Science.gov

Sample records for coli mcra protein

  1. Cloning, Purification and Initial Characterization of E. coli McrA, a Putative 5-methylcytosine-specific Nuclease

    SciTech Connect

    Mulligan,E.; Dunn, J.

    2008-01-01

    Expression strains of Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) overproducing the E. coli m5C McrA restriction protein were produced by cloning the mcrA coding sequence behind a T7 promoter. The recombinant mcrA minus BL21(DE3) host produces active McrA as evidenced by its acquired ability to selectively restrict the growth of T7 phage containing DNA methylated in vitro by HpaII methylase. The mcrA coding region contains several non-optimal E. coli triplets. Addition of the pACYC-RIL tRNA encoding plasmid to the BL21(DE3) host increased the yield of recombinant McrA (rMcrA) upon induction about 5- to 10-fold. McrA protein expressed at 37 C is insoluble but a significant fraction is recovered as soluble protein after autoinduction at 20 C. rMcrA protein, which is predicted to contain a Cys4-Zn2+ finger and a catalytically important histidine triad in its putative nuclease domain, binds to several metal chelate resins without addition of a poly-histidine affinity tag. This feature was used to develop an efficient protocol for the rapid purification of nearly homogeneous rMcrA. The native protein is a dimer with a high a-helical content as measured by circular dichroism analysis. Under all conditions tested purified rMcrA does not have measurable nuclease activity on HpaII methylated (Cm5CGG) DNA, although the purified protein does specifically bind HpaII methylated DNA. These results have implications for understanding the in vivo activity of McrA in 'restricting' m5C-containing DNA and suggest that rMcrA may have utility as a reagent for affinity purification of DNA fragments containing m5C residues.

  2. 32 CFR 757.13 - Responsibility for MCRA actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... § 757.13 Responsibility for MCRA actions. (a) JAG designees. (1) Primary responsibility for....S.C. 1095 claims are brought to the attention of the appropriate JAG designee. (2) The MTF reports all potential MCRA/10 U.S.C. 1095 cases by forwarding a copy of the daily injury log entries...

  3. Strategies for Protein Overproduction in Escherichia coli.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mott, John E.

    1984-01-01

    Examines heterologous expression in Escherichia coli and the role of regulatory sequences which control gene expression at transcription resulting in abundant production of messenger RNA and regulatory sequences in mRNA which promote efficient translation. Also examines the role of E. coli cells in stabilizing mRNA and protein that is…

  4. [Recombinant protein production in Escherichia coli].

    PubMed

    Nuc, Przemysław; Nuc, Katarzyna

    2006-01-01

    Growing needs for efficient recombinant production pose new challenges; starting from cell growth optimization under overexpression conditions, improving vectors, gene and protein sequence to suit them to protein biosynthesis machinery of the host, through extending the knowledge of protein folding, fusion protein construction, and coexpression systems, to improvements in protein purification and renaturation technologies. Hitherto Escherichia coli is the most defined and the cheapest protein biosynthesis system. With its wealth of available mutants tested is the best suited to economically test new gene constructs and to scale up the recombinant protein production.

  5. Transport proteins promoting Escherichia coli pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Fengyi; Saier, Milton H.

    2014-01-01

    Escherichia coli is a genetically diverse species infecting hundreds of millions of people worldwide annually. We examined seven well-characterized E. coli pathogens causing urinary tract infections, gastroenteritis, pyelonephritis and haemorrhagic colitis. Their transport proteins were identified and compared with each other and a non-pathogenic E. coli K12 strain to identify transport proteins related to pathogenesis. Each pathogen possesses a unique set of protein secretion systems for export to the cell surface or for injecting effector proteins into host cells. Pathogens have increased numbers of iron siderophore receptors and ABC iron uptake transporters, but the numbers and types of low-affinity secondary iron carriers were uniform in all strains. The presence of outer membrane iron complex receptors and high-affinity ABC iron uptake systems correlated, suggesting co-evolution. Each pathovar encodes a different set of pore-forming toxins and virulence-related outer membrane proteins lacking in K12. Intracellular pathogens proved to have a characteristically distinctive set of nutrient uptake porters, different from those of extracellular pathogens. The results presented in this report provide information about transport systems relevant to various types of E. coli pathogenesis that can be exploited in future basic and applied studies. PMID:24747185

  6. Preparation of Soluble Proteins from Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Wingfield, Paul T.

    2014-01-01

    Purification of human IL-1β is used in this unit as an example of the preparation of soluble proteins from E. coli. Bacteria containing IL-1β are lysed, and IL-1 β in the resulting supernatant is purified by anion-exchange chromatography, salt precipitation and cation-exchange chromatography, and then concentrated. Finally, the IL-1 β protein is applied to a gel-filtration column to separate it from remaining higher- and lower-molecular-weight contaminants, the purified protein is stored frozen or is lyophilized. The purification protocol described is typical for a protein that is expressed in fairly high abundance (i.e., >5% total protein) and accumulates in a soluble state. Also, the purification procedure serves as an example of how use classical protein purifications methods which may also be used in conjunction with the affinity-based methods now more commonly used. PMID:25367009

  7. Preparation of Soluble Proteins from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Wingfield, Paul T

    2014-01-01

    Purification of human IL-1β is used in this unit as an example of the preparation of a soluble protein from E. coli. Bacteria containing IL-1β are lysed, and IL-1 β in the resulting supernatant is purified by anion-exchange chromatography, salt precipitation, and cation-exchange chromatography, and then concentrated. Finally, the IL-1 β protein is applied to a gel-filtration column to separate it from remaining higher- and lower-molecular-weight contaminants, the purified protein is stored frozen or is lyophilized. The purification protocol described is typical for a protein that is expressed in fairly high abundance (i.e., >5% total protein) and accumulates in a soluble state. In addition, the purification procedure serves as an example of how to use classical protein purifications methods, which may also be used in conjunction with the affinity-based methods now more commonly used. PMID:25367009

  8. An adhesive protein capsule of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Orskov, I; Birch-Andersen, A; Duguid, J P; Stenderup, J; Orskov, F

    1985-01-01

    The nature of the adhesive capacity of three hemagglutinating Escherichia coli strains that had earlier been described as nonfimbriated was studied. The strains that were isolated from human disease adhered to human buccal and urinary tract epithelial cells, an adhesion that was not inhibited by D-mannose. By crossed immunoelectrophoresis it was shown that the three strains produced a common antigen, Z1, developed after growth at 37 degrees C but not 18 degrees C. One of the strains produced an additional antigen, Z2, of almost the same electrophoretic mobility in crossed immunoelectrophoresis. A mutant of this strain deficient of its polysaccharide K antigen had maintained the adhesive capacity, indicating that the K antigen was not responsible for adhesion. A further mutant of the acapsular mutant produced a strongly reduced amount of the Z antigens and had lost the ability to adhere. The Z1 (and Z2?) antigens were therefore deemed to be responsible for adhesion. In sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of extracts of cells of the three strains, a heavy Coomassie-blue stained line was seen, indicating the presence of a protein subunit of molecular weight slightly above 14,400. By immunoblotting with absorbed antiserum, it was shown that this protein was the same as that detected by crossed immunoelectrophoresis. Protease from Streptomyces griseus, but not trypsin, digested the protein. Heating to 100 degrees C did not affect it. By immunoelectron microscopy of embedded and sectioned bacteria that had first been treated with specific antisera and ferritin-labeled antirabbit immunoglobulin, the protein adhesin-antibody complex was found to surround the bacteria as a heavy capsule. After negative staining with uranylacetate (pH approximately 4), the capsule appeared as a mesh of very fine filaments. The possible role of this capsule in the pathogenesis of disease is discussed. Images PMID:2856913

  9. Recombinant protein expression in Escherichia coli: advances and challenges

    PubMed Central

    Rosano, Germán L.; Ceccarelli, Eduardo A.

    2014-01-01

    Escherichia coli is one of the organisms of choice for the production of recombinant proteins. Its use as a cell factory is well-established and it has become the most popular expression platform. For this reason, there are many molecular tools and protocols at hand for the high-level production of heterologous proteins, such as a vast catalog of expression plasmids, a great number of engineered strains and many cultivation strategies. We review the different approaches for the synthesis of recombinant proteins in E. coli and discuss recent progress in this ever-growing field. PMID:24860555

  10. Genes and proteins of Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed

    Riley, M

    1998-01-01

    GenProtEC is a database of Escherichia coli genes and their gene products, classified by type of function and physiological role and with citations to the literature for each. Also present are data on sequence similarities among E.coli proteins, representing groups of paralogous genes, with PAM values, percent identity of amino acids, length of alignment and percent aligned. GenProtEC can be accessed at the URL http://www.mbl.edu/html/ecoli.html PMID:9399799

  11. Biogenesis of inner membrane proteins in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Luirink, Joen; Yu, Zhong; Wagner, Samuel; de Gier, Jan-Willem

    2012-06-01

    The inner membrane proteome of the model organism Escherichia coli is composed of inner membrane proteins, lipoproteins and peripherally attached soluble proteins. Our knowledge of the biogenesis of inner membrane proteins is rapidly increasing. This is in particular true for the early steps of biogenesis - protein targeting to and insertion into the membrane. However, our knowledge of inner membrane protein folding and quality control is still fragmentary. Furthering our knowledge in these areas will bring us closer to understand the biogenesis of individual inner membrane proteins in the context of the biogenesis of the inner membrane proteome of Escherichia coli as a whole. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Biogenesis/Assembly of Respiratory Enzyme Complexes.

  12. Transformation of Escherichia coli and protein expression using lipoplex mimicry.

    PubMed

    Yun, Chul-Ho; Bae, Chun-Sik; Ahn, Taeho

    2016-11-01

    We investigated a "one-step" method for transformation of and protein expression in Escherichia coli (E. coli) using a complex of n-stearylamine, a cationic lipid, and plasmid DNA, which mimics lipoplex-based approaches. When E. coli cells were treated with the cationic lipid-plasmid complex, the transformation efficiencies were in the range of approximately 2-3 × 10(6) colony-forming units. Further increase in the efficiency was obtained by co-treatment with calcium chloride (or rubidium chloride) and the complexes. Moreover, after DNA transfer, E. coli cells successfully expressed plasmid-encoded proteins such as cytochrome P450s and glutathione-S-transferase without overnight incubation of the cells to form colonies, an indispensable step in other bacterial transformation methods. In this study, we provide a simple method for E. coli transformation, which does not require the preparation of competent cells. The present method also shortens the overall procedures for transformation and gene expression in E. coli by omitting the colony-forming step. PMID:27416742

  13. Transformation of Escherichia coli and protein expression using lipoplex mimicry.

    PubMed

    Yun, Chul-Ho; Bae, Chun-Sik; Ahn, Taeho

    2016-11-01

    We investigated a "one-step" method for transformation of and protein expression in Escherichia coli (E. coli) using a complex of n-stearylamine, a cationic lipid, and plasmid DNA, which mimics lipoplex-based approaches. When E. coli cells were treated with the cationic lipid-plasmid complex, the transformation efficiencies were in the range of approximately 2-3 × 10(6) colony-forming units. Further increase in the efficiency was obtained by co-treatment with calcium chloride (or rubidium chloride) and the complexes. Moreover, after DNA transfer, E. coli cells successfully expressed plasmid-encoded proteins such as cytochrome P450s and glutathione-S-transferase without overnight incubation of the cells to form colonies, an indispensable step in other bacterial transformation methods. In this study, we provide a simple method for E. coli transformation, which does not require the preparation of competent cells. The present method also shortens the overall procedures for transformation and gene expression in E. coli by omitting the colony-forming step.

  14. Purification of penicillin-binding protein 2 of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Curtis, S J; Strominger, J L

    1981-01-01

    Penicillin-binding protein 2 (PBP-2) of Escherichia coli K-12 was purified by covalent affinity chromatography using 6-aminopenicillanic acid covalently coupled to carboxymethyl-Sepharose (6-APA-CM-Sepharose). Purification of PBP-2 was accomplished by prebinding the methoxy cephalosporin, cefoxitin, to the Triton X-100-solubilized PBPs of E. coli and then incubating the PBPs with 6-APA-CM-Sepharose. Cefoxitin readily binds to all the E. coli PBPs except PBP-2 and, thus, in the presence of cefoxitin, only PBP-2 could bind to the 6-APA-CM-Sepharose. The purification of a mixture of all of the PBPs of E. coli by affinity chromatography is also described. Images PMID:7007320

  15. Protein Production for Structural Genomics Using E. coli Expression

    PubMed Central

    Makowska-Grzyska, Magdalena; Kim, Youngchang; Maltseva, Natalia; Li, Hui; Zhou, Min; Joachimiak, Grazyna; Babnigg, Gyorgy; Joachimiak, Andrzej

    2014-01-01

    The goal of structural biology is to reveal details of the molecular structure of proteins in order to understand their function and mechanism. X-ray crystallography and NMR are the two best methods for atomic level structure determination. However, these methods require milligram quantities of proteins. In this chapter a reproducible methodology for large-scale protein production applicable to a diverse set of proteins is described. The approach is based on protein expression in E. coli as a fusion with a cleavable affinity tag that was tested on over 20,000 proteins. Specifically, a protocol for fermentation of large quantities of native proteins in disposable culture vessels is presented. A modified protocol that allows for the production of selenium-labeled proteins in defined media is also offered. Finally, a method for the purification of His6-tagged proteins on immobilized metal affinity chromatography columns that generates high-purity material is described in detail. PMID:24590711

  16. Cell surface growth in Escherichia coli: distribution of matrix protein.

    PubMed Central

    Begg, K J

    1978-01-01

    Autoradiography of cell envelope "ghosts" from Escherichia coli was used to demonstrate that newly synthesized molecules of "matrix" protein are inserted at random locations over the entire surface of the outer membrane and that, once inserted, these molecules are not thereafter conserved in any fixed spatial location. Images PMID:355219

  17. Engineering of Therapeutic Proteins Production in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Kamionka, Mariusz

    2011-01-01

    Low cost and simplicity of cultivating bacteria make the E. coli expression system a preferable choice for production of therapeutic proteins both on a lab scale and in industry. In addition straightforward recombinant DNA technology offers engineering tools to produce protein molecules with modified features. The lack of posttranslational modification mechanisms in bacterial cells such as glycosylation, proteolytic protein maturation or limited capacity for formation of disulfide bridges may, to a certain extent, be overcome with protein engineering. Protein engineering is also often employed to improve protein stability or to modulate its biological action. More sophisticated modifications may be achieved by genetic fusions of two proteins. This article presents a variety of examples of genetic engineering of therapeutic proteins. It emphasizes the importance of designing a construct without any unnecessary amino acid residues. PMID:21050165

  18. Genes and proteins of Escherichia coli (GenProtEc).

    PubMed

    Riley, M; Space, D B

    1996-01-01

    GenProtEc is a database of Escherichia coli genes and their gene products, classified by type of function and physiological role and with citations to the literature for each. Also present are data on sequence similarities among E.coli proteins with PAM values, percent identity of amino acids, length of alignment and percent aligned. The database is available as a PKZip file by ftp from mbl.edu/pub/ecoli.exe. The program runs under MS-DOS on IMB-compatible machines. GenProtEc can also be accessed through the World Wide Web at URL http://mbl.edu/html/ecoli.html. PMID:8594596

  19. Posttranslational Modifications of Ribosomal Proteins in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Nesterchuk, M V; Sergiev, P V; Dontsova, O A

    2011-04-01

    А number of ribosomal proteins inEscherichia coliundergo posttranslational modifications. Six ribosomal proteins are methylated (S11, L3, L11, L7/L12, L16, and L33), three proteins are acetylated (S5, S18, and L7), and protein S12 is methylthiolated. Extra amino acid residues are added to protein S6. С-terminal amino acid residues are partially removed from protein L31. The functional significance of these modifications has remained unclear. These modifications are not vital to the cells, and it is likely that they have regulatory functions. This paper reviews all the known posttranslational modifications of ribosomal proteins inEscherichia coli. Certain enzymes responsible for the modifications and mechanisms of enzymatic reactions are also discussed.

  20. Membrane Protein Production in Escherichia coli: Protocols and Rules.

    PubMed

    Angius, Federica; Ilioaia, Oana; Uzan, Marc; Miroux, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Functional and structural studies on membrane proteins are limited by the difficulty to produce them in large amount and in a functional state. In this review, we provide protocols to achieve high-level expression of membrane proteins in Escherichia coli. The T7 RNA polymerase-based expression system is presented in detail and protocols to assess and improve its efficiency are discussed. Protocols to isolate either membrane or inclusion bodies and to perform an initial qualitative test to assess the solubility of the recombinant protein are also included. PMID:27485328

  1. Membrane Protein Production in Escherichia coli: Protocols and Rules.

    PubMed

    Angius, Federica; Ilioaia, Oana; Uzan, Marc; Miroux, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Functional and structural studies on membrane proteins are limited by the difficulty to produce them in large amount and in a functional state. In this review, we provide protocols to achieve high-level expression of membrane proteins in Escherichia coli. The T7 RNA polymerase-based expression system is presented in detail and protocols to assess and improve its efficiency are discussed. Protocols to isolate either membrane or inclusion bodies and to perform an initial qualitative test to assess the solubility of the recombinant protein are also included.

  2. Hydrogen exchange of disordered proteins in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Smith, Austin E; Zhou, Larry Z; Pielak, Gary J

    2015-05-01

    A truly disordered protein lacks a stable fold and its backbone amide protons exchange with solvent at rates predicted from studies of unstructured peptides. We have measured the exchange rates of two model disordered proteins, FlgM and α-synuclein, in buffer and in Escherichia coli using the NMR experiment, SOLEXSY. The rates are similar in buffer and cells and are close to the rates predicted from data on small, unstructured peptides. This result indicates that true disorder can persist inside the crowded cellular interior and that weak interactions between proteins and macromolecules in cells do not necessarily affect intrinsic rates of exchange.

  3. Strategies for efficient production of heterologous proteins in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Jana, S; Deb, J K

    2005-05-01

    In recent years, the number of recombinant proteins used for therapeutic applications has increased dramatically. Production of these proteins has a remarkable demand in the market. Escherichia coli offers a means for the rapid and economical production of recombinant proteins. These advantages, coupled with a wealth of biochemical and genetic knowledge, have enabled the production of such economically therapeutic proteins such as insulin and bovine growth hormone. These demands have driven the development of a variety of strategies for achieving high-level expression of protein, particularly involving several aspects such as expression vectors design, gene dosage, promoter strength (transcriptional regulation), mRNA stability, translation initiation and termination (translational regulation), host design considerations, codon usage, and fermentation factors available for manipulating the expression conditions, which are the major challenges is obtaining the high yield of protein at low cost.

  4. [Analysis of methanogenic community of anaerobic granular sludge based on mcrA gene].

    PubMed

    Liu, Chu; Li, Liang; Ma, Jun-Ke; Wu, Gen; Yang, Jing-Liang

    2011-04-01

    The methanogenic community in anaerobic granular sludge from a full-scale UASB treating avernectin wastewater was analyzed based on mcrA gene, compared to 16S rRNA gene. The results indicated that the diversity indices of methanogenic community, including Shannon diversity index, Margalef richness index and Berger-Parker dominance index, were no difference between mcrA gene-based and 16S rRNA gene-based PCR products analysis by DGGE, although their DGGE band patterns were different, implying that the diversity analysis of methanogenic community based on mcrA genes was consistent with 16S rRNA gene. The phylogenetic analysis of dominant methanogenic populations based on these two target genes also showed resemble and Methanobacteriales and Methanosarcinales were determined to be the main orders of methanogenic populations in anaerobic granular sludge. On the other hand, the difference in phylogenetic analysis suggested simultaneously some group-specific of the two target genes. The hybridization of methanogenic community in FISH analysis based on two target genes was almost identical except a little different hybridization areas. The average relative abundance of methanogenic community was 24.25% +/- 6. 47% detected by FISH based on mcrA gene, lower than that based on 16S rRNA gene (33.42% +/- 2.34%). Then it could be concluded that the analysis of methanogenic community based on mcrA gene and 16S rRNA gene exhibited high resemblance and mcrA gene could used to be target gene for methanogenic community, as an alternative of 16S rRNA gene.

  5. Comprehensive Analysis of Phosphorylated Proteins of E. coli Ribosomes

    PubMed Central

    Soung, George Y.; Miller, Jennifer L.; Koc, Hasan; Koc, Emine C.

    2009-01-01

    Phosphorylation of bacterial ribosomal proteins has been known for decades; however, there is still very limited information available on specific locations of the phosphorylation sites in ribosomal proteins and the role they might play in protein synthesis. In this study, we have mapped the specific phosphorylation sites in twenty-four E. coli ribosomal proteins by tandem mass spectrometry. Specific detection of phosphorylation was achieved by either phosphorylation specific visualization techniques, ProQ staining and antibodies for phospho-Ser, Thr, and Tyr, or by mass spectrometry equipped with a capability to detect addition and the loss of the phosphate moiety. Enrichment by immobilized metal affinity and/or strong cation exchange chromatography was used to improve the success of detection of the low abundance phosphopeptides. We found the small subunit (30S) proteins S3, S4, S5, S7, S11, S12, S13, S18, and S21 and the large subunit (50S) proteins L1, L2, L3, L5, L6, L7/L12, L13, L14, L16, L18, L19, L21, L22, L28, L31 to be phosphorylated at one or more residues. Potential roles for each specific site in ribosome function were deduced through careful evaluation of the given site of the phosphorylation in 3D-crystal structure models of ribosomes and the previous mutational studies of E. coli ribosomal proteins. PMID:19469554

  6. Stress protein synthesis, a potential toxicity marker in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Odberg-Ferragut, C; Espigares, M; Dive, D

    1991-06-01

    Various chemicals were tested in Escherichia coli for the ability to modify the cellular growth rate and to induce the synthesis of heat shock and stress proteins. The toxicity of chemicals as observed by modification of the growth rate depended on concentration and duration of treatment, except for thiram. In this last case, no modification was observed up to a concentration of 10 micrograms.ml-1. In contrast, all toxicants tested enhanced the synthesis of heat shock and stress proteins. The stress response was similar but not identical. Heat shock proteins and stress proteins appear to be a more sensitive toxicity marker than growth inhibition. Suggestions for the use of stress proteins as a practical bioassay are made.

  7. A homolog of an Escherichia coli phosphate-binding protein gene from Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hopkins, C. M.; White, F. F.; Heaton, L. A.; Guikema, J. A.; Leach, J. E.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1995-01-01

    A Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae gene with sequence similarity to an Escherichia coli phosphate-binding protein gene (phoS) produces a periplasmic protein of apparent M(r) 35,000 when expressed in E. coli. Amino terminal sequencing revealed that a signal peptide is removed during transport to the periplasm in E. coli.

  8. Advances in Escherichia coli production of therapeutic proteins.

    PubMed

    Swartz, J R

    2001-04-01

    Escherichia coli offers a means for the rapid and economical production of recombinant proteins. These advantages, coupled with a wealth of biochemical and genetic knowledge, have enabled the production of such economically sensitive products as insulin and bovine growth hormone. Although significant progress has been made in transcription, translation and secretion, one of the major challenges is obtaining the product in a soluble and bioactive form. Recent progress in oxidative cytoplasmic folding and cell-free protein synthesis offers attractive alternatives to standard expression methods.

  9. A protein export pathway involving Escherichia coli porins.

    PubMed

    Prehna, Gerd; Zhang, Guijin; Gong, Xiandi; Duszyk, Marek; Okon, Mark; McIntosh, Lawrence P; Weiner, Joel H; Strynadka, Natalie C J

    2012-07-01

    Escherichia coli export the protein YebF into the extracellular medium by a two-step process. However, as no general outer membrane protein secretion system common to all E. coli strains has been reported, the mechanism of export has remained unclear. Herein, we identify the outer membrane proteins OmpF, OmpC, and OmpX as central to the YebF export mechanism using both genetic and planar lipid bilayer experiments. The nuclear magnetic resonance structural ensemble of YebF reveals a cystatin-like fold consisting of a structured core and an extended dynamic surface in a state of conformational exchange. This surface, conserved throughout YebF orthologs of Enterobacteriaceae, may facilitate the porin-mediated transport of YebF as amino acid substitutions of dynamic residues reduced secretion to the extracellular medium. Our results demonstrate that OmpF and OmpC not only operate to import ions and protein toxins but may also contribute to the export of the YebF protein family.

  10. Escherchia coli ribose binding protein based bioreporters revisited

    PubMed Central

    Reimer, Artur; Yagur-Kroll, Sharon; Belkin, Shimshon; Roy, Shantanu; van der Meer, Jan Roelof

    2014-01-01

    Bioreporter bacteria, i.e., strains engineered to respond to chemical exposure by production of reporter proteins, have attracted wide interest because of their potential to offer cheap and simple alternative analytics for specified compounds or conditions. Bioreporter construction has mostly exploited the natural variation of sensory proteins, but it has been proposed that computational design of new substrate binding properties could lead to completely novel detection specificities at very low affinities. Here we reconstruct a bioreporter system based on the native Escherichia coli ribose binding protein RbsB and one of its computationally designed variants, reported to be capable of binding 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT). Our results show in vivo reporter induction at 50 nM ribose, and a 125 nM affinity constant for in vitro ribose binding to RbsB. In contrast, the purified published TNT-binding variant did not bind TNT nor did TNT cause induction of the E. coli reporter system. PMID:25005019

  11. Small-scale expression of proteins in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Zerbs, Sarah; Giuliani, Sarah; Collart, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Proteins participate in virtually every cellular activity, and a knowledge of protein function is essential for an understanding of biological systems. However, protein diversity necessitates the application of an array of in vivo and in vitro approaches for characterization of the functional and biochemical properties of proteins. Methods that enable production of proteins for in vitro studies are critical for determination of the molecular, kinetic, and thermodynamic properties of these molecules. Ideally, proteins could be purified from the original source; however, the native host is often unsuitable for a number of reasons. Consequently, systems for heterologous protein production are commonly used to produce large amounts of protein. Heterologous expression hosts are chosen using a number of criteria, including genetic tractability, advantageous production or processing characteristics (secretion or posttranslational modifications), or economy of time and growth requirements. The subcloning process also provides an opportunity to introduce purification tags, epitope tags, fusions, truncations, and mutations into the coding sequence that may be useful in downstream purification or characterization applications. Bacterial systems for heterologous protein expression have advantages in ease of use, cost, short generation times, and scalability. These expression systems have been widely used by high-throughput protein production projects and often represent an initial experiment for any expression target. Escherichia coli has been studied for many years as a model bacterial organism and is one of the most popular hosts for heterologous protein expression (Terpe, 2006). Its protein production capabilities have been intensively studied, and the ease of genetic manipulation in this organism has led to the development of strains engineered exclusively for use in protein expression. These resources are widely available from commercial sources and public repositories

  12. Small-scale expression of proteins in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Zerbs, Sarah; Giuliani, Sarah; Collart, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Proteins participate in virtually every cellular activity, and a knowledge of protein function is essential for an understanding of biological systems. However, protein diversity necessitates the application of an array of in vivo and in vitro approaches for characterization of the functional and biochemical properties of proteins. Methods that enable production of proteins for in vitro studies are critical for determination of the molecular, kinetic, and thermodynamic properties of these molecules. Ideally, proteins could be purified from the original source; however, the native host is often unsuitable for a number of reasons. Consequently, systems for heterologous protein production are commonly used to produce large amounts of protein. Heterologous expression hosts are chosen using a number of criteria, including genetic tractability, advantageous production or processing characteristics (secretion or posttranslational modifications), or economy of time and growth requirements. The subcloning process also provides an opportunity to introduce purification tags, epitope tags, fusions, truncations, and mutations into the coding sequence that may be useful in downstream purification or characterization applications. Bacterial systems for heterologous protein expression have advantages in ease of use, cost, short generation times, and scalability. These expression systems have been widely used by high-throughput protein production projects and often represent an initial experiment for any expression target. Escherichia coli has been studied for many years as a model bacterial organism and is one of the most popular hosts for heterologous protein expression (Terpe, 2006). Its protein production capabilities have been intensively studied, and the ease of genetic manipulation in this organism has led to the development of strains engineered exclusively for use in protein expression. These resources are widely available from commercial sources and public repositories

  13. Escherichia coli Protein Expression System for Acetylcholine Binding Proteins (AChBPs)

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, Nikita; Paul, Blessy; Ragnarsson, Lotten; Lewis, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR) are ligand gated ion channels, identified as therapeutic targets for a range of human diseases. Drug design for nAChR related disorders is increasingly using structure-based approaches. Many of these structural insights for therapeutic lead development have been obtained from co-crystal structures of nAChR agonists and antagonists with the acetylcholine binding protein (AChBP). AChBP is a water soluble, structural and functional homolog of the extracellular, ligand-binding domain of nAChRs. Currently, AChBPs are recombinantly expressed in eukaryotic expression systems for structural and biophysical studies. Here, we report the establishment of an Escherichia coli (E. coli) expression system that significantly reduces the cost and time of production compared to the existing expression systems. E. coli can efficiently express unglycosylated AChBP for crystallography and makes the expression of isotopically labelled forms feasible for NMR. We used a pHUE vector containing an N-terminal His-tagged ubiquitin fusion protein to facilitate AChBP expression in the soluble fractions, and thus avoid the need to recover protein from inclusion bodies. The purified protein yield obtained from the E. coli expression system is comparable to that obtained from existing AChBP expression systems. E. coli expressed AChBP bound nAChR agonists and antagonists with affinities matching those previously reported. Thus, the E. coli expression system significantly simplifies the expression and purification of functional AChBP for structural and biophysical studies. PMID:27304486

  14. Metabolic engineering of Escherichia coli to improve recombinant protein production.

    PubMed

    Liu, Min; Feng, Xinjun; Ding, Yamei; Zhao, Guang; Liu, Huizhou; Xian, Mo

    2015-12-01

    Escherichia coli is one of the most widely used strains for recombinant protein production. However, obstacles also exist in both academic researches and industrial applications, such as the metabolic burden, the carbon source waste, and the cells' physiological deterioration. This article reviews recent approaches for improving recombinant protein production in metabolic engineering, including workhorse selection, stress factor application, and carbon flux regulation. Selecting a suitable host is the first key point for recombinant protein production. In general, it all depends on characteristics of the strains and the target proteins. It will be triggered cells physiological deterioration when the medium is significantly different from the cell's natural environment. Coexpression of stress factors can help proteins to fold into their native conformation. Carbon flux regulation is a direct approach for redirecting more carbon flux toward the desirable pathways and products. However, some undesirable consequences are usually found in metabolic engineering, such as glucose transport inhibition, cell growth retardation, and useless metabolite accumulation. More efficient regulators and platform cell factories should be explored to meet a variety of production demands.

  15. Small Stress Response Proteins in Escherichia coli: Proteins Missed by Classical Proteomic Studies ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Hemm, Matthew R.; Paul, Brian J.; Miranda-Ríos, Juan; Zhang, Aixia; Soltanzad, Nima; Storz, Gisela

    2010-01-01

    Proteins of 50 or fewer amino acids are poorly characterized in all organisms. The corresponding genes are challenging to reliably annotate, and it is difficult to purify and characterize the small protein products. Due to these technical limitations, little is known about the abundance of small proteins, not to mention their biological functions. To begin to characterize these small proteins in Escherichia coli, we assayed their accumulation under a variety of growth conditions and after exposure to stress. We found that many small proteins accumulate under specific growth conditions or are stress induced. For some genes, the observed changes in protein levels were consistent with known transcriptional regulation, such as ArcA activation of the operons encoding yccB and ybgT. However, we also identified novel regulation, such as Zur repression of ykgMO, cyclic AMP response protein (CRP) repression of azuC, and CRP activation of ykgR. The levels of 11 small proteins increase after heat shock, and induction of at least 1 of these, YobF, occurs at a posttranscriptional level. These results show that small proteins are an overlooked subset of stress response proteins in E. coli and provide information that will be valuable for determining the functions of these proteins. PMID:19734316

  16. A chimeric Anabaena/ Escherichia coli KdpD protein (Anacoli KdpD) functionally interacts with E. coli KdpE and activates kdp expression in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Ballal, Anand; Heermann, Ralf; Jung, Kirsten; Gassel, Michael; Apte, Kumar; Altendorf, Karlheinz

    2002-08-01

    The kdpFABC operon, coding for a high-affinity K(+)-translocating P-type ATPase, is expressed in Escherichia coli as a backup system during K(+) starvation or an increase in medium osmolality. Expression of the operon is regulated by the membrane-bound sensor kinase KdpD and the cytosolic response regulator KdpE. From a nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium, Anabaena sp. strain L-31, a kdpDgene was cloned (GenBank accession no. AF213466) which codes for a KdpD protein (365 amino acids) that lacks both the transmembrane segments and C-terminal transmitter domain and thus is shorter than E. coli KdpD. A chimeric kdpD gene was constructed and expressed in E. coli coding for a protein (Anacoli KdpD), in which the first 365 amino acids of E. coli KdpD were replaced by those from Anabaena KdpD. In everted membrane vesicles, this chimeric Anacoli KdpD protein exhibited activities, such as autophosphorylation, transphosphorylation and ATP-dependent dephosphorylation of E. coli KdpE, which closely resemble those of the E. coli wild-type KdpD. Cells of E. coli synthesizing Anacoli KdpD expressed kdpFABC in response to K(+) limitation and osmotic upshock. The data demonstrate that Anabaena KdpD can interact with the E. coliKdpD C-terminal domain resulting in a protein that is functional in vitro as well as in vivo.

  17. Green fluorescent protein-based expression screening of membrane proteins in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Bird, Louise E; Rada, Heather; Verma, Anil; Gasper, Raphael; Birch, James; Jennions, Matthew; Lӧwe, Jan; Moraes, Isabel; Owens, Raymond J

    2015-01-01

    The production of recombinant membrane proteins for structural and functional studies remains technically challenging due to low levels of expression and the inherent instability of many membrane proteins once solubilized in detergents. A protocol is described that combines ligation independent cloning of membrane proteins as GFP fusions with expression in Escherichia coli detected by GFP fluorescence. This enables the construction and expression screening of multiple membrane protein/variants to identify candidates suitable for further investment of time and effort. The GFP reporter is used in a primary screen of expression by visualizing GFP fluorescence following SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Membrane proteins that show both a high expression level with minimum degradation as indicated by the absence of free GFP, are selected for a secondary screen. These constructs are scaled and a total membrane fraction prepared and solubilized in four different detergents. Following ultracentrifugation to remove detergent-insoluble material, lysates are analyzed by fluorescence detection size exclusion chromatography (FSEC). Monitoring the size exclusion profile by GFP fluorescence provides information about the mono-dispersity and integrity of the membrane proteins in different detergents. Protein: detergent combinations that elute with a symmetrical peak with little or no free GFP and minimum aggregation are candidates for subsequent purification. Using the above methodology, the heterologous expression in E. coli of SED (shape, elongation, division, and sporulation) proteins from 47 different species of bacteria was analyzed. These proteins typically have ten transmembrane domains and are essential for cell division. The results show that the production of the SEDs orthologues in E. coli was highly variable with respect to the expression levels and integrity of the GFP fusion proteins. The experiment identified a subset for further investigation. PMID

  18. Green Fluorescent Protein-based Expression Screening of Membrane Proteins in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Bird, Louise E.; Rada, Heather; Verma, Anil; Gasper, Raphael; Birch, James; Jennions, Matthew; Lӧwe, Jan; Moraes, Isabel; Owens, Raymond J.

    2015-01-01

    The production of recombinant membrane proteins for structural and functional studies remains technically challenging due to low levels of expression and the inherent instability of many membrane proteins once solubilized in detergents. A protocol is described that combines ligation independent cloning of membrane proteins as GFP fusions with expression in Escherichia coli detected by GFP fluorescence. This enables the construction and expression screening of multiple membrane protein/variants to identify candidates suitable for further investment of time and effort. The GFP reporter is used in a primary screen of expression by visualizing GFP fluorescence following SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Membrane proteins that show both a high expression level with minimum degradation as indicated by the absence of free GFP, are selected for a secondary screen. These constructs are scaled and a total membrane fraction prepared and solubilized in four different detergents. Following ultracentrifugation to remove detergent-insoluble material, lysates are analyzed by fluorescence detection size exclusion chromatography (FSEC). Monitoring the size exclusion profile by GFP fluorescence provides information about the mono-dispersity and integrity of the membrane proteins in different detergents. Protein: detergent combinations that elute with a symmetrical peak with little or no free GFP and minimum aggregation are candidates for subsequent purification. Using the above methodology, the heterologous expression in E. coli of SED (shape, elongation, division, and sporulation) proteins from 47 different species of bacteria was analyzed. These proteins typically have ten transmembrane domains and are essential for cell division. The results show that the production of the SEDs orthologues in E. coli was highly variable with respect to the expression levels and integrity of the GFP fusion proteins. The experiment identified a subset for further investigation. PMID

  19. Green fluorescent protein-based expression screening of membrane proteins in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Bird, Louise E; Rada, Heather; Verma, Anil; Gasper, Raphael; Birch, James; Jennions, Matthew; Lӧwe, Jan; Moraes, Isabel; Owens, Raymond J

    2015-01-06

    The production of recombinant membrane proteins for structural and functional studies remains technically challenging due to low levels of expression and the inherent instability of many membrane proteins once solubilized in detergents. A protocol is described that combines ligation independent cloning of membrane proteins as GFP fusions with expression in Escherichia coli detected by GFP fluorescence. This enables the construction and expression screening of multiple membrane protein/variants to identify candidates suitable for further investment of time and effort. The GFP reporter is used in a primary screen of expression by visualizing GFP fluorescence following SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Membrane proteins that show both a high expression level with minimum degradation as indicated by the absence of free GFP, are selected for a secondary screen. These constructs are scaled and a total membrane fraction prepared and solubilized in four different detergents. Following ultracentrifugation to remove detergent-insoluble material, lysates are analyzed by fluorescence detection size exclusion chromatography (FSEC). Monitoring the size exclusion profile by GFP fluorescence provides information about the mono-dispersity and integrity of the membrane proteins in different detergents. Protein: detergent combinations that elute with a symmetrical peak with little or no free GFP and minimum aggregation are candidates for subsequent purification. Using the above methodology, the heterologous expression in E. coli of SED (shape, elongation, division, and sporulation) proteins from 47 different species of bacteria was analyzed. These proteins typically have ten transmembrane domains and are essential for cell division. The results show that the production of the SEDs orthologues in E. coli was highly variable with respect to the expression levels and integrity of the GFP fusion proteins. The experiment identified a subset for further investigation.

  20. Escherichia coli cell-free protein synthesis and isotope labeling of mammalian proteins.

    PubMed

    Terada, Takaho; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2015-01-01

    This chapter describes the cell-free protein synthesis method, using an Escherichia coli cell extract. This is a cost-effective method for milligram-scale protein production and is particularly useful for the production of mammalian proteins, protein complexes, and membrane proteins that are difficult to synthesize by recombinant expression methods, using E. coli and eukaryotic cells. By adjusting the conditions of the cell-free method, zinc-binding proteins, disulfide-bonded proteins, ligand-bound proteins, etc., may also be produced. Stable isotope labeling of proteins can be accomplished by the cell-free method, simply by using stable isotope-labeled amino acid(s) in the cell-free reaction. Moreover, the cell-free protein synthesis method facilitates the avoidance of stable isotope scrambling and dilution over the recombinant expression methods and is therefore advantageous for amino acid-selective stable isotope labeling. Site-specific stable isotope labeling is also possible with a tRNA molecule specific to the UAG codon. By the cell-free protein synthesis method, coupled transcription-translation is performed from a plasmid vector or a PCR-amplified DNA fragment encoding the protein. A milligram quantity of protein can be produced with a milliliter-scale reaction solution in the dialysis mode. More than a thousand solution structures have been determined by NMR spectroscopy for uniformly labeled samples of human and mouse functional domain proteins, produced by the cell-free method. Here, we describe the practical aspects of mammalian protein production by the cell-free method for NMR spectroscopy.

  1. Temperate Bacteriophage Which Causes the Production of a New Major Outer Membrane Protein by Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Schnaitman, Carl; Smith, Deborah; de Salsas, Montserrat Forn

    1975-01-01

    Under most conditions of growth, the most abundant protein in the outer membrane of most strains of Escherichia coli is a protein designated as “protein 1” or “matrix protein”. In E. coli B, this protein has been shown to be a single polypeptide with a molecular mass of 36,500 and it may account for more than 50% of the total outer membrane protein. E. coli K-12 contains a very similar, although probably not identical, species of protein 1. Some pathogenic E. coli strains contain very little protein 1 and, in its place, make a protein designated as protein 2 which migrates faster on alkaline polyacrylamide gels containing sodium dodecyl sulfate and which gives a different spectrum of CNBr peptides. An E. coli K-12 strain which had been mated with a pathogenic strain was found to produce protein 2, and a temperate bacteriophage was isolated from this K-12 strain after induction with UV light. This phage, designated as PA-2, is similar in morphology and several other properties to phage lambda. When strains of E. coli K-12 are lysogenized by phage PA-2, they produce protein 2 and very little protein 1. Adsorption to lysogenic strains grown under conditions where they produce little protein 1 and primarily protein 2 is greatly reduced as compared to non-lysogenic strains which produce only protein 1. However, when cultures are grown under conditions of catabolite repression, protein 2 is reduced and protein 1 is increased, and lysogenic and non-lysogenic cultures grown under these conditions exhibit the same rate of adsorption. Phage PA-2 does not adsorb to E. coli B, which appears to have a slightly different protein 1 from K-12. These results suggest that protein 1 is the receptor for PA-2, and that protein 2 is made to reduce the superinfection of lysogens. Images PMID:16789148

  2. Protein folding in the cell envelope of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    De Geyter, Jozefien; Tsirigotaki, Alexandra; Orfanoudaki, Georgia; Zorzini, Valentina; Economou, Anastassios; Karamanou, Spyridoula

    2016-01-01

    While the entire proteome is synthesized on cytoplasmic ribosomes, almost half associates with, localizes in or crosses the bacterial cell envelope. In Escherichia coli a variety of mechanisms are important for taking these polypeptides into or across the plasma membrane, maintaining them in soluble form, trafficking them to their correct cell envelope locations and then folding them into the right structures. The fidelity of these processes must be maintained under various environmental conditions including during stress; if this fails, proteases are called in to degrade mislocalized or aggregated proteins. Various soluble, diffusible chaperones (acting as holdases, foldases or pilotins) and folding catalysts are also utilized to restore proteostasis. These responses can be general, dealing with multiple polypeptides, with functional overlaps and operating within redundant networks. Other chaperones are specialized factors, dealing only with a few exported proteins. Several complex machineries have evolved to deal with binding to, integration in and crossing of the outer membrane. This complex protein network is responsible for fundamental cellular processes such as cell wall biogenesis; cell division; the export, uptake and degradation of molecules; and resistance against exogenous toxic factors. The underlying processes, contributing to our fundamental understanding of proteostasis, are a treasure trove for the development of novel antibiotics, biopharmaceuticals and vaccines. PMID:27573113

  3. Membrane attachment activates dnaA protein, the initiation protein of chromosome replication in Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Yung, B.Y.; Kornberg, A.

    1988-10-01

    ADP and ATP are tightly bound to dnaA protein and are crucial to its function in DNA replication; the exchange of these nucleotides is effected specifically by the acidic phospholipids (cardiolipin and phosphatidylglycerol) present in Escherichia coli membranes. We now find that phospholipids derived from membranes lacking an unsaturated fatty acid (e.g., oleic acid) are unable to promote the exchange. This observation correlates strikingly with the long-known effect of 3-decynoyl-N-acetylcysteamine, a ''suicide analog'' that prevents initiation of a cycle of replication in E. coli by inhibiting the synthesis of oleic acid, an inhibition that can be overcome by providing the cells with oleic acid. Profound influences on the specific binding of dnaA protein to phospholipids by temperature, the content of unsaturated fatty acids, and the inclusion of cholesterol can be explained by the need for the phospholipids to be in fluid-phase vesicles. These findings suggest that membrane attachment of dnaA protein is vital for its function in the initiation of chromosome replication in E. coli.

  4. Expression of goose parvovirus whole VP3 protein and its epitopes in Escherichia coli cells.

    PubMed

    Tarasiuk, K; Woźniakowski, G; Holec-Gąsior, L

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was the expression of goose parvovirus capsid protein (VP3) and its epitopes in Escherichia coli cells. Expression of the whole VP3 protein provided an insufficient amount of protein. In contrast, the expression of two VP3 epitopes (VP3ep4, VP3ep6) in E. coli, resulted in very high expression levels. This may suggest that smaller parts of the GPV antigenic determinants are more efficiently expressed than the complete VP3 gene.

  5. Constitutive mutations in the Escherichia coli AraC protein.

    PubMed

    Dirla, Stephanie; Chien, John Yeh-Heng; Schleif, Robert

    2009-04-01

    The Escherichia coli AraC protein represses and induces the araBAD operon in response to the absence or presence of l-arabinose. Constitutive mutations in the AraC gene no longer require the presence of l-arabinose to convert AraC from its repressing to its inducing state. Such mutations were isolated directly by virtue of their constitutivity or by their resistance to the nonmetabolizable arabinose analog, d-fucose. The majority of the constitutive mutations lie within the same residues of the N-terminal regulatory arm of AraC. Two, however, were found in the core of the dimerization domain. As predicted by the light switch mechanism of AraC, constitutive mutations increase the susceptibility of the N-terminal arms to digestion by trypsin or chymotrypsin, suggesting that these mutations weaken or disrupt the arm structure required for repression by AraC. Fluorescence, circular dichroism, and cysteine reactivity measurements show that the constitutive mutations in the core of the dimerization domain lead to a weakening of the support for the arms and reduce the stability of the minus-arabinose arm structure. These mutations also weaken the interaction between the two-helix bundle and the beta-barrel subdomains of the dimerization domain and reduce the structural stability of the beta-barrels.

  6. Non-standard amino acid incorporation into proteins using Escherichia coli cell-free protein synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Seok Hoon; Kwon, Yong-Chan; Jewett, Michael

    2014-06-01

    Incorporating non-standard amino acids (NSAAs) into proteins enables new chemical properties, new structures, and new functions. In recent years, improvements in cell-free protein synthesis (CFPS) systems have opened the way to accurate and efficient incorporation of NSAAs into proteins. The driving force behind this development has been three-fold. First, a technical renaissance has enabled high-yielding (>1 g/L) and long-lasting (>10 h in batch operation) CFPS in systems derived from Escherichia coli. Second, the efficiency of orthogonal translation systems has improved. Third, the open nature of the CFPS platform has brought about an unprecedented level of control and freedom of design. Here, we review recent developments in CFPS platforms designed to precisely incorporate NSAAs. In the coming years, we anticipate that CFPS systems will impact efforts to elucidate structure/function relationships of proteins and to make biomaterials and sequence-defined biopolymers for medical and industrial applications.

  7. Expression and purification of recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli tagged with the metal-binding protein CusF.

    PubMed

    Cantu-Bustos, J Enrique; Vargas-Cortez, Teresa; Morones-Ramirez, Jose Ruben; Balderas-Renteria, Isaias; Galbraith, David W; McEvoy, Megan M; Zarate, Xristo

    2016-05-01

    Production of recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli has been improved considerably through the use of fusion proteins, because they increase protein solubility and facilitate purification via affinity chromatography. In this article, we propose the use of CusF as a new fusion partner for expression and purification of recombinant proteins in E. coli. Using a cell-free protein expression system, based on the E. coli S30 extract, Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) was expressed with a series of different N-terminal tags, immobilized on self-assembled protein microarrays, and its fluorescence quantified. GFP tagged with CusF showed the highest fluorescence intensity, and this was greater than the intensities from corresponding GFP constructs that contained MBP or GST tags. Analysis of protein production in vivo showed that CusF produces large amounts of soluble protein with low levels of inclusion bodies. Furthermore, fusion proteins can be exported to the cellular periplasm, if CusF contains the signal sequence. Taking advantage of its ability to bind copper ions, recombinant proteins can be purified with readily available IMAC resins charged with this metal ion, producing pure proteins after purification and tag removal. We therefore recommend the use of CusF as a viable alternative to MBP or GST as a fusion protein/affinity tag for the production of soluble recombinant proteins in E. coli. PMID:26805756

  8. Expression and purification of recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli tagged with the metal-binding protein CusF.

    PubMed

    Cantu-Bustos, J Enrique; Vargas-Cortez, Teresa; Morones-Ramirez, Jose Ruben; Balderas-Renteria, Isaias; Galbraith, David W; McEvoy, Megan M; Zarate, Xristo

    2016-05-01

    Production of recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli has been improved considerably through the use of fusion proteins, because they increase protein solubility and facilitate purification via affinity chromatography. In this article, we propose the use of CusF as a new fusion partner for expression and purification of recombinant proteins in E. coli. Using a cell-free protein expression system, based on the E. coli S30 extract, Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) was expressed with a series of different N-terminal tags, immobilized on self-assembled protein microarrays, and its fluorescence quantified. GFP tagged with CusF showed the highest fluorescence intensity, and this was greater than the intensities from corresponding GFP constructs that contained MBP or GST tags. Analysis of protein production in vivo showed that CusF produces large amounts of soluble protein with low levels of inclusion bodies. Furthermore, fusion proteins can be exported to the cellular periplasm, if CusF contains the signal sequence. Taking advantage of its ability to bind copper ions, recombinant proteins can be purified with readily available IMAC resins charged with this metal ion, producing pure proteins after purification and tag removal. We therefore recommend the use of CusF as a viable alternative to MBP or GST as a fusion protein/affinity tag for the production of soluble recombinant proteins in E. coli.

  9. Expression and purification of recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli tagged with a small metal-binding protein from Nitrosomonas europaea.

    PubMed

    Vargas-Cortez, Teresa; Morones-Ramirez, Jose Ruben; Balderas-Renteria, Isaias; Zarate, Xristo

    2016-02-01

    Escherichia coli is still the preferred organism for large-scale production of recombinant proteins. The use of fusion proteins has helped considerably in enhancing the solubility of heterologous proteins and their purification with affinity chromatography. Here, the use of a small metal-binding protein (SmbP) from Nitrosomonas europaea is described as a new fusion protein for protein expression and purification in E. coli. Fluorescent proteins tagged at the N-terminal with SmbP showed high levels of solubility, compared with those of maltose-binding protein and glutathione S-transferase, and low formation of inclusion bodies. Using commercially available IMAC resins charged with Ni(II), highly pure recombinant proteins were obtained after just one chromatography step. Proteins may be purified from the periplasm of E. coli if SmbP contains the signal sequence at the N-terminal. After removal of the SmbP tag from the protein of interest, high-yields are obtained since SmbP is a protein of just 9.9 kDa. The results here obtained suggest that SmbP is a good alternative as a fusion protein/affinity tag for the production of soluble recombinant proteins in E. coli.

  10. Endogenous occurrence of protein S-guanylation in Escherichia coli: Target identification and genetic regulation.

    PubMed

    Tsutsuki, Hiroyasu; Jung, Minkyung; Zhang, Tianli; Ono, Katsuhiko; Ida, Tomoaki; Kunieda, Kohei; Ihara, Hideshi; Akaike, Takaaki; Sawa, Tomohiro

    2016-09-01

    8-Nitroguanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (8-nitro-cGMP) is a nitrated cGMP derivative formed in response to nitric oxide (NO) and reactive oxygen species (ROS). It can cause a post-translational modification (PTM) of protein thiols through cGMP adduction (protein S-guanylation). Accumulating evidence has suggested that, in mammals, S-guanylation of redox-sensor proteins may implicate in regulation of adaptive responses against ROS-associated oxidative stress. Occurrence as well as protein targets of S-guanylation in bacteria remained unknown, however. Here we demonstrated, for the first time, the endogenous occurrence of protein S-guanylation in Escherichia coli (E. coli). Western blotting using anti-S-guanylation antibody clearly showed that multiple proteins were S-guanylated in E. coli. Interestingly, some of those proteins were more intensely S-guanylated when bacteria were cultured under static culture condition than shaking culture condition. It has been known that E. coli is deficient of guanylate cyclase, an enzyme indispensable for 8-nitro-cGMP formation in mammals. We found that adenylate cyclase from E. coli potentially catalyzed 8-nitro-cGMP formation from its precursor 8-nitroguanosine 5'-triphosphate. More importantly, E. coli lacking adenylate cyclase showed significantly reduced formation of S-guanylated proteins. Our S-guanylation proteomics successfully identified S-guanylation protein targets in E. coli, including chaperons, ribosomal proteins, and enzymes which associate with protein synthesis, redox regulation and metabolism. Understanding of functional impacts for protein S-guanylation in bacterial signal transduction is necessary basis for development of potential chemotherapy and new diagnostic strategy for control of pathogenic bacterial infections. PMID:27473654

  11. Endogenous occurrence of protein S-guanylation in Escherichia coli: Target identification and genetic regulation.

    PubMed

    Tsutsuki, Hiroyasu; Jung, Minkyung; Zhang, Tianli; Ono, Katsuhiko; Ida, Tomoaki; Kunieda, Kohei; Ihara, Hideshi; Akaike, Takaaki; Sawa, Tomohiro

    2016-09-01

    8-Nitroguanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (8-nitro-cGMP) is a nitrated cGMP derivative formed in response to nitric oxide (NO) and reactive oxygen species (ROS). It can cause a post-translational modification (PTM) of protein thiols through cGMP adduction (protein S-guanylation). Accumulating evidence has suggested that, in mammals, S-guanylation of redox-sensor proteins may implicate in regulation of adaptive responses against ROS-associated oxidative stress. Occurrence as well as protein targets of S-guanylation in bacteria remained unknown, however. Here we demonstrated, for the first time, the endogenous occurrence of protein S-guanylation in Escherichia coli (E. coli). Western blotting using anti-S-guanylation antibody clearly showed that multiple proteins were S-guanylated in E. coli. Interestingly, some of those proteins were more intensely S-guanylated when bacteria were cultured under static culture condition than shaking culture condition. It has been known that E. coli is deficient of guanylate cyclase, an enzyme indispensable for 8-nitro-cGMP formation in mammals. We found that adenylate cyclase from E. coli potentially catalyzed 8-nitro-cGMP formation from its precursor 8-nitroguanosine 5'-triphosphate. More importantly, E. coli lacking adenylate cyclase showed significantly reduced formation of S-guanylated proteins. Our S-guanylation proteomics successfully identified S-guanylation protein targets in E. coli, including chaperons, ribosomal proteins, and enzymes which associate with protein synthesis, redox regulation and metabolism. Understanding of functional impacts for protein S-guanylation in bacterial signal transduction is necessary basis for development of potential chemotherapy and new diagnostic strategy for control of pathogenic bacterial infections.

  12. Fusion tags for protein solubility, purification and immunogenicity in Escherichia coli: the novel Fh8 system

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Sofia; Almeida, André; Castro, António; Domingues, Lucília

    2014-01-01

    Proteins are now widely produced in diverse microbial cell factories. The Escherichia coli is still the dominant host for recombinant protein production but, as a bacterial cell, it also has its issues: the aggregation of foreign proteins into insoluble inclusion bodies is perhaps the main limiting factor of the E. coli expression system. Conversely, E. coli benefits of cost, ease of use and scale make it essential to design new approaches directed for improved recombinant protein production in this host cell. With the aid of genetic and protein engineering novel tailored-made strategies can be designed to suit user or process requirements. Gene fusion technology has been widely used for the improvement of soluble protein production and/or purification in E. coli, and for increasing peptide’s immunogenicity as well. New fusion partners are constantly emerging and complementing the traditional solutions, as for instance, the Fh8 fusion tag that has been recently studied and ranked among the best solubility enhancer partners. In this review, we provide an overview of current strategies to improve recombinant protein production in E. coli, including the key factors for successful protein production, highlighting soluble protein production, and a comprehensive summary of the latest available and traditionally used gene fusion technologies. A special emphasis is given to the recently discovered Fh8 fusion system that can be used for soluble protein production, purification, and immunogenicity in E. coli. The number of existing fusion tags will probably increase in the next few years, and efforts should be taken to better understand how fusion tags act in E. coli. This knowledge will undoubtedly drive the development of new tailored-made tools for protein production in this bacterial system. PMID:24600443

  13. Microbial trophic interactions and mcrA gene expression in monitoring of anaerobic digesters.

    PubMed

    Alvarado, Alejandra; Montañez-Hernández, Lilia E; Palacio-Molina, Sandra L; Oropeza-Navarro, Ricardo; Luévanos-Escareño, Miriam P; Balagurusamy, Nagamani

    2014-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion (AD) is a biological process where different trophic groups of microorganisms break down biodegradable organic materials in the absence of oxygen. A wide range of AD technologies is being used to convert livestock manure, municipal and industrial wastewaters, and solid organic wastes into biogas. AD gains importance not only because of its relevance in waste treatment but also because of the recovery of carbon in the form of methane, which is a renewable energy and is used to generate electricity and heat. Despite the advances on the engineering and design of new bioreactors for AD, the microbiology component always poses challenges. Microbiology of AD processes is complicated as the efficiency of the process depends on the interactions of various trophic groups involved. Due to the complex interdependence of microbial activities for the functionality of the anaerobic bioreactors, the genetic expression of mcrA, which encodes a key enzyme in methane formation, is proposed as a parameter to monitor the process performance in real time. This review evaluates the current knowledge on microbial groups, their interactions, and their relationship to the performance of anaerobic biodigesters with a focus on using mcrA gene expression as a tool to monitor the process. PMID:25429286

  14. Microbial trophic interactions and mcrA gene expression in monitoring of anaerobic digesters

    PubMed Central

    Alvarado, Alejandra; Montañez-Hernández, Lilia E.; Palacio-Molina, Sandra L.; Oropeza-Navarro, Ricardo; Luévanos-Escareño, Miriam P.; Balagurusamy, Nagamani

    2014-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion (AD) is a biological process where different trophic groups of microorganisms break down biodegradable organic materials in the absence of oxygen. A wide range of AD technologies is being used to convert livestock manure, municipal and industrial wastewaters, and solid organic wastes into biogas. AD gains importance not only because of its relevance in waste treatment but also because of the recovery of carbon in the form of methane, which is a renewable energy and is used to generate electricity and heat. Despite the advances on the engineering and design of new bioreactors for AD, the microbiology component always poses challenges. Microbiology of AD processes is complicated as the efficiency of the process depends on the interactions of various trophic groups involved. Due to the complex interdependence of microbial activities for the functionality of the anaerobic bioreactors, the genetic expression of mcrA, which encodes a key enzyme in methane formation, is proposed as a parameter to monitor the process performance in real time. This review evaluates the current knowledge on microbial groups, their interactions, and their relationship to the performance of anaerobic biodigesters with a focus on using mcrA gene expression as a tool to monitor the process. PMID:25429286

  15. Microbial trophic interactions and mcrA gene expression in monitoring of anaerobic digesters.

    PubMed

    Alvarado, Alejandra; Montañez-Hernández, Lilia E; Palacio-Molina, Sandra L; Oropeza-Navarro, Ricardo; Luévanos-Escareño, Miriam P; Balagurusamy, Nagamani

    2014-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion (AD) is a biological process where different trophic groups of microorganisms break down biodegradable organic materials in the absence of oxygen. A wide range of AD technologies is being used to convert livestock manure, municipal and industrial wastewaters, and solid organic wastes into biogas. AD gains importance not only because of its relevance in waste treatment but also because of the recovery of carbon in the form of methane, which is a renewable energy and is used to generate electricity and heat. Despite the advances on the engineering and design of new bioreactors for AD, the microbiology component always poses challenges. Microbiology of AD processes is complicated as the efficiency of the process depends on the interactions of various trophic groups involved. Due to the complex interdependence of microbial activities for the functionality of the anaerobic bioreactors, the genetic expression of mcrA, which encodes a key enzyme in methane formation, is proposed as a parameter to monitor the process performance in real time. This review evaluates the current knowledge on microbial groups, their interactions, and their relationship to the performance of anaerobic biodigesters with a focus on using mcrA gene expression as a tool to monitor the process.

  16. In vitro synthesis of ribosomal proteins directed by Escherichia coli DNA.

    PubMed

    Kaltschmidt, E; Kahan, L; Nomura, M

    1974-02-01

    In vitro synthesis of a number of E. coli 30S ribosomal proteins has been demonstrated in a cell-free system consisting of ribosomes, initiation factors, RNA polymerase, a fraction containing soluble enzymes and factors, and E. coli DNA. DNA-dependent synthesis of the following 30S proteins has been demonstrated: S4, S5, S7, S8, S9, S10, S13, S14, S16, S19, and S20.

  17. Bacteriophage membrane protein P9 as a fusion partner for the efficient expression of membrane proteins in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Jung, Yuna; Jung, Hyeim; Lim, Dongbin

    2015-12-01

    Despite their important roles and economic values, studies of membrane proteins have been hampered by the difficulties associated with obtaining sufficient amounts of protein. Here, we report a novel membrane protein expression system that uses the major envelope protein (P9) of phage φ6 as an N-terminal fusion partner. Phage membrane protein P9 facilitated the synthesis of target proteins and their integration into the Escherichia coli cell membrane. This system was used to produce various multi-pass transmembrane proteins, including G-protein-coupled receptors, transporters, and ion channels of human origin. Green fluorescent protein fusion was used to confirm the correct folding of the expressed proteins. Of the 14 membrane proteins tested, eight were highly expressed, three were moderately expressed, and three were barely expressed in E. coli. Seven of the eight highly expressed proteins could be purified after extraction with the mild detergent lauryldimethylamine-oxide. Although a few proteins have previously been developed as fusion partners to augment membrane protein production, we believe that the major envelope protein P9 described here is better suited to the efficient expression of eukaryotic transmembrane proteins in E. coli.

  18. Methanogen Diversity Evidenced by Molecular Characterization of Methyl Coenzyme M Reductase A (mcrA) Genes in Hydrothermal Sediments of the Guaymas Basin

    PubMed Central

    Dhillon, Ashita; Lever, Mark; Lloyd, Karen G.; Albert, Daniel B.; Sogin, Mitchell L.; Teske, Andreas

    2005-01-01

    The methanogenic community in hydrothermally active sediments of Guaymas Basin (Gulf of California, Mexico) was analyzed by PCR amplification, cloning, and sequencing of methyl coenzyme M reductase (mcrA) and 16S rRNA genes. Members of the Methanomicrobiales and Methanosarcinales dominated the mcrA and 16S rRNA clone libraries from the upper 15 cm of the sediments. Within the H2/CO2- and formate-utilizing family Methanomicrobiales, two mcrA and 16S rRNA lineages were closely affiliated with cultured species of the genera Methanoculleus and Methanocorpusculum. The most frequently recovered mcrA PCR amplicons within the Methanomicrobiales did not branch with any cultured genera. Within the nutritionally versatile family Methanosarcinales, one 16S rRNA amplicon and most of the mcrA PCR amplicons were affiliated with the obligately acetate utilizing species Methanosaeta concilii. The mcrA clone libraries also included phylotypes related to the methyl-disproportionating genus Methanococcoides. However, two mcrA and two 16S rRNA lineages within the Methanosarcinales were unrelated to any cultured genus. Overall, the clone libraries indicate a diversified methanogen community that uses H2/CO2, formate, acetate, and methylated substrates. Phylogenetic affiliations of mcrA and 16S rRNA clones with thermophilic and nonthermophilic cultured isolates indicate a mixed mesophilic and thermophilic methanogen community in the surficial Guaymas sediments. PMID:16085853

  19. Bacterial expression systems for recombinant protein production: E. coli and beyond.

    PubMed

    Chen, Rachel

    2012-01-01

    Escherichia coli expression system continues to dominate the bacterial expression systems and remain to be the preferred system for laboratory investigations and initial development in commercial activities or as a useful benchmark for comparison among various expression platforms. Some new developments in overcoming its shortcomings are reviewed in this paper, including antibiotics-free selection plasmids, extracellular production, and posttranslational modifications. The ability for E. coli to make mg glycosylated proteins promises even broader applications of the E. coli system in the future. Significant progresses have also been made over the past few years in alternative bacterial expression systems. Notably, the Lactoccocus lactis system has proven to be a viable choice for membrane proteins. Additionally, several Pseudomonas systems were developed and achieved product titers comparable to E. coli systems. Other bacterial systems such as Streptomyces, coryneform bacteria, and halophilic bacteria offer advantages in some niche areas, providing more choices of bacterial expression systems for recalcitrant proteins.

  20. Localization of protein aggregation in Escherichia coli is governed by diffusion and nucleoid macromolecular crowding effect.

    PubMed

    Coquel, Anne-Sophie; Jacob, Jean-Pascal; Primet, Mael; Demarez, Alice; Dimiccoli, Mariella; Julou, Thomas; Moisan, Lionel; Lindner, Ariel B; Berry, Hugues

    2013-04-01

    Aggregates of misfolded proteins are a hallmark of many age-related diseases. Recently, they have been linked to aging of Escherichia coli (E. coli) where protein aggregates accumulate at the old pole region of the aging bacterium. Because of the potential of E. coli as a model organism, elucidating aging and protein aggregation in this bacterium may pave the way to significant advances in our global understanding of aging. A first obstacle along this path is to decipher the mechanisms by which protein aggregates are targeted to specific intercellular locations. Here, using an integrated approach based on individual-based modeling, time-lapse fluorescence microscopy and automated image analysis, we show that the movement of aging-related protein aggregates in E. coli is purely diffusive (Brownian). Using single-particle tracking of protein aggregates in live E. coli cells, we estimated the average size and diffusion constant of the aggregates. Our results provide evidence that the aggregates passively diffuse within the cell, with diffusion constants that depend on their size in agreement with the Stokes-Einstein law. However, the aggregate displacements along the cell long axis are confined to a region that roughly corresponds to the nucleoid-free space in the cell pole, thus confirming the importance of increased macromolecular crowding in the nucleoids. We thus used 3D individual-based modeling to show that these three ingredients (diffusion, aggregation and diffusion hindrance in the nucleoids) are sufficient and necessary to reproduce the available experimental data on aggregate localization in the cells. Taken together, our results strongly support the hypothesis that the localization of aging-related protein aggregates in the poles of E. coli results from the coupling of passive diffusion-aggregation with spatially non-homogeneous macromolecular crowding. They further support the importance of "soft" intracellular structuring (based on macromolecular

  1. Strain engineering to prevent norleucine incorporation during recombinant protein production in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Veeravalli, Karthik; Laird, Michael W; Fedesco, Mark; Zhang, Yu; Yu, X Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Incorporation of norleucine in place of methionine residues during recombinant protein production in Escherichia coli is well known. Continuous feeding of methionine is commonly used in E. coli recombinant protein production processes to prevent norleucine incorporation. Although this strategy is effective in preventing norleucine incorporation, there are several disadvantages associated with continuous feeding. Continuous feeding increases the operational complexity and the overall cost of the fermentation process. In addition, the continuous feed leads to undesirable dilution of the fermentation medium possibly resulting in lower cell densities and recombinant protein yields. In this work, the genomes of three E. coli hosts were engineered by introducing chromosomal mutations that result in methionine overproduction in the cell. The recombinant protein purified from the fermentations using the methionine overproducing hosts had no norleucine incorporation. Furthermore, these studies demonstrated that the fermentations using one of the methionine overproducing hosts exhibited comparable fermentation performance as the control host in three different recombinant protein production processes. PMID:25315437

  2. Mapping of Protein-Protein Interactions of E. coli RNA Polymerase with Microfluidic Mechanical Trapping

    PubMed Central

    Bates, Steven R.; Quake, Stephen R.

    2014-01-01

    The biophysical details of how transcription factors and other proteins interact with RNA polymerase are of great interest as they represent the nexus of how structure and function interact to regulate gene expression in the cell. We used an in vitro microfluidic approach to map interactions between a set of ninety proteins, over a third of which are transcription factors, and each of the four subunits of E. coli RNA polymerase, and we compared our results to those of previous large-scale studies. We detected interactions between RNA polymerase and transcription factors that earlier high-throughput screens missed; our results suggest that such interactions can occur without DNA mediation more commonly than previously appreciated. PMID:24643045

  3. Transphosphorylation of E. coli proteins during production of recombinant protein kinases provides a robust system to characterize kinase specificity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Protein kinase specificity is of fundamental importance to pathway regulation and signal transduction. Here, we report a convenient system to monitor the activity and specificity of recombinant protein kinases expressed in E.coli. We apply this to the study of the cytoplasmic domain of the plant rec...

  4. Production of recombinant protein in Escherichia coli cultured in extract from waste product alga, Ulva lactuca.

    PubMed

    Rechtin, Tammy M; Hurst, Matthew; Potts, Tom; Hestekin, Jamie; Beitle, Robert; McLaughlin, John; May, Peter

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the potential for waste product alga, Ulva lactuca, to serve as a media component for recombinant protein production in Escherichia coli. To facilitate this investigation, U. lactuca harvested from Jamaica Bay was dried, and nutrients acid extracted for use as a growth media. The E. coli cell line BL21(DE3) was used to assess the effects on growth and production of recombinant green fluorescent protein (GFP). This study showed that media composed of acid extracts without further nutrient addition maintained E. coli growth and recombinant protein production. Extracts made from dried algae lots less than six-months-old were able to produce two-fold more GFP protein than traditional Lysogeny Broth media. PMID:24799463

  5. Serratia marcescens contains a heterodimeric HU protein like Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed Central

    Oberto, J; Rouviere-Yaniv, J

    1996-01-01

    Homologs of the dimeric HU protein of Escherichia coli can be found in every prokaryotic organism that has been analyzed. In this work, we demonstrate that Serratia marcescens synthesizes two distinct HU subunits, like E. coli and Salmonella typhimurium, suggesting that the heterodimeric HU protein could be a common feature of enteric bacteria. A phylogenetic analysis of the HU-type proteins (HU and IHF) is presented, and a scheme for the origin of the hup genes and the onset of HU heterodimericity is suggested. PMID:8550432

  6. Engineering Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) Derivative Strains To Minimize E. coli Protein Contamination after Purification by Immobilized Metal Affinity Chromatography ▿ † ‡

    PubMed Central

    Robichon, Carine; Luo, Jianying; Causey, Thomas B.; Benner, Jack S.; Samuelson, James C.

    2011-01-01

    Recombinant His-tagged proteins expressed in Escherichia coli and purified by immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) are commonly coeluted with native E. coli proteins, especially if the recombinant protein is expressed at a low level. The E. coli contaminants display high affinity to divalent nickel or cobalt ions, mainly due to the presence of clustered histidine residues or biologically relevant metal binding sites. To improve the final purity of expressed His-tagged protein, we engineered E. coli BL21(DE3) expression strains in which the most recurring contaminants are either expressed with an alternative tag or mutated to decrease their affinity to divalent cations. The current study presents the design, engineering, and characterization of two E. coli BL21(DE3) derivatives, NiCo21(DE3) and NiCo22(DE3), which express the endogenous proteins SlyD, Can, ArnA, and (optionally) AceE fused at their C terminus to a chitin binding domain (CBD) and the protein GlmS, with six surface histidines replaced by alanines. We show that each E. coli CBD-tagged protein remains active and can be efficiently eliminated from an IMAC elution fraction using a chitin column flowthrough step, while the modification of GlmS results in loss of affinity for nickel-containing resin. The “NiCo” strains uniquely complement existing methods for improving the purity of recombinant His-tagged protein. PMID:21602383

  7. The Escherichia coli uropathogenic-specific-protein-associated immunity protein 3 (Imu3) has nucleic acid -binding activity

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The Escherichia coli uropathogenic-specific protein (Usp) is a bacteriocin-like genotoxin, active against mammalian cells and associated with E. coli strains that provoke pyelonephritis, prostatitis and bacteraemia. Usp is encoded by a small pathogenicity island with three downstream small open reading frames (Imu1-3) that are believed to provide immunity to the producer. To prevent host suicide, colicins, bacteriocins of E. coli, form tight complexes with their cognate immunity proteins. Colicin – immunity protein complexes are among the strongest protein complexes known. Here, the Usp associated immunity protein 3 (Imu3) was partially characterized to gain insight into its role and mechanism of activity. Results Isolation and partial characterisation of the Usp-associated immunity protein-3 (Imu3) revealed that, while Usp and Imu3 do not form a high affinity complex, Imu3 exhibits DNA and RNA binding activity. Imu3 was also shown to protect DNA against degradation by colicin E7. Conclusions Our data infer that nonspecific DNA binding of the Imu3 immunity protein, prevents suicide of E. coli producing the genotoxin Usp. PMID:24472116

  8. Most RNAs regulating ribosomal protein biosynthesis in Escherichia coli are narrowly distributed to Gammaproteobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Yang; Deiorio-Haggar, Kaila; Anthony, Jon; Meyer, Michelle M.

    2013-01-01

    In Escherichia coli, 12 distinct RNA structures within the transcripts encoding ribosomal proteins interact with specific ribosomal proteins to allow autogenous regulation of expression from large multi-gene operons, thus coordinating ribosomal protein biosynthesis across multiple operons. However, these RNA structures are typically not represented in the RNA Families Database or annotated in genomic sequences databases, and their phylogenetic distribution is largely unknown. To investigate the extent to which these RNA structures are conserved across eubacterial phyla, we created multiple sequence alignments representing 10 of these messenger RNA (mRNA) structures in E. coli. We find that while three RNA structures are widely distributed across many phyla of bacteria, seven of the RNAs are narrowly distributed to a few orders of Gammaproteobacteria. To experimentally validate our computational predictions, we biochemically confirmed dual L1-binding sites identified in many Firmicute species. This work reveals that RNA-based regulation of ribosomal protein biosynthesis is used in nearly all eubacterial phyla, but the specific RNA structures that regulate ribosomal protein biosynthesis in E. coli are narrowly distributed. These results highlight the limits of our knowledge regarding ribosomal protein biosynthesis regulation outside of E. coli, and the potential for alternative RNA structures responsible for regulating ribosomal proteins in other eubacteria. PMID:23396277

  9. Purification of the Escherichia coli type 1 pilin and minor pilus proteins and partial characterization of the adhesin protein.

    PubMed Central

    Hanson, M S; Hempel, J; Brinton, C C

    1988-01-01

    Type 1 pili of Escherichia coli contain three integral minor proteins with apparent molecular weights (Mr) of 28,000 (28K protein), 16,500, and 14,500 attached to rods composed of Mr-17,000 pilin subunits (Hanson and Brinton, Nature [London] 322:265-268). We describe here an improvement on our earlier method of pilus purification, which gives higher yields and higher purity. Also reported are methods allowing fractionation of intact type 1 pili into rods of pure pilin and free minor proteins, as well as fractionation of the 28K tip adhesion protein from the 16.5K and 14.5K proteins. We have determined the amino acid composition and amino-terminal sequence of the adhesion protein. This sequence shows limited homology with the amino-terminal sequences of several E. coli pilins, including type 1. Images PMID:2900235

  10. A targeted proteomics toolkit for high-throughput absolute quantification of Escherichia coli proteins.

    PubMed

    Batth, Tanveer S; Singh, Pragya; Ramakrishnan, Vikram R; Sousa, Mirta M L; Chan, Leanne Jade G; Tran, Huu M; Luning, Eric G; Pan, Eva H Y; Vuu, Khanh M; Keasling, Jay D; Adams, Paul D; Petzold, Christopher J

    2014-11-01

    Transformation of engineered Escherichia coli into a robust microbial factory is contingent on precise control of metabolism. Yet, the throughput of omics technologies used to characterize cell components has lagged far behind our ability to engineer novel strains. To expand the utility of quantitative proteomics for metabolic engineering, we validated and optimized targeted proteomics methods for over 400 proteins from more than 20 major pathways in E. coli metabolism. Complementing these methods, we constructed a series of synthetic genes to produce concatenated peptides (QconCAT) for absolute quantification of the proteins and made them available through the Addgene plasmid repository (www.addgene.org). To facilitate high sample throughput, we developed a fast, analytical-flow chromatography method using a 5.5-min gradient (10 min total run time). Overall this toolkit provides an invaluable resource for metabolic engineering by increasing sample throughput, minimizing development time and providing peptide standards for absolute quantification of E. coli proteins.

  11. Expression and translocation of the chlamydial major outer membrane protein in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Dascher, C; Roll, D; Bavoil, P M

    1993-12-01

    The entire gene encoding the major outer membrane protein (MOMP) from Chlamydia psittaci strain GPIC has been cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. A tightly regulated T7 promoter is used to control expression of the protein in Escherichia coli. Upon induction of expression, the precursor (pre-MOMP) is synthesized in the cell. This is followed by the appearance of a lower molecular weight protein that comigrates with mature MOMP from chlamydial elementary bodies by both one-dimensional sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. When E. coli cells expressing MOMP are converted to spheroplasts and subjected to protease treatment, MOMP is quantitatively degraded while cytoplasmic pre-MOMP is protected from degradation. Whole cells subjected to the same protease treatment show no degradation of MOMP. Furthermore, MOMP is not detected in surface-labeling experiments using several MOMP-specific antibodies. These data indicate that pre-MOMP is translocated to the periplasmic space and processed but is not surface exposed in E. coli. Expression of MOMP in this system causes a significant reduction in cell viability. In addition, coexpression in E. coli of MOMP or a MOMP-PhoA fusion with various chaperone proteins does not alter the level of MOMP translocation.

  12. Escherichia coli as host for membrane protein structure determination: a global analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hattab, Georges; Warschawski, Dror E.; Moncoq, Karine; Miroux, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    The structural biology of membrane proteins (MP) is hampered by the difficulty in producing and purifying them. A comprehensive analysis of protein databases revealed that 213 unique membrane protein structures have been obtained after production of the target protein in E. coli. The primary expression system used was the one based on the T7 RNA polymerase, followed by the arabinose and T5 promoter based expression systems. The C41λ(DE3) and C43λ(DE3) bacterial mutant hosts have contributed to 28% of non E. coli membrane protein structures. A large scale analysis of expression protocols demonstrated a preference for a combination of bacterial host-vector together with a bimodal distribution of induction temperature and of inducer concentration. Altogether our analysis provides a set of rules for the optimal use of bacterial expression systems in membrane protein production. PMID:26160693

  13. NMR Structure of the hypothetical protein encoded by the YjbJ gene from Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Pineda-Lucena, Antonio; Liao, Jack; Wu, Bin; Yee, Adelinda; Cort, John R.; Kennedy, Michael A.; Edwards, Aled M.; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H.

    2002-06-01

    Here we describe the solution structure of YjbJ (gil418541) as part of a structural proteomics project on the feasibility of the high-throughput generation of samples from Escherichia coli for structural studies. YjbJ is a hypothetical protein from Escherichia coli protein of unknown function. It is conserved, showing significant sequence identity to four predicted prokaryotic proteins, also of unknown function (Figure 1A). These include gil16762921 from Salmonella enterica (S. typhi), gil17938413 from Agrobacterium tumefaciens, gil16265654 from Sinorizhobium meliloti, and gil15599932 from Pseudomona aeruginosa. The structure of YjbJ reveals a new variation of a common motif (four-helix bundle) that could not be predicted from the protein sequence. Although the biochemical function is unknown, the existence of patterns of conserved residues on the protein surface suggest that the fold and function of all these proteins could be similar.

  14. Drosophila yolk protein produced in E. coli is accumulated by mosquito ovaries.

    PubMed

    Bownes, M; Hurd, H; Büsgen, T; Servay, D; Alvis, S; Popovic, B; Bruce, S; Burns, I; Rothwell, K; Walkinshaw, Malcolm

    2002-10-01

    Despite similar functions, the yolk proteins of the higher dipteran flies and the vitellogenins found in other insects are unrelated at the sequence level and have evolved from different genes. Both are selectively endocytosed into the ovary via receptors belonging to the LDLR receptor subfamily. We cloned the Drosophila yp1 gene into an E. coli expression vector and showed that the yolk protein produced by E. coli is taken up into ovaries of both Drosophila melanogaster and the malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae, which normally uses vitellogenin. PMID:12230547

  15. Tunable recombinant protein expression with E. coli in a mixed-feed environment.

    PubMed

    Sagmeister, Patrick; Schimek, Clemens; Meitz, Andrea; Herwig, Christoph; Spadiut, Oliver

    2014-04-01

    Controlling the recombinant protein production rate in Escherichia coli is of utmost importance to ensure product quality and quantity. Up to now, only the genetic construct, introduced into E. coli, and the specific growth rate of the culture were used to influence and stir the productivity. However, bioprocess technological means to control or even tune the productivity of E. coli are scarce. Here, we present a novel method for the process-technological control over the recombinant protein expression rate in E. coli. A mixed-feed fed-batch bioprocess based on the araBAD promoter expression system using both D-glucose and L-arabinose as assimilable C-sources was designed. Using the model product green fluorescent protein, we show that the specific product formation rate can be efficiently tuned even on the cellular level only via the uptake rate of L-arabinose. This novel approach introduces an additional degree of freedom for the design of recombinant bioprocesses with E. coli. We anticipate that the presented method will result in significant quality and robustness improvement as well as cost and process time reduction for recombinant bacterial bioprocesses in the future.

  16. High-throughput recombinant protein expression in Escherichia coli: current status and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Jia, Baolei; Jeon, Che Ok

    2016-08-01

    The ease of genetic manipulation, low cost, rapid growth and number of previous studies have made Escherichia coli one of the most widely used microorganism species for producing recombinant proteins. In this post-genomic era, challenges remain to rapidly express and purify large numbers of proteins for academic and commercial purposes in a high-throughput manner. In this review, we describe several state-of-the-art approaches that are suitable for the cloning, expression and purification, conducted in parallel, of numerous molecules, and we discuss recent progress related to soluble protein expression, mRNA folding, fusion tags, post-translational modification and production of membrane proteins. Moreover, we address the ongoing efforts to overcome various challenges faced in protein expression in E. coli, which could lead to an improvement of the current system from trial and error to a predictable and rational design. PMID:27581654

  17. A self-inducible heterologous protein expression system in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Briand, L.; Marcion, G.; Kriznik, A.; Heydel, J. M.; Artur, Y.; Garrido, C.; Seigneuric, R.; Neiers, F.

    2016-01-01

    Escherichia coli is an important experimental, medical and industrial cell factory for recombinant protein production. The inducible lac promoter is one of the most commonly used promoters for heterologous protein expression in E. coli. Isopropyl-β-D-thiogalactoside (IPTG) is currently the most efficient molecular inducer for regulating this promoter’s transcriptional activity. However, limitations have been observed in large-scale and microplate production, including toxicity, cost and culture monitoring. Here, we report the novel SILEX (Self-InducibLe Expression) system, which is a convenient, cost-effective alternative that does not require cell density monitoring or IPTG induction. We demonstrate the broad utility of the presented self-inducible method for a panel of diverse proteins produced in large amounts. The SILEX system is compatible with all classical culture media and growth temperatures and allows protein expression modulation. Importantly, the SILEX system is proven to be efficient for protein expression screening on a microplate scale. PMID:27611846

  18. A self-inducible heterologous protein expression system in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Briand, L; Marcion, G; Kriznik, A; Heydel, J M; Artur, Y; Garrido, C; Seigneuric, R; Neiers, F

    2016-01-01

    Escherichia coli is an important experimental, medical and industrial cell factory for recombinant protein production. The inducible lac promoter is one of the most commonly used promoters for heterologous protein expression in E. coli. Isopropyl-β-D-thiogalactoside (IPTG) is currently the most efficient molecular inducer for regulating this promoter's transcriptional activity. However, limitations have been observed in large-scale and microplate production, including toxicity, cost and culture monitoring. Here, we report the novel SILEX (Self-InducibLe Expression) system, which is a convenient, cost-effective alternative that does not require cell density monitoring or IPTG induction. We demonstrate the broad utility of the presented self-inducible method for a panel of diverse proteins produced in large amounts. The SILEX system is compatible with all classical culture media and growth temperatures and allows protein expression modulation. Importantly, the SILEX system is proven to be efficient for protein expression screening on a microplate scale. PMID:27611846

  19. High-throughput recombinant protein expression in Escherichia coli: current status and future perspectives

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The ease of genetic manipulation, low cost, rapid growth and number of previous studies have made Escherichia coli one of the most widely used microorganism species for producing recombinant proteins. In this post-genomic era, challenges remain to rapidly express and purify large numbers of proteins for academic and commercial purposes in a high-throughput manner. In this review, we describe several state-of-the-art approaches that are suitable for the cloning, expression and purification, conducted in parallel, of numerous molecules, and we discuss recent progress related to soluble protein expression, mRNA folding, fusion tags, post-translational modification and production of membrane proteins. Moreover, we address the ongoing efforts to overcome various challenges faced in protein expression in E. coli, which could lead to an improvement of the current system from trial and error to a predictable and rational design. PMID:27581654

  20. Monoclonal antibody binding to the major outer membrane protein of Campylobacter coli.

    PubMed

    Qian, Hongliang; Pang, Ervinna; Chang, Jason; Toh, Say Ling; Ng, Fook Kheong; Tan, Ai Ling; Kwang, Jimmy

    2008-11-30

    Campylobacter species are major enteric pathogens causing diarrhea illness in humans and animals. Immunological tests are needed for accurate and rapid identification of C. coli, in conjunction with the use of standard biochemical tests. We initiated the creation of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) using whole C. coli cells as antigen. Four positive clones were identified, namely MAb2G6, MAb3B9, MAb4A10 and MAb5B9. Dot-blot assay and ELISA revealed that only MAb2G6 did not cross react with C. jejuni and other Campylobacter isolates. As demonstrated by dot-blot assay, MAb2G6 reacted with all 23 C. coli isolates tested but did not react with 29 isolates of C. jejuni, 3 other Campylobacter spp. isolates and 19 non-Campylobacter isolates, with the lowest detection limit was in the range of 10(3) to 10(4) bacteria. Western blots and dot blots showed that the antigen of MAb2G6 was a native protein, with immunoprecipitation assay showed that MAb2G6 bound to a protein band of approximately 43 kDa in size, corresponding to major outer membrane protein (MOMP) of C. coli revealed by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS). Immunofluorescence assay (IFA) showed that MOMP of C. coli was indeed the antigen of MAb2G6, with immunogold-electron microscopy demonstrated that MAb2G6 conjugated with immunogold particles bound to all over the surface of C. coli cells. MAb2G6 also showed potential usage in direct detection of C. coli in faecal samples.

  1. The effects of protein solubility on the RNA Integrity Number (RIN) for recombinant Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Baig, Faraz; Harcum, Sarah W.

    2013-01-01

    High quality, intact messenger RNA (mRNA) is required for DNA microarray and reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction analysis and is generally obtained from total RNA isolations. The most widely recognized measure of RNA integrity is the RNA Integrity Number (RIN) obtained from the Agilent Bioanalyzer, as it provides sizing, quantification, and quality control measures. This work describes comparisons of the RIN values obtained for recombinant E. coli. Uninduced recombinant E. coli cultures were examined, as well as induced cultures that produced either a soluble or insoluble recombinant protein. The uninduced cultures and the induced cultures producing soluble protein had higher RIN values than the induced cultures producing insoluble protein. These lower RIN values for E. coli producing the insoluble protein indicate that cellular degradation of the ribosomal RNA species is the likely cause of the lower RIN values. As the use of DNA microarrays and other gene expression tools increase in usage in the industrial recombinant protein production community, these results suggest the need for further studies to determine acceptable RIN ranges for gene expression analysis and effects of various culture conditions on RIN values for recombinant E. coli. PMID:24151430

  2. Toward an era of utilizing methionine overproducing hosts for recombinant protein production in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Veeravalli, Karthik; Laird, Michael W

    2015-01-01

    Amino acid sequence variants, especially variants containing non-canonical amino acids such as norleucine and norvaline, are a concern during therapeutic protein production in microbial systems. Substitution of methionine residues with norleucine in recombinant proteins produced in Escherichia coli is well known. Continuous feeding of amino acids such as methionine is commonly used in E. coli fermentation processes to control incorporation of norleucine in the recombinant protein. There are several disadvantages associated with continuous feeding during a fermentation process. For example, a continuous feed increases the operational complexity and cost of a manufacturing process and results in dilution of culture medium which could result in lower cell densities and product yields. To overcome the limitations of existing approaches to prevent norleucine incorporation during E. coli fermentations, a new approach using an engineered host was developed that overproduces methionine in the cell to prevent norleucine incorporation without negatively impacting fermentation process performance and product yields. In this commentary, the results on using methionine overproducing hosts for recombinant protein production in E. coli and some "watch outs" when using these hosts for recombinant protein production are discussed.

  3. Toward an era of utilizing methionine overproducing hosts for recombinant protein production in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Veeravalli, Karthik; Laird, Michael W

    2015-01-01

    Amino acid sequence variants, especially variants containing non-canonical amino acids such as norleucine and norvaline, are a concern during therapeutic protein production in microbial systems. Substitution of methionine residues with norleucine in recombinant proteins produced in Escherichia coli is well known. Continuous feeding of amino acids such as methionine is commonly used in E. coli fermentation processes to control incorporation of norleucine in the recombinant protein. There are several disadvantages associated with continuous feeding during a fermentation process. For example, a continuous feed increases the operational complexity and cost of a manufacturing process and results in dilution of culture medium which could result in lower cell densities and product yields. To overcome the limitations of existing approaches to prevent norleucine incorporation during E. coli fermentations, a new approach using an engineered host was developed that overproduces methionine in the cell to prevent norleucine incorporation without negatively impacting fermentation process performance and product yields. In this commentary, the results on using methionine overproducing hosts for recombinant protein production in E. coli and some “watch outs” when using these hosts for recombinant protein production are discussed. PMID:25801611

  4. Global Profiling of Protein Lysine Malonylation in Escherichia coli Reveals Its Role in Energy Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Qian, Lili; Nie, Litong; Chen, Ming; Liu, Ping; Zhu, Jun; Zhai, Linhui; Tao, Sheng-Ce; Cheng, Zhongyi; Zhao, Yingming; Tan, Minjia

    2016-06-01

    Protein lysine malonylation is a recently identified post-translational modification (PTM), which is evolutionarily conserved from bacteria to mammals. Although analysis of lysine malonylome in mammalians suggested that this modification was related to energy metabolism, the substrates and biological roles of malonylation in prokaryotes are still poorly understood. In this study, we performed qualitative and quantitative analyses to globally identify lysine malonylation substrates in Escherichia coli. We identified 1745 malonylation sites in 594 proteins in E. coli, representing the first and largest malonylome data set in prokaryotes up to date. Bioinformatic analyses showed that lysine malonylation was significantly enriched in protein translation, energy metabolism pathways and fatty acid biosynthesis, implying the potential roles of protein malonylation in bacterial physiology. Quantitative proteomics by fatty acid synthase inhibition in both auxotrophic and prototrophic E. coli strains revealed that lysine malonylation is closely associated with E. coli fatty acid metabolism. Protein structural analysis and mutagenesis experiment suggested malonylation could impact enzymatic activity of citrate synthase, a key enzyme in citric acid (TCA) cycle. Further comparative analysis among lysine malonylome, succinylome and acetylome data showed that these three modifications could participate in some similar enriched metabolism pathways, but they could also possibly play distinct roles such as in fatty acid synthesis. These data expanded our knowledge of lysine malonylation in prokaryotes, providing a resource for functional study of lysine malonylation in bacteria. PMID:27183143

  5. Engineering Escherichia coli into a Protein Delivery System for Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Many Gram-negative pathogens encode type 3 secretion systems, sophisticated nanomachines that deliver proteins directly into the cytoplasm of mammalian cells. These systems present attractive opportunities for therapeutic protein delivery applications; however, their utility has been limited by their inherent pathogenicity. Here, we report the reengineering of a laboratory strain of Escherichia coli with a tunable type 3 secretion system that can efficiently deliver heterologous proteins into mammalian cells, thereby circumventing the need for virulence attenuation. We first introduced a 31 kB region of Shigella flexneri DNA that encodes all of the information needed to form the secretion nanomachine onto a plasmid that can be directly propagated within E. coli or integrated into the E. coli chromosome. To provide flexible control over type 3 secretion and protein delivery, we generated plasmids expressing master regulators of the type 3 system from either constitutive or inducible promoters. We then constructed a Gateway-compatible plasmid library of type 3 secretion sequences to enable rapid screening and identification of sequences that do not perturb function when fused to heterologous protein substrates and optimized their delivery into mammalian cells. Combining these elements, we found that coordinated expression of the type 3 secretion system and modified target protein substrates produces a nonpathogenic strain that expresses, secretes, and delivers heterologous proteins into mammalian cells. This reengineered system thus provides a highly flexible protein delivery platform with potential for future therapeutic applications. PMID:25853840

  6. Engineering Escherichia coli into a protein delivery system for mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Reeves, Analise Z; Spears, William E; Du, Juan; Tan, Kah Yong; Wagers, Amy J; Lesser, Cammie F

    2015-05-15

    Many Gram-negative pathogens encode type 3 secretion systems, sophisticated nanomachines that deliver proteins directly into the cytoplasm of mammalian cells. These systems present attractive opportunities for therapeutic protein delivery applications; however, their utility has been limited by their inherent pathogenicity. Here, we report the reengineering of a laboratory strain of Escherichia coli with a tunable type 3 secretion system that can efficiently deliver heterologous proteins into mammalian cells, thereby circumventing the need for virulence attenuation. We first introduced a 31 kB region of Shigella flexneri DNA that encodes all of the information needed to form the secretion nanomachine onto a plasmid that can be directly propagated within E. coli or integrated into the E. coli chromosome. To provide flexible control over type 3 secretion and protein delivery, we generated plasmids expressing master regulators of the type 3 system from either constitutive or inducible promoters. We then constructed a Gateway-compatible plasmid library of type 3 secretion sequences to enable rapid screening and identification of sequences that do not perturb function when fused to heterologous protein substrates and optimized their delivery into mammalian cells. Combining these elements, we found that coordinated expression of the type 3 secretion system and modified target protein substrates produces a nonpathogenic strain that expresses, secretes, and delivers heterologous proteins into mammalian cells. This reengineered system thus provides a highly flexible protein delivery platform with potential for future therapeutic applications. PMID:25853840

  7. Purification of inclusion body-forming peptides and proteins in soluble form by fusion to Escherichia coli thermostable proteins.

    PubMed

    Thapa, Arjun; Shahnawaz, Md; Karki, Pratap; Raj Dahal, Giri; Sharoar, Md Golam; Yub Shin, Song; Sup Lee, Jung; Cho, Byungyun; Park, Il-Seon

    2008-05-01

    Proteins and peptides expressed in the prokaryotic system often form inclusion bodies. Solubilization and refolding procedures can be used for their recovery, but this process remains difficult. One strategy for improving the solubility of a protein of interest is to fuse it to a highly soluble protein. To select a suitable fusion partner capable of solubilizing the aggregation-prone (inclusion body-forming) proteins and peptides, Escherichia coli thermostable proteins were identified and tested. Among them, trigger factor (TF) protein was selected because of its high expression and stability. Using an expression system based on fusion to TF, selected proteins and peptides that otherwise form inclusion bodies were expressed in soluble state and were purified like other soluble proteins. This system provides a convenient method for production of aggregation-prone proteins and peptides. PMID:18476832

  8. Secretion and proteolysis of heterologous proteins fused to the Escherichia coli maltose binding protein in Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhiguo; Leung, Wilson; Yon, Amy; Nguyen, John; Perez, Vincent C; Vu, Jane; Giang, William; Luong, Linda T; Phan, Tracy; Salazar, Kate A; Gomez, Seth R; Au, Colin; Xiang, Fan; Thomas, David W; Franz, Andreas H; Lin-Cereghino, Joan; Lin-Cereghino, Geoff P

    2010-07-01

    The Escherichia coli maltose binding protein (MBP) has been utilized as a translational fusion partner to improve the expression of foreign proteins made in E. coli. When located N-terminal to its cargo protein, MBP increases the solubility of intracellular proteins and improves the export of secreted proteins in bacterial systems. We initially explored whether MBP would have the same effect in the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris, a popular eukaryotic host for heterologous protein expression. When MBP was fused as an N-terminal partner to several C-terminal cargo proteins expressed in this yeast, proteolysis occurred between the two peptides, and MBP reached the extracellular region unattached to its cargo. However, in two of three instances, the cargo protein reached the extracellular region as well, and its initial attachment to MBP enhanced its secretion from the cell. Extensive mutagenesis of the spacer region between MBP and its C-terminal cargo protein could not inhibit the cleavage although it did cause changes in the protease target sites in the fusion proteins, as determined by mass spectrometry. Taken together, these results suggested that an uncharacterized P. pastoris protease attacked at different locations in the region C-terminal of the MBP domain, including the spacer and cargo regions, but the MBP domain could still act to enhance the secretion of certain cargo proteins. PMID:20230898

  9. Secretion and Proteolysis of Heterologous Proteins Fused to the Escherichia coli Maltose Binding Protein in Pichia pastoris

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhiguo; Leung, Wilson; Yon, Amy; Nguyen, John; Perez, Vincent C.; Vu, Jane; Giang, William; Luong, Linda T.; Phan, Tracy; Salazar, Katherine A.; Gomez, Seth R.; Au, Colin; Xiang, Fan; Thomas, David W.; Franz, Andreas H.; Lin-Cereghino, Joan; Lin-Cereghino, Geoff P.

    2010-01-01

    The E. coli maltose binding protein (MBP) has been utilized as a translational fusion partner to improve the expression of foreign proteins made in E. coli. When located N-terminal to its cargo protein, MBP increases the solubility of intracellular proteins and improves the export of secreted proteins in bacterial systems. We initially explored whether MBP would have the same effect in the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris, a popular eukaryotic host for heterologous protein expression. When MBP was fused as an N-terminal partner to several C-terminal cargo proteins expressed in this yeast, proteolysis occurred between the two peptides, and MBP reached the extracellular region unattached to its cargo. However, in two of three instances, the cargo protein reached the extracellular region as well, and its initial attachment to MBP enhanced its secretion from the cell. Extensive mutagenesis of the spacer region between MBP and its C-terminal cargo protein could not inhibit the cleavage although it did cause changes in the protease target sites in the fusion proteins, as determined by mass spectrometry. Taken together, these results suggested that an uncharacterized P. pastoris protease attacked at different locations in the region C-terminal of the MBP domain, including the spacer and cargo regions, but the MBP domain could still act to enhance the secretion of certain cargo proteins. PMID:20230898

  10. Direct interaction of the N-terminal domain of ribosomal protein S1 with protein S2 in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Byrgazov, Konstantin; Manoharadas, Salim; Kaberdina, Anna C; Vesper, Oliver; Moll, Isabella

    2012-01-01

    Despite of the high resolution structure available for the E. coli ribosome, hitherto the structure and localization of the essential ribosomal protein S1 on the 30 S subunit still remains to be elucidated. It was previously reported that protein S1 binds to the ribosome via protein-protein interaction at the two N-terminal domains. Moreover, protein S2 was shown to be required for binding of protein S1 to the ribosome. Here, we present evidence that the N-terminal domain of S1 (amino acids 1-106; S1(106)) is necessary and sufficient for the interaction with protein S2 as well as for ribosome binding. We show that over production of protein S1(106) affects E. coli growth by displacing native protein S1 from its binding pocket on the ribosome. In addition, our data reveal that the coiled-coil domain of protein S2 (S2α(2)) is sufficient to allow protein S1 to bind to the ribosome. Taken together, these data uncover the crucial elements required for the S1/S2 interaction, which is pivotal for translation initiation on canonical mRNAs in gram-negative bacteria. The results are discussed in terms of a model wherein the S1/S2 interaction surface could represent a possible target to modulate the selectivity of the translational machinery and thereby alter the translational program under distinct conditions.

  11. Two novel heat shock genes encoding proteins produced in response to heterologous protein expression in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Allen, S P; Polazzi, J O; Gierse, J K; Easton, A M

    1992-11-01

    In Escherichia coli high-level production of some heterologous proteins (specifically, human prorenin, renin, and bovine insulin-like growth factor 2) resulted in the induction of two new E. coli heat shock proteins, both of which have molecular masses of 16 kDa and are tightly associated with inclusion bodies formed during heterologous protein production. We named these inclusion body-associated proteins IbpA and IbpB. The coding sequences for IbpA and IbpB were identified and isolated from the Kohara E. coli gene bank. The genes for these proteins (ibpA and ibpB) are located at 82.5 min on the chromosome. Nucleotide sequencing of the two genes revealed that they are transcribed in the same direction and are separated by 110 bp. Putative Shine-Dalgarno sequences are located upstream from the initiation codons of both genes. A putative heat shock promoter is located upstream from ibpA, and a putative transcription terminator is located downstream from ibpB. A temperature upshift experiment in which we used a wild-type E. coli strain and an isogenic rpoH mutant strain indicated that a sigma 32-containing RNA polymerase is involved in the regulation of expression of these genes. There is 57.5% identity between the genes at the nucleotide level and 52.2% identity at the amino acid level. A search of the protein data bases showed that both of these 16-kDa proteins exhibit low levels of homology to low-molecular-weight heat shock proteins from eukaryotic species.

  12. Problem-Solving Test: RNA and Protein Synthesis in Bacteriophage-Infected "E. coli" Cells

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szeberenyi, Jozsef

    2008-01-01

    The classic experiment presented in this problem-solving test was designed to identify the template molecules of translation by analyzing the synthesis of phage proteins in "Escherichia coli" cells infected with bacteriophage T4. The work described in this test led to one of the most seminal discoveries of early molecular biology: it dealt a…

  13. Myeloid differentiation protein-2-dependent and -independent neutrophil accumulation during Escherichia coli pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Cai, Shanshan; Zemans, Rachel L; Young, Scott K; Worthen, G Scott; Jeyaseelan, Samithamby

    2009-06-01

    Bacterial pneumonia remains a serious disease. Pattern recognition receptors play an integral role in neutrophil accumulation during pneumonia. Although myeloid differentiation protein (MD)-2 has been recognized as a key molecule for LPS signaling, the role of MD-2 in neutrophil accumulation in the lung during bacterial infection has not been explored. Here, we investigate the role of MD-2 in Escherichia coli LPS-induced lung inflammation and E. coli-induced pneumonia. LPS-induced CD14-independent neutrophil accumulation was abolished in CD14/MD-2(-/-) mice. MD-2(-/-) mice challenged with LPS displayed attenuated neutrophil influx, NF-kappaB activation, cytokine/chemokine expression, and lung histopathology. MD-2(-/-) mice transplanted with MD-2(+/+) bone marrow demonstrated decreased neutrophil influx and cytokine/chemokine expression in the lungs when challenged by LPS. MD-2(-/-) mice infected with E. coli demonstrated reduced neutrophil influx and cytokine/chemokine expression in the lungs, whereas heat-killed E. coli did not induce either neutrophil accumulation or cytokine/chemokine expression in MD-2(-/-) mice infected with E. coli. Furthermore, MD-2(-/-) mice displayed increased bacterial burden in the lungs and enhanced bacterial dissemination. Toll-like receptor (TLR)-5(-/-) mice infected with E. coli exhibited attenuated neutrophil accumulation, whereas MD-2/TLR5(-/-) mice inoculated with E. coli showed further attenuated neutrophil influx and impaired bacterial clearance. Taken together, these new findings demonstrate: (1) the important role of MD-2 in the CD14-independent LPS-mediated cascade of neutrophil influx; (2) the relative importance of bone marrow- and non-bone marrow cell-derived MD-2 in LPS-induced inflammation; and (3) the essential role of MD-2-dependent and MD-2-independent (TLR5) signaling in E. coli-induced neutrophil accumulation and pulmonary host defense. PMID:18988922

  14. Characterization of the "Escherichia Coli" Acyl Carrier Protein Phosphodiesterase

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Jacob

    2009-01-01

    Acyl carrier protein (ACP) is a small essential protein that functions as a carrier of the acyl intermediates of fatty acid synthesis. ACP requires the posttranslational attachment of a 4'phosphopantetheine functional group, derived from CoA, in order to perform its metabolic function. A Mn[superscript 2+] dependent enzymatic activity that removes…

  15. Effect of Antimicrobial Agents on MinD Protein Oscillations in E. coli Bacterial Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, Corey; Murphy, Megan; Giuliani, Maximiliano; Dutcher, John

    2011-03-01

    The pole-to-pole oscillation of the MinD proteins in E. coli determines the location of the division septum, and is integral to healthy cell division. It has been shown previously that the MinD oscillation period is approximately 40 s for healthy cells but is strongly dependant on environmental factors such as temperature, which may place stress on the cell [2,3]. We use a strain of E. coli in which the MinD proteins are tagged with green fluorescent protein (GFP), allowing fluorescence visualization of the MinD oscillation. We use high resolution total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy to observe the effect of exposure to antimicrobial agents on the MinD oscillation period and, more generally, to analyze the time variation of the spatial distribution of the MinD proteins within the cells. These measurements provide insight into the mechanism of antimicrobial action.

  16. Beyond the cytoplasm of Escherichia coli: localizing recombinant proteins where you want them.

    PubMed

    Boock, Jason T; Waraho-Zhmayev, Dujduan; Mizrachi, Dario; DeLisa, Matthew P

    2015-01-01

    Recombinant protein expression in Escherichia coli represents a cornerstone of the biotechnology enterprise. While cytoplasmic expression in this host has received the most attention, achieving substantial yields of correctly folded proteins in this compartment can sometimes be met with difficulties. These issues can often be overcome by targeting protein expression to extracytoplasmic compartments (e.g., membrane, periplasm) or to the culture medium. This chapter discusses various strategies for exporting proteins out of the cytoplasm as well as tools for monitoring and optimizing these different export mechanisms. PMID:25447860

  17. Fluorescence study of Escherichia coli cyclic AMP receptor protein.

    PubMed

    Wasylewski, M; Małecki, J; Wasylewski, Z

    1995-07-01

    Time-resolved, steady-state fluorescence and fluorescence-detected circular dichroism (FDCD) have been used to resolve the fluorescence contributions of the two tryptophan residues, Trp-13 and Trp-85, in the cyclic AMP receptor protein (CRP). The iodide and acrylamide quenching data show that in CRP one tryptophan residue, Trp-85, is buried within the protein matrix and the other, Trp-13, is moderately exposed on the surface of the protein. Fluorescence-quenching-resolved spectra show that Trp-13 has emission at about 350 nm and contributes 76-83% to the total fluorescence emission. The Trp-85, unquenchable by iodide and acrylamide, has the fluorescence emission at about 337 nm. The time-resolved fluorescence measurements show that Trp-13 has a longer fluorescence decay time. The Trp-85 exhibits a shorter fluorescence decay time. In the CRP-cAMP complex the Trp-85, previously buried in the apoprotein becomes totally exposed to the iodide and acrylamide quenchers. The FDCD spectra indicate that in the CRP-cAMP complex Trp-85 remains in the same environment as in the protein alone. It has been proposed that the binding of cAMP to CRP is accompanied by a hinge reorientation of two protein domains. This allows for penetration of the quencher molecules into the Trp-85 residue previously buried in the protein matrix. PMID:8590598

  18. An architectural role of the Escherichia coli chromatin protein FIS in organising DNA.

    PubMed

    Schneider, R; Lurz, R; Lüder, G; Tolksdorf, C; Travers, A; Muskhelishvili, G

    2001-12-15

    The Escherichia coli chromatin protein FIS modulates the topology of DNA in a growth phase-dependent manner. In this study we have investigated the global effect of FIS binding on DNA architecture in vitro. We show that in supercoiled DNA molecules FIS binds at multiple sites in a non-random fashion and increases DNA branching. This global DNA reshaping effect is independent of the helical phasing of FIS binding sites. We propose, in addition to the previously inferred stabilisation of tightly bent DNA microloops in the upstream regions of certain promoters, that FIS may perform the distinct architectural function of organising branched plectonemes in the E.coli nucleoid.

  19. Preparation and Extraction of Insoluble (Inclusion-Body) Proteins from Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Ira; Wingfield, Paul T.

    2013-01-01

    High-level expression of many recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli leads to the formation of highly aggregated protein commonly referred to as inclusion bodies. Inclusion bodies are normally formed in the cytoplasm; however, if a secretion vector is used, they can form in the periplasmic space. Inclusion bodies can be recovered from cell lysates by low speed centrifugation. Following preextaction (or washing) protein is extracted from washed pellets using guanidine·HCl. The solubilized and unfolded protein is either directly folded as described in UNIT 6.1 or further purified by gel filtration in the presence of guanidine·HCl as described here. A support protocol describes the removal of guanidine·HCl from column fractions so they can be monitored by SDS-PAGE. High-level expression of many recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli leads to the formation of highly aggregated protein commonly referred to as inclusion bodies (UNITS 5.1 & 6.1). Inclusion bodies are normally formed in the cytoplasm; alternatively, if a secretion vector is used, they can form in the periplasmic space. Inclusion bodies are not restricted to E. coli; they can also form in yeast, mammalian, and insect cells. Inclusion bodies recovered from cell lysates by low-speed centrifugation are heavily contaminated with E. coli cell wall and outer membrane components. The latter are largely removed by selective extraction with detergents and low concentrations of either urea or guanidine·HCl to produce so-called washed pellets. These basic steps result in a significant purification of the recombinant protein, which usually makes up ~60% of the washed pellet protein. The challenge, therefore, is not to purify the recombinant-derived protein, but to solubilize it and then fold it into native and biologically active protein. Basic Protocol 1 describes preparation of washed pellets and solubilization of the protein using guanidine·HCl. The extracted protein, which is unfolded, is either directly

  20. Factors influencing inclusion body formation in the production of a fused protein in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Strandberg, L; Enfors, S O

    1991-01-01

    Different parameters that influenced the formation of inclusion bodies in Escherichia coli during production of a fused protein consisting of protein A from Staphylococcus aureus and beta-galactosidase from E. coli were examined. The intracellular expression of the fused protein was controlled by the pR promoter and its temperature-sensitive repressor. The induction temperature, the pH of the cultivation medium, and changes in the amino acid sequence in the linker region between protein A and beta-galactosidase had a profound effect on the formation of inclusion bodies. At 42 degrees C, inclusion bodies were formed only during the first hours after induction, and thereafter all the recombinant protein that was further produced appeared in a soluble and active state. Production at 39 and 44 degrees C resulted in inclusion body formation throughout the production period with 15 to 20% of the produced recombinant protein appearing as inclusion bodies. Cultivating cells without control of pH caused inclusion body formation throughout the induction period, and inclusion body formation increased with decreasing pH, and at least part of the insoluble protein was formed from the pool of soluble fusion protein within the cell. Changes in the amino acid sequence in the linker region between the two parts of the fusion protein abolished inclusion body formation. PMID:1908208

  1. The single-stranded DNA-binding protein of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, R R; Laine, P S

    1990-01-01

    The single-stranded DNA-binding protein (SSB) of Escherichia coli is involved in all aspects of DNA metabolism: replication, repair, and recombination. In solution, the protein exists as a homotetramer of 18,843-kilodalton subunits. As it binds tightly and cooperatively to single-stranded DNA, it has become a prototypic model protein for studying protein-nucleic acid interactions. The sequences of the gene and protein are known, and the functional domains of subunit interaction, DNA binding, and protein-protein interactions have been probed by structure-function analyses of various mutations. The ssb gene has three promoters, one of which is inducible because it lies only two nucleotides from the LexA-binding site of the adjacent uvrA gene. Induction of the SOS response, however, does not lead to significant increases in SSB levels. The binding protein has several functions in DNA replication, including enhancement of helix destabilization by DNA helicases, prevention of reannealing of the single strands and protection from nuclease digestion, organization and stabilization of replication origins, primosome assembly, priming specificity, enhancement of replication fidelity, enhancement of polymerase processivity, and promotion of polymerase binding to the template. E. coli SSB is required for methyl-directed mismatch repair, induction of the SOS response, and recombinational repair. During recombination, SSB interacts with the RecBCD enzyme to find Chi sites, promotes binding of RecA protein, and promotes strand uptake. PMID:2087220

  2. Ni2+-based immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography of lactose operon repressor protein from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Velkov, Tony; Jones, Alun; Lim, Maria L R

    2008-01-01

    A two-step chromatographic sequence is described for the purification of native lactose operon repressor protein from Escherichia coli cells. The first step involves Ni(2+)-based immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography of the soluble cytoplasmic extract. This method provides superior speed, resolution and yield than the established phosphocellulose cation-exchange chromatographic procedure. Anion-exchange chromatography is used for further purification to >95% purity. The identity and purity of the lactose repressor protein were demonstrated using sodium dodecylsulphate polyacrylamide electrophoresis, crystallization, tryptic finger-printing mass spectrometry, and inducer binding assays. The purified lac repressor exhibited inducer sensitivity for operator DNA binding and undergoes a conformational change upon inducer binding. By all these extensive biochemical criteria, the purified protein behaves exactly as that described for the Escherichia coli lactose operon repressor. PMID:18800304

  3. Antibacterial activity and inhibition of protein synthesis in Escherichia coli by antisense DNA analogs.

    PubMed

    Rahman, M A; Summerton, J; Foster, E; Cunningham, K; Stirchak, E; Weller, D; Schaup, H W

    1991-01-01

    Protein synthesis, which takes place within ribosomes, is essential for the survival of any living organism. Ribosomes are composed of both proteins and RNA. Specific interaction between the 3' end CCUCC sequence of prokaryotic 16S rRNA and a partially complementary sequence preceding the initiating codon of mRNA is believed to be a prerequisite for initiation of protein synthesis. Here we report the use of short (three to six nucleotides) synthetic DNA analogs complementary to this sequence to block protein synthesis in vitro and in vivo in Escherichia coli. In the DNA analogs the normal phosphodiester bond in the antisense DNA was replaced by methylcarbamate internucleoside linkages to enhance transport across plasma membranes. Of the analogs tested, those with the sequence AGG and GGA inhibit protein synthesis and colony formation by E. coli strains lacking an outer cell wall. Polyethylene glycol 1000 (PEG 1000) was attached to the 5' end of some of the test methylcarbamate DNAs to enhance solubility. Analogs of AGG and GGAG with PEG 1000 attached inhibited colony formation in normal E. coli. These analogs may be useful food additives to control bacterial spoilage and biomedically as antibiotics. PMID:1821653

  4. Immunogenicity of Escherichia coli expressed envelope 2 protein of Chikungunya virus.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Nagesh K; Priya, Raj; Shrivastava, Ambuj

    2014-01-01

    Chikungunya fever, a re-emerging infection, is an arthropod-borne viral disease prevalent in different parts of the world, particularly Africa and South East Asia. Chikungunya virus envelope 2 protein is involved in binding to host receptors and it contains specific epitopes that elicit virus neutralizing antibodies. A highly immunogenic, recombinant Chikungunya virus envelope 2 protein was produced by bioreactor in Escherichia coli for development of a suitable diagnostic and vaccine candidate. This protein was refolded and further purified to achieve biologically active protein. The biological function of refolded and purified recombinant envelope 2 protein of Chikungunya virus was confirmed by its ability to generate envelope 2 specific antibodies with high titers in animal models. These findings suggest that recombinant envelope 2 protein of Chikungunya virus in combination with compatible adjuvant is highly immunogenic. Thus, recombinant envelope 2 protein can be a potential diagnostic reagent and vaccine candidate against Chikungunya virus infection.

  5. Adsorption in vitro to Escherichia coli of antibodies and other proteins in bovine serum and colostrum and its effects on the production of E. coli agglutinins.

    PubMed Central

    Steel, E D

    1975-01-01

    IgGl, IgG2, IgA and IgM from bovine serum and colostrum are adsorbed by Escherichia coli in vitro; lactoferrin is also adsorbed from colostrum and alpha2 macroglobulin from serum. The colostral adsorbed proteins on E. coli appear to reduce formation of agglutinins when the treated bacteria are injected into rabbits and guinea-pigs. Assay of the concentration of proteins dissociated from colostrum-treated cells showed equal amounts of secretory IgA AND IgGl, half that amount of IgG2, and traces of IgM and lactoferrin. Dissociation of proteins from serum-treated E. coli yielded equal amounts of IgGl and IgG2, traces of IgA and an alpha2 macroglobulin, but no IgM. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 2 PMID:1095472

  6. Quantification and Classification of E. coli Proteome Utilization and Unused Protein Costs across Environments

    PubMed Central

    O’Brien, Edward J.; Utrilla, Jose; Palsson, Bernhard O.

    2016-01-01

    The costs and benefits of protein expression are balanced through evolution. Expression of un-utilized protein (that have no benefits in the current environment) incurs a quantifiable fitness costs on cellular growth rates; however, the magnitude and variability of un-utilized protein expression in natural settings is unknown, largely due to the challenge in determining environment-specific proteome utilization. We address this challenge using absolute and global proteomics data combined with a recently developed genome-scale model of Escherichia coli that computes the environment-specific cost and utility of the proteome on a per gene basis. We show that nearly half of the proteome mass is unused in certain environments and accounting for the cost of this unused protein expression explains >95% of the variance in growth rates of Escherichia coli across 16 distinct environments. Furthermore, reduction in unused protein expression is shown to be a common mechanism to increase cellular growth rates in adaptive evolution experiments. Classification of the unused protein reveals that the unused protein encodes several nutrient- and stress- preparedness functions, which may convey fitness benefits in varying environments. Thus, unused protein expression is the source of large and pervasive fitness costs that may provide the benefit of hedging against environmental change. PMID:27351952

  7. Quantification and Classification of E. coli Proteome Utilization and Unused Protein Costs across Environments.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Edward J; Utrilla, Jose; Palsson, Bernhard O

    2016-06-01

    The costs and benefits of protein expression are balanced through evolution. Expression of un-utilized protein (that have no benefits in the current environment) incurs a quantifiable fitness costs on cellular growth rates; however, the magnitude and variability of un-utilized protein expression in natural settings is unknown, largely due to the challenge in determining environment-specific proteome utilization. We address this challenge using absolute and global proteomics data combined with a recently developed genome-scale model of Escherichia coli that computes the environment-specific cost and utility of the proteome on a per gene basis. We show that nearly half of the proteome mass is unused in certain environments and accounting for the cost of this unused protein expression explains >95% of the variance in growth rates of Escherichia coli across 16 distinct environments. Furthermore, reduction in unused protein expression is shown to be a common mechanism to increase cellular growth rates in adaptive evolution experiments. Classification of the unused protein reveals that the unused protein encodes several nutrient- and stress- preparedness functions, which may convey fitness benefits in varying environments. Thus, unused protein expression is the source of large and pervasive fitness costs that may provide the benefit of hedging against environmental change. PMID:27351952

  8. Tender coconut water an economical growth medium for the production of recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Escherichia coli is most widely used prokaryotic expression system for the production of recombinant proteins. Several strategies have been employed for expressing recombinant proteins in E.coli. This includes the development of novel host systems, expression vectors and cost effective media. In this study, we exploit tender coconut water (TCW) as a natural and cheaper growth medium for E.coli and Pichia pastoris. Result E.coli and P.pastoris were cultivated in TCW and the growth rate was monitored by measuring optical density at 600 nm (OD600nm), where 1.55 for E.coli and 8.7 for P.pastoris was obtained after 12 and 60 hours, respectively. However, variation in growth rate was observed among TCW when collected from different localities (0.15-2.5 at OD600nm), which is attributed to the varying chemical profile among samples. In this regard, we attempted the supplementation of TCW with different carbon and nitrogen sources to attain consistency in growth rate. Here, supplementation of TCW with 25 mM ammonium sulphate (TCW-S) was noted efficient for the normalization of inconsistency, which further increased the biomass of E.coli by 2 to 10 folds, and 1.5 to 2 fold in P.pastoris. These results indicate that nitrogen source is the major limiting factor for growth. This was supported by total nitrogen and carbon estimation where, nitrogen varies from 20 to 60 mg/100 ml while carbohydrates showed no considerable variation (2.32 to 3.96 g/100 ml). In this study, we also employed TCW as an expression media for recombinant proteins by demonstrating successful expression of maltose binding protein (MBP), MBP-TEV protease fusion and a photo switchable fluorescent protein (mEos2) using TCW and the expression level was found to be equivalent to Luria Broth (LB). Conclusion This study highlights the possible application of TCW-S as a media for cultivation of a variety of microorganisms and recombinant protein expression. PMID:24004578

  9. Bacteriophage receptor binding protein based assays for the simultaneous detection of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli.

    PubMed

    Javed, Muhammad A; Poshtiban, Somayyeh; Arutyunov, Denis; Evoy, Stephane; Szymanski, Christine M

    2013-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli are the most common bacterial causes of foodborne gastroenteritis which is occasionally followed by a debilitating neuropathy known as Guillain-Barré syndrome. Rapid and specific detection of these pathogens is very important for effective control and quick treatment of infection. Most of the diagnostics available for these organisms are time consuming and require technical expertise with expensive instruments and reagents to perform. Bacteriophages bind to their host specifically through their receptor binding proteins (RBPs), which can be exploited for pathogen detection. We recently sequenced the genome of C. jejuni phage NCTC12673 and identified its putative host receptor binding protein, Gp047. In the current study, we localized the receptor binding domain to the C-terminal quarter of Gp047. CC-Gp047 could be produced recombinantly and was capable of agglutinating both C. jejuni and C. coli cells unlike the host range of the parent phage which is limited to a subset of C. jejuni isolates. The agglutination procedure could be performed within minutes on a glass slide at room temperature and was not hindered by the presence of buffers or nutrient media. This agglutination assay showed 100% specificity and the sensitivity was 95% for C. jejuni (n = 40) and 90% for C. coli (n = 19). CC-Gp047 was also expressed as a fusion with enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP). Chimeric EGFP_CC-Gp047 was able to specifically label C. jejuni and C. coli cells in mixed cultures allowing for the detection of these pathogens by fluorescent microscopy. This study describes a simple and rapid method for the detection of C. jejuni and C. coli using engineered phage RBPs and offers a promising new diagnostics platform for healthcare and surveillance laboratories.

  10. No effect of femtosecond laser pulses on M13, E. coli, DNA, or protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wigle, Jeffrey C.; Holwitt, Eric A.; Estlack, Larry E.; Noojin, Gary D.; Saunders, Katharine E.; Yakovlev, Valdislav V.; Rockwell, Benjamin A.

    2014-01-01

    Data showing what appears to be nonthermal inactivation of M13 bacteriophage (M13), Tobacco mosaic virus, Escherichia coli (E. coli), and Jurkatt T-cells following exposure to 80-fs pulses of laser radiation have been published. Interest in the mechanism led to attempts to reproduce the results for M13 and E. coli. Bacteriophage plaque-forming and bacteria colony-forming assays showed no inactivation of the microorganisms; therefore, model systems were used to see what, if any, damage might be occurring to biologically important molecules. Purified plasmid DNA (pUC19) and bovine serum albumin were exposed to and analyzed by agarose gel electrophoresis (AGE) and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE), respectively, and no effect was found. DNA and coat proteins extracted from laser-exposed M13 and analyzed by AGE or PAGE found no effect. Raman scattering by M13 in phosphate buffered saline was measured to determine if there was any physical interaction between M13 and femtosecond laser pulses, and none was found. Positive controls for the endpoints measured produced the expected results with the relevant assays. Using the published methods, we were unable to reproduce the inactivation results or to show any interaction between ultrashort laser pulses and buffer/water, DNA, protein, M13 bacteriophage, or E. coli.

  11. A mutant of Escherichia coli defective in penicillin-binding protein 5 and lacking D-alanine carboxypeptidase IA.

    PubMed Central

    Nishimura, Y; Suzuki, H; Hirota, Y; Park, J T

    1980-01-01

    A mutant of Escherichia coli defective in penicillin-binding protein 5 activity was isolated. The mutation (pfv) was shown to be located at 14.0 min on the E. coli chromosome map. Loss of penicillin-binding protein 5 in the pfv mutant was associated with the loss of D-alanine carboxypeptidase IA activity and increased sensitivity to beta-lactam antibiotics. We conclude that penicillin-binding protein 5 catalyzes the major D-alanine carboxypeptidase IA activity and that the enzyme activity, in vivo, protects E. coli cells from killing by low inhibitory concentrations of beta-lactam antibiotics. PMID:6995448

  12. Biocatalytic Formation of Gold Nanoparticles Decorated with Functional Proteins inside Recombinant Escherichia coli Cells.

    PubMed

    Hosomomi, Yukiho; Niide, Teppei; Wakabayashi, Rie; Goto, Masahiro; Kamiya, Noriho

    2016-01-01

    A novel strategy for the preparation of protein-decorated gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) was developed inside Escherichia coli cells, where an artificial oxidoreductase, composed of antibody-binding protein (pG), Bacillus stearothermophilus glycerol dehydrogenase (BsGLD) and a peptide tag with gold-binding affinity (H6C), was overexpressed in the cytoplasm. In situ formation of Au NPs was promoted by a natural electron-donating cofactor, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD), which was regenerated to the reduced form of NADH by the catalytic activity of the fusion protein (pG-BsGLD-H6C) overexpressed in the cytoplasm of E. coli, with the concomitant addition of exogenous glycerol to the reaction system. The fusion protein was self-immobilized on Au NPs inside the E. coli cells, which was confirmed by SDS-PAGE and western blotting analyses of the resultant Au NPs. Finally, the IgG binding ability of the pG moiety displayed on Au NPs was evaluated by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. PMID:26960608

  13. A Peptidomimetic Antibiotic Targets Outer Membrane Proteins and Disrupts Selectively the Outer Membrane in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Urfer, Matthias; Bogdanovic, Jasmina; Lo Monte, Fabio; Moehle, Kerstin; Zerbe, Katja; Omasits, Ulrich; Ahrens, Christian H; Pessi, Gabriella; Eberl, Leo; Robinson, John A

    2016-01-22

    Increasing antibacterial resistance presents a major challenge in antibiotic discovery. One attractive target in Gram-negative bacteria is the unique asymmetric outer membrane (OM), which acts as a permeability barrier that protects the cell from external stresses, such as the presence of antibiotics. We describe a novel β-hairpin macrocyclic peptide JB-95 with potent antimicrobial activity against Escherichia coli. This peptide exhibits no cellular lytic activity, but electron microscopy and fluorescence studies reveal an ability to selectively disrupt the OM but not the inner membrane of E. coli. The selective targeting of the OM probably occurs through interactions of JB-95 with selected β-barrel OM proteins, including BamA and LptD as shown by photolabeling experiments. Membrane proteomic studies reveal rapid depletion of many β-barrel OM proteins from JB-95-treated E. coli, consistent with induction of a membrane stress response and/or direct inhibition of the Bam folding machine. The results suggest that lethal disruption of the OM by JB-95 occurs through a novel mechanism of action at key interaction sites within clusters of β-barrel proteins in the OM. These findings open new avenues for developing antibiotics that specifically target β-barrel proteins and the integrity of the Gram-negative OM.

  14. A Peptidomimetic Antibiotic Targets Outer Membrane Proteins and Disrupts Selectively the Outer Membrane in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Urfer, Matthias; Bogdanovic, Jasmina; Lo Monte, Fabio; Moehle, Kerstin; Zerbe, Katja; Omasits, Ulrich; Ahrens, Christian H; Pessi, Gabriella; Eberl, Leo; Robinson, John A

    2016-01-22

    Increasing antibacterial resistance presents a major challenge in antibiotic discovery. One attractive target in Gram-negative bacteria is the unique asymmetric outer membrane (OM), which acts as a permeability barrier that protects the cell from external stresses, such as the presence of antibiotics. We describe a novel β-hairpin macrocyclic peptide JB-95 with potent antimicrobial activity against Escherichia coli. This peptide exhibits no cellular lytic activity, but electron microscopy and fluorescence studies reveal an ability to selectively disrupt the OM but not the inner membrane of E. coli. The selective targeting of the OM probably occurs through interactions of JB-95 with selected β-barrel OM proteins, including BamA and LptD as shown by photolabeling experiments. Membrane proteomic studies reveal rapid depletion of many β-barrel OM proteins from JB-95-treated E. coli, consistent with induction of a membrane stress response and/or direct inhibition of the Bam folding machine. The results suggest that lethal disruption of the OM by JB-95 occurs through a novel mechanism of action at key interaction sites within clusters of β-barrel proteins in the OM. These findings open new avenues for developing antibiotics that specifically target β-barrel proteins and the integrity of the Gram-negative OM. PMID:26627837

  15. Distinguishing characteristics of hyperrecombinogenic RecA protein from Pseudomonas aeruginosa acting in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Baitin, Dmitry M; Bakhlanova, Irina V; Kil, Yury V; Cox, Michael M; Lanzov, Vladislav A

    2006-08-01

    In Escherichia coli, a relatively low frequency of recombination exchanges (FRE) is predetermined by the activity of RecA protein, as modulated by a complex regulatory program involving both autoregulation and other factors. The RecA protein of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (RecA(Pa)) exhibits a more robust recombinase activity than its E. coli counterpart (RecA(Ec)). Low-level expression of RecA(Pa) in E. coli cells results in hyperrecombination (an increase of FRE) even in the presence of RecA(Ec). This genetic effect is supported by the biochemical finding that the RecA(Pa) protein is more efficient in filament formation than RecA K72R, a mutant protein with RecA(Ec)-like DNA-binding ability. Expression of RecA(Pa) also partially suppresses the effects of recF, recO, and recR mutations. In concordance with the latter, RecA(Pa) filaments initiate recombination equally from both the 5' and 3' ends. Besides, these filaments exhibit more resistance to disassembly from the 5' ends that makes the ends potentially appropriate for initiation of strand exchange. These comparative genetic and biochemical characteristics reveal that multiple levels are used by bacteria for a programmed regulation of their recombination activities. PMID:16885449

  16. Diffusely Adhering Escherichia coli Strains Induce Attaching and Effacing Phenotypes and Secrete Homologs of Esp Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Beinke, Christina; Laarmann, Sven; Wachter, Clemens; Karch, Helge; Greune, Lilo; Schmidt, M. Alexander

    1998-01-01

    Recent epidemiological studies indicate that Escherichia coli strains which exhibit the diffuse-adherence phenotype (DAEC strains) represent a potential cause of diarrhea in infants. We investigated the interaction of DAEC strains isolated from diarrhea patients in Brazil and in Germany with epithelial cells in tissue culture. The investigated strains were identified as DAEC strains by (i) their attachment pattern, (ii) presence of genes associated with the Dr family of adhesins, and (iii) lack of genetic markers for other diarrhea-associated E. coli categories. Several clinical DAEC isolates were shown to secrete similar patterns of proteins into tissue culture medium. Protein secretion was found to be regulated by environmental parameters, namely, medium, temperature, pH, and iron concentration. DAEC strains secreting these proteins induced accumulation of actin and tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins at sites of bacterial attachment, leading to the formation of pedestals and/or extended surface structures. These changes were phenotypically similar to the attaching and effacing (A/E) lesions observed with enteropathogenic and some enterohemorrhagic E. coli strains carrying the locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE) pathogenicity island. Proteins homologous to the EspA, EspB, and EspD proteins, necessary for signal transduction events inducing A/E lesions, were identified by sequence analysis and cross-reaction of specific antibodies. However, initially nonadhering strains secreting these proteins induced signal transduction events only after prolonged infection. These results indicate that secretion of the Esp proteins alone is not sufficient for efficient signal transduction. This study further shows that some DAEC strains are likely to contain a homolog(s) of the LEE locus which may contribute to the pathogenic potential of DAEC. PMID:9453606

  17. The ybeY protein from Escherichia coli is a metalloprotein

    SciTech Connect

    Zhan, Chenyang; Fedorov, Elena V.; Shi, Wuxian; Ramagopal, U. A.; Thirumuruhan, R.; Manjasetty, Babu A.; Almo, Steve C.; Fiser, Andras; Chance, Mark R.; Fedorov, Alexander A.

    2005-11-01

    The ybeY protein from E. coli is reported at a 2.7 Å resolution with a metal ion. The three-dimensional crystallographic structure of the ybeY protein from Escherichia coli (SwissProt entry P77385) is reported at 2.7 Å resolution. YbeY is a hypothetical protein that belongs to the UPF0054 family. The structure reveals that the protein binds a metal ion in a tetrahedral geometry. Three coordination sites are provided by histidine residues, while the fourth might be a water molecule that is not seen in the diffraction map because of its relatively low resolution. X-ray fluorescence analysis of the purified protein suggests that the metal is a nickel ion. The structure of ybeY and its sequence similarity to a number of predicted metal-dependent hydrolases provides a functional assignment for this protein family. The figures and tables of this paper were prepared using semi-automated tools, termed the Autopublish server, developed by the New York Structural GenomiX Research Consortium, with the goal of facilitating the rapid publication of crystallographic structures that emanate from worldwide Structural Genomics efforts, including the NIH-funded Protein Structure Initiative.

  18. Interaction network containing conserved and essential protein complexes in Escherichia coli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butland, Gareth; Peregrín-Alvarez, José Manuel; Li, Joyce; Yang, Wehong; Yang, Xiaochun; Canadien, Veronica; Starostine, Andrei; Richards, Dawn; Beattie, Bryan; Krogan, Nevan; Davey, Michael; Parkinson, John; Greenblatt, Jack; Emili, Andrew

    2005-02-01

    Proteins often function as components of multi-subunit complexes. Despite its long history as a model organism, no large-scale analysis of protein complexes in Escherichia coli has yet been reported. To this end, we have targeted DNA cassettes into the E. coli chromosome to create carboxy-terminal, affinity-tagged alleles of 1,000 open reading frames (~ 23% of the genome). A total of 857 proteins, including 198 of the most highly conserved, soluble non-ribosomal proteins essential in at least one bacterial species, were tagged successfully, whereas 648 could be purified to homogeneity and their interacting protein partners identified by mass spectrometry. An interaction network of protein complexes involved in diverse biological processes was uncovered and validated by sequential rounds of tagging and purification. This network includes many new interactions as well as interactions predicted based solely on genomic inference or limited phenotypic data. This study provides insight into the function of previously uncharacterized bacterial proteins and the overall topology of a microbial interaction network, the core components of which are broadly conserved across Prokaryota.

  19. Electron crystallography of PhoE porin, an outer membrane, channel- forming protein from E. coli

    SciTech Connect

    Walian, P.J.

    1989-11-01

    One approach to studying the structure of membrane proteins is the use of electron crystallography. Dr. Bing Jap has crystallized PhoE pore-forming protein (porin) from the outer membrane of escherichia coli (E. coli) into monolayer crystals. The findings of this research and those of Jap (1988, 1989) have determined these crystals to be highly ordered, yielding structural information to a resolution of better than 2.8 angstroms. The task of this thesis has been to collect and process the electron diffraction patterns necessary to generate a complete three-dimensional set of high resolution structure factor amplitudes of PhoE porin. Fourier processing of these amplitudes when combined with the corresponding phase data is expected to yield the three-dimensional structure of PhoE porin at better than 3.5 angstroms resolution. 92 refs., 33 figs., 3 tabs. (CBS)

  20. Functional expression of miraculin, a taste-modifying protein in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Matsuyama, Tomomi; Satoh, Makiko; Nakata, Rieko; Aoyama, Takashi; Inoue, Hiroyasu

    2009-04-01

    Miraculin isolated from red berries of Richadella dulcifica, a native shrub of West Africa, has the unusual property of modifying a sour taste into a sweet one. This homodimer protein consists of two glycosylated polypeptides that are cross-linked by a disulfide bond. Recently, functional expression of miraculin was reported in host cells with the ability to glycosylate proteins, such as lettuce, tomato and the microbe Aspergillus oryzae, but not Escherichia coli. Thus, a question remains as to whether glycosylation of miraculin is essential for its taste-modifying properties. Here we show that recombinant miraculin expressed in E. coli has taste-modifying properties as a homodimer, not as a monomer, indicating that glycosylation is not essential for the taste-modifying property. PMID:19122203

  1. Bacteriocin release protein-mediated secretory expression of recombinant chalcone synthase in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Zakaria, Iffah Izzati; Rahman, Raja Noor Zaliha Raja Abdul; Salleh, Abu Bakar; Basri, Mahiran

    2011-09-01

    Flavonoids are secondary metabolites synthesized by plants shown to exhibit health benefits such as anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and anti-tumor effects. Thus, due to the importance of this compound, several enzymes involved in the flavonoid pathway have been cloned and characterized in Escherichia coli. However, the formation of inclusion bodies has become a major disadvantage of this approach. As an alternative, chalcone synthase from Physcomitrella patens was secreted into the medium using a bacteriocin release protein expression vector. Secretion of P. patens chalcone synthase into the culture media was achieved by co-expression with a psW1 plasmid encoding bacteriocin release protein in E. coli Tuner (DE3) plysS. The optimized conditions, which include the incubation of cells for 20 h with 40 ng/ml mitomycin C at OD(600) induction time of 0.5 was found to be the best condition for chalcone synthase secretion.

  2. Bacteriocin release protein-mediated secretory expression of recombinant chalcone synthase in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Zakaria, Iffah Izzati; Rahman, Raja Noor Zaliha Raja Abdul; Salleh, Abu Bakar; Basri, Mahiran

    2011-09-01

    Flavonoids are secondary metabolites synthesized by plants shown to exhibit health benefits such as anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and anti-tumor effects. Thus, due to the importance of this compound, several enzymes involved in the flavonoid pathway have been cloned and characterized in Escherichia coli. However, the formation of inclusion bodies has become a major disadvantage of this approach. As an alternative, chalcone synthase from Physcomitrella patens was secreted into the medium using a bacteriocin release protein expression vector. Secretion of P. patens chalcone synthase into the culture media was achieved by co-expression with a psW1 plasmid encoding bacteriocin release protein in E. coli Tuner (DE3) plysS. The optimized conditions, which include the incubation of cells for 20 h with 40 ng/ml mitomycin C at OD(600) induction time of 0.5 was found to be the best condition for chalcone synthase secretion. PMID:21633820

  3. Monitoring Dynamic Protein Expression in Single Living E. Coli. Bacterial Cells by Laser Tweezers Raman Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, J W; Winhold, H; Corzett, M H; Ulloa, J M; Cosman, M; Balhorn, R; Huser, T

    2007-01-09

    Laser tweezers Raman spectroscopy (LTRS) is a novel, nondestructive, and label-free method that can be used to quantitatively measure changes in cellular activity in single living cells. Here, we demonstrate its use to monitor changes in a population of E. coli cells that occur during overexpression of a protein, the extracellular domain of myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG(1-120)) Raman spectra were acquired of individual E. coli cells suspended in solution and trapped by a single tightly focused laser beam. Overexpression of MOG(1-120) in transformed E. coli Rosetta-Gami (DE3)pLysS cells was induced by addition of isopropyl thiogalactoside (IPTG). Changes in the peak intensities of the Raman spectra from a population of cells were monitored and analyzed over a total duration of three hours. Data was also collected for concentrated purified MOG(1-120) protein in solution, and the spectra compared with that obtained for the MOG(1-120) expressing cells. Raman spectra of individual, living E. coli cells exhibit signatures due to DNA and protein molecular vibrations. Characteristic Raman markers associated with protein vibrations, such as 1257 cm{sup -1}, 1340 cm{sup -1}, 1453 cm{sup -1} and 1660 cm{sup -1}, are shown to increase as a function of time following the addition of IPTG. Comparison of these spectra and the spectra of purified MOG protein indicates that the changes are predominantly due to the induction of MOG protein expression. Protein expression was found to occur mostly within the second hour, with a 470% increase relative to the protein expressed in the first hour. A 230% relative increase between the second and third hour indicates that protein expression begins to level off within the third hour. It is demonstrated that LTRS has sufficient sensitivity for real-time, nondestructive, and quantitative monitoring of biological processes, such as protein expression, in single living cells. Such capabilities, which are not currently available in

  4. Homologous sugar transport proteins in Escherichia coli and their relatives in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Henderson, P J; Maiden, M C

    1990-01-30

    Separate proteins for proton-linked transport of D-xylose, L-arabinose, D-galactose, L-rhamnose and L-fucose into Escherichia coli are being studied. By cloning and sequencing the appropriate genes, the amino acid sequences of proteins for D-xylose/H+ symport (XylE), L-arabinose/H+ symport (AraE), and part of the protein for D-galactose/H+ symport (GalP) have been determined. These are homologous, with at least 28% identical amino acid residues conserved in the aligned sequences, although their primary sequences are not similar to those of other E. coli transport proteins for lactose, melibiose, or D-glucose. However, they are equally homologous to the passive D-glucose transport proteins from yeast, rat brain, rat adipocytes, human erythrocytes, human liver, and a human hepatoma cell line. The substrate specificity of GalP from E. coli is similar to that of the mammalian glucose transporters. Furthermore, the activities of GalP, AraE and the mammalian glucose transporters are all inhibited by cytochalasin B and N-ethylmaleimide. Conserved residues in the aligned sequences of the bacterial and mammalian transporters are identified, and the possible roles of some in sugar binding, cation binding, cytochalasin binding, and reaction with N-ethylmaleimide are discussed. Each protein is independently predicted to form 12 hydrophobic, membrane-spanning alpha-helices with a central hydrophilic segment, also comprised of alpha-helix. This unifying structural model of the sugar transporters shares features with other ion-linked transport proteins for citrate or tetracycline.

  5. High-yield membrane protein expression from E. coli using an engineered outer membrane protein F fusion.

    PubMed

    Su, Pin-Chuan; Si, William; Baker, Deidre L; Berger, Bryan W

    2013-04-01

    Obtaining high yields of membrane proteins necessary to perform detailed structural study is difficult due to poor solubility and variability in yields from heterologous expression systems. To address this issue, an Escherichia coli-based membrane protein overexpression system utilizing an engineered bacterial outer membrane protein F (pOmpF) fusion has been developed. Full-length human receptor activity-modifying protein 1 (RAMP1) was expressed using pOmpF, solubilized in FC15 and purified to homogeneity. Using circular dichroism and fluorescence spectroscopy, purified full-length RAMP1 is composed of approximately 90% α-helix, and retains its solubility and structure in FC15 over a wide range of temperatures (20-60°C). Thus, our approach provides a useful, complementary approach to achieve high-yield, full-length membrane protein overexpression for biophysical studies.

  6. Folding and Purification of Insoluble (Inclusion Body) Proteins from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Wingfield, Paul T; Palmer, Ira; Liang, Shu-Mei

    2014-01-01

    Heterologous expression of recombinant proteins in E. coli often results in the formation of insoluble and inactive protein aggregates, commonly referred to as inclusion bodies. To obtain the native (i.e., correctly folded) and hence active form of the protein from such aggregates, four steps are usually followed: (1) the cells are lysed, (2) the cell wall and outer membrane components are removed, (3) the aggregates are solubilized (or extracted) with strong protein denaturants, and (4) the solubilized, denatured proteins are folded with concomitant oxidation of reduced cysteine residues into the correct disulfide bonds to obtain the native protein. This unit features three different approaches to the final step of protein folding and purification. In the first, guanidine·HCl is used as the denaturant, after which the solubilized protein is folded (before purification) in an "oxido-shuffling" buffer system to increase the rate of protein oxidation. In the second, acetic acid is used to solubilize the protein, which is then partially purified by gel filtration before folding; the protein is then folded and oxidized by simple dialysis against water. Thirdly, folding and purification of a fusion protein using metal-chelate affinity chromatography are described. PMID:25367010

  7. Escherichia coli Heat Shock Protein DnaK: Production and Consequences in Terms of Monitoring Cooking

    PubMed Central

    Seyer, Karine; Lessard, Martin; Piette, Gabriel; Lacroix, Monique; Saucier, Linda

    2003-01-01

    Through use of commercially available DnaK proteins and anti-DnaK monoclonal antibodies, a competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was developed to quantify this heat shock protein in Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 subjected to various heating regimens. For a given process lethality (F7010 of 1, 3, and 5 min), the intracellular concentration of DnaK in E. coli varied with the heating temperature (50 or 55°C). In fact, the highest DnaK concentrations were found after treatments at the lower temperature (50°C) applied for a longer time. Residual DnaK after heating was found to be necessary for cell recovery, and additional DnaK was produced during the recovery process. Overall, higher intracellular concentrations of DnaK tended to enhance cell resistance to a subsequent lethal stress. Indeed, E. coli cells that had undergone a sublethal heat shock (105 min at 55°C, F7010 = 3 min) accompanied by a 12-h recovery (containing 76,786 ± 25,230 molecules/cell) resisted better than exponentially growing cells (38,500 ± 6,056 molecules/cell) when later heated to 60°C for 50 min (F7010 = 5 min). Results reported here suggest that using stress protein to determine cell adaptation and survival, rather than cell counts alone, may lead to more efficient heat treatment. PMID:12788720

  8. Cloning and expression of a species-specific early immunogenic 36-kilodalton protein of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Strasser, M; Frey, J; Bestetti, G; Kobisch, M; Nicolet, J

    1991-01-01

    Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae, the etiologic agent of porcine enzootic pneumonia, synthesizes a 36-kDa protein which is an early and strong immunogenic factor in experimentally and naturally infected swine. The gene encoding this protein was cloned by screening a gene library of M. hyopneumoniae DNA with rabbit hyperimmune serum made against whole M. hyopneumoniae cells and convalescent-phase swine serum. Analysis of the recombinant protein expressed in Escherichia coli by immunoblot techniques showed that the protein is expressed in E. coli in its full length and does not cross-react with proteins from M. flocculare or M. hyorhinis. Genetic analysis showed that the gene was expressed from the lac promoter of the vector and seems to be translationally initiated from its own ribosome binding site. Subcloning in a transcriptional fusion vector to optimize expression resulted in production of the 36-kDa protein in E. coli at levels up to 30% of total protein. Images PMID:2004806

  9. Codon influence on protein expression in E. coli correlates with mRNA levels

    PubMed Central

    Boël, Grégory; Wong, Kam-Ho; Su, Min; Luff, Jon; Valecha, Mayank; Everett, John K.; Acton, Thomas B.; Xiao, Rong; Montelione, Gaetano T.; Aalberts, Daniel P.; Hunt, John F.

    2016-01-01

    Degeneracy in the genetic code, which enables a single protein to be encoded by a multitude of synonymous gene sequences, has an important role in regulating protein expression, but substantial uncertainty exists concerning the details of this phenomenon. Here we analyze the sequence features influencing protein expression levels in 6,348 experiments using bacteriophage T7 polymerase to synthesize messenger RNA in Escherichia coli. Logistic regression yields a new codon-influence metric that correlates only weakly with genomic codon-usage frequency, but strongly with global physiological protein concentrations and also mRNA concentrations and lifetimes in vivo. Overall, the codon content influences protein expression more strongly than mRNA-folding parameters, although the latter dominate in the initial ~16 codons. Genes redesigned based on our analyses are transcribed with unaltered efficiency but translated with higher efficiency in vitro. The less efficiently translated native sequences show greatly reduced mRNA levels in vivo. Our results suggest that codon content modulates a kinetic competition between protein elongation and mRNA degradation that is a central feature of the physiology and also possibly the regulation of translation in E. coli. PMID:26760206

  10. Using Spinach aptamer to correlate mRNA and protein levels in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Pothoulakis, Georgios; Ellis, Tom

    2015-01-01

    In vivo gene expression measurements have traditionally relied on fluorescent proteins such as green fluorescent protein (GFP) with the help of high-sensitivity equipment such as flow cytometers. However, fluorescent proteins report only on the protein level inside the cell without giving direct information about messenger RNA (mRNA) production. In 2011, an aptamer termed Spinach was presented that acts as an RNA mimic of GFP when produced in Escherichia coli and mammalian cells. It was later shown that coexpression of a red fluorescent protein (mRFP1) and the Spinach aptamer, when included into the same gene expression cassette, could be utilized for parallel in vivo measurements of mRNA and protein production. As accurate characterization of component biological parts is becoming increasingly important for fields such as synthetic biology, Spinach in combination with mRFP1 provide a great tool for the characterization of promoters and ribosome binding sites. In this chapter, we discuss how live-cell imaging and flow cytometry can be used to detect and measure fluorescence produced in E. coli cells by different constructs that contain the Spinach aptamer and the mRFP1 gene.

  11. Redesigned purification yields a fully functional PutA protein dimer from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Brown, E D; Wood, J M

    1992-06-25

    Proline utilization by Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium requires expression of genes putP (encoding a proline transporter) and putA. Genetic data indicate that the PutA protein is both put repressor and a respiratory chain-linked dehydrogenase. We report a redesigned purification procedure as well as the physical characteristics and biological activities of the PutA protein purified from E. coli. The purified protein was homogeneous as determined by electrophoresis performed under denaturing and nondenaturing conditions. Its N-terminal sequence corresponded to that predicted by the DNA sequence. We showed copurification of proline and delta 1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate dehydrogenase activities. Purified PutA protein bound put DNA in vitro in an electrophoretic band-shift assay and it could be reconstituted to inverted membrane vesicles, yielding proline dehydrogenase activity. The Stokes radius and Svedberg coefficient of the protein were determined to be 7.1 nm and 9.9 S, respectively. These hydrodynamic data revealed that the protein in our preparation was dimeric with a molecular mass of 293 kDa and that it had an irregular shape indicated by the friction factor (f/f0) of 1.6.

  12. Co-expression of RNA–protein complexes in Escherichia coli and applications to RNA biology

    PubMed Central

    Ponchon, Luc; Catala, Marjorie; Seijo, Bili; El Khouri, Marguerite; Dardel, Frédéric; Nonin-Lecomte, Sylvie; Tisné, Carine

    2013-01-01

    RNA has emerged as a major player in many cellular processes. Understanding these processes at the molecular level requires homogeneous RNA samples for structural, biochemical and pharmacological studies. We previously devised a generic approach that allows efficient in vivo expression of recombinant RNA in Escherichia coli. In this work, we have extended this method to RNA/protein co-expression. We have engineered several plasmids that allow overexpression of RNA–protein complexes in E. coli. We have investigated the potential of these tools in many applications, including the production of nuclease-sensitive RNAs encapsulated in viral protein pseudo-particles, the co-production of non-coding RNAs with chaperone proteins, the incorporation of a post-transcriptional RNA modification by co-production with the appropriate modifying enzyme and finally the production and purification of an RNA–His-tagged protein complex by nickel affinity chromatography. We show that this last application easily provides pure material for crystallographic studies. The new tools we report will pave the way to large-scale structural and molecular investigations of RNA function and interactions with proteins. PMID:23804766

  13. Chemokines derived from soluble fusion proteins expressed in Escherichia coli are biologically active

    SciTech Connect

    Magistrelli, Giovanni; Gueneau, Franck; Muslmani, Machadiya; Ravn, Ulla; Kosco-Vilbois, Marie; Fischer, Nicolas . E-mail: nfischer@novimmune.com

    2005-08-26

    Chemokines are a class of low molecular weight proteins that are involved in leukocytes trafficking. Due to their involvement in recruiting immune cells to sites of inflammation, chemokines, and chemokine receptors have become an attractive class of therapeutic targets. However, when expressed in Escherichia coli chemokines are poorly soluble and accumulate in inclusion bodies. Several purification methods have been described but involve time-consuming refolding, buffer exchange, and purification steps that complicate expression of these proteins. Here, we describe a simple and reliable method to express chemokines as fusions to the protein NusA. The fusion proteins were largely found in the soluble fraction and could be readily purified in a single step. Proteolytic cleavage was used to obtain soluble recombinant chemokines that were found to be very active in a novel in vitro chemotaxis assays. This method could be applied to several {alpha} and {beta} human chemokines, suggesting that it is generally applicable to this class of proteins.

  14. Production of soluble mammalian proteins in Escherichia coli: identification of protein features that correlate with successful expression

    PubMed Central

    Dyson, Michael R; Shadbolt, S Paul; Vincent, Karen J; Perera, Rajika L; McCafferty, John

    2004-01-01

    Background In the search for generic expression strategies for mammalian protein families several bacterial expression vectors were examined for their ability to promote high yields of soluble protein. Proteins studied included cell surface receptors (Ephrins and Eph receptors, CD44), kinases (EGFR-cytoplasmic domain, CDK2 and 4), proteases (MMP1, CASP2), signal transduction proteins (GRB2, RAF1, HRAS) and transcription factors (GATA2, Fli1, Trp53, Mdm2, JUN, FOS, MAD, MAX). Over 400 experiments were performed where expression of 30 full-length proteins and protein domains were evaluated with 6 different N-terminal and 8 C-terminal fusion partners. Expression of an additional set of 95 mammalian proteins was also performed to test the conclusions of this study. Results Several protein features correlated with soluble protein expression yield including molecular weight and the number of contiguous hydrophobic residues and low complexity regions. There was no relationship between successful expression and protein pI, grand average of hydropathicity (GRAVY), or sub-cellular location. Only small globular cytoplasmic proteins with an average molecular weight of 23 kDa did not require a solubility enhancing tag for high level soluble expression. Thioredoxin (Trx) and maltose binding protein (MBP) were the best N-terminal protein fusions to promote soluble expression, but MBP was most effective as a C-terminal fusion. 63 of 95 mammalian proteins expressed at soluble levels of greater than 1 mg/l as N-terminal H10-MBP fusions and those that failed possessed, on average, a higher molecular weight and greater number of contiguous hydrophobic amino acids and low complexity regions. Conclusions By analysis of the protein features identified here, this study will help predict which mammalian proteins and domains can be successfully expressed in E. coli as soluble product and also which are best targeted for a eukaryotic expression system. In some cases proteins may be truncated

  15. Lysyl-derived aldehydes in outer membrane proteins of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Diedrich, D L; Schnaitman, C A

    1978-01-01

    The major outer membrane proteins from Escherichia coli K-12 are modified to contain alpha-aminoadipic acid delta-semialdehyde (allysine). The allysine was found to be derived from lysine and it was identified by derivatizing it to chloronorleucine by reduction, alpha-aminoadipic acid by oxidation, and to alpha,epsilon-diaminopimelic acid by reacting it with CN- and NH3. The alpha-aminoadipic acid was identified by mass spectrometry. Two major outer membrane proteins were found to possess allysine, a modified lysine characteristically found to connective tissue. PMID:358196

  16. Isolation of Escherichia coli synthesized recombinant eukaryotic proteins that contain epsilon-N-acetyllysine.

    PubMed Central

    Violand, B. N.; Schlittler, M. R.; Lawson, C. Q.; Kane, J. F.; Siegel, N. R.; Smith, C. E.; Kolodziej, E. W.; Duffin, K. L.

    1994-01-01

    Recombinant porcine (rpST) and bovine somatotropins (rbST) synthesized in Escherichia coli contain the amino acid, epsilon-N-acetyllysine. This amino acid was initially discovered in place of the normal lysine144 in a modified reversed-phase HPLC (RP-HPLC) species of rpST. Mass spectrometry and amino acid sequencing of a tryptic peptide isolated from this RP-HPLC purified protein were used to identify this altered residue as epsilon-N-acetyllysine. Ion-exchange chromatography was utilized to prepare low isoelectric point (pI) forms of rpST and rbST, which are enriched in epsilon-N-acetyllysine. Electrospray mass spectrometry demonstrated that the majority of the protein in these low pI fractions contained species 42 Da larger than normal. Immobilized pH gradient electrophoresis (IPG) of the ion-exchange purified low pI proteins was used to isolate several monoacetylated species of rpST and rbST. The location of the acetylated lysine in each IPG-purified protein was determined by tryptic peptide mapping and amino acid sequencing of the altered tryptic peptides. Amino acid analyses of enzymatic digests of rpST and rbST were also used to confirm the presence of epsilon-N-acetyllysine in these recombinant proteins. These data demonstrate that a significant portion of rpST and rbST produced in E. coli contain this unusual amino acid. PMID:7920255

  17. Bicistronic expression plasmid for the rapid production of recombinant fused proteins in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Yero, Daniel; Pajón, Rolando; Niebla, Olivia; Sardiñas, Gretel; Vivar, Isbel; Perera, Yasser; García, Darien; Delgado, Maité; Cobas, Karem

    2006-04-01

    In the post-genomic era, every aspect of the production of proteins must be accelerated. In this way, several vectors are currently exploited for rapid production of recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli. N-terminal fusions to the first 47 amino acids of the LpdA (dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase A) protein of Neisseria meningitidis have been shown to increase the expression of recombinant proteins. Consequently, we have constructed a modified N-terminal LpdA fusion vector, introducing the blue/white colony selection by exploiting a bicistronic gene organization. In the new vector, the sequence encoding the first 47 amino acids of meningococcal LpdA and the alpha-peptide sequence of beta-galactosidase were connected via a ribosome-binding site, and two MCSs (multiple cloning sites) were located surrounding the latter, allowing efficient cloning by colour selection of recombinants. The vector was also improved with the addition of a C-terminal polyhistidine tag, and an EKS (enterokinase recognition sequence) immediately after the LpdA fusion sequence. The new plasmid was employed in the expression and purification of six different bacterial polypeptides. One of these recombinant proteins, P6 protein from Haemophilus influenzae, was used as a model and its N-terminal fusion sequence was totally removed from the recombinant version after incubation with the enterokinase protease, while the polyhistidine tail successfully allowed the purification of the unfused protein from the protease reaction. Two completely new neisserial vaccine candidates, NMB0088 and NMB1126 proteins, were cloned, expressed and purified using this system. To our knowledge, this constitutes the first report of the cloning and expression of these proteins in E. coli.

  18. Insights from the molecular characterization of mercury stress proteins identified by proteomics in E.coli nissle 1917.

    PubMed

    Seshapani, Panthangi; Rayalu, Daddam Jayasimha; Kumar, Vadde Kiran; Sekhar, Kathera Chandra; Kumari, Jasti Pramoda

    2013-01-01

    Differently expressed proteins in probiotic Escherichia coli nissle 1917 under mercury stress identified by using a proteomic approach. We applied to separate proteins by using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and proteins were identified using MALDI-TOF-MS using PMF, by mascot database search using the NCBI database. we identified six proteins after exposure to mercury stress with respect to different functional classes. It is useful to understand the molecular insights into mercury stress in probiotic E. coli. Next we describe a structure generated by homology modelling and functional domain identification; it is interesting to study the impact of stress on protein structures. MS characterization and computational methods together provide the opportunity to examine the impact of stress arising from mercury. The role of these proteins in metal tolerance and structure relation is discussed. To the best of our knowledge, proteomics of E. coli nissle 1917 overview of mercury stress has been reported for the first time. PMID:23847405

  19. Engineering versatile protein expression systems mediated by inteins in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Kwong, Keith W Y; Ng, Alan K L; Wong, W K R

    2016-01-01

    We have recently employed an intein, Saccharomyces cerevisiae vascular membrane ATPase (VMA), in conjunction with efficient expression and secretory functions formed between the ompA leader sequence and the human epidermal growth factor (EGF) gene (fused at the 5' end of VMA), and the human basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) gene (fused at the 3' end of VMA), to engineer an efficient intein-based Escherichia coli system for high-level co-expression of EGF and bFGF as authentic mature products. Both products were found not only excreted to the culture medium but also located, surprisingly, in the cytoplasm (Kwong and Wong 2013). In this study, we employed two structurally varied inteins, VMA and Mycobacterium xenopi GyraseA (GyrA), and further demonstrated that despite acting alone, both VMA and GyrA were able to mediate successful co-expression of two widely different proteins, EGF and an endoglucanase (Eng) in E. coli. Although EGF and Eng were initially expressed as large precursors/intermediates, they were soluble and auto-cleavable to finally yield the desired products in both the cytoplasm and culture media. The results further substantiate our postulation that the aforementioned intein/E. coli approach might lead to the development of cost-effective and versatile host systems, wherein all culture fractions are involved in producing the target proteins.

  20. Expression of rotavirus VP6 protein: a comparison amongst Escherichia coli, Pichia pastoris and Hansenula polymorpha.

    PubMed

    Bredell, Helba; Smith, Jacques J; Prins, Willem A; Görgens, Johann F; van Zyl, Willem H

    2016-03-01

    During this study. we successfully expressed a codon-optimized gene for rotavirus VP6 protein intracellularly in two methylotrophic yeasts, Pichia pastoris and Hansenula polymorpha, during methanol induction. Expressions were performed in shake flasks and subsequently scaled-up to 1.3 L bioreactors. The yields obtained in the yeasts were compared with that observed in Escherichia coli. Despite producing the lowest biomass levels of all the expression systems in shake flasks, the highest VP6 concentration was obtained with E. coli. In shake flasks, P. pastoris yielded higher volumetric levels of VP6 than H. polymorpha, but specific production of VP6 was approximately similar in both yeasts. In the controlled environment of bioreactors, yeast strains attained typical high cell densities, but also increased VP6 production compared to all shake flask cultures. Unlike in shake flask expressions, H. polymorpha outperformed both P. pastoris as well as E. coli during bioreactor cultivation. VP6 production was in all three expression systems growth-associated. In contrast to yeast expressions, bacterial expressed VP6 protein was found to be insoluble upon analysis. This is the first report of VP6 expressed in methylotrophic yeast and holds the promise for the inexpensive production of VP6 as a possible vaccine candidate or drug delivery mechanism.

  1. The RNA-Protein Complexes of E. coli Hfq: Form and Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Taewoo; Feig, Andrew L.

    E. coli Hfq is an RNA binding protein that has received significant attention due to its role in post-transcriptional gene regulation. Hfq facilitates the base-pairing between mRNAs and ncRNAs leading to translational activation, translational repression and/or degradation of mRNAs — the bacterial analog of the RNA interference pathway. Hfq is the bacterial homolog of the Sm and Lsm proteins and has a similar doughnut-shaped structure. This review summarizes what is known about the diverse physiological roles of Hfq and how its structure facilitates a diverse array of RNA—protein and protein—protein interactions. These interactions are put into context to explain the models of how Hfq is thought to help facilitate post-transcriptional gene regulation by non-coding RNAs in bacteria.

  2. Secondary structures of proteins from the 30S subunit of the Escherichia coli ribosome.

    PubMed

    Dzionara, M; Robinson, S M; Wittmann-Liebold, B

    1977-08-01

    The secondary structures of the proteins S4, S6, S8, S9, S12, S13, S15, S16, S18, S20 and S21 from the subunit of the E. coli ribosome were predicted according to four different methods. From the resultant diagrams indicating regions of helix, turn, extended structure and random coil, average values for the respective secondary structures could be calculated for each protein. Using the known relative distances for residues in the helical, turn and sheet or allowed random conformations, estimates are made of the maximum possible lengths of the proteins in order to correlate these with results obtained from antibody binding studies to the 30S subunit as determined by electron microscopy. The influence of amino acid changes on the predicted secondary structures of proteins from a few selected mutants was studied. The altered residues tend to be structurally conservative or to induce only minimal local changes.

  3. Altered Escherichia coli membrane protein assembly machinery allows proper membrane assembly of eukaryotic protein vitamin K epoxide reductase

    PubMed Central

    Hatahet, Feras; Blazyk, Jessica L.; Martineau, Eugenie; Mandela, Eric; Zhao, Yongxin; Campbell, Robert E.; Beckwith, Jonathan; Boyd, Dana

    2015-01-01

    Functional overexpression of polytopic membrane proteins, particularly when in a foreign host, is often a challenging task. Factors that negatively affect such processes are poorly understood. Using the mammalian membrane protein vitamin K epoxide reductase (VKORc1) as a reporter, we describe a genetic selection approach allowing the isolation of Escherichia coli mutants capable of functionally expressing this blood-coagulation enzyme. The isolated mutants map to components of membrane protein assembly and quality control proteins YidC and HslV. We show that changes in the VKORc1 sequence and in the YidC hydrophilic groove along with the inactivation of HslV promote VKORc1 activity and dramatically increase its expression level. We hypothesize that such changes correct for mismatches in the membrane topogenic signals between E. coli and eukaryotic cells guiding proper membrane integration. Furthermore, the obtained mutants allow the study of VKORc1 reaction mechanisms, inhibition by warfarin, and the high-throughput screening for potential anticoagulants. PMID:26598701

  4. Methyl coenzyme M reductase (mcrA) gene based phylogenetic analysis of methanogens population in Murrah buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis).

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Prem Prashant; Sirohi, Sunil Kumar; Singh, Dheer; Saxena, Jyoti

    2011-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to decipher the diversity of methanogens in rumen of Murrah buffaloes so that effective strategies can be made in order to mitigate methane emission from these methanogens. In the present study diversity of rumen methanogens in Murrah buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis) from North India was evaluated by using mcr-A gene library obtained from the pooled PCR product from four animals and by using MEGA4 software. A total of 104 clones were examined, revealing 26 different mcr-A gene sequences or phylotypes. Of the 26 phylotypes, 16 (64 of 104 clones) were less than 97% similar to any of the cultured strain of methanogens. Seven clone sequences were clustered with Methanomicrobium mobile and three clone sequences were clustered with Methanobrevibacter gottschalkii during the phylogenetic analysis. Uncultured group of methanogens comes out to be the major component of the methanogens community structure in Murrah buffaloes. Methanomicrobium phylotype comes out to be major phylotype among cultured methanogens followed by Methanobrevibacter phylotype. These results help in making effective strategies to check the growth of dominant communities in the rumen of this animal which in turn help in the reduction of methane emission in the environment and ultimately helps us in fighting with the problem of global warming.

  5. A 1 MDa protein complex containing critical components of the Escherichia coli divisome

    PubMed Central

    Trip, Erik N.; Scheffers, Dirk-Jan

    2015-01-01

    Cell division in bacteria is an essential process that is carried out at mid-cell by a group of cell division proteins referred to as the divisome. In Escherichia coli, over two dozen cell division proteins have been identified of which ten are essential. These division proteins localize sequentially and interdependently to the division site, after which constriction eventually produces two daughter cells. Various genetic and biochemical techniques have identified many interactions amongst cell division proteins, however the existence of the divisome as a large multi-protein complex has never been shown. Here, we identify a 1 MDa protein complex by native page that contains seven essential cell division proteins (FtsZ, ZipA, FtsK, FtsQ, FtsB, FtsL, and FtsN). The 1 MDa complex is present in rapidly dividing cells, but absent when cultures enter the stationary growth phase. Slight overexpression of the ftsQ D237N mutation that blocks cell division prevents formation of this 1 MDa complex. In cells depleted of FtsN, the 1 MDa complex is not assembled. Combined, our findings indicate that a large protein complex containing many different cell division proteins indeed exists. We note that this complex is very fragile and sensitive to the expression of tagged versions of FtsQ. PMID:26643979

  6. Pyrosequencing of mcrA and archaeal 16S rRNA genes reveals diversity and substrate preferences of methanogen communities in anaerobic digesters.

    PubMed

    Wilkins, David; Lu, Xiao-Ying; Shen, Zhiyong; Chen, Jiapeng; Lee, Patrick K H

    2015-01-01

    Methanogenic archaea play a key role in biogas-producing anaerobic digestion and yet remain poorly taxonomically characterized. This is in part due to the limitations of low-throughput Sanger sequencing of a single (16S rRNA) gene, which in the past may have undersampled methanogen diversity. In this study, archaeal communities from three sludge digesters in Hong Kong and one wastewater digester in China were examined using high-throughput pyrosequencing of the methyl coenzyme M reductase (mcrA) and 16S rRNA genes. Methanobacteriales, Methanomicrobiales, and Methanosarcinales were detected in each digester, indicating that both hydrogenotrophic and acetoclastic methanogenesis was occurring. Two sludge digesters had similar community structures, likely due to their similar design and feedstock. Taxonomic classification of the mcrA genes suggested that these digesters were dominated by acetoclastic methanogens, particularly Methanosarcinales, while the other digesters were dominated by hydrogenotrophic Methanomicrobiales. The proposed euryarchaeotal order Methanomassiliicoccales and the uncultured WSA2 group were detected with the 16S rRNA gene, and potential mcrA genes for these groups were identified. 16S rRNA gene sequencing also recovered several crenarchaeotal groups potentially involved in the initial anaerobic digestion processes. Overall, the two genes produced different taxonomic profiles for the digesters, while greater methanogen richness was detected using the mcrA gene, supporting the use of this functional gene as a complement to the 16S rRNA gene to better assess methanogen diversity. A significant positive correlation was detected between methane production and the abundance of mcrA transcripts in digesters treating sludge and wastewater samples, supporting the mcrA gene as a biomarker for methane yield.

  7. Synthesis of Mycoplasma arginine deiminase in E. coli using stress-responsive proteins.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Keum-Young; Lee, Boram; Han, Kyung-Yeon; Song, Jong-Am; Lee, Doo Sung; Lee, Jeewon

    2014-09-01

    We found Escherichia coli proteins, elongation factor Ts (Tsf), and malate dehydrogenase (Mdh) that can exist in the form of native and soluble proteins even under stress situation such as heat shock and protein denaturing condition. To examine their property as solubility enhancers, aggregation-prone Mycoplasma arginine deiminase (mADI), which has been suggested as anti-cancer agent, was fused to the C-terminal of each of them and cloned into pET28a to be expressed in the E. coli cytoplasm. When mADI was fused to fusion partners (Mdh, Tsf), a significant portion of the recombinant mADI was expressed in a soluble fraction (>90%) whereas the directly expressed mADI was aggregated to the inclusion body. In addition, recombinant mADI released from the fusion tag retained its soluble form and presented its specific enzymatic activity of converting l-arginine into citrulline (>10 U/mg). These results show that Tsf and Mdh could serve as effective solubility enhancers for aggregation-prone proteins (e.g. mADI in this case) when used as fusion expression partners in bacterial expression systems. PMID:25039059

  8. Synthesis of Mycoplasma arginine deiminase in E. coli using stress-responsive proteins.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Keum-Young; Lee, Boram; Han, Kyung-Yeon; Song, Jong-Am; Lee, Doo Sung; Lee, Jeewon

    2014-09-01

    We found Escherichia coli proteins, elongation factor Ts (Tsf), and malate dehydrogenase (Mdh) that can exist in the form of native and soluble proteins even under stress situation such as heat shock and protein denaturing condition. To examine their property as solubility enhancers, aggregation-prone Mycoplasma arginine deiminase (mADI), which has been suggested as anti-cancer agent, was fused to the C-terminal of each of them and cloned into pET28a to be expressed in the E. coli cytoplasm. When mADI was fused to fusion partners (Mdh, Tsf), a significant portion of the recombinant mADI was expressed in a soluble fraction (>90%) whereas the directly expressed mADI was aggregated to the inclusion body. In addition, recombinant mADI released from the fusion tag retained its soluble form and presented its specific enzymatic activity of converting l-arginine into citrulline (>10 U/mg). These results show that Tsf and Mdh could serve as effective solubility enhancers for aggregation-prone proteins (e.g. mADI in this case) when used as fusion expression partners in bacterial expression systems.

  9. Expression of the superantigen Mycoplasma arthritidis mitogen in Escherichia coli and characterization of the recombinant protein.

    PubMed Central

    Knudtson, K L; Manohar, M; Joyner, D E; Ahmed, E A; Cole, B C

    1997-01-01

    Mycoplasma arthritidis mitogen (MAM), is a soluble protein with classical superantigenic properties and is produced by an organism that causes an acute and chronic proliferative arthritis. Unfortunately, the process of obtaining purified MAM from M. arthritidis culture supernatants is extremely time-consuming and costly, and very little material is recovered. Thus, our laboratory has expressed MAM in Escherichia coli by using a protein fusion expression system. The construction and expression of recombinant MAM (rMAM), as well as a comparison of the biological properties of rMAM to those of native MAM, are discussed. Briefly, conversion of the three UGA codons to UGG codons was required to obtain full-length expression and mitogenic activity of rMAM. Antisera to native MAM recognized both rMAM and the fusion protein. The T-cell receptor Vbeta and major histocompatibility complex class II receptor usages by rMAM and the fusion protein were identical to that of native MAM. In addition, the ability to induce suppression and form the superantigen bridge could also be demonstrated with rMAM. Importantly, dose-response experiments indicated that homogeneous native MAM and rMAM were of equal potency. Thus, MAM has been successfully expressed in E. coli, thereby creating a viable alternative to native MAM. PMID:9393783

  10. Transcriptional effects of polyamines on ribosomal proteins and on polyamine-synthesizing enzymes in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Huang, S C; Panagiotidis, C A; Canellakis, E S

    1990-05-01

    We find that the transcription of various ribosomal proteins can be differentially affected by polyamines and by changes in growth rates. Using strain MG1655 of Escherichia coli K-12 (F-, lambda-), we have determined the effects of polyamines and changes in growth rate on the transcription of several ribosomal genes and the polyamine-synthesizing enzymes ornithine decarboxylase (L-ornithine carboxy-lyase; EC 4.1.1.17) and arginine decarboxylase (L-arginine carboxylyase; EC 4.1.1.19). Ribosomal proteins S20 and L34 can be differentiated from the other ribosomal proteins studied; the transcription of S20 and L34 is especially sensitive to polyamines and less sensitive to changes in growth rates. In contrast, the transcription of S10, S15, S19, L2, L4, L20, L22, and L23 is insensitive to polyamines although it is particularly sensitive to changes in growth rates. Like S20 and L34, the transcription of ornithine decarboxylase and arginine decarboxylase is especially sensitive to polyamines. Polyamines specifically enhance the transcription of ribosomal proteins S20 and L34, and decrease that of ornithine decarboxylase and arginine decarboxylase. It is evident that polyamines can exert both positive and negative regulation of gene expression in E. coli that can be differentiated from the effects caused by changes in growth rates.

  11. Removal of N-terminal methionine from recombinant proteins by engineered E. coli methionine aminopeptidase

    PubMed Central

    Liao, You-Di; Jeng, Jen-Chong; Wang, Chiu-Feng; Wang, Sui-Chi; Chang, Shu-Ting

    2004-01-01

    The removal of N-terminal translation initiator Met by methionine aminopeptidase (MetAP) is often crucial for the function and stability of proteins. On the basis of crystal structure and sequence alignment of MetAPs, we have engineered Escherichia coli MetAP by the mutation of three residues, Y168G, M206T, Q233G, in the substrate-binding pocket. Our engineered MetAPs are able to remove the Met from bulky or acidic penultimate residues, such as Met, His, Asp, Asn, Glu, Gln, Leu, Ile, Tyr, and Trp, as well as from small residues. The penultimate residue, the second residue after Met, was further removed if the antepenultimate residue, the third residue after Met, was small. By the coexpression of engineered MetAP in E. coli through the same or a separate vector, we have successfully produced recombinant proteins possessing an innate N terminus, such as onconase, an antitumor ribonuclease from the frog Rana pipiens. The N-terminal pyroglutamate of recombinant onconase is critical for its structural integrity, catalytic activity, and cyto-toxicity. On the basis of N-terminal sequence information in the protein database, 85%–90% of recombinant proteins should be produced in authentic form by our engineered MetAPs. PMID:15215523

  12. Expression of Cardamom mosaic virus coat protein in Escherichia coli and its assembly into filamentous aggregates.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Thomas; Usha, R

    2002-06-01

    Cardamom mosaic virus (CdMV), a member of the genus Macluravirus of Potyviridae, causes a mosaic disease in cardamom. A polyclonal antiserum was raised against the purified virus and IgG was prepared. Electron microscopic studies on the purified virus showed flexuous filamentous particles of approximately 800 nm in length, typical of members of Potyviridae. The coat protein (CP) encoding sequence of the virus was expressed in Escherichia coli and the protein purified by affinity chromatography under denaturing conditions. The viral nature of the expressed CP was confirmed by positive reaction with anti CdMV IgG in a Western blot. The expressed CP aggregated irreversibly upon renaturation at concentrations above 0.07 mg/ml. The expression of the CP led to the formation of filamentous aggregates in E. coli as observed by immuno-gold electron microscopy. The filamentous aggregates were of 100-150 nm in length. Immuno-capture RT-PCR confirmed the absence of coat protein mRNA in the filamentous aggregates. Deletion mutations, which were expected to inhibit virus assembly, were introduced in the core region of the coat protein. However, these mutations did not improve the solubility of the CP in non-denaturing buffers.

  13. Effect of Antimicrobial Agents on MinD Protein Oscillations in E. coli Bacterial Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, Corey; Giuliani, Maximiliano; Dutcher, John

    2012-02-01

    The pole-to-pole oscillation of MinD proteins in E. coli cells determines the location of the division septum, and is integral to healthy cell division. It has been shown previously that the MinD oscillation period is approximately 40 s for healthy cells [1] but is strongly dependant on environmental factors such as temperature, which may place stress on the cell [2,3]. We use a strain of E. coli in which the MinD proteins are tagged with green fluorescent protein (GFP), allowing fluorescence visualization of the MinD oscillation. We use high-resolution total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy and a custom, temperature controlled flow cell to observe the effect of exposure to antimicrobial agents on the MinD oscillation period and, more generally, to analyze the time variation of the spatial distribution of the MinD proteins within the cells. These measurements provide insight into the mechanism of antimicrobial action. [1] Raskin, D.M.; de Boer, P. (1999) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. 96: 4971-4976. [2] Touhami, A.; Jericho, M; Rutenberg, A. (2006) J. Bacteriol. 188: 7661-7667. [3] Downing, B.; Rutenberg, A.; Touhami, A.; Jericho, M. (2009) PLoS ONE 4: e7285.

  14. [Hepatitis E virus capsid protein production by high cell density culture of recombinant Escherichia coli].

    PubMed

    Liu, Ru-Shi; He, Zhi-Qiang; Li, Shao-Wei; Yang, Kun-Yu; Xian, Yang-Ling; Pang, Shu-Qiang; Zhang, Jun; Li, Yi-Min; Xia, Ning-Shao

    2004-05-01

    Production of Hepatitis E Virus capsid protein by high cell density culture in recombinant E. coli has been studied in 10L and 30L fermentors. The effects of different factors on growth and producing recombinant protein of E. coli have been studied by batch culture, such as different media, the ratio of phosphate and Magnesium sulfate. Comparison of fermentation performance for recombinant E. coli in different fed-methods culture has been investigated by fed-batch culture. The effects of inducing at different stages of growth and time of inducing on growth and producing recombinant protein, also obtained by fed-batch culture. At last, the solubility of inclusion body in different urea concentrations also has been obtained by fed-batch culture. The results show that the concentration of phosphate and Magnesium sulfate in the optimal media is 80mmol/L and 20mmol/L in batch culture respectively, that induction with 1.0mmol/L IPTG at mid log phase (about 45 OD at 600nm) is suitable for growth and recombinant protein expression, the cells were approaching stationary growth phase and the maximum cell OD at 600nm of 80 was achieved in 5h of fed-batch culture, and the expression level is 29.74%. The results also indicate that the solubility of inclusion body in 4mol/L urea solution induced at 37 degrees C reaches 14mg/mL, over 80% inclusion body was resolved. The culture process achieved in 10L fermentor could be successfully scaled up to 30L fenmentor with good reproducibility. PMID:15971623

  15. Feedback regulation of ribosomal protein gene expression in Escherichia coli: structural homology of ribosomal RNA and ribosomal protein MRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Nomura, M; Yates, J L; Dean, D; Post, L E

    1980-01-01

    Certain ribosomal proteins (r proteins) in Escherichia coli, such as S4 and S7, function as feedback repressors in the regulation of r-protein synthesis. These proteins inhibit the translation of their own mRNA. The repressor r proteins so far identified are also known to bind specifically to rRNA at an initial stage in ribosome assembly. We have found structural homology between the S7 binding region on 16S rRNA and a region of the mRNA where S7 acts as a translational repressor. Similarly, there is structural homology between one of the reported S4 binding regions on 16S rRNA and the mRNA target site for S4. The observed homology supports the concept that regulation by repressor r proteins is based on competition between rRNA and mRNA for these proteins and that the same structural features and of the r proteins are used in their interactions with both rRNA and mRNA. PMID:7012833

  16. Feedback regulation of ribosomal protein gene expression in Escherichia coli: structural homology of ribosomal RNA and ribosomal protein MRNA.

    PubMed

    Nomura, M; Yates, J L; Dean, D; Post, L E

    1980-12-01

    Certain ribosomal proteins (r proteins) in Escherichia coli, such as S4 and S7, function as feedback repressors in the regulation of r-protein synthesis. These proteins inhibit the translation of their own mRNA. The repressor r proteins so far identified are also known to bind specifically to rRNA at an initial stage in ribosome assembly. We have found structural homology between the S7 binding region on 16S rRNA and a region of the mRNA where S7 acts as a translational repressor. Similarly, there is structural homology between one of the reported S4 binding regions on 16S rRNA and the mRNA target site for S4. The observed homology supports the concept that regulation by repressor r proteins is based on competition between rRNA and mRNA for these proteins and that the same structural features and of the r proteins are used in their interactions with both rRNA and mRNA.

  17. Growth of Escherichia coli K88 in piglet ileal mucus: protein expression as an indicator of type of metabolism.

    PubMed Central

    Blomberg, L; Gustafsson, L; Cohen, P S; Conway, P L; Blomberg, A

    1995-01-01

    The physiological and molecular responses of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli K88 strain Bd 1107/7508 during growth in piglet ileal mucus and lipids extracted from mucus were studied in terms of growth rate, protein expression, and rate of heat production. E. coli K88 multiplied at maximum speed in mucus and in lipids extracted from mucus. By two-dimensional gel electrophoresis of [35S]methionine-labelled cells, it was demonstrated that the synthesis of a subclass of 13 proteins was changed at least fourfold during exponential growth in mucus compared with growth in M9 minimal medium. Ten of these proteins were repressed, while three were induced, and one of the induced proteins was identified as heat shock protein GroEL. Furthermore, two-dimensional analysis of E. coli K88 cells grown on lipids extracted from mucus revealed a set of lipid utilization-associated proteins. None of these was induced fourfold during exponential growth in mucus. Microcalorimetric measurements (monitoring the rate of heat production) of E. coli K88 grown in mucus indicated metabolic shifts in the stationary phase, in which five of the lipid utilization-associated proteins were expressed at a higher level. An isogenic E. coli K88 fadAB mutant deficient in fatty acid degradation genes grew as well as the wild type on mucus and mucus lipids. The heat production rate curve of the mutant grown in mucus differed from that of the wild type only during the stationary phase. From these results it was concluded that protein expression is influenced when E. coli K88 is grown in piglet ileal mucus rather than in M9 minimal medium. Lipids extracted from ileal mucus can serve as a substrate for E. coli K88 but appear not to be utilized during exponential growth in mucus. Stationary-phase cells metabolize fatty acids; however, the functional purpose of this is unclear. PMID:7592456

  18. Chromatographic methods for the isolation of, and refolding of proteins from, Escherichia coli inclusion bodies.

    PubMed

    Gu, Zhenyu; Weidenhaupt, Marianne; Ivanova, Natalia; Pavlov, Michail; Xu, Bingze; Su, Zhi-Guo; Janson, Jan-Christer

    2002-06-01

    New methods for the chromatographic isolation of inclusion bodies directly from crude Escherichia coli homogenates and for the refolding of denatured protein are presented. The traditional method of differential centrifugation for the isolation of purified inclusion bodies is replaced by a single gel-filtration step. The principle is that the exclusion limit of the gel particles is chosen such that only the inclusion bodies are excluded, i.e., all other components of the crude homogenate penetrate the gel under the conditions selected. In the novel column refolding process, a decreasing gradient of denaturant (urea or Gu-HCl), combined with an increasing pH gradient, is introduced into a gel-filtration column packed with a gel medium that has an exclusion limit lower than the molecular mass of the protein to be refolded. A limited sample volume of the protein, dissolved in the highest denaturant concentration at the lowest pH of the selected gradient combination, is applied to the column. During the course of elution, the zone of denatured protein moves down the column at a speed approximately threefold higher than that of the denaturant. This means that the protein sample will gradually pass through areas of increasingly lower denaturant concentrations and higher pH, which promotes refolding into the native conformation. The shape and slope of the gradients, as well as the flow rate, will influence the refolding rate and can be adjusted for different protein samples. The principle is illustrated using a denatured recombinant scFv fusion protein obtained from E. coli inclusion bodies.

  19. Soluble cysteine-rich tick saliva proteins Salp15 and Iric-1 from E. coli

    PubMed Central

    Kolb, Philipp; Vorreiter, Jolanta; Habicht, Jüri; Bentrop, Detlef; Wallich, Reinhard; Nassal, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Ticks transmit numerous pathogens, including borreliae, which cause Lyme disease. Tick saliva contains a complex mix of anti-host defense factors, including the immunosuppressive cysteine-rich secretory glycoprotein Salp15 from Ixodes scapularis ticks and orthologs like Iric-1 from Ixodesricinus. All tick-borne microbes benefit from the immunosuppression at the tick bite site; in addition, borreliae exploit the binding of Salp15 to their outer surface protein C (OspC) for enhanced transmission. Hence, Salp15 proteins are attractive targets for anti-tick vaccines that also target borreliae. However, recombinant Salp proteins are not accessible in sufficient quantity for either vaccine manufacturing or for structural characterization. As an alternative to low-yield eukaryotic systems, we investigated cytoplasmic expression in Escherichia coli, even though this would not result in glycosylation. His-tagged Salp15 was efficiently expressed but insoluble. Among the various solubility-enhancing protein tags tested, DsbA was superior, yielding milligram amounts of soluble, monomeric Salp15 and Iric-1 fusions. Easily accessible mutants enabled epitope mapping of two monoclonal antibodies that, importantly, cross-react with glycosylated Salp15, and revealed interaction sites with OspC. Free Salp15 and Iric-1 from protease-cleavable fusions, despite limited solubility, allowed the recording of 1H–15N 2D NMR spectra, suggesting partial folding of the wild-type proteins but not of Cys-free variants. Fusion to the NMR-compatible GB1 domain sufficiently enhanced solubility to reveal first secondary structure elements in 13C/15N double-labeled Iric-1. Together, E. coli expression of appropriately fused Salp15 proteins may be highly valuable for the molecular characterization of the function and eventually the 3D structure of these medically relevant tick proteins. PMID:25628987

  20. Determining the N-terminal orientations of recombinant transmembrane proteins in the Escherichia coli plasma membrane

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chien-Hsien; Chou, Chia-Cheng; Hsu, Min-Feng; Wang, Andrew H.-J.

    2015-01-01

    In silico algorithms have been the common approach for transmembrane (TM) protein topology prediction. However, computational tools may produce questionable results and experimental validation has proven difficult. Although biochemical strategies are available to determine the C-terminal orientation of TM proteins, experimental strategies to determine the N-terminal orientation are still limited but needed because the N-terminal end is essential for membrane targeting. Here, we describe a new and easy method to effectively determine the N-terminal orientation of the target TM proteins in Escherichia coli plasma membrane environment. D94N, the mutant of bacteriorhodopsin from Haloarcula marismortui, can be a fusion partner to increase the production of the target TM proteins if their N-termini are in cytoplasm (Nin orientation). To create a suitable linker for orientating the target TM proteins with the periplasmic N-termini (Nout orientation) correctly, we designed a three-TM-helix linker fused at the C-terminus of D94N fusion partner (termed D94N-3TM) and found that D94N-3TM can specifically improve the production of the Nout target TM proteins. In conclusion, D94N and D94N-3TM fusion partners can be applied to determine the N-terminal end of the target TM proteins oriented either Nin or Nout by evaluating the net expression of the fusion proteins. PMID:26462555

  1. Substrate oscillations boost recombinant protein release from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Jazini, Mohammadhadi; Herwig, Christoph

    2014-05-01

    Intracellular production of recombinant proteins in prokaryotes necessitates subsequent disruption of cells for protein recovery. Since the cell disruption and subsequent purification steps largely contribute to the total production cost, scalable tools for protein release into the extracellular space is of utmost importance. Although there are several ways for enhancing protein release, changing culture conditions is rather a simple and scalable approach compared to, for example, molecular cell design. This contribution aimed at quantitatively studying process technological means to boost protein release of a periplasmatic recombinant protein (alkaline phosphatase) from E. coli. Quantitative analysis of protein in independent bioreactor runs could demonstrate that a defined oscillatory feeding profile was found to improve protein release, about 60 %, compared to the conventional constant feeding rate. The process technology included an oscillatory post-induction feed profile with the frequency of 4 min. The feed rate was oscillated triangularly between a maximum (1.3-fold of the maximum feed rate achieved at the end of the fed-batch phase) and a minimum (45 % of the maximum). The significant improvement indicates the potential to maximize the production rate, while this oscillatory feed profile can be easily scaled to industrial processes. Moreover, quantitative analysis of the primary metabolism revealed that the carbon dioxide yield can be used to identify the preferred feeding profile. This approach is therefore in line with the initiative of process analytical technology for science-based process understanding in process development and process control strategies.

  2. Differential secretion pathways of proteins fused to the Escherichia coli maltose binding protein (MBP) in Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Moua, Pachai S; Gonzalez, Alfonso; Oshiro, Kristin T; Tam, Vivian; Li, Zhiguo Harry; Chang, Jennifer; Leung, Wilson; Yon, Amy; Thor, Der; Venkatram, Sri; Franz, Andreas H; Risser, Douglas D; Lin-Cereghino, Joan; Lin-Cereghino, Geoff P

    2016-08-01

    The Escherichia coli maltose binding protein (MBP) is an N-terminal fusion partner that was shown to enhance the secretion of some heterologous proteins from the yeast Pichia pastoris, a popular host for recombinant protein expression. The amount of increase in secretion was dependent on the identity of the cargo protein, and the fusions were proteolyzed prior to secretion, limiting its use as a purification tag. In order to overcome these obstacles, we used the MBP as C-terminal partner for several cargo peptides. While the Cargo-MBP proteins were no longer proteolyzed in between these two moieties when the MBP was in this relative position, the secretion efficiency of several fusions was lower than when MBP was located at the opposite end of the cargo protein (MBP-Cargo). Furthermore, fluorescence analysis suggested that the MBP-EGFP and EGFP-MBP proteins followed different routes within the cell. The effect of several Pichia pastoris beta-galactosidase supersecretion (bgs) strains, mutants showing enhanced secretion of select reporters, was also investigated on both MBP-EGFP and EGFP-MBP. While the secretion efficiency, proteolysis and localization of the MBP-EGFP was influenced by the modified function of Bgs13, EGFP-MBP behavior was not affected in the bgs strain. Taken together, these results indicate that the location of the MBP in a fusion affects the pathway and trans-acting factors regulating secretion in P. pastoris.

  3. Increased production of low molecular weight recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Belagaje, R M; Reams, S G; Ly, S C; Prouty, W F

    1997-09-01

    A general method for obtaining high-level production of low molecular weight proteins in Escherichia coli is described. This method is based on the use of a novel Met-Xaa-protein construction which is formed by insertion of a single amino acid residue (preferably Arginine or Lysine) between the N-terminal methionine and the protein of interest. The utility of this method is illustrated by examples for achieving high-level production of human insulin-like growth factor-1, human proinsulin, and their analogs. Furthermore, highly produced insulin-like growth factor-1 derivatives and human proinsulin analogs are converted to their natural sequences by removal of dipeptides with cathepsin C.

  4. Periplasmic maltose-binding protein confers specificity on the outer membrane maltose pore of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Heuzenroeder, M W; Reeves, P

    1980-01-01

    ompB mutants of Escherichia coli K-12 are markedly deficient in porin in their outer membrane. This results in a decreased rate of uptake for many substrates: the maltose pore (lambda receptor) can in some circumstances, in the absence of the periplasmic maltose-binding protein, compensate for the consequent defects in permeability to lactose, mannitol, glycylglycyl-L-valine, and tri-L-ornithine. It is postulated that the maltose-binding protein associates with the maltose pore and confers on it the specificity for maltose, and that the absence of the maltose-binding protein leaves the pore open and results in enhanced transmembrane diffusion of molecules other than maltose. This paper presents evidence to support this hypothesis. PMID:6444941

  5. Regulation of adhE (Encoding Ethanol Oxidoreductase) by the Fis Protein in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Membrillo-Hernández, Jorge; Kwon, Ohsuk; De Wulf, Peter; Finkel, Steven E.; Lin, E. C. C.

    1999-01-01

    The adhE gene of Escherichia coli encodes a multifunctional ethanol oxidoreductase whose expression is 10-fold higher under anaerobic than aerobic conditions. Transcription of the gene is under the negative control of the Cra (catabolite repressor-activator) protein, whereas translation of the adhE mRNA requires processing by RNase III. In this report, we show that the expression of adhE also depends on the Fis (factor for inversion stimulation) protein. A strain bearing a fis::kan null allele failed to grow anaerobically on glucose solely because of inadequate adhE transcription. However, fis expression itself is not under redox control. Sequence inspection of the adhE promoter revealed three potential Fis binding sites. Electrophoretic mobility shift analysis, using purified Fis protein and adhE promoter DNA, showed three different complexes. PMID:10572146

  6. Protease La from Escherichia coli Hydrolyzes ATP and Proteins in a Linked Fashion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waxman, Lloyd; Goldberg, Alfred L.

    1982-08-01

    The energy requirement for protein breakdown in Escherichia coli results from an ATP requirement for the function of protease La, the product of the lon gene. This novel serine protease contains an ATPase activity that is essential for proteolysis. ATP and protein hydrolysis show the same Km for ATP (30-40 μ M) and are affected similarly by various inhibitors, activators, and ATP analogs. Vanadate inhibited ATP cleavage and caused a proportionate reduction in casein hydrolysis, and inhibitors of serine proteases reduced ATP cleavage. Thus, ATP and protein hydrolysis appear to be linked stoichiometrically. Furthermore, ATP hydrolysis is stimulated two- to threefold by polypeptides that are substrates for the protease (casein, glucagon) but not by nonhydrolyzed polypeptides (insulin, RNase). Unlike hemoglobin or native albumin, globin and denatured albumin stimulated ATP hydrolysis and were substrates for proteolysis. It is suggested that the stimulation of ATP hydrolysis by potential substrates triggers activation of the proteolytic function.

  7. Autonomous induction of recombinant proteins by minimally rewiring native quorum sensing regulon of E. coli.

    PubMed

    Tsao, Chen-Yu; Hooshangi, Sara; Wu, Hsuan-Chen; Valdes, James J; Bentley, William E

    2010-05-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) enables an individual bacterium's metabolic state to be communicated to and ultimately control the phenotype of an emerging population. Harnessing the hierarchical nature of this signal transduction process may enable the exploitation of individual cell characteristics to direct or "program" entire populations of cells. We re-engineered the native QS regulon so that individual cell signals (autoinducers) are used to guide high level expression of recombinant proteins in E. coli populations. Specifically, the autoinducer-2 (AI-2) QS signal initiates and guides the overexpression of green fluorescent protein (GFP), chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) and beta-galactosidase (LacZ). The new process requires no supervision or input (e.g., sampling for optical density measurement, inducer addition, or medium exchange) and represents a low-cost, high-yield platform for recombinant protein production. Moreover, rewiring a native signal transduction circuit exemplifies an emerging class of metabolic engineering approaches that target regulatory functions. PMID:20060924

  8. Co-expression of ferrochelatase allows for complete heme incorporation into recombinant proteins produced in E. coli

    PubMed Central

    Sudhamsu, Jawahar; Kabir, Mariam; Airola, Michael V.; Patel, Bhumit A.; Yeh, Syun-Ru; Rousseau, Dennis L.; Crane, Brian R.

    2010-01-01

    Over-expression of heme binding proteins in E. coli often results in sub-optimal heme incorporation and the amount of heme-bound protein produced usually varies with the protein of interest. Complete heme incorporation is important for biochemical characterization, spectroscopy, structural studies, and for the production of homogeneous commercial proteins with high activity. We have determined that recombinant proteins expressed in E. coli often contain less than a full complement of heme because they rather are partially incorporated with free-base porphyrin. Porphyrin-incorporated proteins have similar spectral characteristics as the desired heme-loaded targets, and thus are difficult to detect, even in purified samples. We present a straightforward and inexpensive solution to this problem that involves the co-expression of native ferrochelatase with the protein of interest. The method is shown to be effective for proteins that contain either Cys- or His- ligated hemes. PMID:20303407

  9. Comparative proteomic analysis of proteins expression changes in the mammary tissue of cows infected with Escherichia coli mastitis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xiao-wei; Huang, Dong-wei; Cheng, Guang-long; Zhao, Hui-ling

    2015-01-01

    Cows infected with Escherichia (E.) coli usually experience severe clinical symptoms, including damage to mammary tissues, reduced milk yield, and altered milk composition. In order to investigate the host response to E. coli infection and discover novel markers for mastitis treatment, mammary tissue samples were collected from healthy cows and bovines with naturally occurring severe E. coli mastitis. Changes of mammary tissue proteins were examined using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and label-free proteomic approaches. A total of 95 differentially expressed proteins were identified. Of these, 56 proteins were categorized according to molecular function, cellular component, and biological processes. The most frequent biological processes influenced by the proteins were response to stress, transport, and establishment of localization. Furthermore, a network analysis of the proteins with altered expression in mammary tissues demonstrated that these factors are predominantly involved with binding and structural molecule activities. Vimentin and α-enolase were central "functional hubs" in the network. Based on results from the present study, disease-induced alterations of protein expression in mammary glands and potential markers for the effective treatment of E. coli mastitis were identified. These data have also helped elucidate defense mechanisms that protect the mammary glands and promote the pathogenesis of E. coli mastitis. PMID:25549220

  10. Structure and function of the Escherichia coli Tol-Pal stator protein TolR.

    PubMed

    Wojdyla, Justyna A; Cutts, Erin; Kaminska, Renata; Papadakos, Grigorios; Hopper, Jonathan T S; Stansfeld, Phillip J; Staunton, David; Robinson, Carol V; Kleanthous, Colin

    2015-10-30

    TolR is a 15-kDa inner membrane protein subunit of the Tol-Pal complex in Gram-negative bacteria, and its function is poorly understood. Tol-Pal is recruited to cell division sites where it is involved in maintaining the integrity of the outer membrane. TolR is related to MotB, the peptidoglycan (PG)-binding stator protein from the flagellum, suggesting it might serve a similar role in Tol-Pal. The only structure thus far reported for TolR is of the periplasmic domain from Haemophilus influenzae in which N- and C-terminal residues had been deleted (TolR(62-133), Escherichia coli numbering). H. influenzae TolR(62-133) is a symmetrical dimer with a large deep cleft at the dimer interface. Here, we present the 1.7-Å crystal structure of the intact periplasmic domain of E. coli TolR (TolR(36-142)). E. coli TolR(36-142) is also dimeric, but the architecture of the dimer is radically different from that of TolR(62-133) due to the intertwining of its N and C termini. TolR monomers are rotated ∼180° relative to each other as a result of this strand swapping, obliterating the putative PG-binding groove seen in TolR(62-133). We found that removal of the strand-swapped regions (TolR(60-133)) exposes cryptic PG binding activity that is absent in the full-length domain. We conclude that to function as a stator in the Tol-Pal complex dimeric TolR must undergo large scale structural remodeling reminiscent of that proposed for MotB, where the N- and C-terminal sequences unfold in order for the protein to both reach and bind the PG layer ∼90 Å away from the inner membrane.

  11. Overcoming heterologous protein interdependency to optimize P450-mediated Taxol precursor synthesis in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Biggs, Bradley Walters; Lim, Chin Giaw; Sagliani, Kristen; Shankar, Smriti; Stephanopoulos, Gregory; Ajikumar, Parayil Kumaran

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in metabolic engineering have demonstrated the potential to exploit biological chemistry for the synthesis of complex molecules. Much of the progress to date has leveraged increasingly precise genetic tools to control the transcription and translation of enzymes for superior biosynthetic pathway performance. However, applying these approaches and principles to the synthesis of more complex natural products will require a new set of tools for enabling various classes of metabolic chemistries (i.e., cyclization, oxygenation, glycosylation, and halogenation) in vivo. Of these diverse chemistries, oxygenation is one of the most challenging and pivotal for the synthesis of complex natural products. Here, using Taxol as a model system, we use nature’s favored oxygenase, the cytochrome P450, to perform high-level oxygenation chemistry in Escherichia coli. An unexpected coupling of P450 expression and the expression of upstream pathway enzymes was discovered and identified as a key obstacle for functional oxidative chemistry. By optimizing P450 expression, reductase partner interactions, and N-terminal modifications, we achieved the highest reported titer of oxygenated taxanes (∼570 ± 45 mg/L) in E. coli. Altogether, this study establishes E. coli as a tractable host for P450 chemistry, highlights the potential magnitude of protein interdependency in the context of synthetic biology and metabolic engineering, and points to a promising future for the microbial synthesis of complex chemical entities. PMID:26951651

  12. Overcoming heterologous protein interdependency to optimize P450-mediated Taxol precursor synthesis in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Biggs, Bradley Walters; Lim, Chin Giaw; Sagliani, Kristen; Shankar, Smriti; Stephanopoulos, Gregory; De Mey, Marjan; Ajikumar, Parayil Kumaran

    2016-03-22

    Recent advances in metabolic engineering have demonstrated the potential to exploit biological chemistry for the synthesis of complex molecules. Much of the progress to date has leveraged increasingly precise genetic tools to control the transcription and translation of enzymes for superior biosynthetic pathway performance. However, applying these approaches and principles to the synthesis of more complex natural products will require a new set of tools for enabling various classes of metabolic chemistries (i.e., cyclization, oxygenation, glycosylation, and halogenation) in vivo. Of these diverse chemistries, oxygenation is one of the most challenging and pivotal for the synthesis of complex natural products. Here, using Taxol as a model system, we use nature's favored oxygenase, the cytochrome P450, to perform high-level oxygenation chemistry in Escherichia coli. An unexpected coupling of P450 expression and the expression of upstream pathway enzymes was discovered and identified as a key obstacle for functional oxidative chemistry. By optimizing P450 expression, reductase partner interactions, and N-terminal modifications, we achieved the highest reported titer of oxygenated taxanes (∼570 ± 45 mg/L) in E. coli. Altogether, this study establishes E. coli as a tractable host for P450 chemistry, highlights the potential magnitude of protein interdependency in the context of synthetic biology and metabolic engineering, and points to a promising future for the microbial synthesis of complex chemical entities. PMID:26951651

  13. Investigation on stability of transporter protein, glucuronide transporter from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Noriyuki

    2010-06-01

    The glucuronide transporter GusB, the product of the gusB gene from Escherichia coli, is responsible for detoxification of metabolites. In this study, we successfully expressed GusB homologously in E. coli and investigated its oligomeric state in n-dodecyl-beta-D: -maltoside (DDM) detergent solution. Evidence for a pentameric state with a Stokes radius of 57 +/- 2 A for the purified GusB protein in DDM solution was obtained by analytical size-exclusion HPLC. The elution peak corresponding to pentameric GusB is commonly seen in elution profiles in the different buffer systems examined over a wide pH range. Hence, it is likely that GusB resides in the membrane as a pentamer. Stability studies with different incubation periods with the typical lipids, such as dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine, and total E. coli phospholipids, as the representatives of both phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine, show some clues to two-dimensional crystallization of GusB with lipids. PMID:20490474

  14. Overproduction of MalK protein prevents expression of the Escherichia coli mal regulon.

    PubMed Central

    Reyes, M; Shuman, H A

    1988-01-01

    The mal regulon of Escherichia coli comprises a large family of genes whose function is the metabolism of linear maltooligosaccharides. Five gene products are required for the active accumulation of maltodextrins as large as maltoheptaose. Two cytoplasmic gene products are necessary and sufficient for the intracellular catabolism of these sugars. Two newly discovered enzymes have the capacity to metabolize these sugars but are not essential for their catabolism in wild-type cells. A single regulatory protein, MalT, positively regulates the expression of all of these genes in response to intracellular inducers, one of which has been identified as maltotriose. In the course of studying the mechanism of the transport system, we have placed the structural gene for one of the transport proteins, MalK, under the control of the Ptrc promoter to produce large amounts of this protein. We found that although high-level expression of MalK was not detrimental to E. coli, the increased amount of MalK decreased the basal-level expression of the mal regulon and prevented induction of the mal system even in the presence of external maltooligosaccharides. Constitutive mutants in which MalT does not depend on the presence of the internal inducer(s) were unaffected by the increased levels of the MalK protein. These results are consistent with the idea that MalK protein somehow interferes with the activity of the MalT protein. Different models for the regulatory function of MalK are discussed. Images PMID:3049541

  15. 2-step purification of the Ku DNA repair protein expressed in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    The Ku protein is involved in DNA double-strand break repair by non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ), which is crucial to the maintenance of genomic integrity in mammals. To study the role of Ku in NHEJ we developed a bicistronic E. coli expression system for the Ku70 and Ku80 subunits. Association of the Ku70 and Ku80 subunits buries a substantial amount of surface area (~9000Å2 [1]), which suggests that herterodimerization may be important for protein stability. N-terminally his6-tagged Ku80 was soluble in the presence, but not in the absence, of bicistronically expressed untagged Ku70. In a 2-step purification, metal chelating affinity chromatography was followed by step-gradient elution from heparin-agarose. Co-purification of equimolar amounts of his6-tagged Ku80 and untagged Ku70 was observed, which indicated heterodimerization. Recombinant Ku bound dsDNA, activated the catalytic subunit of the DNA-dependent kinase (DNA-PKcs) and functioned in NHEJ reactions in vitro. Our results demonstrate that while the heterodimeric interface of Ku is extensive it is nonetheless possible to produce biologically active Ku protein in E. coli. PMID:17110127

  16. Tunable recombinant protein expression in E. coli: enabler for continuous processing?

    PubMed

    Marschall, Lukas; Sagmeister, Patrick; Herwig, Christoph

    2016-07-01

    Tuning of transcription is a powerful process technological tool for efficient recombinant protein production in Escherichia coli. Many challenges such as product toxicity, formation of inclusion bodies, cell death, and metabolic burden are associated with non-suitable (too high or too low) levels of recombinant protein expression. Tunable expression systems allow adjusting the recombinant protein expression using process technological means. This enables to exploit the cell's metabolic capacities to a maximum. Within this article, we review genetic and process technological aspects of tunable expression systems in E. coli, providing a roadmap for the industrial exploitation of the reviewed technologies. We attempt to differentiate the term "expression tuning" from its inflationary use by providing a concise definition and highlight interesting fields of application for this versatile new technology. Dependent on the type of inducer (metabolizable or non-metabolizable), different process strategies are required in order to achieve tuning. To fully profit from the benefits of tunable systems, an independent control of growth rate and expression rate is indispensable. Being able to tackle problems such as long-term culture stability and constant product quality expression tuning is a promising enabler for continuous processing in biopharmaceutical production. PMID:27170324

  17. Structure of the Escherichia coli Phosphonate Binding Protein PhnD and Rationally Optimized Phosphonate Biosensors

    SciTech Connect

    Alicea, Ismael; Marvin, Jonathan S.; Miklos, Aleksandr E.; Ellington, Andrew D.; Looger, Loren L.; Schreiter, Eric R.

    2012-09-17

    The phnD gene of Escherichia coli encodes the periplasmic binding protein of the phosphonate (Pn) uptake and utilization pathway. We have crystallized and determined structures of E. coli PhnD (EcPhnD) in the absence of ligand and in complex with the environmentally abundant 2-aminoethylphosphonate (2AEP). Similar to other bacterial periplasmic binding proteins, 2AEP binds near the center of mass of EcPhnD in a cleft formed between two lobes. Comparison of the open, unliganded structure with the closed 2AEP-bound structure shows that the two lobes pivot around a hinge by {approx}70{sup o} between the two states. Extensive hydrogen bonding and electrostatic interactions stabilize 2AEP, which binds to EcPhnD with low nanomolar affinity. These structures provide insight into Pn uptake by bacteria and facilitated the rational design of high signal-to-noise Pn biosensors based on both coupled small-molecule dyes and autocatalytic fluorescent proteins.

  18. Repression of btuB gene transcription in Escherichia coli by the GadX protein

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background BtuB (B  twelve uptake) is an outer membrane protein of Escherichia coli, it serves as a receptor for cobalamines uptake or bactericidal toxin entry. A decrease in the production of the BtuB protein would cause E. coli to become resistant to colicins. The production of BtuB has been shown to be regulated at the post-transcriptional level. The secondary structure switch of 5' untranslated region of butB and the intracellular concentration of adenosylcobalamin (Ado-Cbl) would affect the translation efficiency and RNA stability of btuB. The transcriptional regulation of btuB expression is still unclear. Results To determine whether the btuB gene is also transcriptionally controlled by trans-acting factors, a genomic library was screened for clones that enable E. coli to grow in the presence of colicin E7, and a plasmid carrying gadX and gadY genes was isolated. The lacZ reporter gene assay revealed that these two genes decreased the btuB promoter activity by approximately 50%, and the production of the BtuB protein was reduced by approximately 90% in the presence of a plasmid carrying both gadX and gadY genes in E. coli as determined by Western blotting. Results of electrophoretic mobility assay and DNase I footprinting indicated that the GadX protein binds to the 5' untranslated region of the btuB gene. Since gadX and gadY genes are more highly expressed under acidic conditions, the transcriptional level of btuB in cells cultured in pH 7.4 or pH 5.5 medium was examined by quantitative real-time PCR to investigate the effect of GadX. The results showed the transcription of gadX with 1.4-fold increase but the level of btuB was reduced to 57%. Conclusions Through biological and biochemical analysis, we have demonstrated the GadX can directly interact with btuB promoter and affect the expression of btuB. In conclusion, this study provides the first evidence that the expression of btuB gene is transcriptionally repressed by the acid responsive genes gadX and

  19. Comparative expression study to increase the solubility of cold adapted Vibrio proteins in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Niiranen, Laila; Espelid, Sigrun; Karlsen, Christian R; Mustonen, Milla; Paulsen, Steinar M; Heikinheimo, Pirkko; Willassen, Nils P

    2007-03-01

    Functional and structural studies require gene overexpression and purification of soluble proteins. We wanted to express proteins from the psychrophilic bacterium Vibrio salmonicida in Escherichia coli, but encountered solubility problems. To improve the solubility of the proteins, we compared the effects of six N-terminal fusion proteins (Gb1, Z, thioredoxin, GST, MBP and NusA) and an N-terminal His6-tag. The selected test set included five proteins from the fish pathogen V. salmonicida and two related products from the mesophilic human pathogen Vibrio cholerae. We tested the expression in two different expression strains and at three different temperatures (16, 23 and 37 degrees C). His6-tag was the least effective tag, and these vector constructs were also difficult to transform. MBP and NusA performed best, expressing soluble proteins with all fusion partners in at least one of the cell types. In some cases MBP, GST and thioredoxin fusions resulted in products of incorrect size. The effect of temperature is complex: in most cases level of expression increased with temperature, whereas the effect on solubility was opposite. We found no clear connection between the preferred expression temperature of the protein and the temperature of the original host organism's natural habitat.

  20. The deoxyribonucleic acid unwinding protein of Escherichia coli. Properties and functions in replication.

    PubMed

    Weiner, J H; Bertsch, L L; Kornberg, A

    1975-03-25

    The DNA unwinding protein of Escherichia coli (Sigal, N., Delius, H., Kornberg, T., Gefter, M., and Alberts, B. (1972) Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 69, 3537-3541) has been purified to homogeneity by a simple procedure which utilizes its stability to heating. The protein is an asymmetric tetramer of 18,500 dalton subunits which binds preferentially to single-stranded DNA at a ratio of one protein molecule per 32 nucleotides. Binding to DNA is complete in less than 10 s at 0 degrees while release of the protein from single-stranded DNA is relatively slow even at 37 degrees. A simple functional assay for unwinding protein depends on its essential role in the conversion of phage G4 single-stranded DNA to the replicative form. Unwinding protein stimulates initiation of replication of all single-stranded phage DNAs. Approximately 300 copies of unwinding protein are present per cell, as estimated by antibody titration, an amount sufficient to cover substantial lengths of DNA in several replicating forks.

  1. Activity of maize transglutaminase overexpressed in Escherichia coli inclusion bodies: an alternative to protein refolding.

    PubMed

    Carvajal, Patricia; Gibert, Jordi; Campos, Nefertiti; Lopera, Oriol; Barberà, Eduard; Torné, Jose M; Santos, Mireya

    2011-01-01

    Transglutaminases (TGases) catalyze protein post-translational modification by ε-(γ-glutamyl) links and covalent polyamine conjugation. In plants, this enzyme is poorly characterized and only the maize plastidial TGase gene (tgz) has been cloned. The tgz gene (Patent WWO03102128) had been subcloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli cells, and the recombinant protein (TGZp) was present mainly in inclusion bodies (IB) fraction. In this work, after overexpression of TGZ15p and SDS-PAGE IB fraction analysis, bands about 65 and 56 kDa were obtained. Western blot, alkylation and MALDI-TOF/TOF analyses indicated that the 56 kDa band corresponded to a truncated sequence from the native TGZ15p (expected MW 65 kDa), by elimination of a chloroplast signal peptide fragment during expression processing. So that large-scale protein production and protein crystallization can be applied, we characterized the TGZ15p enzyme activity in the IB protein fraction, with and without refolding. Results indicate that it presented the biochemical characteristics of other described TGases, showing a certain plant-substrate preference. Solubilization of the IB fraction with Triton X-100 as nondenaturing detergent yielded active TGZ without the need for refolding, giving activity values comparable to those of the refolded protein, indicating that this is a valuable, faster way to obtain TGZ active protein.

  2. Independent mobility of proteins and lipids in the plasma membrane of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Nenninger, Anja; Mastroianni, Giulia; Robson, Alexander; Lenn, Tchern; Xue, Quan; Leake, Mark C; Mullineaux, Conrad W

    2014-06-01

    Fluidity is essential for many biological membrane functions. The basis for understanding membrane structure remains the classic Singer-Nicolson model, in which proteins are embedded within a fluid lipid bilayer and able to diffuse laterally within a sea of lipid. Here we report lipid and protein diffusion in the plasma membrane of live cells of the bacterium Escherichia coli, using Fluorescence Recovery after Photobleaching (FRAP) and Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy to measure lateral diffusion coefficients. Lipid and protein mobility within the membrane were probed by visualizing an artificial fluorescent lipid and a simple model membrane protein consisting of a single membrane-spanning alpha-helix with a Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) tag on the cytoplasmic side. The effective viscosity of the lipid bilayer is strongly temperature-dependent, as indicated by changes in the lipid diffusion coefficient. Surprisingly, the mobility of the model protein was unaffected by changes in the effective viscosity of the bulk lipid, and TIRF microscopy indicates that it clusters in segregated, mobile domains. We suggest that this segregation profoundly influences the physical behaviour of the protein in the membrane, with strong implications for bacterial membrane function and bacterial physiology.

  3. Engineering formation of multiple recombinant Eut protein nanocompartments in E. coli

    PubMed Central

    Held, Mark; Kolb, Alexander; Perdue, Sarah; Hsu, Szu-Yi; Bloch, Sarah E.; Quin, Maureen B.; Schmidt-Dannert, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Compartmentalization of designed metabolic pathways within protein based nanocompartments has the potential to increase reaction efficiency in multi-step biosynthetic reactions. We previously demonstrated proof-of-concept of this aim by targeting a functional enzyme to single cellular protein nanocompartments, which were formed upon recombinant expression of the Salmonella enterica LT2 ethanolamine utilization bacterial microcompartment shell proteins EutS or EutSMNLK in Escherichia coli. To optimize this system, increasing overall encapsulated enzyme reaction efficiency, factor(s) required for the production of more than one nanocompartment per cell must be identified. In this work we report that the cupin domain protein EutQ is required for assembly of more than one nanocompartment per cell. Overexpression of EutQ results in multiple nanocompartment assembly in our recombinant system. EutQ specifically interacts with the shell protein EutM in vitro via electrostatic interactions with the putative cytosolic face of EutM. These findings lead to the theory that EutQ could facilitate multiple nanocompartment biogenesis by serving as an assembly hub for shell proteins. This work offers insights into the biogenesis of Eut bacterial microcompartments, and also provides an improved platform for the production of protein based nanocompartments for targeted encapsulation of enzyme pathways. PMID:27063436

  4. The priA gene encoding the primosomal replicative n' protein of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, E H; Masai, H; Allen, G C; Kornberg, A

    1990-01-01

    The Escherichia coli gene encoding protein n' has been isolated and named priA for primosomal protein A. Protein n' is absolutely required for the conversion of single-stranded phi X174 DNA to the duplex replicative form in an in vitro-reconstituted system. The gene maps to 88.7 minutes on the chromosome adjacent to the cytR locus. Soluble protein extracts from cells harboring the priA gene on a multicopy plasmid contained 45-fold more n' replication activity than wild-type extracts. Enhanced overproduction of greater than 1000-fold was achieved by replacing the natural Shine-Dalgarno sequence with that of the phage T7 phi 10 gene and placing this priA under the control of the T7 phage promoter and RNA polymerase. The priA sequence reveals a 732-amino acid open reading frame and a nucleotide-binding consensus site consistent with the size and ATPase activity of the purified protein. The gene for protein n has been named priB and the putative gene for protein n", priC. Images PMID:2162050

  5. Refolding and purification of non-fusion HPT protein expressed in Escherichia coli as inclusion bodies.

    PubMed

    Zhuo, Qin; Piao, Jian-hua; Wang, Rui; Yang, Xiao-guang

    2005-05-01

    The gene encoding hygromycin B phosphotransferase (hpt) is a widely used selectable marker in the production of genetically engineered crops. To facilitate the safety assessment of this protein, the non-fusion hpt expression plasmid was constructed and introduced into Escherichia coli to produce enough quantity of the HPT protein. High level expressed HPT was achieved but most of the expressed protein aggregated as inclusion bodies. The inclusion bodies were washed, separated from the cells, and solubilized by 0.3% Sarkosyl. The protein was renatured by dilution and dialysis, and then purified by anion-exchange chromatography. The activity is 8 U/mg protein and the purity is about 95%. Further studies showed that the microbially produced HPT protein had comparable molecular weight, immuno-reactivities, N-terminal amino acid sequences, and biological activities with those of the HPT produced by transgenic rice harboring hpt gene. All these results demonstrated the validity of utilizing the microbially produced HPT to assess the safety of the HPT protein produced in genetically engineered rice.

  6. In vitro expression of Escherichia coli ribosomal protein genes: autogenous inhibition of translation.

    PubMed Central

    Yates, J L; Arfsten, A E; Nomura, M

    1980-01-01

    Escherichia coli ribosomal protein L1 (0.5 micro M) was found to inhibit the synthesis of both proteins of the L11 operon, L11 and L1, but not the synthesis of other proteins directed by lambda rifd 18 DNA. Similarly, S4 (1 micro M) selectively inhibited the synthesis of three proteins of the alpha operon, S13, S11, and S4, directed by lambda spcI DNA or a restriction enzyme fragment obtained from this DNA. S8 (3.6 micro M) also showed preferential inhibitory effects on the synthesis of some proteins encoded in the spc operon, L24 and L5 (and probably S14 and S8), directed by lambda spcl DNA or a restriction enzyme fragment carrying the genes for these proteins. The inhibitory effect of L1 was observed only with L1 and not with other proteins examined, including S4 and S8. Similarly, the effect of S4 was not observed with L1 or S8, and that of S8 was not seen with L1 or S4. Inhibition was shown to take place at the level of translation rather than transcription. Thus, at least some ribosomal proteins (L1 S4, and S8) have the ability to cause selective translational inhibition of the synthesis of certain ribosomal proteins whose genes are in the same operon as their own. These results support the hypothesis that certain free ribosomal proteins not assembled into ribosomes act as "autogenous" feedback inhibitors to regulate the synthesis of ribosomal proteins. Images PMID:6445562

  7. TiO2 Photocatalysis Damages Lipids and Proteins in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Hamon, Erwann; Ennahar, Saïd; Estner, Maxime; Lett, Marie-Claire; Horvatovich, Peter; Gies, Jean-Pierre; Keller, Valérie; Andre, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates the mechanisms of UV-A (315 to 400 nm) photocatalysis with titanium dioxide (TiO2) applied to the degradation of Escherichia coli and their effects on two key cellular components: lipids and proteins. The impact of TiO2 photocatalysis on E. coli survival was monitored by counting on agar plate and by assessing lipid peroxidation and performing proteomic analysis. We observed through malondialdehyde quantification that lipid peroxidation occurred during the photocatalytic process, and the addition of superoxide dismutase, which acts as a scavenger of the superoxide anion radical (O2·−), inhibited this effect by half, showing us that O2·− radicals participate in the photocatalytic antimicrobial effect. Qualitative analysis using two-dimensional electrophoresis allowed selection of proteins for which spot modifications were observed during the applied treatments. Two-dimensional electrophoresis highlighted that among the selected protein spots, 7 and 19 spots had already disappeared in the dark in the presence of 0.1 g/liter and 0.4 g/liter TiO2, respectively, which is accounted for by the cytotoxic effect of TiO2. Exposure to 30 min of UV-A radiation in the presence of 0.1 g/liter and 0.4 g/liter TiO2 increased the numbers of missing spots to 14 and 22, respectively. The proteins affected by photocatalytic oxidation were strongly heterogeneous in terms of location and functional category. We identified several porins, proteins implicated in stress response, in transport, and in bacterial metabolism. This study reveals the simultaneous effects of O2·− on lipid peroxidation and on the proteome during photocatalytic treatment and therefore contributes to a better understanding of molecular mechanisms in antibacterial photocatalytic treatment. PMID:24532071

  8. Association and regulation of casein kinase 2 activity by adenomatous polyposis coli protein

    PubMed Central

    Homma, Miwako Kato; Li, Dongxia; Krebs, Edwin G.; Yuasa, Yasuhito; Homma, Yoshimi

    2002-01-01

    Mutations in the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene are responsible for familial adenomatous polyposis coli and also sporadic colorectal cancer development. By using antibodies raised against the N-terminal region of APC protein, we have detected the variable masses of endogenous APC proteins in individual cell lines established from human colorectal carcinomas caused by nonsense mutations of the gene. Phosphorylation of immunoprecipitates of full-length and truncated APC were observed in in vitro kinase reaction, indicating association of APC with protein kinase activity. The kinase activity complexed with APC was sensitive to heparin and used GTP as phosphoryl donor, suggesting an involvement of casein kinase 2 (CK2). Both CK2α- and β-subunits were found to associate with APC in immunoprecipitates as well as in pull-down assays, with preferential interaction of APC with tetrameric CK2 holoenzyme. In synchronized cell populations, the association of APC with CK2 was cell cycle dependent, with the highest association in G2/M. Unexpectedly, APC immunoprecipitates containing full-length APC protein inhibited CK2 in vitro, whereas immunoprecipitates of truncated APC had little effect. This was confirmed by using recombinant APC, and the inhibitory region was localized to the C terminus of APC between residues 2086 and 2394. Overexpression of this fragment in SW480 cells suppressed cell proliferation rates as well as tumorigenesis. These results demonstrate a previously uncharacterized functional interaction between the tumor suppressor protein APC and CK2 and suggest that growth-inhibitory effects of APC may be regulated by inhibition of CK2. PMID:11972058

  9. Gut Commensal E. coli Proteins Activate Host Satiety Pathways following Nutrient-Induced Bacterial Growth.

    PubMed

    Breton, Jonathan; Tennoune, Naouel; Lucas, Nicolas; Francois, Marie; Legrand, Romain; Jacquemot, Justine; Goichon, Alexis; Guérin, Charlène; Peltier, Johann; Pestel-Caron, Martine; Chan, Philippe; Vaudry, David; do Rego, Jean-Claude; Liénard, Fabienne; Pénicaud, Luc; Fioramonti, Xavier; Ebenezer, Ivor S; Hökfelt, Tomas; Déchelotte, Pierre; Fetissov, Sergueï O

    2016-02-01

    The composition of gut microbiota has been associated with host metabolic phenotypes, but it is not known if gut bacteria may influence host appetite. Here we show that regular nutrient provision stabilizes exponential growth of E. coli, with the stationary phase occurring 20 min after nutrient supply accompanied by bacterial proteome changes, suggesting involvement of bacterial proteins in host satiety. Indeed, intestinal infusions of E. coli stationary phase proteins increased plasma PYY and their intraperitoneal injections suppressed acutely food intake and activated c-Fos in hypothalamic POMC neurons, while their repeated administrations reduced meal size. ClpB, a bacterial protein mimetic of α-MSH, was upregulated in the E. coli stationary phase, was detected in plasma proportional to ClpB DNA in feces, and stimulated firing rate of hypothalamic POMC neurons. Thus, these data show that bacterial proteins produced after nutrient-induced E. coli growth may signal meal termination. Furthermore, continuous exposure to E. coli proteins may influence long-term meal pattern. PMID:26621107

  10. The ybeY protein from Escherichia coli is a metalloprotein.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Chenyang; Fedorov, Elena V; Shi, Wuxian; Ramagopal, U A; Thirumuruhan, R; Manjasetty, Babu A; Almo, Steve C; Fiser, Andras; Chance, Mark R; Fedorov, Alexander A

    2005-11-01

    The three-dimensional crystallographic structure of the ybeY protein from Escherichia coli (SwissProt entry P77385) is reported at 2.7 A resolution. YbeY is a hypothetical protein that belongs to the UPF0054 family. The structure reveals that the protein binds a metal ion in a tetrahedral geometry. Three coordination sites are provided by histidine residues, while the fourth might be a water molecule that is not seen in the diffraction map because of its relatively low resolution. X-ray fluorescence analysis of the purified protein suggests that the metal is a nickel ion. The structure of ybeY and its sequence similarity to a number of predicted metal-dependent hydrolases provides a functional assignment for this protein family. The figures and tables of this paper were prepared using semi-automated tools, termed the Autopublish server, developed by the New York Structural GenomiX Research Consortium, with the goal of facilitating the rapid publication of crystallographic structures that emanate from worldwide Structural Genomics efforts, including the NIH-funded Protein Structure Initiative.

  11. Long polar fimbriae of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7 bind to extracellular matrix proteins.

    PubMed

    Farfan, Mauricio J; Cantero, Lidia; Vidal, Roberto; Botkin, Douglas J; Torres, Alfredo G

    2011-09-01

    Adherence to intestinal cells is a key process in infection caused by enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC). Several adhesion factors that mediate the binding of EHEC to intestinal cells have been described, but the receptors involved in their recognition are not fully characterized. Extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins might act as receptors involved in the recognition of enteric pathogens, including EHEC. In this study, we sought to characterize the binding of EHEC O157:H7 to ECM proteins commonly present in the intestine. We found that EHEC prototype strains as well as other clinical isolates adhered more abundantly to surfaces coated with fibronectin, laminin, and collagen IV. Further characterization of this phenotype, by using antiserum raised against the LpfA1 putative major fimbrial subunit and by addition of mannose, showed that a reduced binding of EHEC to ECM proteins was observed in a long polar fimbria (lpf) mutant. We also found that the two regulators, H-NS and Ler, had an effect in EHEC Lpf-mediated binding to ECM, supporting the roles of these tightly regulated fimbriae as adherence factors. Purified Lpf major subunit bound to all of the ECM proteins tested. Finally, increased bacterial adherence was observed when T84 cells, preincubated with ECM proteins, were infected with EHEC. Taken together, these findings suggest that the interaction of Lpf and ECM proteins contributes to the EHEC colonization of the gastrointestinal tract.

  12. Genetic selection system for improving recombinant membrane protein expression in E. coli

    PubMed Central

    Massey-Gendel, Elizabeth; Zhao, Anni; Boulting, Gabriella; Kim, Hye-Yeon; Balamotis, Michael A; Seligman, Len M; Nakamoto, Robert K; Bowie, James U

    2009-01-01

    A major barrier to the physical characterization and structure determination of membrane proteins is low yield in recombinant expression. To address this problem, we have designed a selection strategy to isolate mutant strains of Escherichia coli that improve the expression of a targeted membrane protein. In this method, the coding sequence of the membrane protein of interest is fused to a C-terminal selectable marker, so that the production of the selectable marker and survival on selective media is linked to expression of the targeted membrane protein. Thus, mutant strains with improved expression properties can be directly selected. We also introduce a rapid method for curing isolated strains of the plasmids used during the selection process, in which the plasmids are removed by in vivo digestion with the homing endonuclease I-CreI. We tested this selection system on a rhomboid family protein from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Rv1337) and were able to isolate mutants, which we call EXP strains, with up to 75-fold increased expression. The EXP strains also improve the expression of other membrane proteins that were not the target of selection, in one case roughly 90-fold. PMID:19165721

  13. Channel forming outer membrane porin protein in halophile: expressed as a soluble form in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Tokunaga, Hiroko; Furukawa, Masafumi; Arakawa, Tsutomu; Tokunaga, Masao

    2013-03-01

    We have previously found that the N-terminal sequence of the outer membrane protein from moderate halophile is similar to the sequence of the well-known pore forming porin proteins from other Gram-negative bacteria. This highly expressed outer membrane protein was purified from Halomonas sp. 40 and reconstituted into liposome. It showed a permeability activity in the liposome swelling assay. Based on the N-terminal and internal amino acid sequences of this major outer membrane, we have cloned here the porin gene, hopP (halophilic outer membrane protein), from Halomonas sp. 40. The hopP gene encodes the porin precursor comprising 366 amino acid residues that include a 21 amino acid signal peptide. Mature porin (345 amino acids, 37,611 Da) is a highly acidic protein, just as is so for many halophilic proteins and was soluble when expressed in Escherichia coli with N-terminal His-tag. Purified recombinant His-porin was soluble even after heat-treatment at 95 °C for 5 min in the absence of salt. Circular dichroism analysis of His-porin showed conversion into a β-sheet rich structure by the addition of NaCl at 0.9-2.7 M.

  14. Divergence of function in sequence-related groups of Escherichia coli proteins.

    PubMed

    Nahum, L A; Riley, M

    2001-08-01

    The most prominent mechanism of molecular evolution is believed to have been duplication and divergence of genes. Proteins that belong to sequence-related groups in any one organism are candidates to have emerged from such a process and to share a common ancestor. Groups of proteins in Escherichia coli having sequence similarity are mostly composed of proteins with closely related function, but some groups comprise proteins with unrelated functions. In order to understand how function can change while sequences remain similar, we have examined some of these groups in detail. The enzymes analyzed in this work include representatives of amidotransferases, phosphotransferases, decarboxylases, and others. Most sequence-related groups contain enzymes that are in the same classes of Enzyme Commission (EC) numbers. We have concentrated on groups that are heterogeneous in that respect, and also on groups containing more than one enzyme of any pathway. We find that although the EC number may differ, the reaction chemistry of these sequence-related proteins is the same or very similar. Some of these families illustrate how diversification has taken place in evolution, using common features of either reaction chemistry or ligand specificity, or both, to create catalysts for different kinds of biochemical reactions. This information has relevance to the area of functional genomics in which the activities of gene products of unknown reading frames are attributed by analogy to the functions of sequence-related proteins of known function.

  15. Strategies for successful recombinant expression of disulfide bond-dependent proteins in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    de Marco, Ario

    2009-01-01

    Bacteria are simple and cost effective hosts for producing recombinant proteins. However, their physiological features may limit their use for obtaining in native form proteins of some specific structural classes, such as for instance polypeptides that undergo extensive post-translational modifications. To some extent, also the production of proteins that depending on disulfide bridges for their stability has been considered difficult in E. coli. Both eukaryotic and prokaryotic organisms keep their cytoplasm reduced and, consequently, disulfide bond formation is impaired in this subcellular compartment. Disulfide bridges can stabilize protein structure and are often present in high abundance in secreted proteins. In eukaryotic cells such bonds are formed in the oxidizing environment of endoplasmic reticulum during the export process. Bacteria do not possess a similar specialized subcellular compartment, but they have both export systems and enzymatic activities aimed at the formation and at the quality control of disulfide bonds in the oxidizing periplasm. This article reviews the available strategies for exploiting the physiological mechanisms of bactera to produce properly folded disulfide-bonded proteins. PMID:19442264

  16. Construction and application of the vectors to identify genes encoding exported proteins of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Niu, Dong; Shen, Qinfang; Zhu, Junli; Liu, Jiangmei; Yuan, Jiajie; Tan, Shuang; Yu, Xuping

    2013-10-01

    In order to clone genes having signal sequences of Escherichia coli, four vectors with or without Lac or Ara promoter were constructed using a leaderless β-lactamase as reporter. Fragments of tetracycline resistance gene (Tet) with or without promoter were used to confirm the vectors' ability to clone and report signal sequences. The minimum inhibitory concentration of ampicillin of the transformants was measured to detect the expression and secretion efficiency of the vectors. The results showed that the β-lactamase could be co-expressed and secreted with Tet protein. The Lac or Ara promoter in the vectors could be regulated by different inducers, and the Ara promoter showed higher regulative efficiency than the Lac. The best induction dose of L-arabinose for the Ara promoter is 1.25 %. All the four vectors were stably maintained in host after being inoculated for 20 passages in antibiotics-free media. Genomic library of an avian pathogenic strain, E. coli O2, was constructed using the pMB-Ara-T vector we developed. 318 clones were obtained from the genomic library of E. coli strain O2, and the inserts in these clones represented 276 genes based on sequence analysis. Among the 276 cloned fragments, only 128 had complete promoter sequence. For the 128 fragments with promoter, only 27 could be expressed under LB culture condition without inducer, the other 101 were only expressed under induction. The results showed our constructed vectors could efficiently capture all kinds of exported protein genes in vitro, including the ones without promoter or with inactive promoter.

  17. Division protein interaction web: identification of a phylogenetically conserved common interactome between Streptococcus pneumoniae and Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Maggi, Silvia; Massidda, Orietta; Luzi, Giuseppe; Fadda, Daniela; Paolozzi, Luciano; Ghelardini, Patrizia

    2008-10-01

    The ability of each of the 11 Streptococcus pneumoniae division proteins to interact with itself and with each of the remaining proteins was studied in 66 combinations of protein pairs, using a bacterial two-hybrid system. Interactions (homo- or hetero-dimerizations) were detected between 37 protein pairs, whereas 29 protein pairs did not interact. In some cases, positive interactions of the S. pneumoniae proteins were confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation experiments in Escherichia coli. Comparison between the S. pneumoniae division protein interaction web and that of E. coli, the only micro-organisms for which the whole division interactome has been described systematically, was also performed. At least nine division proteins, ZapA, FtsZ, FtsA, FtsK, FtsQ/DivIB, FtsB/DivIC, FtsL, FtsI and FtsW, are believed to have a conserved function between these bacteria and thus we may say that a significant part of the interactions are conserved. Out of 45 protein pairs tested in both bacteria, 30 showed the same behaviour: 23 interacted while seven did not. In agreement with these results, cross-interactions between S. pneumoniae proteins and the corresponding E. coli orthologues were observed. Taken together, these results suggest a phylogenetically conserved minimal common interactome of the division proteins.

  18. Reconstitution of Protein Translation of Mycobacterium Reveals Functional Conservation and Divergence with the Gram-Negative Bacterium Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Aashish; Asahara, Haruichi; Zhang, Meng; Zhang, Weijia; Liu, Haiying; Cui, Sheng; Jin, Qi; Chong, Shaorong

    2016-01-01

    Protein translation is essential for all bacteria pathogens. It has also been a major focus of structural and functional studies and an important target of antibiotics. Here we report our attempts to biochemically reconstitute mycobacterial protein translation in vitro from purified components. This mycobacterial translation system consists of individually purified recombinant translation factors from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis), purified tRNAs and ribosomes from Mycobacterium smegmatis (M. smegmatis), and an aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase (AARS) mixture from the cell-extract of M. smegmatis. We demonstrate that such mycobacterial translation system was efficient in in vitro protein synthesis, and enabled functional comparisons of translational components between the gram-positive Mycobacterium and the gram-negative E. coli. Although mycobacterial translation factors and ribosomes were highly compatible with their E. coli counterparts, M. smegmatis tRNAs were not properly charged by the E. coli AARSs to allow efficient translation of a reporter. In contrast, both E. coli and M. smegmatis tRNAs exhibited similar activity with the semi-purified M. smegmatis AARSs mixture for in vitro translation. We further demonstrated the use of both mycobacterial and E. coli translation systems as comparative in vitro assays for small-molecule antibiotics that target protein translation. While mycobacterial and E. coli translation were both inhibited at the same IC50 by the antibiotic spectinomycin, mycobacterial translation was preferentially inhibited by the antibiotic tetracycline, suggesting that there may be structural differences at the antibiotic binding sites between the ribosomes of Mycobacterium and E. coli. Our results illustrate an alternative approach for antibiotic discovery and functional studies of protein translation in mycobacteria and possibly other bacterial pathogens. PMID:27564552

  19. Reconstitution of Protein Translation of Mycobacterium Reveals Functional Conservation and Divergence with the Gram-Negative Bacterium Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Aashish; Asahara, Haruichi; Zhang, Meng; Zhang, Weijia; Liu, Haiying; Cui, Sheng; Jin, Qi; Chong, Shaorong

    2016-01-01

    Protein translation is essential for all bacteria pathogens. It has also been a major focus of structural and functional studies and an important target of antibiotics. Here we report our attempts to biochemically reconstitute mycobacterial protein translation in vitro from purified components. This mycobacterial translation system consists of individually purified recombinant translation factors from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis), purified tRNAs and ribosomes from Mycobacterium smegmatis (M. smegmatis), and an aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase (AARS) mixture from the cell-extract of M. smegmatis. We demonstrate that such mycobacterial translation system was efficient in in vitro protein synthesis, and enabled functional comparisons of translational components between the gram-positive Mycobacterium and the gram-negative E. coli. Although mycobacterial translation factors and ribosomes were highly compatible with their E. coli counterparts, M. smegmatis tRNAs were not properly charged by the E. coli AARSs to allow efficient translation of a reporter. In contrast, both E. coli and M. smegmatis tRNAs exhibited similar activity with the semi-purified M. smegmatis AARSs mixture for in vitro translation. We further demonstrated the use of both mycobacterial and E. coli translation systems as comparative in vitro assays for small-molecule antibiotics that target protein translation. While mycobacterial and E. coli translation were both inhibited at the same IC50 by the antibiotic spectinomycin, mycobacterial translation was preferentially inhibited by the antibiotic tetracycline, suggesting that there may be structural differences at the antibiotic binding sites between the ribosomes of Mycobacterium and E. coli. Our results illustrate an alternative approach for antibiotic discovery and functional studies of protein translation in mycobacteria and possibly other bacterial pathogens. PMID:27564552

  20. [Deinococcus radiodurans RecX and Escherichia coli RecX Proteins Are Able to Replace Each Other in vivo and in vitro].

    PubMed

    Bakhlanova, I V; Baitin, D M

    2016-03-01

    A plasmid carrying the Deinococcus radiodurans recXgene under the control of a lactose promoter decreases the Escherichia coli cell resistance to UV irradiation and γ irradiation and also influences the conjugational recombination process. The D. radiodurans. RecX protein functions in the Escherichia coli cells similarly to the E. coli RecX protein. Isolated and purified D. radiodurans RecX and E. coli RecX proteins are able to replace each other interacting with the E. coli RecA and D. radiodurans RecA proteins in vitro. Data obtained demonstrated that regulatory interaction of RecA and RecX proteins preserves a high degree of conservatism despite all the differences in the recombination reparation system between E. coli and D. radiodurans.

  1. Translocation of capsular polysaccharides in pathogenic strains of Escherichia coli requires a 60-kilodalton periplasmic protein.

    PubMed Central

    Silver, R P; Aaronson, W; Vann, W F

    1987-01-01

    An 11.6-kilobase (kb) region of a 34-kb fragment of Escherichia coli DNA that encodes the K1 capsular polysaccharide genes is necessary for translocation of the K1 polysaccharide to the bacterial cell surface. This 11.6-kb region contains a gene, kpsD, encoding a 60-kilodalton protein. The kpsD gene was localized to a 2.4-kb PstI-BamHI fragment. Cells harboring a Tn1000 insertion in kpsD did not synthesize the 60-kilodalton protein and did not express polysaccharide on the cell surface. Immunodiffusion and rocket immunoelectrophoresis of cell extracts, however, demonstrated that K1 polysaccharide was synthesized by these cells. We present evidence that the kpsD gene product is synthesized as a precursor and that the processed form is located in the periplasmic space. Analysis of alkaline phosphatase activity of a kpsD-phoA fusion demonstrated that kpsD expression was under positive regulation. A 260-base-pair AluI fragment located within the kpsD coding sequence was used as a probe and was found to hybridize to chromosomal DNA from E. coli that synthesizes the K2, K5, K7, K12, and K13 capsular polysaccharides but not K3 and K100. These results suggest that the kpsD gene product may be required for export not only of K1 but for other K antigens as well. Images PMID:3119565

  2. Substrate-Protein Interactions of Type II NADH:Quinone Oxidoreductase from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Salewski, Johannes; Batista, Ana P; Sena, Filipa V; Millo, Diego; Zebger, Ingo; Pereira, Manuela M; Hildebrandt, Peter

    2016-05-17

    Type II NADH:quinone oxidoreductases (NDH-2s) are membrane proteins involved in respiratory chains and responsible for the maintenance of NADH/NAD(+) balance in cells. NDH-2s are the only enzymes with NADH dehydrogenase activity present in the respiratory chain of many pathogens, and thus, they were proposed as suitable targets for antimicrobial therapies. In addition, NDH-2s were also considered key players for the treatment of complex I-related neurodegenerative disorders. In this work, we explored substrate-protein interaction in NDH-2 from Escherichia coli (EcNDH-2) combining surface-enhanced infrared absorption spectroscopic studies with electrochemical experiments, fluorescence spectroscopy assays, and quantum chemical calculations. Because of the specific stabilization of substrate complexes of EcNDH-2 immobilized on electrodes, it was possible to demonstrate the presence of two distinct substrate binding sites for NADH and the quinone and to identify a bound semiprotonated quinol as a catalytic intermediate. PMID:27109164

  3. The Escherichia Coli Hfq Protein: An Unattended DNA-Transactions Regulator

    PubMed Central

    Cech, Grzegorz M.; Szalewska-Pałasz, Agnieszka; Kubiak, Krzysztof; Malabirade, Antoine; Grange, Wilfried; Arluison, Veronique; Węgrzyn, Grzegorz

    2016-01-01

    The Hfq protein was discovered in Escherichia coli as a host factor for bacteriophage Qβ RNA replication. Subsequent studies indicated that Hfq is a pleiotropic regulator of bacterial gene expression. The regulatory role of Hfq is ascribed mainly to its function as an RNA-chaperone, facilitating interactions between bacterial non-coding RNA and its mRNA target. Thus, it modulates mRNA translation and stability. Nevertheless, Hfq is able to interact with DNA as well. Its role in the regulation of DNA-related processes has been demonstrated. In this mini-review, it is discussed how Hfq interacts with DNA and what is the role of this protein in regulation of DNA transactions. Particularly, Hfq has been demonstrated to be involved in the control of ColE1 plasmid DNA replication, transposition, and possibly also transcription. Possible mechanisms of these Hfq-mediated regulations are described and discussed. PMID:27517037

  4. Expression, purification, and characterization of human osteoclastic protein-tyrosine phosphatase catalytic domain in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Huan; Sui, Yuan; Cui, Yue; Lin, Peng; Li, Wannan; Xing, Shu; Wang, Deli; Hu, Min; Fu, Xueqi

    2015-03-01

    Osteoclastic protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP-oc) is a structurally unique transmembrane protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) that contains only a relatively small intracellular PTP catalytic domain, does not have an extracellular domain, and lacks a signal peptide proximal to the NH2 terminus. The present study reports the expression, purification, and characterization of the intracellular catalytic domain of PTP-oc (ΔPTP-oc). ΔPTP-oc was expressed in Escherichia coli cells as a fusion with a six-histidine tag and was purified via nickel affinity chromatography. When with para-nitrophenylphosphate (p-NPP) as a substrate, ΔPTP-oc exhibited classical Michaelis-Menten kinetics. Its responses to temperature and ionic strength were similar to those of other PTPs. The optimal pH value of ΔPTP-oc is approximately 7.0, unlike other PTPs, whose optimal pH values are approximately 5.0. PMID:25462809

  5. Cloning and expression of rapeseed procruciferin in Escherichia coli and crystallization of the purified recombinant protein.

    PubMed

    Tandang, Mary Rose G; Adachi, Motoyasu; Utsumi, Shigeru

    2004-03-01

    Two rapeseed cruciferin cDNAs (cru2/3a and cru2/3b) were cloned and sequenced. A comparison of their DNA and protein sequences with other cruciferins, indicated cru2/3b to be a novel clone and, among them, an inherent and highly conserved sequence of twelve amino acids was identified. Procruciferin 2/3a and 2/3b were expressed in Eschericha coli, and procruciferin 2/3a was obtained in a soluble form. The expressed procruciferin 2/3a has a trimeric structure and formed crystals although the quality was not good, suggesting that this expression system is useful for protein engineering of procruciferin 2/3a.

  6. Amyloidogenic properties of transthyretin-like protein (TLP) from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Santos, Sofia Duque; Costa, Rita; Teixeira, Pedro Filipe; Gottesman, Max; Cardoso, Isabel; Saraiva, Maria João

    2008-08-20

    We report the amyloid-like properties of Escherichia coli transthyretin-like protein (TLP). TLP is 32% homologous to human transthyretin (hTTR), and is also tetrameric. In contrast to hTTR, TLP does not bind thyroxine. TLP orthologues are found in several prokaryotes, lower eukaryotes and vertebrates. TLP carries a signal peptide that targets the protein to the periplasmic space. We found that TLP and hTTR tetramers dissociate into monomers under similar conditions, although TLP monomers have different association properties. Like hTTR, TLP forms aggregates, small fibrillar structures of 8 nm width, and annular structures of 8 nm diameter which present amyloid-like properties and are toxic to cells.

  7. The Escherichia Coli Hfq Protein: An Unattended DNA-Transactions Regulator.

    PubMed

    Cech, Grzegorz M; Szalewska-Pałasz, Agnieszka; Kubiak, Krzysztof; Malabirade, Antoine; Grange, Wilfried; Arluison, Veronique; Węgrzyn, Grzegorz

    2016-01-01

    The Hfq protein was discovered in Escherichia coli as a host factor for bacteriophage Qβ RNA replication. Subsequent studies indicated that Hfq is a pleiotropic regulator of bacterial gene expression. The regulatory role of Hfq is ascribed mainly to its function as an RNA-chaperone, facilitating interactions between bacterial non-coding RNA and its mRNA target. Thus, it modulates mRNA translation and stability. Nevertheless, Hfq is able to interact with DNA as well. Its role in the regulation of DNA-related processes has been demonstrated. In this mini-review, it is discussed how Hfq interacts with DNA and what is the role of this protein in regulation of DNA transactions. Particularly, Hfq has been demonstrated to be involved in the control of ColE1 plasmid DNA replication, transposition, and possibly also transcription. Possible mechanisms of these Hfq-mediated regulations are described and discussed. PMID:27517037

  8. Protein packing interactions and polymorphy of chorismate lyase from E. Coli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallagher, Travis

    2001-11-01

    The enzyme chorismate lyase from E. coli crystallizes into three well characterized polymorphs in identical conditions. The Wild-type enzyme tends to aggregate, even in the presence of a reducing agent, and yields monoclinic crystals that grow in intricate clusters. Protein aggregation was largely eliminated by mutating the protein's two cysteines to serines. The double mutant retains full enzymatic activity and grows singly in two new forms: triclinic and orthorhombic. The triclinic crystals diffract to 0.9 Å resolution. A single-cysteine mutant that crystallizes in the orthorhombic form was used to determine the structure, enabling examination of the packing interactions at 2.0 Å resolution or better in all three forms. A novel system for labeling contacts is proposed, and relations between packing patterns and crystal properties are discussed. Diffraction resolution is found to correlate with coordination number and with the root-mean-square deviation from mean extent of the contacts. Implications for contact energies are considered.

  9. Histone H1 proteins act as receptors for the 987P fimbriae of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Guoqiang; Chen, Huaiqing; Choi, Byung-Kwon; Del Piero, Fabio; Schifferli, Dieter M

    2005-06-17

    The tip adhesin FasG of the 987P fimbriae of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli mediates two distinct adhesive interactions with brush border molecules of the intestinal epithelial cells of neonatal piglets. First, FasG attaches strongly to sulfatide with hydroxylated fatty acyl chains. This interaction involves lysine 117 and other lysine residues of FasG. Second, FasG recognizes specific intestinal brush border proteins that migrate on a sodium-dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel like a distinct set of 32-35-kDa proteins, as shown by ligand blotting assays. The protein sequence of high performance liquid chromatography-purified tryptic fragments of the major protein band matched sequences of human and murine histone H1 proteins. Porcine histone H1 proteins isolated from piglet intestinal epithelial cells demonstrated the same SDS-PAGE migration pattern and 987P binding properties as the 987P-specific protein receptors from porcine intestinal brush borders. Binding was dose-dependent and shown to be specific in adhesion inhibition and gel migration shift assays. Moreover, mapping of the histone H1 binding domain suggested that it is located in their lysine-rich C-terminal domains. Histone H1 molecules were visualized on the microvilli of intestinal epithelial cells by immunohistochemistry and electron microscopy. Taken together these results indicated that the intestinal protein receptors for 987P are histone H1 proteins. It is suggested that histones are released into the intestinal lumen by the high turnover of the intestinal epithelium. Their strong cationic properties can explain their association with the negatively charged brush border surfaces. There, the histone H1 molecules stabilize the sulfatide-fimbriae interaction by simultaneously binding to the membrane and to 987P.

  10. Acylation of Escherichia coli Hemolysin: A Unique Protein Lipidation Mechanism Underlying Toxin Function

    PubMed Central

    Stanley, Peter; Koronakis, Vassilis; Hughes, Colin

    1998-01-01

    The pore-forming hemolysin (HlyA) of Escherichia coli represents a unique class of bacterial toxins that require a posttranslational modification for activity. The inactive protoxin pro-HlyA is activated intracellularly by amide linkage of fatty acids to two internal lysine residues 126 amino acids apart, directed by the cosynthesized HlyC protein with acyl carrier protein as the fatty acid donor. This action distinguishes HlyC from all bacterial acyltransferases such as the lipid A, lux-specific, and nodulation acyltransferases, and from eukaryotic transferases such as N-myristoyl transferases, prenyltransferases, and thioester palmitoyltransferases. Most lipids directly attached to proteins may be classed as N-terminal amide-linked and internal ester-linked acyl groups and C-terminal ether-linked isoprenoid groups. The acylation of HlyA and related toxins does not equate to these but does appear related to a small number of eukaryotic proteins that include inflammatory cytokines and mitogenic and cholinergic receptors. While the location and structure of lipid moieties on proteins vary, there are common effects on membrane affinity and/or protein-protein interactions. Despite being acylated at two residues, HlyA does not possess a “double-anchor” motif and does not have an electrostatic switch, although its dependence on calcium binding for activity suggests that the calcium-myristoyl switch may have relevance. The acyl chains on HlyA may provide anchorage points onto the surface of the host cell lipid bilayer. These could then enhance protein-protein interactions either between HlyA and components of a host signal transduction pathway to influence cytokine production or between HlyA monomers to bring about oligomerization during pore formation. PMID:9618444

  11. Proteome analysis for the global proteins in the jejunum tissues of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli -infected piglets

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Wenkai; Yin, Jie; Chen, Shuai; Duan, Jielin; Liu, Gang; Li, Tiejun; Li, Nengzhang; Peng, Yuanyi; Tan, Bie; Yin, Yulong

    2016-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is a common cause of diarrhea in humans and livestock. In this study, isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) combined with multidimensional liquid chromatography (LC) and MS analysis was used for screening the differentially expressed proteins in piglet jejunum after ETEC infection. Totally 1,897 proteins were identified with quantitative information in piglet jejunum. We identified 92 differentially expressed proteins in ETEC-induced diarrhea, of which 30 were up regulated and 62 down regulated. Most of the differentially expressed proteins were involved in intestinal function of binding, metabolic process, catalytic activity and immune responses. The inhibition of intestinal immune responses in the jejunum in ETEC-induced diarrhea was also validated by immunobloting and RT-PCR. Our study is the first attempt to analyze the protein profile of ETEC-infected piglets by quantitative proteomics, and our findings could provide valuable information with respect to better understanding the host response to ETEC infection. PMID:27157636

  12. Self-cycling operation increases productivity of recombinant protein in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Storms, Zachary J; Brown, Tobin; Sauvageau, Dominic; Cooper, David G

    2012-09-01

    Self-cycling fermentation (SCF), a cyclical, semi-continuous process that induces cell synchrony, was incorporated into a recombinant protein production scheme. Escherichia coli CY15050, a lac(-) mutant lysogenized with temperature-sensitive phage λ modified to over-express β-galactosidase, was used as a model system. The production scheme was divided into two de-coupled stages. The host cells were cultured under SCF operation in the first stage before being brought to a second stage where protein production was induced. In the first stage, the host strain demonstrated a stable cycling pattern immediately following the first cycle. This reproducible pattern was maintained over the course of the experiments and a significant degree of cell synchrony was obtained. By growing cells using SCF, productivity increased 50% and production time decreased by 40% compared to a batch culture under similar conditions. In addition, synchronized cultures induced from the end of a SCF cycle displayed shorter lysis times and a more complete culture-wide lysis than unsynchronized cultures. Finally, protein synthesis was influenced by the time at which the lytic phase was induced in the cell life cycle. For example, induction of a synchronized culture immediately prior to cell division resulted in the maximum protein productivity, suggesting protein production can be optimized with respect to the cell life cycle using SCF. PMID:22407770

  13. Synthetic spider dragline silk proteins and their production in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Fahnestock, S R; Irwin, S L

    1997-01-01

    Synthetic genes were designed to encode analogs of the two proteins of Nephila clavipes dragline silk, spidroins 1 and 2. The genes were constructed of tandem repeats of relatively long (more than 300 bp) DNA sequences assembled from synthetic oligonucleotides, and encoded proteins of high molecular mass (65-163 kDa). Both analogs were produced efficiently in Escherichia coli. The yield and homogeneity of the products of longer genes were limited by premature termination of synthesis, probably as a result of processivity errors in protein synthesis. Average termination rates were determined to be 1 in 1100 codons to 1 in 300 codons, depending on the length and synonymous codon choices of the gene. Both analog proteins could be induced to form stable aqueous solutions without denaturants. Circular dichroism spectra of the purified proteins in dilute solution resembled spectra of redissolved natural dragline silk in reflecting a largely disordered structure in water and more ordered structures in mixed solvents with methanol and trifluoroethanol.

  14. Activities of the feline immunodeficiency virus integrase protein produced in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Vink, C; van der Linden, K H; Plasterk, R H

    1994-01-01

    Retroviral DNA integration requires the activity of at least one viral protein, the integrase (IN) protein. We cloned and expressed the integrase gene of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) in Escherichia coli as a fusion to the malE gene and purified the IN fusion protein by affinity chromatography. The protein is active in site-specific cleavage of the viral DNA ends, DNA strand transfer, and disintegration. FIV IN has a relaxed viral DNA substrate requirement: it cleaves and integrates FIV DNA termini, human immunodeficiency virus DNA ends, and Moloney murine leukemia virus DNA ends with high efficiencies. In the cleavage reaction, IN exposes a specific phosphodiester bond near the viral DNA end to nucleophilic attack. In vitro, either H2O, glycerol, or the 3' OH group of the viral DNA terminus can serve as nucleophile in this reaction. We found that FIV IN preferentially uses the 3' OH ends of the viral DNA as nucleophile, whereas HIV IN protein preferentially uses H2O and glycerol as nucleophiles. Images PMID:8107210

  15. Periscope: quantitative prediction of soluble protein expression in the periplasm of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Chang, Catherine Ching Han; Li, Chen; Webb, Geoffrey I; Tey, BengTi; Song, Jiangning; Ramanan, Ramakrishnan Nagasundara

    2016-01-01

    Periplasmic expression of soluble proteins in Escherichia coli not only offers a much-simplified downstream purification process, but also enhances the probability of obtaining correctly folded and biologically active proteins. Different combinations of signal peptides and target proteins lead to different soluble protein expression levels, ranging from negligible to several grams per litre. Accurate algorithms for rational selection of promising candidates can serve as a powerful tool to complement with current trial-and-error approaches. Accordingly, proteomics studies can be conducted with greater efficiency and cost-effectiveness. Here, we developed a predictor with a two-stage architecture, to predict the real-valued expression level of target protein in the periplasm. The output of the first-stage support vector machine (SVM) classifier determines which second-stage support vector regression (SVR) classifier to be used. When tested on an independent test dataset, the predictor achieved an overall prediction accuracy of 78% and a Pearson's correlation coefficient (PCC) of 0.77. We further illustrate the relative importance of various features with respect to different models. The results indicate that the occurrence of dipeptide glutamine and aspartic acid is the most important feature for the classification model. Finally, we provide access to the implemented predictor through the Periscope webserver, freely accessible at http://lightning.med.monash.edu/periscope/. PMID:26931649

  16. Protein acetylation affects acetate metabolism, motility and acid stress response in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Castaño-Cerezo, Sara; Bernal, Vicente; Post, Harm; Fuhrer, Tobias; Cappadona, Salvatore; Sánchez-Díaz, Nerea C; Sauer, Uwe; Heck, Albert JR; Altelaar, AF Maarten; Cánovas, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Although protein acetylation is widely observed, it has been associated with few specific regulatory functions making it poorly understood. To interrogate its functionality, we analyzed the acetylome in Escherichia coli knockout mutants of cobB, the only known sirtuin-like deacetylase, and patZ, the best-known protein acetyltransferase. For four growth conditions, more than 2,000 unique acetylated peptides, belonging to 809 proteins, were identified and differentially quantified. Nearly 65% of these proteins are related to metabolism. The global activity of CobB contributes to the deacetylation of a large number of substrates and has a major impact on physiology. Apart from the regulation of acetyl-CoA synthetase, we found that CobB-controlled acetylation of isocitrate lyase contributes to the fine-tuning of the glyoxylate shunt. Acetylation of the transcription factor RcsB prevents DNA binding, activating flagella biosynthesis and motility, and increases acid stress susceptibility. Surprisingly, deletion of patZ increased acetylation in acetate cultures, which suggests that it regulates the levels of acetylating agents. The results presented offer new insights into functional roles of protein acetylation in metabolic fitness and global cell regulation. PMID:25518064

  17. Periscope: quantitative prediction of soluble protein expression in the periplasm of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Catherine Ching Han; Li, Chen; Webb, Geoffrey I.; Tey, BengTi; Song, Jiangning; Ramanan, Ramakrishnan Nagasundara

    2016-01-01

    Periplasmic expression of soluble proteins in Escherichia coli not only offers a much-simplified downstream purification process, but also enhances the probability of obtaining correctly folded and biologically active proteins. Different combinations of signal peptides and target proteins lead to different soluble protein expression levels, ranging from negligible to several grams per litre. Accurate algorithms for rational selection of promising candidates can serve as a powerful tool to complement with current trial-and-error approaches. Accordingly, proteomics studies can be conducted with greater efficiency and cost-effectiveness. Here, we developed a predictor with a two-stage architecture, to predict the real-valued expression level of target protein in the periplasm. The output of the first-stage support vector machine (SVM) classifier determines which second-stage support vector regression (SVR) classifier to be used. When tested on an independent test dataset, the predictor achieved an overall prediction accuracy of 78% and a Pearson’s correlation coefficient (PCC) of 0.77. We further illustrate the relative importance of various features with respect to different models. The results indicate that the occurrence of dipeptide glutamine and aspartic acid is the most important feature for the classification model. Finally, we provide access to the implemented predictor through the Periscope webserver, freely accessible at http://lightning.med.monash.edu/periscope/. PMID:26931649

  18. Proteome analysis for the global proteins in the jejunum tissues of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli -infected piglets.

    PubMed

    Ren, Wenkai; Yin, Jie; Chen, Shuai; Duan, Jielin; Liu, Gang; Li, Tiejun; Li, Nengzhang; Peng, Yuanyi; Tan, Bie; Yin, Yulong

    2016-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is a common cause of diarrhea in humans and livestock. In this study, isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) combined with multidimensional liquid chromatography (LC) and MS analysis was used for screening the differentially expressed proteins in piglet jejunum after ETEC infection. Totally 1,897 proteins were identified with quantitative information in piglet jejunum. We identified 92 differentially expressed proteins in ETEC-induced diarrhea, of which 30 were up regulated and 62 down regulated. Most of the differentially expressed proteins were involved in intestinal function of binding, metabolic process, catalytic activity and immune responses. The inhibition of intestinal immune responses in the jejunum in ETEC-induced diarrhea was also validated by immunobloting and RT-PCR. Our study is the first attempt to analyze the protein profile of ETEC-infected piglets by quantitative proteomics, and our findings could provide valuable information with respect to better understanding the host response to ETEC infection. PMID:27157636

  19. Synthetic spider dragline silk proteins and their production in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Fahnestock, S R; Irwin, S L

    1997-01-01

    Synthetic genes were designed to encode analogs of the two proteins of Nephila clavipes dragline silk, spidroins 1 and 2. The genes were constructed of tandem repeats of relatively long (more than 300 bp) DNA sequences assembled from synthetic oligonucleotides, and encoded proteins of high molecular mass (65-163 kDa). Both analogs were produced efficiently in Escherichia coli. The yield and homogeneity of the products of longer genes were limited by premature termination of synthesis, probably as a result of processivity errors in protein synthesis. Average termination rates were determined to be 1 in 1100 codons to 1 in 300 codons, depending on the length and synonymous codon choices of the gene. Both analog proteins could be induced to form stable aqueous solutions without denaturants. Circular dichroism spectra of the purified proteins in dilute solution resembled spectra of redissolved natural dragline silk in reflecting a largely disordered structure in water and more ordered structures in mixed solvents with methanol and trifluoroethanol. PMID:9035407

  20. Purification and DNA-binding properties of human papillomavirus type 16 E6 protein expressed in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Imai, Y; Tsunokawa, Y; Sugimura, T; Terada, M

    1989-11-15

    Unfused human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV 16) E6 protein was expressed in Escherichia coli using a lambda PL promoter system. The protein was isolated from the cells as inclusion bodies, extracted by 6 M guanidine-HCl, and purified by chromatography. The purified protein had high affinity to DNA and was demonstrated for the first time to bind to a specific sequence within the long control region of HPV 16. PMID:2556128

  1. Engineering the Controlled Assembly of Filamentous Injectisomes in E. coli K-12 for Protein Translocation into Mammalian Cells.

    PubMed

    Ruano-Gallego, David; Álvarez, Beatriz; Fernández, Luis Ángel

    2015-09-18

    Bacterial pathogens containing type III protein secretion systems (T3SS) assemble large needle-like protein complexes in the bacterial envelope, called injectisomes, for translocation of protein effectors into host cells. The application of these "molecular syringes" for the injection of proteins into mammalian cells is hindered by their structural and genomic complexity, requiring multiple polypeptides encoded along with effectors in various transcriptional units (TUs) with intricate regulation. In this work, we have rationally designed the controlled expression of the filamentous injectisomes found in enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) in the nonpathogenic strain E. coli K-12. All structural components of EPEC injectisomes, encoded in a genomic island called the locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE), were engineered in five TUs (eLEEs) excluding effectors, promoters and transcriptional regulators. These eLEEs were placed under the control of the IPTG-inducible promoter Ptac and integrated into specific chromosomal sites of E. coli K-12 using a marker-less strategy. The resulting strain, named synthetic injector E. coli (SIEC), assembles filamentous injectisomes similar to those in EPEC. SIEC injectisomes form pores in the host plasma membrane and are able to translocate T3-substrate proteins (e.g., translocated intimin receptor, Tir) into the cytoplasm of HeLa cells reproducing the phenotypes of intimate attachment and polymerization of actin-pedestals elicited by EPEC bacteria. Hence, SIEC strain allows the controlled expression of functional filamentous injectisomes for efficient translocation of proteins with T3S-signals into mammalian cells. PMID:26017572

  2. Engineering the Controlled Assembly of Filamentous Injectisomes in E. coli K-12 for Protein Translocation into Mammalian Cells.

    PubMed

    Ruano-Gallego, David; Álvarez, Beatriz; Fernández, Luis Ángel

    2015-09-18

    Bacterial pathogens containing type III protein secretion systems (T3SS) assemble large needle-like protein complexes in the bacterial envelope, called injectisomes, for translocation of protein effectors into host cells. The application of these "molecular syringes" for the injection of proteins into mammalian cells is hindered by their structural and genomic complexity, requiring multiple polypeptides encoded along with effectors in various transcriptional units (TUs) with intricate regulation. In this work, we have rationally designed the controlled expression of the filamentous injectisomes found in enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) in the nonpathogenic strain E. coli K-12. All structural components of EPEC injectisomes, encoded in a genomic island called the locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE), were engineered in five TUs (eLEEs) excluding effectors, promoters and transcriptional regulators. These eLEEs were placed under the control of the IPTG-inducible promoter Ptac and integrated into specific chromosomal sites of E. coli K-12 using a marker-less strategy. The resulting strain, named synthetic injector E. coli (SIEC), assembles filamentous injectisomes similar to those in EPEC. SIEC injectisomes form pores in the host plasma membrane and are able to translocate T3-substrate proteins (e.g., translocated intimin receptor, Tir) into the cytoplasm of HeLa cells reproducing the phenotypes of intimate attachment and polymerization of actin-pedestals elicited by EPEC bacteria. Hence, SIEC strain allows the controlled expression of functional filamentous injectisomes for efficient translocation of proteins with T3S-signals into mammalian cells.

  3. Rapid, large-scale purification and characterization of 'Ada protein' (O6 methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase) of E. coli.

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharyya, D; Tano, K; Bunick, G J; Uberbacher, E C; Behnke, W D; Mitra, S

    1988-01-01

    The E. coli Ada protein (O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase) has been purified using a high-level expression vector with a yield of about 3 mg per liter of E. coli culture. The 39-kDa protein has an extinction coefficient (E280 nm (1%)) of 5.3. Its isoelectric point of 7.1 is lower than that predicted from the amino acid content. The homogeneous Ada protein is fully active as a methyl acceptor from O6-methylguanine in DNA. Its reaction with O6-methylguanine in a synthetic DNA has a second-order rate constant of 1.1 x 10(9) M-1 min-1 at O degree C. Both the native form and the protein methylated at Cys-69 are monomeric. The CD spectrum suggests a low alpha-helical content and the radius of gyration of 23 A indicates a compact, globular shape. The middle region of the protein is sensitive to a variety of proteases, including an endogenous activity in E. coli, suggesting that the protein is composed of N-terminal and C-terminal domains connected by a hinge region. E. coli B has a higher level of this protease than does K12. Images PMID:3041376

  4. The first global screening of protein substrates bearing protein-bound 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine in E. coli and human mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sangkyu; Chen, Yue; Luo, Hao; Wu, Andrew A.; Wilde, Michael; Schumacker, Paul T.; Zhao, Yingming

    2010-01-01

    Protein hydroxylation at proline and lysine residues is known to have important effects on cellular functions, such as the response to hypoxia. However, for protein hydroxylation at tyrosine residues (called protein-bound 3,4-dihydroxy-phenylalanine (PB-DOPA) has not been carefully examined. Here we report the first proteomics screening of the PB-DOPA protein substrates and their sites in E. coli and human mitochondria by nano-LC/MS/MS and protein sequence alignment using the PTMap algorithm. Our study identified 67 novel PB-DOPA sites in 43 E. coli proteins, and 9 novel PB-DOPA sites in 7 proteins from HeLa mitochondria. Bioinformatics analysis indicates that the structured region is more favored than the unstructured regions of proteins for the PB-DOPA modification. The PB-DOPA substrates in E. coli were dominantly enriched in proteins associated with carbohydrate metabolism. Our study showed that PB-DOPA may be involved in regulation of the specific activity of certain evolutionarily conserved proteins such as superoxide dismutase and glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase, suggesting the conserved nature of the modification among distant biological species. The substrate proteins identified in this study offer a rich source for hunting their regulatory enzymes, and for further characterization of the possible contributions of this modification to cellular physiology and human diseases. PMID:20818827

  5. Overexpression of transport proteins improves the production of 5-aminovalerate from l-lysine in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhong; Xu, Jing; Jiang, Tongtong; Ge, Yongsheng; Liu, Pan; Zhang, Manman; Su, Zhiguo; Gao, Chao; Ma, Cuiqing; Xu, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial transporters mediate the exchanges between intracellular and extracellular environments. Modification of transport route could be applied to speed up the metabolic reactions and promote the production of aimed compounds. Herein, lysine 2-monooxygenase (DavB) and δ-aminovaleramidase (DavA) were co-expressed in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) to produce nylon-5 monomer 5-aminovalerate from l-lysine. Then, PP2911 (4-aminobutyrate transporter in Pseudomonas putida) and LysP (the lysine specific permease in E. coli) were overexpressed to promote 5-aminovalerate production using whole cells of recombinant E. coli. The constructed E. coli strain overexpressing transport proteins exhibited good 5-aminovalerate production performance and might serve as a promising biocatalyst for 5-aminovalerate production from l-lysine. This strategy not only shows an efficient process for the production of nylon monomers but also might be used in production of other chemicals. PMID:27510748

  6. Overexpression of transport proteins improves the production of 5-aminovalerate from l-lysine in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhong; Xu, Jing; Jiang, Tongtong; Ge, Yongsheng; Liu, Pan; Zhang, Manman; Su, Zhiguo; Gao, Chao; Ma, Cuiqing; Xu, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial transporters mediate the exchanges between intracellular and extracellular environments. Modification of transport route could be applied to speed up the metabolic reactions and promote the production of aimed compounds. Herein, lysine 2-monooxygenase (DavB) and δ-aminovaleramidase (DavA) were co-expressed in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) to produce nylon-5 monomer 5-aminovalerate from l-lysine. Then, PP2911 (4-aminobutyrate transporter in Pseudomonas putida) and LysP (the lysine specific permease in E. coli) were overexpressed to promote 5-aminovalerate production using whole cells of recombinant E. coli. The constructed E. coli strain overexpressing transport proteins exhibited good 5-aminovalerate production performance and might serve as a promising biocatalyst for 5-aminovalerate production from l-lysine. This strategy not only shows an efficient process for the production of nylon monomers but also might be used in production of other chemicals. PMID:27510748

  7. Flagellar Cap Protein FliD Mediates Adherence of Atypical Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli to Enterocyte Microvilli.

    PubMed

    Sampaio, Suely C F; Luiz, Wilson B; Vieira, Mônica A M; Ferreira, Rita C C; Garcia, Bruna G; Sinigaglia-Coimbra, Rita; Sampaio, Jorge L M; Ferreira, Luís C S; Gomes, Tânia A T

    2016-04-01

    The expression of flagella correlates with different aspects of bacterial pathogenicity, ranging from adherence to host cells to activation of inflammatory responses by the innate immune system. In the present study, we investigated the role of flagella in the adherence of an atypical enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (aEPEC) strain (serotype O51:H40) to human enterocytes. Accordingly, isogenic mutants deficient in flagellin (FliC), the flagellar structural subunit; the flagellar cap protein (FliD); or the MotAB proteins, involved in the control of flagellar motion, were generated and tested for binding to differentiated Caco-2 cells. Binding of the aEPEC strain to enterocytes was significantly impaired in strains with the fliCa nd fliD genes deleted, both of which could not form flagella on the bacterial surface. A nonmotile but flagellated MotAB mutant also showed impaired adhesion to Caco-2 cells. In accordance with these observations, adhesion of a EPEC strain 1711-4 to Caco-2 cells was drastically reduced after the treatment of Caco-2 cells with purified FliD. In addition, incubation of a EPEC bacteria with specific anti-FliD serum impaired binding to Caco-2 cells. Finally, incubation of Caco-2 cells with purified FliD, followed by immunolabeling, showed that the protein was specifically bound to the microvillus tips of differentiated Caco-2 cells. The a EPEC FliD or anti-FliD serum also reduced the adherence of prototype typical enteropathogenic, enterohemorrhagic, and enterotoxigenic E. coli strains to Caco-2 cells. In conclusion, our findings further strengthened the role of flagella in the adherence of a EPEC to human enterocytes and disclosed the relevant structural and functional involvement of FliD in the adhesion process. PMID:26831466

  8. Interaction of the intrinsically unstructured phage lambda N Protein with Escherichia coli NusA.

    PubMed

    Prasch, Stefan; Schwarz, Sabine; Eisenmann, Anke; Wöhrl, Birgitta M; Schweimer, Kristian; Rösch, Paul

    2006-04-11

    N protein of the Escherichia coli phage lambda (lambdaN) is involved in antitermination, a transcription regulatory process that is essential for the expression of delayed early genes during phage lytic development. lambdaN is an intrinsically unstructured protein that possesses three distinct binding sites interacting with the carboxy terminus of the E. coli host factor protein NusA, the viral nutBoxB-RNA, and RNA polymerase, respectively. Heteronuclear NMR experiments with lambdaN(1-53) in complex with NusA(339-495) revealed that upon complex formation the lambdaN-binding interface, lambdaN(34-47), adopts a rigid structure. NMR data also indicate the induction of a weak helical structure in the nutboxB RNA-binding region lambdaN(1-22) upon binding to NusA(339-495) even in the absence of RNA. Titration experiments of the lambdaN(1-53)-nutBoxB RNA complex with NusA(339-495) revealed that the ternary complex can be described in terms of two structurally independent binary interactions. Furthermore, chemical-shift perturbation experiments with different NusA constructs and different lambdaN peptides showed that only NusA(353-416) is involved in lambdaN binding. We found that only one molecule of NusA(339-426) binds to one molecule of lambdaN(1-53). We also clarified the role of the lambdaN-binding region and could show that N41-R47 also binds to NusA(339-495). Furthermore, we observe that lambdaN(1-22) adopts a helical fold upon binding to NusA(339-495), in agreement with one of the theoretical models of lambdaN action.

  9. Flagellar Cap Protein FliD Mediates Adherence of Atypical Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli to Enterocyte Microvilli

    PubMed Central

    Sampaio, Suely C. F.; Luiz, Wilson B.; Vieira, Mônica A. M.; Ferreira, Rita C. C.; Garcia, Bruna G.; Sinigaglia-Coimbra, Rita; Sampaio, Jorge L. M.; Ferreira, Luís C. S.

    2016-01-01

    The expression of flagella correlates with different aspects of bacterial pathogenicity, ranging from adherence to host cells to activation of inflammatory responses by the innate immune system. In the present study, we investigated the role of flagella in the adherence of an atypical enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (aEPEC) strain (serotype O51:H40) to human enterocytes. Accordingly, isogenic mutants deficient in flagellin (FliC), the flagellar structural subunit; the flagellar cap protein (FliD); or the MotAB proteins, involved in the control of flagellar motion, were generated and tested for binding to differentiated Caco-2 cells. Binding of the aEPEC strain to enterocytes was significantly impaired in strains with the fliC and fliD genes deleted, both of which could not form flagella on the bacterial surface. A nonmotile but flagellated MotAB mutant also showed impaired adhesion to Caco-2 cells. In accordance with these observations, adhesion of aEPEC strain 1711-4 to Caco-2 cells was drastically reduced after the treatment of Caco-2 cells with purified FliD. In addition, incubation of aEPEC bacteria with specific anti-FliD serum impaired binding to Caco-2 cells. Finally, incubation of Caco-2 cells with purified FliD, followed by immunolabeling, showed that the protein was specifically bound to the microvillus tips of differentiated Caco-2 cells. The aEPEC FliD or anti-FliD serum also reduced the adherence of prototype typical enteropathogenic, enterohemorrhagic, and enterotoxigenic E. coli strains to Caco-2 cells. In conclusion, our findings further strengthened the role of flagella in the adherence of aEPEC to human enterocytes and disclosed the relevant structural and functional involvement of FliD in the adhesion process. PMID:26831466

  10. Solitary BioY Proteins Mediate Biotin Transport into Recombinant Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Finkenwirth, Friedrich; Kirsch, Franziska

    2013-01-01

    Energy-coupling factor (ECF) transporters form a large group of vitamin uptake systems in prokaryotes. They are composed of highly diverse, substrate-specific, transmembrane proteins (S units), a ubiquitous transmembrane protein (T unit), and homo- or hetero-oligomeric ABC ATPases. Biotin transporters represent a special case of ECF-type systems. The majority of the biotin-specific S units (BioY) is known or predicted to interact with T units and ABC ATPases. About one-third of BioY proteins, however, are encoded in organisms lacking any recognizable T unit. This finding raises the question of whether these BioYs function as transporters in a solitary state, a feature ascribed to certain BioYs in the past. To address this question in living cells, an Escherichia coli K-12 derivative deficient in biotin synthesis and devoid of its endogenous high-affinity biotin transporter was constructed as a reference strain. This organism is particularly suited for this purpose because components of ECF transporters do not naturally occur in E. coli K-12. The double mutant was viable in media containing either high levels of biotin or a precursor of the downstream biosynthetic path. Importantly, it was nonviable on trace levels of biotin. Eight solitary bioY genes of proteobacterial origin were individually expressed in the reference strain. Each of the BioYs conferred biotin uptake activity on the recombinants, which was inferred from uptake assays with [3H]biotin and growth of the cells on trace levels of biotin. The results underscore that solitary BioY transports biotin across the cytoplasmic membrane. PMID:23836870

  11. Transfection of Escherichia coli spheroplasts with a bacteriophage Mu DNA-protein complex.

    PubMed Central

    Chase, C D; Benzinger, R H

    1982-01-01

    We disrupted bacteriophage Mu particles by freeze-thaw treatment and recovered the DNA by CsCl density gradient centrifugation. This CsCl-purified DNA had a buoyant density which was indistinguishable from that of phenol-extracted Mu DNA. It was, however, 10(3) times more infective than phenol-extracted DNA for spheroplasts of exoV endI Escherichia coli. Infectivity was destroyed by proteinase K as well as by pancreatic DNase, indicating that the infective form was a DNA-protein complex. The infective properties of the complex demonstrated that the protein protects. Mu DNA against degradation by exonuclease V and that it serves at least one other function in bacteriophage Mu infection. The infectivity of the CsCl-purified DNA was due to a small class of highly infective molecules which sedimented 1.2. times faster than phenol-extracted Mu DNA on neutral sucrose gradients. This change in sedimentation rate is best explained by the formation of protein-linked circular monomers or linear dimers of Mu DNA. In vitro labeling of the DNA-protein complex, followed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, showed that the CsCl-purified DNA contained a noncovalently associated 65,000-dalton polypeptide. A 65,000-dalton protein was also found to be a minor component of the bacteriophage Mu particle. No protein was found in phenol-extracted Mu DNA. These results suggest that the 65,000-dalton protein is necessary for successful phage infection and is normally injected into the host cell with the Mu genome. PMID:6211551

  12. Properties of the periplasmic ModA molybdate-binding protein of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Rech, S; Wolin, C; Gunsalus, R P

    1996-02-01

    The modABCD operon, located at 17 min on the Escherichia coli chromosome, encodes the protein components of a high affinity molybdate uptake system. Sequence analysis of the modA gene (GenBank L34009) predicts that it encodes a periplasmic binding protein based on the presence of a leader-like sequence at its N terminus. To examine the properties of the ModA protein, the modA structural gene was overexpressed, and its product was purified. The ModA protein was localized to the periplasmic space of the cell, and it was released following a gentle osmotic shock. The N-terminal sequence of ModA confirmed that a leader region of 24 amino acids was removed upon export from the cell. The apparent size of ModA is 31.6 kDa as determined by gel sieve chromatography, whereas it is 22.5 kDa when examined by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. A ligand-dependent protein mobility shift assay was devised using a native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis protocol to examine binding of molybdate and other anions to the ModA periplasmic protein. Whereas molybdate and tungstate were bound with high affinity (approximately 5 microM), sulfate, chromate, selenate, phosphate, and chlorate did not bind even when tested at 2 mM. A UV spectral assay revealed apparent Kd values of binding for molybdate and tungstate of 3 and 7 microM, respectively. Strains defective in the modA gene were unable to transport molybdate unless high levels of the anion were supplied in the medium. Therefore the modA gene product is essential for high affinity molybdate uptake by the cell. Tungstate interference of molybdate acquisition by the cell is apparently due in part to the high affinity of the ModA protein for this anion.

  13. Functional Heterogeneity of the UpaH Autotransporter Protein from Uropathogenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Allsopp, Luke P.; Beloin, Christophe; Moriel, Danilo Gomes; Totsika, Makrina; Ghigo, Jean-Marc

    2012-01-01

    Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) is responsible for the majority of urinary tract infections (UTI). To cause a UTI, UPEC must adhere to the epithelial cells of the urinary tract and overcome the shear flow forces of urine. This function is mediated primarily by fimbrial adhesins, which mediate specific attachment to host cell receptors. Another group of adhesins that contributes to UPEC-mediated UTI is autotransporter (AT) proteins. AT proteins possess a range of virulence properties, such as adherence, aggregation, invasion, and biofilm formation. One recently characterized AT protein of UPEC is UpaH, a large adhesin-involved-in-diffuse-adherence (AIDA-I)-type AT protein that contributes to biofilm formation and bladder colonization. In this study we characterized a series of naturally occurring variants of UpaH. We demonstrate that extensive sequence variation exists within the passenger-encoding domain of UpaH variants from different UPEC strains. This sequence variation is associated with functional heterogeneity with respect to the ability of UpaH to mediate biofilm formation. In contrast, all of the UpaH variants examined retained a conserved ability to mediate binding to extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. Bioinformatic analysis of the UpaH passenger domain identified a conserved region (UpaHCR) and a hydrophobic region (UpaHHR). Deletion of these domains reduced biofilm formation but not the binding to ECM proteins. Despite variation in the upaH sequence, the transcription of upaH was repressed by a conserved mechanism involving the global regulator H-NS, and mutation of the hns gene relieved this repression. Overall, our findings shed new light on the regulation and functions of the UpaH AT protein. PMID:22904291

  14. Novel Host Proteins and Signaling Pathways in Enteropathogenic E. coli Pathogenesis Identified by Global Phosphoproteome Analysis*

    PubMed Central

    Scholz, Roland; Imami, Koshi; Scott, Nichollas E.; Trimble, William S.; Foster, Leonard J.; Finlay, B. Brett

    2015-01-01

    Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) uses a type III secretion system (T3SS) to directly translocate effector proteins into host cells where they play a pivotal role in subverting host cell signaling needed for disease. However, our knowledge of how EPEC affects host protein phosphorylation is limited to a few individual protein studies. We employed a quantitative proteomics approach to globally map alterations in the host phosphoproteome during EPEC infection. By characterizing host phosphorylation events at various time points throughout infection, we examined how EPEC dynamically impacts the host phosphoproteome over time. This experimental setup also enabled identification of T3SS-dependent and -independent changes in host phosphorylation. Specifically, T3SS-regulated events affected various cellular processes that are known EPEC targets, including cytoskeletal organization, immune signaling, and intracellular trafficking. However, the involvement of phosphorylation in these events has thus far been poorly studied. We confirmed the MAPK family as an established key host player, showed its central role in signal transduction during EPEC infection, and extended the repertoire of known signaling hubs with previously unrecognized proteins, including TPD52, CIN85, EPHA2, and HSP27. We identified altered phosphorylation of known EPEC targets, such as cofilin, where the involvement of phosphorylation has so far been undefined, thus providing novel mechanistic insights into the roles of these proteins in EPEC infection. An overlap of regulated proteins, especially those that are cytoskeleton-associated, was observed when compared with the phosphoproteome of Shigella-infected cells. We determined the biological relevance of the phosphorylation of a novel protein in EPEC pathogenesis, septin-9 (SEPT9). Both siRNA knockdown and a phosphorylation-impaired SEPT9 mutant decreased bacterial adherence and EPEC-mediated cell death. In contrast, a phosphorylation

  15. Calcium chloride made E. coli competent for uptake of extraneous DNA through overproduction of OmpC protein.

    PubMed

    Aich, Pulakesh; Patra, Monobesh; Chatterjee, Arijit Kumar; Roy, Sourav Singha; Basu, Tarakdas

    2012-06-01

    In the standard method of transformation of Escherichia coli with extraneous DNA, cells are made competent for DNA uptake by incubating in ice-cold 100 mM CaCl(2). Analysis of the whole protein profile of CaCl(2)-treated E. coli cells by the techniques of one- and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, MALDI-MS and immunoprecipitation revealed overproduction of outer membrane proteins OmpC, OmpA and heat-shock protein GroEL. In parity, transformation efficiency of E. coli ompC mutant by plasmid pUC19 DNA was found to be about 40 % lower than that of the wild type strain. Moreover, in E. coli cells containing groEL-bearing plasmid, induction of GroEL caused simultaneous overproduction of OmpC. On the other hand, less OmpC was synthesized in E. coli groEL mutant compared to its wild type counterpart, by CaCl(2)-shock. From these results it can be suggested that in the process of CaCl(2)-mediated generation of competence, the heat-shock chaperone GroEL has specific role in DNA entry into the cell, possibly through the overproduced OmpC and OmpA porins.

  16. Systematic Nomenclature for GGDEF and EAL Domain-Containing Cyclic Di-GMP Turnover Proteins of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Hengge, Regine; Galperin, Michael Y; Ghigo, Jean-Marc; Gomelsky, Mark; Green, Jeffrey; Hughes, Kelly T; Jenal, Urs; Landini, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, Escherichia coli has served as one of a few model bacterial species for studying cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) signaling. The widely used E. coli K-12 laboratory strains possess 29 genes encoding proteins with GGDEF and/or EAL domains, which include 12 diguanylate cyclases (DGC), 13 c-di-GMP-specific phosphodiesterases (PDE), and 4 "degenerate" enzymatically inactive proteins. In addition, six new GGDEF and EAL (GGDEF/EAL) domain-encoding genes, which encode two DGCs and four PDEs, have recently been found in genomic analyses of commensal and pathogenic E. coli strains. As a group of researchers who have been studying the molecular mechanisms and the genomic basis of c-di-GMP signaling in E. coli, we now propose a general and systematic dgc and pde nomenclature for the enzymatically active GGDEF/EAL domain-encoding genes of this model species. This nomenclature is intuitive and easy to memorize, and it can also be applied to additional genes and proteins that might be discovered in various strains of E. coli in future studies.

  17. Systematic Nomenclature for GGDEF and EAL Domain-Containing Cyclic Di-GMP Turnover Proteins of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Hengge, Regine; Galperin, Michael Y; Ghigo, Jean-Marc; Gomelsky, Mark; Green, Jeffrey; Hughes, Kelly T; Jenal, Urs; Landini, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, Escherichia coli has served as one of a few model bacterial species for studying cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) signaling. The widely used E. coli K-12 laboratory strains possess 29 genes encoding proteins with GGDEF and/or EAL domains, which include 12 diguanylate cyclases (DGC), 13 c-di-GMP-specific phosphodiesterases (PDE), and 4 "degenerate" enzymatically inactive proteins. In addition, six new GGDEF and EAL (GGDEF/EAL) domain-encoding genes, which encode two DGCs and four PDEs, have recently been found in genomic analyses of commensal and pathogenic E. coli strains. As a group of researchers who have been studying the molecular mechanisms and the genomic basis of c-di-GMP signaling in E. coli, we now propose a general and systematic dgc and pde nomenclature for the enzymatically active GGDEF/EAL domain-encoding genes of this model species. This nomenclature is intuitive and easy to memorize, and it can also be applied to additional genes and proteins that might be discovered in various strains of E. coli in future studies. PMID:26148715

  18. Production of Polyclonal Antibody against Grapevine fanleaf virus Movement Protein Expressed in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Koolivand, Davoud; Bashir, Nemat Sokhandan; Behjatnia, Seyed Aliakbar; Joozani, Raziallah Jafari

    2016-01-01

    The genomic region of Grapevine fanleaf virus (GFLV) encoding the movement protein (MP) was cloned into pET21a and transformed into Escherichia coli strain BL21 (DE3) to express the protein. Induction was made with a wide range of isopropyl-β-D-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG) concentrations (1, 1.5, and 2 mM) each for duration of 4, 6, or 16 h. However, the highest expression level was achieved with 1 mM IPTG for 4 h. Identity of the expressed protein was confirmed by sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) followed by Western blotting. The expressed 41 kDa protein was purified under denaturing condition by affinity chromatography, reconfirmed by Western blotting and plate-trapped antigen enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (PTA-ELISA) before being used as a recombinant antigen to raise polyclonal antibodies in rabbits. Purified anti-GFLV MP immunoglobulines (IgGs) and conjugated IgGs detected the expressed MP and GFLV virions in infected grapevines when used in PTA-ELISA, double antibody sandwich-ELISA, and Western blotting. This is the first report on the production of anti-GFLV MP polyclonal antibodies and application for the virus detection. PMID:27721695

  19. l-Arabinose Binding Protein from Escherichia coli B/r

    PubMed Central

    Hogg, R. W.; Englesberg, E.

    1969-01-01

    A protein which is capable of binding l-arabinose-1-14C has been isolated from l-arabinose-induced cultures of Escherichia coli B/r. Analysis for this l-arabinose-binding protein (ABP) in a number of l-arabinose-negative mutants suggests that the ABP is not coded for by any of the known genetic units of the l-arabinose complex yet is under the control of the regulator gene araC. The ABP has been purified and found to bind l-arabinose, d-fucose, d-xylose, and l-ribulose with decreasing affinities. The Km for l-arabinose is 5.7 × 10−6m. The molecular weight, as determined by equilibrium centrifugation, was found to be 32,000. The protein was observed to have many features that liken it to other recently isolated binding proteins that have been implicated in the active transport of small molecules. Images PMID:4899002

  20. Expression of Functional Recombinant Mussel Adhesive Protein Mgfp-5 in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Dong Soo; Yoo, Hyo Jin; Jun, Jong Hyub; Moon, Won Kyu; Cha, Hyung Joon

    2004-01-01

    Mussel adhesive proteins have been suggested as a basis for environmentally friendly adhesives for use in aqueous conditions and in medicine. However, attempts to produce functional and economical recombinant mussel adhesive proteins (mainly foot protein type 1) in several systems have failed. Here, the cDNA coding for Mytilus galloprovincialis foot protein type 5 (Mgfp-5) was isolated for the first time. Using this cDNA, we produced a recombinant Mgfp-5 fused with a hexahistidine affinity ligand, which was expressed in a soluble form in Escherichia coli and was highly purified using affinity chromatography. The adhesive properties of purified recombinant Mgfp-5 were compared with the commercial extracted mussel adhesive Cell-Tak by investigating adhesion force using atomic force microscopy, material surface coating, and quartz crystal microbalance. Even though further macroscale assays are needed, these microscale assays showed that recombinant Mgfp-5 has significant adhesive ability and may be useful as a bioadhesive in medical or underwater environments. PMID:15184131

  1. Identification of Escherichia coli F4ac-binding proteins in porcine milk fat globule membrane

    PubMed Central

    Novakovic, Predrag; Huang, Yanyun Y.; Lockerbie, Betty; Shahriar, Farshid; Kelly, John; Gordon, John R.; Middleton, Dorothy M.; Loewen, Matthew E.; Kidney, Beverly A.; Simko, Elemir

    2015-01-01

    F4ac-positive enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) must attach to the intestinal mucosa to cause diarrhea in piglets. Prevention of bacterial attachment to the intestinal mucosa is the most effective defense against ETEC-induced diarrhea. Porcine milk fat globule membranes (MFGM) were shown to be able to inhibit attachment of ETEC to the intestinal brush border; however, the specific components of porcine MFGM that inhibited attachment of ETEC to enterocytes were not identified. Accordingly, the purpose of this study was to identify F4ac-binding MFGM proteins by overlay Western blot and affinity chromatography. The proteome of porcine MFGM was characterized and the following F4ac-binding proteins were detected by overlay Western blot and affinity chromatography: lactadherin, butyrophilin, adipophilin, acyl-CoA synthetase 3, and fatty acid-binding protein 3. The biological function of these proteins was not investigated but it is possible that their interaction with F4ac fimbria interferes with bacterial attachment and colonization. PMID:25852227

  2. Identification of Escherichia coli F4ac-binding proteins in porcine milk fat globule membrane.

    PubMed

    Novakovic, Predrag; Huang, Yanyun Y; Lockerbie, Betty; Shahriar, Farshid; Kelly, John; Gordon, John R; Middleton, Dorothy M; Loewen, Matthew E; Kidney, Beverly A; Simko, Elemir

    2015-04-01

    F4ac-positive enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) must attach to the intestinal mucosa to cause diarrhea in piglets. Prevention of bacterial attachment to the intestinal mucosa is the most effective defense against ETEC-induced diarrhea. Porcine milk fat globule membranes (MFGM) were shown to be able to inhibit attachment of ETEC to the intestinal brush border; however, the specific components of porcine MFGM that inhibited attachment of ETEC to enterocytes were not identified. Accordingly, the purpose of this study was to identify F4ac-binding MFGM proteins by overlay Western blot and affinity chromatography. The proteome of porcine MFGM was characterized and the following F4ac-binding proteins were detected by overlay Western blot and affinity chromatography: lactadherin, butyrophilin, adipophilin, acyl-CoA synthetase 3, and fatty acid-binding protein 3. The biological function of these proteins was not investigated but it is possible that their interaction with F4ac fimbria interferes with bacterial attachment and colonization.

  3. A PLGA-encapsulated chimeric protein protects against adherence and toxicity of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Nazarian, Shahram; Gargari, Seyed Latif Mousavi; Rasooli, Iraj; Hasannia, Sadegh; Pirooznia, Nazanin

    2014-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) are the most common cause of diarrhea among children. Colonization factors and enterotoxins are the major ETEC candidate vaccines. Since protection against ETEC mostly occurs by induction of IgA antibodies, much effort is focused on the development of oral vaccines. In this study oral immunogenicity of a poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) encapsulated chimeric protein containing CfaB, CstH, CotA and LTB (Heat-labile B subunit) was investigated. The protein was encapsulated in PLGA by double emulsion method and nanoparticles were characterized physicochemically. Immunogenicity was assessed by evaluating IgG1, IgG2 and IgA titers after BALB/c mice vaccination. Non aggregated nanoparticles had a spherical shape with an average particle size of 252.7±23 nm and 91.96±4.4% of encapsulation efficiency. Western blotting showed maintenance of the molecular weight and antigenicity of the released protein. Oral immunization of mice induced serum IgG and fecal IgA antibody responses. Immunization induced protection against ETEC binding to Caco-2 cells. The effect of LT toxin on fluid accumulation in ileal loops was neutralized by inhibition of enterotoxin binding to GM1-ganglosides. Delivery of the chimeric protein in PLGA elicited both systemic and mucosal immune responses. The findings could be exploited to development of oral multi-component ETEC prophylactic measures. PMID:23906742

  4. Identification of Escherichia coli F4ac-binding proteins in porcine milk fat globule membrane.

    PubMed

    Novakovic, Predrag; Huang, Yanyun Y; Lockerbie, Betty; Shahriar, Farshid; Kelly, John; Gordon, John R; Middleton, Dorothy M; Loewen, Matthew E; Kidney, Beverly A; Simko, Elemir

    2015-04-01

    F4ac-positive enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) must attach to the intestinal mucosa to cause diarrhea in piglets. Prevention of bacterial attachment to the intestinal mucosa is the most effective defense against ETEC-induced diarrhea. Porcine milk fat globule membranes (MFGM) were shown to be able to inhibit attachment of ETEC to the intestinal brush border; however, the specific components of porcine MFGM that inhibited attachment of ETEC to enterocytes were not identified. Accordingly, the purpose of this study was to identify F4ac-binding MFGM proteins by overlay Western blot and affinity chromatography. The proteome of porcine MFGM was characterized and the following F4ac-binding proteins were detected by overlay Western blot and affinity chromatography: lactadherin, butyrophilin, adipophilin, acyl-CoA synthetase 3, and fatty acid-binding protein 3. The biological function of these proteins was not investigated but it is possible that their interaction with F4ac fimbria interferes with bacterial attachment and colonization. PMID:25852227

  5. Characterization of the knob domain of the adenovirus type 5 fiber protein expressed in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Henry, L J; Xia, D; Wilke, M E; Deisenhofer, J; Gerard, R D

    1994-01-01

    The adenovirus fiber protein is used for attachment of the virus to a specific receptor on the cell surface. Structurally, the protein consists of a long, thin shaft that protrudes from the vertex of the virus capsid and terminates in a globular domain termed the knob. To verify that the knob is the domain which interacts with the cellular receptor, we have cloned and expressed the knob from adenovirus type 5 together with a single repeat of the shaft in Escherichia coli. The protein was purified by conventional chromatography and functionally characterized for its interaction with the adenovirus receptor. The recombinant knob domain bound about 4,700 sites per HeLa cell with an affinity of 3 x 10(9) M-1 and blocked adenovirus infection of human cells. Antibodies raised against the knob also blocked virus infection. By gel filtration and X-ray diffraction analysis of protein crystals, the knob was shown to consist of a homotrimer of 21-kDa subunits. The results confirm that the trimeric knob is the ligand for attachment to the adenovirus receptor. Images PMID:8035520

  6. Escherichia coli Response to Uranyl Exposure at Low pH and Associated Protein Regulations

    PubMed Central

    Khemiri, Arbia; Carrière, Marie; Bremond, Nicolas; Ben Mlouka, Mohamed Amine; Coquet, Laurent; Llorens, Isabelle; Chapon, Virginie; Jouenne, Thierry; Cosette, Pascal; Berthomieu, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    Better understanding of uranyl toxicity in bacteria is necessary to optimize strains for bioremediation purposes or for using bacteria as biodetectors for bioavailable uranyl. In this study, after different steps of optimization, Escherichia colicells were exposed to uranyl at low pH to minimize uranyl precipitation and to increase its bioavailability. Bacteria were adapted to mid acidic pH before exposure to 50 or 80 µM uranyl acetate for two hours at pH≈3. To evaluate the impact of uranium, growth in these conditions were compared and the same rates of cells survival were observed in control and uranyl exposed cultures. Additionally, this impact was analyzedby two-dimensional differential gel electrophoresis proteomics to discover protein actors specifically present or accumulated in contact with uranium.Exposure to uranium resulted in differential accumulation of proteins associated with oxidative stress and in the accumulation of the NADH/quinone oxidoreductase WrbA. This FMN dependent protein performs obligate two-electron reduction of quinones, and may be involved in cells response to oxidative stress. Interestingly, this WrbA protein presents similarities with the chromate reductase from E. coli, which was shown to reduce uranyl in vitro. PMID:24587082

  7. Structure and Function of the Escherichia coli Tol-Pal Stator Protein TolR*

    PubMed Central

    Wojdyla, Justyna A.; Cutts, Erin; Kaminska, Renata; Papadakos, Grigorios; Hopper, Jonathan T. S.; Stansfeld, Phillip J.; Staunton, David; Robinson, Carol V.; Kleanthous, Colin

    2015-01-01

    TolR is a 15-kDa inner membrane protein subunit of the Tol-Pal complex in Gram-negative bacteria, and its function is poorly understood. Tol-Pal is recruited to cell division sites where it is involved in maintaining the integrity of the outer membrane. TolR is related to MotB, the peptidoglycan (PG)-binding stator protein from the flagellum, suggesting it might serve a similar role in Tol-Pal. The only structure thus far reported for TolR is of the periplasmic domain from Haemophilus influenzae in which N- and C-terminal residues had been deleted (TolR(62–133), Escherichia coli numbering). H. influenzae TolR(62–133) is a symmetrical dimer with a large deep cleft at the dimer interface. Here, we present the 1.7-Å crystal structure of the intact periplasmic domain of E. coli TolR (TolR(36–142)). E. coli TolR(36–142) is also dimeric, but the architecture of the dimer is radically different from that of TolR(62–133) due to the intertwining of its N and C termini. TolR monomers are rotated ∼180° relative to each other as a result of this strand swapping, obliterating the putative PG-binding groove seen in TolR(62–133). We found that removal of the strand-swapped regions (TolR(60–133)) exposes cryptic PG binding activity that is absent in the full-length domain. We conclude that to function as a stator in the Tol-Pal complex dimeric TolR must undergo large scale structural remodeling reminiscent of that proposed for MotB, where the N- and C-terminal sequences unfold in order for the protein to both reach and bind the PG layer ∼90 Å away from the inner membrane. PMID:26354441

  8. A novel indirect sequence readout component in the E. coli cyclic AMP receptor protein operator.

    PubMed

    Lindemose, Søren; Nielsen, Peter Eigil; Valentin-Hansen, Poul; Møllegaard, Niels Erik

    2014-03-21

    The cyclic AMP receptor protein (CRP) from Escherichia coli has been extensively studied for several decades. In particular, a detailed characterization of CRP interaction with DNA has been obtained. The CRP dimer recognizes a consensus sequence AANTGTGANNNNNNTCACANTT through direct amino acid nucleobase interactions in the major groove of the two operator half-sites. Crystal structure analyses have revealed that the interaction results in two strong kinks at the TG/CA steps closest to the 6-base-pair spacer (N6). This spacer exhibits high sequence variability among the more than 100 natural binding sites in the E. coli genome, but the exact role of the N6 region in CRP interaction has not previously been systematic examined. Here we employ an in vitro selection system based on a randomized N6 spacer region to demonstrate that CRP binding to the lacP1 site may be enhanced up to 14-fold or abolished by varying the N6 spacer sequences. Furthermore, on the basis of sequence analysis and uranyl (UO2(2+)) probing data, we propose that the underlying mechanism relies on N6 deformability.

  9. Dynamic distribution of seqa protein across the chromosome of escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Romero, María Antonia; Busby, Stephen J W; Dyer, Nigel P; Ott, Sascha; Millard, Andrew D; Grainger, David C

    2010-05-18

    The bacterial SeqA protein binds to hemi-methylated GATC sequences that arise in newly synthesized DNA upon passage of the replication machinery. In Escherichia coli K-12, the single replication origin oriC is a well-characterized target for SeqA, which binds to multiple hemi-methylated GATC sequences immediately after replication has initiated. This sequesters oriC, thereby preventing reinitiation of replication. However, the genome-wide DNA binding properties of SeqA are unknown, and hence, here, we describe a study of the binding of SeqA across the entire Escherichia coli K-12 chromosome, using chromatin immunoprecipitation in combination with DNA microarrays. Our data show that SeqA binding correlates with the frequency and spacing of GATC sequences across the entire genome. Less SeqA is found in highly transcribed regions, as well as in the ter macrodomain. Using synchronized cultures, we show that SeqA distribution differs with the cell cycle. SeqA remains bound to some targets after replication has ceased, and these targets locate to genes encoding factors involved in nucleotide metabolism, chromosome replication, and methyl transfer.

  10. Spatial coordination between chromosomes and cell division proteins in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Männik, Jaan; Bailey, Matthew W

    2015-01-01

    To successfully propagate, cells need to coordinate chromosomal replication and segregation with cell division to prevent formation of DNA-less cells and cells with damaged DNA. Here, we review molecular systems in Escherichia coli that are known to be involved in positioning the divisome and chromosome relative to each other. Interestingly, this well-studied micro-organism has several partially redundant mechanisms to achieve this task; none of which are essential. Some of these systems determine the localization of the divisome relative to chromosomes such as SlmA-dependent nucleoid occlusion, some localize the chromosome relative to the divisome such as DNA translocation by FtsK, and some are likely to act on both systems such as the Min system and newly described Ter linkage. Moreover, there is evidence that E. coli harbors other divisome-chromosome coordination systems in addition to those known. The review also discusses the minimal requirements of coordination between chromosomes and cell division proteins needed for cell viability. Arguments are presented that cells can propagate without any dedicated coordination between their chromosomes and cell division machinery at the expense of lowered fitness. PMID:25926826

  11. Spatial coordination between chromosomes and cell division proteins in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Männik, Jaan; Bailey, Matthew W.

    2015-01-01

    To successfully propagate, cells need to coordinate chromosomal replication and segregation with cell division to prevent formation of DNA-less cells and cells with damaged DNA. Here, we review molecular systems in Escherichia coli that are known to be involved in positioning the divisome and chromosome relative to each other. Interestingly, this well-studied micro-organism has several partially redundant mechanisms to achieve this task; none of which are essential. Some of these systems determine the localization of the divisome relative to chromosomes such as SlmA-dependent nucleoid occlusion, some localize the chromosome relative to the divisome such as DNA translocation by FtsK, and some are likely to act on both systems such as the Min system and newly described Ter linkage. Moreover, there is evidence that E. coli harbors other divisome-chromosome coordination systems in addition to those known. The review also discusses the minimal requirements of coordination between chromosomes and cell division proteins needed for cell viability. Arguments are presented that cells can propagate without any dedicated coordination between their chromosomes and cell division machinery at the expense of lowered fitness. PMID:25926826

  12. Pore-forming Activity of the Escherichia coli Type III Secretion System Protein EspD.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Abhishek; Caballero-Franco, Celia; Bakker, Dannika; Totten, Stephanie; Jardim, Armando

    2015-10-16

    Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli is a causative agent of gastrointestinal and diarrheal diseases. Pathogenesis associated with enterohemorrhagic E. coli involves direct delivery of virulence factors from the bacteria into epithelial cell cytosol via a syringe-like organelle known as the type III secretion system. The type III secretion system protein EspD is a critical factor required for formation of a translocation pore on the host cell membrane. Here, we show that recombinant EspD spontaneously integrates into large unilamellar vesicle (LUV) lipid bilayers; however, pore formation required incorporation of anionic phospholipids such as phosphatidylserine and an acidic pH. Leakage assays performed with fluorescent dextrans confirmed that EspD formed a structure with an inner diameter of ∼2.5 nm. Protease mapping indicated that the two transmembrane helical hairpin of EspD penetrated the lipid layer positioning the N- and C-terminal domains on the extralumenal surface of LUVs. Finally, a combination of glutaraldehyde cross-linking and rate zonal centrifugation suggested that EspD in LUV membranes forms an ∼280-320-kDa oligomeric structure consisting of ∼6-7 subunits.

  13. Direct linking of metabolism and gene expression in the proline utilization A protein from Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yuzhen; Zhu, Weidong; Bellur, Padmanetra S.; Rewinkel, Dustin; Becker, Donald F.

    2009-01-01

    Summary The control of gene expression by enzymes provides a direct pathway for cells to respond to fluctuations in metabolites and nutrients. One example is the proline utilization A (PutA) protein from Escherichia coli. PutA is a membrane-associated enzyme that catalyzes the oxidation of L-proline to glutamate using a flavin containing proline dehydrogenase domain and a NAD+ dependent Δ1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate dehydrogenase domain. In some Gram-negative bacteria such as E. coli, PutA is also endowed with a ribbon-helix-helix DNA-binding domain and acts as a transcriptional repressor of the proline utilization genes. PutA switches between transcriptional repressor and enzymatic functions in response to proline availability. Molecular insights into the redox based mechanism of PutA functional switching from recent studies are reviewed. In addition, new results from cell-based transcription assays are presented which correlate PutA membrane localization with put gene expression levels. General membrane localization of PutA, however, is not sufficient to activate the put genes. PMID:18324349

  14. Construction of prokaryotic expression plasmid of mtrC protein of Neisseria gonorrhoeae and its expression in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hongxiang; Tu, Yating; Lin, Nengxing; Huang, Changzheng

    2005-01-01

    In order to provide a rational research basis for detection of resistance of Neisseria gonorrhoeae to antimicrobial hydrophobic agents and study on the resistant mechanism of multiple transferable resistance (mtr) efflux system, plasmid pET-28a(+) encoding mtrC gene was constructed and the related target protein was expressed in Escherichia coli (E. coli) DE3. The fragments of mtrC gene of Neisseria gonorrhoeae from the standard strains were amplified and cloned into prokaryotic expression plasmid pET-28a(+) with restriction endonuclease to construct recombinant pET-mtrC which was verified by restriction endonuclease and DNA sequencing. The recombinant was transformed into E. coli DE3 to express the protein mtrC induced by IPTG. The results showed mtrC DNA fragment was proved correct through restriction endonuclease and DNA sequencing. Its sequence was 99.5% homologus to that published on GeneBank (U14993). A 48.5 kD fusion protein which was induced by IPTG was detected by SDS-PAGE. It was concluded that the construction of prokaryotic expression plasmid of mtrC protein of Neisseria gonorrhoeae was correct and the fusion protein was successively expressed in E. coli. PMID:16463681

  15. A mixture of fortunes: the curious determination of the structure of Escherichia coli BL21 Gab protein.

    PubMed

    Lohkamp, Bernhard; Dobritzsch, Doreen

    2008-04-01

    In protein crystallography, monodisperse protein samples of high purity are usually required in order to obtain diffraction-quality crystals. Here, crystals were reproducibly grown from a protein sample before its homogeneity had been determined. The sample was obtained after the first attempt to purify a recombinant target protein from an Escherichia coli cell lysate. Subsequent analysis revealed that it was a mixture of about 50 different proteins with no predominant species. Diffraction data were collected to 2.1 A and the space group was identified as I422. A molecular-replacement search with models of the expected target did not give a solution, which suggested that a contaminating E. coli protein had been crystallized. A PDB search revealed 256 structures determined in space group I422, of which 14 are E. coli proteins and two have unit-cell parameters similar to those observed. Molecular replacement with these structures showed a clear solution for one of them, the Gab protein. The structure is presented and compared with the deposited structure, from which it shows small but significant differences. The refined model contains bicine and sulfate as bound ligands, which provide insights into possible substrate-binding sites.

  16. Separation of sublethal and lethal effects of the bactericidal/permeability increasing protein on Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Mannion, B A; Weiss, J; Elsbach, P

    1990-01-01

    Binding of the bactericidal/permeability increasing protein (BPI) of granulocytes to Escherichia coli promptly produces several discrete outer envelope alterations and growth arrest without major impairment of bacterial structure or biosynthetic capabilities, raising the question whether these early effects of BPI are sufficient to cause bacterial death. In this study, the bactericidal action of BPI was examined more closely. We have found that bovine or human serum albumin blocks bacterial killing without preventing BPI binding or an increase in outer membrane permeability. Moreover, addition of serum albumin after BPI results in growth resumption without displacement of bound BPI and without (early) repair of the envelope alterations. These effects are opposite to those produced by Mg2+ (80 mM), which displaces greater than 85% of bound BPI and rapidly initiates outer envelope repair without restoration of bacterial growth. The extent of rescue by serum albumin depends on the time and pH of preincubation of BPI with E. coli: e.g., for E. coli J5 treated with human BPI, t1/2 = 79 min at pH 7.4 and 10 min at pH 6.0. The serum albumin effects on BPI action are the same in wild-type E. coli and in a mutant strain lacking an activatable phospholipase, indicating that serum albumin does not act by sequestering membrane-damaging products of bacterial phospholipid hydrolysis. The progression from reversible to irreversible growth arrest, revealed by the subsequent addition of serum albumin at different times, is paralleled by a decrease in amino acid uptake and an increase in the permeability of the cytoplasmic membrane to o-nitrophenyl-beta-D-galactoside. These findings demonstrate at least two stages in the action of BPI: (a) an early, reversible, sublethal stage in which BPI has effects on the outer envelope and causes growth arrest, and (b) time- and pH-dependent progression to a lethal stage, apparently involving cytoplasmic membrane damage, possibly caused by

  17. Separation of sublethal and lethal effects of the bactericidal/permeability increasing protein on Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Mannion, B A; Weiss, J; Elsbach, P

    1990-03-01

    Binding of the bactericidal/permeability increasing protein (BPI) of granulocytes to Escherichia coli promptly produces several discrete outer envelope alterations and growth arrest without major impairment of bacterial structure or biosynthetic capabilities, raising the question whether these early effects of BPI are sufficient to cause bacterial death. In this study, the bactericidal action of BPI was examined more closely. We have found that bovine or human serum albumin blocks bacterial killing without preventing BPI binding or an increase in outer membrane permeability. Moreover, addition of serum albumin after BPI results in growth resumption without displacement of bound BPI and without (early) repair of the envelope alterations. These effects are opposite to those produced by Mg2+ (80 mM), which displaces greater than 85% of bound BPI and rapidly initiates outer envelope repair without restoration of bacterial growth. The extent of rescue by serum albumin depends on the time and pH of preincubation of BPI with E. coli: e.g., for E. coli J5 treated with human BPI, t1/2 = 79 min at pH 7.4 and 10 min at pH 6.0. The serum albumin effects on BPI action are the same in wild-type E. coli and in a mutant strain lacking an activatable phospholipase, indicating that serum albumin does not act by sequestering membrane-damaging products of bacterial phospholipid hydrolysis. The progression from reversible to irreversible growth arrest, revealed by the subsequent addition of serum albumin at different times, is paralleled by a decrease in amino acid uptake and an increase in the permeability of the cytoplasmic membrane to o-nitrophenyl-beta-D-galactoside. These findings demonstrate at least two stages in the action of BPI: (a) an early, reversible, sublethal stage in which BPI has effects on the outer envelope and causes growth arrest, and (b) time- and pH-dependent progression to a lethal stage, apparently involving cytoplasmic membrane damage, possibly caused by

  18. Detection of D-amino acids in purified proteins synthesized in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Tetsuya; Sekine, Masae; Ogawa, Tetsuhiro; Hidaka, Makoto; Homma, Hiroshi; Masaki, Haruhiko

    2010-05-01

    It has long been believed that amino acids comprising proteins of all living organisms are only of the L-configuration, except for Gly. However, peptidyl D-amino acids were observed in hydrolysates of soluble high molecular weight fractions extracted from cells or tissues of various organisms. This strongly suggests that significant amounts of D-amino acids are naturally present in usual proteins. Thus we analyzed the D-amino acid contents of His-tag-purified beta-galactosidase and human urocortin, which were synthesized by Escherichia coli grown in controlled synthetic media. After acidic hydrolysis for various times at 110 degrees C, samples were derivatized with 4-fluoro-7-nitro-2, 1, 3-benzoxadiazole (NBD-F) and separated on a reverse-phase column followed by a chiral column into D- and L-enantiomers. The contents of D-enantiomers of Ala, Leu, Phe, Val, Asp, and Glu were determined by plotting index D/(D + L) against the incubation time for hydrolysis and extrapolating the linear regression line to 0 h to eliminate the effect of racemization of amino acids during the incubation. Significant contents of D-amino acids were reproducibly detected, the D-amino acid profile being specific to an individual protein. This finding indicated the likelihood that D-amino acids are in fact present in the purified proteins. On the other hand, the D-amino acid contents of proteins were hardly influenced by the addition of D- or L-amino acids to the cultivation medium, whereas intracellular free D-amino acids sensitively varied according to the extracellular conditions. The origin of these D-amino acids detected in proteins was discussed.

  19. Soluble protein expression in E. coli cells using IgG-binding domain of protein A as a solubilizing partner in the cold induced system.

    PubMed

    Inouye, Satoshi; Sahara, Yuiko

    2008-11-21

    We constructed a cold induced expression vector in Escherichia coli cells that consists of a histidine tag sequence for nickel chelate affinity purification, IgG-binding domain of protein A (ZZ-domain) and the multiple cloning sites. The role of ZZ-domain as a solubilizing partner at 15 degrees C was demonstrated by expressing the imidazopyrazinone-type luciferases of Renilla, Oplophorus, Gaussia, and Vargula (Cypridina) as well as the calcium-binding photoproteins and firefly luciferase. The fused protein with ZZ-domain was expressed efficiently as a soluble form in the cytoplasm of E. coli cells at low temperature.

  20. meoA is the structural gene for outer membrane protein c of Escherichia coli K12.

    PubMed

    van Alphen, L; Lugtenberg, B; van Boxtel, R; Hack, A M; Verhoef, C; Havekes, L

    1979-01-31

    The isolation and characterization of two mutants of Escherichia coli K12 with an altered outer membrane protein c is described. The first mutant, strain CE1151, was isolated as a bacteriophage Me1 resistant strain which contains normal levels of protein c. Mutant cells adsorbed the phage with a strongly decreased rate. Complexes of purified nonheat modified wild type protein c and wild type lipopolysaccharide inactivated phage Me1, indicating that these components are required for receptor activity for phage Me1. When wild type protein c was replaced by protein c of strain CE1151, the receptor-complex was far less active, showing that protein c of strain CE1151 is altered. The second mutant produces a protein c with a decreased electrophoretic mobility, designated as protein c. An altered apparent molecular weight was also observed for one or more fragments obtained after fragmentation of the mutant protein with cyanogen bromide, trypsin and chymotrypsin. Alteration of protein c was not accompanied by a detectable alteration in protein b or its fragments. Both mutations are located at minute 48 of the Escherichia coli K12 linkage map. The results strongly suggest that meoA is the structural gene for protein c.

  1. Conformation of dCDP Bound to Protein R1 of Escherichia coli Ribonucleotide Reductase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allard, P.; Kuprin, S.; Ehrenberg, A.

    1994-03-01

    Deoxycytidine 5‧-diphosphate (dCDP) is a product and competitive inhibitor of ribonucleoside-diphosphate reductase (EC 1.17.4.1) from Escherichia coli. Its conformation in the enzyme-bound state is of importance for understanding the reaction mechanism. Free and bound dCDP are in fast exchange and the transferred nuclear Overhauser effect in two-dimensional 1H NMR was used to obtain information about interproton distances within bound dCDP. The results are consistent with a model of dCDP with the base in anti conformation and the sugar in S-type puckering, when bound either to the complete enzyme complex or to the large protein subunit alone.

  2. Multiple sites of methylation in the methyl accepting chemotaxis proteins of Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Chelsky, D.; Dahlquist, F.W.

    1981-01-01

    The methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins (MCP) of E coli show at least five bands when subjected to SDS-gel electrophoresis. The intensity of the individual bands varies depending on the environment of the cells before solubilization. The faster migrating bands are enhanced following attractant stimulation, whereas the slower migrating bands are enhanced following attractant dilution or repellent increase. The time scale of these intensity changes is similar to that for adaptation of the behavioral response in these cells suggesting that methylation of the MCP is involved in producing these bands. Peptide mapping experiments show three methylated peptides in both MCP I and MCP II. These results suggest multiple sites of methylation, which are responsible, at least in part, for the observed multiple bands of the MCPs.

  3. A strategy for the production of soluble human senescence marker protein-30 in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Choi, Moonsuk S; Saxena, Ashima; Chilukuri, Nageswararao

    2010-03-12

    Senescence marker protein-30 (SMP30) has been reported to hydrolyze diisopropyl fluorophosphate (DFP), a surrogate compound of chemical warfare nerve agents. Thus, SMP30 has the potential to be useful as a prophylactic against chemical warfare nerve agent toxicity. Our efforts to generate human SMP30 in bacteria using a variety of expression vectors invariably resulted in insoluble and inactive preparations. In this study, properly folded and active recombinant human SMP30 (rHuSMP30) was produced in Escherichia coli by coexpressing it with molecular chaperones in a combined strategy. The coexpression of rHuSMP30 with GroES/GroEL/Tf at 15 degrees C, combined with the addition of a membrane fluidizer, increased osmolytes, and a two-step expression resulted in the highest enhancement of solubility and DFPase activity. Our results pave the way for exploring the use of rHuSMP30 against organophosphate and nerve agent toxicity.

  4. MreB-Dependent Organization of the E. coli Cytoplasmic Membrane Controls Membrane Protein Diffusion.

    PubMed

    Oswald, Felix; Varadarajan, Aravindan; Lill, Holger; Peterman, Erwin J G; Bollen, Yves J M

    2016-03-01

    The functional organization of prokaryotic cell membranes, which is essential for many cellular processes, has been challenging to analyze due to the small size and nonflat geometry of bacterial cells. Here, we use single-molecule fluorescence microscopy and three-dimensional quantitative analyses in live Escherichia coli to demonstrate that its cytoplasmic membrane contains microdomains with distinct physical properties. We show that the stability of these microdomains depends on the integrity of the MreB cytoskeletal network underneath the membrane. We explore how the interplay between cytoskeleton and membrane affects trans-membrane protein (TMP) diffusion and reveal that the mobility of the TMPs tested is subdiffusive, most likely caused by confinement of TMP mobility by the submembranous MreB network. Our findings demonstrate that the dynamic architecture of prokaryotic cell membranes is controlled by the MreB cytoskeleton and regulates the mobility of TMPs. PMID:26958890

  5. Expression of Escherichia coli virulence usher protein attenuates wild-type Salmonella.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xinghong; Suo, Zhiyong; Thornburg, Theresa; Holderness, Kathryn; Cao, Ling; Lim, Timothy; Walters, Nancy; Kellerman, Laura; Loetterle, Linda; Avci, Recep; Pascual, David W

    2012-01-01

    Generation of a live attenuated vaccine for bacterial pathogens often requires prior knowledge of the pathogen's virulence factors. We hypothesized an alternative approach of heterologous gene expression would make a wild-type (wt) pathogen more susceptible to host cell killing, thus, resulting in immunization. As proof of concept, the heterologous expression of enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) colonization factor antigen I (CFA/I) was tested to attenuate Salmonella. The overexpression of CFA/I resulted in significant attenuation of wt Salmonella. In-depth studies revealed the attenuation depended on the co-expression of chaperone (CfaA) and usher (CfaC) proteins. Remarkably, the CfaAC-attenuated Salmonella conferred protection against wt Salmonella challenge. Mechanistic study indicated CfaAC made Salmonella outer membranes permeable, causing Salmonella to be vulnerable to host destruction. Thus, enhancing bacterial permeability via CfaAC represents an alternative method to attenuate pathogens despite the presence of unknown virulence factors. PMID:22286706

  6. Expression of Escherichia coli virulence usher protein attenuates wild-type Salmonella.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xinghong; Suo, Zhiyong; Thornburg, Theresa; Holderness, Kathryn; Cao, Ling; Lim, Timothy; Walters, Nancy; Kellerman, Laura; Loetterle, Linda; Avci, Recep; Pascual, David W

    2012-01-01

    Generation of a live attenuated vaccine for bacterial pathogens often requires prior knowledge of the pathogen's virulence factors. We hypothesized an alternative approach of heterologous gene expression would make a wild-type (wt) pathogen more susceptible to host cell killing, thus, resulting in immunization. As proof of concept, the heterologous expression of enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) colonization factor antigen I (CFA/I) was tested to attenuate Salmonella. The overexpression of CFA/I resulted in significant attenuation of wt Salmonella. In-depth studies revealed the attenuation depended on the co-expression of chaperone (CfaA) and usher (CfaC) proteins. Remarkably, the CfaAC-attenuated Salmonella conferred protection against wt Salmonella challenge. Mechanistic study indicated CfaAC made Salmonella outer membranes permeable, causing Salmonella to be vulnerable to host destruction. Thus, enhancing bacterial permeability via CfaAC represents an alternative method to attenuate pathogens despite the presence of unknown virulence factors.

  7. Effect of 2-phenoxyethanol upon RNA, DNA and protein biosynthesis in Escherichia coli NCTC 5933.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, P; Beveridge, E G; Crone, P B

    1980-01-01

    The effects of concentrations of 2-phenoxyethanol of negligible bactericidal activity upon the rates of biosynthetic assimilation by Escherichia coli, of 14C-thymidine, 14C-uracil, 14C-phenylalanine and 14C-glucose, were assessed. Increasing the drug concentration from 0.05-0.4% w/v progressively increased inhibition of growth rate, measured as changes in optical density. Thymidine, uracil and glucose assimilation were inhibited to an extent similar to growth rate, whilst phenylalanine incorporation was markedly less sensitive at the lower concentrations (leads to 0.2% w/v). In addition to its previously observed roles in inhibiting oxidative phosphorylation and TCA cycle enzymes, it is suggested that 2-phenoxyethanol can exert a more direct inhibitory action upon DNA and RNA biosynthesis and possibly on protein biosynthesis.

  8. The Crystal Structure of the Escherichia coli Autoinducer-2 Processing Protein LsrF

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz, Z.; Xavier, K; Miller, S

    2009-01-01

    Many bacteria produce and respond to the quorum sensing signal autoinducer-2 (AI-2). Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium are among the species with the lsr operon, an operon containing AI-2 transport and processing genes that are up regulated in response to AI-2. One of the Lsr proteins, LsrF, has been implicated in processing the phosphorylated form of AI-2. Here, we present the structure of LsrF, unliganded and in complex with two phospho-AI-2 analogues, ribose-5-phosphate and ribulose-5-phosphate. The crystal structure shows that LsrF is a decamer of (??)8-barrels that exhibit a previously unseen N-terminal domain swap and have high structural homology with aldolases that process phosphorylated sugars. Ligand binding sites and key catalytic residues are structurally conserved, strongly implicating LsrF as a class I aldolase.

  9. Aspirin augments the expression of Adenomatous Polyposis Coli protein by suppression of IKKβ

    SciTech Connect

    Ashida, Noboru; Kishihata, Masako; Tien, Dat Nguyen; Kamei, Kaeko; Kimura, Takeshi; Yokode, Masayuki

    2014-04-04

    Highlights: • Clinical studies revealed aspirin inhibits cancer, but the mechanism is not known. • Adenomatous Polyposis Coli (APC) is a well-known tumor-suppressing gene. • We found aspirin up-regulates the protein of APC. • Aspirin suppressed the expression of IKKβ, an essential kinase in NFκB activation. • The deletion of IKKβ significantly increases the expression of APC protein. - Abstract: Aspirin has been widely used as analgesic, antipyretic and anti-inflammatory medicine for long. In addition to these traditional effects, clinical studies suggest that aspirin can protect against cancer, but its mechanism has not been explored. To unveil it, we identified the proteins up- or down-regulated after incubation with aspirin by using proteomics analysis with Nano-flow LC/MALDI-TOF system. Interestingly, the analysis identified the protein of Adenomatous Polyposis Coli (APC) as one of the most up-regulated protein. APC regulates cell proliferation or angiogenesis, and is widely known as a tumor-suppressing gene which can cause colorectal cancer when it is mutated. Western blots confirmed this result, and real-time PCR indicated it is transcriptionally regulated. We further tried to elucidate the molecular mechanism with focusing on IKKβ. IKKβ is the essential kinase in activation of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB), major transcriptional factors that regulate genes responsible for inflammation or immune response. Previous reports indicated that aspirin specifically inhibits IKKβ activity, and constitutively active form of IKKβ accelerates APC loss. We found that aspirin suppressed the expression of IKKβ, and the deletion of IKKβ by siRNA increases the expression of APC in HEK294 cells. Finally, we observed similar effects of aspirin in human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Taken together, these results reveal that aspirin up-regulates the expression of APC via the suppression of IKKβ. This can be a mechanism how aspirin prevents cancer at

  10. Isoelectric focusing and crossed immunoelectrophoresis of heme proteins in the Escherichia coli cytoplasmic membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Kranz, R.G.; Gennis, R.B.

    1982-04-01

    Isoelectric focusing (IEF), agarose electrophoresis, and crossed immunoelectrophoresis (CIE) were used to resolve the heme-containing proteins of the Escherichia coli cytoplasmic membrane after solubilization by Triton X-100. Two bands in IEF stained for heme with pI values of 4.7 and 5.3. One of the bands, with an isoelectric point of pH 5.3, was present only when the cells were grown to late log or stationary phase and possessed N,N,N,'N'-tetramethyl-p-phenylenediamine (TMPD) oxidase activity. The pI 4.7 band was present in cells harvested in both mid-log and stationary phases. Agarose electrophoresis, using larger samples, revealed the same two components apparent by IEF, and, in addition, a third component. The heme-containing fractions were extracted after agarose electrophoresis and subjected to further study. The component which was present in cells grown to stationary phase contained hemes b, a/sub 1/, and d. The other two fractions contained only b heme. One of these corresponded to the component with pI 4.7 in IEF and had catalase activity. Antisera were raised against Triton X-100-solubilized cytoplasmic membranes and against the focused TMPD oxidase complex. With these anti-sera, CIE in the presence of Triton X-100 revealed four precipitin complexes containing heme. Three of these corresponded to the components identified by IEF and agarose electrophoresis. We demonstrate that the combined use of IEF and CIE is valuable for analysis of membrane proteins. In particular, this work represents a substantial initial step toward a structural elucidation of the E. coli aerobic respiratory chain.

  11. Mechanosensitive channels of Escherichia coli: the MscL gene, protein, and activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sukharev, S. I.; Blount, P.; Martinac, B.; Kung, C.

    1997-01-01

    Although mechanosensory responses are ubiquitous and diverse, the molecular bases of mechanosensation in most cases remain mysterious MscL, a mechanosensitive channel of large conductance of Escherichia coli and its bacterial homologues are the first and currently only channel molecules shown to directly sense mechanical stretch of the membrane. In response to the tension conveyed via the lipid bilayer, MscL increases its open probability by several orders of magnitude. In the present review we describe the identification, cloning, and first sets of biophysical and structural data on this simplest mechanosensory molecule. We discovered a 2.5-ns mechanosensitive conductance in giant E. coli spheroplasts. Using chromatographies to enrich the target and patch clamp to assay the channel activity in liposome-reconstituted fractions, we identified the MscL protein and cloned the mscL gene. MscL comprises 136 amino acid residues (15 kDa), with two highly hydrophobic regions, and resides in the inner membrane of the bacterium. PhoA-fusion experiments indicate that the protein spans the membrane twice with both termini in the cytoplasm. Spectroscopic techniques show that it is highly helical. Expression of MscL tandems and covalent cross-linking suggest that the active channel complex is a homo-hexamer. We have identified several residues, which when deleted or substituted, affect channel kinetics or mechanosensitivity. Although unique when discovered, highly conserved MscL homologues in both gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria have been found, suggesting their ubiquitous importance among bacteria.

  12. The Role of Protein-Ligand Contacts in Allosteric Regulation of the Escherichia coli Catabolite Activator Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Townsend, Philip D.; Rodgers, Thomas L.; Glover, Laura C.; Korhonen, Heidi J.; Richards, Shane A.; Colwell, Lucy J.; Pohl, Ehmke; Wilson, Mark R.; Hodgson, David R. W.; McLeish, Tom C. B.; Cann, Martin J.

    2015-01-01

    Allostery is a fundamental process by which ligand binding to a protein alters its activity at a distant site. Both experimental and theoretical evidence demonstrate that allostery can be communicated through altered slow relaxation protein dynamics without conformational change. The catabolite activator protein (CAP) of Escherichia coli is an exemplar for the analysis of such entropically driven allostery. Negative allostery in CAP occurs between identical cAMP binding sites. Changes to the cAMP-binding pocket can therefore impact the allosteric properties of CAP. Here we demonstrate, through a combination of coarse-grained modeling, isothermal calorimetry, and structural analysis, that decreasing the affinity of CAP for cAMP enhances negative cooperativity through an entropic penalty for ligand binding. The use of variant cAMP ligands indicates the data are not explained by structural heterogeneity between protein mutants. We observe computationally that altered interaction strength between CAP and cAMP variously modifies the change in allosteric cooperativity due to second site CAP mutations. As the degree of correlated motion between the cAMP-contacting site and a second site on CAP increases, there is a tendency for computed double mutations at these sites to drive CAP toward noncooperativity. Naturally occurring pairs of covarying residues in CAP do not display this tendency, suggesting a selection pressure to fine tune allostery on changes to the CAP ligand-binding pocket without a drive to a noncooperative state. In general, we hypothesize an evolutionary selection pressure to retain slow relaxation dynamics-induced allostery in proteins in which evolution of the ligand-binding site is occurring. PMID:26187469

  13. High Throughput Quantitative Expression Screening and Purification Applied to Recombinant Disulfide-rich Venom Proteins Produced in E. coli

    PubMed Central

    Saez, Natalie J.; Nozach, Hervé; Blemont, Marilyne; Vincentelli, Renaud

    2014-01-01

    Escherichia coli (E. coli) is the most widely used expression system for the production of recombinant proteins for structural and functional studies. However, purifying proteins is sometimes challenging since many proteins are expressed in an insoluble form. When working with difficult or multiple targets it is therefore recommended to use high throughput (HTP) protein expression screening on a small scale (1-4 ml cultures) to quickly identify conditions for soluble expression. To cope with the various structural genomics programs of the lab, a quantitative (within a range of 0.1-100 mg/L culture of recombinant protein) and HTP protein expression screening protocol was implemented and validated on thousands of proteins. The protocols were automated with the use of a liquid handling robot but can also be performed manually without specialized equipment. Disulfide-rich venom proteins are gaining increasing recognition for their potential as therapeutic drug leads. They can be highly potent and selective, but their complex disulfide bond networks make them challenging to produce. As a member of the FP7 European Venomics project (www.venomics.eu), our challenge is to develop successful production strategies with the aim of producing thousands of novel venom proteins for functional characterization. Aided by the redox properties of disulfide bond isomerase DsbC, we adapted our HTP production pipeline for the expression of oxidized, functional venom peptides in the E. coli cytoplasm. The protocols are also applicable to the production of diverse disulfide-rich proteins. Here we demonstrate our pipeline applied to the production of animal venom proteins. With the protocols described herein it is likely that soluble disulfide-rich proteins will be obtained in as little as a week. Even from a small scale, there is the potential to use the purified proteins for validating the oxidation state by mass spectrometry, for characterization in pilot studies, or for sensitive

  14. High throughput quantitative expression screening and purification applied to recombinant disulfide-rich venom proteins produced in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Saez, Natalie J; Nozach, Hervé; Blemont, Marilyne; Vincentelli, Renaud

    2014-07-30

    Escherichia coli (E. coli) is the most widely used expression system for the production of recombinant proteins for structural and functional studies. However, purifying proteins is sometimes challenging since many proteins are expressed in an insoluble form. When working with difficult or multiple targets it is therefore recommended to use high throughput (HTP) protein expression screening on a small scale (1-4 ml cultures) to quickly identify conditions for soluble expression. To cope with the various structural genomics programs of the lab, a quantitative (within a range of 0.1-100 mg/L culture of recombinant protein) and HTP protein expression screening protocol was implemented and validated on thousands of proteins. The protocols were automated with the use of a liquid handling robot but can also be performed manually without specialized equipment. Disulfide-rich venom proteins are gaining increasing recognition for their potential as therapeutic drug leads. They can be highly potent and selective, but their complex disulfide bond networks make them challenging to produce. As a member of the FP7 European Venomics project (www.venomics.eu), our challenge is to develop successful production strategies with the aim of producing thousands of novel venom proteins for functional characterization. Aided by the redox properties of disulfide bond isomerase DsbC, we adapted our HTP production pipeline for the expression of oxidized, functional venom peptides in the E. coli cytoplasm. The protocols are also applicable to the production of diverse disulfide-rich proteins. Here we demonstrate our pipeline applied to the production of animal venom proteins. With the protocols described herein it is likely that soluble disulfide-rich proteins will be obtained in as little as a week. Even from a small scale, there is the potential to use the purified proteins for validating the oxidation state by mass spectrometry, for characterization in pilot studies, or for sensitive

  15. Heat-shock response transcriptional program enables high-yield and high-quality recombinant protein production in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xin; Liu, Yu; Genereux, Joseph C; Nolan, Chandler; Singh, Meha; Kelly, Jeffery W

    2014-09-19

    The biosynthesis of soluble, properly folded recombinant proteins in large quantities from Escherichia coli is desirable for academic research and industrial protein production. The basal E. coli protein homeostasis (proteostasis) network capacity is often insufficient to efficiently fold overexpressed proteins. Herein we demonstrate that a transcriptionally reprogrammed E. coli proteostasis network is generally superior for producing soluble, folded, and functional recombinant proteins. Reprogramming is accomplished by overexpressing a negative feedback deficient heat-shock response transcription factor before and during overexpression of the protein-of-interest. The advantage of transcriptional reprogramming versus simply overexpressing select proteostasis network components (e.g., chaperones and co-chaperones, which has been explored previously) is that a large number of proteostasis network components are upregulated at their evolved stoichiometry, thus maintaining the system capabilities of the proteostasis network that are currently incompletely understood. Transcriptional proteostasis network reprogramming mediated by stress-responsive signaling in the absence of stress should also be useful for protein production in other cells.

  16. A highly effective and adjustable dual plasmid system for O-GlcNAcylated recombinant protein production in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Han, Cuifang; Shan, Hui; Bi, Chuanlin; Zhang, Xinling; Qi, Jieqiong; Zhang, Boyuan; Gu, Yuchao; Yu, Wengong

    2015-06-01

    O-GlcNAcylation is a ubiquitous, dynamic and reversible post-translational protein modification in metazoans, and it is catalysed and removed by O-GlcNAc transferase (OGT) and O-GlcNAcase, respectively. Prokaryotes lack endogenous OGT activity. It has been reported that coexpression of mammalian OGT with its target substrates in Escherichia coli produce O-GlcNAcylated recombinant proteins, but the plasmids used were not compatible, and the expression of both OGT and its target protein were induced by the same inducer. Here, we describe a compatible dual plasmid system for coexpression of OGT and its target substrate for O-GlcNAcylated protein production in E. coli. The approach was validated using the CKII and p53 protein as control. This compatible dual plasmid system contains an arabinose-inducible OGT expression vector with a pUC origin and an isopropyl β-d-thiogalactopyranoside-inducible OGT target substrate expression vector bearing a p15A origin. The dual plasmid system produces recombinant proteins with varying O-GlcNAcylation levels by altering the inducer concentration. More importantly, the O-GlcNAcylation efficiency was much higher than the previously reported system. Altogether, we established an adjustable compatible dual plasmid system that can effectively yield O-GlcNAcylated proteins in E. coli.

  17. Interaction with Single-stranded DNA-binding Protein Stimulates Escherichia coli Ribonuclease HI Enzymatic Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Petzold, Christine; Marceau, Aimee H.; Miller, Katherine H.; Marqusee, Susan; Keck, James L.

    2015-01-01

    Single-stranded (ss) DNA-binding proteins (SSBs) bind and protect ssDNA intermediates formed during replication, recombination, and repair reactions. SSBs also directly interact with many different genome maintenance proteins to stimulate their enzymatic activities and/or mediate their proper cellular localization. We have identified an interaction formed between Escherichia coli SSB and ribonuclease HI (RNase HI), an enzyme that hydrolyzes RNA in RNA/DNA hybrids. The RNase HI·SSB complex forms by RNase HI binding the intrinsically disordered C terminus of SSB (SSB-Ct), a mode of interaction that is shared among all SSB interaction partners examined to date. Residues that comprise the SSB-Ct binding site are conserved among bacterial RNase HI enzymes, suggesting that RNase HI·SSB complexes are present in many bacterial species and that retaining the interaction is important for its cellular function. A steady-state kinetic analysis shows that interaction with SSB stimulates RNase HI activity by lowering the reaction Km. SSB or RNase HI protein variants that disrupt complex formation nullify this effect. Collectively our findings identify a direct RNase HI/SSB interaction that could play a role in targeting RNase HI activity to RNA/DNA hybrid substrates within the genome. PMID:25903123

  18. Interaction with Single-stranded DNA-binding Protein Stimulates Escherichia coli Ribonuclease HI Enzymatic Activity.

    PubMed

    Petzold, Christine; Marceau, Aimee H; Miller, Katherine H; Marqusee, Susan; Keck, James L

    2015-06-01

    Single-stranded (ss) DNA-binding proteins (SSBs) bind and protect ssDNA intermediates formed during replication, recombination, and repair reactions. SSBs also directly interact with many different genome maintenance proteins to stimulate their enzymatic activities and/or mediate their proper cellular localization. We have identified an interaction formed between Escherichia coli SSB and ribonuclease HI (RNase HI), an enzyme that hydrolyzes RNA in RNA/DNA hybrids. The RNase HI·SSB complex forms by RNase HI binding the intrinsically disordered C terminus of SSB (SSB-Ct), a mode of interaction that is shared among all SSB interaction partners examined to date. Residues that comprise the SSB-Ct binding site are conserved among bacterial RNase HI enzymes, suggesting that RNase HI·SSB complexes are present in many bacterial species and that retaining the interaction is important for its cellular function. A steady-state kinetic analysis shows that interaction with SSB stimulates RNase HI activity by lowering the reaction Km. SSB or RNase HI protein variants that disrupt complex formation nullify this effect. Collectively our findings identify a direct RNase HI/SSB interaction that could play a role in targeting RNase HI activity to RNA/DNA hybrid substrates within the genome.

  19. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Integration Protein Expressed in Escherichia Coli Possesses Selective DNA Cleaving Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherman, Paula A.; Fyfe, James A.

    1990-07-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) integration protein, a potential target for selective antiviral therapy, was expressed in Escherichia coli. The purified protein, free of detectable contaminating endonucleases, selectively cleaved double-stranded DNA oligonucleotides that mimic the U3 and the U5 termini of linear HIV DNA. Two nucleotides were removed from the 3' ends of both the U5 plus strand and the U3 minus strand; in both cases, cleavage was adjacent to a conserved CA dinucleotide. The reaction was metal-ion dependent, with a preference for Mn2+ over Mg2+. Reaction selectivity was further demonstrated by the lack of cleavage of an HIV U5 substrate on the complementary (minus) strand, an analogous substrate that mimics the U3 terminus of an avian retrovirus, and an HIV U5 substrate in which the conserved CA dinucleotide was replaced with a TA dinucleotide. Such an integration protein-mediated cleavage reaction is expected to occur as part of the integration event in the retroviral life cycle, in which a double-stranded DNA copy of the viral RNA genome is inserted into the host cell DNA.

  20. Evidence for two interconverting protein isomers in the methotrexate complex of dihydrofolate reductase from Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Falzone, C.J.; Benkovic, S.J. ); Wright, P.E. )

    1991-02-26

    Two-dimensional {sup 1}H NMR methods and a knowledge of the X-ray crystal structure have been used to make resonance assignments for the amino acid side chains of dihydrofolate reductase from Escherichia coli complexed with methotrexate. The H7 proton on the pteridine ring of methotrexate was found to have NOEs to the methyl protons of Leu-28 which were assigned by using the L28F mutant. These NOEs indicated that the orientation of the methotrexate pteridine ring is similar in both solution and crystal structures. During the initial assignment process, it became evident that many of the resonances in this complex, unlike those of the folate complex, are severally broadened or doubled. The observation of two distinct sets of resonances in a ratio of approximately 2:1 was attributed to the presence of two protein isomers. Many of the side chains with clearly doubled resonances were located in the {beta}-sheet and the active site. Preliminary studies on the apoprotein also revealed doubled resonances in the absence of the inhibitor, indicating the existence of the protein isomers prior to methotrexate binding. In contrast to the methotrexate complex, the binary complex with folate and the ternary MTX-NADPH-DHFR complex presented a single enzyme form. These results are proposed to reflect the ability of folate and NADPH to bind predominantly to one protein isomer.

  1. Suppression of the Escherichia coli rpoH opal mutation by ribosomes lacking S15 protein.

    PubMed Central

    Yano, R; Yura, T

    1989-01-01

    Several suppressors (suhD) that can specifically suppress the temperature-sensitive opal rpoH11 mutation of Escherichia coli K-12 have been isolated and characterized. Unlike the parental rpoH11 mutant deficient in the heat shock response, the temperature-resistant pseudorevertants carrying suhD were capable of synthesizing sigma 32 and exhibiting partial induction of heat shock proteins. These strains were also cold sensitive and unable to grow at 25 degrees C. Genetic mapping and complementation studies permitted us to localize suhD near rpsO (69 min), the structural gene for ribosomal protein S15. Ribosomes and polyribosomes prepared from suhD cells contained a reduced level (ca. 10%) of S15 relative to that of the wild type. Cloning and sequencing of suhD revealed that an IS10-like element had been inserted at the attenuator-terminator region immediately downstream of the rpsO coding region. The rpsO mRNA level in the suhD strain was also reduced to about 10% that of wild type. Apparently, ribosomes lacking S15 can actively participate in protein synthesis and suppress the rpoH11 opal (UGA) mutation at high temperature but cannot sustain cell growth at low temperature. Images PMID:2646293

  2. Structure and Mechanisms of a Protein-Based Organelle in Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Shiho; Sawaya, Michael R.; Yeates, Todd O.

    2010-08-18

    Many bacterial cells contain proteinaceous microcompartments that act as simple organelles by sequestering specific metabolic processes involving volatile or toxic metabolites. Here we report the three-dimensional (3D) crystal structures, with resolutions between 1.65 and 2.5 angstroms, of the four homologous proteins (EutS, EutL, EutK, and EutM) that are thought to be the major shell constituents of a functionally complex ethanolamine utilization (Eut) microcompartment. The Eut microcompartment is used to sequester the metabolism of ethanolamine in bacteria such as Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica. The four Eut shell proteins share an overall similar 3D fold, but they have distinguishing structural features that help explain the specific roles they play in the microcompartment. For example, EutL undergoes a conformational change that is probably involved in gating molecular transport through shell protein pores, whereas structural evidence suggests that EutK might bind a nucleic acid component. Together these structures give mechanistic insight into bacterial microcompartments.

  3. Optimization of expression and purification of HSPA6 protein from Camelus dromedarius in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Malik, Ajamaluddin; Alsenaidy, Abdulrahman M; Elrobh, Mohamed; Khan, Wajahatullah; Alanazi, Mohammed S; Bazzi, Mohammad D

    2016-05-01

    The HSPA6, one of the members of large family of HSP70, is significantly up-regulated and has been targeted as a biomarker of cellular stress in several studies. Herein, conditions were optimized to increase the yield of recombinant camel HSPA6 protein in its native state, primarily focusing on the optimization of upstream processing parameters that lead to an increase in the specific as well as volumetric yield of the protein. The results showed that the production of cHSPA6 was increased proportionally with increased incubation temperature up to 37 °C. Induction with 10 μM IPTG was sufficient to induce the expression of cHSPA6 which was 100 times less than normally used IPTG concentration. Furthermore, the results indicate that induction during early to late exponential phase produced relatively high levels of cHSPA6 in soluble form. In addition, 5 h of post-induction incubation was found to be optimal to produce folded cHSPA6 with higher specific and volumetric yield. Subsequently, highly pure and homogenous cHSPA6 preparation was obtained using metal affinity and size exclusion chromatography. Taken together, the results showed successful production of electrophoretically pure recombinant HSPA6 protein from Camelus dromedarius in Escherichia coli in milligram quantities from shake flask liquid culture.

  4. Optimization of expression and purification of HSPA6 protein from Camelus dromedarius in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Malik, Ajamaluddin; Alsenaidy, Abdulrahman M; Elrobh, Mohamed; Khan, Wajahatullah; Alanazi, Mohammed S; Bazzi, Mohammad D

    2016-05-01

    The HSPA6, one of the members of large family of HSP70, is significantly up-regulated and has been targeted as a biomarker of cellular stress in several studies. Herein, conditions were optimized to increase the yield of recombinant camel HSPA6 protein in its native state, primarily focusing on the optimization of upstream processing parameters that lead to an increase in the specific as well as volumetric yield of the protein. The results showed that the production of cHSPA6 was increased proportionally with increased incubation temperature up to 37 °C. Induction with 10 μM IPTG was sufficient to induce the expression of cHSPA6 which was 100 times less than normally used IPTG concentration. Furthermore, the results indicate that induction during early to late exponential phase produced relatively high levels of cHSPA6 in soluble form. In addition, 5 h of post-induction incubation was found to be optimal to produce folded cHSPA6 with higher specific and volumetric yield. Subsequently, highly pure and homogenous cHSPA6 preparation was obtained using metal affinity and size exclusion chromatography. Taken together, the results showed successful production of electrophoretically pure recombinant HSPA6 protein from Camelus dromedarius in Escherichia coli in milligram quantities from shake flask liquid culture. PMID:27081368

  5. Overexpression of a modified amaranth protein in Escherichia coli with minimal media and lactose as inducer.

    PubMed

    Morales-Camacho, Jocksan Ismael; Dominguez-Dominguez, Jorge; Paredes-Lopez, Octavio

    2013-04-01

    In this research it was attempted to overexpress the acidic subunit, from the 11S amaranth seed globulin termed amarantin, modified with antihypertensive peptides in Escherichia coli Rosetta (DE3) by manipulating some factors in batch fermenter such as growth medium composition, inducer (isopropyl β-D-thiogalactopyranoside [IPTG] or lactose), air flow, cultivation temperature, agitation speed and induction time. The possibility of using several minimal media and lactose as inducer to increase yields of the recombinant protein was investigated. Previous fermentations at flask level showed that two minimal culture media (A6 and A7) and 0.5% (w/v) lactose presented high yields of the engineered protein expression. Thus, the latter two media were tested at fermenter level, the lactose inducer, and different environmental conditions. Factors with significant effects were identified by Plackett-Burman design with center points and were adjusted at the level suggested and the yields of the recombinant protein were increased from 303.2 to 1,531 mg L(-1) in A6 and from 363.4 to 1,681 mg L(-1) in A7. Unlike some patents where the highest productivity was achieved at 24 h or afterwards, in this research the best productivity of the recombinant acidic subunit was attained at 4 and 6 h of induction using both media, respectively. PMID:23294401

  6. The Escherichia coli Fis protein prevents initiation of DNA replication from oriC in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Wold, S; Crooke, E; Skarstad, K

    1996-01-01

    Fis protein participates in the normal control of chromosomal replication in Escherichia coli. However, the mechanism by which it executes its effect is largely unknown. We demonstrate an inhibitory influence of purified Fis protein on replication from oriC in vitro. Fis inhibits DNA synthesis equally well in replication systems either dependent upon or independent of RNA polymerase, even when the latter is stimulated by the presence of HU or IHF. The extent of inhibition by Fis is modulated by the concentrations of DnaA protein and RNA polymerase; the more limiting the amounts of these, the more severe the inhibition by Fis. Thus, the level of inhibition seems to depend on the ease with which the open complex can be formed. Fis-mediated inhibition of DNA replication does not depend on a functional primary Fis binding site between DnaA boxes R2 and R3 in oriC, as mutations that cause reduced binding of Fis to this site do not affect the degree of inhibition. The data presented suggest that Fis prevents formation of an initiation-proficient structure at oriC by forming an alternative, initiation-preventive complex. This indicates a negative role for Fis in the regulation of replication initiation. PMID:8836178

  7. "In Vitro" Synthesis and Activity of Reporter Proteins in an "Escherichia coli" S30 Extract System: An Undergraduate Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higgins, Pamela J.

    2005-01-01

    This undergraduate laboratory experiment integrates multiple techniques ("in vitro" synthesis, enzyme assays, Western blotting) to determine the production and detection sensitivity of two common reporter proteins (beta-galactosidase and luciferase) within an "Escherichia coli" S30 transcription/translation extract. Comparison of the data suggests…

  8. The cost of expression of Escherichia coli lac operon proteins is in the process, not in the products.

    PubMed

    Stoebel, Daniel M; Dean, Antony M; Dykhuizen, Daniel E

    2008-03-01

    Transcriptional regulatory networks allow bacteria to express proteins only when they are needed. Adaptive hypotheses explaining the evolution of regulatory networks assume that unneeded expression is costly and therefore decreases fitness, but the proximate cause of this cost is not clear. We show that the cost in fitness to Escherichia coli strains constitutively expressing the lactose operon when lactose is absent is associated with the process of making the lac gene products, i.e., associated with the acts of transcription and/or translation. These results reject the hypotheses that regulation exists to prevent the waste of amino acids in useless protein or the detrimental activity of unnecessary proteins. While the cost of the process of protein expression occurs in all of the environments that we tested, the expression of the lactose permease could be costly or beneficial, depending on the environment. Our results identify the basis of a single selective pressure likely acting across the entire E. coli transcriptome. PMID:18245823

  9. Simple defined autoinduction medium for high-level recombinant protein production using T7-based Escherichia coli expression systems.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhaopeng; Kessler, Wolfgang; van den Heuvel, Joop; Rinas, Ursula

    2011-08-01

    Protein production under the control of lac operon regulatory elements using autoinduction is based on diauxic growth of Escherichia coli on lactose after consumption of more preferred carbon substrates. A novel simple and cost-effective defined autoinduction medium using a mixture of glucose, glycerol, and lactose as carbon substrate and NH(4)(+) as sole nitrogen source without any supplementation of amino acids and vitamins was developed for T7-based E. coli expression systems. This medium was successfully employed in 96-well microtiter plates, test tubes, shake flasks, and 15-L bioreactor cultivations for production of different types of proteins achieving an average yield of 500 mg L(-1) product. Cell-specific protein concentrations and solubility were similar as during conventional isopropyl β-D-1-thiogalactopyranoside induction using Luria-Bertani broth. However, the final yield of target proteins was about four times higher, as a higher final biomass was achieved using this novel defined autoinduction broth. PMID:21698378

  10. Hsp20, a small heat shock protein of Deinococcus radiodurans, confers tolerance to hydrogen peroxide in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Singh, Harinder; Appukuttan, Deepti; Lim, Sangyong

    2014-08-01

    The present study shows that DR1114 (Hsp20), a small heat shock protein of the radiationresistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans, enhances tolerance to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) stress when expressed in Escherichia coli. A protein profile comparison showed that E. coli cells overexpressing D. radiodurans Hsp20 (EC-pHsp20) activated the redox state proteins, thus maintaining redox homeostasis. The cells also showed increased expression of pseudouridine (psi) synthases, which are important to the stability and proper functioning of structural RNA molecules. We found that the D. radiodurans mutant strain, which lacks a psi synthase (DR0896), was more sensitive to H2O2 stress than wild type. These suggest that an increased expression of proteins involved in the control of redox state homeostasis along with more stable ribosomal function may explain the improved tolerance of EC-pHsp20 to H2O2 stress.

  11. Structure and Function of the Escherichia coli Protein YmgB: A Protein Critical for Biofilm Formation and Acid-resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Lee,J.; Page, R.; Garcia-Contreras, R.; Palermino, J.; Zhang, X.; Doshi, O.; Wood, T.; Peti, W.

    2007-01-01

    The Escherichia coli gene cluster ymgABC was identified in transcriptome studies to have a role in biofilm development and stability. In this study, we showed that YmgB represses biofilm formation in rich medium containing glucose, decreases cellular motility, and protects the cell from acid indicating that YmgB has a major role in acid-resistance in E. coli. Our data show that these phenotypes are potentially mediated through interactions with the important cell signal indole. In addition, gel mobility-shift assays suggest that YmgB may be a non-specific DNA-binding protein. Using nickel-enrichment DNA microarrays, we showed that YmgB binds, either directly or indirectly, via a probable ligand, genes important for biofilm formation. To advance our understanding of the function of YmgB, we used X-ray crystallography to solve the structure of the protein to 1.8 A resolution. YmgB is a biological dimer that is structurally homologous to the E. coli gene regulatory protein Hha, despite having only 5% sequence identity. This supports our DNA microarray data showing that YmgB is a gene regulatory protein. Therefore, this protein, which clearly has a critical role in acid-resistance in E. coli, has been renamed as AriR for regulator of acid resistance influenced by indole.

  12. MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry analysis of proteins and lipids in Escherichia coli exposed to copper ions and nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Calvano, C D; Picca, R A; Bonerba, E; Tantillo, G; Cioffi, N; Palmisano, F

    2016-09-01

    Escherichia coli (E. coli) is one of the most important foodborne pathogens to the food industry responsible for diseases as bloody diarrhea, hemorrhagic colitis and life-threatening hemolytic-uremic syndrome. For controlling and eliminating E. coli, metal nano-antimicrobials (NAMs) are frequently used as bioactive systems for applications in food treatments. Most NAMs provide controlled release of metal ions, eventually slowing down or completely inhibiting the growth of undesired microorganisms. Nonetheless, their antimicrobial action is not totally unraveled and is strongly dependent on metal properties and environmental conditions. In this work, we propose the use of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight (MALDI TOF) mass spectrometry as a powerful tool for direct, time efficient, plausible identification of the cell membrane damage in bacterial strains exposed to copper-based antimicrobial agents, such as soluble salts (chosen as simplified AM material) and copper nanoparticles. E. coli ATCC 25922 strain was selected as 'training bacterium' to set up some critical experimental parameters (i.e. cell concentration, selection of the MALDI matrix, optimal solvent composition, sample preparation method) for the MS analyses. The resulting procedure was then used to attain both protein and lipid fingerprints from E. coli after exposure to different loadings of Cu salts and NPs. Interestingly, bacteria exposed to copper showed over-expression of copper binding proteins and degradation of lipids when treated with soluble salt. These findings were completed with other investigations, such as microbiological experiments. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27476478

  13. The type III protein translocation system of enteropathogenic Escherichia coli involves EspA-EspB protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Hartland, E L; Daniell, S J; Delahay, R M; Neves, B C; Wallis, T; Shaw, R K; Hale, C; Knutton, S; Frankel, G

    2000-03-01

    Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC), like many bacterial pathogens, use a type III secretion system to deliver effector proteins across the bacterial cell wall. In EPEC, four proteins, EspA, EspB, EspD and Tir are known to be exported by a type III secretion system and to be essential for 'attaching and effacing' (A/E) lesion formation, the hallmark of EPEC pathogenicity. EspA was recently shown to be a structural protein and a major component of a large, transiently expressed, filamentous surface organelle which forms a direct link between the bacterium and the host cell. In contrast, EspB is translocated into the host cell where it is localized to both membrane and cytosolic cell fractions. EspA and EspB are required for translocation of Tir to the host cell membrane suggesting that they may both be components of the translocation apparatus. In this study, we show that EspB co-immunoprecipitates with the EspA filaments and that, during EPEC infection of HEp-2 cells, EspB localizes closely with EspA. Using a number of binding assays, we also show that EspB can bind and be copurified with EspA. Nevertheless, binding of EspA filaments to the host cell membranes occurred even in the absence of EspB. These results suggest that following initial attachment of the EspA filaments to the target cells, EspB is delivered into the host cell membrane and that the interaction between EspA and EspB may be important for protein translocation.

  14. Proteomics and pathway analysis of N-glycosylated mammary gland proteins in response to Escherichia coli mastitis in cattle.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yongxin; Shen, Weijun; Zhao, Xiaowei; Zhao, Huiling; Huang, Dongwei; Cheng, Guanglong

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the N-linked glycosylated protein profile of mammary tissue from healthy cows and cows with mastitis due to Escherichia coli, in order to understand the molecular mechanisms of the host response to mastitis. N-glycopeptides were enriched with a lectin mixture and identified through high-accuracy mass spectrometry. A total of 551 N-glycosylation sites, corresponding to 294 proteins, were identified in the mammary tissues of healthy cows; these glycoproteins were categorised into three functional groups and clustered into 11 specific pathways. A total of 511 N-glycosylation sites, corresponding to 283 glycosylated proteins, were detected in the mammary tissues of cows with E. coli mastitis. There were differences in N-glycosylation sites in 98 proteins in the mammary tissues of healthy cows and cows with mastitis due to E. coli. Most proteins with altered glycosylation were those involved in responses to stress, cell adhesion and the immune response, and were assigned to five specific pathways based on their gene ontology annotation. The results from this study show that the glycosylated protein profile in the mammary tissues of healthy and mastitic cows are different, and altered glycoproteins are associated with several pathways, including the lysosome and O-glycan biosynthesis pathways.

  15. Genetic regulation of spy gene expression in Escherichia coli in the presence of protein unfolding agent ethanol.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Santosh Kumar; Lambadi, Paramesh Ramulu; Ghosh, Tamoghna; Pathania, Ranjana; Navani, Naveen Kumar

    2014-09-10

    In a living cell, folding of proteins is assisted by molecular chaperones and other folding helpers. In Escherichia coli (E. coli), recently an ATP independent chaperon 'Spy' was discovered which is highly up-regulated in the presence of protein unfolding agents like ethanol, butanol and tannic acid. Two response regulators; BaeR and CpxR have been recognized as transcriptional regulators of spy gene. However, the mechanism of genetic regulation of spy under protein denaturants like ethanol has not been studied in detail so far. Based on a combination of genetic, molecular biology and biochemical experimental data, we propose that BaeR protein is the primary regulator of spy gene in response to ethanol stress in E. coli. In addition, we expanded the experimental spectrum and validated that regulation of spy gene in the presence of zinc and copper metal stress is primarily via BaeR and CpxR regulators respectively. We also performed in-silico analysis to identify the homologs of Spy protein and their cognate regulatory elements in bacterial species belonging to enterobacteriaceae family. Based on the unique ATP-independent chaperone nature and genetic regulation of spy we also propose its importance in biosensor development and facilitated production of properly folded recombinant proteins.

  16. The 32-kilodalton envelope protein of vaccinia virus synthesized in Escherichia coli binds with specificity to cell surfaces.

    PubMed Central

    Lai, C F; Gong, S C; Esteban, M

    1991-01-01

    The nature of interaction between vaccinia virus and the surface of host cells as the first step in virus infection is undefined. A 32-kDa virus envelope protein has been identified as a cell surface binding protein (J.-S. Maa, J. F. Rodriguez, and M. Esteban, J. Biol. Chem. 265:1569-1577, 1990). To carry out studies on the structure-function relationship of this protein, the 32-kDa protein was obtained from Escherichia coli cells harboring the expression plasmid pT7Ek32. The recombinant polypeptide was found to have structural properties similar to those of the native virus envelope protein. Binding studies of 125I-labeled 32-kDa protein to cultured cells of various origins revealed that the E. coli-produced 32-kDa protein exhibited selectivity, specificity, and saturability. Scatchard analysis indicated about 4.5 x 10(4) sites per cell with a high affinity (Kd = 1.8 x 10(-9) M), suggesting interaction of the 32-kDa protein with a specific receptor. The availability of large quantities of the 32-kDa virus protein in bacteria will permit further structural and functional studies of this virus envelope protein and facilitate identification of the specific cell surface receptor. Images PMID:1985213

  17. Expression of biologically active recombinant rat IgE-binding protein in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Frigeri, L G; Robertson, M W; Liu, F T

    1990-12-01

    IgE-binding protein (epsilon BP) is a protein which has affinity for IgE and was originally identified in rat basophilic leukemia (RBL) cells. Subsequently, it was found to be the rat homolog of CBP35, a murine beta-galactoside-specific lectin. This protein is also designated as L-34 and RL-29 and studied independently by several laboratories. More recently, CBP35 (epsilon BP) was found to be equivalent to Mac-2, a surface marker on activated macrophages. Using rat epsilon BP cDNA, we have succeeded in expressing recombinant epsilon BP in Escherichia coli. Milligram quantities of homogeneous epsilon BP could be obtained from bacterial lysate in a one-step affinity purification procedure utilizing lactosyl-Sepharose 4B and elution with a lactose gradient. The recombinant epsilon BP (r epsilon BP) binds mouse IgE and retains reactivity to anti-peptide antibodies specific for a sequence within rat epsilon BP. The purified r epsilon BP exhibits binding activity to various saccharides, with affinity for N-acetyllactosamine greater than thiodigalactoside greater than lactose much greater than D-galactose greater than L-arabinose, an order identical to that exhibited by native epsilon BP isolated from RBL cells. The recombinant lectin displayed hemagglutination activity when tested with rabbit erythrocytes. Although epsilon BP shares sequence homology to other lectins containing S-type (thiol-dependent) carbohydrate-recognition domains, r epsilon BP is resistant to air oxidation and does not require reducing agents for maintaining its activity. Furthermore, the single cysteine residue appears to be unexposed and can be alkylated only when the protein is denatured in 5.6 M guanidinium hydrochloride. The availability of a source for a large quantity of epsilon BP should facilitate the analysis of biological function(s) and structure-activity relationships of this lectin.

  18. Production and Characterization of ZFP36L1 Antiserum against Recombinant Protein from Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Heping; Lin, Rui; Ghosh, Sanjukta; Anderson, Richard A.; Urban, Joseph F.

    2009-01-01

    Tristetraprolin/zinc finger protein 36 (TTP/ZFP36) family proteins are anti-inflammatory. They bind and destabilize some AU-rich element-containing mRNAs such as tumor necrosis factor mRNA. In this study, recombinant ZFP36L1/TIS11B (a TTP homologue) was over-expressed in E. coli, purified, and used for polyclonal antibody production in rabbits. The antiserum recognized nanograms of the antigen on immunoblots. This antiserum and another antiserum developed against recombinant mouse TTP were used to detect ZFP36L1 and TTP in mouse 3T3-L1 adipocytes and RAW264.7 macrophages. Immunoblotting showed that ZFP36L1 was stably expressed with a size corresponding to the lower mass size of ZFP36L1 expressed in transfected human embryonic kidney 293 cells, but TTP was induced by cinnamon extract and not by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in adipocytes. In contrast, ZFP36L1 was undetectable but TTP was strongly induced in LPS-stimulated RAW cells. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction confirmed the higher levels of ZFP36L1 mRNA in adipocytes and TTP mRNA in RAW cells. Low levels of ZFP36L1 expression were also confirmed by northern blotting in mouse embryonic fibroblasts. These results demonstrate that ZFP36L1 antiserum is useful in the detection of this protein and that TTP and ZFP36L1 are differentially expressed and regulated at the mRNA and protein levels in mouse adipocytes and macrophages. PMID:18302406

  19. Mapping of the RNA recognition site of Escherichia coli ribosomal protein S7.

    PubMed Central

    Robert, F; Gagnon, M; Sans, D; Michnick, S; Brakier-Gingras, L

    2000-01-01

    Bacterial ribosomal protein S7 initiates the folding of the 3' major domain of 16S ribosomal RNA by binding to its lower half. The X-ray structure of protein S7 from thermophilic bacteria was recently solved and found to be a modular structure, consisting of an alpha-helical domain with a beta-ribbon extension. To gain further insights into its interaction with rRNA, we cloned the S7 gene from Escherichia coli K12 into a pET expression vector and introduced 4 deletions and 12 amino acid substitutions in the protein sequence. The binding of each mutant to the lower half of the 3' major domain of 16S rRNA was assessed by filtration on nitrocellulose membranes. Deletion of the N-terminal 17 residues or deletion of the B hairpins (residues 72-89) severely decreased S7 affinity for the rRNA. Truncation of the C-terminal portion (residues 138-178), which includes part of the terminal alpha-helix, significantly affected S7 binding, whereas a shorter truncation (residues 148-178) only marginally influenced its binding. Severe effects were also observed with several strategic point mutations located throughout the protein, including Q8A and F17G in the N-terminal region, and K35Q, G54S, K113Q, and M115G in loops connecting the alpha-helices. Our results are consistent with the occurrence of several sites of contact between S7 and the 16S rRNA, in line with its role in the folding of the 3' major domain. PMID:11105763

  20. Mapping of the RNA recognition site of Escherichia coli ribosomal protein S7.

    PubMed

    Robert, F; Gagnon, M; Sans, D; Michnick, S; Brakier-Gingras, L

    2000-11-01

    Bacterial ribosomal protein S7 initiates the folding of the 3' major domain of 16S ribosomal RNA by binding to its lower half. The X-ray structure of protein S7 from thermophilic bacteria was recently solved and found to be a modular structure, consisting of an alpha-helical domain with a beta-ribbon extension. To gain further insights into its interaction with rRNA, we cloned the S7 gene from Escherichia coli K12 into a pET expression vector and introduced 4 deletions and 12 amino acid substitutions in the protein sequence. The binding of each mutant to the lower half of the 3' major domain of 16S rRNA was assessed by filtration on nitrocellulose membranes. Deletion of the N-terminal 17 residues or deletion of the B hairpins (residues 72-89) severely decreased S7 affinity for the rRNA. Truncation of the C-terminal portion (residues 138-178), which includes part of the terminal alpha-helix, significantly affected S7 binding, whereas a shorter truncation (residues 148-178) only marginally influenced its binding. Severe effects were also observed with several strategic point mutations located throughout the protein, including Q8A and F17G in the N-terminal region, and K35Q, G54S, K113Q, and M115G in loops connecting the alpha-helices. Our results are consistent with the occurrence of several sites of contact between S7 and the 16S rRNA, in line with its role in the folding of the 3' major domain.

  1. A novel mass spectrometric strategy “BEMAP” reveals Extensive O-linked protein glycosylation in Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Boysen, Anders; Palmisano, Giuseppe; Krogh, Thøger Jensen; Duggin, Iain G.; Larsen, Martin R.; Møller-Jensen, Jakob

    2016-01-01

    The attachment of sugars to proteins via side-chain oxygen atoms (O-linked glycosylation) is seen in all three domains of life. However, a lack of widely-applicable analytical tools has restricted the study of this process, particularly in bacteria. In E. coli, only four O-linked glycoproteins have previously been characterized. Here we present a glycoproteomics technique, termed BEMAP, which is based on the beta-elimination of O-linked glycans followed by Michael-addition of a phosphonic acid derivative, and subsequent titanium dioxide enrichment. This strategy allows site-specific mass-spectrometric identification of proteins with O-linked glycan modifications in a complex biological sample. Using BEMAP we identified cell surface-associated and membrane vesicle glycoproteins from Enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) and non-pathogenic E. coli K-12. We identified 618 glycosylated Serine and Threonine residues mapping to 140 proteins in ETEC, including several known virulence factors, and 34 in E. coli K-12. The two strains had 32 glycoproteins in common. Remarkably, the majority of the ETEC glycoproteins were conserved in both strains but nevertheless were only glycosylated in the pathogen. Therefore, bacterial O-linked glycosylation is much more extensive than previously thought, and is especially important to the pathogen. PMID:27562176

  2. Preparation, characterization, and immunological properties in mice of Escherichia coli O157 O-specific polysaccharide-protein conjugate vaccines.

    PubMed Central

    Konadu, E; Robbins, J B; Shiloach, J; Bryla, D A; Szu, S C

    1994-01-01

    Escherichia coli O157 causes severe enteritis and the extraintestinal complication of hemolytic-uremic syndrome, with their highest incidence occurring in children. We postulated that serum immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies to the O-specific polysaccharide of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) may confer protective immunity to enteric pathogens by inducing bactericidal reactions against the ingested organisms in the jejunum (J. B. Robbins, C. Chu, and R. Schneerson, Clin. Infect. Dis. 15:346-361, 1992; S. C. Szu, R. Gupta, and J. B. Robbins, p. 381-394, in I. K. Wachsmuth, P. A. Blake, and O. Olsvik, ed., Vibrio cholerae, 1994). Because polysaccharide-protein conjugates induce serum IgG antibodies in infants, we bound the O-specific polysaccharide of E. coli O157 to proteins. E. coli O157 LPS, treated with acetic acid or hydrazine, was derivatized with adipic acid dihydrazide and bound to proteins by carbodiimide-mediated condensation. Conjugates of these adipic hydrazide derivative were prepared with bovine serum albumin, formalin-treated exotoxin C of Clostridium welchii (Pig Bel toxoid), or Pseudomonas aeruginosa recombinant exoprotein A. The conjugates had low levels of endotoxin and elicited serum antibodies with bactericidal activity to the O157 LPS. The largest increase in LPS antibodies was of the IgG class. Clinical evaluation of E. coli O157-toxoid conjugates is planned. Images PMID:7927787

  3. A novel mass spectrometric strategy "BEMAP" reveals Extensive O-linked protein glycosylation in Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Boysen, Anders; Palmisano, Giuseppe; Krogh, Thøger Jensen; Duggin, Iain G; Larsen, Martin R; Møller-Jensen, Jakob

    2016-01-01

    The attachment of sugars to proteins via side-chain oxygen atoms (O-linked glycosylation) is seen in all three domains of life. However, a lack of widely-applicable analytical tools has restricted the study of this process, particularly in bacteria. In E. coli, only four O-linked glycoproteins have previously been characterized. Here we present a glycoproteomics technique, termed BEMAP, which is based on the beta-elimination of O-linked glycans followed by Michael-addition of a phosphonic acid derivative, and subsequent titanium dioxide enrichment. This strategy allows site-specific mass-spectrometric identification of proteins with O-linked glycan modifications in a complex biological sample. Using BEMAP we identified cell surface-associated and membrane vesicle glycoproteins from Enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) and non-pathogenic E. coli K-12. We identified 618 glycosylated Serine and Threonine residues mapping to 140 proteins in ETEC, including several known virulence factors, and 34 in E. coli K-12. The two strains had 32 glycoproteins in common. Remarkably, the majority of the ETEC glycoproteins were conserved in both strains but nevertheless were only glycosylated in the pathogen. Therefore, bacterial O-linked glycosylation is much more extensive than previously thought, and is especially important to the pathogen. PMID:27562176

  4. The Serine Protease Pic From Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli Mediates Immune Evasion by the Direct Cleavage of Complement Proteins.

    PubMed

    Abreu, Afonso G; Fraga, Tatiana R; Granados Martínez, Adriana P; Kondo, Marcia Y; Juliano, Maria A; Juliano, Luiz; Navarro-Garcia, Fernando; Isaac, Lourdes; Barbosa, Angela S; Elias, Waldir P

    2015-07-01

    Enteroaggregative and uropathogenic Escherichia coli, Shigella flexneri 2a, and the hybrid enteroaggregative/Shiga toxin-producing E. coli strain (O104:H4) are important pathogens responsible for intestinal and urinary tract infections, as well as sepsis and hemolytic uremic syndrome. They have in common the production of a serine protease called Pic. Several biological roles for Pic have been described, including protection of E. coli DH5α from complement-mediated killing. Hereby we showed that Pic significantly reduces complement activation by all 3 pathways. Pic cleaves purified C3/C3b and other proteins from the classic and lectin pathways, such as C4 and C2. Cleavage fragments of C3, C4, and C2 were also observed with HB101(pPic1) culture supernatants, and C3 cleavage sites were mapped by fluorescence resonance energy transfer peptides. Experiments using human serum as a source of complement proteins confirmed Pic proteolytic activity on these proteins. Furthermore, Pic works synergistically with the human complement regulators factor I and factor H, promoting inactivation of C3b. In the presence of both regulators, further degradation of C3 α' chain was observed. Therefore, Pic may contribute to immune evasion of E. coli and S. flexneri, favoring invasiveness and increasing the severity of the disorders caused by these pathogens.

  5. Innate immunity of surfactant proteins A and D in urinary tract infection with uropathogenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Fengqi; Ding, Guohua; Zhang, Zhiyong; Gatto, Louis A.; Hawgood, Samuel; Poulain, Francis R.; Cooney, Robert N.; Wang, Guirong

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the effects of surfactant proteins A and D (SP-A, SP-D) in urinary tract infection (UTI), SP-A and SP-D double knockout (SP-A/D KO) and wild type (WT) C57BL/6 female mice were infected with uropathogenic Escherichia coli by intravesical inoculation. Compared with WT mice SP-A/D KO mice showed increased susceptibility to UTI as evidenced by higher bacterial CFU, more infiltrating neutrophils and severe pathological changes. Keratinocyte-derived chemokine increased in the kidney of WT mice but not in SP-A/D KO mice 24 h post-infection. Compared to control, level of IL-17 was elevated in the kidney of infected WT and SP-A/D KO mice and the level of IL-17 was higher in the infected SP-A/D KO mice than infected WT mice 24 and 48 h post-infection. Basal level of p38 MAPK phosphorylation in SP-A/D KO mice was higher compared to WT mice. Phosphorylated-p38 level was elevated in the kidney of WT mice post-infection but not in SP-A/D KO mice. Furthermore, in vitro growth of uropathogenic E. coli was inhibited by SP-A and SP-D. We conclude that SP-A and SP-D function as mediators of innate immunity by inhibiting bacterial growth and modulating renal inflammation in part by regulating p38 MAPK-related pathway in murine UTI. PMID:26511057

  6. Genes on a Wire: The Nucleoid-Associated Protein HU Insulates Transcription Units in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Berger, Michael; Gerganova, Veneta; Berger, Petya; Rapiteanu, Radu; Lisicovas, Viktoras; Dobrindt, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    The extent to which chromosomal gene position in prokaryotes affects local gene expression remains an open question. Several studies have shown that chromosomal re-positioning of bacterial transcription units does not alter their expression pattern, except for a general decrease in gene expression levels from chromosomal origin to terminus proximal positions, which is believed to result from gene dosage effects. Surprisingly, the question as to whether this chromosomal context independence is a cis encoded property of a bacterial transcription unit, or if position independence is a property conferred by factors acting in trans, has not been addressed so far. For this purpose, we established a genetic test system assessing the chromosomal positioning effects by means of identical promoter-fluorescent reporter gene fusions inserted equidistantly from OriC into both chromosomal replichores of Escherichia coli K-12. Our investigations of the reporter activities in mutant cells lacking the conserved nucleoid associated protein HU uncovered various drastic chromosomal positional effects on gene transcription. In addition we present evidence that these positional effects are caused by transcriptional activity nearby the insertion site of our reporter modules. We therefore suggest that the nucleoid-associated protein HU is functionally insulating transcription units, most likely by constraining transcription induced DNA supercoiling. PMID:27545593

  7. Flavin-Induced Oligomerization in Escherichia coli Adaptive Response Protein AidB

    SciTech Connect

    Hamill, Michael J.; Jost, Marco; Wong, Cintyu; Elliott, Sean J.; Drennan, Catherine L.

    2011-11-21

    The process known as 'adaptive response' allows Escherichia coli to respond to small doses of DNA-methylating agents by upregulating the expression of four proteins. While the role of three of these proteins in mitigating DNA damage is well understood, the function of AidB is less clear. Although AidB is a flavoprotein, no catalytic role has been established for the bound cofactor. Here we investigate the possibility that flavin plays a structural role in the assembly of the AidB tetramer. We report the generation and biophysical characterization of deflavinated AidB and of an AidB mutant that has greatly reduced affinity for flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD). Using fluorescence quenching and analytical ultracentrifugation, we find that apo AidB has a high affinity for FAD, as indicated by an apparent dissociation constant of 402.1 {+-} 35.1 nM, and that binding of substoichiometric amounts of FAD triggers a transition in the AidB oligomeric state. In particular, deflavinated AidB is dimeric, whereas the addition of FAD yields a tetramer. We further investigate the dimerization and tetramerization interfaces of AidB by determining a 2.8 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure in space group P3{sub 2} that contains three intact tetramers in the asymmetric unit. Taken together, our findings provide strong evidence that FAD plays a structural role in the formation of tetrameric AidB.

  8. Image analysis reveals that Escherichia coli RecA protein consists of two domains.

    PubMed Central

    Yu, X; Egelman, E H

    1990-01-01

    The Escherichia coli RecA protein catalyzes homologous genetic recombination by forming helical polymers around DNA molecules. These polymers have an ATPase activity, which is essential for the movement of strands between two DNA molecules. One obstacle to structural studies of the RecA filament has been that the ATPase results in a dynamical polymer containing a mixture of states with respect to the bound ATP and its hydrolytic products. We have formed filaments which are trapped in the ADP-Pi state by substituting AIF4- for the Pi, and have used these stable filaments to generate a three-dimensional reconstruction from electron micrographs. The resolution of the reconstruction is sufficient to resolve the 38-k RecA subunit into two nearly equal domains. This reconstruction provides the most detailed view yet of the RecA protein, and serves as a framework within which existing biochemical data on RecA can be understood. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 12 PMID:2137715

  9. Flavin-Induced Oligomerization in Escherichia coli Adaptive Response Protein AidB

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The process known as “adaptive response” allows Escherichia coli to respond to small doses of DNA-methylating agents by upregulating the expression of four proteins. While the role of three of these proteins in mitigating DNA damage is well understood, the function of AidB is less clear. Although AidB is a flavoprotein, no catalytic role has been established for the bound cofactor. Here we investigate the possibility that flavin plays a structural role in the assembly of the AidB tetramer. We report the generation and biophysical characterization of deflavinated AidB and of an AidB mutant that has greatly reduced affinity for flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD). Using fluorescence quenching and analytical ultracentrifugation, we find that apo AidB has a high affinity for FAD, as indicated by an apparent dissociation constant of 402.1 ± 35.1 nM, and that binding of substoichiometric amounts of FAD triggers a transition in the AidB oligomeric state. In particular, deflavinated AidB is dimeric, whereas the addition of FAD yields a tetramer. We further investigate the dimerization and tetramerization interfaces of AidB by determining a 2.8 Å resolution crystal structure in space group P32 that contains three intact tetramers in the asymmetric unit. Taken together, our findings provide strong evidence that FAD plays a structural role in the formation of tetrameric AidB. PMID:22004173

  10. The inhibitory effects of Escherichia coli maltose binding protein on β-amyloid aggregation and cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Sharoar, Md Golam; Shahnawaz, Md; Islam, Md Imamul; Ramasamy, Vijay Sankar; Shin, Song Yub; Park, Il-Seon

    2013-10-01

    The aggregation of β-amyloid (Aβ) peptide from its monomeric to its fibrillar form importantly contributes to the development of Alzheimer's disease. Here, we investigated the effects of Escherichia coli maltose binding protein (MBP), which has been previously used as a fusion protein, on Aβ42 fibrillization, in order to improve understanding of the self-assembly process and the cytotoxic mechanism of Aβ42. MBP, at a sub-stoichiometric ratio with respect to Aβ42, was found to have chaperone-like inhibitory effects on β-sheet fibril formation, due to the accumulation of Aβ42 aggregates by sequestration of active Aβ42 species as Aβ42-MBP complexes. Furthermore, MBP increased the lag time of Aβ42 polymerization, decreased the growth rate of fibril extension, and suppressed Aβ42 mediated toxicity in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells. It appears that MBP decreases the active concentration of Aβ42 by sequestering it as Aβ42-MBP complex, and that this sequestration suppresses ongoing nucleation and retards the growth rate of Aβ42 species required for fibril formation. We speculate that inhibition of the growth rate of potent Aβ42 species by MBP suppresses Aβ42-mediated toxicity in SH-SY5Y cells. PMID:23948569

  11. Regulation of fatty acid elongation and initiation by acyl-acyl carrier protein in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Heath, R J; Rock, C O

    1996-01-26

    Long chain acyl-acyl carrier protein (acyl-ACP) has been implicated as a physiological inhibitor of fatty acid biosynthesis since acyl-ACP degradation by thioesterase overexpression leads to constitutive, unregulated fatty acid production. The biochemical targets for acyl-ACP inhibition were unknown, and this work identified two biosynthetic enzymes that were sensitive to acyl-ACP feedback inhibition. Palmitoyl-ACP inhibited the incorporation of [14C]malonyl-CoA into long chain fatty acids in cell-free extracts of Escherichia coli. A short chain acyl-ACP species with the electrophoretic properties of beta-hydroxybutyryl-ACP accumulated concomitant with the overall decrease in the amount of [14C]malonyl-CoA incorporation, indicating that the first elongation cycle was targeted by acyl-ACP. All of the proteins required to catalyze the first round of fatty acid synthesis from acetyl-CoA plus malonyl-CoA in vitro were isolated, and the first fatty acid elongation cycle was reconstituted with these purified components. Analysis of the individual enzymes and the pattern of intermediate accumulation in the reconstituted system identified initiation of fatty acid synthesis by beta-ketoacyl-ACP synthase III (fabH) and enoyl-ACP reductase (fabI) in the elongation cycle as two steps attenuated by long chain acyl-ACP.

  12. Genes on a Wire: The Nucleoid-Associated Protein HU Insulates Transcription Units in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Michael; Gerganova, Veneta; Berger, Petya; Rapiteanu, Radu; Lisicovas, Viktoras; Dobrindt, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    The extent to which chromosomal gene position in prokaryotes affects local gene expression remains an open question. Several studies have shown that chromosomal re-positioning of bacterial transcription units does not alter their expression pattern, except for a general decrease in gene expression levels from chromosomal origin to terminus proximal positions, which is believed to result from gene dosage effects. Surprisingly, the question as to whether this chromosomal context independence is a cis encoded property of a bacterial transcription unit, or if position independence is a property conferred by factors acting in trans, has not been addressed so far. For this purpose, we established a genetic test system assessing the chromosomal positioning effects by means of identical promoter-fluorescent reporter gene fusions inserted equidistantly from OriC into both chromosomal replichores of Escherichia coli K-12. Our investigations of the reporter activities in mutant cells lacking the conserved nucleoid associated protein HU uncovered various drastic chromosomal positional effects on gene transcription. In addition we present evidence that these positional effects are caused by transcriptional activity nearby the insertion site of our reporter modules. We therefore suggest that the nucleoid-associated protein HU is functionally insulating transcription units, most likely by constraining transcription induced DNA supercoiling. PMID:27545593

  13. The spc ribosomal protein operon of Escherichia coli: sequence and cotranscription of the ribosomal protein genes and a protein export gene.

    PubMed

    Cerretti, D P; Dean, D; Davis, G R; Bedwell, D M; Nomura, M

    1983-05-11

    The genes encoding the 52 ribosomal proteins (r-proteins) of Escherichia coli are organized into approximately 19 operons scattered throughout the chromosome. One of these, the spc operon, contains the genes for ten ribosomal proteins: L14, L24, L5, S14, S8, L6, L18, S5, L30 and L15 (rp1N, rp1X, rp1E, rpsN, rpsH, rp1F, rp1R, rpsE, rpmD, and rp1O). We now report the entire 5.9 kb nucleotide sequence of the spc operon. DNA sequence analysis has confirmed the genetic organization and refined the amino acid sequence of the ten r-proteins in this operon. It has also revealed the presence of two open reading frames past the last known gene (L15) of the spc operon. One of these corresponds to a gene (pr1A or secY) which recently has been shown by others to be involved in protein export. In addition, S1 mapping experiments indicate that a significant proportion of transcription initiated from the spc operon continues not only into the two putative genes, but also without termination into the downstream alpha r-protein operon.

  14. Extraction of recombinant protein from Escherichia coli by using a novel cell autolysis activity of VanX.

    PubMed

    Kamioka, Tetsuya; Sohya, Shihori; Wu, Nan; Maki, Tei; Matsuda, Tomoki; Ikegami, Takahisa; Nakamura, Haruki; Kuroda, Yutaka

    2013-08-15

    Escherichia coli is a versatile, low-cost, and popular host for expressing recombinant proteins. However, extracting recombinant proteins from E. coli requires cell wall breakage, which is both time- and effort-consuming. Here we report a novel cell breakage method based on our recent finding that VanX, which is a d-Ala-d-Ala dipeptidase encoded in a vancomycin-resistant VanA gene cluster, exhibits a strong cell lysis activity when expressed in isolation in E. coli. In our strategy, we coexpress VanX with the target protein, causing cell autolysis and release of the cellular content into the culture medium. We demonstrated this strategy for two model proteins, a green fluorescent protein variant (GFPuv) and Gaussia luciferase, and optimized the autolysis conditions and coexpression vectors. The fluorescence activity of GFPuv collected from the medium was identical to that of GFPuv purified by conventional methods. Cell breakage by VanX-mediated autolysis is very simple to implement and will efficiently complement traditional methods. PMID:23624113

  15. Protein expression and isotopic enrichment based on induction of the Entner-Doudoroff pathway in Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Refaeli, Bosmat; Goldbourt, Amir

    2012-10-12

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The Entner-Doudoroff pathway is induced during protein expression in E. coli. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 1-{sup 13}C-gluconate and {sup 15}NH{sub 4}Cl provide a carbonyl-amide protein backbone labeling scheme. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The enrichment pattern is determined by nuclear magnetic resonance. -- Abstract: The Entner-Doudoroff pathway is known to exist in many organisms including bacteria, archea and eukarya. Although the common route for carbon catabolism in Escherichia coli is the Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas pathway, it was shown that gluconate catabolism in E. coli occurs via the Entner-Doudoroff pathway. We demonstrate here that by supplying BL21(DE3) competent E.coli cells with gluconate in a minimal growth medium, protein expression can be induced. Nuclear magnetic resonance data of over-expressed ubiquitin show that by using [1-{sup 13}C]-gluconate as the only carbon source, and {sup 15}N-enriched ammonium chloride, sparse isotopic enrichment in the form of a spin-pair carbonyl-amide backbone enrichment is obtained. The specific amino acid labeling pattern is analyzed and is shown to be compatible with Entner-Doudoroff metabolism. Isotopic enrichment serves as a key factor in the biophysical characterization of proteins by various methods including nuclear magnetic resonance, mass spectrometry, infrared spectroscopy and more. Therefore, the method presented here can be applied to study proteins by obtaining sparse enrichment schemes that are not based on the regular glycolytic pathway, or to study the Entner-Doudoroff metabolism during protein expression.

  16. Engineering the Controlled Assembly of Filamentous Injectisomes in E. coli K-12 for Protein Translocation into Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial pathogens containing type III protein secretion systems (T3SS) assemble large needle-like protein complexes in the bacterial envelope, called injectisomes, for translocation of protein effectors into host cells. The application of these “molecular syringes” for the injection of proteins into mammalian cells is hindered by their structural and genomic complexity, requiring multiple polypeptides encoded along with effectors in various transcriptional units (TUs) with intricate regulation. In this work, we have rationally designed the controlled expression of the filamentous injectisomes found in enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) in the nonpathogenic strain E. coli K-12. All structural components of EPEC injectisomes, encoded in a genomic island called the locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE), were engineered in five TUs (eLEEs) excluding effectors, promoters and transcriptional regulators. These eLEEs were placed under the control of the IPTG-inducible promoter Ptac and integrated into specific chromosomal sites of E. coli K-12 using a marker-less strategy. The resulting strain, named synthetic injector E. coli (SIEC), assembles filamentous injectisomes similar to those in EPEC. SIEC injectisomes form pores in the host plasma membrane and are able to translocate T3-substrate proteins (e.g., translocated intimin receptor, Tir) into the cytoplasm of HeLa cells reproducing the phenotypes of intimate attachment and polymerization of actin-pedestals elicited by EPEC bacteria. Hence, SIEC strain allows the controlled expression of functional filamentous injectisomes for efficient translocation of proteins with T3S-signals into mammalian cells. PMID:26017572

  17. Dual-emitting biosensors for glucose and glutamine from genertically engineered E. coli binding proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolosa, Leah; Ge, Xudong; Kostov, Yordan; Lakowicz, Joseph R.; Rao, Govind

    2003-07-01

    Glucose is the major source of carbon, and glutamine is the major source of nitrogen in cell culture media. Thus, glucose and glutamine monitoring are important in maintaining optimal conditions in industrial bioprocesses. Here we report reagentless glucose and glutamine sensors using the E. coli glucose binding protein (GBP) and the glutamine binding protein (GlnBP). Both of these proteins are derived from the permease system of the gram-negative bacteria. The Q26C variant of GBP was labeled at the 26-position with anilino-naphthalene sulfonate (ANS), while the S179C variant of GlnBP was labeled at the 179-position with acrylodan. The ANS and acrylodan emissions are quenched in the presence of glucose and glutamine, respectively. The acrylodan-labeled GlnBP was labeled at the N-terminal with ruthenium bis-(2,2"-bipyridyl)-1,10-phenanthroline-9-isothiocyanate. The ruthenium acts as a non-responsive long-lived reference. The apparent binding constant, Kd", of 8.0 μM glucose was obtained from the decrease in intensity of ANS in GBP. The reliability of the method in monitoring glucose during yeast fermentation was determined by comparison with the YSI Biochemistry Analyzer. The apparent binding constant, Kd", of 0.72 μM glutamine was calculated from the ratio of emission intensities of acrylodan and ruthenium (I515/I610) in GlnBP. The presence of the long-lived ruthenium allowed for modulation sensing at lower frequencies (1-10 MHz) approaching an accuracy of +/- 0.02 μM. The conversion of the GBP into a similar ratiometric sensor was described.

  18. Functional reconstitution and characterization of AqpZ, the E. coli water channel protein.

    PubMed

    Borgnia, M J; Kozono, D; Calamita, G; Maloney, P C; Agre, P

    1999-09-01

    Understanding the selectivity of aquaporin water channels will require structural and functional studies of wild-type and modified proteins; however, expression systems have not previously yielded aquaporins in the necessary milligram quantities. Here we report expression of a histidine-tagged form of Escherichia coli aquaporin-Z (AqpZ) in its homologous expression system. 10-His-AqpZ is solubilized and purified to near homogeneity in a single step with a final yield of approximately 2.5 mg/l of culture. The histidine tag is removed by trypsin, yielding the native protein with the addition of three N-terminal residues, as confirmed by microsequencing. Sucrose gradient sedimentation analysis showed that the native, solubilized AqpZ protein is a trypsin-resistant tetramer. Unlike other known aquaporins, AqpZ tetramers are not readily dissociated by 1% SDS at neutral pH. Hydrophilic reducing agents have a limited effect on the stability of the tetramer in 1% SDS, whereas incubations for more than 24 hours, pH values below 5.6, or exposure to the hydrophobic reducing agent ethanedithiol cause dissociation into monomers. Cys20, but not Cys9, is necessary for the stability of the AqpZ tetramer in SDS. Upon reconstitution into proteoliposomes, AqpZ displays very high osmotic water permeability (pf > or = 10 x 10(-14) cm3 s-1 subunit-1) and low Arrhenius activation energy (Ea = 3.7 kcal/mol), similar to mammalian aquaporin-1 (AQP1). No permeation by glycerol, urea or sorbitol was detected. Expression of native and modified AqpZ in milligram quantities has permitted biophysical characterization of this remarkably stable aquaporin tetramer, which is being utilized for high-resolution structural studies. PMID:10518952

  19. Functional significance of conserved residues in the phosphohydrolase module of Escherichia coli MutT protein.

    PubMed

    Shimokawa, H; Fujii, Y; Furuichi, M; Sekiguchi, M; Nakabeppu, Y

    2000-09-01

    Escherichia coli MutT protein hydrolyzes 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-dGTP (8-oxo-dGTP) to the monophosphate, thus avoiding the incorporation of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine (8-oxo-G) into nascent DNA. Bacterial and mammalian homologs of MutT protein share the phosphohydrolase module (MutT: Gly37-->Gly59). By saturation mutagenesis of conserved residues in the MutT module, four of the 10 conserved residues (Gly37, Gly38, Glu53 and Glu57) were revealed to be essential to suppress spontaneous A:T-->C:G transversion mutation in a mutT(-) mutator strain. For the other six residues (Lys39, Glu44, Thr45, Arg52, Glu56 and Gly59), many positive mutants which can suppress the spontaneous mutation were obtained; however, all of the positive mutants for Glu44 and Arg52 either partially or inefficiently suppressed the mutation, indicating that these two residues are also important for MutT function. Several positive mutants for Lys39, Thr45, Glu56 and Gly59 efficiently decreased the elevated spontaneous mutation rate, as seen with the wild-type, hence, these four residues are non-essential for MutT function. As Lys38 and Glu55 in human MTH1, corresponding to the non-essential residues Lys39 and Glu56 in MutT, could not be replaced by any other residue without loss of function, different structural features between the two modules of MTH1 and MutT proteins are evident. PMID:10954591

  20. Escherichia coli RecO protein anneals ssDNA complexed with its cognate ssDNA-binding protein: A common step in genetic recombination.

    PubMed

    Kantake, Noriko; Madiraju, Murty V V M; Sugiyama, Tomohiko; Kowalczykowski, Stephen C

    2002-11-26

    We present biochemical evidence for the functional similarity of Escherichia coli RecO protein and bacteriophage T4 UvsY protein to eukaryotic Rad52 protein. Although Rad52 protein is conserved in eukaryotes, no sequence homologue has been found in prokaryotes or archeabacteria. Rad52 protein has two unique activities: facilitation of replication protein-A (RPA) displacement by Rad51 protein and annealing of RPA-single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) complexes. Both activities require species-specific interaction between Rad52 protein and RPA. Both RecO and UvsY proteins also possess the former property with regard to their cognate ssDNA-binding protein. Here, we report that RecO protein anneals ssDNA that is complexed with only its cognate ssDNA-binding protein, suggesting the involvement of species-specific interactions. Optimal activity for RecO protein occurs after formation of a 1:1 complex with SSB protein. RecR protein, which is known to stimulate RecO protein to facilitate SSB protein displacement by RecA protein, inhibits annealing by RecO protein, suggesting that RecR protein may regulate the choice between the DNA strand invasion versus annealing pathways. In addition, we show that UvsY protein anneals ssDNA; furthermore, ssDNA, which is complexed only with its cognate ssDNA-binding protein, is annealed in the presence of UvsY protein. These results indicate that RecO and possibly UvsY proteins are functional counterparts of Rad52 protein. Based on the conservation of these functions, we propose a modified double-strand break repair model that includes DNA annealing as an important intermediate step. PMID:12438681

  1. R Factor Proteins Synthesized in Escherichia coli Minicells: Incorporation Studies with Different R Factors and Detection of Deoxyribonucleic Acid-Binding Proteins1

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Stuart B.

    1974-01-01

    Analysis of the protein synthesized by Escherichia coli minicells containing R factors demonstrated a variety of low- and high-molecular-weight polypeptides in sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-polyacrylamide gels. Only half of this protein was released into a soluble fraction on lysis of these minicells. The other half remained associated with the minicell envelope. The efficiency of precursor incorporation into protein and the kinds of proteins synthesized changed with the age of the minicells at the time of harvest. About 1 to 2% of the soluble R factor-coded protein bound to calf thymus, E. coli, or R factor DNA-cellulose. Although most of these proteins were excluded from Sephadex G-100 columns, they migrated chiefly as low-molecular-weight-polypeptides (13,000 to 15,000) in SDS-polyacrylamide gels. Additional DNA-binding proteins that appeared to be higher-molecular-weight peptides were noted in extracts from younger minicells. At least one protein, identified as an SDS band, appeared to bind selectively to R factor DNA-cellulose. Minicells with R factors also contained DNA-binding proteins of cell origin, including the core RNA polymerase. No such binding proteins were found in R− minicells. These studies suggest that: (i) R factors code for proteins that may be involved in their own DNA metabolism; (ii) R factor DNA-binding proteins may be associated with larger host cell DNA-binding proteins or subunits of larger R factor proteins; and (iii) the age of the minicell influences the extent of protein synthesis and the kinds of proteins synthesized by R factors in minicells. Images PMID:4612023

  2. Unnatural amino acid incorporation in E. coli: current and future applications in the design of therapeutic proteins

    PubMed Central

    Wals, Kim; Ovaa, Huib

    2014-01-01

    Unnatural amino acid (UAA) incorporation by amber codon suppression offers scientists a powerful tool to modify the properties of proteins at will. UAA incorporation has been used for a plethora of fundamental research applications and, more recently, also for the selective modification of therapeutic proteins. In this review most recent developments in Escherichia coli codon expansion and, unnatural amino acid incorporation are discussed together with some remarkable recent developments in improved efficient UAA incorporation. We focus on the generation of proteins that hold promise for future therapeutic applications that would be impossible to obtain without unnatural amino acid incorporation, including the generation of bi-specific antibodies and antibody drug conjugates. PMID:24790983

  3. Unnatural amino acid incorporation in E. coli: current and future applications in the design of therapeutic proteins.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ovaa, Huib; wals, kim

    2014-04-01

    Unnatural amino acid (UAA) incorporation by amber codon suppression offers scientists a powerful tool to modify the properties of proteins at will. UAA incorporation has been used for a plethora of fundamental research applications and, more recently, also for the selective modification of therapeutic proteins. In this review most recent developments in Escherichia coli codon expansion and, unnatural amino acid incorporation are discussed together with some remarkable recent developments in improved efficient UAA incorporation. We focus on the generation of proteins that hold promise for future therapeutic applications that would be impossible to obtain without unnatural amino acid incorporation, including the generation of bi-specific antibodies and antibody drug conjugates.

  4. Rapid detection of translation-terminating mutations at the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene by direct protein truncation test

    SciTech Connect

    Van Der Luut, R.; Khan, P.M.; Van Leeuwen, C.; Tops, C.; Roest, P.; Den Dunnen, J. )

    1994-03-01

    Familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) is usually associated with protein truncating mutations in the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene. The APC mutations are known to play a major role in colorectal carcinogensis. For the identification of protein truncating mutations of the APC gene, the authors developed a rapid, sensitive, and direct screening procedure. The technique is based on the in vitro transcription and translation of the genomic PCR products and is called the protein truncation test. Samples of DNA from individual FAP patients, members of a FAP family, colorectal tumors, and colorectal tumor-derived cell lines were used to show the effectiveness of this method. 9 refs., 2 figs.

  5. Overexpression, purification, and characterization of the periplasmic space thiamin-binding protein of the thiamin traffic ATPase in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Hollenbach, Andrew D; Dickson, Kimberly A; Washabaugh, Michael W

    2002-08-01

    Thiamin (Vitamin B(1)) transport in Escherichia coli occurs by the superfamily of traffic ATPases in which the initial receptor is the periplasmic binding protein. We have cloned the periplasmic thiamin-binding protein (TBP) of the E. coli periplasmic thiamin transport system and purified the overexpressed protein to apparent homogeneity. A subsequent biochemical characterization demonstrates that TBP is a 34.205kDa monomer. TBP also contains one tightly bound thiamin species [thiamin, thiamin monophosphate (TMP), or thiamin diphosphate (TDP)] per monomer (K(D)=0.8 microM) when isolated under conditions that would remove any loosely bound ligands. We also demonstrate that thiamin is readily exchangeable in the presence of exogenous thiamin with a k(off)=0.12s(-1). The biochemical characteristics of the overexpressed, plasmid-derived TBP are indistinguishable from those determined for endogenous TBP purified from E. coli. The overexpression and purification of TBP that we present here allows the rapid isolation of large amounts of pure protein that are required for further mechanistic and structural studies and demonstrates a vast improvement over previously reported purifications.

  6. Structural dynamics of E. coli single-stranded DNA binding protein reveal DNA wrapping and unwrapping pathways

    PubMed Central

    Suksombat, Sukrit; Khafizov, Rustem; Kozlov, Alexander G; Lohman, Timothy M; Chemla, Yann R

    2015-01-01

    Escherichia coli single-stranded (ss)DNA binding (SSB) protein mediates genome maintenance processes by regulating access to ssDNA. This homotetrameric protein wraps ssDNA in multiple distinct binding modes that may be used selectively in different DNA processes, and whose detailed wrapping topologies remain speculative. Here, we used single-molecule force and fluorescence spectroscopy to investigate E. coli SSB binding to ssDNA. Stretching a single ssDNA-SSB complex reveals discrete states that correlate with known binding modes, the likely ssDNA conformations and diffusion dynamics in each, and the kinetic pathways by which the protein wraps ssDNA and is dissociated. The data allow us to construct an energy landscape for the ssDNA-SSB complex, revealing that unwrapping energy costs increase the more ssDNA is unraveled. Our findings provide insights into the mechanism by which proteins gain access to ssDNA bound by SSB, as demonstrated by experiments in which SSB is displaced by the E. coli recombinase RecA. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.08193.001 PMID:26305498

  7. A signal sequence is not required for protein export in prlA mutants of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Derman, A I; Puziss, J W; Bassford, P J; Beckwith, J

    1993-01-01

    The prlA/secY gene, which codes for an integral membrane protein component of the Escherichia coli protein export machinery, is the locus of the strongest suppressors of signal sequence mutations. We demonstrate that two exported proteins of E.coli, maltose-binding protein and alkaline phosphatase, each lacking its entire signal sequence, are exported to the periplasm in several prlA mutants. The export efficiency can be substantial; in a strain carrying the prlA4 allele, 30% of signal-sequenceless alkaline phosphatase is exported to the periplasm. Other components of the E.coli export machinery, including SecA, are required for this export. SecB is required for the export of signal-sequenceless alkaline phosphatase even though the normal export of alkaline phosphatase does not require this chaperonin. Our findings indicate that signal sequences confer speed and efficiency upon the export process, but that they are not always essential for export. Entry into the export pathway may involve components that so overlap in function that the absence of a signal sequence can be compensated for, or there may exist one or more means of entry that do not require signal sequences at all. Images PMID:8458344

  8. Comparing the predicted and observed properties of proteins encoded in the genome of Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed

    Link, A J; Robison, K; Church, G M

    1997-08-01

    Mining the emerging abundance of microbial genome sequences for hypotheses is an exciting prospect of "functional genomics". At the forefront of this effort, we compared the predictions of the complete Escherichia coli genomic sequence with the observed gene products by assessing 381 proteins for their mature N-termini, in vivo abundances, isoelectric points, molecular masses, and cellular locations. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) and Edman sequencing were combined to sequence Coomassie-stained 2-DE spots representing the abundant proteins of wild-type E. coli K-12 strains. Greater than 90% of the abundant proteins in the E. coli proteome lie in a small isoelectric point and molecular mass window of 4-7 and 10-100 kDa, respectively. We identified several highly abundant proteins, YjbJ, YjbP, YggX, HdeA, and AhpC, which would not have been predicted from the genomic sequence alone. Of the 223 uniquely identified loci, 60% of the encoded proteins are proteolytically processed. As previously reported, the initiator methionine was efficiently cleaved when the penultimate amino acid was serine or alanine. In contrast, when the penultimate amino acid was threonine, glycine, or proline, cleavage was variable, and valine did not signal cleavage. Although signal peptide cleavage sites tended to follow predicted rules, the length of the putative signal sequence was occassionally greater than the consensus. For proteins predicted to be in the cytoplasm or inner membrane, the N-terminal amino acids were highly constrained compared to proteins localized to the periplasm or outer membrane. Although cytoplasmic proteins follow the N-end rule for protein stability, proteins in the periplasm or outer membrane do not follow this rule; several have N-terminal amino acids predicted to destabilize the proteins. Surprisingly, 18% of the identified 2-DE spots represent isoforms in which protein products of the same gene have different observed pI and M(r), suggesting they are

  9. Escherichia coli PriA protein is essential for inducible and constitutive stable DNA replication.

    PubMed Central

    Masai, H; Asai, T; Kubota, Y; Arai, K; Kogoma, T

    1994-01-01

    Under certain conditions, Escherichia coli cells exhibit either of two altered modes of chromosomal DNA replication. These are inducible stable DNA replication (iSDR), seen in SOS-induced cells, and constitutive stable DNA replication (cSDR), seen in rnhA mutants. Both iSDR and cSDR can continue to occur in the absence of protein synthesis. They are dependent on RecA protein, but do not require DnaA protein or the oriC site. Here we report the requirement for PriA, a protein essential for assembly of the phi X174-type primosome, for both iSDR and cSDR. In priA1(Null)::kan mutant cells, iSDR is not observed after induction by thymine starvation. Replication from one of the origins (oriM1) specific to iSDR is greatly reduced by the priA1::kan mutation. cSDR in rnhA224 mutant cells deficient in RNase HI is also completely abolished by the same priA mutation. In both cases, SDR is restored by introduction of a plasmid carrying a wild-type priA gene. Furthermore, the viability of an rnhA::cat dnaA46 strain is lost at 42 degrees C upon inactivation of the priA gene, indicating the lethal effect of priA inactivation on those cells whose viability depends on cSDR. These results demonstrate that a function of PriA protein is essential for iSDR and cSDR and suggest the involvement of the PriA-dependent phi X174-type primosome in these DnaA/oriC-independent pathways of chromosome replication. Whereas ColE1-type plasmids, known to be independent of DnaA, absolutely require PriA function for replication, DnaA-dependent plasmid replicons such as pSC101, F, R6K, Rts1 and RK2 are able to transform and to be maintained in the priA1::kan strain.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images PMID:7525276

  10. Assembly of Lipopolysaccharide in Escherichia coli Requires the Essential LapB Heat Shock Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Gracjana; Kobylak, Natalia; Lindner, Buko; Stupak, Anna; Raina, Satish

    2014-01-01

    Here, we describe two new heat shock proteins involved in the assembly of LPS in Escherichia coli, LapA and LapB (lipopolysaccharide assembly protein A and B). lapB mutants were identified based on an increased envelope stress response. Envelope stress-responsive pathways control key steps in LPS biogenesis and respond to defects in the LPS assembly. Accordingly, the LPS content in ΔlapB or Δ(lapA lapB) mutants was elevated, with an enrichment of LPS derivatives with truncations in the core region, some of which were pentaacylated and exhibited carbon chain polymorphism. Further, the levels of LpxC, the enzyme that catalyzes the first committed step of lipid A synthesis, were highly elevated in the Δ(lapA lapB) mutant. Δ(lapA lapB) mutant accumulated extragenic suppressors that mapped either to lpxC, waaC, and gmhA, or to the waaQ operon (LPS biosynthesis) and lpp (Braun's lipoprotein). Increased synthesis of either FabZ (3-R-hydroxymyristoyl acyl carrier protein dehydratase), slrA (novel RpoE-regulated non-coding sRNA), lipoprotein YceK, toxin HicA, or MurA (UDP-N-acetylglucosamine 1-carboxyvinyltransferase) suppressed some of the Δ(lapA lapB) defects. LapB contains six tetratricopeptide repeats and, at the C-terminal end, a rubredoxin-like domain that was found to be essential for its activity. In pull-down experiments, LapA and LapB co-purified with LPS, Lpt proteins, FtsH (protease), DnaK, and DnaJ (chaperones). A specific interaction was also observed between WaaC and LapB. Our data suggest that LapB coordinates assembly of proteins involved in LPS synthesis at the plasma membrane and regulates turnover of LpxC, thereby ensuring balanced biosynthesis of LPS and phospholipids consistent with its essentiality. PMID:24722986

  11. Assembly of lipopolysaccharide in Escherichia coli requires the essential LapB heat shock protein.

    PubMed

    Klein, Gracjana; Kobylak, Natalia; Lindner, Buko; Stupak, Anna; Raina, Satish

    2014-05-23

    Here, we describe two new heat shock proteins involved in the assembly of LPS in Escherichia coli, LapA and LapB (lipopolysaccharide assembly protein A and B). lapB mutants were identified based on an increased envelope stress response. Envelope stress-responsive pathways control key steps in LPS biogenesis and respond to defects in the LPS assembly. Accordingly, the LPS content in ΔlapB or Δ(lapA lapB) mutants was elevated, with an enrichment of LPS derivatives with truncations in the core region, some of which were pentaacylated and exhibited carbon chain polymorphism. Further, the levels of LpxC, the enzyme that catalyzes the first committed step of lipid A synthesis, were highly elevated in the Δ(lapA lapB) mutant. Δ(lapA lapB) mutant accumulated extragenic suppressors that mapped either to lpxC, waaC, and gmhA, or to the waaQ operon (LPS biosynthesis) and lpp (Braun's lipoprotein). Increased synthesis of either FabZ (3-R-hydroxymyristoyl acyl carrier protein dehydratase), slrA (novel RpoE-regulated non-coding sRNA), lipoprotein YceK, toxin HicA, or MurA (UDP-N-acetylglucosamine 1-carboxyvinyltransferase) suppressed some of the Δ(lapA lapB) defects. LapB contains six tetratricopeptide repeats and, at the C-terminal end, a rubredoxin-like domain that was found to be essential for its activity. In pull-down experiments, LapA and LapB co-purified with LPS, Lpt proteins, FtsH (protease), DnaK, and DnaJ (chaperones). A specific interaction was also observed between WaaC and LapB. Our data suggest that LapB coordinates assembly of proteins involved in LPS synthesis at the plasma membrane and regulates turnover of LpxC, thereby ensuring balanced biosynthesis of LPS and phospholipids consistent with its essentiality.

  12. Stability and kinetics of unfolding and refolding of cAMP receptor protein from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Małecki, J; Wasylewski, Z

    1997-02-01

    cAMP receptor protein (CRP) is involved in regulation of expression of several genes in Escherichia coli. The protein is a homodimer and each monomer is folded into two distinct structural domains. The mechanism of the biological activity of the protein may involve the interaction between the subunits and domains. In order to determine the interaction between the subunits or domains of CRP, we have studied the reversible denaturation of the protein by guanidine hydrochloride. The unfolding and refolding kinetics of CRP was monitored using stopped-flow fluorescence spectroscopy at 20 degrees C and pH 7.9. The results of CRP denaturation indicate that the transition can be described by a three-state model: (CRP native)2<=> 2 (CRP native)<=>2 (CRP denatured). The faster process, characterized by the relaxation time tau 2 = 80 +/- 3 ms, corresponds to the dissociation of CRP dimer into monomers. The slower process has the relaxation time tau t = 1.9 +/- 0.1 s and corresponds to the cooperative unfolding of CRP monomer. The free energy change in the absence of denaturant upon CRP dissociation is delta G dis degrees = 46.9 +/- 2.5 kJ/mol and for monomer unfolding delta G unf degrees = 30.9 +/- 1.3 kJ/mol. The thermal unfolding of CRP was studied by circular dichroism and fluorescence spectroscopy at various guanidine hydrochloride concentrations. It has been found that the native protein is maximally stable at about 21 +/- 0.3 degrees C and is denatured upon heating and cooling from this temperature. The apparent free energy change for CRP unfolding at 21 degrees C is equal to 30.5 +/- 0.4 kJ/mol and the apparent specific heat change is equal to delta Cp, app = 10.7 +/- 0.7 kJ mol-1 K-1. The predicted values of cold denaturation midpoint is equal to tau G = -18.8 +/- 1.5 degrees C and for high-temperature transition tau G = 63.1 +/- 1.5 degrees C. The predicted midpoint of high-temperature unfolding transition is about the same as determined experimentally. PMID:9057829

  13. Large protein analysis of Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli by MALDI TOF mass spectrometry using amoxicillin functionalized magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Nazim; Guo, Zhongxian; Wu, Hui-Fen

    2016-09-01

    Bacteria or their protein and peptide entity enrichment using biomolecules-functionalized magnetic nanoparticles, and analysis by matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI MS) is a promising technique to analyze microorganisms. High and low molecular weight proteins like penicillin-binding proteins are responsible for final step synthesis of peptidoglycan biosynthesis; those are the target of lactam antibiotics. In this paper, we synthesized magnetic nanoparticles (mag-NPs) and further modified them with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane, and then the β-lactam antibiotic amoxicillin was covalently linked to their surface. β-Lactam group attributes as penicillin binding proteins (PBPs) in bacteria. Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli were used as model bacteria for enrichment based on the β-lactam affinity of magnetic nanoparticles, and then the bacteria were easily separated by an external magnet. Several high molecular weight penicillin binding proteins (PBPs) were detected by MALDI MS containing 10(4) and 10(3) colony-forming unit (cfu) per milileter (mL) of S. aureus and E. coli, respectively. In the case of E. coli, higher molecular weight PBPs were observed at 20 to 55 kDa in MALDI mass spectra. However, S. aureus bacteria resulted with femAB operon-based proteins, with molecular weight of 49570.4 Da, by MALDI MS after using amoxicillin functionalized-mag-NPs. The current approach provides an effective bacteria detection and preconcentration method that has high potential in the near future for fast and sensitive diagnosis of pathogenic bacteria infection. Graphical Abstract Schematic for large proteins analysis by MALDI TOF MS (a) mag-NPs and bacterial interaction (b) Penicillin binding proteins trapping by Amox-mag-NPs. PMID:27565791

  14. Proteins of Escherichia coli come in sizes that are multiples of 14 kDa: domain concepts and evolutionary implications.

    PubMed

    Savageau, M A

    1986-03-01

    Initial attempts to correlate the distribution of gene density (number of gene loci per unit length on the linkage map) with the distribution of lengths of coding sequences have led to the observation that 46% of approximately 1000 sampled proteins in Escherichia coli have molecular masses of n X 14,000 +/- 2500 daltons (n = 1, 2, ...). This clustering around multiples of 14,000 contrasts with the 36% one would expect in these ranges if the sizes were uniformly distributed. The entire distribution is well fit by a sum of normal or lognormal distributions located at multiples of 14,000, which suggests that the percentage of E. coli proteins governed by the underlying sizing mechanism is much greater than 50%. Clustering of protein molecular sizes around multiples of a unit size also is suggested by the distribution of well-characterized HeLa cell proteins. The distribution of gene lengths for E. coli suggests regular clustering, which implies that the clustering of protein molecular masses is not an artifact of the molecular mass measurement by gel electrophoresis. These observations suggest the existence of a fundamental structural unit. The rather uniform size of this structural unit (without any apparent sequence homology) suggests that a general principle such as geometrical or physical optimization at the DNA or protein level is responsible. This suggestion is discussed in relation to experimental evidence for the domain structure of proteins and to existing hypotheses that attempt to account for these domains. Microevolution would appear to be accommodated by incremental changes within this fundamental unit, whereas macroevolution would appear to involve "quantum" changes to the next stable size of protein.

  15. Cell age dependent concentration of Escherichia coli divisome proteins analyzed with ImageJ and ObjectJ.

    PubMed

    Vischer, Norbert O E; Verheul, Jolanda; Postma, Marten; van den Berg van Saparoea, Bart; Galli, Elisa; Natale, Paolo; Gerdes, Kenn; Luirink, Joen; Vollmer, Waldemar; Vicente, Miguel; den Blaauwen, Tanneke

    2015-01-01

    The rod-shaped Gram-negative bacterium Escherichia coli multiplies by elongation followed by binary fission. Longitudinal growth of the cell envelope and synthesis of the new poles are organized by two protein complexes called elongasome and divisome, respectively. We have analyzed the spatio-temporal localization patterns of many of these morphogenetic proteins by immunolabeling the wild type strain MC4100 grown to steady state in minimal glucose medium at 28°C. This allowed the direct comparison of morphogenetic protein localization patterns as a function of cell age as imaged by phase contrast and fluorescence wide field microscopy. Under steady state conditions the age distribution of the cells is constant and is directly correlated to cell length. To quantify cell size and protein localization parameters in 1000s of labeled cells, we developed 'Coli-Inspector,' which is a project running under ImageJ with the plugin 'ObjectJ.' ObjectJ organizes image-analysis tasks using an integrated approach with the flexibility to produce different output formats from existing markers such as intensity data and geometrical parameters. ObjectJ supports the combination of automatic and interactive methods giving the user complete control over the method of image analysis and data collection, with visual inspection tools for quick elimination of artifacts. Coli-inspector was used to sort the cells according to division cycle cell age and to analyze the spatio-temporal localization pattern of each protein. A unique dataset has been created on the concentration and position of the proteins during the cell cycle. We show for the first time that a subset of morphogenetic proteins have a constant cellular concentration during the cell division cycle whereas another set exhibits a cell division cycle dependent concentration variation. Using the number of proteins present at midcell, the stoichiometry of the divisome is discussed.

  16. Cell age dependent concentration of Escherichia coli divisome proteins analyzed with ImageJ and ObjectJ.

    PubMed

    Vischer, Norbert O E; Verheul, Jolanda; Postma, Marten; van den Berg van Saparoea, Bart; Galli, Elisa; Natale, Paolo; Gerdes, Kenn; Luirink, Joen; Vollmer, Waldemar; Vicente, Miguel; den Blaauwen, Tanneke

    2015-01-01

    The rod-shaped Gram-negative bacterium Escherichia coli multiplies by elongation followed by binary fission. Longitudinal growth of the cell envelope and synthesis of the new poles are organized by two protein complexes called elongasome and divisome, respectively. We have analyzed the spatio-temporal localization patterns of many of these morphogenetic proteins by immunolabeling the wild type strain MC4100 grown to steady state in minimal glucose medium at 28°C. This allowed the direct comparison of morphogenetic protein localization patterns as a function of cell age as imaged by phase contrast and fluorescence wide field microscopy. Under steady state conditions the age distribution of the cells is constant and is directly correlated to cell length. To quantify cell size and protein localization parameters in 1000s of labeled cells, we developed 'Coli-Inspector,' which is a project running under ImageJ with the plugin 'ObjectJ.' ObjectJ organizes image-analysis tasks using an integrated approach with the flexibility to produce different output formats from existing markers such as intensity data and geometrical parameters. ObjectJ supports the combination of automatic and interactive methods giving the user complete control over the method of image analysis and data collection, with visual inspection tools for quick elimination of artifacts. Coli-inspector was used to sort the cells according to division cycle cell age and to analyze the spatio-temporal localization pattern of each protein. A unique dataset has been created on the concentration and position of the proteins during the cell cycle. We show for the first time that a subset of morphogenetic proteins have a constant cellular concentration during the cell division cycle whereas another set exhibits a cell division cycle dependent concentration variation. Using the number of proteins present at midcell, the stoichiometry of the divisome is discussed. PMID:26124755

  17. Cell age dependent concentration of Escherichia coli divisome proteins analyzed with ImageJ and ObjectJ

    PubMed Central

    Vischer, Norbert O. E.; Verheul, Jolanda; Postma, Marten; van den Berg van Saparoea, Bart; Galli, Elisa; Natale, Paolo; Gerdes, Kenn; Luirink, Joen; Vollmer, Waldemar; Vicente, Miguel; den Blaauwen, Tanneke

    2015-01-01

    The rod-shaped Gram-negative bacterium Escherichia coli multiplies by elongation followed by binary fission. Longitudinal growth of the cell envelope and synthesis of the new poles are organized by two protein complexes called elongasome and divisome, respectively. We have analyzed the spatio-temporal localization patterns of many of these morphogenetic proteins by immunolabeling the wild type strain MC4100 grown to steady state in minimal glucose medium at 28°C. This allowed the direct comparison of morphogenetic protein localization patterns as a function of cell age as imaged by phase contrast and fluorescence wide field microscopy. Under steady state conditions the age distribution of the cells is constant and is directly correlated to cell length. To quantify cell size and protein localization parameters in 1000s of labeled cells, we developed ‘Coli-Inspector,’ which is a project running under ImageJ with the plugin ‘ObjectJ.’ ObjectJ organizes image-analysis tasks using an integrated approach with the flexibility to produce different output formats from existing markers such as intensity data and geometrical parameters. ObjectJ supports the combination of automatic and interactive methods giving the user complete control over the method of image analysis and data collection, with visual inspection tools for quick elimination of artifacts. Coli-inspector was used to sort the cells according to division cycle cell age and to analyze the spatio-temporal localization pattern of each protein. A unique dataset has been created on the concentration and position of the proteins during the cell cycle. We show for the first time that a subset of morphogenetic proteins have a constant cellular concentration during the cell division cycle whereas another set exhibits a cell division cycle dependent concentration variation. Using the number of proteins present at midcell, the stoichiometry of the divisome is discussed. PMID:26124755

  18. Spatial Arrangement of Ribosomal Proteins: Reaction of the Escherichia coli 30S Subunit with bis-Imidoesters

    PubMed Central

    Bickle, T. A.; Hershey, J. W. B.; Traut, R. R.

    1972-01-01

    The 30S ribosomal subunit of E. coli was treated with the bifunctional reagent bis-(methyl)suberimidate. Crosslinked ribosomal proteins were identified as bands with increased molecular weight after electrophoresis in polyacrylamide gels containing sodium dodecyl sulphate. The pattern of crosslinked products was altered when unfolded subunits were used. Free ribosomal protein was not crosslinked. Several of the crosslinked products were cleaved by ammonolysis to form the original monomeric protein constituents. The low yields of the reactions necessitated the use of radioactive proteins and auto-radiographic procedures. The crosslinked proteins were tentatively identified by coelectrophoresis of the radioactive ammonolysis products with carrier 30S protein in sodium dodecyl sulphate, and coelectrophoresis at pH 4.5 in buffers containing urea. Images PMID:4556460

  19. Creation of a Cellooligosaccharide-Assimilating Escherichia coli Strain by Displaying Active Beta-Glucosidase on the Cell Surface via a Novel Anchor Protein

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Tsutomu; Kawabata, Hitomi; Ogino, Chiaki; Kondo, Akihiko

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrated direct assimilation of cellooligosaccharide using Escherichia coli displaying beta-glucosidase (BGL). BGL from Thermobifida fusca YX (Tfu0937) was displayed on the E. coli cell surface using a novel anchor protein named Blc. This strain was grown successfully on 0.2% cellobiose, and the optical density at 600 nm (OD600) was 1.05 after 20 h. PMID:21742905

  20. Evidence that E. coli ribosomal protein S13 has two separable functional domains involved in 16S RNA recognition and protein S19 binding.

    PubMed

    Schwarzbauer, J; Craven, G R

    1985-09-25

    We have found that E. coli ribosomal protein S13 recognizes multiple sites on 16S RNA. However, when protein S19 is included with a mixture of proteins S4, S7, S8, S16/S17 and S20, the S13 binds to the complex with measurably greater strength and with a stoichiometry of 1.5 copies per particle. This suggests that the protein may have two functional domains. We have tested this idea by cleaving the protein into two polypeptides. It was found that one of the fragments, composed of amino acid residues 84-117, retained the capacity to bind 16S RNA at multiple sites. Protein S19 had no affect on the strength or stoichiometry of the binding of this fragment. These data suggest that S13 has a C-terminal domain primarily responsible for RNA recognition and possibly that the N-terminal region is important for association with protein S19.

  1. Isotopically Labeled Expression in E. coli, Purification, and Refolding of the Full Ectodomain of the Influenza Virus Membrane Fusion Protein

    PubMed Central

    Curtis-Fisk, Jaime; Spencer, Ryan M.; Weliky, David P.

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes methods to produce an isotopically labeled 23 kDa viral membrane protein with purified yield of 20 mg/L of E. coli shake flask culture. This yield is sufficient for NMR structural studies and the protein production methods are simple, straightforward, and rapid and likely applicable to other recombinant membrane proteins expressed in E. coli. The target FHA2 protein is the full ectodomain construct of the influenza virus hemagglutinin protein which catalyzes fusion between the viral and the cellular endosomal membranes during infection. The high yield of FHA2 was achieved by: (1) initial growth in rich medium to A600 ~ 8 followed by a switch to minimal medium and induction of protein expression; and (2) obtaining protein both from purification of the detergent-soluble lysate and from solubilization, purification, and refolding of inclusion bodies. The high cell density was achieved after optimization of pH, oxygenation, and carbon source and concentration, and the refolding protocol was optimized using circular dichroism spectroscopy. For a single residue of membrane-associated FHA2 that was obtained from purification and refolding of inclusion bodies, native conformation was verified by the 13CO chemical shift measured using solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. PMID:18640277

  2. Electrochemical Characterization of Escherichia coli Adaptive Response Protein AidB

    PubMed Central

    Hamill, Michael J.; Jost, Marco; Wong, Cintyu; Bene, Nicholas C.; Drennan, Catherine L.; Elliott, Sean J.

    2012-01-01

    When exposed to known DNA-damaging alkylating agents, Escherichia coli cells increase production of four DNA repair enzymes: Ada, AlkA, AlkB, and AidB. The role of three enzymes (Ada, AlkA, and AlkB) in repairing DNA lesions has been well characterized, while the function of AidB is poorly understood. AidB has a distinct cofactor that is potentially related to the elusive role of AidB in adaptive response: a redox active flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD). In this study, we report the thermodynamic redox properties of the AidB flavin for the first time, both for free protein and in the presence of potential substrates. We find that the midpoint reduction potential of the AidB flavin is within a biologically relevant window for redox chemistry at −181 mV, that AidB significantly stabilizes the flavin semiquinone, and that small molecule binding perturbs the observed reduction potential. Our electrochemical results combined with structural analysis allow for fresh comparisons between AidB and the homologous acyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase (ACAD) family of enzymes. AidB exhibits several discrepancies from ACADs that suggest a novel catalytic mechanism distinct from that of the ACAD family enzymes. PMID:23443126

  3. Characterization of Adenomatous Polyposis Coli Protein Dynamics and Localization at the Centrosome.

    PubMed

    Lui, Christina; Mok, Myth T S; Henderson, Beric R

    2016-01-01

    The adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) tumor suppressor is a multifunctional regulator of Wnt signaling and acts as a mobile scaffold at different cellular sites. APC was recently found to stimulate microtubule (MT) growth at the interphase centrosome; however, little is known about its dynamics and localization at this site. To address this, we analysed APC dynamics in fixed and live cells by fluorescence microscopy. In detergent-extracted cells, we discovered that APC was only weakly retained at the centrosome during interphase suggesting a rapid rate of exchange. This was confirmed in living cells by fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP), which identified two pools of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-APC: a major rapidly exchanging pool (~86%) and minor retained pool (~14%). The dynamic exchange rate of APC was unaffected by C-terminal truncations implicating a targeting role for the N-terminus. Indeed, we mapped centrosome localization to N-terminal armadillo repeat (ARM) domain amino acids 334-625. Interestingly, the rate of APC movement to the centrosome was stimulated by intact MTs, and APC dynamics slowed when MTs were disrupted by nocodazole treatment or knockdown of γ-tubulin. Thus, the rate of APC recycling at the centrosome is enhanced by MT growth, suggesting a positive feedback to stimulate its role in MT growth. PMID:27144584

  4. Protein diffusion in the periplasm of E. coli under osmotic stress.

    PubMed

    Sochacki, Kem A; Shkel, Irina A; Record, M Thomas; Weisshaar, James C

    2011-01-01

    The physical and mechanical properties of the cell envelope of Escherichia coli are poorly understood. We use fluorescence recovery after photobleaching to measure diffusion of periplasmic green fluorescent protein and probe the fluidity of the periplasm as a function of external osmotic conditions. For cells adapted to growth in complete medium at 0.14-1.02 Osm, the mean diffusion coefficient increases from 3.4 μm² s⁻¹ to 6.6 μm² s⁻¹ and the distribution of D(peri) broadens as growth osmolality increases. This is consistent with a net gain of water by the periplasm, decreasing its biopolymer volume fraction. This supports a model in which the turgor pressure drops primarily across the thin peptidoglycan layer while the cell actively maintains osmotic balance between periplasm and cytoplasm, thus avoiding a substantial pressure differential across the cytoplasmic membrane. After sudden hyperosmotic shock (plasmolysis), the cytoplasm loses water as the periplasm gains water. Accordingly, increases threefold. The fluorescence recovery after photobleaching is complete and homogeneous in all cases, but in minimal medium, the periplasm is evidently thicker at the cell tips. For the relevant geometries, Brownian dynamics simulations in model cytoplasmic and periplasmic volumes provide analytical formulae for extraction of accurate diffusion coefficients from readily measurable quantities. PMID:21190653

  5. The Protein Acetyltransferase PatZ from Escherichia coli Is Regulated by Autoacetylation-induced Oligomerization*

    PubMed Central

    de Diego Puente, Teresa; Gallego-Jara, Julia; Castaño-Cerezo, Sara; Bernal Sánchez, Vicente; Fernández Espín, Vanesa; García de la Torre, José; Manjón Rubio, Arturo; Cánovas Díaz, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Lysine acetylation is an important post-translational modification in the metabolic regulation of both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. In Escherichia coli, PatZ (formerly YfiQ) is the only known acetyltransferase protein and is responsible for acetyl-CoA synthetase acetylation. In this study, we demonstrated PatZ-positive cooperativity in response to acetyl-CoA and the regulation of acetyl-CoA synthetase activity by the acetylation level. Furthermore, functional analysis of an E809A mutant showed that the conserved glutamate residue is not relevant for the PatZ catalytic mechanism. Biophysical studies demonstrated that PatZ is a stable tetramer in solution and is transformed to its octameric form by autoacetylation. Moreover, this modification is reversed by the sirtuin CobB. Finally, an in silico PatZ tetramerization model based on hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions is proposed and validated by three-dimensional hydrodynamic analysis. These data reveal, for the first time, the structural regulation of an acetyltransferase by autoacetylation in a prokaryotic organism. PMID:26251518

  6. Purification, Refolding, and Crystallization of the Outer Membrane Protein OmpG from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Köster, Stefan; van Pee, Katharina; Yildiz, Özkan

    2015-01-01

    OmpG is a pore-forming protein from E. coli outer membranes. Unlike the classical outer membrane porins, which are trimers, the OmpG channel is a monomeric β-barrel made of 14 antiparallel β-strands with short periplasmic turns and longer extracellular loops. The channel activity of OmpG is pH dependent and the channel is gated by the extracellular loop L6. At neutral/high pH, the channel is open and permeable for substrate molecules with a size up to 900 Da. At acidic pH, loop L6 folds across the channel and blocks the pore. The channel blockage at acidic pH appears to be triggered by the protonation of a histidine pair on neighboring β-strands, which repel one another, resulting in the rearrangement of loop L6 and channel closure. OmpG was purified by refolding from inclusion bodies and crystallized in two and three dimensions. Crystallization and analysis by electron microscopy and X-ray crystallography revealed the fundamental mechanisms essential for the channel activity.

  7. Direct detection of green fluorescent protein messenger RNA expressed in Escherichia coli by rolling circle amplification.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Hirokazu; Matsumoto, Atsuko; Sugiyama, Shigeru; Kobori, Toshiro

    2010-06-15

    Prevailing conventional microbial detection methods depend largely on microbial cultivation in selective media that requires several days. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based methods, including quantitative reverse transcription PCR, are also rapid and useful methods for identification of target microbes, although for practical use they still suffer from disadvantages such as contamination problems and cost. Here we demonstrate that RNA-primed rolling circle amplification (RPRCA) using phi29 DNA polymerase, a precircularized probe, and SYBR Green II achieved real-time detection of specific messenger RNA (mRNA) from living microbes. The precircularized DNA probe was prepared by intramolecular ligation using CircLigase and treated by exonuclease I to eliminate uncircularized oligonucleotide, thereby significantly reducing potential noise by nonspecific amplified DNA by-products that affect successive RPRCA. When in vitro transcribed green fluorescent protein (GFP) mRNA was used as a primer, RPRCA could specifically detect at least 1 fmol of this mRNA in the presence of a precircularized probe that had a sequence complementary to the 3' terminus of mRNA without reverse transcription. This method could also detect expressed GFP mRNA present in 10 ng of total RNA isolated from Escherichia coli without DNase treatment. These data suggest that RPRCA has the potential to be a direct, rapid, and convenient method for detecting microbial mRNA.

  8. The Protein Acetyltransferase PatZ from Escherichia coli Is Regulated by Autoacetylation-induced Oligomerization.

    PubMed

    de Diego Puente, Teresa; Gallego-Jara, Julia; Castaño-Cerezo, Sara; Bernal Sánchez, Vicente; Fernández Espín, Vanesa; García de la Torre, José; Manjón Rubio, Arturo; Cánovas Díaz, Manuel

    2015-09-18

    Lysine acetylation is an important post-translational modification in the metabolic regulation of both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. In Escherichia coli, PatZ (formerly YfiQ) is the only known acetyltransferase protein and is responsible for acetyl-CoA synthetase acetylation. In this study, we demonstrated PatZ-positive cooperativity in response to acetyl-CoA and the regulation of acetyl-CoA synthetase activity by the acetylation level. Furthermore, functional analysis of an E809A mutant showed that the conserved glutamate residue is not relevant for the PatZ catalytic mechanism. Biophysical studies demonstrated that PatZ is a stable tetramer in solution and is transformed to its octameric form by autoacetylation. Moreover, this modification is reversed by the sirtuin CobB. Finally, an in silico PatZ tetramerization model based on hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions is proposed and validated by three-dimensional hydrodynamic analysis. These data reveal, for the first time, the structural regulation of an acetyltransferase by autoacetylation in a prokaryotic organism.

  9. MioC and GidA proteins promote cell division in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Lies, Mark; Visser, Bryan J; Joshi, Mohan C; Magnan, David; Bates, David

    2015-01-01

    The well-conserved genes surrounding the E. coli replication origin, mioC and gidA, do not normally affect chromosome replication and have little known function. We report that mioC and gidA mutants exhibit a moderate cell division inhibition phenotype. Cell elongation is exacerbated by a fis deletion, likely owing to delayed replication and subsequent cell cycle stress. Measurements of replication initiation frequency and origin segregation indicate that mioC and gidA do not inhibit cell division through any effect on oriC function. Division inhibition is also independent of the two known replication/cell division checkpoints, SOS and nucleoid occlusion. Complementation analysis indicates that mioC and gidA affect cell division in trans, indicating their effect is at the protein level. Transcriptome analysis by RNA sequencing showed that expression of a cell division septum component, YmgF, is significantly altered in mioC and gidA mutants. Our data reveal new roles for the gene products of gidA and mioC in the division apparatus, and we propose that their expression, cyclically regulated by chromatin remodeling at oriC, is part of a cell cycle regulatory program coordinating replication initiation and cell division.

  10. Virulence characteristics of extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli deletion of gene encoding the outer membrane protein X

    PubMed Central

    MENG, Xianrong; LIU, Xueling; ZHANG, Liyuan; HOU, Bo; LI, Binyou; TAN, Chen; LI, Zili; ZHOU, Rui; LI, Shaowen

    2016-01-01

    Outer membrane protein X (OmpX) and its homologues have been proposed to contribute to the virulence in various bacterial species. But, their role in virulence of extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC) is yet to be determined. This study evaluates the role of OmpX in ExPEC virulence in vitro and in vivo using a clinical strain PPECC42 of porcine origin. The ompX deletion mutant exhibited increased swimming motility and decreased adhesion to, and invasion of pulmonary epithelial A549 cell, compared to the wild-type strain. A mild increase in LD50 and distinct decrease in bacterial load in such organs as heart, liver, spleen, lung and kidney were observed in mice infected with the ompX mutant. Complementation of the complete ompX gene in trans restored the virulence of mutant strain to the level of wild-type strain. Our results reveal that OmpX contributes to ExPEC virulence, but may be not an indispensable virulence determinant. PMID:27149893

  11. Proteomic analysis reveals protein expression differences in Escherichia coli strains associated with persistent versus transient mastitis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Escherichia coli is a leading cause of bacterial mastitis in dairy cattle. Typically this infection is transient in nature, causing an infection that lasts 2-3 days. However, in a minority of cases, E. coli has been shown to cause a persistent intramammary infection. The mechanisms that allow for...

  12. Purification and Bicelle Crystallization for Structure Determination of the E. coli Outer Membrane Protein TamA.

    PubMed

    Gruss, Fabian; Hiller, Sebastian; Maier, Timm

    2015-01-01

    TamA is an Omp85 protein involved in autotransporter assembly in the outer membrane of Escherichia coli. It comprises a C-terminal 16-stranded transmembrane β-barrel as well as three periplasmic POTRA domains, and is a challenging target for structure determination. Here, we present a method for crystal structure determination of TamA, including recombinant expression in E. coli, detergent extraction, chromatographic purification, and bicelle crystallization in combination with seeding. As a result, crystals in space group P21212 are obtained, which diffract to 2.3 Å resolution. This protocol also serves as a template for structure determination of other outer membrane proteins, in particular of the Omp85 family.

  13. Rational Design of a Carrier Protein for the Production of Recombinant Toxic Peptides in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Pizzo, Elio; Varcamonti, Mario; Zanfardino, Anna; Sgambati, Valeria; Di Maro, Antimo; Carpentieri, Andrea; Izzo, Viviana; Di Donato, Alberto; Cafaro, Valeria; Notomista, Eugenio

    2016-01-01

    Commercial uses of bioactive peptides require low cost, effective methods for their production. We developed a new carrier protein for high yield production of recombinant peptides in Escherichia coli very well suited for the production of toxic peptides like antimicrobial peptides. GKY20, a short antimicrobial peptide derived from the C-terminus of human thrombin, was fused to the C-terminus of Onconase, a small ribonuclease (104 amino acids), which efficiently drove the peptide into inclusion bodies with very high expression levels (about 200–250 mg/L). After purification of the fusion protein by immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography, peptide was obtained by chemical cleavage in diluted acetic acid of an acid labile Asp-Pro sequence with more than 95% efficiency. To improve peptide purification, Onconase was mutated to eliminate all acid labile sequences thus reducing the release of unwanted peptides during the acid cleavage. Mutations were chosen to preserve the differential solubility of Onconase as function of pH, which allows its selective precipitation at neutral pH after the cleavage. The improved carrier allowed the production of 15–18 mg of recombinant peptide per liter of culture with 96–98% purity without the need of further chromatographic steps after the acid cleavage. The antimicrobial activity of the recombinant peptide, with an additional proline at the N-terminus, was tested on Gram-negative and Gram-positive strains and was found to be identical to that measured for synthetic GKY20. This finding suggests that N-terminal proline residue does not change the antimicrobial properties of recombinant (P)GKY20. The improved carrier, which does not contain cysteine and methionine residues, Asp-Pro and Asn-Gly sequences, is well suited for the production of peptides using any of the most popular chemical cleavage methods. PMID:26808536

  14. Rational Design of a Carrier Protein for the Production of Recombinant Toxic Peptides in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Pane, Katia; Durante, Lorenzo; Pizzo, Elio; Varcamonti, Mario; Zanfardino, Anna; Sgambati, Valeria; Di Maro, Antimo; Carpentieri, Andrea; Izzo, Viviana; Di Donato, Alberto; Cafaro, Valeria; Notomista, Eugenio

    2016-01-01

    Commercial uses of bioactive peptides require low cost, effective methods for their production. We developed a new carrier protein for high yield production of recombinant peptides in Escherichia coli very well suited for the production of toxic peptides like antimicrobial peptides. GKY20, a short antimicrobial peptide derived from the C-terminus of human thrombin, was fused to the C-terminus of Onconase, a small ribonuclease (104 amino acids), which efficiently drove the peptide into inclusion bodies with very high expression levels (about 200-250 mg/L). After purification of the fusion protein by immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography, peptide was obtained by chemical cleavage in diluted acetic acid of an acid labile Asp-Pro sequence with more than 95% efficiency. To improve peptide purification, Onconase was mutated to eliminate all acid labile sequences thus reducing the release of unwanted peptides during the acid cleavage. Mutations were chosen to preserve the differential solubility of Onconase as function of pH, which allows its selective precipitation at neutral pH after the cleavage. The improved carrier allowed the production of 15-18 mg of recombinant peptide per liter of culture with 96-98% purity without the need of further chromatographic steps after the acid cleavage. The antimicrobial activity of the recombinant peptide, with an additional proline at the N-terminus, was tested on Gram-negative and Gram-positive strains and was found to be identical to that measured for synthetic GKY20. This finding suggests that N-terminal proline residue does not change the antimicrobial properties of recombinant (P)GKY20. The improved carrier, which does not contain cysteine and methionine residues, Asp-Pro and Asn-Gly sequences, is well suited for the production of peptides using any of the most popular chemical cleavage methods. PMID:26808536

  15. Myeloid Differentiation Protein-2–Dependent and –Independent Neutrophil Accumulation during Escherichia coli Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Shanshan; Zemans, Rachel L.; Young, Scott K.; Worthen, G. Scott; Jeyaseelan, Samithamby

    2009-01-01

    Bacterial pneumonia remains a serious disease. Pattern recognition receptors play an integral role in neutrophil accumulation during pneumonia. Although myeloid differentiation protein (MD)-2 has been recognized as a key molecule for LPS signaling, the role of MD-2 in neutrophil accumulation in the lung during bacterial infection has not been explored. Here, we investigate the role of MD-2 in Escherichia coli LPS–induced lung inflammation and E. coli–induced pneumonia. LPS-induced CD14-independent neutrophil accumulation was abolished in CD14/MD-2−/− mice. MD-2−/− mice challenged with LPS displayed attenuated neutrophil influx, NF-κB activation, cytokine/chemokine expression, and lung histopathology. MD-2−/− mice transplanted with MD-2+/+ bone marrow demonstrated decreased neutrophil influx and cytokine/chemokine expression in the lungs when challenged by LPS. MD-2−/− mice infected with E. coli demonstrated reduced neutrophil influx and cytokine/chemokine expression in the lungs, whereas heat-killed E. coli did not induce either neutrophil accumulation or cytokine/chemokine expression in MD-2−/− mice infected with E. coli. Furthermore, MD-2−/− mice displayed increased bacterial burden in the lungs and enhanced bacterial dissemination. Toll-like receptor (TLR)-5−/− mice infected with E. coli exhibited attenuated neutrophil accumulation, whereas MD-2/TLR5−/− mice inoculated with E. coli showed further attenuated neutrophil influx and impaired bacterial clearance. Taken together, these new findings demonstrate: (1) the important role of MD-2 in the CD14-independent LPS-mediated cascade of neutrophil influx; (2) the relative importance of bone marrow– and non–bone marrow cell–derived MD-2 in LPS-induced inflammation; and (3) the essential role of MD-2–dependent and MD-2–independent (TLR5) signaling in E. coli–induced neutrophil accumulation and pulmonary host defense. PMID:18988922

  16. Fluorescent protein-marked Escherichia coli biotype I strains as surrogates for enteric pathogens in validation of beef carcass interventions.

    PubMed

    Cabrera-Diaz, Elisa; Moseley, Tiffany M; Lucia, Lisa M; Dickson, James S; Castillo, Alejandro; Acuff, Gary R

    2009-02-01

    The efficacy of antimicrobial interventions implemented in slaughter establishments to reduce enteric pathogens on beef carcasses should optimally be validated under commercial operation conditions. This study was conducted to identify surrogate organisms for enteric pathogens that could be used to validate beef carcass interventions. The growth, resistance, and attachment properties of nonpathogenic fluorescent protein-marked Escherichia coli strains were compared with those of E. coli O157:H7 and Salmonella strains. Growth curves were obtained based on growth in tryptic soy broth at 37 degrees C. In general, growth parameters were not different among potential surrogates and target pathogens (P > 0.05). Thermal resistance was compared in phosphate-buffered saline (pH 7.4) at 55, 60, and 65 degrees C, and D-values of potential surrogates were not different (P > 0.05) or were higher (P < 0.05) than those of the target pathogens. Acid resistance was tested in phosphate-buffered saline acidified with L-lactic acid at pH 2.5, 3.0, and 3.5, and log reductions (CFU per milliliter) were not different (P > 0.05) among potential surrogates and E. coli O157:H7 strains; however, some Salmonella serotypes were less acid resistant than were surrogates (P < 0.05). The cell surface hydrophobicity was different (P < 0.05) among surrogates and some E. coli O157:H7 strains, but the strength of attachment to beef carcasses was not different (P > 0.05) among all microorganisms. Log reductions (CFU per square centimeter) after application of hot water washes and 2% L-lactic acid sprays on beef carcasses were not different (P > 0.05) among surrogates and pathogens. The nonpathogenic E. coli strains evaluated in this study could be used as surrogates for E. coli O157:H7 and Salmonella to validate hot water and lactic acid interventions on beef carcasses.

  17. Solution structure of the antitermination protein NusB of Escherichia coli: a novel all-helical fold for an RNA-binding protein.

    PubMed Central

    Huenges, M; Rölz, C; Gschwind, R; Peteranderl, R; Berglechner, F; Richter, G; Bacher, A; Kessler, H; Gemmecker, G

    1998-01-01

    The NusB protein of Escherichia coli is involved in the regulation of rRNA biosynthesis by transcriptional antitermination. In cooperation with several other proteins, it binds to a dodecamer motif designated rrn boxA on the nascent rRNA. The antitermination proteins of E.coli are recruited in the replication cycle of bacteriophage lambda, where they play an important role in switching from the lysogenic to the lytic cycle. Multidimensional heteronuclear NMR experiments were performed with recombinant NusB protein labelled with 13C, 15N and 2H. The three-dimensional structure of the protein was solved from 1926 NMR-derived distances and 80 torsion angle restraints. The protein folds into an alpha/alpha-helical topology consisting of six helices; the arginine-rich N-terminus appears to be disordered. Complexation of the protein with an RNA dodecamer equivalent to the rrn boxA site results in chemical shift changes of numerous amide signals. The overall packing of the protein appears to be conserved, but the flexible N-terminus adopts a more rigid structure upon RNA binding, indicating that the N-terminus functions as an arginine-rich RNA-binding motif (ARM). PMID:9670024

  18. Expression, purification and characterization of two truncated peste des petits ruminants virus matrix proteins in Escherichia coli, and production of polyclonal antibodies against this protein.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fuxiao; Wu, Xiaodong; Li, Lin; Liu, Zengshan; Wang, Zhiliang

    2013-09-01

    Peste des petits ruminants virus (PPRV), the etiological agent of peste des petits ruminants, is classified into the genus Morbillivirus in the family Paramyxoviridae. The PPRV matrix (M) gene is composed of 1483 base pairs, encoding a 335 amino acids M protein with a molecular weight of approximately 38kD. We have demonstrated previously that the full-length M protein was expressed at an extremely low level or not even expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3). In this study, the M protein was split into two truncated forms to be successfully expressed in E. coli at a high level using the pET30a (+) vector, respectively, by analysis of SDS-PAGE, western blot and MALDI-TOF-MS. The optimization of culture conditions led us to perform the recombinant protein induction with 0.2mM IPTG at 28°C for 12h, whereby both proteins nevertheless were expressed in the insoluble form. Therefore, both His-tagged proteins were purified under the denaturing condition using a commercially available kit. Balb/c mice were immunized with the complex of purified proteins and then effectively produced polyclonal antibodies, which reached to a relatively high titer by the analysis of ELISA. The specificity of the prepared polyclonal antibodies was checked by western blot and immunofluorescence, revealing them with the desirable specificity against both non-denatured and denatured M proteins.

  19. Genes required for formation of the apoMoFe protein of Klebsiella pneumoniae nitrogenase in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Harris, G S; White, T C; Flory, J E; Orme-Johnson, W H

    1990-09-15

    A binary plasmid system was used to produce nitrogenase components in Escherichia coli and subsequently to define a minimum set of nitrogen fixation (nif) genes required for the production of the iron-molybdenum cofactor (FeMoco) reactivatable apomolybdenum-iron (apoMoFe) protein of nitrogenase. The active MoFe protein is an alpha 2 beta 2 tetramer containing two FeMoco clusters and 4 Fe4S4 P centers (for review see, Orme-Johnson, W.H. (1985) Annu. Rev. Biophys. Biophys. Chem. 14, 419-459). The plasmid pVL15, carrying a tac-promoted nifA activator gene, was coharbored in E. coli with the plasmid pGH1 which contained nifHDKTYENXUSVWZMF' derived from the chromosome of the nitrogen fixing bacterium Klebsiella pneumoniae. The apoMoFe protein produced in E. coli by pGH1 + VL15 was identical to the apoprotein in derepressed cells of the nifB- mutant of K. pneumoniae (UN106) in its electrophoretic properties on nondenaturing polyacrylamide gels as well as in its ability to be activated by FeMoco. The constituent peptides migrated identically to those from purified MoFe protein during electrophoresis on denaturing gels. The concentrations of apoMoFe protein produced in nif-transformed strains of E. coli were greater than 50% of the levels of MoFe protein observed in derepressed wild-type K. pneumoniae. Systematic deletion of individual nif genes carried by pGH1 has established the requirements for the maximal production of the FeMoco-reactivatable apoMoFe protein to be the following gene products, NifHDKTYUSWZM+A. It appears that several of the genes (nifT, Y, U, W, and Z) are only required for maximal production of the apoMoFe protein, while others (nifH, D, K, and S) are absolutely required for synthesis of this protein in E. coli. One curious result is that the nifH gene product, the peptide of the Fe protein, but not active Fe protein itself, is required for formation of the apoMoFe protein. This suggests the possibility of a ternary complex of the NifH, D, and K

  20. Probing of some compounds as anti-aggregatory additives in the protein refolding process from Escherichia coli inclusion bodies.

    PubMed

    Zilinskas, Albinas; Sereikaite, Jolanta

    2011-01-01

    Five compounds of different chemical structure were tested for aggregation suppression during the refolding of porcine and mink growth hormones as model proteins from Escherichia coli inclusion bodies by the dilution method. Of all compounds tested in this work, 3-guanidinopropionic acid (GPA) containing a guanidinium group was the most effective additive for aggregation suppression. Anti-aggregatory properties of GPA were compared with the ones of l-arginine.

  1. Protein A-mouse acidic mammalian chitinase-V5-His expressed in periplasmic space of Escherichia coli possesses chitinase functions comparable to CHO-expressed protein.

    PubMed

    Kashimura, Akinori; Okawa, Kazuaki; Ishikawa, Kotarou; Kida, Yuta; Iwabuchi, Kokoro; Matsushima, Yudai; Sakaguchi, Masayoshi; Sugahara, Yasusato; Oyama, Fumitaka

    2013-01-01

    Acidic mammalian chitinase (AMCase) has been shown to be associated with asthma in mouse models, allergic inflammation and food processing. Here, we describe an E. coli-expression system that allows for the periplasmic production of active AMCase fused to Protein A at the N-terminus and V5 epitope and (His)6 tag (V5-His) at the C-terminus (Protein A-AMCase-V5-His) in E. coli. The mouse AMCase cDNA was cloned into the vector pEZZ18, which is an expression vector containing the Staphylococcus Protein A promoter, with the signal sequence and truncated form of Protein A for extracellular expression in E. coli. Most of the Protein A-AMCase-V5-His was present in the periplasmic space with chitinolytic activity, which was measured using a chromogenic substrate, 4-nitrophenyl N,N'-diacetyl-β-D-chitobioside. The Protein A-AMCase-V5-His was purified from periplasmic fractions using an IgG Sepharose column followed by a Ni Sepharose chromatography. The recombinant protein showed a robust peak of activity with a maximum observed activity at pH 2.0, where an optimal temperature was 54°C. When this protein was preincubated between pH 1.0 and pH 11.0 on ice for 1 h, full chitinolytic activity was retained. This protein was also heat-stable till 54°C, both at pH 2.0 and 7.0. The chitinolytic activity of the recombinant AMCase against 4-nitrophenyl N,N'-diacetyl-β-D-chitobioside was comparable to the CHO-expressed AMCase. Furthermore, the recombinant AMCase bound to chitin beads, cleaved colloidal chitin and released mainly N,N'-diacetylchitobiose fragments. Thus, the E. coli-expressed Protein A-mouse AMCase-V5-His fusion protein possesses chitinase functions comparable to the CHO-expressed AMCase. This recombinant protein can be used to elucidate detailed biomedical functions of the mouse AMCase.

  2. Protein A-Mouse Acidic Mammalian Chitinase-V5-His Expressed in Periplasmic Space of Escherichia coli Possesses Chitinase Functions Comparable to CHO-Expressed Protein

    PubMed Central

    Kida, Yuta; Iwabuchi, Kokoro; Matsushima, Yudai; Sakaguchi, Masayoshi; Sugahara, Yasusato; Oyama, Fumitaka

    2013-01-01

    Acidic mammalian chitinase (AMCase) has been shown to be associated with asthma in mouse models, allergic inflammation and food processing. Here, we describe an E. coli-expression system that allows for the periplasmic production of active AMCase fused to Protein A at the N-terminus and V5 epitope and (His)6 tag (V5-His) at the C-terminus (Protein A-AMCase-V5-His) in E. coli. The mouse AMCase cDNA was cloned into the vector pEZZ18, which is an expression vector containing the Staphylococcus Protein A promoter, with the signal sequence and truncated form of Protein A for extracellular expression in E. coli. Most of the Protein A-AMCase-V5-His was present in the periplasmic space with chitinolytic activity, which was measured using a chromogenic substrate, 4-nitrophenyl N,N′-diacetyl-β-D-chitobioside. The Protein A-AMCase-V5-His was purified from periplasmic fractions using an IgG Sepharose column followed by a Ni Sepharose chromatography. The recombinant protein showed a robust peak of activity with a maximum observed activity at pH 2.0, where an optimal temperature was 54°C. When this protein was preincubated between pH 1.0 and pH 11.0 on ice for 1 h, full chitinolytic activity was retained. This protein was also heat-stable till 54°C, both at pH 2.0 and 7.0. The chitinolytic activity of the recombinant AMCase against 4-nitrophenyl N,N′-diacetyl-β-D-chitobioside was comparable to the CHO-expressed AMCase. Furthermore, the recombinant AMCase bound to chitin beads, cleaved colloidal chitin and released mainly N,N′-diacetylchitobiose fragments. Thus, the E. coli-expressed Protein A-mouse AMCase-V5-His fusion protein possesses chitinase functions comparable to the CHO-expressed AMCase. This recombinant protein can be used to elucidate detailed biomedical functions of the mouse AMCase. PMID:24244337

  3. The human homolog of Escherichia coli endonuclease V is a nucleolar protein with affinity for branched DNA structures.

    PubMed

    Fladeby, Cathrine; Vik, Erik Sebastian; Laerdahl, Jon K; Gran Neurauter, Christine; Heggelund, Julie E; Thorgaard, Eirik; Strøm-Andersen, Pernille; Bjørås, Magnar; Dalhus, Bjørn; Alseth, Ingrun

    2012-01-01

    Loss of amino groups from adenines in DNA results in the formation of hypoxanthine (Hx) bases with miscoding properties. The primary enzyme in Escherichia coli for DNA repair initiation at deaminated adenine is endonuclease V (endoV), encoded by the nfi gene, which cleaves the second phosphodiester bond 3' of an Hx lesion. Endonuclease V orthologs are widespread in nature and belong to a family of highly conserved proteins. Whereas prokaryotic endoV enzymes are well characterized, the function of the eukaryotic homologs remains obscure. Here we describe the human endoV ortholog and show with bioinformatics and experimental analysis that a large number of transcript variants exist for the human endonuclease V gene (ENDOV), many of which are unlikely to be translated into functional protein. Full-length ENDOV is encoded by 8 evolutionary conserved exons covering the core region of the enzyme, in addition to one or more 3'-exons encoding an unstructured and poorly conserved C-terminus. In contrast to the E. coli enzyme, we find recombinant ENDOV neither to incise nor bind Hx-containing DNA. While both enzymes have strong affinity for several branched DNA substrates, cleavage is observed only with E. coli endoV. We find that ENDOV is localized in the cytoplasm and nucleoli of human cells. As nucleoli harbor the rRNA genes, this may suggest a role for the protein in rRNA gene transactions such as DNA replication or RNA transcription.

  4. The Human Homolog of Escherichia coli Endonuclease V Is a Nucleolar Protein with Affinity for Branched DNA Structures

    PubMed Central

    Laerdahl, Jon K.; Gran Neurauter, Christine; Heggelund, Julie E.; Thorgaard, Eirik; Strøm-Andersen, Pernille; Bjørås, Magnar; Dalhus, Bjørn; Alseth, Ingrun

    2012-01-01

    Loss of amino groups from adenines in DNA results in the formation of hypoxanthine (Hx) bases with miscoding properties. The primary enzyme in Escherichia coli for DNA repair initiation at deaminated adenine is endonuclease V (endoV), encoded by the nfi gene, which cleaves the second phosphodiester bond 3′ of an Hx lesion. Endonuclease V orthologs are widespread in nature and belong to a family of highly conserved proteins. Whereas prokaryotic endoV enzymes are well characterized, the function of the eukaryotic homologs remains obscure. Here we describe the human endoV ortholog and show with bioinformatics and experimental analysis that a large number of transcript variants exist for the human endonuclease V gene (ENDOV), many of which are unlikely to be translated into functional protein. Full-length ENDOV is encoded by 8 evolutionary conserved exons covering the core region of the enzyme, in addition to one or more 3′-exons encoding an unstructured and poorly conserved C-terminus. In contrast to the E. coli enzyme, we find recombinant ENDOV neither to incise nor bind Hx-containing DNA. While both enzymes have strong affinity for several branched DNA substrates, cleavage is observed only with E. coli endoV. We find that ENDOV is localized in the cytoplasm and nucleoli of human cells. As nucleoli harbor the rRNA genes, this may suggest a role for the protein in rRNA gene transactions such as DNA replication or RNA transcription. PMID:23139746

  5. Production of specific IgY antibody to the recombinant FanC protein produced in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Nasiri, Khadijeh; Zibaee, Saeed; Nassiri, Mohammadreza; Tahmoorespur, Mojtaba; Haghparast, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strains are one of the primary causes of diarrhea in newborn calves and in humans, pigs, and sheep. IgY technology has been identified as a promising alternative to generating a mass amount of specific antibody for use in immunotherapy and immunodiagnostics. The purpose of this study was to produce specific antibody by egg yolk antibody (IgY) to recombinant FanC protein from ETEC. Materials and Methods: FanC (K99) gene was amplified from ETEC by specific primers and polymerase chain reaction. The gene was cloned and subcloned into pTZ57R/T and pET32a (+) vectors, respectively. Recombinant vector was transferred into E. coli BL21 CodonPlus (DE3). Protein expression was investigated by 1 mM IPTG induction. Hens were immunized by the purified recombinant FanC protein. The activity and specificity of the IgY antibody were detected by dot-blotting, Western blotting, and indirect ELISA. Results: We obtained FanC specific IgYs by immunizing the hens with the recombinant FanC protein. The anti-FanC IgY showed binding specifically to the FanC protein of ETEC. Conclusion: The results emphasize that specific IgY against the recombinant FanC protein could be recommended as a candidate for passive immunization against ETEC infection in animals and humans. PMID:27746871

  6. Expression, crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic studies of the outer membrane protein OmpW from Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Albrecht, Reinhard; Zeth, Kornelius; Söding, Johannes; Lupas, Andrei; Linke, Dirk

    2006-04-01

    The outer membrane protein OmpW from E. coli was overexpressed in inclusion bodies and refolded with the help of detergent. The protein has been crystallized and the crystals diffract to 3.5 Å resolution. OmpW is an eight-stranded 21 kDa molecular-weight β-barrel protein from the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria. It is a major antigen in bacterial infections and has implications in antibiotic resistance and in the oxidative degradation of organic compounds. OmpW from Escherichia coli was cloned and the protein was expressed in inclusion bodies. A method for refolding and purification was developed which yields properly folded protein according to circular-dichroism measurements. The protein has been crystallized and crystals were obtained that diffracted to a resolution limit of 3.5 Å. The crystals belong to space group P422, with unit-cell parameters a = 122.5, c = 105.7 Å. A homology model of OmpW is presented based on known structures of eight-stranded β-barrels, intended for use in molecular-replacement trials.

  7. E. coli metabolic protein aldehyde-alcohol dehydrogenase-E binds to the ribosome: a unique moonlighting action revealed

    PubMed Central

    Shasmal, Manidip; Dey, Sandip; Shaikh, Tanvir R.; Bhakta, Sayan; Sengupta, Jayati

    2016-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly evident that a high degree of regulation is involved in the protein synthesis machinery entailing more interacting regulatory factors. A multitude of proteins have been identified recently which show regulatory function upon binding to the ribosome. Here, we identify tight association of a metabolic protein aldehyde-alcohol dehydrogenase E (AdhE) with the E. coli 70S ribosome isolated from cell extract under low salt wash conditions. Cryo-EM reconstruction of the ribosome sample allows us to localize its position on the head of the small subunit, near the mRNA entrance. Our study demonstrates substantial RNA unwinding activity of AdhE which can account for the ability of ribosome to translate through downstream of at least certain mRNA helices. Thus far, in E. coli, no ribosome-associated factor has been identified that shows downstream mRNA helicase activity. Additionally, the cryo-EM map reveals interaction of another extracellular protein, outer membrane protein C (OmpC), with the ribosome at the peripheral solvent side of the 50S subunit. Our result also provides important insight into plausible functional role of OmpC upon ribosome binding. Visualization of the ribosome purified directly from the cell lysate unveils for the first time interactions of additional regulatory proteins with the ribosome. PMID:26822933

  8. E. coli metabolic protein aldehyde-alcohol dehydrogenase-E binds to the ribosome: a unique moonlighting action revealed.

    PubMed

    Shasmal, Manidip; Dey, Sandip; Shaikh, Tanvir R; Bhakta, Sayan; Sengupta, Jayati

    2016-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly evident that a high degree of regulation is involved in the protein synthesis machinery entailing more interacting regulatory factors. A multitude of proteins have been identified recently which show regulatory function upon binding to the ribosome. Here, we identify tight association of a metabolic protein aldehyde-alcohol dehydrogenase E (AdhE) with the E. coli 70S ribosome isolated from cell extract under low salt wash conditions. Cryo-EM reconstruction of the ribosome sample allows us to localize its position on the head of the small subunit, near the mRNA entrance. Our study demonstrates substantial RNA unwinding activity of AdhE which can account for the ability of ribosome to translate through downstream of at least certain mRNA helices. Thus far, in E. coli, no ribosome-associated factor has been identified that shows downstream mRNA helicase activity. Additionally, the cryo-EM map reveals interaction of another extracellular protein, outer membrane protein C (OmpC), with the ribosome at the peripheral solvent side of the 50S subunit. Our result also provides important insight into plausible functional role of OmpC upon ribosome binding. Visualization of the ribosome purified directly from the cell lysate unveils for the first time interactions of additional regulatory proteins with the ribosome. PMID:26822933

  9. In vivo detection of molybdate-binding proteins using a competition assay with ModE in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Kuper, Jochen; Meyer zu Berstenhorst, Sonja; Vödisch, Bernd; Mendel, Ralf R; Schwarz, Günter; Boxer, David H

    2003-01-21

    Molybdenum is an important trace element as it forms the essential part of the active site in all molybdenum-containing enzymes. We have designed an assay for the in vivo detection of molybdate binding to proteins in Escherichia coli. The assay is based on (i). the molybdate-dependent transcriptional regulation of the moa operon by the ModE protein, and (ii). the competition for molybdate between ModE and other molybdate-binding proteins in the cytoplasm of E. coli. We were able to verify in vivo molybdate binding to three different bacterial proteins that are known to bind molybdate. This sensitive in vivo system allows the testing of different proteins for molybdate binding under in vivo conditions and will facilitate the identification of other cellular factors needed for molybdate binding. As a first example, we examined the eukaryotic protein Cnx1 that is involved in the last step of molybdenum cofactor biosynthesis in plants, and show that it is able to compete with ModE for molybdate in a molybdopterin-dependent fashion.

  10. Overproduction, purification, and ATPase activity of the Escherichia coli RuvB protein involved in DNA repair.

    PubMed Central

    Iwasaki, H; Shiba, T; Makino, K; Nakata, A; Shinagawa, H

    1989-01-01

    The ruvA and ruvB genes of Escherichia coli constitute an operon which belongs to the SOS regulon. Genetic evidence suggests that the products of the ruv operon are involved in DNA repair and recombination. To begin biochemical characterization of these proteins, we developed a plasmid system that overproduced RuvB protein to 20% of total cell protein. Starting from the overproducing system, we purified RuvB protein. The purified RuvB protein behaved like a monomer in gel filtration chromatography and had an apparent relative molecular mass of 38 kilodaltons in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, which agrees with the value predicted from the DNA sequence. The amino acid sequence of the amino-terminal region of the purified protein was analyzed, and the sequence agreed with the one deduced from the DNA sequence. Since the deduced sequence of RuvB protein contained the consensus sequence for ATP-binding proteins, we examined the ATP-binding and ATPase activities of the purified RuvB protein. RuvB protein had a stronger affinity to ADP than to ATP and weak ATPase activity. The results suggest that the weak ATPase activity of RuvB protein is at least partly due to end product inhibition by ADP. Images PMID:2529252

  11. Evaluation of Novel Antibacterial N-Halamine Nanoparticles Prodrugs towards Susceptibility of Escherichia coli Induced by DksA Protein.

    PubMed

    Dong, Qigeqi; Dong, Alideertu; Morigen

    2015-04-21

    Novel N-halamine nanoparticles potentially useful for killing pathogenic bacteria, i.e., SiO2@PS/N-halamine NPs, were successfully synthesized via the immobilization of N-halamines onto the polystyrene-coated silica nanoparticles (SiO2@PS NPs). The effect of reaction conditions, i.e., chlorination temperature, bleaching concentration, chlorination time, on the oxidative chlorine content in the products was systematically investigated. The antibacterial activity of the products was tested via the modified plate counting methd using Escherichia coli (E. coli) as a model bacterium. The possible mechanism of the antibacterial action of the products was also studied using scanning electron microscopy combined with a inhibition zone study. The antimicrobial capability of the products was well controlled by tuning the oxidative chlorine content in the products. More importantly, the role of DksA protein in the susceptibility of E. coli against the products was proven using a time-kill assay. This in-depth investigation of the sensitivity of E. coli towards N-halamine NPs provides a systematic understanding of the utility of N-halamines for deactivating bacteria or even disease control.

  12. In silico prediction of escherichia coli proteins targeting the host cell nucleus, with special reference to their role in colon cancer etiology.

    PubMed

    Khan, Abdul Arif

    2014-06-01

    The potential role of Escherichia coli in the development of colorectal carcinoma (CRC) has been investigated in many studies. Although the exact mechanism is not clear, chronic inflammation caused by E. coli and other related events are suggested as possible causes behind E. coli-induced colon cancer. It has been found that CRC cells, but not normal cells, are colonized by an intracellular form of E. coli. We predicted nuclear targeting of bacterial proteins in the host cell through computational tools nuclear localization signal (NLS) mapper and balanced subcellular localization predictor (BaCeILo). During intracellular E. coli residence, such targeting is highly likely and may have a possible role in colon cancer etiology. We observed that several gene expression-associated proteins of E. coli can migrate to the host nucleus during intracellular infections. This situation provides an opportunity for competitive interaction of host and pathogen proteins with similar cellular substrates, thereby increasing the chances of development of colon cancer. Moreover, the results indicated that proteins localized in the membrane of E. coli mostly act as secretary proteins in host cells. No exact correlation was observed between NLS prediction and nuclear localization prediction by BaCeILo. This is partly because of a number of reasons, including that only 30% of nuclear proteins carry NLS and that proteins <40 kDa molecular weight can passively target the host nucleus. This study concludes that detection of gene expression-specific E. coli proteins and their targeting of the nucleus may have a profound impact on CRC etiology. PMID:24611522

  13. In silico prediction of escherichia coli proteins targeting the host cell nucleus, with special reference to their role in colon cancer etiology.

    PubMed

    Khan, Abdul Arif

    2014-06-01

    The potential role of Escherichia coli in the development of colorectal carcinoma (CRC) has been investigated in many studies. Although the exact mechanism is not clear, chronic inflammation caused by E. coli and other related events are suggested as possible causes behind E. coli-induced colon cancer. It has been found that CRC cells, but not normal cells, are colonized by an intracellular form of E. coli. We predicted nuclear targeting of bacterial proteins in the host cell through computational tools nuclear localization signal (NLS) mapper and balanced subcellular localization predictor (BaCeILo). During intracellular E. coli residence, such targeting is highly likely and may have a possible role in colon cancer etiology. We observed that several gene expression-associated proteins of E. coli can migrate to the host nucleus during intracellular infections. This situation provides an opportunity for competitive interaction of host and pathogen proteins with similar cellular substrates, thereby increasing the chances of development of colon cancer. Moreover, the results indicated that proteins localized in the membrane of E. coli mostly act as secretary proteins in host cells. No exact correlation was observed between NLS prediction and nuclear localization prediction by BaCeILo. This is partly because of a number of reasons, including that only 30% of nuclear proteins carry NLS and that proteins <40 kDa molecular weight can passively target the host nucleus. This study concludes that detection of gene expression-specific E. coli proteins and their targeting of the nucleus may have a profound impact on CRC etiology.

  14. Functional characterization of the late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) protein gene family from Pinus tabuliformis (Pinaceae) in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Jie; Lan, Ting

    2016-01-01

    Late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins are a large and highly diverse gene family present in a wide range of plant species. LEAs are proposed to play a role in various stress tolerance responses. Our study represents the first-ever survey of LEA proteins and their encoding genes in a widely distributed pine (Pinus tabuliformis) in China. Twenty–three LEA genes were identified from the P. tabuliformis belonging to seven groups. Proteins with repeated motifs are an important feature specific to LEA groups. Ten of 23 pine LEA genes were selectively expressed in specific tissues, and showed expression divergence within each group. In addition, we selected 13 genes representing each group and introduced theses genes into Escherichia coli to assess the protective function of PtaLEA under heat and salt stresses. Compared with control cells, the E. coli cells expressing PtaLEA fusion protein exhibited enhanced salt and heat resistance and viability, indicating the protein may play a protective role in cells under stress conditions. Furthermore, among these enhanced tolerance genes, a certain extent of function divergence appeared within a gene group as well as between gene groups, suggesting potential functional diversity of this gene family in conifers. PMID:26781930

  15. Functional characterization of the late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) protein gene family from Pinus tabuliformis (Pinaceae) in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jie; Lan, Ting

    2016-01-01

    Late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins are a large and highly diverse gene family present in a wide range of plant species. LEAs are proposed to play a role in various stress tolerance responses. Our study represents the first-ever survey of LEA proteins and their encoding genes in a widely distributed pine (Pinus tabuliformis) in China. Twenty-three LEA genes were identified from the P. tabuliformis belonging to seven groups. Proteins with repeated motifs are an important feature specific to LEA groups. Ten of 23 pine LEA genes were selectively expressed in specific tissues, and showed expression divergence within each group. In addition, we selected 13 genes representing each group and introduced theses genes into Escherichia coli to assess the protective function of PtaLEA under heat and salt stresses. Compared with control cells, the E. coli cells expressing PtaLEA fusion protein exhibited enhanced salt and heat resistance and viability, indicating the protein may play a protective role in cells under stress conditions. Furthermore, among these enhanced tolerance genes, a certain extent of function divergence appeared within a gene group as well as between gene groups, suggesting potential functional diversity of this gene family in conifers. PMID:26781930

  16. Molecular and Structural Characterization of a Novel Escherichia coli Interleukin Receptor Mimic Protein

    PubMed Central

    Moriel, Danilo G.; Paxman, Jason J.; Lo, Alvin W.; Tan, Lendl; Sullivan, Matthew J.; Dando, Samantha J.; Beatson, Scott A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Urinary tract infection (UTI) is a disease of extremely high incidence in both community and nosocomial settings. UTIs cause significant morbidity and mortality, with approximately 150 million cases globally per year. Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) is the primary cause of UTI and is generally treated empirically. However, the rapidly increasing incidence of UTIs caused by multidrug-resistant UPEC strains has led to limited available treatment options and highlights the urgent need to develop alternative treatment and prevention strategies. In this study, we performed a comprehensive analysis to define the regulation, structure, function, and immunogenicity of recently identified UPEC vaccine candidate C1275 (here referred to as IrmA). We showed that the irmA gene is highly prevalent in UPEC, is cotranscribed with the biofilm-associated antigen 43 gene, and is regulated by the global oxidative stress response OxyR protein. Localization studies identified IrmA in the UPEC culture supernatant. We determined the structure of IrmA and showed that it adopts a unique domain-swapped dimer architecture. The dimeric structure of IrmA displays similarity to those of human cytokine receptors, including the interleukin-2 receptor (IL-2R), interleukin-4 receptor (IL-4R), and interleukin-10 receptor (IL-10R) binding domains, and we showed that purified IrmA can bind to their cognate cytokines. Finally, we showed that plasma from convalescent urosepsis patients contains high IrmA antibody titers, demonstrating the strong immunogenicity of IrmA. Taken together, our results indicate that IrmA may play an important role during UPEC infection. PMID:26980835

  17. Analysis and expansion of the role of the Escherichia coli protein ProQ.

    PubMed

    Sheidy, Daniel T; Zielke, Ryszard A

    2013-01-01

    The decrease in proline transport by the proline porter ProP in a ΔproQ strain has been well documented; however, the reason for this phenotype remains undefined. Previous studies have speculated that ProQ facilitates translation of proP mRNA. Here, we demonstrate that ProQ is enriched in the polysome fractions of sucrose gradient separations of E. coli lysates and the 30S fractions of lysates separated under conditions causing ribosomal subunit dissociation. Thus, ProQ is a bona fide ribosome associated protein. Analysis of proQ constructs lacking predicted structural domains implicates the N-terminal domain in ribosome association. Association with the ribosome appears to be mediated by an interaction with the mRNA being translated, as limited treatment of lysates with Micrococcal Nuclease maintains ribosome integrity but disrupts ProQ localization with polysomes. ProQ also fails to robustly bind to mRNA-free 70S ribosomes in vitro. Interestingly, deletion of proP does not disrupt the localization of ProQ with translating ribosomes, and deletion of proP in combination with the proU operon has no effect on ProQ localization. We also demonstrate that ProQ is necessary for robust biofilm formation, and this phenotype is independent of ProP. Binding studies were carried out using tryptophan fluorescence and in vitro transcribed proP mRNAs. proP is transcribed from two differentially regulated promoters, and ProQ interacts with proP mRNA transcribed from both promoters, as well as a control mRNA with similar affinities. In total, these data suggest that ProQ is positioned to function as a novel translational regulator, and its cellular role extends beyond its effects on proline uptake by ProP. PMID:24205389

  18. The tib adherence locus of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli is regulated by cyclic AMP receptor protein.

    PubMed

    Espert, Shirley M; Elsinghorst, Eric A; Munson, George P

    2011-03-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is a Gram-negative enteric pathogen that causes profuse watery diarrhea through the elaboration of heat-labile and/or heat-stable toxins. Virulence is also dependent upon the expression of adhesive pili and afimbrial adhesins that allow the pathogen to adhere to the intestinal epithelium or mucosa. Both types of enterotoxins are regulated at the level of transcription by cyclic AMP (cAMP) receptor protein (CRP). To further our understanding of virulence gene regulation, an in silico approach was used to identify putative CRP binding sites in the genome of H10407 (O78:H11), an ETEC strain that was originally isolated from the stool of a Bangledeshi patient with cholera-like symptoms circa 1971. One of the predicted binding sites was located within an intergenic region upstream of tibDBCA. TibA is an autotransporter and afimbrial adhesin that is glycosylated by TibC. Expression of the TibA glycoprotein was abolished in an H10407 crp mutant and restored when crp was provided in trans. TibA-dependent aggregation was also abolished in a cyaA::kan strain and restored by addition of exogenous cAMP to the growth medium. DNase I footprinting confirmed that the predicted site upstream of tibDBCA is bound by CRP. Point mutations within the CRP binding site were found to abolish or significantly impair CRP-dependent activation of the tibDB promoter. Thus, these studies demonstrate that CRP positively regulates the expression of the glycosylated afimbrial adhesin TibA through occupancy of a binding site within tibDBp. PMID:21216994

  19. Co-expression of a heat shock transcription factor to improve conformational quality of recombinant protein in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Shao-Yen; Lin, Yu-Sheng; Li, Shu-Jyuan; Lee, Wen-Chien

    2014-09-01

    A co-expression system was established in Escherichia coli for enhancing the cellular expression of heat shock transcription factor, sigma 32 (σ(32)). A Shine-Dalgarno sequence and the rpoH gene of E. coli, which encodes σ(32), were cloned into a bacterial plasmid containing a gene fusion encoding a doubly tagged N-acetyl-d-neuraminic acid aldolase (GST-Neu5Ac aldolase-5R). After the IPTG induction, a substantially higher level of sigma 32 was observed up to 3 h in the co-expression cells, but an enhancement in the solubility of target protein was manifest only in the first hour. Nevertheless, the co-expression of sigma 32 led to higher level of Neu5Ac aldolase enzymatic activity in both the soluble and insoluble (inclusion body) fractions. The Neu5Ac aldolase activity of the supernatant from the lysate of cells co-expressing GST-Neu5Ac aldolase-5R and recombinant σ(32) was 3.4-fold higher at 3 h postinduction than that in cells overexpressing GST-Neu5Ac aldolase-5R in the absence of recombinantly expressed σ(32). The results of acrylamide quenching indicated that the conformational quality of the fusion protein was improved by the co-expression of recombinant σ(32). Thus, the increased level of intracellular σ(32) might have created favorable conditions for the proper folding of recombinant proteins through the cooperative effects of chaperones/heat shock proteins expressed by the E. coli host, which resulted in smaller inclusion bodies, improved conformational quality and a higher specific activity of the overexpressed GST-Neu5Ac aldolase-5R protein.

  20. Staphylococcus aureus FepA and FepB Proteins Drive Heme Iron Utilization in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Turlin, Evelyne; Débarbouillé, Michel; Augustyniak, Katarzyna; Gilles, Anne-Marie; Wandersman, Cécile

    2013-01-01

    EfeUOB-like tripartite systems are widespread in bacteria and in many cases they are encoded by genes organized into iron-regulated operons. They consist of: EfeU, a protein similar to the yeast iron permease Ftrp1; EfeO, an extracytoplasmic protein of unknown function and EfeB, also an extracytoplasmic protein with heme peroxidase activity, belonging to the DyP family. Many bacterial EfeUOB systems have been implicated in iron uptake, but a prefential iron source remains undetermined. Nevertheless, in the case of Escherichia coli, the EfeUOB system has been shown to recognize heme and to allow extracytoplasmic heme iron extraction via a deferrochelation reaction. Given the high level of sequence conservations between EfeUOB orthologs, we hypothesized that heme might be the physiological iron substrate for the other orthologous systems. To test this hypothesis, we undertook characterization of the Staphylococcus aureus FepABC system. Results presented here indicate: i) that the S. aureus FepB protein binds both heme and PPIX with high affinity, like EfeB, the E. coli ortholog; ii) that it has low peroxidase activity, comparable to that of EfeB; iii) that both FepA and FepB drive heme iron utilization, and both are required for this activity and iv) that the E. coli FepA ortholog (EfeO) cannot replace FepA in FepB-driven iron release from heme indicating protein specificity in these activities. Our results show that the function in heme iron extraction is conserved in the two orthologous systems. PMID:23437157

  1. Conserved protein YecM from Escherichia coli shows structural homology to metal-binding isomerases and oxygenases.

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, R.; Duke, N.; Laskowski, R.; Evdokimova, E.; Skarina, T.; Edwards, A.; Joachimiak, A.; Savchenko, A.; Univ. of Toronto; Univ. Health Network; Birbeck Coll.

    2003-01-01

    The crystal structure of protein YecM{sup 1} has been determined at 1.6 {angstrom} resolution as a part of the ongoing structural genomics initiative (http://www.mcsg.anl.gov). The YecM is a conserved, hypothetical Escherichia coli protein with sequence homologs found exclusively in bacteria, including Salmonella typhimunium, Yersinia pestis, Vibrio cholerae, Haemophilus influenza, and Pasteurella multocida. YecM (188 residues) shows also sequence similarity to proteins in COG database (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/cgi-bin/COG/palox-?COG3102). YecM (Pfam-B domain 24546) was selected as a structural genomics target it shows no sequence similarity with proteins of known three-dimensional structure and therefore, may contain a previously unobserved field.

  2. Ratio of active to inactive forms of acyl carrier protein in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Jackowski, S; Rock, C O

    1983-12-25

    Acyl carrier protein (ACP) functions as a cofactor in fatty acid biosynthesis due to the covalent linkage of an acyl moiety to its 4'-phosphopantetheine prosthetic group. This prosthetic group undergoes turnover in vivo and since the apoprotein is functionally inactive, the interconversion between ACP and apo-ACP has been considered as a possible regulatory point in lipid biosynthesis. To investigate this possibility, the ratio of ACP to apo-ACP was measured in Escherichia coli. An apo-ACP standard was synthesized using [ACP] phosphodiesterase (EC 3.1.4.14) and could be clearly separated from ACP by conformationally sensitive gel electrophoresis, thus providing a reliable assay for the presence of these two species. Antibodies specific for ACP were purified from rabbit serum on an ACP-Sepharose column and subsequently used to synthesize an immunoaffinity column. Chromatography of leucine-labeled cell extracts on this support resulted in the specific binding of ACP, but apo-ACP was not detected in either logarithmically growing or stationary phase cells, although both ACP species bound to the purified anti-ACP IgG. Apo-ACP was not detected as an intermediate in ACP biosynthesis, suggesting that apo-ACP is rapidly converted to ACP following translation. CoA is the biosynthetic precursor to the ACP prosthetic group, but apo-ACP did not accumulate when the intracellular CoA concentration was severely depressed in strain SJ16 (panD), a beta-alanine auxotroph. Strain MP4 (acpS) is conditionally defective in [ACP]synthase (EC 2.7.8.7) and apo-ACP was the predominant form of ACP synthesized in this strain under nonpermissive conditions. Even under conditions that permitted growth, apo-ACP comprised 70% of the total ACP pool in strain MP4. Strain MP4 possessed a phospholipid to protein ratio within the normal range, suggesting that the ratio of ACP to apo-ACP can be significantly altered without affecting total lipid content. Thus, it appears that the prosthetic group

  3. Soluble M3 proteins of murine gammaherpesviruses 68 and 72 expressed in Escherichia coli: analysis of chemokine-binding properties.

    PubMed

    Matúšková, R; Pančík, P; Štibrániová, I; Belvončíková, P; Režuchová, I; Kúdelová, M

    2015-12-01

    M3 protein of murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (MHV-68) was identified as a viral chemokine-binding protein 3 (vCKBP-3) capable to bind a broad spectrum of chemokines and their receptors. During both acute and latent infection MHV-68 M3 protein provides a selective advantage for the virus by inhibiting the antiviral and inflammatory response. A unique mutation Asp307Gly was identified in the M3 protein of murine gammaherpesvirus 72 (MHV-72), localized near chemokine-binding domain. Study on chemokine-binding properties of MHV-72 M3 protein purified from medium of infected cells implied reduced binding to some chemokines when compared to MHV-68 M3 protein. It was suggested that the mutation in the M3 protein might be involved in the attenuation of immune response to infection with MHV-72. Recently, Escherichia coli cells were used to prepare native recombinant M3 proteins of murine gammaherpesviruses 68 and 72 (Pančík et al., 2013). In this study, we assessed the chemokine-binding properties of three M3 proteins prepared in E. coli Rosetta-gami 2 (DE3) cells, the full length M3 protein of both MHV-68 and MHV-72 and MHV-68 M3 protein truncated in the signal sequence (the first 24 aa). They all displayed binding activity to human chemokines CCL5 (RANTES), CXCL8 (IL-8), and CCL3 (MIP-1α). The truncated MHV-68 M3 protein had more than twenty times reduced binding activity to CCL5, but only about five and three times reduced binding to CXCL8 and CCL3 when compared to its full length counterpart. Binding of the full length MHV-72 M3 protein to all chemokines was reduced when compared to MHV-68 M3 protein. Its binding to CCL5 and CCL3 was reduced over ten and seven times. However, its binding to CXCL8 was only slightly reduced (64.8 vs 91.8%). These data implied the significance of the signal sequence and also of a single mutation (at aa 307) for efficient M3 protein binding to some chemokines.

  4. Use of FabV-Triclosan Plasmid Selection System for Efficient Expression and Production of Recombinant Proteins in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Syed A.; Chew, Yik Wei; Omar, Tasyriq Che; Azman, Nizuwan

    2015-01-01

    Maintenance of recombinant plasmid vectors in host bacteria relies on the presence of selection antibiotics in the growth media to suppress plasmid -free segregants. However, presence of antibiotic resistance genes and antibiotics themselves is not acceptable in several applications of biotechnology. Previously, we have shown that FabV-Triclosan selection system can be used to select high and medium copy number plasmid vectors in E. coli. Here, we have extended our previous work and demonstrated that expression vectors containing FabV can be used efficiently to express heterologous recombinant proteins in similar or better amounts in E. coli host when compared with expression vectors containing β-lactamase. Use of small amount of non-antibiotic Triclosan as selection agent in growth medium, enhanced plasmid stability, applicability in various culture media, and compatibility with other selection systems for multiple plasmid maintenance are noteworthy features of FabV-Triclosan selection system. PMID:26642325

  5. Use of FabV-Triclosan Plasmid Selection System for Efficient Expression and Production of Recombinant Proteins in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Ali, Syed A; Chew, Yik Wei; Omar, Tasyriq Che; Azman, Nizuwan

    2015-01-01

    Maintenance of recombinant plasmid vectors in host bacteria relies on the presence of selection antibiotics in the growth media to suppress plasmid -free segregants. However, presence of antibiotic resistance genes and antibiotics themselves is not acceptable in several applications of biotechnology. Previously, we have shown that FabV-Triclosan selection system can be used to select high and medium copy number plasmid vectors in E. coli. Here, we have extended our previous work and demonstrated that expression vectors containing FabV can be used efficiently to express heterologous recombinant proteins in similar or better amounts in E. coli host when compared with expression vectors containing β-lactamase. Use of small amount of non-antibiotic Triclosan as selection agent in growth medium, enhanced plasmid stability, applicability in various culture media, and compatibility with other selection systems for multiple plasmid maintenance are noteworthy features of FabV-Triclosan selection system.

  6. Structural similarity among Escherichia coli FtsW and RodA proteins and Bacillus subtilis SpoVE protein, which function in cell division, cell elongation, and spore formation, respectively.

    PubMed Central

    Ikeda, M; Sato, T; Wachi, M; Jung, H K; Ishino, F; Kobayashi, Y; Matsuhashi, M

    1989-01-01

    The Escherichia coli cell division gene ftsW (2 min) was cloned and sequenced. It encodes a hydrophobic protein(s) with 414 and/or 384 amino acid residues. The deduced amino acid sequence and the hydropathy profile of the protein showed high homology with those of the E. coli RodA protein functioning in determination of the cell shape and the Bacillus subtilis SpoVE protein functioning in spore formation. Probably similar functional membrane proteins are involved in these three cell cycle process. PMID:2509435

  7. Single-cell Characterization of Autotransporter-mediated Escherichia coli Surface Display of Disulfide Bond-containing Proteins*

    PubMed Central

    Ramesh, Balakrishnan; Sendra, Victor G; Cirino, Patrick C; Varadarajan, Navin

    2012-01-01

    Autotransporters (ATs) are a family of bacterial proteins containing a C-terminal β-barrel-forming domain that facilitates the translocation of N-terminal passenger domain whose functions range from adhesion to proteolysis. Genetic replacement of the native passenger domain with heterologous proteins is an attractive strategy not only for applications such as biocatalysis, live-cell vaccines, and protein engineering but also for gaining mechanistic insights toward understanding AT translocation. The ability of ATs to efficiently display functional recombinant proteins containing multiple disulfides has remained largely controversial. By employing high-throughput single-cell flow cytometry, we have systematically investigated the ability of the Escherichia coli AT Antigen 43 (Ag43) to display two different recombinant reporter proteins, a single-chain antibody (M18 scFv) that contains two disulfides and chymotrypsin that contains four disulfides, by varying the signal peptide and deleting the different domains of the native protein. Our results indicate that only the C-terminal β-barrel and the threaded α-helix are essential for efficient surface display of functional recombinant proteins containing multiple disulfides. These results imply that there are no inherent constraints for functional translocation and display of disulfide bond-containing proteins mediated by the AT system and should open new avenues for protein display and engineering. PMID:23019324

  8. Investigation of the relationship between protein-protein interaction and catalytic activity of a heme-regulated phosphodiesterase from Escherichia coli (Ec DOS) by protein microarray.

    PubMed

    Sasakura, Yukie; Kanda, Katsuhiro; Yoshimura-Suzuki, Tokiko; Matsui, Takuya; Fukuzono, Shinichi; Shimizu, Toru

    2005-07-19

    Ec DOS, a heme-regulated phosphodiesterase from Escherichia coli, is composed of an N-terminal heme-bound PAS domain and a C-terminal phosphodiesterase domain. The heme redox state in the PAS domain regulates Ec DOS phosphodiesterase activity. Interestingly, the isolated heme-bound PAS fragment enhances phosphodiesterase activity of full-length Ec DOS. The enhancement is also regulated by the heme redox state of the isolated PAS domain. In the present study, we used a newly developed protein microarray system to examine the relationship between catalytic activity and the interaction of full-length Ec DOS and the isolated PAS fragment. Adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP), a substrate of the Ec DOS phosphodiesterase, was found to be indispensable for the interaction between Ec DOS and the PAS fragment, and two phosphodiesterase inhibitors, 3-isobutyl-methyl-xanthine and etazolate hydrochloride, hindered the interaction. In addition, an enzyme with a mutation in the putative cAMP-binding sites (H590 and H594) was unable to interact with Ec DOS and lacked enzymatic activity. These results strongly suggest a close relationship between Ec DOS phosphodiesterase activity and interaction with the isolated PAS fragment. Therefore, this study provides insights into the mechanism of how the isolated PAS domain activates Ec DOS, which has important implications for the general role of the isolated PAS domain in cells. Moreover, we found that multiple microscale analyses using the protein microarray system had several advantages over conventional affinity column methods, including the quantity of protein needed, the sensitivity, the variability of immobilized protein, and the time required for the experiment. PMID:16008345

  9. Structural Characterization and Comparative Phylogenetic Analysis of Escherichia coli HemK, a Protein (N5)-glutamine Methyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhe; Shipman, Lance; Zhang, Meng; Anton, Brian P.; Roberts, Richard J.; Cheng, Xiaodong

    2009-01-01

    Protein glutamine methylation at GGQ sites of protein chain release factors plays a pivotal role in the termination of translation. We report here the crystal structure of the Escherichia coli HemK protein (N5)-glutamine methyltransferase (MTase) in a binary complex with the methyl-donor product S-adenosyl-l-homocysteine (AdoHcy). HemK contains two domains: a putative substrate binding domain at the N terminus consisting of a five helix bundle and a seven-stranded catalytic domain at the C terminus that harbors the binding site for AdoHcy. The two domains are linked by a β-hairpin. Structure-guided sequence analysis of the HemK family revealed 11 invariant residues functioning in methyl-donor binding and catalysis of methyl transfer. The putative substrate-binding domains of HemK from E. coli and Thermotoga maritima are structurally similar, despite the fact that they share very little sequence similarity. When the two proteins are aligned structurally, the helical N-terminal domain is subject to approximately 10° of hinge movement relative to the C-terminal domain. The apparent hinge mobility of the two domains may reflect functional importance during the reaction cycle. Comparative phylogenetic analysis of the hemK gene and its frequent neighbor gene, prfA, which encodes a major substrate, provides evidence for several examples of lateral gene transfer. PMID:15223314

  10. Development of polyclonal antibodies for detection of aflatoxigenic molds involving culture filtrate and chimeric proteins expressed in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Shapira, R; Paster, N; Menasherov, M; Eyal, O; Mett, A; Meiron, T; Kuttin, E; Salomon, R

    1997-03-01

    Polyclonal antibodies (PAb) were raised against an aflatoxigenic strain of Aspergillus parasiticus by using two different sources for antibody elicitation: (i) filtrate of a culture on which the fungus had been grown (ii) and two chimeric proteins, expressed in Escherichia coli as separate products, of the genes ver-1 and apa-2, which are involved in aflatoxin biosynthesis. The gene products were amplified by PCR, and each was cloned into the E. coli expression vector pGEX2T. Upon induction, the bacteria overexpressed 38- and 33-kDa chimeric proteins corresponding to the N-terminal domains of the genes ver-1 and apa-2, respectively. The chimeric proteins were isolated and affinity purified for use as antigens. The specificity of the raised antibodies was examined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The PAbs raised against the culture filtrate reacted with all the species of Aspergillus and Penicillium tested but not with Fusarium species or corn gain. However, the PAbs elicited against the chimeric proteins were highly specific, showing significantly higher ELISA absorbance values (A405) against A. parasiticus and A. flavus than against the other fungi tested and the corn grain. The approach of utilizing gene products associated with aflatoxin biosynthesis for antibody production therefore appears to be feasible. Such a multiantibody system combined with the PCR technique, could provide a useful tool for the rapid, sensitive, and accurate detection of aflatoxin producers present in grains and foods. PMID:9055416

  11. Electrochemical displacement sensor based on ferrocene boronic acid tracer and immobilized glycan for saccharide binding proteins and E. coli.

    PubMed

    Dechtrirat, Decha; Gajovic-Eichelmann, Nenad; Wojcik, Felix; Hartmann, Laura; Bier, Frank F; Scheller, Frieder W

    2014-08-15

    Pathogens such as viruses and bacteria use their envelope proteins and their adhesin lectins to recognize the glycan residues presented on the cell surface of the target tissues. This principle of recognition is used in a new electrochemical displacement sensor for the protein concanavalin A (ConA). A gold electrode was first modified with a self-assembled monolayer of a thiolated mannose/OEG conjugate and a ferrocene boroxol derivative was pre-assembled as reporter molecule onto the mannose surface. The novel tracer molecule based on a 2-hydroxymethyl phenyl boronic acid derivative binds even at neutral pH to the saccharides which could expand the application towards biological samples (i.e., urine and feces). Upon the binding of ConA, the tracer was displaced and washed away from the sensor surface leading to a decrease in the electrochemical signal. Using square wave voltammetry (SWV), the concentration of ConA in the sample solution could be determined in the dynamic concentration range established from 38nmolL(-1) to 5.76µmolL(-1) with a reproducible detection limit of 1µgmL(-1) (38nmolL(-1)) based on the signal-to-noise ratio (S/N=3) with fast response of 15min. The new reporter molecule showed a reduced non-specific displacement by BSA and ribonuclease A. The sensor was also successfully transferred to the first proof of principle for the detection of Escherichia coli exhibiting a detection limit of approximately 6×10(2)cells/mL. Specificity of the displacement by target protein ConA and E. coli was demonstrated since the control proteins (i.e., BSA and RNaseA) and the control E. coli strain, which lack of type 1 fimbriae, were ineffective.

  12. Cold-inducible cloning vectors for low-temperature protein expression in Escherichia coli: application to the production of a toxic and proteolytically sensitive fusion protein.

    PubMed

    Mujacic, M; Cooper, K W; Baneyx, F

    1999-10-01

    TolAI-beta-lactamase a fusion protein consisting of the inner membrane anchoring domain of the Escherichia coli transenvelope protein TolA followed by TEM-beta-lactamase was found to be toxic and highly unstable when transcribed from the bacteriophage T7 promoter at 37 degrees C. Expression at 15 or 23 degrees C alleviated toxicity, but led to only partial stabilization of the fusion protein. To evaluate the usefulness of cold-shock promoters for the production of proteolytically sensitive proteins at low temperatures, we constructed a set of cloning vectors suitable for rapidly positioning PCR products under cspA transcriptional control. TolAI-beta-lactamase degradation was completely abolished when cspA-driven transcription was induced by temperature downshift to 15 or 23 degrees C. Our results suggest that the cspA promoter system may be a valuable tool for the production of proteins containing membrane-spanning domains or otherwise unstable gene products in E. coli.

  13. Selectively Labeling the Heterologous Protein in Escherichia coli for NMR Studies: A Strategy to Speed Up NMR Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almeida, F. C. L.; Amorim, G. C.; Moreau, V. H.; Sousa, V. O.; Creazola, A. T.; Américo, T. A.; Pais, A. P. N.; Leite, A.; Netto, L. E. S.; Giordano, R. J.; Valente, A. P.

    2001-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance is an important tool for high-resolution structural studies of proteins. It demands high protein concentration and high purity; however, the expression of proteins at high levels often leads to protein aggregation and the protein purification step can correspond to a high percentage of the overall time in the structural determination process. In the present article we show that the step of sample optimization can be simplified by selective labeling the heterologous protein expressed in Escherichia coli by the use of rifampicin. Yeast thioredoxin and a coix transcription factor Opaque 2 leucine zipper (LZ) were used to show the effectiveness of the protocol. The 1H/15N heteronuclear correlation two-dimensional NMR spectrum (HMQC) of the selective 15N-labeled thioredoxin without any purification is remarkably similar to the spectrum of the purified protein. The method has high yields and a good 1H/15N HMQC spectrum can be obtained with 50 ml of M9 growth medium. Opaque 2 LZ, a difficult protein due to the lower expression level and high hydrophobicity, was also probed. The 15N-edited spectrum of Opaque 2 LZ showed only the resonances of the protein of heterologous expression (Opaque 2 LZ) while the 1H spectrum shows several other resonances from other proteins of the cell lysate. The demand for a fast methodology for structural determination is increasing with the advent of genome/proteome projects. Selective labeling the heterologous protein can speed up NMR structural studies as well as NMR-based drug screening. This methodology is especially effective for difficult proteins such as hydrophobic transcription factors, membrane proteins, and others.

  14. Recombinant expressions of sweet plant protein mabinlin II in Escherichia coli and food-grade Lactococcus lactis.

    PubMed

    Gu, Wenliang; Xia, Qiyu; Yao, Jing; Fu, Shaoping; Guo, Jianchun; Hu, Xinwen

    2015-04-01

    Sweet plant proteins, which are safe, natural, low-calorie sweeteners, may be suitable replacements for sugars in the food and beverage industries. Mabinlin II, a sweet plant protein, shows the most pronounced heat stability and acid resistance of any of the six known types of plant sweet proteins. However, mabinlin II is difficult to extract from the Capparis masaikai plant, which is itself becoming increasingly scarce. This limits the use of naturally acquired mabinlin II. In this study, recombinant mabinlin II proteins were expressed and purified in Escherichia coli and in food-grade Lactococcus lactis. Recombinant mabinlin II proteins MBL-BH (containing the B-chains of mabinlin II downstream fused with His-tag) and MBL-ABH (containing the A- and B-chains of mabinlin II downstream fused with His-tag) were expressed in E. coli in the form of inclusion bodies. They were then purified and renatured. The refolded MBL-BH was found to be 100 times sweeter than sucrose by weight, but it was not heat-stable. Refolded MBL-ABH was neither sweet nor heat-stable. Recombinant mabinlin II proteins were secreted and expressed intracellularly in food-grade L. lactis, in which the concentrated cell samples and culture medium samples were detected using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and Western blotting analysis with anti-mabinlin II polyclonal antibody. This study demonstrated that the single B chain of mabinlin II has a sweet taste. The recombinant mabinlin II proteins have been successfully expressed in food-grade L. lactis, which is a crucial step in the production of mabinlin II through microorganism expression systems.

  15. Purification and Refolding to Amyloid Fibrils of (His)6-tagged Recombinant Shadoo Protein Expressed as Inclusion Bodies in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiaojing; Richard, Charles-Adrien; Moudjou, Mohammed; Vidic, Jasmina

    2015-12-19

    The Escherichia coli expression system is a powerful tool for the production of recombinant eukaryotic proteins. We use it to produce Shadoo, a protein belonging to the prion family. A chromatographic method for the purification of (His)6-tagged recombinant Shadoo expressed as inclusion bodies is described. The inclusion bodies are solubilized in 8 M urea and bound to a Ni(2+)-charged column to perform ion affinity chromatography. Bound proteins are eluted by a gradient of imidazole. Fractions containing Shadoo protein are subjected to size exclusion chromatography to obtain a highly purified protein. In the final step purified Shadoo is desalted to remove salts, urea and imidazole. Recombinant Shadoo protein is an important reagent for biophysical and biochemical studies of protein conformation disorders occurring in prion diseases. Many reports demonstrated that prion neurodegenerative diseases originate from the deposition of stable, ordered amyloid fibrils. Sample protocols describing how to fibrillate Shadoo into amyloid fibrils at acidic and neutral/basic pHs are presented. The methods on how to produce and fibrillate Shadoo can facilitate research in laboratories working on prion diseases, since it allows for production of large amounts of protein in a rapid and low cost manner.

  16. Coupling of protein motions and hydrogen transfer during catalysis by Escherichia coli dihydrofolate reductase

    PubMed Central

    Swanwick, Richard S.; Maglia, Giovanni; Tey, Lai-hock; Allemann, Rudolf K.

    2005-01-01

    The enzyme DHFR (dihydrofolate reductase) catalyses hydride transfer from NADPH to, and protonation of, dihydrofolate. The physical basis of the hydride transfer step catalysed by DHFR from Escherichia coli has been studied through the measurement of the temperature dependence of the reaction rates and the kinetic isotope effects. Single turnover experiments at pH 7.0 revealed a strong dependence of the reaction rates on temperature. The observed relatively large difference in the activation energies for hydrogen and deuterium transfer led to a temperature dependence of the primary kinetic isotope effects from 3.0±0.2 at 5 °C to 2.2±0.2 at 40 °C and an inverse ratio of the pre-exponential factors of 0.108±0.04. These results are consistent with theoretical models for hydrogen transfer that include contributions from quantum mechanical tunnelling coupled with protein motions that actively modulate the tunnelling distance. Previous work had suggested a coupling of a remote residue, Gly121, with the kinetic events at the active site. However, pre-steady-state experiments at pH 7.0 with the mutant G121V-DHFR, in which Gly121 was replaced with valine, revealed that the chemical mechanism of DHFR catalysis was robust to this replacement. The reduced catalytic efficiency of G121V-DHFR was mainly a consequence of the significantly reduced pre-exponential factors, indicating the requirement for significant molecular reorganization during G121V-DHFR catalysis. In contrast, steady-state measurements at pH 9.5, where hydride transfer is rate limiting, revealed temperature-independent kinetic isotope effects between 15 and 35 °C and a ratio of the pre-exponential factors above the semi-classical limit, suggesting a rigid active site configuration from which hydrogen tunnelling occurs. The mechanism by which hydrogen tunnelling in DHFR is coupled with the environment appears therefore to be sensitive to pH. PMID:16241906

  17. Purification and sequencing of the active site tryptic peptide from penicillin-binding protein 1b of Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Nicholas, R.A.; Suzuki, H.; Hirota, Y.; Strominger, J.L.

    1985-07-02

    This paper reports the sequence of the active site peptide of penicillin-binding protein 1b from Escherichia coli. Purified penicillin-binding protein 1b was labeled with (/sup 14/C)penicillin G, digested with trypsin, and partially purified by gel filtration. Upon further purification by high-pressure liquid chromatography, two radioactive peaks were observed, and the major peak, representing over 75% of the applied radioactivity, was submitted to amino acid analysis and sequencing. The sequence Ser-Ile-Gly-Ser-Leu-Ala-Lys was obtained. The active site nucleophile was identified by digesting the purified peptide with aminopeptidase M and separating the radioactive products on high-pressure liquid chromatography. Amino acid analysis confirmed that the serine residue in the middle of the sequence was covalently bonded to the (/sup 14/C)penicilloyl moiety. A comparison of this sequence to active site sequences of other penicillin-binding proteins and beta-lactamases is presented.

  18. Physico-chemical characterization of human von Ebner gland protein expressed in Escherichia coli: implications for its physiological role.

    PubMed

    Creuzenet, C; Mangroo, D

    1998-11-01

    The human von Ebner gland protein (VEG) was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified to homogeneity. The sequence and mass of the recombinant protein were confirmed, and far and near UV circular dichroic analyses showed that the protein was properly folded. The secondary structure of recombinant VEG consisted of 75% beta-sheets and 12% alpha-helices, and it was found to be stable under acidic conditions, in the presence of alcohol, and at high temperatures. The denaturation temperature was 79 degreesC at pH 3.5, with a denaturation enthalpy (DeltaHd) of 160,600 J/mol. Fluorescence analysis and measurement of the denaturation temperature by circular dichroism did not detect any interaction between VEG and extremely bitter (denatonium benzoate, caffein) or sweet (aspartame) compounds. These results suggest that VEG may not function as a shuttle for transfer of sapid molecules to taste receptors.

  19. Electrochemical potential releases a membrane-bound secretion intermediate of maltose-binding protein in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Geller, B L

    1990-01-01

    A secretionary intermediate of the Escherichia coli maltose-binding protein accumulated in the inner membrane when the membrane electrochemical potential was reduced and the cytosolic ATP concentration was normal. The intermediate was mature in size, but maintained a conformation similar to the cytosolic precursor form, and not the mature periplasmic protein, as measured by differences in susceptibility to proteinase K in vitro. The intermediate was located on the periplasmic side of the inner membrane. Restoration of the membrane electrochemical potential resulted in the movement of the intermediate from the inner membrane to the periplasm. In other experiments in which the ATP concentration was reduced by 96% and the electrochemical potential remained normal, no intermediate accumulated. Thus, the final step in the export of maltose-binding protein requires the electrochemical potential of the inner membrane and does not require ATP. Images PMID:2203734

  20. Migration of a Holliday junction through a nucleosome directed by the E. coli RuvAB motor protein.

    PubMed

    Grigoriev, M; Hsieh, P

    1998-09-01

    Chromatin plays a critical role in regulating access to DNA by proteins that direct recombination and repair. The E. coli RuvAB protein complex promotes branch migration of the Holliday junction recombination intermediate. The ability of RuvAB to negotiate passage of the junction through nucleosomal DNA is examined. The model system involves the formation of a Holliday junction positioned upstream of a nucleosome. Unassisted, the junction is blocked by a histone octamer. In the presence of RuvAB and ATP, rapid branch migration through the nucleosome is observed. It results in disruption of the histone-DNA interactions leading to the removal of the octamer from the junction intermediate. These results suggest that eukaryotic DNA motor proteins analogous to RuvAB could function during recombination to promote branch migration through chromatin.

  1. Characterization of the DNA binding protein encoded by the N-specific filamentous Escherichia coli phage IKe. Binding properties of the protein and nucleotide sequence of the gene.

    PubMed

    Peeters, B P; Konings, R N; Schoenmakers, J G

    1983-09-01

    A DNA binding protein encoded by the filamentous single-stranded DNA phage IKe has been isolated from IKe-infected Escherichia coli cells. Fluorescence and in vitro binding studies have shown that the protein binds co-operatively and with a high specificity to single-stranded but not to double-stranded DNA. From titration of the protein to poly(dA) it has been calculated that approximately four bases of the DNA are covered by one monomer of protein. These binding characteristics closely resemble those of gene V protein encoded by the F-specific filamentous phages M13 and fd. The nucleotide sequence of the gene specifying the IKe DNA binding protein has been established. When compared to the nucleotide sequence of gene V of phage M13 it shows an homology of 58%, indicating that these two phages are evolutionarily related. The IKe DNA binding protein is 88 amino acids long which is one amino acid residue larger than the gene V protein sequence. When the IKe DNA binding protein sequence is compared with that of gene V protein it was found that 39 amino acid residues have identical positions in both proteins. The positions of all five tyrosine residues, a number of which are known to be involved in DNA binding, are conserved. Secondary structure predictions indicate that the two proteins contain similar structural domains. It is proposed that the tyrosine residues which are involved in DNA binding are the ones in or next to a beta-turn, at positions 26, 41 and 56 in gene V protein and at positions 27, 42 and 57 in the IKe DNA binding protein.

  2. Molecular Characterization of UpaB and UpaC, Two New Autotransporter Proteins of Uropathogenic Escherichia coli CFT073

    PubMed Central

    Allsopp, Luke P.; Beloin, Christophe; Ulett, Glen C.; Valle, Jaione; Totsika, Makrina; Sherlock, Orla; Ghigo, Jean-Marc

    2012-01-01

    Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) is the primary cause of urinary tract infection (UTI) in the developed world. The major factors associated with virulence of UPEC are fimbrial adhesins, which mediate specific attachment to host receptors and trigger innate host responses. Another group of adhesins is represented by the autotransporter (AT) subgroup of proteins. The genome-sequenced prototype UPEC strain CFT073 contains 11 putative AT-encoding genes. In this study, we have performed a detailed molecular characterization of two closely related AT adhesins from CFT073: UpaB (c0426) and UpaC (c0478). PCR screening revealed that the upaB and upaC AT-encoding genes are common in E. coli. The upaB and upaC genes were cloned and characterized in a recombinant E. coli K-12 strain background. This revealed that they encode proteins located at the cell surface but possess different functional properties: UpaB mediates adherence to several ECM proteins, while UpaC expression is associated with increased biofilm formation. In CFT073, upaB is expressed while upaC is transcriptionally repressed by the global regulator H-NS. In competitive colonization experiments employing the mouse UTI model, CFT073 significantly outcompeted its upaB (but not upaC) isogenic mutant strain in the bladder. This attenuated phenotype was also observed in single-challenge experiments, where deletion of the upaB gene in CFT073 significantly reduced early colonization of the bladder. PMID:21930758

  3. Purified chaperonin 60 (groEL) interacts with the nonnative states of a multitude of Escherichia coli proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Viitanen, P. V.; Gatenby, A. A.; Lorimer, G. H.

    1992-01-01

    In vitro experiments employing the soluble proteins from Escherichia coli reveal that about half of them, in their unfolded or partially folded states, but not in their native states, can form stable binary complexes with chaperonin 60 (groEL). These complexes can be isolated by gel filtration chromatography and are efficiently discharged upon the addition of Mg.ATP. Binary complex formation is substantially reduced if chaperonin 60 is presaturated with Rubisco-I, the folding intermediate of Rubisco, but not with native Rubisco. Binary complex formation is also reduced if the transient species that interact with chaperonin 60 are permitted to progress to more stable states. This implies that the structural elements or motifs that are recognized by chaperonin 60 and that are responsible for binary complex formation are only present or accessible in the unfolded states of proteins or in certain intermediates along their respective folding pathways. Given the high-affinity binding that we have observed in the present study and the normal cellular abundance of chaperonin 60, we suspect that the folding of most proteins in E. coli does not occur in free solution spontaneously, but instead takes place while they are associated with molecular chaperones. PMID:1363913

  4. Colonization of the meat extracellular matrix proteins by O157 and non-O157 enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Chagnot, Caroline; Caccia, Nelly; Loukiadis, Estelle; Ganet, Sarah; Durand, Alexandra; Bertin, Yolande; Talon, Régine; Astruc, Thierry; Desvaux, Mickaël

    2014-10-01

    Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) are anthropozoonotic agents that range third among food-borne pathogens respective to their incidence and dangerousness in the European Union. EHEC are Shiga-toxin producing E. coli (STEC) responsible for foodborne poisoning mainly incriminated to the consumption of contaminated beef meat. Among the hundreds of STEC serotypes identified, EHEC mainly belong to O157:H7 but non-O157 can represent 20 to 70% of EHEC infections per year. Seven of those serogroups are especially of high-risk for human health, i.e. O26, O45, O103, O111, O121, O145 and O104. While meat can be contaminated all along the food processing chain, EHEC contamination essentially occurs at the dehiding stage of slaughtering. Investigating bacterial colonization to the skeletal-muscle extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins, it appeared that environmental factors influenced specific and non-specific bacterial adhesion of O157 and non-O157 EHEC as well as biofilm formation. Importantly, mechanical treatment (i.e. shaking, centrifugation, pipetting and vortexing) inhibited and biased the results of bacterial adhesion assay. Besides stressing the importance of the protocol to investigate bacterial adhesion to ECM proteins, this study demonstrated that the colonization abilities to ECM proteins vary among EHEC serogroups and should ultimately be taken into consideration to evaluate the risk of contamination for different types of food matrices.

  5. Refolding and purification of recombinant L-asparaginase from inclusion bodies of E. coli into active tetrameric protein

    PubMed Central

    Upadhyay, Arun K.; Singh, Anupam; Mukherjee, K. J.; Panda, Amulya K.

    2014-01-01

    A tetrameric protein of therapeutic importance, Escherichia coli L-asparaginase-II was expressed in Escherichia coli as inclusion bodies (IBs). Asparaginase IBs were solubilized using low concentration of urea and refolded into active tetrameric protein using pulsatile dilution method. Refolded asparaginase was purified in two steps by ion-exchange and gel filtration chromatographic techniques. The recovery of bioactive asparaginase from IBs was around 50%. The melting temperature (Tm) of the purified asparaginase was found to be 64°C. The specific activity of refolded, purified asparaginase was found to be comparable to the commercial asparaginase (190 IU/mg). Enzymatic activity of the refolded asparaginase was high even at four molar urea solutions, where the IB aggregates are completely solubilized. From the comparison of chemical denaturation data and activity at different concentrations of guanidine hydrochloride, it was observed that dissociation of monomeric units precedes the complete loss of helical secondary structures. Protection of the existing native-like protein structure during solubilization of IB aggregates with 4 M urea improved the propensity of monomer units to form oligomeric structure. Our mild solubilization technique retaining native-like structures, improved recovery of asparaginase in bioactive tetrameric form. PMID:25309524

  6. Mapping the ribosomal protein S7 regulatory binding site on mRNA of the E. coli streptomycin operon.

    PubMed

    Surdina, A V; Rassokhin, T I; Golovin, A V; Spiridonova, V A; Kopylov, A M

    2010-07-01

    In this work it is shown by deletion analysis that an intercistronic region (ICR) approximately 80 nucleotides in length is necessary for interaction with recombinant E. coli S7 protein (r6hEcoS7). A model is proposed for the interaction of S7 with two ICR sites-region of hairpin bifurcations and Shine-Dalgarno sequence of cistron S7. A de novo RNA binding site for heterologous S7 protein of Thermus thermophilus (r6hTthS7) was constructed by selection of a combinatorial RNA library based on E. coli ICR: it has only a single supposed protein recognition site in the region of bifurcation. The SERW technique was used for selection of two intercistronic RNA libraries in which five nucleotides of a double-stranded region, adjacent to the bifurcation, had the randomized sequence. One library contained an authentic AG (-82/-20) pair, while in the other this pair was replaced by AU. A serwamer capable of specific binding to r6hTthS7 was selected; it appeared to be the RNA68 mutant with eight nucleotide mutations. The serwamer binds to r6hTthS7 with the same affinity as homologous authentic ICR of str mRNA binds to r6hEcoS7; apparent dissociation constants are 89 +/- 43 and 50 +/- 24 nM, respectively.

  7. De Novo Designed Proteins from a Library of Artificial Sequences Function in Escherichia Coli and Enable Cell Growth

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Michael A.; McKinley, Kara L.; Bradley, Luke H.; Viola, Sara R.; Hecht, Michael H.

    2011-01-01

    A central challenge of synthetic biology is to enable the growth of living systems using parts that are not derived from nature, but designed and synthesized in the laboratory. As an initial step toward achieving this goal, we probed the ability of a collection of >106 de novo designed proteins to provide biological functions necessary to sustain cell growth. Our collection of proteins was drawn from a combinatorial library of 102-residue sequences, designed by binary patterning of polar and nonpolar residues to fold into stable 4-helix bundles. We probed the capacity of proteins from this library to function in vivo by testing their abilities to rescue 27 different knockout strains of Escherichia coli, each deleted for a conditionally essential gene. Four different strains – ΔserB, ΔgltA, ΔilvA, and Δfes – were rescued by specific sequences from our library. Further experiments demonstrated that a strain simultaneously deleted for all four genes was rescued by co-expression of four novel sequences. Thus, cells deleted for ∼0.1% of the E. coli genome (and ∼1% of the genes required for growth under nutrient-poor conditions) can be sustained by sequences designed de novo. PMID:21245923

  8. Methanogenic diversity studies within the rumen of Surti buffaloes based on methyl coenzyme M reductase A (mcrA) genes point to Methanobacteriales.

    PubMed

    Singh, Krishna M; Pandya, Paresh R; Parnerkar, Subhash; Tripathi, Ajai K; Ramani, Umed; Koringa, Prakash G; Rank, Dharamshi N; Joshi, Chaitanya G; Kothari, Ramesh K

    2010-01-01

    Methane emissions from ruminant livestock are considered to be one of the more potent forms of greenhouse gases contributing to global warming. Many strategies to reduce emissions are targeting the methanogens that inhabit the rumen, but such an approach can only be successful if it targets all the major groups of ruminant methanogens. Therefore, basic knowledge of the diversity of these microbes in breeds of buffalo is required. Therefore, the methanogenic community in the rumen of Surti buffaloes was analyzed by PCR amplification, cloning, and sequencing of methyl coenzyme M reductase (mcrA) gene. A total of 76 clones were identified, revealing 14 different sequences (phylotypes). All 14 sequences were similar to methanogens belonging to the order Methanobacteriales. Within Methanobacteriales, 12 clones (6 OTUs) were similar to Methanosphaera stadtmanae and the remaining 8 phylotypes (64 clones) were similar to unclassified Methanobacteriales. Overall, members of the Methanobacteriales dominated the mcrA clone library in the rumen of Surti buffalo. Further studies and effective strategies can be made to inhibit the growth of Methanobacteriales to reduce methane emission from the rumen which would help in preventing global warming.

  9. Two bacteriophages which utilize a new Escherichia coli major outer membrane protein as part of their receptor.

    PubMed

    Chai, T J; Foulds, J

    1978-07-01

    Escherichia coli strain JF694 contains a new major outer membrane protein which we have called protein E (J. Foulds, and T. Chai, J. Bacteriol. 133:1478-1483). Two new bacteriophages, TC45 and TC23, were isolated that require the presence of protein E in the outer membrane of host cells for growth. Both of these bacteriophages have a morphology similar to T-even bacteriophages but are distinct in properties such as plaque morphology, buoyant density, and burst size. Although strain JF694, containing protein E, adsorbs bacteriophage TC45 efficiently, cells killed with heat or chloroform are unable to inactivate this bacteriophage. Purified protein E either in the presence or absence of additional probable cofactors such as lipopolysaccharide was also unable to inactivate bacteriophage TC45. Both bacteriophages probably use protein E as at least part of their receptor but require, in addition, other outer membrane components or a specific orientation or organization of this protein in the outer membrane.

  10. Native-sized recombinant spider silk protein produced in metabolically engineered Escherichia coli results in a strong fiber

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Xiao-Xia; Qian, Zhi-Gang; Ki, Chang Seok; Park, Young Hwan; Kaplan, David L.; Lee, Sang Yup

    2010-01-01

    Spider dragline silk is a remarkably strong fiber that makes it attractive for numerous applications. Much has thus been done to make similar fibers by biomimic spinning of recombinant dragline silk proteins. However, success is limited in part due to the inability to successfully express native-sized recombinant silk proteins (250–320 kDa). Here we show that a 284.9 kDa recombinant protein of the spider Nephila clavipes is produced and spun into a fiber displaying mechanical properties comparable to those of the native silk. The native-sized protein, predominantly rich in glycine (44.9%), was favorably expressed in metabolically engineered Escherichia coli within which the glycyl-tRNA pool was elevated. We also found that the recombinant proteins of lower molecular weight versions yielded inferior fiber properties. The results provide insight into evolution of silk protein size related to mechanical performance, and also clarify why spinning lower molecular weight proteins does not recapitulate the properties of native fibers. Furthermore, the silk expression, purification, and spinning platform established here should be useful for sustainable production of natural quality dragline silk, potentially enabling broader applications. PMID:20660779

  11. Native-sized recombinant spider silk protein produced in metabolically engineered Escherichia coli results in a strong fiber.

    PubMed

    Xia, Xiao-Xia; Qian, Zhi-Gang; Ki, Chang Seok; Park, Young Hwan; Kaplan, David L; Lee, Sang Yup

    2010-08-10

    Spider dragline silk is a remarkably strong fiber that makes it attractive for numerous applications. Much has thus been done to make similar fibers by biomimic spinning of recombinant dragline silk proteins. However, success is limited in part due to the inability to successfully express native-sized recombinant silk proteins (250-320 kDa). Here we show that a 284.9 kDa recombinant protein of the spider Nephila clavipes is produced and spun into a fiber displaying mechanical properties comparable to those of the native silk. The native-sized protein, predominantly rich in glycine (44.9%), was favorably expressed in metabolically engineered Escherichia coli within which the glycyl-tRNA pool was elevated. We also found that the recombinant proteins of lower molecular weight versions yielded inferior fiber properties. The results provide insight into evolution of silk protein size related to mechanical performance, and also clarify why spinning lower molecular weight proteins does not recapitulate the properties of native fibers. Furthermore, the silk expression, purification, and spinning platform established here should be useful for sustainable production of natural quality dragline silk, potentially enabling broader applications. PMID:20660779

  12. The role of AlkB protein in repair of 1,N⁶-ethenoadenine in Escherichia coli cells.

    PubMed

    Maciejewska, Agnieszka M; Sokołowska, Beata; Nowicki, Adam; Kuśmierek, Jarosław T

    2011-05-01

    Etheno (ε) DNA adducts, including 1,N(6)-ethenoadenine (εA), are formed by various bifunctional agents of exogenous and endogenous origin. The AT→TA transversion, the most frequent mutation provoked by the presence of εA in DNA, is very common in critical codons of the TP53 and RAS genes in tumours induced by exposure to carcinogenic vinyl compounds. Here, using a method that allows examination of the mutagenic potency of a metabolite of vinyl chloride, chloroacetaldehyde (CAA), but eliminates its cytotoxicity, we studied the participation of alkA, alkB and mug gene products in the repair of εA in Escherichia coli cells. The test system used comprised the pIF105 plasmid bearing the lactose operon of CC105 origin, which allowed monitoring of Lac(+) revertants that arose by AT→TA substitutions due to the modification of adenine by CAA. The plasmid was CAA-modified in vitro and replicated in E.coli of various genetic backgrounds (wt, alkA, alkB, mug, alkAalkB, alkAmug and alkBmug). To modify the levels of the AlkA and AlkB proteins, mutagenesis was studied in E.coli cells induced or not in adaptive response to alkylating agents. Considering the levels of CAA-induced Lac(+) revertants in strains harbouring the CAA-modified pIF105 plasmid and induced or not in adaptive response, we conclude that the AlkB dioxygenase plays a major role in decreasing the level of AT→TA mutations, thus in the repair of εA in E.coli cells. The observed differences of mutation frequencies in the various mutant strains assayed indicate that Mug glycosylase is also engaged in the repair of εA, whereas the role the AlkA glycosylase in this repair is negligible. PMID:21193516

  13. Enhancing E. coli tolerance towards oxidative stress via engineering its global regulator cAMP receptor protein (CRP).

    PubMed

    Basak, Souvik; Jiang, Rongrong

    2012-01-01

    Oxidative damage to microbial hosts often occurs under stressful conditions during bioprocessing. Classical strain engineering approaches are usually both time-consuming and labor intensive. Here, we aim to improve E. coli performance under oxidative stress via engineering its global regulator cAMP receptor protein (CRP), which can directly or indirectly regulate redox-sensing regulators SoxR and OxyR, and other ~400 genes in E. coli. Error-prone PCR technique was employed to introduce modifications to CRP, and three mutants (OM1~OM3) were identified with improved tolerance via H(2)O(2) enrichment selection. The best mutant OM3 could grow in 12 mM H(2)O(2) with the growth rate of 0.6 h(-1), whereas the growth of wild type was completely inhibited at this H(2)O(2) concentration. OM3 also elicited enhanced thermotolerance at 48°C as well as resistance against cumene hydroperoxide. The investigation about intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), which determines cell viability, indicated that the accumulation of ROS in OM3 was always lower than in WT with or without H(2)O(2) treatment. Genome-wide DNA microarray analysis has shown not only CRP-regulated genes have demonstrated great transcriptional level changes (up to 8.9-fold), but also RpoS- and OxyR-regulated genes (up to 7.7-fold). qRT-PCR data and enzyme activity assay suggested that catalase (katE) could be a major antioxidant enzyme in OM3 instead of alkyl hydroperoxide reductase or superoxide dismutase. To our knowledge, this is the first work on improving E. coli oxidative stress resistance by reframing its transcription machinery through its native global regulator. The positive outcome of this approach may suggest that engineering CRP can be successfully implemented as an efficient strain engineering alternative for E. coli. PMID:23251448

  14. Molecular parasitism in the Escherichia coli-Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus system: translocation of the matrix protein from the host to the parasite outer membrane.

    PubMed Central

    Guerrini, F; Romano, V; Valenzi, M; Di Giulio, M; Mupo, M R; Sacco, M

    1982-01-01

    During the intracellular maturation in Escherichia coli of the parasite Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus the outer membrane, major protein I of E. coli (i.e., the matrix protein) becomes associated with the outer membrane of the emerging parasite cells. The binding properties of this protein with the outer membrane of the host and of the parasite are identical. An analogous phenomenon also occurs during Bdellovibrio parasitism on Klebsiella pneumoniae and on Salmonella typhimurium. Possible roles for this scavenging action of Bdellovibrio, and similar phenomena in other parasitic systems, are discussed. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. PMID:6765198

  15. Role of leucine zipper motifs in association of the Escherichia coli cell division proteins FtsL and FtsB.

    PubMed

    Robichon, Carine; Karimova, Gouzel; Beckwith, Jon; Ladant, Daniel

    2011-09-01

    FtsL and FtsB are two inner-membrane proteins that are essential constituents of the cell division apparatus of Escherichia coli. In this study, we demonstrate that the leucine zipper-like (LZ) motifs, located in the periplasmic domain of FtsL and FtsB, are required for an optimal interaction between these two essential proteins.

  16. Analysis of methane-producing and metabolizing archaeal and bacterial communities in sediments of the northern South China Sea and coastal Mai Po Nature Reserve revealed by PCR amplification of mcrA and pmoA genes

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Zhichao; Chen, Jing; Cao, Huiluo; Han, Ping; Gu, Ji-Dong

    2015-01-01

    Communities of methanogens, anaerobic methanotrophic archaea and aerobic methanotrophic bacteria (MOB) were compared by profiling polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-amplified products of mcrA and pmoA genes encoded by methyl-coenzyme M reductase alpha subunit and particulate methane monooxygenase alpha subunit, respectively, in sediments of northern South China Sea (nSCS) and Mai Po mangrove wetland. Community structures representing by mcrA gene based on 12 clone libraries from nSCS showed separate clusters indicating niche specificity, while, Methanomicrobiales, Methanosarcinales clades 1,2, and Methanomassiliicoccus-like groups of methanogens were the most abundant groups in nSCS sediment samples. Novel clusters specific to the SCS were identified and the phylogeny of mcrA gene-harboring archaea was updated. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used to detect mcrA gene abundance in all samples: similar abundance of mcrA gene in the surface layers of mangrove (3.4∼3.9 × 106 copies per gram dry weight) and of intertidal mudflat (5.5∼5.8 × 106 copies per gram dry weight) was observed, but higher abundance (6.9 × 106 to 1.02 × 108 copies per gram dry weight) was found in subsurface samples of both sediment types. Aerobic MOB were more abundant in surface layers (6.7∼11.1 × 105 copies per gram dry weight) than the subsurface layers (1.2∼5.9 × 105 copies per gram dry weight) based on pmoA gene. Mangrove surface layers harbored more abundant pmoA gene than intertidal mudflat, but less pmoA genes in the subsurface layers. Meanwhile, it is also noted that in surface layers of all samples, more pmoA gene copies were detected than the subsurface layers. Reedbed rhizosphere exhibited the highest gene abundance of mcrA gene (8.51 × 108 copies per gram dry weight) and pmoA gene (1.56 × 107 copies per gram dry weight). This study investigated the prokaryotic communities responsible for methane cycling in both marine and coastal wetland ecosystems, showing

  17. Analysis of methane-producing and metabolizing archaeal and bacterial communities in sediments of the northern South China Sea and coastal Mai Po Nature Reserve revealed by PCR amplification of mcrA and pmoA genes.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhichao; Chen, Jing; Cao, Huiluo; Han, Ping; Gu, Ji-Dong

    2014-01-01

    Communities of methanogens, anaerobic methanotrophic archaea and aerobic methanotrophic bacteria (MOB) were compared by profiling polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-amplified products of mcrA and pmoA genes encoded by methyl-coenzyme M reductase alpha subunit and particulate methane monooxygenase alpha subunit, respectively, in sediments of northern South China Sea (nSCS) and Mai Po mangrove wetland. Community structures representing by mcrA gene based on 12 clone libraries from nSCS showed separate clusters indicating niche specificity, while, Methanomicrobiales, Methanosarcinales clades 1,2, and Methanomassiliicoccus-like groups of methanogens were the most abundant groups in nSCS sediment samples. Novel clusters specific to the SCS were identified and the phylogeny of mcrA gene-harboring archaea was updated. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used to detect mcrA gene abundance in all samples: similar abundance of mcrA gene in the surface layers of mangrove (3.4∼3.9 × 10(6) copies per gram dry weight) and of intertidal mudflat (5.5∼5.8 × 10(6) copies per gram dry weight) was observed, but higher abundance (6.9 × 10(6) to 1.02 × 10(8) copies per gram dry weight) was found in subsurface samples of both sediment types. Aerobic MOB were more abundant in surface layers (6.7∼11.1 × 10(5) copies per gram dry weight) than the subsurface layers (1.2∼5.9 × 10(5) copies per gram dry weight) based on pmoA gene. Mangrove surface layers harbored more abundant pmoA gene than intertidal mudflat, but less pmoA genes in the subsurface layers. Meanwhile, it is also noted that in surface layers of all samples, more pmoA gene copies were detected than the subsurface layers. Reedbed rhizosphere exhibited the highest gene abundance of mcrA gene (8.51 × 10(8) copies per gram dry weight) and pmoA gene (1.56 × 10(7) copies per gram dry weight). This study investigated the prokaryotic communities responsible for methane cycling in both marine and coastal wetland

  18. Optimized Expression, Purification of Herpes B Virus gD Protein in Escherichia coli, and Production of Its Monoclonal Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Zian; Sun, Tao; Xia, Xueshan; Wei, Qiujiang; Song, Yuzhu; Han, Qinqin; Chen, Qiang; Hu, Juan; Zhang, Jinyang

    2016-01-01

    Background Herpes B virus (BV) is a zoonotic disease caused by double-stranded enveloped DNA virus with cercopithecidae as its natural host. The mortality rate of infected people could be up to 70% with fatal encephalitis and encephalomyelitis. Up to now, there are no effective treatments for BV infection. Among the various proteins encoded by monkey B virus, gD, a conserved structural protein, harbors important application value for serological diagnosis of frequent variations of the monkey B virus. Objectives This study aimed to expressed the gD protein of BV in Escherichia coli by a recombinant vector, and prepare specific monoclonal antibodies against gD of BV to pave the way for effective and quick diagnosis reagent research. Materials and Methods The gD gene of BV was optimized by OptimWiz to improve codon usage bias and synthesis, and the recombinant plasmid, pET32a/gD, was constructed and expressed in E. coli Rosetta (DE3). The expressed fusion protein, His-gD, was purified and the BALB/c mice were immunized by this protein. Spleen cells from the immunized mice and SP2/0 myeloma cells were fused together, and the monoclonal cell strains were obtained by indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) screening, followed by preparation of monoclonal antibody ascetic fluid. Results The optimized gD protein was highly expressed in E. coli and successfully purified. Five monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against BV were obtained and named as 4E3, 3F8, 3E7, 1H3 and 4B6, and with ascetic fluid titers of 2 × 106, 2 × 105, 2 × 105, 2 × 103 and 2 × 102, respectively. The 1H3 and 4E3 belonged to the IgG2b subclass, while 3E7, 3F8 and 4B6 belonged to the IgG1 subclass. Conclusions The cell lines obtained in this work secreted potent, stable and specific anti-BV mAbs, which were suitable for the development of herpes B virus diagnosis reagents. PMID:27226876

  19. The periplasmic domain of Escherichia coli outer membrane protein A can undergo a localized temperature dependent structural transition.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Hiroaki; Garcia-Herrero, Alicia; Vogel, Hans J

    2014-12-01

    Gram-negative bacteria such as Escherichia coli are surrounded by two membranes with a thin peptidoglycan (PG)-layer located in between them in the periplasmic space. The outer membrane protein A (OmpA) is a 325-residue protein and it is the major protein component of the outer membrane of E. coli. Previous structure determinations have focused on the N-terminal fragment (residues 1-171) of OmpA, which forms an eight stranded transmembrane β-barrel in the outer membrane. Consequently it was suggested that OmpA is composed of two independently folded domains in which the N-terminal β-barrel traverses the outer membrane and the C-terminal domain (residues 180-325) adopts a folded structure in the periplasmic space. However, some reports have proposed that full-length OmpA can instead refold in a temperature dependent manner into a single domain forming a larger transmembrane pore. Here, we have determined the NMR solution structure of the C-terminal periplasmic domain of E. coli OmpA (OmpA(180-325)). Our structure reveals that the C-terminal domain folds independently into a stable globular structure that is homologous to the previously reported PG-associated domain of Neisseria meningitides RmpM. Our results lend credence to the two domain structure model and a PG-binding function for OmpA, and we could indeed localize the PG-binding site on the protein through NMR chemical shift perturbation experiments. On the other hand, we found no evidence for binding of OmpA(180-325) with the TonB protein. In addition, we have also expressed and purified full-length OmpA (OmpA(1-325)) to study the structure of the full-length protein in micelles and nanodiscs by NMR spectroscopy. In both membrane mimetic environments, the recombinant OmpA maintains its two domain structure that is connected through a flexible linker. A series of temperature-dependent HSQC experiments and relaxation dispersion NMR experiments detected structural destabilization in the bulge region of the

  20. Role of N-terminal region of Escherichia coli maltodextrin glucosidase in folding and function of the protein.

    PubMed

    Pastor, Ashutosh; Singh, Amit K; Shukla, Prakash K; Equbal, Md Javed; Malik, Shikha T; Singh, Tej P; Chaudhuri, Tapan K

    2016-09-01

    Maltodextrin glucosidase (MalZ) hydrolyses short malto-oligosaccharides from the reducing end releasing glucose and maltose in Escherichia coli. MalZ is a highly aggregation prone protein and molecular chaperonins GroEL and GroES assist in the folding of this protein to a substantial level. The N-terminal region of this enzyme appears to be a unique domain as seen in sequence comparison studies with other amylases as well as through homology modelling. The sequence and homology model analysis show a probability of disorder in the N-Terminal region of MalZ. The crystal structure of this enzyme has been reported in the present communication. Based on the crystallographic structure, it has been interpreted that the N-terminal region of the enzyme (Met1-Phe131) might be unstructured or flexible. To understand the role of the N-terminal region of MalZ in its enzymatic activity, and overall stability, a truncated version (Ala111-His616) of MalZ was created. The truncated version failed to fold into an active enzyme both in E. coli cytosol and in vitro even with the assistance of chaperonins GroEL and GroES. Furthermore, the refolding effort of N-truncated MalZ in the presence of isolated N-terminal domain didn't succeed. Our studies suggest that while the structural rigidity or orientation of the N-terminal region of the MalZ protein may not be essential for its stability and function, but the said domain is likely to play an important role in the formation of the native structure of the protein when present as an integral part of the protein. PMID:27317979

  1. Highly efficient immunodiagnosis of Large cardamom chirke virus using the polyclonal antiserum against Escherichia coli expressed recombinant coat protein.

    PubMed

    Vijayanandraj, S; Yogita, M; Das, Amrita; Ghosh, Amalendu; Mandal, Bikash

    2013-09-01

    Large cardamom chirke virus (LCCV), genus Macluravirus, family Potyviridae is an important constrain in large cardamom production in India. Purification of LCCV from large cardamom tissues is difficult and therefore immunodiagnostic reagents are not available. In the present study, we have successfully expressed coat protein (CP) gene of LCCV in Escherichia coli. The purification of expressed protein by Ni-NTA affinity chromatography was inefficient due to precipitation of protein during renaturation. We have optimized a simple, inexpensive and efficient method for purification of the expressed CP through gel extraction with 5 % SDS followed by renaturation in Milli-Q water, which resulted in high yield (4.7 mg/ml) and good quality of the protein. A higher titer (1:256,000) polyclonal antibody (PAb) to the recombinant CP was produced, which strongly recognized LCCV in crude leaf extract and showed minimal background reaction with the healthy leaf extract in enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and dot immunobinding assay (DIBA). The sensitivities of the ELISA and DIBA were 5 and 0.1 ng of expressed protein, respectively. Both the ELISA and DIBA were validated with 100 % accuracy in detecting LCCV in field samples. The PAb differentiated Cardamom mosaic virus, another close relative of LCCV. Our study is first to report highly efficient immunodiagnosis with PAb to E. coli expressed recombinant CP of a virus under the genus Macluravirus. The antigen expression construct and PAb developed in the present study will be useful in production of virus free planting materials of large cardamom. PMID:24426280

  2. Crystal Structure of the Escherichia coli Fic Toxin-Like Protein in Complex with Its Cognate Antitoxin

    PubMed Central

    Stanger, Frédéric V.; Harms, Alexander; Dehio, Christoph; Schirmer, Tilman

    2016-01-01

    FIC domain proteins mediate post-translational modifications of target proteins, which typically results in their inactivation. Depending on the conservation of crucial active site residues, the FIC fold serves as structural scaffold for various enzymatic activities, mostly target adenylylation. The founding member of the vast Fic protein family, EcFicT, was identified in Escherichia coli some time ago. The G55R point mutant of EcFicT displays the “filamentation induced by cAMP” (Fic) phenotype at high 3',5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) concentrations and elevated temperature, but the underlying molecular mechanism and any putative biochemical activity of EcFicT have remained unknown. EcFicT belongs to class I Fic toxin proteins that are encoded together with a small inhibitory protein (antitoxin), named EcFicA in E. coli. Here, we report the crystal structures of two mutant EcFicT/EcFicA complexes (EcFicTG55RA and EcFicTAE28G) both showing close resemblance with the structure of the AMP-transferase VbhT from Bartonella schoenbuchensis in complex with its cognate antitoxin VbhA. However, crucial differences in the active site of EcFicT compared to VbhT and other AMP-transferases rationalize the lack of evidence for adenylylation activity. Comprehensive bioinformatic analysis suggests that EcFicT has evolved from canonical AMP-transferases and has acquired a conserved binding site for a yet to be discovered novel substrate. The G55R mutation has no effect on structure or thermal stability of EcFicT, such that the molecular basis for its associated Fic phenotype remains elusive. We anticipate that this structure will inspire further bioinformatic and experimental analyses in order to characterize the enzymatic activity of EcFicT and help revealing its physiological role. PMID:27657533

  3. Role of N-terminal region of Escherichia coli maltodextrin glucosidase in folding and function of the protein.

    PubMed

    Pastor, Ashutosh; Singh, Amit K; Shukla, Prakash K; Equbal, Md Javed; Malik, Shikha T; Singh, Tej P; Chaudhuri, Tapan K

    2016-09-01

    Maltodextrin glucosidase (MalZ) hydrolyses short malto-oligosaccharides from the reducing end releasing glucose and maltose in Escherichia coli. MalZ is a highly aggregation prone protein and molecular chaperonins GroEL and GroES assist in the folding of this protein to a substantial level. The N-terminal region of this enzyme appears to be a unique domain as seen in sequence comparison studies with other amylases as well as through homology modelling. The sequence and homology model analysis show a probability of disorder in the N-Terminal region of MalZ. The crystal structure of this enzyme has been reported in the present communication. Based on the crystallographic structure, it has been interpreted that the N-terminal region of the enzyme (Met1-Phe131) might be unstructured or flexible. To understand the role of the N-terminal region of MalZ in its enzymatic activity, and overall stability, a truncated version (Ala111-His616) of MalZ was created. The truncated version failed to fold into an active enzyme both in E. coli cytosol and in vitro even with the assistance of chaperonins GroEL and GroES. Furthermore, the refolding effort of N-truncated MalZ in the presence of isolated N-terminal domain didn't succeed. Our studies suggest that while the structural rigidity or orientation of the N-terminal region of the MalZ protein may not be essential for its stability and function, but the said domain is likely to play an important role in the formation of the native structure of the protein when present as an integral part of the protein.

  4. Highly efficient immunodiagnosis of Large cardamom chirke virus using the polyclonal antiserum against Escherichia coli expressed recombinant coat protein.

    PubMed

    Vijayanandraj, S; Yogita, M; Das, Amrita; Ghosh, Amalendu; Mandal, Bikash

    2013-09-01

    Large cardamom chirke virus (LCCV), genus Macluravirus, family Potyviridae is an important constrain in large cardamom production in India. Purification of LCCV from large cardamom tissues is difficult and therefore immunodiagnostic reagents are not available. In the present study, we have successfully expressed coat protein (CP) gene of LCCV in Escherichia coli. The purification of expressed protein by Ni-NTA affinity chromatography was inefficient due to precipitation of protein during renaturation. We have optimized a simple, inexpensive and efficient method for purification of the expressed CP through gel extraction with 5 % SDS followed by renaturation in Milli-Q water, which resulted in high yield (4.7 mg/ml) and good quality of the protein. A higher titer (1:256,000) polyclonal antibody (PAb) to the recombinant CP was produced, which strongly recognized LCCV in crude leaf extract and showed minimal background reaction with the healthy leaf extract in enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and dot immunobinding assay (DIBA). The sensitivities of the ELISA and DIBA were 5 and 0.1 ng of expressed protein, respectively. Both the ELISA and DIBA were validated with 100 % accuracy in detecting LCCV in field samples. The PAb differentiated Cardamom mosaic virus, another close relative of LCCV. Our study is first to report highly efficient immunodiagnosis with PAb to E. coli expressed recombinant CP of a virus under the genus Macluravirus. The antigen expression construct and PAb developed in the present study will be useful in production of virus free planting materials of large cardamom.

  5. Escherichia coli SufE sulfur transfer protein modulates the SufS cysteine desulfurase through allosteric conformational dynamics.

    PubMed

    Singh, Harsimran; Dai, Yuyuan; Outten, F Wayne; Busenlehner, Laura S

    2013-12-20

    Fe-S clusters are critical metallocofactors required for cell function. Fe-S cluster biogenesis is carried out by assembly machinery consisting of multiple proteins. Fe-S cluster biogenesis proteins work together to mobilize sulfide and iron, form the nascent cluster, traffic the cluster to target metalloproteins, and regulate the assembly machinery in response to cellular Fe-S cluster demand. A complex series of protein-protein interactions is required for the assembly machinery to function properly. Despite considerable progress in obtaining static three-dimensional structures of the assembly proteins, little is known about transient protein-protein interactions during cluster assembly or the role of protein dynamics in the cluster assembly process. The Escherichia coli cysteine desulfurase SufS (EC 2.8.1.7) and its accessory protein SufE work together to mobilize persulfide from L-cysteine, which is then donated to the SufB Fe-S cluster scaffold. Here we use amide hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) to characterize SufS-SufE interactions and protein dynamics in solution. HDX-MS analysis shows that SufE binds near the SufS active site to accept persulfide from Cys-364. Furthermore, SufE binding initiates allosteric changes in other parts of the SufS structure that likely affect SufS catalysis and alter SufS monomer-monomer interactions. SufE enhances the initial l-cysteine substrate binding to SufS and formation of the external aldimine with pyridoxal phosphate required for early steps in SufS catalysis. Together, these results provide a new picture of the SufS-SufE sulfur transferase pathway and suggest a more active role for SufE in promoting the SufS cysteine desulfurase reaction for Fe-S cluster assembly.

  6. Role of the ribosome-associated protein PY in the cold-shock response of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Di Pietro, Fabio; Brandi, Anna; Dzeladini, Nadire; Fabbretti, Attilio; Carzaniga, Thomas; Piersimoni, Lolita; Pon, Cynthia L; Giuliodori, Anna Maria

    2013-01-01

    Protein Y (PY) is an Escherichia coli cold-shock protein which has been proposed to be responsible for the repression of bulk protein synthesis during cold adaptation. Here, we present in vivo and in vitro data which clarify the role of PY and its mechanism of action. Deletion of yfiA, the gene encoding protein PY, demonstrates that this protein is dispensable for cold adaptation and is not responsible for the shutdown of bulk protein synthesis at the onset of the stress, although it is able to partially inhibit translation. In vitro assays reveal that the extent of PY inhibition changes with different mRNAs and that this inhibition is related to the capacity of PY of binding 30S subunits with a fairly strong association constant, thus stimulating the formation of 70S monomers. Furthermore, our data provide evidence that PY competes with the other ribosomal ligands for the binding to the 30S subunits. Overall these results suggest an alternative model to explain PY function during cold shock and to reconcile the inhibition caused by PY with the active translation observed for some mRNAs during cold shock. PMID:23420694

  7. Long Polar Fimbriae of Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7 Bind to Extracellular Matrix Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Farfan, Mauricio J.; Cantero, Lidia; Vidal, Roberto; Botkin, Douglas J.; Torres, Alfredo G.

    2011-01-01

    Adherence to intestinal cells is a key process in infection caused by enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC). Several adhesion factors that mediate the binding of EHEC to intestinal cells have been described, but the receptors involved in their recognition are not fully characterized. Extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins might act as receptors involved in the recognition of enteric pathogens, including EHEC. In this study, we sought to characterize the binding of EHEC O157:H7 to ECM proteins commonly present in the intestine. We found that EHEC prototype strains as well as other clinical isolates adhered more abundantly to surfaces coated with fibronectin, laminin, and collagen IV. Further characterization of this phenotype, by using antiserum raised against the LpfA1 putative major fimbrial subunit and by addition of mannose, showed that a reduced binding of EHEC to ECM proteins was observed in a long polar fimbria (lpf) mutant. We also found that the two regulators, H-NS and Ler, had an effect in EHEC Lpf-mediated binding to ECM, supporting the roles of these tightly regulated fimbriae as adherence factors. Purified Lpf major subunit bound to all of the ECM proteins tested. Finally, increased bacterial adherence was observed when T84 cells, preincubated with ECM proteins, were infected with EHEC. Taken together, these findings suggest that the interaction of Lpf and ECM proteins contributes to the EHEC colonization of the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:21708988

  8. Improved 1, 2, 4-butanetriol production from an engineered Escherichia coli by co-expression of different chaperone proteins.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xinyao; He, Shuying; Zong, Hong; Song, Jian; Chen, Wen; Zhuge, Bin

    2016-09-01

    1, 2, 4-Butanetriol (BT) is a high-value non-natural chemical and has important applications in polymers, medical production and military industry. In the constructed BT biosynthesis pathway from xylose in Escherichia coli, the xylose dehydrogenase (Xdh) and the benzoylformate decarboxylase (MdlC) are heterologous enzymes and the activity of MdlC is the key limiting factor for BT production. In this study, six chaperone protein systems were introduced into the engineered E. coli harboring the recombinant BT pathway. The chaperone GroES-GroEL was beneficial to Xdh activity but had a negative effect on MdlC activity and BT titer. The plasmid pTf16 containing the tig gene (trigger factor) was beneficial to Xdh and MdlC activities and improved the BT titer from 0.42 to 0.56 g/l from 20 g/l xylose. However, co-expression of trigger factor and GroES-GroEL simultaneously reduced the activity of MdlC and had no effect on the BT production. The plasmid pKJE7 harboring dnaK-dnaJ-grpE showed significant negative effects on these enzyme activities and cell growth, leading to completely restrained the BT production. Similarly, co-expression of DnaKJ-GrpPE and GroES-GroEL simultaneously reduced Xdh and MdlC activities and decreased the BT titer by 45.2 %. The BT production of the engineered E. coli harboring pTf16 was further improved to the highest level at 1.01 g/l under pH control (pH 7). This work showed the potential application of chaperone proteins in microorganism engineering to get high production of target compounds as an effective and valuable tool. PMID:27430516

  9. Heterologous expression of antifreeze protein gene AnAFP from Ammopiptanthus nanus enhances cold tolerance in Escherichia coli and tobacco.

    PubMed

    Deng, Long-Qun; Yu, Hao-Qiang; Liu, Yan-Ping; Jiao, Pei-Pei; Zhou, Shu-Feng; Zhang, Su-Zhi; Li, Wan-Chen; Fu, Feng-Ling

    2014-04-10

    Antifreeze proteins are a class of polypeptides produced by certain animals, plants, fungi and bacteria that permit their survival under the subzero environments. Ammopiptanthus nanus is the unique evergreen broadleaf bush endemic to the Mid-Asia deserts. It survives at the west edge of the Tarim Basin from the disappearance of the ancient Mediterranean in the Tertiary Period. Its distribution region is characterized by the arid climate and extreme temperatures, where the extreme temperatures range from -30 °C to 40 °C. In the present study, the antifreeze protein gene AnAFP of A. nanus was used to transform Escherichia coli and tobacco, after bioinformatics analysis for its possible function. The transformed E. coli strain expressed the heterologous AnAFP gene under the induction of isopropyl β-D-thiogalactopyranoside, and demonstrated significant enhancement of cold tolerance. The transformed tobacco lines expressed the heterologous AnAFP gene in response to cold stress, and showed a less change of relative electrical conductivity under cold stress, and a less wilting phenotype after 16 h of -3 °C cold stress and thawing for 1h than the untransformed wild-type plants. All these results imply the potential value of the AnAFP gene to be used in genetic modification of commercially important crops for improvement of cold tolerance. PMID:24502990

  10. Profiling of β-Lactam Selectivity for Penicillin-Binding Proteins in Escherichia coli Strain DC2

    PubMed Central

    Kocaoglu, Ozden

    2015-01-01

    Penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) are integral players in bacterial cell division, and their catalytic activities can be monitored with β-lactam-containing chemical probes. Compounds that target a single PBP could provide important information about the specific role(s) of each enzyme, making identification of such molecules important. We evaluated 22 commercially available β-lactams for inhibition of the PBPs in live Escherichia coli strain DC2. Whole cells were titrated with β-lactam antibiotics and subsequently incubated with a fluorescent penicillin derivative, Bocillin-FL (Boc-FL), to label uninhibited PBPs. Protein visualization was accomplished by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) separation and fluorescent scanning. The examined β-lactams exhibited diverse PBP selectivities, with amdinocillin (mecillinam) showing selectivity for PBP2, aztreonam, piperacillin, cefuroxime, cefotaxime, and ceftriaxone for PBP3, and amoxicillin and cephalexin for PBP4. The remaining β-lactams did not block any PBPs in the DC2 strain of E. coli or inhibited more than one PBP at all examined concentrations in this Gram-negative organism. PMID:25733506

  11. Heterologous expression of antifreeze protein gene AnAFP from Ammopiptanthus nanus enhances cold tolerance in Escherichia coli and tobacco.

    PubMed

    Deng, Long-Qun; Yu, Hao-Qiang; Liu, Yan-Ping; Jiao, Pei-Pei; Zhou, Shu-Feng; Zhang, Su-Zhi; Li, Wan-Chen; Fu, Feng-Ling

    2014-04-10

    Antifreeze proteins are a class of polypeptides produced by certain animals, plants, fungi and bacteria that permit their survival under the subzero environments. Ammopiptanthus nanus is the unique evergreen broadleaf bush endemic to the Mid-Asia deserts. It survives at the west edge of the Tarim Basin from the disappearance of the ancient Mediterranean in the Tertiary Period. Its distribution region is characterized by the arid climate and extreme temperatures, where the extreme temperatures range from -30 °C to 40 °C. In the present study, the antifreeze protein gene AnAFP of A. nanus was used to transform Escherichia coli and tobacco, after bioinformatics analysis for its possible function. The transformed E. coli strain expressed the heterologous AnAFP gene under the induction of isopropyl β-D-thiogalactopyranoside, and demonstrated significant enhancement of cold tolerance. The transformed tobacco lines expressed the heterologous AnAFP gene in response to cold stress, and showed a less change of relative electrical conductivity under cold stress, and a less wilting phenotype after 16 h of -3 °C cold stress and thawing for 1h than the untransformed wild-type plants. All these results imply the potential value of the AnAFP gene to be used in genetic modification of commercially important crops for improvement of cold tolerance.

  12. Synthesis and Kinetic Analysis of Two Conformationally Restricted Peptide Substrates of Escherichia coli Penicillin-Binding Protein 5.

    PubMed

    Nemmara, Venkatesh V; Nicholas, Robert A; Pratt, R F

    2016-07-26

    Escherichia coli PBP5 (penicillin-binding protein 5) is a dd-carboxypeptidase involved in bacterial cell wall maturation. Beyond the C-terminal d-alanyl-d-alanine moiety, PBP5, like the essential high-molecular mass PBPs, has little specificity for other elements of peptidoglycan structure, at least as elicited in vitro by small peptidoglycan fragments. On the basis of the crystal structure of a stem pentapeptide derivative noncovalently bound to E. coli PBP6 (Protein Data Bank entry 3ITB ), closely similar in structure to PBP5, we have modeled a pentapeptide structure at the active site of PBP5. Because the two termini of the pentapeptide are directed into solution in the PBP6 crystal structure, we then modeled a 19-membered cyclic peptide analogue by cross-linking the terminal amines by succinylation. An analogous smaller, 17-membered cyclic peptide, in which the l-lysine of the original was replaced by l-diaminobutyric acid, could also be modeled into the active site. We anticipated that, just as the reactivity of stem peptide fragments of peptidoglycan with PBPs in vivo may be entropically enhanced by immobilization in the polymer, so too would that of our cyclic peptides with respect to their acyclic analogues in vitro. This paper describes the synthesis of the peptides described above that were required to examine this hypothesis and presents an analysis of their structures and reaction kinetics with PBP5. PMID:27420403

  13. Immunogold localization of acyl carrier protein in plants and Escherichia coli: Evidence for membrane association in plants.

    PubMed

    Slabas, A R; Smith, C G

    1988-08-01

    Immunogold labelling was used to study the distribution of acyl carrier protein (ACP) in Escherichia coli and a variety of plant tissues. In E. coli, ACP is distributed throughout the cytoplasm, confirming the observation of S. Jackowski et al. (1985, J. Bacteriol., 162, 5-8_. In the mesocarp of Avocado (Persea americana) and maturing seeds of oil-seed rape (Brassica napus cv. Jet Neuf), over 95% of the ACP is localised to plastids. The protein is almost exclusively located in the chloroplasts of leaf material from oil-seed rape. Approximately 80% of the gold particles associated with the ACP were further localized to the thylakoid membrane of the chloroplast. Since acetyl-CoA carboxylase has been reported to be localized to the thylakoid membrane (C.G. Kannangara and C.J. Jensen, 1975, Eur. J. Biochem., 54, 25-30), these results are consistent with the view that the two sequential enzymes in fatty-acid synthesis are in close spacial proximity.

  14. Profiling of β-lactam selectivity for penicillin-binding proteins in Escherichia coli strain DC2.

    PubMed

    Kocaoglu, Ozden; Carlson, Erin E

    2015-05-01

    Penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) are integral players in bacterial cell division, and their catalytic activities can be monitored with β-lactam-containing chemical probes. Compounds that target a single PBP could provide important information about the specific role(s) of each enzyme, making identification of such molecules important. We evaluated 22 commercially available β-lactams for inhibition of the PBPs in live Escherichia coli strain DC2. Whole cells were titrated with β-lactam antibiotics and subsequently incubated with a fluorescent penicillin derivative, Bocillin-FL (Boc-FL), to label uninhibited PBPs. Protein visualization was accomplished by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) separation and fluorescent scanning. The examined β-lactams exhibited diverse PBP selectivities, with amdinocillin (mecillinam) showing selectivity for PBP2, aztreonam, piperacillin, cefuroxime, cefotaxime, and ceftriaxone for PBP3, and amoxicillin and cephalexin for PBP4. The remaining β-lactams did not block any PBPs in the DC2 strain of E. coli or inhibited more than one PBP at all examined concentrations in this Gram-negative organism. PMID:25733506

  15. Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli CS6 gene products and their roles in CS6 structural protein assembly and cellular adherence.

    PubMed

    Wajima, Takeaki; Sabui, Subrata; Fukumoto, Megumi; Kano, Shigeyuki; Ramamurthy, Thandavarayan; Chatterjee, Nabendu Sekhar; Hamabata, Takashi

    2011-10-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) produces a variety of colonization factors necessary for attachment to the host cell, among which CS6 is one of the most prevalent in ETEC isolates from developing countries. The CS6 operon is composed of 4 genes, cssA, cssB, cssC, and cssD. The molecular mechanism of CS6 assembly and cell surface presentation, and the contribution of each protein to the attachment of the bacterium to intestinal cells remain unclear. In the present study, a series of css gene-deletion mutants of the CS6 operon were constructed in the ETEC genetic background, and their effect on adhesion to host cells and CS6 assembly was studied. Each subunit deletion resulted in a reduction in the adhesion to intestinal cells to the same level of laboratory E. coli strains, and this effect was restored by complementary plasmids, suggesting that the 4 proteins are necessary for CS6 expression. Bacterial cell fractionation and western blotting of the mutant strains suggested that the formation of a CssA-CssB-CssC complex is necessary for recognition by CssD and transport of CssA-CssB to the outer membrane as a colonization factor. PMID:21729748

  16. Soft sensor control of metabolic fluxes in a recombinant Escherichia coli fed-batch cultivation producing green fluorescence protein.

    PubMed

    Gustavsson, Robert; Mandenius, Carl-Fredrik

    2013-10-01

    A soft sensor approach is described for controlling metabolic overflow from mixed-acid fermentation and glucose overflow metabolism in a fed-batch cultivation for production of recombinant green fluorescence protein (GFP) in Escherichia coli. The hardware part of the sensor consisted of a near-infrared in situ probe that monitored the E. coli biomass and an HPLC analyzer equipped with a filtration unit that measured the overflow metabolites. The computational part of the soft sensor used basic kinetic equations and summations for estimation of specific rates and total metabolite concentrations. Two control strategies for media feeding of the fed-batch cultivation were evaluated: (1) controlling the specific rates of overflow metabolism and mixed-acid fermentation metabolites at a fixed pre-set target values, and (2) controlling the concentration of the sum of these metabolites at a set level. The results indicate that the latter strategy was more efficient for maintaining a high titer and low variability of the produced recombinant GFP protein.

  17. Conservation of an ATP-binding domain among recA proteins from Proteus vulgaris, erwinia carotovora, Shigella flexneri, and Escherichia coli K-12 and B/r

    SciTech Connect

    Knight, K.L.; Hess, R.M.; McEntee, K.

    1988-06-01

    The purified RecA proteins encoded by the cloned genes from Proteus vulgaris, Erwinia carotovora, Shigella flexneri, and Escherichia coli B/r were compared with the RecA protein from E. coli K-12. Each of the proteins hydrolyzed ATP in the presence of single-stranded DNA, and each was covalently modified with the photoaffinity ATP analog 8-azidoadenosine 5'-triphosphate (8N/sub 3/ATP). Two-dimensional tryptic maps of the four heterologous RecA proteins demonstrated considerable structural conservation among these bacterial genera. Moreover, when the (..cap alpha..-/sup 32/P)8N/sub 3/ATP-modified proteins were digested with trypsin and analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography, a single peak of radioactivity was detected in each of the digests and these peptides eluted identically with the tryptic peptide T/sub 31/ of the E. coli K-12 RecA protein, which was the unique site of 8N/sub 3/ATP photolabeling. Each of the heterologous recA genes hybridized to oligonucleotide probes derived from the ATP-binding domain sequence of the E. coli K-12 gene. These last results demonstrate that the ATP-binding domain of the RecA protein has been strongly conserved for greater than 10/sup 7/ years.

  18. A kinetic model describing cell growth and production of highly active, recombinant ice nucleation protein in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Palaiomylitou, M A; Matis, K A; Zouboulis, A I; Kyriakidis, D A

    2002-05-01

    A structured kinetic model, which describes the production of the recombinant ice nucleation protein in different conditions, was applied. The model parameters were estimated based on the variation of the specific growth rate and the intracellular product concentration during cultivation. The equations employed relate the cellular plasmid content or plasmid copy number with the cloned-gene expression; these correlations were successfully tested on the experimental data. The optimal nutrient conditions for the growth of Escherichia coli expressing the inaZ gene of Pseudomonas syringae were determined for the production of active ice nucleation protein. The kinetics of the cultures expressing the inaZ gene were studied in a bioreactor at different growth temperatures and nutrient conditions. PMID:11920448

  19. The backbone structure of the thermophilic Thermoanaerobacter tengcongensis ribose binding protein is essentially identical to its mesophilic E. coli homolog

    SciTech Connect

    Cuneo, Matthew J.; Tian, Yaji; Allert, Malin; Hellinga, Homme W.

    2008-10-27

    We report the X-ray crystal structure of a Thermoanaerobacter tengcongensis ribose binding protein (tteRBP) determined to 1.9 {angstrom} resolution. We find that tteRBP is significantly more stable ({sup app}T{sub m} value {approx} 102 C) than the mesophilic Escherichia coli ribose binding protein (ecRBP) ({sup app}T{sub m} value {approx} 56 C). The tteRBP has essentially the identical backbone conformation (0.41 {angstrom} RMSD of 235/271 C{sub {alpha}} positions and 0.65 {angstrom} RMSD of 270/271 C{sub {alpha}} positions) as ecRBP. Classification of the amino acid substitutions as a function of structure therefore allows the identification of amino acids which potentially contribute to the observed thermal stability of tteRBP in the absence of large structural heterogeneities.

  20. SDS-PAGE Analysis of the Outer Membrane Proteins of Uropathogenic Escherichia coli Isolated from Patients in Different Wards of Nemazee Hospital, Shiraz, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Dehghani, Behzad; Mottamedifar, Mohammad; Khoshkharam-Roodmajani, Hossein; Hassanzadeh, Amir; Zomorrodian, Kamyar; Rahimi, Amir

    2016-01-01

    Background: Outer membrane proteins (OMPs) constitute the main structure and about half of the cell wall of Gram-negative bacteria. The OMPs of Escherichia coli (E. coli) play an important role in its drug resistance. Previous studies have shown that the OMPs of E. coli enhance its pathogenic effects by helping the bacterium to evade the immune defense and promote its adsorption to host cells. We sought to compare E. coli isolates collected from different hospital wards and to perform a primary investigation of the association between the serotypes and profiles of their OMPs. We also aimed to detect the diversity of the E. coli isolates from the hospitalized patients. Methods: A total of 115 isolates of E. coli were collected from patients hospitalized in Nemazee Hospital, Shiraz, Iran. After biochemical and serological tests, OMPs were extracted by using glass beads and N-Lauroylsarcosine sodium. OMP typing was done by 10% SDS-PAGE and Coomassie brilliant blue staining. In terms of the number of protein bands, OMP-I was detected with 2 bands, OMP-α with 3 bands, and OMP-β with1 band. Results: Of the 115 isolates, 103 were OMP-I and 12 were OMP-α; none of the isolates belonged to OMP-β. Our statistical analyses showed a relationship between OMP patterns and other factors, including hospital wards and source of samples. Serotyping showed that the majority of the isolates were O128. Conclusion: Our results demonstrated some similarities between the OMP band patterns of the analyzed groups of E. coli. Of all the OMPs in the isolates from the hospitalized and outpatient department patients, OmpA and OmpC were the most prevalent proteins in the outer membrane of the studied uropathogenic E. coli. PMID:27582589

  1. Efficient reconstitution of functional Escherichia coli 30S ribosomal subunits from a complete set of recombinant small subunit ribosomal proteins.

    PubMed

    Culver, G M; Noller, H F

    1999-06-01

    Previous studies have shown that the 30S ribosomal subunit of Escherichia coli can be reconstituted in vitro from individually purified ribosomal proteins and 16S ribosomal RNA, which were isolated from natural 30S subunits. We have developed a 30S subunit reconstitution system that uses only recombinant ribosomal protein components. The genes encoding E. coli ribosomal proteins S2-S21 were cloned, and all twenty of the individual proteins were overexpressed and purified. Reconstitution, following standard procedures, using the complete set of recombinant proteins and purified 16S ribosomal RNA is highly inefficient. Efficient reconstitution of 30S subunits using these components requires sequential addition of proteins, following either the 30S subunit assembly map (Mizushima & Nomura, 1970, Nature 226:1214-1218; Held et al., 1974, J Biol Chem 249:3103-3111) or following the order of protein assembly predicted from in vitro assembly kinetics (Powers et al., 1993, J MoI Biol 232:362-374). In the first procedure, the proteins were divided into three groups, Group I (S4, S7, S8, S15, S17, and S20), Group II (S5, S6, S9, Sll, S12, S13, S16, S18, and S19), and Group III (S2, S3, S10, S14, and S21), which were sequentially added to 16S rRNA with a 20 min incubation at 42 degrees C following the addition of each group. In the second procedure, the proteins were divided into Group I (S4, S6, S11, S15, S16, S17, S18, and S20), Group II (S7, S8, S9, S13, and S19), Group II' (S5 and S12) and Group III (S2, S3, S10, S14, and S21). Similarly efficient reconstitution is observed whether the proteins are grouped according to the assembly map or according to the results of in vitro 30S subunit assembly kinetics. Although reconstitution of 30S subunits using the recombinant proteins is slightly less efficient than reconstitution using a mixture of total proteins isolated from 30S subunits, it is much more efficient than reconstitution using proteins that were individually isolated

  2. Genes and proteins of Escherichia coli K-12 (GenProtEC).

    PubMed

    Riley, M

    1997-01-01

    GenProtEC is a database of Escherichia coli genes and their gene products, classified by type of function and physiological role and with citations to the literature for each. Also present are data on sequence similarities amongE.coliproteins with PAM values, percent identity of amino acids, length of alignment and percent aligned. GenProtEC can also be accessed through the World Wide Web at URL http://mbl.edu/html/ecoli.html . PMID:9016503

  3. Inhibition of O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase by an alkyltransferase-like protein from Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Pearson, Steven J.; Ferguson, Jennifer; Santibanez-Koref, Mauro; Margison, Geoffrey P.

    2005-01-01

    The alkyltransferase-like (ATL) proteins contain primary sequence motifs resembling those found in DNA repair O6-alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase proteins. However, in the putative active site of ATL proteins, a tryptophan (W83) residue replaces the cysteine at the known active site of alkyltransferases. The Escherichia coli atl gene was expressed as a fusion protein and purified. Neither ATL nor C83 or A83 mutants transferred [3H] from [3H]-methylated DNA to themselves, and the levels of O6-methyl guanine (O6-meG) in substrate DNA were not affected by ATL. However, ATL inhibited the transfer of methyl groups to human alkyltransferase (MGMT). Inhibition was reduced by prolonged incubation in the presence of MGMT, again suggesting that O6-meG in the substrate is not changed by ATL. Gel-shift assays show that ATL binds to short single- or double-stranded oligonucleotides containing O6-meG, but not to oligonucleotides containing 8-oxoguanine, ethenoadenine, 5-hydroxycytosine or O4-methylthymine. There was no evidence of demethylation of O6-meG or of glycosylase or endonuclease activity. Overexpression of ATL in E.coli increased, or did not affect, the toxicity of N-methyl-N′-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine in an alklyltransferase-proficient and -deficient strain, respectively. These results suggest that ATL may act as a damage sensor that flags O6-meG and possibly other O6-alkylation lesions for processing by other repair pathways. PMID:16027108

  4. RESPIRATION AND PROTEIN SYNTHESIS IN ESCHERICHIA COLI MEMBRANE-ENVELOPE FRAGMENTS

    PubMed Central

    Hendler, Richard W.; Burgess, Amelia H.; Scharff, Raymond

    1970-01-01

    Fatty acids inhibited the ability of Escherichia coli membrane-envelope fragments to catalyze the oxidation of succinate and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, reduced form (NADH) and also inhibited the response of the Clark oxygen electrode to nonenzymatic oxygen uptake. In all cases, unsaturated fatty acids were much more inhibitory than saturated fatty acids. Albumin afforded complete protection from inhibition in the nonenzymatic oxygen-uptake experiments but only partial protection for the respiratory activities of the membrane fragments. The succinoxidase activity was totally inhibited by bovine serum albumin at concentrations that inhibited succinate dehydrogenase only slightly and NADH oxidase not at all. The E. coli acellular preparation showed no dehydrogenase or oxidase activity for any of the fatty acids under a variety of conditions. These conditions included variations of pH, concentration of fatty acids, and the presence or absence of albumin, CoA, ATP, NAD, cysteine, succinate, and carnitine. It thus appears that E. coli grown in the absence of fatty acid can not use fatty acids as an energy source. PMID:4312358

  5. Identification of protein complexes in Escherichia coli using sequential peptide affinity purification in combination with tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Babu, Mohan; Kagan, Olga; Guo, Hongbo; Greenblatt, Jack; Emili, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Since most cellular processes are mediated by macromolecular assemblies, the systematic identification of protein-protein interactions (PPI) and the identification of the subunit composition of multi-protein complexes can provide insight into gene function and enhance understanding of biological systems(1, 2). Physical interactions can be mapped with high confidence vialarge-scale isolation and characterization of endogenous protein complexes under near-physiological conditions based on affinity purification of chromosomally-tagged proteins in combination with mass spectrometry (APMS). This approach has been successfully applied in evolutionarily diverse organisms, including yeast, flies, worms, mammalian cells, and bacteria(1-6). In particular, we have generated a carboxy-terminal Sequential Peptide Affinity (SPA) dual tagging system for affinity-purifying native protein complexes from cultured gram-negative Escherichia coli, using genetically-tractable host laboratory strains that are well-suited for genome-wide investigations of the fundamental biology and conserved processes of prokaryotes(1, 2, 7). Our SPA-tagging system is analogous to the tandem affinity purification method developed originally for yeast(8, 9), and consists of a calmodulin binding peptide (CBP) followed by the cleavage site for the highly specific tobacco etch virus (TEV) protease and three copies of the FLAG epitope (3X FLAG), allowing for two consecutive rounds of affinity enrichment. After cassette amplification, sequence-specific linear PCR products encoding the SPA-tag and a selectable marker are integrated and expressed in frame as carboxy-terminal fusions in a DY330 background that is induced to transiently express a highly efficient heterologous bacteriophage lambda recombination system(10). Subsequent dual-step purification using calmodulin and anti-FLAG affinity beads enables the highly selective and efficient recovery of even low abundance protein complexes from large

  6. The Fh8 tag: a fusion partner for simple and cost-effective protein purification in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Costa, Sofia J; Coelho, Eduardo; Franco, Lara; Almeida, André; Castro, António; Domingues, Lucília

    2013-12-01

    Downstream processing is still a major bottleneck in recombinant protein production representing most of its costs. Hence, there is a continuing demand of novel and cost-effective purification processes aiming at the recovery of pure and active target protein. In this work, a novel purification methodology is presented, using the Fh8 solubility enhancer tag as fusion handle. The binding properties of Fh8 tag to a hydrophobic matrix were first studied via hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC). The Fh8 tag was then evaluated as a purification handle by its fusion to green fluorescent protein and superoxide dismutase. The purification efficiency of the Fh8-HIC strategy was compared to the immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography (IMAC) using the His6 tag. Results showed that the Fh8-HIC binding mechanism is calcium-dependent in a low salt medium, making the purification process highly selective. Both target proteins were biologically active, even when fused to Fh8, and were successfully purified by HIC, achieving efficiencies identical to those of IMAC. Thus, the Fh8 acts as an effective affinity tag that, together with its previously reported solubility enhancer capability, allows for the design of inexpensive and successful recombinant protein production processes in Escherichia coli.

  7. Coexpression of interleukin-6 and -2 from giant panda in Escherichia coli and the biological activity of the fusion protein.

    PubMed

    Yi, Y; Nian, Y-Y; Ji, H-W; Zhang, H; Zhu, L; Xu, Z-W

    2013-06-14

    To construct a fusion cytokine protein with more and stronger bioactivities to enhance the immunity of the cytokine alone, we expressed interleukin (IL)-6/(IL)-2 from giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) in Escherichia coli as a 59.4-kDa fusion protein. Subsequently, the inclusion bodies were solubilized with 8 M urea and applied onto a Ni-nitrilotriacetic acid column. The final production of IL-6/IL-2 reached 6 mg/L in soluble form, and the purified final product was >96% pure. In Western blot assays, the recombinant IL-6/IL-2 was recognized by polyclonal antibodies against IL-6 and IL-2 of giant panda. The results demonstrated that the protein mixture contained correctly folded IL-2 and IL-6 proteins. A 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl) 2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay demonstrated that IL-6/IL-2 can promote lymphocyte proliferation and differentiation. These data suggest that the fusion protein could be used to develop a novel immunoadjuvant to enhance the immunity of animals against infectious diseases.

  8. Coexpression of interleukin-6 and -2 from giant panda in Escherichia coli and the biological activity of the fusion protein.

    PubMed

    Yi, Y; Nian, Y-Y; Ji, H-W; Zhang, H; Zhu, L; Xu, Z-W

    2013-01-01

    To construct a fusion cytokine protein with more and stronger bioactivities to enhance the immunity of the cytokine alone, we expressed interleukin (IL)-6/(IL)-2 from giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) in Escherichia coli as a 59.4-kDa fusion protein. Subsequently, the inclusion bodies were solubilized with 8 M urea and applied onto a Ni-nitrilotriacetic acid column. The final production of IL-6/IL-2 reached 6 mg/L in soluble form, and the purified final product was >96% pure. In Western blot assays, the recombinant IL-6/IL-2 was recognized by polyclonal antibodies against IL-6 and IL-2 of giant panda. The results demonstrated that the protein mixture contained correctly folded IL-2 and IL-6 proteins. A 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl) 2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay demonstrated that IL-6/IL-2 can promote lymphocyte proliferation and differentiation. These data suggest that the fusion protein could be used to develop a novel immunoadjuvant to enhance the immunity of animals against infectious diseases. PMID:23913382

  9. The ATP hydrolyzing transcription activator phage shock protein F of Escherichia coli: Identifying a surface that binds σ54

    PubMed Central

    Bordes, Patricia; Wigneshweraraj, Siva R.; Schumacher, Jörg; Zhang, Xiaodong; Chaney, Matthew; Buck, Martin

    2003-01-01

    Members of the protein family called ATPases associated with various cellular activities (AAA+) play a crucial role in transforming chemical energy into biological events. AAA+ proteins are complex molecular machines and typically form ring-shaped oligomeric complexes that are crucial for ATPase activity and mechanism of action. The Escherichia coli transcription activator phage shock protein F (PspF) is an AAA+ mechanochemical enzyme that functions to sense and relay the energy derived from nucleoside triphosphate hydrolysis to catalyze transcription by the σ54-RNA polymerase. Closed promoter complexes formed by the σ54-RNA polymerase are substrates for the action of PspF. By using a protein fragmentation approach, we identify here at least one σ54-binding surface in the PspF AAA+ domain. Results suggest that ATP hydrolysis by PspF is coupled to the exposure of at least one σ54-binding surface. This nucleotide hydrolysis-dependent presentation of a substrate binding surface can explain why complexes that form between σ54 and PspF are transient and could be part of a mechanism used generally by other AAA+ proteins to regulate activity. PMID:12601152

  10. Roles of Hcp family proteins in the pathogenesis of the porcine extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli type VI secretion system

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Ying; Wang, Xiangru; Shou, Jin; Zong, Bingbing; Zhang, Yanyan; Tan, Jia; Chen, Jing; Hu, Linlin; Zhu, Yongwei; Chen, Huanchun; Tan, Chen

    2016-01-01

    Hcp (hemolysin-coregulated protein) is considered a vital component of the functional T6SS (Type VI Secretion System), which is a newly discovered secretion system. Our laboratory has previously sequenced the whole genome of porcine extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC) strain PCN033, and identified an integrated T6SS encoding three different hcp family genes. In this study, we first identified a functional T6SS in porcine ExPEC strain PCN033, and demonstrated that the Hcp family proteins were involved in bacterial competition and the interactions with other cells. Interestingly, the three Hcp proteins had different functions. Hcp2 functioned predominantly in bacterial competition; all three proteins were involved in the colonization of mice; and Hcp1 and Hcp3 were predominantly contributed to bacterial-eukaryotic cell interactions. We showed an active T6SS in porcine ExPEC strain PCN033, and the Hcp family proteins had different functions in their interaction with other bacteria or host cells. PMID:27229766

  11. Protein oxidation and aggregation in UVA-irradiated Escherichia coli cells as signs of accelerated cellular senescence.

    PubMed

    Bosshard, Franziska; Riedel, Kathrin; Schneider, Thomas; Geiser, Carina; Bucheli, Margarete; Egli, Thomas

    2010-11-01

    Solar disinfection (SODIS) is a simple drinking water treatment method that improves microbiological water quality where other means are unavailable. It makes use of the deleterious effect of solar irradiation on pathogenic microbes and viruses. A positive impact on health has been documented in several epidemiological studies. However, the molecular mechanisms damaging cells during this simple treatment are not yet fully understood. Here we show that protein damage is crucial in the process of inactivation by sunlight. Protein damages in UVA-irradiated Escherichia coli cells have been evaluated by an immunoblot method for carbonylated proteins and an aggregation assay based on semi-quantitative proteomics. A wide spectrum of structural and enzymatic proteins within the cell is affected by carbonylation and aggregation. Vital cellular functions like the transcription and translation apparatus, transport systems, amino acid synthesis and degradation, respiration, ATP synthesis, glycolysis, the TCA cycle, chaperone functions and catalase are targeted by UVA irradiation. The protein damage pattern caused by SODIS strongly resembles the pattern caused by reactive oxygen stress. Hence, sunlight probably accelerates cellular senescence and leads to the inactivation and finally death of UVA-irradiated cells.

  12. A Multi-layered Protein Network Stabilizes the Escherichia coli FtsZ-ring and Modulates Constriction Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Buss, Jackson; Coltharp, Carla; Shtengel, Gleb; Yang, Xinxing; Hess, Harald; Xiao, Jie

    2015-01-01

    The prokaryotic tubulin homolog, FtsZ, forms a ring-like structure (FtsZ-ring) at midcell. The FtsZ-ring establishes the division plane and enables the assembly of the macromolecular division machinery (divisome). Although many molecular components of the divisome have been identified and their interactions extensively characterized, the spatial organization of these proteins within the divisome is unclear. Consequently, the physical mechanisms that drive divisome assembly, maintenance, and constriction remain elusive. Here we applied single-molecule based superresolution imaging, combined with genetic and biophysical investigations, to reveal the spatial organization of cellular structures formed by four important divisome proteins in E. coli: FtsZ, ZapA, ZapB and MatP. We show that these interacting proteins are arranged into a multi-layered protein network extending from the cell membrane to the chromosome, each with unique structural and dynamic properties. Further, we find that this protein network stabilizes the FtsZ-ring, and unexpectedly, slows down cell constriction, suggesting a new, unrecognized role for this network in bacterial cell division. Our results provide new insight into the structure and function of the divisome, and highlight the importance of coordinated cell constriction and chromosome segregation. PMID:25848771

  13. Purification and characterization of recombinant envelope protein GP5 of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus from E. coli.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chong; Liu, Chun-Jiang; Yuan, Xi-Gang; Zhang, Chenming

    2013-08-23

    The major envelope protein, GP5, in porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) plays critical roles in the assembly, invasion and immune response of PRRSV particle, and is one of the mostly studied candidates in the development of recombinant vaccines. In this research, a purification process including immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) and hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC) was developed to prepare recombinant envelope protein GP5 with His-tag from an E. coli strain transformed with pGEM-ORF5. The result of cell culture indicated that His-tagged GP5 protein was expressed mainly in soluble form. After cell disruption, His-tagged GP5 protein was successfully purified by Ni(2+)-chelating Sepharose Fast Flow with a yield and purity of 80.5% and 48%, respectively. Recombinant GP5 protein was further purified by HIC to achieve a purity of 95%. Moreover, the purified rGP5 is shown in monomeric form contrasting the dimeric or tetrameric form when purified by a CEX-HIC process directly from PRRSV virions as reported in a previous study.

  14. Using promoter libraries to reduce metabolic burden due to plasmid-encoded proteins in recombinant Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Pasini, Martina; Fernández-Castané, Alfred; Jaramillo, Alfonso; de Mas, Carles; Caminal, Gloria; Ferrer, Pau

    2016-01-25

    The over-expression of proteins in recombinant host cells often requires a significant amount of resources causing an increase in the metabolic load for the host. This results in a variety of physiological responses leading to altered growth parameters, including growth inhibition or activation of secondary metabolism pathways. Moreover, the expression of other plasmid-encoded genes such as antibiotic resistance genes or repressor proteins may also alter growth kinetics. In this work, we have developed a second-generation system suitable for Escherichia coli expression with an antibiotic-free plasmid maintenance mechanism based on a glycine auxotrophic marker (glyA). Metabolic burden related to plasmid maintenance and heterologous protein expression was minimized by tuning the expression levels of the repressor protein (LacI) and glyA using a library of promoters and applying synthetic biology tools that allow the rapid construction of vectors. The engineered antibiotic-free expression system was applied to the L-fuculose phosphate aldolase (FucA) over-production, showing an increase in production up to 3.8-fold in terms of FucA yield (mg g(-1)DCW) and 4.5-fold in terms of FucA activity (AU g(-1)DCW) compared to previous expression. Moreover, acetic acid production was reduced to 50%, expressed as gAc gDCW(-1). Our results showed that the aforementioned approaches are of paramount importance in order to increment the protein production in terms of mass and activity.

  15. Quantitative Proteomics Analysis Reveals the Min System of Escherichia coli Modulates Reversible Protein Association with the Inner Membrane.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hsiao-Lin; Chiang, I-Chen; Liang, Suh-Yuen; Lee, Der-Yen; Chang, Geen-Dong; Wang, Kwan-Yu; Lin, Shu-Yu; Shih, Yu-Ling

    2016-05-01

    The Min system of Escherichia coli mediates placement of the division septum at the midcell. It oscillates from pole to pole to establish a concentration gradient of the division inhibition that is high at the poles but low at the midcell; the cell middle thereby becomes the most favorable site for division. Although Min oscillation is well studied from molecular and biophysical perspectives, it is still an enigma as to whether such a continuous, energy-consuming, and organized movement of the Min proteins would affect cellular processes other than the division site selection. To tackle this question, we compared the inner membrane proteome of the wild-type and Δmin strains using a quantitative approach. Forty proteins that showed differential abundance on the inner membrane of the mutant cells were identified and defined as proteins of interest (POIs). More than half of the POIs were peripheral membrane proteins, suggesting that the Min system affects mainly reversible protein association with the inner membrane. In addition, 6 out of 10 selected POIs directly interacted with at least one of the Min proteins, confirming the correlation between POIs and the Min system.Further analysis revealed a functional relationship between metabolism and the Min system. Metabolic enzymes accounted for 45% of the POIs, and there was a change of metabolites in the related reactions. We hypothesize that the Min system could alter the membrane location of proteins to modulate their enzymatic activity. Thus, the metabolic modulation in the Δmin mutant is likely an adaptive phenotype in cells of abnormal size and chromosome number due to an imbalanced abundance of proteins on the inner membrane. Taken together, the current work reports novel interactions of the Min system and reveals a global physiological impact of the Min system in addition to the division site placement.

  16. Identification and Quantitation of Newly Synthesized Proteins in Escherichia coli by Enrichment of Azidohomoalanine-labeled Peptides with Diagonal Chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Gertjan; Sprenger, Richard R.; Back, JaapWillem; Dekker, Henk L.; Nessen, Merel A.; van Maarseveen, Jan H.; de Koning, Leo J.; Hellingwerf, Klaas J.; de Jong, Luitzen; de Koster, Chris G.

    2009-01-01

    A method is presented to identify and quantify several hundreds of newly synthesized proteins in Escherichia coli upon pulse labeling cells with the methionine analogue azidohomoalanine (azhal). For the first 30 min after inoculation, a methionine-auxotrophic strain grows equally well on azhal as on methionine. Upon a pulse of 15 min and digestion of total protein, azhal-labeled peptides are isolated by a retention time shift between two reversed phase chromatographic runs. The retention time shift is induced by a reaction selective for the azido group in labeled peptides using tris(2-carboxyethyl)phosphine. Selectively modified peptides are identified by reversed phase liquid chromatography and on-line tandem mass spectrometry. We identified 527 proteins representative of all major Gene Ontology categories. Comparing the relative amounts of 344 proteins synthesized in 15 min upon a switch of growth temperature from 37 to 44 °C showed that nearly 20% increased or decreased more than 2-fold. Among the most up-regulated proteins many were chaperones and proteases in accordance with the cells response to unfolded proteins due to heat stress. Comparison of our data with results from previous microarray experiments revealed the importance of regulation of gene expression at the level of transcription of the most elevated proteins under heat shock conditions and enabled identification of several candidate genes whose expression may predominantly be regulated at the level of translation. This work demonstrates for the first time the use of a bioorthogonal amino acid for proteome-wide detection of changes in the amounts of proteins synthesized during a brief period upon variations in cellular growth conditions. Comparison of such data with relative mRNA levels enables assessment of the separate contributions of transcription and translation to the regulation of gene expression. PMID:19321432

  17. Subunit and amino acid interactions in the Escherichia coli mannitol permease: a functional complementation study of coexpressed mutant permease proteins.

    PubMed

    Saraceni-Richards, C A; Jacobson, G R

    1997-08-01

    Mannitol-specific enzyme II, or mannitol permease, of the phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent carbohydrate phosphotransferase system of Escherichia coli carries out the transport and phosphorylation of D-mannitol and is most active as a dimer in the membrane. We recently reported the importance of a glutamate residue at position 257 in the binding and transport of mannitol by this protein (C. Saraceni-Richards and G. R. Jacobson, J. Bacteriol. 179:1135-1142, 1997). Replacing Glu-257 with alanine (E257A) or glutamine (E257Q) eliminated detectable mannitol binding and transport by the permease. In contrast, an E257D mutant protein was able to bind and phosphorylate mannitol in a manner similar to that of the wild-type protein but was severely defective in mannitol uptake. In this study, we have coexpressed proteins containing mutations at position 257 with other inactive permeases containing mutations in each of the three domains of this protein. Activities of any active heterodimers resulting from this coexpression were measured. The results show that various inactive mutant permease proteins can complement proteins containing mutations at position 257. In addition, we show that both Glu at position 257 and His at position 195, both of which are in the membrane-bound C domain of the protein, must be on the same subunit of a permease dimer in order for efficient mannitol phosphorylation and uptake to occur. The results also suggest that mannitol bound to the opposite subunit within a permease heterodimer can be phosphorylated by the subunit containing the E257A mutation (which cannot bind mannitol) and support a model in which there are separate binding sites on each subunit within a permease dimer. Finally, we provide evidence from these studies that high-affinity mannitol binding is necessary for efficient transport by mannitol permease.

  18. Identification and quantitation of newly synthesized proteins in Escherichia coli by enrichment of azidohomoalanine-labeled peptides with diagonal chromatography.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Gertjan; Sprenger, Richard R; Back, JaapWillem; Dekker, Henk L; Nessen, Merel A; van Maarseveen, Jan H; de Koning, Leo J; Hellingwerf, Klaas J; de Jong, Luitzen; de Koster, Chris G

    2009-07-01

    A method is presented to identify and quantify several hundreds of newly synthesized proteins in Escherichia coli upon pulse labeling cells with the methionine analogue azidohomoalanine (azhal). For the first 30 min after inoculation, a methionine-auxotrophic strain grows equally well on azhal as on methionine. Upon a pulse of 15 min and digestion of total protein, azhal-labeled peptides are isolated by a retention time shift between two reversed phase chromatographic runs. The retention time shift is induced by a reaction selective for the azido group in labeled peptides using tris(2-carboxyethyl)phosphine. Selectively modified peptides are identified by reversed phase liquid chromatography and on-line tandem mass spectrometry. We identified 527 proteins representative of all major Gene Ontology categories. Comparing the relative amounts of 344 proteins synthesized in 15 min upon a switch of growth temperature from 37 to 44 degrees C showed that nearly 20% increased or decreased more than 2-fold. Among the most up-regulated proteins many were chaperones and proteases in accordance with the cells response to unfolded proteins due to heat stress. Comparison of our data with results from previous microarray experiments revealed the importance of regulation of gene expression at the level of transcription of the most elevated proteins under heat shock conditions and enabled identification of several candidate genes whose expression may predominantly be regulated at the level of translation. This work demonstrates for the first time the use of a bioorthogonal amino acid for proteome-wide detection of changes in the amounts of proteins synthesized during a brief period upon variations in cellular growth conditions. Comparison of such data with relative mRNA levels enables assessment of the separate contributions of transcription and translation to the regulation of gene expression.

  19. A small heat shock protein enables Escherichia coli to grow at a lethal temperature of 50°C conceivably by maintaining cell envelope integrity.

    PubMed

    Ezemaduka, Anastasia N; Yu, Jiayu; Shi, Xiaodong; Zhang, Kaiming; Yin, Chang-Cheng; Fu, Xinmiao; Chang, Zengyi

    2014-06-01

    It is essential for organisms to adapt to fluctuating growth temperatures. Escherichia coli, a model bacterium commonly used in research and industry, has been reported to grow at a temperature lower than 46.5°C. Here we report that the heterologous expression of the 17-kDa small heat shock protein from the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, CeHSP17, enables E. coli cells to grow at 50°C, which is their highest growth temperature ever reported. Strikingly, CeHSP17 also rescues the thermal lethality of an E. coli mutant deficient in degP, which encodes a protein quality control factor localized in the periplasmic space. Mechanistically, we show that CeHSP17 is partially localized in the periplasmic space and associated with the inner membrane of E. coli, and it helps to maintain the cell envelope integrity of the E. coli cells at the lethal temperatures. Together, our data indicate that maintaining the cell envelope integrity is crucial for the E. coli cells to grow at high temperatures and also shed new light on the development of thermophilic bacteria for industrial application.

  20. Btcd, a mouse protein that binds to curved DNA, can substitute in Escherichia coli for H-NS, a bacterial nucleoid protein.

    PubMed Central

    Timchenko, T; Bailone, A; Devoret, R

    1996-01-01

    In an Escherichia coli mutant devoid of H-NS, a bacterial nucleoid protein, mouse protein Btcd was able to substitute for H-NS in two tested functions. It restored cell motility and repression of the expression of the bgl operon. Btcd1, a mutant Btcd protein deleted of its zinc finger and thus having reduced DNA binding, failed to substitute for H-NS. Mouse protein Btcd was shown to repress the bgl operon at the level of transcription initiation and to bind preferentially to a curved DNA fragment encompassing the bgl promoter. These effects of Btcd on bacterial gene transcription can be accounted for by the binding of Btcd or H-NS to a curved DNA sequence near a promoter. A few mammalian proteins have been shown to substitute for their Escherichia prototypes involved in DNA and RNA transactions. The efficiency of Btcd protein in substituting for H-NS in Escherichia suggests its possible involvement in regulating gene expression in mouse cells. Images PMID:8670903

  1. Cloning, expression and purification of full length Rep78 of adeno-associated virus as a fusion protein with maltose binding protein in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Batchu, R B; Miles, D A; Rechtin, T M; Drake, R R; Hermonat, P L

    1995-03-17

    The adeno-associated virus (AAV) Rep78 protein is required for many aspects of AAV's life cycle including its DNA replication and the regulation of its gene expression. Because of increasing utilization of AAV as a gene therapy vector and its possible use as an anti-cancer/anti-viral agent, the complete characterization of its Rep78 regulatory protein is important. In order to study various functional aspects of Rep78, we have cloned and expressed the Rep78 gene in Escherichia coli using an inducible expression plasmid. The entire Rep78 open reading frame (nt 321 to 2185) was cloned into the LacZ inducible expression vector pMALc2. Upon induction of the Ptac promoter with isopropyl thio-beta-D-galactopyranoside (IPTG), Rep78 is produced as a fusion protein with maltose binding protein (MBP). This recombinant MBP-Rep78 protein displayed all the biochemical activities which are described for the wild type protein including binding to the AAV terminal repeats (TR), endonuclease activity, and helicase activity. Furthermore, for the first time, ATP binding by Rep78 is demonstrated.

  2. N-Terminal-Based Targeted, Inducible Protein Degradation in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Sekar, Karthik; Gentile, Andrew M; Bostick, John W; Tyo, Keith E J

    2016-01-01

    Dynamically altering protein concentration is a central activity in synthetic biology. While many tools are available to modulate protein concentration by altering protein synthesis rate, methods for decreasing protein concentration by inactivation or degradation rate are just being realized. Altering protein synthesis rates can quickly increase the concentration of a protein but not decrease, as residual protein will remain for a while. Inducible, targeted protein degradation is an attractive option and some tools have been introduced for higher organisms and bacteria. Current bacterial tools rely on C-terminal fusions, so we have developed an N-terminal fusion (Ntag) strategy to increase the possible proteins that can be targeted. We demonstrate Ntag dependent degradation of mCherry and beta-galactosidase and reconfigure the Ntag system to perform dynamic, exogenously inducible degradation of a targeted protein and complement protein depletion by traditional synthesis repression. Model driven analysis that focused on rates, rather than concentrations, was critical to understanding and engineering the system. We expect this tool and our model to enable inducible protein degradation use particularly in metabolic engineering, biological study of essential proteins, and protein circuits. PMID:26900850

  3. N-Terminal-Based Targeted, Inducible Protein Degradation in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Sekar, Karthik; Gentile, Andrew M.; Bostick, John W.; Tyo, Keith E. J.

    2016-01-01

    Dynamically altering protein concentration is a central activity in synthetic biology. While many tools are available to modulate protein concentration by altering protein synthesis rate, methods for decreasing protein concentration by inactivation or degradation rate are just being realized. Altering protein synthesis rates can quickly increase the concentration of a protein but not decrease, as residual protein will remain for a while. Inducible, targeted protein degradation is an attractive option and some tools have been introduced for higher organisms and bacteria. Current bacterial tools rely on C-terminal fusions, so we have developed an N-terminal fusion (Ntag) strategy to increase the possible proteins that can be targeted. We demonstrate Ntag dependent degradation of mCherry and beta-galactosidase and reconfigure the Ntag system to perform dynamic, exogenously inducible degradation of a targeted protein and complement protein depletion by traditional synthesis repression. Model driven analysis that focused on rates, rather than concentrations, was critical to understanding and engineering the system. We expect this tool and our model to enable inducible protein degradation use particularly in metabolic engineering, biological study of essential proteins, and protein circuits. PMID:26900850

  4. Use of a Chimeric Hsp70 to Enhance the Quality of Recombinant Plasmodium falciparum S-Adenosylmethionine Decarboxylase Protein Produced in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Makhoba, Xolani Henry; Burger, Adélle; Coertzen, Dina; Zininga, Tawanda; Birkholtz, Lyn-Marie; Shonhai, Addmore

    2016-01-01

    S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase (PfAdoMetDC) from Plasmodium falciparum is a prospective antimalarial drug target. The production of recombinant PfAdoMetDC for biochemical validation as a drug target is important. The production of PfAdoMetDC in Escherichia coli has been reported to result in unsatisfactory yields and poor quality product. The co-expression of recombinant proteins with molecular chaperones has been proposed as one way to improve the production of the former in E. coli. E. coli heat shock proteins DnaK, GroEL-GroES and DnaJ have previously been used to enhance production of some recombinant proteins. However, the outcomes were inconsistent. An Hsp70 chimeric protein, KPf, which is made up of the ATPase domain of E. coli DnaK and the substrate binding domain of P. falciparum Hsp70 (PfHsp70) has been previously shown to exhibit chaperone function when it was expressed in E. coli cells whose resident Hsp70 (DnaK) function was impaired. We proposed that because of its domain constitution, KPf would most likely be recognised by E. coli Hsp70 co-chaperones. Furthermore, because it possesses a substrate binding domain of plasmodial origin, KPf would be primed to recognise recombinant PfAdoMetDC expressed in E. coli. First, using site-directed mutagenesis, followed by complementation assays, we established that KPf with a mutation in the hydrophobic residue located in its substrate binding cavity was functionally compromised. We further co-expressed PfAdoMetDC with KPf, PfHsp70 and DnaK in E. coli cells either in the absence or presence of over-expressed GroEL-GroES chaperonin. The folded and functional status of the produced PfAdoMetDC was assessed using limited proteolysis and enzyme assays. PfAdoMetDC co-expressed with KPf and PfHsp70 exhibited improved activity compared to protein co-expressed with over-expressed DnaK. Our findings suggest that chimeric KPf may be an ideal Hsp70 co-expression partner for the production of recombinant plasmodial

  5. Extending the cross-linking/mass spectrometry strategy: Facile incorporation of photo-activatable amino acids into the model protein calmodulin in Escherichia coli cells.

    PubMed

    Piotrowski, Christine; Ihling, Christian H; Sinz, Andrea

    2015-11-01

    Photo-induced cross-linking is a highly promising technique to investigate protein conformations and protein-protein interactions in their natural cellular environment. One strategy relies on the non-directed incorporation of diazirine-containing photo-activatable amino acids into proteins and a subsequent cross-link formation induced by UV-A irradiation. The advantage of this photo-cross-linking strategy is that it is not restricted to lysine residues and that hydrophobic regions in proteins can also be targeted, which is advantageous for investigating membrane proteins. Here, we present a simplified protocol that relies on the use of mineral salts medium without any special requirements for the incorporation of photo-methionines into proteins in Escherichia coli cells. The possibility to perform these experiments in E. coli is especially valuable as it is the major system for recombinant protein production. The method is exemplified for the Ca(2+) regulating protein calmodulin containing nine methionines, which were found to be replaced by their photo-activatable analogues. Our protocol allows the facile and stochastic incorporation of photo-methionines as the basis for conducting photo-cross-linking experiments in E. coli in an efficient manner.

  6. The l-Isoaspartyl Protein Repair Methyltransferase Enhances Survival of Aging Escherichia coli Subjected to Secondary Environmental Stresses

    PubMed Central

    Visick, Jonathan E.; Cai, Hui; Clarke, Steven

    1998-01-01

    Like its homologs throughout the biological world, the l-isoaspartyl protein repair methyltransferase of Escherichia coli, encoded by the pcm gene, can convert abnormal l-isoaspartyl residues in proteins (which form spontaneously from asparaginyl or aspartyl residues) to normal aspartyl residues. Mutations in pcm were reported to greatly reduce survival in stationary phase and when cells were subjected to heat or osmotic stresses (C. Li and S. Clarke, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 89:9885–9889, 1992). However, we subsequently demonstrated that those strains had a secondary mutation in rpoS, which encodes a stationary-phase-specific sigma factor (J. E. Visick and S. Clarke, J. Bacteriol. 179:4158–4163, 1997). We now show that the rpoS mutation, resulting in a 90% decrease in HPII catalase activity, can account for the previously observed phenotypes. We further demonstrate that a new pcm mutant lacks these phenotypes. Interestingly, the newly constructed pcm mutant, when maintained in stationary phase for extended periods, is susceptible to environmental stresses, including exposure to methanol, oxygen radical generation by paraquat, high salt concentrations, and repeated heating to 42°C. The pcm mutation also results in a competitive disadvantage in stationary-phase cells. All of these phenotypes can be complemented by a functional pcm gene integrated elsewhere in the chromosome. These data suggest that protein denaturation and isoaspartyl formation may act synergistically to the detriment of aging E. coli and that the repair methyltransferase can play a role in limiting the accumulation of the potentially disruptive isoaspartyl residues in vivo. PMID:9573145

  7. Asymmetric constriction of dividing Escherichia coli cells induced by expression of a fusion between two min proteins.

    PubMed

    Rowlett, Veronica Wells; Margolin, William

    2014-06-01

    The Min system, consisting of MinC, MinD, and MinE, plays an important role in localizing the Escherichia coli cell division machinery to midcell by preventing FtsZ ring (Z ring) formation at cell poles. MinC has two domains, MinCn and MinCc, which both bind to FtsZ and act synergistically to inhibit FtsZ polymerization. Binary fission of E. coli usually proceeds symmetrically, with daughter cells at roughly 180° to each other. In contrast, we discovered that overproduction of an artificial MinCc-MinD fusion protein in the absence of other Min proteins induced frequent and dramatic jackknife-like bending of cells at division septa, with cell constriction predominantly on the outside of the bend. Mutations in the fusion known to disrupt MinCc-FtsZ, MinCc-MinD, or MinD-membrane interactions largely suppressed bending division. Imaging of FtsZ-green fluorescent protein (GFP) showed no obvious asymmetric localization of FtsZ during MinCc-MinD overproduction, suggesting that a downstream activity of the Z ring was inhibited asymmetrically. Consistent with this, MinCc-MinD fusions localized predominantly to segments of the Z ring at the inside of developing cell bends, while FtsA (but not ZipA) tended to localize to the outside. As FtsA is required for ring constriction, we propose that this asymmetric localization pattern blocks constriction of the inside of the septal ring while permitting continued constriction of the outside portion. PMID:24682325

  8. Asymmetric Constriction of Dividing Escherichia coli Cells Induced by Expression of a Fusion between Two Min Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Rowlett, Veronica Wells

    2014-01-01

    The Min system, consisting of MinC, MinD, and MinE, plays an important role in localizing the Escherichia coli cell division machinery to midcell by preventing FtsZ ring (Z ring) formation at cell poles. MinC has two domains, MinCn and MinCc, which both bind to FtsZ and act synergistically to inhibit FtsZ polymerization. Binary fission of E. coli usually proceeds symmetrically, with daughter cells at roughly 180° to each other. In contrast, we discovered that overproduction of an artificial MinCc-MinD fusion protein in the absence of other Min proteins induced frequent and dramatic jackknife-like bending of cells at division septa, with cell constriction predominantly on the outside of the bend. Mutations in the fusion known to disrupt MinCc-FtsZ, MinCc-MinD, or MinD-membrane interactions largely suppressed bending division. Imaging of FtsZ-green fluorescent protein (GFP) showed no obvious asymmetric localization of FtsZ during MinCc-MinD overproduction, suggesting that a downstream activity of the Z ring was inhibited asymmetrically. Consistent with this, MinCc-MinD fusions localized predominantly to segments of the Z ring at the inside of developing cell bends, while FtsA (but not ZipA) tended to localize to the outside. As FtsA is required for ring constriction, we propose that this asymmetric localization pattern blocks constriction of the inside of the septal ring while permitting continued constriction of the outside portion. PMID:24682325

  9. Methanogenic archaea diversity in Hanwoo (Bos taurus coreanae) rumen fluid, rectal dung, and barn floor manure using a culture-independent method based on mcrA gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Daquiado, Aileen Rose; Cho, Kye Man; Kim, Tae Young; Kim, Sam Churl; Chang, Hong-Hee; Lee, Yong Bok

    2014-06-01

    The diversity of methanogenic archaea associated with Korean Hanwoo cattle was analyzed using mcrA gene sequences from samples of rumen fluid (RF), rectal dung (RD), and barn floor manure (BFM). The predominant species were Methanobrevibacter ruminantium in RF and BFM(63.6% and 62.4%, respectively) and Methanocorpusculum labreanum in RD (53.2%).

  10. Combining a PagP fusion protein system with nickel ion-catalyzed cleavage to produce intrinsically disordered proteins in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Zahran, Somaya; Pan, Jonathan S; Liu, Philip B; Hwang, Peter M

    2015-12-01

    Many proteins contain intrinsically disordered regions that are highly solvent-exposed and susceptible to post-translational modifications. Studying these protein segments is critical to understanding their physiologic regulation, but proteolytic degradation can make them difficult to express and purify. We have designed a new protein expression vector that fuses the target protein to the N-terminus of the integral membrane protein, PagP. The two proteins are connected by a short linker containing the sequence SRHW, previously shown to be optimal for nickel ion-catalyzed cleavage. The methodology is demonstrated for an intrinsically disordered segment of cardiac troponin I. cTnI[135-209]-SRHW-PagP-His6 fusion protein was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, accumulating in insoluble inclusion bodies. The protein was solubilized, purified using nickel affinity chromatography, and then cleaved with 0.5mM NiSO4 at pH 9.0 and 45 °C, all in 6M guanidine-HCl. Nickel ion-catalyzed peptide bond hydrolysis is an effective chemical cleavage technique under denaturing conditions that preclude the use of proteases. Moreover, ni