Science.gov

Sample records for coli ef-tu mutants

  1. Reducing ppGpp level rescues an extreme growth defect caused by mutant EF-Tu.

    PubMed

    Bergman, Jessica M; Hammarlöf, Disa L; Hughes, Diarmaid

    2014-01-01

    Transcription and translation of mRNA's are coordinated processes in bacteria. We have previously shown that a mutant form of EF-Tu (Gln125Arg) in Salmonella Typhimurium with a reduced affinity for aa-tRNA, causes ribosome pausing, resulting in an increased rate of RNase E-mediated mRNA cleavage, causing extremely slow growth, even on rich medium. The slow growth phenotype is reversed by mutations that reduce RNase E activity. Here we asked whether the slow growth phenotype could be reversed by overexpression of a wild-type gene. We identified spoT (encoding ppGpp synthetase/hydrolase) as a gene that partially reversed the slow growth rate when overexpressed. We found that the slow-growing mutant had an abnormally high basal level of ppGpp that was reduced when spoT was overexpressed. Inactivating relA (encoding the ribosome-associated ppGpp synthetase) also reduced ppGpp levels and significantly increased growth rate. Because RelA responds specifically to deacylated tRNA in the ribosomal A-site this suggested that the tuf mutant had an increased level of deacylated tRNA relative to the wild-type. To test this hypothesis we measured the relative acylation levels of 4 families of tRNAs and found that proline isoacceptors were acylated at a lower level in the mutant strain relative to the wild-type. In addition, the level of the proS tRNA synthetase mRNA was significantly lower in the mutant strain. We suggest that an increased level of deacylated tRNA in the mutant strain stimulates RelA-mediated ppGpp production, causing changes in transcription pattern that are inappropriate for rich media conditions, and contributing to slow growth rate. Reducing ppGpp levels, by altering the activity of either SpoT or RelA, removes one cause of the slow growth and reveals the interconnectedness of intracellular regulatory mechanisms.

  2. EF-Tu from the enacyloxin producing Frateuria W-315 strain: Structure/activity relationship and antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Créchet, Jean-Bernard; Malosse, Christian; Hountondji, Codjo

    2016-08-01

    In this report, we have demonstrated that the poly(U)-dependent poly(Phe) synthesis activity of elongator factor Tu (EF-Tu) from the enacyloxin producing strain Frateuria sp. W-315 is inhibited by the antibiotic similarly to that of Escherichia coli EF-Tu. The inhibitory effect of enacyloxin observed in a purified system was the same as that obtained with an S30 extract from E. coli or Frateuria sp. W-315, respectively, suggesting that antibiotic resistance of enacyloxin producing Frateuria sp. W-315 is not due neither to EF-Tu nor to other components of the translation machinery but to a still unknown mechanism. The EF-Tu gene, as PCR amplified from Frateuria W-315 genomic DNA and sequenced represented an ORF of 1191 nucleotides corresponding to 396 amino acids. This protein is larger than the product of tufA from E. coli by only two amino acid residues. Alignment of the amino acid sequence of EF-Tu from E. coli with those of Frateuria and Ralstonia solanacearum indicates on average 80% identical amino acid residues and 9.7% conservative replacements between EF-Tu Frateuria and EF-Tu E. coli, on one hand, and 97% identity and 1.7% conservative replacement between EF-Tu Frateuria and EF-Tu Ralstonia solanacearum, on the other hand. These strong primary structure similarities between EF-Tu from different origins are consistent with the fact that this factor is essential for the translation process in all kingdoms of life. Comparison of the effects of antibiotics on EF-Tu Frateuria and EF-Tu E. coli revealed that enacyloxin, kirromycin and pulvomycin exert a stronger stimulation of the GDP dissociation rate on EF-Tu Frateuria, while the effects of the antibiotics on the GDP association rate were comparable for the two EF-Tu species. Different mutants of EF-Tu E. coli were constructed with the help of site directed mutagenesis by changing one or several residues of EF-Tu E. coli by the corresponding residues of EF-Tu Frateuria. The single A45K substitution did

  3. EF-Tu from the enacyloxin producing Frateuria W-315 strain: Structure/activity relationship and antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Créchet, Jean-Bernard; Malosse, Christian; Hountondji, Codjo

    2016-08-01

    In this report, we have demonstrated that the poly(U)-dependent poly(Phe) synthesis activity of elongator factor Tu (EF-Tu) from the enacyloxin producing strain Frateuria sp. W-315 is inhibited by the antibiotic similarly to that of Escherichia coli EF-Tu. The inhibitory effect of enacyloxin observed in a purified system was the same as that obtained with an S30 extract from E. coli or Frateuria sp. W-315, respectively, suggesting that antibiotic resistance of enacyloxin producing Frateuria sp. W-315 is not due neither to EF-Tu nor to other components of the translation machinery but to a still unknown mechanism. The EF-Tu gene, as PCR amplified from Frateuria W-315 genomic DNA and sequenced represented an ORF of 1191 nucleotides corresponding to 396 amino acids. This protein is larger than the product of tufA from E. coli by only two amino acid residues. Alignment of the amino acid sequence of EF-Tu from E. coli with those of Frateuria and Ralstonia solanacearum indicates on average 80% identical amino acid residues and 9.7% conservative replacements between EF-Tu Frateuria and EF-Tu E. coli, on one hand, and 97% identity and 1.7% conservative replacement between EF-Tu Frateuria and EF-Tu Ralstonia solanacearum, on the other hand. These strong primary structure similarities between EF-Tu from different origins are consistent with the fact that this factor is essential for the translation process in all kingdoms of life. Comparison of the effects of antibiotics on EF-Tu Frateuria and EF-Tu E. coli revealed that enacyloxin, kirromycin and pulvomycin exert a stronger stimulation of the GDP dissociation rate on EF-Tu Frateuria, while the effects of the antibiotics on the GDP association rate were comparable for the two EF-Tu species. Different mutants of EF-Tu E. coli were constructed with the help of site directed mutagenesis by changing one or several residues of EF-Tu E. coli by the corresponding residues of EF-Tu Frateuria. The single A45K substitution did

  4. Renaturation of rhodanese by translational elongation factor (EF) Tu. Protein refolding by EF-Tu flexing.

    PubMed

    Kudlicki, W; Coffman, A; Kramer, G; Hardesty, B

    1997-12-19

    The translation elongation factor (EF) Tu has chaperone-like capacity to promote renaturation of denatured rhodanese. This renaturation activity is greatly increased under conditions in which the factor can oscillate between the open and closed conformations that are induced by GDP and GTP, respectively. Oscillation occurs during GTP hydrolysis and subsequent replacement of GDP by EF-Ts which is then displaced by GTP. Renaturation of rhodanese and GTP hydrolysis by EF-Tu are greatly enhanced by the guanine nucleotide exchange factor EF-Ts. However, renaturation is reduced under conditions that stabilize EF-Tu in either the open or closed conformation. Both GDP and the nonhydrolyzable analog of GTP, GMP-PCP, inhibit renaturation. Kirromycin and pulvomycin, antibiotics that specifically bind to EF-Tu and inhibit its activity in peptide elongation, also strongly inhibit EF-Tu-mediated renaturation of denatured rhodanese to levels near those observed for spontaneous, unassisted refolding. Kirromycin locks EF-Tu in the open conformation in the presence of either GTP or GDP, whereas pulvomycin locks the factor in the closed conformation. The results lead to the conclusion that flexing of EF-Tu, especially as occurs between its open and closed conformations, is a major factor in its chaperone-like refolding activity.

  5. Structure of the E. coli ribosome-EF-Tu complex at <3 Å resolution by Cs-corrected cryo-EM.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Niels; Neumann, Piotr; Konevega, Andrey L; Bock, Lars V; Ficner, Ralf; Rodnina, Marina V; Stark, Holger

    2015-04-23

    Single particle electron cryomicroscopy (cryo-EM) has recently made significant progress in high-resolution structure determination of macromolecular complexes due to improvements in electron microscopic instrumentation and computational image analysis. However, cryo-EM structures can be highly non-uniform in local resolution and all structures available to date have been limited to resolutions above 3 Å. Here we present the cryo-EM structure of the 70S ribosome from Escherichia coli in complex with elongation factor Tu, aminoacyl-tRNA and the antibiotic kirromycin at 2.65-2.9 Å resolution using spherical aberration (Cs)-corrected cryo-EM. Overall, the cryo-EM reconstruction at 2.9 Å resolution is comparable to the best-resolved X-ray structure of the E. coli 70S ribosome (2.8 Å), but provides more detailed information (2.65 Å) at the functionally important ribosomal core. The cryo-EM map elucidates for the first time the structure of all 35 rRNA modifications in the bacterial ribosome, explaining their roles in fine-tuning ribosome structure and function and modulating the action of antibiotics. We also obtained atomic models for flexible parts of the ribosome such as ribosomal proteins L9 and L31. The refined cryo-EM-based model presents the currently most complete high-resolution structure of the E. coli ribosome, which demonstrates the power of cryo-EM in structure determination of large and dynamic macromolecular complexes.

  6. Chloroplast EF-Tu and thermal aggregation of Rubisco activase

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chloroplast protein synthesis elongation factor, EF-Tu, has been implicated in heat tolerance in maize. The recombinant precursor of this protein, pre-EF-Tu, has been found to exhibit chaperone activity and protect heat-labile proteins, such as citrate synthase and malate dehydrogenase, from therma...

  7. EF-Tu dynamics during pre-translocation complex formation: EF-Tu·GDP exits the ribosome via two different pathways

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wei; Chen, Chunlai; Kavaliauskas, Darius; Knudsen, Charlotte R.; Goldman, Yale E.; Cooperman, Barry S.

    2015-01-01

    The G-protein EF-Tu, which undergoes a major conformational change when EF-Tu·GTP is converted to EF-Tu·GDP, forms part of an aminoacyl(aa)-tRNA·EF-Tu·GTP ternary complex (TC) that accelerates the binding of aa-tRNA to the ribosome during peptide elongation. Such binding, placing a portion of EF-Tu in contact with the GTPase Associated Center (GAC), is followed by GTP hydrolysis and Pi release, and results in formation of a pretranslocation (PRE) complex. Although tRNA movement through the ribosome during PRE complex formation has been extensively studied, comparatively little is known about the dynamics of EF-Tu interaction with either the ribosome or aa-tRNA. Here we examine these dynamics, utilizing ensemble and single molecule assays employing fluorescent labeled derivatives of EF-Tu, tRNA, and the ribosome to measure changes in either FRET efficiency or fluorescence intensity during PRE complex formation. Our results indicate that ribosome-bound EF-Tu separates from the GAC prior to its full separation from aa-tRNA, and suggest that EF-Tu·GDP dissociates from the ribosome by two different pathways. These pathways correspond to either reversible EF-Tu·GDP dissociation from the ribosome prior to the major conformational change in EF-Tu that follows GTP hydrolysis, or irreversible dissociation after or concomitant with this conformational change. PMID:26338772

  8. EF-Tu dynamics during pre-translocation complex formation: EF-Tu·GDP exits the ribosome via two different pathways.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Chen, Chunlai; Kavaliauskas, Darius; Knudsen, Charlotte R; Goldman, Yale E; Cooperman, Barry S

    2015-10-30

    The G-protein EF-Tu, which undergoes a major conformational change when EF-Tu·GTP is converted to EF-Tu·GDP, forms part of an aminoacyl(aa)-tRNA·EF-Tu·GTP ternary complex (TC) that accelerates the binding of aa-tRNA to the ribosome during peptide elongation. Such binding, placing a portion of EF-Tu in contact with the GTPase Associated Center (GAC), is followed by GTP hydrolysis and Pi release, and results in formation of a pretranslocation (PRE) complex. Although tRNA movement through the ribosome during PRE complex formation has been extensively studied, comparatively little is known about the dynamics of EF-Tu interaction with either the ribosome or aa-tRNA. Here we examine these dynamics, utilizing ensemble and single molecule assays employing fluorescent labeled derivatives of EF-Tu, tRNA, and the ribosome to measure changes in either FRET efficiency or fluorescence intensity during PRE complex formation. Our results indicate that ribosome-bound EF-Tu separates from the GAC prior to its full separation from aa-tRNA, and suggest that EF-Tu·GDP dissociates from the ribosome by two different pathways. These pathways correspond to either reversible EF-Tu·GDP dissociation from the ribosome prior to the major conformational change in EF-Tu that follows GTP hydrolysis, or irreversible dissociation after or concomitant with this conformational change.

  9. Heat-induced Accumulation of Chloroplast Protein Synthesis Elongation Factor, EF-TU, in Winter Wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chloroplast protein synthesis elongation factor, EF-Tu, has been implicated in heat tolerance in maize (Zea mays L.). Chloroplast EF-Tu is highly conserved, and it is possible that this protein may be of importance to heat tolerance in other species including wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). In this ...

  10. Do maise and wheat chloroplast protein synthesis elongation factor, EF-Tu, protect Rubisco activase from thermal aggregation and inactivation?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Maize (Zea mays L.) chloroplast protein synthesis elongation factor, EF-Tu, has been implicated in the development of heat tolerance. The precursor of this protein (pre-EF-Tu) has been shown to display chaperone activity, as it protected heat labile citrate synthase and malate dehydrogenase from the...

  11. Heat tolerance and expression of protein synthesis elongation factors, EF-Tu and EF-1a, in spring wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Protein elongation factors, EF-Tu and EF-1a, have been implicated in cell response to heat stress. In spring wheat, EF-Tu displays chaperone activity and reduces thermal aggregation of Rubisco activase. Similarly, in mammalian cells, EF-1a displays chaperone-like activity and regulates the expressio...

  12. Arabidopsis EF-Tu receptor enhances bacterial disease resistance in transgenic wheat.

    PubMed

    Schoonbeek, Henk-Jan; Wang, Hsi-Hua; Stefanato, Francesca L; Craze, Melanie; Bowden, Sarah; Wallington, Emma; Zipfel, Cyril; Ridout, Christopher J

    2015-04-01

    Perception of pathogen (or microbe)-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs/MAMPs) by pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) is a key component of plant innate immunity. The Arabidopsis PRR EF-Tu receptor (EFR) recognizes the bacterial PAMP elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu) and its derived peptide elf18. Previous work revealed that transgenic expression of AtEFR in Solanaceae confers elf18 responsiveness and broad-spectrum bacterial disease resistance. In this study, we developed a set of bioassays to study the activation of PAMP-triggered immunity (PTI) in wheat. We generated transgenic wheat (Triticum aestivum) plants expressing AtEFR driven by the constitutive rice actin promoter and tested their response to elf18. We show that transgenic expression of AtEFR in wheat confers recognition of elf18, as measured by the induction of immune marker genes and callose deposition. When challenged with the cereal bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. oryzae, transgenic EFR wheat lines had reduced lesion size and bacterial multiplication. These results demonstrate that AtEFR can be transferred successfully from dicot to monocot species, further revealing that immune signalling pathways are conserved across these distant phyla. As novel PRRs are identified, their transfer between plant families represents a useful strategy for enhancing resistance to pathogens in crops.

  13. Elongation Factor-Tu (EF-Tu) proteins structural stability and bioinformatics in ancestral gene reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehipawala, Sunil; Nguyen, A.; Tremberger, G.; Cheung, E.; Schneider, P.; Lieberman, D.; Holden, T.; Cheung, T.

    2013-09-01

    A paleo-experimental evolution report on elongation factor EF-Tu structural stability results has provided an opportunity to rewind the tape of life using the ancestral protein sequence reconstruction modeling approach; consistent with the book of life dogma in current biology and being an important component in the astrobiology community. Fractal dimension via the Higuchi fractal method and Shannon entropy of the DNA sequence classification could be used in a diagram that serves as a simple summary. Results from biomedical gene research provide examples on the diagram methodology. Comparisons between biomedical genes such as EEF2 (elongation factor 2 human, mouse, etc), WDR85 in epigenetics, HAR1 in human specificity, DLG1 in cognitive skill, and HLA-C in mosquito bite immunology with EF Tu DNA sequences have accounted for the reported circular dichroism thermo-stability data systematically; the results also infer a relatively less volatility geologic time period from 2 to 3 Gyr from adaptation viewpoint. Comparison to Thermotoga maritima MSB8 and Psychrobacter shows that Thermus thermophilus HB8 EF-Tu calibration sequence could be an outlier, consistent with free energy calculation by NUPACK. Diagram methodology allows computer simulation studies and HAR1 shows about 0.5% probability from chimp to human in terms of diagram location, and SNP simulation results such as amoebic meningoencephalitis NAF1 suggest correlation. Extensions to the studies of the translation and transcription elongation factor sequences in Megavirus Chiliensis, Megavirus Lba and Pandoravirus show that the studied Pandoravirus sequence could be an outlier with the highest fractal dimension and lowest entropy, as compared to chicken as a deviant in the DNMT3A DNA methylation gene sequences from zebrafish to human and to the less than one percent probability in computer simulation using the HAR1 0.5% probability as reference. The diagram methodology would be useful in ancestral gene

  14. Outwitting EF-Tu and the ribosome: translation with d-amino acids

    PubMed Central

    Achenbach, John; Jahnz, Michael; Bethge, Lucas; Paal, Krisztina; Jung, Maria; Schuster, Maja; Albrecht, Renate; Jarosch, Florian; Nierhaus, Knud H.; Klussmann, Sven

    2015-01-01

    Key components of the translational apparatus, i.e. ribosomes, elongation factor EF-Tu and most aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, are stereoselective and prevent incorporation of d-amino acids (d-aa) into polypeptides. The rare appearance of d-aa in natural polypeptides arises from post-translational modifications or non-ribosomal synthesis. We introduce an in vitro translation system that enables single incorporation of 17 out of 18 tested d-aa into a polypeptide; incorporation of two or three successive d-aa was also observed in several cases. The system consists of wild-type components and d-aa are introduced via artificially charged, unmodified tRNAGly that was selected according to the rules of ‘thermodynamic compensation’. The results reveal an unexpected plasticity of the ribosomal peptidyltransferase center and thus shed new light on the mechanism of chiral discrimination during translation. Furthermore, ribosomal incorporation of d-aa into polypeptides may greatly expand the armamentarium of in vitro translation towards the identification of peptides and proteins with new properties and functions. PMID:26026160

  15. The human mitochondrial elongation factor tu (EF-Tu) gene: cDNA sequence, genomic localization, genomic structure, and identification of a pseudogene.

    PubMed

    Ling, M; Merante, F; Chen, H S; Duff, C; Duncan, A M; Robinson, B H

    1997-09-15

    The human mitochondrial elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu) is nuclear-encoded and functions in the translational apparatus of mitochondria. The complete human EF-Tu cDNA sequence of 1677 base pairs (bp) with a 101 bp 5'-untranslated region, a 1368 bp coding region, and a 207 bp 3'-untranslated region, has been determined and updated. The predicted protein from this cDNA sequence is approximately 49.8 kDa in size and is composed of 455 amino acids (aa) with a putative N-terminal mitochondrial leader sequence of approximately 50 aa residues. The predicted amino acid sequence shows high similarity to other EF-Tu protein sequences from ox, yeast, and bacteria, and also shows limited similarity to human cystolic elongation factor 1 alpha. The complete size of this cDNA (1677 bp) obtained by cloning and sequencing was confirmed by Northern blot analysis, which showed a single transcript (mRNA) of approximately 1.7 kb in human liver. The genomic structure of this EF-Tu gene has been determined for the first time. This gene contains nine introns with a predicted size of approximately 3.6 kilobases (kb) and has been mapped to chromosome 16p11.2. In addition, an intronless pseudogene of approximately 1.7 kb with 92.6% nucleotide sequence similarity to the EF-Tu gene has also been identified and mapped to chromosome 17q11.2. PMID:9332382

  16. Nonchemotactic Mutants of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, John B.; Adler, Julius; Dahl, Margaret M.

    1967-01-01

    We have isolated 40 mutants of Escherichia coli which are nonchemotactic as judged by their failure to swarm on semisolid tryptone plates or to make bands in capillary tubes containing tryptone broth. All the mutants have normal flagella, a fact shown by their shape and reaction with antiflagella serum. All are fully motile under the microscope and all are sensitive to the phage chi. Unlike its parent, one of the mutants, studied in greater detail, failed to show chemotaxis toward oxygen, glucose, serine, threonine, or aspartic acid. The failure to exhibit chemotaxis does not result from a failure to use the chemicals. The swimming of this mutant was shown to be random. The growth rate was normal under several conditions, and the growth requirements were unchanged. Images PMID:5335897

  17. Atypical archaeal tRNA pyrrolysine transcript behaves towards EF-Tu as a typical elongator tRNA

    PubMed Central

    Théobald-Dietrich, Anne; Frugier, Magali; Giegé, Richard; Rudinger-Thirion, Joëlle

    2004-01-01

    The newly discovered tRNAPyl is involved in specific incorporation of pyrrolysine in the active site of methylamine methyltransferases in the archaeon Methanosarcina barkeri. In solution probing experiments, a transcript derived from tRNAPyl displays a secondary fold slightly different from the canonical cloverleaf and interestingly similar to that of bovine mitochondrial tRNASer(uga). Aminoacylation of tRNAPyl transcript by a typical class II synthetase, LysRS from yeast, was possible when its amber anticodon CUA was mutated into a lysine UUU anticodon. Hydrolysis protection assays show that lysylated tRNAPyl can be recognized by bacterial elongation factor. This indicates that no antideterminant sequence is present in the body of the tRNAPyl transcript to prevent it from interacting with EF-Tu, in contrast with the otherwise functionally similar tRNASec that mediates selenocysteine incorporation. PMID:14872064

  18. Identification and cloning of two immunogenic C. perfringens proteins, elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu) and pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFO) of Clostridium perfringens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Clostridium related poultry diseases such as necrotic enteritis (NE) and gangrenous dermatitis (GD) cause substantial economic losses on a global scale. Two antigenic C. perfringens proteins, elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu) and pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFO), were identified by reaction with...

  19. Analysis of transgenic wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) harboring a maize (Zea mays L.) gene for plastid EF-Tu: segregation pattern, expression and effects of the transgene.

    PubMed

    Fu, Jianming; Ristic, Zoran

    2010-06-01

    We previously reported that transgenic wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) carrying a maize (Zea mays L.) gene (Zmeftu1) for chloroplast protein synthesis elongation factor, EF-Tu, displays reduced thermal aggregation of leaf proteins, reduced injury to photosynthetic membranes (thylakoids), and enhanced rate of CO(2) fixation following exposure to heat stress (18 h at 45 degrees C) [Fu et al. in Plant Mol Biol 68:277-288, 2008]. In the current study, we investigated the segregation pattern and expression of the transgene Zmeftu1 and determined the grain yield of transgenic plants after exposure to a brief heat stress (18 h at 45 degrees C). We also assessed thermal aggregation of soluble leaf proteins in transgenic plants, testing the hypothesis that increased levels of EF-Tu will lead to a non-specific protection of leaf proteins against thermal aggregation. The transgenic wheat displayed a single-gene pattern of segregation of Zmeftu1. Zmeftu1 was expressed, and the transgenic plants synthesized and accumulated three anti-EF-Tu cross-reacting polypeptides of similar molecular mass but different pI, suggesting the possibility of posttranslational modification of this protein. The transgenic plants also showed better grain yield after exposure to heat stress compared with their non-transgenic counterparts. Soluble leaf proteins of various molecular masses displayed lower thermal aggregation in transgenic than in non-transgenic wheat. The results suggest that overexpression of chloroplast EF-Tu can be beneficial to wheat tolerance to heat stress. Moreover, the results also support the hypothesis that EF-Tu contributes to heat tolerance by acting as a molecular chaperone and protecting heat-labile proteins from thermal aggregation in a non-specific manner.

  20. Heterologous expression of a plastid EF-Tu reduces protein thermal aggregation and enhances CO2 fixation in wheat (Triticum aestivum) following heat stress.

    PubMed

    Fu, Jianming; Momcilović, Ivana; Clemente, Thomas E; Nersesian, Natalya; Trick, Harold N; Ristic, Zoran

    2008-10-01

    Heat stress is a major constraint to wheat production and negatively impacts grain quality, causing tremendous economic losses, and may become a more troublesome factor due to global warming. At the cellular level, heat stress causes denaturation and aggregation of proteins and injury to membranes leading to alterations in metabolic fluxes. Protein aggregation is irreversible, and protection of proteins from thermal aggregation is a strategy a cell uses to tolerate heat stress. Here we report on the development of transgenic wheat (Triticum aestivum) events, expressing a maize gene coding for plastidal protein synthesis elongation factor (EF-Tu), which, compared to non-transgenic plants, display reduced thermal aggregation of leaf proteins, reduced heat injury to photosynthetic membranes (thylakoids), and enhanced rate of CO(2) fixation after exposure to heat stress. The results support the concept that EF-Tu ameliorates negative effects of heat stress by acting as a molecular chaperone. This is the first demonstration of the introduction of a plastidal EF-Tu in plants that leads to protection against heat injury and enhanced photosynthesis after heat stress. This is also the first demonstration that a gene other than HSP gene can be used for improvement of heat tolerance and that the improvement is possible in a species that has a complex genome, hexaploid wheat. The results strongly suggest that heat tolerance of wheat, and possibly other crop plants, can be improved by modulating expression of plastidal EF-Tu and/or by selection of genotypes with increased endogenous levels of this protein.

  1. Ethanol production using engineered mutant E. coli

    DOEpatents

    Ingram, Lonnie O.; Clark, David P.

    1991-01-01

    The subject invention concerns novel means and materials for producing ethanol as a fermentation product. Mutant E. coli are transformed with a gene coding for pyruvate decarboxylase activity. The resulting system is capable of producing relatively large amounts of ethanol from a variety of biomass sources.

  2. Rejection of tmRNA·SmpB after GTP hydrolysis by EF-Tu on ribosomes stalled on intact mRNA.

    PubMed

    Kurita, Daisuke; Miller, Mickey R; Muto, Akira; Buskirk, Allen R; Himeno, Hyouta

    2014-11-01

    Messenger RNAs lacking a stop codon trap ribosomes at their 3' ends, depleting the pool of ribosomes available for protein synthesis. In bacteria, a remarkable quality control system rescues and recycles stalled ribosomes in a process known as trans-translation. Acting as a tRNA, transfer-messenger RNA (tmRNA) is aminoacylated, delivered by EF-Tu to the ribosomal A site, and accepts the nascent polypeptide. Translation then resumes on a reading frame within tmRNA, encoding a short peptide tag that targets the nascent peptide for degradation by proteases. One unsolved issue in trans-translation is how tmRNA and its protein partner SmpB preferentially recognize stalled ribosomes and not actively translating ones. Here, we examine the effect of the length of the 3' extension of mRNA on each step of trans-translation by pre-steady-state kinetic methods and fluorescence polarization binding assays. Unexpectedly, EF-Tu activation and GTP hydrolysis occur rapidly regardless of the length of the mRNA, although the peptidyl transfer to tmRNA decreases as the mRNA 3' extension increases and the tmRNA·SmpB binds less tightly to the ribosome with an mRNA having a long 3' extension. From these results, we conclude that the tmRNA·SmpB complex dissociates during accommodation due to competition between the downstream mRNA and the C-terminal tail for the mRNA channel. Rejection of the tmRNA·SmpB complex during accommodation is reminiscent of the rejection of near-cognate tRNA from the ribosome in canonical translation.

  3. An Escherichia coli Mutant That Makes Exceptionally Long Cells

    PubMed Central

    Newman, Elaine B.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Although Escherichia coli is a very small (1- to 2-μm) rod-shaped cell, here we describe an E. coli mutant that forms enormously long cells in rich media such as Luria broth, as long indeed as 750 μm. These extremely elongated (eel) cells are as long as the longest bacteria known and have no internal subdivisions. They are metabolically competent, elongate rapidly, synthesize DNA, and distribute cell contents along this length. They lack only the ability to divide. The concentration of the essential cell division protein FtsZ is reduced in these eel cells, and increasing this concentration restores division. IMPORTANCE Escherichia coli is usually a very small bacterium, 1 to 2 μm long. We have isolated a mutant that forms enormously long cells, 700 times longer than the usual E. coli cell. E. coli filaments that form under other conditions usually die within a few hours, whereas our mutant is fully viable even when it reaches such lengths. This mutant provides a useful tool for the study of aspects of E. coli physiology that are difficult to investigate with small cells. PMID:25691528

  4. Fitness of Escherichia coli mutants with reduced susceptibility to tigecycline

    PubMed Central

    Linkevicius, Marius; Anderssen, Jytte Mark; Sandegren, Linus; Andersson, Dan I.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The objective of this study was to determine the fitness of Escherichia coli mutants with reduced susceptibility to tigecycline after exposure to adverse conditions in vitro and in vivo. Methods Survival in response to low pH, bile salts, oxidative stress and human serum was examined for E. coli mutants with reduced susceptibility to tigecycline due to single mutations that caused increased efflux (marR, lon) or impaired LPS (rfaC, rfaE, lpcA). An in vitro competition assay was used to determine growth fitness defects. Competitive fitness was assessed using mouse infection models. MICs, exponential growth rates and expression levels of efflux-related genes were measured for genetically reconstructed double and triple mutants. Results The LPS mutants were 48–85-fold more susceptible to bile salts compared with the ERN mutants and the WT. As shown by in vitro competitions, the fitness reduction was 0.3%–13% for ERN mutants and ∼24% for LPS mutants. During in vivo survival experiments, LPS mutants were outcompeted by the WT strain in the thigh infection model. Constructed double ERN and LPS mutants showed additive and synergistic increases in tigecycline MICs. Conclusions Generally, reduced susceptibility to tigecycline caused a decrease in fitness under stressful in vitro and in vivo conditions with ERN mutants being fitter than LPS mutants. When combined, ERN mutations caused a synergistic increase in the MIC of tigecycline. These findings could explain why clinical resistance to tigecycline in E. coli is mainly associated with up-regulation of the AcrAB efflux system. PMID:26851608

  5. Characterization of lipopolysaccharides from Escherichia coli K-12 mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Boman, H G; Monner, D A

    1975-01-01

    Chemical analyses of the carbohydrate composition of lipopolysaccharides (LPS) from a number of LPS mutants were used to propose a schematic composition for the LPS from Escherichia coli K-12. The formula contains four regions: the first consists of lipid A, ketodeoxyoctonoic acid, and a phosphorous component; the second contains only heptose; the third only glucose; and the fourth additional glucose, galactose, and rhamnose. LPS from E. coli B may have a similar composition but lacks the galactose and rhamnose units. A set of LPS-specific bacteriophages were used for comparing three mutants of Salmonella with a number of LPS mutants of E. coli K-12. The results confirm that there are basic similarities in the first and second regions of the LPS structure; they also support the four region divisions of the LPS formula. Paper chromatography was used for characterization of 32-P-labeled LPS from different strains of E. coli and Salmonella. The Rf values for LPS varied from 0.27 to 0.75 depending on the amounts of carbohydrates in the molecule. LPS from all strains studied was homogenous except for strain D31 which produced two types of LPS. Mild acid hydrolysis of labeled LPS liberated lipid A and two other components with phosphate, one of which was assigned to the first region. It is suggested that paper chromatography can be used in biosynthetic studies concerning regions 2 to 4. Images PMID:1089628

  6. Escherichia coli Mutants that Synthesize Dephosphorylated Lipid A Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Ingram, Brian O.; Masoudi, Ali; Raetz, Christian R. H.

    2010-01-01

    The lipid A moiety of Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide is a hexa-acylated disaccharide of glucosamine that is phosphorylated at the 1 and 4′ positions. Expression of the Francisella novicida lipid A 1-phosphatase FnLpxE in E. coli results in dephosphorylation of the lipid A proximal unit. Co-expression of FnLpxE and the Rhizobium leguminosarum lipid A oxidase RlLpxQ in E. coli converts much of the proximal glucosamine to 2-amino-2-deoxy-gluconate. Expression of the F. novicida lipid A 4′-phosphatase FnLpxF in wild-type E. coli has no effect because FnLpxF cannot dephosphorylate hexa-acylated lipid A. However, expression of FnLpxF in E. coli lpxM mutants, which synthesize penta-acylated lipid A lacking the secondary 3′-myristate chain, causes extensive 4′-dephosphorylation. Co-expression of FnLpxE and FnLpxF in lpxM mutants results in massive accumulation of lipid A species lacking both phosphate groups, and introduction of RlLpxQ generates phosphate-free lipid A variants containing 2-amino-2-deoxy-gluconate. The proposed lipid A structures were confirmed by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. Strains with 4′-dephosphorylated lipid A display increased polymyxin resistance. Heptose-deficient mutants of E. coli lacking both the 1- and 4′-phosphate moieties are viable on plates but sensitive to CaCl2. Our methods for re-engineering lipid A structure may be useful for generating novel vaccines and adjuvants. PMID:20795687

  7. Lysis of Escherichia coli mutants by lactose.

    PubMed

    Alexander, J K

    1979-11-01

    Growth of Escherichia coli strain MM6-13 (ptsI suc lacI sup), which as a suppressor of the succinate-negative phenotype, was inhibited by lactose. Cells growing in yeast extract-tryptone-sodium chloride medium (LB broth) were lysed upon the addition of lactose. In Casamino Acids-salts medium, lactose inhibited growth, but due to the high K+ content no lysis occurred. Lysis required high levels of beta-galctosidase and lactose transport activity. MM6, the parental strain of MM6-13, has lower levels of both of these activities and was resistant to lysis under these conditions. When MM6 was grown in LB broth with exogenous cyclic adenosine monophosphate, however, beta-galactosidase and lactose transport activities were greatly increased, and lysis occurred upon the addition of lactose. Resting cells of both MM6 and MM6-13 were lysed by lactose in buffers containing suitable ions. In the presence of MG2+, lysis was enhanced by 5 mM KCl and 100 mM NaCl. Higher slat concentrations (50 mM KCl or 200 mM NaCl) provided partial protection from lysis. In the absence of Mg2+, lysis occurred without KCl. Lactose-dependent lysis occurred in buffers containing anions such as sulafte, chloride, phosphate, or citrate; however, thiocyanate or acetate protected the cells from lysis. These data indicate that both cations and anions, as well as the levels of lactose transport and beta-galactosidase activity, are important in lysis.

  8. Mutants of Escherichia coli deficient in the fermentative lactate dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Mat-Jan, F.; Alam, K.Y.; Clark, D.P. )

    1989-01-01

    Mutants of Escherichia coli deficient in the fermentative NAD-linked lactate dehydrogenase (ldh) have been isolated. These mutants showed no growth defects under anaerobic conditions unless present together with a defect in pyruvate formate lyase (pfl). Double mutants (pfl ldh) were unable to grow anaerobically on glucose or other sugars even when supplemented with acetate, whereas pfl mutants can do so. The ldh mutation was found to map at 30.5 min on the E. coli chromosome. The ldh mutant FMJ39 showed no detectable lactate dehydrogenase activity and produced no lactic acid from glucose under anaerobic conditions as estimated by in vivo nuclear magnetic resonance measurements. We also found that in wild-type strains the fermentative lactate dehydrogenase was conjointly induced by anaerobic conditions and an acidic pH. Despite previous findings that phosphate concentrations affect the proportion of lactic acid produced during fermentation, we were unable to find any intrinsic effect of phosphate on lactate dehydrogenase activity, apart from the buffering effect of this ion.

  9. Mutant E. coli strain with increased succinic acid production

    DOEpatents

    Donnelly, M.; Millard, C.S.; Stols, L.

    1998-06-23

    A method for isolating succinic acid producing bacteria is provided comprising increasing the biomass of an organism which lacks the ability to catabolize pyruvate, and then subjecting the biomass to glucose-rich medium in an anaerobic environment to enable pyruvate-catabolizing mutants to grow. The invention also provides for a mutant that produces high amounts of succinic acid, which as been derived from a parent which lacked the genes for pyruvate formate lyase and lactate dehydrogenase, and which belongs to the E.coli Group of Bacteria. 2 figs.

  10. Mutant E. coli strain with increased succinic acid production

    DOEpatents

    Donnelly, Mark; Millard, Cynthia S.; Stols, Lucy

    2002-01-01

    A method for isolating succinic acid producing bacteria is provided comprising increasing the biomass of an organism which lacks the ability to catabolize pyruvate, and then subjecting the biomass to glucose-rich medium in an anaerobic environment to enable pyruvate-catabolizing mutants to grow. The invention also provides for a mutant that produces high amounts of succinic acid, which has been derived from a parent which lacked the genes for pyruvate formate lyase and lactate dehydrogenase, and which belongs to the E.coli Group of Bacteria.

  11. Mutant E. coli strain with increased succinic acid production

    DOEpatents

    Donnelly, Mark; Millard, Cynthia S.; Stols, Lucy

    2001-09-25

    A method for isolating succinic acid producing bacteria is provided comprising increasing the biomass of an organism which lacks the ability to catabolize pyruvate, and then subjecting the biomass to glucose-rich medium in an anaerobic environment to enable pyruvate-catabolizing mutants to grow. The invention also provides for a mutant that produces high amounts of succinic acid, which has been derived from a parent which lacked the genes for pyruvate formate lyase and lactate dehydrogenase, and which belongs to the E.coli Group of Bacteria.

  12. Mutant E. coli strain with increased succinic acid production

    DOEpatents

    Donnelly, Mark; Millard, Cynthia S.; Stols, Lucy

    1998-01-01

    A method for isolating succinic acid producing bacteria is provided comprising increasing the biomass of an organism which lacks the ability to catabolize pyruvate, and then subjecting the biomass to glucose-rich medium in an anaerobic environment to enable pyruvate-catabolizing mutants to grow. The invention also provides for a mutant that produces high amounts of succinic acid, which as been derived from a parent which lacked the genes for pyruvate formate lyase and lactate dehydrogenase, and which belongs to the E.coli Group of Bacteria.

  13. Escherichia coli mutants resistant to inactivation by high hydrostatic pressure.

    PubMed Central

    Hauben, K J; Bartlett, D H; Soontjens, C C; Cornelis, K; Wuytack, E Y; Michiels, C W

    1997-01-01

    Alternating cycles of exposure to high pressure and outgrowth of surviving populations were used to select for highly pressure-resistant mutants of Escherichia coli MG1655. Three barotolerant mutants (LMM1010, LMM1020, and LMM1030) were isolated independently by using outgrowth temperatures of 30, 37, and 42 degrees C, respectively. Survival of these mutants after pressure treatment for 15 min at ambient temperature was 40 to 85% at 220 MPa and 0.5 to 1.5% at 800 MPa, while survival of the parent strain, MG1655, decreased from 15% at 220 MPa to 2 x 10(-8)% at 700 MPa. Heat resistance of mutants LMM1020 and LMM1030 was also altered, as evident by higher D values at 58 and 60 degrees C and reduced z values compared to those for the parent strain. D and z values for mutant LMM1010 were not significantly different from those for the parent strain. Pressure sensitivity of the mutants increased from 10 to 50 degrees C, as opposed to the parent strain, which showed a minimum around 40 degrees C. The ability of the mutants to grow at moderately elevated pressure (50 MPa) was reduced at temperatures above 37 degrees C, indicating that resistance to pressure inactivation is unrelated to barotolerant growth. The development of high levels of barotolerance as demonstrated in this work should cause concern about the safety of high-pressure food processing. PMID:9055412

  14. Isolation and characterization of Escherichia coli mutants lacking inducible cyanase.

    PubMed

    Guilloton, M; Karst, F

    1987-03-01

    To determine the physiological role of cyanate aminohydrolase (cyanase, EC 3.5.5.3) in bacteria, mutants of Escherichia coli K12 devoid of this inducible activity were isolated and their properties investigated. Five independent mutations were localized next to lac; three of them lay between lacY and codA. Thus cyanase activity could depend on the integrity of one gene or set of clustered genes; we propose for this locus the symbol cnt. Growth of the mutant stains was more sensitive to cyanate than growth of wild-type strains. This difference was noticeable in synthetic medium in the presence of low concentrations of cyanate (less than or equal to 1 mM). Higher concentrations inhibited growth of both wild-type and mutant strains. Urea in aqueous solutions dissociates slowly into ammonium cyanate. Accordingly wild-type strains were able to grow on a synthetic medium containing 0.5 M-urea whereas mutants lacking cyanase were not. We conclude that cyanase could play a role in destroying exogenous cyanate originating from the dissociation of carbamoyl compounds such as urea; alternatively cyanate might constitute a convenient nitrogen source for bacteria able to synthesize cyanase in an inducible way.

  15. Carbon and energy metabolism of atp mutants of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Jensen, P R; Michelsen, O

    1992-12-01

    The membrane-bound H(+)-ATPase plays a key role in free-energy transduction of biological systems. We report how the carbon and energy metabolism of Escherichia coli changes in response to deletion of the atp operon that encodes this enzyme. Compared with the isogenic wild-type strain, the growth rate and growth yield were decreased less than expected for a shift from oxidative phosphorylation to glycolysis alone as a source of ATP. Moreover, the respiration rate of a atp deletion strain was increased by 40% compared with the wild-type strain. This result is surprising, since the atp deletion strain is not able to utilize the resulting proton motive force for ATP synthesis. Indeed, the ratio of ATP concentration to ADP concentration was decreased from 19 in the wild type to 7 in the atp mutant, and the membrane potential of the atp deletion strain was increased by 20%, confirming that the respiration rate was not controlled by the magnitude of the opposing membrane potential. The level of type b cytochromes in the mutant cells was 80% higher than the level in the wild-type cells, suggesting that the increased respiration was caused by an increase in the expression of the respiratory genes. The atp deletion strain produced twice as much by-product (acetate) and exhibited increased flow through the tricarboxylic acid cycle and the glycolytic pathway. These three changes all lead to an increase in substrate level phosphorylation; the first two changes also lead to increased production of reducing equivalents. We interpret these data as indicating that E. coli makes use of its ability to respire even if it cannot directly couple this ability to ATP synthesis; by respiring away excess reducing equivalents E. coli enhances substrate level ATP synthesis.

  16. Analysis of Escherichia coli mutants with a linear respiratory chain.

    PubMed

    Steinsiek, Sonja; Stagge, Stefan; Bettenbrock, Katja

    2014-01-01

    The respiratory chain of E. coli is branched to allow the cells' flexibility to deal with changing environmental conditions. It consists of the NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductases NADH dehydrogenase I and II, as well as of three terminal oxidases. They differ with respect to energetic efficiency (proton translocation) and their affinity to the different quinone/quinol species and oxygen. In order to analyze the advantages of the branched electron transport chain over a linear one and to assess how usage of the different terminal oxidases determines growth behavior at varying oxygen concentrations, a set of isogenic mutant strains was created, which lack NADH dehydrogenase I as well as two of the terminal oxidases, resulting in strains with a linear respiratory chain. These strains were analyzed in glucose-limited chemostat experiments with defined oxygen supply, adjusting aerobic, anaerobic and different microaerobic conditions. In contrast to the wild-type strain MG1655, the mutant strains produced acetate even under aerobic conditions. Strain TBE032, lacking NADH dehydrogenase I and expressing cytochrome bd-II as sole terminal oxidase, showed the highest acetate formation rate under aerobic conditions. This supports the idea that cytochrome bd-II terminal oxidase is not able to catalyze the efficient oxidation of the quinol pool at higher oxygen conditions, but is functioning mainly under limiting oxygen conditions. Phosphorylation of ArcA, the regulator of the two-component system ArcBA, besides Fnr the main transcription factor for the response towards different oxygen concentrations, was studied. Its phosphorylation pattern was changed in the mutant strains. Dephosphorylation and therefore inactivation of ArcA started at lower aerobiosis levels than in the wild-type strain. Notably, not only the micro- and aerobic metabolism was affected by the mutations, but also the anaerobic metabolism, where the respiratory chain should not be important. PMID:24475268

  17. Detection and characterization of mammalian DNA polymerase beta mutants by functional complementation in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Sweasy, J B; Loeb, L A

    1993-01-01

    We have designed and utilized a bacterial complementation system to identify and characterize mammalian DNA polymerase beta mutants. In this complementation system, wild-type rat DNA polymerase beta replaces both the replicative and repair functions of DNA polymerase I in the Escherichia coli recA718 polA12 double mutant; our 263 DNA polymerase beta mutants replace E. coli polymerase I less efficiently or not at all. Of the 10 mutants that have been shown to contain DNA sequence alterations, 2 exhibit a split phenotype with respect to complementation of the growth defect and methylmethanesulfonate sensitivity of the double mutant; one is a null mutant. The mutants possessing a split phenotype contain amino acid residue alterations within a putative nucleotide binding site of DNA polymerase beta. This approach for the isolation and evaluation of mutants of a mammalian DNA polymerase in E. coli may ultimately lead to a better understanding of the mechanism of action of this enzyme and to precisely defining its role in vertebrate cells. Images Fig. 2 PMID:8506308

  18. Improved penicillin amidase production using a genetically engineered mutant of escherichia coli ATCC 11105

    SciTech Connect

    Robas, N.; Zouheiry, H.; Branlant, G.; Branlant, C. )

    1993-01-05

    Penicillin G amidase (PGA) is a key enzyme for the industrial production of penicillin G derivatives used in therapeutics. Escherichia coli ATCC 11105 is the more commonly used strain for PGA production. To improve enzyme yield, the authors constructed various recombinant E. coli HB 101 and ATCC 11105 strains. For each strain, PGA production was determined for various concentrations of glucose and phenylacetic acid (PAA) in the medium. The E. coli strain, G271, was identified as the best performer (800 U NIPAB/L). This strain was obtained as follows: an E. coli ATCC 11105 mutant (E. coli G133) was first selected based on a low negative effect of glucose on PGA production. This mutant was then transformed with a pBR322 derivative containing the PGA gene. Various experiments were made to try to understand the reason for the high productivity of E. coli G271. The host strain, E. coli G133, was found to be mutated in one (or more) gene(s) whose product(s) act(s) in trans on the PGA gene expression. Its growth is not inhibited by high glucose concentration in the medium. Interestingly, whereas glucose still exerts some negative effect on the PGA production by E. coli G133, PGA production by its transformant (E. coli G271) is stimulated by glucose. The reason for this stimulation is discussed. Transformation of E. coli G133 with a pBR322 derivative containing the HindIII fragment of the PGA gene, showed that the performance of E. coli G271 depends both upon the host strain properties and the plasmid structure. Study of the production by the less efficient E. coli HB101 derivatives brought some light on the mechanism of regulation of the PGA gene.

  19. Selection for Spontaneous "Escherichia coli" Streptomycin Mutants Using Basic Fuchsin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walkosz, Ronald

    1991-01-01

    An exercise that uses a common bacterium, E. coli, in great numbers, to detect a demonstrable change in the ability of some cells to become resistant to the common antibiotic streptomycin is presented. The procedure for preparing and pouring the gradient antibiotic plates is provided. The advantages of using the Basic Fuchsin in the agar are…

  20. Isolation of glutamate-inserting ochre suppressor mutants of Salmonella typhimurium and Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Prival, M J

    1996-01-01

    Glutamate-inserting ochre suppressors have been identified among late-arising, spontaneous revertants of a hisG428 mutant of Salmonella typhimurium and an argE3 mutant of Escherichia coli. The S. typhimurium suppressors mapped in the tRNA2(Glu) gene gltU at 82 min; those in E. coli were found to be in tRNA2(Glu) genes gltW at 56 min, gltU at 85 min, and gltT at 90 min. PMID:8631694

  1. Probing bactericidal mechanisms induced by cold atmospheric plasmas with Escherichia coli mutants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perni, Stefano; Shama, Gilbert; Hobman, J. L.; Lund, P. A.; Kershaw, C. J.; Hidalgo-Arroyo, G. A.; Penn, C. W.; Deng, X. T.; Walsh, J. L.; Kong, M. G.

    2007-02-01

    Mechanisms of plasma-induced microbial inactivation have commonly been studied with physicochemical techniques. In this letter, Escherichia coli K-12 and its ΔrecA, ΔrpoS, and ΔsoxS mutants are employed to discriminate effects of UV photons, OH radicals, and reactive oxygen species produced in atmospheric discharges. This microbiological approach exploits the fact that these E. coli mutants are defective in their resistance against various external stresses. By interplaying bacterial inactivation kinetics with optical emission spectroscopy, oxygen atoms are identified as a major contributor in plasma inactivation with minor contributions from UV photons, OH radicals, singlet oxygen metastables, and nitric oxide.

  2. [Catabolyte repression of Escherichia coli K12 mutants with defects in different systems of glucose transport].

    PubMed

    Gershanovich, V N; Iurovitskaia, N V; Komissarova, L V; Bol'shakova, T N; Erlagaeva, R S

    1976-01-01

    The phenomenon of glucose catabolite repression was studied in E. coli mutants inable to transport this carbohydrate. The pts 1, H mutant P34 was much less sensitive to the repressive effect of glucose on beta-galactosidase synthesis than the parent type. The 1103 mutant devoid of enzyme 1 of the phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase system (PTS) behaves in the same way as P34 mutant after addition of glucose to casamino acid mineral medium. However, in minimal medium with succinate as the sole source of carbon, cells of the 1103 mutant show enhanced sensibility to transient glucose repression. The effect of hypersensibility disappears when the lac I mutation leading to constitutive the beta-galactosidase synthesis is introduced in 1103 mutant. It is shown that the enhanced sensibility of beta-galactosidase synthesis to glucose transient repression in 1103 mutant is an effect of the aburpt decrease in its growth rate in the presence of succinate and most probably this decrease leads to "inducer exclusion" of the lac operon. It is also shown that if one introduces the P34 mutation in strain JD3 devoid of one of the enzymes II for glucose (and due to this resistant to glucose catabolite respression) then the level of resistance in double mutant does not increase in spite of considerable supression of 14C glucose accumulation. In connection with this the role is discussed of separate components of the E. coli K 12 glucose transport system in realization of the phenomenon of catabolite repression. PMID:785237

  3. Involvement of oxidative stress in hydroquinone-induced cytotoxicity in catalase-deficient Escherichia coli mutants.

    PubMed

    Horita, Masako; Wang, Da-Hong; Tsutsui, Ken; Sano, Kuniaki; Masuoka, Noriyoshi; Kira, Shohei

    2005-10-01

    Hydroquinone is a benzene-derived metabolite. To clarify whether the reactive oxygen species (ROS) are involved in hydroquinone-induced cytotoxicity, we constructed transformants of Escherichia coli (E. coli) strains that express mammalian catalase gene derived from catalase mutant mice (Cs(b), Cs(c)) and the wild-type (Cs(a)) using a catalase-deficient E. coli UM255 as a recipient. Specific catalase activities of these tester strains were in order of Cs(a) > Cs(c) > Cs(b) > UM255, and their susceptibility to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) showed UM255 > Cs(b) > Cs(c) > Cs(a). We found that hydroquinone exposure reduced the survival of catalase-deficient E. coli mutants in a dose-dependent manner significantly, especially in the strains with lower catalase activities. Hydroquinone toxicity was also confirmed using zone of inhibition test, in which UM255 was the most susceptible, showing the largest zone of growth inhibition, followed by Cs(b), Cs(c) and Cs(a). Furthermore, we found that hydroquinone-induced cell damage was inhibited by the pretreatment of catalase, ascorbic acid, dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), and augmented by superoxide dismutase (both CuZnSOD and MnSOD). The present results suggest that H2O2 is probably involved in hydroquinone-induced cytotoxicity in catalase-deficient E. coli mutants and catalase plays an important role in protection of the cells against hydroquinone toxicity.

  4. Unglycosylated recombinant human glutathione peroxidase 3 mutant from Escherichia coli is active as a monomer.

    PubMed

    Song, Jian; Yu, Yang; Xing, Ruiqing; Guo, Xiao; Liu, Dali; Wei, Jingyan; Song, Hongwei

    2014-01-01

    Glutathione peroxidase 3 (GPx3) is a glycosylated member of GPx family and can catalyze the reaction of different types of peroxides with GSH to form their corresponding alcohols in vitro. The active center of GPx3 is selenocysteine (Sec), which is incorporated into proteins by a specific mechanism. In this study, we prepared a recombinant human GPx3 (rhGPx3) mutant with all Cys changed to Ser from a Cys auxotrophic strain of E. coli, BL21(DE3)cys. Although lacking post-translational modification, rhGPx3 mutant still retained the ability to reduce H2O2 and PLPC-OOH. Study on the quaternary structure suggested that rhGPx3 mutant existed as a monomer in solution, which is different from native tetrameric GPx3. Loss of the catalytic activity was considered to be attributed to both the absence of glycosylation and the failure of the tetramer. Further analysis was performed to compare the structures of rhGPx3 and GPx4 mutant, which were quite similar except for oligomerization loop. The differences of amino acid composition and electrostatic potentials on the oligomerization loop may affect the binding of large substrates to rhGPx3 mutant. This research provides an important foundation for biosynthesis of functionally selenium-containing GPx3 mutant in E.coli. PMID:25331785

  5. Investigation into the resistance of lactoperoxidase tolerant Escherichia coli mutants to different forms of oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    De Spiegeleer, Philipp; Vanoirbeek, Kristof; Lietaert, Annelies; Sermon, Jan; Aertsen, Abram; Michiels, Chris W

    2005-11-15

    Six lactoperoxidase tolerant Escherichia coli transposon mutants isolated and characterized in an earlier study, and some newly constructed double mutants, were subjected to peroxide, superoxide and hypochlorite stress, and their inactivation was compared to that of the wild type strain MG1655. Knock out mutants of waaQ and waaO, which owed their lactoperoxidase tolerance to an impaired outer membrane permeability due to a reduced porin content, also exhibited higher resistance to hypochlorite, as did a knock-out strain of lrp, encoding a regulatory protein affecting a wide range of cellular functions. Unlike the outer membrane mutants however, the lrp strain was also more resistant to t-butyl hydroperoxide, but more susceptible to the superoxide generating compound plumbagin. Finally, a lactoperoxidase tolerant knock-out strain of ulaA, involved in ascorbic acid uptake, did not show resistance to any of the other oxidants. The possible modes of action of these different oxidants are discussed.

  6. New pleiotropic alkaline phosphatase-negative mutants of Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed Central

    Heyde, M; Portalier, R

    1982-01-01

    Escherichia coli K-12 mutants showing reduced alkaline phosphatase activity were isolated as 5-fluorouracil-plus-adenosine-resistant derivatives of a upp pho (either phoS or phoT) strain. One class of these mutants displayed a temperature-sensitive alkaline phosphatase-negative phenotype, a pleiotropic defect for growth on some substrates, an increased sensitivity to toxic compounds (e.g., EDTA, mitomycin, and chloramphenicol), and alterations in the expression of some membrane proteins. It phenotypically differed from previously described mutants. The mutation was located at min 8.5 close to the phoA gene and defines a new genetic locus we called napA (for negative alkaline phosphatase pleiotropic phenotype). As these mutants have lost the ability to grow on lactose and galactose, Lac+ and Gal+ revertants were isolated that simultaneously recovered the parental phenotype. PMID:7047492

  7. Chemotactic properties of Escherichia coli mutants having abnormal Ca2+ content.

    PubMed Central

    Tisa, L S; Adler, J

    1995-01-01

    The calA, calC, and calD mutants of Escherichia coli are known to be sensitive to Ca2+ (R. N. Brey and B. P. Rosen, J. Bacteriol. 139:824-834, 1979). In the absence of any added stimuli for chemotaxis, both the calC and the calD mutants swam with a tumbly bias. Both the calC and the calD mutants were defective in chemotaxis as measured by computer analysis, use of swarm plates, and capillary assays. The calA mutant was only slightly defective in motility and only slightly impaired in chemotaxis. Chemotactically wild-type cells had an intra-cellular free-Ca2+ level of about 105 nM. The intracellular free-Ca2+ levels of the mutants, as determined by use of the fluorescent Ca2+ indicator dye fura-2 or fluo-3, were about 90, about 1,130, and about 410 nM for calA, calC, and calD, respectively. Lowering the intracellular free-Ca2+ levels in wild-type cells and in the tumbly cal mutants by use of Ca2+ chelators promoted running (smooth swimming). Overexpression of CheZ (which causes dephosphorylation of CheY-phosphate) in the wild type and in the tumbly cal mutants decreased the level of tumbliness (which is caused by CheY-phosphate). The calA mutant was 4- to 10-fold more resistant than the wild type to the inhibitory effect of omega-conotoxin on chemotaxis. omega-Conotoxin had no effect on Ca2+ extrusion by wild-type E. coli; that result suggests that omega-conotoxin affects Ca2+ transport at the point of entry instead of exit. PMID:8522517

  8. Identification and functional annotation of mycobacterial septum formation genes using cell division mutants of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Gaiwala Sharma, Sujata S; Kishore, Vimal; Raghunand, Tirumalai R

    2016-01-01

    The major virulence trait of Mycobacterium tuberculosis is its ability to enter a latent state in the face of robust host immunity. Clues to the molecular basis of latency can emerge from understanding the mechanism of cell division, beginning with identification of proteins involved in this process. Using complementation of Escherichia coli mutants, we functionally annotated M. tuberculosis and Mycobacterium smegmatis homologs of divisome proteins FtsW and AmiC. Our results demonstrate that E. coli can be used as a surrogate model to discover mycobacterial cell division genes, and should prove invaluable in delineating the mechanisms of this fundamental process in mycobacteria.

  9. Furfural and hydroxymethylfurfural tolerance in Escherichia coli ΔacrR regulatory mutants.

    PubMed

    Luhe, Annette Lin; Lim, Chan Yuen; Gerken, Henri; Wu, Jinchuan; Zhao, Hua

    2015-01-01

    The presence of the highly toxic furfural and hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) in the hydrolysate of lignocellulosic biomass prompted the investigation of the Escherichia coli ΔacrR regulatory mutant for higher tolerance to these compounds, to facilitate the production of biofuels and biochemicals, and further biocatalytic conversions. In comparison with the parental strain, the regulatory mutant with the upregulated efflux pump AcrAB-TolC produced moderately better growth and higher tolerance to concentrations of furfural and HMF between 1 and 2 g L(-1) .

  10. Mutant-prevention concentration and mechanism of resistance in clinical isolates and enrofloxacin/marbofloxacin-selected mutants of Escherichia coli of canine origin.

    PubMed

    Gebru, Elias; Choi, Myung-Jin; Lee, Seung-Jin; Damte, Dereje; Park, Seung Chun

    2011-10-01

    The antibacterial activity and selection of resistant bacteria, along with mechanisms of fluoroquinolone resistance, were investigated by integrating the static [MIC or mutant-prevention concentration (MPC)] and in vitro dynamic model approaches using Escherichia coli isolates from diseased dogs. Using the dynamic models, selected E. coli strains and enrofloxacin and marbofloxacin at a range of simulated area under concentration-time curve over a 24 h interval (AUC(24 h))/MIC ratios were investigated. Our results indicated increasing losses in susceptibility of E. coli upon continuous exposure to enrofloxacin and marbofloxacin in vitro. This effect was transferable to other fluoroquinolones, as well as to structurally unrelated drugs. Our results also confirmed an AUC(24 h)/MIC (AUC(24 h)/MPC)-dependent antibacterial activity and selection of resistant E. coli mutants, in which maximum losses in fluoroquinolone susceptibility occurred at simulated AUC(24 h)/MIC ratios of 40-60. AUC(24 h)/MPC ratios of 39 (enrofloxacin) and 32 (marbofloxacin) were considered protective against the selection of resistant mutants of E. coli. Integrating our MIC and MPC data with published pharmacokinetic information in dogs revealed a better effect of the conventional dosing regimen of marbofloxacin than that of enrofloxacin in restricting the selection of resistant mutants of E. coli. Target mutations, especially at codon 83 (serine to leucine) of gyrA, and overexpression of efflux pumps contributed to resistance development in both clinically resistant and in vitro-selected mutants of E. coli. We also report here a previously undescribed mutation at codon 116 of parC in two laboratory-derived resistant mutants of E. coli. Additional studies would determine the exact role of this mutation in fluoroquinolone susceptibility, as well as establish the importance of our findings in the clinical setting.

  11. Dynamics of SOS-Response in UVR-Mutants of Escherichia Coli Cells under Ultraviolet Irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuchina, M. A.; Parkhomenko, A. Yu.; Belov, O. V.; Bugai, A. N.

    2010-01-01

    A mathematical model of the genetic regulatory system of the SOS-response induced by ultraviolet radiation in excision repair-deficient mutants of E. coli bacterial cells is developed. On the basis of the model, the dynamics of the SOS system regulatory proteins is analyzed. The influence of excision repair on the induction of the key gene products during the SOS-response is studied.

  12. SOS mutator effect in E. coli mutants deficient in mismatch correction.

    PubMed Central

    Caillet-Fauquet, P; Maenhaut-Michel, G; Radman, M

    1984-01-01

    We have used bacteriophage lambda to characterize the mutator effect of the SOS response induced by u.v. irradiation of Escherichia coli. Mutagenesis of unirradiated phages grown in irradiated or unirradiated bacteria was detected by measuring forward mutagenesis in the immunity genes or reversion mutagenesis of an amber codon in the R gene. Relative to the wild-type, the SOS mutator effect was higher in E. coli mismatch correction-deficient mutants (mutH, mutL and mutS) and lower in an adenine methylation-deficient mutant ( dam3 ). We conclude that a large proportion of SOS-induced 'untargeted' mutations are removed by the methyl-directed mismatch correction system, which acts on newly synthesized DNA strands. The lower SOS mutator effect observed in E. coli dam mutants may be due to a selective killing of mismatch-bearing chromosomes resulting from undirected mismatch repair. The SOS mutator effect on undamaged lambda DNA, induced by u.v. irradiation of the host, appears to result from decreased fidelity of DNA synthesis. Images Fig. 1. PMID:6233141

  13. Comparative mutant prevention concentration and antibacterial activity of fluoroquinolones against Escherichia coli in diarrheic buffalo calves.

    PubMed

    Beri, Supriya; Sidhu, Pritam K; Kaur, Gurpreet; Chandra, Mudit; Rampal, Satyavan

    2015-10-01

    Owing to emerging threat of antimicrobial resistance, mutant prevention concentration (MPC) is considered as an important parameter to evaluate the antimicrobials for their capacity to restrict/allow the emergence of resistant mutants. Therefore, MPCs of ciprofloxacin, enrofloxacin, levofloxacin, moxifloxacin, and norfloxacin were determined against Escherichia coli isolates of diarrheic buffalo calves. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) and minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBCs) were also established. The MICs of ciprofloxacin, enrofloxacin, levofloxacin, moxifloxacin and norfloxacin were 0·009, 0·022, 0·024, 0·028, and 0·036 μg/ml, respectively. The MBCs obtained were very close to the MICs of respective drugs that suggested a bactericidal mode of action of antimicrobials. The MPCs (μg/ml) of ciprofloxacin (4·2×MIC), moxifloxacin (4·8×MIC), and norfloxacin (5·1×MIC) were approximately equal but slightly lower than enrofloxacin (7·6×MIC) and levofloxacin (8·5×MIC) against clinical isolates of E. coli. The MPC data suggested that enrofloxacin has the potential for restricting the selection of E. coli mutants during treatment at appropriate dosing.

  14. Isolation and characterization of Escherichia coli mutants able to utilize the novel pentose L-ribose.

    PubMed

    Trimbur, D E; Mortlock, R P

    1991-04-01

    Wild-type strains of Escherichia coli were unable to utilize L-ribose for growth. However, L-ribose-positive mutants could be isolated from strains of E. coli K-12 which contained a ribitol operon. L-ribose-positive strains of E. coli, isolated after 15 to 20 days, had a growth rate of 0.22 generation per h on L-ribose. Growth on L-ribose was found to induce the enzymes of the L-arabinose and ribitol pathways, but only ribitol-negative mutants derived from strains originally L-ribose positive lost the ability to grow on L-ribose, showing that a functional ribitol pathway was required. One of the mutations permitting growth on L-ribose enabled the mutants to produce constitutively an NADPH-linked reductase which converted L-ribose to ribitol. L-ribose is not metabolized by an isomerization to L-ribulose, as would be predicted on the basis of other pentose pathways in enteric bacteria. Instead, L-ribose was metabolized by the reduction of L-ribose to ribitol, followed by the conversion to D-ribulose by enzymes of the ribitol pathway.

  15. Escherichia coli mar and acrAB mutants display no tolerance to simple alcohols.

    PubMed

    Ankarloo, Jonas; Wikman, Susanne; Nicholls, Ian A

    2010-01-01

    The inducible Mar phenotype of Escherichia coli is associated with increased tolerance to multiple hydrophobic antibiotics as well as some highly hydrophobic organic solvents such as cyclohexane, mediated mainly through the AcrAB/TolC efflux system. The influence of water miscible alcohols ethanol and 1-propanol on a Mar constitutive mutant and a mar deletion mutant of E. coli K-12, as well as the corresponding strains carrying the additional acrAB deletion, was investigated. In contrast to hydrophobic solvents, all strains were killed in exponential phase by 1-propanol and ethanol at rates comparable to the parent strain. Thus, the Mar phenotype does not protect E. coli from killing by these more polar solvents. Surprisingly, AcrAB does not contribute to an increased alcohol tolerance. In addition, sodium salicylate, at concentrations known to induce the mar operon, was unable to increase 1-propanol or ethanol tolerance. Rather, the toxicity of both solvents was increased in the presence of sodium salicylate. Collectively, the results imply that the resilience of E. coli to water miscible alcohols, in contrast to more hydrophobic solvents, does not depend upon the AcrAB/TolC efflux system, and suggests a lower limit for substrate molecular size and functionality. Implications for the application of microbiological systems in environments containing high contents of water miscible organic solvents, e.g., phage display screening, are discussed. PMID:20480026

  16. Isolation and characterization of Escherichia coli mutants defective for phenylpropionate degradation.

    PubMed Central

    Burlingame, R P; Wyman, L; Chapman, P J

    1986-01-01

    Mutants of Escherichia coli defective in catabolism of 3-phenylpropionate, 3-(3-hydroxyphenyl)propionate, or both were isolated after mutagenesis with ethylmethane sulfonate. Nine phenotypically distinct classes of mutants were identified, including strains lacking each of the first five enzyme activities for the degradation of these compounds and mutants pleiotropically negative for some of these activities. Characterization of these mutants was greatly facilitated by the use of indicator media in which accumulation of 3-(2,3-dihydroxyphenyl)propionate or 2-hydroxy-6-ketononadienedioic acid led to the formation of dark red or bright yellow colors, respectively, in the medium. Assays with wild-type and mutant strains indicated that 3-phenylpropionate (or its dihydrodiol), but none of the hydroxylated derivatives tested, induced the synthesis of enzymes for its conversion to 3-(2,3-dihydroxyphenyl)propionate. The remaining enzymes were induced by the 2- or 3-hydroxy or 2,3-dihydroxy derivatives of 3-phenylpropionate, with the 2-hydroxy compound acting as an apparent gratuitous inducer. Metabolism to nonaromatic intermediates appeared to be unnecessary for full induction of any pathway enzyme. One unusual class of mutants, in which 2-keto-4-pentenoate hydratase appeared to be uninducible, indicated a level of control not previously shown in meta-fission catabolic pathways. PMID:3531186

  17. Development of a mutant strain of Escherichia coli for molecular cloning of highly methylated DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Bishr, M.A.

    1991-01-01

    A mutant strain of Escherichia coli designated as GR219 that allows efficient molecular cloning of highly methylated bean DNA has been developed by UV light mutation of the parent LE392 str[sup r] strain. This mutant strain, like the parent, is streptomycin resistant and is biologically contained, because it requires thymidine for growth. Both the wild type and the mutant strain have lambda phage receptors so both can be utilized for construction of genomic libraries using the phase as a vector. The efficiency of transformation of the parent and the mutant strain with a recombinant plasmid containing bean DNA was compared to the efficiency of transformation of the PLK-F[prime] strain, which has a deletion of mcrA and mcrB genes and, therefore, allows transformation with methylated bean DNA. It has been found that the GR219 strain has the highest efficiency of transformation, while the PLK-F[prime] strain shows less, and the parent LE392 str[sup r] strain the least efficiency of transformation. These results indicate that strains of E. coli with mcrA and mcrB genes can recognize and degrade highly methylated DNA. However, other undefined factors affected by the altered gene(s) in the GR219 strain are also involved in the recognition and degradation of any cloned foreign DNA.

  18. Biochemical characterization of the chlB mutant of E. coli

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, J.L.; Indermauer, L.W.; Rajagopalan, K.V. )

    1991-03-11

    The chlorate resistant mutants of E. coli exhibit a pleiotropic loss of the activities of several molybdoenzymes suggestive of defective molybdenum cofactor synthesis. Indeed, mutants at the chlA and chlE loci have been shown to be deficient in molybdenum cofactor. ChlB mutants, on the other hand, contain high levels of molybdenum cofactor as measured by conversion to the Form A derivative and by reconstitution of the nitrate reductase in the high molecular weight fraction of extracts of the Neurospora crassa nit-1 mutant. The recent discovery that the molybdenum cofactors of E. coli nitrate reductase and formate dehydrogenase contain molybdopterin guanine dinucleotide (MGD) rather than the simpler molybdopterin (MPT) raised the possibility that the chlB locus could be essential for the biosynthesis of MGD from MPT. To test this, conditions were devised for conversion of MGD to a fluorescent, stable derivative, Form A-GMP, and the absorption, fluorescence and chromatographic properties of Form A-GMP were established. Both Form A, arising from MPT, and Form A-GMP arising from MGD, were quantitated in extracts of wild type and chlB cells. Wild type cells were found to contain both Form A and Form A-GMP. In contrast, chlB cells contained elevated levels of Form A but no Form A-GMP. These results suggest that the chlB gene product is essential for the conversion of MPT to MGD.

  19. Process of Cellular Division in Escherichia coli: Physiological Study on Thermosensitive Mutants Defective in Cell Division

    PubMed Central

    Ricard, Matthieu; Hirota, Yukinori

    1973-01-01

    Thermosensitive fts mutants of Escherichia coli belonging to seven previously identified genetic classes (ftsA to ftsG) were studied from a physiological standpoint. These mutants immediately stopped dividing and formed multinucleated filaments when the temperature was shifted to 41 C. Macromolecular syntheses (deoxyribonucleic acid), ribonucleic acid, cell mass, and murein) continued exponentially for at least 40 to 120 min. The number of surviving bacteria remained constant during the time of incubation, and this number began to decrease exponentially, as the rate of cell mass increase leveled off from the initial rate. The recovery of cell division at 30 C in these filamentous cells was studied after 60 min of incubation at 41 C. The existence of three types of mutants was shown. The ftsA and ftsE mutants resumed cell division without new protein synthesis; ftsD mutants resumed cell division only if new protein synthesis occured, while ftsB, C, F and G mutants did not resume cell division at all. No alteration in the cell envelope was detected by the method used here, although the ftsA, B, D, F and G mutations, in contrast with ftsC and E, caused an increased resistance to penicillin G. It was also shown that the recA mutation did not suppress the effect of the fts mutations and that none of the lysogenic fts mutants induced prophage multiplication while forming filaments. The effects of osmotic pressure and salts which rescue the mutant phenotype is described. PMID:4583216

  20. Mutant prevention concentration and phenotypic and molecular basis of fluoroquinolone resistance in clinical isolates and in vitro-selected mutants of Escherichia coli from dogs.

    PubMed

    Gebru, Elias; Damte, Dereje; Choi, Myung-Jin; Lee, Seung-Jin; Kim, Young-Hoan; Park, Seung Chun

    2012-01-27

    The antibacterial activity, selection of Escherichia coli (E. coli) mutants and mechanisms of fluoroquinolone resistance were investigated by integrating the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC), mutant prevention concentration (MPC) and in vitro dynamic model approaches. Difloxacin and orbifloxacin, for which the above information has been scarce, were used. A range of area under curve over a 24h interval (AUC(24h))/MIC ratios and selected E. coli strains were investigated using the dynamic models. Continuous incubation for three days in the presence of difloxacin or orbifloxacin resulted in losses in E. coli susceptibility. An AUC(24h)/MIC (AUC(24h)/MPC)-dependent fluoroquinolone activity and selection of E. coli mutants was confirmed. Maximum losses in susceptibility occurred at AUC(24h)/MIC ratios of 54 (orbifloxacin) and 57.3 (difloxacin). AUC(24h)/MIC ratios of 169.8 (orbifloxacin) and 199.5 (difloxacin) were estimated to be protective against the selection of E. coli mutants, and the corresponding ratios based on AUC(24h)/MPC predictions were 34 (orbifloxacin) and 36.3 (difloxacin). When integrating our in vitro data with pharmacokinetic data in dogs, the conventional clinical doses of both drugs were found to be inadequate to attain the above protective values for 90% of the mutant subpopulation (AUC(24h)/MPC(90)). Both target mutations, esp. at codon 83 (Ser to Leu) of gyrA, and overexpression of efflux pumps contributed to resistance development, with mutants also showing decreased susceptibility to enrofloxacin and marbofloxacin. Additional studies would determine the role of mutations found outside the QRDR, at codon 24 of gyrA, and at codon 116 of parC, and establish the significance of these observations in vivo.

  1. A mutant of Escherichia coli defective in penicillin-binding protein 5 and lacking D-alanine carboxypeptidase IA.

    PubMed Central

    Nishimura, Y; Suzuki, H; Hirota, Y; Park, J T

    1980-01-01

    A mutant of Escherichia coli defective in penicillin-binding protein 5 activity was isolated. The mutation (pfv) was shown to be located at 14.0 min on the E. coli chromosome map. Loss of penicillin-binding protein 5 in the pfv mutant was associated with the loss of D-alanine carboxypeptidase IA activity and increased sensitivity to beta-lactam antibiotics. We conclude that penicillin-binding protein 5 catalyzes the major D-alanine carboxypeptidase IA activity and that the enzyme activity, in vivo, protects E. coli cells from killing by low inhibitory concentrations of beta-lactam antibiotics. PMID:6995448

  2. Discrimination of single-porin Escherichia (E.) coli mutants by ATR and transmission mode FTIR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Saraiva, Raúl G; Lopes, João Almeida; Machado, Jorge; Gameiro, Paula; Feio, Maria J

    2014-06-01

    Vibrational spectroscopy has long been used in bacterial identification with different levels of taxonomic discrimination but its true potential for intra-species differentiation remains poorly explored. Herein, both transmission Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) and attenuated total reflectance (ATR)-FTIR spectroscopy are used to analyse E. coli strains that differ solely in their porin expression profile. In this previously unreported approach, the applicability of both FTIR-spectroscopy techniques is compared with the same collection of unique strains. ATR-FTIR spectroscopy proved to reliably distinguish between several E. coli porin mutants with an accuracy not replicated by FTIR in transmission mode (using previously optimized procedures). Further studies should allow the identification of the individual contribution of the single porin channel to the overall bacterial infrared spectrum and of molecular predictive patterns of porin alterations.

  3. [The directed modification of Escherichia coli MG1655 to obtain histidine-producing mutants].

    PubMed

    Doroshenko, V G; Lobanov, A O; Fedorina, E A

    2013-01-01

    Strain MG 1655+hisGr hisL'-Delta, purR, which produces histidine with a weight yield of approximately 12% from glucose, was constructed through directed chromosomal modifications of the laboratory Escherichia coli strain MG 1655+, which has a known genome sequence. A feedback-resistant ATP-phosphoribosyl transferase encoded by the mutant hisGr (E271 K) was the main determinant of histidine production. A further increase in histidine production was achieved by the expression enhance of a mutant his operon containing hisGr through the deleting attenuator region (hisL'-Delta). An increase in the expression of the wildtype his operon did not result in histidine accumulation. Deletion of the transcriptional regulator gene purR increased the biomass produced and maintained the level of histidine production per cell under the fermentation conditions used.

  4. Cytoplasmic membrane fraction that promotes septation in an Escherichia coli lon mutant

    SciTech Connect

    Adler, H.I.; Carrasco, A.; Crow, W.; Gill, J.S.

    1981-08-01

    A particulate fraction derived from bacterial cells stimulates septation in irradiated Escherichia coli lon mutants when added to postirradiation plating media. It was established that the particles are derived from the cytoplasmic membrane and that they have been partially purified by sucrose density gradient centrifugation. These particles also contain the cytochrome-based respiratory activity of the cell. A variety of experiments established a correlation between the septation-promoting activity of the particles and their ability to remove oxygen from the postirradiation plating medium. It was suggested that the efficient removal of oxygen from the medium allowed the lon cells to repair radiation-induced damage to the septation mechanism.

  5. Measuring cell wall elasticity on enteroaggregative Escherichia coli wild type and dispersin mutant by AFM

    SciTech Connect

    Beckmann, Melissa; Venkataraman, Sankar; Doktycz, Mitchel John; Nataro, James P; Sullivan, Claretta J; Morrell-Falvey, Jennifer L; Allison, David P

    2006-07-01

    Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC) is pathogenic and produces severe diarrhea in humans. A mutant of EAEC that does not produce dispersin, a cell surface protein, is not pathogenic. It has been proposed that dispersin imparts a positive charge to the bacterial cell surface allowing the bacteria to colonize on the negatively charged intestinal mucosa. However, physical properties of the bacterial cell surface, such as rigidity, may be influenced by the presence of dispersin and may contribute to pathogenicity. Using the system developed in our laboratory for mounting and imaging bacterial cells by atomic force microscopy (AFM), in liquid, on gelatin coated mica surfaces, studies were initiated to measure cell surface elasticity. This was carried out in both wild type EAEC, that produces dispersin, and the mutant that does not produce dispersin. This was accomplished using AFM force-distance (FD) spectroscopy on the wild type and mutant grown in liquid or on solid medium. Images in liquid and in air of both the wild-type and mutant grown in liquid and on solid media are presented. This work represents an initial step in efforts to understand the pathogenic role of the dispersin protein in the wild-type bacteria.

  6. Enhanced heterologous gene expression in novel rpoH mutants of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Obukowicz, M G; Staten, N R; Krivi, G G

    1992-05-01

    Extragenic temperature-resistant suppressor mutants of an rpoD800 derivative of Escherichia coli W3110 were selected at 43.5 degrees C. Two of the mutants were shown to have a phenotype of enhanced accumulation of heterologous proteins. Genetic mapping of the two mutants showed that the mutation conferring temperature resistance resided in the rpoH gene. P1-mediated transduction of the rpoD+ gene into both of the rpoD800 rpoH double mutants resulted in viable rpoH mutants, MON102 and MON105, that retained temperature resistance at 46 degrees C, the maximum growth temperature of W3110. The complete rpoH gene, including the regulatory region, from MON102, MON105, and the parental W3110 was cloned and sequenced. Sequencing results showed that a single C----T transition at nucleotide 802 was present in both MON102 and MON105, resulting in an Arg(CGC)----Cys(TGC) substitution at amino acid residue 268 (R-268-C; this gene was designated rpoH358). Heterologous protein accumulation levels in both MON102 and MON105, as well as in rpoH358 mutants constructed in previously unmanipulated W3110 and JM101, were assessed and compared with parental W3110 and JM101 levels. Expression studies utilizing the recA or araBAD promoter and the phage T7 gene 10L ribosome-binding site (g10L) showed that increased accumulation levels of a number of representative heterologous proteins (i.e., human or bovine insulin-like growth factor-1, bovine insulin-like growth factor-2, prohormone of human atrial natriuretic factor, bovine placental lactogen, and/or bovine prolactin) were obtained in the rpoH358 mutants compared with the levels in the parental W3110 and JM101. The mechanism of enhanced heterologous protein accumulation in MON102 and MON105 was unique compared with those of previously described rpoH mutants. Pulse-chase and Northern (RNA) blot analyses showed that the enhanced accumulation of heterologous proteins was not due to decreased proteolysis but was instead due to increased levels

  7. INHIBITION OF A THYMINE-DEFICIENT MUTANT OF ESCHERICHIA COLI BY 5-SUBSTITUTED URACILS

    PubMed Central

    Shapira, Jacob; Lowden, Lois; Hale, Ralph

    1962-01-01

    Shapira, Jacob (Consolidated Veterans Administration Hospital, Little Rock, Ark.), Lois Lowden, and Ralph Hale. Inhibition of a thymine-deficient mutant of Escherichia coli by 5-substituted uracils. J. Bacteriol. 83:919–923. 1962.—Small inocula of well-washed cells of a thymine-requiring mutant of Escherichia coli were incubated in a thymine-containing glucose-salts medium with a variety of 5-substituted pyrimidines and pyrimidine ribosides. After a lag phase, the turbidity of the cultures increased appreciably which, in the case of 5-ethyluracil and 5-ethyluridine, was primarily due to an elongation of the cells. 5-Ethyluracil at low thymine concentrations increased the lag phase and decreased the rate and final amount of growth. At high thymine concentrations, it had less effect on the final turbidity of the cultures. The inhibition index for this compound was relatively constant, suggesting competitive inhibition. Several other pyrimidine analogues inhibited growth. The nucleosides of 5-bromouracil and 5-aminouracil were no more effective than the free bases. The ribosides of 5-ethyluracil and 5-butyluracil were appreciably more inhibitory than the free bases and were the most potent compounds tested. It is likely that the inhibition of growth is a reflection of the effect of these compounds on ribonucleic acid synthesis by the cells. PMID:13911280

  8. Transport-limited growth rates in a mutant of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    von Meyenburg Kaspar

    1971-09-01

    Mutants of Escherichia coli B/r have been selected which require increased nutrient concentrations for half-maximal growth rate. This half-saturation constant (K(m)) for growth on glucose is 10(-6) and 7 x 10(-4)m for the wild type (CP 366) and the mutant (CP 367), respectively. Similarly, the K(m) is increased for growth on many other carbohydrates (20- to 500-fold), for the anions PO(4) (3-) and SO(4) (2-) (ca. 100-fold), and for the uptake of several amino acids (20- to 50-fold). At sufficiently high concentrations of the nutrients, mutant and wild type grow equally fast. The yield in terms of cell mass per milligram of substrate is unaffected by the mutation. The phenotype of the parent is reestablished in what appears to be the reversion of a single mutation (kmt) which maps between strA and metB. The pleiotropic decrease of the affinities for transport of the various nutrients seems to be the result of a modification of the cell envelope which weakens the attachment of the various specific binding proteins to the periplasmic membrane. Since the mutant K(m) values are increased considerably, high cell densities can be reached in batch cultures at growth-rate-limiting substrate concentrations (10(7) to 10(8) cells/ml). This allows chemical analysis of the cell composition; the application of the mutant to studies of bacterial physiology as function of growth rate is discussed. PMID:4937789

  9. Construction and Characterization of an Escherichia coli Mutant Producing Kdo2-Lipid A

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jianli; Ma, Wenjian; Wang, Zhou; Li, Ye; Wang, Xiaoyuan

    2014-01-01

    3-deoxy-d-manno-oct-2-ulosonic acid (Kdo)2-lipid A is the conserved structure domain of lipopolysaccharide found in most Gram-negative bacteria, and it is believed to stimulate the innate immune system through the TLR4/MD2 complex. Therefore, Kdo2-lipid A is an important stimulator for studying the mechanism of the innate immune system and for developing bacterial vaccine adjuvants. Kdo2-lipid A has not been chemically synthesized to date and could only be isolated from an Escherichia coli mutant strain, WBB06. WBB06 cells grow slowly and have to grow in the presence of tetracycline. In this study, a novel E. coli mutant strain, WJW00, that could synthesize Kdo2-lipid A was constructed by deleting the rfaD gene from the genome of E. coli W3110. The rfaD gene encodes ADP-l-glycero-d-manno-heptose-6-epimerase RfaD. Based on the analysis by SDS-PAGE, thin layer chromatography (TLC) and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI/MS), WJW00 could produce similar levels of Kdo2-lipid A to WBB06. WJW00 cells grow much better than WBB06 cells and do not need to add any antibiotics during growth. Compared with the wild-type strain, W3110, WJW00 showed increased hydrophobicity, higher cell permeability, greater autoaggregation and decreased biofilm-forming ability. Therefore, WJW00 could be a more suitable strain than WBB06 for producing Kdo2-lipid A and a good base strain for developing lipid A adjuvants. PMID:24633251

  10. Escherichia coli K-12 Suppressor-free Mutants Lacking Early Glycosyltransferases and Late Acyltransferases

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Gracjana; Lindner, Buko; Brabetz, Werner; Brade, Helmut; Raina, Satish

    2009-01-01

    To elucidate the minimal lipopolysaccharide (LPS) structure needed for the viability of Escherichia coli, suppressor-free strains lacking either the 3-deoxy-d-manno-oct-2-ulosonic acid transferase waaA gene or derivatives of the heptosyltransferase I waaC deletion with lack of one or all late acyltransferases (lpxL/M/P) and/or various outer membrane biogenesis factors were constructed. Δ(waaC lpxL lpxM lpxP) and waaA mutants exhibited highly attenuated growth, whereas simultaneous deletion of waaC and surA was lethal. Analyses of LPS of suppressor-free waaA mutants grown at 21 °C, besides showing accumulation of free lipid IVA precursor, also revealed the presence of its pentaacylated and hexaacylated derivatives, indicating in vivo late acylation can occur without Kdo. In contrast, LPS of Δ(waaC lpxL lpxM lpxP) strains showed primarily Kdo2-lipid IVA, indicating that these minimal LPS structures are sufficient to support growth of E. coli under slow-growth conditions at 21/23 °C. These lipid IVA derivatives could be modified biosynthetically by phosphoethanolamine, but not by 4-amino-4-deoxy-l-arabinose, indicating export defects of such minimal LPS. ΔwaaA and Δ(waaC lpxL lpxM lpxP) exhibited cell-division defects with a decrease in the levels of FtsZ and OMP-folding factor PpiD. These mutations led to strong constitutive additive induction of envelope responsive CpxR/A and σE signal transduction pathways. Δ(lpxL lpxM lpxP) mutant, with intact waaC, synthesized tetraacylated lipid A and constitutively incorporated a third Kdo in growth medium inducing synthesis of P-EtN and l-Ara4N. Overexpression of msbA restored growth of Δ(lpxL lpxM lpxP) under fast-growing conditions, but only partially that of the Δ(waaC lpxL lpxM lpxP) mutant. This suppression could be alleviated by overexpression of certain mutant msbA alleles or the single-copy chromosomal MsbA-498V variant in the vicinity of Walker-box II. PMID:19346244

  11. Transcriptome analysis of all two-component regulatory system mutants of Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed

    Oshima, Taku; Aiba, Hirofumi; Masuda, Yasushi; Kanaya, Shigehiko; Sugiura, Masahito; Wanner, Barry L; Mori, Hirotada; Mizuno, Takeshi

    2002-10-01

    We have systematically examined the mRNA profiles of 36 two-component deletion mutants, which include all two-component regulatory systems of Escherichia coli, under a single growth condition. DNA microarray results revealed that the mutants belong to one of three groups based on their gene expression profiles in Luria-Bertani broth under aerobic conditions: (i) those with no or little change; (ii) those with significant changes; and (iii) those with drastic changes. Under these conditions, the anaeroresponsive ArcB/ArcA system, the osmoresponsive EnvZ/OmpR system and the response regulator UvrY showed the most drastic changes. Cellular functions such as flagellar synthesis and expression of the RpoS regulon were affected by multiple two-component systems. A high correlation coefficient of expression profile was found between several two-component mutants. Together, these results support the view that a network of functional interactions, such as cross-regulation, exists between different two-component systems. The compiled data are avail-able at our website (http://ecoli.aist-nara.ac.jp/xp_analysis/ 2_components). PMID:12366850

  12. Genetic Analysis of Cold-Sensitive Ribosome Maturation Mutants of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Bryant, Robert E.; Sypherd, Paul S.

    1974-01-01

    Four cold-sensitive mutants of Escherichia coli, which have defects in the maturation of the 50S ribosomal subunit, were isolated. Each of the mutations was shown to map at a different locus. The loci were assigned the name rim (ribosome maturation) and were shown to map as follows: rimA is co-transduced with ilvD and with pyrE; rimB is co-transduced with aroD; conjugation experiments limited rimD to a region between ilv and malB, and conjugation experiments limited rimC to the 22 to 30 min region of the chromosome. In merodiploids heterozygous for rimA, rimB, or rimD, the wild-type allele was shown to be dominant to the mutant allele. The observation that the rim loci lie outside the strA region and separate from each other, as well as the recessive character of the rim loci, suggests that the mutants may be defective in ribosome maturation factors rather than being defective in ribosomal structural proteins. PMID:4591943

  13. Isolation of Mutants of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Protease Based on the Toxicity of the Enzyme in Escherichia coli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baum, Ellen Z.; Bebernitz, Geraldine A.; Gluzman, Yakov

    1990-07-01

    The protease encoded by the pol gene of human immunodeficiency virus was expressed in Escherichia coli and found to be toxic to strain BL21(DE3). This toxicity provided a convenient selection for isolating mutants of the protease that are nontoxic and enzymatically inactive. This strong correlation between functional protease and toxicity resulted in rapid identification of several protease mutations, including mutations that exhibit temperature sensitivity. A total of 24 missense mutations and 7 nonsense mutations were identified. The described selection procedure may have wider applications for isolating mutants of other eukaryotic proteins that exhibit a toxic phenotype in E. coli.

  14. Enhanced Biofilm Formation by Escherichia coli LPS Mutants Defective in Hep Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Nakao, Ryoma; Ramstedt, Madeleine; Wai, Sun Nyunt; Uhlin, Bernt Eric

    2012-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is the major component of the surface of Gram-negative bacteria and its polysaccharide portion is situated at the outermost region. We investigated the relationship between the polysaccharide portion of LPS and biofilm formation using a series of Escherichia coli mutants defective in genes earlier shown to affect the LPS sugar compositions. Biofilm formation by a deep rough LPS mutant, the hldE strain, was strongly enhanced in comparison with the parental strain and other LPS mutants. The hldE strain also showed a phenotype of increased auto-aggregation and stronger cell surface hydrophobicity compared to the wild-type. Similar results were obtained with another deep rough LPS mutant, the waaC strain whose LPS showed same molecular mass as that of the hldE strain. Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) analysis and biofilm formation assay using DNase I revealed that biofilm formation by the hldE strain was dependent on extracellular DNA. Furthermore, a loss of flagella and an increase in amount of outer membrane vesicles in case of the hldE strain were also observed by transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy, respectively. In addition, we demonstrated that a mutation in the hldE locus, which alters the LPS structure, caused changes in both expression and properties of several surface bacterial factors involved in biofilm formation and virulence. We suggest that the implication of these results should be considered in the context of biofilm formation on abiotic surfaces, which is frequently associated with nosocominal infections such as the catheter-associated infections. PMID:23284671

  15. Enhanced biofilm formation by Escherichia coli LPS mutants defective in Hep biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Nakao, Ryoma; Ramstedt, Madeleine; Wai, Sun Nyunt; Uhlin, Bernt Eric

    2012-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is the major component of the surface of Gram-negative bacteria and its polysaccharide portion is situated at the outermost region. We investigated the relationship between the polysaccharide portion of LPS and biofilm formation using a series of Escherichia coli mutants defective in genes earlier shown to affect the LPS sugar compositions. Biofilm formation by a deep rough LPS mutant, the hldE strain, was strongly enhanced in comparison with the parental strain and other LPS mutants. The hldE strain also showed a phenotype of increased auto-aggregation and stronger cell surface hydrophobicity compared to the wild-type. Similar results were obtained with another deep rough LPS mutant, the waaC strain whose LPS showed same molecular mass as that of the hldE strain. Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) analysis and biofilm formation assay using DNase I revealed that biofilm formation by the hldE strain was dependent on extracellular DNA. Furthermore, a loss of flagella and an increase in amount of outer membrane vesicles in case of the hldE strain were also observed by transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy, respectively. In addition, we demonstrated that a mutation in the hldE locus, which alters the LPS structure, caused changes in both expression and properties of several surface bacterial factors involved in biofilm formation and virulence. We suggest that the implication of these results should be considered in the context of biofilm formation on abiotic surfaces, which is frequently associated with nosocominal infections such as the catheter-associated infections.

  16. Binding to sulfatide and enterotoxicity of various Escherichia coli STb mutants.

    PubMed

    Labrie, V; Beausoleil, H E; Harel, J; Dubreuil, J D

    2001-11-01

    Binding of the 48 amino acid polypeptide of the mature heat-stable Escherichia coli enterotoxin b (STb) to the functional receptor sulfatide (SFT) constitutes the first step in inducing secretory diarrhoea in the intestinal lumen of animals. The NMR structure of this toxin dictated the choice of amino acids for site-directed mutagenesis to delineate the binding site of STb to SFT. Amino acids facing the solvent either in the loop or the hydrophobic alpha-helix were selected. Seventeen site-specific mutants of STb toxin were produced and purified by high-pressure liquid chromatography. Enterotoxicity of the 17 mutants was determined using a rat loop assay and binding was evaluated using a microtitre plate binding assay. Both hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions are important for STb attachment. When mutations (F37K, I41S and M42S) were introduced into the hydrophobic alpha-helix to lessen hydrophobicity, binding activity and enterotoxicity decreased by more than sixfold. The loop defined by C21 and C36 also made specific contributions. Mutants generated at basic residues (K22, K23 and R29) within this region exhibited both reduced binding activities and reduced toxic activities. For all STb mutants constructed and analysed, when binding to SFT was reduced, a reduction in toxicity equivalent or greater was noted, indicating that binding to SFT is a step that precedes the toxic effect observed for STb toxin. Significantly, when the negatively charged D30 was substituted for either alanine or valine, the binding to SFT was about twice that of native STb, whereas the enterotoxicity was reduced by half.

  17. Isolation and Characterization of Nonchemotactic CheZ Mutants of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Boesch, Kristin C.; Silversmith, Ruth E.; Bourret, Robert B.

    2000-01-01

    The Escherichia coli CheZ protein stimulates dephosphorylation of CheY, a response regulator in the chemotaxis signal transduction pathway, by an unknown mechanism. Genetic analysis of CheZ has lagged behind biochemical and biophysical characterization. To identify putative regions of functional importance in CheZ, we subjected cheZ to random mutagenesis and isolated 107 nonchemotactic CheZ mutants. Missense mutations clustered in six regions of cheZ, whereas nonsense and frameshift mutations were scattered reasonably uniformly across the gene. Intragenic complementation experiments showed restoration of swarming activity when compatible plasmids containing genes for the truncated CheZ1–189 peptide and either CheZA65V, CheZL90S, or CheZD143G were both present, implying the existence of at least two independent functional domains in each chain of the CheZ dimer. Six mutant CheZ proteins, one from each cluster of loss-of-function missense mutations, were purified and characterized biochemically. All of the tested mutant proteins were defective in their ability to dephosphorylate CheY-P, with activities ranging from 0.45 to 16% of that of wild-type CheZ. There was good correlation between the phosphatase activity of CheZ and the ability to form large chemically cross-linked complexes with CheY in the presence of the CheY phosphodonor acetyl phosphate. In consideration of both the genetic and biochemical data, the most severe functional impairments in this set of CheZ mutants seemed to be concentrated in regions which are located in a proposed large N-terminal domain of the CheZ protein. PMID:10852888

  18. Characterization of Escherichia coli Flagellar Mutants That are Insensitive to Catabolite Repression

    PubMed Central

    Silverman, Michael; Simon, Melvin

    1974-01-01

    In Escherichia coli, the synthesis of the flagellar organelle is sensitive to catabolite repression. Synthesis requires the presence of the cyclic adenosine monophosphate receptor protein (Crp) and 3′,5′-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP); i.e., mutants that lack Crp or adenylcyclase (Cya) synthesize no flagella. We isolated and characterized a series of mutants (cfs) that restored flagella-forming ability in a Crp strain of E. coli. The mutations in these strains were transferred onto episomes and they were then introduced into a variety of other strains. The presence of the mutation resulted in flagella synthesis in Cya and Crp strains as well as in the wild type grown under conditions of catabolite repression. Deletion analysis and other genetic studies indicated that: (i) the cfs mutations had a dominant effect when they were in the transconfiguration in merodiploids: (ii) they occurred in or very close to the flaI gene: and (iii) their expression required the presence of an intact flaI gene adjacent to the cfs mutation. Biochemical studies showed that the synthesis of at least two flagellar polypeptides, the hook subunit and an amber fragment of flagellin, were absent in strains that carried a cya mutation. Their synthesis was depressed in strains grown under conditions of catabolite repression. The presence of the cfs mutation restored the specific synthesis of these two polypeptides. We suggest that the formation of the flaI gene product is the step in flagellar synthesis that is catabolite sensitive and requires cAMP. We propose a regulatory function for the product of the flaI gene. Images PMID:4373438

  19. Proteomic analysis of beryllium-induced genotoxicity in an Escherichia coli mutant model system.

    PubMed

    Taylor-McCabe, Kirsten J; Wang, Zaolin; Sauer, Nancy N; Marrone, Babetta L

    2006-03-01

    Beryllium is the second lightest metal, has a high melting point and high strength-to-weight ratio, and is chemically stable. These unique chemical characteristics make beryllium metal an ideal choice as a component material for a wide variety of applications in aerospace, defense, nuclear weapons, and industry. However, inhalation of beryllium dust or fumes induces significant health effects, including chronic beryllium disease and lung cancer. In this study, the mutagenicity of beryllium sulfate (BeSO(4)) and the comutagenicity of beryllium with a known mutagen 1-methyl-3-nitro-1-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) were evaluated using a forward mutant detection system developed in Escherichia coli. In this system, BeSO(4) was shown to be weakly mutagenic alone and significantly enhanced the mutagenicity of MNNG up to 3.5-fold over MNNG alone. Based on these results a proteomic study was conducted to identify the proteins regulated by BeSO(4). Using the techniques of 2-DE and oMALDI-TOF MS, we successfully identified 32 proteins being differentially regulated by beryllium and/or MNNG in the E. coli test system. This is the first study to describe the proteins regulated by beryllium in vitro, and the results suggest several potential pathways for the focus of further research into the mechanisms underlying beryllium-induced genotoxicity. PMID:16447159

  20. Fluorescent Trimethoprim Conjugate Probes To Assess Drug Accumulation in Wild Type and Mutant Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Reduced susceptibility to antimicrobials in Gram-negative bacteria may result from multiple resistance mechanisms, including increased efflux pump activity or reduced porin protein expression. Up-regulation of the efflux pump system is closely associated with multidrug resistance (MDR). To help investigate the role of efflux pumps on compound accumulation, a fluorescence-based assay was developed using fluorescent derivatives of trimethoprim (TMP), a broad-spectrum synthetic antibiotic that inhibits an intracellular target, dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR). Novel fluorescent TMP probes inhibited eDHFR activity with comparable potency to TMP, but did not kill or inhibit growth of wild type Escherichia coli. However, bactericidal activity was observed against an efflux pump deficient E. coli mutant strain (ΔtolC). A simple and quick fluorescence assay was developed to measure cellular accumulation of the TMP probe using either fluorescence spectroscopy or flow cytometry, with validation by LC-MS/MS. This fluorescence assay may provide a simple method to assess efflux pump activity with standard laboratory equipment. PMID:27737551

  1. Microdosimetric considerations of effects of heavy ions on E. coli K-12 mutants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, T.; Yatagai, F.; Izumo, K.

    1992-09-01

    The inactivation cross sections of E. coli K-12 recombination-deficient mutants, JC1553 (recA) and AB2470 (recB), for several MeV/u α-particles and N ions have been successfully analyzed by Katz's target theory in which radiosensitivity parameter E0 is assumed to be LET independent and equal to D37 for gamma-rays. For E. coli K-12 wild type, AB1157 (rec+, uvr+), however, it is impossible to interpret the inactivation cross section data by an LET independent E0-value. In the latter case, as in the case of B. subtilis spore, it is necessary to assume that the radiosensitivity of the target for the core of a heavy ion is higher than that for δ-electrons. As well as Waligorski, Hamm and Katz's dose, the dose around the trajectory of an ion based on Tabata and Ito's energy deposition algorithm for electrons has been used in the course of analysis.

  2. Functional and immunochemical characterization of a mutant of Escherichia coli energy uncoupled for lactose transport

    SciTech Connect

    Herzlinger, D.; Carrasco, N.; Kaback, H.R.

    1985-01-01

    Right-side-out cytoplasmic membrane vesicles from Escherichia coli ML 308-22, a mutant ''uncoupled'' for beta-galactoside/H/sup +/ symport are specifically defective in the ability to catalyze accumulation of methyl 1-thio-beta-D-galactopyranoside (TMG) in the presence of an H/sup +/ electrochemical gradient (interior negative and alkaline). Furthermore, the rate of carrier-mediated efflux under nonenergized conditions is slow and unaffected by ambient pH from pH 5.5 to 7.5, and TMG-induced H/sup +/ influx is only about 15% of that observed in vesicles containing wild-type lac permease (ML 308-225). Alternatively, ML 308-22 vesicles bind p-nitrophenyl alpha-D-galactopyranoside and monoclonal antibody 4B1 to the same extent as ML 308-225 vesicles and catalyze facilitated diffusion and equilibrium exchange as well as ML 308-225 vesicles. When entrance counterflow is studied with external substrate at saturating and subsaturating concentrations, it is apparent that the mutation simulates the effects of deuterium oxide. That is, the mutation has no effect on the rate or extent of counterflow when external substrate is saturating but stimulates the efficiency of counterflow when external substrate is below the apparent K/sub m/. Moreover, although replacement of protium with deuterium stimulates counterflow in ML 308-225 vesicles when external substrate is subsaturating, the isotope has no effect on the mutant vesicles under the same conditions.

  3. Effects of ciprofloxacin on plasmid DNA supercoiling of Escherichia coli topoisomerase I and gyrase mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Aleixandre, V; Herrera, G; Urios, A; Blanco, M

    1991-01-01

    Changes in plasmid DNA supercoiling were measured following treatment of Escherichia coli cells, carrying topoisomerase mutations, with the quinolone ciprofloxacin. In quinolone-susceptible cells (top+ gyr+) as well as in topA mutants and in gyrB mutants, plasmid DNA was relaxed after the addition of ciprofloxacin. In cells partially resistant to quinolones, low ciprofloxacin levels led to an increase in negative superhelicity of plasmid DNA, whereas at higher ciprofloxacin concentrations, DNA became relaxed. Cells exhibiting partial resistance to quinolones carried either a gyrA mutation alone or a combination of gyrA and gyrB mutations. Moreover, they showed a reduction in gyrase activity, indicated by the supercoiling of a reporter plasmid. Therefore, we conclude that a low level of quinolone action and a DNA with a lower-than-normal level of superhelicity are the two essential conditions for obtaining a ciprofloxacin-promoted increase in plasmid DNA supercoiling. In contrast, deficiency in topoisomerase I is not required for this effect. Images PMID:1849710

  4. Plaque color method for rapid isolation of novel recA mutants of Escherichia coli K-12: new classes of protease-constitutive recA mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Tessman, E S; Peterson, P

    1985-01-01

    As a prerequisite to mutational analysis of functional sites on the RecA protein of Escherichia coli, a method was developed for rapid isolation of recA mutants with altered RecA protease function. The method involves plating mutagenized lambda recA+ cI ind on strains deleted for recA and containing, as indicators of RecA protease activity, Mu d(Ap lac) fusions in RecA-inducible genes. The lambda recA phages were recognized by their altered plaque colors, and the RecA protease activity of the lambda recA mutant lysogens was measured by expression of beta-galactosidase from dinD::lac. One class of recA mutants had constitutive protease activity and was designated Prtc; in these cells the RecA protein was always in the protease form without the usual need for DNA damage to activate it. Some Prtc mutants were recombinase negative and were designated Prtc Rec-. Another class of 65 recA mutants isolated as being protease defective were all also recombinase defective. Unlike the original temperature-dependent Prtc Rec+ mutant (recA441), the new Prtc Rec+ mutants showed constitutive protease activity at any growth temperature, with some having considerably greater activity than the recA441 strain. Study of these strong Prtc Rec+ mutants revealed a new SOS phenomenon, increased permeability to drugs. Use of this new SOS phenomenon as an index of protease strength clearly distinguished 5 Prtc mutants as the strongest among 150. These five strongest Prtc mutants showed the greatest increase in spontaneous mutation frequency and were not inhibited by cytidine plus guanosine, which inhibited the constitutive protease activity of the recA441 strain and of all the other new Prtc mutants. Strong Prtc Rec+ mutants were more UV resistant than recA+ strains and showed indications of having RecA proteins whose specific activity of recombinase function was higher than that of wild-type RecA. A Prt+ Rec- mutant with an anomalous response to effectors is described. PMID:3160686

  5. Mutant prevention concentration of orbifloxacin: comparison between Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Staphylococcus pseudintermedius of canine origin

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The mutant prevention concentration (MPC) is an important parameter to evaluate the likelihood of growth of fluoroquinolone-resistant mutants for antimicrobial-pathogen combinations. The MPCs of fluoroquinolones for different canine pathogens have not been compared. In this study, we compared for the first time orbifloxacin MPCs between susceptible strains of Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Staphylococcus pseudintermedius of canine origin. Methods More than 1010 CFU/ml of 10 strains of each bacterial species were inoculated onto Muller-Hinton agar supplemented with different concentrations of orbifloxacin from 1× to 64× minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and the MPCs were recorded. MICs of original strains and of mutants arising after exposure to sub-MPC concentrations (one per original strain) were determined in the presence or absence of efflux pump inhibitors (EPIs). The effects of quinolone resistance-determining region (QRDR) mutations were also examined. Results MPCs were significantly higher for P. aeruginosa (16–128 μg/ml) than for E. coli (0.5–32 μg/ml). MPCs for S. pseudintermedius varied between the low-susceptible (16–128 μg/ml) and the high-susceptible strains (4–16 μg/ml) and were the most broadly distributed among the three species. Regarding resistance mechanisms, only one QRDR mutation in gyrA was found in all of the 10 mutants of E. coli and in 4 of the 10 mutants of P. aeruginosa, whereas mutations in both grlA and gyrA were found in 3 mutants and one mutation in grlA was found in 2 mutants among the 10 mutants of S. pseudintermedius. In the presence of an EPI, the MICs of P. aeruginosa mutants decreased markedly, those of E. coli mutants decreased moderately, and those of S. pseudintermedius mutants were unaffected. Conclusions MPCs of orbifloxacin vary between bacterial species of canine pathogens, possibly due to the diversity of the main fluoroquinolone resistance mechanism among these species

  6. Sub-optimal phenotypes of double-knockout mutants of Escherichia coli depend on the order of gene deletions.

    PubMed

    Gawand, Pratish; Said Abukar, Fatumina; Venayak, Naveen; Partow, Siavash; Motter, Adilson E; Mahadevan, Radhakrishnan

    2015-08-01

    Metabolic networks are characterized by multiple redundant reactions that do not have a clear biological function. The redundancies in the metabolic networks are implicated in adaptation to random mutations and survival under different environmental conditions. Reactions that are not active under wild-type growth conditions, but get transiently activated after a mutation event such as gene deletion are known as latent reactions. Characterization of multiple-gene knockout mutants can identify the physiological roles of latent reactions. In this study, we characterized double-gene deletion mutants of E. coli with the aim of investigating the sub-optimal physiology of the mutants and the possible roles of latent reactions. Specifically, we investigated the effects of the deletion of the glyoxylate-shunt gene aceA (encoding a latent reaction enzyme, isocitrate lyase) on the growth characteristics of the mutant E. coli Δpgi. The deletion of aceA reduced the growth rate of E. coli Δpgi, indicating that the activation of the glyoxylate shunt plays an important role in adaptation of the mutant E. coli Δpgi when no other latent reactions are concurrently inactivated. We also investigated the effect of the order of the gene deletions on the growth rates and substrate uptake rates of the double-gene deletion mutants. The results indicate that the order in which genes are deleted determines the phenotype of the mutants during the sub-optimal growth phase. To elucidate the mechanism behind the difference between the observed phenotypes, we carried out transcriptomic analysis and constraint-based modeling of the mutants. Transcriptomic analysis showed differential expression of the gene aceK (encoding the protein isocitrate dehydrogenase kinase) involved in controlling the isocitrate flux through the TCA cycle and the glyoxylate shunt. Higher acetate production in the E. coli ΔaceA1 Δpgi2 mutant was consistent with the increased aceK expression, which limits the TCA cycle

  7. Altered cobalamin metabolism in Escherichia coli btuR mutants affects btuB gene regulation.

    PubMed Central

    Lundrigan, M D; Kadner, R J

    1989-01-01

    Synthesis of the Escherichia coli outer membrane protein BtuB, which mediates the binding and transport of vitamin B12, is repressed when cells are grown in the presence of vitamin B12. Expression of btuB-lacZ fusions was also found to be repressed, and selection for constitutive production of beta-galactosidase in the presence of vitamin B12 yielded mutations at btuR. The btuR locus, at 27.9 min on the chromosome map, was isolated on a 952-base-pair EcoRV fragment, and its nucleotide sequence was determined. The BtuR protein was identified in maxicells as a 22,000-dalton polypeptide, as predicted from the nucleotide sequence. Strains mutant at btuR had negligible pools of adenosylcobalamin but did convert vitamin B12 into other derivatives. Although btuB expression in a btuR strain could not be repressed by cyano- or methylcobalamin, it was repressed by adenosylcobalamin. Growth on ethanolamine as the sole nitrogen source requires adenosylcobalamin. btuR mutants grew on ethanolamine but were affected in the length of the lag period before initiation of growth, which suggested that an alternative route for adenosylcobalamin synthesis might exist. No mutations were found that conferred constitutive btuB expression in the presence of adenosylcobalamin. Other genes near btuR may also be involved in cobalamin metabolism, as suggested from the complementation behavior of strains generated by excision of the Tn10 element in btuR. These results indicated that the btuR product is involved in the metabolism of adenosylcobalamin and that this cofactor, or some derivative, controls btuB expression. Images PMID:2644187

  8. An Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 missense mutant colonizes the streptomycin-treated mouse intestine better than the wild type but is not a better probiotic.

    PubMed

    Adediran, Jimmy; Leatham-Jensen, Mary P; Mokszycki, Matthew E; Frimodt-Møller, Jakob; Krogfelt, Karen A; Kazmierczak, Krystyna; Kenney, Linda J; Conway, Tyrrell; Cohen, Paul S

    2014-02-01

    Previously we reported that the streptomycin-treated mouse intestine selected for two different Escherichia coli MG1655 mutants with improved colonizing ability: nonmotile E. coli MG1655 flhDC deletion mutants that grew 15% faster in vitro in mouse cecal mucus and motile E. coli MG1655 envZ missense mutants that grew slower in vitro in mouse cecal mucus yet were able to cocolonize with the faster-growing flhDC mutants. The E. coli MG1655 envZ gene encodes a histidine kinase that is a member of the envZ-ompR two-component signal transduction system, which regulates outer membrane protein profiles. In the present investigation, the envZP41L gene was transferred from the intestinally selected E. coli MG1655 mutant to E. coli Nissle 1917, a human probiotic strain used to treat gastrointestinal infections. Both the E. coli MG1655 and E. coli Nissle 1917 strains containing envZP41L produced more phosphorylated OmpR than their parents. The E. coli Nissle 1917 strain containing envZP41L also became more resistant to bile salts and colicin V and grew 50% slower in vitro in mucus and 15% to 30% slower on several sugars present in mucus, yet it was a 10-fold better colonizer than E. coli Nissle 1917. However, E. coli Nissle 1917 envZP41L was not better at preventing colonization by enterohemorrhagic E. coli EDL933. The data can be explained according to our "restaurant" hypothesis for commensal E. coli strains, i.e., that they colonize the intestine as sessile members of mixed biofilms, obtaining the sugars they need for growth locally, but compete for sugars with invading E. coli pathogens planktonically. PMID:24478082

  9. An Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 missense mutant colonizes the streptomycin-treated mouse intestine better than the wild type but is not a better probiotic.

    PubMed

    Adediran, Jimmy; Leatham-Jensen, Mary P; Mokszycki, Matthew E; Frimodt-Møller, Jakob; Krogfelt, Karen A; Kazmierczak, Krystyna; Kenney, Linda J; Conway, Tyrrell; Cohen, Paul S

    2014-02-01

    Previously we reported that the streptomycin-treated mouse intestine selected for two different Escherichia coli MG1655 mutants with improved colonizing ability: nonmotile E. coli MG1655 flhDC deletion mutants that grew 15% faster in vitro in mouse cecal mucus and motile E. coli MG1655 envZ missense mutants that grew slower in vitro in mouse cecal mucus yet were able to cocolonize with the faster-growing flhDC mutants. The E. coli MG1655 envZ gene encodes a histidine kinase that is a member of the envZ-ompR two-component signal transduction system, which regulates outer membrane protein profiles. In the present investigation, the envZP41L gene was transferred from the intestinally selected E. coli MG1655 mutant to E. coli Nissle 1917, a human probiotic strain used to treat gastrointestinal infections. Both the E. coli MG1655 and E. coli Nissle 1917 strains containing envZP41L produced more phosphorylated OmpR than their parents. The E. coli Nissle 1917 strain containing envZP41L also became more resistant to bile salts and colicin V and grew 50% slower in vitro in mucus and 15% to 30% slower on several sugars present in mucus, yet it was a 10-fold better colonizer than E. coli Nissle 1917. However, E. coli Nissle 1917 envZP41L was not better at preventing colonization by enterohemorrhagic E. coli EDL933. The data can be explained according to our "restaurant" hypothesis for commensal E. coli strains, i.e., that they colonize the intestine as sessile members of mixed biofilms, obtaining the sugars they need for growth locally, but compete for sugars with invading E. coli pathogens planktonically.

  10. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray studies of native and mutant intimin from enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Yong; Gao, Feng; Mao, Xuhu; Xiao, Ming; Luo, Ping; Qi, Jianxun; Guo, Gang; Jing, Hua; Cui, Yan; Zou, Quanming

    2011-01-01

    Enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) O157:H7 is a primarily food-borne bacterial pathogen that is capable of causing life-threatening human infections and poses a serious challenge to public health worldwide. The bacterial outer-membrane protein intimin plays a key role in the initiation process of EHEC infection. In this study, intimin from EHEC O157:H7 (Int188) and its N916Y mutant (IntN916Y) were purified and crystals of both were obtained using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method at 291 K. Data were collected from Int188 and IntN916Y crystals to 2.8 and 2.6 Å resolution, respectively. The crystal of Int188 belonged to the orthorhombic space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 235.16, b = 44.81, c = 129.12 Å, α = γ = 90, β = 97.53°. The crystal of IntN916Y belonged to space group P212121, with unit-cell parameters a = 43.78, b = 92.49, c = 100.05 Å, α = β = γ = 90°. PMID:21206020

  11. Functional complementation of Leishmania (Leishmania) amazonensis AP endonuclease gene (lamap) in Escherichia coli mutant strains challenged with DNA damage agents

    PubMed Central

    Verissimo-Villela, Erika; Kitahara-Oliveira, Milene Yoko; dos Reis, Ana Beatriz de Bragança; Albano, Rodolpho Mattos; Da-Cruz, Alda Maria; Bello, Alexandre Ribeiro

    2016-01-01

    During its life cycle Leishmania spp. face several stress conditions that can cause DNA damages. Base Excision Repair plays an important role in DNA maintenance and it is one of the most conserved mechanisms in all living organisms. DNA repair in trypanosomatids has been reported only for Old World Leishmania species. Here the AP endonuclease from Leishmania (L.) amazonensis was cloned, expressed in Escherichia coli mutants defective on the DNA repair machinery, that were submitted to different stress conditions, showing ability to survive in comparison to the triple null mutant parental strain BW535. Phylogenetic and multiple sequence analyses also confirmed that LAMAP belongs to the AP endonuclease class of proteins. PMID:27223868

  12. Chromosomal Fragmentation in "Escherichia Coli": Its Absence in "mutT" Mutants and Its Mechanisms in "seqA" Mutants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rotman, Ella Rose

    2009-01-01

    Chromosomal fragmentation in "Escherichia coli" is a lethal event for the cell unless mended by the recombinational repair proteins RecA, RecBCD, and RuvABC. Certain mutations exacerbate problems that cause the cell to be dependent on the recombinational repair proteins for viability. We tested whether the absence of the MutT protein caused…

  13. Expression of Echmr gene from Eichhornia offers multiple stress tolerance to Cd sensitive Escherichia coli Δgsh mutants.

    PubMed

    Thapa, G; Das, D; Gunupuru, L R

    2016-09-01

    The detoxification of heavy metals frequently involves conjugation to glutathione prior to compartmentalization and eflux in higher plants. We have expressed a heavy metal stress responsive (Echmr) gene from water hyacinth, which conferred tolerance to Cd sensitive Escherichia coli Δgsh mutants against heavy metals and abiotic stresses. The recombinant E. coli Δgsh mutant cells showed better growth recovery and survival than control cells under Cd (200 μM), Pb(200 μM), heat shock (50 °C), cold stress at 4 °C for 4 h, and UV-B (20 min) exposure. The enhanced expression of Echmr gene revealed by northern analysis during above stresses further advocates its role in multi-stress tolerance. Heterologous expression of EcHMR from Eichhornia rescued Cd(2+) sensitive E. coli mutants from Cd(2+) toxicity and induced better recovery post abiotic stresses. This may suggests a possible role of Echmr in Cd(II) and desiccation tolerance in plants for enhanced stress response. PMID:27457806

  14. A mutant screen reveals RNase E as a silencer of group II intron retromobility in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Coros, Colin J.; Piazza, Carol Lyn; Chalamcharla, Venkata R.; Belfort, Marlene

    2008-01-01

    Group II introns are mobile retroelements that invade their hosts. The Lactococcus lactis group II intron recruits cellular polymerases, nucleases, and DNA ligase to complete the retromobility process in Escherichia coli. Here we describe a genetic screen with a Tn5 transposon library to identify other E. coli functions involved in retromobility of the L. lactis LtrB intron. Thirteen disruptions that reproducibly resulted in increased or decreased retrohoming levels into the E. coli chromosome were isolated. These functions were classified as factors involved in RNA processing, DNA replication, energy metabolism, and global regulation. Here we characterize a novel mutant in the rne promoter region, which regulates RNase E expression. Retrohoming and retrotransposition levels are elevated in the rne∷Tn5 mutant. The stimulatory effect of the mutation on retromobility results from intron RNA accumulation in the RNase E mutant. These results suggest that RNase E, which is the central component of the RNA degradosome, could regulate retrohoming levels in response to cellular physiology. PMID:18945808

  15. Synthesis of outer membrane proteins in cpxA cpxB mutants of Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed Central

    McEwen, J; Sambucetti, L; Silverman, P M

    1983-01-01

    Two major proteins, the murein lipoprotein and the OmpF matrix porin, are deficient in the outer membrane of cpxA cpxB mutants of Escherichia coli K-12. We present evidence that the cpx mutations prevent or retard the translocation of these proteins to the outer membrane. The mutations had no effect on the rate of lipoprotein synthesis. Mutant cells labeled for 5 min with radioactive arginine accumulated as much lipoprotein as otherwise isogenic cpxA+ cpxB+ cells. This lipoprotein accumulated as such; no material synthesized in mutant cells and reactive with antilipoprotein antibodies had the electrophoretic mobility of prolipoprotein. Hence, the initial stages of prolipoprotein insertion into the inner membrane leading to its cleavage to lipoprotein appeared normal. However, after a long labeling interval, mutant cells were deficient in free lipoprotein and lacked lipoprotein covalently bound to peptidoglycan, suggesting that little if any of the lipoprotein synthesized in mutant cells reaches the outer membrane. Immunoreactive OmpF protein could also be detected in extracts of mutant cells labeled for 5 min, but the amount that accumulated was severalfold less in mutant cells than in cpxA+ cpxB+ cells. Analysis of beta-galactosidase synthesis from ompF-lacZ fusion genes showed this difference to be the result of a reduced rate of ompF transcription in mutant cells. Even so, little or none of the ompF protein synthesized in mutant cells was incorporated into the outer membrane. Images PMID:6339479

  16. Metastable regulation of type 1 piliation in Escherichia coli and isolation and characterization of a phenotypically stable mutant.

    PubMed Central

    Spears, P A; Schauer, D; Orndorff, P E

    1986-01-01

    Type 1 piliation in Escherichia coli exhibits phase variation due to the inversion of a small, ca. 300-base-pair, element that regulates pilA (fimA), the gene that encodes the structural subunit of pili (Abraham et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 82:5724-5727, 1985). We have used the inversion as an assay to characterize a stably piliated mutant. The mutant strain did not exhibit the pilA ON and pilA OFF colonial variants characteristic of the wild type; rather, every clone produced a level of pilA expression intermediate between ON and OFF wild-type populations. The mutant phenotype was conferred by a lesion at a previously undescribed locus between hemA and trpA, which we have termed pilG. Examination of the pilA promoter region in four pilG mutant populations indicated that the phenotypic stability conferred by the pilG mutation was not due to an inability to carry out the inversion. Rather, all pilG mutant populations consisted of approximately equal mixtures of ON and OFF individuals. We suggest that pilG mutants may undergo such rapid switching of the pilA promoter that populations exhibit an intermediate level of pilA expression and phenotypic stability. Images PMID:3019997

  17. Using student-generated UV-induced Escherichia coli mutants in a directed inquiry undergraduate genetics laboratory.

    PubMed

    Healy, Frank G; Livingstone, Kevin D

    2010-09-01

    We report a thematic sequence of directed inquiry-based labs taking students from bacterial mutagenesis and phenotypic identification of their own self-created mutant, through identification of mutated genes by biochemical testing, to verification of mutant alleles by complementation, and finally to mutant allele characterization by DNA sequence analysis. The lab utilizes UV mutagenesis with wild-type Escherichia coli and a UV-sensitive isogenic derivative optimized for undergraduate use. The labs take advantage of the simplicity of E. coli in a realistic genetic investigation using safe UV irradiation methods for creation and characterization of novel mutants. Assessment data collected over three offerings of the course suggest that the labs, which combine original investigation in a scientifically realistic intellectual environment with learned techniques and concepts, were instrumental in improving students' learning in a number of areas. These include the development of critical thinking skills and understanding of concepts and methods. Student responses also suggest the labs were helpful in improving students' understanding of the scientific process as a rational series of experimental investigations and awareness of the interdisciplinary nature of scientific inquiry.

  18. Using Student-Generated UV-Induced Escherichia coli Mutants in a Directed Inquiry Undergraduate Genetics Laboratory

    PubMed Central

    Healy, Frank G.; Livingstone, Kevin D.

    2010-01-01

    We report a thematic sequence of directed inquiry-based labs taking students from bacterial mutagenesis and phenotypic identification of their own self-created mutant, through identification of mutated genes by biochemical testing, to verification of mutant alleles by complementation, and finally to mutant allele characterization by DNA sequence analysis. The lab utilizes UV mutagenesis with wild-type Escherichia coli and a UV-sensitive isogenic derivative optimized for undergraduate use. The labs take advantage of the simplicity of E. coli in a realistic genetic investigation using safe UV irradiation methods for creation and characterization of novel mutants. Assessment data collected over three offerings of the course suggest that the labs, which combine original investigation in a scientifically realistic intellectual environment with learned techniques and concepts, were instrumental in improving students' learning in a number of areas. These include the development of critical thinking skills and understanding of concepts and methods. Student responses also suggest the labs were helpful in improving students' understanding of the scientific process as a rational series of experimental investigations and awareness of the interdisciplinary nature of scientific inquiry. PMID:20592259

  19. Cytotoxicity of lawsone and cytoprotective activity of antioxidants in catalase mutant Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Sauriasari, Rani; Wang, Da-Hong; Takemura, Yoko; Tsutsui, Ken; Masuoka, Noriyoshi; Sano, Kuniaki; Horita, Masako; Wang, Bing-Ling; Ogino, Keiki

    2007-06-01

    Lawsone is an active naphthoquinone derivative isolated from henna (Lawsonia inermis L.), a widely used hair dye. Previous study on the toxicity of lawsone remains unclear since the involvement of oxidative stress and the kind of ROS (reactive oxygen species) involved have not been fully resolved yet. This present study reports the cytotoxic effects of lawsone and henna. We carried out CAT assay (a zone of inhibition test of bacterial growth and colony-forming efficiency test of transformant Escherichia coli strains that express mammalian catalase gene derived from normal catalase mice (Cs(a)) and catalase-deficient mutant mice (Cs(b))), Ames mutagenicity assay and H(2)O(2) generation assay. Lawsone generated H(2)O(2) slightly in phosphate buffer system and was not mutagenic in Ames assay using TA 98, TA 100 and TA 102, both in the absence and presence of metabolic activation. Lawsone exposure inhibited the growth of both Cs(a) and Cs(b) strains in a dose-dependent manner. Mean zone diameter for Cs(a) was 9.75+/-0.96 mm and 12.75+/-1.5 mm for Cs(b). Natural henna leaves did not show toxic effects, whereas two out of four samples of marketed henna products were shown toxicity effects. Catalase abolished zone of inhibition (ZOI) of marketed henna products, eliminated ZOI of lawsone in a dose-dependent manner and low concentration of exogenous MnSOD and Cu/ZnSOD eliminated the toxicity. Histidine and DTPA, the metal chelator; BHA and low concentration of capsaicin, the inducer of NADH-quinone reductase, effectively protected Cs(a) and Cs(b) against lawsone in this study. We suggest that lawsone cytotoxicity is probably mediated, at least in part, by the release of O(2)(-), H(2)O(2) and OH(-). PMID:17442476

  20. Effect of Spermidine Analogues on Cell Growth of Escherichia coli Polyamine Requiring Mutant MA261

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Taketo; Sakamoto, Akihiko; Terui, Yusuke; Takao, Koichi; Sugita, Yoshiaki; Yamamoto, Kaneyoshi; Ishihama, Akira; Igarashi, Kazuei; Kashiwagi, Keiko

    2016-01-01

    The effects of spermidine analogues [norspermidine (NSPD, 33), spermidine (SPD, 34), homospermidine (HSPD, 44) and aminopropylcadaverine (APCAD, 35)] on cell growth were studied using Escherichia coli polyamine-requiring mutant MA261. Cell growth was compared at 32°C, 37°C, and 42°C. All four analogues were taken up mainly by the PotABCD spermidine-preferential uptake system. The degree of stimulation of cell growth at 32°C and 37°C was NSPD ≥ SPD ≥ HSPD > APCAD, and SPD ≥ HSPD ≥ NSPD > APCAD, respectively. However, at 42°C, it was HSPD » SPD > NSPD > APCAD. One reason for this is HSPD was taken up effectively compared with other triamines. In addition, since natural polyamines (triamines and teteraamines) interact mainly with RNA, and the structure of RNA is more flexible at higher temperatures, HSPD probably stabilized RNA more tightly at 42°C. We have thus far found that 20 kinds of protein syntheses are stimulated by polyamines at the translational level. Among them, synthesis of OppA, RpoE and StpA was more strongly stimulated by HSPD at 42°C than at 37°C. Stabilization of the initiation region of oppA and rpoE mRNA was tighter by HSPD at 42°C than 37°C determined by circular dichroism (CD). The degree of polyamine stimulation of OppA, RpoE and StpA synthesis by NSPD, SPD and APCAD was smaller than that by HSPD at 42°C. Thus, the degree of stimulation of cell growth by spermidine analogues at the different temperatures is dependent on the stimulation of protein synthesis by some components of the polyamine modulon. PMID:27434546

  1. Phase diagram of lipid A from Salmonella minnesota and Escherichia coli rough mutant lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Brandenburg, K; Koch, M H; Seydel, U

    1990-01-01

    We have reported here on the structural polymorphism of lipid A, the "endotoxic principle" of bacterial lipopolysaccharide. For lipid A of rough mutant lipopolysaccharide from Salmonella minnesota and Escherichia coli, the three-dimensional supramolecular structures were determined with x-ray diffraction utilizing synchrotron radiation. The investigations were performed in the water concentration range 10 to 95% by weight, at [lipid A]:[Mg2+] molar ratios from 1:0 to 0.1:1, and in the temperature range from 20 to 70 degrees C. These data were correlated with measurements of the beta----alpha phase behaviour which was monitored with differential scanning calorimetry and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. We found that the transition temperature of the acyl chains ranges--in the absence of Mg2(+)-from 45 degrees C at high to 56 degrees C at low water content, and-at an equimolar content of Mg2(+)-from 52 degrees C at high to 59 degrees C at low water concentrations. In the gel phase-in which the lipid A acyl chains are more disordered than those from saturated phospholipids-cubic phases are adopted at high water content (greater than 60%) and at high [lipid A]:[Mg2+] molar ratios. At low water contents, lamellar states are assumed exclusively. In the liquid crystalline state of lipid A, the hexagonal HII state is adopted under all conditions. The structural variability of lipid A is highest at high water concentrations, and structural changes may be induced by only slight changes in temperature, water content, and Mg2+ concentration. Under physiological conditions, however, the lipid A assemblies exhibit a strong preference to cubic structures.

  2. A mutant crp allele that differentially activates the operons of the fuc regulon in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Y; Lin, E C

    1988-05-01

    L-Fucose is used by Escherichia coli through an inducible pathway mediated by a fucP-encoded permease, a fucI-encoded isomerase, a fucK-encoded kinase, and a fucA-encoded aldolase. The adolase catalyzes the formation of dihydroxyacetone phosphate and L-lactaldehyde. Anaerobically, lactaldehyde is converted by a fucO-encoded oxidoreductase to L-1,2-propanediol, which is excreted. The fuc genes belong to a regulon comprising four linked operons: fucO, fucA, fucPIK, and fucR. The positive regulator encoded by fucR responds to fuculose 1-phosphate as the effector. Mutants serially selected for aerobic growth on propanediol became constitutive in fucO and fucA [fucO(Con) fucA(Con)], but noninducible in fucPIK [fucPIK(Non)]. An external suppressor mutation that restored growth on fucose caused constitutive expression of fucPIK. Results from this study indicate that this suppressor mutation occurred in crp, which encodes the cyclic AMP-binding (or receptor) protein. When the suppressor allele (crp-201) was transduced into wild-type strains, the recipient became fucose negative and fucose sensitive (with glycerol as the carbon and energy source) because of impaired expression of fucA. The fucPIK operon became hyperinducible. The growth rate on maltose was significantly reduced, but growth on L-rhamnose, D-galactose, L-arabinose, glycerol, or glycerol 3-phosphate was close to normal. Lysogenization of fuc+ crp-201 cells by a lambda bacteriophage bearing crp+ restored normal growth ability on fucose. In contrast, lysogenization of [fucO(Con)fucA(Con)fucPIK(Non)crp-201] cells by the same phage retarded their growth on fucose. PMID:2834341

  3. Mutations Affecting Potassium Import Restore the Viability of the Escherichia coli DNA Polymerase III holD Mutant

    PubMed Central

    Durand, Adeline

    2016-01-01

    Mutants lacking the ψ (HolD) subunit of the Escherichia coli DNA Polymerase III holoenzyme (Pol III HE) have poor viability, but a residual growth allows the isolation of spontaneous suppressor mutations that restore ΔholD mutant viability. Here we describe the isolation and characterization of two suppressor mutations in the trkA and trkE genes, involved in the main E. coli potassium import system. Viability of ΔholD trk mutants is abolished on media with low or high K+ concentrations, where alternative K+ import systems are activated, and is restored on low K+ concentrations by the inactivation of the alternative Kdp system. These findings show that the ΔholD mutant is rescued by a decrease in K+ import. The effect of trk inactivation is additive with the previously identified ΔholD suppressor mutation lexAind that blocks the SOS response indicating an SOS-independent mechanism of suppression. Accordingly, although lagging-strand synthesis is still perturbed in holD trkA mutants, the trkA mutation allows HolD-less Pol III HE to resist increased levels of the SOS-induced bypass polymerase DinB. trk inactivation is also partially additive with an ssb gene duplication, proposed to stabilize HolD-less Pol III HE by a modification of the single-stranded DNA binding protein (SSB) binding mode. We propose that lowering the intracellular K+ concentration stabilizes HolD-less Pol III HE on DNA by increasing electrostatic interactions between Pol III HE subunits, or between Pol III and DNA, directly or through a modification of the SSB binding mode; these three modes of action are not exclusive and could be additive. To our knowledge, the holD mutant provides the first example of an essential protein-DNA interaction that strongly depends on K+ import in vivo. PMID:27280472

  4. Development of a selection system for the detection of L-ribose isomerase expressing mutants of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    De Muynck, Cassandra; Van der Borght, Jef; De Mey, Marjan; De Maeseneire, Sofie L; Van Bogaert, Inge N A; Beauprez, Joeri; Soetaert, Wim; Vandamme, Erick

    2007-10-01

    L-Arabinose isomerase (E.C. 5.3.1.14) catalyzes the reversible isomerization between L-arabinose and L-ribulose and is highly selective towards L-arabinose. By using a directed evolution approach, enzyme variants with altered substrate specificity were created and screened in this research. More specifically, the screening was directed towards the identification of isomerase mutants with L-ribose isomerizing activity. Random mutagenesis was performed on the Escherichia coli L-arabinose isomerase gene (araA) by error-prone polymerase chain reaction to construct a mutant library. To enable screening of this library, a selection host was first constructed in which the mutant genes were transformed. In this selection host, the genes encoding for L-ribulokinase and L-ribulose-5-phosphate-4-epimerase were brought to constitutive expression and the gene encoding for the native L-arabinose isomerase was knocked out. L-Ribulokinase and L-ribulose-5-phosphate-4-epimerase are necessary to ensure the channeling of the formed product, L-ribulose, to the pentose phosphate pathway. Hence, the mutant clones could be screened on a minimal medium with L-ribose as the sole carbon source. Through the screening, two first-generation mutants were isolated, which expressed a small amount of L-ribose isomerase activity.

  5. Reduced LPS phosphorylation in Escherichia coli lowers the elevated ori/ter ratio in seqA mutants

    PubMed Central

    Rotman, Ella; Bratcher, Preston; Kuzminov, Andrei

    2009-01-01

    Summary The seqA defect in E. coli increases the ori/ter ratio and causes chromosomal fragmentation, making seqA mutants dependent on recombinational repair (the seqA recA co-lethality). To understand the nature of this chromosomal fragmentation, we characterized ΔseqA mutants and isolated suppressors of the ΔseqA recA lethality. We demonstrate that our ΔseqA alleles have normal function of the downstream pgm gene and normal ratios of the major phospholipids in the membranes, but increased surface lipopolysaccharide (LPS) phosphorylation. The predominant class of ΔseqA recA suppressors disrupts the rfaQGP genes, reducing phosphorylation of the inner core region of LPS. The rfaQGP suppressors also reduce the elevated ori/ter ratio of the ΔseqA mutants, but, unexpectedly, the suppressed mutants still exhibit the high levels of chromosomal fragmentation and SOS induction, characteristic of the ΔseqA mutants. We also found that co-lethality of rfaP with defects in the production of acidic phospholipids is suppressed by alternative initiation of chromosomal replication, suggesting that LPS phosphorylation stimulates replication initiation. The rfaQGP suppression of the seqA recA lethality provides genetic support for the surprising physical evidence that the oriC DNA forms complexes with the outer membrane. PMID:19432803

  6. ssb Gene Duplication Restores the Viability of ΔholC and ΔholD Escherichia coli Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Duigou, Stéphane; Silvain, Maud; Viguera, Enrique; Michel, Bénédicte

    2014-01-01

    The HolC-HolD (χψ) complex is part of the DNA polymerase III holoenzyme (Pol III HE) clamp-loader. Several lines of evidence indicate that both leading- and lagging-strand synthesis are affected in the absence of this complex. The Escherichia coli ΔholD mutant grows poorly and suppressor mutations that restore growth appear spontaneously. Here we show that duplication of the ssb gene, encoding the single-stranded DNA binding protein (SSB), restores ΔholD mutant growth at all temperatures on both minimal and rich medium. RecFOR-dependent SOS induction, previously shown to occur in the ΔholD mutant, is unaffected by ssb gene duplication, suggesting that lagging-strand synthesis remains perturbed. The C-terminal SSB disordered tail, which interacts with several E. coli repair, recombination and replication proteins, must be intact in both copies of the gene in order to restore normal growth. This suggests that SSB-mediated ΔholD suppression involves interaction with one or more partner proteins. ssb gene duplication also suppresses ΔholC single mutant and ΔholC ΔholD double mutant growth defects, indicating that it bypasses the need for the entire χψ complex. We propose that doubling the amount of SSB stabilizes HolCD-less Pol III HE DNA binding through interactions between SSB and a replisome component, possibly DnaE. Given that SSB binds DNA in vitro via different binding modes depending on experimental conditions, including SSB protein concentration and SSB interactions with partner proteins, our results support the idea that controlling the balance between SSB binding modes is critical for DNA Pol III HE stability in vivo, with important implications for DNA replication and genome stability. PMID:25329071

  7. Construction of Escherichia coli K-12 in-frame, single-gene knockout mutants: the Keio collection.

    PubMed

    Baba, Tomoya; Ara, Takeshi; Hasegawa, Miki; Takai, Yuki; Okumura, Yoshiko; Baba, Miki; Datsenko, Kirill A; Tomita, Masaru; Wanner, Barry L; Mori, Hirotada

    2006-01-01

    We have systematically made a set of precisely defined, single-gene deletions of all nonessential genes in Escherichia coli K-12. Open-reading frame coding regions were replaced with a kanamycin cassette flanked by FLP recognition target sites by using a one-step method for inactivation of chromosomal genes and primers designed to create in-frame deletions upon excision of the resistance cassette. Of 4288 genes targeted, mutants were obtained for 3985. To alleviate problems encountered in high-throughput studies, two independent mutants were saved for every deleted gene. These mutants-the 'Keio collection'-provide a new resource not only for systematic analyses of unknown gene functions and gene regulatory networks but also for genome-wide testing of mutational effects in a common strain background, E. coli K-12 BW25113. We were unable to disrupt 303 genes, including 37 of unknown function, which are candidates for essential genes. Distribution is being handled via GenoBase (http://ecoli.aist-nara.ac.jp/). PMID:16738554

  8. Polymorphic Variation in Susceptibility and Metabolism of Triclosan-Resistant Mutants of Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae Clinical Strains Obtained after Exposure to Biocides and Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Curiao, Tânia; Marchi, Emmanuela; Viti, Carlo; Oggioni, Marco R.; Baquero, Fernando; Martinez, José Luis

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to biocides may result in cross-resistance to other antimicrobials. Changes in biocide and antibiotic susceptibilities, metabolism, and fitness costs were studied here in biocide-selected Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae mutants. E. coli and K. pneumoniae mutants with various degrees of triclosan susceptibility were obtained after exposure to triclosan (TRI), benzalkonium chloride (BKC), chlorhexidine (CHX) or sodium hypochlorite (SHC), and ampicillin or ciprofloxacin. Alterations in antimicrobial susceptibility and metabolism in mutants were tested using Phenotype MicroArrays. The expression of AcrAB pump and global regulators (SoxR, MarA, and RamA) was measured by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR), and the central part of the fabI gene was sequenced. The fitness costs of resistance were assessed by a comparison of relative growth rates. Triclosan-resistant (TRIr) and triclosan-hypersusceptible (TRIhs) mutants of E. coli and K. pneumoniae were obtained after selection with biocides and/or antibiotics. E. coli TRIr mutants, including those with mutations in the fabI gene or in the expression of acrB, acrF, and marA, exhibited changes in susceptibility to TRI, CHX, and antibiotics. TRIr mutants for which the TRI MIC was high presented improved metabolism of carboxylic acids, amino acids, and carbohydrates. In TRIr mutants, resistance to one antimicrobial provoked hypersusceptibility to another one(s). TRIr mutants had fitness costs, particularly marA-overexpressing (E. coli) or ramA-overexpressing (K. pneumoniae) mutants. TRI, BKC, and CIP exposure frequently yielded TRIr mutants exhibiting alterations in AraC-like global regulators (MarA, SoxR, and RamA), AcrAB-TolC, and/or FabI, and influencing antimicrobial susceptibility, fitness, and metabolism. These various phenotypes suggest a trade-off of different selective processes shaping the evolution toward antibiotic/biocide resistance and influencing other adaptive traits. PMID

  9. Persistence of escherichia coli O157:H7 and its mutants in soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The persistence of Shiga toxin-producing E. coli O157:H7 in the environment poses a serious threat to public health. However, the role of Shiga toxins and other virulence factors in the survival of E. coli O157:H7 is poorly defined. The aim of this study was to determine if the virulence factors, st...

  10. Escherichia coli mutants defective in membrane phospholipid synthesis: binding and metabolism of 1-oleoylglycerol 3-phosphate by a plsB deep rough mutant.

    PubMed Central

    McIntyre, T M; Bell, R M

    1978-01-01

    Mutants of Escherichia coli containing a defective sn-glycerol 3-phosphate acyltransferase are conditionally defective in the synthesis of acylglycerol phosphate (acylglycerol-P). Incubation of a deep rough derivative of one of these plsB strains with 1-[3H]oleoylglycerol-32P resulted in the binding of up to 70 nmol of oleoylglycerol-P per 100 nmol of cellular phospholipid. The binding was dependent on time, oleoylglycerol-P concentration, and the quantity of cells employed. The rate and extent of oleoylglycerol-P binding was affected by the deep rough mutation. The altered phospholipid composition due to oleoylglycerol-P binding was without consequence on cell growth and viability, but caused the appearance of intracellular multilamellar structures. Use of the double-labeled oleoylglycerol P demonstrated that the entire molecule was bound to the cell. Intact [3H]-oleoylglycerol-32P was converted to phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphotidyl-glycerol at a rate about 40% of that of de novo phospholipid synthesis. These data demonstrate the transmembrane movement of oleoylglycerol-P to the inner surface of the cytoplasmic membrane and suggest that it may become possible to supplement plsB strains of E. coli with acylglycerol-P's. Images PMID:353031

  11. A cyclic AMP receptor protein mutant that constitutively activates an Escherichia coli promoter disrupted by an IS5 insertion.

    PubMed

    Podolny, V; Lin, E C; Hochschild, A

    1999-12-01

    Previously an Escherichia coli mutant that had acquired the ability to grow on propanediol as the sole carbon and energy source was isolated. This phenotype is the result of the constitutive expression of the fucO gene (in the fucAO operon), which encodes one of the enzymes in the fucose metabolic pathway. The mutant was found to bear an IS5 insertion in the intergenic regulatory region between the divergently oriented fucAO and fucPIK operons. Though expression of the fucAO operon was constitutive, the fucPIK operon became noninducible such that the mutant could no longer grow on fucose. A fucose-positive revertant which was found to contain a suppressor mutation in the crp gene was selected. Here we identify this crp mutation, which results in a single amino acid substitution (K52N) that has been proposed previously to uncover a cryptic activating region in the cyclic AMP receptor protein (CRP). We show that the mutant CRP constitutively activates transcription from both the IS5-disrupted and the wild-type fucPIK promoters, and we identify the CRP-binding site that is required for this activity. Our results show that the fucPIK promoter, a complex promoter which ordinarily depends on both CRP and the fucose-specific regulator FucR for its activation, can be activated in the absence of FucR by a mutant CRP that uses three, rather than two, activating regions to contact RNA polymerase. For the IS5-disrupted promoter, which retains a single CRP-binding site, the additional activating region of the mutant CRP evidently compensates for the lack of upstream regulatory sequences. PMID:10601201

  12. Phenotype microarray analysis of Escherichia coli K-12 mutants with deletions of all two-component systems.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Lu; Lei, Xiang-He; Bochner, Barry R; Wanner, Barry L

    2003-08-01

    Two-component systems are the most common mechanism of transmembrane signal transduction in bacteria. A typical system consists of a histidine kinase and a partner response regulator. The histidine kinase senses an environmental signal, which it transmits to its partner response regulator via a series of autophosphorylation, phosphotransfer, and dephosphorylation reactions. Much work has been done on particular systems, including several systems with regulatory roles in cellular physiology, communication, development, and, in the case of bacterial pathogens, the expression of genes important for virulence. We used two methods to investigate two-component regulatory systems in Escherichia coli K-12. First, we systematically constructed mutants with deletions of all two-component systems by using a now-standard technique of gene disruption (K. A. Datsenko and B. L. Wanner, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 97:6640-6645, 2000). We then analyzed these deletion mutants with a new technology called Phenotype MicroArrays, which permits assays of nearly 2,000 growth phenotypes simultaneously. In this study we tested 100 mutants, including mutants with individual deletions of all two-component systems and several related genes, including creBC-regulated genes (cbrA and cbrBC), phoBR-regulated genes (phoA, phoH, phnCDEFGHIJKLMNOP, psiE, and ugpBAECQ), csgD, luxS, and rpoS. The results of this battery of nearly 200,000 tests provided a wealth of new information concerning many of these systems. Of 37 different two-component mutants, 22 showed altered phenotypes. Many phenotypes were expected, and several new phenotypes were also revealed. The results are discussed in terms of the biological roles and other information concerning these systems, including DNA microarray data for a large number of the same mutants. Other mutational effects are also discussed. PMID:12897016

  13. Increased episomal replication accounts for the high rate of adaptive mutation in recD mutants of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Foster, P L; Rosche, W A

    1999-01-01

    Adaptive mutation has been studied extensively in FC40, a strain of Escherichia coli that cannot metabolize lactose (Lac-) because of a frameshift mutation affecting the lacZ gene on its episome. recD mutants of FC40, in which the exonuclease activity of RecBCD (ExoV) is abolished but its helicase activity is retained, have an increased rate of adaptive mutation. The results presented here show that, in several respects, adaptive mutation to Lac+ involves different mechanisms in recD mutant cells than in wild-type cells. About half of the apparent increase in the adaptive mutation rate of recD mutant cells is due to a RecA-dependent increase in episomal copy number and to growth of the Lac- cells on the lactose plates. The remaining increase appears to be due to continued replication of the episome, with the extra copies being degraded or passed to recD+ recipients. In addition, the increase in adaptive mutation rate in recD mutant cells is (i) dependent on activities of the single-stranded exonucleases, RecJ and ExoI, which are not required for (in fact, slightly inhibit) adaptive mutation in wild-type cells, and (ii) enhanced by RecG, which opposes adaptive mutation in wild-type cells. PMID:10224241

  14. [Role of RNA-polymerase in gene activity regulation of E. coli RNA-polymerase mutants with a pleiotropic effect. I. Physiological and biochemical studies].

    PubMed

    Kamzolova, S G; Arutiunian, A V; Ozolin', O N; Oganesian, M G

    1979-01-01

    Four Rifr-mutants of E. coli B/r (rpo B401, rpo B402, rpo B403, rpo B409) which differ from the wild strain in one or more phenotypic properties besides rifampicin resistance were obtained. Transfer of the mutant Rifr-alleles into the parent strain gives the latter all the properties of the mutant. This indicates that the new properties are due to the pleiotropic effect of Rifr-mutations. Biochemical studies of the properties of RNA-polymerases from the mutants and the parent showed that some new properties of the mutants could not be explained by the appearance of analogous properties in the mutant RNA-polymerase itself. They seem to be caused by alteration in functional activity of the mutant enzyme, particulary, alteration of its control properties during transcription. The function of the beta-subunit in genetic transcription is discussed.

  15. A signal sequence is not required for protein export in prlA mutants of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Derman, A I; Puziss, J W; Bassford, P J; Beckwith, J

    1993-01-01

    The prlA/secY gene, which codes for an integral membrane protein component of the Escherichia coli protein export machinery, is the locus of the strongest suppressors of signal sequence mutations. We demonstrate that two exported proteins of E.coli, maltose-binding protein and alkaline phosphatase, each lacking its entire signal sequence, are exported to the periplasm in several prlA mutants. The export efficiency can be substantial; in a strain carrying the prlA4 allele, 30% of signal-sequenceless alkaline phosphatase is exported to the periplasm. Other components of the E.coli export machinery, including SecA, are required for this export. SecB is required for the export of signal-sequenceless alkaline phosphatase even though the normal export of alkaline phosphatase does not require this chaperonin. Our findings indicate that signal sequences confer speed and efficiency upon the export process, but that they are not always essential for export. Entry into the export pathway may involve components that so overlap in function that the absence of a signal sequence can be compensated for, or there may exist one or more means of entry that do not require signal sequences at all. Images PMID:8458344

  16. Active site mutants of Escherichia coli dethiobiotin synthetase: effects of mutations on enzyme catalytic and structural properties.

    PubMed

    Yang, G; Sandalova, T; Lohman, K; Lindqvist, Y; Rendina, A R

    1997-04-22

    Five active site residues, Thr11, Glu12, Lys15, Lys37, and Ser41, implicated by the protein crystal structure studies of Escherichia coli DTBS, were mutated to determine their function in catalysis and substrate binding. Nine mutant enzymes, T11V, E12A, E12D, K15Q, K37L, K37Q, K37R, S41A, and S41C, were overproduced in an E. coli strain lacking a functional endogenous DTBS gene and purified to homogeneity. Replacement of Thr11 with valine resulted in a 24,000-fold increase in the Km(ATP) with little or no change in the Kd(ATP), KM(DAPA) and DTBS k(cat), suggesting an essential role for this residue in the steady-state affinity for ATP. The two Glu12 mutants showed essentially wild-type DTBS activity (slightly elevated k(cat)'s). Unlike wild-type DTBS, E12A had the same apparent KM(DAPA) at subsaturating and saturating ATP concentrations, indicating a possible role for Glu12 in the binding synergy between DAPA and ATP. The mutations in Lys15 and Lys37 resulted in loss of catalytic activity (0.01% and <0.9% of wild-type DTBS k(cat) for K15Q and the Lys37 mutant enzymes, respectively) and higher KM's for both DAPA (40-fold and >100-fold higher than wild-type for the K15Q and Lys37 mutant enzymes, respectively) and ATP (1800-fold and >10-fold higher than wild-type for K15Q and the K37 mutant enzymes, respectively). These results strongly suggest that Lys15 and Lys37 are crucial to both catalysis and substrate binding. S41A and S41C had essentially the same k(cat) as wild-type and had moderate increases in the DAPA and ATP KM and Kd (ATP) values. Replacement of Ser41 with cysteine resulted in larger effects than replacement with alanine. These data suggest that the H-bond between N7 of DAPA and the Ser41 side chain is not very important for catalysis. The catalytic behavior of these mutant enzymes was also studied by pulse-chase experiments which produced results consistent with the steady-state kinetic analyses. X-ray crystallographic studies of four mutant enzymes, S

  17. [A mutant allele gam18, participating in the RecF repair path in Escherichia coli K-12].

    PubMed

    Verbenko, V N; Krup'ian, E P; Kuznetsova, L V; Kalinin, V L

    1999-03-01

    Plasmid pGam18 carrying one of the cloned mutant loci, responsible for enhanced radiation resistance in the strain Escherichia coli Gamr444, was shown to increase resistance to the lethal effect of gamma-rays with a dose modification factor DMF = 2. Enhanced resistance was observed in wild-type cells and in the mutant recBC sbcB, but not recFBC sbcA. This indicates the involvement of a product of the gam18 locus in the RecF pathway of recombinational repair. The protective effect of plasmid pGam18 against radiation was completely abolished by mutations in the most RecF pathway genes (recF, recJ, recR, recO, recQ, recN, and ruvB). However, three mutations in the uvrD gene, which encodes DNA helicase II and belongs to the RecF pathway, can be partially complemented by plasmid pGam18. These data suggest that the mutant allele gam18 affects the DNA helicase II activity at the presynaptic stage of the RecF pathway-mediated repair of DNA double-stranded breaks induced by gamma-irradiation. PMID:10368783

  18. Novel features of the ISC machinery revealed by characterization of Escherichia coli mutants that survive without iron-sulfur clusters.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Naoyuki; Kanazawa, Miaki; Tonosaki, Keitaro; Yokoyama, Nao; Kuzuyama, Tomohisa; Takahashi, Yasuhiro

    2016-03-01

    Biological assembly of iron-sulfur (Fe-S) clusters is mediated by complex systems consisting of multiple proteins. Escherichia coli possesses two distinct systems called the ISC and SUF machineries encoded by iscSUA-hscBA-fdx-iscX and sufABCDSE respectively. Deletion of both pathways results in absence of the biosynthetic apparatus for Fe-S clusters, and consequent lethality, which has hampered detailed genetic studies. Here we report that modification of the isoprenoid biosynthetic pathway can offset the indispensability of the Fe-S cluster biosynthetic systems and show that the resulting Δisc Δsuf double mutants can grow without detectable Fe-S cluster-containing proteins. We also constructed a series of mutants in which each isc gene was disrupted in the deletion background of sufABCDSE. Phenotypic analysis of the mutants revealed that Fdx, an essential electron-transfer Fe-S protein in the ISC machinery, is dispensable under anaerobic conditions, which is similar to the situation with IscA. Furthermore, we found that several suppressor mutations in IscU, an Fe-S scaffold protein responsible for the de novo Fe-S cluster assembly, could bypass the essential role of the chaperone system HscA and HscB. These findings pave the way toward a detailed molecular analysis to understand the mechanisms involved in Fe-S cluster biosynthesis.

  19. Escherichia coli Mutants Thermosensitive for Deoxyribonucleic Acid Gyrase Subunit A: Effects on Deoxyribonucleic Acid Replication, Transcription, and Bacteriophage Growth

    PubMed Central

    Kreuzer, Kenneth N.; Cozzarelli, Nicholas R.

    1979-01-01

    Temperature-sensitive nalA mutants of Escherichia coli have been used to investigate the structure and functions of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) gyrase. Extracts of one such mutant (nalA43) had thermosensitive DNA gyrase subunit A activity but normal gyrase subunit B activity, proving definitively that nalA is the structural gene for subunit A. Extracts of a second nalA (Ts) mutant (nalA45) had a 50-fold deficiency of gyrase subunit A activity. The residual DNA supertwisting was catalyzed by the mutant DNA gyrase rather than by a novel supertwisting enzyme. The nalA45(Ts) extract was also deficient in the nalidixic acid target, which is defined as the protein necessary to confer drug sensitivity to in vitro DNA replication directed by a nalidixic acid-resistant mutant extract. Thus, gyrase subunit A and the nalidixic acid target are one and the same protein, the nalA gene product. Shift of the nalA43(Ts) mutant to a nonpermissive temperature resulted in a precipitous decline in the rate of [3H]thymidine incorporation, demonstrating an obligatory role of the nalA gene product in DNA replication. The rates of incorporation of [3H]uridine pulses and continuously administered [3H]uracil were quickly reduced approximately twofold upon temperature shift of the nalA43(Ts) mutant, and therefore some but not all transcription requires the nalA gene product. The thermosensitive growth of bacteriophages φX174 and T4 in the nalA43(Ts) host shows that these phages depend on the host nalA gene product. In contrast, the growth of phage T7 was strongly inhibited by nalidixic acid but essentially unaffected by the nalA43(Ts) mutation. The inhibition of T7 growth by nalidixic acid was, however, eliminated by temperature inactivation of the nal43 gene product. Therefore, nalidixic acid may block T7 growth by a corruption rather than a simple elimination of the nalidixic acid target. Possible mechanisms for such a corruption are considered, and their relevance to the puzzling

  20. Escherichia coli mutants thermosensitive for deoxyribonucleic acid gyrase subunit A: effects on deoxyribonucleic acid replication, transcription, and bacteriophage growth.

    PubMed

    Kreuzer, K N; Cozzarelli, N R

    1979-11-01

    Temperature-sensitive nalA mutants of Escherichia coli have been used to investigate the structure and functions of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) gyrase. Extracts of one such mutant (nalA43) had thermosensitive DNA gyrase subunit A activity but normal gyrase subunit B activity, proving definitively that nalA is the structural gene for subunit A. Extracts of a second nalA (Ts) mutant (nalA45) had a 50-fold deficiency of gyrase subunit A activity. The residual DNA supertwisting was catalyzed by the mutant DNA gyrase rather than by a novel supertwisting enzyme. The nalA45(Ts) extract was also deficient in the nalidixic acid target, which is defined as the protein necessary to confer drug sensitivity to in vitro DNA replication directed by a nalidixic acid-resistant mutant extract. Thus, gyrase subunit A and the nalidixic acid target are one and the same protein, the nalA gene product. Shift of the nalA43(Ts) mutant to a nonpermissive temperature resulted in a precipitous decline in the rate of [(3)H]thymidine incorporation, demonstrating an obligatory role of the nalA gene product in DNA replication. The rates of incorporation of [(3)H]uridine pulses and continuously administered [(3)H]uracil were quickly reduced approximately twofold upon temperature shift of the nalA43(Ts) mutant, and therefore some but not all transcription requires the nalA gene product. The thermosensitive growth of bacteriophages phiX174 and T4 in the nalA43(Ts) host shows that these phages depend on the host nalA gene product. In contrast, the growth of phage T7 was strongly inhibited by nalidixic acid but essentially unaffected by the nalA43(Ts) mutation. The inhibition of T7 growth by nalidixic acid was, however, eliminated by temperature inactivation of the nal43 gene product. Therefore, nalidixic acid may block T7 growth by a corruption rather than a simple elimination of the nalidixic acid target. Possible mechanisms for such a corruption are considered, and their relevance to the puzzling

  1. Regulation of ferric iron transport in Escherichia coli K12: isolation of a constitutive mutant.

    PubMed

    Hantke, K

    1981-01-01

    The lac genes were inserted with phage Mu(Ap, lac) into the fhuA, fepA, cir and tonB genes which specify components of iron uptake systems. The expression of lac in all these operon fusions was controlled by the availability of iron to the cells, thereby facilitating a quick and simple measurement of the expression of the genes listed above. In an iron rich medium under anaerobic conditions all systems were strongly repressed. fhuA was depressed at higher iron concentration than was fepA or cir, and tonB was repressed only under anaerobic conditions and could be induced by iron limitation. Mutants constitutive for the expression of beta-galactosidase were selected in a fhuA-lac fusion strain. The outer membrane proteins Cir, FhuA, FecA, 76K and 83K were made constitutively in such mutant strains. Therefore, they were termed fur mutants. In these fur mutant strains, the synthesis of a 19K protein was reduced. Furthermore, it was found that transport of ferric enterochelin and ferrichrome was also constitutive in the fur mutant cells, and that ferric citrate uptake could be induced by only 10 microM citrate in the growth medium in contrast to wild-type cells in which at least 100 microM citrate was necessary. The fepA gene was concluded to be under an additional control, because it was not fully derepressed by the fur mutation. PMID:7026976

  2. Facile Alkaline Lysis of Escherichia coli Cells in High-Throughput Mode for Screening Enzyme Mutants: Arylsulfatase as an Example.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Mei; Yang, Xiaolan; Li, Yuwei; Liu, Hongbo; Pu, Jun; Zhan, Chang-Guo; Liao, Fei

    2016-06-01

    Facile alkaline lysis of Escherichia coli cells in high-throughput (HTP) mode for screening enzyme mutants was tested with Pseudomonas aeruginosa arylsulfatase (PAAS). The alkaline lysis buffer was 1.0 M Tris-HCl at pH 9.0 plus 0.1 % Tween-20 and 2.0 mM 4-aminobenzamidine, mixed with cell suspension at 8:1 to 12:1 ratio for continuous agitation of mixtures in 96-well plates under room temperature; enzymatic activity in lysates was measured with 96-well microplate. PAAS activity tolerated final 0.1 % Tween-20. Individual clones were amplified for 12 h in 0.50 mL TB medium with 48-well plates to enhance the repeatability of induced expression. During continuous agitation of the mixture of cells and the lysis buffer, PAAS activities in lysates were steady from 3 to 9 h and comparable to sonication treatment but better than freezing-thawing. Coefficients of variation of activities of PAAS/mutants in lysates after treatment for 7 h reached ∼22 %. The mutant M72Q had specific activity 2-fold of G138S. By HTP lysis of cells, M72Q was recognized as a positive mutant over G138S with the area under the curve of 0.873. Therefore, for enzymes tolerating concentrated alkaline buffers, the proposed alkaline lysis approach may be generally applicable for HTP lysis of host cells during directed evolution. PMID:26899233

  3. Derepression of colicin E1 synthesis in the constitutive tif mutant strain (spr tif sfi) and in a tif sfi mutant strain of Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed Central

    Tessman, E S; Gritzmacher, C A; Peterson, P K

    1978-01-01

    We show here that expression of the colicin gene of the ColE1 plasmid is greatly derepressed in Escherichia coli K-12 strain DM1187 spr tif sfi, which is a constitutive tif mutant, altered in the lexA gene, and which shows constitutive expression of various pathways of the recA-dependent, lexA-blocked (SOS) repair system. In this strain colicin E1 synthesis is at least 100-fold greater than that observed in uninduced control strains (spr+ tif sfi and spr+ tif+ sfi). This result confirms the regulatory role of the lexA product in colicin E1 synthesis. Colicin yields by the uninduced strain DM1187 are as high as the maximum yields from mitomycin-induced control strains and often are several-fold higher. When the nonconstitutive tif sfi strain GC467 is raised to 43 degrees C to induce the SOS system, a low level of colicin synthesis is observed which is less than one-tenth of the yield obtained by induction with mitomycin C. Addition of adenine at the time of shift-up can increase the colicin yield of tif sfi to about one-third of the yield obtained with mitomycin C. We have also found that colicin overproduction can be detected by altered colony appearance in an overlay assay with colicin-sensitive bacteria. In addition, the lethality of the process of colicin synthesis is observed here without the use of bacteriostatic inducing agents. Images PMID:353034

  4. Catabolic regulation analysis of Escherichia coli and its crp, mlc, mgsA, pgi and ptsG mutants

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Most bacteria can use various compounds as carbon sources. These carbon sources can be either co-metabolized or sequentially metabolized, where the latter phenomenon typically occurs as catabolite repression. From the practical application point of view of utilizing lignocellulose for the production of biofuels etc., it is strongly desirable to ferment all sugars obtained by hydrolysis from lignocellulosic materials, where simultaneous consumption of sugars would benefit the formation of bioproducts. However, most organisms consume glucose prior to consumption of other carbon sources, and exhibit diauxic growth. It has been shown by fermentation experiments that simultaneous consumption of sugars can be attained by ptsG, mgsA mutants etc., but its mechanism has not been well understood. It is strongly desirable to understand the mechanism of metabolic regulation for catabolite regulation to improve the performance of fermentation. Results In order to make clear the catabolic regulation mechanism, several continuous cultures were conducted at different dilution rates of 0.2, 0.4, 0.6 and 0.7 h-1 using wild type Escherichia coli. The result indicates that the transcript levels of global regulators such as crp, cra, mlc and rpoS decreased, while those of fadR, iclR, soxR/S increased as the dilution rate increased. These affected the metabolic pathway genes, which in turn affected fermentation result where the specific glucose uptake rate, the specific acetate formation rate, and the specific CO2 evolution rate (CER) were increased as the dilution rate was increased. This was confirmed by the 13C-flux analysis. In order to make clear the catabolite regulation, the effect of crp gene knockout (Δcrp) and crp enhancement (crp+) as well as mlc, mgsA, pgi and ptsG gene knockout on the metabolism was then investigated by the continuous culture at the dilution rate of 0.2 h-1 and by some batch cultures. In the case of Δcrp (and also Δmlc) mutant, TCA cycle and

  5. Isolation and characterization of outer membrane permeability mutants in Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed Central

    Benson, S A; Decloux, A

    1985-01-01

    Escherichia coli normally requires the lamB gene for the uptake of maltodextrins. We have identified and characterized three independent mutations that allow E. coli to grow on maltodextrin in the absence of a functional lamB gene by allowing maltodextrins with a molecular weight greater than 1,000 to cross the outer membrane barrier. Two of the mutations map to the structural gene for the outer membrane porin OmpF, and the remaining mutation maps to the structural gene for the second major outer membrane porin, OmpC. These mutations increase the permeability of the outer membrane to small hydrophilic substances, antibiotics, and detergents. These mutations alter the electrophoretic mobility of the respective porin proteins. Images PMID:2981807

  6. Relationship between chromosome replication and cell division in a thymineless mutant of Escherichia coli B/r.

    PubMed

    Meacock, P A; Pritchard, R H

    1975-06-01

    The relationship between chromosome replication and cell division was investigated in a thymineless mutant of Escherichia coli B/r. Examination of the changes in average cell mass and DNA content of exponential cultures resulting from changes in the thymine concentration in the growth medium suggested that as the replication time (C) is increased there is a decrease in the period between termination of a round of replication and the subsequent cell division (D). Observations on the pattern of DNA synthesis during the division cycle were consistent with this relationship. Nevertheless, the kinetics of transition of exponential cultures moving between steady states of growth with differing replication velocities provided evidence to support the view that the time of cell division is determined by termination of rounds of replication under steady-state conditions.

  7. Construction of a dihydrofolate reductase-deficient mutant of Escherichia coli by gene replacement.

    PubMed Central

    Howell, E E; Foster, P G; Foster, L M

    1988-01-01

    The dihydrofolate reductase (fol) gene in Escherichia coli has been deleted and replaced by a selectable marker. Verification of the delta fol::kan strain has been accomplished using genetic and biochemical criteria, including Southern analysis of the chromosomal DNA. The delta fol::kan mutation is stable in E. coli K549 [thyA polA12 (Ts)] and can be successfully transduced to other E. coli strains providing they have mutations in their thymidylate synthetase (thyA) genes. A preliminary investigation of the relationship between fol and thyA gene expression suggests that a Fol- cell (i.e., a dihydrofolate reductase deficiency phenotype) is not viable unless thymidylate synthetase activity is concurrently eliminated. This observation indicates that either the nonproductive accumulation of dihydrofolate or the depletion of tetrahydrofolate cofactor pools is lethal in a Fol- ThyA+ strain. Strains containing the thyA delta fol::kan lesions require the presence of Fol end products for growth, and these lesions typically increase the doubling time of the strain by a factor of 2.5 in rich medium. Images PMID:2838456

  8. Proteomic analysis of multidrug resistant Escherichia coli strains from scouring calves.

    PubMed

    Gautam, Ablesh; Vinson, Heather M; Gibbs, Penelope S; Olet, Susan; Barigye, Robert

    2011-08-01

    A number of researchers have used chemical inhibitors that target membrane efflux pumps as an experimental treatment strategy for multidrug resistant (MDR) bacterial infections. However, most of these compounds are toxic in vertebrate animals. The present research was therefore done to describe expression dynamics of drug resistance-associated Escherichia coli proteins that could serve as novel drug targets. Proteomes of MDR and antimicrobial susceptible (AS) E. coli were studied in two dimensional (2-D) polyacrylamide gels and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) was performed on proteins of interest. The number of recovered peptides per protein was used to elucidate the amounts of target proteins expressed in MDR and AS E. coli strains. Eight proteins that may be potentially involved in mechanisms of drug resistance were analyzed and identified by LC-MS. These were grouped into membrane porins (TolC, OmpA, OmpC, Nmpc Precursor), proteins involved in microbial protein synthesis (EF-Ts, EF-Tu, RpsA) and Dps, a protein of unknown location and function. Experimental data demonstrated variability in the expression patterns and quantities of the four porins (TolC, OmpA, OmpC, Nmpc precursor), the three microbial protein synthesis associated proteins (EF-Ts, EF-Tu and RpsA), and Dps which has been previously associated with drug resistance. While variability was seen in quantities and expression patterns of some of the proteins of interest, the present data falls short of determining the suitability of these proteins as novel drug targets. Further studies are required to explore how these proteins could be targeted for drug development. PMID:21530109

  9. Selection of a Mutant of Escherichia coli Which Has High Mutation Rates

    PubMed Central

    Helling, Robert B.

    1968-01-01

    A mutation which causes high mutation rates in all other loci tested was induced with nitrosoguanidine and was selected through the ability of the progeny of such mutant cells to mutate to streptomycin resistance at a higher rate than the wild-type cells. This mutation (mut-2) and the Treffers' mutation (mutT1) mapped at approximately the same position to the right of leu. Specificity studies showed that the two mutations differ in rates of mutation produced. PMID:4879569

  10. Polymorphic variation in susceptibility and metabolism of triclosan-resistant mutants of Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae clinical strains obtained after exposure to biocides and antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Curiao, Tânia; Marchi, Emmanuela; Viti, Carlo; Oggioni, Marco R; Baquero, Fernando; Martinez, José Luis; Coque, Teresa M

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to biocides may result in cross-resistance to other antimicrobials. Changes in biocide and antibiotic susceptibilities, metabolism, and fitness costs were studied here in biocide-selected Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae mutants. E. coli and K. pneumoniae mutants with various degrees of triclosan susceptibility were obtained after exposure to triclosan (TRI), benzalkonium chloride (BKC), chlorhexidine (CHX) or sodium hypochlorite (SHC), and ampicillin or ciprofloxacin. Alterations in antimicrobial susceptibility and metabolism in mutants were tested using Phenotype MicroArrays. The expression of AcrAB pump and global regulators (SoxR, MarA, and RamA) was measured by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR), and the central part of the fabI gene was sequenced. The fitness costs of resistance were assessed by a comparison of relative growth rates. Triclosan-resistant (TRI(r)) and triclosan-hypersusceptible (TRI(hs)) mutants of E. coli and K. pneumoniae were obtained after selection with biocides and/or antibiotics. E. coli TRI(r) mutants, including those with mutations in the fabI gene or in the expression of acrB, acrF, and marA, exhibited changes in susceptibility to TRI, CHX, and antibiotics. TRI(r) mutants for which the TRI MIC was high presented improved metabolism of carboxylic acids, amino acids, and carbohydrates. In TRI(r) mutants, resistance to one antimicrobial provoked hypersusceptibility to another one(s). TRI(r) mutants had fitness costs, particularly marA-overexpressing (E. coli) or ramA-overexpressing (K. pneumoniae) mutants. TRI, BKC, and CIP exposure frequently yielded TRI(r) mutants exhibiting alterations in AraC-like global regulators (MarA, SoxR, and RamA), AcrAB-TolC, and/or FabI, and influencing antimicrobial susceptibility, fitness, and metabolism. These various phenotypes suggest a trade-off of different selective processes shaping the evolution toward antibiotic/biocide resistance and influencing other adaptive

  11. Increased Hydrolysis of Oximino-β-Lactams by CMY-107, a Tyr199Cys Mutant Form of CMY-2 Produced by Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Vetouli, E. E.; Bozavoutoglou, E.; Lebessi, E.; Tzelepi, E.; Tzouvelekis, L. S.

    2015-01-01

    The cephalosporinase CMY-107, a Tyr199Cys mutant form of CMY-2 encoded by an IncI self-transferable plasmid carried by an Escherichia coli clinical strain, was characterized. The enzyme hydrolyzed oximino-cephalosporins and aztreonam more efficiently than CMY-2 did. PMID:26438499

  12. Defective initiation in an Escherichia coli dnaA(Cs,Sx) mutant.

    PubMed

    Boye, E; Blinkova, A; Walker, J R

    2001-01-01

    Mutations in the Escherichia coli gene for initiation of DNA replication, dnaA, which suppress the polymerization defect and growth inhibition caused by temperature-sensitive (Ts) mutations in the polymerization gene, dnaX, are called Cs,Sx. We show here that these mutations, on their own, also cause defects in initiation, including inhibition of initiation at both low (20 degrees C) and high (44 degrees C) temperatures and asynchronous initiation at both the permissive (34 degrees C) and suppression (39 degrees C) temperatures. These findings suggests a relationship between partially defective initiation and suppression of the polymerization defect, both of which occur at 39 degrees C.

  13. Accumulation of the F plasmid TraJ protein in cpx mutants of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Silverman, P M; Tran, L; Harris, R; Gaudin, H M

    1993-01-01

    We report here studies of the cellular control of F plasmid TraJ protein levels, focusing on the effects of chromosomal cpx mutations. The principal conclusion from our results is that the cpx mutations impair accumulation of the TraJ protein, thereby reducing tra gene expression. We measured TraJ activity in vivo by expression of a traY'-'lacZ fusion gene and TraJ protein by immuno-overlay blot. In strains with normal TraJ levels, traY expression and donor-related functions were reduced in cells carrying any of four cpxA mutations. In the strain background used to isolate cpx mutants, these reductions were especially evident in cells grown to high density, when traY expression and donor activity both increased in cpx+ cells. In each of the four cpxA mutants tested, TraJ levels were lower than in the otherwise isogenic cpxA+ strain. In cells grown to high density, the differences ranged from 4-fold in the cpxA6 strain to > 10-fold in the cpxA2, cpxA5, and cpxA9 strains. The cpxA2 mutation had little or no effect on traY expression or on donor-related functions when TraJ was present in excess of its limiting level in F' or Hfr cells or on a mutant traY promoter whose expression in vivo was independent of TraJ. Images PMID:8432716

  14. A novel, simple, high-throughput method for isolation of genome-wide transposon insertion mutants of Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed

    Miki, Takeyoshi; Yamamoto, Yoshihiro; Matsuda, Hideo

    2008-01-01

    We developed a novel, simple, high-throughput method for isolation of genome-wide transposon insertion mutants of Escherichia coli K-12. The basic idea of the method is to randomly disrupt the genes on the DNA fragments cloned on the Kohara library by inserting a mini-transposon first, and then transfer the disrupted genes from the lambda vector to the E. coli chromosome by homologous recombination. Using this method, we constructed a set of 8402 Km(r) cis-diploid mutants harboring a mini-Tn10 insertion mutation and the corresponding wild-type gene on a chromosome, as well as a set of 6954 haploid mutants derived from the cis-diploid mutants. The major advantage of the strategy used is that the indispensable genes or sites for growth can be identified. Preliminary results suggest that 415 open reading frames are indispensable for growth in E. coli cells. A total of 6404 haploid mutants were deposited to Genetic Strains Research Center, National Institute of Genetics, Japan (Chapter 26) and are available for public distribution upon request (http://shigen.lab.nig.ac.jp/ecoli/strain/nbrp/resource.jsp). PMID:18392969

  15. An Escherichia coli MG1655 Lipopolysaccharide Deep-Rough Core Mutant Grows and Survives in Mouse Cecal Mucus but Fails To Colonize the Mouse Large Intestine

    PubMed Central

    Møller, Annette K.; Leatham, Mary P.; Conway, Tyrrell; Nuijten, Piet J. M.; de Haan, Louise A. M.; Krogfelt, Karen A.; Cohen, Paul S.

    2003-01-01

    The ability of E. coli strains to colonize the mouse large intestine has been correlated with their ability to grow in cecal and colonic mucus. In the present study, an E. coli MG1655 strain was mutagenized with a mini-Tn5 Km (kanamycin) transposon, and mutants were tested for the ability to grow on agar plates with mouse cecal mucus as the sole source of carbon and nitrogen. One mutant, designated MD42 (for mucus defective), grew poorly on cecal-mucus agar plates but grew well on Luria agar plates and on glucose minimal-agar plates. Sequencing revealed that the insertion in MD42 was in the waaQ gene, which is involved in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) core biosynthesis. Like “deep-rough” E. coli mutants, MD42 was hypersensitive to sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), bile salts, and the hydrophobic antibiotic novobiocin. Furthermore, its LPS core oligosaccharide was truncated, like that of a deep-rough mutant. MD42 initially grew in the large intestines of streptomycin-treated mice but then failed to colonize (<102 CFU per g of feces), whereas its parent colonized at levels between 107 and 108 CFU per g of feces. When mouse cecal mucosal sections were hybridized with an E. coli-specific rRNA probe, MD42 was observed in cecal mucus as clumps 24 h postfeeding, whereas its parent was present almost exclusively as single cells, suggesting that clumping may play a role in preventing MD42 colonization. Surprisingly, MD42 grew nearly as well as its parent during growth in undiluted, highly viscous cecal mucus isolated directly from the mouse cecum and, like its parent, survived well after reaching stationary phase, suggesting that there are no antimicrobials in mucus that prevent MD42 colonization. After mini-mariner transposon mutagenesis, an SDS-resistant suppressor mutant of MD42 was isolated. The mini-mariner insertion was shown to be in the bipA gene, a known regulator of E. coli surface components. When grown in Luria broth, the LPS core of the suppressor mutant remained

  16. Enhanced succinic acid productivity by expression of mgtCB gene in Escherichia coli mutant.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Yang, Le; Wang, Dan; Dong, Lichun; Chen, Rachel

    2016-04-01

    In this study, a novel engineering Escherichia coli strain (CBMG111) with the expression of mgtCB gene was constructed for the enhanced fermentative production of succinic acid by utilizing the synergetic effect of mgtC gene to improve the growth of strains at the environment of low Mg(2+) concentration and mgtB to enhance the transport of Mg(2+) into cells. After the effect of the expression of the individual genes (mgtA, mgtB, mgtC) on the growth of E. coli was clarified, the fermentative production of succinic acid by CBMG111 was studied with the low-price mixture of Mg(OH)2 and NH3·H2O as the alkaline neutralizer and the biomass hydrolysates as the carbon sources, which demonstrated that the expression of mgtCB gene can significantly increase the productivity of succinic acid (2.97 g L(-1) h(-1)) compared with that by using the engineering strain with the overexpression of mgtA gene. PMID:26711444

  17. Complexes of mutants of Escherichia coli aminopeptidase P and the tripeptide substrate ValProLeu

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, Stephen C.; Guss, J. Mitchell

    2008-09-17

    Aminopeptidase P (APPro) is a manganese-containing enzyme that catalyses the hydrolysis of the N-terminal residue of a polypeptide if the second residue is proline. Structures of APPro mutants with reduced or negligible activity have been determined in complex with the tripeptide substrate ValProLeu. In the complex of Glu383Ala APPro with ValProLeu one of the two metal sites is only partly occupied, indicating an essential role for Glu383 in metal binding in the presence of substrate. His361Ala APPro clearly possesses residual activity as the ValProLeu substrate has been cleaved in the crystals; difference electron density consistent with bound ProLeu dipeptide and a disordered Val amino acid is present at the active site. Contrary to previous suggestions, the His243Ala mutant is capable of binding substrate. The structure of the His243Ala APPro complex with ValProLeu shows that the peptide interacts with one of the active-site metal atoms via its terminal amino group. The implications of these complexes for the roles of the respective residues in APPro catalysis are discussed.

  18. Enhanced cell-specific ablation in zebrafish using a triple mutant of Escherichia coli nitroreductase.

    PubMed

    Mathias, Jonathan R; Zhang, Zhanying; Saxena, Meera T; Mumm, Jeff S

    2014-04-01

    Transgenic expression of bacterial nitroreductase (NTR) facilitates chemically-inducible targeted cell ablation. In zebrafish, the NTR system enables studies of cell function and cellular regeneration. Metronidazole (MTZ) has become the most commonly used prodrug substrate for eliciting cell loss in NTR-expressing transgenic zebrafish due to the cell-specific nature of its cytotoxic derivatives. Unfortunately, MTZ treatments required for effective cell ablation border toxic effects, and, thus, likely incur undesirable nonspecific effects. Here, we tested whether a triple mutant variant of NTR, previously shown to display improved activity in bacterial assays, can solve this issue by promoting cell ablation in zebrafish using reduced prodrug treatment regimens. We generated several complementary transgenic zebrafish lines expressing either wild-type or mutant NTR (mutNTR) in specific neural cell types, and assayed prodrug-induced cell ablation kinetics using confocal time series imaging and plate reader-based quantification of fluorescent reporters expressed in targeted cell types. The results show that cell ablation can be achieved in mutNTR expressing transgenic lines with markedly shortened prodrug exposure times and/or at lower prodrug concentrations. The mutNTR variant characterized here can circumvent problematic nonspecific/toxic effects arising from low prodrug conversion efficiency, thus increasing the effectiveness and versatility of this selective cell ablation methodology.

  19. Functions that Protect Escherichia coli from Tightly Bound DNA-Protein Complexes Created by Mutant EcoRII Methyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Morgan L.; Kreuzer, Kenneth N

    2015-01-01

    Expression of mutant EcoRII methyltransferase protein (M.EcoRII-C186A) in Escherichia coli leads to tightly bound DNA-protein complexes (TBCs), located sporadically on the chromosome rather than in tandem arrays. The mechanisms behind the lethality induced by such sporadic TBCs are not well studied, nor is it clear whether very tight binding but non-covalent complexes are processed in the same way as covalent DNA-protein crosslinks (DPCs). Using 2D gel electrophoresis, we found that TBCs induced by M.EcoRII-C186A block replication forks in vivo. Specific bubble molecules were detected as spots on the 2D gel, only when M.EcoRII-C186A was induced, and a mutation that eliminates a specific EcoRII methylation site led to disappearance of the corresponding spot. We also performed a candidate gene screen for mutants that are hypersensitive to TBCs induced by M.EcoRII-C186A. We found several gene products necessary for protection against these TBCs that are known to also protect against DPCs induced with wild-type M.EcoRII (after 5-azacytidine incorporation): RecA, RecBC, RecG, RuvABC, UvrD, FtsK, XerCD and SsrA (tmRNA). In contrast, the RecFOR pathway and Rep helicase are needed for protection against TBCs but not DPCs induced by M.EcoRII. We propose that stalled fork processing by RecFOR and RecA promotes release of tightly bound (but non-covalent) blocking proteins, perhaps by licensing Rep helicase-driven dissociation of the blocking M.EcoRII-C186A. Our studies also argued against the involvement of several proteins that might be expected to protect against TBCs. We took the opportunity to directly compare the sensitivity of all tested mutants to two quinolone antibiotics, which target bacterial type II topoisomerases and induce a unique form of DPC. We uncovered rep, ftsK and xerCD as novel quinolone hypersensitive mutants, and also obtained evidence against the involvement of a number of functions that might be expected to protect against quinolones. PMID:25993347

  20. Dual Roles of Capsular Extracellular Polymeric Substances in Photocatalytic Inactivation of Escherichia coli: Comparison of E. coli BW25113 and Isogenic Mutants.

    PubMed

    Huang, Guocheng; Xia, Dehua; An, Taicheng; Ng, Tsz Wai; Yip, Ho Yin; Li, Guiying; Zhao, Huijun; Wong, Po Keung

    2015-08-01

    The dual roles of capsular extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) in the photocatalytic inactivation of bacteria were demonstrated in a TiO2-UVA system, by comparing wild-type Escherichia coli strain BW25113 and isogenic mutants with upregulated and downregulated production of capsular EPS. In a partition system in which direct contact between bacterial cells and TiO2 particles was inhibited, an increase in the amount of EPS was associated with increased bacterial resistance to photocatalytic inactivation. In contrast, when bacterial cells were in direct contact with TiO2 particles, an increase in the amount of capsular EPS decreased cell viability during photocatalytic treatment. Taken together, these results suggest that although capsular EPS can protect bacterial cells by consuming photogenerated reactive species, it also facilitates photocatalytic inactivation of bacteria by promoting the adhesion of TiO2 particles to the cell surface. Fluorescence microscopy and scanning electron microscopy analyses further confirmed that high capsular EPS density led to more TiO2 particles attaching to cells and forming bacterium-TiO2 aggregates. Calculations of interaction energy, represented by extended Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (XDLVO) potential, suggested that the presence of capsular EPS enhances the attachment of TiO2 particles to bacterial cells via acid-base interactions. Consideration of these mechanisms is critical for understanding bacterium-nanoparticle interactions and the photocatalytic inactivation of bacteria.

  1. Dual Roles of Capsular Extracellular Polymeric Substances in Photocatalytic Inactivation of Escherichia coli: Comparison of E. coli BW25113 and Isogenic Mutants.

    PubMed

    Huang, Guocheng; Xia, Dehua; An, Taicheng; Ng, Tsz Wai; Yip, Ho Yin; Li, Guiying; Zhao, Huijun; Wong, Po Keung

    2015-08-01

    The dual roles of capsular extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) in the photocatalytic inactivation of bacteria were demonstrated in a TiO2-UVA system, by comparing wild-type Escherichia coli strain BW25113 and isogenic mutants with upregulated and downregulated production of capsular EPS. In a partition system in which direct contact between bacterial cells and TiO2 particles was inhibited, an increase in the amount of EPS was associated with increased bacterial resistance to photocatalytic inactivation. In contrast, when bacterial cells were in direct contact with TiO2 particles, an increase in the amount of capsular EPS decreased cell viability during photocatalytic treatment. Taken together, these results suggest that although capsular EPS can protect bacterial cells by consuming photogenerated reactive species, it also facilitates photocatalytic inactivation of bacteria by promoting the adhesion of TiO2 particles to the cell surface. Fluorescence microscopy and scanning electron microscopy analyses further confirmed that high capsular EPS density led to more TiO2 particles attaching to cells and forming bacterium-TiO2 aggregates. Calculations of interaction energy, represented by extended Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (XDLVO) potential, suggested that the presence of capsular EPS enhances the attachment of TiO2 particles to bacterial cells via acid-base interactions. Consideration of these mechanisms is critical for understanding bacterium-nanoparticle interactions and the photocatalytic inactivation of bacteria. PMID:26002903

  2. Dual Roles of Capsular Extracellular Polymeric Substances in Photocatalytic Inactivation of Escherichia coli: Comparison of E. coli BW25113 and Isogenic Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Guocheng; Xia, Dehua; Ng, Tsz Wai; Yip, Ho Yin; Li, Guiying; Zhao, Huijun

    2015-01-01

    The dual roles of capsular extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) in the photocatalytic inactivation of bacteria were demonstrated in a TiO2-UVA system, by comparing wild-type Escherichia coli strain BW25113 and isogenic mutants with upregulated and downregulated production of capsular EPS. In a partition system in which direct contact between bacterial cells and TiO2 particles was inhibited, an increase in the amount of EPS was associated with increased bacterial resistance to photocatalytic inactivation. In contrast, when bacterial cells were in direct contact with TiO2 particles, an increase in the amount of capsular EPS decreased cell viability during photocatalytic treatment. Taken together, these results suggest that although capsular EPS can protect bacterial cells by consuming photogenerated reactive species, it also facilitates photocatalytic inactivation of bacteria by promoting the adhesion of TiO2 particles to the cell surface. Fluorescence microscopy and scanning electron microscopy analyses further confirmed that high capsular EPS density led to more TiO2 particles attaching to cells and forming bacterium-TiO2 aggregates. Calculations of interaction energy, represented by extended Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (XDLVO) potential, suggested that the presence of capsular EPS enhances the attachment of TiO2 particles to bacterial cells via acid-base interactions. Consideration of these mechanisms is critical for understanding bacterium-nanoparticle interactions and the photocatalytic inactivation of bacteria. PMID:26002903

  3. groE mutants of Escherichia coli are defective in umuDC-dependent UV mutagenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Donnelly, C.E.; Walker, G.C. )

    1989-11-01

    Overexpression of the SOS-inducible umuDC operon of Escherichia coli results in the inability of these cells to grow at 30 degrees C. Mutations in several heat shock genes suppress this cold sensitivity. Suppression of umuD+C+-dependent cold sensitivity appears to occur by two different mechanisms. We show that mutations in lon and dnaK heat shock genes suppress cold sensitivity in a lexA-dependent manner. In contrast, mutations in groES, groEL, and rpoH heat shock genes suppress cold sensitivity regardless of the transcriptional regulation of the umuDC genes. We have also found that mutations in groES and groEL genes are defective in umuDC-dependent UV mutagenesis. This defect can be suppressed by increased expression of the umuDC operon. The mechanism by which groE mutations affect umuDC gene product function may be related to the stability of the UmuC protein, since the half-life of this protein is shortened because of mutations at the groE locus.

  4. Escherichia coli redox mutants as microbial cell factories for the synthesis of reduced biochemicals

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz, Jimena A.; de Almeida, Alejandra; Godoy, Manuel S.; Mezzina, Mariela P.; Bidart, Gonzalo N.; Méndez, Beatriz S.; Pettinari, M. Julia; Nikel, Pablo I.

    2013-01-01

    Bioprocesses conducted under conditions with restricted O2 supply are increasingly exploited for the synthesis of reduced biochemicals using different biocatalysts. The model facultative aerobe Escherichia coli, the microbial cell factory par excellence, has elaborate sensing and signal transduction mechanisms that respond to the availability of electron acceptors and alternative carbon sources in the surrounding environment. In particular, the ArcBA and CreBC two-component signal transduction systems are largely responsible for the metabolic regulation of redox control in response to O2 availability and carbon source utilization, respectively. Significant advances in the understanding of the biochemical, genetic, and physiological duties of these regulatory systems have been achieved in recent years. This situation allowed to rationally-design novel engineering approaches that ensure optimal carbon and energy flows within central metabolism, as well as to manipulate redox homeostasis, in order to optimize the production of industrially-relevant metabolites. In particular, metabolic flux analysis provided new clues to understand the metabolic regulation mediated by the ArcBA and CreBC systems. Genetic manipulation of these regulators proved useful for designing microbial cells factories tailored for the synthesis of reduced biochemicals with added value, such as poly(3-hydroxybutyrate), under conditions with restricted O2 supply. This network-wide strategy is in contrast with traditional metabolic engineering approaches, that entail direct modification of the pathway(s) at stake, and opens new avenues for the targeted modulation of central catabolic pathways at the transcriptional level. PMID:24688679

  5. Subunit and amino acid interactions in the Escherichia coli mannitol permease: a functional complementation study of coexpressed mutant permease proteins.

    PubMed

    Saraceni-Richards, C A; Jacobson, G R

    1997-08-01

    Mannitol-specific enzyme II, or mannitol permease, of the phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent carbohydrate phosphotransferase system of Escherichia coli carries out the transport and phosphorylation of D-mannitol and is most active as a dimer in the membrane. We recently reported the importance of a glutamate residue at position 257 in the binding and transport of mannitol by this protein (C. Saraceni-Richards and G. R. Jacobson, J. Bacteriol. 179:1135-1142, 1997). Replacing Glu-257 with alanine (E257A) or glutamine (E257Q) eliminated detectable mannitol binding and transport by the permease. In contrast, an E257D mutant protein was able to bind and phosphorylate mannitol in a manner similar to that of the wild-type protein but was severely defective in mannitol uptake. In this study, we have coexpressed proteins containing mutations at position 257 with other inactive permeases containing mutations in each of the three domains of this protein. Activities of any active heterodimers resulting from this coexpression were measured. The results show that various inactive mutant permease proteins can complement proteins containing mutations at position 257. In addition, we show that both Glu at position 257 and His at position 195, both of which are in the membrane-bound C domain of the protein, must be on the same subunit of a permease dimer in order for efficient mannitol phosphorylation and uptake to occur. The results also suggest that mannitol bound to the opposite subunit within a permease heterodimer can be phosphorylated by the subunit containing the E257A mutation (which cannot bind mannitol) and support a model in which there are separate binding sites on each subunit within a permease dimer. Finally, we provide evidence from these studies that high-affinity mannitol binding is necessary for efficient transport by mannitol permease.

  6. Cloning of Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa phosphomannose isomerase genes and their expression in alginate-negative mutants of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed Central

    Darzins, A; Nixon, L L; Vanags, R I; Chakrabarty, A M

    1985-01-01

    The phosphomannose isomerase (pmi) gene of Escherichia coli was cloned on a broad-host-range cosmid vector and expressed in Pseudomonas aeruginosa at a low level. Plasmid pAD3, which harbors the E. coli pmi gene, contains a 6.2-kilobase-pair HindIII fragment derived from the chromosome of E. coli. Subcloning produced plasmids carrying the 1.5-kilobase-pair HindIII-HpaI subfragment of pAD3 that restored alginic acid production in a nonmucoid, alginate-negative mutant of P. aeruginosa. This fragment also complemented mannose-negative, phosphomannose isomerase-negative mutants of E. coli and showed no homology by DNA-DNA hybridization to P. aeruginosa chromosomal DNA. By using a BamHI constructed cosmid clone bank of the stable alginate producing strain 8830, we have been able to isolate a recombinant plasmid of P. aeruginosa origin that also restores alginate production in the alginate-negative mutant. This new recombinant plasmid, designated pAD4, contained a 9.9-kilobase-pair EcoRI-BamHI fragment with the ability to restore alginate synthesis in the alginate-negative P. aeruginosa. This fragment showed no homology to E. coli chromosomal DNA or to plasmid pAD3. Both mucoid and nonmucoid strains of P. aeruginosa had no detectable levels of phosphomannose isomerase activity as measured by mannose 6-phosphate-to-fructose 6-phosphate conversion. However, P. aeruginosa strains harboring the cloned pmi gene of E. coli contained measurable levels of phosphomannose isomerase activity as evidenced by examining the conversion of mannose 6-phosphate to fructose 6-phosphate. Images PMID:3918000

  7. Properties of a glycogen like polysaccharide produced by a mutant of Escherichia coli lacking glycogen synthase and maltodextrin phosphorylase.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Ji-Yun; Kim, Min-Gyu; Kim, Young-Wan; Ban, Hyun-Seung; Won, Mi-Sun; Park, Jong-Tae; Park, Kwan-Hwa

    2016-01-20

    Escherichia coli mutant TBP38 lacks glycogen synthase (GlgA) and maltodextrin phosphorylase (MalP). When grown on maltose in fed-batch fermentation TBP38 accumulated more than 50-fold higher glycogen-type polysaccharide than its parental strain. The polysaccharides were extracted at different growth stages and migrated as one peak in size-exclusion chromatography. TBP38 produced polysaccharides ranging 2.6 × 10(6)-4.6 × 10(6)Da. A ratio of short side-chains (DP ≦ 12) in the polysaccharides was greater than 50%, and number-average degree of polymerization varied from 9.8 to 8.4. The polysaccharides showed 70-290 times greater water-solubility than amylopectin. Km values using porcine and human pancreatic α-amylases with polysaccharides were 2- to 4-fold larger than that of amylopectin. kcat values were similar for both α-amylases. The TBP38 polysaccharides had 40-60% lower digestibility to amyloglucosidase than amylopectin. Intriguingly, the polysaccharides showed strong immunostimulating effects on mouse macrophage cell comparable to lipopolysaccharides. The lipopolysaccharide contamination levels were too low to account for this effect. PMID:26572397

  8. Determination of mutational spectrum of the pesticide, captan, with an improved set of Escherichia coli LacZ mutants.

    PubMed

    Lu, C; Pfeil, R M; Rice, C P

    1995-07-01

    The mutational spectrum of the fungicide, captan, was determined using a set of improved Escherichia coli lacZ mutants. Captan created mutations mostly at dA-dT sites (83%) with only 17% occurring at dG-dC sites. The hydrolysis products of captan do not appear to be mutagenic because samples of captan at different hydrolysis stages showed basically the same mutational spectra: 31% at AT --> CG transversions, 8% of GC --> AT transitions, 2% of GC --> CG transversions, 8% of GC --> TA transversions, 19% of AT --> TA transversions, and 32% of AT --> GC transitions. Prepared solutions of captan lost their mutational activity gradually over time, indicating that the rate of decrease in mutagenicity agreed with the kinetics of captan hydrolysis reported in other studies. Using the change in mutagenicity to predict degradation, the hydrolysis of captan in pH 7.0 buffer was about three times faster than the hydrolysis carried out in pH 4.5 buffer. To our knowledge, this is the first presentation of mutational spectrum of captan.

  9. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of D53H mutant Escherichia coli cAMP receptor protein

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jing; Wu, Tong; Guo, Zheng; Lou, Tiantian; Yu, Shaoning; Gong, Weimin; Ji, Chaoneng

    2013-01-01

    The Escherichia coli cyclic AMP receptor protein (CRP) is a prokaryotic global transcription activator protein that controls the expression of many different genes. Wild-type CRP can bind to special DNA sequences in the presence of cAMP. The substitution of Asp53 by His results in the CRP* phenotype, which does not require exogenous cAMP. In the present study, the D53H CRP mutant was overexpressed, purified and crystallized. cAMP-free D53H CRP crystals were obtained and diffracted to a resolution of 2.9 Å. Based on the systematic absences of the crystals, the space group is likely to be P212121, with unit-cell parameters a = 76.66, b = 152.14, c = 176.11 Å. The asymmetric unit was confirmed to contain four protein dimers, with a Matthews coefficient of 2.71 Å3 Da−1 and a solvent content of 54.68%. PMID:24316848

  10. Myristoylation negative msbB-mutants of probiotic E. coli Nissle 1917 retain tumor specific colonization properties but show less side effects in immunocompetent mice

    PubMed Central

    Stritzker, Jochen; Hill, Philip J; Gentschev, Ivaylo

    2010-01-01

    Specific colonization of solid tumors by bacteria opens the way to novel approaches in both tumor diagnosis and therapy. However, even non-pathogenic bacteria induce responses by the immune system, which could be devastating for a tumor bearing patient. As such effects are caused e.g., by the lipid A moiety of the lipopolysaccharide, a msbB-mutant of the probiotic E. coli Nissle 1917 strain was investigated. Bacteria of the mutant strain did not show any growth defects in culture media when compared to wild-type E. coli Nissle 1917 but were unable to myristoylate lipid A, had less toxic effects on immunocompetent BALB/c mice, and were still able to specifically colonize tumors. Therefore, the modification of lipid A could result in bacterial strains that might be better suited for diagnosis and therapy of tumors than the corresponding wild-type strains, even if those are not considered pathogenic or are of probiotic background. PMID:21326939

  11. Succinic acid production from hemicellulose hydrolysate by an Escherichia coli mutant obtained by atmospheric and room temperature plasma and adaptive evolution.

    PubMed

    Bao, Haijiao; Liu, Rongming; Liang, Liya; Jiang, Youming; Jiang, Min; Ma, Jiangfeng; Chen, Kequan; Jia, Honghua; Wei, Ping; Ouyang, Pingkai

    2014-11-01

    Atmospheric and room temperature plasma and adaptive evolution were combined to generate Escherichia coli mutants, which can simultaneously and efficiently utilize glucose and xylose to produce succinic acid in chemically defined medium under exclusively anaerobic condition. Compared to the parent strain BA305, a pflB, ldhA, ppc, and ptsG deletion strain overexpressing ATP-forming phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) carboxykinase (PEPCK), the sugar consumption rate and succinic acid productivity of mutant BA408 were significantly improved with a marked increase in the key enzyme activities. Subsequent anaerobic fermentation of BA408 with corn stalk hydrolysate produced a final succinic acid concentration of 23.1 g L(-1) with a yield of 0.85 g g(-1) sugar mixture. The observed synthesis of succinic acid from the corn stalk hydrolysate showed a great potential usage of renewable biomass as a feedstock for an economical succinic acid production using E. coli.

  12. UvrD and UvrD252 counteract RecQ, RecJ, and RecFOR in a rep mutant of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Lestini, Roxane; Michel, Bénédicte

    2008-09-01

    Rep and UvrD are two related Escherichia coli helicases, and inactivating both is lethal. Based on the observation that the synthetic lethality of rep and uvrD inactivation is suppressed in the absence of the recombination presynaptic proteins RecF, RecO, or RecR, it was proposed that UvrD is essential in the rep mutant to counteract a deleterious RecFOR-dependent RecA binding. We show here that the synthetic lethality of rep and uvrD mutations is also suppressed by recQ and recJ inactivation but not by rarA inactivation. Furthermore, it is independent of the action of UvrD in nucleotide excision repair and mismatch repair. These observations support the idea that UvrD counteracts a deleterious RecA binding to forks blocked in the rep mutant. An ATPase-deficient mutant of UvrD [uvrD(R284A)] is dominant negative in a rep mutant, but only in the presence of all RecQJFOR proteins, suggesting that the UvrD(R284A) mutant protein is deleterious when it counteracts one of these proteins. In contrast, the uvrD252 mutant (G30D), which exhibits a strongly decreased ATPase activity, is viable in a rep mutant, where it allows replication fork reversal. We conclude that the residual ATPase activity of UvrD252 prevents a negative effect on the viability of the rep mutant and allows UvrD to counteract the action of RecQ, RecJ, and RecFOR at forks blocked in the rep mutant. Models for the action of UvrD at blocked forks are proposed. PMID:18567657

  13. Improvement of constraint-based flux estimation during L-phenylalanine production with Escherichia coli using targeted knock-out mutants.

    PubMed

    Weiner, Michael; Tröndle, Julia; Albermann, Christoph; Sprenger, Georg A; Weuster-Botz, Dirk

    2014-07-01

    Fed-batch production of the aromatic amino acid L-phenylalanine was studied with recombinant Escherichia coli strains on a 15 L-scale using glycerol as carbon source. Flux Variability Analysis (FVA) was applied for intracellular flux estimation to obtain an insight into intracellular flux distribution during L-phenylalanine production. Variability analysis revealed great flux uncertainties in the central carbon metabolism, especially concerning malate consumption. Due to these results two recombinant strains were genetically engineered differing in the ability of malate degradation and anaplerotic reactions (E. coli FUS4.11 ΔmaeA pF81kan and E. coli FUS4.11 ΔmaeA ΔmaeB pF81kan). Applying these malic enzyme knock-out mutants in the standardized L-phenylalanine production process resulted in almost identical process performances (e.g., L-phenylalanine concentration, production rate and byproduct formation). This clearly highlighted great redundancies in central metabolism in E. coli. Uncertainties of intracellular flux estimations by constraint-based analyses during fed-batch production of L-phenylalanine were drastically reduced by application of the malic enzyme knock-out mutants.

  14. An active site mutant of Escherichia coli cyclopropane fatty acid synthase forms new non-natural fatty acids providing insights on the mechanism of the enzymatic reaction.

    PubMed

    E, Guangqi; Drujon, Thierry; Correia, Isabelle; Ploux, Olivier; Guianvarc'h, Dominique

    2013-12-01

    We have produced and purified an active site mutant of the Escherichia coli cyclopropane fatty acid synthase (CFAS) by replacing the strictly conserved G236 within cyclopropane synthases, by a glutamate residue, which corresponds to E146 of the homologous mycolic acid methyltransferase, Hma, producing hydroxymethyl mycolic acids. The G236E CFAS mutant had less than 1% of the in vitro activity of the wild type enzyme. We expressed the G236E CFAS mutant in an E. coli (DE3) strain in which the chromosomal cfa gene had been deleted. After extraction of phospholipids and conversion into the corresponding fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs), we observed the formation of cyclopropanated FAMEs suggesting that the mutant retained some of the normal activity in vivo. However, we also observed the formation of new C17 methyl-branched unsaturated FAMEs whose structures were determined using GC/MS and NMR analyses. The double bond was located at different positions 8, 9 or 10, and the methyl group at position 10 or 9. Thus, this new FAMEs are likely arising from a 16:1 acyl chain of a phospholipid that had been transformed by the G236E CFAS mutant in vivo. The reaction catalyzed by this G236E CFAS mutant thus starts by the methylation of the unsaturated acyl chain at position 10 or 9 yielding a carbocation at position 9 or 10 respectively. It follows then two competing steps, a normal cyclopropanation or hydride shift/elimination events giving different combinations of alkenes. This study not only provides further evidence that cyclopropane synthases (CSs) form a carbocationic intermediate but also opens the way to CSs engineering for the synthesis of non-natural fatty acids.

  15. RecFOR function is required for DNA repair and recombination in a RecA loading-deficient recB mutant of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Ivancić-Baće, Ivana; Peharec, Petra; Moslavac, Suncana; Skrobot, Nikolina; Salaj-Smic, Erika; Brcić-Kostić, Krunoslav

    2003-02-01

    The RecA loading activity of the RecBCD enzyme, together with its helicase and 5' --> 3' exonuclease activities, is essential for recombination in Escherichia coli. One particular mutant in the nuclease catalytic center of RecB, i.e., recB1080, produces an enzyme that does not have nuclease activity and is unable to load RecA protein onto single-stranded DNA. There are, however, previously published contradictory data on the recombination proficiency of this mutant. In a recF(-) background the recB1080 mutant is recombination deficient, whereas in a recF(+) genetic background it is recombination proficient. A possible explanation for these contrasting phenotypes may be that the RecFOR system promotes RecA-single-strand DNA filament formation and replaces the RecA loading defect of the RecB1080CD enzyme. We tested this hypothesis by using three in vivo assays. We compared the recombination proficiencies of recB1080, recO, recR, and recF single mutants and recB1080 recO, recB1080 recR, and recB1080 recF double mutants. We show that RecFOR functions rescue the repair and recombination deficiency of the recB1080 mutant and that RecA loading is independent of RecFOR in the recB1080 recD double mutant where this activity is provided by the RecB1080C(D(-)) enzyme. According to our results as well as previous data, three essential activities for the initiation of recombination in the recB1080 mutant are provided by different proteins, i.e., helicase activity by RecB1080CD, 5' --> 3' exonuclease by RecJ- and RecA-single-stranded DNA filament formation by RecFOR. PMID:12618388

  16. Isolation and Characterization of β-Ketoacyl-Acyl Carrier Protein Reductase (fabG) Mutants of Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Chiou-Yan; Cronan, John E.

    2004-01-01

    FabG, β-ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) reductase, performs the NADPH-dependent reduction of β-ketoacyl-ACP substrates to β-hydroxyacyl-ACP products, the first reductive step in the elongation cycle of fatty acid biosynthesis. We report the first documented fabG mutants and their characterization. By chemical mutagenesis followed by a tritium suicide procedure, we obtained three conditionally lethal temperature-sensitive fabG mutants. The Escherichia coli [fabG (Ts)] mutant contains two point mutations: A154T and E233K. The β-ketoacyl-ACP reductase activity of this mutant was extremely thermolabile, and the rate of fatty acid synthesis measured in vivo was inhibited upon shift to the nonpermissive temperature. Moreover, synthesis of the acyl-ACP intermediates of the pathway was inhibited upon shift of mutant cultures to the nonpermissive temperature, indicating blockage of the synthetic cycle. Similar results were observed for in vitro fatty acid synthesis. Complementation analysis revealed that only the E233K mutation was required to give the temperature-sensitive growth phenotype. In the two Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium fabG(Ts) mutants one strain had a single point mutation, S224F, whereas the second strain contained two mutations (M125I and A223T). All of the altered residues of the FabG mutant proteins are located on or near the twofold axes of symmetry at the dimer interfaces in this homotetrameric protein, suggesting that the quaternary structures of the mutant FabG proteins may be disrupted at the nonpermissive temperature. PMID:14996818

  17. Deletion of luxS further attenuates the virulence of the avian pathogenic Escherichia coli aroA mutant.

    PubMed

    Han, Xiangan; Bai, Hao; Tu, Jian; Yang, Lijun; Xu, Da; Wang, Shaohui; Qi, Kezong; Fan, Guobo; Zhang, Yuxi; Zuo, Jiakun; Tian, Mingxing; Ding, Chan; Yu, Shengqing

    2015-11-01

    In this study, an aroA-deletion avian pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC) mutant (strain DE17ΔaroA) and aroA and luxS double deletion APEC mutant (strain DE17ΔluxSΔaroA) were constructed from the APEC DE17 strain. The results showed that as compared to DE17ΔaroA, the virulence of DE17ΔluxSΔaroA was further attenuated by 200- and 31.7-fold, respectively, in ducklings based on the 50% lethal dose. The adherence and invasion abilities of DE17ΔluxSΔaroA and DE17ΔaroA were reduced by 36.5%/42.5% and 25.8%/29.3%, respectively, as compared to the wild-type strain DE17 (p < 0.05 and 0.01, respectively). Furthermore, in vivo studies showed that the bacterial loads of DE17ΔluxSΔaroA were reduced by 8400- and 11,333-fold in the spleen and blood of infected birds, respectively, while those of DE17ΔaroA were reduced by 743- and 1000-fold, respectively, as compared to the wild-type strain DE17. Histopathological analysis showed both that the mutants were associated with reduced pathological changes in the liver, spleen, and kidney of ducklings, and changes in DE17ΔluxSΔaroA-infected ducklings were reduced to a greater degree than those infected with DE17ΔaroA. Real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis further demonstrated that the mRNA levels of virulence-related genes (i.e., tsh, ompA, vat, iucD, pfs, fyuA, and fimC) were significantly decreased in DE17ΔaroA, especially in DE17ΔluxSΔaroA, as compared to DE17 (p < 0.05). In addition, the deletion of aroA or the double deletion of aroA and luxS reduced bacterial motility. To evaluate the potential use of DE17ΔluxSΔaroA as a vaccine candidate, 50 7-day-old ducklings were divided randomly into five groups of ten each for the experiment. The results showed that the ducklings immunized with inactivated DE17, DE17ΔluxS, DE17ΔaroA, and DE17ΔluxSΔaroA were 70.0%, 70.0%, 70.0, and 80.0% protected, respectively, after challenge with strain APEC DE17. The results of this study suggest that the double deletion of

  18. Complementation of an Escherichia coli adhE mutant by the Entamoeba histolytica EhADH2 gene provides a method for the identification of new antiamebic drugs.

    PubMed Central

    Yong, T S; Li, E; Clark, D; Stanley, S L

    1996-01-01

    The pathogenic protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica, the cause of amebic dysentery and amebic liver abscess, is an obligate anaerobe, and derives energy from the fermentation of glucose to ethanol with pyruvate and acetyl coenzyme A as intermediates. We have isolated EhADH2, a key enzyme in this pathway, that is a NAD+- and Fe2+-dependent bifunctional enzyme with acetaldehyde dehydrogenase and alcohol dehydrogenase activities. EhADH2 is the only known eukaryotic member of a newly defined family of prokaryotic multifunctional enzymes, which includes the Escherichia coli AdhE enzyme, an enzyme required for anaerobic growth of E. coli. Because of the critical role of EhADH2 in the amebic fermentation pathway and the lack of known eukaryotic homologues of the EhADH2 enzyme, EhADH2 represents a potential target for antiamebic chemotherapy. However, screening of compounds for antiamebic activity is hampered by the cost of large scale growth of Ent. histolytica, and difficulties in quantitating drug efficacy in vitro. To approach this problem, we expressed the EhADH2 gene in a mutant strain of E. coli carrying a deletion of the adhE gene. Expression of EhADH2 restored the ability of the mutant E. coli strain to grow under anaerobic conditions. By screening compounds for the ability to inhibit the anaerobic growth of the E. coli/EhADH2 strain, we have developed a rapid assay for identifying compounds with anti-EhADH2 activity. Using bacteria to bypass the need for parasite culture in the initial screening process for anti-parasitic agents could greatly simplify and reduce the cost of identifying new therapeutic agents effective against parasitic diseases. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:8692838

  19. Analysis of mRNA decay and rRNA processing in Escherichia coli multiple mutants carrying a deletion in RNase III.

    PubMed Central

    Babitzke, P; Granger, L; Olszewski, J; Kushner, S R

    1993-01-01

    RNase III is an endonuclease involved in processing both rRNA and certain mRNAs. To help determine whether RNase III (rnc) is required for general mRNA turnover in Escherichia coli, we have created a deletion-insertion mutation (delta rnc-38) in the structural gene. In addition, a series of multiple mutant strains containing deficiencies in RNase II (rnb-500), polynucleotide phosphorylase (pnp-7 or pnp-200), RNase E (rne-1 or rne-3071), and RNase III (delta rnc-38) were constructed. The delta rnc-38 single mutant was viable and led to the accumulation of 30S rRNA precursors, as has been previously observed with the rnc-105 allele (P. Gegenheimer, N. Watson, and D. Apirion, J. Biol. Chem. 252:3064-3073, 1977). In the multiple mutant strains, the presence of the delta rnc-38 allele resulted in the more rapid decay of pulse-labeled RNA but did not suppress conditional lethality, suggesting that the lethality associated with altered mRNA turnover may be due to the stabilization of specific mRNAs. In addition, these results indicate that RNase III is probably not required for general mRNA decay. Of particular interest was the observation that the delta rnc-38 rne-1 double mutant did not accumulate 30S rRNA precursors at 30 degrees C, while the delta rnc-38 rne-3071 double mutant did. Possible explanations of these results are discussed. Images PMID:8416898

  20. A systematic analysis of TCA Escherichia coli mutants reveals suitable genetic backgrounds for enhanced hydrogen and ethanol production using glycerol as main carbon source.

    PubMed

    Valle, Antonio; Cabrera, Gema; Muhamadali, Howbeer; Trivedi, Drupad K; Ratray, Nicholas J W; Goodacre, Royston; Cantero, Domingo; Bolivar, Jorge

    2015-09-01

    Biodiesel has emerged as an environmentally friendly alternative to fossil fuels; however, the low price of glycerol feed-stocks generated from the biodiesel industry has become a burden to this industry. A feasible alternative is the microbial biotransformation of waste glycerol to hydrogen and ethanol. Escherichia coli, a microorganism commonly used for metabolic engineering, is able to biotransform glycerol into these products. Nevertheless, the wild type strain yields can be improved by rewiring the carbon flux to the desired products by genetic engineering. Due to the importance of the central carbon metabolism in hydrogen and ethanol synthesis, E. coli single null mutant strains for enzymes of the TCA cycle and other related reactions were studied in this work. These strains were grown anaerobically in a glycerol-based medium and the concentrations of ethanol, glycerol, succinate and hydrogen were analysed by HPLC and GC. It was found that the reductive branch is the more relevant pathway for the aim of this work, with malate playing a central role. It was also found that the putative C4-transporter dcuD mutant improved the target product yields. These results will contribute to reveal novel metabolic engineering strategies for improving hydrogen and ethanol production by E. coli.

  1. Overproduction of peroxide-scavenging enzymes in Escherichia coli suppresses spontaneous mutagenesis and sensitivity to redox-cycling agents in oxyR-mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Greenberg, J T; Demple, B

    1988-01-01

    Mutations that suppressed the H2O2 sensitivity of Escherichia coli oxyR- strains caused elevated levels of one three enzymes that destroy organic and hydrogen peroxides: catalase-hydroperoxidase I (the katG gene product), catalase-hydroperoxidase II (controlled by katEF) or alkyl hydroperoxide reductase (specified by the ahp genes). The continuous high-level expression of any one of these enzymes also conferred resistance in an oxyR deletion mutant against other compounds such as N-ethylmaleimide and the superoxide-generator menadione. Overproduction of alkyl hydroperoxide reductase, but not of the catalases, gave resistance to the organic oxidant cumene hydroperoxide. The E. coli delta oxyR strains also exhibited a strongly elevated frequency of spontaneous mutagenesis, as reported for such mutants in Salmonella typhimurium. This mutagenesis was greatly diminished by the individual overexpression of these scavenging enzymes. All of these phenotypes--enzyme overproduction, resistance to oxidants and suppression of spontaneous mutagenesis--remained linked upon transduction of the mutant katG or ahp genes. Peroxides thus appear to mediate the toxicity of a variety of redox agents, and are produced in sufficient quantity during normal metabolism to cause a substantial increase in 'spontaneous' mutations in cells that lack adequate antioxidant defenses. Images PMID:2847922

  2. Production of isoamyl acetate in ackA-pta and/or ldh mutants of Escherichia coli with overexpression of yeast ATF2.

    PubMed

    Vadali, R V; Horton, C E; Rudolph, F B; Bennett, G N; San, K-Y

    2004-02-01

    The gene coding for alcohol acetyltransferase ( ATF2), which catalyzes the esterification of isoamyl alcohol and acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA), was cloned from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and expressed in Escherichia coli. This genetically engineered strain of E. coli produced the ester isoamyl acetate when isoamyl alcohol was added externally to the cell culture medium. Various competing pathways at the acetyl-CoA node were inactivated to increase the intracellular acetyl-CoA pool and divert more carbon flux to the ester synthesis pathway. Several strains with deletions in the ackA-pta and/or ldh pathways and bearing the ATF2 on a high-copy-number plasmid were constructed and studied. Compared to the wild-type, ackA-pta and nuo mutants produced higher amounts of ester and an ackA-pta-ldh-nuo mutant lower amounts. Isoamyl acetate production correlated well with intracellular coenzyme A (CoA) and acetyl-CoA levels. The ackA-pta-nuo mutant had the highest intracellular CoA/acetyl-CoA level and hence produced the highest amount of ester (1.75 mM) during the growth phase under oxic conditions and during the production phase under anoxic conditions. PMID:14586577

  3. Functional expression of the glucose transporter of Zymomonas mobilis leads to restoration of glucose and fructose uptake in Escherichia coli mutants and provides evidence for its facilitator action.

    PubMed Central

    Weisser, P; Krämer, R; Sahm, H; Sprenger, G A

    1995-01-01

    The Zymomonas mobilis genes encoding the glucose facilitator (glf), glucokinase (glk), or fructokinase (frk) were cloned and expressed in a lacIq-Ptac system using Escherichia coli K-12 mutants deficient in uptake and phosphorylation of glucose and fructose. Growth on glucose or fructose was restored when the respective genes (glf-glk or glf-frk) were expressed. In E. coli glf+ strains, both glucose and fructose were taken up via facilitated diffusion (Km, 4.1 mM for glucose and 39 mM for fructose; Vmax at 15 degrees C, 75 and 93 nmol min-1 mg-1 [dry weight] for glucose and fructose, respectively). For both substrates, counterflow maxima were observed. PMID:7768841

  4. Evolution of the adhE gene product of Escherichia coli from a functional reductase to a dehydrogenase. Genetic and biochemical studies of the mutant proteins.

    PubMed

    Membrillo-Hernandez, J; Echave, P; Cabiscol, E; Tamarit, J; Ros, J; Lin, E C

    2000-10-27

    The multifunctional AdhE protein of Escherichia coli (encoded by the adhE gene) physiologically catalyzes the sequential reduction of acetyl-CoA to acetaldehyde and then to ethanol under fermentative conditions. The NH(2)-terminal region of the AdhE protein is highly homologous to aldehyde:NAD(+) oxidoreductases, whereas the COOH-terminal region is homologous to a family of Fe(2+)-dependent ethanol:NAD(+) oxidoreductases. This fusion protein also functions as a pyruvate formate lyase deactivase. E. coli cannot grow aerobically on ethanol as the sole carbon and energy source because of inadequate rate of adhE transcription and the vulnerability of the AdhE protein to metal-catalyzed oxidation. In this study, we characterized 16 independent two-step mutants with acquired and improved aerobic growth ability on ethanol. The AdhE proteins in these mutants catalyzed the sequential oxidation of ethanol to acetaldehyde and to acetyl-CoA. All first stage mutants grew on ethanol with a doubling time of about 240 min. Sequence analysis of a randomly chosen mutant revealed an Ala-267 --> Thr substitution in the acetaldehyde:NAD(+) oxidoreductase domain of AdhE. All second stage mutants grew on ethanol with a doubling time of about 90 min, and all of them produced an AdhE(A267T/E568K). Purified AdhE(A267T) and AdhE(A267T/E568K) showed highly elevated acetaldehyde dehydrogenase activities. It therefore appears that when AdhE catalyzes the two sequential reactions in the counter-physiological direction, acetaldehyde dehydrogenation is the rate-limiting step. Both mutant proteins were more thermosensitive than the wild-type protein, but AdhE(A267T/E568K) was more thermal stable than AdhE(A267T). Since both mutant enzymes exhibited similar kinetic properties, the second mutation probably conferred an increased growth rate on ethanol by stabilizing AdhE(A267T). PMID:10922373

  5. Stabilization of the enzyme--substrate complex of the mutant Asp-67Asn inorganic pyrophosphatase from Escherichia coli by fluoride ions.

    PubMed

    Avaeva, S M; Velichko, T I; Vorobyeva, N N; Kurilova, S A; Nazarova, T I; Sklyankina, V A

    1999-02-01

    Magnesium-supported PPi hydrolysis by the mutant Asp-67Asn E. coli pyrophosphatase at saturating PPi and metal-activator concentrations in the presence of NaF is followed by a gradual decrease in the initial rate of PPi hydrolysis. The reaction occurs in two steps: first a complex containing enzyme, pyrophosphate, magnesium, and fluoride ions is immediately formed, then its conformation changes slowly. This enzyme--substrate complex stabilized by fluoride is partially active and can be isolated by the removal of excess fluoride by gel-filtration. PMID:10187907

  6. The ionization state of D37 in E. coli porin OmpF and the nature of conductance fluctuations in D37 mutants.

    PubMed

    Vrouenraets, Maarten; Miedema, Henk

    2010-11-01

    Understanding the flow of ions through E. coli porin outer membrane protein F (OmpF) requires knowledge of the charge state of all titratable residues located along the permeation pathway. Earlier theoretical studies proved successful in the calculation of the pK values of most residues. The (apparent) pK of Asp37 (D37), on the other hand, appeared rather sensitive to the (unknown) protein dielectric used. We addressed the protonation state of D37 experimentally by replacing D37 with a (neutral) valine. This D37V mutant expressed reduced cation selectivity, in agreement with the view that D37 in wild-type (WT) OmpF is fully ionized, i.e., deprotonated. The introduction of a (positively charged) arginine at position 37 evoked current fluctuations. Similar behavior was observed in the D37K mutant and the cysteine mutants D37C-MTSEA and D37C-MTSET. Nontitratable [2-(trimethylammonium)ethyl]-methanethiosulfonate (MTSET) carries a permanent and pH-independent charge of 1e, implying that the fluctuations of the D37C-MTSET mutant do not represent (de)protonation reactions of MTSET. We therefore conclude that these fluctuations reflect transitions between conformational substates evoked by structural instabilities due to the positive charge at that particular position in the pore lumen. Based on the similarities between D37C-MTSET fluctuations and those seen in the other mutants, notably D37K, the underlying mechanism of these fluctuations may be (essentially) the same in all four mutants studied.

  7. Improved expression of human interleukin-2 in high-cell-density fermentor cultures of Escherichia coli K-12 by a phosphotransacetylase mutant.

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, K A; Ben-Bassat, A; Dawson, M; de la Puente, V T; Neway, J O

    1990-01-01

    A fluoroacetate-resistant mutant of Escherichia coli K-12 (MM-294) accumulated less acetate in the medium during growth to high cell density in fermentor cultures and was shown to be defective in its phosphotransacetylase activity. The mutant had an improved ability to continue growing during induction of interleukin-2 (IL-2) synthesis, and in fermentor cultures it gave a higher level of specific IL-2 accumulation than its parent during expression under control of the temperature-sensitive pL promoter. In flask cultures at lower cell density, the mutant again produced less acetate than the parent, although both showed a much lower level of acetate accumulation than that seen in fermentors at high cell density. Both showed a higher specific expression level of IL-2 in flask cultures, and there was a greater difference between the mutant and its parent in the final extent of specific IL-2 accumulation in fermentor cultures compared with flask cultures. Thus, the concentration of acetate in the medium, which was much higher in fermentor cultures (greater than or equal to 300 mM after 5 h of induction) than in flask cultures (less than or equal to mM) of the parent organism, was a significant factor in limiting expression of the heterologous protein product, IL-2. The acetate kinase-phosphotransacetylase pathway was therefore a major source of acetate formation in these cultures. Blocking this pathway improved accumulation of IL-2 and did not slow growth. PMID:2187412

  8. Metabolic flux analysis of Escherichia coli creB and arcA mutants reveals shared control of carbon catabolism under microaerobic growth conditions.

    PubMed

    Nikel, Pablo I; Zhu, Jiangfeng; San, Ka-Yiu; Méndez, Beatriz S; Bennett, George N

    2009-09-01

    Escherichia coli has several elaborate sensing mechanisms for response to availability of oxygen and other electron acceptors, as well as the carbon source in the surrounding environment. Among them, the CreBC and ArcAB two-component signal transduction systems are responsible for regulation of carbon source utilization and redox control in response to oxygen availability, respectively. We assessed the role of CreBC and ArcAB in regulating the central carbon metabolism of E. coli under microaerobic conditions by means of (13)C-labeling experiments in chemostat cultures of a wild-type strain, DeltacreB and DeltaarcA single mutants, and a DeltacreB DeltaarcA double mutant. Continuous cultures were conducted at D = 0.1 h(-1) under carbon-limited conditions with restricted oxygen supply. Although all experimental strains metabolized glucose mainly through the Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas pathway, mutant strains had significantly lower fluxes in both the oxidative and the nonoxidative pentose phosphate pathways. Significant differences were also found at the pyruvate branching point. Both pyruvate-formate lyase and the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex contributed to acetyl-coenzyme A synthesis from pyruvate, and their activity seemed to be modulated by both ArcAB and CreBC. Strains carrying the creB deletion showed a higher biomass yield on glucose compared to the wild-type strain and its DeltaarcA derivative, which also correlated with higher fluxes from building blocks to biomass. Glyoxylate shunt and lactate dehydrogenase were active mainly in the DeltaarcA strain. Finally, it was observed that the tricarboxylic acid cycle reactions operated in a rather cyclic fashion under our experimental conditions, with reduced activity in the mutant strains.

  9. DnaK dependence of mutant ethanol oxidoreductases evolved for aerobic function and protective role of the chaperone against protein oxidative damage in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Echave, Pedro; Esparza-Cerón, M. Angel; Cabiscol, Elisa; Tamarit, Jordi; Ros, Joaquim; Membrillo-Hernández, Jorge; Lin, E. C. C.

    2002-01-01

    The adhE gene of Escherichia coli encodes a multifunctional ethanol oxidoreductase (AdhE) that catalyzes successive reductions of acetyl-CoA to acetaldehyde and then to ethanol reversibly at the expense of NADH. Mutant JE52, serially selected for acquired and improved ability to grow aerobically on ethanol, synthesized an AdhEA267T/E568K with two amino acid substitutions that sequentially conferred improved catalytic properties and stability. Here we show that the aerobic growth ability on ethanol depends also on protection of the mutant AdhE against metal-catalyzed oxidation by the chaperone DnaK (a member of the Hsp70 family). No DnaK protection of the enzyme is evident during anaerobic growth on glucose. Synthesis of DnaK also protected E. coli from H2O2 killing under conditions when functional AdhE is not required. Our results therefore suggest that, in addition to the known role of protecting cells against heat stress, DnaK also protects numerous kinds of proteins from oxidative damage. PMID:11917132

  10. Unveiling the photoelectrocatalytic inactivation mechanism of Escherichia coli: Convincing evidence from responses of parent and anti-oxidation single gene knockout mutants.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hongwei; Li, Guiying; An, Taicheng; Zhao, Huijun; Wong, Po Keung

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated photoelectrocatalytic (PEC) inactivation mechanism of bacteria using parental Escherichia coli (E. coli) BW25113 and its isogenic mutants deficient in catalase HPI (katG(-), JW3914-1) and Mn-SOD (sodA(-), JW3879-1). BW25113 in the mid-log phase was less susceptible to PEC inactivation than those in early-log and stationary phases, consistent with the peak activities of catalase and superoxide dismutase (SOD) at mid-log phase (30.6 and 13.0 Unit/ml/OD600). For different strains all in mid-log phase, PEC inactivation efficiency followed the order katG(-) > sodA(-) > BW25113, with the duration of 60, 60 and 90 min for complete inactivation of ∼2 × 10(7) CFU mL(-1) bacteria, respectively. Correspondingly, catalase and SOD levels of BW25113 were also higher than the mutants by 5.9 and 11.7 Unit/mL/OD600, respectively. Reactive oxygen species (ROSs) concentrations in PEC systems revealed that the inactivation performance coincided with H2O2 levels, rather than OH. Moreover, pre-incubation with H2O2 elevated catalase activities and PEC inactivation resistance of BW25113 were positively correlated. The above results indicated that H2O2 was the dominant PEC generated bactericide, and anti-oxidative enzymes especially catalase contributed greatly to the bacterial PEC resistance capacity. Further tests revealed that PEC treatment raised the intracellular ROSs concentration by more than 3 times, due to the permeated H2O2 and its intracellular derivative, OH. However, oxidative stress response of E. coli, such as increased catalase or SOD were not observed, perhaps because the ROSs overwhelmed the bacterial protective capacity. The accumulated ROSs subsequently caused oxidative damages to E. coli cells, including membrane damage, K(+) leakage, and protein oxidation. Compared with BW25113, the mutants experienced damages earlier and at higher levels, confirming the essential roles of catalase and SOD in the bacterial PEC resistance. PMID

  11. Unveiling the photoelectrocatalytic inactivation mechanism of Escherichia coli: Convincing evidence from responses of parent and anti-oxidation single gene knockout mutants.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hongwei; Li, Guiying; An, Taicheng; Zhao, Huijun; Wong, Po Keung

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated photoelectrocatalytic (PEC) inactivation mechanism of bacteria using parental Escherichia coli (E. coli) BW25113 and its isogenic mutants deficient in catalase HPI (katG(-), JW3914-1) and Mn-SOD (sodA(-), JW3879-1). BW25113 in the mid-log phase was less susceptible to PEC inactivation than those in early-log and stationary phases, consistent with the peak activities of catalase and superoxide dismutase (SOD) at mid-log phase (30.6 and 13.0 Unit/ml/OD600). For different strains all in mid-log phase, PEC inactivation efficiency followed the order katG(-) > sodA(-) > BW25113, with the duration of 60, 60 and 90 min for complete inactivation of ∼2 × 10(7) CFU mL(-1) bacteria, respectively. Correspondingly, catalase and SOD levels of BW25113 were also higher than the mutants by 5.9 and 11.7 Unit/mL/OD600, respectively. Reactive oxygen species (ROSs) concentrations in PEC systems revealed that the inactivation performance coincided with H2O2 levels, rather than OH. Moreover, pre-incubation with H2O2 elevated catalase activities and PEC inactivation resistance of BW25113 were positively correlated. The above results indicated that H2O2 was the dominant PEC generated bactericide, and anti-oxidative enzymes especially catalase contributed greatly to the bacterial PEC resistance capacity. Further tests revealed that PEC treatment raised the intracellular ROSs concentration by more than 3 times, due to the permeated H2O2 and its intracellular derivative, OH. However, oxidative stress response of E. coli, such as increased catalase or SOD were not observed, perhaps because the ROSs overwhelmed the bacterial protective capacity. The accumulated ROSs subsequently caused oxidative damages to E. coli cells, including membrane damage, K(+) leakage, and protein oxidation. Compared with BW25113, the mutants experienced damages earlier and at higher levels, confirming the essential roles of catalase and SOD in the bacterial PEC resistance.

  12. Modeling and simulation of the main metabolism in Escherichia coli and its several single-gene knockout mutants with experimental verification

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background It is quite important to simulate the metabolic changes of a cell in response to the change in culture environment and/or specific gene knockouts particularly for the purpose of application in industry. If this could be done, the cell design can be made without conducting exhaustive experiments, and one can screen out the promising candidates, proceeded by experimental verification of a select few of particular interest. Although several models have so far been proposed, most of them focus on the specific metabolic pathways. It is preferred to model the whole of the main metabolic pathways in Escherichia coli, allowing for the estimation of energy generation and cell synthesis, based on intracellular fluxes and that may be used to characterize phenotypic growth. Results In the present study, we considered the simulation of the main metabolic pathways such as glycolysis, TCA cycle, pentose phosphate (PP) pathway, and the anapleorotic pathways using enzymatic reaction models of E. coli. Once intracellular fluxes were computed by this model, the specific ATP production rate, the specific CO2 production rate, and the specific NADPH production rate could be estimated. The specific ATP production rate thus computed was used for the estimation of the specific growth rate. The CO2 production rate could be used to estimate cell yield, and the specific NADPH production rate could be used to determine the flux of the oxidative PP pathway. The batch and continuous cultivations were simulated where the changing patterns of extracellular and intra-cellular metabolite concentrations were compared with experimental data. Moreover, the effects of the knockout of such pathways as Ppc, Pck and Pyk on the metabolism were simulated. It was shown to be difficult for the cell to grow in Ppc mutant due to low concentration of OAA, while Pck mutant does not necessarily show this phenomenon. The slower growth rate of the Ppc mutant was properly estimated by taking into account

  13. Escherichia coli K-12 Suppressor-free Mutants Lacking Early Glycosyltransferases and Late Acyltransferases: minimal lipopolysaccharide structure and induction of envelope stress response.

    PubMed

    Klein, Gracjana; Lindner, Buko; Brabetz, Werner; Brade, Helmut; Raina, Satish

    2009-06-01

    To elucidate the minimal lipopolysaccharide (LPS) structure needed for the viability of Escherichia coli, suppressor-free strains lacking either the 3-deoxy-d-manno-oct-2-ulosonic acid transferase waaA gene or derivatives of the heptosyltransferase I waaC deletion with lack of one or all late acyltransferases (lpxL/M/P) and/or various outer membrane biogenesis factors were constructed. Delta(waaC lpxL lpxM lpxP) and waaA mutants exhibited highly attenuated growth, whereas simultaneous deletion of waaC and surA was lethal. Analyses of LPS of suppressor-free waaA mutants grown at 21 degrees C, besides showing accumulation of free lipid IV(A) precursor, also revealed the presence of its pentaacylated and hexaacylated derivatives, indicating in vivo late acylation can occur without Kdo. In contrast, LPS of Delta(waaC lpxL lpxM lpxP) strains showed primarily Kdo(2)-lipid IV(A), indicating that these minimal LPS structures are sufficient to support growth of E. coli under slow-growth conditions at 21/23 degrees C. These lipid IV(A) derivatives could be modified biosynthetically by phosphoethanolamine, but not by 4-amino-4-deoxy-l-arabinose, indicating export defects of such minimal LPS. DeltawaaA and Delta(waaC lpxL lpxM lpxP) exhibited cell-division defects with a decrease in the levels of FtsZ and OMP-folding factor PpiD. These mutations led to strong constitutive additive induction of envelope responsive CpxR/A and sigma(E) signal transduction pathways. Delta(lpxL lpxM lpxP) mutant, with intact waaC, synthesized tetraacylated lipid A and constitutively incorporated a third Kdo in growth medium inducing synthesis of P-EtN and l-Ara4N. Overexpression of msbA restored growth of Delta(lpxL lpxM lpxP) under fast-growing conditions, but only partially that of the Delta(waaC lpxL lpxM lpxP) mutant. This suppression could be alleviated by overexpression of certain mutant msbA alleles or the single-copy chromosomal MsbA-498V variant in the vicinity of Walker-box II.

  14. Resolution of fluorescence intensity decays of the two tryptophan residues in glutamine-binding protein from Escherichia coli using single tryptophan mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Axelsen, P H; Bajzer, Z; Prendergast, F G; Cottam, P F; Ho, C

    1991-01-01

    Time correlated single photon counting measurements of tryptophan (Trp) fluorescence intensity decay and other spectroscopic studies were performed on glutamine-binding protein (GlnBP) from Escherichia coli. Using site-specifically mutated forms of the protein in which tyrosine (Tyr) and phenylalanine (Phe) substitute for the Trp residues at positions 32 and 220, we have examined whether wild-type (Wtyp) intensity decay components may be assigned to specific Trp residues. Results indicate that: (a) two exponential intensity decay components are recovered from the Wtyp protein (6.16 ns, 0.46 ns); (b) the long decay component arises from Trp-220 and comprises greater than 90% of the total fluorescence emission; (c) the short component arises from Trp-32 and is highly quenched; (d) all four single-Trp mutants exhibit multiexponential intensity decays, yet equimolar mixtures of two single-Trp mutants yield only two decay components which are virtually indistinguishable from the Wtyp protein; (e) the recovery of additional components in protein mixtures is obscured by statistical noise inherent in the technique of photon counting; (f) various spectroscopic measurements suggest that Trp-Trp interactions occur in the Wtyp protein, but the Wtyp intensity decay may be closely approximated by a linear combination of intensity decays from single-Trp mutants; and (g) inferences derived independently from fluorescence and NMR spectroscopy which pertain to the presence of Trp-Trp interactions and the relative solvent exposure of the two Trp residues are in agreement. PMID:1932553

  15. Functional complementation of an Escherichia coli gap mutant supports an amphibolic role for NAD(P)-dependent glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase of Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803.

    PubMed Central

    Valverde, F; Losada, M; Serrano, A

    1997-01-01

    The gap-2 gene, encoding the NAD(P)-dependent D-glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH2) of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803, was cloned by functional complementation of an Escherichia coli gap mutant with a genomic DNA library; this is the first time that this cloning strategy has been used for a GAPDH involved in photosynthetic carbon assimilation. The Synechocystis DNA region able to complement the E. coli gap mutant was narrowed down to 3 kb and fully sequenced. A single complete open reading frame of 1,011 bp encoding a protein of 337 amino acids was found and identified as the putative gap-2 gene identified in the complete genome sequence of this organism. Determination of the transcriptional start point, identification of putative promoter and terminator sites, and orientation of the truncated flanking genes suggested the gap-2 transcript should be monocystronic, a possibility further confirmed by Northern blot studies. Both natural and recombinant homotetrameric GAPDH2s were purified and found to exhibit virtually identical physicochemical and kinetic properties. The recombinant GAPDH2 showed the dual pyridine nucleotide specificity characteristic of the native cyanobacterial enzyme, and similar ratios of NAD- to NADP-dependent activities were found in cell extracts from Synechocystis as well as in those from the complemented E. coli clones. The deduced amino acid sequence of Synechocystis GAPDH2 presented a high degree of identity with sequences of the chloroplastic NADP-dependent enzymes. In agreement with this result, immunoblot analysis using monospecific antibodies raised against GAPDH2 showed the presence of the 38-kDa GAPDH subunit not only in crude extracts from the gap-2-expressing E. coli clones and all cyanobacteria that were tested but also in those from eukaryotic microalgae and plants. Western and Northern blot experiments showed that gap-2 is conspicuously expressed, although at different levels, in Synechocystis

  16. Production of succinic acid through overexpression of NAD(+)-dependent malic enzyme in an Escherichia coli mutant.

    PubMed Central

    Stols, L; Donnelly, M I

    1997-01-01

    NAD(+)-dependent malic enzyme was cloned from the Escherichia coli genome by PCR based on the published partial sequence of the gene. The enzyme was overexpressed and purified to near homogeneity in two chromatographic steps and was analyzed kinetically in the forward and reverse directions. The Km values determined in the presence of saturating cofactor and manganese ion were 0.26 mM for malate (physiological direction) and 16 mM for pyruvate (reverse direction). When malic enzyme was induced under appropriate culture conditions in a strain of E. coli that was unable to ferment glucose and accumulated pyruvate, fermentative metabolism of glucose was restored. Succinic acid was the major fermentation product formed. When this fermentation was performed in the presence of hydrogen, the yield of succinic acid increased. The constructed pathway represents an alternative metabolic route for the fermentative production of dicarboxylic acids from renewable feedstocks. PMID:9212416

  17. Super-resolution imaging and tracking of protein-protein interactions in sub-diffraction cellular space.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhen; Xing, Dong; Su, Qian Peter; Zhu, Yun; Zhang, Jiamei; Kong, Xinyu; Xue, Boxin; Wang, Sheng; Sun, Hao; Tao, Yile; Sun, Yujie

    2014-07-17

    Imaging the location and dynamics of individual interacting protein pairs is essential but often difficult because of the fluorescent background from other paired and non-paired molecules, particularly in the sub-diffraction cellular space. Here we develop a new method combining bimolecular fluorescence complementation and photoactivated localization microscopy for super-resolution imaging and single-molecule tracking of specific protein-protein interactions. The method is used to study the interaction of two abundant proteins, MreB and EF-Tu, in Escherichia coli cells. The super-resolution imaging shows interesting distribution and domain sizes of interacting MreB-EF-Tu pairs as a subpopulation of total EF-Tu. The single-molecule tracking of MreB, EF-Tu and MreB-EF-Tu pairs reveals intriguing localization-dependent heterogonous dynamics and provides valuable insights to understanding the roles of MreB-EF-Tu interactions.

  18. Super-resolution imaging and tracking of protein–protein interactions in sub-diffraction cellular space

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhen; Xing, Dong; Su, Qian Peter; Zhu, Yun; Zhang, Jiamei; Kong, Xinyu; Xue, Boxin; Wang, Sheng; Sun, Hao; Tao, Yile; Sun, Yujie

    2014-01-01

    Imaging the location and dynamics of individual interacting protein pairs is essential but often difficult because of the fluorescent background from other paired and non-paired molecules, particularly in the sub-diffraction cellular space. Here we develop a new method combining bimolecular fluorescence complementation and photoactivated localization microscopy for super-resolution imaging and single-molecule tracking of specific protein–protein interactions. The method is used to study the interaction of two abundant proteins, MreB and EF-Tu, in Escherichia coli cells. The super-resolution imaging shows interesting distribution and domain sizes of interacting MreB–EF-Tu pairs as a subpopulation of total EF-Tu. The single-molecule tracking of MreB, EF-Tu and MreB–EF-Tu pairs reveals intriguing localization-dependent heterogonous dynamics and provides valuable insights to understanding the roles of MreB–EF-Tu interactions. PMID:25030837

  19. Super-resolution imaging and tracking of protein-protein interactions in sub-diffraction cellular space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhen; Xing, Dong; Su, Qian Peter; Zhu, Yun; Zhang, Jiamei; Kong, Xinyu; Xue, Boxin; Wang, Sheng; Sun, Hao; Tao, Yile; Sun, Yujie

    2014-07-01

    Imaging the location and dynamics of individual interacting protein pairs is essential but often difficult because of the fluorescent background from other paired and non-paired molecules, particularly in the sub-diffraction cellular space. Here we develop a new method combining bimolecular fluorescence complementation and photoactivated localization microscopy for super-resolution imaging and single-molecule tracking of specific protein-protein interactions. The method is used to study the interaction of two abundant proteins, MreB and EF-Tu, in Escherichia coli cells. The super-resolution imaging shows interesting distribution and domain sizes of interacting MreB-EF-Tu pairs as a subpopulation of total EF-Tu. The single-molecule tracking of MreB, EF-Tu and MreB-EF-Tu pairs reveals intriguing localization-dependent heterogonous dynamics and provides valuable insights to understanding the roles of MreB-EF-Tu interactions.

  20. Mutant forms of Escherichia coli protein L25 unable to bind to 5S rRNA are incorporated efficiently into the ribosome in vivo.

    PubMed

    Anikaev, A Y; Korepanov, A P; Korobeinikova, A V; Kljashtorny, V G; Piendl, W; Nikonov, S V; Garber, M B; Gongadze, G M

    2014-08-01

    5S rRNA-binding ribosomal proteins of the L25 family are an evolutional acquisition of bacteria. Earlier we showed that (i) single replacements in the RNA-binding module of the protein of this family result in destabilization or complete impossibility to form a complex with 5S rRNA in vitro; (ii) ΔL25 ribosomes of Escherichia coli are less efficient in protein synthesis in vivo than the control ribosomes. In the present work, the efficiency of incorporation of the E. coli protein L25 with mutations in the 5S rRNA-binding region into the ribosome in vivo was studied. It was found that the mutations in L25 that abolish its ability to form the complex with free 5S rRNA do not prevent its correct and efficient incorporation into the ribosome. This is supported by the fact that even the presence of a very weakly retained mutant form of the protein in the ribosome has a positive effect on the activity of the translational machinery in vivo. All this suggests the existence of an alternative incorporation pathway for this protein into the ribosome, excluding the preliminary formation of the complex with 5S rRNA. At the same time, the stable L25-5S rRNA contact is important for the retention of the protein within the ribosome, and the conservative amino acid residues of the RNA-binding module play a key role in this.

  1. The crystal structure of TrxA(CACA): Insights into the formation of a [2Fe-2S] iron-sulfur cluster in an Escherichia coli thioredoxin mutant

    SciTech Connect

    Collet, Jean-Francois; Peisach, Daniel; Bardwell, James C.A.; Xu, Zhaohui

    2010-07-13

    Escherichia coli thioredoxin is a small monomeric protein that reduces disulfide bonds in cytoplasmic proteins. Two cysteine residues present in a conserved CGPC motif are essential for this activity. Recently, we identified mutations of this motif that changed thioredoxin into a homodimer bridged by a [2Fe-2S] iron-sulfur cluster. When exported to the periplasm, these thioredoxin mutants could restore disulfide bond formation in strains lacking the entire periplasmic oxidative pathway. Essential for the assembly of the iron-sulfur was an additional cysteine that replaced the proline at position three of the CGPC motif. We solved the crystalline structure at 2.3 {angstrom} for one of these variants, TrxA(CACA). The mutant protein crystallized as a dimer in which the iron-sulfur cluster is replaced by two intermolecular disulfide bonds. The catalytic site, which forms the dimer interface, crystallized in two different conformations. In one of them, the replacement of the CGPC motif by CACA has a dramatic effect on the structure and causes the unraveling of an extended {alpha}-helix. In both conformations, the second cysteine residue of the CACA motif is surface-exposed, which contrasts with wildtype thioredoxin where the second cysteine of the CXXC motif is buried. This exposure of a pair of vicinal cysteine residues apparently allows thioredoxin to acquire an iron-sulfur cofactor at its active site, and thus a new activity and mechanism of action.

  2. Adhesion in vitro and in vivo associated with an adhesive antigen (F41) produced by a K99 mutant of the reference strain Escherichia coli B41.

    PubMed Central

    Morris, J A; Thorns, C; Scott, A C; Sojka, W J; Wells, G A

    1982-01-01

    A K99-negative mutant of the K99 reference strain Escherichia coli B41 (O101:K99) was isolated (strain B41M). It did not react with OK antiserum to a K12 K99+ recombinant or with OK antiserum to K99-positive organisms from the O8, O20, or O64 serogroups, but it did react with OK antiserum to K99-positive organisms from the O101 and O9 serogroups. The mutant hemagglutinated sheep erythrocytes and attached in vitro to calf enterocytes when cultured at 37 degrees C but not when grown at 18 degrees C. Attachment was mannose resistant but susceptible to heating and formaldehyde. These properties were associated with the presence of fimbriae. The isolated hemagglutinin migrated to the anode in immunoelectrophoresis experiments, competitively inhibited attachment of strain B41M to calf enterocytes, and could be demonstrated adhering to these cells in vitro by indirect immunofluorescent staining. The anionic hemagglutinin is referred to provisionally as F41. Germfree piglets infected with strain B41M developed diarrhea within 16 h. Scanning electron microscopy showed groups of bacteria adherent to the microvilli of villous enterocytes. Indirect immunofluorescent staining demonstrated the presence of F41 antigen in vivo. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 2 FIG. 4 PMID:6124503

  3. Evolved Osmotolerant Escherichia coli Mutants Frequently Exhibit Defective N-Acetylglucosamine Catabolism and Point Mutations in Cell Shape-Regulating Protein MreB

    PubMed Central

    Winkler, James D.; Garcia, Carlos; Olson, Michelle; Callaway, Emily

    2014-01-01

    Biocatalyst robustness toward stresses imposed during fermentation is important for efficient bio-based production. Osmotic stress, imposed by high osmolyte concentrations or dense populations, can significantly impact growth and productivity. In order to better understand the osmotic stress tolerance phenotype, we evolved sexual (capable of in situ DNA exchange) and asexual Escherichia coli strains under sodium chloride (NaCl) stress. All isolates had significantly improved growth under selection and could grow in up to 0.80 M (47 g/liter) NaCl, a concentration that completely inhibits the growth of the unevolved parental strains. Whole genome resequencing revealed frequent mutations in genes controlling N-acetylglucosamine catabolism (nagC, nagA), cell shape (mrdA, mreB), osmoprotectant uptake (proV), and motility (fimA). Possible epistatic interactions between nagC, nagA, fimA, and proV deletions were also detected when reconstructed as defined mutations. Biofilm formation under osmotic stress was found to be decreased in most mutant isolates, coupled with perturbations in indole secretion. Transcriptional analysis also revealed significant changes in ompACGL porin expression and increased transcription of sulfonate uptake systems in the evolved mutants. These findings expand our current knowledge of the osmotic stress phenotype and will be useful for the rational engineering of osmotic tolerance into industrial strains in the future. PMID:24727267

  4. Photochemistry of Wild-Type and N378D Mutant E. coli DNA Photolyase with Oxidized FAD Cofactor Studied by Transient Absorption Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Müller, Pavel; Brettel, Klaus; Grama, Laszlo; Nyitrai, Miklos; Lukacs, Andras

    2016-05-01

    DNA photolyases (PLs) and evolutionarily related cryptochrome (CRY) blue-light receptors form a widespread superfamily of flavoproteins involved in DNA photorepair and signaling functions. They share a flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) cofactor and an electron-transfer (ET) chain composed typically of three tryptophan residues that connect the flavin to the protein surface. Four redox states of FAD are relevant for the various functions of PLs and CRYs: fully reduced FADH(-) (required for DNA photorepair), fully oxidized FADox (blue-light-absorbing dark state of CRYs), and the two semireduced radical states FAD(.-) and FADH(.) formed in ET reactions. The PL of Escherichia coli (EcPL) has been studied for a long time and is often used as a reference system; however, EcPL containing FADox has so far not been investigated on all relevant timescales. Herein, a detailed transient absorption study of EcPL on timescales from nanoseconds to seconds after excitation of FADox is presented. Wild-type EcPL and its N378D mutant, in which the asparagine facing the N5 of the FAD isoalloxazine is replaced by aspartic acid, known to protonate FAD(.-) (formed by ET from the tryptophan chain) in plant CRYs in about 1.5 μs, are characterized. Surprisingly, the mutant protein does not show this protonation. Instead, FAD(.-) is converted in 3.3 μs into a state with spectral features that are different from both FADH(.) and FAD(.-) . Such a conversion does not occur in wild-type EcPL. The chemical nature and formation mechanism of the atypical FAD radical in N378D mutant EcPL are discussed.

  5. Photochemistry of Wild-Type and N378D Mutant E. coli DNA Photolyase with Oxidized FAD Cofactor Studied by Transient Absorption Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Müller, Pavel; Brettel, Klaus; Grama, Laszlo; Nyitrai, Miklos; Lukacs, Andras

    2016-05-01

    DNA photolyases (PLs) and evolutionarily related cryptochrome (CRY) blue-light receptors form a widespread superfamily of flavoproteins involved in DNA photorepair and signaling functions. They share a flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) cofactor and an electron-transfer (ET) chain composed typically of three tryptophan residues that connect the flavin to the protein surface. Four redox states of FAD are relevant for the various functions of PLs and CRYs: fully reduced FADH(-) (required for DNA photorepair), fully oxidized FADox (blue-light-absorbing dark state of CRYs), and the two semireduced radical states FAD(.-) and FADH(.) formed in ET reactions. The PL of Escherichia coli (EcPL) has been studied for a long time and is often used as a reference system; however, EcPL containing FADox has so far not been investigated on all relevant timescales. Herein, a detailed transient absorption study of EcPL on timescales from nanoseconds to seconds after excitation of FADox is presented. Wild-type EcPL and its N378D mutant, in which the asparagine facing the N5 of the FAD isoalloxazine is replaced by aspartic acid, known to protonate FAD(.-) (formed by ET from the tryptophan chain) in plant CRYs in about 1.5 μs, are characterized. Surprisingly, the mutant protein does not show this protonation. Instead, FAD(.-) is converted in 3.3 μs into a state with spectral features that are different from both FADH(.) and FAD(.-) . Such a conversion does not occur in wild-type EcPL. The chemical nature and formation mechanism of the atypical FAD radical in N378D mutant EcPL are discussed. PMID:26852903

  6. Identification of the enzymatic basis for. delta. -aminolevulinic acid auxotrophy in a hemA mutant of escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Avissar, Y.J.; Beale, S.I. )

    1989-06-01

    The hemA mutation of Escherichia coli K-12 confers a requirement for {delta}-aminolevulinic acid (ALA). Cell extract prepared from the hemA strain SASX41B was incapable of producing ALA from either glutamate or glutamyl-tRNA, whereas extract of the hem{sup +} strain HB101 formed colorimetrically detectable amounts of ALA and transferred label from 1-({sup 14}C)glutamate and 3,4-({sup 3}H)glutamyl-tRNA to ALA. Extracts of both strains converted glutamate-1-semialdehyde to ALA and were capable of aminoacylating tRNA{sup Glu}. Glutamyl-tRNA formed by extracts of both strains could be converted to ALA by the extract of hem{sup +} cells. The extract of hemA cells did not convert glutamyl-tRNA formed by either strain to ALA. However, the hemA cell extract, when supplemented in vitro with glutamyl-tRNA dehydrogenase isolated from Chlorella vulgaris cells, formed about as much ALA as did the unsupplemented hem{sup +} cell extract. We conclude from these observations that the enzyme activity that is lacking in the ALA auxotrophic strain carrying the hemA mutation is that of glutamyl-tRNA dehydrogenase.

  7. A spontaneous Escherichia coli K12 mutant which inhibits the excision-reintegration process of Mu gem2ts.

    PubMed

    Di Lallo, G; Fabozzi, G; Ghelardini, P; Paolozzi, L

    1997-09-01

    Escherichia coli K12 strains lysogenic for Mu gem2ts with the prophage inserted in a target gene (i.e., lacZ::Mu gem2ts lysogenic strains) revert to Lac+ by prophage precise excision with a relatively high frequency (about 1 x 10(-6)). The revertants obtained are still lysogens with the prophage inserted elsewhere in the bacterial chromosome. We have observed that, with the time of storage in stabs, bacterial cultures lysogenic for Mu gem2ts lose the ability to excise the prophage. The mutation responsible for this effect was co-transducible with the gyrB gene. After the removal of the prophage by P1 vir transduction from these strains, one randomly chosen clone, R3538, was further analyzed. It shows an increment of DNA supercoiling of plasmid pAT153, used as a reporter, and a reduced beta-galactosidase activity. On the other hand, R3538 is totally permissive to both lytic and lysogenic cycles of bacteriophage Mu.

  8. Immuno-Stimulatory Activity of Escherichia coli Mutants Producing Kdo2-Monophosphoryl-Lipid A or Kdo2-Pentaacyl-Monophosphoryl-Lipid A

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Biwen; Han, Yaning; Li, Ye; Li, Yanyan; Wang, Xiaoyuan

    2015-01-01

    Lipid A is the active center of lipopolysaccharide which also known as endotoxin. Monophosphoryl-lipid A (MPLA) has less toxicity but retains potent immunoadjuvant activity; therefore, it can be developed as adjuvant for improving the strength and duration of the immune response to antigens. However, MPLA cannot be chemically synthesized and can only be obtained by hydrolyzing lipopolysaccharide (LPS) purified from Gram-negative bacteria. Purifying LPS is difficult and time-consuming and can damage the structure of MPLA. In this study, Escherichia coli mutant strains HWB01 and HWB02 were constructed by deleting several genes and integrating Francisella novicida gene lpxE into the chromosome of E. coli wild type strain W3110. Compared with W3110, HWB01 and HWB02 synthesized very short LPS, Kdo2-monophosphoryl-lipid A (Kdo2-MPLA) and Kdo2-pentaacyl-monophosphoryl-lipid A (Kdo2-pentaacyl-MPLA), respectively. Structural changes of LPS in the outer membranes of HWB01 and HWB02 increased their membrane permeability, surface hydrophobicity, auto-aggregation ability and sensitivity to some antibiotics, but the abilities of these strains to activate the TLR4/MD-2 receptor of HKE-Blue hTLR4 cells were deceased. Importantly, purified Kdo2-MPLA and Kdo2-pentaacyl-MPLA differed from wild type LPS in their ability to stimulate the mammalian cell lines THP-1 and RAW264.7. The purification of Kdo2-MPLA and Kdo2-pentaacyl-MPLA from HWB01 and HWB02, respectively, is much easier than the purification of LPS from W3110, and these lipid A derivatives could be important tools for developing future vaccine adjuvants. PMID:26710252

  9. Lipopolysaccharides of polymyxin B-resistant mutants of Escherichia coli are extensively substituted by 2-aminoethyl pyrophosphate and contain aminoarabinose in lipid A.

    PubMed

    Nummila, K; Kilpeläinen, I; Zähringer, U; Vaara, M; Helander, I M

    1995-04-01

    Lipopolysaccharides (LPS) of two polymyxin-resistant (pmr) mutants and the corresponding parent strain of Escherichia coli were chemically analysed for composition and subjected to 31P-NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) for assessment of phosphate substitution. Whereas the saccharide portions, fatty acids, and phosphate contents were similar in wild-type and pmr LPS, the latter contained two- to threefold higher amounts of 2-aminoethanol. The pmr LPS also contained 4-amino-4-deoxy-L-arabinopyranose (L-Arap4N), which is normally not a component of E. coli LPS. This aminopentose has been assigned to be linked to the 4'-phosphate of lipid A. Comparative 31P-NMR analysis of the de-O-acylated LPS of the wild-type and pmr strains revealed that phosphate groups of the pmr LPS were mainly (71-79%) diphosphate diesters, which accounted for only 20% in the wild-type LPS. Diphosphate monoesters were virtually nonexistent in the pmr LPS, whereas they accounted for 42% of all phosphates in wild-type LPS. In the lipid A of the pmr strains, the 4'-phosphate was to a significant degree (35%) substituted by L-Arap4N, whereas in the wild-type LPS the L-ArapN was absent. In the pmr lipid A, 2-aminoethanol was completely substituting the glycosidic pyrophosphate but not the glycosidic monophosphate, forming a diphosphate diester linkage at this position in 40% of lipid A molecules. In the wild-type LPS the glycosidic position of lipid A carried mostly unsubstituted monophosphate and pyrophosphate. Thus the polymyxin resistance was shown to be associated, along with the esterification of the lipid A 4'-monophosphate by aminoarabinose, with extensive esterification of diphosphates in LPS by 2-aminoethanol.

  10. Molecular characterization of nine different types of mutants among 107 inhibitor-resistant TEM beta-lactamases from clinical isolates of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Henquell, C; Chanal, C; Sirot, D; Labia, R; Sirot, J

    1995-01-01

    DNA-DNA hybridization and sequencing were performed to determine the molecular basis of resistance to clavulanic acid in 107 inhibitor-resistant TEM (IRT) enzymes produced by Escherichia coli clinical isolates. These beta-lactamases derived from TEM-1 enzyme focused at pI 5.2 (n = 68) or 5.4 (n = 39) and were very poorly inhibited by clavulanic acid compared with TEM-1 enzyme. Results showed that the amino acid sequences of 84 of the 107 enzymes differ from TEM-1 by one or two substitutions previously described: Arg-244-->Ser (IRT-2) in 22 strains, Met-69-->Leu (TEM-33) in 17 strains, Met-69-->Val (TEM-34) in 14 strains, Met-69-->Ile (IRT-3) in 6 strains, Met-69-->Leu associated with Asn-276-->Asp (IRT-4) in 13 strains, and Met-69-->Val associated with Asn-276-->Asp (TEM-36) in 12 strains. A new combination, Met-69-->Ile with Asn-276-->Asp, was found in 20 strains and was called IRT-8. Two IRT enzymes not previously described were characterized. The substitution Met-69-->Val associated with a novel substitution Arg-275-->Leu occurred in one strain. The combination Met-69-->Leu and Asn-276-->Asp was associated with the novel substitution Trp-165-->Arg in two strains. These two novel enzymes were called IRT-9 and IRT-10, respectively. The implication of these novel mutated positions, 165 and 275, in resistance to inactivation by clavulanate was supported by crystallographic data on the TEM-1 enzyme and results of site-directed mutagenesis. Molecular characterization of these mutants showed great diversity among the genes coding for inhibitor-resistant TEM enzymes produced by clinical E. coli isolates. PMID:7726509

  11. Nucleotides that determine Escherichia coli tRNA(Arg) and tRNA(Lys) acceptor identities revealed by analyses of mutant opal and amber suppressor tRNAs.

    PubMed Central

    McClain, W H; Foss, K; Jenkins, R A; Schneider, J

    1990-01-01

    We have constructed an opal suppressor system in Escherichia coli to complement an existing amber suppressor system to study the structural basis of tRNA acceptor identity, particularly the role of middle anticodon nucleotide at position 35. The opal suppressor tRNA contains a UCA anticodon and the mRNA of the suppressed protein (which is easily purified and sequenced) contains a UGA nonsense triplet. Opal suppressor tRNAs of two tRNA(Arg) isoacceptor sequences each gave arginine in the suppressed protein, while the corresponding amber suppressors with U35 in their CUA anticodons each gave arginine plus a second amino acid in the suppressed protein. Since C35 but not U35 is present in the anticodon of wild-type tRNA(Arg) molecules, while the first anticodon position contains either C34 or U34, these results establish that C35 contributes to tRNA(Arg) acceptor identity. Initial characterizations of opal suppressor tRNA(Arg) mutants by suppression efficiency measurements suggest that the fourth nucleotide from the 3' end of tRNA(Arg) (A73 or G73 in different isoacceptors) also contributes to tRNA(Arg) acceptor identity. Wild-type and mutant versions of opal and amber tRNA(Lys) suppressors were examined, revealing that U35 and A73 are important determinants of tRNA(Lys) acceptor identity. Several possibilities are discussed for the general significance of having tRNA acceptor identity in the same positions in different tRNA acceptor types, as exemplified by positions 35 and 73 in tRNA(Arg) and tRNA(Lys). PMID:2251270

  12. Signal strains that can detect certain DNA replication and membrane mutants of Escherichia coli: Isolation of a new ssb allele, ssb-3

    SciTech Connect

    Schmellik-Sandage, C.S.; Tessman, E.S. )

    1990-08-01

    Mutations in several dna genes of Escherichia coli, when introduced into a strain with a lac fusion in the SOS gene sulA, resulted in formation of blue colonies on plates containing 5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl-beta-D-galactoside (X-Gal). Unexpectedly, several lines of evidence indicated that the blue colony color was not primarily due to induction of the SOS system but rather was due to a membrane defect, along with the replication defect, making the cell X-Gal extrasensitive (phenotypically Xgx), possibly because of enhanced permeability to X-Gal or leakage of beta-galactosidase. (i) In most cases, beta-galactosidase specific activity increased only two- to threefold. (ii) Mutations conferring tolerance to colicin E1 resulted in blue colony color with no increase in beta-galactosidase specific activity. (iii) Mutations in either the dnaA, dnaB, dnaC, dnaE, dnaG, or ssb gene, when introduced into a strain containing a bioA::lac fusion, produced a blue colony color without an increase in beta-galactosidase synthesis. These lac fusion strains can serve as signal strains to detect dna mutations as well as membrane mutations. By localized mutagenesis of the 92-min region of the chromosome of the sulA::lac signal strain and picking blue colonies, we isolated a novel ssb allele that confers the same extreme UV sensitivity as a delta recA allele, which is a considerably greater sensitivity than that conferred by the two well-studied ssb alleles, ssb-1 and ssb-113. The technique also yielded dnaB mutants; fortuitously, uvrA mutants were also found.

  13. Mutant Escherichia coli Heat-Labile Toxin B Subunit That Separates Toxoid-Mediated Signaling and Immunomodulatory Action from Trafficking and Delivery Functions

    PubMed Central

    Fraser, Sylvia A.; de Haan, Lolke; Hearn, Arron R.; Bone, Heather K.; Salmond, Robert J.; Rivett, A. Jennifer; Williams, Neil A.; Hirst, Timothy R.

    2003-01-01

    The homopentameric B-subunit components of Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin (EtxB) and cholera toxin (CtxB) possess the capacity to enter mammalian cells and to activate cell-signaling events in leukocytes that modulate immune cell function. Both properties have been attributed to the ability of the B subunits to bind to GM1-ganglioside receptors, a ubiquitous glycosphingolipid found in the plasma membrane. Here we describe the properties of EtxB(H57S), a mutant B subunit with a His→Ser substitution at position 57. The mutant was found to be severely defective in inducing leukocyte signaling, as shown by failure to (i) trigger caspase 3-mediated CD8+-T-cell apoptosis, (ii) activate nuclear translocation of NF-κB in Jurkat T cells, (iii) induce a potent anti-B-subunit response in mice, or (iv) serve as a mucosal adjuvant. However, its GM1 binding, cellular uptake, and delivery functions remained intact. This was further validated by the finding that EtxB(H57S) was as effective as EtxB in delivering a conjugated model class I epitope into the major histocompatibility complex class I pathway of a dendritic cell line. These observations imply that GM1 binding alone is not sufficient to trigger the signaling events responsible for the potent immunomodulatory properties of EtxB. Moreover, they demonstrate that its signaling properties play no role in EtxB uptake and trafficking. Thus, EtxB(H57S) represents a novel tool for evaluating the complex cellular interactions and signaling events occurring after receptor interaction, as well as offering an alternative means of delivering attached peptides in the absence of the potent immunomodulatory signals induced by wild-type B subunits. PMID:12595472

  14. Role of an invariant lysine residue in folate binding on Escherichia coli thymidylate synthase: calorimetric and crystallographic analysis of the K48Q mutant

    PubMed Central

    Arvizu-Flores, Aldo A.; Sugich-Miranda, Rocio; Arreola, Rodrigo; Garcia-Orozco, Karina D.; Velazquez-Contreras, Enrique F.; Montfort, William R.; Maley, Frank; Sotelo-Mundo, Rogerio R.

    2008-01-01

    Thymidylate synthase (TS) catalyzes the reductive methylation of deoxyuridine monophosphate (dUMP) using methylene tetrahydrofolate (CH2THF) as cofactor, the glutamate tail of which forms a water-mediated hydrogen-bond with an invariant lysine residue of this enzyme. To understand the role of this interaction, we studied the K48Q mutant of Escherichia coli TS using structural and biophysical methods. The kcat of the K48Q mutant was 430 fold lower than wild-type TS in activity, while the the Km for the (R)-stereoisomer of CH2THF was 300 µM, about 30 fold larger than Km from the wild-type TS. Affinity constants were determined using isothermal titration calorimetry, which showed that binding was reduced by one order of magnitude for folate-like TS inhibitors, such as propargyl-dideaza folate (PDDF) or compounds that distort the TS active site like BW1843U89 (U89). The crystal structure of the K48Q-dUMP complex revealed that dUMP binding is not impaired in the mutamt, and that U89 in a ternary complex of K48Q-nucleotide-U89 was bound in the active site with subtle differences relative to comparable wild type complexes. PDDF failed to form ternary complexes with K48Q and dUMP. Thermodynamic data correlated with the structural determinations, since PDDF binding was dominated by enthalpic effects while U89 had an important entropic component. In conclusion, K48 is critical for catalysis since it leads to a productive CH2THF binding, while mutation at this residue does not affect much the binding of inhibitors that do not make contact with this group. PMID:18403248

  15. Signal strains that can detect certain DNA replication and membrane mutants of Escherichia coli: isolation of a new ssb allele, ssb-3.

    PubMed Central

    Schmellik-Sandage, C S; Tessman, E S

    1990-01-01

    Mutations in several dna genes of Escherichia coli, when introduced into a strain with a lac fusion in the SOS gene sulA, resulted in formation of blue colonies on plates containing 5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl-beta-D-galactoside (X-Gal). Unexpectedly, several lines of evidence indicated that the blue colony color was not primarily due to induction of the SOS system but rather was due to a membrane defect, along with the replication defect, making the cell X-Gal extrasensitive (phenotypically Xgx), possibly because of enhanced permeability to X-Gal or leakage of beta-galactosidase. (i) In most cases, beta-galactosidase specific activity increased only two- to threefold. (ii) Mutations conferring tolerance to colicin E1 resulted in blue colony color with no increase in beta-galactosidase specific activity. (iii) Mutations in either the dnaA, dnaB, dnaC, dnaE, dnaG, or ssb gene, when introduced into a strain containing a bioA::lac fusion, produced a blue colony color without an increase in beta-galactosidase synthesis. These lac fusion strains can serve as signal strains to detect dna mutations as well as membrane mutations. By localized mutagenesis of the 92-min region of the chromosome of the sulA::lac signal strain and picking blue colonies, we isolated a novel ssb allele that confers the same extreme UV sensitivity as a delta recA allele, which is a considerably greater sensitivity than that conferred by the two well-studied ssb alleles, ssb-1 and ssb-113. The technique also yielded dnaB mutants; fortuitously, uvrA mutants were also found. PMID:2142938

  16. Cold inactivation and dissociation into dimers of Escherichia coli tryptophanase and its W330F mutant form.

    PubMed

    Erez, T; Gdalevsky GYa; Torchinsky, Y M; Phillips, R S; Parola, A H

    1998-05-19

    The kinetics and mechanism of reversible cold inactivation of the tetrameric enzyme tryptophanase have been studied. Cold inactivation is shown to occur slowly in the presence of K+ ions and much faster in their absence. The W330F mutant tryptophanase undergoes rapid cold inactivation even in the presence of K+ ions. In all cases the inactivation is accompanied by a decrease of the coenzyme 420-nm CD and absorption peaks and a shift of the latter peak to shorter wavelengths. The spectral changes and the NaBH4 test indicate that cooling of tryptophanase leads to breaking of the internal aldimine bond and release of the coenzyme. HPLC analysis showed that the ensuing apoenzyme dissociates into dimers. The dissociation depends on the nature and concentration of anions in the buffer solution. It readily occurs at low protein concentrations in the presence of salting-in anions Cl-, NO3- and I-, whereas salting-out anions, especially HPO4(2-), hinder the dissociation. K+ ions do not influence the dissociation of the apoenzyme, but partially protect holotryptophanase from cold inactivation. Thus, the two processes, cold inactivation of tryptophanase and dissociation of its apoform into dimers exhibit different dependencies on K+ ions and anions.

  17. NADPH-dependent reductive biotransformation with Escherichia coli and its pfkA deletion mutant: influence on global gene expression and role of oxygen supply.

    PubMed

    Siedler, Solvej; Bringer, Stephanie; Polen, Tino; Bott, Michael

    2014-10-01

    An Escherichia coli ΔpfkA mutant lacking the major phosphofructokinase possesses a partially cyclized pentose phosphate pathway leading to an increased NADPH per glucose ratio. This effect decreases the amount of glucose required for NADPH regeneration in reductive biotransformations, such as the conversion of methyl acetoacetate (MAA) to (R)-methyl 3-hydroxybutyrate (MHB) by an alcohol dehydrogenase from Lactobacillus brevis. Here, global transcriptional analyses were performed to study regulatory responses during reductive biotransformation. DNA microarray analysis revealed amongst other things increased expression of soxS, supporting previous results indicating that a high NADPH demand contributes to the activation of SoxR, the transcriptional activator of soxS. Furthermore, several target genes of the ArcAB two-component system showed a lower mRNA level in the reference strain than in the ΔpfkA mutant, pointing to an increased QH2 /Q ratio in the reference strain. This prompted us to analyze yields and productivities of MAA reduction to MHB under different oxygen regimes in a bioreactor. Under anaerobic conditions, the specific MHB production rates of both strains were comparable (7.4 ± 0.2 mmolMHB  h(-1)  gcdw (-1) ) and lower than under conditions of 15% dissolved oxygen, where those of the reference strain (12.8 mmol h(-1)  gcdw (-1) ) and of the ΔpfkA mutant (11.0 mmol h(-1)  gcdw (-1) ) were 73% and 49% higher. While the oxygen transfer rate (OTR) of the reference strain increased after the addition of MAA, presumably due to the oxidation of the acetate accumulated before MAA addition, the OTR of the ΔpfkA strain strongly decreased, indicating a very low respiration rate despite sufficient oxygen supply. The latter effect can likely be attributed to a restricted conversion of NADPH into NADH via the soluble transhydrogenase SthA, as the enzyme is outcompeted in the presence of MAA by the recombinant NADPH-dependent alcohol

  18. Activation of the Rcs Signal Transduction System Is Responsible for the Thermosensitive Growth Defect of an Escherichia coli Mutant Lacking Phosphatidylglycerol and Cardiolipin

    PubMed Central

    Shiba, Yasuhiro; Yokoyama, Yasuko; Aono, Yoshiko; Kiuchi, Takashi; Kusaka, Jin; Matsumoto, Kouji; Hara, Hiroshi

    2004-01-01

    The lethal effect of an Escherichia coli pgsA null mutation, which causes a complete lack of the major acidic phospholipids, phosphatidylglycerol and cardiolipin, is alleviated by a lack of the major outer membrane lipoprotein encoded by the lpp gene, but an lpp pgsA strain shows a thermosensitive growth defect. Using transposon mutagenesis, we found that this thermosensitivity was suppressed by disruption of the rcsC, rcsF, and yojN genes, which code for a sensor kinase, accessory positive factor, and phosphotransmitter, respectively, of the Rcs phosphorelay signal transduction system initially identified as regulating the capsular polysaccharide synthesis (cps) genes. Disruption of the rcsB gene coding for the response regulator of the system also suppressed the thermosensitivity, whereas disruption of cpsE did not. By monitoring the expression of a cpsB′-lac fusion, we showed that the Rcs system is activated in the pgsA mutant and is reverted to a wild-type level by the rcs mutations. These results indicate that envelope stress due to an acidic phospholipid deficiency activates the Rcs phosphorelay system and thereby causes the thermosensitive growth defect independent of the activation of capsule synthesis. PMID:15375134

  19. Chemical modification of mono-cysteine mutants allows a more global look at conformations of the epsilon subunit of the ATP synthase from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Ganti, Sangeeta; Vik, Steven B

    2007-02-01

    The epsilon subunit of the ATP synthase from E. coli undergoes conformational changes while rotating through 360 degrees during catalysis. The conformation of epsilon was probed in the membrane-bound ATP synthase by reaction of mono-cysteine mutants with 3-N-maleimidyl-propionyl biocytin (MPB) under resting conditions, during ATP hydrolysis, and after inhibition by ADP-AlF(3). The relative extents of labeling were quantified after electrophoresis and blotting of the partially purified epsilon subunit. Residues from the N-terminal beta-sandwich domain showed a position-specific pattern of labeling, consistent with prior structural studies. Some residues near the epsilon-gamma interface showed changes up to two-fold if labeling occurred during ATP hydrolysis or after inhibition by ADP-AlF(3). In contrast, residues found in the C-terminal alpha-helices were all labeled to a moderate or high level with a pattern that was consistent with a partially opened helical hairpin. The results indicate that the two C-terminal alpha-helices do not adopt a fixed conformation under resting conditions, but rather exhibit intrinsic flexibility. PMID:17318395

  20. Expression of Escherichia coli glycogen branching enzyme in an Arabidopsis mutant devoid of endogenous starch branching enzymes induces the synthesis of starch-like polyglucans.

    PubMed

    Boyer, Laura; Roussel, Xavier; Courseaux, Adeline; Ndjindji, Ofilia M; Lancelon-Pin, Christine; Putaux, Jean-Luc; Tetlow, Ian J; Emes, Michael J; Pontoire, Bruno; D' Hulst, Christophe; Wattebled, Fabrice

    2016-07-01

    Starch synthesis requires several enzymatic activities including branching enzymes (BEs) responsible for the formation of α(1 → 6) linkages. Distribution and number of these linkages are further controlled by debranching enzymes that cleave some of them, rendering the polyglucan water-insoluble and semi-crystalline. Although the activity of BEs and debranching enzymes is mandatory to sustain normal starch synthesis, the relative importance of each in the establishment of the plant storage polyglucan (i.e. water insolubility, crystallinity and presence of amylose) is still debated. Here, we have substituted the activity of BEs in Arabidopsis with that of the Escherichia coli glycogen BE (GlgB). The latter is the BE counterpart in the metabolism of glycogen, a highly branched water-soluble and amorphous storage polyglucan. GlgB was expressed in the be2 be3 double mutant of Arabidopsis, which is devoid of BE activity and consequently free of starch. The synthesis of a water-insoluble, partly crystalline, amylose-containing starch-like polyglucan was restored in GlgB-expressing plants, suggesting that BEs' origin only has a limited impact on establishing essential characteristics of starch. Moreover, the balance between branching and debranching is crucial for the synthesis of starch, as an excess of branching activity results in the formation of highly branched, water-soluble, poorly crystalline polyglucan.

  1. Analysis of the chloroplast proteome in arc mutants and identification of novel protein components associated with FtsZ2.

    PubMed

    Gargano, Daniela; Maple-Grødem, Jodi; Reisinger, Veronika; Eichacker, Lutz Andreas; Møller, Simon Geir

    2013-02-01

    Chloroplasts are descendants of cyanobacteria and divide by binary fission. The number of chloroplasts is regulated in a cell type-specific manner to ensure that specialized cell types can perform their functions optimally. Several protein components of the chloroplast division apparatus have been identified in the past several years, but how this process is regulated in response to developmental status, environmental signals and stress is still unknown. To begin to address this we undertook a proteomic analysis of three accumulation and replication of chloroplasts mutants that show a spectrum of plastid division perturbations. We show that defects in the chloroplast division process results in changes in the abundance of proteins when compared to wild type, but that the profile of the native stromal and membrane complexes remains unchanged. Furthermore, by combining BN-PAGE with protein interaction assays we show that AtFtsZ2-1 and AtFtsZ2-2 assemble together with rpl12A and EF-Tu into a novel chloroplast membrane complex. PMID:23225155

  2. Impact of membrane-associated hydrogenases on the F₀F₁-ATPase in Escherichia coli during glycerol and mixed carbon fermentation: ATPase activity and its inhibition by N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide in the mutants lacking hydrogenases.

    PubMed

    Blbulyan, Syuzanna; Trchounian, Armen

    2015-08-01

    Escherichia coli is able to ferment glycerol and to produce molecular hydrogen (H2) by four membrane-associated hydrogenases (Hyd) changing activity in response to different conditions. In this study, overall ATPase activity of glycerol alone and mixed carbon sources (glucose and glycerol) fermented E. coli wild type and different Hyd mutants and its inhibition by N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide (DCCD) were first investigated. ATPase activity was higher in glycerol fermented wild type cells at pH 7.5 compared to pH 6.5 and pH 5.5; DCCD inhibited markedly ATPase activity at pH 7.5. The ATPase activity at pH 7.5, compared with wild type, was lower in selC and less in hypF single mutants, suppressed in hyaB hybC selC triple mutant. Moreover, total ATPase activity of mixed carbon fermented wild type cells was maximal at pH 7.5 and lowered at pH 5.5. The ATPase activities of hypF and hyaB hybC selC mutants were higher at pH 5.5, compared with wild type; DCCD inhibited markedly ATPase activity of hypF mutant. These results demonstrate that in E. coli during glycerol fermentation the membrane proton-translocating FOF1-ATPase has major input in overall ATPase activity and alkaline pH is more optimal for the FOF1-ATPase operation. Hyd-1 and Hyd-2 are required for the FOF1-ATPase activity upon anaerobic fermentation of glycerol. The impact of Hyd-1 and Hyd-2 on the FOF1-ATPase is more obvious during mixed carbon fermentation at slightly acidic pH.

  3. [Integration and intramolecular transposition of the TnBP3 Bordetella pertussis transposon in the Escherichia coli K-12 cells -- mutant for the phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase system Hpr protein ].

    PubMed

    Sivov, I G; Bol'shakova, T N; Karataev, G I

    2001-07-01

    Integration of a plasmid carrying the TnBP3 transposon of Bordetella pertussis into the chromosome of Escherichia coli and transpositions of the integrated structure within a chromosome in the wild-type and mutant cells ptsH devoid of the major Hpr protein of the phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase system were studied. When transposed to a new chromosome site, the integrated structure was precisely (or almost precisely) excised from the metY gene sequence, which resulted in restoration of the Met+ phenotype. The integration and transposition events were only observed in the E. coli cells carrying the ptsH+ allele. The ptsH mutations inhibited integration and intramolecular transposition, which were restored after phenotypic or genetic suppression of the ptsH mutation. The intensity of the processes studied were suggested to depend on the integrity of a chain that ensures transferring of the phosphoryl residue by proteins of the phosphotransferase system in E. coli K12. The results obtained indicate that the ptsH mutants of E. coli can serve as the optimal host for cloning of fragments carrying repeated sequences of B. pertussis, which may apply to the repeated sequences of other microorganisms.

  4. Structure-activity studies of the inhibition of FabI, the enoyl reductase from Escherichia coli, by triclosan: kinetic analysis of mutant FabIs.

    PubMed

    Sivaraman, Sharada; Zwahlen, Jacque; Bell, Alasdair F; Hedstrom, Lizbeth; Tonge, Peter J

    2003-04-22

    Triclosan, a common antibacterial additive used in consumer products, is an inhibitor of FabI, the enoyl reductase enzyme from type II bacterial fatty acid biosynthesis. In agreement with previous studies [Ward, W. H., Holdgate, G. A., Rowsell, S., McLean, E. G., Pauptit, R. A., Clayton, E., Nichols, W. W., Colls, J. G., Minshull, C. A., Jude, D. A., Mistry, A., Timms, D., Camble, R., Hales, N. J., Britton, C. J., and Taylor, I. W. (1999) Biochemistry 38, 12514-12525], we report here that triclosan is a slow, reversible, tight binding inhibitor of the FabI from Escherichia coli. Triclosan binds preferentially to the E.NAD(+) form of the wild-type enzyme with a K(1) value of 23 pM. In agreement with genetic selection experiments [McMurry, L. M., Oethinger, M., and Levy, S. B. (1998) Nature 394, 531-532], the affinity of triclosan for the FabI mutants G93V, M159T, and F203L is substantially reduced, binding preferentially to the E.NAD(+) forms of G93V, M159T, and F203L with K(1) values of 0.2 microM, 4 nM, and 0.9 nM, respectively. Triclosan binding to the E.NADH form of F203L can also be detected and is defined by a K(2) value of 51 nM. We have also characterized the Y156F and A197M mutants to compare and contrast the binding of triclosan to InhA, the homologous enoyl reductase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis. As observed for InhA, Y156F FabI has a decreased affinity for triclosan and the inhibitor binds to both E.NAD(+) and E.NADH forms of the enzyme with K(1) and K(2) values of 3 and 30 nM, respectively. The replacement of A197 with Met has no impact on triclosan affinity, indicating that differences in the sequence of the conserved active site loop cannot explain the 10000-fold difference in affinities of FabI and InhA for triclosan.

  5. Structure-activity studies of the inhibition of FabI, the enoyl reductase from Escherichia coli, by triclosan: kinetic analysis of mutant FabIs.

    PubMed

    Sivaraman, Sharada; Zwahlen, Jacque; Bell, Alasdair F; Hedstrom, Lizbeth; Tonge, Peter J

    2003-04-22

    Triclosan, a common antibacterial additive used in consumer products, is an inhibitor of FabI, the enoyl reductase enzyme from type II bacterial fatty acid biosynthesis. In agreement with previous studies [Ward, W. H., Holdgate, G. A., Rowsell, S., McLean, E. G., Pauptit, R. A., Clayton, E., Nichols, W. W., Colls, J. G., Minshull, C. A., Jude, D. A., Mistry, A., Timms, D., Camble, R., Hales, N. J., Britton, C. J., and Taylor, I. W. (1999) Biochemistry 38, 12514-12525], we report here that triclosan is a slow, reversible, tight binding inhibitor of the FabI from Escherichia coli. Triclosan binds preferentially to the E.NAD(+) form of the wild-type enzyme with a K(1) value of 23 pM. In agreement with genetic selection experiments [McMurry, L. M., Oethinger, M., and Levy, S. B. (1998) Nature 394, 531-532], the affinity of triclosan for the FabI mutants G93V, M159T, and F203L is substantially reduced, binding preferentially to the E.NAD(+) forms of G93V, M159T, and F203L with K(1) values of 0.2 microM, 4 nM, and 0.9 nM, respectively. Triclosan binding to the E.NADH form of F203L can also be detected and is defined by a K(2) value of 51 nM. We have also characterized the Y156F and A197M mutants to compare and contrast the binding of triclosan to InhA, the homologous enoyl reductase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis. As observed for InhA, Y156F FabI has a decreased affinity for triclosan and the inhibitor binds to both E.NAD(+) and E.NADH forms of the enzyme with K(1) and K(2) values of 3 and 30 nM, respectively. The replacement of A197 with Met has no impact on triclosan affinity, indicating that differences in the sequence of the conserved active site loop cannot explain the 10000-fold difference in affinities of FabI and InhA for triclosan. PMID:12693936

  6. P212A Mutant of Dihydrodaidzein Reductase Enhances (S)-Equol Production and Enantioselectivity in a Recombinant Escherichia coli Whole-Cell Reaction System

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Pyung-Gang; Kim, Joonwon; Kim, Eun-Jung; Jung, EunOk; Pandey, Bishnu Prasad

    2016-01-01

    (S)-Equol, a gut bacterial isoflavone derivative, has drawn great attention because of its potent use for relieving female postmenopausal symptoms and preventing prostate cancer. Previous studies have reported on the dietary isoflavone metabolism of several human gut bacteria and the involved enzymes for conversion of daidzein to (S)-equol. However, the anaerobic growth conditions required by the gut bacteria and the low productivity and yield of (S)-equol limit its efficient production using only natural gut bacteria. In this study, the low (S)-equol biosynthesis of gut microorganisms was overcome by cloning the four enzymes involved in the biosynthesis from Slackia isoflavoniconvertens into Escherichia coli BL21(DE3). The reaction conditions were optimized for (S)-equol production from the recombinant strain, and this recombinant system enabled the efficient conversion of 200 μM and 1 mM daidzein to (S)-equol under aerobic conditions, achieving yields of 95% and 85%, respectively. Since the biosynthesis of trans-tetrahydrodaidzein was found to be a rate-determining step for (S)-equol production, dihydrodaidzein reductase (DHDR) was subjected to rational site-directed mutagenesis. The introduction of the DHDR P212A mutation increased the (S)-equol productivity from 59.0 mg/liter/h to 69.8 mg/liter/h in the whole-cell reaction. The P212A mutation caused an increase in the (S)-dihydrodaidzein enantioselectivity by decreasing the overall activity of DHDR, resulting in undetectable activity for (R)-dihydrodaidzein, such that a combination of the DHDR P212A mutant with dihydrodaidzein racemase enabled the production of (3S,4R)-tetrahydrodaidzein with an enantioselectivity of >99%. PMID:26801575

  7. Altered antibiotic transport in OmpC mutants isolated from a series of clinical strains of multi-drug resistant E. coli.

    PubMed

    Lou, Hubing; Chen, Min; Black, Susan S; Bushell, Simon R; Ceccarelli, Matteo; Mach, Tivadar; Beis, Konstantinos; Low, Alison S; Bamford, Victoria A; Booth, Ian R; Bayley, Hagan; Naismith, James H

    2011-01-01

    Antibiotic-resistant bacteria, particularly gram negative species, present significant health care challenges. The permeation of antibiotics through the outer membrane is largely effected by the porin superfamily, changes in which contribute to antibiotic resistance. A series of antibiotic resistant E. coli isolates were obtained from a patient during serial treatment with various antibiotics. The sequence of OmpC changed at three positions during treatment giving rise to a total of four OmpC variants (denoted OmpC20, OmpC26, OmpC28 and OmpC33, in which OmpC20 was derived from the first clinical isolate). We demonstrate that expression of the OmpC K12 porin in the clinical isolates lowers the MIC, consistent with modified porin function contributing to drug resistance. By a range of assays we have established that the three mutations that occur between OmpC20 and OmpC33 modify transport of both small molecules and antibiotics across the outer membrane. This results in the modulation of resistance to antibiotics, particularly cefotaxime. Small ion unitary conductance measurements of the isolated porins do not show significant differences between isolates. Thus, resistance does not appear to arise from major changes in pore size. Crystal structures of all four OmpC clinical mutants and molecular dynamics simulations also show that the pore size is essentially unchanged. Molecular dynamics simulations suggest that perturbation of the transverse electrostatic field at the constriction zone reduces cefotaxime passage through the pore, consistent with laboratory and clinical data. This subtle modification of the transverse electric field is a very different source of resistance than occlusion of the pore or wholesale destruction of the transverse field and points to a new mechanism by which porins may modulate antibiotic passage through the outer membrane.

  8. Genome-wide screen identifies Escherichia coli TCA cycle-related mutants with extended chronological lifespan dependent on acetate metabolism and the hypoxia-inducible transcription factor ArcA

    PubMed Central

    Gonidakis, Stavros; Finkel, Steven E.; Longo, Valter D.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Single-gene mutants with extended lifespan have been described in several model organisms. We performed a genome-wide screen for long-lived mutants in Escherichia coli which revealed strains lacking TCA cycle-related genes that exhibit longer stationary phase survival and increased resistance to heat stress compared to wild-type. Extended lifespan in the sdhA mutant, lacking subunit A of succinate dehydrogenase, is associated with reduced production of superoxide and increased stress resistance. On the other hand, the longer lifespan of the lipoic acid synthase mutant (lipA) is associated with reduced oxygen consumption and requires the acetate-producing enzyme pyruvate oxidase, as well as acetyl-CoA synthetase, the enzyme that converts extracellular acetate to acetyl-CoA. The hypoxia-inducible transcription factor ArcA, acting independently of acetate metabolism, is also required for maximum lifespan extension in the lipA and lpdA mutants, indicating that these mutations promote entry into a mode normally associated with a low-oxygen environment. Since analogous changes from respiration to fermentation have been observed in long-lived Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Caenorhabditis elegans strains, such metabolic alterations may represent an evolutionarily conserved strategy to extend lifespan. PMID:20707865

  9. Affinity labelling of Escherichia coli ribosomes with a benzylidene derivative of AUGU6 within initiation and pretranslocational complexes.

    PubMed

    Babkina, G T; Veniaminova, A G; Vladimirov, S N; Karpova, G G; Yamkovoy, V I; Berzin, V A; Gren, E J; Cielens, I E

    1986-07-01

    Affinity labelling of E. coli ribosomes with the 2',3'-O-[4-(N-2-chloroethyl)-N-methylamino]benzylidene derivative of AUGU6 was studied within the initiation complex (complex I) obtained by using fMet-tRNAMetf and initiation factors and within the pretranslocational complex (complex II) obtained by treatment of complex I with the ternary complex Phe-tRNAPhe.GTP.EF-Tu. Both proteins and rRNA of 30 S as well as 50 S subunits were found to be labelled. Sets of proteins labelled within complexes I and II differ considerably. Within complex II, proteins S13 and L10 were labelled preferentially. On the other hand, within complex I, multiple modification is observed (proteins S4, S12, S13, S14, S15, S18, S19, S20/L26 were found to be alkylated) despite the single fixation of a template in the ribosome by interaction of the AUG codon with fMet-tRNAMetf.

  10. A complex mutant of TEM-1 beta-lactamase with mutations encountered in both IRT-4 and extended-spectrum TEM-15, produced by an Escherichia coli clinical isolate.

    PubMed Central

    Sirot, D; Recule, C; Chaibi, E B; Bret, L; Croize, J; Chanal-Claris, C; Labia, R; Sirot, J

    1997-01-01

    Escherichia coli GR102 was isolated from feces of a leukemic patient. It expressed different levels of resistance to amoxicillin or ticarcillin plus clavulanate and to the various cephalosporins tested. The double-disk synergy test was weakly positive. Production of a beta-lactamase with a pI of 5.6 was transferred to E. coli HB101 by conjugation. The nucleotide sequence was determined by direct sequencing of the amplification products obtained by PCR performed with TEM gene primers. This enzyme differed from TEM-1 (blaT-1B gene) by four amino acid substitutions: Met-->Leu-69, Glu-->Lys-104, Gly-->Ser-238 and Asn-->Asp-276. The amino acid susbstitutions Leu-69 and Asp-276 are known to be responsible for inhibitor resistance of the IRT-4 mutant, as are Lys-104 and Ser-238 substitutions for hydrolytic activity of the extended-spectrum beta-lactamases TEM-15, TEM-4, and TEM-3. These combined mutations led to a mutant enzyme which conferred a level of resistance to coamoxiclav (MIC, 64 microg/ml) much lower than that conferred by IRT-4 (MIC, 2,048 microg/ml) but higher than that conferred by TEM-15 or TEM-1 (MIC, 16 microg/ml). In addition, the MIC of ceftazidime for E. coli transconjugant GR202 (1 microg/ml) was lower than that for E. coli TEM-15 (16 microg/ml) and higher than that for E. coli IRT-4 or TEM-1 (0.06 microg/ml). The MICs observed for this TEM-type enzyme were related to the kinetic constants Km and k(cat) and the 50% inhibitory concentration, which were intermediate between those observed for IRT-4 and TEM-15. In conclusion, this new type of complex mutant derived from TEM-1 (CMT-1) is able to confer resistance at a very low level to inhibitors and at a low level to extended-spectrum cephalosporins. CMT-1 received the designation TEM-50. PMID:9174192

  11. A novel strategy to isolate cell-envelope mutants resistant to phage infection: bacteriophage mEp213 requires lipopolysaccharides in addition to FhuA to enter Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed

    Reyes-Cortés, Ruth; Martínez-Peñafiel, Eva; Martínez-Pérez, Francisco; de la Garza, Mireya; Kameyama, Luis

    2012-12-01

    We have developed a direct and efficient strategy, based on a three-step method, to select bacterial cell-envelope mutants resistant to bacteriophage infection. Escherichia coli K-12 strain W3110 underwent classical transposon mutagenesis followed by replica plating and selection for mutants resistant to infection by coliphage mEp213. To verify that phage resistance was due to mutations in the cell envelope, we transformed host cells with the viral genome using electroporation and selected those in which virions were subsequently detected in the supernatant. Among the nine mutants resistant to coliphage infection that we selected, six were in the fhuA gene, two were mutated in the waaC gene, and one was mutated in the gmhD gene. The latter two gene products are involved in the synthesis of lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The efficiency of plating and adsorption of phage mEp213 was affected in these mutants. We verified that LPS is required for the efficient infection of phage λ as well. We propose that this mutation-and-selection strategy can be used to find host factors involved in the initial steps of phage infection for any cognate pair of phage and bacteria.

  12. Vacuum-Ultraviolet Circular Dichroism Spectra of Escherichia coli Dihydrofolate Reductase and Its Mutants: Contributions of Phenylalanine and Tyrosine Side Chains and Exciton Coupling of Two Tryptophan Side Chains.

    PubMed

    Ohmae, Eiji; Tanaka, Suguru; Miyashita, Yurina; Katayanagi, Katsuo; Matsuo, Koichi

    2015-10-15

    Vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy has recently been used for secondary structure analysis of proteins; however, the contribution of aromatic side chains to protein VUV CD spectra is unresolved. In this report, VUV CD spectra of 10 Escherichia coli dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) mutants, in which each phenylalanine or tyrosine residue was mutated to leucine, were measured down to 175 nm at 25 °C and pH 8.0 to elucidate the contributions of these aromatic side chains to the high-energy transitions of peptide bonds. The VUV CD spectra of these mutants were different from the spectrum of the wild-type protein, indicating that the contribution of the phenylalanine and tyrosine side chains of DHFR extends to the VUV region. Furthermore, the VUV CD spectrum and the folate- or NADP(+)-induced spectral change of F103L mutant DHFR indicated a modification and regeneration of exciton coupling between the Trp47 and Trp74 side chains, respectively, suggesting that exciton coupling may also contribute to the CD spectrum of DHFR in the VUV region. These results should be useful for theoretically characterizing the contribution of aromatic side chains to protein CD spectra, leading to the improvement of protein secondary-structure analysis by VUV CD spectroscopy.

  13. The adjuvant effect of a non-toxic mutant of heat-labile enterotoxin of Escherichia coli for the induction of measles virus-specific CTL responses after intranasal co-immunization with a synthetic peptide.

    PubMed Central

    Partidos, C D; Pizza, M; Rappuoli, R; Steward, M W

    1996-01-01

    The intranasal route has been shown to be effective for immunization. However, immunization via this route may require the use of potent and safe adjuvant. The construction of non-toxic mutants of heat labile enterotoxin of Escherichia coli (LT), which is a potent mucosal adjuvant, is a major breakthrough for the development of mucosal vaccines. In this study we have assessed the ability of an LT mutant (LTK63) to act as an adjuvant following intranasal co-immunization with a peptide corresponding to a measles virus cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) epitope. LTK63 was more effective at potentiating the in vivo induction of peptide-specific and measles virus-specific CTL responses than was administration of the peptide in saline. A concentration of 10 micrograms/dose of LTK63 was found to be the most effective in potentiating the in vivo priming of peptide-specific and measles virus-specific CTL responses. These findings highlight the potential of the non-toxic mutant of LT as a safe mucosal adjuvant for use in humans. PMID:9014810

  14. Problem-Solving Test: Tryptophan Operon Mutants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szeberenyi, Jozsef

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a problem-solving test that deals with the regulation of the "trp" operon of "Escherichia coli." Two mutants of this operon are described: in mutant A, the operator region of the operon carries a point mutation so that it is unable to carry out its function; mutant B expresses a "trp" repressor protein unable to bind…

  15. Reduction of cellular stress by TolC-dependent efflux pumps in Escherichia coli indicated by BaeSR and CpxARP activation of spy in efflux mutants.

    PubMed

    Rosner, Judah L; Martin, Robert G

    2013-03-01

    Escherichia coli has nine inner membrane efflux pumps which complex with the outer membrane protein TolC and cognate membrane fusion proteins to form tripartite transperiplasmic pumps with diverse functions, including the expulsion of antibiotics. We recently observed that tolC mutants have elevated activities for three stress response regulators, MarA, SoxS, and Rob, and we suggested that TolC-dependent efflux is required to prevent the accumulation of stressful cellular metabolites. Here, we used spy::lacZ fusions to show that two systems for sensing/repairing extracytoplasmic stress, BaeRS and CpxARP, are activated in the absence of TolC-dependent efflux. In either tolC mutants or bacteria with mutations in the genes for four TolC-dependent efflux pumps, spy expression was increased 6- to 8-fold. spy encodes a periplasmic chaperone regulated by the BaeRS and CpxARP stress response systems. The overexpression of spy in tolC or multiple efflux pump mutants also depended on these systems. spy overexpression was not due to acetate, ethanol, or indole accumulation, since external acetate had only a minor effect on wild-type cells, ethanol had a large effect that was not CpxA dependent, and a tolC tnaA mutant which cannot accumulate internal indole overexpressed spy. We propose that, unless TolC-dependent pumps excrete certain metabolites, the metabolites accumulate and activate at least five different stress response systems.

  16. Effects of recJ, recQ, and recFOR mutations on recombination in nuclease-deficient recB recD double mutants of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Ivancic-Bace, Ivana; Salaj-Smic, Erika; Brcic-Kostic, Krunoslav

    2005-02-01

    The two main recombination pathways in Escherichia coli (RecBCD and RecF) have different recombination machineries that act independently in the initiation of recombination. Three essential enzymatic activities are required for early recombinational processing of double-stranded DNA ends and breaks: a helicase, a 5'-->3' exonuclease, and loading of RecA protein onto single-stranded DNA tails. The RecBCD enzyme performs all of these activities, whereas the recombination machinery of the RecF pathway consists of RecQ (helicase), RecJ (5'-->3' exonuclease), and RecFOR (RecA-single-stranded DNA filament formation). The recombination pathway operating in recB (nuclease-deficient) mutants is a hybrid because it includes elements of both the RecBCD and RecF recombination machineries. In this study, genetic analysis of recombination in a recB (nuclease-deficient) recD double mutant was performed. We show that conjugational recombination and DNA repair after UV and gamma irradiation in this mutant are highly dependent on recJ, partially dependent on recFOR, and independent of recQ. These results suggest that the recombination pathway operating in a nuclease-deficient recB recD double mutant is also a hybrid. We propose that the helicase and RecA loading activities belong to the RecBCD recombination machinery, while the RecJ-mediated 5'-->3' exonuclease is an element of the RecF recombination machinery. PMID:15687199

  17. Mutant of Escherichia coli with Anomalous Cell Division and Ability to Decrease Episomally and Chromosomally Mediated Resistance to Ampicillin and Several Other Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Normark, Staffan; Boman, Hans G.; Matsson, Eva

    1969-01-01

    In a mutation experiment with a rough, ampicillin-resistant strain, we isolated two smooth mutants which were both sensitive to ampicillin and carried defects in the cell envelope. One of the strains (with the envA gene) is hindered in its completion of septa and forms chains of cells. The envA gene has been mapped to a position between leu and proB, at 2 to 4 min. The envA gene decreased the resistance mediated by both episomal and chromosomal genes for resistance to several antibiotics. During growth the envA mutant was characterized by abnormal ratios between viable count or cell count and optical density. The ratio between viable count and optical density was affected during shift-up and shift-down experiments. When compared to the parent strain, the envA mutant was found to be more resistant to ultraviolet irradiation on plates. Prestarvation for tryptophan had a protective effect against irradiation both on the parent strain and the envA mutant. Images PMID:4887513

  18. Growth of wildtype and mutant E. coli strains in minimal media for optimal production of nucleic acids for preparing labeled nucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Thakur, Chandar S.; Brown, Margaret E.; Sama, Jacob N.; Jackson, Melantha E.

    2010-01-01

    Since RNAs lie at the center of most cellular processes, there is a need for synthesizing large amounts of RNAs made from stable isotope-labeled nucleotides to advance the study of their structure and dynamics by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. A particularly effective means of obtaining labeled nucleotides is to harvest these nucleotides from bacteria grown in defined minimal media supplemented with 15NH4Cl and various carbon sources. Given the high cost of carbon precursors required for labeling nucleic acids for NMR studies, it becomes important to evaluate the optimal growth for commonly used strains under standard minimal media conditions. Such information is lacking. In this study, we characterize the growth for Escherichia coli strains K12, K10zwf, and DL323 in three minimal media with isotopic-labeled carbon sources of acetate, glycerol, and glycerol combined with formate. Of the three media, the LeMaster-Richards and the Studier media outperform the commonly used M9 media and both support optimal growth of E. coli for the production of nucleotides. However, the growth of all three E. coli strains in acetate is reduced almost twofold compared to growth in glycerol. Analysis of the metabolic pathway and previous gene array studies help to explain this differential growth in glycerol and acetate. These studies should benefit efforts to make selective 13C-15N isotopic-labeled nucleotides for synthesizing biologically important RNAs. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s00253-010-2813-y) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:20730533

  19. RecJ nuclease is required for SOS induction after introduction of a double-strand break in a RecA loading deficient recB mutant of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Vlasić, Ignacija; Ivancić-Baće, Ivana; Imesek, Mirna; Mihaljević, Boris; Brcić-Kostić, Krunoslav

    2008-09-01

    The SOS response is an important mechanism which allows Escherichia coli cells to maintain genome integrity. Two key proteins in SOS regulation are LexA (repressor) and RecA (coprotease). The signal for SOS induction is generated at the level of a RecA filament. Depending on the type of DNA damage, a RecA filament is produced by specific activities (helicase, nuclease and RecA loading) of either RecBCD, RecF or a hybrid recombination pathway. It was recently demonstrated that RecA loading activity is essential for the induction of the SOS response after UV-irradiation. In this paper we studied the genetic requirements for SOS induction after introduction of a double-strand break (DSB) by the I-SceI endonuclease in a RecA loading deficient recB mutant (recB1080). We monitored SOS induction by assaying beta-galactosidase activity and compared induction of the response between strains having one or more inactivated mechanisms of RecA loading and their derivatives. We found that simultaneous inactivation of both RecA loading functions (in recB1080 recO double mutant) partially impairs SOS induction after introduction of a DSB. However, we found that the RecJ nuclease is essential for SOS induction after the introduction of a DSB in the recB1080 mutant. This result indicates that RecJ is needed to prepare ssDNA for subsequent loading of RecA protein. It implies that an additional type of RecA loading could exist in the cell. PMID:18445487

  20. Bioethanol fermentation by recombinant E. coli FBR5 and its robust mutant FBHW using hot-water wood extract hydrolyzate as substrate.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tingjun; Lin, Lu; Sun, Zhijie; Hu, Ruofei; Liu, Shijie

    2010-01-01

    Hemicellulose is a potential by-product currently under-utilized in the papermaking industry. It is a hetero-carbohydrate polymer. For hardwood hemicelluloses, D-xylose is the major component upon depolymerization. At SUNY-ESF, wood extracts were obtained by extracting sugar maple wood chips with hot water at an elevated temperature. The wood extracts were then concentrated and acid hydrolyzed. Ethanologenic bacteria, E. coli FBR5, had a good performance in pure xylose medium for ethanol production. However, FBR5 was strongly inhibited in dilute sulfuric acid hydrolyzate of hot-water wood extract. FBR5 was challenged by hot-water wood extract hydrolyzate in this study. After repeated strain adaptation, an improved strain: E. coli FBHW was obtained. Fermentation experiments indicated that FBHW was resistant to the toxicity of hydrolyzate in the fermentation media of concentrated hydrolyzate, and xylose was completely utilized by the strain to produce ethanol. FBHW was grown in the concentrated hydrolyzate without any detoxification treatment and has yielded 36.8g/L ethanol.

  1. The Walker A motif mutation recA4159 abolishes the SOS response and recombination in a recA730 mutant of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Šimatović, Ana; Mitrikeski, Petar T; Vlašić, Ignacija; Sopta, Mary; Brčić-Kostić, Krunoslav

    2016-01-01

    In bacteria, the RecA protein forms recombinogenic filaments required for the SOS response and DNA recombination. In order to form a recombinogenic filament, wild type RecA needs to bind ATP and to interact with mediator proteins. The RecA730 protein is a mutant version of RecA with superior catalytic abilities, allowing filament formation without the help of mediator proteins. The mechanism of RecA730 filament formation is not well understood, and the question remains as to whether the RecA730 protein requires ATP binding in order to become competent for filament formation. We examined two mutants, recA730,4159 (presumed to be defective for ATP binding) and recA730,2201 (defective for ATP hydrolysis), and show that they have different properties with respect to SOS induction, conjugational recombination and double-strand break repair. We show that ATP binding is essential for all RecA730 functions, while ATP hydrolysis is required only for double-strand break repair. Our results emphasize the similarity of the SOS response and conjugational recombination, neither of which requires ATP hydrolysis by RecA730.

  2. Mucosal vaccination against serogroup B meningococci: induction of bactericidal antibodies and cellular immunity following intranasal immunization with NadA of Neisseria meningitidis and mutants of Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin.

    PubMed

    Bowe, Frances; Lavelle, Ed C; McNeela, Edel A; Hale, Christine; Clare, Simon; Arico, Beatrice; Giuliani, Marzia M; Rae, Aaron; Huett, Alan; Rappuoli, Rino; Dougan, Gordon; Mills, Kingston H G

    2004-07-01

    Conjugated polysaccharide vaccines protect against serogroup C meningococci. However, this approach cannot be applied to serogroup B, which is still a major cause of meningitis. We evaluated the immunogenicity of three surface-exposed proteins from serogroup B Neisseria meningitidis (App, NhhA, and NadA) identified during whole-genome sequencing. Mice were immunized intranasally with individual proteins in the presence of wild-type Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin (LTwt), LTR72, a partially inactivated mutant, or LTK63, a completely nontoxic mutant, as the adjuvant. Each of the meningococcal proteins induced significant cellular responses; NhhA and NadA induced strong antibody responses, but only NadA induced bactericidal antibody when administered intranasally with mucosal adjuvants. In addition, immunoglobulin A and bactericidal antibodies were detected in the respiratory tract following intranasal delivery of NadA. Analysis of antigen-specific cytokine production by T cells from immunized mice revealed that intranasal immunization with NadA alone failed to generate detectable cellular immune responses. In contrast, LTK63, LTR72, and LTwt significantly augmented NadA-specific gamma interferon, interleukin-4 (IL-4), IL-5, and IL-10 production by spleen and lymph node cells, suggesting that both Th1 and Th2 cells were induced in vivo. The strongest cellular responses and highest bactericidal antibody titers were generated with LTR72 as the adjuvant. These findings demonstrate that the quality and magnitude of the immune responses generated by mucosal vaccines are influenced by the antigen as well as the adjuvant and suggest that nasal delivery of NadA with mucosal adjuvants has considerable potential in the development of a mucosal vaccine against serogroup B meningococci.

  3. Biophysics of gating phenomena in voltage-dependent OmpC mutant porin channels (R74C and R37C) of Escherichia coli outer membranes.

    PubMed

    Mobasheri, Hamid; Lea, Edward J A

    2002-09-01

    The mechanism by which the membrane potential closes and opens voltage-dependent beta-barrel membrane channels is not fully understood. OmpC porins form trimeric water-filled channels when incorporated into artificial bilayers, each monomer having a conductance of approximately 510 pS in 1 M KCl. These channels are relatively insensitive to membrane potential difference (pd) and close only when the pd exceeds +/-250 mV. Another well-known trimer, OmpF, has a monomer conductance of approximately 780 pS in 1 M NaCl, is more sensitive to pd, and can be closed reversibly when a pd of more than +/-150 mV is applied to the channel-containing membranes. With the aid of the 3D atomic structure of these channels determined by X-ray crystallography, and using site-directed mutagenesis, specific amino acids can be substituted in desired locations in the channel lumen. In this study we have used mutants 37C and 74C and attached fluorescence probes to them to monitor polarity changes in the channel lumen during gating. From the observed changes in polarity, we conclude that conformational changes occur in the channel which interrupt the electrolyte conducting pathway. PMID:12202916

  4. A phosphoethanolamine transferase specific for the outer 3-deoxy-D-manno-octulosonic acid residue of Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide. Identification of the eptB gene and Ca2+ hypersensitivity of an eptB deletion mutant.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, C Michael; Kalb, Suzanne R; Cotter, Robert J; Raetz, Christian R H

    2005-06-01

    Addition of a phosphoethanolamine (pEtN) moiety to the outer 3-deoxy-D-manno-octulosonic acid (Kdo) residue of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in WBB06, a heptose-deficient Escherichia coli mutant, occurs when cells are grown in 5-50 mM CaCl2 (Kanipes, M. I., Lin, S., Cotter, R. J., and Raetz, C. R. H. (2001) J. Biol. Chem. 276, 1156-1163). A Ca2+-induced, membrane-bound enzyme was responsible for the transfer of the pEtN unit to the Kdo domain. We now report the identification of the gene encoding the pEtN transferase. E. coli yhjW was cloned and overexpressed, because it is homologous to a putative pEtN transferase implicated in the modification of the beta-chain heptose residue of Neisseria meningitidis lipo-oligosaccharide (Mackinnon, F. G., Cox, A. D., Plested, J. S., Tang, C. M., Makepeace, K., Coull, P. A., Wright, J. C., Chalmers, R., Hood, D. W., Richards, J. C., and Moxon, E. R. (2002) Mol. Microbiol. 43, 931-943). In vitro assays with Kdo2-4'-[32P]lipid A as the acceptor showed that YhjW (renamed EptB) utilizes phosphatidylethanolamine in the presence of Ca2+ to transfer the pEtN group. Stoichiometric amounts of diacylglycerol were generated during the EptB-catalyzed transfer of pEtN to Kdo2-lipid A. EptB is an inner membrane protein of 574 amino acid residues with five predicted trans-membrane segments within its N-terminal region. An in-frame replacement of eptB with a kanamycin resistance cassette rendered E. coli WBB06 (but not wild-type W3110) hypersensitive to CaCl2 at 5 mM or higher. Ca2+ hypersensitivity was suppressed by excess Mg2+ in the medium or by restoring the LPS core of WBB06. The latter was achieved by reintroducing the waaC and waaF genes, which encode LPS heptosyl transferases I and II, respectively. Our data demonstrate that pEtN modification of the outer Kdo protected cells containing heptose-deficient LPS from damage by high concentrations of Ca2+. Based on its sequence similarity to EptA(PmrC), we propose that the active site of Ept

  5. Structural analysis and mutant growth properties reveal distinctive enzymatic and cellular roles for the three major L-alanine transaminases of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Peña-Soler, Esther; Fernandez, Francisco J; López-Estepa, Miguel; Garces, Fernando; Richardson, Andrew J; Quintana, Juan F; Rudd, Kenneth E; Coll, Miquel; Vega, M Cristina

    2014-01-01

    In order to maintain proper cellular function, the metabolism of the bacterial microbiota presents several mechanisms oriented to keep a correctly balanced amino acid pool. Central components of these mechanisms are enzymes with alanine transaminase activity, pyridoxal 5'-phosphate-dependent enzymes that interconvert alanine and pyruvate, thereby allowing the precise control of alanine and glutamate concentrations, two of the most abundant amino acids in the cellular amino acid pool. Here we report the 2.11-Å crystal structure of full-length AlaA from the model organism Escherichia coli, a major bacterial alanine aminotransferase, and compare its overall structure and active site composition with detailed atomic models of two other bacterial enzymes capable of catalyzing this reaction in vivo, AlaC and valine-pyruvate aminotransferase (AvtA). Apart from a narrow entry channel to the active site, a feature of this new crystal structure is the role of an active site loop that closes in upon binding of substrate-mimicking molecules, and which has only been previously reported in a plant enzyme. Comparison of the available structures indicates that beyond superficial differences, alanine aminotransferases of diverse phylogenetic origins share a universal reaction mechanism that depends on an array of highly conserved amino acid residues and is similarly regulated by various unrelated motifs. Despite this unifying mechanism and regulation, growth competition experiments demonstrate that AlaA, AlaC and AvtA are not freely exchangeable in vivo, suggesting that their functional repertoire is not completely redundant thus providing an explanation for their independent evolutionary conservation.

  6. Immunization with a Double-Mutant (R192G/L211A) of the Heat-Labile Enterotoxin of Escherichia coli Offers Partial Protection against Campylobacter jejuni in an Adult Mouse Intestinal Colonization Model.

    PubMed

    Albert, M John; Haridas, Shilpa; Ebenezer, Mathew; Raghupathy, Raj; Khan, Islam

    2015-01-01

    We have previously shown that antibodies to cholera toxin (CT) reacted with the major outer membrane proteins (MOMPs) from Campylobacter jejuni strains on Western blot. Further, oral immunization with CT significantly protected against challenge with C. jejuni in an adult mouse colonization model of infection. CT and the heat-labile enterotoxin (LT) of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli are structurally and functionally related. LT and its mutants including the double-mutant LT (R192G/L211A) (dmLT), are powerful mucosal adjuvants. Unlike LT which is reactogenic, dmLT has been shown to be safe for human use. In the current study, we determined whether rabbit anti-dmLT antibodies reacted with MOMPs from C. jejuni strains and whether immunization with dmLT would afford protection against C. jejuni. On Western blot, the MOMPs from C. jejuni 48 (Penner serotype O:19), C. jejuni 75 (O:3) and C. jejuni 111 (O:1,44) were probed with rabbit antibodies to dmLT or LT-E112K (a non-toxic LT mutant), which showed a lack of reaction. Adult BALB/c mice were orally immunized with dmLT and orally challenged with C. jejuni 48 or 111. Protection from colonization with the challenge bacteria was studied by enumerating Campylobacter colonies in feces daily for 9 days. Vaccination produced robust serum and stool antibody responses to dmLT and no antibody responses to C. jejuni MOMP. Vaccinated mice showed reduced colonization and excretion of both challenge strains compared to control mice. However, the differences were not statistically significant. The protective efficacy of the dmLT vaccine varied from 9.1% to 54.5%. The lack of cross-reaction between the MOMP and dmLT suggests that protection is not mediated by cross-reacting antibodies, but may be due to activation of innate immunity. As dmLT is safe for humans, it could be incorporated into a C. jejuni vaccine to enhance its efficacy. PMID:26540197

  7. Efficient biosynthesis of rare natural product scopolamine using E. coli cells expressing a S14P/K97A mutant of hyoscyamine 6β-hydroxylase AaH6H.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yue-De; He, Yu-Cai; Li, Hao; Kai, Guo-Yin; Xu, Jian-He; Yu, Hui-Lei

    2015-10-10

    Hyoscyamine 6β-hydroxylase (H6H, EC 1.14.11.11), an α-ketoglutarate dependent dioxygenase catalyzes the hydroxylation of (-)-hyoscyamine and the subsequent epoxidation of 6β-hydroxyhyoscyamine to form scopolamine, a valuable natural alkaloid. In this study, random mutagenesis and site-directed saturation mutagenesis were used to enhance the hydroxylation activity of H6H from Anisodus acutangulus (AaH6H). A double mutant, AaH6HM1 (S14P/K97A), showed a 3.4-fold improved hydroxylation activity compared with the wild-type enzyme, and the in vivo epoxidation activity was also improved by 2.3 times. After 34h cultivation of Escherichia coli cells harboring Aah6hm1 in a 5-L bioreactor with a working volume of 3L, scopolamine was produced via a single-enzyme-mediated two-step transformation from 500mgL(-1) (-)-hyoscyamine in 97% conversion, and 1.068g of the product were isolated, corresponding to a space-time yield of 251mgL(-1)d(-1). This study shows that the protein engineering of some key enzymes is a promising and effective way for improving the production of rare natural products such as scopolamine.

  8. Regulatory role of recF in the SOS response of Escherichia coli: impaired induction of SOS genes by UV irradiation and nalidixic acid in a recF mutant.

    PubMed

    Thoms, B; Wackernagel, W

    1987-04-01

    We isolated a new recF mutant of Escherichia coli K-12 by insertion of transposon Tn5 into the recF gene. This recF400::Tn5 allele displayed the same phenotypic characteristics as the classic recF143 mutation. By using Mu d(Ap lac) fusions, the induction of nine SOS genes, including recA, umuC, dinA, dinB, dinD, dinF, recN, and sulA, by UV irradiation and nalidixic acid was examined. Induction of eight genes by the two agents was impaired by recF400::Tn5 to different extents. The ninth fused SOS gene, dinF, was no longer inducible by UV when combined with recF400::Tn5. The generally impaired SOS response in recF strains did not result from weak induction of recA protein synthesis, since a recA operator-constitutive mutation did not alleviate the inhibitory effect of the recF mutation. The results suggest that recF plays a regulatory role in the SOS response. It is proposed that this role is to optimize the signal usage by recA protein to become a protease. PMID:3031020

  9. Characterization of cDNA encoding mouse DNA repair protein O sup 6 -methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase and high-level expression of the wild-type and mutant proteins in Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Shiota, Susumu; Tano, Keizo ); von Wronski, M.A.; Brent, T.P. ); Bigner, D.D. ); Mitra, S. )

    1992-02-25

    A mouse cDNA clone encoding O{sup 6}-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT), responsible for repair of mutagenic O{sup 6}-alkylguanine in DNA, was cloned from a {lambda}gt11 library. On the basis of an open reading frame in cDNA, the mouse protein contains 211 amino acids with a molecular mass of 22 kDa. The size and the predicted N-terminal sequence of the mouse protein were confirmed experimentally. The deduced amino acid sequence of the mouse MGMT is 70% homologous to that of the human MGMT. Cysteine-149 was shown to be the only alkyl acceptor residue in the mouse protein, in confirmation of the prediction based on conserved sequences of different MGMTs. Mouse MGMT protein is recognized by some monoclonal antibodies specific for human MGMT. Site-directed mutagenesis was utilized to reclone the mouse cDNA in a T7 promoter-based vector for overexpression of the native repair protein in Escherichia coli. The mouse protein has a tetrapeptide sequence, Pro-Glu-Gly-Val at positions 56-59, absent in the human protein. Neither deletion of this tetrapeptide nor substitution of valine-169 with alanine affected the activity of the mutant proteins.

  10. A second function for pseudouridine synthases: A point mutant of RluD unable to form pseudouridines 1911, 1915, and 1917 in Escherichia coli 23S ribosomal RNA restores normal growth to an RluD-minus strain.

    PubMed

    Gutgsell, N S; Del Campo, M; Raychaudhuri, S; Ofengand, J

    2001-07-01

    This laboratory previously showed that truncation of the gene for RluD, the Escherichia coli pseudouridine synthase responsible for synthesis of 23S rRNA pseudouridines 1911, 1915, and 1917, blocks pseudouridine formation and inhibits growth. We now show that RluD mutants at the essential aspartate 139 allow these two functions of RluD to be separated. In vitro, RluD with aspartate 139 replaced by threonine or asparagine is completely inactive. In vivo, the growth defect could be completely restored by transformation of an RluD-inactive strain with plasmids carrying genes for RluD with aspartate 139 replaced by threonine or asparagine. Pseudouridine sequencing of the 23S rRNA from these transformed strains demonstrated the lack of these pseudouridines. Pseudoreversion, which has previously been shown to restore growth without pseudouridine formation by mutation at a distant position on the chromosome, was not responsible because transformation with empty vector under identical conditions did not alter the growth rate.

  11. Mutant fatty acid desaturase

    DOEpatents

    Shanklin, John; Cahoon, Edgar B.

    2004-02-03

    The present invention relates to a method for producing mutants of a fatty acid desaturase having a substantially increased activity towards fatty acid substrates with chains containing fewer than 18 carbons relative to an unmutagenized precursor desaturase having an 18 carbon atom chain length substrate specificity. The method involves inducing one or more mutations in the nucleic acid sequence encoding the precursor desaturase, transforming the mutated sequence into an unsaturated fatty acid auxotroph cell such as MH13 E. coli, culturing the cells in the absence of supplemental unsaturated fatty acids, thereby selecting for recipient cells which have received and which express a mutant fatty acid desaturase with an elevated specificity for fatty acid substrates having chain lengths of less than 18 carbon atoms. A variety of mutants having 16 or fewer carbon atom chain length substrate specificities are produced by this method. Mutant desaturases produced by this method can be introduced via expression vectors into prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells and can also be used in the production of transgenic plants which may be used to produce specific fatty acid products.

  12. Affinity labeling of eukaryotic elongation factors using N epsilon-bromoacetyl-Lys-tRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, A E; Slobin, L I

    1980-01-01

    eEF-T and eEF-Tu from rabbit reticulocyte and from Artemia were affinity labeled using N epsilon-bromoacetyl-Lys-tRNA prepared with either yeast or E. coli tRNA. Only the eEF-Tu polypeptide was crosslinked when eEF-T was incubated with the reactive aminoacyl-tRNA analogue, which indicates that at least part of the aminoacyl-tRNA binding site is the same in both eEF-Tu and the multisubunit eEF-T. Complex formation (eEF-Tu x aa-tRNA x GTP) was required for crosslinking, since no covalent reaction with eEF-Tu occurred in the absence of GTP. The yield of crosslinked product was greatly reduced by adding either unmodified rabbit liver aminoacyl-tRNA or unmodified E. coli Lys-tRNA to the incubation to compete for the aminoacyl-tRNA binding site on eEF-T or eEF-Tu, indicating that the covalent reaction occurs while the N epsilon-bromoacetyl-Lys-tRNA is bound in this site. The affinity labeling of a prokaryotic and two different eukaryotic elongation factors by the same reagent suggests that there may be conservation of structure in the region of the proteins which binds the aminoacyl end of the aminoacyl-tRNA. PMID:7001363

  13. Thiophene metabolism by E. coli

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, D.P.

    1990-01-01

    The objective of this project is to investigate the mechanism of degradation of sulfur containing heterocyclic molecules such as those found in coal, by mutants of Escherichia coli K-12. We previously isolated multiple mutants of E. coli which were selected for improved oxidation of furan and thiophene derivatives. We have focused on the thdA mutation in our subsequent research as it appears to be of central importance in thiophene oxidation. We hope that analysis of the thd genes of E. coli will lead to improvement of our thiophene metabolizing bacterial strains. 1 tab.

  14. Thiophene metabolism by E. coli

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, D.P.

    1990-01-01

    The objective of this project is to investigate the mechanism of degradation of sulfur containing heterocyclic molecules by mutants of Escherichia coli K-12. We previously isolated multiple mutants of E. coli which were selected for improved oxidation of furan and thiophene derivatives. We have focused on the thdA mutation in our subsequent research as it appears to be of central importance in thiophene oxidation. We hope that analysis of the thd gene of E. coli will lead to improvement of our thiophene metabolizing bacterial strains.

  15. Enhancement of laccase activity through the construction and breakdown of a hydrogen bond at the type I copper center in Escherichia coli CueO and the deletion mutant Δα5-7 CueO.

    PubMed

    Kataoka, Kunishige; Hirota, Shun; Maeda, Yasuo; Kogi, Hiroki; Shinohara, Naoya; Sekimoto, Madoka; Sakurai, Takeshi

    2011-02-01

    CueO is a multicopper oxidase involved in a copper efflux system of Escherichia coli and has high cuprous oxidase activity but little or no oxidizing activity toward various organic substances. However, its activity toward oxidization of organic substrates was found to be considerably increased by the removal of the methionine-rich helical segment that covers the substrate-binding site (Δα5-7 CueO) [Kataoka, K., et al. (2007) J. Mol. Biol. 373, 141]. In the study presented here, mutations at Pro444 to construct a second NH-S hydrogen bond between the backbone amide and coordinating Cys500 thiolate of the type I copper are shown to result in positive shifts in the redox potential of this copper center and enhanced oxidase activity in CueO. Analogous enhancement of the activity of Δα5-7 CueO has been identified only in the Pro444Gly mutant because Pro444 mutants limit the incorporation of copper ions into the trinuclear copper center. The activities of both CueO and Δα5-7 CueO were also enhanced by mutations to break down the hydrogen bond between the imidazole group of His443 that is coordinated to the type I copper and the β-carboxy group of Asp439 that is located in the outer sphere of the type I copper center. A synergetic effect of the positive shift in the redox potential of the type I copper center and the increase in enzyme activity has been achieved by the double mutation of Pro444 and Asp439 of CueO. Absorption, circular dichroism, and resonance Raman spectra indicate that the characteristics of the Cu(II)-S(Cys) bond were only minimally perturbed by mutations involving formation or disruption of a hydrogen bond from the coordinating groups to the type I copper. This study provides widely applicable strategies for tuning the activities of multicopper oxidases.

  16. E. Coli

    MedlinePlus

    ... E. coli is short for the medical term Escherichia coli . The strange thing about these bacteria — and lots ... cause a very serious infection. Someone who has E. coli infection may have these symptoms: bad stomach cramps and ...

  17. A Derivative of the Thiopeptide GE2270A Highly Selective against Propionibacterium acnes

    PubMed Central

    He, Cheng-Guang; Gaspari, Eleonora; Maffioli, Sonia; Brandi, Letizia; Spurio, Roberto; Sosio, Margherita; Jabes, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    A chemical derivative of the thiopeptide GE2270A, designated NAI003, was found to possess a substantially reduced antibacterial spectrum in comparison to the parent compound, being active against just a few Gram-positive bacteria. In particular, NAI003 retained low MICs against all tested isolates of Propionibacterium acnes and, to a lesser extent, against Enterococcus faecalis. Furthermore, NAI003 showed a time- and dose-dependent killing of both a clindamycin-resistant and a clindamycin-sensitive P. acnes isolate. Gel shift experiments indicated that, like the parent compound, NAI003 retained the ability to bind to elongation factors Tu (EF-Tus) derived from Escherichia coli, E. faecalis, or P. acnes, albeit with reduced efficiency. In contrast, EF-Tus derived from the NAI003-insensitive Staphylococcus aureus or Streptococcus pyogenes did not bind this compound. These results were confirmed by in vitro studies using a hybrid translation system, which indicated that NAI003 can inhibit most efficiently protein synthesis driven by the P. acnes EF-Tu. P. acnes mutants resistant to NAI003 were isolated by direct plating. With one exception, all analyzed strains carried mutations in the tuf gene, encoding EF-Tu. Because of its selective effect on P. acnes in comparison to resident skin flora, NAI003 represents a promising candidate for the topical treatment of acne, which has already completed a phase 1 clinical study. PMID:25987631

  18. A Derivative of the Thiopeptide GE2270A Highly Selective against Propionibacterium acnes.

    PubMed

    Fabbretti, Attilio; He, Cheng-Guang; Gaspari, Eleonora; Maffioli, Sonia; Brandi, Letizia; Spurio, Roberto; Sosio, Margherita; Jabes, Daniela; Donadio, Stefano

    2015-08-01

    A chemical derivative of the thiopeptide GE2270A, designated NAI003, was found to possess a substantially reduced antibacterial spectrum in comparison to the parent compound, being active against just a few Gram-positive bacteria. In particular, NAI003 retained low MICs against all tested isolates of Propionibacterium acnes and, to a lesser extent, against Enterococcus faecalis. Furthermore, NAI003 showed a time- and dose-dependent killing of both a clindamycin-resistant and a clindamycin-sensitive P. acnes isolate. Gel shift experiments indicated that, like the parent compound, NAI003 retained the ability to bind to elongation factors Tu (EF-Tus) derived from Escherichia coli, E. faecalis, or P. acnes, albeit with reduced efficiency. In contrast, EF-Tus derived from the NAI003-insensitive Staphylococcus aureus or Streptococcus pyogenes did not bind this compound. These results were confirmed by in vitro studies using a hybrid translation system, which indicated that NAI003 can inhibit most efficiently protein synthesis driven by the P. acnes EF-Tu. P. acnes mutants resistant to NAI003 were isolated by direct plating. With one exception, all analyzed strains carried mutations in the tuf gene, encoding EF-Tu. Because of its selective effect on P. acnes in comparison to resident skin flora, NAI003 represents a promising candidate for the topical treatment of acne, which has already completed a phase 1 clinical study. PMID:25987631

  19. Resistance of Escherichia coli to Penicillins IX. Genetics and Physiology of Class II Ampicillin-Resistant Mutants That Are Galactose Negative or Sensitive to Bacteriophage C21, or Both

    PubMed Central

    Eriksson-Grennberg, Kerstin G.; Nordström, Kurt; Englund, Per

    1971-01-01

    Ampicillin-resistant mutants of class II are determined by a doubling of chromosomally and episomally mediated ampicillin resistance on agar plates. Several mutants were isolated from a female as well as from an Hfr strain. The mutants differed from each other in various properties such as response to colicin E2 and sodium cholate, response to the phages T4 and C21, and fermentation of galactose. By conjugation and transduction experiments, it was shown that mutations in at least four loci gave the class II phenotype. The mutations were found to be in the galU gene, the ctr gene, and two new genes close to mtl denoted lpsA and lpsB. The carbohydrate compositions of the lipopolysaccharides of the mutants were investigated and found to be changed compared to the parent strains. GalU mutants lacked rhamnose and galactose and had 11% glucose compared to the parent strain. The lpsA mutant also lacked rhamnose and had only traces of galactose and 58% glucose, whereas the lpsB mutant contained 14% rhamnose, traces of galactose, and 81% glucose compared to the parent strain. PMID:4945191

  20. Heterologous expression of a plastid EF-Tu reduces protein thermal aggregation and enhances CO2 fixation in wheat following heat stress

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Heat stress is a major constraint to wheat production and negatively impacts grain quality, causing tremendous economic losses, and may become a more troublesome factor due to global warming. At the cellular level, heat stress causes denaturation and aggregation of proteins and injury to membranes ...

  1. Identification and cloning of two immunogenic Clostridium perfringens proteins, elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu) and pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFO) of C. perfringens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Clostridium-related diseases such as gangrenous dermatitis (GD) and necrotic enteritis (NE) are increasingly emerging as major diseases in recent years with high economic loss around the world. In this report, we characterized two immunogenic Clostridium perfringens (CP) proteins (e.g., elongation f...

  2. Characterization of chicken-liver glutathione S-transferase (GST) A1-1 and A2-2 isoenzymes and their site-directed mutants heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli: identification of Lys-15 and Ser-208 on cGSTA1-1 as residues interacting with ethacrynic acid.

    PubMed Central

    Liu, L F; Liaw, Y C; Tam, M F

    1997-01-01

    Escherichia coli-expressed chicken-liver glutathione S-transferase, cGSTA1-1, displays high ethacrynic acid (EA)-conjugating activity. Molecular modelling of cGSTA1-1 with EA in the substrate binding site reveals that the side chain of Phe-111 protrudes into the substrate binding site and possibly interacts with EA. Replacement of Phe-111 with alanine resulted in an enzyme (F111A mutant) with a 4.5-fold increase in EA-conjugating activity (9.2 mmol/min per mg), and an incremental Gibbs free energy (DeltaDeltaG) of 4.0 kJ/mol lower than that of the wild-type cGSTA1-1. Two other amino acid residues that possibly interact with EA are Ser-208 and Lys-15. Substitution of Ser-208 with methionine generated a cGSTA1-1(F111AS208M) double mutant that has low EA-conjugating activity (2.0 mmol/min per mg) and an incremental Gibbs free energy of +3.9 kJ/mol greater than the cGSTA1-1(F111A) single mutant. The cGSTA1-1(F111A) mutant, with an additional Lys-15-to-leucine substitution, lost 90% of the EA-conjugating activity (0.55 mmol/min per mg). The Km values of the cGSTA1-1(F111A) and cGSTA1-1(F111AK15L) mutants for EA are nearly identical. The wild-type cGSTA2-2 isoenzyme has a low EA-conjugating activity (0.56 mmol/min per mg). The kcat of this reaction can be increased 2. 5-fold by substituting Arg-15 and Glu-104 with lysine and glycine respectively. The KmEA of the cGSTA2-2(R15KE104G) double mutant is nearly identical with that of the wild-type enzyme. Another double mutant, cGSTA2-2(E104GL208S), has a KmEA that is 3.3-fold lower and a kcat that is 1.8-fold higher than that of the wild-type enzyme. These results, taken together, illustrate the interactions of Lys-15 and Ser-208 on cGSTA1-1 with EA. PMID:9359434

  3. Recombination-deficient mutant of Streptococcus faecalis

    SciTech Connect

    Yagi, Y.; Clewell, D.B.

    1980-08-01

    An ultraviolet radiation-sensitive derivative of Streptococcus faecalis strain JH2-2 was isolated and found to be deficient in recombination, using a plasmid-plasmid recombination system. The strain was sensitive to chemical agents which interact with deoxyribonucleic acid and also underwent deoxyribonucleic acid degradation after ultraviolet irradiation. Thus, the mutant has properties similar to those of recA strains of Escherichia coli.

  4. Thiophene metabolism by E. coli

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, D.P.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of this project is to investigate the mechanism of degradation of sulfur-containing heterocyclic molecules by mutant strains of Escherichia coli K-12. We have previously isolated multiple mutants of E. coli which had gained the capacity to oxidize thiophene compounds and their furan analogs. We have focused on the thdA mutation in our subsequent research, as this appears to be in a regulatory gene central to the thiophene/furan oxidation system. The thdF gene appears to be more directly involved in the oxidation reactions, whereas thdC and thdD are apparently required for increased protection against the toxic effects of thiophene and furan compounds. 4 tabs.

  5. CO-Releasing Molecules Have Nonheme Targets in Bacteria: Transcriptomic, Mathematical Modeling and Biochemical Analyses of CORM-3 [Ru(CO)3Cl(glycinate)] Actions on a Heme-Deficient Mutant of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Jayne Louise; Wareham, Lauren K.; McLean, Samantha; Begg, Ronald; Greaves, Sarah; Mann, Brian E.; Sanguinetti, Guido

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Carbon monoxide-releasing molecules (CORMs) are being developed with the ultimate goal of safely utilizing the therapeutic potential of CO clinically, including applications in antimicrobial therapy. Hemes are generally considered the prime targets of CO and CORMs, so we tested this hypothesis using heme-deficient bacteria, applying cellular, transcriptomic, and biochemical tools. Results: CORM-3 [Ru(CO)3Cl(glycinate)] readily penetrated Escherichia coli hemA bacteria and was inhibitory to these and Lactococcus lactis, even though they lack all detectable hemes. Transcriptomic analyses, coupled with mathematical modeling of transcription factor activities, revealed that the response to CORM-3 in hemA bacteria is multifaceted but characterized by markedly elevated expression of iron acquisition and utilization mechanisms, global stress responses, and zinc management processes. Cell membranes are disturbed by CORM-3. Innovation: This work has demonstrated for the first time that CORM-3 (and to a lesser extent its inactivated counterpart) has multiple cellular targets other than hemes. A full understanding of the actions of CORMs is vital to understand their toxic effects. Conclusion: This work has furthered our understanding of the key targets of CORM-3 in bacteria and raises the possibility that the widely reported antimicrobial effects cannot be attributed to classical biochemical targets of CO. This is a vital step in exploiting the potential, already demonstrated, for using optimized CORMs in antimicrobial therapy. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 23, 148–162. PMID:25811604

  6. Dialogue between E. coli free radical pathways and the mitochondria of C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Govindan, J. Amaranath; Jayamani, Elamparithi; Zhang, Xinrui; Mylonakis, Eleftherios; Ruvkun, Gary

    2015-01-01

    The microbial world presents a complex palette of opportunities and dangers to animals, which have developed surveillance and response strategies to hints of microbial intent. We show here that the mitochondrial homeostatic response pathway of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans responds to Escherichia coli mutations that activate free radical detoxification pathways. Activation of C. elegans mitochondrial responses could be suppressed by additional mutations in E. coli, suggesting that C. elegans responds to products of E. coli to anticipate challenges to its mitochondrion. Out of 50 C. elegans gene inactivations known to mediate mitochondrial defense, we found that 7 genes were required for C. elegans response to a free radical producing E. coli mutant, including the bZip transcription factor atfs-1 (activating transcription factor associated with stress). An atfs-1 loss-of-function mutant was partially resistant to the effects of free radical-producing E. coli mutant, but a constitutively active atfs-1 mutant growing on wild-type E. coli inappropriately activated the pattern of mitochondrial responses normally induced by an E. coli free radical pathway mutant. Carbonylated proteins from free radical-producing E. coli mutant may directly activate the ATFS-1/bZIP transcription factor to induce mitochondrial stress response: feeding C. elegans with H2O2-treated E. coli induces the mitochondrial unfolded protein response, and inhibition of a gut peptide transporter partially suppressed C. elegans response to free radical damaged E. coli. PMID:26392561

  7. Dialogue between E. coli free radical pathways and the mitochondria of C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Govindan, J Amaranath; Jayamani, Elamparithi; Zhang, Xinrui; Mylonakis, Eleftherios; Ruvkun, Gary

    2015-10-01

    The microbial world presents a complex palette of opportunities and dangers to animals, which have developed surveillance and response strategies to hints of microbial intent. We show here that the mitochondrial homeostatic response pathway of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans responds to Escherichia coli mutations that activate free radical detoxification pathways. Activation of C. elegans mitochondrial responses could be suppressed by additional mutations in E. coli, suggesting that C. elegans responds to products of E. coli to anticipate challenges to its mitochondrion. Out of 50 C. elegans gene inactivations known to mediate mitochondrial defense, we found that 7 genes were required for C. elegans response to a free radical producing E. coli mutant, including the bZip transcription factor atfs-1 (activating transcription factor associated with stress). An atfs-1 loss-of-function mutant was partially resistant to the effects of free radical-producing E. coli mutant, but a constitutively active atfs-1 mutant growing on wild-type E. coli inappropriately activated the pattern of mitochondrial responses normally induced by an E. coli free radical pathway mutant. Carbonylated proteins from free radical-producing E. coli mutant may directly activate the ATFS-1/bZIP transcription factor to induce mitochondrial stress response: feeding C. elegans with H2O2-treated E. coli induces the mitochondrial unfolded protein response, and inhibition of a gut peptide transporter partially suppressed C. elegans response to free radical damaged E. coli.

  8. E. Coli and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... care provider. What is E. coli? E. coli (Escherichia coli) is a bacterium that lives in your colon ( ... 10):1411-1413. Jones B, et al. 2004. Escherichia coli: a growing problem in early onset neonatal sepsis. ...

  9. E. Coli Infection

    MedlinePlus

    ... is E. coli? E. coli is short for Escherichia coli -- bacteria (germs) that cause severe cramps and diarrhea. E. ... and especially in people who have another illness. E. coli infection is more common during the summer months and ...

  10. Profiling of Escherichia coli Chromosome database.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Yukiko; Niki, Hironori; Kato, Jun-ichi

    2008-01-01

    The Profiling of Escherichia coli Chromosome (PEC) database (http://www.shigen.nig.ac.jp/ecoli/pec/) is designed to allow E. coli researchers to efficiently access information from functional genomics studies. The database contains two principal types of data: gene essentiality and a large collection of E. coli genetic research resources. The essentiality data are based on data compilation from published single-gene essentiality studies and on cell growth studies of large-deletion mutants. Using the circular and linear viewers for both whole genomes and the minimal genome, users can not only gain an overview of the genome structure but also retrieve information on contigs, gene products, mutants, deletions, and so forth. In particular, genome-wide exhaustive mutants are an essential resource for studying E. coli gene functions. Although the genomic database was constructed independently from the genetic resources database, users may seamlessly access both types of data. In addition to these data, the PEC database also provides a summary of homologous genes of other bacterial genomes and of protein structure information, with a comprehensive interface. The PEC is thus a convenient and useful platform for contemporary E. coli researchers. PMID:18392982

  11. Escherichia Coli

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodsell, David S.

    2009-01-01

    Diverse biological data may be used to create illustrations of molecules in their cellular context. I describe the scientific results that support a recent textbook illustration of an "Escherichia coli cell". The image magnifies a portion of the bacterium at one million times, showing the location and form of individual macromolecules. Results…

  12. E. coli

    MedlinePlus

    ... sure that ground beef has reached a safe internal temperature of 160° F. Wash hands before preparing food, after diapering infants, and after contact with cows, sheep, or goats, their food or treats, or their living environment . General Information E. coli Infections (NIH MedlinePlus) Trusted ...

  13. Bacteriophage resistance in Escherichia coli K-12: general pattern of resistance.

    PubMed Central

    Hancock, R E; Reeves, P

    1975-01-01

    Resistant mutants were isolated to 42 virulent bacteriophages in one strain of Escherichia coli K-12 and tested for resistance or sensitivity to a set of 56 bacteriophages. Most of the mutants fell into 11 groups with respect to their resistance patterns. It was possible to classify the bacteriophages broadly, according to the variety of mutants that were resistant to them. PMID:1090611

  14. Sporulation of Tricarboxylic Acid Cycle Mutants of Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Yousten, Allan A.; Hanson, Richard S.

    1972-01-01

    A mutant of Bacillus subtilis 168 lacking aconitase (EC 4.2.1.3) was found to be blocked at stage 0 or I of sporulation. Although adenosine triphosphate levels, which normally decrease in tricarboxylic acid cycle mutants at the completion of exponential growth, could be maintained at higher levels by feeding metabolizable carbon sources, this did not permit the cells to progress further into the sporulation sequence. When post-exponential-phase cells of mutants blocked in the first half of the tricarboxylic acid cycle were resuspended with an energy source in culture fluid from post-exponential-phase wild-type B. subtilis or Escherichia coli, good sporulation occurred. The spores produced retained the mutant genotype and were heat stable but lost refractility and heat stability several hours after their production. Images PMID:4110146

  15. E. coli enteritis

    MedlinePlus

    Traveler's diarrhea - E. coli ; Food poisoning - E. coli ; E. coli diarrhea; Hamburger disease ... properly reheated Fish or oysters Raw fruits or vegetables that have not been washed well Raw vegetable ...

  16. Molybdenum accumulation in chlD mutants of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Scott, D; Amy, N K

    1989-01-01

    The content of molybdenum in wild-type and chlD cells was measured under a variety of growth conditions to determine if cells with a defective chlD gene were able to accumulate molybdenum. The chlD cells accumulated less molybdenum than wild-type cells did but concentrated molybdenum to a level at least 20-fold higher than the concentration in the culture medium. Molybdenum was present within spheroplasts of chlD cells and was not dialyzable. The chlD cells accumulated as much molybdenum as wild-type cells did when grown in medium containing 0.1 mM molybdate; thus, the capability of incorporation of molybdenum into cellular component(s) was equivalent to that of the wild type under these conditions. PMID:2646274

  17. Lesion mimic mutants

    PubMed Central

    Moeder, Wolfgang

    2008-01-01

    Over the last decade a substantial number of lesion mimic mutants (LMM) have been isolated and a growing number of the genes have been cloned. It is now becoming clear that these mutants are valuable tools to dissect various aspects of programmed cell death (PCD) and pathogen resistance pathways in plants. Together with other forward genetics approaches LMMs shed light on the PCD machinery in plant cells and revealed important roles for sphingolipids, Ca2+ and chloroplast-derived porphyrin-metabolites during cell death development. PMID:19513227

  18. Engineering the elongation factor Tu for efficient selenoprotein synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Haruna, Ken-ichi; Alkazemi, Muhammad H.; Liu, Yuchen; Söll, Dieter; Englert, Markus

    2014-01-01

    Selenocysteine (Sec) is naturally co-translationally incorporated into proteins by recoding the UGA opal codon with a specialized elongation factor (SelB in bacteria) and an RNA structural signal (SECIS element). We have recently developed a SECIS-free selenoprotein synthesis system that site-specifically—using the UAG amber codon—inserts Sec depending on the elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu). Here, we describe the engineering of EF-Tu for improved selenoprotein synthesis. A Sec-specific selection system was established by expression of human protein O6-alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase (hAGT), in which the active site cysteine codon has been replaced by the UAG amber codon. The formed hAGT selenoprotein repairs the DNA damage caused by the methylating agent N-methyl-N′-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine, and thereby enables Escherichia coli to grow in the presence of this mutagen. An EF-Tu library was created in which codons specifying the amino acid binding pocket were randomized. Selection was carried out for enhanced Sec incorporation into hAGT; the resulting EF-Tu variants contained highly conserved amino acid changes within members of the library. The improved UTu-system with EF-Sel1 raises the efficiency of UAG-specific Sec incorporation to >90%, and also doubles the yield of selenoprotein production. PMID:25064855

  19. Secretion of Alpha-Hemolysin by Escherichia coli Disrupts Tight Junctions in Ulcerative Colitis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Mirsepasi-Lauridsen, Hengameh Chloé; Du, Zhengyu; Struve, Carsten; Charbon, Godefroid; Karczewski, Jurgen; Krogfelt, Karen Angeliki; Petersen, Andreas Munk; Wells, Jerry M

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The potential of Escherichia coli (E. coli) isolated from inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients to damage the integrity of the intestinal epithelium was investigated. Methods: E. coli strains isolated from patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) and healthy controls were tested for virulence capacity by molecular techniques and cytotoxic assays and transepithelial electric resistance (TER). E. coli isolate p19A was selected, and deletion mutants were created for alpha-hemolysin (α-hemolysin) (hly) clusters and cytotoxic necrotizing factor type 1 (cnf1). Probiotic E. coli Nissle and pathogenic E. coli LF82 were used as controls. Results: E. coli strains from patients with active UC completely disrupted epithelial cell tight junctions shortly after inoculation. These strains belong to phylogenetic group B2 and are all α-hemolysin positive. In contrast, probiotic E. coli Nissle, pathogenic E. coli LF82, four E. coli from patients with inactive UC and three E. coli strains from healthy controls did not disrupt tight junctions. E. coli p19A WT as well as cnf1, and single loci of hly mutants from cluster I and II were all able to damage Caco-2 (Heterogeneous human epithelial colorectal adenocarcinoma) cell tight junctions. However, this phenotype was lost in a mutant with knockout (Δ) of both hly loci (P<0.001). Conclusions: UC-associated E. coli producing α-hemolysin can cause rapid loss of tight junction integrity in differentiated Caco-2 cell monolayers. This effect was abolished in a mutant unable to express α-hemolysin. These results suggest that high Hly expression may be a mechanism by which specific strains of E. coli pathobionts can contribute to epithelial barrier dysfunction and pathophysiology of disease in IBD. PMID:26938480

  20. Proton suicide: general method for direct selection of sugar transport- and fermentation-defective mutants

    SciTech Connect

    Winkelman, J.W.; Clark, D.P.

    1984-11-01

    A positive selection procedure was devised for bacterial mutants incapable of producing acid from sugars by fermentation. The method relied on the production of elemental bromine from a mixture of bromide and bromate under acidic conditions. When wild-type Escherichia coli cells were plated on media containing a fermentable sugar and an equimolar mixture of bromide and bromate, most of the cells were killed but a variety of mutants unable to produce acid from the sugar survived. Among these mutants were those defective in (i) sugar uptake, (ii) the glycolytic pathway, and (iii) the excretion. There were also novel mutants with some presumed regulatory defects affecting fermentation.

  1. Two proline porters in Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed Central

    Stalmach, M E; Grothe, S; Wood, J M

    1983-01-01

    Escherichia coli mutants defective at putP and putA lack proline transport via proline porter I and proline dehydrogenase activity, respectively. They retain a proline uptake system (proline porter II) that is induced during tryptophan-limited growth and are sensitive to the toxic L-proline analog, 3,4-dehydroproline. 3,4-Dehydroproline-resistant mutants derived from a putP putA mutant lack proline porter II. Auxotrophic derivatives derived from putP+ or putP bacteria can grow if provided with proline at low concentration (25 microM); those derived from the 3,4-dehydroproline-resistant mutants require high proline for growth (2.5 mM). We conclude that E. coli, like Salmonella typhimurium, possesses a second proline porter that is inactivated by mutations at the proP locus. PMID:6355059

  2. Starch mutants of Chlamydomonas

    SciTech Connect

    Berry-Lowe, S.L.; Schmidt, G.W. )

    1990-05-01

    Wild type Chlamydomonas accumulates starch and triglycerides when grown under nitrogen limiting conditions. Toward elucidation of the mechanisms for control of starch biosynthesis, we isolated mutants impaired int he accumulation of storage carbohydrates. Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (strain ya-12) was mutagenized by UV irradiation and colonies were screened by iodine staining after growth in darkness. Mutants, denoted ais for altered in iodine staining, have been characterized by electron microscopy and assays for starch synthease, ADPG-pyrophosphorylase, phosphoglucose isomerase (PGI), phosphoglucomutase and fructose 1,6-bisphosphatase, and amylase activities. Transcript analysis of wild type and mutant RNAs with PGI, ADPG-pyrophosphorylase, and waxy probes have also been carried out. No deficiencies of any of these components have been detected. Furthermore, long-term cultures of ya-12 and ais-1d in nitrogen-limited chemostats have been studied; starch also does not accumulate in ais-1d under these conditions. Thus, the lesion affects an essential factor of unknown identity that is required for starch synthesis.

  3. Mechanism of Escherichia coli Resistance to Pyrrhocoricin

    PubMed Central

    Narayanan, Shalini; Modak, Joyanta K.; Ryan, Catherine S.; Garcia-Bustos, Jose; Davies, John K.

    2014-01-01

    Due to their lack of toxicity to mammalian cells and good serum stability, proline-rich antimicrobial peptides (PR-AMPs) have been proposed as promising candidates for the treatment of infections caused by antimicrobial-resistant bacterial pathogens. It has been hypothesized that these peptides act on multiple targets within bacterial cells, and therefore the likelihood of the emergence of resistance was considered to be low. Here, we show that spontaneous Escherichia coli mutants resistant to pyrrhocoricin arise at a frequency of approximately 6 × 10−7. Multiple independently derived mutants all contained a deletion in a nonessential gene that encodes the putative peptide uptake permease SbmA. Sensitivity could be restored to the mutants by complementation with an intact copy of the sbmA gene. These findings question the viability of the development of insect PR-AMPs as antimicrobials. PMID:24590485

  4. Diarrheagenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Nataro, James P.; Kaper, James B.

    1998-01-01

    Escherichia coli is the predominant nonpathogenic facultative flora of the human intestine. Some E. coli strains, however, have developed the ability to cause disease of the gastrointestinal, urinary, or central nervous system in even the most robust human hosts. Diarrheagenic strains of E. coli can be divided into at least six different categories with corresponding distinct pathogenic schemes. Taken together, these organisms probably represent the most common cause of pediatric diarrhea worldwide. Several distinct clinical syndromes accompany infection with diarrheagenic E. coli categories, including traveler’s diarrhea (enterotoxigenic E. coli), hemorrhagic colitis and hemolytic-uremic syndrome (enterohemorrhagic E. coli), persistent diarrhea (enteroaggregative E. coli), and watery diarrhea of infants (enteropathogenic E. coli). This review discusses the current level of understanding of the pathogenesis of the diarrheagenic E. coli strains and describes how their pathogenic schemes underlie the clinical manifestations, diagnostic approach, and epidemiologic investigation of these important pathogens. PMID:9457432

  5. Modeling ultraviolet-induced SOS response in translesion synthesis-deficient cells of Escherichia Coli bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belov, O. V.

    2011-01-01

    A quantitative analysis is performed of SOS response induced by ultraviolet radiation in Escherichia coli bacterial cells with the disordered function of translesion synthesis. The dynamics of the concentration of the basic SOS proteins is estimated for the recA, umuD, and umuC mutants of E. coli. The estimation is based on the model approaches developed earlier.

  6. The zebrafish early arrest mutants.

    PubMed

    Kane, D A; Maischein, H M; Brand, M; van Eeden, F J; Furutani-Seiki, M; Granato, M; Haffter, P; Hammerschmidt, M; Heisenberg, C P; Jiang, Y J; Kelsh, R N; Mullins, M C; Odenthal, J; Warga, R M; Nüsslein-Volhard, C

    1996-12-01

    This report describes mutants of the zebrafish having phenotypes causing a general arrest in early morphogenesis. These mutants identify a group of loci making up about 20% of the loci identified by mutants with visible morphological phenotypes within the first day of development. There are 12 Class I mutants, which fall into 5 complementation groups and have cells that lyse before morphological defects are observed. Mutants at three loci, speed bump, ogre and zombie, display abnormal nuclei. The 8 Class II mutants, which fall into 6 complementation groups, arrest development before cell lysis is observed. These mutants seemingly stop development in the late segmentation stages, and maintain a body shape similar to a 20 hour embryo. Mutations in speed bump, ogre, zombie, specter, poltergeist and troll were tested for cell lethality by transplanting mutant cells into wild-type hosts. With poltergeist, transplanted mutant cells all survive. The remainder of the mutants tested were autonomously but conditionally lethal: mutant cells, most of which lyse, sometimes survive to become notochord, muscles, or, in rare cases, large neurons, all cell types which become postmitotic in the gastrula. Some of the genes of the early arrest group may be necessary for progression though the cell cycle; if so, the survival of early differentiating cells may be based on having their terminal mitosis before the zygotic requirement for these genes. PMID:9007229

  7. Internal deletion mutants of Xenopus transcription factor IIIA.

    PubMed Central

    Hanas, J S; Littell, R M; Gaskins, C J; Zebrowski, R

    1989-01-01

    Xenopus transcription factor IIIA (TFIIIA) or TFIIIA mutants with internal deletions were expressed in E. coli utilizing a bacteriophage T7 RNA polymerase system. TFIIIA or deletion mutant TFIIIAs, isolated from E.coli cell extracts, were identified by SDS PAGE and immunoblotting with rabbit antiserum against native TFIIIA purified from Xenopus immature oocytes. Specific DNA binding of intact or internally deleted TFIIIA was compared by analyzing their abilities to protect the internal control gene (ICR) of the Xenopus 5S RNA gene from DNase I digestion. Intact protein, synthesized from a full-length TFIIIA cDNA, bound specifically to the entire ICR (+96 to +43) and promoted 5S RNA gene transcription in vitro. One TFIIIA deletion mutant, expressed from cDNA lacking the coding sequence for the putative fourth zinc finger (designated from the N-terminus, amino acids 103-132) protected the ICR from DNase I digestion from nucleotide positions +96 to +78. A second TFIIIA mutant resulting from fusion of putative zinc fingers 7 and 8 (deletion of amino acids 200-224) protected the 5S gene ICR from positions +96 to +63. The DNase I protection patterns of these mutant proteins are consistent with the formation of strong ICR contacts by those regions of the protein on the N-terminal side of the mutation but not by those regions on the C-terminal side of the mutation. The regions of the protein comprising the N-terminal 3 fingers and N-terminal six fingers appear to be in contact with approximately 18 and 33 bp of DNA respectively on the 3' side of the 5S gene ICR. These internal deletion mutants promoted 5S RNA synthesis in vitro and DNA renaturation. Images PMID:2690011

  8. DNA Adenine Methylase Mutants of Salmonella Typhimurium and a Novel Dam-Regulated Locus

    PubMed Central

    Torreblanca, J.; Casadesus, J.

    1996-01-01

    Mutants of Salmonella typhimurium lacking DNA adenine methylase were isolated; they include insertion and deletion alleles. The dam locus maps at 75 min between cysG and aroB, similar to the Escherichia coli dam gene. Dam(-) mutants of S. typhimurium resemble those of E. coli in the following phenotypes: (1) increased spontaneous mutations, (2) moderate SOS induction, (3) enhancement of duplication segregation, (4) inviability of dam recA and dam recB mutants, and (5) suppression of the inviability of the dam recA and dam recB combinations by mutations that eliminate mismatch repair. However, differences between S. typhimurium and E. coli dam mutants are also found: (1) S. typhimurium dam mutants do not show increased UV sensitivity, suggesting that methyl-directed mismatch repair does not participate in the repair of UV-induced DNA damage in Salmonella. (2) S. typhimurium dam recJ mutants are viable, suggesting that the Salmonella RecJ function does not participate in the repair of DNA strand breaks formed in the absence of Dam methylation. We also describe a genetic screen for detecting novel genes regulated by Dam methylation and a locus repressed by Dam methylation in the S. typhimurium virulence (or ``cryptic'') plasmid. PMID:8878670

  9. Identification of Arabidopsis rat Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yanmin; Nam, Jaesung; Humara, Jaime M.; Mysore, Kirankumar S.; Lee, Lan-Ying; Cao, Hongbin; Valentine, Lisa; Li, Jingling; Kaiser, Anthony D.; Kopecky, Andrea L.; Hwang, Hau-Hsuan; Bhattacharjee, Saikat; Rao, Praveen K.; Tzfira, Tzvi; Rajagopal, Jyothi; Yi, HoChul; Veena; Yadav, Badam S.; Crane, Yan M.; Lin, Kui; Larcher, Yves; Gelvin, Matthew J.K.; Knue, Marnie; Ramos, Cynthia; Zhao, Xiaowen; Davis, Susan J.; Kim, Sang-Ic; Ranjith-Kumar, C.T.; Choi, Yoo-Jin; Hallan, Vipin K.; Chattopadhyay, Sudip; Sui, Xiangzhen; Ziemienowicz, Alicja; Matthysse, Ann G.; Citovsky, Vitaly; Hohn, Barbara; Gelvin, Stanton B.

    2003-01-01

    Limited knowledge currently exists regarding the roles of plant genes and proteins in the Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation process. To understand the host contribution to transformation, we carried out root-based transformation assays to identify Arabidopsis mutants that are resistant to Agrobacterium transformation (rat mutants). To date, we have identified 126 rat mutants by screening libraries of T-DNA insertion mutants and by using various “reverse genetic” approaches. These mutants disrupt expression of genes of numerous categories, including chromatin structural and remodeling genes, and genes encoding proteins implicated in nuclear targeting, cell wall structure and metabolism, cytoskeleton structure and function, and signal transduction. Here, we present an update on the identification and characterization of these rat mutants. PMID:12805582

  10. ECB deacylase mutants

    DOEpatents

    Arnold, Frances H.; Shao, Zhixin; Zhao, Huimin; Giver, Lorraine J.

    2002-01-01

    A method for in vitro mutagenesis and recombination of polynucleotide sequences based on polymerase-catalyzed extension of primer oligonucleotides is disclosed. The method involves priming template polynucleotide(s) with random-sequences or defined-sequence primers to generate a pool of short DNA fragments with a low level of point mutations. The DNA fragments are subjected to denaturization followed by annealing and further enzyme-catalyzed DNA polymerization. This procedure is repeated a sufficient number of times to produce full-length genes which comprise mutants of the original template polynucleotides. These genes can be further amplified by the polymerase chain reaction and cloned into a vector for expression of the encoded proteins.

  11. Involvement of DNA superhelicity in minichromosome maintenance in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Leonard, A C; Whitford, W G; Helmstetter, C E

    1985-01-01

    Evidence is presented that Escherichia coli minichromosomes are harbored at superhelical densities which are lower than those measured for other E. coli plasmids but are comparable to that of the chromosome. When introduced into gyrB decreased-supercoiling mutants, minichromosomes were much more unstable than in strains with normal or increased supercoiling properties; in fact, certain minichromosome derivatives could not be introduced into top gyrB decreased-supercoiling mutants. These observations were unique to minichromosomes, since the maintenance of plasmids which did not replicate from oriC was not altered in these mutants. Analyses of minichromosomes of identical sizes but with different restriction fragment orientations suggested that supercoiling-dependent alterations in promoter-terminator functions, as well as direct effects of supercoiling on replication, may play a role in the observed minichromosome instability. Images PMID:2981821

  12. A new gene in E. coli RNA synthesis.

    PubMed

    Liebke, H H; Speyer, J F

    1983-01-01

    A novel spontaneous temperature sensitive mutant of Escherichia coli, which stops synthesizing stable RNA and some proteins immediately upon temperature shift from 30 degrees C to 42 degrees C, is described. Stable RNA species are not preferentially degraded in the mutant at the nonpermissive temperature. The guanine polyphosphate compounds, ppGpp (MS1) and pppGpp (MS2), are not produced at 42 degrees C. The mutant strain does not grow at 42 degrees C in either broth or defined minimal medium supplemented with any of a variety of carbon sources. The temperature sensitive mutation in this strain maps between dap A, E and pts I and defines a new locus affecting RNA synthesis in E. coli.

  13. Highly ordered crystals of channel-forming membrane proteins, of nucleoside-monophosphate kinases, of FAD-containing oxidoreductases and of sugar-processing enzymes and their mutants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, G. E.; Dreyer, M.; Klein, C.; Kreusch, A.; Mittl, P.; Mu¨ller, C. W.; Mu¨ller-Dieckmann, J.; Muller, Y. A.; Proba, K.; Schlauderer, G.; Spu¨rgin, P.; Stehle, T.; Weiss, M. S.

    1992-08-01

    Preparation and crystallization procedures as well as crystal properties are reported for 12 proteins plus numerous site-directed mutants. The proteins are: the integral membrane protein porin from Rhodobacter capsulatus which diffracts to at least 1.8A˚resolution, porin from Rhodopseudomonas blastica which diffracts to at least 2.0A˚resolution, adenylate kinase from yeast and mutants, adenylate kinase from Escherichia coli and mutants, bovine liver mitochondrial adenylate kinase, guanylate kinase from yeast, uridylate kinase from yeast, glutathione reductase from E. coli and mutants, NADH peroxidase from Streptococcus faecalis containing a sulfenic acid as redox-center, pyruvate oxidase from Lactobacillus plantarum containing FAD and TPP, cyclodextrin glycosyltransferase from Bacillus circulans and mutants, and a fuculose aldolase from E. coli.

  14. Measuring Escherichia coli Gene Expression during Human Urinary Tract Infections

    PubMed Central

    Mobley, Harry L. T.

    2016-01-01

    Extraintestinal Escherichia coli (E. coli) evolved by acquisition of pathogenicity islands, phage, plasmids, and DNA segments by horizontal gene transfer. Strains are heterogeneous but virulent uropathogenic isolates more often have specific fimbriae, toxins, and iron receptors than commensal strains. One may ask whether it is the virulence factors alone that are required to establish infection. While these virulence factors clearly contribute strongly to pathogenesis, bacteria must survive by metabolizing nutrients available to them. By constructing mutants in all major metabolic pathways and co-challenging mice transurethrally with each mutant and the wild type strain, we identified which major metabolic pathways are required to infect the urinary tract. We must also ask what else is E. coli doing in vivo? To answer this question, we examined the transcriptome of E. coli CFT073 in the murine model of urinary tract infection (UTI) as well as for E. coli strains collected and analyzed directly from the urine of patients attending either a urology clinic or a university health clinic for symptoms of UTI. Using microarrays and RNA-seq, we measured in vivo gene expression for these uropathogenic E. coli strains, identifying genes upregulated during murine and human UTI. Our findings allow us to propose a new definition of bacterial virulence. PMID:26784237

  15. Fungal β-1,3-glucan increases ofloxacin tolerance of Escherichia coli in a polymicrobial E. coli/Candida albicans biofilm.

    PubMed

    De Brucker, Katrijn; Tan, Yulong; Vints, Katlijn; De Cremer, Kaat; Braem, Annabel; Verstraeten, Natalie; Michiels, Jan; Vleugels, Jef; Cammue, Bruno P A; Thevissen, Karin

    2015-01-01

    In the past, biofilm-related research has focused mainly on axenic biofilms. However, in nature, biofilms are often composed of multiple species, and the resulting polymicrobial interactions influence industrially and clinically relevant outcomes such as performance and drug resistance. In this study, we show that Escherichia coli does not affect Candida albicans tolerance to amphotericin or caspofungin in an E. coli/C. albicans biofilm. In contrast, ofloxacin tolerance of E. coli is significantly increased in a polymicrobial E. coli/C. albicans biofilm compared to its tolerance in an axenic E. coli biofilm. The increased ofloxacin tolerance of E. coli is mainly biofilm specific, as ofloxacin tolerance of E. coli is less pronounced in polymicrobial E. coli/C. albicans planktonic cultures. Moreover, we found that ofloxacin tolerance of E. coli decreased significantly when E. coli/C. albicans biofilms were treated with matrix-degrading enzymes such as the β-1,3-glucan-degrading enzyme lyticase. In line with a role for β-1,3-glucan in mediating ofloxacin tolerance of E. coli in a biofilm, we found that ofloxacin tolerance of E. coli increased even more in E. coli/C. albicans biofilms consisting of a high-β-1,3-glucan-producing C. albicans mutant. In addition, exogenous addition of laminarin, a polysaccharide composed mainly of poly-β-1,3-glucan, to an E. coli biofilm also resulted in increased ofloxacin tolerance. All these data indicate that β-1,3-glucan from C. albicans increases ofloxacin tolerance of E. coli in an E. coli/C. albicans biofilm.

  16. Murein segregation in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    de Pedro, M A; Quintela, J C; Höltje, J V; Schwarz, H

    1997-01-01

    Peptidoglycan (murein) segregation has been studied by means of a new labeling method. The method relies on the ability of Escherichia coli cells to incorporate D-Cys into macromolecular murein. The incorporation depends on a periplasmic amino acid exchange reaction. At low concentrations, D-Cys is innocuous to the cell. The distribution of modified murein in purified sacculi can be traced and visualized by immunodetection of the -SH groups by fluorescence and electron microscopy techniques. Analysis of murein segregation in wild-type and cell division mutant strains revealed that murein in polar caps is metabolically inert and is segregated in a conservative fashion. Elongation of the sacculus apparently occurs by diffuse insertion of precursors over the cylindrical part of the cell surface. At the initiation of cell division, there is a FtsZ-dependent localized activation of murein synthesis at the potential division sites. Penicillin-binding protein 3 and the products of the division genes ftsA and ftsQ are dispensable for the activation of division sites. As a consequence, under restrictive conditions ftsA,ftsI,or ftsQ mutants generate filamentous sacculi with rings of all-new murein at the positions where septa would otherwise develop. PMID:9139895

  17. Influence of cyclopropane fatty acids on heat, high pressure, acid and oxidative resistance in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuan Yao; Gänzle, Michael G

    2016-04-01

    Heat and high pressure resistant strains of Escherichia coli are a challenge to food safety. This study investigated effects of cyclopropane fatty acids (CFAs) on stress tolerance in the heat- and pressure-resistant strain E. coli AW1.7 and the sensitive strain E. coli MG1655. The role of CFAs was explored by disruption of cfa coding for CFA synthase with an in-frame, unmarked deletion method. Both wild-type strains consumed all the unsaturated fatty acids (C16:1 and C18:1) that were mostly converted to CFAs and a low proportion to saturated fatty acid (C16:0). Moreover, E. coli AW1.7 contained a higher proportion of membrane C19:0 cyclopropane fatty acid than E. coli MG1655 (P<0.05). The Δcfa mutant strains did not produce CFAs, and the corresponding substrates C16:1 and C18:1 accumulated in membrane lipids. The deletion of cfa did not alter resistance to H2O2 but increased the lethality of heat, high pressure and acid treatments in E. coli AW1.7, and E. coli MG1655. E. coli AW1.7 and its Δcfa mutant were more resistant to pressure and heat but less resistant to acid stress than E. coli MG1655. Heat resistance of wild-type strains and their Δcfa mutant was also assessed in beef patties grilled to an internal temperature of 71 °C. After treatment, cell counts of wild type strains were higher than those of the Δcfa mutant strains. In conclusion, CFA synthesis in E. coli increases heat, high pressure and acid resistance, and increases heat resistance in food. This knowledge on mechanisms of stress resistance will facilitate the design of intervention methods for improved pathogen control in food production.

  18. Escherichia coli derivatives lacking both alcohol dehydrogenase and phosphotransacetylase grow anaerobically by lactate fermentation

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, S.; Clark, D.P. )

    1989-07-01

    Escherichia coli mutants lacking alcohol dehydrogenase (adh mutants) cannot synthesize the fermentation product ethanol and are unable to grow anaerobically on glucose and other hexoses. Similarly, phosphotransacetylase-negative mutants (pta mutants) neither excrete acetate nor grow anaerobically. However, when a strain carrying an adh deletion was selected for anaerobic growth on glucose, spontaneous pta mutants were isolated. Strains carrying both adh and pta mutations were observed by in vivo nuclear magnetic resonance and shown to produce lactic acid as the major fermentation product. Various combinations of adh pta double mutants regained the ability to grow anaerobically on hexoses, by what amounts to a homolactic fermentation. Unlike wild-type strains, such adh pta double mutants were unable to grow anaerobically on sorbitol or on glucuronic acid. The growth properties of strains carrying various mutations affecting the enzymes of fermentation are discussed terms of redox balance.

  19. RpoH2 sigma factor controls the photooxidative stress response in a non-photosynthetic rhizobacterium, Azospirillum brasilense Sp7.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Santosh; Rai, Ashutosh Kumar; Mishra, Mukti Nath; Shukla, Mansi; Singh, Pradhyumna Kumar; Tripathi, Anil Kumar

    2012-12-01

    Bacteria belonging to the Alphaproteobacteria normally harbour multiple copies of the heat shock sigma factor (known as σ(32), σ(H) or RpoH). Azospirillum brasilense, a non-photosynthetic rhizobacterium, harbours five copies of rpoH genes, one of which is an rpoH2 homologue. The genes around the rpoH2 locus in A. brasilense show synteny with that found in rhizobia. The rpoH2 of A. brasilense was able to complement the temperature-sensitive phenotype of the Escherichia coli rpoH mutant. Inactivation of rpoH2 in A. brasilense results in increased sensitivity to methylene blue and to triphenyl tetrazolium chloride (TTC). Exposure of A. brasilense to TTC and the singlet oxygen-generating agent methylene blue induced several-fold higher expression of rpoH2. Comparison of the proteome of A. brasilense with its rpoH2 deletion mutant and with an A. brasilense strain overexpressing rpoH2 revealed chaperone GroEL, elongation factors (Ef-Tu and EF-G), peptidyl prolyl isomerase, and peptide methionine sulfoxide reductase as the major proteins whose expression was controlled by RpoH2. Here, we show that the RpoH2 sigma factor-controlled photooxidative stress response in A. brasilense is similar to that in the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides, but that RpoH2 is not involved in the detoxification of methylglyoxal in A. brasilense.

  20. Respiration of Escherichia coli in the mouse intestine.

    PubMed

    Jones, Shari A; Chowdhury, Fatema Z; Fabich, Andrew J; Anderson, April; Schreiner, Darrel M; House, Anetra L; Autieri, Steven M; Leatham, Mary P; Lins, Jeremy J; Jorgensen, Mathias; Cohen, Paul S; Conway, Tyrrell

    2007-10-01

    Mammals are aerobes that harbor an intestinal ecosystem dominated by large numbers of anaerobic microorganisms. However, the role of oxygen in the intestinal ecosystem is largely unexplored. We used systematic mutational analysis to determine the role of respiratory metabolism in the streptomycin-treated mouse model of intestinal colonization. Here we provide evidence that aerobic respiration is required for commensal and pathogenic Escherichia coli to colonize mice. Our results showed that mutants lacking ATP synthase, which is required for all respiratory energy-conserving metabolism, were eliminated by competition with respiratory-competent wild-type strains. Mutants lacking the high-affinity cytochrome bd oxidase, which is used when oxygen tensions are low, also failed to colonize. However, the low-affinity cytochrome bo(3) oxidase, which is used when oxygen tension is high, was found not to be necessary for colonization. Mutants lacking either nitrate reductase or fumarate reductase also had major colonization defects. The results showed that the entire E. coli population was dependent on both microaerobic and anaerobic respiration, consistent with the hypothesis that the E. coli niche is alternately microaerobic and anaerobic, rather than static. The results indicate that success of the facultative anaerobes in the intestine depends on their respiratory flexibility. Despite competition for relatively scarce carbon sources, the energy efficiency provided by respiration may contribute to the widespread distribution (i.e., success) of E. coli strains as commensal inhabitants of the mammalian intestine. PMID:17698572

  1. [Recombinant protein production in Escherichia coli].

    PubMed

    Nuc, Przemysław; Nuc, Katarzyna

    2006-01-01

    Growing needs for efficient recombinant production pose new challenges; starting from cell growth optimization under overexpression conditions, improving vectors, gene and protein sequence to suit them to protein biosynthesis machinery of the host, through extending the knowledge of protein folding, fusion protein construction, and coexpression systems, to improvements in protein purification and renaturation technologies. Hitherto Escherichia coli is the most defined and the cheapest protein biosynthesis system. With its wealth of available mutants tested is the best suited to economically test new gene constructs and to scale up the recombinant protein production.

  2. Mutations in Escherichia coli that effect sensitivity to oxygen

    SciTech Connect

    Jamison, C.S.; Adler, H.I.

    1987-11-01

    Fifteen oxygen-sensitive (Oxy/sup s/) mutants of Escherichia coli were isolated after exposure to UV light. The mutants did not form macroscopic colonies when plated aerobically. They did form macroscopic colonies anaerobically. Oxygen, introduced during log phase, inhibited the growth of liquid cultures. The degree of inhibition was used to separate the mutants into three classes. Class I mutants did not grow after exposure to oxygen. Class II mutants were able to grow, but at a reduced rate and to a reduced final titer, when compared with the wild-type parent. Class III mutants formed filaments in response to oxygen. Genetic experiments indicated that the mutations map to six different chromosomal regions. The results of enzymatic assays indicated that 7 of the 10 class I mutants have low levels of catalase, peroxidase, superoxide dismutase, and respiratory enzymes when compared with the wild-type parent. Mutations in five of the seven class I mutants which have the low enzyme activities mapped within the region 8 to 13.5 min. P1 transduction data indicated that mutations in three of these five mutants, Oxy/sup s/-6, Oxy/sup s/-14, and Oxy/sup s/-17, mapped to 8.4 min. The correlation of low enzyme levels and mapping data suggest that a single gene may regulate several enzymes in response to oxygen. The remaining three class I mutants had wild-type levels of catalase, peroxidase, and superoxide dismutase, but decreased respiratory activity. The class II and III mutants had enzyme activities similar to those of the wild-type parent.

  3. Lipopolysaccharide mutants of Rhizobium meliloti are not defective in symbiosis

    SciTech Connect

    Clover, R.H.; Kieber, J.; Signer, E.R. )

    1989-07-01

    Mutants of Rhizobium meliloti selected primarily for bacteriophage resistance fall into 13 groups. Mutants in the four best-characterized groups (class A, lpsB, lpsC, and class D), which map to the rhizobial chromosome, appear to affect lipopolysaccharide (LPS) as judged by the reactivity with monoclonal antibodies and behavior on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels of extracted LPS. Mutations in all 13 groups, in an otherwise wild-type genetic background, are Fix{sup +} on alfalfa. This suggests that LPS does not play a major role in symbiosis. Mutations in lpsB, however, are Fix{sup {minus}} in one particular genetic background, evidently because of the cumulative effect of several independent background mutations. In addition, an auxotrophic mutation evidently equivalent to Escherichia coli carAB is Fix{sup {minus}} on alfalfa.

  4. Anaerobic respiration of Escherichia coli in the mouse intestine.

    PubMed

    Jones, Shari A; Gibson, Terri; Maltby, Rosalie C; Chowdhury, Fatema Z; Stewart, Valley; Cohen, Paul S; Conway, Tyrrell

    2011-10-01

    The intestine is inhabited by a large microbial community consisting primarily of anaerobes and, to a lesser extent, facultative anaerobes, such as Escherichia coli, which we have shown requires aerobic respiration to compete successfully in the mouse intestine (S. A. Jones et al., Infect. Immun. 75:4891-4899, 2007). If facultative anaerobes efficiently lower oxygen availability in the intestine, then their sustained growth must also depend on anaerobic metabolism. In support of this idea, mutants lacking nitrate reductase or fumarate reductase have extreme colonization defects. Here, we further explore the role of anaerobic respiration in colonization using the streptomycin-treated mouse model. We found that respiratory electron flow is primarily via the naphthoquinones, which pass electrons to cytochrome bd oxidase and the anaerobic terminal reductases. We found that E. coli uses nitrate and fumarate in the intestine, but not nitrite, dimethyl sulfoxide, or trimethylamine N-oxide. Competitive colonizations revealed that cytochrome bd oxidase is more advantageous than nitrate reductase or fumarate reductase. Strains lacking nitrate reductase outcompeted fumarate reductase mutants once the nitrate concentration in cecal mucus reached submillimolar levels, indicating that fumarate is the more important anaerobic electron acceptor in the intestine because nitrate is limiting. Since nitrate is highest in the absence of E. coli, we conclude that E. coli is the only bacterium in the streptomycin-treated mouse large intestine that respires nitrate. Lastly, we demonstrated that a mutant lacking the NarXL regulator (activator of the NarG system), but not a mutant lacking the NarP-NarQ regulator, has a colonization defect, consistent with the advantage provided by NarG. The emerging picture is one in which gene regulation is tuned to balance expression of the terminal reductases that E. coli uses to maximize its competitiveness and achieve the highest possible population in

  5. Use of Electroporation To Generate a Thiobacillus neapolitanus Carboxysome Mutant

    PubMed Central

    English, R. S.; Jin, S.; Shively, J. M.

    1995-01-01

    Two cloning vectors designed for use in Escherichia coli and the thiobacilli were constructed by combining a Thiobacillus intermedius plasmid replicon with a multicloning site, lacZ(prm1), and either a kanamycin or a streptomycin resistance gene. Conditions necessary for the introduction of DNA into T. intermedius and T. neapolitanus via electroporation were examined and optimized. By using optimal electroporation conditions, the gene encoding a carboxysome shell protein, csoS1A, was insertionally inactivated in T. neapolitanus. The mutant showed a reduced number of carboxysomes and an increased level of CO(inf2) necessary for growth. PMID:16535117

  6. PATHOGENIC ESCHERICHIA COLI

    EPA Science Inventory

    Escherichia coli is a bacterial species which inhabits the gastrointestinal tract of man and warm-blooded animals. Because of the ubiquity of this bacterium in the intestinal flora, it serves as an important indicator organism of fecal contamination. E. coli, aside from serving a...

  7. Conditional Lethal Mutants of Adenovirus 2-Simian Virus 40 Hybrids I. Host Range Mutants of Ad2+ND1

    PubMed Central

    Grodzicker, Terri; Anderson, Carl; Sharp, Phillip A.; Sambrook, Joe

    1974-01-01

    Human adenovirus type 2 (Ad2) grows poorly in monkey cells, although this defect can be overcome by co-infection with simian virus 40 (SV40). The nondefective Ad2-SV40 hybrid virus, Ad2+ND1, replicates efficiently in both human and African green monkey kidney cells, presumably due to the insertion of SV40 sequences into the Ad2 DNA. Several mutants of Ad2+ND1 have been isolated that grow and plaque poorly in monkey cells, although they retain the ability to replicate and plaque efficiently in HeLa cells. One of these mutants (H39) has been examined in detail. Studies comparing the DNA of the mutant with Ad2+ND1 either by the cleavage patterns produced by Escherichia coli R·RI restriction endonuclease digestion or by heteroduplexing reveal no differences. The pattern of protein synthesis of Ad2+ND1 and H39 in monkey cells is quite different with the mutant resembling Ad2, which is defective in the synthesis of late proteins. However, in human cells, the proteins synthesized by H39 and the parent Ad2+ND1 are very similar. The production of SV40 U antigen in H39-infected cells is different from that in Ad2+ND1-infected cells. Finally, the growth of H39 in monkey cells can be complemented by SV40. Images PMID:4364898

  8. Influence of very short patch mismatch repair on SOS inducing lesions after aminoglycoside treatment in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Baharoglu, Zeynep; Mazel, Didier

    2014-01-01

    Low concentrations of aminoglycosides induce the SOS response in Vibrio cholerae but not in Escherichia coli. In order to determine whether a specific factor present in E. coli prevents this induction, we developed a genetic screen where only SOS inducing mutants are viable. We identified the vsr gene coding for the Vsr protein of the very short patch mismatch repair (VSPR) pathway. The effect of mismatch repair (MMR) mutants was also studied. We propose that lesions formed upon aminoglycoside treatment are preferentially repaired by VSPR without SOS induction in E. coli and by MMR when VSPR is impaired.

  9. Nature of Escherichia coli cell lysis by culture supernatants of Bacillus species.

    PubMed Central

    Dean, C R; Ward, O P

    1991-01-01

    Escherichia coli cells were found to be sensitive to lysis by the supernatants of a variety of protease-positive Bacillus species when treated at 45 degrees C but not when treated at 37 degrees C. Different E. coli strains manifested different lysis sensitivities when treated at 45 degrees C. When the lysis rates of E. coli cells at various stages of growth were investigated, post-exponential-phase cells were shown to be most sensitive to lysis. The lysis rate was inversely related to cell viability, and susceptibility appeared to be at least partly due to lysis of dead E. coli cells. A close relation was observed between levels of lysis activity and proteolytic activity. A Bacillus subtilis mutant lacking alkaline and neutral protease activity failed to lyse E. coli cells. It was concluded that Bacillus proteases played a major role in the observed E. coli lysis. PMID:1892379

  10. Mutant breeding of Serratia marcescens strain for enhancing prodigiosin production and application to textiles.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoxia; Wang, Yujie; Sun, Shiqing; Zhu, Changjun; Xu, Wei; Park, Yongdoo; Zhou, Haimeng

    2013-01-01

    Microwaves have been used as a mutant agent to select mutant strains with high-yield and high-purity pigment. Mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic techniques were used to elucidate the structures of the pigment. High-performance liquid chromatography was used to measure pigment purity. The analysis of the mutant strain showed that pigment yield increased by 109% and was 98% pure. Prodigiosin in ethanol solution had good stability under ambient temperature and natural indoor light. However, prodigiosin rapidly decomposed under intense sunlight. Prodigiosin is an ecological colorant to dye fabrics, including synthetic and natural fibers. Synthetic fabrics dyed with prodigiosin, such as polyamide and acrylic, have high colorfastness to washing (≥4th grade) and antimicrobial properties (>90%) against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. Antimicrobial properties were significantly different between synthetic and natural fabrics. The mutant strain Serratia marcescens jx1-1, with high prodigiosin yield and purity, has promising prospects in food, cosmetic, and textile industries.

  11. Isolation of temperature-sensitive Abelson virus mutants by site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Engelman, A; Rosenberg, N

    1987-01-01

    Mutants of Abelson virus encoding temperature-sensitive protein-tyrosine kinase (EC 2.7.1.112) were created by site-directed mutagenesis using sequence information from temperature-sensitive mutants of the related v-src oncogene. Expression of these two independent mutations in Escherichia coli resulted in reduced phosphorylation of the mutant proteins at high temperature. Viruses containing one of the mutations induced conditional transformation of both NIH 3T3 and lymphoid cells when expressed in the context of a truncated transforming protein. These results underscore the functional homology between protein-tyrosine kinases and suggest that transfer of mutations within a related gene family may provide a rapid method to create mutants. Images PMID:2825174

  12. Role of glycoside hydrolase genes in sinigrin degradation by E. coli O157:H7.

    PubMed

    Cordeiro, Roniele P; Doria, Juan H; Zhanel, George G; Sparling, Richard; Holley, Richard A

    2015-07-16

    This work examined Escherichia coli O157:H7 strain 02-0304 for putative genes responsible for sinigrin hydrolysis. Sinigrin is a glucosinolate present in Oriental mustard (Brassica juncea), and its hydrolysis is mediated in plants by the enzyme myrosinase. Sinigrin hydrolysis by plant or bacterial myrosinase yields allyl isothiocyanate (AITC) which is bactericidal. In silico analysis using public databases found sequence similarity between plant myrosinase and enzymes encoded by genes from β-glucosidase families in E. coli O157:H7. Specifically, 6-phospho-β-glucosidase encoded by the genes bglA and ascB (family 1), and chbF (family 4) present in E. coli O157:H7 showed the highest similarity. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) confirmed the presence of bglA, ascB, and chbF in the clinical E. coli strain tested. Disruption of these genes in wild-type E. coli O157:H7 strain 02-0304 using lambda-red replacement created single and double mutants. The relative importance of each gene in the hydrolysis of sinigrin by E. coli O157:H7 was also assessed by comparing gene expression and sinigrin degradation rates among the E. coli O157:H7 wild-type strain and its mutants. The results suggested that the genes bglA and ascB play a substantial role in the degradation of sinigrin by E. coli O157:H7 strain 02-0304.

  13. Role of glycoside hydrolase genes in sinigrin degradation by E. coli O157:H7.

    PubMed

    Cordeiro, Roniele P; Doria, Juan H; Zhanel, George G; Sparling, Richard; Holley, Richard A

    2015-07-16

    This work examined Escherichia coli O157:H7 strain 02-0304 for putative genes responsible for sinigrin hydrolysis. Sinigrin is a glucosinolate present in Oriental mustard (Brassica juncea), and its hydrolysis is mediated in plants by the enzyme myrosinase. Sinigrin hydrolysis by plant or bacterial myrosinase yields allyl isothiocyanate (AITC) which is bactericidal. In silico analysis using public databases found sequence similarity between plant myrosinase and enzymes encoded by genes from β-glucosidase families in E. coli O157:H7. Specifically, 6-phospho-β-glucosidase encoded by the genes bglA and ascB (family 1), and chbF (family 4) present in E. coli O157:H7 showed the highest similarity. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) confirmed the presence of bglA, ascB, and chbF in the clinical E. coli strain tested. Disruption of these genes in wild-type E. coli O157:H7 strain 02-0304 using lambda-red replacement created single and double mutants. The relative importance of each gene in the hydrolysis of sinigrin by E. coli O157:H7 was also assessed by comparing gene expression and sinigrin degradation rates among the E. coli O157:H7 wild-type strain and its mutants. The results suggested that the genes bglA and ascB play a substantial role in the degradation of sinigrin by E. coli O157:H7 strain 02-0304. PMID:25897994

  14. Thiolases of Escherichia coli: purification and chain length specificities.

    PubMed Central

    Feigenbaum, J; Schulz, H

    1975-01-01

    The presence of only one thiolase (EC 2.3.1.9) in wild-type Escherichia coli induced for enzymes of beta oxidation was demonstrated. A different thiolase was shown to be present in a mutant constitutive for the enzymes of butyrate degradation. The two thiolases were purified to near homogeneity by a simple two-step procedure and were found to be associated with different proteins as shown by gel electrophoresis. The thiolase isolated from induced wild-type Escherichia coli cell was active on beta-ketoacyl-coenzyme A derivatives containing 4 to 16 carbons, but exhibited optimal activity with medium-chain substrates. In contrast, the thiolase isolated from the constitutive mutant was shown to be specific for acetoacetyl-coenzyme A. PMID:236278

  15. Polarity effects in the lactose operon of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Li, Yong; Altman, Sidney

    2004-05-21

    An intergenic RNA segment between lacY and lacA of the lactose operon in Escherichia coli is cleaved by RNase P, an endoribonuclease. The cleavage of the intergenic RNA was ten times less efficient than cleavage of a tRNA precursor in vitro. Fragments of the RNase P cleavage product are detectable in vivo in the wild-type strain but not in a mutant strain at the restrictive temperature. The cleavage product that contains lacA in the wild-type strain was quickly degraded. When this intergenic segment was cloned upstream of a reporter gene, the expression of the reporter gene was also inhibited substantially in wild-type E.coli, but not in a temperature sensitive mutant strain in RNase P at the restrictive temperature. These results support data regarding the natural polarity between lacZ versus lacA, the downstream gene. PMID:15123418

  16. Engineering Escherichia coli for improved ethanol production from gluconate.

    PubMed

    Hildebrand, Amanda; Schlacta, Theresa; Warmack, Rebeccah; Kasuga, Takao; Fan, Zhiliang

    2013-10-10

    We report on engineering Escherichia coli to produce ethanol at high yield from gluconic acid (gluconate). Knocking out genes encoding for the competing pathways (l-lactate dehydrogenase and pyruvate formate lyase A) in E. coli KO11 eliminated lactate production, lowered the carbon flow toward acetate production, and improved the ethanol yield from 87.5% to 97.5% of the theoretical maximum, while the growth rate of the mutant strain was about 70% of the wild type. The corresponding genetic modifications led to a small improvement of ethanol yield from 101.5% to 106.0% on glucose. Deletion of the pyruvate dehydrogenase gene (pdh) alone improved the ethanol yield from 87.5% to 90.4% when gluconate was a substrate. The growth rate of the mutant strain was identical to that of the wild type. The corresponding genetic modification led to no improvements on ethanol yield on glucose.

  17. Cloning of the Pachysolen tannophilus Xylulokinase Gene by Complementation in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Stevis, Panayiotis E.; Huang, James J.; Ho, Nancy W. Y.

    1987-01-01

    The gene coding for xylulokinase has been isolated from the yeast Pachysolen tannophilus by complementation of Escherichia coli xylulokinase (xylB) mutants. Through subcloning, the gene has been localized at one end of a 3.2-kilobase EcoRI-PstI fragment. Expression of the cloned gene was insensitive to glucose inhibition. Furthermore, the cloned gene did not cross-hybridize with E. coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae xylulokinase genes. Images PMID:16347513

  18. Complementation analysis of eleven tryptophanase mutations in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    White, M K; Yudkin, M D

    1979-10-01

    Nine independent mutants deficient in tryptophanase activity were isolated. Each mutation was transferred to a specialized transducing phage that carries the tryptophanase region of the Escherichia coli chromosome. The nine phages thus produced, and a tenth carrying a previously characterized tryptophanase mutation, were used to lysogenize a bacterial strain harbouring a mutation in the tryptophanase structural gene and also a suppressor of polarity. In no case was complementation observed; we conclude that there is no closely linked positive regulatory gene for tryptophanase.

  19. E. Coli Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... You can also get the infection by swallowing water in a swimming pool contaminated with human waste. Most cases of E. coli infection get better without treatment in 5 to 10 days. NIH: National Institute ...

  20. Characterization of molybdenum cofactor from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Amy, N K; Rajagopalan, K V

    1979-01-01

    Molybdenum cofactor activity was found in the soluble fraction of cell-free extracts of Escherichia coli grown aerobically in media supplemented with molybdate. Cofactor was detected by its ability to complement the nitrate reductase-deficient mutant of Neurospora crossa, nit-1, resulting in the vitro formation of nitrate reductase activity. Acid treatment of E. coli extracts was not required for release of cofactor activity. Cofactor was able to diffuse through a membrane of nominal 2,000-molecular-weight cutoff and was insensitive to trypsin. The cofactor was associated with a carrier molecule (approximately 40,000 daltons) during gel filtration and sucrose gradient centrifugation, but was easily removed from the carrier by dialysis. The carrier molecule protected the cofactor from inactivation by heat or oxygen. E. coli grown in molybdenum-free media, without and with tungsten, synthesized a metal-free "empty" cofactor and its tungsten analog, respectively, both of which were subsequently activated by the addition of molybdate. Empty and tungsten-containing cofactor complemented the nitrate reductase subunits in the nit-1 extract, forming inactive, but intact, 7.9S nitrate reductase. Addition of molybdate to the enzyme complemented in this manner restored nitrate reductase activity. PMID:387715

  1. Lipopolysaccharide structure required for in vitro trimerization of Escherichia coli OmpF porin.

    PubMed Central

    Sen, K; Nikaido, H

    1991-01-01

    Deep rought mutants, which produce very defective lipopolysaccharides, are unable to export normal levels of porins into the outer membrane. In this study, we showed that lipopolysaccharides from such mutants were also unable to facilitate the trimerization, in vitro, of monomeric OmpF porin secreted by spheroplasts of Escherichia coli B/r. In contrast, lipopolysaccharides containing most or all of the core oligosaccharides were able to facilitate trimerization. Images PMID:1702785

  2. Molecular basis for the spontaneous generation of colonization-defective mutants of Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Ueda, S; Kuramitsu, H K

    1988-01-01

    Spontaneous mutants of Streptococcus mutans GS-5 defective in sucrose-dependent colonization of smooth surfaces are generated at frequencies above the spontaneous mutation rate. Southern blot analysis of such mutants suggested rearrangement of the genes coding for glucosyltransferase (GTF) activity. Two strain GS-5 homologous tandem genes, gtfB and gtfC, coding for GTF-I and GTF-S activities respectively, were demonstrated to undergo recombination when introduced into recombination-proficient Escherichia coli transformants. However, the two genes were quite stable when transformed on a single DNA fragment into a recA mutant of E. coli. The DNA fragment coding for GTF activity from one S. mutans colonization-defective mutant, SP2, was isolated and shown also to have undergone recombination between the gtfB and gtfC genes, resulting in reduced GTF activity. These results are discussed relative to the in vivo generation of colonization-defective mutants in cultures of S. mutans.

  3. Isolation and nucleotide sequencing of lactose carrier mutants that transport maltose.

    PubMed Central

    Brooker, R J; Wilson, T H

    1985-01-01

    The wild-type lactose carrier of Escherichia coli has a poor ability to transport the disaccharide maltose. However, it is possible to select lactose carrier mutants that have an enhanced ability to transport maltose by growing E. coli cells on maltose minimal plates in the presence of isopropyl thiogalactoside (an inducer of the lac operon). We have utilized this approach to isolate 18 independent lactose permease mutants that transport maltose. The relevant DNA sequences have been determined, and all of the mutations were found to be single base pair changes either at triplet 177 or at triplet 236. The nucleotide changes replace alanine-177 with valine or threonine, or tyrosine-236 with phenylalanine, asparagine, serine, or histidine. Transport experiments indicate that all of the mutants have faster maltose transport compared with the wild-type strain. Position 177 mutants retain the ability to transport galactosides, such as lactose and melibiose, at rates similar to the rate of the wild-type strain. In contrast, the position 236 mutants are markedly defective in the ability to transport galactosides. With regard to secondary structure, alanine-177 and tyrosine-236 are located on adjacent hydrophobic segments of the lactose carrier that are predicted to span the membrane. Thus, the results of this study indicate that the substrate recognition site of the lactose carrier is located within the plane of the lipid bilayer. In addition, a tertiary structure model is proposed that suggests how certain transmembrane segments might be localized relative to one another. Images PMID:3889919

  4. Stereochemistry of phospho group transfer catalyzed by a mutant alkaline phosphatase

    SciTech Connect

    Butler-Ransohoff, J.E.; Kendall, D.A.; Freeman, S.; Knowles, J.R.; Kaiser, E.T.

    1988-06-28

    The stereochemical course of the phospho group transfer catalyzed by mutant (S102C) alkaline phosphatase from Escherichia coli was investigated by using /sup 31/P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Transphosphorylation from 4-nitrophenyl (R/sub P/)-/sup 17/O, /sup 16/O, /sup 18/O)phosphate to (S)-propane-1,2-diol occurs with overall retention of configuration at phosphorus. This result is consistent with the view that the hydrolysis of substrates by this mutant enzyme proceeds by way of a covalent phosphoenzyme intermediate in the same manner as the wild-type alkaline phosphatase.

  5. Escherichia coli kgtP encodes an. alpha. -ketoglutarate transporter

    SciTech Connect

    Seol, Wongi; Shatkin, A.J. )

    1991-05-01

    The witA gene located between pss and rrnG on the Escherichia coli chromosome encodes a 432-amino acid protein. It is homologous to a human hepatoma glucose transporter and to E. coli membrane proteins that transport citrate (CitA), arabinose (AraE), and xylose (XylE), and, like these carrier proteins, WitA also contains 12 highly hydrophobic putative membrane-spanning regions. Gene disruption mutants constructed in two E. coli strains grew slowly or not at all, depending on genetic background, in M9 minimal medium containing {alpha}-ketoglutarate and uptake of {alpha}-({sup 14}C)ketoglutarate were restored by transformation with plasmids containing witA. These complementation studies indicate that WitA is an {alpha}-ketoglutarate transporter and should be renamed kgtP({alpha}-ketoglutarate permease).

  6. In Vivo Studies of Temperature-Sensitive recB and recC Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Kushner, Sidney R.

    1974-01-01

    Some in vivo properties of Escherichia coli K-12 strains carrying recB270 (formerly recBts1) and recC271 (formerly recCts1) mutations have been determined. Single recB270 and recC271 mutants appear normal at 30 C with regard to ultraviolet and mitomycin C sensitivity, recombination proficiency, and viability. At 43 C these strains become sensitive to ultraviolet and mitomycin C, while showing only a slight decrease in recombination proficiency. The viable titers of the single mutants are somewhat reduced at 43 C. Double mutant strains carrying polA1 and recB270 or recC271 are inviable at 43 C. The double mutant strain (recB270 recC271) is sensitive to both UV and mitomycin C at 30 C, but shows only slightly reduced recombination proficiency. At 43 C the strain resembles absolute recB and recC mutants in all respects. In addition, the double mutant strain exhibits a temperature-induced drop in viable titer. The triple mutant polA1 recB270 recC271 is viable at 30 C. Two hypotheses are advanced to explain these results. PMID:4612007

  7. Curli fimbria: an Escherichia coli adhesin associated with human cystitis.

    PubMed

    Cordeiro, Melina Aparecida; Werle, Catierine Hirsch; Milanez, Guilherme Paier; Yano, Tomomasa

    2016-01-01

    Escherichia coli is the major causative agent of human cystitis. In this study, a preliminary molecular analysis carried out by PCR (polymerase chain reaction) demonstrated that 100% of 31 E. coli strains isolated from patients with recurrent UTIs (urinary tract infections) showed the presence of the curli fimbria gene (csgA). Curli fimbria is known to be associated with bacterial biofilm formation but not with the adhesion of human cystitis-associated E. coli. Therefore, this work aimed to study how curli fimbria is associated with uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) as an adhesion factor. For this purpose, the csgA gene was deleted from strain UPEC-4, which carries three adhesion factor genes (csgA, fimH and ompA). The wild-type UPEC-4 strain and its mutant (ΔcsgA) were analyzed for their adhesion ability over HTB-9 (human bladder carcinoma), Vero (kidney cells of African green monkey) and HUVEC (human umbilical vein) cells in the presence of α-d-mannose. All the wild-type UPEC strains tested (100%) were able to adhere to all three cell types, while the UPEC-4 ΔcsgA mutant lost its adherence to HTB-9 but continued to adhere to the HUVEC and Vero cells. The results suggest that curli fimbria has an important role in the adhesion processes associated with human UPEC-induced cystitis.

  8. Proteomic and phenotypic analysis of triclosan tolerant verocytotoxigenic Escherichia coli O157:H19.

    PubMed

    Sheridan, A; Lenahan, M; Condell, O; Bonilla-Santiago, R; Sergeant, K; Renaut, J; Duffy, G; Fanning, S; Nally, J E; Burgess, C M

    2013-03-27

    Triclosan is a biocidal active agent commonly used in domestic and industrial formulations. Currently, there is limited understanding of the mechanisms involved in triclosan tolerance in Escherichia coli O157. The aim of this study was to identify the differences between a triclosan susceptible E. coli O157:H19 isolate (minimum inhibitory concentration; MIC 6.25 μg/ml) and its triclosan tolerant mutant (MIC>8000 μg/ml) at a proteomic and phenotypic level. Two dimensional DIGE was used to identify differences in protein expression between the reference strain and triclosan tolerant mutant in the presence and absence of triclosan. DIGE analysis indicates the proteome of the reference E. coli O157:H19 was significantly different to its triclosan tolerant mutant. Significant changes in protein expression levels in the triclosan tolerant mutant included the known triclosan target FabI which encodes enoyl reductase, outer membrane proteins and the filament structural protein of flagella, FliC. Phenotypic studies showed that the triclosan tolerant mutant MIC decreased in the presence of efflux inhibitor phenyl-arginine-β-naphthylamide and biofilm formation was increased in the mutant strain. The data generated indicates that enhanced triclosan tolerance is a result of multiple mechanisms which act together to achieve high-level resistance, rather than mutation of FabI alone.

  9. A structural view of the dissociation of Escherichia coli tryptophanase.

    PubMed

    Green, Keren; Qasim, Nasrin; Gdaelvsky, Garik; Kogan, Anna; Goldgur, Yehuda; Parola, Abraham H; Lotan, Ofra; Almog, Orna

    2015-12-01

    Tryptophanase (Trpase) is a pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP)-dependent homotetrameric enzyme which catalyzes the degradation of L-tryptophan. Trpase is also known for its cold lability, which is a reversible loss of activity at low temperature (2°C) that is associated with the dissociation of the tetramer. Escherichia coli Trpase dissociates into dimers, while Proteus vulgaris Trpase dissociates into monomers. As such, this enzyme is an appropriate model to study the protein-protein interactions and quaternary structure of proteins. The aim of the present study was to understand the differences in the mode of dissociation between the E. coli and P. vulgaris Trpases. In particular, the effect of mutations along the molecular axes of homotetrameric Trpase on its dissociation was studied. To answer this question, two groups of mutants of the E. coli enzyme were created to resemble the amino-acid sequence of P. vulgaris Trpase. In one group, residues 15 and 59 that are located along the molecular axis R (also termed the noncatalytic axis) were mutated. The second group included a mutation at position 298, located along the molecular axis Q (also termed the catalytic axis). Replacing amino-acid residues along the R axis resulted in dissociation of the tetramers into monomers, similar to the P. vulgaris Trpase, while replacing amino-acid residues along the Q axis resulted in dissociation into dimers only. The crystal structure of the V59M mutant of E. coli Trpase was also determined in its apo form and was found to be similar to that of the wild type. This study suggests that in E. coli Trpase hydrophobic interactions along the R axis hold the two monomers together more strongly, preventing the dissociation of the dimers into monomers. Mutation of position 298 along the Q axis to a charged residue resulted in tetramers that are less susceptible to dissociation. Thus, the results indicate that dissociation of E. coli Trpase into dimers occurs along the molecular Q axis.

  10. Enhanced Deletion Formation by Aberrant DNA Replication in Escherichia Coli

    PubMed Central

    Saveson, C. J.; Lovett, S. T.

    1997-01-01

    Repeated genes and sequences are prone to genetic rearrangements including deletions. We have investigated deletion formation in Escherichia coli strains mutant for various replication functions. Deletion was selected between 787 base pair tandem repeats carried either on a ColE1-derived plasmid or on the E. coli chromosome. Only mutations in functions associated with DNA Polymerase III elevated deletion rates in our assays. Especially large increases were observed in strains mutant in dnaQ, the ε editing subunit of Pol III, and dnaB, the replication fork helicase. Mutations in several other functions also altered deletion formation: the α polymerase (dnaE), the γ clamp loader complex (holC, dnaX), and the β clamp (dnaN) subunits of Pol III and the primosomal proteins, dnaC and priA. Aberrant replication stimulated deletions through several pathways. Whereas the elevation in dnaB strains was mostly recA- and lexA-dependent, that in dnaQ strains was mostly recA- and lexA-independent. Deletion product analysis suggested that slipped mispairing, producing monomeric replicon products, may be preferentially increased in a dnaQ mutant and sister-strand exchange, producing dimeric replicon products, may be elevated in dnaE mutants. We conclude that aberrant Polymerase III replication can stimulate deletion events through several mechanisms of deletion and via both recA-dependent and independent pathways. PMID:9177997

  11. Fimbriae and lipopolysaccharides are necessary for co-aggregation between Lactobacilli and Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Kouhei; Furukawa, Soichi; Usui, Yumi; Ishiba, Madoka; Ogihara, Hirokazu; Morinaga, Yasushi

    2014-01-01

    Cells of Lactobacilli co-aggregated with Escherichia coli K-12 cells to form co-aggregates under mixed-culture conditions at 37 °C for 24 h. Co-aggregation was inhibited by sodium dodecyl sulfate but not by protease. E. coli deletion mutants of fimbriae formation and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) formation did not co-aggregate with Lactobacilli. These results showed that fimbriae and LPS are necessary for co-aggregation between Lactobacilli and E. coli. PMID:25209514

  12. Improvement of organic solvent tolerance by disruption of the lon gene in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Rei; Doukyu, Noriyuki

    2014-08-01

    The Lon ATP-dependent protease plays an important role in regulating many biological processes in bacteria. In this study, we examined the organic solvent tolerance of a Δlon mutant of Escherichia coli K-12 and found that the mutant showed remarkably higher organic solvent tolerance than the parent strain. Δlon mutants are known to overproduce capsular polysaccharide, resulting in the formation of mucoid colonies. We considered that this increase in capsular polysaccharide production might be involved in the organic solvent tolerance in E. coli. However, a ΔlonΔwcaJ double-gene mutant displaying a nonmucoid phenotype was as tolerant to organic solvents as the Δlon mutant, suggesting that capsular polysaccharide is not involved in organic solvent tolerance. On the other hand, the Lon protease is known to exhibit proteolytic activity against the transcriptional activators MarA and SoxS, which can enhance the expression level of the AcrAB-TolC efflux pump. We found that the Δlon mutant showed a higher expression level of AcrB than the parent strain. In addition, the ΔlonΔacrB double-gene mutant showed a significant decrease in organic solvent tolerance. Thus, it was shown that organic solvent tolerance in the Δlon mutant depends on the AcrAB-TolC pump but not capsular polysaccharide. E. coli strain JA300 acrRIS marR overexpresses the AcrAB-TolC pump and exhibits high-level solvent tolerance. In an attempt to further improve the solvent tolerance of JA300 acrRIS marR, a lon gene disruptant of this strain was constructed. However, the resulting mutant JA300 acrRIS marR Δlon showed lower solvent tolerance than JA300 acrRIS marR.

  13. A (p)ppGpp-null mutant of Haemophilus ducreyi is partially attenuated in humans due to multiple conflicting phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Holley, Concerta; Gangaiah, Dharanesh; Li, Wei; Fortney, Kate R; Janowicz, Diane M; Ellinger, Sheila; Zwickl, Beth; Katz, Barry P; Spinola, Stanley M

    2014-08-01

    (p)ppGpp responds to nutrient limitation through a global change in gene regulation patterns to increase survival. The stringent response has been implicated in the virulence of several pathogenic bacterial species. Haemophilus ducreyi, the causative agent of chancroid, has homologs of both relA and spoT, which primarily synthesize and hydrolyze (p)ppGpp in Escherichia coli. We constructed relA and relA spoT deletion mutants to assess the contribution of (p)ppGpp to H. ducreyi pathogenesis. Both the relA single mutant and the relA spoT double mutant failed to synthesize (p)ppGpp, suggesting that relA is the primary synthetase of (p)ppGpp in H. ducreyi. Compared to the parent strain, the double mutant was partially attenuated for pustule formation in human volunteers. The double mutant had several phenotypes that favored attenuation, including increased sensitivity to oxidative stress. The increased sensitivity to oxidative stress could be complemented in trans. However, the double mutant also exhibited phenotypes that favored virulence. When grown to the mid-log phase, the double mutant was significantly more resistant than its parent to being taken up by human macrophages and exhibited increased transcription of lspB, which is involved in resistance to phagocytosis. Additionally, compared to the parent, the double mutant also exhibited prolonged survival in the stationary phase. In E. coli, overexpression of DksA compensates for the loss of (p)ppGpp; the H. ducreyi double mutant expressed higher transcript levels of dksA than the parent strain. These data suggest that the partial attenuation of the double mutant is likely the net result of multiple conflicting phenotypes.

  14. Analysis of Genome Plasticity in Pathogenic and Commensal Escherichia coli Isolates by Use of DNA Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Dobrindt, Ulrich; Agerer, Franziska; Michaelis, Kai; Janka, Andreas; Buchrieser, Carmen; Samuelson, Martin; Svanborg, Catharina; Gottschalk, Gerhard; Karch, Helge; Hacker, Jörg

    2003-01-01

    Genomes of prokaryotes differ significantly in size and DNA composition. Escherichia coli is considered a model organism to analyze the processes involved in bacterial genome evolution, as the species comprises numerous pathogenic and commensal variants. Pathogenic and nonpathogenic E. coli strains differ in the presence and absence of additional DNA elements contributing to specific virulence traits and also in the presence and absence of additional genetic information. To analyze the genetic diversity of pathogenic and commensal E. coli isolates, a whole-genome approach was applied. Using DNA arrays, the presence of all translatable open reading frames (ORFs) of nonpathogenic E. coli K-12 strain MG1655 was investigated in 26 E. coli isolates, including various extraintestinal and intestinal pathogenic E. coli isolates, 3 pathogenicity island deletion mutants, and commensal and laboratory strains. Additionally, the presence of virulence-associated genes of E. coli was determined using a DNA “pathoarray” developed in our laboratory. The frequency and distributional pattern of genomic variations vary widely in different E. coli strains. Up to 10% of the E. coli K-12-specific ORFs were not detectable in the genomes of the different strains. DNA sequences described for extraintestinal or intestinal pathogenic E. coli are more frequently detectable in isolates of the same origin than in other pathotypes. Several genes coding for virulence or fitness factors are also present in commensal E. coli isolates. Based on these results, the conserved E. coli core genome is estimated to consist of at least 3,100 translatable ORFs. The absence of K-12-specific ORFs was detectable in all chromosomal regions. These data demonstrate the great genome heterogeneity and genetic diversity among E. coli strains and underline the fact that both the acquisition and deletion of DNA elements are important processes involved in the evolution of prokaryotes. PMID:12618447

  15. Ferredoxin Is Involved in Secretion of Cytotoxic Necrotizing Factor 1 across the Cytoplasmic Membrane in Escherichia coli K1▿

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hao; Kim, Kwang Sik

    2010-01-01

    We previously showed that cytotoxic necrotizing factor 1 (CNF1) contributes to Escherichia coli K1 invasion of human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMEC) and interacts with the receptor on the surface of HBMEC. CNF1 is the cytoplasmic protein, and it remains incompletely understood how CNF1 is secreted across the inner and outer membranes in E. coli K1. In order to investigate the genetic determinants for secretion of CNF1 in E. coli K1, we performed Tn5 mutagenesis screening by applying β-lactamase as a reporter to monitor secretion of CNF1. We identified a Tn5 mutant that exhibited no β-lactamase activity in the culture supernatant and in which the mutated gene encodes a ferredoxin gene (fdx). In the fdx deletion mutant, there was no evidence of translocation of CNF1 into HBMEC. Western blot analysis of the fdx deletion mutant revealed that ferredoxin is involved in translocation of CNF1 across the cytoplasmic membrane. The fdx mutant exhibited significantly decreased invasion of HBMEC, similar to the decreased HBMEC invasion observed with the CNF1 mutant. The failures to secrete CNF1 and invade HBMEC of the fdx mutant were restored to the levels of the parent strain by complementation with fdx. These findings demonstrate for the first time that ferredoxin is involved in secretion of CNF1 across the inner membrane in meningitis-causing E. coli K1. PMID:19917710

  16. Transfer of Plasmids to an Antibiotic-Sensitive Mutant of Zymomonas mobilis†

    PubMed Central

    Buchholz, Steven E.; Eveleigh, Douglas E.

    1986-01-01

    Wild-type strains of Zymomonas mobilis exhibit multiple antibiotic resistance and thus restrict the use of many broad-host-range plasmids in them as cloning vehicles. Antibiotic-sensitive mutants of Z. mobilis were isolated and used as hosts for the conjugal transfer of broad-host-range plasmids from Escherichia coli. Such antibiotic-sensitive strains can facilitate the application of broad-host-range plasmids to the study of Z. mobilis. Images PMID:16347136

  17. Transfer of plasmids to an antibiotic-sensitive mutant of Zymomonas mobilis

    SciTech Connect

    Buchholz, S.E.; Eveleigh, D.E.

    1986-08-01

    Wild-type strains of Zymomonas mobilis exhibit multiple antibiotic resistance and thus restrict the use of many broad-host-range plasmids in them as cloning vehicles. Antibiotic-sensitive mutants of Z. mobilis were isolated and used as hosts for the conjugal transfer of broad-host-range plasmids from Escherichia coli. Such antibiotic-sensitive strains can facilitate the application of broad-host-range plasmids to the study of Z. mobilis.

  18. Stringency of substrate specificity of Escherichia coli malate dehydrogenase.

    SciTech Connect

    Boernke, W. E.; Millard, C. S.; Stevens, P. W.; Kakar, S. N.; Stevens, F. J.; Donnelly, M. I.; Nebraska Wesleyan Univ.

    1995-09-10

    Malate dehydrogenase and lactate dehydrogenase are members of the structurally and functionally homologous family of 2-ketoacid dehydrogenases. Both enzymes display high specificity for their respective keto substrates, oxaloacetate and pyruvate. Closer analysis of their specificity, however, reveals that the specificity of malate dehydrogenase is much stricter and less malleable than that of lactate dehydrogenase. Site-specific mutagenesis of the two enzymes in an attempt to reverse their specificity has met with contrary results. Conversion of a specific active-site glutamine to arginine in lactate dehydrogenase from Bacillus stearothermophilus generated an enzyme that displayed activity toward oxaloacetate equal to that of the native enzyme toward pyruvate (H. M. Wilks et al. (1988) Science 242, 1541-1544). We have constructed a series of mutants in the mobile, active site loop of the Escherichia coli malate dehydrogenase that incorporate the complementary change, conversion of arginine 81 to glutamine, to evaluate the role of charge distribution and conformational flexibility within this loop in defining the substrate specificity of these enzymes. Mutants incorporating the change R81Q all had reversed specificity, displaying much higher activity toward pyruvate than to the natural substrate, oxaloacetate. In contrast to the mutated lactate dehydrogenase, these reversed-specificity mutants were much less active than the native enzyme. Secondary mutations within the loop of the E. coli enzyme (A80N, A80P, A80P/M85E/D86T) had either no or only moderately beneficial effects on the activity of the mutant enzyme toward pyruvate. The mutation A80P, which can be expected to reduce the overall flexibility of the loop, modestly improved activity toward pyruvate. The possible physiological relevance of the stringent specificity of malate dehydrogenase was investigated. In normal strains of E. coli, fermentative metabolism was not affected by expression of the mutant

  19. Rapid Evolution of Citrate Utilization by Escherichia coli by Direct Selection Requires citT and dctA

    PubMed Central

    Van Hofwegen, Dustin J.; Hovde, Carolyn J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The isolation of aerobic citrate-utilizing Escherichia coli (Cit+) in long-term evolution experiments (LTEE) has been termed a rare, innovative, presumptive speciation event. We hypothesized that direct selection would rapidly yield the same class of E. coli Cit+ mutants and follow the same genetic trajectory: potentiation, actualization, and refinement. This hypothesis was tested with wild-type E. coli strain B and with K-12 and three K-12 derivatives: an E. coli ΔrpoS::kan mutant (impaired for stationary-phase survival), an E. coli ΔcitT::kan mutant (deleted for the anaerobic citrate/succinate antiporter), and an E. coli ΔdctA::kan mutant (deleted for the aerobic succinate transporter). E. coli underwent adaptation to aerobic citrate metabolism that was readily and repeatedly achieved using minimal medium supplemented with citrate (M9C), M9C with 0.005% glycerol, or M9C with 0.0025% glucose. Forty-six independent E. coli Cit+ mutants were isolated from all E. coli derivatives except the E. coli ΔcitT::kan mutant. Potentiation/actualization mutations occurred within as few as 12 generations, and refinement mutations occurred within 100 generations. Citrate utilization was confirmed using Simmons, Christensen, and LeMaster Richards citrate media and quantified by mass spectrometry. E. coli Cit+ mutants grew in clumps and in long incompletely divided chains, a phenotype that was reversible in rich media. Genomic DNA sequencing of four E. coli Cit+ mutants revealed the required sequence of mutational events leading to a refined Cit+ mutant. These events showed amplified citT and dctA loci followed by DNA rearrangements consistent with promoter capture events for citT. These mutations were equivalent to the amplification and promoter capture CitT-activating mutations identified in the LTEE. IMPORTANCE E. coli cannot use citrate aerobically. Long-term evolution experiments (LTEE) performed by Blount et al. (Z. D. Blount, J. E. Barrick, C. J. Davidson, and

  20. Rapid Evolution of Citrate Utilization by Escherichia coli by Direct Selection Requires citT and dctA.

    PubMed

    Van Hofwegen, Dustin J; Hovde, Carolyn J; Minnich, Scott A

    2016-04-01

    The isolation of aerobic citrate-utilizing Escherichia coli (Cit(+)) in long-term evolution experiments (LTEE) has been termed a rare, innovative, presumptive speciation event. We hypothesized that direct selection would rapidly yield the same class of E. coli Cit(+) mutants and follow the same genetic trajectory: potentiation, actualization, and refinement. This hypothesis was tested with wild-type E. coli strain B and with K-12 and three K-12 derivatives: an E. coli ΔrpoS::kan mutant (impaired for stationary-phase survival), an E. coli ΔcitT::kan mutant (deleted for the anaerobic citrate/succinate antiporter), and an E. coli ΔdctA::kan mutant (deleted for the aerobic succinate transporter). E. coli underwent adaptation to aerobic citrate metabolism that was readily and repeatedly achieved using minimal medium supplemented with citrate (M9C), M9C with 0.005% glycerol, or M9C with 0.0025% glucose. Forty-six independent E. coli Cit(+) mutants were isolated from all E. coli derivatives except the E. coli ΔcitT::kan mutant. Potentiation/actualization mutations occurred within as few as 12 generations, and refinement mutations occurred within 100 generations. Citrate utilization was confirmed using Simmons, Christensen, and LeMaster Richards citrate media and quantified by mass spectrometry. E. coli Cit(+) mutants grew in clumps and in long incompletely divided chains, a phenotype that was reversible in rich media. Genomic DNA sequencing of four E. coli Cit(+) mutants revealed the required sequence of mutational events leading to a refined Cit(+) mutant. These events showed amplified citT and dctA loci followed by DNA rearrangements consistent with promoter capture events for citT. These mutations were equivalent to the amplification and promoter capture CitT-activating mutations identified in the LTEE.IMPORTANCE E. coli cannot use citrate aerobically. Long-term evolution experiments (LTEE) performed by Blount et al. (Z. D. Blount, J. E. Barrick, C. J. Davidson

  1. Molecular Determinants of Mutant Phenotypes, Inferred from Saturation Mutagenesis Data

    PubMed Central

    Tripathi, Arti; Gupta, Kritika; Khare, Shruti; Jain, Pankaj C.; Patel, Siddharth; Kumar, Prasanth; Pulianmackal, Ajai J.; Aghera, Nilesh; Varadarajan, Raghavan

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how mutations affect protein activity and organismal fitness is a major challenge. We used saturation mutagenesis combined with deep sequencing to determine mutational sensitivity scores for 1,664 single-site mutants of the 101 residue Escherichia coli cytotoxin, CcdB at seven different expression levels. Active-site residues could be distinguished from buried ones, based on their differential tolerance to aliphatic and charged amino acid substitutions. At nonactive-site positions, the average mutational tolerance correlated better with depth from the protein surface than with accessibility. Remarkably, similar results were observed for two other small proteins, PDZ domain (PSD95pdz3) and IgG-binding domain of protein G (GB1). Mutational sensitivity data obtained with CcdB were used to derive a procedure for predicting functional effects of mutations. Results compared favorably with those of two widely used computational predictors. In vitro characterization of 80 single, nonactive-site mutants of CcdB showed that activity in vivo correlates moderately with thermal stability and solubility. The inability to refold reversibly, as well as a decreased folding rate in vitro, is associated with decreased activity in vivo. Upon probing the effect of modulating expression of various proteases and chaperones on mutant phenotypes, most deleterious mutants showed an increased in vivo activity and solubility only upon over-expression of either Trigger factor or SecB ATP-independent chaperones. Collectively, these data suggest that folding kinetics rather than protein stability is the primary determinant of activity in vivo. This study enhances our understanding of how mutations affect phenotype, as well as the ability to predict fitness effects of point mutations. PMID:27563054

  2. Human oxygen sensing may have origins in prokaryotic elongation factor Tu prolyl-hydroxylation.

    PubMed

    Scotti, John S; Leung, Ivanhoe K H; Ge, Wei; Bentley, Michael A; Paps, Jordi; Kramer, Holger B; Lee, Joongoo; Aik, WeiShen; Choi, Hwanho; Paulsen, Steinar M; Bowman, Lesley A H; Loik, Nikita D; Horita, Shoichiro; Ho, Chia-hua; Kershaw, Nadia J; Tang, Christoph M; Claridge, Timothy D W; Preston, Gail M; McDonough, Michael A; Schofield, Christopher J

    2014-09-16

    The roles of 2-oxoglutarate (2OG)-dependent prolyl-hydroxylases in eukaryotes include collagen stabilization, hypoxia sensing, and translational regulation. The hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) sensing system is conserved in animals, but not in other organisms. However, bioinformatics imply that 2OG-dependent prolyl-hydroxylases (PHDs) homologous to those acting as sensing components for the HIF system in animals occur in prokaryotes. We report cellular, biochemical, and crystallographic analyses revealing that Pseudomonas prolyl-hydroxylase domain containing protein (PPHD) contain a 2OG oxygenase related in structure and function to the animal PHDs. A Pseudomonas aeruginosa PPHD knockout mutant displays impaired growth in the presence of iron chelators and increased production of the virulence factor pyocyanin. We identify elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu) as a PPHD substrate, which undergoes prolyl-4-hydroxylation on its switch I loop. A crystal structure of PPHD reveals striking similarity to human PHD2 and a Chlamydomonas reinhardtii prolyl-4-hydroxylase. A crystal structure of PPHD complexed with intact EF-Tu reveals that major conformational changes occur in both PPHD and EF-Tu, including a >20-Å movement of the EF-Tu switch I loop. Comparison of the PPHD structures with those of HIF and collagen PHDs reveals conservation in substrate recognition despite diverse biological roles and origins. The observed changes will be useful in designing new types of 2OG oxygenase inhibitors based on various conformational states, rather than active site iron chelators, which make up most reported 2OG oxygenase inhibitors. Structurally informed phylogenetic analyses suggest that the role of prolyl-hydroxylation in human hypoxia sensing has ancient origins.

  3. Human oxygen sensing may have origins in prokaryotic elongation factor Tu prolyl-hydroxylation.

    PubMed

    Scotti, John S; Leung, Ivanhoe K H; Ge, Wei; Bentley, Michael A; Paps, Jordi; Kramer, Holger B; Lee, Joongoo; Aik, WeiShen; Choi, Hwanho; Paulsen, Steinar M; Bowman, Lesley A H; Loik, Nikita D; Horita, Shoichiro; Ho, Chia-hua; Kershaw, Nadia J; Tang, Christoph M; Claridge, Timothy D W; Preston, Gail M; McDonough, Michael A; Schofield, Christopher J

    2014-09-16

    The roles of 2-oxoglutarate (2OG)-dependent prolyl-hydroxylases in eukaryotes include collagen stabilization, hypoxia sensing, and translational regulation. The hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) sensing system is conserved in animals, but not in other organisms. However, bioinformatics imply that 2OG-dependent prolyl-hydroxylases (PHDs) homologous to those acting as sensing components for the HIF system in animals occur in prokaryotes. We report cellular, biochemical, and crystallographic analyses revealing that Pseudomonas prolyl-hydroxylase domain containing protein (PPHD) contain a 2OG oxygenase related in structure and function to the animal PHDs. A Pseudomonas aeruginosa PPHD knockout mutant displays impaired growth in the presence of iron chelators and increased production of the virulence factor pyocyanin. We identify elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu) as a PPHD substrate, which undergoes prolyl-4-hydroxylation on its switch I loop. A crystal structure of PPHD reveals striking similarity to human PHD2 and a Chlamydomonas reinhardtii prolyl-4-hydroxylase. A crystal structure of PPHD complexed with intact EF-Tu reveals that major conformational changes occur in both PPHD and EF-Tu, including a >20-Å movement of the EF-Tu switch I loop. Comparison of the PPHD structures with those of HIF and collagen PHDs reveals conservation in substrate recognition despite diverse biological roles and origins. The observed changes will be useful in designing new types of 2OG oxygenase inhibitors based on various conformational states, rather than active site iron chelators, which make up most reported 2OG oxygenase inhibitors. Structurally informed phylogenetic analyses suggest that the role of prolyl-hydroxylation in human hypoxia sensing has ancient origins. PMID:25197067

  4. Expression of the Escherichia coli K5 capsular antigen: immunoelectron microscopic and biochemical studies with recombinant E. coli.

    PubMed Central

    Kröncke, K D; Boulnois, G; Roberts, I; Bitter-Suermann, D; Golecki, J R; Jann, B; Jann, K

    1990-01-01

    The capsular K5 polysaccharide, a representative of group II capsular antigens of Escherichia coli, has been cloned previously, and three gene regions responsible for polymerization and surface expression have been defined (I. S. Roberts, R. Mountford, R. Hodge, K. B. Jann, and G. J. Boulnois, J. Bacteriol. 170:1305-1310, 1988). In this report, we describe the immunoelectron microscopic analysis of recombinant bacteria expressing the K5 antigen and of mutants defective in either region 1 or region 3 gene functions, as well as the biochemical analysis of the K5 capsular polysaccharide. Whereas the K5 clone expressed the K5 polysaccharide as a well-developed capsule in about 25% of its population, no capsule was observed in whole mount preparations and ultrathin sections of the expression mutants. Immunogold labeling of sections from the region 3 mutant revealed the capsular K5 polysaccharide in the cytoplasm. With the region 1 mutant, the capsular polysaccharide appeared associated with the cell membrane, and, unlike the region 3 mutant polysaccharide, the capsular polysaccharide could be detected in the periplasm after plasmolysis of the bacteria. Polysaccharides were isolated from the homogenized mutants with cetyltrimethylammonium bromide. The polysaccharide from the region 1 mutant had the same size as that isolated from the capsule of the original K5 clone, and both polysaccharides were substituted with phosphatidic acid. The polysaccharide from the region 3 mutant was smaller and was not substituted with phosphatidic acid. These results prompt us to postulate that gene region 3 products are involved in the translocation of the capsular polysaccharide across the cytoplasmic membrane and that region 1 directs the transport of the lipid-substituted capsular polysaccharide through the periplasm and across the outer membrane. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 2 FIG. 3 FIG. 4 FIG. 6 PMID:2404935

  5. Commensal and Pathogenic Escherichia coli Metabolism in the Gut.

    PubMed

    Conway, Tyrrell; Cohen, Paul S

    2015-06-01

    E. coli is a ubiquitous member of the intestinal microbiome. This organism resides in a biofilm comprised of a complex microbial community within the mucus layer where it must compete for the limiting nutrients that it needs to grow fast enough to stably colonize. In this article we discuss the nutritional basis of intestinal colonization. Beginning with basic ecological principles we describe what is known about the metabolism that makes E. coli such a remarkably successful member of the intestinal microbiota. To obtain the simple sugars and amino acids that it requires, E. coli depends on degradation of complex glycoproteins by strict anaerobes. Despite having essentially the same core genome and hence the same metabolism when grown in the laboratory, different E. coli strains display considerable catabolic diversity when colonized in mice. To explain why some E. coli mutants do not grow as well on mucus in vitro as their wild type parents yet are better colonizers, we postulate that each one resides in a distinct "Restaurant" where it is served different nutrients because it interacts physically and metabolically with different species of anaerobes. Since enteric pathogens that fail to compete successfully for nutrients cannot colonize, a basic understanding of the nutritional basis of intestinal colonization will inform efforts to develop prebiotics and probiotics to combat infection. PMID:26185077

  6. Commensal and Pathogenic Escherichia coli Metabolism in the Gut.

    PubMed

    Conway, Tyrrell; Cohen, Paul S

    2015-06-01

    E. coli is a ubiquitous member of the intestinal microbiome. This organism resides in a biofilm comprised of a complex microbial community within the mucus layer where it must compete for the limiting nutrients that it needs to grow fast enough to stably colonize. In this article we discuss the nutritional basis of intestinal colonization. Beginning with basic ecological principles we describe what is known about the metabolism that makes E. coli such a remarkably successful member of the intestinal microbiota. To obtain the simple sugars and amino acids that it requires, E. coli depends on degradation of complex glycoproteins by strict anaerobes. Despite having essentially the same core genome and hence the same metabolism when grown in the laboratory, different E. coli strains display considerable catabolic diversity when colonized in mice. To explain why some E. coli mutants do not grow as well on mucus in vitro as their wild type parents yet are better colonizers, we postulate that each one resides in a distinct "Restaurant" where it is served different nutrients because it interacts physically and metabolically with different species of anaerobes. Since enteric pathogens that fail to compete successfully for nutrients cannot colonize, a basic understanding of the nutritional basis of intestinal colonization will inform efforts to develop prebiotics and probiotics to combat infection.

  7. Genomic Islands of Uropathogenic Escherichia coli Contribute to Virulence▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd, Amanda L.; Henderson, Tiffany A.; Vigil, Patrick D.; Mobley, Harry L. T.

    2009-01-01

    Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) strain CFT073 contains 13 large genomic islands ranging in size from 32 kb to 123 kb. Eleven of these genomic islands were individually deleted from the genome, and nine isogenic mutants were tested for their ability to colonize the CBA/J mouse model of ascending urinary tract infection. Three genomic island mutants (ΔPAI-aspV, ΔPAI-metV, and ΔPAI-asnT) were significantly outcompeted by wild-type CFT073 in the bladders and/or kidneys following transurethral cochallenge (P ≤ 0.0139). The PAI-metV mutant also showed significant attenuation in the ability to independently colonize the kidneys (P = 0.0011). Specific genes within these islands contributed to the observed phenotype, including a previously uncharacterized iron acquisition cluster, fbpABCD (c0294 to c0297 [c0294-97]), autotransporter, picU (c0350), and RTX family exoprotein, tosA (c0363) in the PAI-aspV island. The double deletion mutant with deletions in both copies of the fbp iron acquisition operon (Δc0294-97 Δc2518-15) was significantly outcompeted by wild-type CFT073 in cochallenge. Strains with mutations in a type VI secretion system within the PAI-metV island did not show attenuation. The attenuation of the PAI-metV island was localized to genes c3405-10, encoding a putative phosphotransferase transport system, which is common to UPEC and avian pathogenic E. coli strains but absent from E. coli K-12. We have shown that, in addition to encoding virulence genes, genomic islands contribute to the overall fitness of UPEC strain CFT073 in vivo. PMID:19329634

  8. A Mutant Library Approach to Identify Improved Meningococcal Factor H Binding Protein Vaccine Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Konar, Monica; Rossi, Raffaella; Walter, Helen; Pajon, Rolando; Beernink, Peter T.

    2015-01-01

    Factor H binding protein (FHbp) is a virulence factor used by meningococci to evade the host complement system. FHbp elicits bactericidal antibodies in humans and is part of two recently licensed vaccines. Using human complement Factor H (FH) transgenic mice, we previously showed that binding of FH decreased the protective antibody responses to FHbp vaccination. Therefore, in the present study we devised a library-based method to identify mutant FHbp antigens with very low binding of FH. Using an FHbp sequence variant in one of the two licensed vaccines, we displayed an error-prone PCR mutant FHbp library on the surface of Escherichia coli. We used fluorescence-activated cell sorting to isolate FHbp mutants with very low binding of human FH and preserved binding of control anti-FHbp monoclonal antibodies. We sequenced the gene encoding FHbp from selected clones and introduced the mutations into a soluble FHbp construct. Using this approach, we identified several new mutant FHbp vaccine antigens that had very low binding of FH as measured by ELISA and surface plasmon resonance. The new mutant FHbp antigens elicited protective antibody responses in human FH transgenic mice that were up to 20-fold higher than those elicited by the wild-type FHbp antigen. This approach offers the potential to discover mutant antigens that might not be predictable even with protein structural information and potentially can be applied to other microbial vaccine antigens that bind host proteins. PMID:26057742

  9. Rational design of stable and functional hirudin III mutants with lower antigenicity.

    PubMed

    Asgari, Saeme; Mirzahoseini, Hasan; Karimipour, Morteza; Rahimi, Hamze; Ebrahim-Habibi, Azadeh

    2015-11-01

    Hirudin is an inhibitor of thrombin and used as an effective anticoagulant, but has a potential to develop unacceptable immune responses. In this study, two computational tools were used to predict T-cell epitopes within Hirudin variant III (HVIII) sequence, and design mutations that would lessen its antigenicity. Homology models of native and mutant HVIII proteins (T4K, S9G, V21G, and V21K) were generated, and further used to assess their interactions with thrombin. The docking experiment showed that all mutants had a suitable pattern of interactions, with similar or lower interaction energies compared with the native protein. These complexes were subsequently subjected to molecular dynamics simulation. All mutants complexes had overall stable structures over simulation time, with RMSD, gyration radius, hydrogen bonds numbers, and accessible surface areas patterns that were comparable with the native HVIII over time. Interestingly, in all mutants, a shorter length was observed for the two salt bridges Arg73-Asp55 and Arg77-Glu57, which are suggested to be important in Hirudin-thrombin complex formation. Best selected mutants expressed in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3), subsequently SDS-PAGE and Western blot analysis confirmed the successful same expression of Hirudin and mutants. In conclusion, we believe that this computational approach could identify potentially safer proteins with preserved or even improved functionality. PMID:26321653

  10. Arrestin Expression in E. coli and Purification

    PubMed Central

    Vishnivetskiy, Sergey A.; Zhan, Xuanzhi; Chen, Qiuyan; Iverson, Tina M.; Gurevich, Vsevolod V.

    2014-01-01

    Purified arrestin proteins are necessary for biochemical, biophysical, and crystallographic studies of these versatile regulators of cell signaling. Here we describe a basic protocol for expression in E. coli and purification of tag-free wild type and mutant arrestins. The method includes ammonium sulfate precipitation of arrestins from cell lysates, followed by heparin-Sepharose chromatography. Depending on the arrestin type and/or mutations, this step is followed by Q-Sepharose or SP-Sepharose chromatography. In many cases the non-binding column is used as a pre-filter to bind contaminants without retaining arrestin. In some cases both chromatographic steps need to be performed sequentially to achieve high purity. Purified arrestins can be concentrated up to 10 mg/ml, remain fully functional, and can withstand several cycles of freezing and thawing, provided that overall salt concentration is kept at or above physiological levels. PMID:25446290

  11. Mutations That Enhance the Ciprofloxacin Resistance of Escherichia coli with qnrA1

    PubMed Central

    Vinué, Laura; Corcoran, Marian A.; Hooper, David C.

    2015-01-01

    Plasmid-mediated qnr genes provide only a modest decrease in quinolone susceptibility but facilitate the selection of higher-level resistance. In Escherichia coli strain J53 without qnr, ciprofloxacin resistance often involves mutations in the GyrA subunit of DNA gyrase. Mutations in gyrA were absent, however, when 43 mutants with decreased ciprofloxacin susceptibility were selected from J53(pMG252) with qnrA1. Instead, in 13 mutants, individual and whole-genome sequencing identified mutations in marR and soxR associated with increased expression of marA and soxS and, through them, increased expression of the AcrAB pump, which effluxes quinolones. Nine mutants had increased expression of the MdtE efflux pump, and six demonstrated increased expression of the ydhE pump gene. Many efflux mutants also had increased resistance to novobiocin, another pump substrate, but other mutants were novobiocin hypersusceptible. Mutations in rfaD and rfaE in the pathway for inner core lipopolysaccharide (LPS) biosynthesis were identified in five such strains. Many of the pump and LPS mutants had decreased expression of OmpF, the major porin channel for ciprofloxacin entry. Three mutants had increased expression of qnrA that persisted when pMG252 from these strains was outcrossed. gyrA mutations were also rare when mutants with decreased ciprofloxacin susceptibility were selected from E. coli J53 with aac(6′)-Ib-cr or qepA. We suggest that multiple genes conferring low-level resistance contribute to enhanced ciprofloxacin resistance selected from an E. coli strain carrying qnrA1, aac(6′)-Ib-cr, or qepA because these determinants decrease the effective ciprofloxacin concentration and allow more common but lower-resistance mutations than those in gyrA to predominate. PMID:26711751

  12. Genetic recombination. [Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Stahl, F.W.

    1987-02-01

    The molecular pathways of gene recombination are explored and compared in studies of the model organisms, Escherichia coli and phase lambda. In the discussion of data from these studies it seems that recombination varies with the genetic idiosyncrasies of the organism and may also vary within a single organism.

  13. Contribution of Siderophore Systems to Growth and Urinary Tract Colonization of Asymptomatic Bacteriuria Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Watts, Rebecca E.; Totsika, Makrina; Challinor, Victoria L.; Mabbett, Amanda N.; Ulett, Glen C.; De Voss, James J.

    2012-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms that define asymptomatic bacteriuria (ABU) Escherichia coli colonization of the human urinary tract remain to be properly elucidated. Here, we utilize ABU E. coli strain 83972 as a model to dissect the contribution of siderophores to iron acquisition, growth, fitness, and colonization of the urinary tract. We show that E. coli 83972 produces enterobactin, salmochelin, aerobactin, and yersiniabactin and examine the role of these systems using mutants defective in siderophore biosynthesis and uptake. Enterobactin and aerobactin contributed most to total siderophore activity and growth in defined iron-deficient medium. No siderophores were detected in an 83972 quadruple mutant deficient in all four siderophore biosynthesis pathways; this mutant did not grow in defined iron-deficient medium but grew in iron-limited pooled human urine due to iron uptake via the FecA ferric citrate receptor. In a mixed 1:1 growth assay with strain 83972, there was no fitness disadvantage of the 83972 quadruple biosynthetic mutant, demonstrating its capacity to act as a “cheater” and utilize siderophores produced by the wild-type strain for iron uptake. An 83972 enterobactin/salmochelin double receptor mutant was outcompeted by 83972 in human urine and the mouse urinary tract, indicating a role for catecholate receptors in urinary tract colonization. PMID:21930757

  14. How much territory can a single E. coli cell control?

    PubMed Central

    El-Hajj, Ziad W.; Newman, Elaine B.

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria have been traditionally classified in terms of size and shape and are best known for their very small size. Escherichia coli cells in particular are small rods, each 1–2 μ. However, the size varies with the medium, and faster growing cells are larger because they must have more ribosomes to make more protoplasm per unit time, and ribosomes take up space. Indeed, Maaløe’s experiments on how E. coli establishes its size began with shifts between rich and poor media. Recently much larger bacteria have been described, including Epulopiscium fishelsoni at 700 μm and Thiomargarita namibiensis at 750 μm. These are not only much longer than E. coli cells but also much wider, necessitating considerable intracellular organization. Epulopiscium cells for instance, at 80 μm wide, enclose a large enough volume of cytoplasm to present it with major transport problems. This review surveys E. coli cells much longer than those which grow in nature and in usual lab cultures. These include cells mutated in a single gene (metK) which are 2–4 × longer than their non-mutated parent. This metK mutant stops dividing when slowly starved of S-adenosylmethionine but continues to elongate to 50 μm and more. FtsZ mutants have been routinely isolated as long cells which form during growth at 42°C. The SOS response is a well-characterized regulatory network that is activated in response to DNA damage and also results in cell elongation. Our champion elongated E. coli is a metK strain with a further, as yet unidentified mutation, which reaches 750 μm with no internal divisions and no increase in width. PMID:25954251

  15. Disrupted OmpC causes osmosis sensitivity of Escherichia coli in alkaline medium.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuqi; Wang, Lingling; Sun, Yirong; Chen, Yicai; Zhu, Lei; Guo, Lixia; Luo, Biao; Wang, Haihong

    2007-12-01

    The Escherichia coli strain DH42 is sensitive to high osmolarity in an alkaline medium. Using mini-Tn5 mutagenesis, construction of mutant strains by homologous recombination and subcloning of DNA fragment techniques, gene ompC was identified as the key factor that, once disrupted, caused osmosis-sensitivity of E. coli strain DH42 grown in an alkaline medium. Through P1 transduction, a mutant strain, D9 (W3110 ompC:kan), was constructed and growth comparison was performed between DH42 and D9 under different pHs and salt concentrations. The result showed that ompC was necessarily required for hyperosmotic adaptation of E. coli in the alkaline medium.

  16. Isolation and mapping of a mutation in Escherichia coli with altered levels of ribonuclease H.

    PubMed Central

    Carl, P L; Bloom, L; Crouch, R J

    1980-01-01

    A mutant of Escherichia coli with altered levels of ribonuclease (RNase) H was isolated after mutagenesis with ethyl methane sulfonate. A procedure for assaying RNase H in partially purified extracts was used to screen approximately 1,500 colonies for variations in RNase H activity. Confirmation of a lower level of RNase H in the mutant was accomplished by analysis of RNase H in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels. By Hfr, F', and P1 transduction mapping, the genetic locus responsible for the lower levels of RNase H was located at 5.1 min on the E. coli chromosome. This mutation (rnh) represents a new locus on the E. coli chromosome. The only phenotypic characteristic of this mutation which has been observed to date is the lower level of RNase H (30% of parental values). Images PMID:6998952

  17. Escherichia coli genes whose products are involved in selenium metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Leinfelder, W.; Forchhammer, K.; Zinoni, F.; Sawers, G.; Mandrand-Berthelot, M.A.; Boeck, A.

    1988-02-01

    Mutants of Escherichia coli were isolated which were affected in the formation of both formate dehydrogenase N (phenazine methosulfate reducing) (FDN/sub N/) and formate dehydrogenase H (benzylviologen reducing) (FDH/sub H/). They were analyzed, together with previously characterized pleiotropic fdh mutants (fdhA, fdhB, and fdhC), for their ability to incorporate selenium into the selenopolypeptide subunits of FDH/sub N/ and FDH/sub H/. Results of this study support the notion that the pleiotropic fdh mutants analyzed possess a lesion in the gene(s) encoding the biosynthesis or the incorporation of selenocysteine. The gene complementing the defect in one of the isolated mutants was cloned from a cosmid library. Subclones were tested for complementation of other pleiotropic fdh mutants. The results revealed that the mutations in the eight isolates fell into two complementation groups, one of them containing the fdhA mutation. fdhB, fdhC, and two of the new fdh isolates do not belong to these complementation groups. A new nomenclature (sel) is proposed for pleiotropic fdh mutations affecting selenium metabolism. Four genes have been identified so far: selA and selB (at the fdhA locus), selC (previously fdhC), and selD (previously fdhB).

  18. Isolation of an Escherichia coil strain mutant unable to form biofilm on polystyrene and to adhere to human pneumocyte cells: involvement of tryptophanase.

    PubMed

    Di Martino, P; Merieau, A; Phillips, R; Orange, N; Hulen, C

    2002-02-01

    Escherichia coli adherence to biotic and abiotic surfaces constitutes the first step of infection by promoting colonization and biofilm formation. The aim of this study was to gain a better understanding of the relationship between E. coli adherence to different biotic surfaces and biofilm formation on abiotic surfaces. We isolated mutants defective in A549 pneumocyte cells adherence, fibronectin adherence, and biofilm formation by random transposition mutagenesis and sequential passages over A549 cell monolayers. Among the 97 mutants tested, 80 were decreased in biofilm formation, 8 were decreased in A549 cells adherence, 7 were decreased in their adherence to fibronectin, and 17 had no perturbations in either of the three phenotypes. We observed a correlation between adherence to fibronectin or A549 cells and biofilm formation, indicating that biotic adhesive factors are involved in biofilm formation by E. coli. Molecular analysis of the mutants revealed that a transposon insertion in the tnaA gene encoding for tryptophanase was associated with a decrease in both A549 cells adherence and biofilm formation by E. coli. The complementation of the tnaA mutant with plasmid-located wild-type tnaA restored the tryptophanase activity, epithelial cells adherence, and biofilm formation on polystyrene. The possible mechanism of tryptophanase involvement in E. coli adherence and biofilm formation is discussed.

  19. Impact of metal ion homeostasis of genetically modified Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 and K12 (W3110) strains on colonization properties in the murine intestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Kupz, Andreas; Fischer, André; Nies, Dietrich H; Grass, Gregor; Göbel, Ulf B; Bereswill, Stefan; Heimesaat, Markus M

    2013-09-01

    Metal ions are integral parts of pro- as well as eukaryotic cell homeostasis. Escherichia coli proved a valuable in vitro model organism to elucidate essential mechanisms involved in uptake, storage, and export of metal ions. Given that E. coli Nissle 1917 is able to overcome murine colonization resistance, we generated several E. coli Nissle 1917 mutants with defects in zinc, iron, copper, nickel, manganese homeostasis and performed a comprehensive survey of the impact of metal ion transport and homeostasis for E. coli colonization capacities within the murine intestinal tract. Seven days following peroral infection of conventional mice with E. coli Nissle 1917 strains exhibiting defined defects in zinc or iron uptake, the respective mutant and parental strains could be cultured at comparable, but low levels from the colonic lumen. We next reassociated gnotobiotic mice in which the microbiota responsible for colonization resistance was abrogated by broad-spectrum antibiotics with six different E. coli K12 (W3110) mutants. Seven days following peroral challenge, each mutant and parental strain stably colonized duodenum, ileum, and colon at comparable levels. Taken together, defects in zinc, iron, copper, nickel, and manganese homeostasis do not compromise colonization capacities of E. coli in the murine intestinal tract. PMID:24265943

  20. Impact of metal ion homeostasis of genetically modified Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 and K12 (W3110) strains on colonization properties in the murine intestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Kupz, Andreas; Fischer, André; Nies, Dietrich H; Grass, Gregor; Göbel, Ulf B; Bereswill, Stefan; Heimesaat, Markus M

    2013-09-01

    Metal ions are integral parts of pro- as well as eukaryotic cell homeostasis. Escherichia coli proved a valuable in vitro model organism to elucidate essential mechanisms involved in uptake, storage, and export of metal ions. Given that E. coli Nissle 1917 is able to overcome murine colonization resistance, we generated several E. coli Nissle 1917 mutants with defects in zinc, iron, copper, nickel, manganese homeostasis and performed a comprehensive survey of the impact of metal ion transport and homeostasis for E. coli colonization capacities within the murine intestinal tract. Seven days following peroral infection of conventional mice with E. coli Nissle 1917 strains exhibiting defined defects in zinc or iron uptake, the respective mutant and parental strains could be cultured at comparable, but low levels from the colonic lumen. We next reassociated gnotobiotic mice in which the microbiota responsible for colonization resistance was abrogated by broad-spectrum antibiotics with six different E. coli K12 (W3110) mutants. Seven days following peroral challenge, each mutant and parental strain stably colonized duodenum, ileum, and colon at comparable levels. Taken together, defects in zinc, iron, copper, nickel, and manganese homeostasis do not compromise colonization capacities of E. coli in the murine intestinal tract.

  1. In vivo formation of glutamyl-tRNA(Gln) in Escherichia coli by heterologous glutamyl-tRNA synthetases.

    PubMed

    Núñez, Harold; Lefimil, Claudia; Min, Bokkee; Söll, Dieter; Orellana, Omar

    2004-01-16

    Two types of glutamyl-tRNA synthetase exist: the discriminating enzyme (D-GluRS) forms only Glu-tRNA(Glu), while the non-discriminating one (ND-GluRS) also synthesizes Glu-tRNA(Gln), a required intermediate in protein synthesis in many organisms (but not in Escherichia coli). Testing the capacity to complement a thermosensitive E. coli gltX mutant and to suppress an E. coli trpA49 missense mutant we examined the properties of heterologous gltX genes. We demonstrate that while Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans GluRS1 and Bacillus subtilis Q373R GluRS form Glu-tRNA(Glu), A. ferrooxidans and Helicobacter pylori GluRS2 form Glu-tRNA(Gln) in E. coli in vivo.

  2. Chloro-benzoquinones cause oxidative DNA damage through iron-mediated ROS production in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhilan; Zhou, Qiaohong; Zou, Dandan; Tian, Yun; Liu, Biyun; Zhang, Yongyuan; Wu, Zhenbin

    2015-09-01

    Chloro-benzoquinones (CBQs) are a group of disinfection byproducts that are suspected to be potentially carcinogenic. Here, the mechanism of DNA damage caused by CBQs in the presence of ferrous ions was investigated in an Escherichia coli wild type M5 strain and a mutant L5 (ahpCF katEG mutant) strain that carried an enhanced green fluorescent protein reporter under the control of a SOS response gene (recA) promoter. All tested CBQs (including para-benzoquinone, 2-chloro-para-benzoquinone, and dichloro-para-benzoquinones with different substitutes) caused substantial oxidative DNA damage with EC50 values in the micromolar range. Moreover, 2,5-dichloro-para-benzoquinone (2,5-DCBQ), a typical CBQ, caused substantial ROS production in E. coli mutant cells. And ROS scavengers provided partial protective effects on genotoxicity of 2,5-DCBQ to E. coli mutant cells. The addition of Fe(2+) to the 2,5-DCBQ exposure system caused an increase in DNA oxidative damage; iron-chelating agents could partially prevent these cells from DNA damage. Finally, intracellular AhpCF, catalase E, and catalase G were all found to play an important role in the survival of E. coli cells exposed to CBQs, as indicated by an increased sensitivity of the ahpCF katEG mutant L5 strain to treatment compared with wild type M5 cells. Taken together, these results suggest that CBQs cause oxidative DNA damage in E. coli cells through the participation of iron-mediated ROS production.

  3. gltBDF operon of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Castaño, I; Bastarrachea, F; Covarrubias, A A

    1988-01-01

    A 2.0-kilobase DNA fragment carrying antibiotic resistance markers was inserted into the gltB gene of Escherichia coli previously cloned in a multicopy plasmid. Replacement of the chromosomal gltB+ gene by the gltB225::omega mutation led to cells unable to synthesize glutamate synthase, utilize growth rate-limiting nitrogen sources, or derepress their glutamine synthetase. The existence of a gltBDF operon encoding the large (gltB) and small (gltD) subunits of glutamate synthase and a regulatory peptide (gltF) at 69 min of the E. coli linkage map was deduced from complementation analysis. A plasmid carrying the entire gltB+D+F+ operon complemented cells for all three of the mutant phenotypes associated with the polar gltB225::omega mutation in the chromosome. By contrast, plasmids carrying gltB+ only complemented cells for glutamate synthase activity. A major tricistronic mRNA molecule was detected from Northern (RNA blot) DNA-RNA hybridization experiments with DNA probes containing single genes of the operon. A 30,200-dalton polypeptide was identified as the gltF product, the lack of which was responsible for the inability of cells to use nitrogen-limiting sources associated with gltB225::omega. Images PMID:2448295

  4. A retrospective: Use of Escherichia coli as a vehicle to study phospholipid synthesis and function

    PubMed Central

    Dowhan, William

    2012-01-01

    Although the study of individual phospholipids and their synthesis began in the 1920’s first in plants and then mammals, it was not until the early 1960’s that Eugene Kennedy using Escherichia coli initiated studies of bacterial phospholipid metabolism. With the base of information already available from studies of mammalian tissue, the basic blueprint of phospholipid biosynthesis in E. coli was worked out by the late 1960’s. In 1970’s and 1980’s most of the enzymes responsible for phospholipid biosynthesis were purified and many of the genes encoding these enzymes were identified. By the late 1990’s conditional and null mutants were available along with clones of the genes for every step of phospholipid biosynthesis. Most of these genes had been sequenced before the complete E. coli genome sequence was available. Strains of E. coli were developed in which phospholipid composition could be changed in a systematic manner while maintaining cell viability. Null mutants, strains in which phospholipid metabolism was artificially regulated, and strains synthesizing foreign lipids not found in E. coli have been used to this day to define specific roles for individual phospholipid. This review will trace the findings that have led to the development of E. coli as an excellent model system to study mechanisms underlying the synthesis and function of phospholipids that are widely applicable to other prokaryotic and eukaryotic systems. PMID:22925633

  5. Paranodal permeability in `myelin mutants'

    PubMed Central

    Shroff, S.; Mierzwa, A.; Scherer, S.S.; Peles, E.; Arevalo, J.C.; Chao, M.V.; Rosenbluth, J.

    2011-01-01

    Fluorescent dextran tracers of varying sizes have been used to assess paranodal permeability in myelinated sciatic nerve fibers from control and three `myelin mutant' mice, Caspr-null, cst-null and shaking. We demonstrate that in all of these the paranode is permeable to small tracers (3kDa, 10kDa), which penetrate most fibers, and to larger tracers (40kDa, 70kDa), which penetrate far fewer fibers and move shorter distances over longer periods of time. Despite gross diminution in transverse bands in the Caspr-null and cst-null mice, the permeability of their paranodal junctions is equivalent to that in controls. Thus, deficiency of transverse bands in these mutants does not increase the permeability of their paranodal junctions to the dextrans we used, moving from the perinodal space through the paranode to the internodal periaxonal space. In addition, we show that the shaking mice, which have thinner myelin and shorter paranodes, show increased permeability to the same tracers despite the presence of transverse bands. We conclude that the extent of penetration of these tracers does not depend on the presence or absence of transverse bands but does depend on the length of the paranode and, in turn, on the length of `pathway 3', the helical extracellular pathway that passes through the paranode parallel to the lateral edge of the myelin sheath. PMID:21618613

  6. Paranodal permeability in "myelin mutants".

    PubMed

    Shroff, Seema; Mierzwa, Amanda; Scherer, Steven S; Peles, Elior; Arevalo, Juan C; Chao, Moses V; Rosenbluth, Jack

    2011-10-01

    Fluorescent dextran tracers of varying sizes have been used to assess paranodal permeability in myelinated sciatic nerve fibers from control and three "myelin mutant" mice, Caspr-null, cst-null, and shaking. We demonstrate that in all of these the paranode is permeable to small tracers (3 kDa and 10 kDa), which penetrate most fibers, and to larger tracers (40 kDa and 70 kDa), which penetrate far fewer fibers and move shorter distances over longer periods of time. Despite gross diminution in transverse bands (TBs) in the Caspr-null and cst-null mice, the permeability of their paranodal junctions is equivalent to that in controls. Thus, deficiency of TBs in these mutants does not increase the permeability of their paranodal junctions to the dextrans we used, moving from the perinodal space through the paranode to the internodal periaxonal space. In addition, we show that the shaking mice, which have thinner myelin and shorter paranodes, show increased permeability to the same tracers despite the presence of TBs. We conclude that the extent of penetration of these tracers does not depend on the presence or absence of TBs but does depend on the length of the paranode and, in turn, on the length of "pathway 3," the helical extracellular pathway that passes through the paranode parallel to the lateral edge of the myelin sheath. PMID:21618613

  7. An adhesive protein capsule of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Orskov, I; Birch-Andersen, A; Duguid, J P; Stenderup, J; Orskov, F

    1985-01-01

    The nature of the adhesive capacity of three hemagglutinating Escherichia coli strains that had earlier been described as nonfimbriated was studied. The strains that were isolated from human disease adhered to human buccal and urinary tract epithelial cells, an adhesion that was not inhibited by D-mannose. By crossed immunoelectrophoresis it was shown that the three strains produced a common antigen, Z1, developed after growth at 37 degrees C but not 18 degrees C. One of the strains produced an additional antigen, Z2, of almost the same electrophoretic mobility in crossed immunoelectrophoresis. A mutant of this strain deficient of its polysaccharide K antigen had maintained the adhesive capacity, indicating that the K antigen was not responsible for adhesion. A further mutant of the acapsular mutant produced a strongly reduced amount of the Z antigens and had lost the ability to adhere. The Z1 (and Z2?) antigens were therefore deemed to be responsible for adhesion. In sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of extracts of cells of the three strains, a heavy Coomassie-blue stained line was seen, indicating the presence of a protein subunit of molecular weight slightly above 14,400. By immunoblotting with absorbed antiserum, it was shown that this protein was the same as that detected by crossed immunoelectrophoresis. Protease from Streptomyces griseus, but not trypsin, digested the protein. Heating to 100 degrees C did not affect it. By immunoelectron microscopy of embedded and sectioned bacteria that had first been treated with specific antisera and ferritin-labeled antirabbit immunoglobulin, the protein adhesin-antibody complex was found to surround the bacteria as a heavy capsule. After negative staining with uranylacetate (pH approximately 4), the capsule appeared as a mesh of very fine filaments. The possible role of this capsule in the pathogenesis of disease is discussed. Images PMID:2856913

  8. Pleiotropic Properties and Genetic Organization of the tolA, B Locus of Escherichia coli K-12

    PubMed Central

    Bernstein, Alan; Rolfe, Barry; Onodera, Kazukiyo

    1972-01-01

    Colicin-tolerant mutants of Escherichia coli K-12, which map near gal at 17 min (tolA, B mutants), have been isolated and characterized. These mutants exhibited a very broad spectrum of phenotypic changes consistent with the interpretation that they are cell surface mutants. In addition to being colicintolerant and sensitive to deoxycholate and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, tolA, B mutants are sensitive to vancomycin, bacitracin, and dodecyl sulfate. The tolA, B mutants from most strains also formed mucoid colonies at 30 C on nutrient agar plates and had a greatly increased plating efficiency for lysisdefective S mutants of bacteriophage λ. Complementation analysis showed that the four phenotypic groups of tol mutants that map near gal fall into three complementation groups: tolP, tolA, and tolB. Recombination analysis by three-factor crosses established the order of the three groups as tolP-tolA-tolB—gal. Because of the wide variety of phenotypic changes that accompanies mutation to colicin tolerance, revertants were isolated to test whether single or multiple mutations were involved. The reversion analysis, as well as other genetic criteria, confirmed that only single mutations were involved, suggesting that these pleiotropic changes are a consequence of a single change in the E. coli cell surface. Images PMID:4627928

  9. Trifluoperazine binding to mutant calmodulins.

    PubMed

    Massom, L R; Lukas, T J; Persechini, A; Kretsinger, R H; Watterson, D M; Jarrett, H W

    1991-01-22

    Trifluoperazine (TFP) binding by 14 calmodulins, including 12 produced by site-directed mutagenesis, was determined. While vertebrate calmodulin binds 4.2 +/- 0.2 equiv of TFP, Escherichia coli expressed but unmutated calmodulins bind about 5.0 +/- 0.5 equiv of TFP. The cause for this difference is not known. The E. coli expressed proteins consist of two different series expressed from different calmodulin genes, CaMI and SYNCAM. The wild-type genes code for proteins that differ by nine conservative amino acid substitutions. Both these calmodulins bind 5 equiv of TFP with similar affinities, thus none of these conservative substitutions has any additional effect on TFP binding. Some altered calmodulins (deletion of EE83-84 or SEEE81-84, changing DEE118-120----KKK, M124----I,E120----K, or E82----K) have no appreciable effect on TFP binding. Other mutations affect either the binding of one TFP (deletion of E84) or about two TFP (changing E84----K, EEE82-84----KKK, E67----A, DEQ6-8----KKK, or E11----K). The mutations that affect TFP binding are localized to three regions of calmodulin: The amino-terminal alpha-helix, the central helix between the two globular ends of calmodulin, and a calcium-binding site in the second calcium-binding domain. The results are consistent with each of these regions either directly participating in drug binding or involved structurally in maintaining or inducing the correct conformation for TFP binding in the amino-terminal half of calmodulin.

  10. Escherichia coli pyruvate:flavodoxin oxidoreductase, YdbK - regulation of expression and biological roles in protection against oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Takayuki; Yonekura, Shin-Ichiro; Yonei, Shuji; Zhang-Akiyama, Qiu-Mei

    2013-01-01

    E. coli YdbK is predicted to be a pyruvate:flavodoxin oxidoreductase (PFOR). However, enzymatic activity and the regulation of gene expression of it are not well understood. In this study, we found that E. coli cells overexpressing the ydbK gene had enhanced PFOR activity, indicating the product of ydbK to be a PFOR. The PFOR was labile to oxygen. The expression of ydbK was induced by superoxide generators such as methyl viologen (MV) in a SoxS-dependent manner after a lag period. We identified a critical element upstream of ydbK gene required for the induction by MV and proved direct binding of SoxS to the element. E. coli ydbK mutant was highly sensitive to MV, which was enhanced by additional inactivation of fpr gene encoding ferredoxin (flavodoxin):NADP(H) reductase (FPR). Aconitase activity, a superoxide sensor, was more extensively decreased by MV in the E. coli ydbK mutant than in wild-type strain. The induction level of soxS gene was higher in E. coli ydbK fpr double mutant than in wild-type strain. These results indicate that YdbK helps to protect cells from oxidative stress. It is possible that YdbK maintains the cellular redox state together with FPR and is involved in the reduction of oxidized proteins including SoxR in the late stages of the oxidative stress response in E. coli. PMID:24025246

  11. In vitro and in vivo characterization of an ail mutant of Yersinia enterocolitica.

    PubMed Central

    Wachtel, M R; Miller, V L

    1995-01-01

    Ail is a 17-kDa protein of Yersinia enterocolitica previously identified on the basis of its ability to confer upon Escherichia coli the phenotype of attachment and invasion of cultured epithelial cells. Here we report an examination of the contribution of ail to the pathogenicity of Y. enterocolitica. A low-copy-number ail plasmid that promoted serum resistance in E. coli HB101 was constructed. The serum resistance phenotype conferred by ail to E. coli was affected by the growth phase of the culture as well as by the gene copy number. In contrast, the copy number of ail (and the relative quantity of Ail) was found to have little effect on the amount of Ail-promoted invasion of cultured epithelial cells. An ail mutant of Y. enterocolitica was constructed and characterized in vitro. This mutant produced no detectable Ail and had a reduced ability to invade CHO cells. Serum resistance of Y. enterocolitica was Ail dependent and was affected by growth phase and ail copy number. The phenotype of the ail mutant was examined in vivo by using a murine model for infection. The ail mutant phenotype was identical to that of the wild-type strain in oral 50% lethal dose studies and early colonization of Peyer's patches as well as in kinetic studies. Western blot (immunoblot) analysis of Ail produced by bacteria growing in vivo at 48 h postinfection indicated that ail was expressed at this time point. Thus, our findings confirm that Ail contributes to the serum resistance and invasion phenotypes of Y. enterocolitica in vitro and indicate that Ail is not required to establish an infection or to cause systemic infection of BALB/c or DBA/2 mice. PMID:7790067

  12. Characterization of Phospho-(Tyrosine)-Mimetic Calmodulin Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Stateva, Silviya R.; Salas, Valentina; Benaim, Gustavo; Menéndez, Margarita; Solís, Dolores; Villalobo, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) phosphorylated at different serine/threonine and tyrosine residues is known to exert differential regulatory effects on a variety of CaM-binding enzymes as compared to non-phosphorylated CaM. In this report we describe the preparation and characterization of a series of phospho-(Y)-mimetic CaM mutants in which either one or the two tyrosine residues present in CaM (Y99 and Y138) were substituted to aspartic acid or glutamic acid. It was expected that the negative charge of the respective carboxyl group of these amino acids mimics the negative charge of phosphate and reproduce the effects that distinct phospho-(Y)-CaM species may have on target proteins. We describe some physicochemical properties of these CaM mutants as compared to wild type CaM, after their expression in Escherichia coli and purification to homogeneity, including: i) changes in their electrophoretic mobility in the absence and presence of Ca2+; ii) ultraviolet (UV) light absorption spectra, far- and near-UV circular dichroism data; iii) thermal stability in the absence and presence of Ca2+; and iv) Tb3+-emitted fluorescence upon tyrosine excitation. We also describe some biochemical properties of these CaM mutants, such as their differential phosphorylation by the tyrosine kinase c-Src, and their action as compared to wild type CaM, on the activity of two CaM-dependent enzymes: cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase 1 (PDE1) and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) assayed in vitro. PMID:25830911

  13. Resveratrol Antagonizes Antimicrobial Lethality and Stimulates Recovery of Bacterial Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yuanli; Zhou, Jinan; Qu, Yilin; Yang, Xinguang; Shi, Guojing; Wang, Xiuhong; Hong, Yuzhi; Drlica, Karl; Zhao, Xilin

    2016-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS; superoxide, peroxide, and hydroxyl radical) are thought to contribute to the rapid bactericidal activity of diverse antimicrobial agents. The possibility has been raised that consumption of antioxidants in food may interfere with the lethal action of antimicrobials. Whether nutritional supplements containing antioxidant activity are also likely to interfere with antimicrobial lethality is unknown. To examine this possibility, resveratrol, a popular antioxidant dietary supplement, was added to cultures of Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus that were then treated with antimicrobial and assayed for bacterial survival and the recovery of mutants resistant to an unrelated antimicrobial, rifampicin. Resveratrol, at concentrations likely to be present during human consumption, caused a 2- to 3-fold reduction in killing during a 2-hr treatment with moxifloxacin or kanamycin. At higher, but still subinhibitory concentrations, resveratrol reduced antimicrobial lethality by more than 3 orders of magnitude. Resveratrol also reduced the increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) characteristic of treatment with quinolone (oxolinic acid). These data support the general idea that the lethal activity of some antimicrobials involves ROS. Surprisingly, subinhibitory concentrations of resveratrol promoted (2- to 6-fold) the recovery of rifampicin-resistant mutants arising from the action of ciprofloxacin, kanamycin, or daptomycin. This result is consistent with resveratrol reducing ROS to sublethal levels that are still mutagenic, while the absence of resveratrol allows ROS levels to high enough to kill mutagenized cells. Suppression of antimicrobial lethality and promotion of mutant recovery by resveratrol suggests that the antioxidant may contribute to the emergence of resistance to several antimicrobials, especially if new derivatives and/or formulations of resveratrol markedly increase bioavailability. PMID:27045517

  14. The CreC Regulator of Escherichia coli, a New Target for Metabolic Manipulations

    PubMed Central

    Godoy, Manuel S.; Nikel, Pablo I.; Cabrera Gomez, José G.

    2015-01-01

    The CreBC (carbon source-responsive) two-component regulation system of Escherichia coli affects a number of functions, including intermediary carbon catabolism. The impacts of different creC mutations (a ΔcreC mutant and a mutant carrying the constitutive creC510 allele) on bacterial physiology were analyzed in glucose cultures under three oxygen availability conditions. Differences in the amounts of extracellular metabolites produced were observed in the null mutant compared to the wild-type strain and the mutant carrying creC510 and shown to be affected by oxygen availability. The ΔcreC strain secreted more formate, succinate, and acetate but less lactate under low aeration. These metabolic changes were associated with differences in AckA and LdhA activities, both of which were affected by CreC. Measurement of the NAD(P)H/NAD(P)+ ratios showed that the creC510 strain had a more reduced intracellular redox state, while the opposite was observed for the ΔcreC mutant, particularly under intermediate oxygen availability conditions, indicating that CreC affects redox balance. The null mutant formed more succinate than the wild-type strain under both low aeration and no aeration. Overexpression of the genes encoding phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase from E. coli and a NADH-forming formate dehydrogenase from Candida boidinii in the ΔcreC mutant further increased the yield of succinate on glucose. Interestingly, the elimination of ackA and adhE did not significantly improve the production of succinate. The diverse metabolic effects of this regulator on the central biochemical network of E. coli make it a good candidate for metabolic-engineering manipulations to enhance the formation of bioproducts, such as succinate. PMID:26497466

  15. Escherichia coli K5 capsule expression enhances colonization of the large intestine in the gnotobiotic rat.

    PubMed Central

    Hérias, M V; Midtvedt, T; Hanson, L A; Wold, A E

    1997-01-01

    The role of capsule expression in the capacity of Escherichia coli to colonize in the large intestinal environment was studied in a gnotobiotic rat model. The rats were given perorally a mixture of two mutant strains differing in K5 expression. After 2 weeks, the rats were sacrificed, and subsequently intestinal contents, intestinal mucosae, and mesenteric lymph nodes were homogenized and bacterial numbers were quantified. Two E. coli mutant pairs were used, the first pair (972-998) lacking the O-specific side chain and the second pair (973-997) carrying the O75 lipopolysaccharide. The K5+ mutants established themselves at a higher level than the K5- mutants (10(9) versus 10(6) CFU/g [P < 0.001] for the first pair and 10(9) versus 10(8) CFU/g [P < 0.01] for the second pair, respectively). The results were confirmed by serology showing a K5+ phenotype for practically all isolates. The bacterial population associated with the mucosa was similar to that in the luminal contents with respect to the proportions of the respective mutants, and translocation occurred in numbers proportional to the intestinal population densities of the respective mutants. All mutants were able to express type 1 as well as P fimbriae. After colonization, the expression of P fimbriae remained high whereas only a minority of the isolates expressed type 1 fimbriae. The results suggest that capsule expression and P fimbriae enhance intestinal colonization by E. coli and that these virulence factors, by increasing bacterial densities in the intestine, secondarily increase translocation. PMID:9009309

  16. Construction of mouse adenovirus type 1 mutants.

    PubMed

    Cauthen, Angela N; Welton, Amanda R; Spindler, Katherine R

    2007-01-01

    Mouse adenovirus provides a model for studying adenovirus pathogenesis in the natural host. The ability to make viral mutants allows the investigation of specific mouse adenoviral gene contributions to virus-host interactions. Methods for propagation and titration of wild-type mouse adenovirus, production of viral DNA and viral DNA-protein complex, and transfection of mouse cells to obtain mouse adenovirus mutants are described in this chapter. Plaque purification, propagation, and titration of the mutant viruses are also presented.

  17. The reduction of nitrous oxide to dinitrogen by Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Kaldorf, M; Linne von Berg, K H; Meier, U; Servos, U; Bothe, H

    1993-01-01

    Escherichia coli K12 reduces nitrous oxide stoichiometrically to molecular nitrogen with rates of 1.9 mumol/h x mg protein. The activity is induced by anaerobiosis and nitrate. N2-formation from N2O is inhibited by C2H2 (Ki approximately 0.03 mM in the medium) and nitrite (Ki = 0.3 mM) but not by azide. A mutant defective in FNR synthesis is unable to reduce N2O to N2. The reaction in the wild type could routinely be followed by gas chromatography and alternatively by mass spectrometry measuring the formation of 15N2 from 15N2O. The enzyme catalyzing N2O-reduction in E. coli could not be identified; it is probably neither nitrate reductase nor nitrogenase. E. coli does not grow with N2O as sole respiratory electron acceptor. N2O-reduction might not have a physiological role in E. coli, and the enzyme involved might catalyze something else in nature, as it has a low affinity for the substrate N2O (apparent Km approximately 3.0 mM). The capability for N2O-reduction to N2 is not restricted to E. coli but is also demonstrable in Yersinia kristensenii and Buttiauxella agrestis of the Enterobacteriaceae. E. coli is able to produce NO and N2O from nitrite by nitrate reductase, depending on the assay conditions. In such experiments NO2- is not reduced to N2 because of the high demand for N2O of N2O-reduction and the inhibitory effect of NO2- on this reaction.

  18. Preventing neurodegeneration in the Drosophila mutant bubblegum.

    PubMed

    Min, K T; Benzer, S

    1999-06-18

    The Drosophila melanogaster recessive mutant bubblegum (bgm) exhibits adult neurodegeneration, with marked dilation of photoreceptor axons. The bubblegum mutant shows elevated levels of very long chain fatty acids (VLCFAs), as seen in the human disease adrenoleukodystrophy (ALD). In ALD, the excess can be lowered by dietary treatment with "Lorenzo's oil," a mixture of unsaturated fatty acids. Feeding the fly mutant one of the components, glyceryl trioleate oil, blocked the accumulation of excess VLCFAs as well as development of the pathology. Mutant flies thus provide a potential model system for studying mechanisms of neurodegenerative disease and screening drugs for treatment.

  19. Melanin-deficient mutants of Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed

    Torres-Guererro, H; Edman, J C

    1994-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans is a significant fungal pathogen in immunocompromised patients. The ability of C. neoformans to produce melanin has been correlated with virulence. The role of melanin in promoting virulence is unclear, although an anti-oxidant function has been suggested. To begin to define the genetic mechanisms responsible for melanin production in C. neoformans, we describe the isolation of seven melanin-deficient mutant classes. Some of the mutants can be suppressed by addition of Cu2+ to media, suggesting that the phenoloxidase of C. neoformans, like other fungal phenoloxidases, contains copper. Other mutants display a recessive sterile phenotype. A genetic and phenotypic characterisation of these mutants is presented. PMID:7983575

  20. Bacteriorhodopsin mutants containing single tyrosine to phenylalanine substitutions are all active in proton translocation.

    PubMed Central

    Mogi, T; Stern, L J; Hackett, N R; Khorana, H G

    1987-01-01

    To study the possible role of the tyrosine residues in proton translocation by bacteriorhodopsin, we have replaced these residues individually by phenylalanine. The required codon changes were introduced in the bacterioopsin gene by replacement of appropriate restriction fragments by synthetic counterparts containing the desired nucleotide changes. The denatured opsin polypeptides obtained by expression of the mutant genes in Escherichia coli were purified and treated with a mixture of detergents, phospholipids, and retinal in a previously established renaturation procedure. All of the mutant proteins folded to regenerate bacteriorhodopsin-like chromophores. Three mutants with tyrosine to phenylalanine substitutions at positions 57, 83, and 185 regenerated the chromophore more slowly than the wild-type protein, and two of these mutants, Phe-57 and -83, showed slightly blue-shifted chromophores. When reconstituted into liposomes all of the mutant proteins with single Tyr----Phe substitutions pumped protons at rates and levels comparable to those of the wild-type bacteriorhodopsin. We conclude that single substitutions of tyrosine by phenylalanine do not affect folding, retinal binding, or light-dependent proton pumping in bacteriorhodopsin. PMID:3039495

  1. Switching of Bacterial Flagellar Motors Is Triggered by Mutant FliG

    PubMed Central

    Lele, Pushkar P.; Berg, Howard C.

    2015-01-01

    Binding of the chemotaxis response regulator CheY-P promotes switching between rotational states in flagellar motors of the bacterium Escherichia coli. Here, we induced switching in the absence of CheY-P by introducing copies of a mutant FliG locked in the clockwise (CW) conformation (FliGCW). The composition of the mixed FliG ring was estimated via fluorescence imaging, and the probability of CW rotation (CWbias) was determined from the rotation of tethered cells. The results were interpreted in the framework of a 1D Ising model. The data could be fit by assuming that mutant subunits are more stable in the CW conformation than in the counterclockwise conformation. We found that CWbias varies depending on the spatial arrangement of the assembled subunits in the FliG ring. This offers a possible explanation for a previous observation of hysteresis in the switch function in analogous mixed FliM motors—in motors containing identical fractions of mutant FliMCW in otherwise wild-type motors, the CWbias differed depending on whether mutant subunits were expressed in strains with native motors or native subunits were expressed in strains with mutant motors. PMID:25762339

  2. Production of 3-O-xylosyl quercetin in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Ramesh Prasad; Malla, Sailesh; Simkhada, Dinesh; Kim, Byung-Gee; Sohng, Jae Kyung

    2013-03-01

    Quercetin, a flavonol aglycone, is one of the most abundant flavonoids with high medicinal value. The bioavailability and pharmacokinetic properties of quercetin are influenced by the type of sugars attached to the molecule. To efficiently diversify the therapeutic uses of quercetin, Escherichia coli was harnessed as a production factory by the installation of various plant and bacterial UDP-xylose sugar biosynthetic genes. The genes encoding for the UDP-xylose pathway enzymes phosphoglucomutase (nfa44530), glucose-1-phosphate uridylyltransferase (galU), UDP-glucose dehydrogenase (calS8), and UDP-glucuronic acid decarboxylase (calS9) were overexpressed in E. coli BL21 (DE3) along with a glycosyltransferase (arGt-3) from Arabidopsis thaliana. Furthermore, E. coli BL21(DE3)/∆pgi, E. coli BL21(DE3)/∆zwf, E. coli BL21(DE3)/∆pgi∆zwf, and E. coli BL21(DE3)/∆pgi∆zwf∆ushA mutants carrying the aforementioned UDP-xylose sugar biosynthetic genes and glycosyltransferase and the galU-integrated E. coli BL21(DE3)/∆pgi host harboring only calS8, calS9, and arGt-3 were constructed to enhance whole-cell bioconversion of exogeneously supplied quercetin into 3-O-xylosyl quercetin. Here, we report the highest production of 3-O-xylosyl quercetin with E. coli BL21 (DE3)/∆pgi∆zwf∆ushA carrying UDP-xylose sugar biosynthetic genes and glycosyltransferase. The maximum concentration of 3-O-xylosyl quercetin achieved was 23.78 mg/L (54.75 μM), representing 54.75 % bioconversion, which was an ~4.8-fold higher bioconversion than that shown by E. coli BL21 (DE3) with the same set of genes when the reaction was carried out in 5-mL culture tubes with 100 μM quercetin under optimized conditions. Bioconversion was further improved by 98 % when the reaction was scaled up in a 3-L fermentor at 36 h. PMID:23053089

  3. Low intensity infrared laser induces filamentation in Escherichia coli cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fonseca, A. S.; Presta, G. A.; Geller, M.; Paoli, F.

    2011-10-01

    Low intensity continuous wave and pulsed emission modes laser is used in treating many diseases and the resulting biostimulative effect on tissues has been described, yet the photobiological basis is not well understood. The aim of this wok was to evaluate, using bacterial filamentation assay, effects of laser on Escherichia coli cultures in exponential and stationary growth phase. E. coli cultures, proficient and deficient on DNA repair, in exponential and stationary growth phase, were exposed to low intensity infrared laser, aliquots were spread onto microscopic slides, stained by Gram method, visualized by optical microscopy, photographed and percentage of bacterial filamentation were determined. Low intensity infrared laser with therapeutic fluencies and different emission modes can induce bacterial filamentation in cultures of E. coli wild type, fpg/ mutM, endonuclease III and exonuclease III mutants in exponential and stationary growth phase. This study showed induction of bacterial, filamentation in E. coli cultures expose to low intensity infrared laser and attention to laser therapy protocols, which should take into account fluencies, wavelengths, tissue conditions, and genetic characteristics of cells before beginning treatment.

  4. Polynucleotide phosphorylase has an impact on cell biology of Campylobacter jejuni

    PubMed Central

    Haddad, Nabila; Tresse, Odile; Rivoal, Katell; Chevret, Didier; Nonglaton, Quentin; Burns, Christopher M.; Prévost, Hervé; Cappelier, Jean M.

    2012-01-01

    Polynucleotide phosphorylase (PNPase), encoded by the pnp gene, is known to degrade mRNA, mediating post-transcriptional regulation and may affect cellular functions. The role of PNPase is pleiotropic. As orthologs of the two major ribonucleases (RNase E and RNase II) of Escherichia coli are missing in the Campylobacter jejuni genome, in the current study the focus has been on the C. jejuni ortholog of PNPase. The effect of PNPase mutation on C. jejuni phenotypes and proteome was investigated. The inactivation of the pnp gene reduced significantly the ability of C. jejuni to adhere and to invade Ht-29 cells. Moreover, the pnp mutant strain exhibited a decrease in C. jejuni swimming ability and chick colonization. To explain effects of PNPase on C. jejuni 81-176 phenotype, the proteome of the pnp mutant and parental strains were compared. Overall, little variation in protein production was observed. Despite the predicted role of PNPase in mRNA regulation, the pnp mutation did not induce profound proteomic changes suggesting that other ribonucleases in C. jejuni might ensure this biological function in the absence of PNPase. Nevertheless, synthesis of proteins which are involved in virulence (LuxS, PEB3), motility (N-acetylneuraminic acid synthetase), stress-response (KatA, DnaK, Hsp90), and translation system (EF-Tu, EF-G) were modified in the pnp mutant strain suggesting a more specific role of PNPase in C. jejuni. In conclusion, PNPase deficiency induces limited but important consequences on C. jejuni biology that could explain swimming limitation, chick colonization delay, and the decrease of cell adhesion/invasion ability. PMID:22919622

  5. Dihydroxyacetone production in an engineered Escherichia coli through expression of Corynebacterium glutamicum dihydroxyacetone phosphate dephosphorylase.

    PubMed

    Jain, Vishist Kumar; Tear, Crystal Jing Ying; Lim, Chan Yuen

    2016-05-01

    Dihydroxyacetone (DHA) has several industrial applications such as a tanning agent in tanning lotions in the cosmetic industry; its production via microbial fermentation would present a more sustainable option for the future. Here we genetically engineered Escherichia coli (E. coli) for DHA production from glucose. Deletion of E. coli triose phosphate isomerase (tpiA) gene was carried out to accumulate dihydroxyacetone phosphate (DHAP), for use as the main intermediate or precursor for DHA production. The accumulated DHAP was then converted to DHA through the heterologous expression of Corynebacterium glutamicum DHAP dephosphorylase (cghdpA) gene. To conserve DHAP exclusively for DHA production we removed methylglyoxal synthase (mgsA) gene in the ΔtpiA strain. This drastically improved DHA production from 0.83g/l (0.06g DHA/g glucose) in the ΔtpiA strain bearing cghdpA to 5.84g/l (0.41g DHA/g glucose) in the ΔtpiAΔmgsA double mutant containing the same gene. To limit the conversion of intracellular DHA to glycerol, glycerol dehydrogenase (gldA) gene was further knocked out resulting in a ΔtpiAΔmgsAΔgldA triple mutant. This triple mutant expressing the cghdpA gene produced 6.60g/l of DHA at 87% of the maximum theoretical yield. In summary, we demonstrated an efficient system for DHA production in genetically engineered E. coli strain. PMID:26992791

  6. Harnessing recombination to speed adaptive evolution in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Winkler, James; Kao, Katy C

    2012-09-01

    Evolutionary engineering typically involves asexual propagation of a strain to improve a desired phenotype. However, asexual populations suffer from extensive clonal interference, a phenomenon where distinct lineages of beneficial clones compete and are often lost from the population given sufficient time. Improved adaptive mutants can likely be generated by genetic exchange between lineages, thereby reducing clonal interference. We present a system that allows continuous in situ recombination by using an Esherichia coli F-based conjugation system lacking surface exclusion. Evolution experiments revealed that Hfr-mediated recombination significantly speeds adaptation in certain circumstances. These results show that our system is stable, effective, and suitable for use in evolutionary engineering applications.

  7. Endotoxin neutralization with rabbit antisera to Escherichia coli J5 and other gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Warren, H S; Novitsky, T J; Bucklin, A; Kania, S A; Siber, G R

    1987-01-01

    To study the mechanisms of protection against endotoxin challenge offered by antisera to smooth and rough gram-negative organisms, we have developed an assay to quantitate endotoxin neutralization based on inhibition of the Limulus amoebocyte lysate test. Dilutions of different bacterial lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) were incubated with hyperimmune rabbit sera against Escherichia coli O113, E. coli O18, and rough mutants E. coli J5 and Salmonella minnesota Re595 and were then combined with limulus lysate. The gelation reaction induced by LPS in the lysate was monitored spectrophotometrically, and the concentration of LPS resulting in a 50% lysate response was determined and correlated with antibody titers measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Antisera to smooth organisms neutralized homologous LPS markedly and heterologous LPSs only minimally relative to neutralization by preimmune serum. Neutralization of homologous LPS occurred immediately without preincubation of serum and LPS. Antisera to rough mutants neutralized more heterologous LPS than did antisera to smooth organisms. However, this heterologous neutralization required preincubation of serum and LPS and did not appear to be correlated with antibody concentrations. We conclude that antisera to LPS rapidly neutralize the biological activity of the homologous LPS, as detected by limulus lysate, and that neutralization is at least in part antibody mediated. Antisera to rough-mutant organisms slowly neutralized the activity of heterologous LPSs, but this effect appeared not to be correlated with concentrations of antibody to the LPS of the rough mutant, as measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. PMID:3298063

  8. Citrate synthase mutants of Agrobacterium are attenuated in virulence and display reduced vir gene induction.

    PubMed

    Suksomtip, Maneewan; Liu, Pu; Anderson, Tamara; Tungpradabkul, Sumalee; Wood, Derek W; Nester, Eugene W

    2005-07-01

    A citrate synthase (CS) deletion mutant of Agrobacterium tumefaciens C58 is highly attenuated in virulence. The identity of the mutant was initially determined from its amino acid sequence, which is 68% identical to Escherichia coli and 77% identical to Brucella melitensis. The mutant lost all CS enzymatic activity, and a cloned CS gene complemented a CS mutation in Sinorhizobium. The CS mutation resulted in a 10-fold reduction in vir gene expression, which likely accounts for the attenuated virulence. When a plasmid containing a constitutive virG [virG(Con)] locus was introduced into this mutant, the level of vir gene induction was restored to nearly wild-type level. Further, the virG(Con)-complemented CS mutant strain induced tumors that were similar in size and number to those induced by the parental strain. The CS mutation resulted in only a minor reduction in growth rate in a glucose-salts medium. Both the CS mutant and the virG(Con)-complemented CS strain displayed similar growth deficiencies in a glucose-salts medium, indicating that the reduced growth rate of the CS mutant could not be responsible for the attenuated virulence. A search of the genome of A. tumefaciens C58 revealed four proteins, encoded on different replicons, with conserved CS motifs. However, only the locus that when mutated resulted in an attenuated phenotype has CS activity. Mutations in the other three loci did not result in attenuated virulence and any loss of CS activity, and none were able to complement the CS mutation in Sinorhizobium. The function of these loci remains unknown. PMID:15995199

  9. Isolation and characterization of pediocin AcH chimeric protein mutants with altered bactericidal activity.

    PubMed

    Miller, K W; Schamber, R; Osmanagaoglu, O; Ray, B

    1998-06-01

    A collection of pediocin AcH amino acid substitution mutants was generated by PCR random mutagenesis of DNA encoding the bacteriocin. Mutants were isolated by cloning mutagenized DNA into an Escherichia coli malE plasmid that directs the secretion of maltose binding protein-pediocin AcH chimeric proteins and by screening transformant colonies for bactericidal activity against Lactobacillus plantarum NCDO955 (K. W. Miller, R. Schamber, Y. Chen, and B. Ray, 1998. Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 64:14-20, 1998). In all, 17 substitution mutants were isolated at 14 of the 44 amino acids of pediocin AcH. Seven mutants (N5K, C9R, C14S, C14Y, G37E, G37R, and C44W) were completely inactive against the pediocin AcH-sensitive strains L. plantarum NCDO955, Listeria innocua Lin11, Enterococcus faecalis M1, Pediococcus acidilactici LB42, and Leuconostoc mesenteroides Ly. A C24S substitution mutant constructed by other means also was inactive against these bacteria. Nine other mutants (K1N, W18R, I26T, M31T, A34D, N41K, H42L, K43N, and K43E) retained from <1% to approximately 60% of wild-type activity when assayed against L. innocua Lin11. One mutant, K11E, displayed approximately 2. 8-fold-higher activity against this indicator. About one half of the mutations mapped to amino acids that are conserved in the pediocin-like family of bacteriocins. All four cysteines were found to be required for activity, although only C9 and C14 are conserved among pediocin-like bacteriocins. Several basic amino acids as well as nonpolar amino acids located within the hydrophobic C-terminal region also were found to be important. The mutations are discussed in the context of structural models that have been proposed for the bacteriocin.

  10. Phenotype Sequencing: Identifying the Genes That Cause a Phenotype Directly from Pooled Sequencing of Independent Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Harper, Marc A.; Chen, Zugen; Toy, Traci; Machado, Iara M. P.; Nelson, Stanley F.; Liao, James C.; Lee, Christopher J.

    2011-01-01

    Random mutagenesis and phenotype screening provide a powerful method for dissecting microbial functions, but their results can be laborious to analyze experimentally. Each mutant strain may contain 50–100 random mutations, necessitating extensive functional experiments to determine which one causes the selected phenotype. To solve this problem, we propose a “Phenotype Sequencing” approach in which genes causing the phenotype can be identified directly from sequencing of multiple independent mutants. We developed a new computational analysis method showing that 1. causal genes can be identified with high probability from even a modest number of mutant genomes; 2. costs can be cut many-fold compared with a conventional genome sequencing approach via an optimized strategy of library-pooling (multiple strains per library) and tag-pooling (multiple tagged libraries per sequencing lane). We have performed extensive validation experiments on a set of E. coli mutants with increased isobutanol biofuel tolerance. We generated a range of sequencing experiments varying from 3 to 32 mutant strains, with pooling on 1 to 3 sequencing lanes. Our statistical analysis of these data (4099 mutations from 32 mutant genomes) successfully identified 3 genes (acrB, marC, acrA) that have been independently validated as causing this experimental phenotype. It must be emphasized that our approach reduces mutant sequencing costs enormously. Whereas a conventional genome sequencing experiment would have cost $7,200 in reagents alone, our Phenotype Sequencing design yielded the same information value for only $1200. In fact, our smallest experiments reliably identified acrB and marC at a cost of only $110–$340. PMID:21364744

  11. [Growth and mutation of Escherichia coli with suicide gene circuit based on quorum sensing].

    PubMed

    Gao, Qi; Zheng, Xuesong

    2013-06-01

    Constructing robust gene circuits is a fundamental work for synthetic biology. Bacteria with suicide gene circuit based on quorum-sensing will kill themselves in a controllable pattern upon certain cell density. In the media of different IPTG inducer concentration, we observed the growth and suicidal behavior of the Escherichia coli. Top10F' with such gene circuit, screened the mutants and determined their mutated loci. The results show that, with higher IPTG concentration, the more wild type bacteria were killed; as well the mutants emerged earlier and spread over the population more quickly. The sequence of plasmids in those mutants revealed that a transposon inserted into the luxR gene and therefore disrupted Quorum-Sensing of these individuals. Furthermore, the insertion sequence of the plasmid can solely result in the mutants escaping from suicide.

  12. The Core Lipopolysaccharide of Escherichia coli Is a Ligand for the Dendritic-Cell-Specific Intercellular Adhesion Molecule Nonintegrin CD209 Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Klena, John; Zhang, Pei; Schwartz, Olivier; Hull, Sheila; Chen, Tie

    2005-01-01

    The dendritic-cell-specific intercellular adhesion molecule nonintegrin (DC-SIGN) CD209 is a receptor for Escherichia coli K-12 that promotes bacterial adherence and phagocytosis. However, the ligand of E. coli for DC-SIGN has not yet been identified. In this study, we found that DC-SIGN did not mediate the phagocytosis of several pathogenic strains of E. coli, including enteropathogenic E. coli, enterohemorrhagic E. coli, enterotoxigenic E. coli, and uropathogenic E. coli, in dendritic cells or HeLa cells expressing human DC-SIGN antigen. However, we showed that an outer core lipopolysaccharide (LPS) (rough) mutant, unlike an inner core LPS (deep rough) mutant or O-antigen-expressing recombinant of E. coli K-12 was phagocytosed. These results demonstrate that the host cells expressing DC-SIGN can phagocytose E. coli in part by interacting with the complete core region of the LPS molecule. These results provide a mechanism for how O antigen acts as an antiphagocytic factor. PMID:15716442

  13. Metabolism of d-Arabinose: a New Pathway in Escherichia coli1

    PubMed Central

    LeBlanc, Donald J.; Mortlock, Robert P.

    1971-01-01

    Several growth characteristics of Escherichia coli K-12 suggest that growth on l-fucose results in the synthesis of all the enzymes necessary for growth on d-arabinose. Conversely, when a mutant of E. coli is grown on d-arabinose, all of the enzymes necessary for immediate growth on l-fucose are present. Three enzymes of the l-fucose pathway in E. coli, l-fucose isomerase, l-fuculokinase, and l-fuculose-l-phospháte aldolase possess activity on d-arabinose, d-ribulose, and d-ribulose-l-phosphate, respectively. The products of the aldolase, with d-ribulose-l-phosphate as substrate, are dihydroxyacetone phosphate and glycolaldehyde. l-Fucose, but not d-arabinose, is capable of inducing these activities in wild-type E. coli. In mutants capable of utilizing d-arabinose as sole source of carbon and energy, these activities are induced in the presence of d-arabinose and in the presence of l-fucose. Mutants unable to utilize l-fucose, selected from strains capable of growth on d-arabinose, are found to have lost the ability to grow on d-arabinose. Enzymatic analysis of cell-free extracts, prepared from cultures of these mutants, reveals that a deficiency in any of the l-fucose pathway enzymes results in the loss of ability to utilize d-arabinose. Thus, the pathway of d-arabinose catabolism in E. coli K-12 is believed to be: d-arabinose ⇌ d-ribulose → d-ribulose-l-phosphate ⇌ dihydroxyacetone phosphate plus glycolaldehyde. Evidence is presented which suggests that the glycolaldehyde is further oxidized to glycolate. PMID:4928018

  14. Evolutionary cheating in Escherichia coli stationary phase cultures.

    PubMed Central

    Vulic, M; Kolter, R

    2001-01-01

    Starved cultures of Escherichia coli are highly dynamic, undergoing frequent population shifts. The shifts result from the spread of mutants able to grow under conditions that impose growth arrest on the ancestral population. To analyze competitive interactions underlying this dynamic we measured the survival of a typical mutant and the wild type during such population shifts. Here we show that the survival advantage of the mutant at any given time during a takeover is inversely dependent on its frequency in the population, its growth adversely affects the survival of the wild type, and its ability to survive in stationary phase at fixation is lower than that of its ancestor. These mutants do not enter, or exit early, the nondividing stationary-phase state, cooperatively maintained by the wild type. Thus they end up overrepresented as compared to their initial frequency at the onset of the stationary phase, and subsequently they increase disproportionately their contribution in terms of progeny to the succeeding generation in the next growth cycle, which is a case of evolutionary cheating. If analyzed through the game theory framework, these results might be explained by the prisoner's dilemma type of conflict, which predicts that selfish defection is favored over cooperation. PMID:11404318

  15. Isolation and characterization of a selenium metabolism mutant of Salmonella typhimurium

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, G.F.; Ames, B.N.

    1988-02-01

    Selenium is a constituent in Escherichia coli of the anaerobic enzyme formate dehydrogenase in the form of selenocysteine. Selenium is also present in the tRNA of E. coli in the modified base 5-methylaminomethyl-2-selenouracil (mnm/sup 5/Se/sup 2/U). The pathways of bacterial selenium metabolism are largely uncharacterized, and it is unclear whether nonspecific reactions in the sulfur metabolic pathways may be involved. We demonstrated that sulfur metabolic pathway mutants retain a wild-type pattern of selenium incorporation, indicating that selenite (SeO/sub 3//sup 2 -/) is metabolized entirely via selenium-specific pathways. To investigate the function of mnm/sup 5/Se/sup 2/U, we isolated a mutant which is unable to incorporate selenium into tRNA. This strain was obtained by isolating mutants lacking formate dehydrogenase activity and then screening for the inability to metabolize selenium. This phenotype is the result of a recessive mutation which appears to map in the general region of 21 min on the Salmonella typhimurium chromosome. We showed that the absence of selenium incorporation into suppressor tRNA reduces the efficiency of suppression of nonsense codons in certain contexts and when wobble base pairing is required. Thus, one function of mnm/sup 5/Se/sup 2/U in tRNA may be in codon-anticodon interactions.

  16. [Generation of nalidixic acid-resistant strains and signature-tagged mutants of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae].

    PubMed

    Shang, Lin; Li, Wei; Li, Liangjun; Li, Lu; Zhang, Sihua; Li, Tingting; Li, Yaokun; Liu, Lei; Guo, Zhiwei; Zhou, Rui; Chen, Huanchun

    2008-01-01

    Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae is a very important respiratory pathogen for swine and causes great economic losses in pig industry worldwide. Signature-tagged mutagenesis (STM) is an effective method to identify virulence genes in bacteria. In this study, we selected nalidixic acid-resistant strains of APP serotypes 1 and 3 by in vitro cultivation, and used as receipt strains for constructing transposon mutants by mating with E. coli CC 118 lambdapir or S17-1 lambdapir containing mini-Tn10 tag plasmids pLOF/TAG1-48, with or without the help of E. coli DH5alpha (pRK2073). We screened mutant strains by antibiotics selection, PCR and Southern blot identification. Our data revealed that nalidixic acid-resistance of APP strains could easily be induced in vitro and the resistance was due to the mutation in the DNA gyrase A subunit gene gyrA. In the mating experiments, the bi-parental mating was more effective and easier than tri-parental mating. Different APP strains showed a different mating and transposon efficiency in the bi-parental mating, with the strains of serotype 1 much higher than serotype 3 and the reference strain of serotype 3 higher than the field strains. These data were helpful for the construction of STM mutants and pickup of virulence genes of APP. PMID:18338580

  17. Regulation of Mutant p53 Protein Expression

    PubMed Central

    Vijayakumaran, Reshma; Tan, Kah Hin; Miranda, Panimaya Jeffreena; Haupt, Sue; Haupt, Ygal

    2015-01-01

    For several decades, p53 has been detected in cancer biopsies by virtue of its high protein expression level which is considered indicative of mutation. Surprisingly, however, mouse genetic studies revealed that mutant p53 is inherently labile, similar to its wild type (wt) counterpart. Consistently, in response to stress conditions, both wt and mutant p53 accumulate in cells. While wt p53 returns to basal level following recovery from stress, mutant p53 remains stable. In part, this can be explained in mutant p53-expressing cells by the lack of an auto-regulatory loop with Mdm2 and other negative regulators, which are pivotal for wt p53 regulation. Further, additional protective mechanisms are acquired by mutant p53, largely mediated by the co-chaperones and their paralogs, the stress-induced heat shock proteins. Consequently, mutant p53 is accumulated in cancer cells in response to chronic stress and this accumulation is critical for its oncogenic gain of functions (GOF). Building on the extensive knowledge regarding wt p53, the regulation of mutant p53 is unraveling. In this review, we describe the current understanding on the major levels at which mutant p53 is regulated. These include the regulation of p53 protein levels by microRNA and by enzymes controlling p53 proteasomal degradation. PMID:26734569

  18. Defects in polynucleotide phosphorylase impairs virulence in Escherichia coli O157:H7.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jia; Zhu, Mei-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Polynucleotide phosphorylase (PNPase) is reported to regulate virulence in Salmonella, Yersinia sp. and Campylobacter jejuni, yet its role in Escherichia coli O157:H7 has not been investigated. To gain insights into its roles in E. coli O157:H7 virulence, pnp deletion mutants were generated and the major virulence factors were compared to their parental wild type strains. Deletion of pnp in E. coli O157:H7 dramatically decreased stx2 mRNA expression and Stx2 protein production, and impaired lambdoid prophage activation in E. coli O157:H7. Quantitative PCR further confirmed that the Stx2 phage lytic growth was repressed by pnp deletion. Consistent with reduced Stx2 production and Stx2 phage activation, the transcriptional levels of genes involved in phage lysis and replication were down-regulated. In addition, disruption of pnp in E. coli O157:H7 decreased its adhesion to intestinal epithelial cells as well as cattle colonic explant tissues. On the other hand, PNPase inactivation in E. coli O157:H7 enhanced Tir protein content and the transcription of type three secretion system components, including genes encoding intimin, Tir, and EspB as well as locus of enterocyte and effacement positive regulator, Ler. Collectively, data indicate that PNPase has pleiotropic effects on the virulence of E. coli O157:H7. PMID:26347717

  19. CMPD: cancer mutant proteome database.

    PubMed

    Huang, Po-Jung; Lee, Chi-Ching; Tan, Bertrand Chin-Ming; Yeh, Yuan-Ming; Julie Chu, Lichieh; Chen, Ting-Wen; Chang, Kai-Ping; Lee, Cheng-Yang; Gan, Ruei-Chi; Liu, Hsuan; Tang, Petrus

    2015-01-01

    Whole-exome sequencing, which centres on the protein coding regions of disease/cancer associated genes, represents the most cost-effective method to-date for deciphering the association between genetic alterations and diseases. Large-scale whole exome/genome sequencing projects have been launched by various institutions, such as NCI, Broad Institute and TCGA, to provide a comprehensive catalogue of coding variants in diverse tissue samples and cell lines. Further functional and clinical interrogation of these sequence variations must rely on extensive cross-platforms integration of sequencing information and a proteome database that explicitly and comprehensively archives the corresponding mutated peptide sequences. While such data resource is a critical for the mass spectrometry-based proteomic analysis of exomic variants, no database is currently available for the collection of mutant protein sequences that correspond to recent large-scale genomic data. To address this issue and serve as bridge to integrate genomic and proteomics datasets, CMPD (http://cgbc.cgu.edu.tw/cmpd) collected over 2 millions genetic alterations, which not only facilitates the confirmation and examination of potential cancer biomarkers but also provides an invaluable resource for translational medicine research and opportunities to identify mutated proteins encoded by mutated genes.

  20. CMPD: cancer mutant proteome database

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Po-Jung; Lee, Chi-Ching; Tan, Bertrand Chin-Ming; Yeh, Yuan-Ming; Julie Chu, Lichieh; Chen, Ting-Wen; Chang, Kai-Ping; Lee, Cheng-Yang; Gan, Ruei-Chi; Liu, Hsuan; Tang, Petrus

    2015-01-01

    Whole-exome sequencing, which centres on the protein coding regions of disease/cancer associated genes, represents the most cost-effective method to-date for deciphering the association between genetic alterations and diseases. Large-scale whole exome/genome sequencing projects have been launched by various institutions, such as NCI, Broad Institute and TCGA, to provide a comprehensive catalogue of coding variants in diverse tissue samples and cell lines. Further functional and clinical interrogation of these sequence variations must rely on extensive cross-platforms integration of sequencing information and a proteome database that explicitly and comprehensively archives the corresponding mutated peptide sequences. While such data resource is a critical for the mass spectrometry-based proteomic analysis of exomic variants, no database is currently available for the collection of mutant protein sequences that correspond to recent large-scale genomic data. To address this issue and serve as bridge to integrate genomic and proteomics datasets, CMPD (http://cgbc.cgu.edu.tw/cmpd) collected over 2 millions genetic alterations, which not only facilitates the confirmation and examination of potential cancer biomarkers but also provides an invaluable resource for translational medicine research and opportunities to identify mutated proteins encoded by mutated genes. PMID:25398898

  1. Mutants of thermotaxis in Dictyostelium discoideum

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, M.J.; Fontana, D.R.; Poff, K.L.

    1982-08-01

    Amoebae of Dictyostelium discoideum, strain HL50 were mutagenized with N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine, cloned, allowed to form pseudoplasmodia and screened for aberrant positive and negative thermotaxis. Three types of mutants were found. Mutant HO428 exhibits only positive thermotaxis over the entire temperature range (no negative thermotaxis). HO596 and HO813 exhibit weakened positive thermotaxis and normal negative thermotaxis. The weakened positive thermotactic response results in a shift toward warmer temperatures in the transition temperature from negative to positive thermotaxis. Mutant HO209 exhibits weakened positive and negative thermotactic responses and has a transition temperature similar to the 'wild type' (HL50).The two types of mutants represented by HO428, HO596 and HO813 support the model that positive and negative thermotaxis have separate pathways for temperature sensing. The type of mutants which contains HO209 suggests that those two pathways converge at some point before the response.

  2. Aging of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Clifton, C. E.

    1966-01-01

    Clifton, C. E. (Stanford University, Stanford, Calif.). Aging of Escherichia coli. J. Bacteriol. 92:905–912. 1966.—The rates of endogenous and exogenous (glucose) respiration decreased much more rapidly than did the viable count during the first 24 hr of aging of washed, C14-labeled cells of Escherichia coli K-12 suspended in a basal salt medium devoid of ammonium salts. The rates of decrease of respiration and of death approached each other as the age of the cells increased, but death was not the only factor involved in decreased respiratory activity of the suspensions. The greatest decrease in cellular contents with aging was noted in the ribonucleic acid fraction, of which the ribose appeared to be oxidized, while uracil accumulated in the suspension medium. The viable count and respiratory activities remained higher in glucose-fed than in nonfed suspensions. Proline-labeled cells fed glucose tended to lose more of their proline and to convert more proline into C14O2 than in unfed controls. On the other hand, uracil-labeled cells fed glucose retained more of the uracil than did nonfed cells, but glucose elicited some oxidation of uracil. An exogenous energy source such as glucose aided in the maintenance of a population, but it was not the only factor needed for such maintenance. PMID:5332874

  3. Escherichia coli Type III Secretion System 2 ATPase EivC Is Involved in the Motility and Virulence of Avian Pathogenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shaohui; Liu, Xin; Xu, Xuan; Yang, Denghui; Wang, Dong; Han, Xiangan; Shi, Yonghong; Tian, Mingxing; Ding, Chan; Peng, Daxin; Yu, Shengqing

    2016-01-01

    Type III secretion systems (T3SSs) are crucial for bacterial infections because they deliver effector proteins into host cells. The Escherichia coli type III secretion system 2 (ETT2) is present in the majority of E. coli strains, and although it is degenerate, ETT2 regulates bacterial virulence. An ATPase is essential for T3SS secretion, but the function of the ETT2 ATPase has not been demonstrated. Here, we show that EivC is homologous to the β subunit of F0F1 ATPases and it possesses ATPase activity. To investigate the effects of ETT2 ATPase EivC on the phenotype and virulence of avian pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC), eivC mutant and complemented strains were constructed and characterized. Inactivation of eivC led to impaired flagella production and augmented fimbriae on the bacterial surface, and, consequently, reduced bacterial motility. In addition, the eivC mutant strain exhibited attenuated virulence in ducks, diminished serum resistance, reduced survival in macrophage cells and in ducks, upregulated fimbrial gene expression, and downregulated flagellar and virulence gene expression. The expression of the inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-8 were increased in HD-11 macrophages infected with the eivC mutant strain, compared with the wild-type strain. These virulence-related phenotypes were restored by genetic complementation. These findings demonstrate that ETT2 ATPase EivC is involved in the motility and pathogenicity of APEC. PMID:27630634

  4. Escherichia coli Type III Secretion System 2 ATPase EivC Is Involved in the Motility and Virulence of Avian Pathogenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shaohui; Liu, Xin; Xu, Xuan; Yang, Denghui; Wang, Dong; Han, Xiangan; Shi, Yonghong; Tian, Mingxing; Ding, Chan; Peng, Daxin; Yu, Shengqing

    2016-01-01

    Type III secretion systems (T3SSs) are crucial for bacterial infections because they deliver effector proteins into host cells. The Escherichia coli type III secretion system 2 (ETT2) is present in the majority of E. coli strains, and although it is degenerate, ETT2 regulates bacterial virulence. An ATPase is essential for T3SS secretion, but the function of the ETT2 ATPase has not been demonstrated. Here, we show that EivC is homologous to the β subunit of F0F1 ATPases and it possesses ATPase activity. To investigate the effects of ETT2 ATPase EivC on the phenotype and virulence of avian pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC), eivC mutant and complemented strains were constructed and characterized. Inactivation of eivC led to impaired flagella production and augmented fimbriae on the bacterial surface, and, consequently, reduced bacterial motility. In addition, the eivC mutant strain exhibited attenuated virulence in ducks, diminished serum resistance, reduced survival in macrophage cells and in ducks, upregulated fimbrial gene expression, and downregulated flagellar and virulence gene expression. The expression of the inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-8 were increased in HD-11 macrophages infected with the eivC mutant strain, compared with the wild-type strain. These virulence-related phenotypes were restored by genetic complementation. These findings demonstrate that ETT2 ATPase EivC is involved in the motility and pathogenicity of APEC.

  5. Escherichia coli Type III Secretion System 2 ATPase EivC Is Involved in the Motility and Virulence of Avian Pathogenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shaohui; Liu, Xin; Xu, Xuan; Yang, Denghui; Wang, Dong; Han, Xiangan; Shi, Yonghong; Tian, Mingxing; Ding, Chan; Peng, Daxin; Yu, Shengqing

    2016-01-01

    Type III secretion systems (T3SSs) are crucial for bacterial infections because they deliver effector proteins into host cells. The Escherichia coli type III secretion system 2 (ETT2) is present in the majority of E. coli strains, and although it is degenerate, ETT2 regulates bacterial virulence. An ATPase is essential for T3SS secretion, but the function of the ETT2 ATPase has not been demonstrated. Here, we show that EivC is homologous to the β subunit of F0F1 ATPases and it possesses ATPase activity. To investigate the effects of ETT2 ATPase EivC on the phenotype and virulence of avian pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC), eivC mutant and complemented strains were constructed and characterized. Inactivation of eivC led to impaired flagella production and augmented fimbriae on the bacterial surface, and, consequently, reduced bacterial motility. In addition, the eivC mutant strain exhibited attenuated virulence in ducks, diminished serum resistance, reduced survival in macrophage cells and in ducks, upregulated fimbrial gene expression, and downregulated flagellar and virulence gene expression. The expression of the inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-8 were increased in HD-11 macrophages infected with the eivC mutant strain, compared with the wild-type strain. These virulence-related phenotypes were restored by genetic complementation. These findings demonstrate that ETT2 ATPase EivC is involved in the motility and pathogenicity of APEC. PMID:27630634

  6. Binding and cleavage of E. coli HUbeta by the E. coli Lon protease.

    PubMed

    Liao, Jiahn-Haur; Lin, Yu-Ching; Hsu, Jowey; Lee, Alan Yueh-Luen; Chen, Tse-An; Hsu, Chun-Hua; Chir, Jiun-Ly; Hua, Kuo-Feng; Wu, Tzu-Hua; Hong, Li-Jenn; Yen, Pei-Wen; Chiou, Arthur; Wu, Shih-Hsiung

    2010-01-01

    The Escherichia coli Lon protease degrades the E. coli DNA-binding protein HUbeta, but not the related protein HUalpha. Here we show that the Lon protease binds to both HUbeta and HUalpha, but selectively degrades only HUbeta in the presence of ATP. Mass spectrometry of HUbeta peptide fragments revealed that region K18-G22 is the preferred cleavage site, followed in preference by L36-K37. The preferred cleavage site was further refined to A20-A21 by constructing and testing mutant proteins; Lon degraded HUbeta-A20Q and HUbeta-A20D more slowly than HUbeta. We used optical tweezers to measure the rupture force between HU proteins and Lon; HUalpha, HUbeta, and HUbeta-A20D can bind to Lon, and in the presence of ATP, the rupture force between each of these proteins and Lon became weaker. Our results support a mechanism of Lon protease cleavage of HU proteins in at least three stages: binding of Lon with the HU protein (HUbeta, HUalpha, or HUbeta-A20D); hydrolysis of ATP by Lon to provide energy to loosen the binding to the HU protein and to allow an induced-fit conformational change; and specific cleavage of only HUbeta.

  7. Identification of essential genes and synthetic lethal gene combinations in Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed

    Mori, Hirotada; Baba, Tomoya; Yokoyama, Katsushi; Takeuchi, Rikiya; Nomura, Wataru; Makishi, Kazuichi; Otsuka, Yuta; Dose, Hitomi; Wanner, Barry L

    2015-01-01

    Here we describe the systematic identification of single genes and gene pairs, whose knockout causes lethality in Escherichia coli K-12. During construction of precise single-gene knockout library of E. coli K-12, we identified 328 essential gene candidates for growth in complex (LB) medium. Upon establishment of the Keio single-gene deletion library, we undertook the development of the ASKA single-gene deletion library carrying a different antibiotic resistance. In addition, we developed tools for identification of synthetic lethal gene combinations by systematic construction of double-gene knockout mutants. We introduce these methods herein.

  8. Firefly luciferase as the reporter for transcriptional response to the environment in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Ryo, Masashi; Oshikoshi, Yuta; Doi, Shosei; Motoki, Shogo; Niimi, Atsuko; Aoki, Setsuyuki

    2013-12-15

    We demonstrate that firefly luciferase is a good reporter in Escherichia coli for transcription dynamics in response to the environment. E. coli strains, carrying a fusion of the promoter of the ycgZ gene and the coding region of the luciferase gene, showed transient bioluminescence on receiving blue light. This response was compromised in mutants lacking known regulators in manners consistent with each regulator's function. We also show that relA, a gene encoding a (p)ppGpp synthetase, affects ycgZ dynamics when nullified. Moreover, two unstable luciferase variants showed improved response dynamics and should be useful to study quick changes of gene expression.

  9. Identification of essential genes and synthetic lethal gene combinations in Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed

    Mori, Hirotada; Baba, Tomoya; Yokoyama, Katsushi; Takeuchi, Rikiya; Nomura, Wataru; Makishi, Kazuichi; Otsuka, Yuta; Dose, Hitomi; Wanner, Barry L

    2015-01-01

    Here we describe the systematic identification of single genes and gene pairs, whose knockout causes lethality in Escherichia coli K-12. During construction of precise single-gene knockout library of E. coli K-12, we identified 328 essential gene candidates for growth in complex (LB) medium. Upon establishment of the Keio single-gene deletion library, we undertook the development of the ASKA single-gene deletion library carrying a different antibiotic resistance. In addition, we developed tools for identification of synthetic lethal gene combinations by systematic construction of double-gene knockout mutants. We introduce these methods herein. PMID:25636612

  10. Uncovering a region of Hsp90 important for client binding in E. coli and chaperone function in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Genest, Olivier; Reidy, Michael; Street, Timothy O.; Hoskins, Joel R.; Camberg, Jodi L.; Agard, David A.; Masison, Daniel C.; Wickner, Sue

    2012-01-01

    Summary The Hsp90 family of heat shock proteins is an abundantly expressed and highly conserved family of ATP-dependent molecular chaperones. Hsp90 facilitates remodeling and activation of hundreds of proteins. In this study we developed a screen to identify Hsp90 defective mutants in E. coli. The mutations obtained define a region incorporating residues from the middle and C-terminal domains of E. coli Hsp90. The mutant proteins are defective in chaperone activity and client binding in vitro. We constructed homologous mutations in S. cerevisiae Hsp82 and identified several that caused defects in chaperone activity in vivo and in vitro. However, the Hsp82 mutant proteins were less severely defective in client binding to a model substrate than the corresponding E. coli mutant proteins. Our results identify a region in Hsp90 important for client binding in E. coli Hsp90 and suggest an evolutionary divergence in the mechanism of client interaction by bacterial and yeast Hsp90. PMID:23260660

  11. Impact of acquisition of 16S rRNA methylase RmtB on the fitness of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Ou, Bingming; Chen, Lin; Song, Yujie; Yang, Ying; Zhang, Qian; Yang, Yi; Li, Luan; Tham, Wai Liang; Francis, David H; Zhu, Guoqiang

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to elucidate the biological phenotypes of 16S rRNA methylase RmtB in Escherichia coli and the impact of RmtB acquisition on the fitness of the target bacterium. An rmtB in-frame deletion mutant in E. coli was constructed using a suicide vector (pDMS197)-based double crossover allelic exchange, and its corresponding complemented strain was established. Combined studies of microdilution susceptibility testing, conjugation experiments, growth kinetics assays, competitive experiments, biofilm formation tests and motility assays were performed to study the rmtB-mediated fitness among the prototype E. coli strain, its isogenic mutant and the corresponding complemented strain. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of 4,6-disubstituted 2-deoxystreptamines for the rmtB wild-type strain, its isogenic mutant and the complemented strain were ≥1024, ≤2 and ≥1024mg/L, respectively. Both the growth rates and the competitive abilities of the wild-type and complemented strains were relatively inferior to the ΔrmtB mutant. There was no significant difference in biofilm formation and motility among the three strains. In conclusion, the data presented here suggest that acquisition of the 16S rRNA methylase gene rmtB in E. coli can exact a fitness cost on the bacteria, subsequently reducing the growth rate slightly and decreasing the competitive capacity of the bacterium, whereas it does not affect biofilm formation or motility. PMID:27530836

  12. Expression of the Escherichia coli ftsZ gene: trials and tribulations of gene fusion studies.

    PubMed

    Robin, A; D'Ari, R

    1993-02-01

    The ftsZ gene of Escherichia coli, which codes for an essential cell division protein, is subjected to multiple regulation, as shown in part with studies using an ftsZ::lacZ operon fusion located on phage lambda JFL100. Using this same fusion, we sought to isolate regulatory mutants overexpressing ftsZ by selecting mutants able to grow on lactose. One Lac+ mutant was obtained which overexpressed the ftsZ::lacZ fusion 70-fold. The mutation responsible for the overexpression lies in a new gene, cot, located near 56 min on the E. coli genetic map. The cot mutation probably affects the transcription of a chromosomal open reading frame, ORF1, lying downstream of the bioA gene and adjacent to the ftzZ::lacZ fusion of the lambda JFL100 prophage integrated at att lambda. Using an ftsZ84(Ts) strain, in which there was a double selection for overexpression of both ftsZ::lacZ and ftsZ+, no Lac+Tr mutants were obtained from 3.6 x 10(10) bacteria; the introduction of a mutL allele, increasing spontaneous base substitution mutation rates 75-fold, did not permit us to isolate such a mutant. We conclude that Lac+ ftsZ-constitutive mutations cannot be obtained in lambda JFL100 lysogens by a single base substitution. PMID:8468005

  13. Defective Transamination, a Mechanism for Resistance to Ketomycin in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Julius H.; Umbarger, H. E.

    1973-01-01

    A spontaneous mutant of a derivative of Escherichia coli strain K-12 resistant to 50 μg of ketomycin per ml was selected. The mutant displayed a two- to threefold derepression of the isoleucine-valine biosynthetic enzymes and a reduced growth rate in minimal medium. The lesion was found to lie in the gene (ilvE) specifying transaminase B and resulted in an isoleucine limitation. The presence of exogenous isoleucine during growth in minimal medium restored normal phenotypic properties. The reduced transaminase B activity is responsible for the resistance to ketomycin. An unusual derepression of the acetohydroxy acid synthetase in response to an isoleucine limitation was noted. PMID:4597727

  14. Effects of Lipopolysaccharide Biosynthesis Mutations on K1 Polysaccharide Association with the Escherichia coli Cell Surface

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez, Natalia; Senchenkova, Sofya N.; Knirel, Yuriy A.; Pieretti, Giuseppina; Corsaro, Maria M.; Aquilini, Eleonora; Regué, Miguel; Merino, Susana

    2012-01-01

    The presence of cell-bound K1 capsule and K1 polysaccharide in culture supernatants was determined in a series of in-frame nonpolar core biosynthetic mutants from Escherichia coli KT1094 (K1, R1 core lipopolysaccharide [LPS] type) for which the major core oligosaccharide structures were determined. Cell-bound K1 capsule was absent from mutants devoid of phosphoryl modifications on l-glycero-d-manno-heptose residues (HepI and HepII) of the inner-core LPS and reduced in mutants devoid of phosphoryl modification on HepII or devoid of HepIII. In contrast, in all of the mutants, K1 polysaccharide was found in culture supernatants. These results were confirmed by using a mutant with a deletion spanning from the hldD to waaQ genes of the waa gene cluster to which individual genes were reintroduced. A nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis of core LPS from HepIII-deficient mutants showed an alteration in the pattern of phosphoryl modifications. A cell extract containing both K1 capsule polysaccharide and LPS obtained from an O-antigen-deficient mutant could be resolved into K1 polysaccharide and core LPS by column chromatography only when EDTA and deoxycholate (DOC) buffer were used. These results suggest that the K1 polysaccharide remains cell associated by ionically interacting with the phosphate-negative charges of the core LPS. PMID:22522903

  15. The function of ubiquinone in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Cox, G. B.; Newton, N. A.; Gibson, F.; Snoswell, A. M.; Hamilton, J. A.

    1970-01-01

    1. The function of ubiquinone in Escherichia coli was studied by using whole cells and membrane preparations of normal E. coli and of a mutant lacking ubiquinone. 2. The mutant lacking ubiquinone, strain AN59 (Ubi−), when grown under aerobic conditions, gave an anaerobic type of growth yield and produced large quantities of lactic acid, indicating that ubiquinone plays a vital role in electron transport. 3. NADH and lactate oxidase activities in membranes from strain AN59 (Ubi−) were greatly impaired and activity was restored by the addition of ubiquinone (Q-1). 4. Comparison of the percentage reduction of flavin, cytochrome b1 and cytochrome a2 in the aerobic steady state in membranes from the normal strain (AN62) and strain AN59 (Ubi−) and the effect of respiratory inhibitors on these percentages in membranes from strain AN62 suggest that ubiquinone functions at more than one site in the electron-transport chain. 5. Membranes from strain AN62, in the absence of substrate, showed an electron-spin-resonance signal attributed to ubisemiquinone. The amount of reduced ubiquinone (50%) found after rapid solvent extraction is consistent with the existence of ubiquinone in membranes as a stabilized ubisemiquinone. 6. The effects of piericidin A on membranes from strain AN62 suggest that this inhibitor acts at the ubiquinone sites: thus inhibition of electron transport is reversed by ubiquinone (Q-1); the aerobic steady-state oxidation–reduction levels of flavins and cytochrome b1 in the presence of the inhibitor are raised to values approximating those found in the membranes of strain AN59 (Ubi−); the inhibitor rapidly eliminates the electron-spin-resonance signal attributed to ubisemiquinone and allows slow oxidation of endogenous ubiquinol in the absence of substrate and prevents reduction of ubiquinone in the presence of substrate. It is concluded that piericidin A separates ubiquinone from the remainder of the electron-transport chain. 7. A scheme is

  16. Survival of Escherichia coli exposed to visible light in seawater: analysis of rpoS-dependent effects.

    PubMed

    Gourmelon, M; Touati, D; Pommepuy, M; Cormier, M

    1997-11-01

    We investigated the effect of visible light on Escherichia coli in seawater microcosms. Escherichia coli lost its ability to form colonies in marine environments when exposed to artificial continuous visible light. Survival of illuminated bacteria during the stationary phase was drastically reduced in the absence of the sigma factor (RpoS or KatF) that regulates numerous genes induced in this phase. In the stationary phase, double catalase mutants katE katG and mutants defective in the protein Dps (both catalase and Dps are involved in resistance to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)), were more sensitive to light. In the exponenital phase, a mutation in oxyR, the regulatory gene of the adaptive response to H2O2, increased sensitivity to light, further suggesting that deleterious effects might be associated with H2O2 production. However, in the stationary phase, the katE katG dps mutant was considerably more resistant to visible light than the rpoS mutant, suggesting rpoS-dependent protection against deleterious effects other than those related to H2O2. The deleterious action of visible light was less important when the salinity decreased. In freshwater, rpoS and katE katG dps mutants did not show a drastic difference in sensitivity to light suggesting that osmolarity sensitizes E. coli to those deleterious effects of visible light that are unrelated to H2O2.

  17. Simulation of the rate of transfer of antibiotic resistance between Escherichia coli strains cultured under well controlled environmental conditions.

    PubMed

    Smelt, Jan P; Hoefsloot, Huub C; de Koster, Chris G; Schuurmans, Jasper M; ter Kuile, Benno H; Brul, Stanley

    2015-02-01

    It was demonstrated that the tetracycline resistance plasmid in Escherichia coli resembling K-12 23:06 containing the E. coli plasmid DM0133 could be transferred to tetracycline sensitive E. coli K-12 MG1655 YFP. The sensitive recipient strain has a slight metabolic advantage in continuous fermentation in absence of tetracycline pressure and as a result the numbers of the resistant recipient strain increase during fermentation. In presence of tetracycline pressure the sensitive strain is eliminated, but when it acquires tetracycline resistance the strain has still the same metabolic advantage as its sensitive parent strain in absence of tetracycline. Here a model will be shown that could explain the rate of transformation of a sensitive into a resistant recipient strain and its subsequent growth during continuous fermentation. According to the model the probability of formation of mutants would be much higher at the dilution rate of 0.09 compared to 0.28, whereas the growth of mutants would be much faster at high dilution rate. The growth model shows how the recipient mutants and the donor cells behave in relation to the dilution rate and the number of mutants. Apart from a deterministic model describing the growth rate of both the donor strain and the resistant recipient strain a stochastic model was developed that is particularly useful when low numbers of mutants are formed. PMID:25500384

  18. Transcriptional responses of Escherichia coli K-12 and O157:H7 associated with lettuce leaves.

    PubMed

    Fink, Ryan C; Black, Elaine P; Hou, Zhe; Sugawara, Masayuki; Sadowsky, Michael J; Diez-Gonzalez, Francisco

    2012-03-01

    An increasing number of outbreaks of gastroenteritis recently caused by Escherichia coli O157:H7 have been linked to the consumption of leafy green vegetables. Although it is known that E. coli survives and grows in the phyllosphere of lettuce plants, the molecular mechanisms by which this bacterium associates with plants are largely unknown. The goal of this study was to identify E. coli genes relevant to its interaction, survival, or attachment to lettuce leaf surfaces, comparing E. coli K-12, a model system, and E. coli O157:H7, a pathogen associated with a large number of outbreaks. Using microarrays, we found that upon interaction with intact leaves, 10.1% and 8.7% of the 3,798 shared genes were differentially expressed in K-12 and O157:H7, respectively, whereas 3.1% changed transcript levels in both. The largest group of genes downregulated consisted of those involved in energy metabolism, including tnaA (33-fold change), encoding a tryptophanase that converts tryptophan into indole. Genes involved in biofilm modulation (bhsA and ybiM) and curli production (csgA and csgB) were significantly upregulated in E. coli K-12 and O157:H7. Both csgA and bhsA (ycfR) mutants were impaired in the long-term colonization of the leaf surface, but only csgA mutants had diminished ability in short-term attachment experiments. Our data suggested that the interaction of E. coli K-12 and O157:H7 with undamaged lettuce leaves likely is initiated via attachment to the leaf surface using curli fibers, a downward shift in their metabolism, and the suppression of biofilm formation.

  19. Utilization of a mini-mu transposon to construct defined mutants in Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Kuramitsu, H K

    1987-09-01

    The gtfB gene coding for glucosyltransferase-I (GTF-I) activity previously isolated from Streptococcus mutans GS-5 was insertionally inactivated with the newly constructed transposon MudE in an Escherichia coli background. Insertion of MudE into various regions of the gtfB gene led to inactivation of GTF-I activity. The altered gene was introduced back into S. mutans GS-5 by transformation and produced mutants defective in insoluble glucan synthesis as well as the ability to colonize smooth surfaces in the presence of sucrose. Therefore, the MudE transposon can be utilized to produce specific mutants in oral streptococci as well as in other transformable Gram-positive bacteria expressing an erythromycin-resistance marker.

  20. The active transport of carbohydrates by Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Henderson, P J; Kornberg, H L

    1975-01-01

    The active transport of carbohydrates by Escherichia coli is discussed with particular reference to (1) identification of an uptake process as 'active transport', (2) nature and control of transport proteins, and (3) mechanisms of energy transduction. (1) The use of substrate analogues, of mutants blocked in metabolism and of subcellular vesicles in the isolation of the transport process from interference by subsequent metabolic reactions is described. Criteria are outlined for establishing that the solute is taken up against a concentration gradient and that this is energy-dependent. Three types of poisons for energy systems that act primarily on respiration, on ATP formation and as uncoupling ('proton conducting') agents are considered. (2) Methods are described for the selection of mutants impaired in the active uptake of specific carbohydrates. (3) Results show that the uptake of galactose, D-fucose and arabinose by appropriate strains of E. coli is inducible, specific and accompanied by proton uptake. Such and other data support a model based on a chemiosmotic theory of active transport.

  1. Nutrient dependence of RNase E essentiality in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Masaru; Moore, Christopher J; Cohen, Stanley N

    2013-03-01

    Escherichia coli cells normally require RNase E activity to form colonies (colony-forming ability [CFA]). The CFA-defective phenotype of cells lacking RNase E is partly reversed by overexpression of the related endoribonuclease RNase G or by mutation of the gene encoding the RNA helicase DeaD. We found that the carbon source utilization by rne deaD doubly mutant bacteria differs from that of rne(+) cells and from that of cells mutated in deaD alone and that the loss of rne function in these bacteria limits conversion of the glycolytic pathway product phosphoenolpyruvate to the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle intermediate oxaloacetic acid. We show that the mechanism underlying this effect is reduced production of the enzyme phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PPC) and that adventitious overexpression of PPC, which facilitates phosphoenolpyruvate utilization and connects the glycolytic pathway with the TCA cycle, restored CFA to rne deaD mutant bacteria cultured on carbon sources that otherwise were unable to sustain growth. We further show that bacteria producing full-length RNase E, which allows formation of degradosomes, have nutritional requirements different from those of cells supplied with only the N-terminal catalytic region of RNase E and that mitigation of RNase E deficiency by overexpression of a related RNase, RNase G, is also affected by carbon source. Our results reveal previously unsuspected effects of RNase E deficiency and degradosome formation on nutrient utilization by E. coli cells.

  2. RecBCD Enzyme "Chi Recognition" Mutants Recognize Chi Recombination Hotspots in the Right DNA Context.

    PubMed

    Amundsen, Susan K; Sharp, Jake W; Smith, Gerald R

    2016-09-01

    RecBCD enzyme is a complex, three-subunit protein machine essential for the major pathway of DNA double-strand break repair and homologous recombination in Escherichia coli Upon encountering a Chi recombination-hotspot during DNA unwinding, RecBCD nicks DNA to produce a single-stranded DNA end onto which it loads RecA protein. Conformational changes that regulate RecBCD's helicase and nuclease activities are induced upon its interaction with Chi, defined historically as 5' GCTGGTGG 3'. Chi is thought to be recognized as single-stranded DNA passing through a tunnel in RecC. To define the Chi recognition-domain in RecC and thus the mechanism of the RecBCD-Chi interaction, we altered by random mutagenesis eight RecC amino acids lining the tunnel. We screened for loss of Chi activity with Chi at one site in bacteriophage λ. The 25 recC mutants analyzed thoroughly had undetectable or strongly reduced Chi-hotspot activity with previously reported Chi sites. Remarkably, most of these mutants had readily detectable, and some nearly wild-type, activity with Chi at newly generated Chi sites. Like wild-type RecBCD, these mutants had Chi activity that responded dramatically (up to fivefold, equivalent to Chi's hotspot activity) to nucleotide changes flanking 5' GCTGGTGG 3'. Thus, these and previously published RecC mutants thought to be Chi-recognition mutants are actually Chi context-dependence mutants. Our results fundamentally alter the view that Chi is a simple 8-bp sequence recognized by the RecC tunnel. We propose that Chi hotspots have dual nucleotide sequence interactions, with both the RecC tunnel and the RecB nuclease domain.

  3. Isolation and Characterization of NaCl-Sensitive Mutants of Caulobacter crescentus

    PubMed Central

    Zuleta, Luiz Fernando G.; Italiani, Valéria C. S.; Marques, Marilis V.

    2003-01-01

    An attempt to characterize Caulobacter crescentus genes important for the response to high concentrations of NaCl was initiated by the isolation of mutants defective in survival in the presence of 85 mM NaCl. A transposon Tn5 library was screened, and five strains which contained different genes disrupted by the transposon were isolated. Three of the mutants had the Tn5 in genes involved in lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis, one had the Tn5 in the nhaA gene, which encodes a Na+/H+ antiporter, and one had the Tn5 in the ppiD gene, which encodes a peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase. All the mutant strains showed severe growth arrest in the presence of 85 mM NaCl, but only the nhaA mutant showed decreased viability under these conditions. All the mutants except the nhaA mutant showed a slightly reduced viability in the presence of 40 mM KCl, but all the strains showed a more severe reduction in viability in the presence of 150 mM sucrose, suggesting that they are defective in responding to osmotic shock. The promoter regions of each disrupted gene were cloned in lacZ reporter vectors, and the pattern of expression in response to NaCl and sucrose was determined; this showed that both agents induced ppiD and nhaA gene expression but did not induce the other genes. Furthermore, the ppiD gene was not induced by heat shock, indicating that it does not belong to the σ32 regulon, as opposed to what was observed for its Escherichia coli homolog. PMID:12788696

  4. Multidrug resistant commensal Escherichia coli in animals and its impact for public health

    PubMed Central

    Szmolka, Ama; Nagy, Béla

    2013-01-01

    After the era of plentiful antibiotics we are alarmed by the increasing number of antibiotic resistant strains. The genetic flexibility and adaptability of Escherichia coli to constantly changing environments allows to acquire a great number of antimicrobial resistance mechanisms. Commensal strains of E. coli as versatile residents of the lower intestine are also repeatedly challenged by antimicrobial pressures during the lifetime of their host. As a consequence, commensal strains acquire the respective resistance genes, and/or develop resistant mutants in order to survive and maintain microbial homeostasis in the lower intestinal tract. Thus, commensal E. coli strains are regarded as indicators of antimicrobial load on their hosts. This chapter provides a short historic background of the appearance and presumed origin and transfer of antimicrobial resistance genes in commensal intestinal E. coli of animals with comparative information on their pathogenic counterparts. The dynamics, development, and ways of evolution of resistance in the E. coli populations differ according to hosts, resistance mechanisms, and antimicrobial classes used. The most frequent tools of E. coli against a variety of antimicrobials are the efflux pumps and mobile resistance mechanisms carried by plasmids and/or other transferable elements. The emergence of hybrid plasmids (both resistance and virulence) among E. coli is of further concern. Co-existence and co-transfer of these “bad genes” in this huge and most versatile in vivo compartment may represent an increased public health risk in the future. Significance of multidrug resistant (MDR) commensal E. coli seem to be highest in the food animal industry, acting as reservoir for intra- and interspecific exchange and a source for spread of MDR determinants through contaminated food to humans. Thus, public health potential of MDR commensal E. coli of food animals can be a concern and needs monitoring and more molecular analysis in the

  5. Novel Pseudotaxis Mechanisms Improve Migration of Straight-Swimming Bacterial Mutants Through a Porous Environment

    PubMed Central

    Mohari, Bitan; Licata, Nicholas A.; Kysela, David T.; Merritt, Peter M.; Mukhopadhay, Suchetana; Brun, Yves V.; Setayeshgar, Sima

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bacterial locomotion driven by flagella is given directionality by the chemotaxis signal transduction network. In the classic plate assays of migration in porous motility agar, efficient motility is compromised in chemotaxis mutants of diverse bacteria. Nonchemotactic mutants become trapped within the agar matrix. Suppressor mutations that prevent this entanglement but do not restore chemotaxis, a phenomenon designated pseudotaxis, were first reported to arise for Escherichia coli. In this study, novel mechanisms of pseudotaxis have been identified for the plant-pathogenic alphaproteobacterium Agrobacterium tumefaciens. Mutants with chemotaxis mutation suppressor (cms) mutations that impart enhanced migration in motility agar compared to that of their straight-swimming, nonchemotactic parent were isolated. We find that pseudotaxis in A. tumefaciens occurs most commonly via mutations in the D1 domain of the flagellar hook protein, FlgE, but it can also be found less frequently to be due to mutations in the hook length regulator, FliK, or in the motor protein, MotA. Single-cell-tracking studies of cms mutants in bulk medium clearly reveal frequent changes in the direction of swimming, similar to the swimming of strains that are proficient for chemotaxis, but independent of a sensory mechanism. Our results suggest that the tumbling process can be tuned through mutation and evolution to optimize migration through complex, porous environments. PMID:25714707

  6. Requirement for RecFOR-mediated recombination in priA mutant.

    PubMed

    Grompone, Gianfranco; Sanchez, Nicolas; Dusko Ehrlich, S; Michel, Bénédicte

    2004-04-01

    Restart of arrested replication forks is an important process and PriA, the main Escherichia coli replication restart protein, is essential for viability under any condition that increases the frequency of fork arrest. In priA mutant, replication forks are arrested by spontaneously occurring roadblocks and blocked replication forks persist as a result of the defect in replication restart. In the present work, we analysed how recombination proteins contribute to the viability of the priA mutant. RecFOR-mediated homologous recombination occurs in a large fraction of priA mutant cells, indicating a frequent formation of DNA single strand gaps and their recombinational repair. This high level of homologous recombination renders the proteins that resolve Holliday junctions recombination intermediates essential for viability. When homologous recombination is blocked at early steps by recFOR or recA inactivation, exonuclease V-mediated DNA degradation is required for full viability of priA mutants, indicating that unrepaired gaps are broken and that DNA degradation of the broken DNA allows the formation of viable cells. Models for the formation of single strand DNA gaps consequently to a replication restart defect and for gap processing are proposed. PMID:15066040

  7. Free energy simulations of active-site mutants of dihydrofolate reductase.

    PubMed

    Doron, Dvir; Stojković, Vanja; Gakhar, Lokesh; Vardi-Kilshtain, Alexandra; Kohen, Amnon; Major, Dan Thomas

    2015-01-22

    This study employs hybrid quantum mechanics-molecular mechanics (QM/MM) simulations to investigate the effect of mutations of the active-site residue I14 of E. coli dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) on the hydride transfer. Recent kinetic measurements of the I14X mutants (X = V, A, and G) indicated slower hydride transfer rates and increasingly temperature-dependent kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) with systematic reduction of the I14 side chain. The QM/MM simulations show that when the original isoleucine residue is substituted in silico by valine, alanine, or glycine (I14V, I14A, and I14G DHFR, respectively), the free energy barrier height of the hydride transfer reaction increases relative to the wild-type enzyme. These trends are in line with the single-turnover rate measurements reported for these systems. In addition, extended dynamics simulations of the reactive Michaelis complex reveal enhanced flexibility in the mutants, and in particular for the I14G mutant, including considerable fluctuations of the donor-acceptor distance (DAD) and the active-site hydrogen bonding network compared with those detected in the native enzyme. These observations suggest that the perturbations induced by the mutations partly impair the active-site environment in the reactant state. On the other hand, the average DADs at the transition state of all DHFR variants are similar. Crystal structures of I14 mutants (V, A, and G) confirmed the trend of increased flexibility of the M20 and other loops. PMID:25382260

  8. Pleiotropic effects of regulatory ros mutants of Agrobacterium radiobacter and their interaction with Fe and glucose.

    PubMed

    Brightwell, G; Hussain, H; Tiburtius, A; Yeoman, K H; Johnston, A W

    1995-01-01

    Four exo mutants of Agrobacterium radiobacter, defective in the synthesis of acidic exopolysaccharide were complemented by a gene from that species, which is similar to the transcriptional regulator, ros, of A. tumefaciens. It was confirmed that this A. radiobacter gene, which we term rosAR, like ros, repressed its own transcription as well as that of virC and virD, two loci involved in tumorigenesis. The sequence of RosAR suggested that it might bind to a transition metal and its repressor abilities were shown to require Fe in the medium; repression was also enhanced with increasing levels of glucose. Certain rosAR mutants, in which its 3' end was removed were dominant; i.e., when plasmids containing such mutant forms of the gene were introduced into wild-type A. radiobacter, the transconjugants were nonmucoid. Such effects were also seen in a wide range of bacteria, including Escherichia coli and Xanthomonas. Several mutants that were complementd by rosAR also accumulated protoporphyrin, suggesting a defect in haem synthesis.

  9. Development of Saccharomyces cerevisiae reductase YOL151W mutants suitable for chiral alcohol synthesis using an NADH cofactor regeneration system.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Shin Ah; Jung, Jihye; Park, Seongsoon; Kim, Hyung Kwoun

    2013-02-01

    The aldo-keto reductases catalyze reduction reactions using various aliphatic and aromatic aldehydes/ketones. Most reductases require NADPH exclusively as their cofactors. However, NADPH is much more expensive and unstable than NADH. In this study, we attempted to change the five amino acid residues that interact with the 2'-phosphate group of the adenosine ribose of NADPH. These residues were selected based on a docking model of the YOL151W reductase and were substituted with other amino acids to develop NADH-utilizing enzymes. Ten mutants were constructed by site-directed mutagenesis and expressed in Escherichia coli. Among them, four mutants showed higher reductase activities than wild-type when using the NADH cofactor. Analysis of the kinetic parameters for the wild type and mutants indicated that the kcat/Km value of the Asn9Glu mutant toward NADH increased 3-fold. A docking model was used to show that the carboxyl group of Glu 9 of the mutant formed an additional hydrogen bond with the 2'-hydroxyl group of adenosine ribose. The Asn9Glu mutant was able to produce (R)-ethyl-4-chloro-3-hydroxyl butanoate rapidly when using the NADH regeneration system. PMID:23412065

  10. Mutant OmpF porins of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis with deletions of external loops: structure-functional and immunochemical properties.

    PubMed

    Sidorova, O V; Khomenko, V A; Portnyagina, O Yu; Likhatskaya, G N; Vakorina, T I; Kim, N Yu; Chistyulin, D K; Solov'eva, T F; Novikova, O D

    2014-03-01

    Recombinant mutant OmpF porins from Yersinia pseudotuberculosis outer membrane were obtained using site-directed mutagenesis. Here we used four OmpF mutants where single extracellular loops L1, L4, L6, and L8 were deleted one at a time. The proteins were expressed in Escherichia coli at levels comparable to full-sized recombinant OmpF porin and isolated from the inclusion bodies. Purified trimers of the mutant porins were obtained after dialysis and consequent ion-exchange chromatography. Changes in molecular and spatial structure of the mutants obtained were studied using SDS-PAGE and optical spectroscopy (circular dichroism and intrinsic protein fluorescence). Secondary and tertiary structure of the mutant proteins was found to have some features in comparison with that of the full-sized recombinant OmpF. As shown by bilayer lipid membrane technique, the pore-forming activity of purified mutant porins was identical to OmpF porin isolated from the bacterial outer membrane. Lacking of the external loops mentioned above influenced significantly upon the antigenic structure of the porin as demonstrated using ELISA.

  11. Molecular evaluation of a spearmint mutant altered in the expression of limonene hydroxylases that direct essential oil monoterpene biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Bertea, Cinzia; Schalk, Michel; Mau, Christopher J D; Karp, Frank; Wildung, Mark R; Croteau, Rodney

    2003-12-01

    Gamma irradiation of Scotch spearmint created a mutant line, 643-10-74, which has an altered essential oil reminiscent of peppermint because the monoterpene metabolites in the oil glands of the mutant are predominantly oxygenated at the C3 position of the p-menthane ring instead of the C6 position normally found in spearmint. The limonene hydroxylase genes responsible for directing the regiochemistry of oxygenation were cloned from Scotch spearmint and mutant 643 and expressed in Escherichia coli. The limonene bydroxylase from the wild-type parent hydroxylated the C6 position while the enzyme from the mutant oxygenated the C3 position. Comparison of the amino acid sequences with other limonene hydroxylases showed that the mutant enzyme was more closely related to the peppermint limonene-3-hydroxylases than to the spearmint limonene-6-hydroxylases. Because of the sequence differences between the Scotch spearmint and mutant 643 limonene hydroxylases, it is most likely that the mutation did not occur within the structural gene for limonene hydroxylase but rather at a regulatory site within the genome that controls the expression of one or the other regiospecific variants.

  12. Mutants of yeast sensitive to ultraviolet light.

    PubMed

    Snow, R

    1967-09-01

    Six uvr mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae with hypersensitivity to ultraviolet (UV) light were isolated after mutagen treatment with ethylmethanesulfonate. UV sensitivity ranges from moderate to extreme, and four of the mutants are also sensitive to nitrous acid. Ranking in terms of UV sensitivity does not parallel ranking in terms of nitrous acid sensitivity. Homozygous diploid mutant strains are somewhat less sensitive than the corresponding haploids. All mutations are recessive. None of the mutants is sensitive to gamma rays, and each shows photoreactivation after UV radiation. Complementation tests and tetrad analysis indicate that each strain represents mutation in a different gene. Two of the uvr genes are linked, and two others are centromere-linked.

  13. Prodigiosin synthesis in mutants of Serratia marcesens.

    PubMed

    Morrison, D A

    1966-04-01

    Morrison, D. A. (Harvard College, Cambridge, Mass.). Prodigiosin synthesis in mutants of Serratia marcescens. J. Bacteriol. 91:1509-1604. 1966.-Exchange of biosynthetic intermediates through the culture medium was used to characterize several hundred new color mutants of Serratia marcescens. The general scheme of prodigiosin synthesis as a bifurcated pathway, in which monopyrrole and bipyrrole precursors are synthesized separately and then coupled to form pigment, was confirmed and extended. Mutants of one new class excreted a product likely to be a new intermediate in monopyrrole synthesis, those of a second excreted a new product in the bipyrrole pathway, and those of a third were blocked at early steps in both pathways. Two novel classes of mutants were isolated, in each of which a lack of some product present in Serratia and Escherichia cultures resulted in loss of all steps in prodigiosin biosynthesis.

  14. Cooperative Interaction Within RNA Virus Mutant Spectra.

    PubMed

    Shirogane, Yuta; Watanabe, Shumpei; Yanagi, Yusuke

    2016-01-01

    RNA viruses usually consist of mutant spectra because of high error rates of viral RNA polymerases. Growth competition occurs among different viral variants, and the fittest clones predominate under given conditions. Individual variants, however, may not be entirely independent of each other, and internal interactions within mutant spectra can occur. Examples of cooperative and interfering interactions that exert enhancing and suppressing effects on replication of the wild-type virus, respectively, have been described, but their underlying mechanisms have not been well defined. It was recently found that the cooperation between wild-type and variant measles virus genomes produces a new phenotype through the heterooligomer formation of a viral protein. This observation provides a molecular mechanism underlying cooperative interactions within mutant spectra. Careful attention to individual sequences, in addition to consensus sequences, may disclose further examples of internal interactions within mutant spectra. PMID:26162566

  15. Genome-Wide Assessment of Outer Membrane Vesicle Production in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Kulp, Adam J; Sun, Bo; Ai, Teresa; Manning, Andrew J; Orench-Rivera, Nichole; Schmid, Amy K; Kuehn, Meta J

    2015-01-01

    The production of outer membrane vesicles by Gram-negative bacteria has been well documented; however, the mechanism behind the biogenesis of these vesicles remains unclear. Here a high-throughput experimental method and systems-scale analysis was conducted to determine vesiculation values for the whole genome knockout library of Escherichia coli mutant strains (Keio collection). The resultant dataset quantitatively recapitulates previously observed phenotypes and implicates nearly 150 new genes in the process of vesiculation. Gene functional and biochemical pathway analyses suggest that mutations that truncate outer membrane structures such as lipopolysaccharide and enterobacterial common antigen lead to hypervesiculation, whereas mutants in oxidative stress response pathways result in lower levels. This study expands and refines the current knowledge regarding the cellular pathways required for outer membrane vesiculation in E. coli.

  16. Genome-Wide Assessment of Outer Membrane Vesicle Production in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Kulp, Adam J.; Sun, Bo; Ai, Teresa; Manning, Andrew J.; Orench-Rivera, Nichole

    2015-01-01

    The production of outer membrane vesicles by Gram-negative bacteria has been well documented; however, the mechanism behind the biogenesis of these vesicles remains unclear. Here a high-throughput experimental method and systems-scale analysis was conducted to determine vesiculation values for the whole genome knockout library of Escherichia coli mutant strains (Keio collection). The resultant dataset quantitatively recapitulates previously observed phenotypes and implicates nearly 150 new genes in the process of vesiculation. Gene functional and biochemical pathway analyses suggest that mutations that truncate outer membrane structures such as lipopolysaccharide and enterobacterial common antigen lead to hypervesiculation, whereas mutants in oxidative stress response pathways result in lower levels. This study expands and refines the current knowledge regarding the cellular pathways required for outer membrane vesiculation in E. coli. PMID:26406465

  17. Overexpression of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi recA gene confers fluoroquinolone resistance in Escherichia coli DH5α.

    PubMed

    Yassien, M A M; Elfaky, M A

    2015-11-01

    A spontaneous fluoroquinolone-resistant mutant (STM1) was isolated from its parent Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (S. Typhi) clinical isolate. Unlike its parent isolate, this mutant has selective resistance to fluoroquinolones without any change in its sensitivity to various other antibiotics. DNA gyrase assays revealed that the fluoroquinolone resistance phenotype of the STM1 mutant did not result from alteration of the fluoroquinolone sensitivity of the DNA gyrase isolated from it. To study the mechanism of fluoroquinolone resistance, a genomic library from the STM1 mutant was constructed in Escherichia coli DH5α and two recombinant plasmids were obtained. Only one of these plasmids (STM1-A) conferred the selective fluoroquinolone resistance phenotype to E. coli DH5α. The chromosomal insert from STM1-A, digested with EcoRI and HindIII restriction endonucleases, produced two DNA fragments and these were cloned separately into pUC19 thereby generating two new plasmids, STM1-A1 and STM1-A2. Only STM1-A1 conferred the selective fluoroquinolone resistance phenotype to E. coli DH5α. Sequence and subcloning analyses of STM1-A1 showed the presence of an intact RecA open reading frame. Unlike that of the wild-type E. coli DH5α, protein analysis of a crude STM1-A1 extract showed overexpression of a 40 kDa protein. Western blotting confirmed the 40 kDa protein band to be RecA. When a RecA PCR product was cloned into pGEM-T and introduced into E. coli DH5α, the STM1-A11 subclone retained fluoroquinolone resistance. These results suggest that overexpression of RecA causes selective fluoroquinolone resistance in E. coli DH5α. PMID:26375447

  18. Isolation and complementation of mutants of Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 unable to grow aerobically on dinitrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Wolk, C.P.; Cai, Y.; Cardemil, L.; Flores, E.; Hohn, B.; Murry, M.; Schmetterer, G.; Schrautemeier, B.; Wilson, R.

    1988-03-01

    Mutants of Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 unable to grow aerobically on dinitrogen were isolated by mutagenesis with UV irradiation, followed by a period of incubation in yellow light and then by penicillin enrichment. A cosmid vector, pRL25C, containing replicons functional in Escherichia coli and in Anabaena species was constructed. DNA from wild-type Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 was partially digested with Sau3AI, and size-fractionated fragments about 40 kilobases (kb) in length were ligated into the phosphatase-treated unique BamHI site of pRL25C. A library of 1054 cosmid clones was generated in E. coli DH1 bearing helper plasmid pDS4101. A derivative of conjugative plasmid RP-4 was transferred to this library by conjugation, and the library was replicated to lawns of mutant Anabaena strains with defects in the polysaccharide layer of the envelopes of the heterocysts. Mutant EF116 was complemented by five cosmids, three of which were subjected to detailed restriction mapping; a 2.8-kb fragment of DNA derived from one of the cosmids was found to complement EF116. Mutant EF113 was complemented by a single cosmid, which was also restriction mapped, and was shown to be complemented by a 4.8-kb fragment of DNA derived from this cosmid.

  19. Semiconservative DNA replication is initiated at a single site in recombination-deficient gene 32 mutants of bacteriophage T4.

    PubMed Central

    Dannenberg, R; Mosig, G

    1981-01-01

    We have investigated, by electron microscopy, replicative intermediate produced early after infection of Escherichia coli with two phage T4 gene 32 mutants (amA453 and tsG26) which replicate their parental DNA but are defective in secondary replications and in moderating the activities of recombination nucleases. Under conditions completely restrictive for progeny production, both of these mutant produced replicative intermediates, each containing a single internal loop. Both branches of these loops were double stranded; i.e., both leading and lagging strands were synthesized. The replicative intermediates of these mutants qualitatively and quantitatively resembled early replicating wild-type T4 chromosomes after solitary infection of E. coli. However, in contrast to intracellular wild-type T4 DNA isolated from multiple infection, the mutant DNAs showed neither multiple branches nor multiple tandem loops. These results demonstrate that a truncated gene 32 protein which consists of less than one-third of the wild-type T4 helix-destabilizing protein can facilitate the functions of T4 replication proteins, specifically those of T4 DNA polymerase and priming proteins. Our results also support the hypothesis that the generation of multiple tandem loops or branches in vegetative T4 DNA depends on recombination (Mosig et al., in B. Alberts, ed., Mechanistic Studies of DNA Replication and Genetic Recombination, p. 527-543, Academic Press, Inc., New York, 1980). Images PMID:7321104

  20. Folate Acts in E. coli to Accelerate C. elegans Aging Independently of Bacterial Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Virk, Bhupinder; Jia, Jie; Maynard, Claire A.; Raimundo, Adelaide; Lefebvre, Jolien; Richards, Shane A.; Chetina, Natalia; Liang, Yen; Helliwell, Noel; Cipinska, Marta; Weinkove, David

    2016-01-01

    Summary Folates are cofactors for biosynthetic enzymes in all eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells. Animals cannot synthesize folate and must acquire it from their diet or microbiota. Previously, we showed that inhibiting E. coli folate synthesis increases C. elegans lifespan. Here, we show that restriction or supplementation of C. elegans folate does not influence lifespan. Thus, folate is required in E. coli to shorten worm lifespan. Bacterial proliferation in the intestine has been proposed as a mechanism for the life-shortening influence of E. coli. However, we found no correlation between C. elegans survival and bacterial growth in a screen of 1,000+ E. coli deletion mutants. Nine mutants increased worm lifespan robustly, suggesting specific gene regulation is required for the life-shortening activity of E. coli. Disrupting the biosynthetic folate cycle did not increase lifespan. Thus, folate acts through a growth-independent route in E. coli to accelerate animal aging. PMID:26876180

  1. Folate Acts in E. coli to Accelerate C. elegans Aging Independently of Bacterial Biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Virk, Bhupinder; Jia, Jie; Maynard, Claire A; Raimundo, Adelaide; Lefebvre, Jolien; Richards, Shane A; Chetina, Natalia; Liang, Yen; Helliwell, Noel; Cipinska, Marta; Weinkove, David

    2016-02-23

    Folates are cofactors for biosynthetic enzymes in all eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells. Animals cannot synthesize folate and must acquire it from their diet or microbiota. Previously, we showed that inhibiting E. coli folate synthesis increases C. elegans lifespan. Here, we show that restriction or supplementation of C. elegans folate does not influence lifespan. Thus, folate is required in E. coli to shorten worm lifespan. Bacterial proliferation in the intestine has been proposed as a mechanism for the life-shortening influence of E. coli. However, we found no correlation between C. elegans survival and bacterial growth in a screen of 1,000+ E. coli deletion mutants. Nine mutants increased worm lifespan robustly, suggesting specific gene regulation is required for the life-shortening activity of E. coli. Disrupting the biosynthetic folate cycle did not increase lifespan. Thus, folate acts through a growth-independent route in E. coli to accelerate animal aging.

  2. Toward Network Biology in E. coli Cell.

    PubMed

    Mori, Hirotada; Takeuchi, Rikiya; Otsuka, Yuta; Bowden, Steven; Yokoyama, Katsushi; Muto, Ai; Libourel, Igor; Wanner, Barry L

    2015-01-01

    E. coli has been a critically important model research organism for more than 50 years, particularly in molecular biology. In 1997, the E. coli draft genome sequence was published. Post-genomic techniques and resources were then developed that allowed E. coli to become a model organism for systems biology. Progress made since publication of the E. coli genome sequence will be summarized.

  3. Arabidopsis mutants with increased sensitivity to aluminum.

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, P B; Tai, C Y; Kochian, L V; Howell, S H

    1996-01-01

    Al-sensitive (als) mutants of Arabidopsis were isolated and characterized with the aim of defining mechanisms of Al toxicity and resistance. Most als mutants selected on the basis of root growth sensitivity to Al were recessive, and together the mutants constituted eight complementation groups. Also, in most als mutants, Al sensitivity appeared to be specific for Al relative to La (another trivalent cation), except als2, which was more sensitive to La than wild type. The tendency of roots on mutant seedlings to accumulate Al was examined by staining with morin and hematoxylin, dyes used to indicate the presence of Al. A significant increase in morin staining was observed in als5, consistent with its increased sensitivity to Al. Unexpectedly, als7 and als4 showed less morin staining, suggesting that the roots on these mutants accumulate less Al than wild type seedlings after exposure to Al-containing solutions. Roots of wild-type seedlings produce callose in response to AlCl3 concentrations that inhibit root growth. Only als5 accumulated more callose than wild type in response to low levels (25 mu M) of AICI3 However, als4 and als7 did not accumulate callose at this AlCl3 concentration even though root growth was significantly inhibited. The lack of callose accumulation in als4 and als7 suggests that there is not an obligatory relationship between callose deposition and Al-induced inhibition of root growth. PMID:8819866

  4. Molecular cloning and sequence determination of the nuclear gene coding for mitochondrial elongation factor Tu of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Nagata, S; Tsunetsugu-Yokota, Y; Naito, A; Kaziro, Y

    1983-10-01

    A 3.1-kilobase Bgl II fragment of Saccharomyces cerevisiae carrying the nuclear gene encoding the mitochondrial polypeptide chain elongation factor (EF) Tu has been cloned on pBR327 to yield a chimeric plasmid pYYB. The identification of the gene designated as tufM was based on the cross-hybridization with the Escherichia coli tufB gene, under low stringency conditions. The complete nucleotide sequence of the yeast tufM gene was established together with its 5'- and 3'-flanking regions. The sequence contained 1,311 nucleotides coding for a protein of 437 amino acids with a calculated Mr of 47,980. The nucleotide sequence and the deduced amino acid sequence of tufM were 60% and 66% homologous, respectively, to the corresponding sequences of E. coli tufA, when aligned to obtain the maximal homology. Plasmid YRpYB was then constructed by cloning the 2.5-kilobase EcoRI fragment of pYYB carrying tufM into a yeast cloning vector YRp-7. A mRNA hybridizable with tufM was isolated from the total mRNA of S. cerevisiae D13-1A transformed with YRpYB and translated in the reticulocyte lysate. The mRNA could direct the synthesis of a protein with Mr 48,000, which was immunoprecipitated with an anti-E. coli EF-Tu antibody but not with an antibody against yeast cytoplasmic EF-1 alpha. The results indicate that the tufM gene is a nuclear gene coding for the yeast mitochondrial EF-Tu. PMID:6353412

  5. Plant-Adapted Escherichia coli Show Increased Lettuce Colonizing Ability, Resistance to Oxidative Stress and Chemotactic Response

    PubMed Central

    Dublan, Maria de los Angeles; Ortiz-Marquez, Juan Cesar Federico; Lett, Lina; Curatti, Leonardo

    2014-01-01

    Background Escherichia coli is a widespread gut commensal and often a versatile pathogen of public health concern. E. coli are also frequently found in different environments and/or alternative secondary hosts, such as plant tissues. The lifestyle of E. coli in plants is poorly understood and has potential implications for food safety. Methods/Principal Findings This work shows that a human commensal strain of E. coli K12 readily colonizes lettuce seedlings and produces large microcolony-like cell aggregates in leaves, especially in young leaves, in proximity to the vascular tissue. Our observations strongly suggest that those cell aggregates arise from multiplication of single bacterial cells that reach those spots. We showed that E. coli isolated from colonized leaves progressively colonize lettuce seedlings to higher titers, suggesting a fast adaptation process. E. coli cells isolated from leaves presented a dramatic rise in tolerance to oxidative stress and became more chemotactic responsive towards lettuce leaf extracts. Mutant strains impaired in their chemotactic response were less efficient lettuce colonizers than the chemotactic isogenic strain. However, acclimation to oxidative stress and/or minimal medium alone failed to prime E. coli cells for enhanced lettuce colonization efficiency. Conclusion/Significance These findings help to understand the physiological adaptation during the alternative lifestyle of E. coli in/on plant tissues. PMID:25313845

  6. Metabolic Events Occurring During Recovery from Prolonged Glucose Starvation in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, A.; Gillespie, D.

    1968-01-01

    The effects of starving Escherichia coli for glucose and required amino acids were determined. The disappearance of the majority of the ribosomal population, particularly of the ribonucleic acid (RNA) moiety, was noted. The events during recovery are detailed, with emphasis placed on the timing, requirements, and control of deoxyribonucleic acid, RNA, and protein synthesis and on ribosome reassembly. Finally, the applicability of the system to the study of temperature-sensitive mutants is documented and discussed. PMID:4868350

  7. Cloning and expression in Escherichia coli of genes involved in the lysine pathway of Brevibacterium lactofermentum.

    PubMed Central

    Márquez, G; Sousa, J M; Sánchez, F

    1985-01-01

    The Brevibacterium lactofermentum genes which complement Escherichia coli lysA and asd-1 mutants were identified, respectively, as a 1.9-kilobase PstI-ClaI fragment and a 2.5-kilobase PstI fragment by cloning into pBR325. Southern blot transfers show hybridization to chromosomal fragments of identical size. The putative B. lactofermentum asd and lysA products are 44 and 48 kilodaltons, respectively. Images PMID:2864331

  8. Metabolism of L-glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate in Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Kalyananda, M.K.G.S.

    1985-01-01

    E. coli is able to incorporate L-glyceraldehyde and L-glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate into phospholipids, L-(3-/sup 3/H)Glyceraldehyde was synthesized and the purity and the chemical identity of the product were checked by paper chromatography. L-(3-/sup 3/H)Glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate was synthesized from L-(3-/sup 3/H)glyceraldehyde in a reaction catalyzed by glycerokinase. E. coli extract contains a new enzyme activity which catalyzes an NADPH dependent reduction of L-glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate into sn-glycerol 3-phosphate. A procedure, specifically suitable for assaying the reductase activity in the crude extract, was developed. A more convenient spectrophotometric assay method was employed for the purified enzyme. At moderate concentrations sulfhydryl group inhibitors had no effect on the enzyme activity of L-GAP reductase. At 100..mu..M concentration Zn/sup +2/ inhibited the enzyme activity by about 30% while Mn/sup +2/ elevated the activity by about the same margin. Mg/sup +2/, Ca/sup +2/ and Fe/sup +2/ were without effect at this concentration. L-Glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate is known to be bactericidal at 1.25 ..mu..M concentration and the D-enantiomer is without effect. Furthermore, methylglyoxal is known to be bactericidal at or above 0.5 mM concentration. Strains of E. coli resistant to 1 mM methylglyoxal were isolated. The cell extract prepared from the mutant possessed increased capacity to transform methylglyoxal into D-lactate via a glutathione dependent reaction. These mutants were less sensitive to 2.5 mM DL-GAP suggesting that conversion of L-glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate into methylglyoxal may at least partly be responsible for the bactericidal activity of L-GAP.

  9. Mechanism of gallic acid biosynthesis in bacteria (Escherichia coli) and walnut (Juglans regia).

    PubMed

    Muir, Ryann M; Ibáñez, Ana M; Uratsu, Sandra L; Ingham, Elizabeth S; Leslie, Charles A; McGranahan, Gale H; Batra, Neelu; Goyal, Sham; Joseph, Jorly; Jemmis, Eluvathingal D; Dandekar, Abhaya M

    2011-04-01

    Gallic acid (GA), a key intermediate in the synthesis of plant hydrolysable tannins, is also a primary anti-inflammatory, cardio-protective agent found in wine, tea, and cocoa. In this publication, we reveal the identity of a gene and encoded protein essential for GA synthesis. Although it has long been recognized that plants, bacteria, and fungi synthesize and accumulate GA, the pathway leading to its synthesis was largely unknown. Here we provide evidence that shikimate dehydrogenase (SDH), a shikimate pathway enzyme essential for aromatic amino acid synthesis, is also required for GA production. Escherichia coli (E. coli) aroE mutants lacking a functional SDH can be complemented with the plant enzyme such that they grew on media lacking aromatic amino acids and produced GA in vitro. Transgenic Nicotiana tabacum lines expressing a Juglans regia SDH exhibited a 500% increase in GA accumulation. The J. regia and E. coli SDH was purified via overexpression in E. coli and used to measure substrate and cofactor kinetics, following reduction of NADP(+) to NADPH. Reversed-phase liquid chromatography coupled to electrospray mass spectrometry (RP-LC/ESI-MS) was used to quantify and validate GA production through dehydrogenation of 3-dehydroshikimate (3-DHS) by purified E. coli and J. regia SDH when shikimic acid (SA) or 3-DHS were used as substrates and NADP(+) as cofactor. Finally, we show that purified E. coli and J. regia SDH produced GA in vitro.

  10. Uropathogenic virulence factor FimH facilitates binding of uteropathogenic Escherichia coli to canine endometrium.

    PubMed

    Krekeler, N; Marenda, M S; Browning, G F; Holden, K M; Charles, J A; Wright, P J

    2012-09-01

    Pyometra is a potentially life-threatening condition in bitches and is often caused by Escherichia coli infection. Both pathogenic and non-pathogenic E. coli strains commonly carry the genes for type 1 fimbriae that mediate bacterial adhesion onto host epithelium. To investigate whether the type 1 fimbrial adhesin, FimH, facilitates the binding of uropathogenic E. coli to canine endometrium, the fimH gene was insertionally inactivated in a pathogenic E. coli strain. The ability of E. coli to bind to canine endometrial epithelial cells was determined in vitro using canine uterine biopsies. Binding of the fimH mutant was only 0.3% of that of the wild type. Complementation of the mutation restored the phenotype to that of the parent. This study has developed an in vitro model that allows quantitative and qualitative assessment of bacterial binding to canine endometrium and has demonstrated that the fimH gene plays a role in adherence of pathogenic E. coli to canine endometrium. PMID:22554919

  11. Recombinant expression of Streptococcus pneumoniae capsular polysaccharides in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Kay, Emily J.; Yates, Laura E.; Terra, Vanessa S.; Cuccui, Jon; Wren, Brendan W.

    2016-01-01

    Currently, Streptococcus pneumoniae is responsible for over 14 million cases of pneumonia worldwide annually, and over 1 million deaths, the majority of them children. The major determinant for pathogenesis is a polysaccharide capsule that is variable and is used to distinguish strains based on their serotype. The capsule forms the basis of the pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPV23) that contains purified capsular polysaccharide from 23 serotypes, and the pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13), containing 13 common serotypes conjugated to CRM197 (mutant diphtheria toxin). Purified capsule from S. pneumoniae is required for pneumococcal conjugate vaccine production, and costs can be prohibitively high, limiting accessibility of the vaccine in low-income countries. In this study, we demonstrate the recombinant expression of the capsule-encoding locus from four different serotypes of S. pneumoniae within Escherichia coli. Furthermore, we attempt to identify the minimum set of genes necessary to reliably and efficiently express these capsules heterologously. These E. coli strains could be used to produce a supply of S. pneumoniae serotype-specific capsules without the need to culture pathogenic bacteria. Additionally, these strains could be applied to synthetic glycobiological applications: recombinant vaccine production using E. coli outer membrane vesicles or coupling to proteins using protein glycan coupling technology. PMID:27110302

  12. Isolation of generalized transducing bacteriophages for uropathogenic strains of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Battaglioli, E J; Baisa, G A; Weeks, A E; Schroll, R A; Hryckowian, A J; Welch, R A

    2011-09-01

    The traditional genetic procedure for random or site-specific mutagenesis in Escherichia coli K-12 involves mutagenesis, isolation of mutants, and transduction of the mutation into a clean genetic background. The transduction step reduces the likelihood of complications due to secondary mutations. Though well established, this protocol is not tenable for many pathogenic E. coli strains, such as uropathogenic strain CFT073, because it is resistant to known K-12 transducing bacteriophages, such as P1. CFT073 mutants generated via a technique such as lambda Red mutagenesis may contain unknown secondary mutations. Here we describe the isolation and characterization of transducing bacteriophages for CFT073. Seventy-seven phage isolates were acquired from effluent water samples collected from a wastewater treatment plant in Madison, WI. The phages were differentiated by a host sensitivity-typing scheme with a panel of E. coli strains from the ECOR collection and clinical uropathogenic isolates. We found 49 unique phage isolates. These were then examined for their ability to transduce antibiotic resistance gene insertions at multiple loci between different mutant strains of CFT073. We identified 4 different phages capable of CFT073 generalized transduction. These phages also plaque on the model uropathogenic E. coli strains 536, UTI89, and NU14. The highest-efficiency transducing phage, ΦEB49, was further characterized by DNA sequence analysis, revealing a double-stranded genome 47,180 bp in length and showing similarity to other sequenced phages. When combined with a technique like lambda Red mutagenesis, the newly characterized transducing phages provide a significant development in the genetic tools available for the study of uropathogenic E. coli.

  13. Regulation of alcohol fermentation by Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, D.P.

    1986-03-01

    The purpose of this project is to elucidate the way in which the fermentative synthesis of ethanol is regulated in the facultative anaerobe Escherichia coli. Focus is on the two final steps in alcohol synthesis, which are catalyzed by alcohol dehydrogenase and acetaldehyde CoA dehydrogenase. We have isolated a series of mutations affecting the expression of these enzymes. Some of these mutations are in the structural genes for these enzymes; others affect the regulation of the adh operon. We have recently cloned the genes coding for these enzymes and are now studying the effect of multiple copies of the adh gene on fermentative growth and its regulation. A recently invented technique, proton suicide has allowed the selection of a variety of novel mutants affecting fermentation which are presently being characterized. We have isolated a comprehensive collection of operon fusions in which the lacZ structural gene is fused to promoters that are inactive aerobically but active anaerobically. Although these genes (like adh) are only expressed under anaerobic conditions, the level of induction varies from two-fold to nearly 100-fold. The nitrogen source, medium pH, nature of the buffer, presence of alternative electron acceptors (e.g., nitrate), and other factors exert a great effect on the expression of many of these genes. In the near future we will investigate control mechanisms common to the adh operon and other anaerobically regulated genes.

  14. Eclipse period without sequestration in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Olsson, Jan; Dasgupta, Santanu; Berg, Otto G; Nordström, Kurt

    2002-06-01

    The classical Meselson-Stahl density shift experiment was used to determine the length of the eclipse period in Escherichia coli, the minimum time period during which no new initiation is allowed from a newly replicated origin of chromosome replication, oriC. Populations of bacteria growing exponentially in heavy ((15)NH(4)+ and (13)C(6)-glucose) medium were shifted to light ((14)NH(4)+ and (12)C(6)-glucose) medium. The HH-, HL- and LL-DNA were separated by CsCl density gradient centrifugation, and their relative amounts were determined using radioactive gene-specific probes. The eclipse period, estimated from the kinetics of conversion of HH-DNA to HL- and LL-DNA, turned out to be 0.60 generation times for the wild-type strain. This was invariable for widely varying doubling times (35, 68 and 112 min) and was independent of the chromosome locus at which the eclipse period was measured. For strains with seqA, dam and damseqA mutants, the length of the eclipse period was 0.16, 0.40 and 0.32 generation times respectively. Thus, initiations from oriC were repressed for a considerable proportion of the generation time even when the sequestration function seemed to be severely compromised. The causal relationship between the length of the eclipse period and the synchrony of initiations from oriC is discussed.

  15. Oligosaccharide Binding in Escherichia coli Glycogen Synthase

    SciTech Connect

    Sheng, Fang; Yep, Alejandra; Feng, Lei; Preiss, Jack; Geiger, James H.

    2010-11-17

    Glycogen/starch synthase elongates glucan chains and is the key enzyme in the synthesis of glycogen in bacteria and starch in plants. Cocrystallization of Escherichia coli wild-type glycogen synthase (GS) with substrate ADPGlc and the glucan acceptor mimic HEPPSO produced a closed form of GS and suggests that domain-domain closure accompanies glycogen synthesis. Cocrystallization of the inactive GS mutant E377A with substrate ADPGlc and oligosaccharide results in the first oligosaccharide-bound glycogen synthase structure. Four bound oligosaccharides are observed, one in the interdomain cleft (G6a) and three on the N-terminal domain surface (G6b, G6c, and G6d). Extending from the center of the enzyme to the interdomain cleft opening, G6a mostly interacts with the highly conserved N-terminal domain residues lining the cleft of GS. The surface-bound oligosaccharides G6c and G6d have less interaction with enzyme and exhibit a more curled, helixlike structural arrangement. The observation that oligosaccharides bind only to the N-terminal domain of GS suggests that glycogen in vivo probably binds to only one side of the enzyme to ensure unencumbered interdomain movement, which is required for efficient, continuous glucan-chain synthesis.

  16. Investigation of various genotype characteristics for inosine accumulation in Escherichia coli W3110.

    PubMed

    Matsui, H; Kawasaki, H; Shimaoka, M; Kurahashi, O

    2001-03-01

    For the derivation of an inosine-overproducing strain from the wild type microorganism, it is known that the addition of an adenine requirement, removal of purine nucleoside hydrolyzing activity, removal of the feedback inhibition, and repression of key enzymes in the purine nucleotides biosynthetic pathway are essential. Thus, the disruption of purA (adenine requirement), deoD (removal of purine nucleosides phosphorylase activity), purR (derepression of the regulation of purine nucleotides biosynthetic pathway), and the insensitivity of the feedback inhibition of phosphoribosylpyrophosphate (PRPP) amidotransferase by adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP) and guanosine 5'-monophosphate (GMP) were done in the Escherichia coli strain W3110, and then the inosine productivity was estimated. In the case of using a plasmid harboring the PRPP amidotransferase gene (purF) that encoded a desensitized PRPP amidotransferase, purF disrupted mutants were used as the host strains. It was found that the innovation of the four genotypes brought about a small amount of inosine accumulation. Furthermore, an adenine auxotrophic mutant of E. coli showed inappropriate adenine use because its growth could not respond efficiently to the concentration of adenine added. As the presence of adenosine deaminase is well known in E. coli and it is thought to be involved in adenine use, a mutant disrupted adenosine deaminase gene (add) was constructed and tested. The mutant, which is deficient in purF, purA, deoD, purR, and add genes, and harboring the desensitized purF as a plasmid, accumulated about 1 g of inosine per liter. Although we investigated the effects of purR disruption and purF gene improvement, unexpectedly an increase in the inosine productivity could not be found with this mutant.

  17. Protozoan Predation of Escherichia coli O157:H7 Is Unaffected by the Carriage of Shiga Toxin-Encoding Bacteriophages.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Carrie E; Shringi, Smriti; Besser, Thomas E

    2016-01-01

    Escherichia coli O157:H7 is a food-borne bacterium that causes hemorrhagic diarrhea and hemolytic uremic syndrome in humans. While cattle are a known source of E. coli O157:H7 exposure resulting in human infection, environmental reservoirs may also be important sources of infection for both cattle and humans. Bacteriophage-encoded Shiga toxins (Stx) carried by E. coli O157:H7 may provide a selective advantage for survival of these bacteria in the environment, possibly through their toxic effects on grazing protozoa. To determine Stx effects on protozoan grazing, we co-cultured Paramecium caudatum, a common ciliate protozoon in cattle water sources, with multiple strains of Shiga-toxigenic E. coli O157:H7 and non-Shiga toxigenic cattle commensal E. coli. Over three days at ambient laboratory temperature, P. caudatum consistently reduced both E. coli O157:H7 and non-Shiga toxigenic E. coli populations by 1-3 log cfu. Furthermore, a wild-type strain of Shiga-toxigenic E. coli O157:H7 (EDL933) and isogenic mutants lacking the A subunit of Stx 2a, the entire Stx 2a-encoding bacteriophage, and/or the entire Stx 1-encoding bacteriophage were grazed with similar efficacy by both P. caudatum and Tetrahymena pyriformis (another ciliate protozoon). Therefore, our data provided no evidence of a protective effect of either Stx or the products of other bacteriophage genes on protozoan predation of E. coli. Further research is necessary to determine if the grazing activity of naturally-occurring protozoa in cattle water troughs can serve to decrease cattle exposure to E. coli O157:H7 and other Shiga-toxigenic E. coli. PMID:26824472

  18. Protozoan Predation of Escherichia coli O157:H7 Is Unaffected by the Carriage of Shiga Toxin-Encoding Bacteriophages

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Carrie E.; Shringi, Smriti; Besser, Thomas E.

    2016-01-01

    Escherichia coli O157:H7 is a food-borne bacterium that causes hemorrhagic diarrhea and hemolytic uremic syndrome in humans. While cattle are a known source of E. coli O157:H7 exposure resulting in human infection, environmental reservoirs may also be important sources of infection for both cattle and humans. Bacteriophage-encoded Shiga toxins (Stx) carried by E. coli O157:H7 may provide a selective advantage for survival of these bacteria in the environment, possibly through their toxic effects on grazing protozoa. To determine Stx effects on protozoan grazing, we co-cultured Paramecium caudatum, a common ciliate protozoon in cattle water sources, with multiple strains of Shiga-toxigenic E. coli O157:H7 and non-Shiga toxigenic cattle commensal E. coli. Over three days at ambient laboratory temperature, P. caudatum consistently reduced both E. coli O157:H7 and non-Shiga toxigenic E. coli populations by 1–3 log cfu. Furthermore, a wild-type strain of Shiga-toxigenic E. coli O157:H7 (EDL933) and isogenic mutants lacking the A subunit of Stx 2a, the entire Stx 2a-encoding bacteriophage, and/or the entire Stx 1-encoding bacteriophage were grazed with similar efficacy by both P. caudatum and Tetrahymena pyriformis (another ciliate protozoon). Therefore, our data provided no evidence of a protective effect of either Stx or the products of other bacteriophage genes on protozoan predation of E. coli. Further research is necessary to determine if the grazing activity of naturally-occurring protozoa in cattle water troughs can serve to decrease cattle exposure to E. coli O157:H7 and other Shiga-toxigenic E. coli. PMID:26824472

  19. Protozoan Predation of Escherichia coli O157:H7 Is Unaffected by the Carriage of Shiga Toxin-Encoding Bacteriophages.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Carrie E; Shringi, Smriti; Besser, Thomas E

    2016-01-01

    Escherichia coli O157:H7 is a food-borne bacterium that causes hemorrhagic diarrhea and hemolytic uremic syndrome in humans. While cattle are a known source of E. coli O157:H7 exposure resulting in human infection, environmental reservoirs may also be important sources of infection for both cattle and humans. Bacteriophage-encoded Shiga toxins (Stx) carried by E. coli O157:H7 may provide a selective advantage for survival of these bacteria in the environment, possibly through their toxic effects on grazing protozoa. To determine Stx effects on protozoan grazing, we co-cultured Paramecium caudatum, a common ciliate protozoon in cattle water sources, with multiple strains of Shiga-toxigenic E. coli O157:H7 and non-Shiga toxigenic cattle commensal E. coli. Over three days at ambient laboratory temperature, P. caudatum consistently reduced both E. coli O157:H7 and non-Shiga toxigenic E. coli populations by 1-3 log cfu. Furthermore, a wild-type strain of Shiga-toxigenic E. coli O157:H7 (EDL933) and isogenic mutants lacking the A subunit of Stx 2a, the entire Stx 2a-encoding bacteriophage, and/or the entire Stx 1-encoding bacteriophage were grazed with similar efficacy by both P. caudatum and Tetrahymena pyriformis (another ciliate protozoon). Therefore, our data provided no evidence of a protective effect of either Stx or the products of other bacteriophage genes on protozoan predation of E. coli. Further research is necessary to determine if the grazing activity of naturally-occurring protozoa in cattle water troughs can serve to decrease cattle exposure to E. coli O157:H7 and other Shiga-toxigenic E. coli.

  20. Extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Smith, James L; Fratamico, Pina M; Gunther, Nereus W

    2007-01-01

    Extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC) possesses virulence traits that allow it to invade, colonize, and induce disease in bodily sites outside of the gastrointestinal tract. Human diseases caused by ExPEC include urinary tract infections, neonatal meningitis, sepsis, pneumonia, surgical site infections, as well as infections in other extraintestinal locations. ExPEC-induced diseases represent a large burden in terms of medical costs and productivity losses. In addition to human illnesses, ExPEC strains also cause extraintestinal infections in domestic animals and pets. A commonality of virulence factors has been demonstrated between human and animal ExPEC, suggesting that the organisms are zoonotic pathogens. ExPEC strains have been isolated from food products, in particular from raw meats and poultry, indicating that these organisms potentially represent a new class of foodborne pathogens. This review discusses various aspects of ExPEC, including its presence in food products, in animals used for food or as companion pets; the diseases ExPEC can cause; and the virulence factors and virulence mechanisms that cause disease.

  1. Chemotaxis in Escherichia coli: Methylation of che gene products

    PubMed Central

    Silverman, Michael; Simon, Melvin

    1977-01-01

    The products of three chemotaxis-specific genes in Escherichia coli, cheM, cheD, and cheZ, are methylated. The cheZ gene codes for the synthesis of a 24,000 molecular weight polypeptide that appears in the cytoplasm. cheM codes for the synthesis of a membrane-bound polypeptide with a molecular weight of 61,000. cheD codes for another membrane-bound polypeptide with an apparent molecular weight of 64,000. CheM- mutants show chemotaxis toward some attractants (Tar- phenotype), while CheD- mutants respond to other attractants (Tsr- phenotype). The double mutant (CheD-, CheM-) does not respond to any attractant or repellent tested. Therefore, these polypeptides play a central role in chemotaxis. They collect information from two subsets of chemoreceptors and act as the last step in the chemoreceptor pathway and the first step in the general processing of signals for transmission to the flagellar rotor. It is suggested that they may be involved in both an initial process that reflects the instantaneous state of the chemoreceptors and in an integrative, adaptive process. Two other genes, cheX and cheW, are required for the methylation of the cheD and cheM gene products. Images PMID:333434

  2. Transcriptomic analysis of triclosan-susceptible and -tolerant Escherichia coli O157:H19 in response to triclosan exposure.

    PubMed

    Lenahan, Mary; Sheridan, Áine; Morris, Dermot; Duffy, Geraldine; Fanning, Séamus; Burgess, Catherine M

    2014-04-01

    Triclosan is an active agent that is commonly found in biocide formulations which are used by the food industry to control microbial contamination. The aim of this study was to use microarray analysis to compare gene expression between a triclosan-susceptible Escherichia coli O157:H19 isolate (minimum inhibitory concentration [MIC] 6.25 μg/ml) and its in vitro generated triclosan-tolerant mutant (MIC >8,000 μg/ml). Gene expression profiling was performed on the wild-type and mutant isogenic pairs after 30 min exposure to the parent MIC for triclosan and an untreated control. Microarray analysis was carried out using the Affymetrix GeneChip E. coli Genome 2.0 Array, and differential expression of genes was analyzed using the pumaDE method in Bioconductor R software. Wild-type gene expression was found to be significantly different from the triclosan-tolerant mutant for a large number of genes, even in the absence of triclosan exposure. Significant differences were observed in the expression of a number of pathway genes involved in metabolism, transport, and chemotaxis. In particular, gene expression in the triclosan-tolerant mutant was highly up-regulated for 33 of 38 genes belonging to the flagellar assembly pathway. The presence of extended flagella in the mutant isolate was confirmed visually by transmission electron microscopy, although no significant difference was observed in the motility of the parent and mutant at low levels of triclosan. Data from this study show that at a transcriptomic level, a triclosan-tolerant E. coli O157:H19 mutant is significantly different from the wild-type strain in a number of different pathways, providing an increased understanding of triclosan tolerance.

  3. Molecular intermediates of fitness gain of an RNA virus: characterization of a mutant spectrum by biological and molecular cloning.

    PubMed

    Arias, A; Lázaro, E; Escarmís, C; Domingo, E

    2001-05-01

    The mutant spectrum of a virus quasispecies in the process of fitness gain of a debilitated foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) clone has been analysed. The mutant spectrum was characterized by nucleotide sequencing of three virus genomic regions (internal ribosome entry site; region between the two AUG initiation codons; VP1-coding region) from 70 biological clones (virus from individual plaques formed on BHK-21 cell monolayers) and 70 molecular clones (RT--PCR products cloned in E. coli). The biological and molecular clones provided statistically indistinguishable definitions of the mutant spectrum with regard to the distribution of mutations among the three genomic regions analysed and with regard to the types of mutations, mutational hot-spots and mutation frequencies. Therefore, the molecular cloning procedure employed provides a simple protocol for the characterization of mutant spectra of viruses that do not grow in cell culture. The number of mutations found repeated among the clones analysed was higher than expected from the mean mutation frequencies. Some components of the mutant spectrum reflected genomes that were dominant in the prior evolutionary history of the virus (previous passages), confirming the presence of memory genomes in virus quasispecies. Other components of the mutant spectrum were genomes that became dominant at a later stage of evolution, suggesting a predictive value of mutant spectrum analysis with regard to the outcome of virus evolution. The results underline the observation that greater insight into evolutionary processes of viruses may be gained from detailed clonal analyses of the mutant swarms at the sequence level.

  4. Outsider to insider: resetting the natural host niche of commensal E. coli K-12.

    PubMed

    Sahu, Upasana; Kar, Sudeshna

    2012-01-01

    The status of E. coli K-12 as an exclusively non-invasive, non-pathogenic bacterium has almost been incontrovertible. Our recent finding that a mutation in one of its main architectural protein, HU, converts E. coli K-12 to an actively invasive form suggests that gaining host cell entry might be an expedient survival tactic for traditional commensals during certain altered host conditions. The mutant E. coli (SK3842) exhibits properties usually associated with pathogenic bacteria: host cell invasion, phagosomal disruption and intracellular replication. However, unlike the situation with some pathogens, internalized SK3842 imparts anti-apoptotic and cyto-protective effects rather than lethality on the host cell, both in vitro and in vivo. Here, we show that SK3842 also provides colonization resistance against other invasive pathogens--a trait not shared by the parental commensal strain. Thus, the altered lifestyle of SK3842 encompasses characteristics both from traditional pathogens as well as beneficial probiotic strains.

  5. Molecular genetic analysis of the Escherichia coli phoP locus.

    PubMed

    Groisman, E A; Heffron, F; Solomon, F

    1992-01-01

    We have cloned the Escherichia coli phoP gene, a member of the family of environmentally responsive two-component systems, and found its deduced amino acid sequence to be 93% identical to that of the Salmonella typhimurium homolog, which encodes a major virulence regulator necessary for intramacrophage survival and resistance to cationic peptides of phagocytic cells. The phoP gene was mapped to kilobase 1202 on the Kohara map (25-min region) of the E. coli genome (Y. Kohara, K. Akiyama, and K. Isono, Cell 50:495-508, 1987) and found to be transcribed in a counterclockwise direction. Both E. coli and S. typhimurium phoP mutants were more sensitive than their isogenic wild-type strains to the frog-derived antibacterial peptide magainin 2, suggesting a role for PhoP in the response to various stresses in both enteric species. PMID:1530848

  6. Cycling expression and cooperative operator interaction in the trp operon of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Valdez, Areli; Santillán, Moisés; Zeron, Eduardo S

    2010-04-01

    Oscillatory behaviour in the tryptophan operon of an Escherichia coli mutant strain lacking the enzyme-inhibition regulatory mechanism has been observed by Bliss et al. but not confirmed by others. This behaviour could be important from the standpoint of synthetic biology, whose goals include the engineering of intracellular genetic oscillators. This work is devoted to investigating, from a mathematical modelling point of view, the possibility that the trp operon of the E. coli inhibition-free strain expresses cyclically. For that we extend a previously introduced model for the regulatory pathway of the tryptophan operon in Escherichia coli to account for the observed multiplicity and cooperativity of repressor binding sites. Thereafter we investigate the model dynamics using deterministic numeric solutions, stochastic simulations, and analytic studies. Our results suggest that a quasi-periodic behaviour could be observed in the trp operon expression level of single bacteria. PMID:20004672

  7. Interplay between enterobactin, myeloperoxidase and lipocalin 2 regulates E. coli survival in the inflamed gut.

    PubMed

    Singh, Vishal; Yeoh, Beng San; Xiao, Xia; Kumar, Manish; Bachman, Michael; Borregaard, Niels; Joe, Bina; Vijay-Kumar, Matam

    2015-01-01

    During an inflammatory response in the gut, some commensal bacteria such as E. coli can thrive and contribute to disease. Here we demonstrate that enterobactin (Ent), a catecholate siderophore released by E. coli, is a potent inhibitor of myeloperoxidase (MPO), a bactericidal enzyme of the host. Glycosylated Ent (salmochelin) and non-catecholate siderophores (yersiniabactin and ferrichrome) fail to inhibit MPO activity. An E. coli mutant (ΔfepA) that overproduces Ent, but not an Ent-deficient double mutant (ΔaroB/ΔfepA), inhibits MPO activity and exhibits enhanced survival in inflamed guts. This survival advantage is counter-regulated by lipocalin 2, a siderophore-binding host protein, which rescues MPO from Ent-mediated inhibition. Spectral analysis reveals that Ent interferes with compound I [oxoiron, Fe(IV)=O] and reverts the enzyme back to its native ferric [Fe(III)] state. These findings define a fundamental mechanism by which E. coli surpasses the host innate immune responses during inflammatory gut diseases and gains a distinct survival advantage. PMID:25964185

  8. Supercoiling Effects on Short-Range DNA Looping in E. coli

    PubMed Central

    Mogil, Lauren S.; Becker, Nicole A.; Maher, L. James

    2016-01-01

    DNA-protein loops can be essential for gene regulation. The Escherichia coli lactose (lac) operon is controlled by DNA-protein loops that have been studied for decades. Here we adapt this model to test the hypothesis that negative superhelical strain facilitates the formation of short-range (6–8 DNA turns) repression loops in E. coli. The natural negative superhelicity of E. coli DNA is regulated by the interplay of gyrase and topoisomerase enzymes, adding or removing negative supercoils, respectively. Here, we measured quantitatively DNA looping in three different E. coli strains characterized by different levels of global supercoiling: wild type, gyrase mutant (gyrB226), and topoisomerase mutant (ΔtopA10). DNA looping in each strain was measured by assaying repression of the endogenous lac operon, and repression of ten reporter constructs with DNA loop sizes between 70–85 base pairs. Our data are most simply interpreted as supporting the hypothesis that negative supercoiling facilitates gene repression by small DNA-protein loops in living bacteria. PMID:27783696

  9. Three New Escherichia coli Phages from the Human Gut Show Promising Potential for Phage Therapy.

    PubMed

    Dalmasso, Marion; Strain, Ronan; Neve, Horst; Franz, Charles M A P; Cousin, Fabien J; Ross, R Paul; Hill, Colin

    2016-01-01

    With the emergence of multi-drug resistant bacteria the use of bacteriophages (phages) is gaining renewed interest as promising anti-microbial agents. The aim of this study was to isolate and characterize phages from human fecal samples. Three new coliphages, ɸAPCEc01, ɸAPCEc02 and ɸAPCEc03, were isolated. Their phenotypic and genomic characteristics, and lytic activity against biofilm, and in combination with ciprofloxacin, were investigated. All three phages reduced the growth of E. coli strain DPC6051 at multiplicity of infection (MOI) between 10-3 and 105. A cocktail of all three phages completely inhibited the growth of E. coli. The phage cocktail also reduced biofilm formation and prevented the emergence of phage-resistant mutants which occurred with single phage. When combined with ciprofloxacin, phage alone or in cocktail inhibited the growth of E. coli and prevented the emergence of resistant mutants. These three new phages are promising biocontrol agents for E. coli infections. PMID:27280590

  10. Three New Escherichia coli Phages from the Human Gut Show Promising Potential for Phage Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Dalmasso, Marion; Strain, Ronan; Neve, Horst; Franz, Charles M. A. P.; Cousin, Fabien J.; Ross, R. Paul; Hill, Colin

    2016-01-01

    With the emergence of multi-drug resistant bacteria the use of bacteriophages (phages) is gaining renewed interest as promising anti-microbial agents. The aim of this study was to isolate and characterize phages from human fecal samples. Three new coliphages, ɸAPCEc01, ɸAPCEc02 and ɸAPCEc03, were isolated. Their phenotypic and genomic characteristics, and lytic activity against biofilm, and in combination with ciprofloxacin, were investigated. All three phages reduced the growth of E. coli strain DPC6051 at multiplicity of infection (MOI) between 10−3 and 105. A cocktail of all three phages completely inhibited the growth of E. coli. The phage cocktail also reduced biofilm formation and prevented the emergence of phage-resistant mutants which occurred with single phage. When combined with ciprofloxacin, phage alone or in cocktail inhibited the growth of E. coli and prevented the emergence of resistant mutants. These three new phages are promising biocontrol agents for E. coli infections. PMID:27280590

  11. F4+ enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) adhesion mediated by the major fimbrial subunit FaeG.

    PubMed

    Xia, Pengpeng; Song, Yujie; Zou, Yajie; Yang, Ying; Zhu, Guoqiang

    2015-09-01

    The FaeG subunit is the major constituent of F4(+) fimbriae, associated with glycoprotein and/or glycolipid receptor recognition and majorly contributes to the pathogen attachment to the host cells. To investigate the key factor involved in the fimbrial binding of F4(+) Escherichia coli, both the recombinant E. coli SE5000 strains carrying the fae operon gene clusters that express the different types of fimbriae in vitro, named as rF4ab, rF4ac, and rF4ad, respectively, corresponding to the fimbrial types F4ab, F4ac, and F4ad, and the three isogenic in-frame faeG gene deletion mutants were constructed. The adhesion assays and adhesion inhibition assays showed that ΔfaeG mutants had a significant reduction in the binding to porcine brush border as well as the intestinal epithelial cell lines, while the complemented strain ΔfaeG/pfaeG restored the adhesion function. The recombinant bacterial strains rF4ab, rF4ac, and rF4ad have the same binding property as wild-type F4(+) E. coli strains do and improvement in terms of binding to porcine brush border and the intestinal epithelial cells, and the adherence was blocked by the monoclonal antibody anti-F4 fimbriae. These data demonstrate that the fimbrial binding of F4(+) E. coli is directly mediated by the major FaeG subunit. PMID:25847483

  12. Novel Mutations Affecting a Signaling Component for Chemotaxis of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Parkinson, John S.

    1980-01-01

    The genetic relationship between tsr and cheD mutations, which affect chemotactic ability and map at approximately 99 min on the Escherichia coli chromosome, was investigated. Mutants defective in tsr function typically exhibited wild-type swimming patterns, but were unable to carry out chemotactic responses to a number of attractant and repellent chemicals. In contrast, cheD mutants swam smoothly, with few spontaneous directional changes, and were generally nonchemotactic. In complementation tests, cheD mutations, unlike tsr, proved to be dominant to wild type, suggesting that the cheD defect might be due to an active inhibitor of chemotaxis. Mutations that inactivated the putative inhibitor were obtained by selecting for restoration of chemotactic ability or for loss of cheD dominance. The resultant double mutants were shown to carry the original cheD mutation and a second tightly linked mutation, some of which exhibited nonsense or temperature-sensitive phenotypes, implying that they had occurred in a structural gene for a protein. All such double mutants behaved like typical tsr mutants in all other respects, including complementation pattern, swimming behavior, and chemotactic ability. These findings implied that either overproduction of tsr product or synthesis of an aberrant tsr product was responsible for the chemotaxis defect of cheD strains. Such mutants should be useful in analyzing the role of the tsr product in chemotactic responses. Images PMID:6991496

  13. Introduction of two mutations into AroG increases phenylalanine production in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Ding, Rui; Liu, Lifei; Chen, Xuhui; Cui, Zhenhai; Zhang, Ao; Ren, Daming; Zhang, Lijun

    2014-10-01

    L-Phenylalanine is an important amino acid commercially, and therefore optimization of its manufacture is of interest. We constructed a range of mutant alleles of AroG, the enzyme involved in the first step of phenylalanine biosynthesis. Three single-site mutant alleles were constructed (aroG8, aroG15, and aroG29), which were then combined to generate three double-site aroG (fbr) mutant alleles (aroG8/15, aroG8/29, and aroG15/29). Enzymatic activity, feedback inhibition, and fermentation were analyzed in all of the mutants. All double-site mutants, except AroG15/29, showed higher enzymatic activity and greater resistance to feedback inhibition than their respective single-site mutants. The E. coli strain carrying the aroG8/15 allele produced a phenylalanine titer of 26.78 g/l, a 116 % improvement over the control phenylalanine overproducing strain (12.41 g/l). Our findings provide an effective method for modifying phenylalanine biosynthetic genes, which may be applied to optimize the commercial manufacture of phenylalanine.

  14. Phanerochaete mutants with enhanced ligninolytic activity

    SciTech Connect

    Kakar, S.N.; Perez, A.; Gonzales, J.

    1993-06-01

    In addition to lignin, the white rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium has the ability to degrade a wide spectrum of recalcitrant organopollutants in soils and aqueous media. Although some of the organic compounds are degraded under nonligninolytic conditions, most are degraded under ligninolytic conditions with the involvement of the extracellular enzymes, lignin peroxidases, and manganese-dependent peroxidases, which are produced as secondary metabolites triggered by conditions of nutrient starvation (e.g., nitrogen limitation). The fungus and its enzymes can thus provide alternative technologies for bioremediation, biopulping, biobleaching, and other industrial applications. The efficiency and effectiveness of the fungus can be enhanced by increasing production and secretion of the important enzymes in large quantities and as primary metabolites under enriched conditions. One way this can be achieved is through isolation of mutants that are deregulated or are hyperproducers or supersecretors of key enzymes under enriched conditions. Through ultraviolet-light and gamma-rays mutagenesis we have isolated a variety of mutants, some of which produce key enzymes of the ligninolytic system under high-nitrogen growth conditions. One of the mutants produced 272 units (U) of lignin peroxidases enzyme activity per liter after nine days under high nitrogen. The mutant and the parent strains produced up to 54 U/L and 62 U/L, respectively, of the enzyme activity under low-nitrogen growth conditions during this period. In some experiments the mutant showed 281 U/L of enzyme activity under high nitrogen after 17 days.

  15. Accelerated bang recovery in Drosophila genderblind mutants.

    PubMed

    Featherstone, David E; Yanoga, Fatoumata; Grosjean, Yael

    2008-07-01

    Cystine-glutamate transporters import cystine into cells for glutathione synthesis and protection from oxidative stress, but also export significant amounts of glutamate. Increasing evidence suggests that 'ambient extracellular glutamate' secreted by cystine-glutamate transporters in the nervous system modulates glutamatergic synapse strength and behavior. To date, the only cystine-glutamate transporter mutants examined behaviorally are Drosophila genderblind mutants. These animals contain loss-of-function mutations in the 'genderblind' gene, which encodes an xCT subunit essential for cystine-glutamate transporter function. Genderblind was named based on a mutant courtship phenotype: male genderblind mutants are attracted to normally aversive male pheromones and thus court and attempt to copulate with both male and female partners equally. However, genderblind protein is expressed in many parts of the fly brain and thus might be expected to also regulate other behaviors, including behaviors not related to male courtship or chemosensation. Here, we show that genderblind mutants display faster recovery and increased negative geotaxis after strong mechanical stimuli (e.g., they climb faster and farther after vial banging). This phenotype is displayed by both males and females, consistent with strong genderblind expression in both sexes. PMID:19430543

  16. Role of the host cell in bacteriophage T4 development. II. Characterization of host mutants that have pleiotropic effects on T4 growth.

    PubMed Central

    Stitt, B L; Revel, H R; Lielausis, I; Wood, W B

    1980-01-01

    Mutant host-defective Escherichi coli that fail to propagate bacteriophage T4 and have a pleiotropic effect on T4 development have been isolated and characterized. In phage-infected mutant cells, specific early phage proteins are absent or reduced in amount, phage DNA synthesis is depressed by about 50%, specific structural phage proteins, including some tail and collar components, are deficient or missing, and host-cell lysis is delayed and slow. Almost all phage that can overcome the host block carry mutantions that map in functionally undefined 'nonessential' regions of the T4 genome, most near gene 39. The mutant host strains are temperature sensitive for growth and show simultaneous reversion of the ts phenotype and the inability to propagate T4+. The host mutations are cotransduced with ilv (83 min) and may lie in the gene for transcription termination factor rho. Images PMID:6999171

  17. Selection of affinity-improved neutralizing human scFv against HBV PreS1 from CDR3 VH/VL mutant library.

    PubMed

    Chen, YanMin; Bai, Yin; Guo, XiaoChen; Wang, WenFei; Zheng, Qi; Wang, FuXiang; Sun, Dejun; Li, DeShan; Ren, GuiPing; Yin, JieChao

    2016-07-01

    A CDR3 mutant library was constructed from a previously isolated anti-HBV neutralizing Homo sapiens scFv-31 template by random mutant primers PCR. Then the library was displayed on the inner membrane surface in Escherichia coli periplasmic space. Seven scFv clones were isolated from the mutant library through three rounds of screening by flow cytometry. Competition ELISA assay indicates that isolated scFv fragments show more efficient binding ability to HBV PreS1 compared with parental scFv-31. HBV neutralization assay indicated that two clones (scFv-3 and 59) show higher neutralizing activity by blocking the HBV infection to Chang liver cells. Our method provides a new strategy for rapid screening of mutant antibody library for affinity-enhanced scFv clones and the neutralizing scFvs obtained from this study provide a potential alternative of Hepatitis B immune globulin.

  18. A role of ygfZ in the Escherichia coli response to plumbagin challenge

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Plumbagin is found in many herbal plants and inhibits the growth of various bacteria. Escherichia coli strains are relatively resistant to this drug. The mechanism of resistance is not clear. Previous findings showed that plumbagin treatment triggered up-regulation of many genes in E. coli including ahpC, mdaB, nfnB, nfo, sodA, yggX and ygfZ. By analyzing minimal inhibition concentration and inhibition zones of plumbagin in various gene-disruption mutants, ygfZ and sodA were found critical for the bacteria to resist plumbagin toxicity. We also found that the roles of YgfZ and SodA in detoxifying plumbagin are independent of each other. This is because of the fact that ectopically expressed SodA reduced the superoxide stress but not restore the resistance of bacteria when encountering plumbagin at the absence of ygfZ. On the other hand, an ectopically expressed YgfZ was unable to complement and failed to rescue the plumbagin resistance when sodA was perturbed. Furthermore, mutagenesis analysis showed that residue Cys228 within YgfZ fingerprint region was critical for the resistance of E. coli to plumbagin. By solvent extraction and HPLC analysis to follow the fate of the chemical, it was found that plumbagin vanished apparently from the culture of YgfZ-expressing E. coli. A less toxic form, methylated plumbagin, which may represent one of the YgfZ-dependent metabolites, was found in the culture supernatant of the wild type E. coli but not in the ΔygfZ mutant. Our results showed that the presence of ygfZ is not only critical for the E coli resistance to plumbagin but also facilitates the plumbagin degradation. PMID:21059273

  19. Genetic studies on a nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium. [Anabaena; Escherichi coli

    SciTech Connect

    Wolk, C.P.; Cardemil, L.; Elhai, J.; Flores, E.; Murry, M.; Schmetterer, G.; Schrautemeier, B.

    1987-04-01

    Mutants of Anabaena PCC7120 capable of aerobic growth with NO/sub 3//sup -/ but not N/sub 2/, and capable of microaerobic reduction of C/sub 2/H/sub 2/, were isolated by penicillin enrichment after UV irradiation. Heterocysts of two mutants lack the principal envelope glycolipid, those of EF116 have a non-cohesive envelope polysaccharide, and those of other strains have other defects. A Nm/sup r/ cosmid library of DNA from wild type Anabaena PCC7120 was established in Escherichia coli bearing the Ap helper plasmid pDS4101. A conjugative plasmid was introduced, and the bacteria replicated to lawns of individual mutant strains of Anabaena. After one day of non-selective growth, selection was applied for Nm/sup r/ and nitrogen fixation. Overlapping cosmids complementing EF116 and one complementing another mutant have been mapped. The complementing genes are thought to act early in differentiation. Inclusion, in an E. coli donor of an appropriate methylase gene enhanced, by a factor of 10/sup 2/ to 10/sup 3/, transfer to Anabaena PCC7120 of a plasmid containing numerous sites for the Anabaena restriction endonuclease, AvaII.

  20. Structure of Escherichia coli dGTP triphosphohydrolase: a hexameric enzyme with DNA effector molecules.

    PubMed

    Singh, Deepa; Gawel, Damian; Itsko, Mark; Hochkoeppler, Alejandro; Krahn, Juno M; London, Robert E; Schaaper, Roel M

    2015-04-17

    The Escherichia coli dgt gene encodes a dGTP triphosphohydrolase whose detailed role still remains to be determined. Deletion of dgt creates a mutator phenotype, indicating that the dGTPase has a fidelity role, possibly by affecting the cellular dNTP pool. In the present study, we have investigated the structure of the Dgt protein at 3.1-Å resolution. One of the obtained structures revealed a protein hexamer that contained two molecules of single-stranded DNA. The presence of DNA caused significant conformational changes in the enzyme, including in the catalytic site of the enzyme. Dgt preparations lacking DNA were able to bind single-stranded DNA with high affinity (Kd ∼ 50 nM). DNA binding positively affected the activity of the enzyme: dGTPase activity displayed sigmoidal (cooperative) behavior without DNA but hyperbolic (Michaelis-Menten) kinetics in its presence, consistent with a specific lowering of the apparent Km for dGTP. A mutant Dgt enzyme was also created containing residue changes in the DNA binding cleft. This mutant enzyme, whereas still active, was incapable of DNA binding and could no longer be stimulated by addition of DNA. We also created an E. coli strain containing the mutant dgt gene on the chromosome replacing the wild-type gene. The mutant also displayed a mutator phenotype. Our results provide insight into the allosteric regulation of the enzyme and support a physiologically important role of DNA binding.

  1. Interaction of P2 bacteriophage with the dnaB gene of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Sunshine, M; Usher, D; Calendar, R

    1975-01-01

    The dnaB gene product of Escherischia coli is required for multiplication of temperate phage P2. At 37 C in dnaB-ts mutnats, P2 will not plaque and gives a very small burst of progeny. P2 mutants have been isolated which can grow well enough to plaque under these conditions. This type of phage mutant is cis dominant, and one such mutant (P2rlb1) has been mapped near the left end of the early gene B and to the right of the cox4 (excision) mutation. The rlb1 mutation does not lie at the replication origin, but may affect transcription in the early region, which includes the replication origin. It may also represent a site on the P2 DNA which interacts with the dnaB gene product. PMID:1097733

  2. Type 1 fimbrial expression enhances Escherichia coli virulence for the urinary tract.

    PubMed Central

    Connell, I; Agace, W; Klemm, P; Schembri, M; Mărild, S; Svanborg, C

    1996-01-01

    Type 1 fimbriae are adhesion organelles expressed by many Gram-negative bacteria. They facilitate adherence to mucosal surfaces and inflammatory cells in vitro, but their contribution to virulence has not been defined. This study presents evidence that type 1 fimbriae increase the virulence of Escherichia coli for the urinary tract by promoting bacterial persistence and enhancing the inflammatory response to infection. In a clinical study, we observed that disease severity was greater in children infected with E. coli O1:K1:H7 isolates expressing type 1 fimbriae than in those infected with type 1 negative isolates of the same serotype. The E. coli O1:K1:H7 isolates had the same electrophoretic type, were hemolysin-negative, expressed P fimbriae, and carried the fim DNA sequences. When tested in a mouse urinary tract infection model, the type 1-positive E. coli O1:K1:H7 isolates survived in higher numbers, and induced a greater neutrophil influx into the urine, than O1:K1:H7 type 1-negative isolates. To confirm a role of type 1 fimbriae, a fimH null mutant (CN1016) was constructed from an O1:K1:H7 type 1-positive parent. E. coli CN1016 had reduced survival and inflammatogenicity in the mouse urinary tract infection model. E. coli CN1016 reconstituted with type 1 fimbriae (E. coli CN1018) had restored virulence similar to that of the wild-type parent strain. These results show that type 1 fimbriae in the genetic background of a uropathogenic strain contribute to the pathogenesis of E. coli in the urinary tract. Images Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8790416

  3. Displacement of Escherichia coli O157:H7 from rumen medium containing prebiotic sugars.

    PubMed

    de Vaux, Albane; Morrison, Mark; Hutkins, Robert W

    2002-02-01

    A fed-batch, anaerobic culture system was developed to assess the behavior of Escherichia coli O157:H7 in a rumen-like environment. Fermentation medium consisted of either 50% (vol/vol) raw or sterile rumen fluid and 50% phosphate buffer. Additional rumen fluid was added twice per day, and samples were removed three times per day to simulate the exiting of digesta and microbes from the rumen environment under typical feeding regimens. With both types of medium, anaerobic and enteric bacteria reached 10(10) and 10(4) cells/ml, respectively, and were maintained at these levels for at least 5 days. When a rifampin-resistant strain of E. coli O157:H7 was inoculated into medium containing raw rumen fluid, growth did not occur. In contrast, when this strain was added to sterile rumen fluid medium, cell densities increased from 10(6) to 10(9) CFU/ml within 24 h. Most strains of E. coli O157:H7 are unable to ferment sorbitol; therefore, we assessed whether the addition of sorbitol as the only added carbohydrate could be used to competitively exclude E. coli O157:H7 from the culture system. When inoculated into raw rumen broth containing 3 g of sorbitol per liter, E. coli O157:H7 was displaced within 72 h. The addition of other competitive sugars, such as L-arabinose, trehalose, and rhamnose, to rumen medium gave similar results. However, whenever E. coli O157:H7 was grown in sterile rumen broth containing sorbitol, sorbitol-positive mutants appeared. These results suggest that a robust population of commensal ruminal microflora is required to invoke competitive exclusion of E. coli O157:H7 by the addition of "nonfermentable" sugars and that this approach may be effective as a preharvest strategy for reducing carriage of E. coli O157:H7 in the rumen.

  4. Enhanced cellulase production in mutants of Thermomonospora

    SciTech Connect

    Fennington, G.; Lupo, D.; Stutzenberger, F.

    1982-01-01

    Thermomonospora curvata, a thermophilic actinomycete, secretes multiple forms of endo-beta, 1-4-glucanase (EG) when grown on cellulose-mineral salts liquid medium. The EG activity (measured as carboxymethyl cellulose hydrolysis) was separated by ion exchange chromatography into three distinct components which differed in their kinetic properties. Exposure of T. curvata to ultraviolet light, N-nitrosoguanidine, or ethane methyl sulfonate produced mutants with enhanced EG production. Selection of colonies which cleared cellulose agar plants containing 2-deoxyglucose or glycerol yielded mutants having 1.5 to 2.6 times the extracellular EG and saccharifying activity (measured by filter-paper and cotton-fiber hydrolysis). The secretion of extracellular protein was increased proportionally in mutant cultures. (Refs. 40).

  5. [Synthetic lethal genes to mutant p53].

    PubMed

    Tongyang, Liu; Haiqiang, Guo; Meiyan, Zhu; Yingze, Huang; Shuting, Jia; Ying, Luo; Jihong, Zhang

    2015-04-01

    Targeted therapy has become a powerful approach for cancer treatment. Better understanding of oncogenes as well as synthetic lethal interactions with oncogenes will lead to new strategies for tumor-specific treatment. It is well known that mutant p53 plays an important role in tumorigenesis and tumor development. Thus, understanding the synthetic lethal relationship between p53 mutations and interacting genes in tumor is critical for the personalized treatments of p53 mutant tumors. Synthetic lethal genes to mutant p53 can be divided into cell cycle regulators and non-cell cycle regulators. This paper review show these two types of target genes contribute to synthetic lethal interactions with p53 mutations and potential applications of these interactions in anticancer therapy.

  6. High Persister Mutants in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Torrey, Heather L.; Keren, Iris; Via, Laura E.; Lee, Jong Seok; Lewis, Kim

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis forms drug-tolerant persister cells that are the probable cause of its recalcitrance to antibiotic therapy. While genetically identical to the rest of the population, persisters are dormant, which protects them from killing by bactericidal antibiotics. The mechanism of persister formation in M. tuberculosis is not well understood. In this study, we selected for high persister (hip) mutants and characterized them by whole genome sequencing and transcriptome analysis. In parallel, we identified and characterized clinical isolates that naturally produce high levels of persisters. We compared the hip mutants obtained in vitro with clinical isolates to identify candidate persister genes. Genes involved in lipid biosynthesis, carbon metabolism, toxin-antitoxin systems, and transcriptional regulators were among those identified. We also found that clinical hip isolates exhibited greater ex vivo survival than the low persister isolates. Our data suggest that M. tuberculosis persister formation involves multiple pathways, and hip mutants may contribute to the recalcitrance of the infection. PMID:27176494

  7. Structure of mutant human oncogene protein determined

    SciTech Connect

    Baum, R.

    1989-01-16

    The protein encoded by a mutant human oncogene differs only slightly in structure from the native protein that initiates normal cell division, a finding that may complicate efforts to develop inhibitors of the mutant protein. Previously, the x-ray structure of the protein encoded by the normal c-Ha-ras gene, a protein believed to signal cells to start or stop dividing through its interaction with guanosine triphosphate (GTP), was reported. The structure of the protein encoded by a transforming c-Ha-ras oncogene, in which a valine codon replaces the normal glycine codon at position 12 in the gene, has now been determined. The differences in the structures of the mutant and normal proteins are located primarily in a loop that interacts with the /beta/-phosphate of a bound guanosine diphosphate (GDP) molecule.

  8. Rapid Quantification of Mutant Fitness in Diverse Bacteria by Sequencing Randomly Bar-Coded Transposons

    PubMed Central

    Wetmore, Kelly M.; Price, Morgan N.; Waters, Robert J.; Lamson, Jacob S.; He, Jennifer; Hoover, Cindi A.; Blow, Matthew J.; Bristow, James; Butland, Gareth

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Transposon mutagenesis with next-generation sequencing (TnSeq) is a powerful approach to annotate gene function in bacteria, but existing protocols for TnSeq require laborious preparation of every sample before sequencing. Thus, the existing protocols are not amenable to the throughput necessary to identify phenotypes and functions for the majority of genes in diverse bacteria. Here, we present a method, random bar code transposon-site sequencing (RB-TnSeq), which increases the throughput of mutant fitness profiling by incorporating random DNA bar codes into Tn5 and mariner transposons and by using bar code sequencing (BarSeq) to assay mutant fitness. RB-TnSeq can be used with any transposon, and TnSeq is performed once per organism instead of once per sample. Each BarSeq assay requires only a simple PCR, and 48 to 96 samples can be sequenced on one lane of an Illumina HiSeq system. We demonstrate the reproducibility and biological significance of RB-TnSeq with Escherichia coli, Phaeobacter inhibens, Pseudomonas stutzeri, Shewanella amazonensis, and Shewanella oneidensis. To demonstrate the increased throughput of RB-TnSeq, we performed 387 successful genome-wide mutant fitness assays representing 130 different bacterium-carbon source combinations and identified 5,196 genes with significant phenotypes across the five bacteria. In P. inhibens, we used our mutant fitness data to identify genes important for the utilization of diverse carbon substrates, including a putative d-mannose isomerase that is required for mannitol catabolism. RB-TnSeq will enable the cost-effective functional annotation of diverse bacteria using mutant fitness profiling. PMID:25968644

  9. TOMATOMA: A Novel Tomato Mutant Database Distributing Micro-Tom Mutant Collections

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Takeshi; Ariizumi, Tohru; Okabe, Yoshihiro; Asamizu, Erika; Hiwasa-Tanase, Kyoko; Fukuda, Naoya; Mizoguchi, Tsuyoshi; Yamazaki, Yukiko; Aoki, Koh; Ezura, Hiroshi

    2011-01-01

    The tomato is an excellent model for studies of plants bearing berry-type fruits and for experimental studies of the Solanaceae family of plants due to its conserved genetic organization. In this study, a comprehensive mutant tomato population was generated in the background of Micro-Tom, a dwarf, rapid-growth variety. In this and previous studies, a family including 8,598 and 6,422 M2 mutagenized lines was produced by ethylmethane sulfonate (EMS) mutagenesis and γ-ray irradiation, and this study developed and investigated these M2 plants for alteration of visible phenotypes. A total of 9,183 independent M2 families comprising 91,830 M2 plants were inspected for phenotypic alteration, and 1,048 individual mutants were isolated. Subsequently, the observed mutant phenotypes were classified into 15 major categories and 48 subcategories. Overall, 1,819 phenotypic categories were found in 1,048 mutants. Of these mutants, 549 were pleiotropic, whereas 499 were non-pleiotropic. Multiple different mutant alleles per locus were found in the mutant libraries, suggesting that the mutagenized populations were nearly saturated. Additionally, genetic analysis of backcrosses indicated the successful inheritance of the mutations in BC1F2 populations, confirming the reproducibility in the morphological phenotyping of the M2 plants. To integrate and manage the visible phenotypes of mutants and other associated data, we developed the in silico database TOMATOMA, a relational system interfacing modules between mutant line names and phenotypic categories. TOMATOMA is a freely accessible database, and these mutant recourses are available through the TOMATOMA (http://tomatoma.nbrp.jp/index.jsp). PMID:21258066

  10. Behavioral characterization of system xc- mutant mice.

    PubMed

    McCullagh, Elizabeth A; Featherstone, David E

    2014-05-15

    The slc7a11 gene encodes xCT, an essential component of 'system xc-', a plasma membrane exchanger that imports cystine and exports glutamate. Slc7a11 is expressed primarily in the brain, but its role there is not clear. We performed behavioral tests on two different strains of homozygous slc7a11 mutant mice ('sut' and 'xCT'), as well as heteroallelic offspring of these two strains ('xCT/sut') and their associated genetic backgrounds. Homozygous sut mutant males showed reduced spontaneous alternation in spontaneous alternation tasks as well as reduced movement in an open field maze, but xCT and xCT/sut strains did not show significant changes in these tasks compared to appropriate controls. Neither xCT nor sut mutants showed differences from controls in rotarod tests. Female behavioral phenotypes were independent of estrus cycle stage. To ensure that homozygous xCT, sut, and xCT/sut strains all represent protein null alleles, we measured whole brain xCT protein levels using immunoblots. xCT, sut and xCT/sut strains showed no detectable xCT protein expression, confirming them as null alleles. Previously published microdialysis experiments showed reduced striatal glutamate in xCT mutants. Using the same methods, we measured reduced interstitial glutamate levels in the striatum but not cerebellum of sut mutants. However, we detected no glutamate change in the striatum or cerebellum of sut/xCT mice. We detected no changes in whole brain EAAT-1, -2, or -3 expression. We conclude that the behavioral and chemical differences exist between slc7a11 mutant strains, but we were unable to definitively attribute any of these differences to loss of system xc-.

  11. Asp residues of βDELSEED-motif are required for peptide binding in the Escherichia coli ATP synthase.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Zulfiqar; Tayou, Junior; Laughlin, Thomas F

    2015-04-01

    This study demonstrates the requirement of Asp-380 and Asp-386 in the βDELSEED-motif of Escherichia coli ATP synthase for peptide binding and inhibition. We studied the inhibition profiles of wild-type and mutant E. coli ATP synthase in presence of c-terminal amide bound melittin and melittin related peptide. Melittin and melittin related peptide inhibited wild-type ATPase almost completely while only partial inhibition was observed in single mutations with replacement of Asp to Ala, Gln, or Arg. Additionally, very little or no inhibition occurred among double mutants βD380A/βD386A, βD380Q/βD386Q, or βD380R/βD386R signifying that removal of one Asp residue allows limited peptide binding. Partial or substantial loss of oxidative phosphorylation among double mutants demonstrates the functional requirement of βD380 and βD386 Asp residues. Moreover, abrogation of wild-type E. coli cell growth and normal growth of mutant cells in presence of peptides provides strong evidence for the requirement of βDELSEED-motif Asp residues for peptide binding. It is concluded that while presence of one Asp residue may allow partial peptide binding, both Asp residues, βD380 and βD386, are essential for proper peptide binding and inhibition of ATP synthase.

  12. Asp residues of βDELSEED-motif are required for peptide binding in the Escherichia coli ATP synthase

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Zulfiqar; Tayou, Junior; Laughlin, Thomas F.

    2015-01-01

    This study demonstrates the requirement of Asp-380 and Asp-386 in the βDELSEED-motif of E. coli ATP synthase for peptide binding and inhibition. We studied the inhibition profiles of wild-type and mutant E. coli ATP synthase in presence of c-terminal amide bound melittin and melittin related peptide. Melittin and melittin related peptide inhibited wild-type ATPase almost completely while only partial inhibition was observed in single mutations with replacement of Asp to Ala, Gln, or Arg. Additionally, very little or no inhibition occurred among double mutants βD380A/βD386A, βD380Q/βD386Q, or βD380R/βD386R signifying that removal of one Asp residue allows limited peptide binding. Partial or substantial loss of oxidative phosphorylation among double mutants demonstrates the functional requirement of βD380 and βD386 Asp residues. Moreover, abrogation of wild-type E. coli cell growth and normal growth of mutant cells in presence of peptides provides strong evidence for the requirement of βDELSEED-motif Asp residues for peptide binding. It is concluded that while presence of one Asp residue may allow partial peptide binding, both Asp residues, βD380 and βD386, are essential for proper peptide binding and inhibition of ATP synthase. PMID:25603139

  13. Nondisjunction Mutants of the Nematode CAENORHABDITIS ELEGANS

    PubMed Central

    Hodgkin, Jonathan; Horvitz, H. Robert; Brenner, Sydney

    1979-01-01

    The frequency of males (5AA; XO) among the self progeny of wild-type Caenorhabditis elegans hermaphrodites (5AA; XX) is about one in 500. Fifteen him (for "high incidence of males") mutations have been identified that increase this frequency by a factor of ten to 150, as a result of increased X-chromosome nondisjunction. The mutations define ten complementation groups, which have been mapped: nine are autosomal, and one sex linked. Most of the mutants are superficially wild type in anatomy and behavior; however, him-4 mutants display gonadal abnormalities, and unc-86 mutants, which have a Him phenotype, exhibit a variety of anatomical and behavioral abnormalities. All the mutants segregate fertile 3X hermaphrodite progeny as well as XO male progeny. Some produce large numbers of inviable zygotes. Mutants in all ten genes produce diplo-X and nullo-X exceptional ova, and in the four strains tested, diplo-X and nullo-X exceptional sperm are produced by 2X "transformed" males. It appears likely that most of the mutants have defects in both gamete lines of the hermaphrodite. XO males of him strains other than him-4 and unc-86 are similar to wild-type males in anatomy and behavior, and all produce equal or almost equal numbers of haplo-X and nullo-X sperm, and no diplo-X sperm. Male fertility is reduced to varying extents in all him mutants. In four of the strains, nondisjunction during oogenesis has been shown to occur at a reductional division, and in three of these strains, abnormalities in recombination have been demonstrated. One mutant also exhibits autosomal nondisjunction, but many of the others probably do not. Therefore, the X chromosome of C. elegans may differ from the autosomes in the mechanisms controlling its meiotic behavior.——3X hermaphrodites are shorter and less fertile than 2X hermaphrodites, and they produce many inviable zygotes among their self progeny: these are probably 4X zygotes. Haplo-X and diplo-X ova are produced in 2:1 ratio by 3X

  14. Neurospora crassa mutants deficient in asparagine synthetase.

    PubMed Central

    MacPhee, K G; Nelson, R E; Schuster, S M

    1983-01-01

    Neurospora crassa mutants deficient in asparagine synthetase were selected by using the procedure of inositol-less death. Complementation tests among the 100 mutants isolated suggested that their alterations were genetically allelic. Recombination analysis with strain S1007t, an asparagine auxotroph, indicated that the mutations were located near or within the asn gene on linkage group V. In vitro assays with a heterokaryon indicated that the mutation was dominant. Thermal instability of cell extracts from temperature-sensitive strains in an in vitro asparagine synthetase assay determined that the mutations were in the structural gene(s) for asparagine synthetase. PMID:6137480

  15. Species-Dependent Phenotypes of Replication-Temperature-Sensitive trfA Mutants of Plasmid RK2: a Codon-Neutral Base Substitution Stimulates Temperature Sensitivity by Leading to Reduced Levels of trfA Expression

    PubMed Central

    Karunakaran, Ponniah; Blatny, Janet Martha; Ertesvåg, Helga; Valla, Svein

    1998-01-01

    TrfA is the only plasmid-encoded protein required for initiation of replication of the broad-host-range plasmid RK2. Here we describe the isolation of four trfA mutants temperature sensitive for replication in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. One of the mutations led to substitution of arginine 247 with cysteine. This mutant has been previously described to be temperature sensitive for replication, but poorly functional, in Escherichia coli. The remaining three mutants were identical, and each of them carried two mutations, one leading to substitution of arginine 163 with cysteine (mutation 163C) and the other a codon-neutral mutation changing the codon for glycine 235 from GGC to GGU (mutation 235). Neither of the two mutations caused a temperature-sensitive phenotype alone in P. aeruginosa, and the effect of the neutral mutation was caused by its ability to strongly reduce the trfA expression level. The double mutant and mutant 163C could not be stably maintained in E. coli, but mutant 235 could be established and, surprisingly, displayed a temperature-sensitive phenotype in this host. Mutation 235 strongly reduced the trfA expression level also in E. coli. The glycine 85 codon in trfA mRNA is GGU, and a change of this to GGC did not significantly affect expression. In addition, we found that wild-type trfA was expressed at much lower levels in E. coli than in P. aeruginosa, indicating that this level is a key parameter in the determination of the temperature-sensitive phenotypes in different species. The E. coli lacZ gene was translationally fused at the 3′ end and internally in trfA, in both cases leading to elimination of the effect of mutation 235 on expression. We therefore propose that this mutation acts through an effect on mRNA structure or stability. PMID:9683473

  16. A Toolbox for Herpesvirus miRNA Research: Construction of a Complete Set of KSHV miRNA Deletion Mutants.

    PubMed

    Jain, Vaibhav; Plaisance-Bonstaff, Karlie; Sangani, Rajnikumar; Lanier, Curtis; Dolce, Alexander; Hu, Jianhong; Brulois, Kevin; Haecker, Irina; Turner, Peter; Renne, Rolf; Krueger, Brian

    2016-02-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) encodes 12 viral microRNAs (miRNAs) that are expressed during latency. Research into KSHV miRNA function has suffered from a lack of genetic systems to study viral miRNA mutations in the context of the viral genome. We used the Escherichia coli Red recombination system together with a new bacmid background, BAC16, to create mutants for all known KSHV miRNAs. The specific miRNA deletions or mutations and the integrity of the bacmids have been strictly quality controlled using PCR, restriction digestion, and sequencing. In addition, stable viral producer cell lines based on iSLK cells have been created for wildtype KSHV, for 12 individual miRNA knock-out mutants (ΔmiR-K12-1 through -12), and for mutants deleted for 10 of 12 (ΔmiR-cluster) or all 12 miRNAs (ΔmiR-all). NGS, in combination with SureSelect technology, was employed to sequence the entire latent genome within all producer cell lines. qPCR assays were used to verify the expression of the remaining viral miRNAs in a subset of mutants. Induction of the lytic cycle leads to efficient production of progeny viruses that have been used to infect endothelial cells. Wt BAC16 and miR mutant iSLK producer cell lines are now available to the research community. PMID:26907327

  17. Homology modeling and virtual screening of inhibitors against TEM- and SHV-type-resistant mutants: A multilayer filtering approach.

    PubMed

    Baig, Mohammad H; Balaramnavar, Vishal M; Wadhwa, Gulshan; Khan, Asad U

    2015-01-01

    TEM and SHV are class-A-type β-lactamases commonly found in Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae. Previous studies reported S130G and K234R mutations in SHVs to be 41- and 10-fold more resistant toward clavulanic acid than SHV-1, respectively, whereas TEM S130G and R244S also showed the same level of resistance. These selected mutants confer higher level of resistance against clavulanic acid. They also show little susceptibility against other commercially available β-lactamase inhibitors. In this study, we have used docking-based virtual screening approach in order to screen potential inhibitors against some of the major resistant mutants of SHV and TEM types β-lactamase. Two different inhibitor-resistant mutants from SHV and TEM were selected. Moreover, we have retained the active site water molecules within each enzyme. Active site water molecules were placed within modeled structure of the mutant whose structure was unavailable with protein databank. The novelty of this work lies in the use of multilayer virtual screening approach for the prediction of best and accurate results. We are reporting five inhibitors on the basis of their efficacy against all the selected resistant mutants. These inhibitors were selected on the basis of their binding efficacies and pharmacophore features.

  18. Escherichia coli K-12 pathogenicity in the pea aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum, reveals reduced antibacterial defense in aphids.

    PubMed

    Altincicek, Boran; Ter Braak, Bas; Laughton, Alice M; Udekwu, Klas I; Gerardo, Nicole M

    2011-10-01

    To better understand the molecular basis underlying aphid immune tolerance to beneficial bacteria and immune defense to pathogenic bacteria, we characterized how the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum responds to Escherichia coli K-12 infections. E. coli bacteria, usually cleared in the hemolymph of other insect species, were capable of growing exponentially and killing aphids within a few days. Red fluorescence protein expressing E. coli K-12 laboratory strain multiplied in the aphid hemolymph as well as in the digestive tract, resulting in death of infected aphids. Selected gene deletion mutants of the E. coli K-12 predicted to have reduced virulence during systemic infections showed no difference in either replication or killing rate when compared to the wild type E. coli strain. Of note, however, the XL1-Blue E. coli K-12 strain exhibited a significant lag phase before multiplying and killing aphids. This bacterial strain has recently been shown to be more sensitive to oxidative stress than other E. coli K-12 strains, revealing a potential role for reactive oxygen species-mediated defenses in the otherwise reduced aphid immune system.

  19. Human Defensin 5 Disulfide Array Mutants: Disulfide Bond Deletion Attenuates Antibacterial Activity Against Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Wanniarachchi, Yoshitha A.; Kaczmarek, Piotr; Wan, Andrea; Nolan, Elizabeth M.

    2011-01-01

    Human α-defensin 5 (HD5, HD5ox to specify the oxidized and disulfide linked form) is a 32-residue cysteine-rich host-defense peptide, expressed and released by small intestinal Paneth cells, that exhibits antibacterial activity against a number of Gram-negative and –positive bacterial strains. To ascertain the contributions of its disulfide array to structure, antimicrobial activity, and proteolytic stability, a series of HD5 double mutant peptides where pairs of cysteine residues corresponding to native disulfide linkages (Cys3—Cys31, Cys5—Cys20, Cys10—Cys30) were mutated to Ser or Ala residues were overexpressed in E. coli, purified and characterized. A hexa mutant peptide, HD5[Serhexa], where all six native Cys residues are replaced by Ser residues was also evaluated. Removal of a single native S—S linkage influences oxidative folding and regioisomerization, antibacterial activity, Gram-negative bacterial membrane permeabilization, and proteolytic stability. Whereas the majority of the HD5 mutant peptides show low-micromolar activity against Gram-negative E. coli ATCC 25922 in colony counting assays, the wild-type disulfide array is essential for low-micromolar activity against Gram-positive S. aureus ATCC 25923. Removal of a single disulfide bond attenuates the activity observed for HD5ox against this Gram-positive bacterial strain. This observation supports the notion that the HD5ox mechanism of antibacterial action differs for Gram-negative and Gram-positive species (Wei, G.; de Leeuw, E., Pazgier, M., Yuan, W., Zou, G., Wang, J., Ericksen, B., Lu, W.-Y.; Lehrer, R. I.; Lu, W. (2009) J. Biol. Chem. 284, 29180-29192), and that the native disulfide array is a requirement for its activity against S. aureus. PMID:21861459

  20. Biochemical Characterization of Mutants in Chaperonin Proteins CCT4 and CCT5 Associated with Hereditary Sensory Neuropathy*

    PubMed Central

    Sergeeva, Oksana A.; Tran, Meme T.; Haase-Pettingell, Cameron; King, Jonathan A.

    2014-01-01

    Hereditary sensory neuropathies are a class of disorders marked by degeneration of the nerve fibers in the sensory periphery neurons. Recently, two mutations were identified in the subunits of the eukaryotic cytosolic chaperonin TRiC, a protein machine responsible for folding actin and tubulin in the cell. C450Y CCT4 was identified in a stock of Sprague-Dawley rats, whereas H147R CCT5 was found in a human Moroccan family. As with many genetically identified mutations associated with neuropathies, the underlying molecular basis of the mutants was not defined. We investigated the biochemical properties of these mutants using an expression system in Escherichia coli that produces homo-oligomeric rings of CCT4 and CCT5. Full-length versions of both mutant protein chains were expressed in E. coli at levels approaching that of the WT chains. Sucrose gradient centrifugation revealed chaperonin-sized complexes of both WT and mutant chaperonins, but with reduced recovery of C450Y CCT4 soluble subunits. Electron microscopy of negatively stained samples of C450Y CCT4 revealed few ring-shaped species, whereas WT CCT4, H147R CCT5, and WT CCT5 revealed similar ring structures. CCT5 complexes were assayed for their ability to suppress aggregation of and refold the model substrate γd-crystallin, suppress aggregation of mutant huntingtin, and refold the physiological substrate β-actin in vitro. H147R CCT5 was not as efficient in chaperoning these substrates as WT CCT5. The subtle effects of these mutations are consistent with the homozygous disease phenotype, in which most functions are carried out during development and adulthood, but some selective function is lost or reduced. PMID:25124038

  1. Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium waaP mutants show increased susceptibility to polymyxin and loss of virulence In vivo.

    PubMed

    Yethon, J A; Gunn, J S; Ernst, R K; Miller, S I; Laroche, L; Malo, D; Whitfield, C

    2000-08-01

    In Escherichia coli, the waaP (rfaP) gene product was recently shown to be responsible for phosphorylation of the first heptose residue of the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) inner core region. WaaP was also shown to be necessary for the formation of a stable outer membrane. These earlier studies were performed with an avirulent rough strain of E. coli (to facilitate the structural chemistry required to properly define waaP function); therefore, we undertook the creation of a waaP mutant of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium to assess the contribution of WaaP and LPS core phosphorylation to the biology of an intracellular pathogen. The S. enterica waaP mutant described here is the first to be both genetically and structurally characterized, and its creation refutes an earlier claim that waaP mutations in S. enterica must be leaky to maintain viability. The mutant was shown to exhibit characteristics of the deep-rough phenotype, despite its ability to produce a full-length core capped with O antigen. Further, phosphoryl modifications in the LPS core region were shown to be required for resistance to polycationic antimicrobials. The waaP mutant was significantly more sensitive to polymyxin in both wild-type and polymyxin-resistant backgrounds, despite the decreased negative charge of the mutant LPSs. In addition, the waaP mutation was shown to cause a complete loss of virulence in mouse infection models. Taken together, these data indicate that WaaP is a potential target for the development of novel therapeutic agents.

  2. Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium waaP Mutants Show Increased Susceptibility to Polymyxin and Loss of Virulence In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Yethon, Jeremy A.; Gunn, John S.; Ernst, Robert K.; Miller, Samuel I.; Laroche, Line; Malo, Danielle; Whitfield, Chris

    2000-01-01

    In Escherichia coli, the waaP (rfaP) gene product was recently shown to be responsible for phosphorylation of the first heptose residue of the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) inner core region. WaaP was also shown to be necessary for the formation of a stable outer membrane. These earlier studies were performed with an avirulent rough strain of E. coli (to facilitate the structural chemistry required to properly define waaP function); therefore, we undertook the creation of a waaP mutant of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium to assess the contribution of WaaP and LPS core phosphorylation to the biology of an intracellular pathogen. The S. enterica waaP mutant described here is the first to be both genetically and structurally characterized, and its creation refutes an earlier claim that waaP mutations in S. enterica must be leaky to maintain viability. The mutant was shown to exhibit characteristics of the deep-rough phenotype, despite its ability to produce a full-length core capped with O antigen. Further, phosphoryl modifications in the LPS core region were shown to be required for resistance to polycationic antimicrobials. The waaP mutant was significantly more sensitive to polymyxin in both wild-type and polymyxin-resistant backgrounds, despite the decreased negative charge of the mutant LPSs. In addition, the waaP mutation was shown to cause a complete loss of virulence in mouse infection models. Taken together, these data indicate that WaaP is a potential target for the development of novel therapeutic agents. PMID:10899846

  3. A unique arabinose 5-phosphate isomerase found within a genomic island associated with the uropathogenicity of Escherichia coli CFT073.

    PubMed

    Mosberg, Joshua A; Yep, Alejandra; Meredith, Timothy C; Smith, Sara; Wang, Pan-Fen; Holler, Tod P; Mobley, Harry L T; Woodard, Ronald W

    2011-06-01

    Previous studies showed that deletion of genes c3405 to c3410 from PAI-metV, a genomic island from Escherichia coli CFT073, results in a strain that fails to compete with wild-type CFT073 after a transurethral cochallenge in mice and is deficient in the ability to independently colonize the mouse kidney. Our analysis of c3405 to c3410 suggests that these genes constitute an operon with a role in the internalization and utilization of an unknown carbohydrate. This operon is not found in E. coli K-12 but is present in a small number of pathogenic E. coli and Shigella boydii strains. One of the genes, c3406, encodes a protein with significant homology to the sugar isomerase domain of arabinose 5-phosphate isomerases but lacking the tandem cystathionine beta-synthase domains found in the other arabinose 5-phosphate isomerases of E. coli. We prepared recombinant c3406 protein, found it to possess arabinose 5-phosphate isomerase activity, and characterized this activity in detail. We also constructed a c3406 deletion mutant of E. coli CFT073 and demonstrated that this deletion mutant was still able to compete with wild-type CFT073 in a transurethral cochallenge in mice and could colonize the mouse kidney. These results demonstrate that the presence of c3406 is not essential for a pathogenic phenotype.

  4. Calcium chloride made E. coli competent for uptake of extraneous DNA through overproduction of OmpC protein.

    PubMed

    Aich, Pulakesh; Patra, Monobesh; Chatterjee, Arijit Kumar; Roy, Sourav Singha; Basu, Tarakdas

    2012-06-01

    In the standard method of transformation of Escherichia coli with extraneous DNA, cells are made competent for DNA uptake by incubating in ice-cold 100 mM CaCl(2). Analysis of the whole protein profile of CaCl(2)-treated E. coli cells by the techniques of one- and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, MALDI-MS and immunoprecipitation revealed overproduction of outer membrane proteins OmpC, OmpA and heat-shock protein GroEL. In parity, transformation efficiency of E. coli ompC mutant by plasmid pUC19 DNA was found to be about 40 % lower than that of the wild type strain. Moreover, in E. coli cells containing groEL-bearing plasmid, induction of GroEL caused simultaneous overproduction of OmpC. On the other hand, less OmpC was synthesized in E. coli groEL mutant compared to its wild type counterpart, by CaCl(2)-shock. From these results it can be suggested that in the process of CaCl(2)-mediated generation of competence, the heat-shock chaperone GroEL has specific role in DNA entry into the cell, possibly through the overproduced OmpC and OmpA porins.

  5. The role and synergistic effect of the light irradiation and H2O2 in photocatalytic inactivation of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Ng, Tsz Wai; An, Taicheng; Li, Guiying; Ho, Wing Kei; Yip, Ho Yin; Zhao, Huijun; Wong, Po Keung

    2015-08-01

    Inactivation of Escherichia coli K-12 was conducted by applying a continuous supplying of commercial H2O2 to mimic the H2O2 production in a photocatalytic system, and the contribution of H2O2 in photocatalytic inactivation was investigated using a modified "partition system" and five E. coli mutants. The concentration of exogenous H2O2 required for complete inactivation of bacterial cells was much higher than that produced in-situ in common photocatalytic system, indicating that H2O2 alone plays a minor role in photocatalytic inactivation. However, the concentration of exogenously produced H2O2 required for effective inactivation of E. coli K-12 was much lower when the light irradiation was applied. To further investigate the possible physiological changes, inactivation of E. coli BW25113 (the parental strain), and its corresponding isogenic single-gene deletion mutants with light pretreatment was compared. The results indicate that light irradiation increases the bacterial intracellular Fe(2+) level and favors hydroxyl radical (OH) production via the catalytic reaction of Fe(2+), leading to increase in DNA damage. Moreover, the results indicate that the properties of light source, such as intensity and major emission wavelength, may alter the physiology of bacterial cells and affect the susceptibility to in-situ resultant H2O2 in the photocatalytic inactivation processes, leading to significant influence on the photocatalytic inactivation efficiencies of E. coli K-12. PMID:26083904

  6. Novel Two-Step Hierarchical Screening of Mutant Pools Reveals Mutants under Selection in Chicks

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hee-Jeong; Bogomolnaya, Lydia M.; Elfenbein, Johanna R.; Endicott-Yazdani, Tiana; Reynolds, M. Megan; Porwollik, Steffen; Cheng, Pui; Xia, Xiao-Qin

    2016-01-01

    Contaminated chicken/egg products are major sources of human salmonellosis, yet the strategies used by Salmonella to colonize chickens are poorly understood. We applied a novel two-step hierarchical procedure to identify new genes important for colonization and persistence of Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium in chickens. A library of 182 S. Typhimurium mutants each containing a targeted deletion of a group of contiguous genes (for a total of 2,069 genes deleted) was used to identify regions under selection at 1, 3, and 9 days postinfection in chicks. Mutants in 11 regions were under selection at all assayed times (colonization mutants), and mutants in 15 regions were under selection only at day 9 (persistence mutants). We assembled a pool of 92 mutants, each deleted for a single gene, representing nearly all genes in nine regions under selection. Twelve single gene deletion mutants were under selection in this assay, and we confirmed 6 of 9 of these candidate mutants via competitive infections and complementation analysis in chicks. STM0580, STM1295, STM1297, STM3612, STM3615, and STM3734 are needed for Salmonella to colonize and persist in chicks and were not previously associated with this ability. One of these key genes, STM1297 (selD), is required for anaerobic growth and supports the ability to utilize formate under these conditions, suggesting that metabolism of formate is important during infection. We report a hierarchical screening strategy to interrogate large portions of the genome during infection of animals using pools of mutants of low complexity. Using this strategy, we identified six genes not previously known to be needed during infection in chicks, and one of these (STM1297) suggests an important role for formate metabolism during infection. PMID:26857572

  7. Rapid Antibiotic Resistance Evolution of GASP Mutants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qiucen; Kim, Hyunsung; Pourmand, Nader; Austin, Robert

    2012-02-01

    The GASP phenotype in bacteria is due to a mutation which enables the bacteria to grow under high stress conditions where other bacteria stop growing. We probe using our Death Galaxy microenvironment how rapidly the GASP mutant can evolve resistance to mutagenic antibiotics compared to wild-type bacteria, and explore the genomic landscape changes due to the evolution of resistance.

  8. Yeast mutants overproducing iso-cytochromes c

    SciTech Connect

    Sherman, F.; Cardillo, T.S.; Errede, B.; Friedman, L.; McKnight, G.; Stiles, J.I.

    1980-01-01

    For over 15 years, the iso-cytochrome c system in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been used to investigate a multitude of problems in genetics and molecular biology. More recently, attention has been focused on using mutants for examining translation and transcriptional processes and for probing regulatory regions governing gene expression. In an effort to explore regulatory mechanisms and to investigate mutational alterations that lead to increased levels of gene products, we have isolated and characterized mutants that overproduce cytochrome c. In this paper we have briefly s