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Sample records for coli mcra protein

  1. 32 CFR 757.13 - Responsibility for MCRA actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... CLAIMS REGULATIONS Medical Care Recovery Act (MCRA) Claims and Claims Asserted Pursuant to 10 U.S.C. 1095... Judge Advocate General (Claims and Tort Litigation Division) (Code 15); and the (ii) Commanding Officer... geographic responsibility. (2) JAG designee may assert and receive full payment on any MCRA claim. Code...

  2. Strategies for Protein Overproduction in Escherichia coli.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mott, John E.

    1984-01-01

    Examines heterologous expression in Escherichia coli and the role of regulatory sequences which control gene expression at transcription resulting in abundant production of messenger RNA and regulatory sequences in mRNA which promote efficient translation. Also examines the role of E. coli cells in stabilizing mRNA and protein that is…

  3. Extracellular recombinant protein production from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Ni, Ye; Chen, Rachel

    2009-11-01

    Escherichia coli is the most commonly used host for recombinant protein production and metabolic engineering. Extracellular production of enzymes and proteins is advantageous as it could greatly reduce the complexity of a bioprocess and improve product quality. Extracellular production of proteins is necessary for metabolic engineering applications in which substrates are polymers such as lignocelluloses or xenobiotics since adequate uptake of these substrates is often an issue. The dogma that E. coli secretes no protein has been challenged by the recognition of both its natural ability to secrete protein in common laboratory strains and increased ability to secrete proteins in engineered cells. The very existence of this review dedicated to extracellular production is a testimony for outstanding achievements made collectively by the community in this regard. Four strategies have emerged to engineer E. coli cells to secrete recombinant proteins. In some cases, impressive secretion levels, several grams per liter, were reached. This secretion level is on par with other eukaryotic expression systems. Amid the optimism, it is important to recognize that significant challenges remain, especially when considering the success cannot be predicted a priori and involves much trials and errors. This review provides an overview of recent developments in engineering E. coli for extracellular production of recombinant proteins and an analysis of pros and cons of each strategy.

  4. Transport proteins promoting Escherichia coli pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Tang, Fengyi; Saier, Milton H

    2014-01-01

    Escherichia coli is a genetically diverse species infecting hundreds of millions of people worldwide annually. We examined seven well-characterized E. coli pathogens causing urinary tract infections, gastroenteritis, pyelonephritis and haemorrhagic colitis. Their transport proteins were identified and compared with each other and a non-pathogenic E. coli K12 strain to identify transport proteins related to pathogenesis. Each pathogen possesses a unique set of protein secretion systems for export to the cell surface or for injecting effector proteins into host cells. Pathogens have increased numbers of iron siderophore receptors and ABC iron uptake transporters, but the numbers and types of low-affinity secondary iron carriers were uniform in all strains. The presence of outer membrane iron complex receptors and high-affinity ABC iron uptake systems correlated, suggesting co-evolution. Each pathovar encodes a different set of pore-forming toxins and virulence-related outer membrane proteins lacking in K12. Intracellular pathogens proved to have a characteristically distinctive set of nutrient uptake porters, different from those of extracellular pathogens. The results presented in this report provide information about transport systems relevant to various types of E. coli pathogenesis that can be exploited in future basic and applied studies.

  5. Transport proteins promoting Escherichia coli pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Fengyi; Saier, Milton H.

    2014-01-01

    Escherichia coli is a genetically diverse species infecting hundreds of millions of people worldwide annually. We examined seven well-characterized E. coli pathogens causing urinary tract infections, gastroenteritis, pyelonephritis and haemorrhagic colitis. Their transport proteins were identified and compared with each other and a non-pathogenic E. coli K12 strain to identify transport proteins related to pathogenesis. Each pathogen possesses a unique set of protein secretion systems for export to the cell surface or for injecting effector proteins into host cells. Pathogens have increased numbers of iron siderophore receptors and ABC iron uptake transporters, but the numbers and types of low-affinity secondary iron carriers were uniform in all strains. The presence of outer membrane iron complex receptors and high-affinity ABC iron uptake systems correlated, suggesting co-evolution. Each pathovar encodes a different set of pore-forming toxins and virulence-related outer membrane proteins lacking in K12. Intracellular pathogens proved to have a characteristically distinctive set of nutrient uptake porters, different from those of extracellular pathogens. The results presented in this report provide information about transport systems relevant to various types of E. coli pathogenesis that can be exploited in future basic and applied studies. PMID:24747185

  6. Preparation of Soluble Proteins from Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Wingfield, Paul T.

    2014-01-01

    Purification of human IL-1β is used in this unit as an example of the preparation of soluble proteins from E. coli. Bacteria containing IL-1β are lysed, and IL-1 β in the resulting supernatant is purified by anion-exchange chromatography, salt precipitation and cation-exchange chromatography, and then concentrated. Finally, the IL-1 β protein is applied to a gel-filtration column to separate it from remaining higher- and lower-molecular-weight contaminants, the purified protein is stored frozen or is lyophilized. The purification protocol described is typical for a protein that is expressed in fairly high abundance (i.e., >5% total protein) and accumulates in a soluble state. Also, the purification procedure serves as an example of how use classical protein purifications methods which may also be used in conjunction with the affinity-based methods now more commonly used. PMID:25367009

  7. MCRaT Simulations of Long Gamma Ray Burst Spectra and Light Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsotan, T.; Lazzati, D.

    2016-10-01

    We present the results of the Monte Carlo Radiation Transfer, MCRaT, simulations of long gamma ray bursts from a variety of stellar progenitors and jet properties, including variable engines. We also compare the resulting spectra to observed data.

  8. Combinatorial Method for Overexpression of Membrane Proteins in Escherichia coli*

    PubMed Central

    Leviatan, Shani; Sawada, Keisuke; Moriyama, Yoshinori; Nelson, Nathan

    2010-01-01

    Membrane proteins constitute 20–30% of all proteins encoded by the genome of various organisms. Large amounts of purified proteins are required for activity and crystallization attempts. Thus, there is an unmet need for a heterologous membrane protein overexpression system for purification, crystallization, and activity determination. We developed a combinatorial method for overexpressing and purifying membrane proteins using Escherichia coli. This method utilizes short hydrophilic bacterial proteins, YaiN and YbeL, fused to the ends of the membrane proteins to serve as facilitating factors for expression and purification. Fourteen prokaryotic and mammalian membrane proteins were expressed using this system. Moderate to high expression was obtained for most proteins, and detergent solubilization combined with a short purification process produced stable, monodispersed membrane proteins. Five of the mammalian membrane proteins, overexpressed using our system, were reconstituted into liposomes and exhibited transport activity comparable with the native transporters. PMID:20525689

  9. Combinatorial method for overexpression of membrane proteins in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Leviatan, Shani; Sawada, Keisuke; Moriyama, Yoshinori; Nelson, Nathan

    2010-07-30

    Membrane proteins constitute 20-30% of all proteins encoded by the genome of various organisms. Large amounts of purified proteins are required for activity and crystallization attempts. Thus, there is an unmet need for a heterologous membrane protein overexpression system for purification, crystallization, and activity determination. We developed a combinatorial method for overexpressing and purifying membrane proteins using Escherichia coli. This method utilizes short hydrophilic bacterial proteins, YaiN and YbeL, fused to the ends of the membrane proteins to serve as facilitating factors for expression and purification. Fourteen prokaryotic and mammalian membrane proteins were expressed using this system. Moderate to high expression was obtained for most proteins, and detergent solubilization combined with a short purification process produced stable, monodispersed membrane proteins. Five of the mammalian membrane proteins, overexpressed using our system, were reconstituted into liposomes and exhibited transport activity comparable with the native transporters.

  10. Protein Production for Structural Genomics Using E. coli Expression

    PubMed Central

    Makowska-Grzyska, Magdalena; Kim, Youngchang; Maltseva, Natalia; Li, Hui; Zhou, Min; Joachimiak, Grazyna; Babnigg, Gyorgy; Joachimiak, Andrzej

    2014-01-01

    The goal of structural biology is to reveal details of the molecular structure of proteins in order to understand their function and mechanism. X-ray crystallography and NMR are the two best methods for atomic level structure determination. However, these methods require milligram quantities of proteins. In this chapter a reproducible methodology for large-scale protein production applicable to a diverse set of proteins is described. The approach is based on protein expression in E. coli as a fusion with a cleavable affinity tag that was tested on over 20,000 proteins. Specifically, a protocol for fermentation of large quantities of native proteins in disposable culture vessels is presented. A modified protocol that allows for the production of selenium-labeled proteins in defined media is also offered. Finally, a method for the purification of His6-tagged proteins on immobilized metal affinity chromatography columns that generates high-purity material is described in detail. PMID:24590711

  11. The MCRA model for probabilistic single-compound and cumulative risk assessment of pesticides.

    PubMed

    van der Voet, Hilko; de Boer, Waldo J; Kruisselbrink, Johannes W; Goedhart, Paul W; van der Heijden, Gerie W A M; Kennedy, Marc C; Boon, Polly E; van Klaveren, Jacob D

    2015-05-01

    Pesticide risk assessment is hampered by worst-case assumptions leading to overly pessimistic assessments. On the other hand, cumulative health effects of similar pesticides are often not taken into account. This paper describes models and a web-based software system developed in the European research project ACROPOLIS. The models are appropriate for both acute and chronic exposure assessments of single compounds and of multiple compounds in cumulative assessment groups. The software system MCRA (Monte Carlo Risk Assessment) is available for stakeholders in pesticide risk assessment at mcra.rivm.nl. We describe the MCRA implementation of the methods as advised in the 2012 EFSA Guidance on probabilistic modelling, as well as more refined methods developed in the ACROPOLIS project. The emphasis is on cumulative assessments. Two approaches, sample-based and compound-based, are contrasted. It is shown that additional data on agricultural use of pesticides may give more realistic risk assessments. Examples are given of model and software validation of acute and chronic assessments, using both simulated data and comparisons against the previous release of MCRA and against the standard software DEEM-FCID used by the Environmental Protection Agency in the USA. It is shown that the EFSA Guidance pessimistic model may not always give an appropriate modelling of exposure.

  12. Protein turnover in the cell cycle of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Nishi, A; Kogoma, T

    1965-10-01

    Nishi, Arasuke (University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan), and Tokio Kogoma. Protein turnover in the cell cycle of Escherichia coli. J. Bacteriol. 90:884-890. 1965.-Protein metabolism and enzyme formation throughout the cell cycle were investigated in synchronized cultures of Escherichia coli. The cells showed a temporary cessation of the net increase of bulk protein and of constitutive beta-galactosidase activity during the division period. By contrast, when tested by short-term experiments performed with cells at different growth stages, the bacteria displayed a constant incorporation of labeled protein precursors into the protein fraction, even during the fission period. Similar results were obtained with respect to the capacities for induced enzyme formation. On the other hand, when the cells were previously labeled and then subjected to synchronization in a nonradioactive medium, the radioactivity of the protein fraction decreased temporarily by nearly 10% during the fission period and then regained its previous level at the beginning of the ensuing phase of growth. This indicates that the products of partial degradation of protein were again utilized for protein synthesis in the next cell cycle. It was concluded that the temporary lagging of net increase of bulk protein may be due to the partial breakdown of protein occurring during the fission period.

  13. Physiological Response to Membrane Protein Overexpression in E. coli*

    PubMed Central

    Gubellini, Francesca; Verdon, Grégory; Karpowich, Nathan K.; Luff, Jon D.; Boël, Grégory; Gauthier, Nils; Handelman, Samuel K.; Ades, Sarah E.; Hunt, John F.

    2011-01-01

    Overexpression represents a principal bottleneck in structural and functional studies of integral membrane proteins (IMPs). Although E. coli remains the leading organism for convenient and economical protein overexpression, many IMPs exhibit toxicity on induction in this host and give low yields of properly folded protein. Different mechanisms related to membrane biogenesis and IMP folding have been proposed to contribute to these problems, but there is limited understanding of the physical and physiological constraints on IMP overexpression and folding in vivo. Therefore, we used a variety of genetic, genomic, and microscopy techniques to characterize the physiological responses of Escherichia coli MG1655 cells to overexpression of a set of soluble proteins and IMPs, including constructs exhibiting different levels of toxicity and producing different levels of properly folded versus misfolded product on induction. Genetic marker studies coupled with transcriptomic results indicate only minor perturbations in many of the physiological systems implicated in previous studies of IMP biogenesis. Overexpression of either IMPs or soluble proteins tends to block execution of the standard stationary-phase transcriptional program, although these effects are consistently stronger for the IMPs included in our study. However, these perturbations are not an impediment to successful protein overexpression. We present evidence that, at least for the target proteins included in our study, there is no inherent obstacle to IMP overexpression in E. coli at moderate levels suitable for structural studies and that the biochemical and conformational properties of the proteins themselves are the major obstacles to success. Toxicity associated with target protein activity produces selective pressure leading to preferential growth of cells harboring expression-reducing and inactivating mutations, which can produce chemical heterogeneity in the target protein population, potentially

  14. Purification of secreted recombinant proteins from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Le, H V; Trotta, P P

    1991-01-01

    Secretion systems engineered for the expression of heterologous protein in E. coli provide several advantages for subsequent isolation of purified product. Proteins released from the periplasmic space, which represent a small fraction (i.e., 4-10%) of total cell protein, can readily be separated from other cellular proteins by centrifugation of the remaining cellular debris or cross-flow ultrafiltration. The starting material derived from secretion systems is generally of higher purity than comparable material produced from strains expressing cytoplasmically for systems exhibiting similar expression levels. The available evidence suggests that recombinant proteins derived from the periplasm are generally, but not always (44-46), soluble in a nonaggregated form. Consequently, simple purification protocols can be effectively employed for producing homogeneous product with a high yield. The majority of the secreted recombinant proteins reviewed in this chapter were purified by simple one- or two-step chromatography procedures. High-resolution techniques such as reversed phase HPLC were found necessary only in cases where the secreted polypeptides were contaminated with proteolytic degradation variants, e.g., hirudin (51) and beta-endorphin (22). The fact that a high level of biological activity has been shown to be characteristic of purified recombinant proteins secreted into the periplasmic space suggests the presence of a native conformation stabilized by the expected disulfide linkages. Intramolecular disulfide bonds most probably form either as the polypeptide is translocated through the cytoplasmic membrane into the periplasm or within the periplasmic compartment, which has a higher oxidation potential than that found in the cytoplasm (57). Studies performed with hGH (31) and muIL-2 (35) provide excellent examples of differences observed in protein folding and disulfide bond formation between heterologous proteins expressed in the cytoplasmic and periplasmic

  15. Membrane protein production in Escherichia coli cell-free lysates.

    PubMed

    Henrich, Erik; Hein, Christopher; Dötsch, Volker; Bernhard, Frank

    2015-07-08

    Cell-free protein production has become a core technology in the rapidly spreading field of synthetic biology. In particular the synthesis of membrane proteins, highly problematic proteins in conventional cellular production systems, is an ideal application for cell-free expression. A large variety of artificial as well as natural environments for the optimal co-translational folding and stabilization of membrane proteins can rationally be designed. The high success rate of cell-free membrane protein production allows to focus on individually selected targets and to modulate their functional and structural properties with appropriate supplements. The efficiency and robustness of lysates from Escherichia coli strains allow a wide diversity of applications and we summarize current strategies for the successful production of high quality membrane protein samples.

  16. Comprehensive Analysis of Phosphorylated Proteins of E. coli Ribosomes

    PubMed Central

    Soung, George Y.; Miller, Jennifer L.; Koc, Hasan; Koc, Emine C.

    2009-01-01

    Phosphorylation of bacterial ribosomal proteins has been known for decades; however, there is still very limited information available on specific locations of the phosphorylation sites in ribosomal proteins and the role they might play in protein synthesis. In this study, we have mapped the specific phosphorylation sites in twenty-four E. coli ribosomal proteins by tandem mass spectrometry. Specific detection of phosphorylation was achieved by either phosphorylation specific visualization techniques, ProQ staining and antibodies for phospho-Ser, Thr, and Tyr, or by mass spectrometry equipped with a capability to detect addition and the loss of the phosphate moiety. Enrichment by immobilized metal affinity and/or strong cation exchange chromatography was used to improve the success of detection of the low abundance phosphopeptides. We found the small subunit (30S) proteins S3, S4, S5, S7, S11, S12, S13, S18, and S21 and the large subunit (50S) proteins L1, L2, L3, L5, L6, L7/L12, L13, L14, L16, L18, L19, L21, L22, L28, L31 to be phosphorylated at one or more residues. Potential roles for each specific site in ribosome function were deduced through careful evaluation of the given site of the phosphorylation in 3D-crystal structure models of ribosomes and the previous mutational studies of E. coli ribosomal proteins. PMID:19469554

  17. A homolog of an Escherichia coli phosphate-binding protein gene from Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hopkins, C. M.; White, F. F.; Heaton, L. A.; Guikema, J. A.; Leach, J. E.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1995-01-01

    A Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae gene with sequence similarity to an Escherichia coli phosphate-binding protein gene (phoS) produces a periplasmic protein of apparent M(r) 35,000 when expressed in E. coli. Amino terminal sequencing revealed that a signal peptide is removed during transport to the periplasm in E. coli.

  18. Structure of the Escherichia coli S10 ribosomal protein operon.

    PubMed Central

    Zurawski, G; Zurawski, S M

    1985-01-01

    The complete structure of the Escherichia coli S10 ribosomal protein operon is presented. Based on the DNA sequence, the deduced order of the 11 genes in the operon is rpsJ, rplC, rplD, rplW, rplB, rpsS, rplV, rpsC, rplP, rpmC, rpsQ. The estimated transcribed length of the operon is 5181 base pairs. Putative sequences involved in ribosome binding are discussed. The DNA sequence data corrects several errors in previously determined protein sequence data. PMID:3892488

  19. Escherchia coli ribose binding protein based bioreporters revisited

    PubMed Central

    Reimer, Artur; Yagur-Kroll, Sharon; Belkin, Shimshon; Roy, Shantanu; van der Meer, Jan Roelof

    2014-01-01

    Bioreporter bacteria, i.e., strains engineered to respond to chemical exposure by production of reporter proteins, have attracted wide interest because of their potential to offer cheap and simple alternative analytics for specified compounds or conditions. Bioreporter construction has mostly exploited the natural variation of sensory proteins, but it has been proposed that computational design of new substrate binding properties could lead to completely novel detection specificities at very low affinities. Here we reconstruct a bioreporter system based on the native Escherichia coli ribose binding protein RbsB and one of its computationally designed variants, reported to be capable of binding 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT). Our results show in vivo reporter induction at 50 nM ribose, and a 125 nM affinity constant for in vitro ribose binding to RbsB. In contrast, the purified published TNT-binding variant did not bind TNT nor did TNT cause induction of the E. coli reporter system. PMID:25005019

  20. Regulation of ribosomal protein synthesis in an Escherichia coli mutant missing ribosomal protein L1.

    PubMed Central

    Jinks-Robertson, S; Nomura, M

    1981-01-01

    In an Escherichia coli B strain missing ribosomal protein L1, the synthesis rate of L11 is 50% greater than that of other ribosomal proteins. This finding is in agreement with the previous conclusion that L1 regulates synthesis of itself and L11 and indicates that this regulation is important for maintaining the balanced synthesis of ribosomal proteins under physiological conditions. PMID:7009590

  1. Interactions between phage-shock proteins in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Adams, Hendrik; Teertstra, Wieke; Demmers, Jeroen; Boesten, Rolf; Tommassen, Jan

    2003-02-01

    Expression of the pspABCDE operon of Escherichia coli is induced upon infection by filamentous phage and by many other stress conditions, including defects in protein export. Expression of the operon requires the alternative sigma factor sigma54 and the transcriptional activator PspF. In addition, PspA plays a negative regulatory role, and the integral-membrane proteins PspB and PspC play a positive one. In this study, we investigated whether the suggested protein-protein interactions implicated in this complex regulatory network can indeed be demonstrated. Antisera were raised against PspB, PspC, and PspD, which revealed, in Western blotting experiments, that PspC forms stable sodium dodecyl sulfate-resistant dimers and that the hypothetical pspD gene is indeed expressed in vivo. Fractionation experiments showed that PspD localizes as a peripherally bound inner membrane protein. Cross-linking studies with intact cells revealed specific interactions of PspA with PspB and PspC, but not with PspD. Furthermore, affinity-chromatography suggested that PspB could bind PspA only in the presence of PspC. These data indicate that regulation of the psp operon is mediated via protein-protein interactions.

  2. Identification of Uropathogenic Escherichia coli Surface Proteins by Shotgun Proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Walters, Matthew S.; Mobley, Harry L.T.

    2009-01-01

    Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) cause the majority of uncomplicated urinary tract infections in humans. In the process of identifying candidate antigens for a vaccine, two methods for the identification of the UPEC surface proteome during growth in human urine were investigated. The first approach utilized a protease to ‘shave’ surface-exposed peptides from the bacterial cell surface and identify them by mass spectrometry. Although this approach has been successfully applied to a Gram-positive pathogen, the adaptation to Gram-negative UPEC resulted in cytoplasmic protein contamination. In a more direct approach, whole-cell bacteria were labeled with a biotin tag to indicate surface-exposed peptides and two-dimensional liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (2-DLC-MS/MS) was used to identify proteins isolated from the outer membrane. This method discovered 25 predicted outer membrane proteins expressed by UPEC while growing in human urine. Nine of the 25 predicted outer membrane proteins were part of iron transport systems or putative iron-regulated virulence proteins, indicating the importance of iron acquisition during growth in urine. One of the iron transport proteins identified, Hma, appears to be a promising vaccine candidate is being further investigated. The method described here presents a system to rapidly identify the outer membrane proteome of bacteria, which may prove valuable in vaccine development. PMID:19426766

  3. Inhibition of Escherichia coli Division by Protein X

    PubMed Central

    Satta, Giuseppe; Pardee, Arthur B.

    1978-01-01

    We propose that protein X provides the connection between damage to Escherichia coli DNA and inhibition of septation and cell division. This connection is needed to guarantee that each new bacterium receives a complete DNA copy. We present several new experiments here which demonstrate that the degree to which septation is inhibited following damage to DNA is correlated with the amount of protein X that is produced. Rifampin selectively blocks protein X production. This drug was shown to allow cells whose DNA had been damaged by nalidixic acid to resume septation. Several mutants formed septa-less filaments and also produced protein X at 42°C; rifampin both inhibited their production of protein X and permitted them to form septa and divide. Essentially complementary results were obtained with a dnaA mutant which at 42°C stopped making DNA, did not produce protein X, and continued to divide; added bleomycin degraded DNA, induced protein X, and inhibited septation. These results, as well as previous observations, are all consistent with the proposal that protein X is produced as a consequence of DNA damage and is an inhibitor of septation. We suggest that septation could require binding of a single-stranded region of DNA to a septum site in the membrane. Protein X could block this binding by combining with the DNA. This control could provide an emergency mechanism in addition to the usually proposed coordination in which completion of DNA synthesis creates a positive effector for a terminal step of septation. Or it could be the sole coordinating mechanism, even under unperturbed growth conditions. Images PMID:76627

  4. Escherichia coli Protein Expression System for Acetylcholine Binding Proteins (AChBPs)

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, Nikita; Paul, Blessy; Ragnarsson, Lotten; Lewis, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR) are ligand gated ion channels, identified as therapeutic targets for a range of human diseases. Drug design for nAChR related disorders is increasingly using structure-based approaches. Many of these structural insights for therapeutic lead development have been obtained from co-crystal structures of nAChR agonists and antagonists with the acetylcholine binding protein (AChBP). AChBP is a water soluble, structural and functional homolog of the extracellular, ligand-binding domain of nAChRs. Currently, AChBPs are recombinantly expressed in eukaryotic expression systems for structural and biophysical studies. Here, we report the establishment of an Escherichia coli (E. coli) expression system that significantly reduces the cost and time of production compared to the existing expression systems. E. coli can efficiently express unglycosylated AChBP for crystallography and makes the expression of isotopically labelled forms feasible for NMR. We used a pHUE vector containing an N-terminal His-tagged ubiquitin fusion protein to facilitate AChBP expression in the soluble fractions, and thus avoid the need to recover protein from inclusion bodies. The purified protein yield obtained from the E. coli expression system is comparable to that obtained from existing AChBP expression systems. E. coli expressed AChBP bound nAChR agonists and antagonists with affinities matching those previously reported. Thus, the E. coli expression system significantly simplifies the expression and purification of functional AChBP for structural and biophysical studies. PMID:27304486

  5. Fluorescent IgG fusion proteins made in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Luria, Yael; Raichlin, Dina; Benhar, Itai

    2012-01-01

    Antibodies are among the most powerful tools in biological and biomedical research and are presently the fastest growing category of new bio-pharmaceutics. The most common format of antibody applied for therapeutic, diagnostic and analytical purposes is the IgG format. For medical applications, recombinant IgGs are made in cultured mammalian cells in a process that is too expensive to be considered for producing antibodies for diagnostic and analytical purposes. Therefore, for such purposes, mouse monoclonal antibodies or polyclonal sera from immunized animals are used. While looking for an easier and more rapid way to prepare full-length IgGs for therapeutic purposes, we recently developed and reported an expression and purification protocol for full-length IgGs, and IgG-based fusion proteins in E. coli, called "Inclonals." By applying the Inclonals technology, we could generate full-length IgGs that are genetically fused to toxins. The aim of the study described herein was to evaluate the possibility of applying the "Inclonals" technology for preparing IgG-fluorophore fusion proteins. We found that IgG fused to the green fluorescent proteins enhanced GFP (EGFP) while maintaining functionality in binding, lost most of its fluorescence during the refolding process. In contrast, we found that green fluorescent Superfolder GFP (SFGFP)-fused IgG and red fluorescent mCherry-fused IgG were functional in antigen binding and maintained fluorescence intensity. In addition, we found that we can link several SFGFPs in tandem to each IgG, with fluorescence intensity increasing accordingly. Fluorescent IgGs made in E. coli may become attractive alternatives to monoclonal or polyclonal fluorescent antibodies derived from animals.

  6. Thermolabile antifreeze protein produced in Escherichia coli for structural analysis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Feng-Hsu; Sun, Tianjun; Fletcher, Garth L; Davies, Peter L

    2012-03-01

    The only hyperactive antifreeze protein (AFP) found to date in fishes is an extreme variant of the 3-kDa, alpha-helical, alanine-rich type I AFP, which is referred to here as type Ih. Purification of the 33-kDa homodimeric AFP Ih from a natural source was hampered by its low levels in fish plasma; by the need to remove the more abundant smaller isoforms; and by its extreme thermolability. Moreover, ice affinity as a purification tool was spoiled by the tendency of fish IgM antibodies to bind to ice in the presence of AFPs. In order to produce enough protein for crystallography we expressed AFP Ih as a recombinant protein in the Arctic Express® strain of Escherichia coli at 12 °C, just below the thermal denaturation temperature of 16-18 °C. His-tags were not useful because they compromised the activity and yield of AFP Ih. But in the absence of fish antibodies we were able to recover 10-mg quantities of the antifreeze protein using two cycles of ice affinity purification followed by anion-exchange chromatography to remove contaminating chaperones. The purified recombinant AFP Ih yielded diffraction-quality crystals with an extremely asymmetrical unit cell. By transferring the genes of the chaperones into a methionine auxotroph we were able to grow this host at low temperatures and produce sufficient selenomethionine-labeled AFP Ih for crystallography.

  7. The effect of ribosomal protein S1 from Escherichia coli and Micrococcus luteus on protein synthesis in vitro by E. coli and Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Farwell, M A; Roberts, M W; Rabinowitz, J C

    1992-11-01

    We have designed a set of nine plasmids containing the Bacillus pumilis cat gene with one of three Shine-Dalgarno (SD) sequences (weak, strong or stronger) and one of three initiation codons (AUG, GUG or UUG). These constructions have been used to determine the effect of ribosomal protein S1, SD and initiation codon sequences and Escherichia coli ribosomal protein S1 on translation in vitro by E. coli and B. subtilis ribosomes. Translation of these nine constructions was determined with three types of ribosomes: E. coli containing ribosomal protein S1, E. coli depleted of S1, and B. subtilis which is naturally free of S1. E. coli ribosomes were able to translate all nine transcripts with variable efficiencies. B. subtilis and S1-depleted E. coli ribosomes were similar to each other and differed from non-depleted E. coli ribosomes in that they required strong or stronger SD sequences and were unable to translate any of the weak transcripts. Addition of S1 from either E. coli or Micrococcus luteus, a Gram-positive bacterium, enabled S1-depleted E. coli ribosomes to translate mRNAs with weak SD sequences but had no effect on B. subtilis ribosomes. AUG was the preferred initiation codon for all ribosome types; however, B. subtilis ribosomes showed greater tolerance for the non-AUG codons than either type of E. coli ribosome. The presence of a strong or stronger SD sequence increased the efficiency by which E. coli ribosomes could utilize non-AUG codons.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  8. SEC/reversed-phase separation of E. coli proteins.

    PubMed

    Apffell, Alex

    2010-05-01

    Although many chromatographic modes can be coupled for the multidimensional separation of a complex mixture, a very favorable combination is that of size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) and reversed-phase chromatography. The separation mechanisms are largely orthogonal and the mobile phases are compatible. The use of a retentive second dimension allows trapping of specific fractions from the SEC separation and transferring them to the reversed-phase separation. One of the advantages of multidimensional chromatography is that it is scalable in terms of automation. In a completely manual system, fractions eluting from a first dimension can be manually collected and injected into a second separation dimension. In an automated system, fraction transfer can be accomplished through automated valving. The following protocol illustrates this approach, with both a manual method and an external column switching method integrated into an automated high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method. As an illustration, soluble proteins from Escherichia coli are separated.

  9. Green fluorescent protein-based expression screening of membrane proteins in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Bird, Louise E; Rada, Heather; Verma, Anil; Gasper, Raphael; Birch, James; Jennions, Matthew; Lӧwe, Jan; Moraes, Isabel; Owens, Raymond J

    2015-01-06

    The production of recombinant membrane proteins for structural and functional studies remains technically challenging due to low levels of expression and the inherent instability of many membrane proteins once solubilized in detergents. A protocol is described that combines ligation independent cloning of membrane proteins as GFP fusions with expression in Escherichia coli detected by GFP fluorescence. This enables the construction and expression screening of multiple membrane protein/variants to identify candidates suitable for further investment of time and effort. The GFP reporter is used in a primary screen of expression by visualizing GFP fluorescence following SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Membrane proteins that show both a high expression level with minimum degradation as indicated by the absence of free GFP, are selected for a secondary screen. These constructs are scaled and a total membrane fraction prepared and solubilized in four different detergents. Following ultracentrifugation to remove detergent-insoluble material, lysates are analyzed by fluorescence detection size exclusion chromatography (FSEC). Monitoring the size exclusion profile by GFP fluorescence provides information about the mono-dispersity and integrity of the membrane proteins in different detergents. Protein: detergent combinations that elute with a symmetrical peak with little or no free GFP and minimum aggregation are candidates for subsequent purification. Using the above methodology, the heterologous expression in E. coli of SED (shape, elongation, division, and sporulation) proteins from 47 different species of bacteria was analyzed. These proteins typically have ten transmembrane domains and are essential for cell division. The results show that the production of the SEDs orthologues in E. coli was highly variable with respect to the expression levels and integrity of the GFP fusion proteins. The experiment identified a subset for further investigation.

  10. Escherichia coli cell-free protein synthesis and isotope labeling of mammalian proteins.

    PubMed

    Terada, Takaho; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2015-01-01

    This chapter describes the cell-free protein synthesis method, using an Escherichia coli cell extract. This is a cost-effective method for milligram-scale protein production and is particularly useful for the production of mammalian proteins, protein complexes, and membrane proteins that are difficult to synthesize by recombinant expression methods, using E. coli and eukaryotic cells. By adjusting the conditions of the cell-free method, zinc-binding proteins, disulfide-bonded proteins, ligand-bound proteins, etc., may also be produced. Stable isotope labeling of proteins can be accomplished by the cell-free method, simply by using stable isotope-labeled amino acid(s) in the cell-free reaction. Moreover, the cell-free protein synthesis method facilitates the avoidance of stable isotope scrambling and dilution over the recombinant expression methods and is therefore advantageous for amino acid-selective stable isotope labeling. Site-specific stable isotope labeling is also possible with a tRNA molecule specific to the UAG codon. By the cell-free protein synthesis method, coupled transcription-translation is performed from a plasmid vector or a PCR-amplified DNA fragment encoding the protein. A milligram quantity of protein can be produced with a milliliter-scale reaction solution in the dialysis mode. More than a thousand solution structures have been determined by NMR spectroscopy for uniformly labeled samples of human and mouse functional domain proteins, produced by the cell-free method. Here, we describe the practical aspects of mammalian protein production by the cell-free method for NMR spectroscopy.

  11. Microbial trophic interactions and mcrA gene expression in monitoring of anaerobic digesters

    PubMed Central

    Alvarado, Alejandra; Montañez-Hernández, Lilia E.; Palacio-Molina, Sandra L.; Oropeza-Navarro, Ricardo; Luévanos-Escareño, Miriam P.; Balagurusamy, Nagamani

    2014-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion (AD) is a biological process where different trophic groups of microorganisms break down biodegradable organic materials in the absence of oxygen. A wide range of AD technologies is being used to convert livestock manure, municipal and industrial wastewaters, and solid organic wastes into biogas. AD gains importance not only because of its relevance in waste treatment but also because of the recovery of carbon in the form of methane, which is a renewable energy and is used to generate electricity and heat. Despite the advances on the engineering and design of new bioreactors for AD, the microbiology component always poses challenges. Microbiology of AD processes is complicated as the efficiency of the process depends on the interactions of various trophic groups involved. Due to the complex interdependence of microbial activities for the functionality of the anaerobic bioreactors, the genetic expression of mcrA, which encodes a key enzyme in methane formation, is proposed as a parameter to monitor the process performance in real time. This review evaluates the current knowledge on microbial groups, their interactions, and their relationship to the performance of anaerobic biodigesters with a focus on using mcrA gene expression as a tool to monitor the process. PMID:25429286

  12. Microbial trophic interactions and mcrA gene expression in monitoring of anaerobic digesters.

    PubMed

    Alvarado, Alejandra; Montañez-Hernández, Lilia E; Palacio-Molina, Sandra L; Oropeza-Navarro, Ricardo; Luévanos-Escareño, Miriam P; Balagurusamy, Nagamani

    2014-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion (AD) is a biological process where different trophic groups of microorganisms break down biodegradable organic materials in the absence of oxygen. A wide range of AD technologies is being used to convert livestock manure, municipal and industrial wastewaters, and solid organic wastes into biogas. AD gains importance not only because of its relevance in waste treatment but also because of the recovery of carbon in the form of methane, which is a renewable energy and is used to generate electricity and heat. Despite the advances on the engineering and design of new bioreactors for AD, the microbiology component always poses challenges. Microbiology of AD processes is complicated as the efficiency of the process depends on the interactions of various trophic groups involved. Due to the complex interdependence of microbial activities for the functionality of the anaerobic bioreactors, the genetic expression of mcrA, which encodes a key enzyme in methane formation, is proposed as a parameter to monitor the process performance in real time. This review evaluates the current knowledge on microbial groups, their interactions, and their relationship to the performance of anaerobic biodigesters with a focus on using mcrA gene expression as a tool to monitor the process.

  13. Protein folding in the cell envelope of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    De Geyter, Jozefien; Tsirigotaki, Alexandra; Orfanoudaki, Georgia; Zorzini, Valentina; Economou, Anastassios; Karamanou, Spyridoula

    2016-07-26

    While the entire proteome is synthesized on cytoplasmic ribosomes, almost half associates with, localizes in or crosses the bacterial cell envelope. In Escherichia coli a variety of mechanisms are important for taking these polypeptides into or across the plasma membrane, maintaining them in soluble form, trafficking them to their correct cell envelope locations and then folding them into the right structures. The fidelity of these processes must be maintained under various environmental conditions including during stress; if this fails, proteases are called in to degrade mislocalized or aggregated proteins. Various soluble, diffusible chaperones (acting as holdases, foldases or pilotins) and folding catalysts are also utilized to restore proteostasis. These responses can be general, dealing with multiple polypeptides, with functional overlaps and operating within redundant networks. Other chaperones are specialized factors, dealing only with a few exported proteins. Several complex machineries have evolved to deal with binding to, integration in and crossing of the outer membrane. This complex protein network is responsible for fundamental cellular processes such as cell wall biogenesis; cell division; the export, uptake and degradation of molecules; and resistance against exogenous toxic factors. The underlying processes, contributing to our fundamental understanding of proteostasis, are a treasure trove for the development of novel antibiotics, biopharmaceuticals and vaccines.

  14. McrA primers for the detection and quantification of the anaerobic archaeal methanotroph 'Candidatus Methanoperedens nitroreducens'.

    PubMed

    Vaksmaa, Annika; Jetten, Mike S M; Ettwig, Katharina F; Lüke, Claudia

    2017-02-01

    The nitrogen and methane cycles are important biogeochemical processes. Recently, 'Candidatus Methanoperedens nitroreducens,' archaea that catalyze nitrate-dependent anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM), were enriched, and their genomes were analyzed. Diagnostic molecular tools for the sensitive detection of 'Candidatus M. nitroreducens' are not yet available. Here, we report the design of two novel mcrA primer combinations that specifically target the alpha sub-unit of the methyl-coenzyme M reductase (mcrA) gene of 'Candidatus M. nitroreducens'. The first primer pair produces a fragment of 186-bp that can be used to quantify 'Candidatus M. nitroreducens' cells, whereas the second primer pair yields an 1191-bp amplicon that is with sufficient length and well suited for more detailed phylogenetic analyses. Six different environmental samples were evaluated with the new qPCR primer pair, and the abundances were compared with those determined using primers for the 16S rRNA gene. The qPCR results indicated that the number of copies of the 'Candidatus M. nitroreducens' mcrA gene was highest in rice field soil, with 5.6 ± 0.8 × 10(6) copies g(-1) wet weight, whereas Indonesian river sediment had only 4.6 ± 2.7 × 10(2) copies g(-1) wet weight. In addition to freshwater environments, sequences were also detected in marine sediment of the North Sea, which contained approximately 2.5 ± 0.7 × 10(4) copies g(-1) wet weight. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the amplified 1191-bp mcrA gene sequences from the different environments all clustered together with available genome sequences of mcrA from known 'Candidatus M. nitroreducens' archaea. Taken together, these results demonstrate the validity and utility of the new primers for the quantitative and sensitive detection of the mcrA gene sequences of these important nitrate-dependent AOM archaea. Furthermore, the newly obtained mcrA sequences will contribute to greater phylogenetic resolution of 'Candidatus M

  15. Medium-throughput production of recombinant human proteins: protein production in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Burgess-Brown, Nicola A; Mahajan, Pravin; Strain-Damerell, Claire; Gileadi, Opher; Gräslund, Susanne

    2014-01-01

    In Chapter 4 we described the SGC process for generating multiple constructs of truncated versions of each protein using LIC. In this chapter we provide a step-by-step procedure of our E. coli system for test expressing intracellular (soluble) proteins in a 96-well format that enables us to identify which proteins or truncated versions are expressed in a soluble and stable form suitable for structural studies. In addition, we detail the process for scaling up cultures for large-scale protein purification. This level of production is required to obtain sufficient quantities (i.e., milligram amounts) of protein for further characterization and/or crystallization experiments. Our standard process is purification by immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) using nickel resin followed by size exclusion chromatography (SEC), with additional procedures arising from the complexity of the protein itself.

  16. Membrane attachment activates dnaA protein, the initiation protein of chromosome replication in Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Yung, B.Y.; Kornberg, A.

    1988-10-01

    ADP and ATP are tightly bound to dnaA protein and are crucial to its function in DNA replication; the exchange of these nucleotides is effected specifically by the acidic phospholipids (cardiolipin and phosphatidylglycerol) present in Escherichia coli membranes. We now find that phospholipids derived from membranes lacking an unsaturated fatty acid (e.g., oleic acid) are unable to promote the exchange. This observation correlates strikingly with the long-known effect of 3-decynoyl-N-acetylcysteamine, a ''suicide analog'' that prevents initiation of a cycle of replication in E. coli by inhibiting the synthesis of oleic acid, an inhibition that can be overcome by providing the cells with oleic acid. Profound influences on the specific binding of dnaA protein to phospholipids by temperature, the content of unsaturated fatty acids, and the inclusion of cholesterol can be explained by the need for the phospholipids to be in fluid-phase vesicles. These findings suggest that membrane attachment of dnaA protein is vital for its function in the initiation of chromosome replication in E. coli.

  17. Protein N-myristoylation in Escherichia coli: reconstitution of a eukaryotic protein modification in bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Duronio, R J; Jackson-Machelski, E; Heuckeroth, R O; Olins, P O; Devine, C S; Yonemoto, W; Slice, L W; Taylor, S S; Gordon, J I

    1990-01-01

    Protein N-myristoylation refers to the covalent attachment of a myristoyl group (C14:0), via amide linkage, to the NH2-terminal glycine residue of certain cellular and viral proteins. Myristoyl-CoA:protein N-myristoyltransferase (NMT) catalyzes this cotranslational modification. We have developed a system for studying the substrate requirements and biological effects of protein N-myristoylation as well as NMT structure-activity relationships. Expression of the yeast NMT1 gene in Escherichia coli, a bacterium that has no endogenous NMT activity, results in production of the intact 53-kDa NMT polypeptide as well as a truncated polypeptide derived from proteolytic removal of its NH2-terminal 39 amino acids. Each E. coli-synthesized NMT species has fatty acid and peptide substrate specificities that are indistinguishable from those of NMT recovered from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, suggesting that the NH2-terminal domain of this enzyme is not required for its catalytic activity. By using a dual plasmid system, N-myristoylation of a mammalian protein was reconstituted in E. coli by simultaneous expression of the yeast NMT1 gene and a murine cDNA encoding the catalytic (C) subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PK-A). The fatty acid specificity of N-myristoylation was preserved in this system: [9,10(n)-3H]myristate but not [9,10(n)3H]palmitate was efficiently linked to Gly-1 of the C subunit. [13,14(n)-3H]10-Propoxydecanoic acid, a heteroatom-containing analog of myristic acid with reduced hydrophobicity but similar chain length, was an effective alternative substrate for NMT that also could be incorporated into the C subunit of PK-A. Such analogs have recently been shown to inhibit replication of certain retroviruses that depend upon linkage of a myristoyl group to their gag polyprotein precursors (e.g., the Pr55gag of human immunodeficiency virus type 1). A major advantage of the bacterial system over eukaryotic systems is the absence of endogenous NMT and substrates

  18. Transient protein-protein interactions perturb E. coli metabolome and cause gene dosage toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharyya, Sanchari; Bershtein, Shimon; Yan, Jin; Argun, Tijda; Gilson, Amy I; Trauger, Sunia A; Shakhnovich, Eugene I

    2016-01-01

    Gene dosage toxicity (GDT) is an important factor that determines optimal levels of protein abundances, yet its molecular underpinnings remain unknown. Here, we demonstrate that overexpression of DHFR in E. coli causes a toxic metabolic imbalance triggered by interactions with several functionally related enzymes. Though deleterious in the overexpression regime, surprisingly, these interactions are beneficial at physiological concentrations, implying their functional significance in vivo. Moreover, we found that overexpression of orthologous DHFR proteins had minimal effect on all levels of cellular organization – molecular, systems, and phenotypic, in sharp contrast to E. coli DHFR. Dramatic difference of GDT between ‘E. coli’s self’ and ‘foreign’ proteins suggests the crucial role of evolutionary selection in shaping protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks at the whole proteome level. This study shows how protein overexpression perturbs a dynamic metabolon of weak yet potentially functional PPI, with consequences for the metabolic state of cells and their fitness. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.20309.001 PMID:27938662

  19. Expression of goose parvovirus whole VP3 protein and its epitopes in Escherichia coli cells.

    PubMed

    Tarasiuk, K; Woźniakowski, G; Holec-Gąsior, L

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was the expression of goose parvovirus capsid protein (VP3) and its epitopes in Escherichia coli cells. Expression of the whole VP3 protein provided an insufficient amount of protein. In contrast, the expression of two VP3 epitopes (VP3ep4, VP3ep6) in E. coli, resulted in very high expression levels. This may suggest that smaller parts of the GPV antigenic determinants are more efficiently expressed than the complete VP3 gene.

  20. Appearance of a stress-response protein, phage-shock protein A, in Escherichia coli exposed to hydrophobic organic solvents.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, H; Yamamoto, M; Aono, R

    1998-02-01

    A 28 kDa protein associated with the inner membrane was induced strongly in Escherichia coli K-12 cells grown in the presence of a hydrophobic organic solvent, n-hexane or cyclooctane. These organic solvents suppressed the growth (growth rate and yield) of E. coli. A partial amino acid sequence showed that this protein was the phage-shock protein PspA. PspA is known to be induced in E. coli cells under extreme stress conditions. The results suggest that E. coli cells are subject to strong stress in the presence of organic solvents. Introduction of a multi-copy plasmid vector carrying the psp operon into E. coli improved the survival frequency of cells exposed suddenly to n-hexane but not the growth rate of cells growing in the presence of n-hexane.

  1. Gene 5. 5 protein of bacteriophaze T7 inhibits the nucleoid protein H-NS of Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Q.; Richardson, C.C. )

    1993-03-01

    Gene 5.5 of coliphage T7 is one of the most highly expressed genes during T7 infection. Gene 5.5 protein, purified from cells overexpressing the cloned gene, purifies with the nucleoid protein H-NS of Escherichia coli during three chromatographic steps. A fusion protein of gene 5.5 protein and maltose binding protein also purifies with H-NS. The fusion protein binds to the DNA-H-NS complex and abolishes H-NS-mediated inhibition of transcription by Escherichia coli and T7 RNA polymerases in vitro. Expression of gene 5.5 also relieves the repression of the Escherichia coli proU promoter by H-NS in vivo. The change of leucine to proline at residue 30 of gene 5.5 protein abolishes the interaction between gene 5.5 protein and H-NS. 30 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Protein-protein Interaction Networks of E. coli and S. cerevisiae are similar

    PubMed Central

    Wuchty, S.; Uetz, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Only recently novel high-throughput binary interaction data in E. coli became available that allowed us to compare experimentally obtained protein-protein interaction networks of prokaryotes and eukaryotes (i.e. E. coli and S. cerevisiae). Utilizing binary-Y2H, co-complex and binary literature curated interaction sets in both organisms we found that characteristics of interaction sets that were determined with the same experimental methods were strikingly similar. While essentiality is frequently considered a question of a protein's increasing number of interactions, we found that binary-Y2H interactions failed to show such a trend in both organisms. Furthermore, essential genes are enriched in protein complexes in both organisms. In turn, binary-Y2H interactions hold more bottleneck interactions than co-complex interactions while both binary-Y2H and co-complex interactions are strongly enriched among co-regulated proteins and transcription factors. We discuss if such similarities are a consequence of the underlying methodology or rather reflect truly different biological patterns. PMID:25431098

  3. Two-hybrid system for characterization of protein-protein interactions in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Hays, L B; Chen, Y S; Hu, J C

    2000-08-01

    The yeast two-hybrid system has been used to characterize many protein-protein interactions. A two-hybrid system for E. coli was constructed in which one hybrid protein bound to a specific DNA site recruits another to an adjacent DNA binding site. The first hybrid comprises a test protein, the bait, fused to a chimeric protein containing the 434 repressor DNA binding domain. In the second hybrid, a second test protein, the prey, is fused downstream of a chimeric protein with the DNA binding specificity of the lambda repressor. Reporters were designed to express cat and lacZ under the control of a low-affinity lambda operator. At low expression levels, lambda repressor hybrids weakly repress the reporter genes. A high-affinity operator recognized by 434 repressor was placed nearby, in a position that does not yield repression by 434 repressor alone. If the test proteins interact, the 434 hybrid bound to the 434 operator stabilizes the binding of the lambda repressor hybrid to the lambda operator, causing increased repression of the reporter genes. Reconstruction experiments with the fos and jun leucine zippers detected protein-protein interactions between either homodimeric or heterodimeric leucine zippers.

  4. Constitutive mutations in the Escherichia coli AraC protein.

    PubMed

    Dirla, Stephanie; Chien, John Yeh-Heng; Schleif, Robert

    2009-04-01

    The Escherichia coli AraC protein represses and induces the araBAD operon in response to the absence or presence of l-arabinose. Constitutive mutations in the AraC gene no longer require the presence of l-arabinose to convert AraC from its repressing to its inducing state. Such mutations were isolated directly by virtue of their constitutivity or by their resistance to the nonmetabolizable arabinose analog, d-fucose. The majority of the constitutive mutations lie within the same residues of the N-terminal regulatory arm of AraC. Two, however, were found in the core of the dimerization domain. As predicted by the light switch mechanism of AraC, constitutive mutations increase the susceptibility of the N-terminal arms to digestion by trypsin or chymotrypsin, suggesting that these mutations weaken or disrupt the arm structure required for repression by AraC. Fluorescence, circular dichroism, and cysteine reactivity measurements show that the constitutive mutations in the core of the dimerization domain lead to a weakening of the support for the arms and reduce the stability of the minus-arabinose arm structure. These mutations also weaken the interaction between the two-helix bundle and the beta-barrel subdomains of the dimerization domain and reduce the structural stability of the beta-barrels.

  5. Non-standard amino acid incorporation into proteins using Escherichia coli cell-free protein synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Seok Hoon; Kwon, Yong-Chan; Jewett, Michael C.

    2014-01-01

    Incorporating non-standard amino acids (NSAAs) into proteins enables new chemical properties, new structures, and new functions. In recent years, improvements in cell-free protein synthesis (CFPS) systems have opened the way to accurate and efficient incorporation of NSAAs into proteins. The driving force behind this development has been three-fold. First, a technical renaissance has enabled high-yielding (>1 g/L) and long-lasting (>10 h in batch operation) CFPS in systems derived from Escherichia coli. Second, the efficiency of orthogonal translation systems (OTSs) has improved. Third, the open nature of the CFPS platform has brought about an unprecedented level of control and freedom of design. Here, we review recent developments in CFPS platforms designed to precisely incorporate NSAAs. In the coming years, we anticipate that CFPS systems will impact efforts to elucidate structure/function relationships of proteins and to make biomaterials and sequence-defined biopolymers for medical and industrial applications. PMID:24959531

  6. Non-standard amino acid incorporation into proteins using Escherichia coli cell-free protein synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Seok Hoon; Kwon, Yong-Chan; Jewett, Michael

    2014-06-01

    Incorporating non-standard amino acids (NSAAs) into proteins enables new chemical properties, new structures, and new functions. In recent years, improvements in cell-free protein synthesis (CFPS) systems have opened the way to accurate and efficient incorporation of NSAAs into proteins. The driving force behind this development has been three-fold. First, a technical renaissance has enabled high-yielding (>1 g/L) and long-lasting (>10 h in batch operation) CFPS in systems derived from Escherichia coli. Second, the efficiency of orthogonal translation systems has improved. Third, the open nature of the CFPS platform has brought about an unprecedented level of control and freedom of design. Here, we review recent developments in CFPS platforms designed to precisely incorporate NSAAs. In the coming years, we anticipate that CFPS systems will impact efforts to elucidate structure/function relationships of proteins and to make biomaterials and sequence-defined biopolymers for medical and industrial applications.

  7. Effects of ribosome-inactivating proteins on Escherichia coli and Agrobacterium tumefaciens translation systems.

    PubMed Central

    Girbés, T; Barbieri, L; Ferreras, M; Arias, F J; Rojo, M A; Iglesias, R; Alegre, C; Escarmis, C; Stirpe, F

    1993-01-01

    The effects of 30 type 1 and of 2 (ricin and volkensin) type 2 ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs) on Escherichia coli and Agrobacterium tumefaciens cell-free translation systems were compared with the effects on a rabbit reticulocyte translation system. The depurinating activity of RIPs on E. coli ribosomes was also evaluated. Only six type 1 RIPs inhibited endogenous mRNA-directed translational activity of E. coli lysates, with submicromolar 50% inhibitory concentrations. Four RIPs had similar activities on poly(U)-directed phenylalanine polymerization by E. coli ribosomes, and three RIPs inhibited poly(U)-directed polyphenylalanine synthesis by A. tumefaciens ribosomes, with submicromolar 50% inhibitory concentrations. Images PMID:8407849

  8. Expression and purification of recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli tagged with a small metal-binding protein from Nitrosomonas europaea.

    PubMed

    Vargas-Cortez, Teresa; Morones-Ramirez, Jose Ruben; Balderas-Renteria, Isaias; Zarate, Xristo

    2016-02-01

    Escherichia coli is still the preferred organism for large-scale production of recombinant proteins. The use of fusion proteins has helped considerably in enhancing the solubility of heterologous proteins and their purification with affinity chromatography. Here, the use of a small metal-binding protein (SmbP) from Nitrosomonas europaea is described as a new fusion protein for protein expression and purification in E. coli. Fluorescent proteins tagged at the N-terminal with SmbP showed high levels of solubility, compared with those of maltose-binding protein and glutathione S-transferase, and low formation of inclusion bodies. Using commercially available IMAC resins charged with Ni(II), highly pure recombinant proteins were obtained after just one chromatography step. Proteins may be purified from the periplasm of E. coli if SmbP contains the signal sequence at the N-terminal. After removal of the SmbP tag from the protein of interest, high-yields are obtained since SmbP is a protein of just 9.9 kDa. The results here obtained suggest that SmbP is a good alternative as a fusion protein/affinity tag for the production of soluble recombinant proteins in E. coli.

  9. Expression and purification of recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli tagged with the metal-binding protein CusF.

    PubMed

    Cantu-Bustos, J Enrique; Vargas-Cortez, Teresa; Morones-Ramirez, Jose Ruben; Balderas-Renteria, Isaias; Galbraith, David W; McEvoy, Megan M; Zarate, Xristo

    2016-05-01

    Production of recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli has been improved considerably through the use of fusion proteins, because they increase protein solubility and facilitate purification via affinity chromatography. In this article, we propose the use of CusF as a new fusion partner for expression and purification of recombinant proteins in E. coli. Using a cell-free protein expression system, based on the E. coli S30 extract, Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) was expressed with a series of different N-terminal tags, immobilized on self-assembled protein microarrays, and its fluorescence quantified. GFP tagged with CusF showed the highest fluorescence intensity, and this was greater than the intensities from corresponding GFP constructs that contained MBP or GST tags. Analysis of protein production in vivo showed that CusF produces large amounts of soluble protein with low levels of inclusion bodies. Furthermore, fusion proteins can be exported to the cellular periplasm, if CusF contains the signal sequence. Taking advantage of its ability to bind copper ions, recombinant proteins can be purified with readily available IMAC resins charged with this metal ion, producing pure proteins after purification and tag removal. We therefore recommend the use of CusF as a viable alternative to MBP or GST as a fusion protein/affinity tag for the production of soluble recombinant proteins in E. coli.

  10. Endogenous occurrence of protein S-guanylation in Escherichia coli: Target identification and genetic regulation.

    PubMed

    Tsutsuki, Hiroyasu; Jung, Minkyung; Zhang, Tianli; Ono, Katsuhiko; Ida, Tomoaki; Kunieda, Kohei; Ihara, Hideshi; Akaike, Takaaki; Sawa, Tomohiro

    2016-09-09

    8-Nitroguanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (8-nitro-cGMP) is a nitrated cGMP derivative formed in response to nitric oxide (NO) and reactive oxygen species (ROS). It can cause a post-translational modification (PTM) of protein thiols through cGMP adduction (protein S-guanylation). Accumulating evidence has suggested that, in mammals, S-guanylation of redox-sensor proteins may implicate in regulation of adaptive responses against ROS-associated oxidative stress. Occurrence as well as protein targets of S-guanylation in bacteria remained unknown, however. Here we demonstrated, for the first time, the endogenous occurrence of protein S-guanylation in Escherichia coli (E. coli). Western blotting using anti-S-guanylation antibody clearly showed that multiple proteins were S-guanylated in E. coli. Interestingly, some of those proteins were more intensely S-guanylated when bacteria were cultured under static culture condition than shaking culture condition. It has been known that E. coli is deficient of guanylate cyclase, an enzyme indispensable for 8-nitro-cGMP formation in mammals. We found that adenylate cyclase from E. coli potentially catalyzed 8-nitro-cGMP formation from its precursor 8-nitroguanosine 5'-triphosphate. More importantly, E. coli lacking adenylate cyclase showed significantly reduced formation of S-guanylated proteins. Our S-guanylation proteomics successfully identified S-guanylation protein targets in E. coli, including chaperons, ribosomal proteins, and enzymes which associate with protein synthesis, redox regulation and metabolism. Understanding of functional impacts for protein S-guanylation in bacterial signal transduction is necessary basis for development of potential chemotherapy and new diagnostic strategy for control of pathogenic bacterial infections.

  11. Fusion tags for protein solubility, purification and immunogenicity in Escherichia coli: the novel Fh8 system

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Sofia; Almeida, André; Castro, António; Domingues, Lucília

    2014-01-01

    Proteins are now widely produced in diverse microbial cell factories. The Escherichia coli is still the dominant host for recombinant protein production but, as a bacterial cell, it also has its issues: the aggregation of foreign proteins into insoluble inclusion bodies is perhaps the main limiting factor of the E. coli expression system. Conversely, E. coli benefits of cost, ease of use and scale make it essential to design new approaches directed for improved recombinant protein production in this host cell. With the aid of genetic and protein engineering novel tailored-made strategies can be designed to suit user or process requirements. Gene fusion technology has been widely used for the improvement of soluble protein production and/or purification in E. coli, and for increasing peptide’s immunogenicity as well. New fusion partners are constantly emerging and complementing the traditional solutions, as for instance, the Fh8 fusion tag that has been recently studied and ranked among the best solubility enhancer partners. In this review, we provide an overview of current strategies to improve recombinant protein production in E. coli, including the key factors for successful protein production, highlighting soluble protein production, and a comprehensive summary of the latest available and traditionally used gene fusion technologies. A special emphasis is given to the recently discovered Fh8 fusion system that can be used for soluble protein production, purification, and immunogenicity in E. coli. The number of existing fusion tags will probably increase in the next few years, and efforts should be taken to better understand how fusion tags act in E. coli. This knowledge will undoubtedly drive the development of new tailored-made tools for protein production in this bacterial system. PMID:24600443

  12. Responses of methanogen mcrA genes and their transcripts to an alternate dry/wet cycle of paddy field soil.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ke; Conrad, Ralf; Lu, Yahai

    2012-01-01

    Intermittent drainage can substantially reduce methane emission from rice fields, but the microbial mechanisms remain poorly understood. In the present study, we determined the rates of methane production and emission, the dynamics of ferric iron and sulfate, and the abundance of methanogen mcrA genes (encoding the alpha subunit of methyl coenzyme M reductase) and their transcripts in response to alternate dry/wet cycles in paddy field soil. We found that intermittent drainage did not affect the growth of rice plants but significantly reduced the rates of both methane production and emission. The dry/wet cycles also resulted in shifts of soil redox conditions, increasing the concentrations of ferric iron and sulfate in the soil. Quantitative PCR analysis revealed that both mcrA gene copies and mcrA transcripts significantly decreased after dry/wet alternation compared to continuous flooding. Correlation and regression analyses showed that the abundance of mcrA genes and transcripts positively correlated with methane production potential and soil water content and negatively correlated with the concentrations of ferric iron and sulfate in the soil. However, the transcription of mcrA genes was reduced to a greater extent than the abundance of mcrA genes, resulting in very low mcrA transcript/gene ratios after intermittent drainage. Furthermore, terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis revealed that the composition of methanogenic community remained stable under dry/wet cycles, whereas that of metabolically active methanogens strongly changed. Collectively, our study demonstrated a stronger effect of intermittent drainage on the abundance of mcrA transcripts than of mcrA genes in rice field soil.

  13. Bacteriophage membrane protein P9 as a fusion partner for the efficient expression of membrane proteins in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Jung, Yuna; Jung, Hyeim; Lim, Dongbin

    2015-12-01

    Despite their important roles and economic values, studies of membrane proteins have been hampered by the difficulties associated with obtaining sufficient amounts of protein. Here, we report a novel membrane protein expression system that uses the major envelope protein (P9) of phage φ6 as an N-terminal fusion partner. Phage membrane protein P9 facilitated the synthesis of target proteins and their integration into the Escherichia coli cell membrane. This system was used to produce various multi-pass transmembrane proteins, including G-protein-coupled receptors, transporters, and ion channels of human origin. Green fluorescent protein fusion was used to confirm the correct folding of the expressed proteins. Of the 14 membrane proteins tested, eight were highly expressed, three were moderately expressed, and three were barely expressed in E. coli. Seven of the eight highly expressed proteins could be purified after extraction with the mild detergent lauryldimethylamine-oxide. Although a few proteins have previously been developed as fusion partners to augment membrane protein production, we believe that the major envelope protein P9 described here is better suited to the efficient expression of eukaryotic transmembrane proteins in E. coli.

  14. Recombinant protein production data after expression in the bacterium Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Cantu-Bustos, J. Enrique; Cano del Villar, Kevin D.; Vargas-Cortez, Teresa; Morones-Ramirez, Jose Ruben; Balderas-Renteria, Isaias; Zarate, Xristo

    2016-01-01

    Fusion proteins have become essential for the expression and purification of recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli. The metal-binding protein CusF has shown several features that make it an attractive fusion protein and affinity tag: "Expression and purification of recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli tagged with the metal-binding protein CusF" (Cantu-Bustos et al., 2016 [1]). Here we present accompanying data from protein expression experiments; we tested different protein tags, temperatures, expression times, cellular compartments, and concentrations of inducer in order to obtain soluble protein and low formation of inclusion bodies. Additionally, we present data from the purification of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) tagged with CusF, using Ag(I) metal affinity chromatography. PMID:27014739

  15. Recombinant protein production data after expression in the bacterium Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Cantu-Bustos, J Enrique; Cano Del Villar, Kevin D; Vargas-Cortez, Teresa; Morones-Ramirez, Jose Ruben; Balderas-Renteria, Isaias; Zarate, Xristo

    2016-06-01

    Fusion proteins have become essential for the expression and purification of recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli. The metal-binding protein CusF has shown several features that make it an attractive fusion protein and affinity tag: "Expression and purification of recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli tagged with the metal-binding protein CusF" (Cantu-Bustos et al., 2016 [1]). Here we present accompanying data from protein expression experiments; we tested different protein tags, temperatures, expression times, cellular compartments, and concentrations of inducer in order to obtain soluble protein and low formation of inclusion bodies. Additionally, we present data from the purification of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) tagged with CusF, using Ag(I) metal affinity chromatography.

  16. Heterologous expression ofa histone-like protein from Streptococcus intermedius in Escherichia coli alters the nucleoid structure and inhibits the growth of E. coli.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dali; Yumoto, Hiromichi; Murakami, Keiji; Hirota, Katsuhiko; Kayama, Shizuo; Taniguchi, Tomonori; Yamamoto, Akitake; Ono, Tsuneko; Matsuo, Takashi; Miyake, Yoichiro

    2008-11-01

    Escherichia coli failed to survive after transformation with a Streptococcus intermedius histone-like protein gene (Si-hlp) and its promoter-harbored plasmid. The promoter function of Si-hlp in E. coli was determined using enhanced green fluorescence protein (egfp) gene as a reporter. The inhibitory effect of Si-HLP on E. coli viability was verified by a tetracycline-inducible gene expression system. Further study suggested that Si-HLP may alter the bacterial nucleoid structure, leading to the growth inhibition of E. coli.

  17. Elimination of truncated recombinant protein expressed in Escherichia coli by removing cryptic translation initiation site.

    PubMed

    Jennings, Matthew J; Barrios, Adam F; Tan, Song

    2016-05-01

    Undesirable truncated recombinant protein products pose a special expression and purification challenge because such products often share similar chromatographic properties as the desired full length protein. We describe here our observation of both full length and a truncated form of a yeast protein (Gcn5) expressed in Escherichia coli, and the reduction or elimination of the truncated form by mutating a cryptic Shine-Dalgarno or START codon within the Gcn5 coding region. Unsuccessful attempts to engineer in a cryptic translation initiation site into other recombinant proteins suggest that cryptic Shine-Dalgarno or START codon sequences are necessary but not sufficient for cryptic translation in E. coli.

  18. Localization of protein aggregation in Escherichia coli is governed by diffusion and nucleoid macromolecular crowding effect.

    PubMed

    Coquel, Anne-Sophie; Jacob, Jean-Pascal; Primet, Mael; Demarez, Alice; Dimiccoli, Mariella; Julou, Thomas; Moisan, Lionel; Lindner, Ariel B; Berry, Hugues

    2013-04-01

    Aggregates of misfolded proteins are a hallmark of many age-related diseases. Recently, they have been linked to aging of Escherichia coli (E. coli) where protein aggregates accumulate at the old pole region of the aging bacterium. Because of the potential of E. coli as a model organism, elucidating aging and protein aggregation in this bacterium may pave the way to significant advances in our global understanding of aging. A first obstacle along this path is to decipher the mechanisms by which protein aggregates are targeted to specific intercellular locations. Here, using an integrated approach based on individual-based modeling, time-lapse fluorescence microscopy and automated image analysis, we show that the movement of aging-related protein aggregates in E. coli is purely diffusive (Brownian). Using single-particle tracking of protein aggregates in live E. coli cells, we estimated the average size and diffusion constant of the aggregates. Our results provide evidence that the aggregates passively diffuse within the cell, with diffusion constants that depend on their size in agreement with the Stokes-Einstein law. However, the aggregate displacements along the cell long axis are confined to a region that roughly corresponds to the nucleoid-free space in the cell pole, thus confirming the importance of increased macromolecular crowding in the nucleoids. We thus used 3D individual-based modeling to show that these three ingredients (diffusion, aggregation and diffusion hindrance in the nucleoids) are sufficient and necessary to reproduce the available experimental data on aggregate localization in the cells. Taken together, our results strongly support the hypothesis that the localization of aging-related protein aggregates in the poles of E. coli results from the coupling of passive diffusion-aggregation with spatially non-homogeneous macromolecular crowding. They further support the importance of "soft" intracellular structuring (based on macromolecular

  19. Localization of Protein Aggregation in Escherichia coli Is Governed by Diffusion and Nucleoid Macromolecular Crowding Effect

    PubMed Central

    Coquel, Anne-Sophie; Jacob, Jean-Pascal; Primet, Mael; Demarez, Alice; Dimiccoli, Mariella; Julou, Thomas; Moisan, Lionel

    2013-01-01

    Aggregates of misfolded proteins are a hallmark of many age-related diseases. Recently, they have been linked to aging of Escherichia coli (E. coli) where protein aggregates accumulate at the old pole region of the aging bacterium. Because of the potential of E. coli as a model organism, elucidating aging and protein aggregation in this bacterium may pave the way to significant advances in our global understanding of aging. A first obstacle along this path is to decipher the mechanisms by which protein aggregates are targeted to specific intercellular locations. Here, using an integrated approach based on individual-based modeling, time-lapse fluorescence microscopy and automated image analysis, we show that the movement of aging-related protein aggregates in E. coli is purely diffusive (Brownian). Using single-particle tracking of protein aggregates in live E. coli cells, we estimated the average size and diffusion constant of the aggregates. Our results provide evidence that the aggregates passively diffuse within the cell, with diffusion constants that depend on their size in agreement with the Stokes-Einstein law. However, the aggregate displacements along the cell long axis are confined to a region that roughly corresponds to the nucleoid-free space in the cell pole, thus confirming the importance of increased macromolecular crowding in the nucleoids. We thus used 3D individual-based modeling to show that these three ingredients (diffusion, aggregation and diffusion hindrance in the nucleoids) are sufficient and necessary to reproduce the available experimental data on aggregate localization in the cells. Taken together, our results strongly support the hypothesis that the localization of aging-related protein aggregates in the poles of E. coli results from the coupling of passive diffusion-aggregation with spatially non-homogeneous macromolecular crowding. They further support the importance of “soft” intracellular structuring (based on macromolecular

  20. Transphosphorylation of E. coli proteins during production of recombinant protein kinases provides a robust system to characterize kinase specificity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Protein kinase specificity is of fundamental importance to pathway regulation and signal transduction. Here, we report a convenient system to monitor the activity and specificity of recombinant protein kinases expressed in E.coli. We apply this to the study of the cytoplasmic domain of the plant rec...

  1. A beta-turn rich barley seed protein is correctly folded in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Tamas, L; Greenfield, J; Halford, N G; Tatham, A S; Shewry, P R

    1994-08-01

    Wild-type and cysteine-containing mutant C hordeins from barley were expressed in Escherichia coli at high levels (> or = 30mg/liter). N-terminal sequence analysis, SDS-PAGE, RP-HPLC, cd spectroscopy, and small angle X-ray scattering demonstrated that their physicochemical properties were similar to those of C hordeins isolated from barley grain. This indicates that the expressed proteins were correctly folded. The cysteine-containing mutant showed evidence of polymer formation in E. coli, nonreduced preparations of the protein showing the presence of polymers that were replaced by a single protein when a reducing agent was added.

  2. Statistical approaches to maximize recombinant protein expression in Escherichia coli: a general review.

    PubMed

    Papaneophytou, Christos P; Kontopidis, George

    2014-02-01

    The supply of many valuable proteins that have potential clinical or industrial use is often limited by their low natural availability. With the modern advances in genomics, proteomics and bioinformatics, the number of proteins being produced using recombinant techniques is exponentially increasing and seems to guarantee an unlimited supply of recombinant proteins. The demand of recombinant proteins has increased as more applications in several fields become a commercial reality. Escherichia coli (E. coli) is the most widely used expression system for the production of recombinant proteins for structural and functional studies. However, producing soluble proteins in E. coli is still a major bottleneck for structural biology projects. One of the most challenging steps in any structural biology project is predicting which protein or protein fragment will express solubly and purify for crystallographic studies. The production of soluble and active proteins is influenced by several factors including expression host, fusion tag, induction temperature and time. Statistical designed experiments are gaining success in the production of recombinant protein because they provide information on variable interactions that escape the "one-factor-at-a-time" method. Here, we review the most important factors affecting the production of recombinant proteins in a soluble form. Moreover, we provide information about how the statistical design experiments can increase protein yield and purity as well as find conditions for crystal growth.

  3. Differential regulation by cyclic AMP of starvation protein synthesis in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Schultz, J E; Latter, G I; Matin, A

    1988-09-01

    Of the 30 carbon starvation proteins whose induction has been previously shown to be important for starvation survival of Escherichia coli, two-thirds were not induced in cya or crp deletion mutants of E. coli at the onset of carbon starvation. The rest were induced, although not necessarily with the same temporal pattern as exhibited in the wild type. The starvation proteins that were homologous to previously identified heat shock proteins belonged to the latter class and were hyperinduced in delta cya or delta crp mutants during starvation. Most of the cyclic AMP-dependent proteins were synthesized in the delta cya mutant if exogenous cyclic AMP was added at the onset of starvation. Furthermore, beta-galactosidase induction of several carbon starvation response gene fusions occurred only in a cya+ genetic background. Thus, two-thirds of the carbon starvation proteins of E. coli require cyclic AMP and its receptor protein for induction; the rest do not. The former class evidently has no role in starvation survival, since delta cya or delta crp mutants of either E. coli or Salmonella typhimurium survived starvation as well as their wild-type parents did. The latter class, therefore, is likely to have a direct role in starvation survival. This possibility is strengthened by the finding that nearly all of the cya- and crp-independent proteins were also induced during nitrogen starvation and, as shown previously, during phosphate starvation. Proteins whose synthesis is independent of cya- and crp control are referred to as Pex (postexponential).

  4. Proteomic analysis of differentially expressed proteins in bovine milk during experimentally induced Escherichia coli mastitis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objectives of the current study were to profile changes in protein composition using 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2D-GE) on whey samples from a group of 8 cows prior to and 18 hours after infection with Escherichia coli, and to identify differentially expressed milk proteins by peptide seq...

  5. Engineering Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) derivative strains to minimize E. coli protein contamination after purification by immobilized metal affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Robichon, Carine; Luo, Jianying; Causey, Thomas B; Benner, Jack S; Samuelson, James C

    2011-07-01

    Recombinant His-tagged proteins expressed in Escherichia coli and purified by immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) are commonly coeluted with native E. coli proteins, especially if the recombinant protein is expressed at a low level. The E. coli contaminants display high affinity to divalent nickel or cobalt ions, mainly due to the presence of clustered histidine residues or biologically relevant metal binding sites. To improve the final purity of expressed His-tagged protein, we engineered E. coli BL21(DE3) expression strains in which the most recurring contaminants are either expressed with an alternative tag or mutated to decrease their affinity to divalent cations. The current study presents the design, engineering, and characterization of two E. coli BL21(DE3) derivatives, NiCo21(DE3) and NiCo22(DE3), which express the endogenous proteins SlyD, Can, ArnA, and (optionally) AceE fused at their C terminus to a chitin binding domain (CBD) and the protein GlmS, with six surface histidines replaced by alanines. We show that each E. coli CBD-tagged protein remains active and can be efficiently eliminated from an IMAC elution fraction using a chitin column flowthrough step, while the modification of GlmS results in loss of affinity for nickel-containing resin. The "NiCo" strains uniquely complement existing methods for improving the purity of recombinant His-tagged protein.

  6. Lactobacillus Proteins Are Associated with the Bactericidal Activity against E. coli of Female Genital Tract Secretions

    PubMed Central

    Kalyoussef, Sabah; Nieves, Edward; Dinerman, Ellen; Carpenter, Colleen; Shankar, Viswanathan; Oh, Jamie; Burd, Berta; Angeletti, Ruth H.; Buckheit, Karen W.; Fredricks, David N.; Madan, Rebecca P.; Keller, Marla J.; Herold, Betsy C.

    2012-01-01

    Background Female genital tract secretions are bactericidal for Escherichia (E.) coli ex vivo. However, the intersubject variability and molecules that contribute to this activity have not been defined. Methods The bactericidal activity and concentration of immune mediators in cervicovaginal lavage (CVL) collected from 99 healthy women were determined. Results CVL reduced the number of E. coli colonies by 68% [−26, 100] (median [range]). CVL were active against laboratory and clinical isolates of E. coli, but were inactive against Lactobacillus species. Bactericidal activity correlated with the concentration of protein recovered (p<0.001), but not with cytokines, chemokines or antimicrobial peptides. Four CVL with>90% inhibitory activity (active) and two with<30% activity were subjected to MS/MS proteomic analysis. 215 proteins were identified and six were found exclusively in active samples. Four of these corresponded to Lactobacillus crispatus or jensenii proteins. Moreover, culture supernatants from Lactobacillus jensenii were bactericidal for E. coli. Conclusion Both host and commensal microbiota proteins contribute to mucosal defense. Identification of these proteins will facilitate the development of strategies to maintain a healthy vaginal microbiome and prevent colonization with pathogenic bacteria such as E. coli that increase the risk for urinary tract infections, preterm labor and perinatal infection. PMID:23185346

  7. Soluble expression of recombinant proteins in the cytoplasm of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Sørensen, Hans Peter; Mortensen, Kim Kusk

    2005-01-01

    Pure, soluble and functional proteins are of high demand in modern biotechnology. Natural protein sources rarely meet the requirements for quantity, ease of isolation or price and hence recombinant technology is often the method of choice. Recombinant cell factories are constantly employed for the production of protein preparations bound for downstream purification and processing. Eschericia coli is a frequently used host, since it facilitates protein expression by its relative simplicity, its inexpensive and fast high density cultivation, the well known genetics and the large number of compatible molecular tools available. In spite of all these qualities, expression of recombinant proteins with E. coli as the host often results in insoluble and/or nonfunctional proteins. Here we review new approaches to overcome these obstacles by strategies that focus on either controlled expression of target protein in an unmodified form or by applying modifications using expressivity and solubility tags. PMID:15629064

  8. Comparative evolutionary analysis of protein complexes in E. coli and yeast

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Proteins do not act in isolation; they frequently act together in protein complexes to carry out concerted cellular functions. The evolution of complexes is poorly understood, especially in organisms other than yeast, where little experimental data has been available. Results We generated accurate, high coverage datasets of protein complexes for E. coli and yeast in order to study differences in the evolution of complexes between these two species. We show that substantial differences exist in how complexes have evolved between these organisms. A previously proposed model of complex evolution identified complexes with cores of interacting homologues. We support findings of the relative importance of this mode of evolution in yeast, but find that it is much less common in E. coli. Additionally it is shown that those homologues which do cluster in complexes are involved in eukaryote-specific functions. Furthermore we identify correlated pairs of non-homologous domains which occur in multiple protein complexes. These were identified in both yeast and E. coli and we present evidence that these too may represent complex cores in yeast but not those of E. coli. Conclusions Our results suggest that there are differences in the way protein complexes have evolved in E. coli and yeast. Whereas some yeast complexes have evolved by recruiting paralogues, this is not apparent in E. coli. Furthermore, such complexes are involved in eukaryotic-specific functions. This implies that the increase in gene family sizes seen in eukaryotes in part reflects multiple family members being used within complexes. However, in general, in both E. coli and yeast, homologous domains are used in different complexes. PMID:20122144

  9. Flagella proteins contribute to the production of outer membrane vesicles from Escherichia coli W3110.

    PubMed

    Manabe, Takayuki; Kato, Mayu; Ueno, Takayuki; Kawasaki, Kiyoshi

    2013-11-08

    Gram-negative bacteria, including Escherichia coli, release outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) that are derived from the bacterial outer membrane. OMVs contribute to bacterial cell-cell communications and host-microbe interactions by delivering components to locations outside the bacterial cell. In order to explore the molecular machinery involved in OMV biogenesis, the role of a major OMV protein was examined in the production of OMVs from E. coli W3110, which is a widely used standard E. coli K-12 strain. In addition to OmpC and OmpA, which are used as marker proteins for OMVs, an analysis of E. coli W3110 OMVs revealed that they also contain abundant levels of FliC, which is also known as flagellin. A membrane-impermeable biotin-labeling reagent did not label FliC in intact OMVs, but labeled FliC in sonically disrupted OMVs, suggesting that FliC is localized in the lumen of OMV. Compared to the parental strain expressing wild-type fliC, an E. coli strain with a fliC-null mutation produced reduced amounts of OMVs based on both protein and phosphate levels. In addition, an E. coli W3110-derived strain with a null-mutation in flgK, which encodes flagellar hook-associated protein that is essential along with FliC for flagella synthesis, also produced fewer OMVs than the parental strain. Taken together, these results indicate that the ability to form flagella, including the synthesis of flagella proteins, affects the production of E. coli W3110 OMVs.

  10. Induction of protein expression within Escherichia coli vector for entry into mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qingwen; Lee, Choon-Weng; Sim, Edmund Ui-Hang; Narayanan, Kumaran

    2014-02-01

    Direct protein delivery into the cytosol of mammalian cells by invasive Escherichia coli (E. coli) bacterial vector will bypass the need to achieve nuclear entry and transcription of DNA, a major hurdle that is known to seriously limit gene transfer. The bacterial vector is induced to express the protein during its growth phase, before presentation for entry into mammalian cells and release of its content into the cellular environment. For this class of vector, crossing the plasma membrane becomes the primary step that determines the success of protein delivery. Yet, how the mechanics of protein expression within the vector affect its entry into the host is poorly understood. We found the vector's effectiveness to enter HeLa cells diminished together with its viability when phage N15 protelomerase (TelN) expression was induced continuously in the invasive E. coli despite producing an abundant amount of functional protein. By comparison, shorter induction, even as little as 3 hr, produced sufficient amounts of functional TelN and showed more effective invasion of HeLa cells, comparable to that of uninduced invasive E. coli. These results demonstrate that brief induction of protein expression during vector growth is essential for optimal entry into mammalian cells, an important step for achieving bacteria-mediated protein delivery.

  11. Use of folding modulators to improve heterologous protein production in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Kolaj, Olga; Spada, Stefania; Robin, Sylvain; Wall, J Gerard

    2009-01-01

    Despite the fundamental importance of E. coli in the manufacture of a wide range of biotechnological and biomedical products, extensive process and/or target optimisation is routinely required in order to achieve functional yields in excess of low mg/l levels. Molecular chaperones and folding catalysts appear to present a panacea for problems of heterologous protein folding in the organism, due largely to their broad substrate range compared with, e.g., protein-specific mutagenesis approaches. Painstaking investigation of chaperone overproduction has, however, met with mixed – and largely unpredictable – results to date. The past 5 years have nevertheless seen an explosion in interest in exploiting the native folding modulators of E. coli, and particularly cocktails thereof, driven largely by the availability of plasmid systems that facilitate simultaneous, non-rational screening of multiple chaperones during recombinant protein expression. As interest in using E. coli to produce recombinant membrane proteins and even glycoproteins grows, approaches to reduce aggregation, delay host cell lysis and optimise expression of difficult-to-express recombinant proteins will become even more critical over the coming years. In this review, we critically evaluate the performance of molecular chaperones and folding catalysts native to E. coli in improving functional production of heterologous proteins in the bacterium and we discuss how they might best be exploited to provide increased amounts of correctly-folded, active protein for biochemical and biophysical studies. PMID:19173718

  12. Expression of the major outer membrane protein of Chlamydia trachomatis in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Manning, D S; Stewart, S J

    1993-01-01

    The major outer membrane protein (MOMP) of Chlamydia trachomatis was expressed in Escherichia coli. To assess whether it assembled into a conformationally correct structure at the cell surface, we characterized the recombinant MOMP (rMOMP) by Western immunoblot analysis, indirect immunofluorescence, and immunoprecipitation with monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) that recognize contiguous and conformational MOMP epitopes. Western blot analysis showed that most of the rMOMP comigrated with authentic monomer MOMP, indicating that its signal peptide was recognized and cleaved by E. coli. The rMOMP could not be detected on the cell surface of viable or formalin-killed E. coli organisms by indirect immunofluorescence staining with a MAb specific for a MOMP contiguous epitope. In contrast, the same MAb readily stained rMOMP-expressing E. coli cells that had been permeabilized by methanol fixation. A MAb that recognizes a conformational MOMP epitope and reacted strongly with formalin- or methanol-fixed elementary bodies failed to stain formalin- or methanol-fixed E. coli expressing rMOMP. Moreover, this MAb did not immunoprecipitate rMOMP from expressing E. coli cells even though it precipitated the authentic protein from lysates of C. trachomatis elementary bodies. Therefore we concluded that rMOMP was not localized to the E. coli cell surface and was not recognizable by a conformation-dependent antibody. These results indicate that rMOMP expressed by E. coli is unlikely to serve as an accurate model of MOMP structure and function. They also question the utility of rMOMP as a source of immunogen for eliciting neutralizing antibodies against conformational antigenic sites of the protein. Images PMID:8406797

  13. Purification of the Escherichia coli type 1 pilin and minor pilus proteins and partial characterization of the adhesin protein.

    PubMed Central

    Hanson, M S; Hempel, J; Brinton, C C

    1988-01-01

    Type 1 pili of Escherichia coli contain three integral minor proteins with apparent molecular weights (Mr) of 28,000 (28K protein), 16,500, and 14,500 attached to rods composed of Mr-17,000 pilin subunits (Hanson and Brinton, Nature [London] 322:265-268). We describe here an improvement on our earlier method of pilus purification, which gives higher yields and higher purity. Also reported are methods allowing fractionation of intact type 1 pili into rods of pure pilin and free minor proteins, as well as fractionation of the 28K tip adhesion protein from the 16.5K and 14.5K proteins. We have determined the amino acid composition and amino-terminal sequence of the adhesion protein. This sequence shows limited homology with the amino-terminal sequences of several E. coli pilins, including type 1. Images PMID:2900235

  14. mRNA-programmed translation pauses in the targeting of E. coli membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Fluman, Nir; Navon, Sivan; Bibi, Eitan; Pilpel, Yitzhak

    2014-08-18

    In all living organisms, ribosomes translating membrane proteins are targeted to membrane translocons early in translation, by the ubiquitous signal recognition particle (SRP) system. In eukaryotes, the SRP Alu domain arrests translation elongation of membrane proteins until targeting is complete. Curiously, however, the Alu domain is lacking in most eubacteria. In this study, by analyzing genome-wide data on translation rates, we identified a potential compensatory mechanism in E. coli that serves to slow down the translation during membrane protein targeting. The underlying mechanism is likely programmed into the coding sequence, where Shine-Dalgarno-like elements trigger elongation pauses at strategic positions during the early stages of translation. We provide experimental evidence that slow translation during targeting and improves membrane protein production fidelity, as it correlates with better folding of overexpressed membrane proteins. Thus, slow elongation is important for membrane protein targeting in E. coli, which utilizes mechanisms different from the eukaryotic one to control the translation speed.

  15. NMR Structure of the hypothetical protein encoded by the YjbJ gene from Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Pineda-Lucena, Antonio; Liao, Jack; Wu, Bin; Yee, Adelinda; Cort, John R.; Kennedy, Michael A.; Edwards, Aled M.; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H.

    2002-06-01

    Here we describe the solution structure of YjbJ (gil418541) as part of a structural proteomics project on the feasibility of the high-throughput generation of samples from Escherichia coli for structural studies. YjbJ is a hypothetical protein from Escherichia coli protein of unknown function. It is conserved, showing significant sequence identity to four predicted prokaryotic proteins, also of unknown function (Figure 1A). These include gil16762921 from Salmonella enterica (S. typhi), gil17938413 from Agrobacterium tumefaciens, gil16265654 from Sinorizhobium meliloti, and gil15599932 from Pseudomona aeruginosa. The structure of YjbJ reveals a new variation of a common motif (four-helix bundle) that could not be predicted from the protein sequence. Although the biochemical function is unknown, the existence of patterns of conserved residues on the protein surface suggest that the fold and function of all these proteins could be similar.

  16. Production of recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli tagged with the fusion protein CusF3H.

    PubMed

    Vargas-Cortez, Teresa; Morones-Ramirez, Jose Ruben; Balderas-Renteria, Isaias; Zarate, Xristo

    2017-04-01

    Recombinant protein expression in the bacterium Escherichia coli still is the number one choice for large-scale protein production. Nevertheless, many complications can arise using this microorganism, such as low yields, the formation of inclusion bodies, and the requirement for difficult purification steps. Most of these problems can be solved with the use of fusion proteins. Here, the use of the metal-binding protein CusF3H+ is described as a new fusion protein for recombinant protein expression and purification in E. coli. We have previously shown that CusF produces large amounts of soluble protein, with low levels of formation of inclusion bodies, and that proteins can be purified using IMAC resins charged with Cu(II) ions. CusF3H+ is an enhanced variant of CusF, formed by the addition of three histidine residues at the N-terminus. These residues then can bind Ni(II) ions allowing improved purity after affinity chromatography. Expression and purification of Green Fluorescent Protein tagged with CusF3H+ showed that the mutation did not alter the capacity of the fusion protein to increase protein expression, and purity improved considerably after affinity chromatography with immobilized nickel ions; high yields are obtained after tag-removal since CusF3H+ is a small protein of just 10 kDa. Furthermore, the results of experiments involving expression of tagged proteins having medium to large molecular weights indicate that the presence of the CusF3H+ tag improves protein solubility, as compared to a His-tag. We therefore endorse CusF3H+ as a useful alternative fusion protein/affinity tag for production of recombinant proteins in E. coli.

  17. A novel nucleoid protein of Escherichia coli induced under anaerobiotic growth conditions

    PubMed Central

    Teramoto, Jun; Yoshimura, Shige H.; Takeyasu, Kunio; Ishihama, Akira

    2010-01-01

    A systematic search was performed for DNA-binding sequences of YgiP, an uncharacterized transcription factor of Escherichia coli, by using the Genomic SELEX. A total of 688 YgiP-binding loci were identified after genome-wide profiling of SELEX fragments with a high-density microarray (SELEX-chip). Gel shift and DNase-I footprinting assays indicated that YgiP binds to multiple sites along DNA probes with a consensus GTTNATT sequence. Atomic force microscope observation indicated that at low concentrations, YgiP associates at various sites on DNA probes, but at high concentrations, YgiP covers the entire DNA surface supposedly through protein–protein contact. The intracellular concentration of YgiP is very low in growing E. coli cells under aerobic conditions, but increases more than 100-fold to the level as high as the major nucleoid proteins under anaerobic conditions. An E. coli mutant lacking ygiP showed retarded growth under anaerobic conditions. High abundance and large number of binding sites together indicate that YgiP is a nucleoid-associated protein with both architectural and regulatory roles as the nucleoid proteins Fis and IHF. We then propose that YgiP is a novel nucleoid protein of E. coli under anaerobiosis and propose to rename it Dan (DNA-binding protein under anaerobic conditions). PMID:20156994

  18. A system for dual protein expression in Pichia pastoris and Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Lueking, A; Holz, C; Gotthold, C; Lehrach, H; Cahill, D

    2000-12-01

    We have constructed a novel Pichia pastoris/Escherichia coli dual expression vector for the production of recombinant proteins in both host systems. In this vector, an E. coli T7 promoter region, including the ribosome binding site from the phage T7 major capsid protein for efficient translation is placed downstream from the yeast alcohol oxidase promoter (AOX). For detection and purification of the target protein, the vector contains an amino-terminal oligohistidine domain (His6) followed by the hemaglutinine epitope (HA) adjacent to the cloning sites. A P. pastoris autonomous replicating sequence (PARS) was integrated enabling simple propagation and recovery of plasmids from yeast and bacteria (1). In the present study, the expression of human proteins in P. pastoris and E. coli was compared using this single expression vector. For this purpose we have subcloned a cDNA expression library deriving from human fetal brain (2) into our dual expression T7 vector and investigated 96 randomly picked clones. After sequencing, 29 clones in the correct reading frame have been identified, their plasmids isolated and shuttled from yeast to bacteria. All proteins were expressed soluble in P. pastoris, whereas in E. coli only 31% could be purified under native conditions. Our data indicates that this dual expression vector allows the economic expression and purification of proteins in different hosts without subcloning.

  19. Bacteriophage T5 gene A2 protein alters the outer membrane of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, C E

    1984-01-01

    Evidence for changes in Escherichia coli envelope structure caused by the bacteriophage T5 gene A2 protein was obtained by the use of mutant bacteriophages, envelope fractionation procedures, electrophoretic analysis, and in vitro binding studies with purified gene A2 protein. The results suggested that the T5 gene A2 protein perturbs the host envelope as it functions to promote DNA transfer. Images PMID:6389511

  20. Synthesis and evaluation of potential inhibitors of human and Escherichia coli histidine triad nucleotide binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Bardaweel, Sanaa K; Ghosh, Brahma; Wagner, Carston R

    2012-01-01

    Based on recent substrate specificity studies, a series of ribonucleotide based esters and carbamates were synthesized and screened as inhibitors of the phosphoramidases and acyl-AMP hydrolases, Escherichia coli Histidine Triad Nucleotide Binding Protein (ecHinT) and human Histidine Triad Nucleotide Binding Protein 1 (hHint1). Using our established phosphoramidase assay, K(i) values were determined. All compounds exhibited non-competitive inhibition profiles. The carbamate based inhibitors were shown to successfully suppress the Hint1-associated phenotype in E. coli, suggesting that they are permeable intracellular inhibitors of ecHinT.

  1. Comparisons of recombinant protein expression in diverse natural isolates of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Jung, Yuna; Lim, Dongbin

    2008-05-31

    We assessed heterologous protein expression in 64 strains obtained from the Escherichia coli Reference (ECOR) collection, a collection representing diverse natural E. coli populations. A plasmid generating a glutathione S-transferase and plant carbonic anhydrase fusion protein (GST-CA) under the control of the tac promoter was introduced into the ECOR strains, and the quantity of the fusion protein was determined by SDS-PAGE. The foreign protein was generated at various levels, from very high (40 strains, high producers) to very low (six strains, low producers). Immunoblotting showed that the high producers expressed approximately 250-500 times more GST-CA protein than the low producers. The results of semi-quantitative RT-PCR showed that the low producers generated mRNA levels comparable to those of the high producers, thereby suggesting that, at least in this case, inefficient translation is a major cause of the low production. We introduced a different plasmid, which expressed a maltose binding protein and plant guanylate kinase fusion protein (MBP-GK) into the six low producers. Interestingly, five of these expressed MBP-GK at very high levels. Thus, we conclude that the production of a particular protein from an expression vector can vary considerably, depending on the host strain. Strains in the ECOR collection could function as useful alternative hosts when a desired level of protein expression is not obtained from commonly used strains, such as E. coli K12 or B derivatives.

  2. Surface display of recombinant proteins on Escherichia coli by BclA exosporium of Bacillus anthracis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The anchoring motif is one of the most important aspects of cell surface display as well as efficient and stable display of target proteins. Thus, there is currently a need for the identification and isolation of novel anchoring motifs. Results A system for the display of recombinant proteins on the surface of Escherichia coli was developed using the Bacillus anthracis exosporal protein (BclA) as a new anchoring motif. For the surface display of recombinant proteins, the BAN display platform was constructed in which a target protein is linked to the C-terminus of N-terminal domain (21 amino acids) of BclA. The potential application of BAN platform for cell surface display was demonstrated with two model proteins of different size, the Bacillus sp. endoxylanase (XynA) and monooxygenase (P450 BM3m2). Through experimental analysis including outer membrane fractionation, confocal microscopy and activity assay, it was clearly confirmed that both model proteins were successfully displayed with high activities on the E. coli cell surface. Conclusions These results of this study suggest that the strategy employing the B. anthracis BclA as an anchoring motif is suitable for the display of heterologous proteins on the surface of E. coli and consequently for various biocatalytic applications as well as protein engineering. PMID:24053632

  3. Extracellular production and affinity purification of recombinant proteins with Escherichia coli using the versatility of the maltose binding protein.

    PubMed

    Sommer, Benjamin; Friehs, Karl; Flaschel, Erwin; Reck, Michael; Stahl, Frank; Scheper, Thomas

    2009-03-25

    Recombinant proteins are essential products of today's industrial biotechnology. In this study we address two crucial factors in recombinant protein production: (i) product accessibility and (ii) product recovery. Escherichia coli, one of the most frequently used hosts for recombinant protein expression, does not inherently secrete proteins into the extracellular environment. The major drawback of this expression system is, therefore, to be found in the intracellular protein accumulation and hampered product accessibility. We have constructed a set of expression vectors in order to facilitate extracellular protein production and purification. The maltose binding protein from E. coli is used as fusion partner for several proteins of interest allowing an export to the bacteria's periplasm via both the Sec and the Tat pathway. Upon coexpression of a modified Cloacin DF13 bacteriocin release protein, the hybrid proteins are released into the culture medium. This essentially applies to a distinguished reporter molecule, the green fluorescent protein, for which an extracellular production was not reported so far. The sequestered proteins can be purified to approximate homogeneity by a simple, rapid and cheap procedure which utilizes the affinity of the maltose binding protein to alpha-1,4-glucans.

  4. High-throughput recombinant protein expression in Escherichia coli: current status and future perspectives

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The ease of genetic manipulation, low cost, rapid growth and number of previous studies have made Escherichia coli one of the most widely used microorganism species for producing recombinant proteins. In this post-genomic era, challenges remain to rapidly express and purify large numbers of proteins for academic and commercial purposes in a high-throughput manner. In this review, we describe several state-of-the-art approaches that are suitable for the cloning, expression and purification, conducted in parallel, of numerous molecules, and we discuss recent progress related to soluble protein expression, mRNA folding, fusion tags, post-translational modification and production of membrane proteins. Moreover, we address the ongoing efforts to overcome various challenges faced in protein expression in E. coli, which could lead to an improvement of the current system from trial and error to a predictable and rational design. PMID:27581654

  5. A self-inducible heterologous protein expression system in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Briand, L.; Marcion, G.; Kriznik, A.; Heydel, J. M.; Artur, Y.; Garrido, C.; Seigneuric, R.; Neiers, F.

    2016-01-01

    Escherichia coli is an important experimental, medical and industrial cell factory for recombinant protein production. The inducible lac promoter is one of the most commonly used promoters for heterologous protein expression in E. coli. Isopropyl-β-D-thiogalactoside (IPTG) is currently the most efficient molecular inducer for regulating this promoter’s transcriptional activity. However, limitations have been observed in large-scale and microplate production, including toxicity, cost and culture monitoring. Here, we report the novel SILEX (Self-InducibLe Expression) system, which is a convenient, cost-effective alternative that does not require cell density monitoring or IPTG induction. We demonstrate the broad utility of the presented self-inducible method for a panel of diverse proteins produced in large amounts. The SILEX system is compatible with all classical culture media and growth temperatures and allows protein expression modulation. Importantly, the SILEX system is proven to be efficient for protein expression screening on a microplate scale. PMID:27611846

  6. Glucokinase of Escherichia coli: induction in response to the stress of overexpressing foreign proteins.

    PubMed

    Arora, K K; Pedersen, P L

    1995-06-01

    A variety of stressful conditions, such as heat shock, ethanol, osmotic shock, glucose deprivation, and oxidative stress, are known to induce the synthesis of specific proteins. Here, we report the induction in Escherichia coli of a protein elicited in response to a hitherto unidentified stress condition, i.e., the overexpression of foreign proteins. The induced protein identified as glucokinase (EC 2.7.1.2) is produced at a level > or = 20-fold higher than the level in wild-type E. coli when foreign proteins are expressed under the control of the alkaline phosphatase (phoA) promoter. The bacterial glucokinase is shown to have a mass of approximately 47 kDa determined by a "renaturation activity stain assay" in situ following sodium dodecyl sulfate-poly-acrylamide gel electrophoresis and exhibits a high specificity for the phosphorylation of glucose. The apparent Km values for glucose and ATP for the enzyme are 0.15 and 0.50 mM, respectively, indicating that the E. coli enzyme is a low Km glucose hexokinase. The enzyme cross-reacts with rabbit antisera raised against hexokinase from higher eukaryotes, implicating some sequence similarity with mammalian hexokinases. Under normal conditions, E. coli glucokinase plays a minor role in glucose metabolism. However, under anabolic stress conditions, this glycolytic enzyme may be required to supplement levels of glucose 6-phosphate. Alternatively, glucokinase, which is predicted in analogy to other hexose-utilizing kinases to have structural folds characteristic of hsp 70, may itself, or in combination with other E. coli proteins, function in the stabilization of newly synthesized proteins.

  7. The Protein Interaction Network of Bacteriophage Lambda with Its Host, Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Blasche, Sonja; Wuchty, Stefan; Rajagopala, Seesandra V.

    2013-01-01

    Although most of the 73 open reading frames (ORFs) in bacteriophage λ have been investigated intensively, the function of many genes in host-phage interactions remains poorly understood. Using yeast two-hybrid screens of all lambda ORFs for interactions with its host Escherichia coli, we determined a raw data set of 631 host-phage interactions resulting in a set of 62 high-confidence interactions after multiple rounds of retesting. These links suggest novel regulatory interactions between the E. coli transcriptional network and lambda proteins. Targeted host proteins and genes required for lambda infection are enriched among highly connected proteins, suggesting that bacteriophages resemble interaction patterns of human viruses. Lambda tail proteins interact with both bacterial fimbrial proteins and E. coli proteins homologous to other phage proteins. Lambda appears to dramatically differ from other phages, such as T7, because of its unusually large number of modified and processed proteins, which reduces the number of host-virus interactions detectable by yeast two-hybrid screens. PMID:24049175

  8. Use of Escherichia coli for the production and purification of membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Postis, Vincent G L; Rawlings, Andrea E; Lesiuk, Amelia; Baldwin, Stephen A

    2013-01-01

    Individual types of ion channels and other membrane proteins are typically expressed only at low levels in their native membranes, rendering their isolation by conventional purification techniques difficult. The heterologous over-expression of such proteins is therefore usually a prerequisite for their purification in amounts suitable for structural and for many functional investigations. The most straightforward expression host, suitable for prokaryote membrane proteins and some proteins from eukaryotes, is the bacterium Escherichia coli. Here we describe the use of this expression system for production of functionally active polytopic membrane proteins and methods for their purification by affinity chromatography in amounts up to tens of milligrams.

  9. The blue copper protein gene of Alcaligenes faecalis S-6 directs secretion of blue copper protein from Escherichia coli cells.

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, K; Uozumi, T; Beppu, T

    1987-01-01

    The gene encoding a blue copper protein (a member of the pseudoazurins) of 123 amino acid residues, containing a single type I Cu2+ ion, was cloned from Alcaligenes faecalis S-6. The nucleotide sequence of the coding region, as well as the 5'- and 3'-flanking regions, was determined. The deduced amino acid sequence after Glu-24 coincided with the reported sequence of the blue protein, and its NH2-terminal sequence of 23 residues resembled a typical signal peptide. The cloned gene was expressed under the control of the tac promoter in Escherichia coli, and the correctly processed blue protein was secreted into the periplasm. The blue protein produced in E. coli possessed the activity to transfer electrons to the copper-containing nitrite reductase of A. faecalis S-6 in vitro. Images PMID:2824441

  10. Secretion and Proteolysis of Heterologous Proteins Fused to the Escherichia coli Maltose Binding Protein in Pichia pastoris

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhiguo; Leung, Wilson; Yon, Amy; Nguyen, John; Perez, Vincent C.; Vu, Jane; Giang, William; Luong, Linda T.; Phan, Tracy; Salazar, Katherine A.; Gomez, Seth R.; Au, Colin; Xiang, Fan; Thomas, David W.; Franz, Andreas H.; Lin-Cereghino, Joan; Lin-Cereghino, Geoff P.

    2010-01-01

    The E. coli maltose binding protein (MBP) has been utilized as a translational fusion partner to improve the expression of foreign proteins made in E. coli. When located N-terminal to its cargo protein, MBP increases the solubility of intracellular proteins and improves the export of secreted proteins in bacterial systems. We initially explored whether MBP would have the same effect in the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris, a popular eukaryotic host for heterologous protein expression. When MBP was fused as an N-terminal partner to several C-terminal cargo proteins expressed in this yeast, proteolysis occurred between the two peptides, and MBP reached the extracellular region unattached to its cargo. However, in two of three instances, the cargo protein reached the extracellular region as well, and its initial attachment to MBP enhanced its secretion from the cell. Extensive mutagenesis of the spacer region between MBP and its C-terminal cargo protein could not inhibit the cleavage although it did cause changes in the protease target sites in the fusion proteins, as determined by mass spectrometry. Taken together, these results suggested that an uncharacterized P. pastoris protease attacked at different locations in the region C-terminal of the MBP domain, including the spacer and cargo regions, but the MBP domain could still act to enhance the secretion of certain cargo proteins. PMID:20230898

  11. Production and characterization of ZFP36L1 antiserum against recombinant protein from Escherichia coli

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tristetraprolin (TTP/ZFP36) family proteins are anti-inflammatory. They bind and destabilize some AU-rich element-containing mRNAs such as tumor necrosis factor mRNA. In this study, recombinant ZFP36L1/TIS11B (a TTP homologue) was over-expressed in E. coli, purified, and used for polyclonal antibody...

  12. Problem-Solving Test: RNA and Protein Synthesis in Bacteriophage-Infected "E. coli" Cells

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szeberenyi, Jozsef

    2008-01-01

    The classic experiment presented in this problem-solving test was designed to identify the template molecules of translation by analyzing the synthesis of phage proteins in "Escherichia coli" cells infected with bacteriophage T4. The work described in this test led to one of the most seminal discoveries of early molecular biology: it dealt a…

  13. Contribution of Cysteine Desulfurase (NifS Protein) to the Biotin Synthase Reaction of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Kiyasu, Tatsuya; Asakura, Akira; Nagahashi, Yoshie; Hoshino, Tatsuo

    2000-01-01

    The contribution of cysteine desulfurase, the NifS protein of Klebsiella pneumoniae and the IscS protein of Escherichia coli, to the biotin synthase reaction was investigated in in vitro and in vivo reaction systems with E. coli. When the nifS and nifU genes of K. pneumoniae were coexpressed in E. coli, NifS and NifU proteins in complex (NifU/S complex) and NifU monomer forms were observed. Both the NifU/S complex and the NifU monomer stimulated the biotin synthase reaction in the presence of l-cysteine in an in vitro reaction system. The NifU/S complex enhanced the production of biotin from dethiobiotin by the cells growing in an in vivo reaction system. Moreover, the IscS protein of E. coli stimulated the biotin synthase reaction in the presence of l-cysteine in the cell-free system. These results strongly suggest that cysteine desulfurase participates in the biotin synthase reaction, probably by supplying sulfur to the iron-sulfur cluster of biotin synthase. PMID:10781558

  14. Characterization of the "Escherichia Coli" Acyl Carrier Protein Phosphodiesterase

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Jacob

    2009-01-01

    Acyl carrier protein (ACP) is a small essential protein that functions as a carrier of the acyl intermediates of fatty acid synthesis. ACP requires the posttranslational attachment of a 4'phosphopantetheine functional group, derived from CoA, in order to perform its metabolic function. A Mn[superscript 2+] dependent enzymatic activity that removes…

  15. Evolution of the Min Protein Oscillation in E. coli Bacteria During Cell Growth and Division

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baylis, Benjamin; Giuliani, Maximiliano; Dutcher, John

    2014-03-01

    Cell division is a key step in the life of a bacterium. This process is carefully controlled and regulated so that the cellular machinery is equally partitioned into two daughter cells of equal size. In E. coli, this is accomplished, in part, by the Min protein system, in which Min proteins oscillate along the long axis of the rod-shaped cells. We have used high magnification, time-resolved fluorescence microscopy to characterize in detail the oscillation in E. coli cells in which the MinD proteins are tagged with green fluorescent protein (GFP). We have used a microfluidic device to confine the bacteria into microchannels that allows us to track the evolution of the oscillation in cells as they grow and divide in LB growth media. In particular, we have tracked the loss of synchrony between the oscillations in the daughter cells following cell division.

  16. No effect of femtosecond laser pulses on DNA, protein, M13, or E. coli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wigle, Jeffrey C.; Holwitt, Eric A.; Noojin, Gary D.; Estlack, Larry E.; Sheldon, Katharine E.; Rockwell, Benjamin A.

    2011-03-01

    We were unable to reproduce published inactivation results, or show any interaction, between 90 femtosecond (fs) pulses of 850 nm or 425 nm laser radiation and buffer/water, DNA, protein, M13 bacteriophage or E. coli. Using agarose electrophoresis and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, we examined purified plasmid DNA (pUC19), bovine serum albumin, and DNA and coat proteins extracted from M13 following exposures to irradiances of up to 120 MW/cm2. We measured M13 viability using an assay for plaque-forming ability in soft agar after exposure to the same irradiances used for the protein and DNA experiments. Exposures of up 1 GW/cm2 at 850 nm had no effect on the viability of E. coli as measured by a colony forming assay in soft agar. Peroxynitrite, known to be toxic, to cause single strand breaks in DNA, and fragment proteins in vitro gave positive results in all assays.

  17. An efficient protocol to enhance recombinant protein expression using ethanol in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Chhetri, Gaurav; Kalita, Parismita; Tripathi, Timir

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial cells can be engineered to express non-native genes, resulting in the production of, recombinant proteins, which have various biotechnological and pharmaceutical applications. In eukaryotes, such as yeast or mammalian cells, which have large genomes, a higher recombinant protein expression can be troublesome. Comparatively, in the Escherichia coli (E. coli) expression system, although the expression is induced with isopropyl β-d-1-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG), studies have shown low expression levels of proteins. Irrespective of the purpose of protein production, the production process requires the accomplishment of three individual factors: expression, solubilization and purification. Although several efforts, including changing the host, vector, culture parameters of the recombinant host strain, co-expression of other genes and changing of the gene sequences, have been directed towards enhancing recombinant protein expression, the protein expression is still considered as a significant limiting step. Our protocol explains a simple method to enhance the recombinant protein expression that we have optimized using several unrelated proteins. It works with both T5 and T7 promoters. This protocol can be used to enhance the expressions of most of the proteins. The advantages of this technique are presented below:•It produces several fold increase in the expression of poorly expressed, less expressed or non-expressed recombinant proteins.•It does not employ any additional component such as chaperones, heat shock proteins or co-expression of other genes.•In addition to being inexpensive, easy to manage, universal, and quick to perform, the proposed method does not require any commercial kits and, can be used for various recombinant proteins expressed in the E. coli expression system.

  18. Production of bioactive chicken (Gallus gallus) follistatin-type proteins in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Beum; Park, Sung Kwon; Kim, Yong Soo

    2015-12-01

    Follistatin (FST) is a cysteine-rich autocrine glycoprotein and plays an important role in mammalian prenatal and postnatal development. FST binds to and inhibit myostatin (MSTN), a potent negative regulator of skeletal muscle growth, and FST abundance enhances muscle growth in animals via inhibition of MSTN activity. The objective of this study was to produce biologically active, four chicken FST-type proteins in an Escherichia coli expression system. Gibson assembly cloning method was used to insert the DNA fragments of four FST-type proteins, designated as FST288, NDFSD1/2, NDFSD1, and NDFSD1/1, into pMALc5x vector downstream of the maltose-binding protein (MBP) gene, and the plasmids containing the inserts were eventually transformed into Shuffle E. coli strain for protein expression. We observed a soluble expression of the four MBP-fused FST-type proteins, and the proteins could be easily purified by the combination of amylose and heparin resin affinity chromatography. MBP-fused FST-type proteins demonstrated their affinity to anti-FST antibody. In an in vitro reporter gene assay to examine their potencies and selectivities to different ligands (MSTN, GDF11, and activin A), the four FST-type proteins (MBP-FST288, MBP-NDFSD1/2, MBP-NDFSD1, and MBP-NDFSD1/1) showed different potency and selectivity against the three ligands from each other. Ligand selectivity of each FST-type proteins was similar to its counterpart FST-type protein of eukaryotic origin. In conclusion, we could produce four FST-type proteins having different ligand selectivity in E. coli, and the results imply that economic production of a large amount of FST-type proteins with different ligand selectivity is possible to examine their potential use in meat-producing animals.

  19. A nonstructural protein of feline panleukopenia virus: expression in Escherichia coli and detection of multiple forms in infected cells.

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, J O; Lynde-Maas, M K; Shen, Z D

    1987-01-01

    Sequences coding for the nonstructural protein NS1 of the autonomous parvovirus feline panleukopenia virus were expressed in Escherichia coli as fusion proteins. The fusion proteins were specifically bound by antisera from canine parvovirus-infected dogs. Antisera against one of the fusion proteins bound to several proteins found only in feline panleukopenia virus-infected feline cells. Images PMID:3027392

  20. Crystal structure of Escherichia coli YidC, a membrane protein chaperone and insertase.

    PubMed

    Kumazaki, Kaoru; Kishimoto, Toshiki; Furukawa, Arata; Mori, Hiroyuki; Tanaka, Yoshiki; Dohmae, Naoshi; Ishitani, Ryuichiro; Tsukazaki, Tomoya; Nureki, Osamu

    2014-12-03

    Bacterial YidC, an evolutionally conserved membrane protein, functions as a membrane protein chaperone in cooperation with the Sec translocon and as an independent insertase for membrane proteins. In Gram-negative bacteria, the transmembrane and periplasmic regions of YidC interact with the Sec proteins, forming a multi-protein complex for Sec-dependent membrane protein integration. Here, we report the crystal structure of full-length Escherichia coli YidC. The structure reveals that a hydrophilic groove, formed by five transmembrane helices, is a conserved structural feature of YidC, as compared to the previous YidC structure from Bacillus halodurans, which lacks a periplasmic domain. Structural mapping of the substrate- or Sec protein-contact sites suggested the importance of the groove for the YidC functions as a chaperone and an insertase, and provided structural insight into the multi-protein complex.

  1. The Escherichia coli AlkB protein protects human cells against alkylation-induced toxicity.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, B J; Carroll, P; Samson, L

    1994-01-01

    Escherichia coli can ameliorate the toxic effects of alkylating agents either by preventing DNA alkylation or by repairing DNA alkylation damage. The alkylation-sensitive phenotype of E. coli alkB mutants marks the alkB pathway as an extremely effective defense mechanism against the cytotoxic effects of the SN2, but not the SN1, alkylating agents. Although it is clear that AlkB helps cells to better handle alkylated DNA, no DNA alkylation repair function could be assigned to the purified AlkB protein, suggesting that AlkB either acts as part of a complex or acts to regulate the expression of other genes whose products are directly responsible for alkylation resistance. However, here we present evidence that the provision of alkylation resistance is an intrinsic function of the AlkB protein per se. We expressed the E. coli AlkB protein in two human cell lines and found that it confers the same characteristic alkylation-resistant phenotype in this foreign environment as it does in E. coli. AlkB expression rendered human cells extremely resistant to cell killing by the SN2 but not the SN1 alkylating agents but did not affect the ability of dimethyl sulfate (an SN2 agent) to alkylate the genome. We infer that SN2 agents produce a class of DNA damage that is not efficiently produced by SN1 agents and that AlkB somehow prevents this damage from killing the cell. Images PMID:7928996

  2. Increased glycosylation efficiency of recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli by auto-induction.

    PubMed

    Ding, Ning; Yang, Chunguang; Sun, Shenxia; Han, Lichi; Ruan, Yao; Guo, Longhua; Hu, Xuejun; Zhang, Jianing

    2017-03-25

    Escherichia coli cells have been considered as promising hosts for producing N-glycosylated proteins since the successful production of N-glycosylated protein in E. coli with the pgl (N-linked protein glycosylation) locus from Campylobacter jejuni. However, one hurdle in producing N-glycosylated proteins in large scale using E. coli is inefficient glycan glycosylation. In this study, we developed a strategy for the production of N-glycosylated proteins with high efficiency via an optimized auto-induction method. The 10th human fibronectin type III domain (FN3) was engineered with native glycosylation sequon DFNRSK and optimized DQNAT sequon in C-terminus with flexible linker as acceptor protein models. The resulting glycosylation efficiencies were confirmed by Western blots with anti-FLAG M1 antibody. Increased efficiency of glycosylation was obtained by changing the conventional IPTG induction to auto-induction method, which increased the glycosylation efficiencies from 60% and 75% up to 90% and 100% respectively. Moreover, in the condition of inserting the glycosylation sequon in the loop of FN3 (the acceptor sequon with local structural conformation), the glycosylation efficiency was increased from 35% to 80% by our optimized auto-induction procedures. To justify the potential for general application of the optimized auto-induction method, the reconstituted lsg locus from Haemophilus influenzae and PglB from C. jejuni were utilized, and this led to 100% glycosylation efficiency. Our studies provided quantitative evidence that the optimized auto-induction method will facilitate the large-scale production of pure exogenous N-glycosylation proteins in E. coli cells.

  3. Structural and functional analyses of a yeast mitochondrial ribosomal protein homologous to ribosomal protein S15 of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Dang, H; Ellis, S R

    1990-01-01

    We have purified a small subunit mitochondrial ribosomal protein, MRPS28p, from the yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Sequence from the amino terminus of MRPS28p was used to design a degenerate oligonucleotide that was complementary to the MRPS28 gene. The MRPS28 gene was isolated and its sequence determined. The MRPS28 sequence encodes a 28 kDa protein that has a region of homology with ribosomal protein S15 of E. coli. This region spans the entire length of the E. coli protein, but as MRPS28p is larger, includes only the portion of the MRPS28p sequence from amino acids 150 to 238. Based on this homology, we predict that MRPS28p, like E. coli S15, interacts directly with small subunit rRNA and functions as an early protein in ribosome assembly. Cells carrying a disrupted chromosomal copy of MRPS28 are unable to respire and spontaneously lose portions of their mitochondrial genomes at a high frequency. These phenotypes are consistent with an essential role for MRPS28p in the assembly and/or function of the mitochondrial ribosome. Images PMID:2263452

  4. Murein hydrolase activity of surface layer proteins from Lactobacillus acidophilus against Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Meng, Jun; Gao, Shu-Ming; Zhang, Qiu-Xiang; Lu, Rong-Rong

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the murein hydrolase activities of the surface layer proteins (SLPs) from two strains of Lactobacillus acidophilus using zymography. The influence of these hydrolase activities on Escherichia coli ATCC 43893 was also evaluated by analysing their growth curve, cell morphology and physiological state. After the incubation of E. coli with SLPs, growth was inhibited, the number of viable cells was significantly reduced, examination by transmission electron microscopy showed that the cell wall was damaged and flow cytometry results indicated that the majority of the cells were sublethally injured. All of these results suggested that the SLPs of both L. acidophilus strains possessed murein hydrolase activities that were sublethal to E. coli cells.

  5. Preparation and Extraction of Insoluble (Inclusion-Body) Proteins from Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Ira; Wingfield, Paul T.

    2013-01-01

    High-level expression of many recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli leads to the formation of highly aggregated protein commonly referred to as inclusion bodies. Inclusion bodies are normally formed in the cytoplasm; however, if a secretion vector is used, they can form in the periplasmic space. Inclusion bodies can be recovered from cell lysates by low speed centrifugation. Following preextaction (or washing) protein is extracted from washed pellets using guanidine·HCl. The solubilized and unfolded protein is either directly folded as described in UNIT 6.1 or further purified by gel filtration in the presence of guanidine·HCl as described here. A support protocol describes the removal of guanidine·HCl from column fractions so they can be monitored by SDS-PAGE. High-level expression of many recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli leads to the formation of highly aggregated protein commonly referred to as inclusion bodies (UNITS 5.1 & 6.1). Inclusion bodies are normally formed in the cytoplasm; alternatively, if a secretion vector is used, they can form in the periplasmic space. Inclusion bodies are not restricted to E. coli; they can also form in yeast, mammalian, and insect cells. Inclusion bodies recovered from cell lysates by low-speed centrifugation are heavily contaminated with E. coli cell wall and outer membrane components. The latter are largely removed by selective extraction with detergents and low concentrations of either urea or guanidine·HCl to produce so-called washed pellets. These basic steps result in a significant purification of the recombinant protein, which usually makes up ~60% of the washed pellet protein. The challenge, therefore, is not to purify the recombinant-derived protein, but to solubilize it and then fold it into native and biologically active protein. Basic Protocol 1 describes preparation of washed pellets and solubilization of the protein using guanidine·HCl. The extracted protein, which is unfolded, is either directly

  6. Cost of unneeded proteins in E. coli is reduced after several generations in exponential growth.

    PubMed

    Shachrai, Irit; Zaslaver, Alon; Alon, Uri; Dekel, Erez

    2010-06-11

    When E. coli cells express unneeded protein, they grow more slowly. Such penalty to fitness associated with making proteins is called protein cost. Protein cost is an important component in the cost-benefit tradeoffs that underlie the evolution of protein circuits, but its origins are still poorly understood. Here, we ask how the protein cost varies during the exponential growth phase of E. coli. We find that cells growing exponentially following an upshift from overnight culture show a large cost when producing unneeded proteins. However, after several generations, while still in exponential growth, the cells enter a phase where cost is much reduced despite vigorous unneeded protein production. We find that this reduced-cost phase depends on the ppGpp system, which adjusts the amount of ribosomes in the cell and does not occur after a downshift from rich to poor medium. These findings suggest that protein cost is a transient phenomenon that happens upon an upshift in conditions and that cost is reduced when ribosomes and other cellular systems have increased to their appropriate steady-state level in the new condition.

  7. The single-stranded DNA-binding protein of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, R R; Laine, P S

    1990-01-01

    The single-stranded DNA-binding protein (SSB) of Escherichia coli is involved in all aspects of DNA metabolism: replication, repair, and recombination. In solution, the protein exists as a homotetramer of 18,843-kilodalton subunits. As it binds tightly and cooperatively to single-stranded DNA, it has become a prototypic model protein for studying protein-nucleic acid interactions. The sequences of the gene and protein are known, and the functional domains of subunit interaction, DNA binding, and protein-protein interactions have been probed by structure-function analyses of various mutations. The ssb gene has three promoters, one of which is inducible because it lies only two nucleotides from the LexA-binding site of the adjacent uvrA gene. Induction of the SOS response, however, does not lead to significant increases in SSB levels. The binding protein has several functions in DNA replication, including enhancement of helix destabilization by DNA helicases, prevention of reannealing of the single strands and protection from nuclease digestion, organization and stabilization of replication origins, primosome assembly, priming specificity, enhancement of replication fidelity, enhancement of polymerase processivity, and promotion of polymerase binding to the template. E. coli SSB is required for methyl-directed mismatch repair, induction of the SOS response, and recombinational repair. During recombination, SSB interacts with the RecBCD enzyme to find Chi sites, promotes binding of RecA protein, and promotes strand uptake. PMID:2087220

  8. Application of Noncanonical Amino Acids for Protein Labeling in a Genomically Recoded Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Kipper, Kalle; Lundius, Ebba G; Ćurić, Vladimir; Nikić, Ivana; Wiessler, Manfred; Lemke, Edward A; Elf, Johan

    2017-02-17

    Small synthetic fluorophores are in many ways superior to fluorescent proteins as labels for imaging. A major challenge is to use them for a protein-specific labeling in living cells. Here, we report on our use of noncanonical amino acids that are genetically encoded via the pyrrolysyl-tRNA/pyrrolysyl-RNA synthetase pair at artificially introduced TAG codons in a recoded E. coli strain. The strain is lacking endogenous TAG codons and the TAG-specific release factor RF1. The amino acids contain bioorthogonal groups that can be clicked to externally supplied dyes, thus enabling protein-specific labeling in live cells. We find that the noncanonical amino acid incorporation into the target protein is robust for diverse amino acids and that the usefulness of the recoded E. coli strain mainly derives from the absence of release factor RF1. However, the membrane permeable dyes display high nonspecific binding in intracellular environment and the electroporation of hydrophilic nonmembrane permeable dyes severely impairs growth of the recoded strain. In contrast, proteins exposed on the outer membrane of E. coli can be labeled with hydrophilic dyes with a high specificity as demonstrated by labeling of the osmoporin OmpC. Here, labeling can be made sufficiently specific to enable single molecule studies as exemplified by OmpC single particle tracking.

  9. Binding of diarrheagenic Escherichia coli to 32- to 33-kilodalton human intestinal brush border proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Manjarrez-Hernandez, A; Gavilanes-Parra, S; Chavez-Berrocal, M E; Molina-Lopez, J; Cravioto, A

    1997-01-01

    We have detected human intestinal brush border proteins to which Escherichia coli strains adhere by means of a blotting-nitrocellulose method in which the binding of radiolabeled bacteria to sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis-separated intestinal cell membranes was evaluated. The brush border fraction contained several polypeptides that bound only adherent E. coli strains. The most prominent and consistent of these proteins had apparent molecular masses of 32 to 33 kDa. Additional polypeptides ranging from 50 to 70, from 105 to 130, and from 180 to 200 kDa were also recognized by adherent E. coli strains, although with less intensity (in accordance with the number of bound bacteria to these polypeptides). Independently of the pattern of adherence (localized [LA], diffuse [DA], or aggregative [AggA]) all HEp-2-adhering strains recognized, with different intensities, the 32- to 33-kDa brush border proteins, whereas nonadhesive strains did not. The relative avidity of an LA strain to bind to the 32- to 33-kDa proteins was approximately seven- and sixfold higher than the binding of strains with aggregative and diffuse adherence, respectively. Thus, it is reasonable to think that LA, DA, and AggA strains have a common adhesin that mediates binding to the 32- to 33-kDa bands. Inhibition experiments using HEp-2 cells demonstrated that isolated 32- to 33-kDa proteins or specific antiserum blocked preferentially bacterial adherence of the LA pattern. Delipidization and protein digestion of the human brush borders confirmed that E. coli bound to structures of a proteinaceous nature. Deglycosylation studies and sodium meta-periodate oxidation of the intestinal cell membranes decreased bacterial binding activity significantly, indicating that E. coli bound to carbohydrate moieties in the glycoproteins. These results suggest that binding of E. coli strains, mainly of the LA phenotype, to the 32- to 33-kDa proteins could play a role in colonization through

  10. Pyrosequencing of mcrA and Archaeal 16S rRNA Genes Reveals Diversity and Substrate Preferences of Methanogen Communities in Anaerobic Digesters

    PubMed Central

    Wilkins, David; Lu, Xiao-Ying; Shen, Zhiyong; Chen, Jiapeng

    2014-01-01

    Methanogenic archaea play a key role in biogas-producing anaerobic digestion and yet remain poorly taxonomically characterized. This is in part due to the limitations of low-throughput Sanger sequencing of a single (16S rRNA) gene, which in the past may have undersampled methanogen diversity. In this study, archaeal communities from three sludge digesters in Hong Kong and one wastewater digester in China were examined using high-throughput pyrosequencing of the methyl coenzyme M reductase (mcrA) and 16S rRNA genes. Methanobacteriales, Methanomicrobiales, and Methanosarcinales were detected in each digester, indicating that both hydrogenotrophic and acetoclastic methanogenesis was occurring. Two sludge digesters had similar community structures, likely due to their similar design and feedstock. Taxonomic classification of the mcrA genes suggested that these digesters were dominated by acetoclastic methanogens, particularly Methanosarcinales, while the other digesters were dominated by hydrogenotrophic Methanomicrobiales. The proposed euryarchaeotal order Methanomassiliicoccales and the uncultured WSA2 group were detected with the 16S rRNA gene, and potential mcrA genes for these groups were identified. 16S rRNA gene sequencing also recovered several crenarchaeotal groups potentially involved in the initial anaerobic digestion processes. Overall, the two genes produced different taxonomic profiles for the digesters, while greater methanogen richness was detected using the mcrA gene, supporting the use of this functional gene as a complement to the 16S rRNA gene to better assess methanogen diversity. A significant positive correlation was detected between methane production and the abundance of mcrA transcripts in digesters treating sludge and wastewater samples, supporting the mcrA gene as a biomarker for methane yield. PMID:25381241

  11. Immunogenicity of Escherichia coli expressed envelope 2 protein of Chikungunya virus

    PubMed Central

    Tripathi, Nagesh K; Priya, Raj; Shrivastava, Ambuj

    2014-01-01

    Chikungunya fever, a re-emerging infection, is an arthropod-borne viral disease prevalent in different parts of the world, particularly Africa and South East Asia. Chikungunya virus envelope 2 protein is involved in binding to host receptors and it contains specific epitopes that elicit virus neutralizing antibodies. A highly immunogenic, recombinant Chikungunya virus envelope 2 protein was produced by bioreactor in Escherichia coli for development of a suitable diagnostic and vaccine candidate. This protein was refolded and further purified to achieve biologically active protein. The biological function of refolded and purified recombinant envelope 2 protein of Chikungunya virus was confirmed by its ability to generate envelope 2 specific antibodies with high titers in animal models. These findings suggest that recombinant envelope 2 protein of Chikungunya virus in combination with compatible adjuvant is highly immunogenic. Thus, recombinant envelope 2 protein can be a potential diagnostic reagent and vaccine candidate against Chikungunya virus infection. PMID:24637708

  12. Plasticity of lipid-protein interactions in the function and topogenesis of the membrane protein lactose permease from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Bogdanov, Mikhail; Heacock, Philip; Guan, Ziqiang; Dowhan, William

    2010-08-24

    Phosphatidylcholine (PC) has been widely used in place of naturally occurring phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) in reconstitution of bacterial membrane proteins. However, PC does not support native structure or function for several reconstituted transport proteins. Lactose permease (LacY) of Escherichia coli, when reconstituted in E. coli phospholipids, exhibits energy-dependent uphill and energy-independent downhill transport function and proper conformation of periplasmic domain P7, which is tightly linked to uphill transport function. LacY expressed in cells lacking PE and containing only anionic phospholipids exhibits only downhill transport and lacks native P7 conformation. Reconstitution of LacY in the presence of E. coli-derived PE, but not dioleoyl-PC, results in uphill transport. We now show that LacY exhibits uphill transport and native conformation of P7 when expressed in a mutant of E. coli in which PC completely replaces PE even though the structure is not completely native. E. coli-derived PC and synthetic PC species containing at least one saturated fatty acid also support the native conformation of P7 dependent on the presence of anionic phospholipids. Our results demonstrate that the different effects of PE and PC species on LacY structure and function cannot be explained by differences in the direct interaction of the lipid head groups with specific amino acid residues alone but are due to more complex effects of the physical and chemical properties of the lipid environment on protein structure. This conclusion is supported by the effect of different lipids on the proper folding of domain P7, which indirectly influences uphill transport function.

  13. Plasticity of lipid-protein interactions in the function and topogenesis of the membrane protein lactose permease from Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Bogdanov, Mikhail; Heacock, Philip; Guan, Ziqiang; Dowhan, William

    2010-01-01

    Phosphatidylcholine (PC) has been widely used in place of naturally occurring phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) in reconstitution of bacterial membrane proteins. However, PC does not support native structure or function for several reconstituted transport proteins. Lactose permease (LacY) of Escherichia coli, when reconstituted in E. coli phospholipids, exhibits energy-dependent uphill and energy-independent downhill transport function and proper conformation of periplasmic domain P7, which is tightly linked to uphill transport function. LacY expressed in cells lacking PE and containing only anionic phospholipids exhibits only downhill transport and lacks native P7 conformation. Reconstitution of LacY in the presence of E. coli-derived PE, but not dioleoyl-PC, results in uphill transport. We now show that LacY exhibits uphill transport and native conformation of P7 when expressed in a mutant of E. coli in which PC completely replaces PE even though the structure is not completely native. E. coli-derived PC and synthetic PC species containing at least one saturated fatty acid also support the native conformation of P7 dependent on the presence of anionic phospholipids. Our results demonstrate that the different effects of PE and PC species on LacY structure and function cannot be explained by differences in the direct interaction of the lipid head groups with specific amino acid residues alone but are due to more complex effects of the physical and chemical properties of the lipid environment on protein structure. This conclusion is supported by the effect of different lipids on the proper folding of domain P7, which indirectly influences uphill transport function. PMID:20696931

  14. Hfq reduces envelope stress by controlling expression of envelope-localized proteins and protein complexes in enteropathogenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Vogt, Stefanie L; Raivio, Tracy L

    2014-05-01

    Gram-negative bacteria possess several envelope stress responses that detect and respond to damage to this critical cellular compartment. The σ(E) envelope stress response senses the misfolding of outer membrane proteins (OMPs), while the Cpx two-component system is believed to detect the misfolding of periplasmic and inner membrane proteins. Recent studies in several Gram-negative organisms found that deletion of hfq, encoding a small RNA chaperone protein, activates the σ(E) envelope stress response. In this study, we assessed the effects of deleting hfq upon activity of the σ(E) and Cpx responses in non-pathogenic and enteropathogenic (EPEC) strains of Escherichia coli. We found that the σ(E) response was activated in Δhfq mutants of all E. coli strains tested, resulting from the misregulation of OMPs. The Cpx response was activated by loss of hfq in EPEC, but not in E. coli K-12. Cpx pathway activation resulted in part from overexpression of the bundle-forming pilus (BFP) in EPEC Δhfq. We found that Hfq repressed expression of the BFP via PerA, a master regulator of virulence in EPEC. This study shows that Hfq has a more extensive role in regulating the expression of envelope proteins and horizontally acquired virulence genes in E. coli than previously recognized.

  15. Tender coconut water an economical growth medium for the production of recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Escherichia coli is most widely used prokaryotic expression system for the production of recombinant proteins. Several strategies have been employed for expressing recombinant proteins in E.coli. This includes the development of novel host systems, expression vectors and cost effective media. In this study, we exploit tender coconut water (TCW) as a natural and cheaper growth medium for E.coli and Pichia pastoris. Result E.coli and P.pastoris were cultivated in TCW and the growth rate was monitored by measuring optical density at 600 nm (OD600nm), where 1.55 for E.coli and 8.7 for P.pastoris was obtained after 12 and 60 hours, respectively. However, variation in growth rate was observed among TCW when collected from different localities (0.15-2.5 at OD600nm), which is attributed to the varying chemical profile among samples. In this regard, we attempted the supplementation of TCW with different carbon and nitrogen sources to attain consistency in growth rate. Here, supplementation of TCW with 25 mM ammonium sulphate (TCW-S) was noted efficient for the normalization of inconsistency, which further increased the biomass of E.coli by 2 to 10 folds, and 1.5 to 2 fold in P.pastoris. These results indicate that nitrogen source is the major limiting factor for growth. This was supported by total nitrogen and carbon estimation where, nitrogen varies from 20 to 60 mg/100 ml while carbohydrates showed no considerable variation (2.32 to 3.96 g/100 ml). In this study, we also employed TCW as an expression media for recombinant proteins by demonstrating successful expression of maltose binding protein (MBP), MBP-TEV protease fusion and a photo switchable fluorescent protein (mEos2) using TCW and the expression level was found to be equivalent to Luria Broth (LB). Conclusion This study highlights the possible application of TCW-S as a media for cultivation of a variety of microorganisms and recombinant protein expression. PMID:24004578

  16. A novel self-cleavage system for production of soluble recombinant protein in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yufei; Xu, Qingyuan; Yang, Tao; Sun, Encheng; Li, Junping; Shi, Dongfang; Wu, Donglai

    2014-07-01

    Many approaches for generating large quantities of recombinant protein in Escherichia coli fuse the protein of interest to a protein tag to enhance solubility and improve recovery. However, the fusion tags can confound downstream applications, as the fusion partner can alter the structure and biological activity of the recombinant protein and proteolytic removal of the fusion tags can be expensive. Here we describe a new system for production of native proteins in E. coli that allows for removal of the fusion tag via intracellular self-cleavage by the human rhinovirus 3C (HRV3C) protease. This system allows for parallel cloning of target protein coding sequences into six different expression vectors, each with a different fusion partner tag to enhance solubility during induction. Temperature-regulated expression of the HRV3C protease allows for intracellular removal of the fusion tag following induction, and the liberated recombinant protein can be purified by affinity chromatography by virtue of a short six-histidine tag. This system will be an attractive approach for the expression and purification of recombinant proteins free of solubility-enhancing fusion tags, and should be amenable to high-throughput applications.

  17. Quantification and Classification of E. coli Proteome Utilization and Unused Protein Costs across Environments

    PubMed Central

    O’Brien, Edward J.; Utrilla, Jose; Palsson, Bernhard O.

    2016-01-01

    The costs and benefits of protein expression are balanced through evolution. Expression of un-utilized protein (that have no benefits in the current environment) incurs a quantifiable fitness costs on cellular growth rates; however, the magnitude and variability of un-utilized protein expression in natural settings is unknown, largely due to the challenge in determining environment-specific proteome utilization. We address this challenge using absolute and global proteomics data combined with a recently developed genome-scale model of Escherichia coli that computes the environment-specific cost and utility of the proteome on a per gene basis. We show that nearly half of the proteome mass is unused in certain environments and accounting for the cost of this unused protein expression explains >95% of the variance in growth rates of Escherichia coli across 16 distinct environments. Furthermore, reduction in unused protein expression is shown to be a common mechanism to increase cellular growth rates in adaptive evolution experiments. Classification of the unused protein reveals that the unused protein encodes several nutrient- and stress- preparedness functions, which may convey fitness benefits in varying environments. Thus, unused protein expression is the source of large and pervasive fitness costs that may provide the benefit of hedging against environmental change. PMID:27351952

  18. Rational design of a fusion partner for membrane protein expression in E. coli

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Jianying; Choulet, Julie; Samuelson, James C

    2009-01-01

    We have designed a novel protein fusion partner (P8CBD) to utilize the co-translational SRP pathway in order to target heterologous proteins to the E. coli inner membrane. SRP-dependence was demonstrated by analyzing the membrane translocation of P8CBD-PhoA fusion proteins in wt and SRP-ffh77 mutant cells. We also demonstrate that the P8CBD N-terminal fusion partner promotes over-expression of a Thermotoga maritima polytopic membrane protein by replacement of the native signal anchor sequence. Furthermore, the yeast mitochondrial inner membrane protein Oxa1p was expressed as a P8CBD fusion and shown to function within the E. coli inner membrane. In this example, the mitochondrial targeting peptide was replaced by P8CBD. Several practical features were incorporated into the P8CBD expression system to aid in protein detection, purification, and optional in vitro processing by enterokinase. The basis of membrane protein over-expression toxicity is discussed and solutions to this problem are presented. We anticipate that this optimized expression system will aid in the isolation and study of various recombinant forms of membrane-associated protein. PMID:19530231

  19. Quantification and Classification of E. coli Proteome Utilization and Unused Protein Costs across Environments.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Edward J; Utrilla, Jose; Palsson, Bernhard O

    2016-06-01

    The costs and benefits of protein expression are balanced through evolution. Expression of un-utilized protein (that have no benefits in the current environment) incurs a quantifiable fitness costs on cellular growth rates; however, the magnitude and variability of un-utilized protein expression in natural settings is unknown, largely due to the challenge in determining environment-specific proteome utilization. We address this challenge using absolute and global proteomics data combined with a recently developed genome-scale model of Escherichia coli that computes the environment-specific cost and utility of the proteome on a per gene basis. We show that nearly half of the proteome mass is unused in certain environments and accounting for the cost of this unused protein expression explains >95% of the variance in growth rates of Escherichia coli across 16 distinct environments. Furthermore, reduction in unused protein expression is shown to be a common mechanism to increase cellular growth rates in adaptive evolution experiments. Classification of the unused protein reveals that the unused protein encodes several nutrient- and stress- preparedness functions, which may convey fitness benefits in varying environments. Thus, unused protein expression is the source of large and pervasive fitness costs that may provide the benefit of hedging against environmental change.

  20. No effect of femtosecond laser pulses on M13, E. coli, DNA, or protein.

    PubMed

    Wigle, Jeffrey C; Holwitt, Eric A; Estlack, Larry E; Noojin, Gary D; Saunders, Katharine E; Yakovlev, Valdislav V; Rockwell, Benjamin A

    2014-01-01

    Data showing what appears to be nonthermal inactivation of M13 bacteriophage (M13), Tobacco mosaic virus, Escherichia coli (E. coli), and Jurkatt T-cells following exposure to 80-fs pulses of laser radiation have been published. Interest in the mechanism led to attempts to reproduce the results for M13 and E. coli. Bacteriophage plaque-forming and bacteria colony-forming assays showed no inactivation of the microorganisms; therefore, model systems were used to see what, if any, damage might be occurring to biologically important molecules. Purified plasmid DNA (pUC19) and bovine serum albumin were exposed to and analyzed by agarose gel electrophoresis (AGE) and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE), respectively, and no effect was found. DNA and coat proteins extracted from laser-exposed M13 and analyzed by AGE or PAGE found no effect. Raman scattering by M13 in phosphate buffered saline was measured to determine if there was any physical interaction between M13 and femtosecond laser pulses, and none was found. Positive controls for the endpoints measured produced the expected results with the relevant assays. Using the published methods, we were unable to reproduce the inactivation results or to show any interaction between ultrashort laser pulses and buffer/water, DNA, protein, M13 bacteriophage, or E. coli.

  1. No effect of femtosecond laser pulses on M13, E. coli, DNA, or protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wigle, Jeffrey C.; Holwitt, Eric A.; Estlack, Larry E.; Noojin, Gary D.; Saunders, Katharine E.; Yakovlev, Valdislav V.; Rockwell, Benjamin A.

    2014-01-01

    Data showing what appears to be nonthermal inactivation of M13 bacteriophage (M13), Tobacco mosaic virus, Escherichia coli (E. coli), and Jurkatt T-cells following exposure to 80-fs pulses of laser radiation have been published. Interest in the mechanism led to attempts to reproduce the results for M13 and E. coli. Bacteriophage plaque-forming and bacteria colony-forming assays showed no inactivation of the microorganisms; therefore, model systems were used to see what, if any, damage might be occurring to biologically important molecules. Purified plasmid DNA (pUC19) and bovine serum albumin were exposed to and analyzed by agarose gel electrophoresis (AGE) and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE), respectively, and no effect was found. DNA and coat proteins extracted from laser-exposed M13 and analyzed by AGE or PAGE found no effect. Raman scattering by M13 in phosphate buffered saline was measured to determine if there was any physical interaction between M13 and femtosecond laser pulses, and none was found. Positive controls for the endpoints measured produced the expected results with the relevant assays. Using the published methods, we were unable to reproduce the inactivation results or to show any interaction between ultrashort laser pulses and buffer/water, DNA, protein, M13 bacteriophage, or E. coli.

  2. A Peptidomimetic Antibiotic Targets Outer Membrane Proteins and Disrupts Selectively the Outer Membrane in Escherichia coli*

    PubMed Central

    Urfer, Matthias; Bogdanovic, Jasmina; Lo Monte, Fabio; Moehle, Kerstin; Zerbe, Katja; Omasits, Ulrich; Ahrens, Christian H.; Pessi, Gabriella; Eberl, Leo; Robinson, John A.

    2016-01-01

    Increasing antibacterial resistance presents a major challenge in antibiotic discovery. One attractive target in Gram-negative bacteria is the unique asymmetric outer membrane (OM), which acts as a permeability barrier that protects the cell from external stresses, such as the presence of antibiotics. We describe a novel β-hairpin macrocyclic peptide JB-95 with potent antimicrobial activity against Escherichia coli. This peptide exhibits no cellular lytic activity, but electron microscopy and fluorescence studies reveal an ability to selectively disrupt the OM but not the inner membrane of E. coli. The selective targeting of the OM probably occurs through interactions of JB-95 with selected β-barrel OM proteins, including BamA and LptD as shown by photolabeling experiments. Membrane proteomic studies reveal rapid depletion of many β-barrel OM proteins from JB-95-treated E. coli, consistent with induction of a membrane stress response and/or direct inhibition of the Bam folding machine. The results suggest that lethal disruption of the OM by JB-95 occurs through a novel mechanism of action at key interaction sites within clusters of β-barrel proteins in the OM. These findings open new avenues for developing antibiotics that specifically target β-barrel proteins and the integrity of the Gram-negative OM. PMID:26627837

  3. Expression and purification of an active cecropin-like recombinant protein against multidrug resistance Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Téllez, Germán Alberto; Castaño-Osorio, Jhon Carlos

    2014-08-01

    Lucilin is a 36 residue cecropin antimicrobial peptide identified as a partial genetic sequence in Lucilia sericata maggots. The antimicrobial spectrum and toxicity profile of Lucilin is unknown. We first report the expression of Lucilin as an active recombinant fusion protein with a cysteine protease domain (CPD) tag. The fusion protein, GWLK-Lucilin-CPD-His8, showed maximum overexpression in Escherichia coli BL21 cells after 12h induction with 0.5mM IPTG (isopropyl beta-d-thiogalactoside) and growth conditions were 37 °C and 150 rpm shaking. The fusion protein was expressed as a soluble form and was purified by Ni-IMAC. The purified protein was active against E. coli ATCC 35218 with a MIC of 0.68 μM, and a clinical isolate of E. coli with extended spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) with a MIC of 0.8 μM. The recombinant GWLK-Lucilin-CPD-His8 was not toxic against human erythrocytes or Vero cells with a therapeutic index >63. The results suggest that GWLK-Lucilin-CPD-His8 represents a potential candidate for therapy against multidrug resistant Gram-negative bacteria.

  4. Ribosomal protein methylation in Escherichia coli: the gene prmA, encoding the ribosomal protein L11 methyltransferase, is dispensable.

    PubMed

    Vanet, A; Plumbridge, J A; Guérin, M F; Alix, J H

    1994-12-01

    The prmA gene, located at 72 min on the Escherichia coli chromosome, is the genetic determinant of ribosomal protein L11-methyltransferase activity. Mutations at this locus, prmA1 and prmA3, result in a severely undermethylated form of L11. No effect, other than the lack of methyl groups on L11, has been ascribed to these mutations. DNA sequence analysis of the mutant alleles prmA1 and prmA3 detected point mutations near the C-terminus of the protein and plasmids overproducing the wild-type and the two mutant proteins have been constructed. The wild-type PrmA protein could be crosslinked to its radiolabelled substrate, S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM), by u.v. irradiation indicating that it is the gene for the methyltransferase rather than a regulatory protein. One of the mutant proteins, PrmA3, was also weakly crosslinked to SAM. Both mutant enzymes when expressed from the overproducing plasmids were capable of catalysing the incorporation of 3H-labelled methyl groups from SAM to L11 in vitro. This confirmed the observation that the mutant proteins possess significant residual activity which could account for their lack of growth phenotype. However, a strain carrying an in vitro-constructed null mutation of the prmA gene, transferred to the E. coli chromosome by homologous recombination, was perfectly viable.

  5. Solute Transport Proteins and the Outer Membrane Protein NmpC Contribute to Heat Resistance of Escherichia coli AW1.7▿

    PubMed Central

    Ruan, Lifang; Pleitner, Aaron; Gänzle, Michael G.; McMullen, Lynn M.

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to elucidate determinants of heat resistance in Escherichia coli by comparing the composition of membrane lipids, as well as gene expression, in heat-resistant E. coli AW1.7 and heat-sensitive E. coli GGG10 with or without heat shock. The survival of E. coli AW1.7 at late exponential phase was 100-fold higher than that of E. coli GGG10 after incubation at 60°C for 15 min. The cytoplasmic membrane of E. coli AW1.7 contained a higher proportion of saturated and cyclopropane fatty acids than that of E. coli GGG10. Microarray hybridization of cDNA libraries obtained from exponentially growing or heat-shocked cultures was performed to compare gene expression in these two strains. Expression of selected genes from different functional groups was quantified by quantitative PCR. DnaK and 30S and 50S ribosomal subunits were overexpressed in E. coli GGG10 relative to E. coli AW1.7 upon heat shock at 50°C, indicating improved ribosome stability. The outer membrane porin NmpC and several transport proteins were overexpressed in exponentially growing E. coli AW1.7. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis of membrane properties confirmed that NmpC is present in the outer membrane of E. coli AW1.7 but not in that of E. coli GGG10. Expression of NmpC in E. coli GGG10 increased survival at 60°C 50- to 1,000-fold. In conclusion, the outer membrane porin NmpC contributes to heat resistance in E. coli AW1.7, but the heat resistance of this strain is dependent on additional factors, which likely include the composition of membrane lipids, as well as solute transport proteins. PMID:21398480

  6. The ybeY protein from Escherichia coli is a metalloprotein

    SciTech Connect

    Zhan, Chenyang; Fedorov, Elena V.; Shi, Wuxian; Ramagopal, U. A.; Thirumuruhan, R.; Manjasetty, Babu A.; Almo, Steve C.; Fiser, Andras; Chance, Mark R.; Fedorov, Alexander A.

    2005-11-01

    The ybeY protein from E. coli is reported at a 2.7 Å resolution with a metal ion. The three-dimensional crystallographic structure of the ybeY protein from Escherichia coli (SwissProt entry P77385) is reported at 2.7 Å resolution. YbeY is a hypothetical protein that belongs to the UPF0054 family. The structure reveals that the protein binds a metal ion in a tetrahedral geometry. Three coordination sites are provided by histidine residues, while the fourth might be a water molecule that is not seen in the diffraction map because of its relatively low resolution. X-ray fluorescence analysis of the purified protein suggests that the metal is a nickel ion. The structure of ybeY and its sequence similarity to a number of predicted metal-dependent hydrolases provides a functional assignment for this protein family. The figures and tables of this paper were prepared using semi-automated tools, termed the Autopublish server, developed by the New York Structural GenomiX Research Consortium, with the goal of facilitating the rapid publication of crystallographic structures that emanate from worldwide Structural Genomics efforts, including the NIH-funded Protein Structure Initiative.

  7. Electron crystallography of PhoE porin, an outer membrane, channel- forming protein from E. coli

    SciTech Connect

    Walian, P.J.

    1989-11-01

    One approach to studying the structure of membrane proteins is the use of electron crystallography. Dr. Bing Jap has crystallized PhoE pore-forming protein (porin) from the outer membrane of escherichia coli (E. coli) into monolayer crystals. The findings of this research and those of Jap (1988, 1989) have determined these crystals to be highly ordered, yielding structural information to a resolution of better than 2.8 angstroms. The task of this thesis has been to collect and process the electron diffraction patterns necessary to generate a complete three-dimensional set of high resolution structure factor amplitudes of PhoE porin. Fourier processing of these amplitudes when combined with the corresponding phase data is expected to yield the three-dimensional structure of PhoE porin at better than 3.5 angstroms resolution. 92 refs., 33 figs., 3 tabs. (CBS)

  8. Monitoring Dynamic Protein Expression in Single Living E. Coli. Bacterial Cells by Laser Tweezers Raman Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, J W; Winhold, H; Corzett, M H; Ulloa, J M; Cosman, M; Balhorn, R; Huser, T

    2007-01-09

    Laser tweezers Raman spectroscopy (LTRS) is a novel, nondestructive, and label-free method that can be used to quantitatively measure changes in cellular activity in single living cells. Here, we demonstrate its use to monitor changes in a population of E. coli cells that occur during overexpression of a protein, the extracellular domain of myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG(1-120)) Raman spectra were acquired of individual E. coli cells suspended in solution and trapped by a single tightly focused laser beam. Overexpression of MOG(1-120) in transformed E. coli Rosetta-Gami (DE3)pLysS cells was induced by addition of isopropyl thiogalactoside (IPTG). Changes in the peak intensities of the Raman spectra from a population of cells were monitored and analyzed over a total duration of three hours. Data was also collected for concentrated purified MOG(1-120) protein in solution, and the spectra compared with that obtained for the MOG(1-120) expressing cells. Raman spectra of individual, living E. coli cells exhibit signatures due to DNA and protein molecular vibrations. Characteristic Raman markers associated with protein vibrations, such as 1257 cm{sup -1}, 1340 cm{sup -1}, 1453 cm{sup -1} and 1660 cm{sup -1}, are shown to increase as a function of time following the addition of IPTG. Comparison of these spectra and the spectra of purified MOG protein indicates that the changes are predominantly due to the induction of MOG protein expression. Protein expression was found to occur mostly within the second hour, with a 470% increase relative to the protein expressed in the first hour. A 230% relative increase between the second and third hour indicates that protein expression begins to level off within the third hour. It is demonstrated that LTRS has sufficient sensitivity for real-time, nondestructive, and quantitative monitoring of biological processes, such as protein expression, in single living cells. Such capabilities, which are not currently available in

  9. Lasing from Escherichia coli bacteria genetically programmed to express green fluorescent protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gather, Malte C.; Yun, Seok Hyun

    2011-08-01

    We report on lasing action from colonies of Escherichia coli bacteria that are genetically programmed to synthesize the green fluorescent protein (GFP). When embedded in a Fabry--Perot type cavity and excited by ns-pulses of blue light (465nm), the bacteria generate green laser emission (˜520nm). Broad illumination of pump light yields simultaneous lasing over a large area in bacterial colonies.

  10. Lasing from Escherichia coli bacteria genetically programmed to express green fluorescent protein.

    PubMed

    Gather, Malte C; Yun, Seok Hyun

    2011-08-15

    We report on lasing action from colonies of Escherichia coli bacteria that are genetically programmed to synthesize the green fluorescent protein (GFP). When embedded in a Fabry-Perot type cavity and excited by ns-pulses of blue light (465 nm), the bacteria generate green laser emission (∼520 nm). Broad illumination of pump light yields simultaneous lasing over a large area in bacterial colonies.

  11. Stable, high-level expression of a type I antifreeze protein in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Solomon, R G; Appels, R

    1999-06-01

    The type I antifreeze proteins are simple amphipathic helical proteins found in abundance in polar fish species, where they act to prevent freezing of internal fluids by a mechanism of noncolligative freezing point depression. Large-scale production of these proteins for research and biotechnological purposes has been hampered by their apparent instability when expressed in heterologous host systems. This has necessitated their production as fusion proteins, in polymeric form, or as proproteins for secretion, with the concomitant necessity for postpurification processing to generate the mature form of the protein. We have successfully expressed a recombinant variant of type I antifreeze protein (rAFP) in Escherichia coli using the inducible T7 polymerase transcription expression system. The rAFP contains five copies of the 11 amino acid ice-binding repeat motif found in all type I antifreeze proteins. The protein accumulates to high levels intracellularly in the form of inclusion bodies, with no apparent degradation by the cellular proteolytic machinery. We have devised a simple and rapid purification protocol for this recombinant type I antifreeze protein which does not require cellular fractionation, purification of the inclusion bodies, or chromatographic steps. This protocol may be of general use for this class of protein. The protein displays all three activities common to these proteins: recrystallization inhibition, noncolligative freezing point depression, and modification of the morphology of single ice crystals in solution.

  12. Pore-forming activity of OmpA protein of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Sugawara, E; Nikaido, H

    1992-02-05

    Escherichia coli outer membrane protein OmpA was purified to homogeneity, as a monomer, from a K12 derivative deficient in both OmpF and OmpC porins. When proteoliposomes reconstituted from the purified OmpA, phospholipids, and lithium dodecyl sulfate were tested for permeability to small molecules by osmotic swelling, it was found that OmpA produced apparently nonspecific diffusion channels that allowed the penetration of various solutes. The pore-forming activity was destroyed by the heat denaturation of the OmpA protein, and the use of an OmpA-deficient mutant showed that the activity was not caused by copurifying contaminants. The size of the OmpA channel, estimated by comparison of diffusion rates of solutes of different sizes, was rather similar to that of E. coli OmpF and OmpC porins, i.e. about 1 nm in diameter. The rate of penetration of L-arabinose caused by a given amount of OmpA protein, however, was about a hundredfold lower than the rate produced by the same amount of E. coli OmpF porin. The addition of large amounts of lithium dodecyl sulfate to the reconstitution mixture increased the permeability through the OmpA channel, apparently by facilitating the correct insertion of OmpA into the bilayer.

  13. Escherichia coli Heat Shock Protein DnaK: Production and Consequences in Terms of Monitoring Cooking

    PubMed Central

    Seyer, Karine; Lessard, Martin; Piette, Gabriel; Lacroix, Monique; Saucier, Linda

    2003-01-01

    Through use of commercially available DnaK proteins and anti-DnaK monoclonal antibodies, a competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was developed to quantify this heat shock protein in Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 subjected to various heating regimens. For a given process lethality (F7010 of 1, 3, and 5 min), the intracellular concentration of DnaK in E. coli varied with the heating temperature (50 or 55°C). In fact, the highest DnaK concentrations were found after treatments at the lower temperature (50°C) applied for a longer time. Residual DnaK after heating was found to be necessary for cell recovery, and additional DnaK was produced during the recovery process. Overall, higher intracellular concentrations of DnaK tended to enhance cell resistance to a subsequent lethal stress. Indeed, E. coli cells that had undergone a sublethal heat shock (105 min at 55°C, F7010 = 3 min) accompanied by a 12-h recovery (containing 76,786 ± 25,230 molecules/cell) resisted better than exponentially growing cells (38,500 ± 6,056 molecules/cell) when later heated to 60°C for 50 min (F7010 = 5 min). Results reported here suggest that using stress protein to determine cell adaptation and survival, rather than cell counts alone, may lead to more efficient heat treatment. PMID:12788720

  14. The extended leader peptide of Haemophilus parasuis trimeric autotransporters conditions their protein expression in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Pina-Pedrero, Sonia; Olvera, Àlex; Bensaid, Albert

    2017-02-28

    Trimeric autotransporters are surface-exposed proteins of Gram-negative bacteria belonging to the type V secretion system. They are involved in virulence and are targets for vaccine and diagnostic tool development, so optimal systems for their expression and purification are required. In the present study, the impact of the extended leader peptide of the Haemophilus parasuis virulence-associated trimeric autotransporters (VtaA) in its production as recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli was evaluated. The 13 genes encoding the VtaA1 to VtaA13 passenger domains of the strain Nagasaki were cloned in the pASK-IBA33plus plasmid and expressed in E. coli. Recombinant protein production was higher for truncated forms in which the entire leader peptide was deleted, and the recombinant protein accumulated in the cytoplasm of the cells. The yield of protein production of the different VtaAs was size dependent, and reached maximal amount at 2-4 h post -induction. The optimization of these conditions allowed to scale-up the production to obtain enough recombinant protein to immunize large animals.

  15. Chemokines derived from soluble fusion proteins expressed in Escherichia coli are biologically active

    SciTech Connect

    Magistrelli, Giovanni; Gueneau, Franck; Muslmani, Machadiya; Ravn, Ulla; Kosco-Vilbois, Marie; Fischer, Nicolas . E-mail: nfischer@novimmune.com

    2005-08-26

    Chemokines are a class of low molecular weight proteins that are involved in leukocytes trafficking. Due to their involvement in recruiting immune cells to sites of inflammation, chemokines, and chemokine receptors have become an attractive class of therapeutic targets. However, when expressed in Escherichia coli chemokines are poorly soluble and accumulate in inclusion bodies. Several purification methods have been described but involve time-consuming refolding, buffer exchange, and purification steps that complicate expression of these proteins. Here, we describe a simple and reliable method to express chemokines as fusions to the protein NusA. The fusion proteins were largely found in the soluble fraction and could be readily purified in a single step. Proteolytic cleavage was used to obtain soluble recombinant chemokines that were found to be very active in a novel in vitro chemotaxis assays. This method could be applied to several {alpha} and {beta} human chemokines, suggesting that it is generally applicable to this class of proteins.

  16. Evidence for specificity at an early step in protein export in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Kumamoto, C A; Beckwith, J

    1985-01-01

    We previously described mutations in a gene, secB, which have pleiotropic effects on protein export in Escherichia coli. In this paper, we report the isolation of mutants in which the activity of the secB gene was eliminated. Null mutations in secB affected only a subset of exported proteins. Strains carrying these mutations, although unable to grow on L broth plates, were still viable on minimal media. These secB mutations reversed a block in the translation of an exported protein that was caused by the elimination of another component of the secretion machinery, SecA protein. These results suggest that the secB product acts at an early step in the export process and is involved in the export of only a subset of cell envelope proteins. Images PMID:3891730

  17. Studies on the expression of outer membrane protein 2 in escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Fralick, J A; Diedrich, D L

    1982-01-01

    The relative level of protein 2 expressed in the outer membrane of strains of Escherichia coli K-12 lysogenized with bacteriophage PA-2 was found to be influenced by both the growth temperature and lc+ gene dosage. An increase in either of these parameters was accompanied by an increase in the level of protein 2 up to an apparent saturation level. Any increase in the amount of protein 2 was accompanied by a concomittant decrease in the amount of OmpF and OmpC porins. This inverse relationship led to the maintenance of an approximately constant protein mass per unit of peptidoglycan. Our results are discussed in light of recent genetic studies on the regulation of the OmpF and OmpC porins and can be explained through the competition of these three matrix proteins for a common export or insertion site.

  18. The immunoglobulin-binding Eib proteins from Escherichia coli are receptors for IgG Fc.

    PubMed

    Leo, Jack C; Goldman, Adrian

    2009-05-01

    The immunoglobulin-binding proteins from Escherichia coli (Eibs) comprise a family of six proteins homologous to the Yersinia adhesin YadA. These proteins are postulated to bind to the Fc portion of immunoglobulin G (IgG) in a non-immune manner. However, a recent study [Ghumra, A., Pleass, R.J., 2007. Escherichia coli do not express Fc-receptors for human immunoglobulin G (IgG). Mol. Immunol. 44, 2144-2146] appeared to show that these proteins do not bind Fc and suggested that the binding seen in earlier studies is due to the polyclonal preparations used in the assays containing antibodies specific to epitopes in the Eib proteins. To resolve this matter, we produced purified, recombinant Eibs for the first time and investigated their binding to intact antibodies and Fc fragments by immunoblot and ELISA techniques. We were able to purify four members of the family, EibA, -C, -D and -F, and show conclusively that these bind IgG Fc. We were also able to block the binding of full-length antibody with IgG Fc, but not with IgG Fab. Binding to IgG Fab was not detectable by surface plasmon resonance, whereas the affinities of Eibs to IgG and IgG Fc were in the range of 50-200 nM. We further demonstrate that deglycosylating IgG Fc does not affect Eib binding. Our results show that the Eib proteins do indeed bind human IgG Fc and that IgG Fc receptors are present in E. coli.

  19. Penem derivatives: beta-lactamase stability and affinity for penicillin-binding proteins in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Ohya, S; Utsui, Y; Sugawara, S; Yamazaki, M

    1982-03-01

    Penem derivatives, a new group of beta-lactam antibiotics with potent activities against a wide range of bacteria, including Pseudomonas aeruginosa, were tested for their stability against hydrolysis by beta-lactamases purified from clinical isolates of Morganella morganii. Proteus vulgaris, and Escherichia coli and by a penicillinase from Bacillus cereus. Penems having 6 alpha substituents, such as hydroxyethyl, hydroxymethyl, and ethyl groups, were very stable against hydrolysis by each of the enzymes. Penems having no 6 alpha substituents were easily hydrolyzed by P. vulgaris and E. coli enzymes, whereas they were rather stable against hydrolysis by M. morganii and B. cereus enzymes, a typical cephalosporinase and penicillinase, respectively. Affinity of the penems for E. coli penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) was also tested. beta-Lactamase-stable penems having a 6 alpha-hydroxyethyl group showed high affinity for PBP-4, -5, and -6 as well as for PBP-1A, -1Bs, and -2. However, the penems having no 6 alpha substituents showed a far lower affinity for PBP-4, -5, and -6 than that shown by the corresponding 6 alpha-hydroxyethyl penems. Among the penems tested, affinity for PBP-4, -5, and -6 was closely related to their beta-lactamase stability, as was the case among cephamycins and cephalosporins. Effects of the penems on the morphology of a strain of E. coli are also described.

  20. Effect of membrane-associated f1 bacteriophage coat protein upon the activity of Escherichia coli phosphatidylserine synthetase.

    PubMed Central

    Chamberlain, B K; Webster, R E

    1978-01-01

    The effects of insertion of the major coat protein of f1 bacteriophage into Escherichia coli membranes were investigated under conditions allowing in vivo analysis of phosphatidylserine synthesis. An E. coli strain possessing a temperature-sensitive phosphatidylserine decarboxylase was utilized under conditions in which the decarboxylase activity was reduced but nonlethal. The presence of the coat protein in the host membranes inhibits the activity of the phosphatidylserine synthetase and perhaps affects the activity of the phosphatidylserine decarboxylase. PMID:211116

  1. PspE (phage-shock protein E) of Escherichia coli is a rhodanese.

    PubMed

    Adams, Hendrik; Teertstra, Wieke; Koster, Margot; Tommassen, Jan

    2002-05-08

    The psp (phage-shock protein) operon of Escherichia coli is induced when the bacteria are infected by filamentous phage and under several other stress conditions. The physiological role of the individual Psp proteins is still not known. We demonstrate here that the last gene of the operon, pspE, encodes a thiosulfate:cyanide sulfurtransferase (EC 2.8.1.1; rhodanese). Kinetic analysis revealed that catalysis occurs via a double displacement mechanism as described for other rhodaneses. The K(m)s for SSO3(2-) and CN- were 4.6 and 27 mM, respectively.

  2. recA protein-catalyzed strand assimilation: stimulation by Escherichia coli single-stranded DNA-binding protein.

    PubMed Central

    McEntee, K; Weinstock, G M; Lehman, I R

    1980-01-01

    The single-stranded DNA-binding protein of Escherichia coli significantly alters the strand assimilation reaction catalyzed by recA protein [McEntee, K., Weinstock, G. M. & Lehman, I. R. (1979) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 76, 2615--2619]. The binding protein (i) increases the rate and extent of strand assimilation into homologous duplex DNA, (ii) enhances the formation of a complex between recA protein and duplex DNA in the presence of homologous or heterologous single-stranded DNA, (iii) reduces the rate and extent of ATP hydrolysis catalyzed by recA protein in the presence of single-stranded DNA, (iv) reduces the high concentration of recA protein required for strand assimilation, and (v) permits detection of strand assimilation in the presence of the ATP analog, adenosine 5'-O-(O-thiotriphosphate). Single-stranded DNA-binding protein purified from a binding protein mutant (lexC) is considerably less effective than wild-type binding protein in stimulating strand assimilation, a result which suggests that single-stranded DNA-binding protein participates in general recombination in vivo. PMID:6244589

  3. Escherichia coli fusion carrier proteins act as solubilizing agents for recombinant uncoupling protein 1 through interactions with GroEL

    SciTech Connect

    Douette, Pierre; Navet, Rachel; Gerkens, Pascal; Galleni, Moreno; Levy, Daniel; Sluse, Francis E. . E-mail: F.Sluse@ulg.ac.be

    2005-08-05

    Fusing recombinant proteins to highly soluble partners is frequently used to prevent aggregation of recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli. Moreover, co-overexpression of prokaryotic chaperones can increase the amount of properly folded recombinant proteins. To understand the solubility enhancement of fusion proteins, we designed two recombinant proteins composed of uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1), a mitochondrial membrane protein, in fusion with MBP or NusA. We were able to express soluble forms of MBP-UCP1 and NusA-UCP1 despite the high hydrophobicity of UCP1. Furthermore, the yield of soluble fusion proteins depended on co-overexpression of GroEL that catalyzes folding of polypeptides. MBP-UCP1 was expressed in the form of a non-covalent complex with GroEL. MBP-UCP1/GroEL was purified and characterized by dynamic light scattering, gel filtration, and electron microscopy. Our findings suggest that MBP and NusA act as solubilizing agents by forcing the recombinant protein to pass through the bacterial chaperone pathway in the context of fusion protein.

  4. Use of gene fusions to study outer membrane protein localization in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Silhavy, T J; Shuman, H A; Beckwith, J; Schwartz, M

    1977-01-01

    Escherichia coli strains have been isolated that produce hybrid proteins comprised of an NH2-terminal sequence from the lamB gene product (an outer membrane protein) and a major portion of the COOH-terminal sequence of beta-galactosidase (beta-D-galactoside galactohydrolase, EC 3.2.1.23; a cytoplasmic protein). These proteins exhibit beta-galactosidase activity. One such strain, pop 3105, produces a hybrid protein containing very little of the lamB gene protein; the protein is found in the cytoplasm. The protein found in a second strain, pop 3186, contains much more of the lamB gene protein; a substantial fraction of the beta-galactosidase activity is found in the outer membrane, probably facing outward. These results indicate that information necessary to direct the lamB gene product to its outer membrane location is located within the lamB gene itself. The properties of such fusion strains open up the prospect of a precise genetic analysis of the genetic components involved in protein transport. Images PMID:414221

  5. Induction of the lac carrier and an associated membrane protein in Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Lagarias, D.M.

    1985-01-01

    Induction of the lac operon in wild type Escherichia coli strains results in synthesis of a 16 kilodalton inner membrane protein in addition to the known products of the lacZ, lacY and lacA genes. Cells carrying the lacY gene on a plasmid over produce this 16 kilodalton polypeptide as well as the Lac carrier, the membrane protein product of the lacY gene. However, (/sup 35/S)methionine labeling of minicells carrying the lacY plasmid shows that the 16 kDa protein is not synthesized from the plasmid DNA. The 16 kDa protein was purified and partially characterized. It is an acidic membrane protein of apparent molecular weight 15,800 whose amino terminal sequence (NH/sub 2/-Met-Arg-Asn-Phe-Asp-Leu-) does not correspond to any nucleotide sequence known in lac operon DNA. Using antibody prepared to the purified 16 kDa protein, a quantitative analysis of conditions under which this protein is made was accomplished, and reveals that the amount of 16 kDa protein which appears in the membrane is proportional to lac operon expression. Hybridization of a synthetic oligonucleotide probe complementary to the 5' end of 16 kDa protein mRNA shows that its synthesis is regulated at the level of transcription. A description of attempts to clone this gene is given. Possible functional roles for the 16 kDa protein are discussed.

  6. Quantification of metabolic limitations during recombinant protein production in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Heyland, Jan; Blank, Lars M; Schmid, Andreas

    2011-09-10

    Escherichia coli is one of the major microorganisms for recombinant protein production because it has been best characterized in terms of molecular genetics and physiology, and because of the availability of various expression vectors and strains. The synthesis of proteins is one of the most energy consuming processes in the cell, with the result that cellular energy supply may become critical. Indeed, the so called metabolic burden of recombinant protein synthesis was reported to cause alterations in the operation of the host's central carbon metabolism. To quantify these alterations in E. coli metabolism in dependence of the rate of recombinant protein production, (13)C-tracer-based metabolic flux analysis in differently induced cultures was used. To avoid dilution of the (13)C-tracer signal by the culture history, the recombinant protein produced was used as a flux probe, i.e., as a read out of intracellular flux distributions. In detail, an increase in the generation rate rising from 36 mmol(ATP)g(CDW)(-1)h(-1) for the reference strain to 45 mmol(ATP)g(CDW)(-1)h(-1) for the highest yielding strain was observed during batch cultivation. Notably, the flux through the TCA cycle was rather constant at 2.5±0.1 mmol g(CDW)(-1)h(-1), hence was independent of the induced strength for gene expression. E. coli compensated for the additional energy demand of recombinant protein synthesis by reducing the biomass formation to almost 60%, resulting in excess NADPH. Speculative, this excess NADPH was converted to NADH via the soluble transhydrogenase and subsequently used for ATP generation in the electron transport chain. In this study, the metabolic burden was quantified by the biomass yield on ATP, which constantly decreased from 11.7g(CDW)mmol(ATP)(-1) for the reference strain to 4.9g(CDW)mmol(ATP)(-1) for the highest yielding strain. The insights into the operation of the metabolism of E. coli during recombinant protein production might guide the optimization of

  7. Nutrient-dependent methylation of a membrane-associated protein of Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Young, C.C.; Alvarez, J.D.; Bernlohr, R.W. )

    1990-09-01

    Starvation of a mid-log-phase culture of Escherichia coli B/r for nitrogen, phosphate, or carbon resulted in methylation of a membrane-associated protein of about 43,000 daltons (P-43) in the presence of chloramphenicol and (methyl-3H)methionine. The in vivo methylation reaction occurred with a doubling time of 2 to 5 min and was followed by a slower demethylation process. Addition of the missing nutrient to a starving culture immediately prevented further methylation of P-43. P-43 methylation is not related to the methylated chemotaxis proteins because P-43 is methylated in response to a different spectrum of nutrients and because P-43 is methylated on lysine residues. The characteristics of P-43 are similar to those of a methylated protein previously described in Bacillus subtilis and B. licheniformis and are consistent with the proposal that methylation of this protein functions in nutrient sensing.

  8. Escherichia coli pleiotropic mutant that reduces amounts of several periplasmic and outer membrane proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Wanner, B L; Sarthy, A; Beckwith, J

    1979-01-01

    We have isolated a mutant of Escherichia coli K-12 that is reduced from 6- to 10-fold in the amount of alkaline phosphatase found in the periplasmic space. The reduced synthesis is not due to effects at the level of transcription regulation of the phoA gene, the structural gene for the enzyme. In addition, the mutation (termed perA) responsible for this phenotype results in reduced amounts of possibly six or more other periplasmic proteins and at least three outer membrane proteins. One of the outer membrane proteins affected is protein IA (D. L. Diedrich, A. O. Summers, and C. A. Schnaitman, J. Bacteriol. 131:598-607, 1977). Although other possibilities exist, one explanation for the phenotype of the perA mutation is that it affects the cell's secretory apparatus. Images PMID:387722

  9. Structure of the 'Escherichia Coli' Leucine-Responsive Regulatory Protein Lrp Reveals a Novel Octameric Assembly

    SciTech Connect

    de los Rios, S.; Perona, J.J.; /UC, Santa Barbara

    2007-07-09

    The structure of Escherichia coli leucine-responsive regulatory protein (Lrp) cocrystallized with a short duplex oligodeoxynucleotide reveals a novel quaternary assembly in which the protein octamer forms an open, linear array of four dimers. In contrast, structures of the Lrp homologs LrpA, LrpC and AsnC crystallized in the absence of DNA show that these proteins instead form highly symmetrical octamers in which the four dimers form a closed ring. Although the DNA is disordered within the Lrp crystal, comparative analyses suggest that the observed differences in quaternary state may arise from DNA interactions during crystallization. Interconversion of these conformations, possibly in response to DNA or leucine binding, provides an underlying mechanism to alter the relative spatial orientation of the DNA-binding domains. Breaking of the closed octamer symmetry may be a common essential step in the formation of active DNA complexes by all members of the Lrp/AsnC family of transcriptional regulatory proteins.

  10. Cloning and expression of Tenebrio molitor antifreeze protein in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Yue, Chang-Wu; Zhang, Yi-Zheng

    2009-03-01

    A novel antifreeze protein cDNA was cloned by RT-PCR from the larva of the yellow mealworm Tenebrio molitor. The coding fragment of 339 bp encodes a protein of 112 amino acid residues and was fused to the expression vectors pET32a and pTWIN1. The resulted expression plasmids were transformed into Escherischia coli strains BL21 (DE3), ER2566, and Origami B (DE3), respectively. Several strategies were used for expression of the highly disulfide-bonded beta-helix-contained protein with the activity of antifreeze in different expression systems. A protocol for production of refolded and active T. molitor antifreeze protein in bacteria was obtained.

  11. Preparation and extraction of insoluble (inclusion-body) proteins from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Ira; Wingfield, Paul T

    2012-11-01

    High-level expression of many recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli leads to the formation of highly aggregated protein commonly referred to as inclusion bodies. Inclusion bodies are normally formed in the cytoplasm; however, if a secretion vector is used, they can form in the periplasmic space. Inclusion bodies can be recovered from cell lysates by low-speed centrifugation. Following pre-extaction (or washing), protein is extracted from washed pellets using guanidine⋅HCl. The solubilized and unfolded protein is either directly folded or further purified by gel filtration in the presence of guanidine⋅HCl as described in this unit. A support protocol describes the removal of guanidine⋅HCl from column fractions so they can be monitored by SDS-PAGE.

  12. Soluble expression of disulfide bond containing proteins FGF15 and FGF19 in the cytoplasm of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Kong, Bo; Guo, Grace L

    2014-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 19 (FGF19) is the human ortholog of mouse FGF15, and both proteins function as an endocrine signal to regulate various liver functions. FGF15/FGF19 protein contains two disulfide bonds. It is unfavorable to form disulfide bonds in Escherichia coli (E. coli) cytoplasm because of the bacterial cytoplasmic reducing environment. Modification of the cytoplasmic reducing environment and/or co-expression of protein chaperones are common strategies to express disulfide bond containing proteins in E. coli. In the current study, we report a method to produce soluble FGF15/FGF19 protein in cytoplasm of E. coli. Several commercial available strains with the disruption of thiol-redox pathways, and/or co-expression of redoxase or refolding chaperones were used to develop this novel method for expression of FGF15/FGF19 in E. coli. Mutation of the thiol-disulfide bond reducing pathway in E. coli or N-terminal fusion of thioredox (TRX) alone is not enough to support disulfide bond formation in FGF15/19 proteins. However, TRX fusion protein improved FGF19 solubility in strains of thiol-redox system mutants. In addition, DsbC co-expressed in thiol-redox system mutants alone improved and further enhanced FGF19 solubility with combination of TRX fusion tag. The soluble FGF19 proteins were easily purified through Ni-NTA affinity chromatography and anion exchange chromatography, and the purified protein maintained its biological activities, confirmed by suppressing hepatic Cyp7a1 gene transcription in mice and by activating ERK1/2 signaling pathway in HepG2 cells. In contrast, soluble FGF15 protein in cytoplasm remained very low using these strategies. In summary, we have successfully developed a method to express functional FGF19 protein in prokaryotic cells, and this strategy may be adapted for the expression of other disulfide-containing proteins.

  13. Invasive Escherichia coli vaccines expressing Brucella melitensis outer membrane proteins 31 or 16 or periplasmic protein BP26 confer protection in mice challenged with B. melitensis.

    PubMed

    Gupta, V K; Radhakrishnan, G; Harms, J; Splitter, G

    2012-06-08

    Because of the serious economic and medical consequences of brucellosis, efforts are to prevent infection of domestic animals through vaccines. Many disadvantages are associated with the current Brucella melitensis Rev.1 vaccine prompting development of alternative vaccines and delivery. Escherichia coli (DH5α) was engineered to express a plasmid containing the inv gene from Yersinia pseudotuberculosis and the hly gene from Listeria monocytogenes. These recombinant invasive E. coli expressing B. melitensis outer membrane proteins (Omp31 or 16) or the periplasmic protein BP26 were evaluated for protection of mice against virulent B. melitensis. Importantly, these invasive E. coli vaccines induced significant protection against B. melitensis challenged mice. Invasive E. coli may be an ideal vaccine platform with natural adjuvant properties for application against B. melitensis since the E. coli delivery system is non-pathogenic and can deliver antigens to antigen-presenting cells promoting cellular immune responses.

  14. Autodisplay of the La/SSB protein on LPS-free E. coli for the diagnosis of Sjögren's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Gu; Dilkaute, Carina; Bong, Ji-Hong; Song, Hyun-Woo; Lee, Misu; Kang, Min-Jung; Jose, Joachim; Pyun, Jae-Chul

    2017-05-01

    The objective of this study was to present an immunoassay for the diagnosis of Sjögren's syndrome based on the autodisplayed La/SSB protein on the outer membrane of intact E. coli (strain UT-5600) and LPS-free E. coli (ClearColi™). As the first step, an autodisplay vector (pCK002) was transfected into intact E. coli and LPS-free E. coli for comparison of efficiency of autdisplay of La/SSB. The maximal level of La/SSB expression was estimated to be similar for LPS-free E. coli and intact E. coli at different optimal induction periods. Intact E. coli was found to grow twofold faster than LPS-free E. coli, and the maximal level of expression for LPS-free E. coli was obtained with a longer induction period. When the zeta potential was measured, both intact E. coli and LPS-free E. coli showed negative values, and the autodisplay of negatively charged La/SSB protein (pI<7) on the outer membrane of intact E. coli and LPS-free E. coli resulted in a slight change in zeta potential values. E. coli with autodisplayed La/SSB protein was used for an immunoassay of anti-La/SSB antibodies for the diagnosis of Sjögren's syndrome. The surface of E. coli with the autodisplayed antigen was modified with rabbit serum and papain to prevent false positive signals because of nonspecific binding of unrelated antibodies from human serum. LPS-free E. coli with autodisplayed La/SSB protein yielded sensitivity and selectivity of 81.6% and 78.6%, respectively. The Bland-Altman test showed that the immunoassays based on LPS-free E. coli and intact E. coli with autodisplayed La/SSB protein were statistically equivalent to a clinical immunoassay for detection of anti-La/SSB antibodies (confidence coefficient 95%).

  15. Cloning, expression, purification, and characterization of the membrane protein UncI from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Claudia; Engel, Andreas

    2011-10-01

    The Escherichia coli unc-operon encodes the genes for the subunits of the F0F1-ATP synthase and an integral membrane protein of unknown function called UncI. UncI influences the cell-growth and activity of F0F1, but its exact function is still unknown. The expression level is too low to extract milligram amounts of UncI from E. coli membranes and the existing purification protocol based on methanol/chloroform is not suitable for structural and functional studies. Here we present protocols to increase the expression level, to purify UncI in a detergent where UncI is monodisperse, and we characterize its oligomeric state.

  16. Over-expression of phage HK022 Nun protein is toxic for Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Uc-Mass, Augusto; Khodursky, Arkady; Brown, Lewis; Gottesman, Max E.

    2008-01-01

    The Nun protein of coliphage HK022 excludes superinfecting λ phage. Nun recognizes and binds to the N utilization (nut) sites on phage λ nascent RNA and induces transcription termination. Over-expression of Nun from a high-copy plasmid is toxic for E.coli, despite the fact that nut sites are not encoded in the E.coli genome. Cells expressing Nun cannot exit stationary phase. Toxicity is related to transcription termination, since host and nun mutations that block termination also suppress cell killing. Nun inhibits expression of wild-type lacZ, but not lacZ expressed from the Crp/cAMP–independent lacUV5 promoter. Microarray and proteomics analyses show Nun down-regulates crp and tnaA. Crp over-expression and high indole concentrations partially reverse Nun-mediated toxicity and restore lacZ expression. PMID:18571198

  17. Global analysis of proteins synthesized during phosphorus restriction in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    VanBogelen, R A; Olson, E R; Wanner, B L; Neidhardt, F C

    1996-01-01

    The pattern of proteins synthesized in Escherichia coli during steady-state growth in media with ample inorganic phosphate (Pi), upon limitation for Pi (without an alternative phosphorous compound), and during steady-state growth in media containing phosphonate (PHN) as the sole P source was examined by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Of 816 proteins monitored in these experiments, all those with differential synthesis rates greater than 2.0 or less than 0.5 upon phosphate limitation (P limitation) or during growth on PHN compared with their rates in the cultures with Pi were classified as belonging to the PL or PHN stimulon, respectively. The PL stimulon included 413 proteins, 208 showing induced synthesis and 205 showing repressed synthesis. The PHN stimulon was smaller: it included 257 proteins; 227 showed induced synthesis and 30 showed repressed synthesis. The overlap of the two stimulons included 137 proteins: most (118) were ones showing induced synthesis. The promoter regions of genes for several of the proteins with induced or repressed synthesis contained sequences which resembled the consensus sequence for PhoB binding. The aggregate mass of proteins responding to P limitation or growth on PHN was 30 to 40% of the cells' total mass. By comparing the proteins responding to P limitation with those responding to growth on PHN, one can speculate which proteins are likely involved in adapting cells to new P sources or in preparing cells to survive stationary phase. PMID:8755861

  18. Identification of Transport Proteins Involved in Free Fatty Acid Efflux in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Lennen, Rebecca M.; Politz, Mark G.; Kruziki, Max A.

    2013-01-01

    Escherichia coli has been used as a platform host for studying the production of free fatty acids (FFA) and other energy-dense compounds useful in biofuel applications. Most of the FFA produced by E. coli are found extracellularly. This finding suggests that a mechanism for transport across the cell envelope exists, yet knowledge of proteins that may be responsible for export remains incomplete. Production of FFA has been shown to cause cell lysis, induce stress responses, and impair basic physiological processes. These phenotypes could potentially be diminished if efflux rates were increased. Here, a total of 15 genes and operons were deleted and screened for their impact on cell viability and titer in FFA-producing E. coli. Deletions of acrAB and rob and, to a lower degree of statistical confidence, emrAB, mdtEF, and mdtABCD reduced multiple measures of viability, while deletion of tolC nearly abolished FFA production. An acrAB emrAB deletion strain exhibited greatly reduced FFA titers approaching the tolC deletion phenotype. Expression of efflux pumps on multicopy plasmids did not improve endogenous FFA production in an acrAB+ strain, but plasmid-based expression of acrAB, mdtEF, and an mdtEF-tolC artificial operon improved the MIC of exogenously added decanoate for an acrAB mutant strain. The findings suggest that AcrAB-TolC is responsible for most of the FFA efflux in E. coli, with residual activity provided by other resistance-nodulation-cell division superfamily-type efflux pumps, including EmrAB-TolC and MdtEF-TolC. While the expression of these proteins on multicopy plasmids did not improve production over the basal level, their identification enables future engineering efforts. PMID:23104810

  19. Optimizing heterologous protein production in the periplasm of E. coli by regulating gene expression levels

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In Escherichia coli many heterologous proteins are produced in the periplasm. To direct these proteins to the periplasm, they are equipped with an N-terminal signal sequence so that they can traverse the cytoplasmic membrane via the protein-conducting Sec-translocon. For poorly understood reasons, the production of heterologous secretory proteins is often toxic to the cell thereby limiting yields. To gain insight into the mechanism(s) that underlie this toxicity we produced two secretory heterologous proteins, super folder green fluorescent protein and a single-chain variable antibody fragment, in the Lemo21(DE3) strain. In this strain, the expression intensity of the gene encoding the target protein can be precisely controlled. Results Both SFGFP and the single-chain variable antibody fragment were equipped with a DsbA-derived signal sequence. Producing these proteins following different gene expression levels in Lemo21(DE3) allowed us to identify the optimal expression level for each target gene. Too high gene expression levels resulted in saturation of the Sec-translocon capacity as shown by hampered translocation of endogenous secretory proteins and a protein misfolding/aggregation problem in the cytoplasm. At the optimal gene expression levels, the negative effects of the production of the heterologous secretory proteins were minimized and yields in the periplasm were optimized. Conclusions Saturating the Sec-translocon capacity can be a major bottleneck hampering heterologous protein production in the periplasm. This bottleneck can be alleviated by harmonizing expression levels of the genes encoding the heterologous secretory proteins with the Sec-translocon capacity. Mechanistic insight into the production of proteins in the periplasm is key to optimizing yields in this compartment. PMID:23497240

  20. Cells of Escherichia coli contain a protein-tyrosine kinase, Wzc, and a phosphotyrosine-protein phosphatase, Wzb.

    PubMed

    Vincent, C; Doublet, P; Grangeasse, C; Vaganay, E; Cozzone, A J; Duclos, B

    1999-06-01

    Two proteins of Escherichia coli, termed Wzc and Wzb, were analyzed for their capacity to participate in the reversible phosphorylation of proteins on tyrosine. First, Wzc was overproduced from its specific gene and purified to homogeneity by affinity chromatography. Upon incubation in the presence of radioactive ATP, it was found to effectively autophosphorylate. Two-dimensional analysis of its phosphoamino acid content revealed that it was modified exclusively at tyrosine. Second, Wzb was also overproduced from the corresponding gene and purified to homogeneity by affinity chromatography. It was shown to contain a phosphatase activity capable of cleaving the synthetic substrate p-nitrophenyl phosphate into p-nitrophenol and free phosphate. In addition, it was assayed on individual phosphorylated amino acids and appeared to dephosphorylate specifically phosphotyrosine, with no effect on phosphoserine or phosphothreonine. Such specificity for phosphotyrosine was confirmed by the observation that Wzb was able to dephosphorylate previously autophosphorylated Wzc. Together, these data demonstrate, for the first time, that E. coli cells contain both a protein-tyrosine kinase and a phosphotyrosine-protein phosphatase. They also provide evidence that this phosphatase can utilize the kinase as an endogenous substrate, which suggests the occurrence of a regulatory mechanism connected with reversible protein phosphorylation on tyrosine. From comparative analysis of amino acid sequences, Wzc was found to be similar to a number of proteins present in other bacterial species which are all involved in the synthesis or export of exopolysaccharides. Since these polymers are considered important virulence factors, we suggest that reversible protein phosphorylation on tyrosine may be part of the cascade of reactions that determine the pathogenicity of bacteria.

  1. Escherichia coli response to uranyl exposure at low pH and associated protein regulations.

    PubMed

    Khemiri, Arbia; Carrière, Marie; Bremond, Nicolas; Ben Mlouka, Mohamed Amine; Coquet, Laurent; Llorens, Isabelle; Chapon, Virginie; Jouenne, Thierry; Cosette, Pascal; Berthomieu, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    Better understanding of uranyl toxicity in bacteria is necessary to optimize strains for bioremediation purposes or for using bacteria as biodetectors for bioavailable uranyl. In this study, after different steps of optimization, Escherichia coli cells were exposed to uranyl at low pH to minimize uranyl precipitation and to increase its bioavailability. Bacteria were adapted to mid acidic pH before exposure to 50 or 80 µM uranyl acetate for two hours at pH≈3. To evaluate the impact of uranium, growth in these conditions were compared and the same rates of cells survival were observed in control and uranyl exposed cultures. Additionally, this impact was analyzed by two-dimensional differential gel electrophoresis proteomics to discover protein actors specifically present or accumulated in contact with uranium.Exposure to uranium resulted in differential accumulation of proteins associated with oxidative stress and in the accumulation of the NADH/quinone oxidoreductase WrbA. This FMN dependent protein performs obligate two-electron reduction of quinones, and may be involved in cells response to oxidative stress. Interestingly, this WrbA protein presents similarities with the chromate reductase from E. coli, which was shown to reduce uranyl in vitro.

  2. Helicase properties of the Escherichia coli UvrAb protein complex

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, E.Y.; Grossman, L.

    1987-06-01

    The Escherichia coli UvrA protein has an associated ATPase activity with a turnover number affected by the presence of UvrB protein as well as by DNA. Specifically, the structure of DNA significantly influences the turnover rate of the UvrAB ATPase activity. Double-stranded DNA maximally activates the turnover rate 10-fold whereas single-stranded DNA maximally activates the turnover rate 20-fold, suggesting that the mode of interaction of UvrAB protein with different DNAs is distinctive. We have previously shown that the UvrAB protein complex, driven by the binding energy of ATP, can locally unwind supercoiled DNA. The nature of the DNA unwinding activity and single-stranded DNA activation of ATPase activity suggest potential helicase activity. In the presence of a number of helicase substrates, the UvrAB complex, indeed, manifests a strand-displacement activity-unwinding short duplexes and D-loop DNA, thereby generating component DNA structures. The energy for the activity is derived from ATP or dATP hydrolysis. Unlike the E. coli DnaB, the UvrAB helicase is sensitive to UV-induced photoproducts.

  3. Expression of Cardamom mosaic virus coat protein in Escherichia coli and its assembly into filamentous aggregates.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Thomas; Usha, R

    2002-06-01

    Cardamom mosaic virus (CdMV), a member of the genus Macluravirus of Potyviridae, causes a mosaic disease in cardamom. A polyclonal antiserum was raised against the purified virus and IgG was prepared. Electron microscopic studies on the purified virus showed flexuous filamentous particles of approximately 800 nm in length, typical of members of Potyviridae. The coat protein (CP) encoding sequence of the virus was expressed in Escherichia coli and the protein purified by affinity chromatography under denaturing conditions. The viral nature of the expressed CP was confirmed by positive reaction with anti CdMV IgG in a Western blot. The expressed CP aggregated irreversibly upon renaturation at concentrations above 0.07 mg/ml. The expression of the CP led to the formation of filamentous aggregates in E. coli as observed by immuno-gold electron microscopy. The filamentous aggregates were of 100-150 nm in length. Immuno-capture RT-PCR confirmed the absence of coat protein mRNA in the filamentous aggregates. Deletion mutations, which were expected to inhibit virus assembly, were introduced in the core region of the coat protein. However, these mutations did not improve the solubility of the CP in non-denaturing buffers.

  4. Effect of Antimicrobial Agents on MinD Protein Oscillations in E. coli Bacterial Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, Corey; Giuliani, Maximiliano; Dutcher, John

    2012-02-01

    The pole-to-pole oscillation of MinD proteins in E. coli cells determines the location of the division septum, and is integral to healthy cell division. It has been shown previously that the MinD oscillation period is approximately 40 s for healthy cells [1] but is strongly dependant on environmental factors such as temperature, which may place stress on the cell [2,3]. We use a strain of E. coli in which the MinD proteins are tagged with green fluorescent protein (GFP), allowing fluorescence visualization of the MinD oscillation. We use high-resolution total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy and a custom, temperature controlled flow cell to observe the effect of exposure to antimicrobial agents on the MinD oscillation period and, more generally, to analyze the time variation of the spatial distribution of the MinD proteins within the cells. These measurements provide insight into the mechanism of antimicrobial action. [1] Raskin, D.M.; de Boer, P. (1999) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. 96: 4971-4976. [2] Touhami, A.; Jericho, M; Rutenberg, A. (2006) J. Bacteriol. 188: 7661-7667. [3] Downing, B.; Rutenberg, A.; Touhami, A.; Jericho, M. (2009) PLoS ONE 4: e7285.

  5. FtsH-dependent degradation of phage shock protein C in Yersinia enterocolitica and Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sindhoora; Darwin, Andrew J

    2011-12-01

    The widely conserved phage shock protein (Psp) extracytoplasmic stress response has been studied extensively in Escherichia coli and Yersinia enterocolitica. Both species have the PspF, -A, -B, and -C proteins, which have been linked to robust phenotypes, including Y. enterocolitica virulence. PspB and PspC are cytoplasmic membrane proteins required for stress-dependent induction of psp gene expression and for bacterial survival during the mislocalization of outer membrane secretin proteins. Previously, we reported that Y. enterocolitica PspB functions to positively control the amount of PspC by an uncharacterized posttranscriptional mechanism. In this study, we have discovered that the cytoplasmic membrane protease FtsH is involved in this phenomenon. FtsH destabilizes PspC in Y. enterocolitica, but coproduction of PspC with its binding partner PspB was sufficient to prevent this destabilization. In contrast, FtsH did not affect any other core component of the Psp system. These data suggested that uncomplexed PspC might be particularly deleterious to the bacterial cell and that FtsH acts as an important quality control mechanism to remove it. This was supported by the observation that toxicity caused by PspC production was reduced either by coproduction of PspB or by increased synthesis of FtsH. We also found that the phenomenon of FtsH-dependent PspC destabilization is conserved between Y. enterocolitica and E. coli.

  6. Investigation of CNT-induced Escherichia coli Lysis and Protein Release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosleh, Abdollah

    This research investigated the use of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) as a treatment to increase the permeability of a bacterial cell wall. Recombinant Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) containing a plasmid that expressed Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) and ?-lactamase were exposed to CNTs under various levels of agitation for different times. Fluorescence assay for GFP, optical absorbance for beta-lactamase activity, and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) were used to determine the amount of released protein, and visually examine the permeability enhancement of the cells, respectively. It was found that more beta-lactamase was present in the culture fluid after treatment with CNTs in a dose dependent manner. Indeed, CNTs can lyse the cells up to 90% of maximum when compared to lysozyme treatment. Based on TEM, it is believed that this treatment damaged the cell walls to make E. coli permeable, causing periplasm proteins and enzymes to leak out into the medium. Consequently, CNTs can be used as lysis agents when it is undesirable to add an additional enzyme (lysozyme) to cause the release of intracellular proteins.

  7. Synthesis of Mycoplasma arginine deiminase in E. coli using stress-responsive proteins.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Keum-Young; Lee, Boram; Han, Kyung-Yeon; Song, Jong-Am; Lee, Doo Sung; Lee, Jeewon

    2014-09-01

    We found Escherichia coli proteins, elongation factor Ts (Tsf), and malate dehydrogenase (Mdh) that can exist in the form of native and soluble proteins even under stress situation such as heat shock and protein denaturing condition. To examine their property as solubility enhancers, aggregation-prone Mycoplasma arginine deiminase (mADI), which has been suggested as anti-cancer agent, was fused to the C-terminal of each of them and cloned into pET28a to be expressed in the E. coli cytoplasm. When mADI was fused to fusion partners (Mdh, Tsf), a significant portion of the recombinant mADI was expressed in a soluble fraction (>90%) whereas the directly expressed mADI was aggregated to the inclusion body. In addition, recombinant mADI released from the fusion tag retained its soluble form and presented its specific enzymatic activity of converting l-arginine into citrulline (>10 U/mg). These results show that Tsf and Mdh could serve as effective solubility enhancers for aggregation-prone proteins (e.g. mADI in this case) when used as fusion expression partners in bacterial expression systems.

  8. Efficient preservation in a silicon oxide matrix of Escherichia coli, producer of recombinant proteins.

    PubMed

    Desimone, Martín F; De Marzi, Mauricio C; Copello, Guillermo J; Fernández, Marisa M; Malchiodi, Emilio L; Diaz, Luis E

    2005-10-01

    The aim of this work was to study the use of silicon oxide matrices for the immobilization and preservation of recombinant-protein-producing bacteria. We immobilized Escherichia coli BL21 transformants containing different expression plasmids. One contained DNA coding for a T-cell receptor beta chain, which was expressed as inclusion bodies in the cytoplasm. The other two encoded bacterial superantigens Staphylococcal Enterotoxin G and Streptococcal Superantigen, which were expressed as soluble proteins in the periplasm. The properties of immobilization and storage stability in inorganic matrices prepared from two precursors, silicon dioxide and tetraethoxysilane, were studied. Immobilized E. coli was stored in sealed tubes at 4 and 20 degrees C and the number of viable cells and level of recombinant protein production were analyzed weekly. Different tests showed that the biochemical characteristics of immobilized E. coli remained intact. At both temperatures selected, we found that the number of bacteria in silicon dioxide-derived matrix was of the same order of magnitude (10(9) cfu ml(-1)) as before immobilization, for 2 months. After 2 weeks, cells immobilized in an alkoxide-derived matrix decreased to 10(4) cfu ml(-1) at 4 degrees C, and no viable cells were detected at 20 degrees C. We found that immobilized bacteria could be used as a starter to produce recombinant proteins with yields comparable to those obtained from glycerol stocks: 15 mg l(-1) for superantigens and 2 mg l(-1) for T-cell receptor beta chain. These results contribute to the development of methods for microbial cell preservation under field conditions.

  9. High-resolution mapping of architectural DNA binding protein facilitation of a DNA repression loop in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Becker, Nicole A; Maher, L James

    2015-06-09

    Double-stranded DNA is a locally inflexible polymer that resists bending and twisting over hundreds of base pairs. Despite this, tight DNA bending is biologically important for DNA packaging in eukaryotic chromatin and tight DNA looping is important for gene repression in prokaryotes. We and others have previously shown that sequence nonspecific DNA kinking proteins, such as Escherichia coli heat unstable and Saccharomyces cerevisiae non-histone chromosomal protein 6A (Nhp6A), facilitate lac repressor (LacI) repression loops in E. coli. It has been unknown if this facilitation involves direct protein binding to the tightly bent DNA loop or an indirect effect promoting global negative supercoiling of DNA. Here we adapt two high-resolution in vivo protein-mapping techniques to demonstrate direct binding of the heterologous Nhp6A protein at a LacI repression loop in living E. coli cells.

  10. In-silico design, expression, and purification of novel chimeric Escherichia coli O157:H7 OmpA fused to LTB protein in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Novinrooz, Aytak; Zahraei Salehi, Taghi; Firouzi, Roya; Arabshahi, Sina; Derakhshandeh, Abdollah

    2017-01-01

    E. coli O157:H7, one of the major EHEC serotypes, is capable of developing bloody diarrhea, hemorrhagic colitis (HC), and fatal hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) and is accompanied by high annual economic loss worldwide. Due to the increased risk of HC and HUS development following antibiotic therapy, the prevention of infections caused by this pathogen is considered to be one of the most effective ways of avoiding the consequences of this infection. The main aim of the present study was to design, express, and purify a novel chimeric protein to develope human vaccine candidate against E. coli O157:H7 containing loop 2–4 of E. coli O157:H7, outer membrane protein A (OmpA), and B subunit of E. coli heat labile enterotoxin (LTB) which are connected by a flexible peptide linker. Several online databases and bioinformatics software were utilized to choose the peptide linker among 537 analyzed linkers, design the chimeric protein, and optimize the codon of the relative gene encoding this protein. Subsequently, the recombinant gene encoding OmpA-LTB was synthesized and cloned into pET-24a (+) expression vector and transferred to E. coli BL21(DE3) cells. The expression of OmpA-LTB chimeric protein was then carried out by induction of cultured E. coli Bl21 (DE3) cells with 1mM isopropyl-β-D-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG). The purification of OmpA-LTB was then performed by nickel affinity chromatography. Expression and purification were analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulphate poly acrylamide gel electrophoresis. Moreover, the identity of the expressed protein was analyzed by western blotting. SDS-PAGE and western immunoblotting confirmed the successful expression of a 27 KDa recombinant protein after 24 hours at 37°C post-IPTG induction. OmpA-LTB was then successfully purified, using nickel affinity chromatography under denaturing conditions. The yield of purification was 12 mg per liter of culture media. Ultimately, we constructed the successful design and efficient expression

  11. Chromatographic methods for the isolation of, and refolding of proteins from, Escherichia coli inclusion bodies.

    PubMed

    Gu, Zhenyu; Weidenhaupt, Marianne; Ivanova, Natalia; Pavlov, Michail; Xu, Bingze; Su, Zhi-Guo; Janson, Jan-Christer

    2002-06-01

    New methods for the chromatographic isolation of inclusion bodies directly from crude Escherichia coli homogenates and for the refolding of denatured protein are presented. The traditional method of differential centrifugation for the isolation of purified inclusion bodies is replaced by a single gel-filtration step. The principle is that the exclusion limit of the gel particles is chosen such that only the inclusion bodies are excluded, i.e., all other components of the crude homogenate penetrate the gel under the conditions selected. In the novel column refolding process, a decreasing gradient of denaturant (urea or Gu-HCl), combined with an increasing pH gradient, is introduced into a gel-filtration column packed with a gel medium that has an exclusion limit lower than the molecular mass of the protein to be refolded. A limited sample volume of the protein, dissolved in the highest denaturant concentration at the lowest pH of the selected gradient combination, is applied to the column. During the course of elution, the zone of denatured protein moves down the column at a speed approximately threefold higher than that of the denaturant. This means that the protein sample will gradually pass through areas of increasingly lower denaturant concentrations and higher pH, which promotes refolding into the native conformation. The shape and slope of the gradients, as well as the flow rate, will influence the refolding rate and can be adjusted for different protein samples. The principle is illustrated using a denatured recombinant scFv fusion protein obtained from E. coli inclusion bodies.

  12. Hexahistidine-tagged maltose-binding protein as a fusion partner for the production of soluble recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Austin, Brian P; Nallamsetty, Sreedevi; Waugh, David S

    2009-01-01

    Insolubility of recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli is a major impediment to their production for structural and functional studies. One way to circumvent this problem is to fuse an aggregation-prone protein to a highly soluble partner. E. coli maltose-binding protein (MBP) has emerged as one of the most effective solubilizing agents. In this chapter, we describe how to construct combinatorially-tagged His(6)MBP fusion proteins by recombinational cloning and how to evaluate their yield and solubility. We also describe a procedure to determine how efficiently a His(6)MBP fusion protein is cleaved by tobacco etch virus (TEV) protease in E. coli and a method to assess the solubility of the target protein after it has been separated from His(6)MBP.

  13. Production of FMDV virus-like particles by a SUMO fusion protein approach in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chien-Der; Yan, Yao-Pei; Liang, Shu-Mei; Wang, Ting-Fang

    2009-01-01

    Virus-like particles (VLPs) are formed by the self-assembly of envelope and/or capsid proteins from many viruses. Some VLPs have been proven successful as vaccines, and others have recently found applications as carriers for foreign antigens or as scaffolds in nanoparticle biotechnology. However, production of VLP was usually impeded due to low water-solubility of recombinant virus capsid proteins. Previous studies revealed that virus capsid and envelope proteins were often posttranslationally modified by SUMO in vivo, leading into a hypothesis that SUMO modification might be a common mechanism for virus proteins to retain water-solubility or prevent improper self-aggregation before virus assembly. We then propose a simple approach to produce VLPs of viruses, e.g., foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV). An improved SUMO fusion protein system we developed recently was applied to the simultaneous expression of three capsid proteins of FMDV in E. coli. The three SUMO fusion proteins formed a stable heterotrimeric complex. Proteolytic removal of SUMO moieties from the ternary complexes resulted in VLPs with size and shape resembling the authentic FMDV. The method described here can also apply to produce capsid/envelope protein complexes or VLPs of other disease-causing viruses. PMID:19671144

  14. Determining the N-terminal orientations of recombinant transmembrane proteins in the Escherichia coli plasma membrane

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chien-Hsien; Chou, Chia-Cheng; Hsu, Min-Feng; Wang, Andrew H.-J.

    2015-01-01

    In silico algorithms have been the common approach for transmembrane (TM) protein topology prediction. However, computational tools may produce questionable results and experimental validation has proven difficult. Although biochemical strategies are available to determine the C-terminal orientation of TM proteins, experimental strategies to determine the N-terminal orientation are still limited but needed because the N-terminal end is essential for membrane targeting. Here, we describe a new and easy method to effectively determine the N-terminal orientation of the target TM proteins in Escherichia coli plasma membrane environment. D94N, the mutant of bacteriorhodopsin from Haloarcula marismortui, can be a fusion partner to increase the production of the target TM proteins if their N-termini are in cytoplasm (Nin orientation). To create a suitable linker for orientating the target TM proteins with the periplasmic N-termini (Nout orientation) correctly, we designed a three-TM-helix linker fused at the C-terminus of D94N fusion partner (termed D94N-3TM) and found that D94N-3TM can specifically improve the production of the Nout target TM proteins. In conclusion, D94N and D94N-3TM fusion partners can be applied to determine the N-terminal end of the target TM proteins oriented either Nin or Nout by evaluating the net expression of the fusion proteins. PMID:26462555

  15. Protein Extraction by Means of Electroporation from E. coli with Preserved Viability.

    PubMed

    Haberl Meglic, Sasa; Marolt, Tilen; Miklavcic, Damijan

    2015-10-01

    Extracting proteins by means of electroporation from different microorganisms is gaining on its importance, as electroporation is a quick, chemical-free, and cost-effective method. Since complete cell destruction (to obtain proteins) necessitates additional work, and cost of purifying the end-product is high, pulses have to be adjusted in order to prevent total disintegration. Namely, total disintegration of the cell releases bacterial membrane contaminants in the final sample. Therefore, our goal was to study different electric pulse parameters in order to extract as much proteins as possible from E. coli bacteria, while preserving bacterial viability. Our results show that by increasing electric field strength the concentration of extracted proteins increases and viability reduces. The correlation is reasonable, since high electric field destroys bacterial envelope, releasing all intracellular components into surrounding media. The strong correlation was also found with pulse duration. However, at longer pulses we obtained more proteins, while bacterial viability was not as much affected. Pulse number and/or pulse repetition frequency at our conditions have no or little effect on concentration of extracted proteins and/or bacterial viability. We can conclude that the most promising pulse protocol for protein extraction by means of electroporation based on our experience would be longer pulses with lower pulse amplitude assuring high protein yield and low effect on bacterial viability.

  16. Green fluorescent protein as a scaffold for high efficiency production of functional bacteriotoxic proteins in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Soundrarajan, Nagasundarapandian; Cho, Hye-sun; Ahn, Byeongyong; Choi, Minkyung; Thong, Le Minh; Choi, Hojun; Cha, Se-Yeoun; Kim, Jin-Hoi; Park, Choi-Kyu; Seo, Kunho; Park, Chankyu

    2016-01-01

    The availability of simple, robust, and cost-effective methods for the large-scale production of bacteriotoxic peptides such as antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) is essential for basic and pharmaceutical research. However, the production of bacteriotoxic proteins has been difficult due to a high degree of toxicity in bacteria and proteolytic degradation. In this study, we inserted AMPs into the Green fluorescent protein (GFP) in a loop region and expressed them as insoluble proteins in high yield, circumventing the inherent toxicity of AMP production in Escherichia coli. The AMPs inserted were released by cyanogen bromide and purified by chromatography. We showed that highly potent AMPs such as Protegrin-1, PMAP-36, Buforin-2, and Bactridin-1 are produced in high yields and produced AMPs showed similar activities compared to chemically synthesized AMPs. We increased the yield more than two-fold by inserting three copies of Protegrin-1 in the GFP scaffold. The immunogold electron micrographs showed that the expressed Protegrin-1 in the GFP scaffold forms large and small size aggregates in the core region of the inclusion body and become entirely nonfunctional, therefore not influencing the proliferation of E. coli. Our novel method will be applicable for diverse bacteriotoxic peptides which can be exploited in biomedical and pharmaceutical researches. PMID:26864123

  17. Green fluorescent protein as a scaffold for high efficiency production of functional bacteriotoxic proteins in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Soundrarajan, Nagasundarapandian; Cho, Hye-Sun; Ahn, Byeongyong; Choi, Minkyung; Thong, Le Minh; Choi, Hojun; Cha, Se-Yeoun; Kim, Jin-Hoi; Park, Choi-Kyu; Seo, Kunho; Park, Chankyu

    2016-02-11

    The availability of simple, robust, and cost-effective methods for the large-scale production of bacteriotoxic peptides such as antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) is essential for basic and pharmaceutical research. However, the production of bacteriotoxic proteins has been difficult due to a high degree of toxicity in bacteria and proteolytic degradation. In this study, we inserted AMPs into the Green fluorescent protein (GFP) in a loop region and expressed them as insoluble proteins in high yield, circumventing the inherent toxicity of AMP production in Escherichia coli. The AMPs inserted were released by cyanogen bromide and purified by chromatography. We showed that highly potent AMPs such as Protegrin-1, PMAP-36, Buforin-2, and Bactridin-1 are produced in high yields and produced AMPs showed similar activities compared to chemically synthesized AMPs. We increased the yield more than two-fold by inserting three copies of Protegrin-1 in the GFP scaffold. The immunogold electron micrographs showed that the expressed Protegrin-1 in the GFP scaffold forms large and small size aggregates in the core region of the inclusion body and become entirely nonfunctional, therefore not influencing the proliferation of E. coli. Our novel method will be applicable for diverse bacteriotoxic peptides which can be exploited in biomedical and pharmaceutical researches.

  18. Increased Protein Yields from Escherichia coli Using Pressure-Cycling Technology

    PubMed Central

    Smejkal, Gary B.; Robinson, Myra H.; Lawrence, Nathan P.; Tao, Feng; Saravis, Calvin A.; Schumacher, Richard T.

    2006-01-01

    Sample preparation is critical to the success of two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and other analytical methods. Pressure-cycling technology (PCT) uses alternating cycles of high and low pressure to induce cell lysis. Cell suspensions were placed in PULSE Tubes and subjected to alternating cycles of high and low pressure in a Barocycler instrument. each cycle consisted of 20 sec at 35,000 psi followed by 20 sec at ambient pressure. For the bacterium Escherichia coli, PCT extracted 14.2% more total protein than was extracted using a standard bead mill. Image analysis of two-dimensional gels revealed 801 protein spots in the PCT lysate, compared to 760 protein spots in the bead mill lysate. PMID:16741245

  19. Mapping of chorismate mutase and prephenate dehydrogenase domains in the Escherichia coli T-protein.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shuqing; Vincent, Sarah; Wilson, David B; Ganem, Bruce

    2003-02-01

    The Escherichia coli bifunctional T-protein transforms chorismic acid to p-hydroxyphenylpyruvic acid in the l-tyrosine biosynthetic pathway. The 373 amino acid T-protein is a homodimer that exhibits chorismate mutase (CM) and prephenate dehydrogenase (PDH) activities, both of which are feedback-inhibited by tyrosine. Fifteen genes coding for the T-protein and various fragments thereof were constructed and successfully expressed in order to characterize the CM, PDH and regulatory domains. Residues 1-88 constituted a functional CM domain, which was also dimeric. Both the PDH and the feedback-inhibition activities were localized in residues 94-373, but could not be separated into discrete domains. The activities of cloned CM and PDH domains were comparatively low, suggesting some cooperative interactions in the native state. Activity data further indicate that the PDH domain, in which NAD, prephenate and tyrosine binding sites were present, was more unstable than the CM domain.

  20. Protein Synthesis and Deoxyribonucleic Acid-Membrane Attachment During Thymineless Death in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Dankberg, Frances; Cummings, Donald J.

    1973-01-01

    The proteins synthesized during thymineless death in Escherichia coli B and B/r were analyzed by polyacrylamide gel elctrophoresis. It was found that the amount of a protein of molecular weight 80,000 to 88,000 is greatly increased during thymineless death compared to the amounts of other cell proteins. A technique for the isolation of cell membrane-deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA)-nascent ribonucleic acid (RNA) complex on detergent crystals was used to determine whether DNA might be detached from the cell membrane as a result of thymineless death. It was found that under no conditions of thymineless death or immunity to thymineless death was there any change in the attachment of DNA or pulse-labeled RNA to cell membrane. Images PMID:4570604

  1. Compaction of isolated Escherichia coli nucleoids: Polymer and H-NS protein synergetics.

    PubMed

    Wegner, Anna S; Wintraecken, Kathelijne; Spurio, Roberto; Woldringh, Conrad L; de Vries, Renko; Odijk, Theo

    2016-04-01

    Escherichia coli nucleoids were compacted by the inert polymer polyethylene glycol (PEG) in the presence of the H-NS protein. The protein by itself appears to have little impact on the size of the nucleoids as determined by fluorescent microscopy. However, it has a significant impact on the nucleoidal collapse by PEG. This is quantitatively explained by assuming the H-NS protein enhances the effective diameter of the DNA helix leading to an increase in the depletion forces induced by the PEG. Ultimately, however, the free energy of the nucleoid itself turns out to be independent of the H-NS concentration. This is because the enhancement of the supercoil excluded volume is negligible. The experiments on the nucleoids are corroborated by dynamic light scattering and EMSA analyses performed on DNA plasmids in the presence of PEG and H-NS.

  2. Protein profiles of Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus warneri are altered by photosensitization with cationic porphyrins.

    PubMed

    Alves, Eliana; Esteves, Ana Cristina; Correia, António; Cunha, Ângela; Faustino, Maria A F; Neves, Maria G P M S; Almeida, Adelaide

    2015-06-01

    Oxidative stress induced by photodynamic treatment of microbial cells causes irreversible damages to vital cellular components such as proteins. Photodynamic inactivation (PDI) of bacteria, a promising therapeutic approach for the treatment of superficial and localized skin and oral infections, can be achieved by exciting a photosensitizing agent with visible light in an oxygenated environment. Although some studies have addressed the oxidative alterations of PDI in bacterial proteins, the present study is the first to compare the electrophoretic profiles of proteins of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, having two structurally different porphyrins, with different kinetics of photoinactivation. The cationic porphyrins 5,10,15-tris(1-methylpyridinium-4-yl)-20-(pentafluorophenyl)porphyrin tri-iodide (Tri-Py(+)-Me-PF) and 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(1-methylpyridinium-4-yl)porphyrin tetra-iodide (Tetra-Py(+)-Me) were used to photosensitize Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus warneri upon white light irradiation at an irradiance of 4.0 mW cm(-2). After different photosensitization periods, proteins were extracted from bacteria and analyzed using one-dimensional SDS-PAGE. Apparent molecular weights and band intensities were determined after an irradiation period corresponding to a reduction of 4 log10 in cell viability. After photodynamic treatment, there was a general loss of bacterial proteins, assigned to large-scale protein degradation. Protein loss was more pronounced after PDI with Tri-Py(+)-Me-PF in both bacteria. There was also an increase in the concentration of some proteins as well as an increase in the molecular weight of other proteins. We show that proteins of E. coli and S. warneri are important targets of PDI. Although there is an attempt of cellular response to the PDI-induced damage by overexpression of a limited number of proteins, the damage is lethal. Our results show that changes occurring in the protein pattern during photodynamic treatment are

  3. Structure and function of the Escherichia coli Tol-Pal stator protein TolR.

    PubMed

    Wojdyla, Justyna A; Cutts, Erin; Kaminska, Renata; Papadakos, Grigorios; Hopper, Jonathan T S; Stansfeld, Phillip J; Staunton, David; Robinson, Carol V; Kleanthous, Colin

    2015-10-30

    TolR is a 15-kDa inner membrane protein subunit of the Tol-Pal complex in Gram-negative bacteria, and its function is poorly understood. Tol-Pal is recruited to cell division sites where it is involved in maintaining the integrity of the outer membrane. TolR is related to MotB, the peptidoglycan (PG)-binding stator protein from the flagellum, suggesting it might serve a similar role in Tol-Pal. The only structure thus far reported for TolR is of the periplasmic domain from Haemophilus influenzae in which N- and C-terminal residues had been deleted (TolR(62-133), Escherichia coli numbering). H. influenzae TolR(62-133) is a symmetrical dimer with a large deep cleft at the dimer interface. Here, we present the 1.7-Å crystal structure of the intact periplasmic domain of E. coli TolR (TolR(36-142)). E. coli TolR(36-142) is also dimeric, but the architecture of the dimer is radically different from that of TolR(62-133) due to the intertwining of its N and C termini. TolR monomers are rotated ∼180° relative to each other as a result of this strand swapping, obliterating the putative PG-binding groove seen in TolR(62-133). We found that removal of the strand-swapped regions (TolR(60-133)) exposes cryptic PG binding activity that is absent in the full-length domain. We conclude that to function as a stator in the Tol-Pal complex dimeric TolR must undergo large scale structural remodeling reminiscent of that proposed for MotB, where the N- and C-terminal sequences unfold in order for the protein to both reach and bind the PG layer ∼90 Å away from the inner membrane.

  4. Protein damage and death by radiation in Escherichia coli and Deinococcus radiodurans

    PubMed Central

    Krisko, Anita; Radman, Miroslav

    2010-01-01

    Deinococcus radiodurans is among a small number of bacterial species that are extremely resistant to ionizing radiation, UV light, toxic chemicals, and desiccation. We measured proteome oxidation (i.e., protein carbonylation, PC) in D. radiodurans as well as in standard and evolved resistant strains of Escherichia coli exposed to ionizing radiation or UVC light and found a consistent correlation with cell killing. The unique quantitative relationship between incurred PC and cell death holds over the entire range of killing for all tested bacteria and for both lethal agents, meaning that both bacterial species are equally sensitive to PC. We show that the extraordinary robustness of D. radiodurans depends on efficient proteome protection (but not DNA protection) against constitutive and radiation-induced PC consisting of low molecular weight cytosolic compounds. Remarkably, experimental evolution of resistance to ionizing radiation in E. coli coevolves with protection against PC. The decline in biosynthetic efficacy of the cellular proteome, as measured by the loss of reproduction of undamaged bacteriophage λ in irradiated standard and evolved ionizing radiation-resistant E. coli, correlates with radiation-induced oxidative damage to host cells and their sensitivity to ionizing radiation. This correlation suggests that cell death by radiation is caused primarily by oxidative damage with consequential loss of maintenance activities including DNA repair. PMID:20660760

  5. Protein damage and death by radiation in Escherichia coli and Deinococcus radiodurans.

    PubMed

    Krisko, Anita; Radman, Miroslav

    2010-08-10

    Deinococcus radiodurans is among a small number of bacterial species that are extremely resistant to ionizing radiation, UV light, toxic chemicals, and desiccation. We measured proteome oxidation (i.e., protein carbonylation, PC) in D. radiodurans as well as in standard and evolved resistant strains of Escherichia coli exposed to ionizing radiation or UVC light and found a consistent correlation with cell killing. The unique quantitative relationship between incurred PC and cell death holds over the entire range of killing for all tested bacteria and for both lethal agents, meaning that both bacterial species are equally sensitive to PC. We show that the extraordinary robustness of D. radiodurans depends on efficient proteome protection (but not DNA protection) against constitutive and radiation-induced PC consisting of low molecular weight cytosolic compounds. Remarkably, experimental evolution of resistance to ionizing radiation in E. coli coevolves with protection against PC. The decline in biosynthetic efficacy of the cellular proteome, as measured by the loss of reproduction of undamaged bacteriophage lambda in irradiated standard and evolved ionizing radiation-resistant E. coli, correlates with radiation-induced oxidative damage to host cells and their sensitivity to ionizing radiation. This correlation suggests that cell death by radiation is caused primarily by oxidative damage with consequential loss of maintenance activities including DNA repair.

  6. Thermosensitive omsA mutation of Escherichia coli that causes thermoregulated release of periplasmic proteins.

    PubMed

    Tsuruoka, T; Ito, M; Tomioka, S; Hirata, A; Matsuhashi, M

    1988-11-01

    A mutant of Escherichia coli with a thermosensitive defect, possibly in the outer membrane (omsA mutant), was isolated from E. coli K-12 by mutagenization and selection for thermosensitivity and beta-lactam supersensitivity of growth. The mutant also showed very high sensitivity to other antibiotics, such as macarbomycin, midecamycin, rifampin, and bacitracin. The mutation was recessive to the wild type and was mapped at about 4 min on the E. coli chromosome between fhuA and metD. The mutation caused rapid release into the medium of periplasmic enzymes such as RTEM penicillinase but practically no cytoplasmic enzyme when cells grown at 30 degrees C were transferred to 37 or 42 degrees C. Electron microscopic observations showed many large double-layered vesicles attached to the surface of cells incubated at 42 degrees C. We conclude that the mutant had a mutation that caused a temperature-dependent defect in the outer membrane structure or its assembly (named an oms mutation). The omsA mutant may be useful for production of periplasmic proteins, which it releases into the culture medium on shift up of temperature.

  7. Overcoming heterologous protein interdependency to optimize P450-mediated Taxol precursor synthesis in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Biggs, Bradley Walters; Lim, Chin Giaw; Sagliani, Kristen; Shankar, Smriti; Stephanopoulos, Gregory; Ajikumar, Parayil Kumaran

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in metabolic engineering have demonstrated the potential to exploit biological chemistry for the synthesis of complex molecules. Much of the progress to date has leveraged increasingly precise genetic tools to control the transcription and translation of enzymes for superior biosynthetic pathway performance. However, applying these approaches and principles to the synthesis of more complex natural products will require a new set of tools for enabling various classes of metabolic chemistries (i.e., cyclization, oxygenation, glycosylation, and halogenation) in vivo. Of these diverse chemistries, oxygenation is one of the most challenging and pivotal for the synthesis of complex natural products. Here, using Taxol as a model system, we use nature’s favored oxygenase, the cytochrome P450, to perform high-level oxygenation chemistry in Escherichia coli. An unexpected coupling of P450 expression and the expression of upstream pathway enzymes was discovered and identified as a key obstacle for functional oxidative chemistry. By optimizing P450 expression, reductase partner interactions, and N-terminal modifications, we achieved the highest reported titer of oxygenated taxanes (∼570 ± 45 mg/L) in E. coli. Altogether, this study establishes E. coli as a tractable host for P450 chemistry, highlights the potential magnitude of protein interdependency in the context of synthetic biology and metabolic engineering, and points to a promising future for the microbial synthesis of complex chemical entities. PMID:26951651

  8. Fixation and stabilization of Escherichia coli cells displaying genetically engineered cell surface proteins.

    PubMed

    Freeman, A; Abramov, S; Georgiou, G

    1996-12-05

    A large biotechnological potential is inherent in the display of proteins (e.g., enzymes, single-chain antibodies, on the surface of bacterial cells) (Georgiou et al., 1993). Applications such as immobilized whole-cell biocatalysts or cellular adsorbents require cell fixation to prevent disintegration, stabilization of the anchored protein from leakage, denaturation or proteolysis, and total loss of cell viability, preventing medium and potential product contamination with cells. In this article we describe the adaptation of a simple two-stage chemical crosslinking procedure based on "bi-layer encagement" (Tor et al., 1989) for stabilizing Escherichia coli cells expressing an Lpp-OmpA (46-159)-beta-lactamase fusion that displays beta-lactamase on the cell surface. Bilayer crosslinking and coating the bacteria with a polymeric matrix is accomplished by treating the cells first with either glutaraldehyde or polyglutaraldehyde, followed by secondary crosslinking with polyacrylamide hydrazide. These treatments resulted in a 5- to 25-fold reduction of the thermal inactivation rate constant at 55 degrees C of surface anchored beta-lactamase and completely prevented the deterioration of the cells for at least a week of storage at 4 degrees C. The stabilization procedure developed paves the way to scalable biotechnological applications of E. coli displaying surface anchored proteins as whole-cell biocatalysts and adsorbents.

  9. A translation-coupling DNA cassette for monitoring protein translation in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Mendez-Perez, Daniel; Gunasekaran, Suman; Orler, Victor J; Pfleger, Brian F

    2012-07-01

    A major challenge to using heterologous expression in metabolic engineering experiments is the inability to quickly dissect experiments that have failed at the stage of translating mRNA. While many methods of detecting proteins exist, methods that detect untagged proteins at low levels are limited. Here, we describe a method to quickly determine whether Escherichia coli is capable of expressing the product of any target gene by coupling translation of a target gene to a detectable response gene. A translational coupling cassette was designed to encode a mRNA sequence that forms a secondary structure in the absence of translation and contains the translational start sequence of a detectable response gene. The translational coupling method was successfully tested with fluorescent proteins and antibiotic resistance markers. Only when the target gene was fully translated was the response observed. Further characterization demonstrated that translational coupling functions at both low and high levels of expression and that the response signal is proportional to the amount of target gene product. The translational coupling system was used to determine that a large multi-domain enzyme was not actively translated in E. coli, to isolate the translation problems to the C-terminal domains, and to optimize conditions for expressing a codon-optimized sequence variant.

  10. [Quasi-adaptive response to alkylating agents in Escherichia coli and Ada-protein functions].

    PubMed

    Vasil'eva, S V; Moshkovskaia, E Iu; Terekhov, A S; Mikoian, V D; Vanin, A F

    2008-01-01

    In 2005 we have described in exponentially growing E. coli cells a new fundamental genetic phenomenon,--quasi-adaptive response to alkylating compounds (quasi-Ada). Phenotypic expression of quasi-Ada is similar to the true Ada response. However, in contrast to the letter, it develops in the course of pretreatment of the cells by a sublethal dose of nonalkylating agent, an NO-containing dinitrosyl iron complex with glutathione (DNICglu). To reveal the mechanisms of quasi-adaptation and its association with the function of the Ada regulatory protein, here we used a unique property of dual gene expression regulation of aidB1 gene, a part of the Ada-regulon, namely its relative independence from Ada protein in anaerobic conditions. Based on the results of aidB1 gene expression analysis an EPR spectra of E. coli MV2176 cells (aidB1::lacZ) in aerobic and anaerobic conditions after the corresponding treatments, we conclude that the function and the spatial structure of meAda and [(Cys-)2Fe+(NO+)2]Ada are identical and thus the nitrosylated protein represents a regulator of the Ada regulon gene expression during quasi-adaptation development.

  11. Differential expression of two isolates of beak and feather disease virus capsid protein in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Edward I; Swarbrick, Crystall M D; Roman, Noelia; Forwood, Jade K; Raidal, Shane R

    2013-04-01

    Expression of recombinant beak and feather disease virus (BFDV) capsid-associated protein (Cap) has relied on inefficient techniques that typically produce low yields or use specialized expression systems, which greatly increase the cost and expertise required for mass production. An Escherichia coli system was used to express recombinant BFDV Cap derived from two isolates of BFDV, from a Long-billed Corella (Cacatua tenuirostris) and an Orange-bellied parrot (OBP; Neophema chrysogaster). Purification by affinity and size exclusion chromatography was optimized through an iterative process involving screening and modification of buffer constituents and pH. A buffer containing glycerol, β-mercaptoethanol, Triton X-100, and a high concentration of NaCl at pH 8 was used to increase solubility of the protein. The final concentration of the corella-isolated BFDV protein was fifteen- to twenty-fold greater than that produced in previous publications using E. coli expression systems. Immunoassays were used to confirm the specific antigenicity of recombinant Cap, verifying its validity for use in continued experimentation as a potential vaccine, a reagent in diagnostic assays, and as a concentrated sample for biological discoveries.

  12. Structure of the Escherichia coli Phosphonate Binding Protein PhnD and Rationally Optimized Phosphonate Biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Alicea, Ismael; Marvin, Jonathan S.; Miklos, Aleksandr E.; Ellington, Andrew D.; Looger, Loren L.; Schreiter, Eric R.

    2012-01-01

    The phnD gene of Escherichia coli encodes the periplasmic binding protein of the phosphonate uptake and utilization pathway. We have crystallized and determined structures of E. coli PhnD (EcPhnD) in the absence of ligand and in complex with the environmentally abundant 2-aminoethylphosphonate (2AEP). Similar to other bacterial periplasmic binding proteins, 2AEP binds near the center of mass of EcPhnD in a cleft formed between two lobes. Comparison of the open, unliganded structure with the closed 2AEP-bound structure shows that the two lobes pivot around a hinge by ~70° between the two states. Extensive hydrogen bonding and electrostatic interactions stabilize 2AEP, which binds to EcPhnD with low nanomolar affinity. These structures provide insight into phosphonate uptake by bacteria and facilitated the rational design of high signal-to-noise phosphonate biosensors based both on coupled small molecule dyes and autocatalytic fluorescent proteins. PMID:22019591

  13. Structure of the Escherichia coli Phosphonate Binding Protein PhnD and Rationally Optimized Phosphonate Biosensors

    SciTech Connect

    Alicea, Ismael; Marvin, Jonathan S.; Miklos, Aleksandr E.; Ellington, Andrew D.; Looger, Loren L.; Schreiter, Eric R.

    2012-09-17

    The phnD gene of Escherichia coli encodes the periplasmic binding protein of the phosphonate (Pn) uptake and utilization pathway. We have crystallized and determined structures of E. coli PhnD (EcPhnD) in the absence of ligand and in complex with the environmentally abundant 2-aminoethylphosphonate (2AEP). Similar to other bacterial periplasmic binding proteins, 2AEP binds near the center of mass of EcPhnD in a cleft formed between two lobes. Comparison of the open, unliganded structure with the closed 2AEP-bound structure shows that the two lobes pivot around a hinge by {approx}70{sup o} between the two states. Extensive hydrogen bonding and electrostatic interactions stabilize 2AEP, which binds to EcPhnD with low nanomolar affinity. These structures provide insight into Pn uptake by bacteria and facilitated the rational design of high signal-to-noise Pn biosensors based on both coupled small-molecule dyes and autocatalytic fluorescent proteins.

  14. Characterization of heat-shock proteins in Escherichia coli strains under thermal stress in vitro.

    PubMed

    Urban-Chmiel, Renata; Dec, Marta; Puchalski, Andrzej; Wernicki, Andrzej

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of heat stress in in vitro conditions on the induction of heat-shock protein (Hsp)70 by Escherichia coli cells, and to determine the localization of Hsps in cell fractions. The material consisted of wild strains of E. coli isolated from the digestive tract of calves, suspended in an exponential-phase culture and subjected to 41.5 °C for 2 h. Individual fractions were analysed by SDS-PAGE and two-dimensional electrophoresis. Western blotting with mouse anti-Hsp70 and anti-Hsp60 mAbs was used to identify the proteins. Electrophoretic analysis of the heat-treated cells detected Hsp70 in all three fractions, cytoplasmic, periplasmic and membrane, which was confirmed by Western blotting. The proteins obtained had diverse localizations in the pH gradient in two-dimensional electrophoresis, which may indicate changes in their conformation and physical properties leading to stabilization and protection of intracellular structures in stress conditions. The presence of these Hsps in different cell fractions indicates a very strong protective adaptation in the bacteria in unfavourable conditions, which is critical for the organism infected by them.

  15. Co-expression of ferrochelatase allows for complete heme incorporation into recombinant proteins produced in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Sudhamsu, Jawahar; Kabir, Mariam; Airola, Michael V; Patel, Bhumit A; Yeh, Syun-Ru; Rousseau, Denis L; Crane, Brian R

    2010-09-01

    Over-expression of heme binding proteins in Escherichia coli often results in sub-optimal heme incorporation and the amount of heme-bound protein produced usually varies with the protein of interest. Complete heme incorporation is important for biochemical characterization, spectroscopy, structural studies, and for the production of homogeneous commercial proteins with high activity. We have determined that recombinant proteins expressed in E. coli often contain less than a full complement of heme because they rather are partially incorporated with free-base porphyrin. Porphyrin-incorporated proteins have similar spectral characteristics as the desired heme-loaded targets, and thus are difficult to detect, even in purified samples. We present a straightforward and inexpensive solution to this problem that involves the co-expression of native ferrochelatase with the protein of interest. The method is shown to be effective for proteins that contain either Cys- or His-ligated hemes.

  16. Use of polymeric membranes for purification of an E. coli expressed biotherapeutic protein.

    PubMed

    Muthukumar, S; Rathore, Anurag S

    2016-01-01

    Polymers have had a significant impact on the field of bioseparations in the past few decades. Most recently, membrane chromatography has emerged as an efficient alternative to the conventional packed-bed chromatography by eliminating the diffusion-related limitations associated with the traditional resin beads. In this article, we examine six membrane adsorbers for purification of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (GCSF), an Escherichia coli-based biotherapeutic. These adsorbers differ either in their base matrix or in the surface chemistry. The role of interactions between the filter surfaces and the protein molecules in effecting these separations is the focus of the article.

  17. Engineering formation of multiple recombinant Eut protein nanocompartments in E. coli

    PubMed Central

    Held, Mark; Kolb, Alexander; Perdue, Sarah; Hsu, Szu-Yi; Bloch, Sarah E.; Quin, Maureen B.; Schmidt-Dannert, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Compartmentalization of designed metabolic pathways within protein based nanocompartments has the potential to increase reaction efficiency in multi-step biosynthetic reactions. We previously demonstrated proof-of-concept of this aim by targeting a functional enzyme to single cellular protein nanocompartments, which were formed upon recombinant expression of the Salmonella enterica LT2 ethanolamine utilization bacterial microcompartment shell proteins EutS or EutSMNLK in Escherichia coli. To optimize this system, increasing overall encapsulated enzyme reaction efficiency, factor(s) required for the production of more than one nanocompartment per cell must be identified. In this work we report that the cupin domain protein EutQ is required for assembly of more than one nanocompartment per cell. Overexpression of EutQ results in multiple nanocompartment assembly in our recombinant system. EutQ specifically interacts with the shell protein EutM in vitro via electrostatic interactions with the putative cytosolic face of EutM. These findings lead to the theory that EutQ could facilitate multiple nanocompartment biogenesis by serving as an assembly hub for shell proteins. This work offers insights into the biogenesis of Eut bacterial microcompartments, and also provides an improved platform for the production of protein based nanocompartments for targeted encapsulation of enzyme pathways. PMID:27063436

  18. Comparative expression study to increase the solubility of cold adapted Vibrio proteins in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Niiranen, Laila; Espelid, Sigrun; Karlsen, Christian R; Mustonen, Milla; Paulsen, Steinar M; Heikinheimo, Pirkko; Willassen, Nils P

    2007-03-01

    Functional and structural studies require gene overexpression and purification of soluble proteins. We wanted to express proteins from the psychrophilic bacterium Vibrio salmonicida in Escherichia coli, but encountered solubility problems. To improve the solubility of the proteins, we compared the effects of six N-terminal fusion proteins (Gb1, Z, thioredoxin, GST, MBP and NusA) and an N-terminal His6-tag. The selected test set included five proteins from the fish pathogen V. salmonicida and two related products from the mesophilic human pathogen Vibrio cholerae. We tested the expression in two different expression strains and at three different temperatures (16, 23 and 37 degrees C). His6-tag was the least effective tag, and these vector constructs were also difficult to transform. MBP and NusA performed best, expressing soluble proteins with all fusion partners in at least one of the cell types. In some cases MBP, GST and thioredoxin fusions resulted in products of incorrect size. The effect of temperature is complex: in most cases level of expression increased with temperature, whereas the effect on solubility was opposite. We found no clear connection between the preferred expression temperature of the protein and the temperature of the original host organism's natural habitat.

  19. Proteolytic activity of the plum pox potyvirus NIa-like protein in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    García, J A; Riechmann, J L; Laín, S

    1989-06-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the small nuclear inclusion protein (NIa)-like cistron of plum pox potyvirus (PPV) has been determined. Viral proteolytic activity was expressed in Escherichia coli cells harboring plasmids with a PPV cDNA insert approximately 7000 nt long. Free PPV capsid protein was detected in these cells, but it was not produced when a mutation was introduced in the PPV cDNA insert which induced a Gln to Pro substitution at the large nuclear inclusion protein (NIb)-capsid protein junction. By mutational analysis, the NIa-like protein was determined to be responsible for the proteolytic activity. A Gln to Ser substitution at the presumed NIa-NIb junction, which inhibited proteolytic processing at the carboxyl end of the protease, had no effect on proteolytic cleavage at the NIb-capsid protein junction. In contrast with the high efficiency of proteolytic processing at the NIb-capsid protein cleavage site, processing at the ends of the PPV protease was not complete, suggesting that the PPV polyprotein, like that of other potyviruses, contains cleavage sites with different properties.

  20. GroEL-GroES assisted folding of multiple recombinant proteins simultaneously over-expressed in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Megha; Chaudhuri, Tapan K

    2015-07-01

    Folding of aggregation prone recombinant proteins through co-expression of chaperonin GroEL and GroES has been a popular practice in the effort to optimize preparation of functional protein in Escherichia coli. Considering the demand for functional recombinant protein products, it is desirable to apply the chaperone assisted protein folding strategy for enhancing the yield of properly folded protein. Toward the same direction, it is also worth attempting folding of multiple recombinant proteins simultaneously over-expressed in E. coli through the assistance of co-expressed GroEL-ES. The genesis of this thinking was originated from the fact that cellular GroEL and GroES assist in the folding of several endogenous proteins expressed in the bacterial cell. Here we present the experimental findings from our study on co-expressed GroEL-GroES assisted folding of simultaneously over-expressed proteins maltodextrin glucosidase (MalZ) and yeast mitochondrial aconitase (mAco). Both proteins mentioned here are relatively larger and aggregation prone, mostly form inclusion bodies, and undergo GroEL-ES assisted folding in E. coli cells during over-expression. It has been reported that the relative yield of properly folded functional forms of MalZ and mAco with the exogenous GroEL-ES assistance were comparable with the results when these proteins were overexpressed alone. This observation is quite promising and highlights the fact that GroEL and GroES can assist in the folding of multiple substrate proteins simultaneously when over-expressed in E. coli. This method might be a potential tool for enhanced production of multiple functional recombinant proteins simultaneously in E. coli.

  1. In vitro expression of Escherichia coli ribosomal protein genes: autogenous inhibition of translation.

    PubMed Central

    Yates, J L; Arfsten, A E; Nomura, M

    1980-01-01

    Escherichia coli ribosomal protein L1 (0.5 micro M) was found to inhibit the synthesis of both proteins of the L11 operon, L11 and L1, but not the synthesis of other proteins directed by lambda rifd 18 DNA. Similarly, S4 (1 micro M) selectively inhibited the synthesis of three proteins of the alpha operon, S13, S11, and S4, directed by lambda spcI DNA or a restriction enzyme fragment obtained from this DNA. S8 (3.6 micro M) also showed preferential inhibitory effects on the synthesis of some proteins encoded in the spc operon, L24 and L5 (and probably S14 and S8), directed by lambda spcl DNA or a restriction enzyme fragment carrying the genes for these proteins. The inhibitory effect of L1 was observed only with L1 and not with other proteins examined, including S4 and S8. Similarly, the effect of S4 was not observed with L1 or S8, and that of S8 was not seen with L1 or S4. Inhibition was shown to take place at the level of translation rather than transcription. Thus, at least some ribosomal proteins (L1 S4, and S8) have the ability to cause selective translational inhibition of the synthesis of certain ribosomal proteins whose genes are in the same operon as their own. These results support the hypothesis that certain free ribosomal proteins not assembled into ribosomes act as "autogenous" feedback inhibitors to regulate the synthesis of ribosomal proteins. Images PMID:6445562

  2. A PagP fusion protein system for the expression of intrinsically disordered proteins in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Peter M; Pan, Jonathan S; Sykes, Brian D

    2012-09-01

    PagP, a beta-barrel membrane protein found in Gram-negative bacteria, expresses robustly in inclusion bodies when its signal sequence is removed. We have developed a new fusion protein expression system based on PagP and demonstrated its utility in the expression of the unstructured N-terminal region of human cardiac troponin I (residues 1-71). A yield of 100mg fusion protein per liter M9 minimal media was obtained. The troponin I fragment was removed from PagP using cyanogen bromide cleavage at methionine residues followed by nickel affinity chromatography. We further demonstrate that optimal cleavage requires complete reduction of methionine residues prior to cyanogen bromide treatment, and this is effectively accomplished using potassium iodide under acidic conditions. The PagP-based fusion protein system is more effective at targeting proteins into inclusion bodies than a commercially available system that uses ketosteroid isomerase; it thus represents an important advance for producing large quantities of unfolded peptides or proteins in Escherichia coli.

  3. Characterization of the regulon controlled by the leucine-responsive regulatory protein in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Ernsting, B R; Atkinson, M R; Ninfa, A J; Matthews, R G

    1992-01-01

    The leucine-responsive regulatory protein (Lrp) has been shown to regulate, either positively or negatively, the transcription of several Escherichia coli genes in response to leucine. We have used two-dimensional gel electrophoresis to analyze the patterns of polypeptide expression in isogenic lrp+ and lrp mutant strains in the presence or absence of leucine. The absence of a functional Lrp protein alters the expression of at least 30 polypeptides. The expression of the majority of these polypeptides is not affected by the presence or absence of 10 mM exogenous leucine. Outer membrane porins OmpC and OmpF, glutamine synthetase (GlnA), the small subunit of glutamate synthase (GltD), lysyl-tRNA synthetase form II (LysU), a high-affinity periplasmic binding protein specific for branched-chain amino acids (LivJ), W protein, and the enzymes of the pathway converting threonine to glycine, namely, threonine dehydrogenase (Tdh) and 2-amino-3-ketobutyrate coenzyme A ligase (Kbl), were identified as members of the Lrp regulon by electrophoretic analysis. We have shown that Lrp is a positive regulator of glutamate synthase and glutamine synthetase and that exogenous leucine has little or no effect on the expression of these proteins. In strains carrying a glnL deletion and in strains carrying the glnL2302 allele, which directs the synthesis of a GlnL protein that is constitutively active, expression of glutamine synthetase is no longer regulated by Lrp, demonstrating that the effect of Lrp on glutamine synthetase levels is indirect and requires an intact glnL gene. lrp::Tn10 strains grow poorly when arginine or ornithine is present as the sole nitrogen source in the medium. On the bases of present studies and previous research, we propose that Lrp is involved in the adaptation of E. coli cells to major shifts in environment, such as those which occur when E. coli leaves the intestinal tract of its animal host. Several genes required for amino acid and peptide transport and

  4. Comparative proteomic analysis of differentially expressed proteins in the earthworm Eisenia fetida during Escherichia coli O157:H7 stress.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xing; Chang, Li; Sun, Zhenjun; Zhang, Yufeng

    2010-12-03

    Escherichia coli O157:H7 is an intestine-inhabiting bacterium associated with many severe disease outbreaks worldwide. It may enter the soil environment with the excreta of infected animals (e.g., horses, cattle, chickens) and humans. Earthworms can protect themselves against invading pathogens because of their efficient innate defense system. Identification of differential proteomic responses to E. coli O157:H7 may provide a better understanding of the survival mechanisms of the earthworm Eisenia fetida that lives in E. coli O157:H7-polluted environments. Whole earthworm extracts, collected at days 7, 14, 21, and 28 after E. coli O157:H7 stress, were analyzed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and quantitative image analysis. In total, 124 proteins demonstrated significant regulation at least at one time point, and 52 proteins were identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-tandem time-of-flight mass spectrometry and database searching. Compared with control samples, 11 protein spots were up-regulated and 41 were down-regulated for at least one time point. The identified proteins, including heat shock protein 90, fibrinolytic protease 0, gelsolin-like protein, lombricine kinase, coelomic cytolytic factor-1, manganous superoxide dismutase, catalase, triosephosphate isomerase, extracellular globin-4, lysenin, intermediate filament protein, and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, are involved in several processes, including transcription, translation, the tricarboxylic acid cycle, and the glucose metabolic process. Thus, our study provides a functional profile of the E. coli O157:H7-responsive proteins in earthworms. We suggest that the variable levels and trends in these spots on the gel may be useful as biomarker profiles to investigate E. coli O157:H7 contamination levels in soils.

  5. L. plantarum prevents Enteroinvasive Escherichia coli-induced tight junction proteins changes in intestinal epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background It is increasingly recognized that Lactobacillus plantarum (L. plantarum) has the ability to protect against Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC)-induced damage of the epithelial monolayer barrier function by preventing changes in host cell morphology, attaching/effacing (A/E) lesion formation, monolayer resistance, and macromolecular permeability. However, the cellular mechanism involved in this protective effect still remained to be clarified. Methods This study was to investigate the effect of L. plantarum on the changes of Caco-2 cells responding to Enteroinvasive Escherichia coli (EIEC), the permeability of cell monolayer and the transmissivity of dextran, and the distribution and expression of the tight junction (TJ) proteins, such as Claudin-1, Occludin, JAM-1 and ZO-1 were examined when infected with EIEC or adhesived of L. plantarum after infection by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), immunohistochemistry and Western blotting, the cytoskeleton protein F-actin were observed with FITC-phalloidin. Results This study demonstrated that the transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) step down and dextran integrated intensity (DII) step up with time after infected with EIEC, but after treating with L. plantarum, the changes of TER and DII were improved as compared with EIEC group. L. plantarum prevented the damage of expression and rearrangement of Claudin-1, Occludin, JAM-1 and ZO-1 proteins induced by EIEC, and could ameliorate the injury of cytoskeleton protein F-actin infected with EIEC. Conclusion L. plantarum exerted a protective effect against the damage to integrity of Caco-2 monolayer cells and the structure and distribution of TJ proteins by EIEC infection. PMID:19331693

  6. Gut Commensal E. coli Proteins Activate Host Satiety Pathways following Nutrient-Induced Bacterial Growth.

    PubMed

    Breton, Jonathan; Tennoune, Naouel; Lucas, Nicolas; Francois, Marie; Legrand, Romain; Jacquemot, Justine; Goichon, Alexis; Guérin, Charlène; Peltier, Johann; Pestel-Caron, Martine; Chan, Philippe; Vaudry, David; do Rego, Jean-Claude; Liénard, Fabienne; Pénicaud, Luc; Fioramonti, Xavier; Ebenezer, Ivor S; Hökfelt, Tomas; Déchelotte, Pierre; Fetissov, Sergueï O

    2016-02-09

    The composition of gut microbiota has been associated with host metabolic phenotypes, but it is not known if gut bacteria may influence host appetite. Here we show that regular nutrient provision stabilizes exponential growth of E. coli, with the stationary phase occurring 20 min after nutrient supply accompanied by bacterial proteome changes, suggesting involvement of bacterial proteins in host satiety. Indeed, intestinal infusions of E. coli stationary phase proteins increased plasma PYY and their intraperitoneal injections suppressed acutely food intake and activated c-Fos in hypothalamic POMC neurons, while their repeated administrations reduced meal size. ClpB, a bacterial protein mimetic of α-MSH, was upregulated in the E. coli stationary phase, was detected in plasma proportional to ClpB DNA in feces, and stimulated firing rate of hypothalamic POMC neurons. Thus, these data show that bacterial proteins produced after nutrient-induced E. coli growth may signal meal termination. Furthermore, continuous exposure to E. coli proteins may influence long-term meal pattern.

  7. Mapping RNA-protein interactions in ribonuclease P from Escherichia coli using electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Gopalan, V; Kühne, H; Biswas, R; Li, H; Brudvig, G W; Altman, S

    1999-02-09

    Ribonuclease P (RNase P) is a catalytic ribonucleoprotein (RNP) essential for tRNA biosynthesis. In Escherichia coli, this RNP complex is composed of a catalytic RNA subunit, M1 RNA, and a protein cofactor, C5 protein. Using the sulfhydryl-specific reagent (1-oxyl-2,2,5, 5-tetramethyl-Delta3-pyrroline-3-methyl)methanethiosulfonate (MTSL), we have introduced a nitroxide spin label individually at six genetically engineered cysteine residues (i.e., positions 16, 21, 44, 54, 66, and 106) and the native cysteine residue (i.e., position 113) in C5 protein. The spin label covalently attached to any protein is sensitive to structural changes in its microenvironment. Therefore, we expected that if the spin label introduced at a particular position in C5 protein was present at the RNA-protein interface, the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrum of the spin label would be altered upon binding of the spin-labeled C5 protein to M1 RNA. The EPR spectra observed with the various MTSL-modified mutant derivatives of C5 protein indicate that the spin label attached to the protein at positions 16, 44, 54, 66, and 113 is immobilized to varying degrees upon addition of M1 RNA but not in the presence of a catalytically inactive, deletion derivative of M1 RNA. In contrast, the spin label attached to position 21 displays an increased mobility upon binding to M1 RNA. The results from this EPR spectroscopy-based approach together with those from earlier studies identify residues in C5 protein which are proximal to M1 RNA in the RNase P holoenzyme complex.

  8. Genetic selection system for improving recombinant membrane protein expression in E. coli

    PubMed Central

    Massey-Gendel, Elizabeth; Zhao, Anni; Boulting, Gabriella; Kim, Hye-Yeon; Balamotis, Michael A; Seligman, Len M; Nakamoto, Robert K; Bowie, James U

    2009-01-01

    A major barrier to the physical characterization and structure determination of membrane proteins is low yield in recombinant expression. To address this problem, we have designed a selection strategy to isolate mutant strains of Escherichia coli that improve the expression of a targeted membrane protein. In this method, the coding sequence of the membrane protein of interest is fused to a C-terminal selectable marker, so that the production of the selectable marker and survival on selective media is linked to expression of the targeted membrane protein. Thus, mutant strains with improved expression properties can be directly selected. We also introduce a rapid method for curing isolated strains of the plasmids used during the selection process, in which the plasmids are removed by in vivo digestion with the homing endonuclease I-CreI. We tested this selection system on a rhomboid family protein from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Rv1337) and were able to isolate mutants, which we call EXP strains, with up to 75-fold increased expression. The EXP strains also improve the expression of other membrane proteins that were not the target of selection, in one case roughly 90-fold. PMID:19165721

  9. High Level Expression and Purification of Recombinant Proteins from Escherichia coli with AK-TAG

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Dan; Wen, Caixia; Zhao, Rongchuan; Liu, Xinyu; Liu, Xinxin; Cui, Jingjing; Liang, Joshua G.; Liang, Peng

    2016-01-01

    Adenylate kinase (AK) from Escherichia coli was used as both solubility and affinity tag for recombinant protein production. When fused to the N-terminus of a target protein, an AK fusion protein could be expressed in soluble form and purified to near homogeneity in a single step from Blue-Sepherose via affinity elution with micromolar concentration of P1, P5- di (adenosine—5’) pentaphosphate (Ap5A), a transition-state substrate analog of AK. Unlike any other affinity tags, the level of a recombinant protein expression in soluble form and its yield of recovery during each purification step could be readily assessed by AK enzyme activity in near real time. Coupled to a His-Tag installed at the N-terminus and a thrombin cleavage site at the C terminus of AK, the streamlined method, here we dubbed AK-TAG, could also allow convenient expression and retrieval of a cleaved recombinant protein in high yield and purity via dual affinity purification steps. Thus AK-TAG is a new addition to the arsenal of existing affinity tags for recombinant protein expression and purification, and is particularly useful where soluble expression and high degree of purification are at stake. PMID:27214237

  10. Expression and the antigenicity of recombinant coat proteins of tungro viruses expressed in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Yee, Siew Fung; Chu, Chia Huay; Poili, Evenni; Sum, Magdline Sia Henry

    2017-02-01

    Rice tungro disease (RTD) is a recurring disease affecting rice farming especially in the South and Southeast Asia. The disease is commonly diagnosed by visual observation of the symptoms on diseased plants in paddy fields and by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). However, visual observation is unreliable and PCR can be costly. High-throughput as well as relatively cheap detection methods are important for RTD management for screening large number of samples. Due to this, detection by serological assays such as immunoblotting assays and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay are preferred. However, these serological assays are limited by lack of continuous supply of antibodies as reagents due to the difficulty in preparing sufficient purified virions as antigens. This study aimed to generate and evaluate the reactivity of the recombinant coat proteins of Rice tungro bacilliform virus (RTBV) and Rice tungro spherical virus (RTSV) as alternative antigens to generate antibodies. The genes encoding the coat proteins of both viruses, RTBV (CP), and RTSV (CP1, CP2 and CP3) were cloned and expressed as recombinant fusion proteins in Escherichia coli. All of the recombinant fusion proteins, with the exception of the recombinant fusion protein of the CP2 of RTSV, were reactive against our in-house anti-tungro rabbit serum. In conclusion, our study showed the potential use of the recombinant fusion coat proteins of the tungro viruses as alternative antigens for production of antibodies for diagnostic purposes.

  11. Ultrastructure of a periodic protein layer in the outer membrane of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    1977-01-01

    Matrix protein (36,500 daltons), one of the major polypeptides of the Escherichia coli cell envelope, is arranged in a periodic monolayer which covers the outer surface of the peptidoglycan. Although its association with the peptidoglycan layer is probably tight, the periodic structure of the peptidoglycan. Although its association with the peptidoglycan later is probably tight, the periodic structure is maintained in the absence of peptidoglycan, and is therefore based on strong protein-protein interactions. A detailed analysis of the ultrastructure of the matrix protein array by electron microscopy and image processing of specimens prepared by negative staining or by freeze-drying and shadowing shows that the molecules are arranged according to three fold symmetry on a hexagonal lattice whose repeat is 7.7 nm. The most pronounced feature of the unit cell, which probably contains three molecules of matrix protein, is a triplet of indentations, each approx. 2 nm in diameter, with a center-to-center spacing of 3nm. They are readily penetrated by stain and may represent channels which span the protein monolayer. PMID:319099

  12. The Escherichia coli Protein YfeX Functions as a Porphyrinogen Oxidase, Not a Heme Dechelatase

    PubMed Central

    Dailey, Harry A.; Septer, Alecia N.; Daugherty, Lauren; Thames, Daniel; Gerdes, Svetlana; Stabb, Eric V.; Dunn, Anne K.; Dailey, Tamara A.; Phillips, John D.

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT The protein YfeX from Escherichia coli has been proposed to be essential for the process of iron removal from heme by carrying out a dechelation of heme without cleavage of the porphyrin macrocycle. Since this proposed reaction is unique and would represent the first instance of the biological dechelation of heme, we undertook to characterize YfeX. Our data reveal that YfeX effectively decolorizes the dyes alizarin red and Cibacron blue F3GA and has peroxidase activity with pyrogallal but not guiacol. YfeX oxidizes protoporphyrinogen to protoporphyrin in vitro. However, we were unable to detect any dechelation of heme to free porphyrin with purified YfeX or in cellular extracts of E. coli overexpressing YfeX. Additionally, Vibrio fischeri, an organism that can utilize heme as an iron source when grown under iron limitation, is able to grow with heme as the sole source of iron when its YfeX homolog is absent. Plasmid-driven expression of YfeX in V. fischeri grown with heme did not result in accumulation of protoporphyrin. We propose that YfeX is a typical dye-decolorizing peroxidase (or DyP) and not a dechelatase. The protoporphyrin reported to accumulate when YfeX is overexpressed in E. coli likely arises from the intracellular oxidation of endogenously synthesized protoporphyrinogen and not from dechelation of exogenously supplied heme. Bioinformatic analysis of bacterial YfeX homologs does not identify any connection with iron acquisition but does suggest links to anaerobic-growth-related respiratory pathways. Additionally, some genes encoding homologs of YfeX have tight association with genes encoding a bacterial cytoplasmic encapsulating protein. PMID:22068980

  13. Reconstitution of Protein Translation of Mycobacterium Reveals Functional Conservation and Divergence with the Gram-Negative Bacterium Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Aashish; Asahara, Haruichi; Zhang, Meng; Zhang, Weijia; Liu, Haiying; Cui, Sheng; Jin, Qi; Chong, Shaorong

    2016-01-01

    Protein translation is essential for all bacteria pathogens. It has also been a major focus of structural and functional studies and an important target of antibiotics. Here we report our attempts to biochemically reconstitute mycobacterial protein translation in vitro from purified components. This mycobacterial translation system consists of individually purified recombinant translation factors from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis), purified tRNAs and ribosomes from Mycobacterium smegmatis (M. smegmatis), and an aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase (AARS) mixture from the cell-extract of M. smegmatis. We demonstrate that such mycobacterial translation system was efficient in in vitro protein synthesis, and enabled functional comparisons of translational components between the gram-positive Mycobacterium and the gram-negative E. coli. Although mycobacterial translation factors and ribosomes were highly compatible with their E. coli counterparts, M. smegmatis tRNAs were not properly charged by the E. coli AARSs to allow efficient translation of a reporter. In contrast, both E. coli and M. smegmatis tRNAs exhibited similar activity with the semi-purified M. smegmatis AARSs mixture for in vitro translation. We further demonstrated the use of both mycobacterial and E. coli translation systems as comparative in vitro assays for small-molecule antibiotics that target protein translation. While mycobacterial and E. coli translation were both inhibited at the same IC50 by the antibiotic spectinomycin, mycobacterial translation was preferentially inhibited by the antibiotic tetracycline, suggesting that there may be structural differences at the antibiotic binding sites between the ribosomes of Mycobacterium and E. coli. Our results illustrate an alternative approach for antibiotic discovery and functional studies of protein translation in mycobacteria and possibly other bacterial pathogens. PMID:27564552

  14. Soybean PM2 protein (LEA3) confers the tolerance of Escherichia coli and stabilization of enzyme activity under diverse stresses.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yun; Zheng, Yizhi; Zhang, Yuqin; Wang, Weimao; Li, Ranhui

    2010-05-01

    Late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins are closely associated with the tolerance of diverse stresses in organisms. To elucidate the function of group 3 LEA proteins, the soybean PM2 protein (LEA3) was expressed in E. coli and the protective function of the PM2 protein was assayed both in vivo and in vitro. The results of a spot assay and survival ratio demonstrated that the expression of the PM2 protein conferred the tolerance to the E. coli recombinant for different temperature conditions (4, -20 or 50 degrees C) or high-salinity stresses (120 mmol/l MgCl(2) or 120 mmol/l CaCl(2)). In addition, it was demonstrated that the in vitro addition of the PM2 protein could prevent the lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) inactivation normally induced by freeze-thaw. In the 62 degrees C condition, the PM2 protein (1:5 mass ratio to LDH) effectively prevented the LDH thermo-denaturation by acting synergistically with trehalose (62.5 microg/ml), although the PM2 protein alone at this concentration showed little protective effect on LDH activity. Furthermore, the results showed that the PM2 protein could partially prevent the thermo-denaturation of the bacterial proteome after boiling for 2 min. Based on these results, we propose that the PM2 protein itself, or together with trehalose, conferred the tolerance to the E. coli recombinant against diverse stresses by protecting proteins and enzyme activity under low- or high- temperature conditions.

  15. Maize rayado fino virus capsid proteins assemble into virus-like particles in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Hammond, Rosemarie W; Hammond, John

    2010-02-01

    Maize rayado fino virus (MRFV; genus Marafivirus; family Tymoviridae) is an isometric plant virus of 30 nm containing two components: empty shells and complete virus particles (encapsidating the 6.3 kb genomic RNA). Both particles are composed of two serologically related, carboxy co-terminal, coat proteins (CP) of apparent molecular mass 21-22 kDa (CP2) and 24-28 kDa (CP1) in a molar ratio of 3:1, respectively; CP1 contains a 37 amino acid amino terminal extension of CP2. In our study, expression of CP1 or CP2 in Escherichia coli resulted in assembly of each capsid protein into virus-like particles (VLPs), appearing in electron microscopy as stain-permeable (CP2) or stain-impermeable particles (CP1). CP1 VLPs encapsidated bacterial 16S ribosomal RNA, but not CP mRNA, while CP2 VLPs encapsidated neither CP mRNA nor 16S ribosomal RNA. Expression of CP1 and CP2 in E. coli using a co-expression vector resulted in the assembly of VLPs which were stain-impermeable and encapsidated CP mRNA. These results suggest that the N-terminal 37 amino acid residues of CP1, although not required for particle formation, may be involved in the assembly of complete virions and that the presence of both CP1 and CP2 in the particle is required for specific encapsidation of MRFV CP mRNA.

  16. The Escherichia Coli Hfq Protein: An Unattended DNA-Transactions Regulator

    PubMed Central

    Cech, Grzegorz M.; Szalewska-Pałasz, Agnieszka; Kubiak, Krzysztof; Malabirade, Antoine; Grange, Wilfried; Arluison, Veronique; Węgrzyn, Grzegorz

    2016-01-01

    The Hfq protein was discovered in Escherichia coli as a host factor for bacteriophage Qβ RNA replication. Subsequent studies indicated that Hfq is a pleiotropic regulator of bacterial gene expression. The regulatory role of Hfq is ascribed mainly to its function as an RNA-chaperone, facilitating interactions between bacterial non-coding RNA and its mRNA target. Thus, it modulates mRNA translation and stability. Nevertheless, Hfq is able to interact with DNA as well. Its role in the regulation of DNA-related processes has been demonstrated. In this mini-review, it is discussed how Hfq interacts with DNA and what is the role of this protein in regulation of DNA transactions. Particularly, Hfq has been demonstrated to be involved in the control of ColE1 plasmid DNA replication, transposition, and possibly also transcription. Possible mechanisms of these Hfq-mediated regulations are described and discussed. PMID:27517037

  17. The H-NS protein is involved in the biogenesis of flagella in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Bertin, P; Terao, E; Lee, E H; Lejeune, P; Colson, C; Danchin, A; Collatz, E

    1994-01-01

    The function of the flagellum-chemotaxis regulon requires the expression of many genes and is positively regulated by the cyclic AMP-catabolite activator protein (cAMP-CAP) complex. In this paper, we show that motile behavior was affected in Escherichia coli hns mutants. The loss of motility resulted from a complete lack of flagella. A decrease in the level of transcription of the flhD and fliA genes, which are both required for the synthesis of flagella, was observed in the presence of an hns mutation. Furthermore, the Fla- phenotype was not reversed to the wild type in the presence of a cfs mutation which renders the flagellum synthesis independent of the cAMP-CAP complex. These results suggest that the H-NS protein acts as a positive regulator of genes involved in the biogenesis of flagella by a mechanism independent of the cAMP-CAP pathway. Images PMID:8071234

  18. Iron regulated outer membrane proteins of Escherichia coli: variations in expression due to the chelator used to restrict the availability of iron.

    PubMed

    Chart, H; Buck, M; Stevenson, P; Griffiths, E

    1986-05-01

    Iron restriction was induced in Escherichia coli O 111, E. coli O 164 and E. coli C by growing the organisms in trypticase soy broth containing ovotransferrin, desferal, EDDA (ethylenediamine-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid) or alpha,alpha'-dipyridyl. There were marked qualitative and quantitative differences in the iron regulated outer membrane proteins expressed in the presence of the various iron chelators. Differences in the kinetics of growth were also noted. E. coli C was devoid of a ferric enterobactin iron uptake system.

  19. Guanine nucleotide binding properties of the mammalian RalA protein produced in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Frech, M; Schlichting, I; Wittinghofer, A; Chardin, P

    1990-04-15

    The simian ralA cDNA was inserted in a ptac expression vector, and high amounts of soluble ral protein were expressed in Escherichia coli. The purified p24ral contains 1 mol of bound nucleotide/mol of protein that can be exchanged against external nucleotide. The ral protein exchanges GDP with a t 1/2 of 90 min at 37 degrees C in the presence of Mg2+, and has a low GTPase activity (0.07 min-1 at 37 degrees C). We have also studied its affinity for various guanine nucleotides and analogs. NMR measurements show that the three-dimensional environment around the nucleotide is similar in p21ras and p24ral. In addition to these studies on the wild-type ral protein, we used in vitro mutagenesis to introduce substitutions corresponding to the Val12, Val12 + Thr59, and Leu61 substitutions of p21ras. These mutant ral proteins display altered nucleotide exchange kinetics and GTPase activities, however, the effects of the substitutions are less pronounced than in the ras proteins. p24ralVal12 + Thr59 autophosphorylates on the substituted Thr, as a side reaction of the GTP hydrolysis, but the rate is much lower than those of the Thr59 mutants of p21ras. These results show that ras and ral proteins have similar structures and biochemical properties. Significant differences are found, however, in the contribution of the Mg2+ ion to GDP binding, in the rate of the GTPase reaction and in the sensitivity of these two proteins to substitutions around the phosphate-binding site, suggesting that the various "small G-proteins" of the ras family perform different functions.

  20. Stop codon mutagenesis for homogenous expression of human papillomavirus L1 protein in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Wang, Daning; Fan, Fei; Li, Zhihai; Liu, Xinlin; Song, Shuo; Wei, Shuangping; He, Maozhou; Lin, Yahua; Li, Zhongyi; Wei, Minxi; Yu, Hai; Gu, Ying; Li, Shaowei; Xia, Ningshao

    2017-03-04

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is widely accepted to be the major causative pathogen of cervical cancer, warts, and other epithelial tumors. Virus infection and subsequent disease development can be prevented by vaccination with HPV vaccines derived from eukaryotic expression systems. Here, we report the soluble expression of the major capsid protein L1 of HPV31, a dominant carcinogenic HPV genotype, in Escherichia coli. HPV31 L1 protein and its elongated form (L1+) were observed in SDS-PAGE and CE-SDS analysis, generated by the native HPV31 L1 gene with a TAA stop codon. Replacing the TAA with TAG but not TGA could completely terminate protein translation. Mass spectrometry sequencing showed that L1+ comprised L1 with a C-terminal extension of 38 amino acids (aa). RNA folding analysis revealed that the unfaithful L1+ expression may result from translational read-through, as TAG is more stable and accessible than the other stop codons. The 38-aa elongated fragment perturbs self-assembly of HPV31 L1+, as shown in size and morphology analyses. By 3D cryo-electron microscopy structure determination, we show self-assembly of purified HPV31 L1 (TAG) VLPs into T = 7 icosahedral symmetry particles, resembling the native HPV virion. Finally, through additional characterization and antigenicity/immunogenicity assays, we verified that the E.coli-derived HPV31 VLPs are an ideal immunogen for HPV vaccine development. Our findings outline a codon optimization stratagem for protein expression and provide a method for the in-depth investigation of prokaryotic translation regulation.

  1. Crystal Structure of the Membrane Fusion Protein CusB from Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Chih-Chia; Yang, Feng; Long, Feng; Reyon, Deepak; Routh, Mathew D.; Kuo, Dennis W.; Mokhtari, Adam K.; Van Ornam, Jonathan D.; Rabe, Katherine L.; Hoy, Julie A.; Lee, Young Jin; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta R.; Yu, Edward W.

    2010-03-29

    Gram-negative bacteria, such as Escherichia coli, frequently utilize tripartite efflux complexes belonging to the resistance-nodulation-division family to expel diverse toxic compounds from the cell. These systems contain a periplasmic membrane fusion protein (MFP) that is critical for substrate transport. We here present the x-ray structures of the CusB MFP from the copper/silver efflux system of E. coli. This is the first structure of any MFPs associated with heavy-metal efflux transporters. CusB bridges the inner-membrane efflux pump CusA and outer-membrane channel CusC to mediate resistance to Cu{sup +} and Ag{sup +} ions. Two distinct structures of the elongated molecules of CusB were found in the asymmetric unit of a single crystal, which suggests the flexible nature of this protein. Each protomer of CusB can be divided into four different domains, whereby the first three domains are mostly {beta}-strands and the last domain adopts an entirely helical architecture. Unlike other known structures of MFPs, the {alpha}-helical domain of CusB is folded into a three-helix bundle. This three-helix bundle presumably interacts with the periplasmic domain of CusC. The N- and C-termini of CusB form the first {beta}-strand domain, which is found to interact with the periplasmic domain of the CusA efflux pump. Atomic details of how this efflux protein binds Cu{sup +} and Ag{sup +} were revealed by the crystals of the CusB-Cu(I) and CusB-Ag(I) complexes. The structures indicate that CusB consists of multiple binding sites for these metal ions. These findings reveal novel structural features of an MFP in the resistance-nodulation-division efflux system and provide direct evidence that this protein specifically interacts with transported substrates.

  2. Two distinct regions in the model protein Peb1 are critical for its heterologous transport out of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Escherichia coli is frequently the first-choice host organism in expression of heterologous recombinant proteins in basic research as well as in production of commercial, therapeutic polypeptides. Especially the secretion of proteins into the culture medium of E. coli is advantageous compared to intracellular production due to the ease in recovery of the recombinant protein. Since E. coli naturally is a poor secretor of proteins, a few strategies for optimization of extracellular secretion have been described. We have previously reported efficient secretion of the diagnostically interesting model protein Peb1 of Campylobacter jejuni into the growth medium of Escherichia coli strain MKS12 (ΔfliCfliD). To generate a more detailed understanding of the molecular mechanisms behind this interesting heterologous secretion system with biotechnological implications, we here analyzed further the transport of Peb1 in the E. coli host. Results When mature Peb1 was expressed without its SecA-YEG -dependent signal sequence and without the putative signal peptidase II recognition sequence in E. coli MKS111ΔHBB lacking the flagellar secretion complex, the protein was found in the periplasm and growth medium which indicated a flagellum-independent translocation. We assessed the Peb1 secretion proficiency by an exhaustive search for transport-affecting regions using a transposition-based scanning mutagenesis strategy. Strikingly, insertion mutagenesis of only two segments, called TAR1 (residues 42 and 43) and TAR2 (residues 173 to 180), prevented Peb1 secretion individually. We confirmed the importance of TAR regions by subsequent site-specific mutagenesis and verified that the secretion deficiency of Peb1 mutants was not due to insolubility or aggregation of the proteins in the cytoplasm. We found by cell fractionation that the mutant proteins were present in the periplasm as well as in the cytoplasm of MKS12. Hence, mutagenesis of TAR regions did not affect export of

  3. Understanding the relationship between the primary structure of proteins and its propensity to be soluble on overexpression in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Idicula-Thomas, Susan; Balaji, Petety V.

    2005-01-01

    Solubility of proteins on overexpression in Escherichia coli is a manifestation of the net effect of several sequence-dependent and sequence-independent factors. This study aims to delineate the relationship between the primary structure and solubility on overexpression. The amino acid sequences of proteins reported to be soluble or to form inclusion bodies on overexpression in E. coli under normal growth conditions were analyzed. The results show a positive correlation between thermostability and solubility of proteins, and an inverse correlation between the in vivo half-life of proteins and solubility. The amino acid (Asn, Thr, Tyr) composition and the tripeptide frequency of the protein were also found to influence its solubility on overexpression. The amino acids that were seen to be present in a comparatively higher frequency in inclusion body-forming proteins have a higher sheet propensity, whereas those that are seen more in soluble proteins have a higher helix propensity; this is indicative of a possible correlation between sheet propensity and inclusion body formation. Thus, the present analysis shows that thermostability, in vivo half-life, Asn, Thr, and Tyr content, and tripeptide composition of a protein are correlated to the propensity of a protein to be soluble on overexpression in E. coli. The precise mechanism by which these properties affect the solubility status of the overexpressed protein remains to be understood. PMID:15689506

  4. AraC protein contacts asymmetric sites in the Escherichia coli araFGH promoter.

    PubMed

    Lu, Y; Flaherty, C; Hendrickson, W

    1992-12-05

    AraC protein regulates the transcription of arabinose transport and catabolic operons in Escherichia coli through interaction with specific DNA sequences in the promoter regions of the operons. The interaction of AraC protein with two binding sites in the araFGH promoter was determined and compared to previously studied AraC binding sites in the araBAD promoter. Methylation and ethylation interference assays show that AraC protein binds along one side of the DNA to four adjacent major groove regions at each of the araFG1 and araFG2 sites. Mutations within any of the four regions of araFG1 greatly reduce protein binding in vitro. The promoter function in vivo is also greatly reduced, indicating that all four regions of the binding site are required. The chemical interference and genetic data, combined with the consensus sequence for AraC protein binding to ara promoters, support a binding motif in which two directly repeated units each span two adjacent turns of the DNA helix. The function of the two AraC binding sites was also examined. The proximal araFG1 site is required for promoter activation, whereas the distal araFG2 site has only a slight effect on the promoter activity.

  5. Production and characterization of neurosecretory protein GM using Escherichia coli and Chinese Hamster Ovary cells

    PubMed Central

    Masuda, Keiko; Furumitsu, Megumi; Taniuchi, Shusuke; Iwakoshi-Ukena, Eiko; Ukena, Kazuyoshi

    2015-01-01

    Neurosecretory protein GL (NPGL) and neurosecretory protein GM (NPGM) are paralogs recently discovered in birds and in mammals. The post-translational products of NPGL and of NPGM genes include a signal peptide sequence, a glycine amidation signal, and a dibasic amino acid cleavage site. This suggests that the mature forms of NPGL and of NPGM are small proteins secreted in the hypothalamus and containing an amidated C-terminus. However, endogenous NPGL and NPGM have not yet been identified. Chicken NPGL and NPGM have two highly conserved Cys residues that are likely to form a disulfide bond, while mammalian NPGM has one additional Cys residue located between the two conserved Cys residues and the correct disulfide bond pattern is unclear. In this study, we prepared rat NPGM to elucidate the structure of its mature form. We first expressed the predicted mature NPGM, containing an extra C-terminal Gly, in Escherichia coli SHuffle cells, which are engineered to promote the formation of native disulfide bridges in recombinant proteins. We observed the presence of a disulfide bond between the N-terminal Cys residue and the second Cys residue, while the C-terminal Cys residue was free. Secondly, we transfected a construct containing the entire NPGM open reading frame into Chinese Hamster Ovary cells, and observed that NPGM was cleaved immediately after the signal peptide and that it was secreted into the medium. Furthermore, the protein presented a disulfide bond at the same location observed in recombinant NPGM. PMID:26587371

  6. Periscope: quantitative prediction of soluble protein expression in the periplasm of Escherichia coli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Catherine Ching Han; Li, Chen; Webb, Geoffrey I.; Tey, Bengti; Song, Jiangning; Ramanan, Ramakrishnan Nagasundara

    2016-03-01

    Periplasmic expression of soluble proteins in Escherichia coli not only offers a much-simplified downstream purification process, but also enhances the probability of obtaining correctly folded and biologically active proteins. Different combinations of signal peptides and target proteins lead to different soluble protein expression levels, ranging from negligible to several grams per litre. Accurate algorithms for rational selection of promising candidates can serve as a powerful tool to complement with current trial-and-error approaches. Accordingly, proteomics studies can be conducted with greater efficiency and cost-effectiveness. Here, we developed a predictor with a two-stage architecture, to predict the real-valued expression level of target protein in the periplasm. The output of the first-stage support vector machine (SVM) classifier determines which second-stage support vector regression (SVR) classifier to be used. When tested on an independent test dataset, the predictor achieved an overall prediction accuracy of 78% and a Pearson’s correlation coefficient (PCC) of 0.77. We further illustrate the relative importance of various features with respect to different models. The results indicate that the occurrence of dipeptide glutamine and aspartic acid is the most important feature for the classification model. Finally, we provide access to the implemented predictor through the Periscope webserver, freely accessible at http://lightning.med.monash.edu/periscope/.

  7. Protein acetylation affects acetate metabolism, motility and acid stress response in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Castaño-Cerezo, Sara; Bernal, Vicente; Post, Harm; Fuhrer, Tobias; Cappadona, Salvatore; Sánchez-Díaz, Nerea C; Sauer, Uwe; Heck, Albert JR; Altelaar, AF Maarten; Cánovas, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Although protein acetylation is widely observed, it has been associated with few specific regulatory functions making it poorly understood. To interrogate its functionality, we analyzed the acetylome in Escherichia coli knockout mutants of cobB, the only known sirtuin-like deacetylase, and patZ, the best-known protein acetyltransferase. For four growth conditions, more than 2,000 unique acetylated peptides, belonging to 809 proteins, were identified and differentially quantified. Nearly 65% of these proteins are related to metabolism. The global activity of CobB contributes to the deacetylation of a large number of substrates and has a major impact on physiology. Apart from the regulation of acetyl-CoA synthetase, we found that CobB-controlled acetylation of isocitrate lyase contributes to the fine-tuning of the glyoxylate shunt. Acetylation of the transcription factor RcsB prevents DNA binding, activating flagella biosynthesis and motility, and increases acid stress susceptibility. Surprisingly, deletion of patZ increased acetylation in acetate cultures, which suggests that it regulates the levels of acetylating agents. The results presented offer new insights into functional roles of protein acetylation in metabolic fitness and global cell regulation. PMID:25518064

  8. Proteome analysis for the global proteins in the jejunum tissues of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli -infected piglets

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Wenkai; Yin, Jie; Chen, Shuai; Duan, Jielin; Liu, Gang; Li, Tiejun; Li, Nengzhang; Peng, Yuanyi; Tan, Bie; Yin, Yulong

    2016-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is a common cause of diarrhea in humans and livestock. In this study, isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) combined with multidimensional liquid chromatography (LC) and MS analysis was used for screening the differentially expressed proteins in piglet jejunum after ETEC infection. Totally 1,897 proteins were identified with quantitative information in piglet jejunum. We identified 92 differentially expressed proteins in ETEC-induced diarrhea, of which 30 were up regulated and 62 down regulated. Most of the differentially expressed proteins were involved in intestinal function of binding, metabolic process, catalytic activity and immune responses. The inhibition of intestinal immune responses in the jejunum in ETEC-induced diarrhea was also validated by immunobloting and RT-PCR. Our study is the first attempt to analyze the protein profile of ETEC-infected piglets by quantitative proteomics, and our findings could provide valuable information with respect to better understanding the host response to ETEC infection. PMID:27157636

  9. Periscope: quantitative prediction of soluble protein expression in the periplasm of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Catherine Ching Han; Li, Chen; Webb, Geoffrey I.; Tey, BengTi; Song, Jiangning; Ramanan, Ramakrishnan Nagasundara

    2016-01-01

    Periplasmic expression of soluble proteins in Escherichia coli not only offers a much-simplified downstream purification process, but also enhances the probability of obtaining correctly folded and biologically active proteins. Different combinations of signal peptides and target proteins lead to different soluble protein expression levels, ranging from negligible to several grams per litre. Accurate algorithms for rational selection of promising candidates can serve as a powerful tool to complement with current trial-and-error approaches. Accordingly, proteomics studies can be conducted with greater efficiency and cost-effectiveness. Here, we developed a predictor with a two-stage architecture, to predict the real-valued expression level of target protein in the periplasm. The output of the first-stage support vector machine (SVM) classifier determines which second-stage support vector regression (SVR) classifier to be used. When tested on an independent test dataset, the predictor achieved an overall prediction accuracy of 78% and a Pearson’s correlation coefficient (PCC) of 0.77. We further illustrate the relative importance of various features with respect to different models. The results indicate that the occurrence of dipeptide glutamine and aspartic acid is the most important feature for the classification model. Finally, we provide access to the implemented predictor through the Periscope webserver, freely accessible at http://lightning.med.monash.edu/periscope/. PMID:26931649

  10. Isolation and characterization of the E. coli membrane protein production strain Mutant56(DE3)

    PubMed Central

    Baumgarten, Thomas; Schlegel, Susan; Wagner, Samuel; Löw, Mirjam; Eriksson, Jonas; Bonde, Ida; Herrgård, Markus J.; Heipieper, Hermann J.; Nørholm, Morten H. H.; Slotboom, Dirk Jan; de Gier, Jan-Willem

    2017-01-01

    Membrane protein production is usually toxic to E. coli. However, using genetic screens strains can be isolated in which the toxicity of membrane protein production is reduced, thereby improving production yields. Best known examples are the C41(DE3) and C43(DE3) strains, which are both derived from the T7 RNA polymerase (P)-based BL21(DE3) protein production strain. In C41(DE3) and C43(DE3) mutations lowering t7rnap expression levels result in strongly reduced T7 RNAP accumulation levels. As a consequence membrane protein production stress is alleviated in the C41(DE3) and C43(DE3) strains, thereby increasing membrane protein yields. Here, we isolated Mutant56(DE3) from BL21(DE3) using a genetic screen designed to isolate BL21(DE3)-derived strains with mutations alleviating membrane protein production stress other than the ones in C41(DE3) and C43(DE3). The defining mutation of Mutant56(DE3) changes one amino acid in its T7 RNAP, which weakens the binding of the T7 RNAP to the T7 promoter governing target gene expression rather than lowering T7 RNAP levels. For most membrane proteins tested yields in Mutant56(DE3) were considerably higher than in C41(DE3) and C43(DE3). Thus, the isolation of Mutant56(DE3) shows that the evolution of BL21(DE3) can be promoted towards further enhanced membrane protein production. PMID:28338018

  11. Engineering the Controlled Assembly of Filamentous Injectisomes in E. coli K-12 for Protein Translocation into Mammalian Cells.

    PubMed

    Ruano-Gallego, David; Álvarez, Beatriz; Fernández, Luis Ángel

    2015-09-18

    Bacterial pathogens containing type III protein secretion systems (T3SS) assemble large needle-like protein complexes in the bacterial envelope, called injectisomes, for translocation of protein effectors into host cells. The application of these "molecular syringes" for the injection of proteins into mammalian cells is hindered by their structural and genomic complexity, requiring multiple polypeptides encoded along with effectors in various transcriptional units (TUs) with intricate regulation. In this work, we have rationally designed the controlled expression of the filamentous injectisomes found in enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) in the nonpathogenic strain E. coli K-12. All structural components of EPEC injectisomes, encoded in a genomic island called the locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE), were engineered in five TUs (eLEEs) excluding effectors, promoters and transcriptional regulators. These eLEEs were placed under the control of the IPTG-inducible promoter Ptac and integrated into specific chromosomal sites of E. coli K-12 using a marker-less strategy. The resulting strain, named synthetic injector E. coli (SIEC), assembles filamentous injectisomes similar to those in EPEC. SIEC injectisomes form pores in the host plasma membrane and are able to translocate T3-substrate proteins (e.g., translocated intimin receptor, Tir) into the cytoplasm of HeLa cells reproducing the phenotypes of intimate attachment and polymerization of actin-pedestals elicited by EPEC bacteria. Hence, SIEC strain allows the controlled expression of functional filamentous injectisomes for efficient translocation of proteins with T3S-signals into mammalian cells.

  12. Overexpression of transport proteins improves the production of 5-aminovalerate from l-lysine in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhong; Xu, Jing; Jiang, Tongtong; Ge, Yongsheng; Liu, Pan; Zhang, Manman; Su, Zhiguo; Gao, Chao; Ma, Cuiqing; Xu, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial transporters mediate the exchanges between intracellular and extracellular environments. Modification of transport route could be applied to speed up the metabolic reactions and promote the production of aimed compounds. Herein, lysine 2-monooxygenase (DavB) and δ-aminovaleramidase (DavA) were co-expressed in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) to produce nylon-5 monomer 5-aminovalerate from l-lysine. Then, PP2911 (4-aminobutyrate transporter in Pseudomonas putida) and LysP (the lysine specific permease in E. coli) were overexpressed to promote 5-aminovalerate production using whole cells of recombinant E. coli. The constructed E. coli strain overexpressing transport proteins exhibited good 5-aminovalerate production performance and might serve as a promising biocatalyst for 5-aminovalerate production from l-lysine. This strategy not only shows an efficient process for the production of nylon monomers but also might be used in production of other chemicals. PMID:27510748

  13. High saturated fatty acids proportion in Escherichia coli enhances the activity of ice-nucleation protein from Pantoea ananatis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Feifei; Liu, Xiping; Tao, Yong; Zhu, Kun

    2013-08-01

    The ice-nucleation protein (INP) from Pantoea ananatis was expressed in Escherichia coli. INP expression increased the freezing point of the E. coli culture by a few degrees. Deletion of FabH, an important enzyme in fatty acid biosynthesis, significantly inhibited the ice-nucleation activity. Increased unsaturated fatty acids in the fabH mutant cells decreased the ice-nucleation activity. Adding exogenous saturated fatty acids increased both E. coli fatty acid saturation and the ice-nucleation activity. In contrast, adding unsaturated fatty acids exhibited the opposite effects. Furthermore, an E. coli MG1655-fadR strain with high saturated fatty acids content was constructed, in which the INP activity was enhanced by about 17% compared with its activity in the wild-type MG1655 strain.

  14. Optimization of the Expression of DT386-BR2 Fusion Protein in Escherichia coli using Response Surface Methodology

    PubMed Central

    Shafiee, Fatemeh; Rabbani, Mohammad; Jahanian-Najafabadi, Ali

    2017-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to determine the best condition for the production of DT386-BR2 fusion protein, an immunotoxin consisting of catalytic and translocation domains of diphtheria toxin fused to BR2, a cancer specific cell penetrating peptide, for targeted eradication of cancer cells, in terms of the host, cultivation condition, and culture medium. Materials and Methods: Recombinant pET28a vector containing the codons optimized for the expression of the DT386-BR2 gene was transformed to different strains of Escherichia coli (E. coli BL21 DE3, E. coli Rosetta DE3 and E. coli Rosetta-gami 2 DE3), followed by the induction of expression using 1 mM IPTG. Then, the strain with the highest ability to produce recombinant protein was selected and used to determine the best expression condition using response surface methodology (RSM). Finally, the best culture medium was selected. Results: Densitometry analysis of sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of the expressed fusion protein showed that E. coli Rosetta DE3 produced the highest amounts of the recombinant fusion protein when quantified by 1 mg/ml bovine serum albumin (178.07 μg/ml). Results of RSM also showed the best condition for the production of the recombinant fusion protein was induction with 1 mM IPTG for 2 h at 37°C. Finally, it was established that terrific broth could produce higher amounts of the fusion protein when compared to other culture media. Conclusion: In this study, we expressed the recombinant DT386-BR2 fusion protein in large amounts by optimizing the expression host, cultivation condition, and culture medium. This fusion protein will be subjected to purification and evaluation of its cytotoxic effects in future studies. PMID:28349025

  15. Flagellar Cap Protein FliD Mediates Adherence of Atypical Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli to Enterocyte Microvilli

    PubMed Central

    Sampaio, Suely C. F.; Luiz, Wilson B.; Vieira, Mônica A. M.; Ferreira, Rita C. C.; Garcia, Bruna G.; Sinigaglia-Coimbra, Rita; Sampaio, Jorge L. M.; Ferreira, Luís C. S.

    2016-01-01

    The expression of flagella correlates with different aspects of bacterial pathogenicity, ranging from adherence to host cells to activation of inflammatory responses by the innate immune system. In the present study, we investigated the role of flagella in the adherence of an atypical enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (aEPEC) strain (serotype O51:H40) to human enterocytes. Accordingly, isogenic mutants deficient in flagellin (FliC), the flagellar structural subunit; the flagellar cap protein (FliD); or the MotAB proteins, involved in the control of flagellar motion, were generated and tested for binding to differentiated Caco-2 cells. Binding of the aEPEC strain to enterocytes was significantly impaired in strains with the fliC and fliD genes deleted, both of which could not form flagella on the bacterial surface. A nonmotile but flagellated MotAB mutant also showed impaired adhesion to Caco-2 cells. In accordance with these observations, adhesion of aEPEC strain 1711-4 to Caco-2 cells was drastically reduced after the treatment of Caco-2 cells with purified FliD. In addition, incubation of aEPEC bacteria with specific anti-FliD serum impaired binding to Caco-2 cells. Finally, incubation of Caco-2 cells with purified FliD, followed by immunolabeling, showed that the protein was specifically bound to the microvillus tips of differentiated Caco-2 cells. The aEPEC FliD or anti-FliD serum also reduced the adherence of prototype typical enteropathogenic, enterohemorrhagic, and enterotoxigenic E. coli strains to Caco-2 cells. In conclusion, our findings further strengthened the role of flagella in the adherence of aEPEC to human enterocytes and disclosed the relevant structural and functional involvement of FliD in the adhesion process. PMID:26831466

  16. Dimeric and Trimeric Fusion Proteins Generated with Fimbrial Adhesins of Uropathogenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Luna-Pineda, Víctor M; Reyes-Grajeda, Juan Pablo; Cruz-Córdova, Ariadnna; Saldaña-Ahuactzi, Zeus; Ochoa, Sara A; Maldonado-Bernal, Carmen; Cázares-Domínguez, Vicenta; Moreno-Fierros, Leticia; Arellano-Galindo, José; Hernández-Castro, Rigoberto; Xicohtencatl-Cortes, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality worldwide, and uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) is the main etiologic agent. Fimbriae assembled on the bacterial surface are essential for adhesion to the urinary tract epithelium. In this study, the FimH, CsgA, and PapG adhesins were fused to generate biomolecules for use as potential target vaccines against UTIs. The fusion protein design was generated using bioinformatics tools, and template fusion gene sequences were synthesized by GenScript in the following order fimH-csgA-papG-fimH-csgA (fcpfc) linked to the nucleotide sequence encoding the [EAAAK]5 peptide. Monomeric (fimH, csgA, and papG), dimeric (fimH-csgA), and trimeric (fimH-csgA-papG) genes were cloned into the pLATE31 expression vector and generated products of 1040, 539, 1139, 1442, and 2444 bp, respectively. Fusion protein expression in BL21 E. coli was induced with 1 mM IPTG, and His-tagged proteins were purified under denaturing conditions and refolded by dialysis using C-buffer. Coomassie blue-stained SDS-PAGE gels and Western blot analysis revealed bands of 29.5, 11.9, 33.9, 44.9, and 82.1 kDa, corresponding to FimH, CsgA, PapG, FC, and FCP proteins, respectively. Mass spectrometry analysis by MALDI-TOF/TOF revealed specific peptides that confirmed the fusion protein structures. Dynamic light scattering analysis revealed the polydispersed state of the fusion proteins. FimH, CsgA, and PapG stimulated the release of 372-398 pg/mL IL-6; interestingly, FC and FCP stimulated the release of 464.79 pg/mL (p ≤ 0.018) and 521.24 pg/mL (p ≤ 0.002) IL-6, respectively. In addition, FC and FCP stimulated the release of 398.52 pg/mL (p ≤ 0.001) and 450.40 pg/mL (p ≤ 0.002) IL-8, respectively. High levels of IgA and IgG antibodies in human sera reacted against the fusion proteins, and under identical conditions, low levels of IgA and IgG antibodies were detected in human urine. Rabbit polyclonal antibodies

  17. Dimeric and Trimeric Fusion Proteins Generated with Fimbrial Adhesins of Uropathogenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Luna-Pineda, Víctor M.; Reyes-Grajeda, Juan Pablo; Cruz-Córdova, Ariadnna; Saldaña-Ahuactzi, Zeus; Ochoa, Sara A.; Maldonado-Bernal, Carmen; Cázares-Domínguez, Vicenta; Moreno-Fierros, Leticia; Arellano-Galindo, José; Hernández-Castro, Rigoberto; Xicohtencatl-Cortes, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality worldwide, and uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) is the main etiologic agent. Fimbriae assembled on the bacterial surface are essential for adhesion to the urinary tract epithelium. In this study, the FimH, CsgA, and PapG adhesins were fused to generate biomolecules for use as potential target vaccines against UTIs. The fusion protein design was generated using bioinformatics tools, and template fusion gene sequences were synthesized by GenScript in the following order fimH-csgA-papG-fimH-csgA (fcpfc) linked to the nucleotide sequence encoding the [EAAAK]5 peptide. Monomeric (fimH, csgA, and papG), dimeric (fimH-csgA), and trimeric (fimH-csgA-papG) genes were cloned into the pLATE31 expression vector and generated products of 1040, 539, 1139, 1442, and 2444 bp, respectively. Fusion protein expression in BL21 E. coli was induced with 1 mM IPTG, and His-tagged proteins were purified under denaturing conditions and refolded by dialysis using C-buffer. Coomassie blue-stained SDS-PAGE gels and Western blot analysis revealed bands of 29.5, 11.9, 33.9, 44.9, and 82.1 kDa, corresponding to FimH, CsgA, PapG, FC, and FCP proteins, respectively. Mass spectrometry analysis by MALDI-TOF/TOF revealed specific peptides that confirmed the fusion protein structures. Dynamic light scattering analysis revealed the polydispersed state of the fusion proteins. FimH, CsgA, and PapG stimulated the release of 372–398 pg/mL IL-6; interestingly, FC and FCP stimulated the release of 464.79 pg/mL (p ≤ 0.018) and 521.24 pg/mL (p ≤ 0.002) IL-6, respectively. In addition, FC and FCP stimulated the release of 398.52 pg/mL (p ≤ 0.001) and 450.40 pg/mL (p ≤ 0.002) IL-8, respectively. High levels of IgA and IgG antibodies in human sera reacted against the fusion proteins, and under identical conditions, low levels of IgA and IgG antibodies were detected in human urine. Rabbit polyclonal antibodies

  18. Functional Heterogeneity of the UpaH Autotransporter Protein from Uropathogenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Allsopp, Luke P.; Beloin, Christophe; Moriel, Danilo Gomes; Totsika, Makrina; Ghigo, Jean-Marc

    2012-01-01

    Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) is responsible for the majority of urinary tract infections (UTI). To cause a UTI, UPEC must adhere to the epithelial cells of the urinary tract and overcome the shear flow forces of urine. This function is mediated primarily by fimbrial adhesins, which mediate specific attachment to host cell receptors. Another group of adhesins that contributes to UPEC-mediated UTI is autotransporter (AT) proteins. AT proteins possess a range of virulence properties, such as adherence, aggregation, invasion, and biofilm formation. One recently characterized AT protein of UPEC is UpaH, a large adhesin-involved-in-diffuse-adherence (AIDA-I)-type AT protein that contributes to biofilm formation and bladder colonization. In this study we characterized a series of naturally occurring variants of UpaH. We demonstrate that extensive sequence variation exists within the passenger-encoding domain of UpaH variants from different UPEC strains. This sequence variation is associated with functional heterogeneity with respect to the ability of UpaH to mediate biofilm formation. In contrast, all of the UpaH variants examined retained a conserved ability to mediate binding to extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. Bioinformatic analysis of the UpaH passenger domain identified a conserved region (UpaHCR) and a hydrophobic region (UpaHHR). Deletion of these domains reduced biofilm formation but not the binding to ECM proteins. Despite variation in the upaH sequence, the transcription of upaH was repressed by a conserved mechanism involving the global regulator H-NS, and mutation of the hns gene relieved this repression. Overall, our findings shed new light on the regulation and functions of the UpaH AT protein. PMID:22904291

  19. Properties of the periplasmic ModA molybdate-binding protein of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Rech, S; Wolin, C; Gunsalus, R P

    1996-02-02

    The modABCD operon, located at 17 min on the Escherichia coli chromosome, encodes the protein components of a high affinity molybdate uptake system. Sequence analysis of the modA gene (GenBank L34009) predicts that it encodes a periplasmic binding protein based on the presence of a leader-like sequence at its N terminus. To examine the properties of the ModA protein, the modA structural gene was overexpressed, and its product was purified. The ModA protein was localized to the periplasmic space of the cell, and it was released following a gentle osmotic shock. The N-terminal sequence of ModA confirmed that a leader region of 24 amino acids was removed upon export from the cell. The apparent size of ModA is 31.6 kDa as determined by gel sieve chromatography, whereas it is 22.5 kDa when examined by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. A ligand-dependent protein mobility shift assay was devised using a native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis protocol to examine binding of molybdate and other anions to the ModA periplasmic protein. Whereas molybdate and tungstate were bound with high affinity (approximately 5 microM), sulfate, chromate, selenate, phosphate, and chlorate did not bind even when tested at 2 mM. A UV spectral assay revealed apparent Kd values of binding for molybdate and tungstate of 3 and 7 microM, respectively. Strains defective in the modA gene were unable to transport molybdate unless high levels of the anion were supplied in the medium. Therefore the modA gene product is essential for high affinity molybdate uptake by the cell. Tungstate interference of molybdate acquisition by the cell is apparently due in part to the high affinity of the ModA protein for this anion.

  20. Conformational stability and domain coupling in D-glucose/D-galactose-binding protein from Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    The monomeric D-glucose/D-galactose-binding protein (GGBP) from Escherichia coli (Mr 33000) is a periplasmic protein that serves as a high-affinity receptor for the active transport and chemotaxis towards both sugars. The effect of D-glucose binding on the thermal unfolding of the GGBP protein at pH 7.0 has been measured by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), far-UV CD and intrinsic tryptophanyl residue fluorescence (Trp fluorescence). All three techniques reveal reversible, thermal transitions and a midpoint temperature (Tm) increase from 50 to 63 °C produced by 10 mM D-glucose. Both in the absence and presence of D-glucose a single asymmetric endotherm for GGBP is observed in DSC, although each endotherm consists of two transitions about 4 °C apart in Tm values. In the absence of D-glucose, the protein unfolding is best described by two non-ideal transitions, suggesting the presence of unfolding intermediates. In the presence of D-glucose protein, unfolding is more co-operative than in the absence of the ligand, and the experimental data are best fitted to a model that assumes two ideal (two-state) sequential transitions. Thus D-glucose binding changes the character of the GGBP protein folding/unfolding by linking the two domains such that protein unfolding becomes a cooperative, two two-state process. A KA′ value of 5.6×106 M−1 at 63 °C for D-glucose binding is estimated from DSC results. The domain with the lower stability in DSC measurements has been identified as the C-terminal domain of GGBP from thermally induced Trp fluorescence changes. PMID:15032747

  1. Structure and Function of the Escherichia coli Tol-Pal Stator Protein TolR*

    PubMed Central

    Wojdyla, Justyna A.; Cutts, Erin; Kaminska, Renata; Papadakos, Grigorios; Hopper, Jonathan T. S.; Stansfeld, Phillip J.; Staunton, David; Robinson, Carol V.; Kleanthous, Colin

    2015-01-01

    TolR is a 15-kDa inner membrane protein subunit of the Tol-Pal complex in Gram-negative bacteria, and its function is poorly understood. Tol-Pal is recruited to cell division sites where it is involved in maintaining the integrity of the outer membrane. TolR is related to MotB, the peptidoglycan (PG)-binding stator protein from the flagellum, suggesting it might serve a similar role in Tol-Pal. The only structure thus far reported for TolR is of the periplasmic domain from Haemophilus influenzae in which N- and C-terminal residues had been deleted (TolR(62–133), Escherichia coli numbering). H. influenzae TolR(62–133) is a symmetrical dimer with a large deep cleft at the dimer interface. Here, we present the 1.7-Å crystal structure of the intact periplasmic domain of E. coli TolR (TolR(36–142)). E. coli TolR(36–142) is also dimeric, but the architecture of the dimer is radically different from that of TolR(62–133) due to the intertwining of its N and C termini. TolR monomers are rotated ∼180° relative to each other as a result of this strand swapping, obliterating the putative PG-binding groove seen in TolR(62–133). We found that removal of the strand-swapped regions (TolR(60–133)) exposes cryptic PG binding activity that is absent in the full-length domain. We conclude that to function as a stator in the Tol-Pal complex dimeric TolR must undergo large scale structural remodeling reminiscent of that proposed for MotB, where the N- and C-terminal sequences unfold in order for the protein to both reach and bind the PG layer ∼90 Å away from the inner membrane. PMID:26354441

  2. Robustness of the Process of Nucleoid Exclusion of Protein Aggregates in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Neeli-Venkata, Ramakanth; Martikainen, Antti; Gupta, Abhishekh; Gonçalves, Nadia; Fonseca, Jose

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Escherichia coli segregates protein aggregates to the poles by nucleoid exclusion. Combined with cell divisions, this generates heterogeneous aggregate distributions in subsequent cell generations. We studied the robustness of this process with differing medium richness and antibiotics stress, which affect nucleoid size, using multimodal, time-lapse microscopy of live cells expressing both a fluorescently tagged chaperone (IbpA), which identifies in vivo the location of aggregates, and HupA-mCherry, a fluorescent variant of a nucleoid-associated protein. We find that the relative sizes of the nucleoid's major and minor axes change widely, in a positively correlated fashion, with medium richness and antibiotic stress. The aggregate's distribution along the major cell axis also changes between conditions and in agreement with the nucleoid exclusion phenomenon. Consequently, the fraction of aggregates at the midcell region prior to cell division differs between conditions, which will affect the degree of asymmetries in the partitioning of aggregates between cells of future generations. Finally, from the location of the peak of anisotropy in the aggregate displacement distribution, the nucleoid relative size, and the spatiotemporal aggregate distribution, we find that the exclusion of detectable aggregates from midcell is most pronounced in cells with mid-sized nucleoids, which are most common under optimal conditions. We conclude that the aggregate management mechanisms of E. coli are significantly robust but are not immune to stresses due to the tangible effect that these have on nucleoid size. IMPORTANCE Escherichia coli segregates protein aggregates to the poles by nucleoid exclusion. From live single-cell microscopy studies of the robustness of this process to various stresses known to affect nucleoid size, we find that nucleoid size and aggregate preferential locations change concordantly between conditions. Also, the degree of influence of the nucleoid

  3. Escherichia coli Response to Uranyl Exposure at Low pH and Associated Protein Regulations

    PubMed Central

    Khemiri, Arbia; Carrière, Marie; Bremond, Nicolas; Ben Mlouka, Mohamed Amine; Coquet, Laurent; Llorens, Isabelle; Chapon, Virginie; Jouenne, Thierry; Cosette, Pascal; Berthomieu, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    Better understanding of uranyl toxicity in bacteria is necessary to optimize strains for bioremediation purposes or for using bacteria as biodetectors for bioavailable uranyl. In this study, after different steps of optimization, Escherichia colicells were exposed to uranyl at low pH to minimize uranyl precipitation and to increase its bioavailability. Bacteria were adapted to mid acidic pH before exposure to 50 or 80 µM uranyl acetate for two hours at pH≈3. To evaluate the impact of uranium, growth in these conditions were compared and the same rates of cells survival were observed in control and uranyl exposed cultures. Additionally, this impact was analyzedby two-dimensional differential gel electrophoresis proteomics to discover protein actors specifically present or accumulated in contact with uranium.Exposure to uranium resulted in differential accumulation of proteins associated with oxidative stress and in the accumulation of the NADH/quinone oxidoreductase WrbA. This FMN dependent protein performs obligate two-electron reduction of quinones, and may be involved in cells response to oxidative stress. Interestingly, this WrbA protein presents similarities with the chromate reductase from E. coli, which was shown to reduce uranyl in vitro. PMID:24587082

  4. Recombinant expression and purification of heparin binding proteins: midkine and pleiotrophin from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Singh, Priyo K; Srivastava, Vivek

    2012-10-01

    Midkine (MDK) and Pleiotrophin (PTN) belong to a class of heparin-binding growth factors and are highly expressed in a number of cancers. Bioactive and recombinant MDK and PTN are critical reagent for cancer drug discovery studies. MDK and PTN belong to a newly evolving family of secreted neurotrophic and developmentally regulated heparin-binding molecules. PTN is related to MDK with 45% sequence identity and both proteins have been shown to be involved in promoting neurite outgrowth. MDK is a cysteine-rich 13kDa protein containing five disulfide bonds and PTN is 19kDa protein containing ten disulphide bonds. In this study, we expressed recombinant human MDK (rhMDK), mouse MDK (rmMDK) and human pleiotrophin (rhPTN) in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3)pLysS strain. Soluble rhMDK, rmMDK and rhPTN were expressed at a high-level in this strain and the protein was purified (∼90%) by a one-step purification using heparin affinity chromatography. A total of 4mg purified MDK and 7mg of purified PTN were obtained with the overall yield from 1L of bacterial culture. Activity of purified rhMDK and rhPTN was confirmed by a cell proliferation assay using NIH3T3 cells.

  5. Identification of Escherichia coli F4ac-binding proteins in porcine milk fat globule membrane.

    PubMed

    Novakovic, Predrag; Huang, Yanyun Y; Lockerbie, Betty; Shahriar, Farshid; Kelly, John; Gordon, John R; Middleton, Dorothy M; Loewen, Matthew E; Kidney, Beverly A; Simko, Elemir

    2015-04-01

    F4ac-positive enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) must attach to the intestinal mucosa to cause diarrhea in piglets. Prevention of bacterial attachment to the intestinal mucosa is the most effective defense against ETEC-induced diarrhea. Porcine milk fat globule membranes (MFGM) were shown to be able to inhibit attachment of ETEC to the intestinal brush border; however, the specific components of porcine MFGM that inhibited attachment of ETEC to enterocytes were not identified. Accordingly, the purpose of this study was to identify F4ac-binding MFGM proteins by overlay Western blot and affinity chromatography. The proteome of porcine MFGM was characterized and the following F4ac-binding proteins were detected by overlay Western blot and affinity chromatography: lactadherin, butyrophilin, adipophilin, acyl-CoA synthetase 3, and fatty acid-binding protein 3. The biological function of these proteins was not investigated but it is possible that their interaction with F4ac fimbria interferes with bacterial attachment and colonization.

  6. Production of Polyclonal Antibody against Grapevine fanleaf virus Movement Protein Expressed in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Koolivand, Davoud; Bashir, Nemat Sokhandan; Behjatnia, Seyed Aliakbar; Joozani, Raziallah Jafari

    2016-01-01

    The genomic region of Grapevine fanleaf virus (GFLV) encoding the movement protein (MP) was cloned into pET21a and transformed into Escherichia coli strain BL21 (DE3) to express the protein. Induction was made with a wide range of isopropyl-β-D-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG) concentrations (1, 1.5, and 2 mM) each for duration of 4, 6, or 16 h. However, the highest expression level was achieved with 1 mM IPTG for 4 h. Identity of the expressed protein was confirmed by sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) followed by Western blotting. The expressed 41 kDa protein was purified under denaturing condition by affinity chromatography, reconfirmed by Western blotting and plate-trapped antigen enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (PTA-ELISA) before being used as a recombinant antigen to raise polyclonal antibodies in rabbits. Purified anti-GFLV MP immunoglobulines (IgGs) and conjugated IgGs detected the expressed MP and GFLV virions in infected grapevines when used in PTA-ELISA, double antibody sandwich-ELISA, and Western blotting. This is the first report on the production of anti-GFLV MP polyclonal antibodies and application for the virus detection. PMID:27721695

  7. Characterization of the knob domain of the adenovirus type 5 fiber protein expressed in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Henry, L J; Xia, D; Wilke, M E; Deisenhofer, J; Gerard, R D

    1994-01-01

    The adenovirus fiber protein is used for attachment of the virus to a specific receptor on the cell surface. Structurally, the protein consists of a long, thin shaft that protrudes from the vertex of the virus capsid and terminates in a globular domain termed the knob. To verify that the knob is the domain which interacts with the cellular receptor, we have cloned and expressed the knob from adenovirus type 5 together with a single repeat of the shaft in Escherichia coli. The protein was purified by conventional chromatography and functionally characterized for its interaction with the adenovirus receptor. The recombinant knob domain bound about 4,700 sites per HeLa cell with an affinity of 3 x 10(9) M-1 and blocked adenovirus infection of human cells. Antibodies raised against the knob also blocked virus infection. By gel filtration and X-ray diffraction analysis of protein crystals, the knob was shown to consist of a homotrimer of 21-kDa subunits. The results confirm that the trimeric knob is the ligand for attachment to the adenovirus receptor. Images PMID:8035520

  8. Induction and function of the phage shock protein extracytoplasmic stress response in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Jovanovic, Goran; Lloyd, Louise J; Stumpf, Michael P H; Mayhew, Antony J; Buck, Martin

    2006-07-28

    The phage shock protein (Psp) F regulon response in Escherichia coli is thought to be induced by impaired inner membrane integrity and an associated decrease in proton motive force (pmf). Mechanisms by which the Psp system detects the stress signal and responds have so far remained undetermined. Here we demonstrate that PspA and PspG directly confront a variety of inducing stimuli by switching the cell to anaerobic respiration and fermentation and by down-regulating motility, thereby subtly adjusting and maintaining energy usage and pmf. Additionally, PspG controls iron usage. We show that the Psp-inducing protein IV secretin stress, in the absence of Psp proteins, decreases the pmf in an ArcB-dependent manner and that ArcB is required for amplifying and transducing the stress signal to the PspF regulon. The requirement of the ArcB signal transduction protein for induction of psp provides clear evidence for a direct link between the physiological redox state of the cell, the electron transport chain, and induction of the Psp response. Under normal growth conditions PspA and PspD control the level of activity of ArcB/ArcA system that senses the redox/metabolic state of the cell, whereas under stress conditions PspA, PspD, and PspG deliver their effector functions at least in part by activating ArcB/ArcA through positive feedback.

  9. Comparison of two codon optimization strategies to enhance recombinant protein production in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Variations in codon usage between species are one of the major causes affecting recombinant protein expression levels, with a significant impact on the economy of industrial enzyme production processes. The use of codon-optimized genes may overcome this problem. However, designing a gene for optimal expression requires choosing from a vast number of possible DNA sequences and different codon optimization methods have been used in the past decade. Here, a comparative study of the two most common methods is presented using calf prochymosin as a model. Results Seven sequences encoding calf prochymosin have been designed, two using the "one amino acid-one codon" method and five using a "codon randomization" strategy. When expressed in Escherichia coli, the variants optimized by the codon randomization approach produced significantly more proteins than the native sequence including one gene that produced an increase of 70% in the amount of prochymosin accumulated. On the other hand, no significant improvement in protein expression was observed for the variants designed with the one amino acid-one codon method. The use of codon-optimized sequences did not affect the quality of the recovered inclusion bodies. Conclusions The results obtained in this study indicate that the codon randomization method is a superior strategy for codon optimization. A significant improvement in protein expression was obtained for the largely established process of chymosin production, showing the power of this strategy to reduce production costs of industrial enzymes in microbial hosts. PMID:21371320

  10. Calcium chloride made E. coli competent for uptake of extraneous DNA through overproduction of OmpC protein.

    PubMed

    Aich, Pulakesh; Patra, Monobesh; Chatterjee, Arijit Kumar; Roy, Sourav Singha; Basu, Tarakdas

    2012-06-01

    In the standard method of transformation of Escherichia coli with extraneous DNA, cells are made competent for DNA uptake by incubating in ice-cold 100 mM CaCl(2). Analysis of the whole protein profile of CaCl(2)-treated E. coli cells by the techniques of one- and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, MALDI-MS and immunoprecipitation revealed overproduction of outer membrane proteins OmpC, OmpA and heat-shock protein GroEL. In parity, transformation efficiency of E. coli ompC mutant by plasmid pUC19 DNA was found to be about 40 % lower than that of the wild type strain. Moreover, in E. coli cells containing groEL-bearing plasmid, induction of GroEL caused simultaneous overproduction of OmpC. On the other hand, less OmpC was synthesized in E. coli groEL mutant compared to its wild type counterpart, by CaCl(2)-shock. From these results it can be suggested that in the process of CaCl(2)-mediated generation of competence, the heat-shock chaperone GroEL has specific role in DNA entry into the cell, possibly through the overproduced OmpC and OmpA porins.

  11. Effect of a 20-kilodalton protein from Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis on production of the CytA protein by Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Visick, J E; Whiteley, H R

    1991-01-01

    CytA, a 27-kDa cytolytic crystal protein of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis, is produced only at very low levels by recombinant Escherichia coli cells unless a 20-kDa B. thuringiensis subsp. israelensis protein is also present (K. M. McLean and H. R. Whiteley, J. Bacteriol. 169:1017-1023, 1987; L. F. Adams, J. E. Visick, and H. R. Whiteley, J. Bacteriol. 171:521-530, 1989). However, the data reported here demonstrate that the 20-kDa protein is not required for high-level CytA production in E. coli strains carrying mutations in rpoH, groEL, or dnaK, all of which affect the proteolytic ability of the cells. The 20-kDa protein also increases the amount of CryIVD (another B. thuringiensis subsp. israelensis crystal protein) and LacZX90 (a mutant of beta-galactosidase) made by E. coli. The latter phenomenon is attributable to an increase in the half-life of LacZX90, suggesting that the 20-kDa protein may stabilize this protein. The effect of the 20-kDa protein was also examined in vitro and in a T7 RNA polymerase expression system, and the possible significance of these results for the timing of proteolysis and of 20-kDa protein activity is discussed. Finally, the ability of a single antibody to coimmunoprecipitate CytA and the 20-kDa protein from E. coli extracts provides evidence for a protein-protein interaction that may be related to the mechanism of action of the 20-kDa protein. Images PMID:1900280

  12. Study of high density Escherichia coli fermentation for production of porcine somatotropin protein.

    PubMed

    Chang, L L; Hwang, L Y; Hwang, C F; Mou, D G

    1991-12-27

    Recombinant E. coli strains and culture conditions were studied for the fermentation expression of porcine somatotropin (PST) inclusion bodies under the control of a pL promoter. Our objective was to achieve high cell density together with a high level of recombinant protein expression. Improved fermentation conditions included oxygen enrichment, yeast extract (YE) effect, optimal specific growth to switch on gene expression, and feeding strategies. To maintain a low residual glucose concentration, a medium feed rate was controlled on a real-time basis by using cell density information estimated from on-line carbon dioxide monitoring of a fermentor's exhaust gas. The optimal specific growth rate required to initiate a temperature shift in our system was found to be around 0.2 hr-1. The cell density and PST expression level could reach 55 OD600 and 35%, respectively, after 16 hours of cultivation under optimal conditions by applying computer-controlled nutrient feed. In our recombinant host/vector system, the location of cl gene appears to affect gene expression under YE-supplemented and/or a high cell density culture condition. With cl gene placed on plasmid, our E. coli host no longer showed sensitivity toward YE in PST gene expression.

  13. Pore-forming Activity of the Escherichia coli Type III Secretion System Protein EspD*

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Abhishek; Caballero-Franco, Celia; Bakker, Dannika; Totten, Stephanie; Jardim, Armando

    2015-01-01

    Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli is a causative agent of gastrointestinal and diarrheal diseases. Pathogenesis associated with enterohemorrhagic E. coli involves direct delivery of virulence factors from the bacteria into epithelial cell cytosol via a syringe-like organelle known as the type III secretion system. The type III secretion system protein EspD is a critical factor required for formation of a translocation pore on the host cell membrane. Here, we show that recombinant EspD spontaneously integrates into large unilamellar vesicle (LUV) lipid bilayers; however, pore formation required incorporation of anionic phospholipids such as phosphatidylserine and an acidic pH. Leakage assays performed with fluorescent dextrans confirmed that EspD formed a structure with an inner diameter of ∼2.5 nm. Protease mapping indicated that the two transmembrane helical hairpin of EspD penetrated the lipid layer positioning the N- and C-terminal domains on the extralumenal surface of LUVs. Finally, a combination of glutaraldehyde cross-linking and rate zonal centrifugation suggested that EspD in LUV membranes forms an ∼280–320-kDa oligomeric structure consisting of ∼6–7 subunits. PMID:26324713

  14. Mutagenesis and functional selection protocols for directed evolution of proteins in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Troll, Chris; Alexander, David; Allen, Jennifer; Marquette, Jacob; Camps, Manel

    2011-03-16

    The efficient generation of genetic diversity represents an invaluable molecular tool that can be used to label DNA synthesis, to create unique molecular signatures, or to evolve proteins in the laboratory. Here, we present a protocol that allows the generation of large (>10(11)) mutant libraries for a given target sequence. This method is based on replication of a ColE1 plasmid encoding the desired sequence by a low-fidelity variant of DNA polymerase I (LF-Pol I). The target plasmid is transformed into a mutator strain of E. coli and plated on solid media, yielding between 0.2 and 1 mutations/kb, depending on the location of the target gene. Higher mutation frequencies are achieved by iterating this process of mutagenesis. Compared to alternative methods of mutagenesis, our protocol stands out for its simplicity, as no cloning or PCR are involved. Thus, our method is ideal for mutational labeling of plasmids or other Pol I templates or to explore large sections of sequence space for the evolution of activities not present in the original target. The tight spatial control that PCR or randomized oligonucleotide-based methods offer can also be achieved through subsequent cloning of specific sections of the library. Here we provide protocols showing how to create a random mutant library and how to establish drug-based selections in E. coli to identify mutants exhibiting new biochemical activities.

  15. Crystal structure analysis of c4763, a uropathogenic Escherichia coli-specific protein.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hun; Choi, Jongkeun; Kim, Doyoun; Kim, Kyeong Kyu

    2015-08-01

    Urinary-tract infections (UTIs), which are some of the most common infectious diseases in humans, can cause sepsis and death without proper treatment. Therefore, it is necessary to understand their pathogenicity for proper diagnosis and therapeutics. Uropathogenic Escherichia coli, the major causative agents of UTIs, contain several genes that are absent in nonpathogenic strains and are therefore considered to be relevant to UTI pathogenicity. c4763 is one of the uropathogenic E. coli-specific proteins, but its function is unknown. To investigate the function of c4763 and its possible role in UTI pathogenicity, its crystal structure was determined at a resolution of 1.45 Å by a multiple-wavelength anomalous diffraction method. c4763 is a homodimer with 129 residues in one subunit that contains a GGCT-like domain with five α-helices and seven β-strands. c4763 shows structural similarity to the C-terminal domain of allophanate hydrolase from Kluyveromyces lactis, which is involved in the degradation of urea. These results suggest that c4763 might be involved in the utilization of urea, which is necessary for bacterial survival in the urinary tract. Further biochemical and physiological investigation will elucidate its functional relevance in UTIs.

  16. Correlation between penicillin-binding protein 2 mutations and carbapenem resistance in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Yamachika, Shinichiro; Sugihara, Chika; Kamai, Yasuki; Yamashita, Makoto

    2013-03-01

    It is well known that carbapenem-resistant mutations in penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) are not observed in most Gram-negative bacteria under either clinical or experimental conditions. To understand the mechanisms involved in carbapenem resistance, this study constructed a mutS- and tolC-deficient Escherichia coli strain, which was expected to have elevated mutation frequencies and to lack drug efflux. Using this mutant, carbapenem-resistant strains with target mutations were successfully and efficiently isolated. The mutations T547I/A, M574I and G601D were identified in the PBP2 gene. Meropenem (MEPM)-resistant strains with the PBP2 T547I mutation showed fourfold increased resistance to 1-β-methyl-substituted carbapenems, such as doripenem, MEPM and biapenem, but not to non-substituted carbapenems such as imipenem and panipenem and other β-lactams. In addition, resistance resulting from the G601D mutation was limited to MEPM, whilst the M574I mutation conferred resistance to MEPM, imipenem and panipenem. This is the first report, to the best of our knowledge, that E. coli also has a carbapenem-resistance mechanism as a result of PBP2 mutations, and it provides insight into the resistance profiles of PBP2 mutations to carbapenems with and without the 1-β-methyl group.

  17. Production of disulfide bond-rich peptides by fusion expression using small transmembrane proteins of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ziwei; Lu, Ming; Ma, Yunqi; Kwag, Dong-Geon; Kim, Seo-Hyun; Park, Ji-Min; Nam, Bo-Hye; Kim, Young-Ok; An, Cheul-Min; Li, Huayue; Jung, Jee H; Park, Jang-Su

    2015-03-01

    Recombinant expression in Escherichia coli allows the simple, economical, and effective production of bioactive peptides. On the other hand, the production of native peptides, particularly those rich in disulfide bonds, is a major problem. Previous studies have reported that the use of carrier proteins for fusion expression can result in good peptide yields, but few are folded correctly. In this study, two transmembrane small proteins in E. coli, YoaJ and YkgR, which both orientate with their N-termini in cytoplasm and their C-termini in periplasm, were used for fusion expression. The recombinant production of two peptides, asteropsin A (ASPA) and β-defensin (BD), was induced in the periplasm of E. coli using a selected carrier protein. Both peptides were expressed at high levels, at yields of approximately 5-10 mg/L of culture. Mass spectrometry showed that the resulting peptide had the same molecular weight as their natural forms. After purification, single peaks were observed by reversed phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC), demonstrating the absence of isoforms. Furthermore, cytoplasmically expressed fusion proteins with a carrier at their C-termini did not contain disulfide bonds. This study provides new carrier proteins for fusion expression of disulfide bond-rich peptides in E. coli.

  18. Versatile signal peptide of Flavobacterium-originated organophosphorus hydrolase for efficient periplasmic translocation of heterologous proteins in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Kang, Dong Gyun; Seo, Jeong Hyun; Jo, Byung Hoon; Kim, Chang Sup; Choi, Suk Soon; Cha, Hyung Joon

    2016-07-08

    Organophosphorus hydrolase (OPH) from Flavobacterium species is a membrane-associated homodimeric metalloenzyme and has its own signal peptide in its N-terminus. We found that OPH was translocated into the periplasmic space when the original signal peptide-containing OPH was expressed in recombinant Escherichia coli even though its translocation efficiency was relatively low. To investigate the usability of this OPH signal peptide for periplasmic expression of heterologous proteins in an E. coli system, we employed green fluorescent protein (GFP) as a cytoplasmic folding reporter and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) as a periplasmic folding reporter. We found that the OPH signal peptide was able to use both twin-arginine translocation (Tat) and general secretory (Sec) machineries by switching translocation pathways according to the nature of target proteins in E. coli. These results might be due to the lack of Sec-avoidance sequence in the c-region and a moderate hydrophobicity of the OPH signal peptide. Interestingly, the OPH signal peptide considerably enhanced the translocation efficiencies for both GFP and ALP compared with commonly used TorA and PelB signal peptides that have Tat and Sec pathway dependences, respectively. Therefore, this OPH signal peptide could be successfully used in recombinant E. coli system for efficient periplasmic production of target protein regardless of the subcellular localization where functional folding of the protein occurs. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 32:848-854, 2016.

  19. Involvement of a periplasmic protein kinase in DNA strand break repair and homologous recombination in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Khairnar, Nivedita P; Kamble, Vidya A; Mangoli, Suhas H; Apte, Shree K; Misra, Hari S

    2007-07-01

    The involvement of signal transduction in the repair of radiation-induced damage to DNA has been known in eukaryotes but remains understudied in bacteria. This article for the first time demonstrates a role for the periplasmic lipoprotein (YfgL) with protein kinase activity transducing a signal for DNA strand break repair in Escherichia coli. Purified YfgL protein showed physical as well as functional interaction with pyrroloquinoline-quinone in solution and the protein kinase activity of YfgL was strongly stimulated in the presence of pyrroloquinoline-quinone. Transgenic E. coli cells producing Deinococcus radiodurans pyrroloquinoline-quinone synthase showed nearly four log cycle improvement in UVC dark survival and 10-fold increases in gamma radiation resistance as compared with untransformed cells. Pyrroloquinoline-quinone enhanced the UV resistance of E. coli through the YfgL protein and required the active recombination repair proteins. The yfgL mutant showed higher sensitivity to UVC, mitomycin C and gamma radiation as compared with wild-type cells and showed a strong impairment in homologous DNA recombination. The mutant expressing an active YfgL in trans recovered the lost phenotypes to nearly wild-type levels. The results strongly suggest that the periplasmic phosphoquinolipoprotein kinase YfgL plays an important role in radiation-induced DNA strand break repair and homologous recombination in E. coli.

  20. Tailoring Escherichia coli for the l-Rhamnose PBAD Promoter-Based Production of Membrane and Secretory Proteins.

    PubMed

    Hjelm, Anna; Karyolaimos, Alexandros; Zhang, Zhe; Rujas, Edurne; Vikström, David; Slotboom, Dirk Jan; de Gier, Jan-Willem

    2017-03-03

    Membrane and secretory protein production in Escherichia coli requires precisely controlled production rates to avoid the deleterious saturation of their biogenesis pathways. On the basis of this requirement, the E. coli l-rhamnose PBAD promoter (PrhaBAD) is often used for membrane and secretory protein production since PrhaBAD is thought to regulate protein production rates in an l-rhamnose concentration-dependent manner. By monitoring protein production in real-time in E. coli wild-type and an l-rhamnose catabolism deficient mutant, we demonstrate that the l-rhamnose concentration-dependent tunability of PrhaBAD-mediated protein production is actually due to l-rhamnose consumption rather than regulating production rates. Using this information, a RhaT-mediated l-rhamnose transport and l-rhamnose catabolism deficient double mutant was constructed. We show that this mutant enables the regulation of PrhaBAD-based protein production rates in an l-rhamnose concentration-dependent manner and that this is critical to optimize membrane and secretory protein production yields. The high precision of protein production rates provided by the PrhaBAD promoter in an l-rhamnose transport and catabolism deficient background could also benefit other applications in synthetic biology.

  1. Expression of Plasmodium falciparum Circumsporozoite Proteins in Escherichia coli for Potential Use in a Human Malaria Vaccine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, James F.; Hockmeyer, Wayne T.; Gross, Mitchell; Ripley Ballou, W.; Wirtz, Robert A.; Trosper, James H.; Beaudoin, Richard L.; Hollingdale, Michael R.; Miller, Louis H.; Diggs, Carter L.; Rosenberg, Martin

    1985-05-01

    The circumsporozoite (CS) protein of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum may be the most promising target for the development of a malaria vaccine. In this study, proteins composed of 16, 32, or 48 tandem copies of a tetrapeptide repeating sequence found in the CS protein were efficiently expressed in the bacterium Escherichia coli. When injected into mice, these recombinant products resulted in the production of high titers of antibodies that reacted with the authentic CS protein on live sporozoites and blocked sporozoite invasion of human hepatoma cells in vitro. These CS protein derivatives are therefore candidates for a human malaria vaccine.

  2. Identification and relative quantification of proteins in Escherichia coli proteome by "up-front" collision-induced dissociation.

    PubMed

    Arike, Liisa; Nahku, Ranno; Borrisova, Maria; Adamberg, Kaarel; Vilu, Raivu

    2010-01-01

    A method for identifying and quantifying proteins with relatively low-cost orthogonal acceleration time-of- flight mass spectrometry (oa-ToF-MS) was tested. Escherichia coli (E. coli) K12 MG1655 cell lysate was separated by 1D gel-electrophoresis; fractions were digested and separated fast and reproducibly by ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC). Peptides were identified using oa-ToF-MS to measure exact masses of parent ions and the fragment ions generated by up-front collision-induced dissociation. Fragmentation of all compounds was achieved by rapidly cycling between high- and low values of energy applied to ions. More than 100 proteins from E. coli K12 proteome were identified and relatively quantified. Results were found to correlate with transcriptome data determined by DNA microarrays.

  3. Rapid Identification of Protein Biomarkers of E. coli O157:H7 by MALDI-TOF-TOF Mass Spectrometry and Top-Down Proteomics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We have identified six protein biomarkers from two strains of E. coli O157:H7 and one non-pathogenic E. coli strain by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) time-of-flight/time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry (TOF/TOF-MS/MS) and top-down proteomics. Mature, intact proteins were ext...

  4. Insights into the Structure and Assembly of Escherichia coli Outer Membrane Protein A

    PubMed Central

    Reusch, Rosetta N.

    2012-01-01

    Outer membrane protein A (OmpA) of Escherichia coli is a paradigm for the biogenesis of outer membrane proteins; however, the structure and assembly of OmpA have remained controversial. A review of studies to date supports the hypothesis that native OmpA is a single-domain large pore, while a two-domain narrow pore structure is a folding intermediate or minor conformer. The in vitro refolding of OmpA to the large pore conformation requires that the protein be isolated from outer membranes with an intact disulfide bond and then adequately incubated in lipids at temperatures ≥ 26 °C to overcome the high energy of activation for refolding. The in vivo maturation of the protein involves covalent modification of serines in the eighth β-barrel of the N-terminal domain by oligo-(R)-3-hydroxybutyrates as the protein is escorted across the cytoplasm by SecB for post-translational secretion across the SEC translocase in the inner membrane. After cleavage of the signal sequence, protein chaperones, such a Skp, DegP and SurA, guide OmpA across the periplasm to the BAM complex in the outer membrane. During this passage, a disulfide bond is formed between C290 and C302 by DsbA, and the hydrophobicity of segments of the C-terminal domain which are destined for incorporation as β-barrels in the outer membrane bilayer is increased by covalent attachment of oligo-(R)-3-hydroxybutyrates. With the aid of the BAM complex, OmpA is then assembled into the outer membrane as a single-domain large pore. PMID:22251410

  5. A long period grating-based platform for the detection of E. coli proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Queirós, R. B.; Gouveia, C.; Fernandes, J. R. A.; Marques, P. V. S.; Noronha, J. P.; Sales, M. G. F.; Jorge, P. A. S.

    2013-11-01

    A Long Period Grating (LPG)-based platform for the detection of E. coli outer membranes proteins (EcOMPs) is presented. The sensing probe is achieved by the functionalization of a LPG inscribed in a single mode fiber (SMF28) with a DNA-aptamer resulting in a label-free configuration capable of specific recognize EcOMPs in waters. Measurement takes place by tracking the variations induced in the resonance wavelength by the refractive index changes at the fiber surface (≈100 nm/RIU). The sensing head was characterized and tested against EcOMPs and applied to spiked environmental water samples. The sensor displayed logarithmic responses in the range of 0.1 nM to 10 nM EcOMPs and is regenerated (under low pH conditions) and the deviation of the subsequent detection was less than 0.1 %.

  6. Multiple sites of methylation in the methyl accepting chemotaxis proteins of Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Chelsky, D.; Dahlquist, F.W.

    1981-01-01

    The methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins (MCP) of E coli show at least five bands when subjected to SDS-gel electrophoresis. The intensity of the individual bands varies depending on the environment of the cells before solubilization. The faster migrating bands are enhanced following attractant stimulation, whereas the slower migrating bands are enhanced following attractant dilution or repellent increase. The time scale of these intensity changes is similar to that for adaptation of the behavioral response in these cells suggesting that methylation of the MCP is involved in producing these bands. Peptide mapping experiments show three methylated peptides in both MCP I and MCP II. These results suggest multiple sites of methylation, which are responsible, at least in part, for the observed multiple bands of the MCPs.

  7. Immobilized E. coli alkaline phosphatase. Its properties, stability, and utility in studying the dephosphorylation of proteins.

    PubMed

    Basheeruddin, K; Rothman, V; Margolis, S

    1985-04-01

    We have immobilized E. coli alkaline phosphatase (EC 3.1.3.1) by linking it covalently to sepharose 4B. This preparation has several advantages over the soluble enzyme. The immobilized enzyme is easily separable from other constituents in incubation mixtures. The immobilized enzyme can be reused repeatedly and is more stable than the soluble enzyme to heat treatment in the presence of 10 mM Mg2+. The insoluble and soluble phosphatases removed 75 and 77%, respectively, of the inorganic phosphorus from casein. The immobilized enzyme inactivated two enzymes believed to be active in the phosphorylated state, acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) by 39% and NADPH-cytochrome P-450 reductase by 89%. The utility of immobilized alkaline phosphatase for studying the phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of soluble or membrane-bound enzymes and proteins is discussed.

  8. The Crystal Structure of the Escherichia coli Autoinducer-2 Processing Protein LsrF

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz, Z.; Xavier, K; Miller, S

    2009-01-01

    Many bacteria produce and respond to the quorum sensing signal autoinducer-2 (AI-2). Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium are among the species with the lsr operon, an operon containing AI-2 transport and processing genes that are up regulated in response to AI-2. One of the Lsr proteins, LsrF, has been implicated in processing the phosphorylated form of AI-2. Here, we present the structure of LsrF, unliganded and in complex with two phospho-AI-2 analogues, ribose-5-phosphate and ribulose-5-phosphate. The crystal structure shows that LsrF is a decamer of (??)8-barrels that exhibit a previously unseen N-terminal domain swap and have high structural homology with aldolases that process phosphorylated sugars. Ligand binding sites and key catalytic residues are structurally conserved, strongly implicating LsrF as a class I aldolase.

  9. Assembly principles of a unique cage formed by hexameric and decameric E. coli proteins.

    PubMed

    Malet, Hélène; Liu, Kaiyin; El Bakkouri, Majida; Chan, Sze Wah Samuel; Effantin, Gregory; Bacia, Maria; Houry, Walid A; Gutsche, Irina

    2014-08-05

    A 3.3 MDa macromolecular cage between two Escherichia coli proteins with seemingly incompatible symmetries-the hexameric AAA+ ATPase RavA and the decameric inducible lysine decarboxylase LdcI-is reconstructed by cryo-electron microscopy to 11 Å resolution. Combined with a 7.5 Å resolution reconstruction of the minimal complex between LdcI and the LdcI-binding domain of RavA, and the previously solved crystal structures of the individual components, this work enables to build a reliable pseudoatomic model of this unusual architecture and to identify conformational rearrangements and specific elements essential for complex formation. The design of the cage created via lateral interactions between five RavA rings is unique for the diverse AAA+ ATPase superfamily.

  10. Soluble protein expression in E. coli cells using IgG-binding domain of protein A as a solubilizing partner in the cold induced system.

    PubMed

    Inouye, Satoshi; Sahara, Yuiko

    2008-11-21

    We constructed a cold induced expression vector in Escherichia coli cells that consists of a histidine tag sequence for nickel chelate affinity purification, IgG-binding domain of protein A (ZZ-domain) and the multiple cloning sites. The role of ZZ-domain as a solubilizing partner at 15 degrees C was demonstrated by expressing the imidazopyrazinone-type luciferases of Renilla, Oplophorus, Gaussia, and Vargula (Cypridina) as well as the calcium-binding photoproteins and firefly luciferase. The fused protein with ZZ-domain was expressed efficiently as a soluble form in the cytoplasm of E. coli cells at low temperature.

  11. Aspirin augments the expression of Adenomatous Polyposis Coli protein by suppression of IKKβ

    SciTech Connect

    Ashida, Noboru; Kishihata, Masako; Tien, Dat Nguyen; Kamei, Kaeko; Kimura, Takeshi; Yokode, Masayuki

    2014-04-04

    Highlights: • Clinical studies revealed aspirin inhibits cancer, but the mechanism is not known. • Adenomatous Polyposis Coli (APC) is a well-known tumor-suppressing gene. • We found aspirin up-regulates the protein of APC. • Aspirin suppressed the expression of IKKβ, an essential kinase in NFκB activation. • The deletion of IKKβ significantly increases the expression of APC protein. - Abstract: Aspirin has been widely used as analgesic, antipyretic and anti-inflammatory medicine for long. In addition to these traditional effects, clinical studies suggest that aspirin can protect against cancer, but its mechanism has not been explored. To unveil it, we identified the proteins up- or down-regulated after incubation with aspirin by using proteomics analysis with Nano-flow LC/MALDI-TOF system. Interestingly, the analysis identified the protein of Adenomatous Polyposis Coli (APC) as one of the most up-regulated protein. APC regulates cell proliferation or angiogenesis, and is widely known as a tumor-suppressing gene which can cause colorectal cancer when it is mutated. Western blots confirmed this result, and real-time PCR indicated it is transcriptionally regulated. We further tried to elucidate the molecular mechanism with focusing on IKKβ. IKKβ is the essential kinase in activation of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB), major transcriptional factors that regulate genes responsible for inflammation or immune response. Previous reports indicated that aspirin specifically inhibits IKKβ activity, and constitutively active form of IKKβ accelerates APC loss. We found that aspirin suppressed the expression of IKKβ, and the deletion of IKKβ by siRNA increases the expression of APC in HEK294 cells. Finally, we observed similar effects of aspirin in human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Taken together, these results reveal that aspirin up-regulates the expression of APC via the suppression of IKKβ. This can be a mechanism how aspirin prevents cancer at

  12. Characterization of the universal stress protein F from atypical enteropathogenic Escherichia coli and its prevalence in Enterobacteriaceae.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Cristiane S; Torres, Alfredo G; Caravelli, Andressa; Silva, Anderson; Polatto, Juliana M; Piazza, Roxane M F

    2016-12-01

    Atypical enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (aEPEC) are heterogeneous strains in terms of serotypes, adherence patterns and the presence of novel virulence factors. This heterogeneity is intriguing, promoting studies trying to characterize these novel proteins and to better comprehend this pathotype group. In a previous study analyzing low-molecular mass proteomes of four representative aEPEC strains of three different adhesion phenotypes, we classified proteins according to their annotated function, with most of them being involved in metabolism and transport; while some of them were classified as hypothetical proteins. The majority of the hypothetical proteins were homologue products of genes identified in the genome of enterohemorrhagic E. coli. One of the hypothetical proteins was annotated as Z2335, with orthologue in EPEC, and by bioinformatics analysis, this protein was revealed to be the universal stress protein F (UspF). Thus, herein we successfully obtained a recombinant UspF protein from aEPEC, which is a α/β, ATP-binding protein involved in stress response, with comparable protein production among the four studied strains, but showing noteworthy differences when cultivated in different stress conditions, also present in other enterobacterial species, such as Shigella sonnei and Citrobacter freundii. Furthermore, our results confirm that the Usp protein superfamily encompasses a conserved group of proteins involved in stress resistance in aEPEC and other Enterobacteriaceae.

  13. Characterization of the universal stress protein F from atypical enteropathogenic Escherichia coli and its prevalence in Enterobacteriaceae

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Cristiane S.; Torres, Alfredo G.; Caravelli, Andressa; Silva, Anderson; Polatto, Juliana M.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Atypical enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (aEPEC) are heterogeneous strains in terms of serotypes, adherence patterns and the presence of novel virulence factors. This heterogeneity is intriguing, promoting studies trying to characterize these novel proteins and to better comprehend this pathotype group. In a previous study analyzing low‐molecular mass proteomes of four representative aEPEC strains of three different adhesion phenotypes, we classified proteins according to their annotated function, with most of them being involved in metabolism and transport; while some of them were classified as hypothetical proteins. The majority of the hypothetical proteins were homologue products of genes identified in the genome of enterohemorrhagic E. coli. One of the hypothetical proteins was annotated as Z2335, with orthologue in EPEC, and by bioinformatics analysis, this protein was revealed to be the universal stress protein F (UspF). Thus, herein we successfully obtained a recombinant UspF protein from aEPEC, which is a α/β, ATP‐binding protein involved in stress response, with comparable protein production among the four studied strains, but showing noteworthy differences when cultivated in different stress conditions, also present in other enterobacterial species, such as Shigella sonnei and Citrobacter freundii. Furthermore, our results confirm that the Usp protein superfamily encompasses a conserved group of proteins involved in stress resistance in aEPEC and other Enterobacteriaceae. PMID:27616205

  14. Design of a covalently linked human interleukin-10 fusion protein and its secretory expression in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Guggenbichler, Florian; Büttner, Carolin; Rudolph, Wolfram; Zimmermann, Kurt; Gunzer, Florian; Pöhlmann, Christoph

    2016-12-01

    Wild-type human interleukin-10 (hIL-10) is a non-covalent homodimer with a short half-life, thus limiting its therapeutic applications in vivo. To avoid loss of function due to dimer dissociation, we designed a synthetic hIL-10 analog by bridging both monomers via a 15 amino acid-long peptide spacer in a C-terminal to N-terminal fashion. For secretory expression in Escherichia coli, a 1156 bp fragment was generated from template vector pAZ1 by fusion PCR encoding a T7 promoter region and the signal sequence of the E. coli outer membrane protein F fused in frame to two tandem E. coli codon-optimized mature hIL-10 genes connected via a 45 nucleotide linker sequence. The construct was cloned into pUC19 for high-level expression in E. coli BL21 (DE3). The mean concentrations of hIL-10 fusion protein in the periplasm and supernatant of E. coli at 37 °C growth temperature were 130 ± 40 and 2 ± 1 ng/ml, respectively. The molecular mass of the recombinant protein was assessed via matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) analysis, indicating correct processing of the signaling sequence in E. coli. In vitro biological activity was shown by phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription protein 3 and suppression of tumor necrosis factor α secretion in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated macrophages.

  15. Isoelectric focusing and crossed immunoelectrophoresis of heme proteins in the Escherichia coli cytoplasmic membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Kranz, R.G.; Gennis, R.B.

    1982-04-01

    Isoelectric focusing (IEF), agarose electrophoresis, and crossed immunoelectrophoresis (CIE) were used to resolve the heme-containing proteins of the Escherichia coli cytoplasmic membrane after solubilization by Triton X-100. Two bands in IEF stained for heme with pI values of 4.7 and 5.3. One of the bands, with an isoelectric point of pH 5.3, was present only when the cells were grown to late log or stationary phase and possessed N,N,N,'N'-tetramethyl-p-phenylenediamine (TMPD) oxidase activity. The pI 4.7 band was present in cells harvested in both mid-log and stationary phases. Agarose electrophoresis, using larger samples, revealed the same two components apparent by IEF, and, in addition, a third component. The heme-containing fractions were extracted after agarose electrophoresis and subjected to further study. The component which was present in cells grown to stationary phase contained hemes b, a/sub 1/, and d. The other two fractions contained only b heme. One of these corresponded to the component with pI 4.7 in IEF and had catalase activity. Antisera were raised against Triton X-100-solubilized cytoplasmic membranes and against the focused TMPD oxidase complex. With these anti-sera, CIE in the presence of Triton X-100 revealed four precipitin complexes containing heme. Three of these corresponded to the components identified by IEF and agarose electrophoresis. We demonstrate that the combined use of IEF and CIE is valuable for analysis of membrane proteins. In particular, this work represents a substantial initial step toward a structural elucidation of the E. coli aerobic respiratory chain.

  16. Isoelectric focusing and crossed immunoelectrophoresis of heme proteins in the Escherichia coli cytoplasmic membrane.

    PubMed Central

    Kranz, R G; Gennis, R B

    1982-01-01

    Isoelectric focusing (IEF), agarose electrophoresis, and crossed immunoelectrophoresis (CIE) were used to resolve the heme-containing proteins of the Escherichia coli cytoplasmic membrane after solubilization by Triton X-100. Two bands in IEF stained for heme with pI values of 4.7 and 5.3. One of the bands, with an isoelectric point of pH 5.3, was present only when the cells were grown to late log or stationary phase and possessed N,N,N,'N'-tetramethyl-p-phenylene-diamine (TMPD) oxidase activity. The pI 4.7 band was present in cells harvested in both mid-log and stationary phases. Agarose electrophoresis, using larger samples, revealed the same two components apparent by IEF, and, in addition, a third component. The heme-containing fractions were extracted after agarose electrophoresis and subjected to further study. The component which was present in cells grown to stationary phase contained hemes b, a1, and d. The other two fractions contained only b heme. One of these corresponded to the component with pI 4.7 in IEF and had catalase activity. Antisera were raised against Triton X-100-solubilized cytoplasmic membranes and against the focused TMPD oxidase complex. With these anti-sera, CIE in the presence of Triton X-100 revealed four precipitin complexes containing heme. Three of these corresponded to the components identified by IEF and agarose electrophoresis. We demonstrate that the combined use of IEF and CIE is valuable for analysis of membrane proteins. In particular, this work represents a substantial initial step toward a structural elucidation of the E. coli aerobic respiratory chain. Images PMID:6277868

  17. A phagemid vector using the E. coli phage shock promoter facilitates phage display of toxic proteins.

    PubMed

    Beekwilder, J; Rakonjac, J; Jongsma, M; Bosch, D

    1999-03-04

    Phage display is a powerful tool with which to adapt the specificity of protease inhibitors. To this end, a library of variants of the potato protease inhibitor PI2 was introduced in a canonical phagemid vector. Although PI2 is a natural trypsin inhibitor, we were unable to select trypsin-binding variants from the library. Instead, only mutants carrying deletions or amber stop codons were found. Bacteria carrying these mutations had a much faster growth rate than those carrying the wt PI2-encoding gene, even when the promoter was repressed. To overcome these problems, two new phagemid vectors for g3-mediated phage display were constructed. The first vector has a lower plasmid copy number, as compared to the canonical vector. Bacteria harboring this new vector are much less affected by the presence of the PI2-g3 fusion gene, which appears from a markedly reduced growth retardation. A second vector was equipped with the promoter of the Escherichia coli psp operon, instead of the lac promoter, to control the PI2-g3 gene fusion expression. The psp promoter is induced upon helper phage infection. A phagemid vector with this promoter controlling a PI2-g3 gene fusion did not affect the viability of the host. Furthermore, both new vectors were shown to produce phage particles that display the inhibitor protein and were therefore considered suitable for phage display. The inhibitor library was introduced in both new vectors. Trypsin-binding phages with inhibitory sequences were selected, instead of sequences with stop codons or deletions. This demonstrates the usefulness of these new vectors for phage display of proteins that affect the viability of E. coli.

  18. Loss of Regulatory Protein RfaH Attenuates Virulence of Uropathogenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Nagy, Gábor; Dobrindt, Ulrich; Schneider, György; Khan, A. Salam; Hacker, Jörg; Emödy, Levente

    2002-01-01

    RfaH is a regulatory protein in Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. Although it enhances expression of different factors that are proposed to play a role in bacterial virulence, a direct effect of RfaH on virulence has not been investigated so far. We report that inactivation of rfaH dramatically decreases the virulence of uropathogenic E. coli strain 536 in an ascending mouse model of urinary tract infection. The mortality rate caused by the wild-type strain in this assay is 100%, whereas that of its isogenic rfaH mutant does not exceed 18%. In the case of coinfection, the wild-type strain 536 shows higher potential to colonize the urinary tract even when it is outnumbered 100-fold by its rfaH mutant in the inoculum. In contrast to the wild-type strain, serum resistance of strain 536rfaH::cat is fully abolished. Furthermore, we give evidence that, besides a major decrease in the amount of hemin receptor ChuA (G. Nagy, U. Dobrindt, M. Kupfer, L. Emody, H. Karch, and J. Hacker, Infect. Immun. 69:1924-1928, 2001), loss of the RfaH protein results in an altered lipopolysaccharide phenotype as well as decreased expression of K15 capsule and alpha-hemolysin, whereas levels of other pathogenicity factors such as siderophores, flagella, Prf, and S fimbriae appear to be unaltered in strain 536rfaH::cat in comparison to the wild-type strain. trans complementation of the mutant strain with the rfaH gene restores wild-type levels of the affected virulence factors and consequently restitutes virulence in the mouse model of ascending urinary tract infection. PMID:12117951

  19. Mechanosensitive channels of Escherichia coli: the MscL gene, protein, and activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sukharev, S. I.; Blount, P.; Martinac, B.; Kung, C.

    1997-01-01

    Although mechanosensory responses are ubiquitous and diverse, the molecular bases of mechanosensation in most cases remain mysterious MscL, a mechanosensitive channel of large conductance of Escherichia coli and its bacterial homologues are the first and currently only channel molecules shown to directly sense mechanical stretch of the membrane. In response to the tension conveyed via the lipid bilayer, MscL increases its open probability by several orders of magnitude. In the present review we describe the identification, cloning, and first sets of biophysical and structural data on this simplest mechanosensory molecule. We discovered a 2.5-ns mechanosensitive conductance in giant E. coli spheroplasts. Using chromatographies to enrich the target and patch clamp to assay the channel activity in liposome-reconstituted fractions, we identified the MscL protein and cloned the mscL gene. MscL comprises 136 amino acid residues (15 kDa), with two highly hydrophobic regions, and resides in the inner membrane of the bacterium. PhoA-fusion experiments indicate that the protein spans the membrane twice with both termini in the cytoplasm. Spectroscopic techniques show that it is highly helical. Expression of MscL tandems and covalent cross-linking suggest that the active channel complex is a homo-hexamer. We have identified several residues, which when deleted or substituted, affect channel kinetics or mechanosensitivity. Although unique when discovered, highly conserved MscL homologues in both gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria have been found, suggesting their ubiquitous importance among bacteria.

  20. The Role of Protein-Ligand Contacts in Allosteric Regulation of the Escherichia coli Catabolite Activator Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Townsend, Philip D.; Rodgers, Thomas L.; Glover, Laura C.; Korhonen, Heidi J.; Richards, Shane A.; Colwell, Lucy J.; Pohl, Ehmke; Wilson, Mark R.; Hodgson, David R. W.; McLeish, Tom C. B.; Cann, Martin J.

    2015-01-01

    Allostery is a fundamental process by which ligand binding to a protein alters its activity at a distant site. Both experimental and theoretical evidence demonstrate that allostery can be communicated through altered slow relaxation protein dynamics without conformational change. The catabolite activator protein (CAP) of Escherichia coli is an exemplar for the analysis of such entropically driven allostery. Negative allostery in CAP occurs between identical cAMP binding sites. Changes to the cAMP-binding pocket can therefore impact the allosteric properties of CAP. Here we demonstrate, through a combination of coarse-grained modeling, isothermal calorimetry, and structural analysis, that decreasing the affinity of CAP for cAMP enhances negative cooperativity through an entropic penalty for ligand binding. The use of variant cAMP ligands indicates the data are not explained by structural heterogeneity between protein mutants. We observe computationally that altered interaction strength between CAP and cAMP variously modifies the change in allosteric cooperativity due to second site CAP mutations. As the degree of correlated motion between the cAMP-contacting site and a second site on CAP increases, there is a tendency for computed double mutations at these sites to drive CAP toward noncooperativity. Naturally occurring pairs of covarying residues in CAP do not display this tendency, suggesting a selection pressure to fine tune allostery on changes to the CAP ligand-binding pocket without a drive to a noncooperative state. In general, we hypothesize an evolutionary selection pressure to retain slow relaxation dynamics-induced allostery in proteins in which evolution of the ligand-binding site is occurring. PMID:26187469

  1. Adenomatous polyposis coli associates with the microtubule-destabilizing protein XMCAK.

    PubMed

    Banks, Jennifer D; Heald, Rebecca

    2004-11-23

    During cell division, the proper formation of a bipolar spindle and its function to segregate chromosomes requires precise coordination of microtubule-stabilizing and destabilizing activities. Globally destabilized, dynamic microtubules radiating from duplicated centrosomes are locally regulated by chromosomes. Proteins at the kinetochore of each sister chromatid mediate a dynamic attachment, allowing chromosome movement coupled to microtubule polymerization/depolymerization and error-correction mechanisms for improperly attached chromosomes. The tumor suppressor protein adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) stabilizes microtubules both in vitro and in vivo and is implicated in mitosis, although its mechanisms of action are not well characterized. Here, we show that in mitotic Xenopus egg extracts, the carboxyl-terminus of APC can associate with the amino terminus of the microtubule-destabilizing KinI, Xenopus mitotic centromere-associated kinesin (XMCAK), in a cytoplasmic complex. We find that like XMCAK, APC can localize to the centromere as well as the kinetochore region of mitotic chromosomes and does not require microtubules for chromosomal targeting in Xenopus egg extracts. We propose that the presence of these proteins in a complex brings together both positive and negative microtubule effectors, whose opposing activities may be regulated by additional factors, thereby providing precise control of both global and local microtubule dynamics.

  2. Optimization of culturing conditions of recombined Escherichia coli to produce umami octopeptide-containing protein.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yin; Wei, Xiong; Lu, Zhou; Pan, Zhongli; Gou, Xinhua; Venkitasamy, Chandrasekar; Guo, Siya; Zhao, Liming

    2017-07-15

    Using synthesized peptides to verify the taste of natural peptides was probably the leading cause for tasting disputes regarding umami peptides. A novel method was developed to prepare the natural peptide which could be used to verify the taste of umami peptide. A controversial octopeptide was selected and gene engineering was used to structure its Escherichia coli. expressing vector. A response surface method was adopted to optimize the expression conditions of the recombinant protein. The results of SDS-PAGE for the recombinant protein indicated that the recombinant expression system was successfully structured. The fitting results of the response surface experiment showed that the OD600 value was the key factor which influenced the expression of the recombinant protein. The optimal culturing process conditions predicted with the fitting model were an OD600 value of 0.5, an IPTG concentration of 0.6mM, a culturing temperature of 28.75°C and a culturing time of 5h.

  3. Characterization of the helicase activity of the Escherichia coli UvrAB protein complex

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, E.Y.; Grossman, L.

    1989-01-15

    The requirement for nucleotide hydrolysis in the DNA repair mechanism of the Escherichia coli UvrABC protein complex has been analyzed. The DNA-activated UvrAB ATPase activity is part of a helicase activity exhibited by the UvrAB protein complex. The helicase acts only on short duplexes and, therefore, is unlike other helicases such as those involved in DNA replication that unwind long duplexes. The strand displacement activity occurs in the 5'----3' direction and requires either ATP or dATP. The helicase activity is inhibited by UV photoproducts. The absence of this activity in a complex formed with proteolyzed UvrB (UvrB*), a complex also deficient in the endonuclease activity, suggests that this activity is important in the repair mechanism. The UvrAB protein complex may remain bound to a damaged site and by coupling the energy derived from ATP hydrolysis, alter the DNA conformation around the damage site to one that is permissive for endonucleolytic events. The conformational changes may take the form of DNA unwinding.

  4. Interaction with Single-stranded DNA-binding Protein Stimulates Escherichia coli Ribonuclease HI Enzymatic Activity.

    PubMed

    Petzold, Christine; Marceau, Aimee H; Miller, Katherine H; Marqusee, Susan; Keck, James L

    2015-06-05

    Single-stranded (ss) DNA-binding proteins (SSBs) bind and protect ssDNA intermediates formed during replication, recombination, and repair reactions. SSBs also directly interact with many different genome maintenance proteins to stimulate their enzymatic activities and/or mediate their proper cellular localization. We have identified an interaction formed between Escherichia coli SSB and ribonuclease HI (RNase HI), an enzyme that hydrolyzes RNA in RNA/DNA hybrids. The RNase HI·SSB complex forms by RNase HI binding the intrinsically disordered C terminus of SSB (SSB-Ct), a mode of interaction that is shared among all SSB interaction partners examined to date. Residues that comprise the SSB-Ct binding site are conserved among bacterial RNase HI enzymes, suggesting that RNase HI·SSB complexes are present in many bacterial species and that retaining the interaction is important for its cellular function. A steady-state kinetic analysis shows that interaction with SSB stimulates RNase HI activity by lowering the reaction Km. SSB or RNase HI protein variants that disrupt complex formation nullify this effect. Collectively our findings identify a direct RNase HI/SSB interaction that could play a role in targeting RNase HI activity to RNA/DNA hybrid substrates within the genome.

  5. Structure and Mechanisms of a Protein-Based Organelle in Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Shiho; Sawaya, Michael R.; Yeates, Todd O.

    2010-08-18

    Many bacterial cells contain proteinaceous microcompartments that act as simple organelles by sequestering specific metabolic processes involving volatile or toxic metabolites. Here we report the three-dimensional (3D) crystal structures, with resolutions between 1.65 and 2.5 angstroms, of the four homologous proteins (EutS, EutL, EutK, and EutM) that are thought to be the major shell constituents of a functionally complex ethanolamine utilization (Eut) microcompartment. The Eut microcompartment is used to sequester the metabolism of ethanolamine in bacteria such as Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica. The four Eut shell proteins share an overall similar 3D fold, but they have distinguishing structural features that help explain the specific roles they play in the microcompartment. For example, EutL undergoes a conformational change that is probably involved in gating molecular transport through shell protein pores, whereas structural evidence suggests that EutK might bind a nucleic acid component. Together these structures give mechanistic insight into bacterial microcompartments.

  6. Evidence for two interconverting protein isomers in the methotrexate complex of dihydrofolate reductase from Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Falzone, C.J.; Benkovic, S.J. ); Wright, P.E. )

    1991-02-26

    Two-dimensional {sup 1}H NMR methods and a knowledge of the X-ray crystal structure have been used to make resonance assignments for the amino acid side chains of dihydrofolate reductase from Escherichia coli complexed with methotrexate. The H7 proton on the pteridine ring of methotrexate was found to have NOEs to the methyl protons of Leu-28 which were assigned by using the L28F mutant. These NOEs indicated that the orientation of the methotrexate pteridine ring is similar in both solution and crystal structures. During the initial assignment process, it became evident that many of the resonances in this complex, unlike those of the folate complex, are severally broadened or doubled. The observation of two distinct sets of resonances in a ratio of approximately 2:1 was attributed to the presence of two protein isomers. Many of the side chains with clearly doubled resonances were located in the {beta}-sheet and the active site. Preliminary studies on the apoprotein also revealed doubled resonances in the absence of the inhibitor, indicating the existence of the protein isomers prior to methotrexate binding. In contrast to the methotrexate complex, the binary complex with folate and the ternary MTX-NADPH-DHFR complex presented a single enzyme form. These results are proposed to reflect the ability of folate and NADPH to bind predominantly to one protein isomer.

  7. Structures of revertant signal sequences of Escherichia coli ribose binding protein.

    PubMed Central

    Chi, S W; Yi, G S; Suh, J Y; Choi, B S; Kim, H

    1995-01-01

    Recently we reported (Yi et al., 1994) that the alpha-helical content of the signal peptide of Escherichia coli ribose binding protein, when determined by circular dichroism (CD) and two-dimensional NMR in trifluoroethanol/water solvent, is higher than that of its nonfunctional mutant signal peptide. In the present investigation, the structures of the signal peptides of two revertant ribose binding proteins in the same solvent were also determined with CD and two-dimensional 1H NMR spectroscopy. According to the CD results, both of these revertant signal peptides showed an intermediate helicity between those of wild-type and mutant signal peptides, the helical content of the revertant peptide with higher recovery of the translocation capability being higher. On the other hand, the alpha-helix regions of the wild-type and the revertant peptides as determined by NMR were shown to be the same. This discrepancy may be due to the difference in stability between identical alpha-helical stretches in wild-type and revertant peptides. A good correlation was observed between the helical content of these four ribose binding protein signal peptides in TFE/water as studied by CD and their in vivo translocation activities. It appears, therefore, that both the proper length of the helix and the stability are of functional significance. PMID:8599676

  8. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Integration Protein Expressed in Escherichia Coli Possesses Selective DNA Cleaving Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherman, Paula A.; Fyfe, James A.

    1990-07-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) integration protein, a potential target for selective antiviral therapy, was expressed in Escherichia coli. The purified protein, free of detectable contaminating endonucleases, selectively cleaved double-stranded DNA oligonucleotides that mimic the U3 and the U5 termini of linear HIV DNA. Two nucleotides were removed from the 3' ends of both the U5 plus strand and the U3 minus strand; in both cases, cleavage was adjacent to a conserved CA dinucleotide. The reaction was metal-ion dependent, with a preference for Mn2+ over Mg2+. Reaction selectivity was further demonstrated by the lack of cleavage of an HIV U5 substrate on the complementary (minus) strand, an analogous substrate that mimics the U3 terminus of an avian retrovirus, and an HIV U5 substrate in which the conserved CA dinucleotide was replaced with a TA dinucleotide. Such an integration protein-mediated cleavage reaction is expected to occur as part of the integration event in the retroviral life cycle, in which a double-stranded DNA copy of the viral RNA genome is inserted into the host cell DNA.

  9. "In Vitro" Synthesis and Activity of Reporter Proteins in an "Escherichia coli" S30 Extract System: An Undergraduate Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higgins, Pamela J.

    2005-01-01

    This undergraduate laboratory experiment integrates multiple techniques ("in vitro" synthesis, enzyme assays, Western blotting) to determine the production and detection sensitivity of two common reporter proteins (beta-galactosidase and luciferase) within an "Escherichia coli" S30 transcription/translation extract. Comparison of the data suggests…

  10. PprM, a Cold Shock Domain-Containing Protein from Deinococcus radiodurans, Confers Oxidative Stress Tolerance to Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Park, Sun-Ha; Singh, Harinder; Appukuttan, Deepti; Jeong, Sunwook; Choi, Yong Jun; Jung, Jong-Hyun; Narumi, Issay; Lim, Sangyong

    2016-01-01

    Escherichia coli is a representative microorganism that is frequently used for industrial biotechnology; thus its cellular robustness should be enhanced for the widespread application of E. coli in biotechnology. Stress response genes from the extremely radioresistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans have been used to enhance the stress tolerance of E. coli. In the present study, we introduced the cold shock domain-containing protein PprM from D. radiodurans into E. coli and observed that the tolerance to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) was significantly increased in recombinant strains (Ec-PprM). The overexpression of PprM in E. coli elevated the expression of some OxyR-dependent genes, which play important roles in oxidative stress tolerance. Particularly, mntH (manganese transporter) was activated by 9-fold in Ec-PprM, even in the absence of H2O2 stress, which induced a more than 2-fold increase in the Mn/Fe ratio compared with wild type. The reduced production of highly reactive hydroxyl radicals (·OH) and low protein carbonylation levels (a marker of oxidative damage) in Ec-PprM indicate that the increase in the Mn/Fe ratio contributes to the protection of cells from H2O2 stress. PprM also conferred H2O2 tolerance to E. coli in the absence of OxyR. We confirmed that the H2O2 tolerance of oxyR mutants reflected the activation of the ycgZ-ymgABC operon, whose expression is activated by H2O2 in an OxyR-independent manner. Thus, the results of the present study showed that PprM could be exploited to improve the robustness of E. coli.

  11. PprM, a Cold Shock Domain-Containing Protein from Deinococcus radiodurans, Confers Oxidative Stress Tolerance to Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sun-Ha; Singh, Harinder; Appukuttan, Deepti; Jeong, Sunwook; Choi, Yong Jun; Jung, Jong-Hyun; Narumi, Issay; Lim, Sangyong

    2017-01-01

    Escherichia coli is a representative microorganism that is frequently used for industrial biotechnology; thus its cellular robustness should be enhanced for the widespread application of E. coli in biotechnology. Stress response genes from the extremely radioresistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans have been used to enhance the stress tolerance of E. coli. In the present study, we introduced the cold shock domain-containing protein PprM from D. radiodurans into E. coli and observed that the tolerance to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) was significantly increased in recombinant strains (Ec-PprM). The overexpression of PprM in E. coli elevated the expression of some OxyR-dependent genes, which play important roles in oxidative stress tolerance. Particularly, mntH (manganese transporter) was activated by 9-fold in Ec-PprM, even in the absence of H2O2 stress, which induced a more than 2-fold increase in the Mn/Fe ratio compared with wild type. The reduced production of highly reactive hydroxyl radicals (·OH) and low protein carbonylation levels (a marker of oxidative damage) in Ec-PprM indicate that the increase in the Mn/Fe ratio contributes to the protection of cells from H2O2 stress. PprM also conferred H2O2 tolerance to E. coli in the absence of OxyR. We confirmed that the H2O2 tolerance of oxyR mutants reflected the activation of the ycgZ-ymgABC operon, whose expression is activated by H2O2 in an OxyR-independent manner. Thus, the results of the present study showed that PprM could be exploited to improve the robustness of E. coli. PMID:28119668

  12. Localization of polyamine enhancement of protein synthesis to subcellular components of Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas sp. strain Kim.

    PubMed Central

    Rosano, C L; Bunce, S C; Hurwitz, C

    1983-01-01

    At 5 mM Mg2+, spermidine stimulation of polyphenylalanine synthesis by cell-free extracts of Escherichia coli was found to be about 30 times greater than that by extracts of Pseudomonas sp. strain Kim, a unique organism which lacks detectable levels of spermidine. By means of reconstitution experiments, the target of spermidine stimulation was localized to the protein fraction of the highspeed supernatant component (S-100) of E. coli and was absent from, or deficient in, the S-100 fraction of Pseudomonas sp. strain Kim. The spermidine stimulation did not appear to be due to the presence in the E. coli S-100 fraction of ribosomal protein S1, elongation factors, or E. coli aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases. The failure to observe spermidine stimulation by the Pseudomonas sp. strain Kim S-100 fraction was also not due to a spermidine-enhanced polyuridylic acid degradation. The synthesis of polyphenylalanine by Pseudomonas sp. strain Kim extracts was stimulated by putrescine and by S-(+)-2-hydroxyputrescine to a greater degree than was synthesis by E. coli extracts. The enhancement by putrescine and by S-(+)-2-hydroxyputrescine with Pseudomonas sp. strain Kim extracts was found to be due to effects on its ribosomes. PMID:6336736

  13. YqjD is an inner membrane protein associated with stationary-phase ribosomes in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Hideji; Maki, Yasushi; Furuike, Shou; Sakai, Akiko; Ueta, Masami; Wada, Akira

    2012-08-01

    Here, we provide evidence that YqjD, a hypothetical protein of Escherichia coli, is an inner membrane and ribosome binding protein. This protein is expressed during the stationary growth phase, and expression is regulated by stress response sigma factor RpoS. YqjD possesses a transmembrane motif in the C-terminal region and associates with 70S and 100S ribosomes at the N-terminal region. Interestingly, E. coli possesses two paralogous proteins of YqjD, ElaB and YgaM, which are expressed and bind to ribosomes in a similar manner to YqjD. Overexpression of YqjD leads to inhibition of cell growth. It has been suggested that YqjD loses ribosomal activity and localizes ribosomes to the membrane during the stationary phase.

  14. The cost of expression of Escherichia coli lac operon proteins is in the process, not in the products.

    PubMed

    Stoebel, Daniel M; Dean, Antony M; Dykhuizen, Daniel E

    2008-03-01

    Transcriptional regulatory networks allow bacteria to express proteins only when they are needed. Adaptive hypotheses explaining the evolution of regulatory networks assume that unneeded expression is costly and therefore decreases fitness, but the proximate cause of this cost is not clear. We show that the cost in fitness to Escherichia coli strains constitutively expressing the lactose operon when lactose is absent is associated with the process of making the lac gene products, i.e., associated with the acts of transcription and/or translation. These results reject the hypotheses that regulation exists to prevent the waste of amino acids in useless protein or the detrimental activity of unnecessary proteins. While the cost of the process of protein expression occurs in all of the environments that we tested, the expression of the lactose permease could be costly or beneficial, depending on the environment. Our results identify the basis of a single selective pressure likely acting across the entire E. coli transcriptome.

  15. Dos, a heme-binding PAS protein from Escherichia coli, is a direct oxygen sensor.

    PubMed

    Delgado-Nixon, V M; Gonzalez, G; Gilles-Gonzalez, M A

    2000-03-14

    A direct sensor of O(2), the Dos protein, has been found in Escherichia coli. Previously, the only biological sensors known to respond to O(2) by direct and reversible binding were the FixL proteins of Rhizobia. A heme-binding region in Dos is 60% homologous to the O(2)-sensing PAS domain of the FixL protein, but the remainder of Dos does not resemble FixL. Specifically, the C-terminal domain of Dos, presumed to be a regulatory partner that couples to its heme-binding domain, is not a histidine kinase but more closely resembles a phosphodiesterase. The absorption spectra of Dos indicate that both axial positions of the heme iron are coordinated to side chains of the protein. Nevertheless, O(2) and CO bind to Dos with K(d) values of 13 and 10 microM, respectively, indicating a strong discrimination against CO binding. Association rate constants for binding of O(2) (3 mM(-)(1) s(-)(1)), CO (1 mM(-)(1) s(-)(1)) and even NO (2 mM(-)(1) s(-)(1)) are extraordinarily low and very similar. Displacement of an endogenous ligand, probably Met 95, from the heme iron in Dos triggers a conformational change that alters the activity of the enzymatic domain. This sensing mechanism differs from that of FixL but resembles that of the CO sensor CooA of Rhodospirillum rubrum. Overall the results provide evidence for a heme-binding subgroup of PAS-domain proteins whose working range, signaling mechanisms, and regulatory partners can vary considerably.

  16. Structure and Function of the Escherichia coli Protein YmgB: A Protein Critical for Biofilm Formation and Acid-resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Lee,J.; Page, R.; Garcia-Contreras, R.; Palermino, J.; Zhang, X.; Doshi, O.; Wood, T.; Peti, W.

    2007-01-01

    The Escherichia coli gene cluster ymgABC was identified in transcriptome studies to have a role in biofilm development and stability. In this study, we showed that YmgB represses biofilm formation in rich medium containing glucose, decreases cellular motility, and protects the cell from acid indicating that YmgB has a major role in acid-resistance in E. coli. Our data show that these phenotypes are potentially mediated through interactions with the important cell signal indole. In addition, gel mobility-shift assays suggest that YmgB may be a non-specific DNA-binding protein. Using nickel-enrichment DNA microarrays, we showed that YmgB binds, either directly or indirectly, via a probable ligand, genes important for biofilm formation. To advance our understanding of the function of YmgB, we used X-ray crystallography to solve the structure of the protein to 1.8 A resolution. YmgB is a biological dimer that is structurally homologous to the E. coli gene regulatory protein Hha, despite having only 5% sequence identity. This supports our DNA microarray data showing that YmgB is a gene regulatory protein. Therefore, this protein, which clearly has a critical role in acid-resistance in E. coli, has been renamed as AriR for regulator of acid resistance influenced by indole.

  17. Changes in protein expression profiles in bovine endometrial epithelial cells exposed to E. coli LPS challenge.

    PubMed

    Piras, Cristian; Guo, Yongzhi; Soggiu, Alessio; Chanrot, Metasu; Greco, Viviana; Urbani, Andrea; Charpigny, Gilles; Bonizzi, Luigi; Roncada, Paola; Humblot, Patrice

    2017-01-31

    E. coli is one of the most frequently involved bacteria in uterine diseases. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is a component of the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria involved in pathogenic processes leading to post-partum metritis and endometritis in cattle. It also causes inflammation of the endometrium. The increase of cell proliferation by LPS is part of the inflammatory process. The aim of this study was to investigate possible changes in protein expression in relation to the proliferative response of bEECs after challenge with E. coli-LPS. In vitro culture of bEECs was performed from cow genital tracts collected at a slaughterhouse. In passage 5, bEECs from each of 9 cows (3 series of 3 cows) were exposed to 0, 8, and 16 μg ml(-1) LPS for 72 h. At time 0 and 72 h later, attached cells/living cells were counted and for each time and LPS dosage, cells were frozen for proteomic analyses. All samples from the 3 series were analyzed by 2-D gel electrophoresis coupled to MALDI-TOF/TOF mass spectrometry. The samples from the first series were subjected to shotgun nLC-MS/MS analysis. From the whole differential proteomics analysis, 38 proteins were differentially expressed (p < 0.05 to p < 0.001) following exposure to LPS. Among them, twenty-eight were found to be up-regulated in the LPS groups in comparison to control groups and ten were down-regulated. Differentially expressed proteins were associated with cell proliferation and apoptosis, transcription, destabilization of cell structure, oxidative stress, regulation of histones, allergy and general cell metabolism pathways. The de-regulations induced by LPS were consistent with the proliferative phenotype and indicated strong alterations of several cell functions. In addition, some of the differentially expressed proteins relates to pathways activated at the time of implantation. The specific changes induced through those signals may have negative consequences for the establishment of pregnancy.

  18. Beta-methylthio-aspartic acid: identification of a novel posttranslational modification in ribosomal protein S12 from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Kowalak, J. A.; Walsh, K. A.

    1996-01-01

    Utilizing microscale chemical derivatization reactions and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry, we have identified a novel posttranslational modification of aspartic acid, beta-methylthio-aspartic acid. The modified residue is located at position 88 in ribosomal protein S12 from Escherichia coli, a phylogenetically conserved protein that has been implicated in maintaining translational accuracy of the ribosome. PMID:8844851

  19. Sequence and structural similarities between the leucine-specific binding protein and leucyl-tRNA synthetase of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Williamson, R M; Oxender, D L

    1990-01-01

    A role for the leucyl-tRNA synthetase (EC 6.1.1.4) has been established for regulating the transport of leucine across the inner membrane of Escherichia coli by the leucine, isoleucine, valine (LIV-I) transport system. This transport system is mediated by interactions of periplasmic binding proteins with a complex of membrane-associated proteins, and transcription of the high-affinity branched-chain amino acid transport system genes is repressed by growth of E. coli on high levels of leucine. We now report results from sequence comparisons and structural modeling studies, which indicate that the leucine-specific binding protein, one of the periplasmic components of the LIV-I transport system, contains a 121-residue stretch, representing 36% of the mature protein, which displays both sequence and structural similarities to a region within the putative nucleotide-binding domain of leucyl-tRNA synthetase. Early fusion events between ancestral genes for the leucine-specific binding protein and leucyl-tRNA synthetase could account for the similarity and suggest that processes of aminoacylation and transport for leucine in E. coli may be performed by evolutionarily interrelated proteins. PMID:2191293

  20. Expression of enterovirus 71 capsid protein VP1 in Escherichia coli and its clinical application.

    PubMed

    Shi, Mei; Zhou, Yaping; Cao, Limin; Ding, Cuijun; Ji, Yun; Jiang, Qinbo; Liu, Xiping; Li, Xiang; Hou, Xueling; Peng, Hongjun; Shi, Weifeng

    2013-12-01

    The VPl gene of enterovirus 71 (EV71) was synthesized, construct a recombinant plasmid pET15b/VP1 and expressed in E. coli BL21. The recombinant VP1 protein could specifically react with EV71-infected patient sera without the cross-reaction with serum antibodies of coxsackievirus A16 (CA16), A4, A5, B3 and B5 as well as echovirus 6. In acute and convalescent phases, IgM and IgG antibodies of 182 serum samples were detected by ELISA with recombinant VP1 protein as a coated antigen. The results showed that the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) of IgM antibodies in serum samples for the diagnosis of EV71 infection were 90.1, 98.4, 98.8 and 88.7%, respectively; similarly, those of IgG antibodies in serum samples were 82.4, 89.1, 91.5 and 78.1%, respectively. Five of 80 samples (6.25%) from CA16-infected patients were detected positive by ELISA with recombinant VP1 protein in which indicated the cross reactions and 0 of 5 samples from patients infected with other enteroviruses including CA4, CA5, CB3, CB5 and echovirus 6. Therefore, the recombinant VP1 protein of EV7l may provide a theoretical reference for establishing an effective antibody screening of IgM for EV71-infected patients with clinically suspected hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD).

  1. Expression of enterovirus 71 capsid protein VP1 in Escherichia coli and its clinical application

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Mei; Zhou, Yaping; Cao, Limin; Ding, Cuijun; Ji, Yun; Jiang, Qinbo; Liu, Xiping; Li, Xiang; Hou, Xueling; Peng, Hongjun; Shi, Weifeng

    2013-01-01

    The VPl gene of enterovirus 71 (EV71) was synthesized, construct a recombinant plasmid pET15b/VP1 and expressed in E. coli BL21. The recombinant VP1 protein could specifically react with EV71-infected patient sera without the cross-reaction with serum antibodies of coxsackievirus A16 (CA16), A4, A5, B3 and B5 as well as echovirus 6. In acute and convalescent phases, IgM and IgG antibodies of 182 serum samples were detected by ELISA with recombinant VP1 protein as a coated antigen. The results showed that the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) of IgM antibodies in serum samples for the diagnosis of EV71 infection were 90.1, 98.4, 98.8 and 88.7%, respectively; similarly, those of IgG antibodies in serum samples were 82.4, 89.1, 91.5 and 78.1%, respectively. Five of 80 samples (6.25%) from CA16-infected patients were detected positive by ELISA with recombinant VP1 protein in which indicated the cross reactions and 0 of 5 samples from patients infected with other enteroviruses including CA4, CA5, CB3, CB5 and echovirus 6. Therefore, the recombinant VP1 protein of EV7l may provide a theoretical reference for establishing an effective antibody screening of IgM for EV71-infected patients with clinically suspected hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD). PMID:24688514

  2. Mapping of the RNA recognition site of Escherichia coli ribosomal protein S7.

    PubMed Central

    Robert, F; Gagnon, M; Sans, D; Michnick, S; Brakier-Gingras, L

    2000-01-01

    Bacterial ribosomal protein S7 initiates the folding of the 3' major domain of 16S ribosomal RNA by binding to its lower half. The X-ray structure of protein S7 from thermophilic bacteria was recently solved and found to be a modular structure, consisting of an alpha-helical domain with a beta-ribbon extension. To gain further insights into its interaction with rRNA, we cloned the S7 gene from Escherichia coli K12 into a pET expression vector and introduced 4 deletions and 12 amino acid substitutions in the protein sequence. The binding of each mutant to the lower half of the 3' major domain of 16S rRNA was assessed by filtration on nitrocellulose membranes. Deletion of the N-terminal 17 residues or deletion of the B hairpins (residues 72-89) severely decreased S7 affinity for the rRNA. Truncation of the C-terminal portion (residues 138-178), which includes part of the terminal alpha-helix, significantly affected S7 binding, whereas a shorter truncation (residues 148-178) only marginally influenced its binding. Severe effects were also observed with several strategic point mutations located throughout the protein, including Q8A and F17G in the N-terminal region, and K35Q, G54S, K113Q, and M115G in loops connecting the alpha-helices. Our results are consistent with the occurrence of several sites of contact between S7 and the 16S rRNA, in line with its role in the folding of the 3' major domain. PMID:11105763

  3. ATP-Dependent Interactions between Escherichia coli Min Proteins and the Phospholipid Membrane In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Lackner, Laura L.; Raskin, David M.; de Boer, Piet A. J.

    2003-01-01

    Proper placement of the division apparatus in Escherichia coli requires pole-to-pole oscillation of the MinC division inhibitor. MinC dynamics involves a membrane association-dissociation cycle that is driven by the activities of the MinD ATPase and the MinE topological specificity factor, which themselves undergo coupled oscillatory localization cycles. To understand the biochemical mechanisms underlying Min protein dynamics, we studied the interactions of purified Min proteins with phospholipid vesicles and the role of ATP in these interactions. We show that (i) the ATP-bound form of MinD (MinD.ATP) readily associates with phospholipid vesicles in the presence of Mg2+, whereas the ADP-bound form (MinD.ADP) does not; (ii) MinD.ATP binds membrane in a self-enhancing fashion; (iii) both MinC and MinE can be recruited to MinD.ATP-decorated vesicles; (iv) MinE stimulates dissociation of MinD.ATP from the membrane in a process requiring hydrolysis of the nucleotide; and (v) MinE stimulates dissociation of MinC from MinD.ATP-membrane complexes, even when ATP hydrolysis is blocked. The results support and extend recent work by Z. Hu et al. (Z. Hu, E. P. Gogol, and J. Lutkenhaus, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 99:6761-6766, 2002) and support models of protein oscillation wherein MinE induces Min protein dynamics by stimulating the conversion of the membrane-bound form of MinD (MinD.ATP) to the cytoplasmic form (MinD.ADP). The results also indicate that MinE-stimulated dissociation of MinC from the MinC-MinD.ATP-membrane complex can, and may, occur prior to hydrolysis of the nucleotide. PMID:12533449

  4. Excess production of phage lambda delayed early proteins under conditions supporting high Escherichia coli growth rates.

    PubMed

    Gabig, M; Obuchowski, M; Wegrzyn, A; Szalewska-Pałasz, A; Thomas, M S; Wegrzyn, G

    1998-08-01

    Bacteriophage lambda is unable to lysogenize Escherichia coli hosts harbouring the rpoA341 mutation due to a drastic reduction in transcription from CII-activated lysogenic promoters (pE, pI and paQ). In addition, the level of early transcripts involved in the lytic pathway of lambda development is also decreased in this genetic background due to impaired N-dependent antitermination. Here, it is demonstrated that despite the reduced level of early lytic pL- and pR-derived transcripts, lytic growth of bacteriophage lambda is not affected in rich media. The level of the late lytic, pR-derived transcripts also remains unaffected by the rpoA341 mutation under these conditions. However, it was found that whilst there is no significant difference in the phage burst size in rpoA+ and rpoA341 hosts growing in rich media, phage lambda is not able to produce progeny in the rpoA341 mutant growing in minimal medium, in contrast to otherwise isogenic rpoA+ bacteria. Provision of an excess of the phage replication proteins O and P in trans or overproduction of the antitermination protein N restore the ability of phage lambda to produce progeny in the rpoA341 mutant under the latter conditions. These results suggest that in rich media phage lambda produces some early proteins in excess of that needed for its effective propagation and indicate that replication proteins may be limiting factors for phage lytic growth in poor media.

  5. Evaluation of three industrial Escherichia coli strains in fed-batch cultivations during high-level SOD protein production

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In the biopharmaceutical industry, Escherichia coli (E. coli) strains are among the most frequently used bacterial hosts for producing recombinant proteins because they allow a simple process set-up and they are Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved for human applications. Widespread use of E. coli in biotechnology has led to the development of many different strains, and selecting an ideal host to produce a specific protein of interest is an important step in developing a production process. E. coli B and K–12 strains are frequently employed in large-scale production processes, and therefore are of particular interest. We previously evaluated the individual cultivation characteristics of E. coli BL21 and the K–12 hosts RV308 and HMS174. To our knowledge, there has not yet been a detailed comparison of the individual performances of these production strains in terms of recombinant protein production and system stability. The present study directly compared the T7-based expression hosts E. coli BL21(DE3), RV308(DE3), and HMS174(DE3), focusing on evaluating the specific attributes of these strains in relation to high-level protein production of the model protein recombinant human superoxide dismutase (SOD). The experimental setup was an exponential carbon-limited fed-batch cultivation with minimal media and single-pulse induction. Results The host strain BL21(DE3) produced the highest amounts of specific protein, followed by HMS174(DE3) and RV308(DE3). The expression system HMS174(DE3) exhibited system stability by retaining the expression vector over the entire process time; however, it entirely stopped growing shortly after induction. In contrast, BL21(DE3) and RV308(DE3) encountered plasmid loss but maintained growth. RV308(DE3) exhibited the lowest ppGpp concentration, which is correlated with the metabolic stress level and lowest degradation of soluble protein fraction compared to both other strains. Conclusions Overall, this study provides

  6. A novel mass spectrometric strategy "BEMAP" reveals Extensive O-linked protein glycosylation in Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Boysen, Anders; Palmisano, Giuseppe; Krogh, Thøger Jensen; Duggin, Iain G; Larsen, Martin R; Møller-Jensen, Jakob

    2016-08-26

    The attachment of sugars to proteins via side-chain oxygen atoms (O-linked glycosylation) is seen in all three domains of life. However, a lack of widely-applicable analytical tools has restricted the study of this process, particularly in bacteria. In E. coli, only four O-linked glycoproteins have previously been characterized. Here we present a glycoproteomics technique, termed BEMAP, which is based on the beta-elimination of O-linked glycans followed by Michael-addition of a phosphonic acid derivative, and subsequent titanium dioxide enrichment. This strategy allows site-specific mass-spectrometric identification of proteins with O-linked glycan modifications in a complex biological sample. Using BEMAP we identified cell surface-associated and membrane vesicle glycoproteins from Enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) and non-pathogenic E. coli K-12. We identified 618 glycosylated Serine and Threonine residues mapping to 140 proteins in ETEC, including several known virulence factors, and 34 in E. coli K-12. The two strains had 32 glycoproteins in common. Remarkably, the majority of the ETEC glycoproteins were conserved in both strains but nevertheless were only glycosylated in the pathogen. Therefore, bacterial O-linked glycosylation is much more extensive than previously thought, and is especially important to the pathogen.

  7. Preparation, characterization, and immunological properties in mice of Escherichia coli O157 O-specific polysaccharide-protein conjugate vaccines.

    PubMed Central

    Konadu, E; Robbins, J B; Shiloach, J; Bryla, D A; Szu, S C

    1994-01-01

    Escherichia coli O157 causes severe enteritis and the extraintestinal complication of hemolytic-uremic syndrome, with their highest incidence occurring in children. We postulated that serum immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies to the O-specific polysaccharide of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) may confer protective immunity to enteric pathogens by inducing bactericidal reactions against the ingested organisms in the jejunum (J. B. Robbins, C. Chu, and R. Schneerson, Clin. Infect. Dis. 15:346-361, 1992; S. C. Szu, R. Gupta, and J. B. Robbins, p. 381-394, in I. K. Wachsmuth, P. A. Blake, and O. Olsvik, ed., Vibrio cholerae, 1994). Because polysaccharide-protein conjugates induce serum IgG antibodies in infants, we bound the O-specific polysaccharide of E. coli O157 to proteins. E. coli O157 LPS, treated with acetic acid or hydrazine, was derivatized with adipic acid dihydrazide and bound to proteins by carbodiimide-mediated condensation. Conjugates of these adipic hydrazide derivative were prepared with bovine serum albumin, formalin-treated exotoxin C of Clostridium welchii (Pig Bel toxoid), or Pseudomonas aeruginosa recombinant exoprotein A. The conjugates had low levels of endotoxin and elicited serum antibodies with bactericidal activity to the O157 LPS. The largest increase in LPS antibodies was of the IgG class. Clinical evaluation of E. coli O157-toxoid conjugates is planned. Images PMID:7927787

  8. The Serine Protease Pic From Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli Mediates Immune Evasion by the Direct Cleavage of Complement Proteins.

    PubMed

    Abreu, Afonso G; Fraga, Tatiana R; Granados Martínez, Adriana P; Kondo, Marcia Y; Juliano, Maria A; Juliano, Luiz; Navarro-Garcia, Fernando; Isaac, Lourdes; Barbosa, Angela S; Elias, Waldir P

    2015-07-01

    Enteroaggregative and uropathogenic Escherichia coli, Shigella flexneri 2a, and the hybrid enteroaggregative/Shiga toxin-producing E. coli strain (O104:H4) are important pathogens responsible for intestinal and urinary tract infections, as well as sepsis and hemolytic uremic syndrome. They have in common the production of a serine protease called Pic. Several biological roles for Pic have been described, including protection of E. coli DH5α from complement-mediated killing. Hereby we showed that Pic significantly reduces complement activation by all 3 pathways. Pic cleaves purified C3/C3b and other proteins from the classic and lectin pathways, such as C4 and C2. Cleavage fragments of C3, C4, and C2 were also observed with HB101(pPic1) culture supernatants, and C3 cleavage sites were mapped by fluorescence resonance energy transfer peptides. Experiments using human serum as a source of complement proteins confirmed Pic proteolytic activity on these proteins. Furthermore, Pic works synergistically with the human complement regulators factor I and factor H, promoting inactivation of C3b. In the presence of both regulators, further degradation of C3 α' chain was observed. Therefore, Pic may contribute to immune evasion of E. coli and S. flexneri, favoring invasiveness and increasing the severity of the disorders caused by these pathogens.

  9. A novel mass spectrometric strategy “BEMAP” reveals Extensive O-linked protein glycosylation in Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Boysen, Anders; Palmisano, Giuseppe; Krogh, Thøger Jensen; Duggin, Iain G.; Larsen, Martin R.; Møller-Jensen, Jakob

    2016-01-01

    The attachment of sugars to proteins via side-chain oxygen atoms (O-linked glycosylation) is seen in all three domains of life. However, a lack of widely-applicable analytical tools has restricted the study of this process, particularly in bacteria. In E. coli, only four O-linked glycoproteins have previously been characterized. Here we present a glycoproteomics technique, termed BEMAP, which is based on the beta-elimination of O-linked glycans followed by Michael-addition of a phosphonic acid derivative, and subsequent titanium dioxide enrichment. This strategy allows site-specific mass-spectrometric identification of proteins with O-linked glycan modifications in a complex biological sample. Using BEMAP we identified cell surface-associated and membrane vesicle glycoproteins from Enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) and non-pathogenic E. coli K-12. We identified 618 glycosylated Serine and Threonine residues mapping to 140 proteins in ETEC, including several known virulence factors, and 34 in E. coli K-12. The two strains had 32 glycoproteins in common. Remarkably, the majority of the ETEC glycoproteins were conserved in both strains but nevertheless were only glycosylated in the pathogen. Therefore, bacterial O-linked glycosylation is much more extensive than previously thought, and is especially important to the pathogen. PMID:27562176

  10. Overexpression of Protein Disulfide Isomerase DsbC Stabilizes Multiple-Disulfide-Bonded Recombinant Protein Produced and Transported to the Periplasm in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Kurokawa, Yoichi; Yanagi, Hideki; Yura, Takashi

    2000-01-01

    Dsb proteins (DsbA, DsbB, DsbC, and DsbD) catalyze formation and isomerization of protein disulfide bonds in the periplasm of Escherichia coli. By using a set of Dsb coexpression plasmids constructed recently, we analyzed the effects of Dsb overexpression on production of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) isozyme C that contains complex disulfide bonds and tends to aggregate when produced in E. coli. When transported to the periplasm, HRP was unstable but was markedly stabilized upon simultaneous overexpression of the set of Dsb proteins (DsbABCD). Whereas total HRP production increased severalfold upon overexpression of at least disulfide-bonded isomerase DsbC, maximum transport of HRP to the periplasm seemed to require overexpression of all DsbABCD proteins, suggesting that excess Dsb proteins exert synergistic effects in assisting folding and transport of HRP. Periplasmic production of HRP also increased when calcium, thought to play an essential role in folding of nascent HRP polypeptide, was added to the medium with or without Dsb overexpression. These results suggest that Dsb proteins and calcium play distinct roles in periplasmic production of HRP, presumably through facilitating correct folding. The present Dsb expression plasmids should be useful in assessing and dissecting periplasmic production of proteins that contain multiple disulfide bonds in E. coli. PMID:10966415

  11. Role of outer membrane protein T in pathogenicity of avian pathogenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Hejair, Hassan M A; Ma, Jiale; Zhu, Yingchu; Sun, Min; Dong, Wenyang; Zhang, Yue; Pan, Zihao; Zhang, Wei; Yao, Huochun

    2017-01-27

    An outer membrane protein T (OmpT) could play a vital role in the pathogenesis of the neonatal meningitis Escherichia coli (NMEC) in human and animals. However, whether ompT plays a role in avian pathogenic E. coli (APEC) infection remains unclear. In this study we evaluated the potential of ompT in APEC pathogenesis. An ompT gene was deleted from APEC mutant strain (TW-XM) was constructed and characterized. The inactivation of ompT reduced significantly the adherence and invasion capabilities of APEC to mouse brain microvascular endothelial cell (BMEC) bEnd.3 cells at the rates of 43.8% and 28.8% respectively, compared with the wild strain TW-XM. Further studies showed that deletion of ompT gene reduced the bacterial virulence with 15.2-fold in ducklings and 9.7-fold in mouse models based on the measurement of the LD50. Furthermore, experimental infection of animals revealed that, loss of ompT showed reduced APEC colonization and invasion capacity in brains, lungs and blood by 2-fold, 1.96-fold, and 1.7-fold, respectively, compared with the wild-type strain TW-XM. These virulence-related phenotypes were partially recoverable by genetic complementation. The results of the quantitative real-time reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR) indicated that the loss of ompT significantly decreased the expression levels of ompA, fimC and tsh in the mutant strain ΔOmpT, when compared with TW-XM (p<0.01). Collectively, our data showed that inactivation of ompT decreased adhesion, invasion, colonization, proliferation capacities, possibly by reduced expression levels of ompA, fimC and tsh, which may justify that, ompT is implicated in APEC pathogenicity.

  12. Reaction dynamics analysis of a reconstituted Escherichia coli protein translation system by computational modeling

    PubMed Central

    Matsuura, Tomoaki; Tanimura, Naoki; Hosoda, Kazufumi; Yomo, Tetsuya; Shimizu, Yoshihiro

    2017-01-01

    To elucidate the dynamic features of a biologically relevant large-scale reaction network, we constructed a computational model of minimal protein synthesis consisting of 241 components and 968 reactions that synthesize the Met-Gly-Gly (MGG) peptide based on an Escherichia coli-based reconstituted in vitro protein synthesis system. We performed a simulation using parameters collected primarily from the literature and found that the rate of MGG peptide synthesis becomes nearly constant in minutes, thus achieving a steady state similar to experimental observations. In addition, concentration changes to 70% of the components, including intermediates, reached a plateau in a few minutes. However, the concentration change of each component exhibits several temporal plateaus, or a quasi-stationary state (QSS), before reaching the final plateau. To understand these complex dynamics, we focused on whether the components reached a QSS, mapped the arrangement of components in a QSS in the entire reaction network structure, and investigated time-dependent changes. We found that components in a QSS form clusters that grow over time but not in a linear fashion, and that this process involves the collapse and regrowth of clusters before the formation of a final large single cluster. These observations might commonly occur in other large-scale biological reaction networks. This developed analysis might be useful for understanding large-scale biological reactions by visualizing complex dynamics, thereby extracting the characteristics of the reaction network, including phase transitions. PMID:28167777

  13. Structure of the Escherichia coli ProQ RNA chaperone protein.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Grecia; Hardwick, Steven; Maslen, Sarah L; Skehel, J Mark; Holmqvist, Erik; Vogel, Jörg; Bateman, Alex; Luisi, Ben; Broadhurst, R William

    2017-02-13

    The protein ProQ has recently been identified as a global RNA chaperone in Salmonella, and a similar role is anticipated for its numerous homologues in divergent bacterial species. We report the solution structure of Escherichia coli ProQ, revealing an N-terminal FinO-like domain, a C-terminal domain that unexpectedly has a Tudor-domain fold commonly found in eukaryotes, and an elongated bridging intra-domain linker that is flexible but nonetheless incompressible. Structure based sequence analysis suggests that the Tudor domain was acquired through horizontal gene transfer and gene fusion to the ancestral FinO-like domain. Through a combination of biochemical and biophysical approaches, we have mapped putative RNA binding surfaces on all three domains of ProQ and modelled the protein's conformation in the apo and RNA-bound forms. Taken together, these data suggest how the FinO, Tudor and linker domains of ProQ cooperate to recognise complex RNA structures and serve to promote RNA-mediated regulation.

  14. Genes on a Wire: The Nucleoid-Associated Protein HU Insulates Transcription Units in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Michael; Gerganova, Veneta; Berger, Petya; Rapiteanu, Radu; Lisicovas, Viktoras; Dobrindt, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    The extent to which chromosomal gene position in prokaryotes affects local gene expression remains an open question. Several studies have shown that chromosomal re-positioning of bacterial transcription units does not alter their expression pattern, except for a general decrease in gene expression levels from chromosomal origin to terminus proximal positions, which is believed to result from gene dosage effects. Surprisingly, the question as to whether this chromosomal context independence is a cis encoded property of a bacterial transcription unit, or if position independence is a property conferred by factors acting in trans, has not been addressed so far. For this purpose, we established a genetic test system assessing the chromosomal positioning effects by means of identical promoter-fluorescent reporter gene fusions inserted equidistantly from OriC into both chromosomal replichores of Escherichia coli K-12. Our investigations of the reporter activities in mutant cells lacking the conserved nucleoid associated protein HU uncovered various drastic chromosomal positional effects on gene transcription. In addition we present evidence that these positional effects are caused by transcriptional activity nearby the insertion site of our reporter modules. We therefore suggest that the nucleoid-associated protein HU is functionally insulating transcription units, most likely by constraining transcription induced DNA supercoiling. PMID:27545593

  15. Flavin-Induced Oligomerization in Escherichia coli Adaptive Response Protein AidB

    SciTech Connect

    Hamill, Michael J.; Jost, Marco; Wong, Cintyu; Elliott, Sean J.; Drennan, Catherine L.

    2011-11-21

    The process known as 'adaptive response' allows Escherichia coli to respond to small doses of DNA-methylating agents by upregulating the expression of four proteins. While the role of three of these proteins in mitigating DNA damage is well understood, the function of AidB is less clear. Although AidB is a flavoprotein, no catalytic role has been established for the bound cofactor. Here we investigate the possibility that flavin plays a structural role in the assembly of the AidB tetramer. We report the generation and biophysical characterization of deflavinated AidB and of an AidB mutant that has greatly reduced affinity for flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD). Using fluorescence quenching and analytical ultracentrifugation, we find that apo AidB has a high affinity for FAD, as indicated by an apparent dissociation constant of 402.1 {+-} 35.1 nM, and that binding of substoichiometric amounts of FAD triggers a transition in the AidB oligomeric state. In particular, deflavinated AidB is dimeric, whereas the addition of FAD yields a tetramer. We further investigate the dimerization and tetramerization interfaces of AidB by determining a 2.8 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure in space group P3{sub 2} that contains three intact tetramers in the asymmetric unit. Taken together, our findings provide strong evidence that FAD plays a structural role in the formation of tetrameric AidB.

  16. An endogenous protein inhibitor, YjhX (TopAI), for topoisomerase I from Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Yoshihiro; Inouye, Masayori

    2015-01-01

    Almost all free-living bacteria contain toxin-antitoxin (TA) systems on their genomes and the targets of toxins are highly diverse. Here, we found a novel, previously unidentified TA system in Escherichia coli named yjhX-yjhQ. Induction of YjhX (85 amino acid residues) causes cell-growth arrest resulting in cell death, while YjhQ (181 residues) co-induction resumes cell growth. The primary cellular target of YjhX was found to be topoisomerase I (TopA), inhibiting both DNA replication and RNA synthesis. Notably, YjhX has no homology to any other toxins of the TA systems. YjhX was expressed well with an N-terminal protein S (PrS) tag in soluble forms. PrS-YjhX specifically interacts with the N-terminal region of TopA (TopA67) but not full-TopA in the absence of plasmid DNA, while PrS-YjhX binds to full-TopA in the presence of DNA. Notably, YjhX does not directly interact with DNA and RNA. YjhX inhibits only topoisomerase I but not topoisomerase III and IV in vitro. Hence, yjhX is renamed as the gene for the TopA inhibitor (the topAI gene). TopAI is the first endogenous protein inhibitor specific for topoisomerase I. PMID:26553797

  17. NMR Polypeptide Backbone Conformation of the E. coli Outer Membrane Protein W

    PubMed Central

    Horst, Reto; Stanczak, Pawel; Wüthrich, Kurt

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The outer membrane proteins (Omp) are key factors for bacterial survival and virulence. Among the Omps which have been structurally characterized either by X-ray crystallography or by NMR in solution, the crystal structure of OmpW stands out because three of its four extracellular loops are well defined, whereas long extracellular loops in other E. coli Omps are disordered in the crystals as well as in NMR structures. OmpW thus presented an opportunity for detailed comparison of the extracellular loops in a β-barrel membrane protein structure in crystals and in non-crystalline milieus. Here the polypeptide backbone conformation of OmpW in 30-Fos micelles was determined. Complete backbone NMR assignments were obtained and the loops were structurally characterized. In combination with the OmpW crystal structure, NMR line shape analyses and 15N{1H}-NOE data, these results showed that intact regular secondary structures in the loops undergo slow hinge motions at the detergent–solvent interface. PMID:25017731

  18. Reaction dynamics analysis of a reconstituted Escherichia coli protein translation system by computational modeling.

    PubMed

    Matsuura, Tomoaki; Tanimura, Naoki; Hosoda, Kazufumi; Yomo, Tetsuya; Shimizu, Yoshihiro

    2017-02-21

    To elucidate the dynamic features of a biologically relevant large-scale reaction network, we constructed a computational model of minimal protein synthesis consisting of 241 components and 968 reactions that synthesize the Met-Gly-Gly (MGG) peptide based on an Escherichia coli-based reconstituted in vitro protein synthesis system. We performed a simulation using parameters collected primarily from the literature and found that the rate of MGG peptide synthesis becomes nearly constant in minutes, thus achieving a steady state similar to experimental observations. In addition, concentration changes to 70% of the components, including intermediates, reached a plateau in a few minutes. However, the concentration change of each component exhibits several temporal plateaus, or a quasi-stationary state (QSS), before reaching the final plateau. To understand these complex dynamics, we focused on whether the components reached a QSS, mapped the arrangement of components in a QSS in the entire reaction network structure, and investigated time-dependent changes. We found that components in a QSS form clusters that grow over time but not in a linear fashion, and that this process involves the collapse and regrowth of clusters before the formation of a final large single cluster. These observations might commonly occur in other large-scale biological reaction networks. This developed analysis might be useful for understanding large-scale biological reactions by visualizing complex dynamics, thereby extracting the characteristics of the reaction network, including phase transitions.

  19. In vitro refolding of heterodimeric CapZ expressed in E. coli as inclusion body protein.

    PubMed

    Remmert, K; Vullhorst, D; Hinssen, H

    2000-02-01

    CapZ is a heterodimeric Ca(2+)-independent actin binding protein which plays an important role in organizing the actin filament lattice of cross-striated muscle cells. It caps the barbed end of actin filaments and promotes nucleation of actin polymerization, thereby regulating actin filament length. Here we report the expression of the two muscle-specific isoforms alpha2 and beta1, from chicken in Escherichia coli as individual subunits using the pQE60 expression vector and the subsequent renaturation of the functional CapZ heterodimer from inclusion bodies. Optimal renaturation conditions were obtained both by simultaneous refolding of urea-solubilized subunits and by rapid dilution into a buffer containing 20% glycerol, 5 mM EGTA, 2 mM DTT, 1 mM PMSF, and 100 mM Tris, pH 7.4. The refolding mixture was incubated for 24 h at 15 degrees C and the protein was concentrated by ultrafiltration. Biochemical characterization of the recombinant heterodimer revealed actin binding activities indistinguishable from those of native CapZ as purified from chicken skeletal muscle. Using the same protocol, we were able to refold the beta1, but not the alpha2 isoform as a single polypeptide, indicating a role for beta1 as a molecular template for the folding of alpha2. The reported recombinant approach leads to high yields of active heterodimer and allows the renaturation and characterization of the beta subunit.

  20. Cheese whey-induced high-cell-density production of recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Viitanen, Mikko I; Vasala, Antti; Neubauer, Peter; Alatossava, Tapani

    2003-04-09

    BACKGROUND: Use of lactose-rich concentrates from dairy processes for the induction of recombinant gene's expression has not received much attention although they are interesting low cost substrates for production of recombinant enzymes. Applicability of dairy waste for induction of recombinant genes in Escherichia coli was studied. Clones expressing Lactobacillus phage muramidase and Lactobacillus alcohol dehydrogenase were used for the experiments. RESULTS: Shake flask cultivations in mineral salt medium showed that cheese whey or deproteinised whey induced gene expression as efficiently as IPTG (isopropyl-beta-D-thiogalactopyranoside) or pure lactose. Addition of yeast extract or proteolytically degraded whey proteins did not improve the recombinant protein yield. In contrast, addition of yeast extract to the well-balanced mineral salt medium decreased the product yield. Feeding with glycerol provided sufficient amount of easily assimilable carbon source during the induction period without preventing lactose intake and induction by lactose. High-cell-density fed-batch cultivations showed that product yields comparable to IPTG-induction can be achieved by feeding bacteria with a mixture of glycerol and concentrated whey permeate during the induction. CONCLUSION: Whey and concentrated whey permeate can be applied as an alternative inducer in recombinant high-cell-density fed-batch fermentations. The yield of the recombinant product was comparable to fermentations induced by IPTG. In low-cell-density shake flask experiments the yield was higher with whey or whey permeate than with IPTG.

  1. Proteins and DNA elements essential for the CRISPR adaptation process in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Yosef, Ido; Goren, Moran G; Qimron, Udi

    2012-07-01

    The clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats and their associated proteins (CRISPR/Cas) constitute a recently identified prokaryotic defense mechanism against invading nucleic acids. Activity of the CRISPR/Cas system comprises of three steps: (i) insertion of alien DNA sequences into the CRISPR array to prevent future attacks, in a process called 'adaptation', (ii) expression of the relevant proteins, as well as expression and processing of the array, followed by (iii) RNA-mediated interference with the alien nucleic acid. Here we describe a robust assay in Escherichia coli to explore the hitherto least-studied process, adaptation. We identify essential genes and DNA elements in the leader sequence and in the array which are essential for the adaptation step. We also provide mechanistic insights on the insertion of the repeat-spacer unit by showing that the first repeat serves as the template for the newly inserted repeat. Taken together, our results elucidate fundamental steps in the adaptation process of the CRISPR/Cas system.

  2. Role of Escherichia coli YbeY, a highly conserved protein, in rRNA processing

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Bryan W.; Köhrer, Caroline; Jacob, Asha I.; Simmons, Lyle A.; Zhu, Jianyu; Aleman, Lourdes M.; RajBhandary, Uttam L.; Walker, Graham C.

    2010-01-01

    The UPF0054 protein family is highly conserved with homologs present in nearly every sequenced bacterium. In some bacteria, the respective gene is essential, while in others its loss results in a highly pleiotropic phenotype. Despite detailed structural studies, a cellular role for this protein family has remained unknown. We report here that deletion of the Escherichia coli homolog, YbeY, causes striking defects that affect ribosome activity, translational fidelity and ribosome assembly. Mapping of 16S, 23S and 5S rRNA termini reveals that YbeY influences the maturation of all three rRNAs, with a particularly strong effect on maturation at both the 5′- and 3′-ends of 16S rRNA as well as maturation of the 5′-termini of 23S and 5S rRNAs. Furthermore, we demonstrate strong genetic interactions between ybeY and rnc (encoding RNase III), ybeY and rnr (encoding RNase R), and ybeY and pnp (encoding PNPase), further suggesting a role for YbeY in rRNA maturation. Mutation of highly conserved amino acids in YbeY, allowed the identification of two residues (H114, R59) that were found to have a significant effect in vivo. We discuss the implications of these findings for rRNA maturation and ribosome assembly in bacteria. PMID:20807199

  3. A fluorescent-based HPLC assay for quantification of cysteine and cysteamine adducts in Escherichia coli-derived proteins.

    PubMed

    Soriano, Brian D; Tam, Lei-Ting T; Lu, Hsieng S; Valladares, Violeta G

    2012-01-01

    Recombinant proteins expressed in Escherichia coli are often produced as unfolded, inactive forms accumulated in inclusion bodies. Redox-coupled thiols are typically employed in the refolding process in order to catalyze the formation of correct disulfide bonds at maximal folding efficiency. These thiols and the recombinant proteins can form mixed disulfide bonds to generate thiol-protein adducts. In this work, we apply a fluorescent-based assay for the quantification of cysteine and cysteamine adducts as observed in E. coli-derived proteins. The thiols are released by reduction of the adducted protein, collected and labeled with a fluorescent reagent, 6-aminoquinolyl-N-hydroxysuccinimidyl carbamate. The derivatized thiols are separated by reversed-phase HPLC and can be accurately quantified after method optimization. The estimated thiol content represents total amount of adducted forms present in the analyzed samples. The limit of quantification (LOQ) was established; specifically, the lowest amount of quantifiable cysteine adduction is 30 picograms and the lowest amount of quantifiable cysteamine adduction is 60 picograms. The assay is useful for quantification of adducts in final purified products as well as in-process samples from various purification steps. The assay indicates that the purification process accomplishes a decrease in cysteine adduction from 0.19 nmol adduct/nmol protein to 0.03 nmol adduct/nmol protein as well as a decrease in cysteamine adduction from 0.24 nmol adduct/nmol protein to 0.14 nmol adduct/nmol protein.

  4. Effects of Outer Membrane Protein TolC on the Transport of Escherichia coli within Saturated Quartz Sands

    PubMed Central

    Feriancikova, Lucia; Bardy, Sonia L.; Wang, Lixia; Li, Jin; Xu, Shangping

    2013-01-01

    The outer membrane protein (OMP) TolC is the cell surface component of several drug efflux pumps that are responsible for bacterial resistance against a variety of antibiotics. In this research, we investigated the effects of OMP TolC on E. coli transport within saturated sands through column experiments using a wide type E. coli K12 strain (with OMP TolC), as well as the corresponding transposon mutant (tolC∷kan) and the markerless deletion mutant (ΔtolC). Our results showed OMP TolC could significantly enhance the transport of E. coli when the ionic strength was 20 mM NaCl or higher. The deposition rate coefficients for the wild type E. coli strain (with OMP TolC) was usually >50% lower than those of the tolC-negative mutants. The measurements of contact angles using three probe liquids suggested that TolC altered the surface tension components of E. coli cells and lead to lower Hamaker constants for the cell-water-sand system. The interaction energy calculations using the extended Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (XDLVO) theory suggested that the deposition of the E. coli cell primarily occurred at the secondary energy minimum. The depth of the secondary energy minimum increased with ionic strength, and was greater for the TolC-deletion strains under high ionic strength conditions. Overall, the transport behavior of three E. coli strain within saturated sands could be explained by the XDLVO calculations. Results from this research suggested that antibiotic resistant bacteria expressing OMP TolC could spread more widely within sandy aquifers. PMID:23627691

  5. Effects of outer membrane protein TolC on the transport of Escherichia coli within saturated quartz sands.

    PubMed

    Feriancikova, Lucia; Bardy, Sonia L; Wang, Lixia; Li, Jin; Xu, Shangping

    2013-06-04

    The outer membrane protein (OMP) TolC is the cell surface component of several drug efflux pumps that are responsible for bacterial resistance against a variety of antibiotics. In this research, we investigated the effects of OMP TolC on E. coli transport within saturated sands through column experiments using a wild-type E. coli K12 strain (with OMP TolC), as well as the corresponding transposon mutant (tolC::kan) and the markerless deletion mutant (ΔtolC). Our results showed OMP TolC could significantly enhance the transport of E. coli when the ionic strength was 20 mM NaCl or higher. The deposition rate coefficients for the wild-type E. coli strain (with OMP TolC) was usually >50% lower than those of the tolC-negative mutants. The measurements of contact angles using three probe liquids suggested that TolC altered the surface tension components of E. coli cells and lead to lower Hamaker constants for the cell-water-sand system. The interaction energy calculations using the extended Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (XDLVO) theory suggested that the deposition of the E. coli cell primarily occurred at the secondary energy minimum. The depth of the secondary energy minimum increased with ionic strength, and was greater for the TolC-deletion strains under high ionic strength conditions. Overall, the transport behavior of three E. coli strains within saturated sands could be explained by the XDLVO calculations. Results from this research suggested that antibiotic resistant bacteria expressing OMP TolC could spread more widely within sandy aquifers.

  6. Ligand-induced structural changes in the Escherichia coli ferric citrate transporter reveal modes for regulating protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Mokdad, Audrey; Herrick, Dawn Z; Kahn, Ali K; Andrews, Emily; Kim, Miyeon; Cafiso, David S

    2012-11-09

    Outer-membrane TonB-dependent transporters, such as the Escherichia coli ferric citrate transporter FecA, interact with the inner-membrane protein TonB through an energy-coupling segment termed the Ton box. In FecA, which regulates its own transcription, the Ton box is preceded by an N-terminal extension that interacts with the inner-membrane protein FecR. Here, site-directed spin labeling was used to examine the structural basis for transcriptional signaling and Ton box regulation in FecA. EPR spectroscopy indicates that regions of the N-terminal domain are in conformational exchange, consistent with its role as a protein binding element; however, the local fold and dynamics of the domain are not altered by substrate or TonB. Distance restraints derived from pulse EPR were used to generate models for the position of the extension in the apo, substrate-, and TonB-bound states. In the apo state, this domain is positioned at the periplasmic surface of FecA, where it interacts with the Ton box and blocks access of the Ton box to the periplasm. Substrate addition rotates the transcriptional domain and exposes the Ton box, leading to a disorder transition in the Ton box that may facilitate interactions with TonB. When a soluble fragment of TonB is bound to FecA, the transcriptional domain is displaced to one edge of the barrel, consistent with a proposed β-strand exchange mechanism. However, neither substrate nor TonB displaces the N-terminus further into the periplasm. This result suggests that the intact TonB system mediates both signaling and transport by unfolding portions of the transporter.

  7. Protein S-thiolation by Glutathionylspermidine (Gsp): the role of Escherichia coli Gsp synthetASE/amidase in redox regulation.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Bing-Yu; Chen, Tzu-Chieh; Pai, Chien-Hua; Chou, Chi-Chi; Chen, Hsuan-He; Ko, Tzu-Ping; Hsu, Wen-Hung; Chang, Chun-Yang; Wu, Whei-Fen; Wang, Andrew H-J; Lin, Chun-Hung

    2010-08-13

    Certain bacteria synthesize glutathionylspermidine (Gsp), from GSH and spermidine. Escherichia coli Gsp synthetase/amidase (GspSA) catalyzes both the synthesis and hydrolysis of Gsp. Prior to the work reported herein, the physiological role(s) of Gsp or how the two opposing GspSA activities are regulated had not been elucidated. We report that Gsp-modified proteins from E. coli contain mixed disulfides of Gsp and protein thiols, representing a new type of post-translational modification formerly undocumented. The level of these proteins is increased by oxidative stress. We attribute the accumulation of such proteins to the selective inactivation of GspSA amidase activity. X-ray crystallography and a chemical modification study indicated that the catalytic cysteine thiol of the GspSA amidase domain is transiently inactivated by H(2)O(2) oxidation to sulfenic acid, which is stabilized by a very short hydrogen bond with a water molecule. We propose a set of reactions that explains how the levels of Gsp and Gsp S-thiolated proteins are modulated in response to oxidative stress. The hypersensitivities of GspSA and GspSA/glutaredoxin null mutants to H(2)O(2) support the idea that GspSA and glutaredoxin act synergistically to regulate the redox environment of E. coli.

  8. Coliphage which requires either the LamB protein or the OmpC protein for adsorption to Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed Central

    Beher, M G; Pugsley, A P

    1981-01-01

    Either of two different proteins in the outer membrane of Escherichia coli K-12 (LamB and OmpC) can function in the constitution of receptor activity for a newly isolated T-even bacteriophage. This bacteriophage (SSI) differs from other T-even phages which use the OmpC protein as their receptors. The simple procedure used to isolate phage SSI may be suitable for the detection of bacteriophages with novel outer membrane receptor requirements. PMID:6454006

  9. Protein expression and isotopic enrichment based on induction of the Entner-Doudoroff pathway in Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Refaeli, Bosmat; Goldbourt, Amir

    2012-10-12

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The Entner-Doudoroff pathway is induced during protein expression in E. coli. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 1-{sup 13}C-gluconate and {sup 15}NH{sub 4}Cl provide a carbonyl-amide protein backbone labeling scheme. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The enrichment pattern is determined by nuclear magnetic resonance. -- Abstract: The Entner-Doudoroff pathway is known to exist in many organisms including bacteria, archea and eukarya. Although the common route for carbon catabolism in Escherichia coli is the Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas pathway, it was shown that gluconate catabolism in E. coli occurs via the Entner-Doudoroff pathway. We demonstrate here that by supplying BL21(DE3) competent E.coli cells with gluconate in a minimal growth medium, protein expression can be induced. Nuclear magnetic resonance data of over-expressed ubiquitin show that by using [1-{sup 13}C]-gluconate as the only carbon source, and {sup 15}N-enriched ammonium chloride, sparse isotopic enrichment in the form of a spin-pair carbonyl-amide backbone enrichment is obtained. The specific amino acid labeling pattern is analyzed and is shown to be compatible with Entner-Doudoroff metabolism. Isotopic enrichment serves as a key factor in the biophysical characterization of proteins by various methods including nuclear magnetic resonance, mass spectrometry, infrared spectroscopy and more. Therefore, the method presented here can be applied to study proteins by obtaining sparse enrichment schemes that are not based on the regular glycolytic pathway, or to study the Entner-Doudoroff metabolism during protein expression.

  10. Engineering the Controlled Assembly of Filamentous Injectisomes in E. coli K-12 for Protein Translocation into Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial pathogens containing type III protein secretion systems (T3SS) assemble large needle-like protein complexes in the bacterial envelope, called injectisomes, for translocation of protein effectors into host cells. The application of these “molecular syringes” for the injection of proteins into mammalian cells is hindered by their structural and genomic complexity, requiring multiple polypeptides encoded along with effectors in various transcriptional units (TUs) with intricate regulation. In this work, we have rationally designed the controlled expression of the filamentous injectisomes found in enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) in the nonpathogenic strain E. coli K-12. All structural components of EPEC injectisomes, encoded in a genomic island called the locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE), were engineered in five TUs (eLEEs) excluding effectors, promoters and transcriptional regulators. These eLEEs were placed under the control of the IPTG-inducible promoter Ptac and integrated into specific chromosomal sites of E. coli K-12 using a marker-less strategy. The resulting strain, named synthetic injector E. coli (SIEC), assembles filamentous injectisomes similar to those in EPEC. SIEC injectisomes form pores in the host plasma membrane and are able to translocate T3-substrate proteins (e.g., translocated intimin receptor, Tir) into the cytoplasm of HeLa cells reproducing the phenotypes of intimate attachment and polymerization of actin-pedestals elicited by EPEC bacteria. Hence, SIEC strain allows the controlled expression of functional filamentous injectisomes for efficient translocation of proteins with T3S-signals into mammalian cells. PMID:26017572

  11. Dual-emitting biosensors for glucose and glutamine from genertically engineered E. coli binding proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolosa, Leah; Ge, Xudong; Kostov, Yordan; Lakowicz, Joseph R.; Rao, Govind

    2003-07-01

    Glucose is the major source of carbon, and glutamine is the major source of nitrogen in cell culture media. Thus, glucose and glutamine monitoring are important in maintaining optimal conditions in industrial bioprocesses. Here we report reagentless glucose and glutamine sensors using the E. coli glucose binding protein (GBP) and the glutamine binding protein (GlnBP). Both of these proteins are derived from the permease system of the gram-negative bacteria. The Q26C variant of GBP was labeled at the 26-position with anilino-naphthalene sulfonate (ANS), while the S179C variant of GlnBP was labeled at the 179-position with acrylodan. The ANS and acrylodan emissions are quenched in the presence of glucose and glutamine, respectively. The acrylodan-labeled GlnBP was labeled at the N-terminal with ruthenium bis-(2,2"-bipyridyl)-1,10-phenanthroline-9-isothiocyanate. The ruthenium acts as a non-responsive long-lived reference. The apparent binding constant, Kd", of 8.0 μM glucose was obtained from the decrease in intensity of ANS in GBP. The reliability of the method in monitoring glucose during yeast fermentation was determined by comparison with the YSI Biochemistry Analyzer. The apparent binding constant, Kd", of 0.72 μM glutamine was calculated from the ratio of emission intensities of acrylodan and ruthenium (I515/I610) in GlnBP. The presence of the long-lived ruthenium allowed for modulation sensing at lower frequencies (1-10 MHz) approaching an accuracy of +/- 0.02 μM. The conversion of the GBP into a similar ratiometric sensor was described.

  12. The leucine-responsive regulatory protein, a global regulator of metabolism in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Calvo, J M; Matthews, R G

    1994-01-01

    The leucine-responsive regulatory protein (Lrp) regulates the expression of more than 40 genes and proteins in Escherichia coli. Among the operons that are positively regulated by Lrp are operons involved in amino acid biosynthesis (ilvIH, serA)), in the biosynthesis of pili (pap, fan, fim), and in the assimilation of ammonia (glnA, gltBD). Negatively regulated operons include operons involved in amino acid catabolism (sdaA, tdh) and peptide transport (opp) and the operon coding for Lrp itself (lrp). Detailed studies of a few members of the regulon have shown that Lrp can act directly to activate or repress transcription of target operons. A substantial fraction of operons regulated by Lrp are also regulated by leucine, and the effect of leucine on expression of these operons requires a functional Lrp protein. The patterns of regulation are surprising and interesting: in some cases activation or repression mediated by Lrp is antagonized by leucine, in other cases Lrp-mediated activation or repression is potentiated by leucine, and in still other cases leucine has no effect on Lrp-mediated regulation. Current research is just beginning to elucidate the detailed mechanisms by which Lrp can mediate such a broad spectrum of regulatory effects. Our view of the role of Lrp in metabolism may change as more members of the regulon are identified and their regulation characterized, but at this point Lrp seems to be important in regulating nitrogen metabolism and one-carbon metabolism, permitting adaptations to feast and to famine. PMID:7968922

  13. Role of Protein L25 and Its Contact with Protein L16 in Maintaining the Active State of Escherichia coli Ribosomes in vivo.

    PubMed

    Anikaev, A Y; Isaev, A B; Korobeinikova, A V; Garber, M B; Gongadze, G M

    2016-01-01

    A ribosomal protein of the L25 family specifically binding to 5S rRNA is an evolutionary feature of bacteria. Structural studies showed that within the ribosome this protein contacts not only 5S rRNA, but also the C-terminal region of protein L16. Earlier we demonstrated that ribosomes from the ΔL25 strain of Escherichia coli have reduced functional activity. In the present work, it is established that the reason for this is a fraction of functionally inactive 50S ribosomal subunits. These subunits have a deficit of protein L16 and associate very weakly with 30S subunits. To study the role of the contact of these two proteins in the formation of the active ribosome, we created a number of E. coli strains containing protein L16 with changes in its C-terminal region. We found that some mutations (K133L or K127L/K133L) in this protein lead to a noticeable slowing of cell growth and decrease in the activity of their translational apparatus. As in the case of the ribosomes from the ΔL25 strain, the fraction of 50S subunits, which are deficient in protein L16, is present in the ribosomes of the mutant strains. All these data indicate that the contact with protein L25 is important for the retention of protein L16 within the E. coli ribosome in vivo. In the light of these findings, the role of the protein of the L25 family in maintaining the active state of the bacterial ribosome is discussed.

  14. Mistic and TarCF as fusion protein partners for functional expression of the cannabinoid receptor 2 in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Ananda; Feng, Rentian; Tong, Qin; Zhang, Yuxun; Xie, Xiang-Qun

    2012-06-01

    G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) are key players in signal recognition and cellular communication making them important therapeutic targets. Large-scale production of these membrane proteins in their native form is crucial for understanding their mechanism of action and target-based drug design. Here we report the overexpression system for a GPCR, the cannabinoid receptor subtype 2 (CB2), in Escherichia coli C43(DE3) facilitated by two fusion partners: Mistic, an integral membrane protein expression enhancer at the N-terminal, and TarCF, a C-terminal fragment of the bacterial chemosensory transducer Tar at the C-terminal of the CB2 open reading frame region. Multiple histidine tags were added on both ends of the fusion protein to facilitate purification. Using individual and combined fusion partners, we found that CB2 fusion protein expression was maximized only when both partners were used. Variable growth and induction conditions were conducted to determine and optimize protein expression. More importantly, this fusion protein Mistic-CB2-TarCF can localize into the E. coli membrane and exhibit functional binding activities with known CB2 ligands including CP55,940, WIN55,212-2 and SR144,528. These results indicate that this novel expression and purification system provides us with a promising strategy for the preparation of biologically active GPCRs, as well as general application for the preparation of membrane-bound proteins using the two new fusion partners described.

  15. Probing the Substrate Specificity and Protein-Protein Interactions of the E. coli Fatty Acid Dehydratase, FabA

    PubMed Central

    Finzel, Kara; Nguyen, Chi; Jackson, David R.; Gupta, Aarushi; Tsai, Shiou-Chuan; Burkart, Michael D.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Microbial fatty acid biosynthetic enzymes are important targets for areas as diverse as antibiotic development to biofuel production. Elucidating the molecular basis of chain length control during fatty acid biosynthesis is crucial for the understanding of regulatory processes of this fundamental metabolic pathway. In Escherichia coli, the acyl carrier protein (AcpP) plays a central role by sequestering and shuttling the growing acyl chain between fatty acid biosynthetic enzymes. FabA, a β-hydroxylacyl-AcpP dehydratase, is an important enzyme in controlling fatty acid chain length and saturation levels. FabA-AcpP interactions are transient in nature and thus difficult to visualize. In this study, four mechanistic crosslinking probes mimicking varying acyl chain lengths were synthesized to systematically probe for modified chain length specificity of fourteen FabA mutants. These studies provide evidence for the AcpP interacting “positive patch,” FabA mutations that altered substrate specificity, and the roles that the FabA “gating residues” play in chain-length selection. PMID:26526101

  16. Assembly of lipopolysaccharide in Escherichia coli requires the essential LapB heat shock protein.

    PubMed

    Klein, Gracjana; Kobylak, Natalia; Lindner, Buko; Stupak, Anna; Raina, Satish

    2014-05-23

    Here, we describe two new heat shock proteins involved in the assembly of LPS in Escherichia coli, LapA and LapB (lipopolysaccharide assembly protein A and B). lapB mutants were identified based on an increased envelope stress response. Envelope stress-responsive pathways control key steps in LPS biogenesis and respond to defects in the LPS assembly. Accordingly, the LPS content in ΔlapB or Δ(lapA lapB) mutants was elevated, with an enrichment of LPS derivatives with truncations in the core region, some of which were pentaacylated and exhibited carbon chain polymorphism. Further, the levels of LpxC, the enzyme that catalyzes the first committed step of lipid A synthesis, were highly elevated in the Δ(lapA lapB) mutant. Δ(lapA lapB) mutant accumulated extragenic suppressors that mapped either to lpxC, waaC, and gmhA, or to the waaQ operon (LPS biosynthesis) and lpp (Braun's lipoprotein). Increased synthesis of either FabZ (3-R-hydroxymyristoyl acyl carrier protein dehydratase), slrA (novel RpoE-regulated non-coding sRNA), lipoprotein YceK, toxin HicA, or MurA (UDP-N-acetylglucosamine 1-carboxyvinyltransferase) suppressed some of the Δ(lapA lapB) defects. LapB contains six tetratricopeptide repeats and, at the C-terminal end, a rubredoxin-like domain that was found to be essential for its activity. In pull-down experiments, LapA and LapB co-purified with LPS, Lpt proteins, FtsH (protease), DnaK, and DnaJ (chaperones). A specific interaction was also observed between WaaC and LapB. Our data suggest that LapB coordinates assembly of proteins involved in LPS synthesis at the plasma membrane and regulates turnover of LpxC, thereby ensuring balanced biosynthesis of LPS and phospholipids consistent with its essentiality.

  17. Cell age dependent concentration of Escherichia coli divisome proteins analyzed with ImageJ and ObjectJ

    PubMed Central

    Vischer, Norbert O. E.; Verheul, Jolanda; Postma, Marten; van den Berg van Saparoea, Bart; Galli, Elisa; Natale, Paolo; Gerdes, Kenn; Luirink, Joen; Vollmer, Waldemar; Vicente, Miguel; den Blaauwen, Tanneke

    2015-01-01

    The rod-shaped Gram-negative bacterium Escherichia coli multiplies by elongation followed by binary fission. Longitudinal growth of the cell envelope and synthesis of the new poles are organized by two protein complexes called elongasome and divisome, respectively. We have analyzed the spatio-temporal localization patterns of many of these morphogenetic proteins by immunolabeling the wild type strain MC4100 grown to steady state in minimal glucose medium at 28°C. This allowed the direct comparison of morphogenetic protein localization patterns as a function of cell age as imaged by phase contrast and fluorescence wide field microscopy. Under steady state conditions the age distribution of the cells is constant and is directly correlated to cell length. To quantify cell size and protein localization parameters in 1000s of labeled cells, we developed ‘Coli-Inspector,’ which is a project running under ImageJ with the plugin ‘ObjectJ.’ ObjectJ organizes image-analysis tasks using an integrated approach with the flexibility to produce different output formats from existing markers such as intensity data and geometrical parameters. ObjectJ supports the combination of automatic and interactive methods giving the user complete control over the method of image analysis and data collection, with visual inspection tools for quick elimination of artifacts. Coli-inspector was used to sort the cells according to division cycle cell age and to analyze the spatio-temporal localization pattern of each protein. A unique dataset has been created on the concentration and position of the proteins during the cell cycle. We show for the first time that a subset of morphogenetic proteins have a constant cellular concentration during the cell division cycle whereas another set exhibits a cell division cycle dependent concentration variation. Using the number of proteins present at midcell, the stoichiometry of the divisome is discussed. PMID:26124755

  18. Sequential peptide affinity purification system for the systematic isolation and identification of protein complexes from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Babu, Mohan; Butland, Gareth; Pogoutse, Oxana; Li, Joyce; Greenblatt, Jack F; Emili, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    Biochemical purification of affinity-tagged proteins in combination with mass spectrometry methods is increasingly seen as a cornerstone of systems biology, as it allows for the systematic genome-scale characterization of macromolecular protein complexes, representing demarcated sets of stably interacting protein partners. Accurate and sensitive identification of both the specific and shared polypeptide components of distinct complexes requires purification to near homogeneity. To this end, a sequential peptide affinity (SPA) purification system was developed to enable the rapid and efficient isolation of native Escherichia coli protein complexes (J Proteome Res 3:463-468, 2004). SPA purification makes use of a dual-affinity tag, consisting of three modified FLAG sequences (3X FLAG) and a calmodulin binding peptide (CBP), spaced by a cleavage site for tobacco etch virus (TEV) protease (J Proteome Res 3:463-468, 2004). Using the lambda-phage Red homologous recombination system (PNAS 97:5978-5983, 2000), a DNA cassette, encoding the SPA-tag and a selectable marker flanked by gene-specific targeting sequences, is introduced into a selected locus in the E. coli chromosome so as to create a C-terminal fusion with the protein of interest. This procedure aims for near-endogenous levels of tagged protein production in the recombinant bacteria to avoid spurious, non-specific protein associations (J Proteome Res 3:463-468, 2004). In this chapter, we describe a detailed, optimized protocol for the tagging, purification, and subsequent mass spectrometry-based identification of the subunits of even low-abundance bacterial protein complexes isolated as part of an ongoing large-scale proteomic study in E. coli (Nature 433:531-537, 2005).

  19. Creation of a Cellooligosaccharide-Assimilating Escherichia coli Strain by Displaying Active Beta-Glucosidase on the Cell Surface via a Novel Anchor Protein

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Tsutomu; Kawabata, Hitomi; Ogino, Chiaki; Kondo, Akihiko

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrated direct assimilation of cellooligosaccharide using Escherichia coli displaying beta-glucosidase (BGL). BGL from Thermobifida fusca YX (Tfu0937) was displayed on the E. coli cell surface using a novel anchor protein named Blc. This strain was grown successfully on 0.2% cellobiose, and the optical density at 600 nm (OD600) was 1.05 after 20 h. PMID:21742905

  20. Two different late embryogenesis abundant proteins from Arabidopsis thaliana contain specific domains that inhibit Escherichia coli growth.

    PubMed

    Campos, Francisco; Zamudio, Fernando; Covarrubias, Alejandra A

    2006-04-07

    Late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins constitute a set of proteins widespread in the plant kingdom that show common physicochemical properties such as high hydrophilicity and high content of small amino acid residues such as glycine, alanine, and serine. Typically, these proteins accumulate in response to water deficit conditions imposed by the environment or during plant normal development. In this work, we show that the over-expression in Escherichia coli of proteins of the LEA 2 and the LEA 4 families from Arabidopsis thaliana leads to inhibition of bacterial growth and that this effect is dependent on discrete regions of the proteins. Our data indicate that their antimicrobial effect is achieved through their interaction with intracellular targets. The relevance of the cationic nature and the predicted structural organization of particular protein domains in this detrimental effect on the bacteria growth process is discussed.

  1. Virulence characteristics of extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli deletion of gene encoding the outer membrane protein X

    PubMed Central

    MENG, Xianrong; LIU, Xueling; ZHANG, Liyuan; HOU, Bo; LI, Binyou; TAN, Chen; LI, Zili; ZHOU, Rui; LI, Shaowen

    2016-01-01

    Outer membrane protein X (OmpX) and its homologues have been proposed to contribute to the virulence in various bacterial species. But, their role in virulence of extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC) is yet to be determined. This study evaluates the role of OmpX in ExPEC virulence in vitro and in vivo using a clinical strain PPECC42 of porcine origin. The ompX deletion mutant exhibited increased swimming motility and decreased adhesion to, and invasion of pulmonary epithelial A549 cell, compared to the wild-type strain. A mild increase in LD50 and distinct decrease in bacterial load in such organs as heart, liver, spleen, lung and kidney were observed in mice infected with the ompX mutant. Complementation of the complete ompX gene in trans restored the virulence of mutant strain to the level of wild-type strain. Our results reveal that OmpX contributes to ExPEC virulence, but may be not an indispensable virulence determinant. PMID:27149893

  2. Purification, Refolding, and Crystallization of the Outer Membrane Protein OmpG from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Köster, Stefan; van Pee, Katharina; Yildiz, Özkan

    2015-01-01

    OmpG is a pore-forming protein from E. coli outer membranes. Unlike the classical outer membrane porins, which are trimers, the OmpG channel is a monomeric β-barrel made of 14 antiparallel β-strands with short periplasmic turns and longer extracellular loops. The channel activity of OmpG is pH dependent and the channel is gated by the extracellular loop L6. At neutral/high pH, the channel is open and permeable for substrate molecules with a size up to 900 Da. At acidic pH, loop L6 folds across the channel and blocks the pore. The channel blockage at acidic pH appears to be triggered by the protonation of a histidine pair on neighboring β-strands, which repel one another, resulting in the rearrangement of loop L6 and channel closure. OmpG was purified by refolding from inclusion bodies and crystallized in two and three dimensions. Crystallization and analysis by electron microscopy and X-ray crystallography revealed the fundamental mechanisms essential for the channel activity.

  3. Periplasmic protein related to the sn-glycerol-3-phosphate transport system of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Silhavy, T J; Hartig-Beecken, I; Boos, W

    1976-01-01

    Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis of shock fluids of Escherichia coli K-12 revealed the presence of a periplasmic protein related to sn-glycerol-3-phosphate transport (GLPT) that is under the regulation of glpR, the regulatory gene of the glp regulon. Mutants selected for their resistance to phosphonomycin and found to be defective in sn-glycerol-3-phosphate transport either did not produce GLPT or produced it in reduced amounts. Other mutations exhibited no apparent effect of GLPT. Transductions of glpT+ nalA phage P1 into these mutants and selection for growth on sn-glycerol-3-phosphate revealed a 50% cotransduction frequency to nalA. Reversion of mutants taht did not produce GLPT to growth on sn-glycerol-3-phosphate resulted in strains that produce GLPT. This suggests a close relationship of GLPT to the glpT gene and to sn-glycerol-3-phosphate transport. Attempts to demonstrate binding activity of GLPT in crude shock fluid towards sn-glycerol-3-phosphate have failed so far. However, all shock fluids, independent of their GLPT content, exhibited an enzymatic activity that hydrolyzes under the conditions of the binding assay, 30 to 60% of the sn-glycerol-3-phosphate to glycerol and inorganic orthophosphate. Images PMID:770459

  4. Evidence that regulatory protein MarA of Escherichia coli represses rob by steric hindrance.

    PubMed

    McMurry, Laura M; Levy, Stuart B

    2010-08-01

    The MarA protein of Escherichia coli can both activate and repress the initiation of transcription, depending on the position and orientation of its degenerate 20-bp binding site ("marbox") at the promoter. For all three known repressed genes, the marbox overlaps the promoter. It has been reported that MarA represses the rob promoter via an RNA polymerase (RNAP)-DNA-MarA ternary complex. Under similar conditions, we found a ternary complex for the repressed purA promoter also. These findings, together with the backwards orientation of repressed marboxes, suggested a unique interaction of MarA with RNAP in repression. However, no repression-specific residues of MarA could be found among 38 single-alanine replacement mutations previously shown to retain activation function or among mutants from random mutagenesis. Mutations Thr12Ala, Arg36Ala, Thr95Ile, and Pro106Ala were more damaging for activation than for repression, some up to 10-fold, so these residues may play a specific role in activation. We found that nonspecific binding of RNAP to promoterless regions of DNA was presumably responsible for the ternary complexes seen previously. When RNAP binding was promoter specific, MarA reduced RNAP access to the rob promoter; there was little or no ternary complex. These findings strongly implicate steric hindrance as the mechanism of repression of rob by MarA.

  5. MioC and GidA proteins promote cell division in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Lies, Mark; Visser, Bryan J; Joshi, Mohan C; Magnan, David; Bates, David

    2015-01-01

    The well-conserved genes surrounding the E. coli replication origin, mioC and gidA, do not normally affect chromosome replication and have little known function. We report that mioC and gidA mutants exhibit a moderate cell division inhibition phenotype. Cell elongation is exacerbated by a fis deletion, likely owing to delayed replication and subsequent cell cycle stress. Measurements of replication initiation frequency and origin segregation indicate that mioC and gidA do not inhibit cell division through any effect on oriC function. Division inhibition is also independent of the two known replication/cell division checkpoints, SOS and nucleoid occlusion. Complementation analysis indicates that mioC and gidA affect cell division in trans, indicating their effect is at the protein level. Transcriptome analysis by RNA sequencing showed that expression of a cell division septum component, YmgF, is significantly altered in mioC and gidA mutants. Our data reveal new roles for the gene products of gidA and mioC in the division apparatus, and we propose that their expression, cyclically regulated by chromatin remodeling at oriC, is part of a cell cycle regulatory program coordinating replication initiation and cell division.

  6. Topographic labelling of pore-forming proteins from the outer membrane of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Page, M G; Rosenbusch, J P

    1986-01-01

    The topography of three pore-forming proteins from the outer membrane of Escherichia coli has been explored by using two labelling techniques. Firstly, the distribution of nucleophilic residues has been investigated by selective chemical modification using arylglyoxals (for arginine residues), isothiocyanates (for lysine residues), carbodi-imides (for carboxy residues) and diazonium salts. Secondly, the membrane-embedded domains have been investigated by labelling with photoactivatable phospholipid analogues and a reagent that partitions into the membrane. Few nucleophilic groups are found to be freely accessible to pore-impermeant probes reacting in the aqueous medium. More groups are accessible to small, pore-permeant probes, suggesting that several groups of each sort are contained within the pore. In addition, there appear to be a number of arginine, lysine, carboxyl and many tyrosine residues that are rather inaccessible and that react only with small, hydrophobic probes, if at all. Amongst these more deeply buried residues there are four arginine residues and an as-yet-undetermined number of carboxy residues that appear to be essential to the structural integrity of the oligomeric molecule. Images Fig. 4. PMID:2428354

  7. The Protein Acetyltransferase PatZ from Escherichia coli Is Regulated by Autoacetylation-induced Oligomerization*

    PubMed Central

    de Diego Puente, Teresa; Gallego-Jara, Julia; Castaño-Cerezo, Sara; Bernal Sánchez, Vicente; Fernández Espín, Vanesa; García de la Torre, José; Manjón Rubio, Arturo; Cánovas Díaz, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Lysine acetylation is an important post-translational modification in the metabolic regulation of both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. In Escherichia coli, PatZ (formerly YfiQ) is the only known acetyltransferase protein and is responsible for acetyl-CoA synthetase acetylation. In this study, we demonstrated PatZ-positive cooperativity in response to acetyl-CoA and the regulation of acetyl-CoA synthetase activity by the acetylation level. Furthermore, functional analysis of an E809A mutant showed that the conserved glutamate residue is not relevant for the PatZ catalytic mechanism. Biophysical studies demonstrated that PatZ is a stable tetramer in solution and is transformed to its octameric form by autoacetylation. Moreover, this modification is reversed by the sirtuin CobB. Finally, an in silico PatZ tetramerization model based on hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions is proposed and validated by three-dimensional hydrodynamic analysis. These data reveal, for the first time, the structural regulation of an acetyltransferase by autoacetylation in a prokaryotic organism. PMID:26251518

  8. Crystal structure of penicillin-binding protein 3 (PBP3) from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Sauvage, Eric; Derouaux, Adeline; Fraipont, Claudine; Joris, Marine; Herman, Raphaël; Rocaboy, Mathieu; Schloesser, Marie; Dumas, Jacques; Kerff, Frédéric; Nguyen-Distèche, Martine; Charlier, Paulette

    2014-01-01

    In Escherichia coli, penicillin-binding protein 3 (PBP3), also known as FtsI, is a central component of the divisome, catalyzing cross-linking of the cell wall peptidoglycan during cell division. PBP3 is mainly periplasmic, with a 23 residues cytoplasmic tail and a single transmembrane helix. We have solved the crystal structure of a soluble form of PBP3 (PBP3(57-577)) at 2.5 Å revealing the two modules of high molecular weight class B PBPs, a carboxy terminal module exhibiting transpeptidase activity and an amino terminal module of unknown function. To gain additional insight, the PBP3 Val88-Ser165 subdomain (PBP3(88-165)), for which the electron density is poorly defined in the PBP3 crystal, was produced and its structure solved by SAD phasing at 2.1 Å. The structure shows a three dimensional domain swapping with a β-strand of one molecule inserted between two strands of the paired molecule, suggesting a possible role in PBP3(57-577) dimerization.

  9. The Protein Acetyltransferase PatZ from Escherichia coli Is Regulated by Autoacetylation-induced Oligomerization.

    PubMed

    de Diego Puente, Teresa; Gallego-Jara, Julia; Castaño-Cerezo, Sara; Bernal Sánchez, Vicente; Fernández Espín, Vanesa; García de la Torre, José; Manjón Rubio, Arturo; Cánovas Díaz, Manuel

    2015-09-18

    Lysine acetylation is an important post-translational modification in the metabolic regulation of both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. In Escherichia coli, PatZ (formerly YfiQ) is the only known acetyltransferase protein and is responsible for acetyl-CoA synthetase acetylation. In this study, we demonstrated PatZ-positive cooperativity in response to acetyl-CoA and the regulation of acetyl-CoA synthetase activity by the acetylation level. Furthermore, functional analysis of an E809A mutant showed that the conserved glutamate residue is not relevant for the PatZ catalytic mechanism. Biophysical studies demonstrated that PatZ is a stable tetramer in solution and is transformed to its octameric form by autoacetylation. Moreover, this modification is reversed by the sirtuin CobB. Finally, an in silico PatZ tetramerization model based on hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions is proposed and validated by three-dimensional hydrodynamic analysis. These data reveal, for the first time, the structural regulation of an acetyltransferase by autoacetylation in a prokaryotic organism.

  10. The Escherichia coli RNA polymerase alpha subunit and transcriptional activation by bacteriophage lambda CII protein.

    PubMed

    Gabig, M; Obuchowski, M; Ciesielska, A; Latała, B; Wegrzyn, A; Thomas, M S; Wegrzyn, G

    1998-01-01

    Bacteriophage lambda is not able to lysogenise the Escherichia coli rpoA341 mutant. This mutation causes a single amino acid substitution Lys271Glu in the C-terminal domain of the RNA polymerase alpha subunit (alphaCTD). Our previous studies indicated that the impaired lysogenisation of the rpoA341 host is due to a defect in transcriptional activation by the phage CII protein and suggested a role for alphaCTD in this process. Here we used a series of truncation and point mutants in the rpoA gene placed on a plasmid to investigate the process of transcriptional activation by the cII gene product. Our results indicate that amino-acid residues 265, 268 and 271 in the a subunit may play an important role in the CII-mediated activation of the pE promoter (most probably residue 271) or may be involved in putative interactions between alphaCTD and an UP-like element near pE (most probably residues 265 and 268). Measurement of the activity of pE-lacZ, pI-lacZ and p(aQ)-lacZ fusions in the rpoA+ and rpoA341 hosts demonstrated that the mechanism of activation of these CII-dependent promoters may be in each case different.

  11. The Catabolite Repressor Protein-Cyclic AMP Complex Regulates csgD and Biofilm Formation in Uropathogenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Hufnagel, David A; Evans, Margery L; Greene, Sarah E; Pinkner, Jerome S; Hultgren, Scott J; Chapman, Matthew R

    2016-12-15

    The extracellular matrix protects Escherichia coli from immune cells, oxidative stress, predation, and other environmental stresses. Production of the E. coli extracellular matrix is regulated by transcription factors that are tuned to environmental conditions. The biofilm master regulator protein CsgD upregulates curli and cellulose, the two major polymers in the extracellular matrix of uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) biofilms. We found that cyclic AMP (cAMP) regulates curli, cellulose, and UPEC biofilms through csgD The alarmone cAMP is produced by adenylate cyclase (CyaA), and deletion of cyaA resulted in reduced extracellular matrix production and biofilm formation. The catabolite repressor protein (CRP) positively regulated csgD transcription, leading to curli and cellulose production in the UPEC isolate, UTI89. Glucose, a known inhibitor of CyaA activity, blocked extracellular matrix formation when added to the growth medium. The mutant strains ΔcyaA and Δcrp did not produce rugose biofilms, pellicles, curli, cellulose, or CsgD. Three putative CRP binding sites were identified within the csgD-csgB intergenic region, and purified CRP could gel shift the csgD-csgB intergenic region. Additionally, we found that CRP binded upstream of kpsMT, which encodes machinery for K1 capsule production. Together our work shows that cAMP and CRP influence E. coli biofilms through transcriptional regulation of csgD IMPORTANCE The catabolite repressor protein (CRP)-cyclic AMP (cAMP) complex influences the transcription of ∼7% of genes on the Escherichia coli chromosome (D. Zheng, C. Constantinidou, J. L. Hobman, and S. D. Minchin, Nucleic Acids Res 32:5874-5893, 2004, https://dx.doi.org/10.1093/nar/gkh908). Glucose inhibits E. coli biofilm formation, and ΔcyaA and Δcrp mutants show impaired biofilm formation (D. W. Jackson, J.W. Simecka, and T. Romeo, J Bacteriol 184:3406-3410, 2002, https://dx.doi.org/10.1128/JB.184.12.3406-3410.2002). We determined that the c

  12. Proteomic analysis reveals protein expression differences in Escherichia coli strains associated with persistent versus transient mastitis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Escherichia coli is a leading cause of bacterial mastitis in dairy cattle. Typically this infection is transient in nature, causing an infection that lasts 2-3 days. However, in a minority of cases, E. coli has been shown to cause a persistent intramammary infection. The mechanisms that allow for...

  13. Rational Design of a Carrier Protein for the Production of Recombinant Toxic Peptides in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Pizzo, Elio; Varcamonti, Mario; Zanfardino, Anna; Sgambati, Valeria; Di Maro, Antimo; Carpentieri, Andrea; Izzo, Viviana; Di Donato, Alberto; Cafaro, Valeria; Notomista, Eugenio

    2016-01-01

    Commercial uses of bioactive peptides require low cost, effective methods for their production. We developed a new carrier protein for high yield production of recombinant peptides in Escherichia coli very well suited for the production of toxic peptides like antimicrobial peptides. GKY20, a short antimicrobial peptide derived from the C-terminus of human thrombin, was fused to the C-terminus of Onconase, a small ribonuclease (104 amino acids), which efficiently drove the peptide into inclusion bodies with very high expression levels (about 200–250 mg/L). After purification of the fusion protein by immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography, peptide was obtained by chemical cleavage in diluted acetic acid of an acid labile Asp-Pro sequence with more than 95% efficiency. To improve peptide purification, Onconase was mutated to eliminate all acid labile sequences thus reducing the release of unwanted peptides during the acid cleavage. Mutations were chosen to preserve the differential solubility of Onconase as function of pH, which allows its selective precipitation at neutral pH after the cleavage. The improved carrier allowed the production of 15–18 mg of recombinant peptide per liter of culture with 96–98% purity without the need of further chromatographic steps after the acid cleavage. The antimicrobial activity of the recombinant peptide, with an additional proline at the N-terminus, was tested on Gram-negative and Gram-positive strains and was found to be identical to that measured for synthetic GKY20. This finding suggests that N-terminal proline residue does not change the antimicrobial properties of recombinant (P)GKY20. The improved carrier, which does not contain cysteine and methionine residues, Asp-Pro and Asn-Gly sequences, is well suited for the production of peptides using any of the most popular chemical cleavage methods. PMID:26808536

  14. Rational Design of a Carrier Protein for the Production of Recombinant Toxic Peptides in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Pane, Katia; Durante, Lorenzo; Pizzo, Elio; Varcamonti, Mario; Zanfardino, Anna; Sgambati, Valeria; Di Maro, Antimo; Carpentieri, Andrea; Izzo, Viviana; Di Donato, Alberto; Cafaro, Valeria; Notomista, Eugenio

    2016-01-01

    Commercial uses of bioactive peptides require low cost, effective methods for their production. We developed a new carrier protein for high yield production of recombinant peptides in Escherichia coli very well suited for the production of toxic peptides like antimicrobial peptides. GKY20, a short antimicrobial peptide derived from the C-terminus of human thrombin, was fused to the C-terminus of Onconase, a small ribonuclease (104 amino acids), which efficiently drove the peptide into inclusion bodies with very high expression levels (about 200-250 mg/L). After purification of the fusion protein by immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography, peptide was obtained by chemical cleavage in diluted acetic acid of an acid labile Asp-Pro sequence with more than 95% efficiency. To improve peptide purification, Onconase was mutated to eliminate all acid labile sequences thus reducing the release of unwanted peptides during the acid cleavage. Mutations were chosen to preserve the differential solubility of Onconase as function of pH, which allows its selective precipitation at neutral pH after the cleavage. The improved carrier allowed the production of 15-18 mg of recombinant peptide per liter of culture with 96-98% purity without the need of further chromatographic steps after the acid cleavage. The antimicrobial activity of the recombinant peptide, with an additional proline at the N-terminus, was tested on Gram-negative and Gram-positive strains and was found to be identical to that measured for synthetic GKY20. This finding suggests that N-terminal proline residue does not change the antimicrobial properties of recombinant (P)GKY20. The improved carrier, which does not contain cysteine and methionine residues, Asp-Pro and Asn-Gly sequences, is well suited for the production of peptides using any of the most popular chemical cleavage methods.

  15. The secreted effector protein EspZ is essential for virulence of rabbit enteropathogenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Wilbur, John Scott; Byrd, Wyatt; Ramamurthy, Shylaja; Ledvina, Hannah E; Khirfan, Khaldoon; Riggs, Michael W; Boedeker, Edgar C; Vedantam, Gayatri; Viswanathan, V K

    2015-03-01

    Attaching and effacing (A/E) pathogens adhere intimately to intestinal enterocytes and efface brush border microvilli. A key virulence strategy of A/E pathogens is the type III secretion system (T3SS)-mediated delivery of effector proteins into host cells. The secreted protein EspZ is postulated to promote enterocyte survival by regulating the T3SS and/or by modulating epithelial signaling pathways. To explore the role of EspZ in A/E pathogen virulence, we generated an isogenic espZ deletion strain (ΔespZ) and corresponding cis-complemented derivatives of rabbit enteropathogenic Escherichia coli and compared their abilities to regulate the T3SS and influence host cell survival in vitro. For virulence studies, rabbits infected with these strains were monitored for bacterial colonization, clinical signs, and intestinal tissue alterations. Consistent with data from previous reports, espZ-transfected epithelial cells were refractory to infection-dependent effector translocation. Also, the ΔespZ strain induced greater host cell death than did the parent and complemented strains. In rabbit infections, fecal ΔespZ strain levels were 10-fold lower than those of the parent strain at 1 day postinfection, while the complemented strain was recovered at intermediate levels. In contrast to the parent and complemented mutants, ΔespZ mutant fecal carriage progressively decreased on subsequent days. ΔespZ mutant-infected animals gained weight steadily over the infection period, failed to show characteristic disease symptoms, and displayed minimal infection-induced histological alterations. Terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end labeling (TUNEL) staining of intestinal sections revealed increased epithelial cell apoptosis on day 1 after infection with the ΔespZ strain compared to animals infected with the parent or complemented strains. Thus, EspZ-dependent host cell cytoprotection likely prevents epithelial cell death and sloughing and thereby

  16. The Secreted Effector Protein EspZ Is Essential for Virulence of Rabbit Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Wilbur, John Scott; Byrd, Wyatt; Ramamurthy, Shylaja; Ledvina, Hannah E.; Khirfan, Khaldoon; Riggs, Michael W.; Boedeker, Edgar C.; Vedantam, Gayatri

    2015-01-01

    Attaching and effacing (A/E) pathogens adhere intimately to intestinal enterocytes and efface brush border microvilli. A key virulence strategy of A/E pathogens is the type III secretion system (T3SS)-mediated delivery of effector proteins into host cells. The secreted protein EspZ is postulated to promote enterocyte survival by regulating the T3SS and/or by modulating epithelial signaling pathways. To explore the role of EspZ in A/E pathogen virulence, we generated an isogenic espZ deletion strain (ΔespZ) and corresponding cis-complemented derivatives of rabbit enteropathogenic Escherichia coli and compared their abilities to regulate the T3SS and influence host cell survival in vitro. For virulence studies, rabbits infected with these strains were monitored for bacterial colonization, clinical signs, and intestinal tissue alterations. Consistent with data from previous reports, espZ-transfected epithelial cells were refractory to infection-dependent effector translocation. Also, the ΔespZ strain induced greater host cell death than did the parent and complemented strains. In rabbit infections, fecal ΔespZ strain levels were 10-fold lower than those of the parent strain at 1 day postinfection, while the complemented strain was recovered at intermediate levels. In contrast to the parent and complemented mutants, ΔespZ mutant fecal carriage progressively decreased on subsequent days. ΔespZ mutant-infected animals gained weight steadily over the infection period, failed to show characteristic disease symptoms, and displayed minimal infection-induced histological alterations. Terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end labeling (TUNEL) staining of intestinal sections revealed increased epithelial cell apoptosis on day 1 after infection with the ΔespZ strain compared to animals infected with the parent or complemented strains. Thus, EspZ-dependent host cell cytoprotection likely prevents epithelial cell death and sloughing and thereby

  17. Purification and Bicelle Crystallization for Structure Determination of the E. coli Outer Membrane Protein TamA.

    PubMed

    Gruss, Fabian; Hiller, Sebastian; Maier, Timm

    2015-01-01

    TamA is an Omp85 protein involved in autotransporter assembly in the outer membrane of Escherichia coli. It comprises a C-terminal 16-stranded transmembrane β-barrel as well as three periplasmic POTRA domains, and is a challenging target for structure determination. Here, we present a method for crystal structure determination of TamA, including recombinant expression in E. coli, detergent extraction, chromatographic purification, and bicelle crystallization in combination with seeding. As a result, crystals in space group P21212 are obtained, which diffract to 2.3 Å resolution. This protocol also serves as a template for structure determination of other outer membrane proteins, in particular of the Omp85 family.

  18. Methanogenic diversity studies within the rumen of Surti buffaloes based on methyl coenzyme M reductase A (mcrA) genes point to Methanobacteriales.

    PubMed

    Singh, Krishna M; Pandya, Paresh R; Parnerkar, Subhash; Tripathi, Ajai K; Ramani, Umed; Koringa, Prakash G; Rank, Dharamshi N; Joshi, Chaitanya G; Kothari, Ramesh K

    2010-01-01

    Methane emissions from ruminant livestock are considered to be one of the more potent forms of greenhouse gases contributing to global warming. Many strategies to reduce emissions are targeting the methanogens that inhabit the rumen, but such an approach can only be successful if it targets all the major groups of ruminant methanogens. Therefore, basic knowledge of the diversity of these microbes in breeds of buffalo is required. Therefore, the methanogenic community in the rumen of Surti buffaloes was analyzed by PCR amplification, cloning, and sequencing of methyl coenzyme M reductase (mcrA) gene. A total of 76 clones were identified, revealing 14 different sequences (phylotypes). All 14 sequences were similar to methanogens belonging to the order Methanobacteriales. Within Methanobacteriales, 12 clones (6 OTUs) were similar to Methanosphaera stadtmanae and the remaining 8 phylotypes (64 clones) were similar to unclassified Methanobacteriales. Overall, members of the Methanobacteriales dominated the mcrA clone library in the rumen of Surti buffalo. Further studies and effective strategies can be made to inhibit the growth of Methanobacteriales to reduce methane emission from the rumen which would help in preventing global warming.

  19. Jacks of all trades?--Probably not. The E. coli Eib proteins bind IgG Fc.

    PubMed

    Leo, Jack C; Goldman, Adrian

    2010-05-01

    We recently published a paper in Molecular Immunology (Leo and Goldman, 2009) showing that the Eib proteins from certain E. coli strains bind IgG Fc, in contrast to a previous report (Ghumra and Pleass, 2007). Richard J. Pleass has commented on our paper (Pleass, 2009) and expressed a series of unjustified misgivings about our conclusions. Here, we address the points raised by Pleass, and reassert our claim that the Eibs are indeed genuine receptors for IgG Fc.

  20. Expression, purification and characterization of two truncated peste des petits ruminants virus matrix proteins in Escherichia coli, and production of polyclonal antibodies against this protein.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fuxiao; Wu, Xiaodong; Li, Lin; Liu, Zengshan; Wang, Zhiliang

    2013-09-01

    Peste des petits ruminants virus (PPRV), the etiological agent of peste des petits ruminants, is classified into the genus Morbillivirus in the family Paramyxoviridae. The PPRV matrix (M) gene is composed of 1483 base pairs, encoding a 335 amino acids M protein with a molecular weight of approximately 38kD. We have demonstrated previously that the full-length M protein was expressed at an extremely low level or not even expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3). In this study, the M protein was split into two truncated forms to be successfully expressed in E. coli at a high level using the pET30a (+) vector, respectively, by analysis of SDS-PAGE, western blot and MALDI-TOF-MS. The optimization of culture conditions led us to perform the recombinant protein induction with 0.2mM IPTG at 28°C for 12h, whereby both proteins nevertheless were expressed in the insoluble form. Therefore, both His-tagged proteins were purified under the denaturing condition using a commercially available kit. Balb/c mice were immunized with the complex of purified proteins and then effectively produced polyclonal antibodies, which reached to a relatively high titer by the analysis of ELISA. The specificity of the prepared polyclonal antibodies was checked by western blot and immunofluorescence, revealing them with the desirable specificity against both non-denatured and denatured M proteins.

  1. In silico analysis and recombinant expression of BamA protein as a universal vaccine against Escherichia coli in mice.

    PubMed

    Guan, Qingfeng; Wang, Xiao; Wang, Xiumin; Teng, Da; Wang, Jianhua

    2016-06-01

    Colibacillosis, caused by pathogenic Escherichia coli, is a common disease in animals and human worldwide with extensive losses in breeding industry and with millions of people death annually. There is thus an urgent need for the development of universal vaccines against colibacillosis. In this study, the BamA protein was analyzed in silico for sequence homology, physicochemical properties, allergenic prediction, and epitopes prediction. The BamA protein (containing 286 amino acids) clusters in E. coli were retrieved in UniProtKB database, in which 81.7 % sequences were identical (Uniref entry A7ZHR7), and sequences with 94.82 % identity were above 93.4 %. Moreover, BamA was highly conserved among Salmonella and Shigella and has no allergenicity to mice and human. The epitopes of BamA were located principally in periplasm and extracellular domain. Surf_Ag_VNR domain (at position 448-810 aa) of BamA was expressed, purified, and then used for immunization of mice. Titers of the rBamA sera were 1:736,000 and 1:152,000 against rBamA and E. coli and over 1:27,000 against Salmonella and Shigella. Opsonophagocytosis result revealed that the rBamA sera strengthened the phagocytic activity of neutrophils against E. coli. The survival rate of mice vaccinated with rBamA and PBS was 80 and 20 %, respectively. These data indicated that BamA could serve as a promising universal vaccine candidate for the development of a protective subunit vaccine against bacterial infection. Thus, the above protocol would provide more feasible technical clues and choices for available control of pathogenic E. coli, Salmonella, and Shigella.

  2. Protein A-mouse acidic mammalian chitinase-V5-His expressed in periplasmic space of Escherichia coli possesses chitinase functions comparable to CHO-expressed protein.

    PubMed

    Kashimura, Akinori; Okawa, Kazuaki; Ishikawa, Kotarou; Kida, Yuta; Iwabuchi, Kokoro; Matsushima, Yudai; Sakaguchi, Masayoshi; Sugahara, Yasusato; Oyama, Fumitaka

    2013-01-01

    Acidic mammalian chitinase (AMCase) has been shown to be associated with asthma in mouse models, allergic inflammation and food processing. Here, we describe an E. coli-expression system that allows for the periplasmic production of active AMCase fused to Protein A at the N-terminus and V5 epitope and (His)6 tag (V5-His) at the C-terminus (Protein A-AMCase-V5-His) in E. coli. The mouse AMCase cDNA was cloned into the vector pEZZ18, which is an expression vector containing the Staphylococcus Protein A promoter, with the signal sequence and truncated form of Protein A for extracellular expression in E. coli. Most of the Protein A-AMCase-V5-His was present in the periplasmic space with chitinolytic activity, which was measured using a chromogenic substrate, 4-nitrophenyl N,N'-diacetyl-β-D-chitobioside. The Protein A-AMCase-V5-His was purified from periplasmic fractions using an IgG Sepharose column followed by a Ni Sepharose chromatography. The recombinant protein showed a robust peak of activity with a maximum observed activity at pH 2.0, where an optimal temperature was 54°C. When this protein was preincubated between pH 1.0 and pH 11.0 on ice for 1 h, full chitinolytic activity was retained. This protein was also heat-stable till 54°C, both at pH 2.0 and 7.0. The chitinolytic activity of the recombinant AMCase against 4-nitrophenyl N,N'-diacetyl-β-D-chitobioside was comparable to the CHO-expressed AMCase. Furthermore, the recombinant AMCase bound to chitin beads, cleaved colloidal chitin and released mainly N,N'-diacetylchitobiose fragments. Thus, the E. coli-expressed Protein A-mouse AMCase-V5-His fusion protein possesses chitinase functions comparable to the CHO-expressed AMCase. This recombinant protein can be used to elucidate detailed biomedical functions of the mouse AMCase.

  3. Mutations that alter the equilibrium between open and closed conformations of Escherichia coli maltose-binding protein impede its ability to enhance the solubility of passenger proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Nallamsetty, Sreedevi; Waugh, David S.

    2007-12-21

    Certain highly soluble proteins, such as Escherichia coli maltose-binding protein (MBP), have the ability to enhance the solubility of their fusion partners, making them attractive vehicles for the production of recombinant proteins, yet the mechanism of solubility enhancement remains poorly understood. Here, we report that the solubility-enhancing properties of MBP are dramatically affected by amino acid substitutions that alter the equilibrium between its 'open' and 'closed' conformations. Our findings indicate that the solubility-enhancing activity of MBP is mediated by its open conformation and point to a likely role for the ligand-binding cleft in the mechanism of solubility enhancement.

  4. The Human Homolog of Escherichia coli Endonuclease V Is a Nucleolar Protein with Affinity for Branched DNA Structures

    PubMed Central

    Laerdahl, Jon K.; Gran Neurauter, Christine; Heggelund, Julie E.; Thorgaard, Eirik; Strøm-Andersen, Pernille; Bjørås, Magnar; Dalhus, Bjørn; Alseth, Ingrun

    2012-01-01

    Loss of amino groups from adenines in DNA results in the formation of hypoxanthine (Hx) bases with miscoding properties. The primary enzyme in Escherichia coli for DNA repair initiation at deaminated adenine is endonuclease V (endoV), encoded by the nfi gene, which cleaves the second phosphodiester bond 3′ of an Hx lesion. Endonuclease V orthologs are widespread in nature and belong to a family of highly conserved proteins. Whereas prokaryotic endoV enzymes are well characterized, the function of the eukaryotic homologs remains obscure. Here we describe the human endoV ortholog and show with bioinformatics and experimental analysis that a large number of transcript variants exist for the human endonuclease V gene (ENDOV), many of which are unlikely to be translated into functional protein. Full-length ENDOV is encoded by 8 evolutionary conserved exons covering the core region of the enzyme, in addition to one or more 3′-exons encoding an unstructured and poorly conserved C-terminus. In contrast to the E. coli enzyme, we find recombinant ENDOV neither to incise nor bind Hx-containing DNA. While both enzymes have strong affinity for several branched DNA substrates, cleavage is observed only with E. coli endoV. We find that ENDOV is localized in the cytoplasm and nucleoli of human cells. As nucleoli harbor the rRNA genes, this may suggest a role for the protein in rRNA gene transactions such as DNA replication or RNA transcription. PMID:23139746

  5. Accurate Prediction of Protein Functional Class From Sequence in the Mycobacterium Tuberculosis and Escherichia Coli Genomes Using Data Mining

    PubMed Central

    Karwath, Andreas; Clare, Amanda; Dehaspe, Luc

    2000-01-01

    The analysis of genomics data needs to become as automated as its generation. Here we present a novel data-mining approach to predicting protein functional class from sequence. This method is based on a combination of inductive logic programming clustering and rule learning. We demonstrate the effectiveness of this approach on the M. tuberculosis and E. coli genomes, and identify biologically interpretable rules which predict protein functional class from information only available from the sequence. These rules predict 65% of the ORFs with no assigned function in M. tuberculosis and 24% of those in E. coli, with an estimated accuracy of 60–80% (depending on the level of functional assignment). The rules are founded on a combination of detection of remote homology, convergent evolution and horizontal gene transfer. We identify rules that predict protein functional class even in the absence of detectable sequence or structural homology. These rules give insight into the evolutionary history of M. tuberculosis and E. coli. PMID:11119305

  6. Identification of a new member of the phage shock protein response in Escherichia coli, the phage shock protein G (PspG).

    PubMed

    Lloyd, Louise J; Jones, Susan E; Jovanovic, Goran; Gyaneshwar, Prasad; Rolfe, Matthew D; Thompson, Arthur; Hinton, Jay C; Buck, Martin

    2004-12-31

    The phage shock protein operon (pspABCDE) of Escherichia coli is strongly up-regulated in response to overexpression of the filamentous phage secretin protein IV (pIV) and by many other stress conditions including defects in protein export. PspA has an established role in maintenance of the proton-motive force of the cell under stress conditions. Here we present evidence for a new member of the phage shock response in E. coli. Using transcriptional profiling, we show that the synthesis of pIV in E. coli leads to a highly restricted response limited to the up-regulation of the psp operon genes and yjbO. The psp operon and yjbO are also up-regulated in response to pIV in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. yjbO is a highly conserved gene found exclusively in bacteria that contain a psp operon but is physically unlinked to the psp operon. yjbO encodes a putative inner membrane protein that is co-controlled with the psp operon genes and is predicted to be an effector of the psp response in E. coli. We present evidence that yjbO expression is driven by sigma(54)-RNA polymerase, activated by PspF and integration host factor, and negatively regulated by PspA. PspF specifically regulates only members of the PspF regulon: pspABCDE and yjbO. We found that increased expression of YjbO results in decreased motility of bacteria. Because yjbO is co-conserved and co-regulated with the psp operon and is a member of the phage shock protein F regulon, we propose that yjbO be renamed pspG.

  7. E. coli metabolic protein aldehyde-alcohol dehydrogenase-E binds to the ribosome: a unique moonlighting action revealed

    PubMed Central

    Shasmal, Manidip; Dey, Sandip; Shaikh, Tanvir R.; Bhakta, Sayan; Sengupta, Jayati

    2016-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly evident that a high degree of regulation is involved in the protein synthesis machinery entailing more interacting regulatory factors. A multitude of proteins have been identified recently which show regulatory function upon binding to the ribosome. Here, we identify tight association of a metabolic protein aldehyde-alcohol dehydrogenase E (AdhE) with the E. coli 70S ribosome isolated from cell extract under low salt wash conditions. Cryo-EM reconstruction of the ribosome sample allows us to localize its position on the head of the small subunit, near the mRNA entrance. Our study demonstrates substantial RNA unwinding activity of AdhE which can account for the ability of ribosome to translate through downstream of at least certain mRNA helices. Thus far, in E. coli, no ribosome-associated factor has been identified that shows downstream mRNA helicase activity. Additionally, the cryo-EM map reveals interaction of another extracellular protein, outer membrane protein C (OmpC), with the ribosome at the peripheral solvent side of the 50S subunit. Our result also provides important insight into plausible functional role of OmpC upon ribosome binding. Visualization of the ribosome purified directly from the cell lysate unveils for the first time interactions of additional regulatory proteins with the ribosome. PMID:26822933

  8. Genetic studies of an Escherichia coli K-12 temperature-sensitive mutant defective in membrane protein synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Sato, T; Ohki, M; Yura, T; Ito, K

    1979-01-01

    The mutant divE42(Ts) of Escherichia coli K-12, defective in the synthesis of membrane proteins and in the transcription of the lac operon at high temperature, has been further characterized. It was found that a mutation (divE42) located at about min 22 on the E. coli chromosome map is responsible for the Lac- phenotype and temperature-sensitive growth. The mutation could be contransduced with serC, pyrD, or pyrC by phage P1 at a frequency of 4, 16, or 0.5%, respectively, the gene order being serC-pyrD-ompA-sulA-divE-pyrC. Examination of temperature-independent revertants and Pyr+ transductants revealed that all the mutant phenotypes examined (deficiencies in the increase of activities of some membrane enzymes, expression of the lac operon, and synthesis of several other proteins) are due to a single mutation (divE42) which is recessive to the wild-type (divE+) allele. Protein synthesis in the mutant was also analyzed by dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Synthesis of a number of proteins, including membrane proteins, was found to decrease significantly, whereas that of an elongation factor, EF-Tu, increased upon transfer of a log-phase culture to high temperature (42 degrees C). These effects of temperature shift-up on protein synthesis were evident within 5 min under the conditions used. Images PMID:374381

  9. Expression, crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic studies of the outer membrane protein OmpW from Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Albrecht, Reinhard; Zeth, Kornelius; Söding, Johannes; Lupas, Andrei; Linke, Dirk

    2006-04-01

    The outer membrane protein OmpW from E. coli was overexpressed in inclusion bodies and refolded with the help of detergent. The protein has been crystallized and the crystals diffract to 3.5 Å resolution. OmpW is an eight-stranded 21 kDa molecular-weight β-barrel protein from the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria. It is a major antigen in bacterial infections and has implications in antibiotic resistance and in the oxidative degradation of organic compounds. OmpW from Escherichia coli was cloned and the protein was expressed in inclusion bodies. A method for refolding and purification was developed which yields properly folded protein according to circular-dichroism measurements. The protein has been crystallized and crystals were obtained that diffracted to a resolution limit of 3.5 Å. The crystals belong to space group P422, with unit-cell parameters a = 122.5, c = 105.7 Å. A homology model of OmpW is presented based on known structures of eight-stranded β-barrels, intended for use in molecular-replacement trials.

  10. Production of specific IgY antibody to the recombinant FanC protein produced in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Nasiri, Khadijeh; Zibaee, Saeed; Nassiri, Mohammadreza; Tahmoorespur, Mojtaba; Haghparast, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strains are one of the primary causes of diarrhea in newborn calves and in humans, pigs, and sheep. IgY technology has been identified as a promising alternative to generating a mass amount of specific antibody for use in immunotherapy and immunodiagnostics. The purpose of this study was to produce specific antibody by egg yolk antibody (IgY) to recombinant FanC protein from ETEC. Materials and Methods: FanC (K99) gene was amplified from ETEC by specific primers and polymerase chain reaction. The gene was cloned and subcloned into pTZ57R/T and pET32a (+) vectors, respectively. Recombinant vector was transferred into E. coli BL21 CodonPlus (DE3). Protein expression was investigated by 1 mM IPTG induction. Hens were immunized by the purified recombinant FanC protein. The activity and specificity of the IgY antibody were detected by dot-blotting, Western blotting, and indirect ELISA. Results: We obtained FanC specific IgYs by immunizing the hens with the recombinant FanC protein. The anti-FanC IgY showed binding specifically to the FanC protein of ETEC. Conclusion: The results emphasize that specific IgY against the recombinant FanC protein could be recommended as a candidate for passive immunization against ETEC infection in animals and humans. PMID:27746871

  11. Analysis of methane-producing and metabolizing archaeal and bacterial communities in sediments of the northern South China Sea and coastal Mai Po Nature Reserve revealed by PCR amplification of mcrA and pmoA genes

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Zhichao; Chen, Jing; Cao, Huiluo; Han, Ping; Gu, Ji-Dong

    2015-01-01

    Communities of methanogens, anaerobic methanotrophic archaea and aerobic methanotrophic bacteria (MOB) were compared by profiling polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-amplified products of mcrA and pmoA genes encoded by methyl-coenzyme M reductase alpha subunit and particulate methane monooxygenase alpha subunit, respectively, in sediments of northern South China Sea (nSCS) and Mai Po mangrove wetland. Community structures representing by mcrA gene based on 12 clone libraries from nSCS showed separate clusters indicating niche specificity, while, Methanomicrobiales, Methanosarcinales clades 1,2, and Methanomassiliicoccus-like groups of methanogens were the most abundant groups in nSCS sediment samples. Novel clusters specific to the SCS were identified and the phylogeny of mcrA gene-harboring archaea was updated. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used to detect mcrA gene abundance in all samples: similar abundance of mcrA gene in the surface layers of mangrove (3.4∼3.9 × 106 copies per gram dry weight) and of intertidal mudflat (5.5∼5.8 × 106 copies per gram dry weight) was observed, but higher abundance (6.9 × 106 to 1.02 × 108 copies per gram dry weight) was found in subsurface samples of both sediment types. Aerobic MOB were more abundant in surface layers (6.7∼11.1 × 105 copies per gram dry weight) than the subsurface layers (1.2∼5.9 × 105 copies per gram dry weight) based on pmoA gene. Mangrove surface layers harbored more abundant pmoA gene than intertidal mudflat, but less pmoA genes in the subsurface layers. Meanwhile, it is also noted that in surface layers of all samples, more pmoA gene copies were detected than the subsurface layers. Reedbed rhizosphere exhibited the highest gene abundance of mcrA gene (8.51 × 108 copies per gram dry weight) and pmoA gene (1.56 × 107 copies per gram dry weight). This study investigated the prokaryotic communities responsible for methane cycling in both marine and coastal wetland ecosystems, showing

  12. The Escherichia coli O157:H7 cattle immunoproteome includes outer membrane protein A (OmpA), a modulator of adherence to bovine rectoanal junction squamous epithelial (RSE) cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Building on previous studies, we defined the repertoire of proteins comprising the antigenome of Escherichia coli (E. coli) O157 cultured in Dulbecco's Modified Eagles Medium (DMEM) supplemented with norepinephrine (NE; O157 protein-antigenome), a beta-adrenergic hormone that regulates E. coli O157 ...

  13. In silico prediction of escherichia coli proteins targeting the host cell nucleus, with special reference to their role in colon cancer etiology.

    PubMed

    Khan, Abdul Arif

    2014-06-01

    The potential role of Escherichia coli in the development of colorectal carcinoma (CRC) has been investigated in many studies. Although the exact mechanism is not clear, chronic inflammation caused by E. coli and other related events are suggested as possible causes behind E. coli-induced colon cancer. It has been found that CRC cells, but not normal cells, are colonized by an intracellular form of E. coli. We predicted nuclear targeting of bacterial proteins in the host cell through computational tools nuclear localization signal (NLS) mapper and balanced subcellular localization predictor (BaCeILo). During intracellular E. coli residence, such targeting is highly likely and may have a possible role in colon cancer etiology. We observed that several gene expression-associated proteins of E. coli can migrate to the host nucleus during intracellular infections. This situation provides an opportunity for competitive interaction of host and pathogen proteins with similar cellular substrates, thereby increasing the chances of development of colon cancer. Moreover, the results indicated that proteins localized in the membrane of E. coli mostly act as secretary proteins in host cells. No exact correlation was observed between NLS prediction and nuclear localization prediction by BaCeILo. This is partly because of a number of reasons, including that only 30% of nuclear proteins carry NLS and that proteins <40 kDa molecular weight can passively target the host nucleus. This study concludes that detection of gene expression-specific E. coli proteins and their targeting of the nucleus may have a profound impact on CRC etiology.

  14. Engineering global transcription factor cyclic AMP receptor protein of Escherichia coli for improved 1-butanol tolerance.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongfang; Chong, Huiqing; Ching, Chi Bun; Song, Hao; Jiang, Rongrong

    2012-05-01

    One major challenge in biofuel production, including biobutanol production, is the low tolerance of the microbial host towards increasing biofuel concentration during fermentation. Here, we have demonstrated that Escherichia coli 1-butanol tolerance can be greatly enhanced through random mutagenesis of global transcription factor cyclic AMP receptor protein (CRP). Four mutants (MT1-MT4) with elevated 1-butanol tolerance were isolated from error-prone PCR libraries through an enrichment screening. A DNA shuffling library was then constructed using MT1-MT4 as templates and one mutant (MT5) that exhibited the best tolerance ability among all variants was selected. In the presence of 0.8 % (v/v, 6.5 g/l) 1-butanol, the growth rate of MT5 was found to be 0.28 h(-1) while that of wild type was 0.20 h(-1). When 1-butanol concentration increased to 1.2 % (9.7 g/l), the growth rate of MT5 (0.18 h(-1)) became twice that of the wild type (0.09 h(-1)). Microbial adhesion to hydrocarbon test showed that cell surface of MT5 was less hydrophobic and its cell length became significantly longer in the presence of 1-butanol, as observed by scanning electron microscopy. Quantitative real-time reverse transcription PCR analysis revealed that several CRP regulated, 1-butanol stress response related genes (rpoH, ompF, sodA, manX, male, and marA) demonstrated differential expression in MT5 in the presence or absence of 1-butanol. In conclusion, direct manipulation of the transcript profile through engineering global transcription factor CRP can provide a useful tool in strain engineering.

  15. Molecular and Structural Characterization of a Novel Escherichia coli Interleukin Receptor Mimic Protein

    PubMed Central

    Moriel, Danilo G.; Paxman, Jason J.; Lo, Alvin W.; Tan, Lendl; Sullivan, Matthew J.; Dando, Samantha J.; Beatson, Scott A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Urinary tract infection (UTI) is a disease of extremely high incidence in both community and nosocomial settings. UTIs cause significant morbidity and mortality, with approximately 150 million cases globally per year. Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) is the primary cause of UTI and is generally treated empirically. However, the rapidly increasing incidence of UTIs caused by multidrug-resistant UPEC strains has led to limited available treatment options and highlights the urgent need to develop alternative treatment and prevention strategies. In this study, we performed a comprehensive analysis to define the regulation, structure, function, and immunogenicity of recently identified UPEC vaccine candidate C1275 (here referred to as IrmA). We showed that the irmA gene is highly prevalent in UPEC, is cotranscribed with the biofilm-associated antigen 43 gene, and is regulated by the global oxidative stress response OxyR protein. Localization studies identified IrmA in the UPEC culture supernatant. We determined the structure of IrmA and showed that it adopts a unique domain-swapped dimer architecture. The dimeric structure of IrmA displays similarity to those of human cytokine receptors, including the interleukin-2 receptor (IL-2R), interleukin-4 receptor (IL-4R), and interleukin-10 receptor (IL-10R) binding domains, and we showed that purified IrmA can bind to their cognate cytokines. Finally, we showed that plasma from convalescent urosepsis patients contains high IrmA antibody titers, demonstrating the strong immunogenicity of IrmA. Taken together, our results indicate that IrmA may play an important role during UPEC infection. PMID:26980835

  16. Functional insights into the late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) protein family from Dendrobium officinale (Orchidaceae) using an Escherichia coli system.

    PubMed

    Ling, Hong; Zeng, Xu; Guo, Shunxing

    2016-12-22

    Late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins, a diverse family, accumulate during seed desiccation in the later stages of embryogenesis. LEA proteins are associated with tolerance to abiotic stresses, such as drought, salinity and high or cold temperature. Here, we report the first comprehensive survey of the LEA gene family in Dendrobium officinale, an important and widely grown medicinal orchid in China. Based on phylogenetic relationships with the complete set of Arabidopsis and Oryza LEA proteins, 17 genes encoding D. officinale LEAs (DofLEAs) were identified and their deduced proteins were classified into seven groups. The motif composition of these deduced proteins was correlated with the gene structure found in each LEA group. Our results reveal the DofLEA genes are widely distributed and expressed in tissues. Additionally, 11 genes from different groups were introduced into Escherichia coli to assess the functions of DofLEAs. Expression of 6 and 7 DofLEAs in E. coli improved growth performance compared with the control under salt and heat stress, respectively. Based on qPCR data, all of these genes were up-regulated in various tissues following exposure to salt and heat stresses. Our results suggest that DofLEAs play an important role in responses to abiotic stress.

  17. Alkaline phosphatase and OmpA protein can be translocated posttranslationally into membrane vesicles of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, L; Rhoads, D; Tai, P C

    1985-01-01

    We previously described a system for translocating the periplasmic enzyme alkaline phosphatase and the outer membrane protein OmpA into inverted membrane vesicles of Escherichia coli. We have now optimized and substantially improved the translocation system by including polyamines and by reducing the amount of membrane used. Under these conditions, efficient translocation was seen even posttranslationally, i.e., when vesicles were not added until after protein synthesis was stopped. This was the case not only with the OmpA protein, which is synthesized by free polysomes and hence is presumably exported posttranslationally in the cell, but also with alkaline phosphatase, which is synthesized only by membrane-bound polysomes and has been shown to be secreted cotranslationally in the cells. Prolonged incubation rendered the precursors inactive for subsequent translocation. Posttranslational translocation was impaired, like cotranslational translocation, by inhibitors of the proton motive force and by treatment of the vesicles with protease. Since it appears that E. coli can translocate the same proteins either cotranslationally or posttranslationally, the cotranslational mode may perhaps be more efficient, but not obligatory, for the secretion of bacterial proteins. Images PMID:3882674

  18. Functional characterization of the late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) protein gene family from Pinus tabuliformis (Pinaceae) in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jie; Lan, Ting

    2016-01-19

    Late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins are a large and highly diverse gene family present in a wide range of plant species. LEAs are proposed to play a role in various stress tolerance responses. Our study represents the first-ever survey of LEA proteins and their encoding genes in a widely distributed pine (Pinus tabuliformis) in China. Twenty-three LEA genes were identified from the P. tabuliformis belonging to seven groups. Proteins with repeated motifs are an important feature specific to LEA groups. Ten of 23 pine LEA genes were selectively expressed in specific tissues, and showed expression divergence within each group. In addition, we selected 13 genes representing each group and introduced theses genes into Escherichia coli to assess the protective function of PtaLEA under heat and salt stresses. Compared with control cells, the E. coli cells expressing PtaLEA fusion protein exhibited enhanced salt and heat resistance and viability, indicating the protein may play a protective role in cells under stress conditions. Furthermore, among these enhanced tolerance genes, a certain extent of function divergence appeared within a gene group as well as between gene groups, suggesting potential functional diversity of this gene family in conifers.

  19. Functional insights into the late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) protein family from Dendrobium officinale (Orchidaceae) using an Escherichia coli system

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Hong; Zeng, Xu; Guo, Shunxing

    2016-01-01

    Late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins, a diverse family, accumulate during seed desiccation in the later stages of embryogenesis. LEA proteins are associated with tolerance to abiotic stresses, such as drought, salinity and high or cold temperature. Here, we report the first comprehensive survey of the LEA gene family in Dendrobium officinale, an important and widely grown medicinal orchid in China. Based on phylogenetic relationships with the complete set of Arabidopsis and Oryza LEA proteins, 17 genes encoding D. officinale LEAs (DofLEAs) were identified and their deduced proteins were classified into seven groups. The motif composition of these deduced proteins was correlated with the gene structure found in each LEA group. Our results reveal the DofLEA genes are widely distributed and expressed in tissues. Additionally, 11 genes from different groups were introduced into Escherichia coli to assess the functions of DofLEAs. Expression of 6 and 7 DofLEAs in E. coli improved growth performance compared with the control under salt and heat stress, respectively. Based on qPCR data, all of these genes were up-regulated in various tissues following exposure to salt and heat stresses. Our results suggest that DofLEAs play an important role in responses to abiotic stress. PMID:28004781

  20. Functional characterization of the late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) protein gene family from Pinus tabuliformis (Pinaceae) in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Jie; Lan, Ting

    2016-01-01

    Late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins are a large and highly diverse gene family present in a wide range of plant species. LEAs are proposed to play a role in various stress tolerance responses. Our study represents the first-ever survey of LEA proteins and their encoding genes in a widely distributed pine (Pinus tabuliformis) in China. Twenty–three LEA genes were identified from the P. tabuliformis belonging to seven groups. Proteins with repeated motifs are an important feature specific to LEA groups. Ten of 23 pine LEA genes were selectively expressed in specific tissues, and showed expression divergence within each group. In addition, we selected 13 genes representing each group and introduced theses genes into Escherichia coli to assess the protective function of PtaLEA under heat and salt stresses. Compared with control cells, the E. coli cells expressing PtaLEA fusion protein exhibited enhanced salt and heat resistance and viability, indicating the protein may play a protective role in cells under stress conditions. Furthermore, among these enhanced tolerance genes, a certain extent of function divergence appeared within a gene group as well as between gene groups, suggesting potential functional diversity of this gene family in conifers. PMID:26781930

  1. The new pLAI (lux regulon based auto-inducible) expression system for recombinant protein production in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background After many years of intensive research, it is generally assumed that no universal expression system can exist for high-level production of a given recombinant protein. Among the different expression systems, the inducible systems are the most popular for their tight regulation. However, induction is in many cases less favorable due to the high cost and/or toxicity of inducers, incompatibilities with industrial scale-up or detrimental growth conditions. Expression systems using autoinduction (or self-induction) prove to be extremely versatile allowing growth and induction of recombinant proteins without the need to monitor cell density or add inducer. Unfortunately, almost all the actual auto inducible expression systems need endogenous or induced metabolic changes during the growth to trigger induction, both frequently linked to detrimental condition to cell growth. In this context, we use a simple modular approach for a cell density-based genetic regulation in order to assemble an autoinducible recombinant protein expression system in E. coli. Result The newly designed pLAI expression system places the expression of recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli under control of the regulatory genes of the lux regulon of Vibrio fischeri's Quorum Sensing (QS) system. The pLAI system allows a tight regulation of the recombinant gene allowing a negligible basal expression and expression only at high cell density. Sequence optimization of regulative genes of QS of V. fischeri for expression in E. coli upgraded the system to high level expression. Moreover, partition of regulative genes between the plasmid and the host genome and introduction of a molecular safety lock permitted tighter control of gene expression. Conclusion Coupling gene expression to cell density using cell-to-cell communication provides a promising approach for recombinant protein production. The system allows the control of expression of the target recombinant gene independently from external

  2. Staphylococcus aureus FepA and FepB proteins drive heme iron utilization in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Turlin, Evelyne; Débarbouillé, Michel; Augustyniak, Katarzyna; Gilles, Anne-Marie; Wandersman, Cécile

    2013-01-01

    EfeUOB-like tripartite systems are widespread in bacteria and in many cases they are encoded by genes organized into iron-regulated operons. They consist of: EfeU, a protein similar to the yeast iron permease Ftrp1; EfeO, an extracytoplasmic protein of unknown function and EfeB, also an extracytoplasmic protein with heme peroxidase activity, belonging to the DyP family. Many bacterial EfeUOB systems have been implicated in iron uptake, but a prefential iron source remains undetermined. Nevertheless, in the case of Escherichia coli, the EfeUOB system has been shown to recognize heme and to allow extracytoplasmic heme iron extraction via a deferrochelation reaction. Given the high level of sequence conservations between EfeUOB orthologs, we hypothesized that heme might be the physiological iron substrate for the other orthologous systems. To test this hypothesis, we undertook characterization of the Staphylococcus aureus FepABC system. Results presented here indicate: i) that the S. aureus FepB protein binds both heme and PPIX with high affinity, like EfeB, the E. coli ortholog; ii) that it has low peroxidase activity, comparable to that of EfeB; iii) that both FepA and FepB drive heme iron utilization, and both are required for this activity and iv) that the E. coli FepA ortholog (EfeO) cannot replace FepA in FepB-driven iron release from heme indicating protein specificity in these activities. Our results show that the function in heme iron extraction is conserved in the two orthologous systems.

  3. Characterization of FNR* mutant proteins indicates two distinct mechanisms for altering oxygen regulation of the Escherichia coli transcription factor FNR.

    PubMed Central

    Bates, D M; Lazazzera, B A; Kiley, P J

    1995-01-01

    In order to gain insight into the mechanism by which the Escherichia coli transcription factor FNR* is activated in response to anaerobiosis, we have analyzed FNR mutant proteins which, unlike the wild-type protein, stimulate gene expression in the presence of oxygen in vivo. Cell extracts containing seven different FNR* mutant proteins were tested in vitro for the ability to bind to the FNR consensus DNA site in a gel retardation assay under aerobic conditions. At the concentration of protein tested, only extracts which contained FNR* mutant proteins with amino acid substitutions at position 154 showed significant DNA binding. The three position-154 FNR* mutant proteins could be further distinguished from the other mutant proteins by analysis of the in vivo phenotypes of FNR* proteins containing amino acid substitutions at either of two essential cysteine residues. In the presence of oxygen, FNR* mutant proteins with amino acid substitutions at position 154 were the least affected when either Cys-23 or Cys-122 was substituted for Ser. On the basis of these in vivo and in vitro analyses, FNR* mutant proteins appear to segregate into at least two classes. Thus, it appears that each class of FNR* substitutions alters the normal pathway of FNR activation in response to oxygen deprivation by a different mechanism. PMID:7608069

  4. Anionic lipid binding to the foreign protein MGS provides a tight coupling between phospholipid synthesis and protein overexpression in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Ariöz, Candan; Ye, Weihua; Bakali, Amin; Ge, Changrong; Liebau, Jobst; Götzke, Hansjörg; Barth, Andreas; Wieslander, Ake; Mäler, Lena

    2013-08-20

    Certain membrane proteins involved in lipid synthesis can induce formation of new intracellular membranes in Escherichia coli, i.e., intracellular vesicles. Among those, the foreign monotopic glycosyltransferase MGS from Acholeplasma laidlawii triggers such massive lipid synthesis when overexpressed. To examine the mechanism behind the increased lipid synthesis, we investigated the lipid binding properties of MGS in vivo together with the correlation between lipid synthesis and MGS overexpression levels. A good correlation between produced lipid quantities and overexpressed MGS protein was observed when standard LB medium was supplemented with four different lipid precursors that have significant roles in the lipid biosynthesis pathway. Interestingly, this correlation was highest concerning anionic lipid production and at the same time dependent on the selective binding of anionic lipid molecules by MGS. A selective interaction with anionic lipids was also observed in vitro by (31)P NMR binding studies using bicelles prepared with E. coli lipids. The results clearly demonstrate that the discriminative withdrawal of anionic lipids, especially phosphatidylglycerol, from the membrane through MGS binding triggers an in vivo signal for cells to create a "feed-forward" stimulation of lipid synthesis in E. coli. By this mechanism, cells can produce more membrane surface in order to accommodate excessively produced MGS molecules, which results in an interdependent cycle of lipid and MGS protein synthesis.

  5. Inhibition of protein interactions with the beta 2 sliding clamp of Escherichia coli DNA polymerase III by peptides from beta 2-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Wijffels, Gene; Dalrymple, Brian P; Prosselkov, Pavel; Kongsuwan, Kritaya; Epa, V Chandana; Lilley, Penelope E; Jergic, Slobodan; Buchardt, Jens; Brown, Susan E; Alewood, Paul F; Jennings, Philip A; Dixon, Nicholas E

    2004-05-18

    The sliding clamp of the Escherichia coli replisome is now understood to interact with many proteins involved in DNA synthesis and repair. A universal interaction motif is proposed to be one mechanism by which those proteins bind the E. coli sliding clamp, a homodimer of the beta subunit, at a single site on the dimer. The numerous beta(2)-binding proteins have various versions of the consensus interaction motif, including a related hexameric sequence. To determine if the variants of the motif could contribute to the competition of the beta-binding proteins for the beta(2) site, synthetic peptides derived from the putative beta(2)-binding motifs were assessed for their abilities to inhibit protein-beta(2) interactions, to bind directly to beta(2), and to inhibit DNA synthesis in vitro. A hierarchy emerged, which was consistent with sequence similarity to the pentameric consensus motif, QL(S/D)LF, and peptides containing proposed hexameric motifs were shown to have activities comparable to those containing the consensus sequence. The hierarchy of peptide binding may be indicative of a competitive hierarchy for the binding of proteins to beta(2) in various stages or circumstances of DNA replication and repair.

  6. Protein engineering of the transcriptional activator FhlA To enhance hydrogen production in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Torres, Viviana; Maeda, Toshinari; Wood, Thomas K

    2009-09-01

    Escherichia coli produces H(2) from formate via the formate hydrogenlyase (FHL) complex during mixed acid fermentation; the FHL complex consists of formate dehydrogenase H (encoded by fdhF) for forming 2H(+), 2e(-), and CO(2) from formate and hydrogenase 3 (encoded by hycGE) for synthesizing H(2) from 2H(+) and 2e(-). FHL protein production is activated by the sigma(54) transcriptional activator FhlA, which activates transcription of fdhF and the hyc, hyp, and hydN-hypF operons. Here, through random mutagenesis using error-prone PCR over the whole gene, as well as over the fhlA region encoding the first 388 amino acids of the 692-amino-acid protein, we evolved FhlA to increase H(2) production. The amino acid replacements in FhlA133 (Q11H, L14V, Y177F, K245R, M288K, and I342F) increased hydrogen production ninefold, and the replacements in FhlA1157 (M6T, S35T, L113P, S146C, and E363K) increased hydrogen production fourfold. Saturation mutagenesis at the codons corresponding to the amino acid replacements in FhlA133 and at position E363 identified the importance of position L14 and of E363 for the increased activity; FhlA with replacements L14G and E363G increased hydrogen production (fourfold and sixfold, respectively) compared to FhlA. Whole-transcriptome and promoter reporter constructs revealed that the mechanism by which the FhlA133 changes increase hydrogen production is by increasing transcription of all of the genes activated by FhlA (the FHL complex). With FhlA133, transcription of P(fdhF) and P(hyc) is less sensitive to formate regulation, and with FhlA363 (E363G), P(hyc) transcription increases but P(hyp) transcription decreases and hydrogen production is less affected by the repressor HycA.

  7. Tuning of Recombinant Protein Expression in Escherichia coli by Manipulating Transcription, Translation Initiation Rates, and Incorporation of Noncanonical Amino Acids.

    PubMed

    Schlesinger, Orr; Chemla, Yonatan; Heltberg, Mathias; Ozer, Eden; Marshall, Ryan; Noireaux, Vincent; Jensen, Mogens Høgh; Alfonta, Lital

    2017-03-09

    Protein synthesis in cells has been thoroughly investigated and characterized over the past 60 years. However, some fundamental issues remain unresolved, including the reasons for genetic code redundancy and codon bias. In this study, we changed the kinetics of the Eschrichia coli transcription and translation processes by mutating the promoter and ribosome binding domains and by using genetic code expansion. The results expose a counterintuitive phenomenon, whereby an increase in the initiation rates of transcription and translation lead to a decrease in protein expression. This effect can be rescued by introducing slow translating codons into the beginning of the gene, by shortening gene length or by reducing initiation rates. On the basis of the results, we developed a biophysical model, which suggests that the density of co-transcriptional-translation plays a role in bacterial protein synthesis. These findings indicate how cells use codon bias to tune translation speed and protein synthesis.

  8. Soluble M3 proteins of murine gammaherpesviruses 68 and 72 expressed in Escherichia coli: analysis of chemokine-binding properties.

    PubMed

    Matúšková, R; Pančík, P; Štibrániová, I; Belvončíková, P; Režuchová, I; Kúdelová, M

    2015-12-01

    M3 protein of murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (MHV-68) was identified as a viral chemokine-binding protein 3 (vCKBP-3) capable to bind a broad spectrum of chemokines and their receptors. During both acute and latent infection MHV-68 M3 protein provides a selective advantage for the virus by inhibiting the antiviral and inflammatory response. A unique mutation Asp307Gly was identified in the M3 protein of murine gammaherpesvirus 72 (MHV-72), localized near chemokine-binding domain. Study on chemokine-binding properties of MHV-72 M3 protein purified from medium of infected cells implied reduced binding to some chemokines when compared to MHV-68 M3 protein. It was suggested that the mutation in the M3 protein might be involved in the attenuation of immune response to infection with MHV-72. Recently, Escherichia coli cells were used to prepare native recombinant M3 proteins of murine gammaherpesviruses 68 and 72 (Pančík et al., 2013). In this study, we assessed the chemokine-binding properties of three M3 proteins prepared in E. coli Rosetta-gami 2 (DE3) cells, the full length M3 protein of both MHV-68 and MHV-72 and MHV-68 M3 protein truncated in the signal sequence (the first 24 aa). They all displayed binding activity to human chemokines CCL5 (RANTES), CXCL8 (IL-8), and CCL3 (MIP-1α). The truncated MHV-68 M3 protein had more than twenty times reduced binding activity to CCL5, but only about five and three times reduced binding to CXCL8 and CCL3 when compared to its full length counterpart. Binding of the full length MHV-72 M3 protein to all chemokines was reduced when compared to MHV-68 M3 protein. Its binding to CCL5 and CCL3 was reduced over ten and seven times. However, its binding to CXCL8 was only slightly reduced (64.8 vs 91.8%). These data implied the significance of the signal sequence and also of a single mutation (at aa 307) for efficient M3 protein binding to some chemokines.

  9. A 20-kilodalton protein is required for efficient production of the Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis 27-kilodalton crystal protein in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Adams, L F; Visick, J E; Whiteley, H R

    1989-01-01

    The 27-kilodalton (kDa) mosquitocidal protein gene from Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis has been cloned as a 10-kilobase (kb) HindIII fragment from plasmid DNA; efficient expression in Escherichia coli KM1 depends on a region of DNA located approximately 4 kb upstream (K. McLean and H. R. Whiteley, J. Bacteriol. 169:1017-1023, 1987). We have cloned the upstream DNA region and show that it contains a complete open reading frame (ORF) encoding a protein with a molecular mass of 19,584 Da. Sequencing of adjacent stretches of DNA revealed two partial ORFs: one has 55.2% identity in an overlap of 319 amino acids to the putative transposase of IS231 of B. thuringiensis subsp. thuringiensis, and the other, a 78-codon partial ORF, may be the carboxyl terminus of the 67-kDa protein previously observed in maxicells of strain KM1. A 0.8-kb fragment containing only the 20-kDa protein gene greatly enhanced the expression of the 27-kDa protein in E. coli. The introduction of nonsense codons into the 20-kDa protein gene ORF abolished this effect, indicating that the gene product, not the mRNA or DNA, is required for the enhancement. The effect of the 20-kDa protein gene on various fusions of lacZ to the 27-kDa protein gene suggests that the 20-kDa protein acts after the initiation of translation of the 27-kDa protein gene. Images PMID:2644205

  10. Adhesion of Type 1-Fimbriated Escherichia coli to Abiotic Surfaces Leads to Altered Composition of Outer Membrane Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Otto, Karen; Norbeck, Joakim; Larsson, Thomas; Karlsson, Karl-Anders; Hermansson, Malte

    2001-01-01

    Phenotypic differences between planktonic bacteria and those attached to abiotic surfaces exist, but the mechanisms involved in the adhesion response of bacteria are not well understood. By the use of two-dimensional (2D) polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, we have demonstrated that attachment of Escherichia coli to abiotic surfaces leads to alteration in the composition of outer membrane proteins. A major decrease in the abundance of resolved proteins was observed during adhesion of type 1-fimbriated E. coli strains, which was at least partly caused by proteolysis. Moreover, a study of fimbriated and nonfimbriated mutants revealed that these changes were due mainly to type 1 fimbria-mediated surface contact and that only a few changes occurred in the outer membranes of nonfimbriated mutant strains. Protein synthesis and proteolytic degradation were involved to different extents in adhesion of fimbriated and nonfimbriated cells. While protein synthesis appeared to affect adhesion of only the nonfimbriated strain, proteolytic activity mostly seemed to contribute to adhesion of the fimbriated strain. Using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight mass spectrometry, six of the proteins resolved by 2D analysis were identified as BtuB, EF-Tu, OmpA, OmpX, Slp, and TolC. While the first two proteins were unaffected by adhesion, the levels of the last four were moderately to strongly reduced. Based on the present results, it may be suggested that physical interactions between type 1 fimbriae and the surface are part of a surface-sensing mechanism in which protein turnover may contribute to the observed change in composition of outer membrane proteins. This change alters the surface characteristics of the cell envelope and may thus influence adhesion. PMID:11274103

  11. Different Cellular Origins and Functions of Extracellular Proteins from Escherichia coli O157:H7 and O104:H4 as Determined by Comparative Proteomic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Islam, Nazrul; Nagy, Attila; Garrett, Wesley M.; Shelton, Dan

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Extracellular proteins play important roles in bacterial interactions with the environmental matrices. In this study, we examined the extracellular proteins from Escherichia coli O157:H7 and O104:H4 by tandem mass spectrometry. We identified 500 and 859 proteins from the growth media of E. coli O157:H7 and O104:H4, respectively, including 371 proteins common to both strains. Among proteins that were considered specific to E. coli O157:H7 or present at higher relative abundances in O157:H7 medium, most (57 of 65) had secretion signal sequences in their encoding genes. Noticeably, the proteins included locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE) virulence factors, proteins required for peptidyl-lipoprotein accumulation, and proteins involved in iron scavenging. In contrast, a much smaller proportion of proteins (37 of 150) that were considered specific to O104:H4 or presented at higher relative abundances in O104:H4 medium had signals targeting them for secretion. These proteins included Shiga toxin 2 subunit B and O104:H4 signature proteins, including AAF/1 major fimbrial subunit and serine protease autotransporters. Most of the abundant proteins from the growth medium of E. coli O104:H4 were annotated as having functions in the cytoplasm. We provide evidence that the extensive presence of cytoplasmic proteins in E. coli O104:H4 growth medium was due to biological processes independent of cell lysis, indicating alternative mechanisms for this potent pathogen releasing cytoplasmic contents into the growth milieu, which could play a role in interaction with the environmental matrices, such as pathogenesis and biofilm formation. IMPORTANCE In this study, we compared the extracellular proteins from two of the most prominent foodborne pathogenic E. coli organisms that have caused severe outbreaks in the United States and in Europe. E. coli O157:H7 is a well-studied Shiga toxigenic foodborne pathogen of the enterohemorrhagic pathotype that has caused numerous outbreaks

  12. Preparation of biologically active platelet-derived growth factor type BB from a fusion protein expressed in Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Hoppe, J.; Weich, H.A.; Eichner, W. )

    1989-04-04

    Preparations of the mitogen platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) from human platelets contain two related polypeptides termed A chain and B chain. PDGF-B is highly homologous to a portion of p28{sup v-sis}, the transforming protein of simian sarcoma virus. The authors have studied the mitogenic potential of a PDGF-BB-like homodimer by expressing the sequence coding for the mature part of PDGF-B in Escherichia coli. Expression was achieved as cro-{beta}-gal-PDGF-B fusion protein which was exclusively found in the inclusion bodies. A monomeric PDGF-B fragment shortened by 12 amino acid residues from the NH{sub 2} terminus was excised from the fusion protein by CNBr cleavage. After protection of thiols by S-sulfonation, this fragment was purified by gel permeation chromatography and reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. This monomeric protein was dimerized in the presence of a mixture of reduced and oxidized glutathione to yield biologically active rPDGF-BB with an overall yield of {approx}0.7 mg of rPDGF-BB/L of culture. Escherichia coli rPDGF-BB stimulated ({sup 3}H)thymidine incorporation into AKR2B fibroblast at concentrations of about 1 ng/mL.

  13. Cytochalasin B as a probe of protein structure and substrate recognition by the galactose/H+ transporter of Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Cairns, M.T.; McDonald, T.P.; Horne, P.; Henderson, P.J.; Baldwin, S.A. )

    1991-05-05

    Cytochalasin B is a potent inhibitor of mammalian passive glucose transporters. The recent demonstration of sequence similarities between these proteins and several bacterial proton-linked sugar transporters suggested that cytochalasin B might be a useful tool for investigation of the galactose/H+ symport protein (GalP) of Escherichia coli. Equilibrium binding studies using membranes from a GalP-constitutive (GalPc) strain of E. coli revealed a single set of high affinity binding sites for cytochalasin B with a Kd of 0.8-2.2 microM. Binding was inhibited by D-glucose, but not by L-glucose. UV irradiation of the membranes in the presence of (4-{sup 3}H)cytochalasin B photolabeled principally a protein of apparent Mr 38,000, corresponding to the GalP protein. Labeling was inhibited by greater than 80% in the presence of 500 mM D-glucose or D-galactose, the major substrates of the GalP system. The extent of inhibition of photolabeling by different sugars and sugar analogues showed that the substrate specificity of GalP closely resembles that of the mammalian passive glucose transporters. Structural similarity to the latter was revealed by tryptic digestion of (4-{sup 3}H)cytochalasin B-photolabeled GalP, which yielded a radiolabeled fragment of apparent Mr 17,000-19,000, similar to that previously reported for the human erythrocyte glucose transporter.

  14. Cold-inducible cloning vectors for low-temperature protein expression in Escherichia coli: application to the production of a toxic and proteolytically sensitive fusion protein.

    PubMed

    Mujacic, M; Cooper, K W; Baneyx, F

    1999-10-01

    TolAI-beta-lactamase a fusion protein consisting of the inner membrane anchoring domain of the Escherichia coli transenvelope protein TolA followed by TEM-beta-lactamase was found to be toxic and highly unstable when transcribed from the bacteriophage T7 promoter at 37 degrees C. Expression at 15 or 23 degrees C alleviated toxicity, but led to only partial stabilization of the fusion protein. To evaluate the usefulness of cold-shock promoters for the production of proteolytically sensitive proteins at low temperatures, we constructed a set of cloning vectors suitable for rapidly positioning PCR products under cspA transcriptional control. TolAI-beta-lactamase degradation was completely abolished when cspA-driven transcription was induced by temperature downshift to 15 or 23 degrees C. Our results suggest that the cspA promoter system may be a valuable tool for the production of proteins containing membrane-spanning domains or otherwise unstable gene products in E. coli.

  15. Mecillinam resistance in Escherichia coli is conferred by loss of a second activity of the AroK protein.

    PubMed Central

    Vinella, D; Gagny, B; Joseleau-Petit, D; D'Ari, R; Cashel, M

    1996-01-01

    Mecillinam, a beta-lactam antibiotic specific to penicillin-binding protein 2 (PBP 2) in Escherichia coli, blocks cell wall elongation and, indirectly, cell division, but its lethality can be overcome by increased levels of ppGpp, the nucleotide effector of the stringent response. We have subjected an E. coli K-12 strain to random insertional mutagenesis with a mini-Tn10 element. One insertion, which was found to confer resistance to mecillinam in relA+ and relA strains, was mapped at 75.5 min on the E. coli map and was located between the promoters and the coding sequence of the aroK gene, which codes for shikimate kinase 1, one of two E. coli shikimate kinases, both of which are involved in aromatic amino acid biosynthesis. The mecillinam resistance conferred by the insertion was abolished in a delta relA delta spoT strain completely lacking ppGpp, and it thus depends on the presence of ppGpp. Furthermore, the insertion increased the ppGpp pool approximately twofold in a relA+ strain. However, this increase was not observed in relA strains, although the insertion still conferred mecillinam resistance in these backgrounds, showing that mecillinam resistance is not due to an increased ppGpp pool. The resistance was also abolished in an ftsZ84(Ts) strain under semipermissive conditions, and the aroK::mini-Tn10 allele partially suppressed ftsZ84(Ts); however, it did not increase the concentration of the FtsZ cell division protein. The insertion greatly decreased or abolished the shikimate kinase activity of AroK in vivo and in vitro. The two shikimate kinases of E. coli are not equivalent; the loss of AroK confers mecillinam resistance, whereas the loss of Arol, does not. Furthermore, the ability of the aroK mutation to confer mecillinam resistance is shown to be independent of polar effects on operon expression and of effects on the availability of aromatic amino acids or shikimic acid. Instead, we conclude that the AroK protein has a second activity, possibly

  16. Methanogenic archaea diversity in Hanwoo (Bos taurus coreanae) rumen fluid, rectal dung, and barn floor manure using a culture-independent method based on mcrA gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Daquiado, Aileen Rose; Cho, Kye Man; Kim, Tae Young; Kim, Sam Churl; Chang, Hong-Hee; Lee, Yong Bok

    2014-06-01

    The diversity of methanogenic archaea associated with Korean Hanwoo cattle was analyzed using mcrA gene sequences from samples of rumen fluid (RF), rectal dung (RD), and barn floor manure (BFM). The predominant species were Methanobrevibacter ruminantium in RF and BFM(63.6% and 62.4%, respectively) and Methanocorpusculum labreanum in RD (53.2%).

  17. Recombinant expressions of sweet plant protein mabinlin II in Escherichia coli and food-grade Lactococcus lactis.

    PubMed

    Gu, Wenliang; Xia, Qiyu; Yao, Jing; Fu, Shaoping; Guo, Jianchun; Hu, Xinwen

    2015-04-01

    Sweet plant proteins, which are safe, natural, low-calorie sweeteners, may be suitable replacements for sugars in the food and beverage industries. Mabinlin II, a sweet plant protein, shows the most pronounced heat stability and acid resistance of any of the six known types of plant sweet proteins. However, mabinlin II is difficult to extract from the Capparis masaikai plant, which is itself becoming increasingly scarce. This limits the use of naturally acquired mabinlin II. In this study, recombinant mabinlin II proteins were expressed and purified in Escherichia coli and in food-grade Lactococcus lactis. Recombinant mabinlin II proteins MBL-BH (containing the B-chains of mabinlin II downstream fused with His-tag) and MBL-ABH (containing the A- and B-chains of mabinlin II downstream fused with His-tag) were expressed in E. coli in the form of inclusion bodies. They were then purified and renatured. The refolded MBL-BH was found to be 100 times sweeter than sucrose by weight, but it was not heat-stable. Refolded MBL-ABH was neither sweet nor heat-stable. Recombinant mabinlin II proteins were secreted and expressed intracellularly in food-grade L. lactis, in which the concentrated cell samples and culture medium samples were detected using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and Western blotting analysis with anti-mabinlin II polyclonal antibody. This study demonstrated that the single B chain of mabinlin II has a sweet taste. The recombinant mabinlin II proteins have been successfully expressed in food-grade L. lactis, which is a crucial step in the production of mabinlin II through microorganism expression systems.

  18. Selectively labeling the heterologous protein in Escherichia coli for NMR studies: a strategy to speed up NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Almeida, F C; Amorim, G C; Moreau, V H; Sousa, V O; Creazola, A T; Américo, T A; Pais, A P; Leite, A; Netto, L E; Giordano, R J; Valente, A P

    2001-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance is an important tool for high-resolution structural studies of proteins. It demands high protein concentration and high purity; however, the expression of proteins at high levels often leads to protein aggregation and the protein purification step can correspond to a high percentage of the overall time in the structural determination process. In the present article we show that the step of sample optimization can be simplified by selective labeling the heterologous protein expressed in Escherichia coli by the use of rifampicin. Yeast thioredoxin and a coix transcription factor Opaque 2 leucine zipper (LZ) were used to show the effectiveness of the protocol. The (1)H/(15)N heteronuclear correlation two-dimensional NMR spectrum (HMQC) of the selective (15)N-labeled thioredoxin without any purification is remarkably similar to the spectrum of the purified protein. The method has high yields and a good (1)H/(15)N HMQC spectrum can be obtained with 50 ml of M9 growth medium. Opaque 2 LZ, a difficult protein due to the lower expression level and high hydrophobicity, was also probed. The (15)N-edited spectrum of Opaque 2 LZ showed only the resonances of the protein of heterologous expression (Opaque 2 LZ) while the (1)H spectrum shows several other resonances from other proteins of the cell lysate. The demand for a fast methodology for structural determination is increasing with the advent of genome/proteome projects. Selective labeling the heterologous protein can speed up NMR structural studies as well as NMR-based drug screening. This methodology is especially effective for difficult proteins such as hydrophobic transcription factors, membrane proteins, and others.

  19. Selectively Labeling the Heterologous Protein in Escherichia coli for NMR Studies: A Strategy to Speed Up NMR Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almeida, F. C. L.; Amorim, G. C.; Moreau, V. H.; Sousa, V. O.; Creazola, A. T.; Américo, T. A.; Pais, A. P. N.; Leite, A.; Netto, L. E. S.; Giordano, R. J.; Valente, A. P.

    2001-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance is an important tool for high-resolution structural studies of proteins. It demands high protein concentration and high purity; however, the expression of proteins at high levels often leads to protein aggregation and the protein purification step can correspond to a high percentage of the overall time in the structural determination process. In the present article we show that the step of sample optimization can be simplified by selective labeling the heterologous protein expressed in Escherichia coli by the use of rifampicin. Yeast thioredoxin and a coix transcription factor Opaque 2 leucine zipper (LZ) were used to show the effectiveness of the protocol. The 1H/15N heteronuclear correlation two-dimensional NMR spectrum (HMQC) of the selective 15N-labeled thioredoxin without any purification is remarkably similar to the spectrum of the purified protein. The method has high yields and a good 1H/15N HMQC spectrum can be obtained with 50 ml of M9 growth medium. Opaque 2 LZ, a difficult protein due to the lower expression level and high hydrophobicity, was also probed. The 15N-edited spectrum of Opaque 2 LZ showed only the resonances of the protein of heterologous expression (Opaque 2 LZ) while the 1H spectrum shows several other resonances from other proteins of the cell lysate. The demand for a fast methodology for structural determination is increasing with the advent of genome/proteome projects. Selective labeling the heterologous protein can speed up NMR structural studies as well as NMR-based drug screening. This methodology is especially effective for difficult proteins such as hydrophobic transcription factors, membrane proteins, and others.

  20. Purification and Refolding to Amyloid Fibrils of (His)6-tagged Recombinant Shadoo Protein Expressed as Inclusion Bodies in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiaojing; Richard, Charles-Adrien; Moudjou, Mohammed; Vidic, Jasmina

    2015-12-19

    The Escherichia coli expression system is a powerful tool for the production of recombinant eukaryotic proteins. We use it to produce Shadoo, a protein belonging to the prion family. A chromatographic method for the purification of (His)6-tagged recombinant Shadoo expressed as inclusion bodies is described. The inclusion bodies are solubilized in 8 M urea and bound to a Ni(2+)-charged column to perform ion affinity chromatography. Bound proteins are eluted by a gradient of imidazole. Fractions containing Shadoo protein are subjected to size exclusion chromatography to obtain a highly purified protein. In the final step purified Shadoo is desalted to remove salts, urea and imidazole. Recombinant Shadoo protein is an important reagent for biophysical and biochemical studies of protein conformation disorders occurring in prion diseases. Many reports demonstrated that prion neurodegenerative diseases originate from the deposition of stable, ordered amyloid fibrils. Sample protocols describing how to fibrillate Shadoo into amyloid fibrils at acidic and neutral/basic pHs are presented. The methods on how to produce and fibrillate Shadoo can facilitate research in laboratories working on prion diseases, since it allows for production of large amounts of protein in a rapid and low cost manner.

  1. Responses of mcrA and pmoA Gene Copies and Methane Fluxes to Soil Temperature Changes in Rice Microcosms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sithole, A.; Flores, G. E.; Reysenbach, A. L.; Shearer, M. J.; Butenhoff, C. L.; Khalil, A. M.

    2010-12-01

    Methane generated from microbial activity in rice fields and wetlands is a major source of atmospheric methane, a potent greenhouse gas. The potency of this gas makes understanding the effect of global warming on methane emissions a key challenge in projecting the impact of future global warming. Methane is actively generated in-situ by methanogens, who use H2 and either CO2 or acetate produced by other organisms that degrade the organics. Our work determined the feedback of global warming on methane emissions from rice agriculture by looking at the links between populations of microbial consortia and increased soil temperature conducive to both methane production and consumption within the rhizosphere. Duplicate vertical soil profile samples were collected from temperature-controlled tubs with rice plants. The four waterbaths, set at different temperatures, each contained four tubs, with one bare tub (control) and three planted with rice. The soil samples were immediately frozen and stored at -80 deg. C, and were homogenized before DNA extraction. Quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction (qPCR) was used to measure the concentrations of the methyl coenzyme M reductase (mcrA) and particulate methane monooxygenase (pmoA) genes in the extracted soil DNA. The mcrA and pmoA were used as the functional gene probes for methanogens (methane producing bacteria) and methanotrophs (methane oxidizing bacteria), respectively. An FID-equipped Gas Chromatography was used to measure the methane concentration in air samples collected from acrylic flux chambers. Results from our experiments showed that methanogens and methanotrophs were preferentially located to certain regions of the soil profile under different temperature regimes. Our results also indicated that higher global temperatures will increase methanogens populations, but not as much for methanotrophs, and hence increase methane fluxes from rice agriculture. Considering that the mechanisms of methane production in rice

  2. Purification and sequencing of the active site tryptic peptide from penicillin-binding protein 1b of Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Nicholas, R.A.; Suzuki, H.; Hirota, Y.; Strominger, J.L.

    1985-07-02

    This paper reports the sequence of the active site peptide of penicillin-binding protein 1b from Escherichia coli. Purified penicillin-binding protein 1b was labeled with (/sup 14/C)penicillin G, digested with trypsin, and partially purified by gel filtration. Upon further purification by high-pressure liquid chromatography, two radioactive peaks were observed, and the major peak, representing over 75% of the applied radioactivity, was submitted to amino acid analysis and sequencing. The sequence Ser-Ile-Gly-Ser-Leu-Ala-Lys was obtained. The active site nucleophile was identified by digesting the purified peptide with aminopeptidase M and separating the radioactive products on high-pressure liquid chromatography. Amino acid analysis confirmed that the serine residue in the middle of the sequence was covalently bonded to the (/sup 14/C)penicilloyl moiety. A comparison of this sequence to active site sequences of other penicillin-binding proteins and beta-lactamases is presented.

  3. Native Electrophoresis-Coupled Activity Assays Reveal Catalytically-Active Protein Aggregates of Escherichia coli β-Glucuronidase.

    PubMed

    Burchett, Gina G; Folsom, Charles G; Lane, Kimberly T

    2015-01-01

    β-glucuronidase is found as a functional homotetramer in a variety of organisms, including humans and other animals, as well as a number of bacteria. This enzyme is important in these organisms, catalyzing the hydrolytic removal of a glucuronide moiety from substrate molecules. This process serves to break down sugar conjugates in animals and provide sugars for metabolism in bacteria. While β-glucuronidase is primarily found as a homotetramer, previous studies have indicated that the human form of the protein is also catalytically active as a dimer. Here we present evidence for not only an active dimer of the E. coli form of the protein, but also for several larger active complexes, including an octomer and a 16-mer. Additionally, we propose a model for the structures of these large complexes, based on computationally-derived molecular modeling studies. These structures may have application in the study of human disease, as several diseases have been associated with the aggregation of proteins.

  4. Electrochemical potential releases a membrane-bound secretion intermediate of maltose-binding protein in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Geller, B L

    1990-01-01

    A secretionary intermediate of the Escherichia coli maltose-binding protein accumulated in the inner membrane when the membrane electrochemical potential was reduced and the cytosolic ATP concentration was normal. The intermediate was mature in size, but maintained a conformation similar to the cytosolic precursor form, and not the mature periplasmic protein, as measured by differences in susceptibility to proteinase K in vitro. The intermediate was located on the periplasmic side of the inner membrane. Restoration of the membrane electrochemical potential resulted in the movement of the intermediate from the inner membrane to the periplasm. In other experiments in which the ATP concentration was reduced by 96% and the electrochemical potential remained normal, no intermediate accumulated. Thus, the final step in the export of maltose-binding protein requires the electrochemical potential of the inner membrane and does not require ATP. Images PMID:2203734

  5. The EspB Protein of Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli Is Targeted to the Cytoplasm of Infected HeLa Cells

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Kathleen A.; O’Connell, Colin B.; Luther, Paul W.; Donnenberg, Michael S.

    1998-01-01

    The EspB protein of enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) is exported via a type III secretion apparatus. EspB is critical for signaling the host cell and for the development of the attaching and effacing lesion characteristic of EPEC infection. We used cellular fractionation and confocal laser scanning microscopy to determine the cellular location of EspB during infection of HeLa cells. Both methods indicated that EspB is targeted to the cytoplasm of infected cells. Using mutants, we found that EspB targeting to the host cell cytoplasm requires the type III secretion apparatus and the secreted proteins EspA and EspD, but not intimin. These results provide insights into the function of the type III secretion apparatus of EPEC and the functions of the Esp proteins. PMID:9784563

  6. Molecular cloning, sequencing and expression in Escherichia coli of the bean yellow mosaic virus coat protein gene.

    PubMed

    Hammond, J; Hammond, R W

    1989-08-01

    The sequence of 1015 nucleotides from the 3' poly(A) tract of the potyvirus bean yellow mosaic virus (BYMV) RNA has been determined from two cDNA clones. This sequence contained a single long open reading frame (ORF) starting upstream of the cloned region. The ORF was expressed as a fusion protein in Escherichia coli, and the product was detected by antibodies specific for the coat protein of BYMV. The predicted length of the coat protein gene was 822 nucleotides, corresponding to a 273 amino acid coat protein of Mr 30910. The deduced amino acid sequence of the BYMV coat protein was compared to the chemically determined amino acid composition of purified virion protein, and of protein prepared from trypsin-treated virions. The nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequences were compared to the sequences of the coat protein genes of other potyviruses. The BYMV coat protein gene was found to be 50 to 61% homologous to those of other potyviruses at both the nucleotide and amino acid levels; the greatest variation was between the 5'-proximal one-fifth of the genes. Amino acid sequences and hydrophilicity plots of the different potyvirus coat proteins showed similarities which indicated that the structure of the coat protein is highly conserved; a non-terminal region of variability was predicted to be exposed on the exterior of the virion. A putative cleavage site at a glutamine-serine dipeptide was identified by similarity in context to the cleavage sites of tobacco etch virus and tobacco vein mottling virus coat proteins from the viral polyproteins. The BYMV 3'-terminal non-coding region of 166 nucleotides is followed by a poly(A) tract.

  7. Expression of a bioactive fusion protein of Escherichia coli heat-labile toxin B subunit to a synapsin peptide.

    PubMed

    Julia Scerbo, M; Bibolini, Mario J; Barra, José L; Roth, German A; Monferran, Clara G

    2008-06-01

    The B subunit of Escherichia coli heat-labile toxin (LTB) may function as an efficient carrier molecule for the delivery of genetically coupled antigens across the mucosal barrier. We constructed vectors for the expression of LTB and LTBSC proteins. LTBSC is a fusion protein that comprises the amino acid sequence from the C-domain of rat synapsin fused to the C-terminal end of LTB. Both constructions have a coding sequence for a 6His-tag fused in-frame. LTBSC was expressed in E. coli as inclusion bodies. The inclusion bodies were isolated and purified by Ni2+-chelating affinity chromatography under denaturing condition. Purified LTBSC was diluted in several refolding buffers to gain a soluble and biologically active protein. Refolded LTBSC assembled as an active oligomer which binds to the GM1 receptor in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Soluble LTB in the E. coli lysate was also purified by Ni2+-chelating affinity chromatography and the assembled pentamer was able to bind with high affinity to GM1 in vitro. LTBSC and LTB were fed to rats and the ability to induce antigen-specific tolerance was tested. LTBSC inhibited the specific delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) response and induced decreased antigen-specific in vivo and in vitro cell proliferation more efficiently than LTB. Thus, the novel hybrid molecule LTBSC when orally delivered was able to elicit a systemic immune response. These results suggest that LTBSC could be suitable for exploring further therapeutic treatment of autoimmune inflammatory diseases involving antigens from central nervous system.

  8. Enhancement of excretory production of an exoglucanase from Escherichia coli with phage shock protein A (PspA) overexpression.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y Y; Fu, Z B; Ng, K L; Lam, C C; Chan, A K N; Sze, K F; Wong, W K R

    2011-06-01

    Production of recombinant proteins by excretory expression has many advantages over intracellular expression in Escherichia coli. Hyperexpression of a secretory exoglucanase, Exg, of Cellulomonas fimi was previously shown to saturate the SecYEG pathway and result in dramatic cell death of E. coli. In this study, we demonstrated that overexpression of the PspA in the JM101(pM1VegGcexL-pspA) strain enhanced excretion of Exg to 1.65 U/ml using shake-flask cultivation, which was 80% higher than the highest yield previously obtained from the optimized JM101(pM1VegGcexL) strain. A much higher excreted Exg activity of 4.5 U/ml was further achieved with high cell density cultivation using rich media. Furthermore, we showed that the PspA overexpression strain enjoyed an elevated critical value (CV), which was defined as the largest quotient between the intracellular unprocessed precursor and its secreted mature counterpart that was still tolerable by the host cells prior to the onset of cell death, improving from the previously determined CV of 20/80 to the currently achieved CV of 45/55 for Exg. The results suggested that the PspA overexpression strain might tolerate a higher level of precursor Exg making use of the SecYEG pathway for secretion. The reduced lethal effect might be attributable to the overexpressed PspA, which was postulated to be able to reduce membrane depolarization and damage. Our findings introduce a novel strategy of the combined application of metabolic engineering and construct optimization to the attainment of the best possible E. coli producers for secretory/excretory production of recombinant proteins, using Exg as the model protein.

  9. Maximized Autotransporter-Mediated Expression (MATE) for Surface Display and Secretion of Recombinant Proteins in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Sichwart, Shanna; Tozakidis, Iasson E.P.; Teese, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Summary A new optimized system for the surface display and secretion of recombinant proteins is described, termed MATE (maximized autotransporter-mediated expression). It is based on an artificial gene consisting of the coding region for the signal peptide of CtxB, a multiple cloning site for passenger gene insertion, flanked by coding sequences for linear epitopes for monoclonal antibodies and OmpT, and factor Xa protease cleavage sites followed by a codon-optimized DNA sequence of the linker and the β-barrel of the type V autotransporter EhaA from Escherichia coli under control of an IPTG-inducible T5 promoter. The MATE system enabled the continuous secretion of recombinant passenger mCherry via OmpT-mediated cleavage, using native OmpT protease activity in E. coli when grown at 37 °C. It is the first example to show that native OmpT activity is sufficient to facilitate the secretion of a correctly folded target protein in preparative amounts obtaining 240 µg of purified mCherry from 800 mL of crude culture supernatant. Because the release of mCherry was achieved by a simple transfer of the encoding plasmid from an OmpT-negative to an OmpT-positive strain, it bears the option to use surface display for screening purposes and secretion for production of the selected variant. A single plasmid could therefore be used for continuous secretion in OmpT-positive strains or surface display in OmpT-negative strains. In conclusion, the MATE system appears to be a versatile tool for the surface display and for the secretion of target proteins in E. coli. PMID:27904356

  10. Identification of a protein glycosylation operon from Campylobacter jejuni JCM 2013 and its heterologous expression in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Srichaisupakit, Akkaraphol; Ohashi, Takao; Fujiyama, Kazuhito

    2014-09-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is a human enteropathogenic bacterium possessing an N-glycosylation system. In this work, a protein glycosylation (pgl) operon conferring prokaryotic N-glycosylation in C. jejuni JCM 2013 was cloned and identified. Fourteen open reading frames (ORFs) were found in the pgl operon. The operon organization was similar to that of C. jejuni NCTC 11168, with 98% and 99% identities in overall nucleotide sequence and amino acid sequence, respectively. The pgl operon was heterologously co-expressed with model protein CmeA in the Escherichia coli BL21 ΔwaaL mutant. The immuno- and lectin-blotting analysis indicated the protein glycosylation on the recombinant CmeA. In addition, to analyze the glycan composition, the recombinant CmeA was purified and subjected to in-gel trypsin digestion followed by mass spectrometry analysis. The mass spectrometry analysis showed the presence of the N-acetylhexosamine residue at the reducing end but not the predicted di-N-acetylbacillosamine (diNAcBac) residue. Further glycan structural study using the conventional fluorophore-labeling method revealed the GalNAcα-GalNAcα-(Hex-)HexNAc-HexNAc-HexNAc-HexNAc structure. Transcriptional analysis showed that UDP-diNAcBac synthases and diNAcBac transferase are transcribed but might not function in the constructed system. In conclusion, a pgl operon from C. jejuni JCM 2013 successfully functioned in E. coli, resulting in the observed prokaryotic glycosylation.

  11. A comparative indirect ELISA for the detection of henipavirus antibodies based on a recombinant nucleocapsid protein expressed in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ji-Ming; Yu, Meng; Morrissy, Chris; Zhao, Yong-Gang; Meehan, Greer; Sun, Ying-Xue; Wang, Qing-Hua; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Lin-Fa; Wang, Zhi-Liang

    2006-09-01

    The indirect ELISA is a simple and useful method for detection of pathogen-specific antibodies in animal sera. However, non-specific or background binding is often a problem, especially when recombinant proteins from Escherichia coli are used. In this study, a comparative indirect ELISA in which the total reactivity and the background binding were determined simultaneously on the same ELISA plate was reported. The background was determined by incubation of the test sera with excess free antigen to block specific binding. The sample was considered positive only when its total reactivity reading was higher than a pre-determined cut-off value and the ratio of the total reactivity to the background reading was more than 2.0. Using this approach, an antibody assay for henipaviruses using a recombinant Nipah virus nucleocapsid protein expressed in E. coli was developed. A total of 919 negative serum samples were tested in this assay and the specificity was 95.8%. In addition, eight positive experimental serum samples all tested positive. The use of recombinant protein as the ELISA antigen, instead of inactivated virus antigens, will be of significant advantage for countries where there is no facility of Biosafety level 4 to handle this group of zoonotic viruses.

  12. De Novo Designed Proteins from a Library of Artificial Sequences Function in Escherichia Coli and Enable Cell Growth

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Michael A.; McKinley, Kara L.; Bradley, Luke H.; Viola, Sara R.; Hecht, Michael H.

    2011-01-01

    A central challenge of synthetic biology is to enable the growth of living systems using parts that are not derived from nature, but designed and synthesized in the laboratory. As an initial step toward achieving this goal, we probed the ability of a collection of >106 de novo designed proteins to provide biological functions necessary to sustain cell growth. Our collection of proteins was drawn from a combinatorial library of 102-residue sequences, designed by binary patterning of polar and nonpolar residues to fold into stable 4-helix bundles. We probed the capacity of proteins from this library to function in vivo by testing their abilities to rescue 27 different knockout strains of Escherichia coli, each deleted for a conditionally essential gene. Four different strains – ΔserB, ΔgltA, ΔilvA, and Δfes – were rescued by specific sequences from our library. Further experiments demonstrated that a strain simultaneously deleted for all four genes was rescued by co-expression of four novel sequences. Thus, cells deleted for ∼0.1% of the E. coli genome (and ∼1% of the genes required for growth under nutrient-poor conditions) can be sustained by sequences designed de novo. PMID:21245923

  13. Simplified method to obtain enhanced expression of tau protein from E. coli and one-step purification by direct boiling.

    PubMed

    KrishnaKumar, V Guru; Gupta, Sharad

    2017-01-03

    Tau is an intrinsically disordered protein responsible for maintaining the structure and stability of axonal microtubules. However, in certain disease conditions including Alzheimer's disease, tau protein may undergo biochemical and structural changes to form intracellular aggregates. Since tau is a proline- and arginine-rich eukaryotic protein, heterologous expression in Escherichia coli often results in poor yield and has been a major technical challenge. In the current work, we have improved the expressed yield of tau by overcoming codon bias problem and established a simplified protocol for efficient extraction. The reported method has two distinct features: (i) enhanced tau expression (upto eightfold) by supplementing deficient tRNAs that aid in rapid translation and (ii) direct boiling of expressed E. coli cells to extract tau with no separate cell lysis step. We further demonstrate that tau extracted by the direct boiling method is similar to tau purified by size-exclusion chromatography exhibiting similar structural and biophysical characteristics including aggregation propensity. Since morphologies and in vitro toxicity of fibrillar tau aggregates were also similar, tau extracted by the one-step direct boiling method can be used for tau aggregation assays without any additional purification.

  14. A yeast gene important for protein assembly into the endoplasmic reticulum and the nucleus has homology to DnaJ, an Escherichia coli heat shock protein

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    When nuclear localization sequences (termed NLS) are placed at the N terminus of cytochrome c1, a mitochondrial inner membrane protein, the resulting hybrid proteins do not assemble into mitochondria when synthesized in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Cells lacking mitochondrial cytochrome c1, but expressing the hybrid NLS-cytochrome c1 proteins, are unable to grow on glycerol since the hybrid proteins are associated primarily with the nucleus. A similar hybrid protein with a mutant NLS is transported to and assembled into the mitochondria. To identify proteins that might be involved in recognition of nuclear localization signals, we isolated conditional- lethal mutants (npl, for nuclear protein localization) that missorted NLS-cytochrome c1 to the mitochondria, allowing growth on glycerol. The gene corresponding to one complementation group (NPL1) encodes a protein with homology to DnaJ, an Escherichia coli heat shock protein. npl1-1 is allelic to sec63, a gene that affects transit of nascent secretory proteins across the endoplasmic reticulum. Rothblatt, J. A., R. J. Deshaies, S. L. Sanders, G. Daum, and R. Schekman. 1989. J. Cell Biol. 109:2641-2652. The npl1 mutants reported here also weakly affect translocation of preprocarboxypeptidaseY across the ER membrane. A normally nuclear hybrid protein containing a NLS fused to invertase and a nucleolar protein are not localized to the nucleus in npl1/sec63 cells at the nonpermissive temperature. Thus, NPL1/SEC63 may act at a very early common step in localization of proteins to the nucleus and the ER. Alternatively, by affecting ER and nuclear envelope assembly, npl1 may indirectly alter assembly of proteins into the nucleus. PMID:2556404

  15. Characterization of the DNA binding protein encoded by the N-specific filamentous Escherichia coli phage IKe. Binding properties of the protein and nucleotide sequence of the gene.

    PubMed

    Peeters, B P; Konings, R N; Schoenmakers, J G

    1983-09-05

    A DNA binding protein encoded by the filamentous single-stranded DNA phage IKe has been isolated from IKe-infected Escherichia coli cells. Fluorescence and in vitro binding studies have shown that the protein binds co-operatively and with a high specificity to single-stranded but not to double-stranded DNA. From titration of the protein to poly(dA) it has been calculated that approximately four bases of the DNA are covered by one monomer of protein. These binding characteristics closely resemble those of gene V protein encoded by the F-specific filamentous phages M13 and fd. The nucleotide sequence of the gene specifying the IKe DNA binding protein has been established. When compared to the nucleotide sequence of gene V of phage M13 it shows an homology of 58%, indicating that these two phages are evolutionarily related. The IKe DNA binding protein is 88 amino acids long which is one amino acid residue larger than the gene V protein sequence. When the IKe DNA binding protein sequence is compared with that of gene V protein it was found that 39 amino acid residues have identical positions in both proteins. The positions of all five tyrosine residues, a number of which are known to be involved in DNA binding, are conserved. Secondary structure predictions indicate that the two proteins contain similar structural domains. It is proposed that the tyrosine residues which are involved in DNA binding are the ones in or next to a beta-turn, at positions 26, 41 and 56 in gene V protein and at positions 27, 42 and 57 in the IKe DNA binding protein.

  16. E. Coli

    MedlinePlus

    ... CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC E.coli (Escherichia coli) Note: Javascript is disabled or is not supported ... Brand SoyNut Butter Read the Latest E. coli (Escherichia coli) General Information Protect Yourself Learn about E. coli ...

  17. Immunostimulant patches containing Escherichia coli LT enhance immune responses to DNA- and recombinant protein-based Alzheimer's disease vaccines.

    PubMed

    Davtyan, Hayk; Ghochikyan, Anahit; Hovakimyan, Armine; Petrushina, Irina; Yu, Jianmei; Flyer, David; Madsen, Peter Juul; Pedersen, Lars Ostergaard; Cribbs, David H; Agadjanyan, Michael G

    2014-03-15

    Immunotherapeutic approaches to treating Alzheimer's disease (AD) using vaccination strategies must overcome the obstacle of achieving adequate responses to vaccination in the elderly. Here we demonstrate for the first time that application of the Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin adjuvant-laden immunostimulatory patches (LT-IS) dramatically enhances the onset and magnitude of immune responses to DNA- and protein-based vaccines for Alzheimer's disease following intradermal immunization via gene gun and conventional needles, respectively. Our studies suggest that the immune activation mediated by LT-IS offers improved potency for generating AD-specific vaccination responses that should be investigated as an adjuvant in the clinical arena.

  18. Native-sized recombinant spider silk protein produced in metabolically engineered Escherichia coli results in a strong fiber

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Xiao-Xia; Qian, Zhi-Gang; Ki, Chang Seok; Park, Young Hwan; Kaplan, David L.; Lee, Sang Yup

    2010-01-01

    Spider dragline silk is a remarkably strong fiber that makes it attractive for numerous applications. Much has thus been done to make similar fibers by biomimic spinning of recombinant dragline silk proteins. However, success is limited in part due to the inability to successfully express native-sized recombinant silk proteins (250–320 kDa). Here we show that a 284.9 kDa recombinant protein of the spider Nephila clavipes is produced and spun into a fiber displaying mechanical properties comparable to those of the native silk. The native-sized protein, predominantly rich in glycine (44.9%), was favorably expressed in metabolically engineered Escherichia coli within which the glycyl-tRNA pool was elevated. We also found that the recombinant proteins of lower molecular weight versions yielded inferior fiber properties. The results provide insight into evolution of silk protein size related to mechanical performance, and also clarify why spinning lower molecular weight proteins does not recapitulate the properties of native fibers. Furthermore, the silk expression, purification, and spinning platform established here should be useful for sustainable production of natural quality dragline silk, potentially enabling broader applications. PMID:20660779

  19. Essentiality Is a Strong Determinant of Protein Rates of Evolution during Mutation Accumulation Experiments in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Ponce, David; Sabater-Muñoz, Beatriz; Toft, Christina; Ruiz-González, Mario X; Fares, Mario A

    2016-09-26

    The Neutral Theory of Molecular Evolution is considered the most powerful theory to understand the evolutionary behavior of proteins. One of the main predictions of this theory is that essential proteins should evolve slower than dispensable ones owing to increased selective constraints. Comparison of genomes of different species, however, has revealed only small differences between the rates of evolution of essential and nonessential proteins. In some analyses, these differences vanish once confounding factors are controlled for, whereas in other cases essentiality seems to have an independent, albeit small, effect. It has been argued that comparing relatively distant genomes may entail a number of limitations. For instance, many of the genes that are dispensable in controlled lab conditions may be essential in some of the conditions faced in nature. Moreover, essentiality can change during evolution, and rates of protein evolution are simultaneously shaped by a variety of factors, whose individual effects are difficult to isolate. Here, we conducted two parallel mutation accumulation experiments in Escherichia coli, during 5,500-5,750 generations, and compared the genomes at different points of the experiments. Our approach (a short-term experiment, under highly controlled conditions) enabled us to overcome many of the limitations of previous studies. We observed that essential proteins evolved substantially slower than nonessential ones during our experiments. Strikingly, rates of protein evolution were only moderately affected by expression level and protein length.

  20. RNA helicase activity of the plum pox potyvirus CI protein expressed in Escherichia coli. Mapping of an RNA binding domain.

    PubMed Central

    Fernández, A; Laín, S; García, J A

    1995-01-01

    The plum pox potyvirus (PPV) cylindrical inclusion (CI) protein fused to the maltose binding protein (MBP) has been synthesized in Escherichia coli and purified by affinity chromatography in amylose resin. In the absence of any other viral factors, the fusion product had NTPase, RNA binding and RNA helicase activities. These in vitro activities were not affected by removal of the last 103 amino acids of the CI protein. However, other deletions in the C-terminal part of the protein, although leaving intact all the region conserved in RNA helicases, drastically impaired the ability to unwind dsRNA and to hydrolyze NTPs. A mutant protein lacking the last 225 residues retained the competence to interact with RNA. Further deletions mapped boundaries of the RNA binding domain within residues 350 and 402 of the PPV CI protein. This region includes the arginine-rich motif VI, the most carboxy terminal conserved domain of RNA helicases of the superfamily SF2. These results indicate that NTP hydrolysis is not an essential component for RNA binding of the PPV CI protein. Images PMID:7538661

  1. Enhancing E. coli tolerance towards oxidative stress via engineering its global regulator cAMP receptor protein (CRP).

    PubMed

    Basak, Souvik; Jiang, Rongrong

    2012-01-01

    Oxidative damage to microbial hosts often occurs under stressful conditions during bioprocessing. Classical strain engineering approaches are usually both time-consuming and labor intensive. Here, we aim to improve E. coli performance under oxidative stress via engineering its global regulator cAMP receptor protein (CRP), which can directly or indirectly regulate redox-sensing regulators SoxR and OxyR, and other ~400 genes in E. coli. Error-prone PCR technique was employed to introduce modifications to CRP, and three mutants (OM1~OM3) were identified with improved tolerance via H(2)O(2) enrichment selection. The best mutant OM3 could grow in 12 mM H(2)O(2) with the growth rate of 0.6 h(-1), whereas the growth of wild type was completely inhibited at this H(2)O(2) concentration. OM3 also elicited enhanced thermotolerance at 48°C as well as resistance against cumene hydroperoxide. The investigation about intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), which determines cell viability, indicated that the accumulation of ROS in OM3 was always lower than in WT with or without H(2)O(2) treatment. Genome-wide DNA microarray analysis has shown not only CRP-regulated genes have demonstrated great transcriptional level changes (up to 8.9-fold), but also RpoS- and OxyR-regulated genes (up to 7.7-fold). qRT-PCR data and enzyme activity assay suggested that catalase (katE) could be a major antioxidant enzyme in OM3 instead of alkyl hydroperoxide reductase or superoxide dismutase. To our knowledge, this is the first work on improving E. coli oxidative stress resistance by reframing its transcription machinery through its native global regulator. The positive outcome of this approach may suggest that engineering CRP can be successfully implemented as an efficient strain engineering alternative for E. coli.

  2. (p)ppGpp-Dependent Persisters Increase the Fitness of Escherichia coli Bacteria Deficient in Isoaspartyl Protein Repair

    PubMed Central

    VandenBerg, Kelsey E.; Ahn, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The l-isoaspartyl protein carboxyl methyltransferase (PCM) repairs protein damage resulting from spontaneous conversion of aspartyl or asparaginyl residues to isoaspartate and increases long-term stationary-phase survival of Escherichia coli under stress. In the course of studies intended to examine PCM function in metabolically inactive cells, we identified pcm as a gene whose mutation influences the formation of ofloxacin-tolerant persisters. Specifically, a Δpcm mutant produced persisters for an extended period in stationary phase, and a ΔglpD mutation drastically increased persisters in a Δpcm background, reaching 23% of viable cells. The high-persister double mutant showed much higher competitive fitness than the pcm mutant in competition with wild type during long-term stationary phase, suggesting a link between persistence and the mitigation of unrepaired protein damage. We hypothesized that reduced metabolism in the high-persister strain might retard protein damage but observed no gross differences in metabolism relative to wild-type or single-mutant strains. However, methylglyoxal, which accumulates in glpD mutants, also increased fitness, suggesting a possible mechanism. High-level persister formation in the Δpcm ΔglpD mutant was dependent on guanosine pentaphosphate [(p)ppGpp] and polyphosphate. In contrast, persister formation in the Δpcm mutant was (p)ppGpp independent and thus may occur by a distinct pathway. We also observed an increase in conformationally unstable proteins in the high-persister strain and discuss this as a possible trigger for persistence as a response to unrepaired protein damage. IMPORTANCE Protein damage is an important factor in the survival and function of cells and organisms. One specific form of protein damage, the formation of the abnormal amino acid isoaspartate, can be repaired by a nearly universally conserved enzyme, PCM. PCM-directed repair is associated with stress survival and longevity in bacteria

  3. Kinetics of inclusion body formation and its correlation with the characteristics of protein aggregates in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Upadhyay, Arun K; Murmu, Aruna; Singh, Anupam; Panda, Amulya K

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the research was to understand the structural determinants governing protein aggregation into inclusion bodies during expression of recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli. Recombinant human growth hormone (hGH) and asparaginase were expressed as inclusion bodies in E.coli and the kinetics of aggregate formation was analyzed in details. Asparaginase inclusion bodies were of smaller size (200 nm) and the size of the aggregates did not increase with induction time. In contrast, the seeding and growth behavior of hGH inclusion bodies were found to be sequential, kinetically stable and the aggregate size increased from 200 to 800 nm with induction time. Human growth hormone inclusion bodies showed higher resistance to denaturants and proteinase K degradation in comparison to those of asparaginase inclusion bodies. Asparaginase inclusion bodies were completely solubilized at 2-3 M urea concentration and could be refolded into active protein, whereas 7 M urea was required for complete solubilization of hGH inclusion bodies. Both hGH and asparaginase inclusion bodies showed binding with amyloid specific dyes. In spite of its low β-sheet content, binding with dyes was more prominent in case of hGH inclusion bodies than that of asparaginase. Arrangements of protein molecules present in the surface as well as in the core of inclusion bodies were similar. Hydrophobic interactions between partially folded amphiphillic and hydrophobic alpha-helices were found to be one of the main determinants of hGH inclusion body formation. Aggregation behavior of the protein molecules decides the nature and properties of inclusion bodies.

  4. Highly efficient immunodiagnosis of Large cardamom chirke virus using the polyclonal antiserum against Escherichia coli expressed recombinant coat protein.

    PubMed

    Vijayanandraj, S; Yogita, M; Das, Amrita; Ghosh, Amalendu; Mandal, Bikash

    2013-09-01

    Large cardamom chirke virus (LCCV), genus Macluravirus, family Potyviridae is an important constrain in large cardamom production in India. Purification of LCCV from large cardamom tissues is difficult and therefore immunodiagnostic reagents are not available. In the present study, we have successfully expressed coat protein (CP) gene of LCCV in Escherichia coli. The purification of expressed protein by Ni-NTA affinity chromatography was inefficient due to precipitation of protein during renaturation. We have optimized a simple, inexpensive and efficient method for purification of the expressed CP through gel extraction with 5 % SDS followed by renaturation in Milli-Q water, which resulted in high yield (4.7 mg/ml) and good quality of the protein. A higher titer (1:256,000) polyclonal antibody (PAb) to the recombinant CP was produced, which strongly recognized LCCV in crude leaf extract and showed minimal background reaction with the healthy leaf extract in enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and dot immunobinding assay (DIBA). The sensitivities of the ELISA and DIBA were 5 and 0.1 ng of expressed protein, respectively. Both the ELISA and DIBA were validated with 100 % accuracy in detecting LCCV in field samples. The PAb differentiated Cardamom mosaic virus, another close relative of LCCV. Our study is first to report highly efficient immunodiagnosis with PAb to E. coli expressed recombinant CP of a virus under the genus Macluravirus. The antigen expression construct and PAb developed in the present study will be useful in production of virus free planting materials of large cardamom.

  5. Crystal Structure of the Escherichia coli Fic Toxin-Like Protein in Complex with Its Cognate Antitoxin

    PubMed Central

    Stanger, Frédéric V.; Harms, Alexander; Dehio, Christoph; Schirmer, Tilman

    2016-01-01

    FIC domain proteins mediate post-translational modifications of target proteins, which typically results in their inactivation. Depending on the conservation of crucial active site residues, the FIC fold serves as structural scaffold for various enzymatic activities, mostly target adenylylation. The founding member of the vast Fic protein family, EcFicT, was identified in Escherichia coli some time ago. The G55R point mutant of EcFicT displays the “filamentation induced by cAMP” (Fic) phenotype at high 3',5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) concentrations and elevated temperature, but the underlying molecular mechanism and any putative biochemical activity of EcFicT have remained unknown. EcFicT belongs to class I Fic toxin proteins that are encoded together with a small inhibitory protein (antitoxin), named EcFicA in E. coli. Here, we report the crystal structures of two mutant EcFicT/EcFicA complexes (EcFicTG55RA and EcFicTAE28G) both showing close resemblance with the structure of the AMP-transferase VbhT from Bartonella schoenbuchensis in complex with its cognate antitoxin VbhA. However, crucial differences in the active site of EcFicT compared to VbhT and other AMP-transferases rationalize the lack of evidence for adenylylation activity. Comprehensive bioinformatic analysis suggests that EcFicT has evolved from canonical AMP-transferases and has acquired a conserved binding site for a yet to be discovered novel substrate. The G55R mutation has no effect on structure or thermal stability of EcFicT, such that the molecular basis for its associated Fic phenotype remains elusive. We anticipate that this structure will inspire further bioinformatic and experimental analyses in order to characterize the enzymatic activity of EcFicT and help revealing its physiological role. PMID:27657533

  6. Role of N-terminal region of Escherichia coli maltodextrin glucosidase in folding and function of the protein.

    PubMed

    Pastor, Ashutosh; Singh, Amit K; Shukla, Prakash K; Equbal, Md Javed; Malik, Shikha T; Singh, Tej P; Chaudhuri, Tapan K

    2016-09-01

    Maltodextrin glucosidase (MalZ) hydrolyses short malto-oligosaccharides from the reducing end releasing glucose and maltose in Escherichia coli. MalZ is a highly aggregation prone protein and molecular chaperonins GroEL and GroES assist in the folding of this protein to a substantial level. The N-terminal region of this enzyme appears to be a unique domain as seen in sequence comparison studies with other amylases as well as through homology modelling. The sequence and homology model analysis show a probability of disorder in the N-Terminal region of MalZ. The crystal structure of this enzyme has been reported in the present communication. Based on the crystallographic structure, it has been interpreted that the N-terminal region of the enzyme (Met1-Phe131) might be unstructured or flexible. To understand the role of the N-terminal region of MalZ in its enzymatic activity, and overall stability, a truncated version (Ala111-His616) of MalZ was created. The truncated version failed to fold into an active enzyme both in E. coli cytosol and in vitro even with the assistance of chaperonins GroEL and GroES. Furthermore, the refolding effort of N-truncated MalZ in the presence of isolated N-terminal domain didn't succeed. Our studies suggest that while the structural rigidity or orientation of the N-terminal region of the MalZ protein may not be essential for its stability and function, but the said domain is likely to play an important role in the formation of the native structure of the protein when present as an integral part of the protein.

  7. Characterization of Zn(II)-responsive ribosomal proteins YkgM and L31 in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Hensley, M Patrick; Gunasekera, Thusitha S; Easton, J Allen; Sigdel, Tara K; Sugarbaker, Stacy A; Klingbeil, Lindsey; Breece, Robert M; Tierney, David L; Crowder, Michael W

    2012-06-01

    RT-PCR and DNA microarrays were used to probe for Zn(II)-responsive genes in E. coli cells that were made Zn(II) deficient. Microarray data revealed 114 genes were significantly up-regulated and 146 genes were significantly down-regulated in Zn(II) deficient conditions. The three most up-regulated genes were (1) znuA, which encodes for a periplasmic protein known to be involved with Zn(II) import, (2) yodA, which encodes for a periplasmic protein with unknown function, and (3) ykgM, which encodes for a ribosomal protein that is thought to be a paralog of ribosomal protein L31. YodA was over-expressed and purified as a maltose binding protein (MBP) fusion protein and shown to tightly bind 4 equivalents of Zn(II). Metal analyses showed that MBP-YkgM does not bind Zn(II). On the other hand, MBP-L31 tightly binds 1 equivalent of Zn(II). EXAFS studies on MBP-L31 suggest a ligand field of 1 histidine, 1 cysteine, and 2 additional N/O scatterers. Site-directed mutagenesis studies suggest that Cys16 coordinates Zn(II) in MBP-L31 and that the other three cysteines do not bind metal. These results are discussed in light of Zn(II) starvation model that has been postulated for B. subtilis.

  8. Overproduction of single-stranded-DNA-binding protein specifically inhibits recombination of UV-irradiated bacteriophage DNA in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Moreau, P L

    1988-01-01

    Overproduction of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA)-binding protein (SSB) in uvr Escherichia coli mutants results in a wide range of altered phenotypes. (i) Cell survival after UV irradiation is decreased; (ii) expression of the recA-lexA regulon is slightly reduced after UV irradiation, whereas it is increased without irradiation; and (iii) recombination of UV-damaged lambda DNA is inhibited, whereas recombination of nonirradiated DNA is unaffected. These results are consistent with the idea that in UV-damaged bacteria, SSB is first required to allow the formation of short complexes of RecA protein and ssDNA that mediate cleavage of the LexA protein. However, in a second stage, SSB should be displaced from ssDNA to permit the production of longer RecA-ssDNA nucleoprotein filaments that are required for strand pairing and, hence, recombinational repair. Since bacteria overproducing SSB appear identical in physiological respects to recF mutant bacteria, it is suggested that the RecF protein (alone or with other proteins of the RecF pathway) may help RecA protein to release SSB from ssDNA. PMID:2836358

  9. Role of ribosomal protein S12 in peptide chain elongation: analysis of pleiotropic, streptomycin-resistant mutants of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Zengel, J M; Young, R; Dennis, P P; Nomura, M

    1977-01-01

    Some of the spontaneous streptomycin-resistant mutants of Escherichia coli strain C600 exhibit pleiotropic effects in addition to the antibiotic resistance. These effects include decreased growth rates, reduced levels of certain enzymes, and poor support of bacteriophage growth. One of these mutants, strain SM3, was studied further. We have examined the question of whether the reduced growth rate of the mutant SM3 is related to the reduction in relative amounts of ribosomes or to the reduction in the efficiency of ribosomes in protein synthesis. Measurements of alpha, the differential synthesis rate of ribosomal protein, revealed that the protein synthesis effeciency of ribosomes from the mutant strain SM3 was reduced about twofold relative to that of the parent strain C600. Measurements of the induction lag for beta-galactosidase and of the synthesis time of several different molecular-weight classes of proteins indicated that the mutation resulted in a marked reduction in the peptide chain growth rate. This reduction in the chain growth rate probably accounted for most of the observed reduction in the growth rate of the mutant strain. These experimental results show that the strA gene product, the S12 protein of the 30S subunit, is involved in some aspect of protein chain elongation. Presumably this involvement occurs during the messenger ribonucleic acid-directed binding of transfer ribonucleic acid to the ribosome. PMID:321423

  10. Role of ribosomal protein S12 in peptide chain elongation: analysis of pleiotropic, streptomycin-resistant mutants of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Zengel, J M; Young, R; Dennis, P P; Nomura, M

    1977-03-01

    Some of the spontaneous streptomycin-resistant mutants of Escherichia coli strain C600 exhibit pleiotropic effects in addition to the antibiotic resistance. These effects include decreased growth rates, reduced levels of certain enzymes, and poor support of bacteriophage growth. One of these mutants, strain SM3, was studied further. We have examined the question of whether the reduced growth rate of the mutant SM3 is related to the reduction in relative amounts of ribosomes or to the reduction in the efficiency of ribosomes in protein synthesis. Measurements of alpha, the differential synthesis rate of ribosomal protein, revealed that the protein synthesis effeciency of ribosomes from the mutant strain SM3 was reduced about twofold relative to that of the parent strain C600. Measurements of the induction lag for beta-galactosidase and of the synthesis time of several different molecular-weight classes of proteins indicated that the mutation resulted in a marked reduction in the peptide chain growth rate. This reduction in the chain growth rate probably accounted for most of the observed reduction in the growth rate of the mutant strain. These experimental results show that the strA gene product, the S12 protein of the 30S subunit, is involved in some aspect of protein chain elongation. Presumably this involvement occurs during the messenger ribonucleic acid-directed binding of transfer ribonucleic acid to the ribosome.

  11. Role of the ribosome-associated protein PY in the cold-shock response of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Di Pietro, Fabio; Brandi, Anna; Dzeladini, Nadire; Fabbretti, Attilio; Carzaniga, Thomas; Piersimoni, Lolita; Pon, Cynthia L; Giuliodori, Anna Maria

    2013-01-01

    Protein Y (PY) is an Escherichia coli cold-shock protein which has been proposed to be responsible for the repression of bulk protein synthesis during cold adaptation. Here, we present in vivo and in vitro data which clarify the role of PY and its mechanism of action. Deletion of yfiA, the gene encoding protein PY, demonstrates that this protein is dispensable for cold adaptation and is not responsible for the shutdown of bulk protein synthesis at the onset of the stress, although it is able to partially inhibit translation. In vitro assays reveal that the extent of PY inhibition changes with different mRNAs and that this inhibition is related to the capacity of PY of binding 30S subunits with a fairly strong association constant, thus stimulating the formation of 70S monomers. Furthermore, our data provide evidence that PY competes with the other ribosomal ligands for the binding to the 30S subunits. Overall these results suggest an alternative model to explain PY function during cold shock and to reconcile the inhibition caused by PY with the active translation observed for some mRNAs during cold shock. PMID:23420694

  12. Pichia pastoris is superior to E. coli for the production of recombinant allergenic non-specific lipid-transfer proteins.

    PubMed

    Pokoj, Sven; Lauer, Iris; Fötisch, Kay; Himly, Martin; Mari, Adriano; Enrique, Ernesto; Miguel-Moncin, Maria Del Mar San; Lidholm, Jonas; Vieths, Stefan; Scheurer, Stephan

    2010-01-01

    Non-specific lipid-transfer proteins (nsLTP) from food and pollen are clinically important allergens, especially in patients recruited from the Mediterranean area. For the use of recombinant nsLTPs in allergy diagnosis and preclinical allergy studies the preparation of nsLTPs in a properly folded and biologically active form is required. Using hazelnut nsLTP (Cor a 8) as a model allergen, heterologous over-expression in Escherichia coli and Pichia pastoris was compared. Recombinant Cor a 8 derived from E. coli and P. pastoris was purified by IMAC and SEC or ammonium sulphate precipitation followed by IEC and SEC, respectively. The recombinant proteins were characterized with regard to IgE-binding by immunoblotting and ELISA, structure by N-terminal sequencing, CD-spectroscopy and LS and to their biological activity using an in vitro basophil histamine release assay. Purification of hazelnut nsLTP from bacterial lysate under native conditions resulted in a low yield of Cor a 8. In addition, the preparation contained non-IgE-reactive aggregations besides the IgE-reactive monomer. In contrast, the yield of rCor a 8 produced in P. pastoris was approximately 270-fold higher and impurities with oligomers have not been detected. Purified monomeric Cor a 8 from bacteria and yeast showed similar IgE-antibody reactivity and secondary structures, and both were capable of inducing histamine release from basophils. In summary, P. pastoris is superior to E. coli as expression system for the production of large quantities of soluble, properly folded, and biologically active rCor a 8.

  13. Improved 1, 2, 4-butanetriol production from an engineered Escherichia coli by co-expression of different chaperone proteins.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xinyao; He, Shuying; Zong, Hong; Song, Jian; Chen, Wen; Zhuge, Bin

    2016-09-01

    1, 2, 4-Butanetriol (BT) is a high-value non-natural chemical and has important applications in polymers, medical production and military industry. In the constructed BT biosynthesis pathway from xylose in Escherichia coli, the xylose dehydrogenase (Xdh) and the benzoylformate decarboxylase (MdlC) are heterologous enzymes and the activity of MdlC is the key limiting factor for BT production. In this study, six chaperone protein systems were introduced into the engineered E. coli harboring the recombinant BT pathway. The chaperone GroES-GroEL was beneficial to Xdh activity but had a negative effect on MdlC activity and BT titer. The plasmid pTf16 containing the tig gene (trigger factor) was beneficial to Xdh and MdlC activities and improved the BT titer from 0.42 to 0.56 g/l from 20 g/l xylose. However, co-expression of trigger factor and GroES-GroEL simultaneously reduced the activity of MdlC and had no effect on the BT production. The plasmid pKJE7 harboring dnaK-dnaJ-grpE showed significant negative effects on these enzyme activities and cell growth, leading to completely restrained the BT production. Similarly, co-expression of DnaKJ-GrpPE and GroES-GroEL simultaneously reduced Xdh and MdlC activities and decreased the BT titer by 45.2 %. The BT production of the engineered E. coli harboring pTf16 was further improved to the highest level at 1.01 g/l under pH control (pH 7). This work showed the potential application of chaperone proteins in microorganism engineering to get high production of target compounds as an effective and valuable tool.

  14. The Intimin-Like Protein FdeC Is Regulated by H-NS and Temperature in Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Easton, Donna M.; Allsopp, Luke P.; Phan, Minh-Duy; Moriel, Danilo Gomes; Goh, Guan Kai; Beatson, Scott A.; Mahony, Timothy J.; Cobbold, Rowland N.

    2014-01-01

    Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) is a Shiga-toxigenic pathogen capable of inducing severe forms of enteritis (e.g., hemorrhagic colitis) and extraintestinal sequelae (e.g., hemolytic-uremic syndrome). The molecular basis of colonization of human and animal hosts by EHEC is not yet completely understood, and an improved understanding of EHEC mucosal adherence may lead to the development of interventions that could disrupt host colonization. FdeC, also referred to by its IHE3034 locus tag ECOK1_0290, is an intimin-like protein that was recently shown to contribute to kidney colonization in a mouse urinary tract infection model. The expression of FdeC is tightly regulated in vitro, and FdeC shows promise as a vaccine candidate against extraintestinal E. coli strains. In this study, we characterized the prevalence, regulation, and function of fdeC in EHEC. We showed that the fdeC gene is conserved in both O157 and non-O157 EHEC and encodes a protein that is expressed at the cell surface and promotes biofilm formation under continuous-flow conditions in a recombinant E. coli strain background. We also identified culture conditions under which FdeC is expressed and showed that minor alterations of these conditions, such as changes in temperature, can significantly alter the level of FdeC expression. Additionally, we demonstrated that the transcription of the fdeC gene is repressed by the global regulator H-NS. Taken together, our data suggest a role for FdeC in EHEC when it grows at temperatures above 37°C, a condition relevant to its specialized niche at the rectoanal junctions of cattle. PMID:25239893

  15. Effect of an Antimicrobial Compound on Different Processes within the Oscillation of Min Proteins in E. coli Bacterial Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giuliani, Maximiliano; Dutcher, John

    2013-03-01

    A key step in the life of a bacterium is its division into two daughter cells of equal size. This process is carefully controlled and regulated so that equal partitioning of the cellular machinery is obtained. In E. coli, this regulation is accomplished, in part, by the Min protein system. The Min proteins undergo an oscillation between the poles of rod-shaped E. coli bacteria. We use high magnification, time-resolved total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy to characterize the temporal distributions of different processes within the oscillation: the MinD-MinE interaction time, the residence time for membrane bound MinD, and the recruitment time for MinD to be observed at the opposite pole. We also characterize the change in each of these processes in the presence of the antimicrobial compound polymyxin B (PMB). We show that the times corresponding to the removal of MinD from one pole and the recruitment of MinD at the opposite pole are correlated. We explain this correlation through the existence of a concentration threshold. The effect of PMB on the concentration threshold is used to identify which process within the oscillation is most affected.

  16. A PMMA microfluidic droplet platform for in vitro protein expression using crude E. coli S30 extract.

    PubMed

    Wu, N; Zhu, Y; Brown, S; Oakeshott, J; Peat, T S; Surjadi, R; Easton, C; Leech, P W; Sexton, B A

    2009-12-07

    Droplet based microfluidics are promising new tools for biological and chemical assays. In this paper, a high throughput and high sensitivity microfluidic droplet platform is described for in vitro protein expression using crude Escherichia coli S30 extract. A flow-focusing polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) microchip was designed and integrated with different functions involving droplet generation, storage, separation and detection. The material used for the chip is superior to the previously tested polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) due to its mechanical and chemical properties. Droplet formation characteristics such as size and generation rate are investigated systematically. The effect of surfactants Abil EM90 and Span80 in the oil phase on droplet formation and optical detection is also studied. The performance of the system is demonstrated by the high throughput and stable droplet generation and ultralow detection limit. The robustness of the system is also demonstrated by the successful synthesis of a green fluorescent protein (GFP) using E. coli S30 extract as a source of RNA translation reagents.

  17. Sequences near the Active Site in Chimeric Penicillin Binding Proteins 5 and 6 Affect Uniform Morphology of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Anindya S.; Young, Kevin D.

    2003-01-01

    Penicillin binding protein (PBP) 5, a dd-carboxypeptidase that removes the terminal d-alanine from peptide side chains of peptidoglycan, plays an important role in creating and maintaining the uniform cell shape of Escherichia coli. PBP 6, a highly similar homologue, cannot substitute for PBP 5 in this respect. Previously, we localized the shape-maintaining characteristics of PBP 5 to the globular domain that contains the active site (domain I), where PBPs 5 and 6 share substantial identity. To identify the specific segment of domain I responsible for shape control, we created a set of hybrids and determined which ones complemented the aberrant morphology of a misshapen PBP mutant, E. coli CS703-1. Fusion proteins were constructed in which 47, 199 and 228 amino-terminal amino acids of one PBP were fused to the corresponding carboxy-terminal amino acids of the other. The morphological phenotype was reversed only by hybrid proteins containing PBP 5 residues 200 to 228, which are located next to the KTG motif of the active site. Because residues 220 to 228 were identical in these proteins, the morphological effect was determined by alterations in amino acids 200 to 219. To confirm the importance of this segment, we constructed mosaic proteins in which these 20 amino acids were grafted from PBP 5 into PBP 6 and vice versa. The PBP 6/5/6 mosaic complemented the aberrant morphology of CS703-1, whereas PBP 5/6/5 did not. Site-directed mutagenesis demonstrated that the Asp218 and Lys219 residues were important for shape maintenance by these mosaic PBPs, but the same mutations in wild-type PBP 5 did not eliminate its shape-promoting activity. Homologous enzymes from five other bacteria also complemented the phenotype of CS703-1. The overall conclusion is that creation of a bacterial cell of regular diameter and uniform contour apparently depends primarily on a slight alteration of the enzymatic activity or substrate accessibility at the active site of E. coli PBP 5. PMID

  18. The Escherichia coli orthologue of the Salmonella ushB gene (ushB(c)) produces neither UDP-sugar hydrolase activity nor detectable protein, but has an identical sequence to that of Escherichia coli cdh.

    PubMed

    Schroder, W; Burger, M; Edwards, C; Douglas, M; Innes, D; Beacham, I R; Burns, D M

    2001-09-11

    Salmonella ushB, which encodes a membrane-bound UDP-sugar hydrolase, has an Escherichia coli orthologue (ushB(c)) which does not detectably produce this activity. In this report, we show that ushB(c) does not produce any detectable protein either, despite being transcribed normally. Remarkably, ushB(c) is shown to have 100% sequence identity with E. coli cdh, previously characterised as encoding an active CDP-diglyceride hydrolase, an apparent contradiction with implications regarding enzyme evolution. We suggest that a useful gene designation is cdh (ushB(c)) rather than either ushB(c) or cdh, alone.

  19. Assessment of the Fusion Tags on Increasing Soluble Production of the Active TEV Protease Variant and Other Target Proteins in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xuelian; Sun, Jiaqi; Wang, Weiyu; Jiang, Li; Cheng, Beijiu; Fan, Jun

    2016-12-17

    In this study, five fusion tags affecting soluble production and cleavage activity of the tobacco etch virus (TEV) protease (TEVp) variant in Escherichia coli strains BL21 (DE3) and Rosetta™ (DE3) are investigated. Combination of the augmenting rare transfer RNAs (tRNAs) and the fused expressivity tag (N-terminal seven amino acid residues of E. coli translation initiation factor II) promotes the soluble TEVp partner expressed at relatively high level. Attachment of the maltose-binding protein (MBP) tag increases soluble expression of the protease released from the fusion protein in E. coli cells, but the incorporated TEVp recognition sequence slightly decreases expressivity of the fusion construct. Except for the green fluorescent protein, the attached expressivity tag shows less efficiency than the MBP tag in enhancing expression levels of the selected five target proteins in the Rosetta™ (DE3) cells under different induction conditions. Our results identified that high-level production of the functional target protein as the fusion partner in E. coli is combined with the intrinsic property of fusion tag, fusion protein stability, inherent folding of target protein, rare tRNA abundance, and the incorporated linker. Purified TEVp fusion constructs with the N-terminal expressivity tag, as well as the MBP partner, are the ideal alternatives for removing fusion tag.

  20. Conservation of an ATP-binding domain among RecA proteins from Proteus vulgaris, Erwinia carotovora, Shigella flexneri, and Escherichia coli K-12 and B/r.

    PubMed

    Knight, K L; Hess, R M; McEntee, K

    1988-06-01

    The purified RecA proteins encoded by the cloned genes from Proteus vulgaris, Erwinia carotovora, Shigella flexneri, and Escherichia coli B/r were compared with the RecA protein from E. coli K-12. Each of the proteins hydrolyzed ATP in the presence of single-stranded DNA, and each was covalently modified with the photoaffinity ATP analog 8-azidoadenosine 5'-triphosphate (8N3ATP). Two-dimensional tryptic maps of the four heterologous RecA proteins demonstrated considerable structural conservation among these bacterial genera. Moreover, when the [alpha-32P]8N3ATP-modified proteins were digested with trypsin and analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography, a single peak of radioactivity was detected in each of the digests and these peptides eluted identically with the tryptic peptide T31 of the E. coli K-12 RecA protein, which was the unique site of 8N3ATP photolabeling. Each of the heterologous recA genes hybridized to oligonucleotide probes derived from the ATP-binding domain sequence of the E. coli K-12 gene. These last results demonstrate that the ATP-binding domain of the RecA protein has been strongly conserved for greater than 10(7) years.

  1. Conservation of an ATP-binding domain among recA proteins from Proteus vulgaris, erwinia carotovora, Shigella flexneri, and Escherichia coli K-12 and B/r

    SciTech Connect

    Knight, K.L.; Hess, R.M.; McEntee, K.

    1988-06-01

    The purified RecA proteins encoded by the cloned genes from Proteus vulgaris, Erwinia carotovora, Shigella flexneri, and Escherichia coli B/r were compared with the RecA protein from E. coli K-12. Each of the proteins hydrolyzed ATP in the presence of single-stranded DNA, and each was covalently modified with the photoaffinity ATP analog 8-azidoadenosine 5'-triphosphate (8N/sub 3/ATP). Two-dimensional tryptic maps of the four heterologous RecA proteins demonstrated considerable structural conservation among these bacterial genera. Moreover, when the (..cap alpha..-/sup 32/P)8N/sub 3/ATP-modified proteins were digested with trypsin and analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography, a single peak of radioactivity was detected in each of the digests and these peptides eluted identically with the tryptic peptide T/sub 31/ of the E. coli K-12 RecA protein, which was the unique site of 8N/sub 3/ATP photolabeling. Each of the heterologous recA genes hybridized to oligonucleotide probes derived from the ATP-binding domain sequence of the E. coli K-12 gene. These last results demonstrate that the ATP-binding domain of the RecA protein has been strongly conserved for greater than 10/sup 7/ years.

  2. The yeast omnipotent suppressor SUP46 encodes a ribosomal protein which is a functional and structural homolog of the Escherichia coli S4 ram protein.

    PubMed

    Vincent, A; Liebman, S W

    1992-10-01

    The accurate synthesis of proteins is crucial to the existence of a cell. In yeast, several genes that affect the fidelity of translation have been identified (e.g., omnipotent suppressors, antisuppressors and allosuppressors). We have found that the dominant omnipotent suppressor SUP46 encodes the yeast ribosomal protein S13. S13 is encoded by two similar genes, but only the sup46 copy of the gene is able to fully complement the recessive phenotypes of SUP46 mutations. Both copies of the S13 genes contain introns. Unlike the introns of other duplicated ribosomal protein genes which are highly diverged, the duplicated S13 genes have two nearly identical DNA sequences of 25 and 31 bp in length within their introns. The SUP46 protein has significant homology to the S4 ribosomal protein in prokaryotic-type ribosomes. S4 is encoded by one of the ram (ribosomal ambiguity) genes in Escherichia coli which are the functional equivalent of omnipotent suppressors in yeast. Thus, SUP46 and S4 demonstrate functional as well as sequence conservation between prokaryotic and eukaryotic ribosomal proteins. SUP46 and S4 are most similar in their central amino acid sequences. Interestingly, the alterations resulting from the SUP46 mutations and the segment of the S4 protein involved in binding to the 16S rRNA are within this most conserved region.

  3. Histidine 416 of the periplasmic binding protein NikA is essential for nickel uptake in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Cavazza, Christine; Martin, Lydie; Laffly, Emmanuelle; Lebrette, Hugo; Cherrier, Mickaël V; Zeppieri, Laura; Richaud, Pierre; Carrière, Marie; Fontecilla-Camps, Juan C

    2011-02-18

    Escherichia coli require nickel for the synthesis of [NiFe] hydrogenases under anaerobic growth conditions. Nickel import depends on the specific ABC-transporter NikABCDE encoded by the nik operon, which deletion causes the complete abolition of hydrogenase activity. We have previously postulated that the periplasmic binding protein NikA binds a natural metallophore containing three carboxylate functions that coordinate a Ni(II) ion, the fourth ligand being His416, the only direct metal-protein contact, completing a square-planar coordination for the metal. The crystal structure of the H416I mutant showed no electron density corresponding to a metal-chelator complex. In vivo experiments indicate that the mutation causes a significant decrease in nickel uptake and hydrogenase activity. These results confirm the essential role of His416 in nickel transport by NikA.

  4. Penicillin-binding protein 2 is essential in wild-type Escherichia coli but not in lov or cya mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Ogura, T; Bouloc, P; Niki, H; D'Ari, R; Hiraga, S; Jaffé, A

    1989-01-01

    Penicillin-binding protein 2 (PBP2), target of the beta-lactam mecillinam, is required for rod morphology and cell wall elongation in Escherichia coli. A new temperature-sensitive PBP2 allele and an in vitro-constructed insertion deletion allele were shown to be lethal in wild-type strains, establishing that the activity of this protein is essential. Mutations in the lov or cya genes, conferring mecillinam resistance, compensated for the deleterious effect of the absence of PBP2. The resulting double mutants grew as spheres. In a cya mutant lacking PBP2, the restoration of a Cya+ phenotype by addition of cyclic AMP caused lethality and a block in cell division. These results show that in wild-type cells, PBP2 is essential for growth and division. PMID:2656638

  5. Site-Specific Cleavage of Ribosomal RNA in Escherichia coli-Based Cell-Free Protein Synthesis Systems

    PubMed Central

    Failmezger, Jurek; Nitschel, Robert; Sánchez-Kopper, Andrés; Kraml, Michael; Siemann-Herzberg, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Cell-free protein synthesis, which mimics the biological protein production system, allows rapid expression of proteins without the need to maintain a viable cell. Nevertheless, cell-free protein expression relies on active in vivo translation machinery including ribosomes and translation factors. Here, we examined the integrity of the protein synthesis machinery, namely the functionality of ribosomes, during (i) the cell-free extract preparation and (ii) the performance of in vitro protein synthesis by analyzing crucial components involved in translation. Monitoring the 16S rRNA, 23S rRNA, elongation factors and ribosomal protein S1, we show that processing of a cell-free extract results in no substantial alteration of the translation machinery. Moreover, we reveal that the 16S rRNA is specifically cleaved at helix 44 during in vitro translation reactions, resulting in the removal of the anti-Shine-Dalgarno sequence. These defective ribosomes accumulate in the cell-free system. We demonstrate that the specific cleavage of the 16S rRNA is triggered by the decreased concentrations of Mg2+. In addition, we provide evidence that helix 44 of the 30S ribosomal subunit serves as a point-of-entry for ribosome degradation in Escherichia coli. Our results suggest that Mg2+ homeostasis is fundamental to preserving functional ribosomes in cell-free protein synthesis systems, which is of major importance for cell-free protein synthesis at preparative scale, in order to create highly efficient technical in vitro systems. PMID:27992588

  6. Cloning and Expression of L1 Protein Human Papillomavirus Type 31 Isolated from Iranian Patients in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Hajmohammadi, Sameh; Rassi, Hossein

    2016-08-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV), a major pathogen of human cervical cancer, contains a full-length L1 gene encoding its surface capsid protein. One group of potential vaccine candidates against this virus in Iranian patients is based on surface protein components such as HPV31 L1 protein that can make virus-like particles (VLPs). The high immunity response stimulation of this effecter VLP was observed in host, suggesting that the individual characteristics of a particular effecter may require empirical testing for vaccination. In the present study, we decided to clone and express HPV31 L1 protein to investigate its use as a subunit vaccine and furthermore to insert the gene into an Escherichia coli background so as to analyze production of this recombinant protein. We report the presentation of HPV31 in 100 cervical lesion tissue samples based on polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Type of lesion, age, and other characteristics were reviewed and confirmed by a pathologist. The sequence from L1 genes of HPV was selected using special primers. The gene encoding the major capsid protein L1 was used for subcloning in pTG19-T and pET-32a plasmid. The recombinant protein expression was confirmed by RT-PCR using L1 primers and detected by absorption sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and immunoblot testing. The results presented here offer new insights into the in vivo response of HPV31 in Iranian patients and European models. On the other hand, the use of recombinant L1 protein for Iranian patient protection as well as vaccination studies will permit testing of this antigen protection rate and open the way to the discovery of protein biomarkers for monitoring clinical and subclinical cervical cancers.

  7. Enhancing thermo-induced recombinant protein production in Escherichia coli by temperature oscillations and post-induction nutrient feeding strategies.

    PubMed

    Caspeta, Luis; Lara, Alvaro R; Pérez, Néstor O; Flores, Noemí; Bolívar, Francisco; Ramírez, Octavio T

    2013-08-10

    Traditional strategies for production of thermo-induced recombinant protein in Escherichia coli consist of a two-phase culture, with an initial growth stage at low temperature (commonly 30°C) followed by a production stage where temperature is increased stepwise (commonly up to 42°C). A disadvantage of such strategies is that growth is inhibited upon temperature increase, limiting the duration of the production stage and consequently limiting recombinant protein production. In this work, a novel oscillatory thermo-induction strategy, consisting on temperature fluctuations between 37 and 42°C or 30 and 42°C, was tested for improving recombinant protein production. In addition, the induction schemes were combined with one of three different nutrient feeding strategies: two exponential and one linear. Recombinant human preproinsulin (HPPI), produced under control of the λP(L)-cI857 system in the E. coli BL21 strain, was used as the model protein. Compared to the conventional induction scheme at constant temperature (42°C), longer productive times were attained under oscillatory induction, which resulted in a 1.3- to 1.7-fold increase in maximum HPPI concentration. Temperature oscillations led to a 2.3- to 4.0-fold increase in biomass accumulation and a decrease of 48-62% in the concentration of organic acids, compared to conventional induction. Under constant induction, growth ceased upon temperature increase and the maximum concentration of HPPI was 3.9 g/L, regardless of the post-induction feeding strategy used. In comparison, the combination of temperature oscillations and a high nutrient-feeding rate allowed sustained growth after induction and reaching up to 5.8 g/L of HPPI.

  8. Identification of protein complexes in Escherichia coli using sequential peptide affinity purification in combination with tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Babu, Mohan; Kagan, Olga; Guo, Hongbo; Greenblatt, Jack; Emili, Andrew

    2012-11-12

    Since most cellular processes are mediated by macromolecular assemblies, the systematic identification of protein-protein interactions (PPI) and the identification of the subunit composition of multi-protein complexes can provide insight into gene function and enhance understanding of biological systems(1, 2). Physical interactions can be mapped with high confidence vialarge-scale isolation and characterization of endogenous protein complexes under near-physiological conditions based on affinity purification of chromosomally-tagged proteins in combination with mass spectrometry (APMS). This approach has been successfully applied in evolutionarily diverse organisms, including yeast, flies, worms, mammalian cells, and bacteria(1-6). In particular, we have generated a carboxy-terminal Sequential Peptide Affinity (SPA) dual tagging system for affinity-purifying native protein complexes from cultured gram-negative Escherichia coli, using genetically-tractable host laboratory strains that are well-suited for genome-wide investigations of the fundamental biology and conserved processes of prokaryotes(1, 2, 7). Our SPA-tagging system is analogous to the tandem affinity purification method developed originally for yeast(8, 9), and consists of a calmodulin binding peptide (CBP) followed by the cleavage site for the highly specific tobacco etch virus (TEV) protease and three copies of the FLAG epitope (3X FLAG), allowing for two consecutive rounds of affinity enrichment. After cassette amplification, sequence-specific linear PCR products encoding the SPA-tag and a selectable marker are integrated and expressed in frame as carboxy-terminal fusions in a DY330 background that is induced to transiently express a highly efficient heterologous bacteriophage lambda recombination system(10). Subsequent dual-step purification using calmodulin and anti-FLAG affinity beads enables the highly selective and efficient recovery of even low abundance protein complexes from large

  9. Functional Interaction between the Cytoplasmic ABC Protein LptB and the Inner Membrane LptC Protein, Components of the Lipopolysaccharide Transport Machinery in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Martorana, Alessandra M.; Benedet, Mattia; Maccagni, Elisa A.; Sperandeo, Paola; Villa, Riccardo; Dehò, Gianni

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The assembly of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in the outer leaflet of the outer membrane (OM) requires the transenvelope Lpt (lipopolysaccharide transport) complex, made in Escherichia coli of seven essential proteins located in the inner membrane (IM) (LptBCFG), periplasm (LptA), and OM (LptDE). At the IM, LptBFG constitute an unusual ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter, composed by the transmembrane LptFG proteins and the cytoplasmic LptB ATPase, which is thought to extract LPS from the IM and to provide the energy for its export across the periplasm to the cell surface. LptC is a small IM bitopic protein that binds to LptBFG and recruits LptA via its N- and C-terminal regions, and its role in LPS export is not completely understood. Here, we show that the expression level of lptB is a critical factor for suppressing lethality of deletions in the C-terminal region of LptC and the functioning of a hybrid Lpt machinery that carries Pa-LptC, the highly divergent LptC orthologue from Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We found that LptB overexpression stabilizes C-terminally truncated LptC mutant proteins, thereby allowing the formation of a sufficient amount of stable IM complexes to support growth. Moreover, the LptB level seems also critical for the assembly of IM complexes carrying Pa-LptC which is otherwise defective in interactions with the E. coli LptFG components. Overall, our data suggest that LptB and LptC functionally interact and support a model whereby LptB plays a key role in the assembly of the Lpt machinery. IMPORTANCE The asymmetric outer membrane (OM) of Gram-negative bacteria contains in its outer leaflet an unusual glycolipid, the lipopolysaccharide (LPS). LPS largely contributes to the peculiar permeability barrier properties of the OM that prevent the entry of many antibiotics, thus making Gram-negative pathogens difficult to treat. In Escherichia coli the LPS transporter (the Lpt machine) is made of seven essential proteins (LptABCDEFG) that form a

  10. A novel multimodal chromatography based single step purification process for efficient manufacturing of an E. coli based biotherapeutic protein product.

    PubMed

    Bhambure, Rahul; Gupta, Darpan; Rathore, Anurag S

    2013-11-01

    Methionine oxidized, reduced and fMet forms of a native recombinant protein product are often the critical product variants which are associated with proteins expressed as bacterial inclusion bodies in E. coli. Such product variants differ from native protein in their structural and functional aspects, and may lead to loss of biological activity and immunogenic response in patients. This investigation focuses on evaluation of multimodal chromatography for selective removal of these product variants using recombinant human granulocyte colony stimulating factor (GCSF) as the model protein. Unique selectivity in separation of closely related product variants was obtained using combined pH and salt based elution gradients in hydrophobic charge induction chromatography. Simultaneous removal of process related impurities was also achieved in flow-through leading to single step purification process for the GCSF. Results indicate that the product recovery of up to 90.0% can be obtained with purity levels of greater than 99.0%. Binding the target protein at pH

  11. Roles of Hcp family proteins in the pathogenesis of the porcine extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli type VI secretion system.

    PubMed

    Peng, Ying; Wang, Xiangru; Shou, Jin; Zong, Bingbing; Zhang, Yanyan; Tan, Jia; Chen, Jing; Hu, Linlin; Zhu, Yongwei; Chen, Huanchun; Tan, Chen

    2016-05-27

    Hcp (hemolysin-coregulated protein) is considered a vital component of the functional T6SS (Type VI Secretion System), which is a newly discovered secretion system. Our laboratory has previously sequenced the whole genome of porcine extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC) strain PCN033, and identified an integrated T6SS encoding three different hcp family genes. In this study, we first identified a functional T6SS in porcine ExPEC strain PCN033, and demonstrated that the Hcp family proteins were involved in bacterial competition and the interactions with other cells. Interestingly, the three Hcp proteins had different functions. Hcp2 functioned predominantly in bacterial competition; all three proteins were involved in the colonization of mice; and Hcp1 and Hcp3 were predominantly contributed to bacterial-eukaryotic cell interactions. We showed