunar environment (Metzger, 2011), mostly addressing the effects of regolith erosion by rocket plumes and the fate of the ejected lunar soil particles (Metzger, 2010). These tools are being applied at KSC to predict ejecta from the upcoming Google Lunar X-Prize Landers and how they may damage the historic Apollo landing sites. The emerging interest in lunar mining poses a threat of contamination to pristine craters at the lunar poles, which act as "cold traps" for water and may harbor other valuable minerals Crider and Vondrak (2002). The KSC Granular Mechanics and Regolith Operations Lab tools have been expanded to address the probability for contamination of these pristine "cold trap" craters.

  4. Trapping cold ground state argon atoms.

    PubMed

    Edmunds, P D; Barker, P F

    2014-10-31

    We trap cold, ground state argon atoms in a deep optical dipole trap produced by a buildup cavity. The atoms, which are a general source for the sympathetic cooling of molecules, are loaded in the trap by quenching them from a cloud of laser-cooled metastable argon atoms. Although the ground state atoms cannot be directly probed, we detect them by observing the collisional loss of cotrapped metastable argon atoms and determine an elastic cross section. Using a type of parametric loss spectroscopy we also determine the polarizability of the metastable 4s[3/2](2) state to be (7.3±1.1)×10(-39)  C m(2)/V. Finally, Penning and associative losses of metastable atoms in the absence of light assisted collisions, are determined to be (3.3±0.8)×10(-10)  cm(3) s(-1).

  5. Magnetic Trapping of Cold Methyl Radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yang; Vashishta, Manish; Djuricanin, Pavle; Zhou, Sida; Zhong, Wei; Mittertreiner, Tony; Carty, David; Momose, Takamasa

    2017-03-01

    We have demonstrated that a supersonic beam of methyl radicals (CH3 ) in the ground rotational state of both para and ortho species has been slowed down to standstill with a magnetic molecular decelerator, and successfully captured spatially in an anti-Helmholtz magnetic trap for >1 s . The trapped CH3 radicals have a mean translational temperature of about 200 mK with an estimated density of >5.0 ×1 07 cm-3 . The methyl radical is an ideal system for the study of cold molecules not only because of its high reactivities at low temperatures, but also because further cooling below 1 mK is plausible via sympathetic cooling with ultracold atoms. The demonstrated trapping capability of methyl radicals opens up various possibilities for realizing ultracold ensembles of molecules towards Bose-Einstein condensation of polyatomic molecules and investigations of reactions governed by quantum statistics.

  6. Note: High density pulsed molecular beam for cold ion chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Kokish, M. G.; Rajagopal, V.; Marler, J. P.; Odom, B. C.

    2014-08-15

    A recent expansion of cold and ultracold molecule applications has led to renewed focus on molecular species preparation under ultrahigh vacuum conditions. Meanwhile, molecular beams have been used to study gas phase chemical reactions for decades. In this paper, we describe an apparatus that uses pulsed molecular beam technology to achieve high local gas densities, leading to faster reaction rates with cold trapped ions. We characterize the beam's spatial profile using the trapped ions themselves. This apparatus could be used for preparation of molecular species by reactions requiring excitation of trapped ion precursors to states with short lifetimes or for obtaining a high reaction rate with minimal increase of background chamber pressure.

  7. Microfabricated linear Paul-Straubel ion trap

    DOEpatents

    Mangan, Michael A [Albuquerque, NM; Blain, Matthew G [Albuquerque, NM; Tigges, Chris P [Albuquerque, NM; Linker, Kevin L [Albuquerque, NM

    2011-04-19

    An array of microfabricated linear Paul-Straubel ion traps can be used for mass spectrometric applications. Each ion trap comprises two parallel inner RF electrodes and two parallel outer DC control electrodes symmetric about a central trap axis and suspended over an opening in a substrate. Neighboring ion traps in the array can share a common outer DC control electrode. The ions confined transversely by an RF quadrupole electric field potential well on the ion trap axis. The array can trap a wide array of ions.

  8. Cold Rydberg atom collisions in a dipole trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabral, Jader; Gonçalves, Luis; Kondo, Jorge; Marcassa, Luis

    2011-05-01

    We have built a new experimental setup to investigate cold Rydberg atom collision in a high atomic density sample in a CO2 dipole trap. Briefly, we load a Rb standard magneto-optical trap from an atomic vapor provided by a dispenser. Then we turn on 100W CO2 dipole trap and we apply a loading phase, in which the repumper light intensity is reduced. After this phase, the trapping and repumper laser beams are turned off and we wait 100 ms for the atoms that were not trapped to fall off the dipole trap region due to gravity. Finally, we turn off the dipole trap and excite the Rydberg state using a two photon transition. The Rydberg atoms are detected using pulsed field ionization technique. In this new setup, we can image the ions onto a MCP detector to study the spatial distribution. The electrons maybe detected also by another MCP. During the presentation we shall present preliminary results involving the excitation of nD+nD states. We acknowledge financial support from FAPESP, CNPq, INCT-IQ, AFOSR (FA9550-09-1-0503)

  9. Simplified Quantum Logic with Trapped Ions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-23

    PHYSICAL REVIEW A ATOMIC , MOLECULAR, AND OPTICAL PHYSICS THIRD SERIES, VOLUME 55, NUMBER 4 APRIL 1997Simplified quantum logic with trapped ions C...Received 17 December 1996! We describe a simplified scheme for quantum logic with a collection of laser-cooled trapped atomic ions. Building on the...in a system of laser-cooled trapped atomic ions. In the simplest form of the ion trap quantum computer, two internal electronic levels of each ion in

  10. Microscale ion trap mass spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Ramsey, J. Michael; Witten, William B.; Kornienko, Oleg

    2002-01-01

    An ion trap for mass spectrometric chemical analysis of ions is delineated. The ion trap includes a central electrode having an aperture; a pair of insulators, each having an aperture; a pair of end cap electrodes, each having an aperture; a first electronic signal source coupled to the central electrode; a second electronic signal source coupled to the end cap electrodes. The central electrode, insulators, and end cap electrodes are united in a sandwich construction where their respective apertures are coaxially aligned and symmetric about an axis to form a partially enclosed cavity having an effective radius r.sub.0 and an effective length 2z.sub.0, wherein r.sub.0 and/or z.sub.0 are less than 1.0 mm, and a ratio z.sub.0 /r.sub.0 is greater than 0.83.

  11. Rotation sensing with trapped ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, W. C.; Hamilton, P.

    2017-03-01

    We present a protocol for rotation measurement via matter-wave Sagnac interferometry using trapped ions. The ion trap based interferometer encloses a large area in a compact apparatus through repeated round-trips in a Sagnac geometry. We show how a uniform magnetic field can be used to close the interferometer over a large dynamic range in rotation speed and measurement bandwidth without contrast loss. Since this technique does not require the ions to be confined in the Lamb–Dicke regime, Doppler laser cooling should be sufficient to reach a sensitivity of { S }=1.4× {10}-6 {{rad}} {{{s}}}-1 {{{H}}{{z}}}-1/2. , which features invited work from the best early-career researchers working within the scope of J. Phys. B. This project is part of the Journal of Physics series’ 50th anniversary celebrations in 2017. Wes Campbell was selected by the Editorial Board of J. Phys. B as an Emerging Leader.

  12. Near-Resonant Imaging of Trapped Cold Atomic Samples

    PubMed Central

    You, L.; Lewenstein, Maciej

    1996-01-01

    We study the formation of diffraction patterns in the near-resonant imaging of trapped cold atomic samples. We show that the spatial imaging can provide detailed information on the trapped atomic clouds. PMID:27805110

  13. Scalable Designs for Planar Ion Trap Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slusher, R. E.

    2007-03-01

    Recent progress in quantum operations with trapped ion qubits has been spectacular for qubit counts up to approximately ten ions. Two qubit quantum gates, quantum error correction, simple quantum algorithms and entanglement of up to 8 qubits have been demonstrated by groups including those at NIST, University of Michigan, University of Innsbruck and Oxford. Interesting problems in quantum information processing including quantum simulations of condensed matter systems and quantum repeaters for long distance quantum communication systems require hundreds or thousands of qubits. Initial designs for an ion trap ``Quantum CCD'' using spatially multiplexed planar ion traps as well as initial experiments using planar ion traps are promising routes to scaling up the number of trapped ions to more interesting levels. We describe designs for planar ion traps fabricated using silicon VLSI techniques. This approach allows the control voltages required for the moving and positioning the ions in the array to be connected vertically through the silicon substrate to underlying CMOS electronics. We have developed techniques that allow the ion trap structures to be fabricated monolithically on top of the CMOS electronics. The planar traps have much weaker trapping depths than the more conventional multi-level traps. However, the trap depths are still adequate for trapping hot ions from many ion sources. The planar traps also involve more complex configurations for laser cooling and micromotion control. Initial solutions to these problems will be presented. Laser access to the ions can be provided by laser beams grazing the trap surface or by using vertical slots through the trap chip. We will also discuss limits imposed by power dissipation and ion transport through trap junctions (e.g. crosses and Ys). We have fabricated these VLSI based traps in a number of configurations. Initial fabrication and packaging challenges will be discussed. D. Kielpinski, C. Monroe, and D.J. Wineland

  14. Atomic Clock Based On Linear Ion Trap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestage, John D.; Dick, G. John

    1992-01-01

    Highly stable atomic clock based on excitation and measurement of hyperfine transition in 199Hg+ ions confined in linear quadrupole trap by radio-frequency and static electric fields. Configuration increases stability of clock by enabling use of enough ions to obtain adequate signal while reducing non-thermal component of motion of ions in trapping field, reducing second-order Doppler shift of hyperfine transition. Features described in NPO-17758 "Linear Ion Trap for Atomic Clock." Frequency standard based on hyperfine transition described in NPO-17456, "Trapped-Mercury-Ion Frequency Standard."

  15. Low Temperature Chemistry with Trapped Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marler, Joan

    2015-05-01

    At temperatures 5 orders of magnitude less than room temperature individual ions and ensembles of ions can be studied and manipulated with an unprecedented level of control. To achieve these temperatures ions are isolated in an rf-trap and laser-cooled to temperatures in which their internal states can be measured, set and switched at the individual ion level. Since the earliest days of ion trapping, scientists have appropriated these traps to perform experiments in fields as diverse as fundamental particle physics, anti-matter science, quantum information science, condensed matter, and chemistry. At Clemson near term experiments include following state to state chemical reactions, studying chemistry relevant to astrophysical systems and performing highly accurate measurements of carbon containing organic systems. Additional experiments will explore beyond the standard model physics using Highly Charged Ions (HCIs) from the Clemson EBIT which have been subsequently trapped in an ion trap.

  16. Non-destructive ion trap mass spectrometer and method

    DOEpatents

    Frankevich, Vladimir E.; Soni, Manish H.; Nappi, Mario; Santini, Robert E.; Amy, Jonathan W.; Cooks, Robert G.

    1997-01-01

    The invention relates to an ion trap mass spectrometer of the type having an ion trapping volume defined by spaced end caps and a ring electrode. The ion trap includes a small sensing electrode which senses characteristic motion of ions trapped in said trapping volume and provides an image current. Ions are excited into characteristic motion by application of an excitation pulse to the trapped ions. The invention also relates to a method of operating such an ion trap.

  17. Cold Ion Escape from Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fränz, M.; Dubinin, E.; Wei, Y.; Morgan, D.; Andrews, D.; Barabash, S.; Lundin, R.; Fedorov, A.

    2013-09-01

    It has always been challenging to observe the flux of ions with energies of less than 10eV escaping from the planetary ionospheres. We here report on new measurements of the ionospheric ion flows at Mars by the ASPERA-3 experiment on board Mars Express in combination with the MARSIS radar experiment. We first compare calculations of the mean ion flux observed by ASPERA-3 alone with previously published results. We then combine observations of the cold ion velocity by ASPERA-3 with observations of the cold plasma density by MARSIS since ASPERA-3 misses the cold core of the ion distribution. We show that the mean density of the nightside plasma observed by MARSIS is about two orders higher than observed by ASPERA-3 (Fig.1). Combining both datasets we show that the main escape channel is along the shadow boundary on the tailside of Mars (Fig. 2). At a distance of about 0.5 R_M the flux settles at a constant value (Fig. 3) which indicates that about half of the transterminator ionospheric flow escapes from the planet. Possible mechanism to generate this flux can be the ionospheric pressure gradient between dayside and nightside or momentum transfer from the solar wind via the induced magnetic field since the flow velocity is in the Alfvénic regime.

  18. Trapped Ion Optical Clocks at NPL

    SciTech Connect

    Margolis, H. S.; Barwood, G. P.; Hosaka, K.; Klein, H. A.; Lea, S. N.; Walton, B. R.; Webster, S. A.; Gill, P.; Huang, G.; Stannard, A.

    2006-11-07

    Forbidden transitions in single laser-cooled trapped ions provide highly stable and accurate references for optical frequency standards. This paper describes recent progress on strontium and ytterbium ion optical frequency standards under development at NPL.

  19. Atomic ion clock with two ion traps, and method to transfer ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestage, John D. (Inventor); Chung, Sang K. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    An atomic ion clock with a first ion trap and a second ion trap, where the second ion trap is of higher order than the first ion trap. In one embodiment, ions may be shuttled back and forth from one ion trap to the other by application of voltage ramps to the electrodes in the ion traps, where microwave interrogation takes place when the ions are in the second ion trap, and fluorescence is induced and measured when the ions are in the first ion trap. In one embodiment, the RF voltages applied to the second ion trap to contain the ions are at a higher frequency than that applied to the first ion trap. Other embodiments are described and claimed.

  20. Ion traps fabricated in a CMOS foundry

    SciTech Connect

    Mehta, K. K.; Ram, R. J.; Eltony, A. M.; Chuang, I. L.; Bruzewicz, C. D.; Sage, J. M. Chiaverini, J.

    2014-07-28

    We demonstrate trapping in a surface-electrode ion trap fabricated in a 90-nm CMOS (complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor) foundry process utilizing the top metal layer of the process for the trap electrodes. The process includes doped active regions and metal interconnect layers, allowing for co-fabrication of standard CMOS circuitry as well as devices for optical control and measurement. With one of the interconnect layers defining a ground plane between the trap electrode layer and the p-type doped silicon substrate, ion loading is robust and trapping is stable. We measure a motional heating rate comparable to those seen in surface-electrode traps of similar size. This demonstration of scalable quantum computing hardware utilizing a commercial CMOS process opens the door to integration and co-fabrication of electronics and photonics for large-scale quantum processing in trapped-ion arrays.

  1. Cryptography, quantum computation and trapped ions

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, Richard J.

    1998-03-01

    The significance of quantum computation for cryptography is discussed. Following a brief survey of the requirements for quantum computational hardware, an overview of the ion trap quantum computation project at Los Alamos is presented. The physical limitations to quantum computation with trapped ions are analyzed and an assessment of the computational potential of the technology is made.

  2. (Integrated Diffractive Mirrors (IDM) Ion Traps)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-03-04

    trap electrodes. Fluorescence from trapped ions is collected at high solid angle coverage for subsequent coupling into optical fiber (not shown). 2-6...integrated optics and fiber ribbon. The width of all optics was set by the ground electrode width of 80 μm. Since the trapping potential minimum was...signal. Thermal relaxation of the cables during the bake actually forced the trap carrier up and out of the socket on two occasions. We installed a

  3. Quantum Simulations in Ion Traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berkeland, Dana

    2007-03-01

    When Richard Feynman famously proposed a quantum computer, his intended application was to simulate quantum dynamical systems. This is a hard problem because as the number of elements of a quantum system linearly increases, the complexity of the equations modeling it grows exponentially. Feynman's proposed solution to this problem was to simulate one quantum mechanical system with another. Such quantum simulators can solve only a limited set of problems, but building one would represent an important milestone in the road to universal quantum computation. At LANL we use an array of strontium ions confined in a linear rf trap to build a multi-body quantum simulator. Each ion simulates a single spin system, while Coulomb and optical forces simulate spin-spin interactions and magnetic fields. This system can simulate the most basic models of condensed matter physics, the Ising model and the Heisenberg XY model, in addition to more complex physical systems. We have modeled the basic interactions in this system and are starting to demonstrate the interactions central to the simulations.

  4. Spectroscopy with trapped highly charged ions

    SciTech Connect

    Beiersdorfer, P

    2008-01-23

    We give an overview of atomic spectroscopy performed on electron beam ion traps at various locations throughout the world. Spectroscopy at these facilities contributes to various areas of science and engineering, including but not limited to basic atomic physics, astrophysics, extreme ultraviolet lithography, and the development of density and temperature diagnostics of fusion plasmas. These contributions are accomplished by generating, for example, spectral surveys, making precise radiative lifetime measurements, accounting for radiative power emitted in a given wavelength band, illucidating isotopic effects, and testing collisional-radiative models. While spectroscopy with electron beam ion traps had originally focused on the x-ray emission from highly charged ions interacting with the electron beam, the operating modes of such devices have expanded to study radiation in almost all wavelength bands from the visible to the hard x-ray region; and at several facilities the ions can be studied even in the absence of an electron beam. Photon emission after charge exchange or laser excitation has been observed, and the work is no longer restricted to highly charged ions. Much of the experimental capabilities are unique to electron beam ion traps, and the work performed with these devices cannot be undertaken elsewhere. However, in other areas the work on electron beam ion traps rivals the spectroscopy performed with conventional ion traps or heavy-ion storage rings. The examples we present highlight many of the capabilities of the existing electron beam ion traps and their contributions to physics.

  5. Cooling of highly charged ions in a Penning trap

    SciTech Connect

    Gruber, Lukas

    2000-03-31

    Highly charged ions are extracted from an electron beam ion trap and guided to Retrap, a cryogenic Penning trap, where they are merged with laser cooled Be+ ions. The Be+ ions act as a coolant for the hot highly charged ions and their temperature is dropped by about 8 orders of magnitude in a few seconds. Such cold highly charged ions form a strongly coupled nonneutral plasma exhibiting, under such conditions, the aggregation of clusters and crystals. Given the right mixture, these plasmas can be studied as analogues of high density plasmas like white dwarf interiors, and potentially can lead to the development of cold highly charged ion beams for applications in nanotechnology. Due to the virtually non existent Doppler broadening, spectroscopy on highly charged ions can be performed to an unprecedented precision. The density and the temperature of the Be+ plasma were measured and highly charged ions were sympathetically cooled to similar temperatures. Molecular dynamics simulations confirmed the shape, temperature and density of the highly charged ions. Ordered structures were observed in the simulations.

  6. Space-time crystals of trapped ions.

    PubMed

    Li, Tongcang; Gong, Zhe-Xuan; Yin, Zhang-Qi; Quan, H T; Yin, Xiaobo; Zhang, Peng; Duan, L-M; Zhang, Xiang

    2012-10-19

    Spontaneous symmetry breaking can lead to the formation of time crystals, as well as spatial crystals. Here we propose a space-time crystal of trapped ions and a method to realize it experimentally by confining ions in a ring-shaped trapping potential with a static magnetic field. The ions spontaneously form a spatial ring crystal due to Coulomb repulsion. This ion crystal can rotate persistently at the lowest quantum energy state in magnetic fields with fractional fluxes. The persistent rotation of trapped ions produces the temporal order, leading to the formation of a space-time crystal. We show that these space-time crystals are robust for direct experimental observation. We also study the effects of finite temperatures on the persistent rotation. The proposed space-time crystals of trapped ions provide a new dimension for exploring many-body physics and emerging properties of matter.

  7. Fast transitionless expansions of Gaussian anharmonic traps for cold atoms: Bang-singular-bang control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Xiao-Jing; Chen, Xi; Alonso, J.; Muga, J. G.

    2014-02-01

    Combining invariant-based inverse engineering, perturbation theory, and optimal control theory, we design fast, transitionless expansions of cold neutral atoms or ions in Gaussian anharmonic traps. Bounding the possible trap frequencies and using a "bang-singular-bang" control we find fast processes for a continuum of durations up to a minimum time that corresponds to a purely bang-bang (stepwise frequency constant) control.

  8. Simple analytic potentials for linear ion traps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janik, G. R.; Prestage, J. D.; Maleki, L.

    1989-01-01

    A simple analytical model was developed for the electric and ponderomotive (trapping) potentials in linear ion traps. This model was used to calculate the required voltage drive to a mercury trap, and the result compares well with experiments. The model gives a detailed picture of the geometric shape of the trapping potenital and allows an accurate calculation of the well depth. The simplicity of the model allowed an investigation of related, more exotic trap designs which may have advantages in light-collection efficiency.

  9. Simple analytic potentials for linear ion traps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janik, G. R.; Prestage, J. D.; Maleki, L.

    1990-01-01

    A simple analytical model was developed for the electric and ponderomotive (trapping) potentials in linear ion traps. This model was used to calculate the required voltage drive to a mercury trap, and the result compares well with experiments. The model gives a detailed picture of the geometric shape of the trapping potential and allows an accurate calculation of the well depth. The simplicity of the model allowed an investigation of related, more exotic trap designs which may have advantages in light-collection efficiency.

  10. Interchange mode excited by trapped energetic ions

    SciTech Connect

    Nishimura, Seiya

    2015-07-15

    The kinetic energy principle describing the interaction between ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) modes with trapped energetic ions is revised. A model is proposed on the basis of the reduced ideal MHD equations for background plasmas and the bounce-averaged drift-kinetic equation for trapped energetic ions. The model is applicable to large-aspect-ratio toroidal devices. Specifically, the effect of trapped energetic ions on the interchange mode in helical systems is analyzed. Results show that the interchange mode is excited by trapped energetic ions, even if the equilibrium states are stable to the ideal interchange mode. The energetic-ion-induced branch of the interchange mode might be associated with the fishbone mode in helical systems.

  11. Interchange mode excited by trapped energetic ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, Seiya

    2015-07-01

    The kinetic energy principle describing the interaction between ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) modes with trapped energetic ions is revised. A model is proposed on the basis of the reduced ideal MHD equations for background plasmas and the bounce-averaged drift-kinetic equation for trapped energetic ions. The model is applicable to large-aspect-ratio toroidal devices. Specifically, the effect of trapped energetic ions on the interchange mode in helical systems is analyzed. Results show that the interchange mode is excited by trapped energetic ions, even if the equilibrium states are stable to the ideal interchange mode. The energetic-ion-induced branch of the interchange mode might be associated with the fishbone mode in helical systems.

  12. Magnetic trapping of cold bromine atoms.

    PubMed

    Rennick, C J; Lam, J; Doherty, W G; Softley, T P

    2014-01-17

    Magnetic trapping of bromine atoms at temperatures in the millikelvin regime is demonstrated for the first time. The atoms are produced by photodissociation of Br2 molecules in a molecular beam. The lab-frame velocity of Br atoms is controlled by the wavelength and polarization of the photodissociation laser. Careful selection of the wavelength results in one of the pair of atoms having sufficient velocity to exactly cancel that of the parent molecule, and it remains stationary in the lab frame. A trap is formed at the null point between two opposing neodymium permanent magnets. Dissociation of molecules at the field minimum results in the slowest fraction of photofragments remaining trapped. After the ballistic escape of the fastest atoms, the trapped slow atoms are lost only by elastic collisions with the chamber background gas. The measured loss rate is consistent with estimates of the total cross section for only those collisions transferring sufficient kinetic energy to overcome the trapping potential.

  13. Progress towards producing and trapping cold nitric oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahal, Parshuram

    I present the experimental results of a new source of cold molecular production using activated carbon and the design of the necessary apparatus. This new source may eliminate the need for laser ablation loading in buffer gas cooling experiments. I also analyze the relative signal amplitude of rotational lines of cold Nitric Oxide (NO) molecules in its lower fine structure state. Experimental results showing the effects of the hexapole velocity filter on the production of lowest ro-vibrational low field seeking states of a cold molecular sample of NO is also discussed. The sample is produced by the extraction of the cold fraction of the Maxwell-Boltzman distribution of a thermal source. I also present a computer simulation method for filtering, guiding and magnetic trapping of cold molecular NO. In the filtering process, the low field electric seeking molecules interact with an inhomogeneous electrostatic field of a hexapole guide which is exploited to select the slow molecules from a cold molecular source. Given my computer simulation work, I assert that the resulting cold fraction in the non-magnetic 2pi 1/2 ground state can be directed into a permanent magnetic trap where it could be optically pumped into the 2pi3/2 fine structure state which can be magnetically trapped. I present the full simulation of the procedure and progress toward getting experimental results regarding the magnetic trapping of NO.

  14. Resonance methods in quadrupole ion traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, Dalton T.; Peng, Wen-Ping; Cooks, R. Graham

    2017-01-01

    The quadrupole ion trap is widely used in the chemical physics community for making measurements on dynamical systems, both intramolecular (e.g. ion fragmentation reactions) and intermolecular (e.g. ion/molecule reactions). In this review, we discuss linear and nonlinear resonances in quadrupole ion traps, an understanding of which is critical for operation of these devices and interpretation of the data which they provide. The effect of quadrupole field nonlinearity is addressed, with important implications for promoting fragmentation and achieving unique methods of mass scanning. Methods that depend on ion resonances (i.e. matching an external perturbation with an ion's induced frequency of motion) are discussed, including ion isolation, ion activation, and ion ejection.

  15. Scaling the ion trap quantum processor.

    PubMed

    Monroe, C; Kim, J

    2013-03-08

    Trapped atomic ions are standards for quantum information processing, serving as quantum memories, hosts of quantum gates in quantum computers and simulators, and nodes of quantum communication networks. Quantum bits based on trapped ions enjoy a rare combination of attributes: They have exquisite coherence properties, they can be prepared and measured with nearly 100% efficiency, and they are readily entangled with each other through the Coulomb interaction or remote photonic interconnects. The outstanding challenge is the scaling of trapped ions to hundreds or thousands of qubits and beyond, at which scale quantum processors can outperform their classical counterparts in certain applications. We review the latest progress and prospects in that effort, with the promise of advanced architectures and new technologies, such as microfabricated ion traps and integrated photonics.

  16. Ion-Atom Cold Collisions and Atomic Clocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestage, John D.; Maleki, Lute; Tjoelker, Robert L.

    1997-01-01

    Collisions between ultracold neutral atoms have for some time been the subject of investigation, initially with hydrogen and more recently with laser cooled alkali atoms. Advances in laser cooling and trapping of neutral atoms in a Magneto-Optic Trap (MOT) have made cold atoms available as the starting point for many laser cooled atomic physics investigations. The most spectacularly successful of these, the observation of Bose-Einstein Condensation (BEC) in a dilute ultra-cold spin polarized atomic vapor, has accelerated the study of cold collisions. Experimental and theoretical studies of BEC and the long range interaction between cold alkali atoms is at the boundary of atomic and low temperature physics. Such studies have been difficult and would not have been possible without the development and advancement of laser cooling and trapping of neutral atoms. By contrast, ion-atom interactions at low temperature, also very difficult to study prior to modern day laser cooling, have remained largely unexplored. But now, many laboratories worldwide have almost routine access to cold neutral atoms. The combined technologies of ion trapping, together with laser cooling of neutrals has made these studies experimentally feasible and several very important, novel applications might come out of such investigations . This paper is an investigation of ion-atom interactions in the cold and ultra-cold temperature regime. Some of the collisional ion-atom interactions present at room temperature are very much reduced in the low temperature regime. Reaction rates for charge transfer between unlike atoms, A + B(+) approaches A(+) + B, are expected to fall rapidly with temperature, approximately as T(sup 5/2). Thus, cold mixtures of atoms and ions are expected to coexist for very long times, unlike room temperature mixtures of the same ion-atom combination. Thus, it seems feasible to cool ions via collisions with laser cooled atoms. Many of the conventional collisional interactions

  17. Cold Atom Source Containing Multiple Magneto-Optical Traps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramirez-Serrano, Jaime; Kohel, James; Kellogg, James; Lim, Lawrence; Yu, Nan; Maleki, Lute

    2007-01-01

    An apparatus that serves as a source of a cold beam of atoms contains multiple two-dimensional (2D) magneto-optical traps (MOTs). (Cold beams of atoms are used in atomic clocks and in diverse scientific experiments and applications.) The multiple-2D-MOT design of this cold atom source stands in contrast to single-2D-MOT designs of prior cold atom sources of the same type. The advantages afforded by the present design are that this apparatus is smaller than prior designs.

  18. Improved trapping and transport of cold atoms for magnetic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gadge, Amruta; James, T.; Li, X.; Lu, Bo; Garridogonzalez, N.; Finke, A.; Mellor, C.; Fromhold, M.; Koller, C.; Orucevic, F.; Kruger, Peter

    2016-05-01

    Using cold atoms, a very sensitive and high resolution magnetic and electric field sensor can be realised. Ultra-close trapping of atoms would improve the resolution of cold-atom based surface probes. The limitation on the trapping distance arises from strongly distance-dependent effects such as Casimir force, Johnson noise etc. We are constructing an experimental system to trap atoms at surface separations of less than a micron. We will demonstrate the possibility of using special surfaces such as silicon nitride membranes and graphene for sub-micron trapping. We have designed a 10-layer printed circuit board, which can magnetically trap the cold atom cloud and transport it precisely to a desired location. This gives us the ability to study multiple samples within the same vacuum environment. In order to achieve higher atom number in the initial trapping stages, we use a dual-color MOT technique for Rb-87 atoms. Using this technique we achieve a significant increase in atom number and decrease in temperature. In this talk, I will present the results of the dual color MOT. I will also report on results related to magnetic transport and sub-micron trapping of atoms.

  19. Cryogenic surface-electrode ion trap apparatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubielzig, Timko; Carsjens, Martina; Kohnen, Matthias; Grondkowski, Sebastian; Ospelkaus, Christian

    2014-05-01

    In this talk we describe the infrastructure necessary to operate a surface-electrode ion trap with integrated microwave conductors for near-field quantum control of 9Be+ in a cryogenic environment. These traps are promising systems for analog quantum simulators and for quantum logic applications. Our group recently developed a trap with an integrated meander-like microwave guide for driving motional sidebands on an 9Be+ ion. The trap will be operated in a cryogenic vacuum chamber. We will discuss the vibrational isolated closed cycle cryostat and the design of the vacuum chamber with all electrical supplies necessary to apply two different microwave currents, dc voltages and three independent rf supplies to generate a reconfigurable rf trapping potential. We will also discuss the used hyperfine qubit and the laser systems required to cool and repump. Furthermore we will present the cryogenic, high aperture and fully acromatic imaging system.

  20. Cold Rydberg atoms in a CO2 optical dipole trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonçalves, Luis; Kondo, Jorge; Cabral, Jader; Marcassa, Luis

    2012-06-01

    There has been increasing interest in cold Rydberg atoms over the last several years. The primary reason for this attention is that interactions between Rydberg atoms are strong and lead to many interesting and useful phenomena, which require high atomic density samples. In this work, we have built an experimental setup to investigate cold Rydberg atom collision in a CO2 optical dipole trap. Briefly, we have loaded a Rb standard magneto-optical trap from an atomic vapor provided by a dispenser. Then we turn on 100W CO2 dipole trap and we apply a loading phase, in which the repumper light intensity is reduced and the trapping frequency is detuned to the red. After this phase, the trapping and repumper laser beams are turned off and we wait 100ms for the atoms, that were not trapped, to fall off the dipole trap region due to gravity. Finally, we turn off the dipole trap and excite the Rydberg state using a two photon transition. The Rydberg atoms are detected using pulsed field ionization technique. During the presentation we shall present preliminary results involving collisions between nD states.

  1. A trapped mercury 199 ion frequency standard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cutler, L. S.; Giffard, R. P.; Mcguire, M. D.

    1982-01-01

    Mercury 199 ions confined in an RF quadrupole trap and optically pumped by mercury 202 ion resonance light are investigated as the basis for a high performance frequency standard with commercial possibilities. Results achieved and estimates of the potential performance of such a standard are given.

  2. Sensitive Detection of Radiation Trapping in Cold Atom Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beeler, Matt; Feeney, Laura; Stites, Ron; Kim, Soo; Bali, Samir

    2003-05-01

    We investigate the effect of radiation trapping on the photon statistics of the light scattered from optical molasses. We propose that the intensity correlation function may be sensitive to the presence of radiation trapping at optical depths up to two orders of magnitude lower than where effects of multiple scattering in cold atom clouds have been previously observed [T. Walker, D. Sesko, and C. Wieman, Phys. Rev. Lett. 64, 408 (1990)].

  3. Structure of the alkali-metal-atom + strontium molecular ions: Towards photoassociation and formation of cold molecular ions

    SciTech Connect

    Aymar, M.; Dulieu, O.; Guerout, R.

    2011-08-14

    The potential energy curves, permanent and transition dipole moments, and the static dipolar polarizability, of molecular ions composed of one alkali-metal atom and a strontium ion are determined with a quantum chemistry approach. The molecular ions are treated as effective two-electron systems and are treated using effective core potentials including core polarization, large gaussian basis sets, and full configuration interaction. In the perspective of upcoming experiments aiming at merging cold atom and cold ion traps, possible paths for radiative charge exchange, photoassociation of a cold lithium or rubidium atom and a strontium ion are discussed, as well as the formation of stable molecular ions.

  4. Fundamental studies of ion injection and trapping of electrosprayed ions on a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quarmby, Scott Thomas

    The quadrupole ion trap is a highly versatile and sensitive analytical mass spectrometer. Because of the advantages offered by the ion trap, there has been intense interest in coupling it to ionization techniques such as electrospray which form ions externally to the ion trap. In this work, experiments and computer simulations were employed to study the injection of electrosprayed ions into the ion trap of a Finnigan MAT LCQ LC/MS n mass spectrometer. The kinetic energy distribution of the ion beam was characterized and found to be relatively wide, a result of the high pressures from the atmospheric pressure source. One of the most important experimental parameters which affects ion injection efficiency is the RF voltage applied to the ring electrode. A theoretical model was fit to experimental data allowing the optimum RF voltage for trapping a given m/z ion to be predicted. Computer simulations of ion motion were performed to study the effect of various instrumental parameters on trapping efficiency. A commercially available ion optics program, SIMION v6.0, was chosen because it allowed the actual ion trap electrode geometry including endcap holes to be simulated. In contrast to previous computer simulations, SIMION provided the ability to start ions outside the ion trap and to simulate more accurately the injection of externally formed ions. The endcap holes were found to allow the RF field to penetrate out of the ion trap and affect ions as they approached the ion trap. From these simulations, a model for the process by which injected ions are trapped was developed. Using these computer simulations, techniques of improving trapping efficiency were investigated. Most previous techniques perturb ions which are already in the ion trap and therefore cannot be used to accumulate ions; the ability to accumulate ions is a necessity with ionization sources such as electrospray which form ions continuously. One such novel technique for improving trapping efficiency

  5. Optical probing of cold trapped atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, R. W.; Gilbert, S. L.; Hollberg, L.; Marquardt, J. H.; Robinson, H. G.

    1993-01-01

    Transitions between excited states of laser-cooled and laser-trapped rubidium and cesium atoms are probed by use of fiber and diode lasers. High-resolution Doppler-free spectra are detected by observation of the absorption and fluorescence of light from the intermediate level of two-step cascade systems. The optical double-resonance spectra show Autler-Townes splitting in the weak probe limit and more complicated spectra for a strongly coupled three-level system.

  6. Extended linear ion trap frequency standard apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestage, John D. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A linear ion trap for frequency standard applications is provided with a plurality of trapping rods equally spaced and applied quadruple rf voltages for radial confinement of atomic ions and biased level pins at each end for axial confinement of the ions. The trapping rods are divided into two linear ion trap regions by a gap in each rod in a common radial plane to provide dc discontinuity, thus dc isolating one region from the other. A first region for ion-loading and preparation fluorescence is biased with a dc voltage to transport ions into a second region for resonance frequency comparison with a local oscillator derived frequency while the second region is held at zero voltage. The dc bias voltage of the regions is reversed for transporting the ions back into the first region for fluorescence measurement. The dual mode cycle is repeated continuously for comparison and feedback control of the local oscillator derived frequency. Only the second region requires magnetic shielding for the resonance function which is sensitive to any ambient magnetic fields.

  7. Modular cryostat for ion trapping with surface-electrode ion traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vittorini, Grahame; Wright, Kenneth; Brown, Kenneth R.; Harter, Alexa W.; Doret, S. Charles

    2013-04-01

    We present a simple cryostat purpose built for use with surface-electrode ion traps, designed around an affordable, large cooling power commercial pulse tube refrigerator. A modular vacuum enclosure with a single vacuum space facilitates interior access and enables rapid turnaround and flexibility for future modifications. Long rectangular windows provide nearly 360° of optical access in the plane of the ion trap, while a circular bottom window near the trap enables NA 0.4 light collection without the need for in-vacuum optics. We evaluate the system's mechanical and thermal characteristics and we quantify ion trapping performance by trapping 40Ca+, finding small stray electric fields, long ion lifetimes, and low ion heating rates.

  8. Trapping cold molecules and atoms: Simultaneous magnetic deceleration and trapping of cold molecular Oxygen with Lithium atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akerman, Nitzan; Karpov, Michael; Segev, Yair; Bibelink, Natan; Narevicius, Julia; Narevicius, Edvardas

    2016-05-01

    Cooling molecules to the ultra-cold regime remains a major challenge in the growing field of cold molecules. The molecular internal degrees of freedom complicate the effort of direct application of laser cooling. An alternative and general path towards ultra-cold molecules relies on sympathetic cooling via collisions with laser-cooled atoms. Here, we demonstrate the first step towards application of sympathetic cooling by co-trapping of molecular Oxygen with Lithium atoms in a magnetic trap at a temperature of 300 mK. Our experiment begins with a pulsed supersonic beam which is a general source for cold high-flux atomic and molecular beams. Although the supersonic expansion efficiently cools the beam to temperatures below 1K, it also accelerates the beam to high mean velocities. We decelerate a beam of O2 in a moving magnetic trap decelerator from 375 m/s to a stop. We entrained the molecular beam with Li atoms by laser ablation prior to deceleration. The deceleration ends with loading the molecules and atoms into a static quadrupole trap, which is generated by two permanent magnets. We estimate 109 trapped molecules with background limited lifetime of 0.6 Sec. Our achievement enables application of laser cooling on the Li atoms in order to sympathetically cool the O2.

  9. Cryogenically cooled octupole ion trap for spectroscopy of biomolecular ions.

    PubMed

    Boyarkin, Oleg V; Kopysov, Vladimir

    2014-03-01

    We present here the design of a linear octupole ion trap, suitable for collisional cryogenic cooling and spectroscopy of large ions. The performance of this trap has been assessed using ultraviolet (UV) photofragmentation spectroscopy of protonated dipeptides. At the trap temperature of 6.1 K, the vibrational temperature of the ions reaches 9.1 K, although their estimated translational temperature is ~150 K. This observation suggests that, despite the significant translational heating by radio-frequency electrical field, vibrational cooling of heavy ions in the octupole is at least as efficient as in the 22-pole ion traps previously used in our laboratory. In contrast to the 22-pole traps, excellent radial confinement of ions in the octupole makes it convenient for laser spectroscopy and boosts the dissociation yield of the stored ions to 30%. Overlap of the entire ion cloud by the laser beam in the octupole also allows for efficient UV depletion spectroscopy of ion-He clusters. The measured electronic spectra of the dipeptides and the clusters differ drastically, complicating a use of UV tagging spectroscopy for structural determination of large species.

  10. Cold Trapping of Volatiles in the Lunar Regolith

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hibbitts, C. A.; Dyar, M. D.; Orlando, T. M.; Grieves, G.; Szanyi, J.

    2009-03-01

    Water may cold trap (cryosorb) onto non-ice materials at the lunar poles, and not exist as ice. Water can remain present, adsorbed onto the samples, at several 10s of degrees above which its ice would sublime, but not at or near room temperature.

  11. Ion trap mass spectrometry of externally generated ions

    SciTech Connect

    McLuckey, S.A.; Van Berkel, G.J.; Georinger, D.E. ); Glish, G.L.

    1994-07-01

    This discussion provides background for consideration of the merits of ion trap MS in conjunction with an external ion source relative to a scanning beam-type form of mass analysis. Emphasis has been placed primarily on efficiency. However, a variety of other factors can be major considerations, depending upon the application. For example, the ion trap has clear advantages over most other forms of MS in terms of size, weight, and pumping requirements. These advantages make the ion trap attractive for field applications, particularly because the performance characteristics of the ion trap need not be compromised in a compact system. One of the most significant advantages is the high efficiency obtainable with tandem MS experiments by using collisional activation via resonance excitation. Under favorable conditions, the conversion of 100% of the parent ions to product ions can be achieved, although 10-50% conversions are more typical. The analogous conversion in most beam-type tendem MS experiments is typically 1-3 orders of magnitude lower; thus, significant reductions in detection limits by use of the ion trap can be anticipated in analyses requiring two or more stages of MS. 61 refs., 3 figs.

  12. Electron beam ion source and electron beam ion trap (invited).

    PubMed

    Becker, Reinard; Kester, Oliver

    2010-02-01

    The electron beam ion source (EBIS) and its trap variant [electron beam ion trap (EBIT)] celebrated their 40th and 20th anniversary, respectively, at the EBIS/T Symposium 2007 in Heidelberg. These technologically challenging sources of highly charged ions have seen a broad development in many countries over the last decades. In contrast to most other ion sources the recipe of improvement was not "sorcery" but a clear understanding of the physical laws and obeying the technological constraints. This review will report important achievements of the past as well as promising developments in the future.

  13. Ion-number-density-dependent effects on hyperfine transition of trapped 199Hg+ ions in quadrupole linear ion traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhihui; Chen, Yihe; Yan, Bibo; Wang, Man; Wan, Yongquan; Liu, Hao; She, Lei; Li, Jiaomei

    2017-04-01

    The ion-number-density-dependent frequency offsets and broadening of the ground state hyperfine transition spectra of trapped 199Hg+ ions were measured as a function of the end-cap voltage of the quadrupole linear ion trap. The number density of trapped 199Hg+ ions in the quadrupole linear trap was controlled by the end-cap voltage. The fractional frequency stability of 199Hg+ hyperfine transition to the 1 mV end-cap voltage variation was preliminary estimated to be less than 1 ×10-16. The causes of the ion-number-density-dependent frequency shift and spectrum broadening were analyzed theoretically and explained.

  14. Fast Quantum Rabi Model with Trapped Ions

    PubMed Central

    Moya-Cessa, Héctor M.

    2016-01-01

    We show how to produce a fast quantum Rabi model with trapped ions. Its importance resides not only in the acceleration of the phenomena that may be achieved with these systems, from quantum gates to the generation of nonclassical states of the vibrational motion of the ion, but also in reducing unwanted effects such as the decay of coherences that may appear in such systems. PMID:27941846

  15. Fast Quantum Rabi Model with Trapped Ions.

    PubMed

    Moya-Cessa, Héctor M

    2016-12-12

    We show how to produce a fast quantum Rabi model with trapped ions. Its importance resides not only in the acceleration of the phenomena that may be achieved with these systems, from quantum gates to the generation of nonclassical states of the vibrational motion of the ion, but also in reducing unwanted effects such as the decay of coherences that may appear in such systems.

  16. Interaction of field-aligned cold plasma flows with an equatorially-trapped hot plasma - Electrostatic shock formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Nagendra

    1993-01-01

    Effects of equatorially trapped hot plasma on the highly supersonic cold-plasma flow occurring during early stage plasmaspheric refilling are studied by means of numerical simulations. It is shown that the equatorially trapped hot ions set up a potential barrier for the cold ion beams and facilitate formation of electrostatic shocks by reflecting them from the equatorial region. Simulations with and without the hot plasma show different flow properties; the formation of electrostatic shocks occur only in the former case. The simulation with the hot plasma also reveals that the magnetic trapping in conjunction with the evolution of the electrostatic potential barrier produces ion velocity distribution functions consisting of a cold core and a hot ring in the perpendicular velocity. Such a distribution function provides a source of free energy for equatorial waves. The corresponding electron population is warm and field-aligned.

  17. Trapped Atomic Ions and Quantum Information Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Wineland, D. J.; Leibfried, D.; Bergquist, J. C.; Blakestad, R. B.; Bollinger, J. J.; Britton, J.; Chiaverini, J.; Epstein, R. J.; Hume, D. B.; Itano, W. M.; Jost, J. D.; Koelemeij, J. C. J.; Langer, C.; Ozeri, R.; Reichle, R.; Rosenband, T.; Schaetz, T.; Schmidt, P. O.; Seidelin, S.; Shiga, N.

    2006-11-07

    The basic requirements for quantum computing and quantum simulation (single- and multi-qubit gates, long memory times, etc.) have been demonstrated in separate experiments on trapped ions. Construction of a large-scale information processor will require synthesis of these elements and implementation of high-fidelity operations on a very large number of qubits. This is still well in the future. NIST and other groups are addressing part of the scaling issue by trying to fabricate multi-zone arrays of traps that would allow highly-parallel and scalable processing. In the near term, some simple quantum processing protocols are being used to aid in quantum metrology, such as in atomic clocks. As the number of qubits increases, Schroedinger's cat paradox and the measurement problem in quantum mechanics become more apparent; with luck, trapped ion systems might be able to shed light on these fundamental issues.

  18. Trapped Atomic Ions and Quantum Information Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wineland, D. J.; Leibfried, D.; Bergquist, J. C.; Blakestad, R. B.; Bollinger, J. J.; Britton, J.; Chiaverini, J.; Epstein, R. J.; Hume, D. B.; Itano, W. M.; Jost, J. D.; Knill, M.; Koelemeij, J. C. J.; Langer, C.; Ozeri, R.; Reichle, R.; Rosenband, T.; Schaetz, T.; Schmidt, P. O.; Seidelin, S.; Shiga, N.; Wesenberg, J. H.

    2006-11-01

    The basic requirements for quantum computing and quantum simulation (single- and multi-qubit gates, long memory times, etc.) have been demonstrated in separate experiments on trapped ions. Construction of a large-scale information processor will require synthesis of these elements and implementation of high-fidelity operations on a very large number of qubits. This is still well in the future. NIST and other groups are addressing part of the scaling issue by trying to fabricate multi-zone arrays of traps that would allow highly-parallel and scalable processing. In the near term, some simple quantum processing protocols are being used to aid in quantum metrology, such as in atomic clocks. As the number of qubits increases, Schrödinger's cat paradox and the measurement problem in quantum mechanics become more apparent; with luck, trapped ion systems might be able to shed light on these fundamental issues.

  19. Sensitive detection of radiation trapping in cold-atom clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beeler, Matthew; Stites, Ronald; Kim, Soo; Feeney, Laura; Bali, Samir

    2003-07-01

    In this paper, we calculate the effect of radiation trapping on the photon statistics of the light scattered from optical molasses. We propose that an intensity correlation function measurement may be sensitive to the presence of radiation trapping at an on-resonance optical depth as low as 0.1, more than an order of magnitude less than where effects of multiple scattering in cold-atom clouds have been previously observed [T. Walker, D. Sesko, and C. Wieman, Phys. Rev. Lett. 64, 408 (1990); D. Sesko, T. Walker, and C. Wieman, J. Opt. Soc. Am. B. 8, 946 (1991)].

  20. Characterization of scalable ion traps for quantum computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epstein, R. J.; Bollinger, J. J.; Leibfried, D.; Seidelin, S.; Britton, J.; Wesenberg, J. H.; Shiga, N.; Amini, J. M.; Blakestad, R. B.; Brown, K. R.; Home, J. P.; Itano, W. M.; Jost, J. D.; Langer, C.; Ozeri, R.; Wineland, D. J.

    2007-03-01

    We discuss the experimental characterization of several scalable ion trap architectures for quantum information processing. We have developed an apparatus for testing planar ion trap chips which features: a standardized chip carrier for ease of interchanging traps, a single-laser Raman cooling scheme, and photo-ionization loading of Mg^+ ions. The primary benchmark for a given trap is the heating rate of the ion motional degrees of freedom, which can reduce multi-ion quantum gate fidelities. As the heating rate depends on the ion trap geometry and materials, our testing apparatus allows for efficient iteration and optimization of trap parameters. With the recent ability to fabricate planar traps with sufficiently low heating rates for quantum computation ^2, we describe current results on the simulation and fabrication of planar traps with multiple intersecting trapping zones for versatile ion choreography. S. Seidelin et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 253003 (2006). J. Kim, et al., Quantum Inf. Comput. 5, 515 (2005).

  1. Miniaturized Linear Wire Ion Trap Mass Analyzer.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qinghao; Li, Ailin; Tian, Yuan; Zare, Richard N; Austin, Daniel E

    2016-08-02

    We report a linear ion trap (LIT) in which the electric field is formed by fine wires held under tension and accurately positioned using holes drilled in two end plates made of plastic. The coordinates of the hole positions were optimized in simulation. The stability diagram and mass spectra using boundary ejection were compared between simulation and experiment and good agreement was found. The mass spectra from experiments show peak widths (fwhm) in units of mass-to-charge of around 0.38 Th using a scan rate of 3830 Th/s. The limits of detection are 137 ppbv and 401 ppbv for benzene and toluene, respectively. Different sizes of the wire ion trap can be easily fabricated by drilling holes in scaled positions. Other distinguishing features, such as high ion and photon transmission, low capacitance, high tolerance to mechanical and assembly error, and low weight, are discussed.

  2. Development of a Kingdon ion trap system for trapping externally injected highly charged ions.

    PubMed

    Numadate, Naoki; Okada, Kunihiro; Nakamura, Nobuyuki; Tanuma, Hajime

    2014-10-01

    We have developed a Kingdon ion trap system for the purpose of the laboratory observation of the x-ray forbidden transitions of highly charged ions (HCIs). Externally injected Ar(q+) (q = 5-7) with kinetic energies of 6q keV were successfully trapped in the ion trap. The energy distribution of trapped ions is discussed in detail on the basis of numerical simulations. The combination of the Kingdon ion trap and the time-of-flight mass spectrometer enabled us to measure precise trapping lifetimes of HCIs. As a performance test of the instrument, we measured trapping lifetimes of Ar(q+) (q = 5-7) under a constant number density of H2 and determined the charge-transfer cross sections of Ar(q+)(q = 5, 6)-H2 collision systems at binary collision energies of a few eV. It was confirmed that the present cross section data are consistent with previous data and the values estimated by some scaling formula.

  3. Synthesis of cold antihyrogen in a cusp trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, Yasunori

    2011-05-01

    We report here the first successful synthesis of cold antihydrogen atoms employing a cusp trap, which is not to trap but to extract an intensified antihydrogen beam in a field-free region for high precision microwave spectroscopy. This success opens a new path to make a stringent test of the CPT symmetry via observation of ground-state hyperfine transitions of antihydrogen atoms. The cusp trap consists of superconducting anti-Helmholtz coils and a stack of multiple ring electrodes, which provides non-uniform but axially symmetric magnetic and electric fields. Because of this axial symmetry, a large number of antiprotons and positrons are stably stored in the trap. At the same time, antihydrogen atoms in low-field-seeking states synthesized in the cusp trap can be selectively and effectively extracted along the trap axis. Grant-in-Aid for Specially Promoted Research (19002004) of MEXT, Japan, Special Research Projects for Basic Science of RIKEN, Universita di Breascia and Instituto di Fisica Nucleare, Italy.

  4. Experiments with Single Trapped Ytterbium Ions at JPL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Nan; Maleki, Lute

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents viewgraphs of experiments performed with single trapped Ytterbium ions. The topics include: 1) Ytterbium ion level scheme; 2) Paul-Straubel rf trap and single ion image; 3) D5/2 state lifetime measurement; 4) D3/2 state lifetime measurement; 5) Trapped individual ions in an optical cavity; 6) Initial exploratory system: experimental goals; and 7) Future systems: trap-cavity integration II.

  5. Highly-Charged Ions in Traps - Progress and Opportunities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Church, D. A.; Schneider, D.; Steiger, J.; Beck, B. R.; Holder, J. P.; Weinberg, G.; Gruber, L.; Moehs, D. P.; McDonald, J.

    Penning and Kingdon ion traps have been used to study low-energy multiply-charged ions with charge states up to 80+ during the last few years. The ions have been captured into the traps from beams of external multiply-charged ion sources, or have been produced inside the trap. Measurements of cross sections for electron capture from neutrals to ions and studies of relative double electron capture rates have been completed. The lifetimes of metastable levels of ions, precision spectroscopy on multiply-charged ions in traps, and cooling of trapped ions using lasers, ion-ion elastic collisions, and parallel-tuned circuits, are briefly reviewed. Prospects for the future of highly-charged ions in traps are also discussed.

  6. Cryogenic setup for trapped ion quantum computing.

    PubMed

    Brandl, M F; van Mourik, M W; Postler, L; Nolf, A; Lakhmanskiy, K; Paiva, R R; Möller, S; Daniilidis, N; Häffner, H; Kaushal, V; Ruster, T; Warschburger, C; Kaufmann, H; Poschinger, U G; Schmidt-Kaler, F; Schindler, P; Monz, T; Blatt, R

    2016-11-01

    We report on the design of a cryogenic setup for trapped ion quantum computing containing a segmented surface electrode trap. The heat shield of our cryostat is designed to attenuate alternating magnetic field noise, resulting in 120 dB reduction of 50 Hz noise along the magnetic field axis. We combine this efficient magnetic shielding with high optical access required for single ion addressing as well as for efficient state detection by placing two lenses each with numerical aperture 0.23 inside the inner heat shield. The cryostat design incorporates vibration isolation to avoid decoherence of optical qubits due to the motion of the cryostat. We measure vibrations of the cryostat of less than ±20 nm over 2 s. In addition to the cryogenic apparatus, we describe the setup required for an operation with (40)Ca(+) and (88)Sr(+) ions. The instability of the laser manipulating the optical qubits in (40)Ca(+) is characterized by yielding a minimum of its Allan deviation of 2.4 ⋅ 10(-15) at 0.33 s. To evaluate the performance of the apparatus, we trapped (40)Ca(+) ions, obtaining a heating rate of 2.14(16) phonons/s and a Gaussian decay of the Ramsey contrast with a 1/e-time of 18.2(8) ms.

  7. Cryogenic setup for trapped ion quantum computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandl, M. F.; van Mourik, M. W.; Postler, L.; Nolf, A.; Lakhmanskiy, K.; Paiva, R. R.; Möller, S.; Daniilidis, N.; Häffner, H.; Kaushal, V.; Ruster, T.; Warschburger, C.; Kaufmann, H.; Poschinger, U. G.; Schmidt-Kaler, F.; Schindler, P.; Monz, T.; Blatt, R.

    2016-11-01

    We report on the design of a cryogenic setup for trapped ion quantum computing containing a segmented surface electrode trap. The heat shield of our cryostat is designed to attenuate alternating magnetic field noise, resulting in 120 dB reduction of 50 Hz noise along the magnetic field axis. We combine this efficient magnetic shielding with high optical access required for single ion addressing as well as for efficient state detection by placing two lenses each with numerical aperture 0.23 inside the inner heat shield. The cryostat design incorporates vibration isolation to avoid decoherence of optical qubits due to the motion of the cryostat. We measure vibrations of the cryostat of less than ±20 nm over 2 s. In addition to the cryogenic apparatus, we describe the setup required for an operation with 40Ca+ and 88Sr+ ions. The instability of the laser manipulating the optical qubits in 40Ca+ is characterized by yielding a minimum of its Allan deviation of 2.4 ṡ 10-15 at 0.33 s. To evaluate the performance of the apparatus, we trapped 40Ca+ ions, obtaining a heating rate of 2.14(16) phonons/s and a Gaussian decay of the Ramsey contrast with a 1/e-time of 18.2(8) ms.

  8. The JPL trapped mercury ion frequency standard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestage, J. D.; Dick, G. J.; Maleki, L.

    1988-01-01

    In order to provide frequency standards for the Deep Space Network (DSN) which are more stable than present-day hydrogen masers, a research task was established under the Advanced Systems Program of the TDA to develop a Hg-199(+) trapped ion frequency standard. The first closed-loop operation of this kind is described. Mercury-199 ions are confined in an RF trap and are state-selected through the use of optical pumping with 194 nm UV light from a Hg-202 discharge lamp. Absorption of microwave radiation at the hyperfine frequency (40.5 GHz) is signaled by atomic fluorescence of the UV light. The frequency of a 40.5 GHz oscillator is locked to a 1.6 Hz wide atomic absorption line of the trapped ions. The measured Allan variance of this locked oscillator is currently gamma sub y (pi) = 4.4 x 10 to the minus 12th/square root of pi for 20 is less than pi is less than 320 seconds, which is better stability than the best commercial cesium standards by almost a factor of 2. This initial result was achieved without magnetic shielding and without regulation of ion number.

  9. Fundamentals of trapped ion mobility spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Michelmann, Karsten; Silveira, Joshua A; Ridgeway, Mark E; Park, Melvin A

    2015-01-01

    Trapped ion mobility spectrometry (TIMS) is a relatively new gas-phase separation method that has been coupled to quadrupole orthogonal acceleration time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The TIMS analyzer is a segmented rf ion guide wherein ions are mobility-analyzed using an electric field that holds ions stationary against a moving gas, unlike conventional drift tube ion mobility spectrometry where the gas is stationary. Ions are initially trapped, and subsequently eluted from the TIMS analyzer over time according to their mobility (K). Though TIMS has achieved a high level of performance (R > 250) in a small device (<5 cm) using modest operating potentials (<300 V), a proper theory has yet to be produced. Here, we develop a quantitative theory for TIMS via mathematical derivation and simulations. A one-dimensional analytical model, used to predict the transit time and theoretical resolving power, is described. Theoretical trends are in agreement with experimental measurements performed as a function of K, pressure, and the axial electric field scan rate. The linear dependence of the transit time with 1/K provides a fundamental basis for determination of reduced mobility or collision cross section values by calibration. The quantitative description of TIMS provides an operational understanding of the analyzer, outlines the current performance capabilities, and provides insight into future avenues for improvement.

  10. Cold-atom double-Λ coherent population trapping clock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esnault, F.-X.; Blanshan, E.; Ivanov, E. N.; Scholten, R. E.; Kitching, J.; Donley, E. A.

    2013-10-01

    Miniature atomic clocks based on coherent population trapping (CPT) states in thermal atoms are an important component in many field applications, particularly where satellite frequency standards are not accessible. Cold-atom CPT clocks promise improved accuracy and stability over existing commercial technologies. Here we demonstrate a cold-atom CPT clock based on 87Rb using a high-contrast double-Λ configuration. Doppler frequency shifts are explained using a simple model and canceled by interrogating the atoms with counterpropagating light beams. We realize a compact cold-atom CPT clock with a fractional frequency stability of 4×10-11τ-1/2, thus demonstrating the potential of these devices. We also show that the long-term stability is currently limited by the second-order Zeeman shift to 2×10-12 at 1000 s.

  11. An in situ trap capacitance measurement and ion-trapping detection scheme for a Penning ion trap facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reza, Ashif; Banerjee, Kumardeb; Das, Parnika; Ray, Kalyankumar; Bandyopadhyay, Subhankar; Dam, Bivas

    2017-03-01

    This paper presents the design and implementation of an in situ measurement setup for the capacitance of a five electrode Penning ion trap (PIT) facility at room temperature. For implementing a high Q resonant circuit for the detection of trapped electrons/ions in a PIT, the value of the capacitance of the trap assembly is of prime importance. A tunable Colpitts oscillator followed by a unity gain buffer and a low pass filter is designed and successfully implemented for a two-fold purpose: in situ measurement of the trap capacitance when the electric and magnetic fields are turned off and also providing RF power at the desired frequency to the PIT for exciting the trapped ions and subsequent detection. The setup is tested for the in situ measurement of trap capacitance at room temperature and the results are found to comply with those obtained from measurements using a high Q parallel resonant circuit setup driven by a standard RF signal generator. The Colpitts oscillator is also tested successfully for supplying RF power to the high Q resonant circuit, which is required for the detection of trapped electrons/ions.

  12. Quantum Rabi Model with Trapped Ions

    PubMed Central

    Pedernales, J. S.; Lizuain, I.; Felicetti, S.; Romero, G.; Lamata, L.; Solano, E.

    2015-01-01

    We propose the quantum simulation of the quantum Rabi model in all parameter regimes by means of detuned bichromatic sideband excitations of a single trapped ion. We show that current setups can reproduce, in particular, the ultrastrong and deep strong coupling regimes of such a paradigmatic light-matter interaction. Furthermore, associated with these extreme dipolar regimes, we study the controlled generation and detection of their entangled ground states by means of adiabatic methods. Ion traps have arguably performed the first quantum simulation of the Jaynes-Cummings model, a restricted regime of the quantum Rabi model where the rotating-wave approximation holds. We show that one can go beyond and experimentally investigate the quantum simulation of coupling regimes of the quantum Rabi model that are difficult to achieve with natural dipolar interactions. PMID:26482660

  13. Ultrafast Interferometry and Gates with Trapped Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Kale; Wong-Campos, David; Neyenhuis, Brian; Mizrahi, Jonathan; Monroe, Christopher

    2016-05-01

    We sense the motion of a trapped atomic ion using a sequence of state-dependent ultrafast momentum kicks. We use this atom interferometer to characterize a nearly-pure quantum state with n = 1 phonon and accurately measure thermal states ranging from near the zero-point energy to n ~104 , with the possibility of extending at least 100 times higher in energy. The complete energy range of this method spans from the ground state to far outside of the Lamb-Dicke regime, where atomic motion is greater than the optical wavelength. Apart from thermometry, these interferometric techniques are useful for quantum information purposes, and we discuss the outlook for ultrafast entangling gates between multiple trapped ions. This work is supported by the NSF Physics Frontier Center at JQI.

  14. Oligossacharide structure determination on an ion trap

    SciTech Connect

    Asam, M.R.; Glish, G.L.

    1995-12-31

    Oligosaccharides are important elements in intra- and inter-cellular/molecular recognition mechanisms. Linkage types are part of the information that determine the tertiary structure of oligosaccharides and the tertiary structure is what determines specific recognition, so easily obtained linkage sequences will provide valuable information for computer and other modeling of cellular signaling interactions. Hofmeister et al. have shown that lithium cationized oligosaccharides have specific MS/MS dissociation patterns indicative of the carbohydrate linkage under low energy CID conditions in a hybrid mass spectrometer. The authors have used electrospray ionization on a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer to examine MS/MS disaccharide dissociation patterns under ion trap conditions. These studies have concentrated on disaccharides complexed with lithium and sodium.

  15. Trapped Ion Quantum Computation by Adiabatic Passage

    SciTech Connect

    Feng Xuni; Wu Chunfeng; Lai, C. H.; Oh, C. H.

    2008-11-07

    We propose a new universal quantum computation scheme for trapped ions in thermal motion via the technique of adiabatic passage, which incorporates the advantages of both the adiabatic passage and the model of trapped ions in thermal motion. Our scheme is immune from the decoherence due to spontaneous emission from excited states as the system in our scheme evolves along a dark state. In our scheme the vibrational degrees of freedom are not required to be cooled to their ground states because they are only virtually excited. It is shown that the fidelity of the resultant gate operation is still high even when the magnitude of the effective Rabi frequency moderately deviates from the desired value.

  16. Quantum Rabi Model with Trapped Ions.

    PubMed

    Pedernales, J S; Lizuain, I; Felicetti, S; Romero, G; Lamata, L; Solano, E

    2015-10-20

    We propose the quantum simulation of the quantum Rabi model in all parameter regimes by means of detuned bichromatic sideband excitations of a single trapped ion. We show that current setups can reproduce, in particular, the ultrastrong and deep strong coupling regimes of such a paradigmatic light-matter interaction. Furthermore, associated with these extreme dipolar regimes, we study the controlled generation and detection of their entangled ground states by means of adiabatic methods. Ion traps have arguably performed the first quantum simulation of the Jaynes-Cummings model, a restricted regime of the quantum Rabi model where the rotating-wave approximation holds. We show that one can go beyond and experimentally investigate the quantum simulation of coupling regimes of the quantum Rabi model that are difficult to achieve with natural dipolar interactions.

  17. Note: Ion source design for ion trap systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noriega, J. R.; Quevedo, M.; Gnade, B.; Vasselli, J.

    2013-06-01

    A small plasma (glow discharge) based ion source and circuit are described in this work. The ion source works by producing a high voltage pulsed discharge between two electrodes in a pressure range of 50-100 mTorr. A third mesh electrode is used for ion extraction. The electrodes are small stainless steel screws mounted in a MACOR ionization chamber in a linear arrangement. The electrode arrangement is driven by a circuit, design for low power operation. This design is a proof of concept intended for applications on small cylindrical ion traps.

  18. An improved linear ion trap physics package

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestage, J. D.

    1993-01-01

    This article describes an improvement in the architecture of the physics package used in the Linear Ion Trap (LIT)-based frequency standard recently developed at JPL. This new design is based on the observation that ions can be moved along the axis of an LIT by applied dc voltages. The state selection and interrogation region can be separated from the more critical microwave resonance region where the multiplied local oscillator signal is compared with the stable atomic transition. This separation relaxes many of the design constraints of the present units. Improvements include increased frequency stability and a substantial reduction in size, mass, and cost of the final frequency standard.

  19. ION TRAPPING AND CATHODE BOMBARDMENT BY TRAPPED IONS IN DC PHOTOGUNS.

    SciTech Connect

    POZDEYEV,E.

    2007-06-25

    DC photoguns are used to produce high-quality, high-intensity electron beams for accelerator driven applications. Ion bombardment is believed to be the major cause of degradation of the photocathode efficiency. Additionally to ions produced in the accelerating cathode-anode gap, the electron beam can ionize the residual gas in the transport line. These ions are trapped transversely within the beam and can drift back to the accelerating gap and contribute to the bombardment rate of the cathode. This paper proposes a method to reduce the flow of ions produced in the beam transport line and drifting back to the cathode-anode gap by introducing a positive potential barrier that repels the trapped ions. The reduced ion bombardment rate and increased life time of photocathodes will reduce the downtime required to service photoinjectors and associated costs.

  20. Spectroscopy of ions using fast beams and ion traps

    SciTech Connect

    Pinnington, E H; Trabert, E

    2004-10-01

    A knowledge of the spectra of ionized atoms is of importance in many fields. They can be studied in a wide variety of light sources. In recent years techniques coming under the broad heatings of fast beams and ion traps have been used extensively for such investigations. This article considers the advantages that various techniques have for particular applications.

  1. Protoype Solid State Quantum Interface for Trapped Ions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-11-07

    We study how to couple the motion of trapped ions to each other. For this we set up an ion trap apparatus with an electrically floating electrode...connecting two trapping sites. We find that we can trap ions nearby such an electrically floating electrode. At the same time, we develop a method to...coupling electrode amenable to Arion treatment. Finally, we develop a vision for QIP with electrons with the distinct advantages of avoiding laser technology and being inherently faster than trapped ions .

  2. Prospects for quantum computation with trapped ions

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, R.J.; James, D.F.V.

    1997-12-31

    Over the past decade information theory has been generalized to allow binary data to be represented by two-state quantum mechanical systems. (A single two-level system has come to be known as a qubit in this context.) The additional freedom introduced into information physics with quantum systems has opened up a variety of capabilities that go well beyond those of conventional information. For example, quantum cryptography allows two parties to generate a secret key even in the presence of eavesdropping. But perhaps the most remarkable capabilities have been predicted in the field of quantum computation. Here, a brief survey of the requirements for quantum computational hardware, and an overview of the in trap quantum computation project at Los Alamos are presented. The physical limitations to quantum computation with trapped ions are discussed.

  3. The streaming-trapped ion interface in the equatorial inner magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, J.; Horwitz, J. L.; Gallagher, D.; Pollock, C. J.

    1994-01-01

    Spacecraft measurements of core ions on L=4-7 field-lines typically show trapped ion distributions near the magnetic equator, and frequently indicate field-aligned ion streams at higher latitudes. The nature of the transition between them may indicate both the microphysics of hot-cold plasma interactions and overall consequences for core plasma evolution. We have undertaken a statistical analysis and characterization of this interface and its relation to the equatorial region of the inner magnetosphere. In this analysis, we have characterized such features as the equatorial ion flux anisotropy, the penetration of field-aligned ionospheric streams into the equatorial region, the scale of the transition into trapped ion populations, and the transition latitude. We found that most transition latitudes occur within 13 deg of the equator. The typical values of equatorial ion anisotropies are consistent with bi-Maxwellian temperature ratios of T(sub perpendicular)/T(sub parallel) in the range of 3-5. The latitudinal scales for the edges of the trapped ion populations display a rather strong peak in the 2-3 deg range. We also found that there is a trend for the penetration ratio, the anisotropy half width, and the transition scale length to decrease with a higher equatorial ion anisotropy. We may interpret these features in terms of Liouville mapping of equatorially trapped ions and the reflection of the incoming ionospheric ion streams from the equatorial potential peaks associated with such trapped ions.

  4. Ion dynamics in a trapped ion mobility spectrometer†

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez, Diana Rosa; DeBord, John Daniel; Ridgeway, Mark E.; Kaplan, Desmond A.; Park, Melvin A.; Fernandez-Lima, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    In the present paper, theoretical simulations and experimental observations are used to describe the ion dynamics in a trapped ion mobility spectrometer. In particular, the ion motion, ion transmission and mobility separation are discussed as a function of the bath gas velocity, radial confinement, analysis time and speed. Mobility analysis and calibration procedure are reported for the case of sphere-like molecules for positive and negative ion modes. Results showed that a maximal mobility resolution can be achieved by optimizing the gas velocity, radial confinement (RF amplitude) and ramp speed (voltage range and ramp time). The mobility resolution scales with the electric field and gas velocity and R = 100–250 can be routinely obtained at room temperature. PMID:24571000

  5. Ball-grid array architecture for microfabricated ion traps

    SciTech Connect

    Guise, Nicholas D. Fallek, Spencer D.; Stevens, Kelly E.; Brown, K. R.; Volin, Curtis; Harter, Alexa W.; Amini, Jason M.; Higashi, Robert E.; Lu, Son Thai; Chanhvongsak, Helen M.; Nguyen, Thi A.; Marcus, Matthew S.; Ohnstein, Thomas R.; Youngner, Daniel W.

    2015-05-07

    State-of-the-art microfabricated ion traps for quantum information research are approaching nearly one hundred control electrodes. We report here on the development and testing of a new architecture for microfabricated ion traps, built around ball-grid array (BGA) connections, that is suitable for increasingly complex trap designs. In the BGA trap, through-substrate vias bring electrical signals from the back side of the trap die to the surface trap structure on the top side. Gold-ball bump bonds connect the back side of the trap die to an interposer for signal routing from the carrier. Trench capacitors fabricated into the trap die replace area-intensive surface or edge capacitors. Wirebonds in the BGA architecture are moved to the interposer. These last two features allow the trap die to be reduced to only the area required to produce trapping fields. The smaller trap dimensions allow tight focusing of an addressing laser beam for fast single-qubit rotations. Performance of the BGA trap as characterized with {sup 40}Ca{sup +} ions is comparable to previous surface-electrode traps in terms of ion heating rate, mode frequency stability, and storage lifetime. We demonstrate two-qubit entanglement operations with {sup 171}Yb{sup +} ions in a second BGA trap.

  6. Ball-grid array architecture for microfabricated ion traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guise, Nicholas D.; Fallek, Spencer D.; Stevens, Kelly E.; Brown, K. R.; Volin, Curtis; Harter, Alexa W.; Amini, Jason M.; Higashi, Robert E.; Lu, Son Thai; Chanhvongsak, Helen M.; Nguyen, Thi A.; Marcus, Matthew S.; Ohnstein, Thomas R.; Youngner, Daniel W.

    2015-05-01

    State-of-the-art microfabricated ion traps for quantum information research are approaching nearly one hundred control electrodes. We report here on the development and testing of a new architecture for microfabricated ion traps, built around ball-grid array (BGA) connections, that is suitable for increasingly complex trap designs. In the BGA trap, through-substrate vias bring electrical signals from the back side of the trap die to the surface trap structure on the top side. Gold-ball bump bonds connect the back side of the trap die to an interposer for signal routing from the carrier. Trench capacitors fabricated into the trap die replace area-intensive surface or edge capacitors. Wirebonds in the BGA architecture are moved to the interposer. These last two features allow the trap die to be reduced to only the area required to produce trapping fields. The smaller trap dimensions allow tight focusing of an addressing laser beam for fast single-qubit rotations. Performance of the BGA trap as characterized with 40Ca+ ions is comparable to previous surface-electrode traps in terms of ion heating rate, mode frequency stability, and storage lifetime. We demonstrate two-qubit entanglement operations with 171Yb+ ions in a second BGA trap.

  7. Internal-state dephasing of trapped ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brouard, S.; Plata, J.

    2003-07-01

    The effect of random fields on the internal dynamics of trapped ions is studied analytically. General characteristics of the dependence of the dephasing on the noise statistics are identified: the form of the initial decay of the coherences is determined by the probability distribution; effects of noise color, in particular, collapses and revivals rooted in spectral concentration of the fluctuations, are apparent in a transient regime; at large times, exponential decay sets in for widely different noise properties. The study is particularized to magnetic-field fluctuations: features distinctive of the linear and quadratic Zeeman shifts are traced. The scaling of the dephasing with the number of ions is analyzed; the implications for the realization of decoherence-free states are discussed.

  8. Towards Quantum Simulations Using a Chip Ion Trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Chenglin; Wright, Ken; Brennan, Daniel; Ji, Geoffrey; Monroe, Christopher

    2013-05-01

    We report our current experimental progress towards using chip ion traps for quantum simulation. Current progress is being made using a micro-fabricated symmetric trap from GTRI. This trap implements a novel two level design that combines the benefits of both surface traps and linear four-rod traps. The trap has 50 electrodes which allow for the fine control of the DC potential needed to create large anharmonic potentials, to join and split ion chains and to shuttle ions along the trapping axis similar to many surface traps. However this trap also has a much deeper trapping depth than conventional surface traps and improved optical access via an angled slot through the chip wide enough to accommodate higher power laser light which could cause surface charging or damage in a traditional chip trap. These advantages should allow trapping of long ion chains. We hope to use these features as the next step in increasing the size of current quantum simulations being done at Univ of Maryland, which are aimed at exploring quantum phenomena in spin systems in a regime inaccessible to classical simulation. This work is supported by grants from the U.S. Army Research Office with funding from the DARPA OLE program, IARPA, and the MURI program; and the NSF Physics Frontier Center at JQI. We acknowledge the GTRI team of J. Amini, K. Brown, A. Harter, F. Shaikh, R. Slusher, and C. Volin for the fabrication of the trap.

  9. Trapped ion mode in toroidally rotating plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Artun, M.; Tang, W.M.; Rewoldt, G.

    1995-04-01

    The influence of radially sheared toroidal flows on the Trapped Ion Mode (TIM) is investigated using a two-dimensional eigenmode code. These radially extended toroidal microinstabilities could significantly influence the interpretation of confinement scaling trends and associated fluctuation properties observed in recent tokamak experiments. In the present analysis, the electrostatic drift kinetic equation is obtained from the general nonlinear gyrokinetic equation in rotating plasmas. In the long perpendicular wavelength limit k{sub {tau}}{rho}{sub bi} {much_lt} 1, where {rho}{sub bi} is the average trapped-ion banana width, the resulting eigenmode equation becomes a coupled system of second order differential equations nmo for the poloidal harmonics. These equations are solved using finite element methods. Numerical results from the analysis of low and medium toroidal mode number instabilities are presented using representative TFTR L-mode input parameters. To illustrate the effects of mode coupling, a case is presented where the poloidal mode coupling is suppressed. The influence of toroidal rotation on a TFTR L-mode shot is also analyzed by including a beam species with considerable larger temperature. A discussion of the numerical results is presented.

  10. Integrated Diffractive Optics for Surface Ion Traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streed, Erik; Ghadimi, Moji; Blums, Valdis; Norton, Benjamin; Connor, Paul; Amini, Jason; Volin, Curtis; Lobino, Mirko; Kielpinski, David

    2016-05-01

    Photonic interconnects are a bottleneck to achieving large-scale trapped ion quantum computing. We have modified a Georgia Tech Research Institute microwave chip trap by using e-beam lithography to write reflective diffractive collimating optics (80 μm x 127 μm, f=58.6 μm, λ=369.5nm) on the center electrode. The optics have an NA of 0.55 x 0.73, capturing 13.2% of the solid angle. To evaluate the optics 174Yb+ was loaded by isotope selective photo-ionization from a thermal oven and then shuttled to imaging sites. Near diffraction limited sub-wavelength ion images were obtained with an observed spot sized FWHM of 338 nm x 268 nm vs. a diffraction limit of 336 nm x 257 nm. The total photon collection efficiency was measured to be 5.2+/-1.2%. Coupling into a single mode fiber of up to 2.0+/-0.6% was observed, limited by mismatch in the coupling optics. Image mode quality indicates coupling up to 4% may be possible. Funding from Australian Research Council and IARPA.

  11. Computer simulations of ions in radio-frequency traps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, A.; Prestage, J. D.; Maleki, L.; Djomehri, J.; Harabetian, E.

    1990-01-01

    The motion of ions in a trapped-ion frequency standard affects the stability of the standard. In order to study the motion and structures of large ion clouds in a radio-frequency (RF) trap, a computer simulation of the system that incorporates the effect of thermal excitation of the ions was developed. Results are presented from the simulation for cloud sizes up to 512 ions, emphasizing cloud structures in the low-temperature regime.

  12. Silicon surface-electrode ion traps for quantum information processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doret, S. Charles; Slusher, Richart

    2010-03-01

    The Georgia Tech Research Institute (GTRI) is designing, building, and testing scalable surface-electrode ion traps for quantum information applications, fabricated using silicon VLSI technology. A wide range of trap architectures have been developed, including a linear trap capable of holding long chains of equally spaced ions, a 90-degree X-junction, and an integrated micromirror with collection efficiency approaching 20%. Fabrication features that can be integrated with the surface electrodes include multilayer interconnects, optics for enhanced light collection, flexible optical access through beveled slots extending through the substrate, and recessed wire bonds for clear laser access across the trap surface. Traps are designed at GTRI using in-house codes that calculate trap fields, compute the full motion of ions confined in the trap, including micromotion, and optimize electrode shapes and transport waveforms using genetic algorithms. We will present designs and initial test results for several of these traps, as well as plans for their use in future experiments.

  13. Trap door and underside of cap stone of pyramid ion ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Trap door and underside of cap stone of pyramid ion - Washington Monument, High ground West of Fifteenth Street, Northwest, between Independence & Constitution Avenues, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  14. Test of Lorentz symmetry with trapped ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pruttivarasin, Thaned

    2016-05-01

    The outcome of an experiment should not depend on the orientation of the apparatus in space. This important cornerstone of physics is deeply engrained into the Standard Model of Physics by requiring that all fields must be Lorentz invariant. However, it is well-known that the Standard Model is incomplete. Some theories conjecture that at the Planck scale Lorentz symmetry might be broken and measurable at experimentally accessible energy scales. Therefore, a search for violation of Lorentz symmetry directly probes physics beyond the Standard model. We present a novel experiment utilizing trapped calcium ions as a direct probe of Lorentz-violation in the electron-photon sector. We monitor the energy between atomic states with different orientations of the electronic wave-functions as they rotate together with the motion of the Earth. This is analogous to the famous Michelson-Morley experiment. To remove magnetic field noise, we perform the experiment with the ions prepared in the decoherence-free states. Our result improves on the most stringent bounds on Lorentz symmetry for electrons by 100 times. The experimental scheme is readily applicable to many ion species, hence opening up paths toward much improved test of Lorentz symmetry in the future. (Ph. D. Advisor: Hartmut Haeffner, University of California, Berkeley).

  15. Fundamental symmetries studies with cold trapped francium atoms at ISAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gwinner, G.; Gomez, E.; Orozco, L. A.; Perez Galvan, A.; Sheng, D.; Zhao, Y.; Sprouse, G. D.; Behr, J. A.; Jackson, K. P.; Pearson, M. R.; Aubin, S.; Flambaum, V. V.

    2006-09-01

    Francium combines a heavy nucleus ( Z = 87) with the simple atomic structure of alkalis and is a very promising candidate for precision tests of fundamental symmetries such as atomic parity non-conservation measurements. Fr has no stable isotopes, and the ISAC radioactive beam facility at TRIUMF, equipped with an actinide target, promises to provide record quantities of Fr atoms, up to 1010/s for some isotopes. We discuss our plans for a Fr on-line laser trapping facility at ISAC and experiments with samples of cold Fr atoms. We outline our plans for a measurement of the nuclear anapole moment a parity non-conserving, time-reversal conserving moment that arises from weak interactions between nucleons in a chain of Fr isotopes. Its measurement is a unique probe for neutral weak interactions inside the nucleus.

  16. Fundamental symmetries studies with cold trapped francium atoms at ISAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gwinner, G.; Gomez, E.; Orozco, L. A.; Gaivan, A. Perez; Sheng, D.; Zhao, Y.; Sprouse, G. D.; Behr, J. A.; Jackson, K. P.; Pearson, M. R.; Aubin, S.; Flambaum, V. V.

    Francium combines a heavy nucleus (Z = 87) with the simple atomic structure of alkalis and is a very promising candidate for precision tests of fundamental symmetries such as atomic parity non-conservation measurements. Fr has no stable isotopes, and the ISAC radioactive beam facility at TRIUMF, equipped with an actinide target, promises to provide record quantities of Fr atoms, up to 1010/s for some isotopes. We discuss our plans for a Fr on-line laser trapping facility at ISAC and experiments with samples of cold Fr atoms. We outline our plans for a measurement of the nuclear anapole moment — a parity non-conserving, time-reversal conserving moment that arises from weak interactions between nucléons — in a chain of Fr isotopes. Its measurement is a unique probe for neutral weak interactions inside the nucleus.

  17. Ejection of Coulomb Crystals from a Linear Paul Ion Trap for Ion-Molecule Reaction Studies.

    PubMed

    Meyer, K A E; Pollum, L L; Petralia, L S; Tauschinsky, A; Rennick, C J; Softley, T P; Heazlewood, B R

    2015-12-17

    Coulomb crystals are being increasingly employed as a highly localized source of cold ions for the study of ion-molecule chemical reactions. To extend the scope of reactions that can be studied in Coulomb crystals-from simple reactions involving laser-cooled atomic ions, to more complex systems where molecular reactants give rise to multiple product channels-sensitive product detection methodologies are required. The use of a digital ion trap (DIT) and a new damped cosine trap (DCT) are described, which facilitate the ejection of Coulomb-crystallized ions onto an external detector for the recording of time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectra. This enables the examination of reaction dynamics and kinetics between Coulomb-crystallized ions and neutral molecules: ionic products are typically cotrapped, thus ejecting the crystal onto an external detector reveals the masses, identities, and quantities of all ionic species at a selected point in the reaction. Two reaction systems are examined: the reaction of Ca(+) with deuterated isotopologues of water, and the charge exchange between cotrapped Xe(+) with deuterated isotopologues of ammonia. These reactions are examples of two distinct types of experiment, the first involving direct reaction of the laser-cooled ions, and the second involving reaction of sympathetically-cooled heavy ions to form a mixture of light product ions. Extensive simulations are conducted to interpret experimental results and calculate optimal operating parameters, facilitating a comparison between the DIT and DCT approaches. The simulations also demonstrate a correlation between crystal shape and image shape on the detector, suggesting a possible means for determining crystal geometry for nonfluorescing ions.

  18. Cold fission as heavy ion emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poenaru, D. N.; Maruhn, J. A.; Greiner, W.; Ivaşcu, M.; Mazilu, D.; Gherghescu, R.

    1987-09-01

    The last version of the analytical superasymmetric fission model is applied to study cold fission processes. Strong shell effects are present either in one or both fission fragments. A smooth behaviour is observed when the proton or the neutron numbers are changed by four units. Increasing Z and N, in the transuranium region, a sharp transition from asymmetry with a large peak-to-valley ratio to symmetry at Z=100 and/or N=164 is obtained. The transition toward asymmetry at higher Z and N is much smoother. The most probable cold fission light fragments from234U,236U,239Np and240Pu are100Zr,104Mo,106Mo and106Mo, respectively, in good agreement with experimental data. The unified treatment of alpha decay, heavy ion radioactivities and cold fission is illustrated for234U — the first nucleus in which all three groups have been already observed.

  19. Trapped energetic ion dynamics affected by localized electric field perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, Seiya

    2016-01-01

    Trapped energetic ion orbits in helical systems are numerically simulated using the Lorentz model. Simulation results of precession drift frequencies of trapped energetic ions are benchmarked by those of analytic solutions. The effects of the electric field perturbation localized at the rational surface on trapped energetic ions are examined, where the perturbation has an arbitrary rotation frequency and an amplitude fixed in time. It is found that the trapped energetic ions resonantly interact with the perturbation, when the rotation frequency of the perturbation is comparable to the precession drift frequencies of trapped energetic ions. The simulation results are suggestive to a mechanism of the energetic-ion-induced interchange mode, which might be associated with the fishbone mode observed in helical systems.

  20. JPL Ultrastable Trapped Ion Atomic Frequency Standards.

    PubMed

    Burt, Eric A; Yi, Lin; Tucker, Blake; Hamell, Robert; Tjoelker, Robert L

    2016-07-01

    Recently, room temperature trapped ion atomic clock development at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) has focused on three directions: 1) ultrastable atomic clocks, usually for terrestrial applications emphasizing ultimate stability performance and autonomous timekeeping; 2) new atomic clock technology for space flight applications that require strict adherence to size, weight, and power requirements; and 3) miniature clocks. In this paper, we concentrate on the first direction and present a design and the initial results from a new ultrastable clock referred to as L10 that achieves a short-term stability of 4.5 ×10(-14)/τ(1/2) and an initial measurement of no significant drift with an uncertainty of 2.4 ×10(-16) /day over a two-week period.

  1. Trapped ion simulation of molecular spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yangchao; Lu, Yao; Zhang, Kuan; Zhang, Shuaining; Huh, Joonsuk; Kim, Kihwan

    2016-05-01

    Boson sampling had been suggested as a classically intractable and quantum mechanically manageable problem via computational complexity theory arguments. Recently, Huh and co-workers proposed theoretically a modified version of boson sampling, which is designed to simulate a molecular problem, as a practical application. Here, we report the experimental implementation of the theoretical proposal with a trapped ion system. As a first demonstration, we perform the quantum simulation of molecular vibronic profile of SO2, which incorporates squeezing, rotation and coherent displacements operations, and the collective projection measurement on phonon modes. This work was supported by the National Basic Research Program of China 11CBA00300, 2011CBA00301, National Natural Science Foundation of China 11374178, 11574002. Basic Science Research Program of Korea NRF-2015R1A6A3A04059773.

  2. An ion trap built with photonic crystal fibre technology

    SciTech Connect

    Lindenfelser, F. Keitch, B.; Kienzler, D.; Home, J. P.; Bykov, D.; Uebel, P.; Russell, P. St. J.

    2015-03-15

    We demonstrate a surface-electrode ion trap fabricated using techniques transferred from the manufacture of photonic-crystal fibres. This provides a relatively straightforward route for realizing traps with an electrode structure on the 100 micron scale with high optical access. We demonstrate the basic functionality of the trap by cooling a single ion to the quantum ground state, allowing us to measure a heating rate from the ground state of 787 ± 24 quanta/s. Variation of the fabrication procedure used here may provide access to traps in this geometry with trap scales between 100 μm and 10 μm.

  3. Technologies for trapped-ion quantum information systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eltony, Amira M.; Gangloff, Dorian; Shi, Molu; Bylinskii, Alexei; Vuletić, Vladan; Chuang, Isaac L.

    2016-12-01

    Scaling up from prototype systems to dense arrays of ions on chip, or vast networks of ions connected by photonic channels, will require developing entirely new technologies that combine miniaturized ion trapping systems with devices to capture, transmit, and detect light, while refining how ions are confined and controlled. Building a cohesive ion system from such diverse parts involves many challenges, including navigating materials incompatibilities and undesired coupling between elements. Here, we review our recent efforts to create scalable ion systems incorporating unconventional materials such as graphene and indium tin oxide, integrating devices like optical fibers and mirrors, and exploring alternative ion loading and trapping techniques.

  4. Optical Sideband Cooling of Ions in a Penning Trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, R. C.; Goodwin, J. F.; Stutter, G.; Segal, D. M.

    Optical sideband cooling is a well-established technique for preparing trapped ions in the ground state of one or more of their motional degrees of freedom. Up to now, this technique has mainly been applied in various types of radiofrequency trap. We show in this paper that the technique is also very effective in a Penning trap, and demonstrate that our trap has an exceptionally low heating rate, due to the large size of the Penning trap electrodes and the absence of large-amplitude radiofrequency fields in the trap.

  5. Photodissociation of Trapped Rb2+: Implications for Simultaneous Trapping of Atoms and Molecular Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jyothi, S.; Ray, Tridib; Dutta, Sourav; Allouche, A. R.; Vexiau, Romain; Dulieu, Olivier; Rangwala, S. A.

    2016-11-01

    The direct photodissociation of trapped 85Rb2+ (rubidium) molecular ions by the cooling light for the 85Rb magneto-optical trap (MOT) is studied, both experimentally and theoretically. Vibrationally excited Rb2+ ions are created by photoionization of Rb2 molecules formed photoassociatively in the Rb MOT and are trapped in a modified spherical Paul trap. The decay rate of the trapped Rb2+ ion signal in the presence of the MOT cooling light is measured and agreement with our calculated rates for molecular ion photodissociation is observed. The photodissociation mechanism due to the MOT light is expected to be active and therefore universal for all homonuclear diatomic alkali metal molecular ions.

  6. Photodissociation of Trapped Rb_{2}^{+}: Implications for Simultaneous Trapping of Atoms and Molecular Ions.

    PubMed

    Jyothi, S; Ray, Tridib; Dutta, Sourav; Allouche, A R; Vexiau, Romain; Dulieu, Olivier; Rangwala, S A

    2016-11-18

    The direct photodissociation of trapped ^{85}Rb_{2}^{+} (rubidium) molecular ions by the cooling light for the ^{85}Rb magneto-optical trap (MOT) is studied, both experimentally and theoretically. Vibrationally excited Rb_{2}^{+} ions are created by photoionization of Rb_{2} molecules formed photoassociatively in the Rb MOT and are trapped in a modified spherical Paul trap. The decay rate of the trapped Rb_{2}^{+} ion signal in the presence of the MOT cooling light is measured and agreement with our calculated rates for molecular ion photodissociation is observed. The photodissociation mechanism due to the MOT light is expected to be active and therefore universal for all homonuclear diatomic alkali metal molecular ions.

  7. Proton Transfer Reaction Ion Trap Mass Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Prazeller, Peter; Palmer, Peter T.; Boscaini, Elena; Jobson, B Tom T.; Alexander, M. Lizabeth

    2003-06-11

    Proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry is a relatively new field that has attracted a great deal of interest in the last few years. This technique uses H₃Oþ as a chemical ionization (CI) reagent to measure volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the parts per billion by volume (ppbv) to parts per trillion by volume (pptv) range. Mass spectra acquired with a proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS) are simple because proton transfer chemical ionization is ‘soft’ and results in little or no fragmentation. Unfortunately, peak identification can still be difficult due to isobaric interferences. A possible solution to this problem is to couple the PTR drift tube to an ion trap mass spectrometer (ITMS). The use of an ITMS is appealing because of its ability to perform MS/MS and possibly distinguish between isomers and other isobars. Additionally, the ITMS duty cycle is much higher than that of a linear quadrupole so faster data acquisition rates are possible that will allow for detection of multiple compounds. Here we present the first results from a proton transfer reaction ion trap mass spectrometer (PTR-ITMS). The aim of this study was to investigate ion injection and storage efficiency of a simple prototype instrument in order to estimate possible detection limits of a second-generation instrument. Using this prototype a detection limit of 100 ppbv was demonstrated. Modifications are suggested that will enable further reduction in detection limits to the low-ppbv to high-pptv range. Furthermore, the applicability of MS/MS in differentiating between isobaric species was determined. MS/MS spectra of the isobaric compounds methyl vinyl ketone (MVK) and methacrolein (MACR) are presented and show fragments of different mass making differentiation possible, even when a mixture of both species is present in the same sample. However, MS/MS spectra of acetone and propanal produce fragments with the same molecular masses but with different intensity ratios

  8. Proton Transfer Reaction Ion Trap Mass Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Prazeller, Peter; Palmer, Peter T.; Boscaini, Elena; Jobson, B Tom; Alexander, M. Lizabeth

    2003-07-07

    Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS) is a relatively new field that has attracted a great deal of interest in the last several years. This technique uses H3O+ as a chemical ionization (CI) agent for measuring volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the parts per billion by volume (ppbv) - parts per trillion by volume (pptv) range. PTR-MS mass spectra are simple because the ionization method of proton transfer is “soft”, resulting in little or no fragmentation. Unfortunately, the simplicity of the mass spectra can cause problems in peak identification due to isobaric interferences. A possible solution to this problem is to couple the PTR drift tube to an ion trap mass spectrometer (ITMS). ITMS is appealing because of the ability to perform MS/MS and possibly distinguish between isomers and other isobars. Additionally, the ITMS duty cycle is much higher than that of a linear quadrupole so faster data acquisition rates can be realized for detection of multiple compounds. We present here the first results from a Proton Transfer Reaction Ion Trap Mass Spectrometer (PTR-ITMS). The aim of this study was to investigate ion injection and storage efficiency of a simple prototype interface in order to estimate possible detection limits of a second generation instrument. Using this prototype a detection limit of 100 ppbv was demonstrated for the PTR-ITMS. Modifications are suggested that will enable further reduction in detection limits to the low ppbv to pptv range. Furthermore the applicability of MS/MS to differentiate between isobaric species was determined. MS/MS spectra of the isobaric compounds methyl vinyl ketone (MVK) and methacrolein (MACR) are presented and show fragments of different mass making a differentiation possible even when a mixture of both species is present in the same sample. MS/MS spectra of acetone and propanal produce fragments with the same molecular weight but different ratios, allowing quantitative distinction only if one species

  9. Ion traps in nuclear physics-Recent results and achievements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eronen, Tommi; Kankainen, Anu; Äystö, Juha

    2016-11-01

    Ion traps offer a way to determine nuclear binding energies through atomic mass measurements with a high accuracy and they are routinely used to provide isotopically or even isomerically pure beams of short-living ions for post-trap decay spectroscopy experiments. In this review, different ion-trapping techniques and progresses in recent nuclear physics experiments employing low-energy ion traps are discussed. The main focus in this review is on the benefit of recent high accuracy mass measurements to solve some key problems in physics related to nuclear structure, nuclear astrophysics as well as neutrinos. Also, several cases of decay spectroscopy experiments utilizing trap-purified ion samples are summarized.

  10. Blue-sky bifurcation of ion energies and the limits of neutral-gas sympathetic cooling of trapped ions

    PubMed Central

    Schowalter, Steven J.; Dunning, Alexander J.; Chen, Kuang; Puri, Prateek; Schneider, Christian; Hudson, Eric R.

    2016-01-01

    Sympathetic cooling of trapped ions through collisions with neutral buffer gases is critical to a variety of modern scientific fields, including fundamental chemistry, mass spectrometry, nuclear and particle physics, and atomic and molecular physics. Despite its widespread use over four decades, there remain open questions regarding its fundamental limitations. To probe these limits, here we examine the steady-state evolution of up to 10 barium ions immersed in a gas of three-million laser-cooled calcium atoms. We observe and explain the emergence of nonequilibrium behaviour as evidenced by bifurcations in the ion steady-state temperature, parameterized by ion number. We show that this behaviour leads to the limitations in creating and maintaining translationally cold samples of trapped ions using neutral-gas sympathetic cooling. These results may provide a route to studying non-equilibrium thermodynamics at the atomic level. PMID:27511602

  11. METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR TRAPPING IONS IN A MAGNETIC FIELD

    DOEpatents

    Luce, J.S.

    1962-04-17

    A method and apparatus are described for trapping ions within an evacuated container and within a magnetic field utilizing dissociation and/or ionization of molecular ions to form atomic ions and energetic neutral particles. The atomic ions are magnetically trapped as a result of a change of charge-to- mass ratio. The molecular ions are injected into the container and into the path of an energetic carbon arc discharge which dissociates and/or ionizes a portion of the molecular ions into atomic ions and energetic neutrals. The resulting atomic ions are trapped by the magnetic field to form a circulating beam of atomic ions, and the energetic neutrals pass out of the system and may be utilized in a particle accelerator. (AEC)

  12. Controlling trapping potentials and stray electric fields in a microfabricated ion trap through design and compensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doret, S. Charles; Amini, Jason M.; Wright, Kenneth; Volin, Curtis; Killian, Tyler; Ozakin, Arkadas; Denison, Douglas; Hayden, Harley; Pai, C.-S.; Slusher, Richart E.; Harter, Alexa W.

    2012-07-01

    Recent advances in quantum information processing with trapped ions have demonstrated the need for new ion trap architectures capable of holding and manipulating chains of many (>10) ions. Here we present the design and detailed characterization of a new linear trap, microfabricated with scalable complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) techniques, that is well-suited to this challenge. Forty-four individually controlled dc electrodes provide the many degrees of freedom required to construct anharmonic potential wells, shuttle ions, merge and split ion chains, precisely tune secular mode frequencies, and adjust the orientation of trap axes. Microfabricated capacitors on dc electrodes suppress radio-frequency pickup and excess micromotion, while a top-level ground layer simplifies modeling of electric fields and protects trap structures underneath. A localized aperture in the substrate provides access to the trapping region from an oven below, permitting deterministic loading of particular isotopic/elemental sequences via species-selective photoionization. The shapes of the aperture and radio-frequency electrodes are optimized to minimize perturbation of the trapping pseudopotential. Laboratory experiments verify simulated potentials and characterize trapping lifetimes, stray electric fields, and ion heating rates, while measurement and cancellation of spatially-varying stray electric fields permits the formation of nearly-equally spaced ion chains.

  13. SAMPEX measurements of heavy ions trapped in the magnetosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Cummings, J.R.; Cummings, A.C.; Mewaldt, R.A.; Selesnick, R.S.; Stone, E.C. ); Rosenvinge, T.T. von ); Blake, J.B. )

    1993-12-01

    New observations of >15 MeV/nuc trapped heavy ions with Z [ge] 2 have been made by the S AMPEX spacecraft in low polar orbit. The composition of these ions, which are located primarily around L = 2, is dominated by He, N, O, and Ne. The N, O, and Ne ions are apparently trapped anomalous cosmic rays,'' while the origin of the trapped He flux is presently uncertain. These ions can affect the rate of single-event upsets (SEUs) in spacecraft hardware.

  14. Fragmentation of ions in a low pressure linear ion trap.

    PubMed

    Collings, Bruce A

    2007-08-01

    The efficiency of in-trap fragmentation in a low-pressure linear ion trap (LIT), using dipolar excitation, is dependent upon the choice of both the excitation q and the drive frequency of the quadrupole. In the work presented here, fragmentation efficiencies have been measured as a function of excitation q for drive frequencies of 816 kHz and 1.228 MHz. The experiments were carried out by fragmenting reserpine (609.23-->448.20 Th and 397.21-->365.19 Th transitions) and caffeine (195-->138 Th and 138-->110 Th transitions). The data showed that the onset of efficient fragmentation occurred at a lower Mathieu q for the LIT operated at 1.228 MHz when compared with the LIT operated at 816 kHz. A comparison of the fragmentation efficiency curves as a function of pseudo-potential well depth showed that the onset of fragmentation is independent of the drive frequency. In addition, a comparison of the fragmentation efficiency curves showed that all four of the precursor ions fragmented within a range of four V of pseudo-potential well depth. The choice of an appropriate excitation q can then be determined based upon a minimum pseudo-potential well depth, quadrupole field radius, drive frequency, and the mass of interest. Fragmentation efficiencies were also found to be significantly greater when using the higher drive frequency.

  15. Electron source for a mini ion trap mass spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Dietrich, Daniel D.; Keville, Robert F.

    1995-01-01

    An ion trap which operates in the regime between research ion traps which can detect ions with a mass resolution of better than 1:10.sup.9 and commercial mass spectrometers requiring 10.sup.4 ions with resolutions of a few hundred. The power consumption is kept to a minimum by the use of permanent magnets and a novel electron gun design. By Fourier analyzing the ion cyclotron resonance signals induced in the trap electrodes, a complete mass spectra in a single combined structure can be detected. An attribute of the ion trap mass spectrometer is that overall system size is drastically reduced due to combining a unique electron source and mass analyzer/detector in a single device. This enables portable low power mass spectrometers for the detection of environmental pollutants or illicit substances, as well as sensors for on board diagnostics to monitor engine performance or for active feedback in any process involving exhausting waste products.

  16. Electron source for a mini ion trap mass spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Dietrich, D.D.; Keville, R.F.

    1995-12-19

    An ion trap is described which operates in the regime between research ion traps which can detect ions with a mass resolution of better than 1:10{sup 9} and commercial mass spectrometers requiring 10{sup 4} ions with resolutions of a few hundred. The power consumption is kept to a minimum by the use of permanent magnets and a novel electron gun design. By Fourier analyzing the ion cyclotron resonance signals induced in the trap electrodes, a complete mass spectra in a single combined structure can be detected. An attribute of the ion trap mass spectrometer is that overall system size is drastically reduced due to combining a unique electron source and mass analyzer/detector in a single device. This enables portable low power mass spectrometers for the detection of environmental pollutants or illicit substances, as well as sensors for on board diagnostics to monitor engine performance or for active feedback in any process involving exhausting waste products. 10 figs.

  17. A Scalable Microfabricated Ion Trap for Quantum Information Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maunz, Peter; Haltli, Raymond; Hollowell, Andrew; Lobser, Daniel; Mizrahi, Jonathan; Rembetski, John; Resnick, Paul; Sterk, Jonathan D.; Stick, Daniel L.; Blain, Matthew G.

    2016-05-01

    Trapped Ion Quantum Information Processing (QIP) relies on complex microfabricated trap structures to enable scaling of the number of quantum bits. Building on previous demonstrations of surface-electrode ion traps, we have designed and characterized the Sandia high-optical-access (HOA-2) microfabricated ion trap. This trap features high optical access, high trap frequencies, low heating rates, and negligible charging of dielectric trap components. We have observed trap lifetimes of more than 100h, measured trap heating rates for ytterbium of less than 40quanta/s, and demonstrated shuttling of ions from a slotted to an above surface region and through a Y-junction. Furthermore, we summarize demonstrations of high-fidelity single and two-qubit gates realized in this trap. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. This work was supported by the Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity (IARPA).

  18. Ion sponge: a 3-dimentional array of quadrupole ion traps for trapping and mass-selectively processing ions in gas phase.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wei; Li, Linfan; Zhou, Xiaoyu; Ouyang, Zheng

    2014-05-06

    In this study, the concept of ion sponge has been explored for developing 3D arrays of large numbers of ion traps but with simple configurations. An ion sponge device with 484 trapping units in a volume of 10 × 10 × 3.2 cm has been constructed by simply stacking 9 meshes together. A single rf was used for trapping ions and mass-selective ion processing. The ion sponge provides a large trapping capacity and is highly transparent for transfer of ions, neutrals, and photons for gas phase ion processing. Multiple layers of quadrupole ion traps, with 121 trapping units in each layer, can operate as a single device for MS or MS/MS analysis, or as a series of mass-selective trapping devices with interlayer ion transfers facilitated by AC and DC voltages. Automatic sorting of ions to different trapping layers based on their mass-to-charge (m/z) ratios was achieved with traps of different sizes. Tandem-in-space MS/MS has also been demonstrated with precursor ions and fragment ions trapped in separate locations.

  19. Integrated optics architecture for trapped-ion quantum information processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kielpinski, D.; Volin, C.; Streed, E. W.; Lenzini, F.; Lobino, M.

    2016-12-01

    Standard schemes for trapped-ion quantum information processing (QIP) involve the manipulation of ions in a large array of interconnected trapping potentials. The basic set of QIP operations, including state initialization, universal quantum logic, and state detection, is routinely executed within a single array site by means of optical operations, including various laser excitations as well as the collection of ion fluorescence. Transport of ions between array sites is also routinely carried out in microfabricated trap arrays. However, it is still not possible to perform optical operations in parallel across all array sites. The lack of this capability is one of the major obstacles to scalable trapped-ion QIP and presently limits exploitation of current microfabricated trap technology. Here we present an architecture for scalable integration of optical operations in trapped-ion QIP. We show theoretically that diffractive mirrors, monolithically fabricated on the trap array, can efficiently couple light between trap array sites and optical waveguide arrays. Integrated optical circuits constructed from these waveguides can be used for sequencing of laser excitation and fluorescence collection. Our scalable architecture supports all standard QIP operations, as well as photon-mediated entanglement channels, while offering substantial performance improvements over current techniques.

  20. A system for trapping barium ions in a microfabricated surface trap

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, R. D. Sakrejda, T.; Wright, J.; Zhou, Z.; Blinov, B. B.; Chen, S.-P.

    2014-05-15

    We have developed a vacuum chamber and control system for rapid testing of microfabricated surface ion traps. Our system is modular in design and is based on an in-vacuum printed circuit board with integrated filters. We have used this system to successfully trap and cool barium ions and have achieved ion ‘dark' lifetimes of 31.6 s ± 3.4 s with controlled shuttling of ions. We provide a detailed description of the ion trap system including the in-vacuum materials used, control electronics and neutral atom source. We discuss the challenges presented in achieving a system which can work reliably over two years of operations in which the trap under test was changed at least 10 times.

  1. Spin dynamics and entanglement growth with trapped ions, atoms & molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schachenmayer, Johannes; Lanyon, Ben; Roos, Christian; Daley, Andrew; Zhu, Bihui; Rey, Ana Maria

    2014-03-01

    Trapped ions and systems of cold atoms or molecules in optical lattices offer controlled environments to experimentally study non-equilibrium dynamics of many-body quantum spin-models with interactions of varying range. Theoretically calculating dynamics of observables for these experiments is a major challenge both analytically and numerically. In 1D, the growth behavior of the entanglement entropy between different blocks of a many-body state determines whether the evolution of the system can be efficiently simulated on a classical computer or not. In return, the study of entanglement growth can guide experiments to regimes where a quantum simulator can outperform a numerical simulation. Here we present results on the entanglement growth behavior in 1D strings of ions after a quench, and show how the growth depends on the range of the interactions. Furthermore we report on progress on methods for higher dimensional systems. These can be used to model Ramsey-dynamics for current experiments with alkaline earth atoms or polar molecules in optical lattices, or for systems with Rydberg atoms.

  2. Ion gyroradius effects on particle trapping in kinetic Alfven waves along auroral field lines

    DOE PAGES

    Damiano, P. A.; Johnson, J. R.; Chaston, C. C.

    2016-11-10

    In this study, a 2-D self-consistent hybrid gyrofluid-kinetic electron model is used to investigate Alfven wave propagation along dipolar magnetic field lines for a range of ion to electron temperature ratios. The focus of the investigation is on understanding the role of these effects on electron trapping in kinetic Alfven waves sourced in the plasma sheet and the role of this trapping in contributing to the overall electron energization at the ionosphere. This work also builds on our previous effort by considering a similar system in the limit of fixed initial parallel current, rather than fixed initial perpendicular electric field.more » It is found that the effects of particle trapping are strongest in the cold ion limit and the kinetic Alfven wave is able to carry trapped electrons a large distance along the field line yielding a relatively large net energization of the trapped electron population as the phase speed of the wave is increased. However, as the ion temperature is increased, the ability of the kinetic Alfven wave to carry and energize trapped electrons is reduced by more significant wave energy dispersion perpendicular to the ambient magnetic field which reduces the amplitude of the wave. This reduction of wave amplitude in turn reduces both the parallel current and the extent of the high-energy tails evident in the energized electron populations at the ionospheric boundary (which may serve to explain the limited extent of the broadband electron energization seen in observations). Here, even in the cold ion limit, trapping effects in kinetic Alfven waves lead to only modest electron energization for the parameters considered (on the order of tens of eV) and the primary energization of electrons to keV levels coincides with the arrival of the wave at the ionospheric boundary.« less

  3. Ion gyroradius effects on particle trapping in kinetic Alfven waves along auroral field lines

    SciTech Connect

    Damiano, P. A.; Johnson, J. R.; Chaston, C. C.

    2016-11-10

    In this study, a 2-D self-consistent hybrid gyrofluid-kinetic electron model is used to investigate Alfven wave propagation along dipolar magnetic field lines for a range of ion to electron temperature ratios. The focus of the investigation is on understanding the role of these effects on electron trapping in kinetic Alfven waves sourced in the plasma sheet and the role of this trapping in contributing to the overall electron energization at the ionosphere. This work also builds on our previous effort by considering a similar system in the limit of fixed initial parallel current, rather than fixed initial perpendicular electric field. It is found that the effects of particle trapping are strongest in the cold ion limit and the kinetic Alfven wave is able to carry trapped electrons a large distance along the field line yielding a relatively large net energization of the trapped electron population as the phase speed of the wave is increased. However, as the ion temperature is increased, the ability of the kinetic Alfven wave to carry and energize trapped electrons is reduced by more significant wave energy dispersion perpendicular to the ambient magnetic field which reduces the amplitude of the wave. This reduction of wave amplitude in turn reduces both the parallel current and the extent of the high-energy tails evident in the energized electron populations at the ionospheric boundary (which may serve to explain the limited extent of the broadband electron energization seen in observations). Here, even in the cold ion limit, trapping effects in kinetic Alfven waves lead to only modest electron energization for the parameters considered (on the order of tens of eV) and the primary energization of electrons to keV levels coincides with the arrival of the wave at the ionospheric boundary.

  4. Ion trap electric field measurements using slab coupled optical sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shumway, L.; Chadderdon, S.; Powell, A.; Li, A.; Austin, D.; Hawkins, A.; Selfridge, R.; Schultz, S.

    2014-03-01

    Ion traps are widely used in the field of mass spectrometry. These devices use high electric fields to mass-selectively trap, eject, and count the particles of a material, producing a mass spectrum of the given material. Because of their usefulness, technology pushes for smaller, more portable ion traps for field use. Making internal ion trap field measurements not yet feasible because current electric field sensors are often too bulky or their metallic composition perturbs field measurements. Using slab coupled optical sensor (SCOS) technology, we are able to build sensors that are compatible with the spacing constraints of the ion trap. These sensors are created by attaching a nonlinear crystal slab waveguide to an optical fiber. When a laser propagates through the fiber, certain wavelengths of light couple out of the fiber via the crystal and create "resonances" in the output light spectrum. These resonances shift in proportion to a given applied electric field, and by measuring that shift, we can approximate the electric field. Developing a sensor that can effectively characterize the electric fields within an ion trap will greatly assist in ion trap design, fabrication, and troubleshooting techniques.

  5. Spectroscopic studies of cold, gas-phase biomolecular ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizzo, Thomas R.; Stearns, Jaime A.; Boyarkin, Oleg V.

    While the marriage of mass spectrometry and laser spectroscopy is not new, developments over the last few years in this relationship have opened up new horizons for the spectroscopic study of biological molecules. The combination of electrospray ionisation for producing large biological molecules in the gas phase together with cooled ion traps and multiple-resonance laser schemes are allowing spectroscopic investigation of individual conformations of peptides with more than a dozen amino acids. Highly resolved infrared spectra of single conformations of such species provide important benchmarks for testing the accuracy of theoretical calculations. This review presents a number of techniques employed in our laboratory and in others for measuring the spectroscopy of cold, gas-phase protonated peptides. We show examples that demonstrate the power of these techniques and evaluate their extension to still larger biological molecules.

  6. The deadtime correction for ion-trap particle detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrne, J.

    2005-10-01

    When ion traps are used to store low-energy recoil protons in precision studies of neutron β-decay, decay events are lost when several protons are stored during a single trapping cycle and their detection is registered as a single event during the release phase. The correction for this deadtime effect, which is proportional to the trapping time, is analysed as a problem in Baysian statistics.

  7. In-Trap Spectroscopy of Charge-Bred Radioactive Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lennarz, A.; Grossheim, A.; Leach, K. G.; Alanssari, M.; Brunner, T.; Chaudhuri, A.; Chowdhury, U.; Crespo López-Urrutia, J. R.; Gallant, A. T.; Holl, M.; Kwiatkowski, A. A.; Lassen, J.; Macdonald, T. D.; Schultz, B. E.; Seeraji, S.; Simon, M. C.; Andreoiu, C.; Dilling, J.; Frekers, D.

    2014-08-01

    In this Letter, we introduce the concept of in-trap nuclear decay spectroscopy of highly charged radioactive ions and describe its successful application as a novel spectroscopic tool. This is demonstrated by a measurement of the decay properties of radioactive mass A=124 ions (here, In124 and Cs124) in the electron-beam ion trap of the TITAN facility at TRIUMF. By subjecting the trapped ions to an intense electron beam, the ions are charge bred to high charge states (i.e., equivalent to the removal of N-shell electrons), and an increase of storage times to the level of minutes without significant ion losses is achieved. The present technique opens the venue for precision spectroscopy of low branching ratios and is being developed in the context of measuring electron-capture branching ratios needed for determining the nuclear ground-state properties of the intermediate odd-odd nuclei in double-beta (ββ) decay.

  8. From transistor to trapped-ion computers for quantum chemistry.

    PubMed

    Yung, M-H; Casanova, J; Mezzacapo, A; McClean, J; Lamata, L; Aspuru-Guzik, A; Solano, E

    2014-01-07

    Over the last few decades, quantum chemistry has progressed through the development of computational methods based on modern digital computers. However, these methods can hardly fulfill the exponentially-growing resource requirements when applied to large quantum systems. As pointed out by Feynman, this restriction is intrinsic to all computational models based on classical physics. Recently, the rapid advancement of trapped-ion technologies has opened new possibilities for quantum control and quantum simulations. Here, we present an efficient toolkit that exploits both the internal and motional degrees of freedom of trapped ions for solving problems in quantum chemistry, including molecular electronic structure, molecular dynamics, and vibronic coupling. We focus on applications that go beyond the capacity of classical computers, but may be realizable on state-of-the-art trapped-ion systems. These results allow us to envision a new paradigm of quantum chemistry that shifts from the current transistor to a near-future trapped-ion-based technology.

  9. From transistor to trapped-ion computers for quantum chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yung, M.-H.; Casanova, J.; Mezzacapo, A.; McClean, J.; Lamata, L.; Aspuru-Guzik, A.; Solano, E.

    2014-01-01

    Over the last few decades, quantum chemistry has progressed through the development of computational methods based on modern digital computers. However, these methods can hardly fulfill the exponentially-growing resource requirements when applied to large quantum systems. As pointed out by Feynman, this restriction is intrinsic to all computational models based on classical physics. Recently, the rapid advancement of trapped-ion technologies has opened new possibilities for quantum control and quantum simulations. Here, we present an efficient toolkit that exploits both the internal and motional degrees of freedom of trapped ions for solving problems in quantum chemistry, including molecular electronic structure, molecular dynamics, and vibronic coupling. We focus on applications that go beyond the capacity of classical computers, but may be realizable on state-of-the-art trapped-ion systems. These results allow us to envision a new paradigm of quantum chemistry that shifts from the current transistor to a near-future trapped-ion-based technology.

  10. Quantum Information Experiments with Trapped Ions at NIST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Andrew

    2015-03-01

    We present an overview of recent trapped-ion quantum information experiments at NIST. Advancing beyond few-qubit ``proof-of-principle'' experiments to the many-qubit systems needed for practical quantum simulation and information processing, without compromising on the performance demonstrated with small systems, remains a major challenge. One approach to scalable hardware development is surface-electrode traps. Micro-fabricated planar traps can have a number of useful features, including flexible electrode geometries, integrated microwave delivery, and spatio-temporal tuning of potentials for ion transport and spin-spin interactions. In this talk we report on a number of on-going investigations with surface traps. Experiments feature a multi-zone trap with closely spaced ions in a triangular arrangement (a first step towards 2D arrays of ions with tunable spin-spin interactions), a scheme for smooth transport through a junction in a 2D structure based on switchable RF potentials, and a micro-fabricated photo-detector integrated into a trap. We also give a progress report on our latest efforts to improve the fidelity of both optical and microwave 2-qubit gates. This work was supported by IARPA, ONR and the NIST Quantum Information Program. The 3-ion and switchable-RF-junction traps were developed in collaboration with Sandia National Laboratory.

  11. Toward Scalable Ion Traps for Quantum Information Processing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    Deterministic quantum teleportation of atomic qubits Nature 429 737 [15] Jost J D, Home J P, Amini J M, Hanneke D, Ozeri R, Langer C, Bollinger J J, Leibfried...Toward scalable ion traps for quantum information processing This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full...AND SUBTITLE Toward Scalable ion Traps For Quantum Information Processing 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR

  12. A dense gas of laser-cooled atoms for hybrid atom-ion trapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Höltkemeier, Bastian; Glässel, Julian; López-Carrera, Henry; Weidemüller, Matthias

    2017-01-01

    We describe the realization of a dark spontaneous-force trap of rubidium atoms. The atoms are loaded from a beam provided by a two-dimensional magneto-optical trap yielding a capture efficiency of 75%. The dense and cold atomic sample is characterized by saturated absorption imaging. Up to 10^9 atoms are captured with a loading rate of 3× 10^9 atoms/s into a cloud at a temperature of 250 μK with the density exceeding 10^{11} atoms/cm^3. Under steady-state conditions, more than 90% of the atoms can be prepared into the absolute atomic ground state, which provides favorable conditions for the investigation of sympathetic cooling of ions in a hybrid atom-ion trap.

  13. Single ions trapped in a one-dimensional optical lattice.

    PubMed

    Enderlein, Martin; Huber, Thomas; Schneider, Christian; Schaetz, Tobias

    2012-12-07

    We report on three-dimensional optical trapping of single ions in a one-dimensional optical lattice formed by two counterpropagating laser beams. We characterize the trapping parameters of the standing-wave using the ion as a sensor stored in a hybrid trap consisting of a radio-frequency (rf), a dc, and the optical potential. When loading ions directly from the rf into the standing-wave trap, we observe a dominant heating rate. Monte Carlo simulations confirm rf-induced parametric excitations within the deep optical lattice as the main source. We demonstrate a way around this effect by an alternative transfer protocol which involves an intermediate step of optical confinement in a single-beam trap avoiding the temporal overlap of the standing-wave and the rf field. Implications arise for hybrid (rf-optical) and pure optical traps as platforms for ultracold chemistry experiments exploring atom-ion collisions or quantum simulation experiments with ions, or combinations of ions and atoms.

  14. Recent developments and proposed schemes for trapped ion frequency standards. [trapped mercury ions for microwave and optical frequency standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maleki, L.

    1982-01-01

    Ion traps are exciting candidates as future precision frequency sources. Recent developments demonstrate that mercury ion frequency standards are capable of a stability performance comparable to commercial cesium standards. There is, however, considerable room for improvement with regard to the signal to noise problem. The 40 GHz microwave frequency implies that a careful design should be implemented to ensure the elimination of the unwanted side bands in the microwave pump signal. A long life, high performance light source to be used in a trapped mercury ion microwave standard must be developed and the long term performance of a trapped mercury ion microwave standard must be investigated. While newly proposed two photon pumping schemes in conjuction with mercury ions promise exciting developments for both microwave and optical frequency standards, other ions that may be potential candidates should be evaluated for their usefulness.

  15. Distribution of entanglement in an ion trap array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jost, J. D.; Langer, C.; Ozeri, R.; Blakestad, R. B.; Britton, J.; Chiaverini, J.; Hume, D. B.; Itano, W. M.; Knill, E.; Leibfried, D.; Reichle, R.; Rosenband, T.; Seidelin, S.; Wesenberg, J. H.; Wineland, D. J.

    2006-05-01

    Atomic ions confined in radio frequency traps provide a scalable system for quantum information processing. To implement complex quantum algorithms, sympathetic cooling, long coherence times, multiple trapping zones, and high fidelity coherent operation are necessary. These requirements have been demonstrated in separate experiments. Current experimental work at NIST involves combining these elements. This report describes progress towards the use of ^24Mg^+ to sympathetically cool ^9Be^+ qubits, which will mitigate motional heating and enable multiple high fidelity entangling operations in different trapping zones. Combined with laser beams that address multiple trap zones, this should allow the realization of distributed entanglement and advanced quantum algorithms.

  16. Temperature and heating rate of ion crystals in Penning traps

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, Marie J.; Hasegawa, Taro; Bollinger, John J.

    2004-09-01

    We have determined the temperature and heating rate of laser-cooled ions in a Penning trap using Doppler laser spectroscopy. Between 10{sup 4} and 10{sup 6} {sup 9}Be{sup +} ions are trapped in a Penning trap and Doppler laser cooled to temperatures of a few millikelvin, where they form ion crystals. This system is an example of a strongly coupled one-component plasma. The ion temperature was measured as a function of time after turning off the laser-cooling. In the solid phase, we measured a heating rate of {approx}65 mK/s. Information about possible heating mechanisms was obtained directly from temperature measurements, and also from measurements of the rate of radial expansion of the ion plasma. We determined that the observed heating is due to collisions with the {approx}4x10{sup -9} Pa residual gas of our vacuum system.

  17. Electron capture dissociation in a digital ion trap mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Ding, Li; Brancia, Francesco L

    2006-03-15

    Electron capture dissociation was implemented in a digital ion trap without using any magnetic field to focus the electrons. Since rectangular waveforms are employed in the DIT for both trapping and dipole excitation, electrons can be injected into the trap when the electric field is constant. Following deceleration, electrons reach the precursor ion cloud. The fragment ions produced by interactions with the electron beam are subsequently analyzed by resonant ejection. [Glu(1)]-Fibrinopeptide B and substance P were used to evaluate the performance of the current design. Fragmentation efficiency of 5.5% was observed for substance P peptide ions. Additionally, analysis of the monophosphorylated peptide FQ[pS]EEQQQTEDELQDK shows that in the resulting c- and z-type ions, the phosphate group is retained on the phophoserine residue, providing information on which amino acid residue the modification is located.

  18. Optical cavity integrated surface ion trap for enhanced light collection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benito, Francisco M.

    Ion trap systems allow the faithful storage and manipulation of qubits encoded in the energy levels of the ions, and can be interfaced with photonic qubits that can be transmitted to connect remote quantum systems. Single photons transmitted from two remote sites, each entangled with one quantum memory, can be used to entangle distant quantum memories by interfering on a beam splitter. Efficient remote entanglement generation relies upon efficient light collection from single ions into a single mode fiber. This can be realized by integrating an ion trap with an optical cavity and employing the Purcell effect for enhancing the light collection. Remote entanglement can be used as a resource for a quantum repeater for provably secure long-distance communication or as a method for communicating within a distributed quantum information processor. We present the integration of a 1 mm optical cavity with a micro-fabricated surface ion trap. The plano-concave cavity is oriented normal to the chip surface where the planar mirror is attached underneath the trap chip. The cavity is locked using a 780 nm laser which is stabilized to Rubidium and shifted to match the 369 nm Doppler transition in Ytterbium. The linear ion trap allows ions to be shuttled in and out of the cavity mode. The Purcell enhancement of spontaneous emission into the cavity mode would then allow efficient collection of the emitted photons, enabling faster remote entanglement generation.

  19. Laser-induced charging of microfabricated ion traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shannon X.; Hao Low, Guang; Lachenmyer, Nathan S.; Ge, Yufei; Herskind, Peter F.; Chuang, Isaac L.

    2011-11-01

    Electrical charging of metal surfaces due to photoelectric generation of carriers is of concern in trapped ion quantum computation systems, due to the high sensitivity of the ions' motional quantum states to deformation of the trapping potential. The charging induced by typical laser frequencies involved in Doppler cooling and quantum control is studied here, with microfabricated surface-electrode traps made of aluminum, copper, and gold, operated at 6 K with a single Sr+ ion trapped 100 μm above the trap surface. The lasers used are at 370, 405, 460, and 674 nm, and the typical photon flux at the trap is 1014 photons/cm2/sec. Charging is detected by monitoring the ion's micromotion signal, which is related to the number of charges created on the trap. A wavelength and material dependence of the charging behavior is observed: Lasers at lower wavelengths cause more charging, and aluminum exhibits more charging than copper or gold. We describe the charging dynamic based on a rate-equation approach.

  20. Incomplete rotational cooling in a 22-pole ion trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endres, E. S.; Egger, G.; Lee, S.; Lakhmanskaya, O.; Simpson, M.; Wester, R.

    2017-02-01

    Cryogenic 22-pole ion traps have found many applications in ion-molecule reaction kinetics and in high resolution molecular spectroscopy. For most of these applications it is important to know the translational and internal temperatures of the trapped ions. Here, we present detailed rotational state thermometry measurements over an extended temperature range for hydroxyl anions in He, HD, and H2. The measured rotational temperatures show a termination of the thermalisation with the buffer gas around 25 K, independent of mass ratio and confinement potential of the trap. Different possible explanations for this incomplete thermalisation are discussed, among them the thermalisation of the buffer gas, room temperature blackbody radiation or warm gas entering the trap, and heating due to energy transfer from rotationally excited hydrogen molecules.

  1. Trapped-Ion State Detection through Coherent Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hume, D. B.; Chou, C. W.; Leibrandt, D. R.; Thorpe, M. J.; Wineland, D. J.; Rosenband, T.

    2011-12-01

    We demonstrate a general method for state detection of trapped ions that can be applied to a large class of atomic and molecular species. We couple a spectroscopy ion (Al+27) to a control ion (Mg+25) in the same trap and perform state detection through off-resonant laser excitation of the spectroscopy ion that induces coherent motion. The motional amplitude, dependent on the spectroscopy ion state, is measured either by time-resolved photon counting or by resolved sideband excitations on the control ion. The first method provides a simplified way to distinguish clock states in Al+27, which avoids ground-state cooling and sideband transitions. The second method reduces spontaneous emission and optical pumping on the spectroscopy ion, which we demonstrate by nondestructively distinguishing Zeeman sublevels in the S01 ground state of Al+27.

  2. Resonance ionization of rubidium in an ion trap mass spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Whitten, W.B.; Ramsey, J.M.; Goeringer, D.E.; Buckley, B.T.

    1990-01-01

    We have recently initiated a study of resonance ionization processes in a quadrupole ion storage trap. The trap is a commercially available Ion Trap Detector that uses the voltage dependence of ion mass instability to obtain a mass spectrum of the trapped ions. We have modified the trap to permit laser excitation of atomic and molecular species within the quadrupole electrodes. Mass resolved resonance ionization spectra have been obtained for NO and Rb, described below. Rb was selected for this study for a number of reasons. We want to explore the potential of the ion trap for high resolution (Doppler free) resonance ionization spectroscopy with CW laser excitation. Rb can be excited to upper Rydberg levels with a series of transitions that can be induced with commercially available semiconductor diode lasers. In addition, levels in the same energy range can be reached through two-photon processes with visible wavelength tunable dye lasers or with single-photon processes after the laser is frequency doubled. The upper Rydberg levels can be ionized by photons, electric field, or collisions. Collisional ionization of a reservoir of Rydberg atoms may be a sensitive scheme for detecting electronegative species. RB has two stable isotopes with nonzero nuclear spin so that isotopic and hyperfine splittings can be used to assess the spectral resolution that is attained.

  3. Buffer gas cooling of polyatomic ions in rf multi-electrode traps.

    PubMed

    Gerlich, D; Borodi, G

    2009-01-01

    Cooling all degrees of freedom of a molecule, a cluster, or even a nanoparticle which is suspended in a vacuum, is an experimental challenge. Without suitable schemes, cold or ultracold chemical reactions are not feasible. Methods such as laser based preparation of very slow atoms, decelerating molecules to low velocities with electric fields or freezing molecular ions into Coulomb crystals, are generally not suitable to cool the vibrational or rotational motion of molecules. This contribution describes a new method in which a beam of slow atoms or molecules (H, He, H2, or D2) is used for cooling charged particles confined in a multi-electrode rf trap. For reaching sub-K temperatures, the fast part of a cold effusive beam is removed with a shutter before the slow remaining neutrals interact with the ion cloud. The development of a pulsed cold beam source is discussed as well as suitable methods for determining the ion temperature. A challenging application is to prepare internally cold CH5+ for spectroscopy or chemistry. New experimental results for hydrogen abstraction in collisions with slow H atoms are reported at energies of a few meV. For evaluating these measurements and for predicting effective rate coefficients at lower energies, the kinematic conditions of the slow neutral beam-ion trap arrangement have been analyzed in detail. The potential of cooling ions such as protonated methane or H3+ with slow energy selected H atoms is briefly mentioned. An interesting process is the formation of weakly bound ions such as H4+ or CH6+ via radiative or ternary association. Such ions are ideal candidates for preparing the corresponding collision complexes very close (microeV) to the dissociation continuum using infrared transitions.

  4. High Mass Ion Detection with Charge Detector Coupled to Rectilinear Ion Trap Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, Avinash A.; Chou, Szu-Wei; Chang, Pei-Yu; Lee, Chen-Wei; Cheng, Chun-Yen; Chu, Ming-Lee; Peng, Wen-Ping

    2016-12-01

    Conventional linear ion trap mass analyzers (LIT-MS) provide high ion capacity and show their MS n ability; however, the detection of high mass ions is still challenging because LIT-MS with secondary electron detectors (SED) cannot detect high mass ions. To detect high mass ions, we coupled a charge detector (CD) to a rectilinear ion trap mass spectrometer (RIT-MS). Immunoglobulin G ions (m/z 150,000) are measured successfully with controlled ion kinetic energy. In addition, when mass-to-charge (m/z) ratios of singly charged ions exceed 10 kTh, the detection efficiency of CD is found to be greater than that of SED. The CD can be coupled to LIT-MS to extend the detection mass range and provide the potential to perform MS n of high mass ions inside the ion trap.

  5. Quantum Chaos in SU(3) Models with Trapped Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graß, Tobias; Juliá-Díaz, Bruno; Kuś, Marek; Lewenstein, Maciej

    2013-08-01

    A scheme to generate long-range spin-spin interactions between three-level ions in a chain is presented, providing a feasible experimental route to the rich physics of well-known SU(3) models. In particular, we demonstrate different signatures of quantum chaos which can be controlled and observed in experiments with trapped ions.

  6. Heavy ion plasma confinement in an RF quadrupole trap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schermann, J.; Major, F. G.

    1971-01-01

    The confinement of an electron free plasma in a pure quadrupole RF electric trap was considered. The ultimate goal was to produce a large density of mercury ions, in order to realize a trapped ion frequency standard using the hyperfine resonance of 199 Hg(+) at 40.7 GHz. An attempt was made to obtain an iodine plasma consisting of equal numbers of positive and negative ions of atomic iodine, the positive iodine ions, being susceptible to charge-exchange with mercury atoms, will produce the desired mercury ions. The experiment showed that the photoproduction of ions pairs in iodine using the necessary UV radiation occurs with a small cross-section, making it difficult to demonstrate the feasibility of space charge neutralization in a quadrupole trap. For this reason it was considered expedient to choose thallium iodide, which has a more favorable absorption spectrum (in the region of 2000 to 2100 A). The results indicate that, although the ionic recombination is a serious limiting factor, a considerable improvement can be obtained in practice for the density of trapped ions, with a considerable advantage in lifetimes for spectroscopic purposes. The ion pair formation by photoionization is briefly reviewed.

  7. Method and apparatus for regenerating cold traps within liquid-metal systems

    DOEpatents

    McKee, Jr., John M.

    1976-01-01

    Oxide and hydride impurities of a liquid metal such as sodium are removed from a cold trap by heating to a temperature at which the metal hydroxide is stable in a molten state. The partial pressure of hydrogen within the system is measured to determine if excess hydride or oxide is present. Excess hydride is removed by venting hydrogen gas while excess oxide can be converted to molten hydroxide through the addition of hydrogen. The resulting, molten hydroxide is drained from the trap which is then returned to service at cold trap temperatures within the liquid-metal system.

  8. Ion trap simulations of quantum fields in an expanding universe.

    PubMed

    Alsing, Paul M; Dowling, Jonathan P; Milburn, G J

    2005-06-10

    We propose an experiment in which the phonon excitation of ion(s) in a trap, with a trap frequency exponentially modulated at rate kappa, exhibits a thermal spectrum with an "Unruh" temperature given by k(B)T=Planck kappa. We discuss the similarities of this experiment to the response of detectors in a de Sitter universe and the usual Unruh effect for uniformly accelerated detectors. We demonstrate a new Unruh effect for detectors that respond to antinormally ordered moments using the ion's first blue sideband transition.

  9. Evidence for Surface and Subsurface Ice Inside Micro Cold-Traps on Mercury's North Pole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubanenko, L.; Mazarico, E.; Neumann, G. A.; Paige, D. A.

    2017-01-01

    The small obliquity of Mercury causes topographic depressions located near its poles to cast persistent shadows. Many [1, 9, 15] have shown these permanently shadowed regions (PSRs) may trap water ice for geologic time periods inside cold-traps. More recently, direct evidence for the presence of water ice deposits inside craters was remotely sensed in RADAR [5] and visible imagery [3]. Albedo measurements (reflectence at 1064 nm) obtained by the MErcury Space ENviroment GEochemistry and Ranging Laser Altimeter (MLA) found unusually bright and dark areas next to Mercury's north pole [7]. Using a thermal illumination model, Paige et al. [8] found the bright deposits are correlated with surface cold-traps, and the dark deposits are correlated with subsurface cold-traps. They suggested these anomalous deposits were brought to the surface by comets and were processed by the magnetospheric radiation flux, removing hydrogen and mixing C-N-O-S atoms to form a variety of molecules which will darken with time. Here we use a thermal illumination model to find the link between the cold-trap area fraction of a rough surface and its albedo. Using this link and the measurements obtained by MESSENGER we derive a surface and a subsurface ice distribution map on Mercury's north pole below the MESSENGER spatial resolution, approximately 500 m. We find a large fraction of the polar ice on Mercury resides inside micro cold-traps (of scales 10 - 100 m) distributed along the inter-crater terrain.

  10. A Linear RFQ Ion Trap for the Enriched Xenon Observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Flatt, B.; Green, M.; Wodin, J.; DeVoe, R.; Fierlinger, P.; Gratta, G.; LePort, F.; Montero Diez, M.; Neilson, R.; O'Sullivan, K.; Pocar, A.; Baussan, E.; Breidenbach, M.; Conley, R.; Fairbank Jr., W.; Farine, J.; Hall, K.; Hallman, D.; Hargrove, C.; Hauger, M.; Hodgson, J.; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Neuchatel U. /SLAC /Colorado State U. /Laurentian U. /Carleton U. /Alabama U.

    2008-01-14

    The design, construction, and performance of a linear radio-frequency ion trap (RFQ) intended for use in the Enriched Xenon Observatory (EXO) are described. EXO aims to detect the neutrinoless double-beta decay of {sup 136}Xe to {sup 136}Ba. To suppress possible backgrounds EXO will complement the measurement of decay energy and, to some extent, topology of candidate events in a Xe filled detector with the identification of the daughter nucleus ({sup 136}Ba). The ion trap described here is capable of accepting, cooling, and confining individual Ba ions extracted from the site of the candidate double-beta decay event. A single trapped ion can then be identified, with a large signal-to-noise ratio, via laser spectroscopy.

  11. Reducing Motional Decoherence in Ion Traps with Surface Science Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haeffner, Hartmut

    2014-03-01

    Many trapped ions experiments ask for low motional heating rates while trapping the ions close to trapping electrodes. However, in practice small ion-electrode distances lead to unexpected high heating rates. While the mechanisms for the heating is still unclear, it is now evident that surface contamination of the metallic electrodes is at least partially responsible for the elevated heating rates. I will discuss heating rate measurements in a microfabricated surface trap complemented with basic surface science studies. We monitor the elemental surface composition of the Cu-Al alloy trap with an Auger spectrometer. After bake-out, we find a strong Carbon and Oxygen contamination and heating rates of 200 quanta/s at 1 MHz trap frequency. After removing most of the Carbon and Oxygen with Ar-Ion sputtering, the heating rates drop to 4 quanta/s. Interestingly, we still measure the decreased heating rate even after the surface oxidized from the background gas throughout a 40-day waiting time in UHV.

  12. Parallel Transport Quantum Logic Gates with Trapped Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Clercq, Ludwig E.; Lo, Hsiang-Yu; Marinelli, Matteo; Nadlinger, David; Oswald, Robin; Negnevitsky, Vlad; Kienzler, Daniel; Keitch, Ben; Home, Jonathan P.

    2016-02-01

    We demonstrate single-qubit operations by transporting a beryllium ion with a controlled velocity through a stationary laser beam. We use these to perform coherent sequences of quantum operations, and to perform parallel quantum logic gates on two ions in different processing zones of a multiplexed ion trap chip using a single recycled laser beam. For the latter, we demonstrate individually addressed single-qubit gates by local control of the speed of each ion. The fidelities we observe are consistent with operations performed using standard methods involving static ions and pulsed laser fields. This work therefore provides a path to scalable ion trap quantum computing with reduced requirements on the optical control complexity.

  13. Model-based exploration of the drivers of mountain cold-trapping in soil.

    PubMed

    Westgate, John N; Wania, Frank

    2013-12-01

    A pollutant is said to undergo mountain cold-trapping if it is found at higher concentrations in a surface medium (soil, snow, foliage) high on a mountain, where it is colder, than in the same medium lower on the mountain. The processes that lead to mountain cold-trapping in soil were explored for a set of hypothetical Perfectly Persistent Pollutants (PPPs) by varying several environmental parameters in a fugacity based fate and transport box model. These parameters were: the spatial scale of the mountain; the rate and location of rain; the amount of particles in the atmosphere; the presence and magnitude of the upslope temperature gradient. The relative potential of each hypothetical PPP to exhibit mountain cold-trapping was expressed in terms of its Mountaintop Contamination Potential (MCP). The PPPs with the highest MCPs were those that neither were deposited from the atmosphere to the surface in the lower zones in the model nor left the model domain without being deposited at all. The simulations revealed that under most conditions wet-gaseous deposition is the biggest driver of mountain cold-trapping in soils, and its effects are greatly enhanced by large negative temperature gradients and increased precipitation upslope. Dry-gaseous and wet-and-dry-particle deposition processes cause similar PPPs to exhibit mountain cold-trapping, and the contributions to MCP by the dry processes are of the same magnitude as wet-particle deposition. Dry gaseous deposition alone is insufficient to cause mountain cold-trapping in soils under any conditions modelled here. Those measuring organic contaminants in mountains should expect to find that mountains with different climates cold-trap different pollutants, and that some mountains may not exhibit upslope enrichment of any species.

  14. Prediction of collective characteristics for ion ensembles in quadrupole ion traps without trajectory simulations.

    PubMed

    Goeringer, Douglas E; Viehland, Larry A; Danailov, Daniel M

    2006-07-01

    Fundamental aspects are presented of a two-temperature moment theory for quadrupole ion traps developed via transformation of the Boltzmann equation. Solutions of the moment equations correspond to changes in the ensemble average for any function of ion velocity, because the Boltzmann equation reflects changes to an ion distribution as a whole. The function of primary interest in this paper is the ion effective temperature and its behavior during ion storage and resonance excitation. Calculations suggest that increases in ion effective temperature during resonance excitation are due primarily to power absorption from the main RF trapping field rather than from the dipolar excitation signal. The dipolar excitation signal apparently serves mainly to move ions into regions of the ion trap where the RF electric field, and thus ion RF heating, is greater than near the trap center. Both ideal and non-ideal ion trap configurations are accounted for in the moment equations by incorporating parameterized variables a and q , which are modified versions of the commonly used forms for the DC and AC ring voltages, and b and d , which are new forms that account for the voltages applied to the endcaps. Besides extending the applicability of the moment equations to non-ideal quadrupole ion traps, the modified versions of the parameterized variables can have additional utility. Calculation of the spatial dependence of ion secular oscillation frequencies is demonstrated as an example.

  15. Microfabrication of Surface Electrode Ion Traps for Quantum Information Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Yufei; Labaziewicz, Jaroslaw; Antohi, Paul; Chuang, Isaac

    2008-03-01

    Surface electrode ion traps, while promising for large-scale quantum computation, have long been challenged by ion heating rates which increase rapidly as trap length scales are reduced. Through a series of measurements on over fifteen traps, we show that ion heating rates are surprisingly sensitive to electrode material and morphology, and in particular, to details of the fabrication procedure. For example, one 75 μm size trap, made of chemically etched silver on a single crystal quartz substrate, showed a minimum heating rate of ˜40 quanta/second, when prepared by annealing at 760^oC in vacuum for one hour. This annealing smooths sharp edges, and significantly reduces breakdown voltage. However, if the annealing temperature is lowered to 720^oC, leaving the breakdown voltage still robustly high, the heating rate jumps to ˜1000 quanta/second. With electroplated gold, on a silver seed layer, a record low heating rate of ˜2 quanta/second is obtained. We present details of the fabrication procedures, evaluate alternative electrode materials such as niobium nitride, and explain how these measurements were obtained with an ion trap operated at 6 Kelvin, containing a single strontium ion, sideband cooled to its quantum ground state of motion.

  16. Space-Time Crystals of Trapped Ions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-15

    9Beþ ions [25]). Both laser beams are parallel to the axis of the ion ring and have waists of w0. We assume that the pulse is very weak so that on...The amplitude of the transverse momentum of each photon in a Gaussian beam with waist of w0 is about @=w0. Thus the momentum of the ion ring is...Thus the waists of lasers need to satisfy 2 ffiffiffi 2 p d=N < w0 < ffiffiffi 2 p d in order to localize the position of an ion without

  17. Collisional activation with random noise in ion trap mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    McLuckey, S A; Goeringer, D E; Glish, G L

    1992-07-01

    Random noise applied to the end caps of a quadrupole ion trap is shown to be an effective means for the collisional activation of trapped ions independent of mass/charge ratio and number of ions. This technique is compared and contrasted with conventional single-frequency collisional activation for the molecular ion of N,N-dimethylaniline, protonated cocaine, the molecular anion of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene, and doubly pronated neuromedin U-8. Collisional activation with noise tends to produce more extensive fragmentation than the conventional approach due to the fact that product ions are also kinetically excited in the noise experiment. The efficiency of the noise experiment in producing detectable product ions relative to the conventional approach ranges from being equivalent to being a factor of 3 less efficient. Furthermore, discrimination against low mass/charge product ions is apparent in the data from multiply charged biomolecules. Nevertheless, collisional activation with random noise provides a very simple means for overcoming problems associated with the dependence of single-frequency collisional activation on mass/charge ratio and the number of ions in the ion trap.

  18. Collisional activation with random noise in ion trap mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    McLuckey, S.A.; Goeringer, D.E.; Glish, G.L.

    1992-07-01

    Random noise applied to the end caps of a quadrupole ion trap is shown to be an effective means for the collisional activation of trapped ions independent of mass/charge ratio and number of ions. This technique is compared and contrasted with conventional single-frequency collisional activation for the molecular ion of N,N-dimethylaniline, protonated cocaine, the molecular anion of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene, and doubly protonated neuromedin U-8. Collisional activation with noise tends to produce more extensive fragmentation than the conventional approach due to the fact that product ions are also kinetically excited in the noise experiment. The efficiency of the noise experiment in producing detectable product ions relative to the conventional approach ranges from being equivalent to being a factor of 3 less efficient. Furthermore, discrimination against low mass/charge product ions is apparent in the data from multiply charged biomolecules. Nevertheless, collisional activation with random noise provides a very simple means for overcoming problems associated with the dependence of single-frequency collisional activation on mass/charge ratio and the number of ions in the ion trap. 45 refs., 7 figs.

  19. Characteristics of Ion Activation and Collision Induced Dissociation Using Digital Ion Trap Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Fuxing; Dang, Qiankun; Dai, Xinhua; Fang, Xiang; Wang, Yuanyuan; Ding, Li; Ding, Chuan-Fan

    2016-08-01

    Collision induced dissociation (CID) is one of the most established techniques for tandem mass spectrometry analysis. The CID of mass selected ion could be realized by ion resonance excitation with a digital rectangular waveform. The method is simple, and highly efficient CID result could be obtained by optimizing the experimental parameters, such as digital waveform voltage, frequency, and q value. In this work, the relationship between ion trapping waveform voltage and frequency at preselected q value, the relationship between waveform frequency and the q value at certain ion trapping voltage for optimum CID efficiency were investigated. Experiment results showed that the max CID efficiency of precursor reserpine ions can be obtained at different trapping waveform voltage and frequency when q and β are different. Based on systematic experimental analysis, the optimum experimental conditions for high CID efficiency can be calculated at any selected β or q. By using digital ion trap technology, the CID process and efficient fragmentation of parent ions can be realized by simply changing the trapping waveform amplitude, frequency, and the β values in the digital ion trap mass spectrometry. The technology and method are simple. It has potential use in ion trap mass spectrometry.

  20. Electrostatic particle trap for ion beam sputter deposition

    DOEpatents

    Vernon, Stephen P.; Burkhart, Scott C.

    2002-01-01

    A method and apparatus for the interception and trapping of or reflection of charged particulate matter generated in ion beam sputter deposition. The apparatus involves an electrostatic particle trap which generates electrostatic fields in the vicinity of the substrate on which target material is being deposited. The electrostatic particle trap consists of an array of electrode surfaces, each maintained at an electrostatic potential, and with their surfaces parallel or perpendicular to the surface of the substrate. The method involves interception and trapping of or reflection of charged particles achieved by generating electrostatic fields in the vicinity of the substrate, and configuring the fields to force the charged particulate material away from the substrate. The electrostatic charged particle trap enables prevention of charged particles from being deposited on the substrate thereby enabling the deposition of extremely low defect density films, such as required for reflective masks of an extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) system.

  1. Investigation of nonextensivity trapped electrons effect on the solitary ion-acoustic wave using fractional Schamel equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazari-Golshan, A.

    2016-08-01

    Ion-acoustic (IA) solitary wave propagation is investigated by solving the fractional Schamel equation (FSE) in a homogenous system of unmagnetized plasma. This plasma consists of the nonextensive trapped electrons and cold fluid ions. The effects of the nonextensive q-parameter, electron trapping, and fractional parameter have been studied. The FSE is derived by using the semi-inverse and Agrawal's methods. The analytical results show that an increase in the amount of electron trapping and nonextensive q-parameter increases the soliton ion-acoustic amplitude in agreement with the previously obtained results. However, it is vice-versa for the fractional parameter. This feature leads to the fact that the fractional parameter may be used to increase the IA soliton amplitude instead of increasing electron trapping and nonextensive parameters.

  2. Single Ion Trapping for the Enriched Xenon Observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Waldman, Samuel J.; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SLAC

    2006-03-28

    In the last decade, a variety of neutrino oscillation experiments have established that there is a mass difference between neutrino flavors, without determining the absolute neutrino mass scale. The Enriched Xenon Observatory for neutrinoless double beta decay (EXO) will search for the rare decays of xenon to determine the absolute value of the neutrino mass. The experiment uses a novel technique to minimize backgrounds, identifying the decay daughter product in real time using single ion spectroscopy. Here, we describe single ion trapping and spectroscopy compatible with the EXO detector. We extend the technique of single ion trapping in ultrahigh vacuum to trapping in xenon gas. With this technique, EXO will achieve a neutrino mass sensitivity of {approx_equal} .010 eV.

  3. Towards Laser Cooling Trapped Ions with Telecom Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dungan, Kristina; Becker, Patrick; Donoghue, Liz; Liu, Jackie; Olmschenk, Steven

    2015-05-01

    Quantum information has many potential applications in communication, atomic clocks, and the precision measurement of fundamental constants. Trapped ions are excellent candidates for applications in quantum information because of their isolation from external perturbations, and the precise control afforded by laser cooling and manipulation of the quantum state. For many applications in quantum communication, it would be advantageous to interface ions with telecom light. We present progress towards laser cooling and trapping of doubly-ionized lanthanum, which should require only infrared, telecom-compatible light. Additionally, we present progress on optimization of a second-harmonic generation cavity for laser cooling and trapping barium ions, for future sympathetic cooling experiments. This research is supported by the Army Research Office, Research Corporation for Science Advancement, and Denison University.

  4. Resonant Energy Transfer in a System of Cold Trapped Molecules

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-17

    collisions between cold ammonia molecules and ultracold rubidium atoms, (4) creation and deceleration of velocity controlled beams of rotationally excited...affected collisions between cold ammonia molecules and ultracold rubidium atoms, (4) creation and deceleration of velocity controlled beams of...elastic and inelastic collision cross-sections between rubidium atoms (Rb) and ammonia Fig. 1: Measured decay curves and simulation results for ND3

  5. Crystallization of Ca+ ions in a linear rf octupole ion trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okada, Kunihiro; Yasuda, Kazuhiro; Takayanagi, Toshinobu; Wada, Michiharu; Schuessler, Hans A.; Ohtani, Shunsuke

    2007-03-01

    A laser-cooling experiment with Ca+ ions trapped in a linear rf octupole ion trap is presented. The phase transition of the laser-cooled Ca+ ions from the cloud to the crystal state is observed by an abrupt dip of the laser-induced fluorescence spectrum and indicates that mK temperatures are obtained. We have also performed molecular dynamics simulations under various conditions to confirm this property by deducing axially symmetric structures of Coulomb crystals and by evaluating the translational temperatures of the laser-cooled ions. The simulation results show that for small numbers of ions novel ring-shaped crystals are produced. As the number of ions is increased, cylindrical layers in the ring crystal are sequentially formed. For more than 100 ions, also hexagonal and spiral structures emerge in parts of the large-size ion crystal, which has a length on the order of millimeters for the present geometrical arrangement and voltages. An advantage of the linear rf octupole trap is its large almost-field-free region in the middle of the trap, where the micromotion amplitude is small for trapped ions. These results demonstrate that such a multipole trap has attractive features for quantum computing and ultracold ion-atom collision studies.

  6. Ion Trapping, Storage, and Ejection in Structures for Lossless Ion Manipulations

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xinyu; Garimella, Sandilya V. B.; Prost, Spencer A; Webb, Ian K; Chen, Tsung-Chi; Tang, Keqi; Tohnachev, Aleksey V.; Norheim, Randolph V.; Baker, Erin S.; Anderson, Gordon A; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Smith, Richard D.

    2015-01-01

    A new Structures for Lossless lon Manipulations (SUM) module, having electrode arrays patterned on a pair of parallel printed circuit boards (PCB), was constructed and utilized to investigate capabilities for ion trapping at a pressure of 4 Torr. Positive ions were confined by application of RF voltages to a series of inner rung electrodes with alternating phase on adjacent electrodes, in conjunction with positive DC potentials on surrounding guard electrodes on each PCB. An axial DC :field was also introduced by stepwise varying the DC potentials applied to the inner rung electrodes to control the ion transport and accumulation inside the ion trapping region. We show that ions can be trapped and accumulated with up to 100% efficiency, stored for at least 5 h with no significant losses, and then could be rapidly ejected from the SUM trap. The present results provide a foundation for the development of much more complex SUM devices that facilitate extended ion manipulations. PMID:25971536

  7. Ion Trapping, Storage, and Ejection in Structures for Lossless Ion Manipulations

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xinyu; Garimella, Venkata BS; Prost, Spencer A.; Webb, Ian K.; Chen, Tsung-Chi; Tang, Keqi; Tolmachev, Aleksey V.; Norheim, Randolph V.; Baker, Erin Shammel; Anderson, Gordon A.; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Smith, Richard D.

    2015-06-16

    A structure for lossless ion manipulation (SLIM) module was constructed with electrode arrays patterned on a pair of parallel printed circuit boards (PCB) separated by 5 mm and utilized to investigate capabilities for ion trapping at 4 Torr. Positive ions were confined by application of RF having alternating phases on a series of inner rung electrodes and by positive DC potentials on surrounding guard electrodes on each PCB. An axial DC field was also introduced by stepwise varying the DC potential of the inner rung electrodes so as to control the ion transport and accumulation inside the ion trap. We show that ions could be trapped and accumulated with 100% efficiency, stored for at least 5 hours with no losses, and could be rapidly ejected from the SLIM trap.

  8. Theoretical investigation on confinement of ions in a cube-shaped ion trap.

    PubMed

    Noshad, Houshyar; Amouhashemi, Majid

    2015-09-01

    The confinement of ions in a cube-shaped ion trap and the mathematical formalism governing the behavior of ions in the trap is investigated theoretically. Afterwards, the stability regions are computed using the fourth-order Rung-Kutta method. Consequently, the influence of the direction of ions, injected into the trap from its center on the stability region, is numerically discussed. Moreover, the maximum angle of injection with respect to the vertical axis of the cube for which the ions could be confined in the trap without invoking any direct current component of voltage (henceforth referred to as limiting angle) was calculated. Strong linear correlation between the angle of injection and the ratio of the stability region areas is confirmed. A nonlinear feature of a cube-shaped ion trap is demonstrated with a focus on the equations of motion for an ion confined into the trap. It is worthwhile to note that the stability region of our cubic ion trap, which has its own boundary conditions and electrodynamics, has been theoretically investigated for the first time. Besides, the limiting angle as well as the aforementioned strong linear correlation has not been reported in the literature previously. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Next Generation JPL Ultra-Stable Trapped Ion Atomic Clocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burt, Eric; Tucker, Blake; Larsen, Kameron; Hamell, Robert; Tjoelker, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Over the past decade, trapped ion atomic clock development at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) has focused on two directions: 1) new atomic clock technology for space flight applications that require strict adherence to size, weight, and power requirements, and 2) ultra-stable atomic clocks, usually for terrestrial applications emphasizing ultimate performance. In this paper we present a new ultra-stable trapped ion clock designed, built, and tested in the second category. The first new standard, L10, will be delivered to the Naval Research Laboratory for use in characterizing DoD space clocks.

  10. "Fast Excitation" CID in Quadrupole Ion Trap Mass Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Murrell, J.; Despeyroux, D.; Lammert, Stephen {Steve} A; Stephenson Jr, James {Jim} L; Goeringer, Doug

    2003-01-01

    Collision-induced dissociation (CID) in a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer is usually performed by applying a small amplitude excitation voltage at the same secular frequency as the ion of interest. Here we disclose studies examining the use of large amplitude voltage excitations (applied for short periods of time) to cause fragmentation of the ions of interest. This process has been examined using leucine enkephalin as the model compound and the motion of the ions within the ion trap simulated using ITSIM. The resulting fragmentation information obtained is identical with that observed by conventional resonance excitation CID. ''Fast excitation'' CID deposits (as determined by the intensity ratio of the a{sub 4}/b{sub 4} ion of leucine enkephalin) approximately the same amount of internal energy into an ion as conventional resonance excitation CID where the excitation signal is applied for much longer periods of time. The major difference between the two excitation techniques is the higher rate of excitation (gain in kinetic energy) between successive collisions with helium atoms with ''fast excitation'' CID as opposed to the conventional resonance excitation CID. With conventional resonance excitation CID ions fragment while the excitation voltage is still being applied whereas for ''fast excitation'' CID a higher proportion of the ions fragment in the ion cooling time following the excitation pulse. The fragmentation of the (M + 17H){sup 17+} of horse heart myoglobin is also shown to illustrate the application of ''fast excitation'' CID to proteins.

  11. The truncated Wigner approximation for spin dynamics in systems of trapped ions, atoms & molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schachenmayer, Johannes; Zhu, Bihui; Pikovski, Alexander; Hazzard, Kaden; Holland, Murray; Rey, Ana Maria

    2014-05-01

    Trapped ions and systems of cold atoms or molecules in optical lattices offer controlled environments to experimentally study non-equilibrium dynamics of many-body quantum spin-models with interactions of varying range. Theoretically calculating dynamics of observables for these experiments is a major challenge both analytically and numerically. While in one dimension, time-dependent density matrix renormalization group techniques (t-DMRG) allow for an efficient simulation of the dynamics as long as the time-dependent bi-partite entanglement growth remains moderate, a simulation for systems in two or three dimensions is more demanding. Here we present a numerical technique, which employs the truncated Wigner approximation (TWA) and which can be used to simulate Ramsey-dynamics for current experiments with trapped ions, alkaline earth atoms, polar molecules in optical lattices, or for systems with Rydberg atoms.

  12. A model of optical trapping cold atoms using a metallic nano wire with surface plasmon effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thi Phuong Lan, Nguyen; Thi Nga, Do; Viet, Nguyen Ai

    2016-06-01

    In this work, we construct a new model of optical trapping cold atoms with a metallic nano wire by using surface plasmon effect generated by strong field of laser beams. Using the skin effect, we send a strong oscillated electromagnetic filed through the surface of a metallic nano wire. The local field generated by evanescent effect creates an effective attractive potential near the surface of metallic nano wires. The consideration of some possible boundary and frequency conditions might lead to non-trivial bound state solution for a cold atom. We discus also the case of the laser reflection optical trap with shell-core design, and compare our model with another recent schemes of cold atom optical traps using optical fibers and carbon nanotubes.

  13. Mobility-Selected Ion Trapping and Enrichment Using Structures for Lossless Ion Manipulations

    DOE PAGES

    Chen, Tsung-Chi; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Webb, Ian K.; ...

    2016-01-11

    The integration of ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) with mass spectrometry (MS) and the ability to trap ions in IMS-MS measurements is of great importance for performing reactions, accumulating ions, and increasing analytical measurement sensitivity. The development of Structures for Lossless Ion Manipulations (SLIM) offers the potential for ion manipulations in a more reliable and cost-effective manner, while opening opportunities for much more complex sequences of manipulations. Here, we demonstrate an ion separation and trapping module and a method based upon SLIM that consists of a linear mobility ion drift region, a switch/tee and a trapping region that allows the isolationmore » and accumulation of mobility-separated species. The operation and optimization of the SLIM switch/tee and trap are described and demonstrated for the enrichment of the low abundance ions. Lastly, we observed a linear increase in ion intensity with the number of trapping/accumulation events using the SLIM trap, illustrating its potential for enhancing the sensitivity of low abundance or targeted species.« less

  14. Mobility-Selected Ion Trapping and Enrichment Using Structures for Lossless Ion Manipulations

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Tsung-Chi; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Webb, Ian K.; Garimella, Sandilya V. B.; Zhang, Xing; Hamid, Ahmed M.; Deng, Liulin; Karnesky, William E.; Prost, Spencer A.; Sandoval, Jeremy A.; Norheim, Randolph V.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Tolmachev, Aleksey V.; Baker, Erin Shammel; Smith, Richard D.

    2016-01-11

    The integration of ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) with mass spectrometry (MS) and the ability to trap ions in IMS-MS measurements is of great importance for performing reactions, accumulating ions, and increasing analytical measurement sensitivity. The development of Structures for Lossless Ion Manipulations (SLIM) offers the potential for ion manipulations in a more reliable and cost-effective manner, while opening opportunities for much more complex sequences of manipulations. Here, we demonstrate an ion separation and trapping module and a method based upon SLIM that consists of a linear mobility ion drift region, a switch/tee and a trapping region that allows the isolation and accumulation of mobility-separated species. The operation and optimization of the SLIM switch/tee and trap are described and demonstrated for the enrichment of the low abundance ions. Lastly, we observed a linear increase in ion intensity with the number of trapping/accumulation events using the SLIM trap, illustrating its potential for enhancing the sensitivity of low abundance or targeted species.

  15. Ion-acoustic solitary waves in a positron beam plasma with electron trapping and nonextensivity effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali Shan, S.; -Ur-Rehman, Aman; Mushtaq, A.

    2017-03-01

    Ion-acoustic solitary waves (IASWs) are investigated in a plasma having a cold positron beam fluid, electrons following a vortex-like distribution with entropic index q, and dynamic ions. Using a standard procedure, a pseudo-potential energy equation is derived. The presence of nonextensive q - distributed trapped electrons and cold positron beam has been shown to influence the small amplitude soliton structure quite significantly. From the analysis of our results, it is shown that compressive IASWs are supported in this plasma model. As the real plasma situations are observed with plasma species having a relative flow, our present analysis should be beneficial for comprehending the electrostatic solitary structures observed in fusion plasma devices and positron winds observed in astrophysical plasmas.

  16. Scalable Multiplexed Ion Trap (SMIT) Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-12-08

    collection efficiency of a photon emitted by an ion into a single mode fiber is on the order of 4x10-3: one can dramatically improve this efficiency by placing...atomic decay (g/Γ) < 0.05 > 10 3 ibid B Collection efficiency of photon into fiber < 0.005 > 0.1 4 Moehring et al, Nature 449, 68 (2007) B Integration...waist located at and matched with the core of a single-mode optical fiber . (b) Expected collection efficiency of the single photons when ion is

  17. Photoionizing Trapped Highly Charged Ions with Synchrotron Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Crespo, J R; Simon, M; Beilmann, C; Rudolph, J; Steinbruegge, R; Eberle, S; Schwarz, M; Baumann, T; Schmitt, B; Brunner, F; Ginzel, R; Klawitter, R; Kubicek, K; Epp, S; Mokler, P; Maeckel, V; Ullrich, J; Brown, G V; Graf, A; Leutenegger, M; Beiersdorfer, P; Behar, E; Follath, R; Reichardt, G; Schwarzkopf, O

    2011-09-12

    Photoabsorption by highly charged ions plays an essential role in astrophysical plasmas. Diagnostics of photoionized plasmas surrounding binary systems rely heavily on precise identification of absorption lines and on the knowledge of their cross sections and widths. Novel experiments using an electron beam ion trap, FLASH EBIT, in combination with monochromatic synchrotron radiation allow us to investigate ions in charge states hitherto out of reach. Trapped ions can be prepared in any charge state at target densities sufficient to measure absorption cross sections below 0.1 Mb. The results benchmark state-of-the-art predictions of the transitions wavelengths, widths, and absolute cross sections. Recent high resolution results on Fe{sup 14+}, Fe{sup 15+}, and Ar{sup 12+} at photon energies up to 1 keV are presented.

  18. Linear mode-mixing of phonons with trapped ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Kevin; James, Daniel F. V.

    2017-01-01

    We propose a method to manipulate the normal modes in a chain of trapped ions using only two lasers. Linear chains of trapped ions have proven experimentally to be highly controllable quantum systems with a variety of refined techniques for preparation, evolution, and readout; however, typically for quantum information processing applications people have been interested in using the internal levels of the ions as the computational basis. We analyze the case where the motional degrees of freedom of the ions are the quantum system of interest, and where the internal levels are leveraged to facilitate interactions. In particular, we focus on an analysis of mode-mixing of phonons in different normal modes to mimic the quantum optical equivalent of a beam splitter.

  19. A Modular Quantum System of Trapped Atomic Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hucul, David Alexander

    Scaling up controlled quantum systems to involve large numbers of qubits remains one of the outstanding challenges of quantum information science. One path toward scalability is the use of a modular architecture where adjacent qubits may be entangled with applied electromagnetic fields, and remote qubits may be entangled using photon interference. Trapped atomic ion qubits are one of the most promising platforms for scaling up quantum systems by combining long coherence times with high fidelity entangling operations between proximate and remote qubits. In this thesis, I present experimental progress on combining entanglement between remote atomic ions separated by 1 meter with near-field entanglement between atomic ions in the same ion trap. I describe the experimental improvements to increase the remote entanglement rate by orders of magnitude to nearly 5 per second. This is the first experimental demonstration where the remote entanglement rate exceeds the decoherence rate of the entangled qubits. The flexibility of creating remote entanglement through photon interference is demonstrated by using the interference of distinguishable photons without sacrificing remote entanglement rate or fidelity. Next I describe the use of master clock in combination with a frequency comb to lock the phases of all laser-induced interactions between remote ion traps while removing optical phase stability requirements. The combination of both types of entanglement gates to create a small quantum network are described. Finally, I present ways to mitigate cross talk between photonic and memory qubits by using different trapped ion species. I show preliminary work on performing state detection of nuclear spin 0 ions by using entanglement between atomic ion spin and photon polarization. These control techniques may be important for building a large-scale modular quantum system.

  20. Resonant interaction of trapped cold atoms with a magnetic cantilever tip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montoya, Cris; Valencia, Jose; Geraci, Andrew A.; Eardley, Matthew; Moreland, John; Hollberg, Leo; Kitching, John

    2015-06-01

    Magnetic resonance in an ensemble of laser-cooled trapped Rb atoms is excited using a microcantilever with a magnetic tip. The cantilever is mounted on a multilayer chip designed to capture, cool, and magnetically transport cold atoms. The coupling is observed by measuring the loss from a magnetic trap as the oscillating cantilever induces Zeeman-state transitions in the atoms. Interfacing cold atoms with mechanical devices could enable probing and manipulating atomic spins with nanometer spatial resolution and single-spin sensitivity, leading to new capabilities in quantum computation, quantum simulation, and precision sensing.

  1. TAMU-TRAP: an ion trap facility for Weak Interaction and Nuclear Physics Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shidling, Praveen

    2014-09-01

    In the low-energy regime, precision measurements of nuclear β-decay continue to be an efficient tool to search for new physics beyond the standard electroweak model and is the most abundant weak interaction phenomenon. The β-decay experiments carried out until now can be explained by a time reversal-invariant pure V-A interaction with maximal violation of parity. Nevertheless, experimental error bars still leave sufficient room for the possible existence of other types of weak interaction in beta decay. The primary goal of the TAMU-TRAP facility is to test the standard model for a possible admixture of a scalar type of interaction by measuring the β- ν correlation parameter, aβν, in T =2 super-allowed β-delayed proton emitters. The aβν correlation parameter can be inferred by measuring the proton energy spectrum. Low energy radioactive ion beam (RIB) will be delivered to the facility through the Heavy Ion guide, which is part of the T-REX(TAMU-Reaccelerated EXotics) upgrade project. The main components of the facility are an RFQ (cooler/buncher) and a Penning trap system. The measurement trap will be a large-bore cylindrical Penning trap with 90 mm radius, larger than any existing Penning trap. This geometry will allow for full radial containment of decay products of interest. The trap geometry is also suitable for a wide range of nuclear physics experiments. Additional goals for this system are mass and lifetime measurements. Presently, the TAMUTRAP setup is under construction and is being coupled to the T-REX upgrade project. Several parts of the beamline have been tested using an offline ion source. A brief overview of the TAMU-TRAP set-up, its current status, and the status of the T-REX upgrade project will be presented.

  2. BerlinTrap: A new cryogenic 22-pole ion trap spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Günther, Alan; Nieto, Pablo; Müller, David; Sheldrick, Alexander; Gerlich, Dieter; Dopfer, Otto

    2017-02-01

    The design and first applications of a new tandem mass spectrometer (BerlinTrap) combining an electrospray ion source, a quadrupole mass spectrometer, a cryogenic 22-pole ion trap (4-300 K), and an orthogonal reflectron time-of-flight mass spectrometer are described. The trapped ions are cooled by helium buffer gas cooling. The formation and solvation shell structure of weakly-bound HenH3O+ complexes and the electronic photodissociation spectrum of the protonated amino acid tyrosine are used to calibrate the setup for cooling, tagging, and spectroscopic capabilities. A vibrational temperature below 20 K is inferred for protonated tyrosine. The electronic spectrum of isolated protonated lumichrome, the smallest protonated flavin, is recorded in the visible range and assigned to the most stable N5 isomer by comparison with quantum chemical calculations. These results demonstrate the suitability of the BerlinTrap apparatus for spectroscopy and reactivity studies of small and large (bio-)molecular ions and their clusters.

  3. Improving ion mobility measurement sensitivity by utilizing helium in an ion funnel trap.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Yehia M; Garimella, Sandilya V B; Tolmachev, Aleksey V; Baker, Erin S; Smith, Richard D

    2014-06-03

    Ion mobility instruments that utilize nitrogen as buffer gas are often preceded by an ion trap and accumulation region that also uses nitrogen, and for different inert gases, no significant effects upon performance are expected for ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) of larger ions. However, we have observed significantly improved performance for an ion funnel trap upon adding helium; the signal intensities for higher m/z species were improved by more than an order of magnitude compared to using pure nitrogen. The effect of helium upon IMS resolving power was also studied by introducing a He/N2 gas mixture into the drift cell, and in some cases, a slight improvement was observed compared to pure N2. The improvement in signal can be largely attributed to faster and more efficient ion ejection into the drift tube from the ion funnel trap.

  4. Improving Ion Mobility Measurement Sensitivity by Utilizing Helium in an Ion Funnel Trap

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Ion mobility instruments that utilize nitrogen as buffer gas are often preceded by an ion trap and accumulation region that also uses nitrogen, and for different inert gases, no significant effects upon performance are expected for ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) of larger ions. However, we have observed significantly improved performance for an ion funnel trap upon adding helium; the signal intensities for higher m/z species were improved by more than an order of magnitude compared to using pure nitrogen. The effect of helium upon IMS resolving power was also studied by introducing a He/N2 gas mixture into the drift cell, and in some cases, a slight improvement was observed compared to pure N2. The improvement in signal can be largely attributed to faster and more efficient ion ejection into the drift tube from the ion funnel trap. PMID:24786390

  5. Verification of high efficient broad beam cold cathode ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel Reheem, A. M.; Ahmed, M. M.; Abdelhamid, M. M.; Ashour, A. H.

    2016-08-01

    An improved form of cold cathode ion source has been designed and constructed. It consists of stainless steel hollow cylinder anode and stainless steel cathode disc, which are separated by a Teflon flange. The electrical discharge and output characteristics have been measured at different pressures using argon, nitrogen, and oxygen gases. The ion exit aperture shape and optimum distance between ion collector plate and cathode disc are studied. The stable discharge current and maximum output ion beam current have been obtained using grid exit aperture. It was found that the optimum distance between ion collector plate and ion exit aperture is equal to 6.25 cm. The cold cathode ion source is used to deposit aluminum coating layer on AZ31 magnesium alloy using argon ion beam current which equals 600 μA. Scanning electron microscope and X-ray diffraction techniques used for characterizing samples before and after aluminum deposition.

  6. Enabling Technologies for Scalable Trapped Ion Quantum Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crain, Stephen; Gaultney, Daniel; Mount, Emily; Knoernschild, Caleb; Baek, Soyoung; Maunz, Peter; Kim, Jungsang

    2013-05-01

    Scalability is one of the main challenges of trapped ion based quantum computation, mainly limited by the lack of enabling technologies needed to trap, manipulate and process the increasing number of qubits. Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) technology allows one to design movable micromirrors to focus laser beams on individual ions in a chain and steer the focal point in two dimensions. Our current MEMS system is designed to steer 355 nm pulsed laser beams to carry out logic gates on a chain of Yb ions with a waist of 1.5 μm across a 20 μm range. In order to read the state of the qubit chain we developed a 32-channel PMT with a custom read-out circuit operating near the thermal noise limit of the readout amplifier which increases state detection fidelity. We also developed a set of digital to analog converters (DACs) used to supply analog DC voltages to the electrodes of an ion trap. We designed asynchronous DACs to avoid added noise injection at the update rate commonly found in synchronous DACs. Effective noise filtering is expected to reduce the heating rate of a surface trap, thus improving multi-qubit logic gate fidelities. Our DAC system features 96 channels and an integrated FPGA that allows the system to be controlled in real time. This work was supported by IARPA/ARO.

  7. Quantum Simulation of Quantum Field Theories in Trapped Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Casanova, J.; Lamata, L.; Egusquiza, I. L.; Gerritsma, R.; Roos, C. F.; Garcia-Ripoll, J. J.; Solano, E.

    2011-12-23

    We propose the quantum simulation of fermion and antifermion field modes interacting via a bosonic field mode, and present a possible implementation with two trapped ions. This quantum platform allows for the scalable add up of bosonic and fermionic modes, and represents an avenue towards quantum simulations of quantum field theories in perturbative and nonperturbative regimes.

  8. Differentially pumped dual linear quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Owen, Benjamin C.; Kenttamaa, Hilkka I.

    2016-11-15

    The present disclosure provides a new tandem mass spectrometer and methods of using the same for analyzing charged particles. The differentially pumped dual linear quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer of the present disclose includes a combination of two linear quadrupole (LQIT) mass spectrometers with differentially pumped vacuum chambers.

  9. Differentially pumped dual linear quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Owen, Benjamin C.; Kenttamaa, Hilkka I.

    2015-10-20

    The present disclosure provides a new tandem mass spectrometer and methods of using the same for analyzing charged particles. The differentially pumped dual linear quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer of the present disclose includes a combination of two linear quadrupole (LQIT) mass spectrometers with differentially pumped vacuum chambers.

  10. Criteria for ultrastable operation of the trapped ion frequency standard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tjoelker, R. L.; Prestage, J. D.; Maleki, L.

    1992-01-01

    The leading systematic perturbations to the Jet Propulsion Laboratory's (JPL's) mercury trapped ion frequency standard are characterized under present operating conditions. Sensitivity of the standard to environmental variations is measured, and the required regulation of key components to obtain a stability of 10(exp -16) is identified.

  11. From transistor to trapped-ion computers for quantum chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Yung, M.-H.; Casanova, J.; Mezzacapo, A.; McClean, J.; Lamata, L.; Aspuru-Guzik, A.; Solano, E.

    2014-01-01

    Over the last few decades, quantum chemistry has progressed through the development of computational methods based on modern digital computers. However, these methods can hardly fulfill the exponentially-growing resource requirements when applied to large quantum systems. As pointed out by Feynman, this restriction is intrinsic to all computational models based on classical physics. Recently, the rapid advancement of trapped-ion technologies has opened new possibilities for quantum control and quantum simulations. Here, we present an efficient toolkit that exploits both the internal and motional degrees of freedom of trapped ions for solving problems in quantum chemistry, including molecular electronic structure, molecular dynamics, and vibronic coupling. We focus on applications that go beyond the capacity of classical computers, but may be realizable on state-of-the-art trapped-ion systems. These results allow us to envision a new paradigm of quantum chemistry that shifts from the current transistor to a near-future trapped-ion-based technology. PMID:24395054

  12. Quantum simulation of quantum field theories in trapped ions.

    PubMed

    Casanova, J; Lamata, L; Egusquiza, I L; Gerritsma, R; Roos, C F; García-Ripoll, J J; Solano, E

    2011-12-23

    We propose the quantum simulation of fermion and antifermion field modes interacting via a bosonic field mode, and present a possible implementation with two trapped ions. This quantum platform allows for the scalable add up of bosonic and fermionic modes, and represents an avenue towards quantum simulations of quantum field theories in perturbative and nonperturbative regimes.

  13. Colloquium: Quantum Networks with Trapped Ions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-04-28

    long distances through the quantum teleportation protocol Bennett et al., 1993. Quantum networks can be divided into two major classes: 1 quantum ...emitted photons and can degrade the quantum interfer- FIG. 7. Space-time schematic of the teleportation protocol. Each ion is first initialized to |0...tion of the original quantum state from A to B. FIG. 8. Tomography of the teleported quantum states. The reconstructed density matrices for the six

  14. Trap losses induced by Rydberg dressing of cold atomic gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aman, J. A.; Desalvo, B. J.; Dunning, F. B.; Killian, T. C.

    2015-05-01

    The near-resonant dressing of ultracold strontium gases and BECs contained in an optical dipole trap (ODT) with the n = 303S1 Rydberg state is investigated as a function of the effective two-photon Rabi frequency, detuning, and dressing time. The measurements demonstrate that, even when well detuned from resonance, such dressing can lead to a rapid decrease in the ground-state atom population in the ODT. This decrease is attributed to Rydberg atom excitation which can lead to direct escape from the trap and/or population of very-long-lived metastable states. The large Rydberg atom production rates are explained using a reaction model in which the initial excitation of a Rydberg atom triggers the excitation of neighboring atoms leading to rapid avalanche-like growth in the Rydberg population. Research supported by the AFOSR, the NSF and the Robert A Welch Foundation.

  15. Quantum energy teleportation with trapped ions

    SciTech Connect

    Hotta, Masahiro

    2009-10-15

    We analyze a protocol of quantum energy teleportation that transports energy from the left edge of a linear ion crystal to the right edge by local operations and classical communication at a speed considerably greater than the speed of a phonon in the crystal. A probe qubit is strongly coupled with phonon fluctuation in the ground state for a short time and it is projectively measured in order to obtain information about this phonon fluctuation. During the measurement process, phonons are excited by the time-dependent measurement interaction and the energy of the excited phonons must be infused from outside the system. The obtained information is transferred to the right edge of the crystal through a classical channel. Even though the phonons excited at the left edge do not arrive at the right edge at the same time as when the information arrives at the right edge, we are able to soon extract energy from the ions at the right edge by using the transferred information. Because the intermediate ions of the crystal are not excited during the execution of the protocol, energy is transmitted in the energy-transfer channel without heat generation.

  16. Laser induced fluorescence of trapped molecular ions

    SciTech Connect

    Winn, J.S.

    1980-10-01

    Laser induced fluoresence (LIF) spectra (laser excitation spectra) are conceptually among the most simple spectra to obtain. One need only confine a gaseous sample in a suitable container, direct a laser along one axis of the container, and monitor the sample's fluorescence at a right angle to the laser beam. As the laser wavelength is changed, the changes in fluorescence intensity map the absorption spectrum of the sample. (More precisely, only absorption to states which have a significant radiative decay component are monitored.) For ion spectroscopy, one could benefit in many ways by such an experiment. Most optical ion spectra have been observed by emission techniques, and, aside from the problems of spectral analysis, discharge emission methods often produce the spectra of many species, some of which may be unknown or uncertain. Implicit in the description of LIF given above is certainty as to the chemical identity of the carrier of the spectrum. This article describes a method by which the simplifying aspects of LIF can be extended to molecular ions (albeit with a considerable increase in experimental complexity over that necessary for stable neutral molecules).

  17. Observations of cold ion heating inside the magnetospheric separatrix region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toledo Redondo, Sergio; Andre, Mats; Vaivads, Andris; Khotyaintsev, Yuri; Lavraud, Benoit; Graham, Daniel; Divin, Andrey; Aunai, Nicolas

    2016-04-01

    Several studies have shown that cold ions (energies up to tens of eV) of ionospheric origin can be found in different regions of the magnetosphere, including the dayside magnetopause. They can be very abundant, up to ~100 cc, e.g. plasmaspheric plumes, and become the dominant population of the magnetosphere. Cold ions, when present, participate in magnetic reconnection at the dayside magnetopause, mass loading the magnetospheric side and adding a new length-scale into the system owing to their smaller gyroradius. At the same time, reconnection accelerates and heats the cold ions. Based on multi-spacecraft observations, we report observations of cold ion heating inside the separatrix region when reconnection is ongoing and study the mechanisms that energize the cold ions. The heating is not always observed and our observations indicate that cold ion heating is more effective next to the X-line. We find that large electric field gradients and wave-particle interactions are consistent with the heating observed.

  18. Coulomb crystal mass spectrometry in a digital ion trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deb, Nabanita; Pollum, Laura L.; Smith, Alexander D.; Keller, Matthias; Rennick, Christopher J.; Heazlewood, Brianna R.; Softley, Timothy P.

    2015-03-01

    We present a mass spectrometric technique for identifying the masses and relative abundances of Coulomb-crystallized ions held in a linear Paul trap. A digital radio-frequency wave form is employed to generate the trapping potential, as this can be cleanly switched off, and static dipolar fields are subsequently applied to the trap electrodes for ion ejection. Close to 100% detection efficiency is demonstrated for Ca+ and CaF+ ions from bicomponent Ca+-CaF+ Coulomb crystals prepared by the reaction of Ca+ with CH3F . A quantitative linear relationship is observed between ion number and the corresponding integrated time-of-flight (TOF) peak, independent of the ionic species. The technique is applicable to a diverse range of multicomponent Coulomb crystals—demonstrated here for Ca+-NH 3+ -NH 4+ and Ca+-CaOH +-CaOD + crystals—and will facilitate the measurement of ion-molecule reaction rates and branching ratios in complicated reaction systems.

  19. Klein tunneling and Dirac potentials in trapped ions

    SciTech Connect

    Casanova, J.; Garcia-Ripoll, J. J.; Gerritsma, R.; Roos, C. F.; Solano, E.

    2010-08-15

    We propose the quantum simulation of the Dirac equation with potentials, allowing the study of relativistic scattering and Klein tunneling. This quantum relativistic effect permits a positive-energy Dirac particle to propagate through a repulsive potential via the population transfer to negative-energy components. We show how to engineer scalar, pseudoscalar, and other potentials in the 1+1 Dirac equation by manipulating two trapped ions. The Dirac spinor is represented by the internal states of one ion, while its position and momentum are described by those of a collective motional mode. The second ion is used to build the desired potentials with high spatial resolution.

  20. Phonon-Mediated Detection of Trapped Atomic Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hume, David; Rosenband, Till; Wineland, David

    2008-03-01

    Both quantum information processing and quantum-limited metrology require sensitive detection of quantum states. Using trapped atomic ions, we investigate quantum non-demolition measurements in a two-species ion chain composed of Al^+ and Be^+. By mapping information from Al^+ to a shared phonon-mode then to Be^+ and detecting repetitively we have experimentally demonstrated a fidelity for state initialization and detection of 0.9994. We have also shown an increase in measurement efficiency through an adaptive procedure. Here we apply these ideas to the detection of states of multiple Al^+ using a single Be^+ ion, and describe the preparation of entangled states through measurement.

  1. Scalable digital hardware for a trapped ion quantum computer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mount, Emily; Gaultney, Daniel; Vrijsen, Geert; Adams, Michael; Baek, So-Young; Hudek, Kai; Isabella, Louis; Crain, Stephen; van Rynbach, Andre; Maunz, Peter; Kim, Jungsang

    2016-12-01

    Many of the challenges of scaling quantum computer hardware lie at the interface between the qubits and the classical control signals used to manipulate them. Modular ion trap quantum computer architectures address scalability by constructing individual quantum processors interconnected via a network of quantum communication channels. Successful operation of such quantum hardware requires a fully programmable classical control system capable of frequency stabilizing the continuous wave lasers necessary for loading, cooling, initialization, and detection of the ion qubits, stabilizing the optical frequency combs used to drive logic gate operations on the ion qubits, providing a large number of analog voltage sources to drive the trap electrodes, and a scheme for maintaining phase coherence among all the controllers that manipulate the qubits. In this work, we describe scalable solutions to these hardware development challenges.

  2. A high-performance Hg(+) trapped ion frequency standard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestage, J. D.; Tjoelker, R. L.; Dick, G. J.; Maleki, L.

    1992-01-01

    A high-performance frequency standard based on (199)Hg(+) ions confined in a hybrid radio frequency (RF)/dc linear ion trap is demonstrated. This trap permits storage of large numbers of ions with reduced susceptibility to the second-order Doppler effect caused by the RF confining fields. A 160-mHz-wide atomic resonance line for the 40.5-GHz clock transition is used to steer the output of a 5-mHz crystal oscillator to obtain a stability of 2 x 10(exp -15) for 24,000-second averaging times. Measurements with a 37-mHz line width for the Hg(+) clock transition demonstrate that the inherent stability for this frequency standard is better than 1 x 10(exp -15) at 10,000-second averaging times.

  3. Ion Trap Array-Based Systems And Methods For Chemical Analysis

    DOEpatents

    Whitten, William B [Oak Ridge, TN; Ramsey, J Michael [Knoxville, TN

    2005-08-23

    An ion trap-based system for chemical analysis includes an ion trap array. The ion trap array includes a plurality of ion traps arranged in a 2-dimensional array for initially confining ions. Each of the ion traps comprise a central electrode having an aperture, a first and second insulator each having an aperture sandwiching the central electrode, and first and second end cap electrodes each having an aperture sandwiching the first and second insulator. A structure for simultaneously directing a plurality of different species of ions out from the ion traps is provided. A spectrometer including a detector receives and identifies the ions. The trap array can be used with spectrometers including time-of-flight mass spectrometers and ion mobility spectrometers.

  4. Incomplete optical shielding in cold sodium atom traps

    SciTech Connect

    Yurovsky, Vladimir; Ben-Reuven, Abraham

    1997-01-05

    A simple two-channel model, based on the semiclassical Landau-Zener (LZ) approximation, with averaging over angle-dependent exponents, is proposed as a fast means for accounting for the incomplete optical shielding of collisions, as observed in recent experiments conducted by Weiner and co-workers on ultracold sodium-atom traps, and its dependence on the laser polarization. The model yields a reasonably good agreement with the recent quantum close-coupling calculations of Julienne and co-workers. The remaining discrepancy between both theories and the data is qualitatively attributed to a partial overlap of the collision ranges at which loss processes and optical shielding occur.

  5. MEMS-based arrays of micro ion traps for quantum simulation scaling.

    SciTech Connect

    Berkeland, Dana J.; Blain, Matthew Glenn; Jokiel, Bernhard, Jr.

    2006-11-01

    In this late-start Tier I Seniors Council sponsored LDRD, we have designed, simulated, microfabricated, packaged, and tested ion traps to extend the current quantum simulation capabilities of macro-ion traps to tens of ions in one and two dimensions in monolithically microfabricated micrometer-scaled MEMS-based ion traps. Such traps are being microfabricated and packaged at Sandia's MESA facility in a unique tungsten MEMS process that has already made arrays of millions of micron-sized cylindrical ion traps for mass spectroscopy applications. We define and discuss the motivation for quantum simulation using the trapping of ions, show the results of efforts in designing, simulating, and microfabricating W based MEMS ion traps at Sandia's MESA facility, and describe is some detail our development of a custom based ion trap chip packaging technology that enables the implementation of these devices in quantum physics experiments.

  6. Development and Analysis of Cold Trap for Use in Fission Surface Power-Primary Test Circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolfe, T. M.; Dervan, C. A.; Pearson, J. B.; Godfroy, T. J.

    2012-01-01

    The design and analysis of a cold trap proposed for use in the purification of circulated eutectic sodium potassium (NaK-78) loops is presented. The cold trap is designed to be incorporated into the Fission Surface Power-Primary Test Circuit (FSP-PTC), which incorporates a pumped NaK loop to simulate in-space nuclear reactor-based technology using non-nuclear test methodology as developed by the Early Flight Fission-Test Facility. The FSP-PTC provides a test circuit for the development of fission surface power technology. This system operates at temperatures that would be similar to those found in a reactor (500-800 K). By dropping the operating temperature of a specified percentage of NaK flow through a bypass containing a forced circulation cold trap, the NaK purity level can be increased by precipitating oxides from the NaK and capturing them within the cold trap. This would prevent recirculation of these oxides back through the system, which may help prevent corrosion.

  7. Selection of Environmentally Friendly Solvents for the Extravehicular Mobility Unit Secondary Oxygen Pack Cold Trap Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steele, John; Chullen, Cinda; Morenz, Jesse; Stephenson, Curtis

    2010-01-01

    Freon-113(TradeMark) has been used as a chemistry lab sampling solvent at NASA/JSC for EMU (extravehicular Mobility Unit) SOP (Secondary Oxygen Pack) oxygen testing Cold Traps utilized at the USA (United Space Alliance) Houston facility. Similar testing has occurred at the HSWL (Hamilton Sundstrand Windsor Locks) facility. A NASA Executive Order bans the procurement of all ODS (ozone depleting substances), including Freon-113 by the end of 2009. In order to comply with NASA direction, HSWL began evaluating viable solvents to replace Freon-113 . The study and testing effort to find Freon-113 replacements used for Cold Trap sampling is the subject of this paper. Test results have shown HFE-7100 (a 3M fluorinated ether) to be an adequate replacement for Freon-113 as a solvent to remove and measure the non-volatile residue collected in a Cold Trap during oxygen testing. Furthermore, S-316 (a Horiba Instruments Inc. high molecular weight, non-ODS chlorofluorocarbon) was found to be an adequate replacement for Freon-113 as a solvent to reconstitute non-volatile residue removed from a Cold Trap during oxygen testing for subsequent HC (hydrocarbon) analysis via FTIR (Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy).

  8. Microsecond pulsed hydrogen/deuterium exchange of electrosprayed ubiquitin ions stored in a linear ion trap.

    PubMed

    Rajabi, Khadijeh

    2015-02-07

    A pulse of D2O vapour on the order of microseconds is allowed to react with the +6 to +9 charge states of ubiquitin confined in a linear ion trap (LIT). Two envelopes of peaks are detected for the ions of ubiquitin, corresponding to the ions that exchange more quickly and more slowly. The deuterium uptake of the protonated sites on ubiquitin ions accounts for the ion population with the fast exchange. The hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) kinetics of ubiquitin ions trapped in the LIT for 200 ms showed comparable structural transitions to those trapped for 300 ms. When ions are trapped for longer, i.e. up to 2000 ms, mainly the slow exchanging ion population is detected. In all experiments the +7 ions exchange the most, suggesting a short distance between the surface protonated sites and nearby charged sites, and concomitantly high accessibility of surface protonated sites towards D2O. The +6 ions are more compact than the +7 ions but have one fewer protonated site, therefore fewer surface availabilities for D2O attack. The data suggest that the +6 ions keep most of their solution-phase contacts intact while the hydrophobic core is slightly interrupted in the +7 ions, possibly due to the exposure of charged His68 that is normally buried in the hydrophobic pocket. The +8 and +9 ions have more protonated sites but are less compact than the +7 ions because of Coulombic repulsion, resulting in a larger distance between the protonated sites and the basic sites. The data indicate that the HDX mechanism of ions with the slower exchange corresponding to the second envelope of peaks is primarily governed via a relay mechanism. The results suggest that the pulsed HDX MS method is sampling a population of ubiquitin ions with a similar backbone fold to the solution.

  9. Analysis of VX on soil particles using ion trap secondary ion mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Groenewold, G S; Appelhans, A D; Gresham, G L; Olson, J E; Jeffery, M; Wright, J B

    1999-07-01

    The direct detection of the nerve agent VX (methylphosphonothioic acid, S-[2-[bis(1-methylethyl)amino]ethyl] O-ethyl ester) on milligram quantities of soil particles has been achieved using ion trap secondary ion mass spectrometry (IT-SIMS). VX is highly adsorptive toward a wide variety of surfaces; this attribute makes detection using gas-phase approaches difficult but renders the compound very amenable to surface detection. An ion trap mass spectrometer, modified to perform SIMS, was employed in the present study. A primary ion beam (ReO4-) was fired on axis through the ion trap, where it impacted the soil particle samples. [VX + H]+, [VX + H]+ fragment ions, and ions from the chemical background were sputtered into the gas-phase environment of the ion trap, where they were either scanned out or isolated and fragmented (MS2). At a surface concentration of 0.4 monolayer, intact [VX + H]+, and its fragment ions, were readily observable above background. However, at lower concentrations, the secondary ion signal from VX became obscured by ions derived from the chemical background on the surface of the soil particles. MS2 analysis using the ion trap was employed to improve detection of lower concentrations of VX: detection of the 34S isotopic ion of [VX + H]+, present at a surface concentration of approximately 0.002 monolayer, was accomplished. The study afforded the opportunity to investigate the fragmentation chemistry of VX. Semiempirical calculations suggest strongly that the molecule is protonated at the N atom. Deuterium labeling showed that formation of the base peak ion (C2H4)N(i-C3H7)2+ involves transfer of the amino proton to the phosphonothioate moiety prior to, or concurrent with, C-S bond cleavage. To manage the risk associated with working with the compound, the vacuum unit of the IT-SIMS was located in a hood, connected by cables to the externally located electronics and computer.

  10. Measurement of the low-energy Na+-Na total collision rate in an ion-neutral hybrid trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodman, D. S.; Wells, J. E.; Kwolek, J. M.; Blümel, R.; Narducci, F. A.; Smith, W. W.

    2015-01-01

    We present measurements of the total elastic and resonant charge-exchange ion-atom collision rate coefficient kia of cold sodium (Na) with optically dark low-energy Na+ ions in a hybrid ion-neutral trap. To determine kia, we measured the trap loading and loss rates from both a Na magneto-optical trap (MOT) and a linear radio-frequency quadrupole Paul trap. We found the total rate coefficient to be 7.4 ±1.9 ×10-8 cm3/s for the type-I Na MOT immersed within an ≈140 -K ion cloud and 1.10 ±0.25 ×10-7 cm3/s for the type-II Na MOT within an ≈1070 -K ion cloud. Our measurements show excellent agreement with previously reported theoretical fully quantal ab initio calculations. In the process of determining the total rate coefficient, we demonstrate that a MOT can be used to probe an optically dark ion cloud's spatial distribution within a hybrid trap.

  11. Efficient inter-trap transfer of cold francium atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J.; Collister, R.; Shiells, K.; Tandecki, M.; Aubin, S.; Behr, J. A.; Gomez, E.; Gorelov, A.; Gwinner, G.; Orozco, L. A.; Pearson, M. R.; Zhao, Y.

    2016-12-01

    We report on the status of the FrPNC experiments and summarize our plans for measurements of parity non-conservation (PNC) in a sample of cold francium. The FrPNC collaboration has commissioned a laser cooling apparatus at the TRIUMF accelerator that collects and cools francium atoms for PNC experiments. We have recently demonstrated the robust, high efficiency transfer (50 %) of laser cooled francium atoms to a second laser cooling apparatus, located 0.7 m below the first, where the PNC experiments will be conducted.

  12. Theoretical derivation and simulation of a versatile electrostatic trap for cold polar molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shengqiang

    2016-11-01

    We propose a versatile electrostatic trap scheme using several charged spherical electrodes and a bias electric field. We first give the two-ball scheme and derive the analytical solution of the electric field. In order to make a comparison, we also give the numerical solution calculated by the finite element software (Ansoft Maxwell). Considering the loading of cold polar molecules into the trap, we give the three-ball scheme. We first give the analytical and numerical solutions of the distribution of the electric field. Then we simulate the dynamic process of the loading and trapping cold molecules using the classical Monte Carlo method. We analyze the influence of the velocity of the incident molecular beam and the loading time on the loading efficiency. After that, we give the temperature of the trapped cold molecules. Our study shows that the loading efficiency can reach 82%, and the corresponding temperature of the trapped molecules is about 24.6 mK. At last, we show that the single well divides into two ones by increasing the bias electric field or decreasing the voltages applied to the spherical electrodes. Project supported by the National Nature Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11504318).

  13. The effective temperature of ions stored in a linear quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Donald, William A; Khairallah, George N; O'Hair, Richard A J

    2013-06-01

    The extent of internal energy deposition into ions upon storage, radial ejection, and detection using a linear quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer is investigated as a function of ion size (m/z 59 to 810) using seven ion-molecule thermometer reactions that have well characterized reaction entropies and enthalpies. The average effective temperatures of the reactants and products of the ion-molecule reactions, which were obtained from ion-molecule equilibrium measurements, range from 295 to 350 K and do not depend significantly on the number of trapped ions, m/z value, ion trap q z value, reaction enthalpy/entropy, or the number of vibrational degrees of freedom for the seven reactions investigated. The average of the effective temperature values obtained for all seven thermometer reactions is 318 ± 23 K, which indicates that linear quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometers can be used to study the structure(s) and reactivity of ions at near ambient temperature.

  14. The Oxford electron-beam ion trap: A device for spectroscopy of highly charged ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silver, J. D.; Varney, A. J.; Margolis, H. S.; Baird, P. E. G.; Grant, I. P.; Groves, P. D.; Hallett, W. A.; Handford, A. T.; Hirst, P. J.; Holmes, A. R.; Howie, D. J. H.; Hunt, R. A.; Nobbs, K. A.; Roberts, M.; Studholme, W.; Wark, J. S.; Williams, M. T.; Levine, M. A.; Dietrich, D. D.; Graham, W. G.; Williams, I. D.; O'Neil, R.; Rose, S. J.

    1994-04-01

    An electron-beam ion trap (EBIT) has just been completed in the Clarendon Laboratory, Oxford. The design is similar to the devices installed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. It is intended that the Oxford EBIT will be used for x-ray and UV spectroscopy of hydrogenic and helium-like ions, laser resonance spectroscopy of hydrogenic ions and measurements of dielectronic recombination cross sections, in order to test current understanding of simple highly charged ions.

  15. Diviner lunar radiometer observations of cold traps in the moon's south polar region

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paige, D.A.; Siegler, M.A.; Zhang, J.A.; Hayne, P.O.; Foote, E.J.; Bennett, K.A.; Vasavada, A.R.; Greenhagen, B.T.; Schofield, J.T.; McCleese, D.J.; Foote, M.C.; DeJong, E.; Bills, B.G.; Hartford, W.; Murray, B.C.; Allen, C.C.; Snook, K.; Soderblom, L.A.; Calcutt, S.; Taylor, F.W.; Bowles, N.E.; Bandfield, J.L.; Elphic, R.; Ghent, R.; Glotch, T.D.; Wyatt, M.B.; Lucey, P.G.

    2010-01-01

    Diviner Lunar Radiometer Experiment surface-temperature maps reveal the existence of widespread surface and near-surface cryogenic regions that extend beyond the boundaries of persistent shadow. The Lunar Crater Observation and Sensing Satellite (LCROSS) struck one of the coldest of these regions, where subsurface temperatures are estimated to be 38 kelvin. Large areas of the lunar polar regions are currently cold enough to cold-trap water ice as well as a range of both more volatile and less volatile species. The diverse mixture of water and high-volatility compounds detected in the LCROSS ejecta plume is strong evidence for the impact delivery and cold-trapping of volatiles derived from primitive outer solar system bodies.

  16. Diviner Lunar Radiometer observations of cold traps in the Moon's south polar region.

    PubMed

    Paige, David A; Siegler, Matthew A; Zhang, Jo Ann; Hayne, Paul O; Foote, Emily J; Bennett, Kristen A; Vasavada, Ashwin R; Greenhagen, Benjamin T; Schofield, John T; McCleese, Daniel J; Foote, Marc C; DeJong, Eric; Bills, Bruce G; Hartford, Wayne; Murray, Bruce C; Allen, Carlton C; Snook, Kelly; Soderblom, Laurence A; Calcutt, Simon; Taylor, Fredric W; Bowles, Neil E; Bandfield, Joshua L; Elphic, Richard; Ghent, Rebecca; Glotch, Timothy D; Wyatt, Michael B; Lucey, Paul G

    2010-10-22

    Diviner Lunar Radiometer Experiment surface-temperature maps reveal the existence of widespread surface and near-surface cryogenic regions that extend beyond the boundaries of persistent shadow. The Lunar Crater Observation and Sensing Satellite (LCROSS) struck one of the coldest of these regions, where subsurface temperatures are estimated to be 38 kelvin. Large areas of the lunar polar regions are currently cold enough to cold-trap water ice as well as a range of both more volatile and less volatile species. The diverse mixture of water and high-volatility compounds detected in the LCROSS ejecta plume is strong evidence for the impact delivery and cold-trapping of volatiles derived from primitive outer solar system bodies.

  17. Miniaturized Sources and Traps for Spectroscopy of Multicharged Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Joseph; Guise, Nicholas

    2013-05-01

    Penning traps made extremely compact (<150 cc) with rare-earth (NdFeB) magnets have been used recently to isolate highly charged ions (HCI) for spectroscopy. For example, radiative lifetimes of metastable states are measured by observing the visible fluorescence emitted by isolated Ar XIV (441 nm, 2p 2P3/2 --> 2p 2P1/2) and Kr XVIII (637 nm, 3d 2D3/2 --> 3d 2D1/2) . These measurements use HCIs extracted from an electron beam ion trap (EBIT) at NIST. For planned experiments, a new apparatus is being developed which will incorporate a ``mini-EBIT'' source using similar permanent-magnet structures. It combines a mini-EBIT and a compact Penning trap to facilitate production of multicharged ions including bare nuclei with nuclear charge in the range Z =1 to Z =10, in a cryogen-free setup with multiple ports for laser and atomic beam access to the isolated HCI. One goal is to produce one-electron ions in Rydberg states with transitions accessible to an optical frequency comb. Such engineered atomic systems are sought to enable tests of theory that could illuminate the proton radius puzzle. J.N. Tan, S.M. Brewer, and N.D. Guise, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 83, 023103 (2012).

  18. Synthetic dimensions for cold atoms from shaking a harmonic trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, Hannah M.; Ozawa, Tomoki; Goldman, Nathan

    2017-02-01

    We introduce a simple scheme to implement synthetic dimensions in ultracold atomic gases, which only requires two basic and ubiquitous ingredients: the harmonic trap, which confines the atoms, combined with a periodic shaking. In our approach, standard harmonic oscillator eigenstates are reinterpreted as lattice sites along a synthetic dimension, while the coupling between these lattice sites is controlled by the applied time modulation. The phase of this modulation enters as a complex hopping phase, leading straightforwardly to an artificial magnetic field upon adding a second dimension. We show that this artificial gauge field has important consequences, such as the counterintuitive reduction of average energy under resonant driving, or the realization of quantum Hall physics. Our approach offers significant advantages over previous implementations of synthetic dimensions, providing an intriguing route towards higher-dimensional topological physics and strongly-correlated states.

  19. Long coherence time of an ion memory in a hybrid ion trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ye; Yum, Dahyun; Lyu, Ming; An, Shuoming; Um, Mark; Zhang, Junhua; Duan, Luming; Kim, Kihwan

    2016-05-01

    For an ensemble of qubits, there have reports of hours-long coherence time in both trapped ions and solid state systems. For a single qubit, however, the longest reported coherence time is about tens of seconds, which is mainly limited by the heating of the ion. We have performed an experiment to increase the coherence time of an ion qubit to a few minutes through dynamical decoupling. Our experiment is done in a hybrid ion trap, with 171 Yb + as the memory ion qubit and 138 Ba + as the cooling ion. Both of the ions are kept near their motional ground state through sympathetic cooling. The coherence time in our system is mainly limited by the gate fidelity for the dynamical decoupling pulses and the low frequency noise. This work was supported by the National Basic Research Program of China Grant 2011CBA00301, the National Natural Science Foundation of China Grant 11374178 and 11574002.

  20. Electromagnetic two-dimensional analysis of trapped-ion eigenmodes

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, D.; Rewoldt, G.

    1984-11-01

    A two-dimensional electromagnetic analysis of the trapped-ion instability for the tokamak case with ..beta.. not equal to 0 has been made, based on previous work in the electrostatic limit. The quasineutrality condition and the component of Ampere's law along the equilibrium magnetic field are solved for the perturbed electrostatic potential and the component of the perturbed vector potential along the equilibrium magnetic field. The general integro-differential equations are converted into a matrix eigenvalue-eigenfunction problem by expanding in cubic B-spline finite elements in the minor radius and in Fourier harmonics in the poloidal angle. A model MHD equilibrium with circular, concentric magnetic surfaces and large aspect ratio is used which is consistent with our assemption that B << 1. The effect on the trapped-ion mode of including these electromagnetic extensions to the calculation is considered, and the temperature (and ..beta..) scaling of the mode frequency is shown and discussed.

  1. A New Trapped Ion Clock Based on Hg-201(+)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taghavi-Larigani, S.; Burt, E. A.; Lea, S. N.; Prestage, J. D.; Tjoelker, R. L.

    2009-01-01

    There are two stable odd isotopes of mercury with singly ionized hyperfine structure suitable for a microwave clock: Hg-199(+) and Hg-201(+). Virtually all trapped mercury ion clocks to date have used the 199 isotope. We have begun to investigate the viability of a trapped ion clock based on Hg-201(+). We have measured the unperturbed frequency of the (S-2)(sub 1/2) F = 1, m(sub F) = 0 to (S-2)(sub 1/2) F = 2, m(sub F) = 0 clock transition to be 29.9543658211(2) GHz. In this paper we describe initial measurements with Hg-201(+) and new applications to clocks and fundamental physics.

  2. A simple model for electron dissipation in trapped ion turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesur, M.; Cartier-Michaud, T.; Drouot, T.; Diamond, P. H.; Kosuga, Y.; Réveillé, T.; Gravier, E.; Garbet, X.; Itoh, S.-I.; Itoh, K.

    2017-01-01

    Trapped ion resonance-driven turbulence is investigated in the presence of electron dissipation in a simplified tokamak geometry. A reduced gyrokinetic bounce-averaged model for trapped ions is adopted. Electron dissipation is modeled by a simple phase-shift δ between density and electric potential perturbations. The linear eigenfunction features a peak at the resonant energy, which becomes stronger with increasing electron dissipation. Accurately resolving this narrow peak in numerical simulation of the initial-value problem yields a stringent lower bound on the number of grid points in the energy space. Further, the radial particle flux is investigated in the presence of electron dissipation, including kinetic effects. When the density gradient is higher than the temperature gradient, and the phase-shift is finite but moderate ( δ≈0.02 ), the particle flux peaks at an order-of-magnitude above the gyro-Bohm estimate. Slight particle pinch is observed for δ<0.003 .

  3. Quantum-enhanced deliberation of learning agents using trapped ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunjko, V.; Friis, N.; Briegel, H. J.

    2015-02-01

    A scheme that successfully employs quantum mechanics in the design of autonomous learning agents has recently been reported in the context of the projective simulation (PS) model for artificial intelligence. In that approach, the key feature of a PS agent, a specific type of memory which is explored via random walks, was shown to be amenable to quantization, allowing for a speed-up. In this work we propose an implementation of such classical and quantum agents in systems of trapped ions. We employ a generic construction by which the classical agents are ‘upgraded’ to their quantum counterparts by a nested process of adding coherent control, and we outline how this construction can be realized in ion traps. Our results provide a flexible modular architecture for the design of PS agents. Furthermore, we present numerical simulations of simple PS agents which analyze the robustness of our proposal under certain noise models.

  4. Superconducting qubits can be coupled and addressed as trapped ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y. X.; Wei, L. F.; Johansson, J. R.; Tsai, J. S.; Nori, F.

    2009-03-01

    Exploiting the intrinsic nonlinearity of superconducting Josephson junctions, we propose a scalable circuit with superconducting qubits (SCQs) which is very similar to the successful one now being used for trapped ions. The SCQs are coupled to the ``vibrational'' mode provided by a superconducting LC circuit or its equivalent (e.g., a superconducting quantum interference device). Both single-qubit rotations and qubit-LC-circuit couplings and/or decouplings can be controlled by the frequencies of the time-dependent magnetic fluxes. The circuit is scalable since the qubit-qubit interactions, mediated by the LC circuit, can be selectively performed, and the information transfer can be realized in a controllable way. [4pt] Y.X. Liu, L.F. Wei, J.R. Johansson, J.S. Tsai, F. Nori, Superconducting qubits can be coupled and addressed as trapped ions, Phys. Rev. B 76, 144518 (2007). URL: http://link.aps.org/abstract/PRB/v76/e144518

  5. Quantum Information Processing with Trapped 43Ca+ Ions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-18

    state 11 Fig.3: Deterministic quantum teleportation protocol 12 Fig.4: Density matrix of an entangled eight-ion state 13 Fig.5: Quantum process...4.3.4 Deterministic quantum teleportation Teleportation of a quantum state encompasses the complete transfer of information from one particle to...allow quantum -state teleportation to be performed. We succeeded in demonstrating deterministic quantum -state teleportation between a pair of trapped

  6. Topologically decoherence-protected qubits with trapped ions.

    PubMed

    Milman, P; Maineult, W; Guibal, S; Guidoni, L; Douçot, B; Ioffe, L; Coudreau, T

    2007-07-13

    We show that trapped ions can be used to simulate a highly symmetrical Hamiltonian with eigenstates naturally protected against local sources of decoherence. This Hamiltonian involves long-range coupling between particles and provides a more efficient protection than nearest neighbor models discussed in previous works. Our results open the perspective of experimentally realizing, in controlled atomic systems, complex entangled states with decoherence times up to 9 orders of magnitude longer than isolated quantum systems.

  7. Spectroscopy of Argon Excited in an Electron Beam Ion Trap

    SciTech Connect

    Trabert, E

    2005-04-18

    Argon is one of the gases best investigated and most widely used in plasma discharge devices for a multitude of applications that range from wavelength reference standards to controlled fusion experiments. Reviewing atomic physics and spectroscopic problems in various ionization stages of Ar, the past use and future options of employing an electron beam ion trap (EBIT) for better and more complete Ar data in the x-ray, EUV and visible spectral ranges are discussed.

  8. Ion gyroradius effects on particle trapping in kinetic Alfvén waves along auroral field lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damiano, P. A.; Johnson, J. R.; Chaston, C. C.

    2016-11-01

    In this study, a 2-D self-consistent hybrid gyrofluid-kinetic electron model is used to investigate Alfvén wave propagation along dipolar magnetic field lines for a range of ion to electron temperature ratios. The focus of the investigation is on understanding the role of these effects on electron trapping in kinetic Alfvén waves sourced in the plasma sheet and the role of this trapping in contributing to the overall electron energization at the ionosphere. This work also builds on our previous effort by considering a similar system in the limit of fixed initial parallel current, rather than fixed initial perpendicular electric field. It is found that the effects of particle trapping are strongest in the cold ion limit and the kinetic Alfvén wave is able to carry trapped electrons a large distance along the field line yielding a relatively large net energization of the trapped electron population as the phase speed of the wave is increased. However, as the ion temperature is increased, the ability of the kinetic Alfvén wave to carry and energize trapped electrons is reduced by more significant wave energy dispersion perpendicular to the ambient magnetic field which reduces the amplitude of the wave. This reduction of wave amplitude in turn reduces both the parallel current and the extent of the high-energy tails evident in the energized electron populations at the ionospheric boundary (which may serve to explain the limited extent of the broadband electron energization seen in observations). Even in the cold ion limit, trapping effects in kinetic Alfvén waves lead to only modest electron energization for the parameters considered (on the order of tens of eV) and the primary energization of electrons to keV levels coincides with the arrival of the wave at the ionospheric boundary.

  9. Cavity sideband cooling of a single trapped ion.

    PubMed

    Leibrandt, David R; Labaziewicz, Jaroslaw; Vuletić, Vladan; Chuang, Isaac L

    2009-09-04

    We report a demonstration and quantitative characterization of one-dimensional cavity cooling of a single trapped (88)Sr(+) ion in the resolved-sideband regime. We measure the spectrum of cavity transitions, the rates of cavity heating and cooling, and the steady-state cooling limit. The cavity cooling dynamics and cooling limit of 22.5(3) motional quanta, limited by the moderate coupling between the ion and the cavity, are consistent with a simple model [Phys. Rev. A 64, 033405 (2001)] without any free parameters, validating the rate equation model for cavity cooling.

  10. Measurement of femtosecond atomic lifetimes using ion traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Träbert, Elmar

    2014-01-01

    Two types of experiment are described that both employ an electron beam ion trap for the production of highly charged ion species with the aim of then measuring atomic level lifetimes in the femtosecond range. In one experiment (done by Beiersdorfer et al. some time ago), the lifetime measurement depends on the associated line broadening. In a recent string of experiments at Linac Coherent Light Source Stanford, the HI-LIGHT collaboration employed pump-probe excitation using the FEL as a short-pulse X-ray laser.

  11. Doppler Cooling Trapped Ions with a UV Frequency Comb.

    PubMed

    Davila-Rodriguez, Josue; Ozawa, Akira; Hänsch, Theodor W; Udem, Thomas

    2016-01-29

    We demonstrate Doppler cooling of trapped magnesium ions using a frequency comb at 280 nm obtained from a frequency tripled Ti:sapphire laser. A comb line cools on the 3s_{1/2}-3p_{3/2} transition, while the nearest blue-detuned comb line contributes negligible heating. We observe the cooling-heating transition and long-term cooling of ion chains with several sympathetically cooled ions. Spatial thermometry shows that the ion is cooled to near the Doppler limit. Doppler cooling with frequency combs has the potential to open many additional atomic species to laser cooling by reaching further into the vacuum and extreme ultraviolet via high-harmonic generation and by providing a broad bandwidth from which multiple excitation sidebands can be obtained.

  12. Trapped-Ion Quantum Logic with Global Radiation Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weidt, S.; Randall, J.; Webster, S. C.; Lake, K.; Webb, A. E.; Cohen, I.; Navickas, T.; Lekitsch, B.; Retzker, A.; Hensinger, W. K.

    2016-11-01

    Trapped ions are a promising tool for building a large-scale quantum computer. However, the number of required radiation fields for the realization of quantum gates in any proposed ion-based architecture scales with the number of ions within the quantum computer, posing a major obstacle when imagining a device with millions of ions. Here, we present a fundamentally different approach for trapped-ion quantum computing where this detrimental scaling vanishes. The method is based on individually controlled voltages applied to each logic gate location to facilitate the actual gate operation analogous to a traditional transistor architecture within a classical computer processor. To demonstrate the key principle of this approach we implement a versatile quantum gate method based on long-wavelength radiation and use this method to generate a maximally entangled state of two quantum engineered clock qubits with fidelity 0.985(12). This quantum gate also constitutes a simple-to-implement tool for quantum metrology, sensing, and simulation.

  13. Trapped-Ion Quantum Logic with Global Radiation Fields.

    PubMed

    Weidt, S; Randall, J; Webster, S C; Lake, K; Webb, A E; Cohen, I; Navickas, T; Lekitsch, B; Retzker, A; Hensinger, W K

    2016-11-25

    Trapped ions are a promising tool for building a large-scale quantum computer. However, the number of required radiation fields for the realization of quantum gates in any proposed ion-based architecture scales with the number of ions within the quantum computer, posing a major obstacle when imagining a device with millions of ions. Here, we present a fundamentally different approach for trapped-ion quantum computing where this detrimental scaling vanishes. The method is based on individually controlled voltages applied to each logic gate location to facilitate the actual gate operation analogous to a traditional transistor architecture within a classical computer processor. To demonstrate the key principle of this approach we implement a versatile quantum gate method based on long-wavelength radiation and use this method to generate a maximally entangled state of two quantum engineered clock qubits with fidelity 0.985(12). This quantum gate also constitutes a simple-to-implement tool for quantum metrology, sensing, and simulation.

  14. Noise-induced transport in the motion of trapped ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cormick, Cecilia; Schmiegelow, Christian T.

    2016-11-01

    The interplay of noise and quantum coherence in transport gives rise to rich dynamics relevant for a variety of systems. In this work, we put forward a proposal for an experiment testing noise-induced transport in the vibrational modes of a chain of trapped ions. We focus on the case of transverse modes, considering multiple-isotope chains and an "angle trap," where the transverse trapping varies along the chain. This variation induces localization of the motional modes and therefore suppresses transport. By suitably choosing the action of laser fields that couple to the internal and external degrees of freedom of the ions, we show how to implement effective local dephasing on the modes, broadening the vibrational resonances. This leads to an overlap of the local mode frequencies, giving rise to a pronounced increase in the transport of excitations along the chain. We propose an implementation and measurement scheme which require neither ground-state cooling nor low heating rates, and we illustrate our results with a simulation of the dynamics for a chain of three ions.

  15. A new trapped ion atomic clock based on 201Hg+.

    PubMed

    Burt, Eric A; Taghavi-Larigani, Shervin; Tjoelker, Robert L

    2010-03-01

    High-resolution spectroscopy has been performed on the ground-state hyperfine transitions in trapped (201)Hg+ ions as part of a program to investigate the viability of (201)Hg+ for clock applications. Part of the spectroscopy work was directed at magnetic-field-sensitive hyperfine lines with delta m(F) = 0, which allow accurate Doppler-free measurement of the magnetic field experienced by the trapped ions. Although it is possible to measure Doppler-free magnetic-field-sensitive transitions in the commonly used clock isotope, (199)Hg+, it is more difficult. In this paper, we discuss how this (199)Hg+ feature may be exploited to produce a more stable clock or one requiring less magnetic shielding in environments with magnetic field fluctuations far in excess of what is normally found in the laboratory. We have also determined that in discharge-lamp-based trapped mercury ion clocks, the optical pumping time for (201)Hg+ is about 3 times shorter than that of (199)Hg+ This can be used to reduce dead time in the interrogation cycle for these types of clocks, thereby reducing the impact of local oscillator noise aliasing effects.

  16. MODEL SIMULATIONS OF CONTINUOUS ION INTERJECTION INTO EBIS TRAP WITH SLANTED ELECTROSTATIC MIRROR.

    SciTech Connect

    PIKIN,A.; KPONOU, A.; ALESSI, J.G.; BEEBE, E.N.; PRELEC, K.; RAPARIA, D.

    2007-08-26

    The efficiency of trapping ions in an EBIS is of primary importance for many applications requiring operations with externally produced ions: RIA breeders, ion sources, traps. At the present time, the most popular method of ion injection is pulsed injection, when short bunches of ions get trapped in a longitudinal trap while traversing the trap region. Continuous trapping is a challenge for EBIS devices because mechanisms which reduce the longitudinal ion energy per charge in a trap (cooling with residual gas, energy exchange with other ions, ionization) are not very effective, and accumulation of ions is slow. A possible approach to increase trapping efficiency is to slant the mirror at the end of the trap which is opposite to the injection end. A slanted mirror will convert longitudinal motion of ions into transverse motion, and, by reducing their longitudinal velocity, prevent these ions from escaping the trap on their way out. The trade off for the increased trapping efficiency this way is an increase in the initial transverse energy of the accumulated ions. The slanted mirror can be realized if the ends of two adjacent electrodes- drift tubes - which act as an electrostatic mirror, are machined to produce a slanted gap, rather than an upright one. Applying different voltages to these electrodes will produce a slanted mirror. The results are presented of 2D and 3D computer simulations of ion injection into a simplified model of EBIS with slanted mirror.

  17. Excitation and photo-ionization of ultra-cold potassium atoms in the AC-driven magneto optical trap (AC-MOT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agomuo, John; Murray, Andrew; Harvey, Matthew

    2014-03-01

    The operation of a new cold atom trap (the AC-MOT) and its application in photoionization experiments is described. Ionization of cold K atoms in the AC-MOT is discussed, the ionization proceeding in a stepwise fashion using a combination of infra-red radiation with that from a blue diode laser. A significant limitation of magneto optical trapping (MOT) techniques has been the requirement to eliminate the magnetic fields prior to the interaction occurring. To address this, the AC-MOT was invented in Manchester. This is a pulsed trap, so that the magnetic fields are completely eliminated prior to the electron interaction. Low energy electrons can then be extracted from laser photoionization. In this work, the potassium is cooled to ~0.25mK. Photoionization proceeds by a stepwise route, atoms excited by the trapping laser at ~766nm being ionized by radiation at ~448nm. Both fluorescence from the atoms and the ion yield are used to determine details of the interaction. These techniques are being studied since it then is possible to create cold electron bunches of high coherence. A detailed description of the AC-MOT, its operation and application will be presented. A new cold electron source being built in Manchester will also be discussed. I wish to acknowledge the financial support from Tertiary Education Trust Fund Nigeria and Nigerian Defence Academy Kaduna.

  18. A Cold Atom Measurement of Charge Exchange Collisions between Trapped Yb^+ and Yb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grier, Andrew; Cetina, Marko; Orucevic, Fedja; Vuletic, Vladan

    2008-05-01

    We measure the collisional cross-section and rate constant of the ^174Yb and ^172Yb^+ charge-transfer process. The neutral atoms are trapped in a magneto-optical trap (MOT) resonant with their 399 nm, ^1S0->^1P1 transition and are near the Doppler-limited temperature of 680 μK. The ions are confined in a planar Paul trap with a secular frequency of 39 kHz, Doppler cooled, and spatially overlapped with the neutral atoms. The collisional energy is varied from 4 meV to 100s of neV by varying the micromotion energy of the ions by displacement from the center of the Paul trap. We report the rate constant in comparison to that derived from the Langevin cross-section.

  19. Heating rate and electrode charging measurements in a scalable, microfabricated, surface-electrode ion trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allcock, D. T. C.; Harty, T. P.; Janacek, H. A.; Linke, N. M.; Ballance, C. J.; Steane, A. M.; Lucas, D. M.; Jarecki, R. L.; Habermehl, S. D.; Blain, M. G.; Stick, D.; Moehring, D. L.

    2012-06-01

    We characterise the performance of a surface-electrode ion "chip" trap fabricated using established semiconductor integrated circuit and micro-electro-mechanical-system (MEMS) microfabrication processes, which are in principle scalable to much larger ion trap arrays, as proposed for implementing ion trap quantum information processing. We measure rf ion micromotion parallel and perpendicular to the plane of the trap electrodes, and find that on-package capacitors reduce this to ≲10 nm in amplitude. We also measure ion trapping lifetime, charging effects due to laser light incident on the trap electrodes, and the heating rate for a single trapped ion. The performance of this trap is found to be comparable with others of the same size scale.

  20. In situ plasma removal of surface contaminants from ion trap electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Haltli, Raymond A.

    2015-05-01

    In this thesis, the construction and implementation of an in situ plasma discharge designed to remove surface contaminants from electrodes in an ion trapping experimental system is presented with results. In recent years, many advances have been made in using ion traps for quantum information processing. All of the criteria defined by DiVincenzo for using ion traps for implementing a quantum computer have been individually demonstrated, and in particular surface traps provide a scalable platform for ions. In order to be used for quantum algorithms, trapped ions need to be cooled to their motional (quantum mechanical) ground state. One of the hurdles in integrating surface ion traps for a quantum computer is minimizing electric field noise, which causes the ion to heat out of its motional ground state and which increases with smaller ion-to-electrode distances realized with surface traps. Surface contamination of trap electrodes is speculated to be the primary source of electric field noise. The main goal achieved by this work was to implement an in situ surface cleaning solution for surface electrode ion traps, which would not modify the ion trap electrode surface metal. Care was taken in applying the RF power in order to localize a plasma near the trap electrodes. A method for characterizing the energy of the plasma ions arriving at the ion trap surface is presented and results for plasma ion energies are shown. Finally, a method for quantifying the effectiveness of plasma cleaning of trap electrodes, using the surface analysis technique of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy for measuring the amount and kind of surface contaminants, is described. A significant advantage of the trap electrode surface cleaning method presented here is the minimal changes necessary for implementation on a working ion trap experimental system.

  1. Neutrophil extracellular trap formation is elicited in response to cold physical plasma.

    PubMed

    Bekeschus, Sander; Winterbourn, Christine C; Kolata, Julia; Masur, Kai; Hasse, Sybille; Bröker, Barbara M; Parker, Heather A

    2016-10-01

    Cold physical plasma is an ionized gas with a multitude of components, including hydrogen peroxide and other reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. Recent studies suggest that exposure of wounds to cold plasma may accelerate healing. Upon wounding, neutrophils are the first line of defense against invading microorganisms but have also been identified to play a role in delayed healing. In this study, we examined how plasma treatment affects the functions of peripheral blood neutrophils. Plasma treatment induced oxidative stress, as assessed by the oxidation of intracellular fluorescent redox probes; reduced metabolic activity; but did not induce early apoptosis. Neutrophil oxidative burst was only modestly affected after plasma treatment, and the killing of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus was not significantly affected. Intriguingly, we found that plasma induced profound extracellular trap formation. This was inhibited by the presence of catalase during plasma treatment but was not replicated by adding an equivalent concentration of hydrogen peroxide. Plasma-induced neutrophil extracellular trap formation was not dependent on the activity of myeloperoxidase or NADPH oxidase 2 but seemed to involve short-lived molecules. The amount of DNA release and the time course after plasma treatment were similar to that with the common neutrophil extracellular trap inducer PMA. After neutrophil extracellular traps had formed, concentrations of IL-8 were also significantly increased in supernatants of plasma-treated neutrophils. Both neutrophil extracellular traps and IL-8 release may aid antimicrobial activity and spur inflammation at the wound site. Whether this aids or exacerbates wound healing needs to be tested.

  2. Generation of a Cold Atom Beam from a Pyramidal Magneto-Optical Trap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kohel, J.; Thompson, R. J.; Seidel, D. J.; Klipstein, W. M.; Maleki, L.; Bliss, J.; Libbrecht, K. G.

    2000-01-01

    Techniques to generate cold atom beams are of great interest in a variety of applications, from atomic frequency standards and atom optics to experimental studies of Bose-Einstein condensation. Cold atom beams have been produced by slowing thermal atomic beams using the Zeeman-slowing technique or chirped lasers, or using laser-cooling techniques to extract a slow atomic beam from the background gas in a low-pressure vapor cell. These laser-cooling techniques include "atomic funnels" or two-dimensional magneto-optical traps, as well as a variation of the conventional vapor cell magneto-optical trap called the "low-velocity intense source" (LVIS). Variations of the LVIS have been realized with unique trap geometries such as conical or pyramidal mirror traps. The present work implements a simple and robust design based on the pyramidal trap geometry and allows use of a single large diameter (

  3. Theoretical Study of Dual-Direction Dipolar Excitation of Ions in Linear Ion Traps.

    PubMed

    Dang, Qiankun; Xu, Fuxing; Wang, Liang; Huang, Xiaohua; Dai, Xinhua; Fang, Xiang; Wang, Rizhi; Ding, Chuan-Fan

    2016-04-01

    The ion enhanced activation and collision-induced dissociation (CID) by simultaneous dipolar excitation of ions in the two radial directions of linear ion trap (LIT) have been recently developed and tested by experiment. In this work, its detailed properties were further studied by theoretical simulation. The effects of some experimental parameters such as the buffer gas pressure, the dipolar excitation signal phases, power amplitudes, and frequencies on the ion trajectory and energy were carefully investigated. The results show that the ion activation energy can be significantly increased by dual-direction excitation using two identical dipolar excitation signals because of the addition of an excitation dimension and the fact that the ion motion radius related to ion kinetic energy can be greater than the field radius. The effects of higher-order field components, such as dodecapole field on the performance of this method are also revealed. They mainly cause ion motion frequency shift as ion motion amplitude increases. Because of the frequency shift, there are different optimized excitation frequencies in different LITs. At the optimized frequency, ion average energy is improved significantly with relatively few ions lost. The results show that this method can be used in different kinds of LITs such as LIT with 4-fold symmetric stretch, linear quadrupole ion trap, and standard hyperbolic LIT, which can significantly increase the ion activation energy and CID efficiency, compared with the conventional method.

  4. Theoretical Study of Dual-Direction Dipolar Excitation of Ions in Linear Ion Traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dang, Qiankun; Xu, Fuxing; Wang, Liang; Huang, Xiaohua; Dai, Xinhua; Fang, Xiang; Wang, Rizhi; Ding, Chuan-Fan

    2016-04-01

    The ion enhanced activation and collision-induced dissociation (CID) by simultaneous dipolar excitation of ions in the two radial directions of linear ion trap (LIT) have been recently developed and tested by experiment. In this work, its detailed properties were further studied by theoretical simulation. The effects of some experimental parameters such as the buffer gas pressure, the dipolar excitation signal phases, power amplitudes, and frequencies on the ion trajectory and energy were carefully investigated. The results show that the ion activation energy can be significantly increased by dual-direction excitation using two identical dipolar excitation signals because of the addition of an excitation dimension and the fact that the ion motion radius related to ion kinetic energy can be greater than the field radius. The effects of higher-order field components, such as dodecapole field on the performance of this method are also revealed. They mainly cause ion motion frequency shift as ion motion amplitude increases. Because of the frequency shift, there are different optimized excitation frequencies in different LITs. At the optimized frequency, ion average energy is improved significantly with relatively few ions lost. The results show that this method can be used in different kinds of LITs such as LIT with 4-fold symmetric stretch, linear quadrupole ion trap, and standard hyperbolic LIT, which can significantly increase the ion activation energy and CID efficiency, compared with the conventional method.

  5. Prediction of Collective Characteristics for Ion Ensembles in Quadrupole Ion Traps Without Trajectory Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Goeringer, Doug; Viehland, Mr. Larry A.; Danailov, Daniel M.

    2006-01-01

    Fundamental aspects are presented of a two-temperature moment theory for quadrupole ion traps developed via transformation of the Boltzmann equation. Because the Boltzmann equation reflects changes to an ion distribution as a whole, the resulting general moment equation describes changes in the ensemble average for any function of ion velocity. Thus, the system of differential equations, formed from the general moment equation, can be solved directly (normally, by numerical methods) for average values of the velocity and of the effective temperature (or equivalently, center-of-mass energy), each as a function of time and position. The equations contain parameterized variables ! a and ! q , which are similar to those commonly used in ion trap studies, and ! b and ! d , which are parameterized forms of the voltages applied to the endcaps, to account for both ideal and commonly used ion trap configurations. Examples illustrate some of the capabilities of moment theory for predicting the time- and position-dependent characteristics of ion ensembles during various processes in ion traps of selected configurations.

  6. Ultra Cold Photoelectron Beams for Ion Storage Rings

    SciTech Connect

    Orlov, D. A.; Krantz, C.; Shornikov, A.; Lestinsky, M.; Hoffmann, J.; Wolf, A.; Jaroshevich, A. S.; Kosolobov, S. N.; Terekhov, A. S.

    2009-08-04

    An ultra cold electron target with a cryogenic GaAs photocathode source, developed for the Heidelberg TSR, delivers electron currents up to a few mA with typical kinetic energies of few keV and provides unprecedented energy resolution below 1 meV for electron-ion recombination merged-beam experiments. For the new generation of low-energy electrostatic storage rings, cold electron beams from a photocathode source can bring additional benefits, improving the cooling efficiency of stored ions and making it possible to cool even heavy, slow molecules by electron beams of energies of only a few eV or even below.

  7. Sensitive measurement of radiation trapping in cold-atom clouds by intensity correlation detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stites, Ronald; Beeler, Matthew; Feeney, Laura; Kim, Soo; Bali, Samir

    2004-12-01

    We present experimental evidence that the intensity correlations of light scattered from a cold-atom cloud are sensitive to the presence of small amounts of radiation trapping in an atomic sample of density 6×10^8/cm3, with an optical depth (for a resonant light beam) of 0.4. This density and optical depth are approximately an order of magnitude less than the density and on-resonance optical depth at which effects of multiple scattering in cold-atom clouds have been previously observed [Phys.Rev.Lett.64, 408 (1990)].

  8. Studies of Beta-Delayed Neutron Emission using Trapped Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegl, Kevin; Aprahamian, A.; Scielzo, N. D.; Savard, G.; Clark, J. A.; Levand, A. F.; Burkey, M.; Caldwell, S.; Czeszumska, A.; Hirsh, T. Y.; Kolos, K.; Marley, S. T.; Morgan, G. E.; Norman, E. B.; Nystrom, A.; Orford, R.; Padgett, S.; Pérez Galván, A.; Sh, K. S.; Strauss, S. Y.; Wang, B. S.

    2017-01-01

    Using a radio-frequency quadrupole ion trap to confine radioactive ions allows indirect measurements of beta-delayed neutron (BDN) emission. By determining the recoil energy of the beta-decay daughter ions it is possible to study BDN emission, as the neutron emission can impart a significantly larger nuclear recoil than from beta-decay alone. This method avoids most of the systematic uncertainties associated with direct neutron detection but introduces dependencies on the specifics of the decay and interactions of the ion with the RF fields. The decays of seven BDN precursors were studied using the Beta-decay Paul Trap (BPT) to confine fission fragments from the Californium Rare Isotope Breeder Upgrade (CARIBU) facility at Argonne National Laboratory. The analysis of these measurements and results for the branching ratios and neutron energy spectra will be presented. Supported by the NSF under grant PHY-1419765, and the U.S. DOE under the NEUP project 13-5485, contracts DE-AC02-06CH11357 (ANL) and DE-AC52-07NA27344 (LLNL), and award DE-NA0000979 (NNSA).

  9. Laser desorption lamp ionization source for ion trap mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qinghao; Zare, Richard N

    2015-01-01

    A two-step laser desorption lamp ionization source coupled to an ion trap mass spectrometer (LDLI-ITMS) has been constructed and characterized. The pulsed infrared (IR) output of an Nd:YAG laser (1064 nm) is directed to a target inside a chamber evacuated to ~15 Pa causing desorption of molecules from the target's surface. The desorbed molecules are ionized by a vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) lamp (filled with xenon, major wavelength at 148 nm). The resulting ions are stored and detected in a three-dimensional quadrupole ion trap modified from a Finnigan Mat LCQ mass spectrometer operated at a pressure of ≥ 0.004 Pa. The limit of detection for desorbed coronene molecules is 1.5 pmol, which is about two orders of magnitude more sensitive than laser desorption laser ionization mass spectrometry using a fluorine excimer laser (157 nm) as the ionization source. The mass spectrum of four standard aromatic compounds (pyrene, coronene, rubrene and 1,4,8,11,15,18,22,25-octabutoxy-29H,31H-phthalocyanine (OPC)) shows that parent ions dominate. By increasing the infrared laser power, this instrument is capable of detecting inorganic compounds.

  10. Upgrade of the electron beam ion trap in Shanghai

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, D.; Yang, Y.; Xiao, J.; Shen, Y.; Fu, Y.; Wei, B.; Yao, K.; Hutton, R.; Zou, Y.

    2014-09-15

    Over the last few years the Shanghai electron beam ion trap (EBIT) has been successfully redesigned and rebuilt. The original machine, developed under collaboration with the Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, first produced an electron beam in 2005. It could be tuned with electron energies between 1 and 130 keV and beam current up to 160 mA. After several years of operation, it was found that several modifications for improvements were necessary to reach the goals of better electron optics, higher photon detection, and ion injection efficiencies, and more economical running costs. The upgraded Shanghai-EBIT is made almost entirely from Ti instead of stainless steel and achieves a vacuum of less than 10{sup −10} Torr, which helps to minimize the loss of highly changed ions through charge exchange. Meanwhile, a more compact structure and efficient cryogenic system, and excellent optical alignment have been of satisfactory. The magnetic field in the central trap region can reach up till 4.8 T with a uniformity of 2.77 × 10{sup −4}. So far the upgraded Shanghai-EBIT has been operated up to an electron energy of 151 keV and a beam current of up to 218 mA, although promotion to even higher energy is still in progress. Radiation from ions as highly charged as Xe{sup 53+,} {sup 54+} has been produced and the characterization of current density is estimated from the measured electron beam width.

  11. Monitoring Trace Contaminants in Air Via Ion Trap Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, Peter T.; Karr, Dane; Pearson, Richard; Valero, Gustavo; Wong, Carla

    1995-01-01

    Recent passage of the Clean Air Act with its stricter regulation of toxic gas emissions, and the ever-growing number of applications which require faster turnaround times between sampling and analysis are two major factors which are helping to drive the development of new instrument technologies for in-situ, on-line, real-time monitoring. The ion trap, with its small size, excellent sensitivity, and tandem mass spectrometry capability is a rapidly evolving technology which is well-suited for these applications. In this paper, we describe the use of a commercial ion trap instrument for monitoring trace levels of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in air. A number of sample introduction devices including a direct transfer line interface, short column GC, and a cryotrapping interface are employed to achieve increasing levels of sensitivity. MS, MS/MS, and MS/MS/MS methods are compared to illustrate trade-offs between sensitivity and selectivity. Filtered Noise Field (FNF) technology is found to be an excellent means for achieving lower detection limits through selective storage of the ion(s) of interest during ionization. Figures of merit including typical sample sizes, detection limits, and response times are provided. The results indicate the potential of these techniques for atmospheric assessments, the High Speed Research Program, and advanced life support monitoring applications for NASA.

  12. H/D exchange of gas phase bradykinin ions in a linear quadrupole ion trap.

    PubMed

    Mao, Dunmin; Douglas, D J

    2003-02-01

    The gas phase H/D exchange reaction of bradykinin ions, as well as fragment ions of bradykinin generated through collisions in an orifice skimmer region, have been studied with a linear quadrupole ion trap (LIT) reflectron time-of-flight (rTOF) mass spectrometer system. The reaction in the trap takes only tens of seconds at a pressure of few mTorr of D2O or CD3OD. The exchange rate and hydrogen exchange level are not sensitive to the trapping q value over a broad range, provided q is not close to the stability boundary (q = 0.908). The relative rates and hydrogen exchange levels of protonated and sodiated +1 and +2 ions are similar to those observed previously by others with a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) mass spectrometer system. The doubly and triply protonated ions show multimodal isotopic distributions, suggesting the presence of several different conformations. The y fragment ions show greater exchange rates and levels than a or b ions, and when water or ammonia is lost from the fragment ions, no exchange is observed.

  13. Nonlinear density excitations in electron-positron-ion plasmas with trapping in a quantizing magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iqbal, M. J.; Masood, W.; Shah, H. A.; Tsintsadze, N. L.

    2017-01-01

    In the present work, we have investigated the effect of trapping as a microscopic phenomenon on the formation of solitary structures in the presence of a quantizing magnetic field in an electron-positron-ion (e-p-i) plasma having degenerate electrons and positrons, whereas ions are taken to be classical and cold. We have found that positron concentration, quantizing magnetic field, and finite electron temperature effects not only affect the linear dispersion characteristics of the electrostatic waves under consideration but also have a significant bearing on the propagation of solitary structures in the nonlinear regime. Importantly, the system under consideration has been found to allow the formation of compressive solitary structures only. The work presented here may be beneficial to understand the propagation of nonlinear electrostatic structures in dense astrophysical environments and in intense-laser plasma interactions.

  14. Projection of diffraction patterns for use in cold-neutral-atom trapping

    SciTech Connect

    Gillen-Christandl, Katharina; Gillen, Glen D.

    2010-12-15

    Scalar diffraction theory is combined with beam-propagation techniques to investigate the projection of near-field diffraction patterns to spatial locations away from the aperture for use in optically trapping cold neutral alkali-metal atoms. Calculations show that intensity distributions with localized bright and dark spots usually found within a millimeter of the diffracting aperture can be projected to a region free from optical components such as a cloud of cold atoms within a vacuum chamber. Calculations also predict that the critical properties of the optical dipole atom traps are not only maintained for the projected intensity patterns but also can be manipulated and improved by adjustment of the optical components outside the vacuum chamber.

  15. Shortcuts to Adiabaticity in Transport of a Single Trapped Ion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Shuoming; Lv, Dingshun; Campo, Adolfo Del; Kim, Kihwan

    2015-05-01

    We report an experimental study on shortcuts to adiabaticity in the transport of a single 171Yb+ ion trapped in a harmonic potential. In these driving schemes, the application of a force induces a nonadiabatic dynamics in which excitations are tailored so as to preserve the ion motional state in the ground state upon completion of the process. We experimentally apply the laser induced force and realize three different protocols: (1) a transitionless driving with a counterdiabatic term out of phase with the displacement force, (2) a classical protocol assisted by counterdiabatic fields in phase with the main force, (3) and an engineered transport protocol based on the Fourier transform of the trap acceleration. We experimentally compare and discuss the robustness of these protocols under given experimental limitations such as trap frequency drifts. This work was supported by the National Basic Research Program of China under Grants No. 2011CBA00300 (No. 2011CBA00301), the National Natural Science Foundation of China 11374178, and the University of Massachusetts Boston (No. P20150000029279).

  16. Ion traps, quantum computing, and the measurement problem^

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wineland, D. J.

    2006-05-01

    The basic requirements for quantum computing and quantum simulation (single- and multi-qubit gates, long memory times, etc.) have been demonstrated in separate experiments on trapped ions. Construction of a useful information processor will require synthesis of these elements and implementation of high- fidelity operations on a very large number of qubits. NIST and other groups are addressing this scaling issue by trying to fabricate multi-zone arrays of traps that would allow highly- parallel processing. As the number of qubits increases, the measurement problem in quantum mechanics becomes more glaring; with luck, trapped ion systems might be able to shed light on this fundamental issue. Recent NIST work in collaboration with D. Leibfried, J. C. Bergquist, R. B. Blakestad, J. J. Bollinger, J. Britton, J. Chiaverini, R. E. Drullinger, R. Epstein, D. Hume, W. M. Itano, J. D. Jost, J. Koelemeij, E. Knill, C. Langer, R. Ozeri, R. Reichle, T. Rosenband, P. O. Schmidt, S. Seidelin, N. Shiga, and J. Wesenberg, and supported by DTO, ONR, and NIST.

  17. Quantum Simulation of the Klein Paradox with Trapped Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Gerritsma, R.; Lanyon, B. P.; Kirchmair, G.; Zaehringer, F.; Hempel, C.; Blatt, R.; Roos, C. F.; Casanova, J.; Garcia-Ripoll, J. J.; Solano, E.

    2011-02-11

    We report on quantum simulations of relativistic scattering dynamics using trapped ions. The simulated state of a scattering particle is encoded in both the electronic and vibrational state of an ion, representing the discrete and continuous components of relativistic wave functions. Multiple laser fields and an auxiliary ion simulate the dynamics generated by the Dirac equation in the presence of a scattering potential. Measurement and reconstruction of the particle wave packet enables a frame-by-frame visualization of the scattering processes. By precisely engineering a range of external potentials we are able to simulate text book relativistic scattering experiments and study Klein tunneling in an analogue quantum simulator. We describe extensions to solve problems that are beyond current classical computing capabilities.

  18. Space-charge dynamics in ultra-cold ion bunches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholten, Robert; Murphy, Dene; Speirs, Rory; Thompson, Daniel; Sparkes, Benjamin; McCulloch, Andrew

    2014-05-01

    Cold ion sources based on photoionisation of laser cooled atoms provide a unique system for investigating Coulomb interactions within complex charged particle bunches. Space-charge driven expansion in charged particle beams is of critical importance for applications including electron and ion microscopy, mass spectrometry, synchrotrons and x-ray free electron lasers, and in electron diffraction where space-charge effects constrain the capacity to obtain diffraction information. Self-field effects are often difficult to observe because of thermal diffusion with traditional sources. Cold atom sources produce ions with temperatures of a few mK, such that subtle space-charge effects are apparent. We illustrate the capabilities through detailed investigation of a complex ion bunch shape, showing collective behaviour including high density caustics and shockwave structures arising from long-range interactions between small charge bunches.

  19. Effect of cold collisions on spin coherence and resonance shifts in a magnetically trapped ultracold gas

    SciTech Connect

    Harber, D.M.; Lewandowski, H.J.; McGuirk, J.M.; Cornell, E.A.

    2002-11-01

    We have performed precision microwave spectroscopy on ultracold {sup 87}Rb confined in a magnetic trap, both above and below the Bose-condensation transition. The cold collision frequency shifts for both normal and condensed clouds were measured, which allowed the intrastate and interstate density correlations (characterized by sometimes controversial ''factors of 2'') to be determined. Additionally, temporal coherence of the normal cloud was studied, and the importance of mean-field and velocity-changing collisions in preserving coherence is discussed.

  20. Quantum-enhanced protocols with mixed states using cold atoms in dipole traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krzyzanowska, K.; Copley-May, M.; Romain, R.; MacCormick, C.; Bergamini, S.

    2017-01-01

    We discuss the use of cold atoms in dipole traps to demonstrate experimentally a particular class of protocols for computation and metrology based on mixed states. Modelling of the system shows that, for a specific class of problems (tracing, phase estimation), a quantum advantage can be achieved over classical algorithms for very realistic conditions and strong decoherence. We discuss the results of the models and the experimental implementation.

  1. On the measurement the neutron lifetime using ultra-cold neutrons in a vacuum quadrupole trap

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, J. D.; Penttila, S. I.

    2004-01-01

    We present a conceptual design for an experiment to measure the neutron lifetime ({approx}882 s) with an accuracy of 10{sup -4}. The lifetime will be measured by observing the decay rate of a sample of UCNs confined in vacuum in a magnetic trap. The UCN collaboration at LANL has developed a prototype ultra-cold neutron UCN source that is expected to produce a bottled UCN density of more than 100 UCN/cm{sup 3}. The availability of such an intense source makes it possible to approach the measurement of the neutron lifetime in a new way. We argue below that it is possible to measure the neutron lifetime to 10{sup -4} in a vacuum magnetic trap. The measurement involves no new technology beyond the expected UCN density. If even higher densities are available, the experiment can be made better and/or less expensive. We present the design and methodology for the measurement. The slow loss of neutrons that have stable orbits, but are not energetically trapped would produce a systematic error in the measurement. We discuss a new approach, chaotic cleaning, to the elimination of quasi-neutrons from the trap by breaking the rotational symmetry of the quadrupole trap. The neutron orbits take on a chaotic character and mode mixing causes the neutrons on the quasi-bound orbits to leave the trap.

  2. Semi-analytical model for quasi-double-layer surface electrode ion traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jian; Chen, Shuming; Wang, Yaohua

    2016-11-01

    To realize scale quantum processors, the surface-electrode ion trap is an effective scaling approach, including single-layer, double-layer, and quasi-double-layer traps. To calculate critical trap parameters such as the trap center and trap depth, the finite element method (FEM) simulation was widely used, however, it is always time consuming. Moreover, the FEM simulation is also incapable of exhibiting the direct relationship between the geometry dimension and these parameters. To eliminate the problems above, House and Madsen et al. have respectively provided analytic models for single-layer traps and double-layer traps. In this paper, we propose a semi-analytical model for quasi-double-layer traps. This model can be applied to calculate the important parameters above of the ion trap in the trap design process. With this model, we can quickly and precisely find the optimum geometry design for trap electrodes in various cases.

  3. Correlation between y-type ions observed in ion trap and triple quadrupole mass spectrometers.

    PubMed

    Sherwood, Carly A; Eastham, Ashley; Lee, Lik Wee; Risler, Jenni; Vitek, Olga; Martin, Daniel B

    2009-09-01

    Multiple reaction monitoring mass spectrometry (MRM-MS) is a technique for high-sensitivity targeted analysis. In proteomics, MRM-MS can be used to monitor and quantify a peptide based on the production of expected fragment peaks from the selected peptide precursor ion. The choice of which fragment ions to monitor in order to achieve maximum sensitivity in MRM-MS can potentially be guided by existing MS/MS spectra. However, because the majority of discovery experiments are performed on ion trap platforms, there is concern in the field regarding the generalizability of these spectra to MRM-MS on a triple quadrupole instrument. In light of this concern, many operators perform an optimization step to determine the most intense fragments for a target peptide on a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer. We have addressed this issue by targeting, on a triple quadrupole, the top six y-ion peaks from ion trap-derived consensus library spectra for 258 doubly charged peptides from three different sample sets and quantifying the observed elution curves. This analysis revealed a strong correlation between the y-ion peak rank order and relative intensity across platforms. This suggests that y-type ions obtained from ion trap-based library spectra are well-suited for generating MRM-MS assays for triple quadrupoles and that optimization is not required for each target peptide.

  4. Correlation between y-Type Ions Observed in Ion Trap and Triple Quadrupole Mass Spectrometers

    PubMed Central

    Sherwood, Carly A.; Eastham, Ashley; Lee, Lik Wee; Risler, Jenni; Vitek, Olga; Martin, Daniel B.

    2009-01-01

    Multiple reaction monitoring mass spectrometry (MRM-MS) is a technique for high-sensitivity targeted analysis. In proteomics, MRM-MS can be used to monitor and quantify a peptide based on the production of expected fragment peaks from the selected peptide precursor ion. The choice of which fragment ions to monitor in order to achieve maximum sensitivity in MRM-MS can potentially be guided by existing MS/MS spectra. However, because the majority of discovery experiments are performed on ion trap platforms, there is concern in the field regarding the generalizability of these spectra to MRM-MS on a triple quadrupole instrument. In light of this concern, many operators perform an optimization step to determine the most intense fragments for a target peptide on a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer. We have addressed this issue by targeting, on a triple quadrupole, the top six y-ion peaks from ion trap-derived consensus library spectra for 258 doubly charged peptides from three different sample sets and quantifying the observed elution curves. This analysis revealed a strong correlation between the y-ion peak rank order and relative intensity across platforms. This suggests that y-type ions obtained from ion trap-based library spectra are well-suited for generating MRM-MS assays for triple quadrupoles and that optimization is not required for each target peptide. PMID:19603825

  5. Accessing the quantum Hall regime in cold atom traps using circularly polarized light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wooten, Rachel; Yan, Bin; Greene, Chris H.

    2016-05-01

    There has been considerable interest in designing cold atom experiments to explore the quantum Hall effect with the extreme control allowed in such trapped atom systems. Many theoretical proposals and experimental attempts have been made in the effort to construct a cold atom fractional quantum Hall experiment, but so far, the fractional quantum Hall regime has proven difficult to achieve in experimental setups. One method for reaching the quantum Hall effect consists of rapidly rotating a cold atom system in a harmonic trap to near the centrifugal limit, where the system's Hamiltonian matches the two-dimensional magnetic field Hamiltonian. This condition could be reached in a few-body system through a scheme which increases the angular momentum of the particles in the trap through precision photon excitations. According to the hyperspherical framework from few-body theory, when particle interactions break the harmonic energy spectrum degeneracy, it becomes possible for circularly polarized light to excite the system selectively into the high angular momentum states required for the quantum Hall effect. We will discuss possible experimental systems where this technique could be applicable and challenges that these systems may face.

  6. The formation of Charon's red poles from seasonally cold-trapped volatiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grundy, W. M.; Cruikshank, D. P.; Gladstone, G. R.; Howett, C. J. A.; Lauer, T. R.; Spencer, J. R.; Summers, M. E.; Buie, M. W.; Earle, A. M.; Ennico, K.; Parker, J. Wm.; Porter, S. B.; Singer, K. N.; Stern, S. A.; Verbiscer, A. J.; Beyer, R. A.; Binzel, R. P.; Buratti, B. J.; Cook, J. C.; Dalle Ore, C. M.; Olin, C. B.; Parker, A. H.; Protopapa, S.; Quirico, E.; Retherford, K. D.; Robbins, S. J.; Schmitt, B.; Stansberry, J. A.; Umurhan, O. M.; Weaver, H. A.; Young, L. A.; Zangari, A. M.; Bray, V. J.; Cheng, A. F.; McKinnon, W. B.; McNutt, R. L.; Morre, J. M.; Nimmo, F.; Reuter, D. C.; Schenk, P. M.; New Horizons Science Team; Stern, S. A.; Bagenal, F.; Ennico, K.; Gladstone, G. R.; Grundy, W. M.; McKinnon, W. B.; Moore, J. M.; Olkin, C. B.; Spencer, J. R.; Weaver, H. A.; Young, L. A.; Andert, T.; Barnouin, O.; Beyer, R. A.; Binzel, R. P.; Bird, M.; Bray, V. J.; Brozovic, M.; Buie, M. W.; Buratti, B. J.; Cheng, A. F.; Cook, J. C.; Cruikshank, D. P.; Dalle Ore, C. M.; Earler, A. M.; Elliott, H. A.; Greathouse, T. K.; Hahn, M.; Hamilton, D. P.; Hill, M. E.; Hinson, D. P.; Hofgartner, J.; Horányi, M.; Howard, A. D.; Howett, C. J. A.; Jennings, D. E.; Kammer, J. A.; Kollmann, P.; Lauer, T. R.; Lavvas, P.; Linscott, I. R. Lisse, C. M.; Lunsford, A. W.; McComas, D. J.; McNutt, R. L., Jr.; Mutchler, M.; Nimmo, F.; Nunez, J. I.; Paetzold, M.; Parker, A. H.; Parker, J. Wm.; Philippe, S.; Piquette, M.; Porter, S. B.; Protopapa, S.; Quirico, E.; Reitsema, H. J.; Reuter, D. C.; Robbins, S. J.; Roberts, J. H.; Runyon, K.; Schenk, P. M.; Schindhelm, E.; Schmitt, B.; Showalter, M. R.; Singer, K. N.; Stansberry, J. A.; Steffl, A. J.; Strobel, D. F.; Stryk, T.; Summers, M. E.; Szalay, J. R.; Throop, H. B.; Tsang, C. C. C.; Tyler, G. L.; Umurhan, O. M.; Verbiscer, A. J.; Versteeg, M. H.; Weigle, G. E., II; White, O. L.; Woods, W. W.; Young, E. F.; Zangari, A. M.

    2016-11-01

    A unique feature of Pluto's large satellite Charon is its dark red northern polar cap. Similar colours on Pluto's surface have been attributed to tholin-like organic macromolecules produced by energetic radiation processing of hydrocarbons. The polar location on Charon implicates the temperature extremes that result from Charon's high obliquity and long seasons in the production of this material. The escape of Pluto's atmosphere provides a potential feedstock for a complex chemistry. Gas from Pluto that is transiently cold-trapped and processed at Charon's winter pole was proposed as an explanation for the dark coloration on the basis of an image of Charon's northern hemisphere, but not modelled quantitatively. Here we report images of the southern hemisphere illuminated by Pluto-shine and also images taken during the approach phase that show the northern polar cap over a range of longitudes. We model the surface thermal environment on Charon and the supply and temporary cold-trapping of material escaping from Pluto, as well as the photolytic processing of this material into more complex and less volatile molecules while cold-trapped. The model results are consistent with the proposed mechanism for producing the observed colour pattern on Charon.

  7. The formation of Charon's red poles from seasonally cold-trapped volatiles.

    PubMed

    Grundy, W M; Cruikshank, D P; Gladstone, G R; Howett, C J A; Lauer, T R; Spencer, J R; Summers, M E; Buie, M W; Earle, A M; Ennico, K; Parker, J Wm; Porter, S B; Singer, K N; Stern, S A; Verbiscer, A J; Beyer, R A; Binzel, R P; Buratti, B J; Cook, J C; Dalle Ore, C M; Olkin, C B; Parker, A H; Protopapa, S; Quirico, E; Retherford, K D; Robbins, S J; Schmitt, B; Stansberry, J A; Umurhan, O M; Weaver, H A; Young, L A; Zangari, A M; Bray, V J; Cheng, A F; McKinnon, W B; McNutt, R L; Moore, J M; Nimmo, F; Reuter, D C; Schenk, P M

    2016-11-03

    A unique feature of Pluto's large satellite Charon is its dark red northern polar cap. Similar colours on Pluto's surface have been attributed to tholin-like organic macromolecules produced by energetic radiation processing of hydrocarbons. The polar location on Charon implicates the temperature extremes that result from Charon's high obliquity and long seasons in the production of this material. The escape of Pluto's atmosphere provides a potential feedstock for a complex chemistry. Gas from Pluto that is transiently cold-trapped and processed at Charon's winter pole was proposed as an explanation for the dark coloration on the basis of an image of Charon's northern hemisphere, but not modelled quantitatively. Here we report images of the southern hemisphere illuminated by Pluto-shine and also images taken during the approach phase that show the northern polar cap over a range of longitudes. We model the surface thermal environment on Charon and the supply and temporary cold-trapping of material escaping from Pluto, as well as the photolytic processing of this material into more complex and less volatile molecules while cold-trapped. The model results are consistent with the proposed mechanism for producing the observed colour pattern on Charon.

  8. Fluctuating Potentials In Micrometer Scale Atomic Ion Traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Britton, J.; Seidelin, S.; Chiaverini, J.; Reichle, R.; Bollinger, J. J.; Leibfried, D.; Wesenberg, J. H.; Blakestad, R. B.; Epstein, R. J.; Shiga, N.; Amini, J. M.; Brown, K. R.; Home, J. P.; Hume, D. B.; Itano, W. M.; Jost, J. D.; Langer, C.; Ozeri, R.; Wineland, D. J.

    2007-03-01

    Electromagnetic confinement of atomic ion qubits coupled with laser cooling has permitted observation of 10 minute coherence times [1, 2]. Recent work to miniaturize electromagnetic traps promises qubit densities attractive for large scale quantum computing [3]. However, motional heating resulting from poorly understood fluctuating trapping potentials is observed to increase as approximately dimensions-4 [4]. We discuss efforts to suppress this heating and present experimental results for several microtrap fabrication techniques [5, 6]. [1] P. T. H. Fisk et al., IEEE Trans. Instrum. Meas. 44, 113 (1995). [2] J. J. Bollinger et al., IEEE Trans. Instrum. Measurement 40, 126 (1991). [3] A. Steane, quant-ph/0412165. [4] L. Deslauriers et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 103007 (2006). [5] S. Seidelin et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 253003 (2006). [6] J. Britton et al., quant-ph/0605170.

  9. Infrared spectra of small molecular ions trapped in solid neon

    SciTech Connect

    Jacox, Marilyn E.

    2015-01-22

    The infrared spectrum of a molecular ion provides a unique signature for that species, gives information on its structure, and is amenable to remote sensing. It also serves as a comparison standard for refining ab initio calculations. Experiments in this laboratory trap molecular ions in dilute solid solution in neon at 4.2 K in sufficient concentration for observation of their infrared spectra between 450 and 4000 cm{sup !1}. Discharge-excited neon atoms produce cations by photoionization and/or Penning ionization of the parent molecule. The resulting electrons are captured by other molecules, yielding anions which provide for overall charge neutrality of the deposit. Recent observations of ions produced from C{sub 2}H{sub 4} and BF{sub 3} will be discussed. Because of their relatively large possibility of having low-lying excited electronic states, small, symmetric molecular cations are especially vulnerable to breakdown of the Born-Oppenheimer approximation. Some phenomena which can result from this breakdown will be discussed. Ion-molecule reaction rates are sufficiently high that in some systems absorptions of dimer cations and anions are also observed. When H{sub 2} is introduced into the system, the initially-formed ion may react with it. Among the species resulting from such ion-molecule reactions that have recently been studied are O{sub 4}{sup +}, NH{sub 4}{sup +}, HOCO{sup +}, and HCO{sub 2}{sup !}.

  10. Hydrogen/deuterium exchange of myoglobin ions in a linear quadrupole ion trap.

    PubMed

    Mao, Dunmin; Ding, Chuanfan; Douglas, D J

    2002-01-01

    The hydrogen/deuterium (H/D) exchange of gas-phase ions of holo- and apo-myoglobin has been studied by confining the ions in a linear quadrupole ion trap with D(2)O or CD(3)OD at a pressure of several mTorr. Apo-myoglobin ions were formed by collision-induced dissociation of holo-myoglobin ions between the orifice and skimmer of the ion sampling system. The exchange takes place on a time scale of seconds. Earlier cross section measurements have shown that holo-myoglobin ions can have more compact structures than apo-myoglobin. Despite this, both holo-myoglobin and apo-myoglobin in charge states +8 to +14 are found to exchange nearly the same number of hydrogens (ca. 103) in 4 s. It is possible the ions fold or unfold to new conformations on the much longer time scale of the exchange experiment compared with the cross section measurements.

  11. Atmospheric H2O2 measurement: comparison of cold trap method with impinger bubbling method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakugawa, H.; Kaplan, I. R.

    1987-01-01

    Collection of atmospheric H2O2 was performed by a cold trap method using dry ice-acetone as the refrigerant. The air was drawn by a pump into a glass gas trap immersed in the dry ice-acetone slush in a dewar flask at a flow rate of 2.5 l min-1 for approximately 2 h. Collection efficiency was > 99% and negligible interferences by O3, SO2 or organic matter with the collected H2O2 in the trap were observed. This method was compared with the air impinger bubbling method which has been previously described (Kok et al., 1978a, b, Envir. Sci. Technol. 12, 1072-1080). The measured total peroxide (H2O2 + organic peroxide) values in a series of aim samples collected by the impinger bubbling method (0.06-3.7 ppb) were always higher than those obtained by the cold trap method (0.02-1.2 ppb). Laboratory experiments suggest that the difference in values between the two methods probably results from the aqueous phase generation of H2O2 and organic peroxide in the impinger solution by a reaction of atmospheric O3 with olefinic and aromatic compounds. If these O3-organic compound reactions which occur in the impinger also occur in aqueous droplets in the atmosphere, the process could be very important for aqueous phase generation of H2O2 in clouds and rainwater.

  12. Blueprint for a microwave trapped ion quantum computer.

    PubMed

    Lekitsch, Bjoern; Weidt, Sebastian; Fowler, Austin G; Mølmer, Klaus; Devitt, Simon J; Wunderlich, Christof; Hensinger, Winfried K

    2017-02-01

    The availability of a universal quantum computer may have a fundamental impact on a vast number of research fields and on society as a whole. An increasingly large scientific and industrial community is working toward the realization of such a device. An arbitrarily large quantum computer may best be constructed using a modular approach. We present a blueprint for a trapped ion-based scalable quantum computer module, making it possible to create a scalable quantum computer architecture based on long-wavelength radiation quantum gates. The modules control all operations as stand-alone units, are constructed using silicon microfabrication techniques, and are within reach of current technology. To perform the required quantum computations, the modules make use of long-wavelength radiation-based quantum gate technology. To scale this microwave quantum computer architecture to a large size, we present a fully scalable design that makes use of ion transport between different modules, thereby allowing arbitrarily many modules to be connected to construct a large-scale device. A high error-threshold surface error correction code can be implemented in the proposed architecture to execute fault-tolerant operations. With appropriate adjustments, the proposed modules are also suitable for alternative trapped ion quantum computer architectures, such as schemes using photonic interconnects.

  13. Engineering 2D Ising Interactions in a Large (N>100) Ensemble of Trapped Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawyer, Brian; Britton, Joseph; Keith, Adam; Wang, Joseph; Freericks, James; Uys, Hermann; Biercuk, Michael; Bollinger, John

    2012-06-01

    Experimental progress in atomic, molecular, and optical physics has enabled exquisite control over ensembles of cold trapped ions. We have recently engineered long-range Ising interactions in a two-dimensional, 1-mK Coulomb crystal of hundreds of ^9Be^+ ions confined within a Penning trap. Interactions between the ^9Be^+ valence spins are mediated via spin-dependent optical dipole forces (ODFs) coupling to transverse motional modes of the planar crystal. A continuous range of inverse power-law spin-spin interactions from infinite (1/r^0) to dipolar (1/r^3) are accessible by varying the ODF drive frequency relative to the transverse modes. The ions naturally form a triangular lattice structure within the planar array, allowing for simulation of spin frustration using our generated antiferromagnetic couplings. We report progress toward simulating the ferromagnetic/antiferromagnetic transverse quantum Ising Hamiltonians in this large ensemble. We also report spectroscopy, thermometry, and sensitive displacement detection (˜100 pm) via entanglement of valence spin and drumhead oscillations.

  14. Design of blade-shaped-electrode linear ion traps with reduced anharmonic contributions

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, K.; Che, H.; Ge, Y. P.; Xu, Z. T.; Yuan, W. H.; Zhang, J.; Lu, Z. H.; Lan, Y.

    2015-09-21

    RF quadrupole linear Paul traps are versatile tools in quantum physics experiments. Linear Paul traps with blade-shaped electrodes have the advantages of larger solid angles for fluorescence collection. But with these kinds of traps, the existence of higher-order anharmonic terms of the trap potentials can cause large heating rate for the trapped ions. In this paper, we theoretically investigate the dependence of higher-order terms of trap potentials on the geometry of blade-shaped traps, and offer an optimized design. A modified blade electrodes trap is proposed to further reduce higher-order anharmonic terms while still retaining large fluorescence collection angle.

  15. High efficiency tandem mass spectrometry analysis using dual linear ion traps.

    PubMed

    Li, Linfan; Zhou, Xiaoyu; Hager, James W; Ouyang, Zheng

    2014-10-07

    Tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) plays an essential role in modern chemical analysis. It is used for differentiating isomers and isobars and suppressing chemical noise, which allows high precision quantitation. The MS/MS analysis has been typically applied by isolating the target precursor ions, while disregarding other ions, followed by a fragmentation process that produces the product ions. In this study, configurations of dual linear ion traps were explored to develop high efficiency MS/MS analysis. The ions trapped in the first linear ion trap were axially, mass-selectively transferred to the second linear ion trap for MS/MS analysis. Ions from multiple compounds simultaneously introduced into the mass spectrometer could be sequentially analyzed. This development enables highly efficient use of the sample. For miniature ion trap mass spectrometers with discontinuous atmospheric pressure interfaces, the analysis speed and the quantitation precision can be significantly improved.

  16. High-resolution excitation of ions in a low-pressure linear ion trap.

    PubMed

    Collings, B A

    2011-01-15

    An exploration of the parameters necessary to obtain high-resolution excitation, using dipolar excitation, of an ion in a linear ion trap has been undertaken in this study. These parameters included ion trap pressure, excitation amplitude, excitation period, drive frequency of the ion trap, Mathieu q value and the mass of the ion of interest. An understanding of how these parameters play a role in high-resolution excitation is necessary to the development of a method for the targeted tandem mass spectrometric (MS/MS) analysis of ions with the same nominal mass. Resonance excitation profiles with full width half maxima as narrow as 0.015 m/z units could be obtained, under the right conditions, for an ion from a homogenously substituted triazatriphosphorine at m/z 322.049, which translates into a mass resolution of >21 500. In this particular case the requirement for high resolution was a low trap pressure (3.8 × 10(-5) Torr), low excitation amplitude (3 mV), long excitation period (100 ms) and a high Mathieu q value(0.8) when using a drive frequency of 1.228 MHz. Similar conditions were used to demonstrate the isolation of individual [M + H](+) component ions from mixtures of bromazepam (m/z 316.008)/chlorprothixene (m/z 316.0921)/fendiline (m/z 316.206) and chlorprothixene (m/z 316.0921)/oxycodone (m/z 316.1543)/fendiline (m/z 316.206) prior to obtaining product ion spectra with excitation at q = 0.236. In the former mixture the individual components were isolated with near 100% efficiency while in the latter mixture the isolation efficiency dropped to near 50% for the oxycodone component and to 80% for the other components.

  17. Cold Trap Dismantling and Sodium Removal at a Fast Breeder Reactor - 12327

    SciTech Connect

    Graf, A.; Petrick, H.; Stutz, U.; Hosking, P.

    2012-07-01

    The first German prototype Fast Breeder Nuclear Reactor (KNK) is currently being dismantled after being the only operating Fast Breeder-type reactor in Germany. As this reactor type used sodium as a coolant in its primary and secondary circuit, seven cold traps containing various amounts of partially activated sodium needed to be disposed of as part of the dismantling. The resulting combined difficulties of radioactive contamination and high chemical reactivity were handled by treating the cold traps differently depending on their size and the amount of sodium contained inside. Six small cold traps were processed onsite by cutting them up into small parts using a band saw under a protective atmosphere. The sodium was then converted to sodium hydroxide by using water. The remaining large cold trap could not be handled in the same way due to its dimensions (2.9 m x 1.1 m) and the declared amount of sodium inside (1,700 kg). It was therefore manually dismantled inside a large box filled with a protective atmosphere, while the resulting pieces were packaged for later burning in a special facility. The experiences gained by KNK during this process may be advantageous for future dismantling projects in similar sodium-cooled reactors worldwide. The dismantling of a prototype fast breeder reactor provides the challenge not only to dismantle radioactive materials but also to handle sodium-contaminated or sodium-containing components. The treatment of sodium requires additional equipment and installations to ensure a safe handling. Since it is not permitted to bring sodium into a repository, all sodium has to be neutralized either through a controlled reaction with water or by incinerating. The resulting components can be disposed of as normal radioactive waste with no further conditions. The handling of sodium needs skilled and experienced workers to minimize the inherent risks. And the example of the disposal of the large KNK cold trap shows the interaction with others and

  18. Ion/molecule reactions for detecting ammonia using miniature cylindrical ion trap mass spectrometers.

    PubMed

    Smith, Jonell N; Keil, Adam D; Noll, Robert J; Cooks, R Graham

    2011-01-07

    Gaseous ammonia, a common toxic industrial compound, is not detected readily in ion trap mass spectrometers because its molecular ion falls below the low-mass cutoff (~m/z 40) normally used when examining organic compounds. Instead, reactions of ammonia with halobenzene radical cations were used with internal electron ionization in two cylindrical ion trap miniature mass spectrometers to create a characteristic product ion by which to identify and quantify ammonia. Ammonia showed a linear response over the concentration range studied (parts per million [ppm] to parts per billion [ppb]) with limits of detection of 17 ppm and 220 ppb for experiments involving direct introduction and thermal desorption after pre-concentration, respectively. These values are comparable to ammonia's permissible exposure limit (50 ppm) and odor threshold (5 ppm). Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were used to describe the method sensitivity, the probability of true positives, and the false positive rate for ammonia. A customized reaction scan function was created to select the species available for the ion/molecule reaction and set the amount of time the product ion could be accumulated in the trap. Product ion identity was verified using tandem mass spectrometry. Similar reactions with methylamine, ethylamine and the two nitriles, acetonitrile and benzonitrile, were explored.

  19. Selective control of the symmetric Dicke subspace in trapped ions

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, C. E.; Retamal, J. C.; Solano, E.

    2007-09-15

    We propose a method of manipulating selectively the symmetric Dicke subspace in the internal degrees of freedom of N trapped ions. We show that the direct access to ionic-motional subspaces, based on a suitable tuning of motion-dependent ac Stark shifts, induces a two-level dynamics involving previously selected ionic Dicke states. In this manner, it is possible to produce, sequentially and unitarily, ionic Dicke states with increasing excitation number. Moreover, we propose a probabilistic technique to produce directly any ionic Dicke state assuming suitable initial conditions.

  20. Selective interactions in trapped ions: State reconstruction and quantum logic

    SciTech Connect

    Solano, E.

    2005-01-01

    We propose the implementation of selective interactions of atom-motion subspaces in trapped ions. These interactions yield resonant exchange of population inside a selected subspace, leaving the others in a highly dispersive regime. Selectivity allows us to generate motional Fock (and other nonclassical) states with high purity out of a wide class of initial states, and becomes an unconventional cooling mechanism when the ground state is chosen. Individual population of number states can be distinctively measured, as well as the motional Wigner function. Furthermore, a protocol for implementing quantum logic through a suitable control of selective subspaces is presented.

  1. A Decoherence-Free Quantum Memory Using Trapped Ions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-09-22

    A Decoherence-Free Quantum Memory Using Trapped Ions D. Kielpinski,1* V. Meyer,1 M. A. Rowe,1 C. A. Sackett,1 W. M. Itano,1 C. Monroe,2 D. J...Wineland1 We demonstrate a decoherence-free quantum memory of one qubit. By en- coding the qubit into the decoherence-free subspace (DFS) of a pair of...quantum memory stores information in superposition states of a collection of two- level systems called “qubits.” Quantum com- putation, which may

  2. The effect of intensity noise on trapped-ion qubits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brouard, Santiago; Plata, Jesus

    2004-05-01

    The effect of intensity fluctuations on laser-induced coupling of electronic and vibrational states of a trapped ion is studied analytically. Different types of noise relevant to the experiments are considered. The resulting decoherence phenomenology is shown to present nontrivial characteristics. Noise color leads to nonexponential decay of the coherences: after the initial decay, determined by the probability distribution, a transient period specific to the noise spectrum is apparent; at large times, exponential decay sets in for widely different noise properties. The detection of these features in the evolution of an initial coherent state of the vibrational mode is discussed.

  3. Anti-hydrogen production with positron beam ion trap

    SciTech Connect

    Itahashi, Takahisa

    2008-08-08

    In low-energy antiproton physics, it is advantageous to be able to manipulate anti-particles as freely as normal particles. A robust production and storage system for high-quality positrons and antiprotons would be a substantial advance for the development of anti-matter science. The idea of electron beam ion trap could be applied for storage of anti-particle when the electron beam could be replaced by the positron beam. The bright positron beam would be brought about using synchrotron radiation source with a superconducting wiggler. The new scheme for production of anti-particles is proposed by using new accelerator technologies.

  4. Microfabricated Surface-Electrode Ion Trap for Scalable Quantum Information Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidelin, S.; Chiaverini, J.; Reichle, R.; Bollinger, J. J.; Leibfried, D.; Britton, J.; Wesenberg, J. H.; Blakestad, R. B.; Epstein, R. J.; Hume, D. B.; Itano, W. M.; Jost, J. D.; Langer, C.; Ozeri, R.; Shiga, N.; Wineland, D. J.

    2006-06-01

    Individual laser-cooled Mg+24 ions are confined in a linear Paul trap with a novel geometry where gold electrodes are located in a single plane and the ions are trapped 40μm above this plane. The relatively simple trap design and fabrication procedure are important for large-scale quantum information processing (QIP) using ions. Measured ion motional frequencies are compared to simulations. Measurements of ion recooling after cooling is temporarily suspended yield a heating rate of approximately 5 motional quanta per millisecond for a trap frequency of 2.83 MHz, sufficiently low to be useful for QIP.

  5. Pharmacological Blockade of TRPM8 Ion Channels Alters Cold and Cold Pain Responses in Mice

    PubMed Central

    McCoy, Daniel D.; McKemy, David D.

    2011-01-01

    TRPM8 (Transient Receptor Potential Melastatin-8) is a cold- and menthol-gated ion channel necessary for the detection of cold temperatures in the mammalian peripheral nervous system. Functioning TRPM8 channels are required for behavioral responses to innocuous cool, noxious cold, injury-evoked cold hypersensitivity, cooling-mediated analgesia, and thermoregulation. Because of these various roles, the ability to pharmacologically manipulate TRPM8 function to alter the excitability of cold-sensing neurons may have broad impact clinically. Here we examined a novel compound, PBMC (1-phenylethyl-4-(benzyloxy)-3-methoxybenzyl(2-aminoethyl)carbamate) which robustly and selectively inhibited TRPM8 channels in vitro with sub-nanomolar affinity, as determined by calcium microfluorimetry and electrophysiology. The actions of PBMC were selective for TRPM8, with no functional effects observed for the sensory ion channels TRPV1 and TRPA1. PBMC altered TRPM8 gating by shifting the voltage-dependence of menthol-evoked currents towards positive membrane potentials. When administered systemically to mice, PBMC treatment produced a dose-dependent hypothermia in wildtype animals while TRPM8-knockout mice remained unaffected. This hypothermic response was reduced at lower doses, whereas responses to evaporative cooling were still significantly attenuated. Lastly, systemic PBMC also diminished cold hypersensitivity in inflammatory and nerve-injury pain models, but was ineffective against oxaliplatin-induced neuropathic cold hypersensitivity, despite our findings that TRPM8 is required for the cold-related symptoms of this pathology. Thus PBMC is an attractive compound that serves as a template for the formulation of highly specific and potent TRPM8 antagonists that will have utility both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:21984952

  6. Cold atomic beam ion source for focused ion beam applications

    SciTech Connect

    Knuffman, B.; Steele, A. V.; McClelland, J. J.

    2013-07-28

    We report measurements and modeling of an ion source that is based on ionization of a laser-cooled atomic beam. We show a high brightness and a low energy spread, suitable for use in next-generation, high-resolution focused ion beam systems. Our measurements of total ion current as a function of ionization conditions support an analytical model that also predicts the cross-sectional current density and spatial distribution of ions created in the source. The model predicts a peak brightness of 2 × 10{sup 7} A m{sup −2} sr{sup −1} eV{sup −1} and an energy spread less than 0.34 eV. The model is also combined with Monte-Carlo simulations of the inter-ion Coulomb forces to show that the source can be operated at several picoamperes with a brightness above 1 × 10{sup 7} A m{sup −2} sr{sup −1} eV{sup −1}. We estimate that when combined with a conventional ion focusing column, an ion source with these properties could focus a 1 pA beam into a spot smaller than 1 nm. A total current greater than 5 nA was measured in a lower-brightness configuration of the ion source, demonstrating the possibility of a high current mode of operation.

  7. Cold atomic beam ion source for focused ion beam applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knuffman, B.; Steele, A. V.; McClelland, J. J.

    2013-07-01

    We report measurements and modeling of an ion source that is based on ionization of a laser-cooled atomic beam. We show a high brightness and a low energy spread, suitable for use in next-generation, high-resolution focused ion beam systems. Our measurements of total ion current as a function of ionization conditions support an analytical model that also predicts the cross-sectional current density and spatial distribution of ions created in the source. The model predicts a peak brightness of 2 × 107 A m-2 sr-1 eV-1 and an energy spread less than 0.34 eV. The model is also combined with Monte-Carlo simulations of the inter-ion Coulomb forces to show that the source can be operated at several picoamperes with a brightness above 1 × 107 A m-2 sr-1 eV-1. We estimate that when combined with a conventional ion focusing column, an ion source with these properties could focus a 1 pA beam into a spot smaller than 1 nm. A total current greater than 5 nA was measured in a lower-brightness configuration of the ion source, demonstrating the possibility of a high current mode of operation.

  8. Linear ion trap for second-order Doppler shift reduction in frequency standard applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestage, John D.; Janik, Gary R.; Dick, G. John; Maleki, Lute

    1990-01-01

    The authors have designed and are presently testing a novel linear ion trap that permits storage of a large number of ions with reduced susceptibility to the second-order Doppler effect caused by the RF confining fields. This new trap should store about 20 times the number of ions as a conventional RF trap with no corresponding increase in second-order Doppler shift from the confining field. In addition, the sensitivity of this shift to trapping parameters, i.e., RF voltage, RF frequency, and trap size, is greatly reduced. The authors have succeeded in trapping mercury ions and xenon ions in the presence of helium buffer gas. Trap times as long as 2000 s have been measured.

  9. Low power RF amplifier circuit for ion trap applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noriega, J. R.; García-Delgado, L. A.; Gómez-Fuentes, R.; García-Juárez, A.

    2016-09-01

    A low power RF amplifier circuit for ion trap applications is presented and described. The amplifier is based on a class-D half-bridge amplifier with a voltage mirror driver. The RF amplifier is composed of an RF class-D amplifier, an envelope modulator to ramp up the RF voltage during the ion analysis stage, a detector or amplitude demodulation circuit for sensing the output signal amplitude, and a feedback amplifier that linearizes the steady state output of the amplifier. The RF frequency is set by a crystal oscillator and the series resonant circuit is tuned to the oscillator frequency. The resonant circuit components have been chosen, in this case, to operate at 1 MHz. In testings, the class-D stage operated at a maximum of 78 mW at 1.1356 MHz producing 225 V peak.

  10. Sympathetic cooling of 171 Yb+ qubit ions on a scalable ion trap chip using Yb isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Yeong-Dae; Ahn, Jun Sik; Hong, Seokjun; Lee, Minjae; Cheon, Hongjin; Cho, Dongil ``Dan''; Kim, Taehyun

    2016-05-01

    To achieve ion trap based large-scale quantum computing devices, motional states of qubit ions must be regulated against heating from ion transportation or noise on the chip surface while leaving internal states of the ions intact. Sympathetic cooling is a natural solution for this problem, but trapping two different species of ions generally requires two sets of optical devices including separate lasers for each ion type, increasing the complexity and the cost of the setup. We tested Doppler-cooled 174 Yb+ ions to sympathetically cool 171 Yb+ qubit ions. Since these two isotopes have energy levels close to each other, the optical setup can be vastly simplified. We also verified that the tail of non-ideally focused cooling beam and the scattered light from the surface create excited state population in the 171 Yb+ qubit ions, as expected. This leads to occasional spontaneous emission events, which currently limits the coherence time of our qubit to a few seconds. We will also discuss our plans for optimizing the experiment, which may increase the coherence time by one or two orders of magnitude. This work was partially supported by ICT R&D program of MSIP/IITP. [10043464, Development of quantum repeater technology for the application to communication systems].

  11. Linear Ion Trap for the Mars Organic Molecule Analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brinckerhoff, William; Arevalo, Ricardo; Danell, Ryan; van Amerom, Friso; Pinnick, Veronica; Li, Xiang; Hovmand, Lars; Getty, Stephanie; Mahaffy, Paul; Goesmann, Fred; Steininger, Harald

    2014-05-01

    The 2018 ExoMars rover mission includes the Mars Organic Molecule Analyzer (MOMA) investigation. MOMA will examine the chemical composition of samples acquired from depths of up to two meters below the martian surface, where organics may be protected from radiative and oxidative degradation. When combined with the complement of instruments in the rover's Pasteur Payload, MOMA has the potential to reveal the presence of a wide range of organics preserved in a variety of mineralogical environments, and to begin to understand the structural character and potential origin of those compounds. MOMA includes a linear, or 2D, ion trap mass spectrometer (ITMS) that is designed to analyze molecular composition of (i) gas evolved from pyrolyzed powder samples and separated on a gas chromatograph and (ii) ions directly desorbed from solid samples at Mars ambient pressure using a pulsed laser and a fast-valve capillary ion inlet system. This "dual source" approach gives MOMA unprecedented breadth of detection over a wide range of molecular weights and volatilities. Analysis of nonvolatile, higher-molecular weight organics such as carboxylic acids and peptides even in the presence of significant perchlorate concentrations is enabled by the extremely short (~1 ns) pulses of the desorption laser. Use of the ion trap's tandem mass spectrometry mode permits selective focus on key species for isolation and controlled fragmentation, providing structural analysis capabilities. The flight-like engineering test unit (ETU) of the ITMS, now under construction, will be used to verify breadboard performance with high fidelity, while simultaneously supporting the development of analytical scripts and spectral libraries using synthetic and natural Mars analog samples guided by current results from MSL. ETU campaign data will strongly advise the specifics of the calibration applied to the MOMA flight model as well as the science operational procedures during the mission.

  12. Felion: a Cryogenic Ion Trap Apparatus for Spectroscopic Studies with Felix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunken, S.; Kluge, L.; Fanghanel, S.; Potapov, A.; Asvany, O.; Schlemmer, S.; Oomens, J.; Redlich, B.; Stoffels, A.

    2013-06-01

    The combination of ion trapping techniques with sensitive action spectroscopy schemes has been developed in recent years as a powerful tool to obtain spectra of gas-phase molecular ions from the UV to the (F)IR spectral regions. Here we report on the status of a specifically designed, dedicated cryogenic 22-pole ion trap apparatus (FELion), developed and built in Cologne, Germany, and intended to be installed permanently at the "Free-Electron Lasers for Infrared eXperiments" (FELIX) facility in Nijmegen, the Netherlands. This instrument will allow to record gas-phase IR and FIR spectra of mass-selected, internally cold molecular ions at temperatures in the range 4-300 K. By the use of diverse ionization methods, e.g. electron impact and electrospray ionization, a multitude of molecular ions can be generated and stored in the trap, including astrophysically relevant species ranging in size from the three-atomic H_3^+ up to large polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) ions, but also biomolecular ions like amino acids, peptides, or nucleobases. In combination with the powerful (F)IR radiation of the free electron lasers FELIX-1 and -2 (60-2500 cm^{-1}) and FLARE (6-100 cm^{-1}) at the FELIX facility, a variety of action spectroscopy schemes can be employed to study the ro-vibrational spectra of the stored ions, such as IR multiphoton dissociation, (F)IR/UV double resonance spectroscopy, or the method of laser induced reactions (LIR). In this talk we will give a detailed account of the experimental setup and present the first results obtained with the new apparatus. e.g., S. Schlemmer, E. Lescop, J. von Richthofen, D. Gerlich, and M. A. Smith, J. Chem. Phys. 117, 2068 (2002) J. Oomens, B. G. Sartakov, G. Meijer, and G. van Helden, Int. J. Mass Spectrom. 254, 1 (2006) T. R. Rizzo, J. A. Stearns, and O. V. Boyarkin, International Reviews in Physical Chemistry 28, 481 (2009) FLARE: Free-electron Laser for Advanced spectroscopy and high-Resolution Experiments

  13. Surface ion trap structures with excellent optical access for quantum information processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maunz, P.; Blain, M.; Benito, F.; Chou, C.; Clark, C.; Descour, M.; Ellis, R.; Haltli, R.; Heller, E.; Kemme, S.; Sterk, J.; Tabakov, B.; Tigges, C.; Stick, D.

    2013-05-01

    Microfabricated surface electrode ion traps are necessary for the advancement of trapped ion quantum information processing as it offers a scalable way for realizing complex trap structures capable of storing and controlling many ions. The most promising way of performing two-qubit quantum gates in a chain of trapped ions is to focus laser beams on individual ions of the chain to drive gates. However, in surface ion traps the close proximity of the ions to the surface and the size of the chips usually cannot accommodate the tightly focused laser beams necessary to address individual ions parallel to the chip surface. Here we present a surface electrode ion trap monolithically fabricated in standard silicon technology that implements a linear quadrupole trap on a bowtie shaped chip with a narrow section that is only 1.2 mm wide. Laser beams parallel to the surface can be focused down to a waist of 4 μm with enough separation from the trap chip to prevent light scattering. The trap structure incorporates two Y-junctions for reordering ions and is optimized for quantum information processing. This work was supported by the Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity (IARPA). Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the US Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  14. Development and Evaluation of a Variable-Temperature Quadrupole Ion Trap Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derkits, David; Wiseman, Alex; Snead, Russell F.; Dows, Martina; Harge, Jasmine; Lamp, Jared A.; Gronert, Scott

    2016-02-01

    A new, variable-temperature mass spectrometer system is described. By applying polyimide heating tape to the end-cap electrodes of a Bruker (Bremen, Germany) Esquire ion trap, it is possible to vary the effective temperature of the system between 40 and 100°C. The modification does not impact the operation of the ion trap and the heater can be used for extended periods without degradation of the system. The accuracy of the ion trap temperatures was assessed by examining two gas-phase equilibrium processes with known thermochemistry. In each case, the variable-temperature ion trap provided data that were in good accord with literature data, indicating the effective temperature in the ion trap environment was being successfully modulated by the changes in the set-point temperatures on the end-cap electrodes. The new design offers a convenient and effective way to convert commercial ion trap mass spectrometers into variable-temperature instruments.

  15. A long-lived Zeeman trapped-ion qubit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruster, T.; Schmiegelow, C. T.; Kaufmann, H.; Warschburger, C.; Schmidt-Kaler, F.; Poschinger, U. G.

    2016-10-01

    We demonstrate unprecedentedly long lifetimes for electron spin superposition states of a single trapped ^{40}Ca^+ ion. For a Ramsey measurement, we achieve a 1{/}√{e} coherence time of 300(50) ms, while a spin-echo experiment yields a coherence time of 2.1(1) s. The latter corresponds to residual effective rms magnetic field fluctuations ≤ 2.7× 10^{-12} T during a measurement time of about 1500 s. The suppression of decoherence induced by fluctuating magnetic fields is achieved by combining a two-layer μ-metal shield, which reduces external magnetic noise by 20-30 dB for frequencies of 50 Hz-100 kHz, with Sm_2Co_{17} permanent magnets for generating a quantizing magnetic field of 0.37 mT. Our results extend the coherence time of the simple-to-operate trapped-ion spin qubit to ultralong coherence times which so far have been observed only for magnetic insensitive transitions in atomic qubits with hyperfine structure.

  16. Ion Trap Quantum Computers: Performance Limits and Experimental Progress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Richard

    1998-03-01

    In a quantum computer information would be represented by the quantum mechanical states of suitable atomic-scale systems. (A single bit of information represented by a two-level quantum system is known as a qubit.) This notion leads to the possibility of computing with quantum mechanical superpositions of numbers ("quantum parallelism"), which for certain problems would make quantum computation very much more efficient than classical computation. The possibility of rapidly factoring the large integers used in public-key cryptography is an important example. (Public key cryptosystems derive their security from the difficuty of factoring, and similar problems, with conventional computers.) Quantum computational hardware development is in its infancy, but an experimental study of quantum computation with laser-cooled trapped calcium ions that is under way at Los Alamos will be described. One of the pricipal obstacles to practical quantum computation is the inevitable loss of quantum coherence of the complex quantum states involved. The results of a theoretical analysis showing that quantum factoring of small integers should be possible with trapped ions will be presented. The prospects for larger-scale computations will be discussed.

  17. Blueprint for a microwave trapped ion quantum computer

    PubMed Central

    Lekitsch, Bjoern; Weidt, Sebastian; Fowler, Austin G.; Mølmer, Klaus; Devitt, Simon J.; Wunderlich, Christof; Hensinger, Winfried K.

    2017-01-01

    The availability of a universal quantum computer may have a fundamental impact on a vast number of research fields and on society as a whole. An increasingly large scientific and industrial community is working toward the realization of such a device. An arbitrarily large quantum computer may best be constructed using a modular approach. We present a blueprint for a trapped ion–based scalable quantum computer module, making it possible to create a scalable quantum computer architecture based on long-wavelength radiation quantum gates. The modules control all operations as stand-alone units, are constructed using silicon microfabrication techniques, and are within reach of current technology. To perform the required quantum computations, the modules make use of long-wavelength radiation–based quantum gate technology. To scale this microwave quantum computer architecture to a large size, we present a fully scalable design that makes use of ion transport between different modules, thereby allowing arbitrarily many modules to be connected to construct a large-scale device. A high error–threshold surface error correction code can be implemented in the proposed architecture to execute fault-tolerant operations. With appropriate adjustments, the proposed modules are also suitable for alternative trapped ion quantum computer architectures, such as schemes using photonic interconnects. PMID:28164154

  18. Collisions of FeO(+) with H2 and He in a Cryogenic Ion Trap.

    PubMed

    Gerlich, Dieter; Jašík, Juraj; Andris, Erik; Navrátil, Rafael; Roithová, Jana

    2016-11-18

    The nominal temperature range of cryogenic radio-frequency ion traps has recently been extended down to T=2.3 K. Whereas in situ He tagging of mass-selected ions embedded in dense helium buffer gas is becoming common for recording IR spectra through photofragmentation of small and large ions, much less activity is devoted to the field of cold chemistry, which in this contribution means the two orders of magnitude extending from 300 to below 3 K. The importance of this temperature range for understanding the dynamics of bi- and termolecular reactions is illustrated with new results for the time-honored reaction of FeO(+) with H2 obtained with the cryogenic ion trap ISORI in Prague. The rate coefficient for forming Fe(+) +H2 O increases steeply with decreasing temperature. In addition more product channels open up, such as the stabilized reaction-intermediate complexes H2 FeO(+) and Hen -FeO(+) formed by ternary association with He. For the FeOH(+) +H channel only a minor signal is observed. The rate coefficients provide deep insight into lifetimes, bottlenecks, and barriers impeding almost completely the exothermic, but spin-forbidden, reaction at room temperature. For some of the He-tagged ions, IR predissociation spectra are recorded. A breakthrough is obtaining the first spectrum of [(H2 )FeO](+) , synthesized and tagged in situ with He. These results pave the way to study the structures of reaction intermediates stabilized in the gas phase by means of collisions with helium.

  19. Gated Trapped Ion Mobility Spectrometry Coupled to Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ridgeway, Mark E; Wolff, Jeremy J; Silveira, Joshua A; Lin, Cheng; Costello, Catherine E; Park, Melvin A

    2016-09-01

    Analysis of molecules by ion mobility spectrometry coupled with mass spectrometry (IMS-MS) provides chemical information on the three dimensional structure and mass of the molecules. The coupling of ion mobility to trapping mass spectrometers has historically been challenging due to the large differences in analysis time between the two devices. In this paper we present a modification of the trapped ion mobility (TIMS) analysis scheme termed "Gated TIMS" that allows efficient coupling to a Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance (FT-ICR) analyzer. Analyses of standard compounds and the influence of source conditions on the TIMS distributions produced by ion mobility spectra of labile ubiquitin protein ions are presented. Ion mobility resolving powers up to 100 are observed. Measured collisional cross sections of ubiquitin ions are in excellent qualitative and quantitative agreement to previous measurements. Gated TIMS FT-ICR produces results comparable to those acquired using TIMS/time-of-flight MS instrument platforms as well as numerous drift tube IMS-MS studies published in the literature.

  20. Wavelength-scale imaging of trapped ions using a phase Fresnel lens.

    PubMed

    Jechow, A; Streed, E W; Norton, B G; Petrasiunas, M J; Kielpinski, D

    2011-04-15

    A microfabricated phase Fresnel lens was used to image ytterbium ions trapped in a radio frequency Paul trap. The ions were laser cooled close to the Doppler limit on the 369.5 nm transition, reducing the ion motion so that each ion formed a near point source. By detecting the ion fluorescence on the same transition, near-diffraction-limited imaging with spot sizes of below 440 nm (FWHM) was achieved. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of wavelength-scale imaging of trapped ions and the highest imaging resolution ever achieved with atoms in free space.

  1. Multi-element logic gates for trapped-ion qubits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, T. R.; Gaebler, J. P.; Lin, Y.; Wan, Y.; Bowler, R.; Leibfried, D.; Wineland, D. J.

    2015-12-01

    Precision control over hybrid physical systems at the quantum level is important for the realization of many quantum-based technologies. In the field of quantum information processing (QIP) and quantum networking, various proposals discuss the possibility of hybrid architectures where specific tasks are delegated to the most suitable subsystem. For example, in quantum networks, it may be advantageous to transfer information from a subsystem that has good memory properties to another subsystem that is more efficient at transporting information between nodes in the network. For trapped ions, a hybrid system formed of different species introduces extra degrees of freedom that can be exploited to expand and refine the control of the system. Ions of different elements have previously been used in QIP experiments for sympathetic cooling, creation of entanglement through dissipation, and quantum non-demolition measurement of one species with another. Here we demonstrate an entangling quantum gate between ions of different elements which can serve as an important building block of QIP, quantum networking, precision spectroscopy, metrology, and quantum simulation. A geometric phase gate between a 9Be+ ion and a 25Mg+ ion is realized through an effective spin-spin interaction generated by state-dependent forces induced with laser beams. Combined with single-qubit gates and same-species entangling gates, this mixed-element entangling gate provides a complete set of gates over such a hybrid system for universal QIP. Using a sequence of such gates, we demonstrate a CNOT (controlled-NOT) gate and a SWAP gate. We further demonstrate the robustness of these gates against thermal excitation and show improved detection in quantum logic spectroscopy. We also observe a strong violation of a CHSH (Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt)-type Bell inequality on entangled states composed of different ion species.

  2. Integrated fiber-mirror ion trap for strong ion-cavity coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Brandstätter, B. Schüppert, K.; Casabone, B.; Friebe, K.; Stute, A.; Northup, T. E.; McClung, A.; Schmidt, P. O.; Deutsch, C.; Reichel, J.

    2013-12-15

    We present and characterize fiber mirrors and a miniaturized ion-trap design developed to integrate a fiber-based Fabry-Perot cavity (FFPC) with a linear Paul trap for use in cavity-QED experiments with trapped ions. Our fiber-mirror fabrication process not only enables the construction of FFPCs with small mode volumes, but also allows us to minimize the influence of the dielectric fiber mirrors on the trapped-ion pseudopotential. We discuss the effect of clipping losses for long FFPCs and the effect of angular and lateral displacements on the coupling efficiencies between cavity and fiber. Optical profilometry allows us to determine the radii of curvature and ellipticities of the fiber mirrors. From finesse measurements, we infer a single-atom cooperativity of up to 12 for FFPCs longer than 200 μm in length; comparison to cavities constructed with reference substrate mirrors produced in the same coating run indicates that our FFPCs have similar scattering losses. We characterize the birefringence of our fiber mirrors, finding that careful fiber-mirror selection enables us to construct FFPCs with degenerate polarization modes. As FFPCs are novel devices, we describe procedures developed for handling, aligning, and cleaning them. We discuss experiments to anneal fiber mirrors and explore the influence of the atmosphere under which annealing occurs on coating losses, finding that annealing under vacuum increases the losses for our reference substrate mirrors. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements indicate that these losses may be attributable to oxygen depletion in the mirror coating. Special design considerations enable us to introduce a FFPC into a trapped ion setup. Our unique linear Paul trap design provides clearance for such a cavity and is miniaturized to shield trapped ions from the dielectric fiber mirrors. We numerically calculate the trap potential in the absence of fibers. In the experiment additional electrodes can be used to compensate

  3. Integrated fiber-mirror ion trap for strong ion-cavity coupling.

    PubMed

    Brandstätter, B; McClung, A; Schüppert, K; Casabone, B; Friebe, K; Stute, A; Schmidt, P O; Deutsch, C; Reichel, J; Blatt, R; Northup, T E

    2013-12-01

    We present and characterize fiber mirrors and a miniaturized ion-trap design developed to integrate a fiber-based Fabry-Perot cavity (FFPC) with a linear Paul trap for use in cavity-QED experiments with trapped ions. Our fiber-mirror fabrication process not only enables the construction of FFPCs with small mode volumes, but also allows us to minimize the influence of the dielectric fiber mirrors on the trapped-ion pseudopotential. We discuss the effect of clipping losses for long FFPCs and the effect of angular and lateral displacements on the coupling efficiencies between cavity and fiber. Optical profilometry allows us to determine the radii of curvature and ellipticities of the fiber mirrors. From finesse measurements, we infer a single-atom cooperativity of up to 12 for FFPCs longer than 200 μm in length; comparison to cavities constructed with reference substrate mirrors produced in the same coating run indicates that our FFPCs have similar scattering losses. We characterize the birefringence of our fiber mirrors, finding that careful fiber-mirror selection enables us to construct FFPCs with degenerate polarization modes. As FFPCs are novel devices, we describe procedures developed for handling, aligning, and cleaning them. We discuss experiments to anneal fiber mirrors and explore the influence of the atmosphere under which annealing occurs on coating losses, finding that annealing under vacuum increases the losses for our reference substrate mirrors. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements indicate that these losses may be attributable to oxygen depletion in the mirror coating. Special design considerations enable us to introduce a FFPC into a trapped ion setup. Our unique linear Paul trap design provides clearance for such a cavity and is miniaturized to shield trapped ions from the dielectric fiber mirrors. We numerically calculate the trap potential in the absence of fibers. In the experiment additional electrodes can be used to compensate

  4. Cycle Time Reduction in Trapped Mercury Ion Atomic Frequency Standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burt, Eric A.; Tjoelker, Robert L.; Taghavi, Shervin

    2011-01-01

    The use of the mercury ion isotope (201)Hg(+) was examined for an atomic clock. Taking advantage of the faster optical pumping time in (201)Hg(+) reduces both the state preparation and the state readout times, thereby decreasing the overall cycle time of the clock and reducing the impact of medium-term LO noise on the performance of the frequency standard. The spectral overlap between the plasma discharge lamp used for (201)Hg(+) state preparation and readout is much larger than that of the lamp used for the more conventional (199)Hg(+). There has been little study of (201)Hg(+) for clock applications (in fact, all trapped ion clock work in mercury has been with (199)Hg(+); however, recently the optical pumping time in (201)Hg(+) has been measured and found to be 0.45 second, or about three times faster than in (199)Hg(+) due largely to the better spectral overlap. This can be used to reduce the overall clock cycle time by over 2 seconds, or up to a factor of 2 improvement. The use of the (201)Hg(+) for an atomic clock is totally new. Most attempts to reduce the impact of LO noise have focused on reducing the interrogation time. In the trapped ion frequency standards built so far at JPL, the optical pumping time is already at its minimum so that no enhancement can be had by shortening it. However, by using (201)Hg(+), this is no longer the case. Furthermore, integrity monitoring, the mechanism that determines whether the clock is functioning normally, cannot happen faster than the clock cycle time. Therefore, a shorter cycle time will enable quicker detection of failure modes and recovery from them.

  5. 10 K Ring Electrode Trap - Tandem Mass Spectrometer for Infrared Spectroscopy of Mass Selected Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Goebbert, Daniel J.; Meijer, Gerard; Asmis, Knut R.

    2009-03-17

    A novel instrumental setup for measuring infrared photodissociation spectra of buffer gas cooled, mass-selected ions is described and tested. It combines a cryogenically cooled, linear radio frequency ion trap with a tandem mass spectrometer, optimally coupling continuous ion sources to pulsed laser experiments. The use of six independently adjustable DC potentials superimposed over the trapping radio frequency field provides control over the ion distribution within, as well as the kinetic energy distribution of the ions extracted from the ion trap. The scheme allows focusing the ions in space and time, such that they can be optimally irradiated by a pulsed, widely tunable infrared photodissociation laser. Ion intensities are monitored with a time-of-flight mass spectrometer mounted orthogonally to the ion trap axis.

  6. Adsorption of ions onto nanosolids dispersed in liquid crystals: Towards understanding the ion trapping effect in nanocolloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garbovskiy, Yuriy

    2016-05-01

    The ion capturing effect in liquid crystal nanocolloids was quantified by means of the ion trapping coefficient. The dependence of the ion trapping coefficient on the concentration of nano-dopants and their ionic purity was calculated for a variety of nanosolids dispersed in liquid crystals: carbon nanotubes, graphene nano-flakes, diamond nanoparticles, anatase nanoparticles, and ferroelectric nanoparticles. The proposed method perfectly fits existing experimental data and can be useful in the design of highly efficient ion capturing nanomaterials.

  7. Light shifts in a pulsed cold-atom coherent-population-trapping clock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanshan, E.; Rochester, S. M.; Donley, E. A.; Kitching, J.

    2015-04-01

    Field-grade atomic clocks capable of primary standard performance in compact physics packages would be of significant value in applications ranging from network synchronization to inertial navigation. A coherent-population-trapping clock featuring laser-cooled 87Rb atoms and pulsed Ramsey interrogation is a strong candidate for this technology if the frequency biases can be minimized and controlled. Here we characterize the light shift in a cold-atom coherent-population-trapping clock, explaining observed shifts in terms of phase shifts that arise during the formation of dark-state coherences combined with optical-pumping effects caused by unwanted incoherent light in the interrogation spectrum. Measurements are compared with existing and new theoretical treatments, and a laser configuration is identified that would reduce clock frequency uncertainty from light shifts to a fractional frequency level of Δ ν /ν =4 ×10-14 per 100 kHz of laser frequency uncertainty.

  8. Fundamentals of Trapped Ion Mobility Spectrometry Part II: Fluid Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Silveira, Joshua A; Michelmann, Karsten; Ridgeway, Mark E; Park, Melvin A

    2016-04-01

    Trapped ion mobility spectrometry (TIMS) is a new high resolution (R up to ~300) separation technique that utilizes an electric field to hold ions stationary against a moving gas. Recently, an analytical model for TIMS was derived and, in part, experimentally verified. A central, but not yet fully explored, component of the model involves the fluid dynamics at work. The present study characterizes the fluid dynamics in TIMS using simulations and ion mobility experiments. Results indicate that subsonic laminar flow develops in the analyzer, with pressure-dependent gas velocities between ~120 and 170 m/s measured at the position of ion elution. One of the key philosophical questions addressed is: how can mobility be measured in a dynamic system wherein the gas is expanding and its velocity is changing? We noted previously that the analytically useful work is primarily done on ions as they traverse the electric field gradient plateau in the analyzer. In the present work, we show that the position-dependent change in gas velocity on the plateau is balanced by a change in pressure and temperature, ultimately resulting in near position-independent drag force. That the drag force, and related variables, are nearly constant allows for the use of relatively simple equations to describe TIMS behavior. Nonetheless, we derive a more comprehensive model, which accounts for the spatial dependence of the flow variables. Experimental resolving power trends were found to be in close agreement with the theoretical dependence of the drag force, thus validating another principal component of TIMS theory.

  9. Fundamentals of Trapped Ion Mobility Spectrometry Part II: Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silveira, Joshua A.; Michelmann, Karsten; Ridgeway, Mark E.; Park, Melvin A.

    2016-04-01

    Trapped ion mobility spectrometry (TIMS) is a new high resolution (R up to ~300) separation technique that utilizes an electric field to hold ions stationary against a moving gas. Recently, an analytical model for TIMS was derived and, in part, experimentally verified. A central, but not yet fully explored, component of the model involves the fluid dynamics at work. The present study characterizes the fluid dynamics in TIMS using simulations and ion mobility experiments. Results indicate that subsonic laminar flow develops in the analyzer, with pressure-dependent gas velocities between ~120 and 170 m/s measured at the position of ion elution. One of the key philosophical questions addressed is: how can mobility be measured in a dynamic system wherein the gas is expanding and its velocity is changing? We noted previously that the analytically useful work is primarily done on ions as they traverse the electric field gradient plateau in the analyzer. In the present work, we show that the position-dependent change in gas velocity on the plateau is balanced by a change in pressure and temperature, ultimately resulting in near position-independent drag force. That the drag force, and related variables, are nearly constant allows for the use of relatively simple equations to describe TIMS behavior. Nonetheless, we derive a more comprehensive model, which accounts for the spatial dependence of the flow variables. Experimental resolving power trends were found to be in close agreement with the theoretical dependence of the drag force, thus validating another principal component of TIMS theory.

  10. Measuring and manipulating the temperature of cold molecules trapped on a chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marx, S.; Adu Smith, D.; Insero, G.; Meek, S. A.; Sartakov, B. G.; Meijer, G.; Santambrogio, G.

    2015-12-01

    Following Marx et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 243007 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.111.243007], we discuss the measurement and manipulation of the temperature of cold CO molecules in a microchip environment. In particular, we present a model to explain the observed and calculated velocity distributions. We also show that a translational temperature can be extracted directly from the measurements. Finally, we discuss the conditions needed for an effective adiabatic cooling of the molecular ensemble trapped on the microchip.

  11. High-precision force sensing using a single trapped ion

    PubMed Central

    Ivanov, Peter A.; Vitanov, Nikolay V.; Singer, Kilian

    2016-01-01

    We introduce quantum sensing schemes for measuring very weak forces with a single trapped ion. They use the spin-motional coupling induced by the laser-ion interaction to transfer the relevant force information to the spin-degree of freedom. Therefore, the force estimation is carried out simply by observing the Ramsey-type oscillations of the ion spin states. Three quantum probes are considered, which are represented by systems obeying the Jaynes-Cummings, quantum Rabi (in 1D) and Jahn-Teller (in 2D) models. By using dynamical decoupling schemes in the Jaynes-Cummings and Jahn-Teller models, our force sensing protocols can be made robust to the spin dephasing caused by the thermal and magnetic field fluctuations. In the quantum-Rabi probe, the residual spin-phonon coupling vanishes, which makes this sensing protocol naturally robust to thermally-induced spin dephasing. We show that the proposed techniques can be used to sense the axial and transverse components of the force with a sensitivity beyond the range, i.e. in the (xennonewton, 10−27). The Jahn-Teller protocol, in particular, can be used to implement a two-channel vector spectrum analyzer for measuring ultra-low voltages. PMID:27306426

  12. Three-scale structure of diffusion region in the presence of cold ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Divin, A.; Khotyaintsev, Yu. V.; Vaivads, A.; André, M.; Toledo-Redondo, S.; Markidis, S.; Lapenta, G.

    2016-12-01

    Kinetic simulations and spacecraft observations typically display the two-scale structure of collisionless diffusion region (DR), with electron and ion demagnetization scales governing the spatial extent of the DR. Recent in situ observations of the nightside magnetosphere, as well as investigation of magnetic reconnection events at the Earth's magnetopause, discovered the presence of a population of cold (tens of eV) ions of ionospheric origin. We present two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations of collisionless magnetic reconnection in multicomponent plasma with ions consisting of hot and cold populations. We show that a new cold ion diffusion region scale is introduced in between that of hot ions and electrons. Demagnetization scale of cold ion population is several times (˜4-8) larger than the initial cold ion gyroradius. Cold ions are accelerated and thermalized during magnetic reconnection and form ion beams moving with velocities close to the Alfvén velocity.

  13. Conformation-specific spectroscopy of peptide fragment ions in a low-temperature ion trap.

    PubMed

    Wassermann, Tobias N; Boyarkin, Oleg V; Paizs, Béla; Rizzo, Thomas R

    2012-06-01

    We have applied conformer-selective infrared-ultraviolet (IR-UV) double-resonance photofragment spectroscopy at low temperatures in an ion trap mass spectrometer for the spectroscopic characterization of peptide fragment ions. We investigate b- and a-type ions formed by collision-induced dissociation from protonated leucine-enkephalin. The vibrational analysis and assignment are supported by nitrogen-15 isotopic substitution of individual amino acid residues and assisted by density functional theory calculations. Under such conditions, b-type ions of different size are found to appear exclusively as linear oxazolone structures with protonation on the N-terminus, while a rearrangement reaction is confirmed for the a (4) ion in which the side chain of the C-terminal phenylalanine residue is transferred to the N-terminal side of the molecule. The vibrational spectra that we present here provide a particularly stringent test for theoretical approaches.

  14. Plug-and-Play Planar Ion Traps for Scalable Quantum Computation and Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amini, Jason; Denison, Douglas; Doret, S. Charles; Faircloth, Daniel; Hayden, Harley; Killian, Tyler; Landgren, David; Martin, Kevin; Merrill, True; Ozakin, Arkadas; Pai, C. S.; Shaikh, Fayaz; Shappert, Chris; Volin, Curtis; Wright, Ken; Harter, Alexa; Slusher, Richart

    2011-05-01

    At the heart of most ion-based quantum information processing and simulation efforts is an RF-Paul trap to confine the ion qubits. Cutting edge experiments are transitioning from a few qubits to a few tens of qubits with many more qubits envisioned for the future. The underlying ion traps need to both grow with the experiments and provide additional features that can simplify and extend these experiments. The Georgia Tech Research Institute (GTRI) is developing modeling and fabrication processes for these new generations of ion traps using silicon VLSI technology in surface- electrode geometries. Verified by detailed in-house trap characterization, GTRI has fabricated traps that approach the plug- and-play ideal and demonstrate reliable ion loading and transport, long dark lifetimes, and stable ion chains. Additional features are in development including junctions, integrated GHz range current guides for global qubit rotations, and micromirrors for light collection.

  15. Precise determination of micromotion for trapped-ion optical clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, J.; Partner, H. L.; Burgermeister, T.; Mehlstäubler, T. E.

    2015-09-01

    As relative systematic frequency uncertainties in trapped-ion spectroscopy are approaching the low 10-18 range, motional frequency shifts account for a considerable fraction of the uncertainty budget. Micromotion, a driven motion fundamentally connected to the principle of the Paul trap, is a particular concern in these systems. In this article, we experimentally investigate at this level three common methods for minimizing and determining the micromotion amplitude. We develop a generalized model for a quantitative application of the photon-correlation technique, which is applicable in the commonly encountered regime where the transition linewidth is comparable to the rf drive frequency. We show that a fractional frequency uncertainty due to the 2nd-order Doppler shift below |Δν/ν|=1 ×10-20 can be achieved. The quantitative evaluation is verified in an interleaved measurement with the conceptually simpler resolved sideband method. If not performed deep within the Lamb-Dicke regime, a temperature-dependent offset at the level of 10-19 is observed in resolved sideband measurements due to sampling of intrinsic micromotion. By direct comparison with photon-correlation measurements, we show that the simple to implement parametric heating method is sensitive to micromotion at the level of |Δν/ν|=1 ×10-20 as well.

  16. Beta-delayed neutron spectroscopy using ion traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Barbara; Czeszumska, A.; Siegl, K.; Caldwell, S.; Aprahamian, A.; Burkey, M.; Clark, J.; Levand, A.; Marley, S.; Morgan, G.; Norman, E.; Nystrom, A.; Orford, R.; Padgett, S.; Perez Galvan, A.; Savard, G.; Scielzo, N.; Sharma, K.; Strauss, S.

    2017-01-01

    Trapped radioactive ions suspended in vacuum allow for a new way to perform beta-delayed neutron spectroscopy. Decay branching ratios and energy spectra of the emitted neutrons are inferred from a measurement of the nuclear recoil, thereby circumventing the many limitations associated with direct neutron detection. Beta-delayed neutron measurements were carried out for 137-138,140I, 134-136Sb, and 144-145Cs at the Californium Rare Isotope Breeder Upgrade (CARIBU) facility at Argonne National Laboratory. The data collected are needed in many fields of basic and applied science such as nuclear energy, nuclear astrophysics, and stockpile stewardship. Results for the isotopes 135-136Sb and 140I will be presented. Supported by NSF under PHY-1419765, and U.S. DOE under NEUP 13-5485, DE-AC02-06CH11357 (ANL), DE-AC52-07NA27344 (LLNL), and DE-NA0000979 (NNSA).

  17. Analogue of Cosmological Particle Creation in an Ion Trap

    SciTech Connect

    Schuetzhold, Ralf; Uhlmann, Michael; Petersen, Lutz; Schmitz, Hector; Friedenauer, Axel; Schaetz, Tobias

    2007-11-16

    We study phonons in a dynamical chain of ions confined by a trap with a time-dependent (axial) potential strength and demonstrate that they behave in the same way as quantum fields in an expanding or contracting Universe. Based on this analogy, we present a scheme for the detection of the analogue of cosmological particle creation which should be feasible with present day technology. In order to test the quantum nature of the particle creation mechanism and to distinguish it from classical effects such as heating, we propose to measure the two-phonon amplitude via the 2nd red sideband transition and to compare it with the one-phonon amplitude (1st red sideband)

  18. Beta-delayed neutron spectroscopy using ion traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Barbara; Czeszumska, A.; Siegl, K.; Caldwell, S.; Aprahamian, A.; Burkey, M.; Clark, J.; Levand, A.; Marley, S.; Morgan, G.; Norman, E.; Nystrom, A.; Orford, R.; Padgett, S.; Perez Galvan, A.; Savard, G.; Scielzo, N.; Sharma, K.; Strauss, S.

    2016-09-01

    Trapped radioactive ions suspended in vacuum allow for a new way to perform beta-delayed neutron spectroscopy. Decay branching ratios and energy spectra of the emitted neutrons are inferred from a measurement of the nuclear recoil, thereby circumventing the many limitations associated with direct neutron detection. Beta-delayed neutron measurements were carried out for 137 - 138 , 140I, 134-136Sb, and 144-145Cs at the Californium Rare Isotope Breeder Upgrade (CARIBU) facility at Argonne National Laboratory. The data collected are needed in many fields of basic and applied science such as nuclear energy, nuclear astrophysics, and stockpile stewardship. Results for the isotopes 135-136Sb and 140I will be presented. Supported by NSF under PHY-1419765, U.S. DOE under NEUP 13-5485, DE-AC02-06CH11357 (ANL), DE-AC52-07NA27344 (LLNL), and DE-NA0000979 (NNSA).

  19. Limiting temperature of sympathetically cooled ions in a radio-frequency trap

    SciTech Connect

    Hasegawa, Taro; Shimizu, Tadao

    2003-01-01

    The limiting temperature achieved by sympathetic cooling in an rf trap is calculated with a theoretical model in which no fitting parameters are used. The calculated result agrees well with observation. The dependence of the temperature on trapping parameters and ion mass is also analyzed. The results can be used for designing an rf trap system.

  20. UV photodissociation of trapped ions following ion mobility separation in a Q-ToF mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Bellina, Bruno; Brown, Jeffery M; Ujma, Jakub; Murray, Paul; Giles, Kevin; Morris, Michael; Compagnon, Isabelle; Barran, Perdita E

    2014-12-21

    An ion mobility mass spectrometer has been modified to allow optical interrogation of ions with different mass-to-charge (m/z) ratios and/or mobilities (K). An ion gating and trapping procedure has been developed which allows us to store ions for several seconds enabling UV photodissociation (UVPD).

  1. 'Programming' Electron Beam Ion Traps To Produce Atomic Data Relevant To Plasma Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Currell, Fred; O'Rourke, Brian; Kavanagh, Anthony; Li Yueming; Nakamura, Nobuyuki; Ohtani, Shunsuke; Watanabe, Hirofumi

    2009-09-10

    After a brief review of the processes taking place in electron beam ions traps (EBITs), the means by which EBITs are used to make measurements of electron impact ionization cross-sections and dielectronic recombination resonance strengths are discussed. In particular, results from a study involving holmium ions extracted from an electron beam ion trap are used to illustrate a technique for studying dielectronic recombination in open-shell target ions.

  2. Effect of ion-neutral collision mechanism on the trapped-ion equation of motion: a new mass spectral line shape for high-mass trapped ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Shenheng; Li, Guo-Zhong; Marshall, Alan G.

    1997-11-01

    The decay amplitude envelope of an ICR time-domain signal determines its corresponding Fourier transform mass spectral line shape. The commonly accepted FT-ICR frequency-domain unapodized Lorentzian spectral line shape originates from the Langevin ion-neutral collision model, in which an ion is treated as a point charge that induces an electric dipole moment in a neutral collision partner. The Langevin model provides a good description of reactions of low-energy collisions of low-mass positive ions with neutrals. However, the Langevin model is inappropriate for collisions of high-mass gas-phase biopolymer ions with low-mass neutrals. Here, we examine ion trajectories for both Langevin and hard-sphere ion-neutral collision models. For the Langevin model, collision frequency is independent of ion speed, leading to a linear differential equation of ion motion with a frictional damping term linearly proportional to ion velocity. For the hard-sphere model, collision frequency is proportional to ion speed and the frictional damping term is proportional to the square of ion velocity. We show that the resulting (non-linear) equation of ion motion leads to a non-exponential time-domain ICR signal whose amplitude envelope has the form, 1/(1 + [sigma]t), in which [sigma] is a constant. Dispersion-vs-absorption (DISPA) line shape analysis reveals that the `hard-sphere' spectral line shape resembles that of overlaid narrow and broad Lorentzians. We discuss several important implications of the new `hard-sphere' line shape for ICR spectral analysis, ICR signal processing, collision-based ion activation, and ion axialization. Finally, in the hard-sphere limit, a non-linear frictional damping term will also apply to ions in a Paul trap.

  3. Spin-Orbit Interactions and Quantum Spin Dynamics in Cold Ion-Atom Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tscherbul, Timur V.; Brumer, Paul; Buchachenko, Alexei A.

    2016-09-01

    We present accurate ab initio and quantum scattering calculations on a prototypical hybrid ion-atom system Yb+ -Rb, recently suggested as a promising candidate for the experimental study of open quantum systems, quantum information processing, and quantum simulation. We identify the second-order spin-orbit (SO) interaction as the dominant source of hyperfine relaxation in cold Yb+ -Rb collisions. Our results are in good agreement with recent experimental observations [L. Ratschbacher et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 160402 (2013)] of hyperfine relaxation rates of trapped Yb+ immersed in an ultracold Rb gas. The calculated rates are 4 times smaller than is predicted by the Langevin capture theory and display a weak T-0.3 temperature dependence, indicating significant deviations from statistical behavior. Our analysis underscores the deleterious nature of the SO interaction and implies that light ion-atom combinations such as Yb+ -Li should be used to minimize hyperfine relaxation and decoherence of trapped ions in ultracold atomic gases.

  4. Surface-electrode trap with an integrated permanent magnet for generating a magnetic-field gradient at trapped ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawai, Yuji; Shimizu, Kenji; Noguchi, Atsushi; Urabe, Shinji; Tanaka, Utako

    2017-01-01

    We report on a surface-electrode trap with SmCo magnets arranged in a quadrupole configuration underneath the trap electrode. Because the distance between the magnets and the trapped ions can be as little as several hundred micrometers, a large magnetic field is produced without any heat management. The magnetic-field gradient was measured using the Zeeman splitting of a single trapped 40Ca+ ion at several positions, and a field gradient of 36 T m-1 was obtained. Such a field gradient is useful for the generation of a state-dependent force, which is important for quantum simulation and/or quantum gate operation using radio-frequency or microwave radiation.

  5. EBIT in the Magnetic Trapping Mode: Mass Spectrometry, Atomic Lifetime Measurements, and Charge Transfer Reactions of Highly Charged Atomic Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Schweikhard, L; Beiersdorfer, P; Trabert, E

    2001-07-10

    Although it may sound like a contradiction in terms, the electron beam ion trap (EBIT) works as an ion trap even when the electron beam is switched off. We present various experiments that exploit the ''magnetic trapping mode'' for investigations of ion confinement, charge exchange processes, atomic lifetime and ion mass measurements.

  6. Extending the Dynamic Range of the Ion Trap by Differential Mobility Filtration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Adam B.; Coy, Stephen L.; Kafle, Amol; Glick, James; Nazarov, Erkinjon; Vouros, Paul

    2013-09-01

    A miniature, planar, differential ion mobility spectrometer (DMS) was interfaced to an LCQ classic ion trap to conduct selective ion filtration prior to mass analysis in order to extend the dynamic range of the trap. Space charge effects are known to limit the functional ion storage capacity of ion trap mass analyzers and this, in turn, can affect the quality of the mass spectral data generated. This problem is further exacerbated in the analysis of mixtures where the indiscriminate introduction of matrix ions results in premature trap saturation with non-targeted species, thereby reducing the number of parent ions that may be used to conduct MS/MS experiments for quantitation or other diagnostic studies. We show that conducting differential mobility-based separations prior to mass analysis allows the isolation of targeted analytes from electrosprayed mixtures preventing the indiscriminate introduction of matrix ions and premature trap saturation with analytically unrelated species. Coupling these two analytical techniques is shown to enhance the detection of a targeted drug metabolite from a biological matrix. In its capacity as a selective ion filter, the DMS can improve the analytical performance of analyzers such as quadrupole (3D or linear) and ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) ion traps that depend on ion accumulation.

  7. Extending the dynamic range of the ion trap by differential mobility filtration.

    PubMed

    Hall, Adam B; Coy, Stephen L; Kafle, Amol; Glick, James; Nazarov, Erkinjon; Vouros, Paul

    2013-09-01

    A miniature, planar, differential ion mobility spectrometer (DMS) was interfaced to an LCQ classic ion trap to conduct selective ion filtration prior to mass analysis in order to extend the dynamic range of the trap. Space charge effects are known to limit the functional ion storage capacity of ion trap mass analyzers and this, in turn, can affect the quality of the mass spectral data generated. This problem is further exacerbated in the analysis of mixtures where the indiscriminate introduction of matrix ions results in premature trap saturation with non-targeted species, thereby reducing the number of parent ions that may be used to conduct MS/MS experiments for quantitation or other diagnostic studies. We show that conducting differential mobility-based separations prior to mass analysis allows the isolation of targeted analytes from electrosprayed mixtures preventing the indiscriminate introduction of matrix ions and premature trap saturation with analytically unrelated species. Coupling these two analytical techniques is shown to enhance the detection of a targeted drug metabolite from a biological matrix. In its capacity as a selective ion filter, the DMS can improve the analytical performance of analyzers such as quadrupole (3D or linear) and ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) ion traps that depend on ion accumulation.

  8. Extending the Dynamic Range of the Ion Trap by Differential Mobility Filtration

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Adam B.; Coy, Stephen L.; Kafle, Amol; Glick, James; Nazarov, Erkinjon

    2013-01-01

    A miniature, planar, differential ion mobility spectrometer (DMS) was interfaced to an LCQ classic ion trap to conduct selective ion filtration prior to mass analysis in order to extend the dynamic range of the trap. Space charge effects are known to limit the functional ion storage capacity of ion trap mass analyzers and this, in turn, can affect the quality of the mass spectral data generated. This problem is further exacerbated in the analysis of mixtures where the indiscriminate introduction of matrix ions results in premature trap saturation with non-targeted species, thereby reducing the number of parent ions that may be used to conduct MS/MS experiments for quantitation or other diagnostic studies. We show that conducting differential mobility-based separations prior to mass analysis allows the isolation of targeted analytes from electrosprayed mixtures preventing the indiscriminate introduction of matrix ions and premature trap saturation with analytically unrelated species. Coupling these two analytical techniques is shown to enhance the detection of a targeted drug metabolite from a biological matrix. In its capacity as a selective ion filter, the DMS can improve the analytical performance of analyzers such as quadrupole (3-D or linear) and ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) ion traps that depend on ion accumulation. PMID:23797861

  9. Single-qubit-gate error below 10{sup -4} in a trapped ion

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, K. R.; Wilson, A. C.; Colombe, Y.; Ospelkaus, C.; Meier, A. M.; Knill, E.; Leibfried, D.; Wineland, D. J.

    2011-09-15

    With a {sup 9}Be{sup +} trapped-ion hyperfine-state qubit, we demonstrate an error probability per randomized single-qubit gate of 2.0(2)x10{sup -5}, below the threshold estimate of 10{sup -4} commonly considered sufficient for fault-tolerant quantum computing. The {sup 9}Be{sup +} ion is trapped above a microfabricated surface-electrode ion trap and is manipulated with microwaves applied to a trap electrode. The achievement of low single-qubit-gate errors is an essential step toward the construction of a scalable quantum computer.

  10. Ion Trap Electric Field Characterization Using Slab Coupled Optical Fiber Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chadderdon, Spencer; Shumway, LeGrand; Powell, Andrew; Li, Ailin; Austin, Daniel E.; Hawkins, Aaron R.; Selfridge, Richard H.; Schultz, Stephen M.

    2014-09-01

    This paper presents a method for characterizing electric field profiles of radio frequency (rf) quadrupole ion trap structures using sensors based on slab coupled optical-fiber sensor (SCOS) technology. The all-dielectric and virtually optical fiber-sized SCOS fits within the compact environment required for ion traps and is able to distinguish electric field orientation and amplitude with minimal perturbation. Measurement of the fields offers insight into the functionality of traps, which may not be obtainable solely by performing simulations. The SCOS accurately mapped the well-known field profiles within a commercially available three-dimensional quadrupole ion trap (Paul trap). The results of this test allowed the SCOS to map the more complicated fields within the coaxial ion trap with a high degree of confidence as to the accuracy of the measurement. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  11. Investigation of cold rubidium Rydberg atoms in a magneto-optical trap

    SciTech Connect

    Tretyakov, D. B.; Beterov, I. I.; Entin, V. M.; Ryabtsev, I. I. Chapovsky, P. L.

    2009-03-15

    This paper reports on the results of experiments with cold rubidium Rydberg atoms in a magneto-optical trap. The specific feature of the experiments is the excitation of Rydberg atoms in a small volume within a cloud of cold atoms and the sorting of measured signals and spectra according to the number of detected Rydberg atoms. The effective lifetime of the 37P Rydberg state and its polarizability in a weak electric field are measured. The results obtained are in good agreement with theoretical calculations. It is demonstrated that the localization of the excitation volume in the vicinity of the zero-magnetic-field point makes it possible to improve the spectral resolution and to obtain narrow microwave resonances in Rydberg atoms without switching off the quadrupole magnetic field of the trap. The dependence of the amplitude of dipole-dipole interaction resonances in Rydberg atoms on the number of atoms is measured. This dependence exhibits a linear behavior and agrees with the theory for a weak dipole-dipole interaction.

  12. Inhomogeneous BCS-BEC crossover for trapped cold atoms in optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amaricci, A.; Privitera, A.; Capone, M.

    2014-05-01

    The BCS-BEC (Bose-Einstein condensation) crossover in a lattice is a powerful paradigm that describes how a superconductor deviates from the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer physics as the attractive interaction increases. Optical lattices loaded with binary mixtures of cold atoms allow one to access this phenomenon experimentally in a clean and controlled way. We show that, however, the possibility to study this phenomenon in actual cold-atoms experiments is limited by the effect of the trapping potential. Real-space dynamical mean-field theory calculations show indeed that interactions and the confining potential conspire to pack the fermions in the center of the trap, which approaches a band insulator when the attraction becomes sizeable. Interestingly, the energy gap is spatially more homogeneous than the superfluid condensate order parameter. We show how this physics reflects in several observables, and we propose an alternative strategy to disentangle the effect of the harmonic potential and measure the intrinsic properties resulting from the interaction strength.

  13. Performance Evaluation of a Dual Linear Ion Trap-Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometer for Proteomics Research

    PubMed Central

    Weisbrod, Chad R.; Hoopmann, Michael R.; Senko, Michael W.; Bruce, James E.

    2014-01-01

    A novel dual cell linear ion trap Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer (FT-ICR MS) and its performance characteristics are reported. A linear ion trap-Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer has been modified to incorporate a LTQ-Velos mass spectrometer. This modified instrument features efficient ion accumulation and fast MS/MS acquisition capabilities of dual cell linear RF ion trap instruments coupled to the high mass accuracy, resolution, and dynamic range of a FT-ICR for improved proteomic coverage. The ion accumulation efficiency is demonstrated to be an order of magnitude greater than that observed with LTQ-FT Ultra instrumentation. The proteome coverage with yeast was shown to increase over the previous instrument generation by 50% (100% increase on the peptide level). In addition, many lower abundance level yeast proteins were only detected with this modified instrument. This novel configuration also enables beam type CID fragmentation using a dual cell RF ion trap mass spectrometer. This technique involves accelerating ions between traps while applying an elevated DC offset to one of the traps to accelerate ions and induce fragmentation. This instrument design may serve as a useful option for labs currently considering purchasing new instrumentation or upgrading existing instruments. PMID:23590889

  14. X-ray spectroscopy of highly-ionized atoms in an electron beam ion trap (EBIT)

    SciTech Connect

    Marrs, R.E.; Bennett, C.; Chen, M.H.; Cowan, T.; Dietrich, D.; Henderson, J.R.; Knapp, D.A.; Levine, M.A.; Schneider, M.B.; Scofield, J.H.

    1988-01-01

    An Electron Beam Ion Trap at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is being used to produce and trap very-highly-charged-ions (q /le/ 70+) for x-ray spectroscopy measurements. Recent measurements of dielectronic recombination, electron impact excitation and transition energies are presented. 15 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Ion traps for precision experiments at rare-isotope-beam facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwiatkowski, Anna

    2016-09-01

    Ion traps first entered experimental nuclear physics when the ISOLTRAP team demonstrated Penning trap mass spectrometry of radionuclides. From then on, the demand for ion traps has grown at radioactive-ion-beam (RIB) facilities since beams can be tailored for the desired experiment. Ion traps have been deployed for beam preparation, from bunching (thereby allowing time coincidences) to beam purification. Isomerically pure beams needed for nuclear-structure investigations can be prepared for trap-assisted or in-trap decay spectroscopy. The latter permits studies of highly charged ions for stellar evolution, which would be impossible with traditional experimental nuclear-physics methods. Moreover, the textbook-like conditions and advanced ion manipulation - even of a single ion - permit high-precision experiments. Consequently, the most accurate and precise mass measurements are now performed in Penning traps. After a brief introduction to ion trapping, I will focus on examples which showcase the versatility and utility of the technique at RIB facilities. I will demonstrate how this atomic-physics technique has been integrated into nuclear science, accelerator physics, and chemistry. DOE.

  16. Cold ion demagnetization near the X-line of magnetic reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toledo-Redondo, Sergio; André, Mats; Khotyaintsev, Yuri V.; Vaivads, Andris; Walsh, Andrew; Li, Wenya; Graham, Daniel B.; Lavraud, Benoit; Masson, Arnaud; Aunai, Nicolas; Divin, Andrey; Dargent, Jeremy; Fuselier, Stephen; Gershman, Daniel J.; Dorelli, John; Giles, Barbara; Avanov, Levon; Pollock, Craig; Saito, Yoshifumi; Moore, Thomas E.; Coffey, Victoria; Chandler, Michael O.; Lindqvist, Per-Arne; Torbert, Roy; Russell, Christopher T.

    2016-07-01

    Although the effects of magnetic reconnection in magnetospheres can be observed at planetary scales, reconnection is initiated at electron scales in a plasma. Surrounding the electron diffusion region, there is an Ion-Decoupling Region (IDR) of the size of the ion length scales (inertial length and gyroradius). Reconnection at the Earth's magnetopause often includes cold magnetospheric (few tens of eV), hot magnetospheric (10 keV), and magnetosheath (1 keV) ions, with different gyroradius length scales. We report observations of a subregion inside the IDR of the size of the cold ion population gyroradius (˜15 km) where the cold ions are demagnetized and accelerated parallel to the Hall electric field. Outside the subregion, cold ions follow the E × B motion together with electrons, while hot ions are demagnetized. We observe a sharp cold ion density gradient separating the two regions, which we identify as the cold and hot IDRs.

  17. Quantum Simulation of Frustrated Magnetism with Many Trapped Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senko, Crystal

    2013-05-01

    A collection of trapped atomic ions is an excellent system for simulating quantum many-body physics, like magnetism, which may be difficult to access via classical computation or traditional condensed-matter experiments. Our large crystals of 10-20 ions comprise a platform to study a long-range quantum Ising model with tunable couplings in a 1D spin chain. State-dependent optical dipole forces exploit the Coulomb interaction to generate the spin-spin couplings, and fluorescence measurements on a camera are used to read out individual spin states. We investigated the spin order resulting from changing the range of antiferromagnetic interactions or the strength of an axial magnetic field, demonstrating our control over the amount of frustration present. We are turning to the study of dynamics in this system, with the aim of exploring topics including adiabaticity, spectroscopy of the Hamiltonian, the emergence of Kibble-Zurek-like behavior in a finite system, thermalization in an isolated quantum system, and nonequilibrium phase transitions. There is great promise in extending the system to 30+ spins, where computations become classically intractable. Co-authors are R. Islam, P. Richerme, W. C. Campbell, S. Korenblit, J. Smith, A. Lee, E. E. Edwards, C.-C. J. Wang, J. K. Freericks, and C. Monroe. This work is supported by grants from the U.S. Army Research Office with funding from the DARPA OLE program, IARPA, and the MURI program; and the NSF Physics Frontier Center at JQI.

  18. Divalent ion trapping inside potassium channels of human T lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    Using the patch-clamp whole-cell recording technique, we investigated the influence of external Ca2+, Ba2+, K+, Rb+, and internal Ca2+ on the rate of K+ channel inactivation in the human T lymphocyte-derived cell line, Jurkat E6-1. Raising external Ca2+ or Ba2+, or reducing external K+, accelerated the rate of the K+ current decay during a depolarizing voltage pulse. External Ba2+ also produced a use-dependent block of the K+ channels by entering the open channel and becoming trapped inside. Raising internal Ca2+ accelerated inactivation at lower concentrations than external Ca2+, but increasing the Ca2+ buffering with BAPTA did not affect inactivation. Raising [K+]o or adding Rb+ slowed inactivation by competing with divalent ions. External Rb+ also produced a use-dependent removal of block of K+ channels loaded with Ba2+ or Ca2+. From the removal of this block we found that under normal conditions approximately 25% of the channels were loaded with Ca2+, whereas under conditions with 10 microM internal Ca2+ the proportion of channels loaded with Ca2+ increased to approximately 50%. Removing all the divalent cations from the external and internal solution resulted in the induction of a non-selective, voltage-independent conductance. We conclude that Ca2+ ions from the outside or the inside can bind to a site at the K+ channel and thereby block the channel or accelerate inactivation. PMID:2786551

  19. Trapped-ion Lissajous trajectories by engineering Rashba- and Dresselhaus-type spin-orbit interactions in a Paul trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossetti, R. F.; de Moraes Neto, G. D.; Egues, J. Carlos; Moussa, M. H. Y.

    2016-09-01

    Here we present a protocol for generating Lissajous curves with a trapped ion by engineering Rashba- and the Dresselhaus-type spin-orbit (SO) interactions in a Paul trap. The unique anisotropic Rashba αx , αy and Dresselhaus βx , βy couplings afforded by our setup also enable us to obtain an “unusual” Zitterbewegung, i.e., the semiconductor analog of the relativistic trembling motion of electrons, with cycloidal trajectories in the absence of magnetic fields. We have also introduced bounded SO interactions, confined to an upper-bound vibrational subspace of the Fock states, as an additional mechanism to manipulate the Lissajous motion of the trapped ion. We have also accounted for dissipative effects on the vibrational degrees of freedom of the ion and find that the Lissajous trajectories are still robust and well defined for realistic parameters.

  20. Automated on-line preconcentration of trace aqueous mercury with gold trap focusing for cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Puanngam, Mahitti; Dasgupta, Purnendu K; Unob, Fuangfa

    2012-09-15

    A fully automated system for the determination of trace mercury in water by cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry (CVAAS) is reported. The system uses preconcentration on a novel sorbent followed by liberation of the mercury and focusing by a gold trap. Mercury ions were extracted from water samples by passage through a solid phase sorbent column containing 2-(3-(2-aminoethylthio)propylthio)ethanamine modified silica gel. The captured mercury is released by thiourea and then elemental Hg is liberated by sodium borohydride. The vapor phase Hg is recaptured on a gold-plated tungsten filament. This is liberated as a sharp pulse (half-width<2 s) by directly electrically heating the tungsten filament in a dry argon stream. The mercury is measured by CVAAS; no moisture removal is needed. The effects of chloride and selected interfering ions were studied. The sample loading flow rate and argon flow rates for solution purging and filament sweeping were optimized. An overall 50-fold improvement in the limit of detection was observed relative to direct measurement by CVAAS. With a relatively modest multi-user instrument we attained a limit of detection of 35 ng L(-1) with 12% RSD at 0.20 μg L(-1) Hg level. The method was successfully applied to accurately determine sub-μg L(-1) level Hg in standard reference water samples.

  1. Detection of griseofulvin in a marine strain of Penicillium waksmanii by ion trap mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Petit, K E; Mondeguer, F; Roquebert, M F; Biard, J F; Pouchus, Y F

    2004-07-01

    A marine strain of Penicillium waksmanii Zaleski was isolated from a sample of seawater from shellfish-farming area in the Loire estuary (France). The in vitro marine culture showed an important antifungal activity. Bioassay-guided fractionation was used to purify the crude extract. Dereplication by electrospray-ion trap/mass spectrometry (ESI-IT/MS) afforded the identification of the antifungal compound, after a semi-purification consisting of two stages. A comparison of the ionic composition between the active and the non-active fractions allowed the detection of a monocharged ion at m/z 353 containing a chlorine atom, which could be attributed to the antifungal griseofulvin [C17H17ClO6+H]+. Multi-stage fragmentation (MSn) confirmed the identity of the m/z 353 ion of the antifungal fraction as griseofulvin. It is the first description of griseofulvin production by a strain of P. waksmanii and the first chemical study of a strain of this species isolated from marine temperate cold water.

  2. Guidelines for Designing Surface Ion Traps Using the Boundary Element Method

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Seokjun; Lee, Minjae; Cheon, Hongjin; Kim, Taehyun; Cho, Dong-il “Dan”

    2016-01-01

    Ion traps can provide both physical implementation of quantum information processing and direct observation of quantum systems. Recently, surface ion traps have been developed using microfabrication technologies and are considered to be a promising platform for scalable quantum devices. This paper presents detailed guidelines for designing the electrodes of surface ion traps. First, we define and explain the key specifications including trap depth, q-parameter, secular frequency, and ion height. Then, we present a numerical-simulation-based design procedure, which involves determining the basic assumptions, determining the shape and size of the chip, designing the dimensions of the radio frequency (RF) electrode, and analyzing the direct current (DC) control voltages. As an example of this design procedure, we present a case study with tutorial-like explanations. The proposed design procedure can provide a practical guideline for designing the electrodes of surface ion traps. PMID:27136559

  3. Control of the conformations of ion Coulomb crystals in a Penning trap

    PubMed Central

    Mavadia, Sandeep; Goodwin, Joseph F.; Stutter, Graham; Bharadia, Shailen; Crick, Daniel R.; Segal, Daniel M.; Thompson, Richard C.

    2013-01-01

    Laser-cooled atomic ions form ordered structures in radiofrequency ion traps and in Penning traps. Here we demonstrate in a Penning trap the creation and manipulation of a wide variety of ion Coulomb crystals formed from small numbers of ions. The configuration can be changed from a linear string, through intermediate geometries, to a planar structure. The transition from a linear string to a zigzag geometry is observed for the first time in a Penning trap. The conformations of the crystals are set by the applied trap potential and the laser parameters, and agree with simulations. These simulations indicate that the rotation frequency of a small crystal is mainly determined by the laser parameters, independent of the number of ions and the axial confinement strength. This system has potential applications for quantum simulation, quantum information processing and tests of fundamental physics models from quantum field theory to cosmology. PMID:24096901

  4. A review of silicon microfabricated ion traps for quantum information processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Dong-Il "Dan"; Hong, Seokjun; Lee, Minjae; Kim, Taehyun

    2015-12-01

    Quantum information processing (QIP) has become a hot research topic as evidenced by S. Haroche and D. J. Wineland receiving the Nobel Prize in Physics in 2012. Various MEMS-based microfabrication methods will be a key enabling technology in implementing novel and scalable ion traps for QIP. This paper provides a brief introduction of ion trap devices, and reviews ion traps made using conventional precision machining as well as MEMS-based microfabrication. Then, microfabrication methods for ion traps are explained in detail. Finally, current research issues in microfabricated ion traps are presented. The QIP renders significant new challenges for MEMS, as various QIP technologies are being developed for secure encrypted communication and complex computing applications.

  5. Ion-photon entanglement and quantum frequency conversion with trapped Ba+ ions.

    PubMed

    Siverns, J D; Li, X; Quraishi, Q

    2017-01-20

    Trapped ions are excellent candidates for quantum nodes, as they possess many desirable features of a network node including long lifetimes, on-site processing capability, and production of photonic flying qubits. However, unlike classical networks in which data may be transmitted in optical fibers and where the range of communication is readily extended with amplifiers, quantum systems often emit photons that have a limited propagation range in optical fibers and, by virtue of the nature of a quantum state, cannot be noiselessly amplified. Here, we first describe a method to extract flying qubits from a Ba+ trapped ion via shelving to a long-lived, low-lying D-state with higher entanglement probabilities compared with current strong and weak excitation methods. We show a projected fidelity of ≈89% of the ion-photon entanglement. We compare several methods of ion-photon entanglement generation, and we show how the fidelity and entanglement probability varies as a function of the photon collection optic's numerical aperture. We then outline an approach for quantum frequency conversion of the photons emitted by the Ba+ ion to the telecommunication range for long-distance networking and to 780 nm for potential entanglement with rubidium-based quantum memories. Our approach is significant for extending the range of quantum networks and for the development of hybrid quantum networks compromised of different types of quantum memories.

  6. A monolithic array of three-dimensional ion traps fabricated with conventional semiconductor technology.

    PubMed

    Wilpers, Guido; See, Patrick; Gill, Patrick; Sinclair, Alastair G

    2012-09-01

    The coherent control of quantum-entangled states of trapped ions has led to significant advances in quantum information, quantum simulation, quantum metrology and laboratory tests of quantum mechanics and relativity. All of the basic requirements for processing quantum information with arrays of ion-based quantum bits (qubits) have been proven in principle. However, so far, no more than 14 ion-based qubits have been entangled with the ion-trap approach, so there is a clear need for arrays of ion traps that can handle a much larger number of qubits. Traps consisting of a two-dimensional electrode array have undergone significant development, but three-dimensional trap geometries can create a superior confining potential. However, existing three-dimensional approaches, as used in the most advanced experiments with trap arrays, cannot be scaled up to handle greatly increased numbers of ions. Here, we report a monolithic three-dimensional ion microtrap array etched from a silica-on-silicon wafer using conventional semiconductor fabrication technology. We have confined individual (88)Sr(+) ions and strings of up to 14 ions in a single segment of the array. We have measured motional frequencies, ion heating rates and storage times. Our results demonstrate that it should be possible to handle several tens of ion-based qubits with this approach.

  7. Resonant oscillation modes of sympathetically cooled ions in a radio-frequency trap

    SciTech Connect

    Hasegawa, Taro; Shimizu, Tadao

    2002-12-01

    Sympathetic cooling of Ca{sup +}, Zn{sup +}, Sr{sup +}, Ba{sup +}, and Yb{sup +} as guest ions with laser-cooled {sup 24}Mg{sup +} as host ions in a rf ion trap is carried out, and resonant frequencies of their motion in the trap potential are measured. Various oscillation modes of the sympathetically cooled ions are observed. The resonant frequency of the oscillation mode is different from the frequency of either the collective oscillation frequency of the trapped ions or the oscillation frequency of each ion without host ions. This difference is well explained by a theoretical model in which coupled equations of motion of the host ion cloud with a single guest ion are considered.

  8. Fabrication and operation of a two-dimensional ion-trap lattice on a high-voltage microchip.

    PubMed

    Sterling, R C; Rattanasonti, H; Weidt, S; Lake, K; Srinivasan, P; Webster, S C; Kraft, M; Hensinger, W K

    2014-04-04

    Microfabricated ion traps are a major advancement towards scalable quantum computing with trapped ions. The development of more versatile ion-trap designs, in which tailored arrays of ions are positioned in two dimensions above a microfabricated surface, will lead to applications in fields as varied as quantum simulation, metrology and atom-ion interactions. Current surface ion traps often have low trap depths and high heating rates, because of the size of the voltages that can be applied to them, limiting the fidelity of quantum gates. Here we report on a fabrication process that allows for the application of very high voltages to microfabricated devices in general and use this advance to fabricate a two-dimensional ion-trap lattice on a microchip. Our microfabricated architecture allows for reliable trapping of two-dimensional ion lattices, long ion lifetimes, rudimentary shuttling between lattice sites and the ability to deterministically introduce defects into the ion lattice.

  9. a Novel Method to Measure Spectra of Cold Molecular Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakrabarty, Satrajit; Holz, Mathias; Campbell, Ewen; Banerjee, Agniva; Gerlich, Dieter; Maier, John P.

    2014-06-01

    A universal method has been developed in our group for measuring the spectra of molecular ions in a 22-pole radio frequency trap at low temperatures. It is based on laser induced inhibition of complex growth (LIICG)1. At low temperatures and high number densities of buffer gas, helium attaches to ions via ternary association. The formation of these weakly bound complexes, however, is inhibited following resonant absorption of the bare molecular ion. The first successful measurements have been demonstrated on the A 2Π_u ← X ^2Σ_g^+ electronic transition of N_2^+, with some thousand N_2^+ ions, helium densities of 1015 cm-3, and storage times of 1 s. The reduction in the number of N_2+-He complexes is the result of an interplay between excitation, radiative and collisional cooling, ternary association, and collision induced dissociation, and is explained using a kinetic model. The method is also applicable to larger molecular species. In this case internal conversion following electronic excitation produces internally "hot" ions, reducing the attachment of helium. The technique is universal because complex formation can be impeded over a wide wavelength range. [1] S. Chakrbarty, M. Holz, E. K. Campbell, A. Banerjee, D. Gerlich, and J. P. Maier, J. Phys. Chem. Lett. 2013, 4, 4051.

  10. Velocity diffusion and radiation trapping force in a one-dimensional expansion of cold atomic clouds in a magneto-optical trap

    SciTech Connect

    Pradhan, S.; Mayya, Y. S.; Jagatap, B. N.

    2007-09-15

    We experimentally investigate one-dimensional (1D) expansion of a cold cloud of cesium atoms in orthogonal 2D configuration of near resonant laser beams by temporally modulating a pair of counterpropagating trapping beams of a magneto-optical trap (MOT). The cloud is observed to undergo ballistic expansion followed by superballistic explosive growth due to the fluctuations of the 2D radiation force. A model based on the theory of Brownian motion is developed and a comparison of experiments with theory is shown to provide a direct measure of the velocity diffusion coefficient. We also observe sudden contraction of the cloud immediately after switching off the pair of trapping beams, which provides direct evidence for the existence of the radiation trapping force in a MOT.

  11. Implications of surface noise for the motional coherence of trapped ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talukdar, I.; Gorman, D. J.; Daniilidis, N.; Schindler, P.; Ebadi, S.; Kaufmann, H.; Zhang, T.; Häffner, H.

    2016-04-01

    Electric noise from metallic surfaces is a major obstacle towards quantum applications with trapped ions due to motional heating of the ions. Here, we discuss how the same noise source can also lead to pure dephasing of motional quantum states. The mechanism is particularly relevant at small ion-surface distances, thus imposing a constraint on trap miniaturization. By means of a free induction decay experiment, we measure the dephasing time of the motion of a single ion trapped 50 μ m above a Cu-Al surface. From the dephasing times we extract the integrated noise below the secular frequency of the ion. We find that none of the most commonly discussed surface noise models for ion traps describes both the observed heating as well as the measured dephasing satisfactorily. Thus, our measurements provide a benchmark for future models for the electric noise emitted by metallic surfaces.

  12. Design of a Laser Ablation Ion Source for High-Precision Penning Trap Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, Curtis; Ratnayake, Ishara; Hawks, Paul; Bryce, Richard; Redshaw, Matthew

    2014-05-01

    High-precision atomic mass measurements provide important data for a wide range of fields including atomic, nuclear and neutrino physics, determination of fundamental constants, and metrology. At Central Michigan University we are building a Penning trap system that will utilize ions produced by external ion sources to allow access to a wide range of isotopes, including long-lived radioactive isotopes and isotopes with low natural abundances. The ions will be transported to a ``capture'' trap, before being transferred to double precision-measurement trap structure. In this poster we will present the design of a laser ablation ion source and the ion extraction and transport optics. We will report on the current status of the construction and operation of the ion source and the CMU Penning trap. This work supported in part by NSF award no. 1307233.

  13. Experimental progress with novel surface electrode ion trap structures for quantum information processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Craig; Blain, Matthew; Benito, Francisco; Chou, Chin-Wen; Descour, Mike; Ellis, Rob; Haltli, Ray; Heller, Edwin; Kemme, Shanalyn; Sterk, Jon; Tabakov, Boyan; Tigges, Chris; Maunz, Peter; Stick, Daniel

    2013-05-01

    Segmented surface electrode ion traps are one of the most mature platforms among candidates for scalable quantum information processing. In this poster, an overview of current results from four specific projects will be presented. Two projects involve increased light collection from trapped ion for state detection and/or remote entangling of distant ions. The first involves cavity integration into a linear surface trap, and the second, involves integration of diffractive optical elements into a linear surface trap for increased light collection. Another project involves a trap with a ring geometry which could be used to trap long chains of equally spaced ions. Finally, we report on initial testing of a trap structure with vastly improved in-plane optical access. In this structure in-plane beams can be focused to less than 8 microns while keeping a distance of at least 5 beam radii to the trap structure. Along with these projects other relevant progress from Sandia National Laboratory's ion trap group will be presented. This work was supported by Sandia's Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) and the Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity (IARPA). Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the US Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  14. Infrared ion spectroscopy in a modified quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer at the FELIX free electron laser laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martens, Jonathan; Berden, Giel; Gebhardt, Christoph R.; Oomens, Jos

    2016-10-01

    We report on modifications made to a Paul-type quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer and discuss its application in infrared ion spectroscopy experiments. Main modifications involve optical access to the trapped ions and hardware and software coupling to a variety of infrared laser sources at the FELIX infrared free electron laser laboratory. In comparison to previously described infrared ion spectroscopy experiments at the FELIX laboratory, we find significant improvements in efficiency and sensitivity. Effects of the trapping conditions of the ions on the IR multiple photon dissociation spectra are explored. Enhanced photo-dissociation is found at lower pressures in the ion trap. Spectra obtained under reduced pressure conditions are found to more closely mimic those obtained in the high-vacuum conditions of an Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer. A gas-mixing system is described enabling the controlled addition of a secondary gas into helium buffer gas flowing into the trap and allows for ion/molecule reactions in the trap. The electron transfer dissociation (ETD) option of the mass spectrometer allows for IR structure characterization of ETD-generated peptide dissociation products.

  15. Ion irradiation of graphene on Ir(111): From trapping to blistering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herbig, Charlotte; Åhlgren, E. Harriet; Valerius, Philipp; Schröder, Ulrike A.; Martínez-Galera, Antonio J.; Arman, Mohammad A.; Kotakoski, Jani; Knudsen, Jan; Krasheninnikov, Arkady V.; Michely, Thomas

    Graphene grown epitaxially on Ir(111) is irradiated with low energy noble gas ions and the processes induced by atomic collision and subsequent annealing are analyzed using scanning tunneling microscopy, low energy electron diffraction, X-ray photoelectron diffraction and thermal desorption spectroscopy. Upon room temperature ion irradiation graphene amorphizes and recovers its crystalline structure during annealing. The energetic noble gas projectiles are trapped with surprisingly high efficiency under the graphene cover up to extremely high temperatures beyond 1300K. The energy, angle, and ion species dependence of trapping are quantified. At elevated temperatures the trapped gas forms well developed and highly pressurized blisters under the graphene cover. We use molecular dynamics simulations and ab initio calculations to elucidate the trapping mechanism and its thermal robustness. Similar trapping and blistering are observed after ion irradiation of a single layer of hexagonal boron nitride on Ir(111) and we speculate on the generality of the observed phenomena.

  16. Penning traps with unitary architecture for storage of highly charged ions.

    PubMed

    Tan, Joseph N; Brewer, Samuel M; Guise, Nicholas D

    2012-02-01

    Penning traps are made extremely compact by embedding rare-earth permanent magnets in the electrode structure. Axially-oriented NdFeB magnets are used in unitary architectures that couple the electric and magnetic components into an integrated structure. We have constructed a two-magnet Penning trap with radial access to enable the use of laser or atomic beams, as well as the collection of light. An experimental apparatus equipped with ion optics is installed at the NIST electron beam ion trap (EBIT) facility, constrained to fit within 1 meter at the end of a horizontal beamline for transporting highly charged ions. Highly charged ions of neon and argon, extracted with initial energies up to 4000 eV per unit charge, are captured and stored to study the confinement properties of a one-magnet trap and a two-magnet trap. Design considerations and some test results are discussed.

  17. Extending the Ion Capacity of a Linear Ion Trap Using Nonlinear Radio Frequency Fields.

    PubMed

    Guna, Mircea

    2015-12-01

    Mass selective axial ejection (MSAE) from a low pressure linear ion trap (LIT) is investigated in the presence of added auxiliary nonlinear radio frequency (rf) fields. Nonlinear rf fields allow ions to be ejected with high sensitivity at large excitation amplitudes and reduced deleterious effects of space charge. These permit the operation of the LIT at ion populations considerably larger than the space charge limit usually observed in the absence of the nonlinear fields while maintaining good spectral resolution and mass accuracy. Experimental data show that the greater the strength of the nonlinear field, the less the effects of space charge on mass assignment and peak width. The only deleterious effect is a slight broadening of the mass spectral peaks at the highest values of added nonlinear fields used. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  18. Expansion Discharge Source for Ion Beam Laser Spectroscopy of Cold Molecular Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porambo, Michael; Pearson, Jessica; Riccardo, Craig; McCall, Benjamin J.

    2013-06-01

    Molecular ions are important in several fields of research, and spectroscopy acts as a key tool in the study of these ions. However, problems such as low ion abundance, ion-neutral confusion, and spectral congestion due to high internal temperatures can hinder effective spectroscopic studies. To circumvent these problems, we are developing a technique called Sensitive, Cooled, Resolved, Ion BEam Spectroscopy (SCRIBES). This ion beam spectrometer will feature a continuous supersonic expansion discharge source to produce cold molecular ions, electrostatic ion optics to focus the ions into an ion beam and bend the beam away from co-produced neutral molecules, an overlap region for cavity enhanced spectroscopy, and a time-of-flight mass spectrometer. When completed, SCRIBES will be an effective tool for the study of large, fluxional, and complex molecular ions that are difficult to study with other means. The ion beam spectrometer has been successfully implemented with a hot ion source. This talk will focus on the work of integrating a supersonic expansion discharge source into the instrument. To better understand how the source would work in the whole ion beam instrument, characterization studies are being performed with spectroscopy of HN_2^+ in a section of the system to ascertain the rotational temperature of the ion expansion. Attempts are also underway to measure the ion current from a beam formed from the expansion. Once the source in this environment is properly understood, we will reintegrate it to the rest of the ion beam system, completing SCRIBES. A. A. Mills, B. M. Siller, M. W. Porambo, M. Perera, H. Kreckel and B. J. McCall J. Chem. Phys., 135, 224201, (2011). K. N. Crabtree, C. A. Kauffman and B. J. McCall Rev. Sci. Instrum. 81, 086103, (2010).

  19. Calorimetric Low-Temperature Detectors for X-Ray Spectroscopy on Trapped Highly-Charged Heavy Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kilbourne, Caroline; Kraft-Bermuth, S.; Andrianov, V.; Bleile, A.; Echler, A.; Egelhof, P.; Ilieva, S.; Kilbourne, C.; McCammon, D.

    2012-01-01

    The application of Calorimetric Low-Temperature Detectors (CLTDs) has been proposed at the Heavy-Ion TRAP facility HITRAP which is currently being installed at the Helmholtz Research Center for Heavy Ion Research GSI. This cold ion trap setup will allow the investigation of X-rays from ions practically at rest, for which the excellent energy resolution of CLTDs can be used to its full advantage. However, the relatively low intensities at HITRAP demand larger solid angles and an optimized cryogenic setup. The influence of external magnetic fields has to be taken into account. CLTDs will also be a substantial part of the instrumental equipment at the future Facility for Antiproton and Heavy Ion Research (FAIR), for which a wide variety of high-precision X-ray spectroscopy experiments has been proposed. This contribution will give an overview on the chances and challenges for the application of CLTDs at HITRAP as well as perspectives for future experiments at the FAIR facility.

  20. A hand-portable digital linear ion trap mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Xue, Bing; Sun, Lulu; Huang, Zhengxu; Gao, Wei; Fan, Rongrong; Cheng, Ping; Ding, Li; Ma, Li; Zhou, Zhen

    2016-10-07

    A hand-portable digital linear ion trap mass spectrometer (DLIT-MS) has been developed for VOC analysis. It has a weight of 18 kg with dimensions of 49 cm × 39 cm × 16 cm, and consumes an average power of ca. 60 W. As a result of the introduction of a digital waveform, the DLIT-MS can be driven at a lower voltage (±100 V) to cover a mass range of 30-300 Th with a unit resolution. Compact electronics has been designed to control the DLIT-MS and record mass spectra. The mass drift was reduced after the improvement in electronics to stabilize the digital waveform voltage during the mass scan. Tandem mass spectrometry (MS) has been achieved by using digital asymmetric waveform isolation (DAWI), forward and reverse scan, and collision induced dissociation (CID). The isolation and CID efficiency for methyl salicylate were 83.9% and 81.3%, respectively. A novel buffer gas inlet system was designed to enhance the sensitivity and allow easy and safe use of the instrument. Limits of detection below 1 ppbv were obtained for several mixed gaseous samples.

  1. High-cooling-efficiency cryogenic quadrupole ion trap and UV-UV hole burning spectroscopy of protonated tyrosine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishiuchi, Shun-ichi; Wako, Hiromichi; Kato, Daichi; Fujii, Masaaki

    2017-02-01

    The cooling efficiency of a cryogenic three-dimensional quadrupole ion trap (QIT) is drastically improved by using copper electrodes instead of conventional stainless-steel ones. The temperature of trapped ions (protonated tyrosine TyrH+) was estimated based on the ultraviolet (UV) photo-dissociation spectra. The UV spectrum of TryH+ shows almost no hot bands, and thus the high cooling efficiency of the copper ion trap was proven. The temperature was also estimated by simulating the observed band contour in the UV spectra, which is determined by the population in the rotationally excited levels. From the simulations, the temperature of TryH+ was estimated to be ∼13 K, while that in the stainless-steel QIT was 45-50 K. In addition, to demonstrate the advantage of the copper QIT, UV-UV hole burning (HB) spectra, i.e. conformation-selected UV spectra, were measured. It was confirmed that four different conformers, A∼D, coexist in the ultra-cold protonated tyrosine. By comparing with the calculated Franck-Condon spectra, their structural assignments were discussed, including the orientation of the OH group.

  2. Investigation of radiation trapping in cold-atom clouds by intensity correlation measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stites, Ronald; Beeler, Matthew; Feeney, Laura; Kim, Soo; Bali, Samir

    2004-05-01

    Recently, we predicted that the intensity correlation function of the light scattered from optical molasses may be sensitive to the presence of radiation trapping at on-resonance optical depths as low as 0.1 [M. Beeler, et al., Phys. Rev. A 68, 013411 (2003)]. This is more than an order of magnitude less than the optical depth at which effects of multiple scattering in cold-atom clouds have been previously observed [T. Walker, D. Sesko, and C. Wieman, Phys. Rev. Lett. 64, 408 (1990)]. We present measurements of the intensity correlation function for different number densities and temperatures of the molasses. * now in the Dept. of Physics, Univ. of Maryland, College Park. ** now in the Dept. of Physics, Univ. of Texas, Austin. *** now in the Dept. of Physics, Georgia Tech., Atlanta.

  3. Ion Trapping with Fast-Response Ion-Selective Microelectrodes Enhances Detection of Extracellular Ion Channel Gradients

    PubMed Central

    Messerli, Mark A.; Collis, Leon P.; Smith, Peter J.S.

    2009-01-01

    Previously, functional mapping of channels has been achieved by measuring the passage of net charge and of specific ions with electrophysiological and intracellular fluorescence imaging techniques. However, functional mapping of ion channels using extracellular ion-selective microelectrodes has distinct advantages over the former methods. We have developed this method through measurement of extracellular K+ gradients caused by efflux through Ca2+-activated K+ channels expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells. We report that electrodes constructed with short columns of a mechanically stable K+-selective liquid membrane respond quickly and measure changes in local [K+] consistent with a diffusion model. When used in close proximity to the plasma membrane (<4 μm), the ISMs pose a barrier to simple diffusion, creating an ion trap. The ion trap amplifies the local change in [K+] without dramatically changing the rise or fall time of the [K+] profile. Measurement of extracellular K+ gradients from activated rSlo channels shows that rapid events, 10–55 ms, can be characterized. This method provides a noninvasive means for functional mapping of channel location and density as well as for characterizing the properties of ion channels in the plasma membrane. PMID:19217875

  4. Development of a compact cold-atom atomic clock based on coherent population trapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanshan, Eric M.

    Field-grade atomic clocks capable of primary standard performance in compact physics packages would be of significant value in a variety of applications ranging from network synchronization and secure communications to GPS hold-over and inertial navigation. A cold-atom coherent population trapping (CACPT) clock featuring laser-cooled atoms and pulsed Ramsey interrogation is a strong candidate for this technology if the principal frequency shifts can be controlled and the performance degradation associated with miniaturization can be overcome. In this thesis, research focused on the development of this type of compact atomic clock is presented. To address the low atom numbers obtained in small cold-atom sources, experiments were performed in which an atomic beam was decelerated with bichromatic stimulated laser forces and loaded into a mm-scale magneto-optical trap, increasing the atom number by a factor of 12.5. A CACPT clock using the high-contrast lin||lin optical interrogation technique was developed and achieved a stability of 7 x 10-13 after one hour of integration. Doppler shifts in the clock are explained using a simple kinematic model and canceled by interrogating the atoms with a counter-propagating CPT configuration. Finally, a thorough characterization of the AC-stark effect in lin||lin CPT was performed. Observed shifts are explained in terms of contributions from coherent CPT-generating couplings and population transfer effects caused by optical pumping from incoherent light. Measurements are compared with existing and new theoretical treatments, and a laser configuration is identified that reduces clock drift from light shifts to less than 10-14 for the current system.

  5. Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry of Zeolite Materials: Observation of Abundant Aluminosilicate Oligomers Using an Ion Trap

    SciTech Connect

    Groenewold, Gary Steven; Kessinger, Glen Frank; Scott, Jill Rennee; Gianotto, Anita Kay; Appelhans, Anthony David; Delmore, James Edward

    2000-12-01

    Oligomeric oxyanions were observed in the secondary ion mass spectra (SIMS) of zeolite materials. The oxyanions have the general composition AlmSinO2(m+n)H(m-1)- (m + n = 2 to 8) and are termed dehydrates. For a given mass, multiple elemental compositions are possible because (Al + H) is an isovalent and isobaric substitute for Si. Using 18 keV Ga+ as a projectile, oligomer abundances are low relative to the monomers. Oligomer abundance can be increased by using the polyatomic projectile ReO4- (~5 keV). Oligomer abundance can be further increased using an ion trap (IT-) SIMS; in this instrument, long ion lifetimes (tens of ms) and relatively high He pressure result in significant collisional stabilization and increased high-mass abundance. The dehydrates rapidly react with adventitious H2O present in the IT-SIMS to form mono-, di-, and trihydrates. The rapidity of the reaction and comparison to aluminum oxyanion hydration suggest that H2O adds to the aluminosilicate oxyanions in a dissociative fashion, forming covalently bound product ions. In addition to these findings, it was noted that production of abundant oligomeric aluminosilicates could be significantly increased by substituting the countercation (NH4+) with the larger alkali ions Rb+ and Cs+. This constitutes a useful tactic for generating large aluminosilicate oligomers for surface characterization and ion-molecule reactivity studies.

  6. Experimental system design for the integration of trapped-ion and superconducting qubit systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Motte, D.; Grounds, A. R.; Rehák, M.; Rodriguez Blanco, A.; Lekitsch, B.; Giri, G. S.; Neilinger, P.; Oelsner, G.; Il'ichev, E.; Grajcar, M.; Hensinger, W. K.

    2016-12-01

    We present a design for the experimental integration of ion trapping and superconducting qubit systems as a step towards the realization of a quantum hybrid system. The scheme addresses two key difficulties in realizing such a system: a combined microfabricated ion trap and superconducting qubit architecture, and the experimental infrastructure to facilitate both technologies. Developing upon work by Kielpinski et al. (Phys Rev Lett 108(13):130504, 2012. doi: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.108.130504), we describe the design, simulation and fabrication process for a microfabricated ion trap capable of coupling an ion to a superconducting microwave LC circuit with a coupling strength in the tens of kHz. We also describe existing difficulties in combining the experimental infrastructure of an ion trapping set-up into a dilution refrigerator with superconducting qubits and present solutions that can be immediately implemented using current technology.

  7. Dynamics of laser-cooled Ca+ ions in a Penning trap with a rotating wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bharadia, S.; Vogel, M.; Segal, D. M.; Thompson, R. C.

    2012-06-01

    We have performed systematic measurements of the dynamics of laser-cooled 40Ca+ ions confined in a Penning trap and driven by a rotating dipole field (`rotating wall'). The trap used is a copy of the one used in the SPECTRAP experiment located at the HITRAP facility at GSI, Germany. The size and shape of the ion cloud has been monitored using a CCD camera to image the fluorescence light resulting from excitation by the cooling laser. We have varied the experimental conditions such as amplitude and frequency of the rotating wall drive as well as the trapping parameters. The rotating wall can be used for a radial compression of the ion cloud thus increasing the ion density in the trap. We have also observed plasma mode excitations in agreement with theoretical expectations. This work will allow us to define the optimum parameters for high compression of the ions as needed for precision spectroscopy of forbidden transitions.

  8. Electron capture dissociation in a branched radio-frequency ion trap.

    PubMed

    Baba, Takashi; Campbell, J Larry; Le Blanc, J C Yves; Hager, James W; Thomson, Bruce A

    2015-01-06

    We have developed a high-throughput electron capture dissociation (ECD) device coupled to a quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometer using novel branched radio frequency ion trap architecture. With this device, a low-energy electron beam can be injected orthogonally into the analytical ion beam with independent control of both the ion and electron beams. While ions and electrons can interact in a "flow-through" mode, we observed a large enhancement in ECD efficiency by introducing a short ion trapping period at the region of ion and electron beam intersection. This simultaneous trapping mode still provides up to five ECD spectra per second while operating in an information-dependent acquisition workflow. Coupled to liquid chromatography (LC), this LC-ECD workflow provides good sequence coverage for both trypsin and Lys C digests of bovine serum albumin, providing ECD spectra for doubly charged precursor ions with very good efficiency.

  9. Evaporative cooling and coherent axial oscillations of highly charged ions in a penning trap.

    PubMed

    Hobein, M; Solders, A; Suhonen, M; Liu, Y; Schuch, R

    2011-01-07

    Externally, in an electron beam ion trap, generated Ar16+ ions were retrapped in a Penning trap and evaporatively cooled in their axial motion. The cooling was observed by a novel extraction technique based on the excitation of a coherent axial oscillation which yields short ion bunches of well-defined energies. The initial temperature of the ion cloud was decreased by a factor of more than 140 within 1 s, while the phase-space density of the coldest extracted ion pulses was increased by a factor of up to about 9.

  10. Pipken Award: Nuclear physics mysteries revealed by precision ion trap measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dilling, Jens

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear Physics is a fundamental science discipline for over 100 years, and started with precision measurements by Rutherford. Much has been learned and understood in the meantime, but some questions remain and also new nuclear phenomena have been discovered. Precision experiments open new venue to address these. Ion trap technologies, originally conceived for atomic and molecular physics have been adapted to the specific requirements stemming from nuclear physics, for example, to couple ion traps to accelerators and achieve very high speed and efficiencies. In this talk I will show some recent examples and technical developments pertaining to nuclear physics questions and phenomena and how they are addressed with precision ion trap measurements.

  11. Assembling a ring-shaped crystal in a microfabricated surface ion trap

    DOE PAGES

    Stick, Daniel Lynn; Tabakov, Boyan; Benito, Francisco; ...

    2015-09-01

    We report on experiments with a microfabricated surface trap designed for confining a chain of ions in a ring. Uniform ion separation over most of the ring is achieved with a rotationally symmetric design and by measuring and suppressing undesired electric fields. After reducing stray fields, the ions are confined primarily by a radio-frequency pseudopotential and their mutual Coulomb repulsion. As a result, approximately 400 40Ca+ ions with an average separation of 9 μm comprise the ion crystal.

  12. Lifetime measurements in an electrostatic ion beam trap using image charge monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Rahinov, Igor; Toker, Yoni; Heber, Oded; Rappaport, Michael; Zajfman, Daniel; Strasser, Daniel; Schwalm, Dirk

    2012-03-15

    A technique for mass-selective lifetime measurements of keV ions in a linear electrostatic ion beam trap is presented. The technique is based on bunching the ions using a weak RF potential and non-destructive ion detection by a pick-up electrode. This method has no mass-limitation, possesses the advantage of inherent mass-selectivity, and offers a possibility of measuring simultaneously the lifetimes of different ion species with no need for prior mass-selection.

  13. Comparison of two absorption imaging methods to detect cold atoms in magnetic trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yan; Hu, Zhao-Hui; Qi, Lu

    2015-02-01

    Two methods of absorption imaging to detect cold atoms in a magnetic trap are implemented for a high-precision cold atom interferometer. In the first method, a probe laser which is in resonance with a cycle transition frequency is used to evaluate the quantity and distribution of the atom sample. In the second method, the probe laser is tuned to an open transition frequency, which stimulates a few and constant number of photons per atom. This method has a shorter interaction time and results in absorption images which are not affected by the magnetic field and the light field. We make a comparison of performance between these two imaging methods in the sense of parameters such as pulse duration, light intensity, and magnetic field strength. The experimental results show that the second method is more reliable when detecting the quantity and density profiles of the atoms. These results fit well to the theoretical analysis. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61227902 and 61121003) and the National Defense Basic Scientific Research Program of China (Grant No. B2120132005).

  14. Production of Ar{sup q+} ions with a tandem linear Paul trap

    SciTech Connect

    Higaki, H. Nagayasu, K.; Iwai, T.; Ito, K.; Okamoto, H.

    2015-06-29

    A tandem linear Paul trap was used to create highly charged Argon ions by electron impact ionizations. By improving the operation scheme, the production of Ar{sup 4+} ions was confirmed. Possible improvements for the future experiments with laser cooled Ca{sup +} ions are suggested.

  15. Higher-Pressure Ion Funnel Trap Interface for Orthogonal Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Yehia; Belov, Mikhail E.; Tolmachev, Aleksey V.; Prior, David C.; Smith, Richard D.

    2008-01-01

    A combined electrodynamic ion funnel and ion trap coupled to an orthogonal acceleration (oa)-time-of-flight mass spectrometer (oa-TOF MS) was developed and characterized. The ion trap was incorporated through the use of added terminal electrodynamic ion funnel electrodes enabling control over the axial DC gradient in the trap section. The ion trap operates efficiently at a pressure of 1 Torr, and measurements indicate a maximum charge capacity of ~3×107 charges. An order of magnitude increase in sensitivity was observed in the analysis of low concentration peptides mixtures with oa-TOF MS in the trapping mode as compared to the continuous regime. A signal increase in the trapping mode was accompanied by reduction in the background chemical noise, due to more efficient desolvation of e.g., solvent related clusters. Controlling the ion trap ejection time was found to result in efficient removal of singly charged species and improving signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) for the multiply charged analytes. PMID:17850113

  16. Experimental study on dipole motion of an ion plasma confined in a linear Paul trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, K.; Okano, T.; Moriya, K.; Fukushima, K.; Higaki, H.; Okamoto, H.

    2015-11-01

    The compact non-neutral plasma trap systems named "S-POD" have been developed at Hiroshima University as an experimental simulator of beam dynamics. S-POD is based either on a linear Paul trap or on a Penning trap and can approximately reproduce the collective motion of a relativistic charged-particle beam observed in the center-of-mass frame. We here employ the Paul trap system to investigate the behavior of an ion plasma near a dipole resonance. A simple method is proposed to calibrate the data of secular frequency measurements by using the dipole instability condition. We also show that the transverse density profile of an ion plasma in the trap can be estimated from the time evolution of ion losses caused by the resonance.

  17. Versatile cold atom target apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Goetz, Simone; Hoeltkemeier, Bastian; Hofmann, Christoph S.; Litsch, Dominic; DePaola, Brett D.; Weidemueller, Matthias

    2012-07-15

    We report on a compact and transportable apparatus that consists of a cold atomic target at the center of a high resolution recoil ion momentum spectrometer. Cold rubidium atoms serve as a target which can be operated in three different modes: in continuous mode, consisting of a cold atom beam generated by a two-dimensional magneto-optical trap, in normal mode in which the atoms from the beam are trapped in a three-dimensional magneto-optical trap (3D MOT), and in high density mode in which the 3D MOT is operated in dark spontaneous optical trap configuration. The targets are characterized using photoionization.

  18. Quantum State Control of Trapped Atomic and Molecular Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seck, Christopher M.

    Full quantum control of a molecule would have a significant impact in molecular coherent control (alignment and orientation) and ultracold and quantum chemistry, quantum computing and simulation as well as hybrid quantum devices, and precision spectroscopy of importance to fundamental physics research. Precision spectroscopy of even simple diatomic molecules offers the possibility of uncovering physics beyond the standard model, specifically time variation of the proton-to-electron mass ratio, which is currently constrained by astronomical molecular observations at the 10-16 1/yr level and laboratory atomic measurements at the 10-17 1/yr level. To achieve this level of measurement and to avoid the complications of diatomic structure on traditional spectroscopy methods, molecular quantum logic spectroscopy (mQLS) will be the spectroscopy technique of choice. We discuss development of in-house external-cavity diode laser (ECDL) systems and improvements to the Libbrecht-Hall circuit, which is a well-known, low-noise current driver for narrow-linewidth diode lasers. However, as the current approaches the maximum set limit, the noise in the laser current increases dramatically. This behavior is documented and simple circuit modifications to alleviate this issue are explored. We cool trapped AlH+ molecules to their ground rotational-vibrational quantum state using an electronically-exciting broadband laser to simultaneously drive cooling resonances from many different rotational levels. We demonstrate rotational cooling on the 140(20) ms timescale from room temperature to 3.8 K, with the ground state population increasing from 3% to 95.4%. Since QLS does not require the high gate fidelities usually associated with quantum computation and quantum simulation, it is possible to make simplifying choices in ion species and quantum protocols at the expense of some fidelity. We demonstrate sideband cooling and motional state detection protocols for 138Ba+ of sufficient fidelity

  19. A carbon-cluster laser ion source for TRIGA-TRAP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smorra, C.; Blaum, K.; Eberhardt, K.; Eibach, M.; Ketelaer, J.; Ketter, J.; Knuth, K.; Nagy, Sz

    2009-08-01

    A new laser ablation ion source was developed and tested for the Penning trap mass spectrometer TRIGA-TRAP in order to provide carbon-cluster ions for absolute mass calibration. Ions of different cluster sizes up to C+24 were successfully produced, covering the mass range up to the heavy actinide elements. The ions were captured in a Penning trap, and their time-of-flight cyclotron resonances recorded in order to determine their cyclotron frequency. Furthermore, the same ion source was used to produce GdO+ ions from a gadolinium target in sufficient amount for mass spectrometry purposes. The design of the source and its characteristics are presented. This paper comprises partly the PhD theses of J Ketelaer and C Smorra.

  20. A microfabricated surface-electrode ion trap for scalable quantum information processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidelin, Signe; Chiaverini, John; Reichle, Rainer; Bollinger, John; Leibfried, Didi; Britton, Joe; Wesenberg, Janus; Blakestad, Brad; Epstein, Ryan; Hume, David; Jost, John; Langer, Chris; Ozeri, Roee; Shiga, Nobu; Wineland, David

    2006-05-01

    We demonstrate confinement of individual atomic ions in a radio-frequency Paul trap with a novel geometry where the electrodes are located in a single plane and the ions confined above this plane. This device is realized with a relatively simple fabrication procedure and has important implications for quantum state manipulation and quantum information processing using large numbers of ions. We confine laser-cooled Mg-24 ions approximately 40 micrometer above planar gold electrodes. We measure the ions' motional frequencies and compare them to simulations. From measurements of the escape time of ions from the trap, we also determine a heating rate of approximately five motional quanta per millisecond for a trap frequency of 5.3 MHz.

  1. Microfabricated surface-electrode ion traps for scalable quantum information processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidelin, Signe; Britton, Joe; Chiaverini, John; Reichle, Rainer; Bollinger, John; Leibfried, Didi; Wesenberg, Janus; Blakestad, Brad; Epstein, Ryan; Amini, Jason; Brown, Kenton; Home, Jonathan; Hume, David; Shiga, Nobu; Itano, Wayne; Jost, John; Knill, Emmanuel; Langer, Chris; Ozeri, Roee; Wineland, David

    2007-03-01

    We confine individual atomic ions in an rf Paul trap with a novel geometry where the electrodes are located in a single plane and the ions confined above this plane [1,2,3]. This device is realized with simple fabrication procedures, making it a potential candidate for a scalable ion trap for quantum information processing using large numbers of ions. We confine laser-cooled ions 40 micrometers above planar electrodes. These electrodes are fabricated from gold on a fused quartz substrate. The heating rate of the ions is low enough to make the trap useful for quantum information processing. [1] J. Chiaverini et al., Quantum Inf. Comput. 5, 419 (2005). [2] S. Seidelin et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 253003 (2006). [3] J. Britton et al., quant-ph/0605170.

  2. Cascade emission in electron beam ion trap plasma of W25+ ion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jonauskas, V.; Pütterich, T.; Kučas, S.; Masys, Š.; Kynienė, A.; Gaigalas, G.; Kisielius, R.; Radžiūtė, L.; Rynkun, P.; Merkelis, G.

    2015-07-01

    Spectra of the W25+ ion are studied using the collisional-radiative model (CRM) with an ensuing cascade emission. It is determined that the cascade emission boosts intensities only of a few lines in the 10-30 nm range. The cascade emission is responsible for the disappearance of structure of lines at about 6 nm in the electron beam ion trap plasma. Emission band at 4.5-5.3 nm is also affected by the cascade emission. The strongest lines in the CRM spectrum correspond to 4d9 4f4 → 4f3 transitions, while 4f2 5 d → 4f3 transitions arise after the cascade emission is taken into account.

  3. in situ plasma removal of surface contaminants from ion trap electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Haltli, Raymond A.

    2015-04-01

    This research resulted in a construction and implementation of an in situ plasma discharge to remove surface contaminants from electrodes in an ion trapping experimental system is presented with results.

  4. Development and Characterization of a Ytterbium-171 Miniature Ion Trap Frequency Standard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Partner, Heather L.

    This dissertation reports on the development of a low-power, high-stability miniature atomic frequency standard based on 171Yb+ ions. The ions are buffer-gas cooled and held in a linear quadrupole trap that is integrated into a sealed, getter-pumped vacuum package, and interrogated on the 12.6 GHz hyperfine transition. We hope to achieve a long-term fractional frequency stability of 10-14 with this miniature clock while consuming only 50 mW of power and occupying a volume of 5 cm 3, as part of a project funded to rapidly develop an advanced miniaturized frequency standard that has exceptional long-term stability. I discuss our progress through several years of development on this project. We began by building a relatively conventional tabletop clock system to act as a "test bed" for future components and for testing new techniques in a controlled environment. We moved on to develop and test several designs of miniature ion-trap vacuum packages, while also developing techniques for various aspects of the clock operation, including ion loading, laser and magnetic field stabilization, and a low power ion trap drive. The ion traps were modeled using boundary element software to assist with the design and parameter optimization of new trap geometries. We expect a novel trap geometry made using a material that is new to ion traps to lead to an exceptionally small ion trap vacuum package in the next phase of the project. To achieve the long-term stability required, we have also considered the sensitivity of the clock frequency to magnetic fields. A study of the motion of the individual ions in a room-temperature cloud in the trap was performed. The purpose of this simulation was to understand the effect of both spatially varying and constant magnetic fields on the clock resonance and therefore the operation of the clock. These effects were studied experimentally and theoretically for several traps. In summary, this dissertation is a contribution to the design, development

  5. Collision-induced dissociation of glycero phospholipids using electrospray ion-trap mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Larsen, A; Uran, S; Jacobsen, P B; Skotland, T

    2001-01-01

    Characterisation of phospholipids was achieved using collision-induced dissociation (CID) with an ion-trap mass spectrometer. The product ions were compared with those obtained with a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer. In the negative ion mode the product ions were mainly sn-1 and sn-2 lyso-phospholipids with neutral loss of ketene in combination with neutral loss of the polar head group. Less abundant product ions were sn-1 and sn-2 carboxylate anions. CID using a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer, however, gave primarily the sn-1 and sn-2 carboxylate anions together with lyso-phosphatidic acid with neutral loss of water. For the ion trap a charge-remote-type mechanism is proposed for formation of the lyso-phospholipid product ions by loss of alpha-hydrogen on the fatty acid moiety, electron rearrangement and neutral loss of ketene. A second mechanism involves nucleophilic attack of the phosphate oxygen on the sn-1 and sn-2 glycerol backbone to form carboxylate anions with neutral loss of cyclo lyso-phospholipids. CID (MS(3) and MS(4)) of the lyso-phospholipids using the ion-trap gave the same carboxylate anions as those obtained with a triple quadrupole instrument where multiple collisions in the collision cell are expected to occur. The data demonstrate that phospholipid species determination can be performed by using LC/MS(n) with an ion-trap mass spectrometer with detection of the lyso-phospholipid anions. The ion-trap showed no loss in sensitivity in full scan MS(n) compared to multiple reaction monitoring data acquisition. In combination with on-line liquid chromatography this feature makes the ion-trap useful in the scanning modes for rapid screening of low concentrations of phospholipid species in biological samples as recently described (Uran S, Larsen A, Jacobsen PB, Skotland T. J. Chromatogr. B 2001; 758: 265).

  6. Electron spin resonance from NV centers in diamonds levitating in an ion trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delord, T.; Nicolas, L.; Schwab, L.; Hétet, G.

    2017-03-01

    We report observations of the electron spin resonance (ESR) of nitrogen vacancy centers in diamonds that are levitating in an ion trap. Using a needle Paul trap operating under ambient conditions, we demonstrate efficient microwave driving of the electronic spin and show that the spin properties of deposited diamond particles measured by the ESR are retained in the Paul trap. We also exploit the ESR signal to show angle stability of single trapped mono-crystals, a necessary step towards spin-controlled levitating macroscopic objects.

  7. Determination of mercury(II) ion by electrochemical cold vapor generation atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Arbab-Zavar, M Hosein; Rounaghi, G Hosein; Chamsaz, Mahmoud; Masrournia, Mahboube

    2003-05-01

    A technique for determination of mercury is described; it is based on electrolytic reduction of Hg(II) ion on a graphite cathode, the trapping of mercury vapor and its volatilization into a quartz tube aligned in the optical path of an atomic absorption spectrometer. The electrochemical cell consisted of a graphite cathode and an anode operating with constant direct current for the production of mercury atoms. A pre-activated graphite rod was used as the cathode material. The optimum conditions for electrochemical generation of mercury cold vapor (the electrolysis time and current, the flow rate, the type of electrode and electrolyte) were investigated. The characteristic electrochemical data with chemical cold vapor using NaBH4-acid were compared. The presence of cadmium(II), arsenic(III), antimony(III), selenium(IV), bismuth(III), silver(I), lead(II), lithium(I), sodium(I) and potassium(I) showed interference effects which were eliminated by suitable separation techniques. The calibration curve is linear over the range of 5-90 ng ml(-1) mercury(II). The detection limit is 2 ng ml(-1) of Hg(II) and the RSD is 2.5% (n = 10) for 40 ng ml(-1). The accuracy and recovery of the method were investigated by analyzing spiked tap water and river water.

  8. Multiple Mass Analysis Using an Ion Trap Array (ITA) Mass Analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Yu; Chu, Yanqiu; Ling, Xing; Ding, Zhengzhi; Xu, Chongsheng; Ding, Li; Ding, Chuan-Fan

    2013-09-01

    A novel ion trap array (ITA) mass analyzer with six ion trapping and analyzing channels was investigated. It is capable of analyzing multiple samples simultaneously. The ITA was built with several planar electrodes made of stainless steel and 12 identical parallel zirconia ceramic substrates plated with conductive metal layers. Each two of the opposing ceramic electrode plates formed a boundary of an ion trap channel and six identical ion trapping and analyzing channels were placed in parallel without physical electrode between any two adjacent channels. The electric field distribution inside each channel was studied with simulation. The new design took the advantage of high precision machining attributable to the rigidity of ceramic, and the convenience of surface patterning technique. The ITA system was tested by using a two-channel electrospray ionization source, a multichannel simultaneous quadruple ion guide, and two detectors. The simultaneous analysis of two different samples with two adjacent ITA channels was achieved and independent mass spectra were obtained. For each channel, the mass resolution was tested. Additional ion trap functions such as mass-selected ion isolation and collision-induced dissociation (CID) were also tested. The results show that one ITA is well suited for multiple simultaneous mass analyses.

  9. Computer Modeling of an Ion Trap Mass Analyzer, Part I: Low Pressure Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolić, Dragan; Madzunkov, Stojan M.; Darrach, Murray R.

    2015-12-01

    We present the multi-particle simulation program suite Computational Ion Trap Analyzer (CITA) designed to calculate the ion trajectories within a Paul quadrupole ion trap developed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). CITA uses an analytical expression of the electrodynamic field, employing up to six terms in multipole expansion and a modified velocity-Verlet method to numerically calculate ion trajectories. The computer code is multithreaded and designed to run on shared-memory architectures. CITA yields near real-time simulations with full propagation of 26 particles per second per core. As a consequence, a realistic numbers of trapped ions (100+ million) can be used and their trajectories modeled, yielding a representative prediction of mass spectrometer analysis of trace gas species. When the model is compared with experimental results conducted at low pressures using the conventional quadrupole and dipole excitation modes, there is an excellent agreement with the observed peak shapes. Owing to the program's efficiency, CITA has been used to explore regions of trapping stability that are of interest to experimental research. These results are expected to facilitate a fast and reliable modeling of ion dynamics in miniature quadrupole ion trap and improve the interpretation of observed mass spectra.

  10. Computer Modeling of an Ion Trap Mass Analyzer, Part I: Low Pressure Regime.

    PubMed

    Nikolić, Dragan; Madzunkov, Stojan M; Darrach, Murray R

    2015-12-01

    We present the multi-particle simulation program suite Computational Ion Trap Analyzer (CITA) designed to calculate the ion trajectories within a Paul quadrupole ion trap developed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). CITA uses an analytical expression of the electrodynamic field, employing up to six terms in multipole expansion and a modified velocity-Verlet method to numerically calculate ion trajectories. The computer code is multithreaded and designed to run on shared-memory architectures. CITA yields near real-time simulations with full propagation of 26 particles per second per core. As a consequence, a realistic numbers of trapped ions (100+ million) can be used and their trajectories modeled, yielding a representative prediction of mass spectrometer analysis of trace gas species. When the model is compared with experimental results conducted at low pressures using the conventional quadrupole and dipole excitation modes, there is an excellent agreement with the observed peak shapes. Owing to the program's efficiency, CITA has been used to explore regions of trapping stability that are of interest to experimental research. These results are expected to facilitate a fast and reliable modeling of ion dynamics in miniature quadrupole ion trap and improve the interpretation of observed mass spectra. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  11. Greatly Increasing Trapped Ion Populations for Mobility Separations Using Traveling Waves in Structures for Lossless Ion Manipulations

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Liulin; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Garimella, Sandilya V. B.; Webb, Ian K.; Hamid, Ahmed M.; Norheim, Randolph V.; Prost, Spencer A.; Sandoval, Jeremy A.; Baker, Erin S.; Smith, Richard D.

    2016-10-18

    The initial use of traveling waves (TW) for ion mobility (IM) separations using a structures for lossless ion manipulations (SLIM) employed an ion funnel trap (IFT) to accumulate ions from a continuous electrospray ionization source, and limited to injected ion populations of ~106 charges due to the onset of space charge effects in the trapping region. Additional limitations arise due to the loss of resolution for the injection of ions over longer periods (e.g. in extended pulses). In this work a new SLIM ‘flat funnel’ (FF) module has been developed and demonstrated to enable the accumulation of much larger ion populations and their injection for IM separations. Ion current measurements indicate a capacity of ~3.2×108 charges for the extended trapping volume, over an order of magnitude greater than the IFT. The orthogonal ion injection into a funnel shaped separation region can greatly reduce space charge effects during the initial IM separation stage, and the gradually reduced width of the path allows the ion packet to be increasingly compressed in the lateral dimension as the separation progresses, allowing e.g. efficient transmission through conductance limits or compatibility with subsequent ion manipulations. This work examined the TW, RF, and DC confining field SLIM parameters involved in ion accumulation, injection, transmission and separation in the FF IM module using both direct ion current and MS measurements. Wide m/z range ion transmission is demonstrated, along with significant increases in signal to noise (S/N) ratios due to the larger ion populations injected. Additionally, we observed a reduction in the chemical background, which was attributed to more efficient desolvation of solvent related clusters over the extended ion accumulation periods. The TW SLIM FF IM module is anticipated to be especially effective as a front end for long path SLIM IM separation modules.

  12. Experimental Characterization of Secular Frequency Scanning in Ion Trap Mass Spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, Dalton T.; Pulliam, Christopher J.; Wiley, Joshua S.; Duncan, Jason; Cooks, R. Graham

    2016-07-01

    Secular frequency scanning is implemented and characterized using both a benchtop linear ion trap and a miniature rectilinear ion trap mass spectrometer. Separation of tetraalkylammonium ions and those from a mass calibration mixture and from a pesticide mixture is demonstrated with peak widths approaching unit resolution for optimized conditions using the benchtop ion trap. The effects on the spectra of ion trap operating parameters, including waveform amplitude, scan direction, scan rate, and pressure are explored, and peaks at black holes corresponding to nonlinear (higher-order field) resonance points are investigated. Reverse frequency sweeps (increasing mass) on the Mini 12 are shown to result in significantly higher ion ejection efficiency and superior resolution than forward frequency sweeps that decrement mass. This result is accounted for by the asymmetry in ion energy absorption profiles as a function of AC frequency and the shift in ion secular frequency at higher amplitudes in the trap due to higher order fields. We also found that use of higher AC amplitudes in forward frequency sweeps biases ions toward ejection at points of higher order parametric resonance, despite using only dipolar excitation. Higher AC amplitudes also increase peak width and decrease sensitivity in both forward and reverse frequency sweeps. Higher sensitivity and resolution were obtained at higher trap pressures in the secular frequency scan, in contrast to conventional resonance ejection scans, which showed the opposite trend in resolution on the Mini 12. Mass range is shown to be naturally extended in secular frequency scanning when ejecting ions by sweeping the AC waveform through low frequencies, a method which is similar, but arguably superior, to the more usual method of mass range extension using low q resonance ejection.

  13. High-Fidelity Two-Qubit Gates in a Surface Ion Trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobser, Daniel; Blain, Matthew; Blume-Kohout, Robin; Fortier, Kevin; Mizrahi, Jonathan; Nielsen, Erik; Rudinger, Kenneth; Sterk, Jonathan; Stick, Daniel; Maunz, Peter

    2016-05-01

    Microfabricated surface traps are capable of supporting a variety of exotic trapping geometries and provide a scalable system for trapped ion Quantum Information Processing (QIP). However, the feasibility of using surface traps for QIP has long been a point of contention because the close proximity of the ions to trap electrodes increases heating rates and might lead to laser-induced charging of the trap. As surface traps continue to evolve at a remarkable rate, their performance is rapidly approaching that of macroscopic electrode traps. Using Sandia's High-Optical-Access surface trap, we demonstrate robust single-qubit gates, both laser- and microwave-based. Our gates are accurately characterized by Gate Set Tomography (GST) and we report the first diamond norm measurements near the fault-tolerance threshold. Extending these techniques, we've realized a Mølmer-Sørensen two-qubit gate that is stable for several hours. This stability has allowed us to perform the first GST measurements of a two-qubit gate, yielding a process fidelity of 99.58(6)%. This work was supported by the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program at Sandia National Laboratories.

  14. Charge Breeding Techniques in an Electron Beam Ion Trap for High Precision Mass Spectrometry at TITAN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDonald, T. D.; Simon, M. C.; Bale, J. C.; Chowdhury, U.; Eibach, M.; Gallant, A. T.; Lennarz, A.; Simon, V. V.; Chaudhuri, A.; Grossheim, A.; Kwiatkowski, A. A.; Schultz, B. E.; Dilling, J.

    2012-10-01

    Penning trap mass spectrometry is the most accurate and precise method available for performing atomic mass measurements. TRIUMF's Ion Trap for Atomic and Nuclear science is currently the only facility to couple its Penning trap to a rare isotope facility and an electron beam ion trap (EBIT). The EBIT is a valuable tool for beam preparation: since the precision scales linearly with the charge state, it takes advantage of the precision gained by using highly charged ions. However, this precision gain is contingent on fast and efficient charge breeding. An optimization algorithm has been developed to identify the optimal conditions for running the EBIT. Taking only the mass number and half-life of the isotope of interest as inputs, the electron beam current density, charge breeding time, charge state, and electron beam energy are all specified to maximize this precision. An overview of the TITAN charge breeding program, and the results of charge breeding simulations will be presented.

  15. Analysis of thermal radiation in ion traps for optical frequency standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doležal, M.; Balling, P.; Nisbet-Jones, P. B. R.; King, S. A.; Jones, J. M.; Klein, H. A.; Gill, P.; Lindvall, T.; Wallin, A. E.; Merimaa, M.; Tamm, C.; Sanner, C.; Huntemann, N.; Scharnhorst, N.; Leroux, I. D.; Schmidt, P. O.; Burgermeister, T.; Mehlstäubler, T. E.; Peik, E.

    2015-12-01

    In many of the high-precision optical frequency standards with trapped atoms or ions that are under development to date, the ac Stark shift induced by thermal radiation leads to a major contribution to the systematic uncertainty. We present an analysis of the inhomogeneous thermal environment experienced by ions in various types of ion traps. Finite element models which allow the determination of the temperature of the trap structure and the temperature of the radiation were developed for five ion trap designs, including operational traps at PTB and NPL and further optimized designs. Models were refined based on comparison with infrared camera measurement until an agreement of better than 10% of the measured temperature rise at critical test points was reached. The effective temperature rises of the radiation seen by the ion range from 0.8 K to 2.1 K at standard working conditions. The corresponding fractional frequency shift uncertainties resulting from the uncertainty in temperature are in the 10-18 range for optical clocks based on the Sr+ and Yb+ E2 transitions, and even lower for Yb+ E3, In+ and Al+. Issues critical for heating of the trap structure and its predictability were identified and design recommendations developed.

  16. Electrospray/Ion Trap Mass Spectrometry for the Detection and Identification of Organisms

    SciTech Connect

    McLuckey, Scott A.; Stephenson, James L., Jr.

    1997-12-31

    Current electrospray ion trap methodology for rapid mixture analysis of proteins used for the identification of microorganisms is described. Development of ion/ion reaction techniques (e.g. reactions of multiply-charged protein cations with singly-charged anions) from both a fundamental and practical approach are presented, detailing the necessary steps and considerations involved in complex mixture analysis. Data describing the reduction of the initial charge states of electrospray ions to arbitrarily low values, the utility of ion/ion reactions for mixture separation on the millisecond time scale, and effects of excess singly-charged reactants on detection and storage efficiency are illustrated.

  17. Highly charged ion research at the Livermore electron beam ion traps

    SciTech Connect

    Beiersdorfer, P

    2004-01-04

    Spectroscopy performed with the three Livermore electron beam ion traps is reviewed, which is continuing and complementing the innumerable contributions to atomic physics provided over the years by heavy-ion accelerators. Numerous spectrometers were developed that cover the spectral bands from the visible to the hard x ray region. These enabled exhaustive line surveys useful for x-ray astrophysics and for systematic studies along iso-electronic sequences, such as the 4s-4p, 3s-3p, and 2s-2p transitions in ions of the Cu-I, Na-I, and Li-I sequences useful for studying QED and correlation effects as well as for precise determinations of atomic-nuclear interactions. They also enabled measurements of radiative transition probabilities of very long-lived (milli- and microseconds) and very short-live (femtosecond) levels. Because line excitation processes can be controlled by choice of the electron beam energy, the observed line intensities are used to infer cross sections for electron-impact excitation, dielectronic recombination, resonance excitation, and innershell ionization. These capabilities have recently been expanded to simulate x-ray emission from comets by charge exchange. Specific contributions to basic atomic physics, nuclear physics, and high-temperature diagnostics are illustrated.

  18. CID of singly charged antioxidants applied in lubricants by means of a 3D ion trap and a linear ion trap-Orbitrap mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Kassler, Alexander; Pittenauer, Ernst; Doerr, Nicole; Allmaier, Guenter

    2011-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the fragmentation behavior induced by low-energy collision-induced dissociation (LE-CID) of four selected antioxidants applied in lubricants, by two different types of ion trap mass spectrometers: a three-dimensional ion trap (3D-IT) and a linear IT (LIT) Orbitrap MS. Two sterically hindered phenols and two aromatic amines were selected as model compounds representing different antioxidant classes and were characterized by positive-ion electrospray ionization (ESI) and LE-CID. Various types of molecular ions (e.g. [M](+•) , [M + H](+) , [M + NH(4) ](+) or [M + Na](+) ) were used as precursor ions generating a significant number of structurally relevant product ions. Furthermore, the phenolic compounds were analyzed by negative-ion ESI. For both IT types applied for fragmentation, the antioxidants exhibited the same unusual LE-CID behavior: (1) they formed stable radical product ions and (2) CC bond cleavages of aliphatic substituents were observed and their respective cleavage sites depended on the precursor ion selected. This fragmentation provided information on the type of structural isomer usually not obtainable for branched aliphatic substituents utilizing LE-CID. Comparing the two instruments, the main benefit of applying the LIT-Orbitrap was direct access to elemental composition of product ions enabling unambiguous interpretation of fragmentation trees not obtainable by the 3D-IT device (e.g. loss of isobaric neutrals). It should be emphasized that the types of product ions formed do not depend on the type of IT analyzer applied. For characterizing degradation products of antioxidants, the LIT-Orbitrap hybrid system, allowing the determination of accurate m/z values for product ions, is the method of choice.

  19. Multisectional linear ion trap and novel loading method for optical spectroscopy of electron and nuclear transitions.

    PubMed

    Sysoev, Alexey A; Troyan, Victor I; Borisyuk, Peter V; Krasavin, Andrey V; Vasiliev, Oleg S; Palchikov, Vitaly G; Avdeev, Ivan A; Chernyshev, Denis M; Poteshin, Sergey S

    2015-01-01

    There is a growing need for the development of atomic and nuclear frequency standards because of the important contribution of methods for precision time and frequency measurements to the development of fundamental science, technology, and the economy. It is also conditioned by their potential use in optical clocks and quantum logic applications. It is especially important to develop a universal method that could allow one to use ions of most elements effectively (including ones that are not easily evaporated) proposed for the above-mentioned applications. A linear quadrupole ion trap for the optical spectroscopy of electron and nuclear transitions has been developed and evaluated experimentally. An ion source construction is based on an ultra-high vacuum evaporator in which a metal sample is subjected to an electron beam of energy up to 1 keV, resulting in the appearance of gaseous atoms and ions of various charge state. The linear ion trap consists of five successive quadrupole sections including an entrance quadrupole section, quadrupole mass filter, quadrupole ion guide, ion-trap section, and exit quadrupole section. The same radiofrequency but a different direct current voltage feeds the quadrupole sections. The instrument allows the mass and energy selected trapping of ions from ion beams of various intensities and their localization in the area of laser irradiation. The preliminary results presented show that the proposed instrument and methods allow one to produce effectively up to triply charged thorium ions as well as to trap ions for future spectroscopic study. The instrument is proposed for future use in optical clocks and quantum logic application development.

  20. High fidelity quantum gates of trapped ions in the presence of motional heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haddadfarshi, Farhang; Mintert, Florian

    2016-12-01

    We describe entangling quantum gates for trapped ions mediated by a dissipative bus mode and show that suitably designed, polychromatic control pulses decrease ion-phonon entanglement substantially while maintaining the mediated interaction. In particular for multi-qubit gates this yields a significant improvement in gate performance.

  1. Physical implementation of holonomic quantum computation in decoherence-free subspaces with trapped ions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Xinding; Zhang Qinghua; Wang, Z. D.

    2006-09-15

    We propose a feasible scheme to achieve holonomic quantum computation in a decoherence-free subspace (DFS) with trapped ions. By the application of appropriate bichromatic laser fields on the designated ions, we are able to construct two noncommutable single-qubit gates and one controlled-phase gate using the holonomic scenario in the encoded DFS.

  2. Quantum information experiments with 2D arrays of hundreds of trapped ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilmore, Kevin; Bohnet, Justin; Sawyer, Brian; Britton, Joseph; Wall, Michael; Foss-Feig, Michael; Rey, Ana Maria; Bollinger, John

    2016-05-01

    We summarize recent experimental work with 2D arrays of hundreds of trapped 9 Be+ ions stored in a Penning trap. Penning traps utilize static magnetic and electric fields to confine ions, and enable the trapping and laser cooling of ion crystals larger than typically possible in RF ion traps. We work with single-plane ion crystals where the ions form a triangular lattice through minimization of their Coulomb potential energy. The crystals rotate, and we present numerical studies that determine optimal operating parameters for producing low temperature, stable 2-dimensional crystals with Doppler laser cooling and a rotating wall potential. Our qubit is the electron spin-flip transition in the ground state of 9 Be+ and is sensitive to magnetic field fluctuations. Through mitigation of part-per-billion, vibration-induced magnetic field fluctuations we demonstrate T2 coherence times longer than 50 ms. We engineer long-range Ising interactions with spin-dependent optical dipole forces, and summarize recent measurements that characterize the entanglement generated through single-axis twisting. Supported by: JILA-NSF-PFC-1125844, NSF-PHY-1521080, ARO, AFOSR, AFOSR-MURI.

  3. An electrodynamic ion funnel interface for greater sensitivity and higher throughput with linear ion trap mass spectrometers

    SciTech Connect

    Page, Jason S.; Tang, Keqi; Smith, Richard D.

    2007-09-01

    An electrospray ionization interface incorporating an electrodynamic ion funnel has been designed and implemented in conjunction with a linear ion trap mass spectrometer (Thermo Electron, LTQ). We found ion transmission to be greatly improved by replacing the standard capillary-skimmer interface with the capillary-ion funnel interface. An infusion study using a serial dilution of a reserpine solution showed that ion injection times to fill the ion trap were reduced by ~90% which resulted in an ~10-fold increase in reported peak intensities. In liquid chromatography (LC)-MS and LC tandem MS (MS/MS) experiments performed using a proteomic sample from the bacterium, Shewanella oneidensis, the ion funnel interface provided an ~7-fold reduction in ion injection (accumulation) times. In a series of LC-MS/MS experiments we found that more dilute S. oneidensis samples provided more peptide and protein identifications when the ion funnel interface was used in place of the standard interface. This improvement was most pronounced at lower sample concentrations, where extended ion accumulation times are required, resulting in an ~2-fold increase in the number of protein identifications. Implementation of the ion funnel interface with a LTQ Fourier transform (FT) MS requiring much greater ion populations resulted in spectrum acquisition times reduced by ~25 to 50%.

  4. High resolution extreme ultraviolet spectrometer for an electron beam ion trap

    SciTech Connect

    Ohashi, Hayato; Yatsurugi, Junji; Nakamura, Nobuyuki; Sakaue, Hiroyuki A.

    2011-08-15

    An extreme ultraviolet spectrometer has been developed for spectroscopic studies of highly charged ions with an electron beam ion trap. It has a slit-less configuration with a spherical varied-line-spacing grating that provides a flat focal plane for grazing incidence light. Alternative use of two different gratings enables us to cover the wavelength range 1-25 nm. Test observations with the Tokyo electron beam ion trap demonstrate the high performance of the present spectrometer such as a resolving power of above 1000.

  5. Paul trapping of radioactive 6He+ ions and direct observation of their beta decay.

    PubMed

    Fléchard, X; Liénard, E; Méry, A; Rodríguez, D; Ban, G; Durand, D; Duval, F; Herbane, M; Labalme, M; Mauger, F; Naviliat-Cuncic, O; Thomas, J C; Velten, Ph

    2008-11-21

    We demonstrate that abundant quantities of short-lived beta unstable ions can be trapped in a novel transparent Paul trap and that their decay products can directly be detected in coincidence. Low energy 6He+ (807 ms half-life) ions were extracted from the SPIRAL source at GANIL, then decelerated, cooled, and bunched by means of the buffer gas cooling technique. More than 10(8) ions have been stored over a measuring period of six days, and about 10(5) decay coincidences between the beta particles and the 6Li++ recoiling ions have been recorded. The technique can be extended to other short-lived species, opening new possibilities for trap assisted decay experiments.

  6. Effects of trapped electrons on ion reflection in an oblique shock wave

    SciTech Connect

    Toida, Mieko; Inagaki, Junya

    2015-06-15

    A magnetosonic shock wave propagating obliquely to an external magnetic field can trap electrons and accelerate them to ultrarelativistic energies. The trapped electrons excite two-dimensional (2D) electromagnetic fluctuations with finite wavenumbers along the shock front. We study effects of the trapped electrons on ion motions through the 2D fluctuations. It is analytically shown that the fraction of ions reflected from the shock front is enhanced by the 2D fluctuations. This is confirmed by 2D (two space coordinates and three velocities) relativistic, electromagnetic particle simulations with full ion and electron dynamics and calculation of test ions in the electromagnetic fields averaged along the shock front. A comparison between 2D and one-dimensional electromagnetic particle simulations is also shown.

  7. Phase-Stable Free-Space Optical Lattices for Trapped Ions.

    PubMed

    Schmiegelow, C T; Kaufmann, H; Ruster, T; Schulz, J; Kaushal, V; Hettrich, M; Schmidt-Kaler, F; Poschinger, U G

    2016-01-22

    We demonstrate control of the absolute phase of an optical lattice with respect to a single trapped ion. The lattice is generated by off-resonant free-space laser beams, and we actively stabilize its phase by measuring its ac-Stark shift on a trapped ion. The ion is localized within the standing wave to better than 2% of its period. The locked lattice allows us to apply displacement operations via resonant optical forces with a controlled direction in phase space. Moreover, we observe the lattice-induced phase evolution of spin superposition states in order to analyze the relevant decoherence mechanisms. Finally, we employ lattice-induced phase shifts for inferring the variation of the ion position over the 157  μm range along the trap axis at accuracies of better than 6 nm.

  8. Phase-Stable Free-Space Optical Lattices for Trapped Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmiegelow, C. T.; Kaufmann, H.; Ruster, T.; Schulz, J.; Kaushal, V.; Hettrich, M.; Schmidt-Kaler, F.; Poschinger, U. G.

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate control of the absolute phase of an optical lattice with respect to a single trapped ion. The lattice is generated by off-resonant free-space laser beams, and we actively stabilize its phase by measuring its ac-Stark shift on a trapped ion. The ion is localized within the standing wave to better than 2% of its period. The locked lattice allows us to apply displacement operations via resonant optical forces with a controlled direction in phase space. Moreover, we observe the lattice-induced phase evolution of spin superposition states in order to analyze the relevant decoherence mechanisms. Finally, we employ lattice-induced phase shifts for inferring the variation of the ion position over the 157 μ m range along the trap axis at accuracies of better than 6 nm.

  9. Ion trap mass spectrometry in the structural analysis of haemoglobin peptides modified by epichlorohydrin and diepoxybutane.

    PubMed

    Miraglia, Nadia; Basile, Adriana; Pieri, Maria; Acampora, Antonio; Malorni, Livia; De Giulio, Beatrice; Sannolo, Nicola

    2002-01-01

    Ion trap mass spectrometry has been shown to be particularly suitable for the structural analysis of high molecular weight peptides directly fragmented in the mass analyser without needing further sub-digestion reactions. Here we report the advantages of using multi-stage ion trap mass spectrometry in the structural characterisation of haemoglobin alkylated with epichlorohydrin and diepoxybutane. Alkylated globins were digested with trypsin and the peptide mixtures were analysed by MS(3). This technique allows the sequential fragmentation of peptides under analysis, giving rise to MS(3) product ion spectra with additional information with respect to MS(2) mass spectra. The results obtained complete the previously reported structural characterisation of alkylated haemoglobin, demonstrating the potential of ion trap mass spectrometry.

  10. Microfabricated surface-electrode ion traps for scalable quantum information processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidelin, S.; Britton, J.; Chiaverini, J.; Reichle, R.; Bollinger, J. J.; Leibfried, D.; Wesenberg, J. H.; Blakestad, R. B.; Epstein, R. J.; Amini, J. M.; Brown, K. R.; Home, J. P.; Hume, D. B.; Itano, W. M.; Jost, J. D.; Knill, E.; Langer, C.; Ozeri, R.; Shiga, N.; Wineland, D. J.

    2007-06-01

    We confine individual atomic ions in rf Paul traps with a novel geometry where the electrodes are located in a single plane and the ions are confined above this plane ootnotetextJ. Chiaverini et al., Quantum Inf. Comput. 5, 419 (2005).^, ootnotetextS. Seidelin et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 253003 (2006).^, ootnotetextJ. Britton et al., quant-ph/0605170.. These devices are realized with simple fabrication procedures, making them potentially scalable for quantum information processing using large numbers of ions. For traps fabricated from gold on fused quartz, the ions are 40 micrometers above the planar electrodes and their heating rate is low enough to make the traps useful for quantum information processing.

  11. Theory and simulation of ion Coulomb crystal formation in a Penning trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asprusten, Martin; Worthington, Simon; Thompson, Richard C.

    2014-01-01

    Ion Coulomb crystals (ICCs) are formed by laser-cooled ions in both radio-frequency and Penning traps. In radio-frequency traps, the crystals are generally stationary. In Penning traps, ICCs always rotate. The frequency of rotation is often set by an applied rotating wall drive that forces the crystal to rotate at the same frequency as the drive. In the absence of any applied rotating or oscillating fields, ICCs in a Penning trap can be in stable equilibrium with a range of rotation frequencies. The density and shape of the crystal adjust with the rotation frequency to ensure that equilibrium is reached. Here, we show that the parameters of the radial laser-cooling beam determine the rotation frequency of a small crystal in a Penning trap when no driving fields are present. We demonstrate, using an approximate theoretical treatment and realistic simulations, that the crystal rotation frequency is independent of the number of ions and the trap parameters, so long as the crystal radius remains smaller than the cooling laser beam waist. As the rotation frequency increases, the crystal eventually becomes a linear string, at which point it is no longer able to adjust its density. Instead, a small amplitude vibration in the zigzag mode of oscillation manifests itself as a rotation of the crystal at a fixed frequency that depends only on the applied trap potential.

  12. Microfabricated ion trap mass spectrometry for characterization of organics and potential biomarkers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Austin, Daniel

    Mass spectrometry is a powerful analytical technique with a strong history in planetary exploration, and is the method of choice for detection and identification of organic and biological molecules. MS instrumentation can also be combined with techniques such as gas chromatography, liquid chromatography, or chiral separation, which are particularly important for analysis of complex mixtures or possible homochirality. Ion traps have several inherent advantages, including speed of analysis (important for GC-MS), MS/MS capabilities (important to identification of unknown compounds), excellent sensitivity, and ease of coupling with ambient ionization techniques that are under development for biomolecule detection. We report on progress in using microfabrication techniques to produce radiofrequency quadrupole ion traps that are much smaller, lighter, and lower power than existing instruments. We produce ion traps using an assembly of two ceramic plates, the facing surfaces of which are lithographically patterned with electrodes. This approach allows great flexibility in the trap geometry, and we have demonstrated working mass spectrometers with quadrupole, linear, and toroidal trapping fields. The approach also allows correction of higher-order terms in the electric field. With this system, mass resolution of up to 1300 has been demonstrated, which is adequate for identification of a wide range of potential biomarkers. Capabilities such as tandem analysis have also been demonstrated. Of particular interest is an ion trap that contains both quadrupole and toroidal trapping regions simultaneously and coaxially. Ions can be trapped as a large reservoir in the toroidal region and introduced in small batches to the quadrupole region for mass analysis. This capability is particularly valuable where the sample of interest is very small, such as microfossil with trace organics, and where the organic inventory is both complex and unknown. Development and results of this device

  13. Final Report - Advanced Ion Trap Mass Spectrometry Program - Oak Ridge National Laboratory - Sandia National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Whitten, W.B.

    2002-12-18

    This report covers the three main projects that collectively comprised the Advanced Ion Trap Mass Spectrometry Program. Chapter 1 describes the direct interrogation of individual particles by laser desorption within the ion trap mass spectrometer analyzer. The goals were (1) to develop an ''intelligent trigger'' capable of distinguishing particles of biological origin from those of nonbiological origin in the background and interferent particles and (2) to explore the capability for individual particle identification. Direct interrogation of particles by laser ablation and ion trap mass spectrometry was shown to have good promise for discriminating between particles of biological origin and those of nonbiological origin, although detailed protocols and operating conditions were not worked out. A library of more than 20,000 spectra of various types of biological particles has been assembled. Methods based on multivariate analysis and on neural networks were used to discriminate between particles of biological origin and those of nonbiological origin. It was possible to discriminate between at least some species of bacteria if mass spectra of several hundred similar particles were obtained. Chapter 2 addresses the development of a new ion trap mass analyzer geometry that offers the potential for a significant increase in ion storage capacity for a given set of analyzer operating conditions. This geometry may lead to the development of smaller, lower-power field-portable ion trap mass spectrometers while retaining laboratory-scale analytical performance. A novel ion trap mass spectrometer based on toroidal ion storage geometry has been developed. The analyzer geometry is based on the edge rotation of a quadrupolar ion trap cross section into the shape of a torus. Initial performance of this device was poor, however, due to the significant contribution of nonlinear fields introduced by the rotation of the symmetric ion-trapping geometry. These nonlinear resonances

  14. Experimental quantum simulations of many-body physics with trapped ions.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Ch; Porras, Diego; Schaetz, Tobias

    2012-02-01

    Direct experimental access to some of the most intriguing quantum phenomena is not granted due to the lack of precise control of the relevant parameters in their naturally intricate environment. Their simulation on conventional computers is impossible, since quantum behaviour arising with superposition states or entanglement is not efficiently translatable into the classical language. However, one could gain deeper insight into complex quantum dynamics by experimentally simulating the quantum behaviour of interest in another quantum system, where the relevant parameters and interactions can be controlled and robust effects detected sufficiently well. Systems of trapped ions provide unique control of both the internal (electronic) and external (motional) degrees of freedom. The mutual Coulomb interaction between the ions allows for large interaction strengths at comparatively large mutual ion distances enabling individual control and readout. Systems of trapped ions therefore exhibit a prominent system in several physical disciplines, for example, quantum information processing or metrology. Here, we will give an overview of different trapping techniques of ions as well as implementations for coherent manipulation of their quantum states and discuss the related theoretical basics. We then report on the experimental and theoretical progress in simulating quantum many-body physics with trapped ions and present current approaches for scaling up to more ions and more-dimensional systems.

  15. EBIT (Electron Beam Ion Trap), N-Division Experimental Physics. Annual report, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, D.

    1995-10-01

    The experimental groups in the Electron Beam Ion Trap (EBIT) program continue to perform front-line research with trapped and extracted highly charged ions (HCI) in the areas of ion/surface interactions, atomic spectroscopy, electron-ion interaction and structure measurements, highly charged ion confinement, and EBIT development studies. The ion surface/interaction studies which were initiated five years ago have reached a stage where they an carry out routine investigations, as well as produce breakthrough results towards the development of novel nanotechnology. At EBIT and SuperEBIT studies of the x-ray emission from trapped ions continue to produce significant atomic structure data with high precision for few electron systems of high-Z ions. Furthermore, diagnostics development for magnetic and laser fusion, supporting research for the x-ray laser and weapons programs, and laboratory astrophysics experiments in support of NASA`s astrophysics program are a continuing effort. The two-electron contributions to the binding energy of helium like ions were measured for the first time. The results are significant because their precision is an order of magnitude better than those of competing measurements at accelerators, and the novel technique isolates the energy corrections that are the most interesting. The RETRAP project which was initiated three years ago has reached a stage where trapping, confining and electronic cooling of HCI ions up to Th{sup 80+} can be performed routinely. Measurements of the rates and cross sections for electron transfer from H{sub 2} performed to determine the lifetime of HCI up to Xe{sup q+} and Th{sup q+} (35 {le} q {le} 80) have been studied at mean energies estimated to be {approximately} 5 q eV. This combination of heavy ions with very high charges and very low energies is rare in nature, but may be encountered in planned fusion energy demonstration devices, in highly charged ion sources, or in certain astrophysical events.

  16. Effect of Trapped Energetic Ions on MHD Activity in Spherical Tori

    SciTech Connect

    R.B. White; Ya.I. Kolesnichenko; V.V. Lutsenko; V.S. Marchenko

    2002-05-30

    It is shown that the increase of beta (the ratio of plasma pressure to the magnetic field pressure) may change the character of the influence of trapped energetic ions on MHD stability in spherical tori. Namely, the energetic ions, which stabilize MHD modes (such as the ideal-kink mode, collisionless tearing mode, and semi-collisional tearing mode) at low beta, have a destabilizing influence at high beta unless the radial distribution of the energetic ions is very peaked.

  17. Research on heat transfer characteristics and cold trap capacity of a water catcher during vacuum pre-cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Enhai; Liu, Yin; Wang, Changzhong; Liu, Shiqi

    2017-01-01

    Effect of vacuum pre-cooling process on apples was a complex process of heat and mass transfers. The research is based on the physical properties of apples and their heat and mass transfer mechanisms during vacuum pre-cooling. As for the heat transfer characteristics of a water catcher in vacuum pre-cooling, the research studied the heat transfer mechanism and calculated the cold trap capacity by experimental means, and it cold trap capacity were evaluated to supply references for future research into the practical applications of such vacuum pre-cooling techniques. The results provide a theoretical basis for exploring better pre-cooling process conditions and the design of water catchers. The experimental results show that, when the wall temperature of the water catcher is -5°C, the optimal cold trap capacity is about 90.72g and the required cooling capacity is 210.13W in the vacuum pre-cooling of 201.9g of apples.

  18. Self-generated zonal flows in the plasma turbulence driven by trapped-ion and trapped-electron instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drouot, T.; Gravier, E.; Reveille, T.; Collard, M.

    2015-10-01

    This paper presents a study of zonal flows generated by trapped-electron mode and trapped-ion mode micro turbulence as a function of two plasma parameters—banana width and electron temperature. For this purpose, a gyrokinetic code considering only trapped particles is used. First, an analytical equation giving the predicted level of zonal flows is derived from the quasi-neutrality equation of our model, as a function of the density fluctuation levels and the banana widths. Then, the influence of the banana width on the number of zonal flows occurring in the system is studied using the gyrokinetic code. Finally, the impact of the temperature ratio Te/Ti on the reduction of zonal flows is shown and a close link is highlighted between reduction and different gyro-and-bounce-average ion and electron density fluctuation levels. This reduction is found to be due to the amplitudes of gyro-and-bounce-average density perturbations ne and ni gradually becoming closer, which is in agreement with the analytical results given by the quasi-neutrality equation.

  19. Self-generated zonal flows in the plasma turbulence driven by trapped-ion and trapped-electron instabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Drouot, T.; Gravier, E.; Reveille, T.; Collard, M.

    2015-10-15

    This paper presents a study of zonal flows generated by trapped-electron mode and trapped-ion mode micro turbulence as a function of two plasma parameters—banana width and electron temperature. For this purpose, a gyrokinetic code considering only trapped particles is used. First, an analytical equation giving the predicted level of zonal flows is derived from the quasi-neutrality equation of our model, as a function of the density fluctuation levels and the banana widths. Then, the influence of the banana width on the number of zonal flows occurring in the system is studied using the gyrokinetic code. Finally, the impact of the temperature ratio T{sub e}/T{sub i} on the reduction of zonal flows is shown and a close link is highlighted between reduction and different gyro-and-bounce-average ion and electron density fluctuation levels. This reduction is found to be due to the amplitudes of gyro-and-bounce-average density perturbations n{sub e} and n{sub i} gradually becoming closer, which is in agreement with the analytical results given by the quasi-neutrality equation.

  20. Cold ion UV photofragmentation spectroscopy and dynamics (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feraud, Geraldine; Broquier, Michel; Dedonder, Claude; Jouvet, Christophe; Gregoire, Gilles; Soorkia, Satchin

    2014-12-01

    Up to ten years ago, very little was known about the excited states of protonated amino acids isolated in the gas phase. From the experimental point of view, the study was hampered by the lack of ease of production of such species in sufficient density to apply photon-based techniques. With the development and widespread use of electrospray ionization sources coupled with modified or homebuilt mass spectrometers, there has been significant research into the spectroscopy of biomimetic and biologically relevant molecules. Besides, these species are floppy such that an efficient cooling is required to record clear spectroscopy. Warm protonated species display congested spectra. To extract precise spectroscopic information and avoid spectral congestion, the species need to be cooled down to less than 50 K. We present our latest results on the electronic spectroscopy of protonated phenylalanine and tyrosine on a large spectral domain (225-290 nm). These species are studied in a new simplified apparatus combining an electrospray ionization source, a cryogenically cooled quadrupole ion trap (˜10 K) and time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The role of proton transfer from the NH3+ moiety to the p-ring or to CO of the carboxylic acid group is evidenced by UV photofragment spectroscopy. This first step controls the fragmentation pathways, which strongly depend on the nature of the electronic excited states, i.e. ππ*, ππ*CO and πσNH 3.

  1. Assembling a ring-shaped crystal in a microfabricated surface ion trap

    SciTech Connect

    Stick, Daniel Lynn; Tabakov, Boyan; Benito, Francisco; Blain, Matthew; Clark, Craig R.; Clark, Susan; Haltli, Raymond A.; Maunz, Peter; Sterk, Jonathan D.; Tigges, Chris

    2015-09-01

    We report on experiments with a microfabricated surface trap designed for confining a chain of ions in a ring. Uniform ion separation over most of the ring is achieved with a rotationally symmetric design and by measuring and suppressing undesired electric fields. After reducing stray fields, the ions are confined primarily by a radio-frequency pseudopotential and their mutual Coulomb repulsion. As a result, approximately 400 40Ca+ ions with an average separation of 9 μm comprise the ion crystal.

  2. Optimizing the Stark-decelerator beamline for the trapping of cold molecules using evolutionary strategies

    SciTech Connect

    Gilijamse, Joop J.; Kuepper, Jochen; Hoekstra, Steven; Vanhaecke, Nicolas; Meerakker, Sebastiaan Y. T. van de; Meijer, Gerard

    2006-06-15

    We demonstrate feedback control optimization for the Stark deceleration and trapping of neutral polar molecules using evolutionary strategies. In a Stark-decelerator beamline, pulsed electric fields are used to decelerate OH radicals and subsequently store them in an electrostatic trap. The efficiency of the deceleration and trapping process is determined by the exact timings of the applied electric field pulses. Automated optimization of these timings yields an increase of 40% of the number of trapped OH radicals.

  3. Characterization of environmental samples using ion trap-secondary ion mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Groenewold, G.S.; Appelhans, A.D.; Ingram, J.C.

    1998-02-01

    The detection of chemical warfare agent residues on environmental surfaces is an important analytical activity because of the potential for proliferation of these weapons, and for environmental monitoring in areas where they are stored. Historically, one of the most widely used agents has been bis(2-chloroethyl) sulfide, also known as mustard gas and HD. It was initially used in combat in 1917; by the end of the First World War, more than 16% of all casualties were due to chemicals, in most cases mustard. Manufacture of mustard is continuing to this day; consequently, there are ongoing opportunities for exposure. 2-Chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (CEES) is used as a simulant for mustard (HD) in a study to develop secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) for rapid, semi-quantitative detection of mustard on soil. Using SIMS with single stage mass spectrometry, a signature for CEES can be unequivocally observed only at the highest concentrations (0.1 monolayer and above). Selectivity and sensitivity are markedly improved employing multiple-stage mass spectrometry using an ion trap. C{sub 2}H{sub 5}SC{sub 2}H{sub 4}{sup +} from CEES eliminates C{sub 2}H{sub 4} and H{sub 2}S, which are highly diagnostic. CEES was detected at 0.0012 monolayer on soil. A single analysis could be conducted in under 5 minutes.

  4. Magnetic reconnection and modification of the Hall physics due to cold ions at the magnetopause

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    André, M.; Li, W.; Toledo-Redondo, S.; Khotyaintsev, Yu. V.; Vaivads, A.; Graham, D. B.; Norgren, C.; Burch, J.; Lindqvist, P.-A.; Marklund, G.; Ergun, R.; Torbert, R.; Magnes, W.; Russell, C. T.; Giles, B.; Moore, T. E.; Chandler, M. O.; Pollock, C.; Young, D. T.; Avanov, L. A.; Dorelli, J. C.; Gershman, D. J.; Paterson, W. R.; Lavraud, B.; Saito, Y.

    2016-07-01

    Observations by the four Magnetospheric Multiscale spacecraft are used to investigate the Hall physics of a magnetopause magnetic reconnection separatrix layer. Inside this layer of currents and strong normal electric fields, cold (eV) ions of ionospheric origin can remain frozen-in together with the electrons. The cold ions reduce the Hall current. Using a generalized Ohm's law, the electric field is balanced by the sum of the terms corresponding to the Hall current, the v × B drifting cold ions, and the divergence of the electron pressure tensor. A mixture of hot and cold ions is common at the subsolar magnetopause. A mixture of length scales caused by a mixture of ion temperatures has significant effects on the Hall physics of magnetic reconnection.

  5. Wave packet dynamics of an atomic ion in a Paul trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashemloo, A.; Dion, C. M.; Rahali, G.

    2016-07-01

    Using numerical simulations of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation, we study the full quantum dynamics of the motion of an atomic ion in a linear Paul trap. Such a trap is based on a time-varying, periodic electric field and hence corresponds to a time-dependent potential for the ion, which we model exactly. We compare the center-of-mass motion with that obtained from classical equations of motion, as well as to results based on a time-independent effective potential. We also study the oscillations of the width of the ion’s wave packet, including close to the border between stable (bounded) and unstable (unbounded) trajectories. Our results confirm that the center-of-mass motion always follows the classical trajectory, that the width of the wave packet is bounded for trapping within the stability region, and therefore that the classical trapping criterion is fully applicable to quantum motion.

  6. Infrared multiphoton dissociation of peptide cations in a dual pressure linear ion trap mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Myles W; Smith, Suncerae I; Ledvina, Aaron R; Madsen, James A; Coon, Joshua J; Schwartz, Jae C; Stafford, George C; Brodbelt, Jennifer S

    2009-10-01

    A dual pressure linear ion trap mass spectrometer was modified to permit infrared multiphoton dissociation (IRMPD) in each of the two cells-the first a high pressure cell operated at nominally 5 x 10(-3) Torr and the second a low pressure cell operated at nominally 3 x 10(-4) Torr. When IRMPD was performed in the high pressure cell, most peptide ions did not undergo significant photodissociation; however, in the low pressure cell peptide cations were efficiently dissociated with less than 25 ms of IR irradiation regardless of charge state. IRMPD of peptide cations allowed the detection of low m/z product ions including the y(1) fragments and immonium ions which are not typically observed by ion trap collision induced dissociation (CID). Photodissociation efficiencies of approximately 100% and MS/MS (tandem mass spectrometry) efficiencies of greater than 60% were observed for both multiply and singly protonated peptides. In general, higher sequence coverage of peptides was obtained using IRMPD over CID. Further, greater than 90% of the product ion current in the IRMPD mass spectra of doubly charged peptide ions was composed of singly charged product ions compared to the CID mass spectra in which the abundances of the multiply and singly charged product ions were equally divided. Highly charged primary product ions also underwent efficient photodissociation to yield singly charged secondary product ions, thus simplifying the IRMPD product ion mass spectra.

  7. Infrared Multiphoton Dissociation of Peptide Cations in a Dual Pressure Linear Ion Trap Mass Spectrometer

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Myles W.; Smith, Suncerae I.; Ledvina, Aaron R.; Madsen, James A.; Coon, Joshua J.; Schwartz, Jae C.; Stafford, George C.; Brodbelt, Jennifer S.

    2009-01-01

    A dual pressure linear ion trap mass spectrometer was modified to permit infrared multiphoton dissociation (IRMPD) in each of the two cells - the first a high pressure cell operated at nominally 5 × 10-3 Torr and the second a low pressure cell operated at nominally 3 × 10-4 Torr. When IRMPD was performed in the high pressure cell, most peptide ions did not undergo significant photodissociation; however, in the low pressure cell peptide cations were efficiently dissociated with less than 25 ms of IR irradiation regardless of charge state. IRMPD of peptide cations allowed the detection of low m/z product ions including the y1 fragments and immonium ions which are not typically observed by ion trap collision induced dissociation (CID). Photodissociation efficiencies of ~100% and MS/MS (tandem mass spectrometry) efficiencies of greater than 60% were observed for both multiply and singly protonated peptides. In general, higher sequence coverage of peptides was obtained using IRMPD over CID. Further, greater than 90% of the product ion current in the IRMPD mass spectra of doubly charged peptide ions was composed of singly charged product ions compared to the CID mass spectra in which the abundances of the multiply and singly charged product ions were equally divided. Highly charged primary product ions also underwent efficient photodissociation to yield singly charged secondary product ions, thus simplifying the IRMPD product ion mass spectra. PMID:19739654

  8. Mapping the stability diagram of a digital ion trap (DIT) mass spectrometer varying the duty cycle of the trapping rectangular waveform.

    PubMed

    Berton, Alberto; Traldi, Pietro; Ding, Li; Brancia, Francesco L

    2008-04-01

    In a digital ion trap the beta(r) and beta(z) boundary lines of the stability diagram are determined experimentally using an innovative approach. In the rectangular waveform-driven digital ion trap (DIT) manipulation of the waveform duty cycle allows introduction of a precisely defined DC quadrupole component into the main trapping field. Variation of the duty cycle can be controlled at software level without any hardware modification. The data generated use peptide ions, which produce stability diagrams in good agreement with the theoretical stability diagrams previously determined by simulation studies.

  9. A "screened" electrostatic ion trap for enhanced mass resolution, mass accuracy, reproducibility, and upper mass limit in Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wang, M; Marshall, A G

    1989-06-01

    Until now, it was thought that the optimal static electromagnetic ion trap for Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometry should be designed to produce a quadrupolar electrical potential, for which the ion cyclotron frequency is independent of the ion's preexcitation location within the trap. However, a quadrupolar potential results in a transverse (to the magnetic field) electric field that increases linearly with distance from the center of the trap. That radially linear electric field shifts the observed ICR frequency, increases the ICR orbital radius, and ultimately limits the highest mass-to-charge ratio ion that can be contained within the trap. In this paper, we propose a new static electromagnetic ion "trap" in which grounded screens placed just inside the usual "trapping" plates produce a good approximation to a "particle-in-a-box" potential (rather than the quadrupolar "harmonic oscillator" potential). SIMION calculations confirm that the electric potential of the screened trap is near zero almost everywhere within the trap. For our screened orthorhombic (2.5 in. X 2 in. X 2 in.) trap, the experimental ICR frequency shift due to trapping voltage is reduced by a factor of approximately 100, and the experimental variation of ICR frequency with ICR radius is reduced by a factor of approximately 10 compared to a conventional (unscreened) 2-in. cubic ion trap.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  10. An electrodynamic ion funnel interface for greater sensitivity and higher throughput with linear ion trap mass spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Page, Jason S.; Tang, Keqi; Smith, Richard D.

    2007-09-01

    An electrospray ionization interface incorporating an electrodynamic ion funnel has been designed and implemented on a linear ion trap mass spectrometer (Thermo Electron, LTQ). We found ion transmission to be greatly improved by replacing the standard capillary-skimmer interface with the capillary-ion funnel interface. An infusion study using a serial dilution of a reserpine solution showed that ion injection (accumulation) times to fill the ion trap at a given automatic gain control (AGC) target value were reduced by ~90% which resulted in an ~10-fold increase in peak intensities. In liquid chromatography tandem MS (LC-MS/MS) experiments performed using a global protein digest sample from the bacterium, Shewanella oneidensis, more peptides and proteins were identified when the ion funnel interface was used in place of the standard interface. This improvement was most pronounced at lower sample concentrations, where extended ion accumulation times are required, resulting in an ~2-fold increase in the number of protein identifications. Implementation of the ion funnel interface on a LTQ Fourier transform (FT) mass spectrometer showed a ~25-50% reduction in spectrum acquisition time. The duty cycle improvement in this case was due to the ion accumulation event contributing a larger portion to the total spectrum acquisition time.

  11. Planar ion trap (retarding potential analyzer) experiment for atmosphere explorer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, W. B.; Sanatani, S.; Lippincott, C. R.; Zuccaro, D. R.

    1982-01-01

    The retarding potential analyzer and drift meter were carried aboard all three Atmosphere Explorer spacecraft. These instruments measure the total thermal ion concentration and temperature, the bulk thermal ion velocity vector and some limited properties of the relative abundance of H(+), He(+), O(+) and molecular ions. These instruments functioned with no internal failures on all the spacecraft. On AE-E there existed some evidence for external surface contamination that damaged the integrity of the RPA sweep grids. This led to some difficulties in data reduction and interpretation that did not prove to be a disastrous problem. The AE-D spacecraft functioned for only a few months before it re-entered. During this time the satellite suffered from a nutation about the spin axis of about + or - 2 deg. This 2 deg modulation was superimposed upon the ion drift meter horizontal ion arrival angle output requiring the employment of filtering techniques to retrieve the real data.

  12. Rotational dynamics of a diatomic molecular ion in a Paul trap

    SciTech Connect

    Hashemloo, A.; Dion, C. M.

    2015-11-28

    We present models for a heteronuclear diatomic molecular ion in a linear Paul trap in a rigid-rotor approximation, one purely classical and the other where the center-of-mass motion is treated classically, while rotational motion is quantized. We study the rotational dynamics and their influence on the motion of the center-of-mass, in the presence of the coupling between the permanent dipole moment of the ion and the trapping electric field. We show that the presence of the permanent dipole moment affects the trajectory of the ion and that it departs from the Mathieu equation solution found for atomic ions. For the case of quantum rotations, we also evidence the effect of the above-mentioned coupling on the rotational states of the ion.

  13. A Tuning Method for Electrically Compensated Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometer Traps

    PubMed Central

    Brustkern, Adam M.; Rempel, Don L.; Gross, Michael L.

    2010-01-01

    We describe a method for tuning electrically compensated ion cyclotron resonance (ICR) traps by tracking the observed cyclotron frequency of an ion cloud at different oscillation mode amplitudes. Although we have used this method to tune the compensation voltages of a custom-built electrically compensated trap, the approach is applicable to other designs that incorporate electrical compensation. To evaluate the effectiveness of tuning, we examined the frequency shift as a function of cyclotron orbit size at different z-mode oscillation amplitudes. The cyclotron frequencies varied by ~ 12 ppm for ions with low z-mode oscillation amplitudes compared to those with high z-mode amplitudes. This frequency difference decreased to ~1 ppm by one iteration of trap tuning. PMID:20060743

  14. Parity-relevant zitterbewegung and quantum simulation by a single trapped ion

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Kunling; Liu Tao; Feng Mang; Yang Wanli; Wang Kelin

    2010-12-15

    Zitterbewegung (ZB), the trembling of free relativistic electrons in a vacuum, could be simulated by a single trapped ion. We focus on the variations of ZB under different parity conditions and find no ZB in the case of odd or even parity. ZB occurs only for the admixture of the odd- and even-parity states. We also show that a similar role is played by the parity operator for the trapped ion in Fock-state representation and the space-inversion operator for a realistic relativistic electron. Although the ZB effect is invisible in a relativistic electron, preparation of the trapped ion in different parity states is a sophisticated job, which makes it possible to observe the parity-relevant ZB effects with currently available techniques.

  15. Error in trapped-ion quantum gates due to spontaneous photon scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozeri, R.; Langer, C.; Jost, J. D.; Blakestad, R. B.; Britton, J.; Chiaverini, J.; Hume, D.; Itano, W. M.; Knill, E.; Leibfried, D.; Reichle, R.; Seidelin, S.; Wesenberg, J. H.; Wineland, D. J.

    2006-05-01

    Quantum bits that are encoded into hyperfine states of trapped ions are a promising system for Quantum Information Processing (QIP). Quantum gates performed on trapped ions use laser induced stimulated Raman transitions. The spontaneous scattering of photons therefore sets a fundamental limit to the gate fidelity. Here we present a calculation that explores these limits. Errors are shown to arise from two sources. The first is due to spin relaxation (spontaneous Raman photon-scattering events) and the second due to the momentum-recoil that is imparted to the trapped ions in the scattering process. It is shown that the gate error due to spontaneous photon scattering can be reduced to very small values with the use of high laser power. It is further shown that error levels required for fault-tolerant QIP are within reach of experimentally realistic laser parameters.

  16. Dust Acoustic Solitary Waves in Dusty Plasma with Trapped Electrons Having Different Temperature Nonthermal Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deka, Manoj Kr.

    2016-12-01

    In this report, a detailed investigation on the study of dust acoustics solitary waves solution with negatively dust charge fluctuation in dusty plasma corresponding to lower and higher temperature nonthermal ions with trapped electrons is presented. We consider temporal variation of dust charge as a source of dissipation term to derive the lower order modified Kadomtsev-Petviashvili equation by using the reductive perturbation technique. Solitary wave solution is obtained with the help of sech method in presence of trapped electrons and low (and high) temperature nonthermal ions. Both nonthermality of ions and trapped state of the electrons are found to have an imperative control on the nonlinear coefficient, dissipative coefficient as well as height of the wave potential.

  17. Ring-shaped Wigner crystals of trapped ions at the micronscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Haokun; Urban, Erik; Noel, Crystal; Chuang, Alexander; Xia, Yang; Hemmerling, Borge; Wang, Yuan; Zhang, Xiang; Haeffner, Hartmut

    Trapped ion crystals are ideal platforms to study many-body physics and quantum information processing, with both the internal electronic states and external motional degree-of-freedoms controllable at the single quantum level. In contrast to conventional, finite, linear chains of ions, a ring topology exhibiting periodic boundary conditions and rotational symmetry opens up a new directions to diverse topics. However, previous implementations of ion rings result in small aspect ratios (<0.07) of ion-electrode distance to ring diameter, making the rotational symmetry of the ion crystals prone to stray electric fields from imperfections of the trap electrodes, particularly evident at low temperatures. Here, using a new trap design with a 60-fold improvement of this aspect ratio, we demonstrate crystallization of 40Ca+ ions in a ring with rotational energy barriers comparable to the thermal energy of Doppler laser cooled ion crystals. When further reducing the rotational energy barriers, we observe delocalization of the ion rings. With this result, we enter a regime where quantum topological effects can be studied and novel quantum computation and simulation experiments can be implemented.

  18. RF Manipulation of Ions in the High Performance Antiproton Trap (HiPAT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearson, J. Boise; Martin, James J.; Sims, William H.; Chakrabarti, Suman; Lewis, Raymond A.; Rodgers, Stephen L. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The annihilation of antimatter provides the highest mass specific energy of any other known reaction. Proper harnessing of this energy holds great promise for future space propulsion systems. Many different propulsion concepts have been proposed that take advantage of antimatter, either using matter-antimatter as the primary fuel, or as a 'spark plug' for fusion and fission systems. In order to begin to address these concepts experimentally, a method of storing and transporting antimatter must be developed. The High Performance Antiproton Trap (HiPAT) is a first-generation storage and transportation device designed to store and transport 10(exp 12) antiprotons with a storage half-life of 18 days. It uses a Penning-Malmberg ion trap with a 4T magnetic field and 20 kV potential. This will enable researchers much more flexibility in the design of antimatter experiments related to propulsion. Ions cannot be stored indefinitely in a real trap, as ion cloud instabilities develop from imperfections in manufacturing and misalignments in assembly. Previous work has been done at both the National Institute of Standards and University of California in San Diego in using RF (radio frequency) signals to both diagnose and confine the ion cloud. Two electrodes in the trap have been segmented to allow both reception and transmission of RF waves in the ion cloud. Experiments are underway to determine the number of ions and density in the cloud by "listening" to protons contained in the HiPAT. Currently we believe the density of ions stored in the trap is roughly 10(exp 15) m(exp -3). Development of non-destructive techniques is vital to the project goals, enabling continuous monitoring of the quantities stored in the system. Experimental work is also being done in identifying RF transmission frequencies that can manipulate the density of the cloud, by exchanging energy and momentum between the RF wave and the ions. Preliminary experiments have demonstrated this interaction.

  19. Operational Parameters, Considerations, and Design Decisions for Resource-Constrained Ion Trap Mass Spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danell, Ryan M.; VanAmerom, Friso H. W.; Pinnick, Veronica; Cotter, Robert J.; Brickerhoff, William; Mahaffy, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Mass spectrometers are increasingly finding applications in new and unique areas, often in situations where key operational resources (i.e. power, weight and size) are limited. One such example is the Mars Organic Molecule Analyzer (MOMA). This instrument is a joint venture between NASA and the European Space Agency (ESA) to develop an ion trap mass spectrometer for chemical analysis on Mars. The constraints on such an instrument are significant as are the performance requirements. While the ideal operating parameters for an ion trap are generally well characterized, methods to maintain analytical performance with limited power and system weight need to be investigated and tested. Methods Experiments have been performed on two custom ion trap mass spectrometers developed as prototypes for the MOMA instrument. This hardware consists of quadrupole ion trap electrodes that are 70% the size of common commercial instrumentation. The trapping RF voltage is created with a custom tank circuit that can be tuned over a range of RF frequencies and is driven using laboratory supplies and amplifiers. The entire instrument is controlled with custom Lab VIEW software that allows a high degree of flexibility in the definition of the scan function defining the ion trap experiment. Ions are typically generated via an internal electron ionization source, however, a laser desorption source is also in development for analysis of larger intact molecules. Preliminary Data The main goals in this work have been to reduce the power required to generate the radio frequency trapping field used in an ion trap mass spectrometer. Generally minimizing the power will also reduce the volume and mass of the electronics to support the instrument. In order to achieve optimum performance, commercial instruments typically utilize RF frequencies in the 1 MHz range. Without much concern for power usage, they simply generate the voltage required to access the mass range of interest. In order to reduce the

  20. Endoscopy in the Paul Trap: Measurement of the Vibratory Quantum State of a Single Ion

    SciTech Connect

    Bardroff, P.J.; Leichtle, C.; Schrade, G.; Schleich, W.P.

    1996-09-01

    We reconstruct the density operator of the center-of-mass motion of an ion stored in a Paul trap by mapping the dynamics of the motion onto the internal dynamics of the ion. Our technique takes into account the explicit time dependence of the trap potential, operates outside the Lamb-Dicke limit, and is not restricted to pure states. We demonstrate the feasibility of this method using the example of a damped Schr{umlt o}dinger cat state. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  1. Ion trap mass spectrometry on a comet nucleus: the Ptolemy instrument and the Rosetta space mission.

    PubMed

    Todd, John F J; Barber, Simeon J; Wright, Ian P; Morgan, Geraint H; Morse, Andrew D; Sheridan, Simon; Leese, Mark R; Maynard, Jon; Evans, Suzanne T; Pillinger, Colin T; Drummond, Duncan L; Heys, Samantha C; Huq, S Ejaz; Kent, Barry J; Sawyer, Eric C; Whalley, Martin S; Waltham, Nicholas R

    2007-01-01

    In May 2014, the Rosetta spacecraft is scheduled to rendezvous with the comet Churyumov-Gerasimenko ('67P'). One of the instruments on board the 'Lander' which will descend on to the surface of the comet is a miniaturised GC/MS system that incorporates an ion trap mass spectrometer, specially developed for isotope ratio analysis. This article describes the development and optimisation of the ion trap for this unique application, and presents a summary of the range of pre-programmed experiments that will contribute to the characterisation of the solid and volatile cometary materials.

  2. Digital-Analog Quantum Simulation of Spin Models in Trapped Ions

    PubMed Central

    Arrazola, Iñigo; Pedernales, Julen S.; Lamata, Lucas; Solano, Enrique

    2016-01-01

    We propose a method to simulate spin models in trapped ions using a digital-analog approach, consisting in a suitable gate decomposition in terms of analog blocks and digital steps. In this way, we show that the quantum dynamics of an enhanced variety of spin models could be implemented with substantially less number of gates than a fully digital approach. Typically, analog blocks are built of multipartite dynamics providing the complexity of the simulated model, while the digital steps are local operations bringing versatility to it. Finally, we describe a possible experimental implementation in trapped-ion technologies. PMID:27470970

  3. Experimental Issues in Coherent Quantum-State Manipulation of Trapped Atomic Ions

    PubMed Central

    Wineland, D. J.; Monroe, C.; Itano, W. M.; Leibfried, D.; King, B. E.; Meekhof, D. M.

    1998-01-01

    Methods for, and limitations to, the generation of entangled states of trapped atomic ions are examined. As much as possible, state manipulations are described in terms of quantum logic operations since the conditional dynamics implicit in quantum logic is central to the creation of entanglement. Keeping with current interest, some experimental issues in the proposal for trappedion quantum computation by J. I. Cirac and P. Zoller (University of Innsbruck) are discussed. Several possible decoherence mechanisms are examined and what may be the more important of these are identified. Some potential applications for entangled states of trapped-ions which lie outside the immediate realm of quantum computation are also discussed. PMID:28009379

  4. Cold interactions between an Yb+ ion and a Li atom: Prospects for sympathetic cooling, radiative association, and Feshbach resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomza, Michał; Koch, Christiane P.; Moszynski, Robert

    2015-04-01

    The electronic structure of the (LiYb )+ molecular ion is investigated with two variants of the coupled cluster method restricted to single, double, and noniterative or linear triple excitations. Potential-energy curves for the ground and excited states, permanent and transition electric dipole moments, and long-range interaction coefficients C4 and C6 are reported. The data are subsequently employed in scattering calculations and photoassociation studies. Feshbach resonances are shown to be measurable, despite the ion's micromotion in the Paul trap. Molecular ions can be formed in their singlet electronic ground state by one-photon photoassociation and in triplet states by two-photon photoassociation; and control of cold atom-ion chemistry based on Feshbach resonances should be feasible. Conditions for sympathetic cooling of an Yb+ ion by an ultracold gas of Li atoms are found to be favorable in the temperature range 10 nK -10 mK , and further improvements using Feshbach resonances should be possible. Overall, these results suggest excellent prospects for building a quantum simulator with ultracold Yb+ ions and Li atoms.

  5. Local density probing of atomic gas via cold Li-Ca+ inelastic collisions in an atom-ion hybrid system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Ryoichi; Haze, Shinsuke; Fujinaga, Munekazu; Kyuno, Kazuki; Mukaiyama, Takashi

    2015-05-01

    Ultracold atoms in a harmonic trap inevitably has an inhomogeneous density distribution, which makes an atomic gas an ensemble of atoms in different physical phases. Recent technical advances in the determination of local physical quantities in an atomic gas overcome this complexity and make it possible to directly compare experimental results with many-body theories of a homogeneous atomic gas. A laser-cooled ion can be used as a high-spatial resolution probe of physical quantities of an atomic gas. The spatial spread of an ion can be reduced to sub-microns, which is even small enough for the application of the local probe of atoms in optical lattices. In our experiment, we constructed Li and Ca+ ultracold hybrid system and observed inelastic collisions as a loss of ions. The inelastic collision is confirmed to be a charge-exchange process, whose rate depends linearly on the local atomic density. From the measurement of the rate of the charge-exchange, we can reproduce an atomic density profile. This is an important step toward a local probe of physical quantities of atoms with cold ions. In this presentation, we report on the observation of charge-exchange collisions between Li atom and Ca+ ions, and discuss the feasibility of the ions as a probe of the atoms.

  6. The use of ion beam cleaning to obtain high quality cold welds with minimal deformation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sater, B. L.; Moore, T. J.

    1978-01-01

    A variation of cold welding is described which utilizes an ion beam to clean mating surfaces prior to joining in a vacuum environment. High quality solid state welds were produced with minimal deformation.

  7. On the presence and properties of cold ions near Earth's equatorial magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Justin H.; Angelopoulos, Vassilis

    2014-03-01

    Plasma flows related to magnetospheric convection or ULF waves often increase cold ions' kinetic energy sufficiently above the spacecraft potential energy so that these ions can be detected by charged particle instrumentation. Other detection methods also reveal the presence of cold ions even in the absence of flows. By applying such methods to complementary data sets obtained from particle, electric field, and magnetic field measurements by the multiple Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms spacecraft, we study the occurrence rates of cold ions and properties—composition, densities, and temperatures—of the dominant species (H+, He+, and O+) near the equatorial magnetosphere. As plasma flows occur at all magnetic local time (MLT) sectors, predominantly outside the plasmasphere, they enable studies of cold ion occurrence and properties as functions of geocentric distance (up to 13 RE) and MLT. Of the dominant cold ions, protons are most abundant on the dayside and coldest almost everywhere. By comparison, the heavier ions show evidence of larger abundance on the nightside and higher temperatures at most locations: median nHe+/nH+ is ≤0.1 in the afternoon, ≥1.0 on the nightside, and near 0.5 at dawn; median nO+/nH+ exceeds 1 throughout the nightside and around dawn at smaller geocentric distances but varies from 0.0 to 0.1 in the afternoon; and TO+ > THe+ everywhere. By isolating the convective particle drift component of measured ion flows, we deduce that nightside/dawn/prenoon cold ions are components of the warm plasma cloak while cold ions near noon/afternoon are likely of mixed origin, including nightside/cusp outflow, plasmaspheric plumes, and the solar wind.

  8. Detection and clearing of trapped ions in the high current Cornell photoinjector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Full, S.; Bartnik, A.; Bazarov, I. V.; Dobbins, J.; Dunham, B.; Hoffstaetter, G. H.

    2016-03-01

    We have recently performed experiments to test the effectiveness of three ion-clearing strategies in the Cornell high intensity photoinjector: DC clearing electrodes, bunch gaps, and beam shaking. The photoinjector reaches a new regime of linac beam parameters where high continuous wave beam currents lead to ion trapping. Therefore ion mitigation strategies must be evaluated for this machine and other similar future high current linacs. We have developed several techniques to directly measure the residual trapped ions. Our two primary indicators of successful clearing are the amount of ion current removed by a DC clearing electrode, and the absence of bremsstrahlung radiation generated by beam-ion interactions. Measurements were taken for an electron beam with an energy of 5 MeV and continuous wave beam currents in the range of 1-20 mA. Several theoretical models have been developed to explain our data. Using them, we are able to estimate the clearing electrode voltage required for maximum ion clearing, the creation and clearing rates of the ions while employing bunch gaps, and the sinusoidal shaking frequency necessary for clearing via beam shaking. In all cases, we achieve a maximum ion clearing of at least 70% or higher, and in some cases our data is consistent with full ion clearing.

  9. Zinc ion availability--the determinant of efficacy in zinc lozenge treatment of common colds.

    PubMed

    Eby, G A

    1997-10-01

    This is a re-analysis of reports from 1984 to 1992 of double-blind, placebo-controlled, clinical trials of zinc lozenges in the treatment of common colds. This re-analysis was performed to test the hypothesis that major variations in daily zinc ion availability (ZIA) between chemically different lozenge formulations caused differing results in these clinical trials. Solution chemistry computations determined the bioavailability of Zn2+ ions at physiological pH from the lozenges used in these clinical trails. ZIA was derived from Fick's laws of diffusion in a bio-electric field. Lozenges that released Zn2+ ions at physiological pH (positive ZIAs) shortened colds. Lozenges that released negatively charged zinc species at physiological pH (negative ZIAs) lengthened colds. Lozenges having a zero ZIA had no effect on common colds. Lozenges with ZIA = 100 shortened colds by 7 days while ZIA = -55 lozenges lengthened colds by 4.4 days. A linear dose-response relationship exists between ZIAs of zinc lozenges and changes in duration of common colds. It is concluded that: prospective efficacy of zinc lozenges can be predicted based upon readily determined ZIA factors and ZIAs; chemically different zinc lozenge formulations having greatly different ZIAs resulted in greatly differing results in clinical trials; mast cell granule-derived Zn2+ ions are the foundation of the primary immune system; and high ZIA zinc acetate lozenges are beneficial for common colds.

  10. Toward Visible-Wavelength Multi-Species Trapped-Ion Quantum Logic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruzewicz, Colin; McConnell, Robert; Loh, William; Sage, Jeremy; Chiaverini, John

    2016-05-01

    Large-scale quantum information processing and quantum networking using trapped ions will likely require multiple atomic species to allow for sympathetic cooling of ion vibrational modes, quantum state measurement without decoherence of unmeasured qubits, and interfacing with flying qubits. Inter-species quantum logic and quantum state transfer are key components of these tasks, particularly in the cases of quantum-error-correction syndrome extraction or remote entanglement generation using sympathetic ions. Multi-species logic and manipulation in a large processor will require control light of several wavelengths delivered to many ion-trap array sites in parallel, a challenge at short wavelengths. We report on progress toward sympathetic cooling and intra- and inter-species logic using Sr+ and Ca+ ions in surface-electrode trap arrays. These species admit optical control fields that can be routed using photonic waveguides straightforwardly integrated into the trap-array structure as their relevant transitions are accessible using visible and near-infra-red light.

  11. Advanced Automation for Ion Trap Mass Spectrometry-New Opportunities for Real-Time Autonomous Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, Peter T.; Wong, C. M.; Salmonson, J. D.; Yost, R. A.; Griffin, T. P.; Yates, N. A.; Lawless, James G. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    The utility of MS/MS for both target compound analysis and the structure elucidation of unknowns has been described in a number of references. A broader acceptance of this technique has not yet been realized as it requires large, complex, and costly instrumentation which has not been competitive with more conventional techniques. Recent advancements in ion trap mass spectrometry promise to change this situation. Although the ion trap's small size, sensitivity, and ability to perform multiple stages of mass spectrometry have made it eminently suitable for on-line, real-time monitoring applications, advance automation techniques are required to make these capabilities more accessible to non-experts. Towards this end we have developed custom software for the design and implementation of MS/MS experiments. This software allows the user to take full advantage of the ion trap's versatility with respect to ionization techniques, scan proxies, and ion accumulation/ejection methods. Additionally, expert system software has been developed for autonomous target compound analysis. This software has been linked to ion trap control software and a commercial data system to bring all of the steps in the analysis cycle under control of the expert system. These software development efforts and their utilization for a number of trace analysis applications will be described.

  12. Ion Dynamic Capture Experiments With The High Performance Antiproton Trap (HiPAT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, James; Lewis, Raymond; Chakrabarti, Suman; Sims, William H.; Pearson, J. Boise; Fant, Wallace E.

    2002-01-01

    To take the first step towards using the energy produced from the matter-antimatter annihilation for propulsion applications, the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Propulsion Research Center (PRC) has initiated a research activity examining the storage of low energy antiprotons. The High Performance Antiproton Trap (HiPAT) is an electromagnetic system (Penning-Malmberg design) consisting of a 4 Tesla superconductor, a high voltage electrode confinement system, and an ultra high vacuum test section. It has been designed with an ultimate goal of maintaining 10(exp 12) charged particles with a half-life of 18 days. Currently, this system is being evaluated experimentally using normal matter ions that are cheap to produce, relatively easy to handle, and provide a good indication of overall trap behavior (with the exception of assessing annihilation losses). The ions are produced via a positive hydrogen ion source and transported to HiPAT in a beam line equipped with electrostatic optics. The optics serve to both focus and gate the incoming ions, providing microsecond-timed beam pulses that are dynamically captured by cycling the HiPAT forward containment field like a "trap door". Initial dynamic capture experiments have been successfully performed with beam energy and currents set to 1.9 kV and 23 micro-amps, respectively. At these settings up to 2x10(exp 9) ions have been trapped during a single dynamic cycle.

  13. Technology for On-Chip Qubit Control with Microfabricated Surface Ion Traps

    SciTech Connect

    Highstrete, Clark; Scott, Sean Michael; Maunz, Peter Lukas Wilhelm; Tigges, Christopher P.; Blain, Matthew Glenn; Heller, Edwin J.; Stevens, James E.

    2013-11-01

    Trapped atomic ions are a leading physical system for quantum information processing. However, scalability and operational fidelity remain limiting technical issues often associated with optical qubit control. One promising approach is to develop on-chip microwave electronic control of ion qubits based on the atomic hyperfine interaction. This project developed expertise and capabilities at Sandia toward on-chip electronic qubit control in a scalable architecture. The project developed a foundation of laboratory capabilities, including trapping the 171Yb+ hyperfine ion qubit and developing an experimental microwave coherent control capability. Additionally, the project investigated the integration of microwave device elements with surface ion traps utilizing Sandia’s state-of-the-art MEMS microfabrication processing. This effort culminated in a device design for a multi-purpose ion trap experimental platform for investigating on-chip microwave qubit control, laying the groundwork for further funded R&D to develop on-chip microwave qubit control in an architecture that is suitable to engineering development.

  14. A rare-earth-magnet ion trap for confining low-Z, bare nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brewer, Samuel M.; Tan, Joseph N.

    2009-05-01

    Simplifications in the theory for Rydberg states of hydrogenlike ions allow a substantial improvement in the accuracy of predicted levels, which can yield information on the values of fundamental constants and test theory if they can be compared with precision frequency measurements.[1] We consider the trapping of bare nuclei (fully-stripped) to be used in making Rydberg states of one-electron ions with atomic number 1< Z < 11. Numerical simulation is used here to study ion confinement in a compact, Penning-style ion trap consisting of electrodes integrated with rare-earth permanent magnets, and to model the capture of charge-state-selected ions extracted from an electron beam ion trap (EBIT). An experimental apparatus adapted to the NIST EBIT will also be discussed. Reference: [1] U.D. Jentschura, P.J. Mohr, J.N. Tan, and B.J. Wundt, ``Fundamental constants and tests of theory in Rydberg states of hydrogenlike ions,'' Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 160404 (2008).

  15. Ion Storage with the High Performance Antiproton Trap (HiPAT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, James; Lewis, Raymond; Chakrabarti, Suman; Pearson, Boise

    2002-01-01

    The matter antimatter reaction represents the densest form of energy storage/release known to modern physics: as such it offers one of the most compact sources of power for future deep space exploration. To take the first steps along this path, NASA-Marshall Space Flight Center is developing a storage system referred to as the High Performance Antiproton Trap (HiPAT) with a goal of maintaining 10(exp 12) particles for up to 18 days. Experiments have been performed with this hardware using normal matter (positive hydrogen ions) to assess the device's ability to hold charged particles. These ions are currently created using an electron gun method to ionize background gas; however, this technique is limited by the quantity that can be captured. To circumvent this issue, an ion source is currently being commissioned which will greatly increase the number of ions captured and more closely simulate actual operations expected at an antiproton production facility. Ions have been produced, stored for various time intervals, and then extracted against detectors to measure species, quantity and energy. Radio frequency stabilization has been tested as a method to prolong ion lifetime: results show an increase in the baseline 1/e lifetime of trapped particles from hours to days. Impurities in the residual background gas (typically carbon-containing species CH4, CO, CO2, etc.) present a continuing problem by reducing the trapped hydrogen population through the mechanism of ion charge exchange.

  16. An apparatus for immersing trapped ions into an ultracold gas of neutral atoms.

    PubMed

    Schmid, Stefan; Härter, Arne; Frisch, Albert; Hoinka, Sascha; Denschlag, Johannes Hecker

    2012-05-01

    We describe a hybrid vacuum system in which a single ion or a well-defined small number of trapped ions (in our case Ba(+) or Rb(+)) can be immersed into a cloud of ultracold neutral atoms (in our case Rb). This apparatus allows for the study of collisions and interactions between atoms and ions in the ultracold regime. Our setup is a combination of a Bose-Einstein condensation apparatus and a linear Paul trap. The main design feature of the apparatus is to first separate the production locations for the ion and the ultracold atoms and then to bring the two species together. This scheme has advantages in terms of stability and available access to the region where the atom-ion collision experiments are carried out. The ion and the atoms are brought together using a moving one-dimensional optical lattice transport which vertically lifts the atomic sample over a distance of 30 cm from its production chamber into the center of the Paul trap in another chamber. We present techniques to detect and control the relative position between the ion and the atom cloud.

  17. Effect of trapped ions in a gated time-of-flight apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martus, K. E.; Orient, O. J.; Chutjian, A.

    1993-01-01

    A three-mesh gate is used in a time-of-flight (TOF) apparatus to analyze the velocity of positive ions. Test results and a theoretical description are presented of an effect arising from trapping ions between meshes of a two-gate TOF velocity analyzer. The entrapped ions produce a side peak in the TOF spectra corresponding to faster ions. The onset and relative height of the side peak is dependent on the gating voltage and risetime of the pulsing electronics, while the relative intensity depends upon the velocity being sampled and the ratio of the gate width to duration.

  18. Development of a linear ion trap/orthogonal-time-of-flight mass spectrometer for time-dependent observation of product ions by ultraviolet photodissociation of peptide ions.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae-Young; Schwartz, Jae C; Reilly, James P

    2009-11-01

    A hybrid linear ion trap/orthogonal time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometer has been developed to observe time-dependent vacuum ultraviolet photodissociation product ions. In this apparatus, a reflectron TOF mass analyzer is orthogonally interfaced to an LTQ using rf-only octopole and dc quadrupole ion guides. Precursor ions are generated by electrospray ionization and isolated in the ion trap. Subsequently they are directed to the TOF source where photodissociation occurs and product ions are extracted for mass analysis. To detect photodissociation product ions having axially divergent trajectories, a large rectangular detector is utilized. With variation of the time between photodissociation and orthogonal extraction in the TOF source, product ions formed over a range of times after photoexcitation can be sampled. Time-dependent observation of product ions following 157 nm photodissociation of a singly charged tryptic peptide ion (NWDAGFGR) showed that prompt photofragment ions (x- and v-type ions) dominate the tandem mass spectrum up to 1 micros after the laser shot, but the intensities of low energy thermal fragment ions (y-type ions) become comparable several microseconds later. Different proton mobilization time scales were observed for arginine- and lysine-terminated tryptic peptides.

  19. Electron beam ion trap bi-annual report 1996/1997

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, D

    1999-01-05

    The research of the EBIT (Electron Beam Ion Trap) program in N Division of the Physics and Space Technology Directorate at LLNL continues to contribute significantly to the understanding of physical processes with low energy highly charged ions in atomic physics, plasma physics, and material science. Low-energy highly charged ions (up to U92+), provided by the EBIT facilities, provide a unique laboratory opportunity to study high field effects in atomic structures and dynamic interaction processes. The formation, existence, and structure of highly charged ions in astrophysical environments and laboratory plasmas make highly charged ions desirable for diagnosing various plasma conditions. The strong interaction of highly charged ions with matter and the response of solid surfaces make them a sensitive analysis tool and possibly a future capability for materials modifications at the atomic scale (nano technology). These physical applications require a good understanding and careful study of the dynamics of the interactions of the ions with complex systems. The EBIT group hosted an international conference and a workshop on trapped charged particles. The various talks and discussions showed that physics research with trapped charged particles is a very active and attractive area of innovative research, and provides a basis for research efforts in new areas. It also became obvious that the EBIT/RETRAP project has unique capabilities to perform important new experiments with trapped very highly charged ions at rest, which are complementary to and competitive with research at heavy ion storage rings and other trapping facilities planned or in operation in Europe, Japan, and the United States. Atomic structure research at EBIT provides ever better and more experimental complete benchmark data, supplying data needed to improve atomic theories. Research highlights through 1996 and 1997 include hyperfine structure measurements in H-like ions, QED studies, lifetime

  20. Bichromatic state-insensitive trapping of cold 133Cs-87Rb atomic mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metbulut, M. M.; Renzoni, F.

    2015-12-01

    We investigate simultaneous state-insensitive trapping of a mixture of two different atomic species, Caesium and Rubidium. The magic wavelengths of the Caesium and Rubidium atoms are different, 935.6 and 789.9 nm respectively, thus single-frequency simultaneous state-insensitive trapping is not possible. We thus identify bichromatic trapping as a viable approach to tune the two magic wavelengths to a common value. Correspondingly, we present several common magic wavelength combinations appropriate for simultaneous state-insensitive trapping of the two atomic species.