Science.gov

Sample records for coleoptera melyridae cytogenetic

  1. Cytogenetics, cytotaxonomy and chromosomal evolution of Chrysomelinae revisited (Coleoptera, Chrysomelidae) *

    PubMed Central

    Petitpierre, Eduard

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Nearly 260 taxa and chromosomal races of subfamily Chrysomelinae have been chromosomally analyzed showing a wide range of diploid numbers from 2n = 12 to 2n = 50, and four types of male sex-chromosome systems. with the parachute-like ones Xyp and XYp clearly prevailing (79.0%), but with the XO well represented too (19.75%). The modal haploid number for chrysomelines is n = 12 (34.2%) although it is not probably the presumed most plesiomorph for the whole subfamily, because in tribe Timarchini the modal number is n = 10 (53.6%) and in subtribe Chrysomelina n = 17 (65.7%). Some well sampled genera, such as Timarcha, Chrysolina and Cyrtonus, are variable in diploid numbers, whereas others, like Chrysomela, Paropsisterna, Oreina and Leptinotarsa, are conservative and these differences are discussed. The main shifts in the chromosomal evolution of Chrysomelinae seems to be centric fissions and pericentric inversions but other changes as centric fusions are also clearly demonstrated. The biarmed chromosome shape is the prevalent condition, as found in most Coleoptera, although a fair number of species hold a few uniarmed chromosomes at least. A significant negative correlation between the haploid numbers and the asymmetry in size of karyotypes (r = -0.74) has been found from a large sample of 63 checked species of ten different genera. Therefore, the increases in haploid number are generally associated with a higher karyotype symmetry. PMID:22303104

  2. Cytogenetics

    SciTech Connect

    Obe, G.; Basler, A.

    1987-01-01

    Different aspects of cytogenetics, such as the molecular structure of eukaryotic chromosomes, computerized analyses of chromosomes, evolution of karyotypes, chromosomes and cancer, chromosomes in genetic toxicology, and chromosomal aberrations (-induction, -in human populations, -in human eggs and sperm) are covered in this book. New techniques and approaches accompany overviews of all the different aspects of eukaryotic chromosomes.

  3. Cytogenetic analysis of Lagria villosa (Coleoptera, Tenebrionidae): emphasis on the mechanism of association of the Xy(p) sex chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Goll, L G; Artoni, R F; Vicari, M R; Nogaroto, V; Petitpierre, E; Almeida, M C

    2013-01-01

    The Xy(p) sex determination mechanism is the system most frequent and ancestral to Coleoptera. Moreover, the presence of argyrophilous material associated with the sex bivalent is described as being responsible for the maintenance and association of these chromosomes. There are no karyotype data available regarding the genus Lagria and no consensus in the literature regarding the argyrophilous material present in the lumen of sex bivalent. Therefore, the aim of this work was to investigate the mechanism of sex chromosome bivalent association in Lagria villosa by analyzing the argyrophilous nature of the material present in the Xy(p) lumen. It was also intended to characterize L. villosa cytogenetically. The analysis of meiotic cells showed 2n = 18 = 16+Xy(p) for males and 2n = 18 = 16+XX in females and the meiotic formula was 2n = 8(II)+Xy(p). The C-banding showed blocks of pericentromeric heterochromatin in all chromosomes except in the y(p) chromosome. In these regions, the use of fluorochromes revealed the presence of heterochromatin containing GC rich DNA sequences. The study of synaptonemal complex showed a gradual increase in the electron-density of the axial elements of the sex chromosomes and their association with strongly electron-dense material. The pepsin pretreatment revealed that the material impregnated by silver is protein.

  4. Molecular cytogenetic studies in the ladybird beetle Henosepilachna argus Geoffroy, 1762 (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae, Epilachninae)

    PubMed Central

    Mora, Pablo; Vela, Jesús; Sanllorente, Olivia; Palomeque, Teresa; Lorite, Pedro

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The ladybird Henosepilachna argus Geoffroy, 1762 has been cytogenetically studied. In addition we have conducted a review of chromosome numbers and the chromosomal system of sex determination available in the literature in species belonging to the genus Henosepilachna and in its closely related genus Epilachna. Chromosome number of Henosepilachna argus was 2n=18, including the sex chromosome pair, a common diploid chromosome number within the tribe Epilachnini. The study of prophase I meiotic chromosomes showed the typical Xyp “parachute” bivalent as in the majority of species of Coccinellidae. C-banding and fluorescent staining with AT-specific DAPI fluorochrome dye have been carried out for the first time in H. argus. C-banding technique revealed that heterochromatic blocks are pericentromerically located and DAPI staining showed that this heterochromatin is AT rich. Fluorescence in situ hybridizations using rDNA and the telomeric TTAGG sequence as probes have been carried out. FISH using rDNA showed that the nucleolar organizing region is located on the short arm of the X chromosome. FISH with the telomeric sequence revealed that in this species telomeres of chromosomes are composed of the pentanucleotide TTAGG repeats. This is the first study on the telomeric sequences in Coccinellidae. PMID:26312131

  5. Molecular cytogenetic studies in the ladybird beetle Henosepilachnaargus Geoffroy, 1762 (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae, Epilachninae).

    PubMed

    Mora, Pablo; Vela, Jesús; Sanllorente, Olivia; Palomeque, Teresa; Lorite, Pedro

    2015-01-01

    The ladybird Henosepilachnaargus Geoffroy, 1762 has been cytogenetically studied. In addition we have conducted a review of chromosome numbers and the chromosomal system of sex determination available in the literature in species belonging to the genus Henosepilachna and in its closely related genus Epilachna. Chromosome number of Henosepilachnaargus was 2n=18, including the sex chromosome pair, a common diploid chromosome number within the tribe Epilachnini. The study of prophase I meiotic chromosomes showed the typical Xyp "parachute" bivalent as in the majority of species of Coccinellidae. C-banding and fluorescent staining with AT-specific DAPI fluorochrome dye have been carried out for the first time in H. argus. C-banding technique revealed that heterochromatic blocks are pericentromerically located and DAPI staining showed that this heterochromatin is AT rich. Fluorescence in situ hybridizations using rDNA and the telomeric TTAGG sequence as probes have been carried out. FISH using rDNA showed that the nucleolar organizing region is located on the short arm of the X chromosome. FISH with the telomeric sequence revealed that in this species telomeres of chromosomes are composed of the pentanucleotide TTAGG repeats. This is the first study on the telomeric sequences in Coccinellidae.

  6. Cytogenetic analyses using C-banding and DAPI/CMA3 staining of four populations of the maize weevil Sitophilus zeamais Motschulsky, 1855 (Coleoptera, Curculionidae)

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Alexandra A.; Braga, Lucas S.; Guedes, Raul Narciso C.; Tavares, Mara G.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Cytogenetic data avalaible for the maize weevil Sitophilus zeamais Motschulsky, 1855 (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), one of the most destructive pests of stored cereal grains, are controversial. Earlier studies focused on single populations and emphasized chromosome number and sex determination system. In this paper, the karyotypes of four populations of Sitophilus zeamais were characterized by conventional staining, C-banding and sequential staining with the fluorochromes chromomycin-A3/4-6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (CMA3/DAPI). The analyses of metaphases obtained from the cerebral ganglia of last instar larvae and the testes of adults showed that the species had 2n = 22 chromosomes, with 10 autosomal pairs and a sex chromosome pair (XX in females and Xyp in males). Chromosome number, however, ranged from 2n = 22 to 26 due to the presence of 0–4 supernumerary chromosomes in individuals from the populations of Viçosa, Unai and Porto Alegre. With the exception of the Y chromosome, which was dot-like, all other chromosomes of this species were metacentric, including the supernumeraries. The heterochromatin was present in the centromeric regions of all autosomes and in the centromere of the X chromosome. The B chromosomes were partially or totally heterochromatic, and the Y chromosome was euchromatic. The heterochromatic regions were labeled with C-banding and DAPI, which showed that they were rich in AT base pairs. PMID:25893077

  7. Cytogenetic analyses using C-banding and DAPI/CMA3 staining of four populations of the maize weevil Sitophiluszeamais Motschulsky, 1855 (Coleoptera, Curculionidae).

    PubMed

    da Silva, Alexandra A; Braga, Lucas S; Guedes, Raul Narciso C; Tavares, Mara G

    2015-01-01

    Cytogenetic data avalaible for the maize weevil Sitophiluszeamais Motschulsky, 1855 (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), one of the most destructive pests of stored cereal grains, are controversial. Earlier studies focused on single populations and emphasized chromosome number and sex determination system. In this paper, the karyotypes of four populations of Sitophiluszeamais were characterized by conventional staining, C-banding and sequential staining with the fluorochromes chromomycin-A3/4-6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (CMA3/DAPI). The analyses of metaphases obtained from the cerebral ganglia of last instar larvae and the testes of adults showed that the species had 2n = 22 chromosomes, with 10 autosomal pairs and a sex chromosome pair (XX in females and Xyp in males). Chromosome number, however, ranged from 2n = 22 to 26 due to the presence of 0-4 supernumerary chromosomes in individuals from the populations of Viçosa, Unai and Porto Alegre. With the exception of the Y chromosome, which was dot-like, all other chromosomes of this species were metacentric, including the supernumeraries. The heterochromatin was present in the centromeric regions of all autosomes and in the centromere of the X chromosome. The B chromosomes were partially or totally heterochromatic, and the Y chromosome was euchromatic. The heterochromatic regions were labeled with C-banding and DAPI, which showed that they were rich in AT base pairs.

  8. Astylus atromaculatus (Coleoptera: Melyridae): abundance and role in pollen dispersal in Bt and non-Bt cotton in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Pierre, Jacqueline; Hofs, Jean-Luc

    2010-10-01

    In South Africa, modified Bt (Cry1 Ac) cotton cultivars and organic ones coexist. This raises the question of the risk of dissemination of genetically modified (GM) pollen to non-GM crops by visiting insects. We inventoried the flower-visiting insects in Bt and non-Bt cotton fields of the South African Highveld region and investigated their role in pollen dispersal. Their diversity and abundance varied slightly among sites, with Astylus atromaculatus as the predominant insect on both Bt and non-Bt cotton flowers. The other major flower-visiting species were Apis mellifera and solitary Apidae. No differences were found in the abundance of each taxum between Bt and non-Bt cotton except for Scoliidae and Nitidulidae, which were scarce overall (<0.5%) but more abundant on the non-Bt flowers in the central area of the field at one site. The pollen load on A. atromaculatus was as high as on Apis mellifera. Cage tests showed that A. atromaculatus can pollinate female cotton plants by transferring pollen from male donor plants. In the field, the flight range of this insect was generally short (25 m), but it can occasionally reach up to 200 m or even more. This study therefore highlights that A. atromaculatus, commonly regarded as a pest, could be an unexpected but efficient pollinator. Because its population density can be high, this species could mediate unwanted cotton pollen flow when distances between coexiting fields are not sufficient.

  9. Cytogenetic Nomenclature and Reporting.

    PubMed

    Stevens-Kroef, Marian; Simons, Annet; Rack, Katrina; Hastings, Rosalind J

    2017-01-01

    A standardized nomenclature is critical for the accurate and consistent description of genomic changes as identified by karyotyping, fluorescence in situ hybridization and microarray. The International System for Human Cytogenomic Nomenclature (ISCN) is the central reference for the description of karyotyping, FISH, and microarray results, and provides rules for describing cytogenetic and molecular cytogenetic findings in laboratory reports. These laboratory reports are documents to the referring clinician, and should be clear, accurate and contain all information relevant for good interpretation of the cytogenetic findings. Here, we describe guidelines for cytogenetic nomenclature and laboratory reports for cytogenetic testing applied to tumor samples.

  10. Further contributions to the Coleoptera fauna of New Brunswick with an addition to the fauna of Nova Scotia, Canada.

    PubMed

    Webster, Reginald P; Webster, Vincent L; Alderson, Chantelle A; Hughes, Cory C; Sweeney, Jon D

    2016-01-01

    This paper treats 134 new records of Coleoptera for the province of New Brunswick, Canada from the following 41 families: Gyrinidae, Carabidae, Dytiscidae, Histeridae, Leiodidae, Scarabaeidae, Scirtidae, Buprestidae, Elmidae, Limnichidae, Heteroceridae, Ptilodactylidae, Eucnemidae, Throscidae, Elateridae, Lampyridae, Cantharidae, Dermestidae, Bostrichidae, Ptinidae, Cleridae, Melyridae, Monotomidae, Cryptophagidae, Silvanidae, Laemophloeidae, Nitidulidae, Endomychidae, Coccinellidae, Corylophidae, Latridiidae, Tetratomidae, Melandryidae, Mordellidae, Tenebrionidae, Mycteridae, Pyrochroidae, Aderidae, Scraptiidae, Megalopodidae, and Chrysomelidae. Among these, the following four species are newly recorded from Canada: Dirrhagofarsus ernae Otto, Muona & McClarin (Eucnemidae), Athous equestris (LeConte) (Elateridae), Ernobius opicus Fall (Ptinidae), and Stelidota coenosa Erichson (Nitidulidae). The Family Limnichidae is newly reported for New Brunswick, and one species is added to the fauna of Nova Scotia. Stephostethus productus Rosenhauer (Latridiidae), Tetratoma (Abstrulia) variegata Casey (Tetratomidae), and Chauliognathus marginatus (Fabricius) (Cantharidae) are removed from the faunal list of New Brunswick, and additional records of Lacconotus punctatus LeConte (Mycteridae) are presented and discussed. Lindgren funnel traps provided specimens for 104 (78%) of the species and were the sole source of specimens for 89 (66%) of the species reported here, suggesting they are a very useful tool for sampling Coleoptera fauna in the forests of New Brunswick.

  11. Further contributions to the Coleoptera fauna of New Brunswick with an addition to the fauna of Nova Scotia, Canada

    PubMed Central

    Webster, Reginald P.; Webster, Vincent L.; Alderson, Chantelle A.; Hughes, Cory C.; Sweeney, Jon D.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This paper treats 134 new records of Coleoptera for the province of New Brunswick, Canada from the following 41 families: Gyrinidae, Carabidae, Dytiscidae, Histeridae, Leiodidae, Scarabaeidae, Scirtidae, Buprestidae, Elmidae, Limnichidae, Heteroceridae, Ptilodactylidae, Eucnemidae, Throscidae, Elateridae, Lampyridae, Cantharidae, Dermestidae, Bostrichidae, Ptinidae, Cleridae, Melyridae, Monotomidae, Cryptophagidae, Silvanidae, Laemophloeidae, Nitidulidae, Endomychidae, Coccinellidae, Corylophidae, Latridiidae, Tetratomidae, Melandryidae, Mordellidae, Tenebrionidae, Mycteridae, Pyrochroidae, Aderidae, Scraptiidae, Megalopodidae, and Chrysomelidae. Among these, the following four species are newly recorded from Canada: Dirrhagofarsus ernae Otto, Muona & McClarin (Eucnemidae), Athous equestris (LeConte) (Elateridae), Ernobius opicus Fall (Ptinidae), and Stelidota coenosa Erichson (Nitidulidae). The Family Limnichidae is newly reported for New Brunswick, and one species is added to the fauna of Nova Scotia. Stephostethus productus Rosenhauer (Latridiidae), Tetratoma (Abstrulia) variegata Casey (Tetratomidae), and Chauliognathus marginatus (Fabricius) (Cantharidae) are removed from the faunal list of New Brunswick, and additional records of Lacconotus punctatus LeConte (Mycteridae) are presented and discussed. Lindgren funnel traps provided specimens for 104 (78%) of the species and were the sole source of specimens for 89 (66%) of the species reported here, suggesting they are a very useful tool for sampling Coleoptera fauna in the forests of New Brunswick. PMID:27110171

  12. Family-group names in Coleoptera (Insecta)

    PubMed Central

    Bouchard, Patrice; Bousquet, Yves; Davies, Anthony E.; Alonso-Zarazaga, Miguel A.; Lawrence, John F.; Lyal, Chris H. C.; Newton, Alfred F.; Reid, Chris A. M.; Schmitt, Michael; Ślipiński, S. Adam; Smith, Andrew B. T.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract We synthesize data on all known extant and fossil Coleoptera family-group names for the first time. A catalogue of 4887 family-group names (124 fossil, 4763 extant) based on 4707 distinct genera in Coleoptera is given. A total of 4492 names are available, 183 of which are permanently invalid because they are based on a preoccupied or a suppressed type genus. Names are listed in a classification framework. We recognize as valid 24 superfamilies, 211 families, 541 subfamilies, 1663 tribes and 740 subtribes. For each name, the original spelling, author, year of publication, page number, correct stem and type genus are included. The original spelling and availability of each name were checked from primary literature. A list of necessary changes due to Priority and Homonymy problems, and actions taken, is given. Current usage of names was conserved, whenever possible, to promote stability of the classification. New synonymies (family-group names followed by genus-group names): Agronomina Gistel, 1848 syn. nov. of Amarina Zimmermann, 1832 (Carabidae), Hylepnigalioini Gistel, 1856 syn. nov. of Melandryini Leach, 1815 (Melandryidae), Polycystophoridae Gistel, 1856 syn. nov. of Malachiinae Fleming, 1821 (Melyridae), Sclerasteinae Gistel, 1856 syn. nov. of Ptilininae Shuckard, 1839 (Ptinidae), Phloeonomini Ádám, 2001 syn. nov. of Omaliini MacLeay, 1825 (Staphylinidae), Sepedophilini Ádám, 2001 syn. nov. of Tachyporini MacLeay, 1825 (Staphylinidae), Phibalini Gistel, 1856 syn. nov. of Cteniopodini Solier, 1835 (Tenebrionidae); Agronoma Gistel 1848 (type species Carabus familiaris Duftschmid, 1812, designated herein) syn. nov. of Amara Bonelli, 1810 (Carabidae), Hylepnigalio Gistel, 1856 (type species Chrysomela caraboides Linnaeus, 1760, by monotypy) syn. nov. of Melandrya Fabricius, 1801 (Melandryidae), Polycystophorus Gistel, 1856 (type species Cantharis aeneus Linnaeus, 1758, designated herein) syn. nov. of Malachius Fabricius, 1775 (Melyridae), Sclerastes

  13. Cancer cytogenetics: methodology revisited.

    PubMed

    Wan, Thomas S K

    2014-11-01

    The Philadelphia chromosome was the first genetic abnormality discovered in cancer (in 1960), and it was found to be consistently associated with CML. The description of the Philadelphia chromosome ushered in a new era in the field of cancer cytogenetics. Accumulating genetic data have been shown to be intimately associated with the diagnosis and prognosis of neoplasms; thus, karyotyping is now considered a mandatory investigation for all newly diagnosed leukemias. The development of FISH in the 1980s overcame many of the drawbacks of assessing the genetic alterations in cancer cells by karyotyping. Karyotyping of cancer cells remains the gold standard since it provides a global analysis of the abnormalities in the entire genome of a single cell. However, subsequent methodological advances in molecular cytogenetics based on the principle of FISH that were initiated in the early 1990s have greatly enhanced the efficiency and accuracy of karyotype analysis by marrying conventional cytogenetics with molecular technologies. In this review, the development, current utilization, and technical pitfalls of both the conventional and molecular cytogenetics approaches used for cancer diagnosis over the past five decades will be discussed.

  14. Methods in human cytogenetics

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 4, discusses the various techniques used in the study human cytogenetics. The methods are discussed in historical order, from direct methods to tissue culture techniques, prenatal studies, meiotic studies, sex chromatin techniques, banding techniques, prophase banding and replication studies. Nomenclature of human chromosomes and quantitative methods are also mentioned. 60 refs., 3 figs.

  15. Cytogenetics and cladistics.

    PubMed

    Dobigny, Gauthier; Ducroz, Jean-François; Robinson, Terence J; Volobouev, Vitaly

    2004-06-01

    Chromosomal data have been underutilized in phylogenetic investigations despite the obvious potential that cytogenetic studies have to reveal both structural and functional homologies among taxa. In large part this is associated with difficulties in scoring conventional and molecular cytogenetic information for phylogenetic analysis. The manner in which chromosomal data have been used by most authors in the past was often conceptionally flawed in terms of the methods and principles underpinning modern cladistics. We present herein a review of the different methods employed, examine their relative strengths, and then outline a simple approach that considers the chromosomal change as the character, and its presence or absence the character state. We test this using one simulated and several empirical data sets. Features that are unique to cytogenetic investigations, including B-chromosomes, heterochromatic additions/deletions, and the location and number of nucleolar organizer regions (NORs), as well as the weighting of chromosomal characters, are critically discussed with regard to their suitability for phylogenetic reconstruction. We conclude that each of these classes of data have inherent problems that limit their usefulness in phylogenetic analyses and in most of these instances, inclusion should be subject to rigorous appraisal that addresses the criterion of unequivocal homology.

  16. Recent patents on molecular cytogenetics.

    PubMed

    Iourov, Ivan Y; Vorsanova, Svetlana G; Yurov, Yuri B

    2008-01-01

    The questions surrounding patenting of DNA sequences encoding specific proteins are relatively well reviewed in the available literature. However, neither applications nor molecular cytogenetic techniques, which use these sequences as a probe, have been reviewed in the light of the patenting. Furthermore, the patenting of the use of numerous probes, which are produced on different types of repetitive genome elements (i.e. satellite DNA or telomeric DNA sequences) and those generated by chromosome microdissection has not been reviewed. Molecular cytogenetic techniques are one of the most applied in current bioscience (as to June 2007, over 40,000 papers in browseable scientific databases mention one or several molecular cytogenetic techniques). Therefore, reviewing recent patents in this field is of general interest for numerous researchers in different areas of biology and medicine. Here, we address world-wide patents on DNA sequences used as molecular cytogenetic probes and molecular cytogenetic techniques to define current state and perspectives of this biomedical direction.

  17. Overview of Clinical Cytogenetics.

    PubMed

    Gonzales, Patrick R; Carroll, Andrew J; Korf, Bruce R

    2016-04-01

    Chromosome analysis is one of the first approaches to genetic testing and remains a key component of genetic analysis of constitutional and somatic genetic disorders. Numerical or unbalanced structural chromosome abnormalities usually lead to multiple congenital anomalies. Sometimes these are compatible with live birth, usually resulting in severe cognitive and physical handicaps; other times they result in miscarriage or stillbirth. Chromosome rearrangements also occur as somatic changes in malignancies. Identification of constitutional chromosomal anomalies (anomalies present in most or all cells of the body and/or the germline) can provide important information for genetic counseling. In this unit, we introduce chromosomal microarray analysis (CMA), which is a relatively recent addition to cytogenetic technologies, and has become the recommended first-tier testing method for patients with developmental delay, intellectual disability, autism, and/or multiple congenital anomalies. We also discuss non-invasive prenatal testing/screening (NIPTS), which uses circulating cell-free fetal DNA (cfDNA) from maternal plasma to rapidly screen for autosomal and sex-chromosome aneuploidies. Cytogenetic analysis of tumors is helpful in diagnosis and in monitoring the effects of treatment. The protocols in this chapter cover the clinical study of chromosomes in nonmalignant tissues.

  18. Evolutionary cytogenetics in salamanders.

    PubMed

    Sessions, Stanley K

    2008-01-01

    Salamanders (Amphibia: Caudata/Urodela) have been the subject of numerous cytogenetic studies, and data on karyotypes and genome sizes are available for most groups. Salamanders show a more-or-less distinct dichotomy between families with large chromosome numbers and interspecific variation in chromosome number, relative size, and shape (i.e. position of the centromere), and those that exhibit very little variation in these karyological features. This dichotomy is the basis of a major model of karyotype evolution in salamanders involving a kind of 'karyotypic orthoselection'. Salamanders are also characterized by extremely large genomes (in terms of absolute mass of nuclear DNA) and extensive variation in genome size (and overall size of the chromosomes), which transcends variation in chromosome number and shape. The biological significance and evolution of chromosome number and shape within the karyotype is not yet understood, but genome size variation has been found to have strong phenotypic, biogeographic, and phylogenetic correlates that reveal information about the biological significance of this cytogenetic variable. Urodeles also present the advantage of only 10 families and less than 600 species, which facilitates the analysis of patterns within the entire order. The purpose of this review is to present a summary of what is currently known about overall patterns of variation in karyology and genome size in salamanders. These patterns are discussed within an evolutionary context.

  19. Cytogenetic effects of cyclamates

    SciTech Connect

    Jemison, E.W.; Brown, K.; Rivers, B.; Knight, R.

    1984-01-01

    PHA-stimulated human peripheral lymphocytes were used as a model system for assessing the in vitro effects of calcium cyclamate. Techniques of autoradiography, cytological staining, cell counting, liquid scintillation and karyotyping were used to study the cytogenetic damage and biochemical effects of calcium cyclamate when assayed in 24 hour intervals for 96 hours. The cells were exposed to 10(-2) and 10(-3) molar concentrations of calcium cyclamate in TC 199 medium with fetal calf serum and antibiotics. It was noted that the addition of cyclamate increased mitotic rate of lymphocyte cells in cultures. It was determined that calcium cyclamate impaired the synthesis of deoxribonunucleic acid (as depicted by decreased incorporation of tritiated thymidine), reduced grain counts in autoradiographs and increased chromosome aberrations in cyclamate treated PHA stimulated peripheral blood lymphocytes in vitro. Morphological changes and growth rates showed significant effects. These studies indicate that calcium cyclamate has variable significant effects on leucocytes growth and chromosome morphology.

  20. Cytogenetic features in myelodysplastic syndromes

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) comprise a group of bone marrow diseases characterized by profound heterogeneity in morphologic presentation, clinical course, and cytogenetic features. Roughly 50% of patients display clonal chromosome abnormalities. In several multicentric studies, the karyotype turned out to be one of the most important prognostic parameters and was incorporated into statistical models aiming for a better prediction of the individual prognosis like the International Prognostic Scoring System. However, due to the profound cytogenetic heterogeneity, the impact of many rare abnormalities as well as combinations of anomalies occurring in a substantial portion of patients with MDS is still unknown and can only be delineated on the basis of large international multicentric cooperations. Recently, the German–Austrian MDS Study Group presented cytogenetic findings in 2,072 patients with MDS, which serve as a basis for the characterization of the cytogenetic subgroups discussed in this article. The availability of new therapeutic options for low- and high-risk MDS targeted against distinct entities characterized by specific chromosome abnormalities, like 5q-deletions, monosomy 7, and complex abnormalities underlines the important role of cytogenetics for the clinical management of MDS. This article thus focuses on the clinical and prognostic relevance, the molecular background, and therapeutic perspectives in these three cytogenetic subgroups. PMID:18414863

  1. Cytogenetic effects of cyclamates.

    PubMed

    Jemison, E W; Brown, K; Rivers, B; Knight, R

    1984-01-01

    PHA-stimulated human peripheral lymphocytes were used as a model system for assessing the in vitro effects of calcium cyclamate. Techniques of autoradiography, cytological staining, cell counting, liquid scintillation and karyotyping were used to study the cytogenetic damage and biochemical effects of calcium cyclamate when assayed in 24 hour intervals for 96 hours. The cells were exposed to 10(-2) and 10(-3) molar concentrations of calcium cyclamate in TC 199 medium with fetal calf serum and antibiotics. These studies were carried out in three (3) phases. Phase I was primarily orientation studies of the effects of cyclamates and included running preliminary test checks, the establishment of parameters of dosage, assessing growth patterns and selecting key chromosomal aberrations. Sixty four (64) of the metaphase spreads showed morphologically detectable changes and aberrations. It was also noted that the addition of cyclamate increased mitotic rate of lymphocyte cells in cultures. Phase III arranged research designs to determine more precise characterization of chromosomal observations and morphological effects. Among other findings it was noted that of 13 types of observations only ten were found in the experimental group. The introduction of cyclamates increased the stability of the leucocyte cultures. These studies reinforced the findings on the increase of mitotic rate. Phase III extended protocols to include autoradiography and scintillation counting. It was determined that calcium cyclamate impaired the synthesis of deoxribonunucleic acid (as depicted by decreased incorporation of tritiated thymidine), reduced grain counts in autoradiographs and increased chromosome aberrations in cyclamate treated PHA stimulated peripheral blood lymphocytes in vitro. Morphological changes and growth rates showed significant effects. These studies indicate that calcium cyclamate has variable significant effects on leucocytes growth and chromosome morphology.

  2. [Cytogenetic analysis of choroidal melanoma].

    PubMed

    Filloy, A; Caminal, J M; Varela, M M; Gomà, M; Arias, L; Arruga, J

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the presence of known cytogenetic alterations of choroidal melanoma in a series of patients diagnosed and treated in our Ocular Oncology Service. A review of the present literature on this topic is also presented. Microsatellite analysis (MSA) studies on loss of heterozygosity (LOH) of chromosome 3, as well as multiplex ligation prove amplification (MLPA) on chromosomes 1, 3, 6 and 8, were performed on enucleation or local resection samples obtained from a total of 27 patients, over a 2 year period. Twenty patients showed at least one of the cytogenetic alterations looked for. A total of 11 cases were found that showed LOH of chromosome 3 (44%), 8 gains of chromosome 8 (30%), 8 gains of chromosome 6p (30%), and 7 partial or total losses of chromosome 1 (26%). This is the first study on the cytogenetics of choroidal melanoma performed in our country. The results are similar to that published in the literature. Cytogenetic analysis provides more accurate knowledge on a vital individual prognosis. It also may become a valuable tool for establishing the most adequate follow-up regimes, and the need for adjuvant therapies. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Oftalmología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  3. Cytogenetic Prognostication Within Medulloblastoma Subgroups

    PubMed Central

    Shih, David J.H.; Northcott, Paul A.; Remke, Marc; Korshunov, Andrey; Ramaswamy, Vijay; Kool, Marcel; Luu, Betty; Yao, Yuan; Wang, Xin; Dubuc, Adrian M.; Garzia, Livia; Peacock, John; Mack, Stephen C.; Wu, Xiaochong; Rolider, Adi; Morrissy, A. Sorana; Cavalli, Florence M.G.; Jones, David T.W.; Zitterbart, Karel; Faria, Claudia C.; Schüller, Ulrich; Kren, Leos; Kumabe, Toshihiro; Tominaga, Teiji; Shin Ra, Young; Garami, Miklós; Hauser, Peter; Chan, Jennifer A.; Robinson, Shenandoah; Bognár, László; Klekner, Almos; Saad, Ali G.; Liau, Linda M.; Albrecht, Steffen; Fontebasso, Adam; Cinalli, Giuseppe; De Antonellis, Pasqualino; Zollo, Massimo; Cooper, Michael K.; Thompson, Reid C.; Bailey, Simon; Lindsey, Janet C.; Di Rocco, Concezio; Massimi, Luca; Michiels, Erna M.C.; Scherer, Stephen W.; Phillips, Joanna J.; Gupta, Nalin; Fan, Xing; Muraszko, Karin M.; Vibhakar, Rajeev; Eberhart, Charles G.; Fouladi, Maryam; Lach, Boleslaw; Jung, Shin; Wechsler-Reya, Robert J.; Fèvre-Montange, Michelle; Jouvet, Anne; Jabado, Nada; Pollack, Ian F.; Weiss, William A.; Lee, Ji-Yeoun; Cho, Byung-Kyu; Kim, Seung-Ki; Wang, Kyu-Chang; Leonard, Jeffrey R.; Rubin, Joshua B.; de Torres, Carmen; Lavarino, Cinzia; Mora, Jaume; Cho, Yoon-Jae; Tabori, Uri; Olson, James M.; Gajjar, Amar; Packer, Roger J.; Rutkowski, Stefan; Pomeroy, Scott L.; French, Pim J.; Kloosterhof, Nanne K.; Kros, Johan M.; Van Meir, Erwin G.; Clifford, Steven C.; Bourdeaut, Franck; Delattre, Olivier; Doz, François F.; Hawkins, Cynthia E.; Malkin, David; Grajkowska, Wieslawa A.; Perek-Polnik, Marta; Bouffet, Eric; Rutka, James T.; Pfister, Stefan M.; Taylor, Michael D.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Medulloblastoma comprises four distinct molecular subgroups: WNT, SHH, Group 3, and Group 4. Current medulloblastoma protocols stratify patients based on clinical features: patient age, metastatic stage, extent of resection, and histologic variant. Stark prognostic and genetic differences among the four subgroups suggest that subgroup-specific molecular biomarkers could improve patient prognostication. Patients and Methods Molecular biomarkers were identified from a discovery set of 673 medulloblastomas from 43 cities around the world. Combined risk stratification models were designed based on clinical and cytogenetic biomarkers identified by multivariable Cox proportional hazards analyses. Identified biomarkers were tested using fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) on a nonoverlapping medulloblastoma tissue microarray (n = 453), with subsequent validation of the risk stratification models. Results Subgroup information improves the predictive accuracy of a multivariable survival model compared with clinical biomarkers alone. Most previously published cytogenetic biomarkers are only prognostic within a single medulloblastoma subgroup. Profiling six FISH biomarkers (GLI2, MYC, chromosome 11 [chr11], chr14, 17p, and 17q) on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues, we can reliably and reproducibly identify very low-risk and very high-risk patients within SHH, Group 3, and Group 4 medulloblastomas. Conclusion Combining subgroup and cytogenetic biomarkers with established clinical biomarkers substantially improves patient prognostication, even in the context of heterogeneous clinical therapies. The prognostic significance of most molecular biomarkers is restricted to a specific subgroup. We have identified a small panel of cytogenetic biomarkers that reliably identifies very high-risk and very low-risk groups of patients, making it an excellent tool for selecting patients for therapy intensification and therapy de-escalation in future clinical trials. PMID

  4. Cytogenetic prognostication within medulloblastoma subgroups.

    PubMed

    Shih, David J H; Northcott, Paul A; Remke, Marc; Korshunov, Andrey; Ramaswamy, Vijay; Kool, Marcel; Luu, Betty; Yao, Yuan; Wang, Xin; Dubuc, Adrian M; Garzia, Livia; Peacock, John; Mack, Stephen C; Wu, Xiaochong; Rolider, Adi; Morrissy, A Sorana; Cavalli, Florence M G; Jones, David T W; Zitterbart, Karel; Faria, Claudia C; Schüller, Ulrich; Kren, Leos; Kumabe, Toshihiro; Tominaga, Teiji; Shin Ra, Young; Garami, Miklós; Hauser, Peter; Chan, Jennifer A; Robinson, Shenandoah; Bognár, László; Klekner, Almos; Saad, Ali G; Liau, Linda M; Albrecht, Steffen; Fontebasso, Adam; Cinalli, Giuseppe; De Antonellis, Pasqualino; Zollo, Massimo; Cooper, Michael K; Thompson, Reid C; Bailey, Simon; Lindsey, Janet C; Di Rocco, Concezio; Massimi, Luca; Michiels, Erna M C; Scherer, Stephen W; Phillips, Joanna J; Gupta, Nalin; Fan, Xing; Muraszko, Karin M; Vibhakar, Rajeev; Eberhart, Charles G; Fouladi, Maryam; Lach, Boleslaw; Jung, Shin; Wechsler-Reya, Robert J; Fèvre-Montange, Michelle; Jouvet, Anne; Jabado, Nada; Pollack, Ian F; Weiss, William A; Lee, Ji-Yeoun; Cho, Byung-Kyu; Kim, Seung-Ki; Wang, Kyu-Chang; Leonard, Jeffrey R; Rubin, Joshua B; de Torres, Carmen; Lavarino, Cinzia; Mora, Jaume; Cho, Yoon-Jae; Tabori, Uri; Olson, James M; Gajjar, Amar; Packer, Roger J; Rutkowski, Stefan; Pomeroy, Scott L; French, Pim J; Kloosterhof, Nanne K; Kros, Johan M; Van Meir, Erwin G; Clifford, Steven C; Bourdeaut, Franck; Delattre, Olivier; Doz, François F; Hawkins, Cynthia E; Malkin, David; Grajkowska, Wieslawa A; Perek-Polnik, Marta; Bouffet, Eric; Rutka, James T; Pfister, Stefan M; Taylor, Michael D

    2014-03-20

    Medulloblastoma comprises four distinct molecular subgroups: WNT, SHH, Group 3, and Group 4. Current medulloblastoma protocols stratify patients based on clinical features: patient age, metastatic stage, extent of resection, and histologic variant. Stark prognostic and genetic differences among the four subgroups suggest that subgroup-specific molecular biomarkers could improve patient prognostication. Molecular biomarkers were identified from a discovery set of 673 medulloblastomas from 43 cities around the world. Combined risk stratification models were designed based on clinical and cytogenetic biomarkers identified by multivariable Cox proportional hazards analyses. Identified biomarkers were tested using fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) on a nonoverlapping medulloblastoma tissue microarray (n = 453), with subsequent validation of the risk stratification models. Subgroup information improves the predictive accuracy of a multivariable survival model compared with clinical biomarkers alone. Most previously published cytogenetic biomarkers are only prognostic within a single medulloblastoma subgroup. Profiling six FISH biomarkers (GLI2, MYC, chromosome 11 [chr11], chr14, 17p, and 17q) on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues, we can reliably and reproducibly identify very low-risk and very high-risk patients within SHH, Group 3, and Group 4 medulloblastomas. Combining subgroup and cytogenetic biomarkers with established clinical biomarkers substantially improves patient prognostication, even in the context of heterogeneous clinical therapies. The prognostic significance of most molecular biomarkers is restricted to a specific subgroup. We have identified a small panel of cytogenetic biomarkers that reliably identifies very high-risk and very low-risk groups of patients, making it an excellent tool for selecting patients for therapy intensification and therapy de-escalation in future clinical trials.

  5. Possible origin of B chromosome in Dichotomius sericeus (Coleoptera).

    PubMed

    Amorim, Igor Costa; Milani, Diogo; Cabral-de-Mello, Diogo Cavalcanti; Rocha, Marília França; Moura, Rita Cássia

    2016-08-01

    B chromosomes have so far been described in about 80 species of Coleoptera, mainly using conventional staining analysis. In this study, 152 individuals of the dung beetle Dichotomius sericeus (Coleoptera), collected from three isolated geographical areas in the State of Pernambuco, Brazil, were analyzed to determine the frequency, prevalence, distribution, meiotic behavior, and possible B chromosome origin. The cytogenetic analysis consisted of conventional staining, C-banding, triple fluorochrome staining (CMA3/DA/DAPI), and fluorescent in situ hybridization using ribosomal DNAs (rDNAs) and H3 histone gene as probes, as well as microdissection and chromosome painting of the B chromosome. The B chromosomes were detected in all populations analyzed. Analysis revealed the heterochromatic nature and the presence of G+C-rich blocks and 18S rDNA on the B chromosome. FISH with DNA from microdissected B chromosome painted the entire extension of the B chromosome for all populations, besides the pericentromeric regions of all the autosomes, as well as the X chromosome. Finally, cross-hybridization in nine related species of Dichotomius using the microdissected B chromosome as probe did not reveal any hybridization signal. The results suggest an intraspecific and monophyletic origin for B chromosomes in D. sericeus, probably from the second or third autosomal pair.

  6. Cytogenetic analysis in prenatal diagnosis.

    PubMed Central

    Schonberg, S A

    1993-01-01

    Chromosome analysis is the single most frequent test used in laboratory prenatal diagnostic studies. I summarize the current status of the field, including diagnostic problems in the laboratory and the clinical problems associated with communicating unexpected laboratory findings. I explore the effect of molecular genetics on these issues and its possible future effects on the entire practice of prenatal diagnosis as it relates to the risk for chromosome nondisjunction (trisomy). I also discuss the use of cytogenetic analysis in the prenatal diagnosis of certain inherited genetic diseases. Images PMID:8236978

  7. Cytogenetic studies in Dupuytren contracture.

    PubMed Central

    Wurster-Hill, D H; Brown, F; Park, J P; Gibson, S H

    1988-01-01

    Dupuytren contracture is a connective tissue disease mainly confined to Caucasians. It is characterized by nodular growth and proliferation of collagen in the palmar and plantar fascias. Autosomal dominance with variable penetrance is considered the most likely mode of inheritance. The goal of the present study was to examine the cytogenetics of this common benign neoplasia. Chromosome studies were performed on the nodular growth of eight patients with Dupuytren contracture, all of whom showed chromosome abnormalities that included numerical and structural clones, random numerical and structural aberrations, prophasing, and premature centromere separation. Numerical clones of trisomies 7 and/or 8, as well as some random structural aberrations, were considered to represent in vivo abnormalities, whereas most structural clones appeared likely to be the results of rapid and selective in vitro growth of particular cells. The disease process occurring in Dupuytren contracture was found to involve marked chromosome instability, as well as some in vivo clonal formation. Transverse fascial tissue, usually considered to be uninvolved in the disease process, unexpectedly showed all the same types of abnormalities as the nodular tissue. This indicates a more widespread distribution of disease in the tissues than previously suspected. The findings in the present study are similar to those in various malignant and benign types of tumorous growth and suggest the importance of further cytogenetic investigation into other conditions of benign growth. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:3414684

  8. Human molecular cytogenetics: From cells to nucleotides.

    PubMed

    Riegel, Mariluce

    2014-03-01

    The field of cytogenetics has focused on studying the number, structure, function and origin of chromosomal abnormalities and the evolution of chromosomes. The development of fluorescent molecules that either directly or via an intermediate molecule bind to DNA has led to the development of fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), a technology linking cytogenetics to molecular genetics. This technique has a wide range of applications that increased the dimension of chromosome analysis. The field of cytogenetics is particularly important for medical diagnostics and research as well as for gene ordering and mapping. Furthermore, the increased application of molecular biology techniques, such as array-based technologies, has led to improved resolution, extending the recognized range of microdeletion/microduplication syndromes and genomic disorders. In adopting these newly expanded methods, cytogeneticists have used a range of technologies to study the association between visible chromosome rearrangements and defects at the single nucleotide level. Overall, molecular cytogenetic techniques offer a remarkable number of potential applications, ranging from physical mapping to clinical and evolutionary studies, making a powerful and informative complement to other molecular and genomic approaches. This manuscript does not present a detailed history of the development of molecular cytogenetics; however, references to historical reviews and experiments have been provided whenever possible. Herein, the basic principles of molecular cytogenetics, the technologies used to identify chromosomal rearrangements and copy number changes, and the applications for cytogenetics in biomedical diagnosis and research are presented and discussed.

  9. Cytogenetic risk stratification in chronic myelomonocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Such, Esperanza; Cervera, José; Costa, Dolors; Solé, Francesc; Vallespí, Teresa; Luño, Elisa; Collado, Rosa; Calasanz, María J.; Hernández-Rivas, Jesús M.; Cigudosa, Juan C.; Nomdedeu, Benet; Mallo, Mar; Carbonell, Felix; Bueno, Javier; Ardanaz, María T.; Ramos, Fernando; Tormo, Mar; Sancho-Tello, Reyes; del Cañizo, Consuelo; Gómez, Valle; Marco, Victor; Xicoy, Blanca; Bonanad, Santiago; Pedro, Carmen; Bernal, Teresa; Sanz, Guillermo F.

    2011-01-01

    Background The prognostic value of cytogenetic findings in chronic myelomonocytic leukemia is unclear. Our purpose was to evaluate the independent prognostic impact of cytogenetic abnormalities in a large series of patients with chronic myelomonocytic leukemia included in the database of the Spanish Registry of Myelodysplastic Syndromes. Design and Methods We studied 414 patients with chronic myelomonocytic leukemia according to WHO criteria and with a successful conventional cytogenetic analysis at diagnosis. Different patient and disease characteristics were examined by univariate and multivariate methods to establish their relationship with overall survival and evolution to acute myeloid leukemia. Results Patients with abnormal karyotype (110 patients, 27%) had poorer overall survival (P=0.001) and higher risk of acute myeloid leukemia evolution (P=0.010). Based on outcome analysis, three cytogenetic risk categories were identified: low risk (normal karyotype or loss of Y chromosome as a single anomaly), high risk (presence of trisomy 8 or abnormalities of chromosome 7, or complex karyotype), and intermediate risk (all other abnormalities). Overall survival at five years for patients in the low, intermediate, and high risk cytogenetic categories was 35%, 26%, and 4%, respectively (P<0.001). Multivariate analysis confirmed that this new CMML-specific cytogenetic risk stratification was an independent prognostic variable for overall survival (P=0.001). Additionally, patients belonging to the high-risk cytogenetic category also had a higher risk of acute myeloid leukemia evolution on univariate (P=0.001) but not multivariate analysis. Conclusions Cytogenetic findings have a strong prognostic impact in patients with chronic myelomonocytic leukemia. PMID:21109693

  10. Injuries from Coleoptera.

    PubMed

    Southcott, R V

    The effects of Coleoptera (beetles) on humans in the Australian region are surveyed. Ill-effects range from the immediate trauma of a bite, possibly with minor effects from the beetle's salivary secretions, to the effects of the vesicating beetles of the families Meloidae, Oedemeridae and Staphylinidae, and also the acute corneal erosion that is attributed to the small beetle Orthoperus sp. (family Corylophidae) in southeastern Australia. Reference also is made to other effects that are known as a result of beetle metabolites or structures, such as "carpet beetle dermatitis" from the irritating hairs of Anthrenus larvae (family Dermestidae), and inhalational asthma from beetles, notably the grain weevil Sitophilus, the causative agent of certain cases of grain-worker's asthma. Beetles as human intestinal inhabitants, and their role as intermediary hosts of metazoal diseases are discussed.

  11. Cytogenetics of aborters and abortuses.

    PubMed

    Kajii, T; Ferrier, A

    1978-05-01

    783 aborters and 430 abortuses were studied in a prospective cytogenetic survey which attempted to link chromosome abnormalities and history of recurrent abortion. 425 female and 358 male spontaneous aborters and their 430 abortuses (310 were karotyped) showed 4 women and 2 men as balanced translocation carriers (3 Robertsonian and 3 reciprocal translocations) and a woman with an XXX karotype. 5 of the abortuses were successfully karotyped; 4 had inherited unbalanced translocation products, and the other had a balanced 13q14q translocation plus trisomy 18. Apparently, translocation chromosomes carried by aborters were transmitted to their abortuses. Structural chromosome abnormalities were found with higher frequency (.8%) among aborters than among the general adult population (.3%). Translocation carriers were more frequent among the aborters with histories of recurrent abortions (2.7%) as well as among aborters with a history of perinatal deaths (3.6%) than among those persons with no such histories (.6%). Data on 18 couples whose 2 or 3 successive spontaneous abortuses were karotyped are presented.

  12. The Cerrado (Brazil) plant cytogenetics database

    PubMed Central

    Roa, Fernando; Telles, Mariana Pires de Campos

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Cerrado is a biodiversity hotspot that has lost ca. 50% of its original vegetation cover and hosts ca. 11,000 species belonging to 1,423 genera of phanerogams. For a fraction of those species some cytogenetic characteristics like chromosome numbers and C-value were available in databases, while other valuable information such as karyotype formula and banding patterns are missing. In order to integrate and share all cytogenetic information published for Cerrado species, including frequency of cytogenetic attributes and scientometrics aspects, Cerrado plant species were searched in bibliographic sources, including the 50 richest genera (with more than 45 taxa) and 273 genera with only one species in Cerrado. Determination of frequencies and the database website (http://cyto.shinyapps.io/cerrado) were developed in R. Studies were pooled by employed technique and decade, showing a rise in non-conventional cytogenetics since 2000. However, C-value estimation, heterochromatin staining and molecular cytogenetics are still not common for any family. For the richest and best sampled families, the following modal 2n counts were observed: Oxalidaceae 2n = 12, Lythraceae 2n = 30, Sapindaceae 2n = 24, Solanaceae 2n = 24, Cyperaceae 2n = 10, Poaceae 2n = 20, Asteraceae 2n = 18 and Fabaceae 2n = 26. Chromosome number information is available for only 16.1% of species, while there are genome size data for only 1.25%, being lower than the global percentages. In general, genome sizes were small, ranging from 2C = ca. 1.5 to ca. 3.5 pg. Intra-specific 2n number variation and higher 2n counts were mainly related to polyploidy, which relates to the prevalence of even haploid numbers above the mode of 2n in most major plant clades. Several orphan genera with almost no cytogenetic studies for Cerrado were identified. This effort represents a complete diagnosis for cytogenetic attributes of plants of Cerrado. PMID:28919965

  13. The Cerrado (Brazil) plant cytogenetics database.

    PubMed

    Roa, Fernando; Telles, Mariana Pires de Campos

    2017-01-01

    Cerrado is a biodiversity hotspot that has lost ca. 50% of its original vegetation cover and hosts ca. 11,000 species belonging to 1,423 genera of phanerogams. For a fraction of those species some cytogenetic characteristics like chromosome numbers and C-value were available in databases, while other valuable information such as karyotype formula and banding patterns are missing. In order to integrate and share all cytogenetic information published for Cerrado species, including frequency of cytogenetic attributes and scientometrics aspects, Cerrado plant species were searched in bibliographic sources, including the 50 richest genera (with more than 45 taxa) and 273 genera with only one species in Cerrado. Determination of frequencies and the database website (http://cyto.shinyapps.io/cerrado) were developed in R. Studies were pooled by employed technique and decade, showing a rise in non-conventional cytogenetics since 2000. However, C-value estimation, heterochromatin staining and molecular cytogenetics are still not common for any family. For the richest and best sampled families, the following modal 2n counts were observed: Oxalidaceae 2n = 12, Lythraceae 2n = 30, Sapindaceae 2n = 24, Solanaceae 2n = 24, Cyperaceae 2n = 10, Poaceae 2n = 20, Asteraceae 2n = 18 and Fabaceae 2n = 26. Chromosome number information is available for only 16.1% of species, while there are genome size data for only 1.25%, being lower than the global percentages. In general, genome sizes were small, ranging from 2C = ca. 1.5 to ca. 3.5 pg. Intra-specific 2n number variation and higher 2n counts were mainly related to polyploidy, which relates to the prevalence of even haploid numbers above the mode of 2n in most major plant clades. Several orphan genera with almost no cytogenetic studies for Cerrado were identified. This effort represents a complete diagnosis for cytogenetic attributes of plants of Cerrado.

  14. Significance of FISH in clinical cytogenetics

    SciTech Connect

    Gopal Rao, V.V.N.; Harris, S.; Roop, H.

    1994-09-01

    Ever since its discovery, FISH technology has become an invaluable adjunct to conventional cytogenetics. FISH has been instrumental in resolving previously unresolved cytogenetic dilemmas. FISH has been used to elucidate complex as well as subtle chromosomal translocations, in detection of microdeletions, to confirm duplications and inversions and to identify marker chromosomes. We report a few selected cases where FISH proved to be invaluable in not only confirming the anomaly, but also in arriving at an accurate diagnosis and appropriate counseling of the patients. These include 3 cases of prenatal and 3 cases of postnatal diagnosis. The results clearly demonstrate the significance of FISH in identifying and interpreting the difficult karyotype in clinical cytogenetics. In addition, FISH has been used to rule out microdeletions in Prader-Willi (16), Angelman (3), Miller-Dieker (7), DiGeorge (4) and Smith-Magenis (1) syndrome patients. Without FISH in the majority of these cases, it would not have been possible to accurately identify the karyotype and interpret the results. Hence, we recommend that FISH be used as a powerful adjunct to conventional cytogenetics in order to arrive at an accurate interpretation of the results but not to replace routine cytogenetic studies.

  15. Cytogenetics and chromosomes of tapeworms (Platyhelminthes, Cestoda).

    PubMed

    Spakulová, Marta; Orosová, Martina; Mackiewicz, John S

    2011-01-01

    Tapeworms (Cestoda, Platyhelminthes) are a highly diversified group of parasites that can have significant veterinary importance as well as medical impact as disease agents of human alveococcosis, hydatidosis, taeniosis/cysticercosis/neurocysticercosis, hymenolepidosis or diphyllobothriasis. Because of their great diversity, there has been keen interest in their phylogenetic relationships to other obligate parasitic platyhelminthes, as well as within the group itself. Recent phylogenetic analyses of cestodes, however, have focused on morphological, molecular, life cycle, embryology and host-specificity features and conspicuously omitted inclusion of karyological data. Here we review the literature from 1907 to 2010 and the current status of knowledge of the chromosomes and cytogenetics within all of the cestode orders and place it within an evolutionary perspective. Karyological data are discussed and tabulated for 115 species from nine eucestode orders with ideograms of 46 species, and a comparison of cytogenetic patterns between acetabulate and bothriate cestode lineages is made. Attention is drawn to gaps in our knowledge for seven remaining orders and cestodarian groups Gyrocotylidea and Amphilinidea. Among the cytogenetic aspects covered are: chromosome number, triploidy, classical karyotype cytogenetics (banding patterns, karyotype asymmetry, secondary constrictions), as well as advanced karyotype techniques allowing location of genes on chromosomes by fluorescence in situ hybridization. We demonstrate that further progress in cestode karyosystematics rests with new molecular approaches and the application of advanced cytogenetic markers facilitating intimate karyotype analysis.

  16. Genetics Home Reference: cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... normal acute myeloid leukemia cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... expand/collapse boxes. Description Cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia (CN-AML) is one form of a cancer ...

  17. 42 CFR 493.1225 - Condition: Clinical cytogenetics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Condition: Clinical cytogenetics. 493.1225 Section... Testing § 493.1225 Condition: Clinical cytogenetics. If the laboratory provides services in the specialty of Clinical cytogenetics, the laboratory must meet the requirements specified in §§ 493.1230...

  18. Fifty years of cytogenetics: a parallel view of the evolution of cytogenetics and genotoxicology.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Sagredo, J M

    2008-01-01

    A parallelism exists between human cytogenetics and cytogenetic toxicology. The breakthroughs, mostly coming from and used in clinical genetics, are widely used in genetic toxicology. The birth of human cytogenetics occurred in 1956 when it was published that the diploid number of chromosomes in humans is 46. The first stage in chromosome-induced mutagenesis began in 1938 when Sax published the effects of X-rays on the chromosomes of Drosophila. In 1959, the cytogenetic anomalies for Down, Klinefelter, and Turner syndromes were described, and parallelly in 1960, the first publication on chromosomal aberrations in man caused by ionizing radiation appeared. The cytogenetic analysis of chromosomal aberrations in cell cultures is considered one of the primary methods to evaluate induced mutagenesis. At the end of the 1960s, banding techniques allowed chromosomes to be individually identified, in parallel, the sister chromatid exchange analysis technology was described. Another milestone in the history of induced mutagenesis was the discovery that mutagenic agents were able to alter chromosomal division and segregation in gonads inducing meiotic nondisjunction. Here we review new approaches and applications such as biological dosimetry, translocation scoring using FISH, and micronucleus test. Chromosomal aberrations and micronucleus test are now effective cytogenetic biomarkers of early effect used as cancer predictors. Human cytogenetics has proven to be effective over its 50-year lifespan and, although each new technique that has appeared seemed to announce its end, the fact is that the current state of cytogenetics is in reality a collection of techniques that, while common, are cheap, fast, and wide-ranging. Therefore, in genotoxicology, they continue to be useful to identify mutagenic agents as well as to evaluate and analyze exposed populations.

  19. The cytogenetics of mammalian autosomal rearrangements

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel, A.

    1988-01-01

    Combining data from animal and clinical studies with classical cytogenetic observations, the volume provides information on various aspects of mammalian autosomal rearrangements. Topics range from the reproductive consequences to carriers of autosomal rearrangements to the application of structural rearrangements and DNA probes to gene mapping. In addition, the book presents an overview of new perspectives and future directions for research.

  20. Cytogenetic activity of the coumarin glucoside seseloside

    SciTech Connect

    Arshava, E.A.

    1986-05-01

    The cytogenetic effect of the coumarin glucoside seseloside on plant objects was studied. It was established that low concentrations of the preparation (from 1 x 10/sup -5/ to 1 x 10/sup -3/ ..mu..g/ml) inhibit both spontaneous and radiation-induced mutagenesis. The effect of high concentrations (10 and 100 ..mu..g/ml) causes a mutagenic effect.

  1. Methods in molecular biology: plant cytogenetics

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Cytogenetic studies have contributed greatly to our understanding of genetics, biology, reproduction, and evolution. From early studies in basic chromosome behavior the field has expanded enabling whole genome analysis to the manipulation of chromosomes and their organization. This book covers a ran...

  2. Cytogenetic Biodosimetry for Radiation Disasters: Recent Advances

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    Radiation exposure induces many types of chromosomal aberrations in the exposed individual’s peripheral blood lymphocytes. The presence of dicentrics , a... chromosomal structural aberration, in an individual’s pe- ripheral blood lymphocytes indicates radiation exposure. Dicentrics are considered relatively...method. This cytogenetic chromosome aberration bioassay is a thoroughly investigated biodosimetry method. The dicentric assay is conventionally

  3. Rare Cytogenetic Abnormalities in Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Bacher, Ulrike; Schanz, Julie; Braulke, Friederike; Haase, Detlef

    2015-01-01

    The karyotype represents one of the main cornerstones for the International Prognostic Scoring System (IPSS) and the revised IPSS-R (IPSS-R) that are most widely used for prognostication in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). The most frequent cytogenetic abnormalities in MDS, i.e. del(5q), -7/del(7q), +8, complex karyotypes, or −Y have been extensively explored for their prognostic impact. The IPSS-R also considers some less frequent abnormalities such as del(11q), isochromosome 17, +19, or 3q abnormalities. However, more than 600 different cytogenetic categories had been identified in a previous MDS study. This review aims to focus interest on selected rare cytogenetic abnormalities in patients with MDS. Examples are numerical gains of the chromosomes 11 (indicating rapid progression), of chromosome 14 or 14q (prognostically intermediate to favorable), -X (in females, with an intermediate prognosis), or numerical abnormalities of chromosome 21. Structural abnormalities are also considered, e.g. del(13q) that is associated with bone marrow failure syndromes and favorable response to immunosuppressive therapy. These and other rare cytogenetic abnormalities should be integrated into existing prognostication systems such as the IPSS-R. However, due to the very low number of cases, this is clearly dependent on international collaboration. Hopefully, this article will help to inaugurate this process. PMID:25960862

  4. The history of human cytogenetics in India-A review.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Usha R

    2016-09-10

    It is 60years since the discovery of the correct number of chromosomes in 1956; the field of cytogenetics had evolved. The late evolution of this field with respect to other fields is primarily due to the underdevelopment of lenses and imaging techniques. With the advent of the new technologies, especially automation and evolution of advanced compound microscopes, cytogenetics drastically leaped further to greater heights. This review describes the historic events that had led to the development of human cytogenetics with a special attention about the history of cytogenetics in India, its present status, and future. Apparently, this review provides a brief account into the insights of the early laboratory establishments, funding, and the German collaborations. The details of the Indian cytogeneticists establishing their labs, promoting the field, and offering the chromosomal diagnostic services are described. The detailed study of chromosomes helps in increasing the knowledge of the chromosome structure and function. The delineation of the chromosomal rearrangements using cytogenetics and molecular cytogenetic techniques pays way in identifying the molecular mechanisms involved in the chromosomal rearrangement. Although molecular cytogenetics is greatly developing, the conventional cytogenetics still remains the gold standard in the diagnosis of various numerical chromosomal aberrations and a few structural aberrations. The history of cytogenetics and its importance even in the era of molecular cytogenetics are discussed.

  5. Cytogenetics of the darkling beetles Zophobas aff. confusus and Nyctobates gigas (Coleoptera, Tenebrionidae).

    PubMed

    Lira-Neto, A C; Silva, G M; Moura, R C; Souza, M J

    2012-08-16

    Males of Zophobas aff. confusus and Nyctobates gigas (Tenebrionidae) collected in the State of Pernambuco, Brazil, were studied through conventional staining, C-banding, silver nitrate impregnation (AgNO₃), and the base specific fluorochromes CMA₃ and DAPI. Z. aff. confusus was found to have 2n = 20 (9+Xyp) while N. gigas exhibited 2n = 18 (8+neoXY). Large pericentromeric blocks of constitutive heterochromatin (CH) were detected throughout the autosomal complement of the two species, except in one autosomal pair of N. gigas in which no heterochromatic block was observed. The sex chromosomes of both species were almost totally heterochromatic. Double staining with CMA₃/DA (distamycin) and DAPI/DA marked CH in Z. aff. confusus. However, DAPI staining was more intense. N. gigas was found to possess blocks of CH-positive CMA₃ and homogeneous DAPI. AgNO₃ staining also revealed differences between the two species. In Z. confusus an NOR was observed in the sexual bivalent Xyp and N. gigas was found to have an autosomal NOR.

  6. Cytogenetic effect of Alternanthera philoxeroides (alligator weed) on Agasicles hygrophila (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) in its native range

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Plant polyploidy potentially affects plant-insect interactions; however, its effect on insect fitness remains largely unexplored. Alternanthera philoxeroides is a South American amphibious Amaranthaceae, which invades aquatic and terrestrial habitats. Different morphotypes and cytotypes were identif...

  7. Interpretation of cytogenetic results in multiple myeloma for clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Rajan, A M; Rajkumar, S V

    2015-10-30

    The interpretation of cytogenetic abnormalities in multiple myeloma (MM) is often a challenging task. MM is characterized by several cytogenetic abnormalities that occur at various time points in the disease course. The interpretation of cytogenetic results in MM is complicated by the number and complexity of the abnormalities, the methods used to detect them and the disease stage at which they are detected. Specific cytogenetic abnormalities affect clinical presentation, progression of smoldering multiple myeloma (SMM) to MM, prognosis of MM and management strategies. The goal of this paper is to provide a review of how MM is classified into specific subtypes based on primary cytogenetic abnormalities and to provide a concise overview of how to interpret cytogenetic abnormalities based on the disease stage to aid clinical practice and patient management.

  8. Interpretation of cytogenetic results in multiple myeloma for clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Rajan, A M; Rajkumar, S V

    2015-01-01

    The interpretation of cytogenetic abnormalities in multiple myeloma (MM) is often a challenging task. MM is characterized by several cytogenetic abnormalities that occur at various time points in the disease course. The interpretation of cytogenetic results in MM is complicated by the number and complexity of the abnormalities, the methods used to detect them and the disease stage at which they are detected. Specific cytogenetic abnormalities affect clinical presentation, progression of smoldering multiple myeloma (SMM) to MM, prognosis of MM and management strategies. The goal of this paper is to provide a review of how MM is classified into specific subtypes based on primary cytogenetic abnormalities and to provide a concise overview of how to interpret cytogenetic abnormalities based on the disease stage to aid clinical practice and patient management. PMID:26517360

  9. Cytogenetic diversity in primary human tumors.

    PubMed

    Wolman, S R; Camuto, P M; Perle, M A

    1988-02-01

    Cytogenetic patterns from primary short-term culture of breast cancer, renal carcinoma, and tumors of the central nervous system are presented to illustrate the range of karyotypic diversity of human solid tumors as well as their biologic differences in culture systems that support their growth. These studies have illustrated several major issues. 1) Results vary with the tissue of origin: primary cultures from breast are almost uniformly diploid, while renal tumors are near-diploid, mosaic, and show clonal aberrations; and CNS tumors are heterogeneous: some diploid, some near-diploid and some highly aneuploid. 2) Results after short-term culture are selective, representing subpopulations from the heterogeneous cells that are detected on direct analysis of fresh tumors by cytogenetics or flow cytometry (FCM). It is not yet clear whether prognosis depends on the dominant population of the primary tumor or alternatively should be influenced by detection of small aneuploid subpopulations. 3) Evidence from all three tumor types supports the interpretation that cytogenetically normal diploid cells constitute part of some tumor populations, and may be better adapted to routine growth in culture than aneuploid subpopulations from the same primary tumors. These cells may also compose a major portion of the viable population of tumors in vivo and, therefore, could represent a useful model for studies of tumorigenesis and therapeutic regimens.

  10. Comparative genomic hybridization in clinical cytogenetics

    SciTech Connect

    Bryndorf, T.; Kirchhoff, M.; Rose, H.

    1995-11-01

    We report the results of applying comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) in a cytogenetic service laboratory for (1) determination of the origin of extra and missing chromosomal material in intricate cases of unbalanced aberrations and (2) detection of common prenatal numerical chromosome aberrations. A total of 11 fetal samples were analyzed. Seven cases of complex unbalanced aberrations that could not be identified reliably by conventional cytogenetics were successfully resolved by CGH analysis. CGH results were validated by using FISH with chromosome-specific probes. Four cases representing common prenatal numerical aberrations (trisomy 21, 18, and 13 and monosomy X) were also successfully diagnosed by CGH. We conclude that CGH is a powerful adjunct to traditional cytogenetic techniques that makes it possible to solve clinical cases of intricate unbalanced aberrations in a single hybridization. CGH may also be a useful adjunct to screen for euchromatic involvement in marker chromosomes. Further technical development may render CGH applicable for routine aberration screening. 16 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Cytogenetic findings in blastoid mantle cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Khoury, Joseph D; Sen, Filiz; Abruzzo, Lynne V; Hayes, Kimberly; Glassman, Armand; Medeiros, L Jeffrey

    2003-10-01

    A subset of mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) tumors has blastoid morphology, and a number of morphologic variants of blastoid MCL have been described in the literature. In this report, we document the cytogenetic findings in 27 cases of blastoid MCL. Conventional cytogenetic analyses were performed on bone marrow aspirates involved by MCL from 27 patients. There were 14 men and 13 women with a median age of 63 years (range, 40-79 years). Diagnostic tissue biopsy and bone marrow specimens were reviewed, and cases were divided into 2 morphologic groups: classic (12 cases) and pleomorphic (15 cases), as defined in the World Health Organization classification. All tumors had an immunophenotype compatible with MCL, were positive for cyclin D1, and carried the t(11;14). Twenty-four cases had complex karyotypes with 3 or more chromosomal abnormalities in addition to the t(11;14). In classic blastoid MCL, abnormalities of chromosomes 13, 18, and 8 were most common. In pleomorphic blastoid MCL, abnormalities of chromosomes 13, 17, and 3 were most frequent. Chromosome 22 abnormalities were detected exclusively in the pleomorphic group. Tumors in which the neoplastic cells showed prominent nucleoli had a significantly higher frequency of chromosome 17 abnormalities (P = 0.03). We conclude that blastoid MCL tumors often show complex cytogenetic aberrations. Some abnormalities correlate with morphologic features, suggesting that morphologic variants of blastoid MCL may arise via different molecular pathways.

  12. Molecular cytogenetic characterization of mammary neuroendocrine carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Xiang, De-Bing; Wei, Bing; Abraham, Susan C; Huo, Lei; Albarracin, Constance T; Zhang, Hong; Babiera, Gildy; Caudle, Abigail S; Akay, Catherine L; Rao, Pulivarthi; Zhao, Yi-Jue; Lu, Xinyan; Wu, Yun

    2014-09-01

    Primary mammary neuroendocrine carcinoma (NEC) is an uncommon entity that accounts for 2% to 5% of breast carcinomas. Recent reports have shown that NEC of the breast is an aggressive subtype of mammary carcinoma that is distinct from invasive ductal carcinoma, not otherwise specified, and have suggested that these tumors have a poorer prognosis than invasive ductal carcinoma, not otherwise specified. In this study, we provide the first cytogenetic characterization of mammary NEC using both conventional G-banding and spectral karyotype on a group of 7 tumors. We identified clonal chromosomal aberrations in 5 (71.4%) cases, with 4 of them showing complex karyotypes. Of these, recurrent numerical aberrations included gain of chromosome 7 (n = 2) and loss of chromosome 15 (n = 2). Recurrent clonal structural chromosomal aberrations involved chromosomes 1 (n = 3), 3 (n = 2), 6q (n = 3), and 17q (n = 3). Of the 4 (57.1%) cases with complex karyotypes, 2 showed evidence of chromothripsis, a phenomenon in which tens to hundreds of genomic rearrangements occur in a one-off cellular crisis. One of these had evidence of chromothripsis involving chromosomes 1, 6, 8, and 15. The other also had evidence of chromosome 8 chromothripsis, making this a recurrent finding shared by both cases. We also found that mammary NEC shared some cytogenetic abnormalities--such as trisomy 7 and 12--with other neuroendocrine tumors in the lung and gastrointestinal tract, suggesting trisomy 7 and 12 as potential common molecular aberrations in neuroendocrine tumors. To our knowledge, this is the first report on molecular cytogenetic characterization of mammary NEC.

  13. [Familial forms of schizophrenia. Cytogenetic study].

    PubMed

    Gorwood, P; Leboyer, M; Jay, M; Hillaire, D; Carteault, F; Dugain, A M; Berg, S; Des Lauriers, A; Feingold, J

    1991-01-01

    As a preliminary step in the search for chromosomal location of a susceptibility gene predisposing to schizophrenia, cytogenetic screening of patients might be useful. Search for chromosomal aberrations has successfully directed and accelerated the identification of several disease genes, such as the Duchenne muscular dystrophy gene, retinoblastoma, Burkitt's lymphoma and chronic myeloïd leukemia. Although karyotypes abnormalities do not account for a large portion of cases of Schizophrenia, the two candidate regions predisposing to this disease resulted from observation of chromosomal abnormalities. First, the identification of a partial trisomy of the 5q11-q13 region (Basset et al., 1988) led Sherrington et al. (1988) to report a positive linkage with markers localized on the long arm of chromosome 5, which has not yet been replicated (Kauffman et al., 1989; Kennedy et al., 1988; St Clair et al., 1989). Second, on the basis of frequent cytogenetic abnormalities of the sex chromosome (DeLisi, 1985) in addition to epidemiological observations, Crow (1988) suggested that there could be a locus for psychosis within the pseudoautosomal region, a data which has been recently confirmed (Collinge et al., 1991). With the hypothesis that such aberrations could be more frequent among schizophrenics who have at least one affected first-degree relative, we undertook cytogenetic screening on a sample recruited from consecutive psychiatric admissions to a Psychiatric facility (Hôpital Saint Paul) involving patients living in a limited geographical area on the island of La Réunion, a French Department in the Indian Ocean.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. Cytogenetic findings in primary and secondary MDS.

    PubMed

    Heim, S

    1992-01-01

    More than 1300 MDS cases with clonal cytogenetic abnormalities, 200 of them secondary MDS, have been reported. The most common aberrations in primary MDS are del(5q) (27%), trisomy 8 (19%), monosomy 7 (15%), der(11q) (7%), -5, der(12p) and -Y (5%), del(7q) (4%), and t(1;7), der(3q), del(13q), i(17q) and del(20q) in 2% or less. The 5q- is mostly, but not always, a del(5)(q13q33); it is the cytogenetic hall-mark of the "5q- syndrome" and is frequently found as the sole abnormality. The frequency of the aberrations varies among MDS subgroups: 5q- is most frequent in RA, -5, -7, and der(12p) are more common in CMML and especially in RAEB, and +8 and der(11q) are more often found in RARS. The most common aberrations in secondary MDS are -7 (41%), del(5q) (28%), -5 (11%), der(21q) (9%), 7q-, +8 and der(12p) (8%), t(1;7) and -12 (7%), der(17p) (6%), der(3p) and der(6p) (5%), and der(3q), der(11q), -17, -18 and der(19q) (4%). The average number of abnormalities per case is 5.3, compared with 2.9 in unspecified MDS. The frequency of cytogenetically unrelated clones is 5.7% in secondary and 4.3% in primary MDS. When the literature data are broken down by type of genotoxic exposure, it turns out that -5, -7, and der(17p) are over-represented in patients who have received chemotherapy, whereas 5q- is associated with no exposure or preceding radiotherapy only. The karyotypic profile is prognostically important: patients with -7 or complex karyotypes have a higher risk of progression to acute leukemia and shorter survival.

  15. Molecular karyotyping in human constitutional cytogenetics.

    PubMed

    Sanlaville, Damien; Lapierre, Jean-Michel; Turleau, Catherine; Coquin, Aurélie; Borck, Guntram; Colleaux, Laurence; Vekemans, Michel; Romana, Serge Pierrick

    2005-01-01

    Using array CGH it is possible to detect very small genetic imbalances anywhere in the genome. Its usefulness has been well documented in cancer and more recently in constitutional disorders. In particular it has been used to detect interstitial and subtelomeric submicroscopic imbalances, to characterize their size at the molecular level and to define the breakpoints of chromosomal translocation. Here, we review the various applications of array CGH in constitutional cytogenetics. This technology remains expensive and the existence of numerous sequence polymorphisms makes its interpretation difficult. The challenge today is to transfer this technology in the clinical setting.

  16. [Familial retinoblastoma: cytogenetic study of the tumor].

    PubMed

    Robledo Batanero, M; Manzanal Martínez, A; Ayuso García, C; Benítez Ortiz, J

    1990-05-01

    We report a case of familiar retinoblastoma, in which both mother and daughter show bilateral retinoblastoma. The cytogenetic study, in both peripheral blood lymphocytes and tumoral tissue did not show alterations on the 13 chromosome, although we found a complex kariotype in tumoral tissue defined by three celular lines. In all of them appears a marker in which the 6 chromosome is involved (der 6). The derivated of 6 chromosome are markers highly characteristic of the retinoblastoma cases, and can be related with the aggressivity of tumor and the appearance of the second tumors.

  17. Molecular cytogenetics using fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, J.W.; Kuo, Wen-Lin; Lucas, J.; Pinkel, D.; Weier, H-U.; Yu, Loh-Chung.

    1990-12-07

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with chromosome-specific probes enables several new areas of cytogenetic investigation by allowing visual determination of the presence and normality of specific genetic sequences in single metaphase or interphase cells. in this approach, termed molecular cytogenetics, the genetic loci to be analyzed are made microscopically visible in single cells using in situ hybridization with nucleic acid probes specific to these loci. To accomplish this, the DNA in the target cells is made single stranded by thermal denaturation and incubated with single-stranded, chemically modified probe under conditions where the probe will anneal only with DNA sequences to which it has high DNA sequence homology. The bound probe is then made visible by treatment with a fluorescent reagent such as fluorescein that binds to the chemical modification carried by the probe. The DNA to which the probe does not bind is made visible by staining with a dye such as propidium iodide that fluoresces at a wavelength different from that of the reagent used for probe visualization. We show in this report that probes are now available that make this technique useful for biological dosimetry, prenatal diagnosis and cancer biology. 31 refs., 3 figs.

  18. Cytogenetic and molecular aspects of lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Panani, Anna D; Roussos, Charis

    2006-07-28

    Lung cancer is one of the most common cancers worldwide and its pathogenesis is closely associated with tobacco smoking. Continuous exposure of smoking carcinogens results in the accumulation of several alterations of tumorigenesis related genes leading to neoplastic bronchial lesions. Lung cancer is divided in two main histological groups, non-small cell lung carcinomas (NSCLCs) and small cell lung carcinomas (SCLCs). It seems that lung tumorigenesis is a multistep process in which a number of genetic events including alterations of oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes have been occurred. Cytogenetic abnormalities in lung cancer are very complex. However, a number of recurrent cytogenetic abnormalities have been identified. Many of these changes are common in both major histological groups of lung cancer while certain chromosomal abnormalities have been correlated with the stage or the grade of the tumors. In addition, several molecular alterations have been constantly found. Some of them are common in different histological subtypes of lung cancer and they appear to play an important role in the pathogenesis of lung cancer. A good understanding of the underlying genetic changes of lung tumorigenesis will provide new perspectives for early diagnosis and screening of high-risk individuals. In addition, a number of genetical prognostic factors have been identified as possibly helpful parameters in the evaluation of lung cancer patients. Further research is required in order to systematically investigate genetical alterations in lung cancer contributing to improvement of lung cancer classification and staging and to development of new molecular targeted therapies.

  19. Cytogenetic findings in thirty lung carcinoma patients.

    PubMed

    Berker-Karaüzüm, S; Lüleci, G; Ozbilim, G; Erdoğan, A; Kuzucu, A; Demircan, A

    1998-01-15

    Primary tissue cultures of human lung tumors were prepared from 30 cases of which 16 were diagnosed as squamous cell carcinoma, six adenocarcinoma, four adenosquamous cell carcinoma, three large cell carcinoma, and one small cell lung carcinoma. Chromosomal abnormalities were observed in 26 cases by cytogenetic studies with a GTG banding technique. Specific chromosome bands frequently involved in structural abnormalities were seen on 1p11, 1q11, 2p10, 6p10, 7q11, 7q22, 7q32, 8q22, 9q22, 11q11, 21q10, and Xq24. We assumed that especially i(2)(p10), i(9)(p10), i(21)(q10), t(11;12), t(14;15), del(X)(q24), and loss of the Y chromosome may play a role in the development of lung cancer as secondary changes. In this way, our cytogenetic findings provide evidence that multiple genetic lesions are associated with the pathogenesis of lung cancer.

  20. Cytogenetic studies of small ape (Hylobatidae) chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Stanyon, R

    2013-01-01

    Each genus of small apes has a highly distinctive karyotype (karyomorph) at every level of cytogenetic analysis. Early workers using classical staining and banding had problems integrating the karyolocial data with that of other primates. Chromosome painting allowed syntenic homology maps to be constructed for each of the four karyomorphs (2n = 38, 44, 50 and 52). They revealed that the great apes and Old World monkeys had strongly conserved karyotypes while those of small apes were highly rearranged. However, they provided contradictory phylogenetic results to other bio-molecular tree of small ape evolution. More recently BAC-FISH investigations using a panel of about 900 BACs defined each breakpoint by spanning or flanking BAC clones The syntenic map was refined and now includes small segments of homology which had previously gone undected, marker order (synteny block orientation) and the location of ancestral and Evolutionarily New Centromeres. However, the BAC-FISH data similar to other biomolecular methods used up to now could not resolve the phylogenetic tree of hylobatids. These difficulties may be explained by the rapid divergence of crown hylobatids, reticulate evolution and incomplete lineage sorting. The lack of significant cytogenetic landmarks at the nodes of the gibbon tree could indicate that chromosomal rearrangements did not play a primary role in hylobatid speciation.

  1. The use of foetal ovarian stromal cell culture for cytogenetic diagnosis. Stromal ovarian culture cytogenetic diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Roig, I; Vanrell, I; Ortega, A; Cabero, Ll; Egozcue, J; Garcia, M

    2003-01-01

    Some studies have been carried out to analyze human female first meiotic prophase. Most of them use samples from foetuses collected after legal interruption of pregnancy. In some cases, a control population is needed and foetuses aborted for non-chromosomal reasons are used. The assumption of these samples as being euploids could perhaps represent an error. In this article, we describe an easy methodology to certify the euploidy of foetal ovarian tissue using an one-week somatic culture. Using this protocol, we have obtained a primary culture in 88.2% of the studied cases, material usable for being karyotyped in 93.3% of the cases, and a cytogenetic diagnosis was performed in 100% of these cases. Finding the same karyotype in cultured cells in cases in which we had a prenatal cytogenetic diagnosis has validated the technique, and in applying this protocol we have been able to check our prophase meiotic-study control population.

  2. [Contribution of molecular cytogenetics to the diagnosis of chromosome anomalies].

    PubMed

    Tachdjian, G

    1999-01-09

    MOLECULAR CYTOGENETICS: New fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) techniques have been developed using fluorescent non-radioactive DNA probes. FISH: Based on the complementary of nucleotides FISH enables visualization and localization of a DNA fragment on chromosomes by hybridizing the complementary DNA sequence, the probe. Many types of tissues can be analyzed, for example hematopoietic cells in blood or bone marrow, amniotic cells, trophoblasts, fibroblasts, gamete or tumoral cells. Molecular cytogenetics can be used to characterize chromosome anomalies in many fields of cytogenetics (constitutional studies, prenatal diagnosis, hematology, oncology).

  3. [Cytogenetic findings in patients with Down's syndrome].

    PubMed

    Cortés, F; Alliende, M; Curotto, B

    1990-01-01

    In order to describe the frequency of non classical forms of 21 trisomy in patients with Down's syndrome at the cytogenetic's laboratory of our institution (Instituto de Nutrición y Tecnología de los Alimentos, Universidad de Chile) 201 chromosomal studies from peripheral blood lymphocytes of patients referred with a clinical diagnosis of Down's syndrome were analyzed. Among them 22 (11%) cases showed no chromosomal abnormalities, 161 (80%) had classic 21 trisomy, 7 (3.5%), showed 21 trisomy by translocation, 5 (2.5%) had 21 trisomy mosaicism, 6 (3%) showed 21 trisomy plus an autosomic balanced translocation. Male to female rate was 1.18:1 and diagnosis was done at the neonatal period in 26.8% of cases. Early recognition of the different kinds of chromosomal abnormalities in Down's syndrome is important if appropriate genetic council is the goal.

  4. B chromosomes: from cytogenetics to systems biology.

    PubMed

    Valente, Guilherme T; Nakajima, Rafael T; Fantinatti, Bruno E A; Marques, Diego F; Almeida, Rodrigo O; Simões, Rafael P; Martins, Cesar

    2017-02-01

    Though hundreds to thousands of reports have described the distribution of B chromosomes among diverse eukaryote groups, a comprehensive theory of their biological role has not yet clearly emerged. B chromosomes are classically understood as a sea of repetitive DNA sequences that are poor in genes and are maintained by a parasitic-drive mechanism during cell division. Recent developments in high-throughput DNA/RNA analyses have increased the resolution of B chromosome biology beyond those of classical and molecular cytogenetic methods; B chromosomes contain many transcriptionally active sequences, including genes, and can modulate the activity of autosomal genes. Furthermore, the most recent knowledge obtained from omics analyses, which is associated with a systemic view, has demonstrated that B chromosomes can influence cell biology in a complex way, possibly favoring their own maintenance and perpetuation.

  5. Cytogenetics Findings in a Histiocytic Sarcoma Case

    PubMed Central

    Alonso-Dominguez, J. M.; Calbacho, M.; Talavera, M.; Villalon, C.; Abalo, L.; Garcia-Gutierrez, J. V.; Lozano, S.; Tenorio, M.; Villarrubia, J.; Lopez-Jimenez, J.; Ferro, M. T.

    2012-01-01

    Histiocytic sarcoma (HS) is a neoplasm derived from histiocytes. Its diagnosis was not clear until its immunohistochemistry profile was correctly established. Not much is known about its genetic properties. We report a case of a 48-year-old male patient whose bone marrow was almost completely occupied by monomorphic medium size neoplastic cellularity. Its immunohistochemical profile was CD68+, CD4+, CD45+ with negativity of other dendritic cells, and other lineage markers. Cytogenetic study showed 4 related clones: one with trisomy 8 and extra material on the short arms of chromosome 4; a second line with tetrasomy of chromosome 8, add(4)(p16); the third clone had the same alterations as the previous and deletion of chromosome 3 at q11; the fourth line had tetrasomy 8 and translocation t(3;5)(q25;q35). To our knowledge this is the first HS case showing chromosome 8 trisomy and tetrasomy and the other described alterations. PMID:22937328

  6. Cytogenetic changes in nonmalignant breast tissue.

    PubMed

    Steinarsdóttir, Margrét; Jónasson, Jón Gunnlaugur; Vidarsson, Hilmar; Júlíusdóttir, Hildur; Hauksdóttir, Halla; Ogmundsdóttir, Helga M

    2004-09-01

    Cytogenetic changes are common in breast cancer and have also been described in fibroadenomas and fibrocystic disease, but not in histologically normal breast tissue. Cytogenetic analysis was performed on nonmalignant breast tissue from benign breast lumps (n = 8), reduction mammoplasties (n = 31), and grossly nontumorous tissue from cancerous breasts (n = 84), using standard techniques and G-banding. All samples were reviewed histologically. Clonal chromosomal changes were found in three of eight benign breast tumors (38%). Of the reduction mammoplasties, 17 samples contained nonproliferative changes, and three of these (18%) showed a clonal deletion of 3p. No pathology was identified in the other 14 samples, of which one (7%) contained two clonal changes, apparently balanced translocations. Of nontumorous tissues from cancerous breasts, 15 (18%) showed clonal chromosomal abnormalities. Five of these samples were histologically normal. Two clones were identical to those found in the corresponding cancer. In 18 additional samples, single cells were detected with the same change as that seen in clones or single cells in the cancer. Only 4 of these 20 samples contained detectable cancer cells. Clonal abnormalities found in two or more samples included trisomies X, 7, and 20 and monosomies 19 and 18. Clonal changes were not significantly more frequent in proliferative than in nonproliferative lesions. The Icelandic BRCA2 founder mutation, 999del5, was detected in four samples, all histologically normal, two of which had clonal chromosomal abnormalities. In conclusion, clonal chromosomal changes are not infrequent in nonmalignant breast tissue and can be detected even in the absence of histological abnormalities. Copyright 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. Cytogenetically unrelated clones in hematological neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Heim, S; Mitelman, F

    1989-01-01

    We have reviewed literature data on 6,306 cases of hematological neoplasia--acute and chronic lymphatic and myeloid leukemias (CML excepted), myelodysplastic and chronic lymphoproliferative and myeloproliferative disorders, and malignant lymphomas--with the goal of quantitatively ascertaining how often cytogenetically unrelated clones occur in these diseases. Unexpectedly wide variations were found: in ANLL, unrelated clones were present in 1.1% of the 2,506 known cases with chromosome abnormalities characterized with banding technique; in the various myelodysplastic (MDS) and chronic myeloproliferative (CMD) disorders (total number of cases 1,299) the frequency was 4.3% and in lymphatic malignancies 1.3% (total case number 2,501). In the latter group the proportions varied between 0.4% and 0.6% in ALL and malignant lymphoma (ML) to as much as 6.2% in CLD and 7.3% in CLL. Some karyotypic abnormalities were encountered more often than would be expected from their general frequency in the various diseases. This discrepancy was particularly evident in MDS and CMD, where 5q- was found in slightly less and +8 in somewhat more than half of the 56 cases. Furthermore, these two aberrations were found as the only changes in the two coexisting clones in one-fourth of the material. Although if viewed in isolation these data would undoubtedly be best explained by assuming a multicellular origin of the neoplasm, it is entirely possible that what are cytogenetically perceived as unrelated clones could be subclones with some invisible aberration in common. If so, this interpretation indicates that changes like +8 and 5q-, both of which are common rearrangements in bone marrow neoplasms, are actually secondary changes that develop during tumor progression.

  8. The response of Dendroctonus valens (Coleoptera: Scolytidae) and Temnochila chlorodia (Coleoptera: Trogossitidae) to Ips paraconfusus (Coleoptera: Scolytidae) pheromone components and verbenone

    Treesearch

    Christopher J. Fettig; Stepehen R. McKelvey; Christopher P. Dabney; Robert R. Borys

    2007-01-01

    The red turpentine beetle, Dendroctonus valens LeConte, 1860 (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, Scolytinae), is a common bark beetle species found throughout much of North America and China. In 2004, we observed that California fivespined ips, Ips paraconfusus Lanier, 1970 (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, Scolytinae), attack densities in logging debris were inversely related to D...

  9. Coleoptera Associated with Decaying Wood in a Tropical Deciduous Forest.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-López, N Z; Andrés-Hernández, A R; Carrillo-Ruiz, H; Rivas-Arancibia, S P

    2016-08-01

    Coleoptera is the largest and diverse group of organisms, but few studies are dedicated to determine the diversity and feeding guilds of saproxylic Coleoptera. We demonstrate the diversity, abundance, feeding guilds, and succession process of Coleoptera associated with decaying wood in a tropical deciduous forest in the Mixteca Poblana, Mexico. Decaying wood was sampled and classified into four stages of decay, and the associated Coleoptera. The wood was identified according to their anatomy. Diversity was estimated using the Simpson index, while abundance was estimated using a Kruskal-Wallis test; the association of Coleoptera with wood species and decay was assessed using canonical correspondence analysis. Decay wood stage I is the most abundant (51%), followed by stage III (21%). We collected 93 Coleoptera belonging to 14 families, 41 genera, and 44 species. The family Cerambycidae was the most abundant, with 29% of individuals, followed by Tenebrionidae with 27% and Carabidae with 13%. We recognized six feeding guilds. The greatest diversity of Coleoptera was recorded in decaying Acacia farnesiana and Bursera linanoe. Kruskal-Wallis analysis indicated that the abundance of Coleoptera varied according to the species and stage of decay of the wood. The canonical analysis showed that the species and stage of decay of wood determined the composition and community structure of Coleoptera.

  10. Chromosome in situ suppression hybridisation in clinical cytogenetics.

    PubMed Central

    Hulten, M A; Gould, C P; Goldman, A S; Waters, J J

    1991-01-01

    The use of chromosome in situ suppression hybridisation with whole chromosome libraries has previously been reported by various research laboratories to be an effective method of identifying specific human chromosomal material. As a clinical cytogenetic service laboratory we have used the technique as a complement to diagnosis by classical chromosome banding. In three examples of structural rearrangements the potential use of the 'chromosome painting' method is assessed for its ability to enhance the routine cytogenetic service currently available. Images PMID:1956055

  11. An opportune life: 50 years in human cytogenetics.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Patricia A

    2014-01-01

    This article is one person's view of human cytogenetics over the past 50 years. The flowering of human cytogenetics led the way to the establishment of clinical genetics as one of the most important developments in medicine in the twentieth century. The article is written from the viewpoint of a scientist who never tired of analyzing the images of dividing cells on the light microscope and interpreting the wealth of information contained in them.

  12. Analytical cytology applied to detection of induced cytogenetic abnormalities

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, J.W.; Lucas, J.; Straume, T.; Pinkel, D.

    1987-08-06

    Radiation-induced biological damage results in formation of a broad spectrum of cytogenetic changes such as translocations, dicentrics, ring chromosomes, and acentric fragments. A battery of analytical cytologic techniques are now emerging that promise to significantly improve the precision and ease with which these radiation induced cytogenetic changes can be quantified. This report summarizes techniques to facilitate analysis of the frequency of occurrence of structural and numerical aberrations in control and irradiated human cells. 14 refs., 2 figs.

  13. Revision of Benedictus Scherer (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae: Galerucinae)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The alpine flea beetle genus Benedictus Scherer (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae: Galerucinae) is revised. Twenty new species, namely B. chilalla, B. dochula, B. ha, B. nobding, B. thumsila and B. yatongla from Bhutan, B. belousovi, B. cangshanicus, B. kabaki, B. kurbatovi, B. nigrinus, B. sichuanensis a...

  14. Cytogenetic abnormalities in acute leukaemia of ambiguous lineage: an overview.

    PubMed

    Manola, Kalliopi N

    2013-10-01

    Acute leukaemia of ambiguous lineage (ALAL) is a rare complex entity with heterogeneous clinical, immunophenotypic, cytogenetic and molecular genetic features and adverse outcome. According to World Health Organization 2008 classification, ALAL encompasses those leukaemias that show no clear evidence of differentiation along a single lineage. The rarity of ALAL and the lack of uniform diagnostic criteria have made it difficult to establish its cytogenetic features, although cytogenetic analysis reveals clonal chromosomal abnormalities in 59-91% of patients. This article focuses on the significance of cytogenetic analysis in ALAL supporting the importance of cytogenetic analysis in the pathogenesis, diagnosis, prognosis, follow up and treatment selection of ALAL. It reviews in detail the types of chromosomal aberrations, their molecular background, their correlation with immunophenotype and age distribution and their prognostic relevance. It also summarizes some novel chromosome aberrations that have been observed only once. Furthermore, it highlights the ongoing and future research on ALAL in the field of cytogenetics. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Development and Application of Camelid Molecular Cytogenetic Tools

    PubMed Central

    Avila, Felipe; Das, Pranab J.; Kutzler, Michelle; Owens, Elaine; Perelman, Polina; Rubes, Jiri; Hornak, Miroslav; Johnson, Warren E.

    2014-01-01

    Cytogenetic chromosome maps offer molecular tools for genome analysis and clinical cytogenetics and are of particular importance for species with difficult karyotypes, such as camelids (2n = 74). Building on the available human–camel zoo-fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) data, we developed the first cytogenetic map for the alpaca (Lama pacos, LPA) genome by isolating and identifying 151 alpaca bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones corresponding to 44 specific genes. The genes were mapped by FISH to 31 alpaca autosomes and the sex chromosomes; 11 chromosomes had 2 markers, which were ordered by dual-color FISH. The STS gene mapped to Xpter/Ypter, demarcating the pseudoautosomal region, whereas no markers were assigned to chromosomes 14, 21, 22, 28, and 36. The chromosome-specific markers were applied in clinical cytogenetics to identify LPA20, the major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-carrying chromosome, as a part of an autosomal translocation in a sterile male llama (Lama glama, LGL; 2n = 73,XY). FISH with LPAX BACs and LPA36 paints, as well as comparative genomic hybridization, were also used to investigate the origin of the minute chromosome, an abnormally small LPA36 in infertile female alpacas. This collection of cytogenetically mapped markers represents a new tool for camelid clinical cytogenetics and has applications for the improvement of the alpaca genome map and sequence assembly. PMID:23109720

  16. Cytogenetic and molecular cytogenetic characterization of 6 new cases of idiopathic hypereosinophilic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bigoni, R; Cuneo, A; Roberti, M G; Milani, R; Bardi, A; Cavazzini, F; Minotto, C; Castoldi, G

    2000-05-01

    Idiopathic hypereosinophilic syndrome (HES) is defined as a peripheral blood eosiniphilia greater than 1, 500 cells/microL for longer than 6 months, absence of other apparent etiologies for eosinophilia and signs and symptoms of organ involvement. HES may be a reactive condition or a chronic myeloproliferative disorder but scanty information is available concerning its cytogenetic profile. Six patients with HES were studied by cytogenetic analysis. To increase the sensitivity of cytogenetic analysis, interphase FISH studies were performed to detect some cryptic chromosomal lesions involving the regions known to be frequently involved in myeloproliferative disorders (i.e. BCR/ABL, 5q31, 7q31.1, 11q23, 13q14, 17p13). Clinical parameters were recorded in all patients. A 3q deletion was detected in one patient; two unrelated clones with +14 and +11 were present in another patient who had a cryptic 5q31 deletion as disclosed by FISH; both patients had a mild clinical course. The 5q31 deletion was shown to involve the eosinophilic lineage and not the lymphoid cells. No chromosome abnormalities were found by karyotyping or interphase FISH in the remaining 4 cases. In two of these cases the clinical course was aggressive, with progressive leukocytosis and marked splenomegaly in one patient, central nervous system and cardiac involvement as well as bone marrow failure in the other. The 3q deletion, +11 and +14, and a cryptic 5q31 deletion involving the cells of the eosinophilic lineage are three novel chromosome abnormalities occurring in HES. We did not find a correlation between evolving or aggressive disease and the presence of chromosome anomalies. Our data confirm that HES is a clinically and biologically heterogeneous condition and suggest that more cases need to be studied to identify clinically significant chromosome changes in this rare condition. Some patients may benefit from treatment with interferon.

  17. Pleuropulmonary blastoma: cytogenetic and spectral karyotype analysis.

    PubMed

    Taube, Janis M; Griffin, Constance A; Yonescu, Raluca; Morsberger, Laura; Argani, Pedram; Askin, Frederic B; Batista, Denise A S

    2006-01-01

    Pleuropulmonary blastoma (PPB) is a rare neoplasm of the pleuropulmonary mesenchyme. The molecular mechanisms underlying the genesis of this tumor are of particular interest as a large number of affected patients as well as their relatives have concurrent disease including additional dysplasia or neoplasia. To date, detailed karyotypes have been published on a limited number of cases. We report clinical, pathologic, and cytogenetic data in 2 cases of PPB including spectral karyotyping in 1 of them. Additionally, we conducted a review of the literature and compiled 15 published karyotypes of this tumor. Gain of chromosome 8 material was a highly prevalent finding in PPB, most times occurring as trisomy, but tetrasomy of the long arm was also frequent. Other occurring abnormalities, in order of observed frequency, included loss of 17p, loss of chromosome 10 or 10q, rearrangement of 11p, loss of chromosome X or Xp, gain of chromosomes/arms 1q, 2, and 7q, and loss of 6q and 18p. Loss of 10q has not been previously emphasized in PPB. The significance of these chromosome findings is discussed in relation to tumorigenesis.

  18. Cytogenetic investigations of chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Wren, Catherine; Moriarty, Helen; Marsden, Katherine; Tegg, Elizabeth

    2010-04-15

    This study aimed to determine which culture method would yield the highest culture success rate, mitotic index, banding resolution, and abnormality rate in investigation of patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). A range of culture techniques for conventional cytogenetic (CC) analyses was compared: 24-hour unstimulated, 72 hours incubation with additional fetal calf serum, 72 hours stimulation with interleukin 4, 72 hours stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), 72 hours stimulation with TPA (12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate), and 72 hours stimulation with CpG-oligonucleotide DSP30 + Interleukin-2 (IL-2). CC abnormality rates were also compared to fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) results using probes for CLL (LSI D13S319/13q34/CEP 12: LSI ATM/p53). Forty-five samples from 24 patients (consisting of 11 newly diagnosed and 13 previously diagnosed patients) were included. For CC, a 100.0% culture success rate was achieved (n = 45) by means of an EDTA (ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid) peripheral blood sample with an associated 62.5% CC abnormality rate (n = 24). FISH detected an abnormality rate of 75.0% (n = 24). The combined CC and FISH abnormality rate was 87.5% (n = 24). This study demonstrates that CC that uses TPA and DSP30 + IL-2 on EDTA peripheral blood is effective in the investigation of CLL and may be used as a supplement to FISH studies.

  19. Cytogenetic studies on Gonatodes (Reptilia, Squamata, Sphaerodactylidae).

    PubMed

    Schmid, Michael; Steinlein, Claus; Feichtinger, Wolfgang; Haaf, Thomas; Mijares-Urrutia, Abraham; Schargel, Walter E; Hedges, S Blair

    2014-01-01

    Mitotic and meiotic chromosomes of 5 species of the reptile genus Gonatodes are described by means of conventional staining, banding analyses and in situ hybridization using a synthetic telomeric DNA probe. The amount, location and fluorochrome affinities of constitutive heterochromatin, the number and positions of nucleolus organizer regions, and the patterns of telomeric DNA sequences were determined for most of the species. The karyotypes of G. falconensis and G. taniae from northern Venezuela are distinguished by their extraordinarily reduced diploid chromosome number of 2n = 16, which is the lowest value found so far in reptiles. In contrast to most other reptiles, both species have exclusively large biarmed (meta- and submetacentric) chromosomes. Comparison of the karyotypes of G. falconensis and G. taniae with those of other Gonatodes species indicates that the exceptional 2n = 16 karyotype originated by a series of 8 centric fusions. The karyotypes of G. falconensis and G. taniae are further characterized by the presence of considerable amounts of (TTAGGG)n telomeric sequences in the centromeric regions of all chromosomes. These are probably not only relics of the centric fusion events, but a component of the highly repetitive DNA in the constitutive heterochromatin of the chromosomes. The genome sizes of 4 Gonatodes species were determined using flow cytometry. For comparative purposes, all previously published cytogenetic data on Gonatodes and other sphaerodactylids are included and discussed.

  20. Results and Pitfalls in Prenatal Cytogenetic Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Lillian Y. F.; Dubin, Elyse C.; Kerenyi, Thomas; Hirschhorn, Kurt

    1973-01-01

    Since 1969, we have cultured over 200 diagnostic amniotic fluids. Of these, 183 were for cytogenetic diagnosis. The chromosome analysis was successful in 168 cases. The indications and the results of the affected fetuses (followed by therapeutic abortion) are: (1) previous child with Down's syndrome: 62 cases (1:47,XX,+21); (2) advanced maternal age: 54 cases (1:47,XXY; 1:45,X/46,XY mosaicism; 1:47,+18); (3) previous child with multiple anomalies: 12 cases; (4) previous child with 47,XY,+18 or 47,+13: five cases; (5) translocation carrier: two cases; (6) parental mosaicism: three cases; (7) X-linked disorders: six cases (3:XY); (8) others: 24 cases. We have found firstly, that for prenatal sex determination, karyotype analysis of the cultured amniotic fluid cells is the only accurate means and that caution must be taken if sex chromatin and Y-fluorescent body determination from the uncultured amniotic fluid cells is used. Secondly, that diagnosis of chromosomal mosaicism can be problematic as exemplified by our case of 45,X/46,XY mosaicism, where only 45,X cells were recovered from the first culture. Thirdly, that in cases with enlarged satellites, cells of late prophase or early metaphase must be used to eliminate confusion with translocations. We encountered three cases of enlarged satellites—one in the D group and two in the G group—and all three resulted in normal infants. Fourthly, that the karyotype may be altered by contamination and/or treatment or other unknown factors. We have observed two such cases where each mother delivered a normal infant. Images PMID:4268389

  1. Cytogenetic surveillance of workers exposed to genotoxic chemicals: Preliminary experiences from a prospective cancer study in a cytogenetic cohort

    SciTech Connect

    Sorsa, M.; Ojajaervi, A.S.; Salomaa, S. )

    1990-01-01

    Cytogenetic endpoints, conventionally chromosomal aberrations, and later sister chromatid exchanges and micronuclei have long been used to assess exposure of human populations to genotoxic agents. Although the adverse nature of somatic chromosome damage is recognized at the group level, no ill-health manifestations have been causally related to cytogenetic damage at the individual level. In work-related exposures, e.g., ethylene oxide, styrene, benzene, vinyl chloride, and alkylating anticancer agents have been shown to induce somatic chromosomal damage in several studies. For all of these, a carcinogenic risk to humans has also been documented. The possible association of somatic chromosome damage and cancer will be elucidated in a Nordic prospective study. The objective is to find out the significance of a high or low score in any of the cytogenetic parametres to risk of cancer. In the Finnish part of the cohort of 806 individuals, 10 cases of cancer were observed during the first follow-up period. Although the cohort is young and the numbers small, a slightly significant (P = 0.04) trend was observed for individuals with cancer and a score of chromosomal aberrations. No trend was observed for sister chromatid exchanges. The application of cytogenetic surveillance is still not routine methodology, but it is useful and informative in carefully controlled study designs. Special efforts should be directed toward combining different disciplines, i.e., cytogenetics, adduct monitoring, and end-effect epidemiology, in order to reach quantitativeness in risk assessment.13 references.

  2. [Half a century of human and medical cytogenetics].

    PubMed

    Vago, P

    2009-01-01

    In 1956, the number of chromosomes in humans is set at 46; in 1959, the link between a disability (mongolism) and a chromosomal anomaly (the Down syndrome) is established: human and medical cytogenetics were born. Since then, progress has been remarkable: the techniques of chromosomal and molecular cytogenetics can reach a resolution of the size of a single gene with a pangenomic scope. Practical applications are constantly expanded. The clinical impact is significant, from the genetic counselling in constitutional to the targeted therapies. Fifty years later, cytogenetics can be defined as the science which aims to detect chromosomal abnormalities, whether constitutional or acquired, using chromosomal or molecular techniques aiming to study the arrangement of genes in chromosomes, to quantify the number of gene copy and to look for the presence of gene fusion.

  3. [Cytogenetic and clinical investigations in trisomia 22 (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Mangold, B; Müller, W; Hochleitner, M; Rosenkranz, W

    1976-01-01

    Since the introduction of new cytogenetic methods, as the "Pancreatin-Giemsa"-stain and similar methods, it is possible for the first time to determine the chromosomes of group G accurately. There are few cases reported in the literature with an additional small chromosome which could be associated with group G. None of those children presented the classical signs of a Down-Syndrome, therefore a trisomy 22 was discussed. This is the report of a female patient, on whom trisomy 22 was confirmed cytogenetically. So far it was only in a small number of cases possible to prove this thesis by cytogenetic studies. We compare our findings with previous reports of suspected or proven cases of trisomy 22.

  4. Is Having Clonal Cytogenetic Abnormalities the Same as Having Leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Farina, Mirko; Rossi, Giuseppe; Bellotti, Daniella; Marchina, Eleonora; Gale, Robert Peter

    2016-01-01

    A finding of cytogenetic abnormalities, even when these are clonal and even when the abnormalities are typically associated with leukaemia, is not the same as a person having leukaemia. We describe a person who had acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) and achieved a complete haematological remission and who then had persistent and transient clonal cytogenetic abnormalities for 22 years but no recurrence of leukaemia. These data suggest that clones of myeloid cells with mutations and capable of expanding to levels detectable by routine cytogenetic analyses do not all eventuate in leukaemia, even after a prolonged observation interval. The possibility of incorrectly diagnosing a person as having leukaemia becomes even greater when employing more sensitive techniques to detect mutations such as by polymerase chain reaction and whole-exome or whole-genome sequencing. Caution is needed when interpreting clonal abnormalities in AML patients with normal blood and bone marrow parameters.

  5. Cytogenetic abnormalities in Tunisian women with premature ovarian failure.

    PubMed

    Ayed, Wiem; Amouri, Ahlem; Hammami, Wajih; Kilani, Olfa; Turki, Zinet; Harzallah, Fatma; Bouayed-Abdelmoula, Nouha; Chemkhi, Imen; Zhioua, Fethi; Slama, Claude Ben

    2014-12-01

    To identify the distribution of chromosome abnormalities among Tunisian women with premature ovarian failure (POF) referred to the department of Cytogenetic at the Pasteur Institute of Tunis (Tunisia), standard cytogenetic analysis was carried out in a total of 100 women younger than 40 affected with premature ovarian failure. We identified 18 chromosomal abnormalities, including seven X-numerical anomalies in mosaic and non-mosaic state (45,X; 47,XXX), four sex reversal, three X-structural abnormalities (terminal deletion and isochromosomes), one autosomal translocation and one supernumerary marker. The overall prevalence of chromosomal abnormalities was 18% in our cohort. X chromosome aneuploidy was the most frequent aberration. This finding confirms the essential role of X chromosome in ovarian function and underlies the importance of cytogenetic investigations in the routine management of POF.

  6. Cytogenetic profile of Indian patients with de novo myelodysplastic syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Chaubey, Rekha; Sazawal, Sudha; Dada, Rima; Mahapatra, Manoranjan; Saxena, Renu

    2011-01-01

    Background & objectives: Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is a clonal haematopoietic stem cell disorder characterized by ineffective haematopoiesis and leukaemia progression. Cytogenetic analysis has proven to be a mandatory part of the diagnosis of MDS as well as a major indicator for predicting clinical course and outcome. Studies on cytogenetics of MDS are reported mostly from the West and only a few are available from Asian countries. We report herein cytogenetic studies on 40 Indian patients with primary MDS to find out the occurrence and type of chromosome abnormalities and recurring defects. Methods: Cytogenetic analysis was done using GTG banding and karyotyped according to the International System for Human Cytogenetic Nomenclature (ISCN). Results: Of the 40 patients, 19 patients (47.5%) showed clonal karyotypic abnormalities with distribution as follows: 3 of 15 (20%) of refractory anaemia (RA), 4 of 7 (57%) of refractory anaemia with excess blasts-1 (RAEB-1), 4 of 6 (67%) of refractory anaemia with excess blasts 2 (RAEB-2), 2 of 3 (67%) of refractory anaemia with ring sideroblasts (RARS), 2 of 4 (50%) of refractory cytopenia with multilineage dysplasia (RCMD), none (0%) RCMD-ringed sideroblasts (RCMD-RS) and 4 patients with 5q syndrome. The frequent abnormalities observed in our study were -7, 5q-and trisomy 8. Interpretation & conclusions: Two rare chromosomal abnormalities (6q-, 3q-) were found with unknown prognostic significance. Hence, cytogenetic analysis may be incorporated in the routine diagnosis of MDS since there are racial differences in clinical pictures and the molecular events. PMID:22089606

  7. Cytogenetic findings in persons living near the Love Canal.

    PubMed

    Heath, C W; Nadel, M R; Zack, M M; Chen, A T; Bender, M A; Preston, R J

    1984-03-16

    Cytogenetic analyses were performed on peripheral blood from 46 present or past residents of the area surrounding Love Canal, a former dump site for chemical wastes in Niagara Falls, NY. Participants included 17 persons in whom cytogenetic analyses had been performed in 1980 and 29 persons who had been living in 1978 in seven homes that directly adjoined the canal and in which environmental tests showed elevated levels of chemicals spreading from the canal. Frequencies of chromosomal aberrations and of sister chromatid exchange (SCE) did not differ significantly from control levels. For all participants, cigarette smoking was associated with an increase in sister chromatid exchange frequency.

  8. Cytogenetic findings in persons living near the Love Canal

    SciTech Connect

    Heath, C.W. Jr.; Nadel, M.R.; Zack, M.M. Jr.; Chen, A.T.L.; Bender, M.A.; Preston, R.J.

    1984-03-16

    Cytogenetic analyses were performed on peripheral blood from 46 present or past residents of the areas surrounding Love Canal, a former dump site for chemical wastes in Niagara Falls, NY. Participants included 17 persons in whom cytogenetic analyses had been performed in 1980 and 29 persons who had been living in 1978 in seven homes that directly adjoined the canal and in which environmental tests showed elevated levels of chemicals spreading from the canal. Frequencies of chromosomal aberrations and of sister chromatid exchange (SCE) did not differ significantly from control levels. For all participants, cigarette smoking was associated with an increase in sister chromatid exchange frequency.

  9. Cytogenetic damage and occupational exposure. 1. Exposure to stone dust

    SciTech Connect

    Sobti, R.C.; Bhardwaj, D.K. )

    1991-10-01

    Cytogenetic investigations were carried out on 50 workers exposed to stone dust in a stone crusher industry and on 25 control subjects never exposed to such dust. The frequency of chromosomal aberrations and sister chromatid exchanges in exposed individuals was significantly higher than that in controls. The cytogenetic indices demonstrated a clear dependence on the working environment. The effect of smoking and/or alcoholic habits coupled with exposure to stone dust has also been investigated. The results indicate that the mutagenic risk in the working environment is probably associated with silica dust in the area.

  10. The role of the Giemsa stain in cytogenetics.

    PubMed

    Dolan, M

    2011-04-01

    In just half a century since the human diploid chromosome number was correctly identified as 46, there has been a rapid expansion in our understanding of both the genetic foundation of normal human development and the development of various constitutional and acquired abnormalities. The ability to detect numerical and structural chromosomal abnormalities was made possible by the Giemsa stain. Despite the recent advent of powerful molecular-based cytogenetic techniques (e.g., fluorescence in situ hybridization, array-based comparative genomic hybridization), Giemsa-based chromosomal banding and staining techniques retain their crucial role in cytogenetics.

  11. Parasitism and olfactory responses of Dastarcus helophoroides (Coleoptera: Bothrideridae) to different Cerambycid hosts

    Treesearch

    Jian-Rong Wei; Zhong-Qi Yang; Therese M. Poland; Jia-Wei. Du

    2009-01-01

    Dastarcus helophoroides (Fairmaire) (Coleoptera: Bothrideridae) is an important natural enemy of longhorned beetles (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae). It is distributed throughout most Provinces in China. We investigated whether there were differences among D. helophoroides populations collected from different hosts in different...

  12. Cytogenetic studies of three triazine herbicides. I. In vitro studies

    EPA Science Inventory

    Atrazine, simazine, and cyanazine are widely used pre-emergence and post-emergence triazine herbicides that have made their way into the potable water supply of many agricultural communities. Because of this and the prevalence of contradictory cytogenetic studies in the literatur...

  13. [Cytogenetic activity of the butylcaptax defoliant transformation product].

    PubMed

    Vesmanova, O Ia; Semykina, E E; Koblov, R K; Ergashev

    1989-01-01

    Cytogenetical activity of the product of metabolitic butylcaptax transformations in cells of cotton plants G. barbadense has been studied. It is shown that butylcaptax, with a significant mutagenicity, looses its mutagenic activity, metabolizing in low mutagenic 2-oxyamylthiobenzthiazole. Low water solubility prevents its concentration to exceed 0.005% in tissue liquids and to exert a mutagenic action on cotton plants.

  14. Cytogenetic characterization of cat eye syndrome marker chromosome.

    PubMed

    Wenger, S L; Surti, U; Nwokoro, N A; Steele, M W

    1994-01-01

    Cat eye syndrome is associated with a partial tetrasomy 22q and can be inherited. The authors have evaluated the marker chromosome in a proband and his mother by cytogenetic banding techniques to verify the dicentric chromosomal rearrangement and by fluorescence in situ hybridization to confirm the involvement of 22. The mother also had an affected offspring with an unrelated aneuploidy, trisomy 21.

  15. Cytogenetic studies of the blood (M111), part A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lockhart, L. H.

    1973-01-01

    The cytogenetic study of the crew appears to indicate that Skylab-type environmental conditions have no deleterious effect upon chromosomal material. The findings are, however, less clear-cut than might be desired, due in large measure to confounding of the experimental design by the administration of isotope injections for the purposes of other experiments and to the lack of control subjects.

  16. Practical Instruction in Tissue Culture and Cytogenetics for Sandwich Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, D. C.; Bishun, N. P.

    1973-01-01

    Describes the training and practical techniques taught to students involved in a sandwich course at the Tissue Culture and Cytogenetics Unit of the Marie Curie Memorial Foundation, Surrey, England. Students spend a minimum of six months involved in the sandwich course before returning to university for a final academic year. (JR)

  17. Cytogenetic studies of three triazine herbicides. I. In vitro studies

    EPA Science Inventory

    Atrazine, simazine, and cyanazine are widely used pre-emergence and post-emergence triazine herbicides that have made their way into the potable water supply of many agricultural communities. Because of this and the prevalence of contradictory cytogenetic studies in the literatur...

  18. Practical Instruction in Tissue Culture and Cytogenetics for Sandwich Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, D. C.; Bishun, N. P.

    1973-01-01

    Describes the training and practical techniques taught to students involved in a sandwich course at the Tissue Culture and Cytogenetics Unit of the Marie Curie Memorial Foundation, Surrey, England. Students spend a minimum of six months involved in the sandwich course before returning to university for a final academic year. (JR)

  19. Constructing a Cytogenetic Map of the Maize Genome

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    We are developing a pachytene cytogenetic FISH (Fluorescence in situ Hybridization) map of the maize (Zea mays L.) genome using maize marker-selected sorghum BACs (Bacterial Artificial Chromosome) as described by Koumbaris and Bass (2003, Plant J. 35:647). The two main projects are the production of...

  20. Molecular and cytogenetic analysis of chromosome 7 in uterine leiomyoma

    SciTech Connect

    Ishwad, C.; Ferrell, R.E.; Davare, J.

    1994-09-01

    Uterine leiomyomas are benign tumors which arise clonally from smooth muscle cells of the myometrium. Cytogenetic studies of uterine leiomyomas revealed that about 50% have chromosome abnormalities and that deletion 7q is a common finding. This observation suggest the possible location of a growth suppressor gene within the 7q21-q22 region. Molecular genetic analysis of cytogenetically normal tumors has frequently revealed somatic loss of specific tumor suppressor genes detected by loss of heterozygosity in the critical region (RB1 in retinoblastoma and WT1 in Wilms tumor). To test the hypothesis that chromosome region 7q21-q22 contains a growth suppressor gene involved in the development of leiomyomas, we tested 67 leiomyomas for allelic loss of 7q markers spanning the cytogenetically defined critical region. Nineteen tumors with cytogenetically defined 7q deletion and 48 tumors without cytogenetically visible 7q deletion were examined for allelic loss of loci D7S487, D7S440, D7S492, D7S518, D7S471, D7S466 and D7S530. Loss of heterozygosity for one or more of these loci was observed in 14/19 (73.7%) of tumors with deletion 7q and no evidence of allelic loss was observed in tumors without cytogenetic deletion. The tumors with deletion 7q but no loss of 7q21-q22 markers were tumors which were mosaics with only a minority of cells showing chromosome 7q deletion. The critical region of loss is defined by markers D7S518 and D7S471, each showing loss in 56% of informative cases. These markers define a 10cM region of 7q21.2-q22 consistent with the cytogenetically defined smallest region of overlap. These markers exclude loss of the MET oncogene locus and WNT1, the murine mammary tumor virus integration site, from the critical region. These results define a region that is consistently lost in leiomyomas with abnormalities in chromosome 7q and may define the location of a gene involved in the development of a subset of leiomyomas.

  1. The genus Leptostylopsis of Hispaniola (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae: Acanthocinini)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The generic differences and similarities between Leptostylus LeConte and Leptostylopsis Dillon (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae: Acanthocinini) are discussed. Leptostylopsis is redescribed and the following species are transferred from Leptostylus to Leptostylopsis: Leptostylopsis annulipes (Fisher 1942)...

  2. Host plant preference in Colorado potato beetle (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Field and laboratory-choice tests were conducted to better understand host plant preference by the Colorado potato beetle, Leptinotarsa decemlineata Say (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), in Virginia. In laboratory olfactometer studies, L. decemlineata preferred potato over both tomato and eggplant foli...

  3. New synonymy in Cuban Tilloclytus (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae: Anaglyptini)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Examination of holotypes of Tilloclytus (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae: Anaglyptini) in the Fernando de Zayas collection (Havana, Cuba) and the Museum of Comparative Zoology, Harvard University reveals that T. elongatus Zayas (1975) is a new synonym of T. rufipes Fisher (1942)....

  4. Tumidusternus, a new genus of Aspidimerini from China (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae)

    PubMed Central

    Huo, Lizhi; Li, Wenjing; Chen, Xiaosheng; Wang, Xingmin; Ren, Shunxiang

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Tumidusternus gen. n., along with Tumidusternus fujianensis sp. n. (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae, Aspidimerini) from China is described and illustrated. A key to the tribe Aspidimerini is given. PMID:26257552

  5. Methiini and Oemini of Hispaniola (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae: Cerambycinae)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Two new species of Methiini (Tessaropa hispaniolae Lingafelter, Methia dolichoptera) (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) from Hispaniola are diagnosed, described, and illustrated. The Dominican Republic represents a New Country Record for Malacopterus tenellus (Fabricius) (Oemini), and all hispaniolan local...

  6. The first cytogenetic report on Laena reitteri Weise, 1877 (Coleoptera, Tenebrionidae, Lagriinae) with notes on karyotypes of darkling beetles.

    PubMed

    Holecová, Milada; Rozek, Maria; Lachowska, Dorota

    2008-01-01

    The karyotype structure of Laena reitteri is described for the first time. The chromosome number 2n = 18+1-3B and meioformula n(male) = 8+Xy+1-3B deviates from the modal tenebrionid number. The karyotype exhibits low variation in morphology and length. The diploid set consists of four long (subtelocentric and acrocentric), twelve medium-sized acrocentric autosomes and sex heterochromosomes Xy. The X chromosome is submetacentric, while the y is acrocentric and the smallest element of the set. On mitotic and meiotic plates 1-3 small additional elements are also visible, and probably represent B-chromosomes. The NORs are very active at mitotic prophase and early meiotic stages.

  7. The histology of the cerebral neurosecretory system in several representatives of Cleroidea (Coleoptera, Insecta).

    PubMed

    Panov, A A

    1989-01-01

    In Thymalus sp. (Peltidae), Melambia tekkensi (Trogositidae), Trichodes apiarius and Thanasimus formicarius (Cleridae), the composition of cerebral neurosecretory cells (NSC) is similar to that found earlier in Meloidae (Panov 1985a) and Tenebrionidae (Melnikova and Panov 1981; Melnikova 1983). 20 type I NSCs, 16 type II NSCs, 4 type III NSCs, several type IV NSCs and 4 type V NSCs are characteristic of their pars intercerebralis. On the other hand, a reduction of type I and II NSC number to 10 and 12 cells, respectively, was revealed in Malachius affinis, Malachius viridis and Malachius bipustulatus (Melyridae). There are 6 large dorsolateral NSCs and 2 lateral ones in each brain hemisphere of most Cleroidea studied. Their retrocerebral endocrine complex is similar to that of most polyphagous coleopterans: a single nervus corporis cardiaci leaves each brain side, the corpora cardiaca are fused with lateral aorta walls and corresponding corpora allata.

  8. Chorionic villus sampling in continuing pregnancies. II. Cytogenetic reliability.

    PubMed

    Martin, A O; Simpson, J L; Rosinsky, B J; Elias, S

    1986-06-01

    Cytogenetic analysis was performed on 103 chorionic villus samples. Analysis of the 103 samples revealed six abnormalities. In three of the six the abnormalities were confirmed in fetal or neonatal tissue (47,XY, + 13; 46,XY, t(13q13q); 45,X). In three samples the abnormalities detected were not confirmed; in two of the three the abnormalities were detected only in long-term cultures, whereas in the other samples the abnormality was restricted to direct analysis of the villi after overnight incubation. Our initial experience leads us to conclude that certain abnormalities in chorionic villus sampling may not be indicative of fetal abnormalities; 45,X/46,XX or 45,X/46,XY mosaicism is such a complement. Discrepancies between cytogenetic analysis of intact villi processed soon after sampling and of cells grown in culture can be managed by adhering to several suggested guidelines and by liberal use of confirmatory amniocentesis.

  9. Comparative cytogenetics of Auchenorrhyncha (Hemiptera, Homoptera): a review

    PubMed Central

    Kuznetsova, Valentina; Aguin-Pombo, Dora

    2015-01-01

    Abstract A comprehensive review of cytogenetic features is provided for the large hemipteran suborder Auchenorrhyncha, which currently contains approximately 42,000 valid species. This review is based on the analysis of 819 species, 483 genera, and 31 families representing all presently recognized Auchenorrhyncha superfamilies, e.i. Cicadoidea (cicadas), Cercopoidea (spittle bugs), Membracoidea (leafhoppers and treehoppers), Myerslopioidea (ground-dwelling leafhoppers), and Fulgoroidea (planthoppers). History and present status of chromosome studies are described, as well as the structure of chromosomes, chromosome counts, trends and mechanisms of evolution of karyotypes and sex determining systems, their variation at different taxonomic levels and most characteristic (modal) states, occurrence of parthenogenesis, polyploidy, B-chromosomes and chromosome rearrangements, and methods used for cytogenetic analysis of Auchenorrhyncha. PMID:26807037

  10. [From conventional cytogenetics to microarrays. Fifty years of Philadelphia chromosome].

    PubMed

    Hernández, Jesús M; Granada, Isabel; Solé, Francesc

    2011-07-23

    In 1960 Ph-chromosome was found associated with the presence of chronic myelogenous leukemia. In these 50 years an increasing number of cytogenetic abnormalities have been found associated with hematological malignancies. The presence of these abnormalities is not only important for the diagnosis of the patient, but it also contributes to the prognosis of patients with leukemia or lymphoma. For this reason the WHO classification of hematological disease has included these studies for the correct characterization of leukemias and lymphomas. In addition, the use of FISH and micromatrix methodologies have refined the genetic lesions present in these malignancies. The cytogenetic changes observed also provide further information in relation to the therapy. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  11. Cytogenetic findings in Serbian patients with Turner's syndrome stigmata.

    PubMed

    Djordjević, V A; Jovanović, J V; Pavković-Lučić, S B; Drakulić, D D; Djurović, M M; Gotić, M D

    2010-11-09

    Cytogenetic findings are reported for 31 female patients with Turner's syndrome. Chromosome studies were made from lymphocyte cultures. Non-mosaicism 45,X was demonstrated in 15 of these patients, whereas only three were apparently mosaic. Eight patients showed non-mosaic and four patients showed mosaic structural aberrations of the X-chromosome. One non-mosaic case displayed a karyotype containing a small marker chromosome. Conventional cytogenetics was supplemented by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with an X-specific probe to identify the chromosomal origin of the ring and a 1q12-specific DNA probe to identify de novo balanced translocation (1;9) in one patient. To our knowledge, this is the first finding of karyotype 45,X,t(1;9)(cen;cen)/46,X,r(X),t(1;9)(cen;cen) in Turner's syndrome. The same X-specific probe was also used to identify a derivative chromosome in one patient.

  12. Cytogenetic and molecular analysis in trisomy 12p

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, T.L.; Brothman, A.R.; Carey, J.C.

    1996-05-03

    We studied a male patient with de novo pure trisomy 12p syndrome by molecular analysis and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with markers from chromosome 12. G-banding studies demonstrated a 46,XY, 22p+ karyotype and the banding pattern and clinical findings suggested that the extra chromosomal material was derived from 12p. Trisomy 12p was confirmed by dosage analysis with chromosome 12p markers and FISH analysis with a whole chromosome 12 paint. The de novo rearranged chromosome was of paternal origin. A comparison of the clinical and cytogenetic findings in this patient was made with previously described cases of trisomy 12p. We propose a classification system for 12p trisomy in order to better characterize the correlative relationships between specific cytogenetic constitution and phenotype. 32 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Congenital malignant melanoma: a case report with cytogenetic studies.

    PubMed

    Singh, Krishna; Moore, Stephen; Sandoval, Marina; Balzer, Bonnie; Frishberg, David; Lewin, Sheryl; Schreck, Rhona; Raffel, Leslie

    2013-12-01

    Although rare, congenital malignant melanoma (CMM) should be considered in the differential diagnosis of congenital skin lesions. We report a case of CMM in a 4-month-old infant presenting with an enlarging scalp mass, initially thought to be a hemangioma. Incisional biopsy of the lesion showed a compound congenital nevus with atypical cells suggestive of a proliferative nodule versus malignancy on histopathology. Subsequent excisional biopsy revealed malignant melanoma, and further workup confirmed extensive disease with distant metastases. Cytogenetic analysis of both the tumor sites showed highly abnormal karyotypes including pseudotetraploidy, telomere associations, and evidence of gene amplification, all consistent with malignancy. Fluorescence in situ hybridization demonstrated amplification of the MYC gene, with no copy number changes in CDKN2A (INK4/ARF), PTEN, or Cyclin D1. Our report details the cytogenetic and molecular studies of CMM, which provide insight into the biologic behavior of the lesions and may confirm diagnosis when histopathology is not determinant.

  14. Cytogenetic toxicity of Aloe vera (a medicinal plant).

    PubMed

    Verma, Anjana; Gupta, Ashok K; Kumar, Amod; Khan, Parimal K

    2012-01-01

    The cytogenetic toxicity of the crude leaf extract of Aloe vera, a medicinal plant, was evaluated in two test systems, onion and Swiss albino mice, using their root tip meristematic and bone marrow cells, respectively. No significant increase in structural abnormalities in chromosomes was observed, but a marked increase in cells with chromosome-number anomalies was found. The extract, however, significantly increased the mitotic index of both cell types.

  15. Cytogenetics of monosomes in Zea mays. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, D.F.

    1984-11-01

    The cytogenetics of monosomics in maize generated using the r-X1 system was studied. The goal was to isolate as many as possible of the ten possible primary monosomic types and to characterize them by studying: (1) the cytology of meiosis; (2) the cytological behavior of monosomic chromosomes in meiosis; (3) the effect of monosomic on recombination in heterozygous bivalents; and (4) the frequency and types of spontaneous chromosomal aberrations arising in monosomics. 113 references, 1 figure, 5 tables. (ACR)

  16. Acardius in a triplet pregnancy: cytogenetic and morphological profile.

    PubMed

    Bolaji, I I; Mortimer, G; Meehan, F P; England, S; Greally, M

    1992-01-01

    We describe a rare case of acardius in a triplet pregnancy terminated by Caesarean Section at 32 weeks gestation. Morphological and chromosomal abnormalities of the fetus as well as structural abnormalities of the placenta are presented. Cytogenetic analysis and examination of the single disc triplet placenta provide evidence for the two major theories of pathogenesis of acardius, the twin reversed arterial perfusion (TRAP) sequence and the genetic theory, which we believe are not necessarily mutually exclusive.

  17. The evolution of asymmetric genitalia in Coleoptera

    PubMed Central

    de Jong, Paulien; van Beek, Rick; Hoogenboom, Tamara; zu Schlochtern, Melanie Meijer

    2016-01-01

    The evolution of asymmetry in male genitalia is a pervasive and recurrent phenomenon across almost the entire animal kingdom. Although in some taxa the asymmetry may be a response to the evolution of one-sided, male-above copulation from a more ancestral female-above condition, in other taxa, such as Mammalia and Coleoptera, this explanation appears insufficient. We carried out an informal assessment of genital asymmetry across the Coleoptera and found that male genital asymmetry is present in 43% of all beetle families, and at all within-family taxonomic levels. In the most diverse group, Cucujiformia, however, genital asymmetry is comparatively rare. We also reconstructed the phylogeny of the leiodid tribe Cholevini, and mapped aspects of genital asymmetry on the tree, revealing that endophallus sclerites, endophallus, median lobe and parameres are, in a nested fashion, increasingly unlikely to have evolved asymmetry. We interpret these results in the light of cryptic female choice versus sexually antagonistic coevolution and advocate further ways in which the phenomenon may be better understood. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Provocative questions in left–right asymmetry’. PMID:27821530

  18. Cytogenetic effects of pesticides. IV. Cytogenetic effects of the insecticides Gardona and Dursban.

    PubMed

    Amer, S M; Aly, F A

    1992-06-01

    The cytogenetic effects of the insecticides Gardona and Dursban were investigated. The toxicity and ability of both insecticides to induce chromosome aberrations and sister-chromatid exchange in vitro was tested in a primary culture of mouse spleen cells, in order to assess the potential mutagenicity of both insecticides. The concentrations 10(-7)-10(-3) M were used for testing the toxic effects of the insecticides. Both Gardona and Dursban were toxic to spleen cell cultures and the percentage of viable cells decreased as the concentration of the insecticide was increased. It reached 76.8% and 77.8% of control after treatment with the highest concentration tested (10(-3) M) of Gardona and Dursban respectively. Gardona at 0.25, 0.50, 1.0 and 2.0 micrograms/ml, and Dursban at 0.50, 1.0, 2.0 and 4.0 micrograms/ml were tested for the induction of chromosome aberrations and sister-chromatid exchanges. All of the tested concentrations of both insecticides induced a high percentage of metaphases with chromosomal aberrations in cultured mouse spleen cells after 4-h treatment. The frequency of SCEs/cell increased with increasing concentration of the insecticides. It reached 11.92 +/- 0.14/cell and 13.40 +/- 0.20/cell after treatment with Gardona (2 micrograms/ml) and Dursban (4 micrograms/ml), respectively, compared with 8.2 +/- 0.19/cell and 7.6 +/- 0.15/cell in the solvent control. The presented results indicate that both Gardona and Dursban in the tested concentrations are mutagenic in mouse spleen cell cultures.

  19. LS-CAP: an algorithm for identifying cytogenetic aberrations in hepatocellular carcinoma using microarray data.

    PubMed

    He, Xianmin; Wei, Qing; Sun, Meiqian; Fu, Xuping; Fan, Sichang; Li, Yao

    2006-05-01

    Biological techniques such as Array-Comparative genomic hybridization (CGH), fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) and affymetrix single nucleotide pleomorphism (SNP) array have been used to detect cytogenetic aberrations. However, on genomic scale, these techniques are labor intensive and time consuming. Comparative genomic microarray analysis (CGMA) has been used to identify cytogenetic changes in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) using gene expression microarray data. However, CGMA algorithm can not give precise localization of aberrations, fails to identify small cytogenetic changes, and exhibits false negatives and positives. Locally un-weighted smoothing cytogenetic aberrations prediction (LS-CAP) based on local smoothing and binomial distribution can be expected to address these problems. LS-CAP algorithm was built and used on HCC microarray profiles. Eighteen cytogenetic abnormalities were identified, among them 5 were reported previously, and 12 were proven by CGH studies. LS-CAP effectively reduced the false negatives and positives, and precisely located small fragments with cytogenetic aberrations.

  20. Differential Analysis of Genetic, Epigenetic, and Cytogenetic Abnormalities in AML

    PubMed Central

    Islam, Mirazul

    2017-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a haematological malignancy characterized by the excessive proliferation of immature myeloid cells coupled with impaired differentiation. Many AML cases have been reported without any known cytogenetic abnormalities and carry no mutation in known AML-associated driver genes. In this study, 200 AML cases were selected from a publicly available cohort and differentially analyzed for genetic, epigenetic, and cytogenetic abnormalities. Three genes (FLT3, DNMT3A, and NPMc) are found to be predominantly mutated. We identified several aberrations to be associated with genome-wide methylation changes. These include Del (5q), T (15; 17), and NPMc mutations. Four aberrations—Del (5q), T (15; 17), T (9; 22), and T (9; 11)—are significantly associated with patient survival. Del (5q)-positive patients have an average survival of less than 1 year, whereas T (15; 17)-positive patients have a significantly better prognosis. Combining the methylation and mutation data reveals three distinct patient groups and four clusters of genes. We speculate that combined signatures have the better potential to be used for subclassification of AML, complementing cytogenetic signatures. A larger sample cohort and further investigation of the effects observed in this study are required to enable the clinical application of our patient classification aided by DNA methylation. PMID:28713819

  1. Monoclonality and cytogenetic abnormalities in hyaline vascular Castleman disease.

    PubMed

    Chang, Kung-Chao; Wang, Yu-Chu; Hung, Liang-Yi; Huang, Wan-Ting; Tsou, Jen-Hui; M Jones, Dan; Song, Hsiang-Lin; Yeh, Yu-Min; Kao, Lin-Yuan; Medeiros, L Jeffrey

    2014-06-01

    Hyaline vascular Castleman disease is traditionally regarded as a reactive hyperplastic process. Occasional cases, however, have been reported with cytogenetic anomalies bringing this concept into question. In this study, we used conventional and methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction methods to assess the human androgen receptor α (HUMARA) gene in 29 female patients with hyaline vascular Castleman disease and compared the results with three cases of plasma cell Castleman disease and 20 cases of age-matched lymphoid hyperplasia. We also assessed for immunoglobulin gene and T-cell receptor gene rearrangements, and conventional cytogenetic analysis was performed in three cases of hyaline vascular Castleman disease. In cases with informative results, conventional and methylation-specific human androgen receptor α gene analyses yielded a monoclonal pattern in 10 of 19 (53%) and 17 of 23 (74%) cases of hyaline vascular Castleman disease, respectively. A monoclonal pattern was also detected in three cases of plasma cell Castleman disease but not in cases of lymphoid hyperplasia. The frequency of monoclonality was higher for lesions >5 cm in size (100%) and for the stromal-rich variant (91%). Cytogenetic abnormalities in stromal cells were revealed in two cases of hyaline vascular Castleman disease and no cases showed monoclonal immunoglobulin or T-cell receptor gene rearrangements. Follow-up data showed persistent disease in 4 of 23 (17%) patients. We conclude that hyaline vascular Castleman disease is often a monoclonal proliferation, most likely of lymph node stromal cells.

  2. Cytogenetics and clinical features of pediatric myelodysplastic syndrome in Japan.

    PubMed

    Moriwaki, Koichi; Manabe, Atsushi; Taketani, Takeshi; Kikuchi, Akira; Nakahata, Tatsutoshi; Hayashi, Yasuhide

    2014-11-01

    We analyzed the cytogenetics and clinical features of pediatric myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) in Japan. Data on patients (<16 years) diagnosed with MDS from 1990 to 2000 were retrospectively collected from pediatric hematologists in 234 institutions. Chromosome analysis was successfully performed in 255 of 277 MDS patients. The numbers of patients with refractory anemia, refractory anemia with ringed sideroblasts, refractory anemia with excess of blasts (RAEB), refractory anemia with excess of blasts in transformation (RAEBt), chronic myelomonocytic leukemia, and juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia were 67 (24%), 51 (18%), 51 (18%), 20 (7%), and 65 (23%), respectively. The other 23 patients (8%) could not be classified specifically. The distribution of childhood MDS in Japan according to the French-American-British subclassification was similar to that in other countries. However, we identified a higher incidence of therapy-related cases. As for relationship between cytogenetics and prognoses, abnormal karyotypes were related to poorer prognoses than normal karyotype (P < 0.01). However, patients with trisomy 8 had prognoses comparable to those with normal karyotypes. Complex karyotypes were associated with poorer prognoses among RAEB and RAEBt patients. In conclusion, prognosis of pediatric MDS is related to cytogenetics. A more precise diagnosis and classification system is needed for childhood MDS.

  3. Molecular cytogenetic analysis of dicentric chromosomes in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Sarova, Iveta; Brezinova, Jana; Zemanova, Zuzana; Ransdorfova, Sarka; Izakova, Silvia; Svobodova, Karla; Pavlistova, Lenka; Berkova, Adela; Cermak, Jaroslav; Jonasova, Anna; Siskova, Magda; Michalova, Kyra

    2016-04-01

    Dicentric chromosomes (DCs) have been described in many hematological diseases, including acute myeloid leukemia (AML). They are markers of cancer and induce chromosomal instability, leading to the formation of other chromosomal aberrations and the clonal evolution of pathological cells. Our knowledge of the roles and behavior of human DCs is often derived from studies of induced DCs and cell lines. It is difficult to identify all the DCs in the karyotypes of patients because of the limitations of metaphase cytogenetic methods. The aim of this study was to revise the karyotypes of 20 AML patients in whom DCs were found with conventional G-banding or multicolor fluorescence in situ hybridization (mFISH) with (multi)centromeric probes and to characterize the DCs at the molecular cytogenetic level. FISH analyses confirmed 23 of the 29 expected DCs in 18 of 20 patients and identified 13 others that had not been detected cytogenetically. Fourteen DCs were altered by other chromosomal changes. In conclusion, karyotypes with DCs are usually very complex, and we have shown that they often contain more than one DC, which can be missed with conventional or mFISH methods. Our study indicates an association between number of DCs in karyotype and very short survival of patients.

  4. Whole genome scanning as a cytogenetic tool in hematologic malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Mufti, Ghulam J.

    2008-01-01

    Over the years, methods of cytogenetic analysis evolved and became part of routine laboratory testing, providing valuable diagnostic and prognostic information in hematologic disorders. Karyotypic aberrations contribute to the understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of disease and thereby to rational application of therapeutic modalities. Most of the progress in this field stems from the application of metaphase cytogenetics (MC), but recently, novel molecular technologies have been introduced that complement MC and overcome many of the limitations of traditional cytogenetics, including a need for cell culture. Whole genome scanning using comparative genomic hybridization and single nucleotide polymorphism arrays (CGH-A; SNP-A) can be used for analysis of somatic or clonal unbalanced chromosomal defects. In SNP-A, the combination of copy number detection and genotyping enables diagnosis of copy-neutral loss of heterozygosity, a lesion that cannot be detected using MC but may have important pathogenetic implications. Overall, whole genome scanning arrays, despite the drawback of an inability to detect balanced translocations, allow for discovery of chromosomal defects in a higher proportion of patients with hematologic malignancies. Newly detected chromosomal aberrations, including somatic uniparental disomy, may lead to more precise prognostic schemes in many diseases. PMID:18505780

  5. [AML treatment strategy based on cytogenetic abnormalities and somatic mutations].

    PubMed

    Imai, Yoichi

    2015-10-01

    In addition to morphological and histocytochemical analyses of acute myeloid leukemia (AML), data on cytogenetic abnormalities and somatic mutations are used for classification of AML. The risk stratification based on these examinations facilitates determining the treatment strategy for AML. Cytogenetic risk category definitions by the Southwest Oncology Group (SWOG), Cancer and Leukemia Group B (CALGB), and The Medical Research Council (MRC) classify AML patients into favorable, intermediate, and adverse groups. Approximately 80% of patients in the intermediate group have a normal karyotype and the importance of molecular genetic analyses in these patients is increasing. Somatic mutations of NPM1, CEBPA, and FLT3 are known to be related to the prognosis of AML patients. The European LeukemiaNet (ELN) introduced risk stratification for AML patients based on cytogenetic abnormalities and NPM1, CEBPA, and FLT3 mutations. This risk stratification can be used to select only chemotherapy or chemotherapy with allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation as consolidation therapy for individual AML patients. Development of molecular targeted therapies against FLT3 or IDH mutations is in progress and these novel therapies are expected to contribute to improving the prognosis of AML patients.

  6. Environmental genotoxicity evaluation using cytogenetic end points in wild rodents.

    PubMed Central

    de Souza Bueno, A M; de Bragança Pereira, C A; Rabello-Gay, M N

    2000-01-01

    We analyzed cytogenetic end points in three populations of two species of wild rodents--Akodon montensis and Oryzomys nigripes--living in an industrial, an agricultural, and a preservation area at the Itajaí Valley, state of Santa Catarina, Brazil. Our purpose was to evaluate the performance of the following end points in the establishment of a genotoxic profile of each area: the polychromatic/normochromatic cell ratio; the mitotic index; the frequency of micronucleated cells both in the bone marrow and peripheral blood; and the frequency of cells with chromosome aberrations in the bone marrow. Preparations were obtained using conventional cytogenetic techniques. The results showed a) the role of the end points used as biomarkers in the early detection of genotoxic agents and in the identification of species and populations at higher risk; b) the difference in sensitivity of the species selected as bioindicators in relation to the cytogenetic end points analyzed; c) the need to use at least two sympatric species to detect the presence of genotoxins in each locality; and d) the need to use several end points when trying to establish a genotoxic profile of an area. PMID:11133397

  7. An overview of cytogenetics of the tribe Meliponini (Hymenoptera: Apidae).

    PubMed

    Tavares, Mara Garcia; Lopes, Denilce Meneses; Campos, L A O

    2017-06-01

    The present study provides a comprehensive review of cytogenetic data on Meliponini and their chromosomal evolution. The compiled data show that only 104 species of stingless bees, representing 32 of the 54 living genera have been studied cytogenetically and that among these species, it is possible to recognize three main groups with n = 9, 15 and 17, respectively. The first group comprises the species of the genus Melipona, whereas karyotypes with n = 15 and n = 17 have been detected in species from different genera. Karyotypes with n = 17 are the most common among the Meliponini studied to date. Cytogenetic information on Meliponini also shows that although chromosome number, in general, is conserved among species of a certain genus, other aspects, such as chromosome morphology, quantity, distribution and composition of heterochromatin, may vary between them. This reinforces the fact that the variations observed in the karyotypes of different Meliponini groups cannot be explained by a single theory or a single type of structural change. In addition, we present a discussion about how these karyotype variations are related to the phylogenetic relationships among the different genera of this tribe.

  8. Cytogenetic examination of cosmonauts for space radiation exposure estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snigiryova, G. P.; Novitskaya, N. N.; Fedorenko, B. S.

    2012-08-01

    PurposeTo evaluate radiation induced chromosome aberration frequency in peripheral blood lymphocytes of cosmonauts who participated in flights on Mir Orbital Station and ISS (International Space Station). Materials and methodsCytogenetic examination which has been performed in the period 1992-2008 included the analysis of chromosome aberrations using conventional Giemsa staining method in 202 blood samples from 48 cosmonauts who participated in flights on Mir Orbital Station and ISS. ResultsSpace flights led to an increase of chromosome aberration frequency. Frequency of dicentrics plus centric rings (Dic+Rc) depend on the space flight duration and accumulated dose value. After the change of space stations (from Mir Orbital Station to ISS) the radiation load of cosmonauts based on data of cytogenetic examination decreased. Extravehicular activity also adds to chromosome aberration frequency in cosmonauts' blood lymphocytes. Average doses after the first flight, estimated by the frequency of Dic+Rc, were 227 and 113 mGy Eq for long-term flights (LTF) and 107 and 53 mGy Eq for short-term flights (STF). ConclusionCytogenetic examination of cosmonauts can be applied to assess equivalent doses.

  9. Cytogenetic monitoring of human populations at risk in Egypt: role of cytogenetic data in cancer risk assessment.

    PubMed Central

    Anwar, W A

    1991-01-01

    Somatic mutation plays a critical role in carcinogenesis. Numerous environmental agents can increase the probability that somatic mutation will occur. The use of genotoxicity testing is essential for assessing potential human toxicity so that hazards can be prevented. Cytogenetic monitoring of human populations exposed to chemicals has proved to be a useful tool for detecting the chemical mutagenic effects. Cytogenetic analyses of human chromosomes in peripheral lymphocytes allows direct detection of mutation in somatic cells. Different methods can be used for chromosomal analysis (conventional chromosomal analysis, sister chromatid exchange, micronucleus frequency detection). Micronucleus frequency can be detected either in peripheral blood lymphocytes or in exfoliated cells. Different examples of human population studies are presented. Several problems that are found in biomonitoring studies are discussed. These studies should help us learn about individual exposure assessment and biologically relevant doses, leading to quantitative assessment of human cancer risks. PMID:1820285

  10. Heterochromatin and molecular characterization of DsmarMITE transposable element in the beetle Dichotomius schiffleri (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae).

    PubMed

    Xavier, Crislaine; Cabral-de-Mello, Diogo Cavalcanti; de Moura, Rita Cássia

    2014-12-01

    Cytogenetic studies of the Neotropical beetle genus Dichotomius (Scarabaeinae, Coleoptera) have shown dynamism for centromeric constitutive heterochromatin sequences. In the present work we studied the chromosomes and isolated repetitive sequences of Dichotomius schiffleri aiming to contribute to the understanding of coleopteran genome/chromosomal organization. Dichotomius schiffleri presented a conserved karyotype and heterochromatin distribution in comparison to other species of the genus with 2n = 18, biarmed chromosomes, and pericentromeric C-positive blocks. Similarly to heterochromatin distributional patterns, the highly and moderately repetitive DNA fraction (C 0 t-1 DNA) was detected in pericentromeric areas, contrasting with the euchromatic mapping of an isolated TE (named DsmarMITE). After structural analyses, the DsmarMITE was classified as a non-autonomous element of the type miniature inverted-repeat transposable element (MITE) with terminal inverted repeats similar to Mariner elements of insects from different orders. The euchromatic distribution for DsmarMITE indicates that it does not play a part in the dynamics of constitutive heterochromatin sequences.

  11. The Ochodaeidae of Argentina (Coleoptera, Scarabaeoidea)

    PubMed Central

    Paulsen, M.J.; Ocampo, Federico C.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The Ochodaeidae (Coleoptera: Scarabaeoidea) of Argentina are revised. Previously, two species of Ochodaeinae were known from the country, both in the genus Parochodaeus Nikolajev: Parochodaeus campsognathus (Arrow) and Parochodaeus cornutus (Ohaus). An additional 7 species of Parochodaeus from Argentina are described here as new. In addition, Gauchodaeus patagonicus, new genus and new species in the subfamilyChaetocanthinae, is described. This is the first record of the subfamily Chaetocanthinae in South America. Redescriptions, diagnoses, and maps are provided for each species. We also provide a key to genera and a key to species of Parochodaeus of Argentina. With this work, the number of ochodaeid species known from Argentina is increased from 2 to 10. PMID:22451781

  12. The ochodaeidae of Argentina (coleoptera, scarabaeoidea).

    PubMed

    Paulsen, M J; Ocampo, Federico C

    2012-01-01

    The Ochodaeidae (Coleoptera: Scarabaeoidea) of Argentina are revised. Previously, two species of Ochodaeinae were known from the country, both in the genus Parochodaeus Nikolajev: Parochodaeus campsognathus (Arrow) and Parochodaeus cornutus (Ohaus). An additional 7 species of Parochodaeus from Argentina are described here as new. In addition, Gauchodaeus patagonicus, new genus and new species in the subfamilyChaetocanthinae, is described. This is the first record of the subfamily Chaetocanthinae in South America. Redescriptions, diagnoses, and maps are provided for each species. We also provide a key to genera and a key to species of Parochodaeus of Argentina. With this work, the number of ochodaeid species known from Argentina is increased from 2 to 10.

  13. Molecular cytogenetic of the Amoy croaker, Argyrosomus amoyensis (Teleostei, Sciaenidae)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Mengxiang; Zheng, Jiao; Wang, Zhiyong; Wang, Yilei; Zhang, Jing; Cai, Mingyi

    2017-08-01

    The family Sciaenidae is remarkable for its species richness and economic importance. However, the cytogenetic data available in this fish group are still limited, especially those obtained using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). In the present study, the chromosome characteristics of a sciaenid species, Argyrosomus amoyensis, were examined with several cytogenetic methods, including dual-FISH with 18S and 5S rDNA probes, and a self-genomic in situ hybridization procedure (Self-GISH). The karyotype of A. amoyensis comprised 2n=48 acrocentric chromosomes. A single pair of nucleolar organizer regions (NORs) was located at the proximal position of chromosome 1, which was positive for silver nitrate impregnation (AgNO3) staining and denaturation-propidium iodide (DPI) staining but negative for Giemsa staining and 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) staining, and was confirmed by FISH with 18S rDNA probes. The 5S rDNA sites were located at the centromeric region of chromosome 3. Telomeric FISH signals were detected at all chromosome ends with different intensities, but internal telomeric sequences (ITSs) were not found. Self-GISH resulted in strong signals distributed at the centromeric regions of all chromosomes. C-banding revealed not only centromeric heterochromatin, but also heterochromatin that located on NORs, in interstitial and distal telomeric regions of specific chromosomes. These results suggest that the karyotype of Amoy croaker was relatively conserved and primitive. By comparison with the reported cytogenetic data of other sciaenids, it can be deduced that although the karyotypic macrostructure and chromosomal localization of 18S rDNA are conserved, the distribution of 5S rDNA varies dynamically among sciaenid species. Thus, the 5S rDNA sites may have different evolutionary dynamics in relation to other chromosomal regions, and have the potential to be effective cytotaxonomic markers in Sciaenidae.

  14. Implications of cytogenetics for venous thromboembolism in acute myeloid leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yun-Gyoo; Kim, Inho; Kwon, Ji-hyun; Yoon, Sung Soo; Park, Seongyang; Song, Leo; Yoon, Jae-Ho; Shin, Seung-Hwan; Min, Woo-Sung; Kim, Hee-Je

    2015-01-01

    Due to the high risk of thrombocytopenia and haemorrhage, thrombotic complications have received little attention in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Furthermore, the predictive role of cytogenetics on venous thromboembolism (VTE) has largely been ignored. This study aimed to evaluate the incidence, risk factors, and prognostic aspects of VTE in AML. A total of 811 consecutive patients with AML were enrolled and analysed retrospectively. Cox time-dependent covariate regression analysis was used to identify the significant predictors of VTE development. To minimise potential confounding factors, we used propensity-score matching to compare overall survival between patients with and without VTE. The six-month and one-year cumulative incidences of VTE were 3.1 % (95 % confidence interval [CI], 2.0-4.7) and 3.9 % (95 % CI, 2.6-5.7), respectively. Of the 26 cases of VTE, 22 (85 %) developed within 6 months of leukemia diagnosis and 13 (50 %) were catheter-related. In multivariate analysis, advanced age (≥ 65 years) (hazard ratio [HR], 2.70; p = 0.03) and increasing cytogenetic risk (common HR, 1.84; p = 0.05) were independent predictors of VTE. There was no significant association between VTE development and decreased survival (p = 0.32 for matched analysis). Advanced age and increasing cytogenetic risk, well-known predictors for clinical outcome in AML, were also independent risk factors of VTE development. Our results suggest that VTE does not hold prognostic implications for AML.

  15. Cytogenetic effect of 5-azacytidine in patients with hematological malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Tsuda, Jessica Romy; Segato, Rosimeire; Barbosa, Waldênia; Smith, Marília de Arruda Cardoso; Payão, Spencer Luiz Marques

    2011-01-01

    Background Recently, the importance of cytogenetics has grown in the diagnosis, prognosis and treatment of leukemias and myelodysplastic syndromes. 5-azacytidine is a drug that has well-known cytogenetical effects and is approved in the treatment of myelodysplastic syndromes. To date, no studies have been performed to evaluate the impact of 5-azacytidine on the chromosomes of patients with hematological neoplasias. This study aimed to investigate the effects of 5-azacytidine on chromosomes of patients with different hematological malignancies using G-band analyses to identify possible cytogenetical alterations. Methods The peripheral blood of 18 patients with hematological malignancies and 18 controls was collected in heparinized tubes. 5-azacytidine was added, at a final concentration of 10-5M, to cultures 7 hours prior to harvest. Results Uncoiled centromeric/pericentromeric heterochromatin of chromosomes-1, 9 and 16 occurred more frequently in the patients than in controls. This higher frequency of uncoiled heterochromatin was statistically significant (p-value = 0.004) for chromosome-9. Conversely, we observed that the fragile site at 19q13 was more frequent in controls (p-value = 0.0468). Conclusions The results of this study suggest that satellite sequences, located in the heterochromatin of chromosome-9, are hypomethylated in hematological malignancies. This hypomethylation may contribute to the disease, activating transposable elements and/or promoting genomic instability, enabling the loss of heterozygosity of important tumor suppressor genes. An investigation of the 19q13 region may help to understand whether or not the predominant occurrence of the fragile site at 19q13 in controls is due to hypermethylation of this region. PMID:23049342

  16. Cytogenetic effect of 5-azacytidine in patients with hematological malignancies.

    PubMed

    Tsuda, Jessica Romy; Segato, Rosimeire; Barbosa, Waldênia; Smith, Marília de Arruda Cardoso; Payão, Spencer Luiz Marques

    2011-01-01

    Recently, the importance of cytogenetics has grown in the diagnosis, prognosis and treatment of leukemias and myelodysplastic syndromes. 5-azacytidine is a drug that has well-known cytogenetical effects and is approved in the treatment of myelodysplastic syndromes. To date, no studies have been performed to evaluate the impact of 5-azacytidine on the chromosomes of patients with hematological neoplasias. This study aimed to investigate the effects of 5-azacytidine on chromosomes of patients with different hematological malignancies using G-band analyses to identify possible cytogenetical alterations. The peripheral blood of 18 patients with hematological malignancies and 18 controls was collected in heparinized tubes. 5-azacytidine was added, at a final concentration of 10-5M, to cultures 7 hours prior to harvest. Uncoiled centromeric/pericentromeric heterochromatin of chromosomes-1, 9 and 16 occurred more frequently in the patients than in controls. This higher frequency of uncoiled heterochromatin was statistically significant (p-value = 0.004) for chromosome-9. Conversely, we observed that the fragile site at 19q13 was more frequent in controls (p-value = 0.0468). The results of this study suggest that satellite sequences, located in the heterochromatin of chromosome-9, are hypomethylated in hematological malignancies. This hypomethylation may contribute to the disease, activating transposable elements and/or promoting genomic instability, enabling the loss of heterozygosity of important tumor suppressor genes. An investigation of the 19q13 region may help to understand whether or not the predominant occurrence of the fragile site at 19q13 in controls is due to hypermethylation of this region.

  17. Evolutionary molecular cytogenetics of catarrhine primates: past, present and future.

    PubMed

    Stanyon, R; Rocchi, M; Bigoni, F; Archidiacono, N

    2012-01-01

    The catarrhine primates were the first group of species studied with comparative molecular cytogenetics. Many of the fundamental techniques and principles of analysis were initially applied to comparisons in these primates, including interspecific chromosome painting, reciprocal chromosome painting and the extensive use of cloned DNA probes for evolutionary analysis. The definition and importance of chromosome syntenies and associations for a correct cladistics analysis of phylogenomic relationships were first applied to catarrhines. These early chromosome painting studies vividly illustrated a striking conservation of the genome between humans and macaques. Contemporarily, it also revealed profound differences between humans and gibbons, a group of species more closely related to humans, making it clear that chromosome evolution did not follow a molecular clock. Chromosome painting has now been applied to more that 60 primate species and the translocation history has been mapped onto the major taxonomic divisions in the tree of primate evolution. In situ hybridization of cloned DNA probes, primarily BAC-FISH, also made it possible to more precisely map breakpoints with spanning and flanking BACs. These studies established marker order and disclosed intrachromosomal rearrangements. When applied comparatively to a range of primate species, they led to the discovery of evolutionary new centromeres as an important new category of chromosome evolution. BAC-FISH studies are intimately connected to genome sequencing, and probes can usually be assigned to a precise location in the genome assembly. This connection ties molecular cytogenetics securely to genome sequencing, assuring that molecular cytogenetics will continue to have a productive future in the multidisciplinary science of phylogenomics.

  18. Cytogenetic Profile of Down Syndrome Cases Seen by a General Genetics Outpatient Service in Brazil

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biselli, Joice; Goloni-Bertollo, Eny; Ruiz, Mariangela; Pavarino-Bertelli, Erika

    2009-01-01

    Down syndrome or trisomy 21 can be caused by three types of chromosomal abnormalities: free trisomy 21, translocation or mosaicism. The cytogenetic diagnosis, made through karyotypic examination, is important mainly to determine recurrence risks to assist genetic counselling. The object of this work was to carry out a cytogenetic profile of…

  19. Methylphenidate and Amphetamine Do Not Induce Cytogenetic Damage in Lymphocytes of Children with ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Witt, Kristine L.; Shelby, Michael D.; Itchon-Ramos, Nilda; Faircloth, Melissa; Kissling, Grace E.; Chrisman, Allan K.; Ravi, Hima; Murli, Hemalatha; Mattison, Donald R.; Kollins, Scott H.

    2008-01-01

    The inducement of chromosomal damage in lymphocytes among children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder receiving treatment with methylphenidate- or amphetamine-based drugs is investigated. Findings did not reveal significant increases in cytogenetic damage related to the treatment. The risk for cytogenetic damage posed by such products…

  20. Cytogenetic Profile of Down Syndrome Cases Seen by a General Genetics Outpatient Service in Brazil

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biselli, Joice; Goloni-Bertollo, Eny; Ruiz, Mariangela; Pavarino-Bertelli, Erika

    2009-01-01

    Down syndrome or trisomy 21 can be caused by three types of chromosomal abnormalities: free trisomy 21, translocation or mosaicism. The cytogenetic diagnosis, made through karyotypic examination, is important mainly to determine recurrence risks to assist genetic counselling. The object of this work was to carry out a cytogenetic profile of…

  1. Methylphenidate and Amphetamine Do Not Induce Cytogenetic Damage in Lymphocytes of Children with ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Witt, Kristine L.; Shelby, Michael D.; Itchon-Ramos, Nilda; Faircloth, Melissa; Kissling, Grace E.; Chrisman, Allan K.; Ravi, Hima; Murli, Hemalatha; Mattison, Donald R.; Kollins, Scott H.

    2008-01-01

    The inducement of chromosomal damage in lymphocytes among children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder receiving treatment with methylphenidate- or amphetamine-based drugs is investigated. Findings did not reveal significant increases in cytogenetic damage related to the treatment. The risk for cytogenetic damage posed by such products…

  2. [Cytogenetic and histologic examination of four tortoiseshell cats].

    PubMed

    Kuiper, H; Hewicker-Trautwein, M; Distl, O

    2003-11-01

    Tortoiseshell colored tomcats are very uncommon. In most cases their phenotype is caused by an aberration of sex chromosomes. In this study, we carried out cytogenetic investigations in four tortoiseshell tomacats. In two cases, an XXY syndrome could be proven. Another tortoiseshell tomcat had an XX/XY chromosomal constitution. One tomcat showed an exclusively male XY karyotype. In two cases the testes were histologically examined. In one XXY phenotypically male cat there was no spermatogenesis present. In the tomcat with XX/XY-chimerism spermatogenesis was seen in some testicular tubules.

  3. Nanotechnology and molecular cytogenetics: the future has not yet arrived

    PubMed Central

    Ioannou, Dimitris; Griffin, Darren K.

    2010-01-01

    Quantum dots (QDs) are a novel class of inorganic fluorochromes composed of nanometer-scale crystals made of a semiconductor material. They are resistant to photo-bleaching, have narrow excitation and emission wavelengths that can be controlled by particle size and thus have the potential for multiplexing experiments. Given the remarkable optical properties that quantum dots possess, they have been proposed as an ideal material for use in molecular cytogenetics, specifically the technique of fluorescent in situ hybridisation (FISH). In this review, we provide an account of the current QD-FISH literature, and speculate as to why QDs are not yet optimised for FISH in their current form. PMID:22110858

  4. Cytogenetic changes induced by aqueous ferrofluids in agricultural plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Răcuciu, Mihaela; Creangă, Dorina

    2007-04-01

    In this paper, the authors present their results regarding the cellular division rate and the percentage of chromosomal aberrations in the root meristematic cells of agricultural plants when cultivated in the presence of different concentrations of aqueous ferrofluid, ranging between 10 and 250 μL/L. The agricultural species ( Zea mays) with a major role in the life of people was chosen for the experimental project. The water-based ferrofluid was prepared following the chemical co-precipitation method, using tetramethylammonium hydroxide as magnetite core stabilizer. Microscopic investigations (cytogenetic tests) resulted in the evaluation of the mitotic and chromosomal aberration index. They appeared to increase following ferrofluid addition.

  5. Evaluation of vacuum technology to kill larvae of the Asian longhorned beetle, Anoplophora glabripennis (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae), and the emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), in wood

    Treesearch

    Zhangjing Chen; Marshall S. White; Melody A. Keena; Therese M. Poland; Erin L. Clark

    2008-01-01

    The potential for using vacuum technology to kill larvae of the Asian longhorned beetle (ALB), Anoplophora glabripennis (Motschulsky) (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae), and emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), in solid-wood packing materials (SWPM) and other wood products was assessed. Current...

  6. Molecular markers detect cryptic predation on coffee berry borer (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) by silvanid and laemophloeid flat bark beetles (Coleoptera: Silvanidae, Laemophloeidae) in coffee beans

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The coffee berry borer, Hypothenemus hampei(Coleoptera: Curculionidae)(Ferrari), is a serious pest of coffee worldwide and has been recently introduced in Hawai’i, first detected in the state in 2010. Adult silvanid flat bark beetles, Cathartus quadricollis (Coleoptera: Silvanidae) and adult laemoph...

  7. Seasonal abundance, arrival and emergence patterns of predaceous hister beetles (Coleoptera: Histeridae) associated with Ips engraver beetles (Coleoptera: Scolytidae) in Louisiana

    Treesearch

    William P. Shepherd; Richard A. Goyer

    2003-01-01

    The most common predaceious hister beetles (Coleoptera: Histeridae) found associated with Ips engraver beetles (Coleoptera: Scolytidae) in southern Louisiana were Platysoma attenuata LeConte, P. cylindrica (Paykull), P. parallelum (Say), and Plegaderus transversus (Say). The seasonal abundance of...

  8. Cytogenetic heterogeneity and their serial dynamic changes during acquisition of cytogenetic aberrations in cultured mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung-Ah; Im, Kyong Ok; Park, Si Nae; Kwon, Ji Seok; Kim, Seon Young; Oh, Keunhee; Lee, Dong-Sup; Kim, Min Kyung; Kim, Seong Who; Jang, Mi; Lee, Gene; Oh, Yeon-Mok; Lee, Sang Do; Lee, Dong Soon

    2015-07-01

    To minimize the risk of tumorigenesis in mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), G-banding analysis is widely used to detect chromosomal aberrations in MSCs. However, a critical limitation of G-banding is that it only reflects the status of metaphase cells, which can represent as few as 0.01% of tested cells. During routine cytogenetic testing in MSCs, we often detect chromosomal aberrations in minor cell populations. Therefore, we aimed to investigate whether such a minority of cells can expand over time or if they ultimately disappear during MSC passaging. We passaged MSCs serially while monitoring quantitative changes for each aberrant clone among heterogeneous MSCs. To investigate the cytogenetic status of interphase cells, which represent the main population, we also performed interphase FISH analysis, in combination with G-banding and telomere length determination. In human adipose tissue-derived MSCs, 4 types of chromosomal aberrations were found during culturing, and in umbilical cord MSCs, 2 types of chromosomal aberrations were observed. Sequential dynamic changes among heterogeneous aberrant clones during passaging were similar to the dynamic changes observed in cancer stem cells during disease progression. Throughout all passages, the quantitative G-banding results were inconsistent with those of the interphase FISH analysis. Interphase FISH revealed hidden aberrations in stem cell populations with normal karyotypes by G-banding analysis. We found that telomere length gradually decreased during passaging until the point at which cytogenetic aberrations appeared. The present study demonstrates that rare aberrant clones at earlier passages can become predominant clones during later passages. Considering the risk of tumorigenesis due to aberrant MSCs, we believe that our results will help to establish proper safety guidelines for MSC use. In particular, we believe it is critical to test for chromosomal aberrations using both G-banding and FISH to ensure the safety

  9. New species of Hemilophini (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae, Lamiinae) from Colombia and Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Monné, Marcela L; Monné, Miguel A

    2015-12-02

    Three new species of Hemilophini (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae, Lamiinae) are described: Chrysaperda mimica sp. nov. and Malacoscylus nearnsi sp. nov. from Ecuador, and Eulachnesia boteroi sp. nov. from Colombia.

  10. Comparative cytogenetic analysis of marine needlefishes (Beloniformes) from southern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Cipriano, Roger Raupp; Noleto, Rafael Bueno; Kantek, Daniel Luis Zanella; da Silva Cortinhas, Maria Cristina; Cestari, Marta Margarete

    2016-08-01

    Cytogenetic studies have assisted in the taxonomic classification of organisms, especially those involving species with highly similar morphologic characteristics, or so-called cryptic species. Strongylura marina and Strongylura timucu collected from Paranaguá Bay, Paraná Coast in Southern Brazil are considered cryptic species, and the identification of interspecific variations based on the number and/or morphology of its chromosomes may serve as differentiating cytotaxonomic markers. Chromosomes of the two species were subjected to different banding and staining methods (C-, Ag-, and DAPI-CMA3), as well as chromosomal mapping of major rDNA (45S), revealed with an 18S probe by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). The pattern of distribution of constitutive heterochromatin showed distinct features involving the pericentromeric and telomeric bands in both species. In S. marina, chromosome 1 represents the main species-specific marker, appearing almost entirely heterochromatic. In both species, the 45S rDNA is located at terminal region of the short arm of the chromosome 6, as detected by silver nitrate staining and FISH. Despite the apparent conserved diploid number of 48 chromosomes, data on the karyotype microstructure characterize the cytogenetic profile of the genus and may allow the establishment of cytotaxonomic and evolutionary inferences for these fishes.

  11. Discordance between prenatal cytogenetic diagnosis and outcome of pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Loft, A; Tabor, A

    1984-01-01

    From 1.3.73 to 30.9.80 5580 women had an amniocentesis performed here or elsewhere; fetal chromosome analyses were carried out in this laboratory. We found 112 abnormal karyotypes (2 per cent) out of 5591 chromosome analyses. In 40 women (0.7 per cent) no cytogenetic diagnosis was obtained. Follow-up was successful in 99.5 per cent. Nine cases are reported in detail: Three cases had discrepancy between the karyotype in amniotic fluid and peripheral blood after delivery, two of these cases turned out to be 46,XX (male) while the third was prenatally determined as trisomy 21, but had a 46,XX karyotype at birth. Six cases had discrepancy between the karyotype in amniotic fluid and the phenotypic outcome at birth/abortion. One case was a prenatally undetected 45,X/46,XY mosaicism; one case was an unexplained 45,X male fetus; two cases were prenatally determined as trisomy 21, but at abortion a normal karyotype was determined and in two cases maternal cells were probably examined. The incidence of cytogenetic errors in this study was very low.

  12. Cytogenetic instability of dental pulp stem cell lines.

    PubMed

    Duailibi, Monica Talarico; Kulikowski, Leslie Domenici; Duailibi, Silvio Eduardo; Lipay, Monica Vannucci Nunes; Melaragno, Maria Isabel; Ferreira, Lydia Masako; Vacanti, Joseph Phillip; Yelick, Pamela Crotty

    2012-02-01

    Human adult stem cells (hASCs) offer a potentially renewable source of cell types that are easily isolated and rapidly expanded for use in regenerative medicine and cell therapies without the complicating ethical problems that are associated with embryonic stem cells. However, the eventual therapeutic use of hASCs requires that these cells and their derivatives maintain their genomic stability. There is currently a lack of systematic studies that are aimed at characterising aberrant chromosomal changes in cultured ASCs over time. However, the presence of mosaicism and accumulation of karyotypic abnormalities within cultured cell subpopulations have been reported. To investigate cytogenetic integrity of cultured human dental stem cell (hDSC) lines, we analysed four expanded hDSC cultures using classical G banding and fluorescent in situ hybridisation (FISH) with X chromosome specific probe. Our preliminary results revealed that about 70% of the cells exhibited karyotypic abnormalities including polyploidy, aneuploidy and ring chromosomes. The heterogeneous spectrum of abnormalities indicates a high frequency of chromosomal mutations that continuously arise upon extended culture. These findings emphasise the need for the careful analysis of the cytogenetic stability of cultured hDSCs before they can be used in clinical therapies.

  13. Cytogenetic Biodosimetry Using the Blood Lymphocytes of Astronauts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, Kerry; Rhone, J.; Chappell, L. J.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2010-01-01

    Cytogenetic analysis of blood lymphocytes remains the most sensitive and reliable method available for in vivo assessment of the biological effects of exposure to radiation and provides the most informative measurement of radiation induced health risks. To date chromosome damage has been assessed in lymphocytes from more than 30 astronauts before and after they participated in long-duration space missions of three months or more on board the International Space Station. For all individuals, the frequency of chromosome damage measured within a month of return from space was higher than their prefight yield and biodosimetry estimates lie within the range expected from physical dosimetry. Biodosimetry data provides a direct measurement of space radiation damage, which takes into account individual radiosensitivity in the presence of confounding factors such as microgravity and other stress conditions. In contrast to physical measurements, which are external to body and require multiple devices to detect all radiation types all of which have poor sensitivity to neutrons, biodosimetry is internal and includes the effects of shielding provided by the body itself plus chromosome damage shows excellent sensitivity to protons, heavy ions, and neutrons. In addition, chromosome damage is reflective of cancer risk and biodosimetry values can therefore be used to validate and develop risk assessment models that can be used to characterize excess health risk incurred by crewmembers. A review of astronaut biodosimetry data will be presented along with recent findings on the persistence of space radiation induced chromosome damage and the cytogenetic effects of repeat long duration missions

  14. A cytogenetic view of sex chromosome evolution in plants.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, S J; Filatov, D A

    2008-01-01

    The recent origin of sex chromosomes in plant species provides an opportunity to study the early stages of sex chromosome evolution. This review focuses on the cytogenetic aspects of the analysis of sex chromosome evolution in plants and in particular, on the best-studied case, the sex chromosomes in Silene latifolia. We discuss the emerging picture of sex chromosome evolution in plants and the further work that is required to gain better understanding of the similarities and differences between the trends in animal and plant sex chromosome evolution. Similar to mammals, suppression of recombination between the X and Y in S. latifolia species has occurred in several steps, however there is little evidence that inversions on the S. latifolia Y chromosome have played a role in cessation of X/Y recombination. Secondly, in S. latifolia there is a lack of evidence for genetic degeneration of the Y chromosome, unlike the events documented in mammalian sex chromosomes. The insufficient number of genes isolated from this and other plant sex chromosomes does not allow us to generalize whether the trends revealed on S. latifolia Y chromosome are general for other dioecious plants. Isolation of more plant sex-linked genes and their cytogenetic mapping with fluorescent in situ hybridisation (FISH) will ultimately lead to a much better understanding of the processes driving sex chromosome evolution in plants. 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel

  15. High-grade neuroendocrine carcinomas display unique cytogenetic aberrations.

    PubMed

    Welborn, Jeanna; Jenks, Helen; Taplett, Janet; Walling, Paula

    2004-11-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors represent a spectrum of tumor types with different biologic and clinical features. The morphologic types include the low-grade typical and atypical carcinoids and the high-grade small cell and large cell neuroendocrine carcinomas (NECs). Cytogenetic descriptions of high-grade NECs are rare. Complete karyotypic descriptions of 34 high-grade NECs are reviewed: 7 extrapulmonary small cell NECs, 3 metastatic NECs of unknown primary, and 24 small cell lung carcinomas (SCLCs). Chromosomal deletions are more frequent than gains and often involve the entire chromosome arm. Typical aberrations are deletions of chromosome 3p, 5q, 10q, and 17p and gains of 1q, 3q, and 5p occurring as isochromosomes. Non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLCs) have different cytogenetic aberrations, but those with a metastatic phenotype display the identical aberrations as SCLC, a tumor known for its metastatic phenotype at onset. A genetic classification of lung cancer that incorporates the pattern of recurrent chromosome aberrations may be a better predictor of clinical outcome than a morphologic classification.

  16. Cytogenetic abnormalities in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder.

    PubMed

    Bastain, Theresa M; Lewczyk, Caroline M; Sharp, Wendy S; James, Regina S; Long, Robert T; Eagen, Patricia B; Ebens, Christen L; Meck, Jeanne M; Chan, Wai-Yee; Sidransky, Ellen; Rapoport, Judith L; Castellanos, F Xavier

    2002-07-01

    To systematically assess the prevalence of fragile X syndrome, velocardiofacial syndrome, and other cytogenetic abnormalities in a group of children with attention-defict/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Blood samples were obtained from 100 children (64 boys) with combined type ADHD and normal intelligence and analyzed for the presence of fragile X mutation expansions, the 22q11.2 microdeletion associated with velocardiofacial syndrome, and cytogenetic abnormalities that would be detected with high resolution chromosomal banding. One girl with ADHD had a sex chromosome aneuploidy (47,XXX). One boy had a premutation-sized allele for fragile X; no subjects showed the full mutation. Testing for 22q11.2 microdeletion was negative for all subjects with ADHD screened. None of these differences exceeded those expected by chance. In the absence of clinical signs or positive family history, these relatively expensive laboratory assessments are not clinically indicated for children with ADHD and normal intelligence, and are not recommended as a component of other genetic investigations of this disorder.

  17. Molecular and cytogenetic assessment of Dipterygium glaucum genotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Altwaty, Nada H; El-Sayed, Osama E; Aly, Nariman A H; Baeshen, Mohamed N; Baeshen, Nabih A

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to assess the genotoxicity of Dipterygium glaucum grows widely in Saudi Arabia desert to produce safety herbal products. This work is considered the first and pioneer report so far due to the lack and poor evaluated reports of the plant species for their mutagensity, genotoxicity and cytogenetics effects. Cytogenetic effects of D. glaucum on mitotic in roots of Vicia faba showed reduction in mitotic activity using three extracts; water, ethanol and ethyl acetate. Chromosomal abnormalities were recorded that included stickiness of chromosomes, chromatin bridge, fragments, lagging chromosome and micronuclei. Protein bands and RAPD analyses of V. faba treated with three D. glaucum extracts revealed some newly induced proteins and DNA fragments and other disappeared. Chemical constitution of the plant species should be identified with their biological activities against human and animal cells like HeLa cancer cell line. We are recommending using additional genotoxicity tests and other toxicity tests on animal culture with different concentrations and also utilizing several drought and heat tolerant genes of the plant species in gene cloning to develop and improve other economical crop plants instead of using the species as oral herbal remedy.

  18. Molecular cytogenetic and genomic insights into chromosomal evolution

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Herrera, A; Farré, M; Robinson, T J

    2012-01-01

    This review summarizes aspects of the extensive literature on the patterns and processes underpinning chromosomal evolution in vertebrates and especially placental mammals. It highlights the growing synergy between molecular cytogenetics and comparative genomics, particularly with respect to fully or partially sequenced genomes, and provides novel insights into changes in chromosome number and structure across deep division of the vertebrate tree of life. The examination of basal numbers in the deeper branches of the vertebrate tree suggest a haploid (n) chromosome number of 10–13 in an ancestral vertebrate, with modest increases in tetrapods and amniotes most probably by chromosomal fissioning. Information drawn largely from cross-species chromosome painting in the data-dense Placentalia permits the confident reconstruction of an ancestral karyotype comprising n=23 chromosomes that is similarly retained in Boreoeutheria. Using in silico genome-wide scans that include the newly released frog genome we show that of the nine ancient syntenies detected in conserved karyotypes of extant placentals (thought likely to reflect the structure of ancestral chromosomes), the human syntenic segmental associations 3p/21, 4pq/8p, 7a/16p, 14/15, 12qt/22q and 12pq/22qt predate the divergence of tetrapods. These findings underscore the enhanced quality of ancestral reconstructions based on the integrative molecular cytogenetic and comparative genomic approaches that collectively highlight a pattern of conserved syntenic associations that extends back ∼360 million years ago. PMID:22108627

  19. [Dicentric Y chromosomes. First part: cytogenetic and molecular aspects].

    PubMed

    Bouayed Abdelmoula, N; Amouri, A

    2005-01-01

    Dicentric Y chromosomes have been reviewed twice in 1994 by Hsu et al. and in 1995 by Tuck-Muller et al. who showed that dic(Y) are the most common Y structural abnormalities and that their influence on gonadal and somatic development is extremely variable. The prediction of their phenotypic consequences is often difficult because of the variety of genomic sequences concerned by duplications and deletions, because of the variable degrees of mosaicism (cell line 45,X in particular) and at the end, because of identification and analysis technical difficulties of the structure of the rearranged Y chromosome. The clinical specter of this cytogenetic abnormality is rather wide going from almost-normal or infertile males, to females with or without stigmas of Turner syndrome. Middle phenotypes consist of various degrees of genital ambiguities. However, clinical expression seems to be related to the genomic capital of the Y chromosome, mainly the Y genes involved in the control of the process of the determination of gonads (Yp) and spermatogenesis (Yq) as well as control of the growth and the skeletal development (Yp). Here, we report a third comprehensive review of the literature concerning dicentric Y chromosomes reported since 1994. In the light of previous reviews as well as the recent data of the genetic cartography of the Y chromosome, we try, in this first part, to determine characteristics of reported dicentric Y chromosomes as well as their chromosomal mechanics, their mitotic stability and finally their cytogenetic and molecular investigations.

  20. First cytogenetic study of Cavernicola pilosa Barber, 1937 (Hemiptera, Triatominae).

    PubMed

    Souza, E S; Alevi, K C C; Ribeiro, A R; Furtado, M B; Atzingen, N C B V; Azeredo-Oliveira, M T V; Rosa, J A

    2015-10-30

    Cavernicola pilosa is a triatomine species that lives in caves and feeds on bat blood. This vector has a wide geographical distribution, and is found in Brazil, Colombia, Panama, Peru, and Venezuela. Little is known about the reproductive biology of this species, because most previous studies have only characterized its morphology, morphometry, ecology, and epidemiology. Therefore, this study aimed to obtain preliminary data related to spermatogenesis in C. pilosa by conducting cytogenetic analysis. Analysis of the heterochromatic pattern of C. pilosa during the initial prophases revealed that heterochromatic blocks are only present in the sex chromosomes. Based on the analyses of the meiotic metaphase and prophases, we found that the sex determination system of C. pilosa is XY and the chromosomes are holocentric. C. pilosa spermatids are filamentous and have long flagella. It was not possible to detect corpuscle or filament heteropycnosis in spermatids of this species. The initial cytogenetic data presented in this study are important in characterizing the spermatogenesis and heterochromatic patterns of C. pilosa. Our results suggest that adaptation to troglodytism did not result in differences in spermatogenesis in this vector.

  1. Cytogenetic analysis of myoepithelial cell carcinoma of salivary gland.

    PubMed

    Magrini, Elisabetta; Pragliola, Antonella; Farnedi, Anna; Betts, Christine M; Cocchi, Roberto; Foschini, Maria P

    2004-01-01

    Myoepithelial cell carcinoma (MCC) of the salivary gland is a rare entity. Here, we describe the karyotype of MCC. The patient was a 53-year-old man, with a rapidly growing lesion of the palate. Despite complete surgical excision, radio- and chemotherapy, the lesion rapidly harboured local and distant metastases leading to the death of the patient, 4 months after the diagnosis. On histological and ultrastructural examination, the primary tumour and the related metastases were composed of oval and spindle cells, with features of myoepithelial cell differentiation reported in the literature. Cytogenetic analysis showed a composite karyotype in the primary tumour: 45-46,XY, +3[cp3]/ 44-45,XY, -17[cp4]/ 46,XY[5]. The lymph-node metastasis was near-triploid and showed a complex karyotype. Our cytogenetic data differ from those described in benign or slowly growing salivary gland tumours showing myoepithelial cell differentiation. It is suggested that highly aggressive tumours might follow a different pathway of malignant transformation.

  2. [Cytogenetic aberrations in histologically benign infiltratively growing sphenoid wing meningiomas].

    PubMed

    Korshunov, A G; Cherekaev, V A; Bekiashev, A Kh; Sycheva, R V

    2007-01-01

    Meningiomas of the sphenoid wing (SW) frequently show an invasive pattern of growth and cause destruction of the adjacent structures. As a result, the rate of recurrent SW meningiomas is as high as 30%. Cytogenetic investigations showed no aberrations specific to invasively growing meningiomas. During this study, the authors evaluated 10 invasive and 5 non-invasive SW meningiomas via comparative genome hybridization (CGH) (matrix CGH), by using the gene chips of GenoSensor Array micromatrixes. The mean number of aberrations in the tumor cells was much greater in case of invasive meningiomas (67.4 versus 40.5 in case of non-invasive SW meningiomas. Furthermore, in invasive SW meningiomas, there were frequently losses in loci 1p, 6q, and 14q and gains in loci 15q and 10, which had been predetermined as molecular markers of stepwise progression of meningioma. Thus, the presence of a complex cytogenetic profile and progression-associated chromosome aberrations in benign SW meningiomas is linked with the increase of their invasive potential. Due to the fact that there are no well-defined adjuvant therapy regimens for recurring meningiomas at present, the revealed genomic aberrations may become potential targets for searching for drugs and a therapeutic intervention in future.

  3. Cytogenetic effects of cadmium accumulation on water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes)

    SciTech Connect

    Rosas, I.; Carbajal, M.E.; Gomez-Arroyo, S.; Belmont, R.; Villalobos-Pietrini, R.

    1984-04-01

    Cadmium was bioassayed to observe cytogenetic effects in the water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes). Plants were exposed for 96 hr to freshwater containing 0.01, 0.05, 0.10, 1, 5, and 10 mg/liter of cadmium. Metal concentrations in tissues were determined by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. The highest level was found in roots, thus root-tip cells were used for cytogenetic studies; after 24 hr of exposure, micronuclei, c-mitotic effects, and pycnosis were detected and after 48 hr polyploidy was observed. A linear relationship between frequencies of micronuclei and cadmium concentrations was found; at 1, 5, and 10 mg/liter micronuclei numbers were always the lowest. The inhibition of cell proliferation, shown by the low mitotic index, was proportional to the concentration and time of exposure. From the results presented in this paper it may be concluded that water hyacinth is a good sensor, due to its fast rate of metal accumulation, which allows an easy way to determine the presence of potential mutagenic compounds in water. 63 references.

  4. Cytogenetic map of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.)

    PubMed Central

    Fonsêca, Artur; Ferreira, Joana; dos Santos, Tiago Ribeiro Barros; Mosiolek, Magdalena; Bellucci, Elisa; Kami, James; Gepts, Paul; Geffroy, Valérie; Schweizer, Dieter; dos Santos, Karla G. B.

    2010-01-01

    A cytogenetic map of common bean was built by in situ hybridization of 35 bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) selected with markers mapping to eight linkage groups, plus two plasmids for 5S and 45S ribosomal DNA and one bacteriophage. Together with three previously mapped chromosomes (chromosomes 3, 4, and 7), 43 anchoring points between the genetic map and the cytogenetic map of the species are now available. Furthermore, a subset of four BAC clones was proposed to identify the 11 chromosome pairs of the standard cultivar BAT93. Three of these BACs labelled more than a single chromosome pair, indicating the presence of repetitive DNA in their inserts. A repetitive distribution pattern was observed for most of the BACs; for 38% of them, highly repetitive pericentromeric or subtelomeric signals were observed. These distribution patterns corresponded to pericentromeric and subtelomeric heterochromatin blocks observed with other staining methods. Altogether, the results indicate that around half of the common bean genome is heterochromatic and that genes and repetitive sequences are intermingled in the euchromatin and heterochromatin of the species. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s10577-010-9129-8) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:20449646

  5. Systematics of Mepraia (Hemiptera-Reduviidae): cytogenetic and molecular variation.

    PubMed

    Calleros, L; Panzera, F; Bargues, M D; Monteiro, F A; Klisiowicz, D R; Zuriaga, M A; Mas-Coma, S; Pérez, R

    2010-03-01

    The haematophagous insects of the subfamily Triatominae (Hemiptera-Reduviidae) have great epidemiological importance as vectors of Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease. Mepraia was originally described as a monotypic genus comprised of Mepraia spinolai, distributed along coastal areas of northern Chile (from Region I to the Metropolitan Region). Recently, some M. spinolai populations have been ranked as a new species named Mepraia gajardoi. Several populations along the distribution range of the genus were sampled, and genetic differentiation was studied based upon the analysis of three molecular markers: cytogenetics (karyotype and chromosome behaviour during meiosis using the C-banding technique), mitochondrial DNA (a cytochrome oxidase I gene fragment), and nuclear ribosomal DNA (intergenic region including the two internal transcribed spacers ITS-1 and ITS-2 and the 5.8S rRNA gene). The data here presented indicate that populations within the Mepraia genus (excluding Region II specimens) can be divided into two separate lineages. One lineage is comprised of specimens from the northernmost Region I and represents M. gajardoi. The other includes samples from the southern III, IV and the Metropolitan Regions, and represents M. spinolai. Region II individuals deserve particular attention as their relationship to the two identified lineages is not clear-cut. While they appear to belong to M. spinolai based on cytogenetics and rDNA markers, COI results indicate a closer relationship to M. gajardoi. This disagreement can be due to mitochondrial DNA introgression or the retention of ancestral polymorphisms.

  6. Cytogenetics and genome evolution in the subfamily Triatominae (Hemiptera, Reduviidae).

    PubMed

    Panzera, F; Pérez, R; Panzera, Y; Ferrandis, I; Ferreiro, M J; Calleros, L

    2010-01-01

    The subfamily Triatominae (Hemiptera, Reduviidae), vectors of Chagas disease, includes over 140 species. Karyotypic information is currently available for 80 of these species. This paper summarizes the chromosomal variability of the subfamily and how it may reveal aspects of genome evolution in this group. The Triatominae present a highly conserved chromosome number. All species, except 3, present 20 autosomes. The differences in chromosome number are mainly caused by variation in the number of sex chromosomes, due to the existence of 3 sex systems in males (XY, X(1)X(2)Y and X(1)X(2)X(3)Y). However, inter- and intraspecific differences in the position, quantity and meiotic behavior of constitutive heterochromatin, in the total genome size, and in the location of ribosomal 45S rRNA clusters, have revealed considerable cytogenetic variability within the subfamily. This cytogenetic diversity offers the opportunity to perform cytotaxonomic and phylogenetic studies, as well as structural, evolutionary, and functional analyses of the genome. The imminent availability of the complete genome of Rhodnius prolixus also opens new perspectives for understanding the evolution and genome expression of triatomines. The application of fluorescence in situ hybridization for the mapping of genes and sequences, as well as comparative analyses of genome homology by comparative genomic hybridization will be useful tools for understanding the genomic changes in relation to evolutionary processes such as speciation and adaptation to different environments.

  7. Sex chromosome changes in leukemia: cytogenetics and molecular aspects.

    PubMed

    Shahrabi, Saeid; Khodadi, Elahe; Saba, Fakhredin; Shahjahani, Mohammad; Saki, Najmaldin

    2017-09-10

    Sex chromosome loss (SCL) can occur in older men as a physiological phenomenon or as an acquired abnormality in leukemia. Loss of chromosome Y and loss of chromosome X are acquired disorders that are mainly observed in patients over 80 years as well as in myeloid and lymphoid malignancies. In this review, we examine the cytogenetic and molecular changes of sex chromosomes in leukemia. Relevant English language literature were searched and retrieved from PubMed search engine (1990-2016). The following keywords were used: 'Sex chromosomes', 'Leukemia' and 'Cytogenetics'. The loss of tumor suppressor genes along with these chromosomal abnormalities in the majority of malignant cells in bone marrow (BM) has raised the question whether this is an age-related phenomenon or has occurred as a result of clonal abnormality. On the other hand, the presence of these chromosomal abnormalities in a number of genetic diseases associated with leukemia leads to progression of malignancy, and their role in peripheral blood stem cell transplantation confirm the finding that these chromosomal abnormalities can play an important role in clonal abnormality. The presence of these abnormalities can cause genetic instability in BM and result in the development of a malignant clone and progression of the disease. In addition, the evaluation of SCL together with the genes involved in these chromosomes can contribute to predict the disease prognosis as well as monitoring of malignancy.

  8. Temperature-dependent development of Xyleborus glabratus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Redbay ambrosia beetle, Xyleborus glabratus Eichhoff (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) is a nonnative pest that vectors the pathogenic fungus Raffaelea lauricola, which causes laurel wilt in trees of the family Lauraceae. Laurel wilt is present in the commercial growing areas of avocado (Perse...

  9. Morphometric analysis of instar variation in Tenebrio molitor (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Measurements of head capsule, mandible, metanotum, and body weight were done on larvae of Tenebrio molitor L. (Coleoptera: Tenebrionide) from the second to the last instar. Instar number varied from 14 to 18, but 15 or 16 instars were the most common. The value of dimensional measurements was evalua...

  10. An annotated checklist of Malachiidae (Coleoptera: Cleroidea) from Iran.

    PubMed

    Mirutenko, Vladyslav; Ghahari, Hassan

    2016-09-09

    A checklist of Iranian Malachiidae (Coleoptera) is given in this paper. Eighty two species from 22 genera (subfamily Malachiinae) are listed in the fauna of Iran. Of these species, 31 are endemic to Iran, and one Anthocomus pupillatus Abeille de Perrin, 1890 is a new record for this country.

  11. Tomicus piniperda (Coleoptera: Scolytidae) Initial Flight and Shoot

    Treesearch

    Therese M. Poland; Robert A. Haack; Toby R. Petrice

    2002-01-01

    The exotic pine shoot beetle, Tomicus piniperda (L.) (Coleoptera: Scolytidae), established in the north central and northeastern United States (U.S.) and adjacent regions in Canada, is regulated by a federal quarantine that restricts movement of pine material during specific times of the year based on the beetle's life history. Although climatic...

  12. Checklist of the Coleoptera of New Brunswick, Canada

    PubMed Central

    Webster, Reginald P.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract All 3,062 species of Coleoptera from 92 families known to occur in New Brunswick, Canada, are recorded, along with their author(s) and year of publication using the most recent classification framework. Adventive and Holarctic species are indicated. There are 366 adventive species in the province, 12.0% of the total fauna. PMID:27110174

  13. A coffee berry borer (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) bibliography

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    One hundred years ago, one of the most significant biological invasions of an agricultural insect pest in the Americas was initiated. Endemic to Africa, the coffee berry borer (Hypothenemus hampei; Coleoptera: Curculionidae) was accidentally introduced to Brazil in 1913 and years later invaded coffe...

  14. Mating frequency and fecundity in Agrilus anxius (Coleoptera: Buprestidae)

    Treesearch

    Claire E. Rutledge; Melody A. Keena

    2012-01-01

    Bronze birch borers (Agrilus anxius Gory) (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), a key pest of birches in North America, have the potential to be a major threat to Eurasian birch forests. Therefore, the consequences of single versus multiple mating on the longevity, fecundity and fertility of female A. anxius were examined. There were three...

  15. Diet based fitness variability of Coccinella novemnotata (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Coccinella novemnotata (Herbst) is a species of North American native lady beetle (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) that has come under great ecological duress over the past 30 years and is experiencing a significant decline throughout its native range. This species once was widely distributed across mos...

  16. Attractant and disruptant semiochemicals for Dendroctonus jeffreyi (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae)

    Treesearch

    Brian Strom; Smith S.L.; Brownie C.

    2013-01-01

    Jeffrey pine, Pinus jeffreyi Greville and Balfour, is a dominant yellow pine and important overstory component of forests growing on diverse sites from southwestern Oregon to Baja California to western Nevada. The Jeffrey pine beetle, Dedroctonus jeffreyi Hopkins (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae), is monophagous on Jeffrey...

  17. Using Malaise traps to sample ground beetles (Coleoptera: Carabidae)

    Treesearch

    Michael D. Ulyshen; James L. Hanula; Scott Horn

    2005-01-01

    Pitfall traps provide an easy and inexpensive way to sample ground-dwelling arthropods (Spence and Niemela 1994; Spence et al. 1997; Abildsnes and Tommeras 2000) and have been used exclusively in many studies of the abundance and diversity of ground beetles (Coleoptera: Carabidae). Despite the popularity of this trapping technique, pitfall traps have many disadvantages...

  18. A new species of Cephalocyclus (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Aphodiinae) from Mexico.

    PubMed

    Minor, Pablo; Dellacasa, Marco; Dellacasa, Giovanni

    2015-06-22

    Cephalocyclus moroni new species (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Aphodiinae) from humid forest in the mountains of Manantlán, Jalisco, Mexico is described and illustrated. It is similar to Cephalocyclus ordonezi Dellacasa, Dellacasa, & Gordon, 2007 and Cephalocyclus stebnickae Deloya & Ibañez-Bernal, 2000, both from Mexico.

  19. Two new species of South American Glaresidae (Coleoptera: Scarabaeoidea).

    PubMed

    Paulsen, M J

    2016-08-24

    Two new species of South American Glaresidae (Coleoptera: Scarabaeoidea) are described: Glaresis smithi Paulsen, new species from Argentina, and Glaresis mondacai Paulsen, new species from Chile and Peru. The species are compared to their closest congener, Glaresis fritzi Martínez et al., and a key is provided for the known South American species of the genus Glaresis Erichson.

  20. [The cytogenetic characteristics of 178 acute myeloid leukemia patients].

    PubMed

    Liu, Hui; Chang, Nai-bai; Pei, Lei; Ning, Shang-yong; Li, Jiang-tao; Xing, Bao-li; Xu, Xiao-dong

    2011-08-01

    To explore the cytogenetic characteristics of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients. The karyotype analysis was performed in 178 AML using the short-term culture of bone marrow cell and G-banding technique. Among the 178 patients, 171 had enough metaphases for analysis and 128 (74.9%) had clonal karyotypic abnormalities. Twenty-seven patients were secondary to myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS-AML), with 25 (92.6%) patients carrying clonal karyotypic abnormalities. Among the remaining 144 patients of de novo AML, 103 (71.5%) had clonal karyotypic abnormalities. The rate of abnormal clonal karyotype was higher in MDS-AML than that of de novo AML (P = 0.021). Among the 171 patients, 41 (24.0%) were in favorable risk group, 80(46.8%) in intermediate risk group and 50 (29.2%) in adverse risk group. t(15;17) was the most common chromosomal aberration. The majority intermediate risk chromosomal aberration was normal karyotype. The most common cytogenetic abnormality among adverse group was a complex karyotype. Adverse cytogenetic aberrations, such as -5/5q-, -7/7q-, frequently occurred in conjunction with one another as part of a complex karyotype. Totally 75 patients were 60 years or older, among them, 16.0% were in favorable risk group, 48.0% in intermediate risk group and 36.0% in adverse risk group. Among 96 younger patients, 30.2% were in favorable risk group, 45.8% in intermediate risk group and 24.0% in adverse risk group. The rate of favorable risk chromosomal aberration was lower in elder patients than in younger (P = 0.031). The rate of adverse risk chromosomal aberration and the rate of monosomal karyotype were higher in MDS-AML than in de novo AML patients (P < 0.001). The most common favorable, intermediate and adverse chromosomal aberrations were t(15;17), normal karyotype and complex karyotype respectively. The karyotype was poor in MDS-AML and elder AML patients.

  1. Predation by Flat Bark Beetles (Coleoptera: Silvanidae and Laemophloeidae) on Coffee Berry Borer (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) in Hawaii coffee

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Coffee berry borer(CBB), Hypothenemus hampei, is a serious pest of coffee worldwide and a new invasive pest in Hawaii. Adult flat bark beetles, mainly Leptophloeus sp.(75%) and Cathartus quadricollis(21%) (Coleoptera: Laemophloeidae and Silvanidae, respectively), were found feeding in CBB-infested c...

  2. Natural enemies of emerald ash borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) in northeast China, with notes on two species of parasitic Coleoptera

    Treesearch

    Xiao-Yi Wang; Liang-Ming Cao; Zhong-Qi Yang; Jian J. Duan; Juli R. Gould; Leah S. Bauer

    2016-01-01

    To investigate natural enemies of emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), in northeastern China, we conducted field surveys of ash (Fraxinus Linnaeus (Oleaceae)) trees in semi-natural forests and plantations at variable EAB densities from 2008 to 2013. Our surveys revealed a complex of...

  3. Cytogenetics of the true bug infraorder Cimicomorpha (Hemiptera, Heteroptera): a review

    PubMed Central

    Kuznetsova, Valentina G.; Grozeva, Snejana M.; Nokkala, Seppo; Nokkala, Christina

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The Cimicomorpha is one of the largest and highly diversified infraorders of the Heteroptera. This group is also highly diversified cytogenetically and demonstrates a number of unusual cytogenetic characters such as holokinetic chromosomes; m-chromosomes; multiple sex chromosome systems; post-reduction of sex chromosomes in meiosis; variation in the presence/absence of chiasmata in spermatogenesis; different types of achiasmate meiosis. We present here a review of essential cytogenetic characters of the Cimicomorpha and outline the chief objectives and goals of future investigations in the field. PMID:22287915

  4. Pallister-Killian syndrome in a preterm newborn who died soon after precipitous delivery: cytogenetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Moro, M A; Sanna, R; Cambosu, F; Soro, G; Dessole, S; Montella, A; Capobianco, G

    2014-01-01

    The authors report a preterm neonate with dysmorphic traits and cleft palate who was born preterm because of precipitous delivery and died soon after birth notwithstanding neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) support. The cytogenetic analysis on fibroblasts from post-mortem skin biopsy demonstrated a Pallister-Killian syndrome (PKS). PKS is a cytogenetically syndrome characterized by a tissue limited mosaic distribution of one isochromosome 12p (tetrasomy 12p). Clinical manifestations of PKS are variable, and some symptoms may overlap with other malformative syndromes, thus the correct diagnosis mainly depends on the demonstration of the specific cytogenetic abnormality.

  5. Cytogenetic evaluation of chromosomal disorders in Down Syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Shafik, H.M.

    1987-01-01

    Down Syndrome (DS) patients are at high risk to develop leukemia. They are also highly sensitive to the induction of chromosomal aberrations when their GO lymphocytes are irradiated in vitro. The objective of this study was to further investigate the differential radiosensitivity of DS lymphocytes at the different stages of the cell cycle, as damage to proliferating cells is more relevant to health problems than damage to non-dividing cells. In addition, the proliferation kinetics and stage of differentiation of circulating DS lymphocytes was studied in an attempt to understand the mechanism for the enhanced chromosomal radiosensitivity. Moreover, the x-ray induced specific chromosomal breakpoints were identified and correlated with the locations of oncogene and fragile sites in order to investigate cytogenetically the early stages of leukemogenesis.

  6. [Genetic nature of atrophic rhinitis in swine. II. Cytogenetic research].

    PubMed

    Gavrichenkov, A I

    1985-02-01

    This work is concerned with the problem of the nature of the atrophic rhinitis in swine. Our study demonstrates that the filter-passers when injecting intranasal provoke catarrhal rhinitis in sucking-pigs and rabbits and the disease lasts 10-12 days. Guinea-pigs and white mice show no disease symptoms after injection. After four passages of filter-passers through sucking-pigs, the pathogenic properties do not restore. The sucking-pigs and laboratory animals show no changes in organs and in nasal cavity. The findings of cytogenetic and allergic investigations indicate genetic aspects of this disease. To eliminate atrophic rhinitis, it is necessary to reveal heterozygotes, carry out experimental matings and analysis of hybrids. To date, a recessive gene is considered to mediate the disease. To obtain healthy offspring, animals heterozygous for this gene should be bred.

  7. Testing hygrometers used in cytogenetics laboratories for metaphase preparation.

    PubMed

    Hartley, Thomas; Dun, Karen

    2011-07-01

    This protocol describes procedures for checking small laboratory hygrometers for accuracy at three relative humidity (rh) levels. The work arose out of the need to provide laboratory assessors with documentary evidence that the hygrometer used to monitor humidity in the vicinity of the laboratory where medical cytogenetics testing slides are prepared and dried in the ambient environment is reproducible and sufficiently accurate. The procedure is based upon the physicochemical principle that when water or certain saturated salt solutions are placed into a sealed environment, the humidity will equilibrate to well defined levels. We choose to check our hygrometers at three points: 95%, 75%, and 33% rh, using distilled water, saturated sodium chloride solution, and saturated magnesium chloride solution, respectively. Our results have demonstrated that the procedure is convenient and of sufficient accuracy to be fit for this annual hygrometer validation purpose. The procedure takes 24 hr per relative humidity point checked.

  8. Distinctive cytogenetic profile in benign metastasizing leiomyoma: pathogenetic implications.

    PubMed

    Nucci, Marisa R; Drapkin, Ronny; Dal Cin, Paola; Fletcher, Christopher D M; Fletcher, Jonathan A

    2007-05-01

    "Benign metastasizing leiomyoma" is the terminology used to describe a controversial entity characterized by a proliferation of bland-appearing smooth muscle in lung or abdominopelvic lymph nodes. In this report, we describe 5 cases of pulmonary-based smooth muscle tumors that are clinically and histologically consistent with this entity, and in which we identified consistent chromosomal aberrations (19q and 22q terminal deletion in all cases). This cytogenetic profile is found in approximately 3% of uterine leiomyoma, but has not been described in other types of benign or malignant neoplasia. These findings suggest that the nodular pulmonary smooth muscle proliferations termed "benign metastasizing leiomyoma," are a genetically distinct entity, which likely originate from a biologically distinctive subset of uterine leiomyoma.

  9. radir package: an R implementation for cytogenetic biodosimetry dose estimation.

    PubMed

    Moriña, David; Higueras, Manuel; Puig, Pedro; Ainsbury, Elizabeth A; Rothkamm, Kai

    2015-09-01

    The Bayesian framework has been shown to be very useful in cytogenetic dose estimation. This approach allows description of the probability of an event in terms of previous knowledge, e.g. its expectation and/or its uncertainty. A new R package entitled radir (radiation inverse regression) has been implemented with the aim of reproducing a recent Bayesian-type dose estimation methodology. radir adopts the method of dose estimation under the Poisson assumption of the responses (the chromosomal aberrations counts) for the required dose-response curve (typically linear or quadratic). The individual commands are described in detail and relevant examples of the use of the methods and the corresponding radir software tools are given. The suitability of this methodology is highlighted and its application encouraged by providing a user-friendly command-type software interface within the R statistical software (version 3.1.1 or higher), which includes a complete manual.

  10. [Mechanism of cytogenetic adaptive response induced by low dose radiation].

    PubMed

    Cai, L; Liu, S

    1990-11-01

    Cytogenetic observation on human lymphocytes indicated that pre-exposure of 10, 50 and 75 mGy X-rays could induced the adaptive response. Experimental results with different temperature treatment showed that the adaptive response induced by low dose radiation could be enhanced by 41 degrees C and 43 degrees C, but inhibited by 4 degrees C in addition the treatment by 41 degrees C for one hour could also cause the adaptive response as did low dose radiation. Results showed that adaptive response induced by low dose radiation (10 or 50 mGy X-rays) could be eliminated by the protein synthesis inhibitor, implying that the adaptive response is related with the metabolism of cells, especially with the production of certain protective proteins.

  11. Cytogenetics and molecular genetics of childhood brain tumors.

    PubMed Central

    Biegel, J. A.

    1999-01-01

    Considerable progress has been made toward improving survival for children with brain tumors, and yet there is still relatively little known regarding the molecular genetic events that contribute to tumor initiation or progression. Nonrandom patterns of chromosomal deletions in several types of childhood brain tumors suggest that the loss or inactivation of tumor suppressor genes are critical events in tumorigenesis. Deletions of chromosomal regions 10q, 11 and 17p, and example, are frequent events in medulloblastoma, whereas loss of a region within 22q11.2, which contains the INI1 gene, is involved in the development of atypical teratoid and rhabdoid tumors. A review of the cytogenetic and molecular genetic changes identified to date in childhood brain tumors will be presented. PMID:11550309

  12. [The results of cytogenetic studies of workers in industrial enterprises].

    PubMed

    Baryliak, I R; Frolov, V M; Peresadin, M O; Vytrishchak, V Ia; Koval'chuk, L Ie

    1995-01-01

    Cytogenetic monitoring of workers of large industrial enterprizes showed the presence of chromatide aberrations in the peripheral blood lymphocytes, which were more manifest in workers of chemical and byproduct cokeplants, and somewhat less apparent in metallurgists. The frequency of metaphases involving chromosomal aberrations is dependent upon the duration of occupational exposure to chemical mutagens. However, the number of chromosomal abberrations does not appear to be influenced by chemical factors remaining essantially the same. The human embrion genome sensitivity to the chemical mutagen action was found to be much higher than that of somatic cells of the adults occupationally exposed to alterating factors. Use of complexes of antioxidants (tocopheroli acetas, quercetin, splenin) makes for reduction in the number of chromosomal aberrations in workers engaged in chemical industry.

  13. Cytogenetic investigation of subjects professionally exposed to radiofrequency radiation.

    PubMed

    Maes, Annemarie; Van Gorp, Urbain; Verschaeve, Luc

    2006-03-01

    Nowadays, virtually everybody is exposed to radiofrequency radiation (RFR) from mobile phone base station antennas or other sources. At least according to some scientists, this exposure can have detrimental health effects. We investigated cytogenetic effects in peripheral blood lymphocytes from subjects who were professionally exposed to mobile phone electromagnetic fields in an attempt to demonstrate possible RFR-induced genetic effects. These subjects can be considered well suited for this purpose as their RFR exposure is 'normal' though rather high, and definitely higher than that of the 'general population'. The alkaline comet assay, sister chromatid exchange (SCE) and chromosome aberration tests revealed no evidence of RFR-induced genetic effects. Blood cells were also exposed to the well known chemical mutagen mitomycin C in order to investigate possible combined effects of RFR and the chemical. No cooperative action was found between the electromagnetic field exposure and the mutagen using either the comet assay or SCE test.

  14. In vivo cytogenetic effects of oil shale retort process waters.

    PubMed

    Meyne, J; Deaven, L L

    1982-01-01

    The induction of cytogenetic effects by oil shale retort process waters from 3 types of pilot plant retorts were examined in murine bone marrow. Each of the process waters induced increased frequencies of structural aberrations in mice treated with 3 daily intraperitoneal injections of the waters. The same treatment had no effect on the frequency of sister chromatid exchanges. Mice given a 1% solution of an above-ground retort water ad libitum for 8 weeks consumed about 1 ml/kg per day of the process water and had a frequency of aberrations comparable to mice given the same dose intraperitoneally for 3 days. Transplacental exposure of C3H mouse embryos indicated that clastogenic compounds in the above-ground retort process water can cross the placenta and induce chromosomal aberrations in embryonic tissues.

  15. Cytogenetic analysis in fetuses with late onset abnormal sonographic findings.

    PubMed

    Bardin, Ron; Hadar, Eran; Haizler-Cohen, Lylach; Gabbay-Benziv, Rinat; Meizner, Israel; Kahana, Sarit; Yeshaya, Josepha; Yacobson, Shiri; Cohen-Vig, Lital; Agmon-Fishman, Ifaat; Basel-Vanagaite, Lina; Maya, Idit

    2017-09-15

    To determine the rate of chromosomal cytogenetic abnormalities in fetuses with late onset abnormal sonographic findings. Retrospective cohort of women who underwent amniocentesis at or beyond 23 weeks of gestation, for fetal karyotype and chromosomal microarray analysis, indicated due to late onset abnormal sonographic findings. All 103 fetuses had a normal karyotype. Ninety-five women also had chromosomal microarray analysis (CMA) performed. The detection rate of abnormal CMA (5/95, 5.3%) was similar to that of women who underwent amniocentesis due to abnormal early onset ultrasound findings detected at routine prenatal screening tests during the first or early second trimester (7.3%, P=0.46) and significantly higher than that for women who underwent amniocentesis and CMA upon request, without a medical indication for CMA (0.99%, P<0.0001). Late onset sonographic findings are an indication for amniocentesis, and if performed, CMA should be applied to evaluate fetuses with late onset abnormal sonographic findings.

  16. Cytogenetic, clinical, and cytologic characteristics of radiotherapy-related leukemias

    SciTech Connect

    Philip, P.; Pedersen-Bjergaard, J.

    1988-04-01

    From 1978 to 1985, we observed eight cases of acute nonlymphocytic leukemia or preleukemia, three cases of acute lymphoblastic leukemia, and three cases of chronic myeloid leukemia in patients previously treated exclusively with radiotherapy for other tumor types. The latent period from administration of radiotherapy to development of leukemia varied between 12 and 243 months. Clonal chromosome aberrations reported previously as characteristic of acute nonlymphocytic leukemia following therapy with alkylating agents were observed in three of the eight patients with acute nonlymphocytic leukemia (5q- and -7) and in two of the three patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (-7 and 12p-). All three patients with radiotherapy-related chronic myeloid leukemia presented a t(9;22)(q34;q11). The results suggest that cytogenetic characteristics may reflect the etiology in radiation-induced acute leukemias, whereas radiation-related chronic myeloid leukemia does not seem to differ chromosomally from de novo cases of the disease.

  17. Comparative molecular cytogenetic characterization of seven Deschampsia (Poaceae) species.

    PubMed

    Amosova, Alexandra V; Bolsheva, Nadezhda L; Zoshchuk, Svyatoslav A; Twardovska, Maryana O; Yurkevich, Olga Yu; Andreev, Igor O; Samatadze, Tatiana E; Badaeva, Ekaterina D; Kunakh, Viktor A; Muravenko, Olga V

    2017-01-01

    The genus Deschampsia P. Beauv (Poaceae) involves a group of widespread polymorphic species. Some of them are highly tolerant to stressful and variable environmental conditions, and D. antarctica is one of the only two vascular plants growing in Antarctic. This species is a source of useful for selection traits and a valuable model for studying an environmental stress tolerance in plants. Genome diversity and comparative chromosomal phylogeny within the genus have not been studied yet as karyotypes of most Deschampsia species are poorly investigated. We firstly conducted a comparative molecular cytogenetic analysis of D. antarctica (Antarctic Peninsula) and related species from various localities (D. cespitosa, D. danthonioides, D. elongata, D. flexuosa (= Avenella flexuosa), D. parvula and D. sukatschewii by fluorescence in situ hybridization with 45S and 5S rDNA, DAPI-banding and sequential rapid in situ hybridization with genomic DNA of D. antarctica, D. cespitosa, and D. flexuosa. Based on patterns of distribution of the examined markers, chromosomes of the studied species were identified. Within these species, common features as well as species peculiarities in their karyotypic structure and chromosomal distribution of molecular cytogenetic markers were characterized. Different chromosomal rearrangements were detected in D. antarctica, D. flexuosa, D. elongata and D. sukatschewii. In karyotypes of D. antarctica, D. cespitosa, D. elongata and D. sukatschewii, 0-3 B chromosomes possessed distinct DAPI-bands were observed. Our findings suggest that the genome evolution of the genus Deschampsia involved polyploidy and also different chromosomal rearrangements. The obtained results will help clarify the relationships within the genus Deschampsia, and can be a basis for the further genetic and biotechnological studies as well as for selection of plants tolerant to extreme habitats.

  18. Molecular Cytogenetic Analysis of Deschampsia antarctica Desv. (Poaceae), Maritime Antarctic.

    PubMed

    Amosova, Alexandra V; Bolsheva, Nadezhda L; Samatadze, Tatiana E; Twardovska, Maryana O; Zoshchuk, Svyatoslav A; Andreev, Igor O; Badaeva, Ekaterina D; Kunakh, Viktor A; Muravenko, Olga V

    2015-01-01

    Deschampsia antarctica Desv. (Poaceae) (2n = 26) is one of the two vascular plants adapted to the harshest environment of the Antarctic. Although the species is a valuable model for study of environmental stress tolerance in plants, its karyotype is still poorly investigated. We firstly conducted a comprehensive molecular cytogenetic analysis of D. antarctica collected on four islands of the Maritime Antarctic. D. antarctica karyotypes were studied by Giemsa C- and DAPI/C-banding, Ag-NOR staining, multicolour fluorescence in situ hybridization with repeated DNA probes (pTa71, pTa794, telomere repeats, pSc119.2, pAs1) and the GAA simple sequence repeat probe. We also performed sequential rapid in situ hybridization with genomic DNA of D. caespitosa. Two chromosome pairs bearing transcriptionally active 45S rDNA loci and five pairs with 5S rDNA sites were detected. A weak intercalary site of telomere repeats was revealed on the largest chromosome in addition to telomere hybridization signals at terminal positions. This fact confirms indirectly the hypothesis that chromosome fusion might have been the cause of the unusual for cereals chromosome number in this species. Based on patterns of distribution of the examined molecular cytogenetic markers, all chromosomes in karyotypes were identified, and chromosome idiograms of D. antarctica were constructed. B chromosomes were found in most karyotypes of plants from Darboux Island. A mixoploid plant with mainly triploid cells bearing a Robertsonian rearrangement was detected among typical diploid specimens from Great Jalour Island. The karyotype variability found in D. antarctica is probably an expression of genome instability induced by environmental stress factors. The differences in C-banding patterns and in chromosome distribution of rDNA loci as well as homologous highly repeated DNA sequences detected between genomes of D. antarctica and its related species D. caespitosa indicate that genome reorganization involving

  19. Molecular Cytogenetic Analysis of Deschampsia antarctica Desv. (Poaceae), Maritime Antarctic

    PubMed Central

    Amosova, Alexandra V.; Bolsheva, Nadezhda L.; Samatadze, Tatiana E.; Twardovska, Maryana O.; Zoshchuk, Svyatoslav A.; Andreev, Igor O.; Badaeva, Ekaterina D.; Kunakh, Viktor A.; Muravenko, Olga V.

    2015-01-01

    Deschampsia antarctica Desv. (Poaceae) (2n = 26) is one of the two vascular plants adapted to the harshest environment of the Antarctic. Although the species is a valuable model for study of environmental stress tolerance in plants, its karyotype is still poorly investigated. We firstly conducted a comprehensive molecular cytogenetic analysis of D. antarctica collected on four islands of the Maritime Antarctic. D. antarctica karyotypes were studied by Giemsa C- and DAPI/C-banding, Ag-NOR staining, multicolour fluorescence in situ hybridization with repeated DNA probes (pTa71, pTa794, telomere repeats, pSc119.2, pAs1) and the GAA simple sequence repeat probe. We also performed sequential rapid in situ hybridization with genomic DNA of D. caespitosa. Two chromosome pairs bearing transcriptionally active 45S rDNA loci and five pairs with 5S rDNA sites were detected. A weak intercalary site of telomere repeats was revealed on the largest chromosome in addition to telomere hybridization signals at terminal positions. This fact confirms indirectly the hypothesis that chromosome fusion might have been the cause of the unusual for cereals chromosome number in this species. Based on patterns of distribution of the examined molecular cytogenetic markers, all chromosomes in karyotypes were identified, and chromosome idiograms of D. antarctica were constructed. B chromosomes were found in most karyotypes of plants from Darboux Island. A mixoploid plant with mainly triploid cells bearing a Robertsonian rearrangement was detected among typical diploid specimens from Great Jalour Island. The karyotype variability found in D. antarctica is probably an expression of genome instability induced by environmental stress factors. The differences in C-banding patterns and in chromosome distribution of rDNA loci as well as homologous highly repeated DNA sequences detected between genomes of D. antarctica and its related species D. caespitosa indicate that genome reorganization involving

  20. Non-isotopic molecular cytogenetics in neuro-oncology.

    PubMed

    Darling, J L; Warr, T J; Ashmore, S M; Luxsuwong, M; Revesz, T

    1997-12-01

    The molecular genetic analysis of brain tumours has been the focus of considerable interest for a number of years. However, these studies have been largely directed towards understanding the fundamental biological processes involved in tumorigenesis and the techniques which have been used require considerable molecular biological skills. Unfortunately, there has not been the impetus to correlate basic biological studies with clinical or neuropathological features. The development of non-isotopic molecular cytogenetic in situ hybridization (ISH) techniques which can be applied to archival tumour material provides an opportunity to address a wide range of neuropathological questions at a genetic level. Identification of specific chromosomes has been made possible by the isolation of probes which recognize the highly repeated sequences present in the centromeric regions of individual chromosomes. Libraries of human chromosome-specific painting probes are also available. A range of probes which bind to the whole or part of specific single copy genes are becoming available. These can be detected with either fluorochromes with different emission colours or with enzymatic detection systems in either interphase nuclei derived from fresh, fixed and embedded tumour samples, touch preparations or smears (so-called 'interphase cytogenetics') as well as conventional metaphase spreads. Comparative genomic hybridization can be used to scan the entire genome for deletions or amplifications without any pre-existing information about the likely locations of these abnormalities or the availability of any specific DNA probes. These techniques can be used to identify aneuploidy or structural alterations in individual chromosomes and are likely to yield important information about the location of genes important in the pathogenesis of brain tumours and may also provide the basis for the refinement of diagnostic or prognostic criteria of these neoplasms.

  1. Cytogenetic biodosimetry using the blood lymphocytes of astronauts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, Kerry A.; Rhone, Jordan; Chappell, Lori J.; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2013-11-01

    Cytogenetic analysis of peripheral blood lymphocytes is the most sensitive and reliable method currently available for in vivo assessment of the biological effects of exposure to radiation and provides the most informative measurement of radiation induced health risks. Data indicates that space missions of a few months or more can induce measureable increases in the yield of chromosome damage in the blood lymphocytes of astronauts that can be used to estimate an organ dose equivalent, and biodosimetry estimates lie within the range expected from physical dosimetry. Space biodosimetry poses some unique challenges compared to terrestrial biological assessments of radiation exposures, but data provides a direct measurement of space radiation damage, which takes into account individual radiosensitivity in the presence of confounding factors such as microgravity and other stress conditions. Moreover if chromosome damage persists in the blood for many years, results can be used for retrospective dose reconstruction. In contrast to physical measurements, which are external to body and require multiple devices to detect all radiation types all of which have poor sensitivity to neutrons, biodosimetry is internal and includes the effects of shielding provided by the body itself plus chromosome damage shows excellent sensitivity to protons, heavy ions, and neutrons. In addition, chromosome damage is reflective of cancer risk and biodosimetry values can therefore be used to validate and develop risk assessment models that can be used to characterize health risk incurred by crewmembers. The current paper presents a review of astronaut biodosimetry data, along with recently derived data on the relative cancer risk estimated using the quantitative approach derived from the European Study Group on Cytogenetic Biomarkers and Health database.

  2. Intercept™ Panel Trap (INT PT) effective in management of forest Coleoptera

    Treesearch

    D. Czokajlo; J. McLaughlin; L. I. Abu Ayyash; S. Teale; J. Wickham; J. Warren; R. Hoffman; B. Aukema; K. Raffa; P. Kirsch

    2003-01-01

    Trap efficacy in capturing economically important forest Coleoptera was measured in field trials comparing the Intercept Panel Trap (INT PT) with the Multi-Funnel Trap. The INT PT was designed to provide a better option for the monitoring of forest Coleoptera. The trap is made of corrugated plastic and is very robust under rigorous field conditions, but still...

  3. 75 FR 32484 - Array-Based Cytogenetic Tests: Questions on Performance Evaluation, Result Reporting and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-08

    ... hybridization (FISH) provide the information about chromosome abnormalities at specific loci. The recent... copy number alterations associated with chromosome abnormalities. Array-based cytogenetic testing is... anomalies, dysmorphic features, developmental disabilities, etc. Traditionally, chromosomes were analyzed...

  4. Cytogenetic abnormalities in follicular dendritic cell sarcoma: report of two cases and literature review.

    PubMed

    Perry, Anamarija M; Nelson, Marilu; Sanger, Warren G; Bridge, Julia A; Greiner, Timothy C

    2013-01-01

    The identification of chromosomal abnormalities in many hematopoietic and mesenchymal neoplasms has contributed significantly to classification systems. Follicular dendritic cell (FDC) sarcoma is an intermediate-grade malignancy with morphological and immunophenotypic features of follicular dendritic cells. Available data on genetic changes in this neoplasm are limited, with only isolated case reports of cytogenetic abnormalities. We reviewed histological, immunophenotypic and cytogenetic findings in two cases of FDC sarcoma. The two cases of FDC sarcoma, were observed in female patients, one was nodal and one extranodal and they exhibited relatively complex karyotypes, characterized by structural abnormalities and loss of multiple chromosomes. One patient had several disease recurrences. At the last follow-up both patients were alive with no residual disease. The cytogenetic findings in these two cases, coupled with the few previously described abnormal karyotypes, suggest that FDC sarcoma is cytogenetically diverse.

  5. Case of extra pulmonary, pleuro-pulmonary blastoma in a child: pathological and cytogenetic findings.

    PubMed

    Kelsey, A M; McNally, K; Birch, J; Mitchell, E L

    1997-07-01

    We report the cytogenetic findings in a case of Pleuro-Pulmonary Blastoma of Childhood Type II. This is a rare intrathoracic tumour that can occur in the lungs with up to 25% of cases being extra pulmonary.

  6. Evolution of human cytogenetics: an encyclopedic essay. III. The second decade after 1956: banding techiques.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, P K; Lucas, F V

    1976-12-01

    Unequivocal establishment of the correct diploid chromosome number in 1956 started the modern era of human cytogenetics. The next impetus came when the peripheral blood leukocyte culture technique for the chromosome preparation was described in 1960. Discovery of special staining procedures - banding techniques - in early seventies not only saved it from early senescence but played decisive roles in broadening the horizons of modern human cytogenetics.

  7. Results of cytogenetic investigation in adolescent patients with primary or secondary amenorrhea.

    PubMed

    Temoçin, K; Vardar, M A; Süleymanova, D; Ozer, E; Tanriverdi, N; Demirhan, O; Kadayifçi, O

    1997-05-01

    A cytogenetic study of 77 adolescent girls with primary or secondary amenorrhea was performed. A pathologic or male karyotype was found in 18 (26.4%) of 68 patients with primary amenorrhea. In 1 (11.1%) of 9 patients with secondary amenorrhea, 46,XX/47,XXX mosaicism was recovered. The importance of the cytogenetic investigations in patients with primary or secondary amenorrhea was discussed.

  8. Cytogenetic and environmental factors in the etiology of the acute leukemias in adults

    SciTech Connect

    Sandler, D.P.; Collman, G.W.

    1987-12-01

    This review focuses on familial and cytogenetic factors and on environmental exposures that play a role in the etiology of the leukemias. Differential prognosis and treatment responses as well as new cytogenetic assays suggest that acute lymphocytic and acute nonlymphocytic leukemias are each comprised of different diseases with similar appearance. Risk factors, including exposure to ionizing radiations, benzene,cigarette smokes, electric currents, antineoplastic agents, petroleum products and pesticides are discussed. 149 references.

  9. Imatinib Mesylate Effectiveness in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia with Additional Cytogenetic Abnormalities at Diagnosis among Black Africans

    PubMed Central

    Aïssata, Tolo Diebkilé; Sawadogo, Duni; Nanho, Clotaire; Kouakou, Boidy; Meité, N'dogomo; Emeuraude, N'Dhatz; Roméo, Ayémou; Yassongui Mamadou, Sekongo; Kouéhion, Paul; Mozart, Konan; Koffi, Gustave; Sanogo, Ibrahima

    2013-01-01

    Imatinib mesylate provides good results in the treatment of CML in general. But what about the results of this treatment in CML associated with additional cytogenetic abnormalities at diagnosis among black Africans? For this, we retrospectively studied 27 cases of CML associated with additional cytogenetic abnormalities, diagnosed in the department of clinical hematology of the University Hospital of Yopougon in Côte d'Ivoire, from May 2005 to October 2011. The age of patients ranged from 13 to 68 years, with a mean age of 38 years and a sex ratio of 2. Patients were severely symptomatic with a high Sokal score of 67%. CML in chronic phase accounted for 67%. The prevalence of additional cytogenetic abnormalities was 29.7%. There were variants of the Philadelphia chromosome (18.5%), trisomy 8 (14.8%), complex cytogenetic abnormalities (18.5%), second Philadelphia chromosome (14.8%), and minor cytogenetic abnormalities (44.4%). Complete hematologic remission was achieved in 59%, with 52% of major cytogenetic remission. The outcome was fatal in 37% of patients. Death was related in 40% to hematologic toxicity and in 30% to acutisation. The median survival was 40 months. PMID:23802015

  10. Integrated cytogenetics and genomics analysis of transposable elements in the Nile tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus.

    PubMed

    Valente, Guilherme; Kocher, Thomas; Eickbush, Thomas; Simões, Rafael P; Martins, Cesar

    2016-06-01

    Integration of cytogenetics and genomics has become essential to a better view of architecture and function of genomes. Although the advances on genomic sequencing have contributed to study genes and genomes, the repetitive DNA fraction of the genome is still enigmatic and poorly understood. Among repeated DNAs, transposable elements (TEs) are major components of eukaryotic chromatin and their investigation has been hindered even after the availability of whole sequenced genomes. The cytogenetic mapping of TEs in chromosomes has proved to be of high value to integrate information from the micro level of nucleotide sequence to a cytological view of chromosomes. Different TEs have been cytogenetically mapped in cichlids; however, neither details about their genomic arrangement nor appropriated copy number are well defined by these approaches. The current study integrates TEs distribution in Nile tilapia Oreochromis niloticus genome based on cytogenetic and genomics/bioinformatics approach. The results showed that some elements are not randomly distributed and that some are genomic dependent on each other. Moreover, we found extensive overlap between genomics and cytogenetics data and that tandem duplication may be the major mechanism responsible for the genomic dynamics of TEs here analyzed. This paper provides insights in the genomic organization of TEs under an integrated view based on cytogenetics and genomics.

  11. Two new species of Scymnini (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) from Karnataka, India.

    PubMed

    Poorani, J

    2015-01-01

    The Scymnini (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) of the Indian region is rich and highly speciose, with nearly 90 described species and scores of undescribed species (Poorani 2002). There is a dire need to systematically revise the genera and species of this tribe from the Indian region. Due to paucity of representative collections covering the entire region and lack of access to types, it is difficult to identify most of the Scymnini of the Indian region to species. As a result, many economically important species remain poorly characterized, or worse, unnamed. Two economically important and unique species of Scymnini (Coccinellidae) belonging to Horniolus Weise (1900) and Scymnus (Pullus) Mulsant (1846) from the Southern Indian state of Karnataka that have remained unnamed for long are treated in this paper. These species are externally similar to other known species and often misidentified. Horniolussororius sp. n. and Scymnus (Pullus) rajeshwariae sp. n. (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) are described here and illustrated with notes on their biology and related species.

  12. A checklist of stag beetles (Coleoptera: Scarabaeoidea: Lucanidae) from Iran.

    PubMed

    Bartolozzi, Luca; Ghahari, Hassan; Sprecher-Uebersax, Eva; Zilioli, Michele

    2014-11-26

    An updated checklist of the Lucanidae (Coleoptera) from Iran is given. New locality records are listed and some dubious distributional records are discussed. Dorcus vavrai Nonfried, 1905 is placed in synonymy with Dorcus peyronis Reiche and Saulcy, 1856 (new synonymy) The female of Lucanus xerxes Král, 2004 is described. A key for the identification of the Iranian stag beetle species is also provided and all the species are figured.

  13. Addition of sargramostim (GM-CSF) to imatinib results in major cytogenetic response in a patient with chronic myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Connor, Rebecca F; Hurd, David; Pettenati, Mark J; Koty, Patrick; Molnár, István

    2006-10-01

    Imatinib mesylate, an inhibitor of BCR/ABL tyrosine kinase, has remarkable activity in chronic myeloid leukemia resulting in an 87% major cytogenetic response. We describe a woman who failed to achieve any cytogenetic response after 2.5 years of imatinib, 400mg daily. When daily sargramostim (GM-CSF) 100 microg/m2 was added, cytogenetic studies revealed a gradual increase in percentage of normal cells from start, 4, 9, and 15 months at 0%, 10%, 55%, and 85%, respectively. She became transfusion independent after starting GM-CSF. The addition of GM-CSF to imatinib resulted in a clinical benefit and a major cytogenetic response in this patient.

  14. Sex- and Size-Related Patterns of Carrion Visitation in Necrodes littoralis (Coleoptera: Silphidae) and Creophilus maxillosus (Coleoptera: Staphylinidae).

    PubMed

    Mądra-Bielewicz, Anna; Frątczak-Łagiewska, Katarzyna; Matuszewski, Szymon

    2016-12-28

    The estimation of postmortem interval (PMI) based on successional patterns of adult insects is largely limited, due to the lack of potential PMI markers. Sex and size of adult insects could be easily used for such estimation. In this study, sex- and size-related patterns of carrion attendance by adult insects were analyzed in Necrodes littoralis (Coleoptera: Silphidae) and Creophilus maxillosus (Coleoptera: Staphylinidae). For both species, abundance of males and females changed similarly during decomposition. A slightly female-biased sex ratio was recorded in N. littoralis. Females of N. littoralis started visiting carcasses, on average, one day earlier than males. There was a rise in size of males of N. littoralis at the end of decomposition, whereas for females of both species and males of C. maxillosus, no size-related patterns of carrion visitation were found. Current results demonstrate that size and sex of adult carrion beetles are poor indicators of PMI.

  15. Cytogenetic analysis of interphase cells using spectral imaging [SIm] technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weier, Heinz-Ulli G.; Smida, Jan; Zitzelsberger, Horst; Lersch, Robert A.; Hung, Jamie; Hsieh, H. B.; Salassidis, K.; McNamara, George; Pedersen, Roger A.; Fung, Jingly

    2000-03-01

    Spectral Imaging (SIm) has dramatically improved our ability to localize and quantitatively analyze multiple nucleic acid targets such as chromosomes, genes and gene transcripts. Studies on metaphase cells such as `Spectral Karyotyping' are less complicated than interphase cell studies because the objects (chromosomes) are spatially separated and ratio- labeled probes can be used to uniquely stain each chromosome type. Our research, however, targets the extensive cytogenetic and phenotypic analysis of interphase cells. The complex organization of interphase chromatin and co- localization of gene transcripts (RNAs) in nuclear or cytoplasmic domains requires unique fluorochrome-labeling for each nucleic acid target. An increasing number of commercially available dyes for probe labeling and software to deconvolute partially overlapping emission spectra has helped to overcome most of these obstacles. This presentation summarizes our experience in analyzing numerical and structural alterations in various human cell types (leukocytes, amniocytes, blastomeres or solid tissue) as well as our approach to multi-gene expression profiling using SIm. Examples illustrate a wide spectrum of groundbreaking techniques for interphase cell analysis. We demonstrate how ten or more chromosomes can be scored in interphase nuclei or the relative level of expression of different transforming RNAs in tumor cells can be measured by SIm.

  16. Comparative Cytogenetics of the Congo African Grey Parrot (Psittacus erithacus).

    PubMed

    Seibold-Torres, Cassandra; Owens, Elaine; Chowdhary, Renuka; Ferguson-Smith, Malcolm A; Tizard, Ian; Raudsepp, Terje

    2015-01-01

    The Congo African grey parrot (Psittacus erithacus, PER) is an endemic species of Central Africa, valued for its intelligence and listed as vulnerable due to poaching and habitat destruction. Improved knowledge about the P. erithacus genome is needed to address key biological questions and conservation of this species. The P. erithacus genome was studied using conventional and molecular cytogenetic approaches including Zoo-FISH. P. erithacus has a 'typical' parrot karyotype with 2n = 62-64 and 8 pairs of macrochromosomes. A distinct feature was a sharp macro-microchromosome boundary. Telomeric sequences were present at all chromosome ends and interstitially in PER2q, the latter coinciding with a C-band. NORs mapped to 4 pairs of microchromosomes which is in contrast to a single NOR in ancestral type avian karyotypes. Zoo-FISH with chicken macrochromosomes GGA1-9 and Z revealed patterns of conserved synteny similar to many other avian groups, though neighboring synteny combinations of GGA6/7, 8/9, and 1/4 were distinctive only to parrots. Overall, P. erithacus shared more Zoo-FISH patterns with neotropical macaws than Australian species such as cockatiel and budgerigar. The observations suggest that Psittaciformes karyotypes have undergone more extensive evolutionary rearrangements compared to the majority of other avian genomes. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. Molecular cytogenetic characterization of the Amazon River dolphin Inia geoffrensis.

    PubMed

    Bonifácio, Heidi L; da Silva, Vera M F; Martin, Anthony R; Feldberg, Eliana

    2012-09-01

    Classical and molecular cytogenetic (18S rDNA, telomeric sequence, and LINE-1 retrotransposon probes) studies were carried out to contribute to an understanding of the organization of repeated DNA elements in the Amazon River dolphin (boto, Inia geoffrensis). Twenty-seven specimens were examined, each presenting 2n = 44 chromosomes, the karyotype formula 12m + 14sm + 6st + 10t + XX/XY, and fundamental number (FN) = 74. C-positive heterochromatin was observed in terminal and interstitial positions, with the occurrence of polymorphism. Interstitial telomeric sequences were not observed. The nucleolar organizer region (NOR) was located at a single site on a smallest autosomal pair. LINE-1 was preferentially distributed in the euchromatin regions, with the greatest accumulation on the X chromosome. Although the karyotype structure in cetaceans is considered to be conserved, the boto karyotype demonstrated significant variations in its formula, heterochromatin distribution, and the location of the NOR compared to other cetacean species. These results contribute to knowledge of the chromosome organization in boto and to a better understanding of karyoevolution in cetaceans.

  18. Cytogenetic Analysis for Suspected Chromosomal Abnormalities; A Five Years Experience

    PubMed Central

    Karra, Vijay Kumar; Jindal, Ankur; Puppala, Madhavi; Singh, Pratiksha; Rawat, Kanchan; Kapoor, Seema

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Chromosomal abnormalities are the results of alterations in the number or structure of chromosomes causing significant human morbidity and mortality. They are responsible for a large proportion of miscarriages, developmental delay, disorders of sexual development, congenital malformations and mental retardation. Aim The aim of this study was to describe the prevalence of different chromosomal abnormalities in North Indian patients referred for cytogenetic analysis. Materials and Methods Total of 859 patients ranging from newborn to 37 years of age were referred to the division of genetics, Department of Paediatrics between 2010 and 2015, with a variety of clinical disorders; Down syndrome (DS), Turner’s syndrome (TS) and Klinefelter syndrome; amenorrhea; ambiguous sex and multiple congenital malformations. Chromosomal analysis was performed on lymphocyte culture according to standard methods. Results Of the 859 cases studied, 371 (43.1%) had chromosomal abnormalities. The most common autosomal abnormalities were DS 302 (81.4%) and sex chromosomal abnormalities were TS 51 (13.7%). Numerical abnormalities were accounted for 353 (41.0%) and structural abnormalities 18 (2.0%), respectively. Various other chromosomal anomalies were also reported. Conclusion We have reviewed the incidence and distribution of chromosomal abnormalities and found higher rate of chromosomal abnormalities 43.1% in the referred cases. Our data suggest that chromosomal analysis is important tool in the evaluation of genetic disorders and helps clinicians to provide accurate diagnosis and proper genetic counselling. PMID:27790464

  19. Cytogenetic analysis in Rothmund-Thomson syndrome with osteosarcoma

    SciTech Connect

    Amar, M.; Sutphen, R.; Kousseff, B.G.

    1994-09-01

    Rothmund-Thomson syndrome (RTS) is a rare autosomal recessive condition of poikiloderma, erythema, depigmentation, hyperpigmentation, musculoskeletal abnormalities and abnormalities of hair, teeth and nails. Osteogenic sacoma has been reported in 8 patients. Abnormal chromosome studies have been reported in only two patients. Chromosome analysis of tumor or bone marrow has not been reported. We performed cytogenetic studies on a patient with Rothmund-Thomson syndrome and osteogenic sarcoma. Analysis of peripheral lymphocytes revealed 46, XX karyotype by GTW banding. Both spontaneous and chemically-induced chromosome breakage (0.35 and 0.8 breaks/cell) were increased but not significantly different from the age-matched control levels (0.05 and 0.25 breaks/cell). Analysis of mitogen-stimulated bone marrow by Giemsa banding showed slightly increased aneuploidy (20% of cells with random loss of 1 to 5 chromosomes each) and non-specific chromatid despiralization. All 34 cells analyzed from the tumor had normal diploid karyotype, 46.XX. Five of 40 cells derived from skin of the amputated right leg were hyperdiploid with karyotype 47, XX, +7. Skin from the right forearm showed normal karyotype, 46,XX. These results suggest that RTS is associated with chromosomal rearrangement causing acquired somatic mosaicism, including trisomy 7 anomalies. These abnormalities may aid in the diagnosis of RTS and provide clues to the location of the causative gene(s).

  20. Molecular cytogenetic characterization of a human thyroid cancercell line

    SciTech Connect

    Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.; Tuton, Tiffany B.; Ito, Yuko; Chu, LisaW.; Lu, Chung-Mei; Baumgartner, Adolf; Zitzelsberger, Horst F.; Weier,Jingly F.

    2006-01-04

    The incidence of papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) increases significantly after exposure of the head and neck region to ionizing radiation, yet we know neither the steps involved in malignant transformation of thyroid epithelium nor the specific carcinogenic mode of action of radiation. Such increased tumor frequency became most evident in children after the 1986 nuclear accident in Chernobyl, Ukraine. In the twelve years following the accident, the average incidence of childhood PTCs (chPTC) increased over one hundred-fold compared to the rate of about 1 tumor incidence per 10{sup 6} children per year prior to 1986. To study the etiology of radiation-induced thyroid cancer, we formed an international consortium to investigate chromosomal changes and altered gene expression in cases of post-Chernobyl chPTC. Our approach is based on karyotyping of primary cultures established from chPTC specimens, establishment of cell lines and studies of genotype-phenotype relationships through high resolution chromosome analysis, DNA/cDNA micro-array studies, and mouse xenografts that test for tumorigenicity. Here, we report the application of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH)-based techniques for the molecular cytogenetic characterization of a highly tumorigenic chPTC cell line, S48TK, and its subclones. Using chromosome 9 rearrangements as an example, we describe a new approach termed ''BAC-FISH'' to rapidly delineate chromosomal breakpoints, an important step towards a better understanding of the formation of translocations and their functional consequences.

  1. Cytogenetic characteristics of herbicide production workers in Ufa.

    PubMed

    Kaioumova, D F; Khabutdinova, L Kh

    1998-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated the effect of dioxin-containing products on the cytogenetic characteristics of peripheral blood lymphocytes of herbicide plant workers in Ufa. We found that the mean incidence of cells with chromosomal abberations (CHA) was two fold higher in the herbicide plant workers than the mean incidence level of controls groups consisting of people with no professional contact to herbicides or hospital stuff working in the close vicinity of the herbicide plant in Ufa (for both cases: p < 0.05). Moreover, the mean CHA cell incidence in the controls groups was also two times higher than the average level of spontaneous abberations in humans. The chemical herbicides 2,4,5-trichlorphenol (2,4,5-T) and 2,4-dichlorophenoxiacetic acid (2,4-D) appeared to affect various cellular cycle phases. Chromosomal type abberations occurred in the G0 stage of cellular cycle and chromatic type aberrations in the G2 stage. In the S stage, the aberrations of both types were observed. Our results indicate that the herbicides 2,4,5-T and 2,4-D have mutagenic effects in humans.

  2. Prenatal identification of i(Yp) by molecular cytogenetic analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, B.T.; Peng, W.; Williams, J. III

    1994-09-01

    An isochromosome derived from the short arm of the Y chromosome, i(Yp), is a rare marker chromosome. Its de novo presence prenatally represents a diagnostic dilemna since its impact on fetal development is difficult to predict. We present a case of 46,X,+i(Yp) de novo detected in an amniotic fluid specimen received for karyotype analysis. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) studies using a panel of Y-specific biotinylated DNA probes including a Y-centromere probe, a Y whole chromosome painting probe, and a lambda HAM2 probe containing 19 kb of AMG-Y sequence, located to Yp11.2, have identified the marker chromosome as i(Yp). The breakpoint on this marker chromosome is tentatively assigned to Yq11.1 which is close to the centromere. The present report illustrates the importance of FISH techniques as a complement to cytogenetic methods for accurate identification of chromosome rearrangements in prenatal diagnosis and genetic counseling.

  3. [Cat-eye syndrome. Clinical and cytogenetical differentialdiagnosis (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Kunze, J; Tolksdorf, M; Wiedemann, H R

    1975-01-01

    We report a 5 1/2-year-old girl whose clinical symptoms are consistent with diagnosis of the cat-eye syndrome. The prominent symptoms are: anal stenosis, preauricular tags and pits, coloboma of the iris, doubling of the pelvis and ureter on both sides, vesicourethral reflux on the right side and normal mental development. Leucocyte alkaline phosphatase is normal. Chromosomal analysis shows a supernumerary submetacentric chromosome. This extra chromosome is smaller than the G-group chromosomes and has satellites on the short and long arms. Autoradiography after 3H-thymidine incorporation shows a late-labeling marker chromosome. After using the Giemsa-banding technique, the chromatides demonstrate dark bandings with only soft, unstained satellites. With the fluorescence method, one can see spotlike fluorescence of the satellites on both arms and diffuse fluorescence of the hetero-chromatic segments. In addition, the C-bandings demonstrate a homogeneous dark staining of the chromatids, but we did not find stained satellites. Using the Giemsa-11 technique one can see the 47th chromosome with predominantly heterochromatic parts, but small euchromatic segments are visible between them. Satellites are unstained. Using currently accepted cytogenetical methods, it is not possible to identify the origin of this supernumerary marker chromosome.

  4. Cytogenetic and molecular studies of down syndrome individual with leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, J.J.; Hassold, T.J.; Williams, B.J.; Zupursky, A.; Doyle, J.; Sherman, S.L.; Jacobs, P.A.; Shugar, A.L.; Soukup, S.W.

    1995-04-01

    There is an increased risk of leukemia in Down syndrome (DS) patients, with estimates ranging from 14 to 30 times the incidence rate observed for chromosomally normal children. Furthermore, one type of leukemia, called {open_quotes}transient leukemia{close_quotes} (TL), occurs almost exclusively in DS infants. The basis of the association between DS and leukemia is unknown, but we and others have hypothesized that it may be influenced by the mechanism of origin of the extra chromosome. Therefore, we initiated a cytogenetic and molecular study of nondisjunction in leukemic DS individuals. To date, we have obtained blood and/or tissue samples from 55 individuals consisting of 17 cases with TL, 7 cases of acute nonlymphocytic leukemia subtype M7 (ANLL-M7, or acute megakaryoblastic leukemia, postulated to be related to TL), and 31 cases of other forms of leukemia. Analysis of these cases suggests differences between DS children with TL and those with other types of leukemia or DS individuals with no history of leukemia. Specifically, the TL and ANLL-M7 cases have a highly significant increase in the frequency of {open_quotes}atypical{close_quotes} constitutional karyotypes (i.e., mosaic trisomies, rings, and/or isochromosomes) and are almost always male. Additionally, genetic mapping studies suggest an increase in the frequency of disomic homozygosity, especially in proximal 21q, in DS individuals with TL and ANLL-M7. 19 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  5. Intercomparison in Cytogenetic Dosimetry among 22 Laboratories in China

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jian Xiang; Pan, Yan; Ruan, Jian Lei; Piao, Chunnan; Su, Xu

    2016-01-01

    As part of a regional International Atomic Energy Agency-coordinated research project with the support from the National Health and Family Planning Commission of China, 22 laboratories participated in the intercomparison in cytogenetic dosimetry in China. Slides for chromosomal aberrations were prepared by the Department of Radiation Epidemiology, National Institute for Radiological Protection, which organized the exercise. Slides were sent to the other participating laboratories through Express Mail Service. For estimates of dose, each laboratory scored the frequency of dicentrics plus centric rings chromosomes. The whole blood samples were irradiated with 60Co γ-rays (1.3 Gy, 2.4 Gy and 1.5 Gy, 2.6 Gy). Each laboratory got one group of the slides. Ten of the 44 estimates of dose fell within ±5% of the true physical dose, 12 fell within ±5–10%, 9 fell within ±10–15%, 12 fell within ±15–20%, while only one sample fell ± >20%. The evaluation of the respective dose was achieved by 21 laboratories. PMID:28217282

  6. Cytogenetic analysis of the third chromosome heterochromatin of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed Central

    Koryakov, Dmitry E; Zhimulev, Igor F; Dimitri, Patrizio

    2002-01-01

    Previous cytological analysis of heterochromatic rearrangements has yielded significant insight into the location and genetic organization of genes mapping to the heterochromatin of chromosomes X, Y, and 2 of Drosophila melanogaster. These studies have greatly facilitated our understanding of the genetic organization of heterochromatic genes. In contrast, the 12 essential genes known to exist within the mitotic heterochromatin of chromosome 3 have remained only imprecisely mapped. As a further step toward establishing a complete map of the heterochomatic genetic functions in Drosophila, we have characterized several rearrangements of chromosome 3 by using banding techniques at the level of mitotic chromosome. Most of the rearrangement breakpoints were located in the dull fluorescent regions h49, h51, and h58, suggesting that these regions correspond to heterochromatic hotspots for rearrangements. We were able to construct a detailed cytogenetic map of chromosome 3 heterochromatin that includes all of the known vital genes. At least 7 genes of the left arm (from l(3)80Fd to l(3)80Fj) map to segment h49-h51, while the most distal genes (from l(3)80Fa to l(3)80Fc) lie within the h47-h49 portion. The two right arm essential genes, l(3)81Fa and l(3)81Fb, are both located within the distal h58 segment. Intriguingly, a major part of chromosome 3 heterochromatin was found to be "empty," in that it did not contain either known genes or known satellite DNAs. PMID:11861557

  7. Cytogenetic and molecular profile of endometrial stromal sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Micci, Francesca; Gorunova, Ludmila; Agostini, Antonio; Johannessen, Lene E; Brunetti, Marta; Davidson, Ben; Heim, Sverre; Panagopoulos, Ioannis

    2016-11-01

    Recent cytogenetic and molecular investigations have improved our understanding of endometrial stromal tumors, including sarcomas (ESS), and helped redefine their classification into more pathogenetically meaningful categories. Because much more can be gained through such studies, we add information on another 22 ESS examined by karyotyping, PCR analysis, expression array analysis, and transcriptome sequencing. In spite of the known preference for certain pathogenetic pathways, we found considerable genetic heterogeneity in high-grade (HG) as well as in low-grade (LG) ESS. Not all HG tumors showed a YWHAE-NUTM chimeric transcript and as many as six LGESS showed no hitherto known ESS-related fusions. Among the transcripts identified by transcriptome sequencing and verified by Sanger sequencing, new variants of ZC3H7-BCOR and its reciprocal BCOR-ZC3H7 were identified as was involvement of the CREBBP and MLLT4 genes (both well known leukemia-related genes) in two new fusions. FISH analysis identified a known EPC1-PHF1 fusion which led to the identification of a new variant at the molecular level. The fact that around 70 genes were found differentially expressed, by microarray analysis, when comparing LGESS showing ESS-related fusions with LGESS without such transcripts, underscores the biochemical importance of the observed genetic heterogeneity and hints that new subgroups/entities in LGESS still remain undiscovered. © 2016 The Authors. Genes, Chromosomes & Cancer Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. [Benefit of human gamete cytogenetics: results and perspectives].

    PubMed

    Vialard, F; Pellestor, F

    2008-09-01

    In man, the incidence of reproductive failures is high and chromosomal abnormalities remains the major cause of pregnancy wastage. The advent of molecular cytogenetic techniques and assisted reproduction technology have brought forth new approaches for the chromosomal analysis of human oocytes and spermatozoa. The oocyte analyses have evidenced the high rate of chromosomal abnormalities in women and identified premature separation of sister chromatid as a major mechanism in aneuploidy occurrence. High frequencies of aneuploidy have been found in various groups of women, such as patients over 35 or 38 years old, patients with recurrent implantation failures or recurrent miscarriages. The polar body analysis has confirmed the major contribution of premature separation of sister chromatids in aneuploidies and the effect of maternal ageing on its occurrence. In spermatozoa, the efficient adaptation of in situ chromosomal detection techniques has facilitated the segregation analysis of chromosomal abnormalities. Despite the consensus observed in sperm studies of robertsonnian translocations and inversions, new data are required for accurate estimates of imbalances in various types of structural rearrangements. For infertile patients with normal karyotypes, there is significant increase in aneuploidy frequencies, which can be extremely elevated in some groups of subjects, such as patients with large headed spermatozoa syndrome.

  9. [Cytogenetic studies of human lymphocytes under the influence of oxicams].

    PubMed

    Kullich, W; Hermann, J; Klein, G

    1990-01-01

    The influence of the oxicams, a special group of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, to the sister chromatid exchange (SCE) was determined on human lymphocytes in vitro and in vivo. The analysis of SCE is a sensitive parameter indicating chromosomal damage. The cytogenetic examinations of Lornoxicam, Tenoxicam, and Piroxicam in vitro showed no influence on the SCE frequencies in therapeutic dosages. With addition of mitomycin C (MMC) to the cultures (a method which simulates an additional genotoxic stress) we found significant higher SCE rates in connection with the oxicams than in controls without an oxicam. A 14-day treatment with Tenoxicam and Lornoxicam changed the spontaneous SCE rates in vivo; Piroxicam did not. The raised SCE levels could indicate an antimutagenic effect of the oxicams if the repair of DNA damages is transferred to a more perfect pathway; however by an overloading of the repair, due to additional genotoxic factors (such as cytostatics, cigarette smoking, x-ray exposure) therapy with oxicams could point out a genotoxic risk.

  10. Molecular cytogenetics of the california condor: evolutionary and conservation implications.

    PubMed

    Modi, W S; Romanov, M; Green, E D; Ryder, O

    2009-01-01

    Evolutionary cytogenetic comparisons involved 5 species of birds (California condor, chicken, zebra finch, collared flycatcher and black stork) belonging to divergent taxonomic orders. Seventy-four clones from a condor BAC library containing 80 genes were mapped to condor chromosomes using FISH, and 15 clones containing 16 genes were mapped to the stork Z chromosome. Maps for chicken and finch were derived from genome sequence databases, and that for flycatcher from the published literature. Gene content and gene order were highly conserved when individual condor, chicken, and zebra finch autosomes were compared, confirming that these species largely retain karyotypes close to the ancestral condition for neognathous birds. However, several differences were noted: zebra finch chromosomes 1 and 1A are homologous to condor and chicken chromosomes 1, the CHUNK1 gene appears to have transposed on condor chromosome 1, condor chromosomes 4 and 9 and zebra finch chromosomes 4 and 4A are homologous to chicken chromosome arms 4q and 4p, and novel inversions on chromosomes 4, 12 and 13 were found. Condor and stork Z chromosome gene orders are collinear and differentiated by a series of inversions/transpositions when compared to chicken, zebra finch, or flycatcher; phylogenetic analyses suggest independent rearrangement along the chicken, finch, and flycatcher lineages.

  11. Comparative cytogenetics of tapirs, genus tapirus (Perissodactyla, tapiridae).

    PubMed

    Houck, M L; Kingswood, S C; Kumamoto, A T

    2000-01-01

    Chromosomes of the four species of Tapirus were 2n = 52 in T. indicus, 2n = 76 in T. pinchaque, 2n = 80 in T. bairdii, and 2n = 80 in T. terrestris. The number of autosomal arms was 80-94. G-banded karyotypes indicated that a heterochromatic addition/deletion distinguished chromosomes 2 and 3 of T. bairdii and T. pinchaque, respectively. There were at least 13 conserved autosomes between the karyotypes of T. bairdii and T. terrestris, and at least 15 were conserved between T. bairdii and T. pinchaque. In G- and C-banded preparations, the X chromosomes of T. bairdii, T. indicus, and T. terrestris were identical, whereas the X chromosome of T. pinchaque differed from the X of the other species by a heterochromatic addition/deletion. The Y chromosome was a medium-sized to small acrocentric in T. bairdii, T. indicus, and T. pinchaque, but it was not positively identified in T. terrestris. There appeared to be fewer homologies between T. indicus and the three species occurring in Central and South America. Future cytogenetic studies of tapirs from the entire range of each of the four species might provide additional insight into their evolutionary biology and aid wildlife conservation efforts aimed at these threatened mammals.

  12. Molecular cytogenetic mapping of Humulus lupulus sex chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Divashuk, M G; Alexandrov, O S; Kroupin, P Yu; Karlov, G I

    2011-01-01

    Dioecy is relatively rare in plants and sex determination systems vary among such species. A good example of a plant with heteromorphic sex chromosomes is hop (Humulus lupulus). The genotypes carrying XX or XY chromosomes correspond to female and male plants, respectively. Until now no clear cytogenetic markers for the sex chromosomes of hop have been established. Here, for the first time the sex chromosomes of hop are clearly identified and characterized. The high copy sequence of hop (HSR1) has been cloned and localized on chromosomes by fluorescence in situ hybridization. The HSR1 repeat has shown subtelomeric location on autosomes with the same intensity of the signal. The signal has been present in the subtelomeric region of the long arm and in the near-centromeric region but absent in the telomeric region of the short arm of the X chromosome. At the same time the signal has been found in the telomeric region only of the long arm of the Y chromosome. This finding indicates that the sex chromosomes of hop have evolved from a pair of autosomes via ancient translocation or inversion. The observation of the meiotic configuration of the sex bivalents shows the location of a pseudoautosomal region on the long arms of X and Y chromosomes.

  13. [Cytogenetic features of teenage girls with secondary amenorrhea].

    PubMed

    Nachetova, T A; Nefidova, V E

    2014-11-01

    Some features of the chromosome apparatus status were studied in 25 adolescent girls, aged 14-18, with secondary amenorrhea and in 29 girls of the same age with a regular menstrual cycle. Materials for cytogenetic analysis were preparations of chromosomes at the stage of metaphase obtained from the culture of the peripheral blood lymphocytes. The technique of the culture preparation was carried out according to the standard method. 2225 metaphase plates were analyzed in girls with secondary amenorrhea, and 2603 plates were tested in their healthy age-mates. An increased total level of chromosomal aberrations and a rise in the frequency of disorders in the chromatid, chromosome and genome types of peripheral blood lymphocytes have been registered in the examined persons as compared with their healthy age-mates. We have shown, that polyploid cell registered in 15 times oftener in adolescent girls with SA as compared with healthy girls. It can be assumed that some marked changes in the frequency of chromosomal aberrations in patients with secondary amenorrhea and in their healthy age-mates may arise both as a result of exposure to the multiple environmental factors and disorders of rather complicated processes of DNA damages reparation.

  14. Cytogenetic and molecular changes in leukemia among atomic bomb survivors.

    PubMed

    Kamada, N; Tanaka, K; Oguma, N; Mabuchi, K

    1991-12-01

    Seventy five radiation-related leukemia patients in Hiroshima including 16 patients exposed to more than one Gray were cytogenetically examined. Statistical analysis of data on the frequencies of chromosomal aberrations in the survivor groups according to bone marrow doses by DS86 estimation revealed that the heavily exposed group tended to have significantly higher aberration rates compared to the non-exposed group. Furthermore, the chromosomal aberrations in the survivors were observed to be of a more complex nature and had the characteristic findings of secondary leukemia. These observations therefore suggest that patients with a history of heavy exposure to atomic bomb radiation had leukemic cells originating from a stem cell which had been damaged by irradiation at the time of the bombing as well as cells involved in complex chromosome abnormalities. Molecular biologic studies on ras genes in acute and chronic leukemias and the bcr gene in chronic myelocytic leukemia were performed in exposed and non-exposed groups. So far, no distinctive differences have been observed in the frequency and sites of point mutations in N- and K-ras genes or in the rearrangement of the bcr gene. Further, retrospective analysis using DNA from leukemia patients who developed this disease in the early period from atomic bomb radiation exposure would be useful for the elucidation of the mechanisms of radiation-induced leukemia.

  15. Human sperm cytogenetics and the one-cell zygote

    SciTech Connect

    Brandriff, B.F.; Gordon, L.A.

    1989-11-27

    Human reproductive wastage is known to be a common event. One major cause of embryonic and fetal losses is chromosomal aberrations, identified by karyotyping spontaneous abortion material and in vitro fertilized human embryos. Karyotyping of human gametes has made it possible to document types and frequencies of chromosomal aberrations directly in eggs and sperm themselves. Our studies with human sperm from normal, healthy men support the view that chromosome-specific aneuploidy does in fact occur, and that frequencies of structural chromosomal aberrations appear to be person specific and stable over time. The types of structural aberrations identified suggest that normal human spermiogenesis may be vulnerable to breakage events or precursor lesions leading to such breakage events. After entry into egg cytoplasm and preceding the formation of first-cleavage mitotic chromosomes, the male as well as the female genome replicate their DNA in a pattern qualitatively similar to that in somatic cells. However, at present it is not known what relationship exists between spontaneous chromosome breaks seen at first cleavage and DNA replication activities. Limited data on survivors of radiotherapy lend support to the view that long-term effects on sperm chromosomal integrity can be identified. Studies on sperm cytogenetics thus have the potential for identifying adverse environmental effects on human spermatogenesis as monitored by this well-defined endpoint. 32 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Cytogenetic study in workers occupationally exposed to mercury fulminate.

    PubMed

    Anwar, W A; Gabal, M S

    1991-05-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the cytogenetic effects in male workers exposed to mercury fulminate. A total of 29 male workers and 29 age- and sex-matched controls were examined. The mean mercury level in urine from the exposed workers was 123.2 +/- 54.1 micrograms/l compared with 39.2 +/- 11.1 micrograms/l in the control group. The difference was statistically significant (P less than 0.001). Metaphase chromosomes were studied. Micronucleated peripheral blood lymphocytes were also analyzed in cytochalasin B blocked binucleated lymphocytes. The percentage of metaphases with chromosomal aberrations was significantly higher (P less than 0.001) in the exposed group (6.1 +/- 2.3) compared to the control group (2.8 +/- 0.7). The chromosomal aberrations detected were in the form of gaps, breaks and fragments. A significant increase in the incidence of micronucleated lymphocytes was found among the exposed group (7.1 +/- 4.2) compared to the control group (5.4 +/- 2.2) (P less than 0.01). The detected chromosomal damage correlated neither with the duration of exposure nor with the urinary mercury level.

  17. Cytogenetic studies in Brazilian marine Sciaenidae and Sparidae fishes (Perciformes).

    PubMed

    Accioly, I V; Molina, W F

    2008-04-22

    Fishes from the families Sciaenidae and Sparidae, the former comprising coastal species associated with shallow waters on the continental shelf and the latter composed of typically marine species, are of significant economic value. Karyotypic data are available for about 20% of the total number of species in these groups. In the present study, cytogenetic analyses were carried out in three Sciaenidae species, Menticirrhus americanus, Ophioscion punctatissimus and Pareques acuminatus, as well as in the sparid fish, Archosargus probatocephalus, using conventional staining (Giemsa) and Ag-nucleolar organizer regions (NORs) and C-banding techniques. The diploid values (2n) and number of chromosome arms were equal to 48 in all species analyzed. NORs were located at pericentromeric positions, equivalent to large heterochromatic blocks, in M. americanus (1st pair), O. punctatissimus (10th pair), P. acuminatus (2nd pair), and A. probatocephalus (3rd pair). Heterochromatin was detected at the centromeric position in most chromosome pairs, being more conspicuous among Scianidae members. The remarkable karyotypic conservativeness detected in these species is similar to that observed in other perciform groups previously studied, regarding both the number of acrocentric chromosomes and NOR location. However, unusual events of heterochromatinization seem to have taken place along the karyotypic evolution of members of the family Sciaenidae. For the family Sparidae, distinct cytotypes between samples of Northeast Brazil and those previously analyzed on the southeastern coast were identified, suggesting that putative biogeographic barriers could be present throughout both regions on South Atlantic coast.

  18. Cytogenetic Analysis of a Pseudoangiomatous Pleomorphic/Spindle Cell Lipoma.

    PubMed

    Panagopoulos, Ioannis; Gorunova, Ludmila; Lobmaier, Ingvild; Andersen, Hege Kilen; Bjerkehagen, Bodil; Heim, Sverre

    2017-05-01

    Pseudoangiomatous pleomorphic/spindle cell lipoma is a rare subtype of pleomorphic/spindle cell lipoma. Only approximately 20 such tumors have been described. Genetic information on pseudoangiomatous pleomorphic/spindle cell lipoma is restricted to a single case in which deletion of the forkhead box O1 (FOXO1) gene was found, using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). G-banding and FISH analyses were performed on a pseudoangiomatous pleomorphic/spindle cell lipoma. G-banding of tumor cells showed complex karyotypic changes including loss of chromosome 13. FISH analysis revealed that the deleted region contained the RB1 gene (13q14.2) and the part of chromosome arm 13q (q14.2-q14.3) in which spans the TRIM13 gene, the two non-coding RNA genes, DLEU1 and DLEU2, and the genetic markers RH44686 and D13S25. Several acquired genomic aberrations were found in the tumor. Among them was loss of chromosome 13 material. Results confirm the (cyto)genetic similarity between pseudoangiomatous pleomorphic/spindle cell lipoma and spindle cell lipomas. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  19. Cytogenetic characteristics of cell lines from Ixodes scapularis (Acari: Ixodidae).

    PubMed

    Chen, C; Munderloh, U G; Kurtti, T J

    1994-05-01

    Three new cell lines, IDE8 and IDE12 from embryos of northern specimens of Ixodes scapularis Say and ISE18 from southern specimens of I. scapularis, were compared cytogenetically via conventional karyotyping, C- and G-banding, and nucleolar organizing regions (NORs). The karyotypes were very similar. The standard karyotype in the three cell lines consisted of 28 chromosomes with 26 autosomes and XX (female) or XY (male) sex chromosomes. The X chromosome was the largest, and the Y chromosome the smallest chromosome of the karyotype. Constitutive heterochromatin (C-bands) was almost entirely restricted to the centromeric region. An additional interstitial C-band in chromosome 7 was an important notable characteristic of the three cell lines. In sets showing a similar degree of condensation, individual chromosomes of the three lines had identical G-banding patterns. In addition, there was no difference among the cells in number and position of NORs. There were approximately 100 G-bands per haploid set in chromosomes from cells in metaphase, with three to 18 G-bands in each chromosome arm. After staining with silver nitrate, interstitial NORs were identified in chromosomes 7, 10, and the X chromosome. Male cells had five and female cells had six NORs. These findings support the notion that I. scapularis and I. dammini Spielman et al. are conspecific.

  20. LARALink: a web application for cytogenetic linkage analysis.

    PubMed

    Fayz, B; Moldenhauer, J S; Wang, D; Zhao, C; Yao, B; Liu, D; Weinsheimer, S; Gardner, L; Johnson, A; Womble, D D; Krawetz, S A

    2005-04-01

    Genomic and expression data have increased dramatically over the last several years. This is primarily due to the completion of the human genome project as well as an upsurge in the use of various high-throughput technologies. Recent attempts to correlate genomic and expression data have stimulated the scientific community to determine how this data can be used within a clinical setting (P Khatri et al., Genomics 2002: 79: 266; LJ van't Veer et al., Nature 2002: 415: 530). LARALink (Loci Analysis for Rearrangements Link) is a database-driven web application that utilizes several public datasets to analyze clinical cytogenetic data to identify candidate genes. LARALink allows UniGene clusters or single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) to be queried for multiple patients by cytoband, chromosome marker, or base pair. The results can be further refined with the use of an anatomical site, developmental stage, pathology, or cell-type expression filter. Once a set of UniGene clusters (expressed genes) has been identified either for a single patient or for a shared region among multiple patients, the expression-distribution profile, expressed sequence tags (ESTs), or online mendelian inheritance in man (OMIM) entries are displayed. The utility of this tool is shown by its application to both research and clinical medicine. LARALink is a public resource available at: http://www.laralink.bioinformatics.wayne.edu:8080/unigene.

  1. [Future aspect of cytogenetics using chromosomal microarray testing].

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Toshiyuki

    2014-01-01

    With the advent of chromosomal microarray testing, microdeletions can be detected in approximately 17% of cases without any abnormality detectable by conventional karyotyping. Structural abnormalities frequently occur at the terminal regions of the chromosomes, called the subtelomeres, because of their structural features. Subtelomere deletions and unbalanced translocations between chromosomes are frequently observed. However, most microdeletions observed by chromosomal microarray testing are microdeletions in intermediate regions. Submicroscopic duplications reciprocal to the deletions seen in the microdeletion syndromes, such as the 16p11.2 region, have been revealed. Discovery of multi-hit chromosomal abnormalities is another achievement by chromosomal microarray testing. Chromosomal microarray testing can determine the ranges of chromosomal structural abnormalities at a DNA level. Thus, the effects of a specific gene deletion on symptoms can be revealed by comparing multiple patients with slightly different chromosomal deletions in the same region (genotype/phenotype correlation). Chromosomal microarray testing comprehensively determines the genomic copy number, but reveals no secondary structure, requiring verification by cytogenetics using FISH. To interpret the results, familial or benign copy number variations (CNV) should be taken into consideration. An appropriate system should be constructed to provide opportunities of chromosomal microarray testing for patients who need this examination and to facilitate the use of results for medical practice.

  2. [Cytogenetic, molecular cytogenetic, clinical and genealogical study of mothers of children with autism: a search for family genetic markers of autistic disorders].

    PubMed

    Vorsanova, S G; Voinova, V Iu; Iurov, I Iu; Kurinnaia, O S; Demidova, I A; Iurov, Iu B

    2009-01-01

    Using modern cytogenetic and molecular cytogenetic techniques towards the study of human chromosomes, an analysis of chromosomal abnormalities/chromosomal variations as well as clinical and genealogical data in mothers of children with autism has been performed. It has been shown that mothers of autistic children exhibit an increased incidence of chromosomal abnormalities (mainly mosaic forms involving chromosome X) and an increased occurrence of chromosomal variations compared to controls. The analysis of genotype-phenotype correlations revealed the increase in the frequency of cognitive disturbances and spontaneous abortions in mothers of children with autism as well as the higher frequency of mental retardation, early death and reproductive problems in the pedigrees. The high frequency of congenital malformations in the pedigrees of mothers with chromosomal variations was observed as well. Taking into account the data obtained, we have concluded that cytogenetic and molecular cytogenetic studies of mothers of children with autism are obligatory for detection of possible genetic causes of autism and genetic counseling of families with children affected with autistic disorders.

  3. Cytogenetic, molecular-cytogenetic, and clinical-genealogical studies of the mothers of children with autism: a search for familial genetic markers for autistic disorders.

    PubMed

    Vorsanova, S G; Voinova, V Yu; Yurov, I Yu; Kurinnaya, O S; Demidova, I A; Yurov, Yu B

    2010-09-01

    State-of-the-art cytogenetic and molecular-cytogenetic methods for studying human chromosomes were used to analyze chromosomal anomalies and variants in mothers of children with autistic disorders and the results were compared with clinical-genealogical data. These investigations showed that these mothers, as compared with a control group, showed increases in the frequencies of chromosomal anomalies (mainly mosaic forms involving chromosome X) and chromosomal heteromorphisms. Analysis of correlations of genotypes and phenotypes revealed increases in the frequencies of cognitive impairments and spontaneous abortions in the mothers of children with autism with chromosomal anomalies, as well as increases in the frequencies of mental retardation, death in childhood, and impairments to reproductive function in the pedigrees of these women. There was a high incidence of developmental anomalies in the pedigrees of mothers with chromosomal variants. These results lead to the conclusion that cytogenetic and molecular-cytogenetic studies of mothers and children with autism should be regarded as obligatory in terms of detecting possible genetic causes of autism and for genetic counseling of families with autistic children.

  4. Array comparative genomic hybridization and cytogenetic analysis in pediatric acute leukemias.

    PubMed

    Dawson, A J; Yanofsky, R; Vallente, R; Bal, S; Schroedter, I; Liang, L; Mai, S

    2011-10-01

    Most patients with acute lymphocytic leukemia (all) are reported to have acquired chromosomal abnormalities in their leukemic bone marrow cells. Many established chromosome rearrangements have been described, and their associations with specific clinical, biologic, and prognostic features are well defined. However, approximately 30% of pediatric and 50% of adult patients with all do not have cytogenetic abnormalities of clinical significance. Despite significant improvements in outcome for pediatric all, therapy fails in approximately 25% of patients, and these failures often occur unpredictably in patients with a favorable prognosis and "good" cytogenetics at diagnosis.It is well known that karyotype analysis in hematologic malignancies, although genome-wide, is limited because of altered cell kinetics (mitotic rate), a propensity of leukemic blasts to undergo apoptosis in culture, overgrowth by normal cells, and chromosomes of poor quality in the abnormal clone. Array comparative genomic hybridization (acgh-"microarray") has a greatly increased genomic resolution over classical cytogenetics. Cytogenetic microarray, which uses genomic dna, is a powerful tool in the analysis of unbalanced chromosome rearrangements, such as copy number gains and losses, and it is the method of choice when the mitotic index is low and the quality of metaphases is suboptimal. The copy number profile obtained by microarray is often called a "molecular karyotype."In the present study, microarray was applied to 9 retrospective cases of pediatric all either with initial high-risk features or with at least 1 relapse. The conventional karyotype was compared to the "molecular karyotype" to assess abnormalities as interpreted by classical cytogenetics. Not only were previously undetected chromosome losses and gains identified by microarray, but several karyotypes interpreted by classical cytogenetics were shown to be discordant with the microarray results. The complementary use of microarray

  5. Comparative cytogenetics of ten species of cichlid fishes (Teleostei, Cichlidae) from the Araguaia River system, Brazil, by conventional cytogenetic methods.

    PubMed

    Valente, G Targino; Vitorino, C de Andrade; Cabral-de-Mello, D C; Oliveira, C; Souza, I Lima; Martins, C; Venere, P C

    2012-01-01

    Cichlids represent one of the most species-rich families of fishes and have attracted the attention of evolutionary biologists due to the rapid radiation occurring in some groups and the importance of some species in the world aquaculture. Cytogenetic analysis was conducted in 10 cichlid species from the Araguaia River, Amazon Basin, Brazil. The chromosome number was 2n=48 for all analyzed species except for Laetacara araguaiae Ottoni et Costa, 2009 (2n=44). Chromosomal polymorphism was detected only in Geophagus proximus (Castelnau, 1855), which exhibits an extra large submetacentric and and a dot-like chromosomes. Moreover, the C-banding revealed a general pericentromeric heterochromatic pattern and some additional blocks for some species. The heterochromatic blocks corresponding to AgNOR bearing regions were observed in all species and also corresponded to CMA3 positive blocks, which were observed in terminal regions. Besides the general conserved chromosomal and heterochromatin patterns for South American cichlids, the presence of GC-rich heterochromatin was quite different in the species Biotodoma cupido (Heckel, 1840), Geophagus proximus, Retroculus lapidifer (Castelnau, 1855), Crenicichla strigata Günther, 1862 and Heros efasciatus Heckel, 1840. The results suggest that independent events of heterochromatin modification occurred during chromosome evolution in the group, regardless of the conservation of macro-chromosomal structure.

  6. Comparison of cytogenetics and molecular karyotyping for chromosome testing of miscarriage specimens.

    PubMed

    Shah, Meera Sridhar; Cinnioglu, Cengiz; Maisenbacher, Melissa; Comstock, Ioanna; Kort, Jonathan; Lathi, Ruth Bunker

    2017-04-01

    To compare chromosome testing of miscarriage specimens between traditional cytogenetic analysis and molecular karyotyping using single nucleotide polymorphism microarrays (SNP) and array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH). Prospective blinded cohort study. University-based practice. Women undergoing dilation and curettage for first-trimester miscarriage between March 2014 and December 2015. None. Chromosome analysis from chorionic villi separated equally and submitted for cytogenetics, SNP microarray, and aCGH testing. Sixty samples were analyzed, of which 47 (78%) were chromosomally abnormal. A correct call was defined when a result was concordant with at least one other testing platform. The correct call rate was 85%, 93%, and 85% using cytogenetics, SNP array, and aCGH, respectively. We found a 33% overall discordance rate between results. Discordances were due to maternal cell contamination, balanced chromosome rearrangements, polyploidy, and placental mosaicism. Mosaicism was detected in 18% of all samples. Growth failure occurred in four samples sent to cytogenetics, of which three were chromosomally abnormal by molecular testing. This study demonstrates the many technical limitations of the three testing modalities. Our rates of maternal cell contamination were low, but it is important to note that this is a commonly reported limitation of cytogenetics. Given the similar overall performance of the three testing modalities, providers may choose a method based on individual availability and consideration of limitations as it applies to each clinical scenario. The unexpected high rate of placental mosaicism warrants further investigation. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Banding cytogenetic analysis in pediatric patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in a Brazilian population

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cytogenetic studies in Brazilian population about childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), the most common childhood malignancy, are scarce. Moreover, Brazilian race is very heterogeneous and is made by the confluence of people of several different origins, from the original Native Brazilians, with the influx of Portuguese colonizers, Black African slaves, and recent European, Arab and Japanese immigration. The purpose of this prospective, multicentric study was to assess the sociodemographic, clinic and cytogenetic characteristics of the children treated for ALL in the Northeast region of Brazil. Results This study includes thirty patients between 4 months and 17 years old treated for ALL from January 1st, 2009 to November 30th, 2010. Cytogenetic analysis showed that in nineteen out of thirty patients (64%) presented some chromosome abnormalities, in which 53% corresponds to numerical abnormalities, 21% structural and numerical abnormalities, and 26% only structural changes. Moreover, seven patients presented complexes karyotype not yet described in the literature. Taken together these results show the importance of the cytogenetic analysis in ALL pediatric patients and illustrates that the studied population presented unexpected complexes karyotypes which were correlated to poor outcome. Conclusion The results demonstrate the importance of banding cytogenetics for ALL diagnosis despite the use of most modern techniques such as FISH and aCGH, and provide reliable insight into the ALL in Brazil. PMID:24025689

  8. Cytogenetic correlates of TET2 mutations in 199 patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Hussein, Kebede; Abdel-Wahab, Omar; Lasho, Terra L.; Van Dyke, Daniel L.; Levine, Ross L.; Hanson, Curtis A.; Pardanani, Animesh; Tefferi, Ayalew

    2015-01-01

    TET2 is a putative tumor suppressor gene located at chromosome 4q24. TET2 mutations were recently described in several myeloid neoplasms but correlations with cytogenetic findings have not been studied. Among a recently described cohort of patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN) who underwent TET2 mutation analysis, 199 had information on karyotype at diagnosis or time of TET2 testing: 71 polycythemia vera (PV), 55 primary myelofibrosis (PMF), 43 essential thrombocythemia (ET), 13 post-PV MF, 7 post-ET MF, and 10 blast phase MPN. Forty eight patients (24%) exhibited abnormal karyotype: 15 favorable (sole 20q-, 13q-, or +9), 8 unfavorable (complex karyotype or sole +8), and 25 “other” cytogenetic abnormalities. We found no significant difference either in the incidence or type of cytogenetic abnormalities between TET2 mutated (n = 25) and unmutated (n = 174) cases. Seventy nine patients, including 14 with TET2 mutations, underwent follow-up cytogenetic testing and the findings were again not affected by TET2 mutational status. We conclude that TET2 mutated MPN patients are not cytogenetically different than their TET2 unmutated counterparts. PMID:19957346

  9. The protein expression profile of meningioma cells is associated with distinct cytogenetic tumour subgroups.

    PubMed

    Domingues, Patrícia Henriques; Teodósio, Cristina; Otero, Álvaro; Sousa, Pablo; Gonçalves, Jesus Maria; Nieto, Ana Belen; Lopes, Maria Celeste; de Oliveira, Catarina; Orfao, Alberto; Tabernero, Maria Dolores

    2015-04-01

    Limited information exists about the impact of cytogenetic alterations on the protein expression profiles of individual meningioma cells and their association with the clinicohistopathological characteristics of the disease. The aim of this study is to investigate the potential association between the immunophenotypic profile of single meningioma cells and the most relevant features of the tumour. Multiparameter flow cytometry (MFC) was used to evaluate the immunophenotypic profile of tumour cells (n = 51 patients) and the Affymetrix U133A chip was applied for the analysis of the gene expression profile (n = 40) of meningioma samples, cytogenetically characterized by interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization. Overall, a close association between the pattern of protein expression and the cytogenetic profile of tumour cells was found. Thus, diploid tumours displayed higher levels of expression of the CD55 complement regulatory protein, tumours carrying isolated monosomy 22/del(22q) showed greater levels of bcl2 and PDGFRβ and meningiomas carrying complex karyotypes displayed a greater proliferation index and decreased expression of the CD13 ectoenzyme, the CD9 and CD81 tetraspanins, and the Her2/neu growth factor receptor. From the clinical point of view, higher expression of CD53 and CD44 was associated with a poorer outcome. Here we show that the protein expression profile of individual meningioma cells is closely associated with tumour cytogenetics, which may reflect the involvement of different signalling pathways in the distinct cytogenetic subgroups of meningiomas, with specific immunophenotypic profiles also translating into a different tumour clinical behaviour. © 2014 British Neuropathological Society.

  10. Advanced comparative cytogenetic analysis of X chromosomes in river buffalo, cattle, sheep, and human.

    PubMed

    Perucatti, A; Genualdo, V; Iannuzzi, A; Rebl, A; Di Berardino, D; Goldammer, T; Iannuzzi, Leopoldo

    2012-05-01

    Based on a recently generated comprehensive gene map for Ovis aries chromosome X (OARX) with an approximately even locus distribution, we assigned selected bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) probes corresponding to these OARX loci to Bubalus bubalis (BBU) and Bos taurus (BTA) by comparative fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) to improve cytogenetically the X chromosome maps in these species. Twenty-five added loci in BBUX and BTAX, respectively, contribute to a more detailed description of the cytogenetic organization of these chromosomes. Further seven loci were identified in OARX and two DNA probes were assigned to X and Y chromosomes in river buffalo, cattle, and sheep, respectively, and thus identified loci in the pseudoautosomal region. The additional assignments double the number of cytogenetic loci in BBUX and increase their number in BTAX and OARX. The larger quantity of cytogenetic anchors allows a more precise morphological comparison of bovid X chromosomes among each other and with the Homo sapiens (HSA) X chromosome. The anchor loci confirm and refine syntenic fragments in HSAX and identify several evolutionary breakpoints between the compared chromosomes. The cytogenetic assignments in BBUX, BTAX, and OARX represent useable anchors for the ongoing genome sequence assembly in Bovidae.

  11. Cytogenetic telomere and telomerase studies in lumbo-sacral chordoma

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, H.S.; Dahir, G.A.; Miller, L.K.

    1994-09-01

    Lumbo-sacral chordomas are rare skeletal sarcomas that originate from the remnant notochord. There are approximately 35 lumbo-sacral chordomas reported annually in the U.S.A. The understanding of this rare human cancer is limited to observations of its clinical behavior and embryonic link. We performed chromosome and molecular analyses from five surgically harvested chordomas in an effort to document genetic abnormalities and to further understand its tumor biology. Cytogenetically, four of five patients had entirely normal chromosomes. One patient had several abnormalities seen in one of 100 cells including a translocation with breakpoints at bands 5q13 and 7q22, loss of one X chromosome and an extra chromosome 14. There was no evidence of monosomy X or trisomy 14 seen with interphase in situ hybridization using biotin-labeled alpha satellite chromosome specific probes for chromosome 14/22 and X. Telomere integrity is required to protect termini from illegitimate recombination. Typically telomeric reduction occurs in senescent fibroblasts in vivo aging and several human solid tumors. A telomeric probe (TTAGGG){sub 50} was hybridized to genomic DNA isolated from chordoma cells and digested with Hinf I which allows the telomeric DNA to remain intact. The tumor DNA was paired with leukocyte DNA from age-matched controls and revealed telomere elongation in all four patients studied with molecular genetic techniques. Telomerase activity is required to maintain telomere integrity and is not present in normal somatic cells. It is determined by visualizing the sizes of the electrophoresis gel-separated radioactive telomeric fragments assembled during incubation of cytoplasmic extracts containing telomerase. Telomerase activity was detected when compared with HeLa cells, a positive control. In addition, no telomerase activity was detected from the chordoma patient`s fibroblasts.

  12. Definitive Molecular Cytogenetic Characterization of 15 Colorectal Cancer Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Knutsen, Turid; Padilla-Nash, Hesed M.; Wangsa, Danny; Barenboim-Stapleton, Linda; Camps, Jordi; McNeil, Nicole; Difilippantonio, Michael J.; Ried, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    In defining the genetic profiles in cancer, cytogenetically aberrant cell lines derived from primary tumors are important tools for the study of carcinogenesis. We here present the results of a comprehensive investigation of 15 established colorectal cancer cell lines utilizing spectral karyotyping (SKY), fluorescence in situ hybridization, and comparative genomic hybridization (CGH). Detailed karyotypic analysis by SKY on five of the lines (P53HCT116, T84, NCI-H508, NCI-H716, and SK-CO-1) are described here for the first time. The five lines with karyotypes in the diploid range and that are characterized by defects in DNA mismatch repair had a mean of 4.8 chromosomal abnormalities per line, whereas the 10 aneuploid lines exhibited complex karyotypes and a mean of 30 chromosomal abnormalities. Of the 150 clonal translocations, only eight were balanced and none were recurrent among the lines. We also reviewed the karyotypes of 345 cases of adenocarcinoma of the large intestine listed in the Mitelman Database of Chromosome Aberrations in Cancer. The types of abnormalities observed in the cell lines reflected those seen in primary tumors: there were no recurrent translocations in either tumors or cell lines, isochromosomes were the most common recurrent abnormalities, and breakpoints occurred most frequently at the centromeric/pericentromeric and telomere regions. Of the genomic imbalances detected by array CGH, 87% correlated with chromosome aberrations observed in the SKY studies. The fact that chromosome abnormalities result predominantly in copy number changes rather than specific chromosome or gene fusions, suggests this may be the major mechanism leading to carcinogenesis in colorectal cancer. PMID:19927377

  13. High resolution comparative genomic hybridisation in clinical cytogenetics

    PubMed Central

    Kirchhoff, M.; Rose, H.; Lundsteen, C.

    2001-01-01

    High resolution comparative genomic hybridisation (HR-CGH) is a diagnostic tool in our clinical cytogenetics laboratory. The present survey reports the results of 253 clinical cases in which 47 abnormalities were detected. Among 144 dysmorphic and mentally retarded subjects with a normal conventional karyotype, 15 (10%) had small deletions or duplications, of which 11 were interstitial. In addition, a case of mosaic trisomy 9 was detected. Among 25 dysmorphic and mentally retarded subjects carrying apparently balanced de novo translocations, four had deletions at translocation breakpoints and two had deletions elsewhere in the genome. Seventeen of 19 complex rearrangements were clarified by HR-CGH. A small supernumerary marker chromosome occurring with low frequency and the breakpoint of a mosaic r(18) case could not be clarified. Three of 19 other abnormalities could not be confirmed by HR-CGH. One was a Williams syndrome deletion and two were DiGeorge syndrome deletions, which were apparently below the resolution of HR-CGH. However, we were able to confirm Angelman and Prader-Willi syndrome deletions, which are about 3-5 Mb. We conclude that HR-CGH should be used for the evaluation of (1) dysmorphic and mentally retarded subjects where normal karyotyping has failed to show abnormalities, (2) dysmorphic and mentally retarded subjects carrying apparently balanced de novo translocations, (3) apparently balanced de novo translocations detected prenatally, and (4) for clarification of complex structural rearrangements.


Keywords: comparative genomic hybridisation; chromosome analysis; chromosome aberrations; dysmorphism PMID:11694545

  14. Induction and repair of HZE induced cytogenetic damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, A. L.; Bao, S.; Rithidech, K.; Chrisler, W. B.; Couch, L. A.; Braby, L. A.

    2001-01-01

    Wistar rats were exposed to high-mass, high energy (HZE) 56Fe particles (1000 GeV/AMU) using the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS). The animals were sacrificed at 1-5 hours or after a 30-day recovery period. The frequency of micronuclei in the tracheal and the deep lung epithelial cells were evaluated. The relative effectiveness of 56Fe, for the induction of initial chromosome damage in the form of micronuclei, was compared to damage produced in the same biological system exposed to other types of high and low-LET radiation. It was demonstrated that for animals sacrificed at short times after exposure, the tracheal and lung epithelial cells, the 56Fe particles were 3.3 and 1.3 times as effective as 60Co in production of micronuclei, respectively. The effectiveness was also compared to that for exposure to inhaled radon. With this comparison, the 56Fe exposure of the tracheal epithelial cells and the lung epithelial cells were only 0.18 and 0.20 times as effective as radon in the production of the initial cytogenetic damage. It was suggested that the low relative effectiveness was related to potential for 'wasted energy' from the core of the 56Fe particles. When the animals were sacrificed after 30 days, the slopes of the dose-response relationships, which reflect the remaining level of damage, decreased by a factor of 10 for both the tracheal and lung epithelial cells. In both cases, the slope of the dose-response lines were no longer significantly different from zero, and the r2 values were very high. Lung epithelial cells, isolated from the animals sacrificed hours after exposure, were maintained in culture, and the micronuclei frequency evaluated after 4 and 6 subcultures. These cells were harvested at 24 and 36 days after the exposure. There was no dose-response detected in these cultures and no signs of genomic instability at either sample time.

  15. Cytogenetics and karyosystematics of Oryzomys albigularis (Rodentia, Cricetidae) from Venezuela.

    PubMed

    Aguilera, M; Pérez-Zapata, A; Martino, A

    1995-01-01

    Several authors have proposed that Oryzomys albigularis constitutes a supraspecific complex and that chromosomal pericentromeric inversions have played a fundamental role in the diversifying process. With the purpose of clarifying the unclear taxonomic situation of the nominal forms of O. albigularis living in Venezuela, a cytogenetic study was carried out on individuals from five different localities along the Andean range and the Cordillera de la Costa. All of the individuals examined showed a diploid number (2n) of 66 chromosomes, but there were differences in the number of autosomal arms (FN = 90, 92, and 104) and in the morphology of the X chromosome (metacentric or acrocentric). The C-banding pattern was similar in all populations, autosomal heterochromatin was restricted to the centromere, and the Y chromosome was the only one that had completely heterochromatic arms. G-banding was useful in making arm-to-arm comparison between the FN = 90 and FN = 104 karyomorphs; 23 shared pairs were found, 7 pairs differed due to pericentric inversions, and 3 pairs had no correspondence. We postulate that these karyomorphs probably correspond to allospecies, and that the specific denominations must correspond to two previously recognized populations of sigmodontine rodents: O. caracolus Thomas 1914 (2n = 66, FN = 90), for the populations from the Cordillera de la Costa, and O. meridensis Thomas 1894 (2n = 66, FN = 104), for the populations distributed between the middle and extreme north of the Andean range. The specific denomination for the populations of animals from the southern portion of the Andean range (Oryzomys sp., 2n = 66, FN = 92) is still to be determined.

  16. Definitive molecular cytogenetic characterization of 15 colorectal cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Knutsen, Turid; Padilla-Nash, Hesed M; Wangsa, Danny; Barenboim-Stapleton, Linda; Camps, Jordi; McNeil, Nicole; Difilippantonio, Michael J; Ried, Thomas

    2010-03-01

    In defining the genetic profiles in cancer, cytogenetically aberrant cell lines derived from primary tumors are important tools for the study of carcinogenesis. Here, we present the results of a comprehensive investigation of 15 established colorectal cancer cell lines using spectral karyotyping (SKY), fluorescence in situ hybridization, and comparative genomic hybridization (CGH). Detailed karyotypic analysis by SKY on five of the lines (P53HCT116, T84, NCI-H508, NCI-H716, and SK-CO-1) is described here for the first time. The five lines with karyotypes in the diploid range and that are characterized by defects in DNA mismatch repair had a mean of 4.8 chromosomal abnormalities per line, whereas the 10 aneuploid lines exhibited complex karyotypes and a mean of 30 chromosomal abnormalities. Of the 150 clonal translocations, only eight were balanced and none were recurrent among the lines. We also reviewed the karyotypes of 345 cases of adenocarcinoma of the large intestine listed in the Mitelman Database of Chromosome Aberrations in Cancer. The types of abnormalities observed in the cell lines reflected those seen in primary tumors: there were no recurrent translocations in either tumors or cell lines; isochromosomes were the most common recurrent abnormalities; and breakpoints occurred most frequently at the centromeric/pericentromeric and telomere regions. Of the genomic imbalances detected by array CGH, 87% correlated with chromosome aberrations observed in the SKY studies. The fact that chromosome abnormalities predominantly result in copy number changes rather than specific chromosome or gene fusions suggests that this may be the major mechanism leading to carcinogenesis in colorectal cancer.

  17. Induction and repair of HZE induced cytogenetic damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, A. L.; Bao, S.; Rithidech, K.; Chrisler, W. B.; Couch, L. A.; Braby, L. A.

    2001-01-01

    Wistar rats were exposed to high-mass, high energy (HZE) 56Fe particles (1000 GeV/AMU) using the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS). The animals were sacrificed at 1-5 hours or after a 30-day recovery period. The frequency of micronuclei in the tracheal and the deep lung epithelial cells were evaluated. The relative effectiveness of 56Fe, for the induction of initial chromosome damage in the form of micronuclei, was compared to damage produced in the same biological system exposed to other types of high and low-LET radiation. It was demonstrated that for animals sacrificed at short times after exposure, the tracheal and lung epithelial cells, the 56Fe particles were 3.3 and 1.3 times as effective as 60Co in production of micronuclei, respectively. The effectiveness was also compared to that for exposure to inhaled radon. With this comparison, the 56Fe exposure of the tracheal epithelial cells and the lung epithelial cells were only 0.18 and 0.20 times as effective as radon in the production of the initial cytogenetic damage. It was suggested that the low relative effectiveness was related to potential for 'wasted energy' from the core of the 56Fe particles. When the animals were sacrificed after 30 days, the slopes of the dose-response relationships, which reflect the remaining level of damage, decreased by a factor of 10 for both the tracheal and lung epithelial cells. In both cases, the slope of the dose-response lines were no longer significantly different from zero, and the r2 values were very high. Lung epithelial cells, isolated from the animals sacrificed hours after exposure, were maintained in culture, and the micronuclei frequency evaluated after 4 and 6 subcultures. These cells were harvested at 24 and 36 days after the exposure. There was no dose-response detected in these cultures and no signs of genomic instability at either sample time.

  18. [Cytogenetic testing in evaluation of the ecological situation and the effect of natural adaptogens on children and adult health].

    PubMed

    Gorovaia, A I; Klimkina, I I

    2002-01-01

    The use of cytogenetic testing on the micronuclear test in cells of the population of children is substantiated for the estimation of mutagenicity of the territory on which they live. The positive modifying cytogenetic influence of natural adaptogens on improvement of health of organisms injured by adverse factors is established.

  19. A standard cytogenetic photomap for the mosquito Anopheles stephensi (Diptera: Culicidae): application for physical mapping.

    PubMed

    Sharakhova, Maria V; Xia, Ai; McAlister, Sarah I; Sharakhov, Igor V

    2006-09-01

    To facilitate physical genome mapping, we have developed a new cytogenetic photomap for Anopheles stephensi (Liston) (Diptera: Culicidae), an important malaria vector in Asia. The high-resolution images of the ovarian polytene chromosomes have been straightened and divided by numbered divisions and lettered subdivisions. The exact chromosomal locations of eight DNA probes have been determined by fluorescent in situ hybridization. Using the DNA sequences, we have established correspondence between chromosomal arms among An. stephensi, Anopheles gambiae (Patton), and Anopheles funestus (Giles). The results support previous cytogenetic observations of arm translocations taking place during diversification of the species. To make the cytogenetic map useful for population genetics studies, we have indicated the chromosomal positions for the breakpoints of 19 polymorphic inversions.

  20. Complex cytogenetic abnormalities including telomeric associations and MEN1 mutation in a pediatric ependymoma.

    PubMed

    Urioste, M; Martínez-Ramírez, A; Cigudosa, J C; Colmenero, I; Madero, L; Robledo, M; Martínez-Delgado, B; Benítez, J

    2002-10-15

    Ependymomas are neuroectodermal tumors of the brain and spinal cord. Some recurrent cytogenetic aberrations have been reported in these tumors, including alterations involving chromosomes 22, 6, and 11. However, consistent molecular alterations have not been identified in ependymal tumors. We studied a recurrent ependymoma in a 3-year-old patient by standard cytogenetic and molecular analysis of TP53 and MEN1 genes. In the present case, we found many of the cytogenetic features previously described as being recurrent in ependymomas, including unstable telomeric alterations. Furthermore, we detected a novel acquired heterozygous mutation in the MEN1 gene. The chromosomal instability produced by the telomeric alterations and the mutation in the MEN1 gene could be important events in the tumorigenesis of ependymomas.

  1. Customized laboratory information management system for a clinical and research leukemia cytogenetics laboratory.

    PubMed

    Bakshi, Sonal R; Shukla, Shilin N; Shah, Pankaj M

    2009-01-01

    We developed a Microsoft Access-based laboratory management system to facilitate database management of leukemia patients referred for cytogenetic tests in regards to karyotyping and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). The database is custom-made for entry of patient data, clinical details, sample details, cytogenetics test results, and data mining for various ongoing research areas. A number of clinical research laboratoryrelated tasks are carried out faster using specific "queries." The tasks include tracking clinical progression of a particular patient for multiple visits, treatment response, morphological and cytogenetics response, survival time, automatic grouping of patient inclusion criteria in a research project, tracking various processing steps of samples, turn-around time, and revenue generated. Since 2005 we have collected of over 5,000 samples. The database is easily updated and is being adapted for various data maintenance and mining needs.

  2. Toxicity of botanical formulations to nursery-infesting white grubs (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The toxicity of eight commercially-available botanical formulations were evaluated against 3rd instars of the nursery-infesting white grubs (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae) Popillia japonica Newman, Exomala orientalis (Waterhouse), Rhizotrogus majalis (Razoumowsky), and Cyclocephala borealis Arrow. In vi...

  3. An annotated checklist of the New World pentodontine scarab beetles (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Dynastinae: Pentodontini).

    PubMed

    López-García, Margarita M; Gasca-Álvarez, Héctor J; Cave, Ronald D; Amat-García, Germán

    2016-09-26

    An updated and annotated checklist of the Pentodontini (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Dynastinae) of the New World is presented. The tribe is composed of 32 genera and 151 species, including the introduced species Heteronychus arator (Fabricius).

  4. Primary types of Chinese longhorned woodboring beetles (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae: and Disteniidae) of the Smithsonian Institution

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The primary types of Chinese (mainland China, Taiwan, and Tibet) longhorned woodboring beetles (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae, Disteniidae) of the Smithsonian Institution are catalogued and figured, current through 2012. Data on the original combination, current name, current tribal classification, and ...

  5. Primary types of longhorned woodboring beetles (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae and Disteniidae) of the Smithsonian Institution

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The primary types of longhorned woodboring beetles (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae, Disteniidae) of the National Museum of Natural History (Smithsonian Institution) are catalogued and figured, current through 2012 (but also including some 2013 holotypes). Data on the original combination, current combina...

  6. Apostasimerini (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Baridinae). Rectification of authorship, year of publication, rank, and taxa included

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The following nomenclatural changes are proposed in the Coleoptera, Curculionidae: the author of Apostasimerini is Schoenherr (1844), not Lacordaire (1866); Madopterini Lacordaire, 1866 is demoted to subtribe of Apostasimerini; Erirhinus mourei Bondar, 1943 is a new synonym of Apostasimerus serriros...

  7. Two new fossil species of Cryptocephalus Geoffroy (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) from Baltic and Dominican Amber

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Two new species of Cryptocephalus Geoffroy (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) are described and illustrated from fossil resin: Cryptocephalus groehni sp. nov (Baltic amber) and Cryptocephalus kheelorum sp. nov. (Dominican amber). These are the first described species of Cryptocephalinae from fossil resin. ...

  8. A new species of the genus Falsoibidion Pic (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae) from Korea.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seunghyun; Lee, Seunghwan

    2016-01-01

    A new species of the genus Falsoibidion Pic, 1922 (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae, Cerambycinae, Callidiopini) from Korea is described. Habitus and genitalia of male and female of the new species are illustrated.

  9. Primary types of Chinese longhorned woodboring beetles (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae: and Disteniidae) of the Smithsonian Institution

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The primary types of Chinese (mainland China, Taiwan, and Tibet) longhorned woodboring beetles (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae, Disteniidae) of the Smithsonian Institution are catalogued and figured, current through 2012. Data on the original combination, current name, current tribal classification, and ...

  10. A new species of Phymatodes Mulsant (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae) from China

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shulin

    2014-01-01

    Abstract A new species Phymatodes (Poecilium) latefasciatus sp. n. (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae, Cerambycinae, Callidiini) from China is described and illustrated. Features distinguishing the new species from its congeners are presented. PMID:24478575

  11. An unusual new species of Micraspis Chevrolat (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) from northeastern India.

    PubMed

    Poorani, J

    2014-01-01

    Micraspispusillus sp. n. (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) is described and illustrated from the northeastern region of India. It is unusual in possessing very large eye canthus and is the smallest species of the genus known from India so far.

  12. Methods for assessing infestations of sunflower stem weevil (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) in sunflower stems

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The sunflower stem weevil, Cylindrocopturus adspersus LeConte (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), reduces sunflower, Helianthus annuus L. (Asteraceae), yields by spreading pathogens, damaging vascular tissues, and promoting lodging of sunflower plants. To assess weevil populations for host plant resistanc...

  13. Illustrated guide to the emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire and related species (Coleoptera, Buprestidae)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The 33 species of Agrilus (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) hypothesized to be most closely related to Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (the emerald ash borer), are described and illustrated. Morphology (adults and immatures), biology, distribution, detailed taxonomic history and systematics are presented fo...

  14. Host range specificity of Scymnus camptodromus (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae), a predator of hemlock woolly adelgid (Hemiptera: Adelgidae)

    Treesearch

    Samita Limbu; Katie Cassidy; Melody Keena; Patrick Tobin; Kelli Hoover

    2015-01-01

    Scymnus (Neopullus) camptodromus Yu and Liu (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) was brought to the United States from China as a potential biological control agent for hemlock woolly adelgid (Adelges tsugae Annand) (Hemiptera: Adelgidae). Scymnus camptodromus phenology is...

  15. New records of predaceous diving beetles (Coleoptera:Dytiscidae) in Maine

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boobar, L.R.; Gibbs, K.E.; Longcore, J.R.; Perillo, A.M.

    1996-01-01

    Locations, habitat descriptions, and collection dates are listed for new records of 4 genera and 12 species of predaceous diving beetles (Coleoptera: Dytiscidae) in Maine. Previously, 17 genera and 53 species of the aquatic beetle were reported from Maine.

  16. Effects of Insecticide Exposure on Movement and Population Size Estimates of Predatory Ground Beetles (Coleoptera: Carabidae)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Population size estimates of arthropod predators and parasitoids may paradoxically increase following insecticide applications. Previous research with ground beetles (Coleoptera: Carabidae) suggests such unusual results reflect increased arthropod movement and capture in traps rather than real chang...

  17. Scymnus camptodromus (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) larval development and predation of hemlock woolly adelgid (Hemiptera: Adelgidae)

    Treesearch

    Samita Limbu; Melody A. Keena; David Long; Nancy Ostiguy; Kelli. Hoover

    2015-01-01

    Development time and prey consumption of Scymnus (Neopullus) camptodromus Yu and Liu (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) larvae by instar, strain, and temperature were evaluated. S. camptodromus, a specialist predator of hemlock woolly adelgid Adelges tsugae (Annand) (Hemiptera:...

  18. Pseudomacrochenus wusuae sp. n., a new species from Sichuan, China (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae, Lamiinae)

    PubMed Central

    He, Li; Liu, Bin; Wang, Cheng-Bin

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Pseudomacrochenus wusuae sp. n. (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae, Lamiinae, Lamiini) is described from Sichuan, China. Relevant morphological characters are illustrated by colour plates and a differential diagnosis of the new species from its relatives is provided. PMID:28331404

  19. Similarities in pheromonal communication of flea beetles Phyllotreta cruciferae Goeze and Ph. vittula Redtenbacher (Coleoptera, Chrysomelidae)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Remarkable similarities have been found in the pheromonal communication of Phyllotreta vittula Redtenbacher and of Ph. cruciferae Goeze (European population) (Coleoptera, Chrysomelidae). In previous European field tests with Ph. cruciferae, only the major male-produced sesquiterpene identified from ...

  20. Timing of onset of evening activity of adult chinese rose beetles (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Adult Chinese rose beetles, Adoretus sinicus (Burmeister) (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Adoretini), present in China, Taiwan, Indonesia, Cambodia, Laos, Singapore, Thailand, Vietnam, the Marianas Islands, the Caroline Islands, and the Hawaiian Islands, are nighttime defoliators that feed on a wide vari...

  1. Cytogenetic profile in 1,921 cases of trisomy 21 syndrome.

    PubMed

    Flores-Ramírez, Francisco; Palacios-Guerrero, Claudia; García-Delgado, Constanza; Morales-Jiménez, Ariadna Berenice; Arias-Villegas, Christian Martín; Cervantes, Alicia; Morán-Barroso, Verónica Fabiola

    2015-08-01

    Trisomy 21 is the most frequent genetic cause of intellectual disability. It is caused by different cytogenetic aberrations: free trisomy, Robertsonian translocations, mosaicism, duplication of the critical region and other structural rearrangements of chromosome 21. The aim of the study was to identify in Mexican trisomy 21 patients who attended Hospital Infantil de México Federico Gómez from 1992-2011 the type and frequency of the cytogenetic aberration and to evaluate the effect of maternal age. A retrospective analysis of epidemiological data and karyotype reports were carried out; type and frequency of the cytogenetic variants were determined. We identified 2,018 cases referred with a clinical diagnosis of trisomy 21. In 1,921 analyses (95.2%) a cytogenetic variant of trisomy 21 was identified: free trisomy 21 in 1,787 cases (93.02%), four cases (0.21%) had an additional non-contributory aberration; Robertsonian translocations in 92 cases (4.79%); mosaicism in 31 cases (1.61%) and seven cases (0.36%) had other chromosomal abnormalities, five (0.26%) had other contributory structural rearrangements and two corresponded to double aneuploidies (0.10%). Gender distribution was 1,048 (54.56%) males and 873 (45.44%) females. A maternal age effect was observed in patients with free trisomy 21 with mothers >36 years of age. The present work reports the experience of a Mexican referral center regarding the karyotype diagnosis of patients with trisomy 21 and is one of the most extensive studies published so far. Percentages of the cytogenetic abnormalities present in our population reflect the ones previously reported for these cytogenetic alterations worldwide. Copyright © 2015 IMSS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Cytogenetic findings of patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia in fars province.

    PubMed

    Safaei, Akbar; Shahryari, Jahanbanoo; Farzaneh, Mohamad Reza; Tabibi, Narjes; Hosseini, Marzieh

    2013-12-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the sixth most common malignancy in Iran. Cytogenetic analysis of leukemic blasts plays an important role in classification and prognosis in ALL patients. The purpose of this study was to define the frequency of chromosomal abnormalities of ALL patients in adults and children in Fars province, Iran. In this cross-sectional study, we evaluated karyotype results of bone marrow specimens in 168 Iranian patients with ALL (154 B-ALL and 14 T-ALL) in Fars Province using the conventional cytogenetic G-banding method. The frequency of cytogenetic abnormalities, including numerical and/or structural changes, was 61.7% and 53.8% in the B-ALL and T-ALL patients, respectively. Hyperdiploidy was the most common (32%) cytogenetic abnormality. Among structural abnormalities, the most common was t(9;22) in 11% of the patients. The children showed a higher incidence of hyperdiploidy and lower incidence of t(9;22) than adults (P<0.05). We found a lower incidence of recurrent abnormalities such as 11q23, t(1;19), and t(12;21) than those reported in previous studies. Normal karyotype was more frequent in our study. The frequencies of some cytogenetic abnormalities such as hyperdiploidy and t(9;22) in our study were comparable to those reported in the literature. The results of this study in Fars Province can be used as baseline information for treatment decision and research purposes in ALL patients. We recommend the use of advanced molecular techniques in the future to better elucidate cryptic cytogenetic abnormalities.

  3. Cytogenetic studies of Brazilian pediatric myelodysplastic syndrome cases: challenges and difficulties in a large and emerging country

    PubMed Central

    Velloso, E.D.R.P.; Chauffaille, M.L.; Peliçario, L.M.; Tanizawa, R.S.S.; Toledo, S.R.C.; Gaiolla, R.D.; Lopes, L.F.

    2013-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) and juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia (JMML) are rare hematopoietic stem cell diseases affecting children. Cytogenetics plays an important role in the diagnosis of these diseases. We report here the experience of the Cytogenetic Subcommittee of the Brazilian Cooperative Group on Pediatric Myelodysplastic Syndromes (BCG-MDS-PED). We analyzed 168 cytogenetic studies performed in 23 different cytogenetic centers; 84 of these studies were performed in patients with confirmed MDS (primary MDS, secondary MDS, JMML, and acute myeloid leukemia/MDS+Down syndrome). Clonal abnormalities were found in 36.9% of the MDS cases and cytogenetic studies were important for the detection of constitutional diseases and for differential diagnosis with other myeloid neoplasms. These data show the importance of the Cooperative Group for continuing education in order to avoid a late or wrong diagnosis. PMID:23314345

  4. A catalogue of Lithuanian beetles (Insecta, Coleoptera)

    PubMed Central

    Tamutis, Vytautas; Tamutė, Brigita; Ferenca, Romas

    2011-01-01

    Abstract This paper presents the first complete and updated list of all 3597 species of beetles (Insecta: Coleoptera) belonging to 92 familiesfound and published in Lithuania until 2011, with comments also provided on the main systematic and nomenclatural changes since the last monographic treatment in two volumes (Pileckis and Monsevičius 1995, 1997). The introductory section provides a general overview of the main features of the territory of Lithuania, the origins and formation of the beetle fauna and their conservation, the faunistic investigations in Lithuania to date revealing the most important stages of the faunistic research process with reference to the most prominent scientists, an overview of their work, and their contribution to Lithuanian coleopteran faunal research. Species recorded in Lithuania by some authors without reliable evidence and requiring further confirmation with new data are presented in a separate list, consisting of 183 species. For the first time, analysis of errors in works of Lithuanian authors concerning data on coleopteran fauna has been conducted and these errors have been corrected. All available published and Internet sources on beetles found in Lithuania have been considered in the current study. Over 630 literature sources on species composition of beetles, their distribution in Lithuania and neighbouring countries, and taxonomic revisions and changes are reviewed and cited. An alphabetical list of these literature sources is presented. After revision of public beetle collections in Lithuania, the authors propose to remove 43 species from the beetle species list of the country on the grounds, that they have been wrongly identified or published by mistake. For reasons of clarity, 19 previously noted but later excluded species are included in the current checklist with comments. Based on faunal data from neighbouring countries, species expected to occur in Lithuania are matnioned. In total 1390 species are attributed to this

  5. Lilioceris groehni sp. n.: the first authentic species of Criocerinae (Coleoptera, Chrysomelidae) from Baltic amber.

    PubMed

    Bukejs, Andris; Schmitt, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Based on a single well-preserved specimen from Eocene Baltic amber, Lilioceris groehnisp. n. is described and illustrated using phase-contrast X-ray microtomography. It is the first described species of Criocerinae (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) from Baltic amber. A check-list of fossil Criocerinae is provided. Placement of Crioceris pristiana (Germar, 1813) is discussed, this species is removed from Criocerinae and placed in Coleoptera incertae sedis.

  6. Lilioceris groehni sp. n.: the first authentic species of Criocerinae (Coleoptera, Chrysomelidae) from Baltic amber

    PubMed Central

    Bukejs, Andris; Schmitt, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Based on a single well-preserved specimen from Eocene Baltic amber, Lilioceris groehni sp. n. is described and illustrated using phase-contrast X-ray microtomography. It is the first described species of Criocerinae (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) from Baltic amber. A check-list of fossil Criocerinae is provided. Placement of Crioceris pristiana (Germar, 1813) is discussed, this species is removed from Criocerinae and placed in Coleoptera incertae sedis. PMID:27853400

  7. [Application of spectral karyotyping to cytogenetic analysis in acute myeloid leukemia].

    PubMed

    Guo, Bo; Zhu, Hong-Li; Li, Su-Xia; Han, Xiao-Ping; Sun, Jing-Fen; Wang, Li-Li; Huang, Wen-Rong; Da, Wan-Ming

    2011-07-01

    To evaluate the value of spectral karyotyping (SKY) in cytogenetic analysis of acute myeloid leukemias (AML). Nine AML patients were analyzed by R-banding and SKY. MLL, PML-RARalpha, AML1-ETO fusion genes were detected by dual fusion- fluorescence in situ hybridization (D-FISH). All 9 samples were successfully hybridized. SKY identified structural aberrations including 9q -, t(15;17) and ins(10;17) (q22;p11p12) ; and some numeral abnormalities. The results of SKY confirmed those of R-band karyotyping and D-FISH; with more accurate localization. SKY appears to be fairly stable, accurate and sensitive, for AML cytogenetic study.

  8. Cytogenetic response of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris Linnaeus, 1753) (Pinaceae) to heavy metals.

    PubMed

    Belousov, Mikhail Vladimirovich; Mashkina, Olga Sergeyevna; Popov, Vasily Nikolayevich

    2012-01-01

    We studied cytogenetic reactions of Scots pine seedlings to heavy metals - lead, cupric and zinc nitrates applied at concentrations 0.5 to 2000 µM. We determined the range of concentrations of heavy metals that causes mutagenic effect. Lead was found to cause the strongest genotoxicity as manifested by significant increase in the frequency of pathological mitosis, occurrence of fragmentations and agglutinations of chromosomes, various types of bridges, and a significant number of the micronuclei which were absent in the control. Possible cytogenetic mechanisms of the cytotoxic action of heavy metals are discussed.

  9. [Non-radioactive in situ hybridization of alpha-satellite sequences in cytogenetic diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Perfumo, C; Arslanian, A; Zara, F; Piombo, G; Pierluigi, M

    1992-01-01

    Non isotopic in situ hybridization with alpha-satellite DNA probes in the cytogenetic diagnosis. Standard banding cytogenetic techniques do not always allow to define the structure and the origin of chromosome rearrangements involving the centromere region. Non-isotopic in situ hybridization of alphoid sequences has allowed to determine the origin of the centromeres in the metaphases of 5 patients referred to us for: 2 structural rearrangements involving chromosome 21, 2 structural rearrangements involving chromosome Y and 1 reciprocal translocation involving on chromosome 20 and one chromosome 15.

  10. Molecular cytogenetics and comparative mapping in goats (Capra hircus, 2n = 60).

    PubMed

    Schibler, L; Di Meo, G P; Cribiu, E P; Iannuzzi, L

    2009-01-01

    Few goat genome analysis projects have been developed in the last 10 years. The aim of this review was to compile and update all available cytogenetic mapping data, according to the last goat chromosome nomenclature, as well as human and cattle whole genome sequences. In particular, human regions homologous to most of the FISH-mapped microsatellites were identified in silico. This new goat cytogenetic map made it possible to refine delineation of conserved segments relative to the human and cattle genomic sequence. These improvements did not lead to detection of major new rearrangements within ruminants but confirmed the good conservation of synteny and the numerous intrachromosomal rearrangements observed between goats and humans.

  11. Trends in utilization of prenatal cytogenetic diagnosis by New York State residents in 1979 and 1980.

    PubMed Central

    Hook, E B; Schreinemachers, D M

    1983-01-01

    It is estimated that 35.3 per cent of pregnant New York State women age 35 or over underwent cytogenetic diagnosis in 1980 as compared to 28.7 per cent in 1979. Rates varied sharply by county. In several small counties far from genetic centers, no 1980 cytogenetic diagnostic studies were reported in women 35 or over while in New York City the rate was 41 per cent. In one county with an active genetic center the rate appears to have plateaued at 30 per cent. PMID:6849479

  12. Cytogenetic analysis in a large series of children with non-syndromic mental retardation

    PubMed Central

    Bouhjar, Inesse Ben Abdallah; Gmidène, Abir; Mougou-Zrelli, Soumaya; Hannachi, Hanene; Soyah, Najla; Gadour, Naoufel; Harrabi, Imed; Elghezal, Hatem; Saad, Ali

    2012-01-01

    Mental retardation affects 1–3% of the population. To evaluate the implication of chromosomal abnormalities in the etiology of mental retardation, 1420 patients with non-syndromic mental retardation recruited at the department of cytogenetics of Farhat Hached hospital (Sousse, Tunisia) between January 2005 and December 2009, were analyzed using standard cytogenetic techniques. Age ranged between 3 and 18 years with a median of 8 years. Chromosomal abnormalities were detected in 7.8% of patients and an increased prevalence of chromosome anomalies was observed in patients when the mental retardation is associated with a severe degree of intellectual disability, facial dysmorphic features and/or congenital malformations or epilepsy. PMID:27625819

  13. Cytogenetic analysis in a large series of children with non-syndromic mental retardation.

    PubMed

    Bouhjar, Inesse Ben Abdallah; Gmidène, Abir; Mougou-Zrelli, Soumaya; Hannachi, Hanene; Soyah, Najla; Gadour, Naoufel; Harrabi, Imed; Elghezal, Hatem; Saad, Ali

    2012-09-01

    Mental retardation affects 1-3% of the population. To evaluate the implication of chromosomal abnormalities in the etiology of mental retardation, 1420 patients with non-syndromic mental retardation recruited at the department of cytogenetics of Farhat Hached hospital (Sousse, Tunisia) between January 2005 and December 2009, were analyzed using standard cytogenetic techniques. Age ranged between 3 and 18 years with a median of 8 years. Chromosomal abnormalities were detected in 7.8% of patients and an increased prevalence of chromosome anomalies was observed in patients when the mental retardation is associated with a severe degree of intellectual disability, facial dysmorphic features and/or congenital malformations or epilepsy.

  14. Cytogenetic response of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris Linnaeus, 1753) (Pinaceae) to heavy metals

    PubMed Central

    Belousov, Mikhail Vladimirovich; Mashkina, Olga Sergeyevna; Popov, Vasily Nikolayevich

    2012-01-01

    Abstract We studied cytogenetic reactions of Scots pine seedlings to heavy metals – lead, cupric and zinc nitrates applied at concentrations 0.5 to 2000 µM. We determined the range of concentrations of heavy metals that causes mutagenic effect. Lead was found to cause the strongest genotoxicity as manifested by significant increase in the frequency of pathological mitosis, occurrence of fragmentations and agglutinations of chromosomes, various types of bridges, and a significant number of the micronuclei which were absent in the control. Possible cytogenetic mechanisms of the cytotoxic action of heavy metals are discussed. PMID:24260654

  15. Evolution of clonal cytogenetic abnormalities in aplastic anemia.

    PubMed

    Maciejewski, Jaroslaw P; Selleri, Carmine

    2004-03-01

    Prior to the introduction of effective therapies, the high mortality rates of severe aplastic anemia (AA) precluded recognition of late complications of this disease. Once the survival of AA improved, observation of clonal evolution raised questions as to whether the development of secondary myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is a part of the extended natural history of the disease or is related to the therapies applied. Clinical features of myelodysplasia and AA can overlap, and typical MDS may evolve as a complication of AA. Common pathophysiologic elements operate in these diseases and are subject to many studies and theories as to what mechanisms in AA may lead to the late evolution of MDS. Similarly, AA has been hypothesized to be a reflection of an over-reactive immune response triggered by the appearance of genetically altered and/or phenotypically abnormal dysplastic clones. Hypocellular variants of myelodysplasia and responsiveness of certain forms of MDS to immunosuppressive regimens serve as the most appealing examples of the intricate and close pathophysiologic relationship of this disease with AA. The diagnosis of clonal evolution in the course of AA can be obvious if secondary cytopenia involves hypercellularity and a high percentage of blasts. In addition, the occurrence of a new karyotypic defect objectively heralds the progression of disease to MDS. However, the diagnostic imprecision of dysplasia recognition in the context of marrow hypocellularity, inability to obtain informative cytogenetics, and a high proportion of MDS cases with normal karyoptype have hampered studies designed to determine the frequency and timing of MDS evolution in AA. In addition, the diagnostic criteria and definitions used are not unified. While some centers recognize that the abnormal karyotype does not preclude the diagnosis of AA; in others, the diagnosis of AA includes the presence of normal karyoptype. Many typical features of dysplastic evolution in AA have been

  16. An annotated catalogue of the Buprestidae of Iran (Coleoptera: Buprestoidea).

    PubMed

    Ghahari, Hassan; Volkovitsh, Mark G; Bellamy, Charles L

    2015-07-08

    An annotated taxonomic catalogue of the jewel beetles (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) of Iran is given. Original descriptions and recent revisionary or catalogue data are included along with the distribution, both within and outside of Iran, ecological data and host plant associations, junior synonyms, and comments. A complete bibliography completes the catalogue. In total 428 species and 52 subspecies of jewel beetles belonging to 6 subfamilies (Julodinae, Polycestinae, Galbellinae, Chrysochroinae, Buprestinae, and Agrilinae), 20 tribes, and 38 genera are known from Iran including doubtful records and 4 nomina nuda. It is likely that the number of jewel beetle species from Iran will be between 460-480 and possibly even more species.

  17. Determination of Coleoptera fauna on carcasses in Ankara province, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Ozdemir, Senem; Sert, Osman

    2009-01-10

    In this study, 40 species from Staphylinidae, Histeridae, Dermestidae, Silphidae, Nitidulidae and Cleridae families of Coleoptera which were found in 12 pig (Sus scrofa L.) carcasses were identified and recorded during a one-year period at the Hacettepe University Beytepe Campus located in Ankara, Turkey. According to the duration of their presence on the carcasses, 22 of these species were accepted to be important in decomposition. Their distribution over the months and the duration of their presence in the various decomposition stages over the seasons were determined.

  18. Checklist of beetles (Coleoptera) of Canada and Alaska. Second edition

    PubMed Central

    Bousquet, Yves; Bouchard, Patrice; Davies, Anthony E.; Sikes, Derek S.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract All 8237 species-group taxa of Coleoptera known to occur in Canada and Alaska are recorded by province/territory or state, along with their author(s) and year of publication, in a classification framework. Only presence of taxa in each Canadian province or territory and Alaska is noted. Labrador is considered a distinct geographical entity. Adventive and Holarctic species-group taxa are indicated. References to pertinent identification keys are given under the corresponding supraspecific taxa in the data archive. PMID:24363590

  19. Endemism patterns in the Italian leaf beetle fauna (Coleoptera, Chrysomelidae)

    PubMed Central

    Biondi, Maurizio; Urbani, Fabrizia; D’Alessandro, Paola

    2013-01-01

    Abstract In this contribution the results of a zoogeographical analysis, carried out on the 123 endemic leaf beetle species (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) occurring in Italy and its immediately adjacent regions, are reported. To assess the level of faunistic similarity among the different geographic regions studied, a cluster analysis was performed, based on the endemic component. This was done by calculating the Baroni Urbani & Buser’s similarity index (BUB). Finally, a parsimony analysis of endemicity (PAE) was used to identify the most important areas of endemism in Italy. PMID:24163584

  20. Revision of the genus Endochilus Weise (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae: Chilocorini).

    PubMed

    Łączyński, Piotr; Tomaszewska, Wioletta

    2014-05-20

    The members of the endemic African genus Endochilus Weise, 1898 (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae: Chilocorini) are redescribed, diagnosed, and illustrated. Lectotypes are designated for Endochilus compater Weise, Endochilus minor Weise, Endochilus plagiatus Sicard, Endochilus rubicundus Weise, and Endochilus styx Sicard. One new species is described: Endochilus abdominalis sp nov. Notes on the genus and nomenclatural history for each species are provided. A key for identification of all species is presented. Adult characters concerning similarities of Endochilus to other genera of African Chilocorini are discussed. This is an open access paper. We use the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 license that permits unrestricted use, provided that the paper is properly attributed.

  1. Revision of the genus Endochilus Weise (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae: Chilocorini)

    PubMed Central

    Tomaszewska, Wioletta

    2014-01-01

    The members of the endemic African genus Endochilus Weise, 1898 (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae: Chilocorini) are redescribed, diagnosed, and illustrated. Lectotypes are designated for Endochilus compater Weise, Endochilus minor Weise, Endochilus plagiatus Sicard, Endochilus rubicundus Weise, and Endochilus styx Sicard. One new species is described: Endochilus abdominalis sp. nov. Notes on the genus and nomenclatural history for each species are provided. A key for identification of all species is presented. Adult characters concerning similarities of Endochilus to other genera of African Chilocorini are discussed. PMID:25373218

  2. New taxa, notes and new synonymy in Neoibidionini (Cerambycidae, Coleoptera).

    PubMed

    Martins, Ubirajara R; Galileo, Maria Helena M

    2014-04-11

    New taxa, notes, and new synonymy in Neoibidionini (Cerambycidae, Coleoptera) are given. New taxa are described from Ecuador: Compsibidion inflatum sp. nov., Bezarkia gen. nov. and B. suturalis sp. nov., Corimbion antennatum sp. nov. and Neocompsa muira sp. nov.; from México: Neocompsa chiapensis sp. nov., and from French Guyana: Kunaibidion giesberti sp. nov. Pygmodeon maculatum Martins & Galileo, 2012 is considered a new synonym of Heterachthes xyleus Martins, 1974 which is transferred to the genus Pygmodeon as a new combination. Notes on variability and new records of Asynapteron equatorianum (Martins, 1960) are presented.

  3. Revision of the Australian ceratocanthinae (coleoptera, scarabaeoidea, hybosoridae).

    PubMed

    Ballerio, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    The Australian fauna of Ceratocanthinae (Coleoptera, Scarabaeoidea, Hybosoridae) is revised. Two genera are present, both shared with Asia, with a total of seven species, all localized in eastern Queensland and all except one, endemic to Australia. Cyphopisthes is comprised of three species, two of them new (Cyphopisthes yorkensis sp. n. and Cyphopisthes monteithi sp. n., the latter, together with Cyphopisthes descarpentriesi Paulian, 1977 displaying an unusual ecology, with occurrence in the southern Queensland dry rainforest/scrub habitats), and Pterorthochaetes is comprised of four species, two of them new (Pterorthochaetes danielsi sp. n. and Pterorthochaeres storeyi sp. n.). Descriptions, distribution, ecological remarks and a key to species are provided.

  4. Passalidae (Coleoptera: Scarabaeoidea) of the Greater and Lesser Antilles.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Ferbans, Larry; Reyes-Castillo, Pedro; Schuster, Jack C

    2015-05-12

    We present a synthesis of the state of knowledge concerning the species of Passalidae (Coleoptera) of the West Indies and we present a key to the species. The recently described genus Antillanax Boucher renders the subgenus Passalus (Pertinax) Kaup paraphyletic, therefore we place Antillanax in synonymy with Passalus (Pertinax) and we propose a new combination for Passalus (Pertinax) doesburgi (Boucher). The island richest in species is Hispaniola, with five species, three of them endemic. Excluding Trinidad and Tobago, the passalid fauna of the West Indies comprises 13 species; this is low richness, but with high endemism (50%), especially for the Greater Antilles.

  5. Revision of the Australian Ceratocanthinae (Coleoptera, Scarabaeoidea, Hybosoridae)

    PubMed Central

    Ballerio, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The Australian fauna of Ceratocanthinae (Coleoptera, Scarabaeoidea, Hybosoridae) is revised. Two genera are present, both shared with Asia, with a total of seven species, all localized in eastern Queensland and all except one, endemic to Australia. Cyphopisthes is comprised of three species, two of them new (Cyphopisthes yorkensis sp. n. and Cyphopisthes monteithi sp. n., the latter, together with Cyphopisthes descarpentriesi Paulian, 1977 displaying an unusual ecology, with occurrence in the southern Queensland dry rainforest/scrub habitats), and Pterorthochaetes is comprised of four species, two of them new (Pterorthochaetes danielsi sp. n. and Pterorthochaeres storeyi sp. n.). Descriptions, distribution, ecological remarks and a key to species are provided. PMID:24146587

  6. Review of the tribe Hyperaspidini Mulsant (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) from Iran.

    PubMed

    Biranvand, Amir; Tomaszewska, Wioletta; Nedvěd, Oldřich; Khormizi, Mehdi Zare; Nicolas, Vincent; Canepari, Claudio; Shakarami, Jahanshir; Fekrat, Lida; Fürsch, Helmut

    2017-02-22

    The Iranian species of the tribe Hyperaspidini Mulsant, 1846 (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) are reviewed. The current list includes 12 species, all placed in a single genus Hyperaspis Chevrolat, 1836. Hyperapsis asiatica Lewis, 1896 and H. pumila Mulsant, 1850 are excluded from the Iranian list of Coccinellidae. Diagnoses of the tribe Hyperaspidini and the genus Hyperaspis are given. Images of adult beetles and diagnostic characters of the male genitalia of all species distributed in Iran are shown. A key to identification of the species is presented. Distribution records are provided for each species along with information on host plants and prey species when available.

  7. Cytogenetic analysis of Otiorhynchus bisulcatus (Fabricius, 1781) and O.(Zadrehus) atroapterus (De Geer, 1775) (Coleoptera, Curculionidae, Entiminae) using C bands, NORs, and DAPI/CMA3 staining.

    PubMed

    Holecová, Milada; Maryańska-Nadachowska, Anna; Rozek, Maria

    2013-01-01

    The structure of the karyotypes of two Otiorhynchus species belonging to separate subgenera, viz. Otiorhynchus s.str. bisulcatus and O. (Zadrehus) atroapterus, is compared and described for the first time. Both species have the same chromosome number (2n = 22), sex chromosome system of an achiasmate parachute type (Xy(p)), symmetric karyotype with the prevalence of metacentrics, similar meiotic behaviour, localization of NORs and positive DAPI signals. The main differences involve the morphology of autosomes and the X chromosome in the C-banding pattern and DAPI/CMA3 signals as well as in the presence of additional B chromosomes.

  8. 40 CFR 798.5395 - In vivo mammalian bone marrow cytogenetics tests: Micronucleus assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false In vivo mammalian bone marrow... Genetic Toxicity § 798.5395 In vivo mammalian bone marrow cytogenetics tests: Micronucleus assay. (a... mitotic apparatus by chemicals. Polychromatic erythrocytes in the bone marrow of rodents are used in...

  9. CYTOGENETIC STUDIES IN MICE TREATED WITH THE JET FUELS, JET-A AND JP-8

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cytogenetic studies in mice treated with the jet fuels, Jet-A and JP-8
    Abstract
    The genotoxic potential of the jet fuels, Jet-A and JP-8, were examined in mice treated on the skin with a single dose of 240 ug/mouse. Peripheral blood smears were prepared at the start of the ...

  10. Inferring Diversity and Evolution in Fish by Means of Integrative Molecular Cytogenetics.

    PubMed

    Artoni, Roberto Ferreira; Castro, Jonathan Pena; Jacobina, Uedson Pereira; Lima-Filho, Paulo Augusto; da Costa, Gideão Wagner Werneck Félix; Molina, Wagner Franco

    2015-01-01

    Fish constitute a paraphyletic and profusely diversified group that has historically puzzled ichthyologists. Hard efforts are necessary to better understand this group, due to its extensive diversity. New species are often identified and it leads to questions about their phylogenetic aspects. Cytogenetics is becoming an important biodiversity-detection tool also used to measure biodiversity evolutionary aspects. Molecular cytogenetics by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) allowed integrating quantitative and qualitative data from DNA sequences and their physical location in chromosomes and genomes. Although there is no intention on presenting a broader review, the current study presents some evidences on the need of integrating molecular cytogenetic data to other evolutionary biology tools to more precisely infer cryptic species detection, population structuring in marine environments, intra- and interspecific karyoevolutionary aspects of freshwater groups, evolutionary dynamics of marine fish chromosomes, and the origin and differentiation of sexual and B chromosomes. The new cytogenetic field, called cytogenomics, is spreading due to its capacity to give resolute answers to countless questions that cannot be answered by traditional methodologies. Indeed, the association between chromosomal markers and DNA sequencing as well as between biological diversity analysis methodologies and phylogenetics triggers the will to search for answers about fish evolutionary, taxonomic, and structural features.

  11. [Molecular cytogenetic methods for studying interphase chromosomes in human brain cells].

    PubMed

    Iurov, I Iu; Vorsanova, S G; Solov'ev, I V; Iurov, Iu B

    2010-09-01

    One of the main genetic factors determining the functional activity of the genome in somatic cells, including brain nerve cells, is the spatial organization of chromosomes in the interphase nucleus. For a long time, no studies of human brain cells were carried out until high-resolution methods of molecular cytogenetics were developed to analyze interphase chromosomes in nondividing somatic cells. The purpose of the present work was to assess the potential of high-resolution methods of interphase molecular cytogenetics for studying chromosomes and the nuclear organization in postmitotic brain cells. A high efficiency was shown by such methods as multiprobe and quantitative fluorescence in situ hybridization (Multiprobe FISH and QFISH), ImmunoMFISH (analysis of the chromosome organization in different types of brain cells), and interphase chromosome-specific multicolor banding (ICS-MCB). These approaches allowed studying the nuclear organization depending on the gene composition and types of repetitive DNA of specific chromosome regions in certain types of brain cells (in neurons and glial cells, in particular). The present work demonstrates a high potential of interphase molecular cytogenetics for studying the structural and functional organizations of the cell nucleus in highly differentiated nerve cells. Analysis of interphase chromosomes of brain cells in the normal and pathological states can be considered as a promising line of research in modern molecular cytogenetics and cell neurobiology, i. e., molecular neurocytogenetics.

  12. Describing sequencing results of structural chromosome rearrangements with a suggested next-generation cytogenetic nomenclature.

    PubMed

    Ordulu, Zehra; Wong, Kristen E; Currall, Benjamin B; Ivanov, Andrew R; Pereira, Shahrin; Althari, Sara; Gusella, James F; Talkowski, Michael E; Morton, Cynthia C

    2014-05-01

    With recent rapid advances in genomic technologies, precise delineation of structural chromosome rearrangements at the nucleotide level is becoming increasingly feasible. In this era of "next-generation cytogenetics" (i.e., an integration of traditional cytogenetic techniques and next-generation sequencing), a consensus nomenclature is essential for accurate communication and data sharing. Currently, nomenclature for describing the sequencing data of these aberrations is lacking. Herein, we present a system called Next-Gen Cytogenetic Nomenclature, which is concordant with the International System for Human Cytogenetic Nomenclature (2013). This system starts with the alignment of rearrangement sequences by BLAT or BLAST (alignment tools) and arrives at a concise and detailed description of chromosomal changes. To facilitate usage and implementation of this nomenclature, we are developing a program designated BLA(S)T Output Sequence Tool of Nomenclature (BOSToN), a demonstrative version of which is accessible online. A standardized characterization of structural chromosomal rearrangements is essential both for research analyses and for application in the clinical setting.

  13. Cytogenetics of monosomes in Zea mays. Comprehensive report, February 1, 1977-May 15, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, D. F.

    1980-02-01

    Progress is reported in research on the cytogenetics of maize. The study has identified genetic factors that control the meiotic process, genetic recombination, lipid biosynthesis, and the free amino acid pool. It has also been determined that distributive pairing, gene compensation, and gene magnification do not occur in maize. (ACR)

  14. Inferring Diversity and Evolution in Fish by Means of Integrative Molecular Cytogenetics

    PubMed Central

    Artoni, Roberto Ferreira; Castro, Jonathan Pena; Jacobina, Uedson Pereira; Lima-Filho, Paulo Augusto; Félix da Costa, Gideão Wagner Werneck; Molina, Wagner Franco

    2015-01-01

    Fish constitute a paraphyletic and profusely diversified group that has historically puzzled ichthyologists. Hard efforts are necessary to better understand this group, due to its extensive diversity. New species are often identified and it leads to questions about their phylogenetic aspects. Cytogenetics is becoming an important biodiversity-detection tool also used to measure biodiversity evolutionary aspects. Molecular cytogenetics by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) allowed integrating quantitative and qualitative data from DNA sequences and their physical location in chromosomes and genomes. Although there is no intention on presenting a broader review, the current study presents some evidences on the need of integrating molecular cytogenetic data to other evolutionary biology tools to more precisely infer cryptic species detection, population structuring in marine environments, intra- and interspecific karyoevolutionary aspects of freshwater groups, evolutionary dynamics of marine fish chromosomes, and the origin and differentiation of sexual and B chromosomes. The new cytogenetic field, called cytogenomics, is spreading due to its capacity to give resolute answers to countless questions that cannot be answered by traditional methodologies. Indeed, the association between chromosomal markers and DNA sequencing as well as between biological diversity analysis methodologies and phylogenetics triggers the will to search for answers about fish evolutionary, taxonomic, and structural features. PMID:26345638

  15. Cytogenetic Survey for Autistic Fragile X Carriers in a Mental Retardation Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cantu, Eduardo S.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    The cytogenetic survey of 67 individuals previously identified as having mental retardation and autistic behaviors revealed only 1.5 percent with the fragile X chromosome. The finding suggests that most persons with fragile X syndrome do not have autistic behaviors severe enough to be identified as a secondary psychiatric diagnosis. (Author/DB)

  16. Cytogenetics at the University of Cape Town: A 45-year journey.

    PubMed

    Smart, R D; Schutte, G; Ruppelt, T; Greenberg, L J

    2016-05-25

    This article is a brief record of the cytogenetics laboratory from its birth in 1971, under the auspices of the University of Cape Town, throughout its development within the Department of Human Genetics, under the leadership of Professor Peter Beighton, to its present position at Groote Schuur Hospital, as a multidisciplinary unit run by the National Health Laboratory Service.

  17. CYTOGENETIC STUDIES IN MICE TREATED WITH THE JET FUELS, JET-A AND JP-8

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cytogenetic studies in mice treated with the jet fuels, Jet-A and JP-8
    Abstract
    The genotoxic potential of the jet fuels, Jet-A and JP-8, were examined in mice treated on the skin with a single dose of 240 ug/mouse. Peripheral blood smears were prepared at the start of the ...

  18. Cytogenetic profiles of 2806 patients with acute myeloid leukemia-a retrospective multicenter nationwide study.

    PubMed

    Byun, Ja Min; Kim, Young Jin; Yoon, Hwi-Joong; Kim, Si-Young; Kim, Hee-Je; Yoon, Jaeho; Min, Yoo Hong; Cheong, Jun-Won; Park, Jinny; Lee, Jae Hoon; Hong, Dae Sik; Park, Seong Kyu; Kim, Hyeoung-Joon; Ahn, Jae-Sook; Shin, Ho-Jin; Chung, Joo Seop; Lee, Won Sik; Lee, Sang Min; Park, Yong; Kim, Byung Soo; Lee, Je-Hwan; Lee, Kyoo-Hyung; Jung, Chul Won; Jang, Jun Ho; Min, Woo-Sung; Park, Tae Sung

    2016-08-01

    The cytogenetic and molecular data is recognized as the most valuable prognostic factor in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Our aim was to systemically analyze the cytogenetics of Korean AML patients and to compare the cytogenetic profiles of various races to identify possible geographic heterogeneity. We retrospectively reviewed medical records of 2806 AML patients diagnosed at 11 tertiary teaching hospitals in Korea between January 2007 and December 2011. The most common recurrent chromosomal abnormality was t(8;21) (8.8 %, 238/2717), but t(15;17) showed an almost same number (8.6 %,235/2717). Among de novo AML, the most frequent aberrations were t(15;17), observed in 229 (10.7 %). The most common French-American-British (FAB) classification type was M2 (32.2 %), and recurrent cytogenetic abnormalities correlated with the FAB subtypes. Among 283 secondary AML cases, myelodysplastic syndrome was the most common predisposing factor. About 67.1 % of the secondary AML cases were associated with chromosomal aberrations, and chromosome 7 abnormalities (n = 45, 15.9 %) were most common. The incidence of FLT3 internal tandem duplication mutation was relatively low at 15 %. Our study reports certain similarities and differences in comparison to previous reports. Such discrepancies call for extensive epidemiological studies to clarify the role of genetic as well as geographic heterogeneity in the pathogenesis of AML.

  19. Molecular cytogenetic characterization of two Turner syndrome patients with mosaic ring X chromosome.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Pooja; Jaiswal, Sushil Kumar; Lakhotia, Anjali Rani; Rai, Amit Kumar

    2016-09-01

    In the present study, we reported two cases of TS with mosaic ring X chromosome showing common clinical characteristics of TS like growth retardation and ovarian dysfunction. The purpose of the present study was to cytogenetically characterize both cases. Whole blood culture and G-banding were performed for karyotyping the cases following standard protocol. Origin of the ring chromosome and degree of mosaicism were further determined by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Breakpoints and loss of genetic material in formation of different ring X chromosomes r (X) in cases were determined with the help of cytogenetic microarray. Cases 1 and 2 with ring chromosome were cytogenetically characterized as 45, X [114]/46Xr (X) (p22.11q21.32) [116] and 45, X [170]/46, Xr (X) (p22.2q21.33) [92], respectively. Sizes of these ring X chromosomes were found to be ~75 and ~95 Mb in cases 1 and 2, respectively, using visual estimation as part of cytogenetic observation. In both cases, we observed breakpoints on Xq chromosome were within relatively narrow region between Xq21.33 and Xq22.1 compared to regions in previously reported cases associated with ovarian dysgenesis. Our observation agrees with the fact that despite of large heterogeneity, severity of the cases with intact X-inactive specific transcript (XIST) is dependent on degree of mosaicism and extent of Xq deletion having crucial genes involved directly or indirectly in various physiological involving ovarian cyclicity.

  20. Cytogenetic Survey for Autistic Fragile X Carriers in a Mental Retardation Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cantu, Eduardo S.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    The cytogenetic survey of 67 individuals previously identified as having mental retardation and autistic behaviors revealed only 1.5 percent with the fragile X chromosome. The finding suggests that most persons with fragile X syndrome do not have autistic behaviors severe enough to be identified as a secondary psychiatric diagnosis. (Author/DB)

  1. Capture of Tribolium castaneum and Tribolium confusum (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae) in floor traps: the effect of previous captures

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The impact of prior captures on the trapping performance of floor traps was evaluated for the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum (Herbst) (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae) and the confused flour beetle, Tribolium confusum Jacquelin du Val (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae) in laboratory conditions. The effect...

  2. Effects of prescribed fire and fire surrogates on Saproxylic coleoptera in the Southern Appalachians of North Carolina

    Treesearch

    Joshua W. Campbell; James L. Hanula; Thomas A. Waldrop

    2008-01-01

    We examined the effects of forest management practices (prescribed burning, mechanical, and prescribed burn plus mechanical) on saproxylic forest Coleoptera in the southern Appalachian Mountains of North Carolina. During the 2-yr study, we captured 37,191 Coleoptera with baited multiple- unnel traps and pipe traps, comprising 20 families and 122 species that were used...

  3. Ipsenol and Ipsdienol Attract Monochamus titillator (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) and Associated Large Pine Woodborers in Southeastern United States

    Treesearch

    D. R. Miller; C. Asaro

    2005-01-01

    We determined the responses of the southern pine sawyer, Monochamus titillator (F.) (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae), to the pheromones (ipsenol, ipsdienol, and lanierone) used by pine engraver beetles (Coleoptera: Scolytidae) in the southeastern United States. (±)-Ipsenol, (±)- ipsdienol, or a combination increased catches of M. titillator...

  4. Keratinocyte cytogenetics in 10 patients with pigmentary mosaicism: identification of one case of trisomy 20 mosaicism confined to keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Taibjee, S M; Hall, D; Balderson, D; Larkins, S; Stubbs, T; Moss, C

    2009-10-01

    Hypomelanosis of Ito and linear and whorled hypermelanosis are pigmentary disorders that follow Blaschko's lines and are associated with cytogenetic mosaicism. However, mosaicism cannot always be shown using conventional karyotyping of blood lymphocytes or skin fibroblasts. This may be because these cell lines originate from mesoderm, whereas Blaschko's lines are an ectodermal phenomenon. To investigate the diagnostic value of keratinocyte cytogenetics in patients with pigmentary mosaicism (PM). We undertook a prospective study of 10 patients with clinically suspected PM. Previous karyotyping of blood, and in some cases skin fibroblasts, was normal in all cases. Keratinocytes and fibroblasts were cultured from skin biopsies taken from light and dark skin, and examined for cytogenetic abnormalities. In 9 of 10 cases both keratinocyte and fibroblast cytogenetic analyses were normal. The remaining patient showed trisomy 20 mosaicism confined to keratinocytes from hypopigmented skin. Fluorescent in situ hybridization using a probe for 20q confirmed trisomy 20 mosaicism in keratinocytes but not fibroblasts, with higher signal expression in hypopigmented compared with normal skin. In patients with clinically suspected PM but normal blood cytogenetics, keratinocytes may be more sensitive than skin fibroblasts in identifying cytogenetic mosaicism in selected patients. However, the additional diagnostic yield appears to be insufficient to justify routine keratinocyte cytogenetic investigation. Our findings indirectly support the hypothesis that Blaschko's lines delineate the embryonal migration paths taken by ectodermal cells including keratinocytes and melanocytes.

  5. Minimal residual disease evaluation by flow cytometry is a complementary tool to cytogenetics for treatment decisions in acute myeloid leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Vidriales, María-Belén; Pérez-López, Estefanía; Pegenaute, Carlota; Castellanos, Marta; Pérez, José-Juan; Chandía, Mauricio; Díaz-Mediavilla, Joaquín; Rayón, Consuelo; de Las Heras, Natalia; Fernández-Abellán, Pascual; Cabezudo, Miguel; de Coca, Alfonso García; Alonso, Jose M; Olivier, Carmen; Hernández-Rivas, Jesús M; Montesinos, Pau; Fernández, Rosa; García-Suárez, Julio; García, Magdalena; Sayas, María-José; Paiva, Bruno; González, Marcos; Orfao, Alberto; San Miguel, Jesús F

    2016-01-01

    The clinical utility of minimal residual disease (MRD) analysis in acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) is not yet defined. We analysed the prognostic impact of MRD level at complete remision after induction therapy using multiparameter flow cytometry in 306 non-APL AML patients. First, we validated the prognostic value of MRD-thresholds we have previously proposed (≥ 0.1%; ≥ 0.01-0.1%; and <0.01), with a 5-year RFS of 38%, 50% and 71%, respectively (p=0.002). Cytogenetics is the most relevant prognosis factor in AML, however intermediate risk cytogenetics represent a grey zone that require other biomarkers for risk stratification, and we show that MRD evaluation discriminate three prognostic subgroups (p=0.03). Also, MRD assessments yielded relevant information on favourable and adverse cytogenetics, since patients with favourable cytogenetics and high MRD levels have poor prognosis and patients with adverse cytogenetics but undetectable MRD overcomes the adverse prognosis. Interestingly, in patients with intermediate or high MRD levels, intensification with transplant improved the outcome as compared with chemotherapy, while the type of intensification therapy did not influenced the outcome of patients with low MRD levels. Multivariate analysis revealed age, MRD and cytogenetics as independent variables. Moreover, a scoring system, easy in clinical practice, was generated based on MRD level and cytogenetics.

  6. Cytogenetic profiles in multiple myeloma and monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance: a study in highly purified aberrant plasma cells.

    PubMed

    Schmidt-Hieber, Martin; Gutiérrez, María Laura; Pérez-Andrés, Martin; Paiva, Bruno; Rasillo, Ana; Tabernero, Maria Dolores; Sayagués, José Maria; Lopez, Antonio; Bárcena, Paloma; Sanchez, María Luz; Gutiérrez, Norma C; San Miguel, Jesus F; Orfao, Alberto

    2013-02-01

    Cytogenetic studies in clonal plasma cell disorders have mainly been done in whole bone marrow or CD138(+) microbead-enriched plasma cells and suggest that recurrent immunoglobulin heavy chain translocations - e.g. t(4;14) -are primary oncogenetic events. The aim of this study was to determine cytogenetic patterns of highly purified aberrant plasma cells (median purity ≥ 98%) in different clonal plasma cell disorders. We analyzed aberrant plasma cells from 208 patients with multiple myeloma (n=148) and monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (n=60) for the presence of del(13q14), del(17p13) and t(14q32) using multicolor interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization. Additionally, immunoglobulin heavy chain gene arrangements were analyzed and complementarity determining region 3 was sequenced in a subset of patients and combined multicolor interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization/immunofluorescent protein staining analyses were performed in selected cases to confirm clonality and cytogenetic findings. At diagnosis, 96% of cases with multiple myeloma versus 77% of monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance cases showed at least one cytogenetic alteration and/or hyperdiploidy. The cytogenetic heterogeneity of individual cases reflected coexistence of cytogenetically-defined aberrant plasma cell clones, and led to the assumption that karyotypic alterations were acquired stepwise. Cases of multiple myeloma and monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance frequently showed different but related cytogenetic profiles when other cytogenetic alterations such as deletions/gains of the immunoglobulin heavy chain or the fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 were additionally considered. Interestingly, in 24% of multiple myeloma versus 62% of monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance patients with an immunoglobulin heavy chain translocation, aberrant plasma cells with and without t(14q32) coexisted in the same patient. Our data suggest that

  7. Cytogenetic profiles in multiple myeloma and monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance: a study in highly purified aberrant plasma cells

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt-Hieber, Martin; Gutiérrez, María Laura; Pérez-Andrés, Martin; Paiva, Bruno; Rasillo, Ana; Tabernero, Maria Dolores; Sayagués, José Maria; Lopez, Antonio; Bárcena, Paloma; Sanchez, María Luz; Gutiérrez, Norma C.; San Miguel, Jesus F.; Orfao, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    Cytogenetic studies in clonal plasma cell disorders have mainly been done in whole bone marrow or CD138+ microbead-enriched plasma cells and suggest that recurrent immunoglobulin heavy chain translocations - e.g. t(4;14) -are primary oncogenetic events. The aim of this study was to determine cytogenetic patterns of highly purified aberrant plasma cells (median purity ≥98%) in different clonal plasma cell disorders. We analyzed aberrant plasma cells from 208 patients with multiple myeloma (n=148) and monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (n=60) for the presence of del(13q14), del(17p13) and t(14q32) using multicolor interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization. Additionally, immunoglobulin heavy chain gene arrangements were analyzed and complementarity determining region 3 was sequenced in a subset of patients and combined multicolor interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization/immunofluorescent protein staining analyses were performed in selected cases to confirm clonality and cytogenetic findings. At diagnosis, 96% of cases with multiple myeloma versus 77% of monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance cases showed at least one cytogenetic alteration and/or hyperdiploidy. The cytogenetic heterogeneity of individual cases reflected coexistence of cytogenetically-defined aberrant plasma cell clones, and led to the assumption that karyotypic alterations were acquired stepwise. Cases of multiple myeloma and monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance frequently showed different but related cytogenetic profiles when other cytogenetic alterations such as deletions/gains of the immunoglobulin heavy chain or the fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 were additionally considered. Interestingly, in 24% of multiple myeloma versus 62% of monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance patients with an immunoglobulin heavy chain translocation, aberrant plasma cells with and without t(14q32) coexisted in the same patient. Our data suggest that

  8. Two new species of Scymnini (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) from Karnataka, India

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background The Scymnini (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) of the Indian region is rich and highly speciose, with nearly 90 described species and scores of undescribed species (Poorani 2002). There is a dire need to systematically revise the genera and species of this tribe from the Indian region. Due to paucity of representative collections covering the entire region and lack of access to types, it is difficult to identify most of the Scymnini of the Indian region to species. As a result, many economically important species remain poorly characterized, or worse, unnamed. New information Two economically important and unique species of Scymnini (Coccinellidae) belonging to Horniolus Weise (1900) and Scymnus (Pullus) Mulsant (1846) from the Southern Indian state of Karnataka that have remained unnamed for long are treated in this paper. These species are externally similar to other known species and often misidentified. Horniolus sororius sp. n. and Scymnus (Pullus) rajeshwariae sp. n. (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) are described here and illustrated with notes on their biology and related species. PMID:26177296

  9. Variations on a Theme: Antennal Lobe Architecture across Coleoptera.

    PubMed

    Kollmann, Martin; Schmidt, Rovenna; Heuer, Carsten M; Schachtner, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Beetles comprise about 400,000 described species, nearly one third of all known animal species. The enormous success of the order Coleoptera is reflected by a rich diversity of lifestyles, behaviors, morphological, and physiological adaptions. All these evolutionary adaptions that have been driven by a variety of parameters over the last about 300 million years, make the Coleoptera an ideal field to study the evolution of the brain on the interface between the basic bauplan of the insect brain and the adaptions that occurred. In the current study we concentrated on the paired antennal lobes (AL), the part of the brain that is typically responsible for the first processing of olfactory information collected from olfactory sensilla on antenna and mouthparts. We analyzed 63 beetle species from 22 different families and thus provide an extensive comparison of principal neuroarchitecture of the AL. On the examined anatomical level, we found a broad diversity including AL containing a wide range of glomeruli numbers reaching from 50 to 150 glomeruli and several species with numerous small glomeruli, resembling the microglomerular design described in acridid grasshoppers and diving beetles, and substructures within the glomeruli that have to date only been described for the small hive beetle, Aethina tumida. A first comparison of the various anatomical features of the AL with available descriptions of lifestyle and behaviors did so far not reveal useful correlations. In summary, the current study provides a solid basis for further studies to unravel mechanisms that are basic to evolutionary adaptions of the insect olfactory system.

  10. Roberts syndrome: study of 4 new Rgyptian cases with comparison of clinical and cytogenetic findings.

    PubMed

    Temtamy, S A; Ismail, S; Helmy, N A

    2006-01-01

    Roberts syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive genetic disorder (MIM 268300). It is characterized by pre and postnatal growth retardation, severe shortening of limbs with radial defects, oligodactyly and characteristic facial features. The present study reports 4 new cases of Roberts syndrome from 3 families presenting variable phenotypes. Patients were thoroughly investigated clinically and cytogenetically. By reviewing literature, we compared our cases to those previously reported. The rating severity system proposed by Van den Berg and Francke (30) was applied to correlate the phenotypic and cytogenetics changes. We observed more severe reduction defects in the upper limbs than in the lower limbs. While the main reduction defects in the upper limbs involved the thumb and radius ranging to phocomelia, absent or severely hypoplastic fibula was the main lower limb involvement. We emphasize this finding in the present investigation. Heterochromatin repulsion of chromosomes derived from Roberts syndrome patients is a characteristic cytogenetic abnormality. It was a constant finding in our studied patients demonstrated by DABI stain which supports the possibility that mutations in Roberts syndrome lie in centromere related proteins which may also play a role in body patterning. This was proved recently by Vega et al. (31). Application of the clinical rating score and its correlation with cytogenetic changes showed negative results. Cytogenetic studies in normal obligatory heterozygotes parents showed no changes. Phenotypic variability within the same family as well as between different families was observed. The ascertainment of 4 cases with Roberts syndrome from 3 Egyptian consanguineous families during one year in our department may indicate a high frequency of the Roberts syndrome allele among Egyptians. This confirms the need for molecular studies for early and accurate prenatal diagnosis to prevent such dramatic malformation syndrome.

  11. Role of cytogenetic biomarkers in management of chronic kidney disease patients: A review

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Zeba; Pandey, Manoj; Samartha, Ravindra M

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is much more common than people recognize, and habitually goes undetected and undiagnosed until the disease is well advanced or when their kidney functions is down to 25% of normal function. Genetic and non-genetic factors contribute to cause CKD. Non-genetic factors include hypertension, High level of DNA damage due to the production of reactive oxygen species and nucleic acid oxidation has been reported in CKD patients. Main genetic factor which causes CKD is diabetic nephropathy. A three- to nine-fold greater risk of End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) is observed in individuals with a family history of ESRD. This greater risk have led researchers to search for genes linked to diabetic and other forms of nephropathy for the management of CKD. Multicenter consortia are currently recruiting large numbers of multiplex diabetic families with index cases having nephropathy for linkage and association analyses using various cytogenetic techniques. In addition, large-scale screening studies are underway, with the goals of better defining the overall prevalence of chronic kidney disease, as well as educating the population about risk factors for nephropathy, including family history. Cytogenetic biomarkers play an imperative role for the linkage study using G banding and detection of genomic instability in CKD patients. Classical and molecular cytogenetic tools with cytogenetic biomarkers provide remarkable findings in CKD patients. The aim of the present review is to draw outline of classical and molecular cytogenetic findings in CKD patients and their possible role in management to reduce genomic instability in CKD patients. PMID:27833523

  12. Combined Use of Cytogenetic and Molecular Methods in Prenatal Diagnostics of Chromosomal Abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Stomornjak-Vukadin, Meliha; Kurtovic-Basic, Ilvana; Mehinovic, Lejla; Konjhodzic, Rijad

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The aim of prenatal diagnostics is to provide information of the genetic abnormalities of the fetus early enough for the termination of pregnancy to be possible. Chromosomal abnormalities can be detected in an unborn child through the use of cytogenetic, molecular- cytogenetic and molecular methods. In between them, central spot is still occupied by cytogenetic methods. In cases where use of such methods is not informative enough, one or more molecular cytogenetic methods can be used for further clarification. Combined use of the mentioned methods improves the quality of the final findings in the diagnostics of chromosomal abnormalities, with classical cytogenetic methods still occupying the central spot. Material and methods: Conducted research represent retrospective-prospective study of a four year period, from 2008 through 2011. In the period stated, 1319 karyotyping from amniotic fluid were conducted, along with 146 FISH analysis. Results: Karyotyping had detected 20 numerical and 18 structural aberrations in that period. Most common observed numerical aberration were Down syndrome (75%), Klinefelter syndrome (10%), Edwards syndrome, double Y syndrome and triploidy (5% each). Within observed structural aberrations more common were balanced chromosomal aberrations then non balanced ones. Most common balanced structural aberrations were as follows: reciprocal translocations (60%), Robertson translocations (13.3%), chromosomal inversions, duplications and balanced de novo chromosomal rearrangements (6.6% each). Conclusion: With non- balanced aberrations observed in the samples of amniotic fluid, non- balanced translocations, deletions and derived chromosomes were equally represented. Number of detected aneuploidies with FISH, prior to obtaining results with karyotyping, were 6. PMID:26005269

  13. Targeted deep sequencing improves outcome stratification in chronic myelomonocytic leukemia with low risk cytogenetic features

    PubMed Central

    Palomo, Laura; Garcia, Olga; Arnan, Montse; Xicoy, Blanca; Fuster, Francisco; Cabezón, Marta; Coll, Rosa; Ademà, Vera; Grau, Javier; Jiménez, Maria-José; Pomares, Helena; Marcé, Sílvia; Mallo, Mar; Millá, Fuensanta; Alonso, Esther; Sureda, Anna; Gallardo, David; Feliu, Evarist; Ribera, Josep-Maria; Solé, Francesc; Zamora, Lurdes

    2016-01-01

    Clonal cytogenetic abnormalities are found in 20-30% of patients with chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML), while gene mutations are present in >90% of cases. Patients with low risk cytogenetic features account for 80% of CMML cases and often fall into the low risk categories of CMML prognostic scoring systems, but the outcome differs considerably among them. We performed targeted deep sequencing of 83 myeloid-related genes in 56 CMML patients with low risk cytogenetic features or uninformative conventional cytogenetics (CC) at diagnosis, with the aim to identify the genetic characteristics of patients with a more aggressive disease. Targeted sequencing was also performed in a subset of these patients at time of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) transformation. Overall, 98% of patients harbored at least one mutation. Mutations in cell signaling genes were acquired at time of AML progression. Mutations in ASXL1, EZH2 and NRAS correlated with higher risk features and shorter overall survival (OS) and progression free survival (PFS). Patients with SRSF2 mutations associated with poorer OS, while absence of TET2 mutations (TET2wt) was predictive of shorter PFS. A decrease in OS and PFS was observed as the number of adverse risk gene mutations (ASXL1, EZH2, NRAS and SRSF2) increased. On multivariate analyses, CMML-specific scoring system (CPSS) and presence of adverse risk gene mutations remained significant for OS, while CPSS and TET2wt were predictive of PFS. These results confirm that mutation analysis can add prognostic value to patients with CMML and low risk cytogenetic features or uninformative CC. PMID:27486981

  14. Dioxins and cytogenetic status of villagers after 40 years of agent Orange application in Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Sycheva, Lyudmila P; Umnova, Nataliya V; Kovalenko, Maria A; Zhurkov, Vjacheslav S; Shelepchikov, Andrey A; Roumak, Vladimir S

    2016-02-01

    We have examined cytogenetic status of the rural population living on dioxin-contaminated territories (DCT, TCDD in soil 2.6 ng/kg) compared to the villagers of the control area (TCDD in soil 0.18 ng kg(-1)). The examination took place almost 40 years after the war. The consequences of some confounding factors (years of residence in the region, farming, and aging) has been examined. Karyological analysis of buccal and nasal epitheliocytes among healthy adult males living on DCT and control area (26 and 35 persons) was conducted. A wide range of cytogenetic (micronuclei, nuclear protrusions), proliferative (binucleated cells and cells with doubled nucleus) and endpoints of cell death (cells with perinuclear vacuoles, with damaged nucleus membrane, condensed chromatin, pyknosis, karyorrhexis, karyolysis) had been analyzed. The frequent amount of cells with nuclear protrusions in both epithelia was slightly decreased in the DСT group. Biomarkers of early and late stages of nuclear destruction in buccal epithelium (cells with damaged nuclear membrane, karyolysis) were elevated significantly in DCT. Higher level of the same parameters was also identified in nasal epithelium. The cytogenetic status of healthy adult males on DCT had got "normalization" by present moment in comparison with our early data. Nevertheless, in exposed group some alteration of the cytogenetic status was being registered (mostly biomarkers of apoptosis). Years of residence (and exposure to dioxins) affected the cytogenetic status of DCT inhabitants, whereas no influence of farming factors (pesticides, fertilizers, etc.) had been discovered. Some biomarkers of proliferation and cell death were affected by aging.

  15. Role of cytogenetic biomarkers in management of chronic kidney disease patients: A review.

    PubMed

    Khan, Zeba; Pandey, Manoj; Samartha, Ravindra M

    2016-10-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is much more common than people recognize, and habitually goes undetected and undiagnosed until the disease is well advanced or when their kidney functions is down to 25% of normal function. Genetic and non-genetic factors contribute to cause CKD. Non-genetic factors include hypertension, High level of DNA damage due to the production of reactive oxygen species and nucleic acid oxidation has been reported in CKD patients. Main genetic factor which causes CKD is diabetic nephropathy. A three- to nine-fold greater risk of End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) is observed in individuals with a family history of ESRD. This greater risk have led researchers to search for genes linked to diabetic and other forms of nephropathy for the management of CKD. Multicenter consortia are currently recruiting large numbers of multiplex diabetic families with index cases having nephropathy for linkage and association analyses using various cytogenetic techniques. In addition, large-scale screening studies are underway, with the goals of better defining the overall prevalence of chronic kidney disease, as well as educating the population about risk factors for nephropathy, including family history. Cytogenetic biomarkers play an imperative role for the linkage study using G banding and detection of genomic instability in CKD patients. Classical and molecular cytogenetic tools with cytogenetic biomarkers provide remarkable findings in CKD patients. The aim of the present review is to draw outline of classical and molecular cytogenetic findings in CKD patients and their possible role in management to reduce genomic instability in CKD patients.

  16. Evolutionary chromosomal differentiation among four species of Conoderus Eschscholtz, 1829 (Coleoptera, Elateridae, Agrypninae, Conoderini) detected by standard staining, C-banding, silver nitrate impregnation, and CMA3/DA/DAPI staining.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Marielle Cristina; Almeida, Mara Cristina; Rosa, Simone Policena; Costa, Cleide; Cella, Doralice Maria

    2006-01-01

    The speciose Brazilian Elateridae fauna is characterized by high karyotypic diversity, including one species (Chalcolepidius zonatus Eschscholtz, 1829) with the lowest diploid number within any Coleoptera order. Cytogenetic analysis of Conoderus dimidiatus Germar, 1839, C. scalaris (Germar, 1824,) C. ternarius Germar, 1839, and C. stigmosus Germar, 1839 by standard and differential staining was performed with the aim of establishing mechanisms of karyotypic differentiation in these species. Conoderus dimidiatus, C. scalaris, and C. ternarius have diploid numbers of 2n(male) = 17 and 2n(female) = 18, and a X0/XX sex determination system, similar to that encountered in the majority of Conoderini species. The karyotype of C. stigmosus was characterized by a diploid number of 2n = 16 and a neoXY/neoXX sex determination system that was highly differentiated from other species of the genus. Some features of the mitotic and meiotic chromosomes suggest an autosome/ancestral X chromosome fusion as the cause of the neoXY system origin in C. stigmosus. C-banding and silver impregnation techniques showed that the four Conoderus species possess similar chromosomal characteristics to those registered in most Polyphaga species, including pericentromeric C band and autosomal NORs. Triple staining techniques including CMA3/DA/DAPI also provided useful information for differentiating these Conoderus species. These techniques revealed unique GC-rich heterochromatin associated with NORs in C. scalaris and C. stigmosus and CMA3-heteromorphism in C. scalaris and C. ternarius.

  17. An informative constitutional cytogenetic marker found in a patient post bone marrow transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Zaslav, A.L.; Graziano, J.; Ebert, R.

    1994-09-01

    It is cytogenetically difficult to distinguish between host and donor cells in allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT) individuals of the same sex. Here we describe a patient with a cytogenetic marker found after BMT. A 7-month-old male presented with leukemia which was CD7+, CD33+, HLADR+, and CD4-, CD8-, indicating a diagnosis of acute stem cell leukemia (ASCL). Cytogenetic analysis revealed an abnormal clone in all of the cells analyzed: 46,XY,t(2;8)(p11.2;q24),inv(9)(p13p24). This translocation is associated with B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL); thus, it was possible for this patient to develop B-cell ALL. The abnormal clone persisted along with normal 46,XY cells, and evolved in several of seven additional analyses. The patient was treated with two courses of chemotherapy and failed to attain cytogenetic remission. While in relapse, the patient received a BMT from his 3-year-old brother. Two weeks later, a different translocation was seen in all cells: 46,XY,t(3;12)(p21;q21). This result could be interpreted in two ways: (1) the structural abnormality was indicative of a newly evolved clone related to the patient`s disease; or (2) the donor was a balanced translocation carrier. Cytogenetic analysis of peripheral blood from the donor revealed the same translocation seen in the patient. Parental blood chromosomes were normal indicating that the donor carried a de novo balanced translocation. Subsequent chromosome analysis of both peripheral blood and BM from the patient revealed the presence of the translocation in all cells. De novo balanced translocations are rare and occur with a frequency of 1/2,000 live borns. The family received genetic counseling and was informed of the possible reproductive risks to translocation carriers. This unusual finding will serve as a useful cytogenetic marker to assist in monitoring the patient`s clinical course, i.e., chimerism and remission status.

  18. Vertical stratification of beetles (Coleoptera) and flies (Diptera) in temperate forest canopies.

    PubMed

    Maguire, Dorothy Y; Robert, Katleen; Brochu, Kristen; Larrivée, Maxim; Buddle, Christopher M; Wheeler, Terry A

    2014-02-01

    Forest canopies support high arthropod biodiversity, but in temperate canopies, little is known about the spatial distribution of these arthropods. This is an important first step toward understanding ecological roles of insects in temperate canopies. The objective of this study was to assess differences in the species composition of two dominant and diverse taxa (Diptera and Coleoptera) along a vertical gradient in temperate deciduous forest canopies. Five sugar maple trees from each of three deciduous forest sites in southern Quebec were sampled using a combination of window and trunk traps placed in three vertical strata (understory, mid-canopy, and upper-canopy) for three sampling periods throughout the summer. Coleoptera species richness and abundance did not differ between canopy heights, but more specimens and species of Diptera were collected in the upper-canopy. Community composition of Coleoptera and Diptera varied significantly by trap height. Window traps collected more specimens and species of Coleoptera than trunk traps, although both trap types should be used to maximize representation of the entire Coleoptera community. There were no differences in abundance, diversity, or composition of Diptera collected between trap types. Our data confirm the relevance of sampling all strata in a forest when studying canopy arthropod biodiversity.

  19. Acoustic detection of Rhynchophorus ferrugineus (Coleoptera: Dryophthoridae) and Oryctes elegans (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae) in Phoenix dactylifera (Arecales: Arecacae) trees and offshoots in Saudi Arabian orchards

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Rhynchophorus ferrugineus (Olivier) (Coleoptera: Dryophthoridae) larvae are cryptic, internal-tissue feeding pests of palm trees that are difficult to detect until after they have caused severe economic damage; consequently, infestations may remain undetected until they are widespread in an orchard....

  20. Identification of novel cytogenetic markers with prognostic significance in a series of 968 patients with primary myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Solé, Francesc; Luño, Elisa; Sanzo, Carmen; Espinet, Blanca; Sanz, Guillermo F; Cervera, José; Calasanz, María José; Cigudosa, Juan Cruz; Millà, Fuensanta; Ribera, Josep Maria; Bureo, Encarna; Marquez, Maria Luisa; Arranz, Eva; Florensa, Lourdes

    2005-09-01

    The main prognostic factors in myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are chromosomal abnormalities, the proportion of blasts in bone marrow and number and degree of cytopenias. A consensus-defined International Prognostic Scoring System (IPSS) for predicting outcome and planning therapy in MDS has been developed, but its prognostic value in a large and independent series remains unproven. Furthermore, the intermediate-risk cytogenetic subgroup defined by the IPSS includes a miscellaneous number of different single abnormalities of uncertain prognostic significance at present. The main aim of the present study was to identify chromosomal abnormalities with a previously unrecognized good or poor prognosis in order to find new cytogenetic markers with predictive value. We report the cytogenetic findings in a series of 968 patients with primary MDS from the Spanish Cytogenetics Working Group, Grupo Cooperativo Español de Citogenética Hematológica (GCECGH). In this series of 968 MDS patients, we found various cytogenetic aberrations with a new prognostic impact. Complex karyotype, -7/7q- and i(17q) had a poor prognosis; normal karyotype, loss of Y chromosome, deletion 11q, deletion 12p and deletion 20q as single alterations had a good prognosis. Intermediate prognosis aberrations were rearrangements of 3q21q26, trisomy 8, trisomy 9, translocations of 11q and del(17p). Finally, a new group of single or double cytogenetic abnormalities, most of which are considered rare cytogenetic events and are usually included in the intermediate category of the IPSS, showed a trend to poor prognosis. This study suggests that some specific chromosomal abnormalities could be segregated from the IPSS intermediate-risk cytogenetic prognostic subgroup and included in the low risk or in the poor risk groups.

  1. Treatment of multiple myeloma with high-risk cytogenetics: a consensus of the International Myeloma Working Group

    PubMed Central

    Avet-Loiseau, Hervé; Lonial, Sagar; Usmani, Saad; Siegel, David; Anderson, Kenneth C.; Chng, Wee-Joo; Moreau, Philippe; Attal, Michel; Kyle, Robert A.; Caers, Jo; Hillengass, Jens; San Miguel, Jesús; van de Donk, Niels W. C. J.; Einsele, Hermann; Bladé, Joan; Durie, Brian G. M.; Goldschmidt, Hartmut; Mateos, María-Victoria; Palumbo, Antonio; Orlowski, Robert

    2016-01-01

    The International Myeloma Working Group consensus updates the definition for high-risk (HR) multiple myeloma based on cytogenetics Several cytogenetic abnormalities such as t(4;14), del(17/17p), t(14;16), t(14;20), nonhyperdiploidy, and gain(1q) were identified that confer poor prognosis. The prognosis of patients showing these abnormalities may vary with the choice of therapy. Treatment strategies have shown promise for HR cytogenetic diseases, such as proteasome inhibition in combination with lenalidomide/pomalidomide, double autologous stem cell transplant plus bortezomib, or combination of immunotherapy with lenalidomide or pomalidomide. Careful analysis of cytogenetic subgroups in trials comparing different treatments remains an important goal. Cross-trial comparisons may provide insight into the effect of new drugs in patients with cytogenetic abnormalities. However, to achieve this, consensus on definitions of analytical techniques, proportion of abnormal cells, and treatment regimens is needed. Based on data available today, bortezomib and carfilzomib treatment appear to improve complete response, progression-free survival, and overall survival in t(4;14) and del(17/17p), whereas lenalidomide may be associated with improved progression-free survival in t(4;14) and del(17/17p). Patients with multiple adverse cytogenetic abnormalities do not benefit from these agents. FISH data are implemented in the revised International Staging System for risk stratification. PMID:27002115

  2. Cytogenetic abnormalities and monosomal karyotypes in children and adolescents with acute myeloid leukemia: correlations with clinical characteristics and outcome.

    PubMed

    Manola, Kalliopi N; Panitsas, Fotios; Polychronopoulou, Sophia; Daraki, Aggeliki; Karakosta, Maria; Stavropoulou, Cryssa; Avgerinou, Georgia; Hatzipantelis, Emmanuel; Pantelias, Gabriel; Sambani, Constantina; Pagoni, Maria

    2013-03-01

    The whole spectrum of chromosomal abnormalities and their prognostic significance in children and adolescents with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) has not been fully elucidated yet, although a considerable amount of knowledge has been gained recently. Moreover, the incidence and prognostic impact of monosomal karyotypes (MKs), which are new cytogenetic categories reported recently in adults with AML, are currently unknown for childhood and adolescent AML. In this study, we investigated the cytogenetic and clinical characteristics of 140 children and adolescents (≤21 y) with AML, and correlated their cytogenetic features with both the clinical characteristics and outcomes of our patient cohort. The most frequent cytogenetic abnormality found in our study was the t(15;17), followed by the t(8;21). Striking differences in the genetic abnormalities and French-American-British subtypes were found among infants, children, and adolescents. Of 124 cases, 15 (12.1%) met the criteria of the MK definition, and 12 of the 15 MKs (80%) were complex karyotypes. Of 124 cases, 27 (21.8%) had cytogenetic abnormalities sufficient to be diagnosed as AML with myelodyspastic sydrome-related features. As expected, patients with the t(15;17) had the most favorable outcomes, whereas patients with 11q23 rearrangements and monosomy 7 had the worst outcomes. These data expand our knowledge by providing novel insights into the cytogenetic features and their correlations with clinical characteristics and outcomes in childhood and adolescent AML.

  3. Coleoptera associated with macrophytes of the genus Salvinia in four oxbow lakes in two river basins in southeast Brazil.

    PubMed

    Paula-Bueno, M C; Fonseca-Gessner, A A

    2015-11-01

    Macrophytes in oxbow lakes represent an important substrate for the Coleoptera. Two oxbow lakes the Rio Paranapanema were studied and the other two Rio Mogi-Guaçu, in the State de São Paulo, Brasil. In this study, there is greater similarity between the communities of Coleoptera of lakes greater connectivity with the main river channel or the difference in the species of Salvinia collected in the lakes studied interferes Coleoptera fauna that uses as substrate. A total of 9,222 specimens of Coleoptera were collected and identified in 10 families and 40 genera. The analysis MDS for abundance of Coleoptera showed the grouping of the oxbow lakes the Paranapanema River and a distancing the oxbow lakes the Mogi-Guaçu. The PERMANOVA test did not reveal any difference in the fauna between the wet and dry periods. It was concluded that the connectivity between river and lake is not decisive for the richness and abundance of aquatic fauna of Coleoptera. Therefore, the richness and abundance of aquatic Coleoptera associated vary with the species of Salvinia used as substrate.

  4. Case report: Concomitant Chronic Lymphocytic Leukaemia and Cytogenetically Normal de novo Acute Leukaemia in a Patient.

    PubMed

    Kajtár, Béla; Rajnics, Péter; Egyed, Miklós; Alizadeh, Hussain

    2015-01-01

    The simultaneous occurrence of acute myeloid leukaemia with untreated chronic lymphocytic leukemia is extremely rare. We report a case of a 74-year-old man who was evaluated for macrocytic anaemia. Based on the morphology and immunophenotyping analysis of peripheral blood, a diagnosis of chronic lymphocytic leukemia was established. Subsequently, the bone marrow examination revealed the presence of two distinct, coexisting CLL and AML clones. Cytogenetic and molecular genetic analysis detected deletion 13q14.3 and unmutated immunoglobulin variable heavy-chain in the CLL clone, only. The AML and CLL clones did not share clonality, and the AML did not involve the peripheral blood. A diagnosis of cytogenetically normal de novo AML occurring concurrently with untreated CLL has not been reported previously in English literature. © 2015 by the Association of Clinical Scientists, Inc.

  5. A comparative study of phytohaemagglutinin and extract of Phaseolus vulgaris seeds by characterization and cytogenetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badari Nath, A. R. S.; Sivaramakrishna, A.; Marimuthu, K. M.; Saraswathy, Radha

    2015-01-01

    Phytohaemagglutinin (PHA) is a lectin obtained from Phaseolus vulgaris (red kidney beans), that acts as a mitogen in human leucocyte culture and is commercially available from Gibco®. This PHA (Gibco®) was found to be very expensive, hence other inexpensive sources that can be used in all kinds of cytogenetics labs (rich and poor), were attempted. One such successful attempt was PHA extract from seeds of P.vulgaris. This paper details the methodology of extraction and application of PHA from seeds of P.vulgaris. Attempts has been made to identify the chemical and physical properties of the products in the extract, analyzed by various spectroscopic and analytical techniques. The analysis clearly indicates that the product from Phaseolus seeds extract was found to be similar to the commercially available PHA (Gibco®) in the cytogenetic study of human leucocyte cultures. The present study enforces the possible utility of the plant extract directly for human leucocyte cultures.

  6. Comparative Cytogenetic Study on the Toxicity of Magnetite and Zinc Ferrite Nanoparticles in Sunflower Root Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foca-nici, Ecaterina; Capraru, Gabriela; Creanga, Dorina

    2010-12-01

    In this experimental study the authors present their results regarding the cellular division rate and the percentage of chromosomal aberrations in the root meristematic cells of Helianthus annuus cultivated in the presence of different volume fractions of magnetic nanoparticle suspensions, ranging between 20 and 100 microl/l. The aqueous magnetic colloids were prepared from chemically co-precipitated ferrites coated in sodium oleate. Tissue samples from the root meristeme of 2-3 day old germinated seeds were taken to prepare microscope slides following Squash method combined with Fuelgen techniques. Microscope investigation (cytogenetic tests) has resulted in the evaluation of mitotic index and chromosomal aberration index that appeared diminished and respectively increased following the addition of magnetic nanoparticles in the culture medium of the young seedlings. Zinc ferrite toxic influence appeared to be higher than that of magnetite, according to both cytogenetic parameters.

  7. Comparative analyses in Lotus: the cytogenetic map of Lotus uliginosus Schkuhr.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, J; Mendes, S; Dall'agnol, M; Sandal, N; Sato, S; Pedrosa-Harand, A

    2012-01-01

    A comparative cytogenetic map was built for Lotusuliginosus (2n = 12), expanding previous analyses that revealed intra- and interspecific chromosomal rearrangements in the model legume L. japonicus, L. filicaulis, and L. burttii. This species is positioned in a sister clade of the previously-mapped species and is proposed as one of the progenitors of L. corniculatus, the main forage crop of the genus. The cytogenetic map allowed the location of 12 genomic regions to be compared between these species. A high macrosynteny was revealed, but it was interrupted by a translocation involving chromosomes 3 and 5, a new rearrangement for the genus. Also, a transposition on chromosome 2 was found in L. japonicus 'Miyakojima'. Furthermore, changes in the number, size, and position of rDNA sites were observed, as well as an intraspecific size heteromorphism of the 5S rDNA site on L. uliginosus chromosome 6. The karyotype differences observed are proportional to the phylogenetic distance among these species.

  8. [Cytogenetical and molecular analyses in a horse with SRY-negative sex reversal].

    PubMed

    Pieńkowska-Schelling, A; Becker, D; Bracher, V; Pineroli, B; Schelling, C

    2014-07-01

    Numerical and structural aberrations of chromosomes may cause malformations, embryonal losses and reduced or missing fertility. In male horses the fertility is rather well controlled through their semen evaluation. For mares there are no mandatory regulations which specify their use in a breeding programme. Therefore, mares with chromosomal aberrations, which exclude reproduction success may be chosen for breeding. The present case describes a horse, offically registered as a female, which was presented for a breeding exam. On this occasion, small and inactive ovaries were diagnosed. Although the cytogenetical analysis excluded a numerical or gross structural chromosome aberration, the karyotype (64,XY) corresponded to the male sex. The diagnosis male to female sex-reversal (SRY-negative) excludes reproductive success for this horse. This case underlines the importance of a cytogenetic analysis for female horses, before they enter a breeding programme.

  9. Cytogenetic characterization of Lippia alba and Lantana camara (Verbenaceae) from Brazil.

    PubMed

    Brandão, Aline Dias; Viccini, Lyderson Facio; Salimena, Fátima Regina Gonçalves; Vanzela, André Luiz Laforga; Recco-Pimentel, Shirlei Maria

    2007-03-01

    The aim of this work was to determine the cytogenetic characteristics of Brazilian Lippia alba (Mill) N. E. Brown and Lantana camara Plum. that could be useful for future characterization of these genera. Our analyses revealed that Li. alba has 2n=30 chromosomes consisting of ten metacentric and five submetacentric pairs, while La. camara has 44 metacentric chromosomes. The large blocks of heterochromatin seen in both species suggest an apomorphic condition. Six 45S rDNA sites were detected in both species by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Two and four 5S rDNA sites were observed in Li. alba and La. camara, respectively. Meiotic analysis revealed a normal chromosomal behaviour. The number of chromosomes and the presence of 45S rDNA and 5S rDNA sites do not exclude a possible polyploid origin. The cytogenetic differences between La. camara and Li. alba may be useful markers for differentiating these species.

  10. Comparative cytogenetics among allopatric populations of the fish, Hoplias malabaricus. Cytotypes with 2n = 42 chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Born, G G; Bertollo, L A

    2000-01-01

    The available chromosomal data on Hoplias malabaricus make possible the identification of three major karyotypic forms in this fish group, all of them bearing 2n = 42 chromosomes, and named as Cytotypes A, B and E in previous studies. While Cytotype A and B share a general macrokaryotypic feature, Cytotype E is well differentiated concerning the morphology and size of some chromosome pairs. On the other hand, Cytotype B presents an exclusive XX/XY sex chromosome system. Six allopatric populations, belonging to Cytotype A, were subjected to cytogenetic analysis in the present study. Despite their basic karyotypic similarity, some differences in the chromosome formulae, as well as in the heterochromatin and Ag-NORs locations, were observed among populations indicating that they no more correspond to a unit, at least in the cytogenetical level.

  11. A clinical, cytogenetic, and molecular study of 40 adults with the Prader-Willi syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Webb, T; Clarke, D; Hardy, C A; Kilpatrick, M W; Corbett, J; Dahlitz, M

    1995-01-01

    A clinical, cytogenetic, and molecular study has been carried out on 40 adults with a firm diagnosis of Prader-Willi syndrome. A cytogenetically detectable deletion was observed in 58% while further subjects had a deletion which was detectable by molecular methods only, giving a total of 76%. Four cases of maternal uniparental disomy (UPD) were all female. Three of them were heterodisomic while the fourth was isodisomic. Two male probands were heterozygous at all loci tested yet did not have UPD. Although methylation studies showed that one of them had a single band using probe PW71, the other one had two bands. Psychiatric studies suggest that females with maternal UPD are indistinguishable psychologically from those with a paternal deletion in 15q11q13. Images PMID:7783165

  12. Studying the effect of antioxidants on cytogenetic manifestations of solvent exposure in the paint industry.

    PubMed

    El Safty, Aamal; Metwally, Fateheya Mohamed; Mohammed Samir, Aisha; ElShahawy, Amir; Raouf, Ehab Abdel

    2015-12-01

    To investigate the antioxidant role in reversing cytogenetic changes caused by solvent exposure in paint industry. A prospective controlled clinical trial was performed on 39 workers exposed to solvents and 39 workers not exposed to solvents by supplying a mixture of antioxidant vitamins (A, C, E and selenium) and the after effects of such regimen were analyzed. Environmental monitoring was carried out for air concentrations of different solvents at workplace. Exposed group was cytogenetically tested before and after giving the mixture of antioxidant vitamins for 1 month duration. Frequency of chromosomal aberrations (CAs) and the mean of sister chromatid exchanges (SCEs) were statistically significantly higher among exposed workers than among controls. After the supplementation of antioxidants, there was a statistically significant decrease in the frequency of CAs, and 88% abnormal levels of SCEs were back to normal levels. Antioxidant supplementation decreases the frequency of CAs and SCEs among exposed workers. © The Author(s) 2013.

  13. High-Resolution Cytogenetic Map for the African Malaria Vector Anopheles gambiae

    PubMed Central

    George, Phillip; Sharakhova, Maria V.; Sharakhov, Igor V.

    2010-01-01

    Cytogenetic and physical maps are indispensible for precise assembly of genome sequences, functional characterization of chromosomal regions, and population genetic and taxonomic studies. We have created a new cytogenetic map for Anopheles gambiae by using a high-pressure squash technique that increases overall band clarity. To link chromosomal regions to the genome sequence, we attached genome coordinates, based on 302 markers of BAC, cDNA clones, and PCR-amplified gene fragments, to the chromosomal bands and interbands at approximately a 0.5-1 Mb interval. In addition, we placed the breakpoints of seven common polymorphic inversions on the map and described the chromosomal landmarks for the arm and inversion identification. The map's improved resolution can be used to further enhance physical mapping, improve genome assembly, and stimulate epigenomic studies of malaria vectors. PMID:20609021

  14. Cytogenetic analogy between myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myeloid leukemia of elderly patients.

    PubMed

    Rossi, G; Pelizzari, A M; Bellotti, D; Tonelli, M; Barlati, S

    2000-04-01

    The biological and clinical importance of cytogenetic analysis in myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is being increasingly recognized. Recently, cytogenetic similarities were noted between elderly de novo AML and secondary AML, suggesting common etiopathogenetic mechanisms. In the present study we analyzed the cytogenetic similarities between patients with AML of different age and patients with MDS consecutively diagnosed during a 5-year period at a single, primary referral, hematologic center. Of 246 patients aged <86 years, 195 (80%) had a cytogenetic study at diagnosis. Informative metaphases were obtained in 182 cases (93%), including 17 (9.3%) with secondary MDS/AML. Patients were classified according to FAB criteria and were subdivided into four groups: (1) 'early MDS': 42 patients with MDS of FAB subtypes other than refractory anemia with excess of blasts (RAEB) or RAEB in transformation (RAEB-T); (2) 'late MDS': 35 patients with RAEB and RAEB-T; (3) 'old AML': 48 patients with AML aged 65 to 85 years; (4) 'young AML': 57 patients with AML aged <65 years. Results showed that 'late MDS' and 'old AML' had striking cytogenetic similarities both in the frequency of normal karyotypes (31% and 27%), single abnormalities (14% and 13%), double abnormalities (17% and 14%), complex karyotypes (37% and 46%), and numerical abnormalities (89% and 93%), as well as in the frequency of rearrangements involving chromosome 5 (20% and 31%) and 7 (27% and 27%). The only difference between the two groups was found in the median number of chromosomes involved in complex karyotypes (5 vs 8; P=0.03). 'Early MDS' had significantly less complex karyotypes (21%; P<0.05), but its cytogenetic features resembled otherwise those of 'late MDS' and 'old AML', and any significant difference disappeared when patients with chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML) were excluded. CMML markedly differed from other MDS subtypes in the frequency of normal (57%) and of

  15. Atypical cytogenetics in therapy-related myelodysplastic syndrome secondary to indolent B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Sinsabaugh, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    A case of therapy-related myelodysplastic syndrome (t-MDS) with unusual cytogenetics is presented. While therapy related myeloid neoplasms account for 10-20% of all myeloid neoplasms, 90% of therapy related myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) present with a del(7q) or a del(5q) and fewer than 1% present with a del(20q). In this case, the common cytogenetic pattern of either del(7q) or del(5q) is absent while presenting with an abnormal del(20q). Also demonstrated is the potently poor prognostic indicator of cytomegalovirus (CMV) seropositivity, even when seropositivity is matched between donor and recipient of hematopoietic stem-cell transplant. The patient also continues to demonstrate the inherent dangers of a stem-cell transplant, presenting with graft-versus-host disease (GvHD) while being a haploidentical 10 out of 10 HLA match to the allogeneic stem cell donor.

  16. Cytogenetic differences in breast cancer samples between German and Japanese patients

    PubMed Central

    Packeisen, J; Nakachi, K; Boecker, W; Brandt, B; Buerger, H

    2005-01-01

    Background: Japanese and German breast cancer cases differ substantially in the frequency of egfr amplification. Aims: To unravel further the cytogenetic differences between Japanese and German breast cancer cases. Methods: Forty one Japanese breast cancer cases were evaluated by means of comparative genomic hybridisation (CGH). The results were compared with the CGH results from 161 German breast cancer cases. Results: The mean number of genetic alterations/case was significantly higher in German premenopausal patients with breast cancer than in their Japanese counterparts. Japanese breast cancer cases revealed a higher number of chromosome 17p losses. Losses of 8p were associated with oestrogen receptor (ER) negativity in Japanese patients with breast cancer, whereas in the German patients gains of 3q and 6q were associated with the lack of ER expression. Conclusions: The interethnic differences of invasive breast cancer are reflected by cytogenetic aberrations, which are also associated with the differential expression of the ER. PMID:16189159

  17. Cytogenetic tests for animal production: state of the art and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Udroiu, I; Sgura, A

    2017-10-01

    Cytogenetic tests are effective tools for monitoring the health status of livestock and improving their genetic value. Cytogenetic screening allows for the detection of animals carrying chromosomal aberrations and to avoid using them as breeders. Progress in karyotype monitoring, with new molecular probes and automation, has greatly increased the productivity of this procedure. Several genotoxicity tests are available to detect the possible presence and effects of pollutants or drugs. Among these, the micronucleus test and the Comet assay are the most convenient in terms of costs and benefits. Finally, analysis of telomeres, the end of chromosomes and markers of genomic instability, may be developed into a new marker of stress and genetic value. © 2017 Stichting International Foundation for Animal Genetics.

  18. Cytogenetic effects of alachlor and/or atrazine in vivo and in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Meisner, L.F.; Roloff, B.D. ); Belluck, D.A. )

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the cytogenetic effects of two commonly used herbicides, alachlor and atrazine, which are often found together in groundwater. Chromosome damage was examined in bone marrow cells of mice drinking water containing 20 ppm alachlor and/or 20 ppm atrazine, with an immunosuppressive dose of cyclophosphamide used as a positive control. Chromosome damage was also quantified in human lymphocytes. The in vitro study demonstrated dose related cytogenetic damage not associated with mitotic inhibition or cell death, with damage due to the alachlor-atrazine combination suggesting an additive model. The fact that the elevated mitotic index was associated with immune suppresion in the cyclophosphamide group suggests that death of cells with accumulated chromosomal aberrations resulted in increased bone marrow proliferation, so a higher fraction of cells examined were newer with less damage.

  19. Substrate discrimination in burying beetles, Nicrophorus orbicollis (Coleoptera: Silphidae)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Muths, Erin Louise

    1991-01-01

    Burying beetles Nicrophorus orbicollis (Coleoptera: Silphidae) secure and bury small vertebrate carcasses as a food resource for their offspring and themselves. Burial may take place at the point of carcass discovery or at some distance from that site. Burying beetles were tested to determine if they discriminate between different substrates when burying a carcass. Three substrates were presented simultaneously. Substrate one contained soil from typical beetle habitat; substrates two and three contained 2:1 and 5:1 ratios, respectively, of soil and a senescent prairie grass (Panicum virgatum), which added a bulk structural component to the soil. Beetles generally moved and buried the carcass within 24 hours. Results for both paired and individual trials suggest that burying beetles discriminate between substrates, preferring substrates with added bulk over those without.

  20. First Occurrence of Sternochetus mangiferae (Fabricius) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Silva, A C; Ricalde, M P

    2017-05-24

    Specimens of the mango stone weevil Sternochetus mangiferae (Fabricius) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) were found in fruits of mango from a tree in the residential area of the Rio de Janeiro, RJ. This is the first report of the S. mangiferae in Brazil, currently regulated as an absent quarantine pest in the country. A taxonomist specialized in Curculionidae confirmed the identification based on morphological diagnostics characteristics. This detection is a relevant finding, because Brazil is a major producer and exporter of mango and the main areas of mango for exportation are located very far from this detection point. This pest damages seed and embryo of mango fruits and it causes reduction of fruit size and its premature dropping. The detection was notified to the Plant Health Department, division of the Brazilian Ministry of Agriculture, Livestock and Food Supply (MAPA), which is the National Plant Protection Organization of Brazil.

  1. Biology and Management of Billbugs (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) in Turfgrass

    PubMed Central

    Dupuy, Madeleine M.; Ramirez, Ricardo A.

    2016-01-01

    Billbugs (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Sphenophorus spp.) are a complex of weevil pests affecting turfgrass throughout the United States. Billbug larvae cause damage by feeding in stems, on roots, and on the crowns of turf, causing severe discoloration and eventual plant death. Monitoring efforts have focused on nondestructive pitfall sampling of ground-active billbug adults and on destructive sampling using soil cores for larval stages in the soil. Given the cryptic nature of the susceptible larval stages, billbugs are typically managed by preventive applications of long-residual, systemic insecticides, including neonicotinoids and anthranilic diamides. Despite knowledge of effective management practices including pest-resistant turf varieties, irrigation management, and microbial controls that contribute to an IPM approach, billbug management continues to rely heavily on prophylactic synthetic insecticides. This review will summarize the identification and biology of billbugs and strategies for their management. PMID:27065080

  2. Tolerance of wheat (Poales: Poaceae) seedlings to wireworm (Coleoptera: Elateridae).

    PubMed

    Higginbotham, Ryan W; Froese, Paul S; Carter, Arron H

    2014-04-01

    Wireworms (Coleoptera: Elateridae), the subterranean larval stage of the click beetle, are becoming more prevalent in many cropping systems and posing an increasing economic threat to wheat growers in the Pacific Northwest following the cancellation of the insecticide lindane in 2006. Current insecticide seed treatments alone are not adequate for wireworm control. The objective of this study was to evaluate a diverse set of 163 wheat genotypes for tolerance to wireworm feeding. Entries were planted in replicated field trials over 3 yr and evaluated for their performance when grown in the presence of wireworms. Entries were rated based on survival and given a tolerance score. Results indicated that differences exist among wheat genotypes in their level of tolerance to wireworm feeding. In particular, consistently high-ranking genotypes of interest may be 'BR 18', 'Sonalika', 'Safed Lerma', and 'Hollis'. These genotypes, used in conjunction with other cultural or chemical control methods, may help provide an economic means of controlling wireworms.

  3. A study on the Neotropical Anthaxiini (Coleoptera, Buprestidae, Buprestinae)

    PubMed Central

    Bílý, Svatopluk

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Revision of the Neotropical genera of the subtribe Anthaxiina Gory & Laporte, 1839 (Coleoptera, Buprestidae, Buprestinae, Anthaxiini). Five new genera are described: Anthaxita gen. n., Charlesina gen. n., Cobosina gen. n., Marikia gen. n. and Sanchezia gen. n. Genus Agrilaxia Kerremans, 1903 is divided into two subgenera: Agrilaxia and Costiptera subgen. n. and the genus Bilyaxia Hołyński, 1989 is divided into three subgenera: Bilyaxia, Paraguayetta subgen. n. and Tomasia subgen. n. One new species is described: Anthaxita peruviana sp. n., and two informal species-groups are suggested within Agrilaxia (Costiptera subgen. n.): Agrilaxia (Costiptera) modesta (Kerremans, 1897) species-group and Agrilaxia (Costiptera) occidentalis (Kerremans, 1900) species-group. Lectotype is designated for Agrilaxia mrazi Obenberger, 1932. A key of all genera/subgenera is provided and all treated taxa are illustrated. PMID:23794907

  4. Diversity of forensic rove beetles (Coleoptera, Staphylinidae) associated with decaying pig carcass in a forest biotope.

    PubMed

    Dekeirsschieter, Jessica; Frederick, Christine; Verheggen, Francois J; Drugmand, Didier; Haubruge, Eric

    2013-07-01

    Most forensic studies are focused on Diptera pattern colonization while neglecting Coleoptera succession. So far, little information is available on the postmortem colonization by beetles and the decomposition process they initiate under temperate biogeoclimatic countries. These beetles have, however, been referred to as being part of the entomofaunal colonization of a dead body. Forensic entomologists need increased databases detailing the distribution, ecology, and phenology of necrophagous insects, including staphylinids (Coleoptera, Staphylinidae). While pig carcasses are commonly used in forensic entomology studies to surrogate human decomposition and to investigate the entomofaunal succession, very few works have been conducted in Europe on large carcasses. Our work reports the monitoring of the presence of adult rove beetles (Coleoptera, Staphylinidae) on decaying pig carcasses in a forest biotope during four seasons (spring, summer, fall, and winter). A total of 23 genera comprising 60 species of rove beetles were collected from pig carcasses.

  5. Sample Tracking in an Automated Cytogenetic Biodosimetry Laboratory for Radiation Mass Casualties.

    PubMed

    Martin, P R; Berdychevski, R E; Subramanian, U; Blakely, W F; Prasanna, P G S

    2007-07-01

    Chromosome aberration-based dicentric assay is expected to be used after mass casualty life-threatening radiation exposures to assess radiation dose to individuals. This will require processing of a large number of samples for individual dose assessment and clinical triage to aid treatment decisions. We have established an automated, high-throughput, cytogenetic biodosimetry laboratory to process a large number of samples for conducting the dicentric assay using peripheral blood from exposed individuals according to internationally accepted laboratory protocols (i.e., within days following radiation exposures). The components of an automated cytogenetic biodosimetry laboratory include blood collection kits for sample shipment, a cell viability analyzer, a robotic liquid handler, an automated metaphase harvester, a metaphase spreader, high-throughput slide stainer and coverslipper, a high-throughput metaphase finder, multiple satellite chromosome-aberration analysis systems, and a computerized sample tracking system. Laboratory automation using commercially available, off-the-shelf technologies, customized technology integration, and implementation of a laboratory information management system (LIMS) for cytogenetic analysis will significantly increase throughput.This paper focuses on our efforts to eliminate data transcription errors, increase efficiency, and maintain samples' positive chain-of-custody by sample tracking during sample processing and data analysis. This sample tracking system represents a "beta" version, which can be modeled elsewhere in a cytogenetic biodosimetry laboratory, and includes a customized LIMS with a central server, personal computer workstations, barcode printers, fixed station and wireless hand-held devices to scan barcodes at various critical steps, and data transmission over a private intra-laboratory computer network. Our studies will improve diagnostic biodosimetry response, aid confirmation of clinical triage, and medical

  6. Comparative cytogenetics among populations of Astyanax altiparanae (Characiformes, Characidae, Incertae sedis)

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Cytogenetic data are presented for Astyanax altiparanae populations from three Brazilian hydrographic systems. The chromosomal data obtained in A. altiparanae support the hypothesis of diploid number conservation. However, small differences in the karyotype formula and number of nucleolar organizer regions were observed in these populations. The apparent karyotypical similarity among the studied populations strongly suggests a close relationship among them with some chromosomal divergences due to gene flow restriction. PMID:21637456

  7. Modification of cytogenetic and physiological effects of space flight factors by biologically active compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aliyev, A. A.; Mekhti-Zade, E. R.; Mashinskiy, A. L.; Alekperov, U. K.

    1986-01-01

    Physiological and cytogenetic changes in the Welsh onion plants induced by a short (82 days) and long term (522 days) space flight are expressed in decrease of seed germination, inhibition of stem growth, depression of cell division in root meristem, and increase in the number of structural chromosome rearrangements. The treatment of such plants with solutions of a-tocopherol, auxin, and kinetin decreased the level of chromosome aberrations to the control one and normalized cell divisions and growth partly or completely.

  8. Cytogenetic study of a nodular hyperplasia of the thyroid after irradiation for Hodgkin's disease

    SciTech Connect

    van den Berg, E.; van Doormaal, J.J.; Oosterhuis, J.W.; de Jong, B.; Buist, J.; Vos, A.M.; Dam, A.; Vermeij, A. )

    1991-05-01

    We describe cytogenetics of a case of nodular hyperplasia of the thyroid with papillary microcarcinoma following radiotherapy for Hodgkin's disease. The chromosomal pattern found was very heterogeneous with a clonal abnormality of chromosome 10, among others. Together with some recent data from the literature, this finding may point to an important role of chromosome 10 abnormalities in the pathogenesis of benign and malignant thyroid neoplasms.

  9. Prenatal BoBsTM in the cytogenetic analysis of products of spontaneous miscarriage.

    PubMed

    Mellali, Sarah; Haoud, Khadidja; Gouas, Laetitia; Khaled, Meghit Boumediene; Vago, Philippe; Moulessehoul, Soraya

    2015-09-19

    Fifty percent of spontaneous miscarriages (SMs) are attributed to chromosomal abnormalities. Cytogenetic analysis is an important tool for patient counselling and assessment of the risk of recurrence in future pregnancies. Conventional karyotyping has been the gold standard for chromosomal investigation of products of conception (POC), but it has limitations due to sample maceration, culture failure and maternal cell contamination. Molecular cytogenetic approaches have therefore been developed and found valuable in the cytogenetic investigation of these samples. The Prenatal BoBsTM and KaryoLite BoBsTM, based on the newly developed BACs-on-BeadsTM technology, have been described as reliable tests for rapid detection of aneuploidies in prenatal and POC samples, respectively. To describe our clinical experience of routine screening of POC samples with Prenatal BoBsTM, the test used by our laboratory in France. Seventeen samples collected at the University Hospital of Sidi Bel Abbès (Western Algeria) and a further 60 from the University Hospital of Clermont-Ferrand (France) were analysed (19 chorionic villi from products of curettage, 12 placentas, 9 amniotic cells and 37 biopsy specimens). All were screened for the frequent aneuploidies (chromosomes 13, 18, 21, X and Y) in addition to nine microdeletion/microduplication syndrome regions by Prenatal BoBsTM. Standard karyotyping was performed on 51 samples, but failed in 38 cases. Prenatal BoBsTM identified one trisomy 21 and one deletion of 17p13.3. Furthermore, it provided a conclusive result in cases of culture failure (n=38) and in samples with macerated tissue (n=19). The overall failure rate was 11.4%. Prenatal BoBsTM is a promising technology that represents a fast, sensitive and robust alternative to routine screening for chromosomal abnormality in products of SM. Furthermore, it overcomes the limitations of conventional karyotyping and current molecular cytogenetic techniques.

  10. [The role of cytogenetic examination for prognosis of remote consequences of irradiation].

    PubMed

    Snigireva, G P; Novitskaia, N N; Popova, G M

    2011-01-01

    Correlation between the level of somatic pathology and cytogenetic characteristics of blood was analyzed in a group of liquidators of the accident at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (ChNPP). A statistically significant correlation was found between the occurrence of cardiovascular diseases and the level of chromosome aberrations (total frequency of chromosome aberrations, frequency of dicentrics and centric rings, frequency of chromatid aberrations). The results obtained are of great importance for the substantiated prediction of the development of postradiation pathologies.

  11. Sample Tracking in an Automated Cytogenetic Biodosimetry Laboratory for Radiation Mass Casualties

    PubMed Central

    Martin, P.R.; Berdychevski, R.E.; Subramanian, U.; Blakely, W.F.; Prasanna, P.G.S.

    2007-01-01

    Chromosome aberration-based dicentric assay is expected to be used after mass casualty life-threatening radiation exposures to assess radiation dose to individuals. This will require processing of a large number of samples for individual dose assessment and clinical triage to aid treatment decisions. We have established an automated, high-throughput, cytogenetic biodosimetry laboratory to process a large number of samples for conducting the dicentric assay using peripheral blood from exposed individuals according to internationally accepted laboratory protocols (i.e., within days following radiation exposures). The components of an automated cytogenetic biodosimetry laboratory include blood collection kits for sample shipment, a cell viability analyzer, a robotic liquid handler, an automated metaphase harvester, a metaphase spreader, high-throughput slide stainer and coverslipper, a high-throughput metaphase finder, multiple satellite chromosome-aberration analysis systems, and a computerized sample tracking system. Laboratory automation using commercially available, off-the-shelf technologies, customized technology integration, and implementation of a laboratory information management system (LIMS) for cytogenetic analysis will significantly increase throughput. This paper focuses on our efforts to eliminate data transcription errors, increase efficiency, and maintain samples’ positive chain-of-custody by sample tracking during sample processing and data analysis. This sample tracking system represents a “beta” version, which can be modeled elsewhere in a cytogenetic biodosimetry laboratory, and includes a customized LIMS with a central server, personal computer workstations, barcode printers, fixed station and wireless hand-held devices to scan barcodes at various critical steps, and data transmission over a private intra-laboratory computer network. Our studies will improve diagnostic biodosimetry response, aid confirmation of clinical triage, and medical

  12. Primary pleuropulmonary synovial sarcoma diagnosed by fine needle aspiration with cytogenetic confirmation: a case report.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Cullen A; Barnhart, Amanda; Pettenati, Mark J; Geisinger, Kim R

    2005-01-01

    Pleuropulmonary synovial sarcomas (PPSSs) are rare neoplasins that have been well described in recent years, although there are only very infrequent reports within the cytology literature. Such lesions present a diagnostic challenge on fine needle aspiration (ENA) due to several factors, particularly when the aspirate material displays monophasic, small cell or poorly differentiated morphology. Immunoperoxidase studies on cell block material and confirmation with molecular cytogenetics are important tools to establish the diagnosis and determine appropriate therapy. We report a case of PPSS in a 27-year-old man diagnosed by computed tomography (CT)-guided FNA with confirmation by conventional and molecular cytogenetics. A 27-year-old man presented with several rapidly enlarging, pleura-based masses following a several-month history of recurrent hemopneumothorax. Previous surgical pathology on decorticated pleura was interpreted as a reactive mesothelial proliferation at another institution. Upon referral, CT-guided transthoracic FNA was performed. Smears revealed a highly cellular, dispersed "small round blue cell" neoplasm in a hemorrhagic background. The cytomorphology, in conjunction with a select immunoperoxidase panel, was diagnostic of PPSS. Conventional and molecular cytogenetics subsequently provided confirmation of the diagnosis. PPSSs are uncommon neoplasms seldom diagnosed by FNA, with only very rare reports in the cytology literature. Although their cytomorphology has been well described, monophasic tumors and other morphologic variants present a diagnostic challenge and may be difficult to discern from a variety of neoplastic and reactive/reparative processes. Emphasis should be placed upon securing material at the time of aspiration for immunoperoxidase studies (cell block or core biopsy). In equivocal cases, conventional and/or molecular cytogenetic studies may be needed.

  13. Adult Xp11 translocation renal cell carcinoma diagnosed by cytogenetics and immunohistochemistry.

    PubMed

    Komai, Yoshinobu; Fujiwara, Mutsunori; Fujii, Yasuhisa; Mukai, Hiroyuki; Yonese, Junji; Kawakami, Satoru; Yamamoto, Shinya; Migita, Toshiro; Ishikawa, Yuichi; Kurata, Morito; Nakamura, Takuro; Fukui, Iwao

    2009-02-15

    To determine the incidence of Xp11 translocation renal cell carcinoma (RCC) in adult patients using cytogenetics and immunohistochemstry. Cytogenetic studies were prospectively done using tumor samples from 443 consecutive adult Japanese patients (ages 15-89 years) who underwent nephrectomy for RCC. TFE3 immunohistochemistry was done for cases in which cytogenetic results were not obtained. Clinicopathologic characteristics of Xp11 translocation RCC were examined. Mitotic cells suitable for cytogenetic analysis were obtained in 244 tumor samples (55%); among these, we identified 4 cases (1.6%) of Xp11 translocation RCC. TFE3 immunohistochemistry identified 3 positive cases (1.5%) among the remaining 199 cases. The median age of the 7 patients was 41 years (range, 15-59 years), and 15% of RCC patients (4 of 26) who were younger than ages 45 years had this type of RCC. Of the four Xp11 translocation RCC patients whose karyotypes were determined, two had an ASPL-TFE3 gene fusion. Of these 2, 1 had pulmonary metastasis at presentation, and the other developed liver metastasis 12 months after nephrectomy and died of the disease. The remaining two patients had PRCC-TFE3 and PSF-TFE3 gene fusions, respectively. Both had nodal involvement but remained disease free for 3 and 5 years, respectively, after surgical resection of lymph node metastases. Of the 3 immunohistochemically diagnosed patients, 1 had nodal metastases at presentation and died 9 months after surgery. This is the first report to determine the incidence of Xp11 translocation RCC in adult patients. We found that this disease is relatively common in young adults.

  14. A systematic review of cytogenetic studies conducted in human populations exposed to cadmium compounds.

    PubMed

    Verougstraete, Violaine; Lison, Dominique; Hotz, Philippe

    2002-03-01

    Exposure to cadmium fumes or dusts has been associated with an increased risk of lung cancer and the characterisation of the genotoxic potential of cadmium compounds is, among other possible mechanisms, an important element in the assessment of the carcinogenic hazard of the element. While there is some evidence that in experimental systems, cadmium compounds may exert genotoxic effects, the results of the epidemiological studies having examined cytogenetic endpoints in humans exposed to cadmium appear conflicting. Therefore, a systematic review was undertaken to assess whether a cytogenetic effect of cadmium exposure is supported by the studies with the strongest design. The relevant literature was identified through several databases and assessed with a check-list by two reviewers. Causes of heterogeneity between studies were looked for. Results were extracted and the strength of the evidence was evaluated with causality criteria. No studies met the criteria for being considered as very convincing. Several factors were identified that could explain contradictory findings (small sample size, selection bias, insufficient characterisation of exposure, lack of consideration of confounders) but their actual impact could not be conclusively assessed with the published information. Importantly, it should be recognised that the absence of a clear mechanism for the cytogenetic action of cadmium compounds did not allow to select the most appropriate endpoint to be examined. No clear association between cadmium exposure and cytogenetic endpoint appeared but no definite conclusion can be drawn from the existing studies in humans. Future research efforts should mainly focus on experimental studies to understand how cadmium compounds could produce genotoxic/carcinogenic effects, in order to target the most relevant endpoint to be examined in humans.

  15. FISH cytogenetics and prognosis in breast and non-small cell lung cancers.

    PubMed

    Massoner, Anita; Augustin, Florian; Duba, Hans-Christoph; Zojer, Niklas; Fiegl, Michael

    2004-11-01

    Interphase cytogenetics by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) has been demonstrated to be a valuable diagnostic tool in effusions from patients with solid tumors. As the next step, we investigated whether certain patterns of numeric aberrations in malignant effusion cells supply prognostic information. From a large series of effusions from patients with solid tumors, 55 effusions from breast cancer and 39 effusions from non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) were classified as malignant by cytology or FISH. Tumor cells were classified as FISH aneuploid for chromosome 11 and/or 17 or as not aneuploid. Predominant cytogenetic anomalies and patterns of intratumor cytogenetic heterogeneity were brought in relation to overall survival rate. There was no difference with respect to overall survival rate when effusions with or without aneuploidy for chromosomes 11 and 17 were compared. Likewise, in effusions with aneuploidy, there was no difference in overall survival rate among patients with different modal chromosome copy numbers (e.g., trisomy vs. tetrasomy 11) or among patients with a low or high grade of intratumor complexity (defined by the intratumor heterogeneity of FISH aneuploidy). In breast cancer, aneuploidy with gain of chromosome 11 was associated with a significantly superior survival rate, suggesting that amplification of chromosome 11 DNA is associated with a less aggressive phenotype. Simple chromosomal changes as determined by FISH, such as gain of chromosome 11 copy numbers in breast cancer, may be prognostic. Prospective studies in primary tumors that classify distinct prognostic groups by FISH cytogenetics are warranted. (c) 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  16. Variations on a Theme: Antennal Lobe Architecture across Coleoptera

    PubMed Central

    Kollmann, Martin; Schmidt, Rovenna; Heuer, Carsten M.

    2016-01-01

    Beetles comprise about 400,000 described species, nearly one third of all known animal species. The enormous success of the order Coleoptera is reflected by a rich diversity of lifestyles, behaviors, morphological, and physiological adaptions. All these evolutionary adaptions that have been driven by a variety of parameters over the last about 300 million years, make the Coleoptera an ideal field to study the evolution of the brain on the interface between the basic bauplan of the insect brain and the adaptions that occurred. In the current study we concentrated on the paired antennal lobes (AL), the part of the brain that is typically responsible for the first processing of olfactory information collected from olfactory sensilla on antenna and mouthparts. We analyzed 63 beetle species from 22 different families and thus provide an extensive comparison of principal neuroarchitecture of the AL. On the examined anatomical level, we found a broad diversity including AL containing a wide range of glomeruli numbers reaching from 50 to 150 glomeruli and several species with numerous small glomeruli, resembling the microglomerular design described in acridid grasshoppers and diving beetles, and substructures within the glomeruli that have to date only been described for the small hive beetle, Aethina tumida. A first comparison of the various anatomical features of the AL with available descriptions of lifestyle and behaviors did so far not reveal useful correlations. In summary, the current study provides a solid basis for further studies to unravel mechanisms that are basic to evolutionary adaptions of the insect olfactory system. PMID:27973569

  17. Walking stability of Rhyzopertha dominica (Fabricius, 1792) (Coleoptera: Bostrichidae).

    PubMed

    Pires, E M; Nogueira, R M; Pina, D S; Manica, C L M; Faroni, L R A; Moreira, P S A

    2016-04-19

    Results obtained in studies can contribute to the advancement of science and innovative methods and techniques for developing practical activities. Reporting conditions that may restrict the implementation of research is critical to ensure the optimal development of further technical studies. The objective of this study was to assess the walking stability of R. dominica on a flat and smooth surface. The study was based on the determination of mortality, morphology and walking stability of the insect outside the grain mass, on a flat and smooth surface. Mortality of adults of this Coleoptera in conditions with and without food was similar, which explains the difficulty that this insect had for accessing the food source on the flat and smooth surface. The measurements of body length (BOL), width (BOW) and height (BOH) of R. dominica were compared with those of Tribolium castaneum (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae), which showed good ability to walk in these conditions. This study indicated that the former presents lower BOL and BOW, and greater BOH than the second, and all these variables showed differences when analyzed simultaneously by means of the construction of multivariate morphometric indices (Width × Height, Length × Height and Height × Length × Width). These morphometric variables, together with the definition of the geometry most similar to the body shape, resulted in determination of the center of gravity (CG) and static rollover threshold (SRTgeom) for both species. Rhyzopertha dominica and T. castaneum presented CGs considered high and low, respectively, and together with the values obtained for SRTgeom, may justify that R. dominica can be considered a less stable species during movement, and presents greater risk of rollover on flat and smooth surfaces.

  18. Cytogenetic Study in Children with Down Syndrome Among Kosova Albanian Population Between 2000 and 2010

    PubMed Central

    Kolgeci, Selim; Kolgeci, Jehona; Azemi, Mehmedali; Shala-Beqiraj, Ruke; Gashi, Zafer; Sopjani, Mentor

    2013-01-01

    Conflict of interest: none declared. Aim The aim of this research was to ascertain the frequency of three basic cytogenetical types of Down syndrome among Kosova Albanian population and to evaluate the maternal age effect on the frequency of births of children with Down syndrome. Methods Cytogenetics diagnosis has been made according to the standard method of Moorhead and Seabright. Results In the time period 2000-2010 cytogenetics diagnosis of overall 305 children with Down syndrome has been realized. Of which in 285 children (93.4%) were found free trisomy 21 (regular type), and in three other children (~1.0%) were detected mosaic trisomy 21. Translocation trisomy 21 was detected in 17 children (5.6%), of which in 14 children it occurred de novo translocation, whereas in 3 other children translocation has been inherited by a parent translocation carrier. The highest number of children with Trisomy 21 due to translocation was caused by Robertsonian translocation created by a fusion of two homologous chromosomes 21 (3.3%). Analysis showed that the number of children born with Down’s syndrome, from 2000 to 2010, was not decreasing among the Kosova Albanian population. Conclusion Down syndrome resulted by an extra free chromosome 21 is the most common genetic cause for that condition. Robertsonian translocations present in Down syndrome children often are de novo or inherited from a carrier parent with translocation. PMID:24082839

  19. Classical and molecular cytogenetics of disorders of sex development in domestic animals.

    PubMed

    Villagómez, D A F; Parma, P; Radi, O; Di Meo, G; Pinton, A; Iannuzzi, L; King, W A

    2009-01-01

    The association of abnormal chromosome constitutions and disorders of sex development in domestic animals has been recorded since the beginnings of conventional cytogenetic analysis. Deviated karyotypes consisting of abnormal sex chromosome sets (e.g. aneuploidy) and/or the coexistence of cells with different sex chromosome constitutions (e.g. mosaicism or chimerism) in an individual seem to be the main causes of anomalies of sex determination and sex differentiation. Molecular cytogenetics and genetics have increased our understanding of these pathologies, where human and mouse models have provided a substantial amount of knowledge, leading to the discovery of a number of genes implicated in mammalian sex determination and differentiation. Additionally, other genes, which appeared to be involved in ovary differentiation, have been found by investigations in domestic species such as the goat. In this paper, we present an overview of the biology of mammalian sex development as a scientific background for better understanding the body of knowledge of the clinical cytogenetics of disorders of sex development in domestic animals. An attempt to summarize of what has been described in that particular subject of veterinary medicine for each of the main mammalian domestic species is presented here.

  20. Definition of the zebrafish genome using flow cytometry and cytogenetic mapping

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, Jennifer L; Adeniyi, Adeola; Banerjee, Ruby; Dallaire, Stephanie; Maguire, Sean F; Chi, Jianxiang; Ng, Bee Ling; Zepeda, Cinthya; Scott, Carol E; Humphray, Sean; Rogers, Jane; Zhou, Yi; Zon, Leonard I; Carter, Nigel P; Yang, Fengtang; Lee, Charles

    2007-01-01

    Background The zebrafish (Danio rerio) is an important vertebrate model organism system for biomedical research. The syntenic conservation between the zebrafish and human genome allows one to investigate the function of human genes using the zebrafish model. To facilitate analysis of the zebrafish genome, genetic maps have been constructed and sequence annotation of a reference zebrafish genome is ongoing. However, the duplicative nature of teleost genomes, including the zebrafish, complicates accurate assembly and annotation of a representative genome sequence. Cytogenetic approaches provide "anchors" that can be integrated with accumulating genomic data. Results Here, we cytogenetically define the zebrafish genome by first estimating the size of each linkage group (LG) chromosome using flow cytometry, followed by the cytogenetic mapping of 575 bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones onto metaphase chromosomes. Of the 575 BAC clones, 544 clones localized to apparently unique chromosomal locations. 93.8% of these clones were assigned to a specific LG chromosome location using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and compared to the LG chromosome assignment reported in the zebrafish genome databases. Thirty-one BAC clones localized to multiple chromosomal locations in several different hybridization patterns. From these data, a refined second generation probe panel for each LG chromosome was also constructed. Conclusion The chromosomal mapping of the 575 large-insert DNA clones allows for these clones to be integrated into existing zebrafish mapping data. An accurately annotated zebrafish reference genome serves as a valuable resource for investigating the molecular basis of human diseases using zebrafish mutant models. PMID:17597531

  1. Atlas of genetics and cytogenetics in oncology and haematology in 2013.

    PubMed

    Huret, Jean-Loup; Ahmad, Mohammad; Arsaban, Mélanie; Bernheim, Alain; Cigna, Jérémy; Desangles, François; Guignard, Jean-Christophe; Jacquemot-Perbal, Marie-Christine; Labarussias, Maureen; Leberre, Vanessa; Malo, Anne; Morel-Pair, Catherine; Mossafa, Hossein; Potier, Jean-Claude; Texier, Guillaume; Viguié, Franck; Yau Chun Wan-Senon, Sylvie; Zasadzinski, Alain; Dessen, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    The Atlas of Genetics and Cytogenetics in Oncology and Haematology (http://AtlasGeneticsOncology.org) is a peer-reviewed internet journal/encyclopaedia/database focused on genes implicated in cancer, cytogenetics and clinical entities in cancer and cancer-prone hereditary diseases. The main goal of the Atlas is to provide review articles that describe complementary topics, namely, genes, genetic abnormalities, histopathology, clinical diagnoses and a large iconography. This description, which was historically based on karyotypic abnormalities and in situ hybridization (fluorescence in situ hybridization) techniques, now benefits from comparative genomic hybridization and massive sequencing, uncovering a tremendous amount of genetic rearrangements. As the Atlas combines different types of information (genes, genetic abnormalities, histopathology, clinical diagnoses and external links), its content is currently unique. The Atlas is a cognitive tool for fundamental and clinical research and has developed into an encyclopaedic work. In clinical practice, it contributes to the cytogenetic diagnosis and may guide treatment decision making, particularly regarding rare diseases (because they are numerous and are frequently encountered). Readers as well as the authors of the Atlas are researchers and/or clinicians.

  2. Atlas of Genetics and Cytogenetics in Oncology and Haematology in 2013

    PubMed Central

    Huret, Jean-Loup; Ahmad, Mohammad; Arsaban, Mélanie; Bernheim, Alain; Cigna, Jérémy; Desangles, François; Guignard, Jean-Christophe; Jacquemot-Perbal, Marie-Christine; Labarussias, Maureen; Leberre, Vanessa; Malo, Anne; Morel-Pair, Catherine; Mossafa, Hossein; Potier, Jean-Claude; Texier, Guillaume; Viguié, Franck; Yau Chun Wan-Senon, Sylvie; Zasadzinski, Alain; Dessen, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    The Atlas of Genetics and Cytogenetics in Oncology and Haematology (http://AtlasGeneticsOncology.org) is a peer-reviewed internet journal/encyclopaedia/database focused on genes implicated in cancer, cytogenetics and clinical entities in cancer and cancer-prone hereditary diseases. The main goal of the Atlas is to provide review articles that describe complementary topics, namely, genes, genetic abnormalities, histopathology, clinical diagnoses and a large iconography. This description, which was historically based on karyotypic abnormalities and in situ hybridization (fluorescence in situ hybridization) techniques, now benefits from comparative genomic hybridization and massive sequencing, uncovering a tremendous amount of genetic rearrangements. As the Atlas combines different types of information (genes, genetic abnormalities, histopathology, clinical diagnoses and external links), its content is currently unique. The Atlas is a cognitive tool for fundamental and clinical research and has developed into an encyclopaedic work. In clinical practice, it contributes to the cytogenetic diagnosis and may guide treatment decision making, particularly regarding rare diseases (because they are numerous and are frequently encountered). Readers as well as the authors of the Atlas are researchers and/or clinicians. PMID:23161685

  3. FISH and GISH: molecular cytogenetic tools and their applications in ornamental plants.

    PubMed

    Younis, Adnan; Ramzan, Fahad; Hwang, Yoon-Jung; Lim, Ki-Byung

    2015-09-01

    The innovations in chromosome engineering have improved the efficiency of interrogation breeding, and the identification and transfer of resistance genes from alien to native species. Recent advances in molecular biology and cytogenetics have brought revolutionary, conceptual developments in mitosis and meiosis research, chromosome structure and manipulation, gene expression and regulation, and gene silencing. Cytogenetic studies offer integrative tools for imaging, genetics, epigenetics, and cytological information that can be employed to enhance chromosome and molecular genomic research in plant taxa. In situ hybridization techniques, such as fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and genomic in situ hybridization (GISH), can identify chromosome morphologies and sequences, amount and distribution of various types of chromatin in chromosomes, and genome organization during the metaphase stage of meiosis. Over the past few decades, various new molecular cytogenetic applications have been developed. The FISH and GISH techniques present an authentic model for analyzing the individual chromosome, chromosomal segments, or the genomes of natural and artificial hybrid plants. These have become the most reliable techniques for studying allopolyploids, because most cultivated plants have been developed through hybridization or polyploidization. Moreover, introgression of the genes and chromatin from the wild types into cultivated species can also be analyzed. Since hybrid derivatives may have variable alien chromosome numbers or chromosome arms, the use of these approaches opens new avenues for accurately identifying genome differences.

  4. Evaluation of cytogenetic and DNA damage in human lymphocytes treated with adrenaline in vitro.

    PubMed

    Djelić, Ninoslav; Radaković, Milena; Spremo-Potparević, Biljana; Zivković, Lada; Bajić, Vladan; Stevanović, Jevrosima; Stanimirović, Zoran

    2015-02-01

    Catechol groups can be involved in redox cycling accompanied by generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) which may lead to oxidative damage of cellular macromolecules including DNA. The objective of this investigation was to evaluate possible genotoxic effects of a natural catecholamine adrenaline in cultured human lymphocytes using cytogenetic (sister chromatid exchange and micronuclei) and the single cell gel electrophoresis (Comet) assay. In cytogenetic tests, six experimental concentrations of adrenaline were used in a range from 0.01-500 μM. There were no indications of genotoxic effects of adrenaline in sister chromatid exchange and micronucleus tests. However, at four highest concentrations of adrenaline (5 μM, 50 μM, 150 μM and 300 μM) we observed a decreased mitotic index and cell-cycle delay. In addition, in the Comet assay we used adrenaline in a range from 0.0005-500 μM, at two treatment times: 15 min or 60 min. In contrast to cytogenetic analysis, there was a dose-dependent increase of DNA damage detected in the Comet assay. These effects were significantly reduced by concomitant treatment with quercetin or catalase. Therefore, the obtained results indicate that adrenaline may exhibit genotoxic effects in cultured human lymphocytes, most likely due to production of reactive oxygen species.

  5. Molecular cytogenetics to characterize mechanisms of gene duplication in pesticide resistance.

    PubMed

    Jugulam, Mithila; Gill, Bikram S

    2017-07-17

    Recent advances in molecular cytogenetics empower construction of physical maps to illustrate the precise position of genetic loci on the chromosomes. Such maps provide visible information about the position of DNA sequences, including the distribution of repetitive sequences on the chromosomes. This is an important step toward unraveling the genetic mechanisms implicated in chromosomal aberrations (e.g., gene duplication). In response to stress, such as pesticide selection, duplicated genes provide an immediate adaptive advantage to organisms that overcome unfavorable conditions. Although the significance of gene duplication as one of the important events driving genetic diversity has been reported, the precise mechanisms of gene duplication that contribute to pesticide resistance, especially to herbicides, are elusive. With particular reference to pesticide resistance, we discuss the prospects of application of molecular cytogenetic tools to uncover mechanism(s) of gene duplication, and illustrate hypothetical models that predict the evolutionary basis of gene duplication. The cytogenetic basis of duplicated genes, their stability, as well as the magnitude of selection pressure, can determine the dynamics of the genetic locus (loci) conferring pesticide resistance not only at the population level, but also at the individual level. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  6. Informatics Enhanced SNP Microarray Analysis of 30 Miscarriage Samples Compared to Routine Cytogenetics

    PubMed Central

    Lathi, Ruth B.; Loring, Megan; Massie, Jamie A. M.; Demko, Zachary P.; Johnson, David; Sigurjonsson, Styrmir; Gemelos, George; Rabinowitz, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The metaphase karyotype is often used as a diagnostic tool in the setting of early miscarriage; however this technique has several limitations. We evaluate a new technique for karyotyping that uses single nucleotide polymorphism microarrays (SNP). This technique was compared in a blinded, prospective fashion, to the traditional metaphase karyotype. Methods Patients undergoing dilation and curettage for first trimester miscarriage between February and August 2010 were enrolled. Samples of chorionic villi were equally divided and sent for microarray testing in parallel with routine cytogenetic testing. Results Thirty samples were analyzed, with only four discordant results. Discordant results occurred when the entire genome was duplicated or when a balanced rearrangement was present. Cytogenetic karyotyping took an average of 29 days while microarray-based karytoyping took an average of 12 days. Conclusions Molecular karyotyping of POC after missed abortion using SNP microarray analysis allows for the ability to detect maternal cell contamination and provides rapid results with good concordance to standard cytogenetic analysis. PMID:22403611

  7. Mild hyperthermia can induce adaptation to cytogenetic damage caused by subsequent X irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Lu.; Jiang, Jie.

    1995-07-01

    Many low-level environmental agents are able to induce an increased resistance to subsequent mutagenic effects induced by ionizing radiation. In this paper, an induced cytogenetic adaptation to radiation in human lymphocytes was studied with mild hyperthermia as the adaptive treatment and compared with that induced by low-dose radiation. We found that this adaptation could be induced not only in PHA-stimulated human lymphocytes (at 14, 38 and 42 h after addition of PHA), but also in unstimulated G{sub 0}-phase cells (before addition of PHA) by mild hyperthermia (41{degrees}C for 1 h) as well as 50 mGy X rays. When the two adaptive treatments were combined, no additive effects on the magnitude of the adaptation induced were observed, suggesting that low-dose radiation and hyperthermia may share one mechanism of induction of adaptation to cytogenetic damage. Some mechanisms which may be involved in the induction of adaptation to cytogenetic damage by low-dose radiation are discussed and compared with the effects of mild hyperthermia in inducing thermotolerance and radioresistance. 56 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. Monitoring of human populations at risk by different cytogenetic end points.

    PubMed Central

    Anwar, W A

    1994-01-01

    Humans are exposed to a large number of environmental genotoxic agents. These can increase the probability that somatic mutation will occur. The use of genotoxicity testing is essential for assessment of potential human toxicity so that hazards can be prevented. Cytogenetic monitoring of human populations exposed to chemicals has proved to be a useful tool for detecting the chemical mutagenic effects. Cytogenetic analysis of human chromosomes in peripheral lymphocytes allows direct detection of mutation in somatic cells. Cytogenetic monitoring of a group of traffic policemen from Cairo, Egypt, was an example of a human population study. The induction of chromosomal damage was studied in a group of 28 traffic policemen with exposure of over 10 years and a control group of 15 policemen trainers. Blood lead level was significantly higher in the traffic policemen (30 +/- 8.7) unit compared to the control group (18.2 +/- 1.2) unit. The percentage of chromosomal aberrations (7.7 +/- 3.1), as well as the mean sister chromatid exchanges (7.5 +/- 3.4), were significantly higher among the traffic policemen than in the control group. The percentage of chromosomal aberrations was 2.8 +/- 2.1 and the mean sister chromatid exchanges was 4.8 +/- 2.9 in the control group. On the other hand, the increase in chromosome damage among the traffic policemen was enhanced further by smoking. Several problems that are found in biomonitoring studies are discussed. PMID:7529700

  9. An integrated molecular cytogenetic map of Cucumis sativus L. chromosome 2

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Integration of molecular, genetic and cytological maps is still a challenge for most plant species. Recent progress in molecular and cytogenetic studies created a basis for developing integrated maps in cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.). Results In this study, eleven fosmid clones and three plasmids containing 45S rDNA, the centromeric satellite repeat Type III and the pericentriomeric repeat CsRP1 sequences respectively were hybridized to cucumber metaphase chromosomes to assign their cytological location on chromosome 2. Moreover, an integrated molecular cytogenetic map of cucumber chromosomes 2 was constructed by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) mapping of 11 fosmid clones together with the cucumber centromere-specific Type III sequence on meiotic pachytene chromosomes. The cytogenetic map was fully integrated with genetic linkage map since each fosmid clone was anchored by a genetically mapped simple sequence repeat marker (SSR). The relationship between the genetic and physical distances along chromosome was analyzed. Conclusions Recombination was not evenly distributed along the physical length of chromosome 2. Suppression of recombination was found in centromeric and pericentromeric regions. Our results also indicated that the molecular markers composing the linkage map for chromosome 2 provided excellent coverage of the chromosome. PMID:21272311

  10. Molecular cytogenetic analyses of Epinephelus bruneus and Epinephelus moara (Perciformes, Epinephelidae).

    PubMed

    Guo, Minglan; Wang, Shifeng; Su, Yongquan; Zhou, Yongcan; Liu, Min; Wang, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Genus Epinephelus (Perciformes, Epinephelidae), commonly known as groupers, are usually difficult in species identification for the lack and/or change of morphological specialization. In this study, molecular cytogenetic analyses were firstly performed to identify the closely related species Epinephelus bruneus and E. moara in this genus. The species-specific differences of both fish species showed in karyotype, chromosomal distribution of nucleolar organizer regions (NORs) and localization of 18S rDNA. The heterochromatin (interstitial C-bands) and distribution pattern of telomere (TTAGGG) n in E. bruneus revealed the chromosomal rearrangements and different karyotypic evolutionary characteristics compared to those in E. moara. The cytogenetic data suggested that the lineages of E. bruneus and E. moara were recently derived within the genus Epinephelus, and E. moara exhibited more plesiomorphic features than E. bruneus. All results confirmed that E. moara, which has long been considered a synonym of E. bruneus, is a distinct species in the family Epinephelidae. In addition, molecular cytogenetic analyses are useful in species differentiation and phylogenetic reconstruction in groupers.

  11. Conventional and molecular cytogenetic diagnostic methods in stem cell research: a concise review.

    PubMed

    Catalina, Purificación; Cobo, Fernando; Cortés, José L; Nieto, Ana I; Cabrera, Carmen; Montes, Rosa; Concha, Angel; Menendez, Pablo

    2007-09-01

    Regenerative medicine and cell therapy are emerging clinical disciplines in the field of stem cell biology. The most important sources for cell transplantation are human embryonic and adult stem cells. The future use of these human stem cell lines in humans requires a guarantee of exhaustive control with respect to quality control, safety and traceability. Genetic instability and chromosomal abnormalities represent a potential weakness in basic studies and future therapeutic applications based on these stem cell lines, and may explain, at least in part, their usual tumourigenic properties. So, the introduction of the cytogenetic programme in the determination of the chromosomal stability is a key point in the establishment of the stem cell lines. The aim of this review is to provide readers with an up-to-date overview of all the cytogenetic techniques, both conventional methods and molecular fluorescence methods, to be used in a stem cell bank or other stem cell research centres. Thus, it is crucial to optimize and validate their use in the determination of the chromosomal stability of these stem cell lines, and assess the advantages and limitations of these cutting-edge cytogenetic technologies.

  12. Clinical relevance of cytogenetics to pediatric practice. Postnatal findings of Patau syndrome - Review of 5 cases.

    PubMed

    Plaiasu, Vasilica; Ochiana, Diana; Motei, Gabriela; Anca, Ioana; Georgescu, Adrian

    2010-07-01

    Patau syndrome (trisomy 13) is one of the most common chromosomal anomalies clinically characterized by the presence of numerous malformations with a limited survival rate for most cases. Babies are usually identified at birth and the diagnosis is confirmed with genetic testing. In this review we outline the clinical and cytogenetic aspects of trisomy 13 and associated phenotypes for 5 cases analyzed in the last 3 years, referred to our Clinical Genetics Department. For each child cytogenetic analysis was performed to determine the genetic variant; also, the patients were investigated for other associated malformations (cardiac, cerebral, renal, ocular anomalies). All 5 cases presented multiple malformations, including some but not all signs of the classical clinical triad suggestive of Patau syndrome. The cytogenetic investigation confirmed for each case the suspected diagnosis and also indicated the specific genetic variant, this being a valuable information for the genetic counselling of the families. The application of genetic analysis can increase diagnosis and prognosis accuracy and have an impact on clinical management.

  13. Integrated cytogenetic BAC map of the genome of the gray, short-tailed opossum, Monodelphis domestica.

    PubMed

    Duke, S E; Samollow, P B; Mauceli, E; Lindblad-Toh, K; Breen, M

    2007-01-01

    The generation of high-quality genome assemblies for numerous species is advancing at a rapid pace. As the number of genome assemblies increases, so does our ability to investigate genome relationships and their contributions to unraveling complex biological, evolutionary, and biomedical processes. A key process in the generation of a genome assembly is to determine and verify the precise physical location and order of the large sequence blocks (scaffolds) that result from the assembly. For organisms of relatively recent common ancestry this process may be achieved largely through comparative sequence alignment. However, as the evolutionary distance between species lengthens, the use of comparative sequence alignment becomes increasingly less reliable. Simultaneous cytogenetic mapping, using multicolor fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) analysis, offers an alternative means to define the cytogenetic location and relative order of DNA sequences, thereby anchoring the genome sequence to the karyotype. In this article we report the molecular cytogenetic locations of 415 bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones that served to anchor sequence scaffolds of the gray, short-tailed opossum (Monodelphis domestica) to its karyotype, which enabled accurate integration of these regions into the genome assembly.

  14. A preliminary investigation: the impact of microscopic condenser on depth of field in cytogenetic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Liqiang; Qiu, Yuchen; Li, Zheng; Li, Yuhua; Zheng, Bin; Li, Shibo; Chen, Wei R.; Liu, Hong

    2013-02-01

    As one of the important components of optical microscopes, the condenser has a considerable impact on system performance, especially on the depth of field (DOF). DOF is a critical technical feature in cytogenetic imaging that may affect the efficiency and accuracy of clinical diagnosis. The purpose of this study is to investigate the influence of microscopic condenser on DOF using a prototype of transmitted optical microscope, based on objective and subjective evaluations. After the description of the relationship between condenser and objective lens and the theoretical analysis of the condenser impact on system numerical aperture and DOF, a standard resolution pattern and several cytogenetic samples are adopted to assess the condenser impact on DOF, respectively. The experimental results of these objective and subjective evaluations are in agreement with the theoretical analysis and show that, under the specific intermediate range of condenser numerical aperture ( NAcond ), the DOF value decreases with the increase of NAcond . Although the above qualitative results are obtained under the experimental conditions with a specific prototype system, the methods presented in this preliminary investigation could offer useful guidelines for optimizing operational parameters in cytogenetic imaging.

  15. Coleoptera species inhabiting prairie wetlands of the Cottonwood Lake Area, Stutsman County, North Dakota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hanson, B.A.; Swanson, G.A.

    1989-01-01

    The aquatic Coleoptera of a prairie wetland complex in Stutsman County, North Dakota, were collected from April 1979 to November 1980. Identification of 2594 individuals confirmed 57 species, including seven new records for North Dakota. Two seasonally flooded and two semipermanent wetlands, totaling 7.43 ha, contained 53% of the Dytiscidae, 43% of the Haliplidae, 38% of the Hydrophilidae, and 22% of the Gyrinidae species previously identified from North Dakota. Although 49.1% of the Coleoptera species occurred in both types of wetlands, the occurrence of 29 species varied by wetland class.

  16. Cytogenetics in the management of multiple myeloma: an update by the Groupe francophone de cytogénétique hématologique (GFCH).

    PubMed

    Daudignon, Agnès; Quilichini, Benoît; Ameye, Geneviève; Poirel, Hélène; Bastard, Christian; Terré, Christine

    2016-10-01

    Cytogenetics of multiple myeloma has evolved in recent years by the emergence of Interphasic fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) performed on sorted plasma cells detecting abnormalities independently of a proliferative and infiltrative index. Cytogenetic analysis plays a major part in the risk stratification of myeloma diagnosis due to prognostic impact of various cytogenetic abnormalities as well as to the association between emerging therapeutic approaches in MM. Thus, practice guidelines now recommend interphasic FISH or alternative molecular technics as the initial analysis for multiple myeloma. The Groupe francophone de cytogénétique hématologique (GFCH) proposes in this issue an update of managing multiple myeloma cytogenetics.

  17. Responses by Dendroctonus frontalis and Dendroctonus mesoamericanus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) to Ssemiochemical lures in Chiapas, Mexico: possible roles of pheromones during joint host attacks

    Treesearch

    Alicia Nino-Dominguez; Brian T. Sullivan; Jose H. Lopez-Urbina; Jorge E. Macias-Samano

    2016-01-01

    In southern Mexico and Central America, the southern pine beetle Dendroctonus frontalis Zimmermann (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) commonly colonizes host trees simultaneously with Dendroctonus mesoamericanus Armend

  18. Host plant oviposition preference of Ceratapion basicorne (Coleoptera:Apionidae), a potential biological control agent of yellow starthistle

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Ceratapion basicorne (Coleoptera: Apionidae) is a weevil native to Europe and western Asia that is being evaluated as a prospective classical biological control agent of Centaurea solstitialis (yellow starthistle) in the United States. Choice oviposition experiments were conducted under laboratory ...

  19. Ancyronyx reticulatus and A. pulcherrimus, two new riffle beetle species from Borneo, and discussion about elmid plastron structures (Coleoptera: Elmidae).

    PubMed

    Kodada, Ján; Jäch, Manfred A; Ciampor, Fedor

    2014-02-03

    Two new species of Ancyronyx Erichson, 1847 (Coleoptera: Elmidae) are described from Borneo: A. pulcherrimus (Brunei) and A. reticulatus (Sabah). Habitus views, illustrations of important characters as well as plastron structures of Ancyronyx reticulatus are presented and discussed.

  20. Non-constant thermal regimes enhance overwintering success and accelerate diapause development for Smicronyx fulvus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Recent populations of the red sunflower seed weevil, Smicronyx fulvus LeConte (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) have been inconsistent or declining, particularly in North Dakota. Consequently, field and laboratory research on weevil biology, including development of resistant germplasm, have been limited....

  1. Detection of reproducing populations of Coccinella novemnotata within coccinellid assemblages (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) in western South Dakota and western Nebraska

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Adults of three native species of lady beetles [Coccinella novemnotata Herbst, Coccinella transversoguttata richardsoni Brown, and Adalia bipunctata (L.); Coleoptera: Coccinellidae] of conservation interest were detected during recent surveys at several locations in western South Dakota and western ...

  2. Evaluation of the effectiveness of the entomopathogens for the management of wireworms (Coleoptera: Elateridae) on spring wheat

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Wireworms, the larval stage of click beetles (Coleoptera: Elateridae), are serious soil dwelling pests of small grain, corn, sugar beet and potato crops. Limonius californicus (Mannerheim) and Hypnoidus bicolor (Eschscholtz) are the predominant wireworm species infesting wheat in Montana, particula...

  3. Role of emerald ash borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) larval vibrations in host-quality assessments by Tetrastichus planipennisi (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae)

    Treesearch

    Michael D. Ulyshen; Richard W. Mankin; Yigen Chen; Jian J. Duan; Therese M. Poland; Leah S. Bauer

    2011-01-01

    The biological control agent Tetrastichus planipennisi Yang (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae) is a gregarious larval endoparasitoid of the emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), an invasive cambium-feeding species responsible for recent, widespread mortality of ash (Fraxinus spp.) in...

  4. Susceptibility of fruit from diverse apple and crabapple germplasm to attack from plum curculio, Conotrachelus nenuphar (Herbst) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Plum curculio, Conotrachelus nenuphar (Herbst) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) is an important apple pest that significantly hinders sustainable apple production in eastern North America. The potential for host plant resistance to plum curculio among apple (Malus) germplasm has never been rigorously ev...

  5. Comparative study of microsatellite and cytogenetic markers for detecting the origin of the nondisjoined chromosome 21 in down syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Petersen, M.B.; Frantzen, M.; Lund, C.; Olsen, B.; Poulsen, H.; Sand, A.; Tommerup, N.; Mikkelsen, M. ); Antonarakis, S.E.; Warren, A.C. ); Van Broeckhoven, C. ); Chakravarti, A.; Cox, T.K. )

    1992-09-01

    Nondisjunction in trisomy 21 has traditionally been studied by cytogenetic heteromorphisms. Those studies assumed no crossing-over on the short arm of chromosome 21. Recently, increased accuracy of detection of the origin of nondisjunction has been demonstrated by DNA polymorphism analysis. The authors describe a comparative study of cytogenetic heteromorphisms and seven PCR-based DNA polymorphism analysis. They describe a comparative study of cytogenetic heteromorphisms and seven PCR-based DNA polymorphisms for detecting the origin of the additional chromosome 21 in 68 cases of Down syndrome. The polymorphisms studied were the highly informative microsatellites at loci D21S120, D21S192, IFNAR, D21S156, HMG14, and D21S171. The meiotic stage of nondisjunction was assigned on the basis of the pericentromeric markers D21S215, D21S120, and D21S192. Only unequivocal cytogenetic results were compared with the results of the DNA analysis. The parental and meiotic division origin could be determined in 51% of the cases by using the cytogenetic markers and in 88% of the cases by using the DNA markers. Although there were no discrepancies between the two scoring systems regarding parental origin, there were eight discrepancies regarding meiotic stage of nondisjunction. The results raise the possibility of recombination between the two marker systems, particularly on the short arm. 46 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Prognostic Impact of Discordant Results from Cytogenetics and Flow Cytometry in Patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia Undergoing Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Min; Store, Barry; Wood, Brent; Gyurkocza, Boglarka; Sandmaier, Brenda M.; Appelbaum, Frederick R.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Cytogenetics and multicolor flow cytometry (MFC) are useful tools for monitoring outcome of treatment in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). However, no data are available regarding the meaning of results when the two tests do not agree. METHODS We analyzed 1464 pairs of concurrent cytogenetics and flow results from 424 patients, both pre- and post- hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT), and compared the prognostic impact of discordant and concordant results. RESULTS Informative discordant results were found in 22% of patients. Compared with patients with double negative testing results, either positive result had a significant impact on overall survival (OS) and relapse-free survival (RFS). The hazard ratios (HR) with either cytogenetics or MFC positive pre-transplant were 3.1 (P = 0.009) and 2.5 (P = 0.0008), respectively, for reduced OS, and 2.7 (P = 0.01) and 4.1 (P < 0.0001), respectively, for decreased RFS. Similar findings were obtained post-transplant. Molecular cytogenetics, i.e. fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), further added value to the evaluation of discordant cases. CONCLUSION Detection of residual disease of AML by either cytogenetics or flow cytometry in HCT patients predicts early relapse and shortened survival. PMID:21928360

  7. Integrating kaolin clay for ambrosia beetle (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) management in ornamental tree nurseries

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Abstract Invasive ambrosia beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) are an important pest problem at ornamental tree nurseries. Available chemical measures are not completely effective, and due to the length of the beetle dispersal period and product breakdown, repeated treatments can become costly in ...

  8. Coexistence and competition between Tomicus Yunnanensis and T. minor (Coleoptera: Scolytidae) in yunnan pine

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Competition and cooperation between bark beetles, Tomicus yunnanensis and Tomicus minor (Coleoptera: Scolytidae) were examined when they coexisted together in living Yunnan pine trees (Pinus yunnanensis L.) in Yunnan province in southwest China. T. yunnanensis bark beetles were observed to initiate ...

  9. Contribution to the knowledge of seed-beetles (Coleoptera, Chrysomelidae, Bruchinae) in Xinjiang, China.

    PubMed

    Li, You; Wang, Zhiliang; Guo, Jianjun; Nápoles, Jesús Romero; Ji, Yingchao; Jiang, Chunyan; Zhang, Runzhi

    2014-01-01

    Nineteen species of seed-beetles belonging to the subfamily Bruchinae (Coleoptera, Chrysomelidae) were collected in Xinjiang, China. Of these, the following four were new records for China: Bruchusaffinis Frolich, 1799, Bruchusatomarius L., 1761, Bruchusloti Paykull, 1800 and Kytorhinuskergoati Delobel & Legalov, 2009. We provide an annotated checklist, illustrations and a key to the 19 species.

  10. Influence of temperature on spring flight initiation for southwestern ponderosa pine bark beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, Scolytinae)

    Treesearch

    M. L. Gaylord; K. K. Williams; R. W. Hofstetter; J. D. McMillin; T. E. Degomez; M. R. Wagner

    2008-01-01

    Determination of temperature requirements for many economically important insects is a cornerstone of pest management. For bark beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, Scolytinae), this information can facilitate timing of management strategies. Our goals were to determine temperature predictors for flight initiation of three species of Ips bark beetles...

  11. Molecular Diagnostic for Boll Weevil (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) Based on Amplification of Three Species-specific Microsatellites

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The boll weevil, Anthonomus grandis Boheman (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), is a serious pest of cultivated cotton in the Americas, and reinfestation of zones from which they have been eradicated is of perpetual concern. Extensive arrays of pheromone traps monitor for reintroductions, but occasionally...

  12. Flight propensty of Anoplophora glabripennis, an Asian longhorned beetle (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae)

    Treesearch

    J. A. Francese; B. Wang; D. R. Lance; Z. Xu; S. Zong; Y. Luo; A. J. Sawyer; V. C. Mastro

    2003-01-01

    Anoplophora glabripennis (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) (Motschulsky), is a recently introduced pest of hardwoods. Research to study its flight behavior was conducted in the field in Ningxia Autonomous Region, Peoples' Republic of China. To study the flight propensity of A. glabripennis, adult beetles were observed in population...

  13. Host boring preferences of the tea shot-hole borer Euwallacea fornicatus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The non-native shot-hole borer, Euwallacea nr. fornicatus Eichhoff (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae), was discovered in Florida’s avocado production area in Homestead in 2010. It is a highly polyphagous ambrosia beetle that carries Fusarium fungal symbionts. In susceptible host trees, the fung...

  14. Illustrated guide to the emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire and related species (Coleoptera, Buprestidae)

    Treesearch

    M. Lourdes Chamorro; Eduard Jendek; Robert A. Haack; Toby Petrice; Norman E. Woodley; Alexander S. Konstantinov; Mark G. Volkovitsh; Xing-Ke Yang; Vasily V. Grebennikov

    2015-01-01

    The 33 species of Agrilus (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) hypothesized to be most closely related or most similar to Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (the emerald ash borer), are described and illustrated. Morphology (adults and immatures), biology, distribution, detailed taxonomic history and systematics are presented for each species,...

  15. A small-bolt method for screening tree protectants against bark beetles (coleoptera: curculionidae)

    Treesearch

    B.L. Strom; L.M. Roton

    2009-01-01

    A simple, small-bolt method was developed and refi ned for evaluating and screening treatments being considered as prophylactics against bark beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae). Using this method, 4 insecticide products (3 active ingredients) were evaluated against the southern pine beetle, Dendroctonus frontalis Zimmermann, intermittently during a period...

  16. Field Response of Dendroctonus frontalis (Coleoptera: Scolytinae) to Synthetic Semiochemicals in Chiapas, Mexico.

    Treesearch

    Benjamin Moreno; Jorge Macias; Brian Sullivan; Stephen Clarke

    2008-01-01

    Dendroctonus frontalis Zimmermann (Coleoptera: Scolytinae) is the most serious pestof pines (Pinus spp.) in Mexico. ConspeciÞcs are attracted to trees undergoing colonization by the  aggregation pheromone frontalin, which is synergized by odors of pine oleoresin released from beetle-damaged host tissue. Synthetic racemic frontalin combined with turpentine has been the...

  17. Lack of genetic differentiation in aggressive and secondary bark beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, Scolytinae) from Arizona

    Treesearch

    Christopher J. Allender; Karen M. Clancy; Tom E. DeGomez; Joel D. McMillin; Scott A. Woolbright; Paul Keim; David M. Wagner

    2008-01-01

    Bark beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, Scolytinae) play an important role as disturbance agents in ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa Douglas ex Lawson) forests of Arizona. However, from 2001 to 2003, elevated bark beetle activity caused unprecedented levels of ponderosa pine mortality. A better understanding of the population structure of these...

  18. Bioacoustics of Acanthoscelides obtectus (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae: Bruchinae) on Phaseolus vulgaris (Fabaceae)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Acanthoscelides obtectus (Say) (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), is an economically important pest of common bean Phaseolus vulgaris L. (Fabaceae) in the tropics and subtropics. It is difficult to detect the presence of A. obtectus because the larvae are cryptic and spend most of their developmental time...

  19. Intercepted Scolytidae (Coleoptera) at U.S. ports of entry: 1985-2000.

    Treesearch

    Robert A. Haack

    2001-01-01

    Since 1985, the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service has maintained the 'Port Information Network' (PIN) database for plant pests intercepted at the U.S. ports of entry. As of August 2001, PIN contained 6825 records of beetles (Coleoptera) in the family Scolytidae that had been intercepted during the years 1985-2000 from...

  20. Evaluation of double-decker traps for emerald ash borer (Coleoptera:Buprestidae)

    Treesearch

    Therese M. Poland; Deborah G. McCullough; Andrea C. Anulewicz

    2011-01-01

    Improved detection tools are needed for the emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), an invasive forest insect from Asia that has killed millions of ash (Fraxinus spp.) trees in North America since its discovery in Michigan in 2002.We evaluated attraction of adult A. planipennis...

  1. A new species and first record of Cotinis Burmeister (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Cetoniinae) for Venezuela.

    PubMed

    Gasca-Álvarez, Héctor Jaime; Deloya, Cuauhtémoc

    2015-04-20

    A new Cotinis Burmeister (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Cetoniinae: Gymnetini) species from Venezuela is described and illustrated. The new species is compared with Cotinis barthelemyi (Gory & Percheron) from Colombia. The Neotropical distribution of Cotinis is expanded to Venezuela. A revised key to the species of Cotinis is provided in both English and Spanish.

  2. Semiochemical disruption of the pine shoot beetle, Tomicus piniperda (Coleoptera: Scolytidae)

    Treesearch

    Therese M. Poland; Peter De Groot; Stephen Burke; David Wakarchuk; Robert A. Haack; Reginald Nott

    2004-01-01

    The pine shoot beetle, Tomicus piniperda (Coleoptera: Scolytidae), is an exotic pest of pine in North America. We evaluated blends of semiochemical disruptants, which included nonhost volatiles and verbenone, for their ability to disrupt attraction of T. piniperda to traps baited with the attractant α-pinene and to Scots...

  3. A catalog of the Coleoptera of America north of Mexico, family: curculionidae subfamily: Curculioninae

    Treesearch

    Lester P. Gibson

    1985-01-01

    The Coleoptera, or beetles, are represented in the world by about 220,000 described species, of which about 24,000 occur in the United States and Canada. A comprehensive taxonomic catalog of beetles for this area has not been available except the series of world-based "Coleopterorum Catalogus" volumes (1909-present, Junk, Berlin). The Leng "Catalogue of...

  4. A new Oxyurida (Thelastomatidae) from Cyclocephala signaticollis Burmeister (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae) from Argentina.

    PubMed

    Camino, Nora B; Reboredo, Guillermo R

    2005-08-01

    Cephalobellus cyclocephalae n. sp. (Oxyurida: Thelastomatidae), a parasite of larvae of Cyclocephala signaticollis (Coleoptera, Scarabaeidae), found in Argentina is described and illustrated. It is characterized by the cuticle striated at the anterior end in both sexes, with 15 annules, buccal cavity short and not armed, and the male with 4 pairs of genital papillae, 1 pair of preanal papillae, 3 pairs of postanal papillae.

  5. A new species of Golinca Thomson (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Cetoniinae): first record of the genus for Brazil.

    PubMed

    Valois, M; Silva, F

    2015-02-16

    Golinca trevisani Valois & Silva, new species (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Cetoniinae: Trichiini: Incina) from Ouro Preto do Oeste, Rondônia, and Amazonas, Brazil is described, representing the first record of the genus Golinca for Brazil. Diagnosis, illustrations of key morphological characters, the first male genitalia description in the genus, and a key for identification of four species of Golinca are provided.

  6. Host selection and feeding preference of Agrilus planipennis (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) on ash (Fraxinus spp.)

    Treesearch

    Deepa S. Pureswaran; Therese M. Poland

    2009-01-01

    We studied the host selection behavior and feeding preference of the emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae). A. planipennis is an exotic forest insect pest native to Asia that was discovered in North America in 2002 and is causing widespread mortality of ash trees (Fraxinus spp...

  7. Detection of Rhynchophorus palmarum (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) and identification of associated nematodes in south Texas

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This study reports a survey conducted to find the South American palm weevil Rhynchophorus palmarum (L.) and the red palm weevil R. ferrugineus (Olivier) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), two invasive species of palm trees. The study was performed in the Rio Grande Valley of south Texas and near the bor...

  8. Progress in the classical biological control of Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) in North America

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Discovered in North America in 2002, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) is a phloem-feeding beetle from Asia that attacks and kills ash trees (Fraxinus spp.). Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) populations surveyed for natural enemies in North America reveal low prevalence of native larva...

  9. Chemical control of the redbay ambrosia beetle, Xyleborus glabratus, and other Scolytinae (Coleoptera: Curculionidae)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The redbay ambrosia beetle, Xyleborus glabratus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae), is an exotic pest of Lauraceae in the southeastern U.S. This wood-boring insect vectors a lethal fungus, Raffaelea lauricola, the causal agent of laurel wilt disease. The vector-pathogen complex is responsible...

  10. Chemical Control of the Redbay Ambrosia Beetle, Xyleborus glabratus (Coleoptera: Scolytinae) in Florida

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The redbay ambrosia beetle, Xyleborus glabratus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae), is an exotic pest of U.S. trees in the family Lauraceae, including avocado (Persea americana) and redbay (P. borbonia). It threatens avocado production in Florida by transmitting Raffaelea lauricola, the fungal...

  11. First contact pheromone identified for a longhorned beetle (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) in the subfamily Prioninae

    Treesearch

    Annie E. Spikes; Matthew A. Paschen; Jocelyn G. Miller; Jardel A. Moreira; Paul B. Hamel; Nathan M. Schiff; Matthew D. Ginzel

    2010-01-01

    Little is known of the reproductive behavior of longhorned beetles (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) in the subfamily Prioninae. Mallodon dasystomus (Say), the hardwood stump borer, is a widely distributed prionine that is native to the southern U.S. Here, we explored the chemically-mediated mating behavior of M dasystomus, and tested the hypothesis that males recognize...

  12. Ambrosia Beetle (Coleoptera: Scolytidae) species, flight, and attack on living eastern cottonwood trees

    Treesearch

    David R. Coyle; Derek C. Booth; M. S. Wallace

    2005-01-01

    In spring 2002, ambrosia beetles (Coleoptera: Scolytidae) infested an intensively managed 22-ha tree plantation on the upper coastal plain of South Carolina. Nearly 3,500 scolytids representing 28 species were captured in ethanol-baited traps from 18 June 2002 to 18 April 2004. More than 88% of total captures were exotic species. Five species [Dryoxylon...

  13. Ground beetle (Coleoptera: Carabidae) assemblages in the Conservation Reserve Program crop rotation systems in Interior Alaska

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Adult ground beetles (Coleoptera: Carabidae) abundance and diversity were documented on Conservation Research Program (CRP) agricultural lands in Delta Junction, Alaska (64ºN, 145º W). Twenty species were documented based on a total sample of 6,116 specimens collected during 2006 and 2007. Two speci...

  14. Morphology and sexual dimorphism of the weevil Myllocerus undecimpustulatus undatus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Myllocerus undecimpustulatus undatus Marshall (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) also known as Sri Lankan weevil, is becoming a major pest of ornamentals and tropical fruit trees in the southern states of USA, especially in Florida. Recent findings of this species in Florida citrus groves justify research ...

  15. Improved visualization of Alphitobius diaperinus (Panzer) (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae) - Part II: Alimentary canal components and measurements

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Alphitobius diaperinus (Panzer) (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae) is a pest of stored food products and problematic to every type of poultry production facility. Larvae and adults can ingest and harbor foodborne and poultry pathogens. Determining the efficiency of this insect’s capacity to transmit dise...

  16. Exotic bark- and wood-boring Coleoptera in the United States: recent establishments and interceptions

    Treesearch

    Robert A. Haack

    2006-01-01

    Summary data are given for the 25 new species of exotic bark- and wood-boring Coleoptera first reported in the continental United States between 1985 and 2005, including 2 Buprestidae (Agrilus planipennis and Agrilus prionurus), 5 Cerambycidae (Anoplophora glabripennis, Callidiellum rufipenne, Phoracantha recurva, Sybra...

  17. High-level phylogeny of the Coleoptera inferred with mitochondrial genome sequences.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Ming-Long; Zhang, Qi-Lin; Zhang, Li; Guo, Zhong-Long; Liu, Yong-Jian; Shen, Yu-Ying; Shao, Renfu

    2016-11-01

    The Coleoptera (beetles) exhibits tremendous morphological, ecological, and behavioral diversity. To better understand the phylogenetics and evolution of beetles, we sequenced three complete mitogenomes from two families (Cleridae and Meloidae), which share conserved mitogenomic features with other completely sequenced beetles. We assessed the influence of six datasets and three inference methods on topology and nodal support within the Coleoptera. We found that both Bayesian inference and maximum likelihood with homogeneous-site models were greatly affected by nucleotide compositional heterogeneity, while the heterogeneous-site mixture model in PhyloBayes could provide better phylogenetic signals for the Coleoptera. The amino acid dataset generated more reliable tree topology at the higher taxonomic levels (i.e. suborders and series), where the inclusion of rRNA genes and the third positions of protein-coding genes improved phylogenetic inference at the superfamily level, especially under a heterogeneous-site model. We recovered the suborder relationships as (Archostemata+Adephaga)+(Myxophaga+Polyphaga). The series relationships within Polyphaga were recovered as (Scirtiformia+(Elateriformia+((Bostrichiformia+Scarabaeiformia+Staphyliniformia)+Cucujiformia))). All superfamilies within Cucujiformia were recovered as monophyletic. We obtained a cucujiform phylogeny of (Cleroidea+(Coccinelloidea+((Lymexyloidea+Tenebrionoidea)+(Cucujoidea+(Chrysomeloidea+Curculionoidea))))). This study showed that although tree topologies were sensitive to data types and inference methods, mitogenomic data could provide useful information for resolving the Coleoptera phylogeny at various taxonomic levels by using suitable datasets and heterogeneous-site models.

  18. A novel semiochemical tool for protecting Pinus contorta from mortality attributed to Dendroctonus ponderosae (Coleoptera: Curculionidae)

    Treesearch

    Chris Fettig; A. S. Munson; M. Reinke; A. Mafra-Neto

    2015-01-01

    Verbenone (4,6,6-trimethylbicyclo[3.1.1]hept-3-en-2-one) is an antiaggregant of the mountain pine beetle, Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), a notable forest insect capable of causing extensive levels of tree mortality in western North America. Several formulations of verbenone are registered...

  19. Trapping Phyllophaga spp. (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Melolonthinae) in the United States and Canada using sex attractants

    Treesearch

    Paul S. Robbins; Steven R. Alm; Charles D. Armstrong; Anne L. Averill; Thomas C. Baker; Robert J. Bauernfiend; Frederick P. Baxendale; S. Kris Braman; Rick L. Brandenburg; Daniel B. Cash; Gary J. Couch; Richard S. Cowles; Robert L. Crocker; Zandra D. DeLamar; Timothy G. Dittl; Sheila M. Fitzpatrick; Kathy L. Flanders; Tom Forgatsch; Timothy J. Gibb; Bruce D. Gill; Daniel O. Gilrein; Clyde S. Gorsuch; Abner M. Hammond; Patricia D. Hastings; David W. Held; Paul R. Heller; Rose T. Hiskes; James L. Holliman; William G. Hudson; Michael G. Klein; Vera L. Krischik; David J. Lee; Charles E. Linn; Nancy J. Luce; Kenna E. MacKenzie; Catherine M. Mannion; Sridhar Polavarapu; Daniel A. Potter; Wendell L. Roelofs; Brian M. Rovals; Glenn A. Salsbury; Nathan M. Schiff; David J. Shetlar; Margaret Skinner; Beverly L. Sparks; Jessica A. Sutschek; Timothy P. Sutschek; Stanley R. Swier; Martha M. Sylvia; Niel J. Vickers; Patricia J. Vittum; Richard Weidman; Donald C. Weber; R. Chris Williamson; Michael G. Villani

    2006-01-01

    The sex pheromone of the scarab beetle, Phyllophaga anxia, is a blend of the methyl esters of two amino acids, L-valine and L-isoleucine. A field trapping study was conducted, deploying different blends of the two compounds at 59 locations in the United States and Canada. More than 57,000 males of 61 Phyllophaga species (Coleoptera...

  20. Diversity abundance and seasonality of ambrosia beetles (Coleoptera: curculionida) in Southern Mississippi

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A survey was undertaken in 2010 to assess the makeup of the ambrosia beetle (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) community at two research sites in South Mississippi. Inexpensive beetle traps were constructed and fitted with ethanol lures, with bi-weekly collections made from March through November. The gr...

  1. How varying pest and trap densities affect Tribolium castaneum (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae) capture in pheromone traps

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum (Herbst) (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae), is an important insect pest in food processing facilities. Pheromone trapping is frequently used to monitor red flour beetle populations in structures; however, the optimal trap density and the relationship between trap ...

  2. Review of the genus Ceresium Newman, 1842 (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) in Fiji

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A taxonomic review of the genus Ceresium (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) found within the Fiji Islands is presented. A total of 17 species is treated. Full morphological descriptions and comparative images of each species are included, along with a dichotomous key for their identification....

  3. Effect of larval density on food utilization efficiency of Tenebrio molitor (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Rearing conditions, particularly the crowding of larvae, may have a significant impact on production efficiency of some insects produced commercially, such as Tenebrio molitor L. (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae). Although larval densities are known to affect developmental time and growth in T. molitor, n...

  4. Behavioral assays for evaluating host preferences of Euwallacea nr. fornicatus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae).

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In 2010, the exotic ambrosia beetle, Euwallacea nr. fornicatus Eichhoff (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) was first discovered in Florida avocado groves. Introduction of its symbiotic Fusarium spp. fungi into galleries in the xylem tissue results in Fusarium-dieback disease. Unlike most ambros...

  5. Characterization of an Aggregation Pheromone in Hylesinus pruinosus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae)

    Treesearch

    William Shepherd; Brian Sullivan; Bradley Hoosier; JoAnne Barrett; Tessa Bauman

    2010-01-01

    We conducted laboratory and field bioassays to characterize the pheromone system of an ash bark beetle, Hylesinus pruinosus Eichhoff (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae). Solitary females in newly initiated galleries in ash logs produced (+)-exo-brevicomin, whereas male beetles paired with females produced (+)-endo-brevicomin, lesser quantities of...

  6. Role of volatile semiochemicals in the host and mate location behavior of Mallodon dasystomus (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae)

    Treesearch

    Matthew A. Paschen; Nathan M. Schiff; Matthew D. Ginzel

    2012-01-01

    Little is known of the role semiochemicals play in the mating systems of longhorned beetles (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) in the primitive subfamily Prioninae. Mallodon dasystomus (Say), the hardwood stump borer, is a widely distributed prionine native to the southern US. Preferred hosts of M. dasystomus include oak, sweetgum,...

  7. Novel method for determining sex of live adult Laricobius nigrinus (Coleoptera: Derodontidae).

    Treesearch

    William Shepherd; Michael Montgomery; Brian Sullivan; Albert (Bud) Mayfield

    2014-01-01

    A method for determining the sex of live adult Laricobius nigrinus Fender (Coleoptera:Derodontidae) is described. Beetles were briefly chilled and positioned ventral-side-up under a dissecting microscope. Two forceps with blunted ends were used to gently brace the beetle and press on the centre of the abdomen to extrude its terminal segments. Male beetles were...

  8. Efficacy of three insecticides applied to bark to control Agrilus planipennis (Coleoptera: Buprestidae)

    Treesearch

    Toby R. Petrice; Robert A. Haack

    2006-01-01

    Emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), is a serious exotic pest of ash (Fraxinus) trees in North America. In 2003 and 2004, we tested the efficacy of different insecticides sprayed on the bark of cut ash logs for killing emerging EAB adults. Logs (means: length = 30 cm; diam. = 16 cm) were...

  9. Review of the genus Ceresium Newman, 1842 (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae) in Fiji

    PubMed Central

    Waqa-Sakiti, Hilda; Winder, Linton; Lingafelter, Steven W.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract A taxonomic review of the genus Ceresium (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) found within the Fiji Islands is presented. A total of 17 species is treated. Full morphological descriptions and comparative images of each species are included, along with a dichotomous key for their identification. PMID:26692805

  10. Biology of the invasive banded elm bark beetle (Coleoptera: Scolytidae) in the western United States

    Treesearch

    Jana C. Lee; Jose F. Negron; Sally J. McElwey; Livy Williams; Jeffrey J. Witcosky; John B. Popp; Steven J. Seybold

    2011-01-01

    The banded elm bark beetle, Scolytus schevyrewi Semenov (Coleoptera: Scolytidae), native to Asia, was detected in the United States in 2003, and as of 2011 it is known to occur in 28 states and four Canadian provinces. S. schevyrewi infests the same elm (Ulmus spp.) hosts as the longestablished invasive...

  11. Susceptibility of Agrilus planipennis (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) to Beauveria bassiana and Metarhizium anisopliae

    Treesearch

    Houping Lui; Leah S. Bauer

    2006-01-01

    The susceptibility of Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) to selected strains of the entomopathogenic fungi Beauveria bassiana (Balsamo) Vuillemin and Metarhizium anisopliae (Metschnikoff) Sorokin was evaluated through bioassays with direct immersion or foliar exposure under laboratory conditions. Results showed that A. planipennis adults were...

  12. Dilution of Fluon Before Trap Surface Treatment Has No Effect on Longhorned Beetle (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) Captures

    Treesearch

    Jeremy D. Allison; Elizabeth E. Graham; Therese M. Poland; Brian L. Strom

    2016-01-01

    Several studies have observed that trap captures of longhorned beetles (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) can be increased by treating the surface of intercept traps with a lubricant. In addition to being expensive, these treatments can alter the spectral properties of intercept traps when applied neat. These surface treatments, particularly Fluon, are commonly used diluted as...

  13. Use of nutrient self selection as a diet refining tool in Tenebrio molitor (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A new method to refine existing dietary supplements for improving production of the yellow mealworm, Tenebrio molitor L. (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae), was tested. Self selected ratios of 6 dietary ingredients by T. molitor larvae were used to produce a dietary supplement. This supplement was compared...

  14. Impact of Adult Weight, Density, and Age on Reproduction of Tenebrio molitor (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The impact of adult weight, age, and density on reproduction of Tenebrio molitor L. (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae) was studied. The impact of adult weight on reproduction was determined in two ways: 1) counting the daily progeny of individual adult pairs of known weight and analyzing the data with line...

  15. The genus Platytenerus Miyatake, 1985 (Coleoptera: Cleridae: Neorthopleurinae), with description of a new species from Japan.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Hiroyuki

    2015-03-23

    The genus Platytenerus Miyatake, 1985 (Coleoptera: Cleridae) is redescribed and classified into the subfamily Neorthopleurinae Opitz, 2009. A phylogenetic tree is supplementally provided for Platytenerus based on twenty morphological and two geographical characters. A new species of the genus, Platytenerus iriomotensis sp. n. is described from Iriomote Island, Okinawa, Japan.

  16. Capture of Xylosandrus crassiusculus and other Scolytinae (Coleoptera, Curculionidae) in response to visual and volatile cues

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In June and July 2011 traps were deployed in Tuskegee National Forest, Macon County, Alabama to test the influence of chemical and visual cues on for the capture of bark and ambrosia beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae). \\using chemical and visual cues. The first experiment investigated t...

  17. Risk to native Uroleucon aphids (Hemiptera: Aphididae) from non-native lady beetles (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Aphids in the genus Uroleucon Mordvilko (Hemiptera: Aphididae) are native herbivores that feed on goldenrod (Solidago spp.) and other Asteraceae in North America. The aphids are potential prey for a wide variety of natural enemies, including native and non-native species of lady beetles (Coleoptera...

  18. Incorporating a sorghum habitat for enhancing lady beetles (Coleoptera:Coccinellidae) in cotton

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Lady beetles (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) are important predators of cotton insect pests. The objective of this 2-yr on-farm study was to examine the ability of a sorghum trap crop with Euschistus spp. pheromone baited capture traps to enhance these predators in cotton in Georgia. Scymnus spp., Cocci...

  19. An unusual new species of Micraspis Chevrolat (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) from northeastern India

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Micraspis pusillus sp. n. (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) is described and illustrated from the northeastern region of India. It is unusual in possessing very large eye canthus and is the smallest species of the genus known from India so far. PMID:25425937

  20. Rearing redbay ambrosia beetle, Xyleborus glabratus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae), on semi-artifical media

    Treesearch

    M. Lake Maner; James Hanula; S. Kristine Braman

    2014-01-01

    Semi-artificial diets consisting of redbay (Persea borbonia (L.) Spreng,; Laurales: Lauraceae) sawdust and various nutrients were tested for rearing Xyleborus glabratus Eichoff (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) in vitro. Comparison of 2 media, modified and standard, adapted from Biedermann et al. (2009) showed that the more...

  1. Hitchhikers with invasive Tetropium fuscum (Fabr.) (Coleoptera:Cerambycidae) in Atlantic Canada

    Treesearch

    Karin Jacobs; Keith A. Seifert; Ken J. Harrison; Georgette Smith; Thomas Kirisits

    2003-01-01

    Tetropium fuscum (Fabr.) (Coleoptera:Cerambycidae) is native to Europe and apart from the Halifax, Nova Scotia area, is unknown elsewhere in North America (Smith & Hurley, 2000). Tetropium fuscum poses no primary threat to Picea abies Karst. in Europe and is regarded there as a secondary insect that usually...

  2. Interactions of Hylastes Species (Coleoptera: Scolytidae) with Leptographium Species Associated with Loblolly Pine Decline

    Treesearch

    Lori G. Eckhardt; Richard A. Goyer; Kier Klepzig; John P. Jones

    2004-01-01

    Abstract Hylastes spp. (Coleoptera: Scolytidae)were evaluated as potential vectors of Leptographium spp. fungi. Bark beetles were trapped from stands of loblolly pine, Pinus taeda L., exhibiting a range of decline symptoms in central Alabama. Under controlled conditions, field-collected adult...

  3. Hydraena Kugelann, 1794 (Coleoptera, Hydraenidae) from the Seychelles, Indian Ocean, with description of a new species

    PubMed Central

    Jäch, Manfred A.; Delgado, Juan A.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Hydraena matyoti sp. n. (Coleoptera, Hydraenidae) is described from the Seychelles, Indian Ocean. Hydraena mahensis Scott, 1913 is redescribed. The latter is here recorded from La Digue for the first time. A key to the species of the genus Hydraena Kugelann, 1794 of the Seychelles is presented. PMID:27843389

  4. Leptotrachelus dorsalis (F.) (Coleoptera: Carabidae): A candidate biological control agent of the sugarcane borer in Louisiana

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    With the registration and wide-spread use of insect growth regulators (e.g. tebufenozide and novaluron) for control of sugarcane borer, Diatraea saccharalis (F.) (Lepidoptera: Crambidae) in Louisiana, larvae of the ground beetle, Leptotrachelus dorsalis (F.) (Coleoptera: Carabidae) have become appar...

  5. Hydraena Kugelann, 1794 (Coleoptera, Hydraenidae) from the Seychelles, Indian Ocean, with description of a new species.

    PubMed

    Jäch, Manfred A; Delgado, Juan A

    2016-01-01

    Hydraena matyotisp. n. (Coleoptera, Hydraenidae) is described from the Seychelles, Indian Ocean. Hydraena mahensis Scott, 1913 is redescribed. The latter is here recorded from La Digue for the first time. A key to the species of the genus Hydraena Kugelann, 1794 of the Seychelles is presented.

  6. Dispersal of Agrilus planipennis (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) from discrete epicenters in two outlier sites

    Treesearch

    N.W. Siegert; D.G. McCullough; D.W. Williams; I. Fraser; T.M. Poland; S.J. Pierce

    2010-01-01

    Emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis (Fairmaire) (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), a phloem- feeding beetle native to Asia, has become one of the most destructive forest pests in North America. Since it was Þrst identified in 2002 in southeast Michigan and Windsor, Ontario, dozens of isolated A. planipennis populations have been...

  7. A comparison of trap type and height for capturing cerambycid beetles (Coleoptera)

    Treesearch

    Elizabeth E. Graham; Therese M. Poland; Deborah G. McCullough; Jocelyn G. Millar

    2012-01-01

    Wood-boring beetles in the family Cerambycidae (Coleoptera) play important roles in many forest ecosystems. However, increasing numbers of invasive cerambycid species are transported to new countries by global commerce and threaten forest health in the United States and worldwide. Our goal was to identify effective detection tools for a broad array of cerambycid...

  8. Factors affecting pheromone production by the pepper weevil, Anthonomus eugenii Cano (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) and collection efficiency

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Several factors which might affect pheromone production by male pepper weevils, Anthonomus eugenii Cano (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), were investigated. Included were a comparison of porous polymer adsorbents (Tenax versus Super Q), the effect of male age, the effect of time of day, the effect of mal...

  9. Contribution to the knowledge of seed-beetles (Coleoptera, Chrysomelidae, Bruchinae) in Xinjiang, China

    PubMed Central

    Li, You; Wang, Zhiliang; Guo, Jianjun; Nápoles, Jesús Romero; Ji, Yingchao; Jiang, Chunyan; Zhang, Runzhi

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Nineteen species of seed-beetles belonging to the subfamily Bruchinae (Coleoptera, Chrysomelidae) were collected in Xinjiang, China. Of these, the following four were new records for China: Bruchus affinis Frolich, 1799, Bruchus atomarius L., 1761, Bruchus loti Paykull, 1800 and Kytorhinus kergoati Delobel & Legalov, 2009. We provide an annotated checklist, illustrations and a key to the 19 species. PMID:25610333

  10. Biology, ecology, and management of Xylosandrus spp. ambrosia beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) in ornamental tree nurseries

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Xylosandrus germanus (Blandford) and Xylosandrus crassiusculus (Motschulsky) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) are two of the most damaging non-native ambrosia beetle pests in ornamental tree nurseries. Adult females tunnel into the stems and branches of host trees to create galleries with bro...

  11. Entomopathogens in conjunction with imidacloprid could be used to manage wireworms (Coleoptera: Elateridae) on spring wheat

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The soil-dwelling larvae of click beetles (wireworms) (Coleoptera: Elateridae) are serious pests of several agricultural crops worldwide. Hypnoidus bicolor and Limonius californicus are two major wireworm species damaging to spring wheat, particularly in the Golden Triangle, an important cereal-grow...

  12. Development and evaluation of a trapping system for Anoplophora glabripennis (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) in the United States

    Treesearch

    M.E. Nehme; R.T. Trotter; M.A. Keena; C. McFarland; J. Coop; H.M. Hull-Sanders; P. Meng; C.M. De Moraes; M.C. Mescher; K. Hoover

    2014-01-01

    Anoplophora glabripennis (Motschulsky) (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae), commonly known as the Asian longhorned beetle, is an invasive wood-boring pest that infests a number of hardwood species and causes considerable economic losses in North America, several countries in Europe, and in its native range in Asia. The success of eradication efforts may...

  13. Agrilus auroguttatus (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) seasonal development within Quercus agrifolia (Fagales: Fagaceae) in southern California

    Treesearch

    L.J. Haavik; T.W. Coleman; M.L. Flint; R.C. Venette; S.J. Seybold

    2013-01-01

    We investigated seasonal development of the goldspotted oak borer, Agrilus auroguttatus Schaeffer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), and physical conditions of the phloem within a preferred host species, coast live oak, Quercus agrifolia Née. We sampled infested trees on a monthly basis at two sites in southern California throughout...

  14. Variation in enantiospecific attraction of Ips avulsus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) to the pheromone ipsdienol in Georgia.

    Treesearch

    Daniel Miller; Jeremy Allison

    2011-01-01

    In 2006, we tested the responses of the small southern pine engraver, Ips avulsus (Eichhoff) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), to multiple-funnel traps baited with (+)-, (-)-, and (+/-)- ipsdienol. Three experiments were conducted in Georgia with all traps co-baited with one of the following lure combinations, respectively: experiment 1, ipsenol; experiment 2, lanierone and...

  15. Field Evaluations of Systemic Insecticides for Control of Anoplophora glabripennis (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) in China

    Treesearch

    Therese M. Poland; Robert A. Haack; Toby R. Petrice; Deborah L. Miller; Leah S. Bauer; Ruitong Gao

    2006-01-01

    Anoplophora glabripennis (Motschulsky) (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae), a pest native to China and Korea, was discovered in North America in 1996. Currently, the only reliable strategy available for eradication and control is to cut and chip all infested trees. We evaluated various doses of the systemic insecticides azadirachtin, emamectin benzoate,...

  16. Suitability and accessibility of immature Agrilus planipennis (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) stages to Tetrastichus planipennisi (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae)

    Treesearch

    Michael D. Ulyshen; Jian J. Duan; Leah S. Bauer; Ivich. Fraser

    2010-01-01

    Tetrastichus planipennisi Yang (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae), a gregarious larval endoparasitoid, is one of three biocontrol agents from Asia currently being released in the United States to combat the invasive emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae). The current protocol for rearing T....

  17. Life cycle, development, and culture of Xyleborus glabratus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The redbay ambrosia beetle, Xyleborus glabratus Eichhoff (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae), is a wood-boring pest that transmits the fungal pathogen Raffaelea lauricola, the causal agent of laurel wilt disease in American Lauraceae. This study documents the gallery formation patterns of X. gla...

  18. Microbial control of Agrilus planipennis (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) with Beauveria bassiana strain GHA: field applications

    Treesearch

    Houping Liu; Leah S. Bauer

    2008-01-01

    The effects of Beauveria bassiana strain GHA, applied as BotaniGard ES, on newly colonised and well-established populations of emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) were evaluated in the field using foliar and trunk sprays in Michigan in 2004-2005. Results from field trials at a newly colonised white ash...

  19. Developing monitoring techniques for the invasive goldspotted oak borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) in California

    Treesearch

    Tom W. Coleman; Yigen Chen; Andrew D. Graves; Stacy M. Hishinuma; Nancy E. Grulke; Mary Louise Flint; Steven J. Seybold

    2014-01-01

    The goldspotted oak borer, Agrilus auroguttatus Schaeffer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), is an invasive species that has colonized oak woodlands in southern California. To better define its seasonal flight activity, assist with forest and integrated pest management activities, and define the current distribution in California, an effective monitoring...

  20. Pine sawyers (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) attracted to a-pinene, monochamol, and ipsenol in North America

    Treesearch

    Dan Miller; J. D. Allison; C. M. Crowe; Matthew Dickinson; A. Eglitis; R. W. Hofstetter; A. S. Munson; Therese M. Poland; L. S. Reid; B. E. Steed; J. D. Sweeney

    2016-01-01

    Detection tools are needed for Monochamus species (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) because they are known to introduce pine wilt disease by vectoring nematodes in Asia, Europe, and North America. In 2012–2014, we examined the effects of the semiochemicals monochamol and ipsenol on the flight responses of the sawyer beetles Monochamus carolinensis (Olivier), Monochamus...

  1. Progress in the classical biological control of Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) in North America

    Treesearch

    Leah S. Bauer; Jian J. Duan; Juli R. Gould; Roy. Van Driesche

    2015-01-01

    First detected in North America in 2002, the emerald ash borer (EAB) (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire; Coleoptera: Buprestidae), an invasive phloem-feeding beetle from Asia, has killed tens of millions of ash (Fraxinus Linnaeus; Oleaceae) trees. Although few parasitoids attack EAB in North America, three parasitoid species were found...

  2. Tribolium castaneum (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae) associated with rice mills: Fumigation efficacy and population rebound

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum (Herbst) (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae), is the most important stored-product insect pest infesting rice mills in the U.S. Due to the phasing out of methyl bromide in accordance with the 1987 Montreal Protocol, the efficacy of alternative fumigants in controlli...

  3. Diversity of Scolytinae (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) attracted to avocado, lychee, and essential oil lures

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The redbay ambrosia beetle, Xyleborus glabratus Eichhoff (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae), is an exotic wood-boring insect that vectors laurel wilt, a lethal vascular disease of trees in the Lauraceae, including avocado (Persea americana) and native Persea species (redbay, swampbay). As part...

  4. Development of an improved attractive lure for the pine shoot beetle, Tomicus piniperda (Coleoptera: Scolytidae)

    Treesearch

    Therese M. Poland; Peter de Groot; Stephen Burke; David Wakarchuk; Robert A. Haack; Reginald Nott; Taylor Scarr

    2003-01-01

    1) The pine shoot beetle, Tomicus piniperda (L.) (Coleoptera: Scolytidae), is an exotic pest of pine, Pinus spp., and was first discovered in North America in 1992. 2) Although primary attraction to host volatiles has been clearly demonstrated for T. piniperda, the existence and role of secondary attraction to...

  5. Suitability and Accessibility of Immature Agrilus planipennis (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) Stages to Tetrastichus planipennisi (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae).

    Treesearch

    Michael Ulyshen; Jian Duan; Leah Bauer; Ivich Fraser

    2010-01-01

    Tetrastichus planipennisi Yang (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae), a gregarious larval endoparasitoid, is one of three biocontrol agents from Asia currently being released in the United States to combat the invasive emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae). The current protocol for rearing T. planipennisi involves presenting the wasps with...

  6. Effects of Temperature on Anoplophora glabripennis (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) Adult Survival, Reproduction, and Egg Hatch

    Treesearch

    Melody A. Keena

    2006-01-01

    Anoplophora glabripennis (Motschulsky) (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) is a recently introduced non-native invasive species in North America that has the potential to destroy several tree species in urban and forest habitats. Adult survival, reproduction, and egg hatch of A. glabripennis from two populations (Ravenswood, Chicago, IL, and Bayside, Queens, NY) were evaluated...

  7. Tomicus Piniperda (Coleoptera: Scolytidae): Is Shoot-Feeding Requires For Reproductive Maturation

    Treesearch

    Therese M. Poland; Robert A. Haack

    2000-01-01

    The pine shoot beetle, Tomicus piniperda (Coleoptera: Scolytidae), is a univoltine pest of pine in its native range of Europe and Asia. Tomicus piniperda is now widely established in the Great Lakes region and poses a potentially significant threat to other pine-producing areas in North America. An unusual aspect of the life...

  8. Effects of temperature on Anoplophora glabripennis (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) larvae and pupae

    Treesearch

    M.A. Keena; P.M. Moore

    2010-01-01

    Developmental thresholds, degree-days for development, larval weights, and head capsule widths for each larval instar and the pupal stage of Anoplophora glabripennis (Motschulsky) (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) were studied at eight constant temperatures (5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35, and 40ºC) for two source populations (Ravenswood, Chicago, IL [...

  9. Seasonal and spatial dispersal patterns of ambrosia beetles (Coleoptera: curculionidae) from forest habitats into production nurseries

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Exotic ambrosia beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) are important pests of tree nurseries. While they are known to migrate in early spring from peripheral forested areas into nurseries, there are few data to show how far ambrosia beetles will fly to infest new host trees, or whether a mass trapping...

  10. Field response of Dendroctonus frontalis (Coleoptera: Scolytinae) to Synthetic Semiochemicals in Chiapas, Mexico.

    Treesearch

    Benjamin Moreno; Jorge Macias; Brian T. Sullivan; Stephen R. Clarke

    2008-01-01

    Dendroctonus frontalis Zimmermann (Coleoptera: Scolytinae) is the most serious pest of pines (Pinus spp.) in Mexico. Con specifics are attracted to trees undergoing colonization by the aggregation pheromone frontalin, which is synergized by odors of pine oleoresin released from beetle-damaged host tissue. Synthetic racemic frontalin...

  11. Irradiation quarantine treatment for control of Sitophilus oryzae (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) in rice

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Irradiation is a quarantine treatment option for stored products pests. Dose response tests were conducted to identify a postharvest radiation treatment that would control rice weevil, Sitophilus oryzae (L.) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) in rice. Rice infested with adult or immature weevils was treate...

  12. Two new species of Parandrinae (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) in genera Parandra and Acutandra from South America

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Two new species of high-elevation Parandrinae (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) are described from Bolivia and Ecuador, South America. Both species are unusual in having piceous coloration over most of the dorsal surface. Acutandra caterinoi Lingafelter & Tishechkin, new species, is described from Pichin...

  13. Effect of abiotic factors on initiation of red flour beetle (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae) flight

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Traps baited with pheromones are used to monitor the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum (Herbst) (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae), populations in flour mills to aid in making pest management decisions, but the factors that influence T. castaneum flight aren’t fully understood. We investigated the impa...

  14. Efficacy of systemic insecticides for protection of loblolly pine against southern pine engraver beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) and wood borers (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae).

    PubMed

    Grosman, Donald M; Upton, William W

    2006-02-01

    We evaluated the efficacy of the systemic insecticides dinotefuran, emamectin benzoate, fipronil, and imidacloprid for preventing attacks and brood production of southern pine engraver beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) and wood borers (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) on standing, stressed trees and bolt sections of loblolly pine, Pinus taeda L., in eastern Texas. Emamectin benzoate significantly reduced the colonization success of engraver beetles and associated wood borers in both stressed trees and pine bolt sections. Fipronil was nearly as effective as emamectin benzoate in reducing insect colonization of bolts 3 and 5 mo after injection but only moderately effective 1 mo after injection. Fipronil also significantly reduced bark beetle-caused mortality of stressed trees. Imidacloprid and dinotefuran were ineffective in preventing bark beetle and wood borer colonization of bolts or standing, stressed trees. The injected formulation of emamectin benzoate was found to cause long vertical lesions in the sapwood-phloem interface at each injection point.

  15. Multistate characters and diet shifts: evolution of Erotylidae (Coleoptera).

    PubMed

    Leschen, Richard A B; Buckley, Thomas R

    2007-02-01

    The dominance of angiosperms has played a direct role in the diversification of insects, especially Coleoptera. The shift to angiosperm feeding from other diets is likely to have increased the rate of speciation in Phytophaga. However, Phytophaga is only one of many hyperdiverse lineages of beetles and studies of host-shift proliferation have been somewhat limited to groups that primitively feed on plants. We have studied the diet-diverse beetle family Erotylidae (Cucujoidea) to determine if diet is correlated with high diversification rates and morphological evolution by first reconstructing ancestral diets and then testing for associations between diet and species number and diet and ovipositor type. A Bayesian phylogenetic analysis of morphological data that was previously published in Leschen (2003, Pages 1-108 in Fauna of New Zealand, 47; 53 terminal taxa and 1 outgroup, 120 adult characters and 1 diet character) yielded results that are similar to the parsimony analyses of Leschen (2003). Ancestral state reconstructions based on Bayesian and parsimony inference were largely congruent and both reconstructed microfungal feeding (the diet of the outgroup Biphyllidae) at the root of the Erotylidae tree. Shifts among microfungal, saprophagous, and phytophagous diets were most frequent. The largest numbers of species are contained in lineages that are macrofungal feeders (subfamily Erotylinae) and phytophagous (derived Languriinae), although the Bayesian posterior predictive tests of character state correlation were unable to detect any significant associations. Ovipositor morphology correlated with diet (i.e., acute forms were associated with phytophagy and unspecialized forms were associated with a mixture of diets). Although there is a general trend to increased species number associated with the shift from microfungal feeding to phytophagy (based on character mapping and mainly restricted to shifts in Languriinae), there is a large radiation of taxa feeding on

  16. "Holostei versus Halecostomi" Problem: Insight from Cytogenetics of Ancient Nonteleost Actinopterygian Fish, Bowfin Amia Calva.

    PubMed

    Majtánová, Zuzana; Symonová, Radka; Arias-Rodriguez, Lenin; Sallan, Lauren; Ráb, Petr

    2017-01-11

    Bowfin belongs to an ancient lineage of nonteleost ray-finned fishes (actinopterygians) and is the only extant survivor of a once diverged group, the Halecomorphi or Amiiformes. Owing to the scarcity of extant nonteleost ray-finned lineages, also referred as "living fossils," their phylogenetic interrelationships have been the target of multiple hypotheses concerning their sister group relationships. Molecular and morphological data sets have produced controversial results; bowfin is considered as either the sister group to genome-duplicated teleosts (together forming the group of Halecostomi) or to gars (Lepisosteiformes; together forming the group of Holostei). However, any detailed cytogenetic analysis of bowfin chromosomes has never been performed to address this issue. Here we examined bowfin chromosomes by conventional (Giemsa-staining, C-banding, base-specific fluorescence and silver staining) and molecular (FISH with rDNA probes) cytogenetic protocols. We identified diploid chromosome number 2n = 46 with a middle-sized submetacentric chromosome pair as the major ribosomal DNA-bearing (45S rDNA), GC-positive and silver-positive element. The minor rDNA (5S rDNA) sites were localized in the pericentromeric region of one middle-sized acrocentric chromosome pair. Comparison with available cytogenetic data of other nonteleost actinopterygians (bichirs, sturgeons, gars) and teleost species including representative of basally branching lineages showed bowfin chromosomal characteristics more similar to the teleost type than to any other nonteleosts. Particularly striking differences were identified between bowfin and gars, the latter of which were found to mimic mammalian AT/GC genomic organisation. Such conclusion however contradicts the most recent phylogenomic results and raises the question what states are ancestral and what are derived.

  17. Molecular cytogenetic map of the central bearded dragon, Pogona vitticeps (Squamata: Agamidae).

    PubMed

    Young, M J; O'Meally, D; Sarre, S D; Georges, A; Ezaz, T

    2013-07-01

    Reptiles, as the sister group to birds and mammals, are particularly valuable for comparative genomic studies among amniotes. The Australian central bearded dragon (Pogona vitticeps) is being developed as a reptilian model for such comparisons, with whole-genome sequencing near completion. The karyotype consists of 6 pairs of macrochromosomes and 10 pairs microchromosomes (2n = 32), including a female heterogametic ZW sex microchromosome pair. Here, we present a molecular cytogenetic map for P. vitticeps comprising 87 anchor bacterial artificial chromosome clones that together span each macro- and microchromosome. It is the first comprehensive cytogenetic map for any non-avian reptile. We identified an active nucleolus organizer region (NOR) on the sub-telomeric region of 2q by mapping 18S rDNA and Ag-NOR staining. We identified interstitial telomeric sequences in two microchromosome pairs and the W chromosome, indicating that microchromosome fusion has been a mechanism of karyotypic evolution in Australian agamids within the last 21 to 19 million years. Orthology searches against the chicken genome revealed an intrachromosomal rearrangement of P. vitticeps 1q, identified regions orthologous to chicken Z on P. vitticeps 2q, snake Z on P. vitticeps 6q and the autosomal microchromosome pair in P. vitticeps orthologous to turtle Pelodiscus sinensis ZW and lizard Anolis carolinensis XY. This cytogenetic map will be a valuable reference tool for future gene mapping studies and will provide the framework for the work currently underway to physically anchor genome sequences to chromosomes for this model Australian squamate.

  18. Pediatric epithelial salivary gland tumors: spectrum of histologies and cytogenetics at a children's hospital.

    PubMed

    Craver, Randall D; Fonseca, Paula; Carr, Ronald

    2010-01-01

    There are conflicting reports regarding the relative frequency of benign and malignant epithelial salivary gland tumors in children. There are only a few reports of the cytogenetic abnormalities in the pleomorphic adenomas (PA) that arise in children, and even less information regarding the pleomorphic adenoma gene 1 (PLAG1) and high motility group A2 (HMGA2 ) histochemical staining in PAs, or their correlation with histologic types (stromal vs epithelial predominance). A retrospective 14 year review of epithelial salivary gland tumors encountered at a children's hospital identified 13 tumors: 12 PAs and 1 acinic cell carcinoma (ACC). No mucoepidermoid carcinomas were identified. Tumors arose in the parotid (7) and other sites (2 submandibular, 4 minor). Ten PAs in our cohort had cytogenetic studies. Four were normal, 5 involved 8q12, and 1 involved 12q13. Immunohistochemistry identified an additional 2 PAs with PLAG1 staining, and 5 additional PAs with HMGA2 staining. One tumor with ins(18;8)(q21.1;q12q22.2) had no PLAG1 staining, but stained with HMGA2. This ins(18;8) may not have involved the PLAG1 gene. There was no demonstrable correlation of 8q12/PLAG1 staining or 12q13/HMGA2 staining with histologic type. Thus we found abnormalities in either 8q12/PLAG1 staining or 12q13/HMGA2 staining in all PAs. The HMGA2 staining in 50% of PAs suggests that it may be more frequently involved in PAs than previously thought based on cytogenetic studies, at least in children.

  19. Drug-induced premature chromosome condensation (PCC) protocols: cytogenetic approaches in mitotic chromosome and interphase chromatin.

    PubMed

    Gotoh, Eisuke

    2015-01-01

    Chromosome analysis is a fundamental technique which is used in wide areas of cytogenetic study including karyotyping species, hereditary diseases diagnosis, or chromosome biology study. Chromosomes are usually prepared from mitotic cells arrested by colcemid block protocol. However, obtaining mitotic chromosomes is often hampered under several circumstances. As a result, cytogenetic analysis will be sometimes difficult or even impossible in such cases. Premature chromosome condensation (PCC) (see Note 1) is an alternative method that has proved to be a unique and useful way in chromosome analysis. Former, PCC has been achieved following cell fusion method (cell-fusion PCC) mediated either by fusogenic viruses (e.g., Sendai virus) or cell fusion chemicals (e.g., polyethylene glycol), but the cell fusion PCC has several drawbacks. The novel drug-induced PCC using protein phosphatase inhibitors was introduced about 20 years ago. This method is much simpler and easier even than the conventional mitotic chromosome preparation protocol use with colcemid block and furthermore obtained PCC index (equivalent to mitotic index for metaphase chromosome) is usually much higher than colcemid block method. Moreover, this method allows the interphase chromatin to be condensed to visualize like mitotic chromosomes. Therefore drug-induced PCC has opened the way for chromosome analysis not only in metaphase chromosomes but also in interphase chromatin. The drug-induced PCC has thus proven the usefulness in cytogenetics and other cell biology fields. For this second edition version, updated modifications/changes are supplemented in Subheadings 2, 3, and 4, and a new section describing the application of PCC in chromosome science fields is added with citation of updated references.

  20. Molecular and cytogenetic evaluation of a patient with ring chromosome 13 and discordant results.

    PubMed

    Kaylor, Julie; Alfaro, Maria; Ishwar, Arjun; Sailey, Charles; Sawyer, Jeffrey; Zarate, Yuri A

    2014-01-01

    We describe the case of a male newborn with ring chromosome 13 found to have dysmorphic features, growth retardation, imperforate anus, and ambiguous genitalia. An initial karyotype showed 46,XY,r(13)(p13q34) in the 30 cells analyzed. SNP microarray from peripheral blood revealed not only an 8.14-Mb 13q33.2q34 deletion, but also a duplication of 87.49 Mb suggesting partial trisomy 13q that the patient did not appear to have clinically. Further cytogenetic characterization detected 3 distinct cell lines in the repeated peripheral blood sample: 46,XY,r(13)(p13q34)[89]/ 46,XY,r(13;13)(p13q34)[7]/45,XY,-13[5] and 2 in cultured fibroblasts: 46,XY,r(13)(p13q34)[65]/45,XY,-13[35]. Repeated molecular studies on peripheral blood and fibroblasts, however, failed to document the initially seen partial trisomy 13q. We postulate that the presence of duplicated material may be evidence of the high burden of duplicate rings in peripheral blood at any given time, with the high rates of cell death caused by mitotically unstable double rings accounting for the repeated microarray results that failed to detect any duplications. We emphasize the correlation between both cytogenetic and molecular studies with thorough clinical assessment and suggest that given the high sensitivity of newer molecular cytogenetic techniques, careful interpretation of results is critical in the context of ring chromosomes.